WorldWideScience

Sample records for trial basis set

  1. Dynamical basis set

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco, M.; Heller, E.J.

    1985-01-01

    A new Cartesian basis set is defined that is suitable for the representation of molecular vibration-rotation bound states. The Cartesian basis functions are superpositions of semiclassical states generated through the use of classical trajectories that conform to the intrinsic dynamics of the molecule. Although semiclassical input is employed, the method becomes ab initio through the standard matrix diagonalization variational method. Special attention is given to classical-quantum correspondences for angular momentum. In particular, it is shown that the use of semiclassical information preferentially leads to angular momentum eigenstates with magnetic quantum number Vertical BarMVertical Bar equal to the total angular momentum J. The present method offers a reliable technique for representing highly excited vibrational-rotational states where perturbation techniques are no longer applicable

  2. Estimating the CCSD basis-set limit energy from small basis sets: basis-set extrapolations vs additivity schemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spackman, Peter R.; Karton, Amir, E-mail: amir.karton@uwa.edu.au [School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, The University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009 (Australia)

    2015-05-15

    Coupled cluster calculations with all single and double excitations (CCSD) converge exceedingly slowly with the size of the one-particle basis set. We assess the performance of a number of approaches for obtaining CCSD correlation energies close to the complete basis-set limit in conjunction with relatively small DZ and TZ basis sets. These include global and system-dependent extrapolations based on the A + B/L{sup α} two-point extrapolation formula, and the well-known additivity approach that uses an MP2-based basis-set-correction term. We show that the basis set convergence rate can change dramatically between different systems(e.g.it is slower for molecules with polar bonds and/or second-row elements). The system-dependent basis-set extrapolation scheme, in which unique basis-set extrapolation exponents for each system are obtained from lower-cost MP2 calculations, significantly accelerates the basis-set convergence relative to the global extrapolations. Nevertheless, we find that the simple MP2-based basis-set additivity scheme outperforms the extrapolation approaches. For example, the following root-mean-squared deviations are obtained for the 140 basis-set limit CCSD atomization energies in the W4-11 database: 9.1 (global extrapolation), 3.7 (system-dependent extrapolation), and 2.4 (additivity scheme) kJ mol{sup –1}. The CCSD energy in these approximations is obtained from basis sets of up to TZ quality and the latter two approaches require additional MP2 calculations with basis sets of up to QZ quality. We also assess the performance of the basis-set extrapolations and additivity schemes for a set of 20 basis-set limit CCSD atomization energies of larger molecules including amino acids, DNA/RNA bases, aromatic compounds, and platonic hydrocarbon cages. We obtain the following RMSDs for the above methods: 10.2 (global extrapolation), 5.7 (system-dependent extrapolation), and 2.9 (additivity scheme) kJ mol{sup –1}.

  3. Estimating the CCSD basis-set limit energy from small basis sets: basis-set extrapolations vs additivity schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spackman, Peter R.; Karton, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Coupled cluster calculations with all single and double excitations (CCSD) converge exceedingly slowly with the size of the one-particle basis set. We assess the performance of a number of approaches for obtaining CCSD correlation energies close to the complete basis-set limit in conjunction with relatively small DZ and TZ basis sets. These include global and system-dependent extrapolations based on the A + B/L α two-point extrapolation formula, and the well-known additivity approach that uses an MP2-based basis-set-correction term. We show that the basis set convergence rate can change dramatically between different systems(e.g.it is slower for molecules with polar bonds and/or second-row elements). The system-dependent basis-set extrapolation scheme, in which unique basis-set extrapolation exponents for each system are obtained from lower-cost MP2 calculations, significantly accelerates the basis-set convergence relative to the global extrapolations. Nevertheless, we find that the simple MP2-based basis-set additivity scheme outperforms the extrapolation approaches. For example, the following root-mean-squared deviations are obtained for the 140 basis-set limit CCSD atomization energies in the W4-11 database: 9.1 (global extrapolation), 3.7 (system-dependent extrapolation), and 2.4 (additivity scheme) kJ mol –1 . The CCSD energy in these approximations is obtained from basis sets of up to TZ quality and the latter two approaches require additional MP2 calculations with basis sets of up to QZ quality. We also assess the performance of the basis-set extrapolations and additivity schemes for a set of 20 basis-set limit CCSD atomization energies of larger molecules including amino acids, DNA/RNA bases, aromatic compounds, and platonic hydrocarbon cages. We obtain the following RMSDs for the above methods: 10.2 (global extrapolation), 5.7 (system-dependent extrapolation), and 2.9 (additivity scheme) kJ mol –1

  4. Conductance calculations with a wavelet basis set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Kristian Sommer; Bollinger, Mikkel; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    2003-01-01

    We present a method based on density functional theory (DFT) for calculating the conductance of a phase-coherent system. The metallic contacts and the central region where the electron scattering occurs, are treated on the same footing taking their full atomic and electronic structure into account....... The linear-response conductance is calculated from the Green's function which is represented in terms of a system-independent basis set containing wavelets with compact support. This allows us to rigorously separate the central region from the contacts and to test for convergence in a systematic way...

  5. Optimized Basis Sets for the Environment in the Domain-Specific Basis Set Approach of the Incremental Scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anacker, Tony; Hill, J Grant; Friedrich, Joachim

    2016-04-21

    Minimal basis sets, denoted DSBSenv, based on the segmented basis sets of Ahlrichs and co-workers have been developed for use as environmental basis sets for the domain-specific basis set (DSBS) incremental scheme with the aim of decreasing the CPU requirements of the incremental scheme. The use of these minimal basis sets within explicitly correlated (F12) methods has been enabled by the optimization of matching auxiliary basis sets for use in density fitting of two-electron integrals and resolution of the identity. The accuracy of these auxiliary sets has been validated by calculations on a test set containing small- to medium-sized molecules. The errors due to density fitting are about 2-4 orders of magnitude smaller than the basis set incompleteness error of the DSBSenv orbital basis sets. Additional reductions in computational cost have been tested with the reduced DSBSenv basis sets, in which the highest angular momentum functions of the DSBSenv auxiliary basis sets have been removed. The optimized and reduced basis sets are used in the framework of the domain-specific basis set of the incremental scheme to decrease the computation time without significant loss of accuracy. The computation times and accuracy of the previously used environmental basis and that optimized in this work have been validated with a test set of medium- to large-sized systems. The optimized and reduced DSBSenv basis sets decrease the CPU time by about 15.4% and 19.4% compared with the old environmental basis and retain the accuracy in the absolute energy with standard deviations of 0.99 and 1.06 kJ/mol, respectively.

  6. Setting clear expectations for safety basis development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MORENO, M.R.

    2003-01-01

    DOE-RL has set clear expectations for a cost-effective approach for achieving compliance with the Nuclear Safety Management requirements (10 CFR 830, Nuclear Safety Rule) which will ensure long-term benefit to Hanford. To facilitate implementation of these expectations, tools were developed to streamline and standardize safety analysis and safety document development resulting in a shorter and more predictable DOE approval cycle. A Hanford Safety Analysis and Risk Assessment Handbook (SARAH) was issued to standardized methodologies for development of safety analyses. A Microsoft Excel spreadsheet (RADIDOSE) was issued for the evaluation of radiological consequences for accident scenarios often postulated for Hanford. A standard Site Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) detailing the safety management programs was issued for use as a means of compliance with a majority of 3009 Standard chapters. An in-process review was developed between DOE and the Contractor to facilitate DOE approval and provide early course correction. As a result of setting expectations and providing safety analysis tools, the four Hanford Site waste management nuclear facilities were able to integrate into one Master Waste Management Documented Safety Analysis (WM-DSA)

  7. Groebner basis, resultants and the generalized Mandelbrot set

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geum, Young Hee [Centre of Research for Computational Sciences and Informatics in Biology, Bioindustry, Environment, Agriculture and Healthcare, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)], E-mail: conpana@empal.com; Hare, Kevin G. [Department of Pure Mathematics, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ont., N2L 3G1 (Canada)], E-mail: kghare@math.uwaterloo.ca

    2009-10-30

    This paper demonstrates how the Groebner basis algorithm can be used for finding the bifurcation points in the generalized Mandelbrot set. It also shows how resultants can be used to find components of the generalized Mandelbrot set.

  8. Groebner basis, resultants and the generalized Mandelbrot set

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geum, Young Hee; Hare, Kevin G.

    2009-01-01

    This paper demonstrates how the Groebner basis algorithm can be used for finding the bifurcation points in the generalized Mandelbrot set. It also shows how resultants can be used to find components of the generalized Mandelbrot set.

  9. Localized atomic basis set in the projector augmented wave method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ask Hjorth; Vanin, Marco; Mortensen, Jens Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    We present an implementation of localized atomic-orbital basis sets in the projector augmented wave (PAW) formalism within the density-functional theory. The implementation in the real-space GPAW code provides a complementary basis set to the accurate but computationally more demanding grid...

  10. Dynamical basis sets for algebraic variational calculations in quantum-mechanical scattering theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan; Kouri, Donald J.; Truhlar, Donald G.; Schwenke, David W.

    1990-01-01

    New basis sets are proposed for linear algebraic variational calculations of transition amplitudes in quantum-mechanical scattering problems. These basis sets are hybrids of those that yield the Kohn variational principle (KVP) and those that yield the generalized Newton variational principle (GNVP) when substituted in Schlessinger's stationary expression for the T operator. Trial calculations show that efficiencies almost as great as that of the GNVP and much greater than the KVP can be obtained, even for basis sets with the majority of the members independent of energy.

