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Sample records for trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias

  1. The usual treatment of trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Juan A; Álvarez, Mónica

    2013-10-01

    Trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias include cluster headache, paroxysmal hemicrania, and short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks with conjunctival injection, tearing, and rhinorrhea (SUNCT). Conventional pharmacological therapy can be successful in the majority of trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias patients. Most cluster headache attacks respond to 100% oxygen inhalation, or 6 mg subcutaneous sumatriptan. Nasal spray of sumatriptan (20 mg) or zolmitriptan (5 mg) are recommended as second choice. The bouts can be brought under control by a short course of corticosteroids (oral prednisone: 60-100 mg/day, or intravenous methylprednisolone: 250-500 mg/day, for 5 days, followed by tapering off the dosage), or by long-term prophylaxis with verapamil (at least 240 mg/day). Alternative long-term preventive medications include lithium carbonate (800-1600 mg/day), methylergonovine (0.4-1.2 mg/day), and topiramate (100-200 mg/day). As a rule, paroxysmal hemicrania responds to preventive treatment with indomethacin (75-150 mg/day). A short course of intravenous lidocaine (1-4 mg/kg/hour) can reduce the flow of attacks during exacerbations of SUNCT. Lamotrigine (100-300 mg/day) is the preventive drug of choice for SUNCT. Gabapentin (800-2700 mg/day), topiramate (50-300 mg/day), and carbamazepine (200-1600 mg/day) may be of help. © 2013 American Headache Society.

  2. The Neuropharmacology of Cluster Headache and other Trigeminal Autonomic Cephalalgias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Alfredo; Antonaci, Fabio; Ramusino, Matteo Cotta; Nappi, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs) are a group of primary headaches including cluster headache (CH), paroxysmal hemicrania (PH) and short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache with conjunctival injection and tearing (SUNCT). Another form, hemicrania continua (HC), is also included this group due to its clinical and pathophysiological similarities. CH is the most common of these syndromes, the others being infrequent in the general population. The pathophysiology of the TACs has been partly elucidated by a number of recent neuroimaging studies, which implicate brain regions associated with nociception (pain matrix). In addition, the hypothalamic activation observed in the course of TAC attacks and the observed efficacy of hypothalamic neurostimulation in CH patients suggest that the hypothalamus is another key structure. Hypothalamic activation may indeed be involved in attack initiation, but it may also lead to a condition of central facilitation underlying the recurrence of pain episodes. The TACs share many pathophysiological features, but are characterised by differences in attack duration and frequency, and to some extent treatment response. Although alternative strategies for the TACs, especially CH, are now emerging (such as neurostimulation techniques), this review focuses on the available pharmacological treatments complying with the most recent guidelines. We discuss the clinical efficacy and tolerability of the currently used drugs. Due to the low frequency of most TACs, few randomised controlled trials have been conducted. The therapies of choice in CH continue to be the triptans and oxygen for acute treatment, and verapamil and lithium for prevention, but promising results have recently been obtained with novel modes of administration of the triptans and other agents, and several other treatments are currently under study. Indomethacin is extremely effective in PH and HC, while antiepileptic drugs (especially lamotrigine) appear to be

  3. Diagnostic and therapeutic errors in trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias and hemicrania continua: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs) and hemicrania continua (HC) are relatively rare but clinically rather well-defined primary headaches. Despite the existence of clear-cut diagnostic criteria (The International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd edition - ICHD-II) and several therapeutic guidelines, errors in workup and treatment of these conditions are frequent in clinical practice. We set out to review all available published data on mismanagement of TACs and HC patients in order to understand and avoid its causes. The search strategy identified 22 published studies. The most frequent errors described in the management of patients with TACs and HC are: referral to wrong type of specialist, diagnostic delay, misdiagnosis, and the use of treatments without overt indication. Migraine with and without aura, trigeminal neuralgia, sinus infection, dental pain and temporomandibular dysfunction are the disorders most frequently overdiagnosed. Even when the clinical picture is clear-cut, TACs and HC are frequently not recognized and/or mistaken for other disorders, not only by general physicians, dentists and ENT surgeons, but also by neurologists and headache specialists. This seems to be due to limited knowledge of the specific characteristics and variants of these disorders, and it results in the unnecessary prescription of ineffective and sometimes invasive treatments which may have negative consequences for patients. Greater knowledge of and education about these disorders, among both primary care physicians and headache specialists, might contribute to improving the quality of life of TACs and HC patients. PMID:23565739

  4. The pathophysiology of the trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias, with clinical implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barloese, Mads C J

    2018-01-01

    , it is obvious that this brainstem reflex is regulated by higher centers that seemingly play a pivotal role in the attacks and the wide range of other symptoms indicating a homeostatic disturbance. These symptoms, as well as a number of well-validated findings, implicate the hypothalamus in the pathophysiology....... over the course of the past 2-3 decades, novel therapies and technological advances have helped increase our knowledge of these clinical syndromes, and will likely continue to do so in the coming years as we witness the arrival of new drugs and neurostimulation options. In this review, the clinical...

  5. Trigeminal neuralgia

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    Maarbjerg, Stine; Di Stefano, Giulia; Bendtsen, Lars

    2017-01-01

    -occupying lesion affecting the trigeminal nerve. Differential diagnosis and treatment Important differential diagnoses include trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias, posttraumatic or postherpetic pain and other facial pains. First line treatment is prophylactic medication with sodium channel blockers, and second line......Introduction Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is characterized by touch-evoked unilateral brief shock-like paroxysmal pain in one or more divisions of the trigeminal nerve. In addition to the paroxysmal pain, some patients also have continuous pain. TN is divided into classical TN (CTN) and secondary TN...

  6. A Case of Acoustic Shock with Post-trauma Trigeminal-Autonomic Activation

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    Alain Londero

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the case of an acoustic shock injury (ASI, which did not result in a significant hearing loss, but was followed by manifold chronic symptoms both within (tinnitus, otalgia, tingling in the ear, tension in the ear, and red tympanum and outside the ears (blocked nose, pain in the neck/temporal region. We suggest that these symptoms may result from a loop involving injury to middle ear muscles, peripheral inflammatory processes, activation and sensitization of the trigeminal nerve, the autonomic nervous system, and central feedbacks. The pathophysiology of this ASI is reminiscent of that observed in post-traumatic trigeminal-autonomic cephalalgia. This framework opens new and promising perspectives on the understanding and medical management of ASI.

  7. Autonomic headache with autonomic seizures: a case report.

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    Ozge, Aynur; Kaleagasi, Hakan; Yalçin Tasmertek, Fazilet

    2006-10-01

    The aim of the report is to present a case of an autonomic headache associated with autonomic seizures. A 19-year-old male who had had complex partial seizures for 15 years was admitted with autonomic complaints and left hemicranial headache, independent from seizures, that he had had for 2 years and were provoked by watching television. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed right hippocampal sclerosis and electroencephalography revealed epileptic activity in right hemispheric areas. Treatment with valproic acid decreased the complaints. The headache did not fulfil the criteria for the diagnosis of trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias, and was different from epileptic headache, which was defined as a pressing type pain felt over the forehead for several minutes to a few hours. Although epileptic headache responds to anti-epileptics and the complaints of the present case decreased with antiepileptics, it has been suggested that the headache could be a non-trigeminal autonomic headache instead of an epileptic headache.

  8. Neck pain in different cephalalgias

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    E. A. Chechet

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviews the literature related to the investigations of neck pain (cervicalgia in patients with headache (cephalalgia. Neck pain is second to lower back pain as a reason for considerable socioeconomic damage to society. The prevalence of cervicalgia in the population ranges from 5.9 to 38%; the annual incidence is 10.4–21.3%; 14.2 to 71% of people report to have neck pain at some time in their lifetime. Neck pain is concurrent with cephalalgia in 70% of cases. In patients with cervicalgia, the prevalence of headache is 20–40% higher than in those with musculoskeletal pain at another site. Neck pain is as a major risk factor for migraine and tension headache (TH. Neck pain in TH progresses with the increased intensity, frequency, and strength of headache. There is a direct relationship of the quality of life worsening associated withcervicalgia to the frequency of migraine attacks and the risk of its chronization. Neck pain is noted in cervicogenic headache belonging to secondary headaches. The identification of mixed headache in a patient with cervicalgia allows the prescription of a treatment option that may be effective in relieving both headache and neck pain. The paper discusses the causes and pathogenesis of cervicalgia in patients with headache, examination methods, and main approaches to drug and nondrug therapies in relation to the leading pathophysiological mechanism, as well as new possibilities for the effective and safe relief of pain syndrome in this category of patients. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, myorelaxants,and their combination are observed to be effective in treating patients with cervicalgia and cephalalgia.

  9. Trigeminal Neuralgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your doctor. Causes In trigeminal neuralgia, also called tic douloureux, the trigeminal nerve's function is disrupted. Usually, ... logo are trademarks of Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. © 1998-2018 Mayo Foundation for Medical ...

  10. Sleep in trigeminal autonomic cephalagias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barløse, Mads; Lund, Nunu; Jensen, Rigmor Højland

    2014-01-01

    and eventually to more effective therapeutic regimens. This review aims to evaluate the existing literature on the subject of TACs and sleep. An association between episodic CH and distinct macrostructural sleep phases, especially the relation to rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, has been described in some older...... studies but could not be confirmed in other, more recent studies. Investigations into the microstructure of sleep in these patients are lacking. Only a few case reports exist on the relation between sleep and other TACs. SUMMARY: Recent studies do not find an association between CH and REM sleep. One...... older study suggests chronic paroxysmal hemicranias may be locked to REM sleep but otherwise the relation is unknown. Reports indicate that CH and obstructive sleep apnoea are associated in some individuals but results are diverging. Single cases show improvement of CH upon treatment of sleep apnoea...

  11. A Case of Cardiac Cephalalgia Showing Reversible Coronary Vasospasm on Coronary Angiogram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, YoungSoon; Jin, Dong Gyu; Jang, Il Mi; Jang, YoungHee; Na, Hae Ri; Kim, SanYun

    2010-01-01

    Background Under certain conditions, exertional headaches may reflect coronary ischemia. Case Report A 44-year-old woman developed intermittent exercise-induced headaches with chest tightness over a period of 10 months. Cardiac catheterization followed by acetylcholine provocation demonstrated a right coronary artery spasm with chest tightness, headache, and ischemic effect of continuous electrocardiography changes. The patient's headache disappeared following intra-arterial nitroglycerine injection. Conclusions A coronary angiogram with provocation study revealed variant angina and cardiac cephalalgia, as per the International Classification of Headache Disorders (code 10.6). We report herein a patient with cardiac cephalalgia that manifested as reversible coronary vasospasm following an acetylcholine provocation test. PMID:20607049

  12. IMAGING EVALUATION OF TRIGEMINAL NEURALGIA

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    Marinos KONTZIALIS

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Trigeminal neuralgia is a debilitating pain syndrome in the sensory distribution of the trigeminal nerve. Compression of the cisternal segment of the trigeminal nerve by a vessel, usually an artery, is considered the most common cause of trigeminal neuralgia. A number of additional lesions may affect the trigeminal nerve anywhere along its course from the trigeminal nuclei to the most peripheral branches to cause facial pain. Relevant differential considerations are reviewed starting proximally at the level of the brainstem.

  13. Perception of trigeminal mixtures.

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    Filiou, Renée-Pier; Lepore, Franco; Bryant, Bruce; Lundström, Johan N; Frasnelli, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    The trigeminal system is a chemical sense allowing for the perception of chemosensory information in our environment. However, contrary to smell and taste, we lack a thorough understanding of the trigeminal processing of mixtures. We, therefore, investigated trigeminal perception using mixtures of 3 relatively receptor-specific agonists together with one control odor in different proportions to determine basic perceptual dimensions of trigeminal perception. We found that 4 main dimensions were linked to trigeminal perception: sensations of intensity, warmth, coldness, and pain. We subsequently investigated perception of binary mixtures of trigeminal stimuli by means of these 4 perceptual dimensions using different concentrations of a cooling stimulus (eucalyptol) mixed with a stimulus that evokes warmth perception (cinnamaldehyde). To determine if sensory interactions are mainly of central or peripheral origin, we presented stimuli in a physical "mixture" or as a "combination" presented separately to individual nostrils. Results showed that mixtures generally yielded higher ratings than combinations on the trigeminal dimensions "intensity," "warm," and "painful," whereas combinations yielded higher ratings than mixtures on the trigeminal dimension "cold." These results suggest dimension-specific interactions in the perception of trigeminal mixtures, which may be explained by particular interactions that may take place on peripheral or central levels. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Imaging the trigeminal nerve

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    Borges, Alexandra; Casselman, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Of all cranial nerves, the trigeminal nerve is the largest and the most widely distributed in the supra-hyoid neck. It provides sensory input from the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. In order to adequately image the full course of the trigeminal nerve and its main branches a detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy and imaging technique is required. Although the main trunk of the trigeminal nerve is consistently seen on conventional brain studies, high-resolution tailored imaging is mandatory to depict smaller nerve branches and subtle pathologic processes. Increasing developments in imaging technique made possible isotropic sub-milimetric images and curved reconstructions of cranial nerves and their branches and led to an increasing recognition of symptomatic trigeminal neuropathies. Whereas MRI has a higher diagnostic yield in patients with trigeminal neuropathy, CT is still required to demonstrate the bony anatomy of the skull base and is the modality of choice in the context of traumatic injury to the nerve. Imaging of the trigeminal nerve is particularly cumbersome as its long course from the brainstem nuclei to the peripheral branches and its rich anastomotic network impede, in most cases, a topographic approach. Therefore, except in cases of classic trigeminal neuralgia, in which imaging studies can be tailored to the root entry zone, the full course of the trigeminal nerve has to be imaged. This article provides an update in the most recent advances on MR imaging technique and a segmental imaging approach to the most common pathologic processes affecting the trigeminal nerve.

  15. Imaging the trigeminal nerve

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    Borges, Alexandra [Radiology Department, Instituto Portugues de Oncologia Francisco Gentil, Centro de Lisboa, Rua Prof. Lima Basto, 1093, Lisboa (Portugal)], E-mail: borgalexandra@gmail.com; Casselman, Jan [Department of Radiology, A. Z. St Jan Brugge and A. Z. St Augustinus Antwerpen Hospitals (Belgium)

    2010-05-15

    Of all cranial nerves, the trigeminal nerve is the largest and the most widely distributed in the supra-hyoid neck. It provides sensory input from the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. In order to adequately image the full course of the trigeminal nerve and its main branches a detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy and imaging technique is required. Although the main trunk of the trigeminal nerve is consistently seen on conventional brain studies, high-resolution tailored imaging is mandatory to depict smaller nerve branches and subtle pathologic processes. Increasing developments in imaging technique made possible isotropic sub-milimetric images and curved reconstructions of cranial nerves and their branches and led to an increasing recognition of symptomatic trigeminal neuropathies. Whereas MRI has a higher diagnostic yield in patients with trigeminal neuropathy, CT is still required to demonstrate the bony anatomy of the skull base and is the modality of choice in the context of traumatic injury to the nerve. Imaging of the trigeminal nerve is particularly cumbersome as its long course from the brainstem nuclei to the peripheral branches and its rich anastomotic network impede, in most cases, a topographic approach. Therefore, except in cases of classic trigeminal neuralgia, in which imaging studies can be tailored to the root entry zone, the full course of the trigeminal nerve has to be imaged. This article provides an update in the most recent advances on MR imaging technique and a segmental imaging approach to the most common pathologic processes affecting the trigeminal nerve.

  16. Comparative study between manual therapy and TENS Burst in patients with tension-type cephalalgia

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    Denise Vasconcelos Fernandes

    Full Text Available Introduction Cephalgia or cephalalgia is one of the most common symptoms in the general population. Objective To compare the efficacy of physical therapy modalities, through manual therapy and the effect of Transcutaneous Nerve Stimulation (TENS for tension-type cephalalgia. Materials and methods The study was compounded by 60 subjects, but only 40 of them completed it, due to the exclusion criteria. These were divided into control group and intervention group. The control group received treatment — manual therapy. The intervention group received TENS Burst. Patients underwent ten sessions of treatment, made at every two days on a week, lasting 30 minutes each session. Results The characteristics related to lifestyle, postural issues and range of motion are responsible for the main causes of tension-type cephalalgia. Discussion treatments showed effective results in all cases in relation to pain intensity, but the use of manual therapy techniques give the patient a better quality of life compared to the use of TENS. Final considerations The treatment of this condition deserves analysis and studies; however, there are only a few studying physical therapy techniques, especially regarding to the use of TENS.

  17. Trigeminal trophic syndrome

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    Parimalam Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Trigeminal trophic syndrome (TTS is a rare cause of facial ulceration, consequent to damage to the trigeminal nerve or its central sensory connections. We reporta case of TTS in a 48-year-old woman with Bell′s palsy following herpes zoster infection. The patient was treated and counseled. There hasnot been any recurrence for 1 year and the patient is being followed-up. The diagnosis of TTS should be suspected when there is unilateral facial ulceration, especially involving the ala nasi associated with sensory impairment.

  18. Triggering trigeminal neuralgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Stefano, Giulia; Maarbjerg, Stine; Nurmikko, Turo

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Although it is widely accepted that facial pain paroxysms triggered by innocuous stimuli constitute a hallmark sign of trigeminal neuralgia, very few studies to date have systematically investigated the role of the triggers involved. In the recently published diagnostic classification...

  19. MR imaging of trigeminal neuropathy

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    Kim, Si Yeon; Yoon, Pyeong Ho; Chung, Jin Il; Lee, Seung Ik; Kim, Dong Ik [Yonsei Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-03-01

    The trigeminal nerve is the largest of the cranial nerves and has both sensory and motor functions. It can be divided into proximal (brainstem, preganglionic, gasserian ganglion, and cavernous sinus) and distal (extracranial opthalmic, maxillary, and mandibular) segments. Patients with trigeminal neuropathy present with a wide variety of symptoms, and lesions producing those symptoms may occur anywhere along the protracted course of the trigeminal nerve, from its distal facial branches to its nuclear columns in the brainstem. The purpose of this article is to illustrate the normal anatomy of the trigeminal nerve and associated various pathologic conditions. These are arranged anatomically according to their site of interaction with it.

  20. MRI EVALUATION OF TRIGEMINAL NEURALGIA

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    Sama Surya Sravani

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Neuralgia is the set of symptoms associated with nerve dysfunction. The most common of these symptoms is pain, which can occur intermittently in one area of the body or can radiate along the length of a damaged nerve. The most common type of neuralgia is trigeminal neuralgia. This study focuses on the effectiveness of MRI in visualising the entire course of trigeminal nerve and to diagnose the exact location, aetiology responsible for trigeminal neuralgia and possible pretreatment evaluation. MATERIALS AND METHODS Clinical records and imaging studies of 30 patients between the ages of 18-60 years who presented to the Department of Radiodiagnosis, KIMS, for brain magnetic resonance imaging with (Philips 1.5T machine during June 2015 to December 2016 were analysed retrospectively. RESULTS  The entire course of trigeminal nerve is evaluated in these patients.  There are different causes of trigeminal neuralgia, but in our study, most frequent cause is mechanical irritation of nerve is due to neurovascular contact (24 cases. The other causes identified are cerebellopontine angle lesions, brainstem tumours, demyelinating disease involving brainstem.  The cisternal portion of the nerve is the most common site of involvement. CONCLUSION Trigeminal nerve is the largest cranial nerve. MRI is unique as it produces images of entire course of the nerve. Of the many causes of trigeminal neuralgia, neurovascular conflict is the most common cause. The exact location and degree of neurovascular compression is graded on MRI.

  1. The temporal evolution of a facial pain syndrome associated with neurovascular contact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Sabrina; Wibrandt, Ida; Rochat, Per Bjørnstad

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias are primary headaches characterized by unilateral pain and cranial autonomic symptoms. However, associated autonomic symptoms have also been reported in other headaches and facial pains, e.g. trigeminal neuralgia, with the clinical differentiation...... proving a complex task. CASE: A 54-year-old man presented with right-sided, sharp, intense facial pain in the distribution area of the trigeminal nerve. Pain duration was from seconds to a few minutes, and trigger factors included ipsilateral touching of the skin and hair. Over the next ten years...... revealed a right-sided deviation of the basilar artery at the level of pons, creating neurovascular contact with the trigeminal nerve. Microvascular decompression was performed, and symptoms resolved within days. CONCLUSION: Differentiating between trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias and trigeminal neuralgia...

  2. In situ free-floating craniectomy: an unusual cause of chronic post-traumatic cephalalgia.

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    Kaliaperumal, Chandrasekaran; Raveendran, Savitha

    2012-08-13

    We describe a case of post-traumatic cephalalgia in a 54-year-old man with chronic right parieto-occipital headache 3 years posthead injury. At the initial presentation, his Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) was 13/15 and CT brain revealed an acute subdural haematoma with fronto-temporal contusions. After 24 h his GCS dropped to 8/15 and subsequently he underwent a right-sided craniotomy and evacuation of the subdural haematoma and contusionectomy and intracranial pressure monitoring. To manage the cerebral oedema, the cranial bone flap was left in situ free-floating and was managed in an intensive care setting. He made good clinical recovery and 3 months postoperatively he complained of right-sided headache not relieved with medication and occipital nerve block. Three years later he underwent an exploration of the previous craniotomy scalp wound and the free-floating bone flap under the scalp was immobilised. The headache completely resolved following the procedure and is currently asymptomatic.

  3. Botulinum toxin in trigeminal neuralgia.

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    Castillo-Álvarez, Federico; Hernando de la Bárcena, Ignacio; Marzo-Sola, María Eugenia

    2017-01-06

    Trigeminal neuralgia is one of the most disabling facial pain syndromes, with a significant impact on patients' quality of life. Pharmacotherapy is the first choice for treatment but cases of drug resistance often require new strategies, among which various interventional treatments have been used. In recent years a new therapeutic strategy consisting of botulinum toxin has emerged, with promising results. We reviewed clinical cases and case series, open-label studies and randomized clinical trials examining the use of botulinum toxin for drug-refractory trigeminal neuralgia published in the literature. The administration of botulinum toxin has proven to be a safe and effective therapeutic strategy in patients with drug-refractory idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia, but many questions remain unanswered as to the precise role of botulinum toxin in the treatment of this disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Trigeminal Nerve Root Demyelination Not Seen in Six Horses Diagnosed with Trigeminal-Mediated Headshaking

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    Veronica L. Roberts

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Trigeminal-mediated headshaking is an idiopathic neuropathic facial pain syndrome in horses. There are clinical similarities to trigeminal neuralgia, a neuropathic facial pain syndrome in man, which is usually caused by demyelination of trigeminal sensory fibers within either the nerve root or, less commonly, the brainstem. Our hypothesis was that the neuropathological substrate of headshaking in horses is similar to that of trigeminal neuralgia in man. Trigeminal nerves, nerve roots, ganglia, infraorbital, and caudal nasal nerves from horse abattoir specimens and from horses euthanized due to trigeminal-mediated headshaking were removed, fixed, and processed for histological assessment by a veterinary pathologist and a neuropathologist with particular experience of trigeminal neuralgia histology. No histological differences were detected between samples from horses with headshaking and those from normal horses. These results suggest that trigeminal-mediated headshaking may have a different pathological substrate from trigeminal neuralgia in man.

  5. Anatomy of the trigeminal nerve

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    van Eijden, T.M.G.J.; Langenbach, G.E.J.; Baart, J.A.; Brand, H.S.

    2017-01-01

    The trigeminal nerve is the fifth cranial nerve (n. V), which plays an important role in the innervation of the head and neck area, together with other cranial and spinal nerves. Knowledge of the nerve’s anatomy is very important for the correct application of local anaesthetics.

  6. Straightening the trigeminal nerve axis by complete dissection of arachnoidal adhesion and its neuroendoscopic confirmation for trigeminal neuralgia without neurovascular compression

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    Mami Ishikawa, MD, PhD

    2017-12-01

    Conclusions: Straightening the trigeminal nerve axis by complete dissection of the arachnoidal adhesion around the trigeminal nerve was effective for typical trigeminal neuralgia without neurovascular compression.

  7. MR findings of trigeminal neurinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hong Suk; Han, Moon Hee; Chang, Kee Hyun; Yoo, In Kyu; Kim, Sam Soo; Lee, Kyoung Won; Jung, Hee Won; Yeon, Kyung Mo

    1997-01-01

    To describe the MRI findings of trigeminal neurinoma. We retrospectively analyzed the MRI findings of 19 patients with trigeminal neurinomas proven by surgery and pathologic examination. Axial T1- and T2-weighted MR images in all patients and gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted images in 14 patients were obtained at 2.0T(8 cases), 1.5T(6 cases) or 0.5T(5 cases). These were analyzed in terms of tumor size, signal intensity, degree of contrast enhancement, the presence or absence of cystic change and denervation atrophy of the masticator muscles. Clinical manifestations included sensory abnormality or pain(n=12), headache(n=10), impaired visual acuity or diplopia(n=6), hearing loss or tinnitus(n=3), weakness of masticator muscles(n=2), and mass or nasal obstruction(n=2). On MR images, tumor size was seen to average 4.2(range 1.5-6)cm;tumors were located in the posterior cranial fossa(n=8), middle cranial fossa(n=4), ophthalmic nerve(n=2), maxillary nerve(n=1), and mandibular nerve(n=1), and in three cases were dumbbell-shaped and extended into both the middle and posterior cranial fossa. On T1-weighted images, signals were isointense with cortical grey matter, in ten cases(53%), and of low intensity in nine (47%);on T2-weighted images, signals were of high intensity in 15cases(79%) and were isointense in four (21%). Cystic change was seen in 12 cases(63%). After enhancement, all (14/14) the tumors enhanced. Denervation atrophy was seen in nine cases(47%) and all of these involved the trigeminal ganglion or mandibular nerve. A trigeminal neurinoma shows similar signal intensity and enhancement to other cranial neurinomas with a higher incidence of cystic degeneration. Its location and shape are characteristic, and where there is involvement of the trigeminal ganglion or mandibular nerve, denervation atrophy may be seen

  8. MR findings of trigeminal neurinoma

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    Park, Hong Suk; Han, Moon Hee; Chang, Kee Hyun; Yoo, In Kyu; Kim, Sam Soo; Lee, Kyoung Won; Jung, Hee Won; Yeon, Kyung Mo [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-08-01

    To describe the MRI findings of trigeminal neurinoma. We retrospectively analyzed the MRI findings of 19 patients with trigeminal neurinomas proven by surgery and pathologic examination. Axial T1- and T2-weighted MR images in all patients and gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted images in 14 patients were obtained at 2.0T(8 cases), 1.5T(6 cases) or 0.5T(5 cases). These were analyzed in terms of tumor size, signal intensity, degree of contrast enhancement, the presence or absence of cystic change and denervation atrophy of the masticator muscles. Clinical manifestations included sensory abnormality or pain(n=12), headache(n=10), impaired visual acuity or diplopia(n=6), hearing loss or tinnitus(n=3), weakness of masticator muscles(n=2), and mass or nasal obstruction(n=2). On MR images, tumor size was seen to average 4.2(range 1.5-6)cm;tumors were located in the posterior cranial fossa(n=8), middle cranial fossa(n=4), ophthalmic nerve(n=2), maxillary nerve(n=1), and mandibular nerve(n=1), and in three cases were dumbbell-shaped and extended into both the middle and posterior cranial fossa. On T1-weighted images, signals were isointense with cortical grey matter, in ten cases(53%), and of low intensity in nine (47%);on T2-weighted images, signals were of high intensity in 15cases(79%) and were isointense in four (21%). Cystic change was seen in 12 cases(63%). After enhancement, all (14/14) the tumors enhanced. Denervation atrophy was seen in nine cases(47%) and all of these involved the trigeminal ganglion or mandibular nerve. A trigeminal neurinoma shows similar signal intensity and enhancement to other cranial neurinomas with a higher incidence of cystic degeneration. Its location and shape are characteristic, and where there is involvement of the trigeminal ganglion or mandibular nerve, denervation atrophy may be seen.

  9. Trigeminal Neuropathy in Sjogren′s Syndrome

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    Pinheiro L

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Trigeminal neuropathy is the most common CNS disorder in Sjogren′s syndrome. It is believed to be caused by vasculitis. Unless this is recognised, a diagnosis of trigeminal neuralgia is often made. The therapeutic response to steroids is unpredictable. There are two subgroups - those with associated collagen disorders and those only with the sicca syndrome.

  10. Trigeminal neuralgia: report of 3 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Geum Mee; Ki, Joo Yeon; Cho, Bong Hae; Nah, Kyung Soo

    2002-01-01

    Orofacial pain can be caused by intracranial disorders or can be musculoskeletal, vascular, internal derangemental, and neurologic in origin. The neurologic pain is derived from structural and functional disorders of nerve, and the trigeminal neuralgia is the typical manifestation. Trigeminal neuralgia is known from centuries ago, and is one of the most common pains in human. We present our experience with three patients who have trigeminal neuralgia. The first case is a 50-year-old female who had no specific evidence radiographically. Second is a 50-year-old male with microvascular compression on right trigeminal nerve. The third case is a 60-year-old female who had a neoplasm in cerebellopontine angle with associated mass effect.

  11. Trigeminal neuralgia: report of 3 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Geum Mee; Ki, Joo Yeon; Cho, Bong Hae; Nah, Kyung Soo [College of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-15

    Orofacial pain can be caused by intracranial disorders or can be musculoskeletal, vascular, internal derangemental, and neurologic in origin. The neurologic pain is derived from structural and functional disorders of nerve, and the trigeminal neuralgia is the typical manifestation. Trigeminal neuralgia is known from centuries ago, and is one of the most common pains in human. We present our experience with three patients who have trigeminal neuralgia. The first case is a 50-year-old female who had no specific evidence radiographically. Second is a 50-year-old male with microvascular compression on right trigeminal nerve. The third case is a 60-year-old female who had a neoplasm in cerebellopontine angle with associated mass effect.

  12. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Classical Trigeminal Neuralgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Kodrat

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Trigeminal neuralgia is a debilitating pain syndrome with a distinct symptom mainly excruciating facial pain that tends to come and go unpredictably in sudden shock-like attacks. Medical management remains the primary treatment for classical trigeminal neuralgia. When medical therapy failed, surgery with microvascular decompression can be performed. Radiosurgery can be offered for classical trigeminal neuralgia patients who are not surgical candidate or surgery refusal and they should not in acute pain condition. Radiosurgery is widely used because of good therapeutic result and low complication rate. Weakness of this technique is a latency period, which is time required for pain relief. It usually ranges from 1 to 2 months. This review enlightens the important role of radiosurgery in the treatment of classical trigeminal neuralgia.

  13. Microvascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, S.A.; Khan, B.; Khan, A.A.; Afridi, E.A.A.; Mehmood, S.; Muhammad, G.; Hussain, I.; Zadran, K.K.; Bhatti, S.N.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Trigeminal Neuralgia (TGN) is the most frequently diagnosed type of facial pain. In idiopathic type of TGN it is caused by the neuro-vascular conflict involving trigeminal nerve. Microvascular decompression (MVD) aims at addressing this basic pathology in the idiopathic type of TGN. This study was conducted to determine the outcome and complications of patients with idiopathic TGN undergoing MVD. Method: In a descriptive case series patients with idiopathic TGN undergoing MVD were included in consecutive manner. Patients were diagnosed on the basis of detailed history and clinical examination. Retromastoid approach with craniectomy was used to access cerebellopontine angle (CP-angle) and microsurgical decompression was done. Patients were followed up for 6 months. Results: A total of 53 patients underwent MVD with mean age of 51.6±4.2 years and male predominance. In majority of cases (58.4 percentage) both Maxillary and Mandibular divisions were involved. Per-operatively superior cerebellar artery (SCA) was causing the neuro-vascular conflict in 33 (62.2 percentage) of the cases, anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) in 6 (11.3 percentage) cases, both CSA and AICA in 3 (5.6 percentage) cases, venous compressions in only 1 (1.8percentage) patient and thick arachnoid adhesions were seen in 10 (18.9 percentage) patients. Postoperatively, 33 (68 percentage) patients were pain free, in 14 (26.45 percentage) patients pain was significantly improved whereas in 3 (5.6 percentage) patients there was mild improvement in symptoms. Three (5.6 percentage) patients did not improve after the primary surgery. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak was encountered in 7 (13.2 percentage) patients post-operatively, 4 (7.5 percentage) patients developed wound infection and 1 (1.8 percentage) patient developed aseptic meningitis. Three (5.6 percentage) patients had transient VII nerve palsy while one patient developed permanent VII nerve palsy. Conclusion: MVD is a safe and

  14. Trigeminal induced arousals during human sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiser, Clemens; Baja, Jan; Lenz, Franziska; Sommer, J Ulrich; Hörmann, Karl; Herr, Raphael M; Stuck, Boris A

    2015-05-01

    Arousals caused by external stimuli during human sleep have been studied for most of the sensorial systems. It could be shown that a pure nasal trigeminal stimulus leads to arousals during sleep. The frequency of arousals increases dependent on the stimulus concentration. The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of different stimulus durations on arousal frequency during different sleep stages. Ten young healthy volunteers with 20 nights of polysomnography were included in the study. Pure trigeminal stimulation with both different concentrations of CO2 (0, 10, 20, 40% v/v) and different stimulus durations (1, 3, 5, and 10 s) were applied during different sleep stages to the volunteers using an olfactometer. The application was performed during different sleep stages (light sleep, deep sleep, REM sleep). The number of arousals increased with rising stimulus duration and stimulus concentration during each sleep stage. Trigeminal stimuli during sleep led to arousals in dose- and time-dependent manner.

  15. Laboratory tests of headache disorders - Dawn of a new era?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schytz, Henrik Winther; Olesen, Jes

    2016-01-01

    secondary headaches. Background In this narrative review we present and discuss published tests that might be useful in phenotyping and/or diagnosis of long-lasting headache disorders such as migraine, tension-type headache, trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias, trigeminal neuralgia and persisting secondary...... headaches. Aim The palpometer test, quantitative sensory testing, nociceptive blink reflex and autonomic tests may be valuable to phenotype and/or diagnose subforms of migraine, tension-type headache, cluster headache, trigeminal neuralgia and medication-overuse headache. Provocation tests with glyceryl...... if well-reputed tertiary headache centers commence developing and implementing laboratory tests in order to improve the classification and treatment of headache patients....

  16. MR imaging of persistent primitive trigeminal artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashikaga, Ryuichiro; Araki, Yutaka; Ono, Yukihiko; Ishida, Osamu; Mabuchi, Nobuhisa.

    1997-01-01

    The persistent trigeminal artery is the most common anomaly of the primitive carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomoses. We reviewed MR images and MR angiographies of 11 patients with primitive trigeminal artery. In 8 of the 11 cases, PTA were identified with conventional long TR spin-echo images. In 8 of 11 cases, a hypoplastic basilar trunk associated with PTA was seen on both MR images and MR angiographies. In 7 of 11 cases, a hypoplasia or agenesis of the ipsilateral posterior communicating artery was seen on MR angiographies. (author)

  17. Small-fiber dysfunction in trigeminal neuralgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cruccu, G.; Leandri, M.; Iannetti, G. D.

    2001-01-01

    Background: In patients with trigeminal neuralgia, results of clinical examination of sensory function are normal. Reflex and evoked potential studies have already provided information on large-afferent (non-nociceptive) function. Using laser-evoked potentials (LEP), the authors sought information...... was significantly longer than that of the age-matched controls. The nonpainful-side latency correlated significantly with the carbamazepine dose. Conclusions: LEP detect severe impairment of the nociceptive afferent system on the painful side of patients with idiopathic as well as symptomatic trigeminal neuralgia...

  18. MRI analysis of vascular compressive trigeminal neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Ling; Chai Weimin; Song Qi; Ling Huawei; Miao Fei; Chen Kemin

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the offending vessels of vascular compressive trigeminal neuralgia by magnetic resonance tomographic angiography (MRTA). Methods: MRTA images of 235 asymptomatic trigeminal nerves and 147 symptomatic trigeminal nerves were analyzed by two radiologists who were blinded to the clinical findings. Judgment was made on if there were some vessels close to the trigeminal nerve. The diameter of the offending vessel, the distance from the offending vessel's contact point to the pons and the direction of the vessel toward the nerve were also recorded at the same time. Group t-test and Chi-Square test were used for statistics. Results: Two hundred and forty-two trigeminal nerves of all 382 nerves can be detected offending vessels on MRTA images, 111 of 242 trigeminal nerves were asymptomatic, the rest 131 were symptomatic. Statistical analysis indicated that the distance from the offending vessel's contact point to the pons in symptomatic group (the median is 2 mm) was shorter than that in the asymptomatic group (the median is 4 mm) (P<0.01). In 89.3% cases (117/131) of the symptomatic group the angle between the vessel and the nerve is larger than 45 degree, but only in 67.6% cases (75/111) in the asymptomatic group the angle is larger than 45 degree. That means significant difference is between the two groups (P<0.01). Vessel-nerve compression can be seen in 1 case of asymptomatic group (0.4%, 1/235) and 45 eases in symptomatic group (30.6%, 45/147). The vessel-nerve compression rate of the symptomatic group was much higher than that of the asymptomatic group (P<0.01). Conclusion: MR is a useful tool to evaluate the offending vessels of vascular compressive trigeminal neuralgia. The distance from the offending vessel's contact point to the pons and the direction of the vessel toward the nerve are related to the onset of vascular compressive trigeminal neuralgia. (authors)

  19. Trigeminal perineural spread of renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hornik, Alejandro; Rosenblum, Jordan; Biller, Jose

    2012-01-01

    A 55-year-old man had a five-day history of “pins and needles” sensation on the left chin. Examination showed decreased pinprick sensation on the territory of the left mandibular branch of the trigeminal nerve. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with gadolinium showed enhancement involving the left mandibular branch. Computed tomography (CT) of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis showed a left kidney mass diagnosed as renal carcinoma following nephrectomy. The “numb-chin” syndrome heralds or accompanies systemic malignancies. Trigeminal perineural spread has been well-documented in head and neck neoplasms, however, to our knowledge, it has not been reported in renal neoplasms. (author)

  20. Structural magnetic resonance imaging can identify trigeminal system abnormalities in classical trigeminal neuralgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle DeSouza

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Classical trigeminal neuralgia (TN is a chronic pain disorder that has been described as one ofthe most severe pains one can suffer. The most prevalent theory of TN etiology is that the trigeminal nerve is compressed at the root entry zone (REZ by blood vessels. However, there is significant evidence showing a lack of neurovascular compression (NVC for many cases of classical TN. Furthermore, a considerable number of patients who are asymptomatic have MR evidence of NVC. Since there is no validated animal model that reproduces the clinical features of TN, our understanding of TN pathology mainly comes from biopsy studies that have limitations. Sophisticated structural MRI techniques including diffusion tensor imaging provide new opportunities to assess the trigeminal nerves and CNS to provide insight into TN etiology and pathogenesis. Specifically, studies have used high-resolution structural MRI methods to visualize patterns of trigeminal nerve-vessel relationships and to detect subtle pathological features at the trigeminal REZ. Structural MRI has also identified CNS abnormalities in cortical and subcortical gray matter and white matter and demonstrated that effective neurosurgical treatment for TN is associated with a reversal of specific nerve and brain abnormalities. In conclusion, this review highlights the advanced structural neuroimaging methods that are valuable tools to assess the trigeminal system in TN and may inform our current understanding of TN pathology. These methods may in the future have clinical utility for the development of neuroimaging-based biomarkers of TN.

  1. Ganglioglioma of the trigeminal nerve: MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Athale, S.; Jinkins, J.R. [Neuroradiology Section, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 7703 F. Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX 78284-7800 (United States); Hallet, K.K. [Neuropathology Department, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Texas (United States)

    1999-08-01

    Ganglioglioma of the cranial nerves is extremely rare; only a few cases involving the optic nerves have been reported. We present a case of ganglioglioma of the trigeminal nerve, which was isointense with the brain stem on all MRI sequences and showed no contrast enhancement. (orig.) With 2 figs., 6 refs.

  2. Idiopathic trigeminal neuropathy in a poodle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Aparicio

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A seven years old, male poodle is examined presenting acute mandible paralysis (dropped jaw, drooling and difficulty for the apprehension and chewing; not evidence of an other alteration of cranial nerves. The muscular biopsy rules out a myositisof masticatory muscles. The disorder is resolved completely in 3 weeks confirming diagnosis of idiopathic trigeminal neuropathy.

  3. Management of trigeminal neuralgia by radiofrequency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The outcome depends on the type of TN with best results with classical idiopathic type. Also better results occurred with isolated V3 affection. The radiofrequency thermocoagulation of trigeminal nerve is a low risk, highly effective and minimally invasive procedure that should be started with in all cases of TN.

  4. Management of Trigeminal Neuralgia using Amitriptyline and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is a clinical condition presenting with severe, paroxysmal facial pain, often described by patients also known as tic douloureux. Carbamazepine (CBZ) is the drug of choice, but some patients develop adverse effects and some others may become unresponsive to CBZ. We present three cases of TN ...

  5. Autonomic Neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... risk of autonomic neuropathy. Other diseases. Amyloidosis, porphyria, hypothyroidism and cancer (usually due to side effects from treatment) may also increase the risk of autonomic neuropathy. ...

  6. Effect of the gamma knife treatment on the trigeminal nerve root in Chinese patients with primary trigeminal neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhi-Xiu; Qian, Wei; Wu, Yu-Quan; Sun, Fang-Jie; Fei, Jun; Huang, Run-Sheng; Fang, Jing-Yu; Wu, Cai-Zhen; An, You-Ming; Wang, Daxin; Yang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    To understand the mechanism of the gamma knife treating the trigeminal neuralgia. Using the MASEP-SRRS type gamma knife treatment system, 140 Chinese patients with trigeminal neuralgia (NT) were treated in our hospital from 2002 to 2010, in which the pain relief rate reached 95% and recurrence rate was 3% only. We investigated the effect of the gamma knife treatment on the trigeminal nerve root in 20 Chinese patients with primary trigeminal neuralgia by the magnetic resonance imager (MRI) observation. 1) The cross-sectional area of trigeminal nerve root became smaller and MRI signals were lower in the treatment side than those in the non-treatment side after the gamma knife treatment of primary trigeminal neuralgia; 2) in the treatment side, the cross-sectional area of the trigeminal nerve root decreased significantly after the gamma knife treatment; 3) there was good correlation between the clinical improvement and the MRI findings; and 4) the straight distance between the trigeminal nerve root and the brainstem did not change after the gamma knife treatment. The pain relief induced the gamma knife radiosurgery might be related with the atrophy of the trigeminal nerve root in Chinese patients with primary trigeminal neuralgia.

  7. Olfactory dysfunction affects thresholds to trigeminal chemosensory sensations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasnelli, J; Schuster, B; Hummel, T

    2010-01-14

    Next to olfaction and gustation, the trigeminal system represents a third chemosensory system. These senses are interconnected; a loss of olfactory function also leads to a reduced sensitivity in the trigeminal chemosensory system. However, most studies so far focused on comparing trigeminal sensitivity to suprathreshold stimuli; much less data is available with regard to trigeminal sensitivity in the perithreshold range. Therefore we assessed detection thresholds for CO(2), a relatively pure trigeminal stimulus in controls and in patients with olfactory dysfunction (OD). We could show that OD patients exhibit higher detection thresholds than controls. In addition, we were able to explore the effects of different etiologies of smell loss on trigeminal detection thresholds. We could show that in younger subjects, patients suffering from olfactory loss due to head trauma are more severely impaired with regard to their trigeminal sensitivity than patients with isolated congenital anosmia. In older patients, we could not observe any differences between different etiologies, probably due to the well known age-related decrease of trigeminal sensitivity. Furthermore we could show that a betterment of the OD was accompanied by decreased thresholds. This was most evident in patients with postviral OD. In conclusion, factors such as age, olfactory status and etiology of olfactory disorder can affect responsiveness to perithreshold trigeminal chemosensory stimuli. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Trigeminal neuralgia--a prospective systematic study of clinical characteristics in 158 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maarbjerg, Stine; Gozalov, Aydin; Olesen, Jes

    2014-01-01

     = .043. It affected solely the second and/or third trigeminal branch in 109 (69%) while the first branch alone was affected in only 7 (4%). Notably, 78 (49%) had concomitant persistent pain in addition to paroxysmal stabbing pain. Autonomic symptoms were present in 48 (31%). Patients who had...... not undergone surgery for TN had sensory abnormalities in 35 (29%). CONCLUSIONS: This, the first study in a series of papers focusing on the clinical, radiological, and etiological aspects of TN, revealed that the symptomatology of TN includes a high percentage of concomitant persistent pain, autonomic symptoms......, and sensory abnormalities. These findings offer new insights to the prevailing clinical impression of the clinical characteristics in TN....

  9. Trigeminal Trophic Syndrome – Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boštjan Matos

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available 1024x768 Trigeminal trophic syndrome is a rare condition resulting from compulsive self-manipulation of the skin after a peripheral or central injury to the trigeminal system. The classic triad consists of trigeminal anesthesia, facial paresthesias, and crescentric lateral nasal alar erosion and ulceration. Although the symptoms are visibly clear, the diagnosis is not easy to establish. The appearance of the ulcers mimics many other disease entities such as neoplasm, infection, granulomatous disease, vasculitis and factitial dermatitis. Trigeminal trophic syndrome should be considered with a positive neurologic history and when laboratory and biopsy workup is inconclusive. Once diagnosis is confirmed, treatment is complicated and often multidisciplinary. We report a case of a woman who developed a strictly unilateral crescent ulcer of the ala nasi after resection of an statoacoustic neurinoma. A clinician who is faced with a patient with nasal ulceration should consider this diagnosis.     Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  10. Dietary grape seed polyphenols repress neuron and glia activation in trigeminal ganglion and trigeminal nucleus caudalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durham Paul L

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammation and pain associated with temporomandibular joint disorder, a chronic disease that affects 15% of the adult population, involves activation of trigeminal ganglion nerves and development of peripheral and central sensitization. Natural products represent an underutilized resource in the pursuit of safe and effective ways to treat chronic inflammatory diseases. The goal of this study was to investigate effects of grape seed extract on neurons and glia in trigeminal ganglia and trigeminal nucleus caudalis in response to persistent temporomandibular joint inflammation. Sprague Dawley rats were pretreated with 200 mg/kg/d MegaNatural-BP grape seed extract for 14 days prior to bilateral injections of complete Freund's adjuvant into the temporomandibular joint capsule. Results In response to grape seed extract, basal expression of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase 1 was elevated in neurons and glia in trigeminal ganglia and trigeminal nucleus caudalis, and expression of the glutamate aspartate transporter was increased in spinal glia. Rats on a normal diet injected with adjuvant exhibited greater basal levels of phosphorylated-p38 in trigeminal ganglia neurons and spinal neurons and microglia. Similarly, immunoreactive levels of OX-42 in microglia and glial fibrillary acidic protein in astrocytes were greatly increased in response to adjuvant. However, adjuvant-stimulated levels of phosphorylated-p38, OX-42, and glial fibrillary acidic protein were significantly repressed in extract treated animals. Furthermore, grape seed extract suppressed basal expression of the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide in spinal neurons. Conclusions Results from our study provide evidence that grape seed extract may be beneficial as a natural therapeutic option for temporomandibular joint disorders by suppressing development of peripheral and central sensitization.

  11. Pharmaceutical management of trigeminal neuralgia in the elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomens, M.A.E.M.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2015-01-01

    Classical trigeminal neuralgia (CTN) is a severe neuropathic pain in the distribution of one or more branches of the trigeminal nerve, which occurs in recurrent episodes, causing deterioration in quality of life, affecting everyday habits and inducing severe disability. The aim of this review is to

  12. Pharmaceutical Management of Trigeminal Neuralgia in the Elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomens, M.A.E.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2015-01-01

    Classical trigeminal neuralgia (CTN) is a severe neuropathic pain in the distribution of one or more branches of the trigeminal nerve, which occurs in recurrent episodes, causing deterioration in quality of life, affecting everyday habits and inducing severe disability. The aim of this review is to

  13. Trigeminal small-fibre dysfunction in patients with diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agostino, R.; Cruccu, G.; Iannetti, G. D.

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To investigate trigeminal small-fibre function in patients with diabetes mellitus. Methods: In 52 diabetic patients we studied the trigeminal laser evoked potentials after stimulation of the skin bordering the lower lip. In the 21 patients with the severest peripheral nerve damage we a...

  14. Trigeminal neuralgia: how often are trigeminal nerve-vessel contacts found by MRI in normal volunteers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kress, B.; Schindler, M.; Haehnel, S.; Sartor, K.; Rasche, D.; Tronnier, V.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To assess prospectively how often contacts are found between the trigeminal nerve and arteries or veins in the perimesencephalic cistern via MRI in normal volunteers. Materials and methods: 48 volunteers without a history of trigeminal neuralgia were examined prospectively (MRI at 1.5T; T2-CISS sequence, coronal orientation, 0.9 mm slice thickness). Two radiologists decided by consensus whether there was a nerve-vessel contact in the perimesencephalic cistern. Results: In 27% of the volunteers, no contact was found between the trigeminal nerve and regional vessels, while in 73%, such a contact was present. In 61% of the cases, the offending vessel was an artery, in 39%, it was a vein. In 2 volunteers, a deformation of the nerve was noted. Conclusion: Contrary to what has been suggested by retrospective studies, the majority of normal volunteers, if studied prospectively, do show a contact between the trigeminal nerve and local vessels. A close proximity between the nerve and regional vessels is thus normal and is not necessarily proof of a pathological nerve-vessel conflict. (orig.)

  15. Linear accelerator radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Hyong Geun [Dongguk University International Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-15

    Trigeminal neuralgia is defined as an episodic electrical shock-like sensation in a dermatomal distribution of the trigeminal nerve. When medications fail to control pain, various procedures are used to attempt to control refractory pain. Of available procedures, stereotactic radiosurgery is the least invasive procedure and has been demonstrated to produce significant pain relief with minimal side effects. Recently, linear accelerators were introduced as a tool for radiosurgery of trigeminal neuralgia beneath the already accepted gamma unit. Author have experienced one case with trigeminal neuralgia treated with linear accelerator. The patient was treated with 85 Gy by means of 5 mm collimator directed to trigeminal nerve root entry zone. The patient obtained pain free without medication at 20 days after the procedure and remain pain free at 6 months after the procedure. He didn't experience facial numbness or other side effects.

  16. SOLITARY CHEMORECEPTOR CELL SURVIVAL IS INDEPENDENT OF INTACT TRIGEMINAL INNERVATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulbransen, Brian; Silver, Wayne; Finger, Tom

    2008-01-01

    Nasal solitary chemoreceptor cells (SCCs) are a population of specialized chemosensory epithelial cells presumed to broaden trigeminal chemoreceptivity in mammals (Finger et al., 2003). SCCs are innervated by peptidergic trigeminal nerve fibers (Finger et al., 2003) but it is currently unknown if intact innervation is necessary for SCC development or survival. We tested the dependence of SCCs on innervation by eliminating trigeminal nerve fibers during development with neurogenin-1 knockout mice, during early postnatal development with capsaicin desensitization, and during adulthood with trigeminal lesioning. Our results demonstrate that elimination of innervation at any of these times does not result in decreased SCC numbers. In conclusion, neither SCC development nor mature cell maintenance is dependent on intact trigeminal innervation. PMID:18300260

  17. Repeat Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Trigeminal Neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubuchon, Adam C.; Chan, Michael D.; Lovato, James F.; Balamucki, Christopher J.; Ellis, Thomas L.; Tatter, Stephen B.; McMullen, Kevin P.; Munley, Michael T.; Deguzman, Allan F.; Ekstrand, Kenneth E.; Bourland, J. Daniel; Shaw, Edward G.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Repeat gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKRS) for recurrent or persistent trigeminal neuralgia induces an additional response but at the expense of an increased incidence of facial numbness. The present series summarized the results of a repeat treatment series at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, including a multivariate analysis of the data to identify the prognostic factors for treatment success and toxicity. Methods and Materials: Between January 1999 and December 2007, 37 patients underwent a second GKRS application because of treatment failure after a first GKRS treatment. The mean initial dose in the series was 87.3 Gy (range, 80–90). The mean retreatment dose was 84.4 Gy (range, 60–90). The dosimetric variables recorded included the dorsal root entry zone dose, pons surface dose, and dose to the distal nerve. Results: Of the 37 patients, 81% achieved a >50% pain relief response to repeat GKRS, and 57% experienced some form of trigeminal dysfunction after repeat GKRS. Two patients (5%) experienced clinically significant toxicity: one with bothersome numbness and one with corneal dryness requiring tarsorraphy. A dorsal root entry zone dose at repeat treatment of >26.6 Gy predicted for treatment success (61% vs. 32%, p = .0716). A cumulative dorsal root entry zone dose of >84.3 Gy (72% vs. 44%, p = .091) and a cumulative pons surface dose of >108.5 Gy (78% vs. 44%, p = .018) predicted for post-GKRS numbness. The presence of any post-GKRS numbness predicted for a >50% decrease in pain intensity (100% vs. 60%, p = .0015). Conclusion: Repeat GKRS is a viable treatment option for recurrent trigeminal neuralgia, although the patient assumes a greater risk of nerve dysfunction to achieve maximal pain relief.

  18. Repeat Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Trigeminal Neuralgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubuchon, Adam C., E-mail: acaubuchon@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Chan, Michael D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Lovato, James F. [Department of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Balamucki, Christopher J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Ellis, Thomas L.; Tatter, Stephen B. [Department of Neurosurgery, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); McMullen, Kevin P.; Munley, Michael T.; Deguzman, Allan F.; Ekstrand, Kenneth E.; Bourland, J. Daniel; Shaw, Edward G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Repeat gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKRS) for recurrent or persistent trigeminal neuralgia induces an additional response but at the expense of an increased incidence of facial numbness. The present series summarized the results of a repeat treatment series at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, including a multivariate analysis of the data to identify the prognostic factors for treatment success and toxicity. Methods and Materials: Between January 1999 and December 2007, 37 patients underwent a second GKRS application because of treatment failure after a first GKRS treatment. The mean initial dose in the series was 87.3 Gy (range, 80-90). The mean retreatment dose was 84.4 Gy (range, 60-90). The dosimetric variables recorded included the dorsal root entry zone dose, pons surface dose, and dose to the distal nerve. Results: Of the 37 patients, 81% achieved a >50% pain relief response to repeat GKRS, and 57% experienced some form of trigeminal dysfunction after repeat GKRS. Two patients (5%) experienced clinically significant toxicity: one with bothersome numbness and one with corneal dryness requiring tarsorraphy. A dorsal root entry zone dose at repeat treatment of >26.6 Gy predicted for treatment success (61% vs. 32%, p = .0716). A cumulative dorsal root entry zone dose of >84.3 Gy (72% vs. 44%, p = .091) and a cumulative pons surface dose of >108.5 Gy (78% vs. 44%, p = .018) predicted for post-GKRS numbness. The presence of any post-GKRS numbness predicted for a >50% decrease in pain intensity (100% vs. 60%, p = .0015). Conclusion: Repeat GKRS is a viable treatment option for recurrent trigeminal neuralgia, although the patient assumes a greater risk of nerve dysfunction to achieve maximal pain relief.

  19. Comparison of Trigeminal and Postherpetic Neuralgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Peter N Watson

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Although postherpetic neuralgia and trigeminal neuralgia (tic douloureux are common causes of facial pain, they have very little in common aside from lancinating pain (other qualities of pain in each disorder are different. Each disorder affects different areas of the face and the treatment of each is quite dissimilar. The pathogenesis of these two disorders quite likely involves different mechanisms. This report reviews aspects of these two difficult pain problems, particularly with reference to the work of the late Gerhard Fromm, to whom this is dedicated.

  20. CT findings of trigeminal neurinoma (root type)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munemoto, Shigeru; Ishiguro, Shuzo; Kimura, Akira; Shoin, Katsuo; Futami, Kazuya; Rikimaru, Shigeho; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Inoue, Kazuhiko

    1986-01-01

    The CT findings of three patients with trigeminal neurinomas arising from the trigeminal nerve roots were analysed. The tumors were seated behind the posterior wall of the petrous bone: The tumors showed a low density, an isodensity, or a mixed iso and low density on the CT scan. After contrast infusion, the two tumors were markedly enhanced, and the last showed rim enhancement. All the tumors had cystic lesions. None of the tumors had surrounding brain edema. In the 1st case, the tumor compressed the cerebellum mainly; in the 2nd case, it compressed the brain stem, and in the last case, it compressed both the brain stem and the cerebellum. The 2nd case is easy to differentiate from the acoustic neurinoma by its location. The other two cases could be differentiated from the acoustic neurinoma by means of CECT, because the enhanced masses were attached to the apex of the petrous bone. Metrizamide CT cisternography played an important role in circumscribing the tumor. (author)

  1. Gamma knife radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomida, Mihoko; Hayashi, Motohiro; Kawakami, Yoriko; Ishimaru, Jun-ichi

    2009-01-01

    Gamma knife surgery (GKS) has been employed for treating intractable pain such as trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and pain relief has been gained from the treatment, however, little is understood about the side effects of other sensitivities induced from GKS. We assessed ten patients (four men and six women; mean age 67 years) with TN who were investigated by questionnaire for symptoms and visual analog scale (VAS) of pain, and their threshold of touch sensation was examined using Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments, cold sensation and allodynia before and after GKS. MR and CT images were obtained after a Leksell head frame was applied to the head parallel to the trigeminal nerve. These images were uploaded to a computer system and retro-Gasserian area planned the target was correctly marked on the images of a computer in which gamma planning software was installed. All patients were irradiated with a maximum dose of 90 Gy at retro-Gasserian using a 4 mm collimator. The mean±standard deviation (SD) of VAS of pain was 8.5±1.3 and 8 patients had facial paresthesia before GKS. All patients experienced a significant reduction in pain without side effects such as effect on the peripheral nerves without 6 month after GKS. Allodynia, facial paresthesia or cold sensation numbness occurred in the patients before GKS disappeared according to complete pain relief. These results suggest that GKS is a safe and effective treatment for TN. (author)

  2. Chemosensory Information Processing between Keratinocytes and Trigeminal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sondersorg, Anna Christina; Busse, Daniela; Kyereme, Jessica; Rothermel, Markus; Neufang, Gitta; Gisselmann, Günter; Hatt, Hanns; Conrad, Heike

    2014-01-01

    Trigeminal fibers terminate within the facial mucosa and skin and transmit tactile, proprioceptive, chemical, and nociceptive sensations. Trigeminal sensations can arise from the direct stimulation of intraepithelial free nerve endings or indirectly through information transmission from adjacent cells at the peripheral innervation area. For mechanical and thermal cues, communication processes between skin cells and somatosensory neurons have already been suggested. High concentrations of most odors typically provoke trigeminal sensations in vivo but surprisingly fail to activate trigeminal neuron monocultures. This fact favors the hypothesis that epithelial cells may participate in chemodetection and subsequently transmit signals to neighboring trigeminal fibers. Keratinocytes, the major cell type of the epidermis, express various receptors that enable reactions to multiple environmental stimuli. Here, using a co-culture approach, we show for the first time that exposure to the odorant chemicals induces a chemical communication between human HaCaT keratinocytes and mouse trigeminal neurons. Moreover, a supernatant analysis of stimulated keratinocytes and subsequent blocking experiments with pyrodoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2′,4′-disulfonate revealed that ATP serves as the mediating transmitter molecule released from skin cells after odor stimulation. We show that the ATP release resulting from Javanol® stimulation of keratinocytes was mediated by pannexins. Consequently, keratinocytes act as chemosensors linking the environment and the trigeminal system via ATP signaling. PMID:24790106

  3. Gastric Lymphoma with Secondary Trigeminal Nerve Lymphoma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warissara Rongthong

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Data supporting the role of radiotherapy in secondary trigeminal nerve lymphoma is scarce. Here, I report the case of 64-year-old Thai male diagnosed as gastric diffuse large B cell lymphoma with secondary trigeminal nerve lymphoma. He had previously received one cycle of cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP, followed by five cycles of rituximab plus CHOP (R-CHOP with intrathecal methotrexate (MTX and cytarabine (Ara-C. One month after the last cycle of R-CHOP, he developed a headache and numbness on the left side of his face. MRI revealed thickening of the left trigeminal nerve. He received one intrathecal injection of MTX and Ara-C, followed by systemic chemotherapy. After receiving intrathecal chemotherapy, his symptoms disappeared. Clinical response and MRI studies suggested secondary trigeminal nerve lymphoma. Two months later, our patient’s secondary trigeminal nerve lymphoma had progressed. Salvage whole brain irradiation (36 Gy with boost dose (50 Gy along the left trigeminal nerve was given. Unfortunately, our patient developed heart failure and expired during the radiotherapy session. In conclusion and specific to secondary central nervous system lymphoma (SCNSL, radiotherapy may benefit patients who fail to respond to systemic chemotherapy and palliative treatment. The results this report fail to support the role of radiotherapy in secondary trigeminal nerve lymphoma.

  4. Trigeminal neuralgia secondary to basilar impression: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurus Marques de Almeida Holanda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of trigeminal neuralgia. A 23-year-old woman with a history of 1 year of typical trigeminal neuralgia manifested the characteristics of basilar impression. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI demonstrated basilar impression, deformity of the posterior fossa with asymmetry of petrous bone, and compression of medulla oblongata in the topography of the odontoid apophysis. The operation was performed through a suboccipital craniectomy. The neuralgia disappeared after surgery and remains completely resolved until today. This is the second reported case of trigeminal neuralgia in a patient with basilar impression in Brazil.

  5. Linear accelerator stereotactic radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela-Lema, Leonor; Lopez-Garcia, Marisa; Maceira-Rozas, Maria; Munoz-Garzon, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is accepted as an alternative for patients with refractory trigeminal neuralgia, but existing evidence is fundamentally based on the Gamma Knife, which is a specific device for intracranial neurosurgery, available in few facilities. Over the last decade it has been shown that the use of linear accelerators can achieve similar diagnostic accuracy and equivalent dose distribution. To assess the effectiveness and safety of linear-accelerator stereotactic radiosurgery for the treatment of patients with refractory trigeminal neuralgia. We carried out a systematic search of the literature in the main electronic databases (PubMed, Embase, ISI Web of Knowledge, Cochrane, Biomed Central, IBECS, IME, CRD) and reviewed grey literature. All original studies on the subject published in Spanish, French, English, and Portuguese were eligible for inclusion. The selection and critical assessment was carried out by 2 independent reviewers based on pre-defined criteria. In view of the impossibility of carrying out a pooled analysis, data were analyzed in a qualitative way. Eleven case series were included. In these, satisfactory pain relief (BIN I-IIIb or reduction in pain = 50) was achieved in 75% to 95.7% of the patients treated. The mean time to relief from pain ranged from 8.5 days to 3.8 months. The percentage of patients who presented with recurrences after one year of follow-up ranged from 5% to 28.8%. Facial swelling or hypoesthesia, mostly of a mild-moderate grade appeared in 7.5% - 51.9% of the patients. Complete anaesthesia dolorosa was registered in only study (5.3%). Cases of hearing loss (2.5%), brainstem edema (5.8%), and neurotrophic keratoplasty (3.5%) were also isolated. The results suggest that stereotactic radiosurgery with linear accelerators could constitute an effective and safe therapeutic alternative for drug-resistant trigeminal neuralgia. However, existing studies leave important doubts as to optimal treatment doses or the

  6. Autonomous houses. Autonomous house

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, S. (Tokai University, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering)

    1991-09-30

    Self-sufficiency type houses are outlined. On condition that people gain a certain amount of income in relation with the society, they self-suffice under the given environment, allowing themselves to accept a minimum of industrial products with small environmental load. Ordinary supply from outside of fossil energy and materials which depend on it is minimized. Types are classified into three: energy, energy materials and perfect self-sufficiency. A study project for environment symbiotic houses is progressing which is planned by the Ministry of Construction and Institute of Building Energy Conservation and is invested by a private company. Its target is making a house for halving an environmental load by CO{sub 2}, for the purpose of creating the environment symbiotic house which is nice to and in harmony with the global environment and human beings. As a part of the studies on energy-saving and resource conservation on houses, introduced is a plan of an autonomous house at Izu-Atagawa. The passive method and high thermal-insulation are used for air conditioning, and hot spring water for hot water supply. Electric power is generated by hydroelectric power generation using mountain streams and by solar cells. Staple food is purchased, while subsidiary food is sufficed. 17 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Gamma Knife® radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Chun-Po; Schlesinger, David; Sheehan, Jason P

    2011-11-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is characterized by a temporary paroxysmal lancinating facial pain in the trigeminal nerve distribution. The prevalence is four to five per 100,000. Local pressure on nerve fibers from vascular loops results in painful afferent discharge from an injured segment of the fifth cranial nerve. Microvascular decompression addresses the underlying pathophysiology of the disease, making this treatment the gold standard for medically refractory trigeminal neuralgia. In patients who cannot tolerate a surgical procedure, those in whom a vascular etiology cannot be identified, or those unwilling to undergo an open surgery, stereotactic radiosurgery is an appropriate alternative. The majority of patients with typical facial pain will achieve relief following radiosurgical treatment. Long-term follow-up for recurrence as well as for radiation-induced complications is required in all patients undergoing stereotactic radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia.

  8. Update on neuropathic pain treatment for trigeminal neuralgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Quliti, Khalid W.

    2015-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is a syndrome of unilateral, paroxysmal, stabbing facial pain, originating from the trigeminal nerve. Careful history of typical symptoms is crucial for diagnosis. Most cases are caused by vascular compression of the trigeminal root adjacent to the pons leading to focal demyelination and ephaptic axonal transmission. Brain imaging is required to exclude secondary causes. Many medical and surgical treatments are available. Most patients respond well to pharmacotherapy; carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine are first line therapy, while lamotrigine and baclofen are considered second line treatments. Other drugs such as topiramate, levetiracetam, gabapentin, pregabalin, and botulinum toxin-A are alternative treatments. Surgical options are available if medications are no longer effective or tolerated. Microvascular decompression, gamma knife radiosurgery, and percutaneous rhizotomies are most promising surgical alternatives. This paper reviews the medical and surgical therapeutic options for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia, based on available evidence and guidelines. PMID:25864062

  9. Neurophysiological aspects of the trigeminal sensory system: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Cruyssen, Frederic; Politis, Constantinus

    2018-02-23

    The trigeminal system is one of the most complex cranial nerve systems of the human body. Research on it has vastly grown in recent years and concentrated more and more on molecular mechanisms and pathophysiology, but thorough reviews on this topic are lacking, certainly on the normal physiology of the trigeminal sensory system. Here we review the current literature on neurophysiology of the trigeminal nerve from peripheral receptors up to its central projections toward the somatosensory cortex. We focus on the most recent scientific discoveries and describe historical relevant research to substantiate further. One chapter on new insights of the pathophysiology of pain at the level of the trigeminal system is added. A database search of Medline, Embase and Cochrane was conducted with the search terms 'animal study', 'neurophysiology', 'trigeminal', 'oral' and 'sensory'. Articles were manually selected after reading the abstract and where needed the article. Reference lists also served to include relevant research articles. Fifty-six articles were included after critical appraisal. Physiological aspects on mechanoreceptors, trigeminal afferents, trigeminal ganglion and central projections are reviewed in light of reference works. Embryologic and anatomic insights are cited where needed. A brief description of pathophysiology of pain pathways in the trigeminal area and recent advances in dental stem cell research are also discussed. Neurophysiology at the level of the central nervous system is not reviewed. The current body of knowledge is mainly based on animal and cadaveric studies, but recent advancements in functional imaging and molecular neuroscience are elucidating the pathways and functioning of this mixed nerve system. Extrapolation of animal studies or functioning of peripheral nerves should be warranted.

