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Sample records for trial comparing daptomycin

  1. Daptomycin versus linezolid for the treatment of vancomycin-resistant enterococcal bacteraemia: implications of daptomycin dose.

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    Chuang, Y-C; Lin, H-Y; Chen, P-Y; Lin, C-Y; Wang, J-T; Chang, S-C

    2016-10-01

    Treatment options for vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) bloodstream infection are limited. Studies comparing daptomycin or linezolid in treating VRE bloodstream infection have conflicting results and suggest daptomycin underdosing. The responses to different daptomycin doses have not been studied. We conducted a multicentre prospective cohort study to compare linezolid and daptomycin (≥6 mg/kg) for the treatment of VRE bloodstream infection. The primary outcome was 14-day mortality. We used multivariate logistic regression analysis for outcome analysis and a generalized additive model for dose-dependent response estimation. Two hundred twelve patients were included (daptomycin, n = 141; linezolid, n = 71). All-cause 14-day mortality was higher in the daptomycin group (36.9% vs. 21.1%; p 0.03). After adjusting for confounders in logistic regression, mortality was lower in the linezolid group (adjusted odds ratio (aOR), 0.45; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.21-0.96; p 0.04). The generalized additive model showed that higher-dose daptomycin (≥9 mg/kg) was associated with better survival than lower-dose daptomycin (6-9 mg/kg). Logistic regression showed that linezolid (aOR, 0.36; 95% CI, 0.17-0.79; p 0.01) and higher-dose daptomycin (aOR, 0.26; 95% CI, 0.09-0.74; p 0.01) independently predicted lower mortality compared to lower-dose daptomycin. Linezolid was not superior to higher-dose daptomycin in terms of mortality (aOR, 1.40; 95% CI, 0.45-4.37; p 0.57). Higher-dose daptomycin had lower mortality than lower-dose daptomycin. Despite higher mortality for lower-dose daptomycin than linezolid, linezolid conferred no survival benefit compared to higher-dose daptomycin. Our findings suggest that the recommended daptomycin dose is suboptimal for treating VRE bacteraemia. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Comparative Effectiveness of Vancomycin Versus Daptomycin for MRSA Bacteremia With Vancomycin MIC >1 mg/L: A Multicenter Evaluation.

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    Moise, Pamela A; Culshaw, Darren L; Wong-Beringer, Annie; Bensman, Joyce; Lamp, Kenneth C; Smith, Winter J; Bauer, Karri; Goff, Debra A; Adamson, Robert; Leuthner, Kimberly; Virata, Michael D; McKinnell, James A; Chaudhry, Saira B; Eskandarian, Romic; Lodise, Thomas; Reyes, Katherine; Zervos, Marcus J

    2016-01-01

    Clinical studies comparing vancomycin with alternative therapy for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia are limited. The objective of this study was to compare outcomes of early daptomycin versus vancomycin treatment for MRSA bacteremia with high vancomycin MICs in a geographically diverse multicenter evaluation. This nationwide, retrospective, multicenter (N = 11), matched, cohort study compared outcomes of early daptomycin with vancomycin for MRSA bloodstream infection (BSI) with vancomycin MICs 1.5 to 2 µg/mL. Matching variables, based on propensity regression analysis, included age, intensive care unit (ICU), and type of BSI. Outcomes were as follows: (1) composite failure (60-day all-cause mortality, 7-day clinical or microbiologic failure, 30-day BSI relapse, or end-of-treatment failure (EOT; discontinue/change daptomycin or vancomycin because of treatment failure or adverse event]); (2) nephrotoxicity; and (2) day 4 BSI clearance. A total of 170 patients were included. The median (interquartile range) age was 60 years (50-74); the median (range) Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score was 15 (10-18); 31% were in an ICU; and 92% had an infectious disease consultation. BSI types included endocarditis/endovascular (39%), extravascular (55%), and central catheter (6%). The median daptomycin dose was 6 mg/kg, and the vancomycin trough level was 17 mg/L. Overall composite failure was 35% (59 of 170): 15% due to 60-day all-cause mortality, 14% for lack of clinical or microbiologic response by 7 days, and 17% due to failure at end of therapy (discontinue/change because of treatment failure or adverse event). Predictors of composite failure according to multivariate analysis were age >60 years (odds ratio, 3.7; P day 4 bacteremia clearance rates for immunocompromised patients (n = 26) (94% vs 56% for daptomycin vs vancomycin; P = 0.035). Results from this multicenter study provide, for the first time, a geographically diverse

  3. Daptomycin: a novel lipopeptide antibiotic against Gram-positive pathogens

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    Andres Beiras-Fernandez

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Andres Beiras-Fernandez1,*, Ferdinand Vogt1,*, Ralf Sodian1, Florian Weis21Department of Cardiac Surgery, University Hospital Großhadern, Ludwig-Maximilian-University, Munich, Germany; 2Department of Anesthesiology, University Hospital Großhadern, Ludwig-Maximilian-University, Munich, Germany *Andres Beiras-Fernandez and Ferdinand Vogt contributed equally to this paperAbstract: The aim of this review is to summarize the historical background of drug resistance of Gram-positive pathogens as well as to describe in detail the novel lipopeptide antibiotic daptomycin. Pharmacological and pharmacokinetic aspects are reviewed and the current clinical use of daptomycin is presented. Daptomycin seems to be a reliable drug in the treatment of complicated skin and skin structure infections, infective right-sided endocarditis, and bacteremia caused by Gram-positive agents. Its unique mechanism of action and its low resistance profile, together with its rapid bactericidal action make it a favorable alternative to vancomycin in multi-drug resistant cocci. The role of daptomycin in the treatment of prosthetic material infections, osteomyelitis, and urogenital infections needs to be evaluated in randomized clinical trials.Keywords: daptomycin, multi-drug resistance, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, pneumonia, urinary tract infection, left-sided endocarditis

  4. Clinical outcomes with daptomycin: a post-marketing, real-world evaluation.

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    Sakoulas, G

    2009-12-01

    The Cubicin Outcomes Registry and Experience (CORE) is an ongoing, retrospective, post-marketing database of daptomycin use in the USA. Although non-comparative, CORE offers insight into real-life clinical experience with daptomycin in various Gram-positive infections and specific patient types. Analyses of daptomycin treatment outcomes using the CORE database revealed that treatment with daptomycin has resulted in high rates of clinical success for a variety of Gram-positive infections, including indicated infections such as complicated skin and soft tissue infections, Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia and right-sided infective endocarditis, and non-indicated infections such as osteomyelitis. Treatment outcomes did not differ significantly according to the causative pathogen for any of the analyses performed and were not influenced by the vancomycin MIC. Patients frequently received therapy with alternative antibiotics prior to treatment with daptomycin, particularly those patients with more serious infections. However, similar treatment outcomes were observed when daptomycin was used as first-line therapy or as salvage therapy, demonstrating the effectiveness of daptomycin in the treatment of these patients.

  5. Daptomycin approved in Japan for the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

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    Mori T

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Mao Hagihara1, Takumi Umemura1, Takeshi Mori1,2, Hiroshige Mikamo11Department of Infection Control and Prevention, Aichi Medical University School of Medicine, Nagakute, Aichi, Japan; 2Division of Pharmaceutical Science, Faculty of Pharmacy, Meijo University, Nagoya, Aichi, JapanAbstract: Daptomycin is a lipoglycopeptide antibacterial drug that is rapidly bactericidal for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA infection and has antibiotic activity against a wide range of Gram-positive organisms. It has been approved by the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare in Japan for the treatment for bacteremia, right-sided endocarditis, and skin and skin-structure infections, such as necrotizing fasciitis, due to MRSA on the basis of a Phase III trial conducted in Japan since July, 2011. In Japanese Phase I and III trials, daptomycin therapy given at 4 mg/kg and 6 mg/kg once per day was well tolerated and effective as standard therapy for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infections and bacteremia caused by MRSA, but side effects remain to be evaluated in large-scale trials.Keywords: daptomycin, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, Japan

  6. Impact of High-Level Daptomycin Resistance in the Streptococcus mitis Group on Virulence and Survivability during Daptomycin Treatment in Experimental Infective Endocarditis

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    Garcia-de-la-Maria, C.; Xiong, Y. Q.; Pericas, J. M.; Armero, Y.; Moreno, A.; Mishra, N. N.; Rybak, M. J.; Tran, T. T.; Arias, C. A.; Sullam, P. M.; Bayer, A. S.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Among the viridans group streptococci, the Streptococcus mitis group is the most common cause of infective endocarditis. These bacteria have a propensity to be β-lactam resistant, as well as to rapidly develop high-level and durable resistance to daptomycin (DAP). We compared a parental, daptomycin-susceptible (DAPs) S. mitis/S. oralis strain and its daptomycin-resistant (DAPr) variant in a model of experimental endocarditis in terms of (i) their relative fitness in multiple target organs in this model (vegetations, kidneys, spleen) when animals were challenged individually and in a coinfection strategy and (ii) their survivability during therapy with daptomycin-gentamicin (an in vitro combination synergistic against the parental strain). The DAPr variant was initially isolated from the cardiac vegetations of animals with experimental endocarditis caused by the parental DAPs strain following treatment with daptomycin. The parental strain and the DAPr variant were comparably virulent when animals were individually challenged. In contrast, in the coinfection model without daptomycin therapy, at both the 106- and 107-CFU/ml challenge inocula, the parental strain outcompeted the DAPr variant in all target organs, especially the kidneys and spleen. When the animals in the coinfection model of endocarditis were treated with DAP-gentamicin, the DAPs strain was completely eliminated, while the DAPr variant persisted in all target tissues. These data underscore that the acquisition of DAPr in S. mitis/S. oralis does come at an intrinsic fitness cost, although this resistance phenotype is completely protective against therapy with a potentially synergistic DAP regimen. PMID:28264848

  7. An open-label, pragmatic, randomized controlled clinical trial to evaluate the comparative effectiveness of daptomycin versus vancomycin for the treatment of complicated skin and skin structure infection.

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    Kauf, Teresa L; McKinnon, Peggy; Corey, G Ralph; Bedolla, John; Riska, Paul F; Sims, Matthew; Jauregui-Peredo, Luis; Friedman, Bruce; Hoehns, James D; Mercier, Renée-Claude; Garcia-Diaz, Julia; Brenneman, Susan K; Ng, David; Lodise, Thomas

    2015-11-07

    Treatment of complicated skin and skin structure infection (cSSSI) places a tremendous burden on the health care system. Understanding relative resource utilization associated with different antimicrobials is important for decision making by patients, health care providers, and payers. The authors conducted an open-label, pragmatic, randomized (1:1) clinical study (N = 250) to compare the effectiveness of daptomycin with that of vancomycin for treatment of patients hospitalized with cSSSI caused by suspected or documented methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection. The primary study end point was infection-related length of stay (IRLOS). Secondary end points included health care resource utilization, cost, clinical response, and patient-reported outcomes. Patient assessments were performed daily until the end of antibiotic therapy or until hospital discharge, and at 14 days and 30 days after discharge. No difference was found for IRLOS, total LOS, and total inpatient cost between cohorts. Hospital LOS contributed 85.9% to the total hospitalization cost, compared with 6.4% for drug costs. Daptomycin showed a nonsignificant trend toward a higher clinical success rate, compared with vancomycin, at treatment days 2 and 3. In the multivariate analyses, vancomycin was associated with a lower likelihood of day 2 clinical success (odds ratio [OR] = 0.498, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.249-0.997; P < 0.05). This study did not provide conclusive evidence of the superiority of one treatment over the other in terms of clinical, economic, or patient outcomes. The data suggest that physician and patient preference, rather than drug acquisition cost, should be the primary driver of initial antibiotic selection for hospitalized patients with cSSSI. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01419184 (Date: August 16, 2011).

  8. Daptomycin Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in a class of medications called cyclic lipopeptide antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as daptomycin injection will not work for treating colds, flu, or other viral infections. ...

  9. The interplay between daptomycin and the immune system

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    Theodoros eKelesidis

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics may have bacteriostatic or bactericidal effects but may also cause immunomodulation. Lipopeptides are known immunomodulators that interact with pattern recognition receptors (PRRs such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs in antigen presenting cells. Daptomycin is a novel lipopeptide antibiotic with a lipid moiety and unique structure that in the presence of divalent ions may directly interact with lipid membrane phospholipids, the major component of lipid membranes in immune cells. Daptomycin may also penetrate immune cells including neutrophils and macrophages. However, the possible immunomodulatory effects of daptomycin remain unknown. Understanding these effects is important to determine whether this agent can provide protection against infectious challenge through multiple mechanisms. Preliminary studies suggest that daptomycin may have minimal effects on cytokine production and may have synergistic immunomodulatory effects in combination with other immunomodulators. This review focuses on the hypothesis that daptomycin may also have immunomodulatory effects but further studies are needed to investigate this hypothesis.

  10. Daptomycin-Induced Acute Eosinophilic Pneumonia: Late Onset and Quick Recovery

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    Mohamad Rachid

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Daptomycin is a cyclic lipopeptide antibiotic that provides great coverage for gram positive cocci. From the early years of daptomycin use, concerns were raised regarding the pulmonary side effects of daptomycin and potential development of acute eosinophilic pneumonia (AEP secondary to daptomycin therapy. Discussion. AEP could be idiopathic or induced by drugs or toxins. It is a distinct entity from atopic diseases and autoimmune, parasitic, or fungal infections that can also cause pulmonary eosinophilia. Multiple medications are associated with acute eosinophilic pneumonia. Multiple cases of daptomycin-induced AEP have been reported in the literature. Diagnosis of AEP is based on clinical history, laboratory tests, and radiographic studies. Obtaining bronchoalveolar lavage or lung biopsy is needed to confirm the diagnosis. Timing of the drug use and clinical presentation is crucial in the diagnosis of drug-induced AEP. Discontinuation of the offending drug and systemic corticosteroids are the mainstay treatment with great outcomes and recovery. Conclusion. We present a case of AEP caused by daptomycin, with complete recovery after discontinuation of daptomycin and administration of steroids. The patient had AEP after almost 6 weeks of daptomycin therapy which has never been reported in literature and our patient achieved complete recovery with appropriate management.

  11. Eosinophilic pneumonia associated with daptomycin: a case report and a review of the literature

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    Fanourgiakis Panagiotis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Although several studies did not demonstrate that daptomycin may cause significantly higher rates of pulmonary adverse effects when compared with vancomycin or penicillinase-resistant penicillins, there have been a few case reports of severe pulmonary complications associated with daptomycin administration. Case presentation A rare case of eosinophilic pneumonia occurring 10 days after daptomycin administration in a 78-year-old Caucasian man with possible infectious endocarditis is described. He developed new onset fever, up to 38.5°C, with bilateral pulmonary crackles on physical examination and with no signs of severe respiratory failure. A chest computed tomography-scan showed bilateral nodular consolidations with air bronchograms and pleural effusions. Immediate discontinuation of daptomycin was followed by vigorous improvement of clinical signs and symptoms with progressive resolution of pulmonary consolidations a month later. Conclusion Physicians should be aware of this rare but serious complication during daptomycin treatment, and prompt discontinuation of the offending agent, with or without additional supportive treatment, must occur immediately.

  12. Daptomycin treatment in Gram-positive vascular graft infections

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    Francisco Arnaiz de las Revillas

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Daptomycin is a bactericidal antibiotic approved for the treatment of skin and soft tissue infections and right-side endocarditis. However, there is a lack of published data outlining its usefulness in vascular graft infections (VGI. The aim of this study was to describe the clinical experience of daptomycin use in the treatment of VGI caused by Gram-positive bacteria. Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study of patients diagnosed with VGI receiving daptomycin at a tertiary care hospital during the period January 2010 to December 2012. Results: Of a total 1066 consecutive patients who had undergone vascular grafts (VG, 25 were diagnosed with VGI. Fifteen of these patients (11 prosthetic VG, three autologous VG, one both types received daptomycin (median dose 6.7 mg/kg/day, range 4.1–7.1 mg/kg/day; median age 69 years, range 45–83 years; 80% male. The infected bypass was removed in 13 cases. The most common reason for selecting daptomycin was kidney failure (53%. The Gram-positive organisms isolated were coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (n = 10, Staphylococcus aureus (n = 3 (two methicillin-resistant S. aureus, Enterococcus faecium (n = 2, and Enterococcus faecalis (n = 1. The mean follow-up was 69 months (interquartile range 48–72 months. Ten patients (66.7% achieved complete healing of the VGI. A recurrence of the infection was observed in 100% of patients in whom the bypass was not removed. Among patients who did not achieve complete healing, one needed a supracondylar amputation and one died as a consequence of infection. Five patients received treatment with rifampicin in addition to daptomycin and they were all cured. Conclusions: The use of daptomycin and surgery for Gram-positive VGI was effective and well tolerated, and this may be a good alternative for the treatment of VGI in patients with peripheral arterial disease in whom renal insufficiency is common. Keywords: Daptomycin, Gram-positive, Vascular

  13. Safety of high-dose daptomycin in patients with severe renal impairment

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    Tai CH

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Chih-Hsun Tai,1 Chi-Hao Shao,2 Chen-You Chen,2 Shu-Wen Lin,1–3 Chien-Chih Wu1,2 1Department of Pharmacy, National Taiwan University Hospital, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan; 2School of Pharmacy, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan; 3Graduate Institute of Clinical Pharmacy, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan Background: Treatment options are limited for infections due to multidrug-resistant Gram-positive pathogens. Daptomycin is a lipopeptide antibiotic with concentration-dependent killing characteristic and dose-dependent post-antibiotic effect. To achieve optimized pharmacodynamic effect, some experts advocated using a high dose of daptomycin (≥9 mg/kg for severe infections. However, the safety of high-dose therapy in patients with renal impairment remains unknown. This study was aimed to evaluate the safety of daptomycin in patients with severe renal impairment. Methods: This was a retrospective study performed by reviewing electronic medical records. Patients with severe renal impairment who were treated with daptomycin in a tertiary teaching hospital between January 1, 2013, and June 30, 2016, were included for evaluation. The incidence rates of creatine kinase (CK elevation between high-dose (≥9 mg/kg and standard-dose (<9 mg/kg groups were compared. Results: Overall, 164 patients met the inclusion criteria, and 114 (69.5% of them were on renal replacement therapy. Vancomycin-resistant enterococci were the most common pathogens (61.3% of the patients with documented pathogens. The treatment success rate was 51.6% in the 91 patients with bacteremia. The average dose of daptomycin was 8.0±2.3 mg/kg, and 37 (22.6% patients received ≥9 mg/kg. CK levels were followed in 108 (65.9% patients. Significantly higher incidence of CK elevation was found in the high-dose group compared with that in the standard-dose group (10.8% vs 1.6%, P<0.05. Moreover

  14. Efficacy and safety of intravenous daptomycin in Japanese patients with skin and soft tissue infections.

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    Aikawa, Naoki; Kusachi, Shinya; Mikamo, Hiroshige; Takesue, Yoshio; Watanabe, Shinichi; Tanaka, Yoshiyuki; Morita, Akiko; Tsumori, Keiko; Kato, Yoshiaki; Yoshinari, Tomoko

    2013-06-01

    Daptomycin is a lipopeptide antibiotic active against gram-positive organisms and recently approved for marketing in Japan. This study investigates the efficacy and safety of daptomycin in Japanese patients with skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) for regulatory filing in Japan. Overall, 111 Japanese patients with SSTI were randomized in this open-label, randomized, active-comparator controlled, parallel-group, multicenter, phase III study. Patients received intravenous daptomycin 4 mg/kg once daily or vancomycin 1 g twice daily for 7-14 days. Efficacy was determined by a blinded Efficacy Adjudication Committee. Among patients with SSTIs caused by MRSA, 81.8 % (95 % CI, 69.1-90.9) of daptomycin recipients and 84.2 % (95 % CI, 60.4-96.6) of vancomycin recipients achieved a successful clinical response at the test-of-cure (TOC) visit. The microbiological success rate against MRSA at the TOC visit was 56.4 % (95 % CI, 42.3-69.7) with daptomycin and 47.4 % (95 % CI, 24.4-71.1) with vancomycin. Daptomycin was generally well tolerated; most adverse events were of mild to moderate severity. The measurement of daptomycin concentration in plasma revealed that patients with mild or moderate impaired renal function showed similar pharmacokinetics profiles to patients with normal renal function. Clinical and microbiological responses, stratified by baseline MRSA susceptibility, suggested that patients infected with MRSA of higher daptomycin MIC showed a trend of lower clinical success with a P value of 0.052 by Cochran-Armitage test. Daptomycin was clinically and microbiologically effective for the treatment of MRSA-associated SSTIs in Japanese patients.

  15. A retrospective study of daptomycin use in a Paris teaching-hospital.

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    Marc, F; Esquirol, C; Papy, E; Longuet, P; Armand-Lefevre, L; Rioux, C; Diamantis, S; Dumortier, C; Bourgeois-Nicolaos, N; Lucet, J-C; Wolff, M; Arnaud, P

    2014-01-01

    We retrospectively studied daptomycin use during 2010 at the Bichat-Claude-Bernard teaching-hospital (Paris) to observe the evolution of daptomycin prescriptions. Twenty-one patients were included and several parameters were documented: site of infection, bacterial species involved, reason for daptomycin use, dose and clinical outcome. Ninety-five percent of daptomycin prescritions were off-label and most did not comply with local guidelines. Fifteen of the 21 patients were cured (71%), including 9 patients of the 12 with off-label and off-local recommendation prescriptions (75%). Osteitis and Enterococcus spp endocarditis were the new indications. Daptomycin was increasingly used at higher doses: 52% of our patients were given doses above 6mg/kg. Staphylococcus spp. was the most frequent pathogen responsible for infection is our patients, followed by Enterococcus spp. Daptomycin use is likely to evolve because of its effectiveness in the treatment of osteitis, left-sided and Enterococcus spp. infective endocarditis. It is generally used at higher doses, which are well tolerated. However, therapeutic monitoring needs to be developed. The antibiotic commission of our hospital gave new recommendations for daptomycin use in 2011. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Improvement of daptomycin yield by overexpression of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of the accessory genes flanking the non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) genes on daptomycin production were investigated by overexpression under the control of ermE* promoter via the integrative Escherichia coli–Streptomyces vector pIB139. The yield of daptomycin was promoted significantly when ...

  17. Evaluation of pharmacokinetics and the stability of daptomycin in serum at various temperatures.

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    Ogami, Chika; Tsuji, Yasuhiro; Kasai, Hidefumi; Hiraki, Yoichi; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Matsunaga, Kazuhisa; Karube, Yoshiharu; To, Hideto

    2017-04-01

    Daptomycin exhibits concentration-dependent antibacterial activity. By monitoring daptomycin serum concentrations, clinicians may be able to predict the effectiveness of treatments for infections more accurately. However, it has been reported that daptomycin concentrations in plasma samples stored at -20°C decrease approximately 25% after 4 weeks. The aim of this study was to evaluate the stability of daptomycin in serum at various temperatures. Daptomycin serum samples were prepared and stored at different temperatures. The stability of daptomycin under various conditions was evaluated by sequential measurements of concentration. Although the loss of concentration of daptomycin in serum samples stored in freezers (-80°C and -20°C) was less than 10% after 168days (6 months), the concentrations in samples stored in a refrigerator (4°C) decreased by more than 70% over the same period. Furthermore, daptomycin concentrations in serum samples stored at close to body temperature (35°C, 37°C, and 39°C) decreased by more than 50% after only 24h. The results of the present study demonstrate that the measurement of serum concentrations of daptomycin needs to be performed rapidly. Furthermore, the degradation of daptomycin in serum may be involved in its elimination from the living body. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Daptomycin experience in critical care patients: results from a registry.

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    Brown, Jack E; Fominaya, Cory; Christensen, Keith J; McConnell, Scott A; Lamp, Kenneth C

    2012-04-01

    Vancomycin is often the drug of choice in critically ill patients with gram-positive infections, although circumstances often prevent its use. In these situations, clinicians are frequently left with limited data regarding alternative agents. To describe patients with reported sepsis receiving daptomycin in a critical care unit. This multicenter, noncomparative, noninterventional study identified patients in critical care units, using the Cubicin Outcomes Registry and Experience (CORE) 2005-2009 registry. A descriptive account of patient characteristics, infectious etiology, outcomes at the end of daptomycin therapy, and 30-day mortality is reported. Nonevaluable patients were excluded from the efficacy analysis but included in the safety analysis. We identified 128 patients, 98 (77%) of whom were evaluable for efficacy. Patient characteristics for the efficacy population were 55 (56%) males, 30 (31%) aged 66 years or older, 38 (39%) had creatinine clearance less than 30 mL/min, and 27 (28%) were on dialysis. Common underlying diseases included acute or chronic renal failure 44 (45%), hypertension 40 (41%), and diabetes 27 (28%). Seventy-two (73%) patients were bacteremic. The most common pathogens found were methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (32%), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (21%), and coagulase-negative staphylococci (20%). Prior to daptomycin, antibiotics were used in 84 (86%) patients, most commonly vancomycin (65/84; 77%). The median (range) initial daptomycin dose was 6 mg/kg (3-10) and duration of 10 days (1-58). Overall success rate was 70% (31% cured; 39% improved). Twelve adverse events possibly related to daptomycin were reported in 9 of 128 (7%) patients in the safety population; 4 of these in 4 (3%) patients were serious. The mortality rate within 30 days of completing daptomycin was 42 of 128 (33%) patients. These data provide preliminary results on the use of daptomycin in critically ill patients with complicated conditions

  19. Statins and daptomycin: safety assessment of concurrent use and evaluation of drug interaction liability.

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    Golightly, Larry K; Barber, Gerard R; Barron, Michelle A; Page, Robert L

    2013-01-01

    Acute muscle injury and potentially fatal rhabdomyolysis may occur with use of statins and certain interacting medications. This investigation assessed risk for myopathy in patients receiving treatment with a statin in combination with daptomycin, a medication also associated with muscle injury. Patients hospitalized from July 1, 2005, through June 30, 2010, who received simvastatin or rosuvastatin concurrently with daptomycin were identified and their medical records were examined. Patients were judged to have treatment-related muscle injury if their records contained evidence of myalgia with or without weakness and secondarily impaired mobility together with elevated creatine kinase (CK) levels. These assessments were compared with similar data from hospitalized patients who received a statin alone. A total of 52 patients received 66 courses of concurrent treatment with simvastatin or rosuvastatin and daptomycin. Of these, no patient (0%) met evidentiary requirements for diagnosis of myopathy or related complications. No patient (0%) developed muscle pain or discomfort and none developed markedly elevated CK levels. The incidence of asymptomatic elevations of CK in these simvastatin or rosuvastatin plus daptomycin recipients (9%) was statistically indistinguishable from the incidence of CK elevations found in a cohort of 105 inpatients who received simvastatin or rosuvastatin alone (21%; p=0.135). In patients receiving treatment with simvastatin or rosuvastatin and daptomycin, no symptoms or objective evidence of muscle injury attributable to a drug interaction were identified. These findings are consistent with data indicating that the myopathic effects of statins and daptomycin are incited by disparate and perhaps unique pharmacological mechanisms. Risk of muscle injury therefore appears to be no greater when a statin is administered with daptomycin than when either medication is used alone.

  20. Assessing outcomes of adult oncology patients treated with linezolid versus daptomycin for bacteremia due to vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus.

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    Patel, Khilna; Kabir, Rubiya; Ahmad, Samrah; Allen, Steven L

    2016-04-01

    The incidence and severity of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus blood stream infections continue to rise and is a significant burden in the healthcare setting. Literature thus far is minimal regarding treatment outcomes in patients with malignancy and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus bacteremia. Appropriate antibiotic selection is vital to treatment success due to high rates of resistance, limited antimicrobials and mortality in this patient population. We conducted this study to determine whether treatment outcomes differed between cancer patients treated with linezolid and those treated with daptomycin for vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus bacteremia. This single-center, retrospective study included adult patients hospitalized on the oncology service with documented vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium or Enterococcus faecalis bacteremia who received at least 48 h of either linezolid or daptomycin as primary treatment. A total of 65 patients were included in the analysis. Thirty-two patients received daptomycin as primary treatment, and 33 patients received linezolid as primary treatment. Twenty-six (76.5%) patients in the linezolid cohort versus 22 (71%) patients in the daptomycin cohort achieved microbiological cure (p = 0.6141). Median length of stay in days (30 vs. 42, p = 0.0714) and mortality (7/32 (20.6%) vs. 8/33 (25.8%), p = 0.6180) were also similar between the linezolid and daptomycin treated patients, respectively. No differences in microbiological cure, length of stay or mortality were identified between the groups. This study suggests that linezolid and daptomycin are each reasonable options for treating vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus bacteremia in oncology patients. Further prospective, randomized controlled trials are needed to assess the optimal treatment for vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus bacteremia in this patient population. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Study on breeding of daptomycin-producing strains by nitrogen ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Jian; Liu Ying; Fang Dongsheng; Jiang Hong; Zhang Yin; Gao Wuyan

    2008-01-01

    Streptomyces roseosporus C20, the bacteria used in production of daptomycin, were implanted with (15-200)x10 13 /cm 2 of 20keV N + ions. Survival rate of the bacteria at different absorbed doses was investigated, and mutagenic effects of the microbe were studied. After breeding under the selection pressure of resistance to streptomycin (the lethal concentration is 1.2μg/mL), several mutant strains with higher yields of daptomycin have been obtained. One of mutant strains, N3-36, can increase up to 126% compared to the original strain. It also shows that the mutant strains have high genetic stability. (authors)

  2. Brazilian experience in EU-CORE: daptomycin registry and treatment of serious Gram-positive infections

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    Artur Timerman

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To collect data about non-controlled prescribing use of daptomycin and its impact among Brazilian patients with serious Gram positive bacterial infection, as well as the efficacy and safety outcomes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This is a multi-center, retrospective, non-interventional registry (August 01, 2009 to June 30, 2011 to collect data on 120 patients (44 patients in the first year and 76 patients in the second year who had received at least one dose of commercial daptomycin in Brazil for the treatment of serious Gram-positive bacterial infection. RESULTS: Right-sided endocarditis (15.8%, complicated skin and soft tissue infections (cSSTIwound (15.0% and bacteremia-catheter-related (14.2% were the most frequent primary infections; lung (21.7% was the most common site for infection. Daptomycin was used empirically in 76 (63.3% patients, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA was the most common suspected pathogen (86.1%. 82.5% of the cultures were obtained prior to or shortly after initiation of daptomycin therapy. Staphylococcus spp. - coagulase negative, MRSA, and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus were the most frequently identified pathogens (23.8%, 23.8% and 12.5%, respectively. The most common daptomycin dose administered for bacteremia and cSSTI was 6 mg/kg (30.6% and 4 mg/kg (51.7%, respectively. The median duration of inpatient daptomycin therapy was 14 days. Most patients (57.1% did not receive daptomycin while in intensive care unit. Carbapenem (22.5% was the most commonly used antibiotic concomitantly. The patients showed clinical improvement after two days (median following the start of daptomycin therapy. The clinical success rate was 80.8% and the overall rate of treatment failure was 10.8%. The main reasons for daptomycin discontinuation were successful end of therapy (75.8%, switched therapy (11.7%, and treatment failure (4.2%. Daptomycin demonstrated a favorable safety and tolerability profile

  3. Daptomycin inhibits cell envelope synthesis by interfering with fluid membrane microdomains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, A.; Wenzel, M.; Strahl, H.; Grein, F.; Saaki, T.N.V.; Kohl, B.; Siersma, T.; Bandow, J.E.; Sahl, H.-G.; Schneider, T.; Hamoen, L.W.

    2016-01-01

    Daptomycin is a highly efficient last-resort antibiotic that targets the bacterial cell membrane. Despite its clinical importance, the exact mechanism by which daptomycin kills bacteria is not fully understood. Different experiments have led to different models, including (i) blockage of cell wall

  4. Defining the Active Fraction of Daptomycin against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA Using a Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Approach.

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    Samira M Garonzik

    Full Text Available Our objective was to study the pharmacodynamics of daptomycin in the presence of varying concentrations of human serum (HS in vitro to quantify the fraction of daptomycin that is 'active'. Time kill experiments were performed with daptomycin (0 to 256 mg/L against two MRSA strains at log-phase growth, in the presence of HS (0%, 10%, 30%, 50%, 70% combined with Mueller-Hinton broth. Daptomycin ≥ 2 mg/L achieved 99.9% kill within 8 h at all HS concentrations; early killing activity was slightly attenuated at higher HS concentrations. After 1 h, bacterial reduction of USA300 upon exposure to daptomycin 4 mg/L ranged from -3.1 to -0.5 log10CFU/mL in the presence of 0% to 70% HS, respectively. Bactericidal activity was achieved against both strains at daptomycin ≥ 4 mg/L for all fractions of HS exposure. A mechanism-based mathematical model (MBM was developed to estimate the active daptomycin fraction at each %HS, comprising 3 bacterial subpopulations differing in daptomycin susceptibility. Time-kill data were fit with this MBM with excellent precision (r2 >0.95. The active fraction of daptomycin was estimated to range from 34.6% to 25.2% at HS fractions of 10% to 70%, respectively. Despite the reported low unbound fraction of daptomycin, the impact of protein binding on the activity of daptomycin was modest. The active fraction approach can be utilized to design in vitro experiments and to optimize therapeutic regimens of daptomycin in humans.

  5. [Daptomycin: revitalizing a former drug due to the need of new active agents against grampositive multiresistant bacterias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Martí, V; Romá Sánchez, E; Salavert Lletí, M; Bosó Ribelles, V; Poveda Andrés, J L

    2007-09-01

    The development of mechanisms of resistance of many Gram-positive bacterial strains that cause complicated skin and soft tissue infections, as well as sepsis and bacteremia, has necessitated the search for new drugs that will improve treatment strategies. Daptomycin is a cyclic lipopeptide antibacterial that was launched for the treatment of complicated skin and soft tissue infections caused by Gram-positive organisms. The drug's mechanism of action is different from that of any other antibiotic. It binds to bacterial membranes and causes a rapid depolarization of membrane potential. This loss of membrane potential causes inhibition of protein, DNA and RNA synthesis, which results in bacterial cell death. The in vitro spectrum of activity of daptomycin encompasses most clinically relevant aerobic Gram-positive pathogenic bacteria. Compared to other antibiotics with a similar antibacterial spectrum, daptomycin does not cause nephrotoxicity. Taking these and other characteristics into consideration, daptomycin appears to be a good alternative to other drugs used in the treatment of complicated skin and soft tissue infections and in Gram-positive bacteremial infections.

  6. Activity of daptomycin alone and in combination with rifampin and gentamicin against Staphylococcus aureus assessed by time-kill methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Credito, Kim; Lin, Gengrong; Appelbaum, Peter C

    2007-04-01

    The synergistic effects of daptomycin plus gentamicin or rifampin were tested against 50 Staphylococcus aureus strains, with daptomycin MICs ranging between 0.25 and 8 microg/ml. Daptomycin sub-MICs combined with gentamicin concentrations lower than the MIC yielded synergy in 34 (68%) of the 50 strains. Daptomycin combined with rifampin yielded synergy in one vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus strain only, and virtually all synergy occurred between daptomycin and gentamicin.

  7. Evaluation of pharmacokinetics and the stability of daptomycin in serum at various temperatures

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    Chika Ogami

    2017-04-01

    Conclusions: The results of the present study demonstrate that the measurement of serum concentrations of daptomycin needs to be performed rapidly. Furthermore, the degradation of daptomycin in serum may be involved in its elimination from the living body.

  8. Treatment of gram-positive deep sternal wound infections in cardiac surgery -experiences with daptomycin-

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    Coskun Kasim O

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The reported incidence of deep sternal wound infection (DSWI after cardiac surgery is 0.4-5% with Staphylococcus aureus being the most common pathogen isolated from infected wound sternotomies and bacteraemic blood cultures. This infection is associated with a higher morbidity and mortality than other known aetiologies. Little is reported about the optimal antibiotic management. The aim of the study is to quantify the application of daptomycin treatment of DSWI due to gram-positive organisms post cardiac surgery. We performed an observational analysis in 23 cases of post sternotomy DSWI with gram-positive organisms February 2009 and September 2010. When the wound appeared viable and the microbiological cultures were negative, the technique of chest closure was individualised to the patient. The incidence of DSWI was 1.46%. The mean dose of daptomycin application was 4.4 ± 0.9 mg/kg/d and the average duration of the daptomycin application was 14.47 ± 7.33 days. In 89% of the patients VAC therapy was used. The duration from daptomycin application to sternal closure was 18 ± 13.9 days. The parameters of infection including, fibrinogen (p = 0.03, white blood cell count (p = 0.001 and C-reactive protein (p = 0.0001 were significantly reduced after daptomycin application. We had no mortality and wound healing was successfully achieved in all patients. Treatment of DSWI due to gram-positive organisms with a daptomycin-containing antibiotic regimen is safe, effective and promotes immediate improvement of local wound conditions. Based on these observations, daptomycin may offer a new treatment option for expediting surgical management of DSWI after cardiac surgery.

  9. Similar efficacy and safety of daptomycin versus linezolid for treatment of vancomycin-resistant enterococcal bloodstream infections: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ming; Liang, Liang; Ji, Liwei; Chen, Di; Zhang, Yatong; Zhu, Yuanchao; Patel, Khilna

    2016-09-01

    Daptomycin and linezolid are the most commonly used antibiotics for bloodstream infection caused by vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE-BSI). However, the best therapeutic agent to treat VRE-BSI remains to be established. In order to provide evidence for an optimal treatment decision, a systematic review and meta-analysis was performed comparing the efficacy and safety of daptomycin and linezolid for the treatment of VRE-BSI. After thorough searching of relevant studies from MEDLINE, EMBASE, Clinicaltrials.gov and international meetings up to November 2015, 11 retrospective cohort studies were finally included with a sample size of 1339 patients. Among these 11 included studies, all patients in the daptomycin group received standard or high-dose daptomycin treatment (≥6 mg/kg/day). Data were extracted and pooled risk ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated using a random-effects model. The meta-analysis indicated similar crude overall mortality between patients receiving daptomycin and those treated with linezolid (RR = 1.07, 95% CI 0.83-1.37). Moreover, no difference regarding clinical cure (RR = 1.11, 95% CI 0.88-1.42), microbiological cure (RR = 0.99, 95% CI 0.90-1.09) or relapse rate of VRE-BSI (RR = 1.08, 95% CI 0.76-1.52) was found between daptomycin and linezolid. Adverse event rates were not significantly different between the two groups. Currently available evidence indicates similar efficacy and safety of daptomycin and linezolid for the treatment of VRE-BSI. However, the findings in the meta-analysis are limited by heterogeneity between relatively small-scale retrospective studies and should be interpreted cautiously. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  10. Activity of Daptomycin Alone and in Combination with Rifampin and Gentamicin against Staphylococcus aureus Assessed by Time-Kill Methodology▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Credito, Kim; Lin, Gengrong; Appelbaum, Peter C.

    2007-01-01

    The synergistic effects of daptomycin plus gentamicin or rifampin were tested against 50 Staphylococcus aureus strains, with daptomycin MICs ranging between 0.25 and 8 μg/ml. Daptomycin sub-MICs combined with gentamicin concentrations lower than the MIC yielded synergy in 34 (68%) of the 50 strains. Daptomycin combined with rifampin yielded synergy in one vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus strain only, and virtually all synergy occurred between daptomycin and gentamicin. PMID:17220402

  11. Increasing rate of daptomycin non-susceptible strains of Staphylococcus aureus in patients with atopic dermatitis

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    Izabela Błażewicz

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Daptomycin is a cyclic lipopeptide that is bactericidal against Staphylococcus aureus , including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA, vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA and vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (VRSA strains. Daptomycin exerts its antimicrobial effect by a calcium-dependent interaction with the cytoplasmic membrane resulting in depolarization, ion loss and rapid cell death. Unfortunately, loss of daptomycin susceptibility in S. aureus in the clinical setting has been noted. Aim : To evaluate the susceptibility profile to daptomycin among S. aureus strains isloted from patients with atopic dermatitis (AD. Another point was to correlate the results obtained by broth microdilution method and Etest, which is commonly applied in clinical setting. Material and methods : One hundred patients with the diagnosis of atopic dermatitis were microbiologically assessed for the carriage of S. aureus . Antimicrobial susceptibility tests were performed using broth-microdilution (BMD and Etests for daptomycin. Results : Staphylococcus aureus strains were isolated from the majority of our patients, either from the skin (73% or the anterior nares (75%. Six of the 100 nasal swabs (6% and 5 of the 100 skin swabs (5% were positive for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. A total of 81 of 148 (54.7% daptomycin non-susceptible isolates of S. aureus were identified by BMD. Only 19 of 81 were also classified as non-susceptible by Etest. Conclusions : Clinicians and microbiologists should be aware of the possibility of the emergence of daptomycin non-susceptibility (or increase in minimal inhibitory concentration during prolonged therapy and closely monitor the susceptibility of persisting isolates that might be recovered during therapy.

  12. Identification of a novel clone, ST736, among Enterococcus faecium clinical isolates and its association with daptomycin nonsusceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guiqing; Kamalakaran, Sitharthan; Dhand, Abhay; Huang, Weihua; Ojaimi, Caroline; Zhuge, Jian; Yee, Leslie Lee; Mayigowda, Pramod; Surendraiah, Pavan Kumar Makam; Dimitrova, Nevenka; Fallon, John T

    2014-08-01

    Resistance to daptomycin in enterococcal clinical isolates remains rare but is being increasingly reported in the United States and worldwide. There are limited data on the genetic relatedness and microbiological and clinical characteristics of daptomycin-nonsusceptible enterococcal clinical isolates. In this study, we assessed the population genetics of daptomycin-nonsusceptible Enterococcus faecium (DNSE) clinical isolates by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and whole-genome sequencing analysis. Forty-two nonduplicate DNSE isolates and 43 randomly selected daptomycin-susceptible E. faecium isolates were included in the analysis. All E. faecium isolates were recovered from patients at a tertiary care medical center in suburban New York City from May 2009 through December 2013. The daptomycin MICs of the DNSE isolates ranged from 6 to >256 μg/ml. Three major clones of E. faecium (ST18, ST412, and ST736) were identified among these clinical isolates by MLST and whole-genome sequence-based analysis. A newly recognized clone, ST736, was seen in 32 of 42 (76.2%) DNSE isolates and in only 14 of 43 (32.6%) daptomycin-susceptible E. faecium isolates (P clone ST736 and daptomycin nonsusceptibility. The identification and potential spread of this novel E. faecium clone and its association with daptomycin nonsusceptibility constitute a challenge for patient management and infection control at our medical center. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Kinetic analysis and modeling of daptomycin batch fermentation by Streptomyces roseosporus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wenyu; Fan, Jinghua; Wen, Jianping; Xia, Zhendong; Caiyin, Qinggele

    2011-02-01

    In this study, Streptomyces roseosporus was subjected to helium-neon (He-Ne) laser (632.8 nm) irradiation to improve the production ability of extracellular antibiotic daptomycin. Under the optimum irradiation dosage of 18 mW for 22 min, a stable positive mutant strain S. roseosporus LC-54 was obtained. The maximum A21978C (daptomycin is a semisynthetic antimicrobial substance derived from the A21978C complex) yield of this mutant strain was 296 mg/l, which was 146% higher than that of the wild strain. The mutant strain grew more quickly and utilized carbohydrate sources more efficiently than the wild strain. The batch culture kinetics was investigated in a 7 l bioreactor. The logistic equation for growth, the Luedeking-Piret equation for daptomycin production, and Luedeking-Piret-like equations for carbon substrate consumption were established. This model appeared to provide a reasonable description for each parameter during the growth phase and fitted fairly well with the experiment data.

  14. Preparation and characterization of flexible nanoliposomes loaded with daptomycin, a novel antibiotic, for topical skin therapy

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    Li C

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Chong Li, Xiaolin Zhang, Xinliang Huang, Xiaoying Wang, Guojian Liao, Zhangbao ChenCollege of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Southwest University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: The purpose of this study was to investigate flexible nanoliposomes for mediating topical delivery of daptomycin, and to document permeation rates and bacteriostatic activity towards skin infections. Response surface methodology was used to optimize the daptomycin-loaded flexible nanoliposomes (DAP-FL, and the amount of drug loaded into the particles was evaluated as the investigation index. The optimal lipid ratio was lecithin to sodium cholate 17:1 (w/w and the lipid to drug ratio was 14:1 (w/w. The hydration temperature was set at 37°C and the duration of treatment with ultrasound was 20 minutes. The DAP-FL obtained had a small mean particle size (55.4 nm with a narrow size distribution (polydispersity index 0.15. The mean entrapment efficiency was 87.85% ± 2.15% and the mean percent drug loading was 5.61% ± 0.14%. Using skin mounted between the donor and receptor compartments of a modified Franz diffusion cell, the percentage and quantity of cumulative daptomycin permeation from DAP-FL within 12 hours were measured at 96.28% ± 0.70% and (132.23 ± 17.73 µg/cm2 *5 = 661.15 ± 88.65 µg/cm2, directly, showing rapid and efficient antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus. Following local administration of DAP-FL, daptomycin was detected in multilayer tissues within the skin and underlying structures in the dorsal skin of the mouse. Effective therapeutic concentrations were maintained for several hours, and significantly inhibited bacterial growth and injury-induced biofilms. These results demonstrate that the DAP-FL can enhance the ability of daptomycin to permeate the skin efficiently, where it has a powerful antibacterial action and activity against biofilms. This novel formulation of daptomycin has potential as a new approach in the

  15. Failure of daptomycin β-Lactam combination therapy to prevent resistance emergence in Enterococcus faecium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Vidthiya; Davis, Rebecca; Shackel, Nick; Espedido, Bjorn A; Beukers, Alicia G; Jensen, Slade O; van Hal, Sebastiaan J

    2018-02-01

    Daptomycin β-Lactam combination therapy offers "protection" against daptomycin non-susceptibility (DNS) development in Enterococcus faecium. We report failure of this strategy and the importance of source control. Mutations were detected in the LiaF and cls genes in DNS isolates. A single DNS isolate contained an unrecognized mutation, which requires confirmation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Activity of daptomycin- and vancomycin-loaded poly-epsilon-caprolactone microparticles against mature staphylococcal biofilms

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    Santos Ferreira I

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Inês Santos Ferreira,1 Ana F Bettencourt,1 Lídia MD Gonçalves,1 Stefanie Kasper,2 Bertrand Bétrisey,3 Judith Kikhney,2 Annette Moter,2 Andrej Trampuz,4 António J Almeida1 1Research Institute for Medicines (iMed.ULisboa, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal; 2Biofilmcenter, German Heart Institute Berlin, Berlin, Germany; 3Infectious Diseases Service, Department of Medicine, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne, Switzerland; 4Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery, Charité – University Medicine Berlin, Berlin, Germany Abstract: The aim of the present study was to develop novel daptomycin-loaded poly-epsilon-caprolactone (PCL microparticles with enhanced antibiofilm activity against mature biofilms of clinically relevant bacteria, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and polysaccharide intercellular adhesin-positive Staphylococcus epidermidis. Daptomycin was encapsulated into PCL microparticles by a double emulsion-solvent evaporation method. For comparison purposes, formulations containing vancomycin were also prepared. Particle morphology, size distribution, encapsulation efficiency, surface charge, thermal behavior, and in vitro release were assessed. All formulations exhibited a spherical morphology, micro­meter size, and negative surface charge. From a very early time stage, the released concentrations of daptomycin and vancomycin were higher than the minimal inhibitory concentration and continued so up to 72 hours. Daptomycin presented a sustained release profile with increasing concentrations of the drug being released up to 72 hours, whereas the release of vancomycin stabilized at 24 hours. The antibacterial activity of the microparticles was assessed by isothermal microcalorimetry against planktonic and sessile MRSA and S. epidermidis. Regarding planktonic bacteria, daptomycin-loaded PCL microparticles presented the highest antibacterial activity against both strains. Isothermal

  17. Activity of Fosfomycin- and Daptomycin-Containing Bone Cement on Selected Bacterial Species Being Associated with Orthopedic Infections

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    Sigrun Eick

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine activity of fosfomycin/gentamicin and daptomycin/gentamicin-containing PMMA bone-cement against Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, MSSA, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Enterococcus faecium (VRE, and E. coli (ESBL; only fosfomycin. Test specimens of the bone cement were formed and bacteria in two concentrations were added one time or repeatedly up to 96 h. All fosfomycin-containing cement killed ultimately all MSSA, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and E. coli within 24 h; growth of MRSA was suppressed up to 48 h. Activity of daptomycin-containing cement depended on the concentration; the highest concentrated bone cement used (1.5 g daptomycin/40 g of powder was active against all one-time added bacteria. When bacteria were added repeatedly to fosfomycin-containing cement, growth was suppressed up to 96 h and that of MRSA and VRE only up to 24 h. The highest concentration of daptomycin suppressed the growth of repeated added bacteria up to 48 h (VRE until 96 h (MSSA, MRSA. In conclusion, PMMA bone cement with 1.5 g of daptomycin and 0.5 g of gentamicin may be an alternative in treatment of periprosthetic infections caused by Gram-positive bacteria.

  18. Safety and efficacy of high-dose daptomycin as salvage therapy for severe gram-positive bacterial sepsis in hospitalized adult patients

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    Lai Chung-Chih

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasing the dosage of daptomycin may be advantageous in severe infection by enhancing bactericidal activity and pharmacodynamics. However, clinical data on using daptomycin at doses above 6 mg/kg in Asian population are limited. Methods A retrospective observational cohort study of all hospitalized adult patients treated with daptomycin (> 6 mg/kg for at least 72 hours was performed in Taiwan. Results A total of 67 patients (40 males with a median age of 57 years received a median dose of 7.61 mg/kg (range, 6.03-11.53 mg/kg of daptomycin for a median duration of 14 days (range, 3–53 days. Forty-one patients (61.2% were in intensive care units (ICU. Sites of infections included complicated skin and soft tissue infections (n = 16, catheter-related bacteremia (n = 16, endocarditis (n = 11, primary bacteremia (n = 10, osteomyelitis and septic arthritis (n = 9, and miscellaneous (n = 5. The median Pitt bacteremia score among the 54 (80.6% patients with bacteremia was 4. The most common pathogen was methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (n = 38. Fifty-nine patients (88.1% were treated with daptomycin after glycopepetide use. Overall, 52 (77.6% patients achieved clinical success. The all-cause mortality rate at 28 day was 35.8%. In multivariate analysis, the significant predictors of in-hospital mortality in 54 bacteremic patients were malignancies (P = 0.01 and ICU stay (P = 0.02. Adverse effects of daptomycin were generally well-tolerated, leading to discontinuation in 3 patients. Daptomycin-related creatine phosphokinase (CPK elevations were observed in 4 patients, and all received doses > 8 mg/kg. Conclusions Treatment with high dose daptomycin as salvage therapy was generally effective and safe in Taiwan. CPK level elevations were more frequent in patients with dose > 8 mg/kg.

  19. High MICs for Vancomycin and Daptomycin and Complicated Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infections with Methicillin-Sensitive Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viedma, Esther; Chaves, Fernando; Lalueza, Antonio; Fortún, Jesús; Loza, Elena; Pujol, Miquel; Ardanuy, Carmen; Morales, Isabel; de Cueto, Marina; Resino-Foz, Elena; Morales-Cartagena, Alejandra; Rico, Alicia; Romero, María P.; Orellana, María Ángeles; López-Medrano, Francisco; Fernández-Ruiz, Mario; Aguado, José María

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the prognostic role of high MICs for antistaphylococcal agents in patients with methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus catheter-related bloodstream infection (MSSA CRBSI). We prospectively reviewed 83 episodes from 5 centers in Spain during April 2011–June 2014 that had optimized clinical management and analyzed the relationship between E-test MICs for vancomycin, daptomycin, oxacillin, and linezolid and development of complicated bacteremia by using multivariate analysis. Complicated MSSA CRBSI occurred in 26 (31.3%) patients; MICs for vancomycin and daptomycin were higher in these patients (optimal cutoff values for predictive accuracy = 1.5 μg/mL and 0.5 μg/mL). High MICs for vancomycin (hazard ratio 2.4, 95% CI 1.2–5.5) and daptomycin (hazard ratio 2.4, 95% CI 1.1–5.9) were independent risk factors for development of complicated MSSA CRBSI. Our data suggest that patients with MSSA CRBSI caused by strains that have high MICs for vancomycin or daptomycin are at increased risk for complications. PMID:27192097

  20. Comparison of the Effectiveness and Safety of Linezolid and Daptomycin in Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcal Bloodstream Infection: A National Cohort Study of Veterans Affairs Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britt, Nicholas S; Potter, Emily M; Patel, Nimish; Steed, Molly E

    2015-09-15

    Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus bloodstream infections (VRE-BSIs) are becoming increasingly common. Linezolid and daptomycin are the primary treatment options for VRE-BSI, but optimal treatment is unclear. This was a national retrospective cohort study comparing linezolid and daptomycin for the treatment of VRE-BSI among Veterans Affairs Medical Center patients admitted during 2004-2013. The primary outcome was treatment failure, defined as a composite of (1) 30-day all-cause mortality; (2) microbiologic failure; and (3) 60-day VRE-BSI recurrence. Poisson regression was conducted to determine if antimicrobial treatment was independently associated with clinical outcomes. A total of 644 patients were included (linezolid, n = 319; daptomycin, n = 325). Overall, treatment failure was 60.9% (n = 392/644), and 30-day all-cause mortality was 38.2% (n = 246/644). Linezolid was associated with a significantly higher risk of treatment failure compared with daptomycin (risk ratio [RR], 1.37; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.13-1.67; P = .001). After adjusting for confounding factors in Poisson regression, the relationship between linezolid use and treatment failure persisted (adjusted RR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.02-1.30; P = .026). Linezolid was also associated with higher 30-day mortality (42.9% vs 33.5%; RR, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.04-1.32; P = .014) and microbiologic failure rates (RR, 1.10; 95% CI, 1.02-1.18; P = .011). No difference in 60-day VRE-BSI recurrence was observed between treatment groups. Treatment with linezolid for VRE-BSI resulted in significantly higher treatment failure in comparison to daptomycin. Linezolid treatment was also associated with greater 30-day all-cause mortality and microbiologic failure in this cohort. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  1. Role of Daptomycin on Burn Wound Healing in an Animal Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infection Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonetti, Oriana; Lucarini, Guendalina; Orlando, Fiorenza; Pierpaoli, Elisa; Ghiselli, Roberto; Provinciali, Mauro; Castelli, Pamela; Guerrieri, Mario; Di Primio, Roberto; Offidani, Annamaria; Giacometti, Andrea; Cirioni, Oscar

    2017-09-01

    Prolonged hospitalization and antibiotic therapy are risk factors for the development of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections in thermal burn patients. We used a rat model to study the in vivo efficacy of daptomycin in the treatment of burn wound infections by S. aureus , and we evaluated the wound healing process through morphological and immunohistochemical analysis. A copper bar heated in boiling water was applied on a paraspinal site of each rat, resulting in two full-thickness burns. A small gauze was placed over each burn and inoculated with 5 × 10 7 CFU of S. aureus ATCC 43300. The study included two uninfected control groups with and without daptomycin treatment, an infected control group that did not receive any treatment, and two infected groups treated, respectively, with intraperitoneal daptomycin and teicoplanin. The main outcome measures were quantitative culture, histological evaluation of tissue repair, and immunohistochemical expression of wound healing markers: epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2). The highest inhibition of infection was achieved in the group that received daptomycin, which reduced the bacterial load from 10 7 CFU/ml to about 10 3 CFU/g ( P repair by possibly reducing hypertrophic burn scar formation. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  2. Structure-activity relationship of daptomycin analogues with substitution at (2S, 3R) 3-methyl glutamic acid position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Du'an; Lam, Hiu Yung; Han, Wenbo; Cotroneo, Nicole; Pandya, Bhaumik A; Li, Xuechen

    2017-02-01

    Daptomycin is a highly effective lipopeptide antibiotic against Gram-positive pathogens. The presence of (2S, 3R) 3-methyl glutamic acid (mGlu) in daptomycin has been found to be important to the antibacterial activity. However the role of (2S, 3R) mGlu is yet to be revealed. Herein, we reported the syntheses of three daptomycin analogues with (2S, 3R) mGlu substituted by (2S, 3R) methyl glutamine (mGln), dimethyl glutamic acid and (2S, 3R) ethyl glutamic acid (eGlu), respectively, and their antibacterial activities. The detailed synthesis of dimethyl glutamic acid was also reported. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Daptomycin-Vancomycin–Resistant Enterococcus faecium Native Valve Endocarditis

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    Khandakar Hussain MD

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug-resistant enterococcal nosocomial invasive infections are a rising concern faced by the medical community. Not many options are available to treat these highly virulent organisms. Risk factors for developing these highly resistant organisms include prolonged hospital stay, previous antibiotic use, and immunosuppression. In this article, we report a case of daptomycin-resistant enterococcal native infective endocarditis treated with off-label use of quinupristin-dalfopristin.

  4. Daptomycin in the treatment of prosthetic joint infection by Enterococcus faecalis: safety and efficacy of high-dose and prolonged therapy

    OpenAIRE

    José Ramón Yuste; Milena Quesada; Pablo Díaz-Rada; José Luis Del Pozo

    2014-01-01

    Enterococci are implicated in less than 2.3% of prosthetic joint infections. These infections can be difficult to treat and therapeutic failures are not uncommon. In these situations, daptomycin is a safe and effective alternative. We present a clinical case with a successful response to the prolonged use of high-dose daptomycin.

  5. Daptomycin in the treatment of prosthetic joint infection by Enterococcus faecalis: safety and efficacy of high-dose and prolonged therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ramón Yuste

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Enterococci are implicated in less than 2.3% of prosthetic joint infections. These infections can be difficult to treat and therapeutic failures are not uncommon. In these situations, daptomycin is a safe and effective alternative. We present a clinical case with a successful response to the prolonged use of high-dose daptomycin.

  6. Observed Antagonistic Effect of Linezolid on Daptomycin or Vancomycin Activity against Biofilm-Forming Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in an In Vitro Pharmacodynamic Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luther, Megan K.

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacodynamic activity in antibiotic combinations of daptomycin, vancomycin, and linezolid was investigated in a 48-h in vitro pharmacodynamic model. Using human-simulated free drug concentrations, activity against clinical biofilm-forming methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates was evaluated. Linezolid antagonized vancomycin activity at 24 and 48 h. Linezolid antagonized daptomycin at 24 and 48 h depending on dose and strain. Adding daptomycin increased vancomycin activity at 48 h (P < 0.03). These results may be strain dependent and require further clinical investigation. PMID:26369963

  7. Activity of daptomycin against Listeria monocytogenes isolates from cerebrospinal fluid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanjaard, Lodewijk; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M. J. E.

    2008-01-01

    We tested the activity of daptomycin against 76 Listeria monocytogenes isolates from cerebrospinal fluid by broth dilution and Etest methods. For the broth dilution method, the MIC range was 1.0 to 8.0 and the MIC at which 90% of the isolates tested were inhibited (MIC(90)) was 4.0 mg/liter. For the

  8. Investigation of the potential for mutational resistance to XF-73, retapamulin, mupirocin, fusidic acid, daptomycin, and vancomycin in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates during a 55-passage study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, David J; Robbins, Marion; Rhys-Williams, William; Love, William G

    2011-03-01

    XF-73 is a dicationic porphyrin drug with rapid Gram-positive antibacterial activity currently undergoing clinical trials for the nasal decolonization of Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). In multistep (55-passage) resistance selection studies in the presence of subinhibitory concentrations of XF-73, retapamulin, mupirocin, fusidic acid, and vancomycin against four Network on Antimicrobial Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus MRSA strains, there was no >4-fold increase in the MIC for XF-73 after 55 passages. In contrast, there was an increase in the MICs for retapamulin (from 0.25 μg/ml to 4 to 8 μg/ml), for mupirocin (from 0.12 μg/ml to 16 to 512 μg/ml), for fusidic acid (from 0.12 μg/ml to 256 μg/ml), and for vancomycin (from 1 μg/ml to 8 μg/ml in two of the four strains tested). Further investigations using S. aureus NRS384 (USA300) and daptomycin demonstrated a 64-fold increase in the MIC after 55 passages (from 0.5 μg/ml to 32 μg/ml) with a >4-fold increase in the MIC obtained after only five passages. Sequencing analysis of selected isolates confirmed previously reported point mutations associated with daptomycin resistance. No cross-resistance to XF-73 was observed with the daptomycin-resistant strains, suggesting that whereas the two drugs act on the bacterial cell membrane, their specific site of action differs. XF-73 thus represents the first in a new class of antibacterial drugs, which (unlike the comparator antibiotics) after 55 passages exhibited a ≤4-fold increase in MIC against the strains tested. Antibacterial drugs with a low propensity for inducing bacterial resistance are much needed for the prevention and treatment of multidrug-resistant bacteria both within and outside the hospital setting.

  9. In vitro activity of daptomycin against clinical isolates of Gram-positive bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Kerryl E; Steckelberg, James M; Patel, Robin

    2005-08-01

    We determined the activity of daptomycin, a recently FDA-approved antimicrobial agent, against clinical isolates of Gram-positive bacteria, including viridans group streptococci (16 Streptococcus mitis species group, 12 S. mutans species group, 9 S. anginosus species group, 8 S. sanguinis species group, 5 S. salivarius species group) from patients with infective endocarditis, 32 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, 32 high-level penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae, 38 vancomycin-resistant enterococci (including 1 linezolid-resistant isolate), and the following unusual Gram-positive bacteria: 3 Listeria monocytogenes, 4 Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae, 9 Corynebacterium species, 10 Abiotrophia/Granulicatella species, 2 Rothia (Stomatococcus) mucilaginosus, and 4 Gemella morbillorum. Daptomycin minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC)(90) values for the viridans group streptococci, methicillin-resistant S. aureus, penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae, and Enterococcus species were 0.5, 0.5, endocarditis as well as against several types of unusual Gram-positive bacteria that can cause endocarditis.

  10. In vitro activity of daptomycin combined with dalbavancin and linezolid, and dalbavancin with linezolid against MRSA strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktas, Gulseren; Derbentli, Sengul

    2017-02-01

    Combination therapies have a distinct advantage over monotherapies in terms of their broad spectrum, synergistic effect and prevention of the emergence of drug resistance. In the present study, the in vitro antibacterial activity of daptomycin combinations with linezolid and dalbavancin, and dalbavancin with linezolid were evaluated against 30 clinical MRSA strains. The MICs of all antibiotics were determined using microbroth dilution as described by the CLSI. The in vitro activities of antibiotics in combination were assessed by using a microbroth 'chequerboard' assay. The MIC values of all antibiotics determined were evaluated in accordance with the recommendations of the CLSI for daptomycin and linezolid, and the FDA for dalbavancin. All strains (100%) were found to be susceptible to daptomycin, dalbavancin and linezolid. The MIC 50 , MIC 90 and MIC range values of these antibiotics were determined to be 1, 1 and 0.5-1 mg/L, 0.12, 0.12 and 0.03-0.12 mg/L, and 1, 2 and 1-2 mg/L, respectively. The rates of synergistic effects were 67% for daptomycin combined with dalbavancin and with linezolid, and 60% for dalbavancin combined with linezolid. The results of this study show that in vitro combinations of these new antimicrobials will be effective in the therapy of MRSA infections. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Activity of vancomycin, linezolid, and daptomycin against staphylococci and enterococci isolated in 5 Greek hospitals during a 5-year period (2008-2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitriou-Olivgeris, Matthaios; Kolonitsiou, Fevronia; Zerva, Loukia; Lebessi, Evangelia; Koutsia, Chryssa; Drougka, Eleanna; Sarrou, Styliani; Giormezis, Nikolaos; Vourli, Sofia; Doudoulakakis, Anastassios; Konsolakis, Christos; Marangos, Markos; Anastassiou, Evangelos D; Petinaki, Efthimia; Spiliopoulou, Iris

    2015-12-01

    The tendency of vancomycin, linezolid, and daptomycin MICs was investigated among 6920 staphylococci and enterococci during a 5-year period. Antimicrobial consumption was determined. Decrease of vancomycin MIC was detected associated with reduction in consumption. Linezolid and daptomycin remained active. An upward trend of linezolid MIC for methicillin-resistant staphylococci was observed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Modulating activity of vancomycin and daptomycin on the expression of autolysis cell-wall turnover and membrane charge genes in hVISA and VISA strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviana Cafiso

    Full Text Available Glycopeptides are still the gold standard to treat MRSA (Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections, but their widespread use has led to vancomycin-reduced susceptibility [heterogeneous Vancomycin-Intermediate-Staphylococcus aureus (hVISA and Vancomycin-Intermediate-Staphylococcus aureus (VISA], in which different genetic loci (regulatory, autolytic, cell-wall turnover and cell-envelope positive charge genes are involved. In addition, reduced susceptibility to vancomycin can influence the development of resistance to daptomycin. Although the phenotypic and molecular changes of hVISA/VISA have been the focus of different papers, the molecular mechanisms responsible for these different phenotypes and for the vancomycin and daptomycin cross-resistance are not clearly understood. The aim of our study was to investigate, by real time RT-PCR, the relative quantitative expression of genes involved in autolysis (atl-lytM, cell-wall turnover (sceD, membrane charges (mprF-dltA and regulatory mechanisms (agr-locus-graRS-walKR, in hVISA and VISA cultured with or without vancomycin and daptomycin, in order to better understand the molecular basis of vancomycin-reduced susceptibility and the modulating activity of vancomycin and daptomycin on the expression of genes implicated in their reduced susceptibility mechanisms. Our results show that hVISA and VISA present common features that distinguish them from Vancomycin-Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (VSSA, responsible for the intermediate glycopeptide resistance i.e. an increased cell-wall turnover, an increased positive cell-wall charge responsible for a repulsion mechanism towards vancomycin and daptomycin, and reduced agr-functionality. Indeed, VISA emerges from hVISA when VISA acquires a reduced autolysis caused by a down-regulation of autolysin genes, atl/lytM, and a reduction of the net negative cell-envelope charge via dltA over-expression. Vancomycin and daptomycin, acting in a similar

  13. Implementing an intensified antibiotic stewardship programme targeting daptomycin use in orthopaedic surgery: a cost-benefit analysis from the hospital perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borde, Johannes P; Nussbaum, Sarah; Hauser, Stefanie; Hehn, Philip; Hübner, Johannes; Sitaru, Gabriela; Köller, Sebastian; Schweigert, Bruno; deWith, Katja; Kern, Winfried V; Kaier, Klaus

    2016-06-01

    well as for daptomycin (p antibiotic consumption decreased by an estimated € 4563 per month (p antibiotic stewardship programme was beneficial, as monthly cost savings of € 2575 (p = 0.005) were achieved. In this example of large endoprosthetic surgery department in a community-based hospital, the applied hospital ABS programme targeting daptomycin use has shown to be feasible, effective and beneficial compared to no intervention.

  14. Activity of Daptomycin or Linezolid in Combination with Rifampin or Gentamicin against Biofilm-Forming Enterococcus faecalis or E. faecium in an In Vitro Pharmacodynamic Model Using Simulated Endocardial Vegetations and an In Vivo Survival Assay Using Galleria mellonella Larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luther, Megan K.; Arvanitis, Marios; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2014-01-01

    Enterococci are the third most frequent cause of infective endocarditis. A high-inoculum stationary-phase in vitro pharmacodynamic model with simulated endocardial vegetations was used to simulate the human pharmacokinetics of daptomycin at 6 or 10 mg/kg of body weight/day or linezolid at 600 mg every 12 h (q12h), alone or in combination with gentamicin at 1.3 mg/kg q12h or rifampin at 300 mg q8h or 900 mg q24h. Biofilm-forming, vancomycin-susceptible Enterococcus faecalis and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (vancomycin-resistant enterococcus [VRE]) strains were tested. At 24, 48, and 72 h, all daptomycin-containing regimens demonstrated significantly more activity (decline in CFU/g) than any linezolid-containing regimen against biofilm-forming E. faecalis. The addition of gentamicin to daptomycin (at 6 or 10 mg/kg) in the first 24 h significantly improved bactericidal activity. In contrast, the addition of rifampin delayed the bactericidal activity of daptomycin against E. faecalis, and the addition of rifampin antagonized the activities of all regimens against VRE at 24 h. Also, against VRE, the addition of gentamicin to linezolid at 72 h improved activity and was bactericidal. Rifampin significantly antagonized the activity of linezolid against VRE at 72 h. In in vivo Galleria mellonella survival assays, linezolid and daptomycin improved survival. Daptomycin at 10 mg/kg improved survival significantly over that with linezolid against E. faecalis. The addition of gentamicin improved the efficacy of daptomycin against E. faecalis and those of linezolid and daptomycin against VRE. We conclude that in enterococcal infection models, daptomycin has more activity than linezolid alone. Against biofilm-forming E. faecalis, the addition of gentamicin in the first 24 h causes the most rapid decline in CFU/g. Of interest, the addition of rifampin decreased the activity of daptomycin against both E. faecalis and VRE. PMID:24867993

  15. Successful salvage therapy with Daptomycin for osteomyelitis caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a renal transplant recipient with Fabry-Anderson disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polilli Ennio

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Daptomycin is licensed in adults for the management of Staphylococcus aureus methicillin-resistant infections, including bone and skin complicated infections. We describe for the first time its use in a renal transplant recipient for Fabry-Anderson Disease with right heel osteomyelitis. The patient was unresponsive to first-line Teicoplanin and second-line Tigecycline, whereas he was successfully treated with third-line Daptomycin monotherapy at 4 mg/Kg/qd for 4 weeks. Local debridement was performed in advance of each line of treatment.

  16. In vitro activities of the new semisynthetic glycopeptide telavancin (TD-6424), vancomycin, daptomycin, linezolid, and four comparator agents against anaerobic gram-positive species and Corynebacterium spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Ellie J C; Citron, Diane M; Merriam, C Vreni; Warren, Yumi A; Tyrrell, Kerin L; Fernandez, Helen T

    2004-06-01

    Telavancin is a new semisynthetic glycopeptide anti-infective with multiple mechanisms of action, including inhibition of bacterial membrane phospholipid synthesis and inhibition of bacterial cell wall synthesis. We determined the in vitro activities of telavancin, vancomycin, daptomycin, linezolid, quinupristin-dalfopristin, imipenem, piperacillin-tazobactam, and ampicillin against 268 clinical isolates of anaerobic gram-positive organisms and 31 Corynebacterium strains using agar dilution methods according to National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards procedures. Plates with daptomycin were supplemented with Ca(2+) to 50 mg/liter. The MICs at which 90% of isolates tested were inhibited (MIC(90)s) for telavancin and vancomycin were as follows: Actinomyces spp. (n = 45), 0.25 and 1 microg/ml, respectively; Clostridium difficile (n = 14), 0.25 and 1 microg/ml, respectively; Clostridium ramosum (n = 16), 1 and 4 microg/ml, respectively; Clostridium innocuum (n = 15), 4 and 16 microg/ml, respectively; Clostridium clostridioforme (n = 15), 8 and 1 microg/ml, respectively; Eubacterium group (n = 33), 0.25 and 2 microg/ml, respectively; Lactobacillus spp. (n = 26), 0.5 and 4 microg/ml, respectively; Propionibacterium spp. (n = 34), 0.125 and 0.5 microg/ml, respectively; Peptostreptococcus spp. (n = 52), 0.125 and 0.5 microg/ml, respectively; and Corynebacterium spp. (n = 31), 0.03 and 0.5 microg/ml, respectively. The activity of TD-6424 was similar to that of quinupristin-dalfopristin for most strains except C. clostridioforme and Lactobacillus casei, where quinupristin-dalfopristin was three- to fivefold more active. Daptomycin had decreased activity (MIC > 4 microg/ml) against 14 strains of Actinomyces spp. and all C. ramosum, Eubacterium lentum, and Lactobacillus plantarum strains. Linezolid showed decreased activity (MIC > 4 microg/ml) against C. ramosum, two strains of C. difficile, and 15 strains of Lactobacillus spp. Imipenem and piperacillin

  17. Retrospective Analysis of Clinical and Cost Outcomes Associated with Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Complicated Skin and Skin Structure Infections Treated with Daptomycin, Vancomycin, or Linezolid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley M. Wright

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The objective of this analysis was to compare clinical and cost outcomes associated with patients who had suspected or documented methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA infections treated with daptomycin, vancomycin, or linezolid in complicated skin and skin structure infections (cSSSIs. Design. This was a retrospective analysis conducted from February to June of 2007. Appropriate data was collected, collated, and subsequently evaluated with the purpose of quantifying length of stay, antibiotic therapy duration, clinical cure rates, adverse drug events, and cost of hospitalization. Results. All 82 patients included in the analysis experienced clinical cure. The duration of antibiotic therapy was similar among the three groups yet the length of hospitalization was slightly shorter in the daptomycin group. Conclusions. The incidence of resistant staphylococcal infections is increasing; therefore, judicious use of MRSA active agents is paramount. Future studies are necessary to determine if MRSA treatment options can be stratified based on the severity of the infectious process.

  18. Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus spp.: validation of susceptibility testing and in vitro activity of vancomycin, linezolid, tigecycline and daptomycin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathe, Mathias; Kristensen, Lise; Ellermann-Eriksen, Svend

    2010-01-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) have emerged to become a significant nosocomial pathogen. However, detection may be challenging and treatment possibilities are limited. Reports of resistance to linezolide, daptomycin and tigecycline underline the need for reliable susceptibility testing wi...