  11. Point Set Denoising Using Bootstrap-Based Radial Basis Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khang Jie Liew

    Full Text Available This paper examines the application of a bootstrap test error estimation of radial basis functions, specifically thin-plate spline fitting, in surface smoothing. The presence of noisy data is a common issue of the point set model that is generated from 3D scanning devices, and hence, point set denoising is one of the main concerns in point set modelling. Bootstrap test error estimation, which is applied when searching for the smoothing parameters of radial basis functions, is revisited. The main contribution of this paper is a smoothing algorithm that relies on a bootstrap-based radial basis function. The proposed method incorporates a k-nearest neighbour search and then projects the point set to the approximated thin-plate spline surface. Therefore, the denoising process is achieved, and the features are well preserved. A comparison of the proposed method with other smoothing methods is also carried out in this study.

  12. Point Set Denoising Using Bootstrap-Based Radial Basis Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Khang Jie; Ramli, Ahmad; Abd Majid, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the application of a bootstrap test error estimation of radial basis functions, specifically thin-plate spline fitting, in surface smoothing. The presence of noisy data is a common issue of the point set model that is generated from 3D scanning devices, and hence, point set denoising is one of the main concerns in point set modelling. Bootstrap test error estimation, which is applied when searching for the smoothing parameters of radial basis functions, is revisited. The main contribution of this paper is a smoothing algorithm that relies on a bootstrap-based radial basis function. The proposed method incorporates a k-nearest neighbour search and then projects the point set to the approximated thin-plate spline surface. Therefore, the denoising process is achieved, and the features are well preserved. A comparison of the proposed method with other smoothing methods is also carried out in this study.

  13. Some considerations about Gaussian basis sets for electric property calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arruda, Priscilla M.; Canal Neto, A.; Jorge, F. E.

    Recently, segmented contracted basis sets of double, triple, and quadruple zeta valence quality plus polarization functions (XZP, X = D, T, and Q, respectively) for the atoms from H to Ar were reported. In this work, with the objective of having a better description of polarizabilities, the QZP set was augmented with diffuse (s and p symmetries) and polarization (p, d, f, and g symmetries) functions that were chosen to maximize the mean dipole polarizability at the UHF and UMP2 levels, respectively. At the HF and B3LYP levels of theory, electric dipole moment and static polarizability for a sample of molecules were evaluated. Comparison with experimental data and results obtained with a similar size basis set, whose diffuse functions were optimized for the ground state energy of the anion, was done.

  14. The Dirac Equation in the algebraic approximation. VII. A comparison of molecular finite difference and finite basis set calculations using distributed Gaussian basis sets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quiney, H. M.; Glushkov, V. N.; Wilson, S.; Sabin,; Brandas, E

    2001-01-01

    A comparison is made of the accuracy achieved in finite difference and finite basis set approximations to the Dirac equation for the ground state of the hydrogen molecular ion. The finite basis set calculations are carried out using a distributed basis set of Gaussian functions the exponents and

  15. Basis set approach in the constrained interpolation profile method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utsumi, T.; Koga, J.; Yabe, T.; Ogata, Y.; Matsunaga, E.; Aoki, T.; Sekine, M.

    2003-07-01

    We propose a simple polynomial basis-set that is easily extendable to any desired higher-order accuracy. This method is based on the Constrained Interpolation Profile (CIP) method and the profile is chosen so that the subgrid scale solution approaches the real solution by the constraints from the spatial derivative of the original equation. Thus the solution even on the subgrid scale becomes consistent with the master equation. By increasing the order of the polynomial, this solution quickly converges. 3rd and 5th order polynomials are tested on the one-dimensional Schroedinger equation and are proved to give solutions a few orders of magnitude higher in accuracy than conventional methods for lower-lying eigenstates. (author)

  16. Basis set expansion for inverse problems in plasma diagnostic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, B.; Ruiz, C. L.

    2013-07-01

    A basis set expansion method [V. Dribinski, A. Ossadtchi, V. A. Mandelshtam, and H. Reisler, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 73, 2634 (2002)], 10.1063/1.1482156 is applied to recover physical information about plasma radiation sources from instrument data, which has been forward transformed due to the nature of the measurement technique. This method provides a general approach for inverse problems, and we discuss two specific examples relevant to diagnosing fast z pinches on the 20-25 MA Z machine [M. E. Savage, L. F. Bennett, D. E. Bliss, W. T. Clark, R. S. Coats, J. M. Elizondo, K. R. LeChien, H. C. Harjes, J. M. Lehr, J. E. Maenchen, D. H. McDaniel, M. F. Pasik, T. D. Pointon, A. C. Owen, D. B. Seidel, D. L. Smith, B. S. Stoltzfus, K. W. Struve, W. A. Stygar, L. K. Warne, J. R. Woodworth, C. W. Mendel, K. R. Prestwich, R. W. Shoup, D. L. Johnson, J. P. Corley, K. C. Hodge, T. C. Wagoner, and P. E. Wakeland, in Proceedings of the Pulsed Power Plasma Sciences Conference (IEEE, 2007), p. 979]. First, Abel inversion of time-gated, self-emission x-ray images from a wire array implosion is studied. Second, we present an approach for unfolding neutron time-of-flight measurements from a deuterium gas puff z pinch to recover information about emission time history and energy distribution. Through these examples, we discuss how noise in the measured data limits the practical resolution of the inversion, and how the method handles discontinuities in the source function and artifacts in the projected image. We add to the method a propagation of errors calculation for estimating uncertainties in the inverted solution.

  17. Radiobiological basis for setting neutron radiation safety standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straume, T.

    1985-01-01

    Present neutron standards, adopted more than 20 yr ago from a weak radiobiological data base, have been in doubt for a number of years and are currently under challenge. Moreover, recent dosimetric re-evaluations indicate that Hiroshima neutron doses may have been much lower than previously thought, suggesting that direct data for neutron-induced cancer in humans may in fact not be available. These recent developments make it urgent to determine the extent to which neutron cancer risk in man can be estimated from data that are available. Two approaches are proposed here that are anchored in particularly robust epidemiological and experimental data and appear most likely to provide reliable estimates of neutron cancer risk in man. The first approach uses gamma-ray dose-response relationships for human carcinogenesis, available from Nagasaki (Hiroshima data are also considered), together with highly characterized neutron and gamma-ray data for human cytogenetics. When tested against relevant experimental data, this approach either adequately predicts or somewhat overestimates neutron tumorigenesis (and mutagenesis) in animals. The second approach also uses the Nagasaki gamma-ray cancer data, but together with neutron RBEs from animal tumorigenesis studies. Both approaches give similar results and provide a basis for setting neutron radiation safety standards. They appear to be an improvement over previous approaches, including those that rely on highly uncertain maximum neutron RBEs and unnecessary extrapolations of gamma-ray data to very low doses. Results suggest that, at the presently accepted neutron dose limit of 0.5 rad/yr, the cancer mortality risk to radiation workers is not very different from accidental mortality risks to workers in various nonradiation occupations

  18. Basis set expansion for inverse problems in plasma diagnostic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, B.; Ruiz, C. L. [Sandia National Laboratories, PO Box 5800, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    A basis set expansion method [V. Dribinski, A. Ossadtchi, V. A. Mandelshtam, and H. Reisler, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 73, 2634 (2002)] is applied to recover physical information about plasma radiation sources from instrument data, which has been forward transformed due to the nature of the measurement technique. This method provides a general approach for inverse problems, and we discuss two specific examples relevant to diagnosing fast z pinches on the 20–25 MA Z machine [M. E. Savage, L. F. Bennett, D. E. Bliss, W. T. Clark, R. S. Coats, J. M. Elizondo, K. R. LeChien, H. C. Harjes, J. M. Lehr, J. E. Maenchen, D. H. McDaniel, M. F. Pasik, T. D. Pointon, A. C. Owen, D. B. Seidel, D. L. Smith, B. S. Stoltzfus, K. W. Struve, W. A. Stygar, L. K. Warne, J. R. Woodworth, C. W. Mendel, K. R. Prestwich, R. W. Shoup, D. L. Johnson, J. P. Corley, K. C. Hodge, T. C. Wagoner, and P. E. Wakeland, in Proceedings of the Pulsed Power Plasma Sciences Conference (IEEE, 2007), p. 979]. First, Abel inversion of time-gated, self-emission x-ray images from a wire array implosion is studied. Second, we present an approach for unfolding neutron time-of-flight measurements from a deuterium gas puff z pinch to recover information about emission time history and energy distribution. Through these examples, we discuss how noise in the measured data limits the practical resolution of the inversion, and how the method handles discontinuities in the source function and artifacts in the projected image. We add to the method a propagation of errors calculation for estimating uncertainties in the inverted solution.

  19. 21 CFR 886.1405 - Ophthalmic trial lens set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ophthalmic trial lens set. 886.1405 Section 886...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1405 Ophthalmic trial lens set. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic trial lens set is a device that is a set of lenses of various dioptric powers...

  20. Density Functional Theory and the Basis Set Truncation Problem with Correlation Consistent Basis Sets: Elephant in the Room or Mouse in the Closet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, David; Dixon, David A

    2018-03-08

    Two recent papers in this journal called into question the suitability of the correlation consistent basis sets for density functional theory (DFT) calculations, because the sets were designed for correlated methods such as configuration interaction, perturbation theory, and coupled cluster theory. These papers focused on the ability of the correlation consistent and other basis sets to reproduce total energies, atomization energies, and dipole moments obtained from "quasi-exact" multiwavelet results. Undesirably large errors were observed for the correlation consistent basis sets. One of the papers argued that basis sets specifically optimized for DFT methods were "essential" for obtaining high accuracy. In this work we re-examined the performance of the correlation consistent basis sets by resolving problems with the previous calculations and by making more appropriate basis set choices for the alkali and alkaline-earth metals and second-row elements. When this is done, the statistical errors with respect to the benchmark values and with respect to DFT optimized basis sets are greatly reduced, especially in light of the relatively large intrinsic error of the underlying DFT method. When judged with respect to high-quality Feller-Peterson-Dixon coupled cluster theory atomization energies, the PBE0 DFT method used in the previous studies exhibits a mean absolute deviation more than a factor of 50 larger than the quintuple zeta basis set truncation error.