  10. Sensory trigeminal ULF-TENS stimulation reduces HRV response to experimentally induced arithmetic stress: A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaco, Annalisa; Cattaneo, Ruggero; Ortu, Eleonora; Constantinescu, Marian Vladimir; Pietropaoli, Davide

    2017-05-01

    Ultra Low Frequency Transcutaneous Electric Nervous Stimulation (ULF-TENS) is extensively used for pain relief and for the diagnosis and treatment of temporomandibular disorders (TMD). In addition to its local effects, ULF-TENS acts on the autonomic nervous system (ANS), with particular reference to the periaqueductal gray (PAG), promoting the release of endogenous opioids and modulating descending pain systems. It has been suggested that the PAG participates in the coupling between the emotional stimulus and the appropriate behavioral autonomic response. This function is successfully investigated by HRV. Therefore, our goal is to investigate the effects of trigeminal ULF-TENS stimulation on autonomic behavior in terms of HRV and respiratory parameters during an experimentally-induced arithmetic stress test in healthy subjects. Thirty healthy women between 25 and 35years of age were enrolled and randomly assigned to either the control (TENS stimulation off) or test group (TENS stimulation on). Heart (HR, LF, HF, LF/HF ratio, DET, RMSSD, PNN50, RR) and respiratory (BR) rate were evaluated under basal, T1 (TENS off/on), and stress (mathematical task) conditions. Results showed that HRV parameters and BR significantly changed during the arithmetic stress paradigm (pTENS and control group could be discriminated only by non-linear HRV data, namely RR and DET (p=0.038 and p=0.027, respectively). During the arithmetic task, LF/HF ratio was the most sensitive parameter to discriminate between groups (p=0.019). Our data suggest that trigeminal sensory ULF-TENS reduces the autonomic response in terms of HRV and BR during acute mental stress in healthy subjects. Future directions of our work aim at applying the HRV and BR analysis, with and without TENS stimulation, to individuals with dysfunctional ANS among those with TMD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Autonomous search

    CERN Document Server

    Hamadi, Youssef; Saubion, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    Autonomous combinatorial search (AS) represents a new field in combinatorial problem solving. Its major standpoint and originality is that it considers that problem solvers must be capable of self-improvement operations. This is the first book dedicated to AS.

  12. Temporomandibular joint inflammation activates glial and immune cells in both the trigeminal ganglia and in the spinal trigeminal nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmin Luc

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glial cells have been shown to directly participate to the genesis and maintenance of chronic pain in both the sensory ganglia and the central nervous system (CNS. Indeed, glial cell activation has been reported in both the dorsal root ganglia and the spinal cord following injury or inflammation of the sciatic nerve, but no data are currently available in animal models of trigeminal sensitization. Therefore, in the present study, we evaluated glial cell activation in the trigeminal-spinal system following injection of the Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA into the temporomandibular joint, which generates inflammatory pain and trigeminal hypersensitivity. Results CFA-injected animals showed ipsilateral mechanical allodynia and temporomandibular joint edema, accompanied in the trigeminal ganglion by a strong increase in the number of GFAP-positive satellite glial cells encircling neurons and by the activation of resident macrophages. Seventy-two hours after CFA injection, activated microglial cells were observed in the ipsilateral trigeminal subnucleus caudalis and in the cervical dorsal horn, with a significant up-regulation of Iba1 immunoreactivity, but no signs of reactive astrogliosis were detected in the same areas. Since the purinergic system has been implicated in the activation of microglial cells during neuropathic pain, we have also evaluated the expression of the microglial-specific P2Y12 receptor subtype. No upregulation of this receptor was detected following induction of TMJ inflammation, suggesting that any possible role of P2Y12 in this paradigm of inflammatory pain does not involve changes in receptor expression. Conclusions Our data indicate that specific glial cell populations become activated in both the trigeminal ganglia and the CNS following induction of temporomandibular joint inflammation, and suggest that they might represent innovative targets for controlling pain during trigeminal nerve sensitization.

  13. Trigeminal neuralgia and facial nerve paralysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Alexandra [IPOFG, Department of Radiology, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2005-03-01

    The trigeminal nerve is the largest of the cranial nerves. It provides sensory input from the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. The facial nerve is the cranial nerve with the longest extracranial course, and its main functions include motor innervation to the muscles of facial expression, sensory control of lacrimation and salivation, control of the stapedial reflex and to carry taste sensation from the anterior two-thirds of the tongue. In order to be able adequately to image and follow the course of these cranial nerves and their main branches, a detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy is required. As we are dealing with very small anatomic structures, high resolution dedicated imaging studies are required to pick up normal and pathologic nerves. Whereas CT is best suited to demonstrate bony neurovascular foramina and canals, MRI is preferred to directly visualize the nerve. It is also the single technique able to detect pathologic processes afflicting the nerve without causing considerable expansion such as is usually the case in certain inflammatory/infectious conditions, perineural spread of malignancies and in very small intrinsic tumours. Because a long course from the brainstem nuclei to the peripheral branches is seen, it is useful to subdivide the nerve in several segments and then tailor the imaging modality and the imaging study to that specific segment. This is particularly true in cases where topographic diagnosis can be used to locate a lesion in the course of these nerves. (orig.)

  14. Trigeminal neuralgia and facial nerve paralysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Alexandra

    2005-01-01

    The trigeminal nerve is the largest of the cranial nerves. It provides sensory input from the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. The facial nerve is the cranial nerve with the longest extracranial course, and its main functions include motor innervation to the muscles of facial expression, sensory control of lacrimation and salivation, control of the stapedial reflex and to carry taste sensation from the anterior two-thirds of the tongue. In order to be able adequately to image and follow the course of these cranial nerves and their main branches, a detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy is required. As we are dealing with very small anatomic structures, high resolution dedicated imaging studies are required to pick up normal and pathologic nerves. Whereas CT is best suited to demonstrate bony neurovascular foramina and canals, MRI is preferred to directly visualize the nerve. It is also the single technique able to detect pathologic processes afflicting the nerve without causing considerable expansion such as is usually the case in certain inflammatory/infectious conditions, perineural spread of malignancies and in very small intrinsic tumours. Because a long course from the brainstem nuclei to the peripheral branches is seen, it is useful to subdivide the nerve in several segments and then tailor the imaging modality and the imaging study to that specific segment. This is particularly true in cases where topographic diagnosis can be used to locate a lesion in the course of these nerves. (orig.)

  15. Trigeminal Trophic Syndrome Associated With the Use of Synthetic Marijuana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Fawad A; Manacheril, Rinu; Ulep, Robin; Martin, Julie E; Chimakurthy, Anil

    2017-01-01

    Trigeminal trophic syndrome (TTS) is an uncommon disorder of the trigeminal nerve tract and trigeminal brainstem nucleus. The syndrome is characterized by a triad of unilateral crescentic ulcers with anesthesia and paresthesias of the involved trigeminal dermatomes. A 24-year-old right-handed black female presented to our emergency department with a 4-week history of rapidly progressive painless desquamation/denudation of skin over her right face and scalp. Four weeks prior, she had been admitted to another institution for seizures and was diagnosed with seizures provoked by synthetic marijuana use. She was afebrile during her initial presentation at our institution. Dermatologic examination revealed denudation of the epidermis and partial dermis over the right frontal, parietal, and temporal scalp with associated alopecia. To our knowledge, the association of disorders of the trigeminal nerve pathway, including TTS, with the use of synthetic marijuana has not been previously reported. The long-term neurologic effects of synthetic marijuana are difficult to predict, and the pathologic underpinnings of TTS are largely unknown. Further studies dedicated to exploring the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms may translate into effective therapies and approaches to halt and reverse the process and prevent tissue destruction and cosmetic disfigurement.

  16. MRI volumetry for the preoperative diagnosis of trigeminal neuralgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kress, Bodo; Schindler, Markus; Haehnel, Stefan; Sartor, Klaus; Stippich, Christoph [University of Heidelberg, Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Neurology, Medical Center, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Rasche, Dirk; Tronnier, Volker [University of Heidelberg, Department of Neurosurgery, Medical Center, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    To assess whether quantitative measuring methods can help improve the reliability of MRI-based evaluations of the pathological role of a neurovascular conflict between an artery and the trigeminal nerve. In a prospective study, magnetic resonance images were obtained from 62 patients with unilateral facial pain and 50 healthy test subjects. In coronal T1- and T2-weighted sequences volume measurements were performed by regions of interest and compared intraindividually (healthy versus affected side in the patient populations and right versus left side in the group of test subjects) and on the basis of the different clinical pictures (t test for dependent and independent samples, p<0.05). In patients with trigeminal neuralgia, the affected nerve showed a smaller volume than the trigeminal nerve on the healthy side (p<0.001). Such a volume difference was noted neither in the other patients nor in the healthy test subjects. Quantitative MRI measurements allow a pathological neurovascular conflict to be distinguished from a nonpathological condition where an artery is in close proximity to the trigeminal nerve. The measured volume difference between the healthy and the affected nerve in patients with neuralgia is indicative of trigeminal nerve atrophy resulting from damage to the nerve. (orig.)

  17. Pain in trigeminal neuralgia: neurophysiology and measurement: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S; Rastogi, S; Kumar, S; Mahendra, P; Bansal, M; Chandra, L

    2013-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is defined as sudden, usually unilateral, severe, brief, stabbing recurrent episodes of pain within the distribution of one or more branches of the trigeminal nerve. It is the most frequent cranial neuralgia, the incidence being 1 per 1,000,00 persons per year. Pain attacks start abruptly and last several seconds but may persist 1 to 2 minutes. The attacks are initiated by non painful physical stimulation of specific areas (trigger points or zones) that are located ipsilateral to the pain. After each episode, there is usually a refractive period during which stimulation of the trigger zone will not induce the pain. According to the European Federation of Neurological Societies (EFNS) guidelines on neuropathic pain assessment and the American Academy of Neurology (AAN)-EFNS guidelines on TN management the neurophysiological recording of trigeminal reflexes represents the most useful and reliable test for the neurophysiological diagnosis of trigeminal pains. The present article discusses different techniques for investigation of the trigeminal system by which an accurate topographical diagnosis and profile of sensory fiber pathology can be determined. With the aid of neurophysiological recordings and quantitative sensory testing, it is possible to approach a mechanism-based classification of orofacial pain.

  18. Distinctive features of Phox2b-expressing neurons in the rat reticular formation dorsal to the trigeminal motor nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagoya, Kouta; Nakamura, Shiro; Ikeda, Keiko; Onimaru, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Atsushi; Nakayama, Kiyomi; Mochizuki, Ayako; Kiyomoto, Masaaki; Sato, Fumihiko; Kawakami, Kiyoshi; Takahashi, Koji; Inoue, Tomio

    2017-09-01

    Phox2b encodes a paired-like homeodomain-containing transcription factor essential for development of the autonomic nervous system. Phox2b-expressing (Phox2b + ) neurons are present in the reticular formation dorsal to the trigeminal motor nucleus (RdV) as well as the nucleus of the solitary tract and parafacial respiratory group. However, the nature of Phox2b + RdV neurons is still unclear. We investigated the physiological and morphological properties of Phox2b + RdV neurons using postnatal day 2-7 transgenic rats expressing yellow fluorescent protein under the control of Phox2b. Almost all of Phox2b + RdV neurons were glutamatergic, whereas Phox2b-negative (Phox2b - ) RdV neurons consisted of a few glutamatergic, many GABAergic, and many glycinergic neurons. The majority (48/56) of Phox2b + neurons showed low-frequency firing (LF), while most of Phox2b - neurons (35/42) exhibited high-frequency firing (HF) in response to intracellularly injected currents. All, but one, Phox2b + neurons (55/56) did not fire spontaneously, whereas three-fourths of the Phox2b - neurons (31/42) were spontaneously active. K + channel and persistent Na + current blockers affected the firing of LF and HF neurons. The majority of Phox2b + (35/46) and half of the Phox2b - neurons (19/40) did not respond to stimulations of the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus, the trigeminal tract, and the principal sensory trigeminal nucleus. Biocytin labeling revealed that about half of the Phox2b + (5/12) and Phox2b - RdV neurons (5/10) send their axons to the trigeminal motor nucleus. These results suggest that Phox2b + RdV neurons have distinct neurotransmitter phenotypes and firing properties from Phox2b - RdV neurons and might play important roles in feeding-related functions including suckling and possibly mastication. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation and management of "sinus headache" in the otolaryngology practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Zara M; Setzen, Michael; Poetker, David M; DelGaudio, John M

    2014-04-01

    Patients, primary care doctors, neurologists and otolaryngologists often have differing views on what is truly causing headache in the sinonasal region. This review discusses common primary headache diagnoses that can masquerade as "sinus headache" or "rhinogenic headache," such as migraine, trigeminal neuralgia, tension-type headache, temporomandibular joint dysfunction, giant cell arteritis (also known as temporal arteritis) and medication overuse headache, as well as the trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias, including cluster headache, paroxysmal hemicrania, and hemicrania continua. Diagnostic criteria are discussed and evidence outlined that allows physicians to make better clinical diagnoses and point patients toward better treatment options. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of trigeminal neurovascular compression in patients with trigeminal neuralgia with 3.0 T MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lirong; Wang Dehang; Wang Dongqing; Wu Min; Xu Guangming; Ma Cong

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify anatomical characteristics of neurovascular compression associated with trigeminal neuralgia (TN). Methods: Fifty patients with TN (23 of 50 patients underwent microvascular decompression) and 50 patients without facial pain underwent 3.0 T MRI scanning for analysis of 50 trigeminal nerves ipsilateral to TN symptoms, 50 contralateral to TN symptoms, and 100 in asymptomatic patients. MRI sequences included balanced fast-field echo and 3D MR angiography. Images were fused and reconstructed into virtual cisternoscopy images to determine the degree (severity of compression was defined as follows: 1=no compression; 2 =compressed by a vein; 3 =contacted by an artery; 4 =indented by an artery; and 5 =nerve displaced or distorted by an artery) and site of neurovascular compression (the point of each offending vascular structure: proximal was defined as located in 1/3 length of the cisternal segment of the trigeminal nerve near root entry zone; the place of superior was defined as above the cisternal segment of the trigeminal nerve). Reconstructed MPR images were used to measure nerve length and cross sectional area. The chi-square test was used for all 2 × 2 contingency tables. The t-test was used for dependent samples. The Logistic regression was used for prediction of occurrence of the event of TN. Results: Twenty-three of 50 patients with TN underwent microvascular decompression, which confirmed predicted neurovascular relationships in all cases, and 21 of 23 patients were pain free after the operation. The incidence of neurovascular compression on asymptomatic nerves (no. of level 1=79, level 2=5, level 3 =8, level 4 =8), on nerves contralateral to TN symptoms (no. of level 1=27, level 2 =6, level 3 =9, level 4 =8), and on nerves ipsilateral to TN symptoms (no. of level 1=4, level 2 =12, level 3 =12, level 4 =7, level 5 =15) was 21.0% (21/100), 46.0% (23/50), and 92.0% (46/50), respectively. The difference between symptomatic and asymptomatic

  1. Gamma-knife radiosurgery in the treatment of trigeminal schwannomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peker, S.; Bayrakli, F.; Kilic, T.; Pamir, M.N.

    2007-01-01

    Trigeminal nerve schwannomas account for 0.07 %-0.28 % of all intracranial tumors. Advances in skull base surgery have led to more aggressive resection of these tumors, but surgery may associated with development of new neurological deficits. In this report, we analyse the long-term results 15 patients with newly diagnosed or residual/recurrent trigeminal schwannoma who underwent gamma-knife treatment. During a mean 61 months of follow-up, MRI revealed reduction of tumor size in 13 and no size change in 2 patients. The tumor growth control rate was 100 % and only 1 patient had transient facial numbness and diplopia. For patients with small to moderate size trigeminal schwannomas, gamma-knife radiosurgery is associated with good tumor control and a minimal risk of adverse radiation effects. (author)

  2. Unilateral pure trigeminal motor nerve neuropathy: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishant K Srivastava

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Unilateral pure trigeminal motor nerve neuropathy is an extremely rare and unique condition, characterized by atrophy of the muscles, innervated by the motor branch of the trigeminal nerve. We report such a case in a 25-year-old male patient. The diagnosis was made on the basis of clinical and radiological examinations. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI proved to be the key for establishing the diagnosis, which showed atrophy and fatty infiltration over the affected side of the muscles of mastication. We were unable to establish the cause of the condition even after performing a brain MRI.

  3. Trigeminal Neuralgia and Multiple Sclerosis: A Historical Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkholder, David B; Koehler, Peter J; Boes, Christopher J

    2017-09-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) associated with multiple sclerosis (MS) was first described in Lehrbuch der Nervenkrankheiten für Ärzte und Studirende in 1894 by Hermann Oppenheim, including a pathologic description of trigeminal root entry zone demyelination. Early English-language translations in 1900 and 1904 did not so explicitly state this association compared with the German editions. The 1911 English-language translation described a more direct association. Other later descriptions were clinical with few pathologic reports, often referencing Oppenheim but citing the 1905 German or 1911 English editions of Lehrbuch. This discrepancy in part may be due to the translation differences of the original text.

  4. Significance of neurovascular contact in classical trigeminal neuralgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maarbjerg, Stine; Wolfram, Frauke; Gozalov, Aydin

    2015-01-01

    and degree of neurovascular contact. Severe neurovascular contact was defined as displacement or atrophy of the trigeminal nerve. A total of 135 patients with classical trigeminal neuralgia were included. Average age of disease onset was 53.0 years (95% confidence interval mean 40.5-55.5) and current age...... was 60.1 years (95% % confidence interval mean 57.5-62.7). Eighty-two (61%, 95% confidence interval 52-69%) patients were female. Neurovascular contact was prevalent both on the symptomatic and asymptomatic side [89% versus 78%, P = 0.014, odds ratio = 2.4 (1.2-4.8), P = 0.017], while severe...

  5. Influence of oculomotor nerve afferents on central endings of primary trigeminal fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manni, E; Bortolami, R; Pettorossi, V E; Lucchi, M L; Callegari, E; Draicchio, F

    1987-12-01

    Painful fibers running in the third nerve and originating from the ophthalmic trigeminal area send their central projections at level of substantia gelatinosa of nucleus caudalis trigemini. The central endings of these fibers form axoaxonic synapses with trigeminal fibers entering the brain stem through the trigeminal root. The effect of electrical stimulation of the third nerve central stump on the central endings of trigeminal afferent fibers consists in an increased excitability, possibly resulting in a presynaptic inhibition. This inhibitory influence is due to both direct and indirect connections of the third nerve afferent fibers with the trigeminal ones.

  6. Arterial compression of nerve is the primary cause of trigeminal neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guo-Qiang; Wang, Xiao-Song; Wang, Lin; Zheng, Jia-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Whether arterial or venous compression or arachnoid adhesions are primarily responsible for compression of the trigeminal nerve in patients with trigeminal neuralgia is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the causes of trigeminal nerve compression in patients with trigeminal neuralgia. The surgical findings in patients with trigeminal neuralgia who were treated by micro vascular decompression were compared to those in patients with hemifacial spasm without any signs or symptoms of trigeminal neuralgia who were treated with microvascular decompression. The study included 99 patients with trigeminal neuralgia (median age, 57 years) and 101 patients with hemifacial spasm (median age, 47 years). There were significant differences between the groups in the relationship of artery to nerve (p relationship of vein to nerve. After adjustment for age, gender, and other factors, patients with vein compression of nerve or with artery compression of nerve were more likely to have trigeminal neuralgia (OR = 5.21 and 42.54, p = 0.026 and p compression of the trigeminal nerve is the primary cause of trigeminal neuralgia and therefore, decompression of veins need not be a priority when performing microvascular dissection in patients with trigeminal neuralgia.

  7. Trigeminal nerve anatomy in neuropathic and non-neuropathic orofacial pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Sophie L; Gustin, Sylvia M; Eykman, Elizabeth N; Fowler, Gordon; Peck, Christopher C; Murray, Greg M; Henderson, Luke A

    2013-08-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia, painful trigeminal neuropathy, and painful temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) are chronic orofacial pain conditions that are thought to have fundamentally different etiologies. Trigeminal neuralgia and neuropathy are thought to arise from damage to or pressure on the trigeminal nerve, whereas TMD results primarily from peripheral nociceptor activation. This study sought to assess the volume and microstructure of the trigeminal nerve in these 3 conditions. In 9 neuralgia, 18 neuropathy, 20 TMD, and 26 healthy controls, the trigeminal root entry zone was selected on high-resolution T1-weighted magnetic resonance images and the volume (mm(3)) calculated. Additionally, using diffusion-tensor images (DTIs), the mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy values of the trigeminal nerve root were calculated. Trigeminal neuralgia patients displayed a significant (47%) decrease in nerve volume but no change in DTI values. Conversely, trigeminal neuropathy subjects displayed a significant (40%) increase in nerve volume but again no change in DTI values. In contrast, TMD subjects displayed no change in volume or DTI values. The data suggest that the changes occurring within the trigeminal nerve are not uniform in all orofacial pain conditions. These structural and volume changes may have implications in diagnosis and management of different forms of chronic orofacial pain. This study reveals that neuropathic orofacial pain conditions are associated with changes in trigeminal nerve volume, whereas non-neuropathic orofacial pain is not associated with any change in nerve volume. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Frequent mild head injury promotes trigeminal sensitivity concomitant with microglial proliferation, astrocytosis, and increased neuropeptide levels in the trigeminal pain system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyburski, Ashley L; Cheng, Lan; Assari, Soroush; Darvish, Kurosh; Elliott, Melanie B

    2017-12-01

    Frequent mild head injuries or concussion along with the presence of headache may contribute to the persistence of concussion symptoms. In this study, the acute effects of recovery between mild head injuries and the frequency of injuries on a headache behavior, trigeminal allodynia, was assessed using von Frey testing up to one week after injury, while histopathological changes in the trigeminal pain pathway were evaluated using western blot, ELISA and immunohistochemistry.  RESULTS: A decreased recovery time combined with an increased mild closed head injury (CHI) frequency results in reduced trigeminal allodynia thresholds compared to controls. The repetitive CHI group with the highest injury frequency showed the greatest reduction in trigeminal thresholds along with greatest increased levels of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis. Repetitive CHI resulted in astrogliosis in the central trigeminal system, increased GFAP protein levels in the sensory barrel cortex, and an increased number of microglia cells in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis. Headache behavior in rats is dependent on the injury frequency and recovery interval between mild head injuries. A worsening of headache behavior after repetitive mild head injuries was concomitant with increases in CGRP levels, the presence of astrocytosis, and microglia proliferation in the central trigeminal pathway. Signaling between neurons and proliferating microglia in the trigeminal pain system may contribute to the initiation of acute headache after concussion or other traumatic brain injuries.

  9. Microstructural abnormalities in the trigeminal nerves of patients with trigeminal neuralgia revealed by multiple diffusion metrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yaou [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Beijing Key laboratory of MRI and Brain Informatics, Beijing (China); Li, Jiping [Department of Functional Neurosurgery, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Butzkueven, Helmut [Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010 (Australia); Duan, Yunyun; Zhang, Mo [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Shu, Ni [State Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Li, Yongjie [Department of Functional Neurosurgery, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Zhang, Yuqing, E-mail: yuqzhang@sohu.com [Department of Functional Neurosurgery, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Li, Kuncheng, E-mail: kunchengli55@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China)

    2013-05-15

    Objective: To investigate microstructural tissue changes of trigeminal nerve (TGN) in patients with unilateral trigeminal neuralgia (TN) by multiple diffusion metrics, and correlate the diffusion indexes with the clinical variables. Methods: 16 patients with TN and 6 healthy controls (HC) were recruited into our study. All participants were imaged with a 3.0 T system with three-dimension time-of-flight (TOF) magnetic resonance angiography and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) DTI-sequence. We placed regions of interest over the root entry zone of the TGN and measured fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axial diffusivity (AD) and radial diffusivity (RD). The mean values of FA, MD, AD and RD were compared between the affected and unaffected sides in the same patient, and to HC values. The correlation between the side-to-side diffusion metric difference and clinical variables (disease duration and visual analogy scale, VAS) was further explored. Results: Compared with the unaffected side and HC, the affected side showed significantly decreased FA and increased RD; however, no significant changes of AD were found. A trend toward significantly increased MD was identified on the affected side comparing with the unaffected side. We also found the significant correlation between the FA reduction and VAS of pain (r = −0.55, p = 0.03). Conclusion: DTI can quantitatively assess the microstructural abnormalities of the affected TGN in patients with TN. Our results suggest demyelination without significant axonal injury is the essential pathological basis of the affected TGN by multiple diffusion metrics. The correlation between FA reduction and VAS suggests FA as a potential objective MRI biomarker to correlate with clinical severity.

  10. Microstructural abnormalities in the trigeminal nerves of patients with trigeminal neuralgia revealed by multiple diffusion metrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yaou; Li, Jiping; Butzkueven, Helmut; Duan, Yunyun; Zhang, Mo; Shu, Ni; Li, Yongjie; Zhang, Yuqing; Li, Kuncheng

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate microstructural tissue changes of trigeminal nerve (TGN) in patients with unilateral trigeminal neuralgia (TN) by multiple diffusion metrics, and correlate the diffusion indexes with the clinical variables. Methods: 16 patients with TN and 6 healthy controls (HC) were recruited into our study. All participants were imaged with a 3.0 T system with three-dimension time-of-flight (TOF) magnetic resonance angiography and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) DTI-sequence. We placed regions of interest over the root entry zone of the TGN and measured fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axial diffusivity (AD) and radial diffusivity (RD). The mean values of FA, MD, AD and RD were compared between the affected and unaffected sides in the same patient, and to HC values. The correlation between the side-to-side diffusion metric difference and clinical variables (disease duration and visual analogy scale, VAS) was further explored. Results: Compared with the unaffected side and HC, the affected side showed significantly decreased FA and increased RD; however, no significant changes of AD were found. A trend toward significantly increased MD was identified on the affected side comparing with the unaffected side. We also found the significant correlation between the FA reduction and VAS of pain (r = −0.55, p = 0.03). Conclusion: DTI can quantitatively assess the microstructural abnormalities of the affected TGN in patients with TN. Our results suggest demyelination without significant axonal injury is the essential pathological basis of the affected TGN by multiple diffusion metrics. The correlation between FA reduction and VAS suggests FA as a potential objective MRI biomarker to correlate with clinical severity

  11. An additional trigeminal system in certain snakes possessing infrared receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, Gerard J.

    1974-01-01

    This communication describes a nucleus and tract of the trigeminal system whose existence is not mentioned in any account of brain stem architecture known to the present author. The structures were first recognised in the brain stem of a giant snake (Python reticulatus) and later were also found

  12. Update on the challenges of treating trigeminal neuralgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obermann M

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mark Obermann Department of Neurology, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany Abstract: Despite the multitude of treatment options currently available for trigeminal neuralgia, its management remains challenging in a considerable number of patients. The response to any particular treatment can be quite variable interindividually, and personalized treatment options are both resource-consuming and time-consuming. Anticonvulsant drugs, muscle relaxants, and neuroleptic agents are the preferred medical treatment for trigeminal neuralgia. Large placebo-controlled clinical trials are scarce, and no specific established substance has been developed for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia. Promising new treatment options currently in clinical evaluation are botulinum neurotoxin type A injections and CNV1014802, a novel sodium channel blocker that selectively blocks the Nav1.7 sodium channel. Patients who do not respond to medical therapy may be eligible for more invasive treatment options, such as percutaneous Gasserian ganglion techniques, gamma knife surgery, and microvascular decompression. Keywords: trigeminal neuralgia, treatment, current, future, options, orphan drugs 

  13. Magnetic Resonance in trigeminal neuralgia: Presentation of three cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochoa Escudero, Martin; Echeverri Betancourt, Alejandro; Vargas Velez, Sergio Alberto

    2005-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is characterized by episodes of acute facial pain. lt can be caused by diverse pathologies that affect anyone of the segments of the V cranial nerve. Magnetic resonance is of choice when imaging studies are necessary. Three cases evaluated by this modality and confirmed by surgery are shown

  14. Pain. Part 2a: Trigeminal Anatomy Related to Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renton, Tara; Egbuniwe, Obi

    2015-04-01

    In order to understand the underlying principles of orofacial pain it is important to understand the corresponding anatomy and mechanisms. Paper 1 of this series explains the central nervous and peripheral nervous systems relating to pain. The trigeminal nerve is the 'great protector' of the most important region of our body. It is the largest sensory nerve of the body and over half of the sensory cortex is responsive to any stimulation within this system. This nerve is the main sensory system of the branchial arches and underpins the protection of the brain, sight, smell, airway, hearing and taste, underpinning our very existence. The brain reaction to pain within the trigeminal system has a significant and larger reaction to the threat of, and actual, pain compared with other sensory nerves. We are physiologically wired to run when threatened with pain in the trigeminal region and it is a 'miracle' that patients volunteer to sit in a dental chair and undergo dental treatment. Clinical Relevance: This paper aims to provide the dental and medical teams with a review of the trigeminal anatomy of pain and the principles of pain assessment.

  15. Cerebro-afferent vessel and pupillary basal diameter variation induced by stomatognathic trigeminal proprioception: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cicco, Vincenzo

    2012-09-03

    A patient affected by asymmetric hemodynamics of cerebro-afferent vessels underwent duplex color scanner investigations in occlusal proprioceptive un- and rebalance conditions. Pupillometric video-oculographic examinations were performed in order to spot connected trigeminal proprioceptive motor patterns able to interfere on sympathetic autonomic activity. The aim of this case report is to verify if involuntary jaw closing during swallowing, executed in unbalance and rebalance myoelectric activity, would be able to modify cerebral hemodynamics. A 56-year-old Caucasian Italian woman affected by asymmetric blood flow of cerebro-afferent vessels underwent an electromyographic investigation of her occlusal muscles in order to assess their occlusal functional balance. The extreme asymmetry of myoelectric activity in dental occlusion evidenced by electromyographic values suggested the rebalancing of the functions of occlusal muscles through concurrent transcutaneous stimulation of the trigeminal nerve supra- and submandibular motor branches. The above-mentioned method allowed the detection of a symmetric craniomandibular muscular relation that can be kept constant through the use of a cusp bite modeled on the inferior dental arch: called orthotic-syntropic bite for its peculiar use of electrostimulation. A few days later, the patient underwent a duplex color scanner investigation and pupillometric video-oculographic examinations in occlusal unbalance and rebalance conditions. A comparative data analysis showed that an unbalanced dental occlusal function may represent an interferential pattern on cerebral hemodynamics velocity and pupillometric evaluations have proved useful both in the analysis of locus coeruleus functional modalities and as a diagnostic tool in the assessment of pathologies involving locus coeruleus and autonomic systems. The inclusion of myoelectric masseter examinations can be useful in patients with asymmetric hemodynamics of cerebro

  16. Early trigeminal nerve involvement in Listeria monocytogenes rhombencephalitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, William K; Harboe, Zitta Barrella; Roed, Casper

    2017-01-01

    dysfunction on that side. In addition, we identified another 120 cases of Listeria rhombencephalitis following a systematic review. Cranial nerves VII, V, IX, and X, respectively, medulla oblongata, cerebellum and pons, were the most frequently involved brain structures. The present clinical and radiological...... findings corroborate earlier data from animal experiments, indicating that L. monocytogenes may be capable of retrograde intra-axonal migration along the cranial nerves. We suggest that in a subset of patients with rhombencephalitis L. monocytogenes enters the cerebellopontine angle through the trigeminal......Listeria monocytogenes is associated with rhombencephalitis. However, the exact mechanisms of brainstem invasion remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate clinical and radiological data suggesting that Listeria may invade the brainstem via the trigeminal nerve. Three females (41, 64 and 70...

  17. Isolated intermittent vertigo: A presenting feature of persistent trigeminal artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajsrinivas Parthasarathy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic carotid – basilar anastomosis when persistent in adult life can present with a variety of neurological symptoms. We present a patient with isolated intermittent vertigo attributable to the embryonic anastomosis and describe the different types of persistent trigeminal artery. A 76-year-old Caucasian man presented with isolated intermittent vertigo and symptoms suggestive of anterior and posterior circulation strokes. Impaired vasomotor reactivity was demonstrated on insonation of the anterior and posterior cerebral arteries in this patient with a persistent left trigeminal artery and 75% stenosis of the left internal carotid artery (ICA. The symptom of intermittent vertigo resolved with carotid endarterectomy. Decreased flow across the stenotic segment of the ICA which subserved the posterior circulation resulted in basilar insufficiency. Hypoperfusion to the flocculonodular lobe supplied by the anterior inferior cerebellar artery is a likely cause for the intermittent vertigo.

  18. Intracranial Management of Perineural Spread in the Trigeminal Nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, Michael J; Panizza, Benedict J

    2016-04-01

    Since the mid-1960s surgeons have attempted to cure intracranial perineural spread (PNS) of cutaneous malignancies. Untreated patients with trigeminal PNS die from brainstem invasion and leptomeningeal disease. It was understood that resection with clear margins was potentially curative, but early surgical attempts were unsuccessful. The prevailing wisdom considered that this surgery failed to improve the results achieved with radiation therapy alone and was associated with high morbidity. However, with improved imaging, surgical equipment, and better understanding of cavernous sinus (CS) anatomy and access, contemporary surgeons can improve outcomes for this disease. The aim of this paper is to describe a technique to access the interdural compartment of the CS and treat PNS of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) in the intracranial trigeminal nerve and ganglion. It is based on the experience of the Queensland Skull Base Unit, Australia in managing PNS of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (cSCCHN).

  19. Electrophysiology of Cranial Nerve Testing: Trigeminal and Facial Nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzyka, Iryna M; Estephan, Bachir

    2018-01-01

    The clinical examination of the trigeminal and facial nerves provides significant diagnostic value, especially in the localization of lesions in disorders affecting the central and/or peripheral nervous system. The electrodiagnostic evaluation of these nerves and their pathways adds further accuracy and reliability to the diagnostic investigation and the localization process, especially when different testing methods are combined based on the clinical presentation and the electrophysiological findings. The diagnostic uniqueness of the trigeminal and facial nerves is their connectivity and their coparticipation in reflexes commonly used in clinical practice, namely the blink and corneal reflexes. The other reflexes used in the diagnostic process and lesion localization are very nerve specific and add more diagnostic yield to the workup of certain disorders of the nervous system. This article provides a review of commonly used electrodiagnostic studies and techniques in the evaluation and lesion localization of cranial nerves V and VII.

  20. Effect of beam channel plugging on the outcome of gamma knife radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massager, Nicolas; Nissim, Ouzi; Murata, Noriko; Devriendt, Daniel; Desmedt, Francoise; Vanderlinden, Bruno; Regis, Jean; Levivier, Marc

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: We studied the influence of using plugs for brainstem protection during gamma knife radiosurgery (GKR) of trigeminal neuralgia (TN), with special emphasis on irradiation doses delivered to the trigeminal nerve, pain outcomes, and incidence of trigeminal dysfunction. Methods and Materials: A GKR procedure for TN using an anterior cisternal target and a maximum dose of 90 Gy was performed in 109 patients. For 49 patients, customized beam channel blocking (plugs) were used to reduce the dose delivered to the brainstem. We measured the mean and integrated radiation doses delivered to the trigeminal nerve and the clinical course of patients treated with and without plugs. Results: We found that blocking increases the length of trigeminal nerve exposed to high-dose radiation, resulting in a significantly higher mean dose to the trigeminal nerve. Significantly more of the patients with blocking achieved excellent pain outcomes (84% vs. 62%), but with higher incidences of moderate and bothersome trigeminal nerve dysfunction (37% mild/10% bothersome with plugs vs. 30% mild/2% bothersome without). Conclusions: The use of plugs to protect the brainstem during GKR treatment for TN increases the dose of irradiation delivered to the intracisternal trigeminal nerve root and is associated with an important increase in the incidence of trigeminal nerve dysfunction. Therefore, beam channel blocking should be avoided for 90 Gy-GKR of TN

  1. Results of Percutaneous Balloon Compression in Trigeminal Pain Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grewal, Sanjeet S; Kerezoudis, Panagiotis; Garcia, Oscar; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Reimer, Ronald; Wharen, Robert E

    2018-06-01

    To investigate initial pain relief and subsequent recurrence after percutaneous balloon compression (PBC) and describe its association with the nature of trigeminal pain, previous procedures, or other clinical factors. A total of 222 patients with medically refractory trigeminal pain treated with PBC at Mayo Clinic Florida between 1998 and 2017 were enrolled into this study. Patients were divided into those with typical trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and those with atypical trigeminal pain. The postprocedural rate of pain recurrence and associations between patient characteristics and recurrence were studied. One hundred fifty-two patients had TN and 70 patients had atypical pain. At the last follow-up, 158 patients had excellent pain relief, 37 had good pain relief, 11 had fair pain relief, and 16 had poor pain relief. The median duration of follow-up was 31.1 months. Patients with atypical pain were less likely to have an excellent result compared with patients with typical pain (61.4% vs. 82.9%; P < 0.001). Recurrence was observed in 103 patients (46.4%) and was associated with previous procedures (hazard ratio, 1.658; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-2.49; P = 0.017). Other clinical factors were not significant. Our study demonstrates the safety and efficacy of PBC, with 88% of patients pain-free at last follow-up. Patients with atypical pain have worse outcomes, and patients with previous procedures have a higher risk of recurrence. Repeat surgery does not decrease efficacy. We recommend conservative parameter selection at the initial procedure. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Immediate pain relief by microvascular decompression for idiopathic trigeminal neuralagia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haq, N.U.; Ali, M.; Khan, H.M.; Ishaq, M.; Khattak, M.I.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Trigeminal neuralgia is a common entity which is managed by neurosurgeons in day to day practice. Up-till now many treatment options have been adopted for it but micro-vascular decompression is much impressive in terms of pain control and recurrence rate in all of them. The objective of study was known the efficacy of micro vascular decompression for idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia by using muscle patch in terms of immediate pain relief. Methods: This descriptive study was carried out in Neurosurgery Department lady reading hospital, Peshawar from January 2010 to December 2012. All patients who underwent micro vascular decompression for idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia were included in the study. Patients were assessed 72 hours after the surgery by borrow neurological institute pain scale (BNIP scale) for pain relief and findings were documented on predesigned proforma. Data was analysed by SPSS-17. Results: Total 52 patients were included in this study. Among these 32 (61.53 percentage) were female and 20 (38.46 percentage) were males having age from 22-76 years (mean 49 years). Right side was involved in 36 (69.23 percentage) and left side in 16 (30.76 percentage) patients. Duration of symptoms ranged from 6 months to 16 years (mean 8 years). History of dental extraction and peripheral neurectomy was present in 20 (38 percentage) and 3(5.76 percentage) patients while V3 was most commonly involved branch with 28(57.69 percentage) frequency and combined V2,V3 involvement was 1 (11.53 percentage). Superior cerebellar artery was most common offending vessel in 46(88.46 percentage) while arachnoid adhesions were in 2(3.84 percentage) patients. We assessed patient immediate postoperatively using BNIP pain scale. Conclusion: Micro-vascular decompression is most effective mode of treatment for trigeminal neuralgia in terms of immediate pain relief. (author)

  3. Trigeminal complications arising after surgery of cranial base meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerlund, Ulf; Linderoth, Bengt; Mathiesen, Tiit

    2012-04-01

    Chronic severe facial pain is a feared sequel of cranial base surgery. This study explores the symptomatology, incidence and impact on the individual of postoperative de novo trigeminal nerve affection as well as the recovery potential. Out of 231 patients operated for cranial base meningiomas at the Karolinska University Hospital during 7 years, 25 complained of de novo trigeminal symptoms at clinical follow-up 3 months after surgery. Six were later lost to follow-up leaving 19 participants in the study, which was conducted using a questionnaire and a structured telephone interview. All patients complained of facial numbness, affecting the V1 branch in 10/19 patients (53%), the V2 branch in 18/19 (95%) and the V3 branch in 9/19 (47%). Surprisingly, only three (16%) suffered from trigeminal pain, which could be adequately managed by pharmacotherapy. However, five patients (26%) demonstrated ocular dysaesthetic problems. Twelve (63%) described their handicap to be mild, while seven (37%) had daily or severe symptoms. Five patients (26%) reported no improvement over time, while nine (47%) showed improvement and four (21%) stated good recovery. Only one patient (5%) claimed complete symptom remission. In the present study, 11% of the patients presented with a de novo postoperative affection of the trigeminal nerve after removal of a cranial base meningioma; 37% of these reported daily/severe symptoms. Only 26% showed good recovery, observed in patients without tumour infiltration of the nerve or intraoperative nerve damage. In spite of frequent complaints of numbness, pain was uncommon (16%) and often manageable by pharmacotherapy, while ocular symptoms turned out to be more frequent and more disabling than expected.

  4. Cytoarchitectonic study of the trigeminal ganglion in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    KRASTEV, DIMO STOYANOV; APOSTOLOV, ALEXANDER

    2013-01-01

    The trigeminal ganglion (TG), a cluster of pseudounipolar neurons, is located in the trigeminal impression of the temporal pyramid. It is covered by a sheath of the dura mater and arachnoid and is near the rear end of the cavernous sinus. The peripheral processes of the pseudounipolar cells are involved in the formation of the first and second branch and the sensory part of the third branch of the fifth cranial nerve, and the central ones form the sensory root of the nerve, which penetrates at the level of the middle cerebellar peduncle, aside from the pons, and terminate in the sensory nuclei of the trigeminal complex. We found that the primary sensory neurons involved in sensory innervation of the orofacial complex are a diverse group. Although they possess the general structure of pseudounipolar neurons, there are significant differences among them, seen in varying intensities of staining. Based on our investigations we classified the neurons into 7 groups, i.e. large, subdivided into light and dark, medium, also light and dark, and small light and dark, and, moreover, neurons with an irregular shape of their perikarya. Further research by applying various immunohistochemical methods will clarify whether differences in the morphological patterns of the neurons are associated with differences in the neurochemical composition of various neuronal types. PMID:26527926

  5. A rare cause of hyperprolactinemia: persistent trigeminal artery with stalk-section effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekinci, G.; Baltacioglu, F.; Cimsit, C.; Akpinar, I.; Erzen, C.; Kilic, T.; Pamir, N.

    2001-01-01

    The primitive trigeminal, otic, hypoglossal, and proatlantal intersegmental arteries are fetal anastomoses between the carotid and vertebrobasilar systems. Persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) is the most frequent embryonic communication between the vertebrobasilar and carotid systems in adults. We report a case of PTA compressing the left side of the pituitary gland and stalk, in a patient with elevated blood prolactin level. (orig.)

  6. Trigeminal cardiac reflex and cerebral blood flow regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominga Lapi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The stimulation of some facial regions is known to trigger the trigemino-cardiac reflex: the main stimulus is represented by the contact of the face with water. This phenomenon called diving reflex induces a set of reactions in the cardiovascular and respiratory systems occurring in all mammals, especially marine (whales, seals. During the immersion of the face in the water, the main responses are aimed at reducing the oxygen consumption of the organism. Accordingly reduction in heart rate, peripheral vasoconstriction, blood pooling in certain organs, especially the heart and brain, and an increase in blood pressure have been reported. Moreover, the speed and intensity of the reflex is inversely proportional to the temperature of the water: more cold the water, more reactions as described are strong. In the case of deep diving an additional effect, such as blood deviation, has been reported: the blood is requested within the lungs, to compensate for the increase in the external pressure, preventing them from collapsing.The trigeminal-cardiac reflex is not just confined to the diving reflex; recently it has been shown that a brief proprioceptive stimulation (10 min by jaw extension in rats produces interesting effects both at systemic and cerebral level, reducing the arterial blood pressure and vasodilating the pial arterioles. The arteriolar dilation is associated with rhythmic diameter changes characterized by an increase in the endothelial activity. Fascinating the stimulation of trigeminal nerve is able to activated the nitric oxide release by vascular endothelial. Therefore the aim of this review was to highlight the effects due to trigeminal cardiac reflex induced by a simple mandibular extension, because produced opposite effects compared to those elicited by the diving reflex as it induces hypotension and modulation of cerebral arteriolar tone.

  7. Predictors of Trigeminal Neuropathy After Radiosurgery for Vestibular Schwannomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senova, Suhan [Unité de Radiochirurgie Gamma Knife, Region Ile De France, Paris (France); Service de Neurochirurgie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) La Pitié-Salpêtrière, Assistance Publique des Hôpitaux de Paris, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); Inserm, U955, Equipe 14, Université Paris Est, Faculté de médecine, Créteil (France); Aggad, Mourad [Unité de Radiochirurgie Gamma Knife, Region Ile De France, Paris (France); Service de Neurochirurgie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) La Pitié-Salpêtrière, Assistance Publique des Hôpitaux de Paris, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); Golmard, Jean-Louis [Service de Biostatistiques, CHU La Pitié-Salpêtrière, Assistance Publique des Hôpitaux de Paris, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); Hasboun, Dominique [Service de Neuroanatomie, CHU La Pitié-Salpêtrière, Assistance Publique des Hôpitaux de Paris, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); Lamproglou, Ioannis [Unité de Radiochirurgie Gamma Knife, Region Ile De France, Paris (France); and others

    2016-06-01

    Purpose: To analyze the relationship between dosimetric characteristics and symptoms related to trigeminal neuropathy (TN) observed after radiosurgery (RS) for vestibular schwannomas (VS); to propose guidelines to optimize planification in VS RS regarding TN preservation; and to detail the mechanism of TN impairment after VS RS. Methods and Materials: One hundred seventy-nine patients treated between 2011 and 2013 for VS RS and without trigeminal impairment before RS were included in a retrospective study. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine predictors of TN among characteristics of the patients, the dosimetry, and the VS. Results: There were 20 Koos grade 1, 99 grade 2, 57 grade 3, and 3 grade 4. Fourteen patients (7.8%) presented a transitory or permanent TN. Between the patients with and without TN after VS RS, there was no significant difference regarding dosimetry or VS volume itself. Significant differences (univariate analysis P<.05, Mann-Whitney test) were found for parameters related to the cisternal portion of the trigeminal nerve: total integrated dose, maximum dose, mean dose, volume of the Vth nerve (Vol{sub v}), and volume of the Vth nerve receiving at least 11 Gy (Vol{sub Vcist>11Gy}), but also for maximal dose to the Vth nerve nucleus and intra-axial portion (Dose max{sub Vax}). After multivariate analysis, the best model predicting TN included Vol{sub Vcist>11Gy} (P=.0045), Dose max{sub Vax} (P=.0006), and Vol{sub v} (P=.0058). The negative predictive value of this model was 97%. Conclusions: The parameters Vol{sub Vcist>11Gy}, Dose max{sub Vax}, and Vol{sub v} should be checked when designing dosimetry for VS RS.

  8. Treatment strategy for trigeminal neuralgia: a thirty years experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broggi, Giovanni; Ferroli, Paolo; Franzini, Angelo

    2008-05-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is an invalidating disease when become drug-resistant. The only possible treatment is surgery with different modalities, percutaneous, open surgery or radiosurgery. The thirty years experience at the Fondazione Istituto Neurologico C. Besta, Milano, Italy suggests that these surgical strategies are successful in pain control in short and long term period in more than 90% of cases, with a low rate of side effects and high improvement of quality of life. The type of surgery should be tailored on the particular patient considering age, general physical condition, neuroradiological assessment in which MRI with dedicated sequences are mandatory, and also patient's attitude.

  9. Neurogenic inflammation: a study of rat trigeminal ganglion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Kim Anker; Edvinsson, Lars

    2010-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is linked to neurogenic inflammation and to migraine. Activation of the trigeminovascular system plays a prominent role during migraine attacks with the release of CGRP. The trigeminal ganglion (TG) contains three main cell types: neurons, satellite glial...... cells (SGC) and Schwann cells; the first two have before been studied in vitro separately. Culture of rat TG provides a method to induce inflammation and the possibility to evaluate the different cell types in the TG simultaneously. We investigated expression levels of various inflammatory cytokines...

  10. Electrophysiological Features of Neurons in the Mesencephalic Trigeminal Nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Ling Xing

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus (Mes V neurons represent an uncommon class of primary sensory neurons. Besides receiving somatosensory information, Mes V neurons are also involved in regulating multisensory information. The present review first describes the passive features as well as three important currents, followed by a distinct excitability classification and a description of the excitability transition of Mes V neurons. Furthermore, their resonance property, the existence of membrane oscillation and electrical coupling which may promote strong synchronization, as well as their function in controlling stretch reflex activity, are discussed.

  11. Primary nerve-sheath tumours of the trigeminal nerve: clinical and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majoie, C.B.L.M.; Hulsmans, F.J.H.; Sie, L.H.; Castelijns, J.A.; Valk, J.; Walter, A.; Albrecht, K.W.

    1999-01-01

    We reviewed the clinical and MRI findings in primary nerve-sheath tumours of the trigeminal nerve. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records, imaging and histological specimens of 10 patients with 11 primary tumours of the trigeminal nerve. We assessed whether tumour site, size, morphology or signal characteristics were related to symptoms and signs or histological findings. Histological proof was available for 8 of 11 tumours: six schwannomas and two plexiform neurofibromas. The other three tumours were thought to be schwannomas, because they were present in patients with neurofibromatosis type 2 and followed the course of the trigeminal nerve. Uncommon MRI appearances were observed in three schwannomas and included a large intratumoral haemorrhage, a mainly low-signal appearance on T2-weighted images and a rim-enhancing, multicystic appearance. Only four of nine schwannomas caused trigeminal nerve symptoms, including two with large cystic components, one haemorrhagic and one solid tumor. Of the five schwannomas which did not cause any trigeminal nerve symptoms, two were large. Only one of the plexiform neurofibromas caused trigeminal nerve symptoms. Additional neurological symptoms and signs, not related to the trigeminal nerve, could be attributed to the location of the tumour in three patients. (orig.)

  12. Autonomic Nervous System Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your autonomic nervous system is the part of your nervous system that controls involuntary actions, such as the beating of your heart ... breathing and swallowing Erectile dysfunction in men Autonomic nervous system disorders can occur alone or as the result ...

  13. Trigeminal root entry zone involvement in neuromyelitis optica and multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Atsuhiko; Mori, Masahiro; Masuda, Hiroki; Uchida, Tomohiko; Muto, Mayumi; Uzawa, Akiyuki; Ito, Shoichi; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2015-08-15

    Trigeminal root entry zone abnormality on brain magnetic resonance imaging has been frequently reported in multiple sclerosis patients, but it has not been investigated in neuromyelitis optica patients. Brain magnetic resonance imaging of 128 consecutive multiple sclerosis patients and 46 neuromyelitis optica patients was evaluated. Trigeminal root entry zone abnormality was present in 11 (8.6%) of the multiple sclerosis patients and two (4.3%) of the neuromyelitis optica patients. The pontine trigeminal root entry zone may be involved in both multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Maresin 1 Inhibits TRPV1 in Temporomandibular Joint-Related Trigeminal Nociceptive Neurons and TMJ Inflammation-Induced Synaptic Plasticity in the Trigeminal Nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chul-Kyu Park

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the trigeminal system, disruption of acute resolution processing may lead to uncontrolled inflammation and chronic pain associated with the temporomandibular joint (TMJ. Currently, there are no effective treatments for TMJ pain. Recently, it has been recognized that maresin 1, a newly identified macrophage-derived mediator of inflammation resolution, is a potent analgesic for somatic inflammatory pain without noticeable side effects in mice and a potent endogenous inhibitor of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1 in the somatic system. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the analgesic actions of maresin 1 on TMJ pain are unclear in the trigeminal system. Here, by performing TMJ injection of a retrograde labeling tracer DiI (a fluorescent dye, I showed that maresin 1 potently inhibits capsaicin-induced TRPV1 currents and neuronal activity via Gαi-coupled G-protein coupled receptors in DiI-labeled trigeminal nociceptive neurons. Further, maresin 1 blocked TRPV1 agonist-evoked increases in spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current frequency and abolished TMJ inflammation-induced synaptic plasticity in the trigeminal nucleus. These results demonstrate the potent actions of maresin 1 in regulating TRPV1 in the trigeminal system. Thus, maresin 1 may serve as a novel endogenous inhibitor for treating TMJ-inflammatory pain in the orofacial region.

  15. Vagus nerve stimulation inhibits trigeminal nociception in a rodent model of episodic migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan L. Hawkins

    2017-12-01

    Conclusion:. Our findings demonstrate that nVNS inhibits mechanical nociception and represses expression of proteins associated with peripheral and central sensitization of trigeminal neurons in a novel rodent model of episodic migraine.

  16. Trigeminal nociception-induced, cerebral Fos expression in the conscious rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ter Horst, GJ; Meijler, WJ; Korf, J; Kemper, RHA

    2001-01-01

    Little is known about trigeminal nociception-induced cerebral activity and involvement of cerebral structures in pathogenesis of trigeminovascular headaches such as migraine. Neuroimaging has demonstrated cortical, hypothalamic and brainstem activation during the attack and after abolition with

  17. Immunogold localization of serotonin within synaptic terminals in the rat mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liem, RSB; Copray, JCVM

    1996-01-01

    With the use of postembedding electron-microscopic immunogold cytochemistry, the vesicular distribution of serotonin within serotonergic synaptic terminals in the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus was determined in order to obtain further insight into the mechanisms and function, significance of

  18. Percutaneous micro-balloon compression for treatment of high risk idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Jianjun; Ma Yi; Wang Bin; Li Yanfeng; Huang Haitao; Li Fuyong

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical effectiveness and complications of percutaneous micro- balloon compression (PMC) of trigeminal ganglion for high risk idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia. Methods: To analyze retrospectively the clinical data of 3053 cases of idiopathic trigeminal nemalgia, of which 804 cases were in high risk, who underwent PMC from Jan. 2001 to Dec. 2007 in our department. Results: 833 procedures were performed on these 804 patients. The immediate effective rate was 97.3%; with recurrence rate of 6.8%, ipsilateral paresthesia incidence 3.7%; and no keratohelcosis with approximately 2/3 masticator, muscles weakness and diplopia 0.2%. Mean follow-up time was 36 months. Conclusions: PMC procedure is very effective for idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia especially in high risk patients, and especially prefer for the pain involved the first branch neuralgia. (authors)

  19. MRI and MR angiography of persistent trigeminal artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piotin, M.; Miralbes, S.; Cattin, F.; Marchal, H.; Amor-Sahli, M.; Moulin, T.; Bonneville, J.F.

    1996-01-01

    We describe the MRA and MR angiography (MRA) features of persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) found incidentally in eight patients, with special attention to its origin, site and course. The different patterns of posterior communicating arteries were also noted. The PTA were shown on sagittal, coronal and axial MRI and on MRA. In four cases, the PTA arose from the lateral aspect of the intracavernous internal carotid artery, ran caudally, passing round the bottom of the dorsum sellae to join the basilar artery. In the other four cases, it arose from the medial aspect, ran caudally through the sella turcica and pierced the dorsum sellae to join the basilar artery. The posterior communicating arteries were present unilaterally in five cases and bilaterally in one, and absent bilaterally in two. Identification of a PTA with a trans-sellar course is crucial if a trans-sphenoidal surgery is planned. (orig.). With 3 figs

  20. Ophthalmic branch radiofrequency thermocoagulation for atypical trigeminal neuralgia:a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Shibin; Ma, Xiaoliang; Li, Xiaoqin; Yuan, Hongjie

    2015-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is an intense neuralgia involving facial areas supplied by trigeminal nerve. The pain is characterized by sudden onset, short persistence, sharp or lancinating. Trigeminal neuralgia commonly affects frontal areas, infraorbital or paranasal areas, mandibular areas and teeth. While Trigeminal neuralgia affecting merely the upper eyelid is rare. Here we report a case of atypical Trigeminal neuralgia confined to the upper eyelid. The patient was pain free during the follow-up period of 6 months after unusual ophthalmic branch radiofrequency thermocoagulation. A 55-year-old female patient was diagnosed as primary trigeminal neuralgia involving the right upper eyelid. As the pain could not be controlled by drug therapy, peripheral nerve branch radiofrequency thermocoagulation was recommended. A combination of infratrochlear, supratrochlear and lacrimal radiofrequency thermocoagulation was implemented in this case. The point where the bridge of the nose abuts the supraorbital ridge and the point slightly above the lateral canthus along outer border of the orbit were selected respectively as the puncture sites. After positive diagnostic test, radiofrequency thermocoagulation of the above-mentioned nerve branches was performed respectively. The patient was pain free immediately after the treatment and during the follow-up period of 6 months. Trigeminal neuralgia is a common severe and chronic facial neuralgia which requires accurate diagnosis and effective therapy. With typical clinical symptoms, normal neurological signs, normal CT and MRI findings, the patient was diagnosed as classic trigeminal neuralgia. As the patient was drug resistant, some invasive treatments were considered. Peripheral branch neurolysis was chosen for its minimal invasiveness, convenience, low risk and not affecting further invasive treatments. According to the anatomic data and the diagnostic test results, infratrochlear, supratrochlear and lacrimal nerve were responsible

  1. Advances in diagnosis and treatment of trigeminal neuralgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montano, Nicola; Conforti, Giulio; Di Bonaventura, Rina; Meglio, Mario; Fernandez, Eduardo; Papacci, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Various drugs and surgical procedures have been utilized for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia (TN). Despite numerous available approaches, the results are not completely satisfying. The need for more contemporaneous drugs to control the pain attacks is a common experience. Moreover, a number of patients become drug resistant, needing a surgical procedure to treat the neuralgia. Nonetheless, pain recurrence after one or more surgical operations is also frequently seen. These facts reflect the lack of the precise understanding of the TN pathogenesis. Classically, it has been related to a neurovascular compression at the trigeminal nerve root entry-zone in the prepontine cistern. However, it has been evidenced that in the pain onset and recurrence, various neurophysiological mechanisms other than the neurovascular conflict are involved. Recently, the introduction of new magnetic resonance techniques, such as voxel-based morphometry, diffusion tensor imaging, three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography, and fluid attenuated inversion recovery sequences, has provided new insight about the TN pathogenesis. Some of these new sequences have also been used to better preoperatively evidence the neurovascular conflict in the surgical planning of microvascular decompression. Moreover, the endoscopy (during microvascular decompression) and the intraoperative computed tomography with integrated neuronavigation (during percutaneous procedures) have been recently introduced in the challenging cases. In the last few years, efforts have been made in order to better define the optimal target when performing the gamma knife radiosurgery. Moreover, some authors have also evidenced that neurostimulation might represent an opportunity in TN refractory to other surgical treatments. The aim of this work was to review the recent literature about the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and medical and surgical treatments, and discuss the significant advances in all these fields

  2. Visualization of isolated trigeminal nerve invasion by lymphoma using gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manon-Espaillat, R.; Lanska, D.J.; Ruff, R.L.; Cleveland Veteran's Administration Medical Center, OH; Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH; Masaryk, T.; University Hospitals of Cleveland, OH; Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH

    1990-01-01

    A 50-year-old man with active histiocytic lymphoma for 12 years developed an isolated right trigeminal neuropathy. Initial evaluation with head computed tomography, X-rays of the skull base, bone scan, and cerebrospinal fluid analysis including cytology were normal. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed enlargement of the proximal third of the right trigeminal nerve. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI can be useful for the early demonstration of cranial nerve invasion by lymphoma. (orig.)

  3. Transient receptor potential channels encode volatile chemicals sensed by rat trigeminal ganglion neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Lübbert

    Full Text Available Primary sensory afferents of the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia constantly transmit sensory information depicting the individual's physical and chemical environment to higher brain regions. Beyond the typical trigeminal stimuli (e.g. irritants, environmental stimuli comprise a plethora of volatile chemicals with olfactory components (odorants. In spite of a complete loss of their sense of smell, anosmic patients may retain the ability to roughly discriminate between different volatile compounds. While the detailed mechanisms remain elusive, sensory structures belonging to the trigeminal system seem to be responsible for this phenomenon. In order to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying the activation of the trigeminal system by volatile chemicals, we investigated odorant-induced membrane potential changes in cultured rat trigeminal neurons induced by the odorants vanillin, heliotropyl acetone, helional, and geraniol. We observed the dose-dependent depolarization of trigeminal neurons upon application of these substances occurring in a stimulus-specific manner and could show that distinct neuronal populations respond to different odorants. Using specific antagonists, we found evidence that TRPA1, TRPM8, and/or TRPV1 contribute to the activation. In order to further test this hypothesis, we used recombinantly expressed rat and human variants of these channels to investigate whether they are indeed activated by the odorants tested. We additionally found that the odorants dose-dependently inhibit two-pore potassium channels TASK1 and TASK3 heterologously expressed In Xenopus laevis oocytes. We suggest that the capability of various odorants to activate different TRP channels and to inhibit potassium channels causes neuronal depolarization and activation of distinct subpopulations of trigeminal sensory neurons, forming the basis for a specific representation of volatile chemicals in the trigeminal ganglia.

  4. NEURO-VASCULAR CONFLICT AS CAUSATIVE FACTOR IN IDI-OPATHIC TRIGEMINAL NEURALGIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mumtaz Ali

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Trigeminal neuralgia is one of the most unbearable pain syndromes in one or more branches of trigeminal nerve. The basic pathology is still poorly understood 1. Two divergent view points, central versus peripheral have been presented to explain the possible mechanism 2. In spite of numerous favorable reports, the neurovascular conflict theory remains contra-vertical 3. Nevertheless, whether or not, neurovascular compression is accessory or predominant in the mechanism of trigeminal neuralgia is not yet determined. Although neurovascular compression and global atrophy of the root, a focal arachnoid thickening and angulated root on crossing over the petrous ridge have been observed. Yet, neurovascular conflict has made responsible as the main cause of this neuralgia 4. This lead to focal demylination of the nerve due to its pulsatile compression. Demylination result in short circuiting of neuronal flow and hence trigeminal neuralgia 5.      Present study was therefore designed as to appreciate neurovascular conflict as causative agent in idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia. Material and Methods This prospective observational study was conducted in department of Neurosurgery Government Lady Reading Hospital Peshawar where microvascular decompression is performed as a primary procedure of choice for patients with trigeminal neuralgia. The duration of this study was from May 2003 – to June 2007. Total number of patients operated was 86. Drug resistant cases of trigeminal neuralgia that were   willing for operation was selected and proper clinical record was documented. MRI was done in all patients to exclude secondary causes of trigeminal Neuralgia. Under general Anesthesia in lateral position, small 2.5x2.5cm retro-mastoid craniotomy was performed. All these cases were operated by one surgeon with a team of associate’s doctors. Microscopic per-operative anatomical findings were recorded. Any possible per-operative complications

  5. Nasal solitary chemoreceptor cell responses to bitter and trigeminal stimulants in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Gulbransen, Brian D; Clapp, Tod R; Kinnamon, Sue C; Finger, Thomas E

    2008-01-01

    Nasal trigeminal chemosensitivity in mice and rats is mediated in part by epithelial solitary chemoreceptor (chemosensory) cells (SCCs), but the exact role of these cells in chemoreception is unclear (Finger et al. 2003). Histological evidence suggests that SCCs express elements of the bitter taste transduction pathway including T2R (bitter taste) receptors, the G protein α-gustducin, PLCβ2, and TRPM5, leading to speculation that SCCs are the receptor cells that mediate trigeminal nerve respo...

  6. Aberrant TRPV1 expression in heat hyperalgesia associated with trigeminal neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urano, Hiroko; Ara, Toshiaki; Fujinami, Yoshiaki; Hiraoka, B Yukihiro

    2012-01-01

    Trigeminal neuropathic pain is a facial pain syndrome associated with trigeminal nerve injury. However, the mechanism of trigeminal neuropathic pain is poorly understood. This study aimed to determine the role of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in heat hyperalgesia in a trigeminal neuropathic pain model. We evaluated nociceptive responses to mechanical and heat stimuli using a partial infraorbital nerve ligation (pIONL) model. Withdrawal responses to mechanical and heat stimuli to vibrissal pads (VP) were assessed using von Frey filaments and a thermal stimulator equipped with a heat probe, respectively. Changes in withdrawal responses were measured after subcutaneous injection of the TRP channel antagonist capsazepine. In addition, the expression of TRPV1 in the trigeminal ganglia was examined. Mechanical allodynia and heat hyperalgesia were observed in VP by pIONL. Capsazepine suppressed heat hyperalgesia but not mechanical allodynia. The number of TRPV1-positive neurons in the trigeminal ganglia was significantly increased in the large-diameter-cell group. These results suggest that TRPV1 plays an important role in the heat hyperalgesia observed in the pIONL model.

  7. [Influence of trigeminal nerve lesion on facial growth: study of two cases of Goldenhar syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darris, Pierre; Treil, Jacques; Marchal-Sixou, Christine; Baron, Pascal

    2015-06-01

    This cases report confirms the hypothesis that embryonic and maxillofacial growth are influenced by the peripheral nervous system, including the trigeminal nerve (V). So, it's interesting to use the stigma of the trigeminal nerve as landmarks to analyze the maxillofacial volume and understand its growth. The aim of this study is to evaluate the validity of the three-dimensional cephalometric analysis of Treil based on trigeminal landmarks. The first case is a caucasian female child with Goldenhar syndrome. The second case is a caucasian male adult affected by the same syndrome. In both cases, brain MRI showed an unilateral trigeminal nerve lesion, ipsilateral to the facial dysmorphia. The results of this radiological study tend to prove the primary role of the trigeminal nerve in craniofacial growth. These cases demonstrate the validity of the theory of Moss. They are one of anatomo-functional justifications of the three-dimensional cephalometric biometry of Treil based on trigeminal nerve landmarks. © EDP Sciences, SFODF, 2015.

  8. Testing for autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J

    1984-01-01

    Autonomic neuropathy is a common complication in long-term diabetes, about 30% of the patients showing measurable signs of autonomic dysfunction after 10 years duration of disease. The diagnosis is often difficult to establish because clinical symptoms generally occur late in the course of the di......Autonomic neuropathy is a common complication in long-term diabetes, about 30% of the patients showing measurable signs of autonomic dysfunction after 10 years duration of disease. The diagnosis is often difficult to establish because clinical symptoms generally occur late in the course...