  19. Optimization of nebulized delivery of linezolid, daptomycin, and vancomycin aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarogoulidis P

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Paul Zarogoulidis,1 Ioannis Kioumis,1 Sofia Lampaki,1 John Organtzis,1 Konstantinos Porpodis,1 Dionysios Spyratos,1 Georgia Pitsiou,1 Dimitris Petridis,2 Athanasia Pataka,1 Haidong Huang,3 Qiang Li,3 Lonny Yarmus,4 Wolfgang Hohenforst-Schmidt,5 Nikolaos Pezirkianidis,6 Konstantinos Zarogoulidis1 1Pulmonary Department-Oncology Unit, “G Papanikolaou” General Hospital, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece; 2Department of Food Technology, School of Food Technology and Nutrition, Alexander Technological Educational Institute, Thessaloniki, Greece; 3Department of Respiratory Diseases, Shanghai Hospital, II Military University Hospital, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 4Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA; 5II Medical Department, “Coburg” Regional Hospital, Coburg, Germany; 6Surgery Department, Private Cabinet, Serres, Greece Background: At this time, several antibiotics have been investigated as possibilities for aerosol administration, but local therapy has been found to be more efficient in several diseases. Materials and methods: The drugs linezolid (Zyvox, vancomycin (Voncon, and daptomycin (Cubicin were tested with three jet nebulizers with seven different residual cups and different loadings. Moreover, three ultrasound nebulizers were again tested with these drugs, with different loadings and mouthpiece attachments. Results: When drugs are combined with particular cup designs, they significantly lower the droplet size to 1.60 and 1.80 µm, which represents the best combination of Zyvox and cup G and Cubicin and cup D, respectively. Cup design D is suggested as the most effective cup for lowering the droplet size (2.30 µm when considering a higher loading level (8 mL. Conclusion: Modification of current drugs from dry powder to solution is possible, and the residual cup design plays the most important role in droplet size production when the

  20. The target of daptomycin is absent from Escherichia coli and other gram-negative pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Christopher P; Mariner, Katherine R; Chopra, Ian; O'Neill, Alex J

    2013-01-01

    Antistaphylococcal agents commonly lack activity against Gram-negative bacteria like Escherichia coli owing to the permeability barrier presented by the outer membrane and/or the action of efflux transporters. When these intrinsic resistance mechanisms are artificially compromised, such agents almost invariably demonstrate antibacterial activity against Gram negatives. Here we show that this is not the case for the antibiotic daptomycin, whose target appears to be absent from E. coli and other Gram-negative pathogens.

  1. Dermabacter hominis: a usually daptomycin-resistant gram-positive organism infrequently isolated from human clinical samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Natal, I; Sáez-Nieto, J A; Medina-Pascual, M J; Albersmeier, A; Valdezate, S; Guerra-Laso, J M; Rodríguez, H; Marrodán, T; Parras, T; Tauch, A; Soriano, F

    2013-01-01

    During a 12-year period, Dermabacter hominis was isolated from 21 clinical samples belonging to 14 patients attending a tertiary hospital in León, Spain. Samples included blood cultures (14), peritoneal dialysis catheter exit sites (three), cutaneous abscesses (two), an infected vascular catheter (one) and a wound swab (one). Identification was made by API Coryne™ V2.0, Biolog™ GP2 and 16S rRNA gene amplification. Six febrile patients had positive blood cultures (one, two or three sets) and all of them were treated with teicoplanin (two patients), vancomycin, ampicillin plus gentamicin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and ciprofloxacin (one each). An additional patient with a single positive blood culture was not treated, the finding being considered non-significant. In the remaining seven patients the organism was isolated from a single specimen and three of them received antimicrobial treatment (ciprofloxacin, ceftriaxone plus vancomycin and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid). At least ten patients had several underlying diseases and conditions, and no direct mortality was observed in relation to the isolated organism. All isolates were susceptible to vancomycin, rifampin and linezolid. Resistance to other antibiotics varied: erythromycin (100%), clindamycin (78.5%), ciprofloxacin (21.4%) and gentamicin, quinupristin-dalfopristin, benzylpenicillin and imipenem 7.1% each. Thirteen isolates were highly resistant to daptomycin with MICs ranging from 8 to 48 (MIC90 = 32 mg/L); only one was daptomycin-sensitive (MIC = 0.19 mg/L). PMID:25356327

  2. Ceftaroline-Resistant, Daptomycin-Tolerant, and Heterogeneous Vancomycin-Intermediate Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Causing Infective Endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigo, Masayuki; Diaz, Lorena; Carvajal, Lina P; Tran, Truc T; Rios, Rafael; Panesso, Diana; Garavito, Juan D; Miller, William R; Wanger, Audrey; Weinstock, George; Munita, Jose M; Arias, Cesar A; Chambers, Henry F

    2017-03-01

    We report a case of infective endocarditis (IE) caused by ceftaroline-resistant, daptomycin-tolerant, and heterogeneous vancomycin-intermediate methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Resistance to ceftaroline emerged in the absence of drug exposure, and the E447K substitution in the active site of PBP2a previously associated with ceftaroline resistance was identified. Additionally, we present evidence of patient-to-patient transmission of the strain within the same unit. This case illustrates the difficulties in treating MRSA IE in the setting of a multidrug-resistant phenotype. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  3. Eradication of Biofilm-like Microcolony Structures of Borrelia burgdorferi by Daunomycin and Daptomycin but not Mitomycin C in Combination with Doxycycline and Cefuroxime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie eFeng

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Lyme disease, caused by Borrelia burgdorferi, is the most common vector-borne disease in the United States and Europe. While the majority of Lyme disease patients can resolve their symptoms if treated promptly, 10-20% of patients suffer from prolonged symptoms called post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome (PTLDS. Although the cause for PTLDS is unclear, one possibility is the presence of bacterial persisters not effectively cleared by the current Lyme antibiotics. Recent studies identified several drug candidates including daptomycin, daunomycin, doxorubicin, and mitomycin C that had good activity against B. burgdorferi persisters. However, their relative activities against B. burgdorferi persisters have not been evaluated under the same conditions. In this study, we tested the anti-persister activities of these drugs against both 7-day and 15-day old stationary phase cultures of B. burgdorferi individually as well as in combination with Lyme antibiotics doxycycline and cefuroxime (Ceftin. Our findings demonstrate daunomycin and daptomycin were more active than mitomycin C in single drug comparison at 10 and 20 µM, as well as in drug combinations with doxycycline and cefuroxime. In addition, daunomycin was more active than doxorubicin which correlated with their ability to stain and accumulate in B. burgdorferi. The two drug combination of doxycycline and cefuroxime was unable to eradicate biofilm-like microcolonies of B. burgdorferi persisters. However, the addition of either daunomycin or daptomycin to the doxycycline + cefuroxime combination completely eradicated the biofilm-like structures and produced no visible bacterial regrowth after 7 days and 21 days, while the addition of doxorubicin was unable to prevent regrowth at either 7 day or 21 day subculture. Mitomycin C in combination with doxycycline and cefuroxime caused no regrowth at 7 days but visible spirochetal regrowth occurred after 21 day subculture. Furthermore, we found that

  4. Daptomycin as a possible new treatment option for surgical management of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus sternal wound infection after cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmert Alexander

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present a case of a 77-year old female who had undergone a coronary artery bypass grafting with an aortic valve replacement and developed three month later a Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA sternal wound infection which was successful treated with Daptomycin combined with vacuum-assisted closure (VAC.

  5. Fitness Cost of Daptomycin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Obtained from in Vitro Daptomycin Selection Pressure

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    Shuguang Li

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Daptomycin-resistant (DAP-R Staphylococcus aureus strains are well documented, but have not been reported in China. To elucidate the evolution adaptability and fitness cost of DAP-R S. aureus, three DAP susceptible strains, Pre3 (MRSA, ST239-t037, Pre5 (MRSA, ST239-t037, and Pre14b (MSSA, ST188-t189, were isolated from patients with bloodstream infections, and serially passaged in Mueller–Hinton broth with a gradient of DAP concentration to select for resistance. Highly DAP-R mutants were obtained after screening for 34 passages. The DAP minimum inhibitory concentrations increased from 0.5 μg/ml in the parent strains to 16 μg/ml in the mutants, which remained tolerant to 4 μg/ml of DAP for more than 160 generations. The growth of the three mutant strains was slower than that of the parent strains, with relative fitness cost of 34.8%, 19.2%, and 15.0%, respectively. The in vitro serum tolerance of the mutants was decreased, and the lethality and pathogenicity in mice were weakened (P < 0.01. Transmission electron microscopy found that the cell walls of the mutants were significantly thicker (from 38.6% to 75.4% than those of the parent cells. Mutation L826F of mprF was found in Post14b, G299V, and L473I of mprF and Y225N of walK were found in Post3, while T345A of mprF, S52N of graS, and F473I of walK were found in Post5. Thus, stable DAP-R mutants could be obtained from a middle-short term of in vitro DAP selection, and according to their fitness cost, some prevention and control work may be done to cope with DAP-R S. aureus that may appear in China in the future.

  6. Vancomycin, linezolid and daptomycin susceptibility pattern among clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA from Sub- Himalyan Center

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    Afzal Husain

    2018-01-01

    CONCLUSION: MIC creep was observed with vancomycin. Although linezolid MIC was within the susceptible zone, more than 40% strains showing MIC 3 μg/ml may herald the future development of either resistant or heteroresistant. Daptomycin showed good sensitivity against MRSA isolates. Therefore, it could be considered as an alternative agent for the treatment of infections caused by MRSA. However, it should be reserved where this class has a clear therapeutic advantage over other anti-MRSA drugs.

  7. Comparability of prostate trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suciu, S; Sylvester, R; Iversen, P

    1993-01-01

    The present overview of advanced prostate cancer required the identification of randomized clinical trials studying the question of maximal androgen blockade versus the classic castration therapy. The heterogeneity of the trials concerned the type of castration (surgical or chemical) and the type...... of antiandrogen (flutamide, Anandron, or cyproterone acetate) added to castration. This paper reviews the different types of heterogeneity that might exist among trials that are involved in the overview: study design, randomization procedure, treatment evaluation, statistical evaluation, and data maturity....... In order to overcome these various types of heterogeneity and to compare like with like, the treatment comparison should be stratified a posteriori by question (i.e., type of castration or type of anti-androgen studied) and by study. In this way, one may draw valid conclusions. Of course, those trials...

  8. Adaptation of Enterococcus faecalis to daptomycin reveals an ordered progression to resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Corwin; Kong, Jiayi; Tran, Truc T; Arias, Cesar A; Saxer, Gerda; Shamoo, Yousif

    2013-11-01

    With increasing numbers of hospital-acquired antibiotic resistant infections each year and staggering health care costs, there is a clear need for new antimicrobial agents, as well as novel strategies to extend their clinical efficacy. While genomic studies have provided a wealth of information about the alleles associated with adaptation to antibiotics, they do not provide essential information about the relative importance of genomic changes, their order of appearance, or potential epistatic relationships between adaptive changes. Here we used quantitative experimental evolution of a single polymorphic population in continuous culture with whole-genome sequencing and allelic frequency measurements to study daptomycin (DAP) resistance in the vancomycin-resistant clinical pathogen Enterococcus faecalis S613. Importantly, we sustained both planktonic and nonplanktonic (i.e., biofilm) populations in coculture as the concentration of antibiotic was raised, facilitating the development of more ecological complexity than is typically observed in laboratory evolution. Quantitative experimental evolution revealed a clear order and hierarchy of genetic changes leading to resistance, the signaling and metabolic pathways responsible, and the relative importance of these mutations to the evolution of DAP resistance. Despite the relative simplicity of this ex vivo approach compared to the ecological complexity of the human body, we showed that experimental evolution allows for rapid identification of clinically relevant adaptive molecular pathways and new targets for drug design in pathogens.

  9. Comparative efficacy and safety of antibiotics used to treat acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections: Results of a network meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian F Guest

    Full Text Available This NMA compared the efficacy and safety between IV antibiotics that are used in the current standard of care for managing adult patients (≥18 years of age with ABSSSI.Comparators were chosen on the basis that both direct and indirect comparisons between the interventions of interest could be performed. Outcomes of the analysis were selected on the basis that they are frequently measured and reported in trials involving ABSSSI patients, and only published randomised control trials of any size and duration and with any blinding status were eligible for inclusion in the analysis. The NMA was performed using both a fixed-effect and random-effect model. Efficacy-related endpoints were (1 clinical treatment success and (2 microbiological success at TOC visit. Safety-related endpoints were (1 number of discontinuations due to AEs/SAEs, (2 patients experiencing AEs, (3 patients experiencing SAEs and (4 all-cause mortality.Study interventions included daptomycin, dalbavancin, linezolid and tigecycline. Vancomycin was the comparator in all studies, except in two where it was linezolid and teicoplanin. The NMA showed that irrespective of patient subgroup, the likelihood of clinical and microbiological success with dalbavancin was statistically similar to the comparators studied. No statistically significant differences were observed between dalbavancin and any of the comparators in the discontinuation rate due to AEs/SAEs. In contrast, dalbavancin was associated with a significantly lower likelihood of experiencing an AE than linezolid, a significantly lower likelihood of experiencing a SAE than vancomycin and daptomycin, and a significantly lower risk of all-cause mortality than vancomycin, linezolid and tigecycline.Dalbavancin affords a promising, new alternative IV antimicrobial agent which is as effective as traditional therapies, but with the added benefit of enabling clinicians to treat patients with ABSSSI in different organisational settings

  10. Comparative efficacy and safety of antibiotics used to treat acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections: Results of a network meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban, Jaime; Manganelli, Anton G.; Novelli, Andrea; Rizzardini, Giuliano; Serra, Miquel

    2017-01-01

    Objective This NMA compared the efficacy and safety between IV antibiotics that are used in the current standard of care for managing adult patients (≥18 years of age) with ABSSSI. Methods Comparators were chosen on the basis that both direct and indirect comparisons between the interventions of interest could be performed. Outcomes of the analysis were selected on the basis that they are frequently measured and reported in trials involving ABSSSI patients, and only published randomised control trials of any size and duration and with any blinding status were eligible for inclusion in the analysis. The NMA was performed using both a fixed-effect and random-effect model. Efficacy-related endpoints were (1) clinical treatment success and (2) microbiological success at TOC visit. Safety-related endpoints were (1) number of discontinuations due to AEs/SAEs, (2) patients experiencing AEs, (3) patients experiencing SAEs and (4) all-cause mortality. Results Study interventions included daptomycin, dalbavancin, linezolid and tigecycline. Vancomycin was the comparator in all studies, except in two where it was linezolid and teicoplanin. The NMA showed that irrespective of patient subgroup, the likelihood of clinical and microbiological success with dalbavancin was statistically similar to the comparators studied. No statistically significant differences were observed between dalbavancin and any of the comparators in the discontinuation rate due to AEs/SAEs. In contrast, dalbavancin was associated with a significantly lower likelihood of experiencing an AE than linezolid, a significantly lower likelihood of experiencing a SAE than vancomycin and daptomycin, and a significantly lower risk of all-cause mortality than vancomycin, linezolid and tigecycline. Conclusion Dalbavancin affords a promising, new alternative IV antimicrobial agent which is as effective as traditional therapies, but with the added benefit of enabling clinicians to treat patients with ABSSSI in different

  11. Comparative efficacy and safety of antibiotics used to treat acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections: Results of a network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, Julian F; Esteban, Jaime; Manganelli, Anton G; Novelli, Andrea; Rizzardini, Giuliano; Serra, Miquel

    2017-01-01

    This NMA compared the efficacy and safety between IV antibiotics that are used in the current standard of care for managing adult patients (≥18 years of age) with ABSSSI. Comparators were chosen on the basis that both direct and indirect comparisons between the interventions of interest could be performed. Outcomes of the analysis were selected on the basis that they are frequently measured and reported in trials involving ABSSSI patients, and only published randomised control trials of any size and duration and with any blinding status were eligible for inclusion in the analysis. The NMA was performed using both a fixed-effect and random-effect model. Efficacy-related endpoints were (1) clinical treatment success and (2) microbiological success at TOC visit. Safety-related endpoints were (1) number of discontinuations due to AEs/SAEs, (2) patients experiencing AEs, (3) patients experiencing SAEs and (4) all-cause mortality. Study interventions included daptomycin, dalbavancin, linezolid and tigecycline. Vancomycin was the comparator in all studies, except in two where it was linezolid and teicoplanin. The NMA showed that irrespective of patient subgroup, the likelihood of clinical and microbiological success with dalbavancin was statistically similar to the comparators studied. No statistically significant differences were observed between dalbavancin and any of the comparators in the discontinuation rate due to AEs/SAEs. In contrast, dalbavancin was associated with a significantly lower likelihood of experiencing an AE than linezolid, a significantly lower likelihood of experiencing a SAE than vancomycin and daptomycin, and a significantly lower risk of all-cause mortality than vancomycin, linezolid and tigecycline. Dalbavancin affords a promising, new alternative IV antimicrobial agent which is as effective as traditional therapies, but with the added benefit of enabling clinicians to treat patients with ABSSSI in different organisational settings

  12. In vitro testing of daptomycin plus rifampin againstmethicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus resistant to rifampin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaswneh, Faisal A.; Ashcraft, Deborah S.; Pankey, George A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to test for synergy between daptomycin (DAP) and rifampin(RIF) against RIF-resistant methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus(MRSA) isolates. Synergy testing using time-kill assay (TKA) was performed on6 clinically and genetically unique RIF-resistant MRSA isolates. The isolateswere identified out of 489 (1.2%) samples collected during April 2003 toAugust 2006, from patients at the Ochsner Medical Center in New Orleans,Louisiana, United States of America. Synergy testing of DAP plus RIF by TKAshowed that 5 isolates were different, but one isolate was antagonistic. Ourin-vitro study failed to demonstrate synergy between DAP plus RIF, againstour RIF-resistant MRSA isolates. Clinical failure of this combination shouldprompt the clinician to consider antagonism as one of the potential causes.(author)

  13. Comparative trials in registration files of cardiovascular drugs : Comparator drugs and dosing schemes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieringa, NF; Vos, R; de Graeff, PA

    Registration files of 13 cardiovascular drugs were analysed with respect to the number of double-blind phase-III clinical trials, the use of placebo and active comparator drugs and their dosing schemes. Half of the 146 double-blind trials used active comparator drugs. The majority of files included

  14. Differential Adaptations of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus to Serial In Vitro Passage in Daptomycin: Evolution of Daptomycin Resistance and Role of Membrane Carotenoid Content and Fluidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagendra N. Mishra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies showed serial 20 d in vitro passage of MRSA strain MW2 in sublethal daptomycin (DAP resulted in diverse perturbations in both cell membrane (CM and cell wall (CW characteristics, including increased CM rigidity; increased CW thickness; “gain-in-function” single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the mprF locus (i.e., increased synthesis and translocation of lysyl-phosphatidylglycerol (L-PG; progressive accumulation of SNPs in yyc and rpo locus genes; reduced carotenoid production; cross-resistance to innate host defense peptides. The current study was designed to characterize the reproducibility of these phenotypic and genotypic modifications following in vitro serial passages of the same parental strain. After a second 20d serial in vitro passage of parental MW2, emergence of DAP-R was associated with evolution of several phenotypes closely mirroring previous passage outcomes. However, in contrast to the initial serial passage strain set, we observed (i only modest increase in L-PG synthesis and no increase in L-PG outer CM translocation; (ii significantly increased carotenoid synthesis (P<0.05; (iii a different order of SNP accumulations (mprF≫rpoB≫yycG; (iv a different cadre and locations of such SNPs. Thus, MRSA strains are not “pre-programmed” to phenotypically and/or genotypically adapt in an identical manner during induction of DAP resistance.

  15. Efficacy of Daptomycin Monotherapy and In Combination with β-lactams for Daptomycin-Susceptible Enterococcus faecium Harboring LiaSR Substitutions: Influence of The Inoculum Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebriaei, Razieh; Rice, Seth A; Singh, Kavindra V; Stamper, Kyle C; Dinh, An Q; Rios, Rafael; Diaz, Lorena; Murray, Barbara E; Munita, Jose M; Tran, Truc T; Arias, Cesar A; Rybak, Michael J

    2018-05-14

    Enterococcus faecium that harbor LiaFSR substitutions but are phenotypically susceptible to daptomycin (DAP) by current breakpoints are problematic since predisposition to resistance may lead to therapeutic failure. Using a simulated endocardial vegetation (SEV) PK/PD model, we investigated DAP regimens (6, 8 and 10 mg/kg/day) as monotherapy and in combination with ampicillin (AMP), ceftaroline (CPT) or ertapenem (ERT) against E. faecium HOU503, a DAP-susceptible strain that harbors common LiaS and LiaR substitutions found in clinical isolates (T120S and W73C, respectively). Of interest, the efficacy of DAP monotherapy, at any dose regimen, was dependent on the size of the inoculum. At an inoculum of ∼10 9 CFU/g, DAP doses of 6-8 mg/kg/d were not effective and led to significant regrowth with emergence of resistant derivatives. In contrast, at an inoculum of ∼10 7 , marked reductions in bacterial counts were observed with DAP 6 mg/kg/d with no resistance. The inoculum effect was confirmed in a rat model using humanized DAP exposures. Combinations of DAP with AMP, CPT or ERT demonstrated enhanced eradication and reduced potential for resistance allowing for de-escalation of the DAP dose. Persistence of the LiaRS substitutions were identified in DAP-resistant isolates recovered from the SEV model and in DAP-resistant derivatives of an initially DAP-susceptible clinical isolate of E. faecium (HOU668) harboring LiaSR substitutions and recovered from a patient with a recurrent bloodstream infection. Our results provide novel data for the use of DAP monotherapy and combinations for recalcitrant E. faecium infections and paves the way for testing these approaches in humans. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  16. Comparability of prostate trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suciu, S; Sylvester, R; Iversen, P

    1993-01-01

    The present overview of advanced prostate cancer required the identification of randomized clinical trials studying the question of maximal androgen blockade versus the classic castration therapy. The heterogeneity of the trials concerned the type of castration (surgical or chemical) and the type...

  17. Daptomycin resistance in enterococci is associated with distinct alterations of cell membrane phospholipid content.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagendra N Mishra

    Full Text Available The lipopeptide antibiotic, daptomycin (DAP interacts with the bacterial cell membrane (CM. Development of DAP resistance during therapy in a clinical strain of Enterococcus faecalis was associated with mutations in genes encoding enzymes involved in cell envelope homeostasis and phospholipid metabolism. Here we characterized changes in CM phospholipid profiles associated with development of DAP resistance in clinical enterococcal strains.Using two clinical strain-pairs of DAP-susceptible and DAP-resistant E. faecalis (S613 vs. R712 and E. faecium (S447 vs. R446 recovered before and after DAP therapy, we compared four distinct CM profiles: phospholipid content, fatty acid composition, membrane fluidity and capacity to be permeabilized and/or depolarized by DAP. Additionally, we characterized the cell envelope of the E. faecium strain-pair by transmission electron microscopy and determined the relative cell surface charge of both strain-pairs.Both E. faecalis and E. faecium mainly contained four major CM PLs: phosphatidylglycerol (PG, cardiolipin, lysyl-phosphatidylglycerol (L-PG and glycerolphospho-diglycodiacylglycerol (GP-DGDAG. In addition, E. faecalis CMs (but not E. faecium also contained: i phosphatidic acid; and ii two other unknown species of amino-containing PLs. Development of DAP resistance in both enterococcal species was associated with a significant decrease in CM fluidity and PG content, with a concomitant increase in GP-DGDAG. The strain-pairs did not differ in their outer CM translocation (flipping of amino-containing PLs. Fatty acid content did not change in the E. faecalis strain-pair, whereas a significant decrease in unsaturated fatty acids was observed in the DAP-resistant E. faecium isolate R446 (vs S447. Resistance to DAP in E. faecium was associated with distinct structural alterations of the cell envelope and cell wall thickening, as well as a decreased ability of DAP to depolarize and permeabilize the CM

  18. The efficacy of maggot debridement therapy - a review of comparative clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zarchi, K.; Jemec, G.B.

    2012-01-01

    in a variety of ulcers. However, comparative clinical trials and in particular randomized controlled trials investigating the efficacy of MDT are sparse. A systematic search in the literature showed three randomized clinical trials and five non randomized studies evaluating the efficacy of sterile Lucilia......, including hydrocolloid, hydrogel and saline moistened gauze. However, the design of the studies was suboptimal, with important differences in the use of other therapies, such as compression, that may influence both debridement and healing between the compared groups, as well as inappropriately short follow...

  19. Clinical Trial Of Glimepiride Compared With Glibenclamide For ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The study was undertaken to compare the efficacy and safety of Glimepiride against Glibenclamide in the management of patients with type 2 DM in Jos, Nigeria. Study design: An open, randomised controlled trial. Setting: Diabetes Clinic of the Jos University Teaching Hospital, Jos, Nigeria. Subjects: Seventy four ...

  20. Mechanistic and structural basis of stereospecific Cbeta-hydroxylation in calcium-dependent antibiotic, a daptomycin-type lipopeptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strieker, Matthias; Kopp, Florian; Mahlert, Christoph; Essen, Lars-Oliver; Marahiel, Mohamed A

    2007-03-20

    Non-ribosomally synthesized lipopeptide antibiotics of the daptomycin type are known to contain unnatural beta-modified amino acids, which are essential for bioactivity. Here we present the biochemical and structural basis for the incorporation of 3-hydroxyasparagine at position 9 in the 11-residue acidic lipopeptide lactone calcium-dependent antibiotic (CDA). Direct hydroxylation of l-asparagine by AsnO, a non-heme Fe(2+)/alpha-ketoglutarate-dependent oxygenase encoded by the CDA biosynthesis gene cluster, was validated by Fmoc derivatization of the reaction product and LC/MS analysis. The 1.45, 1.92, and 1.66 A crystal structures of AsnO as apoprotein, Fe(2+) complex, and product complex, respectively, with (2S,3S)-3-hydroxyasparagine and succinate revealed the stereoselectivity and substrate specificity of AsnO. The comparison of native and product-complex structures of AsnO showed a lid-like region (residues F208-E223) that seals the active site upon substrate binding and shields it from sterically demanding peptide substrates. Accordingly, beta-hydroxylated asparagine is synthesized prior to its incorporation into the growing CDA peptide. The AsnO structure could serve as a template for engineering novel enzymes for the synthesis of beta-hydroxylated amino acids.

  1. A Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial Comparing Efficacy, Safety ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial Comparing Efficacy, Safety and Cost Effectiveness of Lornoxicam with Diclofenac Sodium in Patients of Osteoarthritis Knee. ... All patients were assessed with visual analogue scale and 100 meter walking test before starting of therapy, at 15 days and at 1, 2 and 3 months of therapy.

  2. The decision to conduct a head-to-head comparative trial: a game-theoretic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansley, Edward C; Elbasha, Elamin H; Teutsch, Steven M; Berger, Marc L

    2007-01-01

    Recent Medicare legislation calls on the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality to conduct research related to the comparative effectiveness of health care items and services, including prescription drugs. This reinforces earlier calls for head-to-head comparative trials of clinically relevant treatment alternatives. Using a game-theoretic model, the authors explore the decision of pharmaceutical companies to conduct such trials. The model suggests that an important factor affecting this decision is the potential loss in market share and profits following a result of inferiority or comparability. This hidden cost is higher for the market leader than the market follower, making it less likely that the leader will choose to conduct a trial. The model also suggests that in a full-information environment, it will never be the case that both firms choose to conduct such a trial. Furthermore, if market shares and the probability of proving superiority are similar for both firms, it is quite possible that neither firm will choose to conduct a trial. Finally, the results indicate that incentives that offset the direct cost of a trial can prevent a no-trial equilibrium, even when both firms face the possibility of an inferior outcome.

  3. The IDvIP Trial: A two-centre randomised double-blind controlled trial comparing intramuscular diamorphine and intramuscular pethidine for labour analgesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Peter

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intramuscular pethidine is routinely used throughout the UK for labour analgesia. Studies have suggested that pethidine provides little pain relief in labour and has a number of side effects affecting mother and neonate. It can cause nausea, vomiting and dysphoria in mothers and can cause reduced fetal heart rate variability and accelerations. Neonatal effects include respiratory depression and impaired feeding. There are few large studies comparing the relative side effects and efficacy of different opioids in labour. A small trial comparing intramuscular pethidine with diamorphine, showed diamorphine to have some benefits over pethidine when used for labour analgesia but the study did not investigate the adverse effects of either opioid. Methods The Intramuscular Diamorphine versus Intramuscular Pethidine (IDvIP trial is a randomised double-blind two centre controlled trial comparing intramuscular diamorphine and pethidine regarding their analgesic efficacy in labour and their side effects in mother, fetus and neonate. Information about the trial will be provided to women in the antenatal period or in early labour. Consent and recruitment to the trial will be obtained when the mother requests opioid analgesia. The sample size requirement is 406 women with data on primary outcomes. The maternal primary outcomes are pain relief during the first 3 hours after trial analgesia and specifically pain relief after 60 minutes. The neonatal primary outcomes are need for resuscitation and Apgar Score Discussion If the trial demonstrates that diamorphine provides better analgesia with fewer side effects in mother and neonate this could lead to a change in national practice and result in diamorphine becoming the preferred intramuscular opioid for analgesia in labour. Trial Registration ISRCTN14898678 Eudra No: 2006-003250-18, REC Reference No: 06/Q1702/95, MHRA Authorisation No: 1443/0001/001-0001, NIHR UKCRN reference 6895, RfPB grant

  4. Decision on performing interim analysis for comparative clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Kyongsun; Jacobus, Susanna; Uno, Hajime

    2017-09-01

    In randomized-controlled trials, interim analyses are often planned for possible early trial termination to claim superiority or futility of a new therapy. While unblinding is necessary to conduct the formal interim analysis in blinded studies, blinded data also have information about the potential treatment difference between the groups. We developed a blinded data monitoring tool that enables investigators to predict whether they observe such an unblinded interim analysis results that supports early termination of the trial. Investigators may skip some of the planned interim analyses if an early termination is unlikely. We specifically focused on blinded, randomized-controlled studies to compare binary endpoints of a new treatment with a control. Assuming one interim analysis is planned for early termination for superiority or futility, we conducted extensive simulation studies to assess the impact of the implementation of our tool on the size, power, expected number of interim analyses, and bias in the treatment effect. The numerical study showed the proposed monitoring tool does not affect size or power, but dramatically reduces the expected number of interim analyses when the effect of the treatment difference is small. The tool serves as a useful reference when interpreting the summary of the blinded data throughout the course of the trial, without losing integrity of the study. This tool could potentially save the study resources and budget by avoiding unnecessary interim analyses.

  5. An international randomized trial comparing four thrombolytic strategies for acute myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.L. Simoons (Maarten); E.J. Topol (Eric); R.M. Califf (Robert); F.J.J. van de Werf (Frans); P.W. Armstrong (Paul); P.E. Aylward (Philip Edmund); G.I. Barbash; E.R. Bates (Eric); A. Betriu; J.H. Chesebro (James); J.J. Col (Jacques); D.P. de Bono (David); J.M. Gore (Joel); A.D. Guerci (Alan); J.R. Hampton (John)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: The relative efficacy of streptokinase and tissue plasminogen activator and the roles of intravenous as compared with subcutaneous heparin as adjunctive therapy in acute myocardial infarction are unresolved questions. The current trial was designed to compare new, aggressive

  6. A randomized trial comparing treatments for varicose veins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brittenden, Julie; Cotton, Seonaidh C; Elders, Andrew; Ramsay, Craig R; Norrie, John; Burr, Jennifer; Campbell, Bruce; Bachoo, Paul; Chetter, Ian; Gough, Michael; Earnshaw, Jonothan; Lees, Tim; Scott, Julian; Baker, Sara A; Francis, Jill; Tassie, Emma; Scotland, Graham; Wileman, Samantha; Campbell, Marion K

    2014-09-25

    Ultrasound-guided foam sclerotherapy and endovenous laser ablation are widely used alternatives to surgery for the treatment of varicose veins, but their comparative effectiveness and safety remain uncertain. In a randomized trial involving 798 participants with primary varicose veins at 11 centers in the United Kingdom, we compared the outcomes of foam, laser, and surgical treatments. Primary outcomes at 6 months were disease-specific quality of life and generic quality of life, as measured on several scales. Secondary outcomes included complications and measures of clinical success. After adjustment for baseline scores and other covariates, the mean disease-specific quality of life was slightly worse after treatment with foam than after surgery (P=0.006) but was similar in the laser and surgery groups. There were no significant differences between the surgery group and the foam or the laser group in measures of generic quality of life. The frequency of procedural complications was similar in the foam group (6%) and the surgery group (7%) but was lower in the laser group (1%) than in the surgery group (Pdisease-specific quality of life in the foam group than in the surgery group. All treatments had similar clinical efficacy, but complications were less frequent after laser treatment and ablation rates were lower after foam treatment. (Funded by the Health Technology Assessment Programme of the National Institute for Health Research; Current Controlled Trials number, ISRCTN51995477.).

  7. Albendazole versus praziquantel in the treatment of neurocysticercosis: a meta-analysis of comparative trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios K Matthaiou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neurocysticercosis, infection of the brain with larvae of Taenia solium (pork tapeworm, is one of several forms of human cysticercosis caused by this organism. We investigated the role of albendazole and praziquantel in the treatment of patients with parenchymal neurocysticercosis by performing a meta-analysis of comparative trials of their effectiveness and safety. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed a search in the PubMed database, Cochrane Database of Controlled Trials, and in references of relevant articles. Six studies were included in the meta-analysis. Albendazole was associated with better control of seizures than praziquantel in the pooled data analysis, when the generic inverse variance method was used to combine the incidence of seizure control in the included trials (patients without seizures/[patients x years at risk] (156 patients in 4 studies, point effect estimate [incidence rate ratio] = 4.94, 95% confidence interval 2.45-9.98. In addition, albendazole was associated with better effectiveness than praziquantel in the total disappearance of cysts (335 patients in 6 studies, random effects model, OR = 2.30, 95% CI 1.06-5.00. There was no difference between albendazole and praziquantel in reduction of cysts, proportion of patients with adverse events, and development of intracranial hypertension due to the administered therapy. CONCLUSIONS: A critical review of the available data from comparative trials suggests that albendazole is more effective than praziquantel regarding clinically important outcomes in patients with neurocysticercosis. Nevertheless, given the relative scarcity of trials, more comparative interventional studies--especially randomized controlled trials--are required to draw a safe conclusion about the best regimen for the treatment of patients with parenchymal neurocysticercosis.

  8. The IDvIP trial: a two-centre randomised double-blind controlled trial comparing intramuscular diamorphine and intramuscular pethidine for labour analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Michael Y K; Tuckey, Jenny P; Thomas, Peter; Burnard, Sara

    2011-07-08

    Intramuscular pethidine is routinely used throughout the UK for labour analgesia. Studies have suggested that pethidine provides little pain relief in labour and has a number of side effects affecting mother and neonate. It can cause nausea, vomiting and dysphoria in mothers and can cause reduced fetal heart rate variability and accelerations. Neonatal effects include respiratory depression and impaired feeding. There are few large studies comparing the relative side effects and efficacy of different opioids in labour. A small trial comparing intramuscular pethidine with diamorphine, showed diamorphine to have some benefits over pethidine when used for labour analgesia but the study did not investigate the adverse effects of either opioid. The Intramuscular Diamorphine versus Intramuscular Pethidine (IDvIP) trial is a randomised double-blind two centre controlled trial comparing intramuscular diamorphine and pethidine regarding their analgesic efficacy in labour and their side effects in mother, fetus and neonate. Information about the trial will be provided to women in the antenatal period or in early labour. Consent and recruitment to the trial will be obtained when the mother requests opioid analgesia. The sample size requirement is 406 women with data on primary outcomes. The maternal primary outcomes are pain relief during the first 3 hours after trial analgesia and specifically pain relief after 60 minutes. The neonatal primary outcomes are need for resuscitation and Apgar Score analgesia, whether method of analgesia would be used again, use of Entonox, umbilical arterial and venous pH, fetal heart rate, meconium staining, time from delivery to first breath, Apgar scores at 5 mins, naloxone requirement, transfer to neonatal intensive care unit, neonatal haemoglobin oxygen saturation at 30, 60, 90, and 120 mins after delivery, and neonatal sedation and feeding behaviour during first 2 hours. If the trial demonstrates that diamorphine provides better analgesia

  9. A Comparative Effectiveness Education Trial for Lifestyle Health Behavior Change in African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbert, Chanita Hughes; Bellamy, Scarlett; Briggs, Vanessa; Delmoor, Ernestine; Purnell, Joseph; Rogers, Rodney; Weathers, Benita; Johnson, Jerry C.

    2017-01-01

    Obesity and excess weight are significant clinical and public health issues that disproportionately affect African Americans because of physical inactivity and unhealthy eating. We compared the effects of alternate behavioral interventions on obesity-related health behaviors. We conducted a comparative effectiveness education trial in a…

  10. A randomized trial comparing primary angioplasty versus stent placement for symptomatic intracranial stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Adnan I; Chaudhry, Saqib A; Siddiq, Farhan; Majidi, Shahram; Rodriguez, Gustavo J; Suri, M Fareed K

    2013-01-01

    Background: Both primary angioplasty alone and angioplasty with a self-expanding stent have been compared in non-randomized concurrent clinical studies that suggest equivalent results. However, there is no randomized trial that has compared the two procedures in patients with symptomatic high grade intracranial stenosis. Objective: The primary aim of the randomized trial was to compare the clinical and angiographic efficacy of primary angioplasty and angioplasty followed by stent placement in preventing restenosis, stroke, requirement for second treatment, and death in patients with symptomatic intracranial stenosis. Methods: The study prospectively evaluated efficacy and safety of the two existing neurointerventional techniques for treatment of moderate intracranial stenosis (stenosis ≥ 50%) with documented failure of medical treatment or severe stenosis (≥70%) with or without failure of medical treatment. Results: A total of 18 patients were recruited in the study (mean age [±SD] was 64.7 ± 15.1 years); out of these, 12 were men. Of these 18, 10 were treated with primary angioplasty and 8 were treated with angioplasty followed by self-expanding stent. The technical success rates of intracranial angioplasty and stent placements defined as ability to achieve <30% residual stenosis when assessed by immediate post-procedure angiography was 5 of 10 and 5 of 8 patients, respectively. The total fluoroscopic time (mean [±SD]) was lower in patients undergoing primary angioplasty 37 [±11] min versus those undergoing angioplasty followed by self-expanding stent 42 [±15] min, P = 0.4321. The stroke and death rate within 1 month was very low in both patient groups (1 of 10 versus 0 of 8 patients). One patient randomized to stent placement continued to have recurrent ischemic symptoms requiring another angioplasty in the vertebral artery on post-procedure Day 2. Conclusions: The trial suggests that a randomized trial comparing primary angioplasty to angioplasty

  11. Daptomycin Tolerance in the Staphylococcus aureus pitA6 Mutant Is Due to Upregulation of the dlt Operon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechler, Lukas; Bonetti, Eve-Julie; Reichert, Sebastian; Flötenmeyer, Matthias; Schrenzel, Jacques; Bertram, Ralph; François, Patrice; Götz, Friedrich

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of how bacteria become tolerant toward antibiotics during clinical therapy is a very important object. In a previous study, we showed that increased daptomycin (DAP) tolerance of Staphylococcus aureus was due to a point mutation in pitA (inorganic phosphate transporter) that led to intracellular accumulation of both inorganic phosphate (Pi) and polyphosphate (polyP). DAP tolerance in the pitA6 mutant differs from classical resistance mechanisms since there is no increase in the MIC. In this follow-up study, we demonstrate that DAP tolerance in the pitA6 mutant is not triggered by the accumulation of polyP. Transcriptome analysis revealed that 234 genes were at least 2.0-fold differentially expressed in the mutant. Particularly, genes involved in protein biosynthesis, carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, and replication and maintenance of DNA were downregulated. However, the most important change was the upregulation of the dlt operon, which is induced by the accumulation of intracellular Pi The GraXRS system, known as an activator of the dlt operon (d-alanylation of teichoic acids) and of the mprF gene (multiple peptide resistance factor), is not involved in DAP tolerance of the pitA6 mutant. In conclusion, DAP tolerance of the pitA6 mutant is due to an upregulation of the dlt operon, triggered directly or indirectly by the accumulation of Pi. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Prospective controlled trial comparing colostomy irrigation with "spontaneous-action" method.

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, N S; Johnston, D

    1980-01-01

    Thirty randomly selected patients with permanent colostomies entered a prospective controlled trial comparing colostomy irrigation with spontaneous action. Each patient was interviewed and examined before irrigation was begun and again after the technique had been used for three months. Each then reverted to spontaneous action for a further three months and was then reassessed. Eight patients abandoned irrigation and 22 (73%) adhered to the protocol. Irrigation caused no mishaps or complicati...

  13. Informing hot flash treatment decisions for breast cancer survivors: a systematic review of randomized trials comparing active interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Claire; Seav, Susan M; Dominick, Sally A; Gorman, Jessica R; Li, Hongying; Natarajan, Loki; Mao, Jun James; Irene Su, H

    2016-04-01

    Patient-centered decision making about hot flash treatments often incorporates a balance of efficacy and side effects in addition to patient preference. This systematic review examines randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing at least two non-hormonal hot flash treatments in breast cancer survivors. In July 2015, PubMed, SCOPUS, CINAHL, Cochrane, and Web of Science databases were searched for RCTs comparing active, non-hormonal hot flash treatments in female breast cancer survivors. Thirteen trials were included after identifying 906 potential studies. Four trials were dose comparison studies of pharmacologic treatments citalopram, venlafaxine, gabapentin, and paroxetine. Hot flash reduction did not differ by tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitor use. Citalopram 10, 20, and 30 mg daily had comparable outcomes. Venlafaxine 75 mg daily improved hot flashes without additional side effects from higher dosing. Gabapentin 900 mg daily improved hot flashes more than 300 mg. Paroxetine 10 mg daily had fewer side effects than 20 mg. Among four trials comparing different pharmacologic treatments, venlafaxine alleviated hot flash symptoms faster than clonidine; participants preferred venlafaxine over gabapentin. Five trials compared pharmacologic to non-pharmacologic treatments. Acupuncture had similar efficacy to venlafaxine and gabapentin but may have longer durability after completing treatment and fewer side effects. We could not perform a pooled meta-analysis because outcomes were not reported in comparable formats. Clinical trial data on non-hormonal hot flash treatments provide comparisons of hot flash efficacy and other patient important outcomes to guide clinical management. Clinicians can use the information to help patients select hot flash interventions.

  14. Experimental study of cerebrospinal fluid tumor necrosis factor-alpha release in penicillin- and cephalosporin-resistant pneumococcal meningitis treated with different antibiotic schedules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vivas

    2017-08-01

    Conclusion: CSF TNF-α levels were significantly lower in rabbits treated with daptomycin than in rabbits treated with ceftriaxone. Daptomycin avoided the inflammatory peak after administration observed in ceftriaxone-treated rabbits. The use of daptomycin plus dexamethasone achieved a significantly larger reduction in CSF TNF-α levels.

  15. In Vitro Synergy of Telavancin and Rifampin Against Enterococcus faecium Resistant to Both Linezolid and Vancomycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankey, George A; Ashcraft, Deborah S

    2013-01-01

    An emerging pathogen is Enterococcus faecium resistant to both linezolid and vancomycin (LRVRE). Antimicrobial combinations may be required for therapy and need to be evaluated. The combination of daptomycin and rifampin has demonstrated good in vitro activity against gram-positive bacteria, including E faecium. Telavancin, a newer lipoglycopeptide, has shown in vitro activity against E faecium. We evaluated the combination of telavancin and rifampin and compared the results to the combination of daptomycin and rifampin used previously on the same isolates. Twenty-four genetically unique (by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis), clinical LRVRE isolates were collected in the United States from 2001-2004. Etest minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) (μg/mL) were 0.064-8 for telavancin, 1-4 for daptomycin, and 0.012 to >32 for rifampin. In vitro synergy testing was performed in triplicate by an Etest MIC:MIC ratio method, and summation fractional inhibitory concentration (ΣFIC) was calculated: synergy ≤0.5; indifference >0.5-4; and antagonism >4. The Etest method showed synergy (ΣFICs of 0.1-0.5) with telavancin + rifampin in 20/24 (83%) isolates and indifference (ΣFICs of 0.6-0.8) in 4/24 (17%) isolates. Similarly, the daptomycin + rifampin combination showed synergy (ΣFICs of 0.1-0.5) in 21/24 (88%) isolates and indifference (ΣFICs of 0.6-1.0) in 3/24 (12%) isolates by the Etest method. No antagonism was found. In vitro synergy with both combinations (rifampin + telavancin or daptomycin) was 83% and 88%, respectively, by Etest against these LRVRE isolates. Although both daptomycin and telavancin in combination with rifampin showed a high incidence of synergistic activity, further in vitro synergy testing with this combination should be performed against additional E faecium isolates. In vitro synergy may or may not translate into in vivo effectiveness.

  16. Comparative effectiveness of Tai Chi versus physical therapy for knee osteoarthritis: a randomized trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Few remedies effectively treat long-term pain and disability from knee osteoarthritis. Studies suggest that Tai Chi alleviates symptoms, but no trials have directly compared Tai Chi with standard therapies for osteoarthritis. Objective: To compare Tai Chi with standard physical therapy f...

  17. Rosemary oil vs minoxidil 2% for the treatment of androgenetic alopecia: a randomized comparative trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panahi, Yunes; Taghizadeh, Mohsen; Marzony, Eisa Tahmasbpour; Sahebkar, Amirhossein

    2015-01-01

    Rosmarinus officinalis L. is a medicinal plant with diverse activities including enhancement microcapillary perfusion. The present study aimed to investigate the clinical efficacy of rosemary oil in the treatment of androgenetic alopecia (AGA) and compare its effects with minoxidil 2%. Patients with AGA were randomly assigned to rosemary oil (n = 50) or minoxidil 2% (n = 50) for a period of 6 months. After a baseline visit, patients returned to the clinic for efficacy and safety evaluations every 3 months. A standardized professional microphotographic assessment of each volunteer was taken at the initial interview and after 3 and 6 months of the trial. No significant change was observed in the mean hair count at the 3-month endpoint, neither in the rosemary nor in the minoxidil group (P > .05). In contrast, both groups experienced a significant increase in hair count at the 6-month endpoint compared with the baseline and 3-month endpoint (P .05). The frequencies of dry hair, greasy hair, and dandruff were not found to be significantly different from baseline at either month 3 or month 6 trial in the groups (P > .05). The frequency of scalp itching at the 3- and 6-month trial points was significantly higher compared with baseline in both groups (P minoxidil group at both assessed endpoints (P < .05). The findings of the present trial provided evidence with respect to the efficacy of rosemary oil in the treatment of AGA.

  18. A comparative analysis of quality management standards for contract research organisations in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Elizabeth; McAdam, Rodney

    2007-01-01

    This article compares and contrasts the main quality standards in the highly regulated pharmaceutical industry with specific focus on Good Clinical Practice (GCP), the standard for designing, conducting, recording and reporting clinical trials involving human participants. Comparison is made to ISO quality standards, which can be applied to all industries and types of organisation. The study is then narrowed to that of contract research organisations (CROs) involved in the conduct of clinical trials. The paper concludes that the ISO 9000 series of quality standards can act as a company-wide framework for quality management within such organisations by helping to direct quality efforts on a long-term basis without any loss of compliance. This study is valuable because comparative analysis in this domain is uncommon.

  19. Comparative effectiveness of injection therapies in lateral epicondylitis: a systematic review and network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogh, Thøger Persson; Bartels, Else Marie; Ellingsen, Torkell; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Fredberg, Ulrich; Bliddal, Henning; Christensen, Robin

    2013-06-01

    Injection therapy with glucocorticoids has been used since the 1950s as a treatment strategy for lateral epicondylitis (tennis elbow). Lately, several novel injection therapies have become available. To assess the comparative effectiveness and safety of injection therapies in patients with lateral epicondylitis. Systematic review and meta-analysis. Randomized controlled trials comparing different injection therapies for lateral epicondylitis were included provided they contained data for change in pain intensity (primary outcome). Trials were assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Network (random effects) meta-analysis was applied to combine direct and indirect evidence within and across trial data using the final end point reported in the trials, and results for the arm-based network analyses are reported as standardized mean differences (SMDs). Seventeen trials (1381 participants; 3 [18%] at low risk of bias) assessing injection with 8 different treatments-glucocorticoid (10 trials), botulinum toxin (4 trials), autologous blood (3 trials), platelet-rich plasma (2 trials), and polidocanol, glycosaminoglycan, prolotherapy, and hyaluronic acid (1 trial each)-were included. Pooled results (SMD [95% confidence interval]) showed that beyond 8 weeks, glucocorticoid injection was no more effective than placebo (-0.04 [-0.45 to 0.35]), but only 1 trial (which did not include a placebo arm) was at low risk of bias. Although botulinum toxin showed marginal benefit (-0.50 [-0.91 to -0.08]), it caused temporary paresis of finger extension, and all trials were at high risk of bias. Both autologous blood (-1.43 [-2.15 to -0.71]) and platelet-rich plasma (-1.13 [-1.77 to -0.49]) were also statistically superior to placebo, but only 1 trial was at low risk of bias. Prolotherapy (-2.71 [-4.60 to -0.82]) and hyaluronic acid (-5.58 [-6.35 to -4.82]) were both more efficacious than placebo, whereas polidocanol (0.39 [-0.42 to 1.20]) and glycosaminoglycan (-0.32 [-1.02 to 0

  20. Dropout Rates in Randomized Clinical Trials of Antipsychotics: A Meta-analysis Comparing First- and Second-Generation Drugs and an Examination of the Role of Trial Design Features

    OpenAIRE

    Rabinowitz, Jonathan; Levine, Stephen Z.; Barkai, Orna; Davidov, Ori

    2008-01-01

    Dropout is often used as an outcome measure in clinical trials of antipsychotic medication. Previous research is inconclusive regarding (a) differences in dropout rates between first- and second-generation antipsychotic medications and (b) how trial design features reduce dropout. Meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of antipsychotic medication was conducted to compare dropout rates for first- and second-generation antipsychotic drugs and to examine how a broad range of design...

  1. In vitro activities of dalbavancin and nine comparator agents against anaerobic gram-positive species and corynebacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Ellie J C; Citron, Diane M; Merriam, C Vreni; Warren, Yumi; Tyrrell, Kerin; Fernandez, Helen T

    2003-06-01

    Dalbavancin is a novel semisynthetic glycopeptide with enhanced activity against gram-positive species. Its comparative in vitro activities and those of nine comparator agents, including daptomycin, vancomycin, linezolid, and quinupristin-dalfopristin, against 290 recent gram-positive clinical isolates strains, as determined by the NCCLS agar dilution method, were studied. The MICs of dalbavancin at which 90% of various isolates tested were inhibited were as follows: Actinomyces spp., 0.5 microg/ml; Clostridium clostridioforme, 8 microg/ml; C. difficile, 0.25 microg/ml; C. innocuum, 0.25 microg/ml; C. perfringens, 0.125 microg/ml; C. ramosum, 1 microg/ml; Eubacterium spp., 1 microg/ml; Lactobacillus spp., >32 microg/ml, Propionibacterium spp., 0.5 microg/ml; and Peptostreptococcus spp., 0.25 microg/ml. Dalbavancin was 1 to 3 dilutions more active than vancomycin against most strains. Dalbavancin exhibited excellent activity against gram-positive strains tested and warrants clinical evaluation.

  2. Comparing Amazon Mechanical Turk with unpaid internet resources in online clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Bunge

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Internet interventions face significant challenges in recruitment and attrition rates are typically high and problematic. Finding innovative yet scientifically valid avenues for attaining and retaining participants is therefore of considerable importance. The main goal of this study was to compare recruitment process and participants characteristics between two similar randomized control trials of mood management interventions. One of the trials (Bunge et al., 2016 was conducted with participants recruited from Amazon's Mechanical Turk (AMT, and the other trial recruited via Unpaid Internet Resources (UIR. Methods: The AMT sample (Bunge et al., 2016 consisted of 765 adults, and the UIR sample (recruited specifically for this study consisted of 329 adult US residents. Participants' levels of depression, anxiety, confidence, motivation, and perceived usefulness of the intervention were assessed. The AMT sample was financially compensated whereas the UIR was not. Results: AMT yielded higher recruitment rates per month (p < .05. At baseline, the AMT sample reported significantly lower depression and anxiety scores (p < .001 and p < .005, respectively and significantly higher mood, motivation, and confidence (all p < .001 compared to the UIR sample. AMT participants spent significantly less time on the site (p < .05 and were more likely to complete follow-ups than the UIR sample (p < .05. Both samples reported a significant increase in their level of confidence and motivation from pre- to post-intervention. AMT participants showed a significant increase in perceived usefulness of the intervention (p < .0001, whereas the UIR sample did not (p = .1642. Conclusions: By using AMT, researchers can recruit very rapidly and obtain higher retention rates; however, these participants may not be representative of the general online population interested in clinical interventions. Considering that AMT and UIR participants

  3. Antistaphylococcal activity of LBM415, a new peptide deformylase inhibitor, compared with those of other agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Credito, Kim; Lin, Gengrong; Ednie, Lois M; Appelbaum, Peter C

    2004-10-01

    The MICs of LBM415, a new peptide diformylase inhibitor, were daptomycin, oritavancin, and quinupristin-dalfopristin. LBM415 at the MIC was bacteriostatic after 24 h.

  4. A comparison of different antibiotic regimens for the treatment of infective endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí-Carvajal, Arturo J; Dayer, Mark; Conterno, Lucieni O; Gonzalez Garay, Alejandro G; Martí-Amarista, Cristina Elena; Simancas-Racines, Daniel

    2016-04-19

    alone reporting uncertain effects on all-cause mortality (8/31 (26%) with levofloxacin plus standard treatment versus 9/39 (23%) with standard treatment alone; RR 1.12, 95% CI 0.49 to 2.56, very low quality evidence). The second trial compared daptomycin versus low-dose gentamicin plus an anti-staphylococcal penicillin (nafcillin, oxacillin or flucloxacillin) or vancomycin. This showed uncertain effects in terms of cure rates (9/28 (32.1%) with daptomycin versus 9/25 (36%) with low-dose gentamicin plus anti-staphylococcal penicillin or vancomycin, RR 0.89 95% CI 0.42 to 1.89; very low quality evidence). The third trial compared cloxacillin plus gentamicin with a glycopeptide (vancomycin or teicoplanin) plus gentamicin. In participants receiving gentamycin plus glycopeptide only 13/23 (56%) were cured versus 11/11 (100%) receiving cloxacillin plus gentamicin (RR 0.59, 95% CI 0.40 to 0.85; very low quality evidence). The fourth trial compared ceftriaxone plus gentamicin versus ceftriaxone alone and found no conclusive differences in terms of cure (15/34 (44%) with ceftriaxone plus gentamicin versus 21/33 (64%) with ceftriaxone alone, RR 0.69, 95% CI 0.44 to 1.10; very low quality evidence).The trials reported adverse events, need for cardiac surgical interventions, uncontrolled infection and relapse of endocarditis and found no conclusive differences between comparison groups (very low quality evidence). No trials assessed septic emboli or quality of life. Limited and very low quality evidence suggested that there were no conclusive differences between antibiotic regimens in terms of cure rates or other relevant clinical outcomes. However, because of the very low quality evidence, this needs confirmation. The conclusion of this Cochrane review was based on randomised controlled trials with high risk of bias. Accordingly, current evidence does not support or reject any regimen of antibiotic therapy for treatment of infective endocarditis.

  5. Economic evaluation of the randomized European Achalasia trial comparing pneumodilation with Laparoscopic Heller myotomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moonen, A.; Busch, O.; Costantini, M.; Finotti, E.; Tack, J.; Salvador, R.; Boeckxstaens, G.; Zaninotto, G.

    2017-01-01

    BackgroundA recent multicenter randomized trial in achalasia patients has shown that pneumatic dilation resulted in equivalent relief of symptoms compared to laparoscopic Heller myotomy. Additionally, the cost of each treatment should be also taken in consideration. Therefore, the aim of the present

  6. Randomized clinical trial comparing percutaneous closure of patent foramen ovale (PFO using the Amplatzer PFO Occluder with medical treatment in patients with cryptogenic embolism (PC-Trial: rationale and design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schuler Gerhard

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies have shown an association of cryptogenic stroke and embolism with patent foramen ovale (PFO, but the question how to prevent further events in such patients is unresolved. Options include antithrombotic treatment with warfarin or antiplatelet agents or surgical or endovascular closure of the PFO. The PC-Trial was set up to compare endovascular closure and best medical treatment for prevention of recurrent events. Methods The PC-Trial is a randomized clinical trial comparing the efficacy of percutaneous closure of the PFO using the Amplatzer PFO occluder with best medical treatment in patients with cryptogenic embolism, i.e. mostly cryptogenic stroke. Warfarin for 6 months followed by antiplatelet agents is recommended as medical treatment. Randomization is stratified according to patients age ( Discussion patients were randomized in 29 centers of Europe, Canada, and Australia. Randomization started February 2000. Enrollment of 414 patients was completed in February 2009. All patients will be followed-up longitudinally. Follow-up is maintained until the last enrolled patient is beyond 2.5 years of follow-up (expected in 2011. Trial Registration Trial listed in ClinicalTrials.gov as NCT00166257 and sponsored by AGA Medical, Plymouth, MN, USA

  7. CYberinfrastructure for COmparative effectiveness REsearch (CYCORE): improving data from cancer clinical trials

    OpenAIRE

    Patrick, Kevin; Wolszon, Laura; Basen-Engquist, Karen M; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Prokhorov, Alex V; Barrera, Stephanie; Baru, Chaitan; Farcas, Emilia; Krueger, Ingolf; Palmer, Doug; Raab, Fred; Rios, Phil; Ziftci, Celal; Peterson, Susan

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Improved approaches and methodologies are needed to conduct comparative effectiveness research (CER) in oncology. While cancer therapies continue to emerge at a rapid pace, the review, synthesis, and dissemination of evidence-based interventions across clinical trials lag in comparison. Rigorous and systematic testing of competing therapies has been clouded by age-old problems: poor patient adherence, inability to objectively measure the environmental influences on health, lack of kn...

  8. Alcohol, indomethacin, and salbutamol. A comparative trial of their use in preterm labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spearing, G

    1979-02-01

    In a comparative trial, ethanol effectively arrested preterm labor for 48 hours for more in 32% of cases, a beta-adrenergic agent (salbutamol) in 60% of cases (not statistically significant), and a combination of ethanol and indomethacin in 70% of cases (statistically significant, P less than 0.5). Labor was delayed for 14 days or more in 36, 60, and 50%, respectively (not statistically significant). The numbers studied were small, and tests of statistical significance were of doubtful value. Salbutamol was more acceptable to patients and the staff than ethanol. The trial was suspended and eventually abandoned due to reports of prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors causing premature closure of the ductus arteriosus. In this series no problems were encountered with the use of indomethacin.

  9. Protocol for a multi-centre randomised controlled trial comparing arthroscopic hip surgery to physiotherapy-led care for femoroacetabular impingement (FAI): the Australian FASHIoN trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Nicholas J; Eyles, Jillian; Bennell, Kim L; Bohensky, Megan; Burns, Alexander; Callaghan, Fraser M; Dickenson, Edward; Fary, Camdon; Grieve, Stuart M; Griffin, Damian R; Hall, Michelle; Hobson, Rachel; Kim, Young Jo; Linklater, James M; Lloyd, David G; Molnar, Robert; O'Connell, Rachel L; O'Donnell, John; O'Sullivan, Michael; Randhawa, Sunny; Reichenbach, Stephan; Saxby, David J; Singh, Parminder; Spiers, Libby; Tran, Phong; Wrigley, Tim V; Hunter, David J

    2017-09-26

    Femoroacetabular impingement syndrome (FAI), a hip disorder affecting active young adults, is believed to be a leading cause of hip osteoarthritis (OA). Current management approaches for FAI include arthroscopic hip surgery and physiotherapy-led non-surgical care; however, there is a paucity of clinical trial evidence comparing these approaches. In particular, it is unknown whether these management approaches modify the future risk of developing hip OA. The primary objective of this randomised controlled trial is to determine if participants with FAI who undergo hip arthroscopy have greater improvements in hip cartilage health, as demonstrated by changes in delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cartilage (dGEMRIC) index between baseline and 12 months, compared to those who undergo physiotherapy-led non-surgical management. This is a pragmatic, multi-centre, two-arm superiority randomised controlled trial comparing hip arthroscopy to physiotherapy-led management for FAI. A total of 140 participants with FAI will be recruited from the clinics of participating orthopaedic surgeons, and randomly allocated to receive either surgery or physiotherapy-led non-surgical care. The surgical intervention involves arthroscopic FAI surgery from one of eight orthopaedic surgeons specialising in this field, located in three different Australian cities. The physiotherapy-led non-surgical management is an individualised physiotherapy program, named Personalised Hip Therapy (PHT), developed by a panel to represent the best non-operative care for FAI. It entails at least six individual physiotherapy sessions over 12 weeks, and up to ten sessions over six months, provided by experienced musculoskeletal physiotherapists trained to deliver the PHT program. The primary outcome measure is the change in dGEMRIC score of a ROI containing both acetabular and femoral head cartilages at the chondrolabral transitional zone of the mid-sagittal plane between baseline and

  10. Methodological reporting of randomized controlled trials in major hepato-gastroenterology journals in 2008 and 1998: a comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background It was still unclear whether the methodological reporting quality of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in major hepato-gastroenterology journals improved after the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) Statement was revised in 2001. Methods RCTs in five major hepato-gastroenterology journals published in 1998 or 2008 were retrieved from MEDLINE using a high sensitivity search method and their reporting quality of methodological details were evaluated based on the CONSORT Statement and Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of interventions. Changes of the methodological reporting quality between 2008 and 1998 were calculated by risk ratios with 95% confidence intervals. Results A total of 107 RCTs published in 2008 and 99 RCTs published in 1998 were found. Compared to those in 1998, the proportion of RCTs that reported sequence generation (RR, 5.70; 95%CI 3.11-10.42), allocation concealment (RR, 4.08; 95%CI 2.25-7.39), sample size calculation (RR, 3.83; 95%CI 2.10-6.98), incomplete outecome data addressed (RR, 1.81; 95%CI, 1.03-3.17), intention-to-treat analyses (RR, 3.04; 95%CI 1.72-5.39) increased in 2008. Blinding and intent-to-treat analysis were reported better in multi-center trials than in single-center trials. The reporting of allocation concealment and blinding were better in industry-sponsored trials than in public-funded trials. Compared with historical studies, the methodological reporting quality improved with time. Conclusion Although the reporting of several important methodological aspects improved in 2008 compared with those published in 1998, which may indicate the researchers had increased awareness of and compliance with the revised CONSORT statement, some items were still reported badly. There is much room for future improvement. PMID:21801429

  11. Comparing surgical repair with conservative treatment for degenerative rotator cuff tears : a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambers Heerspink, Okke; van Raay, Jos J. A. M.; Koorevaar, Rinco C. T.; van Eerden, Pepijn J. M.; Westerbeek, Robin E.; van 't Riet, Esther; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge; Diercks, Ronald L.

    Background: Good clinical results have been reported for both surgical and conservative treatment of rotator cuff tears. The primary aim of this randomized controlled trial was to compare functional and radiologic improvement after surgical and conservative treatment of degenerative rotator cuff

  12. Comparative efficacy trial of cupping and serkangabin versus conventional therapy of migraine headaches: A randomized, open-label, comparative efficacy trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firoozabadi, Mohammad Dehghani; Navabzadeh, Maryam; Roudsari, Mohammad Khodashenas; Zahmatkash, Mohsen

    2014-12-01

    Migraine headaches are the most common acute and recurrent headaches. Current treatment of a migraine headache consists of multiple medications for control and prevention of recurrent attacks. Global emergence of alternative medicine led us to examine the efficacy of cupping therapy plus serkangabin syrup in the treatment of migraine headaches. This study was a randomized, controlled, open-label, comparative efficacy trial. We randomly assigned patients with migraine into cupping therapy plus serkangabin group (30 patients) and conventional treatment group (30 patients). An investigator assessed the severity of headache, frequency of attacks in a week and duration of attacks per hour in 5 visits (at the end of 2 weeks, 1, 3 and 6 months). Generalized estimating equations approach was used to analyze repeated measures data to compare outcomes in both groups. Average age for cupping therapy group and conventional treatment group were 31.7 (±7.6) and 32.6 (±12.7) years, respectively (P = 0.45). After treatment for 2 weeks; and 1, 3 and 6 months, severity of headache (P = 0.80), frequency of migraine attacks (P = 0.63) and duration of attacks per hours (P = 0.48) were similar in conventional and cupping groups but these symptoms were decreased in each group during the study (P cupping plus serkangabin therapy and conventional treatment in the treatment and prophylaxis of migraine. The alternative therapy may be used in cases of drug intolerance, no medication response, and in primary care.

  13. Gestational Weight Gain: Results from the Delta Healthy Sprouts Comparative Impact Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L. Thomson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Delta Healthy Sprouts trial was designed to test the comparative impact of two home visiting programs on weight status, dietary intake, and health behaviors of Southern African American women and their infants. Results pertaining to the primary outcome, gestational weight gain, are reported. Methods. Participants (n=82, enrolled early in their second trimester of pregnancy, were randomly assigned to one of two treatment arms. Gestational weight gain, measured at six monthly home visits, was calculated by subtracting measured weight at each visit from self-reported prepregnancy weight. Weight gain was classified as under, within, or exceeding the Institute of Medicine recommendations based on prepregnancy body mass index. Chi-square tests and generalized linear mixed models were used to test for significant differences in percentages of participants within recommended weight gain ranges. Results. Differences in percentages of participants within the gestational weight gain guidelines were not significant between treatment arms across all visits. Conclusions. Enhancing the gestational nutrition and physical activity components of an existing home visiting program is feasible in a high risk population of primarily low income African American women. The impact of these enhancements on appropriate gestational weight gain is questionable given the more basic living needs of such women. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01746394, registered 4 December 2012.

  14. Pre-trial quality assurance processes for an intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) trial: PARSPORT, a UK multicentre Phase III trial comparing conventional radiotherapy and parotid-sparing IMRT for locally advanced head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, C H; Miles, E A; Urbano, M T Guerrero; Bhide, S A; Bidmead, A M; Harrington, K J; Nutting, C M

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare conventional radiotherapy with parotid gland-sparing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using the PARSPORT trial. The validity of such a trial depends on the radiotherapy planning and delivery meeting a defined standard across all centres. At the outset, many of the centres had little or no experience of delivering IMRT; therefore, quality assurance processes were devised to ensure consistency and standardisation of all processes for comparison within the trial. The pre-trial quality assurance (QA) programme and results are described. Each centre undertook exercises in target volume definition and treatment planning, completed a resource questionnaire and produced a process document. Additionally, the QA team visited each participating centre. Each exercise had to be accepted before patients could be recruited into the trial. 10 centres successfully completed the quality assurance exercises. A range of treatment planning systems, linear accelerators and delivery methods were used for the planning exercises, and all the plans created reached the standard required for participation in this multicentre trial. All 10 participating centres achieved implementation of a comprehensive and robust IMRT programme for treatment of head and neck cancer.

  15. A Defensin from the Model Beetle Tribolium castaneum Acts Synergistically with Telavancin and Daptomycin against Multidrug Resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajamuthiah, Rajmohan; Jayamani, Elamparithi; Conery, Annie L; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; Kim, Wooseong; Johnston, Tatiana; Vilcinskas, Andreas; Ausubel, Frederick M; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2015-01-01

    The red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum is a common insect pest and has been established as a model beetle to study insect development and immunity. This study demonstrates that defensin 1 from T. castaneum displays in vitro and in vivo antimicrobial activity against drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of defensin 1 against 11 reference and clinical staphylococcal isolates was between 16-64 μg/ml. The putative mode of action of the defensin peptide is disruption of the bacterial cell membrane. The antibacterial activity of defensin 1 was attenuated by salt concentrations of 1.56 mM and 25 mM for NaCl and CaCl2 respectively. Treatment of defensin 1 with the reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT) at concentrations 1.56 to 3.13 mM abolished the antimicrobial activity of the peptide. In the presence of subinhibitory concentrations of antibiotics that also target the bacterial cell envelope such as telavancin and daptomycin, the MIC of the peptide was as low as 1 μg/ml. Moreover, when tested against an S. aureus strain that was defective in D-alanylation of the cell wall, the MIC of the peptide was 0.5 μg/ml. Defensin 1 exhibited no toxicity against human erythrocytes even at 400 μg/ml. The in vivo activity of the peptide was validated in a Caenorhabditis elegans-MRSA liquid infection assay. These results suggest that defensin 1 behaves similarly to other cationic AMPs in its mode of action against S. aureus and that the activity of the peptide can be enhanced in combination with other antibiotics with similar modes of action or with compounds that have the ability to decrease D-alanylation of the bacterial cell wall.

  16. A Defensin from the Model Beetle Tribolium castaneum Acts Synergistically with Telavancin and Daptomycin against Multidrug Resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajmohan Rajamuthiah

    Full Text Available The red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum is a common insect pest and has been established as a model beetle to study insect development and immunity. This study demonstrates that defensin 1 from T. castaneum displays in vitro and in vivo antimicrobial activity against drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of defensin 1 against 11 reference and clinical staphylococcal isolates was between 16-64 μg/ml. The putative mode of action of the defensin peptide is disruption of the bacterial cell membrane. The antibacterial activity of defensin 1 was attenuated by salt concentrations of 1.56 mM and 25 mM for NaCl and CaCl2 respectively. Treatment of defensin 1 with the reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT at concentrations 1.56 to 3.13 mM abolished the antimicrobial activity of the peptide. In the presence of subinhibitory concentrations of antibiotics that also target the bacterial cell envelope such as telavancin and daptomycin, the MIC of the peptide was as low as 1 μg/ml. Moreover, when tested against an S. aureus strain that was defective in D-alanylation of the cell wall, the MIC of the peptide was 0.5 μg/ml. Defensin 1 exhibited no toxicity against human erythrocytes even at 400 μg/ml. The in vivo activity of the peptide was validated in a Caenorhabditis elegans-MRSA liquid infection assay. These results suggest that defensin 1 behaves similarly to other cationic AMPs in its mode of action against S. aureus and that the activity of the peptide can be enhanced in combination with other antibiotics with similar modes of action or with compounds that have the ability to decrease D-alanylation of the bacterial cell wall.

  17. Comparative efficacy trial of cupping and serkangabin versus conventional therapy of migraine headaches: A randomized, open-label, comparative efficacy trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Dehghani Firoozabadi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Migraine headaches are the most common acute and recurrent headaches. Current treatment of a migraine headache consists of multiple medications for control and prevention of recurrent attacks. Global emergence of alternative medicine led us to examine the efficacy of cupping therapy plus serkangabin syrup in the treatment of migraine headaches. Materials and Methods: This study was a randomized, controlled, open-label, comparative efficacy trial. We randomly assigned patients with migraine into cupping therapy plus serkangabin group (30 patients and conventional treatment group (30 patients. An investigator assessed the severity of headache, frequency of attacks in a week and duration of attacks per hour in 5 visits (at the end of 2 weeks, 1, 3 and 6 months. Generalized estimating equations approach was used to analyze repeated measures data to compare outcomes in both groups. Results: Average age for cupping therapy group and conventional treatment group were 31.7 (±7.6 and 32.6 (±12.7 years, respectively (P = 0.45. After treatment for 2 weeks; and 1, 3 and 6 months, severity of headache (P = 0.80, frequency of migraine attacks (P = 0.63 and duration of attacks per hours (P = 0.48 were similar in conventional and cupping groups but these symptoms were decreased in each group during the study (P < 0.001. Conclusion: There was no significant difference between cupping plus serkangabin therapy and conventional treatment in the treatment and prophylaxis of migraine. The alternative therapy may be used in cases of drug intolerance, no medication response, and in primary care.

  18. Systematic review and meta-analysis of published, randomized, controlled trials comparing suture anastomosis to stapled anastomosis for ileostomy closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajid, M S; Craciunas, L; Baig, M K; Sains, P

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this article is to systematically analyze the randomized, controlled trials comparing the effectiveness of suture anastomosis (SUA) versus stapled anastomosis (STA) in patients undergoing ileostomy closure. Randomized, controlled trials comparing the effectiveness of SUA versus STA in patients undergoing ileostomy closure were analyzed using RevMan(®), and combined outcomes were expressed as odds risk ratio (OR) and standardized mean difference (SMD). Four randomized, controlled trials that recruited 645 patients were retrieved from electronic databases. There were 327 patients in the STA group and 318 patients in the SUA group. There was significant heterogeneity among included trials. Operative time (SMD -1.02; 95 % CI -1.89, -0.15; z = 2.29; p infection, reoperation and readmission were similar following STA and SUA in patients undergoing ileostomy closure. Length of hospital stay was also similar between STA and SUA groups. In ileostomy closure, STA was associated with shorter operative time and lower risk of postoperative small bowel obstruction. However, STA and SUA were similar in terms of anastomotic leak, surgical site infection, readmission, reoperations and length of hospital stay.