  1. Dynamical pruning of static localized basis sets in time-dependent quantum dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McCormack, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the viability of dynamical pruning of localized basis sets in time-dependent quantum wave packet methods. Basis functions that have a very small population at any given time are removed from the active set. The basis functions themselves are time independent, but the set of active

  2. On the performance of atomic natural orbital basis sets: A full configuration interaction study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Illas, F.; Ricart, J.M.; Rubio, J.; Bagus, P.S.

    1990-01-01

    The performance of atomic natural orbital (ANO) basis sets has been studied by comparing self-consistant field (SCF) and full configuration interaction (CI) results obtained for the first row atoms and hydrides. The ANO results have been compared with those obtained using a segmented basis set containing the same number of contracted basis functions. The total energies obtained with the ANO basis sets are always lower than the one obtained by using the segmented one. However, for the hydrides, differential electronic correlation energy obtained with the ANO basis set may be smaller than the one recovered with the segmented set. We relate this poorer differential correlation energy for the ANO basis set to the fact that only one contracted d function is used for the ANO and segmented basis sets

  3. Basis set construction for molecular electronic structure theory: natural orbital and Gauss-Slater basis for smooth pseudopotentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruzielo, F R; Toulouse, Julien; Umrigar, C J

    2011-02-14

    A simple yet general method for constructing basis sets for molecular electronic structure calculations is presented. These basis sets consist of atomic natural orbitals from a multiconfigurational self-consistent field calculation supplemented with primitive functions, chosen such that the asymptotics are appropriate for the potential of the system. Primitives are optimized for the homonuclear diatomic molecule to produce a balanced basis set. Two general features that facilitate this basis construction are demonstrated. First, weak coupling exists between the optimal exponents of primitives with different angular momenta. Second, the optimal primitive exponents for a chosen system depend weakly on the particular level of theory employed for optimization. The explicit case considered here is a basis set appropriate for the Burkatzki-Filippi-Dolg pseudopotentials. Since these pseudopotentials are finite at nuclei and have a Coulomb tail, the recently proposed Gauss-Slater functions are the appropriate primitives. Double- and triple-zeta bases are developed for elements hydrogen through argon. These new bases offer significant gains over the corresponding Burkatzki-Filippi-Dolg bases at various levels of theory. Using a Gaussian expansion of the basis functions, these bases can be employed in any electronic structure method. Quantum Monte Carlo provides an added benefit: expansions are unnecessary since the integrals are evaluated numerically.

  4. The aug-cc-pVnZ-F12 basis set family: Correlation consistent basis sets for explicitly correlated benchmark calculations on anions and noncovalent complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvetsky, Nitai; Kesharwani, Manoj K; Martin, Jan M L

    2017-10-07

    We have developed a new basis set family, denoted as aug-cc-pVnZ-F12 (or aVnZ-F12 for short), for explicitly correlated calculations. The sets included in this family were constructed by supplementing the corresponding cc-pVnZ-F12 sets with additional diffuse functions on the higher angular momenta (i.e., additional d-h functions on non-hydrogen atoms and p-g on hydrogen atoms), optimized for the MP2-F12 energy of the relevant atomic anions. The new basis sets have been benchmarked against electron affinities of the first- and second-row atoms, the W4-17 dataset of total atomization energies, the S66 dataset of noncovalent interactions, the Benchmark Energy and Geometry Data Base water cluster subset, and the WATER23 subset of the GMTKN24 and GMTKN30 benchmark suites. The aVnZ-F12 basis sets displayed excellent performance, not just for electron affinities but also for noncovalent interaction energies of neutral and anionic species. Appropriate CABSs (complementary auxiliary basis sets) were explored for the S66 noncovalent interaction benchmark: between similar-sized basis sets, CABSs were found to be more transferable than generally assumed.

  5. Multiple-scattering theory with a truncated basis set

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, X.; Butler, W.H.

    1992-01-01

    Multiple-scattering theory (MST) is an extremely efficient technique for calculating the electronic structure of an assembly of atoms. The wave function in MST is expanded in terms of spherical waves centered on each atom and indexed by their orbital and azimuthal quantum numbers, l and m. The secular equation which determines the characteristic energies can be truncated at a value of the orbital angular momentum l max , for which the higher angular momentum phase shifts, δ l (l>l max ), are sufficiently small. Generally, the wave-function coefficients which are calculated from the secular equation are also truncated at l max . Here we point out that this truncation of the wave function is not necessary and is in fact inconsistent with the truncation of the secular equation. A consistent procedure is described in which the states with higher orbital angular momenta are retained but with their phase shifts set to zero. We show that this treatment gives smooth, continuous, and correctly normalized wave functions and that the total charge density calculated from the corresponding Green function agrees with the Lloyd formula result. We also show that this augmented wave function can be written as a linear combination of Andersen's muffin-tin orbitals in the case of muffin-tin potentials, and can be used to generalize the muffin-tin orbital idea to full-cell potentals

  6. Simple and efficient LCAO basis sets for the diffuse states in carbon nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papior, Nick R; Calogero, Gaetano; Brandbyge, Mads

    2018-06-27

    We present a simple way to describe the lowest unoccupied diffuse states in carbon nanostructures in density functional theory calculations using a minimal LCAO (linear combination of atomic orbitals) basis set. By comparing plane wave basis calculations, we show how these states can be captured by adding long-range orbitals to the standard LCAO basis sets for the extreme cases of planar sp 2 (graphene) and curved carbon (C 60 ). In particular, using Bessel functions with a long range as additional basis functions retain a minimal basis size. This provides a smaller and simpler atom-centered basis set compared to the standard pseudo-atomic orbitals (PAOs) with multiple polarization orbitals or by adding non-atom-centered states to the basis.

  7. Distinguishing the elements of a full product basis set needs only projective measurements and classical communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Pingxing; Li Chengzu

    2004-01-01

    Nonlocality without entanglement is an interesting field. A manifestation of quantum nonlocality without entanglement is the possible local indistinguishability of orthogonal product states. In this paper we analyze the character of operators to distinguish the elements of a full product basis set in a multipartite system, and show that distinguishing perfectly these product bases needs only local projective measurements and classical communication, and these measurements cannot damage each product basis. Employing these conclusions one can discuss local distinguishability of the elements of any full product basis set easily. Finally we discuss the generalization of these results to the locally distinguishability of the elements of incomplete product basis set

  8. New basis set for the prediction of the specific rotation in flexible biological molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baranowska-Łaczkowska, Angelika; Z. Łaczkowski, Krzysztof Z. Łaczkowski; Henriksen, Christian

    2016-01-01

    are compared to those obtained with the (d-)aug-cc-pVXZ (X = D, T and Q) basis sets of Dunning et al. The ORP values are in good overall agreement with the aug-cc-pVTZ results making the ORP a good basis set for routine TD-DFT optical rotation calculations of conformationally flexible molecules. The results...

  9. A comparison of the behavior of functional/basis set combinations for hydrogen-bonding in the water dimer with emphasis on basis set superposition error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumley, Joshua A; Dannenberg, J J

    2011-06-01

    We evaluate the performance of ten functionals (B3LYP, M05, M05-2X, M06, M06-2X, B2PLYP, B2PLYPD, X3LYP, B97D, and MPWB1K) in combination with 16 basis sets ranging in complexity from 6-31G(d) to aug-cc-pV5Z for the calculation of the H-bonded water dimer with the goal of defining which combinations of functionals and basis sets provide a combination of economy and accuracy for H-bonded systems. We have compared the results to the best non-density functional theory (non-DFT) molecular orbital (MO) calculations and to experimental results. Several of the smaller basis sets lead to qualitatively incorrect geometries when optimized on a normal potential energy surface (PES). This problem disappears when the optimization is performed on a counterpoise (CP) corrected PES. The calculated interaction energies (ΔEs) with the largest basis sets vary from -4.42 (B97D) to -5.19 (B2PLYPD) kcal/mol for the different functionals. Small basis sets generally predict stronger interactions than the large ones. We found that, because of error compensation, the smaller basis sets gave the best results (in comparison to experimental and high-level non-DFT MO calculations) when combined with a functional that predicts a weak interaction with the largest basis set. As many applications are complex systems and require economical calculations, we suggest the following functional/basis set combinations in order of increasing complexity and cost: (1) D95(d,p) with B3LYP, B97D, M06, or MPWB1k; (2) 6-311G(d,p) with B3LYP; (3) D95++(d,p) with B3LYP, B97D, or MPWB1K; (4) 6-311++G(d,p) with B3LYP or B97D; and (5) aug-cc-pVDZ with M05-2X, M06-2X, or X3LYP. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Quantum Dynamics with Short-Time Trajectories and Minimal Adaptive Basis Sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saller, Maximilian A C; Habershon, Scott

    2017-07-11

    Methods for solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation via basis set expansion of the wave function can generally be categorized as having either static (time-independent) or dynamic (time-dependent) basis functions. We have recently introduced an alternative simulation approach which represents a middle road between these two extremes, employing dynamic (classical-like) trajectories to create a static basis set of Gaussian wavepackets in regions of phase-space relevant to future propagation of the wave function [J. Chem. Theory Comput., 11, 8 (2015)]. Here, we propose and test a modification of our methodology which aims to reduce the size of basis sets generated in our original scheme. In particular, we employ short-time classical trajectories to continuously generate new basis functions for short-time quantum propagation of the wave function; to avoid the continued growth of the basis set describing the time-dependent wave function, we employ Matching Pursuit to periodically minimize the number of basis functions required to accurately describe the wave function. Overall, this approach generates a basis set which is adapted to evolution of the wave function while also being as small as possible. In applications to challenging benchmark problems, namely a 4-dimensional model of photoexcited pyrazine and three different double-well tunnelling problems, we find that our new scheme enables accurate wave function propagation with basis sets which are around an order-of-magnitude smaller than our original trajectory-guided basis set methodology, highlighting the benefits of adaptive strategies for wave function propagation.