  9. Cholinergic Nociceptive Mechanisms in Rat Meninges and Trigeminal Ganglia: Potential Implications for Migraine Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelukhina, Irina; Mikhailov, Nikita; Abushik, Polina; Nurullin, Leniz; Nikolsky, Evgeny E; Giniatullin, Rashid

    2017-01-01

    Parasympathetic innervation of meninges and ability of carbachol, acetylcholine (ACh) receptor (AChR) agonist, to induce headaches suggests contribution of cholinergic mechanisms to primary headaches. However, neurochemical mechanisms of cholinergic regulation of peripheral nociception in meninges, origin place for headache, are almost unknown. Using electrophysiology, calcium imaging, immunohistochemistry, and staining of meningeal mast cells, we studied effects of cholinergic agents on peripheral nociception in rat hemiskulls and isolated trigeminal neurons. Both ACh and carbachol significantly increased nociceptive firing in peripheral terminals of meningeal trigeminal nerves recorded by local suction electrode. Strong nociceptive firing was also induced by nicotine, implying essential role of nicotinic AChRs in control of excitability of trigeminal nerve endings. Nociceptive firing induced by carbachol was reduced by muscarinic antagonist atropine, whereas the action of nicotine was prevented by the nicotinic blocker d-tubocurarine but was insensitive to the TRPA1 antagonist HC-300033. Carbachol but not nicotine induced massive degranulation of meningeal mast cells known to release multiple pro-nociceptive mediators. Enzymes terminating ACh action, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase, were revealed in perivascular meningeal nerves. The inhibitor of AChE neostigmine did not change the firing per se but induced nociceptive activity, sensitive to d-tubocurarine, after pretreatment of meninges with the migraine mediator CGRP. This observation suggested the pro-nociceptive action of endogenous ACh in meninges. Both nicotine and carbachol induced intracellular Ca 2+ transients in trigeminal neurons partially overlapping with expression of capsaicin-sensitive TRPV1 receptors. Trigeminal nerve terminals in meninges, as well as dural mast cells and trigeminal ganglion neurons express a repertoire of pro-nociceptive nicotinic and muscarinic AChRs, which

  10. Advances in diagnosis and treatment of trigeminal neuralgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montano N

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Nicola Montano,1 Giulio Conforti,1 Rina Di Bonaventura,1 Mario Meglio,2 Eduardo Fernandez,1 Fabio Papacci1 1Institute of Neurosurgery, Catholic University, Rome, 2Institute of Neurosurgery, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Integrata, Verona, Italy Abstract: Various drugs and surgical procedures have been utilized for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia (TN. Despite numerous available approaches, the results are not completely satisfying. The need for more contemporaneous drugs to control the pain attacks is a common experience. Moreover, a number of patients become drug resistant, needing a surgical procedure to treat the neuralgia. Nonetheless, pain recurrence after one or more surgical operations is also frequently seen. These facts reflect the lack of the precise understanding of the TN pathogenesis. Classically, it has been related to a neurovascular compression at the trigeminal nerve root entry-zone in the prepontine cistern. However, it has been evidenced that in the pain onset and recurrence, various neurophysiological mechanisms other than the neurovascular conflict are involved. Recently, the introduction of new magnetic resonance techniques, such as voxel-based morphometry, diffusion tensor imaging, three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography, and fluid attenuated inversion recovery sequences, has provided new insight about the TN pathogenesis. Some of these new sequences have also been used to better preoperatively evidence the neurovascular conflict in the surgical planning of microvascular decompression. Moreover, the endoscopy (during microvascular decompression and the intraoperative computed tomography with integrated neuronavigation (during percutaneous procedures have been recently introduced in the challenging cases. In the last few years, efforts have been made in order to better define the optimal target when performing the gamma knife radiosurgery. Moreover, some authors have also evidenced that

  11. Peripheral axotomy of the rat mandibular trigeminal nerve leads to an increase in VIP and decrease of other primary afferent neuropeptides in the spinal trigeminal nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, M E; Shehab, S A

    1986-12-01

    In the vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP)-rich lumbosacral spinal cord, VIP increases at the expense of other neuropeptides after primary sensory nerve axotomy. This study was undertaken to ascertain whether similar changes occur in peripherally axotomised cranial sensory nerves. VIP immunoreactivity increased in the terminal region of the mandibular nerve in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis following unilateral section of the sensory root of the mandibular trigeminal nerve at the foramen orale. Other primary afferent neuropeptides (substance P, cholecystokinin and somatostatin) were depleted and fluoride-resistant acid phosphatase activity was abolished in the same circumscribed areas of the nucleus caudalis. The rise in VIP and depletion of other markers began 4 days postoperatively and was maximal by 10 days, these levels remaining unchanged up to 1 year postoperatively. VIP-immunoreactive cell bodies were absent from trigeminal ganglia from the unoperated side but small and medium cells stained intensely in the ganglia of the operated side after axotomy. These observations indicate that increase of VIP in sensory nerve terminals is a general phenomenon occurring in both cranial and spinal sensory terminal areas. The intense VIP immunoreactivity in axotomised trigeminal ganglia suggests that the increased levels of VIP in the nucleus caudalis are of peripheral origin, indicating a change in expression of neuropeptides within primary afferent neurons following peripheral axotomy.

  12. Semi-Autonomous Systems Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — VisionThe Semi-Autonomous Systems Lab focuses on developing a comprehensive framework for semi-autonomous coordination of networked robotic systems. Semi-autonomous...

  13. The Molecular Fingerprint of Dorsal Root and Trigeminal Ganglion Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas M. Lopes

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The dorsal root ganglia (DRG and trigeminal ganglia (TG are clusters of cell bodies of highly specialized sensory neurons which are responsible for relaying information about our environment to the central nervous system. Despite previous efforts to characterize sensory neurons at the molecular level, it is still unknown whether those present in DRG and TG have distinct expression profiles and therefore a unique molecular fingerprint. To address this question, we isolated lumbar DRG and TG neurons using fluorescence-activated cell sorting from Advillin-GFP transgenic mice and performed RNA sequencing. Our transcriptome analyses showed that, despite being overwhelmingly similar, a number of genes are differentially expressed in DRG and TG neurons. Importantly, we identified 24 genes which were uniquely expressed in either ganglia, including an arginine vasopressin receptor and several homeobox genes, giving each population a distinct molecular fingerprint. We compared our findings with published studies to reveal that many genes previously reported to be present in neurons are in fact likely to originate from other cell types in the ganglia. Additionally, our neuron-specific results aligned well with a dataset examining whole human TG and DRG. We propose that the data can both improve our understanding of primary afferent biology and help contribute to the development of drug treatments and gene therapies which seek targets with unique or restricted expression patterns.

  14. Genetic autonomic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelrod, Felicia B

    2013-03-01

    Genetic disorders affecting the autonomic nervous system can result in abnormal development of the nervous system or they can be caused by neurotransmitter imbalance, an ion-channel disturbance or by storage of deleterious material. The symptoms indicating autonomic dysfunction, however, will depend upon whether the genetic lesion has disrupted peripheral or central autonomic centers or both. Because the autonomic nervous system is pervasive and affects every organ system in the body, autonomic dysfunction will result in impaired homeostasis and symptoms will vary. The possibility of genetic confirmation by molecular testing for specific diagnosis is increasing but treatments tend to remain only supportive and directed toward particular symptoms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Advanced MRI manifestations of trigeminal ganglioneuroma: a case report and literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Xiaojuan; Fang, Jingqin; Luo, Qingya; Tong, Haipeng; Zhang, Weiguo

    2016-01-01

    Ganglioneuroma is a rare benign tumor originating from the sympathetic nerves, and its origination from the trigeminal nerves is even rarer. Only 4 cases of ganglioneuroma originating from the trigeminal nerve have previously been reported, and these studies only reported conventional MRI manifestations. To our knowledge, the advanced MRI features of trigeminal ganglioneuroma have not been reported thus far. This study reports a case of trigeminal ganglioneuroma in the left cerebellopontine angle. Advanced MRI showed the following tumor characteristics: significantly increased perfusion on perfusion imaging; isointense on diffusion-weighted imaging, whorled appearance within the tumor and no significant signs of damage to the white matter fiber tracts in the fractional anisotropy color map, and compare to the adjacent brain tissue, Choline didn’t show markedly elevation, and N-acetylaspartate peak showed slightly reduction on magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The tumor was completely resected, and the diagnosis of ganglioneuroma was confirmed by postoperative pathological examination. This case demonstrates the conventional as well as advanced MRI manifestations of this rare extra-axial tumor, which have never been previously reported. In addition, we reviewed the literature to demonstrate the advanced MRI features of trigeminal ganglioneuroma, in order to aid preoperative diagnosis and differentiation

  16. Phenytoin and carbamazepine in trigeminal neuralgia: marketing-based versus evidence-based treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keppel Hesselink JM

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Jan M Keppel Hesselink,1 Michael E Schatman2,31Institute for Neuropathic Pain, Bosch en Duin, the Netherlands; 2Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA; 3Boston Pain Care, Waltham, MA, USAIntroductionMost review articles support carbamazepine as a first-line pharmacotherapy for idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia.1–3 However, the empirical support for this recommendation is somewhat suspect. Phenytoin, as the prototype for all anticonvulsants, was already positioned as an analgesic compound 70 years ago. Since these initial findings, the data that have been gathered have supported the use of anticonvulsants as painkillers – from phenytoin up to and including more recent anticonvulsants such as gabapentin and pregabalin. Since 1942, a number of papers supported phenytoin’s therapeutic effects in trigeminal neuralgia (Table 1. The introduction of carbamazepine in 1962 by Geigy shifted the interest of neurologists from phenytoin as a treatment for trigeminal neuralgia to carbamazepine, without sound scientific evidence. To date, no convincing randomized controlled trials (RCTs have been published supporting the role of carbamazepine in trigeminal neuralgia, and we could not identify a single study comparing the effects of phenytoin with those of carbamazepine. Accordingly, phenytoin should probably be considered more often as a viable therapy for (treatmentresistant trigeminal neuralgia.

  17. Orofacial neuropathic pain mouse model induced by Trigeminal Inflammatory Compression (TIC of the infraorbital nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Fei

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trigeminal neuropathic pain attacks can be excruciating for patients, even after being lightly touched. Although there are rodent trigeminal nerve research models to study orofacial pain, few models have been applied to studies in mice. A mouse trigeminal inflammatory compression (TIC model is introduced here which successfully and reliably promotes vibrissal whisker pad hypersensitivity. Results The chronic orofacial neuropathic pain model is induced after surgical placement of chromic gut suture in the infraorbital nerve fissure in the maxillary bone. Slight compression and chemical effects of the chromic gut suture on the portion of the infraorbital nerve contacted cause mild nerve trauma. Nerve edema is observed in the contacting infraorbital nerve bundle as well as macrophage infiltration in the trigeminal ganglia. Centrally in the spinal trigeminal nucleus, increased immunoreactivity for an activated microglial marker is evident (OX42, postoperative day 70. Mechanical thresholds of the affected whisker pad are significantly decreased on day 3 after chromic gut suture placement, persisting at least 10 weeks. The mechanical allodynia is reversed by suppression of microglial activation. Cold allodynia was detected at 4 weeks. Conclusions A simple, effective, and reproducible chronic mouse model mimicking clinical orofacial neuropathic pain (Type 2 is induced by placing chromic gut suture between the infraorbital nerve and the maxillary bone. The method produces mild inflammatory compression with significant continuous mechanical allodynia persisting at least 10 weeks and cold allodynia measureable at 4 weeks.

  18. Increased Asics Expression via the Camkii-CREB Pathway in a Novel Mouse Model of Trigeminal Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Migraine is a disabling condition that severely impacts socioeconomic function and quality of life. The focus of this study was to develop a mouse model of trigeminal pain that mimics migraine. Methods: After undergoing dural cannulation surgery, mice were treated with repeated dural doses of an acidic solution to induce trigeminal pain. Results: The method elicited intermittent, head-directed wiping and scratching as well as the expression of both the c-FOS gene in the spinal trigeminal nucleus caudalis and calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP in the periaqueductal grey matter. Interestingly, the acid-induced trigeminal pain behaviour was inhibited by amiloride, an antagonist of acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs, but not by AMG-9810, an inhibitor of transient receptor potential cation channel V1(TRPV1. In addition, the relative mRNA and protein expression levels of ASIC1a and ASIC3 were increased in the acid-induced trigeminal nociceptive pathways. Furthermore, blocking CaMKII with KN-93 significantly reduced the acid-induced trigeminal pain behaviour and c-FOS gene expression. Conclusion: The data suggested that chronic intermittent administration of an acidic solution to mice resulted in trigeminal hypersensitivity and that dural acid-induced trigeminal pain behaviour in mice may mechanistically mimic migraine. The observations here identify an entirely novel treatment strategy for migraine.

  19. Percutaneous high-frequency selective rhizotomy in the trigeminal neuralgia therapy in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Tyurnikov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Trigeminal neuralgia is a rare symptom of multiple sclerosis affecting the disability. Multiple sclerosis related trigeminal neuralgia has been attributed to a demyelinating lesion in the pons. When the adequate pain drug-relieve therapy is not possible or when the patient becomes refractory to the treatment or can not continue pharmacological treatment because of the side effects, surgical intervention, including percutaneous radiofrequency rhizotomy is being discussed. Literature review and the data upon the efficiency and safety of this neurosurgical treatment in 16 patients with multiple sclerosis have been analyzed. Percutaneous radiofrequency rhizotomy has been proved to be a safe, reproducible and effective method of the symptomatic surgical treatment of trigeminal neuralgia in patients with multiple sclerosis in cases of the intolerance/inefficiency of the pharmacological therapy.

  20. Oxcarbazepine: Drug of the future in the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Revant H Chole

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of the study was to estimate the efficacy of oxcarbazepine in trigeminal neuralgia. Oxcarbazepine is a novel antiepilepfic drug, and its effect on trigeminal neuralgia has not been studied extensively previously. Materials and methods: Fifty-three patients with trigeminal neuralgia (34 men and 19 women took a mean dose of 600 mg of oxcarbazepine for a period of three weeks. Pain intensity was measured by using visual analog scale. Results: Of the 53 patients, 42 (79% were completely or well controlled by OXC, and nine (17% partially but acceptably controlled. Treatment with OXC was therefore satisfactory initially in 51 (96% of the patients. In seven of these patients, mild transient side effects occurred but did not necessitate cessation of treatment Conclusion: OXC appears to be an effective substitute for carbamazepine in those patients intolerant of this agent, or experiencing significant side effects.

  1. Lipopolysaccharide-induced Pulpitis Up-regulates TRPV1 in Trigeminal Ganglia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, M.-K.; Lee, J.; Duraes, G.; Ro, J.Y.

    2011-01-01

    Tooth pain often accompanies pulpitis. Accumulation of lipopolysaccharides (LPS), a product of Gram-negative bacteria, is associated with painful clinical symptoms. However, the mechanisms underlying LPS-induced tooth pain are not clearly understood. TRPV1 is a capsaicin- and heat-gated nociceptive ion channel implicated in thermosensation and hyperalgesia under inflammation or injury. Although TRPV1 is expressed in pulpal afferents, it is not known whether the application of LPS to teeth modulates TRPV1 in trigeminal nociceptors. By assessing the levels of protein and transcript of TRPV1 in mouse trigeminal ganglia, we demonstrate that dentinal application of LPS increases the expression of TRPV1. Our results suggest that the up-regulation of TRPV1 in trigeminal nociceptors following bacterial infection could contribute to hyperalgesia under pulpitis conditions. PMID:21712529

  2. Ultrasound-Guided Intervention for Treatment of Trigeminal Neuralgia: An Updated Review of Anatomy and Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdallah El-Sayed Allam

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Orofacial myofascial pain is prevalent and most often results from entrapment of branches of the trigeminal nerves. It is challenging to inject branches of the trigeminal nerve, a large portion of which are shielded by the facial bones. Bony landmarks of the cranium serve as important guides for palpation-guided injections and can be delineated using ultrasound. Ultrasound also provides real-time images of the adjacent muscles and accompanying arteries and can be used to guide the needle to the target region. Most importantly, ultrasound guidance significantly reduces the risk of collateral injury to vital neurovascular structures. In this review, we aimed to summarize the regional anatomy and ultrasound-guided injection techniques for the trigeminal nerve and its branches, including the supraorbital, infraorbital, mental, auriculotemporal, maxillary, and mandibular nerves.

  3. Pseudocapsule formation after gamma knife radiosurgery for trigeminal neurinoma. Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyama, Takenori; Ikeda, Eiji; Kawase, Takeshi; Yoshida, Kazunari

    2005-01-01

    A 38-year-old female presented with a trigeminal neurinoma manifesting as left facial paresthesia. The diagnosis was based on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings. Gamma knife radiosurgery (GKR) was performed at another hospital at her request. Fifteen months after the GKR, follow-up MR imaging revealed tumor regrowth causing extensive compression of the brainstem, and cyst formation in the tumor. Her clinical symptoms including facial pain and diplopia had worsened, so she was referred to our affiliated hospital for microsurgery. The tumor was totally resected, but the left trigeminal nerve had to be sacrificed because of pseudocapsule formation which covered both the tumor and the trigeminal nerve fibers. The diplopia disappeared, but her facial pain deteriorated after the operation. GKR can induce fibrosis or degenerative change in nearby structures, which may complicate subsequent surgery. (author)

  4. Trigeminal nerve involvement in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia: value of MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karadag, Demet; Karaguelle, Ayse Tuba; Erden, Ilhan; Erden, Ayse E-mail: erden@ada.net.tr

    2002-10-01

    A 30-year-old male with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia presented with facial numbness. Neurological examination revealed paresthesia of the left trigeminal nerve. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cytology showed no atypical cells. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging demonstrated enlargement and enhancement of intracranial portions of the left trigeminal nerve. The abnormal MR imaging findings almost completely resolved after the chemotherapy. Gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging is not only a useful procedure for the early diagnosis of cranial nerve invasion by leukemia but it might be helpful to follow the changes after the treatment.

  5. Trigeminal neuralgia: successful antiepileptic drug combination therapy in three refractory cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prisco L

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Lara Prisco1, Mario Ganau2, Federica Bigotto1, Francesca Zornada11Department of Anaesthesiology, Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine, University Hospital of Cattinara, 2Graduate School of Nanotechnology, University of Trieste, ItalyAbstract: Antiepileptic drug combination therapy remains an empirical second-line treatment approach in trigeminal neuralgia, after treatment with one antiepileptic drug or other nonantiepileptic drugs have failed. The results in three patients followed in our clinic are not sufficient to draw definitive conclusions, but suggest the possibility of developing this type of therapeutic approach further.Keywords: trigeminal neuralgia, antiepileptic drugs, combination therapy

  6. Autonomous Propellant Loading Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The AES Autonomous Propellant Loading (APL) project consists of three activities. The first is to develop software that will automatically control loading of...

  7. Autonomous Systems and Operations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The AES Autonomous Systems and Operations (ASO) project will develop an understanding of the impacts of increasing communication time delays on mission operations,...

  8. Autonomous Star Tracker Algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Betto, Maurizio; Jørgensen, John Leif; Kilsgaard, Søren

    1998-01-01

    Proposal, in response to an ESA R.f.P., to design algorithms for autonomous star tracker operations.The proposal also included the development of a star tracker breadboard to test the algorithms performances.......Proposal, in response to an ESA R.f.P., to design algorithms for autonomous star tracker operations.The proposal also included the development of a star tracker breadboard to test the algorithms performances....

  9. Cardiac cephalalgia: First case from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Prakash

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 67-year-old male smoker had exertional headaches for 2 years. The headaches were holocephalic, very severe, excruciating, and occasionally accompanied by nausea. Physical examinations and neuroimaging were normal. Electrocardiogram (ECG showed old infarct in inferior leads. Sublingual nitrate provided relief in headaches. Stress test was positive with recurrence of similar headaches with ECG changes suggestive of myocardial ischemia. Coronary angiogram revealed three-vessel disease. Coronary artery bypass surgery provided complete resolution of headaches.

  10. Inclusion of Cocoa as a Dietary Supplement Represses Expression of Inflammatory Proteins in Spinal Trigeminal Nucleus in Response to Chronic Trigeminal Nerve Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cady, Ryan J.; Denson, Jennifer E.; Durham, Paul L.

    2013-01-01

    Scope Central sensitization is implicated in the pathology of temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) and other types of orofacial pain. We investigated the effects of dietary cocoa on expression of proteins involved in the development of central sensitization in the spinal trigeminal nucleus (STN) in response to inflammatory stimulation of trigeminal nerves. Methods and results Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed either a control diet or an isocaloric diet consisting of 10% cocoa powder 14 days prior to bilateral injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) into the temporomandibular joint to promote prolonged activation of trigeminal ganglion neurons and glia. While dietary cocoa stimulated basal expression of GLAST and MKP-1 when compared to animals on a normal diet, cocoa suppressed basal calcitonin gene-related peptide levels in the STN. CFA-stimulated levels of protein kinase A, P2X3, P-p38, GFAP, and OX-42, whose elevated levels in the STN are implicated in central sensitization, were repressed to near control levels in animals on a cocoa enriched diet. Similarly, dietary cocoa repressed CFA-stimulated inflammatory cytokine expression. Conclusion Based on our findings, we speculate that cocoa enriched diets could be beneficial as a natural therapeutic option for TMD and other chronic orofacial pain conditions. PMID:23576361

  11. Autonomic cardiac innervation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Wohaib

    2013-01-01

    Autonomic cardiac neurons have a common origin in the neural crest but undergo distinct developmental differentiation as they mature toward their adult phenotype. Progenitor cells respond to repulsive cues during migration, followed by differentiation cues from paracrine sources that promote neurochemistry and differentiation. When autonomic axons start to innervate cardiac tissue, neurotrophic factors from vascular tissue are essential for maintenance of neurons before they reach their targets, upon which target-derived trophic factors take over final maturation, synaptic strength and postnatal survival. Although target-derived neurotrophins have a central role to play in development, alternative sources of neurotrophins may also modulate innervation. Both developing and adult sympathetic neurons express proNGF, and adult parasympathetic cardiac ganglion neurons also synthesize and release NGF. The physiological function of these “non-classical” cardiac sources of neurotrophins remains to be determined, especially in relation to autocrine/paracrine sustenance during development.   Cardiac autonomic nerves are closely spatially associated in cardiac plexuses, ganglia and pacemaker regions and so are sensitive to release of neurotransmitter, neuropeptides and trophic factors from adjacent nerves. As such, in many cardiac pathologies, it is an imbalance within the two arms of the autonomic system that is critical for disease progression. Although this crosstalk between sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves has been well established for adult nerves, it is unclear whether a degree of paracrine regulation occurs across the autonomic limbs during development. Aberrant nerve remodeling is a common occurrence in many adult cardiovascular pathologies, and the mechanisms regulating outgrowth or denervation are disparate. However, autonomic neurons display considerable plasticity in this regard with neurotrophins and inflammatory cytokines having a central regulatory

  12. Percutaneous microsphere compression for the treatment of bilateral primary trigeminal neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yanfeng; Ma Yi; Huang Haitao; Zou Jianjun; Wang Bin; Li Fuyong; Wang Quancai

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical effectiveness of percutaneous microsphere compression (PMC) in treating bilateral primary trigeminal neuralgia and to discuss the optimal contralateral operation time after one side trigeminal neuralgia was treated with PMC. Methods: From Dec.2000 to Aug. 2009 PMC was performed in 74 patients with bilateral primary trigeminal neuralgia. The clinical data were retrospectively analyzed. Based on the pain-relieving degree the therapeutic effect was evaluated. Complete disappearance of pain was regarded as the criteria of a successful procedure. According to the recovery of mastication function of the operated side, the operation time for the contralateral side was decided. Results: A total of 145 PMC procedures were carried out in 74 patients,including three repeated operations in 3 cases due to recurrent pain after initial PMC. The postoperative instant effective rate was 96.5%. The recurrence rate was 2.1% during a mean follow-up period of 2.9 years (ranged 1-7 years). Of the 74 patients, bilateral PMC was accomplished in 68, and among them 57 patients received the contralateral operation within 1-3 months after the initial procedure was finished. Conclusion: Percutaneous microsphere compression is a quite effective treatment for bilateral primary trigeminal neuralgia. Usually, PMC for the contralateral side can be considered to perform in 1-3 months after the initial procedure. (authors)

  13. Mastication induces long-term increases in blood perfusion of the trigeminal principal nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viggiano, A; Manara, R; Conforti, R; Paccone, A; Secondulfo, C; Lorusso, L; Sbordone, L; Di Salle, F; Monda, M; Tedeschi, G; Esposito, F

    2015-12-17

    Understanding mechanisms for vessel tone regulation within the trigeminal nuclei is of great interest because some headache syndromes are due to dysregulation of such mechanisms. Previous experiments on animal models suggest that mastication may alter neuron metabolism and blood supply in these nuclei. To investigate this hypothesis in humans, arterial spin-labeling magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to measure blood perfusion within the principal trigeminal nucleus (Vp) and in the dorsolateral-midbrain (DM, including the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus) in healthy volunteers, before and immediately after a mastication exercise consisting of chewing a gum on one side of the mouth for 1 h at 1 bite/s. The side preference for masticating was evaluated with a chewing test and the volume of the masseter muscle was measured on T1-weighted MRI scans. The results demonstrated that the mastication exercise caused a perfusion increase within the Vp, but not in the DM. This change was correlated to the preference score for the side where the exercise took place. Moreover, the basal Vp perfusion was correlated to the masseter volume. These results indicate that the local vascular tone of the trigeminal nuclei can be constitutively altered by the chewing practice and by strong or sustained chewing. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Somesthetic, gustatory, olfactory function and salivary flow in patients with neuropathic trigeminal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siviero, M; Teixeira, M J; de Siqueira, J T T; Siqueira, S R D T

    2010-07-01

    To determine somesthetic, olfactory, gustative and salivary abnormalities in patients with burning mouth syndrome (BMS), idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia (ITN) and trigeminal postherpetic neuralgia (PHN). Twenty patients from each group (BMS, ITN, PHN) and 60 healthy controls were evaluated with a systematized quantitative approach of thermal (cold and warm), mechanical, pain, gustation, olfaction and salivary flow; data were analyzed with ANOVA, Tukey, Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests with a level of significance of 5%. There were no salivary differences among the groups with matched ages; the cold perception was abnormal only at the mandibular branch of PHN (P = 0.001) and warm was abnormal in all trigeminal branches of PHN and BMS; mechanical sensitivity was altered at the mandibular branch of PHN and in all trigeminal branches of BMS. The salty, sweet and olfactory thresholds were higher in all studied groups; the sour threshold was lower and there were no differences of bitter. All groups showed abnormal thresholds of gustation and olfaction; somesthetic findings were discrete in ITN and more common in PHN and BMS; central mechanisms of balance of sensorial inputs might be underlying these observations.

  15. Comparison of neurotrophin and repellent sensitivities of early embryonic geniculate and trigeminal axons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rochlin, M William; O'Connor, R.; Giger, Roman J; Verhaagen, J; Farbman, A I

    2000-01-01

    Geniculate (gustatory) and trigeminal (somatosensory) afferents take different routes to the tongue during rat embryonic development. To learn more about the mechanisms controlling neurite outgrowth and axon guidance, we are studying the roles of diffusible factors. We previously profiled the in

  16. Magnetic resonance neurography in the management of peripheral trigeminal neuropathy: experience in a tertiary care centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, Brian; Chhabra, Avneesh [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Dallas, TX (United States); Zuniga, John R. [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Surgery, Neurology and Neurotherapeutics, Dallas, TX (United States); Panchal, Neeraj [University of Pennsylvania, Department of Oral Maxillofacial Surgery, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Cheng, Jonathan [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Plastic Surgery, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-10-15

    This tertiary care experience examines the utility of magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) in the management of peripheral trigeminal neuropathies. Seventeen patients with clinically suspected peripheral trigeminal neuropathies (inferior alveolar nerve and lingual nerve) were imaged uniformly with 1.5-T examinations. MRN results were correlated with clinical and surgical findings in operated patients and the impact on clinical management was assessed. Clinical findings included pain (14/17), sensory changes (15/17), motor changes (2/17) and palpable masses (3/17). Inciting events included prior dental surgery (12/17), trauma (1/17) and idiopathic incidents (4/17). Non-affected side nerves and trigeminal nerves in the intracranial and skull base course were normal in all cases. Final diagnoses on affected sides were nerve inflammation (4/17), neuroma in continuity (2/17), LN transection (1/17), scar entrapment (3/17), infectious granuloma (1/17), low-grade injuries (3/17) and no abnormality (3/17). Associated submandibular gland and sublingual gland oedema-like changes were seen in 3/17 cases because of parasympathetic effects. Moderate-to-excellent MRN-surgical correlation was seen in operated (8/17) patients, and neuroma and nerve transection were prospectively identified in all cases. MRN is useful for the diagnostic work-up of suspected peripheral trigeminal neuropathy patients with significant impact on clinical management and moderate-to-excellent correlation with intra-operative findings. (orig.)

  17. Magnetic resonance neurography in the management of peripheral trigeminal neuropathy: experience in a tertiary care centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, Brian; Chhabra, Avneesh; Zuniga, John R.; Panchal, Neeraj; Cheng, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    This tertiary care experience examines the utility of magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) in the management of peripheral trigeminal neuropathies. Seventeen patients with clinically suspected peripheral trigeminal neuropathies (inferior alveolar nerve and lingual nerve) were imaged uniformly with 1.5-T examinations. MRN results were correlated with clinical and surgical findings in operated patients and the impact on clinical management was assessed. Clinical findings included pain (14/17), sensory changes (15/17), motor changes (2/17) and palpable masses (3/17). Inciting events included prior dental surgery (12/17), trauma (1/17) and idiopathic incidents (4/17). Non-affected side nerves and trigeminal nerves in the intracranial and skull base course were normal in all cases. Final diagnoses on affected sides were nerve inflammation (4/17), neuroma in continuity (2/17), LN transection (1/17), scar entrapment (3/17), infectious granuloma (1/17), low-grade injuries (3/17) and no abnormality (3/17). Associated submandibular gland and sublingual gland oedema-like changes were seen in 3/17 cases because of parasympathetic effects. Moderate-to-excellent MRN-surgical correlation was seen in operated (8/17) patients, and neuroma and nerve transection were prospectively identified in all cases. MRN is useful for the diagnostic work-up of suspected peripheral trigeminal neuropathy patients with significant impact on clinical management and moderate-to-excellent correlation with intra-operative findings. (orig.)

  18. New Insights in Trigeminal Anatomy: A Double Orofacial Tract for Nociceptive Input

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henssen, D.J.H.A.; Kurt, E.; Kozicz, L.T.; Dongen, R.T.M. van; Bartels, R.H.M.A.; Cappellen van Walsum, A.M. van

    2016-01-01

    Orofacial pain in patients relies on the anatomical pathways that conduct nociceptive information, originating from the periphery towards the trigeminal sensory nucleus complex (TSNC) and finally, to the thalami and the somatosensorical cortical regions. The anatomy and function of the so-called

  19. Nasal solitary chemoreceptor cell responses to bitter and trigeminal stimulants in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulbransen, Brian D; Clapp, Tod R; Finger, Thomas E; Kinnamon, Sue C

    2008-06-01

    Nasal trigeminal chemosensitivity in mice and rats is mediated in part by epithelial solitary chemoreceptor (chemosensory) cells (SCCs), but the exact role of these cells in chemoreception is unclear. Histological evidence suggests that SCCs express elements of the bitter taste transduction pathway including T2R (bitter taste) receptors, the G protein alpha-gustducin, PLCbeta2, and TRPM5, leading to speculation that SCCs are the receptor cells that mediate trigeminal nerve responses to bitter taste receptor ligands. To test this hypothesis, we used calcium imaging to determine whether SCCs respond to classic bitter-tasting or trigeminal stimulants. SCCs from the anterior nasal cavity were isolated from transgenic mice in which green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression was driven by either TRPM5 or gustducin. Isolated cells were exposed to a variety of test stimuli to determine which substances caused an increase in intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i). GFP-positive cells respond with increased [Ca2+]i to the bitter receptor ligand denatonium and this response is blocked by the PLC inhibitor U73122. In addition, GFP+ cells respond to the neuromodulators adenosine 5'-triphosphate and acetylcholine but only very rarely to other bitter-tasting or trigeminal stimuli. Our results demonstrate that TRPM5- and gustducin-expressing nasal SCCs respond to the T2R agonist denatonium via a PLC-coupled transduction cascade typical of T2Rs in the taste system.

  20. Intranasal trigeminal function in subjects with and without an intact sense of smell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannilli, E; Gerber, J; Frasnelli, J; Hummel, T

    2007-03-30

    The intranasal trigeminal system is involved in the perception of odors. To investigate the cerebral processing of sensory information from the trigeminal nerve in detail we studied subjects with and without olfactory function using functional magnetic resonance imaging. A normosmic group (n=12) was compared with a group of anosmic subjects (n=11). For trigeminal stimulation gaseous CO(2) was used. Following right-sided stimulation with CO(2) controls exhibited a stronger right-sided cerebral activation than anosmic subjects. Stronger activation was found in controls compared to anosmic subjects for the right prefrontal cortex, the right somatosensory cortex (SI), and the left parietal insula. In contrast, relatively higher activation was found in anosmic subjects for the left supplementary motor area in the frontal lobe, the right superior and middle temporal lobe, the left parahippocampal gyrus in the limbic lobe, and the sub-lobar region of the left putamen and right insula which was mostly due to a decreased BOLD signal of controls in these areas. Additional conjunction analysis revealed that activated areas common to the two groups were the cerebellum and the right premotor frontal cortex. These data suggest that the processing of the trigeminally mediated information is different in the presence or absence of an intact sense of smell, pointing towards the intimate connection between the two chemosensory systems.

  1. PROJECTIONS OF THE PARVOCELLULAR RETICULAR-FORMATION TO THE CONTRALATERAL MESENCEPHALIC TRIGEMINAL NUCLEUS IN THE RAT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MINKELS, RF; JUCH, PJW; TERHORST, GJ; VANWILLIGEN, JD

    1991-01-01

    Projections of the parvocellular reticular nucleus (PCRt) to the contralateral mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus (Me5) were studied in the rat with neurophysiological and neuroanatomical techniques. Three types of responses (classified by latencies) were recorded extracellularly in the Me5 area after

  2. An autoradiographic analysis of the development of the chick trigeminal ganglion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amico-Martel, A.D; Noden, D.M.

    1980-01-01

    The avian trigeminal ganglion, which is embryonically derived from the neural crest and epidermal placodes, consists of two topographically segregated classes of immature neurons, large and small, during the second week of incubation, and two neuronal cell types, dark and light, interspersed throughout the mature ganglion. In order to establish the times of terminal mitosis of trigeminal sensory neurons, embryos were treated with [ 3 H]thymidine during the first week of incubation and their ganglia fixed on embryonic day 11. The embryonically large, distal, placodal-derived neurons were generated between days 2 and 5, while the small, proximal, neural crest-derived neurons were formed mostly between days 4 and 7. By comparing the locations of labelled cells in ganglia treated with isotope but fixed on day 18 on incubation with their 11-day counterparts, it was shown that there are no morpho-genetic rearrangements of neurons during the final week of incubation. Thus, no unique relationship exists between the two neuron types in the mature ganglion and the two cell classes in the immature trigeminal. Therefore, both the light and the dark neurons in the mature trigeminal ganglion arise from neural crest as well as placodal primordia. (author)

  3. Trigeminal Schwannoma with intra- and extracranial portions - a case report and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Ricardo Pires de; Setubal, Roger; Florencio, Filipe Toledo; Gomes, Marcio Rogerio Alcala; Mayo, Suzete Varela; Leiro, Luis Carlos Filgueira; Soares, Aldemir Humberto

    1997-01-01

    The authors report a case of a 40-year-old male patient presenting a mandibular branch Schwannoma of the trigeminal nerve with intra-and extracranial portions. The radiologic, computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging findings are discussed and a review of the literature is presented. (author)

  4. Trigeminal neuralgia--a coherent cross-specialty management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinskou, Tone; Maarbjerg, Stine; Rochat, Per; Wolfram, Frauke; Jensen, Rigmor Højland; Bendtsen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Optimal management of patients with classical trigeminal neuralgia (TN) requires specific treatment programs and close collaboration between medical, radiological and surgical specialties. Organization of such treatment programs has never been described before. With this paper we aim to describe the implementation and feasibility of an accelerated cross-speciality management program, to describe the collaboration between the involved specialties and to report the patient flow during the first 2 years after implementation. Finally, we aim to stimulate discussions about optimal management of TN. Based on collaboration between neurologists, neuroradiologists and neurosurgeons a standardized program for TN was implemented in May 2012 at the Danish Headache Center (DHC). First out-patient visit and subsequent 3.0 Tesla MRI scan was booked in an accelerated manner. The MRI scan was performed according to a special TN protocol developed for this program. Patients initially referred to neurosurgery were re-directed to DHC for pre-surgical evaluation of diagnosis and optimization of medical treatment. Follow-up was 2 years with fixed visits where medical treatment and indication for neurosurgery was continuously evaluated. Scientific data was collected in a structured and prospective manner. From May 2012 to April 2014, 130 patients entered the accelerated program. Waiting time for the first out-patient visit was 42 days. Ninety-four percent of the patients had a MRI performed according to the special protocol after a mean of 37 days. Within 2 years follow-up 35% of the patients were referred to neurosurgery after a median time of 65 days. Five scientific papers describing demographics, clinical characteristics and neuroanatomical abnormalities were published. The described cross-speciality management program proved to be feasible and to have acceptable waiting times for referral and highly specialized work-up of TN patients in a public tertiary referral centre for headache

  5. SU-E-T-669: Radiosurgery Failure for Trigeminal Neuralgia: A Study of Radiographic Spatial Fidelity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howe, J [Associates In Medical Physics, Louisville, KY (United States); Spalding, A [Norton Cancer Institute, Louisville, Kentucky (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Management of Trigeminal Neuralgia with radiosurgery is well established, but often met with limited success. Recent advancements in imaging afford improvements in target localization for radiosurgery. Methods: A Trigeminal Neuralgia radiosurgery specific protocol was established for MR enhancement of the trigeminal nerve using a CISS scan with slice spacing of 0.7mm. Computed Tomography simulation was performed using axial slices on a 40 slice CT with slice spacing of 0.6mm. These datasets were registered using a mutual information algorithm and localized in a stereotactic coordinate system. Image registration between the MR and CT was evaluated for each patient by a Medical Physicist to ensure accuracy. The dorsal root entry zone target was defined on the CISS MR by a Neurosurgeon and dose calculations performed on the localized CT. Treatment plans were reviewed and approved by a Radiation Oncologist and Neurosurgeon. Image guided radiosurgery was delivered using positioning tolerance of 0.5mm and 1°. Eight patients with Trigeminal Neuralgia were treated with this protocol. Results: Seven patients reported a favorable response to treatment with average Barrow Neurological Index pain score of four before treatment and one following treatment. Only one patient had a BNI>1 following treatment and review of the treatment plan revealed that the CISS MR was registered to the CT via a low resolution (5mm slice spacing) T2 MR. All other patients had CISS MR registered directly with the localized CT. This patient was retreated 6 months later using direct registration between CISS MR and localized CT and subsequently responded to treatment with a BNI of one. Conclusion: Frameless radiosurgery offers an effective solution to Trigeminal Neuralgia management provided appropriate technology and imaging protocols (utilizing submillimeter imaging) are established and maintained.

  6. SU-E-T-669: Radiosurgery Failure for Trigeminal Neuralgia: A Study of Radiographic Spatial Fidelity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, J; Spalding, A

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Management of Trigeminal Neuralgia with radiosurgery is well established, but often met with limited success. Recent advancements in imaging afford improvements in target localization for radiosurgery. Methods: A Trigeminal Neuralgia radiosurgery specific protocol was established for MR enhancement of the trigeminal nerve using a CISS scan with slice spacing of 0.7mm. Computed Tomography simulation was performed using axial slices on a 40 slice CT with slice spacing of 0.6mm. These datasets were registered using a mutual information algorithm and localized in a stereotactic coordinate system. Image registration between the MR and CT was evaluated for each patient by a Medical Physicist to ensure accuracy. The dorsal root entry zone target was defined on the CISS MR by a Neurosurgeon and dose calculations performed on the localized CT. Treatment plans were reviewed and approved by a Radiation Oncologist and Neurosurgeon. Image guided radiosurgery was delivered using positioning tolerance of 0.5mm and 1°. Eight patients with Trigeminal Neuralgia were treated with this protocol. Results: Seven patients reported a favorable response to treatment with average Barrow Neurological Index pain score of four before treatment and one following treatment. Only one patient had a BNI>1 following treatment and review of the treatment plan revealed that the CISS MR was registered to the CT via a low resolution (5mm slice spacing) T2 MR. All other patients had CISS MR registered directly with the localized CT. This patient was retreated 6 months later using direct registration between CISS MR and localized CT and subsequently responded to treatment with a BNI of one. Conclusion: Frameless radiosurgery offers an effective solution to Trigeminal Neuralgia management provided appropriate technology and imaging protocols (utilizing submillimeter imaging) are established and maintained

  7. Long-Term Results for Trigeminal Schwannomas Treated With Gamma Knife Surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, Toshinori, E-mail: h-toshi@komakihp.gr.jp; Kato, Takenori; Iizuka, Hiroshi; Kida, Yoshihisa

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Surgical resection is considered the desirable curative treatment for trigeminal schwannomas. However, complete resection without any complications remains challenging. During the last several decades, stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) has emerged as a minimally invasive treatment modality. Information regarding long-term outcomes of SRS for patients harboring trigeminal schwannomas is limited because of the rarity of this tumor. The aim of this study was to evaluate long-term tumor control and functional outcomes in patients harboring trigeminal schwannomas treated with SRS, specifically with gamma knife surgery (GKS). Methods and Materials: Fifty-three patients harboring trigeminal schwannomas treated with GKS were evaluated. Of these, 2 patients (4%) had partial irradiation of the tumor, and 34 patients (64%) underwent GKS as the initial treatment. The median tumor volume was 6.0 cm{sup 3}. The median maximum and marginal doses were 28 Gy and 14 Gy, respectively. Results: The median follow-up period was 98 months. On the last follow-up image, 7 patients (13%) had tumor enlargement, including the 2 patients who had partial treatment. Excluding the 2 patients who had partial treatment, the actuarial 5- and 10-year progression-free survival (PFS) rates were 90% and 82%, respectively. Patients with tumors compressing the brainstem with deviation of the fourth ventricle had significantly lower PFS rates. If those patients with tumors compressing the brainstem with deviation of the fourth ventricle are excluded, the actuarial 5- and 10-year PFS rates increased to 95% and 90%, respectively. Ten percent of patients had worsened facial numbness or pain in spite of no tumor progression, indicating adverse radiation effect. Conclusions: GKS can be an acceptable alternative to surgical resection in patients with trigeminal schwannomas. However, large tumors that compress the brainstem with deviation of the fourth ventricle should be surgically removed first and then

  8. Rat whisker movement after facial nerve lesion: evidence for autonomic contraction of skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaton, James T; Sheu, Shu Hsien; Hohman, Marc H; Knox, Christopher J; Weinberg, Julie S; Kleiss, Ingrid J; Hadlock, Tessa A

    2014-04-18

    Vibrissal whisking is often employed to track facial nerve regeneration in rats; however, we have observed similar degrees of whisking recovery after facial nerve transection with or without repair. We hypothesized that the source of non-facial nerve-mediated whisker movement after chronic denervation was from autonomic, cholinergic axons traveling within the infraorbital branch of the trigeminal nerve (ION). Rats underwent unilateral facial nerve transection with repair (N=7) or resection without repair (N=11). Post-operative whisking amplitude was measured weekly across 10weeks, and during intraoperative stimulation of the ION and facial nerves at ⩾18weeks. Whisking was also measured after subsequent ION transection (N=6) or pharmacologic blocking of the autonomic ganglia using hexamethonium (N=3), and after snout cooling intended to elicit a vasodilation reflex (N=3). Whisking recovered more quickly and with greater amplitude in rats that underwent facial nerve repair compared to resection (Pfacial-nerve-mediated whisking was elicited by electrical stimulation of the ION, temporarily diminished following hexamethonium injection, abolished by transection of the ION, and rapidly and significantly (Pfacial nerve resection. This study provides the first behavioral and anatomical evidence of spontaneous autonomic innervation of skeletal muscle after motor nerve lesion, which not only has implications for interpreting facial nerve reinnervation results, but also calls into question whether autonomic-mediated innervation of striated muscle occurs naturally in other forms of neuropathy. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A RARE CASE OF PERSISTENT TRIGEMINAL ARTERY IN AN ADULT FEMALE WITH PARA POSTERIOR COMMUNICATING ARTERY ANEURYSM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banavathu Daya Bharath Singh

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Anastomosis found in the adulthood between the carotid and vertebro - basilar systems, apart from the posterior communicating artery, are extremely infrequent and are due to the persistence of vessels that joined both systems during the fetal period. This carotid - vertebrobasilar anastomosis are the trigeminal, otic, and hypoglossal and proatlantal arteries. P ersistent trigeminal artery is the commonest of the above mentioned four arteries. The reported incidence is about 0.2%. Patients may be asymptomatic or present symptoms due to low flow of posterior circulation or carotid microembolization from posterior circulation. PTA can cause trigemina l neuralgia. We report in this paper a case of a persistant trigeminal artery found in an adult female with a para p com aneurysm who had persistent trigeminal artery which was seen in C T angiogram .

  10. Overview of the Autonomic Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be reversible or progressive. Anatomy of the autonomic nervous system The autonomic nervous system is the part of ... organs they connect with. Function of the autonomic nervous system The autonomic nervous system controls internal body processes ...

  11. Autonomous Forest Fire Detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breejen, E. den; Breuers, M.; Cremer, F.; Kemp, R.A.W.; Roos, M.; Schutte, K.; Vries, J.S. de

    1998-01-01

    Forest fire detection is a very important issue in the pre-suppression process. Timely detection allows the suppression units to reach the fire in its initial stages and this will reduce the suppression costs considerably. The autonomous forest fire detection principle is based on temporal contrast

  12. Experimental Autonomous Vehicle Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Ole; Andersen, Nils Axel

    1998-01-01

    The paper describes the requirements for and a prototype configuration of a software architecture for control of an experimental autonomous vehicle. The test bed nature of the system is emphasised in the choice of architecture making re-configurability, data logging and extendability simple...

  13. Towards autonomous vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    We are moving towards an age of autonomous vehicles. Cycles of innovation initiated in the public and private sectors : have led one into another since the 1990s; and out of these efforts have sprung a variety of Advanced Driver Assistance : Systems ...

  14. ADAM: ADaptive Autonomous Machine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oosten, Daan C.; Nijenhuis, Lucas F.J.; Bakkers, André; Vervoort, Wiek

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a part of the development of an adaptive autonomous machine that is able to move in an unknown world extract knowledge out of the perceived data, has the possibility to reason, and finally has the capability to exchange experiences and knowledge with other agents. The agent is

  15. Microvascular Decompression for Classical Trigeminal Neuralgia Caused by Venous Compression: Novel Anatomic Classifications and Surgical Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Min; Fu, Xianming; Ji, Ying; Ding, Wanhai; Deng, Dali; Wang, Yehan; Jiang, Xiaofeng; Niu, Chaoshi

    2018-05-01

    Microvascular decompression of the trigeminal nerve is the most effective treatment for trigeminal neuralgia. However, when encountering classical trigeminal neuralgia caused by venous compression, the procedure becomes much more difficult, and failure or recurrence because of incomplete decompression may become frequent. This study aimed to investigate the anatomic variation of the culprit veins and discuss the surgical strategy for different types. We performed a retrospective analysis of 64 consecutive cases in whom veins were considered as responsible vessels alone or combined with other adjacent arteries. The study classified culprit veins according to operative anatomy and designed personalized approaches and decompression management according to different forms of compressive veins. Curative effects were assessed by the Barrow Neurological Institute (BNI) pain intensity score and BNI facial numbness score. The most commonly encountered veins were the superior petrosal venous complex (SPVC), which was artificially divided into 4 types according to both venous tributary distribution and empty point site. We synthetically considered these factors and selected an approach to expose the trigeminal root entry zone, including the suprafloccular transhorizontal fissure approach and infratentorial supracerebellar approach. The methods of decompression consist of interposing and transposing by using Teflon, and sometimes with the aid of medical adhesive. Nerve combing (NC) of the trigeminal root was conducted in situations of extremely difficult neurovascular compression, instead of sacrificing veins. Pain completely disappeared in 51 patients, and the excellent outcome rate was 79.7%. There were 13 patients with pain relief treated with reoperation. Postoperative complications included 10 cases of facial numbness, 1 case of intracranial infection, and 1 case of high-frequency hearing loss. The accuracy recognition of anatomic variation of the SPVC is crucial for the

  16. Keyhole craniotomy through retrosigmoid approach followed by microvascular decompression for primary trigeminal neuralgia:a report of 23 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang-ge CHENG

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the surgical technique,effects,and complications of keyhole craniotomy through retrosigmoid approach followed by microvascular decompression for primary trigeminal neuralgia.Methods The craniotomy with a keyhole incision above postauricular hairline followed by microvascular decompression was performed in 23 patients with primary trigeminal neuralgia.Dissection of intracranial part of trigeminal nerve under microscope was done to search for the offending vessels,which were thereby freed and between which and the root entry zone(REZ of trigeminal nerve the Teflon grafts were placed.Effects and complications were observed in follow-up,ranging from 1 month to 2 years.Results Out of 23 patients who were all found compression in REZ of trigeminal nerves by the offending vessels in operation,disappearance of symptoms post-surgery was found in 22 cases,face numbness on the surgical side in 3 cases and no effects in 1 case.Recurrence of pain was not observed in patients who had initially benefited from the surgery at the follow-up.Conclusion The keyhole craniotomy through retrosigmoid approach followed by microvascular decompression is safe and effective for primary trigeminal neuralgia,in which accurate technique during operation plays a vital role in the decrease of complications and the outcome post-surgery.

  17. Catecholamines and diabetic autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J

    1995-01-01

    In diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy plasma noradrenaline concentration, used as an index of sympathetic nervous activity, is low. This decrease is, however, only found in patients with a long duration of diabetes with clinically severe autonomic neuropathy. This apparent insensitivity...... of plasma catecholamine measurements is not due to changes in the clearance of catecholamines in diabetic autonomic neuropathy. The physiological responses to infused adrenaline and to noradrenaline are enhanced, for noradrenaline mainly cardiovascular responses. Adrenoceptors (alpha and beta adrenoceptors......) are not altered in circulating blood cells in diabetic autonomic neuropathy. Thus, a generalized up-regulation of adrenoceptors does not occur in diabetic autonomic neuropathy....

  18. Small Radiation Beam Dosimetry for Radiosurgery of Trigeminal Neuralgia: One Case Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Garduno, O. A.; Larraga-Gutierrez, J. M.; Rodriguez-Villafuerte, M.; Martinez-Davalos, A.; Moreno-Jimenez, S.; Suarez-Campos, J. J.; Celis, M. A.

    2008-01-01

    The use of small radiation beams for trigeminal neuralgia (TN) treatment requires high precision and accuracy in dose distribution calculations and delivery. Special attention must be kept on the type of detector to be used. In this work, the use of GafChromic EBT registered radiochromic and X-OMAT V2 radiographic films for small radiation beam characterization is reported. The dosimetric information provided by the films (total output factors, tissue maximum ratios and off axis ratios) is compared against measurements with a shielded solid state (diode) reference detector. The film dosimetry was used for dose distribution calculations for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia radiosurgery. Comparison of the isodose curves shows that the dosimetry produced with the X-OMAT radiographic film overestimates the dose distributions in the penumbra region

  19. Expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in trigeminal ganglion cells during culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen-Olesen, Inger; Zhou, MingFang; Zinck, Tina Jovanovic

    2005-01-01

    RNA and protein could be detected. The data suggest that iNOS expression may be a molecular mechanism mediating the adaptive response of trigeminal ganglia cells to the serum free stressful stimulus the culture environment provides. It may act as a cellular signalling molecule that is expressed after cell......Nitric oxide (NO) is an important signalling molecule that has been suggested to be a key molecule for induction and maintenance of migraine attacks based on clinical studies, animal experimental studies and the expression of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) immunoreactivity within the trigeminovascular......, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting. In trigeminal ganglia cells not subjected to culture, endothelial (e) and neuronal (n) but not inducible (i) NOS mRNA and protein were detected. Culture of rat neurones resulted in a rapid axonal outgrowth of NOS positive...

  20. Selective percutaneous radiofrequency thermocoagulation in the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia:report on 1860 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴承远; 孟凡刚; 徐淑军; 刘玉光; 王宏伟

    2004-01-01

    @@Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is defined by the International Association for the Study of Pain as "a sudden, usually unilateral, severe, brief, stabbing, recurrent pain in the distribution of one or more branches of the fifth cranial nerve".1 The incidence rate is about three to five cases per year per 100000 persons and increases with age.2 In our hospital, percutaneous radiofrequency therapy was performed on 1860 patients with TN from June 1986 to April 2003, and percutaneous trigeminal ganglion radiofrequency therapy on 579 cases. Among this group of patients, X-ray, 3-D CT, and navigational localization of the oval foramen were performed on 42 cases. The indications, techniques, and results are reported here.

  1. Clinical experience with Leksell gamma knife in the treatment of trigeminal schwannomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG En-min; PAN Li; ZHANG Nan; ZHOU Liang-fu; WANG Bing-jiang; DONG Ya-fei; DAI Jia-zhong; CAI Pei-wu

    2005-01-01

    @@ Trigeminal nerve schwannomas, which are rare, slowly growing, benign tumors, account for 0.2% to 1.0% of all intracranial tumors and 0.8% to 8.0% of intracranial schwannomas.1-5 These tumors are treated surgically.1-4 The development of microsurgery and skull base surgery has made complete resection possible in most patients. Nevertheless, cranial nerve sequelae appear after complete resection of these tumors because they are located close to the cavernous sinus and usually adhere to the vital vascular and neural structures. As an alternative to microsurgical resection, Leksell gamma knife (LGK) radiosurgery has been performed for patients with intracranial schwannomas to minimize the treatment-related morbidity and achieve a long-term control of tumor growth.6,7 In this report, we describe our 6-year experience in the treatment of 38 patients with trigeminal schwannomas by LGK.

  2. Preemptive application of QX-314 attenuates trigeminal neuropathic mechanical allodynia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jeong-Ho; Son, Jo-Young; Kim, Min-Ji; Kang, Song-Hee; Ju, Jin-Sook; Bae, Yong-Chul; Ahn, Dong-Kuk

    2018-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of preemptive analgesia on the development of trigeminal neuropathic pain. For this purpose, mechanical allodynia was evaluated in male Sprague-Dawley rats using chronic constriction injury of the infraorbital nerve (CCI-ION) and perineural application of 2% QX-314 to the infraorbital nerve. CCI-ION produced severe mechanical allodynia, which was maintained until postoperative day (POD) 30. An immediate single application of 2% QX-314 to the infraorbital nerve following CCI-ION significantly reduced neuropathic mechanical allodynia. Immediate double application of QX-314 produced a greater attenuation of mechanical allodynia than a single application of QX-314. Immediate double application of 2% QX-314 reduced the CCI-ION-induced upregulation of GFAP and p-p38 expression in the trigeminal ganglion. The upregulated p-p38 expression was co-localized with NeuN, a neuronal cell marker. We also investigated the role of voltage-gated sodium channels (Navs) in the antinociception produced by preemptive application of QX-314 through analysis of the changes in Nav expression in the trigeminal ganglion following CCI-ION. Preemptive application of QX-314 significantly reduced the upregulation of Nav1.3, 1.7, and 1.9 produced by CCI-ION. These results suggest that long-lasting blockade of the transmission of pain signaling inhibits the development of neuropathic pain through the regulation of Nav isoform expression in the trigeminal ganglion. Importantly, these results provide a potential preemptive therapeutic strategy for the treatment of neuropathic pain after nerve injury.

  3. Oxcarbazepine: a new drug in the management of intractable trigeminal neuralgia.

    OpenAIRE

    Zakrzewska, J M; Patsalos, P N

    1989-01-01

    The efficacy and tolerability of oxcarbazepine, a keto derivative of carbamazepine, has been assessed in six patients (two males, four females; mean age 61 years, range 42-77), with trigeminal neuralgia refractory to carbamazepine therapy, over a period of 6 months. An excellent therapeutic response to oxcarbazepine was seen in all patients with pain control correlating well with serum drug concentrations of oxcarbazepine and its primary active metabolite 10-OH-carbazepine. Onset of the effec...

  4. Prolonged vertigo and ataxia after mandibular nerve block for treatment of trigeminal neuralgia

    OpenAIRE

    Arvind Chaturvedi; H H Dash

    2011-01-01

    Common complications of neurolytic mandibular nerve block are hypoesthesia, dysesthesia, and chemical neuritis. We report a rare complication, prolonged severe vertigo and ataxia, after neurolytic mandibular blockade in a patient suffering from trigeminal neuralgia. Coronoid approach was used for right sided mandibular block. After successful test injection with local anesthetic, absolute alcohol was given for neurolytic block. Immediately after alcohol injection, patient developed nausea and...

  5. Bilateral descending hypothalamic projections to the spinal trigeminal nucleus caudalis in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Abdallah

    Full Text Available Several lines of evidence suggest that the hypothalamus is involved in trigeminal pain processing. However, the organization of descending hypothalamic projections to the spinal trigeminal nucleus caudalis (Sp5C remains poorly understood. Microinjections of the retrograde tracer, fluorogold (FG, into the Sp5C, in rats, reveal that five hypothalamic nuclei project to the Sp5C: the paraventricular nucleus, the lateral hypothalamic area, the perifornical hypothalamic area, the A11 nucleus and the retrochiasmatic area. Descending hypothalamic projections to the Sp5C are bilateral, except those from the paraventricular nucleus which exhibit a clear ipsilateral predominance. Moreover, the density of retrogradely FG-labeled neurons in the hypothalamus varies according to the dorso-ventral localization of the Sp5C injection site. There are much more labeled neurons after injections into the ventrolateral part of the Sp5C (where ophthalmic afferents project than after injections into its dorsomedial or intermediate parts (where mandibular and maxillary afferents, respectively, project. These results demonstrate that the organization of descending hypothalamic projections to the spinal dorsal horn and Sp5C are different. Whereas the former are ipsilateral, the latter are bilateral. Moreover, hypothalamic projections to the Sp5C display somatotopy, suggesting that these projections are preferentially involved in the processing of meningeal and cutaneous inputs from the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve in rats. Therefore, our results suggest that the control of trigeminal and spinal dorsal horn processing of nociceptive information by hypothalamic neurons is different and raise the question of the role of bilateral, rather than unilateral, hypothalamic control.

  6. PERCUTANEOUS BALLOON COMPRESSION OF GASSERIAN GANGLION FOR THE TREATMENT OF TRIGEMINAL NEURALGIA: AN EXPERIENCE FROM INDIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Anurag; Dhama, Vipin; Manik, Yogesh K; Upadhyaya, M K; Singh, C S; Rastogi, V

    2015-02-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is characterized by unilateral, lancinating, paroxysmal pain in the dermatomal distribution area of trigeminal nerve. Percutaneous balloon compression (PBC) of Gasserian ganglion is an effective, comparatively cheaper and simple therapeutic modality for treatment of TN. Compression secondary to PBC selectively injures the large myelinated A-alfa (afferent) fibers that mediate light touch and does not affect A-delta and C-fibres, which carry pain sensation. Balloon compression reduces the sensory neuronal input, thus turning off the trigger to the neuropathic trigeminal pain. In this current case series, we are sharing our experience with PBC of Gasserian Ganglion for the treatment of idiopathic TN in our patients at an academic university-based medical institution in India. During the period of August 2012 to October 2013, a total of twelve PBCs of Gasserian Ganglion were performed in eleven patients suffering from idiopathic TN. There were nine female patients and two male patients with the age range of 35-70 years (median age: 54 years). In all patients cannulation of foramen ovale was done successfully in the first attempt. In eight out of eleven (72.7%) patients ideal 'Pear-shaped' balloon visualization could be achieved. In the remaining three patients (27.3%), inflated balloon was 'Bullet-shaped'. In one patient final placement of Fogarty balloon was not satisfactory and it ruptured during inflation. This case was deferred for one week when it was completed successfully with 'Pear-shaped' balloon inflation. During the follow up period of 1-13 months, there have been no recurrences of TN. Eight out of eleven patients (72.7%) are completely off medicines (carbamazepine and baclofen) and other two patients are stable on very low doses of carbamazepine. All patients have reported marked improvement in quality of life. This case series shows that percutaneous balloon compression is a useful minimally invasive intervention for the

  7. Description of a neural sheath tumor of the trigeminal nerve: immunohistochemical and electron microscopy study

    OpenAIRE

    Khademi, Bijan; Owji, Seied Mohammad; Khosh, Khadije Jamshidi; Mohammadianpanah, Mohammad; Gandomi, Behrooz

    2006-01-01

    CONTEXT: Malignant neural sheath tumors of the trigeminal nerve affecting the nasal cavity and the paranasal sinuses are extremely rare. With conventional optical microscopy, their identification is difficult, and it is necessary to confirm them by means of electron microscopy and immunohistochemical techniques. CASE REPORT: The patient was a 41-year-old woman with a ten-month progressive history of pain followed by painful edema in the left facial region, and with symptoms of bleeding, secre...

  8. Altered regional homogeneity of spontaneous brain activity in idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yanping; Zhang, Xiaoling; Guan, Qiaobing; Wan, Lihong; Yi, Yahui; Liu, Chun-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Yanping Wang,1,2 Xiaoling Zhang,2 Qiaobing Guan,2 Lihong Wan,2 Yahui Yi,2 Chun-Feng Liu1 1Department of Neurology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu Province, 2Department of Neurology, The Second Hospital of Jiaxing City, Jiaxing, Zhejiang Province, People’s Republic of China Abstract: The pathophysiology of idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia (ITN) has conventionally been thought to be induced by neurovascular compression theory. Recent structural ...

  9. Differential regulation of glutamate receptors in trigeminal ganglia following masseter inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jongseok; Ro, Jin Y.

    2007-01-01

    The present study examined whether N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) and 5-α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor (AMPAR) subunits and group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are constitutively expressed in trigeminal ganglia (TG) using Western blot analysis in male Sprague Dawley rats. We then investigated whether experimental induction of masseter inflammation influences glutamate receptor expressions by comparing the protein levels from naïve rats to th...

  10. Anastomoses between lower cranial and upper cervical nerves: a comprehensive review with potential significance during skull base and neck operations, part I: trigeminal, facial, and vestibulocochlear nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoja, Mohammadali M; Oyesiku, Nelson M; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Radcliff, Virginia; Loukas, Marios; Chern, Joshua J; Benninger, Brion; Rozzelle, Curtis J; Shokouhi, Ghaffar; Tubbs, R Shane

    2014-01-01

    Descriptions of the anatomy of the neural communications among the cranial nerves and their branches is lacking in the literature. Knowledge of the possible neural interconnections found among these nerves may prove useful to surgeons who operate in these regions to avoid inadvertent traction or transection. We review the literature regarding the anatomy, function, and clinical implications of the complex neural networks formed by interconnections among the lower cranial and upper cervical nerves. A review of germane anatomic and clinical literature was performed. The review is organized in two parts. Part I concerns the anastomoses between the trigeminal, facial, and vestibulocochlear nerves or their branches with any other nerve trunk or branch in the vicinity. Part II concerns the anastomoses among the glossopharyngeal, vagus, accessory and hypoglossal nerves and their branches or among these nerves and the first four cervical spinal nerves; the contribution of the autonomic nervous system to these neural plexuses is also briefly reviewed. Part I is presented in this article. An extensive anastomotic network exists among the lower cranial nerves. Knowledge of such neural intercommunications is important in diagnosing and treating patients with pathology of the skull base. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Trigeminal Neuralgia, Glossopharyngeal Neuralgia, and Myofascial Pain Dysfunction Syndrome: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Khan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain is a common phenomenon that affects millions of people worldwide. Maxillofacial structures consist of various tissues that receive frequent stimulation during food digestion. The unique functions (masticatory process and facial expression of the maxillofacial structure require the exquisite organization of both the peripheral and central nervous systems. Neuralgia is painful paroxysmal disorder of the head-neck region characterized by some commonly shared features such as the unilateral pain, transience and recurrence of attacks, and superficial and shock-like pain at a trigger point. These types of pain can be experienced after nerve injury or as a part of diseases that affect peripheral and central nerve function, or they can be psychological. Since the trigeminal and glossopharyngeal nerves innervate the oral structure, trigeminal and glossopharyngeal neuralgia are the most common syndromes following myofascial pain dysfunction syndrome. Nevertheless, misdiagnoses are common. The aim of this review is to discuss the currently available diagnostic procedures and treatment options for trigeminal neuralgia, glossopharyngeal neuralgia, and myofascial pain dysfunction syndrome.

  12. Repression of calcitonin gene-related peptide expression in trigeminal neurons by a Theobroma cacao extract☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbey, Marcie J.; Patil, Vinit V.; Vause, Carrie V.; Durham, Paul L.

    2008-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance Cocoa bean preparations were first used by the ancient Maya and Aztec civilizations of South America to treat a variety of medical ailments involving the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and nervous systems. Diets rich in foods containing abundant polyphenols, as found in cocoa, underlie the protective effects reported in chronic inflammatory diseases. Release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) from trigeminal nerves promotes inflammation in peripheral tissues and nociception. Aim of the study To determine whether a methanol extract of Theobroma cacao L. (Sterculiaceae) beans enriched for polyphenols could inhibit CGRP expression, both an in vitro and an in vivo approach was taken. Results Treatment of rat trigeminal ganglia cultures with depolarizing stimuli caused a significant increase in CGRP release that was repressed by pretreatment with Theobroma cacao extract. Pretreatment with Theobroma cacao was also shown to block the KCl- and capsaicin-stimulated increases in intracellular calcium. Next, the effects of Theobroma cacao on CGRP levels were determined using an in vivo model of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) inflammation. Capsaicin injection into the TMJ capsule caused an ipsilateral decrease in CGRP levels. Theobroma cacao extract injected into the TMJ capsule 24 h prior to capsaicin treatment repressed the stimulatory effects of capsaicin. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that Theobroma cacao extract can repress stimulated CGRP release by a mechanism that likely involves blockage of calcium channel activity. Furthermore, our findings suggest that the beneficial effects of diets rich in cocoa may include suppression of sensory trigeminal nerve activation. PMID:17997062

  13. Repression of calcitonin gene-related peptide expression in trigeminal neurons by a Theobroma cacao extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbey, Marcie J; Patil, Vinit V; Vause, Carrie V; Durham, Paul L

    2008-01-17

    Cocoa bean preparations were first used by the ancient Maya and Aztec civilizations of South America to treat a variety of medical ailments involving the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and nervous systems. Diets rich in foods containing abundant polyphenols, as found in cocoa, underlie the protective effects reported in chronic inflammatory diseases. Release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) from trigeminal nerves promotes inflammation in peripheral tissues and nociception. To determine whether a methanol extract of Theobroma cacao L. (Sterculiaceae) beans enriched for polyphenols could inhibit CGRP expression, both an in vitro and an in vivo approach was taken. Treatment of rat trigeminal ganglia cultures with depolarizing stimuli caused a significant increase in CGRP release that was repressed by pretreatment with Theobroma cacao extract. Pretreatment with Theobroma cacao was also shown to block the KCl- and capsaicin-stimulated increases in intracellular calcium. Next, the effects of Theobroma cacao on CGRP levels were determined using an in vivo model of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) inflammation. Capsaicin injection into the TMJ capsule caused an ipsilateral decrease in CGRP levels. Theobroma cacao extract injected into the TMJ capsule 24h prior to capsaicin treatment repressed the stimulatory effects of capsaicin. Our results demonstrate that Theobroma cacao extract can repress stimulated CGRP release by a mechanism that likely involves blockage of calcium channel activity. Furthermore, our findings suggest that the beneficial effects of diets rich in cocoa may include suppression of sensory trigeminal nerve activation.

  14. [Trigeminal motor paralysis and dislocation of the temporo-mandibular joints].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkawa, S; Yoshida, T; Ohsumi, Y; Tabuchi, M

    1996-07-01

    A 64-year-old woman with diabetes mellitus was admitted to our hospital with left hemiparesis of sudden onset. A brain MRI demonstrated a cerebral infarction in the ventral part of the right lower pons. When left hemiparesis worsened, she had dislocation of the temporo-mandibular joints repeatedly. Then, her lower jaw deviated to the right when she opened her mouth. Also, there was decreased contraction of the right masseter when she clenched her teeth. These findings suggest that there was trigeminal motor paralysis on the right side resulting from involvement of the intrapontine trigeminal motor nerve. She has no history of dislocation of the temporo-mandibular joints. An X-ray film showed that the temporo-mandibular joints were intact. Thus, it is possible that deviation of the lower jaw was the cause of this dislocation. We suspect that dislocation of the temporo-mandibular joints may occur as a complication of unilateral trigeminal motor paralysis. This has not been reported to our knowledge.

  15. Surgical Management of Familial Trigeminal Neuralgia With Different Inheritance Patterns: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Cervera-Martinez

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionTrigeminal neuralgia is a disorder characterized by unilateral electric shock-like pain, distributed in one or more trigeminal nerve branches and triggered by usually innocuous stimuli. Among the few case reports and literature reviews on familial trigeminal neuralgia (FTN, the results of several suggest the involvement of genes associated with biochemical alterations or atherosclerotic vascular malformations.BackgroundWe present four cases of FTN within two families (family A: two brothers; family B: two sisters. All patients were submitted to surgical treatment by the same surgeon.DiscussionCases 1 and 2 (family A exhibited FTN with an uncommon autosomal recessive pattern and clinical features consistent with previous literature reviews and case reports. However, in cases 3 and 4 (family B, we found FTN with a dominant autosomal pattern and an unusual physiopathology characterized by arachnoid adhesions.ConclusionWe conclude, in this case report, that there are several inheritance patterns as well as physiopathology that may be involved in FTN, and that both patterns described in our reported cases were successfully managed with surgery.