  19. Internet treatment for depression: a randomized controlled trial comparing clinician vs. technician assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titov, Nickolai; Andrews, Gavin; Davies, Matthew; McIntyre, Karen; Robinson, Emma; Solley, Karen

    2010-06-08

    Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (iCBT) for depression is effective when guided by a clinician, less so if unguided. Would guidance from a technician be as effective as guidance from a clinician? Randomized controlled non-inferiority trial comparing three groups: Clinician-assisted vs. technician-assisted vs. delayed treatment. Community-based volunteers applied to the VirtualClinic (www.virtualclinic.org.au) research program, and 141 participants with major depressive disorder were randomized. Participants in the clinician- and technician-assisted groups received access to an iCBT program for depression comprising 6 online lessons, weekly homework assignments, and weekly supportive contact over a treatment period of 8 weeks. Participants in the clinician-assisted group also received access to a moderated online discussion forum. The main outcome measures were the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and the Patient Health QUESTIONnaire-9 Item (PHQ-9). Completion rates were high, and at post-treatment, both treatment groups reduced scores on the BDI-II (ptechnician-assisted groups respectively, and on the PHQ-9, were 1.54 and 1.60 respectively. At 4-month follow-up participants in the technician group had made further improvements and had significantly lower scores on the PHQ-9 than those in the clinician group. A total of approximately 60 minutes of clinician or technician time was required per participant during the 8-week treatment program. Both clinician- and technician-assisted treatment resulted in large effect sizes and clinically significant improvements comparable to those associated with face-to-face treatment, while a delayed treatment control group did not improve. These results provide support for large scale trials to determine the clinical effectiveness and acceptability of technician-assisted iCBT programs for depression. This form of treatment has potential to increase the capacity of existing mental health services. Australian New

  20. Adaptation and dissemination of an evidence-based obesity prevention intervention: design of a comparative effectiveness trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscemi, Joanna; Odoms-Young, Angela; Stolley, Melinda L; Blumstein, Lara; Schiffer, Linda; Berbaum, Michael L; McCaffrey, Jennifer; Montoya, Anastasia McGee; Braunschweig, Carol; Fitzgibbon, Marian L

    2014-07-01

    Low-income youth are at increased risk for excess weight gain. Although evidence-based prevention programs exist, successful adaptation to provide wide dissemination presents a challenge. Hip-Hop to Health (HH) is a school-based obesity prevention intervention that targets primarily preschool children of low-income families. In a large randomized controlled trial, HH was found to be efficacious for prevention of excessive weight gain. The Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program-Education (SNAP-Ed) are USDA-funded nutrition education programs offered to low-income families, and may provide an ideal platform for the wide dissemination of evidence-based obesity prevention programs. A research-practice partnership was established in order to conduct formative research to guide the adaptation and implementation of HH through EFNEP and SNAP-Ed. We present the design and method of a comparative effectiveness trial that will determine the efficacy of HH when delivered by peer educators through these programs compared to the standard EFNEP and SNAP-Ed nutrition education (NE) curriculum. Results from this trial will inform larger scale dissemination. The dissemination of HH through government programs has the potential to increase the reach of efficacious obesity prevention programs that target low-income children and families. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Randomized clinical trial comparing percutaneous closure of patent foramen ovale (PFO) using the Amplatzer PFO Occluder with medical treatment in patients with cryptogenic embolism (PC-Trial): rationale and design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khattab, Ahmed A; Windecker, Stephan; Jüni, Peter; Hildick-Smith, David; Dudek, Dariusz; Andersen, Henning R; Ibrahim, Reda; Schuler, Gerhard; Walton, Antony S; Wahl, Andreas; Mattle, Heinrich P; Meier, Bernhard

    2011-02-28

    Several studies have shown an association of cryptogenic stroke and embolism with patent foramen ovale (PFO), but the question how to prevent further events in such patients is unresolved. Options include antithrombotic treatment with warfarin or antiplatelet agents or surgical or endovascular closure of the PFO. The PC-Trial was set up to compare endovascular closure and best medical treatment for prevention of recurrent events. The PC-Trial is a randomized clinical trial comparing the efficacy of percutaneous closure of the PFO using the Amplatzer PFO occluder with best medical treatment in patients with cryptogenic embolism, i.e. mostly cryptogenic stroke. Warfarin for 6 months followed by antiplatelet agents is recommended as medical treatment. Randomization is stratified according to patients age (Australia. Randomization started February 2000. Enrollment of 414 patients was completed in February 2009. All patients will be followed-up longitudinally. Follow-up is maintained until the last enrolled patient is beyond 2.5 years of follow-up (expected in 2011).

  2. Clinical trial of osteoarthritis jamu formula compare to piroxicam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danang Ardiyanto

    2016-12-01

    is a lack of evidence of its efficacy and safety. The objectives of study were to investigate the efficacy and safety of  a traditional formula for OA. Methods: Design of the study was a randomized clinical trial (RCT involved 123 patients (subjects for 28 days intervention. This study was conducted between March - December 2014 with 30 physicians were participated at 20 regencies in Indonesia. The variables measured were VAS score, PGAP functional status assessment (FSA, and Short Form (SF-36 to assess jamu efficacy in comparison to piroxicam. To evaluate the safety of jamu formula using values of SGOT, SGPT, BUN, and creatinine. Result: The jamu formula administration effects can reduce VAS significantly  (p<0.05  if it was compared to baseline. FSA score of jamu formula group was decreased significantly (p=0.000 when compared to the start of intervention. Short Form (SF-36 of jamu formula group were significantly improved when compared with baseline value. The result of the three parameters between jamu group and piroxicam group should not significantly different. There was no difference in those parameters between both groups (p>0.05. In biological parameters, SGPT, SGOT, BUN, and creatinine level, showed normal range in both groups. Conclusion: This study showed that the efficacy and safety of jamu formula was clinically comparable to piroxicam after 28 days of treatment. Keywords: efficacy, safety, RCT, jamu formula  

  3. Comparative efficacy of simultaneous versus sequential multiple health behavior change interventions among adults: A systematic review of randomised trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Erica; Freund, Megan; Booth, Angela; Duncan, Mitch J; Johnson, Natalie; Short, Camille E; Wolfenden, Luke; Stacey, Fiona G; Kay-Lambkin, Frances; Vandelanotte, Corneel

    2016-08-01

    Growing evidence points to the benefits of addressing multiple health behaviors rather than single behaviors. This review evaluates the relative effectiveness of simultaneous and sequentially delivered multiple health behavior change (MHBC) interventions. Secondary aims were to identify: a) the most effective spacing of sequentially delivered components; b) differences in efficacy of MHBC interventions for adoption/cessation behaviors and lifestyle/addictive behaviors, and; c) differences in trial retention between simultaneously and sequentially delivered interventions. MHBC intervention trials published up to October 2015 were identified through a systematic search. Eligible trials were randomised controlled trials that directly compared simultaneous and sequential delivery of a MHBC intervention. A narrative synthesis was undertaken. Six trials met the inclusion criteria and across these trials the behaviors targeted were smoking, diet, physical activity, and alcohol consumption. Three trials reported a difference in intervention effect between a sequential and simultaneous approach in at least one behavioral outcome. Of these, two trials favoured a sequential approach on smoking. One trial favoured a simultaneous approach on fat intake. There was no difference in retention between sequential and simultaneous approaches. There is limited evidence regarding the relative effectiveness of sequential and simultaneous approaches. Given only three of the six trials observed a difference in intervention effectiveness for one health behavior outcome, and the relatively consistent finding that the sequential and simultaneous approaches were more effective than a usual/minimal care control condition, it appears that both approaches should be considered equally efficacious. PROSPERO registration number: CRD42015027876. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The effects of Red Bull energy drink compared with caffeine on cycling time-trial performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlivan, Alannah; Irwin, Christopher; Grant, Gary D; Anoopkumar-Dukie, Sheilandra; Skinner, Tina; Leveritt, Michael; Desbrow, Ben

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the ergogenic effects of a commercial energy drink (Red Bull) or an equivalent dose of anhydrous caffeine in comparison with a noncaffeinated control beverage on cycling performance. Eleven trained male cyclists (31.7 ± 5.9 y 82.3 ± 6.1 kg, VO2max = 60.3 ± 7.8 mL · kg-1 · min-1) participated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover-design study involving 3 experimental conditions. Participants were randomly administered Red Bull (9.4 mL/kg body mass [BM] containing 3 mg/kg BM caffeine), anhydrous caffeine (3 mg/kg BM given in capsule form), or a placebo 90 min before commencing a time trial equivalent to 1 h cycling at 75% peak power output. Carbohydrate and fluid volumes were matched across all trials. Performance improved by 109 ± 153 s (2.8%, P = .039) after Red Bull compared with placebo and by 120 ± 172 s (3.1%, P = .043) after caffeine compared with placebo. No significant difference (P > .05) in performance time was detected between Red Bull and caffeine treatments. There was no significant difference (P > .05) in mean heart rate or rating of perceived exertion among the 3 treatments. This study demonstrated that a moderate dose of caffeine consumed as either Red Bull or in anhydrous form enhanced cycling time-trial performance. The ergogenic benefits of Red Bull energy drink are therefore most likely due to the effects of caffeine, with the other ingredients not likely to offer additional benefit.

  5. Comparing cluster-level dynamic treatment regimens using sequential, multiple assignment, randomized trials: Regression estimation and sample size considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    NeCamp, Timothy; Kilbourne, Amy; Almirall, Daniel

    2017-08-01

    Cluster-level dynamic treatment regimens can be used to guide sequential treatment decision-making at the cluster level in order to improve outcomes at the individual or patient-level. In a cluster-level dynamic treatment regimen, the treatment is potentially adapted and re-adapted over time based on changes in the cluster that could be impacted by prior intervention, including aggregate measures of the individuals or patients that compose it. Cluster-randomized sequential multiple assignment randomized trials can be used to answer multiple open questions preventing scientists from developing high-quality cluster-level dynamic treatment regimens. In a cluster-randomized sequential multiple assignment randomized trial, sequential randomizations occur at the cluster level and outcomes are observed at the individual level. This manuscript makes two contributions to the design and analysis of cluster-randomized sequential multiple assignment randomized trials. First, a weighted least squares regression approach is proposed for comparing the mean of a patient-level outcome between the cluster-level dynamic treatment regimens embedded in a sequential multiple assignment randomized trial. The regression approach facilitates the use of baseline covariates which is often critical in the analysis of cluster-level trials. Second, sample size calculators are derived for two common cluster-randomized sequential multiple assignment randomized trial designs for use when the primary aim is a between-dynamic treatment regimen comparison of the mean of a continuous patient-level outcome. The methods are motivated by the Adaptive Implementation of Effective Programs Trial which is, to our knowledge, the first-ever cluster-randomized sequential multiple assignment randomized trial in psychiatry.

  6. Effect of tai chi versus aerobic exercise for fibromyalgia: comparative effectiveness randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Christopher H; Fielding, Roger A; Harvey, William F; Reid, Kieran F; Price, Lori Lyn; Driban, Jeffrey B; Kalish, Robert; Rones, Ramel; McAlindon, Timothy

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Objectives To determine the effectiveness of tai chi interventions compared with aerobic exercise, a current core standard treatment in patients with fibromyalgia, and to test whether the effectiveness of tai chi depends on its dosage or duration. Design Prospective, randomized, 52 week, single blind comparative effectiveness trial. Setting Urban tertiary care academic hospital in the United States between March 2012 and September 2016. Participants 226 adults with fibromyalgia (as defined by the American College of Rheumatology 1990 and 2010 criteria) were included in the intention to treat analyses: 151 were assigned to one of four tai chi groups and 75 to an aerobic exercise group. Interventions Participants were randomly assigned to either supervised aerobic exercise (24 weeks, twice weekly) or one of four classic Yang style supervised tai chi interventions (12 or 24 weeks, once or twice weekly). Participants were followed for 52 weeks. Adherence was rigorously encouraged in person and by telephone. Main outcome measures The primary outcome was change in the revised fibromyalgia impact questionnaire (FIQR) scores at 24 weeks compared with baseline. Secondary outcomes included changes of scores in patient’s global assessment, anxiety, depression, self efficacy, coping strategies, physical functional performance, functional limitation, sleep, and health related quality of life. Results FIQR scores improved in all five treatment groups, but the combined tai chi groups improved statistically significantly more than the aerobic exercise group in FIQR scores at 24 weeks (difference between groups=5.5 points, 95% confidence interval 0.6 to 10.4, P=0.03) and several secondary outcomes (patient’s global assessment=0.9 points, 0.3 to 1.4, P=0.005; anxiety=1.2 points, 0.3 to 2.1, P=0.006; self efficacy=1.0 points, 0.5 to 1.6, P=0.0004; and coping strategies, 2.6 points, 0.8 to 4.3, P=0.005). Tai chi treatment compared with aerobic exercise administered with

  7. A prospective randomized controlled multicenter trial comparing antibiotic therapy with appendectomy in the treatment of uncomplicated acute appendicitis (APPAC trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paajanen, Hannu; Grönroos, Juha M; Rautio, Tero; Nordström, Pia; Aarnio, Markku; Rantanen, Tuomo; Hurme, Saija; Dean, Kirsti; Jartti, Airi; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka; Sand, Juhani; Salminen, Paulina

    2013-02-08

    Although the standard treatment of acute appendicitis (AA) consists of an early appendectomy, there has recently been both an interest and an increase in the use of antibiotic therapy as the primary treatment for uncomplicated AA. However, the use of antibiotic therapy in the treatment of uncomplicated AA is still controversial. The APPAC trial is a randomized prospective controlled, open label, non-inferiority multicenter trial designed to compare antibiotic therapy (ertapenem) with emergency appendectomy in the treatment of uncomplicated AA. The primary endpoint of the study is the success of the randomized treatment. In the antibiotic treatment arm successful treatment is defined as being discharged from the hospital without the need for surgical intervention and no recurrent appendicitis during a minimum follow-up of one-year (treatment efficacy). Treatment efficacy in the operative treatment arm is defined as successful appendectomy evaluated to be 100%. Secondary endpoints are post-intervention complications, overall morbidity and mortality, the length of hospital stay and sick leave, treatment costs and pain scores (VAS, visual analoque scale). A maximum of 610 adult patients (aged 18-60 years) with a CT scan confirmed uncomplicated AA will be enrolled from six hospitals and randomized by a closed envelope method in a 1:1 ratio either to undergo emergency appendectomy or to receive ertapenem (1 g per day) for three days continued by oral levofloxacin (500 mg per day) plus metronidazole (1.5 g per day) for seven days. Follow-up by a telephone interview will be at 1 week, 2 months and 1, 3, 5 and 10 years; the primary and secondary endpoints of the trial will be evaluated at each time point. The APPAC trial aims to provide level I evidence to support the hypothesis that approximately 75-85% of patients with uncomplicated AA can be treated with effective antibiotic therapy avoiding unnecessary appendectomies and the related operative morbidity, also resulting

  8. A randomized trial comparing perinatal outcomes using insulin detemir or neutral protamine Hagedorn in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hod, Moshe; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R; Jovanovič, Lois

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This randomized controlled trial aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of insulin detemir (IDet) with neutral protamine Hagedorn (NPH), both with insulin aspart, in pregnant women with type 1 diabetes. The perinatal and obstetric pregnancy outcomes are presented. METHODS: Subjects w...

  9. Results of a randomized trial comparing high-dose chemotherapy plus Auto-SCT and R-FC in CLL at diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magni, M; Di Nicola, M; Patti, C; Scimè, R; Mulè, A; Rambaldi, A; Intermesoli, T; Viero, P; Tarella, C; Gueli, A; Bergui, L; Trentin, L; Barzan, A; Benedetti, F; Ambrosetti, A; Di Raimondo, F; Chiarenza, A; Parvis, G; Billio, A; Attolico, I; Olivieri, A; Montanari, M; Carlo-Stella, C; Matteucci, P; Devizzi, L; Guidetti, A; Viviani, S; Valagussa, P; Gianni, A M

    2014-04-01

    The importance of early therapy intensification in B-cell CLL (B-CLL) patients remains to be defined. Even though several studies have been published, no randomized trials comparing directly autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT) and the accepted conventional therapy (that is, rituximab, fludarabine and CY; R-FC) have been reported so far. To assess the benefit of a first-line aggressive therapy, we designed a multicenter, randomized, phase 3 trial comparing R-FC and high-dose chemotherapy supported by ASCT in patients under 65 years of age, with stage B(II) or C B-CLL. Primary end point was CR: 96 patients were enrolled (48 in each arm). On an intent-to-treat basis, the CR rates in the ASCT and R-FC arms were 62.5% and 58%, respectively. After 5 years of follow-up, PFS was 60.4% in the ASCT arm and 65.1% in the R-FC arm, time to progression 65.8 and 70.5%, and overall survival 88% vs 88.1%, respectively. Our trial demonstrates, for the first time in a randomized manner, that frontline ASCT does not translate into a survival advantage when compared with benchmark chemoimmunotherapy in B-CLL patients; the possibility of its clinical benefit in certain subgroups remains uncertain.

  10. The effects of honey compared to silver sulfadiazine for the treatment of burns: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Zoriah; Abdul Rasool Hassan, Bassam

    2017-02-01

    Evidence from animal studies and trials suggests that honey may accelerate wound healing. The objective of this review was to assess the effects of honey compared with silver dressings on the healing of burn wounds. Relevant databases for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of honey compared with silver sulfadiazine (SSD) were searched. The quality of the selected trials was assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Assessment Tool. The primary endpoints considered were wound healing time and the number of infected wounds rendered sterile. Nine RCTs met the inclusion criteria. Based on moderate quality evidence there was a statistically significant difference between the two groups, favoring honey in healing time (MD -5.76days, 95% CI -8.14 to -3.39) and the proportions of infected wounds rendered sterile (RR 2.59; 95% CI 1.58-2.88). The available evidence suggests that honey dressings promote better wound healing than silver sulfadiazine for burns. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  11. Study protocol for "Study of Practices Enabling Implementation and Adaptation in the Safety Net (SPREAD-NET)": a pragmatic trial comparing implementation strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Rachel; Hollombe, Celine; Bunce, Arwen; Nelson, Christine; Davis, James V; Cowburn, Stuart; Perrin, Nancy; DeVoe, Jennifer; Mossman, Ned; Boles, Bruce; Horberg, Michael; Dearing, James W; Jaworski, Victoria; Cohen, Deborah; Smith, David

    2015-10-16

    Little research has directly compared the effectiveness of implementation strategies in any setting, and we know of no prior trials directly comparing how effectively different combinations of strategies support implementation in community health centers. This paper outlines the protocol of the Study of Practices Enabling Implementation and Adaptation in the Safety Net (SPREAD-NET), a trial designed to compare the effectiveness of several common strategies for supporting implementation of an intervention and explore contextual factors that impact the strategies' effectiveness in the community health center setting. This cluster-randomized trial compares how three increasingly hands-on implementation strategies support adoption of an evidence-based diabetes quality improvement intervention in 29 community health centers, managed by 12 healthcare organizations. The strategies are as follows: (arm 1) a toolkit, presented in paper and electronic form, which includes a training webinar; (arm 2) toolkit plus in-person training with a focus on practice change and change management strategies; and (arm 3) toolkit, in-person training, plus practice facilitation with on-site visits. We use a mixed methods approach to data collection and analysis: (i) baseline surveys on study clinic characteristics, to explore how these characteristics impact the clinics' ability to implement the tools and the effectiveness of each implementation strategy; (ii) quantitative data on change in rates of guideline-concordant prescribing; and (iii) qualitative data on the "how" and "why" underlying the quantitative results. The outcomes of interest are clinic-level results, categorized using the Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation, Maintenance (RE-AIM) framework, within an interrupted time-series design with segmented regression models. This pragmatic trial will compare how well each implementation strategy works in "real-world" practices. Having a better understanding of how different

  12. Palm Oil Consumption Increases LDL Cholesterol Compared with Vegetable Oils Low in Saturated Fat in a Meta-Analysis of Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ye; Neelakantan, Nithya; Wu, Yi; Lote-Oke, Rashmi; Pan, An; van Dam, Rob M

    2015-07-01

    Palm oil contains a high amount of saturated fat compared with most other vegetable oils, but studies have reported inconsistent effects of palm oil on blood lipids. We systematically reviewed the effect of palm oil consumption on blood lipids compared with other cooking oils using data from clinical trials. We searched PubMed and the Cochrane Library for trials of at least 2 wk duration that compared the effects of palm oil consumption with any of the predefined comparison oils: vegetable oils low in saturated fat, trans fat-containing partially hydrogenated vegetable oils, and animal fats. Data were pooled by using random-effects meta-analysis. Palm oil significantly increased LDL cholesterol by 0.24 mmol/L (95% CI: 0.13, 0.35 mmol/L; I(2) = 83.2%) compared with vegetable oils low in saturated fat. This effect was observed in randomized trials (0.31 mmol/L; 95% CI: 0.20, 0.42 mmol/L) but not in nonrandomized trials (0.03 mmol/L; 95% CI: -0.15, 0.20 mmol/L; P-difference = 0.02). Among randomized trials, only modest heterogeneity in study results remained after considering the test oil dose and the comparison oil type (I(2) = 27.5%). Palm oil increased HDL cholesterol by 0.02 mmol/L (95% CI: 0.01, 0.04 mmol/L; I(2) = 49.8%) compared with vegetable oils low in saturated fat and by 0.09 mmol/L (95% CI: 0.06, 0.11 mmol/L; I(2) = 47.8%) compared with trans fat-containing oils. Palm oil consumption results in higher LDL cholesterol than do vegetable oils low in saturated fat and higher HDL cholesterol than do trans fat-containing oils in humans. The effects of palm oil on blood lipids are as expected on the basis of its high saturated fat content, which supports the reduction in palm oil use by replacement with vegetable oils low in saturated and trans fat. This systematic review was registered with the PROSPERO registry at http://www.crd.york.ac.uk/PROSPERO/display_record.asp?ID=CRD42012002601#.VU3wvSGeDRZ as CRD42012002601. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  13. Similar early migration when comparing CR and PS in Triathlon™ TKA: A prospective randomised RSA trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molt, Mats; Toksvig-Larsen, Sören

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the early migration of the cruciate retaining and posterior stabilising versions of the recently introduced Triathlon™ total knee system, with a view to predicting long term fixation performance. Sixty patients were prospectively randomised to receive either Triathlon™ posterior stabilised cemented knee prosthesis or Triathlon™ cruciate retaining cemented knee prosthesis. Tibial component migration was measured by radiostereometric analysis postoperatively and at three months, one year and two years. Clinical outcome was measured by the American Knee Society Score and Knee Osteoarthritis and Injury Outcome Score. There were no differences in rotation around the three coordinal axes or in the maximum total point motion (MTPM) during the two year follow-up. The posterior stabilised prosthesis had more posterior-anterior translation at three months and one year and more caudal-cranial translation at one year and two years. There were no differences in functional outcome between the groups. The tibial tray of the Triathlon™ cemented knee prosthesis showed similar early stability. Level I. Article focus: This was a prospective randomised trial aiming to compare the single radius posterior stabilised (PS) Triathlon™ total knee arthroplasty (TKA) to the cruciate retaining Triathlon™ TKA system with regard to fixation. Strengths and limitations of this study: Strength of this study was that it is a randomised prospective trial using an objective measuring tool. The sample size of 25-30 patients was reportedly sufficient for the screening of implants using RSA [1]. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00436982. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A randomised controlled trial to compare opt-in and opt-out parental consent for childhood vaccine safety surveillance using data linkage: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duszynski Katherine M

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Vaccine Assessment using Linked Data (VALiD trial compared opt-in and opt-out parental consent for a population-based childhood vaccine safety surveillance program using data linkage. A subsequent telephone interview of all households enrolled in the trial elicited parental intent regarding the return or non-return of reply forms for opt-in and opt-out consent. This paper describes the rationale for the trial and provides an overview of the design and methods. Methods/Design Single-centre, single-blind, randomised controlled trial (RCT stratified by firstborn status. Mothers who gave birth at one tertiary South Australian hospital were randomised at six weeks post-partum to receive an opt-in or opt-out reply form, along with information explaining data linkage. The primary outcome at 10 weeks post-partum was parental participation in each arm, as indicated by the respective return or non-return of a reply form (or via telephone or email response. A subsequent telephone interview at 10 weeks post-partum elicited parental intent regarding the return or non-return of the reply form, and attitudes and knowledge about data linkage, vaccine safety, consent preferences and vaccination practices. Enrolment began in July 2009 and 1,129 households were recruited in a three-month period. Analysis has not yet been undertaken. The participation rate and selection bias for each method of consent will be compared when the data are analysed. Discussion The VALiD RCT represents the first trial of opt-in versus opt-out consent for a data linkage study that assesses consent preferences and intent compared with actual opting in or opting out behaviour, and socioeconomic factors. The limitations to generalisability are discussed. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12610000332022

  15. Comparing high altitude treatment with current best care in Dutch children with moderate to severe atopic dermatitis (and asthma): study protocol for a pragmatic randomized controlled trial (DAVOS trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fieten, Karin B; Zijlstra, Wieneke T; van Os-Medendorp, Harmieke; Meijer, Yolanda; Venema, Monica Uniken; Rijssenbeek-Nouwens, Lous; l'Hoir, Monique P; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, Carla A; Pasmans, Suzanne G M A

    2014-03-26

    About 10 to 20% of children in West European countries have atopic dermatitis (AD), often as part of the atopic syndrome. The full atopic syndrome also consists of allergic asthma, allergic rhinitis and food allergy. Treatment approaches for atopic dermatitis and asthma include intermittent anti-inflammatory therapy with corticosteroids, health education and self-management training. However, symptoms persist in a subgroup of patients. Several observational studies have shown significant improvement in clinical symptoms in children and adults with atopic dermatitis or asthma after treatment at high altitude, but evidence on the efficacy when compared to treatment at sea level is still lacking. This study is a pragmatic randomized controlled trial for children with moderate to severe AD within the atopic syndrome. Patients are eligible for enrolment in the study if they are: diagnosed with moderate to severe AD within the atopic syndrome, aged between 8 and 18 years, fluent in the Dutch language, have internet access at home, able to use the digital patient system Digital Eczema Center Utrecht (DECU), willing and able to stay in Davos for a six week treatment period. All data are collected at the Wilhelmina Children's Hospital and DECU. Patients are randomized over two groups. The first group receives multidisciplinary inpatient treatment during six weeks at the Dutch Asthma Center in Davos, Switzerland. The second group receives multidisciplinary treatment during six weeks at the outpatient clinic of the Wilhelmina Children's Hospital, Utrecht, the Netherlands. The trial is not conducted as a blind trial. The trial is designed with three components: psychosocial, clinical and translational. Primary outcomes are coping with itch, quality of life and disease activity. Secondary outcomes include asthma control, medication use, parental quality of life, social and emotional wellbeing of the child and translational parameters. The results of this trial will provide

  16. Protocol for the saMS trial (supportive adjustment for multiple sclerosis: a randomized controlled trial comparing cognitive behavioral therapy to supportive listening for adjustment to multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCrone Paul

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple Sclerosis (MS is an incurable, chronic, potentially progressive and unpredictable disease of the central nervous system. The disease produces a range of unpleasant and debilitating symptoms, which can have a profound impact including disrupting activities of daily living, employment, income, relationships, social and leisure activities, and life goals. Adjusting to the illness is therefore particularly challenging. This trial tests the effectiveness of a Cognitive Behavioural intervention compared to Supportive Listening to assist adjustment in the early stages of MS. Methods/Design This is a two arm randomized multi-centre parallel group controlled trial. 122 consenting participants who meet eligibility criteria will be randomly allocated to receive either Cognitive Behavioral Therapy or Supportive Listening. Eight one hour sessions of therapy (delivered over a period of 10 weeks will be delivered by general nurses trained in both treatments. Self-report questionnaire data will be collected at baseline (0 weeks, mid-therapy (week 5 of therapy, post-therapy (15 weeks and at six months (26 weeks and twelve months (52 weeks follow-up. Primary outcomes are distress and MS-related social and role impairment at twelve month follow-up. Analysis will also consider predictors and mechanisms of change during therapy. In-depth interviews to examine participants' experiences of the interventions will be conducted with a purposively sampled sub-set of the trial participants. An economic analysis will also take place. Discussion This trial is distinctive in its aims in that it aids adjustment to MS in a broad sense. It is not a treatment specifically for depression. Use of nurses as therapists makes the interventions potentially viable in terms of being rolled out in the NHS. The trial benefits from incorporating patient input in the development and evaluation stages. The trial will provide important information about the

  17. Spontaneous improvement in randomised clinical trials: meta-analysis of three-armed trials comparing no treatment, placebo and active intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsbøll, Lasse Theis; Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2009-01-01

    were psychological in 17 trials, physical in 15 trials, and pharmacological in 5 trials. Overall, across all conditions and interventions, there was a statistically significant change from baseline in all three arms. The standardized mean difference (SMD) for change from baseline was -0.24 (95...... uncertainty, as indicated by the confidence intervals for the three SMDs. The conditions that had the most pronounced spontaneous improvement were nausea (45%), smoking (40%), depression (35%), phobia (34%) and acute pain (25%). CONCLUSION: Spontaneous improvement and effect of placebo contributed importantly...

  18. Randomized Trial of a Smartphone Mobile Application Compared to Text Messaging to Support Smoking Cessation

    OpenAIRE

    Buller, David B.; Borland, Ron; Bettinghaus, Erwin P.; Shane, James H.; Zimmerman, Donald E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Text messaging has successfully supported smoking cessation. This study compares a mobile application with text messaging to support smoking cessation. Materials and Methods: Young adult smokers 18–30 years old (n=102) participated in a randomized pretest–posttest trial. Smokers received a smartphone application (REQ-Mobile) with short messages and interactive tools or a text messaging system (onQ), managed by an expert system. Self-reported usability of REQ-Mobile and qu...

  19. The Tilburg double blind randomised controlled trial comparing inguinal hernia repair according to Lichtenstein and the transinguinal preperitoneal technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerritsen Pieter G

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anterior open treatment of the inguinal hernia with a tension free mesh has reduced the incidence of recurrence and direct postoperative pain. The Lichtenstein procedure rules nowadays as reference technique for hernia treatment. Not recurrences but chronic pain is the main postoperative complication in inguinal hernia repair after Lichtenstein's technique. Preliminary experiences with a soft mesh placed in the preperitoneal space showed good results and less chronic pain. Methods The TULIP is a double-blind randomised controlled trial in which 300 patients will be randomly allocated to anterior inguinal hernia repair according to Lichtenstein or the transinguinal preperitoneal technique with soft mesh. All unilateral primary inguinal hernia patients eligible for operation who meet inclusion criteria will be invited to participate in this trial. The primary endpoint will be direct postoperative- and chronic pain. Secondary endpoints are operation time, postoperative complications, hospital stay, costs, return to daily activities (e.g. work and recurrence. Both groups will be evaluated. Success rate of hernia repair and complications will be measured as safeguard for quality. To demonstrate that inguinal hernia repair according to the transinguinal preperitoneal (TIPP technique reduces postoperative pain to Discussion The TULIP trial is aimed to show a reduction in postoperative chronic pain after anterior hernia repair according to the transinguinal preperitoneal (TIPP technique, compared to Lichtenstein. In our hypothesis the TIPP technique reduces chronic pain compared to Lichtenstein. Trial registration ISRCTN 93798494

  20. Comparing the Effectiveness of a Clinical Registry and a Clinical Data Warehouse for Supporting Clinical Trial Recruitment: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Chunhua; Bigger, J Thomas; Busacca, Linda; Wilcox, Adam; Getaneh, Asqual

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports a case study comparing the relative efficiency of using a Diabetes Registry or a Clinical Data Warehouse to recruit participants for a diabetes clinical trial, TECOS. The Clinical Data Warehouse generated higher positive predictive accuracy (31% vs. 6.6%) and higher participant recruitment than the Registry (30 vs. 14 participants) in a shorter time period (59 vs. 74 working days). We identify important factors that increase clinical trial recruitment efficiency and lower cost. PMID:21347102

  1. Ciclosporin compared with prednisolone therapy for patients with pyoderma gangrenosum: cost-effectiveness analysis of the STOP GAP trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, J M; Thomas, K S; Ormerod, A D; Craig, F E; Mitchell, E; Norrie, J; Williams, H C

    2017-12-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is a painful, ulcerating skin disease with poor evidence for management. Prednisolone and ciclosporin are the most commonly used treatments, although not previously compared within a randomized controlled trial (RCT). To compare the cost-effectiveness of ciclosporin and prednisolone-initiated treatment for patients with PG. Quality of life (QoL, EuroQoL five dimensions three level questionnaire, EQ-5D-3L) and resource data were collected as part of the STOP GAP trial: a multicentre, parallel-group, observer-blind RCT. Within-trial analysis used bivariate regression of costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), with multiple imputation of missing data, informing a probabilistic assessment of incremental treatment cost-effectiveness from a health service perspective. In the base case analysis, when compared with prednisolone, ciclosporin was cost-effective due to a reduction in costs [net cost: -£1160; 95% confidence interval (CI) -2991 to 672] and improvement in QoL (net QALYs: 0·055; 95% CI 0·018-0·093). However, this finding appears driven by a minority of patients with large lesions (≥ 20 cm 2 ) (net cost: -£5310; 95% CI -9729 to -891; net QALYs: 0·077; 95% CI 0·004-0·151). The incremental cost-effectiveness of ciclosporin for the majority of patients with smaller lesions was £23 374/QALY, although the estimate is imprecise: the probability of being cost-effective at a willingness-to-pay of £20 000/QALY was 43%. Consistent with the clinical findings of the STOP GAP trial, patients with small lesions should receive treatment guided by the side-effect profiles of the drugs and patient preference - neither strategy is clearly a preferred use of National Health Service resources. However, ciclosporin-initiated treatment may be more cost-effective for patients with large lesions. © 2017 The Authors. British Journal of Dermatology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Association of Dermatologists.

  2. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... healthy people to test new approaches to prevention, diagnosis, or screening. In the past, clinical trial participants ... DSMBs for large trials comparing alternative strategies for diagnosis or treatment. In addition, the NIH requires DSMBs ...

  3. A randomised controlled trial to compare opt-in and opt-out parental consent for childhood vaccine safety surveillance using data linkage: study protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Berry, Jesia G; Ryan, Philip; Braunack-Mayer, Annette J; Duszynski, Katherine M; Xafis, Vicki; Gold, Michael S

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The Vaccine Assessment using Linked Data (VALiD) trial compared opt-in and opt-out parental consent for a population-based childhood vaccine safety surveillance program using data linkage. A subsequent telephone interview of all households enrolled in the trial elicited parental intent regarding the return or non-return of reply forms for opt-in and opt-out consent. This paper describes the rationale for the trial and provides an overview of the design and methods. Methods...

  4. A Bayesian Analysis of a Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing Antimetabolite Therapies for Non-Infectious Uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Erica N; Rathinam, Sivakumar R; Kanakath, Anuradha; Thundikandy, Radhika; Babu, Manohar; Lietman, Thomas M; Acharya, Nisha R

    2017-02-01

    To conduct a Bayesian analysis of a randomized clinical trial (RCT) for non-infectious uveitis using expert opinion as a subjective prior belief. A RCT was conducted to determine which antimetabolite, methotrexate or mycophenolate mofetil, is more effective as an initial corticosteroid-sparing agent for the treatment of intermediate, posterior, and pan-uveitis. Before the release of trial results, expert opinion on the relative effectiveness of these two medications was collected via online survey. Members of the American Uveitis Society executive committee were invited to provide an estimate for the relative decrease in efficacy with a 95% credible interval (CrI). A prior probability distribution was created from experts' estimates. A Bayesian analysis was performed using the constructed expert prior probability distribution and the trial's primary outcome. A total of 11 of the 12 invited uveitis specialists provided estimates. Eight of 11 experts (73%) believed mycophenolate mofetil is more effective. The group prior belief was that the odds of treatment success for patients taking mycophenolate mofetil were 1.4-fold the odds of those taking methotrexate (95% CrI 0.03-45.0). The odds of treatment success with mycophenolate mofetil compared to methotrexate was 0.4 from the RCT (95% confidence interval 0.1-1.2) and 0.7 (95% CrI 0.2-1.7) from the Bayesian analysis. A Bayesian analysis combining expert belief with the trial's result did not indicate preference for one drug. However, the wide credible interval leaves open the possibility of a substantial treatment effect. This suggests clinical equipoise necessary to allow a larger, more definitive RCT.

  5. Acute migraine therapy: recent evidence from randomized comparative trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mett, A.; Tfelt-Hansen, P.

    2008-01-01

    (1) A wide array of data regarding acute migraine treatment are available, but few trials strictly adhere to International Headache Society guidelines for patient inclusion criteria. (2) Triptans appear to have similar efficacy profiles, but among newer triptans, almotriptan offers improved...

  6. Focus on Function – a randomized controlled trial comparing two rehabilitation interventions for young children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell Dianne

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children with cerebral palsy receive a variety of long-term physical and occupational therapy interventions to facilitate development and to enhance functional independence in movement, self-care, play, school activities and leisure. Considerable human and financial resources are directed at the "intervention" of the problems of cerebral palsy, although the available evidence supporting current interventions is inconclusive. A considerable degree of uncertainty remains about the appropriate therapeutic approaches to manage the habilitation of children with cerebral palsy. The primary objective of this project is to conduct a multi-site randomized clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy of a task/context-focused approach compared to a child-focused remediation approach in improving performance of functional tasks and mobility, increasing participation in everyday activities, and improving quality of life in children 12 months to 5 years of age who have cerebral palsy. Method/Design A multi-centred randomized controlled trial research design will be used. Children will be recruited from a representative sample of children attending publicly-funded regional children's rehabilitation centers serving children with disabilities in Ontario and Alberta in Canada. Target sample size is 220 children with cerebral palsy aged 12 months to 5 years at recruitment date. Therapists are randomly assigned to deliver either a context-focused approach or a child-focused approach. Children follow their therapist into their treatment arm. Outcomes will be evaluated at baseline, after 6 months of treatment and at a 3-month follow-up period. Outcomes represent the components of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, including body function and structure (range of motion, activities (performance of functional tasks, motor function, participation (involvement in formal and informal activities, and environment (parent

  7. Dextrose saline compared with normal saline rehydration of hyperemesis gravidarum: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Peng Chiong; Norazilah, Mat Jin; Omar, Siti Zawiah

    2013-02-01

    To compare 5% dextrose-0.9% saline against 0.9% saline solution in the intravenous rehydration of hyperemesis gravidarum. Women at their first hospitalization for hyperemesis gravidarum were enrolled on admission to the ward and randomly assigned to receive either 5% dextrose-0.9% saline or 0.9% saline by intravenous infusion at a rate 125 mL/h over 24 hours in a double-blind trial. All participants also received thiamine and an antiemetic intravenously. Oral intake was allowed as tolerated. Primary outcomes were resolution of ketonuria and well-being (by 10-point visual numerical rating scale) at 24 hours. Nausea visual numerical rating scale scores were obtained every 8 hours for 24 hours. Persistent ketonuria rates after the 24-hour study period were 10 of 101 (9.9%) compared with 11 of 101 (10.9%) (P>.99; relative risk 0.9, 95% confidence interval 0.4-2.2) and median (interquartile range) well-being scores at 24 hours were 9 (8-10) compared with 9 (8-9.5) (P=.73) in the 5% dextrose-0.9% saline and 0.9% saline arms, respectively. Repeated measures analysis of variance of the nausea visual numerical rating scale score as assessed every 8 hours during the 24-hour study period showed a significant difference in favor of the 5% dextrose-0.9% saline arm (P=.046) with the superiority apparent at 8 and 16 hours, but the advantage had dissipated by 24 hours. Secondary outcomes of vomiting, resolution of hyponatremia, hypochloremia and hypokalemia, length of hospitalization, duration of intravenous antiemetic, and rehydration were not different. Intravenous rehydration with 5% dextrose-0.9% saline or 0.9% saline solution in women hospitalized for hyperemesis gravidarum produced similar outcomes. ISRCTN Register, www.controlled-trials.com/isrctn, ISRCTN65014409. I.

  8. Behavioral Effects of Neurofeedback Compared to Stimulants and Physical Activity in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gelade, K.; Janssen, T.W.P.; Bink, M.; van Mourik, R.; Maras, A.; Oosterlaan, J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The efficacy of neurofeedback as treatment for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and whether neurofeedback is a viable alternative for stimulant medication, are still intensely debated subjects. The current randomised controlled trial compared neurofeedback to (1) optimally

  9. Behavioral Effects of Neurofeedback Compared to Stimulants and Physical Activity in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geladé, Katleen; Janssen, Tieme W. P.; Bink, Marleen; van Mourik, Rosa; Maras, Athanasios; Oosterlaan, Jaap

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of neurofeedback as a treatment for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and whether neurofeedback is a viable alternative for stimulant medication, is still an intensely debated subject. The current randomized controlled trial compared neurofeedback to (1) optimally

  10. A randomised controlled trial to compare opt-in and opt-out parental consent for childhood vaccine safety surveillance using data linkage: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Jesia G; Ryan, Philip; Braunack-Mayer, Annette J; Duszynski, Katherine M; Xafis, Vicki; Gold, Michael S

    2011-01-04

    The Vaccine Assessment using Linked Data (VALiD) trial compared opt-in and opt-out parental consent for a population-based childhood vaccine safety surveillance program using data linkage. A subsequent telephone interview of all households enrolled in the trial elicited parental intent regarding the return or non-return of reply forms for opt-in and opt-out consent. This paper describes the rationale for the trial and provides an overview of the design and methods. Single-centre, single-blind, randomised controlled trial (RCT) stratified by firstborn status. Mothers who gave birth at one tertiary South Australian hospital were randomised at six weeks post-partum to receive an opt-in or opt-out reply form, along with information explaining data linkage. The primary outcome at 10 weeks post-partum was parental participation in each arm, as indicated by the respective return or non-return of a reply form (or via telephone or email response). A subsequent telephone interview at 10 weeks post-partum elicited parental intent regarding the return or non-return of the reply form, and attitudes and knowledge about data linkage, vaccine safety, consent preferences and vaccination practices. Enrolment began in July 2009 and 1,129 households were recruited in a three-month period. Analysis has not yet been undertaken. The participation rate and selection bias for each method of consent will be compared when the data are analysed. The VALiD RCT represents the first trial of opt-in versus opt-out consent for a data linkage study that assesses consent preferences and intent compared with actual opting in or opting out behaviour, and socioeconomic factors. The limitations to generalisability are discussed. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12610000332022.

  11. Cost utility analysis of co-prescribed heroin compared with methadone maintenance treatment in heroin addicts in two randomised trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkgraaf, Marcel G. W.; van der Zanden, Bart P.; de Borgie, Corianne A. J. M.; Blanken, Peter; van Ree, Jan M.; van den Brink, Wim

    2005-01-01

    Objective To determine the cost utility of medical co-prescription of heroin compared with methadone maintenance treatment for chronic, treatment resistant heroin addicts. Design Cost utility analysis of two pooled open label randomised controlled trials. Setting Methadone maintenance programmes in

  12. A pragmatic, multicentre, randomised controlled trial comparing stapled haemorrhoidopexy to traditional excisional surgery for haemorrhoidal disease (eTHoS): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Angus J M; Bruhn, Hanne; MacLeod, Kathleen; McDonald, Alison; McPherson, Gladys; Kilonzo, Mary; Norrie, John; Loudon, Malcolm A; McCormack, Kirsty; Buckley, Brian; Brown, Steven; Curran, Finlay; Jayne, David; Rajagopal, Ramesh; Cook, Jonathan A

    2014-11-11

    Current interventions for haemorrhoidal disease include traditional haemorrhoidectomy (TH) and stapled haemorrhoidopexy (SH) surgery. However, uncertainty remains as to how they compare from a clinical, quality of life (QoL) and economic perspective. The study is therefore designed to determine whether SH is more effective and more cost-effective, compared with TH. eTHoS (either Traditional Haemorrhoidectomy or Stapled Haemorrhoidopexy for Haemorrhoidal Disease) is a pragmatic, multicentre, randomised controlled trial. Currently, 29 secondary care centres are open to recruitment. Patients, aged 18 year or older, with circumferential haemorrhoids grade II to IV, are eligible to take part. The primary clinical and economic outcomes are QoL profile (area under the curve derived from the EuroQol Group's 5 Dimension Health Status Questionnaire (EQ-5D) at all assessment points) and incremental cost per quality adjusted life year (QALY) based on the responses to the EQ-5D at 24 months. The secondary outcomes include a comparison of the SF-36 scores, pain and symptoms sub-domains, disease recurrence, complication rates and direct and indirect costs to the National Health Service (NHS). A sample size of n =338 per group has been calculated to provide 90% power to detect a difference in the mean area under the curve (AUC) of 0.25 standard deviations derived from EQ-5D score measurements, with a two-sided significance level of 5%. Allowing for non-response, 400 participants will be randomised per group. Randomisation will utilise a minimisation algorithm that incorporates centre, grade of haemorrhoidal disease, baseline EQ-5D score and gender. Blinding of participants and outcome assessors is not attempted. This is one of the largest trials of its kind. In the United Kingdom alone, 29,000 operations for haemorrhoidal disease are done annually. The trial is therefore designed to give robust evidence on which clinicians and health service managers can base management decisions

  13. Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial comparing mindfulness-based cognitive therapy with maintenance anti-depressant treatment in the prevention of depressive relapse/recurrence: the PREVENT trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayes Rachel

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depression is a common and distressing mental health problem that is responsible for significant individual disability and cost to society. Medication and psychological therapies are effective for treating depression and maintenance anti-depressants (m-ADM can prevent relapse. However, individuals with depression often express a wish for psychological help that can help them recover from depression in the long-term. We need to develop psychological therapies that prevent depressive relapse/recurrence. A recently developed treatment, Mindfulness-based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT, see http://www.mbct.co.uk shows potential as a brief group programme for people with recurring depression. In two studies it has been shown to halve the rates of depression recurring compared to usual care. This trial asks the policy research question, is MBCT superior to m-ADM in terms of: a primary outcome of preventing depressive relapse/recurrence over 24 months; and, secondary outcomes of (a depression free days, (b residual depressive symptoms, (c antidepressant (ADM usage, (d psychiatric and medical co-morbidity, (e quality of life, and (f cost effectiveness? An explanatory research question asks is an increase in mindfulness skills the key mechanism of change? Methods/Design The design is a single blind, parallel RCT examining MBCT vs. m-ADM with an embedded process study. To answer the main policy research question the proposed trial compares MBCT plus ADM-tapering with m-ADM for patients with recurrent depression. Four hundred and twenty patients with recurrent major depressive disorder in full or partial remission will be recruited through primary care. Depressive relapse/recurrence over two years is the primary outcome variable. The explanatory question will be addressed in two mutually informative ways: quantitative measurement of potential mediating variables pre/post-treatment and a qualitative study of service users' views and experiences

  14. The mycotic ulcer treatment trial: a randomized trial comparing natamycin vs voriconazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajna, N Venkatesh; Krishnan, Tiruvengada; Mascarenhas, Jeena; Rajaraman, Revathi; Prajna, Lalitha; Srinivasan, Muthiah; Raghavan, Anita; Oldenburg, Catherine E; Ray, Kathryn J; Zegans, Michael E; McLeod, Stephen D; Porco, Travis C; Acharya, Nisha R; Lietman, Thomas M

    2013-04-01

    To compare topical natamycin vs voriconazole in the treatment of filamentous fungal keratitis. This phase 3, double-masked, multicenter trial was designed to randomize 368 patients to voriconazole (1%) or natamycin (5%), applied topically every hour while awake until reepithelialization, then 4 times daily for at least 3 weeks. Eligibility included smear-positive filamentous fungal ulcer and visual acuity of 20/40 to 20/400. The primary outcome was best spectacle-corrected visual acuity at 3 months; secondary outcomes included corneal perforation and/or therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty. A total of 940 patients were screened and 323 were enrolled. Causative organisms included Fusarium (128 patients [40%]), Aspergillus (54 patients [17%]), and other filamentous fungi (141 patients [43%]). Natamycintreated cases had significantly better 3-month best spectacle-corrected visual acuity than voriconazole-treated cases (regression coefficient=0.18 logMAR; 95% CI, 0.30 to 0.05; P=.006). Natamycin-treated cases were less likely to have perforation or require therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty (odds ratio=0.42; 95% CI, 0.22 to 0.80; P=.009). Fusarium cases fared better with natamycin than with voriconazole (regression coefficient=0.41 logMAR; 95% CI,0.61 to 0.20; P<.001; odds ratio for perforation=0.06; 95% CI, 0.01 to 0.28; P<.001), while non-Fusarium cases fared similarly (regression coefficient=0.02 logMAR; 95% CI, 0.17 to 0.13; P=.81; odds ratio for perforation=1.08; 95% CI, 0.48 to 2.43; P=.86). Natamycin treatment was associated with significantly better clinical and microbiological outcomes than voriconazole treatment for smear-positive filamentous fungal keratitis, with much of the difference attributable to improved results in Fusarium cases. Voriconazole should not be used as monotherapy in filamentous keratitis. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00996736

  15. Economic evaluation of the randomized European Achalasia trial comparing pneumodilation with Laparoscopic Heller myotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moonen, A; Busch, O; Costantini, M; Finotti, E; Tack, J; Salvador, R; Boeckxstaens, G; Zaninotto, G

    2017-11-01

    A recent multicenter randomized trial in achalasia patients has shown that pneumatic dilation resulted in equivalent relief of symptoms compared to laparoscopic Heller myotomy. Additionally, the cost of each treatment should be also taken in consideration. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to perform an economic analysis of the European achalasia trial. Patients with newly diagnosed achalasia were enrolled from to 2003 to 2008 in 14 centers in five European countries and were randomly assigned to either pneumatic dilation (PD) or laparoscopic Heller (LHM). The economic analysis was performed in the three centers in three different countries where most patients were enrolled (Amsterdam [NL], Leuven, [B] and Padova [I]) and then applied to all patients included in the study. The total raw costs of the two treatments per patient include the initial costs, the costs of complications, and the costs of retreatments. Two hundred and one patients, 107 (57 males and 50 females, mean age 46 CI: 43-49 years) were randomized to LHM and 94 (59 males and 34 females, mean age 46 CI 43-50 years) to PD. The total cost of PD per patient was quite comparable in the three different centers; €3397 in Padova, €3259 in Amsterdam and €3792 in Leuven. For LHM, the total costs per patient were highest in Amsterdam: €4488 in Padova, €6720 in Amsterdam, and €5856 in Leuven. In conclusion, the strategy of treating achalasia starting with PD appears the most economic approach, independent of the health system. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. A novel comparative effectiveness study of Tai Chi versus aerobic exercise for fibromyalgia: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenchen; McAlindon, Timothy; Fielding, Roger A; Harvey, William F; Driban, Jeffrey B; Price, Lori Lyn; Kalish, Robert; Schmid, Anna; Scott, Tammy M; Schmid, Christopher H

    2015-01-30

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic musculoskeletal pain syndrome that causes substantial physical and psychological impairment and costs the US healthcare system over $25 billion annually. Current pharmacological therapies may cause serious adverse effects, are expensive, and fail to effectively improve pain and function. Finding new and effective non-pharmacological treatments for fibromyalgia patients is urgently needed. We are currently conducting the first comparative effectiveness randomized trial of Tai Chi versus aerobic exercise (a recommended component of the current standard of care) in a large fibromyalgia population. This article describes the design and conduct of this trial. A single-center, 52-week, randomized controlled trial of Tai Chi versus aerobic exercise is being conducted at an urban tertiary medical center in Boston, Massachusetts. We plan to recruit 216 patients with fibromyalgia. The study population consists of adults ≥21 years of age with fibromyalgia who meet American College of Rheumatology 1990 and 2010 diagnostic criteria. Participants are randomized to one of four Tai Chi intervention groups: 12 or 24 weeks of supervised Tai Chi held once or twice per week, or a supervised aerobic exercise control held twice per week for 24 weeks. The primary outcome is the change in Revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire total score from baseline to 24 weeks. Secondary outcomes include measures of widespread pain, symptom severity, functional performance, balance, muscle strength and power, psychological functioning, sleep quality, self-efficacy, durability effects, and health-related quality of life at 12, 24, and 52 week follow-up. This study is the first comparative effectiveness randomized trial of Tai Chi versus aerobic exercise in a large fibromyalgia population with long-term follow up. We present here a robust and well-designed trial to determine the optimal frequency and duration of a supervised Tai Chi intervention with regard to short

  17. PIMS (Positioning In Macular hole Surgery) trial - a multicentre interventional comparative randomised controlled clinical trial comparing face-down positioning, with an inactive face-forward position on the outcome of surgery for large macular holes: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasu, Saruban; Bunce, Catey; Hooper, Richard; Thomson, Ann; Bainbridge, James

    2015-11-17

    Idiopathic macular holes are an important cause of blindness. They have an annual incidence of 8 per 100,000 individuals, and prevalence of 0.2 to 3.3 per 1000 individuals with visual impairment. The condition occurs more frequently in adults aged 75 years or older. Macular holes can be repaired by surgery in which the causative tractional forces in the eye are released and a temporary bubble of gas is injected. To promote successful hole closure individuals may be advised to maintain a face-down position for up to 10 days following surgery. The aim of this study is to determine whether advice to position face-down improves the surgical success rate of closure of large (>400 μm) macular holes, and thereby reduces the need for further surgery. This will be a multicentre interventional, comparative randomised controlled clinical trial comparing face-down positioning with face-forward positioning. At the conclusion of standardised surgery across all sites, participants still eligible for inclusion will be allocated randomly 1:1 to 1 of the 2 treatment arms stratified by site, using random permuted blocks of size 4 or 6 in equal proportions. We will recruit 192 participants having surgery for large macular holes (>400 μm); 96 in each of the 2 arms of the study. The primary objective is to determine the impact of face-down positioning on the likelihood of closure of large (≥400 μm) full-thickness macular holes following surgery. This will be the first multicentre randomised control trial to investigate the value of face-down positioning following macular hole standardised surgery. UK CRN: 17966 (date of registration 26 November 2014).

  18. Dutch randomized trial comparing standard catheter-directed thrombolysis versus Ultrasound-accElerated Thrombolysis for thromboembolic infrainguinal disease (DUET: design and rationale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fioole Bram

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of thrombolytic therapy in the treatment of thrombosed infrainguinal native arteries and bypass grafts has increased over the years. Main limitation of this treatment modality, however, is the occurrence of bleeding complications. Low intensity ultrasound (US has been shown to accelerate enzymatic thrombolysis, thereby reducing therapy time. So far, no randomized trials have investigated the application of US-accelerated thrombolysis in the treatment of thrombosed infra-inguinal native arteries or bypass grafts. The DUET study (Dutch randomized trial comparing standard catheter-directed thrombolysis versus Ultrasound-accElerated Thrombolysis for thrombo-embolic infrainguinal disease is designed to assess whether US-accelerated thrombolysis will reduce therapy time significantly compared with standard catheter-directed thrombolysis. Methods/design Sixty adult patients with recently (between 1 and 7 weeks thrombosed infrainguinal native arteries or bypass grafts with acute limb ischemia class I or IIa, according to the Rutherford classification for acute ischemia, will be randomly allocated to either standard thrombolysis (group A or US-accelerated thrombolysis (group B. Patients will be recruited from 5 teaching hospitals in the Netherlands during a 2-year period. The primary endpoint is the duration of catheter-directed thrombolysis needed for uninterrupted flow in the thrombosed infrainguinal native artery or bypass graft, with outflow through at least 1 crural artery. Discussion The DUET study is a randomized controlled trial that will provide evidence of whether US-accelerated thrombolysis will significantly reduce therapy time in patients with recently thrombosed infrainguinal native arteries or bypass grafts, without an increase in complications. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN72676102

  19. Analysis of complications in a prospective randomized trial comparing two brachytherapy low dose rates in cervical carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-07-30

    The analysis of complications in a prospective randomized trial comparing two preoperative brachytherapy low-dose rates in early stage cervical cancer is presented. The objective of this trial was to determine the benefits, if any, of the higher-dose rate within the therapeutic aresenal for this patient population, in terms of survival, local control, and complications. Overall survival, 85% at 2 years and local control, 93% at 2 years, were similarly distributed between the two groups. Regardless of their nature and severity, 139 and 175 complications were observed among 63% and 75% of patients, in the 0.4 and 0.8 Gy/h dose rate groups respectively. Gynecologic and urinary complications were the most frequent (38% and 28% of all complications), followed by vascular (15%), digestive (10%), nervous (5%), and cutaneous (5%). A total of 14 and 17 severe complications (Grade 3) were observed in 7% and 13% of patients, respectively in the 0.4 and 0.8 Gy/h dose rate groups (p = 0.12) Nonparametric survival methods used to compare the time to the first complication did not show a significant difference between the two groups: 62% and 72% at 2 years (p = 0.27). When the first complication and its evolution were considered (early complications), the prevalence of complications was not significantly different between the two groups: 28% vs. 34% at 2 years (p = 0.31). In this prospective trial, patients were regularly followed-up and complications of varying nature and severity were observed in succession during follow-up. When successive complications and their evolution were taken into account, the prevalence of complications was significantly greater in the higher-dose rate group: 30% vs 45% at 2 years (p = 0.03). The results of this trial showed that long-term effects of treatment, when represented by prevalence of complications over time, were more frequent in the higher dose rate group. 33 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Conservative treatment of a mandibular condyle fracture: comparing intermaxillary fixation with screws or arch bar. A randomised clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bergh, B.; Blankestijn, J.; van der Ploeg, T.; Tuinzing, D.B.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction A mandibular condyle fracture can be treated conservatively by intermaxillary fixation (IMF) or by open reposition and internal fixation (ORIF). Many IMF-modalities can be chosen, including IMF-screws (IMFS). This prospective multi-centre randomised clinical trial compared the use of

  1. Conservative treatment of a mandibular condyle fracture: Comparing intermaxillary fixation with screws or arch bar. A randomised clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bergh, B.; Blankestijn, J.; van der Ploeg, T.; Tuinzing, D.B.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction A mandibular condyle fracture can be treated conservatively by intermaxillary fixation (IMF) or by open reposition and internal fixation (ORIF). Many IMF-modalities can be chosen, including IMF-screws (IMFS). This prospective multi-centre randomised clinical trial compared the use of

  2. Randomised controlled trial comparing hypnotherapy versus gabapentin for the treatment of hot flashes in breast cancer survivors: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLaughlan David, Shannon; Salzillo, Sandra; Bowe, Patrick; Scuncio, Sandra; Malit, Bridget; Raker, Christina; Gass, Jennifer S; Granai, C O; Dizon, Don S

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To compare the efficacy of hypnotherapy versus gabapentin for the treatment of hot flashes in breast cancer survivors, and to evaluate the feasibility of conducting a clinical trial comparing a drug with a complementary or alternative method (CAM). Design Prospective randomised trial. Setting Breast health centre of a tertiary care centre. Participants 15 women with a personal history of breast cancer or an increased risk of breast cancer who reported at least one daily hot flash. Interventions Gabapentin 900 mg daily in three divided doses (control) compared with standardised hypnotherapy. Participation lasted 8 weeks. Outcome measures The primary endpoints were the number of daily hot flashes and hot flash severity score (HFSS). The secondary endpoint was the Hot Flash Related Daily Interference Scale (HFRDIS). Results 27 women were randomised and 15 (56%) were considered evaluable for the primary endpoint (n=8 gabapentin, n=7 hypnotherapy). The median number of daily hot flashes at enrolment was 4.5 in the gabapentin arm and 5 in the hypnotherapy arm. HFSS scores were 7.5 in the gabapentin arm and 10 in the hypnotherapy arm. After 8 weeks, the median number of daily hot flashes was reduced by 33.3% in the gabapentin arm and by 80% in the hypnotherapy arm. The median HFSS was reduced by 33.3% in the gabapentin arm and by 85% in the hypnotherapy arm. HFRDIS scores improved by 51.6% in the gabapentin group and by 55.2% in the hypnotherapy group. There were no statistically significant differences between groups. Conclusions Hypnotherapy and gabapentin demonstrate efficacy in improving hot flashes. A definitive trial evaluating traditional interventions against CAM methods is feasible, but not without challenges. Further studies aimed at defining evidence-based recommendations for CAM are necessary. Trial registration clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00711529). PMID:24022390

  3. Physical activity and trial-by-trial adjustments of response conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamijo, Keita; Takeda, Yuji

    2013-08-01

    The relationship of physical activity to trial-by-trial adjustments of response conflict was assessed using behavioral task performance, the N2 event-related brain potential component, and phase-locking values (PLVs) in a lower gamma band during a perceptual conflict task. Nineteen physically active and 19 inactive young adults (mean age = 21.3 years) performed a Navon task, using a global letter made up of local letters of either the same kind (congruent trials) or a different kind (incongruent trials). Findings revealed that active individuals exhibited smaller N2 amplitudes and greater PLVs on incongruent trials that were preceded by incongruent trials compared with those preceded by congruent trials. Such phenomena were not observed for inactive individuals. These results suggest that greater physical activity is associated with larger trial-by-trial adjustments of response conflict, which we attribute to upregulation of top-down cognitive control and reductions in response conflict.

  4. Internet treatment for generalized anxiety disorder: a randomized controlled trial comparing clinician vs. technician assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Emma; Titov, Nickolai; Andrews, Gavin; McIntyre, Karen; Schwencke, Genevieve; Solley, Karen

    2010-06-03

    Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (iCBT) for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) has been shown to be effective when guided by a clinician. The present study sought to replicate this finding, and determine whether support from a technician is as effective as guidance from a clinician. Randomized controlled non-inferiority trial comparing three groups: Clinician-assisted vs. technician-assisted vs. delayed treatment. Community-based volunteers applied to the VirtualClinic (www.virtualclinic.org.au) research program and 150 participants with GAD were randomized. Participants in the clinician- and technician-assisted groups received access to an iCBT program for GAD comprising six online lessons, weekly homework assignments, and weekly supportive contact over a treatment period of 10 weeks. Participants in the clinician-assisted group also received access to a moderated online discussion forum. The main outcome measures were the Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ) and the Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 Item (GAD-7). Completion rates were high, and both treatment groups reduced scores on the PSWQ (ptechnician-assisted groups, respectively, and on the GAD-7 were 1.55 and 1.73, respectively. At 3 month follow-up participants in both treatment groups had sustained the gains made at post-treatment. Participants in the clinician-assisted group had made further gains on the PSWQ. Approximately 81 minutes of clinician time and 75 minutes of technician time were required per participant during the 10 week treatment program. Both clinician- and technician-assisted treatment resulted in large effect sizes and clinically significant improvements comparable to those associated with face-to-face treatment, while a delayed treatment/control group did not improve. These results provide support for large scale trials to determine the clinical effectiveness and acceptability of technician-assisted iCBT programs for GAD. This form of treatment has potential to increase the

  5. A randomized controlled trial comparing EMDR and CBT for obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, Zoe; Lovell, Karina; Blore, David; Ali, Shehzad; Delgadillo, Jaime

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) as a treatment for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), by comparison to cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) based on exposure and response prevention. This was a pragmatic, feasibility randomized controlled trial in which 55 participants with OCD were randomized to EMDR (n = 29) or CBT (n = 26). The Yale-Brown obsessive-compulsive scale was completed at baseline, after treatment and at 6 months follow-up. Treatment completion and response rates were compared using chi-square tests. Effect size was examined using Cohen's d and multilevel modelling. Overall, 61.8% completed treatment and 30.2% attained reliable and clinically significant improvement in OCD symptoms, with no significant differences between groups (p > .05). There were no significant differences between groups in Yale-Brown obsessive-compulsive scale severity post-treatment (d = -0.24, p = .38) or at 6 months follow-up (d = -0.03, p = .90). EMDR and CBT had comparable completion rates and clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Comparative costs and activity from a sample of UK clinical trials units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hind, Daniel; Reeves, Barnaby C; Bathers, Sarah; Bray, Christopher; Corkhill, Andrea; Hayward, Christopher; Harper, Lynda; Napp, Vicky; Norrie, John; Speed, Chris; Tremain, Liz; Keat, Nicola; Bradburn, Mike

    2017-05-02

    The costs of medical research are a concern. Clinical Trials Units (CTUs) need to better understand variations in the costs of their activities. Representatives of ten CTUs and two grant-awarding bodies pooled their experiences in discussions over 1.5 years. Five of the CTUs provided estimates of, and written justification for, costs associated with CTU activities required to implement an identical protocol. The protocol described a 5.5-year, nonpharmacological randomized controlled trial (RCT) conducted at 20 centres. Direct and indirect costs, the number of full time equivalents (FTEs) and the FTEs attracting overheads were compared and qualitative methods (unstructured interviews and thematic analysis) were used to interpret the results. Four members of the group (funding-body representatives or award panel members) reviewed the justification statements for transparency and information content. Separately, 163 activities common to trials were assigned to roles used by nine CTUs; the consistency of role delineation was assessed by Cohen's κ. Median full economic cost of CTU activities was £769,637 (range: £661,112 to £1,383,323). Indirect costs varied considerably, accounting for between 15% and 59% (median 35%) of the full economic cost of the grant. Excluding one CTU, which used external statisticians, the total number of FTEs ranged from 2.0 to 3.0; total FTEs attracting overheads ranged from 0.3 to 2.0. Variation in directly incurred staff costs depended on whether CTUs: supported particular roles from core funding rather than grants; opted not to cost certain activities into the grant; assigned clerical or data management tasks to research or administrative staff; employed extensive on-site monitoring strategies (also the main source of variation in non-staff costs). Funders preferred written justifications of costs that described both FTEs and indicative tasks for funded roles, with itemised non-staff costs. Consistency in role delineation was fair (κ

  7. Postpartum perineal reapir performed by midwives: A randomised trial comparing two suture techniques for perineal repair leaving the skin unsutured

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kindberg, Sara; Misan, Stehouwer; Hvidman, Lone

    2008-01-01

    Postpartum perineal repair performed by midwives: A randomised trial comparing two suture techniques leaving the skin unsutured. Objective      To compare a continuous suture technique to interrupted stitches using inverted knots for postpartum perineal repair of second-degree lacerations...... and episiotomies.   Design          A double blind randomised controlled trial.   Setting          A Danish university hospital with more than 4800 deliveries annually.   Population   400 healthy primiparous women with a vaginal delivery at term.   Method         Randomisation was computer-controlled. Structured...... healing, patient satisfaction, dyspareunia or need for resuturing. The continuous suture technique was significantly faster (15 min. vs. 17 min, p=0.03) and less suture material was used (1 vs. 2 packets, pskin unsutured...

  8. Prospective controlled trial comparing colostomy irrigation with "spontaneous-action" method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, N S; Johnston, D

    1980-07-12

    Thirty randomly selected patients with permanent colostomies entered a prospective controlled trial comparing colostomy irrigation with spontaneous action. Each patient was interviewed and examined before irrigation was begun and again after the technique had been used for three months. Each then reverted to spontaneous action for a further three months and was then reassessed. Eight patients abandoned irrigation and 22 (73%) adhered to the protocol. Irrigation caused no mishaps or complications. The mean time spent managing the stoma was 45 +/- SEM 9 min/24 hours during spontaneous action and 53 +/- 9 min/24 hours during irrigation. This difference was not significant. The numbers of bowel actions weekly were 13 +/ SEM 2 during spontaneous action and 6 +/- 1 during irrigation (p Irrigation reduced odour and flatus in 20 patients and enabled 12 out of 18 to stop using drugs and seven to discard their appliance. Irrigation also improved the social life of 18 patients and the working conditions of eight out of 14. These finding show that some patients may not be suitable for irrigation but that for many it is better than the conventional British method of colostomy management. With modern apparatus the technique is safe.

  9. Randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial comparing two multimodal opioid-minimizing pain management regimens following transsphenoidal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Deborah M; Jahnke, Heidi; White, William L; Little, Andrew S

    2018-02-01

    OBJECTIVE Pain control is an important clinical consideration and quality-of-care metric. No studies have examined postoperative pain control following transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary lesions. The study goals were to 1) report postoperative pain scores following transsphenoidal surgery, 2) determine if multimodal opioid-minimizing pain regimens yielded satisfactory postoperative pain control, and 3) determine if intravenous (IV) ibuprofen improved postoperative pain scores and reduced opioid use compared with placebo. METHODS This study was a single-center, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled intervention trial involving adult patients with planned transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary tumors randomized into 2 groups. Group 1 patients were treated with scheduled IV ibuprofen, scheduled oral acetaminophen, and rescue opioids. Group 2 patients were treated with IV placebo, scheduled oral acetaminophen, and rescue opioids. The primary end point was patient pain scores (visual analog scale [VAS], rated 0-10) for 48 hours after surgery. The secondary end point was opioid use as estimated by oral morphine equivalents (OMEs). RESULTS Of 136 patients screened, 62 were enrolled (28 in Group 1, 34 in Group 2). The study was terminated early because the primary and secondary end points were reached. Baseline characteristics between groups were well matched except for age (Group 1, 59.3 ± 14.4 years; Group 2, 49.8 ± 16.2 years; p = 0.02). Mean VAS pain scores were significantly different, with a 43% reduction in Group 1 (1.7 ± 2.2) compared with Group 2 (3.0 ± 2.8; p transsphenoidal surgery. IV ibuprofen resulted in significantly improved pain scores and significantly decreased opioid use compared with placebo. Postoperative multimodal pain management, including a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory medication, should be considered after surgery to improve patient comfort and to limit opioid use. Clinical trial registration no.: NCT02351700 (clinicaltrials

  10. A multicenter, randomized trial comparing synthetic surfactant with modified bovine surfactant extract in the treatment of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adams, E; Vollman, J; Giebner, D; Maurer, M; Dreyer, G; Bailey, L; Anderson, M; Mefford, L; Beaumont, E; Sutton, D; Puppala, B; Mangurten, HH; Secrest, J; Lewis, WJ; Carteaux, P; Bednarek, F; Welsberger, S; Gosselin, R; Pantoja, AF; Belenky, A; Campbell, P; Patole, S; Duenas, M; Kelly, M; Alejo, W; Lewallen, P; DeanLieber, S; Hanft, M; Ferlauto, J; Newell, RW; Bagwell, J; Levine, D; Lipp, RW; Harkavy, K; Vasa, R; Birenbaum, H; Broderick, KA; Santos, AQ; Long, BA; Gulrajani, M; Stern, M; Hopgood, G; Hegyi, T; Alba, J; Christmas, L; McQueen, M; Nichols, N; Brown, M; Quissell, BJ; Rusk, C; Marks, K; Gifford, K; Hoehn, G; Pathak, A; Marino, B; Hunt, P; Fox, [No Value; Sharpstein, C; Feldman, B; Johnson, N; Beecham, J; Balcom, R; Helmuth, W; Boylan, D; Frakes, C; Magoon, M; Reese, K; Schwersenski, J; Schutzman, D; Soll, R; Horbar, JD; Leahy, K; Troyer, W; Juzwicki, C; Anderson, P; Dworsky, M; Reynolds, L; Urrutia, J; Gupta, U; Adray, C

    Objective. To compare the efficacy of a synthetic surfactant (Exosurf Neonatal, Burroughs-Wellcome Co) and a modified bovine surfactant extract (Survanta, Ross Laboratories) in the treatment of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). Design. Multicenter, randomized trial. Setting. Thirty-eight

  11. Systematic review and meta-analysis of published randomized controlled trials comparing purse-string vs conventional linear closure of the wound following ileostomy (stoma) closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajid, Muhammad Shafique; Bhatti, Muhammad I; Miles, William Fa

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this article is to systematically analyse the randomized, controlled trials comparing the effectiveness of purse-string closure (PSC) of an ileostomy wound with conventional linear closure (CLC). Randomized, controlled trials comparing the effectiveness of purse-string closure vs conventional linear closure (CLC) of ileostomy wound in patients undergoing ileostomy closure were analysed using RevMan®, and the combined outcomes were expressed as risk ratio (RR) and standardized mean difference (SMD). Three randomized, controlled trials, recruiting 206 patients, were retrieved from medical electronic databases. There were 105 patients in the PSC group and 101 patients in the CLC group. There was no heterogeneity among included trials. Duration of operation (SMD: -0.18; 95% CI: -0.45, 0.09; z = 1.28; P SMD: 0.01; 95% CI: -0.26, 0.28; z = 0.07; P infection (OR, 0.10; 95% CI: 0.03, 0.33; z = 3.78; P infection apparently without influencing the duration of operation and length of hospital stay. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press and the Digestive Science Publishing Co. Limited.

  12. Trial publication after registration in ClinicalTrials.Gov: a cross-sectional analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph S Ross

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available ClinicalTrials.gov is a publicly accessible, Internet-based registry of clinical trials managed by the US National Library of Medicine that has the potential to address selective trial publication. Our objectives were to examine completeness of registration within ClinicalTrials.gov and to determine the extent and correlates of selective publication.We examined reporting of registration information among a cross-section of trials that had been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov after December 31, 1999 and updated as having been completed by June 8, 2007, excluding phase I trials. We then determined publication status among a random 10% subsample by searching MEDLINE using a systematic protocol, after excluding trials completed after December 31, 2005 to allow at least 2 y for publication following completion. Among the full sample of completed trials (n = 7,515, nearly 100% reported all data elements mandated by ClinicalTrials.gov, such as intervention and sponsorship. Optional data element reporting varied, with 53% reporting trial end date, 66% reporting primary outcome, and 87% reporting trial start date. Among the 10% subsample, less than half (311 of 677, 46% of trials were published, among which 96 (31% provided a citation within ClinicalTrials.gov of a publication describing trial results. Trials primarily sponsored by industry (40%, 144 of 357 were less likely to be published when compared with nonindustry/nongovernment sponsored trials (56%, 110 of 198; p<0.001, but there was no significant difference when compared with government sponsored trials (47%, 57 of 122; p = 0.22. Among trials that reported an end date, 75 of 123 (61% completed prior to 2004, 50 of 96 (52% completed during 2004, and 62 of 149 (42% completed during 2005 were published (p = 0.006.Reporting of optional data elements varied and publication rates among completed trials registered within ClinicalTrials.gov were low. Without greater attention to reporting of all data

  13. Anti-Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Comparative Effectiveness Trial for Diabetic Macular Edema: Additional Efficacy Post Hoc Analyses of a Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jampol, Lee M; Glassman, Adam R; Bressler, Neil M; Wells, John A; Ayala, Allison R

    2016-12-01

    Post hoc analyses from the Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network randomized clinical trial comparing aflibercept, bevacizumab, and ranibizumab for diabetic macular edema (DME) might influence interpretation of study results. To provide additional outcomes comparing 3 anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) agents for DME. Post hoc analyses performed from May 3, 2016, to June 21, 2016, of a randomized clinical trial performed from August 22, 2012, to September 23, 2015, of 660 participants comparing 3 anti-VEGF treatments in eyes with center-involved DME causing vision impairment. Randomization to intravitreous aflibercept (2.0 mg), bevacizumab (1.25 mg), or ranibizumab (0.3 mg) administered up to monthly based on a structured retreatment regimen. Focal/grid laser treatment was added after 6 months for the treatment of persistent DME. Change in visual acuity (VA) area under the curve and change in central subfield thickness (CST) within subgroups based on whether an eye received laser treatment for DME during the study. Post hoc analyses were performed for 660 participants (mean [SD] age, 61 [10] years; 47% female, 65% white, 16% black or African American, 16% Hispanic, and 3% other). For eyes with an initial VA of 20/50 or worse, VA improvement was greater with aflibercept than the other agents at 1 year but superior only to bevacizumab at 2 years. Mean (SD) letter change in VA over 2 years (area under curve) was greater with aflibercept (+17.1 [9.7]) than with bevacizumab (+12.1 [9.4]; 95% CI, +1.6 to +7.3; P grid laser treatment was performed for DME, the only participants to have a substantial reduction in mean CST between 1 and 2 years were those with a baseline VA of 20/50 or worse receiving bevacizumab and laser treatment (mean [SD], -55 [108] µm; 95% CI, -82 to -28 µm; P grid laser treatment, ceiling and floor effects, or both may account for mean thickness reductions noted only in bevacizumab-treated eyes between 1 and 2 years

  14. Stent thrombosis: insights on outcomes, predictors and impact of dual antiplatelet therapy interruption from the SPIRIT II, SPIRIT III, SPIRIT IV and COMPARE trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedhi, Elvin; Stone, Gregg W; Kereiakes, Dean J; Serruys, Patrick W; Parise, Helen; Fahy, Martin; Simonton, Charles A; Sudhir, Krishnankutty; Sood, Poornima; Smits, Pieter C

    2012-09-01

    Recent studies have suggested that EES may reduce ST compared to PES, but no individual trial has been adequately powered for this endpoint. The incidence of stent thrombosis, as well as the impact of dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) discontinuation during the first two years following everolimus-eluting stent (EES) and paclitaxel-eluting stent (PES) deployment were therefore analysed from a pooled, patient-level database derived from four randomised clinical trials. Data from the SPIRIT II, SPIRIT III, SPIRIT IV and COMPARE trials (n=6,789 patients) were analysed. Two-year ST rates were determined using time-to-event methods and compared with the log-rank test. ST rates were also determined after DAPT discontinuation. EES compared to PES significantly reduced the two-year rates of ST (0.7% versus 2.3%, p=0.0001), including the interval rates of ST up to 30 days (0.2% versus 1.0%, p<0.0001), between 31 days and one year (0.2% versus 0.6%, p=0.02), and after one year (0.3% versus 0.8%, p=0.001). EES also reduced the two-year composite rate of cardiac death or MI (4.0% versus 6.6%, p=0.0001). Increased rates of ST after DAPT discontinuation beyond six months were observed in the PES cohort, but not in the EES cohort. In this large pooled analysis from four randomised trials, treatment with EES compared to PES significantly reduced the rates of ST through two years of follow-up, with a concomitant reduction in cardiac death or MI. DAPT discontinuation beyond six months may be safe with EES.