  11. Molecular basis sets - a general similarity-based approach for representing chemical spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavendra, Akshay S; Maggiora, Gerald M

    2007-01-01

    A new method, based on generalized Fourier analysis, is described that utilizes the concept of "molecular basis sets" to represent chemical space within an abstract vector space. The basis vectors in this space are abstract molecular vectors. Inner products among the basis vectors are determined using an ansatz that associates molecular similarities between pairs of molecules with their corresponding inner products. Moreover, the fact that similarities between pairs of molecules are, in essentially all cases, nonzero implies that the abstract molecular basis vectors are nonorthogonal, but since the similarity of a molecule with itself is unity, the molecular vectors are normalized to unity. A symmetric orthogonalization procedure, which optimally preserves the character of the original set of molecular basis vectors, is used to construct appropriate orthonormal basis sets. Molecules can then be represented, in general, by sets of orthonormal "molecule-like" basis vectors within a proper Euclidean vector space. However, the dimension of the space can become quite large. Thus, the work presented here assesses the effect of basis set size on a number of properties including the average squared error and average norm of molecular vectors represented in the space-the results clearly show the expected reduction in average squared error and increase in average norm as the basis set size is increased. Several distance-based statistics are also considered. These include the distribution of distances and their differences with respect to basis sets of differing size and several comparative distance measures such as Spearman rank correlation and Kruscal stress. All of the measures show that, even though the dimension can be high, the chemical spaces they represent, nonetheless, behave in a well-controlled and reasonable manner. Other abstract vector spaces analogous to that described here can also be constructed providing that the appropriate inner products can be directly

  12. Comparison of Property-Oriented Basis Sets for the Computation of Electronic and Nuclear Relaxation Hyperpolarizabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaleśny, Robert; Baranowska-Łączkowska, Angelika; Medveď, Miroslav; Luis, Josep M

    2015-09-08

    In the present work, we perform an assessment of several property-oriented atomic basis sets in computing (hyper)polarizabilities with a focus on the vibrational contributions. Our analysis encompasses the Pol and LPol-ds basis sets of Sadlej and co-workers, the def2-SVPD and def2-TZVPD basis sets of Rappoport and Furche, and the ORP basis set of Baranowska-Łączkowska and Łączkowski. Additionally, we use the d-aug-cc-pVQZ and aug-cc-pVTZ basis sets of Dunning and co-workers to determine the reference estimates of the investigated electric properties for small- and medium-sized molecules, respectively. We combine these basis sets with ab initio post-Hartree-Fock quantum-chemistry approaches (including the coupled cluster method) to calculate electronic and nuclear relaxation (hyper)polarizabilities of carbon dioxide, formaldehyde, cis-diazene, and a medium-sized Schiff base. The primary finding of our study is that, among all studied property-oriented basis sets, only the def2-TZVPD and ORP basis sets yield nuclear relaxation (hyper)polarizabilities of small molecules with average absolute errors less than 5.5%. A similar accuracy for the nuclear relaxation (hyper)polarizabilites of the studied systems can also be reached using the aug-cc-pVDZ basis set (5.3%), although for more accurate calculations of vibrational contributions, i.e., average absolute errors less than 1%, the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set is recommended. It was also demonstrated that anharmonic contributions to first and second hyperpolarizabilities of a medium-sized Schiff base are particularly difficult to accurately predict at the correlated level using property-oriented basis sets. For instance, the value of the nuclear relaxation first hyperpolarizability computed at the MP2/def2-TZVPD level of theory is roughly 3 times larger than that determined using the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set. We link the failure of the def2-TZVPD basis set with the difficulties in predicting the first-order field

  13. A Hartree–Fock study of the confined helium atom: Local and global basis set approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Toby D., E-mail: tyoung@ippt.pan.pl [Zakład Metod Komputerowych, Instytut Podstawowych Prolemów Techniki Polskiej Akademia Nauk, ul. Pawińskiego 5b, 02-106 Warszawa (Poland); Vargas, Rubicelia [Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana Iztapalapa, División de Ciencias Básicas e Ingenierías, Departamento de Química, San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, Iztapalapa, D.F. C.P. 09340, México (Mexico); Garza, Jorge, E-mail: jgo@xanum.uam.mx [Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana Iztapalapa, División de Ciencias Básicas e Ingenierías, Departamento de Química, San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, Iztapalapa, D.F. C.P. 09340, México (Mexico)

    2016-02-15

    Two different basis set methods are used to calculate atomic energy within Hartree–Fock theory. The first is a local basis set approach using high-order real-space finite elements and the second is a global basis set approach using modified Slater-type orbitals. These two approaches are applied to the confined helium atom and are compared by calculating one- and two-electron contributions to the total energy. As a measure of the quality of the electron density, the cusp condition is analyzed. - Highlights: • Two different basis set methods for atomic Hartree–Fock theory. • Galerkin finite element method and modified Slater-type orbitals. • Confined atom model (helium) under small-to-extreme confinement radii. • Detailed analysis of the electron wave-function and the cusp condition.

  14. The Bethe Sum Rule and Basis Set Selection in the Calculation of Generalized Oscillator Strengths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cabrera-Trujillo, Remigio; Sabin, John R.; Oddershede, Jens

    1999-01-01

    Fulfillment of the Bethe sum rule may be construed as a measure of basis set quality for atomic and molecular properties involving the generalized oscillator strength distribution. It is first shown that, in the case of a complete basis, the Bethe sum rule is fulfilled exactly in the random phase...

  15. Energy optimized Gaussian basis sets for the atoms T1 - Rn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faegri, K. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Energy optimized Gaussian basis sets have been derived for the atoms Tl-Rn. Two sets are presented - a (20,16,10,6) set and a (22,17,13,8) set. The smallest sets yield atomic energies 107 to 123 mH above the numerical Hartree-Fock values, while the larger sets give energies 11 mH above the numerical results. Energy trends from the smaller sets indicate that reduced shielding by p-electrons may place a greater demand on the flexibility of d- and f-orbital description for the lighter elements of the series

  16. A two-center-oscillator-basis as an alternative set for heavy ion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tornow, V.; Reinhard, P.G.; Drechsel, D.

    1977-01-01

    The two-center-oscillator-basis, which is constructed from harmonic oscillator wave functions developing about two different centers, suffers from numerical problems at small center separations due to the overcompleteness of the set. In order to overcome these problems we admix higer oscillator wave functions before the orthogonalization, or antisymmetrization resp. This yields a numerically stable basis set at each center separation. The results obtained for the potential energy suface are comparable with the results of more elaborate models. (orig.) [de

  17. A Comparison of the Behavior of Functional/Basis Set Combinations for Hydrogen-Bonding in the Water Dimer with Emphasis on Basis Set Superposition Error

    OpenAIRE

    Plumley, Joshua A.; Dannenberg, J. J.

    2011-01-01

    We evaluate the performance of nine functionals (B3LYP, M05, M05-2X, M06, M06-2X, B2PLYP, B2PLYPD, X3LYP, B97D and MPWB1K) in combination with 16 basis sets ranging in complexity from 6-31G(d) to aug-cc-pV5Z for the calculation of the H-bonded water dimer with the goal of defining which combinations of functionals and basis sets provide a combination of economy and accuracy for H-bonded systems. We have compared the results to the best non-DFT molecular orbital calculations and to experimenta...

  18. On sets of vectors of a finite vector space in which every subset of basis size is a basis II

    OpenAIRE

    Ball, Simeon; De Beule, Jan

    2012-01-01

    This article contains a proof of the MDS conjecture for k a parts per thousand currency sign 2p - 2. That is, that if S is a set of vectors of in which every subset of S of size k is a basis, where q = p (h) , p is prime and q is not and k a parts per thousand currency sign 2p - 2, then |S| a parts per thousand currency sign q + 1. It also contains a short proof of the same fact for k a parts per thousand currency sign p, for all q.

  19. Quality of Gaussian basis sets: direct optimization of orbital exponents by the method of conjugate gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kari, R.E.; Mezey, P.G.; Csizmadia, I.G.

    1975-01-01

    Expressions are given for calculating the energy gradient vector in the exponent space of Gaussian basis sets and a technique to optimize orbital exponents using the method of conjugate gradients is described. The method is tested on the (9/sups/5/supp/) Gaussian basis space and optimum exponents are determined for the carbon atom. The analysis of the results shows that the calculated one-electron properties converge more slowly to their optimum values than the total energy converges to its optimum value. In addition, basis sets approximating the optimum total energy very well can still be markedly improved for the prediction of one-electron properties. For smaller basis sets, this improvement does not warrant the necessary expense

  20. Continuum contributions to dipole oscillator-strength sum rules for hydrogen in finite basis sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Jens; Ogilvie, John F.; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2017-01-01

    Calculations of the continuum contributions to dipole oscillator sum rules for hydrogen are performed using both exact and basis-set representations of the stick spectra of the continuum wave function. We show that the same results are obtained for the sum rules in both cases, but that the conver......Calculations of the continuum contributions to dipole oscillator sum rules for hydrogen are performed using both exact and basis-set representations of the stick spectra of the continuum wave function. We show that the same results are obtained for the sum rules in both cases......, but that the convergence towards the final results with increasing excitation energies included in the sum over states is slower in the basis-set cases when we use the best basis. We argue also that this conclusion most likely holds also for larger atoms or molecules....

  1. Systematic determination of extended atomic orbital basis sets and application to molecular SCF and MCSCF calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feller, D.F.

    1979-01-01

    The behavior of the two exponential parameters in an even-tempered gaussian basis set is investigated as the set optimally approaches an integral transform representation of the radial portion of atomic and molecular orbitals. This approach permits a highly accurate assessment of the Hartree-Fock limit for atoms and molecules.