  16. Management of uncommon secondary trigeminal neuralgia related to a rare Arnold Chiari type I malformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zafar Ali Khan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Trigeminal neuralgia (TN may sometimes present secondary to an intra-cranial cause. Arnold Chiari Malformation (ACM is downward herniation of the cerebellar tonsils through the foramen magnum that may be a cause of TN like pain in very rare cases. Aims The aim of this brief report is to suggest the proper management of uncommon secondary trigeminal neuralgia related to a rare Arnold Chiari type I malformation. Methods A male patient presented electric shock like stabbing pain on the right side of the face for more than ten years. The symptoms were typical of trigeminal neuralgia except that there was loss of corneal reflex on the right side and the patient also complained of gait & sleep disturbances. Complex and multilevel diagnosis was made. Results A multiplanar imaging through brain acquiring T1/T2W1 revealed ACM Type I Malformation with caudal displacement of cerebellar tonsils through foramen magnum. Conclusion Dental surgeons and oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons should exclude intra-cranial causes by Magnetic Resonance Imaging(MRI in patients of TN presenting with loss of corneal reflex, gait and sleep disturbances due to night time pain episodes.

  17. Relationship between Sensory Stimulation and Side Effects in Percutaneous Radiofrequency Treatment of the Trigeminal Ganglion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koning, Mark V; Koning, Nick J; Koning, Henk M; van Kleef, Maarten

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of percutaneous radiofrequency (RF) treatment of the trigeminal ganglion for treating patients with trigeminal neuralgia, to determine which patients have a long-term benefit, and to evaluate the effect of RF parameters. A retrospective study in 28 consecutive patients in combination with a follow-up questionnaire (n = 26, 93% response). An initial treatment effect of 89% was observed, 60% sustained at 12-month follow-up. Major side effects were hypesthesia (56%), dry eye (20%), and masseter muscle weakness (12%). A lower sensory stimulation threshold during treatment was associated with better patient satisfaction (P = 0.016), improved pain relief (P = 0.039), and trended toward more hypesthesia (P = 0.077). This low-volume study reported treatment effects in an older population that were similar to previous studies. Only a higher incidence of hypesthesia was detected by long-term follow-up. This study supported the high efficiency of RF treatment, but there was a high level of side effects. Most notable, low sensory stimulation was associated with increased hypesthesia, whereas higher stimulation levels yielded less effectiveness. Further investigation of an optimal sensory stimulation range for percutaneous RF treatment of the trigeminal ganglion was found to be warranted. © 2013 World Institute of Pain.

  18. Post-operative orofacial pain, temporomandibular dysfunction and trigeminal sensitivity after recent pterional craniotomy: preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazoloto, Thiago Medina; de Siqueira, Silvia Regina Dowgan Tesseroli; Rocha-Filho, Pedro Augusto Sampaio; Figueiredo, Eberval Gadelha; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; de Siqueira, José Tadeu Tesseroli

    2017-05-01

    Surgical trauma at the temporalis muscle is a potential cause of post-craniotomy headache and temporomandibular disorders (TMD). The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of pain, masticatory dysfunction and trigeminal somatosensory abnormalities in patients who acquired aneurysms following pterional craniotomy. Fifteen patients were evaluated before and after the surgical procedure by a trained dentist. The evaluation consisted of the (1) research diagnostic criteria for TMD, (2) a standardized orofacial pain questionnaire and (3) a systematic protocol for quantitative sensory testing (QST) for the trigeminal nerve. After pterional craniotomy, 80% of the subjects, 12 patients, developed orofacial pain triggered by mandibular function. The pain intensity was measured by using the visual analog scale (VAS), and the mean pain intensity was 3.7. The prevalence of masticatory dysfunction was 86.7%, and there was a significant reduction of the maximum mouth opening. The sensory evaluation showed tactile and thermal hypoesthesia in the area of pterional access in all patients. There was a high frequency of temporomandibular dysfunction, postoperative orofacial pain and trigeminal sensory abnormalities. These findings can help to understand several abnormalities that can contribute to postoperative headache or orofacial pain complaints after pterional surgeries.

  19. Neuronavigator-guided percutaneous radiofrequency thermocoagulation in the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W C; Zhong, W X; Li, S T; Zheng, X S; Yang, M; Shi, J

    2012-03-01

    Although radiofrequency thermocoagulation is considered as a primary treatment for most patients with trigeminal neuralgia, neuronavigator-guided percutaneous radiofrequency thermocoagulation has been rarely reported. The object of this study was to assess the clinical value of neuronavigator-guided percutaneous radiofrequency thermocoagulation in the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia. The radiofrequency thermocoagulation was performed in 100 cases of trigeminal neuralgia. The patients were positioned supine or sitting, under Hartel's technique (reported by Sweet and Wepsic J Neurosurg 40:143-156, 1974), by anterior lateral facial approaches. The Gasserian ganglions were acupunctured, assisted by intraoperative CT scanning (3-digital reconstruction) and electrophysiology in order to accurately locate target. The needles located in oval foramen at the first puncture, the direction and position could be defined according to the electrophysiology examination. The pain alleviated immediately after operation. There occurred no serious complication and other nerve injury in all patients despite face numbness only. 3D-CT and electrophysiology Gasser's ganglion locations can raise the success rate of puncture, enhance the safety and reduce the incidence of complication, showing high academic value and its promising future.

  20. Hemorrhagic intracranial inflammatory pseudotumor originating from the trigeminal nerve: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Tae-Young; Jung, Shin; Lee, Min-Cheol; Moon, Kyung-Sub; Kim, In-Young; Kang, Sam-Suk; Kim, Soo-Han

    2006-01-01

    We report here on a case of intracranial inflammatory pseudotumor arising from the trigeminal nerve. A 52-year-old man presented with sudden onset severe headache. He had had facial numbness several months earlier and no signs indicating infection. On the computerized tomography scan, intracranial hemorrhage was detected at the cerebellopontine angle. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a 2.7-cm-sized, homogenously enhancing mass. A provisional diagnosis of trigeminal schwannoma was made, and suboccipital craniotomy was then performed. The mass was encapsulated and had multiple capsular veins. There was a evidence of intratumoral bleeding. It originated from the trigeminal root and was adhered to the 4th cranial nerve. Pathologic examination showed fibrovascular tissue with dense infiltrates of plasma cells and lymphocytes, some histiocytes, and occasional neutrophils and eosinophils. It showed immunopositivity for leukocyte common antigen (LCA) and immunonegativity for S-100 and lysozyme. It was also immunopositive for EBV antigen. Intracranial inflammatory pseudotumors mostly arise from dural/meningeal structures in the intracranial location. This case is the first to describe an intracranial inflammatory pseudotumor originating from a cranial nerve. The pathologic examination supported the postinfection hypothesis out of several possible pathologic mechanisms.

  1. An Open Study of Botulinum-A Toxin Treatment of Idiopathic Trigeminal Neuralgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Nikkhah

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Trigeminal Neuralgia (TN is a unilateral, recurrent, sharp facial pain disorder that is limited to the distribution of divisions of the trigeminal nerve. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of Botulinum neurotoxin type A (BTX-A for alleviating the frequency and severity of TN pain. Materials and Methods: This trial was performed as a before and after study. We treated 31 patients (15 male and 16 female with mean age of 52 year old that their diagnosis was made at least 4.5 years before. We injected BTX-A in various parts of face and particularly in the origin of mandibular and maxillary branches of trigeminal nerve. Injection volume was determined by the necessity and pain intensity measured with visual analog scale up to 100U. Patients were evaluated before and after the injection and were followed after week, and each month, for a three months period. Other related variables were recorded such as: toxin complications, pain status variations by brushing, chewing, cold weather and patient’s satisfaction with their therapy. Results: showed that after injection, pain intensity and frequency decreased after tooth brushing, chewing and cold weather (P

  2. [Herpes zoster of the trigeminal nerve: a case report and review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, V; Leonardi, A; Pavese, M; Raviola, E; Giordano, M

    2004-01-01

    Herpes zoster (shingles) is caused when the varicella zoster virus that has remained latent since an earlier varicella infection (chicken-pox) is reactivated. Herpes Zoster is a less common and endemic disease than varicella: factors causing reactivation are still not well known, but it occurs in older and/or immunocompromised individuals. Following reactivation, centrifugal migration of herpes zoster virus (HZV) occurs along sensory nerves to produce a characteristic painful cutaneous or mucocutaneous vesicular eruption that is generally limited to the single affected dermatome. Herpes zoster may affect any sensory ganglia and its cutaneous nerve: the most common sites affected are thoracic dermatomes (56%), followed by cranial nerves (13%) and lumbar (13%), cervical (11%) and sacral nerves (4%). Among cranial nerves, the trigeminal and facial nerves are the most affected due to reactivation of HZV latent in gasserian and geniculated ganglia. The 1st division of the trigeminal nerve is commonly affected, whereas the 2nd and the 3rd are rarely involved. During the prodromal stage, the only presenting symptom may be odontalgia, which may prove to be a diagnostic challenge for the dentist, since many diseases can cause orofacial pain, and the diagnosis must be established before final treatment. A literature review of herpes zoster of the trigeminal nerve is presented and the clinical presentation, differential diagnosis and treatment modalities are underlined. A case report is presented.

  3. Autonomous Intersection Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    detects that the driver is not slowing sufficiently fast. Jaguar, Honda, and BMW offer similar systems. Nissan and Toyota have recently begun offering...that the driver is not braking hard enough. Both Toyota and BMW are currently selling vehicles that can parallel park completely autonomously, even...other vehicles. The system was tested both in simulation and with a robotic vehicle. This work is sponsored by Toyota , who have also currently have an

  4. Autonomía

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez Muñoz, Juan Antonio

    2007-01-01

    En este ensayo la noción de autonomía es estudiada de un modo diferente al sentido habitual; sus implicaciones y las contradicciones que encierra, específicamente como sucedáneo de la genuina libertad. El artículo describe el modelo de hombre presupuesto en su uso. Concluye con su inviabilidad para resolver problemas morales y sociales.

  5. Mobile Intelligent Autonomous Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Jitendra R. Raol; Ajith Gopal

    2010-01-01

    Mobile intelligent autonomous systems (MIAS) is a fast emerging research area. Although it can be regarded as a general R&D area, it is mainly directed towards robotics. Several important subtopics within MIAS research are:(i) perception and reasoning, (ii) mobility and navigation,(iii) haptics and teleoperation, (iv) image fusion/computervision, (v) modelling of manipulators, (vi) hardware/software architectures for planning and behaviour learning leadingto robotic architecture, (vii) ve...

  6. Highly Skilled Autonomous Vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Manuel Acosta Reche; Stratis Kanarachos; Mike V Blundell

    2017-01-01

    Recent research suggests that collision mitigation on low grip surfaces might require autonomous vehicles to execute maneuvers such as drift, trail braking or Scandinavian flick. In order to achieve this it is necessary to perceive the vehicle states and their interaction with the environment, and use this information to determine the chassis limits. A first look at the virtual automotive sensing problem is provided, followed by a description of Rally driving modeling approaches. Finally, a c...

  7. Autonomous Underwater Gliders

    OpenAIRE

    Wood,; Stephen,

    2009-01-01

    Autonomous Underwater Vehicles are only now being marketed as robust commercial vehicles for many industries, and of these vehicles underwater gliders are becoming the new tool for oceanographers. Satellites have provided scientists and marine specialists with measurements of the sea surface such as temperature since the late 1970s, and data via subsurface oceanographic moorings since the 1950's. As stated by David Smeed of the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, England, that "gliders...

  8. Nature's Autonomous Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, H. G.; Yee, J.-H.; Mayr, M.; Schnetzler, R.

    2012-01-01

    Nonlinearity is required to produce autonomous oscillations without external time dependent source, and an example is the pendulum clock. The escapement mechanism of the clock imparts an impulse for each swing direction, which keeps the pendulum oscillating at the resonance frequency. Among nature's observed autonomous oscillators, examples are the quasi-biennial oscillation and bimonthly oscillation of the Earth atmosphere, and the 22-year solar oscillation. The oscillations have been simulated in numerical models without external time dependent source, and in Section 2 we summarize the results. Specifically, we shall discuss the nonlinearities that are involved in generating the oscillations, and the processes that produce the periodicities. In biology, insects have flight muscles, which function autonomously with wing frequencies that far exceed the animals' neural capacity; Stretch-activation of muscle contraction is the mechanism that produces the high frequency oscillation of insect flight, discussed in Section 3. The same mechanism is also invoked to explain the functioning of the cardiac muscle. In Section 4, we present a tutorial review of the cardio-vascular system, heart anatomy, and muscle cell physiology, leading up to Starling's Law of the Heart, which supports our notion that the human heart is also a nonlinear oscillator. In Section 5, we offer a broad perspective of the tenuous links between the fluid dynamical oscillators and the human heart physiology.

  9. Spontaneous behavioral responses in the orofacial region: A model of trigeminal pain in mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Reyes, Marcela; Akerman, Simon; Nguyen, Elaine; Vijjeswarapu, Alice; Hom, Betty; Dong, Hong-Wei; Charles, Andrew C.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To develop a translational mouse model for the study and measurement of non-evoked pain in the orofacial region by establishing markers of nociceptive-specific grooming behaviors in the mouse. BACKGROUND Some of the most prevalent and debilitating conditions involve pain in the trigeminal distribution. Although there are current therapies for these pain conditions, for many patients they are far from optimal. Understanding the pathophysiology of pain disorders arising from structures innervated by the trigeminal nerve is still limited and most animal behavioral models focus on the measurement of evoked pain. In patients, spontaneous (non-evoked) pain responses provide a more accurate representation of the pain experience than do responses that are evoked by an artificial stimulus. Therefore, the development of animal models that measure spontaneous nociceptive behaviors may provide a significant translational tool for a better understanding of pain neurobiology. METHODS C57BL/6 mice received either an injection of 0.9% Saline solution or complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) into the right masseter muscle. Animals were video recorded and then analyzed by an observer blind to the experiment group. The duration of different facial grooming patterns performed in the area of injection were measured. After 2 hrs, mice were euthanized, perfused and the brainstem was removed. Fos protein expression in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis was quantified using immunohistochemistry to investigate nociceptive-specific neuronal activation. A separate group of animals was treated with morphine sulfate, to determine the nociceptive-specific nature of their behaviors. RESULTS We characterized and quantified 3 distinct patterns of acute grooming behaviors: fore-paw rubbing, lower lip skin/cheek rubbing against enclosure floor and hind paw scratching. These behaviors occurred with a reproducible frequency and time course, and were inhibited by the analgesic morphine. CFA

  10. Autonomic Neuropathy in Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Verrotti, Alberto; Prezioso, Giovanni; Scattoni, Raffaella; Chiarelli, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN) is a serious and common complication of diabetes, often overlooked and misdiagnosed. It is a systemic-wide disorder that may be asymptomatic in the early stages. The most studied and clinically important form of DAN is cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy defined as the impairment of autonomic control of the cardiovascular system in patients with diabetes after exclusion of other causes. The reported prevalence of DAN varies widely depending on inconsistent ...

  11. Nerve growth factor induces facial heat hyperalgesia and plays a role in trigeminal neuropathic pain in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Reis, Renata C; Kopruszinski, Caroline M; Nones, Carina F M; Chichorro, Juliana G

    2016-09-01

    There is preclinical evidence that nerve growth factor (NGF) contributes toward inflammatory hyperalgesia in the orofacial region, but the mechanisms underlying its hyperalgesic effect as well as its role in trigeminal neuropathic pain require further investigation. This study investigated the ability of NGF to induce facial heat hyperalgesia and the involvement of tyrosine kinase receptor A, transient receptor potential vanilloid 1, and mast cells in NGF pronociceptive effects. In addition, the role of NGF in heat hyperalgesia in a model of trigeminal neuropathic pain was evaluated. NGF injection into the upper lip of naive rats induced long-lasting heat hyperalgesia. Pretreatment with an antibody anti-NGF, antagonists of tyrosine kinase receptor A, and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 receptors or compound 48/80, to induce mast-cell degranulation, all attenuated NGF-induced hyperalgesia. In a rat model of trigeminal neuropathic pain, local treatment with anti-NGF significantly reduced heat hyperalgesia. In addition, increased NGF levels were detected in the ipsilateral infraorbital nerve branch at the time point that represents the peak of heat hyperalgesia. The results suggest that NGF is a prominent hyperalgesic mediator in the trigeminal system and it may represent a potential therapeutic target for the management of painful orofacial conditions, including trigeminal neuropathic pain.

  12. Robotics and Autonomous Systems Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides an environment for developing and evaluating intelligent software for both actual and simulated autonomous vehicles. Laboratory computers provide...

  13. Autonomic Fuselet Specification and Composition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mills, Peter H

    2006-01-01

    A framework for autonomic fuselet business logic development was developed, using semantic web services and workflow technologies to specify fuselet information needs, to define an executable workflow...

  14. Autonomous component carrier selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, Luis Guilherme Uzeda; Pedersen, Klaus; Mogensen, Preben

    2009-01-01

    management and efficient system operation. Due to the expected large number of user-deployed cells, centralized network planning becomes unpractical and new scalable alternatives must be sought. In this article, we propose a fully distributed and scalable solution to the interference management problem...... in local areas, basing our study case on LTE-Advanced. We present extensive network simulation results to demonstrate that a simple and robust interference management scheme, called autonomous component carrier selection allows each cell to select the most attractive frequency configuration; improving...... the experience of all users and not just the few best ones; while overall cell capacity is not compromised....

  15. Toward autonomous spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, L. J.; Calabrese, P. G.; Walsh, M. J.; Owens, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    Ways in which autonomous behavior of spacecraft can be extended to treat situations wherein a closed loop control by a human may not be appropriate or even possible are explored. Predictive models that minimize mean least squared error and arbitrary cost functions are discussed. A methodology for extracting cyclic components for an arbitrary environment with respect to usual and arbitrary criteria is developed. An approach to prediction and control based on evolutionary programming is outlined. A computer program capable of predicting time series is presented. A design of a control system for a robotic dense with partially unknown physical properties is presented.

  16. Autonomous mobile robot teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agah, Arvin; Bekey, George A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes autonomous mobile robot teams performing tasks in unstructured environments. The behavior and the intelligence of the group is distributed, and the system does not include a central command base or leader. The novel concept of the Tropism-Based Cognitive Architecture is introduced, which is used by the robots in order to produce behavior transforming their sensory information to proper action. The results of a number of simulation experiments are presented. These experiments include worlds where the robot teams must locate, decompose, and gather objects, and defend themselves against hostile predators, while navigating around stationary and mobile obstacles.

  17. Learning for Autonomous Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelova, Anelia; Howard, Andrew; Matthies, Larry; Tang, Benyang; Turmon, Michael; Mjolsness, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Robotic ground vehicles for outdoor applications have achieved some remarkable successes, notably in autonomous highway following (Dickmanns, 1987), planetary exploration (1), and off-road navigation on Earth (1). Nevertheless, major challenges remain to enable reliable, high-speed, autonomous navigation in a wide variety of complex, off-road terrain. 3-D perception of terrain geometry with imaging range sensors is the mainstay of off-road driving systems. However, the stopping distance at high speed exceeds the effective lookahead distance of existing range sensors. Prospects for extending the range of 3-D sensors is strongly limited by sensor physics, eye safety of lasers, and related issues. Range sensor limitations also allow vehicles to enter large cul-de-sacs even at low speed, leading to long detours. Moreover, sensing only terrain geometry fails to reveal mechanical properties of terrain that are critical to assessing its traversability, such as potential for slippage, sinkage, and the degree of compliance of potential obstacles. Rovers in the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission have got stuck in sand dunes and experienced significant downhill slippage in the vicinity of large rock hazards. Earth-based off-road robots today have very limited ability to discriminate traversable vegetation from non-traversable vegetation or rough ground. It is impossible today to preprogram a system with knowledge of these properties for all types of terrain and weather conditions that might be encountered.

  18. Towards autonomous vehicular clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Olariu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The dawn of the 21st century has seen a growing interest in vehicular networking and its myriad potential applications. The initial view of practitioners and researchers was that radio-equipped vehicles could keep the drivers informed about potential safety risks and increase their awareness of road conditions. The view then expanded to include access to the Internet and associated services. This position paper proposes and promotes a novel and more comprehensive vision namely, that advances in vehicular networks, embedded devices and cloud computing will enable the formation of autonomous clouds of vehicular computing, communication, sensing, power and physical resources. Hence, we coin the term, autonomous vehicular clouds (AVCs. A key feature distinguishing AVCs from conventional cloud computing is that mobile AVC resources can be pooled dynamically to serve authorized users and to enable autonomy in real-time service sharing and management on terrestrial, aerial, or aquatic pathways or theaters of operations. In addition to general-purpose AVCs, we also envision the emergence of specialized AVCs such as mobile analytics laboratories. Furthermore, we envision that the integration of AVCs with ubiquitous smart infrastructures including intelligent transportation systems, smart cities and smart electric power grids will have an enormous societal impact enabling ubiquitous utility cyber-physical services at the right place, right time and with right-sized resources.

  19. KYNA analogue SZR72 modifies CFA-induced dural inflammation- regarding expression of pERK1/2 and IL-1β in the rat trigeminal ganglion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukács, M; Warfvinge, K; Kruse, L S

    2016-01-01

    modify the neurogenic inflammatory response in the trigeminal ganglion. METHODS: Inflammation in the trigeminal ganglion was induced by local dural application of Complete Freunds Adjuvant (CFA). Levels of phosphorylated MAP kinase pERK1/2 and IL-1β expression in V1 region of the trigeminal ganglion were...... investigated using immunohistochemistry and Western blot. FINDINGS: Pretreatment with one dose of SZR72 abolished the CFA-induced pERK1/2 and IL-1β activation in the trigeminal ganglion. No significant change was noted in case of repeated treatment with SZR72 as compared to a single dose. CONCLUSIONS......: This is the first study that demonstrates that one dose of KYNA analog before application of CFA can give anti-inflammatory response in a model of trigeminal activation, opening a new line for further investigations regarding possible effects of KYNA derivates....

  20. A Comparative Study between Oxcarbazepine and Gabapentin Regarding Therapeutic Efficiency and Tolerability in the Treatment of Trigeminal Neuralgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakir Mohan Debta

    2010-01-01

    Recently two newer anticonvulsant oxcarbazepine (OXC a ketoderivative of carbamazepine and gabapentin (GBP has been trailed in trigeminal neuralgia in different open clinical trial as monotherapy with encouraging results. These drugs have convenient dosage and surprisingly fewer side effects. These facts that trigeminal neuralgia responds to newer anticonvulsant (oxcarbazepine, gabapentin in a better perspective, enabled me to conduct the present clinical trial on 54 patients (both in newly diagnosed TN patient and refractive patient of trigeminal neuralgia who were made two randomized group for separate monotherapy study for a period of six months. The therapeutic effect of OXC and gabapentin (GBP in relation to reduction in number of attacks of pain and severity of pain were evaluated. All the scoring data showed OXC is more therapeutic efficacious cost-effective and well-tolerated profile than gabapentin and an emerging as a drug for treatment of TN in both new and refractive patients.

  1. [Pure trigeminal motor neuropathy presenting with temporo-mandibular joint dysfunction in a patient with HIV and HCV infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anheim, M; Echaniz-Laguna, A; Rey, D; Tranchant, C

    2006-01-01

    Pure trigeminal motor neuropathy (PTMN) is a rarely described condition. We report the case of a 41-year-old woman infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV1) and hepatitis C virus who presented with weakness of left temporalis and masseter muscles and painful left temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMD) a few months after cerebral toxoplasmosis revealing acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Magnetic resonance imaging revealed severe wasting and fat replacement of the left temporalis, pterygoid and masseter muscles and showed neither abnormalities in the left motor nucleus of the trigeminal nerve nor compression of the left trigeminal nerve. Electromyographic examination gave evidence of denervation in the left temporalis, masseter and pterygoid muscles and blink reflex studies were normal, confirming the diagnosis of PTMN which was probably secondary to HIV and HCV co-infection.

  2. The Role of Nav1.9 Channel in the Development of Neuropathic Orofacial Pain Associated with Trigeminal Neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lulz, Ana Paula; Kopach, Olga; Santana-Varela, Sonia; Wood, John N

    2015-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is accompanied by severe mechanical, thermal and chemical hypersensitivity of the orofacial area innervated by neurons of trigeminal ganglion (TG). We examined the role of the voltage-gated sodium channel subtype Nav1.9 in the development of trigeminal neuralgia. We found that Nav1.9 is required for the development of both thermal and mechanical hypersensitivity induced by constriction of the infraorbital nerve (CION). The CION model does not induce change on Nav1.9 mRNA expression in the ipsilateral TG neurons when evaluated 9 days after surgery. These results demonstrate that Nav1.9 channels play a critical role in the development of orofacial neuropathic pain. New routes for the treatment of orofacial neuropathic pain focussing on regulation of the voltage-gated Nav1.9 sodium channel activity should be investigated. © 2015 Luiz et al.

  3. Behavioural domain knowledge transfer for autonomous agents

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rosman, Benjamin S

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available , and Behavior Transfer in Autonomous Robots, AAAI 2014 Fall Symposium Series, 13-15 November 2014 Behavioural Domain Knowledge Transfer for Autonomous Agents Benjamin Rosman Mobile Intelligent Autonomous Systems Modelling and Digital Science Council...

  4. From cooperative to autonomous vehicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sande, T.P.J.; Nijmeijer, H.; Fossen, T.I.; Pettersen, K.Y.; Nijmeijer, H.

    2017-01-01

    What defines an autonomous vehicle? In this chapter the authors will try to answer this question and formulate the limitations of driver assistance systems as well as for—conditionally—autonomous vehicles . First a short summary of the levels of automation as provided by the society of automotive

  5. Autonomous Learner Model Resource Book

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, George T.; Carey, Robin J.; Kapushion, Blanche M.

    2016-01-01

    "Autonomous Learner Model Resource Book" includes activities and strategies to support the development of autonomous learners. More than 40 activities are included, all geared to the emotional, social, cognitive, and physical development of students. Teachers may use these activities and strategies with the entire class, small groups, or…

  6. Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Found Inline with the Fields of Repeat Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Recurrent Trigeminal Neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berti, Aldo; Granville, Michelle; Jacobson, Robert E

    2018-01-12

    A case of an extremely healthy, active, 96-year-old patient, nonsmoker, is reviewed. He was initially treated for left V1, V2, and V3 trigeminal neuralgia in 2001, at age 80, with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) with a dose of 80 Gy to the left retrogasserian trigeminal nerve. He remained asymptomatic for nine years until his trigeminal pain recurred in 2010. He was first treated medically but was intolerant to increasing doses of carbamazepine and gabapentin. He underwent a second SRS in 2012 with a dose of 65.5 Gy to the same retrogasserian area of the trigeminal nerve, making the total cumulative dose 125.5 Gy. In late 2016, four years after the 2 nd SRS, he was found to have invasive keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma in the left posterior mandibular oral mucosa. Keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma is seen primarily in smokers or associated with the human papillomavirus, neither of which was found in this patient. A review of his two SRS plans shows that the left lower posterior mandibular area was clearly within the radiation fields for both SRS treatments. It is postulated that his cancer developed secondary to the long-term radiation effect with a very localized area being exposed twice to a focused, cumulative, high-dose radiation. There are individual reports in the literature of oral mucositis immediately after radiation for trigeminal neuralgia and the delayed development of malignant tumors, including glioblastoma found after SRS for acoustic neuromas, but there are no reports of delayed malignant tumors developing within the general radiation field. Using repeat SRS is an accepted treatment for recurrent trigeminal neuralgia, but physicians and patients should be aware of the potential effects of higher cumulative radiation effects within the treatment field when patients undergo repeat procedures.

  7. Fetal alcohol exposure reduces responsiveness of taste nerves and trigeminal chemosensory neurons to ethanol and its flavor components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glendinning, John I; Tang, Joyce; Morales Allende, Ana Paula; Bryant, Bruce P; Youngentob, Lisa; Youngentob, Steven L

    2017-08-01

    Fetal alcohol exposure (FAE) leads to increased intake of ethanol in adolescent rats and humans. We asked whether these behavioral changes may be mediated in part by changes in responsiveness of the peripheral taste and oral trigeminal systems. We exposed the experimental rats to ethanol in utero by administering ethanol to dams through a liquid diet; we exposed the control rats to an isocaloric and isonutritive liquid diet. To assess taste responsiveness, we recorded responses of the chorda tympani (CT) and glossopharyngeal (GL) nerves to lingual stimulation with ethanol, quinine, sucrose, and NaCl. To assess trigeminal responsiveness, we measured changes in calcium levels of isolated trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons during stimulation with ethanol, capsaicin, mustard oil, and KCl. Compared with adolescent control rats, the adolescent experimental rats exhibited diminished CT nerve responses to ethanol, quinine, and sucrose and GL nerve responses to quinine and sucrose. The reductions in taste responsiveness persisted into adulthood for quinine but not for any of the other stimuli. Adolescent experimental rats also exhibited reduced TG neuron responses to ethanol, capsaicin, and mustard oil. The lack of change in responsiveness of the taste nerves to NaCl and the TG neurons to KCl indicates that FAE altered only a subset of the response pathways within each chemosensory system. We propose that FAE reprograms development of the peripheral taste and trigeminal systems in ways that reduce their responsiveness to ethanol and surrogates for its pleasant (i.e., sweet) and unpleasant (i.e., bitterness, oral burning) flavor attributes. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Pregnant mothers are advised to avoid alcohol. This is because even small amounts of alcohol can alter fetal brain development and increase the risk of adolescent alcohol abuse. We asked how fetal alcohol exposure (FAE) produces the latter effect in adolescent rats by measuring responsiveness of taste nerves and trigeminal

  8. Calcitonin gene-related peptide promotes cellular changes in trigeminal neurons and glia implicated in peripheral and central sensitization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cady Ryan J

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP, a neuropeptide released from trigeminal nerves, is implicated in the underlying pathology of temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD. Elevated levels of CGRP in the joint capsule correlate with inflammation and pain. CGRP mediates neurogenic inflammation in peripheral tissues by increasing blood flow, recruiting immune cells, and activating sensory neurons. The goal of this study was to investigate the capability of CGRP to promote peripheral and central sensitization in a model of TMD. Results Temporal changes in protein expression in trigeminal ganglia and spinal trigeminal nucleus were determined by immunohistochemistry following injection of CGRP in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ capsule of male Sprague-Dawley rats. CGRP stimulated expression of the active forms of the MAP kinases p38 and ERK, and PKA in trigeminal ganglia at 2 and 24 hours. CGRP also caused a sustained increase in the expression of c-Fos neurons in the spinal trigeminal nucleus. In contrast, levels of P2X3 in spinal neurons were only significantly elevated at 2 hours in response to CGRP. In addition, CGRP stimulated expression of GFAP in astrocytes and OX-42 in microglia at 2 and 24 hours post injection. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that an elevated level of CGRP in the joint, which is associated with TMD, stimulate neuronal and glial expression of proteins implicated in the development of peripheral and central sensitization. Based on our findings, we propose that inhibition of CGRP-mediated activation of trigeminal neurons and glial cells with selective non-peptide CGRP receptor antagonists would be beneficial in the treatment of TMD.

  9. Activation properties of trigeminal motoneurons in participants with and without bruxism

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amico, Jessica M.; Yavuz, Ş. Utku; Saraçoğlu, Ahmet; Atiş, Elif Sibel; Türker, Kemal S.

    2013-01-01

    In animals, sodium- and calcium-mediated persistent inward currents (PICs), which produce long-lasting periods of depolarization under conditions of low synaptic drive, can be activated in trigeminal motoneurons following the application of the monoamine serotonin. Here we examined if PICs are activated in human trigeminal motoneurons during voluntary contractions and under physiological levels of monoaminergic drive (e.g., serotonin and norepinephrine) using a paired motor unit analysis technique. We also examined if PICs activated during voluntary contractions are larger in participants who demonstrate involuntary chewing during sleep (bruxism), which is accompanied by periods of high monoaminergic drive. In control participants, during a slowly increasing and then decreasing isometric contraction, the firing rate of an earlier-recruited masseter motor unit, which served as a measure of synaptic input to a later-recruited test unit, was consistently lower during derecruitment of the test unit compared with at recruitment (ΔF = 4.6 ± 1.5 imp/s). The ΔF, therefore, is a measure of the reduction in synaptic input needed to counteract the depolarization from the PIC to provide an indirect estimate of PIC amplitude. The range of ΔF values measured in the bruxer participants during similar voluntary contractions was the same as in controls, suggesting that abnormally high levels of monoaminergic drive are not continually present in the absence of involuntary motor activity. We also observed a consistent “onion skin effect” during the moderately sized contractions (motor units discharged at slower rates (by 4–7 imp/s) compared with motor units with relatively lower thresholds. The presence of lower firing rates in the more fatigue-prone, higher threshold trigeminal motoneurons, in addition to the activation of PICs, likely facilitates the activation of the masseter muscle during motor activities such as eating, nonnutritive chewing, clenching, and yawning

  10. Microvascular Decompression for Treatment of Trigeminal Neuralgia in Patient with Facial Nerve Schwannoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinelli, John P; Van Gompel, Jamie J; Link, Michael J; Carlson, Matthew L

    2018-05-01

    Secondary trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is uncommon. When a space-occupying lesion with mass effect is identified, the associated TN is often exclusively attributed to the tumor. This report illustrates the importance of considering coexistent actionable pathology when surgically treating secondary TN. A 51-year-old woman presented with abrupt-onset TN of the V2 and V3 nerve divisions with hypesthesia. She denied changes in hearing, balance, or facial nerve dysfunction. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a 1.6-cm contrast-enhancing cerebellopontine angle tumor that effaced the trigeminal nerve, consistent with a vestibular schwannoma. In addition, a branch of the superior cerebellar artery abutted the cisternal segment of the trigeminal nerve on T2-weighted thin-slice magnetic resonance imaging. Intraoperative electrical stimulation of the tumor elicited a response from the facial nerve at low threshold over the entire accessible tumor surface, indicating that the tumor was a facial nerve schwannoma. Considering the patient's lack of facial nerve deficit and that the tumor exhibited no safe entry point for intracapsular debulking, tumor resection was not performed. Working between the tumor and tentorium, a branch of the superior cerebellar artery was identified and decompressed with a Teflon pad. At last follow-up, the patient exhibited resolution of her TN. Her hearing and facial nerve function remained intact. Despite obstruction from a medium-sized tumor, it is still possible to achieve microvascular decompression of the fifth cranial nerve. This emphasizes the importance of considering other actionable pathology during surgical management of presumed tumor-induced TN. Further, TN is relatively uncommon with medium-sized vestibular schwannomas and coexistent causes should be considered. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Early Corneal Innervation and Trigeminal Alterations in Parkinson Disease: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrigo, Alessandro; Rania, Laura; Calamuneri, Alessandro; Postorino, Elisa Imelde; Mormina, Enricomaria; Gaeta, Michele; Marino, Silvia; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; Quartarone, Angelo; Anastasi, Giuseppe; Puzzolo, Domenico; Aragona, Pasquale

    2018-04-01

    To describe corneal innervation and trigeminal alterations in drug-naive patients with Parkinson disease (PD). A case series study was conducted by recruiting 3 early drug-naive patients with PD, 2 men and 1 woman (age: 72, 68, and 66, respectively). Ophthalmologic assessment included Ocular Surface Disease Index questionnaire, visual acuity by the logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution score, pupillary light reflexes, extrinsic ocular movements, corneal sensitivity, and slit-lamp examination. Corneal innervation parameter changes were evaluated in vivo using the Confoscan 4 confocal microscope, and they were compared with a control data set. The Heidelberg Retina Tomograph 3 (HRT3) has been used to assess retinal alterations in our patients, if compared with normal range values provided by the HRT3. Moreover, 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) analysis of water diffusion property changes of trigeminal nerves was performed. All data were analyzed and compared with 2 control data sets made by 14 age-matched controls. Patients with PD showed profound alterations of corneal innervation and of trigeminal diffusion MRI parameters, compared with controls. Strong differences (PD vs. controls) were found for deep nerve tortuosity (Kallinikos mean 19.94 vs. 2.13) and the number of beadings (mean 34.2 vs. 15.5). HRT3 retinal evaluation revealed less structural changes compared with the normal range. Diffusion MRI showed profound changes of white matter diffusion properties (PD vs. controls), with fractional anisotropy decrement (mean 0.3029 vs. 0.3329) and mean diffusivity increment (mean 0.00127 vs. 0.00106). Corneal innervation changes might occur earlier in patients with PD than in retinal ones. Confocal corneal innervation analysis might provide possible early biomarkers for a better PD evaluation and for its earlier diagnosis.

  12. Antinociceptive Effects of Transcytosed Botulinum Neurotoxin Type A on Trigeminal Nociception in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye-Jin; Lee, Geun-Woo; Kim, Min-Ji; Yang, Kui-Ye; Kim, Seong-Taek; Bae, Yong-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    We examined the effects of peripherally or centrally administered botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT-A) on orofacial inflammatory pain to evaluate the antinociceptive effect of BoNT-A and its underlying mechanisms. The experiments were carried out on male Sprague-Dawley rats. Subcutaneous (3 U/kg) or intracisternal (0.3 or 1 U/kg) administration of BoNT-A significantly inhibited the formalin-induced nociceptive response in the second phase. Both subcutaneous (1 or 3 U/kg) and intracisternal (0.3 or 1 U/kg) injection of BoNT-A increased the latency of head withdrawal response in the complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-treated rats. Intracisternal administration of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) evoked nociceptive behavior via the activation of trigeminal neurons, which was attenuated by the subcutaneous or intracisternal injection of BoNT-A. Intracisternal injection of NMDA up-regulated c-Fos expression in the trigeminal neurons of the medullary dorsal horn. Subcutaneous (3 U/kg) or intracisternal (1 U/kg) administration of BoNT-A significantly reduced the number of c-Fos immunoreactive neurons in the NMDA-treated rats. These results suggest that the central antinociceptive effects the peripherally or centrally administered BoNT-A are mediated by transcytosed BoNT-A or direct inhibition of trigeminal neurons. Our data suggest that central targets of BoNT-A might provide a new therapeutic tool for the treatment of orofacial chronic pain conditions. PMID:26170739

  13. Intravenous dextromethorphan/quinidine inhibits activity of dura-sensitive spinal trigeminal neurons in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, A Y; Lyubashina, O A; Berkovich, R R; Panteleev, S S

    2015-09-01

    Migraine is a chronic neurological disorder characterized by episodes of throbbing headaches. Practically all medications currently used in migraine prophylaxis have a number of substantial disadvantages and use limitations. Therefore, the further search for principally new prophylactic antimigraine agents remains an important task. The objective of our study was to evaluate the effects of a fixed combination of dextromethorphan hydrobromide and quinidine sulphate (DM/Q) on activity of the spinal trigeminal neurons in an electrophysiological model of trigemino-durovascular nociception. The study was performed in 15 male Wistar rats, which were anaesthetized with urethane/α-chloralose and paralysed using pipecuronium bromide. The effects of cumulative intravenous infusions of DM/Q (three steps performed 30 min apart, 15/7.5 mg/kg of DM/Q in 0.5 mL of isotonic saline per step) on ongoing and dural electrical stimulation-induced neuronal activities were tested in a group of eight rats over 90 min. Other seven animals received cumulative infusion of equal volumes of saline and served as control. Cumulative administration of DM/Q produced steady suppression of both the ongoing activity of the spinal trigeminal neurons and their responses to electrical stimulation of the dura mater. It is evident that the observed DM/Q-induced suppression of trigeminal neuron excitability can lead to a reduction in nociceptive transmission from meninges to higher centres of the brain. Since the same mechanism is believed to underlie the pharmacodynamics of many well-known antimigraine drugs, results of the present study enable us to anticipate the potential efficacy of DM/Q in migraine. © 2014 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  14. Neurons within the trigeminal mesencephalic nucleus encode for the kinematic parameters of the whisker pad macrovibrissae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mameli, Ombretta; Caria, Marcello A; Biagi, Francesca; Zedda, Marco; Farina, Vittorio

    2017-05-01

    It has been recently shown in rats that spontaneous movements of whisker pad macrovibrissae elicited evoked responses in the trigeminal mesencephalic nucleus (Me5). In the present study, electrophysiological and neuroanatomical experiments were performed in anesthetized rats to evaluate whether, besides the whisker displacement per se, the Me5 neurons are also involved in encoding the kinematic properties of macrovibrissae movements, and also whether, as reported for the trigeminal ganglion, even within the Me5 nucleus exists a neuroanatomical representation of the whisker pad macrovibrissae. Extracellular electrical activity of single Me5 neurons was recorded before, during, and after mechanical deflection of the ipsilateral whisker pad macrovibrissae in different directions, and with different velocities and amplitudes. In several groups of animals, single or multiple injections of the tracer Dil were performed into the whisker pad of one side, in close proximity to the vibrissae follicles, in order to label the peripheral terminals of the Me5 neurons innervating the macrovibrissae (whisking-neurons), and therefore, the respective perikaria within the nucleus. Results showed that: (1) the whisker pad macrovibrissae were represented in the medial-caudal part of the Me5 nucleus by a single cluster of cells whose number seemed to match that of the macrovibrissae; (2) macrovibrissae mechanical deflection elicited significant responses in the Me5 whisking-neurons, which were related to the direction, amplitude, and frequency of the applied deflection. The specific functional role of Me5 neurons involved in encoding proprioceptive information arising from the macrovibrissae movements is discussed within the framework of the whole trigeminal nuclei activities. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  15. Field-testing of the ICHD-3 beta diagnostic criteria for classical trigeminal neuralgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maarbjerg, Stine; Sørensen, Morten Togo; Gozalov, Aydin

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We aimed to field-test the beta version of the third edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD-3 beta) diagnostic criteria for classical trigeminal neuralgia (TN). The proposed beta draft of the 11th version of the International Classification of Diseases...... (ICD-11 beta) is almost exclusively based on the ICHD-3 beta classification structure although slightly abbreviated. We compared sensitivity and specificity to ICHD-2 criteria, and evaluated the needs for revision. METHODS: Clinical characteristics were systematically and prospectively collected from...

  16. Intractable trigeminal neuralgia: A single institution experience in 26 patients treated with stereotactic gamma knife radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mark, Rufus J.; Duma, Christopher M.; Jacques, Dean B.; Kopyov, Oleg V.; Copcutt, Brian

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: In patients with trigeminal neuralgia, severe pain can persist, or recur despite aggressive medical management and open surgery. Recently, Gamma Knife radiosurgery has been used with promising results. We report on our series of 26 patients with intractable trigeminal neuralgia treated with stereotactic Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Materials and Methods: Between 1991 and 1995, 26 patients with intractable trigeminal neuralgia were treated at our institution using stereotactic Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Medical management had failed in all cases. In addition, 13 patients underwent a total of 20 open surgeries, with transient, or no pain relief. There were 19 females, and 7 males. Patient ages ranged from 37 to 87 years, with a median of 74 years. All patients were treated with a 201 source Cobalt-60 Gamma Knife unit. All patients underwent placement of the Leksell frame, followed by MRI scanning and computer treatment planning. The target in all patients was the fifth cranial nerve root entry zone into the brainstem. Twenty-five patients received between 64.3 to 70 Gy prescribed to Dmax in one shot. One patient received 120 Gy to Dmax in one shot. The 4 mm collimator was used in 22 cases, and the 8 mm in 4 cases. Follow-up ranged from 5 to 55 months, with a median of 19 months. Complete resolution (CR) of pain was scored when the patient reported being pain free off all medication. Partial resolution (PR) was scored when the patient reported > 50% pain reduction after Gamma Knife treatment. Results: At last follow-up, 84.6% ((22(26))) reported CR or PR of pain after Gamma Knife treatment. Forty-two percent ((11(26))) of patients reported CR, and 42%((11(26))) reported PR of pain. There was a dose response. In patients receiving < 70 Gy, 25% ((3(12))) reported CR, while 57% ((8(14))) of those receiving ≥ 70 Gy reported CR. Complications occurred in two (8%) patients. One patient developed transient numbness of the face after 70 Gy, and a second patient

  17. Prolonged vertigo and ataxia after mandibular nerve block for treatment of trigeminal neuralgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind Chaturvedi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Common complications of neurolytic mandibular nerve block are hypoesthesia, dysesthesia, and chemical neuritis. We report a rare complication, prolonged severe vertigo and ataxia, after neurolytic mandibular blockade in a patient suffering from trigeminal neuralgia. Coronoid approach was used for right sided mandibular block. After successful test injection with local anesthetic, absolute alcohol was given for neurolytic block. Immediately after alcohol injection, patient developed nausea and vomiting along with severe vertigo, ataxia and hypertension. Neurological evaluation was normal except for the presence of vertigo and ataxia. Computerised tomography scan brain was also normal. Patient was admitted for observation and symptomatic treatment was given. Vertigo and ataxia gradually improved over 24 hours.

  18. Prolonged vertigo and ataxia after mandibular nerve block for treatment of trigeminal neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Arvind; Dash, Hh

    2011-07-01

    Common complications of neurolytic mandibular nerve block are hypoesthesia, dysesthesia, and chemical neuritis. We report a rare complication, prolonged severe vertigo and ataxia, after neurolytic mandibular blockade in a patient suffering from trigeminal neuralgia. Coronoid approach was used for right sided mandibular block. After successful test injection with local anesthetic, absolute alcohol was given for neurolytic block. Immediately after alcohol injection, patient developed nausea and vomiting along with severe vertigo, ataxia and hypertension. Neurological evaluation was normal except for the presence of vertigo and ataxia. Computerised tomography scan brain was also normal. Patient was admitted for observation and symptomatic treatment was given. Vertigo and ataxia gradually improved over 24 hours.

  19. Pharmacological versus microvascular decompression approaches for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia: clinical outcomes and direct costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida A

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Laurinda Lemos1,2, Carlos Alegria3, Joana Oliveira3, Ana Machado2, Pedro Oliveira4, Armando Almeida11Life and Health Sciences Research Institute (ICVS, School of Health Sciences, Campus de Gualtar, University of Minho, Braga, Portugal; 2Hospital Center of Alto Ave, Unit of Fafe, Fafe, Portugal; 3Department of Neurosurgery, Hospital São Marcos; 4Products and Systems Engineering, Campus de Azurém, University of Minho, Guimarães, PortugalAbstract: In idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia (TN the neuroimaging evaluation is usually normal, but in some cases a vascular compression of trigeminal nerve root is present. Although the latter condition may be referred to surgery, drug therapy is usually the first approach to control pain. This study compared the clinical outcome and direct costs of (1 a traditional treatment (carbamazepine [CBZ] in monotherapy [CBZ protocol], (2 the association of gabapentin (GBP and analgesic block of trigger-points with ropivacaine (ROP (GBP+ROP protocol, and (3 a common TN surgery, microvascular decompression of the trigeminal nerve (MVD protocol. Sixty-two TN patients were randomly treated during 4 weeks (CBZ [n = 23] and GBP+ROP [n = 17] protocols from cases of idiopathic TN, or selected for MVD surgery (n = 22 due to intractable pain. Direct medical cost estimates were determined by the price of drugs in 2008 and the hospital costs. Pain was evaluated using the Numerical Rating Scale (NRS and number of pain crises; the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Sickness Impact Profile, and satisfaction with treatment and hospital team were evaluated. Assessments were performed at day 0 and 6 months after the beginning of treatment. All protocols showed a clinical improvement of pain control at month 6. The GBP+ROP protocol was the least expensive treatment, whereas surgery was the most expensive. With time, however, GBP+ROP tended to be the most and MVD the least expensive. No sequelae resulted in any patient after drug

  20. Expression of varicella-zoster virus and herpes simplex virus in normal human trigeminal ganglia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vafai, A.; Wellish, M.; Devlin, M.; Gilden, D.H.; Murray, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    Lysates of radiolabeled explants from four human trigeminal ganglia were immunoprecipitated with antibodies to varicella-zoster virus (VZV) and to herpes simplex virus. Both herpes simplex virus- and VZV-specific proteins were detected in lysates of all four ganglia. Absence of reactivity in ganglion explants with monoclonal antibodies suggested that herpes simplex virus and VZV were not reactivated during the culture period. In situ hybridization studies demonstrated the presence of RNA transcripts from the VZV immediate early gene 63. This approach to the detection of herpes simplex virus and VZV expression in human ganglia should facilitate analysis of viral RNA and proteins in human sensory ganglia

  1. Research Institute for Autonomous Precision Guided Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rogacki, John R

    2007-01-01

    ... vehicles, cooperative flight of autonomous aerial vehicles using GPS and vision information, cooperative and sharing of information in search missions involving multiple autonomous agents, multi-scale...

  2. Mobile Autonomous Reconfigurable System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavliuk N.A.

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The object of this study is a multifunctional modular robot able to assemble independently in a given configuration and responsively change it in the process of operation depending on the current task. In this work we aim at developing and examining unified modules for a modular robot, which can both perform autonomous movement and form a complex structure by connecting to other modules. The existing solutions in the field of modular robotics were reviewed and classified by power supply, the ways of interconnection, the ways of movement and the possibility of independent movement of separate modules. Basing on the analysis of the shortcomings of existing analogues, we have developed a module of mobile autonomous reconfigurable system, including a base unit, a set of magneto-mechanical connectors and two motor wheels. The basic kinematic scheme of the modular robot, the features of a single module, as well as the modular structure formed by an array of similar modules were described. Two schemes for placing sets of magneto-mechanical connectors in the basic module have been proposed. We described the principle of operation of a magneto-mechanical connector based on redirection of the magnetic flux of a permanent magnet. This solution simplifies the system for controlling a mechanism of connection with other modules, increases energy efficiency and a battery life of the module. Since the energy is required only at the moment of switching the operating modes of the connector, there is no need to power constantly the connector mechanism to maintain the coupling mode.

  3. Association between neurovascular contact on MRI and response to gamma knife radiosurgery in trigeminal neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erbay, Sami H.; Bhadelia, Rafeeque A.; Gupta, Punita; O'Callaghan, Mark; Yun, Eric; Oljeski, Steven; Riesenburger, Ron

    2006-01-01

    Treatment with gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) provides adequate short-term pain control in about 70% of the patients with intractable trigeminal neuralgia (TN). The purpose of our study was to evaluate whether the presence of neurovascular contact (NVC) at the root entry zone of the trigeminal nerve on pre-gamma knife MR imaging predicts an increased likelihood of an adequate response to GKRS.We studied 40 consecutive patients who underwent GKRS for treatment of intractable TN. Two neuroradiologists blinded to the side of symptoms analyzed pre-treatment constructive interference in steady state (CISS) images to determine the presence of NVC by consensus. An adequate response was defined as freedom from pain with or without reduced need for medical therapy. Adequate short-term response to GKRS was seen in 29 (72.5%) of 40 patients. NVC was seen in 30 of the 40 patients. Twenty-five (83.3%) of 30 patients with NVC had adequate short-term response to GKRS. Only four (40%) of the 10 patients without NVC had adequate response to GKRS (X 2 =7.06; P<0.01). Patients with NVC were seven times more likely to have an adequate response to GKRS than those without NVC (odds ratio =7.5).The presence of NVC on pre-treatment MR imaging predicts an increased likelihood of an adequate response to GKRS. (orig.)

  4. SU-E-T-420: Failure Effects Mode Analysis for Trigeminal Neuralgia Frameless Radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howe, J [Associates In Medical Physics, Louisville, KY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Functional radiosurgery has been used successfully in the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia but presents significant challenges to ensuring the high prescription dose is delivered accurately. A review of existing practice should help direct the focus of quality improvement for this treatment regime. Method: Failure modes and effects analysis was used to identify the processes in preparing radiosurgery treatment for TN. The map was developed by a multidisciplinary team including: neurosurgeon, radiation oncology, physicist and therapist. Potential failure modes were identified for each step in the process map as well as potential causes and end effect. A risk priority number was assigned to each cause. Results: The process map identified 66 individual steps (see attached supporting document). Corrective actions were developed for areas of high risk priority number. Wrong site treatment is at higher risk for trigeminal neuralgia treatment due to the lack of site specific pathologic imaging on MR and CT – additional site specific checks were implemented to minimize the risk of wrong site treatment. Failed collision checks resulted from an insufficient collision model in the treatment planning system and a plan template was developed to address this problem. Conclusion: Failure modes and effects analysis is an effective tool for developing quality improvement in high risk radiotherapy procedures such as functional radiosurgery.

  5. Oxcarbazepine: a new drug in the management of intractable trigeminal neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrzewska, J M; Patsalos, P N

    1989-01-01

    The efficacy and tolerability of oxcarbazepine, a keto derivative of carbamazepine, has been assessed in six patients (two males, four females; mean age 61 years, range 42-77), with trigeminal neuralgia refractory to carbamazepine therapy, over a period of 6 months. An excellent therapeutic response to oxcarbazepine was seen in all patients with pain control correlating well with serum drug concentrations of oxcarbazepine and its primary active metabolite 10-OH-carbazepine. Onset of the effect was observed within 24 hours in all cases. An overall serum therapeutic concentration range, in the six patients, of 50-110 mumol/l of 10-OH-carbazepine corresponding to a daily effective dose range of 1200-2400 mg (14.6-35.6 mg/kg body weight) oxcarbazepine, was observed. There was a significant correlation between oxcarbazepine dose and serum oxcarbazepine (r = 0.695, p less than 0.05) and 10-OH-carbazepine (r = 0.957, p less than 0.001) concentrations. Oxcarbazepine was well tolerated and no significant side effects were identified, though a mild hyponatraemia was observed during high doses (greater than 28 and greater than 35 mg/kg/day) in two patients. It is concluded that oxcarbazepine has potent antineuralgic properties in the absence of significant side effects and therefore may be useful in the management of intractable trigeminal neuralgia. Images PMID:2738589

  6. Facial hyperalgesia due to direct action of endothelin-1 in the trigeminal ganglion of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Lenyta Oliveira; Chichorro, Juliana Geremias; Araya, Erika Ivanna; de Oliveira, Jade; Rae, Giles Alexander

    2018-03-23

    This study assessed the ability of endothelin-1 (ET-1) to evoke heat hyperalgesia when injected directly into the trigeminal ganglia (TG) of mice and determined the receptors implicated in this effect. The effects of TG ET A and ET B receptor blockade on alleviation of heat hyperalgesia in a model of trigeminal neuropathic pain induced by infraorbital nerve constriction (CION) were also examined. Naive mice received an intraganglionar (i.g.) injection of ET-1 (0.3-3 pmol) or the selective ET B R agonist sarafotoxin S6c (3-30 pmol), and response latencies to ipsilateral heat stimulation were assessed before the treatment and at 1-h intervals up to 5 h after the treatment. Heat hyperalgesia induced by i.g. ET-1 or CION was assessed after i.g. injections of ET A R and ET B R antagonists (BQ-123 and BQ-788, respectively, each at 0.5 nmol). Intraganglionar ET-1 or sarafotoxin S6c injection induced heat hyperalgesia lasting 4 and 2 h, respectively. Heat hyperalgesia induced by ET-1 was attenuated by i.g. BQ-123 or BQ-788. On day 5 after CION, i.g. BQ-788 injection produced a more robust antihyperalgesic effect compared with BQ-123. ET-1 injection into the TG promotes ET A R/ET B R-mediated facial heat hyperalgesia, and both receptors are clearly implicated in CION-induced hyperalgesia in the murine TG system. © 2018 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  7. RNA-Seq Analysis of Human Trigeminal and Dorsal Root Ganglia with a Focus on Chemoreceptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Flegel

    Full Text Available The chemosensory capacity of the somatosensory system relies on the appropriate expression of chemoreceptors, which detect chemical stimuli and transduce sensory information into cellular signals. Knowledge of the complete repertoire of the chemoreceptors expressed in human sensory ganglia is lacking. This study employed the next-generation sequencing technique (RNA-Seq to conduct the first expression analysis of human trigeminal ganglia (TG and dorsal root ganglia (DRG. We analyzed the data with a focus on G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs and ion channels, which are (potentially involved in chemosensation by somatosensory neurons in the human TG and DRG. For years, transient receptor potential (TRP channels have been considered the main group of receptors for chemosensation in the trigeminal system. Interestingly, we could show that sensory ganglia also express a panel of different olfactory receptors (ORs with putative chemosensory function. To characterize OR expression in more detail, we performed microarray, semi-quantitative RT-PCR experiments, and immunohistochemical staining. Additionally, we analyzed the expression data to identify further known or putative classes of chemoreceptors in the human TG and DRG. Our results give an overview of the major classes of chemoreceptors expressed in the human TG and DRG and provide the basis for a broader understanding of the reception of chemical cues.

  8. SU-E-T-420: Failure Effects Mode Analysis for Trigeminal Neuralgia Frameless Radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Functional radiosurgery has been used successfully in the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia but presents significant challenges to ensuring the high prescription dose is delivered accurately. A review of existing practice should help direct the focus of quality improvement for this treatment regime. Method: Failure modes and effects analysis was used to identify the processes in preparing radiosurgery treatment for TN. The map was developed by a multidisciplinary team including: neurosurgeon, radiation oncology, physicist and therapist. Potential failure modes were identified for each step in the process map as well as potential causes and end effect. A risk priority number was assigned to each cause. Results: The process map identified 66 individual steps (see attached supporting document). Corrective actions were developed for areas of high risk priority number. Wrong site treatment is at higher risk for trigeminal neuralgia treatment due to the lack of site specific pathologic imaging on MR and CT – additional site specific checks were implemented to minimize the risk of wrong site treatment. Failed collision checks resulted from an insufficient collision model in the treatment planning system and a plan template was developed to address this problem. Conclusion: Failure modes and effects analysis is an effective tool for developing quality improvement in high risk radiotherapy procedures such as functional radiosurgery

  9. Dose and diameter relationships for facial, trigeminal, and acoustic neuropathies following acoustic neuroma radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flickinger, John C.; Kondziolka, Douglas; Lunsford, L. Dade

    1996-01-01

    Purpose and objective: To define the relationships between dose and tumor diameter for the risks of developing trigeminal, facial, and acoustic neuropathies after acoustic neuroma radiosurgery, a large single-institution experience was analyzed. Materials and methods: Two hundred and thirty-eight patients with unilateral acoustic neuromas who underwent Gamma knife radiosurgery between 1987-1994 with 6-91 months of follow-up (median 30 months) were studied. Minimum tumor doses were 12-20 Gy (median 15 Gy). Transverse tumor diameter varied from 0.3-5.5 cm (median 2.1 cm). The relationships of dose and diameter to the development of cranial neuropathies were delineated by multivariate logistic regression. Results: The development of post-radiosurgery neuropathies affecting cranial nerves V, VII, and VIII were correlated with minimum tumor dose and transverse tumor diameter (P min for VIII where P=0.10). A comparison of the dose-diameter response curves showed the acoustic nerve to be the most sensitive to doses of 12-16 Gy and the facial nerve to be the least sensitive. Conclusion: The risks of developing trigeminal, facial, and acoustic neuropathies following acoustic neuroma radiosurgery can be predicted from the transverse tumor diameter and the minimum tumor dose using models constructed from data presently available

  10. The role of trigeminal function in the sensation of nasal obstruction in chronic rhinosinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saliba, Joe; Fnais, Naif; Tomaszewski, Marcel; Carriere, Junie S; Frenkiel, Saul; Frasnelli, Johannes; Tewfik, Marc A

    2016-05-01

    Trigeminal sensation (TS) within the nasal cavity is important for the perception of nasal airflow. The objective of this study is to examine whether impaired TS contributes to the sensation of nasal obstruction in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). Prospective case-control study conducted in a tertiary referral rhinology clinic. Cases consisted of CRS patients with subjective nasal obstruction, not previously treated with oral corticoids. Controls consisted of patients without CRS. Neither group demonstrated obvious anatomical obstructions. Both groups underwent peak nasal inspiratory flows (PNIF), olfactory testing (quick eight-item odor identification test), and trigeminal testing (lateralization task using eucalyptol and odorless solvent). A total of 28 subjects (14 CRS patients and 14 controls) were recruited. Analyses revealed no statistical differences in age (P = .93), gender (P = .47), or PNIF (P = .82) between the two groups, but they differed in Lund-Mackay scores (P sensation of nasal obstruction in CRS. 3b. Laryngoscope, 126:E174-E178, 2016. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  11. Cybersecurity for aerospace autonomous systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Jeremy

    2015-05-01

    High profile breaches have occurred across numerous information systems. One area where attacks are particularly problematic is autonomous control systems. This paper considers the aerospace information system, focusing on elements that interact with autonomous control systems (e.g., onboard UAVs). It discusses the trust placed in the autonomous systems and supporting systems (e.g., navigational aids) and how this trust can be validated. Approaches to remotely detect the UAV compromise, without relying on the onboard software (on a potentially compromised system) as part of the process are discussed. How different levels of autonomy (task-based, goal-based, mission-based) impact this remote characterization is considered.

  12. Decentralized Control of Autonomous Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Autonomous Vehicles by John S. Baras, Xiaobo Tan, Pedram Hovareshti CSHCN TR 2003-8 (ISR TR 2003-14) Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704...AND SUBTITLE Decentralized Control of Autonomous Vehicles 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Decentralized Control of Autonomous Vehicles ∗ John S. Baras, Xiaobo Tan, and Pedram

  13. Repeat Gamma-Knife Radiosurgery for Refractory or Recurrent Trigeminal Neuralgia with Consideration About the Optimal Second Dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seong-Cheol; Kwon, Do Hoon; Lee, Do Hee; Lee, Jung Kyo

    2016-02-01

    To investigate adequate radiation doses for repeat Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKS) for trigeminal neuralgia in our series and meta-analysis. Fourteen patients treated by ipsilateral repeat GKS for trigeminal neuralgia were included. Median age of patients was 65 years (range, 28-78), the median target dose, 140-180). Patients were followed a median of 10.8 months (range, 1-151) after the second gamma-knife surgery. Brainstem dose analysis and vote-counting meta-analysis of 19 studies were performed. After the second gamma-knife radiosurgeries, pain was relieved effectively in 12 patients (86%; Barrow Neurological Institute Pain Intensity Score I-III). Post-gamma-knife radiosurgery trigeminal nerve deficits were mild in 5 patients. No serious anesthesia dolorosa was occurred. The second GKS radiation dose ≤ 60 Gy was significantly associated with worse pain control outcome (P = 0.018 in our series, permutation analysis of variance, and P = 0.009 in the meta-analysis, 2-tailed Fisher's exact test). Cumulative dose ≤ 140-150 Gy was significantly associated with poor pain control outcome (P = 0.033 in our series and P = 0.013 in the meta-analysis, 2-tailed Fisher's exact test). A cumulative brainstem edge dose >12 Gy tended to be associated with trigeminal nerve deficit (P = 0.077). Our study suggests that the second GKS dose is a potentially important factor. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Experimental inflammation following dural application of complete Freund's adjuvant or inflammatory soup does not alter brain and trigeminal microvascular passage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundblad, Cornelia; Haanes, Kristian A; Grände, Gustaf

    2015-01-01

    , following dural application of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) or inflammatory soup (IS) on brain and trigeminal microvascular passage. METHODS: In order to address this issue, we induced local inflammation in male Sprague-Dawley-rats dura mater by the addition of CFA or IS directly on the dural surface...

  15. Dural administration of inflammatory soup or Complete Freund's Adjuvant induces activation and inflammatory response in the rat trigeminal ganglion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukács, M; Haanes, K A; Majláth, Zs

    2015-01-01

    induces inflammatory activation in the trigeminal ganglion. METHODS: We performed topical administration of inflammatory soup (IS) or Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) onto an exposed area of the rat dura mater in vivo for 20 min. The window was closed and the rats were sacrificed after 4 h and up to 7...

  16. Facial injections of pruritogens and algogens excite partly overlapping populations of primary and second-order trigeminal neurons in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, T; Carstens, M Iodi; Carstens, E

    2010-11-01

    Intradermal cheek injection of pruitogens or algogens differentially elicits hindlimb scratching or forelimb wiping, suggesting that these behaviors distinguish between itch and pain. We studied whether pruritogens and algogens excite separate or overlapping populations of primary afferent and second-order trigeminal neurons in mice. Calcium imaging of primary sensory trigeminal ganglion (TG) cells showed that 15.4% responded to histamine, 5.8% to the protease-activated receptor (PAR)-2 agonist, 13.4% to allyl isothiocyanate (AITC), and 36.7% to capsaicin. AITC and/or capsaicin activated the vast majority of histamine- and PAR-2 agonist-sensitive TG cells. A chemical search strategy identified second-order neurons in trigeminal subnucleus caudalis (Vc) responsive to histamine, the PAR-2 agonist, or AITC. A minority of histamine or PAR-2 agonist-responsive Vc neurons responded to the other pruritogen, whereas a large majority of puritogen-responsive Vc neurons responded to capsaicin and/or AITC. A minority of AITC-responsive Vc neurons responded to pruritogens, whereas most responded to capsaicin. These data indicate that most primary and higher-order trigeminal sensory neurons are activated by both pruritic and algesic stimuli, although a minority exhibit selectivity. The results are discussed in terms of population codes for itch and pain that result in distinct behavioral responses of hindlimb scratching and forelimb wiping that are mediated at lumbar and cervical segmental levels, respectively.

  17. Safety and efficacy of a Nav1.7 selective sodium channel blocker in patients with trigeminal neuralgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zakrzewska, Joanna M; Palmer, Joanne; Morisset, Valerie

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Current standard of care for trigeminal neuralgia is treatment with the sodium channel blockers carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine, which although effective are associated with poor tolerability and the need for titration. BIIB074, a Nav1.7-selective, state-dependent sodium-channel blocker...

  18. The Autonomous Student: A Footnote.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jancis

    1987-01-01

    An argument that rationality is a learned behavior, rather than a natural facility, is developed vis-a-vis certain educational theories. The difficulties students face in maintaining a rational stance in an autonomous classroom are also discussed. (JL)

  19. Structural Discrimination and Autonomous Vehicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Hin-Yan

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the potential for structural discrimination to be woven into the fabric of autonomous vehicle developments, which remain underexplored and undiscussed. The prospect for structural discrimination arises as a result of the coordinated modes of autonomous vehicle behaviour...... individual identity, and potentially relative worth, to autonomous vehicles engaging in a crash damage calculus. At the risk of introducing these ideas into the development of autonomous vehicles, this paper hopes to spark a debate to foreclose these eventualities....... that is prescribed by its code. This leads to the potential for individuated outcomes to be networked and thereby multiplied consistently to any number of vehicles implementing such a code. The aggregated effects of such algorithmic policy preferences will thus cumulate in the reallocation of benefits and burdens...