  15. Rationale for a randomized controlled trial comparing two prophylaxis regimens in adults with severe hemophilia A: the Hemophilia Adult Prophylaxis Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragni, Margaret V

    2011-01-01

    A major goal of comprehensive hemophilia care is to prevent occurrence of bleeds by prophylaxis or regular preventive factor, one or more times weekly. Although prophylaxis is effective in reducing bleeding and joint damage in children, whether it is necessary to continue into adulthood is not known. The purpose of this article is to describe a Phase III randomized controlled trial to evaluate prophylaxis comparing two dose regimens in adults with severe hemophilia A. I hypothesize that adults with mature cartilage and joints are less susceptible to joint bleeds and joint damage, and that once-weekly recombinant factor VIII prophylaxis, with up to two rescue doses per week, is as effective as thrice-weekly prophylaxis in reducing bleeding frequency, but less costly and more acceptable, with higher quality of life. The ultimate goal of this project is to determine whether once-weekly prophylaxis is any worse than thrice-weekly prophylaxis in reducing joint bleeding frequency, while potentially utilizing less factor, at lower cost, leading to a better quality of life. This is an innovative concept, as it challenges the current paradigm of thrice-weekly prophylaxis in adults, which is based on dosing in children. Furthermore, this trial will assess interdose thrombin generation, a novel tissue factor-based assay of hemostasis, to determine if individualized thrombin generation can predict more individualized prophylaxis dosing, which would be practice changing. PMID:21939418

  16. Comparative effects of meditation and exercise on physical and psychosocial health outcomes: a review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Meghan K; Loprinzi, Paul D

    2018-03-01

    No review papers have examined studies that have directly compared non-active forms of meditation with exercise to evaluate effects on physical or psychosocial outcomes, which was the purpose of this paper. Studies were included if they had a randomized controlled trial (RCT) design, included a non-active form of meditation and exercise as intervention arms, and evaluated physical or psychosocial outcomes. The quality of included RCTs was rated using the Cochrane Collaboration's tool for assessing risk of bias in randomized trials. Five RCTs met the inclusion criteria. The total sample size across all studies was N = 325. Of the main outcomes assessed across the five studies, meditation was shown to be more effective than the exercise comparison arm when evaluating the psychosocial outcomes of anxiety, altruism, and life changes. Additionally, meditation was more effective at reducing chronic neck pain at rest and pain-related bothersomeness. Exercise, however, was more effective in improving physical health-related quality of life, HDL and LDL cholesterol, and fasting blood glucose levels. The interventions were found to be comparable when evaluating the outcomes of well-being, ethanol consumption, and perceived stress levels. Four of the evaluated studies were determined to have an overall 'unclear' risk of bias and one study was found to have a 'high' risk of bias. Exercise and non-active meditation may uniquely influence various health-related outcomes. A continued exploration of the effects of exercise and non-active meditation in controlled trials may yield a better understanding of their benefits.

  17. Comparing methods to combine functional loss and mortality in clinical trials for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Eijk RPA

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Ruben PA van Eijk,1 Marinus JC Eijkemans,2 Dimitris Rizopoulos,3 Leonard H van den Berg,4,* Stavros Nikolakopoulos5,* 1Department of Neurology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands; 2Department of Biostatistics, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands; 3Department of Biostatistics, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands; 4Department of Neurology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands; 5Department of Biostatistics, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS clinical trials based on single end points only partially capture the full treatment effect when both function and mortality are affected, and may falsely dismiss efficacious drugs as futile. We aimed to investigate the statistical properties of several strategies for the simultaneous analysis of function and mortality in ALS clinical trials. Methods: Based on the Pooled Resource Open-Access ALS Clinical Trials (PRO-ACT database, we simulated longitudinal patterns of functional decline, defined by the revised amyotrophic lateral sclerosis functional rating scale (ALSFRS-R and conditional survival time. Different treatment scenarios with varying effect sizes were simulated with follow-up ranging from 12 to 18 months. We considered the following analytical strategies: 1 Cox model; 2 linear mixed effects (LME model; 3 omnibus test based on Cox and LME models; 4 composite time-to-6-point decrease or death; 5 combined assessment of function and survival (CAFS; and 6 test based on joint modeling framework. For each analytical strategy, we calculated the empirical power and sample size. Results: Both Cox and LME models have increased false-negative rates when treatment exclusively affects either function or survival. The joint model has superior power compared to other strategies. The composite end point

  18. Comparison of reporting phase I trial results in ClinicalTrials.gov and matched publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepshelovich, D; Goldvaser, H; Wang, L; Abdul Razak, A R; Bedard, P L

    2017-12-01

    Background Data on completeness of reporting of phase I cancer clinical trials in publications are lacking. Methods The ClinicalTrials.gov database was searched for completed adult phase I cancer trials with reported results. PubMed was searched for matching primary publications published prior to November 1, 2016. Reporting in primary publications was compared with the ClinicalTrials.gov database using a 28-point score (2=complete; 1=partial; 0=no reporting) for 14 items related to study design, outcome measures and safety profile. Inconsistencies between primary publications and ClinicalTrials.gov were recorded. Linear regression was used to identify factors associated with incomplete reporting. Results After a review of 583 trials in ClinicalTrials.gov , 163 matching primary publications were identified. Publications reported outcomes that did not appear in ClinicalTrials.gov in 25% of trials. Outcomes were upgraded, downgraded or omitted in publications in 47% of trials. The overall median reporting score was 23/28 (interquartile range 21-25). Incompletely reported items in >25% publications were: inclusion criteria (29%), primary outcome definition (26%), secondary outcome definitions (53%), adverse events (71%), serious adverse events (80%) and dates of study start and database lock (91%). Higher reporting scores were associated with phase I (vs phase I/II) trials (ppublication in journals with lower impact factor (p=0.004). Conclusions Reported results in primary publications for early phase cancer trials are frequently inconsistent or incomplete compared with ClinicalTrials.gov entries. ClinicalTrials.gov may provide more comprehensive data from new cancer drug trials.

  19. Improvdent: Improving dentures for patient benefit. A crossover randomised clinical trial comparing impression materials for complete dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gray Janine C

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background According to the UK Adult Dental Health Survey (2009 15% of adults aged 65–74, 30% aged 75–84 and 47% aged >85 years are edentulous and require complete dentures. Patients’ quality of life and nutrition status are affected by poor dentures. The quality of the dental impression is the most important issue for improving the fit and comfort of new dentures. There is paucity of RCT evidence for which impression material is best for complete dentures construction. This study aims to compare two impression materials for effectiveness and cost effectiveness. Methods/Design IMPROVDENT is a double-blind crossover trial comparing the use of alginate and silicone, two commonly used denture impression materials, in terms of patient preference and cost-effectiveness. Eighty five edentulous patients will be recruited and provided with two sets of dentures, similar in all aspects except for the impression material used (alginate or silicone. Patients will try both sets of dentures for a two-week period, unadjusted, to become accustomed to the feel of the new dentures (habituation period. Patients will then wear each set of dentures for a period of 8 weeks (in random order during which time the dentures will be adjusted for optimum comfort. Finally, patients will be given both sets of dentures for a further two weeks to wear whichever denture they prefer (confirmation period. Patients will be asked about quality of life and to rate dentures on function and comfort at the end of each trial period and asked which set they prefer at the end of the habituation period (unadjusted denture preference and confirmation period (adjusted denture preference. A health economic evaluation will estimate incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of producing dentures from the two materials. A qualitative study will investigate the impact of dentures on behaviour and quality of life. Funding: IMPROVDENT is funded by NIHR RfPB (PB-PG-0408-16300. Discussion

  20. Randomized Trials Comparing Inactivated Vaccine after Medium- or High-titer Measles Vaccine with Standard Titer Measles Vaccine after Inactivated Vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaby, Peter; Ravn, Henrik; Benn, Christine S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Observational studies have suggested that girls have higher mortality if their most recent immunization is an inactivated vaccine rather than a live vaccine. We therefore reanalyzed 5 randomized trials of early measles vaccine (MV) in which it was possible to compare an inactivated va...

  1. Outcomes of the Smoker's Health Project: A Pragmatic Comparative Effectiveness Trial of Tobacco-Dependence Interventions Based on Self-Determination Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Geoffrey C.; Niemiec, Christopher P.; Patrick, Heather; Ryan, Richard M.; Deci, Edward L.

    2016-01-01

    A pragmatic comparative effectiveness trial examined whether extending the duration of a cost-effective, intensive tobacco-dependence intervention designed to support autonomy will facilitate long-term tobacco abstinence. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three tobacco-dependence interventions based on self-determination theory,…

  2. A Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing the Low FODMAP Diet vs. Modified NICE Guidelines in US Adults with IBS-D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eswaran, Shanti L; Chey, William D; Han-Markey, Theresa; Ball, Sarah; Jackson, Kenya

    2016-12-01

    There has been an increasing interest in the role of fermentable oligo-, di-, and monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAPs) in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). We report results from the first randomized controlled trial of the low FODMAP diet in US adults with IBS and diarrhea (IBS-D). The objectives were to compare the efficacy of the low FODMAP diet vs. a diet based upon modified National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines (mNICE) on overall and individual symptoms in IBS-D patients. This was a single-center, randomized-controlled trial of adult patients with IBS-D (Rome III) which compared 2 diet interventions. After a 2-week screening period, eligible patients were randomized to a low FODMAP or mNICE diet for 4 weeks. The primary end point was the proportion of patients reporting adequate relief of IBS-D symptoms ≥50% of intervention weeks 3-4. Secondary outcomes included a composite end point which required response in both abdominal pain (≥30% reduction in mean daily pain score compared with baseline) and stool consistency (decrease in mean daily Bristol Stool Form of ≥1 compared with baseline), abdominal pain and stool consistency responders, and other key individual IBS symptoms assessed using daily questionnaires. After screening, 92 subjects (65 women, median age 42.6 years) were randomized. Eighty-four patients completed the study (45 low FODMAP, 39 mNICE). Baseline demographics, symptom severity, and nutrient intake were similar between groups. Fifty-two percent of the low FODMAP vs. 41% of the mNICE group reported adequate relief of their IBS-D symptoms (P=0.31). Though there was no significant difference in the proportion of composite end point responders (P=0.13), the low FODMAP diet resulted in a higher proportion of abdominal pain responders compared with the mNICE group (51% vs. 23%, P=0.008). Compared with baseline scores, the low FODMAP diet led to greater reductions in average daily scores of abdominal pain, bloating

  3. Comparing abrupt and gradual smoking cessation: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etter, Jean-François

    2011-11-01

    To compare abrupt and gradual smoking cessation. Randomized trial and observational study, Internet, 2007-2010. Smokers with no strong preference for abrupt or gradual quitting were randomly assigned to quitting immediately (n=472), or to gradually reducing their cigarette consumption over 2 weeks and then quit (n=502). Smokers who strongly preferred to quit abruptly were instructed to do so immediately (n=2456), those who strongly preferred gradual were instructed to reduce their cigarette consumption over 2 weeks, then quit (n=1801). Follow-up was conducted 4 weeks after target quit dates. Those who preferred abrupt quitting were the most motivated to quit and the most confident in their ability to quit. At follow-up, quit rates were 16% in those who preferred abrupt cessation, 7% in those who preferred gradual cessation and 9% in those who had no preference (pmotivation to quit and confidence in ability to quit: those who had low levels of motivation or low levels of confidence were more likely to quit at follow-up if they preferred and used abrupt rather than gradual. In those who had no strong preference for either method, abrupt and gradual produced similar results. Those who preferred and used the abrupt method were more likely to quit than those who preferred and used the gradual method, in particular when they had low motivation and confidence. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Cost Analyses in the US and Japan: A Cross-Country Comparative Analysis Applied to the PRONOUNCE Trial in Non-Squamous Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Lisa M; Rajan, Narayan; Winfree, Katherine; Davey, Peter; Ball, Mark; Knox, Hediyyih; Graham, Christopher

    2015-12-01

    Health technology assessment is not required for regulatory submission or approval in either the United States (US) or Japan. This study was designed as a cross-country evaluation of cost analyses conducted in the US and Japan based on the PRONOUNCE phase III lung cancer trial, which compared pemetrexed plus carboplatin followed by pemetrexed (PemC) versus paclitaxel plus carboplatin plus bevacizumab followed by bevacizumab (PCB). Two cost analyses were conducted in accordance with International Society For Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research good research practice standards. Costs were obtained based on local pricing structures; outcomes were considered equivalent based on the PRONOUNCE trial results. Other inputs were included from the trial data (e.g., toxicity rates) or from local practice sources (e.g., toxicity management). The models were compared across key input and transferability factors. Despite differences in local input data, both models demonstrated a similar direction, with the cost of PemC being consistently lower than the cost of PCB. The variation in individual input parameters did affect some of the specific categories, such as toxicity, and impacted sensitivity analyses, with the cost differential between comparators being greater in Japan than in the US. When economic models are based on clinical trial data, many inputs and outcomes are held consistent. The alterable inputs were not in and of themselves large enough to significantly impact the results between countries, which were directionally consistent with greater variation seen in sensitivity analyses. The factors that vary across jurisdictions, even when minor, can have an impact on trial-based economic analyses. Eli Lilly and Company.

  5. The QUIT-PRIMO provider-patient Internet-delivered smoking cessation referral intervention: a cluster-randomized comparative effectiveness trial: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ford Daniel E

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although screening for tobacco use is increasing with electronic health records and standard protocols, other tobacco-control activities, such as referral of patients to cessation resources, is quite low. In the QUIT-PRIMO study, an online referral portal will allow providers to enter smokers' email addresses into the system. Upon returning home, the smokers will receive automated emails providing education about tobacco cessation and encouragement to use the patient smoking cessation website (with interactive tools, educational resources, motivational email messages, secure messaging with a tobacco treatment specialist, and online support group. Methods The informatics system will be evaluated in a comparative effectiveness trial of 160 community-based primary care practices, cluster-randomized at the practice level. In the QUIT-PRIMO intervention, patients will be provided a paper information-prescription referral and then "e-referred" to the system. In the comparison group, patients will receive only the paper-based information-prescription referral with the website address. Once patients go to the website, they are subsequently randomized within practices to either a standard patient smoking cessation website or an augmented version with access to a tobacco treatment specialist online, motivational emails, and an online support group. We will compare intervention and control practice participation (referral rates and patient participation (proportion referred who go to the website. We will then compare the effectiveness of the standard and augmented patient websites. Discussion Our goal is to evaluate an integrated informatics solution to increase access to web-delivered smoking cessation support. We will analyze the impact of this integrated system in terms of process (provider e-referral and patient login and patient outcomes (six-month smoking cessation. Trial Registration Web-delivered Provider Intervention for

  6. Efficacy of electroacupuncture compared with transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation for functional constipation: Study protocol for a randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yuxiao; Zhang, Xuecheng; Zhou, Jing; Wang, Xinwei; Jiao, Ruimin; Liu, Zhishun

    2018-05-01

    To treat functional constipation, both electroacupuncture (EA) therapy and transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) are safe and effective. However, no head-to-head comparison trial has been conducted. This trial compares the efficacy of electroacupuncture relative to transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation for functional constipation. Individuals with functional constipation will be randomly allocated to receive either EA or TENS (n = 51, each), 3 times per week for 8 weeks. The primary outcome is the percentage of participants with an average increase from baseline of 1 or more complete spontaneous bowel movements at week 8. The secondary outcome measures are the following: at the time of visits, changes in the number of complete spontaneous bowel movements, number of spontaneous bowel movements, stool character, difficulty in defecation, patients' assessment of quality of life regarding constipation (self-report questionnaire), and use of auxiliary defecation methods. The results of this trial should verify whether EA is more efficacious than TENS for relieving symptoms of functional constipation. The major limitation of the study is the lack of blinding of the participants and acupuncturist.

  7. Comparative effectiveness of family problem-solving therapy (F-PST for adolescents after traumatic brain injury: Protocol for a randomized, multicenter, clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad G. Kurowski

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The objective of this manuscript is to describe the methodology that will be used to test the comparative effectiveness, feasibility, and acceptability of three formats of family problem solving therapy (F-PST for improving functional outcomes of complicated mild to severe adolescent TBI. Methods: Three-arm comparative effectiveness, randomized clinical trial (RCT design. We describe the protocol of a three-arm RCT comparing the effectiveness of three modalities of F-PST to reduce executive dysfunction and behavior problems following TBI in adolescence. The RCT will compare the relative effectiveness among face-to-face; online and self-directed; and therapist-supported online modes of treatment. Ethics and dissemination: It is anticipated that findings from this work will inform future clinical care practices, with implications for treatment of other patient populations of youth with psychological symptoms arising from neurological conditions. Institutional review board approval will be obtained from all sites prior to commencement of the study. Clinical Trials Registration: NCT:02368366, Keywords: Pediatric traumatic brain injury, Telehealth, Problem solving, Behavior, Executive function

  8. Impact of a cancer clinical trials web site on discussions about trial participation: a cluster randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dear, R F; Barratt, A L; Askie, L M; Butow, P N; McGeechan, K; Crossing, S; Currow, D C; Tattersall, M H N

    2012-07-01

    Cancer patients want access to reliable information about currently recruiting clinical trials. Oncologists and their patients were randomly assigned to access a consumer-friendly cancer clinical trials web site [Australian Cancer Trials (ACT), www.australiancancertrials.gov.au] or to usual care in a cluster randomized controlled trial. The primary outcome, measured from audio recordings of oncologist-patient consultations, was the proportion of patients with whom participation in any clinical trial was discussed. Analysis was by intention-to-treat accounting for clustering and stratification. Thirty medical oncologists and 493 patients were recruited. Overall, 46% of consultations in the intervention group compared with 34% in the control group contained a discussion about clinical trials (P=0.08). The mean consultation length in both groups was 29 min (P=0.69). The proportion consenting to a trial was 10% in both groups (P=0.65). Patients' knowledge about randomized trials was lower in the intervention than the control group (mean score 3.0 versus 3.3, P=0.03) but decisional conflict scores were similar (mean score 42 versus 43, P=0.83). Good communication between patients and physicians is essential. Within this context, a web site such as Australian Cancer Trials may be an important tool to encourage discussion about clinical trial participation.

  9. Randomized clinical trial to comparing efficacy of daily, weekly and monthly administration of vitamin D3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takács, István; Tóth, Béla E; Szekeres, László; Szabó, Boglárka; Bakos, Bence; Lakatos, Péter

    2017-01-01

    The comparative efficacy and safety profiles of selected daily 1000 IU, weekly 7000 IU and monthly 30,000 IU vitamin D 3 -not previously investigated-will be evaluated. Here, a prospective, randomized clinical trial, comparing efficacy and safety of a daily single dose of 1000 IU (group A) to a once-weekly 7000 IU dose (group B), or monthly 30,000 IU dose (group C) of vitamin D 3 . The present study is a controlled, randomized, open-label, multicenter clinical trial, 3  months in duration. Sixty-four adult subjects with vitamin D deficiency (25OHD<20 ng/ml), were included according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Dose-responses for increases in serum vitamin 25OHD were statistically equivalent for each of the three groups: A, B and C. Outcomes were 13.0 ± 1.5; 12.6 ± 1.1 and 12.9 ± 0.9 ng/ml increases in serum 25OHD per 1000 IU, daily, weekly and monthly, respectively. The treatment of subjects with selected doses restored 25OHD values to levels above 20 ng/ml in all groups. Treatment with distinct administration frequency of vitamin D 3 did not exhibit any differences in safety parameters. The daily, weekly and monthly administrations of daily equivalent of 1000 IU of vitamin D 3 provide equal efficacy and safety profiles.

  10. Manual therapy compared with physical therapy in patients with non-specific neck pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groeneweg, Ruud; van Assen, Luite; Kropman, Hans; Leopold, Huco; Mulder, Jan; Smits-Engelsman, Bouwien C M; Ostelo, Raymond W J G; Oostendorp, Rob A B; van Tulder, Maurits W

    2017-01-01

    Manual therapy according to the School of Manual Therapy Utrecht (MTU) is a specific type of passive manual joint mobilization. MTU has not yet been systematically compared to other manual therapies and physical therapy. In this study the effectiveness of MTU is compared to physical therapy, particularly active exercise therapy (PT) in patients with non-specific neck pain. Patients neck pain, aged between 18-70 years, were included in a pragmatic randomized controlled trial with a one-year follow-up. Primary outcome measures were global perceived effect and functioning (Neck Disability Index), the secondary outcome was pain intensity (Numeric Rating Scale for Pain). Outcomes were measured at 3, 7, 13, 26 and 52 weeks. Multilevel analyses (intention-to-treat) were the primary analyses for overall between-group differences. Additional to the primary and secondary outcomes the number of treatment sessions of the MTU group and PT group was analyzed. Data were collected from September 2008 to February 2011. A total of 181 patients were included. Multilevel analyses showed no statistically significant overall differences at one year between the MTU and PT groups on any of the primary and secondary outcomes. The MTU group showed significantly lower treatment sessions compared to the PT group (respectively 3.1 vs. 5.9 after 7 weeks; 6.1 vs. 10.0 after 52 weeks). Patients with neck pain improved in both groups without statistical significantly or clinically relevant differences between the MTU and PT groups during one-year follow-up. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00713843.

  11. Ten year results of a randomised trial comparing two conservative treatment strategies for small size breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mariani, L.; Salvadori, B.; Marubini, E.; Conti, A.R.; Rovini, D.; Cusumano, F.; Rosolin, T.; Andreola, S.; Zucali, R.; Rilke, F.; Veronesi, U.

    1998-01-01

    We report the 10-year results of a randomised clinical trial in which two different breast conservation treatment strategies were compared in women with small, non-metastatic primary breast cancer: quadrantectomy, axillary dissection and radiotherapy (QUART) versus tumorectomy and axillary dissection followed by external radiotherapy and a boost with 192 Ir implantation (TART). No second surgery was given to women with affected surgical margins. Axillary node positive women received adjuvant medical therapy. From 1985-1987, this trial accrued 705 patients, 360 in the QUART and 345 in the TART arm. Crude cumulative incidence curves for intrabreast tumour recurrence (IBTR) and metastases as first events and mortality curves in each of the two treatment arms were computed. A crude cumulative incidence curve of IBTR as a second event (in women who had already had a local recurrence) was also computed. The two groups were compared in terms of hazard for IBTR, metastases or death occurrence by using Cox regression models, both with and without adjustment for patient age, tumour size, number of metastatic axillary nodes and histology. Possible interactions between the aforementioned prognostic factors and the type of surgery were also investigated. The two groups were well matched for baseline patient and tumour characteristics, the only exception being resection margins, which were more often positive in the TART group. At the Cox model, a significant difference between groups was detected for IBTR (P<0.0001), but not for distant metastases and overall survival. In particular, 5- and 10-year estimates of crude cumulative incidence of IBTR were 4.7 and 7.4% in the QUART group, and 11.6 and 18.6% in the TART group. The difference was not substantially affected by patient or disease characteristics. Likewise, the status of resection margins in women who underwent TART treatment did not significantly influence the risk of occurrence of IBTRs. Finally, the rate of second IBTR

  12. Letrozole compared with tamoxifen for elderly patients with endocrine-responsive early breast cancer: the BIG 1-98 trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crivellari, D.; Sun, Z.; Coates, A.S.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: To explore potential differences in efficacy, treatment completion, and adverse events (AEs) in elderly women receiving adjuvant tamoxifen or letrozole for five years in the Breast International Group (BIG) 1-98 trial. METHODS: This report includes the 4,922 patients allocated to 5 years...... of letrozole or tamoxifen in the BIG 1-98 trial. The median follow-up was 40.4 months. Subpopulation Treatment Effect Pattern Plot (STEPP) analysis was used to examine the patterns of differences in disease-free survival and incidences of AEs according to age. In addition, three categoric age groups were...... had superior efficacy (DFS) compared with tamoxifen in all age groups. On the basis of a small number of patients older than 75 years (6%), age per se should not unduly affect the choice of adjuvant endocrine therapy Udgivelsesdato: 2008/4/20...

  13. A Randomized, Controlled Trial of Meditation Compared to Exposure Therapy and Education Control on PTSD in Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    score >45. Exclusion criteria: Service related trauma within last 3 months, history of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder , dementia, moderate or severe...7.7% 0.0% 8.3% 0.191 Bipolar disorder , % 7.7% 10.3% 13.9% 0.681 Substance use disorder , % 30.8% 43.6% 41.7% 0.458 Major depressive disorder ...Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0576 TITLE: A Randomized, Controlled Trial of Meditation Compared to Exposure Therapy and Education Control on PTSD in

  14. Comparability of patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis enrolled in clinical trials or in observational cohorts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagnoux, Christian; Carette, Simon; Khalidi, Nader A.; Walsh, Michael; Hiemstra, Thomas F.; Cuthbertson, David; Langford, Carol; Hoffman, Gary S.; Koening, Curry L.; Monach, Paul A.; Moreland, Larry; Mouthon, Luc; Seo, Phil; Specks, Ulrich; Ytterberg, Steven; Westman, Kerstin; Hoglund, Peter; Harper, Lorraine; Flossmann, Oliver; Luqmani, Raashid; Savage, Caroline; Rasmussen, Niels; de Groot, Kirstin; Tesar, Vladimir; Jayne, David; Merkel, Pater A.; Guillevin, Loic

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyse the differences between patients with granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) or microscopic polyangiitis (MPA) entered into randomised clinical trials (RCTs) and those followed in large observational cohorts. Methods The main characteristics and outcomes of patients with generalised and/or severe GPA or MPA with a five-factor score ≥1 enrolled in the French Vasculitis Study Group (FVSG) or the US-Canadian-based Vasculitis Clinical Research Consortium cohorts were compared to those enrolled in one of 2 FVSG clinical RCTs (WEG91, WEGENT) or 3 European Vasculitis Society clinical trials (CYCLOPS, CYCAZAREM, IMPROVE). Results 657 patients (65.3% with GPA) in RCTs were compared to 437 in cohorts (90.6% with GPA). RCT patients were older at diagnosis than the cohort patients (56.6±13.9 vs. 46.8±17.3 years), had higher Birmingham vasculitis activity score (19.5±9.1 vs. 16.9±7.4), and more frequent kidney disease (84.0% vs. 54.9%) but fewer ear, nose, and throat symptoms (56.8% vs. 72.2%). At 56 months post-diagnosis, mortality and relapse rates, adjusted for age and renal function, were higher for patients with GPA in RCTs vs. cohorts (10.7% vs. 2.5% [p=0.001] and 22.5% vs. 15.6% [p=0.03], respectively) but similar for patients with MPA (6.2% vs. 6.6% [p=0.92] and 16.6% vs. 10.1% [p=0.39], respectively). Conclusion Patients with GPA or MPA in RCTs and those in observational cohorts show important differences that should be remembered when interpreting results based on these study populations. PMID:26016754

  15. Population-based versus practice-based recall for childhood immunizations: a randomized controlled comparative effectiveness trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempe, Allison; Saville, Alison; Dickinson, L Miriam; Eisert, Sheri; Reynolds, Joni; Herrero, Diana; Beaty, Brenda; Albright, Karen; Dibert, Eva; Koehler, Vicky; Lockhart, Steven; Calonge, Ned

    2013-06-01

    We compared the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of population-based recall (Pop-recall) versus practice-based recall (PCP-recall) at increasing immunizations among preschool children. This cluster-randomized trial involved children aged 19 to 35 months needing immunizations in 8 rural and 6 urban Colorado counties. In Pop-recall counties, recall was conducted centrally using the Colorado Immunization Information System (CIIS). In PCP-recall counties, practices were invited to attend webinar training using CIIS and offered financial support for mailings. The percentage of up-to-date (UTD) and vaccine documentation were compared 6 months after recall. A mixed-effects model assessed the association between intervention and whether a child became UTD. Ten of 195 practices (5%) implemented recall in PCP-recall counties. Among children needing immunizations, 18.7% became UTD in Pop-recall versus 12.8% in PCP-recall counties (P immunization rates in preschool children.

  16. Comparative study of outcome measures and analysis methods for traumatic brain injury trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alali, Aziz S; Vavrek, Darcy; Barber, Jason; Dikmen, Sureyya; Nathens, Avery B; Temkin, Nancy R

    2015-04-15

    Batteries of functional and cognitive measures have been proposed as alternatives to the Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOSE) as the primary outcome for traumatic brain injury (TBI) trials. We evaluated several approaches to analyzing GOSE and a battery of four functional and cognitive measures. Using data from a randomized trial, we created a "super" dataset of 16,550 subjects from patients with complete data (n=331) and then simulated multiple treatment effects across multiple outcome measures. Patients were sampled with replacement (bootstrapping) to generate 10,000 samples for each treatment effect (n=400 patients/group). The percentage of samples where the null hypothesis was rejected estimates the power. All analytic techniques had appropriate rates of type I error (≤5%). Accounting for baseline prognosis either by using sliding dichotomy for GOSE or using regression-based methods substantially increased the power over the corresponding analysis without accounting for prognosis. Analyzing GOSE using multivariate proportional odds regression or analyzing the four-outcome battery with regression-based adjustments had the highest power, assuming equal treatment effect across all components. Analyzing GOSE using a fixed dichotomy provided the lowest power for both unadjusted and regression-adjusted analyses. We assumed an equal treatment effect for all measures. This may not be true in an actual clinical trial. Accounting for baseline prognosis is critical to attaining high power in Phase III TBI trials. The choice of primary outcome for future trials should be guided by power, the domain of brain function that an intervention is likely to impact, and the feasibility of collecting outcome data.

  17. Examination of Individual Differences in Outcomes from a Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial Comparing Formal and Informal Individual Auditory Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sherri L.; Saunders, Gabrielle H.; Chisolm, Theresa H.; Frederick, Melissa; Bailey, Beth A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine if patient characteristics or clinical variables could predict who benefits from individual auditory training. Method: A retrospective series of analyses were performed using a data set from a large, multisite, randomized controlled clinical trial that compared the treatment effects of at-home…

  18. Publication and non-publication of drug trial results: a 10-year cohort of trials in Norwegian general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brænd, Anja Maria; Straand, Jørund; Jakobsen, Rune Bruhn; Klovning, Atle

    2016-04-11

    Previously, we identified a 10-year cohort of protocols from applications to the Norwegian Medicines Agency 1998-2007, consisting of 196 drug trials in general practice. The aim of this study was to examine whether trial results were published and whether trial funding and conflicts of interest were reported. Cohort study of trials with systematic searches for published results. Clinical drug trials in Norwegian general practice. We performed systematic literature searches of MEDLINE, Embase and CENTRAL to identify publications originating from each trial using characteristics such as test drug, comparator and patient groups as search terms. When no publication was identified, we contacted trial sponsors for information regarding trial completion and reference to any publications. We determined the frequency of publication of trial results and trial characteristics associated with publication of results. Of the 196 trials, 5 were never started. Of the remaining 191 trials, 71% had results published in a journal, 11% had results publicly available elsewhere and 18% of trials had no results available. Publication was more common among trials with an active comparator drug (χ(2) test, p=0.040), with a larger number of patients (total sample size≥median, p=0.010) and with a longer trial period (duration≥median, p=0.025). Trial funding was reported in 85% of publications and increased over time, as did reporting of conflicts of interest among authors. Among the 134 main journal articles from the trials, 60% presented statistically significant results for the investigational drug, and the conclusion of the article was favourable towards the test drug in 78% of papers. We did not identify any journal publication of results for 29% of the general practice drug trials. Trials with an active comparator, larger and longer trials were more likely to be published. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a

  19. The effectiveness of neuro-music therapy according to the Heidelberg model compared to a single session of educational counseling as treatment for tinnitus: a controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argstatter, Heike; Grapp, Miriam; Hutter, Elisabeth; Plinkert, Peter K; Bolay, Hans-Volker

    2015-03-01

    Tinnitus is a very common symptom, yet the quest for an effective treatment is challenging. Results from several clinical trials support the notion that neuro-music therapy is an effective means to reduce tinnitus distress with short duration and long lasting effect. However, until now, the effectiveness has not been tested in a controlled trial against an active comparator. The trial was designed as two-center, parallel intervention group controlled study with two intervention groups: Counseling (50minute individualized personal instruction) or neuro-music therapy (counseling plus eight 50-minute sessions of individualized music therapy). Data of n=290 patients suffering from chronic tinnitus were analyzed. Outcome measure was the change in Tinnitus Questionnaire Total Scores (TQ) from baseline (admission) to end of treatment. Both treatment groups achieved a statistically relevant reduction in TQ scores, though 66% of patients in the music therapy group attained a clinically meaningful improvement compared to 33% in the counseling group. A binary logistic regression revealed two variables significantly influencing therapy outcome: initial tinnitus score and type of therapy with an OR for the music therapy compared to the counseling of 4.34 (CI 2.33-8.09). Counseling is an appropriate treatment option with well above chance of improvement. The neuro-music therapy outperformed the counseling. This treatment targets the tinnitus sound itself, is short in duration, intrinsically motivating and easy to operate and thus presents a possible complement to the therapeutic spectrum in chronic tinnitus. The trial was registered at the ClinicalTrials.gov registry (ID: NCT01845155). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. FLOW (finding lasting options for women): multicentre randomized controlled trial comparing tampons with menstrual cups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Courtney; Rose, Caren Lee; Trouton, Konia; Stamm, Holly; Marentette, Danielle; Kirkpatrick, Nicole; Karalic, Sanja; Fernandez, Renee; Paget, Julie

    2011-06-01

    To determine whether menstrual cups are a viable alternative to tampons. Randomized controlled trial. Prince George, Victoria, and Vancouver, BC. A total of 110 women aged 19 to 40 years who had previously used tampons as their main method of menstrual management. Participants were randomized into 2 groups, a tampon group and a menstrual cup group. Using online diaries, participants tracked 1 menstrual cycle using their regular method and 3 menstrual cycles using the method of their allocated group. Overall satisfaction; secondary outcomes included discomfort, urovaginal infection, cost, and waste. Forty-seven women in each group completed the final survey, 5 of whom were subsequently excluded from analysis (3 from the tampon group and 2 from the menstrual cup group). Overall satisfaction on a 7-point Likert scale was higher for the menstrual cup group than for the tampon group (mean [standard deviation] score 5.4 [1.5] vs 5.0 [1.0], respectively; P=.04). Approximately 91% of women in the menstrual cup group said they would continue to use the cup and recommend it to others. Women used a median of 13 menstrual products per cycle, or 169 products per year, which corresponds to approximately 771,248,400 products used annually in Canada. Estimated cost for tampon use was $37.44 a year (similar to the retail cost of 1 menstrual cup). Subjective vaginal discomfort was initially higher in the menstrual cup group, but the discomfort decreased with continued use. There was no significant difference in physician-diagnosed urovaginal symptoms between the 2 groups. Both of the menstrual management methods evaluated were well tolerated by subjects. Menstrual cups are a satisfactory alternative to tampons and have the potential to be a sustainable solution to menstrual management, with moderate cost savings and much-reduced environmental effects compared with tampons. Trial registration number C06-0478 (ClinicalTrials.gov).

  1. Effect of race/ethnicity on participation in HIV vaccine trials and comparison to other trials of biomedical prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhalla, Shayesta; Poole, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Racial/ethnic minorities are underrepresented in actual HIV vaccine trials in North America, and willingness to participate (WTP) and retention in an HIV vaccine trial may differ from that in Whites. In this review, the authors identified HIV vaccine preparedness studies (VPS) in North America in high-risk populations that examined the relationship between race/ethnicity and WTP in a preventive phase 3 HIV vaccine trial, and the relationship to retention. Studies were categorized by risk group, and comparison group (Whites vs. non-Whites). Other types of trials of biomedical prevention were also identified, and WTP and retention rates were compared and contrasted to actual HIV vaccine trials. In the studies identified, WTP in a hypothetical trial HIV vaccine trial did not differ by race/ethnicity. In contrast, actual HIV vaccine trials, an HIV acquisition trial, and a phase 2B preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) trial have enrolled a large percentage of White men. Human papilloma virus (HPV) privately-funded trials have also enrolled a large number of Whites, due to convenience sampling. Retention in the HIV acquisition trial was lower in African-Americans compared with Whites. Strategies to increase WTP and enhanced retention (ER) strategies may help in recruiting and retaining minority participants in actual HIV vaccine trials and other trials of biomedical prevention.

  2. Is a comparative clinical trial for breast cancer tumor markers to monitor disease recurrence warranted? A value of information analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thariani, Rahber; Henry, Norah Lynn; Ramsey, Scott D; Blough, David K; Barlow, Bill; Gralow, Julie R; Veenstra, David L

    2013-05-01

    Breast cancer tumor markers are used by some clinicians to screen for disease recurrence risk. Since there is limited evidence of benefit, additional research may be warranted. To assess the potential value of a randomized clinical trial of breast tumor marker testing in routine follow-up of high-risk, stage II-III breast cancer survivors. We developed a decision-analytic model of tumor marker testing plus standard surveillance every 3-6 months for 5 years. The expected value of sample information was calculated using probabilistic simulations and was a function of: the probability of selecting the optimal monitoring strategy with current versus future information; the impact of choosing the nonoptimal strategy; and the size of the population affected. The value of information for a randomized clinical trial involving 9000 women was US$214 million compared with a cost of US$30-60 million to conduct such a trial. The probability of making an alternate, nonoptimal decision and choosing testing versus no testing was 32% with current versus future information from the trial. The impact of a nonoptimal decision was US$2150 and size of population impacted over 10 years was 308,000. The value of improved information on overall survival was US$105 million, quality of life US$37 million and test performance US$71 million. Conducting a randomized clinical trial of breast cancer tumor markers appears to offer a good societal return on investment. Retrospective analyses to assess test performance and evaluation of patient quality of life using tumor markers may also offer valuable areas of research. However, alternative investments may offer even better returns in investments and, as such, the trial concept deserves further study as part of an overall research-portfolio evaluation.

  3. Successful management of a complicated clinical crisis: A patient with left-sided endocarditis and secondary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis: a rare case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Peipei; Zeng, Hui; Zhou, Min; Ouyang, Jian; Chen, Bing; Zhang, Qiguo

    2017-12-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) secondary to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE)-related left-sided infectious endocarditis had never been reported before. In the last decade, daptomycin, a novel lipopeptide antibiotic, showed its excellent role in anti-Gram-positive bacteria, including soft tissue infection, bloodstream and deep tissueinfection. An Asian women under sever condition due to the cooccurrence of HLH and MRSE-related endocarditis while also be allergic to vancomycin. The patient was cured by high-dose daptomycin monotheraphy, HLH-2004 protocol and cardiothoracic surgery to remove the valve at last, and was obviously benefit from the endeavor of a multidisciplinary team (MDT) strategy. IE was made on March 27according to the modified Duke criteria. HLH was diagnosed too. The patient was cured by high-dose daptomycin monotheraphy, HLH-2004 protocol and cardiothoracic surgery to remove the valve at last, and was obviously benefit from the endeavor of a multidisciplinary team (MDT) strategy. The patient was healthy andstable when we published this case. This case proves high-dose daptomycin monotheraphy could be used as an effective alternative regimen for vancomycin in treating MRSE-related left-sided endocarditis and highlight the importance of early diagnosis and appropriate management for HLH. Furthermore, our work suggests an MDT model as a practical strategy in managing similar clinical situation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Five-year extension of a clinical trial comparing the EX-PRESS glaucoma filtration device and trabeculectomy in primary open-angle glaucoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Leo; Lafuma, Antoine; Aguadé, Anne-Sophie; Berdeaux, Gilles

    2011-01-01

    This study compared the efficacy of the EX-PRESS(®) glaucoma filtration device and trabeculectomy in primary open-angle glaucoma up to five years after surgery. Patients from a previously reported randomized, open-label, parallel-arm clinical trial in which 78 patients received either the EX-PRESS

  5. Tolerability and efficacy of paliperidone ER compared to olanzapine in the treatment of schizophrenia: A randomized, double-blind, multicentric trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandip Shah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Paliperidone is an active metabolite of risperidone and actss through a combination of central dopamine Type 2 (D2 and serotonin Type 2 (5HT2A receptor antagonism. Aim: The present randomized, double-blind, multicentric trial was designed to determine the safety and efficacy of paliperidone extended release (ER compared to olanzapine in the treatment of acute schizophrenia. Materials and Methods: A total of 214 patients with diagnosis of schizophrenia were randomized to paliperidone ER (n=109 and olanzapine (n=106 treatment groups. Totally 206 patients were evaluated for efficacy parameters using Positive and negative syndrome scale (PANSS score and Clinical Global Impression-severity of illness (CGI-S and Clinical Global Impression-improvement of illness (CGI-I scales. Safety was assessed by treatment-emergent adverse events and movement disorders. Results: All patients showed significant reduction in PANSS scores at the end of treatment. However, the results were comparable and there was no significant difference at the end of the trial between paliperidone ER group and olanzapine group. Both the treatment groups showed decrease in the severity of illness and improvement in symptomatology. The most common adverse events reported in paliperidone ER versus olanzapine group were Extra Pyramidal Syndrome (EPS (13.7% vs. 15.6%, headache (12.7% vs. 8.9%, increased appetite (8.8% vs. 10.0% and drowsiness (4.9% vs. 303%. There was no clinically relevant difference in change from baseline to the end of the trial in abnormal involuntary movement scale (AIMS and barnes akathisia rating scale (BARS total scores between both the groups. Conclusion: Paliperidone ER is effective in controlling schizophrenic symptoms as well as exhibits comparable tolerability profile. Thus, paliperidone ER has the potential to be a useful new treatment option for patients with schizophrenia.

  6. Interaction Between 2 Nutraceutical Treatments and Host Immune Status in the Pediatric Critical Illness Stress-Induced Immune Suppression Comparative Effectiveness Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcillo, Joseph A; Dean, J Michael; Holubkov, Richard; Berger, John; Meert, Kathleen L; Anand, Kanwaljeet J S; Zimmerman, Jerry J; Newth, Christopher J L; Harrison, Rick; Burr, Jeri; Willson, Douglas F; Nicholson, Carol; Bell, Michael J; Berg, Robert A; Shanley, Thomas P; Heidemann, Sabrina M; Dalton, Heidi; Jenkins, Tammara L; Doctor, Allan; Webster, Angie; Tamburro, Robert F

    2017-11-01

    The pediatric Critical Illness Stress-induced Immune Suppression (CRISIS) trial compared the effectiveness of 2 nutraceutical supplementation strategies and found no difference in the development of nosocomial infection and sepsis in the overall population. We performed an exploratory post hoc analysis of interaction between nutraceutical treatments and host immune status related to the development of nosocomial infection/sepsis. Children from the CRISIS trial were analyzed according to 3 admission immune status categories marked by decreasing immune competence: immune competent without lymphopenia, immune competent with lymphopenia, and previously immunocompromised. The comparative effectiveness of the 2 treatments was analyzed for interaction with immune status category. There were 134 immune-competent children without lymphopenia, 79 previously immune-competent children with lymphopenia, and 27 immunocompromised children who received 1 of the 2 treatments. A significant interaction was found between treatment arms and immune status on the time to development of nosocomial infection and sepsis ( P patient characteristic.

  7. Meta-analysis of randomized, controlled trials comparing griseofulvin and terbinafine in the treatment of tinea capitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tey, Hong Liang; Tan, Andy Soon Leong; Chan, Yuin Chew

    2011-04-01

    Griseofulvin has been the standard treatment for tinea capitis but newer antifungal agents, particularly terbinafine, are increasingly being used because of their shorter duration of treatment and more consistent absorption rates. We sought to compare the efficacy of oral griseofulvin and oral terbinafine in the treatment of tinea capitis. A search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Clinical Trials, and the Cochrane Skin Group Ongoing Skin Trials Register was performed up to January 2010 for randomized controlled trials comparing griseofulvin and terbinafine in the treatment of tinea capitis in immunocompetent patients. The primary outcome measure was the complete cure rate. The mycological and clinical cure rates and adverse effects were secondary outcome measures. Pooling of treatment effect was accomplished using a random effects model and the I(2) test was used to check for heterogeneity among the studies. Seven studies involving 2163 subjects were included. There was no significant difference in efficacy between griseofulvin (mean duration of treatment 8 weeks, range 6-12 weeks) and terbinafine (mean duration of treatment 4 weeks, range 2-6 weeks); odds ratio = 1.22 favoring terbinafine (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.785-1.919; P = .37). In the pooled analysis of 5 studies in which Trichophyton species were the predominant (≥65%) pathogenic dermatophyte, terbinafine showed a trend toward greater efficacy (odds ratio 1.49; 95% CI = 0.975-2.277; P = .065). Subgroup analysis revealed that terbinafine was more efficacious than griseofulvin in treating Trichophyton species (1.616; 95% CI = 1.274-2.051; P terbinafine in treating Microsporum species (0.408; 95% CI = 0.254-0.656; P terbinafine demonstrated good safety profiles in the studies. Data on efficacy of griseofulvin and terbinafine for separate groups of Trichophyton and Microsporum species were not available from every study. In the subgroup analysis of Microsporum species, data from only

  8. A Crossover Design for Comparative Efficacy: A 36-Week Randomized Trial of Bevacizumab and Ranibizumab for Diabetic Macular Edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Henry E; Thompson, Darby J S; Bailey, Clare; Chew, Emily Y; Cukras, Catherine A; Jaffe, Glenn J; Lee, Richard W J; Loken, Erin K; Meyerle, Catherine B; Wong, Wai; Ferris, Frederick L

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the comparative efficacy of bevacizumab (Avastin) and ranibizumab (Lucentis; both Genentech, Inc, South San Francisco, CA) for diabetic macular edema (DME) using a crossover study design. Randomized, double-masked, 36-week, 3-period crossover clinical trial. Fifty-six subjects with DME involving the center of the macula in one or both eyes. Monthly intravitreous injections of bevacizumab (1.25 mg) or ranibizumab (0.3 mg). Comparison of mean changes in visual acuity and central retinal thickness, tested using a linear mixed-effects model. Based on the linear mixed-effects model, the 3-month estimated mean improvement in visual acuity was 5.3 letters for bevacizumab and 6.6 letters for ranibizumab (difference, 1.3 letters; P = 0.039). Estimated change in optical coherence tomography (OCT) central subfield mean thickness (CSMT) was -89 μm for bevacizumab and -137 μm for ranibizumab (difference, 48 μm; P < 0.001). Incorporating cumulative treatment benefit, the model yielded a predicted 36-week (9-month) average improvement in visual acuity of 7.1 letters (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.0-9.2) for bevacizumab and 8.4 letters (95% CI, 6.3-10.5) for ranibizumab, and a change in OCT CSMT of -128 μm (95% CI, -155 to -100) for bevacizumab and -176 μm (95% CI, -202 to -149) for ranibizumab. There was no significant treatment-by-period interaction (i.e., treatment difference was constant in all 3 periods), nor was there a significant differential carryover effect from one period to the next. This trial demonstrated a statistically significant but small relative clinical benefit of ranibizumab compared with bevacizumab for treatment of DME, using a markedly reduced sample size relative to a full comparative efficacy study. The effects on visual acuity and central retinal thickness for the 2 drugs are consistent with those reported at 1 year for the concurrent parallel-group trial by the Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network testing bevacizumab

  9. A Randomized Trial Comparing Two Tongue-Pressure Resistance Training Protocols for Post-Stroke Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Catriona M; Bayley, Mark T; Peladeau-Pigeon, Melanie; Nagy, Ahmed; Namasivayam, Ashwini M; Stokely, Shauna L; Wolkin, Talia

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the outcomes of two tongue resistance training protocols. One protocol ("tongue-pressure profile training") emphasized the pressure-timing patterns that are typically seen in healthy swallows by focusing on gradual pressure release and saliva swallowing tasks. The second protocol ("tongue-pressure strength and accuracy training") emphasized strength and accuracy in tongue-palate pressure generation and did not include swallowing tasks. A prospective, randomized, parallel allocation trial was conducted. Of 26 participants who were screened for eligibility, 14 received up to 24 sessions of treatment. Outcome measures of posterior tongue strength, oral bolus control, penetration-aspiration and vallecular residue were made based on videofluoroscopy analysis by blinded raters. Complete data were available for 11 participants. Significant improvements were seen in tongue strength and post-swallow vallecular residue with thin liquids, regardless of treatment condition. Stage transition duration (a measure of the duration of the bolus presence in the pharynx prior to swallow initiation, which had been chosen to capture impairments in oral bolus control) showed no significant differences. Similarly, significant improvements were not seen in median scores on the penetration-aspiration scale. This trial suggests that tongue strength can be improved with resistance training for individuals with tongue weakness following stroke. We conclude that improved penetration-aspiration does not necessarily accompany improvements in tongue strength; however, tongue-pressure resistance training does appear to be effective for reducing thin liquid vallecular residue.

  10. "I was a little surprised": Qualitative Insights from Patients Enrolled in a 12-Month Trial Comparing Opioids to Non-Opioid Medications for Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marianne S Matthias; Donaldson, Melvin T; Jensen, Agnes C; Krebs, Erin E

    2018-04-28

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain is a major public health problem. Although opioid prescribing for chronic pain has increased dramatically since the 1990s, this practice has come under scrutiny because of increases in opioid-related harms and lack of evidence for long-term effectiveness. The Strategies for Prescribing Analgesics Comparative Effectiveness (SPACE) trial was a pragmatic 12-month randomized trial comparing benefits and harms of opioid versus non-opioid medications for chronic musculoskeletal pain. The current qualitative study was designed to better understand trial results by exploring patients' experiences, including perceptions of medications, experiences with the intervention, and whether expectations were met. Thirty-four participants who were purposefully sampled based on treatment group and intervention response participated in semi-structured interviews. The constant comparison method guided analysis. Results revealed that participants often held strong beliefs about opioid medications, which sometimes changed during the trial as they gained experience with medications; participants described a wide variety of experiences with treatment effectiveness, regardless of study group or their response to the intervention; and participants highly valued the personalized pain care model used in SPACE. SPACE trial results indicated no advantage for opioid over non-opioid medications. Qualitative findings suggest that, for patients in both treatment groups, pre-existing expectations of medications and of anticipated improvement in pain shaped experiences with and responses to medications. In addition, the personalized pain care model was described as contributing to positive outcomes in both groups. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. A Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Telemedical and Standard Outpatient Monitoring of Diabetic Foot Ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Benjamin S B; Froekjaer, Johnny; Bjerregaard, Mads R

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The role of telemedical monitoring in diabetic foot ulcer care is still uncertain. Our aim was to compare telemedical and standard outpatient monitoring in the care of patients with diabetic foot ulcers in a randomized controlled trial. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Of the 736 screened...... individuals with diabetic foot ulcers, 401 met the eligibility criteria and were randomized between October 2010 and November 2014. The per-protocol telemedical monitoring consisted of two consultations in the patient's own home and one consultation at the outpatient clinic. Standard practice consisted...... monitoring, a higher mortality throws into question the role of telemedicine in monitoring diabetic foot ulcers. Further studies are needed to investigate effects of telemedicine on mortality and other clinical outcomes and to identify patient subgroups that may have a poorer outcome through telemedical...

  12. Recruitment to publicly funded trials--are surgical trials really different?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Jonathan A; Ramsay, Craig R; Norrie, John

    2008-09-01

    Good recruitment is integral to the conduct of a high-quality randomised controlled trial. It has been suggested that recruitment is particularly difficult for evaluations of surgical interventions, a field in which there is a dearth of evidence from randomised comparisons. While there is anecdotal speculation to support the inference that recruitment to surgical trials is more challenging than for medical trials we are unaware of any formal assessment of this. In this paper, we compare recruitment to surgical and medical trials using a cohort of publicly funded trials. Overall recruitment to trials was assessed using of a cohort of publicly funded trials (n=114). Comparisons were made by using the Recruitment Index, a simple measure of recruitment activity for multicentre randomised controlled trials. Recruitment at the centre level was also investigated through three example surgical trials. The Recruitment Index was found to be higher, though not statistically significantly, in the surgical group (n=18, median=38.0 IQR (10.7, 77.4)) versus (n=81, median=34.8 IQR (11.7, 98.0)) days per recruit for the medical group (median difference 1.7 (-19.2, 25.1); p=0.828). For the trials where the comparison was between a surgical and a medical intervention, the Recruitment Index was substantially higher (n=6, 68.3 (23.5, 294.8)) versus (n=93, 34.6 (11.7, 90.0); median difference 25.9 (-35.5, 221.8); p=0.291) for the other trials. There was no clear evidence that surgical trials differ from medical trials in terms of recruitment activity. There was, however, support for the inference that medical versus surgical trials are more difficult to recruit to. Formal exploration of the recruitment data through a modelling approach may go some way to tease out where important differences exist.

  13. A prospective randomised trial comparing nasogastric with intravenous hydration in children with bronchiolitis (protocol) The comparative rehydration in bronchiolitis study (CRIB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Bronchiolitis is the most common reason for admission of infants to hospital in developed countries. Fluid replacement therapy is required in about 30% of children admitted with bronchiolitis. There are currently two techniques of fluid replacement therapy that are used with the same frequency-intravenous (IV) or nasogastric (NG). The evidence to determine the optimum route of hydration therapy for infants with bronchiolitis is inadequate. This randomised trial will be the first to provide good quality evidence of whether nasogastric rehydration (NGR) offers benefits over intravenous rehydration (IVR) using the clinically relevant continuous outcome measure of duration of hospital admission. Methods/Design A prospective randomised multi-centre trial in Australia and New Zealand where children between 2 and 12 months of age with bronchiolitis, needing non oral fluid replacement, are randomised to receive either intravenous (IV) or nasogastric (NG) rehydration. 750 patients admitted to participating hospitals will be recruited, and will be followed daily during the admission and by telephone 1 week after discharge. Patients with chronic respiratory, cardiac, or neurological disease; choanal atresia; needing IV fluid resuscitation; needing an IV for other reasons, and those requiring CPAP or ventilation are excluded. The primary endpoint is duration of hospital admission. Secondary outcomes are complications, need for ICU admission, parental satisfaction, and an economic evaluation. Results will be analysed using t-test for continuous data, and chi squared for categorical data. Non parametric data will be log transformed. Discussion This trial will define the role of NGR and IVR in bronchiolitis Trail registration The trial is registered with the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry - ACTRN12605000033640 PMID:20515467

  14. A prospective randomised trial comparing nasogastric with intravenous hydration in children with bronchiolitis (protocol The comparative rehydration in bronchiolitis study (CRIB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borland Meredith

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bronchiolitis is the most common reason for admission of infants to hospital in developed countries. Fluid replacement therapy is required in about 30% of children admitted with bronchiolitis. There are currently two techniques of fluid replacement therapy that are used with the same frequency-intravenous (IV or nasogastric (NG. The evidence to determine the optimum route of hydration therapy for infants with bronchiolitis is inadequate. This randomised trial will be the first to provide good quality evidence of whether nasogastric rehydration (NGR offers benefits over intravenous rehydration (IVR using the clinically relevant continuous outcome measure of duration of hospital admission. Methods/Design A prospective randomised multi-centre trial in Australia and New Zealand where children between 2 and 12 months of age with bronchiolitis, needing non oral fluid replacement, are randomised to receive either intravenous (IV or nasogastric (NG rehydration. 750 patients admitted to participating hospitals will be recruited, and will be followed daily during the admission and by telephone 1 week after discharge. Patients with chronic respiratory, cardiac, or neurological disease; choanal atresia; needing IV fluid resuscitation; needing an IV for other reasons, and those requiring CPAP or ventilation are excluded. The primary endpoint is duration of hospital admission. Secondary outcomes are complications, need for ICU admission, parental satisfaction, and an economic evaluation. Results will be analysed using t-test for continuous data, and chi squared for categorical data. Non parametric data will be log transformed. Discussion This trial will define the role of NGR and IVR in bronchiolitis Trail registration The trial is registered with the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry - ACTRN12605000033640

  15. Subcutaneous Injection of Adalimumab Trial compared with Control (SCIATiC): a randomised controlled trial of adalimumab injection compared with placebo for patients receiving physiotherapy treatment for sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Nefyn H; Jenkins, Alison; Goulden, Nia; Hoare, Zoe; Hughes, Dyfrig A; Wood, Eifiona; Foster, Nadine E; Walsh, David A; Carnes, Dawn; Sparkes, Valerie; Hay, Elaine M; Isaacs, John; Konstantinou, Kika; Morrissey, Dylan; Karppinen, Jaro; Genevay, Stephane; Wilkinson, Clare

    2017-10-01

    Biological treatments such as adalimumab (Humira ® ; AbbVie Ltd, Maidenhead, UK) are antibodies targeting tumour necrosis factor alpha, released from ruptured intervertebral discs, which might be useful in sciatica. Recent systematic reviews concluded that they might be effective, but that a definitive randomised controlled trial was needed. Usual care in the NHS typically includes a physiotherapy intervention. To test whether or not injections of adalimumab plus physiotherapy are more clinically effective and cost-effective than injections of saline plus physiotherapy for patients with sciatica. Pragmatic, parallel-group, randomised controlled trial with blinded participants and clinicians, and an outcome assessment and statistical analysis with concurrent economic evaluation and internal pilot. Participants were referred from primary care and musculoskeletal services to outpatient physiotherapy clinics. Adults with persistent symptoms of sciatica of 1-6 months' duration and with moderate to high levels of disability. Eligibility was assessed by research physiotherapists according to clinical criteria for diagnosing sciatica. After a second eligibility check, trial participants were randomised to receive two doses of adalimumab (80 mg and then 40 mg 2 weeks later) or saline injections. Both groups were referred for a course of physiotherapy. Outcomes were measured at the start, and after 6 weeks' and 6 months' follow-up. The main outcome measure was the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Other outcomes: leg pain version of the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire, Sciatica Bothersomeness Index, EuroQol-5 Dimensions, 5-level version, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, resource use, risk of persistent disabling pain, pain trajectory based on a single question, Pain Self-Efficacy Questionnaire, Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia and adverse effects. To detect an effect size of 0.4 with 90% power, a 5% significance level for a two-tailed t -test and 80% retention

  16. Massed Trials versus Trials Embedded into Game Play: Child Outcomes and Preference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledford, Jennifer R.; Chazin, Kate T.; Harbin, Emilee R.; Ward, Sarah E.

    2017-01-01

    Limited data are available regarding how response prompting procedures should be used in early childhood settings. The purpose of this study was to compare the efficiency of progressive time delay instruction presented via two trial arrangements: massed and embedded. During massed trial sessions, a short instructional session was conducted,…

  17. UK Dermatology Clinical Trials Network's STOP GAP trial (a multicentre trial of prednisolone versus ciclosporin for pyoderma gangrenosum): protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Fiona F; Thomas, Kim S; Mitchell, Eleanor J; Williams, Hywel C; Norrie, John; Mason, James M; Ormerod, Anthony D

    2012-04-28

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is a rare inflammatory skin disorder characterised by painful and rapidly progressing skin ulceration. PG can be extremely difficult to treat and patients often require systemic immunosuppression. Recurrent lesions of PG are common, but the relative rarity of this condition means that there is a lack of published evidence regarding its treatment. A systematic review published in 2005 found no randomised controlled trials (RCTs) relating to the treatment of PG. Since this time, one small RCT has been published comparing infliximab to placebo, but none of the commonly used systemic treatments for PG have been formally assessed. The UK Dermatology Clinical Trials Network's STOP GAP Trial has been designed to address this lack of trial evidence. The objective is to assess whether oral ciclosporin is more effective than oral prednisolone for the treatment of PG. The trial design is a two-arm, observer-blind, parallel-group, randomised controlled trial comparing ciclosporin (4 mg/kg/day) to prednisolone (0.75 mg/kg/day). A total of 140 participants are to be recruited over a period of 4 years, from up to 50 hospitals in the UK and Eire. Primary outcome of velocity of healing at 6 weeks is assessed blinded to treatment allocation (using digital images of the ulcers). Secondary outcomes include: (i) time to healing; (ii) global assessment of improvement; (iii) PG inflammation assessment scale score; (iv) self-reported pain; (v) health-related quality of life; (vi) time to recurrence; (vii) treatment failures; (viii) adverse reactions to study medications; and (ix) cost effectiveness/utility. Patients with a clinical diagnosis of PG (excluding granulomatous PG); measurable ulceration (that is, not pustular PG); and patients aged over 18 years old who are able to give informed consent are included in the trial. Randomisation is by computer generated code using permuted blocks of randomly varying size, stratified by lesion size, and

  18. A Randomized Trial Comparing Acupuncture, Simulated Acupuncture, and Usual Care for Chronic Low Back Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkin, Daniel C.; Sherman, Karen J.; Avins, Andrew L.; Erro, Janet H.; Ichikawa, Laura; Barlow, William E.; Delaney, Kristin; Hawkes, Rene; Hamilton, Luisa; Pressman, Alice; Khalsa, Partap S.; Deyo, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Acupuncture is a popular complementary and alternative treatment for chronic back pain. Recent European trials suggest similar short-term benefits from real and sham acupuncture needling. This trial addresses the importance of needle placement and skin penetration in eliciting acupuncture effects for patients with chronic low back pain. Methods 638 adults with chronic mechanical low back pain were randomized to: individualized acupuncture, standardized acupuncture, simulated acupuncture, or usual care. Ten treatments were provided over 7 weeks by experienced acupuncturists. The primary outcomes were back-related dysfunction (Roland Disability score, range: 0 to 23) and symptom bothersomeness (0 to 10 scale). Outcomes were assessed at baseline and after 8, 26 and 52 weeks. Results At 8 weeks, mean dysfunction scores for the individualized, standardized, and simulated acupuncture groups improved by 4.4, 4.5, and 4.4 points, respectively, compared with 2.1 points for those receiving usual care (P0.05). Conclusions Although acupuncture was found effective for chronic low back pain, tailoring needling sites to each patient and penetration of the skin appear to be unimportant in eliciting therapeutic benefits. These findings raise questions about acupuncture’s purported mechanisms of action. It remains unclear whether acupuncture, or our simulated method of acupuncture, provide physiologically important stimulation or represent placebo or non-specific effects. PMID:19433697

  19. Safety and efficacy of antibiotics compared with appendicectomy for treatment of uncomplicated acute appendicitis: meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadhan, Krishna K; Neal, Keith R

    2012-01-01

    Objective To compare the safety and efficacy of antibiotic treatment versus appendicectomy for the primary treatment of uncomplicated acute appendicitis. Design Meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials. Population Randomised controlled trials of adult patients presenting with uncomplicated acute appendicitis, diagnosed by haematological and radiological investigations. Interventions Antibiotic treatment versus appendicectomy. Outcome measures The primary outcome measure was complications. The secondary outcome measures were efficacy of treatment, length of stay, and incidence of complicated appendicitis and readmissions. Results Four randomised controlled trials with a total of 900 patients (470 antibiotic treatment, 430 appendicectomy) met the inclusion criteria. Antibiotic treatment was associated with a 63% (277/438) success rate at one year. Meta-analysis of complications showed a relative risk reduction of 31% for antibiotic treatment compared with appendicectomy (risk ratio (Mantel-Haenszel, fixed) 0.69 (95% confidence interval 0.54 to 0.89); I2=0%; P=0.004). A secondary analysis, excluding the study with crossover of patients between the two interventions after randomisation, showed a significant relative risk reduction of 39% for antibiotic therapy (risk ratio 0.61 (0.40 to 0.92); I2=0%; P=0.02). Of the 65 (20%) patients who had appendicectomy after readmission, nine had perforated appendicitis and four had gangrenous appendicitis. No significant differences were seen for treatment efficacy, length of stay, or risk of developing complicated appendicitis. Conclusion Antibiotics are both effective and safe as primary treatment for patients with uncomplicated acute appendicitis. Initial antibiotic treatment merits consideration as a primary treatment option for early uncomplicated appendicitis. PMID:22491789

  20. Characteristics of children and young adults with Marfan syndrome and aortic root dilation in a randomized trial comparing atenolol and losartan therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lacro, R.V.; Guey, L.T.; Dietz, H.C.; Pearson, G.D.; Yetman, A.T.; Gelb, B.D.; Loeys, B.L.; Benson, D.W.; Bradley, T.J.; Backer, J. de; Forbus, G.A.; Klein, G.L.; Lai, W.W.; Levine, J.C.; Lewin, M.B.; Markham, L.W.; Paridon, S.M.; Pierpont, M.E.; Radojewski, E.; Selamet Tierney, E.S.; Sharkey, A.M.; Wechsler, S.B.; Mahony, L.; et al.,

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Pediatric Heart Network designed a clinical trial to compare aortic root growth and other short-term cardiovascular outcomes in children and young adults with Marfan syndrome randomized to receive atenolol or losartan. We report here the characteristics of the screened population and

  1. A multicenter randomized controlled trial comparing pancreatic leaks after TissueLink versus SEAMGUARD after distal pancreatectomy (PLATS) NCT01051856.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubert, Christopher R; Ferrone, Christina R; Fernandez-Del Castillo, Carlos; Kendrick, Michael L; Farnell, Michael B; Smoot, Rory L; Truty, Mark J; Que, Florencia G

    2016-11-01

    Pancreatic leak is common after distal pancreatectomy. This trial sought to compare TissueLink closure of the pancreatic stump to that of SEAMGUARD. A multicenter, prospective, trial of patients undergoing distal pancreatectomy randomized to either TissueLink or SEAMGUARD. Enrollment was closed early due to poor accrual. Overall, 67 patients were enrolled, 35 TissueLink and 32 SEAMGUARD. The two groups differed in American Society of Anesthesiologist class and diagnosis at baseline and were relatively balanced otherwise. Overall, 37 of 67 patients (55%) experienced a leak of any grade, 15 (46.9%) in the SEAMGUARD arm and 22 (62.9%) in the TissueLink arm (P = 0.19). The clinically significant leak rate was 17.9%; 22.9% for TissueLink and 12.5% for SEAMGUARD (P = 0.35). There were no statistically significant differences in major or any pancreatic fistula-related morbidity between the two groups. This is the first multicentered randomized trial evaluating leak rate after distal pancreatectomy between two common transection methods. Although a difference in leak rates was observed, it was not statistically significant and therefore does not provide evidence of the superiority of one technique over the other. Choice should remain based on surgeon comfort, experience, and pancreas characteristics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and compare new treatments with other available treatments. Steps To Avoid Bias The researchers doing clinical trials take steps to avoid bias. "Bias" means that human choices ...

  3. Very late stent thrombosis with second generation drug eluting stents compared to bare metal stents: Network meta-analysis of randomized primary percutaneous coronary intervention trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Femi; Stewart, Susan; Southard, Jeffrey A

    2016-07-01

    The relative safety of drug-eluting stents (DES) and bare-metal stents (BMS) in primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) in ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) continues to be debated. The long-term clinical outcomes between second generation DES and BMS for primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) using network meta-analysis were compared. Randomized controlled trials comparing stent types (first generation DES, second generation DES, or BMS) were considered for inclusion. A search strategy used Medline, Embase, Cochrane databases, and proceedings of international meetings. Information about study design, inclusion criteria, and sample characteristics were extracted. Network meta-analysis was used to pool direct (comparison of second generation DES to BMS) and indirect evidence (first generation DES with BMS and second generation DES) from the randomized trials. Twelve trials comparing all stents types including 9,673 patients randomly assigned to treatment groups were analyzed. Second generation DES was associated with significantly lower incidence of definite or probable ST (OR 0.59, 95% CI 0.39-0.89), MI (OR 0.59, 95% CI 0.39-0.89), and TVR at 3 years (OR 0.50: 95% CI 0.31-0.81) compared with BMS. In addition, there was a significantly lower incidence of MACE with second generation DES versus BMS (OR 0.54, 95% CI 0.34-0.74) at 3 years. These were driven by a higher rate of TVR, MI and stent thrombosis in the BMS group at 3 years. There was a non-significant reduction in the overall and cardiac mortality [OR 0.83, 95% CI (0.60-1.14), OR 0.88, 95% CI (0.6-1.28)] with the use of second generation DES versus BMS at 3 years. Network meta-analysis of randomized trials of primary PCI demonstrated lower incidence of MACE, MI, TVR, and stent thrombosis with second generation DES compared with BMS. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Iohexol and iopamidol myelography in the dog: a clinical trial comparing adverse effects and myelographic quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widmer, W.R.; Blevins, W.E.; Jakovljevic, S.; Teclaw, R.F.; Han, C.M.; Hurd, C.D.

    1992-01-01

    In a blind clinical trial, adverse effects after iohexol and iopamidol myelography were evaluated in 151 dogs. Eighty-one dogs were given iohexol (240 mgI/ml) and 70 dogs were given iopamidol (200 mgI/ml) by pre-determined assignment. Each dog was evaluated postmyelographically for seizures, hyperthermia, prolonged recovery from anesthesia and intensification of pre-existing neural signs. Myelographic quality was evaluated with a subjective scoring method. In comparing iohexol and iopamidol groups, there was not a statistically significant difference in the incidence of adverse effects or in myelographic quality. Iopamidol and iohexol appeared to be equally efficacious for routine canine myelography

  5. Porcine dermis compared with polypropylene mesh for laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culligan, Patrick J; Salamon, Charbel; Priestley, Jennifer L; Shariati, Amir

    2013-01-01

    To compare the surgical outcomes 12 months after laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy performed with porcine dermis and the current gold standard of polypropylene mesh. Patients scheduled for laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy were eligible for this randomized controlled trial. Both our clinical research nurse and the patients were blinded as to which material was used. Our primary end point was objective anatomic cure defined as no pelvic organ prolapse quantification (POP-Q) points Stage 2 or greater at any postoperative interval. Our sample size calculation called for 57 patients in each group to achieve 90% power to detect a 23% difference in objective anatomic cure at 12 months (α=0.05). Our secondary end point was clinical cure. Any patient with a POP-Q point greater than zero, or Point C less than or equal to -5, or any complaints of prolapse symptoms whatsoever on Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory-20 or Pelvic Floor Impact Questionnaire, Short Form 7, or reoperation for prolapse were considered "clinical failures"; the rest were "clinical cures." Statistical comparisons were performed using the χ or independent samples t test as appropriate. As expected, there were no preoperative differences between the porcine (n=57) and mesh (n=58) groups. The 12-month objective anatomic cure rates for the porcine and mesh groups were 80.7% and 86.2%, respectively (P=.24), and the "clinical cure" rates for the porcine and mesh groups were 84.2% and 89.7%, respectively (P=.96). Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory-20 and Pelvic Floor Impact Questionnaire, Short Form 7 score improvements were significant for both groups with no differences found between groups. There were no major operative complications. There were similar outcomes in subjective or objective results 12 months after laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy performed with either porcine dermis or polypropylene mesh. ClinicalTrials.gov, www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT00564083. I.