  2. The limitations of using randomised controlled trials as a basis for developing treatment guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Roger; Singh, Ajeet B; Hamilton, Amber; Das, Pritha; Outhred, Tim; Morris, Grace; Bassett, Darryl; Baune, Bernhard T; Berk, Michael; Boyce, Philip; Lyndon, Bill; Parker, Gordon; Malhi, Gin S

    2018-02-01

    Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) are considered the 'gold standard' by which novel psychotropic medications and psychological interventions are evaluated and consequently adopted into widespread clinical practice. However, there are some limitations to using RCTs as the basis for developing treatment guidelines. While RCTs allow researchers to determine whether a given medication or intervention is effective in a specific patient sample, for practicing clinicians it is more important to know whether it will work for their particular patient in their particular setting. This information cannot be garnered from an RCT. These inherent limitations are exacerbated by biases in design, recruitment, sample populations and data analysis that are inevitable in real-world studies. While trial registration and CONSORT have been implemented to correct and improve these issues, it is worrying that many trials fail to achieve such standards and yet their findings are used to inform clinical decision making. This perspective piece questions the assumptions of RCTs and highlights the widespread distortion of findings that currently undermine the credibility of this powerful design. It is recommended that the clinical guidelines include advice as to what should be considered good and relevant evidence and that external bodies continue to monitor RCTs to ensure that the outcomes published indeed reflect reality. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  3. Localized orbitals vs. pseudopotential-plane waves basis sets: performances and accuracy for molecular magnetic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Massobrio, C

    2003-01-01

    Density functional theory, in combination with a) a careful choice of the exchange-correlation part of the total energy and b) localized basis sets for the electronic orbital, has become the method of choice for calculating the exchange-couplings in magnetic molecular complexes. Orbital expansion on plane waves can be seen as an alternative basis set especially suited to allow optimization of newly synthesized materials of unknown geometries. However, little is known on the predictive power of this scheme to yield quantitative values for exchange coupling constants J as small as a few hundredths of eV (50-300 cm sup - sup 1). We have used density functional theory and a plane waves basis set to calculate the exchange couplings J of three homodinuclear Cu-based molecular complexes with experimental values ranging from +40 cm sup - sup 1 to -300 cm sup - sup 1. The plane waves basis set proves as accurate as the localized basis set, thereby suggesting that this approach can be reliably employed to predict and r...

  4. Localized orbitals vs. pseudopotential-plane waves basis sets: performances and accuracy for molecular magnetic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massobrio, C.; Ruiz, E.

    2003-01-01

    Density functional theory, in combination with a) a careful choice of the exchange-correlation part of the total energy and b) localized basis sets for the electronic orbital, has become the method of choice for calculating the exchange-couplings in magnetic molecular complexes. Orbital expansion on plane waves can be seen as an alternative basis set especially suited to allow optimization of newly synthesized materials of unknown geometries. However, little is known on the predictive power of this scheme to yield quantitative values for exchange coupling constants J as small as a few hundredths of eV (50-300 cm -1 ). We have used density functional theory and a plane waves basis set to calculate the exchange couplings J of three homodinuclear Cu-based molecular complexes with experimental values ranging from +40 cm -1 to -300 cm -1 . The plane waves basis set proves as accurate as the localized basis set, thereby suggesting that this approach can be reliably employed to predict and rationalize the magnetic properties of molecular-based materials. (author)

  5. Gaussian basis sets for use in correlated molecular calculations. IV. Calculation of static electrical response properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woon, D.E.; Dunning, T.H. Jr.

    1994-01-01

    An accurate description of the electrical properties of atoms and molecules is critical for quantitative predictions of the nonlinear properties of molecules and of long-range atomic and molecular interactions between both neutral and charged species. We report a systematic study of the basis sets required to obtain accurate correlated values for the static dipole (α 1 ), quadrupole (α 2 ), and octopole (α 3 ) polarizabilities and the hyperpolarizability (γ) of the rare gas atoms He, Ne, and Ar. Several methods of correlation treatment were examined, including various orders of Moller--Plesset perturbation theory (MP2, MP3, MP4), coupled-cluster theory with and without perturbative treatment of triple excitations [CCSD, CCSD(T)], and singles and doubles configuration interaction (CISD). All of the basis sets considered here were constructed by adding even-tempered sets of diffuse functions to the correlation consistent basis sets of Dunning and co-workers. With multiply-augmented sets we find that the electrical properties of the rare gas atoms converge smoothly to values that are in excellent agreement with the available experimental data and/or previously computed results. As a further test of the basis sets presented here, the dipole polarizabilities of the F - and Cl - anions and of the HCl and N 2 molecules are also reported

  6. Accurate and balanced anisotropic Gaussian type orbital basis sets for atoms in strong magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wuming; Trickey, S B

    2017-12-28

    In high magnetic field calculations, anisotropic Gaussian type orbital (AGTO) basis functions are capable of reconciling the competing demands of the spherically symmetric Coulombic interaction and cylindrical magnetic (B field) confinement. However, the best available a priori procedure for composing highly accurate AGTO sets for atoms in a strong B field [W. Zhu et al., Phys. Rev. A 90, 022504 (2014)] yields very large basis sets. Their size is problematical for use in any calculation with unfavorable computational cost scaling. Here we provide an alternative constructive procedure. It is based upon analysis of the underlying physics of atoms in B fields that allow identification of several principles for the construction of AGTO basis sets. Aided by numerical optimization and parameter fitting, followed by fine tuning of fitting parameters, we devise formulae for generating accurate AGTO basis sets in an arbitrary B field. For the hydrogen iso-electronic sequence, a set depends on B field strength, nuclear charge, and orbital quantum numbers. For multi-electron systems, the basis set formulae also include adjustment to account for orbital occupations. Tests of the new basis sets for atoms H through C (1 ≤ Z ≤ 6) and ions Li + , Be + , and B + , in a wide B field range (0 ≤ B ≤ 2000 a.u.), show an accuracy better than a few μhartree for single-electron systems and a few hundredths to a few mHs for multi-electron atoms. The relative errors are similar for different atoms and ions in a large B field range, from a few to a couple of tens of millionths, thereby confirming rather uniform accuracy across the nuclear charge Z and B field strength values. Residual basis set errors are two to three orders of magnitude smaller than the electronic correlation energies in multi-electron atoms, a signal of the usefulness of the new AGTO basis sets in correlated wavefunction or density functional calculations for atomic and molecular systems in an external strong B

  7. Accurate and balanced anisotropic Gaussian type orbital basis sets for atoms in strong magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wuming; Trickey, S. B.

    2017-12-01

    In high magnetic field calculations, anisotropic Gaussian type orbital (AGTO) basis functions are capable of reconciling the competing demands of the spherically symmetric Coulombic interaction and cylindrical magnetic (B field) confinement. However, the best available a priori procedure for composing highly accurate AGTO sets for atoms in a strong B field [W. Zhu et al., Phys. Rev. A 90, 022504 (2014)] yields very large basis sets. Their size is problematical for use in any calculation with unfavorable computational cost scaling. Here we provide an alternative constructive procedure. It is based upon analysis of the underlying physics of atoms in B fields that allow identification of several principles for the construction of AGTO basis sets. Aided by numerical optimization and parameter fitting, followed by fine tuning of fitting parameters, we devise formulae for generating accurate AGTO basis sets in an arbitrary B field. For the hydrogen iso-electronic sequence, a set depends on B field strength, nuclear charge, and orbital quantum numbers. For multi-electron systems, the basis set formulae also include adjustment to account for orbital occupations. Tests of the new basis sets for atoms H through C (1 ≤ Z ≤ 6) and ions Li+, Be+, and B+, in a wide B field range (0 ≤ B ≤ 2000 a.u.), show an accuracy better than a few μhartree for single-electron systems and a few hundredths to a few mHs for multi-electron atoms. The relative errors are similar for different atoms and ions in a large B field range, from a few to a couple of tens of millionths, thereby confirming rather uniform accuracy across the nuclear charge Z and B field strength values. Residual basis set errors are two to three orders of magnitude smaller than the electronic correlation energies in multi-electron atoms, a signal of the usefulness of the new AGTO basis sets in correlated wavefunction or density functional calculations for atomic and molecular systems in an external strong B field.

  8. Basis set convergence on static electric dipole polarizability calculations of alkali-metal clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Fabio A. L. de; Jorge, Francisco E.

    2013-01-01

    A hierarchical sequence of all-electron segmented contracted basis sets of double, triple and quadruple zeta valence qualities plus polarization functions augmented with diffuse functions for the atoms from H to Ar was constructed. A systematic study of basis sets required to obtain reliable and accurate values of static dipole polarizabilities of lithium and sodium clusters (n = 2, 4, 6 and 8) at their optimized equilibrium geometries is reported. Three methods are examined: Hartree-Fock (HF), second-order Moeller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2), and density functional theory (DFT). By direct calculations or by fitting the directly calculated values through one extrapolation scheme, estimates of the HF, MP2 and DFT complete basis set limits were obtained. Comparison with experimental and theoretical data reported previously in the literature is done (author)

  9. Basis set convergence on static electric dipole polarizability calculations of alkali-metal clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Fabio A. L. de; Jorge, Francisco E., E-mail: jorge@cce.ufes.br [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, 29060-900 Vitoria-ES (Brazil)

    2013-07-15

    A hierarchical sequence of all-electron segmented contracted basis sets of double, triple and quadruple zeta valence qualities plus polarization functions augmented with diffuse functions for the atoms from H to Ar was constructed. A systematic study of basis sets required to obtain reliable and accurate values of static dipole polarizabilities of lithium and sodium clusters (n = 2, 4, 6 and 8) at their optimized equilibrium geometries is reported. Three methods are examined: Hartree-Fock (HF), second-order Moeller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2), and density functional theory (DFT). By direct calculations or by fitting the directly calculated values through one extrapolation scheme, estimates of the HF, MP2 and DFT complete basis set limits were obtained. Comparison with experimental and theoretical data reported previously in the literature is done (author)

  10. On the use of Locally Dense Basis Sets in the Calculation of EPR Hyperfine Couplings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegård, Erik D.; Sauer, Stephan P. A.; Milhøj, Birgitte O.