  20. Atrophic changes in the trigeminal nerves of patients with trigeminal neuralgia due to neurovascular compression and their association with the severity of compression and clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Paulo Roberto Lacerda; Barbier, Charlotte; Hermier, Marc; Souza, Miguel Angelo; Cristino-Filho, Gerardo; Sindou, Marc

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate atrophic changes in trigeminal nerves (TGNs) using measurements of volume (V) and cross-sectional area (CSA) from high-resolution 3-T MR images obtained in patients with unilateral trigeminal neuralgia (TN), and to correlate these data with patient and neurovascular compression (NVC) characteristics and with clinical outcomes. Anatomical TGN parameters (V and CSA) were obtained in 50 patients (30 women and 20 men; mean age 56.42 years, range 22-79 years) with classic TN before treatment with microvascular decompression (MVD). Parameters were compared between the symptomatic (ipsilateralTN) and asymptomatic (contralateralTN) sides of the face. Twenty normal control subjects were also included. Two independent observers blinded to the side of pain separately analyzed the images. Measurements of V (from the pons to the entrance of the nerve into Meckel's cave) and CSA (at 5 mm from the entry of the TGN into the pons) for each TGN were performed using imaging software and axial and coronal projections, respectively. These data were correlated with patient characteristics (age, duration of symptoms before MVD, side of pain, sex, and area of pain distribution), NVC characteristics (type of vessel involved in NVC, location of compression along the nerve, site of compression around the circumference of the root, and degree of compression), and clinical outcomes at the 2-year follow-up after surgery. Comparisons were made using Bonferroni's test. Interobserver variability was assessed using the Pearson correlation coefficient. The mean V of the TGN on the ipsilateralTN (60.35 ± 21.74 mm(3)) was significantly smaller (p controls (78.62 ± 24.62 mm(3) and 89.09 ± 14.72 mm(3), respectively). The mean CSA of the TGN on the ipsilateralTN (4.17 ± 1.74 mm(2)) was significantly smaller than those for the contralateralTN and controls (5.41 ± 1.89 mm(2) and 5.64 ± 0.85 mm(2), respectively). The ipsilateralTN with NVC Grade III

  1. Do carbamazepine, gabapentin, or other anticonvulsants exert sufficient radioprotective effects to alter responses from trigeminal neuralgia radiosurgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flickinger, John C; Kim, Hyun; Kano, Hideyuki; Greenberger, Joel S; Arai, Yoshio; Niranjan, Ajay; Lunsford, L Dade; Kondziolka, Douglas; Flickinger, John C

    2012-07-15

    Laboratory studies have documented radioprotective effects with carbamazepine. We sought to determine whether carbamazepine or other anticonvulsant/neuroleptic drugs would show significant radioprotective effects in patients undergoing high-dose small-volume radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia. We conducted a retrospective review of 200 patients undergoing Gamma Knife (Elekta Instrument AB, Stockholm, Sweden) stereotactic radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia between February 1995 and May 2008. We selected patients treated with a maximum dose of 80 Gy with 4-mm diameter collimators, with no previous microvascular decompression, and follow-up ≥6 months (median, 24 months; range, 6-153 months). At the time of radiosurgery, 28 patients were taking no anticonvulsants, 62 only carbamazepine, 35 only gabapentin, 21 carbamazepine plus gabapentin, 17 carbamazepine plus other anticonvulsants, and 9 gabapentin plus other anticonvulsants, and 28 were taking other anticonvulsants or combinations. Pain improvement developed post-radiosurgery in 187 of 200 patients (93.5%). Initial complete pain relief developed in 84 of 200 patients (42%). Post-radiosurgery trigeminal neuropathy developed in 27 of 200 patients (13.5%). We could not significantly correlate pain improvement or initial complete pain relief with use of carbamazepine, gabapentin, or use of any anticonvulsants/neuroleptic drugs or other factors in univariate or multivariate analysis. Post-radiosurgery numbness/paresthesias correlated with the use of gabapentin (1 of 36 patients with gabapentin vs. 7 of 28 without, p = 0.017). In multivariate analysis, decreasing age, purely typical pain, and use of gabapentin correlated (p = 0.008, p = 0.005, and p = 0.021) with lower risks of developing post-radiosurgery trigeminal neuropathy. New post-radiosurgery numbness/paresthesias developed in 3% (1 of 36), 5% (4 of 81), and 13% (23 of 187) of patients on gabapentin alone, with age ≤70 years, and Type 1 typical

  2. Do Carbamazepine, Gabapentin, or Other Anticonvulsants Exert Sufficient Radioprotective Effects to Alter Responses From Trigeminal Neuralgia Radiosurgery?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flickinger, John C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); College of Arts and Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Kim, Hyun [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Kano, Hideyuki [Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Greenberger, Joel S.; Arai, Yoshio [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Niranjan, Ajay [Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Lunsford, L. Dade; Kondziolka, Douglas [Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Flickinger, John C., E-mail: flickingerjc@upmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Laboratory studies have documented radioprotective effects with carbamazepine. We sought to determine whether carbamazepine or other anticonvulsant/neuroleptic drugs would show significant radioprotective effects in patients undergoing high-dose small-volume radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia. Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective review of 200 patients undergoing Gamma Knife (Elekta Instrument AB, Stockholm, Sweden) stereotactic radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia between February 1995 and May 2008. We selected patients treated with a maximum dose of 80 Gy with 4-mm diameter collimators, with no previous microvascular decompression, and follow-up {>=}6 months (median, 24 months; range, 6-153 months). At the time of radiosurgery, 28 patients were taking no anticonvulsants, 62 only carbamazepine, 35 only gabapentin, 21 carbamazepine plus gabapentin, 17 carbamazepine plus other anticonvulsants, and 9 gabapentin plus other anticonvulsants, and 28 were taking other anticonvulsants or combinations. Results: Pain improvement developed post-radiosurgery in 187 of 200 patients (93.5%). Initial complete pain relief developed in 84 of 200 patients (42%). Post-radiosurgery trigeminal neuropathy developed in 27 of 200 patients (13.5%). We could not significantly correlate pain improvement or initial complete pain relief with use of carbamazepine, gabapentin, or use of any anticonvulsants/neuroleptic drugs or other factors in univariate or multivariate analysis. Post-radiosurgery numbness/paresthesias correlated with the use of gabapentin (1 of 36 patients with gabapentin vs. 7 of 28 without, p = 0.017). In multivariate analysis, decreasing age, purely typical pain, and use of gabapentin correlated (p = 0.008, p = 0.005, and p = 0.021) with lower risks of developing post-radiosurgery trigeminal neuropathy. New post-radiosurgery numbness/paresthesias developed in 3% (1 of 36), 5% (4 of 81), and 13% (23 of 187) of patients on gabapentin alone, with age

  3. Chemokine CCL2 and its receptor CCR2 in the medullary dorsal horn are involved in trigeminal neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Zhi-Jun

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuropathic pain in the trigeminal system is frequently observed in clinic, but the mechanisms involved are largely unknown. In addition, the function of immune cells and related chemicals in the mechanism of pain has been recognized, whereas few studies have addressed the potential role of chemokines in the trigeminal system in chronic pain. The present study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that chemokine C-C motif ligand 2 (CCL2-chemokine C-C motif receptor 2 (CCR2 signaling in the trigeminal nucleus is involved in the maintenance of trigeminal neuropathic pain. Methods The inferior alveolar nerve and mental nerve transection (IAMNT was used to induce trigeminal neuropathic pain. The expression of ATF3, CCL2, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, and CCR2 were detected by immunofluorescence histochemical staining and western blot. The cellular localization of CCL2 and CCR2 were examined by immunofluorescence double staining. The effect of a selective CCR2 antagonist, RS504393 on pain hypersensitivity was checked by behavioral testing. Results IAMNT induced persistent (>21 days heat hyperalgesia of the orofacial region and ATF3 expression in the mandibular division of the trigeminal ganglion. Meanwhile, CCL2 expression was increased in the medullary dorsal horn (MDH from 3 days to 21 days after IAMNT. The induced CCL2 was colocalized with astroglial marker GFAP, but not with neuronal marker NeuN or microglial marker OX-42. Astrocytes activation was also found in the MDH and it started at 3 days, peaked at 10 days and maintained at 21 days after IAMNT. In addition, CCR2 was upregulated by IAMNT in the ipsilateral medulla and lasted for more than 21 days. CCR2 was mainly colocalized with NeuN and few cells were colocalized with GFAP. Finally, intracisternal injection of CCR2 antagonist, RS504393 (1, 10 μg significantly attenuated IAMNT-induced heat hyperalgesia. Conclusion The data suggest that CCL2-CCR

  4. Do Carbamazepine, Gabapentin, or Other Anticonvulsants Exert Sufficient Radioprotective Effects to Alter Responses From Trigeminal Neuralgia Radiosurgery?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flickinger, John C.; Kim, Hyun; Kano, Hideyuki; Greenberger, Joel S.; Arai, Yoshio; Niranjan, Ajay; Lunsford, L. Dade; Kondziolka, Douglas; Flickinger, John C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Laboratory studies have documented radioprotective effects with carbamazepine. We sought to determine whether carbamazepine or other anticonvulsant/neuroleptic drugs would show significant radioprotective effects in patients undergoing high-dose small-volume radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia. Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective review of 200 patients undergoing Gamma Knife (Elekta Instrument AB, Stockholm, Sweden) stereotactic radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia between February 1995 and May 2008. We selected patients treated with a maximum dose of 80 Gy with 4-mm diameter collimators, with no previous microvascular decompression, and follow-up ≥6 months (median, 24 months; range, 6–153 months). At the time of radiosurgery, 28 patients were taking no anticonvulsants, 62 only carbamazepine, 35 only gabapentin, 21 carbamazepine plus gabapentin, 17 carbamazepine plus other anticonvulsants, and 9 gabapentin plus other anticonvulsants, and 28 were taking other anticonvulsants or combinations. Results: Pain improvement developed post-radiosurgery in 187 of 200 patients (93.5%). Initial complete pain relief developed in 84 of 200 patients (42%). Post-radiosurgery trigeminal neuropathy developed in 27 of 200 patients (13.5%). We could not significantly correlate pain improvement or initial complete pain relief with use of carbamazepine, gabapentin, or use of any anticonvulsants/neuroleptic drugs or other factors in univariate or multivariate analysis. Post-radiosurgery numbness/paresthesias correlated with the use of gabapentin (1 of 36 patients with gabapentin vs. 7 of 28 without, p = 0.017). In multivariate analysis, decreasing age, purely typical pain, and use of gabapentin correlated (p = 0.008, p = 0.005, and p = 0.021) with lower risks of developing post-radiosurgery trigeminal neuropathy. New post-radiosurgery numbness/paresthesias developed in 3% (1 of 36), 5% (4 of 81), and 13% (23 of 187) of patients on gabapentin alone, with

  5. Simple autonomous Mars walker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larimer, Stanley J.; Lisec, Thomas R.; Spiessbach, Andrew J.

    1989-01-01

    Under a contract with NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Martin Marietta has developed several alternative rover concepts for unmanned exploration of the planet Mars. One of those concepts, the 'Walking Beam', is the subject of this paper. This concept was developed with the goal of achieving many of the capabilities of more sophisticated articulated-leg walkers with a much simpler, more robust, less computationally demanding and more power efficient design. It consists of two large-base tripods nested one within the other which alternately translate with respect to each other along a 5-meter beam to propel the vehicle. The semiautonomous navigation system relies on terrain geometry sensors and tacticle feedback from each foot to autonomously select a path which avoids hazards along a route designated from earth. Both mobility and navigation features of this concept are discussed including a top-level description of the vehicle's physical characteristics, deployment strategy, mobility elements, sensor suite, theory of operation, navigation and control processes, and estimated performance.

  6. Is paramecium swimming autonomic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Promode R.; Toplosky, Norman; Hansen, Joshua

    2010-11-01

    We seek to explore if the swimming of paramecium has an underlying autonomic mechanism. Such robotic elements may be useful in capturing the disturbance field in an environment in real time. Experimental evidence is emerging that motion control neurons of other animals may be present in paramecium as well. The limit cycle determined using analog simulation of the coupled nonlinear oscillators of olivo-cerebellar dynamics (ieee joe 33, 563-578, 2008) agrees with the tracks of the cilium of a biological paramecium. A 4-motor apparatus has been built that reproduces the kinematics of the cilium motion. The motion of the biological cilium has been analyzed and compared with the results of the finite element modeling of forces on a cilium. The modeling equates applied torque at the base of the cilium with drag, the cilium stiffness being phase dependent. A low friction pendulum apparatus with a multiplicity of electromagnetic actuators is being built for verifying the maps of the attractor basin computed using the olivo-cerebellar dynamics for different initial conditions. Sponsored by ONR 33.

  7. Autonomous Energy Grids: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroposki, Benjamin D [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Dall-Anese, Emiliano [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Bernstein, Andrey [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Zhang, Yingchen [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hodge, Brian S [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-10-04

    With much higher levels of distributed energy resources - variable generation, energy storage, and controllable loads just to mention a few - being deployed into power systems, the data deluge from pervasive metering of energy grids, and the shaping of multi-level ancillary-service markets, current frameworks to monitoring, controlling, and optimizing large-scale energy systems are becoming increasingly inadequate. This position paper outlines the concept of 'Autonomous Energy Grids' (AEGs) - systems that are supported by a scalable, reconfigurable, and self-organizing information and control infrastructure, can be extremely secure and resilient (self-healing), and self-optimize themselves in real-time for economic and reliable performance while systematically integrating energy in all forms. AEGs rely on scalable, self-configuring cellular building blocks that ensure that each 'cell' can self-optimize when isolated from a larger grid as well as partaking in the optimal operation of a larger grid when interconnected. To realize this vision, this paper describes the concepts and key research directions in the broad domains of optimization theory, control theory, big-data analytics, and complex system modeling that will be necessary to realize the AEG vision.

  8. AUTONOMOUS GAUSSIAN DECOMPOSITION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindner, Robert R.; Vera-Ciro, Carlos; Murray, Claire E.; Stanimirović, Snežana; Babler, Brian [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Heiles, Carl [Radio Astronomy Lab, UC Berkeley, 601 Campbell Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Hennebelle, Patrick [Laboratoire AIM, Paris-Saclay, CEA/IRFU/SAp-CNRS-Université Paris Diderot, F-91191 Gif-sur Yvette Cedex (France); Goss, W. M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, 1003 Lopezville, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Dickey, John, E-mail: rlindner@astro.wisc.edu [University of Tasmania, School of Maths and Physics, Private Bag 37, Hobart, TAS 7001 (Australia)

    2015-04-15

    We present a new algorithm, named Autonomous Gaussian Decomposition (AGD), for automatically decomposing spectra into Gaussian components. AGD uses derivative spectroscopy and machine learning to provide optimized guesses for the number of Gaussian components in the data, and also their locations, widths, and amplitudes. We test AGD and find that it produces results comparable to human-derived solutions on 21 cm absorption spectra from the 21 cm SPectral line Observations of Neutral Gas with the EVLA (21-SPONGE) survey. We use AGD with Monte Carlo methods to derive the H i line completeness as a function of peak optical depth and velocity width for the 21-SPONGE data, and also show that the results of AGD are stable against varying observational noise intensity. The autonomy and computational efficiency of the method over traditional manual Gaussian fits allow for truly unbiased comparisons between observations and simulations, and for the ability to scale up and interpret the very large data volumes from the upcoming Square Kilometer Array and pathfinder telescopes.

  9. AUTONOMOUS GAUSSIAN DECOMPOSITION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindner, Robert R.; Vera-Ciro, Carlos; Murray, Claire E.; Stanimirović, Snežana; Babler, Brian; Heiles, Carl; Hennebelle, Patrick; Goss, W. M.; Dickey, John

    2015-01-01

    We present a new algorithm, named Autonomous Gaussian Decomposition (AGD), for automatically decomposing spectra into Gaussian components. AGD uses derivative spectroscopy and machine learning to provide optimized guesses for the number of Gaussian components in the data, and also their locations, widths, and amplitudes. We test AGD and find that it produces results comparable to human-derived solutions on 21 cm absorption spectra from the 21 cm SPectral line Observations of Neutral Gas with the EVLA (21-SPONGE) survey. We use AGD with Monte Carlo methods to derive the H i line completeness as a function of peak optical depth and velocity width for the 21-SPONGE data, and also show that the results of AGD are stable against varying observational noise intensity. The autonomy and computational efficiency of the method over traditional manual Gaussian fits allow for truly unbiased comparisons between observations and simulations, and for the ability to scale up and interpret the very large data volumes from the upcoming Square Kilometer Array and pathfinder telescopes

  10. Design of Autonomous Gel Actuators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuji Hashimoto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we introduce autonomous gel actuators driven by chemical energy. The polymer gels prepared here have cyclic chemical reaction networks. With a cyclic reaction, the polymer gels generate periodical motion. The periodic motion of the gel is produced by the chemical energy of the oscillatory Belouzov-Zhabotinsky (BZ reaction. We have succeeded in making synthetic polymer gel move autonomously like a living organism. This experimental fact represents the great possibility of the chemical robot.

  11. Cocoa Enriched Diets Enhance Expression of Phosphatases and Decrease Expression of Inflammatory Molecules in Trigeminal Ganglion Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cady, Ryan J.; Durham, Paul L.

    2010-01-01

    Activation of trigeminal nerves and release of neuropeptides that promote inflammation are implicated in the underlying pathology of migraine and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders. The overall response of trigeminal nerves to peripheral inflammatory stimuli involves a balance between enzymes that promote inflammation, kinases, and those that restore homeostasis, phosphatases. The goal of this study was to determine the effects of a cocoa-enriched diet on the expression of key inflammatory proteins in trigeminal ganglion neurons under basal and inflammatory conditions. Rats were fed a control diet or an isocaloric diet enriched in cocoa for 14 days prior to an injection of noxious stimuli to cause acute or chronic excitation of trigeminal neurons. In animals fed a cocoa-enriched diet, basal levels of the mitogen-activated kinase (MAP) phosphatases MKP-1 and MKP-3 were elevated in neurons. Importantly, the stimulatory effects of acute or chronic peripheral inflammation on neuronal expression of the MAPK p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) were significantly repressed in response to cocoa. Similarly, dietary cocoa significantly suppressed basal neuronal expression of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) as well as stimulated levels of the inducible form of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), proteins implicated in the underlying pathology of migraine and TMJ disorders. To our knowledge, this is first evidence that a dietary supplement can cause upregulation of MKP, and that cocoa can prevent inflammatory responses in trigeminal ganglion neurons. Furthermore, our data provide evidence that cocoa contains biologically active compounds that would be beneficial in the treatment of migraine and TMJ disorders. PMID:20138852

  12. Autonomous Byte Stream Randomizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paloulian, George K.; Woo, Simon S.; Chow, Edward T.

    2013-01-01

    Net-centric networking environments are often faced with limited resources and must utilize bandwidth as efficiently as possible. In networking environments that span wide areas, the data transmission has to be efficient without any redundant or exuberant metadata. The Autonomous Byte Stream Randomizer software provides an extra level of security on top of existing data encryption methods. Randomizing the data s byte stream adds an extra layer to existing data protection methods, thus making it harder for an attacker to decrypt protected data. Based on a generated crypto-graphically secure random seed, a random sequence of numbers is used to intelligently and efficiently swap the organization of bytes in data using the unbiased and memory-efficient in-place Fisher-Yates shuffle method. Swapping bytes and reorganizing the crucial structure of the byte data renders the data file unreadable and leaves the data in a deconstructed state. This deconstruction adds an extra level of security requiring the byte stream to be reconstructed with the random seed in order to be readable. Once the data byte stream has been randomized, the software enables the data to be distributed to N nodes in an environment. Each piece of the data in randomized and distributed form is a separate entity unreadable on its own right, but when combined with all N pieces, is able to be reconstructed back to one. Reconstruction requires possession of the key used for randomizing the bytes, leading to the generation of the same cryptographically secure random sequence of numbers used to randomize the data. This software is a cornerstone capability possessing the ability to generate the same cryptographically secure sequence on different machines and time intervals, thus allowing this software to be used more heavily in net-centric environments where data transfer bandwidth is limited.

  13. The coexistence of paroxysmal hemicrania and temporomandibular disorder: Importance of multidisciplinary approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luís Porporatti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Paroxysmal hemicrania (PH is a trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia, a rare primary headache characterized by unilateral periorbital and/or temporal attacks of severe intensity and short duration. In this situation, the determination of a correct diagnosis is crucial for the establishment of a proper management strategy. In the case of head and facial pain, this step is usually a big challenge since many conditions share the same features, as some primary headaches and temporomandibular disorders (TMD. The relationship between PH and TMD has not been determined. This paper describes a case of a female patient diagnosed with TMD and presenting concomitant headache attacks fulfilling the International Headache Society′s criteria for PH. It is also emphasized the importance of dentist in this scenario, for many times responsible for the initial diagnosis of facial/head pain. Moreover, it is presented an integrated and simultaneously approach of both conditions, PH and TMD.

  14. [Botulinum toxin type A in headache treatment : Established and experimental indications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaul, C; Holle-Lee, D; Straube, A

    2016-08-01

    In recent years botulinum toxin type A has been used increasingly more in the treatment of specific headache disorders. Especially regarding chronic migraine with and without combined medication overuse, convincing randomized studies have proven the efficacy of this treatment option and have led to approval for this indication. Regarding other headache entities, such as episodic migraine, tension-type headache, trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia (TAC), neuralgic, neuropathic and myofascial pain, currently available scientific data on the efficacy of botulinum toxin type A are scarce and often ambiguous. The exact underlying mechanisms of the influence of botulinum toxin type A on the pathophysiology of headache are not completely clear but an influence on the release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) seems to play a crucial role. This article summarizes the most important studies as well as experiences of treatment with botulinum toxin type A regarding different headache entities.

  15. Compact autonomous navigation system (CANS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Y. C.; Ying, L.; Xiong, K.; Cheng, H. Y.; Qiao, G. D.

    2017-11-01

    Autonomous navigation of Satellite and constellation has series of benefits, such as to reduce operation cost and ground station workload, to avoid the event of crises of war and natural disaster, to increase spacecraft autonomy, and so on. Autonomous navigation satellite is independent of ground station support. Many systems are developed for autonomous navigation of satellite in the past 20 years. Along them American MANS (Microcosm Autonomous Navigation System) [1] of Microcosm Inc. and ERADS [2] [3] (Earth Reference Attitude Determination System) of Honeywell Inc. are well known. The systems anticipate a series of good features of autonomous navigation and aim low cost, integrated structure, low power consumption and compact layout. The ERADS is an integrated small 3-axis attitude sensor system with low cost and small volume. It has the Earth center measurement accuracy higher than the common IR sensor because the detected ultraviolet radiation zone of the atmosphere has a brightness gradient larger than that of the IR zone. But the ERADS is still a complex system because it has to eliminate many problems such as making of the sapphire sphere lens, birefringence effect of sapphire, high precision image transfer optical fiber flattener, ultraviolet intensifier noise, and so on. The marginal sphere FOV of the sphere lens of the ERADS is used to star imaging that may be bring some disadvantages., i.e. , the image energy and attitude measurements accuracy may be reduced due to the tilt image acceptance end of the fiber flattener in the FOV. Besides Japan, Germany and Russia developed visible earth sensor for GEO [4] [5]. Do we have a way to develop a cheaper/easier and more accurate autonomous navigation system that can be used to all LEO spacecraft, especially, to LEO small and micro satellites? To return this problem we provide a new type of the system—CANS (Compact Autonomous Navigation System) [6].

  16. Cilostazol induces C-fos expression in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis and behavioural changes suggestive of headache with the migraine-like feature photophobia in female rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, S L; Petersen, Steffen; Sørensen, Dorte B

    2018-01-01

    -like behaviours and c-fos expression in rats. In order to evaluate the predictive validity of the model, we examined the response to the migraine specific drug sumatriptan. Methods The effect of cilostazol (125 mg/kg p.o.) in female Sprague Dawley rats was evaluated on a range of spontaneous behavioural...... parameters, light sensitivity and mechanical sensitivity thresholds. We also measured c-fos expression in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis. Results Cilostazol increased light sensitivity and grooming behaviour. These manifestations were not inhibited by sumatriptan. Cilostazol also induced c-fos expression...... in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis. Furthermore, trigeminal - but not hind paw hyperalgesia was observed. Conclusion The altered behaviours are suggestive of cilostazol induced headache with migraine-like features, but not specific. The presence of head specific hyperalgesia and the c-fos response in the trigeminal...

  17. [Activity of glial cells in trigeminal nervous system in rats with experimental pulpitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Bin; Liu, Na; Liu, Hongchen

    2014-04-29

    To observe the activity change of astrocyte in related nucleus caused by acute pulpitis in rats. Rat acute pulpitis model was induced by lipopolysaccharides (LPS). And, according to processing time, a total of 30 rats were divided into 5 groups of control, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot were employed to detect the dynamic expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in spinal nucleus of trigeminal nerve (Vc). The relative gray value of ipsilateral Vc GFAP expression in experimental groups was 153 ± 11 at 12 h. And it significantly increased versus the control group (100 ± 4)(P pulpitis model, activated glial cells are probably involved in the processes of pulpitis and hyperalgesia.

  18. Whole transcriptome expression of trigeminal ganglia compared to dorsal root ganglia in Rattus Norvegicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kogelman, Lisette Johanna Antonia; Christensen, Rikke Elgaard; Pedersen, Sara Hougaard

    2017-01-01

    The trigeminal ganglia (TG) subserving the head and the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) subserving the rest of the body are homologous handling sensory neurons. Differences exist, as a number of signaling substances cause headache but no pain in the rest of the body. To date, very few genes involved...... in this difference have been identified. We aim to reveal basal gene expression levels in TG and DRG and detect genes that are differentially expressed (DE) between TG and DRG. RNA-Sequencing from six naïve rats describes the whole transcriptome expression profiles of TG and DRG. Differential expression analysis...... was followed by pathway analysis to identify DE processes between TG and DRG. In total, 64 genes had higher and 55 genes had lower expressed levels in TG than DRG. Higher expressed genes, including S1pr5 and Gjc2, have been related to phospholipase activity. The lower expressed genes, including several Hox...

  19. Botulinum neurotoxin type-A when utilized in animals with trigeminal sensitization induced a antinociceptive effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elcio J Piovesan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose of the study was evaluate the possible antinociceptive effect of botulinum neurotoxin type-A (BoNT/A in an experimental model of trigeminal neuralgia. Method Neuropathic pain was induced by surgical constriction of the infraorbital nerve in rats. A control group underwent a sham procedure consisting of surgical exposure of the nerve. Subgroups of each group received either BoNT/A or isotonic saline solution. The clinical response was assessed with the -20°C test. Animals that underwent nerve constriction developed sensitization; the sham group did not. Results The sensitization was reversed by BoNT/A treatment evident 24 hours following application. Pronociceptive effect was observed in the sham group following BoNT/A. Conclusion BoNT/A has an antinociceptive effect in sensitized animals and a pronociceptive effect in non-sensitized animals.

  20. Diagnosis and treatment of trigeminal schwannomas extending into both the middle and posterior cranial fossa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐启武; 车晓明; 胡杰; 杨伯捷

    2004-01-01

    @@ Trigeminal schwannomas (TSs) account for 0.1%-0.4% of all intracranial tumors and 1%-8% of intracranial schwannomas.1,2 Yoshida and Kawase3 classified TSs into 6 types according to their locations: M (TS involving the middle cranial fossa), P (TS involving the posterior cranial fossa), E (TS located at extracranial space), MP (TS involving both the middle and the posterior cranial fossa), ME (TS involving the middle cranial fossa and the extracranial space), and MPE (TS involving the the middle and the posterior cranial fossa and the extracranial space). Of these types, MP is the commonest, but is difficult to be totally removed. Between January 1984 and June 2003, we surgically treated 28 patients with TSs of type MP and obtained satisfactory results. To make a correct diagnosis of TS, to select appropriate surgical approach, and to improve surgical outcome of TS of type MP, we analysed the related clinical data and experiences.

  1. Gamma knife radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia. Analysis of a multi institutional study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takanashi, Masami; Ozaki, Yoshimaru; Satou, Kenichi; Oikawa, Mitsuteru; Nakamura, Hirohiko; Fukuoka, Seiji

    2013-01-01

    A multi-institutional study was conducted to evaluate the results of gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia. Eleven hundred and thirty-five patients at 39 centers were analyzed. Three hundred and sixty-nine patients had undergone percutaneous nerve block and 173 patients had undergone microvascular decompression (MVD) prior to GKRS. GKRS was performed for 69.4% of patients targeted at the nerve root entry zone (REZ) and for 20.4% of patients targeted at the retrogasserian region (RGR). The target dose of the GKRS used in the current study varied from 70 to 90 Gy (mean: 77.8 Gy). The median follow-up period after GKRS was 21.1 months (range 1 to 125 months). Six hundred and eighty-nine patients (66%) responded with excellent or good control (pain free), 157 (15%) obtained fair control (more than 50% relief), and 192 (19%) experienced treatment failure. After 3 years, 64% of cases were pain free and 80% had more than 50% pain relief. After 4 years, 37 patients underwent additional GKRS, 36 MVD and 36 percutaneous nerve block. Tolerable hypoesthesia or paresthesia occurred in 129 patients (11%), whereas bothersome symptoms developed in 8 patients (1%). But no patient developed deafferentation pain. Nine patients (1%) complained of dry eye, but no other abnormalities of the cornea and conjunctiva were found on ophthalmological examination. Higher maximum radiosurgical dose was associated with a significantly greater factor of complete pain relief (p=0.0101). GKRS is a safe and effective alternative treatment for trigeminal neuralgia, and is a minimally invasive treatment. In addition it provided benefit to a patient population unwilling or unable to undergo more invasive surgical approaches. (author)

  2. Trigeminal Nerve Stimulation for Comorbid Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Ian A; Abrams, Michelle; Leuchter, Andrew F

    2016-04-01

    External stimulation of the trigeminal nerve (eTNS) is an emerging neuromodulation therapy for epilepsy and depression. Preliminary studies suggest it has an excellent safety profile and is associated with significant improvements in seizures and mood. Neuroanatomical projections of the trigeminal system suggest eTNS may alter activity in structures regulating mood, anxiety, and sleep. In this proof-of-concept trial, the effects of eTNS were evaluated in adults with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and comorbid unipolar major depressive disorder (MDD) as an adjunct to pharmacotherapy for these commonly co-occurring conditions. Twelve adults with PTSD and MDD were studied in an eight-week open outpatient trial (age 52.8 [13.7 sd], 8F:4M). Stimulation was applied to the supraorbital and supratrochlear nerves for eight hours each night as an adjunct to pharmacotherapy. Changes in symptoms were monitored using the PTSD Patient Checklist (PCL), Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS-17), Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (QIDS-C), and the Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire (Q-LES-Q). Over the eight weeks, eTNS treatment was associated with significant decreases in PCL (p = 0.003; median decrease of 15 points; effect size d 1.5), HDRS-17 (p depression severity were achieved in the eight weeks of acute eTNS treatment. This novel approach to wearable brain stimulation may have use as an adjunct to pharmacotherapy in these disorders if efficacy and tolerability are confirmed with additional studies. © 2016 International Neuromodulation Society.

  3. Central syntropic effects elicited by trigeminal proprioceptive equilibrium in Alzheimer’s disease: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Cicco Vincenzo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The presented patient, affected by Alzheimer’s disease, underwent neuropsychological evaluation and functional magnetic resonance imaging investigation under occlusal proprioceptive un-balance and re-balance conditions. Saccadic and pupillometric video-oculographic examinations were performed in order to detect connected trigeminal proprioceptive motor patterns able to interfere with reticular formation cerebellum functions linked to visual and procedural processes prematurely altered in Alzheimer’s disease. Case presentation A 66-year-old Caucasian man, affected by Alzheimer’s disease and with a neuropsychological evaluation issued by the Alzheimer’s Evaluation Unit, underwent an electromyographic investigation of the masseter muscles in order to assess their functional balance. The patient showed a bilateral lack of all inferior molars. The extreme myoelectric asymmetry in dental occlusion suggested the rebalancing of masseter muscular functions through concurrent transcutaneous stimulation of the trigeminal nerve supramandibular and submandibular motor branches. The above-mentioned method allows detection of symmetric craniomandibular muscular relation that can be kept constant through the use of a cusp bite modeled on the inferior dental arch, called orthotic-syntropic bite. A few days later, the patient underwent a new neuropsychological investigation, together with a functional magnetic resonance imaging study, and saccadic, pupillometric video-oculographic examinations in occlusal un-balance and re-balance conditions. Conclusions Comparative data analysis has shown that a re-balanced occlusal condition can improve a patient’s cognitive-attentive functions. Moreover, the saccadic and pupillometric video-oculographic investigations have proven useful both in analyzing reticulo-cerebellar subcortical systems, prematurely altered in Alzheimer’s disease, and in implementing neurological evaluations.

  4. Neurochemical dynamics of acute orofacial pain in the human trigeminal brainstem nuclear complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Matos, Nuno M P; Hock, Andreas; Wyss, Michael; Ettlin, Dominik A; Brügger, Mike

    2017-11-15

    The trigeminal brainstem sensory nuclear complex is the first central relay structure mediating orofacial somatosensory and nociceptive perception. Animal studies suggest a substantial involvement of neurochemical alterations at such basal CNS levels in acute and chronic pain processing. Translating this animal based knowledge to humans is challenging. Human related examining of brainstem functions are challenged by MR related peculiarities as well as applicability aspects of experimentally standardized paradigms. Based on our experience with an MR compatible human orofacial pain model, the aims of the present study were twofold: 1) from a technical perspective, the evaluation of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 3 T regarding measurement accuracy of neurochemical profiles in this small brainstem nuclear complex and 2) the examination of possible neurochemical alterations induced by an experimental orofacial pain model. Data from 13 healthy volunteers aged 19-46 years were analyzed and revealed high quality spectra with significant reductions in total N-acetylaspartate (N-acetylaspartate + N-acetylaspartylglutamate) (-3.7%, p = 0.009) and GABA (-10.88%, p = 0.041) during the pain condition. These results might reflect contributions of N-acetylaspartate and N-acetylaspartylglutamate in neuronal activity-dependent physiologic processes and/or excitatory neurotransmission, whereas changes in GABA might indicate towards a reduction in tonic GABAergic functioning during nociceptive signaling. Summarized, the present study indicates the applicability of 1 H-MRS to obtain neurochemical dynamics within the human trigeminal brainstem sensory nuclear complex. Further developments are needed to pave the way towards bridging important animal based knowledge with human research to understand the neurochemistry of orofacial nociception and pain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Usefulness of a Virtual Reality Percutaneous Trigeminal Rhizotomy Simulator in Neurosurgical Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakur, Sophia F; Luciano, Cristian J; Kania, Patrick; Roitberg, Ben Z; Banerjee, P Pat; Slavin, Konstantin V; Sorenson, Jeffrey; Charbel, Fady T; Alaraj, Ali

    2015-09-01

    Simulation-based training may be incorporated into neurosurgery in the future. To assess the usefulness of a novel haptics-based virtual reality percutaneous trigeminal rhizotomy simulator. A real-time augmented reality simulator for percutaneous trigeminal rhizotomy was developed using the ImmersiveTouch platform. Ninety-two neurosurgery residents tested the simulator at American Association of Neurological Surgeons Top Gun 2014. Postgraduate year (PGY), number of fluoroscopy shots, the distance from the ideal entry point, and the distance from the ideal target were recorded by the system during each simulation session. Final performance score was calculated considering the number of fluoroscopy shots and distances from entry and target points (a lower score is better). The impact of PGY level on residents' performance was analyzed. Seventy-one residents provided their PGY-level and simulator performance data; 38% were senior residents and 62% were junior residents. The mean distance from the entry point (9.4 mm vs 12.6 mm, P = .01), the distance from the target (12.0 mm vs 15.2 mm, P = .16), and final score (31.1 vs 37.7, P = .02) were lower in senior than in junior residents. The mean number of fluoroscopy shots (9.8 vs 10.0, P = .88) was similar in these 2 groups. Linear regression analysis showed that increasing PGY level is significantly associated with a decreased distance from the ideal entry point (P = .001), a shorter distance from target (P = .05), a better final score (P = .007), but not number of fluoroscopy shots (P = .52). Because technical performance of percutaneous rhizotomy increases with training, we proposed that the skills in performing the procedure in our virtual reality model would also increase with PGY level, if our simulator models the actual procedure. Our results confirm this hypothesis and demonstrate construct validity.

  6. Sensitization of trigeminal brainstem pathways in a model for tear deficient dry eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mostafeezur; Okamoto, Keiichiro; Thompson, Randall; Katagiri, Ayano; Bereiter, David A

    2015-05-01

    Chronic dry eye disease (DE) is associated with an unstable tear film and symptoms of ocular discomfort. The characteristics of symptoms suggest a key role for central neural processing; however, little is known about central neuroplasticity and DE. We used a model for tear deficient DE and assessed effects on eye blink behavior, orbicularis oculi muscle activity (OOemg), and trigeminal brainstem neural activity in male rats. Ocular-responsive neurons were recorded at the interpolaris/caudalis transition (Vi/Vc) and Vc/upper cervical cord (Vc/C1) regions under isoflurane, whereas OOemg activity was recorded under urethane. Spontaneous tear volume was reduced by ∼50% at 14 days after exorbital gland removal. Hypertonic saline-evoked eye blink behavior in awake rats was enhanced throughout the 14 days after surgery. Saline-evoked neural activity at the Vi/Vc transition and in superficial and deep laminae at the Vc/C1 region was greatly enhanced in DE rats. Neurons from DE rats classified as wide dynamic range displayed enlarged convergent periorbital receptive fields consistent with central sensitization. Saline-evoked OOemg activity was markedly enhanced in DE rats compared with controls. Synaptic blockade at the Vi/Vc transition or the Vc/C1 region greatly reduced hypertonic saline-evoked OOemg activity in DE and sham rats. These results indicated that persistent tear deficiency caused sensitization of ocular-responsive neurons at multiple regions of the caudal trigeminal brainstem and enhanced OOemg activity. Central sensitization of ocular-related brainstem circuits is a significant factor in DE and likely contributes to the apparent weak correlation between peripheral signs of tear dysfunction and symptoms of irritation.

  7. Neuronavigator-guided percutaneous radiofrequency thermocoagulation in the treatment of intractable trigeminal neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shu-jun; Zhang, Wen-hua; Chen, Teng; Wu, Cheng-yuan; Zhou, Mao-de

    2006-09-20

    Percutaneous radiofrequency thermocoagulation of the trigeminal ganglion (PRTTG) is regarded as the first choice for most patients with trigeminal neuralgia (TN) because of its safety and feasibility. However, neuronavigator-guided PRTTG has been seldom reported. The purpose of this study was to assess the safety and efficacy of neuronavigator-guided PRTTG for the treatment of intractable TN. Between January 2000 and December 2004, 54 patients with intractable TN were enrolled into this study and were randomly divided into two groups. The patients in navigation group (n = 26) underwent PRTTG with frameless neuronavigation, and those in control group (n = 28) received PRTTG without neuronavigation. Three months after the operation, the efficacy, side effects, and complications of the surgery were recorded. The patients in the control group were followed up for 10 to 54 months (mean, 34 +/- 5), and those in the navigation group were followed up for 13 to 58 months (mean, 36 +/- 7). Kaplan-Meier analyses of the pain-free survival curves were used for the censored survival data, and the log-rank test was used to compare survival curves of the two groups. The immediate complete pain-relief rate of the navigation group was 100%, whereas it was 95% in the control. The proportion of sustained pain-relief rates at 12, 24 and 36 months after the procedure were 85%, 77%, and 62% in the navigation group, and 54%, 40%, and 35% in the control. Recurrences in the control group were more common than that in the navigation group. Annual recurrence rate in the first and second years were 15% and 23% in the navigation group, and 46%, 60% in the control group. No side-effect and complication was noted in the navigation group except minimal facial hypesthesia. Neuronavigator-guided PRTTG is a safe and promising method for treatment of intractable TN with better short- and long-term outcomes and lower complication rate than PRTTG without neuronavigation.

  8. Stereotactic radiosurgery for trigeminal pain secondary to recurrent malignant skull base tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Jack; Pollard, Courtney; Brown, Paul D; Guha-Thakurta, Nandita; Garden, Adam S; Rosenthal, David I; Fuller, Clifton D; Frank, Steven J; Gunn, G Brandon; Morrison, William H; Ho, Jennifer C; Li, Jing; Ghia, Amol J; Yang, James N; Luo, Dershan; Wang, He C; Su, Shirley Y; Raza, Shaan M; Gidley, Paul W; Hanna, Ehab Y; DeMonte, Franco

    2018-04-27

    OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to assess outcomes after Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) re-irradiation for palliation of patients with trigeminal pain secondary to recurrent malignant skull base tumors. METHODS From 2009 to 2016, 26 patients who had previously undergone radiation treatment to the head and neck received GKRS for palliation of trigeminal neuropathic pain secondary to recurrence of malignant skull base tumors. Twenty-two patients received single-fraction GKRS to a median dose of 17 Gy (range 15-20 Gy) prescribed to the 50% isodose line (range 43%-55%). Four patients received fractionated Gamma Knife Extend therapy to a median dose of 24 Gy in 3 fractions (range 21-27 Gy) prescribed to the 50% isodose line (range 45%-50%). Those with at least a 3-month follow-up were assessed for symptom palliation. Self-reported pain was evaluated by the numeric rating scale (NRS) and MD Anderson Symptom Inventory-Head and Neck (MDASI-HN) pain score. Frequency of as-needed (PRN) analgesic use and opioid requirement were also assessed. Baseline opioid dose was reported as a fentanyl-equivalent dose (FED) and PRN for breakthrough pain use as oral morphine-equivalent dose (OMED). The chi-square and Student t-tests were used to determine differences before and after GKRS. RESULTS Seven patients (29%) were excluded due to local disease progression. Two experienced progression at the first follow-up, and 5 had local recurrence from disease outside the GKRS volume. Nineteen patients were assessed for symptom palliation with a median follow-up duration of 10.4 months (range 3.0-34.4 months). At 3 months after GKRS, the NRS scores (n = 19) decreased from 4.65 ± 3.45 to 1.47 ± 2.11 (p control.

  9. Altered regional homogeneity of spontaneous brain activity in idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Y

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Yanping Wang,1,2 Xiaoling Zhang,2 Qiaobing Guan,2 Lihong Wan,2 Yahui Yi,2 Chun-Feng Liu1 1Department of Neurology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu Province, 2Department of Neurology, The Second Hospital of Jiaxing City, Jiaxing, Zhejiang Province, People’s Republic of China Abstract: The pathophysiology of idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia (ITN has conventionally been thought to be induced by neurovascular compression theory. Recent structural brain imaging evidence has suggested an additional central component for ITN pathophysiology. However, far less attention has been given to investigations of the basis of abnormal resting-state brain activity in these patients. The objective of this study was to investigate local brain activity in patients with ITN and its correlation with clinical variables of pain. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data from 17 patients with ITN and 19 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were analyzed using regional homogeneity (ReHo analysis, which is a data-driven approach used to measure the regional synchronization of spontaneous brain activity. Patients with ITN had decreased ReHo in the left amygdala, right parahippocampal gyrus, and left cerebellum and increased ReHo in the right inferior temporal gyrus, right thalamus, right inferior parietal lobule, and left postcentral gyrus (corrected. Furthermore, the increase in ReHo in the left precentral gyrus was positively correlated with visual analog scale (r=0.54; P=0.002. Our study found abnormal functional homogeneity of intrinsic brain activity in several regions in ITN, suggesting the maladaptivity of the process of daily pain attacks and a central role for the pathophysiology of ITN. Keywords: trigeminal neuralgia, resting fMRI, brain, chronic pain, local connectivity

  10. Outcome of radiosurgery treatment with a linear accelerator in patients with trigeminal neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero Tous, N; Cruz Sabido, J de la; Román Cutillas, A M; Saura Rojas, E J; Jorques Infante, A M; Olivares Granados, G

    2017-04-01

    An overview of the effectiveness of radiosurgery in patients diagnosed with trigeminal neuralgia with an analysis of potential predictors of good outcome. All patients treated with linear accelerator radiosurgery between 2004 and 2011 were analysed. A dose of 60Gy dose was administered 1 to 2mm from the root entry zone with a maximum isodose of 20% delivered to the brainstem. Clinical results for pain control and any side effects were analysed at 12 and 36 months (BNI score). The study included 71 patients (mean follow-up 50.5 months). Pain improvement at 12 months was observed in 68.11% of the total (28.98% with BNI score i-ii; 39.12% with BNI score iii) and at 36 months in 58.21% (23.88% BNI score i-ii; 34.32% BNI score iii). Average recovery time was 3.69 months and the relapse rate was 44.68%. Patients with typical pain displayed statistically significant differences in improvement rates at 12 and at 36 months (P<047 and P<.002). Onset of improvement was analysed using Kaplan-Meyer plots. Statistically significant differences were observed between patients with typical and atypical pain at 36 months (P<.012) in Kaplan-Meyer plots. Side effects were recorded in 15 patients (20.89%), including 9 cases of facial numbness (13.43%); only 2 cases were clinically relevant (2.98%). According to our results, radiosurgery is an effective treatment for trigeminal neuralgia, with few side effects. Typical pain seems to be a good predictor of pain relief. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. A case of trigeminal hypersensitivity after administration of intrathecal sufentanil and bupivacaine for labor analgesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Bechara de Souza Hobaika

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rostral spread of intrathecal drugs and sensitization of supraspinal sites may provoke several adverse effects. This case describes a patient with right hemifacial paresthesia, trismus and dysphasia on the trigeminal nerve distribution after intrathecal sufentanil administration. Primigravida, 34 years, 39 weeks of pregnancy, with hypothyroidism and pregnancy induced hypertension. Allergic to latex. In the use of puran T4, 50 μg /day. When the patient presented cervical dilatation of 4 cm, she requested analgesia. She was placed in the sitting position and a spinal puncture was performed with a 27G needle pencil point in L4/L5 (1.5 mg of bupivacaine plus 7.5 μg of sufentanil. Next, was performed an epidural puncture in the same space. It was injected bupivacaine 0.065%, 10 ml, to facilitate the passage of the catheter. After 5 min lying down in the lateral upright position, she complained of perioral and right hemifacial paresthesia, mainly maxillary and periorbital, as well as trismus and difficulty to speak. The symptoms lasted for 30 min and resolved spontaneously. After 1 h, patient requested supplementary analgesia (12 ml of bupivacaine 0.125% and a healthy baby girl was born. Temporary mental alterations have been described with the use of fentanyl and sufentanil in combined epidural-spinal analgesia, such as aphasia, difficulty of swallowing, mental confusion and even unconsciousness. In this patient, facial areas with paresthesia indicated by patient appear in clear association with the ophthalmic and maxillary branches of the trigeminal nerve and the occurrence of trismus and dysphagia are in association with the mandibular motor branch. The exact mechanism of rostral spread is not known, but it is speculated that after spinal drug administration, a subsequent epidural dose may reduce the intratecal space and propel the drug into the supraspinal sites.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of vascular compression in trigeminal neuralgia and hemifacial spasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaseki, Yoshishige; Horikoshi, Tohru; Omata, Tomohiro; Sugita, Masao; Nukui, Hideaki; Sakamoto, Hajime; Kumagai, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Hideo; Tsuji, Reizou.

    1991-01-01

    We show how neurosurgical planning can benefit from the better visualization of the precise vascular compression of the nerve provided by the oblique-sagittal and gradient-echo method (OS-GR image) using magnetic resonance images (MRI). The scans of 3 patients with trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and of 15 with hemifacial spasm (HFS) were analyzed for the presence and appearance of the vascular compression of the nerves. Imaging sequences consisted of an OS-GR image (TR/TE: 200/20, 3-mm-thick slice) cut along each nerve shown by the axial view, which was scanned at the angle of 105 degrees taken between the dorsal line of the brain stem and the line corresponding to the pontomedullary junction. In the OS-GR images of the TN's, the vascular compressions of the root entry zone (REZ) of the trigeminal nerve were well visualized as high-intensity lines in the 2 cases whose vessels were confirmed intraoperatively. In the other case, with atypical facial pain, vascular compression was confirmed at the rostral distal site on the fifth nerve, apart from the REZ. In the 15 cases of HFS, twelve OS-GR images (80%) demonstrated vascular compressions at the REZ of the facial nerves from the direction of the caudoventral side. During the surgery for these 12 cases, in 11 cases (excepting the 1 case whose facial nerve was not compressed by any vessels), vascular compressions were confirmed corresponding to the findings of the OS-GR images. Among the 10 OS-GR images on the non-affected side, two false-positive findings were visualized. It is concluded that OS-GR images obtained by means of MRI may serve as a useful planning aid prior to microvascular decompression for cases of TN and HFS. (author)

  13. Microvascularization in trigeminal ganglion of the common tree shrew (Tupaia glis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongstaponkit, S; Pradidarcheep, W; Toutip, S; Chunhabundit, P; Somana, R

    1997-01-01

    Since there is only a limited number of studies of the blood supply to the trigeminal ganglion (TG) in mammalian species, the TG from 16 common tree shrews (Tupaia glis) were investigated by light microscope, transmission electron microscope (TEM) and the corrosion cast technique in conjunction with scanning electron microscope (SEM). It was found that the TG contained clusters of neurons in the peripheral region whereas the bundles of nerve fibers were located more centrally. Each ganglionic neuron had a concentric nucleus and was ensheathed by satellite cells. It was noted that blood vessels of a continuous type were predominantly found in the area where the neurons were densely located and were much less frequently observed in the area occupied by nerve fibers. With TEM, the TG was shown to be mainly associated with large neurons containing big nuclei and prominent nucleoli. The blood supply of the TG is derived from the most rostral branch of the pontine artery, from the stapedial artery or sometimes from the supraorbital artery, and from the accessory meningeal artery which is a branch of the maxillary artery passing through the foramen ovale. These arteries give off branches and become capillary networks in the ganglion before draining blood to the peripheral region. The veins at the medial border drained into the cavernous sinus directly or through the inferior hypophyseal vein, while those at the lateral side of the ganglion carried the blood into the pterygoid plexus via an accessory meningeal vein. The veins along the trigeminal nerve root joined the posterior part of the cavernous sinus. These studies establish a unique anatomical distribution of the TG blood supply in the tree shrew and the utility of the cast/SEM technique in discerning detailed features of the blood supply in the nervous system.

  14. Autonomous Landing on Moving Platforms

    KAUST Repository

    Mendoza Chavez, Gilberto

    2016-08-01

    This thesis investigates autonomous landing of a micro air vehicle (MAV) on a nonstationary ground platform. Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and micro air vehicles (MAVs) are becoming every day more ubiquitous. Nonetheless, many applications still require specialized human pilots or supervisors. Current research is focusing on augmenting the scope of tasks that these vehicles are able to accomplish autonomously. Precise autonomous landing on moving platforms is essential for self-deployment and recovery of MAVs, but it remains a challenging task for both autonomous and piloted vehicles. Model Predictive Control (MPC) is a widely used and effective scheme to control constrained systems. One of its variants, output-feedback tube-based MPC, ensures robust stability for systems with bounded disturbances under system state reconstruction. This thesis proposes a MAV control strategy based on this variant of MPC to perform rapid and precise autonomous landing on moving targets whose nominal (uncommitted) trajectory and velocity are slowly varying. The proposed approach is demonstrated on an experimental setup.

  15. ERK-GluR1 phosphorylation in trigeminal spinal subnucleus caudalis neurons is involved in pain associated with dry tongue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaya, Yuka; Tsuboi, Yoshiyuki; Okada-Ogawa, Akiko; Shinoda, Masamichi; Kubo, Asako; Chen, Jui Yen; Noma, Noboru; Batbold, Dulguun; Imamura, Yoshiki; Sessle, Barry J; Iwata, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Dry mouth is known to cause severe pain in the intraoral structures, and many dry mouth patients have been suffering from intraoral pain. In development of an appropriate treatment, it is crucial to study the mechanisms underlying intraoral pain associated with dry mouth, yet the detailed mechanisms are not fully understood. To evaluate the mechanisms underlying pain related to dry mouth, the dry-tongue rat model was developed. Hence, the mechanical or heat nocifensive reflex, the phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase and phosphorylated GluR1-IR immunohistochemistries, and the single neuronal activity were examined in the trigeminal spinal subnucleus caudalis of dry-tongue rats. The head-withdrawal reflex threshold to mechanical, but not heat, stimulation of the tongue was significantly decreased on day 7 after tongue drying. The mechanical, but not heat, responses of trigeminal spinal subnucleus caudalis nociceptive neurons were significantly enhanced in dry-tongue rats compared to sham rats on day 7. The number of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase-immunoreactive cells was also significantly increased in the trigeminal spinal subnucleus caudalis following noxious stimulation of the tongue in dry-tongue rats compared to sham rats on day 7. The decrement of the mechanical head-withdrawal reflex threshold (HWT) was reversed during intracisternal administration of the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 inhibitor, PD98059. The trigeminal spinal subnucleus caudalis neuronal activities and the number of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase-immunoreactive cells following noxious mechanical stimulation of dried tongue were also significantly decreased following intracisternal administration of PD98059 compared to vehicle-administrated rats. Increased number of the phosphorylated GluR1-IR cells was observed in the trigeminal spinal subnucleus caudalis of dry-tongue rats, and the number of phosphorylated GluR1-IR cells

  16. Computed tomography-guided percutaneous ozone injection of the Gasserian ganglion for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An JX

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Jian-Xiong An,1,2 Hui Liu,1 Ruo-Wen Chen,1,2 Yong Wang,1 Wen-Xing Zhao,1 Derek Eastwood,3 John P Williams4 1Department of Anesthesiology, Pain Medicine & Critical Care Medicine, Aviation General Hospital of China Medical University & Beijing Institute of Translational Medicine, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 2Department of Anesthesiology, Weifang Medical University, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Pain Services, Wirral University Teaching Hospital, Wirral, Merseyside, UK; 4Department of Anesthesiology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic effect of computed tomography (CT-guided percutaneous ozone injection for refractory trigeminal neuralgia. Design: A retrospective evaluation was performed in the study. Setting: The study was conducted at a university hospital pain center. Patients and methods: A total of 29 patients with a clinical diagnosis of refractory trigeminal neuralgia were enrolled. All patients were treated with a percutaneous ozone injection and one patient was excluded. There were 21 patients with classical trigeminal neuralgia (group A and seven patients with painful trigeminal neuropathy caused by post-herpetic neuralgia (group B. The percutaneous injection was an oxygen–ozone mixture at an ozone concentration of 30 mg/­mL into the Gasserian ganglion performed under CT guidance. The number of ­procedures performed varied from one to as many as 16. Outcomes were evaluated using visual analog scale (VAS pain scores. Results: The combined VAS scores were 7.11 ± 1.23 pretreatment, 2.86 ± 1.69 posttreatment (P < 0.05 and 3.25 ± 2.01 after 6-month follow-up (P < 0.05. In group A, the VAS scores were 7.10 ± 1.04 pretreatment and 2.90 ± 1.84 posttreatment (P < 0.05. In group B, the VAS scores were 7.14 ± 1.77 pretreatment and 2.71 ± 1.25 posttreatment (P < 0.05. After 6-months follow-up, the VAS score was 3.38

  17. Assessment of neurovascular compression in patients with trigeminal neuralgia with a boundary fusion three-dimensional magnetic resonance cisternogram/angiogram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Toru; Omi, Megumi; Ohsako, Chika; Onoda, Keisuke; Date, Isao

    2007-01-01

    Precise assessment of the complex nerve-vessel relationship at the root entry zone (REZ) of the trigeminal nerve is useful for the planning of the microvascular decompression (MVD) in patients with trigeminal neuralgia. We have applied a boundary imaging of fusion three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance (MR) cisternogram/angiogram. The boundary imaging allows virtual assessment of the spatial relationship of the neurovascular compression at the REZ of the trigeminal nerve. The boundary images depicted complex anatomical relationship of the offending vessels to the trigeminal nerve REZ. The presence of offending vessels, compressive site, and degree of neurovascular compression were assessed from various viewpoints in the cistern and virtually through the brainstem and trigeminal nerve per se. The 3D visualization of the nerve-vessel relationship with fusion images was consistent with the intraoperative findings. The boundary fusion 3D MR cisternogram/angiogram may prove a useful adjunct for the diagnosis and decision-marking process to execute the MVD in patients with trigeminal neuralgia. (author)

  18. Epidermoid cyst in the cerebellopontine angle cistern presenting as trigeminal neuralgia. Diagnostic values of the orbicularis oculi reflex and metrizamide CT cisternography - case report -

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, Takashi; Goya, Tomokazu; Kinoshita, Kazuo (Miyazaki Medical College, Miyazaki (Japan)); Fukui, Masashi

    1983-05-01

    This 29-year-old male had been suffering from left trigeminal neuralgia one year prior to admission. Admission was prompted by the development of pain in the third division of the left trigeminal nerve. Physical and neurological examinations were not remarkable except for the facial pain. The orbicularis oculi reflex showed delayed latency of R/sub 1/ on the affected side. CT scans performed pre- and post-contrast enhancement revealed a low density area in the left cerebellopontine angle cistern. Metrizamide CT cisternography clearly revealed the margin of the lesion as the contrast media did not enter into the low density area. A left suboccipital craniectomy was performed. The trigeminal nerve was surrounded by a thin-capsulated mass and cholesteatoma materials. Histological diagnosis was epidermoid cyst. Since this surgical procedure, the trigeminal neuralgia has not recurred for one year. Without objective neurological deficits, it is difficult to distinguish symptomatic trigeminal from idiopathic neuralgia. Therefore, minor change of the orbicularis oculi reflex should help in objectively detecting dysfunction of the trigeminal nerve. Metrizamide CT cisternography is also useful in diagnosis of cystic lesions.

  19. The Bering Autonomous Target Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, John Leif; Denver, Troelz; Betto, Maurizio

    2003-01-01

    An autonomous asteroid target detection and tracking method has been developed. The method features near omnidirectionality and focus on high speed operations and completeness of search of the near space rather than the traditional faint object search methods, employed presently at the larger...... telescopes. The method has proven robust in operation and is well suited for use onboard spacecraft. As development target for the method and the associated instrumentation the asteroid research mission Bering has been used. Onboard a spacecraft, the autonomous detection is centered around the fully...... autonomous star tracker the Advanced Stellar Compass (ASC). One feature of this instrument is that potential targets are registered directly in terms of date, right ascension, declination, and intensity, which greatly facilitates both tracking search and registering. Results from ground and inflight tests...

  20. Autonomous Industrial Mobile Manipulation (AIMM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvilshøj, Mads; Bøgh, Simon; Nielsen, Oluf Skov

    2012-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of the interdisciplinary research field Autonomous Industrial Mobile Manipulation (AIMM), with an emphasis on physical implementations and applications. Design/methodology/approach - Following an introduction to AIMM, this paper investiga......Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of the interdisciplinary research field Autonomous Industrial Mobile Manipulation (AIMM), with an emphasis on physical implementations and applications. Design/methodology/approach - Following an introduction to AIMM, this paper......; sustainability, configuration, adaptation, autonomy, positioning, manipulation and grasping, robot-robot interaction, human-robot interaction, process quality, dependability, and physical properties. Findings - The concise yet comprehensive review provides both researchers (academia) and practitioners (industry......) with a quick and gentle overview of AIMM. Furthermore, the paper identifies key open issues and promising research directions to realize real-world integration and maturation of the AIMM technology. Originality/value - This paper reviews the interdisciplinary research field Autonomous Industrial Mobile...

  1. Diagnosis, pathophysiology, and management of cluster headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Jan; May, Arne

    2018-01-01

    Cluster headache is a trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia characterised by extremely painful, strictly unilateral, short-lasting headache attacks accompanied by ipsilateral autonomic symptoms or the sense of restlessness and agitation, or both. The severity of the disorder has major effects on the patient's quality of life and, in some cases, might lead to suicidal ideation. Cluster headache is now thought to involve a synchronised abnormal activity in the hypothalamus, the trigeminovascular system, and the autonomic nervous system. The hypothalamus appears to play a fundamental role in the generation of a permissive state that allows the initiation of an episode, whereas the attacks are likely to require the involvement of the peripheral nervous system. Triptans are the most effective drugs to treat an acute cluster headache attack. Monoclonal antibodies against calcitonin gene-related peptide, a crucial neurotransmitter of the trigeminal system, are under investigation for the preventive treatment of cluster headache. These studies will increase our understanding of the disorder and perhaps reveal other therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Rare primary headaches: clinical insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casucci, G; d'Onofrio, F; Torelli, P

    2004-10-01

    So-called "rare" headaches, whose prevalence rate is lower than 1% or is not known at all and have been reported in only a few dozen cases to date, constitute a very heterogeneous group. Those that are best characterised from the clinical point of view can be classified into forms with prominent autonomic features and forms with sparse or no autonomic features. Among the former are trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs) and hemicrania continua, while the latter comprise classical trigeminal neuralgia, hypnic headache, primary thunderclap headache, and exploding head syndrome. The major clinical discriminating factor for the differential diagnosis of TACs is the relationship between duration and frequency of attacks: the forms in which pain is shorter lived are those with the higher frequency of daily attacks. Other aspects to be considered are the time pattern of symptoms, intensity and timing of attacks, the patient's behaviour during the attacks, the presence of any triggering factors and of the refractory period after an induced attack, and response to therapy, especially with indomethacin. Often these are little known clinical entities, which are not easily detected in clinical practice. For some of them, e. g., thunderclap headache, it is always necessary to perform instrumental tests to exclude the presence of underlying organic diseases.

  3. Proposal for evaluating the quality of reports of surgical interventions in the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia: the Surgical Trigeminal Neuralgia Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Harith; Mirza, Bilal; Kitchen, Neil; Zakrzewska, Joanna M

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to design a checklist with a scoring system for reporting on studies of surgical interventions for trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and to validate it by a review of the recent literature. A checklist with a scoring system, the Surgical Trigeminal Neuralgia Score (STNS), was devised partially based on the validated STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) criteria and customized for TN after a literature review and then applied to a series of articles. These articles were identified using a prespecified MEDLINE and Embase search covering the period from 2008 to 2010. Of the 584 articles found, 59 were studies of interventional procedures for TN that fulfilled the inclusion criteria and 56 could be obtained in full. The STNS was then applied independently by 3 of the authors. The maximum STNS came to 30, and was reliable and reproducible when used by the 3 authors who performed the scoring. The range of scores was 6-23.5, with a mean of 14 for all the journals. The impact factor scores of the journals in which the papers were published ranged from 0 to 4.8. Twenty-four of the studies were published in the Journal of Neurosurgery or in Neurosurgery. Studies published in neurosurgical journals ranked higher on the STNS scale than those published in nonneurosurgical journals. There was no statistically significant correlation between STNS and impact factors. Stereotactic radiosurgery (n = 25) and microvascular decompression (n = 15) were the most commonly reported procedures. The diagnostic criteria were stated in 35% of the studies, and 4 studies reported subtypes of TN. An increasing number of studies (46%) used the recommended Kaplan-Meier methodology for pain survival outcomes. The follow-up period was unclear in 8 studies, and 26 reported follow-ups of more than 5 years. Complications were reported fairly consistently but the temporal course was not always indicated. Direct interview, telephone conversation

  4. Autonomic Regulation of Splanchnic Circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen A Fraser

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of the autonomic nervous system in circulatory regulation of the splanchnic organs (stomach, small intestine, colon, liver, pancreas and spleen is reviewed. In general, the sympathetic nervous system is primarily involved in vasoconstriction, while the parasympathetic contributes to vasodilation. Vasoconstriction in the splanchnic circulation appears to be mediated by alpha-2 receptors and vasodilation by activation of primary afferent nerves with subsequent release of vasodilatory peptides, or by stimulation of beta-adrenergic receptors. As well, an important function of the autonomic nervous system is to provide a mechanism by which splanchnic vascular reserve can be mobilized during stress to maintain overall cardiovascular homeostasis.

  5. Political accountability and autonomous weapons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Igoe Walsh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Autonomous weapons would have the capacity to select and attack targets without direct human input. One important objection to the introduction of such weapons is that they will make it more difficult to identify and hold accountable those responsible for undesirable outcomes such as mission failures and civilian casualties. I hypothesize that individuals can modify their attribution of responsibility in predicable ways to accommodate this new technology. The results of a survey experiment are consistent with this; subjects continue to find responsible and hold accountable political and military leaders when autonomous weapons are used, but also attribute responsibility to the designers and programmers of such weapons.

  6. Discerning non-autonomous dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clemson, Philip T.; Stefanovska, Aneta, E-mail: aneta@lancaster.ac.uk

    2014-09-30

    Structure and function go hand in hand. However, while a complex structure can be relatively safely broken down into the minutest parts, and technology is now delving into nanoscales, the function of complex systems requires a completely different approach. Here the complexity clearly arises from nonlinear interactions, which prevents us from obtaining a realistic description of a system by dissecting it into its structural component parts. At best, the result of such investigations does not substantially add to our understanding or at worst it can even be misleading. Not surprisingly, the dynamics of complex systems, facilitated by increasing computational efficiency, is now readily tackled in the case of measured time series. Moreover, time series can now be collected in practically every branch of science and in any structural scale—from protein dynamics in a living cell to data collected in astrophysics or even via social networks. In searching for deterministic patterns in such data we are limited by the fact that no complex system in the real world is autonomous. Hence, as an alternative to the stochastic approach that is predominantly applied to data from inherently non-autonomous complex systems, theory and methods specifically tailored to non-autonomous systems are needed. Indeed, in the last decade we have faced a huge advance in mathematical methods, including the introduction of pullback attractors, as well as time series methods that cope with the most important characteristic of non-autonomous systems—their time-dependent behaviour. Here we review current methods for the analysis of non-autonomous dynamics including those for extracting properties of interactions and the direction of couplings. We illustrate each method by applying it to three sets of systems typical for chaotic, stochastic and non-autonomous behaviour. For the chaotic class we select the Lorenz system, for the stochastic the noise-forced Duffing system and for the non-autonomous

  7. Gas House Autonomous System Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Luke; Edsall, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    Gas House Autonomous System Monitoring (GHASM) will employ Integrated System Health Monitoring (ISHM) of cryogenic fluids in the High Pressure Gas Facility at Stennis Space Center. The preliminary focus of development incorporates the passive monitoring and eventual commanding of the Nitrogen System. ISHM offers generic system awareness, adept at using concepts rather than specific error cases. As an enabler for autonomy, ISHM provides capabilities inclusive of anomaly detection, diagnosis, and abnormality prediction. Advancing ISHM and Autonomous Operation functional capabilities enhances quality of data, optimizes safety, improves cost effectiveness, and has direct benefits to a wide spectrum of aerospace applications.

  8. Discerning non-autonomous dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clemson, Philip T.; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2014-01-01

    Structure and function go hand in hand. However, while a complex structure can be relatively safely broken down into the minutest parts, and technology is now delving into nanoscales, the function of complex systems requires a completely different approach. Here the complexity clearly arises from nonlinear interactions, which prevents us from obtaining a realistic description of a system by dissecting it into its structural component parts. At best, the result of such investigations does not substantially add to our understanding or at worst it can even be misleading. Not surprisingly, the dynamics of complex systems, facilitated by increasing computational efficiency, is now readily tackled in the case of measured time series. Moreover, time series can now be collected in practically every branch of science and in any structural scale—from protein dynamics in a living cell to data collected in astrophysics or even via social networks. In searching for deterministic patterns in such data we are limited by the fact that no complex system in the real world is autonomous. Hence, as an alternative to the stochastic approach that is predominantly applied to data from inherently non-autonomous complex systems, theory and methods specifically tailored to non-autonomous systems are needed. Indeed, in the last decade we have faced a huge advance in mathematical methods, including the introduction of pullback attractors, as well as time series methods that cope with the most important characteristic of non-autonomous systems—their time-dependent behaviour. Here we review current methods for the analysis of non-autonomous dynamics including those for extracting properties of interactions and the direction of couplings. We illustrate each method by applying it to three sets of systems typical for chaotic, stochastic and non-autonomous behaviour. For the chaotic class we select the Lorenz system, for the stochastic the noise-forced Duffing system and for the non-autonomous

  9. Persistent trigeminal artery/persistent trigeminal artery variant and coexisting variants of the head and neck vessels diagnosed using 3 T MRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, M.; Guo, Q.; Li, S.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To report the prevalence and characteristic features of persistent trigeminal artery (PTA), PTA variant (PTAV), and other variants of the head and neck vessels, identified using magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Materials and methods: The three-dimensional (3D) time of flight (TOF) MRA and 3D contrast-enhanced (CE) MRA images of 6095 consecutive patients who underwent 3 T MRA at Liaocheng People's Hospital from 1 September 2008 through 31 May 2012 were retrospectively reviewed and analysed. Thirty-two patients were excluded because of suboptimal image quality or internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion. Results: The prevalence of both PTA and PTAV was 0.63% (PTA, 26 cases; PTAV, 12 cases). The prevalence of coexisting variants of the head and neck vessels in cases of PTA/PTAV was 52.6% (20 of 38 cases). The vascular variants that coexisted with cases of PTA/PTAV were as follows: the intracranial arteries varied in 10 cases, the origin of the supra-aortic arteries varied in nine cases, the vertebral artery (VA) varied in 14 cases, and six cases displayed fenestrations. Fifteen of the 20 cases contained more than two types of variants. Conclusion: The prevalence of both PTA and PTAV was 0.63%. Although PTA and PTAV are rare vascular variants, they frequently coexist with other variants of the head and neck vessels. Multiple vascular variations can coexist in a single patient. Recognizing PTA, PTAV, and other variants of the head and neck vessels is crucial when planning a neuroradiological intervention or surgery. Recognizing the medial PTA is very important in clinical practice when performing trans-sphenoidal surgery on the pituitary as failure to do so could result in massive haemorrhage

  10. Quantitative sensory testing in classical trigeminal neuralgia-a blinded study in patients with and without concomitant persistent pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Younis, Samaira; Maarbjerg, Stine; Reimer, Maren

    2016-01-01

    The diagnostic criteria of the third International Classification of Headache Disorders state that there should be no neurological deficits in patients with classical trigeminal neuralgia (TN) at clinical examination. However, studies demonstrating sensory abnormalities at bedside examination in TN...... scores were calculated to process frequency analyses and Z-profiles. We found increased mechanical detection threshold on the symptomatic side (47.2% vs 0%, P = 0.008), asymptomatic side (33.3% vs 0%, P = 0.011), and hand (36% vs 0%, P ... increased mechanical detection threshold on the symptomatic side compared with the asymptomatic side (-2.980 vs -2.166, P = 0.040). Thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia was detected bilaterally in the face and the hand. Trigeminal neuralgia patients with concomitant persistent pain tended to have higher mean...