  6. Clinical trials of homoeopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleijnen, J; Knipschild, P; ter Riet, G

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To establish whether there is evidence of the efficacy of homoeopathy from controlled trials in humans. DESIGN--Criteria based meta-analysis. Assessment of the methodological quality of 107 controlled trials in 96 published reports found after an extensive search. Trials were scored using a list of predefined criteria of good methodology, and the outcome of the trials was interpreted in relation to their quality. SETTING--Controlled trials published world wide. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Results of the trials with the best methodological quality. Trials of classical homoeopathy and several modern varieties were considered separately. RESULTS--In 14 trials some form of classical homoeopathy was tested and in 58 trials the same single homoeopathic treatment was given to patients with comparable conventional diagnosis. Combinations of several homoeopathic treatments were tested in 26 trials; isopathy was tested in nine trials. Most trials seemed to be of very low quality, but there were many exceptions. The results showed a positive trend regardless of the quality of the trial or the variety of homeopathy used. Overall, of the 105 trials with interpretable results, 81 trials indicated positive results whereas in 24 trials no positive effects of homoeopathy were found. The results of the review may be complicated by publication bias, especially in such a controversial subject as homoeopathy. CONCLUSIONS--At the moment the evidence of clinical trials is positive but not sufficient to draw definitive conclusions because most trials are of low methodological quality and because of the unknown role of publication bias. This indicates that there is a legitimate case for further evaluation of homoeopathy, but only by means of well performed trials. PMID:1825800

  7. A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing hysteroscopic morcellation with resectoscopy for patients with endometrial lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunbo; Dai, Zhiyuan; Gong, Yuping; Xie, Bingying; Wang, Bei

    2017-01-01

    Results on the efficacy of hysteroscopic morcellation for patients with endometrial lesions remain conflicting. To compare hysteroscopic morcellation with conventional resectoscopy for removal of endometrial lesions. Electronic databases were searched for reports published up to February 1, 2016, using terms such as "morcellator," "morcellators," "morcellate," "morcellation," "morcellated," "hysteroscopy," "hysteroscopy," "uteroscope," and "transcervical." Randomized controlled trials were included if they assessed success rate, procedure speed, complications, tolerability, and/or learning curve. Data were extracted by two independent reviewers and a meta-analysis was performed. Four trials including 392 patients were analyzed. Successful removal of all endometrial lesions was more frequent with hysteroscopic morcellation than conventional resectoscopy (odds ratio 4.49, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.94-10.41; Physteroscopic morcellation (mean difference -4.94 minutes, 95% CI -7.20 to -2.68; Plearning curve. In one study, hysteroscopic morcellation was acceptable to more patients (P=0.009). Hysteroscopic morcellation is associated with a higher operative success rate and a shorter operative time among patients with endometrial lesions than is resectoscopy. More high-quality trials are required to validate these results. © 2016 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  8. Systematic review and meta-analysis of published trials comparing the effectiveness of transanal endoscopic microsurgery and radical resection in the management of early rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajid, M S; Farag, S; Leung, P; Sains, P; Miles, W F A; Baig, M K

    2014-01-01

    A systematic analysis was conducted of trials comparing the effectiveness of transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEMS) with radical resection (RR) for T1 and T2 rectal cancer. An electronic search was carried out of trials reporting the effectiveness of TEMS and RR in the treatment of T1 and T2 rectal cancers. Ten trials including 942 patients were retrieved. There was a trend toward a higher risk of local recurrence (odds ratio 2.78; 95% confidence interval 1.42, 5.44; z = 2.97; P TEMS compared with RR. The risk of distant recurrence, overall survival (odds ratio 0.90; 95% confidence interval 0.49, 1.66; z = 0.33; P = 0.74) and mortality was similar. TEMS was associated with a shorter operation time and hospital stay and a reduced risk of postoperative complications (P TEMS is superior to RR in the management of early rectal cancer. Larger, better designed and executed prospective studies are needed to answer this question. Colorectal Disease © 2013 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  9. UK Dermatology Clinical Trials Network’s STOP GAP trial (a multicentre trial of prednisolone versus ciclosporin for pyoderma gangrenosum: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Fiona F

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG is a rare inflammatory skin disorder characterised by painful and rapidly progressing skin ulceration. PG can be extremely difficult to treat and patients often require systemic immunosuppression. Recurrent lesions of PG are common, but the relative rarity of this condition means that there is a lack of published evidence regarding its treatment. A systematic review published in 2005 found no randomised controlled trials (RCTs relating to the treatment of PG. Since this time, one small RCT has been published comparing infliximab to placebo, but none of the commonly used systemic treatments for PG have been formally assessed. The UK Dermatology Clinical Trials Network’s STOP GAP Trial has been designed to address this lack of trial evidence. Methods The objective is to assess whether oral ciclosporin is more effective than oral prednisolone for the treatment of PG. The trial design is a two-arm, observer-blind, parallel-group, randomised controlled trial comparing ciclosporin (4 mg/kg/day to prednisolone (0.75 mg/kg/day. A total of 140 participants are to be recruited over a period of 4 years, from up to 50 hospitals in the UK and Eire. Primary outcome of velocity of healing at 6 weeks is assessed blinded to treatment allocation (using digital images of the ulcers. Secondary outcomes include: (i time to healing; (ii global assessment of improvement; (iii PG inflammation assessment scale score; (iv self-reported pain; (v health-related quality of life; (vi time to recurrence; (vii treatment failures; (viii adverse reactions to study medications; and (ix cost effectiveness/utility. Patients with a clinical diagnosis of PG (excluding granulomatous PG; measurable ulceration (that is, not pustular PG; and patients aged over 18 years old who are able to give informed consent are included in the trial. Randomisation is by computer generated code using permuted blocks of randomly varying size

  10. Effect of tai chi versus aerobic exercise for fibromyalgia: comparative effectiveness randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenchen; Schmid, Christopher H; Fielding, Roger A; Harvey, William F; Reid, Kieran F; Price, Lori Lyn; Driban, Jeffrey B; Kalish, Robert; Rones, Ramel; McAlindon, Timothy

    2018-03-21

    To determine the effectiveness of tai chi interventions compared with aerobic exercise, a current core standard treatment in patients with fibromyalgia, and to test whether the effectiveness of tai chi depends on its dosage or duration. Prospective, randomized, 52 week, single blind comparative effectiveness trial. Urban tertiary care academic hospital in the United States between March 2012 and September 2016. 226 adults with fibromyalgia (as defined by the American College of Rheumatology 1990 and 2010 criteria) were included in the intention to treat analyses: 151 were assigned to one of four tai chi groups and 75 to an aerobic exercise group. Participants were randomly assigned to either supervised aerobic exercise (24 weeks, twice weekly) or one of four classic Yang style supervised tai chi interventions (12 or 24 weeks, once or twice weekly). Participants were followed for 52 weeks. Adherence was rigorously encouraged in person and by telephone. The primary outcome was change in the revised fibromyalgia impact questionnaire (FIQR) scores at 24 weeks compared with baseline. Secondary outcomes included changes of scores in patient's global assessment, anxiety, depression, self efficacy, coping strategies, physical functional performance, functional limitation, sleep, and health related quality of life. FIQR scores improved in all five treatment groups, but the combined tai chi groups improved statistically significantly more than the aerobic exercise group in FIQR scores at 24 weeks (difference between groups=5.5 points, 95% confidence interval 0.6 to 10.4, P=0.03) and several secondary outcomes (patient's global assessment=0.9 points, 0.3 to 1.4, P=0.005; anxiety=1.2 points, 0.3 to 2.1, P=0.006; self efficacy=1.0 points, 0.5 to 1.6, P=0.0004; and coping strategies, 2.6 points, 0.8 to 4.3, P=0.005). Tai chi treatment compared with aerobic exercise administered with the same intensity and duration (24 weeks, twice weekly) had greater benefit (between group

  11. Nausea and Vomiting following Balanced Xenon Anesthesia Compared to Sevoflurane: A Post-Hoc Explorative Analysis of a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid V Fahlenkamp

    Full Text Available Like other inhalational anesthetics xenon seems to be associated with post-operative nausea and vomiting (PONV. We assessed nausea incidence following balanced xenon anesthesia compared to sevoflurane, and dexamethasone for its prophylaxis in a randomized controlled trial with post-hoc explorative analysis.220 subjects with elevated PONV risk (Apfel score ≥2 undergoing elective abdominal surgery were randomized to receive xenon or sevoflurane anesthesia and dexamethasone or placebo after written informed consent. 93 subjects in the xenon group and 94 subjects in the sevoflurane group completed the trial. General anesthesia was maintained with 60% xenon or 2.0% sevoflurane. Dexamethasone 4mg or placebo was administered in the first hour. Subjects were analyzed for nausea and vomiting in predefined intervals during a 24h post-anesthesia follow-up.Logistic regression, controlled for dexamethasone and anesthesia/dexamethasone interaction, showed a significant risk to develop nausea following xenon anesthesia (OR 2.30, 95% CI 1.02-5.19, p = 0.044. Early-onset nausea incidence was 46% after xenon and 35% after sevoflurane anesthesia (p = 0.138. After xenon, nausea occurred significantly earlier (p = 0.014, was more frequent and rated worse in the beginning. Dexamethasone did not markedly reduce nausea occurrence in both groups. Late-onset nausea showed no considerable difference between the groups.In our study setting, xenon anesthesia was associated with an elevated risk to develop nausea in sensitive subjects. Dexamethasone 4mg was not effective preventing nausea in our study. Group size or dosage might have been too small, and change of statistical analysis parameters in the post-hoc evaluation might have further contributed to a limitation of our results. Further trials will be needed to address prophylaxis of xenon-induced nausea.EU Clinical Trials EudraCT-2008-004132-20 ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00793663.

  12. Carotid artery stenting compared with endarterectomy in patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis (International Carotid Stenting Study): an interim analysis of a randomised controlled trial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ederle, Jörg

    2010-03-20

    Stents are an alternative treatment to carotid endarterectomy for symptomatic carotid stenosis, but previous trials have not established equivalent safety and efficacy. We compared the safety of carotid artery stenting with that of carotid endarterectomy.

  13. The OA Trial Bank

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Middelkoop, Marienke; Arden, N K; Atchia, I.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of intra-articular (IA) glucocorticoids for knee or hip osteoarthritis (OA) in specific subgroups of patients with severe pain and inflammatory signs using individual patient data (IPD) from existing trials. Design: Randomized trials evaluating one or more IA...... glucocorticoid preparation in patients with knee or hip OA, published from 1995 up to June 2012 were selected from the literature. IPD obtained from original trials included patient and disease characteristics and outcomes measured. The primary outcome was pain severity at short-term follow-up (up to 4 weeks...... Interval 1.50-26.31) when receiving IA glucocorticoid injection compared to placebo. No statistical significant interaction effects were found between inflammatory signs and IA glucocorticoid injections compared to placebo and to tidal irrigation at all follow-up points. Conclusions: This IPD meta...

  14. Reducing therapeutic misconception: A randomized intervention trial in hypothetical clinical trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul P Christopher

    Full Text Available Participants in clinical trials frequently fail to appreciate key differences between research and clinical care. This phenomenon, known as therapeutic misconception, undermines informed consent to clinical research, but to date there have been no effective interventions to reduce it and concerns have been expressed that to do so might impede recruitment. We determined whether a scientific reframing intervention reduces therapeutic misconception without significantly reducing willingness to participate in hypothetical clinical trials.This prospective randomized trial was conducted from 2015 to 2016 to test the efficacy of an informed consent intervention based on scientific reframing compared to a traditional informed consent procedure (control in reducing therapeutic misconception among patients considering enrollment in hypothetical clinical trials modeled on real-world studies for one of five disease categories. Patients with diabetes mellitus, hypertension, coronary artery disease, head/neck cancer, breast cancer, and major depression were recruited from medical clinics and a clinical research volunteer database. The primary outcomes were therapeutic misconception, as measured by a validated, ten-item Therapeutic Misconception Scale (range = 10-50, and willingness to participate in the clinical trial.154 participants completed the study (age range, 23-87 years; 92.3% white, 56.5% female; 74 (48.1% had been randomized to receive the experimental intervention. Therapeutic misconception was significantly lower (p = 0.004 in the scientific reframing group (26.4, 95% CI [23.7 to 29.1] compared to the control group (30.9, 95% CI [28.4 to 33.5], and remained so after controlling for education (p = 0.017. Willingness to participate in the hypothetical trial was not significantly different (p = 0.603 between intervention (52.1%, 95% CI [40.2% to 62.4%] and control (56.3%, 95% CI [45.3% to 66.6%] groups.An enhanced educational intervention augmenting

  15. Sequential Multiple Assignment Randomized Trials: An Opportunity for Improved Design of Stroke Reperfusion Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meurer, William J; Seewald, Nicholas J; Kidwell, Kelley

    2017-04-01

    Modern clinical trials in stroke reperfusion fall into 2 categories: alternative systemic pharmacological regimens to alteplase and "rescue" endovascular approaches using targeted thrombectomy devices and/or medications delivered directly for persistently occluded vessels. Clinical trials in stroke have not evaluated how initial pharmacological thrombolytic management might influence subsequent rescue strategy. A sequential multiple assignment randomized trial (SMART) is a novel trial design that can test these dynamic treatment regimens and lead to treatment guidelines that more closely mimic practice. To characterize a SMART design in comparison to traditional approaches for stroke reperfusion trials. We conducted a numerical simulation study that evaluated the performance of contrasting acute stroke clinical trial designs of both initial reperfusion and rescue therapy. We compare a SMART design where the same patients are followed through initial reperfusion and rescue therapy within 1 trial to a standard phase III design comparing 2 reperfusion treatments and a separate phase II futility design of rescue therapy in terms of sample size, power, and ability to address particular research questions. Traditional trial designs can be well powered and have optimal design characteristics for independent treatment effects. When treatments, such as the reperfusion and rescue therapies, may interact, commonly used designs fail to detect this. A SMART design, with similar sample size to standard designs, can detect treatment interactions. The use of SMART designs to investigate effective and realistic dynamic treatment regimens is a promising way to accelerate the discovery of new, effective treatments for stroke. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A prospective randomised trial comparing mesh types and fixation in totally extraperitoneal inguinal hernia repairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristaudo, Adam; Nayak, Arun; Martin, Sarah; Adib, Reza; Martin, Ian

    2015-05-01

    The totally extraperitoneal (TEP) approach for surgical repair of inguinal hernias has emerged as a popular technique. We conducted a prospective randomised trial to compare patient comfort scores using different mesh types and fixation using this technique. Over a 14 month period, 146 patients underwent 232 TEP inguinal hernia repairs. We compared the comfort scores of patients who underwent these procedures using different types of mesh and fixation. A non-absorbable 15 × 10 cm anatomical mesh fixed with absorbable tacks (Control group) was compared with either a non-absorbable 15 × 10 cm folding slit mesh with absorbable tacks (Group 2), a partially-absorbable 15 × 10 cm mesh with absorbable tacks (Group 3) or a non-absorbable 15 × 10 cm anatomical mesh fixed with 2 ml fibrin sealant (Group 4). Outcomes were compared at 1, 2, 4 and 12 weeks using the Carolina Comfort Scale (CCS) scores. At 1, 2, 4 and 12 weeks, the median global CCS scores were low for all treatment groups. Statistically significant differences were seen only for median CCS scores and subscores with the use of partially-absorbable mesh with absorbable tacks (Group 3) at weeks 2 and 4. However, these were no longer significant at week 12. In this study, the TEP inguinal hernia repair with minimal fixation results in low CCS scores. There were no statistical differences in CCS scores when comparing types of mesh, configuration of the mesh or fixation methods. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The Head Injury Retrieval Trial (HIRT): a single-centre randomised controlled trial of physician prehospital management of severe blunt head injury compared with management by paramedics only

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Alan A; Mann, Kristy P; Fearnside, Michael; Poynter, Elwyn; Gebski, Val

    2015-01-01

    Background Advanced prehospital interventions for severe brain injury remains controversial. No previous randomised trial has been conducted to evaluate additional physician intervention compared with paramedic only care. Methods Participants in this prospective, randomised controlled trial were adult patients with blunt trauma with either a scene GCS score <9 (original definition), or GCS<13 and an Abbreviated Injury Scale score for the head region ≥3 (modified definition). Patients were randomised to either standard ground paramedic treatment or standard treatment plus a physician arriving by helicopter. Patients were evaluated by 30-day mortality and 6-month Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) scores. Due to high non-compliance rates, both intention-to-treat and as-treated analyses were preplanned. Results 375 patients met the original definition, of which 197 was allocated to physician care. Differences in the 6-month GOS scores were not significant on intention-to-treat analysis (OR 1.11, 95% CI 0.74 to 1.66, p=0.62) nor was the 30-day mortality (OR 0.91, 95% CI 0.60 to 1.38, p=0.66). As-treated analysis showed a 16% reduction in 30-day mortality in those receiving additional physician care; 60/195 (29%) versus 81/180 (45%), p<0.01, Number needed to treat =6. 338 patients met the modified definition, of which 182 were allocated to physician care. The 6-month GOS scores were not significantly different on intention-to-treat analysis (OR 1.14, 95% CI 0.73 to 1.75, p=0.56) nor was the 30-day mortality (OR 1.05, 95% CI 0.66 to 1.66, p=0.84). As-treated analyses were also not significantly different. Conclusions This trial suggests a potential mortality reduction in patients with blunt trauma with GCS<9 receiving additional physician care (original definition only). Confirmatory studies which also address non-compliance issues are needed. Trial registration number NCT00112398. PMID:25795741

  18. Reducing the environmental impact of trials: a comparison of the carbon footprint of the CRASH-1 and CRASH-2 clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background All sectors of the economy, including the health research sector, must reduce their carbon emissions. The UK National Institute for Health Research has recently prepared guidelines on how to minimize the carbon footprint of research. We compare the carbon emissions from two international clinical trials in order to identify where emissions reductions can be made. Methods We conducted a carbon audit of two clinical trials (the CRASH-1 and CRASH-2 trials), quantifying the carbon dioxide emissions produced over a one-year audit period. Carbon emissions arising from the coordination centre, freight delivery, trial-related travel and commuting were calculated and compared. Results The total emissions in carbon dioxide equivalents during the one-year audit period were 181.3 tonnes for CRASH-1 and 108.2 tonnes for CRASH-2. In total, CRASH-1 emitted 924.6 tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalents compared with 508.5 tonnes for CRASH-2. The CRASH-1 trial recruited 10,008 patients over 5.1 years, corresponding to 92 kg of carbon dioxide per randomized patient. The CRASH-2 trial recruited 20,211 patients over 4.7 years, corresponding to 25 kg of carbon dioxide per randomized patient. The largest contributor to emissions in CRASH-1 was freight delivery of trial materials (86.0 tonnes, 48% of total emissions), whereas the largest contributor in CRASH-2 was energy use by the trial coordination centre (54.6 tonnes, 30% of total emissions). Conclusions Faster patient recruitment in the CRASH-2 trial largely accounted for its greatly increased carbon efficiency in terms of emissions per randomized patient. Lighter trial materials and web-based data entry also contributed to the overall lower carbon emissions in CRASH-2 as compared to CRASH-1. Trial Registration Numbers CRASH-1: ISRCTN74459797 CRASH-2: ISRCTN86750102 PMID:21291517

  19. Reducing the environmental impact of trials: a comparison of the carbon footprint of the CRASH-1 and CRASH-2 clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberts Ian

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background All sectors of the economy, including the health research sector, must reduce their carbon emissions. The UK National Institute for Health Research has recently prepared guidelines on how to minimize the carbon footprint of research. We compare the carbon emissions from two international clinical trials in order to identify where emissions reductions can be made. Methods We conducted a carbon audit of two clinical trials (the CRASH-1 and CRASH-2 trials, quantifying the carbon dioxide emissions produced over a one-year audit period. Carbon emissions arising from the coordination centre, freight delivery, trial-related travel and commuting were calculated and compared. Results The total emissions in carbon dioxide equivalents during the one-year audit period were 181.3 tonnes for CRASH-1 and 108.2 tonnes for CRASH-2. In total, CRASH-1 emitted 924.6 tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalents compared with 508.5 tonnes for CRASH-2. The CRASH-1 trial recruited 10,008 patients over 5.1 years, corresponding to 92 kg of carbon dioxide per randomized patient. The CRASH-2 trial recruited 20,211 patients over 4.7 years, corresponding to 25 kg of carbon dioxide per randomized patient. The largest contributor to emissions in CRASH-1 was freight delivery of trial materials (86.0 tonnes, 48% of total emissions, whereas the largest contributor in CRASH-2 was energy use by the trial coordination centre (54.6 tonnes, 30% of total emissions. Conclusions Faster patient recruitment in the CRASH-2 trial largely accounted for its greatly increased carbon efficiency in terms of emissions per randomized patient. Lighter trial materials and web-based data entry also contributed to the overall lower carbon emissions in CRASH-2 as compared to CRASH-1. Trial Registration Numbers CRASH-1: ISRCTN74459797 CRASH-2: ISRCTN86750102

  20. Central coordination as an alternative for local coordination in a multicenter randomized controlled trial: the FAITH trial experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zielinski Stephanie M

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgeons in the Netherlands, Canada and the US participate in the FAITH trial (Fixation using Alternative Implants for the Treatment of Hip fractures. Dutch sites are managed and visited by a financed central trial coordinator, whereas most Canadian and US sites have local study coordinators and receive per patient payment. This study was aimed to assess how these different trial management strategies affected trial performance. Methods Details related to obtaining ethics approval, time to trial start-up, inclusion, and percentage completed follow-ups were collected for each trial site and compared. Pre-trial screening data were compared with actual inclusion rates. Results Median trial start-up ranged from 41 days (P25-P75 10-139 in the Netherlands to 232 days (P25-P75 98-423 in Canada (p = 0.027. The inclusion rate was highest in the Netherlands; median 1.03 patients (P25-P75 0.43-2.21 per site per month, representing 34.4% of the total eligible population. It was lowest in Canada; 0.14 inclusions (P25-P75 0.00-0.28, representing 3.9% of eligible patients (p Conclusions In this trial, a central financed trial coordinator to manage all trial related tasks in participating sites resulted in better trial progression and a similar follow-up. It is therefore a suitable alternative for appointing these tasks to local research assistants. The central coordinator approach can enable smaller regional hospitals to participate in multicenter randomized controlled trials. Circumstances such as available budget, sample size, and geographical area should however be taken into account when choosing a management strategy. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00761813

  1. The TOPSHOCK study: Effectiveness of radial shockwave therapy compared to focused shockwave therapy for treating patellar tendinopath - design of a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diercks Ron L

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patellar tendinopathy is a chronic overuse injury of the patellar tendon that is especially prevalent in people who are involved in jumping activities. Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy is a relatively new treatment modality for tendinopathies. It seems to be a safe and promising part of the rehabilitation program for patellar tendinopathy. Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy originally used focused shockwaves. Several years ago a new kind of shockwave therapy was introduced: radial shockwave therapy. Studies that investigate the effectiveness of radial shockwave therapy as treatment for patellar tendinopathy are scarce. Therefore the aim of this study is to compare the effectiveness of focussed shockwave therapy and radial shockwave therapy as treatments for patellar tendinopathy. Methods/design The TOPSHOCK study (Tendinopathy Of Patella SHOCKwave is a two-armed randomised controlled trial in which the effectiveness of focussed shockwave therapy and radial shockwave therapy are directly compared. Outcome assessors and patients are blinded as to which treatment is given. Patients undergo three sessions of either focused shockwave therapy or radial shockwave therapy at 1-week intervals, both in combination with eccentric decline squat training. Follow-up measurements are scheduled just before treatments 2 and 3, and 1, 4, 7 and 12 weeks after the final treatment. The main outcome measure is the Dutch VISA-P questionnaire, which asks for pain, function and sports participation in subjects with patellar tendinopathy. Secondary outcome measures are pain determined with a VAS during ADL, sports and decline squats, rating of subjective improvement and overall satisfaction with the treatment. Patients will also record their sports activities, pain during and after these activities, and concurrent medical treatment on a weekly basis in a web-based diary. Results will be analysed according to the intention-to-treat principle. Discussion

  2. Transparency of Outcome Reporting and Trial Registration of Randomized Controlled Trials Published in the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azar, Marleine; Riehm, Kira E; McKay, Dean; Thombs, Brett D

    2015-01-01

    Confidence that randomized controlled trial (RCT) results accurately reflect intervention effectiveness depends on proper trial conduct and the accuracy and completeness of published trial reports. The Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology (JCCP) is the primary trials journal amongst American Psychological Association (APA) journals. The objectives of this study were to review RCTs recently published in JCCP to evaluate (1) adequacy of primary outcome analysis definitions; (2) registration status; and, (3) among registered trials, adequacy of outcome registrations. Additionally, we compared results from JCCP to findings from a recent study of top psychosomatic and behavioral medicine journals. Eligible RCTs were published in JCCP in 2013-2014. For each RCT, two investigators independently extracted data on (1) adequacy of outcome analysis definitions in the published report, (2) whether the RCT was registered prior to enrolling patients, and (3) adequacy of outcome registration. Of 70 RCTs reviewed, 12 (17.1%) adequately defined primary or secondary outcome analyses, whereas 58 (82.3%) had multiple primary outcome analyses without statistical adjustment or undefined outcome analyses. There were 39 (55.7%) registered trials. Only two trials registered prior to patient enrollment with a single primary outcome variable and time point of assessment. However, in one of the two trials, registered and published outcomes were discrepant. No studies were adequately registered as per Standard Protocol Items: Recommendation for Interventional Trials guidelines. Compared to psychosomatic and behavioral medicine journals, the proportion of published trials with adequate outcome analysis declarations was significantly lower in JCCP (17.1% versus 32.9%; p = 0.029). The proportion of registered trials in JCCP (55.7%) was comparable to behavioral medicine journals (52.6%; p = 0.709). The quality of published outcome analysis definitions and trial registrations in JCCP is

  3. Transparency of Outcome Reporting and Trial Registration of Randomized Controlled Trials Published in the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marleine Azar

    Full Text Available Confidence that randomized controlled trial (RCT results accurately reflect intervention effectiveness depends on proper trial conduct and the accuracy and completeness of published trial reports. The Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology (JCCP is the primary trials journal amongst American Psychological Association (APA journals. The objectives of this study were to review RCTs recently published in JCCP to evaluate (1 adequacy of primary outcome analysis definitions; (2 registration status; and, (3 among registered trials, adequacy of outcome registrations. Additionally, we compared results from JCCP to findings from a recent study of top psychosomatic and behavioral medicine journals.Eligible RCTs were published in JCCP in 2013-2014. For each RCT, two investigators independently extracted data on (1 adequacy of outcome analysis definitions in the published report, (2 whether the RCT was registered prior to enrolling patients, and (3 adequacy of outcome registration.Of 70 RCTs reviewed, 12 (17.1% adequately defined primary or secondary outcome analyses, whereas 58 (82.3% had multiple primary outcome analyses without statistical adjustment or undefined outcome analyses. There were 39 (55.7% registered trials. Only two trials registered prior to patient enrollment with a single primary outcome variable and time point of assessment. However, in one of the two trials, registered and published outcomes were discrepant. No studies were adequately registered as per Standard Protocol Items: Recommendation for Interventional Trials guidelines. Compared to psychosomatic and behavioral medicine journals, the proportion of published trials with adequate outcome analysis declarations was significantly lower in JCCP (17.1% versus 32.9%; p = 0.029. The proportion of registered trials in JCCP (55.7% was comparable to behavioral medicine journals (52.6%; p = 0.709.The quality of published outcome analysis definitions and trial registrations in JCCP is

  4. A randomized trial comparing surgeon-administered intraoperative transversus abdominis plane block with anesthesiologist-administered transcutaneous block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narasimhulu, D M; Scharfman, L; Minkoff, H; George, B; Homel, P; Tyagaraj, K

    2018-04-27

    Injection of local anesthetic into the transversus abdominis plane (TAP block) decreases systemic morphine requirements after abdominal surgery. We compared intraoperative surgeon-administered TAP block (surgical TAP) to anesthesiologist-administered transcutaneous ultrasound-guided TAP block (conventional TAP) for post-cesarean analgesia. We hypothesized that surgical TAP blocks would take less time to perform than conventional TAP blocks. We performed a randomized trial, recruiting 41 women undergoing cesarean delivery under neuraxial anesthesia, assigning them to either surgical TAP block (n=20) or conventional TAP block (n=21). Time taken to perform the block was the primary outcome, while postoperative pain scores and 24-hour opioid requirements were secondary outcomes. Student's t-test was used to compare block time and Kruskal-Wallis test opioid consumption and pain-scores. Time taken to perform the block (2.4 vs 12.1 min, P consumption (P=0.17) and postoperative pain scores at 4, 8, 24 and 48 h were not significantly different between the groups. Surgical TAP blocks are feasible and less time consuming than conventional TAP blocks, while providing comparable analgesia after cesarean delivery. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. To compare the efficacy of two kinds of Zhizhu pills in the treatment of functional dyspepsia of spleen-deficiency and qi-stagnation syndrome:a randomized group sequential comparative trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) theory, functional dyspepsia (FD) can be divided into different syndromes according to different clinical symptoms and signs, and the most common one is spleen-deficiency and qi-stagnation syndrome that can be treated by Chinese traditional patent medicine ---- two kinds of Zhizhu pills, between which the primary difference in ingredients is that one contains immature orange fruit of Citrus aurantium L.(IFCA) and the other contains that of Citrus sinensis Osbeck (IFCS). The trial's objective was to compare the efficacy of two kinds of Zhizhu pills on symptom changes in patients with FD of spleen-deficiency and qi-stagnation syndrome. Methods A randomized, group sequential, double-blinded, multicenter trial was conducted in patients with FD of spleen-deficiency and qi-stagnation syndrome at 3 hospitals in Beijing between June 2003 and May 2005. Participants were randomly allocated into two groups (IFCA group and IFCS group) in a 1:1 ratio, and respectively took one of the two kinds of Zhizhu pills orally, 6 g each time, 3 times a day, for 4 weeks. Statistical analysis was performed with use of a group sequential method, the triangular test (TT). Results A total of 163 patients were randomized, and 3 patients were excluded from analysis because of early dropouts, leaving 160 patients (IFCA group: n = 82; IFCS group: n = 78) for statistical analysis. Three interim analyses were done after 62, 116, and 160 patients had completed their 4-week treatment, respectively. At the third interim analysis, the sample path crossed the upper boundary and the trial was stopped, the cure-markedly effective rates were 45% for IFCS group and 67% for IFCA group, respectively, the one-sided p-value was 0.0036, the median unbiased estimate of the odds ratio (OR) for the benefit of IFCA relative to IFCS was 2.91 with 95%CI: 1.40 to 6.06. No adverse events were observed in the two groups. Conclusions Zhizhu pills containing IFCA was superior

  6. A randomized trial comparing structured and lifestyle goals in an internet-mediated walking program for people with type 2 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Richardson, Caroline R; Mehari, Kathleen S; McIntyre, Laura G; Janney, Adrienne W; Fortlage, Laurie A; Sen, Ananda; Strecher, Victor J; Piette, John D

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background The majority of individuals with type 2 diabetes do not exercise regularly. Pedometer-based walking interventions can help; however, pedometer-based interventions targeting only total daily accumulated steps might not yield the same health benefits as physical activity programs specifying a minimum duration and intensity of physical activity bouts. Methods This pilot randomized trial compared two goal-setting strategies: 1) lifestyle goals targeting total daily accumulated...

  7. Relative Effectiveness of Letrozole Compared With Tamoxifen for Patients With Lobular Carcinoma in the BIG 1-98 Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Metzger Filho, Otto; Giobbie-Hurder, Anita; Mallon, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    assigned onto the Breast International Group (BIG) 1-98 trial and who had centrally reviewed pathology data were included (N = 2,923). HER2-negative IDC and ILC were additionally classified as hormone receptor-positive with high (luminal B [LB] -like) or low (luminal A [LA] -like) proliferative activity......PURPOSE: To evaluate the relative effectiveness of letrozole compared with tamoxifen for patients with invasive ductal or lobular carcinoma. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients diagnosed with early-stage invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) or classic invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) who were randomly...

  8. Carotid artery stenting compared with endarterectomy in patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis (International Carotid Stenting Study): an interim analysis of a randomised controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ederle, J.; Dobson, J.; Featherstone, R.L.; Bonati, L.H.; Worp, H.B. van der; Borst, G.J. de; Lo, T.H.; Gaines, P.; Dorman, P.J.; Macdonald, S.; Lyrer, P.A.; Hendriks, J.M.; McCollum, C.; Nederkoorn, P.J.; Brown, M.M.; Blankensteijn, J.D.; Leeuw, F.E. de; Schultze Kool, L.J.; Vliet, J.A. van der; et al.,

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stents are an alternative treatment to carotid endarterectomy for symptomatic carotid stenosis, but previous trials have not established equivalent safety and efficacy. We compared the safety of carotid artery stenting with that of carotid endarterectomy. METHODS: The International

  9. Carotid artery stenting compared with endarterectomy in patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis (International Carotid Stenting Study): an interim analysis of a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ederle, Jörg; Dobson, Joanna; Featherstone, Roland L.; Bonati, Leo H.; van der Worp, H. Bart; de Borst, Gert J.; Lo, T. Hauw; Gaines, Peter; Dorman, Paul J.; Macdonald, Sumaira; Lyrer, Philippe A.; Hendriks, Johanna M.; McCollum, Charles; Nederkoorn, Paul J.; Brown, Martin M.; Algra, A.; Bamford, J.; Beard, J.; Bland, M.; Bradbury, A. W.; Brown, M. M.; Clifton, A.; Gaines, P.; Collins, R.; Molyneux, A.; Naylor, R.; Warlow, C.; Ferro, J. M.; Thomas, D.; Bonati, L. H.; Coward, L.; Dobson, J.; Ederle, J.; Featherstone, R. F.; Tindall, H.; McCabe, D. J. H.; Wallis, A.; Brooks, M.; Chambers, B.; Chan, A.; Chu, P.; Clark, D.; Dewey, H.; Donnan, G.; Fell, G.; Hoare, M.; Molan, M.; Roberts, A.; Roberts, N.; Beiles, B.; Bladin, C.; Clifford, C.; Grigg, M.; New, G.; Bell, R.; Bower, S.; Chong, W.; Holt, M.; Saunder, A.; Than, P. G.; Gett, S.; Leggett, D.; McGahan, T.; Quinn, J.; Ray, M.; Wong, A.; Woodruff, P.; Foreman, R.; Schultz, D.; Scroop, R.; Stanley, B.; Allard, B.; Atkinson, N.; Cambell, W.; Davies, S.; Field, P.; Milne, P.; Mitchell, P.; Tress, B.; Yan, B.; Beasley, A.; Dunbabin, D.; Stary, D.; Walker, S.; Cras, P.; d'Archambeau, O.; Hendriks, J. M. H.; van Schil, P.; St Blasius, A. Z.; Bosiers, M.; Deloose, K.; van Buggenhout, E.; de Letter, J.; Devos, V.; Ghekiere, J.; Vanhooren, G.; Astarci, P.; Hammer, F.; Lacroix, V.; Peeters, A.; Verbist, J.; Blair, J.-F.; Caron, J. L.; Daneault, N.; Giroux, M.-F.; Guilbert, F.; Lanthier, S.; Lebrun, L.-H.; Oliva, V.; Raymond, J.; Roy, D.; Soulez, G.; Weill, A.; Hill, M.; Hu, W.; Hudion, M.; Morrish, W.; Sutherland, G.; Wong, J.; Albäck, A.; Harno, H.; Ijäs, P.; Kaste, M.; Lepäntalo, M.; Mustanoja, S.; Paananen, T.; Porras, M.; Putaala, J.; Railo, M.; Sairanen, T.; Soinne, L.; Vehmas, A.; Vikatmaa, P.; Goertler, M.; Halloul, Z.; Skalej, M.; Brennan, P.; Kelly, C.; Leahy, A.; Moroney, J.; Thornton, J.; Koelemay, M. J. W.; Reekers, J. A. A.; Roos, Y. B. W. E. M.; Hendriks, J. M.; Koudstaal, P. J.; Pattynama, P. M. T.; van der Lugt, A.; van Dijk, L. C.; van Sambeek, M. R. H. M.; van Urk, H.; Verhagen, H. J. M.; Bruijninckx, C. M. A.; de Bruijn, S. F.; Keunen, R.; Knippenberg, B.; Mosch, A.; Treurniet, F.; van Dijk, L.; van Overhagen, H.; Wever, J.; de Beer, F. C.; van den Berg, J. S. P.; van Hasselt, B. A. A. M.; Zeilstra, D. J.; Boiten, J.; van Otterloo, J. C. A. de Mol; de Vries, A. C.; Lycklama a Nijeholt, G. J.; van der Kallen, B. F. W.; Blankensteijn, J. D.; de Leeuw, F. E.; Kool, L. J. Schultze; van der Vliet, J. A.; de Borst, G. J.; de Kort, G. A. P.; Kapelle, L. J.; Lo, T. H.; Mali, W. P. Th M.; Moll, F.; van der Worp, H. B.; Verhagen, H.; Barber, P. A.; Bourchier, R.; Hill, A.; Holden, A.; Stewart, J.; Bakke, S. J.; Krohg-Sørensen, K.; Skjelland, M.; Tennøe, B.; Bialek, P.; Biejat, Z.; Czepiel, W.; Czlonkowska, A.; Dowzenko, A.; Jedrzejewska, J.; Kobayashi, A.; Lelek, M.; Polanski, J.; Kirbis, J.; Milosevic, Z.; Zvan, B.; Blasco, J.; Chamorro, A.; Macho, J.; Obach, V.; Riambau, V.; San Roman, L.; Branera, J.; Canovas, D.; Estela, Jordi; Gaibar, A. Gimenez; Perendreu, J.; Björses, K.; Gottsater, A.; Ivancev, K.; Maetzsch, T.; Sonesson, B.; Berg, B.; Delle, M.; Formgren, J.; Gillgren, P.; Kall, T.-B.; Konrad, P.; Nyman, N.; Takolander, R.; Andersson, T.; Malmstedt, J.; Soderman, M.; Wahlgren, C.; Wahlgren, N.; Binaghi, S.; Hirt, L.; Michel, P.; Ruchat, P.; Engelter, S. T.; Fluri, F.; Guerke, L.; Jacob, A. L.; Kirsch, E.; Lyrer, P. A.; Radue, E.-W.; Stierli, P.; Wasner, M.; Wetzel, S.; Bonvin, C.; Kalangos, A.; Lovblad, K.; Murith, M.; Ruefenacht, D.; Sztajzel, R.; Higgins, N.; Kirkpatrick, P. J.; Martin, P.; Varty, K.; Adam, D.; Bell, J.; Crowe, P.; Gannon, M.; Henderson, M. J.; Sandler, D.; Shinton, R. A.; Scriven, J. M.; Wilmink, T.; D'Souza, S.; Egun, A.; Guta, R.; Punekar, S.; Seriki, D. M.; Thomson, G.; Brennan, J. A.; Enevoldson, T. P.; Gilling-Smith, G.; Gould, D. A.; Harris, P. L.; McWilliams, R. G.; Nasser, H.-C.; White, R.; Prakash, K. G.; Serracino-Inglott, F.; Subramanian, G.; Symth, J. V.; Walker, M. G.; Clarke, M.; Davis, M.; Dixit, S. A.; Dorman, P.; Dyker, A.; Ford, G.; Golkar, A.; Jackson, R.; Jayakrishnan, V.; Lambert, D.; Lees, T.; Louw, S.; Macdonald, S.; Mendelow, A. D.; Rodgers, H.; Rose, J.; Stansby, G.; Wyatt, M.; Baker, T.; Baldwin, N.; Jones, L.; Mitchell, D.; Munro, E.; Thornton, M.; Baker, D.; Davis, N.; Hamilton, G.; McCabe, D.; Platts, A.; Tibballs, J.; Cleveland, T.; Dodd, D.; Lonsdale, R.; Nair, R.; Nassef, A.; Nawaz, S.; Venables, G.; Belli, A.; Cloud, G.; Halliday, A.; Markus, H.; McFarland, R.; Morgan, R.; Pereira, A.; Thompson, A.; Chataway, J.; Cheshire, N.; Gibbs, R.; Hammady, M.; Jenkins, M.; Malik, I.; Wolfe, J.; Adiseshiah, M.; Bishop, C.; Brew, S.; Brookes, J.; Jäger, R.; Kitchen, N.; Ashleigh, R.; Butterfield, S.; Gamble, G. E.; McCollum, C.; Nasim, A.; O'Neill, P.; Edwards, R. D.; Lees, K. R.; MacKay, A. J.; Moss, J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stents are an alternative treatment to carotid endarterectomy for symptomatic carotid stenosis, but previous trials have not established equivalent safety and efficacy. We compared the safety of carotid artery stenting with that of carotid endarterectomy. METHODS: The International

  10. Study protocol for a randomised controlled trial of meniscal surgery compared with exercise and patient education for treatment of meniscal tears in young adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Soren Thorgaard; Lind, Martin; Holmich, Per

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Arthroscopic surgery is a very common orthopaedic procedure. While several trials have investigated the effect of knee arthroscopy for middle-aged and older patients with meniscal tears, there is a paucity of trials comparing meniscal surgery with non-surgical treatment for younger...... adults. The aim of this randomised controlled trial (RCT) is to investigate if early arthroscopic surgery is superior to exercise therapy and education, with the option of later surgery if needed, in improving pain, function and quality of life in younger adults with meniscal tears. METHODS AND ANALYSIS......: This is a protocol for a multicentre, parallel-group RCT conducted at six hospitals across all five healthcare regions in Denmark. 140 patients aged 18-40 years with a clinical history and symptoms consistent with a meniscal tear, verified on MRI, found eligible for meniscal surgery by an orthopaedic surgeon...

  11. Heterogeneity of Clinical Trials for Antihypertensive Drugs in Japan: Exploratory Analysis of Confirmatory Phase III Trials Used for Marketing Approval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Reina; Sano, Kota; Ono, Shunsuke

    2018-07-01

    The results of pivotal trials, which provide a rationale for marketing approval decisions for new drugs, are considered for various comparative purposes in postmarketing analyses. Using meta-regression analysis of 91 randomized controlled trials of 61 approved antihypertensive drugs in Japan, we show that mean baseline blood pressure (BP) of each arm was associated with predetermined entry criteria (EC), age, and trial start year (TSY). BP changes following treatment were associated with EC, subject characteristics (e.g., age, complications, baseline BP), study design (e.g., concomitant drug use), and TSY. Effect sizes were generally larger in trials for the first and second drugs in the same class than in trials for follow-on drugs. Results of pivotal trials may vary depending on many factors, suggesting possible challenges associated with the comparison of these results indirectly. Due to the heterogeneity in pivotal trials, caution should be exercised when comparing approved drugs and conducting meta-analyses retrospectively. © 2017, The American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  12. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... small groups of people for safety and side effects. Phase II clinical trials look at how well ... confirm how well treatments work, further examine side effects, and compare new treatments with other available treatments. ...

  13. Competing events and costs of clinical trials: Analysis of a randomized trial in prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakeri, Kaveh; Rose, Brent S.; D’Amico, Anthony V.; Jeong, Jong-Hyeon; Mell, Loren K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Clinical trial costs may be reduced by identifying enriched subpopulations of patients with favorable risk profiles for the events of interest. However, increased selectivity affects accrual rates, with uncertain impact on clinical trial cost. Methods: We conducted a secondary analysis of Southwest Oncology Group (SWOG) 8794 randomized trial of adjuvant radiotherapy for high-risk prostate cancer. The primary endpoint was metastasis-free survival (MFS), defined as time to metastasis or death from any cause (competing mortality). We used competing risks regression models to identify an enriched subgroup at high risk for metastasis and low risk for competing mortality. We applied a cost model to estimate the impact of enrichment on trial cost and duration. Results: The treatment effect on metastasis was similar in the enriched subgroup (HR, 0.42; 95% CI, 0.23–0.76) compared to the whole cohort (HR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.30–0.81) while the effect on competing mortality was not significant in the subgroup or the whole cohort (HR 0.70; 95% CI 0.39–1.23, vs. HR 0.94; 95% CI, 0.68–1.31). Due to the higher incidence of metastasis relative to competing mortality in the enriched subgroup, the treatment effect on MFS was greater in the subgroup compared to the whole cohort (HR 0.55; 95% CI 0.36–0.82, vs. HR 0.77; 95% CI, 0.58–1.01). Trial cost was 75% less in the subgroup compared to the whole cohort ($1.7 million vs. $6.8 million), and the trial duration was 30% shorter (8.4 vs. 12.0 years). Conclusion: Competing event enrichment can reduce clinical trial cost and duration, without sacrificing generalizability

  14. Carotid artery stenting compared with endarterectomy in patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis (International Carotid Stenting Study) : an interim analysis of a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ederle, Joerg; Dobson, Joanna; Featherstone, Roland L.; Bonati, Leo H.; van der Worp, H. Bart; de Borst, Gert J.; Lo, T. Hauw; Gaines, Peter; Dorman, Paul J.; Macdonald, Sumaira; Lyrer, Philippe A.; Hendriks, Johanna M.; McCollum, Charles; Nederkoorn, Paul J.; Brown, Martin M.; Algra, A.; Bamford, J.; Beard, J.; Bland, M.; Bradbury, A. W.; Brown, M. M.; Clifton, A.; Gaines, P.; Hacke, W.; Halliday, A.; Malik, I.; Mas, J. L.; McGuire, A. J.; Sidhu, P.; Venables, G.; Bradbury, A.; Brown, M. M.; Clifton, A.; Gaines, P.; Collins, R.; Molynewc, A.; Naylor, R.; Warlow, C.; Ferro, J. M.; Thomas, D.; Bonati, L. H.; Coward, L.; Dobson, J.; Ederle, J.; Featherstone, R. F.; Tindall, H.; McCabe, D. J. H.; Wallis, A.; Hendriks, J. M. H.; Hendriks, J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Stents are an alternative treatment to carotid endarterectomy for symptomatic carotid stenosis, but previous trials have not established equivalent safety and efficacy. We compared the safety of carotid artery stenting with that of carotid endarterectomy. Methods The International Carotid

  15. [Meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing procedure for prolapse and hemorrhoids with Milligan-Morgan hemorrhoidectomy in the treatment of prolapsed hemorrhoids].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ping; Chen, Hongliang

    2015-12-01

    To compare the safety and efficacy of procedure for prolapse and hemorrhoids (PPH) with Milligan-Morgan hemorrhoidectomy (MMH) in the treatment of prolapsed hemorrhoids. All the randomized controlled trials (RCT) comparing PPH with MMH in the treatment of prolapsed hemorrhoids published between January 1998 and January 2015 were retrieved from PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, CBM, CNKI, Wangfang, VIP databases. Hand search was applied in Chinese Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Chinese Journal of Coloproctology and Journal of Colorectal and Anal Surgery from the library of Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine. Associated reference documents in enrolled trials were reviewed. The methodological quality of enrolled trials was evaluated according to the Cochrane handbook for systematic reviews of interventions. Meta-analysis was performed using RevMan 5.3 software. Sixteen RCTs recruiting 1411 patients were identified. Among them, 702 patients underwent PPH, and other 709 patients MMH. Meta-analysis showed that as compared to MMH, PPH had shorter operating time(WMD=-12.34, 95% CI:-17.87 to -6.80, P=0.000], shorter hospital stay (WMD=-1.48, 95% CI: -1.81 to -1.14, P=0.000) and shorter time to recover normal activity (WMD=-14.11, 95% CI: -24.51 to -3.70, P=0.008). Patients in PPH group experienced less pain at postoperative 24 h, postoperative 1 week and the first postoperative bowel movement (all P0.05). Satisfaction degree of patients in PPH group was better than that in MMH group (OR=2.36, 95% CI:1.36 to 4.07, P=0.002). Procedure for prolapse and hemorrhoids offers some short-term benefits over Milligan-Morgan hemorrhoidectomy, but is associated with a higher rate of recurrent disease.

  16. School playground surfacing and arm fractures in children: a cluster randomized trial comparing sand to wood chip surfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew W Howard

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The risk of playground injuries, especially fractures, is prevalent in children, and can result in emergency room treatment and hospital admissions. Fall height and surface area are major determinants of playground fall injury risk. The primary objective was to determine if there was a difference in playground upper extremity fracture rates in school playgrounds with wood fibre surfacing versus granite sand surfacing. Secondary objectives were to determine if there were differences in overall playground injury rates or in head injury rates in school playgrounds with wood fibre surfacing compared to school playgrounds with granite sand surfacing.The cluster randomized trial comprised 37 elementary schools in the Toronto District School Board in Toronto, Canada with a total of 15,074 students. Each school received qualified funding for installation of new playground equipment and surfacing. The risk of arm fracture from playground falls onto granitic sand versus onto engineered wood fibre surfaces was compared, with an outcome measure of estimated arm fracture rate per 100,000 student-months. Schools were randomly assigned by computer generated list to receive either a granitic sand or an engineered wood fibre playground surface (Fibar, and were not blinded. Schools were visited to ascertain details of the playground and surface actually installed and to observe the exposure to play and to periodically monitor the depth of the surfacing material. Injury data, including details of circumstance and diagnosis, were collected at each school by a prospective surveillance system with confirmation of injury details through a validated telephone interview with parents and also through collection (with consent of medical reports regarding treated injuries. All schools were recruited together at the beginning of the trial, which is now closed after 2.5 years of injury data collection. Compliant schools included 12 schools randomized to Fibar that installed

  17. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... sponsor clinical trials. Examples include Government Agencies, such as the U.S. Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs; ... age and frequency for doing screening tests, such as mammography; and compare two or more screening tests ...

  18. The Effectiveness Of Social Media (Facebook) Compared With More Traditional Advertising Methods for Recruiting Eligible Participants To Health Research Studies: A Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thow, Megan; Ferguson, Stuart G

    2016-01-01

    Background Recruiting participants for research studies can be difficult and costly. The popularity of social media platforms (eg, Facebook) has seen corresponding growth in the number of researchers turning to social networking sites and their embedded advertising frameworks to locate eligible participants for studies. Compared with traditional recruitment strategies such as print media, social media advertising has been shown to be favorable in terms of its reach (especially with hard-to-reach populations), cost effectiveness, and usability. However, to date, no studies have examined how participants recruited via social media progress through a study compared with those recruited using more traditional recruitment strategies. Objectives (1) Examine whether visiting the study website prior to being contacted by researchers creates self-screened participants who are more likely to progress through all study phases (eligible, enrolled, completed); (2) compare conversion percentages and cost effectiveness of each recruitment method at each study phase; and, (3) compare demographic and smoking characteristics of participants recruited through each strategy to determine if they attract similar samples. Methods Participants recruited to a smoking cessation clinical trial were grouped by how they had become aware of the study: via social media (Facebook) or traditional media (eg, newspaper, flyers, radio, word of mouth). Groups were compared based on throughput data (conversion percentages and cost) as well as demographic and smoking characteristics. Results Visiting the study website did not result in individuals who were more likely to be eligible for (P=.24), enroll in (P=.20), or complete (P=.25) the study. While using social media was more cost effective than traditional methods when we examined earlier endpoints of the recruitment process (cost to obtain a screened respondent: AUD $22.73 vs $29.35; cost to obtain an eligible respondent: $37.56 vs $44.77), it was

  19. Non-inferiority trials: methodological and regulatory challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wangge, G.

    2012-01-01

    A randomized clinical trial (RCT) is the gold standard to evaluate the intended effects of drugs. In such trials a drug can be compared with a placebo or with another active compound for the same indication. RCTs can be used to demonstrate that a drug is superior to placebo or an active comparator

  20. The effects of nocturnal compared with conventional hemodialysis on mineral metabolism: A randomized-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Michael; Manns, Braden J; Klarenbach, Scott; Tonelli, Marcello; Hemmelgarn, Brenda; Culleton, Bruce

    2010-04-01

    Hyperphosphatemia is common among patients receiving dialysis and is associated with increased mortality. Nocturnal hemodialysis (NHD) is a long, slow dialytic modality that may improve hyperphosphatemia and disorders of mineral metabolism. We performed a randomized-controlled trial of NHD compared with conventional hemodialysis (CvHD); in this paper, we report detailed results of mineral metabolism outcomes. Prevalent patients were randomized to receive NHD 5 to 6 nights per week for 6to 10 hours per night or to continue CvHD thrice weekly for 6 months. Oral phosphate binders and vitamin D analogs were adjusted to maintain phosphate, calcium and parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels within recommended targets. Compared with CvHD patients, patients in the NHD group had a significant decrease in serum phosphate over the course of the study (0.49 mmol/L, 95% confidence interval 0.24-0.74; P=0.002) despite a significant reduction in the use of phosphate binders. Sixty-one percent of patients in the NHD group compared with 20% in the CvHD group had a decline in intact PTH (P=0.003). Nocturnal hemodialysis lowers serum phosphate, calcium-phosphate product and requirement for phosphate binders. The effects of NHD on PTH are variable. The impact of these changes on long-term cardiovascular and bone-related outcomes requires further investigation.

  1. Split-mouth and parallel-arm trials to compare pain with intraosseous anaesthesia delivered by the computerised Quicksleeper system and conventional infiltration anaesthesia in paediatric oral healthcare: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Smail-Faugeron , Violaine; Muller-Bolla , Michèle; Sixou , Jean-Louis; Courson , Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Local anaesthesia is commonly used in paediatric oral healthcare. Infiltration anaesthesia is the most frequently used, but recent developments in anaesthesia techniques have introduced an alternative: intraosseous anaesthesia. We propose to perform a split-mouth and parallel-arm multicentre randomised controlled trial (RCT) comparing the pain caused by the insertion of the needle for the injection of conventional infiltration anaesthesia, and intraosseous anaesthesia by the comp...

  2. A Randomized Controlled Trial for Children with Childhood Apraxia of Speech Comparing Rapid Syllable Transition Treatment and the Nuffield Dyspraxia Programme-Third Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Elizabeth; McCabe, Patricia; Ballard, Kirrie J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This randomized controlled trial compared the experimental Rapid Syllable Transition (ReST) treatment to the Nuffield Dyspraxia Programme-Third Edition (NDP3; Williams & Stephens, 2004), used widely in clinical practice in Australia and the United Kingdom. Both programs aim to improve speech motor planning/programming for children…

  3. A combination of subcuticular suture and sterile Micropore tape compared with conventional interrupted sutures for skin closure. A controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taube, M.; Porter, R. J.; Lord, P. H.

    1983-01-01

    We have conducted a controlled trial to compare skin closure using conventional interrupted sutures with a combination of subcuticular suture and sterile Micropore tape in 169 patients undergoing appendicectomy, inguinal herniorrhaphy, or saphenofemoral ligation. We have found that the combination technique consistently gives a better cosmetic result and that the tape acts well as a dressing, is convenient, and is well tolerated by patients. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:6344732

  4. Maternal Efficacy and Safety Outcomes in a Randomized, Controlled Trial Comparing Insulin Detemir With NPH Insulin in 310 Pregnant Women With Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Elisabeth R; Hod, Moshe; Ivanisevic, Marina

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This randomized, controlled noninferiority trial aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of insulin detemir (IDet) versus neutral protamine Hagedorn (NPH) (both with prandial insulin aspart) in pregnant women with type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Patients were randomized an...

  5. Economic analysis comparing induction of labor and expectant management in women with preterm prelabor rupture of membranes between 34 and 37 weeks (PPROMEXIL trial)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vijgen, S.M.; Ham, D.P. van der; Bijlenga, D.; Beek, J.J. van; Bloemenkamp, K.W.; Kwee, A.; Groenewout, M.; Kars, M.M.; Kuppens, S.; Mantel, G.; Molkenboer, J.F.; Mulder, A.L.; Nijhuis, J.G.; Pernet, P.J.; Porath, M.; Woiski, M.D.; Weinans, M.J.; Wijngaarden, W.J. van; Wildschut, H.I.J.; Akerboom, B.; Sikkema, J.M.; Willekes, C.; Mol, B.W.; Opmeer, B.C.; et al.,

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the costs of induction of labor and expectant management in women with preterm prelabor rupture of membranes (PPROM). DESIGN: Economic analysis based on a randomized clinical trial. SETTING: Obstetric departments of eight academic and 52 non-academic hospitals in the

  6. Economic Analysis of Kiva VCF Treatment System Compared to Balloon Kyphoplasty Using Randomized Kiva Safety and Effectiveness Trial (KAST) Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, Douglas P; Olan, Wayne J; Kakad, Priyanka; Li, Qianyi; Hornberger, John

    2015-01-01

    Vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) are the most common osteoporotic fractures and cause persistent pain, kyphotic deformity, weight loss, depression, reduced quality of life, and even death. Current surgical approaches for the treatment of VCF include vertebroplasty (VP) and balloon kyphoplasty (BK). The Kiva® VCF Treatment System (Kiva System) is a next-generation alternative surgical intervention in which a percutaneously introduced nitinol Osteo Coil guidewire is advanced through a deployment cannula and subsequently a PEEK Implant is implanted incrementally and fully coiled in the vertebral body. The Kiva System's effectiveness for the treatment of VCF has been evaluated in a large randomized controlled trial, the Kiva Safety and Effectiveness Trial (KAST). The Kiva System was non-inferior to BK with respect to pain reduction (70.8% vs. 71.8% in Visual Analogue Scale) and physical function restoration (38.1 % vs. 42.2% reduction in Oswestry Disability Index) while using less bone cement. The economic impact of the Kiva system has yet to be analyzed. To analyze hospital resource use and costs of the Kiva System over 2 years for the treatment of VCF compared to BK. A representative US hospital. Economic analysis of the KAST randomized trial, focusing on hospital resource use and costs. The analysis was conducted from a hospital perspective and utilized clinical data from KAST as well as unit-cost data from the published literature. The cost of initial VCF surgery, reoperation cost, device market cost, and other medical costs were compared between the Kiva System and BK. The relative risk reduction rate in adjacent-level fracture with Kiva [31.6% (95% CI: -22.5%, 61.9%)] demonstrated in KAST was used in this analysis. With 304 vertebral augmentation procedures performed in a representative U.S. hospital over 2 years, the Kiva System will produce a direct medical cost savings of $1,118 per patient and $280,876 per hospital. This cost saving with the Kiva

  7. Sample size requirements for separating out the effects of combination treatments: randomised controlled trials of combination therapy vs. standard treatment compared to factorial designs for patients with tuberculous meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolbers, Marcel; Heemskerk, Dorothee; Chau, Tran Thi Hong; Yen, Nguyen Thi Bich; Caws, Maxine; Farrar, Jeremy; Day, Jeremy

    2011-02-02

    In certain diseases clinical experts may judge that the intervention with the best prospects is the addition of two treatments to the standard of care. This can either be tested with a simple randomized trial of combination versus standard treatment or with a 2 x 2 factorial design. We compared the two approaches using the design of a new trial in tuberculous meningitis as an example. In that trial the combination of 2 drugs added to standard treatment is assumed to reduce the hazard of death by 30% and the sample size of the combination trial to achieve 80% power is 750 patients. We calculated the power of corresponding factorial designs with one- to sixteen-fold the sample size of the combination trial depending on the contribution of each individual drug to the combination treatment effect and the strength of an interaction between the two. In the absence of an interaction, an eight-fold increase in sample size for the factorial design as compared to the combination trial is required to get 80% power to jointly detect effects of both drugs if the contribution of the less potent treatment to the total effect is at least 35%. An eight-fold sample size increase also provides a power of 76% to detect a qualitative interaction at the one-sided 10% significance level if the individual effects of both drugs are equal. Factorial designs with a lower sample size have a high chance to be underpowered, to show significance of only one drug even if both are equally effective, and to miss important interactions. Pragmatic combination trials of multiple interventions versus standard therapy are valuable in diseases with a limited patient pool if all interventions test the same treatment concept, it is considered likely that either both or none of the individual interventions are effective, and only moderate drug interactions are suspected. An adequately powered 2 x 2 factorial design to detect effects of individual drugs would require at least 8-fold the sample size of the

  8. A clinical trial comparing Lanconone® with ibuprofen for rapid relief in acute joint pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girandola, Robert N; Srivastava, Shalini; Loullis, Costas C

    2016-04-06

    To study the effect of Lanconone® (1000 mg) on acute pain on exertion as compared to the standard of care, Ibuprofen (400 mg). The study recruited 72 subjects diagnosed with mild to moderate knee joint pain on exertion. Subjects with Pain Visual Analogue Scale of more than 40 mm were included. Uphill walking was provided as the stressor using Naughton's protocol on a treadmill. The subjects walked for 10 minutes continuously followed by a rest period and baseline pain score for index knee joint was recorded. Subjects were administered a single dose of Lanconone® (1000 mg)/Ibuprofen (400 mg). Thereafter the same stressor was provided at 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6 hours, subsequently, pain scores were recorded on a visual analogue scale. Double stopwatch method was used to evaluate the onset of pain relief and time taken to meaningful pain relief. Both Lanconone® and Ibuprofen showed the first perceived pain relief at 65.31 ± 35.57 mins as compared to 60.82 ± 32.56 mins respectively. The mean time taken to experience meaningful pain relief in Lanconone® group was 196.59 ± 70.85 mins compared to 167.13 ± 71.41 mins amongst Ibuprofen group. The meaningful pain relief continued for 6 hours. The current study successfully demonstrated rapid pain-relieving potential of Lanconone® which was comparable to Ibuprofen. No adverse event related to the interventions was reported in the study. Clinical trials.gov NCT02417506 . 21 January 2015.

  9. Protocol of the Australasian Malignant Pleural Effusion (AMPLE) trial: a multicentre randomised study comparing indwelling pleural catheter versus talc pleurodesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fysh, Edward T H; Thomas, Rajesh; Read, Catherine A; Lam, Ben C H; Yap, Elaine; Horwood, Fiona C; Lee, Pyng; Piccolo, Francesco; Shrestha, Ranjan; Garske, Luke A; Lam, David C L; Rosenstengel, Andrew; Bint, Michael; Murray, Kevin; Smith, Nicola A; Lee, Y C Gary

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Malignant pleural effusion can complicate most cancers. It causes breathlessness and requires hospitalisation for invasive pleural drainages. Malignant effusions often herald advanced cancers and limited prognosis. Minimising time spent in hospital is of high priority to patients and their families. Various treatment strategies exist for the management of malignant effusions, though there is no consensus governing the best choice. Talc pleurodesis is the conventional management but requires hospitalisation (and substantial healthcare resources), can cause significant side effects, and has a suboptimal success rate. Indwelling pleural catheters (IPCs) allow ambulatory fluid drainage without hospitalisation, and are increasingly employed for management of malignant effusions. Previous studies have only investigated the length of hospital care immediately related to IPC insertion. Whether IPC management reduces time spent in hospital in the patients’ remaining lifespan is unknown. A strategy of malignant effusion management that reduces hospital admission days will allow patients to spend more time outside hospital, reduce costs and save healthcare resources. Methods and analysis The Australasian Malignant Pleural Effusion (AMPLE) trial is a multicentred, randomised trial designed to compare IPC with talc pleurodesis for the management of malignant pleural effusion. This study will randomise 146 adults with malignant pleural effusions (1:1) to IPC management or talc slurry pleurodesis. The primary end point is the total number of days spent in hospital (for any admissions) from treatment procedure to death or end of study follow-up. Secondary end points include hospital days specific to pleural effusion management, adverse events, self-reported symptom and quality-of-life scores. Ethics and dissemination The Sir Charles Gairdner Group Human Research Ethics Committee has approved the study as have the ethics boards of all the participating hospitals. The

  10. Complications and Adverse Events of a Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing 3 Graft Types for ACL Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohtadi, Nicholas; Barber, Rhamona; Chan, Denise; Paolucci, Elizabeth Oddone

    2016-05-01

    ). This article reports on the complications/adverse events that were prospectively identified up to 2 years postoperatively, in a defined patient population participating in a large double-blind randomized clinical trial comparing PT, single-bundle hamstring, and DB hamstring reconstructions for ACL rupture.

  11. Comparing Once- versus Twice-Weekly Yoga Classes for Chronic Low Back Pain in Predominantly Low Income Minorities: A Randomized Dosing Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert B. Saper

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Previous studies have demonstrated that once-weekly yoga classes are effective for chronic low back pain (cLBP in white adults with high socioeconomic status. The comparative effectiveness of twice-weekly classes and generalizability to racially diverse low income populations are unknown. Methods. We conducted a 12-week randomized, parallel-group, dosing trial for 95 adults recruited from an urban safety-net hospital and five community health centers comparing once-weekly (n=49 versus twice-weekly (n=46 standardized yoga classes supplemented by home practice. Primary outcomes were change from baseline to 12 weeks in pain (11-point scale and back-related function (23-point modified Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire. Results. 82% of participants were nonwhite; 77% had annual household incomes <$40,000. The sample’s baseline mean pain intensity [6.9 (SD 1.6] and function [13.7 (SD 5.0] reflected moderate to severe back pain and impairment. Pain and back-related function improved within both groups (P<0.001. However, there were no differences between once-weekly and twice-weekly groups for pain reduction [-2.1 (95% CI -2.9, -1.3 versus −2.4 (95% CI -3.1, -1.8, P=0.62] or back-related function [-5.1 (95% CI -7.0, -3.2 versus −4.9 (95% CI -6.5, -3.3, P=0.83]. Conclusions. Twelve weeks of once-weekly or twice-weekly yoga classes were similarly effective for predominantly low income minority adults with moderate to severe chronic low back pain. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01761617.

  12. A network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials for comparing the effectiveness and safety profile of treatments with marketing authorization for relapsing multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjigeorgiou, G M; Doxani, C; Miligkos, M; Ziakas, P; Bakalos, G; Papadimitriou, D; Mprotsis, T; Grigoriadis, N; Zintzaras, E

    2013-12-01

    The relative effectiveness and safety profile of the treatments with marketing authorization for relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS) are not well known because randomized controlled trials with head-to-head comparisons between these treatments do not exist. Thus, a network of multiple-treatments meta-analysis was performed using four clinical outcomes: 'patients free of relapse', 'patients without disease progression', 'patients without MRI progression' and 'patients with adverse events'. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on MS were systematically searched in PubMed and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trial. The network analysis performed pairwise comparisons between the marketed treatments (Betaferon 250mcg, Avonex 30mcg, Rebif 44mcg, Rebif 22mcg, Aubagio 7 mg, Aubagio 14 mg, Copaxone 20 mg, Tysabri 300 mg, Gilenya 0·5 mg and Novantrone 12 mg/m(2)) using direct and indirect analyses. The analysis included 48 articles, involving 20 455 patients with MS. The direct analysis showed better response for more than one outcome for Gilenya compared with Avonex ('patients free of relapse' and 'patients without MRI progression') and for Betaferon compared with Avonex ('patients without disease progression' and 'patients without MRI progression'). The indirect analysis indicated that Tysabri may have better relative effectiveness compared with the other treatments for two outcomes: 'patients free of relapse' and 'patients without MRI progression'. Regarding 'patients with adverse events', no data were available for all comparisons to make fair inferences. This was an attempt, for the first time, to compare the efficacy and safety profile of existing approved treatments for relapsing MS. Although some treatments have shown better response, the results of the network analysis should be interpreted with caution because of the lack of RCTs with head-to-head comparisons between treatments. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Internet trials: participant experiences and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Erin; Barratt, Alexandra; Carter, Stacy M; Jamtvedt, Gro

    2012-10-23

    Use of the Internet to conduct randomised controlled trials is increasing, and provides potential to increase equity of access to medical research, increase the generalisability of trial results and decrease the costs involved in conducting large scale trials. Several studies have compared response rates, completeness of data, and reliability of surveys using the Internet and traditional methods, but very little is known about participants' attitudes towards Internet-based randomised trials or their experience of participating in an Internet-based trial. To obtain insights into the experiences and perspectives of participants in an Internet-based randomised controlled trial, their attitudes to the use of the Internet to conduct medical research, and their intentions regarding future participation in Internet research. All English speaking participants in a recently completed Internet randomised controlled trial were invited to participate in an online survey. 1246 invitations were emailed. 416 participants completed the survey between May and October 2009 (33% response rate). Reasons given for participating in the Internet RCT fell into 4 main areas: personal interest in the research question and outcome, ease of participation, an appreciation of the importance of research and altruistic reasons. Participants' comments and reflections on their experience of participating in a fully online trial were positive and less than half of participants would have participated in the trial had it been conducted using other means of data collection. However participants identified trade-offs between the benefits and downsides of participating in Internet-based trials. The main trade-off was between flexibility and convenience - a perceived benefit - and a lack connectedness and understanding - a perceived disadvantage. The other tradeoffs were in the areas of: ease or difficulty in use of the Internet; security, privacy and confidentiality issues; perceived benefits and

  14. Economic analysis comparing induction of labor and expectant management in women with preterm prelabor rupture of membranes between 34 and 37 weeks (PPROMEXIL trial)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vijgen, Sylvia M. C.; Van der Ham, David P.; Bijlenga, Denise; Van Beek, Johannes J.; Bloemenkamp, Kitty W. M.; Kwee, Anneke; Groenewout, Mariet; Kars, Michael M.; Kuppens, Simone; Mantel, Gerald; Molkenboer, Jan F. M.; Mulder, Antonius L. M.; Nijhuis, Jan G.; Pernet, Paula J. M.; Porath, Martina; Woiski, Mallory D.; Weinans, Martin J. N.; Van Wijngaarden, Wim J.; Wildschut, Hajo I. J.; Akerboom, Bertina; Sikkema, J. Marko; Willekes, Christine; Mol, Ben W. J.; Opmeer, Brent C.

    ObjectiveTo compare the costs of induction of labor and expectant management in women with preterm prelabor rupture of membranes (PPROM). DesignEconomic analysis based on a randomized clinical trial. SettingObstetric departments of eight academic and 52 non-academic hospitals in the Netherlands.

  15. Economic analysis comparing induction of labor and expectant management in women with preterm prelabor rupture of membranes between 34 and 37 weeks (PPROMEXIL trial)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vijgen, Sylvia M. C.; van der Ham, David P.; Bijlenga, Denise; van Beek, Johannes J.; Bloemenkamp, Kitty W. M.; Kwee, Anneke; Groenewout, Mariët; Kars, Michael M.; Kuppens, Simone; Mantel, Gerald; Molkenboer, Jan F. M.; Mulder, Antonius L. M.; Nijhuis, Jan G.; Pernet, Paula J. M.; Porath, Martina; Woiski, Mallory D.; Weinans, Martin J. N.; van Wijngaarden, Wim J.; Wildschut, Hajo I. J.; Akerboom, Bertina; Sikkema, J. Marko; Willekes, Christine; Mol, Ben W. J.; Opmeer, Brent C.

    2014-01-01

    To compare the costs of induction of labor and expectant management in women with preterm prelabor rupture of membranes (PPROM). Economic analysis based on a randomized clinical trial. Obstetric departments of eight academic and 52 non-academic hospitals in the Netherlands. Women with PPROM near

  16. A scientific nutrition strategy improves time trial performance by ≈6% when compared with a self-chosen nutrition strategy in trained cyclists: a randomized cross-over study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hottenrott, Kuno; Hass, Erik; Kraus, Manon; Neumann, Georg; Steiner, Martin; Knechtle, Beat

    2012-08-01

    We investigated whether an athlete's self-chosen nutrition strategy (A), compared with a scientifically determined one (S), led to an improved endurance performance in a laboratory time trial after an endurance exercise. S consisted of about 1000 mL·h(-1) fluid, in portions of 250 mL every 15 min, 0.5 g sodium·L(-1), 60 g glucose·h(-1), 30 g fructose·h(-1), and 5 mg caffeine·kg body mass(-1). Eighteen endurance-trained cyclists (16 male; 2 female) were tested using a randomized crossover-design at intervals of 2 weeks, following either A or S. After a warm-up, a maximal oxygen uptake test was performed. Following a 30-min break, a 2.5-h endurance exercise on a bicycle ergometer was carried out at 70% maximal oxygen uptake. After 5 min of rest, a time trial of 64.37 km (40 miles) was completed. The ingested nutrition was recorded every 15 min. In S, the athletes completed the time trial faster (128 vs. 136 min; p ≤ 0.001) and with a significantly higher power output (212 vs. 184 W; p ≤ 0.001). The intake of fluid, energy (carbohydrate-, mono-, and disaccharide), and sodium was significantly higher in S compared with A (p ≤ 0.001) during the endurance exercise. In the time trial, only sodium intake was significantly higher in S (p ≤ 0.001). We concluded that a time trial performance after a 2.5-h endurance exercise in a laboratory setting was significantly improved following a scientific nutrition strategy.

  17. Biopharmaceutical industry-sponsored global clinical trials in emerging countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarenga, Lenio Souza; Martins, Elisabeth Nogueira

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate biopharmaceutical industry-sponsored clinical trials placed in countries previously described as emerging regions for clinical research, and potential differences for those placed in Brazil. Data regarding recruitment of subjects for clinical trials were retrieved from www.clinicaltrials.gov on February 2nd 2009. Proportions of sites in each country were compared among emerging countries. Multiple logistic regressions were performed to evaluate whether trial placement in Brazil could be predicted by trial location in other countries and/or by trial features. A total of 8,501 trials were then active and 1,170 (13.8%) included sites in emerging countries (i.e., Argentina, Brazil, China, Czech Republic, Hungary, India, Mexico, Poland, Russia, South Korea, and South Africa). South Korea and China presented a significantly higher proportion of sites when compared to other countries (pattractiveness for biopharmaceutical industry-sponsored clinical trials.