    2013-01-01

    The usage of locally dense basis sets in the calculation of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) hyperne coupling constants is investigated at the level of Density Functional Theory (DFT) for two model systems of biologically important transition metal complexes: One for the active site in the c......The usage of locally dense basis sets in the calculation of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) hyperne coupling constants is investigated at the level of Density Functional Theory (DFT) for two model systems of biologically important transition metal complexes: One for the active site...

  11. On the use of locally dense basis sets in the calculation of EPR hyperfine couplings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milhøj, Birgitte Olai; Hedegård, Erik D.; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2013-01-01

    The usage of locally dense basis sets in the calculation of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) hyperne coupling constants is investigated at the level of Density Functional Theory (DFT) for two model systems of biologically important transition metal complexes: One for the active site in the c......The usage of locally dense basis sets in the calculation of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) hyperne coupling constants is investigated at the level of Density Functional Theory (DFT) for two model systems of biologically important transition metal complexes: One for the active site...

  12. Strategies for reducing basis set superposition error (BSSE) in O/AU and O/Ni

    KAUST Repository

    Shuttleworth, I.G.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. The effect of basis set superposition error (BSSE) and effective strategies for the minimisation have been investigated using the SIESTA-LCAO DFT package. Variation of the energy shift parameter ΔEPAO has been shown to reduce BSSE for bulk Au and Ni and across their oxygenated surfaces. Alternative strategies based on either the expansion or contraction of the basis set have been shown to be ineffective in reducing BSSE. Comparison of the binding energies for the surface systems obtained using LCAO were compared with BSSE-free plane wave energies.

  13. Strategies for reducing basis set superposition error (BSSE) in O/AU and O/Ni

    KAUST Repository

    Shuttleworth, I.G.

    2015-11-01

    © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. The effect of basis set superposition error (BSSE) and effective strategies for the minimisation have been investigated using the SIESTA-LCAO DFT package. Variation of the energy shift parameter ΔEPAO has been shown to reduce BSSE for bulk Au and Ni and across their oxygenated surfaces. Alternative strategies based on either the expansion or contraction of the basis set have been shown to be ineffective in reducing BSSE. Comparison of the binding energies for the surface systems obtained using LCAO were compared with BSSE-free plane wave energies.

  14. Magnetic anisotropy basis sets for epitaxial (110) and (111) REFe2 nanofilms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowden, G J; Martin, K N; Fox, A; Rainford, B D; Groot, P A J de

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic anisotropy basis sets for the cubic Laves phase rare earth intermetallic REFe 2 compounds are discussed in some detail. Such compounds can be either free standing, or thin films grown in either (110) or (111) mode using molecular beam epitaxy. For the latter, it is useful to rotate to a new coordinate system where the z-axis coincides with the growth axes of the film. In this paper, three symmetry adapted basis sets are given, for multi-pole moments up to n = 12. These sets can be used for free-standing compounds and for (110) and (111) epitaxial films. In addition, the distortion of REFe 2 films, grown on sapphire substrates, is also considered. The distortions are different for the (110) and (111) films. Strain-induced harmonic sets are given for both specific and general distortions. Finally, some predictions are made concerning the preferred direction of easy magnetization in (111) molecular beam epitaxy grown REFe 2 films

  15. Correlation consistent basis sets for actinides. I. The Th and U atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, Kirk A., E-mail: kipeters@wsu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164-4630 (United States)

    2015-02-21

    New correlation consistent basis sets based on both pseudopotential (PP) and all-electron Douglas-Kroll-Hess (DKH) Hamiltonians have been developed from double- to quadruple-zeta quality for the actinide atoms thorium and uranium. Sets for valence electron correlation (5f6s6p6d), cc − pV nZ − PP and cc − pV nZ − DK3, as well as outer-core correlation (valence + 5s5p5d), cc − pwCV nZ − PP and cc − pwCV nZ − DK3, are reported (n = D, T, Q). The -PP sets are constructed in conjunction with small-core, 60-electron PPs, while the -DK3 sets utilized the 3rd-order Douglas-Kroll-Hess scalar relativistic Hamiltonian. Both series of basis sets show systematic convergence towards the complete basis set limit, both at the Hartree-Fock and correlated levels of theory, making them amenable to standard basis set extrapolation techniques. To assess the utility of the new basis sets, extensive coupled cluster composite thermochemistry calculations of ThF{sub n} (n = 2 − 4), ThO{sub 2}, and UF{sub n} (n = 4 − 6) have been carried out. After accurately accounting for valence and outer-core correlation, spin-orbit coupling, and even Lamb shift effects, the final 298 K atomization enthalpies of ThF{sub 4}, ThF{sub 3}, ThF{sub 2}, and ThO{sub 2} are all within their experimental uncertainties. Bond dissociation energies of ThF{sub 4} and ThF{sub 3}, as well as UF{sub 6} and UF{sub 5}, were similarly accurate. The derived enthalpies of formation for these species also showed a very satisfactory agreement with experiment, demonstrating that the new basis sets allow for the use of accurate composite schemes just as in molecular systems composed only of lighter atoms. The differences between the PP and DK3 approaches were found to increase with the change in formal oxidation state on the actinide atom, approaching 5-6 kcal/mol for the atomization enthalpies of ThF{sub 4} and ThO{sub 2}. The DKH3 atomization energy of ThO{sub 2} was calculated to be smaller than the DKH2

  16. Accurate Conformational Energy Differences of Carbohydrates: A Complete Basis Set Extrapolation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Csonka, G. I.; Kaminský, Jakub

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 4 (2011), s. 988-997 ISSN 1549-9618 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : MP2 * basis set extrapolation * saccharides Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 5.215, year: 2011

  17. Predicting Pt-195 NMR chemical shift using new relativistic all-electron basis set

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paschoal, D.; Fonseca Guerra, C.; de Oliveira, M.A.L.; Ramalho, T.C.; Dos Santos, H.F.

    2016-01-01

    Predicting NMR properties is a valuable tool to assist the experimentalists in the characterization of molecular structure. For heavy metals, such as Pt-195, only a few computational protocols are available. In the present contribution, all-electron Gaussian basis sets, suitable to calculate the

  18. Incomplete basis-set problem. V. Application of CIBS to many-electron systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDowell, K.; Lewis, L.

    1982-01-01

    Five versions of CIBS (corrections to an incomplete basis set) theory are used to compute first and second corrections to Roothaan--Hartree--Fock energies via expansion of a given basis set. Version one is an order by order perturbation approximation which neglects virtual orbitals; version two is a full CIBS expansion which neglects virtual orbitals; version three is an order by order perturbation approximation which includes virtual orbitals; version four is a full CIBS expansion which includes orthogonalization to virtual orbitals but neglects virtual orbital coupling terms; and version five is a full CIBS expansion with inclusion of coupling to virtual orbitals. Results are presented for the atomic and molecular systems He, Be, H 2 , LiH, Li 2 , and H 2 O. Version five is shown to produce a corrected Hartree--Fock energy which is essentially in agreement with a comparable SCF result using the same expanded basis set. Versions one through four yield varying degrees of agreement; however, it is evident that the effect of the virtual orbitals must be included. From the results, CIBS version five is shown to be a viable quantitative procedure which can be used to expand or to study the use of basis sets in quantum chemistry

  19. An approach to develop chemical intuition for atomistic electron transport calculations using basis set rotations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, A.; Solomon, G. C. [Department of Chemistry and Nano-Science Center, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 5, 2100 Copenhagen Ø (Denmark)

    2016-05-21

    Single molecule conductance measurements are often interpreted through computational modeling, but the complexity of these calculations makes it difficult to directly link them to simpler concepts and models. Previous work has attempted to make this connection using maximally localized Wannier functions and symmetry adapted basis sets, but their use can be ambiguous and non-trivial. Starting from a Hamiltonian and overlap matrix written in a hydrogen-like basis set, we demonstrate a simple approach to obtain a new basis set that is chemically more intuitive and allows interpretation in terms of simple concepts and models. By diagonalizing the Hamiltonians corresponding to each atom in the molecule, we obtain a basis set that can be partitioned into pseudo-σ and −π and allows partitioning of the Landuaer-Büttiker transmission as well as create simple Hückel models that reproduce the key features of the full calculation. This method provides a link between complex calculations and simple concepts and models to provide intuition or extract parameters for more complex model systems.

  20. An editor for the maintenance and use of a bank of contracted Gaussian basis set functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taurian, O.E.

    1984-01-01

    A bank of basis sets to be used in ab-initio calculations has been created. The bases are sets of contracted Gaussian type orbitals to be used as input to any molecular integral package. In this communication we shall describe the organization of the bank and a portable editor program which was designed for its maintenance and use. This program is operated by commands and it may be used to obtain any kind of information about the bases in the bank as well as to produce output to be directly used as input for different integral programs. The editor may also be used to format basis sets in the conventional way utilized in publications, as well as to generate a complete, or partial, manual of the contents of the bank if so desired. (orig.)