  11. Neuronal vacuolation of the trigeminal nuclei in goats caused by ingestion of Prosopis juliflora pods (mesquite beans).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabosa, I M; Souza, J C; Graça, D L; Barbosa-Filho, J M; Almeida, R N; Riet-Correa, F

    2000-06-01

    Three groups of 6 goats each were fed a ration containing 30, 60, or 90%, on a dry matter base, of Prosopis juliflora pods. A control group of 4 goats ingested only the basic ration. Two hundred and ten days after the start of the experiment 3 goats that ingested 60% pods in and 4 that ingested 90% had mandibular tremors, mainly during chewing. All animals were killed after 270 d of ingestion. No gross lesions were observed. Histologic lesions were characterized by fine vacuolation of the pericaryon of neurons from the trigeminal nuclei. Occasionally neurons of the oculomotor nuclei were also affected. Wallerian degeneration was occasionally observed in the mandibular and trigeminal nerves. Denervation atrophy of the masseter, temporal, hypoglossus, genioglossus, styloglossus, medial pterygoid and lateral pterygoid muscles was seen. The clinical signs from feeding the P juliflora pods were caused by a selective toxicity to neurons of some cranial nerve nuclei.

  12. Autonomic dysfunction in cirrhosis and portal hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dümcke, Christine Winkler; Møller, Søren

    2008-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension are frequently associated with signs of circulatory dysfunction and peripheral polyneuropathy, which includes defects of the autonomic nervous system. Autonomic dysfunction, which is seen in both alcoholic and non-alcoholic liver cirrhosis and increases...

  13. Energy homeostasis, autonomic activity and obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheurink, AJW; Balkan, B; Nyakas, C; vanDijk, G; Steffens, AB; Bohus, B

    1995-01-01

    Obesity is often accompanied by alterations in both sympathetic and parasympathetic autonomic functions. The present paper summarizes the results of a number of studies designed to investigate autonomic functioning in normal, genetically, and experimentally obese rats, Particular emphasis is given

  14. Connected and autonomous vehicles 2040 vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT) commissioned a one-year project, Connected and Autonomous : Vehicles 2040 Vision, with researchers at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) to assess the implications of connected and : autonomous ve...

  15. Mining in the Future: Autonomous Robotics for Safer Mines

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Shahdi, A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available ? Require less support infrastructure ? Advanced sensors ? CSIR 2012 Slide 4 Degree of Autonomy ? Teleoperation ? Semi-autonomous ? Autonomous ? CSIR 2012 Slide 5 Mobile Intelligent Autonomous Systems Group ? The Mobile Intelligent Autonomous...

  16. Microvascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia: comments on a series of 250 cases, including 10 patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broggi, G; Ferroli, P; Franzini, A; Servello, D; Dones, I

    2000-01-01

    To examine surgical findings and results of microvascular decompression (MVD) for trigeminal neuralgia (TN), including patients with multiple sclerosis, to bring new insight about the role of microvascular compression in the pathogenesis of the disorder and the role of MVD in its treatment. Between 1990 and 1998, 250 patients affected by trigeminal neuralgia underwent MVD in the Department of Neurosurgery of the "Istituto Nazionale Neurologico C Besta" in Milan. Limiting the review to the period 1991-6, to exclude the "learning period" (the first 50 cases) and patients with less than 1 year follow up, surgical findings and results were critically analysed in 148 consecutive cases, including 10 patients with multiple sclerosis. Vascular compression of the trigeminal nerve was found in all cases. The recurrence rate was 15.3% (follow up 1-7 years, mean 38 months). In five of 10 patients with multiple sclerosis an excellent result was achieved (follow up 12-39 months, mean 24 months). Patients with TN for more than 84 months did significantly worse than those with a shorter history (p<0.05). There was no mortality and most complications occurred in the learning period. Surgical complications were not related to age of the patients. Aetiopathogenesis of trigeminal neuralgia remains a mystery. These findings suggest a common neuromodulatory role of microvascular compression in both patients with or without multiple sclerosis rather than a direct causal role. MVD was found to be a safe and effective procedure to relieve typical TN in patients of all ages. It should be proposed as first choice surgery to all patients affected by TN, even in selected cases with multiple sclerosis, to give them the opportunity of pain relief without sensory deficits.

  17. Patterns of neurovascular compression in patients with classic trigeminal neuralgia: A high-resolution MRI-based study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenzoni, José; David, Philippe; Levivier, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the anatomical characteristics and patterns of neurovascular compression in patients suffering classic trigeminal neuralgia (CTN), using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and methods: The analysis of the anatomy of the trigeminal nerve, brain stem and the vascular structures related to this nerve was made in 100 consecutive patients treated with a Gamma Knife radiosurgery for CTN between December 1999 and September 2004. MRI studies (T1, T1 enhanced and T2-SPIR) with axial, coronal and sagital simultaneous visualization were dynamically assessed using the software GammaPlan™. Three-dimensional reconstructions were also developed in some representative cases. Results: In 93 patients (93%), there were one or several vascular structures in contact, either, with the trigeminal nerve, or close to its origin in the pons. The superior cerebellar artery was involved in 71 cases (76%). Other vessels identified were the antero-inferior cerebellar artery, the basilar artery, the vertebral artery, and some venous structures. Vascular compression was found anywhere along the trigeminal nerve. The mean distance between the nerve compression and the origin of the nerve in the brainstem was 3.76 ± 2.9 mm (range 0–9.8 mm). In 39 patients (42%), the vascular compression was located proximally and in 42 (45%) the compression was located distally. Nerve dislocation or distortion by the vessel was observed in 30 cases (32%). Conclusions: The findings of this study are similar to those reported in surgical and autopsy series. This non-invasive MRI-based approach could be useful for diagnostic and therapeutic decisions in CTN, and it could help to understand its pathogenesis.

  18. Experimental inflammation following dural application of complete Freund's adjuvant or inflammatory soup does not alter brain and trigeminal microvascular passage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundblad, Cornelia; Haanes, Kristian A; Grände, Gustaf; Edvinsson, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Migraine is a paroxysmal, disabling primary headache that affects 16 % of the adult population. In spite of decades of intense research, the origin and the pathophysiology mechanisms involved are still not fully known. Although triptans and gepants provide effective relief from acute migraine for many patients, their site of action remains unidentified. It has been suggested that during migraine attacks the leakiness of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is altered, increasing the passage of anti-migraine drugs. This study aimed to investigate the effect of experimental inflammation, following dural application of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) or inflammatory soup (IS) on brain and trigeminal microvascular passage. In order to address this issue, we induced local inflammation in male Sprague-Dawley-rats dura mater by the addition of CFA or IS directly on the dural surface. Following 2, 24 or 48 h of inflammation we calculated permeability-surface area product (PS) for [(51)Cr]-EDTA in the trigeminal ganglion (TG), spinal trigeminal nucleus, cortex, periaqueductal grey and cerebellum. We observed that [(51)Cr]-EDTA did not pass into the central nervous system (CNS) in a major way. However, [(51)Cr]-EDTA readily passed the TG by >30 times compared to the CNS. Application of CFA or IS did not show altered transfer constants. With these experiments we show that dural IS/CFA triggered TG inflammation, did not increase the BBB passage, and that the TG is readily exposed to circulating molecules. The TG could provide a site of anti-migraine drug interaction with effect on the trigeminal system.

  19. Inhibition of excitatory synaptic transmission in the trigeminal motor nucleus by the nitric oxide-cyclic GMP signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pose, Inés; Silveira, Valentina; Morales, Francisco R

    2011-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and cyclic GMP (cGMP) suppressed glutamatergic synaptic transmission to trigeminal motoneurons in brain stem slices of neonatal rats. Histological studies showed guanylate cyclase (GC) containing fibers in the trigeminal motor pool. Glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) were recorded from neonatal trigeminal motoneurons in response to stimulation of the supratrigeminal nucleus (SuV). The NO donors DETA/NONOate (DETA/NO), at a concentration which released 275.1 nM of NO, and Spermine/NONOate (Sper/NO) reduced the amplitude of the EPSC to 52.7±0.6% and 60.1±10.8% of control values, respectively. These actions were not blocked by the GC inhibitors, ODQ or NS-2028. However, in the presence of YC-1 or BAY41-2272, modulators of GC that act as NO sensitizers, lower and otherwise ineffective concentrations of DETA/NO induced a reduction of the EPSC to 60.6±5.2%. Moreover, NO effects were mimicked by 8BrcGMP and by Zaprinast, an inhibitor of Phosphodiesterase 5. Glutamatergic currents evoked by exogenous glutamate were not reduced by DETA/NO nor 8BrcGMP. Paired-pulse facilitation was increased by NO donors. Under "minimal stimulation" conditions NO donors and cGMP increased the failure rate of evoked EPSCs. Protein kinase inhibitors antagonized cGMP effects. The results suggest that NO, through the synthesis of cGMP, presynaptically inhibits glutamatergic synaptic transmission on trigeminal motoneurons. We propose that NO has complex actions on motor pools; specific studies are needed to elucidate their physiological significance in the behaving animal. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Astringency is a trigeminal sensation that involves the activation of G protein-coupled signaling by phenolic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöbel, Nicole; Radtke, Debbie; Kyereme, Jessica; Wollmann, Nadine; Cichy, Annika; Obst, Katja; Kallweit, Kerstin; Kletke, Olaf; Minovi, Amir; Dazert, Stefan; Wetzel, Christian H; Vogt-Eisele, Angela; Gisselmann, Günter; Ley, Jakob P; Bartoshuk, Linda M; Spehr, Jennifer; Hofmann, Thomas; Hatt, Hanns

    2014-07-01

    Astringency is an everyday sensory experience best described as a dry mouthfeel typically elicited by phenol-rich alimentary products like tea and wine. The neural correlates and cellular mechanisms of astringency perception are still not well understood. We explored taste and astringency perception in human subjects to study the contribution of the taste as well as of the trigeminal sensory system to astringency perception. Subjects with either a lesion or lidocaine anesthesia of the Chorda tympani taste nerve showed no impairment of astringency perception. Only anesthesia of both the lingual taste and trigeminal innervation by inferior alveolar nerve block led to a loss of astringency perception. In an in vitro model of trigeminal ganglion neurons of mice, we studied the cellular mechanisms of astringency perception. Primary mouse trigeminal ganglion neurons showed robust responses to 8 out of 19 monomeric phenolic astringent compounds and 8 polymeric red wine polyphenols in Ca(2+) imaging experiments. The activating substances shared one or several galloyl moieties, whereas substances lacking the moiety did not or only weakly stimulate responses. The responses depended on Ca(2+) influx and voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels, but not on transient receptor potential channels. Responses to the phenolic compound epigallocatechin gallate as well as to a polymeric red wine polyphenol were inhibited by the Gαs inactivator suramin, the adenylate cyclase inhibitor SQ, and the cyclic nucleotide-gated channel inhibitor l-cis-diltiazem and displayed sensitivity to blockers of Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Dynamic Regulation of Delta-Opioid Receptor in Rat Trigeminal Ganglion Neurons by Lipopolysaccharide-induced Acute Pulpitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jin; Lv, Yiheng; Fu, Yunjie; Ren, Lili; Wang, Pan; Liu, Baozhu; Huang, Keqiang; Bi, Jing

    2015-12-01

    Delta-opioid receptor (DOR) and its endogenous ligands distribute in trigeminal system and play a very important role in modulating peripheral inflammatory pain. DOR activation can trigger p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK1/2) and Akt signaling pathways, which participate in anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects. In this study, our purpose was to determine the dynamic changes of DOR in trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons during the process of acute dental pulp inflammation and elucidate its possible mechanism. Forty rats were used to generate lipopolysaccharide-induced acute pulpitis animal models at 6, 12, and 24 hours and sham-operated groups. Acute pulpitis was confirmed by hematoxylin-eosin staining, and TG neuron activation was determined by anti-c-Fos immunohistochemistry. DOR protein and gene expression in TG was investigated by immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, and real-time polymerase chain reaction, and DOR expression in trigeminal nerves and dental pulp was also determined by immunohistochemistry. To further investigate the mechanism of DOR modulating acute inflammation, the change of pErk1/2 and pAkt in TG was examined by immunohistochemistry. Lipopolysaccharide could successfully induce acute pulpitis and activated TG neurons. Acute pulpitis could dynamically increase DOR protein and gene expression at 6, 12, and 24 hours in TG, and DOR dimerization was significantly increased at 12 and 24 hours. Acute pulpitis also induced the dynamic change of DOR protein in trigeminal nerve and dental pulp. Furthermore, ERK1/2 and Akt signaling pathways were inhibited in TG after acute pulpitis. Increased DOR expression and dimerization may play important roles in peripheral acute inflammatory pain. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A relationship between bruxism and orofacial-dystonia? A trigeminal electrophysiological approach in a case report of pineal cavernoma

    OpenAIRE

    Frisardi, Gianni; Iani, Cesare; Sau, Gianfranco; Frisardi, Flavio; Leornadis, Carlo; Lumbau, Aurea; Enrico, Paolo; Sirca, Donatella; Staderini, Enrico Maria; Chessa, Giacomo

    2013-01-01

    Background: In some clinical cases, bruxism may be correlated to central nervous system hyperexcitability, suggesting that bruxism may represent a subclinical form of dystonia. To examine this hypothesis, we performed an electrophysiological evaluation of the excitability of the trigeminal nervous system in a patient affected by pineal cavernoma with pain symptoms in the orofacial region and pronounced bruxism. Methods: Electrophysiological studies included bilateral electrical transcrania...

  3. Trigeminal nerve injury-induced thrombospondin-4 up-regulation contributes to orofacial neuropathic pain states in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, K-W; Kim, D-S; Zaucke, F; Luo, Z D

    2014-04-01

    Injury to the trigeminal nerve often results in the development of chronic pain states including tactile allodynia, or hypersensitivity to light touch, in orofacial area, but its underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Peripheral nerve injury has been shown to cause up-regulation of thrombospondin-4 (TSP4) in dorsal spinal cord that correlates with neuropathic pain development. In this study, we examined whether injury-induced TSP4 is critical in mediating orofacial pain development in a rat model of chronic constriction injury to the infraorbital nerve. Orofacial sensitivity to mechanical stimulation was examined in a unilateral infraorbital nerve ligation rat model. The levels of TSP4 in trigeminal ganglia and associated spinal subnucleus caudalis and C1/C2 spinal cord (Vc/C2) from injured rats were examined at time points correlating with the initiation and peak orofacial hypersensitivity. TSP4 antisense and mismatch oligodeoxynucleotides were intrathecally injected into injured rats to see if antisense oligodeoxynucleotide treatment could reverse injury-induced TSP4 up-regulation and orofacial behavioural hypersensitivity. Our data indicated that trigeminal nerve injury induced TSP4 up-regulation in Vc/C2 at a time point correlated with orofacial tactile allodynia. In addition, intrathecal treatment with TSP4 antisense, but not mismatch, oligodeoxynucleotides blocked both injury-induced TSP4 up-regulation in Vc/C2 and behavioural hypersensitivity. Our data support that infraorbital nerve injury leads to TSP4 up-regulation in trigeminal spinal complex that contributes to orofacial neuropathic pain states. Blocking this pathway may provide an alternative approach in management of orofacial neuropathic pain states. © 2013 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  4. A Proposed Neurologic Pathway for Scalp Acupuncture: Trigeminal Nerve-Meninges-Cerebrospinal Fluid-Contacting Neurons-Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuya; Liu, Kun; Wang, Yuan; Wang, Shuyou; He, Xun; Cui, Xiang; Gao, Xinyan; Zhu, Bing

    2017-10-01

    Objective: Scalp acupuncture is a somatic stimulation therapy that produces prominent clinical effects when used to treat cerebral diseases. However, this acupuncture's therapeutic mechanisms have not yet been well-addressed. Scalp acupoints are innervated by the trigeminal nerve, which is coincident with the intracranial sensory afferents as well as with the meningeal vessels. In recent years, cerebrospinal fluid-contacting neurons have been found and proved to transmit allergic substances between brain the parenchyma and meninges, representing a possible network between scalp acupuncture and the brain. The aim of the current study was to observe the connections between scalp acupoints and the meninges and to establish a possible mechanism for scalp acupuncture. Materials and Methods: Twenty-five adult Sprague-Dawley rats were used for the present study. Evans Blue dye (Sigma Chemical Co, St. Louis, MO) was injected though each rat's caudal vein after trigeminal stimulation for plasma extravasation observation. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) values of the rat's brain surface were measured at different timepoints before and after electroacupuncture (EA) on GB 15 ( Toulinqi ) or ST 36 ( Zusanli ). Results: These preliminary studies indicated that neurogenic plasma extravasation on a rat's skin and dura mater after mechanical or electrical stimulation of the trigeminal nerves is a reliable way to show the pathologic connection between scalp acupoints and the meninges. Moreover, CBF of the rat's brain surface is increased significantly after EA stimulation at GB 15 ( Toulinqi ), which is located in the receptive field of the supraorbital nerve. Conclusions: These findings suggest that the mechanism of scalp acupuncture might lie in the specific neurologic pathway that could be termed as trigeminal nerve-meninges-cerebrospinal fluid-contacting neurons-brain , which is a possible shortcut to brain functional regulation and cerebral disease treatment.

  5. [Linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia. Nine years' experience in a single institution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Rubio, A A; Martinez-Manrique, J J; Revuelta-Gutierrez, R; Gomez-Amador, J L; Martinez-Anda, J J; Ponce-Gomez, J A; Moreno-Jimenez, S

    2014-09-16

    INTRODUCTION. Pharmacological treatment is the first therapeutic step towards controlling pain in trigeminal neuralgia, but 25-50% of patients become medication resistant. There are currently several surgical alternatives for treating these patients. AIM. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of stereotactic radiosurgery for the treatment of patients with trigeminal neuralgia. PATIENTS AND METHODS. A follow-up study was conducted on 30 patients who underwent radiosurgery using a Novalis linear accelerator. Eighty per cent of the dosage was calculated at the isocentre, the entry zone of the root of the trigeminal nerve. The mean follow-up time was 27.5 months (range: 1-65 months). RESULTS. The mean age was 66 years (range: 36-87 years), with a time to progression of 7.1 years (range: 4-27 years). The distribution of the pain was from the right side (63.3%). Of the 30 patients, 27 experienced an improvement (90%) 1.6 months (range: 1 week-4 months) after the treatment; 10 patients (33.3%) scored grade I, and 17 patients (56.6%) obtained a score of grade II. During the follow-up, four patients (14.2%) suffered a relapse; two underwent re-irradiation. Time without recurrence was 62.7 months (range: 54.6-70.8 months). The rate of side effects was 76.7% and only three patients developed facial anaesthesia with loss of the corneal reflex. CONCLUSIONS. The use of the linear accelerator is an effective therapeutic option in the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia, since it provides adequate long-term control of the pain, reduces the use of medication and improves the quality of life.

  6. Formal Verification of Autonomous Vehicle Platooning

    OpenAIRE

    Kamali, Maryam; Dennis, Louise A.; McAree, Owen; Fisher, Michael; Veres, Sandor M.

    2016-01-01

    The coordination of multiple autonomous vehicles into convoys or platoons is expected on our highways in the near future. However, before such platoons can be deployed, the new autonomous behaviors of the vehicles in these platoons must be certified. An appropriate representation for vehicle platooning is as a multi-agent system in which each agent captures the "autonomous decisions" carried out by each vehicle. In order to ensure that these autonomous decision-making agents in vehicle platoo...

  7. Hazard Map for Autonomous Navigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Troels

    This dissertation describes the work performed in the area of using image analysis in the process of landing a spacecraft autonomously and safely on the surface of the Moon. This is suggested to be done using a Hazard Map. The correspondence problem between several Hazard Maps are investigated...

  8. Designing Assessment for Autonomous Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Marie; Mathers, Lucy

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to disseminate and evaluate an autonomous learning framework developed through collaborative research with first- and second-year undergraduate students at De Montfort University. Central to the framework is the involvement of students in the assessment of their peers and themselves using dialogue about the assessment and feedback…

  9. Computing architecture for autonomous microgrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Steven Y.

    2015-09-29

    A computing architecture that facilitates autonomously controlling operations of a microgrid is described herein. A microgrid network includes numerous computing devices that execute intelligent agents, each of which is assigned to a particular entity (load, source, storage device, or switch) in the microgrid. The intelligent agents can execute in accordance with predefined protocols to collectively perform computations that facilitate uninterrupted control of the .

  10. Autonomous Landing on Moving Platforms

    KAUST Repository

    Mendoza Chavez, Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    -deployment and recovery of MAVs, but it remains a challenging task for both autonomous and piloted vehicles. Model Predictive Control (MPC) is a widely used and effective scheme to control constrained systems. One of its variants, output-feedback tube-based MPC, ensures

  11. Bi-modal radiofrequency treatment for coexisting neuralgia and neuropathy in adjacent divisions of the trigeminal nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatjiwale, M; Bhatjiwale, M; Naik, L D; Chopade, P

    2018-05-29

    Trigeminal neuralgia and deafferentation neuropathic pain, or trigeminal neuropathy, are different symptomatologies, rarely reported to present together. The case of a 65-year-old gentleman suffering from trigeminal neuralgia of the maxillary and mandibular division is reported. He first underwent an infraorbital neurectomy that was complicated by deafferentation neuropathic pain, whilst his mandibular neuralgia continued. He was treated successfully for both the neuropathic and neuralgic symptoms in the same session using ultra-extended euthermic pulsed radiofrequency treatment for the maxillary division (V2) and radiofrequency thermocoagulation for the mandibular division (V3). This report is novel in describing the use of dual modalities in the same session for two distinct coexisting clinical entities in two different divisions of the same cranial nerve. The use of ultra-extended pulsed radiofrequency treatment for neuropathic pain in this case is also unique. Nearly 2years after the procedure, the patient continues to have complete pain relief. Copyright © 2018 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in the trigeminal vascular system and other brain structures related to pain in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramachandran, Roshni; Ploug, Kenneth Beri; Hay-Schmidt, Anders

    2010-01-01

    to measure the respective levels of mRNA and protein for nNOS and eNOS in peripheral and central tissues involved in migraine pain: dura mater, pial arteries, trigeminal ganglion (TG) trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC), periaqueductal grey (PAG), thalamus, hypothalamus, cortex, pituitary gland, hippocampus...... and cerebellum. iNOS was excluded from the present study because it was not induced. In the trigeminal vascular system we found the highest expression of nNOS mRNA in pial arteries. However, protein expression of nNOS was maximum in TNC. Among other brain structures, nNOS mRNA and protein expression...... was remarkably higher in the cerebellum than in any other tissues. Regarding eNOS in the trigeminovascular system, the highest mRNA expression was found in pial arteries. In the other brain structures, eNOS mRNA expression was similar but with lowest mRNA concentration in the pituitary gland and the highest...

  13. Effects of NSAIDs on the Release of Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide and Prostaglandin E2 from Rat Trigeminal Ganglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittorio Vellani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are frequently used to treat migraine, but the mechanisms of their effects in this pathology are not fully elucidated. The trigeminal ganglia and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP have been implicated in the pathophysiology of migraine. The release of CGRP and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 from freshly isolated rat trigeminal ganglia was evaluated after oral administration of nimesulide, etoricoxib, and ketoprofen, NSAIDs with different pharmacological features. Thirty minutes after oral administration, nimesulide, 10 mg/Kg, decreased the GCRP release induced by an inflammatory soup, while the other NSAIDs were ineffective at this point in time. Two hours after oral nimesulide (5 and 10 mg/Kg and ketoprofen (10 mg/Kg, but not of etoricoxib, a significant decrease in the CGRP release was observed. All drugs reduced PGE2, although with some differences in timing and doses, and the action on CGRP does not seem to be related to PGE2 inhibition. The reduction of CGRP release from rat trigeminal ganglia after nimesulide and ketoprofen may help to explain the mechanism of action of NSAIDs in migraine. Since at 30 minutes only nimesulide was effective in reducing CGRP release, these results suggest that this NSAID may exert a particularly rapid effect in patients with migraine.

  14. Occlusal splint versus modified nociceptive trigeminal inhibition splint in bruxism therapy: a randomized, controlled trial using surface electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalewski, B; Chruściel-Nogalska, M; Frączak, B

    2015-12-01

    An occlusal splint and a modified nociceptive trigeminal inhibition splint (AMPS, anterior deprogrammer, Kois deprogrammer, Lucia jig, etc.) are commonly and quite frequently used in the treatment of masticatory muscle disorders, although their sustainable and long-lasting effect on these muscles' function is still not very well known. Results of scant surface electromyography studies in patients with temporomandibular disorders have been contradictory. The aim of this study was to evaluate both devices in bruxism therapy; EMG activity levels during postural activity and maximum voluntary contraction of the superficial temporal and masseter muscles were compared before and after 30 days of treatment. Surface electromyography of the examined muscles was performed in two groups of bruxers (15 patients each). Patients in the first group used occlusal splints, while those in the second used modified nociceptive trigeminal inhibition splints. The trial was randomized, controlled and semi-blind. Neither device affected the asymmetry index or postural activity/maximum voluntary contraction ratio after 1 month of treatment. Neither the occlusal nor the nociceptive trigeminal inhibition splint showed any significant influence on the examined muscles. Different scientific methods should be considered in clinical applications that require either direct influence on the muscles' bioelectrical activity or a quantitative measurement of the treatment quality. © 2015 Australian Dental Association.

  15. Loss of Axon Bifurcation in Mesencephalic Trigeminal Neurons Impairs the Maximal Biting Force in Npr2-Deficient Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gohar Ter-Avetisyan

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Bifurcation of axons from dorsal root ganglion (DRG and cranial sensory ganglion (CSG neurons is mediated by a cGMP-dependent signaling pathway composed of the ligand C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP, the receptor guanylyl cyclase Npr2 and the cGMP-dependent protein kinase I (cGKI. Here, we demonstrate that mesencephalic trigeminal neurons (MTN which are the only somatosensory neurons whose cell bodies are located within the CNS co-express Npr2 and cGKI. Afferents of MTNs form Y-shaped branches in rhombomere 2 where the ligand CNP is expressed. Analyzing mouse mutants deficient for CNP or Npr2 we found that in the absence of CNP-induced cGMP signaling MTN afferents no longer bifurcate and instead extend either into the trigeminal root or caudally in the hindbrain. Since MTNs provide sensory information from jaw closing muscles and periodontal ligaments we measured the bite force of conditional mouse mutants of Npr2 (Npr2flox/flox;Engr1Cre that lack bifurcation of MTN whereas the bifurcation of trigeminal afferents is normal. Our study revealed that the maximal biting force of both sexes is reduced in Npr2flox/flox;Engr1Cre mice as compared to their Npr2flox/flox littermate controls. In conclusion sensory feedback mechanisms from jaw closing muscles or periodontal ligaments might be impaired in the absence of MTN axon bifurcation.

  16. Trigeminofacial reflex: a means of detecting proximity to ophthalmic and maxillary divisions of the trigeminal nerve during surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlMasri, Omar A; Brown, Emma E; Forster, Alan; Kamel, Mahmoud H

    2014-11-01

    The aim in this paper was to localize and detect incipient damage to the ophthalmic and maxillary branches of the trigeminal nerve during tumor surgery. This was an observational study of patients with skull base, retroorbital, or cavernous sinus tumors warranting dissection toward the cavernous sinus at a university hospital. Stimuli were applied as normal during approach to the cavernous sinus to localize cranial nerves (CNs) III, IV, and VI. Recordings were also obtained from the facial muscles to localize CN VII. The trigeminofacial reflex was sought simply by observing a longer time base routinely. Clear facial electromyography responses were reproduced when stimuli were applied to the region of V1, V2, and V3. Response latency was increased compared with direct CN VII stimuli seen in some cases. Responses gave early warning of approach to these sensory trigeminal branches. The authors submit this as a new technique, which may improve the chances of preserving trigeminal sensory branches during surgery in this region.

  17. Does increased nerve length within the treatment volume improve trigeminal neuralgia radiosurgery? a prospective double-blind, randomized study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flickinger, John C.; Pollock, Bruce E.; Kondziolka, Douglas; Phuong, Loi K.; Foote, Robert L.; Stafford, Scott L.; Lunsford, L. Dade

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that increasing the nerve length within the treatment volume for trigeminal neuralgia radiosurgery would improve pain relief. Methods and Materials: Eighty-seven patients with typical trigeminal neuralgia were randomized to undergo retrogasserian gamma knife radiosurgery (75 Gy maximal dose with 4-mm diameter collimators) using either one (n=44) or two (n=43) isocenters. The median follow-up was 26 months (range 1-36). Results: Pain relief was complete in 57 patients (45 without medication and 12 with low-dose medication), partial in 15, and minimal in another 15 patients. The actuarial rate of obtaining complete pain relief (with or without medication) was 67.7%±5.1%. The pain relief was identical for one- and two-isocenter radiosurgery. Pain relapsed in 30 of 72 responding patients. Facial numbness and mild and severe paresthesias developed in 8, 5, and 1 two-isocenter patients vs. 3, 4, and 0 one-isocenter patients, respectively (p=0.23). Improved pain relief correlated with younger age (p=0.025) and fewer prior procedures (p=0.039) and complications (numbness or paresthesias) correlated with the nerve length irradiated (p=0.018). Conclusions: Increasing the treatment volume to include a longer nerve length for trigeminal neuralgia radiosurgery does not significantly improve pain relief but may increase complications

  18. Effects of Sex and Stress on Trigeminal Neuropathic Pain-Like Behavior in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korczeniewska, Olga Anna; Khan, Junad; Tao, Yuanxiang; Eliav, Eli; Benoliel, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the effects and interactions of sex and stress (provoked by chronic restraint [RS]) on pain-like behavior in a rat model of trigeminal neuropathic pain. The effects of sex and RS (carried out for 14 days as a model for stress) on somatosensory measures (reaction to pinprick, von Frey threshold) in a rat model of trigeminal neuropathic pain were examined. The study design was 2 × 4, with surgery (pain) and sham surgery (no pain) interacting with male restrained (RS) and unrestrained (nRS) rats and female RS and nRS rats. A total of 64 Sprague Dawley rats (32 males and 32 females) were used. Half of the animals in each sex group underwent RS, and the remaining half were left unstressed. Following the RS period, trigeminal neuropathic pain was induced by unilateral infraorbital nerve chronic constriction injury (IOCCI). Half of the animals in the RS group and half in the nRS group (both males and females) were exposed to IOCCI, and the remaining halves to sham surgery. Elevated plus maze (EPM) assessment and plasma interferon gamma (IFN-γ) levels were used to measure the effects of RS. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to assess the effects of stress, sex, and their interactions on plasma IFN-γ levels, changes in body weight, EPM parameters, tactile allodynia, and mechanohyperalgesia. Pairwise comparisons were performed by using Tukey post hoc test corrected for multiple comparisons. Both male and female RS rats showed significantly altered exploratory behavior (as measured by EPM) and had significantly lower plasma IFN-γ levels than nRS rats. Rats exposed to RS gained weight significantly slower than the nRS rats, irrespective of sex. Following RS but before surgery, RS rats showed significant bilateral reductions in von Frey thresholds and significantly increased pinprick response difference scores compared to nRS rats, irrespective of sex. From 17 days postsurgery, RSIOCCI rats showed significantly reduced von Frey thresholds and

  19. Spatial–temporal signature of resting-state BOLD signals in classic trigeminal neuralgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Y

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Yanping Wang,1 Congying Xu,1 Liping Zhai,1 Xudong Lu,1 Xiaoqiang Wu,1 Yahui Yi,2 Ziyun Liu,1 Qiaobing Guan,1 Xiaoling Zhang1 1Department of Neurology, the Second Hospital of Jiaxing City, Jiaxing, Zhejiang, 2Department of Radiology, the Second Hospital of Jiaxing City, Jiaxing, Zhejiang, China Abstract: Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (R-fMRI signals are spatiotemporally organized. R-fMRI studies in patients with classic trigeminal neuralgia (CTN have suggested alterations in functional connectivity. However, far less attention has been given to investigations of the local oscillations and their frequency-specific changes in these patients. The objective of this study was to address this issue in patients with CTN. R-fMRI data from 17 patients with CTN and 19 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (HCs were analyzed using amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF. The ALFF was computed across different frequencies (slow-4: 0.027–0.073 Hz; slow-5: 0.01–0.027 Hz; and typical band: 0.01–0.08 Hz in patients with CTN compared to HCs. In the typical band, patients with CTN showed increases of ALFF in bilateral temporal, occipital, and left middle frontal regions and in the left middle cingulate gyrus, as well as decreases of ALFF in the right inferior temporal region and in regions (medial prefrontal regions of default mode network. These significant group differences were identified in different sub-bands, with greater brainstem findings in higher frequencies (slow-4 and extensive default mode network and right postparietal results in lower frequencies (slow-5. Furthermore, significant relationships were found between subjective pain ratings and both amplitudes of higher frequency (slow-4 blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD signals in pain localization brain regions and lower frequencies (slow-5 in pain signaling/modulating brain regions in the patients, and decreased ALFF within the prefrontal regions was significantly

  20. Multimodal Image-Based Virtual Reality Presurgical Simulation and Evaluation for Trigeminal Neuralgia and Hemifacial Spasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Shujing; Zhang, Jiashu; Zhao, Yining; Hou, Yuanzheng; Xu, Xinghua; Zhang, Zhizhong; Kikinis, Ron; Chen, Xiaolei

    2018-05-01

    To address the feasibility and predictive value of multimodal image-based virtual reality in detecting and assessing features of neurovascular confliction (NVC), particularly regarding the detection of offending vessels, degree of compression exerted on the nerve root, in patients who underwent microvascular decompression for nonlesional trigeminal neuralgia and hemifacial spasm (HFS). This prospective study includes 42 consecutive patients who underwent microvascular decompression for classic primary trigeminal neuralgia or HFS. All patients underwent preoperative 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with T2-weighted three-dimensional (3D) sampling perfection with application-optimized contrasts by using different flip angle evolutions, 3D time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography, and 3D T1-weighted gadolinium-enhanced sequences in combination, whereas 2 patients underwent extra experimental preoperative 7.0-T MRI scans with the same imaging protocol. Multimodal MRIs were then coregistered with open-source software 3D Slicer, followed by 3D image reconstruction to generate virtual reality (VR) images for detection of possible NVC in the cerebellopontine angle. Evaluations were performed by 2 reviewers and compared with the intraoperative findings. For detection of NVC, multimodal image-based VR sensitivity was 97.6% (40/41) and specificity was 100% (1/1). Compared with the intraoperative findings, the κ coefficients for predicting the offending vessel and the degree of compression were >0.75 (P < 0.001). The 7.0-T scans have a clearer view of vessels in the cerebellopontine angle, which may have significant impact on detection of small-caliber offending vessels with relatively slow flow speed in cases of HFS. Multimodal image-based VR using 3D sampling perfection with application-optimized contrasts by using different flip angle evolutions in combination with 3D time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography sequences proved to be reliable in detecting NVC

  1. Autonomous Cryogenics Loading Operations Simulation Software: Knowledgebase Autonomous Test Engineer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehner, Walter S., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Working on the ACLO (Autonomous Cryogenics Loading Operations) project I have had the opportunity to add functionality to the physics simulation software known as KATE (Knowledgebase Autonomous Test Engineer), create a new application allowing WYSIWYG (what-you-see-is-what-you-get) creation of KATE schematic files and begin a preliminary design and implementation of a new subsystem that will provide vision services on the IHM (Integrated Health Management) bus. The functionality I added to KATE over the past few months includes a dynamic visual representation of the fluid height in a pipe based on number of gallons of fluid in the pipe and implementing the IHM bus connection within KATE. I also fixed a broken feature in the system called the Browser Display, implemented many bug fixes and made changes to the GUI (Graphical User Interface).

  2. Therapeutic cranial nerve irradiation: results from a multi-center dose response study of radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondziolka, D; Flickinger, J; Lunsford, L D; Young, R; Vermeulen, S; Duma, C; Jacques, D B; Rand, R; Regis, J; Peragut, J C; Epstein, M H; Lindquist, C

    1995-07-01

    Purpose/Objective: We performed a multi-institution study to evaluate the technique, dose-selection parameters, and results of gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery in the management of trigeminal neuralgia. We hypothesized that MRI-stereotactic targeting of the trigeminal nerve and irradiation with a single 4 mm isocenter, 2-4 mm anterior to the brainstem, could be a safe and effective treatment for this disorder. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients at five centers had radiosurgery using a single 4 mm isocenter targeted at the root entry zone. All patients had typical trigeminal neuralgia. The mean patient age was 70 years, (range, 40-87). Thirty-two patients had undergone prior surgery, and the mean number of procedures performed was 2.8 (range, 1-7). Eighteen patients (36%) had not had prior surgery before radiosurgery. Maximum radiosurgery doses included 60 Gy (n=8), 65 Gy (n=3), 70 Gy (n=27), 75 Gy (n=2), 80 Gy (n=6) and 90 Gy (n=4). All patients were discharged within 24 hours and were studied in regard to the degree of pain relief, latency interval to pain relief, sensory loss, and the need for further therapy. Mean follow-up after radiosurgery was 9.2 months (range, 2-26 months). Results: At last follow-up, 25 patients (50%) had excellent control (pain-free), 17 (34%) had good control (50-90% relief), and 8 (16%) had failed (see Figure). The median time to pain relief was one month. We identified an actuarial response rate of 53% for complete pain relief at seven months, and 93% for pain reduction (50-100% relief). At 18 months, these results declined to 48% and 77% respectively. A significantly greater proportion of patients receiving a radiosurgery maximum dose of {>=} 70 Gy achieved complete pain relief (63% vs. 18%) and >50% pain reduction (96% vs. 80%) than those with doses <70 Gy. Patients without prior surgery had significantly better outcomes in univariate testing. Three patients (6%) developed increased facial paresthesiae after radiosurgery

  3. Therapeutic cranial nerve irradiation: results from a multi-center dose response study of radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondziolka, D.; Flickinger, J.; Lunsford, L.D.; Young, R.; Vermeulen, S.; Duma, C.; Jacques, D.B.; Rand, R.; Regis, J.; Peragut, J.C.; Epstein, M.H.; Lindquist, C.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: We performed a multi-institution study to evaluate the technique, dose-selection parameters, and results of gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery in the management of trigeminal neuralgia. We hypothesized that MRI-stereotactic targeting of the trigeminal nerve and irradiation with a single 4 mm isocenter, 2-4 mm anterior to the brainstem, could be a safe and effective treatment for this disorder. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients at five centers had radiosurgery using a single 4 mm isocenter targeted at the root entry zone. All patients had typical trigeminal neuralgia. The mean patient age was 70 years, (range, 40-87). Thirty-two patients had undergone prior surgery, and the mean number of procedures performed was 2.8 (range, 1-7). Eighteen patients (36%) had not had prior surgery before radiosurgery. Maximum radiosurgery doses included 60 Gy (n=8), 65 Gy (n=3), 70 Gy (n=27), 75 Gy (n=2), 80 Gy (n=6) and 90 Gy (n=4). All patients were discharged within 24 hours and were studied in regard to the degree of pain relief, latency interval to pain relief, sensory loss, and the need for further therapy. Mean follow-up after radiosurgery was 9.2 months (range, 2-26 months). Results: At last follow-up, 25 patients (50%) had excellent control (pain-free), 17 (34%) had good control (50-90% relief), and 8 (16%) had failed (see Figure). The median time to pain relief was one month. We identified an actuarial response rate of 53% for complete pain relief at seven months, and 93% for pain reduction (50-100% relief). At 18 months, these results declined to 48% and 77% respectively. A significantly greater proportion of patients receiving a radiosurgery maximum dose of ≥ 70 Gy achieved complete pain relief (63% vs. 18%) and >50% pain reduction (96% vs. 80%) than those with doses <70 Gy. Patients without prior surgery had significantly better outcomes in univariate testing. Three patients (6%) developed increased facial paresthesiae after radiosurgery

  4. Autonomic computing enabled cooperative networked design

    CERN Document Server

    Wodczak, Michal

    2014-01-01

    This book introduces the concept of autonomic computing driven cooperative networked system design from an architectural perspective. As such it leverages and capitalises on the relevant advancements in both the realms of autonomic computing and networking by welding them closely together. In particular, a multi-faceted Autonomic Cooperative System Architectural Model is defined which incorporates the notion of Autonomic Cooperative Behaviour being orchestrated by the Autonomic Cooperative Networking Protocol of a cross-layer nature. The overall proposed solution not only advocates for the inc

  5. Morphologic Changes in Autonomic Nerves in Diabetic Autonomic Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heung Yong Jin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic neuropathy is one of the major complications of diabetes, and it increases morbidity and mortality in patients with both type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Because the autonomic nervous system, for example, parasympathetic axons, has a diffuse and wide distribution, we do not know the morphological changes that occur in autonomic neural control and their exact mechanisms in diabetic patients with diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN. Although the prevalence of sympathetic and parasympathetic neuropathy is similar in T1DM versus T2DM patients, sympathetic nerve function correlates with parasympathetic neuropathy only in T1DM patients. The explanation for these discrepancies might be that parasympathetic nerve function was more severely affected among T2DM patients. As parasympathetic nerve damage seems to be more advanced than sympathetic nerve damage, it might be that parasympathetic neuropathy precedes sympathetic neuropathy in T2DM, which was Ewing's concept. This could be explained by the intrinsic morphologic difference. Therefore, the morphological changes in the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves of involved organs in T1DM and T2DM patients who have DAN should be evaluated. In this review, evaluation methods for morphological changes in the epidermal nerves of skin, and the intrinsic nerves of the stomach will be discussed.

  6. Insights into the background of autonomic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laranjo, Sérgio; Geraldes, Vera; Oliveira, Mário; Rocha, Isabel

    2017-10-01

    Knowledge of the physiology underlying the autonomic nervous system is pivotal for understanding autonomic dysfunction in clinical practice. Autonomic dysfunction may result from primary modifications of the autonomic nervous system or be secondary to a wide range of diseases that cause severe morbidity and mortality. Together with a detailed history and physical examination, laboratory assessment of autonomic function is essential for the analysis of various clinical conditions and the establishment of effective, personalized and precise therapeutic schemes. This review summarizes the main aspects of autonomic medicine that constitute the background of cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spallone, Vincenza; Ziegler, Dan; Freeman, Roy

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular Autonomic Neuropathy (CAN) Subcommittee of Toronto Consensus Panel on Diabetic Neuropathy worked to update CAN guidelines, with regard to epidemiology, clinical impact, diagnosis, usefulness of CAN testing, and management. CAN is the impairment of cardiovascular autonomic control...... in type 2 diabetes. CAN is a risk marker of mortality and cardiovascular morbidity, and possibly a progression promoter of diabetic nephropathy. Criteria for CAN diagnosis and staging are: 1. one abnormal cardio-vagal test identifies possible or early CAN; 2. at least two abnormal cardio-vagal tests....... diagnosis of CAN clinical forms, 2. detection and tailored treatment of CAN clinical correlates (e.g. tachycardia, OH, nondipping, QT interval prolongation), 3. risk stratification for diabetic complications and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and 4. modulation of targets of diabetes therapy...

  8. Autonomous Laser-Powered Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, William C. (Inventor); Hogan, Bartholomew P. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An autonomous laser-powered vehicle designed to autonomously penetrate through ice caps of substantial (e.g., kilometers) thickness by melting a path ahead of the vehicle as it descends. A high powered laser beam is transmitted to the vehicle via an onboard bare fiber spooler. After the beam enters through the dispersion optics, the beam expands into a cavity. A radiation shield limits backscatter radiation from heating the optics. The expanded beam enters the heat exchanger and is reflected by a dispersion mirror. Forward-facing beveled circular grooves absorb the reflected radiant energy preventing the energy from being reflected back towards the optics. Microchannels along the inner circumference of the beam dump heat exchanger maximize heat transfer. Sufficient amount of fiber is wound on the fiber spooler to permit not only a descent but also to permit a sample return mission by inverting the vehicle and melting its way back to the surface.

  9. Health, autonomic financing and transferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Cantarero Prieto

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper has as objective to study the whole relative problem to the autonomous communities and regional heath care expenditure financing in Spain. This article has a dual purpose. First, the financing of the current health care attendance is approached in the Spanish regions passing magazine to its possible variants and we observe that the balance of our system is clearly inclined towards the side of the integration in the general pattern of financing («Fiscal Room» with specific conditions («Mixed System». Secondly, we examine the new situation in the mark of health care and its corresponding financing in the new model approved in 2001, in terms of the effects of tax assignment on autonomous communities.

  10. Autonomously managed high power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeks, D.J.; Bechtel, R.T.

    1985-01-01

    The need for autonomous power management capabilities will increase as the power levels of spacecraft increase into the multi-100 kW range. The quantity of labor intensive ground and crew support consumed by the 9 kW Skylab cannot be afforded in support of a 75-300 kW Space Station or high power earth orbital and interplanetary spacecraft. Marshall Space Flight Center is managing a program to develop necessary technologies for high power system autonomous management. To date a reference electrical power system and automation approaches have been defined. A test facility for evaluation and verification of management algorithms and hardware has been designed with the first of the three power channel capability nearing completion

  11. Development of autonomous operation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endou, Akira; Watanabe, Kenshiu; Miki, Tetsushi

    1992-01-01

    To enhance operation reliability of nuclear plants by removing human factors, study on an autonomous operation system has been carried out to substitute artificial intelligence (AI) for plant operators and, in addition, traditional controllers used in existing plants. For construction of the AI system, structurization of knowledge on the basis of the principles such as physical laws, function and structure of relevant objects and generalization of problem solving process are intended. A hierarchical distributed cooperative system configuration in employed because it is superior from the viewpoint of dynamical reorganization of system functions. This configuration is realized by an object-oriented multi-agent system. Construction of a prototype system was planned and the conceptual design was made for FBR plant in order to evaluate applicability of AI to the autonomous operation and to have a prospect for the realization of the system. The prototype system executes diagnosis, state evaluation, operation and control for the main plant subsystems. (author)

  12. Autonomous Agents as Artistic Collaborators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kadish, David

    In this paper, I ask whether it is possible to exert creative direction on the emergence of large scale patterns from the actions of autonomous or semi-autonomous actors. As an artist and an engineer, I undertake installations and projects with an intent to create, to make art or innovative...... structures. At the same time, one of my artistic interests is in ceding a great deal of creative control to a cluster of robotic actors, in the process interrogating the lack of control that we, as a species, exert over the world. Here, I explore this idea in the context of an ongoing project called...... that navigate the space as well. My work has implications for how we as a species address planetary-scale challenges and whether we can organize societies to find emergent solutions to complex problems. Behind my artistic interest is the idea that "creation" has no teleological impulse. The creative force from...

  13. The role of trigeminal nasal TRPM8-expressing afferent neurons in the antitussive effects of menthol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plevkova, J; Kollarik, M; Poliacek, I; Brozmanova, M; Surdenikova, L; Tatar, M; Mori, N; Canning, B J

    2013-07-15

    The cold-sensitive cation channel TRPM8 is a target for menthol, which is used routinely as a cough suppressant and as an additive to tobacco and food products. Given that cold temperatures and menthol activate neurons through gating of TRPM8, it is unclear how menthol actively suppresses cough. In this study we describe the antitussive effects of (-)-menthol in conscious and anesthetized guinea pigs. In anesthetized guinea pigs, cough evoked by citric acid applied topically to the tracheal mucosa was suppressed by menthol only when it was selectively administered as vapors to the upper airways. Menthol applied topically to the tracheal mucosa prior to and during citric acid application or administered continuously as vapors or as an aerosol to the lower airways was without effect on cough. These actions of upper airway menthol treatment were mimicked by cold air delivered to the upper airways but not by (+)-menthol, the inactive isomer of menthol, or by the TRPM8/TRPA1 agonist icilin administered directly to the trachea. Subsequent molecular analyses confirmed the expression of TRPM8 in a subset of nasal trigeminal afferent neurons that do not coincidently express TRPA1 or TRPV1. We conclude that menthol suppresses cough evoked in the lower airways primarily through a reflex initiated from the nose.

  14. A neurofibromatosis type 2 case with vestibular, trigeminal and facial schwannomas together: magnetic resonance imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akay, S.; Hamcan, S.; Kara, K.; Battal, B.; Tasar, M.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) is characterized by the development of multiple nervous system tumors. This disorder is also called multiple inherited schwannomas (MIS), meningiomas (M), and ependymomas (E) (MISME) syndrome. Objectives and tasks: To discuss the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of a NF2 case who has bilateral vestibular and trigeminal schwannomas, unilateral facial schwannoma, multiple meningiomas and cervical intramedullary spinal cord tumors. Materials and methods: A 23-year-old male patient complaining of tinnitus and imbalance for 3 years, came to Neck-Nose-Throat department of our hospital. After the physical examination, the patient was referred to our department for the further work up with MR imaging. Results: Brain MR imaging showed bilateral acoustic schwannoma which reach through the internal acoustic canals. Bilateral symmetric homogeneously enhanced masses were also detected in Meckel's caves. Similarly, one milimetric enhancing lesion was seen at the right facial nerve. Eight meningiomas in various locations were observed, as well. Additionally, two enhancing intramedullary well-defined small foci were detected in the proximal cervical spinal cord. Ependymomas or intraparanchimal schwannomas were primarily suspected. Conclusion: This case includes all the probable intracranial and spinal mass lesions which may be associated with NF2. Enhanced MR is very reliable imaging modality for the detailed evaluation of NF2 patients

  15. Clinical Outcomes of Gamma Knife Radiosurgery in the Treatment of Patients with Trigeminal Neuralgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elaimy, Ameer L.; Hanson, Peter W.; Lamoreaux, Wayne T.; Mackay, Alexander R.; Demakas, John J.; Fairbanks, Robert K.; Cooke, Barton S.; Thumma, Sudheer R.; Lee, Christopher M.

    2012-01-01

    Since its introduction by Leksell, Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) has become increasingly popular as a management approach for patients diagnosed with trigeminal neuralgia (TN). For this reason, we performed a modern review of the literature analyzing the efficacy of GKRS in the treatment of patients who suffer from TN. For patients with medically refractory forms of the condition, GKRS has proven to be an effective initial and repeat treatment option. Cumulative research suggests that patients treated a single time with GKRS exhibit similar levels of facial pain control when compared to patients treated multiple times with GKRS. However, patients treated on multiple occasions with GKRS are more likely to experience facial numbness and other facial sensory changes when compared to patients treated once with GKRS. Although numerous articles have reported MVD to be superior to GKRS in achieving facial pain relief, the findings of these comparison studies are weakened by the vast differences in patient age and comorbidities between the two studied groups and cannot be considered conclusive. Questions remain regarding optimal GKRS dosing and targeting strategies, which warrants further investigation into this controversial matter. PMID:22229034

  16. Activation of Satellite Glial Cells in Rat Trigeminal Ganglion after Upper Molar Extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunjigake, Kaori K.; Goto, Tetsuya; Nakao, Kayoko; Kobayashi, Shigeru; Yamaguchi, Kazunori

    2009-01-01

    The neurons in the trigeminal ganglion (TG) are surrounded by satellite glial cells (SGCs), which passively support the function of the neurons, but little is known about the interactions between SGCs and TG neurons after peripheral nerve injury. To examine the effect of nerve injury on SGCs, we investigated the activation of SGCs after neuronal damage due to the extraction of the upper molars in rats. Three, 7, and 10 days after extraction, animals were fixed and the TG was removed. Cryosections of the ganglia were immunostained with antibodies against glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a marker of activated SGCs, and ATF3, a marker of damaged neurons. After tooth extraction, the number of ATF3-immunoreactive (IR) neurons enclosed by GFAP-IR SGCs had increased in a time-dependent manner in the maxillary nerve region of the TG. Although ATF3-IR neurons were not detected in the mandibular nerve region, the number of GFAP-IR SGCs increased in both the maxillary and mandibular nerve regions. Our results suggest that peripheral nerve injury affects the activation of TG neurons and the SGCs around the injured neurons. Moreover, our data suggest the existence of a neuronal interaction between maxillary and mandibular neurons via SGC activation

  17. Reduced basal ganglia μ-opioid receptor availability in trigeminal neuropathic pain: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DosSantos Marcos

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although neuroimaging techniques have provided insights into the function of brain regions involved in Trigeminal Neuropathic Pain (TNP in humans, there is little understanding of the molecular mechanisms affected during the course of this disorder. Understanding these processes is crucial to determine the systems involved in the development and persistence of TNP. Findings In this study, we examined the regional μ-opioid receptor (μOR availability in vivo (non-displaceable binding potential BPND of TNP patients with positron emission tomography (PET using the μOR selective radioligand [11C]carfentanil. Four TNP patients and eight gender and age-matched healthy controls were examined with PET. Patients with TNP showed reduced μOR BPND in the left nucleus accumbens (NAc, an area known to be involved in pain modulation and reward/aversive behaviors. In addition, the μOR BPND in the NAc was negatively correlated with the McGill sensory and total pain ratings in the TNP patients. Conclusions Our findings give preliminary evidence that the clinical pain in TNP patients can be related to alterations in the endogenous μ-opioid system, rather than only to the peripheral pathology. The decreased availability of μORs found in TNP patients, and its inverse relationship to clinical pain levels, provide insights into the central mechanisms related to this condition. The results also expand our understanding about the impact of chronic pain on the limbic system.

  18. Peripheral Neuropathic Facial/Trigeminal Pain and RANTES/CCL5 in Jawbone Cavitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann Lechner

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In this study, we elucidate the possible causative role of chronic subclinical inflammation in jawbone of patients with atypical facial pain (AFP and trigeminal neuralgia (TRN in the local overexpression of the chemokine regulated on activation and normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES/C-C motif ligand 5 CCL5. Neurons contain opioid receptors that transmit antipain reactions in the peripheral and central nervous system. Proinflammatory chemokines like RANTES/CCL5 desensitize μ-opioid receptors in the periphery sensory neurons and it has been suggested that RANTES modifies the nociceptive reaction. Materials and Methods. In 15 patients with AFP/TRN, we examined fatty degenerated jawbone (FDOJ samples for the expression of seven cytokines by multiplex analysis and compared these results with healthy jawbones. Results. Each of these medullary jawbone samples exhibited RANTES as the only highly overexpressed cytokine. The FDOJ cohort with AFP/TRN showed a mean 30-fold overexpression of RANTES compared to healthy jawbones. Conclusions. To the best of our knowledge, no other research has identified RANTES overexpression in silent inflamed jawbones as a possible cause for AFP/TRN. Thus, we hypothesize that the surgical clearing of FDOJ might diminish RANTES signaling pathways in neurons and contribute to resolving chronic neurological pain in AFP/TRN patients.

  19. Inhibition of 2-arachydonoylgycerol degradation attenuates orofacial neuropathic pain in trigeminal nerve-injured mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamimura, Rantaro; Hossain, Mohammad Z; Unno, Shumpei; Ando, Hiroshi; Masuda, Yuji; Takahashi, Kojiro; Otake, Masanori; Saito, Isao; Kitagawa, Junichi

    2018-03-24

    Current therapeutics are not effective for orofacial neuropathic pain, and better options are needed. The present study used inferior orbital nerve (ION)-injured mice to investigate the effect of inhibiting monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), an enzyme that degrades the major endocannabinoid 2-arachydonoylgycerol (2-AG) in orofacial neuropathic pain. The head-withdrawal threshold to mechanical stimulation of the whisker pad was reduced on days 3, 5, and 7 after ION injury. Injection of JZL184, a selective inhibitor of MAGL, on day 7 after ION injury attenuated the reduction in head-withdrawal threshold at 2 h after administration. Moreover, the numbers of MAGL-immunoreactive neurons in the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis (Vc) and upper cervical spinal cord (C1-C2) were significantly greater in ION-injured mice than in sham-operated mice but were reduced after administration of JZL184. The increase in MAGL immunoreactivity suggests that increased 2-AG production is followed by rapid enzymatic degradation of 2-AG. JZL184 inhibited this degradation and thus increased 2-AG concentration in the brain, particularly in the Vc and C1-C2 regions, thus attenuating pain. Our findings suggest that inhibition of 2-AG degradation by MAGL inhibitors is a promising therapeutic option for treatment of orofacial neuropathic pain.

  20. A neurofibromatosis type 2 case with vestibular, trigeminal and facial schwannomas together: magnetic resonance imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akay, S; Hamcan, S; Kara, K; Battal, B; Tasar, M

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Introduction: Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) is characterized by the development of multiple nervous system tumors. This disorder is also called multiple inherited schwannomas (MIS), meningiomas (M), and ependymomas (E) (MISME) syndrome. Objectives and tasks: To discuss the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of a NF2 case who has bilateral vestibular and trigeminal schwannomas, unilateral facial schwannoma, multiple meningiomas and cervical intramedullary spinal cord tumors. Materials and methods: A 23-year-old male patient complaining of tinnitus and imbalance for 3 years, came to Neck-Nose-Throat department of our hospital. After the physical examination, the patient was referred to our department for the further work up with MR imaging. Results: Brain MR imaging showed bilateral acoustic schwannoma which reach through the internal acoustic canals. Bilateral symmetric homogeneously enhanced masses were also detected in Meckel's caves. Similarly, one milimetric enhancing lesion was seen at the right facial nerve. Eight meningiomas in various locations were observed, as well. Additionally, two enhancing intramedullary well-defined small foci were detected in the proximal cervical spinal cord. Ependymomas or intraparanchimal schwannomas were primarily suspected. Conclusion: This case includes all the probable intracranial and spinal mass lesions which may be associated with NF2. Enhanced MR is very reliable imaging modality for the detailed evaluation of NF2 patients.

  1. Altered regional homogeneity of spontaneous brain activity in idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanping; Zhang, Xiaoling; Guan, Qiaobing; Wan, Lihong; Yi, Yahui; Liu, Chun-Feng

    2015-01-01

    The pathophysiology of idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia (ITN) has conventionally been thought to be induced by neurovascular compression theory. Recent structural brain imaging evidence has suggested an additional central component for ITN pathophysiology. However, far less attention has been given to investigations of the basis of abnormal resting-state brain activity in these patients. The objective of this study was to investigate local brain activity in patients with ITN and its correlation with clinical variables of pain. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data from 17 patients with ITN and 19 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were analyzed using regional homogeneity (ReHo) analysis, which is a data-driven approach used to measure the regional synchronization of spontaneous brain activity. Patients with ITN had decreased ReHo in the left amygdala, right parahippocampal gyrus, and left cerebellum and increased ReHo in the right inferior temporal gyrus, right thalamus, right inferior parietal lobule, and left postcentral gyrus (corrected). Furthermore, the increase in ReHo in the left precentral gyrus was positively correlated with visual analog scale (r=0.54; P=0.002). Our study found abnormal functional homogeneity of intrinsic brain activity in several regions in ITN, suggesting the maladaptivity of the process of daily pain attacks and a central role for the pathophysiology of ITN.

  2. Frame and frameless linear accelerator-based radiosurgery for idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Allan Y; Hsieh, Yen; McNair, Steffanie; Li, Qijuan; Xu, Kevin Y; Pappas, Conrad

    2015-01-01

    We report outcome of linear accelerator (Linac)-based stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for trigeminal neuralgia (TGN) utilizing rigid head frame (RF) and facemask (FM) immobilization.Method: From November 2008 to October 2012, 48 patients with idiopathic TGN underwent primary SRS by a dedicated Linac. RF immobilization was utilized for 34 patients, and frameless image-guided radiosurgery (IGRS) with FM immobilization was performed in 14 patients. Treatment outcome was assessed by patient interviews with a 7-item questionnaire. Sub-millimeter targeting accuracy (0.71±0.31 mm) was recorded for frameless IGRS by a novel hidden-target phantom method. With a follow-up of 26 months, significant pain relief was recorded in 43 (89%) patients, including 26 (54%) complete and 17 (35%) partial responses; with a significant reduction of 2.4±1.3 points ( p < 0.01) on the 5-point Barrow Neurological Institute pain scale. No significant pain relief difference ( p = 0.23) was detected between patients immobilized by RF and FM. Notable pin site problems were reported in 9 (26%) of 34 patients immobilized by RF. Frameless IGRS with FM immobilization is more patient friendly and can achieve as excellent treatment outcome as with RF immobilization for idiopathic TGN.

  3. Autonomous spacecraft rendezvous and docking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tietz, J. C.; Almand, B. J.

    A storyboard display is presented which summarizes work done recently in design and simulation of autonomous video rendezvous and docking systems for spacecraft. This display includes: photographs of the simulation hardware, plots of chase vehicle trajectories from simulations, pictures of the docking aid including image processing interpretations, and drawings of the control system strategy. Viewgraph-style sheets on the display bulletin board summarize the simulation objectives, benefits, special considerations, approach, and results.

  4. Biology-Inspired Autonomous Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-31

    insect brain, allow these animals to fly with damaged wings, order of body mass payloads (e.g., foraging bees with a load of pollen , blood satiated...The research focus addressed two broad, complementary research areas : autonomous systems concepts inspired by the behavior and neurobiology...UL 46 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (include area code) 850 883-1887 Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 iii Table of

  5. Autonomous Electrical Vehicles’ Charging Station

    OpenAIRE

    Józef Paska; Mariusz Kłos; Łukasz Rosłaniec; Rafał Bielas; Magdalena Błędzińska

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a model of an autonomous electrical vehicles’ charging station. It consists of renewable energy sources: wind turbine system, photovoltaic cells, as well as an energy storage, load, and EV charging station. In order to optimise the operating conditions, power electronic converters were added to the system. The model was implemented in the Homer Energy programme. The first part of the paper presents the design assumptions and technological solutions. Further in the paper...

  6. Fleet management for autonomous vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Bsaybes, Sahar; Quilliot, Alain; Wagler, Annegret K.

    2016-01-01

    The VIPAFLEET project consists in developing models and algorithms for man- aging a fleet of Individual Public Autonomous Vehicles (VIPA). Hereby, we consider a fleet of cars distributed at specified stations in an industrial area to supply internal transportation, where the cars can be used in different modes of circulation (tram mode, elevator mode, taxi mode). One goal is to develop and implement suitable algorithms for each mode in order to satisfy all the requests under an economic point...

  7. Urban planning for autonomous vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Fourie, Pieter J.; Ordoñez Medina, Sergio A.; Maheshwari, Tanvi; Wang, Biyu; Erath, Alexander; Cairns, Stephen; Axhausen, Kay W.

    2018-01-01

    In land-scarce Singapore, population growth and increasingly dense development are running up against limited remaining space for mobility infrastructure expansion. Autonomous Vehicles (AV) promise to relieve some of this pressure, through more efficient use of road space through platooning and intersection coordination, reducing the need for parking space, and reducing overall reliance on privately owned cars, realising Singapore’s vision of a “car-lite” future. In a collaborative resear...

  8. Failure Prediction for Autonomous Driving

    OpenAIRE

    Hecker, Simon; Dai, Dengxin; Van Gool, Luc

    2018-01-01

    The primary focus of autonomous driving research is to improve driving accuracy. While great progress has been made, state-of-the-art algorithms still fail at times. Such failures may have catastrophic consequences. It therefore is important that automated cars foresee problems ahead as early as possible. This is also of paramount importance if the driver will be asked to take over. We conjecture that failures do not occur randomly. For instance, driving models may fail more likely at places ...

  9. Autonomic computing meets SCADA security

    OpenAIRE

    Nazir, S; Patel, S; Patel, D

    2017-01-01

    © 2017 IEEE. National assets such as transportation networks, large manufacturing, business and health facilities, power generation, and distribution networks are critical infrastructures. The cyber threats to these infrastructures have increasingly become more sophisticated, extensive and numerous. Cyber security conventional measures have proved useful in the past but increasing sophistication of attacks dictates the need for newer measures. The autonomic computing paradigm mimics the auton...

  10. After microvascular decompression to treat trigeminal neuralgia, both immediate pain relief and recurrence rates are higher in patients with arterial compression than with venous compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lei; Gu, Xiaoyan; Sun, Guan; Guo, Jun; Lin, Xin; Zhang, Shuguang; Qian, Chunfa

    2017-07-04

    We explored differences in postoperative pain relief achieved through decompression of the trigeminal nerve compressed by arteries and veins. Clinical characteristics, intraoperative findings, and postoperative curative effects were analyzed in 72 patients with trigeminal neuralgia who were treated by microvascular decompression. The patients were divided into arterial and venous compression groups based on intraoperative findings. Surgical curative effects included immediate relief, delayed relief, obvious reduction, and invalid result. Among the 40 patients in the arterial compression group, 32 had immediate pain relief of pain (80.0%), 5 cases had delayed relief (12.5%), and 3 cases had an obvious reduction (7.5%). In the venous compression group, 12 patients had immediate relief of pain (37.5%), 13 cases had delayed relief (40.6%), and 7 cases had an obvious reduction (21.9%). During 2-year follow-up period, 6 patients in the arterial compression group experienced recurrence of trigeminal neuralgia, but there were no recurrences in the venous compression group. Simple artery compression was followed by early relief of trigeminal neuralgia more often than simple venous compression. However, the trigeminal neuralgia recurrence rate was higher in the artery compression group than in the venous compression group.

  11. KYNA analogue SZR72 modifies CFA-induced dural inflammation- regarding expression of pERK1/2 and IL-1β in the rat trigeminal ganglion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukács, M; Warfvinge, K; Kruse, L S; Tajti, J; Fülöp, F; Toldi, J; Vécsei, L; Edvinsson, L

    2016-12-01

    Neurogenic inflammation has for decades been considered an important part of migraine pathophysiology. In the present study, we asked the question if administration of a novel kynurenic acid analogue (SZR72), precursor of an excitotoxin antagonist and anti-inflammatory substance, can modify the neurogenic inflammatory response in the trigeminal ganglion. Inflammation in the trigeminal ganglion was induced by local dural application of Complete Freunds Adjuvant (CFA). Levels of phosphorylated MAP kinase pERK1/2 and IL-1β expression in V1 region of the trigeminal ganglion were investigated using immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Pretreatment with one dose of SZR72 abolished the CFA-induced pERK1/2 and IL-1β activation in the trigeminal ganglion. No significant change was noted in case of repeated treatment with SZR72 as compared to a single dose. This is the first study that demonstrates that one dose of KYNA analog before application of CFA can give anti-inflammatory response in a model of trigeminal activation, opening a new line for further investigations regarding possible effects of KYNA derivates.

  12. Autonomic neuropathy in diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto eVerrotti

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN is a serious and common complication of diabetes, often overlooked and misdiagnosed. It is a systemic-wide disorder that may be asymptomatic in the early stages. The most studied and clinically important form of DAN is cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN defined as the impairment of autonomic control of the cardiovascular system in patients with diabetes after exclusion of other causes. The reported prevalence of DAN varies widely depending on inconsistent definition, different diagnostic method, different patient cohorts studied. The pathogenesis is still unclear and probably multifactorial. Once DAN becomes clinically evident, no form of therapy has been identified which can effectively stop or reverse it. Prevention strategies are based on strict glycemic control with intensive insulin treatment, multifactorial intervention and lifestyle modification including control of hypertension, dyslipidemia, stop smoking, weight loss and adequate physical exercise. The present review summarizes the latest knowledge regarding clinical presentation, epidemiology, pathogenesis and management of DAN, with some mention to childhood and adolescent population.