  18. Protocol for the PINCER trial: a cluster randomised trial comparing the effectiveness of a pharmacist-led IT-based intervention with simple feedback in reducing rates of clinically important errors in medicines management in general practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray Scott A

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medication errors are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in primary care. The aims of this study are to determine the effectiveness, cost effectiveness and acceptability of a pharmacist-led information-technology-based complex intervention compared with simple feedback in reducing proportions of patients at risk from potentially hazardous prescribing and medicines management in general (family practice. Methods Research subject group: "At-risk" patients registered with computerised general practices in two geographical regions in England. Design: Parallel group pragmatic cluster randomised trial. Interventions: Practices will be randomised to either: (i Computer-generated feedback; or (ii Pharmacist-led intervention comprising of computer-generated feedback, educational outreach and dedicated support. Primary outcome measures: The proportion of patients in each practice at six and 12 months post intervention: - with a computer-recorded history of peptic ulcer being prescribed non-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs - with a computer-recorded diagnosis of asthma being prescribed beta-blockers - aged 75 years and older receiving long-term prescriptions for angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or loop diuretics without a recorded assessment of renal function and electrolytes in the preceding 15 months. Secondary outcome measures; These relate to a number of other examples of potentially hazardous prescribing and medicines management. Economic analysis: An economic evaluation will be done of the cost per error avoided, from the perspective of the UK National Health Service (NHS, comparing the pharmacist-led intervention with simple feedback. Qualitative analysis: A qualitative study will be conducted to explore the views and experiences of health care professionals and NHS managers concerning the interventions, and investigate possible reasons why the interventions prove effective, or conversely prove

  19. Design of Lamifuse: a randomised, multi-centre controlled trial comparing laminectomy without or with dorsal fusion for cervical myeloradiculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grotenhuis J André

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background laminectomy is a valuable surgical treatment for some patients with a cervical radiculomyelopathy due to cervical spinal stenosis. More recently attention has been given to motion of the spinal cord over spondylotic spurs as a cause of myelopathic changes. Immobilisation by fusion could have a positive effect on the recovery of myelopathic signs or changes. This has never been investigated in a prospective, randomised trial. Lamifuse is an acronyme for laminectomy and fusion. Methods/Design Lamifuse is a multicentre, randomised controlled trial comparing laminectomy with and without fusion in patients with a symptomatic cervical canal stenosis. The study population will be enrolled from patients that are 60 years or older with myelopathic signs and/or symptoms due to a cervical canal stenosis. A kyphotis shape of the cervical spine is an exclusion criterium. Each treatment arm needs 30 patients. Discussion This study will contribute to the discussion whether additional fusion after a cervical laminectomy results in a better clinical outcome. ISRCT number ISRCTN72800446

  20. Statistical analysis plan for the family-led rehabilitation after stroke in India (ATTEND) trial: A multicenter randomized controlled trial of a new model of stroke rehabilitation compared to usual care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billot, Laurent; Lindley, Richard I; Harvey, Lisa A; Maulik, Pallab K; Hackett, Maree L; Murthy, Gudlavalleti Vs; Anderson, Craig S; Shamanna, Bindiganavale R; Jan, Stephen; Walker, Marion; Forster, Anne; Langhorne, Peter; Verma, Shweta J; Felix, Cynthia; Alim, Mohammed; Gandhi, Dorcas Bc; Pandian, Jeyaraj Durai

    2017-02-01

    Background In low- and middle-income countries, few patients receive organized rehabilitation after stroke, yet the burden of chronic diseases such as stroke is increasing in these countries. Affordable models of effective rehabilitation could have a major impact. The ATTEND trial is evaluating a family-led caregiver delivered rehabilitation program after stroke. Objective To publish the detailed statistical analysis plan for the ATTEND trial prior to trial unblinding. Methods Based upon the published registration and protocol, the blinded steering committee and management team, led by the trial statistician, have developed a statistical analysis plan. The plan has been informed by the chosen outcome measures, the data collection forms and knowledge of key baseline data. Results The resulting statistical analysis plan is consistent with best practice and will allow open and transparent reporting. Conclusions Publication of the trial statistical analysis plan reduces potential bias in trial reporting, and clearly outlines pre-specified analyses. Clinical Trial Registrations India CTRI/2013/04/003557; Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN1261000078752; Universal Trial Number U1111-1138-6707.

  1. Cholgate - a randomized controlled trial comparing the effect of automated and on-demand decision support on the management of cardiovascular disease factors in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.T. van Wyk (Jacobus); M.A.M. van Wijk (Marc); P.W. Moorman (Peter); M. Mosseveld (Mees); J. van der Lei (Johan)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractAutomated and on-demand decision support systems integrated into an electronic medical record have proven to be an effective implementation strategy for guidelines. Cholgate is a randomized controlled trial comparing the effect of automated and on-demand decision

  2. Sample size requirements for separating out the effects of combination treatments: Randomised controlled trials of combination therapy vs. standard treatment compared to factorial designs for patients with tuberculous meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farrar Jeremy

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In certain diseases clinical experts may judge that the intervention with the best prospects is the addition of two treatments to the standard of care. This can either be tested with a simple randomized trial of combination versus standard treatment or with a 2 × 2 factorial design. Methods We compared the two approaches using the design of a new trial in tuberculous meningitis as an example. In that trial the combination of 2 drugs added to standard treatment is assumed to reduce the hazard of death by 30% and the sample size of the combination trial to achieve 80% power is 750 patients. We calculated the power of corresponding factorial designs with one- to sixteen-fold the sample size of the combination trial depending on the contribution of each individual drug to the combination treatment effect and the strength of an interaction between the two. Results In the absence of an interaction, an eight-fold increase in sample size for the factorial design as compared to the combination trial is required to get 80% power to jointly detect effects of both drugs if the contribution of the less potent treatment to the total effect is at least 35%. An eight-fold sample size increase also provides a power of 76% to detect a qualitative interaction at the one-sided 10% significance level if the individual effects of both drugs are equal. Factorial designs with a lower sample size have a high chance to be underpowered, to show significance of only one drug even if both are equally effective, and to miss important interactions. Conclusions Pragmatic combination trials of multiple interventions versus standard therapy are valuable in diseases with a limited patient pool if all interventions test the same treatment concept, it is considered likely that either both or none of the individual interventions are effective, and only moderate drug interactions are suspected. An adequately powered 2 × 2 factorial design to detect effects of

  3. Comparing the analgesic effect of heat patch containing iron chip and ibuprofen for primary dysmenorrhea: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navvabi Rigi Shahindokht

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary dysmenorrhea is a common and sometimes disabling condition. In recent years, some studies aimed to improve the treatment of dysmenorrhea, and therefore, introduced several therapeutic measures. This study was designed to compare the analgesic effect of iron chip containing heat wrap with ibuprofen for the treatment of primary dysmenorrhea. Methods In this randomized (IRCT201107187038N2 controlled trial, 147 students (18–30 years old with the diagnosis of primary dysmenorrhea were enrolled considering the CONSORT guideline. Screening for primary dysmenorrhea was done by a two-question screening tool. The participants were randomly assigned into one of the intervention groups (heat Patch and ibuprofen. Data regarding the severity and emotional impact of the pain were recorded by a shortened version of McGill Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ. Student's t test was used for statistical analysis. Results The maximum and minimum pain severities were observed at 2 and 24 hours in both groups. The severity of sensual pain at 8, 12, and 24 hours was non-significantly less in the heat Patch group. There was also no significant difference between the groups regarding the emotional impact of pain at the first 2, 4, 8, 12 and 12 hours of menstruation. Conclusions Heat patch containing Iron chip has comparable analgesic effects to ibuprofen and can possibly be used for primary dysmenorrhea. Trial registration IRCT201107187038N2

  4. Born not breathing: A randomised trial comparing two self-inflating bag-masks during newborn resuscitation in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thallinger, Monica; Ersdal, Hege Langli; Francis, Fortunata; Yeconia, Anita; Mduma, Estomih; Kidanto, Hussein; Linde, Jørgen Erland; Eilevstjønn, Joar; Gunnes, Nina; Størdal, Ketil

    2017-07-01

    Effective ventilation is crucial to save non-breathing newborns. We compared standard equipment for newborn resuscitation to a new Upright bag, in an area with high neonatal mortality. Newborns requiring resuscitation at Haydom Lutheran Hospital, Tanzania, were ventilated with 230ml standard or 320ml Upright bag-mask by weekly non-blinded block randomisation. A Laerdal Newborn Resuscitation Monitor collected ventilation data through a flow sensor between mask and bag and heart rate with electrocardiography electrodes. Primary outcome was expiratory tidal volume per birth weight. Of 6110 babies born, 136 randomised to standard bag-mask and 192 to Upright, both groups had similar birth weight, gestational age, Apgar scores, gender, and mode of delivery. Compared to standard bag-mask, Upright gave higher median expiratory tidal volume (8.6ml/kg (IQR: 3.5-13.8) vs. 10.0ml/kg (IQR: 4.3-16.8) difference ratio 1.29, 95%CI 1.05, 1.58, p=0.014)), increased mean airway and peak inspiratory pressures, and higher early expired CO 2 (median at 20s 4.2% vs. 3.2%, p=0.0099). Clinical outcome 30min post-delivery was normal in 44% with standard versus 57% with Upright (p=0.016), but similar at 24h. Upright provided higher expired tidal volume, MAP, PIP and early ECO 2 than the standard bag. Clinical outcome differed at 30min, but not at 24h. Larger volume of Upright than standard bag can be an important factor. The results are relevant for low- and high-income settings as ventilatory and heart rate parameters during resuscitation of newborns are rarely reported. Trial registered at www.ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01869582. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. No sustained attention differences in a longitudinal randomized trial comparing mindfulness based stress reduction versus active control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donal G MacCoon

    Full Text Available Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR is a secular form of meditation training. The vast majority of the extant literature investigating the health effects of mindfulness interventions relies on wait-list control comparisons. Previous studies have found that meditation training over several months is associated with improvements in cognitive control and attention.We used a visual continuous performance task (CPT to test the effects of eight weeks of mindfulness training on sustained attention by comparing MBSR to the Health Enhancement Program (HEP, a structurally equivalent, active control condition in a randomized, longitudinal design (ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01301105 focusing on a non-clinical population typical of MBSR participants. Researchers were blind to group assignment. 63 community participants were randomized to either MBSR (n = 31 or HEP (n = 32. CPT analyses were conducted on 29 MBSR participants and 25 HEP participants. We predicted that MBSR would improve visual discrimination ability and sustained attention over time on the CPT compared to HEP, with more home practice associated with greater improvements. Our hypotheses were not confirmed but we did find some evidence for improved visual discrimination similar to effects in partial replication of other research. Our study had sufficient power to demonstrate that intervention groups do not differ in their improvement over time in sustained attention performance. One of our primary predictions concerning the effects of intervention on attentional fatigue was significant but not interpretable.Attentional sensitivity is not affected by mindfulness practice as taught in MBSR, but it is unclear whether mindfulness might positively affect another aspect of attention, vigilance. These results also highlight the relevant procedural modifications required by future research to correctly investigate the role of sustained attention in similar samples.ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT

  6. CYberinfrastructure for COmparative effectiveness REsearch (CYCORE): improving data from cancer clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Kevin; Wolszon, Laura; Basen-Engquist, Karen M; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Prokhorov, Alex V; Barrera, Stephanie; Baru, Chaitan; Farcas, Emilia; Krueger, Ingolf; Palmer, Doug; Raab, Fred; Rios, Phil; Ziftci, Celal; Peterson, Susan

    2011-03-01

    Improved approaches and methodologies are needed to conduct comparative effectiveness research (CER) in oncology. While cancer therapies continue to emerge at a rapid pace, the review, synthesis, and dissemination of evidence-based interventions across clinical trials lag in comparison. Rigorous and systematic testing of competing therapies has been clouded by age-old problems: poor patient adherence, inability to objectively measure the environmental influences on health, lack of knowledge about patients' lifestyle behaviors that may affect cancer's progression and recurrence, and limited ability to compile and interpret the wide range of variables that must be considered in the cancer treatment. This lack of data integration limits the potential for patients and clinicians to engage in fully informed decision-making regarding cancer prevention, treatment, and survivorship care, and the translation of research results into mainstream medical care. Particularly important, as noted in a 2009 report on CER to the President and Congress, the limited focus on health behavior-change interventions was a major hindrance in this research landscape (DHHS 2009). This paper describes an initiative to improve CER for cancer by addressing several of these limitations. The Cyberinfrastructure for Comparative Effectiveness Research (CYCORE) project, informed by the National Science Foundation's 2007 report "Cyberinfrastructure Vision for 21(st) Century Discovery" has, as its central aim, the creation of a prototype for a user-friendly, open-source cyberinfrastructure (CI) that supports acquisition, storage, visualization, analysis, and sharing of data important for cancer-related CER. Although still under development, the process of gathering requirements for CYCORE has revealed new ways in which CI design can significantly improve the collection and analysis of a wide variety of data types, and has resulted in new and important partnerships among cancer researchers engaged in

  7. A comparative trial of psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy for "pure" dysthymic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowitz, John C; Kocsis, James H; Bleiberg, Kathryn L; Christos, Paul J; Sacks, Michael

    2005-12-01

    Psychotherapy of "pure" dysthymic disorder remains understudied. This article reports outcomes of an acute randomized trial of 94 subjects treated for 16 weeks with either interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT), brief supportive psychotherapy (BSP), sertraline, or sertraline plus IPT. Recruited by clinical referral and advertising, subjects met DSM-IV criteria for early onset dysthymic disorder, with no episode of major depression in the prior six months. They were randomly assigned to one of four 16-week treatments, with options for crossover or continuation treatment. Results were analyzed from the intention-to-treat sample by ANCOVA, controlling for baseline depressive severity. Subjects improved in all conditions over time, with the cells including sertraline pharmacotherapy showing superiority over psychotherapy alone for response and remission. Response rates were 58% for sertraline alone, 57% for combined treatment, 35% for IPT, and 31% for BSP. The study was underpowered and may have employed too "active" a control condition. Follow-up data were unobtainable. In this acute trial for "pure" dysthymic disorder, sertraline with or without IPT showed advantages relative to IPT and BSP. Methodological difficulties may have limited differential outcome findings. This study bolsters a small but growing literature on the treatment of dysthymic disorder, suggesting that pharmacotherapy may acutely benefit patients more than psychotherapy.

  8. Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Open Versus Laparoscopic Placement of a Peritoneal Dialysis Catheter and Outcomes: The CAPD I Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Laanen, Jorinde H H; Cornelis, Tom; Mees, Barend M; Litjens, Elisabeth J; van Loon, Magda M; Tordoir, Jan H M; Peppelenbosch, Arnoud G

    2018-01-01

    had a paramedian wound infection. In the laparoscopic group, 1 patient had a transient cardiac event, 1 patient had intraabdominal bleeding requiring reoperation, and 1 patient had fluid leakage that could be managed conservatively. The survival curve demonstrated a good long-term function of PD. This randomized controlled trial (RCT) comparing open vs laparoscopic placement of PD catheters demonstrates equal clinical success rates between the 2 techniques. Advanced laparoscopic techniques such as catheter fixation techniques and omentopexy might further improve clinical outcome. Copyright © 2018 International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis.

  9. End-tidal control vs. manually controlled minimal-flow anesthesia: a prospective comparative trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetz, A J; Mueller, M M; Walliser, K; Foest, C; Wand, S; Brandes, I F; Waeschle, R M; Bauer, M

    2017-11-01

    To ensure safe general anesthesia, manually controlled anesthesia requires constant monitoring and numerous manual adjustments of the gas dosage, especially for low- and minimal-flow anesthesia. Oxygen flow-rate and administration of volatile anesthetics can also be controlled automatically by anesthesia machines using the end-tidal control technique, which ensures constant end-tidal concentrations of oxygen and anesthetic gas via feedback and continuous adjustment mechanisms. We investigated the hypothesis that end-tidal control is superior to manually controlled minimal-flow anesthesia (0.5 l/min). In this prospective trial, we included 64 patients undergoing elective surgery under general anesthesia. We analyzed the precision of maintenance of the sevoflurane concentration (1.2-1.4%) and expiratory oxygen (35-40%) and the number of necessary adjustments. Target-concentrations of sevoflurane and oxygen were maintained at more stable levels with the use of end-tidal control (during the first 15 min 28% vs. 51% and from 15 to 60 min 1% vs. 19% deviation from sevoflurane target, P tidal oxygen (5, IQR 3-6). The target-concentrations were reached earlier with the use of end-tidal compared with manual controlled minimal-flow anesthesia but required slightly greater use of anesthetic agents (6.9 vs. 6.0 ml/h). End-tidal control is a superior technique for setting and maintaining oxygen and anesthetic gas concentrations in a stable and rapid manner compared with manual control. Consequently, end-tidal control can effectively support the anesthetist. © 2017 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. The Head Injury Retrieval Trial (HIRT): a single-centre randomised controlled trial of physician prehospital management of severe blunt head injury compared with management by paramedics only.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Alan A; Mann, Kristy P; Fearnside, Michael; Poynter, Elwyn; Gebski, Val

    2015-11-01

    Advanced prehospital interventions for severe brain injury remains controversial. No previous randomised trial has been conducted to evaluate additional physician intervention compared with paramedic only care. Participants in this prospective, randomised controlled trial were adult patients with blunt trauma with either a scene GCS score definition), or GCSdefinition). Patients were randomised to either standard ground paramedic treatment or standard treatment plus a physician arriving by helicopter. Patients were evaluated by 30-day mortality and 6-month Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) scores. Due to high non-compliance rates, both intention-to-treat and as-treated analyses were preplanned. 375 patients met the original definition, of which 197 was allocated to physician care. Differences in the 6-month GOS scores were not significant on intention-to-treat analysis (OR 1.11, 95% CI 0.74 to 1.66, p=0.62) nor was the 30-day mortality (OR 0.91, 95% CI 0.60 to 1.38, p=0.66). As-treated analysis showed a 16% reduction in 30-day mortality in those receiving additional physician care; 60/195 (29%) versus 81/180 (45%), pdefinition, of which 182 were allocated to physician care. The 6-month GOS scores were not significantly different on intention-to-treat analysis (OR 1.14, 95% CI 0.73 to 1.75, p=0.56) nor was the 30-day mortality (OR 1.05, 95% CI 0.66 to 1.66, p=0.84). As-treated analyses were also not significantly different. This trial suggests a potential mortality reduction in patients with blunt trauma with GCSdefinition only). Confirmatory studies which also address non-compliance issues are needed. NCT00112398. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  11. At what price? A cost-effectiveness analysis comparing trial of labour after previous Caesarean versus elective repeat Caesarean delivery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fawsitt, Christopher G

    2013-01-01

    Elective repeat caesarean delivery (ERCD) rates have been increasing worldwide, thus prompting obstetric discourse on the risks and benefits for the mother and infant. Yet, these increasing rates also have major economic implications for the health care system. Given the dearth of information on the cost-effectiveness related to mode of delivery, the aim of this paper was to perform an economic evaluation on the costs and short-term maternal health consequences associated with a trial of labour after one previous caesarean delivery compared with ERCD for low risk women in Ireland.

  12. Are multiple-trial experiments appropriate for eyewitness identification studies? Accuracy, choosing, and confidence across trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, J K; Beaudry, J L; Lindsay, R C L

    2017-12-01

    Eyewitness identification experiments typically involve a single trial: A participant views an event and subsequently makes a lineup decision. As compared to this single-trial paradigm, multiple-trial designs are more efficient, but significantly reduce ecological validity and may affect the strategies that participants use to make lineup decisions. We examined the effects of a number of forensically relevant variables (i.e., memory strength, type of disguise, degree of disguise, and lineup type) on eyewitness accuracy, choosing, and confidence across 12 target-present and 12 target-absent lineup trials (N = 349; 8,376 lineup decisions). The rates of correct rejections and choosing (across both target-present and target-absent lineups) did not vary across the 24 trials, as reflected by main effects or interactions with trial number. Trial number had a significant but trivial quadratic effect on correct identifications (OR = 0.99) and interacted significantly, but again trivially, with disguise type (OR = 1.00). Trial number did not significantly influence participants' confidence in correct identifications, confidence in correct rejections, or confidence in target-absent selections. Thus, multiple-trial designs appear to have minimal effects on eyewitness accuracy, choosing, and confidence. Researchers should thus consider using multiple-trial designs for conducting eyewitness identification experiments.

  13. C-MAC compared with direct laryngoscopy for intubation in patients with cervical spine immobilization: A manikin trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smereka, Jacek; Ladny, Jerzy R; Naylor, Amanda; Ruetzler, Kurt; Szarpak, Lukasz

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare C-MAC videolaryngoscopy with direct laryngoscopy for intubation in simulated cervical spine immobilization conditions. The study was designed as a prospective randomized crossover manikin trial. 70 paramedics with immobilization (Scenario A); manual inline cervical immobilization (Scenario B); cervical immobilization using cervical extraction collar (Scenario C). Scenario A: Nearly all participants performed successful intubations with both MAC and C-MAC on the first attempt (95.7% MAC vs. 100% C-MAC), with similar intubation times (16.5s MAC vs. 18s C-MAC). Scenario B: The results with C-MAC were significantly better than those with MAC (pimmobilization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Methodology Series Module 4: Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setia, Maninder Singh

    2016-01-01

    In a clinical trial, study participants are (usually) divided into two groups. One group is then given the intervention and the other group is not given the intervention (or may be given some existing standard of care). We compare the outcomes in these groups and assess the role of intervention. Some of the trial designs are (1) parallel study design, (2) cross-over design, (3) factorial design, and (4) withdrawal group design. The trials can also be classified according to the stage of the trial (Phase I, II, III, and IV) or the nature of the trial (efficacy vs. effectiveness trials, superiority vs. equivalence trials). Randomization is one of the procedures by which we allocate different interventions to the groups. It ensures that all the included participants have a specified probability of being allocated to either of the groups in the intervention study. If participants and the investigator know about the allocation of the intervention, then it is called an "open trial." However, many of the trials are not open - they are blinded. Blinding is useful to minimize bias in clinical trials. The researcher should familiarize themselves with the CONSORT statement and the appropriate Clinical Trials Registry of India.

  15. Differences in postprandial protein handling after beef compared with milk ingestion during postexercise recovery: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burd, Nicholas A; Gorissen, Stefan H; van Vliet, Stephan; Snijders, Tim; van Loon, Luc Jc

    2015-10-01

    Protein consumed after resistance exercise increases postexercise muscle protein synthesis rates. To date, dairy protein has been studied extensively, with little known about the capacity of other protein-dense foods to augment postexercise muscle protein synthesis rates. We aimed to compare protein digestion and absorption kinetics, postprandial amino acid availability, anabolic signaling, and the subsequent myofibrillar protein synthetic response after the ingestion of milk compared with beef during recovery from resistance-type exercise. In crossover trials, 12 healthy young men performed a single bout of resistance exercise. Immediately after cessation of exercise, participants ingested 30 g protein by consuming isonitrogenous amounts of intrinsically l-[1-(13)C]phenylalanine-labeled beef or milk. Blood and muscle biopsy samples were collected at rest and after exercise during primed continuous infusions of l-[ring-(2)H5]phenylalanine and l-[ring-3,5-(2)H2]tyrosine to assess protein digestion and absorption kinetics, plasma amino acid availability, anabolic signaling, and subsequent myofibrillar protein synthesis rates in vivo in young men. Beef protein-derived phenylalanine appeared more rapidly in circulation compared with milk ingestion (P Nutrition.

  16. Comparing the behavioural impact of a nudge-based handwashing intervention to high-intensity hygiene education: a cluster-randomised trial in rural Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Elise; Hossain, Mohammed Kamal; Uddin, Saker; Venkatesh, Mohini; Ram, Pavani K; Dreibelbis, Robert

    2018-01-01

    To determine the impact of environmental nudges on handwashing behaviours among primary school children as compared to a high-intensity hygiene education intervention. In a cluster-randomised trial (CRT), we compared the rates of handwashing with soap (HWWS) after a toileting event among primary school students in rural Bangladesh. Eligible schools (government run, on-site sanitation and water, no hygiene interventions in last year, fewer than 450 students) were identified, and 20 schools were randomly selected and allocated without blinding to one of four interventions, five schools per group: simultaneous handwashing infrastructure and nudge construction, sequential infrastructure then nudge construction, simultaneous infrastructure and high-intensity hygiene education (HE) and sequential handwashing infrastructure and HE. The primary outcome, incidence of HWWS after a toileting event, was compared between the intervention groups at different data collection points with robust-Poisson regression analysis with generalised estimating equations, adjusting for school-level clustering of outcomes. The nudge intervention and the HE intervention were found to be equally effective at sustained impact over 5 months post-intervention (adjusted IRR 0.81, 95% CI 0.61-1.09). When comparing intervention delivery timing, the simultaneous delivery of the HE intervention significantly outperformed the sequential HE delivery (adjusted IRR 1.58 CI 1.20-2.08), whereas no significant difference was observed between sequential and simultaneous nudge intervention delivery (adjusted IRR 0.75, 95% CI 0.48-1.17). Our trial demonstrates sustained improved handwashing behaviour 5 months after the nudge intervention. The nudge intervention's comparable performance to a high-intensity hygiene education intervention is encouraging. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Coagulation parameters in copperhead compared to other Crotalinae envenomation: secondary analysis of the F(ab')2 versus Fab antivenom trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerardo, Charles J; Vissoci, Joao R Nickenig; Brown, Michael W J; Bush, Sean P

    2017-02-01

    Coagulation derangements in copperhead envenomation are considered less severe than other crotaline envenomations, resulting in recommendations to limit both coagulation testing and antivenom treatment. A prospective, blinded, multicenter, randomized clinical trial comparing the effectiveness of F(ab') 2 versus Fab antivenom in crotaline envenomation patients was completed in 2011. We determined the difference between coagulation parameters in copperhead compared to other crotaline envenomations. We performed a post hoc analysis comparing the coagulation parameters (platelets and fibrinogen) prospectively obtained in the aforementioned trial. All the patients received antivenom in one of three treatment arms [F(ab') 2 with maintenance, F(ab') 2 with placebo maintenance, or Fab with maintenance]. Coagulation parameters were measured at pretreatment baseline, during acute hospitalization, day 5, day 8, and day 15 post-envenomation. Mean platelet count and fibrinogen levels for the copperhead and other crotaline groups were compared. The platelet and fibrinogen point estimates with distribution are presented graphically over time. 122 patients were enrolled in the study. There were 22 patients with copperhead envenomation, 93 with other crotaline envenomations, and 7 that could not be definitively determined. The mean age was 42 (SD 20) years. There was a minor pretreatment difference in mean baseline platelet count between the copperhead group (246 × 109/L 95% CI 215, 277) compared to other crotaline envenomation patients (184 × 109/L 95% CI 167, 202). There was a modest pretreatment difference in mean fibrinogen level between copperhead patients (345 mg/dL 95% CI 277, 415) and other crotaline patients (261mg/dL 95% CI 241, 281). Pretreatment coagulation parameter means were normal and converged post treatment. On average, copperhead envenomations have less severe initial coagulation derangements. However, in mild envenomations, differences in laboratory

  18. Comparative randomised active drug controlled clinical trial of a herbal eye drop in computer vision syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Pranab Kr; Bairagi, Debasis; Roy, Sudipta; Majumder, Nilay Kr; Paul, Ratish Ch; Bagchi, Sunil Ch

    2005-07-01

    A comparative double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial of a herbal eye drop (itone) was conducted to find out its efficacy and safety in 120 patients with computer vision syndrome. Patients using computers for more than 3 hours continuously per day having symptoms of watering, redness, asthenia, irritation, foreign body sensation and signs of conjunctival hyperaemia, corneal filaments and mucus were studied. One hundred and twenty patients were randomly given either placebo, tears substitute (tears plus) or itone in identical vials with specific code number and were instructed to put one drop four times daily for 6 weeks. Subjective and objective assessments were done at bi-weekly intervals. In computer vision syndrome both subjective and objective improvements were noticed with itone drops. Itone drop was found significantly better than placebo (pcomputer vision syndrome.

  19. Efficacy and safety of apixaban compared with warfarin according to age for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation: observations from the ARISTOTLE trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvorsen, Sigrun; Atar, Dan; Yang, Hongqiu; De Caterina, Raffaele; Erol, Cetin; Garcia, David; Granger, Christopher B.; Hanna, Michael; Held, Claes; Husted, Steen; Hylek, Elaine M.; Jansky, Petr; Lopes, Renato D.; Ruzyllo, Witold; Thomas, Laine; Wallentin, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Aims The risk of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) increases with age. In the ARISTOTLE trial, apixaban when compared with warfarin reduced the rate of stroke, death, and bleeding. We evaluated these outcomes in relation to patient age. Methods and results A total of 18 201 patients with AF and a raised risk of stroke were randomized to warfarin or apixaban 5 mg b.d. with dose reduction to 2.5 mg b.d. or placebo in 831 patients with ≥2 of the following criteria: age ≥80 years, body weight ≤60 kg, or creatinine ≥133 μmol/L. We used Cox models to compare outcomes in relation to patient age during 1.8 years median follow-up. Of the trial population, 30% were 0.11 for all). Results were also consistent for the 13% of patients ≥80 years. No significant interaction with apixaban dose was found with respect to treatment effect on major outcomes. Conclusion The benefits of apixaban vs. warfarin were consistent in patients with AF regardless of age. Owing to the higher risk at older age, the absolute benefits of apixaban were greater in the elderly. PMID:24561548

  20. A randomized single blind crossover trial comparing leather and commercial wrist splints for treating chronic wrist pain in adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, Jill; Nimmo, Rachel; Rowell, Wendy; Quinn, Stephen; Jones, Graeme

    2009-01-01

    Background To compare the effectiveness of a custom-made leather wrist splint (LS) with a commercially available fabric splint (FS) in adults with chronic wrist pain. Methods Participants (N = 25, mean age = 54) were randomly assigned to treatment order in a 2-phase crossover trial. Splints were worn for 2 weeks, separated by a one-week washout period. Outcomes were assessed at baseline and after each splint phase using the Australian/Canadian Osteoarthritis Hand Index (AUSCAN), the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) and Jamar dynamometer by an observer blinded to treatment allocation. Results Both styles of wrist splint significantly reduced pain (effect size LS 0.79, FS 0.43), improved hand function and increased grip strength compared to baseline (all p leather splint compared to the commercially available splint. Conclusion Leather wrist splints were superior to a commercially available fabric splint for the short-term relief of pain and dysfunction. PMID:19843345

  1. Report of a randomized trial of d(15)+Be neutrons compared with megavoltage X ray therapy of bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, W.; Arnott, S.J.; Jack, W.J.; MacDougall, R.H.; Quilty, P.M.; Rodger, A.; Kerr, G.R.; Williams, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    The results of a randomized trial of d(15)+Be neutrons compared with 4 or 6 MV photons for the treatment of transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. Between December 1978 and December 1981, 113 patients were accrued, 53 allocated to be treated by neutrons and 60 by photons. Complete local tumor regression was observed in 64% of patients treated by neutrons and 62% treated by photons. Recurrent cancer was subsequently confirmed in 31% of patients, similar in both treatment groups. There was no significant difference in the control rates by T stage between the two treatment groups. Late morbidity was significantly worse in patients treated by neutrons. Following neutron therapy, 78% of patients had serious late morbidity in at least one tissue compared with 38% in the group treated by photons. Survival was significantly better in the photon treated group 45.3% (+/- 11%) at 5 years compared with 12% (+/- 6%) after neutron therapy

  2. The Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial lipid lowering arm: extended observations 2 years after trial closure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sever, Peter S; Poulter, Neil R; Dahlof, Bjorn

    2008-01-01

    Aims To determine the cardiovascular benefits in those originally assigned atorvastatin in the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial-2.2 years after closure of the lipid-lowering arm of the trial (ASCOT-LLA). Methods and results The Blood Pressure Lowering Arm of the ASCOT trial (ASCOT......-BPLA) compared two different antihypertensive treatment strategies on cardiovascular outcomes. ASCOT-LLA was a double-blind placebo-controlled trial of atorvastatin in those enrolled into ASCOT-BPLA with total cholesterol concentrations at baseline of ... enrolled in ASCOT-BPLA and 10 305 were further assigned either atorvastatin, 10 mg, or placebo. ASCOT-LLA was stopped prematurely after a median 3.3 years follow-up because of substantial cardiovascular benefits in those assigned atorvastatin. Trial physicians were invited to offer atorvastatin to all...

  3. The effect of static scanning and mobility training on mobility in people with hemianopia after stroke: A randomized controlled trial comparing standardized versus non-standardized treatment protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Visual loss following stroke impacts significantly on activities of daily living and is an independent risk factor for becoming dependent. Routinely, allied health clinicians provide training for visual field loss, mainly with eye movement based therapy. The effectiveness of the compensatory approach to rehabilitation remains inconclusive largely due to difficulty in validating functional outcome with the varied type and dosage of therapy received by an individual patient. This study aims to determine which treatment is more effective, a standardized approach or individualized therapy in patients with homonymous hemianopia post stroke. Methods/Design This study is a double-blind randomized controlled, multicenter trial. A standardised scanning rehabilitation program (Neuro Vision Technology (NVT) program) of 7 weeks at 3 times per week, is compared to individualized therapy recommended by clinicians. Discussion The results of the trial will provide information that could potentially inform the allocation of resources in visual rehabilitation post stroke. Trial Registration Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register (ANZCTR): ACTRN12610000494033 PMID:21767413

  4. The effect of static scanning and mobility training on mobility in people with hemianopia after stroke: A randomized controlled trial comparing standardized versus non-standardized treatment protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Stacey

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Visual loss following stroke impacts significantly on activities of daily living and is an independent risk factor for becoming dependent. Routinely, allied health clinicians provide training for visual field loss, mainly with eye movement based therapy. The effectiveness of the compensatory approach to rehabilitation remains inconclusive largely due to difficulty in validating functional outcome with the varied type and dosage of therapy received by an individual patient. This study aims to determine which treatment is more effective, a standardized approach or individualized therapy in patients with homonymous hemianopia post stroke. Methods/Design This study is a double-blind randomized controlled, multicenter trial. A standardised scanning rehabilitation program (Neuro Vision Technology (NVT program of 7 weeks at 3 times per week, is compared to individualized therapy recommended by clinicians. Discussion The results of the trial will provide information that could potentially inform the allocation of resources in visual rehabilitation post stroke. Trial Registration Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register (ANZCTR: ACTRN12610000494033

  5. Metformin compared with insulin in the management of gestational diabetes mellitus: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niromanesh, Shirin; Alavi, Azin; Sharbaf, Fatemeh Rahimi; Amjadi, Nooshin; Moosavi, Sanaz; Akbari, Soheila

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of metformin and insulin in glycemic control and compare pregnancy outcome in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). This randomized controlled trial was conducted in GDM women with singleton pregnancy and gestational age between 20 and 34 weeks who did not achieve glycemic control on diet were assigned randomly to receive either metformin (n=80) or insulin (n=80). The primary outcomes were maternal glycemic control and birth weight. The secondary outcomes were neonatal and obstetric complications. Two groups were comparable regarding the maternal characteristics. Two groups were similar in mean FBS (P=0.68) and postprandial measurements (P=0.87) throughout GDM treatment. The neonates of metformin group had less rate of birth weight centile >90 than insulin group (RR: 0.5, 95% CI: 0.3-0.9, P=0.012). Maternal weight gain was reduced in the metformin group (P0.05). In metformin group 14% of women needed to supplemental insulin to achieve euglycemia. Metformin is an effective and safe alternative treatment to insulin for women with GDM. This study does not show significant risk of maternal or neonatal adverse outcome with the use of metformin. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Internet trials: participant experiences and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Use of the Internet to conduct randomised controlled trials is increasing, and provides potential to increase equity of access to medical research, increase the generalisability of trial results and decrease the costs involved in conducting large scale trials. Several studies have compared response rates, completeness of data, and reliability of surveys using the Internet and traditional methods, but very little is known about participants’ attitudes towards Internet-based randomised trials or their experience of participating in an Internet-based trial. Objective To obtain insights into the experiences and perspectives of participants in an Internet-based randomised controlled trial, their attitudes to the use of the Internet to conduct medical research, and their intentions regarding future participation in Internet research. Methods All English speaking participants in a recently completed Internet randomised controlled trial were invited to participate in an online survey. Results 1246 invitations were emailed. 416 participants completed the survey between May and October 2009 (33% response rate). Reasons given for participating in the Internet RCT fell into 4 main areas: personal interest in the research question and outcome, ease of participation, an appreciation of the importance of research and altruistic reasons. Participants’ comments and reflections on their experience of participating in a fully online trial were positive and less than half of participants would have participated in the trial had it been conducted using other means of data collection. However participants identified trade-offs between the benefits and downsides of participating in Internet-based trials. The main trade-off was between flexibility and convenience – a perceived benefit – and a lack connectedness and understanding – a perceived disadvantage. The other tradeoffs were in the areas of: ease or difficulty in use of the Internet; security, privacy and

  7. Internet trials: participant experiences and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Erin

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Use of the Internet to conduct randomised controlled trials is increasing, and provides potential to increase equity of access to medical research, increase the generalisability of trial results and decrease the costs involved in conducting large scale trials. Several studies have compared response rates, completeness of data, and reliability of surveys using the Internet and traditional methods, but very little is known about participants’ attitudes towards Internet-based randomised trials or their experience of participating in an Internet-based trial. Objective To obtain insights into the experiences and perspectives of participants in an Internet-based randomised controlled trial, their attitudes to the use of the Internet to conduct medical research, and their intentions regarding future participation in Internet research. Methods All English speaking participants in a recently completed Internet randomised controlled trial were invited to participate in an online survey. Results 1246 invitations were emailed. 416 participants completed the survey between May and October 2009 (33% response rate. Reasons given for participating in the Internet RCT fell into 4 main areas: personal interest in the research question and outcome, ease of participation, an appreciation of the importance of research and altruistic reasons. Participants’ comments and reflections on their experience of participating in a fully online trial were positive and less than half of participants would have participated in the trial had it been conducted using other means of data collection. However participants identified trade-offs between the benefits and downsides of participating in Internet-based trials. The main trade-off was between flexibility and convenience – a perceived benefit – and a lack connectedness and understanding – a perceived disadvantage. The other tradeoffs were in the areas of: ease or difficulty in use of the Internet

  8. INCITE: A randomised trial comparing constraint induced movement therapy and bimanual training in children with congenital hemiplegia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilmore Rose

    2010-01-01

    , strength and sensation, activity limitations (upper limb unimanual capacity and bimanual motor coordination, participation restrictions (in home, school and recreation, environmental (barriers and facilitators to participation and quality of life. Discussion This paper outlines the theoretical basis, study hypotheses and outcome measures for a matched pairs randomised trial comparing CIMT and BIM training to improve outcomes across the ICF. Trial Registration ACTRN12609000912280

  9. Effect of pelvic floor muscle training compared with watchful waiting in older women with symptomatic mild pelvic organ prolapse : randomised controlled trial in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegersma, Marian; Panman, Chantal M. C. R.; Kollen, Boudewijn J.; Berger, Marjolein Y.; Lisman-Van Leeuwen, Yvonne; Dekker, Janny H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the effects of pelvic floor muscle training and watchful waiting on pelvic floor symptoms in a primary care population of women aged 55 years and over with symptomatic mild pelvic organ prolapse. Design Randomised controlled trial. Setting Dutch primary care. Participants Women

  10. A Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing the Letter Project Advance Directive to Traditional Advance Directive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periyakoil, Vyjeyanthi S; Neri, Eric; Kraemer, Helena

    2017-09-01

    Simpler alternatives to traditional advance directives that are easy to understand and available in multiple formats and can be initiated by patients and families will help facilitate advance care planning. The goal of this study was to compare the acceptability of the letter advance directive (LAD) to the traditional advance directive (TAD) of the state of California. A web-based, randomized controlled trial was conducted, in which the participants were randomized to one of two types of advance directives (ADs): the LAD (intervention) or the TAD (control). Primary outcomes were participant ratings of the ease, value, and their level of comfort in the AD document they completed. A total of 400 participants completed the study, with 216 randomized to the LAD and 184 to the TAD by a computerized algorithm. Overall, participants preferred the LAD to the TAD (success rate difference [SRD] = 0.46, 95th percentile confidence interval [CI]: 0.36-0.56, p advance directive to be a better alternative to the traditional advance directive form.

  11. Fixed, low radiant exposure vs. incremental radiant exposure approach for diode laser hair reduction: a randomized, split axilla, comparative single-blinded trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlović, M D; Adamič, M; Nenadić, D

    2015-12-01

    Diode lasers are the most commonly used treatment modalities for unwanted hair reduction. Only a few controlled clinical trials but not a single randomized controlled trial (RCT) compared the impact of various laser parameters, especially radiant exposure, onto efficacy, tolerability and safety of laser hair reduction. To compare the safety, tolerability and mid-term efficacy of fixed, low and incremental radiant exposures of diode lasers (800 nm) for axillary hair removal, we conducted an intrapatient, left-to-right, patient- and assessor-blinded and controlled trial. Diode laser (800 nm) treatments were evaluated in 39 study participants (skin type II-III) with unwanted axillary hairs. Randomization and allocation to split axilla treatments were carried out by a web-based randomization tool. Six treatments were performed at 4- to 6-week intervals with study subjects blinded to the type of treatment. Final assessment of hair reduction was conducted 6 months after the last treatment by means of blinded 4-point clinical scale using photographs. The primary endpoint was reduction in hair growth, and secondary endpoints were patient-rated tolerability and satisfaction with the treatment, treatment-related pain and adverse effects. Excellent reduction in axillary hairs (≥ 76%) at 6-month follow-up visit after receiving fixed, low and incremental radiant exposure diode laser treatments was obtained in 59% and 67% of study participants respectively (Z value: 1.342, P = 0.180). Patients reported lower visual analogue scale (VAS) pain score on the fixed (4.26) than on the incremental radiant exposure side (5.64) (P diode laser treatments were less painful and better tolerated. © 2015 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  12. Classroom Application of a Trial-Based Functional Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Sarah E.; Iwata, Brian A.; Fritz, Jennifer N.; Roscoe, Eileen M.; Carreau, Abbey B.

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated a trial-based approach to conducting functional analyses in classroom settings. Ten students referred for problem behavior were exposed to a series of assessment trials, which were interspersed among classroom activities throughout the day. Results of these trial-based functional analyses were compared to those of more traditional…

  13. Comparative effects of cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibition, statin or ezetimibe on lipid factors: The ACCENTUATE trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, Stephen J; Ray, Kausik K; Ballantyne, Christie M; Beacham, Lauren A; Miller, Debra L; Ruotolo, Giacomo; Nissen, Steven E; Riesmeyer, Jeffrey S

    2017-06-01

    The optimal approaches to management of patients treated with moderate statin doses on lipid parameters are unknown. The ACCENTUATE study aimed to compare the effects of adding the cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitor (CETP) evacetrapib, ezetimibe or increasing statin dose in atorvastatin-treated high-vascular risk patients on lipid parameters. 366 patients with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) and/or diabetes were treated with atorvastatin 40 mg/day for 28 days prior to randomization to atorvastatin 40 mg plus evacetrapib 130 mg, atorvastatin 80 mg, atorvastatin 40 mg plus ezetimibe 10 mg or atorvastatin 40 mg plus placebo, daily for 90 days at 64 centers in the United States. Lipid parameters, safety and tolerability were measured. Addition of evacetrapib significantly reduced LDL-C (-33%) compared with ezetimibe (-27%, p=0.045), increasing statin dose (-6%) and statin alone (0%, pstatin dose (pstatin dose, and p=0.004 vs. statin alone). Addition of evacetrapib to atorvastatin produced an increase in hsCRP compared with ezetimibe (p=0.02). While evacetrapib improved traditional atherogenic and putative protective lipid measures compared with ezetimibe and increasing statin dose in patients with ASCVD and/or diabetes, it also adversely affected novel atherogenic risk factors. These findings may contribute to the lack of clinical benefit observed in the ACCELERATE trial. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Prospective, Randomized, Double-Blind, Parallel-Group, Comparative Effectiveness Clinical Trial Comparing a Powder Vehicle Compound of Vitamin D With an Oil Vehicle Compound in Adults With Cystic Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermes, Wendy A; Alvarez, Jessica A; Lee, Moon J; Chesdachai, Supavit; Lodin, Daud; Horst, Ron; Tangpricha, Vin

    2017-08-01

    There is little consensus on the most efficacious vehicle substance for vitamin D supplements. Fat malabsorption may impede the ability of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) to absorb vitamin D in an oil vehicle. We hypothesized that vitamin D contained in a powder vehicle would be absorbed more efficiently than vitamin D contained in an oil vehicle in patients with CF. In this double-blind, randomized controlled trial, hospitalized adults with CF were given a one-time bolus dose of 100,000 IU of cholecalciferol (D 3 ) in a powder-based or oil-based vehicle. Serum D 3 , 25-hydroxyvitamin D, and parathyroid hormone concentrations were analyzed at 0, 12, 24, and 48 hours posttreatment. The area under the curve for serum D 3 and the 12-hour time point were also assessed as indicators of D 3 absorption. This trial was completed by 15 patients with CF. The median (interquartile range) age, body mass index, and forced expiratory volume in 1 second were 23.7 (19.9-33.2) years, 19.9 (18.6-22.6) kg/m 2 , and 63% (37%-80%), respectively. The increase in serum D 3 and the area under the curve was greater in the powder group ( P = .002 and P = .036, respectively). Serum D 3 was higher at 12 hours in the powder group compared with the oil group ( P = .002), although levels were similar between groups by 48 hours. In adults with CF, cholecalciferol is more efficiently absorbed in a powder compared with an oil vehicle. Physicians should consider prescribing vitamin D in a powder vehicle in patients with CF to improve the absorption of vitamin D from supplements.

  15. The Prostate cancer Intervention Versus Observation Trial:VA/NCI/AHRQ Cooperative Studies Program #407 (PIVOT): design and baseline results of a randomized controlled trial comparing radical prostatectomy to watchful waiting for men with clinically localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilt, Timothy J; Brawer, Michael K; Barry, Michael J; Jones, Karen M; Kwon, Young; Gingrich, Jeffrey R; Aronson, William J; Nsouli, Imad; Iyer, Padmini; Cartagena, Ruben; Snider, Glenn; Roehrborn, Claus; Fox, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common noncutaneous malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer death in men. Ninety percent of men with prostate cancer are over aged 60 years, diagnosed by early detection with the prostate specific antigen (PSA) blood test and have disease believed confined to the prostate gland (clinically localized). Common treatments for clinically localized prostate cancer include watchful waiting surgery to remove the prostate gland (radical prostatectomy), external beam radiation therapy and interstitial radiation therapy (brachytherapy) and androgen deprivation. Little is known about the relative effectiveness and harms of treatments due to the paucity of randomized controlled trials. The VA/NCI/AHRQ Cooperative Studies Program Study #407: Prostate cancer Intervention Versus Observation Trial (PIVOT), initiated in 1994, is a multicenter randomized controlled trial comparing radical prostatectomy to watchful waiting in men with clinically localized prostate cancer. We describe the study rationale, design, recruitment methods and baseline characteristics of PIVOT enrollees. We provide comparisons with eligible men declining enrollment and men participating in another recently reported randomized trial of radical prostatectomy versus watchful waiting conducted in Scandinavia. We screened 13,022 men with prostate cancer at 52 United States medical centers for potential enrollment. From these, 5023 met initial age, comorbidity and disease eligibility criteria and a total of 731 men agreed to participate and were randomized. The mean age of enrollees was 67 years. Nearly one-third were African-American. Approximately 85% reported they were fully active. The median prostate specific antigen (PSA) was 7.8 ng/mL (mean 10.2 ng/mL). In three-fourths of men the primary reason for biopsy leading to a diagnosis of prostate cancer was a PSA elevation or rise. Using previously developed tumor risk categorizations incorporating PSA levels, Gleason

  16. The clinically-integrated randomized trial: proposed novel method for conducting large trials at low cost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scardino Peter T

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Randomized controlled trials provide the best method of determining which of two comparable treatments is preferable. Unfortunately, contemporary randomized trials have become increasingly expensive, complex and burdened by regulation, so much so that many trials are of doubtful feasibility. Discussion Here we present a proposal for a novel, streamlined approach to randomized trials: the "clinically-integrated randomized trial". The key aspect of our methodology is that the clinical experience of the patient and doctor is virtually indistinguishable whether or not the patient is randomized, primarily because outcome data are obtained from routine clinical data, or from short, web-based questionnaires. Integration of a randomized trial into routine clinical practice also implies that there should be an attempt to randomize every patient, a corollary of which is that eligibility criteria are minimized. The similar clinical experience of patients on- and off-study also entails that the marginal cost of putting an additional patient on trial is negligible. We propose examples of how the clinically-integrated randomized trial might be applied in four distinct areas of medicine: comparisons of surgical techniques, "me too" drugs, rare diseases and lifestyle interventions. Barriers to implementing clinically-integrated randomized trials are discussed. Conclusion The proposed clinically-integrated randomized trial may allow us to enlarge dramatically the number of clinical questions that can be addressed by randomization.

  17. Comparison of randomization techniques for clinical trials with data from the HOMERUS-trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verberk, W. J.; Kroon, A. A.; Kessels, A. G. H.; Nelemans, P. J.; van Ree, J. W.; Lenders, J. W. M.; Thien, T.; Bakx, J. C.; van Montfrans, G. A.; Smit, A. J.; Beltman, F. W.; de Leeuw, P. W.

    2005-01-01

    Background. Several methods of randomization are available to create comparable intervention groups in a study. In the HOMERUS-trial, we compared the minimization procedure with a stratified and a non-stratified method of randomization in order to test which one is most appropriate for use in

  18. Comparison of randomization techniques for clinical trials with data from the HOMERUS-trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verberk, W.J.; Kroon, A.A.; Kessels, A.G.H.; Nelemans, P.J.; Ree, J.W. van; Lenders, J.W.M.; Thien, Th.; Bakx, J.C.; Montfrans, G.A. van; Smit, A.J.; Beltman, F.W.; Leeuw, P.W. de

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several methods of randomization are available to create comparable intervention groups in a study. In the HOMERUS-trial, we compared the minimization procedure with a stratified and a non-stratified method of randomization in order to test which one is most appropriate for use in

  19. Duodenum preserving pancreatectomy in chronic pancreatitis: Design of a randomized controlled trial comparing two surgical techniques [ISRCTN50638764

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reidel Margot A

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease which is characterized by an irreversible conversion of pancreatic parenchyma to fibrous tissue. Beside obstructive jaundice and pseudocyst formation, about half of the patients need surgical intervention due to untreatable chronic pain during the course of the disease. In most of the patients with chronic pancreatitis, the head of the pancreas is the trigger of the chronic inflammatory process. Therefore, resection of pancreatic head tissue must be the central part of any surgical intervention. However, it is unclear to which extent the surgical procedure must be radical in order to obtain a favourable outcome for the patients. Design A single centre randomized controlled, superiority trial to compare two techniques of duodenum preserving pancreatic head resection. Sample size: 65 patients will be included and randomized intraoperatively. Eligibility criteria: All patients with chronic pancreatitis and indication for surgical resection and signed informed consent. Cumulative primary endpoint (hierarchical model: duration of surgical procedure, quality of life after one year, duration of intensive care unit stay, duration of hospital stay. Reference treatment: Resection of the pancreatic head with dissection of the pancreas from the portal vein and transsection of the gland (Beger procedure. Intervention: Partial Resection of the pancreatic head without transsection of the organ and visualization of the portal vein (Berne procedure. Duration: September 2003-October 2007. Organisation/responsibility The trial is conducted in compliance with the protocol and in accordance with the moral, ethical, regulatory and scientific principles governing clinical research as set out in the Declaration of Helsinki (1989 and the Good Clinical Practice guideline (GCP. The Center for Clinical Studies of the Department of Surgery Heidelberg is responsible for planning, conducting and final

  20. Mechanisms of antibiotic resistance in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantosti, Annalisa; Sanchini, Andrea; Monaco, Monica

    2007-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus can exemplify better than any other human pathogen the adaptive evolution of bacteria in the antibiotic era, as it has demonstrated a unique ability to quickly respond to each new antibiotic with the development of a resistance mechanism, starting with penicillin and methicillin, until the most recent, linezolid and daptomycin. Resistance mechanisms include enzymatic inactivation of the antibiotic (penicillinase and aminoglycoside-modification enzymes), alteration of the target with decreased affinity for the antibiotic (notable examples being penicillin-binding protein 2a of methicillin-resistant S. aureus and D-Ala-D-Lac of peptidoglycan precursors of vancomycin-resistant strains), trapping of the antibiotic (for vancomycin and possibly daptomycin) and efflux pumps (fluoroquinolones and tetracycline). Complex genetic arrays (staphylococcal chromosomal cassette mec elements or the vanA operon) have been acquired by S. aureus through horizontal gene transfer, while resistance to other antibiotics, including some of the most recent ones (e.g., fluoroquinolones, linezolid and daptomycin) have developed through spontaneous mutations and positive selection. Detection of the resistance mechanisms and their genetic basis is an important support to antibiotic susceptibility surveillance in S. aureus.

  1. Cancer-Related Fatigue and Rehabilitation : A Randomized Controlled Multicenter Trial Comparing Physical Training Combined With Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy With Physical Training Only and With No Intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Weert, E.; May, A.M.; Korstjens, I.; Post, W.J.; van der Schans, C.P.; van den Borne, B.; Mesters, I.; Ros, W.J.G.; Hoekstra-Weebers, J.E.H.M.

    2010-01-01

    Background. Research suggests that cancer rehabilitation reduces fatigue in survivors of cancer. To date, it is unclear what type of rehabilitation is most beneficial. Objective. This randomized controlled trial compared the effect on cancer-related fatigue of physical training combined with

  2. Cancer-related fatigue and rehabilitation: A randomized controlled multicenter trial comparing physical training combined with cognitive-behavioral therapy with physical training only and with no intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. van Weert (Ellen); A.M. May (Anne); I. Korstjens (Irene); W.J. Post (Wendy); C.P. van der Schans (Cees); B. van den Borne (Bart); I. Mesters (Ilse); W.J.G. Ros (Wynand); J.E.H.M. Hoekstra-Weebers (Josette)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Research suggests that cancer rehabilitation reduces fatigue in survivors of cancer. To date, it is unclear what type of rehabilitation is most beneficial. Objective. This randomized controlled trial compared the effect on cancerrelated fatigue of physical training combined

  3. Methodology series module 4: Clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maninder Singh Setia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In a clinical trial, study participants are (usually divided into two groups. One group is then given the intervention and the other group is not given the intervention (or may be given some existing standard of care. We compare the outcomes in these groups and assess the role of intervention. Some of the trial designs are (1 parallel study design, (2 cross-over design, (3 factorial design, and (4 withdrawal group design. The trials can also be classified according to the stage of the trial (Phase I, II, III, and IV or the nature of the trial (efficacy vs. effectiveness trials, superiority vs. equivalence trials. Randomization is one of the procedures by which we allocate different interventions to the groups. It ensures that all the included participants have a specified probability of being allocated to either of the groups in the intervention study. If participants and the investigator know about the allocation of the intervention, then it is called an "open trial." However, many of the trials are not open - they are blinded. Blinding is useful to minimize bias in clinical trials. The researcher should familiarize themselves with the CONSORT statement and the appropriate Clinical Trials Registry of India.

  4. Comparative efficacy of the Cognitive Behavioral Analysis System of Psychotherapy versus Supportive Psychotherapy for early onset chronic depression: design and rationale of a multisite randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Effective treatment strategies for chronic depression are urgently needed since it is not only a common and particularly disabling disorder, but is also considered treatment resistant by most clinicians. There are only a few studies on chronic depression indicating that traditional psycho- and pharmacological interventions are not as effective as in acute, episodic depression. Current medications are no more effective than those introduced 50 years ago whereas the only psychotherapy developed specifically for the subgroup of chronic depression, the Cognitive Behavioral Analysis System of Psychotherapy (CBASP), faired well in one large trial. However, CBASP has never been directly compared to a non-specific control treatment. Methods/Design The present article describes the study protocol of a multisite parallel-group randomized controlled trial in Germany. The purpose of the study is to estimate the efficacy of CBASP compared to supportive psychotherapy in 268 non-medicated early-onset chronically depressed outpatients. The intervention includes 20 weeks of acute treatment with 24 individual sessions followed by 28 weeks of continuation treatment with another 8 sessions. Depressive symptoms are evaluated 20 weeks after randomisation by means of the 24-item Hamilton Rating Scale of Depression (HRSD). Secondary endpoints are depressive symptoms after 12 and 48 weeks, and remission after 12, 20, and 48 weeks. Primary outcome will be analysed using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) controlled for pre-treatment scores and site. Analyses of continuous secondary variables will be performed using linear mixed models. For remission rates, chi-squared tests and logistic regression will be applied. Discussion The study evaluates the comparative effects of a disorder-specific psychotherapy and a well designed non-specific psychological approach in the acute and continuation treatment phase in a large sample of early-onset chronically depressed patients. Trial

  5. A randomised trial to compare cognitive outcome after gamma knife radiosurgery versus whole brain radiation therapy in patients with multiple brain metastases: research protocol CAR-study B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmel, Wietske C M; Verhaak, Eline; Hanssens, Patrick E J; Gehring, Karin; Sitskoorn, Margriet M

    2018-02-21

    Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) is increasingly applied in patients with multiple brain metastases and is expected to have less adverse effects in cognitive functioning than whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT). Effective treatment with the least negative cognitive side effects is increasingly becoming important, as more patients with brain metastases live longer due to more and better systemic treatment options. There are no published randomized trials yet directly comparing GKRS to WBRT in patients with multiple brain metastases that include objective neuropsychological testing. CAR-Study B is a prospective randomised trial comparing cognitive outcome after GKRS or WBRT in adult patients with 11-20 newly diagnosed brain metastases on a contrast-enhanced MRI-scan, KPS ≥70 and life expectancy of at least 3 months. Randomisation by the method of minimization, is stratified by the cumulative tumour volume in the brain, systemic treatment, KPS, histology, baseline cognitive functioning and age. The primary endpoint is the between-group difference in the percentage of patients with significant memory decline at 3 months. Secondary endpoints include overall survival, local control, development of new brain metastases, cognitive functioning over time, quality of life, depression, anxiety and fatigue. Cognitive functioning is assessed by a standardised neuropsychological test battery. Assessments (cognitive testing, questionnaires and MRI-scans) are scheduled at baseline and at 3, 6, 9, 12 and 15 months after treatment. Knowledge gained from this trial may be used to inform individual patients with BM more precisely about the cognitive effects they can expect from treatment, and to assist both doctors and patients in making (shared) individual treatment decisions. This trial is currently recruiting. Target accrual: 23 patients at 3-months follow-up in both groups. The Netherlands Trials Register number NTR5463. ClinicalTrials.gov registration number NCT02953717

  6. Assignment refusal and its relation to outcome in a randomized controlled trial comparing Cognitive Therapy and Fluvoxamine in treatment-resistant patients with obsessive compulsive disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Landsheer, Johannes A.; Smit, Johannes H.; van Oppen, Patricia; van Balkom, Anton J L M

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of Fluvoxamine was compared to that of Cognitive Therapy (CT) in a 12-week randomized controlled trial (RCT) in 48 patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), who were treatment-resistant to a previous behavior therapy (BT). A considerable amount of patients did not comply

  7. Randomized clinical trial comparing cold knife conization of the cervix with and without lateral hemostatic sutures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Letícia Rossi; Binda, Marcia; Monego, Heleusa; Scherer, Roberta Luísa; Rolim, Karen Machado; Bottini, Alessandra Leal; Fregnani, José H T G; dos Reis, Ricardo

    2015-06-01

    Compare blood loss during cold knife conization of the cervix with and without lateral hemostatic sutures in the cervical branches of the uterine arteries. Randomized clinical trial. Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre (HCPA). 102 patients that underwent cold knife conization. Women that underwent cold knife conization of the cervix were randomized to undergo the procedure with or without lateral hemostatic sutures. blood loss measured in grams. operative time and postoperative intervention. Only the participants were blinded to group assignment. From March 2009 to August 2012, patients were randomly assigned to one of the study groups. There were no differences in amount of blood loss between patients that underwent the procedure with and without sutures (p = 0.39). Operative time was shorter in the group without suture (p = 0.020). There were no differences in intervention due to bleeding (p = 0.20). Blood loss was greater among menstruating women than for menopausal women (p = 0.011). There were no differences in amount of blood lost between smoking and nonsmoking patients (p = 0.082). Lateral hemostatic sutures do not affect the amount of intraoperative bleeding or the number of postoperative interventions. Their use is not necessary because they result in longer operative time, have a higher cost due to the use of suture material and pose the risk of ureter lesion in case the sutures are not placed at a lower position in the cervix. ClinicalTrials. gov identifier: NCT02184975. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Spirulina platensis versus silymarin in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus infection. A pilot randomized, comparative clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakoot Mostafa

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spirulina platensis, a cynobacterium used frequently as a dietary supplement had been found to exhibit many immune-stimulating and antiviral activities. It had been found to activate macrophages, NK cells, T cells, B cells, and to stimulate the production of Interferon gamma (IFN-γ and other cytokines. Natural substances isolated from Spirulina platensis had been found to be potent inhibitors against several enveloped viruses by blocking viral absorption/penetration and some replication stages of progeny viruses after penetration into cells. We aimed to study whether this dietary supplement possesses any therapeutically feasible activity worthy of further larger controlled clinical evaluation. Methods Sixty six patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection and eligible for inclusion had been randomized to either Spirulina or Silymarin treated groups for a period of six months treatment. The two groups were followed up and blindly compared for early (after 3 months and end of 6 months treatment virological response. The effects of both treatments on each of alanine aminotransferase (ALT, Chronic Liver Disease Questionnaire scores (CLDQ, Arizona Sexual Experience Scale scores (ASEX and the occurrence of any attributable adverse events were also compared. Results Among the 30 patients who had been treated with Spirulina and completed the 6 months protocol, 4 patients (13.3% had a complete end of treatment virological response and 2 patients (6.7% had a partial end of treatment response defined as significant decrease of virus load of at least 2-logs10. Though the proportion of responders in Spirulina group was greater than in the Silymarin group, the difference was not statistically significant at the end of both 6 months (p = 0.12 and 3 months treatment (p = 0.22 by Exact test. Alanine aminotransferase as well as CLDQ and ASEX scores were found to be more significantly improved in Spirulina than in Silymarin treated group

  9. Do clinical trials conducted in India match its healthcare needs? An audit of the Clinical Trials Registry of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansi Chaturvedi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: India continues to contribute disproportionately to the global burden of disease and public health research output from India is also known to be not commensurate with her healthcare needs. We carried out the present study to assess if clinical trials were in line with the health care needs of the country by auditing the clinical trials registry of India. Materials and Methods: All the clinical studies registered in CTRI between July 20, 2007 and December 31, 2015 were searched in the “Trial Search” section. The total number of studies, their phases of development, and therapeutic areas were assessed. Trials in each therapeutic area was compared with the disease burden (DALYs in that area taken from Global Health Estimates [2014] Summary Tables of the WHO. The number of trials conducted per state in India was also compared with the population of that state [Census 2011]. Results: A total of 6474 studies were registered of which 3325 (51.4% were clinical trials. The state of Maharashtra had the highest number trials [16.4%] followed by Karnataka ( 11.6% and Tamil Nadu (10%. Populous states like Uttar Pradesh (5.3% and Bihar (1.4% had far fewer trials. The largest number of trials was in the area of cancer (16.4%, followed by diabetes (12.1% and cardiovascular diseases (10.1%. Infectious and parasitic diseases had the highest DALYs (82,681 and ranked first in disease burden but accounted for only 5% of the total trials and ranked 7th according to number of trials. Cancer ranked first in the number of trials (16.4%, but ranked 6th based on DALYs. Conclusion: Clinical trials conducted in India are not in consonance with her health care needs. Strengthening the capacity for conducting trials in the populous states and the north-eastern part of the country is necessary to allow a more equitable selection of participants. The government should introduce policies to encourage new drug development in areas where needed the most.

  10. RTOG: Updated results of randomized trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curran, Walter J.

    1997-01-01

    Objective: To review the background, rationale and available results for recently completed randomized comparative clinical trials of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG), including inter group trials in which the RTOG has been the managing group or a major participant. When available, laboratory studies will be correlated with clinical results

  11. Comparative efficacy of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) in treating major depressive disorder: a protocol for network meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yongliang; Zhu, Hongmei; Leung, Siu-Wai

    2016-06-07

    There have been inconsistent findings from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and systematic reviews on the efficacies of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) as the first-line treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD). Besides inconsistencies among randomised controlled trials (RCTs), their risks of bias and evidence grading have seldom been evaluated in meta-analysis. This study aims to compare the efficacy of SSRIs by conducting a Bayesian network meta-analysis, which will be the most comprehensive evaluation of evidence to resolve the inconsistency among previous studies. SSRIs including citalopram, escitalopram, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, paroxetine, sertraline and vilazodone have been selected. Systematic database searching and screening will be conducted for the RCTs on drug treatment of patients with MDD according to pre-specified search strategies and selection criteria. PubMed, the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, ScienceDirect, the US Food and Drug Administration Website, ClinicalTrial.gov and WHO Clinical Trials will be searched. Outcome data including Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS), Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and Clinical Global Impression (CGI) from eligible RCTs will be extracted. The outcomes will be analysed as ORs and mean differences under a random-effects model. A Bayesian network meta-analysis will be conducted with WinBUGS software, to compare the efficacies of SSRIs. Subgroup and sensitivity analysis will be performed to explain the study heterogeneity and evaluate the robustness of the results. Meta-regression analysis will be conducted to determine the possible factors affecting the efficacy outcomes. The Cochrane risk of bias assessment tool will be used to assess the RCT quality, and the Grading of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation will be used to assess the strength of evidence from the meta-analysis. No ethical approval is required because this study includes neither

  12. Protocol and Recruitment Results from a Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Group Phone-Based versus Newsletter Interventions for Weight Loss Maintenance among Rural Breast Cancer Survivors

    OpenAIRE

    Befort, Christie A.; Klemp, Jennifer R.; Fabian, Carol; Perri, Michael G.; Sullivan, Debra K.; Schmitz, Kathryn H.; Diaz, Francisco J.; Shireman, Theresa

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for breast cancer recurrence and death. Women who reside in rural areas have higher obesity prevalence and suffer from breast cancer treatment-related disparities compared to urban women. The objective of this 5-year randomized controlled trial is to compare methods for delivering extended care for weight loss maintenance among rural breast cancer survivors. Group phone-based counseling via conference calls addresses access barriers, is more cost-effective than indivi...

  13. A multi-centre open-label randomised non-inferiority trial comparing watchful waiting to antibiotic treatment for acute otitis media without perforation in low-risk urban Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children (the WATCH trial): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Penelope; Gunasekera, Hasantha; Leach, Amanda Jane; Askew, Deborah; Walsh, Robyn; Kong, Kelvin; Girosi, Federico; Bond, Chelsea; Morris, Peter; Lujic, Sanja; Hu, Wendy; Usherwood, Tim; Tyson, Sissy; Spurling, Geoffrey; Douglas, Markeeta; Schubert, Kira; Chapman, Shavaun; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Murray, Reeion; Rabbitt, Keitha; Porykali, Bobby; Woodall, Cheryl; Newman, Tina; Reath, Jennifer

    2016-03-03

    Treatment guidelines recommend watchful waiting for children older than 2 years with acute otitis media (AOM) without perforation, unless they are at high risk of complications. The high prevalence of chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM) in remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities leads these children to be classified as high risk. Urban Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children are at lower risk of complications, but evidence to support the subsequent recommendation for watchful waiting in this population is lacking. This non-inferiority multi-centre randomised controlled trial will determine whether watchful waiting is non-inferior to immediate antibiotics for urban Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children with AOM without perforation. Children aged 2 - 16 years with AOM who are considered at low risk for complications will be recruited from six participating urban primary health care services across Australia. We will obtain informed consent from each participant or their guardian. The primary outcome is clinical resolution on day 7 (no pain, no fever of at least 38 °C, no bulging eardrum and no complications of AOM such as perforation or mastoiditis) as assessed by general practitioners or nurse practitioners. Participants and outcome assessors will not be blinded to treatment. With a sample size of 198 children in each arm, we have 80 % power to detect a non-inferiority margin of up to 10 % at a significance level of 5 %, assuming clinical improvement of at least 80 % in both groups. Allowing for a 20 % dropout rate, we aim to recruit 495 children. We will analyse both by intention-to-treat and per protocol. We will assess the cost- effectiveness of watchful waiting compared to immediate antibiotic prescription. We will also report on the implementation of the trial from the perspectives of parents/carers, health professionals and researchers. The trial will provide evidence for the safety and effectiveness of watchful waiting

  14. Expanding the Evidence Base: Comparing Randomized Controlled Trials and Observational Studies of Statins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atar, Dan; Ong, Seleen; Lansberg, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    It is widely accepted that randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are the gold standard for demonstrating the efficacy of a given therapy (results under ideal conditions). Observational studies, on the other hand, can complement this by demonstrating effectiveness (results under real-world conditions).

  15. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... treatments produce better results for certain illnesses or groups of people; look at the best age and frequency for doing screening tests, such as mammography; and compare two or more screening tests to see which test ... Some companies and groups sponsor clinical trials that test the safety of ...

  16. Comparing open and minimally invasive surgical procedures for oesophagectomy in the treatment of cancer: the ROMIO (Randomised Oesophagectomy: Minimally Invasive or Open) feasibility study and pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Chris; Avery, Kerry; Berrisford, Richard; Barham, Paul; Noble, Sian M; Fernandez, Aida Moure; Hanna, George; Goldin, Robert; Elliott, Jackie; Wheatley, Timothy; Sanders, Grant; Hollowood, Andrew; Falk, Stephen; Titcomb, Dan; Streets, Christopher; Donovan, Jenny L; Blazeby, Jane M

    2016-06-01

    Localised oesophageal cancer can be curatively treated with surgery (oesophagectomy) but the procedure is complex with a risk of complications, negative effects on quality of life and a recovery period of 6-9 months. Minimal-access surgery may accelerate recovery. The ROMIO (Randomised Oesophagectomy: Minimally Invasive or Open) study aimed to establish the feasibility of, and methodology for, a definitive trial comparing minimally invasive and open surgery for oesophagectomy. Objectives were to quantify the number of eligible patients in a pilot trial; develop surgical manuals as the basis for quality assurance; standardise pathological processing; establish a method to blind patients to their allocation in the first week post surgery; identify measures of postsurgical outcome of importance to patients and clinicians; and establish the main cost differences between the surgical approaches. Pilot parallel three-arm randomised controlled trial nested within feasibility work. Two UK NHS departments of upper gastrointestinal surgery. Patients aged ≥ 18 years with histopathological evidence of oesophageal or oesophagogastric junctional adenocarcinoma, squamous cell cancer or high-grade dysplasia, referred for oesophagectomy or oesophagectomy following neoadjuvant chemo(radio)therapy. Oesophagectomy, with patients randomised to open surgery, a hybrid open chest and minimally invasive abdomen or totally minimally invasive access. The primary outcome measure for the pilot trial was the number of patients recruited per month, with the main trial considered feasible if at least 2.5 patients per month were recruited. During 21 months of recruitment, 263 patients were assessed for eligibility; of these, 135 (51%) were found to be eligible and 104 (77%) agreed to participate, an average of five patients per month. In total, 41 patients were allocated to open surgery, 43 to the hybrid procedure and 20 to totally minimally invasive surgery. Recruitment is continuing

  17. The COLOFOL trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansdotter Andersson, Pernilla; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer; Horváth-Puhó, Erzsébet

    2016-01-01

    population. To be eligible, patients had to be 75 years or younger and curatively resected for stage II or III colorectal cancer. Exclusion criteria were hereditary colorectal cancer, no signed consent, other malignancy, and life expectancy less than 2 years due to concomitant disease. In four of the 24......INTRODUCTION: The COLOFOL trial, a prospective randomized multicenter trial comparing two follow-up regimes after curative surgical treatment for colorectal cancer, focuses on detection of asymptomatic recurrences. This paper aims to describe the design and recruitment procedure in the COLOFOL...... participating centers, we scrutinized hospital inpatient data to identify all colorectal cancer patients who underwent surgery, in order to ascertain all eligible patients who were not included in the study and to compare them with enrolled patients. RESULTS: Of a total of 4,445 eligible patients, 2...

  18. Informed consent from cognitively impaired persons participating in research trials: comparative law observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrini, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    This article addresses the ethical requirements to be considered when conducting clinical trials involving human subjects whose mental condition limits their ability to understand the information and to express fully autonomous and informed consent. It does not address other categories of vulnerable persons, such as children, or advanced directives concerning end-of-life care. There are many ethical issues entailed in clinical trials involving subjects with mental disabilities: how to obtain informed consent, balancing risks and benefits, balancing individual benefits with collective scientific and social interests, legal representation and many more. This article focuses on the issues surrounding the concept of minimal risk and the relationship between informed consent and risk. These issues are addressed with particular emphasis on the regulations adopted by the European Union and the federal government of the United States of America. The conclusion proposes a list of working criteria.

  19. Informed consent from cognitively impaired persons participating in research trials: comparative law observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Petrini

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses the ethical requirements to be considered when conducting clinical trials involving human subjects whose mental condition limits their ability to understand the information and to express fully autonomous and informed consent. It does not address other categories of vulnerable persons, such as children, or advanced directives concerning end-of-life care. There are many ethical issues entailed in clinical trials involving subjects with mental disabilities: how to obtain informed consent, balancing risks and benefits, balancing individual benefits with collective scientific and social interests, legal representation and many more. This article focuses on the issues surrounding the concept of minimal risk and the relationship between informed consent and risk. These issues are addressed with particular emphasis on the regulations adopted by the European Union and the federal government of the United States of America. The conclusion proposes a list of working criteria.

  20. A Randomized Trial Comparing Skin Antiseptic Agents at Cesarean Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuuli, Methodius G; Liu, Jingxia; Stout, Molly J; Martin, Shannon; Cahill, Alison G; Odibo, Anthony O; Colditz, Graham A; Macones, George A

    2016-02-18

    Preoperative skin antisepsis has the potential to decrease the risk of surgical-site infection. However, evidence is limited to guide the choice of antiseptic agent at cesarean delivery, which is the most common major surgical procedure among women in the United States. In this single-center, randomized, controlled trial, we evaluated whether the use of chlorhexidine-alcohol for preoperative skin antisepsis was superior to the use of iodine-alcohol for the prevention of surgical-site infection after cesarean delivery. We randomly assigned patients undergoing cesarean delivery to skin preparation with either chlorhexidine-alcohol or iodine-alcohol. The primary outcome was superficial or deep surgical-site infection within 30 days after cesarean delivery, on the basis of definitions from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. From September 2011 through June 2015, a total of 1147 patients were enrolled; 572 patients were assigned to chlorhexidine-alcohol and 575 to iodine-alcohol. In an intention-to-treat analysis, surgical-site infection was diagnosed in 23 patients (4.0%) in the chlorhexidine-alcohol group and in 42 (7.3%) in the iodine-alcohol group (relative risk, 0.55; 95% confidence interval, 0.34 to 0.90; P=0.02). The rate of superficial surgical-site infection was 3.0% in the chlorhexidine-alcohol group and 4.9% in the iodine-alcohol group (P=0.10); the rate of deep infection was 1.0% and 2.4%, respectively (P=0.07). The frequency of adverse skin reactions was similar in the two groups. The use of chlorhexidine-alcohol for preoperative skin antisepsis resulted in a significantly lower risk of surgical-site infection after cesarean delivery than did the use of iodine-alcohol. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01472549.).