  1. Outdoor Biology Instructional Strategies Trial Edition, Set IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Throgmorton, Larry, Ed.; And Others

    Eight games are included in the 24 activities in the Outdoor Biology Instructional Strategies (OBIS) Trial Edition Set IV. There are also simulations, crafts, biological techniques, and organism investigations focusing on animal and plant life in the forest, desert, and snow. Designed for small groups of children ages 10 to 15 from schools and…

  2. First-principle modelling of forsterite surface properties: Accuracy of methods and basis sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demichelis, Raffaella; Bruno, Marco; Massaro, Francesco R; Prencipe, Mauro; De La Pierre, Marco; Nestola, Fabrizio

    2015-07-15

    The seven main crystal surfaces of forsterite (Mg2 SiO4 ) were modeled using various Gaussian-type basis sets, and several formulations for the exchange-correlation functional within the density functional theory (DFT). The recently developed pob-TZVP basis set provides the best results for all properties that are strongly dependent on the accuracy of the wavefunction. Convergence on the structure and on the basis set superposition error-corrected surface energy can be reached also with poorer basis sets. The effect of adopting different DFT functionals was assessed. All functionals give the same stability order for the various surfaces. Surfaces do not exhibit any major structural differences when optimized with different functionals, except for higher energy orientations where major rearrangements occur around the Mg sites at the surface or subsurface. When dispersions are not accounted for, all functionals provide similar surface energies. The inclusion of empirical dispersions raises the energy of all surfaces by a nearly systematic value proportional to the scaling factor s of the dispersion formulation. An estimation for the surface energy is provided through adopting C6 coefficients that are more suitable than the standard ones to describe O-O interactions in minerals. A 2 × 2 supercell of the most stable surface (010) was optimized. No surface reconstruction was observed. The resulting structure and surface energy show no difference with respect to those obtained when using the primitive cell. This result validates the (010) surface model here adopted, that will serve as a reference for future studies on adsorption and reactivity of water and carbon dioxide at this interface. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Pseudo-atomic orbitals as basis sets for the O(N) DFT code CONQUEST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torralba, A S; Brazdova, V; Gillan, M J; Bowler, D R [Materials Simulation Laboratory, UCL, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Todorovic, M; Miyazaki, T [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Choudhury, R [London Centre for Nanotechnology, UCL, 17-19 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom)], E-mail: david.bowler@ucl.ac.uk

    2008-07-23

    Various aspects of the implementation of pseudo-atomic orbitals (PAOs) as basis functions for the linear scaling CONQUEST code are presented. Preliminary results for the assignment of a large set of PAOs to a smaller space of support functions are encouraging, and an important related proof on the necessary symmetry of the support functions is shown. Details of the generation and integration schemes for the PAOs are also given.

  4. Approaching the basis set limit for DFT calculations using an environment-adapted minimal basis with perturbation theory: Formulation, proof of concept, and a pilot implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, Yuezhi; Horn, Paul R.; Mardirossian, Narbe; Head-Gordon, Teresa; Skylaris, Chris-Kriton; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Recently developed density functionals have good accuracy for both thermochemistry (TC) and non-covalent interactions (NC) if very large atomic orbital basis sets are used. To approach the basis set limit with potentially lower computational cost, a new self-consistent field (SCF) scheme is presented that employs minimal adaptive basis (MAB) functions. The MAB functions are optimized on each atomic site by minimizing a surrogate function. High accuracy is obtained by applying a perturbative correction (PC) to the MAB calculation, similar to dual basis approaches. Compared to exact SCF results, using this MAB-SCF (PC) approach with the same large target basis set produces <0.15 kcal/mol root-mean-square deviations for most of the tested TC datasets, and <0.1 kcal/mol for most of the NC datasets. The performance of density functionals near the basis set limit can be even better reproduced. With further improvement to its implementation, MAB-SCF (PC) is a promising lower-cost substitute for conventional large-basis calculations as a method to approach the basis set limit of modern density functionals.

  5. Development of new auxiliary basis functions of the Karlsruhe segmented contracted basis sets including diffuse basis functions (def2-SVPD, def2-TZVPPD, and def2-QVPPD) for RI-MP2 and RI-CC calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellweg, Arnim; Rappoport, Dmitrij

    2015-01-14

    We report optimized auxiliary basis sets for use with the Karlsruhe segmented contracted basis sets including moderately diffuse basis functions (Rappoport and Furche, J. Chem. Phys., 2010, 133, 134105) in resolution-of-the-identity (RI) post-self-consistent field (post-SCF) computations for the elements H-Rn (except lanthanides). The errors of the RI approximation using optimized auxiliary basis sets are analyzed on a comprehensive test set of molecules containing the most common oxidation states of each element and do not exceed those of the corresponding unaugmented basis sets. During these studies an unsatisfying performance of the def2-SVP and def2-QZVPP auxiliary basis sets for Barium was found and improved sets are provided. We establish the versatility of the def2-SVPD, def2-TZVPPD, and def2-QZVPPD basis sets for RI-MP2 and RI-CC (coupled-cluster) energy and property calculations. The influence of diffuse basis functions on correlation energy, basis set superposition error, atomic electron affinity, dipole moments, and computational timings is evaluated at different levels of theory using benchmark sets and showcase examples.

  6. Current-voltage curves for molecular junctions computed using all-electron basis sets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W.; Lawson, John W.

    2006-01-01

    We present current-voltage (I-V) curves computed using all-electron basis sets on the conducting molecule. The all-electron results are very similar to previous results obtained using effective core potentials (ECP). A hybrid integration scheme is used that keeps the all-electron calculations cost competitive with respect to the ECP calculations. By neglecting the coupling of states to the contacts below a fixed energy cutoff, the density matrix for the core electrons can be evaluated analytically. The full density matrix is formed by adding this core contribution to the valence part that is evaluated numerically. Expanding the definition of the core in the all-electron calculations significantly reduces the computational effort and, up to biases of about 2 V, the results are very similar to those obtained using more rigorous approaches. The convergence of the I-V curves and transmission coefficients with respect to basis set is discussed. The addition of diffuse functions is critical in approaching basis set completeness

  7. Geminal embedding scheme for optimal atomic basis set construction in correlated calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorella, S., E-mail: sorella@sissa.it [International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA), Via Beirut 2-4, 34014 Trieste, Italy and INFM Democritos National Simulation Center, Trieste (Italy); Devaux, N.; Dagrada, M., E-mail: mario.dagrada@impmc.upmc.fr [Institut de Minéralogie, de Physique des Matériaux et de Cosmochimie, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Case 115, 4 Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Mazzola, G., E-mail: gmazzola@phys.ethz.ch [Theoretische Physik, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Casula, M., E-mail: michele.casula@impmc.upmc.fr [CNRS and Institut de Minéralogie, de Physique des Matériaux et de Cosmochimie, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Case 115, 4 Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2015-12-28

    We introduce an efficient method to construct optimal and system adaptive basis sets for use in electronic structure and quantum Monte Carlo calculations. The method is based on an embedding scheme in which a reference atom is singled out from its environment, while the entire system (atom and environment) is described by a Slater determinant or its antisymmetrized geminal power (AGP) extension. The embedding procedure described here allows for the systematic and consistent contraction of the primitive basis set into geminal embedded orbitals (GEOs), with a dramatic reduction of the number of variational parameters necessary to represent the many-body wave function, for a chosen target accuracy. Within the variational Monte Carlo method, the Slater or AGP part is determined by a variational minimization of the energy of the whole system in presence of a flexible and accurate Jastrow factor, representing most of the dynamical electronic correlation. The resulting GEO basis set opens the way for a fully controlled optimization of many-body wave functions in electronic structure calculation of bulk materials, namely, containing a large number of electrons and atoms. We present applications on the water molecule, the volume collapse transition in cerium, and the high-pressure liquid hydrogen.

  8. Accuracy of Lagrange-sinc functions as a basis set for electronic structure calculations of atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sunghwan; Hong, Kwangwoo; Kim, Jaewook; Kim, Woo Youn

    2015-01-01

    We developed a self-consistent field program based on Kohn-Sham density functional theory using Lagrange-sinc functions as a basis set and examined its numerical accuracy for atoms and molecules through comparison with the results of Gaussian basis sets. The result of the Kohn-Sham inversion formula from the Lagrange-sinc basis set manifests that the pseudopotential method is essential for cost-effective calculations. The Lagrange-sinc basis set shows faster convergence of the kinetic and correlation energies of benzene as its size increases than the finite difference method does, though both share the same uniform grid. Using a scaling factor smaller than or equal to 0.226 bohr and pseudopotentials with nonlinear core correction, its accuracy for the atomization energies of the G2-1 set is comparable to all-electron complete basis set limits (mean absolute deviation ≤1 kcal/mol). The same basis set also shows small mean absolute deviations in the ionization energies, electron affinities, and static polarizabilities of atoms in the G2-1 set. In particular, the Lagrange-sinc basis set shows high accuracy with rapid convergence in describing density or orbital changes by an external electric field. Moreover, the Lagrange-sinc basis set can readily improve its accuracy toward a complete basis set limit by simply decreasing the scaling factor regardless of systems

  9. Correlation consistent basis sets for actinides. II. The atoms Ac and Np-Lr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Rulin; Peterson, Kirk A

    2017-08-28

    New correlation consistent basis sets optimized using the all-electron third-order Douglas-Kroll-Hess (DKH3) scalar relativistic Hamiltonian are reported for the actinide elements Ac and Np through Lr. These complete the series of sets reported previously for Th-U [K. A. Peterson, J. Chem. Phys. 142, 074105 (2015); M. Vasiliu et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 119, 11422 (2015)]. The new sets range in size from double- to quadruple-zeta and encompass both those optimized for valence (6s6p5f7s6d) and outer-core electron correlations (valence + 5s5p5d). The final sets have been contracted for both the DKH3 and eXact 2-component (X2C) Hamiltonians, yielding cc-pVnZ-DK3/cc-pVnZ-X2C sets for valence correlation and cc-pwCVnZ-DK3/cc-pwCVnZ-X2C sets for outer-core correlation (n = D, T, Q in each case). In order to test the effectiveness of the new basis sets, both atomic and molecular benchmark calculations have been carried out. In the first case, the first three atomic ionization potentials (IPs) of all the actinide elements Ac-Lr have been calculated using the Feller-Peterson-Dixon (FPD) composite approach, primarily with the multireference configuration interaction (MRCI) method. Excellent convergence towards the respective complete basis set (CBS) limits is achieved with the new sets, leading to good agreement with experiment, where these exist, after accurately accounting for spin-orbit effects using the 4-component Dirac-Hartree-Fock method. For a molecular test, the IP and atomization energy (AE) of PuO 2 have been calculated also using the FPD method but using a coupled cluster approach with spin-orbit coupling accounted for using the 4-component MRCI. The present calculations yield an IP 0 for PuO 2 of 159.8 kcal/mol, which is in excellent agreement with the experimental electron transfer bracketing value of 162 ± 3 kcal/mol. Likewise, the calculated 0 K AE of 305.6 kcal/mol is in very good agreement with the currently accepted experimental value of 303.1 ± 5 kcal

  10. OBESITY OF ADULTS LIVING IN THE URBAN SETTINGS AS BASIS FOR DIFFERENT APPLICATIONS OF RECREATIONAL SPORTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesko Drašković

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available According to the World Health Organization’s data, obesity is one of the main risk factors for the human health, especially in so called “mature age”, that is in forties and fiftees of the human’s life. There are many causes of obesity, and the most common ones are unadequate or excessive nutrition, low quality food rich in fats and highly caloric sweetener, unsufficient physical activity – hypokinesy, but also technical and technological development of the modern World (TV, cell phones, elevators, cars etc.. The objective of this research is to define the obesity of adults living in the urban settings through BMI (body mass index and to create, on the basis of these findings, the basis for different applications of the recreational sports programme.