  13. Autonomous Cryogenic Load Operations: Knowledge-Based Autonomous Test Engineer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrading, J. Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    The Knowledge-Based Autonomous Test Engineer (KATE) program has a long history at KSC. Now a part of the Autonomous Cryogenic Load Operations (ACLO) mission, this software system has been sporadically developed over the past 20 years. Originally designed to provide health and status monitoring for a simple water-based fluid system, it was proven to be a capable autonomous test engineer for determining sources of failure in the system. As part of a new goal to provide this same anomaly-detection capability for a complicated cryogenic fluid system, software engineers, physicists, interns and KATE experts are working to upgrade the software capabilities and graphical user interface. Much progress was made during this effort to improve KATE. A display of the entire cryogenic system's graph, with nodes for components and edges for their connections, was added to the KATE software. A searching functionality was added to the new graph display, so that users could easily center their screen on specific components. The GUI was also modified so that it displayed information relevant to the new project goals. In addition, work began on adding new pneumatic and electronic subsystems into the KATE knowledge base, so that it could provide health and status monitoring for those systems. Finally, many fixes for bugs, memory leaks, and memory errors were implemented and the system was moved into a state in which it could be presented to stakeholders. Overall, the KATE system was improved and necessary additional features were added so that a presentation of the program and its functionality in the next few months would be a success.

  14. Autonomous Cryogenic Load Operations: KSC Autonomous Test Engineer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrading, Nicholas J.

    2012-01-01

    The KSC Autonomous Test Engineer (KATE) program has a long history at KSC. Now a part of the Autonomous Cryogenic Load Operations (ACLO) mission, this software system has been sporadically developed over the past 20+ years. Originally designed to provide health and status monitoring for a simple water-based fluid system, it was proven to be a capable autonomous test engineer for determining sources of failure in. the system, As part.of a new goal to provide this same anomaly-detection capability for a complicated cryogenic fluid system, software engineers, physicists, interns and KATE experts are working to upgrade the software capabilities and graphical user interface. Much progress was made during this effort to improve KATE. A display ofthe entire cryogenic system's graph, with nodes for components and edges for their connections, was added to the KATE software. A searching functionality was added to the new graph display, so that users could easily center their screen on specific components. The GUI was also modified so that it displayed information relevant to the new project goals. In addition, work began on adding new pneumatic and electronic subsystems into the KATE knowledgebase, so that it could provide health and status monitoring for those systems. Finally, many fixes for bugs, memory leaks, and memory errors were implemented and the system was moved into a state in which it could be presented to stakeholders. Overall, the KATE system was improved and necessary additional features were added so that a presentation of the program and its functionality in the next few months would be a success.

  15. Trigeminal Electrophysiology: a 2 × 2 matrix model for differential diagnosis between temporomandibular disorders and orofacial pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Pain due to temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) often has the same clinical symptoms and signs as other types of orofacial pain (OP). The possible presence of serious neurological and/or systemic organic pathologies makes differential diagnosis difficult, especially in early disease stages. In the present study, we performed a qualitative and quantitative electrophysiological evaluation of the neuromuscular responses of the trigeminal nervous system. Using the jaw jerk reflex (JJ) and the motor evoked potentials of the trigeminal roots (bR-MEPs) tests, we investigated the functional and organic responses of healthy subjects (control group) and patients with TMD symptoms (TMD group). Method Thirty-three patients with temporomandibular disorder (TMD) symptoms and 36 control subjects underwent two electromyographic (EMG) tests: the jaw jerk reflex test and the motor evoked potentials of the trigeminal roots test using bilateral electrical transcranial stimulation. The mean, standard deviation, median, minimum, and maximum values were computed for the EMG absolute values. The ratio between the EMG values obtained on each side was always computed with the reference side as the numerator. For the TMD group, this side was identified as the painful side (pain side), while for the control group this was taken as the non-preferred masticatory side (non-preferred side). The 5th, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th, and 95th percentiles were also calculated. Results Analysis of the ratios (expressed as percentages) between the values obtained on both sides revealed a high degree of symmetry in the bR-MEPs % in the control (0.93 ± 0.12%) and TMD (0.91 ± 0.22%) groups. This symmetry indicated organic integrity of the trigeminal root motor fibers and correct electrode arrangement. A degree of asymmetry of the jaw jerk's amplitude between sides (ipJJ%), when the mandible was kept in the intercuspal position, was found in the TMD group (0.24% ± 0.14%) with a statistically

  16. Trigeminal Electrophysiology: a 2 × 2 matrix model for differential diagnosis between temporomandibular disorders and orofacial pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chessa Giacomo

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pain due to temporomandibular disorders (TMDs often has the same clinical symptoms and signs as other types of orofacial pain (OP. The possible presence of serious neurological and/or systemic organic pathologies makes differential diagnosis difficult, especially in early disease stages. In the present study, we performed a qualitative and quantitative electrophysiological evaluation of the neuromuscular responses of the trigeminal nervous system. Using the jaw jerk reflex (JJ and the motor evoked potentials of the trigeminal roots (bR-MEPs tests, we investigated the functional and organic responses of healthy subjects (control group and patients with TMD symptoms (TMD group. Method Thirty-three patients with temporomandibular disorder (TMD symptoms and 36 control subjects underwent two electromyographic (EMG tests: the jaw jerk reflex test and the motor evoked potentials of the trigeminal roots test using bilateral electrical transcranial stimulation. The mean, standard deviation, median, minimum, and maximum values were computed for the EMG absolute values. The ratio between the EMG values obtained on each side was always computed with the reference side as the numerator. For the TMD group, this side was identified as the painful side (pain side, while for the control group this was taken as the non-preferred masticatory side (non-preferred side. The 5th, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th, and 95th percentiles were also calculated. Results Analysis of the ratios (expressed as percentages between the values obtained on both sides revealed a high degree of symmetry in the bR-MEPs % in the control (0.93 ± 0.12% and TMD (0.91 ± 0.22% groups. This symmetry indicated organic integrity of the trigeminal root motor fibers and correct electrode arrangement. A degree of asymmetry of the jaw jerk's amplitude between sides (ipJJ%, when the mandible was kept in the intercuspal position, was found in the TMD group (0.24% ± 0.14% with a

  17. A potent and selective calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist, MK-8825, inhibits responses to nociceptive trigeminal activation: Role of CGRP in orofacial pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Reyes, Marcela; Pardi, Vanessa; Akerman, Simon

    2015-09-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) are orofacial pains within the trigeminal distribution, which involve the masticatory musculature, the temporomandibular joint or both. Their pathophysiology remains unclear, as inflammatory mediators are thought to be involved, and clinically TMD presents pain and sometimes limitation of function, but often appears without gross indications of local inflammation, such as visible edema, redness and increase in temperature. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) has been implicated in other pain disorders with trigeminal distribution, such as migraine, of which TMD shares a significant co-morbidity. CGRP causes activation and sensitization of trigeminal primary afferent neurons, independent of any inflammatory mechanisms, and thus may also be involved in TMD. Here we used a small molecule, selective CGRP receptor antagonist, MK-8825, to dissect the role of CGRP in inducing spontaneous nociceptive facial grooming behaviors, neuronal activation in the trigeminal nucleus, and systemic release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, in a mouse model of acute orofacial masseteric muscle pain that we have developed, as a surrogate of acute TMD. We show that CFA masseteric injection causes significant spontaneous orofacial pain behaviors, neuronal activation in the trigeminal nucleus, and release of interleukin-6 (IL-6). In mice pre-treated with MK-8825 there is a significant reduction in these spontaneous orofacial pain behaviors. Also, at 2 and 24h after CFA injection the level of Fos immunoreactivity in the trigeminal nucleus, used as a marker of neuronal activation, was much lower on both ipsilateral and contralateral sides after pre-treatment with MK-8825. There was no effect of MK-8825 on the release of IL-6. These data suggest that CGRP may be involved in TMD pathophysiology, but not via inflammatory mechanisms, at least in the acute stage. Furthermore, CGRP receptor antagonists may have therapeutic efficacy in the treatment of TMD, as they

  18. Human Supervision of Multiple Autonomous Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-22

    AFRL-RH-WP-TR-2013-0143 HUMAN SUPERVISION OF MULTIPLE AUTONOMOUS VEHICLES Heath A. Ruff Ball...REPORT TYPE Interim 3. DATES COVERED (From – To) 09-16-08 – 03-22-13 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE HUMAN SUPERVISION OF MULTIPLE AUTONOMOUS VEHICLES 5a...Supervision of Multiple Autonomous Vehicles To support the vision of a system that enables a single operator to control multiple next-generation

  19. The treatment of autonomic dysfunction in tetanus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T van den Heever

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of generalised tetanus in a 50-year-old female patient after sustaining a wound to her right lower leg. She developed autonomic dysfunction, which included labile hypertension alternating with hypotension and sweating. The autonomic dysfunction was treated successfully with a combination of morphine sulphate infusion, magnesium sulphate, and clonidine. She also received adrenaline and phenylephrine infusions as needed for hypotension. We then discuss the pathophysiology, clinical features and treatment options of autonomic dysfunction.

  20. Epidemiologic assessment of trigeminal neuralgia in patients referred to the Imam clinic of Hamedan city during 2013-2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Ghiasian

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Trigeminal neuralgia is the most common disease of the fifth cranial nerve. This study aimed at evaluating the epidemiology of patients with the trigeminal neuralgia referred to Imam Clinic in Hamedan City, Iran. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, 40 patients with trigeminal neuralgia symptoms were studied. Diagnosis of patients was made based on the history, physical examination and paraclinical tests. Results: This study was conducted on 27 (67.5% females and 13 (32.5% males with the mean ages of 43.3±16.9 and 51.7±21.5 years, respectively (P=0.526.The incidence of this disease was higher among young women than others. The right side involvement was detected in 47.5%, left side involvement in 40% and bilateral involvement in 12.5% of the cases. Regarding the engaged nerve branch, simultaneous engagement of maxillary and mandibular nerves was seen in 47.5%, mandibular in 27.5%, maxillary in 20%, and ophthalmic in 5% of the individuals. The primary causes were seen in 42.5% and secondary causes in 57.5% of the cases. Among the secondary causes, face surgery and multiple sclerosis had the highest rate (39.1%, followed by tumors (21.7%. Also, 65% of the patients had normal MRI and 35% had abnormal one. Conclusion: Due to the similar symptoms of the disease such as dental pain, and also maxillofacial surgery in the elderly as one of the most common secondary causes of this disease, facial surgeons and dentists should know more about this disease to avoid unnecessary surgeries.

  1. Organization of hyperactive microglial cells in trigeminal spinal subnucleus caudalis and upper cervical spinal cord associated with orofacial neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibuta, Kazuo; Suzuki, Ikuko; Shinoda, Masamichi; Tsuboi, Yoshiyuki; Honda, Kuniya; Shimizu, Noriyoshi; Sessle, Barry J; Iwata, Koichi

    2012-04-27

    The aim of this study was to evaluate spatial organization of hyperactive microglial cells in trigeminal spinal subnucleus caudalis (Vc) and upper cervical spinal cord (C1), and to clarify the involvement in mechanisms underlying orofacial secondary hyperalgesia following infraorbital nerve injury. We found that the head-withdrawal threshold to non-noxious mechanical stimulation of the maxillary whisker pad skin was significantly reduced in chronic constriction injury of the infraorbital nerve (ION-CCI) rats from day 1 to day 14 after ION-CCI. On day 3 after ION-CCI, mechanical allodynia was obvious in the orofacial skin areas innervated by the 1st and 3rd branches of the trigeminal nerve as well as the 2nd branch area. Hyperactive microglial cells in Vc and C1 were observed on days 3 and 7 after ION-CCI. On day 3 after ION-CCI, a large number of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK)-immunoreactive (IR) cells were observed in Vc and C1. Many hyperactive microglial cells were also distributed over a wide area of Vc and C1 innervated by the trigeminal nerve. The intraperitoneal administration of minocycline significantly reduced the activation of microglial cells and the number of pERK-IR cells in Vc and C1, and also significantly attenuated the development of mechanical allodynia. Furthermore, enhanced background activity and mechanical evoked responses of Vc wide dynamic range neurons in ION-CCI rats were significantly reversed following minocycline administration. These findings suggest that activation of microglial cells over a wide area of Vc and C1 is involved in the enhancement of Vc and C1 neuronal excitability in the early period after ION-CCI, resulting in the neuropathic pain in orofacial areas innervated by the injured as well as uninjured nerves. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A relationship between bruxism and orofacial-dystonia? A trigeminal electrophysiological approach in a case report of pineal cavernoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisardi, Gianni; Iani, Cesare; Sau, Gianfranco; Frisardi, Flavio; Leornadis, Carlo; Lumbau, Aurea; Enrico, Paolo; Sirca, Donatella; Staderini, Enrico Maria; Chessa, Giacomo

    2013-10-28

    In some clinical cases, bruxism may be correlated to central nervous system hyperexcitability, suggesting that bruxism may represent a subclinical form of dystonia. To examine this hypothesis, we performed an electrophysiological evaluation of the excitability of the trigeminal nervous system in a patient affected by pineal cavernoma with pain symptoms in the orofacial region and pronounced bruxism. Electrophysiological studies included bilateral electrical transcranial stimulation of the trigeminal roots, analysis of the jaw jerk reflex, recovery cycle of masseter inhibitory reflex, and a magnetic resonance imaging study of the brain. The neuromuscular responses of the left- and right-side bilateral trigeminal motor potentials showed a high degree of symmetry in latency (1.92 ms and 1.96 ms, respectively) and amplitude (11 mV and 11.4 mV, respectively), whereas the jaw jerk reflex amplitude of the right and left masseters was 5.1 mV and 8.9 mV, respectively. The test stimulus for the recovery cycle of masseter inhibitory reflex evoked both silent periods at an interstimulus interval of 150 ms. The duration of the second silent period evoked by the test stimulus was 61 ms and 54 ms on the right and left masseters, respectively, which was greater than that evoked by the conditioning stimulus (39 ms and 35 ms, respectively). We found evidence of activation and peripheral sensitization of the nociceptive fibers, the primary and secondary nociceptive neurons in the central nervous system, and the endogenous pain control systems (including both the inhibitory and facilitatory processes), in the tested subject. These data suggest that bruxism and central orofacial pain can coexist, but are two independent symptoms, which may explain why numerous experimental and clinical studies fail to reach unequivocal conclusions.

  3. Functional crosstalk in culture between macrophages and trigeminal sensory neurons of a mouse genetic model of migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franceschini Alessia

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enhanced activity of trigeminal ganglion neurons is thought to underlie neuronal sensitization facilitating the onset of chronic pain attacks, including migraine. Recurrent headache attacks might establish a chronic neuroinflammatory ganglion profile contributing to the hypersensitive phenotype. Since it is difficult to study this process in vivo, we investigated functional crosstalk between macrophages and sensory neurons in primary cultures from trigeminal sensory ganglia of wild-type (WT or knock-in (KI mice expressing the Cacna1a gene mutation (R192Q found in familial hemiplegic migraine-type 1. After studying the number and morphology of resident macrophages in culture, the consequences of adding host macrophages on macrophage phagocytosis and membrane currents mediated by pain-transducing P2X3 receptors on sensory neurons were examined. Results KI ganglion cultures constitutively contained a larger number of active macrophages, although no difference in P2X3 receptor expression was found. Co-culturing WT or KI ganglia with host macrophages (active as much as resident cells strongly stimulated single cell phagocytosis. The same protocol had no effect on P2X3 receptor expression in WT or KI co-cultures, but it largely enhanced WT neuron currents that grew to the high amplitude constitutively seen for KI neurons. No further potentiation of KI neuronal currents was observed. Conclusions Trigeminal ganglion cultures from a genetic mouse model of migraine showed basal macrophage activation together with enhanced neuronal currents mediated by P2X3 receptors. This phenotype could be replicated in WT cultures by adding host macrophages, indicating an important functional crosstalk between macrophages and sensory neurons.

  4. Functional crosstalk in culture between macrophages and trigeminal sensory neurons of a mouse genetic model of migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschini, Alessia; Nair, Asha; Bele, Tanja; van den Maagdenberg, Arn Mjm; Nistri, Andrea; Fabbretti, Elsa

    2012-11-21

    Enhanced activity of trigeminal ganglion neurons is thought to underlie neuronal sensitization facilitating the onset of chronic pain attacks, including migraine. Recurrent headache attacks might establish a chronic neuroinflammatory ganglion profile contributing to the hypersensitive phenotype. Since it is difficult to study this process in vivo, we investigated functional crosstalk between macrophages and sensory neurons in primary cultures from trigeminal sensory ganglia of wild-type (WT) or knock-in (KI) mice expressing the Cacna1a gene mutation (R192Q) found in familial hemiplegic migraine-type 1. After studying the number and morphology of resident macrophages in culture, the consequences of adding host macrophages on macrophage phagocytosis and membrane currents mediated by pain-transducing P2X3 receptors on sensory neurons were examined. KI ganglion cultures constitutively contained a larger number of active macrophages, although no difference in P2X3 receptor expression was found. Co-culturing WT or KI ganglia with host macrophages (active as much as resident cells) strongly stimulated single cell phagocytosis. The same protocol had no effect on P2X3 receptor expression in WT or KI co-cultures, but it largely enhanced WT neuron currents that grew to the high amplitude constitutively seen for KI neurons. No further potentiation of KI neuronal currents was observed. Trigeminal ganglion cultures from a genetic mouse model of migraine showed basal macrophage activation together with enhanced neuronal currents mediated by P2X3 receptors. This phenotype could be replicated in WT cultures by adding host macrophages, indicating an important functional crosstalk between macrophages and sensory neurons.

  5. [Trigeminal purinergic P2X4 receptor involved in experimental occlusal interference-induced hyperalgesia in rat masseter muscle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoxiang; Cao, Ye; Ding, Tingting; Fu, Kaiyuan; Xie, Qiufei

    2016-03-01

    To explore the expression of purinergic p2X4 receptor (P2X4R) in trigeminal ganglion of rats after occlusal interference. Investigation of peripheral receptor mechanism of occlusal interference-induced masticatory muscle pain will aid the development of drug intervention against this condition. Experimental occlusal interference was established by application of 0.4 mm metal crown to the upper right first molar of male Sprague-Dawley rats. Real-time PCR assay was used to investigate P2X4R mRNA level in trigeminal ganglion in rats with occlusal interference for 3, 7, 10 and 14 days and in control rats without occlusal interference (n=5 in each). Retrograde labelling combining immunofluorescence was performed to evaluate the percentage of P2X4R-positive cells in masseter afferent neurons (n=5 in each group). Graded concentrations of P2XR antagonist TNP-ATP (0.1, 10, 125, 250, 500 μmol/L) or saline (n=5 in each group) was administrated in right masseter and the mechanical sensitivity of bilateral masseters was measured before occlusal interference application, before the injection, and 30 min as well as 60 min after the injection. Compared with control rats (P2X4R mRNA: right side: 1.00±0.26, left side: 0.94± 0.21; percentage of P2X4R-positive masseter afferents: right side: [64.3±6.3]%, left side: [67.7±5.8]%), the level of P2X4R mRNA in bilateral trigeminal ganglia (right side: 5.98±3.56; left side: 5.06±2.88) of rats with occlusal interference for 7 days up-regulated (Pocclusal interference-induced masseter hyperalgesia.

  6. Public Health, Ethics, and Autonomous Vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleetwood, Janet

    2017-04-01

    With the potential to save nearly 30 000 lives per year in the United States, autonomous vehicles portend the most significant advance in auto safety history by shifting the focus from minimization of postcrash injury to collision prevention. I have delineated the important public health implications of autonomous vehicles and provided a brief analysis of a critically important ethical issue inherent in autonomous vehicle design. The broad expertise, ethical principles, and values of public health should be brought to bear on a wide range of issues pertaining to autonomous vehicles.

  7. A Generic Architecture for Autonomous Uninhabited Vehicles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Barbier, Magali; Gabard, Jean-Francois; Ayreault, Herve

    2007-01-01

    ...; few solutions propose architecture adaptive to several types of platform. Autonomous vehicles that move in partially known and dynamic environments have to deal with asynchronous disruptive events...

  8. Research Institute for Autonomous Precision Guided Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rogacki, John R

    2007-01-01

    ... actuators, development of a visualization lab for modeling vision based guidance algorithms, concept development of a rapid prototyping and aero characterization lab, vision based control of autonomous...

  9. Chemokine CXCL13 mediates orofacial neuropathic pain via CXCR5/ERK pathway in the trigeminal ganglion of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Cao, De-Li; Zhang, Zhi-Jun; Jiang, Bao-Chun; Gao, Yong-Jing

    2016-07-11

    Trigeminal nerve damage-induced neuropathic pain is a severely debilitating chronic orofacial pain syndrome. Spinal chemokine CXCL13 and its receptor CXCR5 were recently demonstrated to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of spinal nerve ligation-induced neuropathic pain. Whether and how CXCL13/CXCR5 in the trigeminal ganglion (TG) mediates orofacial pain are unknown. The partial infraorbital nerve ligation (pIONL) was used to induce trigeminal neuropathic pain in mice. The expression of ATF3, CXCL13, CXCR5, and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK) in the TG was detected by immunofluorescence staining and western blot. The effect of shRNA targeting on CXCL13 or CXCR5 on pain hypersensitivity was checked by behavioral testing. pIONL induced persistent mechanical allodynia and increased the expression of ATF3, CXCL13, and CXCR5 in the TG. Inhibition of CXCL13 or CXCR5 by shRNA lentivirus attenuated pIONL-induced mechanical allodynia. Additionally, pIONL-induced neuropathic pain and the activation of ERK in the TG were reduced in Cxcr5 (-/-) mice. Furthermore, MEK inhibitor (PD98059) attenuated mechanical allodynia and reduced TNF-α and IL-1β upregulation induced by pIONL. TNF-α inhibitor (Etanercept) and IL-1β inhibitor (Diacerein) attenuated pIONL-induced orofacial pain. Finally, intra-TG injection of CXCL13 induced mechanical allodynia, increased the activation of ERK and the production of TNF-α and IL-1β in the TG of WT mice, but not in Cxcr5 (-/-) mice. Pretreatment with PD98059, Etanercept, or Diacerein partially blocked CXCL13-induced mechanical allodynia, and PD98059 also reduced CXCL13-induced TNF-α and IL-1β upregulation. CXCL13 and CXCR5 contribute to orofacial pain via ERK-mediated proinflammatory cytokines production. Targeting CXCL13/CXCR5/ERK/TNF-α and IL-1β pathway in the trigeminal ganglion may offer effective treatment for orofacial neuropathic pain.

  10. Management of refractory trigeminal neuralgia using extended duration pulsed radiofrequency application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, Deepak; Ahuja, Vanita; Dass, Christopher; Verma, Parul

    2015-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) produces incapacitating facial pain that reduces quality of life in patients. Thermal radiofrequency (RF) ablation of gasserian ganglion (GG) is associated with masseter weakness and unpleasant sensations along the distribution of the ablated nerve. Pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) of GG has minimal side effects but literature is inconclusive regarding its benefit in refractory TN. Increasing the duration of PRF application to 6 minutes in TN produced encouraging results. PRF application to the saphenous nerve for 8 minutes reported improved pain relief and patient satisfaction. We report successful management of two patients of classic TN, which were refractory to medical management and interventional nerve blocks. The lesion site were confirmed with motor and sensory stimulation through a 22 G, 10 cm RF needle with 5 mm active tip. Both the patients received four cycles of PRF at 42 °C with each cycle of 120 seconds (8 minutes). The visual analogue scale (VAS) in case 1 reduced from pre-block score of 80 to score 10 post-block, while in case 2 the VAS reduced from pre-block score of 85 to score 15 post-block. During follow up both the patients are now pain free with minimal dose of carbamazepine at 12 and 6 months respectively. We used PRF for longer duration (8 minutes) in these patients, which resulted in improved VAS and WHOQOL-BREF score in these patients. PRF of mandibular division of GG for extended duration provided long-term effective pain relief and quality of life in patients of refractory classic TN.

  11. Gamma knife radiosurgery for typical trigeminal neuralgia: An institutional review of 108 patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elaimy, Ameer L.; Lamm, Andrew F.; Demakas, John J.; Mackay, Alexander R.; Lamoreaux, Wayne T.; Fairbanks, Robert K.; Pfeffer, Robert D.; Cooke, Barton S.; Peressini, Benjamin J.; Lee, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: In this study, we present the previously unreported pain relief outcomes of 108 patients treated at Gamma Knife of Spokane for typical trigeminal neuralgia (TN) between 2002 and 2011. Methods: Pain relief outcomes were measured using the Barrow Neurological Institute (BNI) pain intensity scale. In addition, the effects gender, age at treatment, pain laterality, previous surgical treatment, repeat Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS), and maximum radiosurgery dose have on patient pain relief outcomes were retrospectively analyzed. Statistical analysis was performed using Andersen 95% confidence intervals, approximate confidence intervals for log hazard ratios, and multivariate Cox proportional hazard models. Results: All 108 patients included in this study were grouped into BNI class IV or V prior to GKRS. The median clinical follow-up time was determined to be 15 months. Following the first GKRS procedure, 71% of patients were grouped into BNI class I-IIIb (I = 31%; II = 3%; IIIa = 19%; IIIb = 18%) and the median duration of pain relief for those patients was determined to be 11.8 months. New facial numbness was reported in 19% of patients and new facial paresthesias were reported in 7% of patients after the first GKRS procedure. A total of 19 repeat procedures were performed on the 108 patients included in this study. Following the second GKRS procedure, 73% of patients were grouped into BNI class I-IIIb (I = 44%; II = 6%; IIIa = 17%, IIIb = 6%) and the median duration of pain relief for those patients was determined to be 4.9 months. For repeat procedures, new facial numbness was reported in 22% of patients and new facial paresthesias were reported in 6% of patients. Conclusions: GKRS is a safe and effective management approach for patients diagnosed with typical TN. However, further studies and supporting research is needed on the effects previous surgical treatment, number of radiosurgery procedures, and maximum radiosurgery dose have on GKRS clinical

  12. Dysregulation of Pain- and Emotion-Related Networks in Trigeminal Neuralgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanyang Zhang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Classical trigeminal neuralgia (TN is a severe neuropathic facial pain disorder associated with increased risks of anxiety and depression. Converging evidence suggests that chronic pain pathophysiology involves dysfunctional pain-related and emotion-related networks. However, whether these systems are also among the culprit networks for TN remains unclear. Here, we aimed to assess TN-related anatomical and functional brain anomalies in pain-related and emotion-related networks. We investigated differences in gray matter (GM volume and the related resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC between 29 classical TN patients and 34 matched healthy controls. Relationships between brain measurement alterations, clinical pain and emotional states were identified. A longitudinal observation was further conducted to determine whether alterations in the brain could renormalize following pain relief. Reduced GM volumes in the bilateral amygdala, periaqueductal gray (PAG and right insula were found in TN patients compared with healthy control subjects. Whole-brain rsFC analyses with the four above-mentioned anatomical regions as seeds identified three significantly altered functional circuits, including amygdala-DLPFC, amygdala-mPFC and amygdala-thalamus/putamen circuitry. The amygdala-DLPFC and amygdala-mPFC circuits were associated with clinical pain duration and emotional state ratings, respectively. Further longitudinal analysis found that rsFC strength abnormalities in two fronto-limbic circuits (left amygdala/left DLPFC and right amygdala/right PFC were resolved after pain relief. Together, structural and functional deficits in pain-related and emotion-related networks were associated with TN patients, as demonstrated by our multimodal results. Pain relief had protective effects on brain functional connectivity within fronto-limbic circuits. Our study provides novel insights into the pathophysiology of TN, which may ultimately facilitate advances in

  13. Efficacy of botulinum toxin type a in trigeminal neuralgia in a South Asian Cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjula Chandragomi Caldera

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The antinociceptive effect of botulinum toxin-A (BTX-A in trigeminal neuralgia (TN has been described. We evaluated effects of BTX-A in relieving pain in patients with refractory TN at National Hospital of Sri Lanka. Materials and Methods: Pain in patients with TN was assessed using a visual analog from 0 to 10. Three months after commencement of drug therapy with ≥2 drugs including one first-line drug (carbamazepine/oxcarbazepine, pain scores were re-assessed. Twenty-two patients who did not report improvement of ≥50% at 90 days' posttreatment were recruited. They were given adjunct BTX-A directly to the trigger point (if identified or intradermal. Pain scores were assessed at 10, 20, 30, 60, and 90 days' posttreatment. Results: There was a statistically significant improvement in mean pain scores at 10, 20, 30, 60, and 90 days' posttreatment (5.59 [standard deviation (SD = 2.7], 5.68 [SD = 2.6], 5.27 [SD = 3.2], 4.77 [SD = 3.7], and 5.32 [SD = 4.0] compared to pre-BTX-A treatment (7.14, SD = 2.2. Percentage reduction in mean pain score ranged from 20.4% to 33.1%. Maximum response was at day 60 post-BTX-A (50% had ≥50% reduction in pain. No significant difference was found in response with higher doses and injection strategy. Conclusion: Consistent statistically significant reductions in pain scores at the aforesaid intervals compared to pretreatment means that there is a place for BTX in refractory TN.

  14. Thalamic metabolic alterations with cognitive dysfunction in idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia: a multivoxel spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yuan; Bao, Faxiu; Ma, Shaohui; Guo, Chenguang; Jin, Chenwang; Zhang, Ming [First Affiliated Hospital of Xi' an Jiaotong University, Department of Medical Imaging, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Li, Dan [First Affiliated Hospital of Xi' an Jiaotong University, Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China)

    2014-08-15

    Although abnormalities in metabolite compositions in the thalamus are well described in patients with idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia (ITN), differences in distinct thalamic subregions have not been measured with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H-MRS), and whether there are correlations between thalamic metabolites and cognitive function still remain unknown. Multivoxel MRS was recorded to investigate the metabolic alterations in the thalamic subregions of patients with ITN. The regions of interest were localized in the anterior thalamus (A-Th), intralaminar portion of the thalamus (IL-Th), posterior lateral thalamus (PL-Th), posterior medial thalamus (PM-Th), and medial and lateral pulvinar of the thalamus (PuM-Th and PuL-Th). The N-acetylaspartate to creatine (NAA/Cr) and choline to creatine (Cho/Cr) ratios were measured in the ITN and control groups. Scores of the visual analogue scale (VAS) and the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) were analyzed to correlate with the neuroradiological findings. The NAA/Cr ratio in the affected side of PM-Th and PL-Th in ITN patients was statistically lower than that in the corresponding regions of the thalamus in controls. The NAA/Cr ratio in the affected PM-Th was negatively associated with VAS and disease duration. Furthermore, decreases of NAA/Cr and Cho/Cr were detected in the affected side of IL-Th, and lower Cho/Cr was positively correlated with MoCA values in the ITN group. Our result of low level of NAA/Cr in the affected PM-Th probably serves as a marker of the pain-rating index, and decreased Cho/Cr in IL-Th may be an indicator of cognitive disorder in patients with ITN. (orig.)

  15. Trigeminal Inflammatory Compression (TIC) injury induces chronic facial pain and susceptibility to anxiety-related behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, D N; Kniffin, T C; Zhang, L P; Danaher, R J; Miller, C S; Bocanegra, J L; Carlson, C R; Westlund, K N

    2015-06-04

    Our laboratory previously developed a novel neuropathic and inflammatory facial pain model for mice referred to as the Trigeminal Inflammatory Compression (TIC) model. Rather than inducing whole nerve ischemia and neuronal loss, this injury induces only slight peripheral nerve demyelination triggering long-term mechanical allodynia and cold hypersensitivity on the ipsilateral whisker pad. The aim of the present study is to further characterize the phenotype of the TIC injury model using specific behavioral assays (i.e. light-dark box, open field exploratory activity, and elevated plus maze) to explore pain- and anxiety-like behaviors associated with this model. Our findings determined that the TIC injury produces hypersensitivity 100% of the time after surgery that persists at least 21 weeks post injury (until the animals are euthanized). Three receptive field sensitivity pattern variations in mice with TIC injury are specified. Animals with TIC injury begin displaying anxiety-like behavior in the light-dark box preference and open field exploratory tests at week eight post injury as compared to sham and naïve animals. Panic anxiety-like behavior was shown in the elevated plus maze in mice with TIC injury if the test was preceded with acoustic startle. Thus, in addition to mechanical and cold hypersensitivity, the present study identified significant anxiety-like behaviors in mice with TIC injury resembling the clinical symptomatology and psychosocial impairments of patients with chronic facial pain. Overall, the TIC injury model's chronicity, reproducibility, and reliability in producing pain- and anxiety-like behaviors demonstrate its usefulness as a chronic neuropathic facial pain model. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Downregulation of selective microRNAs in trigeminal ganglion neurons following inflammatory muscle pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Dong

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Active regulation of gene expression in the nervous system plays an important role in the development and/or maintenance of inflammatory pain. MicroRNA (miRNA negatively regulates gene expression via posttranscriptional or transcriptional inhibition of specific genes. To explore the possible involvement of miRNA in gene regulation during inflammatory pain, we injected complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA unilaterally into the rat masseter muscle and quantified changes in neuron-specific mature miRNAs in the trigeminal ganglion (TG. Real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction revealed significant, but differential, downregulation of mature miR-10a, -29a, -98, -99a, -124a, -134, and -183 in the ipsilateral mandibular division (V3 of the TG within 4 hr after CFA. In contrast, levels of tested miRNAs did not change significantly in the contralateral V3 or the ipsilateral ophthalmic and maxillary divisions of the TG from inflamed rats, nor in the ipsilateral V3 of saline-injected animals. The downregulated miRNAs recovered differentially to a level equal to or higher than that in naive animals. Full recovery time varied with miRNA species but was at least 4 days. Expression and downregulation of some miRNAs were further confirmed by in situ hybridization of TG neurons that innervate the inflamed muscle. Although neurons of all sizes expressed these miRNAs, their signals varied between neurons. Our results indicate that miRNA species specific to neurons are quickly regulated following inflammatory muscle pain.

  17. Trigeminal-Rostral Ventromedial Medulla circuitry is involved in orofacial hyperalgesia contralateral to tissue injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chai Bryan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our previous studies have shown that complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA-induced masseter inflammation and microinjection of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β into the subnucleus interpolaris/subnucleus caudalis transition zone of the spinal trigeminal nucleus (Vi/Vc can induce contralateral orofacial hyperalgesia in rat models. We have also shown that contralateral hyperalgesia is attenuated with a lesion of the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM, a critical site of descending pain modulation. Here we investigated the involvement of the RVM-Vi/Vc circuitry in mediating contralateral orofacial hyperalgesia after an injection of CFA into the masseter muscle. Results Microinjection of the IL-1 receptor antagonist (5 nmol, n=6 into the ipsilateral Vi/Vc attenuated the CFA-induced contralateral hyperalgesia but not the ipsilateral hyperalgesia. Intra-RVM post-treatment injection of the NK1 receptor antagonists, RP67580 (0.5-11.4 nmol and L-733,060 (0.5-11.4 nmol, attenuated CFA-induced bilateral hyperalgesia and IL-1β induced bilateral hyperalgesia. Serotonin depletion in RVM neurons prior to intra-masseter CFA injection prevented the development of contralateral hyperalgesia 1–3 days after CFA injection. Inhibition of 5-HT3 receptors in the contralateral Vi/Vc with direct microinjection of the select 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, Y-25130 (2.6-12.9 nmol, attenuated CFA-induced contralateral hyperalgesia. Lesions to the ipsilateral Vc prevented the development of ipsilateral hyperalgesia but did not prevent the development of contralateral hyperalgesia. Conclusions These results suggest that the development of CFA-induced contralateral orofacial hyperalgesia is mediated through descending facilitatory mechanisms of the RVM-Vi/Vc circuitry.

  18. Frameless Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Treatment of Multiple Sclerosis-Related Trigeminal Neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Alfredo; Pontoriero, Antonio; Iatì, Giuseppe; Esposito, Felice; Siniscalchi, Enrico Nastro; Crimi, Salvatore; Vinci, Sergio; Brogna, Anna; De Ponte, Francesco; Germanò, Antonino; Pergolizzi, Stefano; Tomasello, Francesco

    2017-07-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) affects 7% of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). In such patients, TN is difficult to manage either pharmacologically and surgically. Radiosurgical rhizotomy is an effective treatment option. The nonisocentric geometry of radiation beams of CyberKnife introduces new concepts in the treatment of TN. Its efficacy for MS-related TN has not yet been demonstrated. Twenty-seven patients with refractory TN and MS were treated. A nonisocentric beams distribution was chosen; the maximal target dose was 72.5 Gy. The maximal dose to the brainstem was <12 Gy. Effects on pain, medications, sensory disturbance, rate, and time of pain recurrence were analyzed. Median follow-up was 37 (18-72) months. Barrow Neurological Institute pain scale score I-III was achieved in 23/27 patients (85%) within 45 days. Prescription isodose line (80%) accounting for a dose of 58 Gy incorporated an average of 4.85 mm (4-6 mm) of the nerve and mean nerve volume of 26.4 mm 3 (range 20-38 mm 3 ). Seven out of 27 patients (26%) had mild, not bothersome, facial numbness (Barrow Neurological Institute numbness score II). The rate of pain control decreased progressively after the first year, and only 44% of patients retained pain control 4 years later. Frameless radiosurgery can be effectively used to perform retrogasserian rhizotomy. Pain relief was satisfactory and, with our dose/volume constraints, no sensory complications were recorded. Nonetheless, long-term pain control was possible in less than half of the patients. This is a limitation that CyberKnife radiosurgery shares with other techniques in MS patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Trigeminal pain and quantitative sensory testing in painful peripheral diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arap, Astrid; Siqueira, Silvia R D T; Silva, Claudomiro B; Teixeira, Manoel J; Siqueira, José T T

    2010-07-01

    To evaluate patients with Diabetes Mellitus type 2 and painful peripheral neuropathy in order to investigate oral complaints and facial somatosensory findings. Case-control study; 29 patients (12 women, mean age 57.86 yo) with Diabetes Mellitus type 2 and 31 age-gender-matched controls were evaluated with a standardized protocol for general characteristics, orofacial pain, research diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders, visual analogue scale and McGill Pain questionnaire, and a systematic protocol of quantitative sensory testing for bilateral facial sensitivity at the areas innervated by the trigeminal branches, which included the thermal detection by ThermoSensi 2, tactile evaluation with vonFrey filaments, and superficial pain thresholds with a superficial algometer (Micromar). Statistical analysis was performed with Wilcoxon, chi-square, confidence intervals and Spearman (ppain was reported by 55.2% of patients, and the most common descriptor was fatigue (50%); 17.2% had burning mouth. Myofascial temporomandibular disorders were diagnosed in 9 (31%) patients. The study group showed higher sensory thresholds of pain at the right maxillary branch (p=0.017) but sensorial differences were not associated with pain (p=0.608). Glycemia and HbA(1c) were positively correlated with the quantitative sensory testing results of pain (ppain thresholds were correlated with higher glycemia and glycated hemoglobin (p=0.027 and p=0.026). There was a high prevalence of orofacial pain and burning mouth was the most common complaint. The association of loss of pain sensation and higher glycemia and glycated hemoglobin can be of clinical use for the follow-up of DM complications. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Bidirectional modulation of windup by NMDA receptors in the rat spinal trigeminal nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woda, Alain; Blanc, Olivier; Voisin, Daniel L; Coste, Jérôme; Molat, Jean-Louis; Luccarini, Philippe

    2004-04-01

    Activation of afferent nociceptive pathways is subject to activity-dependent plasticity, which may manifest as windup, a progressive increase in the response of dorsal horn nociceptive neurons to repeated stimuli. At the cellular level, N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activation by glutamate released from nociceptive C-afferent terminals is currently thought to generate windup. Most of the wide dynamic range nociceptive neurons that display windup, however, do not receive direct C-fibre input. It is thus unknown where the NMDA mechanisms for windup operate. Here, using the Sprague-Dawley rat trigeminal system as a model, we anatomically identify a subpopulation of interneurons that relay nociceptive information from the superficial dorsal horn where C-fibres terminate, to downstream wide dynamic range nociceptive neurons. Using in vivo electrophysiological recordings, we show that at the end of this pathway, windup was reduced (24 +/- 6%, n = 7) by the NMDA receptor antagonist AP-5 (2.0 fmol) and enhanced (62 +/- 19%, n = 12) by NMDA (1 nmol). In contrast, microinjections of AP-5 (1.0 fmol) within the superficial laminae increased windup (83 +/- 44%, n = 9), whereas NMDA dose dependently decreased windup (n = 19). These results indicate that NMDA receptor function at the segmental level depends on their precise location in nociceptive neural networks. While some NMDA receptors actually amplify pain information, the new evidence for NMDA dependent inhibition of windup we show here indicates that, simultaneously, others act in the opposite direction. Working together, the two mechanisms may provide a fine tuning of gain in pain.

  1. Autonomous Real Time Requirements Tracing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plattsmier, George; Stetson, Howard

    2014-01-01

    One of the more challenging aspects of software development is the ability to verify and validate the functional software requirements dictated by the Software Requirements Specification (SRS) and the Software Detail Design (SDD). Insuring the software has achieved the intended requirements is the responsibility of the Software Quality team and the Software Test team. The utilization of Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) Auto- Procedures for relocating ground operations positions to ISS automated on-board operations has begun the transition that would be required for manned deep space missions with minimal crew requirements. This transition also moves the auto-procedures from the procedure realm into the flight software arena and as such the operational requirements and testing will be more structured and rigorous. The autoprocedures would be required to meet NASA software standards as specified in the Software Safety Standard (NASASTD- 8719), the Software Engineering Requirements (NPR 7150), the Software Assurance Standard (NASA-STD-8739) and also the Human Rating Requirements (NPR-8705). The Autonomous Fluid Transfer System (AFTS) test-bed utilizes the Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) Language for development of autonomous command and control software. The Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) system has the unique feature of providing the current line of the statement in execution during real-time execution of the software. The feature of execution line number internal reporting unlocks the capability of monitoring the execution autonomously by use of a companion Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) sequence as the line number reporting is embedded inside the Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) execution engine. This negates I/O processing of this type data as the line number status of executing sequences is built-in as a function reference. This paper will outline the design and capabilities of the AFTS Autonomous Requirements Tracker, which traces and logs SRS requirements as they are being met during real-time execution of the

  2. Autonomous sensor manager agents (ASMA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osadciw, Lisa A.

    2004-04-01

    Autonomous sensor manager agents are presented as an algorithm to perform sensor management within a multisensor fusion network. The design of the hybrid ant system/particle swarm agents is described in detail with some insight into their performance. Although the algorithm is designed for the general sensor management problem, a simulation example involving 2 radar systems is presented. Algorithmic parameters are determined by the size of the region covered by the sensor network, the number of sensors, and the number of parameters to be selected. With straight forward modifications, this algorithm can be adapted for most sensor management problems.

  3. Autonomously managed electrical power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callis, Charles P.

    1986-01-01

    The electric power systems for future spacecraft such as the Space Station will necessarily be more sophisticated and will exhibit more nearly autonomous operation than earlier spacecraft. These new power systems will be more reliable and flexible than their predecessors offering greater utility to the users. Automation approaches implemented on various power system breadboards are investigated. These breadboards include the Hubble Space Telescope power system test bed, the Common Module Power Management and Distribution system breadboard, the Autonomusly Managed Power System (AMPS) breadboard, and the 20 kilohertz power system breadboard. Particular attention is given to the AMPS breadboard. Future plans for these breadboards including the employment of artificial intelligence techniques are addressed.

  4. Autonomous quality assurance and troubleshooting

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuPlain, Ronald F.; Radziwill, Nicole M.; Shelton, Amy L.

    2006-06-01

    To improve operational availability (the proportion of time that a telescope is able to accomplish what a visiting observer wants at the time the observation is scheduled), response time to faults must be minimized. One way this can be accomplished is by characterizing the relationships and interdependencies between components in a control system, developing algorithms to identify the root cause of a problem, and capturing expert knowledge of a system to simplify the process of troubleshooting. Results from a prototype development are explained, along with deployment issues. Implications for the future, such as effective knowledge representation and management, and learning processes which integrate autonomous and interactive components, are discussed.

  5. Artificial Intelligence in Autonomous Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, William; Thanjavur, Karun

    2011-03-01

    Artificial Intelligence (AI) is key to the natural evolution of today's automated telescopes to fully autonomous systems. Based on its rapid development over the past five decades, AI offers numerous, well-tested techniques for knowledge based decision making essential for real-time telescope monitoring and control, with minimal - and eventually no - human intervention. We present three applications of AI developed at CFHT for monitoring instantaneous sky conditions, assessing quality of imaging data, and a prototype for scheduling observations in real-time. Closely complementing the current remote operations at CFHT, we foresee further development of these methods and full integration in the near future.

  6. Topological entropy of autonomous flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badii, R. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    When studying fluid dynamics, especially in a turbulent regime, it is crucial to estimate the number of active degrees of freedom or of localized structures in the system. The topological entropy quantifies the exponential growth of the number of `distinct` orbits in a dynamical system as a function of their length, in the infinite spatial resolution limit. Here, I illustrate a novel method for its evaluation, which extends beyond maps and is applicable to any system, including autonomous flows: these are characterized by lack of a definite absolute time scale for the orbit lengths. (author) 8 refs.

  7. BART: The Czech Autonomous Observatory

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nekola, Martin; Hudec, René; Jelínek, M.; Kubánek, P.; Štrobl, Jan; Polášek, Cyril

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 2010, Spec. Is. (2010), 103986/1-103986/5 ISSN 1687-7969. [Workshop on Robotic Autonomous Observatories. Málaga, 18.05.2009-21.05.2009] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/08/1207 Grant - others:ESA(XE) ESA-PECS project No. 98023; Spanish Ministry of Education and Science(ES) AP2003-1407 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : robotic telescope * BART * gamma ray bursts Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics http://www.hindawi.com/journals/aa/2010/103986.html

  8. Hemicrania continua: clinical review, diagnosis and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash S

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Sanjay Prakash,1 Payal Patel2 1Department of Neurology, Smt. B. K. Shah Medical Institute and Research Centre, Sumandeep Vidyapeeth University, Vadodara, Gujarat, India; 2Department of Neurology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH, USA Abstract: Hemicrania continua (HC is an indomethacin-responsive primary headache disorder which is currently classified under the heading of trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs. It is a highly misdiagnosed and underreported primary headache. The pooled mean delay of diagnosis of HC is 8.0 ± 7.2 years. It is not rare. We noted more than 1000 cases in the literature. It represents 1.7% of total headache patients attending headache or neurology clinic. Just like other TACs, it is characterized by strictly unilateral pain in the trigeminal distribution, cranial autonomic features in the same area and agitation during exacerbations/attacks. It is different from other TACs in one aspect. While all other TACs are episodic, HC patients have continuous headaches with superimposed severe exacerbations. The central feature of HC is continuous background headache. However, the patients may be worried only for superimposed exacerbations. Focusing only on exacerbations and ignoring continuous background headache are the most important factors for the misdiagnosis of HC. A large number of patients may have migrainous features during exacerbation phase. Up to 70% patients may fulfill the diagnostic criteria for migraine during exacerbations. Besides migraine, its exacerbations can mimic a large number of other primary and secondary headaches. The other specific feature of HC is a remarkable response to indomethacin. However, a large number of patients develop side effects because of the long-term use of indomethacin. A few other medications may also be effective in a subset of patients with HC. Various surgical interventions have been suggested for patients who are intolerant to indomethacin. Several aspects of HC

  9. Neuropatía sensitiva trigeminal secundaria a granuloma de colesterol de la punta del peñasco del temporal Trigeminal neuralgia secondary to cholesterol granuloma of the petrous bone apex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Pons García

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available La neuropatía aislada de la rama sensitiva del trigémino es una entidad poco habitual. Los pacientes suelen referir hipoestesia y /o disestesia generalmente a nivel de la segunda y tercera rama del trigémino, mientras que la neuralgia es muy infrecuente.¹ Su asociación con enfermedades sistémicas del tejido conectivo es bien conocida.² Se ha descrito asociada a distintas lesiones del SNC sobre todo tumores de fosa posterior o base de cráneo, así como neoplasias mandibulares.3,4 Presentamos una paciente con hipoestesia en el territorio V2-V3 asociada a dolor hemifacial paroxístico secundario a una lesión del peñasco del temporal.Trigeminal Neuralgia is an uncommon entity. The patients report hypoesthesia and/or dysesthesia of the second and third ramus of trigeminal nerve, while neuralgia is very rare.¹ Its association with systemic diseases of connective tissue is well know.² It has been described as being associated with different lesions of the central nervous system, especially with the posterior cavity or cranial base tumors, as well as jaw neoplasias.3,4 We presented a patient with hypoesthesia V2-V3 and hemi facial paroxysmal pain secondary to lesion of petrous apex of temporal bone.

  10. Autonomous Lawnmower using FPGA implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Nabihah; Lokman, Nabill bin; Helmy Abd Wahab, Mohd

    2016-11-01

    Nowadays, there are various types of robot have been invented for multiple purposes. The robots have the special characteristic that surpass the human ability and could operate in extreme environment which human cannot endure. In this paper, an autonomous robot is built to imitate the characteristic of a human cutting grass. A Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) is used to control the movements where all data and information would be processed. Very High Speed Integrated Circuit (VHSIC) Hardware Description Language (VHDL) is used to describe the hardware using Quartus II software. This robot has the ability of avoiding obstacle using ultrasonic sensor. This robot used two DC motors for its movement. It could include moving forward, backward, and turning left and right. The movement or the path of the automatic lawn mower is based on a path planning technique. Four Global Positioning System (GPS) plot are set to create a boundary. This to ensure that the lawn mower operates within the area given by user. Every action of the lawn mower is controlled by the FPGA DE' Board Cyclone II with the help of the sensor. Furthermore, Sketch Up software was used to design the structure of the lawn mower. The autonomous lawn mower was able to operate efficiently and smoothly return to coordinated paths after passing the obstacle. It uses 25% of total pins available on the board and 31% of total Digital Signal Processing (DSP) blocks.

  11. Structured control for autonomous robots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, R.G.

    1994-01-01

    To operate in rich, dynamic environments, autonomous robots must be able to effectively utilize and coordinate their limited physical and occupational resources. As complexity increases, it becomes necessary to impose explicit constraints on the control of planning, perception, and action to ensure that unwanted interactions between behaviors do not occur. This paper advocates developing complex robot systems by layering reactive behaviors onto deliberative components. In this structured control approach, the deliberative components handle normal situations and the reactive behaviors, which are explicitly constrained as to when and how they are activated, handle exceptional situations. The Task Control Architecture (TCA) has been developed to support this approach. TCA provides an integrated set of control constructs useful for implementing deliberative and reactive behaviors. The control constructs facilitate modular and evolutionary system development: they are used to integrate and coordinate planning, perception, and execution, and to incrementally improve the efficiency and robustness of the robot systems. To date, TCA has been used in implementing a half-dozen mobile robot systems, including an autonomous six-legged rover and indoor mobile manipulator

  12. An autonomous weeding robot for organic farming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, T.; Asselt, van C.J.; Bontsema, J.; Müller, J.; Straten, van G.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this research is the replacement of hand weeding in organic farming by a device working autonomously at ¯eld level. The autonomous weeding robot was designed using a structured design approach, giving a good overview of the total design. A vehicle was developed with a diesel engine,

  13. Autonomous Control of Space Reactor Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belle R. Upadhyaya; K. Zhao; S.R.P. Perillo; Xiaojia Xu; M.G. Na

    2007-01-01

    Autonomous and semi-autonomous control is a key element of space reactor design in order to meet the mission requirements of safety, reliability, survivability, and life expectancy. Interrestrial nuclear power plants, human operators are available to perform intelligent control functions that are necessary for both normal and abnormal operational conditions

  14. Overfeeding, autonomic regulation and metabolic consequences.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheurink, A.J.W.; Balkan, B; Strubbe, J.H.; van Dijk, G.; Steffens, A.B

    The autonomic nervous system plays an important role in the regulation of body processes in health and disease. Overfeeding and obesity (a disproportional increase of the fat mass of the body) are often accompanied by alterations in both sympathetic and parasympathetic autonomic functions. The

  15. Technologies for highly miniaturized autonomous sensor networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baert, K.; Gyselinckx, B.; Torfs, T.; Leonov, V.; Yazicioglu, F.; Brebels, S.; Donnay, S.; Vanfleteren, J.; Beyne, E.; Hoof, C. van

    2006-01-01

    Recent results of the autonomous sensor research program HUMAN++ will be summarized in this paper. The research program aims to achieve highly miniaturized and (nearly) autonomous sensor systems that assist our health and comfort. Although the application examples are dedicated to human

  16. Cooperative Control of Multiple Unmanned Autonomous Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-03

    I I Final Report 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Cooperative Control of Multiple Unmanned Autonomous Vehicles F49620-01-1-0337 6. AUTHOR(S... Autonomous Vehicles Final Report Kendall E. Nygard Department of Computer Science and Operations Research North Dakota State University Fargo, ND 58105-5164

  17. 3-D Vision Techniques for Autonomous Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-01

    TITLE (Include Security Classification) W 3-D Vision Techniques for Autonomous Vehicles 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Martial Hebert, Takeo Kanade, inso Kweoni... Autonomous Vehicles Martial Hebert, Takeo Kanade, Inso Kweon CMU-RI-TR-88-12 The Robotics Institute Carnegie Mellon University Acession For Pittsburgh

  18. Autonomy Level Specification for Intelligent Autonomous Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-09-01

    Autonomy Level Specification for Intelligent Autonomous Vehicles : Interim Progress Report Hui-Min Huang, Elena Messina, James Albus...Level Specification for Intelligent Autonomous Vehicles : Interim Progress Report 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6

  19. Intelligent autonomous systems 12. Vol. 2. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sukhan [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Gyeonggi-Do (Korea, Republic of). College of Information and Communication Engineering; Yoon, Kwang-Joon [Konkuk Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyungsuck [Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jangmyung (eds.) [Pusan National Univ. (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Electronics Engineering

    2013-02-01

    Recent research in Intelligent and Autonomous Systems. Volume 2 of the proceedings of the 12th International Conference IAS-12, held June 26-29, 2012, jeju Island, Korea. Written by leading experts in the field. Intelligent autonomous systems are emerged as a key enabler for the creation of a new paradigm of services to humankind, as seen by the recent advancement of autonomous cars licensed for driving in our streets, of unmanned aerial and underwater vehicles carrying out hazardous tasks on-site, and of space robots engaged in scientific as well as operational missions, to list only a few. This book aims at serving the researchers and practitioners in related fields with a timely dissemination of the recent progress on intelligent autonomous systems, based on a collection of papers presented at the 12th International Conference on Intelligent Autonomous Systems, held in Jeju, Korea, June 26-29, 2012. With the theme of ''Intelligence and Autonomy for the Service to Humankind, the conference has covered such diverse areas as autonomous ground, aerial, and underwater vehicles, intelligent transportation systems, personal/domestic service robots, professional service robots for surgery/rehabilitation, rescue/security and space applications, and intelligent autonomous systems for manufacturing and healthcare. This volume 2 includes contributions devoted to Service Robotics and Human-Robot Interaction and Autonomous Multi-Agent Systems and Life Engineering.

  20. Safe and Autonomous Drones for Urban Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnakumar, Kalmanje

    2016-01-01

    Autonomous vehicles are no longer futuristic technology; in fact, there are already cars with self-driving features on the road. Over the next five years, the connected vehicles will disrupt the entire automotive and UAS ecosystems. The industry will undergo fundamental change as semi-autonomous driving and flying emerges, followed by an eventual shift to full autonomy.

  1. Autonomous Control of Space Reactor Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belle R. Upadhyaya; K. Zhao; S.R.P. Perillo; Xiaojia Xu; M.G. Na

    2007-11-30

    Autonomous and semi-autonomous control is a key element of space reactor design in order to meet the mission requirements of safety, reliability, survivability, and life expectancy. Interrestrial nuclear power plants, human operators are avilable to perform intelligent control functions that are necessary for both normal and abnormal operational conditions.

  2. Squamous cell carcinoma presenting with trigeminal anesthesia: An uncommon presentation of head & neck cancer with unknown primary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ameer T; Dagher, Walid I; O'Leary, Miriam A; Wein, Richard O

    The differential diagnosis of facial anesthesia is vast. This may be secondary to trauma, neoplasm, both intracranial and extracranial, infection, and neurologic disease. When evaluating a patient with isolated facial anesthesia, the head and neck surgeon often thinks of adenoid cystic carcinoma, which has a propensity for perineural invasion and spread. When one thinks of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma with or without unknown primary, the typical presentation involves dysphagia, odynophagia, weight loss, hoarseness, or more commonly, a neck mass. Squamous cell carcinoma presenting as facial anesthesia and perineural spread, with no primary site is quite rare. Case presentations and review of the literature. Trigeminal anesthesia is an uncommon presentation of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma with unknown primary. We present two interesting cases of invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the trigeminal nerve, with no primary site identified. We will also review the literature of head and neck malignancies with perineural spread and the management techniques for the two different cases presented. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Trigeminal Neuralgia: Evaluation of the Relationship Between the Region of Neuralgic Manifestation and the Site of Neurovascular Compression Under Endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenhao; Chen, Minjie; Zhang, Weijie; Chai, Ying

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the relationship among the pain region, branches of trigeminal nerve, and the neurovascular compression (NVC) location. A total of 123 consecutive patients with trigeminal neuralgia (TN) underwent endoscope-assisted microvascular decompression according to positive preoperative tomographic angiography. V2 alone was in 51 cases and V3 alone was in 64 cases. The location of NVC was classified into cranial, caudal, medial, or lateral sites. Some patients with multiple regions were recorded as medial + cranial, lateral + cranial, medial + caudal, and lateral + caudal. Twenty-eight (71.8%) of 39 patients with TN (V2) had their NVC at the medial site of the nerve. Twenty-seven (64.3%) of 42 patients with TN (V3) had their NVC at the lateral site of the nerve. There was a statistically significant difference (P = 0.0011  0.01). Evaluation of the relationship between the pain region and the NVC location by endoscopic images during microvascular decompression is more accurate. The second branch is mostly distributed in the medial area, and third branch is mainly distributed in the lateral area.

  4. Kynurenine aminotransferase in the supratentorial dura mater of the rat: effect of stimulation of the trigeminal ganglion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knyihár-Csillik, Elizabeth; Chadaide, Zoltán; Okuno, Etsuo; Krisztin-Péva, Beata; Toldi, József; Varga, Csaba; Molnár, Andor; Csillik, Bert; Vécsei, László

    2004-04-01

    Electrical stimulation of the trigeminal ganglion has been widely used as a model of nociception, characterizing migraine. This treatment is known to evoke release of neuropeptides and neurotransmitters from nerve fibers of the dura mater. On the basis of immunocytochemical investigations, we found that under normal conditions, surface membranes of Schwann cells surrounding nerve fibers in the supratentorial dura mater display kynurenine aminotransferase-immunoreaction (KAT-IR); also KAT-IR are the granules of mast cells and the cytoplasms of macrophages (histiocytes). In consequence of stimulation of the trigeminal ganglion, Schwann cells in the dura mater became conspicuously swollen while their KAT-IR decreased considerably; also KAT-IR of mast cells and macrophages decreased significantly. At the same time, nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-IR of nerve fibers in the dura mater increased, suggesting release of nitric oxide (NO), this is known to be involved in NMDA receptor activation leading to vasodilation followed by neurogenic inflammation. Because kynurenic acid (KYNA) is an antagonist of NMDA receptors, we hypothesize that KYNA and its synthesizing enzyme, KAT, may play a role in the prevention of migraine attacks.

  5. Malignant Trigeminal Nerve Sheath Tumor and Anaplastic Astrocytoma Collision Tumor with High Proliferative Activity and Tumor Suppressor P53 Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher Kurdi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The synchronous development of two primary brain tumors of distinct cell of origin in close proximity or in contact with each other is extremely rare. We present the first case of collision tumor with two histological distinct tumors. Case Presentation. A 54-year-old woman presented with progressive atypical left facial pain and numbness for 8 months. MRI of the brain showed left middle cranial fossa heterogeneous mass extending into the infratemporal fossa. At surgery, a distinct but intermingled intra- and extradural tumor was demonstrated which was completely removed through left orbitozygomatic-temporal craniotomy. Histopathological examination showed that the tumor had two distinct components: malignant nerve sheath tumor of the trigeminal nerve and temporal lobe anaplastic astrocytoma. Proliferative activity and expressed tumor protein 53 (TP53 gene mutations were demonstrated in both tumors. Conclusions. We describe the first case of malignant trigeminal nerve sheath tumor (MTNST and anaplastic astrocytoma in collision and discuss the possible hypothesis of this rare occurrence. We propose that MTNST, with TP53 mutation, have participated in the formation of anaplastic astrocytoma, or vice versa.

  6. ROV90 - A prototype autonomous inspection vehicle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roedseth, Oe.J.; Hallset, J.O.

    1991-04-01

    Simple autonomous inspection vehicles are suitable for operations where the cost, danger to humans, or area of operation prohibits the use of conventional underwater technology. Autonomous vehicles are, however, in their infancy and few such vehicles are available. There are still some problems to be overcome before this technology becomes useful in commercial applications. We have built ROV90 to investigate these problems. It is a test bed for experimenting with the different parts of an autonomous underwater vehicle. ROV90 will be able to autonomously follow prominent features in the real world, man made or natural. Examples are pipelines or walls in tunnels. ROV90 is tethered, but we are planning to use experience and results from ROV90 to develop av ''real'' autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) called PISCIS. 11 refs., 8 figs.

  7. Current challenges in autonomous driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabás, I.; Todoruţ, A.; Cordoş, N.; Molea, A.

    2017-10-01

    Nowadays the automotive industry makes a quantum shift to a future, where the driver will have smaller and smaller role in driving his or her vehicle ending up being totally excluded. In this paper, we have investigated the different levels of driving automatization, the prospective effects of these new technologies on the environment and traffic safety, the importance of regulations and their current state, the moral aspects of introducing these technologies and the possible scenarios of deploying the autonomous vehicles. We have found that the self-driving technologies are facing many challenges: a) They must make decisions faster in very diverse conditions which can include many moral dilemmas as well; b) They have an important potential in reducing the environmental pollution by optimizing their routes, driving styles by communicating with other vehicles, infrastructures and their environment; c) There is a considerable gap between the self-drive technology level and the current regulations; fortunately, this gap shows a continuously decreasing trend; d) In case of many types of imminent accidents management there are many concerns about the ability of making the right decision. Considering that this field has an extraordinary speed of development, our study is up to date at the submission deadline. Self-driving technologies become increasingly sophisticated and technically accessible, and in some cases, they can be deployed for commercial vehicles as well. According to the current stage of research and development, it is still unclear how the self-driving technologies will be able to handle extreme and unexpected events including their moral aspects. Since most of the traffic accidents are caused by human error or omission, it is expected that the emergence of the autonomous technologies will reduce these accidents in their number and gravity, but the very few currently available test results have not been able to scientifically underpin this issue yet. The

  8. Mild closed head traumatic brain injury-induced changes in monoamine neurotransmitters in the trigeminal subnuclei of a rat model: mechanisms underlying orofacial allodynias and headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golam Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Our recent findings have demonstrated that rodent models of closed head traumatic brain injury exhibit comprehensive evidence of progressive and enduring orofacial allodynias, a hypersensitive pain response induced by non-painful stimulation. These allodynias, tested using thermal hyperalgesia, correlated with changes in several known pain signaling receptors and molecules along the trigeminal pain pathway, especially in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis. This study focused to extend our previous work to investigate the changes in monoamine neurotransmitter immunoreactivity changes in spinal trigeminal nucleus oralis, pars interpolaris and nucleus tractus solitaries following mild to moderate closed head traumatic brain injury, which are related to tactile allodynia, touch-pressure sensitivity, and visceral pain. Our results exhibited significant alterations in the excitatory monoamine, serotonin, in spinal trigeminal nucleus oralis and pars interpolaris which usually modulate tactile and mechanical sensitivity in addition to the thermal sensitivity. Moreover, we also detected a robust alteration in the expression of serotonin, and inhibitory molecule norepinephrine in the nucleus tractus solitaries, which might indicate the possibility of an alteration in visceral pain, and existence of other morbidities related to solitary nucleus dysfunction in this rodent model of mild to moderate closed head traumatic brain injury. Collectively, widespread changes in monoamine neurotransmitter may be related to orofacial allodynhias and headache after traumatic brain injury.

  9. Correlation between the Appearance of Neuropeptides in the Rat Trigeminal Ganglion and Reinnervation of the Healing Root Socket after Tooth Extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunjigake, Kaori K.; Goto, Tetsuya; Nakao, Kayoko; Konoo, Tetsuro; Kobayashi, Shigeru; Yamaguchi, Kazunori

    2006-01-01

    The neuropeptide substance P (SP) modulates bone metabolism. This study examined the temporal appearance of the neuropeptides SP and brain-derived nerve growth factor (BDNF) and their receptors (neurokinin-1 receptor (NK 1 -R) and Trk B, respectively) in the rat trigeminal ganglion to investigate the role of neuropeptides in healing after tooth extraction. Rats were anesthetized and their upper right first molars were extracted; the rats were sacrificed 3 hours and 1–21 days after extraction. Their trigeminal ganglion and maxilla were removed, and cryosections were prepared and immunostained using specific antibodies against SP, BDNF, NK 1 -R, and Trk B. In the tooth sockets after extraction, new bone and a few SP-immunoreactive nerve fibers were first seen at day 7, and bone completely filled the sockets at day 21. In the trigeminal ganglion, the proportions of NK 1 -R-, BDNF-, and Trk B-immunoreactive neurons changed similarly, i.e., they initially decreased, increased rapidly to maximum levels by day 3, and then decreased gradually to control levels until 21 days. These findings suggest that the appearance of neuropeptides in the trigeminal ganglion, the reinnervation of SP-immunoreactive nerve fibers, and bone repair in the tooth socket during healing after extraction were correlated

  10. Expression of BKCa channels and the modulatory ß-subunits in the rat and porcine trigeminal ganglion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulf-Johansson, Helle; Hay-Schmidt, Anders; Poulsen, Asser Nyander

    2009-01-01

    Large conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK(Ca)) channels contribute to electrical impulses, proper signal transmission of information and regulation of neurotransmitter release. Migraine has been proposed to be a trigeminovascular disease involving the sensory trigeminal pathways and the c...

  11. Electrophysiological and Morphological Properties of α and γ Motoneurons in the Rat Trigeminal Motor Nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayo Nishimura

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The muscle contraction during voluntary movement is regulated by activities of α- and γ-motoneurons (αMNs and γMNs, respectively. The tension of jaw-closing muscles can be finely tuned over a wide range. This excellent function is likely to be achieved by the specific populations of αMNs innervating jaw-closing muscles. Indeed, we have recently demonstrated that in the rat dorsolateral trigeminal motor nucleus (dl-TMN, the size distribution of αMNs was bimodal and the population of smaller αMNs showed a size distribution similar to that of γMNs, by immunohistochemically identifying αMNs and γMNs based on the expressions of estrogen-related receptor gamma (Err3 and neuronal DNA binding protein NeuN together with ChAT. This finding suggests the presence of αMNs as small as γMNs. However, differences in the electrophysiological membrane properties between αMNs and γMNs remain unknown also in the dl-TMN. Therefore, in the present study, we studied the electrophysiological membrane properties of MNs in the dl-TMN of infant rats at postnatal days 7–12 together with their morphological properties using whole-cell current-clamp recordings followed by immunohistochemical staining with an anti-NeuN and anti-ChAT antibodies. We found that the ChAT-positive and NeuN-positive αMNs were divided into two subclasses: the first one had a larger cell body and displayed a 4-aminopyridine (4-AP-sensitive current while the second one had a smaller cell body and displayed a less prominent 4-AP-sensitive current and a low-threshold spike, suitable for their orderly recruitment. We finally found that γMNs showing ChAT-positive and NeuN-negative immunoreactivities had smaller cell bodies and displayed an afterdepolarization mediated by flufenamate-sensitive cation current. It is suggested that these electrophysiological and morphological features of MNs in the dl-TMN are well correlated with the precise control of occlusion.