  1. The PREEMPT study - evaluating smartphone-assisted n-of-1 trials in patients with chronic pain: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Colin; Marois, Maria; Sim, Ida; Schmid, Christopher H; Wilsey, Barth; Ward, Deborah; Duan, Naihua; Hays, Ron D; Selsky, Joshua; Servadio, Joseph; Schwartz, Marc; Dsouza, Clyde; Dhammi, Navjot; Holt, Zachary; Baquero, Victor; MacDonald, Scott; Jerant, Anthony; Sprinkle, Ron; Kravitz, Richard L

    2015-02-27

    Chronic pain is prevalent, costly, and clinically vexatious. Clinicians typically use a trial-and-error approach to treatment selection. Repeated crossover trials in a single patient (n-of-1 trials) may provide greater therapeutic precision. N-of-1 trials are the most direct way to estimate individual treatment effects and are useful in comparing the effectiveness and toxicity of different analgesic regimens. The goal of the PREEMPT study is to test the 'Trialist' mobile health smartphone app, which has been developed to make n-of-1 trials easier to accomplish, and to provide patients and clinicians with tools for individualizing treatments for chronic pain. A randomized controlled trial is being conducted to test the feasibility and effectiveness of the Trialist app. A total of 244 participants will be randomized to either the Trialist app intervention group (122 patients) or a usual care control group (122 patients). Patients assigned to the Trialist app will work with their clinicians to set up an n-of-1 trial comparing two pain regimens, selected from a menu of flexible options. The Trialist app provides treatment reminders and collects data entered daily by the patient on pain levels and treatment side effects. Upon completion of the n-of-1 trial, patients review results with their clinicians and develop a long-term treatment plan. The primary study outcome (comparing Trialist to usual care patients) is pain-related interference with daily functioning at 26 weeks. Trialist will allow patients and clinicians to conduct personalized n-of-1 trials. In prior studies, n-of-1 trials have been shown to encourage greater patient involvement with care, which has in turn been associated with better health outcomes. mHealth technology implemented using smartphones may offer an efficient means of facilitating n-of-1 trials so that more patients can benefit from this approach. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02116621 , first registered 15 April 2014.

  2. Endeavour zotarolimus-eluting stent reduces stent thrombosis and improves clinical outcomes compared with cypher sirolimus-eluting stent : 4-year results of the PROTECT randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijns, William; Steg, Ph. Gabriel; Mauri, Laura; Kurowski, Volkhard; Parikh, Keyur; Gao, Runlin; Bode, Christoph; Greenwood, John P.; Lipsic, Erik; Alamgir, Farqad; Rademaker-Havinga, Tessa; Boersma, Eric; Radke, Peter; van Leeuwen, Frank; Camenzind, Edoardo

    2014-01-01

    Aims To compare the long-term clinical safety between two drug-eluting stents with different healing characteristics in the Patient Related Outcomes with Endeavour (E-ZES) vs. Cypher (C-SES) Stenting Trial (PROTECT). At 3 years, there was no difference in the primary outcome of definite or probable

  3. Explaining feast or famine in randomized field trials. Medical science and criminology compared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Jonathan P

    2003-06-01

    A feast of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in medical science and comparative famine in criminology can be explained in terms of cultural and structural factors. Of central importance is the context in which the evaluation of interventions is done and the difference in status of situational research in the two disciplines. Evaluation of medical interventions has traditionally been led by practitioner (clinical) academics. This is not the case in criminal justice, where theory has had higher status than intervention research. Medical science has advanced in, or closely associated with, university teaching hospitals, but links between criminology and criminal justice services are far more tenuous. The late development of situational crime prevention seems extraordinary from a medical perspective, as does the absence of university police schools in the United Kingdom and elsewhere. These structural and cultural factors explain concentration of expectation, resource, and RCT productivity in medical science. The Campbell Collaboration and the Academy of Experimental Criminology are forces which are reducing this polarization of feast and famine in RCTs. But unless scientific criminology is embedded in university schools which are responsible for the education and training of law, probation, and police practitioners, convergence in terms of RCTs and implementation of findings in practice seems unlikely.

  4. Troxipide in the Management of Gastritis: A Randomized Comparative Trial in General Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhupesh Dewan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. A trial of empirical acid-suppressive therapy is the usual practice for most patients with symptoms of gastritis in primary care. Aim. To assess the relative efficacy of Troxipide and Ranitidine in patients with endoscopic gastritis over a four-week period. Methods. In all, 142 patients were randomized to Troxipide (100 mg tid or Ranitidine (150 mg bid for a period of four weeks. The severity of the signs of endoscopic gastritis at baseline and week 4 using a four-point scale and the subjective symptom severity at baseline and week 2 & week 4 using a Visual analog scale (VAS were documented. Results. Troxipide was found to be superior to Ranitidine for both, the complete resolution and improvement of endoscopic gastritis. Higher proportion of patients showed complete healing of erosions (88.14%, oozing (96.77%, and edema (93.88% with Troxipide as compared to Ranitidine (<.01. Patients receiving Troxipide also showed a greater improvement in the VAS scores for abdominal pain, bloating, and heartburn (<.01. Both the drugs were found to be well tolerated. Conclusion. In patients with endoscopic gastritis, Troxipide, with its superior rate of improvement, resolution of signs, and subjective clinical symptoms, can be considered as an alternative to the commonly used antisecretory agents.

  5. Aflibercept, Bevacizumab, or Ranibizumab for Diabetic Macular Edema: Two-Year Results from a Comparative Effectiveness Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, John A; Glassman, Adam R; Ayala, Allison R; Jampol, Lee M; Bressler, Neil M; Bressler, Susan B; Brucker, Alexander J; Ferris, Frederick L; Hampton, G Robert; Jhaveri, Chirag; Melia, Michele; Beck, Roy W

    2016-06-01

    To provide 2-year results comparing anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) agents for center-involved diabetic macular edema (DME) using a standardized follow-up and retreatment regimen. Randomized clinical trial. Six hundred sixty participants with visual acuity (VA) impairment from DME. Randomization to 2.0-mg aflibercept, 1.25-mg repackaged (compounded) bevacizumab, or 0.3-mg ranibizumab intravitreous injections performed up to monthly using a protocol-specific follow-up and retreatment regimen. Focal/grid laser photocoagulation was added after 6 months if DME persisted. Visits occurred every 4 weeks during year 1 and were extended up to every 4 months thereafter when VA and macular thickness were stable. Change in VA, adverse events, and retreatment frequency. Median numbers of injections were 5, 6, and 6 in year 2 and 15, 16, and 15 over 2 years in the aflibercept, bevacizumab, and ranibizumab groups, respectively (global P = 0.08). Focal/grid laser photocoagulation was administered in 41%, 64%, and 52%, respectively (aflibercept vs. bevacizumab, P 0.10, for pairwise comparisons). Anti-Platelet Trialists' Collaboration (APTC) events occurred in 5% with aflibercept, 8% with bevacizumab, and 12% with ranibizumab (global P = 0.047; aflibercept vs. bevacizumab, P = 0.34; aflibercept vs. ranibizumab, P = 0.047; ranibizumab vs. bevacizumab, P = 0.20; global P = 0.09 adjusted for potential confounders). All 3 anti-VEGF groups showed VA improvement from baseline to 2 years with a decreased number of injections in year 2. Visual acuity outcomes were similar for eyes with better baseline VA. Among eyes with worse baseline VA, aflibercept had superior 2-year VA outcomes compared with bevacizumab, but superiority of aflibercept over ranibizumab, noted at 1 year, was no longer identified. Higher APTC event rates with ranibizumab over 2 years warrants continued evaluation in future trials. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Ophthalmology. All rights

  6. Prospective molecular profiling of canine cancers provides a clinically relevant comparative model for evaluating personalized medicine (PMed trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Paoloni

    Full Text Available Molecularly-guided trials (i.e. PMed now seek to aid clinical decision-making by matching cancer targets with therapeutic options. Progress has been hampered by the lack of cancer models that account for individual-to-individual heterogeneity within and across cancer types. Naturally occurring cancers in pet animals are heterogeneous and thus provide an opportunity to answer questions about these PMed strategies and optimize translation to human patients. In order to realize this opportunity, it is now necessary to demonstrate the feasibility of conducting molecularly-guided analysis of tumors from dogs with naturally occurring cancer in a clinically relevant setting.A proof-of-concept study was conducted by the Comparative Oncology Trials Consortium (COTC to determine if tumor collection, prospective molecular profiling, and PMed report generation within 1 week was feasible in dogs. Thirty-one dogs with cancers of varying histologies were enrolled. Twenty-four of 31 samples (77% successfully met all predefined QA/QC criteria and were analyzed via Affymetrix gene expression profiling. A subsequent bioinformatics workflow transformed genomic data into a personalized drug report. Average turnaround from biopsy to report generation was 116 hours (4.8 days. Unsupervised clustering of canine tumor expression data clustered by cancer type, but supervised clustering of tumors based on the personalized drug report clustered by drug class rather than cancer type.Collection and turnaround of high quality canine tumor samples, centralized pathology, analyte generation, array hybridization, and bioinformatic analyses matching gene expression to therapeutic options is achievable in a practical clinical window (<1 week. Clustering data show robust signatures by cancer type but also showed patient-to-patient heterogeneity in drug predictions. This lends further support to the inclusion of a heterogeneous population of dogs with cancer into the preclinical

  7. Comparing the effects of Calendula officinalis and clotrimazole on vaginal Candidiasis: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffari, Elnaz; Mohammad-Alizadeh-Charandabi, Sakineh; Adibpour, Mohammad; Mirghafourvand, Mojgan; Javadzadeh, Yousef

    2017-01-01

    This triple-blind trial examined the effects of Calendula officinalis vaginal cream on the treatment of vaginal Candidiasis (primary outcome) and sexual function (secondary outcome). Married women aged 18-45 years with vaginal Candidiasis (n = 150) were recruited from April to October 2014 and randomized into Calendula and clotrimazole groups, using 5-g vaginal cream every night for seven nights. Clinical and laboratory assessments were conducted at 10-15 and 30-35 days after intervention and the female sexual function index was assessed at 30-35 days. Six women were lost to follow-up. The frequency of testing negative for Candidiasis in the Calendula group was significantly lower at the first (49% vs. 74%; odds ratio (OR) 0.32; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.16-0.67) but higher at the second (77% vs. 34%; OR 3.1; 95% CI 1.5-6.2) follow-up compared to the clotrimazole group. The frequency of most signs and symptoms were almost equal in the two groups at the first follow-up, but were significantly lower in the Calendula group at the second follow-up. Sexual function had almost equal significant improvement in both groups. Calendula vaginal cream appears to have been effective in the treatment of vaginal Candidiasis and to have a delayed but greater long-term effect compared to clotrimazole.

  8. A 12-week commercial web-based weight-loss program for overweight and obese adults: randomized controlled trial comparing basic versus enhanced features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Clare E; Morgan, Philip J; Jones, Penelope; Fletcher, Kate; Martin, Julia; Aguiar, Elroy J; Lucas, Ashlee; Neve, Melinda J; Callister, Robin

    2012-04-25

    The development and use of Web-based programs for weight loss is increasing rapidly, yet they have rarely been evaluated using randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Interestingly, most people who attempt weight loss use commercially available programs, yet it is very uncommon for commercial programs to be evaluated independently or rigorously. To compare the efficacy of a standard commercial Web-based weight-loss program (basic) versus an enhanced version of this Web program that provided additional personalized e-feedback and contact from the provider (enhanced) versus a wait-list control group (control) on weight outcomes in overweight and obese adults. This purely Web-based trial using a closed online user group was an assessor-blinded RCT with participants randomly allocated to the basic or enhanced 12-week Web-based program, based on social cognitive theory, or the control, with body mass index (BMI) as the primary outcome. We enrolled 309 adults (129/309, 41.8% male, BMI mean 32.3, SD 4 kg/m(2)) with 84.1% (260/309) retention at 12 weeks. Intention-to-treat analysis showed that both intervention groups reduced their BMI compared with the controls (basic: -0.72, SD 1.1 kg/m(2), enhanced: -1.0, SD 1.4, control: 0.15, SD 0.82; P 3.0, SD 4.1, control: 0.4, SD 2.3; P 3.0; P Web-based weight-loss program can be efficacious across a range of weight-related outcomes and lifestyle behaviors and achieve clinically important weight loss. Although the provision of additional personalized feedback did not facilitate greater weight loss after 12 weeks, the impact of superior participant retention on longer-term outcomes requires further study. Further research is required to determine the optimal mix of program features that lead to the biggest treatment impact over time. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR): 12610000197033.

  9. Home exercise programmes supported by video and automated reminders compared with standard paper-based home exercise programmes in patients with stroke: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmerson, Kellie B; Harding, Katherine E; Taylor, Nicholas F

    2017-08-01

    To determine whether patients with stroke receiving rehabilitation for upper limb deficits using smart technology (video and reminder functions) demonstrate greater adherence to prescribed home exercise programmes and better functional outcomes when compared with traditional paper-based exercise prescription. Randomized controlled trial comparing upper limb home exercise programmes supported by video and automated reminders on smart technology, with standard paper-based home exercise programmes. A community rehabilitation programme within a large metropolitan health service. Patients with stroke with upper limb deficits, referred for outpatient rehabilitation. Participants were randomly assigned to the control (paper-based home exercise programme) or intervention group (home exercise programme filmed on an electronic tablet, with an automated reminder). Both groups completed their prescribed home exercise programme for four weeks. The primary outcome was adherence using a self-reported log book. Secondary outcomes were change in upper limb function and patient satisfaction. A total of 62 participants were allocated to the intervention ( n = 30) and control groups ( n = 32). There were no differences between the groups for measures of adherence (mean difference 2%, 95% CI -12 to 17) or change in the Wolf Motor Function Test log transformed time (mean difference 0.02 seconds, 95% CI -0.1 to 0.1). There were no between-group differences in how participants found instructions ( p = 0.452), whether they remembered to do their exercises ( p = 0.485), or whether they enjoyed doing their exercises ( p = 0.864). The use of smart technology was not superior to standard paper-based home exercise programmes for patients recovering from stroke. This trial design was registered prospectively with the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register, ID: ACTRN 12613000786796. http://www.anzctr.org.au/trialSearch.aspx.

  10. The Effectiveness Of Social Media (Facebook) Compared With More Traditional Advertising Methods for Recruiting Eligible Participants To Health Research Studies: A Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frandsen, Mai; Thow, Megan; Ferguson, Stuart G

    2016-08-10

    Recruiting participants for research studies can be difficult and costly. The popularity of social media platforms (eg, Facebook) has seen corresponding growth in the number of researchers turning to social networking sites and their embedded advertising frameworks to locate eligible participants for studies. Compared with traditional recruitment strategies such as print media, social media advertising has been shown to be favorable in terms of its reach (especially with hard-to-reach populations), cost effectiveness, and usability. However, to date, no studies have examined how participants recruited via social media progress through a study compared with those recruited using more traditional recruitment strategies. (1) Examine whether visiting the study website prior to being contacted by researchers creates self-screened participants who are more likely to progress through all study phases (eligible, enrolled, completed); (2) compare conversion percentages and cost effectiveness of each recruitment method at each study phase; and, (3) compare demographic and smoking characteristics of participants recruited through each strategy to determine if they attract similar samples. Participants recruited to a smoking cessation clinical trial were grouped by how they had become aware of the study: via social media (Facebook) or traditional media (eg, newspaper, flyers, radio, word of mouth). Groups were compared based on throughput data (conversion percentages and cost) as well as demographic and smoking characteristics. Visiting the study website did not result in individuals who were more likely to be eligible for (P=.24), enroll in (P=.20), or complete (P=.25) the study. While using social media was more cost effective than traditional methods when we examined earlier endpoints of the recruitment process (cost to obtain a screened respondent: AUD $22.73 vs $29.35; cost to obtain an eligible respondent: $37.56 vs $44.77), it was less cost effective in later endpoints

  11. A new fully human recombinant FSH (follitropin epsilon): two phase I randomized placebo and comparator-controlled pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-Elaziz, Khalid; Duijkers, Ingrid; Stöckl, Lars; Dietrich, Bruno; Klipping, Christine; Eckert, Kelvin; Goletz, Steffen

    2017-08-01

    performed by the investigators, such as transvaginal ultrasound assessments, may have been subject to personal bias. No prospective calculations of statistical power had been made, as is common practice for first in human and early phase I studies in healthy volunteers. These early development studies showed that follitropin epsilon exhibits comparable PK characteristics, as well as inducing stronger PD effects in terms of follicle growth and serum inhibin B, than the comparators. Follitropin epsilon induced a dose-dependent increase in follicular growth. The results warrant further studies with this new fully human recombinant FSH. The studies were sponsored by GLYCOTOPE GmbH, Berlin, Germany. K.A-E. is an employee of QPS-Netherlands, B.V., which received funding for the studies from Glycotope GmbH; I.D. and C.K. are employees of Dinox B.V., which received funding for the studies from Glycotope GmbH; L.S. and S.G. are employees and shareholders of Glycotope GmbH; B.D. and K.E. are employees of Glycotope GmbH. www.clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01354886 (single-dose); NCT01477073 (multiple-dose). The single-dose trial was registered on 11 May 2011 while the multiple-dose trial was registered on 09 November 2011. First subject was enroled in the single-dose trial in 27 April 2011 and in the multiple-dose trial in 02 October 2011. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  12. Explaining Feast or Famine in Randomized Field Trials: Medical Science and Criminology Compared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Jonathan P.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the contrast between the frequency of randomized clinical trials in the health sciences and the relative famine of such studies in criminology. Attributes this difference to the contexts in which research is done and the difference in the status of situational research in the two disciplines. (SLD)

  13. The ExStroke Pilot Trial: rationale, design, and baseline data of a randomized multicenter trial comparing physical training versus usual care after an ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, L.H.; Gluud, C.; Truelsen, T.

    2008-01-01

    of increasing stroke patients' level of physical activity and secondarily to associate the level of physical activity to the risk of recurrent stroke, myocardial infarction, and all-cause mortality in the two groups. We describe the rationale, design, and baseline data of the ExStroke Pilot Trial. METHODS......INTRODUCTION: A high level of physical activity is associated with a decreased risk of first stroke and physical activity modifies recognized stroke risk factors and is recommended for stroke survivors. Available research shows that stroke patients can increase their level of physical performance...... over a short period. When the intervention period is over, physical performance often declines towards baseline level. Currently, there is no evidence on the association between physical activity and the risk of recurrent stroke. The ExStroke Pilot Trial is a randomized clinical trial with the aim...

  14. Risk factors for low vision related functioning in the Mycotic Ulcer Treatment Trial: a randomised trial comparing natamycin with voriconazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose-Nussbaumer, Jennifer; Prajna, N Venkatesh; Krishnan, Tiruvengada; Mascarenhas, Jeena; Rajaraman, Revathi; Srinivasan, Muthiah; Raghavan, Anita; Oldenburg, Catherine E; O'Brien, Kieran S; Ray, Kathryn J; Porco, Travis C; McLeod, Stephen D; Acharya, Nisha R; Keenan, Jeremy D; Lietman, Thomas M

    2016-07-01

    The Mycotic Ulcer Treatment Trial I (MUTT I) was a double-masked, multicentre, randomised controlled trial, which found that topical natamycin is superior to voriconazole for the treatment of filamentous fungal corneal ulcers. In this study, we determine risk factors for low vision-related quality of life in patients with fungal keratitis. The Indian visual function questionnaire (IND-VFQ) was administered to MUTT I study participants at 3 months. Associations between patient and ulcer characteristics and IND-VFQ subscale score were assessed using generalised estimating equations. 323 patients were enrolled in the trial, and 292 (90.4%) completed the IND-VFQ at 3 months. Out of a total possible score of 100, the average VFQ score for all participants was 81.3 (range 0-100, SD 23.6). After correcting for treatment arm, each logMAR line of worse baseline visual acuity in the affected eye resulted in an average 1.2 points decrease on VFQ at 3 months (95% CI -1.8 to 0.6, p<0.001). Those who required therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty had an average of 25.2 points decrease on VFQ after correcting for treatment arm (95% CI -31.8 to -18.5, p<0.001). Study participants who were unemployed had on average 28.5 points decrease on VFQ (95% CI -46.9 to -10.2, p=0.002) after correcting for treatment arm. Monocular vision loss from corneal opacity due to fungal keratitis reduced vision-related quality of life. Given the relatively high worldwide burden of corneal opacity, improving treatment outcomes of corneal infections should be a public health priority. Clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00996736. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  15. The TOPSHOCK study: effectiveness of radial shockwave therapy compared to focused shockwave therapy for treating patellar tendinopath - design of a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Worp, Henk; Zwerver, Johannes; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge; Diercks, Ron L

    2011-10-11

    Patellar tendinopathy is a chronic overuse injury of the patellar tendon that is especially prevalent in people who are involved in jumping activities. Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy is a relatively new treatment modality for tendinopathies. It seems to be a safe and promising part of the rehabilitation program for patellar tendinopathy. Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy originally used focused shockwaves. Several years ago a new kind of shockwave therapy was introduced: radial shockwave therapy. Studies that investigate the effectiveness of radial shockwave therapy as treatment for patellar tendinopathy are scarce. Therefore the aim of this study is to compare the effectiveness of focussed shockwave therapy and radial shockwave therapy as treatments for patellar tendinopathy. The TOPSHOCK study (Tendinopathy Of Patella SHOCKwave) is a two-armed randomised controlled trial in which the effectiveness of focussed shockwave therapy and radial shockwave therapy are directly compared. Outcome assessors and patients are blinded as to which treatment is given. Patients undergo three sessions of either focused shockwave therapy or radial shockwave therapy at 1-week intervals, both in combination with eccentric decline squat training. Follow-up measurements are scheduled just before treatments 2 and 3, and 1, 4, 7 and 12 weeks after the final treatment. The main outcome measure is the Dutch VISA-P questionnaire, which asks for pain, function and sports participation in subjects with patellar tendinopathy. Secondary outcome measures are pain determined with a VAS during ADL, sports and decline squats, rating of subjective improvement and overall satisfaction with the treatment. Patients will also record their sports activities, pain during and after these activities, and concurrent medical treatment on a weekly basis in a web-based diary. Results will be analysed according to the intention-to-treat principle. The TOPSHOCK study is the first randomised controlled trial that

  16. Sample size for comparing negative binomial rates in noninferiority and equivalence trials with unequal follow-up times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yongqiang

    2017-05-25

    We derive the sample size formulae for comparing two negative binomial rates based on both the relative and absolute rate difference metrics in noninferiority and equivalence trials with unequal follow-up times, and establish an approximate relationship between the sample sizes required for the treatment comparison based on the two treatment effect metrics. The proposed method allows the dispersion parameter to vary by treatment groups. The accuracy of these methods is assessed by simulations. It is demonstrated that ignoring the between-subject variation in the follow-up time by setting the follow-up time for all individuals to be the mean follow-up time may greatly underestimate the required size, resulting in underpowered studies. Methods are provided for back-calculating the dispersion parameter based on the published summary results.

  17. Does participating in a clinical trial affect subsequent nursing management? Post-trial care for participants recruited to the INTACT pressure ulcer prevention trial: A follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Joan; Bucknall, Tracey; Wallis, Marianne; McInnes, Elizabeth; Roberts, Shelley; Chaboyer, Wendy

    2017-06-01

    Participation in a clinical trial is believed to benefit patients but little is known about the post-trial effects on routine hospital-based care. To describe (1) hospital-based, pressure ulcer care-processes after patients were discharged from a pressure ulcer prevention, cluster randomised controlled trial; and (2) to investigate if the trial intervention had any impact on subsequent hospital-based care. We conducted a retrospective analysis of 133 trial participants who developed a pressure ulcer during the clinical trial. We compared outcomes and care processes between participants who received the pressure ulcer prevention intervention and those in the usual care, control group. We also compared care processes according to the pressure ulcer stage. A repositioning schedule was reported for 19 (14.3%) patients; 33 (24.8%) had a dressing applied to the pressure ulcer; 17 (12.8) patients were assessed by a wound care team; and 20 (15.0%) were seen by an occupational therapist. Patients in the trial's intervention group were more likely to have the presence of a pressure ulcer documented in their chart (odds ratio (OR) 8.18, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 3.64-18.36); to be referred to an occupational therapist OR 0.92 (95% CI 0.07; 0.54); to receive a pressure relieving device OR 0.31 (95% CI 0.14; 0.69); or a pressure relieving mattress OR 0.44 (95% CI 0.20; 0.96). Participants with Stage 2 or unstageable ulcers were more likely than others to have dressings applied to their wounds (p=pressure ulcer status and care is poor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Protocol for a randomised controlled trial investigating the effectiveness of an online e-health application compared to attention placebo or sertraline in the treatment of generalised anxiety disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenardy Justin

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Generalised anxiety disorder (GAD is a high prevalence, chronic psychiatric disorder which commonly presents early in the lifespan. Internet e-health applications have been found to be successful in reducing symptoms of anxiety and stress for post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD, panic disorder, social phobia and depression. However, to date, there is little evidence for the effectiveness of e-health applications in adult GAD. There are no studies which have directly compared e-health applications with recognised evidence-based medication. This study aims to determine the effectiveness of a web-based program for treating GAD relative to sertraline and attention placebo. Methods/Design 120 community-dwelling participants, aged 18-30 years with a clinical diagnosis of GAD will be recruited from the Australian Electoral Roll. They will be randomly allocated to one of three conditions: (i an online treatment program for GAD, E-couch (ii pharmacological treatment with a selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor (SSRI, sertraline (a fixed-flexible dose of 25-100 mg/day or (iii an attention control placebo, HealthWatch. The treatment program will be completed over a 10 week period with a 12 month follow-up. Discussion As of February 2010, there were no registered trials evaluating the effectiveness of an e-health application for GAD for young adults. Similarly to date, this will be the first trial to compare an e-health intervention with a pharmacological treatment. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN76298775

  19. Comparing systemic therapy and cognitive behavioral therapy for social anxiety disorders: study protocol for a randomized controlled pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunger, Christina; Hilzinger, Rebecca; Koch, Theresa; Mander, Johannes; Sander, Anja; Bents, Hinrich; Schweitzer, Jochen

    2016-03-31

    Social anxiety disorders are among the most prevalent anxiety disorders in the general population. The efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for social anxiety disorders is well demonstrated. However, only three studies point to the efficacy of systemic therapy (ST) in anxiety disorders, and only two of them especially focus on social anxiety disorders. These ST studies either do not use a good comparator but minimal supportive therapy, they do not use a multi-person ST but a combined therapy, or they do not especially focus on social anxiety disorders but mood and anxiety disorders in general. Though ST was approved as evidence based in Germany for a variety of disorders in 2008, evidence did not include anxiety disorders. This is the first pilot study that will investigate multi-person ST, integrating a broad range of systemic methods, specifically for social anxiety disorders and that will compare ST to the "gold standard" CBT. This article describes the rationale and protocol of a prospective, open, interventive, balanced, bi-centric, pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT). A total of 32 patients with a primary SCID diagnosis of social anxiety disorder will be randomized to either CBT or ST. Both treatments will be manualized. The primary outcome will include social anxiety symptoms at the end of therapy. Therapy will be restricted to no more than 26 hours (primary endpoint). Secondary outcomes will include psychological, social systems and interpersonal functioning, symptom adjustment, and caregiver burden, in addition to change measures, therapist variables and treatment adherence. At the secondary endpoints, 9 and 12 months after the beginning of therapy, we will again assess all outcomes. The study is expected to pilot test a RCT which will be the first to directly compare CBT and multi-person ST, integrating a broad range of systemic methods, for social anxiety disorders, and it will provide empirical evidence for the calculation of the number of

  20. Comparing Different Epinephrine Concentrations for Spinal Anesthesia in Cesarean Section: A Double-Blind Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Hamzei

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although various anesthetic techniques can be used in different kinds of surgeries, spinal anesthesia has received considerable attention for the lower abdomen and lower extremities surgeries and cesarean section. This study aimed at comparing the effect of adding epinephrine 1:1000 and 1:10000 to lidocaine and fentanyl in spinal anesthesia on the prolongation of paralysis, analgesia and hemodynamic changes in pregnant women candidate for cesarean section. Methods: A double blind randomized clinical trial was carried out on 66 pregnant women (equally sized control and treatment groups of 33 in 2011. After randomizing the participants into two groups of recipients of epinephrine 1:1000 plus lidocaine 5% and fentanyl (control group and recipients of epinephrine 1:10000 with lidocaine 5% and fentanyl, (treatment group, the participants’ systolic and diastolic blood pressure and heart rate were recorded before and 1, 3, 5, 10, 15 minutes after procedure. Besides the prolongation of paralysis and analgesia, the presence of postoperative nausea and vomiting were evaluated. The outcome of the study was analyzed using SPSS software and via t test, χ2 test and RMANOVA. Results: The mean age (standard deviation of the participants was 29.3 (4.4 and 28.2 (4.5 in the treatment and control groups, respectively. There were no statistical significance between the participants’ prolongation of paralysis, analgesia, the frequency of nausea and vomiting, and the average values of hemodynamic variables between the two groups. Conclusion: The use of epinephrine 1:10000 along with lidocaine and fentanyl is recommended in spinal anesthesia in pregnant women candidate for cesarean section. Trial Registration Number: IRCT201012225445N1.

  1. The Prostate Cancer Intervention Versus Observation Trial: VA/NCI/AHRQ Cooperative Studies Program #407 (PIVOT): design and baseline results of a randomized controlled trial comparing radical prostatectomy with watchful waiting for men with clinically localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilt, Timothy J

    2012-12-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common noncutaneous malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer death in men. In the United States, 90% of men with prostate cancer are more than age 60 years, diagnosed by early detection with the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test, and have disease believed confined to the prostate gland (clinically localized). Common treatments for clinically localized prostate cancer include watchful waiting (WW), surgery to remove the prostate gland (radical prostatectomy), external-beam radiation therapy and interstitial radiation therapy (brachytherapy), and androgen deprivation. Little is known about the relative effectiveness and harms of treatments because of the paucity of randomized controlled trials. The Department of Veterans Affairs/National Cancer Institute/Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Cooperative Studies Program Study #407:Prostate Cancer Intervention Versus Observation Trial (PIVOT), initiated in 1994, is a multicenter randomized controlled trial comparing radical prostatectomy with WW in men with clinically localized prostate cancer. We describe the study rationale, design, recruitment methods, and baseline characteristics of PIVOT enrollees. We provide comparisons with eligible men declining enrollment and men participating in another recently reported randomized trial of radical prostatectomy vs WW conducted in Scandinavia. We screened 13 022 men with prostate cancer at 52 US medical centers for potential enrollment. From these, 5023 met initial age, comorbidity, and disease eligibility criteria, and a total of 731 men agreed to participate and were randomized. The mean age of enrollees was 67 years. Nearly one-third were African American. Approximately 85% reported that they were fully active. The median PSA was 7.8ng/mL (mean 10.2ng/mL). In three-fourths of men, the primary reason for biopsy leading to a diagnosis of prostate cancer was a PSA elevation or rise. Using previously developed tumor risk

  2. Investigating the heterogeneity of alkylating agents' efficacy and toxicity between sexes: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized trials comparing cyclophosphamide and ifosfamide (MAIAGE study)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fresneau, Brice; Hackshaw, A.; Hawkins, D. S.; Paulussen, M.; Anderson, J. R.; Judson, I.; Litière, S.; Dirksen, U.; Lewis, I.; van den Berg, H.; Gaspar, N.; Gelderblom, H.; Whelan, J.; Boddy, A. V.; Wheatley, K.; Pignon, J. P.; de Vathaire, F.; Le Deley, M. C.; Le Teuff, G.

    2017-01-01

    A marginal interaction between sex and the type of alkylating agent was observed for event-free survival in the Euro-EWING99-R1 randomized controlled trial (RCT) comparing cyclophosphamide and ifosfamide in Ewing sarcoma. To further evaluate this interaction, we performed an individual patient data

  3. A Randomized Trial Comparing Mail versus In-Office Distribution of the CAHPS Clinician and Group Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastario, Michael P; Rodriguez, Hector P; Gallagher, Patricia M; Cleary, Paul D; Shaller, Dale; Rogers, William H; Bogen, Karen; Safran, Dana Gelb

    2010-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of survey distribution protocol (mail versus handout) on data quality and measurement of patient care experiences. Data Sources/Study Setting Multisite randomized trial of survey distribution protocols. Analytic sample included 2,477 patients of 15 clinicians at three practice sites in New York State. Data Collection/Extraction Methods Mail and handout distribution modes were alternated weekly at each site for 6 weeks. Principal Findings Handout protocols yielded an incomplete distribution rate (74 percent) and lower overall response rates (40 percent versus 58 percent) compared with mail. Handout distribution rates decreased over time and resulted in more favorable survey scores compared with mailed surveys. There were significant mode–physician interaction effects, indicating that data cannot simply be pooled and adjusted for mode. Conclusions In-office survey distribution has the potential to bias measurement and comparison of physicians and sites on patient care experiences. Incomplete distribution rates observed in-office, together with between-office differences in distribution rates and declining rates over time suggest staff may be burdened by the process and selective in their choice of patients. Further testing with a larger physician and site sample is important to definitively establish the potential role for in-office distribution in obtaining reliable, valid assessment of patient care experiences. PMID:20579126

  4. The Steroids for Corneal Ulcers Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Muthiah; Mascarenhas, Jeena; Rajaraman, Revathi; Ravindran, Meenakshi; Lalitha, Prajna; Glidden, David V.; Ray, Kathryn J.; Hong, Kevin C.; Oldenburg, Catherine E.; Lee, Salena M.; Zegans, Michael E.; McLeod, Stephen D.; Lietman, Thomas M.; Acharya, Nisha R.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To provide comprehensive trial methods and baseline data for the Steroids for Corneal Ulcers Trial and to present epidemiological characteristics such as risk factors, causative organisms, and ulcer severity. Methods Baseline data from a 1:1 randomized, placebo-controlled, double-masked clinical trial comparing prednisolone phosphate, 1%, with placebo as adjunctive therapy for the treatment of bacterial corneal ulcers. Eligible patients had a culture-positive bacterial corneal ulcer and had been taking moxifloxacin for 48 hours. The primary outcome for the trial is best spectacle-corrected visual acuity at 3 months from enrollment. This report provides comprehensive baseline data, including best spectacle-corrected visual acuity, infiltrate size, microbio-logical results, and patient demographics, for patients enrolled in the trial. Results Of 500 patients enrolled, 97% were in India. Two hundred twenty patients (44%) were agricultural workers. Median baseline visual acuity was 0.84 logMAR (Snellen, 20/125) (interquartile range, 0.36-1.7; Snellen, 20/50 to counting fingers). Baseline visual acuity was not significantly different between the United States and India. Ulcers in India had larger infiltrate/scar sizes (P=.04) and deeper infiltrates (P=.04) and were more likely to be localized centrally (P=.002) than ulcers enrolled in the United States. Gram-positive bacteria were the most common organisms isolated from the ulcers (n=366, 72%). Conclusions The Steroids for Corneal Ulcers Trial will compare the use of a topical corticosteroid with placebo as adjunctive therapy for bacterial corneal ulcers. Patients enrolled in this trial had diverse ulcer severity and on average significantly reduced visual acuity at presentation. PMID:21987581

  5. An analysis of registered clinical trials in otolaryngology from 2007 to 2010: ClinicalTrials.gov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witsell, David L; Schulz, Kristine A; Lee, Walter T; Chiswell, Karen

    2013-11-01

    To describe the conditions studied, interventions used, study characteristics, and funding sources of otolaryngology clinical trials from the ClinicalTrials.gov database; compare this otolaryngology cohort of interventional studies to clinical visits in a health care system; and assess agreement between clinical trials and clinical activity. Database analysis. Trial registration data downloaded from ClinicalTrials.gov and administrative data from the Duke University Medical Center from October 1, 2007 to September 27, 2010. Data extraction from ClinicalTrials.gov was done using MeSH and non-MeSH disease condition terms. Studies were subcategorized to create the following groupings for descriptive analysis: ear, nose, allergy, voice, sleep, head and neck cancer, thyroid, and throat. Duke Health System visits were queried by using selected ICD-9 codes for otolaryngology and non-otolaryngology providers. Visits were grouped similarly to ClinicalTrials.gov for further analysis. Chi-square tests were used to explore differences between groups. A total of 1115 of 40,970 registered interventional trials were assigned to otolaryngology. Head and neck cancer trials predominated. Study models most frequently incorporated parallel design (54.6%), 2 study groups (46.6%), and randomization (69.1%). Phase 2 or 3 studies constituted 46.4% of the cohort. Comparison of the ClinicalTrials.gov database with administrative health system visit data by disease condition showed discordance between national research activity and clinical visit volume for patients with otolaryngology complaints. Analysis of otolaryngology-related clinical research as listed in ClinicalTrials.gov can inform patients, physicians, and policy makers about research focus areas. The relative burden of otolaryngology-associated conditions in our tertiary health system exceeds research activity within the field.

  6. Nutritional Recovery after Open and Laparoscopic Distal Gastrectomy for Early Gastric Cancer: A Prospective Multicenter Comparative Trial (CCOG1204).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Hidenobu; Tanaka, Chie; Murotani, Kenta; Misawa, Kazunari; Ito, Seiji; Ito, Yuichi; Kanda, Mitsuro; Mochizuki, Yoshinari; Ishigure, Kiyoshi; Yaguchi, Toyohisa; Teramoto, Jin; Nakayama, Hiroshi; Kawase, Yoshihisa; Fujiwara, Michitaka; Kodera, Yasuhiro

    2018-01-01

    Little information from prospective clinical trials is available on the influences of surgical approaches on postoperative body compositions and nutritional status. We designed a prospective non-randomized trial to compare postoperative chronological changes in body composition and nutritional status between laparoscopic and open distal gastrectomy for stage I gastric cancer (GC). Body compositions and nutritional indicators in blood tests were measured at the baseline and at the 1st, 3rd, 6th, and 12th postoperative months (POM). The primary end point was the decrease relative to the baseline in the body muscle mass at POM 6. Ninety-six patients for the laparoscopic group and 52 for the open group were eligible for data analysis. No significant differences were found in any baseline demographics, body compositions, and nutritional indicators between the groups. The changes of body muscle mass at POM 6 were similar in both groups. Overall, no significant differences between the groups were observed in any of the body composition and nutritional indicators during the first year after surgery. Postoperative body compositions and nutritional status were not affected by surgical approaches during the first 12 months after surgery in patients who underwent distal gastrectomy for stage I GC. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. The DYD-RCT protocol: an on-line randomised controlled trial of an interactive computer-based intervention compared with a standard information website to reduce alcohol consumption among hazardous drinkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godfrey Christine

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Excessive alcohol consumption is a significant public health problem throughout the world. Although there are a range of effective interventions to help heavy drinkers reduce their alcohol consumption, these have little proven population-level impact. Researchers internationally are looking at the potential of Internet interventions in this area. Methods/Design In a two-arm randomised controlled trial, an on-line psychologically enhanced interactive computer-based intervention is compared with a flat, text-based information web-site. Recruitment, consent, randomisation and data collection are all on-line. The primary outcome is total past-week alcohol consumption; secondary outcomes include hazardous or harmful drinking, dependence, harm caused by alcohol, and mental health. A health economic analysis is included. Discussion This trial will provide information on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of an on-line intervention to help heavy drinkers drink less. Trial registration International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number Register ISRCTN31070347

  8. Immediate delivery compared with expectant management after preterm pre-labour rupture of the membranes close to term (PPROMT trial): a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Jonathan M; Roberts, Christine L; Bowen, Jennifer R; Patterson, Jillian A; Bond, Diana M; Algert, Charles S; Thornton, Jim G; Crowther, Caroline A

    2016-01-30

    Preterm pre-labour ruptured membranes close to term is associated with increased risk of neonatal infection, but immediate delivery is associated with risks of prematurity. The balance of risks is unclear. We aimed to establish whether immediate birth in singleton pregnancies with ruptured membranes close to term reduces neonatal infection without increasing other morbidity. The PPROMT trial was a multicentre randomised controlled trial done at 65 centres across 11 countries. Women aged over 16 years with singleton pregnancies and ruptured membranes before the onset of labour between 34 weeks and 36 weeks and 6 days weeks who had no signs of infection were included. Women were randomly assigned (1:1) by a computer-generated randomisation schedule with variable block sizes, stratified by centre, to immediate delivery or expectant management. The primary outcome was the incidence of neonatal sepsis. Secondary infant outcomes included a composite neonatal morbidity and mortality indicator (ie, sepsis, mechanical ventilation ≥24 h, stillbirth, or neonatal death); respiratory distress syndrome; any mechanical ventilation; and duration of stay in a neonatal intensive or special care unit. Secondary maternal outcomes included antepartum or intrapartum haemorrhage, intrapartum fever, postpartum treatment with antibiotics, and mode of delivery. Women and caregivers could not be masked, but those adjudicating on the primary outcome were masked to group allocation. Analyses were by intention to treat. This trial is registered with the International Clinical Trials Registry, number ISRCTN44485060. Between May 28, 2004, and June 30, 2013, 1839 women were recruited and randomly assigned: 924 to the immediate birth group and 915 to the expectant management group. One woman in the immediate birth group and three in the expectant group were excluded from the primary analyses. Neonatal sepsis occurred in 23 (2%) of 923 neonates whose mothers were assigned to immediate birth and 29

  9. Comparison of metformin and insulin versus insulin alone for type 2 diabetes: systematic review of randomised clinical trials with meta-analyses and trial sequential analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmingsen, Bianca; Christensen, Louise Lundby; Wetterslev, Jørn; Vaag, Allan; Gluud, Christian; Lund, Søren S; Almdal, Thomas

    2012-04-19

    To compare the benefits and harms of metformin and insulin versus insulin alone as reported in randomised clinical trials of patients with type 2 diabetes. Systematic review of randomised clinical trials with meta-analyses and trial sequential analyses. The Cochrane Library, Medline, Embase, Science Citation Index Expanded, Latin American Caribbean Health Sciences Literature, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature until March 2011. We also searched abstracts presented at the American Diabetes Association and European Association for the Study of Diabetes Congresses, contacted relevant trial authors and pharmaceutical companies, hand searched reference lists of included trials, and searched the US Food and Drug Administration website. Two authors independently screened titles and abstracts for randomised clinical trials comparing metformin and insulin versus insulin alone (with or without placebo) in patients with type 2 diabetes, older than 18 years, and with an intervention period of at least 12 weeks. We included trials irrespective of language, publication status, predefined outcomes, antidiabetic interventions used before randomisation, and reported outcomes. We included 26 randomised trials with 2286 participants, of which 23 trials with 2117 participants could provide data. All trials had high risk of bias. Data were sparse for outcomes relevant to patients. Metformin and insulin versus insulin alone did not significantly affect all cause mortality (relative risk 1.30, 95% confidence interval 0.57 to 2.99) or cardiovascular mortality (1.70, 0.35 to 8.30). Trial sequential analyses showed that more trials were needed before reliable conclusions could be drawn regarding these outcomes. In a fixed effect model, but not in a random effects model, severe hypoglycaemia was significantly more frequent with metformin and insulin than with insulin alone (2.83, 1.17 to 6.86). In a random effects model, metformin and insulin resulted in reduced Hb

  10. Genomic Selection in Multi-environment Crop Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakey, Helena; Cullis, Brian; Thompson, Robin; Comadran, Jordi; Halpin, Claire; Waugh, Robbie

    2016-05-03

    Genomic selection in crop breeding introduces modeling challenges not found in animal studies. These include the need to accommodate replicate plants for each line, consider spatial variation in field trials, address line by environment interactions, and capture nonadditive effects. Here, we propose a flexible single-stage genomic selection approach that resolves these issues. Our linear mixed model incorporates spatial variation through environment-specific terms, and also randomization-based design terms. It considers marker, and marker by environment interactions using ridge regression best linear unbiased prediction to extend genomic selection to multiple environments. Since the approach uses the raw data from line replicates, the line genetic variation is partitioned into marker and nonmarker residual genetic variation (i.e., additive and nonadditive effects). This results in a more precise estimate of marker genetic effects. Using barley height data from trials, in 2 different years, of up to 477 cultivars, we demonstrate that our new genomic selection model improves predictions compared to current models. Analyzing single trials revealed improvements in predictive ability of up to 5.7%. For the multiple environment trial (MET) model, combining both year trials improved predictive ability up to 11.4% compared to a single environment analysis. Benefits were significant even when fewer markers were used. Compared to a single-year standard model run with 3490 markers, our partitioned MET model achieved the same predictive ability using between 500 and 1000 markers depending on the trial. Our approach can be used to increase accuracy and confidence in the selection of the best lines for breeding and/or, to reduce costs by using fewer markers. Copyright © 2016 Oakey et al.

  11. The transvaginal hybrid NOTES versus conventionally assisted laparoscopic sigmoid resection for diverticular disease (TRANSVERSAL) trial: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senft, Jonas D; Warschkow, Rene; Diener, Markus K; Tarantino, Ignazio; Steinemann, Daniel C; Lamm, Sebastian; Simon, Thomas; Zerz, Andreas; Müller-Stich, Beat P; Linke, Georg R

    2014-11-20

    Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) is the consequence of further development of minimally invasive surgery to reduce abdominal incisions and surgical trauma. The potential benefits are expected to be less postoperative pain, faster convalescence, and reduced risk for incisional hernias and wound infections compared to conventional methods. Recent clinical studies have demonstrated the feasibility and safety of transvaginal NOTES, and transvaginal access is currently the most frequent clinically applied route for NOTES procedures. However, despite increasing clinical application, no firm clinical evidence is available for objective assessment of the potential benefits and risks of transvaginal NOTES compared to the current surgical standard. The TRANSVERSAL trial is designed as a randomized controlled trial to compare transvaginal hybrid NOTES and laparoscopic-assisted sigmoid resection. Female patients referred to elective sigmoid resection due to complicated or reoccurring diverticulitis of the sigmoid colon are considered eligible. The primary endpoint will be pain intensity during mobilization 24 hours postoperatively as measured by the blinded patient and blinded assessor on a visual analogue scale (VAS). Secondary outcomes include daily pain intensity and analgesic use, patient mobility, intraoperative complications, morbidity, length of stay, quality of life, and sexual function. Follow-up visits are scheduled 3, 12, and 36 months after surgery. A total sample size of 58 patients was determined for the analysis of the primary endpoint. The confirmatory analysis will be performed based on the intention-to-treat (ITT) principle. The TRANSVERSAL trial is the first study to compare transvaginal hybrid NOTES and conventionally assisted laparoscopic surgery for colonic resection in a randomized controlled setting. The results of the TRANSVERSAL trial will allow objective assessment of the potential benefits and risks of NOTES compared to the

  12. Effects of preferred-exercise prescription compared to usual exercise prescription on outcomes for people with non-specific low back pain: a randomized controlled trial [ACTRN12608000524392

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keating Jennifer L

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-specific chronic low back pain (NSCLBP has become a significant problem due to high healthcare utilization, rising costs of care and perceived limitations of effectiveness of many current treatments. Systematic reviews have repeatedly concluded that, on average across participants, exercise for NSCLBP appears effective in decreasing pain and improving function. Not all people with NSCLBP benefit from exercise programs and it would assist care-providers and care-seekers if factors that impact on program effectiveness and success were identified. Methods and design The study will be a randomised controlled trial comparing an exercise rehabilitation program informed by a participant preferences questionnaire compared to a program without this guideline for patients with chronic low back pain. A sample of 150 patients will be recruited in Melbourne, Australia through community-based healthcare clinics that provide supervised exercise rehabilitation programs for people with non-specific chronic low back pain. Clinicians will be randomly assigned to exercise preferences questionnaire or no questionnaire and participants will be allocated in a concealed manner. A qualitative focus group study of exercise instructor feedback about the exercise preferences instrument will be embedded in the research design. Two qualitative focus group studies will also be conducted for participants in the intervention and the control groups to obtain feedback about participants' experiences of the two types of exercise programs. The primary outcomes will be functional ability, pain, fear avoidance, exercise adherence. Discussion This trial will evaluate the effectiveness of individualised exercise prescription compared to usual exercise prescription for NSCLP and, using feedback following the trial, refine the exercise preferences questionnaire.

  13. Does the StartReact Effect Apply to First-Trial Reactive Movements?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Sutter

    Full Text Available StartReact is the acceleration of reaction time by a startling acoustic stimulus (SAS. The SAS is thought to release a pre-prepared motor program. Here, we investigated whether the StartReact effect is applicable to the very first trial in a series of repeated unpractised single-joint movements.Twenty healthy young subjects were instructed to perform a rapid ankle dorsiflexion movement in response to an imperative stimulus. Participants were divided in two groups of ten. Both groups performed 17 trials. In one group a SAS (116 dB was given in the first trial, whereas the other group received a non-startling sound (70 dB as the first imperative stimulus. In the remaining 16 trials, the SAS was given as the imperative stimulus in 25% of the trials in both groups. The same measurement was repeated one week later, but with the first-trial stimuli counterbalanced between groups.When a SAS was given in the very first trial, participants had significantly shorter onset latencies compared to first-trial responses to a non-startling stimulus. Succeeding trials were significantly faster compared to the first trial, both for trials with and without a SAS. However, the difference between the first and succeeding trials was significantly larger for responses to a non-startling stimulus compared to responses triggered by a SAS. SAS-induced acceleration in the first trial of the second session was similar to that in succeeding trials of session 1.The present results confirm that the StartReact phenomenon also applies to movements that have not yet been practiced in the experimental context. The excessive SAS-induced acceleration in the very first trial may be due to the absence of integration of novel context-specific information with the existing motor memory for movement execution. Our findings demonstrate that StartReact enables a rapid release of motor programs in the very first trial also without previous practice, which might provide a behavioural

  14. Randomized, double-blind, controlled, comparative trial of formula food containing soy protein vs. milk protein in visceral fat obesity. FLAVO study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahira, Masaya; Noda, Keita; Fukushima, Mikio; Zhang, Bo; Mitsutake, Ryoko; Uehara, Yoshinari; Ogawa, Masahiro; Saku, Keijiro; Kakuma, Tatsuyuki

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to clarify the efficacy of soy at reducing visceral fat. A randomized, double-blind, controlled, comparative trial was carried out to compare formula food containing soy protein (SP) to the same food in which soy was replaced with milk protein (MP). Forty-eight participants were enrolled for the treatment of visceral fat obesity (visceral fat area >100 cm 2 on computed tomography). The SP formula contained 12 g of SP, 9 g of MP, and other nutrients, and was given for 20 weeks in the morning, while in the MP formula SP was replaced with MP. During the 20 weeks of the trial period, visceral fat area and subcutaneous fat area in the MP group were significantly reduced, while those in the SP group did not change as assessed on analysis of covariance. Although waist circumference was reduced in both the SP and MP groups, body weight and body mass index were significantly reduced only in the MP group. Based on a mixed-effects model, the difference in log-transformed visceral fat profiles between the 2 groups was statistically significant (P<0.05), while a negative relationship was observed between the changes in visceral fat and adiponectin in the MP group (P<0.001), but not in the SP group. Formula food containing MP is superior to that containing SP for reducing visceral and subcutaneous fat. (author)

  15. Fractionated bipolar radiofrequency and bipolar radiofrequency potentiated by infrared light for treating striae: A prospective randomized, comparative trial with objective evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmelin, Yona; Boineau, Dominique; Cardot-Leccia, Nathalie; Fontas, Eric; Bahadoran, Philippe; Becker, Anne-Lise; Montaudié, Henri; Castela, Emeline; Perrin, Christophe; Lacour, Jean-Philippe; Passeron, Thierry

    2016-03-01

    Very few treatments for striae are based on prospective randomized trials. The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy of bipolar fractional radiofrequency and bipolar radiofrequency potentiated with infrared light, alone or combined, for treating abdominal stretch marks. Bicentric prospective interventional randomized controlled trial in the department of Dermatology of University Hospital of Nice and Aesthetics Laser Center of Bordeaux, France. Men and women of age 18 years or above, who presented for the treatment of mature or immature abdominal striae were included. The patients' abdomens were divided into four equal quadrants. Bipolar radiofrequency potentiated with infrared light and fractional bipolar radiofrequency were applied, alone or combined, and compared to the remaining untreated quadrant. The main criterion of evaluation was the measurement of depth of striae, using 3D photography at 6 months follow-up. A global assessment was also rated by the physician performing the treatment and by the patients. Histological analysis and confocal laser microscopy were additionally performed. A total of 22 patients were enrolled, and 384 striae were measured. In per protocol analysis mean striae depth was decreased by 21.64%, observed at 6 months follow-up with the combined approach, compared to an increase of 1.73% in the control group (P radiofrequency, combined with bipolar radiofrequency potentiated by infrared light, is an effective treatment of both immature and mature striae of the abdomen. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. A virtual clinical trial comparing static versus dynamic PET imaging in measuring response to breast cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangerin, Kristen A.; Muzi, Mark; Peterson, Lanell M.; Linden, Hannah M.; Novakova, Alena; Mankoff, David A.; E Kinahan, Paul

    2017-05-01

    We developed a method to evaluate variations in the PET imaging process in order to characterize the relative ability of static and dynamic metrics to measure breast cancer response to therapy in a clinical trial setting. We performed a virtual clinical trial by generating 540 independent and identically distributed PET imaging study realizations for each of 22 original dynamic fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) breast cancer patient studies pre- and post-therapy. Each noise realization accounted for known sources of uncertainty in the imaging process, such as biological variability and SUV uptake time. Four definitions of SUV were analyzed, which were SUVmax, SUVmean, SUVpeak, and SUV50%. We performed a ROC analysis on the resulting SUV and kinetic parameter uncertainty distributions to assess the impact of the variability on the measurement capabilities of each metric. The kinetic macro parameter, K i , showed more variability than SUV (mean CV K i   =  17%, SUV  =  13%), but K i pre- and post-therapy distributions also showed increased separation compared to the SUV pre- and post-therapy distributions (mean normalized difference K i   =  0.54, SUV  =  0.27). For the patients who did not show perfect separation between the pre- and post-therapy parameter uncertainty distributions (ROC AUC  dynamic imaging outperformed SUV in distinguishing metabolic change in response to therapy, ranging from 12 to 14 of 16 patients over all SUV definitions and uptake time scenarios (p  PET imaging.

  17. Prospective randomized clinical trial comparing laparoscopic cholecystectomy and hybrid natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) (NCT00835250).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguera, José F; Cuadrado, Angel; Dolz, Carlos; Olea, José M; García, Juan C

    2012-12-01

    Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) is a technique still in experimental development whose safety and effectiveness call for assessment through clinical trials. In this paper we present a three-arm, noninferiority, prospective randomized clinical trial of 1 year duration comparing the vaginal and transumbilical approaches for transluminal endoscopic surgery with the conventional laparoscopic approach for elective cholecystectomy. Sixty female patients between the ages of 18 and 65 years who were eligible for elective cholecystectomy were randomized in a ratio of 1:1:1 to receive hybrid transvaginal NOTES (TV group), hybrid transumbilical NOTES (TU group) or conventional laparoscopy (CL group). The main study variable was parietal complications (wound infection, bleeding, and eventration). The analysis was by intention to treat, and losses were not replaced. Cholecystectomy was successfully performed on 94% of the patients. One patient in the TU group was reconverted to CL owing to difficulty in maneuvering the endoscope. After a minimum follow-up period of 1 year, no differences were noted in the rate of parietal complications. Postoperative pain, length of hospital stay, and time off from work were similar in the three groups. No patient developed dyspareunia. Surgical time was longer among cases in which a flexible endoscope was used (CL, 47.04 min; TV, 64.85 min; TU, 59.80 min). NOTES approaches using the flexible endoscope are not inferior in safety or effectiveness to conventional laparoscopy. The transumbilical approach with flexible endoscope is as effective and safe as the transvaginal approach and is a promising, single-incision approach.

  18. A Comparative Clinical Trial of Topical Triamcinolone (Adcortyle and a Herbal Solution for the Treatment of Minor Aphthous Stomatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Rad

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the therapeutic effect of topical Myrtus communis (myrtle solution with topical triamcinolone (Adcortyle in the treatment of minor apotheosis. Materials & Methods: This clinical-trial study was conducted at Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences in 2009. 100 patients were randomly assigned into 2 groups. The 1st group received topical myrtle solution. The 2nd group received topical trimcinolone (Adcortyle. After one week, patients' declaration about time of the recovery of the pain and deterioration of oral lesion was recorded. The gathered data was then analyzed using the SPSS statistical software using t-test and chi-square. Results: After treatment, both groups showed response to topical medications with no significant difference between them (p>0.05. Conclusion: results of this study showed that topical myrtle solution is effective in the treatment of minor aphthous stomatitis and its therapeutic effect is comparable with topical triamcinolone (Adcortyle.

  19. A randomized controlled trial of 1% aqueous chlorhexidine gluconate compared with 10% povidone-iodine for topical antiseptic in neonates: effects on blood culture contamination rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuntnarumit, Pracha; Sangsuksawang, Nartsiri

    2013-04-01

    We conducted a randomized controlled trial in neonates with birth weight greater than or equal to 1,500 g that compared 1% aqueous chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) with 10% povidone-iodine (PI) as a topical antiseptic. We found 1% CHG to be more effective than 1% PI in reducing blood culture contamination rates, and no contact dermatitis was observed.

  20. Raisins compared with other snack effects on glycemia and blood pressure: a randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, James W; Weiter, Kathy M; Christian, Amber L; Ritchey, Michelle B; Bays, Harold E

    2014-01-01

    To compare effects of raisin snacks with conventional snacks on glycemia and cardiovascular risk factors. A 12-week, randomized, controlled trial compared 3-times-a-day consumption of raisins with intake of processed snacks on glycemia and cardiovascular risk factors. Men and women were randomized to snacks (n = 15) or raisins (n = 31). Outcome measures were performed at baseline, 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Fasting plasma glucose levels were not significantly affected by intake of raisins or snacks. Mean subject post prandial glucose levels were significantly reduced by raisin intake at 12 weeks; changes with raisin intake were -13.1 mg/dL (P = 0.003 vs baseline; P = 0.03 vs snacks). Eating raisins significantly decreased glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level (-0.12%; P = 0.004), a significantly greater level decrease than seen with snack intake (P = 0.036). Snack intake did not significantly affect subject systolic or diastolic blood pressure (BP). Raisin intake was associated with reductions in systolic blood pressure (SBP) at 4, 8, and 12 weeks with mean changes of -6.0 to 10.2 mmHg; all these changes were statistically significant (P = 0.015 to 0.001). Raisins were associated with significantly greater changes in diastolic blood pressure (DBP) at 4, 8, and 12 weeks than snacks (P < 0.05). Body weight did not significantly change within or between groups. Regular consumption of raisins may reduce glycemia and cardiovascular risk factors, including BP rate.

  1. Cost-effectiveness of intensive multifactorial treatment compared with routine care for individuals with screen-detected Type 2 diabetes : analysis of the ADDITION-UK cluster-randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tao, L.; Wilson, E. C. F.; Wareham, N. J.; Sandbaek, A.; Rutten, G. E. H. M.; Lauritzen, T.; Khunti, K.; Davies, M. J.; Borch-Johnsen, K.; Griffin, S. J.; Simmons, R. K.

    Aims To examine the short- and long-term cost-effectiveness of intensive multifactorial treatment compared with routine care among people with screen-detected Type 2 diabetes. Methods Cost-utility analysis in ADDITION-UK, a cluster-randomized controlled trial of early intensive treatment in people

  2. Determinants of Dropout and Nonadherence in a Dementia Prevention Randomized Controlled Trial: The Prevention of Dementia by Intensive Vascular Care Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beishuizen, Cathrien R. L.; Coley, Nicola; Moll van Charante, Eric P.; van Gool, Willem A.; Richard, Edo; Andrieu, Sandrine

    2017-01-01

    To explore and compare sociodemographic, clinical, and neuropsychiatric determinants of dropout and nonadherence in older people participating in an open-label cluster-randomized controlled trial-the Prevention of Dementia by Intensive Vascular care (preDIVA) trial-over 6 years. Secondary analysis.

  3. Determinants of Dropout and Nonadherence in a Dementia Prevention Randomized Controlled Trial: The Prevention of Dementia by Intensive Vascular Care Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beishuizen, C.R.; Coley, N.; Charante, E.P.M. van; Gool, W.A. van; Richard, E.; Andrieu, S.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To explore and compare sociodemographic, clinical, and neuropsychiatric determinants of dropout and nonadherence in older people participating in an open-label cluster-randomized controlled trial-the Prevention of Dementia by Intensive Vascular care (preDIVA) trial-over 6 years. DESIGN:

  4. The opportunities and challenges of pragmatic point-of-care randomised trials using routinely collected electronic records : evaluations of two exemplar trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Staa, Tjeerd-Pieter; Dyson, Lisa; McCann, Gerard; Padmanabhan, Shivani; Belatri, Rabah; Goldacre, Ben; Cassell, Jackie; Pirmohamed, Munir; Torgerson, David; Ronaldson, Sarah; Adamson, Joy; Taweel, Adel; Delaney, Brendan; Mahmood, Samhar; Baracaia, Simona; Round, Thomas; Fox, Robin; Hunter, Tommy; Gulliford, Martin; Smeeth, Liam

    BACKGROUND: Pragmatic trials compare the effects of different decisions in usual clinical practice. OBJECTIVES: To develop and evaluate methods to implement simple pragmatic trials using routinely collected electronic health records (EHRs) and recruiting patients at the point of care; to identify

  5. How does routinely delivered cognitive-behavioural therapy for gambling disorder compare to "gold standard" clinical trial?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David P; Fairweather-Schmidt, A Kate; Harvey, Peter W; Battersby, Malcolm W

    2018-03-01

    Currently, it is unknown whether treatment outcomes derived from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) for problem gamblers still hold when applied to patients seen in routine practice. Thus, data from an RCT of cognitive therapy versus exposure therapy for problem gambling versus patients of a gambling help service were compared. Assessments of problem gambling severity, psychosocial impairment, and alcohol use were undertaken at baseline and post-treatment and evaluated within a counterfactual framework. Findings showed that the contrast between routine CBT for pokies and horse betting had a significant effect, indicative of a 62% lower gambling urge score if routine CBT recipients had all been horse/track betters opposed to gambling with "pokies." However, the majority of contrasts indicated therapeutic outcomes achieved in routine CBT treatments were of equivalent robustness relative to RCT conditions. The present findings infer routine practice treatment outcomes are as efficacious as those generated in RCT contexts. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Pediatric Clinical Trials Conducted in South Korea from 2006 to 2015: An Analysis of the South Korean Clinical Research Information Service, US ClinicalTrials.gov and European Clinical Trials Registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sheung-Nyoung; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Song, In-Kyung; Kim, Eun-Hee; Kim, Jin-Tae; Kim, Hee-Soo

    2017-12-01

    The status of pediatric clinical trials performed in South Korea in the last decade, including clinical trials of drugs with unapproved indications for children, has not been previously examined. The aim was to provide information regarding the current state of pediatric clinical trials and create a basis for future trials performed in South Korea by reviewing three databases of clinical trials registrations. We searched for pediatric clinical studies (participants South Korea between 2006 and 2015 registered on the Clinical Research Information Service (CRIS), ClinicalTrials.gov, and the European Clinical Trials Registry (EuCTR). Additionally, we reviewed whether unapproved indications were involved in each trial by comparing the trials with a list of authorized trials provided by the Ministry of Food and Drug Safety (MFDS). The primary and secondary outcomes were to determine the change in number of pediatric clinical trials with unapproved indications over time and to assess the status of unauthorized pediatric clinical trials from the MFDS and the publication of articles after these clinical trials, respectively. We identified 342 clinical studies registered in the CRIS (n = 81), ClinicalTrials.gov (n = 225), and EuCTR (n = 36), of which 306 were reviewed after excluding duplicate registrations. Among them, 181 studies were interventional trials dealing with drugs and biological agents, of which 129 (71.3%) involved unapproved drugs. Of these 129 trials, 107 (82.9%) were authorized by the MFDS. Pediatric clinical trials in South Korea aiming to establish the safety and efficacy of drugs in children are increasing; however, non-MFDS-authorized studies remain an issue.

  7. Randomized Controlled Feasibility Trial of Intranasal Ketamine Compared to Intranasal Fentanyl for Analgesia in Children with Suspected Extremity Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Stacy L; Bryant, Kathleen K; Studnek, Jonathan R; Hogg, Melanie; Dunn, Connell; Templin, Megan A; Moore, Charity G; Young, James R; Walker, Katherine Rivera; Runyon, Michael S

    2017-12-01

    We compared the tolerability and efficacy of intranasal subdissociative ketamine to intranasal fentanyl for analgesia of children with acute traumatic pain and investigated the feasibility of a larger noninferiority trial that could investigate the potential opioid-sparing effects of intranasal ketamine. This randomized controlled trial compared 1 mg/kg intranasal ketamine to 1.5 μg/kg intranasal fentanyl in children 4 to 17 years old with acute pain from suspected isolated extremity fractures presenting to an urban Level II pediatric trauma center from December 2015 to November 2016. Patients, parents, treating physicians, and outcome assessors were blinded to group allocation. The primary outcome, a tolerability measure, was the frequency of cumulative side effects and adverse events within 60 minutes of drug administration. The secondary outcomes included the difference in mean pain score reduction at 20 minutes, the proportion of patients achieving a clinically significant reduction in pain in 20 minutes, total dose of opioid pain medication in morphine equivalents/kg/hour (excluding study drug) required during the emergency department (ED) stay, and the feasibility of enrolling children presenting to the ED in acute pain into a randomized trial conducted under U.S. regulations. All patients were monitored until 6 hours after their last dose of study drug or until admission to the hospital ward or operating room. Of 629 patients screened, 87 received the study drug and 82 had complete data for the primary outcome (41 patients in each group). The median (interquartile range) age was 8 (6-11) years and 62% were male. Baseline pain scores were similar among patients randomized to receive ketamine (73 ± 26) and fentanyl (69 ± 26; mean difference [95% CI] = 4 [-7 to 15]). The cumulative number of side effects was 2.2 times higher in the ketamine group, but there were no serious adverse events and no patients in either group required intervention. The most

  8. Comparative efficacy and safety of methylphenidate and atomoxetine for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder in children and adolescents: Meta-analysis based on head-to-head trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiang; Zhang, Hong; Fang, Qingqing; Qin, Lili

    2017-11-01

    Comparative efficacy and safety are important issues for appropriate drug selection for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) treatment. Therefore we conducted a meta-analysis, where we compared atomoxetine (ATX) and methylphenidate (MPH) for ADHD treatment in children and adolescents. Literature retrieval was conducted in relevant databases from their inception to April 2016 to select head-to-head trials that compared ATX and MPH in children and adolescents. Outcomes like response rate, ADHD Rating Scale (ADHD-RS) score, and adverse events were compared between ATX and MPH treatments. The standardized mean difference (SMD) and risk ratio (RR) with their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used as the effect size for continuous data or dichotomous data, respectively. Eleven eligible randomized-controlled trials were included, and two of them were double-blind, while the remaining were open-label. Compared to ATX, MPH showed a higher response rate (RR = 1.14, 95% CI [1. 09, 1.20]), decreased inattention (SMD = -0.13, 95% CI [-0.25, -0.01]) and lower risk of adverse events (drowsiness: RR = 0.17, 95% CI [0.11, 0.26; nausea: RR = 0.49; 95% CI [0.29, 0.85; vomiting: RR = 0.41, 95% CI [0.27, 0.63]). However, MPH presented a higher risk of insomnia than ATX (RR = 2.27, 95% CI [1.63, 3.15], p < .01). Results of the meta-analysis add additional evidence of the effectiveness of both ATX and MPH and suggest that MPH should be a first treatment option in most patients with ADHD.

  9. Design of COSMIC: a randomized, multi-centre controlled trial comparing conservative or early surgical management of incomplete cervical cord syndrome without spinal instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartels Ronald HMA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Incomplete cervical cord syndrome without spinal instability is a very devastating event for the patient and the family. It is estimated that up to 25% of all traumatic spinal cord lesions belong to this category. The treatment for this type of spinal cord lesion is still subject of discussion. From a biological point of view early surgery could prevent secondary damage due to ongoing compression of the already damaged spinal cord. Historically, however, conservative treatment was propagated with good clinical results. Proponents for early surgery as well those favoring conservative treatment are still in debate. The proposed trial will contribute to the discussion and hopefully also to a decrease in the variability of clinical practice. Methods/Design A randomized controlled trial is designed to compare the clinical outcome of early surgical strategy versus a conservative approach. The primary outcome is clinical outcome according to mJOA. This also measured by ASIA score, DASH score and SCIM III score. Other endpoints are duration of the stay at a high care department (medium care, intensive care, duration of the stay at the hospital, complication rate, mortality rate, sort of rehabilitation, and quality of life. A sample size of 36 patients per group was calculated to reach a power of 95%. The data will be analyzed as intention-to-treat at regular intervals, but the end evaluation will take place at two years post-injury. Discussion At the end of the study, clinical outcomes between treatments attitudes can be compared. Efficacy, but also efficiency can be determined. A goal of the study is to determine which treatment will result in the best quality of life for the patients. This study will certainly contribute to more uniformity of treatment offered to patients with a special sort of spinal cord injury. Trial Registration Gov: NCT01367405

  10. Esoteric Connective Tissue Therapy for chronic low back pain to reduce pain, and improve functionality and general well-being compared with physiotherapy: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnelle, Christoph; Messerschmidt, Steffen; Minford, Eunice J; Greenaway-Twist, Kate; Szramka, Maxine; Masiorski, Marianna; Sheldrake, Michelle; Jones, Mark

    2017-07-17

    Low back pain causes more global disability than any other condition. Once the acute pain becomes chronic, about two-thirds of sufferers will not fully recover after 1-2 years. There is a paucity of effective treatments for non-specific, chronic low back pain. It has been noted that low back pain is associated with changes in the connective tissue in the affected area, and a very low-impact treatment, Esoteric Connective Tissue Therapy (ECTT), has been developed to restore flexibility in connective tissue. ECTT uses patterns of very small, circular movements, to the legs, arms, spine, sacrum and head, which anecdotally are effective in pain relief. In an unpublished single-arm phase I/II trial with chronic pain patients, ECTT showed a 56% reduction in pain after five treatments and 45% and 54% improvements at 6 months and 7-9 years of follow-up respectively. The aim of this randomised controlled trial is to compare ECTT with physiotherapy for reducing pain and improving physical function and physical and mental well-being in patients with chronic low back pain. The trial will be held at two hospitals in Vietnam. One hundred participants with chronic low back pain greater than or equal to 40/100 on the visual analogue scale will be recruited and randomised to either ECTT or physiotherapy. Four weekly treatments will be provided by two experienced ECTT practitioners (Treatment Group, 40 minutes each) and hospital-employed physiotherapy nurses (Control Group, 50 minutes). The primary outcomes will be changes in pain, physical function per the Quebec Pain Functionality Questionnaire and physical and mental well-being recorded by the Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), with mixed modelling used as the primary statistical tool because the data are longitudinal. Initial follow-up will be at either 4 or 8 months, with a second follow-up after 12 months. The trial design has important strengths, because it is to be conducted in hospitals under medical supervision

  11. Protocol of an expertise based randomized trial comparing surgical Venae Sectio versus radiological Puncture of Vena Subclavia for insertion of Totally Implantable Access Port in oncological patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radeleff Boris

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Totally Implantable Access Ports (TIAP are being extensively used world-wide and can be expected to gain further importance with the introduction of new neoadjuvant and adjuvant treatments in oncology. Two different techniques for the implantation can be selected: A direct puncture of a central vein and the utilization of a Seldinger device or the surgical Venae sectio. It is still unclear which technique has the optimal benefit/risk ratio for the patient. Design A single-center, expertise based randomized, controlled superiority trial to compare two different TIAP implantation techniques. 100 patients will be included and randomized pre-operatively. All patients aged 18 years or older scheduled for primary elective implantation of a TIAP under local anesthesia who signed the informed consent will be included. The primary endpoint is the primary success rate of the randomized technique. Control Intervention: Venae Sectio will be employed to insert a TIAP by a surgeon; Experimental intervention: Punction of V. Subclavia will be used to place a TIAP by a radiologist. Duration of study: Approximately 10 months, follow up time: 90 days. Organisation/Responsibility The PORTAS 2 – Trial will be conducted in accordance with the protocol and in compliance with the moral, ethical, and scientific principles governing clinical research as set out in the Declaration of Helsinki (1989 and Good Clinical Practice (GCP. The Center of Clinical Trials at the Department of Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg is responsible for design and conduct of the trial including randomization and documentation of patients' data. Data management and statistical analysis will be performed by the independent Institute for Medical Biometry and Informatics (IMBI, University of Heidelberg. Trial Registration The trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00600444.

  12. Primary HPV screening for cervical cancer prevention: results from European trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynge, Elsebeth; Rebolj, Matejka

    2009-01-01

    testing increased the detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grade 2+. Detection of CIN3+ was significantly increased in two trials (relative risks [RRs] 1.70 and 2.26), but not in three other trials (RRs 1.03, 1.09 and 1.31). In three trials, seven extra women had a false-positive test......Six European, randomized, controlled trials that will compare human papillomavirus (HPV) testing with cytological testing for cervical screening are under way. We reviewed the results published so far to compare the benefits and costs for participating women. At baseline screening, use of HPV...

  13. Comparative economic evaluation of data from the ACRIN National CT Colonography Trial with three cancer intervention and surveillance modeling network microsimulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanness, David J; Knudsen, Amy B; Lansdorp-Vogelaar, Iris; Rutter, Carolyn M; Gareen, Ilana F; Herman, Benjamin A; Kuntz, Karen M; Zauber, Ann G; van Ballegooijen, Marjolein; Feuer, Eric J; Chen, Mei-Hsiu; Johnson, C Daniel

    2011-11-01

    To estimate the cost-effectiveness of computed tomographic (CT) colonography for colorectal cancer (CRC) screening in average-risk asymptomatic subjects in the United States aged 50 years. Enrollees in the American College of Radiology Imaging Network National CT Colonography Trial provided informed consent, and approval was obtained from the institutional review board at each site. CT colonography performance estimates from the trial were incorporated into three Cancer Intervention and Surveillance Modeling Network CRC microsimulations. Simulated survival and lifetime costs for screening 50-year-old subjects in the United States with CT colonography every 5 or 10 years were compared with those for guideline-concordant screening with colonoscopy, flexible sigmoidoscopy plus either sensitive unrehydrated fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) or fecal immunochemical testing (FIT), and no screening. Perfect and reduced screening adherence scenarios were considered. Incremental cost-effectiveness and net health benefits were estimated from the U.S. health care sector perspective, assuming a 3% discount rate. CT colonography at 5- and 10-year screening intervals was more costly and less effective than FOBT plus flexible sigmoidoscopy in all three models in both 100% and 50% adherence scenarios. Colonoscopy also was more costly and less effective than FOBT plus flexible sigmoidoscopy, except in the CRC-SPIN model assuming 100% adherence (incremental cost-effectiveness ratio: $26,300 per life-year gained). CT colonography at 5- and 10-year screening intervals and colonoscopy were net beneficial compared with no screening in all model scenarios. The 5-year screening interval was net beneficial over the 10-year interval except in the MISCAN model when assuming 100% adherence and willingness to pay $50,000 per life-year gained. All three models predict CT colonography to be more costly and less effective than non-CT colonographic screening but net beneficial compared with no

  14. Intubating conditions and side effects of propofol, remifentanil and sevoflurane compared with propofol, remifentanil and rocuronium: a randomised, prospective, clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Tracheal intubation without muscle relaxants is usually performed with remifentanil and propofol or sevoflurane. Remifentanil 1.0 to 4.0 μg·kg-1 and propofol 2.0-3.0 mg·kg-1 or sevoflurane up to 8.0 Vol% provide acceptable, i.e. excellent or good intubating conditions. We hypothesized that sevoflurane 1.0 MAC would provide acceptable intubating conditions when combined with propofol and remifentanil. Methods Eighty-three patients to be intubated were randomised to two groups. The SEVO group received propofol 1.5 mg kg-1, remifentanil 0.30 μg kg min-1 and sevoflurane 1.0 MAC; the MR group received the same doses of propofol and remifentanil plus rocuronium 0.45 mg kg-1. We evaluated intubation and extubation conditions, mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR) and bispectral index (BIS). The vocal cords were examined for injury by videolaryngoscopy before and 24 hours after surgery. Results Acceptable intubating conditions were seen more frequently with rocuronium than with sevoflurane: 97% versus 82%; p = 0.03; the subscore for vocal cords was comparable: 100% versus 98%. MAP before intubation decreased significantly compared with the MAP at baseline to the same extent in both groups; ephedrine IV was given in 15 (SEVO) versus 16 (MR) patients; p = 0.93. BIS at tracheal intubation was 27 (13-65) in the SEVO group, 29 (14-62) in the MR group; p = 0.07. Vocal cord injuries (oedema, haematoma) were similar: 4 patients in each group. Conclusions Overall intubating conditions were better when rocuronium was used; the subscore for vocal cords was comparable. The incidence of side effects was the same in the two groups. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.Gov: NCT 01591031. PMID:24860256

  15. The Septic Shock 3.0 Definition and Trials: A Vasopressin and Septic Shock Trial Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, James A; Lee, Terry; Singer, Joel; Boyd, John H; Walley, Keith R

    2017-06-01

    The Septic Shock 3.0 definition could alter treatment comparisons in randomized controlled trials in septic shock. Our first hypothesis was that the vasopressin versus norepinephrine comparison and 28-day mortality of patients with Septic Shock 3.0 definition (lactate > 2 mmol/L) differ from vasopressin versus norepinephrine and mortality in Vasopressin and Septic Shock Trial. Our second hypothesis was that there are differences in plasma cytokine levels in Vasopressin and Septic Shock Trial for lactate less than or equal to 2 versus greater than 2 mmol/L. Retrospective analysis of randomized controlled trial. Multicenter ICUs. We compared vasopressin-to-norepinephrine group 28- and 90-day mortality in Vasopressin and Septic Shock Trial in lactate subgroups. We measured 39 cytokines to compare patients with lactate less than or equal to 2 versus greater than 2 mmol/L. Patients with septic shock with lactate greater than 2 mmol/L or less than or equal to 2 mmol/L, randomized to vasopressin or norepinephrine. Concealed vasopressin (0.03 U/min.) or norepinephrine infusions. The Septic Shock 3.0 definition would have decreased sample size by about half. The 28- and 90-day mortality rates were 10-12 % higher than the original Vasopressin and Septic Shock Trial mortality. There was a significantly (p = 0.028) lower mortality with vasopressin versus norepinephrine in lactate less than or equal to 2 mmol/L but no difference between treatment groups in lactate greater than 2 mmol/L. Nearly all cytokine levels were significantly higher in patients with lactate greater than 2 versus less than or equal to 2 mmol/L. The Septic Shock 3.0 definition decreased sample size by half and increased 28-day mortality rates by about 10%. Vasopressin lowered mortality versus norepinephrine if lactate was less than or equal to 2 mmol/L. Patients had higher plasma cytokines in lactate greater than 2 versus less than or equal to 2 mmol/L, a brisker cytokine response to infection. The Septic

  16. Quality Assurance for Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Haworth, Annette; Followill, David S.

    2013-01-01

    Cooperative groups, of which the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group is one example, conduct national clinical trials that often involve the use of radiation therapy. In preparation for such a trial, the cooperative group prepares a protocol to define the goals of the trial, the rationale for its design, and the details of the treatment procedure to be followed. The Radiological Physics Center (RPC) is one of several quality assurance (QA) offices that is charged with assuring that participating institutions deliver doses that are clinically consistent and comparable. The RPC does this by conducting a variety of independent audits and credentialing processes. The RPC has compiled data showing that credentialing can help institutions comply with the requirements of a cooperative group clinical protocol. Phantom irradiations have been demonstrated to exercise an institution’s procedures for planning and delivering advanced external beam techniques (1–3). Similarly, RPC data indicate that a rapid review of patient treatment records or planning procedures can improve compliance with clinical trials (4). The experiences of the RPC are presented as examples of the contributions that a national clinical trials QA center can make to cooperative group trials. These experiences illustrate the critical need for comprehensive QA to assure that clinical trials are successful and cost-effective. The RPC is supported by grants CA 10953 and CA 81647 from the National Cancer Institute, NIH, DHHS. PMID:24392352

  17. Peri-operative morbidity and early results of a randomised trial comparing TVT and TVT-O.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meschia, Michele; Bertozzi, Rosanna; Pifarotti, Paola; Baccichet, Roberto; Bernasconi, Francesco; Guercio, Elso; Magatti, Fabio; Minini, Gianfranco

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the morbidity and short-term efficacy of retro-pubic (TVT) and inside-out trans-obturator (TVT-O) sub-urethral sling in the treatment of stress urinary incontinence. This was a prospective multi-centre randomised trial; 231 women with primary stress urinary incontinence were randomised to TVT (114) or TVT-O (117). The International Consultation on Incontinence-Short Form (ICIQ-SF), Women Irritative Prostate Symptoms Score (W-IPSS) and Patient Global Impression of Severity (PGI-S) questionnaires were used to evaluate the impact of incontinence and voiding dysfunction on QoL and to measure the patient's perception of incontinence severity. The primary and secondary outcome measures were rates of success and complications. The SPSS software was used for data analysis. The TVT-O procedure was associated with significantly shorter operation time and with a more extensive use of general anaesthesia when compared with TVT. There were 5 (4%) bladder perforations in the TVT group compared with none in the TVT-O group. Rates of early post-operative urinary retention and voiding difficulty were similar for both groups and no difference was found in the average hospital stay. Six patients (5%) in the TVT-O group complained of thigh pain in the post-operative course. The median follow-up time was 6 months. Two hundred eighteen patients were available for the analysis of outcomes. Subjective and objective cure rates were 92% and 92% in the TVT group and 87% and 89% in the TVT-O group. The ICIQ-SF questionnaire symptoms score showed a highly statistical decrease in both groups, the W-IPSS on the contrary was unchanged. Our data show that both procedures were equally effective in the short-term for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence with a highly significant improvement in incontinence-related QoL.

  18. Are pilot trials useful for predicting randomisation and attrition rates in definitive studies: A review of publicly funded trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Amy; Pottrill, Edward; Julious, Steven A; Walters, Stephen J

    2018-01-01

    Background/aims: External pilot trials are recommended for testing the feasibility of main or confirmatory trials. However, there is little evidence that progress in external pilot trials actually predicts randomisation and attrition rates in the main trial. To assess the use of external pilot trials in trial design, we compared randomisation and attrition rates in publicly funded randomised controlled trials with rates in their pilots. Methods: Randomised controlled trials for which there was an external pilot trial were identified from reports published between 2004 and 2013 in the Health Technology Assessment Journal. Data were extracted from published papers, protocols and reports. Bland–Altman plots and descriptive statistics were used to investigate the agreement of randomisation and attrition rates between the full and external pilot trials. Results: Of 561 reports, 41 were randomised controlled trials with pilot trials and 16 met criteria for a pilot trial with sufficient data. Mean attrition and randomisation rates were 21.1% and 50.4%, respectively, in the pilot trials and 16.8% and 65.2% in the main. There was minimal bias in the pilot trial when predicting the main trial attrition and randomisation rate. However, the variation was large: the mean difference in the attrition rate between the pilot and main trial was −4.4% with limits of agreement of −37.1% to 28.2%. Limits of agreement for randomisation rates were −47.8% to 77.5%. Conclusion: Results from external pilot trials to estimate randomisation and attrition rates should be used with caution as comparison of the difference in the rates between pilots and their associated full trial demonstrates high variability. We suggest using internal pilot trials wherever appropriate. PMID:29361833

  19. Effects of cognitive therapy versus interpersonal psychotherapy in patients with major depressive disorder: a systematic review of randomized clinical trials with meta-analyses and trial sequential analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, J C; Hansen, J L; Simonsen, S; Simonsen, E; Gluud, C

    2012-07-01

    Major depressive disorder afflicts an estimated 17% of individuals during their lifetime at tremendous suffering and cost. Cognitive therapy and interpersonal psychotherapy are treatment options, but their effects have only been limitedly compared in systematic reviews. Using Cochrane systematic review methodology we compared the benefits and harm of cognitive therapy versus interpersonal psychotherapy for major depressive disorder. Trials were identified by searching the Cochrane Library's CENTRAL, Medline via PubMed, EMBASE, Psychlit, PsycInfo, and Science Citation Index Expanded until February 2010. Continuous outcome measures were assessed by mean difference and dichotomous outcomes by odds ratio. We conducted trial sequential analysis to control for random errors. We included seven trials randomizing 741 participants. All trials had high risk of bias. Meta-analysis of the four trials reporting data at cessation of treatment on the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression showed no significant difference between the two interventions [mean difference -1.02, 95% confidence interval (CI) -2.35 to 0.32]. Meta-analysis of the five trials reporting data at cessation of treatment on the Beck Depression Inventory showed comparable results (mean difference -1.29, 95% CI -2.73 to 0.14). Trial sequential analysis indicated that more data are needed to definitively settle the question of a differential effect. None of the included trial reported on adverse events. Randomized trials with low risk of bias and low risk of random errors are needed, although the effects of cognitive therapy and interpersonal psychotherapy do not seem to differ significantly regarding depressive symptoms. Future trials should report on adverse events.

  20. Non-sedation versus sedation with a daily wake-up trial in critically ill patients receiving mechanical ventilation (NONSEDA Trial)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Palle; Olsen, Hanne Tanghus; Jørgensen, Helene Korvenius

    2014-01-01

    comparing sedation with no sedation, a priori powered to have all-cause mortality as primary outcome.The objective is to assess the benefits and harms of non-sedation versus sedation with a daily wake-up trial in critically ill patients. METHODS: The non-sedation (NONSEDA) trial is an investigator......-sedation supplemented with pain management during mechanical ventilation.Control intervention is sedation with a daily wake-up trial.The primary outcome will be all cause mortality at 90 days after randomization. Secondary outcomes will be: days until death throughout the total observation period; coma- and delirium...... in mortality with a type I error risk of 5% and a type II error risk of 20% (power at 80%). DISCUSSION: The trial investigates potential benefits of non-sedation. This might have large impact on the future treatment of mechanically ventilated critically ill patients.Trial register: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT...

  1. The Effects of Biocompatible Compared with Standard Peritoneal Dialysis Solutions on Peritonitis Microbiology, Treatment, and Outcomes: the balANZ Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, David W.; Brown, Fiona G.; Clarke, Margaret; Boudville, Neil; Elias, Tony J.; Foo, Marjorie W.Y.; Jones, Bernard; Kulkarni, Hemant; Langham, Robyn; Ranganathan, Dwarakanathan; Schollum, John; Suranyi, Michael G.; Tan, Seng H.; Voss, David

    2012-01-01

    ♦ Background: A multicenter, multi-country randomized controlled trial (the balANZ study) recently reported that peritonitis rates significantly improved with the use of neutral-pH peritoneal dialysis (PD) solutions low in glucose degradation products (“biocompatible”) compared with standard solutions. The present paper reports a secondary outcome analysis of the balANZ trial with respect to peritonitis microbiology, treatment, and outcomes. ♦ Methods: Adult incident PD patients with residual renal function were randomized to receive either biocompatible or conventional (control) PD solutions for 2 years. ♦ Results: The safety population analysis for peritonitis included 91 patients in each group. The unadjusted geometric mean peritonitis rates in those groups were 0.30 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.22 to 0.41] episodes per patient-year for the biocompatible group and 0.49 (95% CI: 0.39 to 0.62) episodes per patient-year for the control group [incidence rate ratio (IRR): 0.61; 95% CI: 0.41 to 0.90; p = 0.01]. When specific causative organisms were examined, the rates of culture-negative, gram-positive, gram-negative, and polymicrobial peritonitis episodes were not significantly different between the biocompatible and control groups, although the biocompatible group did experience a significantly lower rate of non-pseudomonal gram-negative peritonitis (IRR: 0.41; 95% CI: 0.18 to 0.92; p = 0.03). Initial empiric antibiotic regimens were comparable between the groups. Biocompatible fluid use did not significantly reduce the risk of peritonitis-associated hospitalization (adjusted odds ratio: 0.80; 95% CI: 0.48 to 1.34), but did result in a shorter median duration of peritonitis-associated hospitalization (6 days vs 11 days, p = 0.05). Peritonitis severity was more likely to be rated as mild in the biocompatible group (37% vs 10%, p = 0.001). Overall peritonitis-associated technique failures and peritonitis-related deaths were comparable in the two groups

  2. Smoking-Cessation Interventions for Urban Hospital Patients: A Randomized Comparative Effectiveness Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Scott E; Link, Alissa R; Rogers, Erin S; Krebs, Paul; Ladapo, Joseph A; Shelley, Donna R; Fang, Yixin; Wang, Binhuan; Grossman, Ellie

    2016-10-01

    Hospitalization is a unique opportunity for smoking cessation, but prior interventions have measured efficacy with narrowly defined populations. The objective of this study was to enroll smokers admitted to two "safety net" hospitals and compare the effectiveness of two post-discharge cessation interventions. A randomized comparative effectiveness trial was conducted. At two New York City public hospitals, every hospitalized patient identified as a smoker (based on admission records) was approached. Inclusion criteria were: smoked cigarettes in the past 30 days; spoke English, Spanish, or Mandarin; had a U.S. phone number; not discharged to an institution where follow-up or smoking was limited; and not pregnant/breastfeeding. Of 18,797 patients identified as current smokers between July 2011 and April 2014, a total of 3,047 (16%) were discharged before being approached, 3,273 (17%) were not current smokers, 4,026 (21%) had no U.S. phone number, 2,831 (15%) were ineligible for other reasons, and 3,983 (21%) refused participation. In total, 1,618 (9%) participants enrolled in the study. During follow-up, 69% of participants were reached at 2 months and 68% at 6 months. At discharge, participants were randomized to multisession telephone counseling from study staff (n=804) or referral to the state quitline for proactive outreach and counseling (n=814). Self-reported abstinence at 6 months was measured. Analyses were conducted in late 2015. One quarter of participants were homeless or in unstable housing, 60% had a history of substance abuse, 43% reported current hazardous drinking, and half had a psychiatric diagnosis other than substance abuse. At follow-up, the rate of abstinence (30-day point prevalence) was higher in the intensive counseling arm than the quitline arm at 2 months (29.0% vs 20.7%; relative risk=1.40; 95% CI=1.13, 1.73) and 6 months (37.4% vs 31.5%; relative risk=1.19; 95% CI=1.01, 1.40). Intensive counseling was more effective than referral to the

  3. Modifying the Clinical Research Infrastructure at a Dedicated Clinical Trials Unit: Assessment of Trial Development, Activation, and Participant Accrual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chad; Hess, Kenneth R; Sanders, Dwana; Davis, Suzanne E; Buzdar, Aman U; Kurzrock, Razelle; Lee, J Jack; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Hong, David S

    2017-03-15

    Purpose: Information on processes for trials assessing investigational therapeutics is sparse. We assessed the trial development processes within the Department of Investigational Cancer Therapeutics (ICT) at MD Anderson Cancer Center (Houston, TX) and analyzed their effects on the trial activation timeline and enrolment. Experimental Design: Data were from a prospectively maintained registry that tracks all clinical studies at MD Anderson. From this database, we identified 2,261 activated phase I-III trials; 221 were done at the ICT. ICT trials were matched to trials from other MD Anderson departments by phase, sponsorship, and submission year. Trial performance metrics were compared with paired Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Results: We identified three facets of the ICT research infrastructure: parallel processing of trial approval steps; a physician-led research team; and regular weekly meetings to foster research accountability. Separate analyses were conducted stratified by sponsorship [industry (133 ICT and 133 non-ICT trials) or institutional (68 ICT and 68 non-ICT trials)]. ICT trial development was faster from IRB approval to activation (median difference of 1.1 months for industry-sponsored trials vs. 2.3 months for institutional) and from activation to first enrolment (median difference of 0.3 months for industry vs. 1.2 months for institutional; all matched P infrastructure within a large academic cancer center was associated with efficient trial development and participant accrual. Clin Cancer Res; 23(6); 1407-13. ©2016 AACR . ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. A National Strategy to Develop Pragmatic Clinical Trials Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guise, Jeanne‐Marie; Dolor, Rowena J.; Meissner, Paul; Tunis, Sean; Krishnan, Jerry A.; Pace, Wilson D.; Saltz, Joel; Hersh, William R.; Michener, Lloyd; Carey, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract An important challenge in comparative effectiveness research is the lack of infrastructure to support pragmatic clinical trials, which compare interventions in usual practice settings and subjects. These trials present challenges that differ from those of classical efficacy trials, which are conducted under ideal circumstances, in patients selected for their suitability, and with highly controlled protocols. In 2012, we launched a 1‐year learning network to identify high‐priority pragmatic clinical trials and to deploy research infrastructure through the NIH Clinical and Translational Science Awards Consortium that could be used to launch and sustain them. The network and infrastructure were initiated as a learning ground and shared resource for investigators and communities interested in developing pragmatic clinical trials. We followed a three‐stage process of developing the network, prioritizing proposed trials, and implementing learning exercises that culminated in a 1‐day network meeting at the end of the year. The year‐long project resulted in five recommendations related to developing the network, enhancing community engagement, addressing regulatory challenges, advancing information technology, and developing research methods. The recommendations can be implemented within 24 months and are designed to lead toward a sustained national infrastructure for pragmatic trials. PMID:24472114

  5. Trial Protocol: Cognitive functional therapy compared with combined manual therapy and motor control exercise for people with non-specific chronic low back pain: protocol for a randomised, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belache, Fabiana Terra Cunha; Souza, Cíntia Pereira de; Fernandez, Jessica; Castro, Julia; Ferreira, Paula Dos Santos; Rosa, Elizana Rodrigues de Sousa; Araújo, Nathalia Cristina Gimenez de; Reis, Felipe José Jandre; Almeida, Renato Santos de; Nogueira, Leandro Alberto Calazans; Correia, Luís Cláudio Lemos; Meziat-Filho, Ney

    2018-06-11

    Chronic low back pain is a public health problem, and there is strong evidence that it is associated with a complex interaction of biopsychosocial factors. Cognitive functional therapy is an intervention that deals with potentially modifiable multidimensional aspects of pain (eg, provocative cognitive, movement and lifestyle behaviours). There is evidence (from a single randomised, controlled trial) that cognitive functional therapy is better than combined manual therapy and motor control exercise. However, this study had significant methodological shortcomings including the failure to carry out an intention-to-treat analysis and a considerable loss of follow-up of participants. It is important to replicate this study in another domain through a randomised clinical trial with similar objectives but correcting these methodological shortcomings. To investigate the efficacy of cognitive functional therapy compared to combined manual therapy and exercise on pain and disability at 3 months in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain. Two-group, randomised, multicentre controlled trial with blinded assessors. One hundred and forty-eight participants with chronic low back pain that has persisted for >3months and no specific spinal pathology will be recruited from the school clinic of the Centro Universitário Augusto Motta and a private clinic in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Four to 10 sessions of cognitive functional therapy. The physiotherapists who will treat the participants in the cognitive functional therapy group have previously attended 2 workshops with two different tutors of the method. Such physiotherapists have completed 106 hours of training, including workshops and patient examinations, as well as conducting a pilot study under the supervision of another physiotherapist with>3 years of clinical experience in cognitive functional therapy. Four to 10 sessions of combined manual therapy and motor control exercises. Participants in the combined

  6. Meta-analysis of individual-patient data from EVAR-1, DREAM, OVER and ACE trials comparing outcomes of endovascular or open repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm over 5 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Powell, J. T.; Sweeting, M. J.; Ulug, P.; Blankensteijn, J. D.; Lederle, F. A.; Becquemin, J.-P.; Greenhalgh, R. M.; Beard, J. D.; Buxton, M. J.; Brown, L. C.; Harris, P. L.; Rose, J. D. G.; Russell, I. T.; Sculpher, M. J.; Thompson, S. G.; Lilford, R. J.; Bell, P. R. F.; Whitaker, S. C.; Poole-Wilson, The Late P. A.; Ruckley, C. V.; Campbell, W. B.; Dean, M. R. E.; Ruttley, M. S. T.; Coles, E. C.; Halliday, A.; Gibbs, S. J.; Epstein, D.; Hannon, R. J.; Johnston, L.; Bradbury, A. W.; Henderson, M. J.; Parvin, S. D.; Shepherd, D. F. C.; Mitchell, A. W.; Edwards, P. R.; Abbott, G. T.; Higman, D. J.; Vohra, A.; Ashley, S.; Robottom, C.; Wyatt, M. G.; Byrne, D.; Edwards, R.; Leiberman, D. P.; McCarter, D. H.; Taylor, P. R.; Reidy, J. F.; Wilkinson, A. R.; Ettles, D. F.; Clason, A. E.; Leen, G. L. S.; Wilson, N. V.; Downes, M.; Walker, S. R.; Lavelle, J. M.; Gough, M. J.; McPherson, S.; Scott, D. J. A.; Kessell, D. O.; Naylor, R.; Sayers, R.; Fishwick, N. G.; Gould, D. A.; Walker, M. G.; Chalmers, N. C.; Garnham, A.; Collins, M. A.; Gaines, P. A.; Ashour, M. Y.; Uberoi, R.; Braithwaite, B.; Davies, J. N.; Travis, S.; Hamilton, G.; Platts, A.; Shandall, A.; Sullivan, B. A.; Sobeh, M.; Matson, M.; Fox, A. D.; Orme, R.; Yusef, W.; Doyle, T.; Horrocks, M.; Hardman, J.; Blair, P. H. B.; Ellis, P. K.; Morris, G.; Odurny, A.; Vohra, R.; Duddy, M.; Thompson, M.; Loosemore, T. M. L.; Belli, A. M.; Morgan, R.; Adiseshiah, M.; Brookes, J. A. S.; McCollum, C. N.; Ashleigh, R.; Aukett, M.; Baker, S.; Barbe, E.; Batson, N.; Bell, J.; Blundell, J.; Boardley, D.; Boyes, S.; Brown, O.; Bryce, J.; Carmichael, M.; Chance, T.; Coleman, J.; Cosgrove, C.; Curran, G.; Dennison, T.; Devine, C.; Dewhirst, N.; Errington, B.; Farrell, H.; Fisher, C.; Fulford, P.; Gough, M.; Graham, C.; Hooper, R.; Horne, G.; Horrocks, L.; Hughes, B.; Hutchings, T.; Ireland, M.; Judge, C.; Kelly, L.; Kemp, J.; Kite, A.; Kivela, M.; Lapworth, M.; Lee, C.; Linekar, L.; Mahmood, A.; March, L.; Martin, J.; Matharu, N.; McGuigen, K.; Morris-Vincent, P.; Murray, S.; Murtagh, A.; Owen, G.; Ramoutar, V.; Rippin, C.; Rowley, J.; Sinclair, J.; Spencer, S.; Taylor, V.; Tomlinson, C.; Ward, S.; Wealleans, V.; West, J.; White, K.; Williams, J.; Wilson, L.; Grobbee, D. E.; Bak, A. A. A.; Buth, J.; Pattynama, P. M.; Verhoeven, E. L. G.; van Voorthuisen, A. E.; Balm, R.; Cuypers, P. W. M.; Prinssen, M.; van Sambeek, M. R. H. M.; Baas, A. F.; Hunink, M. G.; van Engelshoven, J. M.; Jacobs, M. J. H. M.; de Mol, B. A. J. M.; van Bockel, J. H.; Reekers, J.; Tielbeek, X.; Wisselink, W.; Boekema, N.; Heuveling, L. M.; Sikking, I.; de Bruin, J. L.; Tielbeek, A. V.; Pattynama, P.; Prins, T.; van der Ham, A. C.; van der Velden, J. J. I. M.; van Sterkenburg, S. M. M.; ten Haken, G. B.; Bruijninckx, C. M. A.; van Overhagen, H.; Tutein Nolthenius, R. P.; Hendriksz, T. R.; Teijink, J. A. W.; Odink, H. F.; de Smet, A. A. E. A.; Vroegindeweij, D.; van Loenhout, R. M. M.; Rutten, M. J.; Hamming, J. F.; Lampmann, L. E. H.; Bender, M. H. M.; Pasmans, H.; Vahl, A. C.; de Vries, C.; Mackaay, A. J. C.; van Dortmont, L. M. C.; van der Vliet, A. J.; Schultze Kool, L. J.; Boomsma, J. H. B.; van Dop, H. R.; de Mol van Otterloo, J. C. A.; de Rooij, T. P. W.; Smits, T. M.; Yilmaz, E. N.; van den Berg, F. G.; Visser, M. J. T.; van der Linden, E.; Schurink, G. W. H.; de Haan, M.; Smeets, H. J.; Stabel, P.; van Elst, F.; Poniewierski, J.; Vermassen, F. E. G.; Freischlag, J. A.; Kohler, T. R.; Latts, E.; Matsumura, J.; Padberg, F. T.; Kyriakides, T. C.; Swanson, K. M.; Guarino, P.; Peduzzi, P.; Antonelli, M.; Cushing, C.; Davis, E.; Durant, L.; Joyner, S.; Kossack, The Late A.; LeGwin, Mary; McBride, V.; O'Connor, T.; Poulton, J.; Stratton, The Late S.; Zellner, S.; Snodgrass, A. J.; Thornton, J.; Haakenson, C. M.; Stroupe, K. T.; Jonk, Y.; Hallett, J. W.; Hertzer, N.; Towne, J.; Katz, D. A.; Karrison, T.; Matts, J. P.; Marottoli, R.; Kasl, S.; Mehta, R.; Feldman, R.; Farrell, W.; Allore, H.; Perry, E.; Niederman, J.; Randall, F.; Zeman, M.; Beckwith, The Late D.; O'Leary, T. J.; Huang, G. D.; Bader, M.; Ketteler, E. R.; Kingsley, D. D.; Marek, J. M.; Massen, R. J.; Matteson, B. D.; Pitcher, J. D.; Langsfeld, M.; Corson, J. D.; Goff, J. M.; Kasirajan, K.; Paap, C.; Robertson, D. C.; Salam, A.; Veeraswamy, R.; Milner, R.; Guidot, J.; Lal, B. K.; Busuttil, S. J.; Lilly, M. P.; Braganza, M.; Ellis, K.; Patterson, M. A.; Jordan, W. D.; Whitley, D.; Taylor, S.; Passman, M.; Kerns, D.; Inman, C.; Poirier, J.; Ebaugh, J.; Raffetto, J.; Chew, D.; Lathi, S.; Owens, C.; Hickson, K.; Dosluoglu, H. H.; Eschberger, K.; Kibbe, M. R.; Baraniewski, H. M.; Endo, M.; Busman, A.; Meadows, W.; Evans, M.; Giglia, J. S.; El Sayed, H.; Reed, A. B.; Ruf, M.; Ross, S.; Jean-Claude, J. M.; Pinault, G.; Kang, P.; White, N.; Eiseman, M.; Jones, The Late R.; Timaran, C. H.; Modrall, J. G.; Welborn, M. B.; Lopez, J.; Nguyen, T.; Chacko, J. K. Y.; Granke, K.; Vouyouka, A. G.; Olgren, E.; Chand, P.; Allende, B.; Ranella, M.; Yales, C.; Whitehill, T. A.; Krupski, The Late W. C.; Nehler, M. R.; Johnson, S. P.; Jones, D. N.; Strecker, P.; Bhola, M. A.; Shortell, C. K.; Gray, J. L.; Lawson, J. H.; McCann, R.; Sebastian, M. W.; Kistler Tetterton, J.; Blackwell, C.; Prinzo, P. A.; Lee, N.; Cerveira, J. J.; Zickler, R. W.; Hauck, K. A.; Berceli, S. A.; Lee, W. A.; Ozaki, C. K.; Nelson, P. R.; Irwin, A. S.; Baum, R.; Aulivola, B.; Rodriguez, H.; Littooy, F. N.; Greisler, H.; O'Sullivan, M. T.; Kougias, P.; Lin, P. H.; Bush, R. L.; Guinn, G.; Bechara, C.; Cagiannos, C.; Pisimisis, G.; Barshes, N.; Pillack, S.; Guillory, B.; Cikrit, D.; Lalka, S. G.; Lemmon, G.; Nachreiner, R.; Rusomaroff, M.; O'Brien, E.; Cullen, J. J.; Hoballah, J.; Sharp, W. J.; McCandless, J. L.; Beach, V.; Minion, D.; Schwarcz, T. H.; Kimbrough, J.; Ashe, L.; Rockich, A.; Warner-Carpenter, J.; Moursi, M.; Eidt, J. F.; Brock, S.; Bianchi, C.; Bishop, V.; Gordon, I. L.; Fujitani, R.; Kubaska, S. M.; Behdad, M.; Azadegan, R.; Ma Agas, C.; Zalecki, K.; Hoch, J. R.; Carr, S. C.; Acher, C.; Schwarze, M.; Tefera, G.; Mell, M.; Dunlap, B.; Rieder, J.; Stuart, J. M.; Weiman, D. S.; Abul-Khoudoud, O.; Garrett, H. E.; Walsh, S. M.; Wilson, K. L.; Seabrook, G. R.; Cambria, R. A.; Brown, K. R.; Lewis, B. D.; Framberg, S.; Kallio, C.; Barke, R. A.; Santilli, S. M.; d'Audiffret, A. C.; Oberle, N.; Proebstle, C.; Johnson, L. L.; Jacobowitz, G. R.; Cayne, N.; Rockman, C.; Adelman, M.; Gagne, P.; Nalbandian, M.; Caropolo, L. J.; Pipinos, I. I.; Johanning, J.; Lynch, T.; DeSpiegelaere, H.; Purviance, G.; Zhou, W.; Dalman, R.; Lee, J. T.; Safadi, B.; Coogan, S. M.; Wren, S. M.; Bahmani, D. D.; Maples, D.; Thunen, S.; Golden, M. A.; Mitchell, M. E.; Fairman, R.; Reinhardt, S.; Wilson, M. A.; Tzeng, E.; Muluk, S.; Peterson, N. M.; Foster, M.; Edwards, J.; Moneta, G. L.; Landry, G.; Taylor, L.; Yeager, R.; Cannady, E.; Treiman, G.; Hatton-Ward, S.; Salabsky, The Late B.; Kansal, N.; Owens, E.; Estes, M.; Forbes, B. A.; Sobotta, C.; Rapp, J. H.; Reilly, L. M.; Perez, S. L.; Yan, K.; Sarkar, R.; Dwyer, S. S.; Perez, S.; Chong, K.; Hatsukami, T. S.; Glickerman, D. G.; Sobel, M.; Burdick, T. S.; Pedersen, K.; Cleary, P.; Back, M.; Bandyk, D.; Johnson, B.; Shames, M.; Reinhard, R. L.; Thomas, S. C.; Hunter, G. C.; Leon, L. R.; Westerband, A.; Guerra, R. J.; Riveros, M.; Mills, J. L.; Hughes, J. D.; Escalante, A. M.; Psalms, S. B.; Day, N. N.; Macsata, R.; Sidawy, A.; Weiswasser, J.; Arora, S.; Jasper, B. J.; Dardik, A.; Gahtan, V.; Muhs, B. E.; Sumpio, B. E.; Gusberg, R. J.; Spector, M.; Pollak, J.; Aruny, J.; Kelly, E. L.; Wong, J.; Vasilas, P.; Joncas, C.; Gelabert, H. A.; DeVirgillio, C.; Rigberg, D. A.; Cole, L.; Marzelle, J.; Sapoval, M.; Favre, J.-P.; Watelet, J.; Lermusiaux, P.; Lepage, E.; Hemery, F.; Dolbeau, G.; Hawajry, N.; Cunin, P.; Harris, P.; Stockx, L.; Chatellier, G.; Mialhe, C.; Fiessinger, J.-N.; Pagny, L.; Kobeiter, H.; Boissier, C.; Lacroix, P.; Ledru, F.; Pinot, J.-J.; Deux, J.-F.; Tzvetkov, B.; Duvaldestin, P.; Jourdain, C.; DAVID, V.; Enouf, D.; Ady, N.; Krimi, A.; Boudjema, N.; Jousset, Y.; Enon, B.; Blin, V.; Picquet, J.; L'Hoste, P.; Thouveny, F.; Borie, H.; Kowarski, S.; Pernes, J.-M.; Auguste, M.; Desgranges, P.; Allaire, E.; Meaulle, P.-Y.; Chaix, D.; Juliae, P.; Fabiani, J. N.; Chevalier, P.; Combes, M.; Seguin, A.; Belhomme, D.; Baque, J.; Pellerin, O.; Favre, J. P.; Barral, X.; Veyret, C.; Peillon, C.; Plissonier, D.; Thomas, P.; Clavier, E.; Martinez, R.; Bleuet, F.; C, Dupreix; Verhoye, J. P.; Langanay, T.; Heautot, J. F.; Koussa, M.; Haulon, S.; Halna, P.; Destrieux, L.; Lions, C.; Wiloteaux, S.; Beregi, J. P.; Bergeron, P.; Patra, P.; Costargent, A.; Chaillou, P.; D'Alicourt, A.; Goueffic, Y.; Cheysson, E.; Parrot, A.; Garance, P.; Demon, A.; Tyazi, A.; Pillet, J.-C.; Lescalie, F.; Tilly, G.; Steinmetz, E.; Favier, C.; Brenot, R.; Krause, D.; Cercueil, J. P.; Vahdat, O.; Sauer, M.; Soula, P.; Querian, A.; Garcia, O.; Levade, M.; Colombier, D.; Cardon, J.-M.; Joyeux, A.; Borrelly, P.; Dogas, G.; Magnan, P.-É; Branchereau, A.; Bartoli, J.-M.; Hassen-Khodja, R.; Batt, M.; Planchard, P.-F.; Bouillanne, P.-J.; Haudebourg, P.; Bayne, J.; Gouny, P.; Badra, A.; Braesco, J.; Nonent, M.; Lucas, A.; Cardon, A.; Kerdiles, Y.; Rolland, Y.; Kassab, M.; Brillu, C.; Goubault, F.; Tailboux, L.; Darrieux, H.; Briand, O.; Maillard, J.-C.; Varty, K.; Cousins, C.

    2017-01-01

    The erosion of the early mortality advantage of elective endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) compared with open repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm remains without a satisfactory explanation. An individual-patient data meta-analysis of four multicentre randomized trials of EVAR versus open repair

  7. Update on clinical trials in Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logemann, Jeri A

    2006-04-01

    Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) are often known as the gold standard in treatment efficacy studies. This article defines the characteristics of RCTs and the factors that investigators must consider in designing clinical trials in dysphagia. Design issues unique to behavioral treatments often used in dysphagia are discussed. Ongoing RCTs in dysphagia are described including studies of (1) the effectiveness of the Shaker exercise versus standardized treatment in patients with severe dysphagia resulting from stroke or treatment for head and neck cancer who have been nonoral for at least three months; (2) the comparative effects of nectar- and honey-thickened liquids versus chin tuck posture and in patients with dementia or Parkinson's disease with or without dementia who aspirate on thin liquids; and (3) the comparative effects of muscle exercise versus sensory postural therapy for dysphagia resulting from treatment for head and neck cancer. Issues in generalizing from the results of clinical trials are also described.

  8. Randomised controlled trial comparing the effectiveness of electroacupuncture and TENS for low back pain: a preliminary study for a pragmatic trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukayama, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Hitoshi; Amagai, Hitoshi; Tanno, Yasuo

    2002-12-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of electroacupuncture and TENS for low back pain when the electroacupuncture is applied in a clinically realistic manner. The study was designed as an evaluator-blinded randomised controlled trial (RCT). The study was performed at the Tsukuba College of Technology Clinic in Japan. Twenty subjects, who suffered from low back pain (LBP) without sciatica, were recruited, using leaflets in Tsukuba city. Subjects were allocated to either an electroacupuncture (EA) group (10 patients) or a transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) group (10 patients). The procedure for EA was in accordance with standard practice at our clinic. The main outcome measures were a pain relief scale (100 mm visual analogue scale: VAS) and a LBP score recommended by the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA Score). Mean VAS value during the 2-weeks experimental period of the EA group was significantly smaller than that of the TENS group (65 mm vs 86 mm; 95% CI, 4.126 - 37.953). JOA Score in the EA group improved significantly while that in the TENS group showed no change. Although some placebo effect may be included, EA appeared more useful than TENS in the short-term effect on low back pain. We suggest that more realistic acupuncture interventions based on standard practice should be employed in pragmatic RCTs.

  9. Subgroup analyses in randomised controlled trials: cohort study on trial protocols and journal publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasenda, Benjamin; Schandelmaier, Stefan; Sun, Xin; von Elm, Erik; You, John; Blümle, Anette; Tomonaga, Yuki; Saccilotto, Ramon; Amstutz, Alain; Bengough, Theresa; Meerpohl, Joerg J; Stegert, Mihaela; Olu, Kelechi K; Tikkinen, Kari A O; Neumann, Ignacio; Carrasco-Labra, Alonso; Faulhaber, Markus; Mulla, Sohail M; Mertz, Dominik; Akl, Elie A; Bassler, Dirk; Busse, Jason W; Ferreira-González, Ignacio; Lamontagne, Francois; Nordmann, Alain; Gloy, Viktoria; Raatz, Heike; Moja, Lorenzo; Rosenthal, Rachel; Ebrahim, Shanil; Vandvik, Per O; Johnston, Bradley C; Walter, Martin A; Burnand, Bernard; Schwenkglenks, Matthias; Hemkens, Lars G; Bucher, Heiner C; Guyatt, Gordon H; Briel, Matthias

    2014-07-16

    To investigate the planning of subgroup analyses in protocols of randomised controlled trials and the agreement with corresponding full journal publications. Cohort of protocols of randomised controlled trial and subsequent full journal publications. Six research ethics committees in Switzerland, Germany, and Canada. 894 protocols of randomised controlled trial involving patients approved by participating research ethics committees between 2000 and 2003 and 515 subsequent full journal publications. Of 894 protocols of randomised controlled trials, 252 (28.2%) included one or more planned subgroup analyses. Of those, 17 (6.7%) provided a clear hypothesis for at least one subgroup analysis, 10 (4.0%) anticipated the direction of a subgroup effect, and 87 (34.5%) planned a statistical test for interaction. Industry sponsored trials more often planned subgroup analyses compared with investigator sponsored trials (195/551 (35.4%) v 57/343 (16.6%), P<0.001). Of 515 identified journal publications, 246 (47.8%) reported at least one subgroup analysis. In 81 (32.9%) of the 246 publications reporting subgroup analyses, authors stated that subgroup analyses were prespecified, but this was not supported by 28 (34.6%) corresponding protocols. In 86 publications, authors claimed a subgroup effect, but only 36 (41.9%) corresponding protocols reported a planned subgroup analysis. Subgroup analyses are insufficiently described in the protocols of randomised controlled trials submitted to research ethics committees, and investigators rarely specify the anticipated direction of subgroup effects. More than one third of statements in publications of randomised controlled trials about subgroup prespecification had no documentation in the corresponding protocols. Definitive judgments regarding credibility of claimed subgroup effects are not possible without access to protocols and analysis plans of randomised controlled trials. © The DISCO study group 2014.

  10. Adjunct Screening With Tomosynthesis or Ultrasound in Women With Mammography-Negative Dense Breasts: Interim Report of a Prospective Comparative Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagliafico, Alberto S; Calabrese, Massimo; Mariscotti, Giovanna; Durando, Manuela; Tosto, Simona; Monetti, Francesco; Airaldi, Sonia; Bignotti, Bianca; Nori, Jacopo; Bagni, Antonella; Signori, Alessio; Sormani, Maria Pia; Houssami, Nehmat

    2016-03-09

    Debate on adjunct screening in women with dense breasts has followed legislation requiring that women be informed about their mammographic density and related adjunct imaging. Ultrasound or tomosynthesis can detect breast cancer (BC) in mammography-negative dense breasts, but these modalities have not been directly compared in prospective trials. We conducted a trial of adjunct screening to compare, within the same participants, incremental BC detection by tomosynthesis and ultrasound in mammography-negative dense breasts. Adjunct Screening With Tomosynthesis or Ultrasound in Women With Mammography-Negative Dense Breasts is a prospective multicenter study recruiting asymptomatic women with mammography-negative screens and dense breasts. Eligible women had tomosynthesis and physician-performed ultrasound with independent interpretation of adjunct imaging. Outcome measures included cancer detection rate (CDR), number of false-positive (FP) recalls, and incremental CDR for each modality; these were compared using McNemar's test for paired binary data in a preplanned interim analysis. Among 3,231 mammography-negative screening participants (median age, 51 years; interquartile range, 44 to 78 years) with dense breasts, 24 additional BCs were detected (23 invasive): 13 tomosynthesis-detected BCs (incremental CDR, 4.0 per 1,000 screens; 95% CI, 1.8 to 6.2) versus 23 ultrasound-detected BCs (incremental CDR, 7.1 per 1,000 screens; 95% CI, 4.2 to 10.0), P = .006. Incremental FP recall occurred in 107 participants (3.33%; 95% CI, 2.72% to 3.96%). FP recall (any testing) did not differ between tomosynthesis (FP = 53) and ultrasound (FP = 65), P = .26; FP recall (biopsy) also did not differ between tomosynthesis (FP = 22) and ultrasound (FP = 24), P = .86. The Adjunct Screening With Tomosynthesis or Ultrasound in Women With Mammography-Negative Dense Breasts' interim analysis shows that ultrasound has better incremental BC detection than tomosynthesis in mammography

  11. Comparing three forms of early intervention for youth with borderline personality disorder (the MOBY study): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanen, Andrew; Jackson, Henry; Cotton, Sue M; Gleeson, John; Davey, Christopher G; Betts, Jennifer; Reid, Sophie; Thompson, Katherine; McCutcheon, Louise

    2015-10-21

    Borderline personality disorder is a severe mental disorder that usually has its onset in youth, but its diagnosis and treatment are often delayed. Psychosocial 'early intervention' is effective in improving symptoms and behaviours, but no trial has studied adaptive functioning as a primary outcome, even though this remains the major persistent impairment in this patient group. Also, the degree of complexity of treatment and requirements for implementation in mainstream health services are unclear. The primary aim of this trial is to evaluate the effectiveness of three forms of early intervention for borderline personality disorder in terms of adaptive functioning. Each treatment is defined by combining either a specialised or a general service delivery model with either an individual psychotherapy or a control psychotherapy condition. The study is a parallel-group, single-blind, randomised controlled trial, which has randomised permuted blocking, stratified by depression score, sex and age. The treatments are: (1) the specialised Helping Young People Early service model plus up to 16 sessions of individual cognitive analytic therapy; (2) the Helping Young People Early service plus up to 16 sessions of a control psychotherapy condition known as 'befriending'; (3) a general youth mental health care model plus up to 16 sessions of befriending. Participants will comprise 135 help-seeking youth aged 15-25 years with borderline personality disorder. After baseline assessment, staff blind to the study design and treatment group allocation will conduct assessments at 3, 6, 12 and 18 months. At the 12-month primary endpoint, the primary outcome is adaptive functioning (measures of social adjustment and interpersonal problems); secondary outcomes include measures of client satisfaction, borderline personality disorder features, depression and substance use. The results of this trial will help to clarify the comparative effectiveness of a specialised early intervention

  12. Comparative evaluation of pregnancy outcome in gonadotrophin-clomiphene combination vs clomiphene alone in polycystic ovarian syndrome and unexplained infertility-A prospective clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiuli Mukherjee

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: A large prospective clinical trial was conducted to compare the efficacy of single dose uFSH and clomiphene citrate combination with clomiphene citrate alone for ovulation induction to improve the pregnancy rate. Materials and Methods: The study was a randomized, prospective clinical trial. Totally, 1527 infertile women (4381 cycles with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS (n=911/2573 cycles and unexplained infertility (n=616/1808 cycles were randomized into two groups. Group A received single dose of uFSH on D 3 of menstrual cycle along with clomiphene. Group B received clomiphene only for ovulation induction. We compared the pregnancy rate and miscarriage rate between two groups. Results: Group A had a pregnancy rate of 17% compared to 8.3% of Group B which was significantly higher (P=0.0001. The miscarriage rate was 11% in Group A and 10% in Group B which was not significant (P=0.99. Pregnancy rates in PCOS women were 22% in Group A and 9.3% in Group B which shows significantly higher pregnancy rate (P=0.0001 in anovulatory infertility. But in unexplained infertility, there was no significant difference in pregnancy rate between Group A (11% and Group B(6.3%. Miscarriage rates were 8.8% and 9.5% in Group A and Group B, respectively, in PCOS women and 14% and 13% in women with unexplained infertility. Conclusion: Addition of single dose of uFSH improves pregnancy outcome particularly in anovulatory infertility (WHO II. Correction of unexplained infertility may need more than simple correction of possible subtle ovulatory effect.

  13. Comparing Two Exercise Programmes for the Management of Lateral Elbow Tendinopathy (Tennis Elbow/Lateral Epicondylitis—A Controlled Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Stasinopoulos

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To compare the effectiveness of supervised exercise programme as proposed by Stasinopoulos and colleagues with home exercise programme as proposed by Pienimaki and his coworkers in the treatment of lateral elbow tendinopathy. Design: Controlled clinical trial. Setting: Physiotherapy and rehabilitation centre. Participants: This trial was carried out with 60 patients, who had lateral elbow tendinopathy. Intervention: Group A (n = 30 had received supervised exercise programme, once per day for 4 weeks. Group B (n = 30 was treated with home exercise programme four to six times daily for 8 weeks. Outcome measures: pain, using a visual analogue scale, function, using a visual analogue scale for elbow function and the pain-free grip strength. Patients were evaluated at baseline, at the end of treatment (week 12, and 3 months (week 24 after the end of treatment. Results: Both the supervised and home exercise programme were found to be significantly effective in the reduction of pain and in the improvement of functional status. The supervised exercise programme resulted in significantly different improvement in comparison to those who received home exercise programme. Conclusion: A specific supervised exercise programme is superior to a specific home exercise programme in reducing pain and improving function in patients with LET at the end of the treatment and at the 3 month follow-up. Further research is needed to confirm our results.

  14. Comparing Two Methods of Cryotherapy and Intense Pulsed Light with Triamcinolone Injection in the Treatment of Keloid and Hypertrophic Scars: A Clinical Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Meymandi, Simin Shamsi; Moosazadeh, Mahmood; Rezazadeh, Azadeh

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Keloid and hypertrophic scars are abnormal manifestations of wounds that occur following skin injuries in the form of local proliferation of fibroblasts and increased production of collagen. There are several ways to cure these scars; treatment must be selected based on the nature of the scars. In this clinical trial, two methods?cryotherapy and intense pulsed light (IPL)?are compared in the treatment of scars, and the results are presented in terms of improvement level, complicati...

  15. Two parallel, pragmatic, UK multicentre, randomised controlled trials comparing surgical options for upper compartment (vault or uterine) pelvic organ prolapse (the VUE Study): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazener, Cathryn; Constable, Lynda; Hemming, Christine; Breeman, Suzanne; Elders, Andrew; Cooper, Kevin; Freeman, Robert; Smith, Anthony R B; Hagen, Suzanne; McDonald, Alison; McPherson, Gladys; Montgomery, Isobel; Kilonzo, Mary; Boyers, Dwayne; Goulao, Beatriz; Norrie, John

    2016-09-08

    One in three women who have a prolapse operation will go on to have another operation, though not necessarily in the same compartment. Surgery can result in greater impairment of quality of life than the original prolapse itself (such as the development of new-onset urinary incontinence, or prolapse at a different site). Anterior and posterior prolapse surgery is most common (90 % of operations), but around 43 % of women also have a uterine (34 %) or vault (9 %) procedure at the same time. There is not enough evidence from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) to guide management of vault or uterine prolapse. The Vault or Uterine prolapse surgery Evaluation (VUE) study aims to assess the surgical management of upper compartment pelvic organ prolapse (POP) in terms of clinical effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and adverse events. VUE is two parallel, pragmatic, UK multicentre, RCTs (Uterine Trial and Vault Trial). Eligible for inclusion are women with vault or uterine prolapse: requiring a surgical procedure, suitable for randomisation and willing to be randomised. Randomisation will be computer-allocated separately for each trial, minimised on: requiring concomitant anterior and/or posterior POP surgery or not, concomitant incontinence surgery or not, age (under 60 years or 60 years and older) and surgeon. Participants will be randomly assigned, with equal probability to intervention or control arms in either the Uterine Trial or the Vault Trial. Uterine Trial participants will receive either a vaginal hysterectomy or a uterine preservation procedure. Vault Trial participants will receive either a vaginal sacrospinous fixation or an abdominal sacrocolpopexy. Participants will be followed up by postal questionnaires (6 months post surgery and 12 months post randomisation) and also reviewed in clinic 12 months post surgery. The primary outcome is the participant-reported Pelvic Organ Prolapse Symptom Score (POP-SS) at 12 months post randomisation

  16. The landscape of precision cancer medicine clinical trials in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roper, Nitin; Stensland, Kristian D; Hendricks, Ryan; Galsky, Matthew D

    2015-05-01

    Advances in tumor biology and multiplex genomic analysis have ushered in the era of precision cancer medicine. Little is currently known, however, about the landscape of prospective "precision cancer medicine" clinical trials in the U.S. We identified all adult interventional cancer trials registered on ClinicalTrials.gov between September 2005 and May 2013. Trials were classified as "precision cancer medicine" if a genomic alteration in a predefined set of 88 genes was required for enrollment. Baseline characteristics were ascertained for each trial. Of the initial 18,797 trials identified, 9094 (48%) were eligible for inclusion: 684 (8%) were classified as precision cancer medicine trials and 8410 (92%) were non-precision cancer medicine trials. Compared with non-precision cancer medicine trials, precision cancer medicine trials were significantly more likely to be phase II [RR 1.19 (1.10-1.29), pPrecision medicine trials required 38 unique genomic alterations for enrollment. The proportion of precision cancer medicine trials compared to the total number of trials increased from 3% in 2006 to 16% in 2013. The proportion of adult cancer clinical trials in the U.S. requiring a genomic alteration for enrollment has increased substantially over the past several years. However, such trials still represent a small minority of studies performed within the cancer clinical trials enterprise and include a small subset of putatively "actionable" alterations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. ChroPac-Trial: Duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection versus pancreatoduodenectomy for chronic pancreatitis. Trial protocol of a randomised controlled multicentre trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schlitt Hans

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A recently published systematic review indicated superiority of duodenum-preserving techniques when compared with pancreatoduodenectomy, for the treatment of patients with chronic pancreatitis in the head of the gland. A multicentre randomised trial to confirm these results is needed. Methods/Design ChroPac aims to investigate differences in quality of life, mortality and morbidity during 24 months after surgery (duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection versus pancreatoduodenectomy in patients with chronic pancreatitis of the pancreatic head. ChroPac is a randomised, controlled, observer and patient blinded multicentre surgical trial with two parallel comparison groups. The primary outcome measure will be the average quality of life during 24 months after surgery. Statistical analysis is based on the intention-to-treat population. Analysis of covariance will be applied for the intervention group comparison adjusting for age, centre and quality of life before surgery. Level of significance is set at 5% (two-sided and sample size (n = 100 per group is determined to assure a power of 90%. Discussion The ChroPac trial will explore important outcomes from different perspectives (e.g. surgeon, patient, health care system. Its pragmatic approach promises high external validity allowing a comprehensive evaluation of the surgical strategy for treatment of patients with chronic pancreatitis. Trial registration Controlled-trials.com ISRCTN38973832

  18. Gender differences in clinical registration trials: is there a real problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labots, Geert; Jones, Aubrey; de Visser, Saco J.; Burggraaf, Jacobus

    2018-01-01

    Aims Several studies have reported the under‐representation of women in clinical trials, thereby challenging the external validity of the benefit/risk assessments of launched drugs. Our aim was to determine the extent to which women have been included in clinical trials used for drug registration and to analyse the fraction of women participating in phases I, II and III. Methods We conducted cross‐sectional, structured research into publicly available registration dossiers of Food and Drug Administration (FDA)‐approved drugs that are prescribed frequently. Furthermore, we analysed compounds with high hepatic clearance and a known gender‐related difference in drug response. In a sensitivity analysis, we compared figures with US disease prevalence data. Results For 38 of the initial 137 drugs (28%), sufficient data were reported and publicly available. For these drugs, 185 479 trial participants were included, of whom 47% were female and 44% were male; gender was not reported for 9% of participants. However, the number of female participants varied with the phase of the trial, with 22% females in phase I trials vs. 48% and 49%, respectively, in phase II and III trials. When compared with US disease prevalence data, 10 drugs (26%) had a greater than 20% difference between the proportion of females affected with the disease compared with representation in clinical trials. Conclusions From these publicly available data, there was no evidence of any systematic under‐representation of women in clinical trials. PMID:29293280

  19. Influenza detection and prediction algorithms: comparative accuracy trial in Östergötland county, Sweden, 2008-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spreco, A; Eriksson, O; Dahlström, Ö; Timpka, T

    2017-07-01

    Methods for the detection of influenza epidemics and prediction of their progress have seldom been comparatively evaluated using prospective designs. This study aimed to perform a prospective comparative trial of algorithms for the detection and prediction of increased local influenza activity. Data on clinical influenza diagnoses recorded by physicians and syndromic data from a telenursing service were used. Five detection and three prediction algorithms previously evaluated in public health settings were calibrated and then evaluated over 3 years. When applied on diagnostic data, only detection using the Serfling regression method and prediction using the non-adaptive log-linear regression method showed acceptable performances during winter influenza seasons. For the syndromic data, none of the detection algorithms displayed a satisfactory performance, while non-adaptive log-linear regression was the best performing prediction method. We conclude that evidence was found for that available algorithms for influenza detection and prediction display satisfactory performance when applied on local diagnostic data during winter influenza seasons. When applied on local syndromic data, the evaluated algorithms did not display consistent performance. Further evaluations and research on combination of methods of these types in public health information infrastructures for 'nowcasting' (integrated detection and prediction) of influenza activity are warranted.

  20. Impact of Mental Health Screening on Promoting Immediate Online Help-Seeking: Randomized Trial Comparing Normative Versus Humor-Driven Feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Isabella; Milne, David N; Deady, Mark; Calvo, Rafael A; Harvey, Samuel B; Glozier, Nick

    2018-04-05

    younger adults were less likely to click on the link compared to older adults across all measures (P=.005, OR 0.44, 95% CI 0.25-0.78). This pilot study found that there was no difference between normative and humor-driven feedback on promoting immediate clicks to an external resource, suggesting no impact on online help-seeking. Limitations included: lack of personal score control group, limited measures of predictors and potential confounders, and the fact that other forms of professional help-seeking were not assessed. Further investigation into other predictors and factors that impact on help-seeking is needed. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12616000707460; https://www.anzctr.org.au/ Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?id=370187 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6y8m8sVxr). ©Isabella Choi, David N Milne, Mark Deady, Rafael A Calvo, Samuel B Harvey, Nick Glozier. Originally published in JMIR Mental Health (http://mental.jmir.org), 05.04.2018.

  1. A randomized trial comparing bladder volume consistency during fractionated prostate radiation therapy

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mullaney, L.

    2014-01-10

    Organ motion is a contributory factor to the variation in location of the prostate and organs at risk during a course of fractionated prostate radiation therapy (RT). A prospective randomized controlled trial was designed with the primary endpoint to provide evidence-based bladder-filling instructions to achieve a consistent bladder volume (BV) and thus reduce the bladder-related organ motion. The secondary endpoints were to assess the incidence of acute and late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity for patients and patients’ satisfaction with the bladder-filling instructions.

  2. The Magpie Trial follow up study: outcome after discharge from hospital for women and children recruited to a trial comparing magnesium sulphate with placebo for pre-eclampsia [ISRCTN86938761

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Magpie Trial compared magnesium sulphate with placebo for women with pre-eclampsia. 10,141 women were recruited, 8804 before delivery. Overall, 9024 children were included in the analysis of outcome at discharge from hospital. Magnesium sulphate more than halved the risk of eclampsia, and probably reduced the risk of maternal death. There did not appear to be any substantive harmful effects on the baby, in the short term. It is now important to assess whether these benefits persist, and to provide adequate reassurance about longer term safety. The main objective of the Magpie Trial Follow Up Study is to assess whether in utero exposure to magnesium sulphate has a clinically important effect on the child's chance of surviving without major neurosensory disability. Other objectives are to assess long term outcome for the mother, and to develop and assess appropriate strategies for following up large numbers of children in perinatal trials. Study design Follow up is only feasible in selected centres. We therefore anticipate contacting 2800–3350 families, for 2435–2915 of whom the woman was randomised before delivery. A further 280–335 children would have been eligible for follow up if they had survived. The total sample size for the children is therefore 3080–3685, 2680–3210 of whom will have been born to women randomised before delivery. Families eligible for the follow up will be contacted, and surviving children screened using the Ages and Stages Questionnaires. Children who screen positive, and a sample of those who screen negative, will whenever possible have a paediatric and neurodevelopmental assessment. When women are contacted to ask how their child is, they will also be asked about their own health. The primary outcome is a composite measure of death or neurosensory disability for the child at 18 months. Discussion The Follow Up Study began in 2002, and now involves collaborators in 19 countries. Data

  3. Enhancing Recruitment Using Teleconference and Commitment Contract (ERUTECC): study protocol for a randomised, stepped-wedge cluster trial within the EFFECTS trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundström, Erik; Isaksson, Eva; Wester, Per; Laska, Ann-Charlotte; Näsman, Per

    2018-01-08

    Many randomised controlled trials (RCTs) fail to meet their recruitment goals in time. Trialists are advised to include study recruitment strategies within their trials. EFFECTS is a Swedish, academic-led RCT of fluoxetine for stroke recovery. The trial's primary objective is to investigate whether 20 mg fluoxetine daily compared with placebo for 6 months after an acute stroke improves the patient's functional outcome. The first patient was included on 20 October 2014 and, as of 31 August 2017, EFFECTS has included 810 of planned 1500 individuals. EFFECTS currently has 32 active centres. The primary objective of the ERUTECC (Enhancing Recruitment Using Teleconference and Commitment Contract) study is to investigate whether a structured teleconference re-visit with the study personnel at the centres, accompanied by a commitment contract, can enhance recruitment by 20% at 60 days post intervention, compared with 60 days pre-intervention, in an ongoing RCT. ERUTECC is a randomised, stepped-wedge cluster trial embedded in EFFECTS. The plan is to start ERUTECC with a running-in period of September 2017. The first intervention is due in October 2017, and the study will continue for 12 months. We are planning to intervene at all active centres in EFFECTS, except the five top recruiting centres (n = 27). The rationale for not intervening at the top recruiting centres is that we believe they have reached their full potential and the intervention would be too weak for them. The hypothesis of this study is that a structured teleconference re-visit with the study personnel at the centres, accompanied by a commitment contract, can enhance recruitment by 20% 60 days post intervention, compared to 60 days pre-intervention, in an ongoing RCT. EFFECTS is a large, pragmatic RCT of stroke in Sweden. Results from the embedded ERUTECC study could probably be generalised to high-income Western countries, and is relevant to trial management and could improve trial management in the

  4. A comparative study between a simplified Kalman filter and Sliding Window Averaging for single trial dynamical estimation of event-related potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel-Larsen, Esben; Fuglø, Jacob; Channir, Fouad

    2010-01-01

    , are variable and depend on cognitive function. This study compares the performance of a simplified Kalman filter with Sliding Window Averaging in tracking dynamical changes in single trial P300. The comparison is performed on simulated P300 data with added background noise consisting of both simulated and real...... background EEG in various input signal to noise ratios. While both methods can be applied to track dynamical changes, the simplified Kalman filter has an advantage over the Sliding Window Averaging, most notable in a better noise suppression when both are optimized for faster changing latency and amplitude...

  5. Evaluation of Lumicyano™ cyanoacrylate fuming process for the development of latent fingermarks on plastic carrier bags by means of a pseudo operational comparative trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, Kevin J; Deacon, Paul; Fraser, Joanna

    2014-03-01

    There are a number of studies discussing recent developments of a one-step fluorescent cyanoacrylate process. This study is a pseudo operational trial to compare an example of a one-step fluorescent cyanoacrylate product, Lumicyano™, with the two recommended techniques for plastic carrier bags; cyanoacrylate fuming followed by basic yellow 40 (BY40) dyeing and powder suspensions. 100 plastic carrier bags were collected from the place of work and the items were treated as found without any additional fingermark deposition. The bags were split into three and after treatment with the three techniques a comparable number of fingermarks were detected by each technique (average of 300 fingermarks). The items treated with Lumicyano™ were sequentially processed with BY40 and an additional 43 new fingermarks were detected. Lumicyano™ appears to be a suitable technique for the development of fingermarks on plastic carrier bags and it can help save lab space and time as it does not require dyeing or drying procedures. Furthermore, contrary to other one-step cyanoacrylate products, existing cyanoacrylate cabinets do not require any modification for the treatment of articles with Lumicyano™. To date, there is little peer reviewed articles in the literature on trials related to Lumicyano™ and this study aims to contribute to fill this gap. © 2013.

  6. Data extraction from machine-translated versus original language randomized trial reports: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balk, Ethan M; Chung, Mei; Chen, Minghua L; Chang, Lina Kong Win; Trikalinos, Thomas A

    2013-11-07

    Google Translate offers free Web-based translation, but it is unknown whether its translation accuracy is sufficient to use in systematic reviews to mitigate concerns about language bias. We compared data extraction from non-English language studies with extraction from translations by Google Translate of 10 studies in each of five languages (Chinese, French, German, Japanese and Spanish). Fluent speakers double-extracted original-language articles. Researchers who did not speak the given language double-extracted translated articles along with 10 additional English language trials. Using the original language extractions as a gold standard, we estimated the probability and odds ratio of correctly extracting items from translated articles compared with English, adjusting for reviewer and language. Translation required about 30 minutes per article and extraction of translated articles required additional extraction time. The likelihood of correct extractions was greater for study design and intervention domain items than for outcome descriptions and, particularly, study results. Translated Spanish articles yielded the highest percentage of items (93%) that were correctly extracted more than half the time (followed by German and Japanese 89%, French 85%, and Chinese 78%) but Chinese articles yielded the highest percentage of items (41%) that were correctly extracted >98% of the time (followed by Spanish 30%, French 26%, German 22%, and Japanese 19%). In general, extractors' confidence in translations was not associated with their accuracy. Translation by Google Translate generally required few resources. Based on our analysis of translations from five languages, using machine translation has the potential to reduce language bias in systematic reviews; however, pending additional empirical data, reviewers should be cautious about using translated data. There remains a trade-off between completeness of systematic reviews (including all available studies) and risk of

  7. Additive Complex Ayurvedic Treatment in Patients with Fibromyalgia Syndrome Compared to Conventional Standard Care Alone: A Nonrandomized Controlled Clinical Pilot Study (KAFA Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian S. Kessler

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Fibromyalgia (FMS is a challenging condition for health care systems worldwide. Only limited trial data is available for FMS for outcomes of complex treatment interventions of complementary and integrative (CIM approaches. Methods. We conducted a controlled, nonrandomized feasibility study that compared outcomes in 21 patients treated with Ayurveda with those of 11 patients treated with a conventional approach at the end of a two-week inpatient hospital stay. Primary outcome was the impact of fibromyalgia on patients as assessed by the FIQ. Secondary outcomes included scores of pain intensity, pain perception, depression, anxiety, and quality of sleep. Follow-up assessments were done after 6 months. Results. At 2 weeks, there were comparable and significant improvements in the FIQ and for most of secondary outcomes in both groups with no significant in-between-group differences. The beneficial effects for both treatment groups were partly maintained for the main outcome and a number of secondary outcomes at the 6-month followup, again with no significant in-between-group differences. Discussion. The findings of this feasibility study suggest that Ayurvedic therapy is noninferior to conventional treatment in patients with severe FMS. Since Ayurveda was only used as add-on treatment, RCTs on Ayurveda alone are warranted to increase model validity. This trial is registered with NCT01389336.

  8. Duct-to-mucosa versus dunking techniques of pancreaticojejunostomy after pancreaticoduodenectomy: Do we need more trials? A systematic review and meta-analysis with trial sequential analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilambi, Ragini; Singh, Anand Narayan

    2018-03-25

    Pancreaticojejunostomy (PJ is the most widely used reconstruction technique after pancreaticoduodenectomy. Despite several randomized trials, the ideal technique of pancreaticojejunostomy remains debatable. We planned a meta-analysis of randomized trials comparing the two most common techniques of PJ (duct-to-mucosa and dunking) to identify the best available evidence in the current literature. We searched the Pubmed/Medline, Web of science, Science citation index, Google scholar and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials electronic databases till October 2017 for all English language randomized trials comparing the two approaches. Statistical analysis was performed using Review Manager (RevMan), Version 5.3. Copenhagen: The Nordic Cochrane Center, The Cochrane Collaboration, 2014 and results were expressed as odds ratio for dichotomous and mean difference for continuous variables. P-value ≤ 0.05 was considered significant. Trial sequential analysis was performed using TSA version 0.9.5.5 (Copenhagen: The Copenhagen Trial Unit, Center for Clinical Intervention Research, 2016). A total of 8 trials were included, with a total of 1043 patients (DTM: 518; Dunking: 525). There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of overall as well as clinically relevant POPF rate. Similarly, both groups were comparable for the secondary outcomes. Trial sequential analysis revealed that the required information size had been crossed without achieving a clinically significant difference for overall POPF; and though the required information size had not been achieved for CR-POPF, the current data has already crossed the futility line for CR-POPF with a 10% risk difference, 80% power and 5% α error. This meta-analysis found no significant difference between the two techniques in terms of overall and CR-POPF rates. Further, the existing evidence is sufficient to conclude lack of difference and further trials are unlikely to result in any change in the

  9. Cost of intervention delivery in a lifestyle weight loss trial in type 2 diabetes: results from the Look AHEAD clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Rushing, J.; Wing, R.; Wadden, T. A.; Knowler, W. C.; Lawlor, M.; Evans, M.; Killean, T.; Montez, M.; Espeland, M. A.; Zhang, P.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Objective The Action for Health in Diabetes (Look AHEAD) trial was a randomized controlled clinical trial to compare the effects of 10?years of intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) with a control condition of diabetes support and education (DSE) on health outcomes in over 5,000 participants with type 2 diabetes. The ILI had significantly greater weight losses than DSE throughout the trial. The goal of this analysis is to describe the cost of delivering the intervention. Methods The ...

  10. Magnitude of effects in clinical trials published in high-impact general medical journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siontis, Konstantinos C M; Evangelou, Evangelos; Ioannidis, John P A

    2011-10-01

    Prestigious journals select for publication studies that are considered most important and informative. We aimed to examine whether high-impact general (HIG) medical journals systematically demonstrate more favourable results for experimental interventions compared with the rest of the literature. We scrutinized systematic reviews of the Cochrane Database (Issue 4, 2009) and meta-analyses published in four general journals (2008-09). Eligible articles included ≥1 binary outcome meta-analysis(es) pertaining to effectiveness with ≥1 clinical trial(s) published in NEJM, JAMA or Lancet. Effect sizes in trials from NEJM, JAMA or Lancet were compared with those from other trials in the same meta-analyses by deriving summary relative odds ratios (sRORs). Additional analyses examined separately early- and late-published trials in HIG journals and journal-specific effects. A total of 79 meta-analyses including 1043 clinical trials were analysed. Trials in HIG journals had similar effects to trials in other journals, when there was large-scale evidence, but showed more favourable results for experimental interventions when they were small. When HIG trials had less than 40 events, the sROR was 1.64 [95% confidence interval (95% CI): 1.23-2.18). The difference was most prominent when small early trials published in HIG journals were compared with subsequent trials [sROR 2.68 (95% CI: 1.33-5.38)]. Late-published HIG trials showed no consistent inflation of effects. The patterns did not differ beyond chance between NEJM, JAMA or Lancet. Small trials published in the most prestigious journals show more favourable effects for experimental interventions, and this is most prominent for early-published trials in such journals. No effect inflation is seen for large trials.

  11. Efficacy and safety of darunavir-ritonavir compared with that of lopinavir-ritonavir at 48 weeks in treatment-experienced, HIV-infected patients in TITAN: a randomised controlled phase III trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madruga, José Valdez; Berger, Daniel; McMurchie, Marilyn

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The protease inhibitor darunavir has been shown to be efficacious in highly treatment-experienced patients with HIV infection, but needs to be assessed in patients with a broader range of treatment experience. We did a randomised, controlled, phase III trial (TITAN) to compare 48-week....... The primary endpoint was non-inferiority (95% CI lower limit for the difference in treatment response -12% or greater) for HIV RNA of less than 400 copies per mL in plasma at week 48 (per-protocol analysis). TITAN (TMC114-C214) is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00110877. FINDINGS: Of 595...

  12. A Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Suture-Fixation Mucopexy and Doppler-Guided Hemorrhoidal Artery Ligation in Patients with Grade III Hemorrhoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Zhai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a suture-fixation mucopexy procedure by comparing with Doppler-guided hemorrhoidal artery ligation (DGHAL in the management of patients with grade III hemorrhoids. Methods. This was a randomized controlled trial. One hundred patients with grade III hemorrhoids were randomly assigned to receive suture-fixation mucopexy (n=50 or DGHAL (n=50. Outcome assessments were performed at 2 weeks, 12 months, and 24 months. Assessments included resolution of clinical symptoms, postoperative complications, duration of hospitalization, and total costs. Results. At 2 weeks, one (2% patient in suture-fixation group and four (8% patients in DGHAL group had persistent prolapsing hemorrhoids. Postoperative bleeding was observed in two patients (4% in suture-fixation group and one patient in DGHAL group. There was no significant difference in short-term recurrence between groups. Postoperative complications and duration of hospitalization were comparable between the two groups. Rates of recurrence of prolapse or bleeding at 12 months did not differ between groups. However, recurrence of prolapse at 24 months was significantly more common in DGHAL group (19.0% versus 2.3%, p=0.030. Conclusions. Compared with DGHAL, the suture-fixation mucopexy technique had comparable short-term outcomes and favorable long-term outcomes.

  13. Cardiovascular events in acute coronary syndrome patients with peripheral arterial disease treated with ticagrelor compared to clopidogrel: Data from the PLATO trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patel, Manesh R.; Becker, Richard C.; Wojdyla, Daniel M.

    Abstract 14299: Cardiovascular Events in Acute Coronary Syndrome Patients With Peripheral Arterial Disease Treated With Ticagrelor Compared to Clopidogrel: Data From the PLATO Trial Manesh R Patel1; Richard C Becker1; Daniel M Wojdyla2; Håkan Emanuelsson3; William Hiatt4; Jay Horrow5; Steen Husted6...... Uppsala, Sweden 10 Cardiology, Uppsala Clinical Rsch center, 75185 Uppsala, Sweden Background: Patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) and acute coronary syndrome (ACS) are at high risk for clinical events and are often difficult to manage. We evaluated cardiovascular outcomes of ACS patients...

  14. Clinical benefit of intra-articular saline as a comparator in clinical trials of knee osteoarthritis treatments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altman, Roy D; Devji, Tahira; Bhandari, Mohit

    2016-01-01

    August 14th, 2014. Two reviewers assessed the eligibility of potential reports and the risk of bias of included trials. We analyzed short (≤3 months) and long-term (6-12 months) pain reduction of the saline arm of included trials using standardized mean differences (SMDs; estimated assuming a null effect...... in the meta-analysis. Based on data with moderate inconsistency IA saline was found to significantly improve short-term knee pain in 32 studies involving 1705 patients (SMD = -0.68; 95% CI: -0.78 to -0.57; P ... with saline in 19 studies involving 1445 patients (SMD = -0.61; 95% CI: -0.76 to -0.45; P

  15. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Trial Protocol Each clinical trial has a master plan called a protocol (PRO-to-kol). This plan explains how the trial will work. The trial ... clinical trial; and detailed information about the treatment plan. Eligibility Criteria A clinical trial's protocol describes what ...

  16. Spine device clinical trials: design and sponsorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cher, Daniel J; Capobianco, Robyn A

    2015-05-01

    Multicenter prospective randomized clinical trials represent the best evidence to support the safety and effectiveness of medical devices. Industry sponsorship of multicenter clinical trials is purported to lead to bias. To determine what proportion of spine device-related trials are industry-sponsored and the effect of industry sponsorship on trial design. Analysis of data from a publicly available clinical trials database. Clinical trials of spine devices registered on ClinicalTrials.gov, a publicly accessible trial<