  12. Intercellular signal communication among odontoblasts and trigeminal ganglion neurons via glutamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, A; Sato, M; Kimura, M; Katakura, A; Tazaki, M; Shibukawa, Y

    2016-11-01

    Various stimuli to the exposed surface of dentin induce changes in the hydrodynamic force inside the dentinal tubules resulting in dentinal pain. Recent evidences indicate that mechano-sensor channels, such as the transient receptor potential channels, in odontoblasts receive these hydrodynamic forces and trigger the release of ATP to the pulpal neurons, to generate dentinal pain. A recent study, however, has shown that odontoblasts also express glutamate receptors (GluRs). This implies that cells in the dental pulp tissue have the ability to release glutamate, which acts as a functional intercellular mediator to establish inter-odontoblast and odontoblast-trigeminal ganglion (TG) neuron signal communication. To investigate the intercellular signal communication, we applied mechanical stimulation to odontoblasts and measured the intracellular free Ca 2+ concentration ([Ca 2+ ] i ). During mechanical stimulation in the presence of extracellular Ca 2+ , we observed a transient [Ca 2+ ] i increase not only in single stimulated odontoblasts, but also in adjacent odontoblasts. We could not observe these responses in the absence of extracellular Ca 2+ . [Ca 2+ ] i increases in the neighboring odontoblasts during mechanical stimulation of single odontoblasts were inhibited by antagonists of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) as well as glutamate-permeable anion channels. In the odontoblast-TG neuron coculture, we observed an increase in [Ca 2+ ] i in the stimulated odontoblasts and TG neurons, in response to direct mechanical stimulation of single odontoblasts. These [Ca 2+ ] i increases in the neighboring TG neurons were inhibited by antagonists for mGluRs. The [Ca 2+ ] i increases in the stimulated odontoblasts were also inhibited by mGluRs antagonists. We further confirmed that the odontoblasts express group I, II, and III mGluRs. However, we could not record any currents evoked from odontoblasts near the mechanically stimulated odontoblast, with or without

  13. Brainstem circuitry regulating phasic activation of trigeminal motoneurons during REM sleep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christelle Anaclet

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapid eye movement sleep (REMS is characterized by activation of the cortical and hippocampal electroencephalogram (EEG and atonia of non-respiratory muscles with superimposed phasic activity or twitching, particularly of cranial muscles such as those of the eye, tongue, face and jaw. While phasic activity is a characteristic feature of REMS, the neural substrates driving this activity remain unresolved. Here we investigated the neural circuits underlying masseter (jaw phasic activity during REMS. The trigeminal motor nucleus (Mo5, which controls masseter motor function, receives glutamatergic inputs mainly from the parvocellular reticular formation (PCRt, but also from the adjacent paramedian reticular area (PMnR. On the other hand, the Mo5 and PCRt do not receive direct input from the sublaterodorsal (SLD nucleus, a brainstem region critical for REMS atonia of postural muscles. We hypothesized that the PCRt-PMnR, but not the SLD, regulates masseter phasic activity during REMS.To test our hypothesis, we measured masseter electromyogram (EMG, neck muscle EMG, electrooculogram (EOG and EEG in rats with cell-body specific lesions of the SLD, PMnR, and PCRt. Bilateral lesions of the PMnR and rostral PCRt (rPCRt, but not the caudal PCRt or SLD, reduced and eliminated REMS phasic activity of the masseter, respectively. Lesions of the PMnR and rPCRt did not, however, alter the neck EMG or EOG. To determine if rPCRt neurons use glutamate to control masseter phasic movements, we selectively blocked glutamate release by rPCRt neurons using a Cre-lox mouse system. Genetic disruption of glutamate neurotransmission by rPCRt neurons blocked masseter phasic activity during REMS.These results indicate that (1 premotor glutamatergic neurons in the medullary rPCRt and PMnR are involved in generating phasic activity in the masseter muscles, but not phasic eye movements, during REMS; and (2 separate brainstem neural circuits control postural and cranial muscle

  14. Autonomic Function in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Gertrud Laura; Jennum, Poul Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    areas, which is consistent with the Braak hypothesis. In the narcolepsy patients, it was shown that a reduced HRR to arousals was primarily predicted by hypocretin deficiency in both rapid-eye-movement (REM) and non-REM sleep, independent of cataplexy and other factors. The results confirm...... that hypocretin deficiency affects the autonomic nervous system of patients with narcolepsy and that the hypocretin system is important for proper heart rate modulation at rest.Furthermore, it was shown that hypocretin deficiency and cataplexy are associated with signs of destabilized sleep-wake and REM sleep...... control, indicating that the disorder may serve as a human model for the sleep-wake and REM sleep flip-flop switches. The increased frequency of transitions may cause increased sympathetic activity during sleep and thereby increased heart rate, or the increased heart rate could be caused by decreased...

  15. Autonomous navigation system and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruemmer, David J [Idaho Falls, ID; Few, Douglas A [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-09-08

    A robot platform includes perceptors, locomotors, and a system controller, which executes instructions for autonomously navigating a robot. The instructions repeat, on each iteration through an event timing loop, the acts of defining an event horizon based on the robot's current velocity, detecting a range to obstacles around the robot, testing for an event horizon intrusion by determining if any range to the obstacles is within the event horizon, and adjusting rotational and translational velocity of the robot accordingly. If the event horizon intrusion occurs, rotational velocity is modified by a proportion of the current rotational velocity reduced by a proportion of the range to the nearest obstacle and translational velocity is modified by a proportion of the range to the nearest obstacle. If no event horizon intrusion occurs, translational velocity is set as a ratio of a speed factor relative to a maximum speed.

  16. Design of Autonomous Underwater Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadahiro Hyakudome

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available There are concerns about the impact that global warming will have on our environment, and which will inevitably result in expanding deserts and rising water levels. While a lot of underwater vehicles are utilized, AUVs (Autonomous Underwater Vehicle were considered and chosen, as the most suitable tool for conduction survey concerning these global environmental problems. AUVs can comprehensive survey because the vehicle does not have to be connected to the support vessel by tether cable. When such underwater vehicles are made, it is necessary to consider about the following things. 1 Seawater and Water Pressure Environment, 2 Sink, 3 There are no Gas or Battery Charge Stations, 4 Global Positioning System cannot use, 5 Radio waves cannot use. In the paper, outline of above and how deal about it are explained.

  17. Wireless autonomous device data transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammel, Jr., David W. (Inventor); Cain, James T. (Inventor); Mickle, Marlin H. (Inventor); Mi, Minhong (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method of communicating information from a wireless autonomous device (WAD) to a base station. The WAD has a data element having a predetermined profile having a total number of sequenced possible data element combinations. The method includes receiving at the WAD an RF profile transmitted by the base station that includes a triggering portion having a number of pulses, wherein the number is at least equal to the total number of possible data element combinations. The method further includes keeping a count of received pulses and wirelessly transmitting a piece of data, preferably one bit, to the base station when the count reaches a value equal to the stored data element's particular number in the sequence. Finally, the method includes receiving the piece of data at the base station and using the receipt thereof to determine which of the possible data element combinations the stored data element is.

  18. Autonomous Infrastructure for Observatory Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, R.

    This is an era of rapid change from ancient human-mediated modes of astronomical practice to a vision of ever larger time domain surveys, ever bigger "big data", to increasing numbers of robotic telescopes and astronomical automation on every mountaintop. Over the past decades, facets of a new autonomous astronomical toolkit have been prototyped and deployed in support of numerous space missions. Remote and queue observing modes have gained significant market share on the ground. Archives and data-mining are becoming ubiquitous; astroinformatic techniques and virtual observatory standards and protocols are areas of active development. Astronomers and engineers, planetary and solar scientists, and researchers from communities as diverse as particle physics and exobiology are collaborating on a vast range of "multi-messenger" science. What then is missing?

  19. Digital autonomous terminal access communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novacki, S.

    1987-01-01

    A significant problem for the Bus Monitor Unit is to identify the source of a given transmission. This problem arises from the fact that the label which identifies the source of the transmission as it is put into the bus is intercepted by the Digital Autonomous Terminal Access Communications (DATAC) terminal and removed from the transmission. Thus, a given subsystem will see only data associated with a label and never the identifying label itself. The Bus Monitor must identify the source of the transmission so as to be able to provide some type of error identification/location in the event that some problem with the data transmission occurs. Steps taken to alleviate this problem by modifications to the DATAC terminal are discussed.

  20. Full autonomous microline trace robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Deer; Lu, Si; Yan, Yingbai; Jin, Guofan

    2000-10-01

    Optoelectric inspection may find applications in robotic system. In micro robotic system, smaller optoelectric inspection system is preferred. However, as miniaturizing the size of the robot, the number of the optoelectric detector becomes lack. And lack of the information makes the micro robot difficult to acquire its status. In our lab, a micro line trace robot has been designed, which autonomous acts based on its optoelectric detection. It has been programmed to follow a black line printed on the white colored ground. Besides the optoelectric inspection, logical algorithm in the microprocessor is also important. In this paper, we propose a simply logical algorithm to realize robot's intelligence. The robot's intelligence is based on a AT89C2051 microcontroller which controls its movement. The technical details of the micro robot are as follow: dimension: 30mm*25mm*35*mm; velocity: 60mm/s.

  1. MR volumetry of the trigeminal nerve in patients with unilateral facial pain; MR-Volumetrie des N. trigeminus bei Patienten mit einseitigen Gesichtsschmerzen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kress, B.; Fiebach, J.; Sartor, K.; Stippich, C. [Abt. Neuroradiologie, Neurologische Klinik, Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg (Germany); Rasche, D.; Tronnier, V. [Neurochirurgische Klinik, Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg (Germany)

    2004-05-01

    Purpose: to assess whether MRI can detect atrophy of the trigeminal nerve in patients with trigeminal neuralgia. Materials and methods: a prospective MRI study was conducted in 39 patients (trigeminal neuralgia, trigeminal neuropathy, or atypical facial pain) and 25 volunteers. Using a coronal orientation (T1 flash 3D; T2 CISS 3D), regions of interest were delineated in the cisternal part of the trigeminal nerve along the border of the nerve to calculate the volume of the nerve. The volume of the nerve was compared side-by-side in each patient (t-test, p < 0.05) and the volume difference compared between patients and volunteers. Results: the volume of the compromised trigeminal nerve in patients with trigeminal neuralgia was lower than on the contralateral healthy side, with the difference between healthy and compromised side statistically significant (p < 0.05). In all other patients and in all volunteers, no significant difference was found between the volume of the healthy and compromised nerve. The volume difference between the healthy and compromised side in patients with trigeminal neuralgia was significantly higher (p < 0.05) than in all other patients and volunteers. Conclusion: atrophy of the trigeminal nerve caused by a nerve-vessel conflict can be detected by MRI. Only patients with trigeminal neuralgia show this unilateral atrophy. Therefore, it is possible to demonstrate the result of the nerve-vessel conflict and to determine the consequences of such a conflict. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Die Studie wurde mit der Frage durchgefuehrt, ob die bei Patienten mit Trigeminusneuralgie durch einen Gefaess-Nerven-Konflikt bedingte Atrophie des Nervs magnetresonanztomographisch darstellbar ist. Methodik: 39 Patienten (Trigeminusneuralgie, Trigeminusneuropathie, atypischer Gesichtsschmerz) und 25 Probanden wurden prospektiv magnetresonanztomographisch untersucht. In koronaren T1- und T2-Gradientenechosequenzen wurde der zisternale Abschnitt des N. trigeminus mittels

  2. Na,K-ATPase alpha isoforms at the blood-cerebrospinal fluid-trigeminal nerve and blood-retina interfaces in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakaki, Xianghong; McCleary, Paige; Techy, Matthew; Chiang, Jiarong; Kuo, Linus; Fonteh, Alfred N; Armstrong, Brian; Levy, Dan; Harrington, Michael G

    2013-03-14

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) sodium concentration increases during migraine attacks, and both CSF and vitreous humor sodium increase in the rat migraine model. The Na,K-ATPase is a probable source of these sodium fluxes. Since Na,K-ATPase isoforms have different locations and physiological roles, our objective was to establish which alpha isoforms are present at sites where sodium homeostasis is disrupted. Specific Na,K-ATPase alpha isoforms were identified in rat tissues by immunohistochemistry at the blood-CSF barrier at the choroid plexus, at the blood-CSF-trigeminal barrier at the meninges, at the blood-retina barrier, and at the blood-aqueous barrier at the ciliary body. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), occludin, or von Willibrand factor (vWF) were co-localized with Na,K-ATPase to identify trigeminal nociceptor fibers, tight junctions, and capillary endothelial cells respectively. The Na,K-ATPase alpha-2 isoform is located on capillaries and intensely at nociceptive trigeminal nerve fibers at the meningeal blood-CSF-trigeminal barrier. Alpha-1 and -3 are lightly expressed on the trigeminal nerve fibers but not at capillaries. Alpha-2 is expressed at the blood-retina barriers and, with alpha-1, at the ciliary body blood aqueous barrier. Intense apical membrane alpha-1 was associated with moderate cytoplasmic alpha-2 expression at the choroid plexus blood-CSF barrier. Na,K-ATPase alpha isoforms are present at the meningeal, choroid plexus, and retinal barriers. Alpha-2 predominates at the capillary endothelial cells in the meninges and retinal ganglion cell layer.

  3. Orofacial neuropathic pain induced by oxaliplatin: downregulation of KCNQ2 channels in V2 trigeminal ganglion neurons and treatment by the KCNQ2 channel potentiator retigabine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Jennifer; Erol, Ferhat; Viatchenko-Karpinski, Viacheslav; Kanda, Hirosato; Gu, Jianguo G

    2017-01-01

    Neuropathic pain induced by chemotherapy drugs such as oxaliplatin is a dose-limiting side effect in cancer treatment. The mechanisms underlying chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain are not fully understood. KCNQ2 channels are low-threshold voltage-gated K+ channels that play a role in controlling neuronal excitability. Downregulation of KCNQ2 channels has been proposed to be an underlying mechanism of sensory hypersensitivity that leads to neuropathic pain. However, it is currently unknown whether KCNQ channels may be downregulated by chemotherapy drugs in trigeminal ganglion neurons to contribute to the pathogenesis of chemotherapy-induced orofacial neuropathic pain. In the present study, mechanical sensitivity in orofacial regions is measured using the operant behavioral test in rats treated with oxaliplatin. Operant behaviors in these animals show the gradual development of orofacial neuropathic pain that manifests with orofacial mechanical allodynia. Immunostaining shows strong KCNQ2 immunoreactivity in small-sized V2 trigeminal ganglion neurons in controls, and the numbers of KCNQ2 immunoreactivity positive V2 trigeminal ganglion neurons are significantly reduced in oxaliplatin-treated animals. Immunostaining is also performed in brainstem and shows strong KCNQ2 immunoreactivity at the trigeminal afferent central terminals innervating the caudal spinal trigeminal nucleus (Vc) in controls, but the KCNQ2 immunoreactivity intensity is significantly reduced in oxaliplatin-treated animals. We further show with the operant behavioral test that oxaliplatin-induced orofacial mechanical allodynia can be alleviated by the KCNQ2 potentiator retigabine. Taken together, these findings suggest that KCNQ2 downregulation may be a cause of oxaliplatin-induced orofacial neuropathic pain and KCNQ2 potentiators may be useful for alleviating the neuropathic pain.

  4. Current challenges in autonomous vehicle development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly, J.; Hong, W. S.; Mahoney, R. B., Jr.; Sparrow, D. A.

    2006-05-01

    The field of autonomous vehicles is a rapidly growing one, with significant interest from both government and industry sectors. Autonomous vehicles represent the intersection of artificial intelligence (AI) and robotics, combining decision-making with real-time control. Autonomous vehicles are desired for use in search and rescue, urban reconnaissance, mine detonation, supply convoys, and more. The general adage is to use robots for anything dull, dirty, dangerous or dumb. While a great deal of research has been done on autonomous systems, there are only a handful of fielded examples incorporating machine autonomy beyond the level of teleoperation, especially in outdoor/complex environments. In an attempt to assess and understand the current state of the art in autonomous vehicle development, a few areas where unsolved problems remain became clear. This paper outlines those areas and provides suggestions for the focus of science and technology research. The first step in evaluating the current state of autonomous vehicle development was to develop a definition of autonomy. A number of autonomy level classification systems were reviewed. The resulting working definitions and classification schemes used by the authors are summarized in the opening sections of the paper. The remainder of the report discusses current approaches and challenges in decision-making and real-time control for autonomous vehicles. Suggested research focus areas for near-, mid-, and long-term development are also presented.

  5. PHM Enabled Autonomous Propellant Loading Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Mark; Figueroa, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    The utility of Prognostics and Health Management (PHM) software capability applied to Autonomous Operations (AO) remains an active research area within aerospace applications. The ability to gain insight into which assets and subsystems are functioning properly, along with the derivation of confident predictions concerning future ability, reliability, and availability, are important enablers for making sound mission planning decisions. When coupled with software that fully supports mission planning and execution, an integrated solution can be developed that leverages state assessment and estimation for the purposes of delivering autonomous operations. The authors have been applying this integrated, model-based approach to the autonomous loading of cryogenic spacecraft propellants at Kennedy Space Center.

  6. Autonomic symptoms in idiopathic REM behavior disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferini-Strambi, Luigi; Oertel, Wolfgang; Dauvilliers, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Patients with idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder (iRBD) are at very high risk of developing neurodegenerative synucleinopathies, which are disorders with prominent autonomic dysfunction. Several studies have documented autonomic dysfunction in iRBD, but large-scale assessment of autonomic...... symptoms has never been systematically performed. Patients with polysomnography-confirmed iRBD (318 cases) and controls (137 healthy volunteers and 181 sleep center controls with sleep diagnoses other than RBD) were recruited from 13 neurological centers in 10 countries from 2008 to 2011. A validated scale...

  7. Tics in TACs: A Step into an Avalanche? Systematic Literature Review and Conclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wöber, Christian

    2017-11-01

    Trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs) comprise cluster headache, paroxysmal hemicrania, short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks, and hemicrania continua. In some cases, trigeminal neuralgia (TN, "tic douloureux") or TN-like pain may co-occur with TACs. This article will review the co-occurrence and overlap of TACs and tics in order to contribute to a better understanding of the issue and an improved management of the patients. For performing a systematic literature review Pubmed was searched using a total of ten terms. The articles identified were screened for further articles of relevance. TACs are related to tics in various ways. TN or TN-like paroxysms may co-occur with CH, PH, and HC, labeled as cluster-tic syndrome, PH-tic syndrome, and HC-tic syndrome. Such co-occurrence was not only found in the primary TACs but also in secondary headaches resembling TACs. The initial onset of TAC and tic may be simultaneous or separated by months or years. In acute attacks, tic and TAC may occur concurrently or much more often independently of each other. The term "cluster-tic syndrome" was also used in patients with a single type of pain in a twilight zone between TACs and TN fulfilling none of the relevant diagnostic criteria. Short-lasting neuralgiform headache attacks overlap with TN in terms of clinical features, imaging findings, and therapy. © 2017 American Headache Society.

  8. Autonomic Dysfunction in Patients with Mild to Moderate Alzheimer's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen-Dahm, Christina; Waldemar, Gunhild; Staehelin Jensen, Troels

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Autonomic function has received little attention in Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD pathology has an impact on brain regions which are important for central autonomic control, but it is unclear if AD is associated with disturbance of autonomic function. OBJECTIVE: To investigate autonomic...

  9. Autonomous Operations Design Guidelines for Flight Hardware

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SSC experimentally modified an autonomous operations flexible system suite developed for a ground application for a flight system under development by JSC. The...

  10. Interpersonal communication and issues for autonomous vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Interpersonal roadway communication is a vital component of the transportation system. Road users communicate to coordinate movement and increase roadway safety. Future autonomous vehicle research needs to account for the role of interpersonal roadwa...

  11. Autonomous Task Primitives for Complex Manipulation Operations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of this research effort is to enable robots to autonomously perform the complex manipulation tasks that are necessary to maintain a spacecraft. Robots, like...

  12. Adaptively detecting changes in Autonomic Grid Computing

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xiangliang; Germain, Cé cile; Sebag, Michè le

    2010-01-01

    Detecting the changes is the common issue in many application fields due to the non-stationary distribution of the applicative data, e.g., sensor network signals, web logs and gridrunning logs. Toward Autonomic Grid Computing, adaptively detecting

  13. Autonomous Operations System: Development and Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro Medina, Jaime A.; Wilkins, Kim N.; Walker, Mark; Stahl, Gerald M.

    2016-01-01

    Autonomous control systems provides the ability of self-governance beyond the conventional control system. As the complexity of mechanical and electrical systems increases, there develops a natural drive for developing robust control systems to manage complicated operations. By closing the bridge between conventional automated systems to knowledge based self-awareness systems, nominal control of operations can evolve into relying on safe critical mitigation processes to support any off-nominal behavior. Current research and development efforts lead by the Autonomous Propellant Loading (APL) group at NASA Kennedy Space Center aims to improve cryogenic propellant transfer operations by developing an automated control and health monitoring system. As an integrated systems, the center aims to produce an Autonomous Operations System (AOS) capable of integrating health management operations with automated control to produce a fully autonomous system.

  14. A Primer on Autonomous Aerial Vehicle Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppejans, Hugo H G; Myburgh, Herman C

    2015-12-02

    There is a large amount of research currently being done on autonomous micro-aerial vehicles (MAV), such as quadrotor helicopters or quadcopters. The ability to create a working autonomous MAV depends mainly on integrating a simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) solution with the rest of the system. This paper provides an introduction for creating an autonomous MAV for enclosed environments, aimed at students and professionals alike. The standard autonomous system and MAV automation are discussed, while we focus on the core concepts of SLAM systems and trajectory planning algorithms. The advantages and disadvantages of using remote processing are evaluated, and recommendations are made regarding the viability of on-board processing. Recommendations are made regarding best practices to serve as a guideline for aspirant MAV designers.

  15. Cislunar Autonomous Positioning System (CAPS), Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Recent efforts led by the PI of this proposal have studied the benefits of a satellite navigation technique known as Linked Autonomous Interplanetary Satellite Orbit...

  16. Computer vision for an autonomous mobile robot

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Withey, Daniel J

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Computer vision systems are essential for practical, autonomous, mobile robots – machines that employ artificial intelligence and control their own motion within an environment. As with biological systems, computer vision systems include the vision...

  17. Eye Accommodation, Personality, and Autonomic Balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-11-01

    associated with central nervous system action, "transient catecnolamine ( dopamine and norepinephrine) action followed by a cholinergic rebound together with...parallels of psycnopatny: A psychophysiological model relating autonomic imbalance to hyperactivity, psychopathy, and autism . Advnces in Cild

  18. Data Provisioning Systems for Autonomous Vehicles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Varaiya, Pravin

    1999-01-01

    This project is part of a portfolio comprising four other projects to investigate the possibility of operating a collection of intelligent autonomous agents so that the collection can undertakes complex missions...

  19. A Primer on Autonomous Aerial Vehicle Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo H. G. Coppejans

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a large amount of research currently being done on autonomous micro-aerial vehicles (MAV, such as quadrotor helicopters or quadcopters. The ability to create a working autonomous MAV depends mainly on integrating a simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM solution with the rest of the system. This paper provides an introduction for creating an autonomous MAV for enclosed environments, aimed at students and professionals alike. The standard autonomous system and MAV automation are discussed, while we focus on the core concepts of SLAM systems and trajectory planning algorithms. The advantages and disadvantages of using remote processing are evaluated, and recommendations are made regarding the viability of on-board processing. Recommendations are made regarding best practices to serve as a guideline for aspirant MAV designers.

  20. Layered Safe Motion Planning for Autonomous Vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The major problem addressed by this research is how to plan a safe motion for autonomous vehicles in a two dimensional, rectilinear world. With given start and goal configurations, the planner performs motion planning which

  1. Tracked robot controllers for climbing obstacles autonomously

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Isabelle

    2009-05-01

    Research in mobile robot navigation has demonstrated some success in navigating flat indoor environments while avoiding obstacles. However, the challenge of analyzing complex environments to climb obstacles autonomously has had very little success due to the complexity of the task. Unmanned ground vehicles currently exhibit simple autonomous behaviours compared to the human ability to move in the world. This paper presents the control algorithms designed for a tracked mobile robot to autonomously climb obstacles by varying its tracks configuration. Two control algorithms are proposed to solve the autonomous locomotion problem for climbing obstacles. First, a reactive controller evaluates the appropriate geometric configuration based on terrain and vehicle geometric considerations. Then, a reinforcement learning algorithm finds alternative solutions when the reactive controller gets stuck while climbing an obstacle. The methodology combines reactivity to learning. The controllers have been demonstrated in box and stair climbing simulations. The experiments illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach for crossing obstacles.

  2. Framework for Autonomous Optimization, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Phoenix Integration and MIT propose to create a novel autonomous optimization tool and application programming interface (API). The API will demonstrate the ability...

  3. Advisory and autonomous cooperative driving systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, T.H.A. van den; Ploeg, J.; Netten, B.D.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the traffic efficiency of an advisory cooperative driving system, Advisory Acceleration Control is examined and compared to the efficiency of an autonomous cooperative driving system, Cooperative Adaptive Cruise Control. The algorithms and implementation thereof are explained. The

  4. The Cardiovascular Autonomic Nervous System and Anaesthesia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    QuickSilver

    system that continues to sustain and control our vital organ systems. .... vagal tone and increased sympathetic outflow to the sinus node due to the fall in blood pressure) ... intraoperative autonomic balance of a particular patient population.

  5. Adaptive Sampling in Autonomous Marine Sensor Networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eickstedt, Donald P

    2006-01-01

    ... oceanographic network scenario. This architecture has three major components, an intelligent, logical sensor that provides high-level environmental state information to a behavior-based autonomous vehicle control system, a new...

  6. Future Autonomous and Automated Systems Testbed

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Trust is the greatest obstacle to implementing greater autonomy and automation (A&A) in the human spaceflight program. The Future Autonomous and Automated...

  7. Autonomous Training for Long-Term Spaceflight

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project will develop the autonomous capability to intelligently select/generate practice scenarios in order to provide individually targeted crew training when...

  8. Feasibility of Multiple Repeat Gamma Knife Radiosurgeries for Trigeminal Neuralgia: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Guy C.; Elaimy, Ameer L.; Demakas, John J.; Jiang, Hansi; Lamoreaux, Wayne T.; Fairbanks, Robert K.; Mackay, Alexander R.; Cooke, Barton S.; Lee, Christopher M.

    2011-01-01

    Treatment options for trigeminal neuralgia (TN) must be customized for the individual patient, and physicians must be aware of the medical, surgical, and radiation treatment modalities to prescribe optimal treatment courses for specific patients. The following case illustrates the potential for gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) to be repeated multiple times for the purpose of achieving facial pain control in cases of TN that have been refractory to other medical and surgical options, as well as prior GKRS. The patient described failed to achieve pain control with initial GKRS, as well as medical and surgical treatments, but experienced significant pain relief for a period of time with a second GKRS procedure and later underwent a third procedure. Only a small subset of patients have reportedly undergone more than two GKRS for TN; thus, further research and long-term clinical followup will be valuable in determining its usefulness in specific clinical situations. PMID:21904556

  9. Topical dura mater application of CFA induces enhanced expression of c-fos and glutamate in rat trigeminal nucleus caudalis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukács, M; Warfvinge, K; Tajti, J

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Migraine is a debilitating neurological disorder where trigeminovascular activation plays a key role. We have previously reported that local application of Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) onto the dura mater caused activation in rat trigeminal ganglion (TG) which was abolished......) was achieved by application of CFA onto the dural parietal surface. SZR72 was given intraperitoneally (i.p.), one dose prior CFA deposition and repeatedly daily for 7 days. Immunohistochemical studies were performed for mapping glutamate, c-fos, PACAP, substance P, IL-6, IL-1β and TNFα in the TNC/Sp5 and other...... regions of the brainstem and at the C1-C2 regions of the spinal cord. RESULTS: We found that CFA increased c-fos and glutamate immunoreactivity in TNC and C1-C2 neurons. This effect was mitigated by SZR72. PACAP positive fibers were detected in the fasciculus cuneatus and gracilis. Substance P, TNFα, IL-6...

  10. Improved autonomous star identification algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Li-Yan; Xu Lu-Ping; Zhang Hua; Sun Jing-Rong

    2015-01-01

    The log–polar transform (LPT) is introduced into the star identification because of its rotation invariance. An improved autonomous star identification algorithm is proposed in this paper to avoid the circular shift of the feature vector and to reduce the time consumed in the star identification algorithm using LPT. In the proposed algorithm, the star pattern of the same navigation star remains unchanged when the stellar image is rotated, which makes it able to reduce the star identification time. The logarithmic values of the plane distances between the navigation and its neighbor stars are adopted to structure the feature vector of the navigation star, which enhances the robustness of star identification. In addition, some efforts are made to make it able to find the identification result with fewer comparisons, instead of searching the whole feature database. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can effectively accelerate the star identification. Moreover, the recognition rate and robustness by the proposed algorithm are better than those by the LPT algorithm and the modified grid algorithm. (paper)

  11. Semi-Autonomous Vehicle Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    The primary objective this summer is "evaluating standards for wireless architecture for the internet of things". The Internet of Things is the network of physical objects or "things" embedded with electronics, software, sensors and network connectivity which enables these objects to collect and exchange data and make decisions based on said data. This was accomplished by creating a semi-autonomous vehicle that takes advantage of multiple sensors, cameras, and onboard computers and combined them with a mesh network which enabled communication across large distances with little to no interruption. The mesh network took advantage of what is known as DTN - Disruption Tolerant Networking which according to NASA is the new communications protocol that is "the first step towards interplanetary internet." The use of DTN comes from the fact that it will store information if an interruption in communications is detected and even forward that information via other relays within range so that the data is not lost. This translates well into the project because as the car moves further away from whatever is sending it commands (in this case a joystick), the information can still be forwarded to the car with little to no loss of information thanks to the mesh nodes around the driving area.

  12. Imposing limits on autonomous systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, P A

    2017-02-01

    Our present era is witnessing the genesis of a sea-change in the way that advanced technologies operate. Amongst this burgeoning wave of untrammelled automation there is now beginning to arise a cadre of ever-more independent, autonomous systems. The degree of interaction between these latter systems with any form of human controller is becoming progressively more diminished and remote; and this perhaps necessarily so. Here, I advocate for human-centred and human favouring constraints to be designed, programmed, promulgated and imposed upon these nascent forms of independent entity. I am not sanguine about the collective response of modern society to this call. Nevertheless, the warning must be voiced and the issue debated, especially among those who most look to mediate between people and technology. Practitioner Summary: Practitioners are witnessing the penetration of progressively more independent technical orthotics into virtually all systems' operations. This work enjoins them to advocate for sentient, rational and mindful human-centred approaches towards such innovations. Practitioners need to place user-centred concerns above either the technical or the financial imperatives which motivate this line of progress.

  13. Autonomous intelligent cruise control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baret, Marc; Bomer, Thierry T.; Calesse, C.; Dudych, L.; L'Hoist, P.

    1995-01-01

    Autonomous intelligent cruise control (AICC) systems are not only controlling vehicles' speed but acting on the throttle and eventually on the brakes they could automatically maintain the relative speed and distance between two vehicles in the same lane. And more than just for comfort it appears that these new systems should improve the safety on highways. By applying a technique issued from the space research carried out by MATRA, a sensor based on a charge coupled device (CCD) was designed to acquire the reflected light on standard-mounted car reflectors of pulsed laser diodes emission. The CCD is working in a unique mode called flash during transfer (FDT) which allows identification of target patterns in severe optical environments. It provides high accuracy for distance and angular position of targets. The absence of moving mechanical parts ensures high reliability for this sensor. The large field of view and the high measurement rate give a global situation assessment and a short reaction time. Then, tracking and filtering algorithms have been developed in order to select the target, on which the equipped vehicle determines its safety distance and speed, taking into account its maneuvering and the behaviors of other vehicles.

  14. Models Supporting Trajectory Planning in Autonomous Vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Ward, Erik

    2018-01-01

    Autonomous vehicles have the potential to drastically improve the safety, efficiency and cost of transportation. Instead of a driver, an autonomous vehicle is controlled by an algorithm, offering improved consistency and the potential to eliminate human error from driving: by far the most common cause of accidents. Data collected from different types of sensors, along with prior information such as maps, are used to build models of the surrounding traffic scene, encoding relevant aspects of t...

  15. Autonomous Flight in Unknown Indoor Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Bachrach, Abraham Galton; He, Ruijie; Roy, Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents our solution for enabling a quadrotor helicopter, equipped with a laser rangefinder sensor, to autonomously explore and map unstructured and unknown indoor environments. While these capabilities are already commodities on ground vehicles, air vehicles seeking the same performance face unique challenges. In this paper, we describe the difficulties in achieving fully autonomous helicopter flight, highlighting the differences between ground and helicopter robots that make it ...

  16. Autonomous nutrient detection for water quality monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Maher, Damien; Cleary, John; Cogan, Deirdre; Diamond, Dermot

    2012-01-01

    The ever increasing demand for real time environmental monitoring is currently being driven by strong legislative and societal drivers. Low cost autonomous environmental monitoring systems are required to meet this demand as current monitoring solutions are insufficient. This poster presents an autonomous nutrient analyser platform for water quality monitoring. Results from a field trial of the nutrient analyser are reported along with current work to expand the range of water quality targ...

  17. Effects of Pulsed Versus Conventional Versus Combined Radiofrequency for the Treatment of Trigeminal Neuralgia: A Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elawamy, Abdelraheem; Abdalla, Esam Eldein Mohamed; Shehata, Ghaydaa A

    2017-09-01

    During radiofrequency bursts of energy are applied to nervous tissue. The clinical advantages of this treatment remain unclear. We compared the effectiveness and pain relief for idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia (TN) after continuous radiofrequency (CRF), pulsed radiofrequency (PRF), and combined continuous and pulsed radiofrequency (CCPRF) treatment of the Gasserian ganglion (GG). We conducted a randomized prospective study. Forty-three patients were included. Eleven patients were treated with PRF at 42°C for 10 minutes (PRF group), 12 patients received CRF for 270 seconds at 75 °C (CRF group), and 20 patients received PRF for 10 minutes at 42°C followed by CRF for at 60°C for 270 seconds (CCPRF group). Assuit University Hospital, Pain and Neurology outpatient clinics. Patients were assessed for pain, satisfaction, and consumption of analgesics at baseline and 7 days, one month, 6 months, 12 months, and 24 months after the procedure. The incidence of complications, anesthesia dolorosa, weakness of muscles of mastication, numbness, and technical complications, was evaluated after the procedure. Excellent pain relief was achieved after 6, 12, and 24 months, respectively in 95%, 85%, and 70% of patients with CCPRF; 75%, 75%, and reduced to 50% among patients with CRF; and 82%, reduced to 9.1%, and 0% of patients with PRF. No complications were recorded in 75% of patients in the CCPRF and PRF groups. There was one case of anesthesia dolorosa, 4 cases of masseter muscle weakness, and 5 cases of severe numbness recorded in the CRF group. There was a small number of patients in each group. The best results were observed in the CCPRF group, followed by the CRF group, and then the PRF group.Key words: Pulsed, continuous, radiofrequency, trigeminal neuralgia, Gasserian ganglion.

  18. Involvement of ERK phosphorylation of trigeminal spinal subnucleus caudalis neurons in thermal hypersensitivity in rats with infraorbital nerve injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikuko Suzuki

    Full Text Available To evaluate the involvement of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK cascade in orofacial neuropathic pain mechanisms, this study assessed nocifensive behavior evoked by mechanical or thermal stimulation of the whisker pad skin, phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK in trigeminal spinal subnucleus caudalis (Vc neurons, and Vc neuronal responses to mechanical or thermal stimulation of the whisker pad skin in rats with the chronic constriction nerve injury of the infraorbital nerve (ION-CCI. The mechanical and thermal nocifensive behavior was significantly enhanced on the side ipsilateral to the ION-CCI compared to the contralateral whisker pad or sham rats. ION-CCI rats had an increased number of phosphorylated ERK immunoreactive (pERK-IR cells which also manifested NeuN-IR but not GFAP-IR and Iba1-IR, and were significantly more in ION-CCI rats compared with sham rats following noxious but not non-noxious mechanical stimulation. After intrathecal administration of the MEK1 inhibitor PD98059 in ION-CCI rats, the number of pERK-IR cells after noxious stimulation and the enhanced thermal nocifensive behavior but not the mechanical nocifensive behavior were significantly reduced in ION-CCI rats. The enhanced background activities, afterdischarges and responses of wide dynamic range neurons to noxious mechanical and thermal stimulation in ION-CCI rats were significantly depressed following i.t. administration of PD98059, whereas responses to non-noxious mechanical and thermal stimulation were not altered. The present findings suggest that pERK-IR neurons in the Vc play a pivotal role in the development of thermal hypersensitivity in the face following trigeminal nerve injury.

  19. Communication between corneal epithelial cells and trigeminal neurons is facilitated by purinergic (P2) and glutamatergic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, Duane J; Lee, Albert; Trinidad, Monique; Chi, Cheryl; Ren, Ruiyi; Rich, Celeste B; Trinkaus-Randall, Vickery

    2012-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that nucleotides released upon mechanical injury to corneal epithelium activate purinergic (P2) receptors resulting in mobilization of a Ca(2+) wave. However, the tissue is extensively innervated and communication between epithelium and neurons is critical and not well understood. Therefore, we developed a co-culture of primary trigeminal neurons and human corneal limbal epithelial cells. We demonstrated that trigeminal neurons expressed a repertoire of P2Yand P2X receptor transcripts and responded to P2 agonists in a concentration-dependent manner. Mechanical injuries to epithelia in the co-cultures elicited a Ca(2+) wave that mobilized to neurons and was attenuated by Apyrase, an ectonucleotidase. To elucidate the role of factors released from each cell type, epithelial and neuronal cells were cultured, injured, and the wound media from one cell type was collected and added to the other cell type. Epithelial wound media generated a rapid Ca(2+) mobilization in neuronal cells that was abrogated in the presence of Apyrase, while neuronal wound media elicited a complex response in epithelial cells. The rapid Ca(2+) mobilization was detected, which was abrogated with Apyrase, but it was followed by Ca(2+) waves that occurred in cell clusters. When neuronal wound media was preincubated with a cocktail of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor inhibitors, the secondary response in epithelia was diminished. Glutamate was detected in the neuronal wound media and epithelial expression of NMDA receptor subunit transcripts was demonstrated. Our results indicate that corneal epithelia and neurons communicate via purinergic and NMDA receptors that mediate the wound response in a highly orchestrated manner.

  20. Communication between corneal epithelial cells and trigeminal neurons is facilitated by purinergic (P2 and glutamatergic receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duane J Oswald

    Full Text Available Previously, we demonstrated that nucleotides released upon mechanical injury to corneal epithelium activate purinergic (P2 receptors resulting in mobilization of a Ca(2+ wave. However, the tissue is extensively innervated and communication between epithelium and neurons is critical and not well understood. Therefore, we developed a co-culture of primary trigeminal neurons and human corneal limbal epithelial cells. We demonstrated that trigeminal neurons expressed a repertoire of P2Yand P2X receptor transcripts and responded to P2 agonists in a concentration-dependent manner. Mechanical injuries to epithelia in the co-cultures elicited a Ca(2+ wave that mobilized to neurons and was attenuated by Apyrase, an ectonucleotidase. To elucidate the role of factors released from each cell type, epithelial and neuronal cells were cultured, injured, and the wound media from one cell type was collected and added to the other cell type. Epithelial wound media generated a rapid Ca(2+ mobilization in neuronal cells that was abrogated in the presence of Apyrase, while neuronal wound media elicited a complex response in epithelial cells. The rapid Ca(2+ mobilization was detected, which was abrogated with Apyrase, but it was followed by Ca(2+ waves that occurred in cell clusters. When neuronal wound media was preincubated with a cocktail of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor inhibitors, the secondary response in epithelia was diminished. Glutamate was detected in the neuronal wound media and epithelial expression of NMDA receptor subunit transcripts was demonstrated. Our results indicate that corneal epithelia and neurons communicate via purinergic and NMDA receptors that mediate the wound response in a highly orchestrated manner.

  1. Acid-sensing ion channels in trigeminal ganglion neurons innervating the orofacial region contribute to orofacial inflammatory pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Hui; Fang, Peng; Zhou, Hai-Yun; Zhou, Jun; Yu, Xiao-Wei; Ni, Ming; Zheng, Jie-Yan; Jin, You; Chen, Jian-Guo; Wang, Fang; Hu, Zhuang-Li

    2016-02-01

    Orofacial pain is a common clinical symptom that is accompanied by tooth pain, migraine and gingivitis. Accumulating evidence suggests that acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), especially ASIC3, can profoundly affect the physiological properties of nociception in peripheral sensory neurons. The aim of this study is to examine the contribution of ASICs in trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons to orofacial inflammatory pain. A Western blot (WB), immunofluorescence assay of labelled trigeminal ganglion neurons, orofacial formalin test, cell preparation and electrophysiological experiments are performed. This study demonstrated that ASIC1, ASIC2a and ASIC3 are highly expressed in TG neurons innervating the orofacial region of rats. The amplitude of ASIC currents in these neurons increased 119.72% (for ASIC1-like current) and 230.59% (for ASIC3-like current) in the formalin-induced orofacial inflammatory pain model. In addition, WB and immunofluorescence assay demonstrated a significantly augmented expression of ASICs in orofacial TG neurons during orofacial inflammation compared with the control group. The relative protein density of ASIC1, ASIC2a and ASIC3 also increased 58.82 ± 8.92%, 45.30 ± 11.42% and 55.32 ± 14.71%, respectively, compared with the control group. Furthermore, pharmacological blockade of ASICs and genetic deletion of ASIC1 attenuated the inflammation response. These findings indicate that peripheral inflammation can induce the upregulation of ASICs in TG neurons, causing orofacial inflammatory pain. Additionally, the specific inhibitor of ASICs may have a significant analgesic effect on orofacial inflammatory pain. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  2. Identification of offending vessele in trigeminal neuralgia and hemifacial spasm using SPGR-MRI and 3D-TOF-MRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwa, Yoshikazu; Shiotani, Masahiro; Karasawa, Hidetake; Ohseto, Kiyoshige; Naganuma, Yoshikazu

    1996-01-01

    We investigated 100 consecutive patients with trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and 53 patients with hemifacial spasm (HFS) concerning the anatomical relationship between the root entry (exit) zone (REZ) of cranial nerve and the offending artery, using spoiled GRASS MRI (SPGR-MRI) and three dimensional-time of fly-MRA (MRA). In 67 of 100 (67%) patients with TN, this new radiological method, SPGR-MRI and MRA demonstrated the relationship between the fifth cranial nerve root and offending artery causing neurovascular compression (NVC), and in 46 of 53 (87%) with HFS, demonstrated the similar relationship between seventh and eighth nerve complex and offending artery. Microvascular decompression (MVD) was performed in 10 with HFS, and NVC of the REZ of the facial nerve caused by the offending artery was exactly predicted by SPGR-MRI and MRA in 9 (90%). The combination of SPGR-MRI and MRA is very useful for demonstrating NVC as the cause of TN and HFS. On the other hand, we investigated asymptomatic 206 trigemimal and 253 facial nerves about the relationship between their REZ and the surrounding structures using the similar method. The contact of REZ of cranial nerve with surrounding artery is demonstrated in 31.6% of trigeminal nerves and in 22.5% of facial nerves. These results indicate that the contact of REZ of cranial nerve with surrounding artery is not rare in healthy subjects, though causing TN and HFS in particular patients. In this context, we discussed the difference between the contact which is asymptomatic and the compression which is symptomatic. (author)

  3. Age-dependent trigeminal and female-specific lumbosacral increase in herpes zoster distribution in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraki, Kimiyasu; Toyama, Nozomu; Shiraki, Atsuko; Yajima, Misako

    2018-05-01

    Varicella-zoster virus causes herpes zoster (HZ) along specific dermatomes, but the effects of age and sex on HZ distribution are unclear. We investigated the age- and sex-dependent distribution characteristics of HZ. Patients with HZ were monitored by members of the Miyazaki Dermatologist Society. Questionnaires containing information on age, sex, and dermatome distribution and lesion specimens from 2730 patients were collected, and 2508 PCR-diagnosed cases were analyzed. The ratio of lesions in the thoracic area to lesions in the whole body decreased with age, whereas those of other areas increased. HZ incidence increased with age to about four times that of the basic incidence in the dermatome areas at age 0-29 years; the incidence in the trigeminal area in both sexes increased 11-fold, and the incidence in the thoracic and lumbosacral areas increased in females more than in males. Furthermore, the fact that the highest incidence was found along the first branch of the trigeminal nerve suggests an association with long-term ultraviolet ray exposure. Segmental dermatomes comprising thoracic 10-lumbar 1/sacral 2-4 and thoracic 5-6 were significantly more frequently affected in female patients at age 50-59 years and are consistent with areas of obstetric anesthesia for childbirth and of breastfeeding, respectively. HZ incidence increased with age; moreover, exposure to ultraviolet rays, childbirth, and breastfeeding might increase the incidence at specific dermatomes in older individuals. This study provides important information on the etiology of HZ. Copyright © 2018 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Advancing Autonomous Operations for Deep Space Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddock, Angie T.; Stetson, Howard K.

    2014-01-01

    Starting in Jan 2012, the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Autonomous Mission Operations (AMO) Project began to investigate the ability to create and execute "single button" crew initiated autonomous activities [1]. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) designed and built a fluid transfer hardware test-bed to use as a sub-system target for the investigations of intelligent procedures that would command and control a fluid transfer test-bed, would perform self-monitoring during fluid transfers, detect anomalies and faults, isolate the fault and recover the procedures function that was being executed, all without operator intervention. In addition to the development of intelligent procedures, the team is also exploring various methods for autonomous activity execution where a planned timeline of activities are executed autonomously and also the initial analysis of crew procedure development. This paper will detail the development of intelligent procedures for the NASA MSFC Autonomous Fluid Transfer System (AFTS) as well as the autonomous plan execution capabilities being investigated. Manned deep space missions, with extreme communication delays with Earth based assets, presents significant challenges for what the on-board procedure content will encompass as well as the planned execution of the procedures.

  5. The Human Element and Autonomous Ships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sauli Ahvenjärvi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The autonomous ship technology has become a “hot” topic in the discussion about more efficient, environmentally friendly and safer sea transportation solutions. The time is becoming mature for the introduction of commercially sensible solutions for unmanned and fully autonomous cargo and passenger ships. Safety will be the most interesting and important aspect in this development. The utilization of the autonomous ship technology will have many effects on the safety, both positive and negative. It has been announced that the goal is to make the safety of an unmanned ship better that the safety of a manned ship. However, it must be understood that the human element will still be present when fully unmanned ships are being used. The shore-based control of a ship contains new safety aspects and an interesting question will be the interaction of manned and unmanned ships in the same traffic area. The autonomous ship technology should therefore be taken into account on the training of seafarers. Also it should not be forgotten that every single control algorithm and rule of the internal decision making logic of the autonomously navigating ship has been designed and coded by a human software engineer. Thus the human element is present also in this point of the lifetime navigation system of the autonomous ship.

  6. Autonomous power networks based power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jokic, A.; Van den Bosch, P.P.J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presented the concept of autonomous networks to cope with this increased complexity in power systems while enhancing market-based operation. The operation of future power systems will be more challenging and demanding than present systems because of increased uncertainties, less inertia in the system, replacement of centralized coordinating activities by decentralized parties and the reliance on dynamic markets for both power balancing and system reliability. An autonomous network includes the aggregation of networked producers and consumers in a relatively small area with respect to the overall system. The operation of an autonomous network is coordinated and controlled with one central unit acting as an interface between internal producers/consumers and the rest of the power system. In this study, the power balance problem and system reliability through provision of ancillary services was formulated as an optimization problem for the overall autonomous networks based power system. This paper described the simulation of an optimal autonomous network dispatching in day ahead markets, based on predicted spot prices for real power, and two ancillary services. It was concluded that large changes occur in a power systems structure and operation, most of them adding to the uncertainty and complexity of the system. The introduced concept of an autonomous power network-based power system was shown to be a realistic and consistent approach to formulate and operate a market-based dispatch of both power and ancillary services. 9 refs., 4 figs

  7. Autonomous renewable energy conversion system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valtchev, V. [Technical University of Varna (Bulgaria). Dept. of Electronics; Bossche, A. van den; Ghijselen, J.; Melkebeek, J. [University of Gent (Belgium). Dept. of Electrical Power Engineering

    2000-02-01

    This paper briefly reviews the need for renewable power generation and describes a medium-power Autonomous Renewable Energy Conversion System (ARECS), integrating conversion of wind and solar energy sources. The objectives of the paper are to extract maximum power from the proposed wind energy conversion scheme and to transfer this power and the power derived by the photovoltaic system in a high efficiency way to a local isolated load. The wind energy conversion operates at variable shaft speed yielding an improved annual energy production over constant speed systems. An induction generator (IG) has been used because of its reduced cost, robustness, absence of separate DC source for excitation, easier dismounting and maintenance. The maximum energy transfer of the wind energy is assured by a simple and reliable control strategy adjusting the stator frequency of the IG so that the power drawn is equal to the peak power production of the wind turbine at any wind speed. The presented control strategy also provides an optimal efficiency operation of the IG by applying a quadratic dependence between the IG terminal voltage and frequency V {approx} f{sup 2}. For improving the total system efficiency, high efficiency converters have been designed and implemented. The modular principle of the proposed DC/DC conversion provides the possibility for modifying the system structure depending on different conditions. The configuration of the presented ARECS and the implementation of the proposed control algorithm for optimal power transfer are fully discussed. The stability and dynamic performance as well as the different operation modes of the proposed control and the operation of the converters are illustrated and verified on an experimental prototype. (author)

  8. Lateral medullary infarction with cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction: an unusual presentation with review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Tridu R; Decker, Barbara; Fries, Timothy J; Tunguturi, Ajay

    2018-01-24

    We report an unusual case of lateral medullary infarction presenting with orthostatic hypotension with pre-syncope without vertigo or Horner's syndrome. Case report with review of the literature. A 67-year-old man presented with pre-syncope and ataxia without vertigo. Initial brain CT and MRI were normal. Neurological evaluation revealed right-beating nystagmus with left gaze, vertical binocular diplopia, right upper-extremity dysmetria, truncal ataxia with right axial lateropulsion, and right-facial and lower extremity hypoesthesia. Bedside blood pressure measurements disclosed orthostatic hypotension. He had normal sinus rhythm on telemetry and normal ejection fraction on echocardiogram. A repeat brain MRI disclosed an acute right dorsolateral medullary infarct. Autonomic testing showed reduced heart rate variability during paced deep breathing, attenuated late phase II and phase IV overshoot on Valsalva maneuver, and a fall of 25 mmHg of blood pressure at the end of a 10-min head-up tilt with no significant change in heart rate. These results were consistent with impaired sympathetic and parasympathetic cardiovascular reflexes. He was discharged to acute rehabilitation a week later with residual right dysmetria and ataxia. Lateral medullary infarctions are usually reported as partial presentations of classical lateral medullary syndrome with accompanying unusual symptoms ranging from trigeminal neuralgias to hiccups. Pre-syncope from orthostatic hypotension is a rare presentation. In the first 3-4 days, absence of early DWI MRI findings is possible in small, dorsolateral medullary infarcts with sensory disturbances. Physicians should be aware of this presentation, as early diagnosis and optimal therapy are associated with good prognosis.

  9. Influence of nerve growth factor on developing dorso-medial and ventro-lateral neurons of chick and mouse trigeminal ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, A; Lumsden, A

    1983-01-01

    Trigeminal ganglia have been removed from five, six, seven and eight day chick embryos and explants of the dorso-medial (DM) and ventro-lateral (VL) parts of the maxillomandibular lobe were grown in tissue culture. Quantitative methods were used to assess the influence of nerve growth factor (NGF) on fiber outgrowth from these explants. At all ages outgrowth from DM explants was significantly greater than from VL explants, the difference being most pronounced between the extreme DM and VL poles of the maxillomandibular lobe. These observations are interpreted as indicating the existence of two distinct populations of neurons in terms of their response to NGF rather than the consequence of the asynchronous differentiation and maturation of the VL and DM neurons. A similar study of 10, 11 and 12 day embryonic mouse trigeminal ganglia revealed no significant difference in neurite outgrowth between DM and VL regions grown in the presence or absence of NGF. Copyright © 1983. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. CILOSTAZOL INDUCES C-FOS EXPRESSION IN THE TRIGEMINAL NUCLEUS CAUDALIS AND BEHAVIOURAL CHANGES SUGGESTIVE OF HEADACHE WITH MIGRAINE-LIKE MANIFESTATIONS IN RATS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, S. L. T.; Petersen, S.; Sorensen, D. B.

    2016-01-01

    in rats. Also, we tested the response to sumatriptan in order to evaluate the predictive properties of the model. Methods: The effect of cilostazol (125 mg/kg p.o.) was evaluated on a range of spontaneous behavioural parameters, light sensitivity and mechanical sensitivity thresholds. To assess headache...... specificity we evaluated the c-fos expression in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis. All experiments were done in female Sprague Dawley rats and the oestrous cycle was included in the analyses. Results: We found that cilostazol increased the light sensitivity and grooming behaviour of the rats and decreased......: The altered behaviours are suggestive of headache with migraine features, but not specific. The c-fos response in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis implies that the rats had pain originating from the head. The lack of response to sumatriptan disqualifies the model as predictive, but confirms the translation...

  11. Patients With Fibromyalgia Have Significant Autonomic Symptoms But Modest Autonomic Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Ann; Whipple, Mary O; Low, Phillip A; Joyner, Michael; Hoskin, Tanya L

    2016-05-01

    Research suggests that disordered autonomic function may be one contributor to deconditioning reported in fibromyalgia; however, no study to date has assessed these variables simultaneously with comprehensive measures. To characterize physical fitness and autonomic function with the use of clinically validated measures and subjective questionnaires between patients with fibromyalgia and healthy controls. Cross-sectional, observational, controlled study. Community sample of patients with fibromyalgia and healthy controls. Thirty patients with fibromyalgia and 30 pain and fatigue-free controls. Participants completed a battery of self-report questionnaires and physiological measures, including clinically validated measures of physical fitness and autonomic function. Six-Minute Walk Test total distance, maximal oxygen consumption as assessed by cardiopulmonary exercise testing, total steps using activity monitor, Composite Autonomic Scoring Scale as assessed by Autonomic Reflex Screen, total metabolic equivalents per week using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire, and self-reported autonomic symptoms via the 31-item Composite Autonomic Symptom Score questionnaire. Autonomic function, as assessed by self-report, was significantly different between patients and controls (P physical activity was not significantly different between patients and controls (P = .99), but levels of moderate and vigorous physical activity as measured by actigraphy were significantly lower in patients (P = .012 and P = .047, respectively). Exercise capacity (6-Minute Walk) was poorer in patients (P = .0006), but there was no significant difference in maximal volume of oxygen consumption (P = .07). Patients with fibromyalgia report more severe symptoms across all domains, including physical activity and autonomic symptoms, compared with controls, but the objective assessments only showed modest differences. Our results suggest that patients with widespread subjective impairment of

  12. Comparison of the effects of atropine and labetalol on trigeminocardiac reflex-induced hemodynamic alterations during percutaneous microballoon compression of the trigeminal ganglion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Yu; Luo, Chiao-Fen; Hsu, Yi-Chun; Chen, Jyi-Feng; Day, Yuan-Ji

    2012-12-01

    A significant abrupt drop in heart rate is the most frequent complication during percutaneous microballoon compression of the trigeminal ganglion. It is suggested that co-activation of the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems plays an important role in this occurrence. We hypothesized that not only atropine, but also labetalol might be effective in preventing this cardiovascular reflex during percutaneous microballoon compression of the trigeminal ganglion. Patients who underwent percutaneous microballoon compression for trigeminal neuralgia between September 2007 and December 2009 were prospectively evaluated. The relationship between the hemodynamic changes and intraoperative use of atropine (0.01 mg/kg) or labetalol (0.05 mg/kg) was compared. One-way analysis of variance with Bartlett's and Tukey's post-tests was used, and a value of p compression for trigeminal neuralgia were studied, of whom 38 received atropine before ganglion compression, 36 received labetalol, and 45 received normal saline as a control. Of the patients who received normal saline, 31.3% had moderate bradycardia (heart rate compression. Of the patients who received labetalol, 16.7% had moderate bradycardia, 5.6% had severe bradycardia, and 2.8% had arrhythmia. Systemic blood pressure was markedly elevated straight after compression in all groups and tended to normalize 3 minutes afterwards. Both atropine and labetalol were able to lower the frequency of bradycardia. Neither of them could abolish episodes of bradycardia during the procedure. Patients receiving labetalol before microballoon compression were subject to a smaller change in hemodynamics. Our findings verified that the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems may be involved in the complex interneuronal interaction of the trigeminocardiac reflex. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Topical dura mater application of CFA induces enhanced expression of c-fos and glutamate in rat trigeminal nucleus caudalis: attenuated by KYNA derivate (SZR72).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukács, M; Warfvinge, K; Tajti, J; Fülöp, F; Toldi, J; Vécsei, L; Edvinsson, L

    2017-12-01

    Migraine is a debilitating neurological disorder where trigeminovascular activation plays a key role. We have previously reported that local application of Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) onto the dura mater caused activation in rat trigeminal ganglion (TG) which was abolished by a systemic administration of kynurenic acid (KYNA) derivate (SZR72). Here, we hypothesize that this activation may extend to the trigeminal complex in the brainstem and is attenuated by treatment with SZR72. Activation in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC) and the trigeminal tract (Sp5) was achieved by application of CFA onto the dural parietal surface. SZR72 was given intraperitoneally (i.p.), one dose prior CFA deposition and repeatedly daily for 7 days. Immunohistochemical studies were performed for mapping glutamate, c-fos, PACAP, substance P, IL-6, IL-1β and TNFα in the TNC/Sp5 and other regions of the brainstem and at the C 1 -C 2 regions of the spinal cord. We found that CFA increased c-fos and glutamate immunoreactivity in TNC and C 1 -C 2 neurons. This effect was mitigated by SZR72. PACAP positive fibers were detected in the fasciculus cuneatus and gracilis. Substance P, TNFα, IL-6 and IL-1β immunopositivity were detected in fibers of Sp5 and neither of these molecules showed any change in immunoreactivity following CFA administration. This is the first study demonstrating that dural application of CFA increases the expression of c-fos and glutamate in TNC neurons. Treatment with the KYNA analogue prevented this expression.

  14. Autonomous Vehicles: Disengagements, Accidents and Reaction Times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Vinayak V; Chand, Sai; Nair, Divya J

    2016-01-01

    Autonomous vehicles are being viewed with scepticism in their ability to improve safety and the driving experience. A critical issue with automated driving at this stage of its development is that it is not yet reliable and safe. When automated driving fails, or is limited, the autonomous mode disengages and the drivers are expected to resume manual driving. For this transition to occur safely, it is imperative that drivers react in an appropriate and timely manner. Recent data released from the California trials provide compelling insights into the current factors influencing disengagements of autonomous mode. Here we show that the number of accidents observed has a significantly high correlation with the autonomous miles travelled. The reaction times to take control of the vehicle in the event of a disengagement was found to have a stable distribution across different companies at 0.83 seconds on average. However, there were differences observed in reaction times based on the type of disengagements, type of roadway and autonomous miles travelled. Lack of trust caused by the exposure to automated disengagements was found to increase the likelihood to take control of the vehicle manually. Further, with increased vehicle miles travelled the reaction times were found to increase, which suggests an increased level of trust with more vehicle miles travelled. We believe that this research would provide insurers, planners, traffic management officials and engineers fundamental insights into trust and reaction times that would help them design and engineer their systems.

  15. Autonomous Vehicles: Disengagements, Accidents and Reaction Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Vinayak V.; Chand, Sai; Nair, Divya J.

    2016-01-01

    Autonomous vehicles are being viewed with scepticism in their ability to improve safety and the driving experience. A critical issue with automated driving at this stage of its development is that it is not yet reliable and safe. When automated driving fails, or is limited, the autonomous mode disengages and the drivers are expected to resume manual driving. For this transition to occur safely, it is imperative that drivers react in an appropriate and timely manner. Recent data released from the California trials provide compelling insights into the current factors influencing disengagements of autonomous mode. Here we show that the number of accidents observed has a significantly high correlation with the autonomous miles travelled. The reaction times to take control of the vehicle in the event of a disengagement was found to have a stable distribution across different companies at 0.83 seconds on average. However, there were differences observed in reaction times based on the type of disengagements, type of roadway and autonomous miles travelled. Lack of trust caused by the exposure to automated disengagements was found to increase the likelihood to take control of the vehicle manually. Further, with increased vehicle miles travelled the reaction times were found to increase, which suggests an increased level of trust with more vehicle miles travelled. We believe that this research would provide insurers, planners, traffic management officials and engineers fundamental insights into trust and reaction times that would help them design and engineer their systems. PMID:27997566

  16. Autonomous Vehicles: Disengagements, Accidents and Reaction Times.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinayak V Dixit

    Full Text Available Autonomous vehicles are being viewed with scepticism in their ability to improve safety and the driving experience. A critical issue with automated driving at this stage of its development is that it is not yet reliable and safe. When automated driving fails, or is limited, the autonomous mode disengages and the drivers are expected to resume manual driving. For this transition to occur safely, it is imperative that drivers react in an appropriate and timely manner. Recent data released from the California trials provide compelling insights into the current factors influencing disengagements of autonomous mode. Here we show that the number of accidents observed has a significantly high correlation with the autonomous miles travelled. The reaction times to take control of the vehicle in the event of a disengagement was found to have a stable distribution across different companies at 0.83 seconds on average. However, there were differences observed in reaction times based on the type of disengagements, type of roadway and autonomous miles travelled. Lack of trust caused by the exposure to automated disengagements was found to increase the likelihood to take control of the vehicle manually. Further, with increased vehicle miles travelled the reaction times were found to increase, which suggests an increased level of trust with more vehicle miles travelled. We believe that this research would provide insurers, planners, traffic management officials and engineers fundamental insights into trust and reaction times that would help them design and engineer their systems.

  17. Preoperative assessment of trigeminal neuralgia and hemifacial spasm using constructive interference in steady state-three-dimensional fourier transformation magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamakami, Iwao; Kobayashi, Eiichi; Hirai, Shinji; Yamaura, Akira [Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-11-01

    Results of microvascular decompression (MVD) for trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and hemifacial spasm (HFS) may be improved by accurate preoperative assessment of neurovascular relationships at the root entry/exit zone (REZ). Constructive interference in steady state (CISS)-three-dimensional Fourier transformation (3DFT) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was evaluated for visualizing the neurovascular relationships at the REZ. Fourteen patients with TN and eight patients with HFS underwent MR imaging using CISS-3DFT and 3D fast inflow with steady-state precession (FISP) sequences. Axial images of the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) obtained by the two sequences were reviewed to assess the neurovascular relationships at the REZ of the trigeminal and facial nerves. Eleven patients subsequently underwent MVD. Preoperative MR imaging findings were related to surgical observations and results. CISS MR imaging provided excellent contrast between the cranial nerves, small vessels, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the CPA. CISS was significantly better than FISP for delineating anatomic detail in the CPA (trigeminal and facial nerves, petrosal vein) and abnormal neurovascular relationships responsible for TN and HFS (vascular contact and deformity at the REZ). Preoperative CISS MR imaging demonstrated precisely the neurovascular relationships at the REZ and identified the offending artery in all seven patients with TN undergoing MVD. CISS MR imaging has high resolution and excellent contrast between cranial nerves, small vessels, and CSF, so can precisely and accurately delineate normal and abnormal neurovascular relationships at the REZ in the CPA, and is a valuable preoperative examination for MVD. (author)

  18. Preoperative evaluation of neurovascular relationship by using contrast-enhanced and unenhanced 3D time-of-flight MR angiography in patients with trigeminal neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, Zhou; Zhiling, Liu; Chuanfu, Li; Qingshi Zeng; Chuncheng, Qu; Shilei, Ni

    2011-01-01

    Background Microvascular decompression is an etiological strategy for the therapy of trigeminal neuralgia (TN). Preoperative identification of neurovascular compression, therefore, could have an impact on the determination of appropriate treatment for TN. Purpose To evaluate the value of contrast-enhanced and unenhanced three-dimensional (3D) time-of-flight (TOF) MR angiography in the visualization of neurovascular relationship in patients with TN. Material and Methods Thirty-seven patients with unilateral TN underwent unenhanced and contrast-enhanced 3D TOF MR angiography with a 3.0-T MR system. Images were reviewed by a radiologist blinded to clinical details. Vascular contact with the trigeminal nerve was identified, and the nature of the involved vessels (artery or vein) was determined. All patients underwent microvascular decompression. Results In 37 patients with TN, contrast-enhanced 3D TOF MR angiography identified surgically verified neurovascular contact in 35 of 36 symptomatic nerves, and there was no false-positive. Based on surgical findings, the sensitivity of MR imaging was 97.2% and specificity 100%. The nature of the offending vessel was correctly identified in 94.4% of the patients by using the combination of contrast-enhanced and unenhanced MR angiography. Conclusion Contrast-enhanced 3D TOF MR angiography is useful in the detection of vascular contact with the trigeminal nerve in patients with TN, and this MR imaging in combination with unenhanced MR angiography could help in the identification of the nature of the responsible vessels

  19. Preoperative assessment of trigeminal neuralgia and hemifacial spasm using constructive interference in steady state-three-dimensional fourier transformation magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamakami, Iwao; Kobayashi, Eiichi; Hirai, Shinji; Yamaura, Akira

    2000-01-01

    Results of microvascular decompression (MVD) for trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and hemifacial spasm (HFS) may be improved by accurate preoperative assessment of neurovascular relationships at the root entry/exit zone (REZ). Constructive interference in steady state (CISS)-three-dimensional Fourier transformation (3DFT) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was evaluated for visualizing the neurovascular relationships at the REZ. Fourteen patients with TN and eight patients with HFS underwent MR imaging using CISS-3DFT and 3D fast inflow with steady-state precession (FISP) sequences. Axial images of the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) obtained by the two sequences were reviewed to assess the neurovascular relationships at the REZ of the trigeminal and facial nerves. Eleven patients subsequently underwent MVD. Preoperative MR imaging findings were related to surgical observations and results. CISS MR imaging provided excellent contrast between the cranial nerves, small vessels, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the CPA. CISS was significantly better than FISP for delineating anatomic detail in the CPA (trigeminal and facial nerves, petrosal vein) and abnormal neurovascular relationships responsible for TN and HFS (vascular contact and deformity at the REZ). Preoperative CISS MR imaging demonstrated precisely the neurovascular relationships at the REZ and identified the offending artery in all seven patients with TN undergoing MVD. CISS MR imaging has high resolution and excellent contrast between cranial nerves, small vessels, and CSF, so can precisely and accurately delineate normal and abnormal neurovascular relationships at the REZ in the CPA, and is a valuable preoperative examination for MVD. (author)

  20. Autonomous calibration of single spin qubit operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Florian; Unden, Thomas; Zoller, Jonathan; Said, Ressa S.; Calarco, Tommaso; Montangero, Simone; Naydenov, Boris; Jelezko, Fedor

    2017-12-01

    Fully autonomous precise control of qubits is crucial for quantum information processing, quantum communication, and quantum sensing applications. It requires minimal human intervention on the ability to model, to predict, and to anticipate the quantum dynamics, as well as to precisely control and calibrate single qubit operations. Here, we demonstrate single qubit autonomous calibrations via closed-loop optimisations of electron spin quantum operations in diamond. The operations are examined by quantum state and process tomographic measurements at room temperature, and their performances against systematic errors are iteratively rectified by an optimal pulse engineering algorithm. We achieve an autonomous calibrated fidelity up to 1.00 on a time scale of minutes for a spin population inversion and up to 0.98 on a time scale of hours for a single qubit π/2 -rotation within the experimental error of 2%. These results manifest a full potential for versatile quantum technologies.