  11. Spectral properties of minimal-basis-set orbitals: Implications for molecular electronic continuum states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhoff, P. W.; Winstead, C. L.

    Early studies of the electronically excited states of molecules by John A. Pople and coworkers employing ab initio single-excitation configuration interaction (SECI) calculations helped to simulate related applications of these methods to the partial-channel photoionization cross sections of polyatomic molecules. The Gaussian representations of molecular orbitals adopted by Pople and coworkers can describe SECI continuum states when sufficiently large basis sets are employed. Minimal-basis virtual Fock orbitals stabilized in the continuous portions of such SECI spectra are generally associated with strong photoionization resonances. The spectral attributes of these resonance orbitals are illustrated here by revisiting previously reported experimental and theoretical studies of molecular formaldehyde (H2CO) in combination with recently calculated continuum orbital amplitudes.

  12. Investigation of confined hydrogen atom in spherical cavity, using B-splines basis set

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Barezi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Studying confined quantum systems (CQS is very important in nano technology. One of the basic CQS is a hydrogen atom confined in spherical cavity. In this article, eigenenergies and eigenfunctions of hydrogen atom in spherical cavity are calculated, using linear variational method. B-splines are used as basis functions, which can easily construct the trial wave functions with appropriate boundary conditions. The main characteristics of B-spline are its high localization and its flexibility. Besides, these functions have numerical stability and are able to spend high volume of calculation with good accuracy. The energy levels as function of cavity radius are analyzed. To check the validity and efficiency of the proposed method, extensive convergence test of eigenenergies in different cavity sizes has been carried out.

  13. Formulation of improved basis sets for the study of polymer dynamics through diffusion theory methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspari, Roberto; Rapallo, Arnaldo

    2008-06-28

    In this work a new method is proposed for the choice of basis functions in diffusion theory (DT) calculations. This method, named hybrid basis approach (HBA), combines the two previously adopted long time sorting procedure (LTSP) and maximum correlation approximation (MCA) techniques; the first emphasizing contributions from the long time dynamics, the latter being based on the local correlations along the chain. In order to fulfill this task, the HBA procedure employs a first order basis set corresponding to a high order MCA one and generates upper order approximations according to LTSP. A test of the method is made first on a melt of cis-1,4-polyisoprene decamers where HBA and LTSP are compared in terms of efficiency. Both convergence properties and numerical stability are improved by the use of the HBA basis set whose performance is evaluated on local dynamics, by computing the correlation times of selected bond vectors along the chain, and on global ones, through the eigenvalues of the diffusion operator L. Further use of the DT with a HBA basis set has been made on a 71-mer of syndiotactic trans-1,2-polypentadiene in toluene solution, whose dynamical properties have been computed with a high order calculation and compared to the "numerical experiment" provided by the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation in explicit solvent. The necessary equilibrium averages have been obtained by a vacuum trajectory of the chain where solvent effects on conformational properties have been reproduced with a proper screening of the nonbonded interactions, corresponding to a definite value of the mean radius of gyration of the polymer in vacuum. Results show a very good agreement between DT calculations and the MD numerical experiment. This suggests a further use of DT methods with the necessary input quantities obtained by the only knowledge of some experimental values, i.e., the mean radius of gyration of the chain and the viscosity of the solution, and by a suitable vacuum

  14. Consistent structures and interactions by density functional theory with small atomic orbital basis sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimme, Stefan; Brandenburg, Jan Gerit; Bannwarth, Christoph; Hansen, Andreas

    2015-08-07

    A density functional theory (DFT) based composite electronic structure approach is proposed to efficiently compute structures and interaction energies in large chemical systems. It is based on the well-known and numerically robust Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhoff (PBE) generalized-gradient-approximation in a modified global hybrid functional with a relatively large amount of non-local Fock-exchange. The orbitals are expanded in Ahlrichs-type valence-double zeta atomic orbital (AO) Gaussian basis sets, which are available for many elements. In order to correct for the basis set superposition error (BSSE) and to account for the important long-range London dispersion effects, our well-established atom-pairwise potentials are used. In the design of the new method, particular attention has been paid to an accurate description of structural parameters in various covalent and non-covalent bonding situations as well as in periodic systems. Together with the recently proposed three-fold corrected (3c) Hartree-Fock method, the new composite scheme (termed PBEh-3c) represents the next member in a hierarchy of "low-cost" electronic structure approaches. They are mainly free of BSSE and account for most interactions in a physically sound and asymptotically correct manner. PBEh-3c yields good results for thermochemical properties in the huge GMTKN30 energy database. Furthermore, the method shows excellent performance for non-covalent interaction energies in small and large complexes. For evaluating its performance on equilibrium structures, a new compilation of standard test sets is suggested. These consist of small (light) molecules, partially flexible, medium-sized organic molecules, molecules comprising heavy main group elements, larger systems with long bonds, 3d-transition metal systems, non-covalently bound complexes (S22 and S66×8 sets), and peptide conformations. For these sets, overall deviations from accurate reference data are smaller than for various other tested DFT methods

  15. Consistent structures and interactions by density functional theory with small atomic orbital basis sets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimme, Stefan; Brandenburg, Jan Gerit; Bannwarth, Christoph; Hansen, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    A density functional theory (DFT) based composite electronic structure approach is proposed to efficiently compute structures and interaction energies in large chemical systems. It is based on the well-known and numerically robust Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhoff (PBE) generalized-gradient-approximation in a modified global hybrid functional with a relatively large amount of non-local Fock-exchange. The orbitals are expanded in Ahlrichs-type valence-double zeta atomic orbital (AO) Gaussian basis sets, which are available for many elements. In order to correct for the basis set superposition error (BSSE) and to account for the important long-range London dispersion effects, our well-established atom-pairwise potentials are used. In the design of the new method, particular attention has been paid to an accurate description of structural parameters in various covalent and non-covalent bonding situations as well as in periodic systems. Together with the recently proposed three-fold corrected (3c) Hartree-Fock method, the new composite scheme (termed PBEh-3c) represents the next member in a hierarchy of “low-cost” electronic structure approaches. They are mainly free of BSSE and account for most interactions in a physically sound and asymptotically correct manner. PBEh-3c yields good results for thermochemical properties in the huge GMTKN30 energy database. Furthermore, the method shows excellent performance for non-covalent interaction energies in small and large complexes. For evaluating its performance on equilibrium structures, a new compilation of standard test sets is suggested. These consist of small (light) molecules, partially flexible, medium-sized organic molecules, molecules comprising heavy main group elements, larger systems with long bonds, 3d-transition metal systems, non-covalently bound complexes (S22 and S66×8 sets), and peptide conformations. For these sets, overall deviations from accurate reference data are smaller than for various other tested DFT

  16. Correlation consistent basis sets for lanthanides: The atoms La–Lu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Qing; Peterson, Kirk A., E-mail: kipeters@wsu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164-4630 (United States)

    2016-08-07

    Using the 3rd-order Douglas-Kroll-Hess (DKH3) Hamiltonian, all-electron correlation consistent basis sets of double-, triple-, and quadruple-zeta quality have been developed for the lanthanide elements La through Lu. Basis sets designed for the recovery of valence correlation (defined here as 4f5s5p5d6s), cc-pVnZ-DK3, and outer-core correlation (valence + 4s4p4d), cc-pwCVnZ-DK3, are reported (n = D, T, and Q). Systematic convergence of both Hartree-Fock and correlation energies towards their respective complete basis set (CBS) limits are observed. Benchmark calculations of the first three ionization potentials (IPs) of La through Lu are reported at the DKH3 coupled cluster singles and doubles with perturbative triples, CCSD(T), level of theory, including effects of correlation down through the 4s electrons. Spin-orbit coupling is treated at the 2-component HF level. After extrapolation to the CBS limit, the average errors with respect to experiment were just 0.52, 1.14, and 4.24 kcal/mol for the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd IPs, respectively, compared to the average experimental uncertainties of 0.03, 1.78, and 2.65 kcal/mol, respectively. The new basis sets are also used in CCSD(T) benchmark calculations of the equilibrium geometries, atomization energies, and heats of formation for Gd{sub 2}, GdF, and GdF{sub 3}. Except for the equilibrium geometry and harmonic frequency of GdF, which are accurately known from experiment, all other calculated quantities represent significant improvements compared to the existing experimental quantities. With estimated uncertainties of about ±3 kcal/mol, the 0 K atomization energies (298 K heats of formation) are calculated to be (all in kcal/mol): 33.2 (160.1) for Gd{sub 2}, 151.7 (−36.6) for GdF, and 447.1 (−295.2) for GdF{sub 3}.

  17. Symmetry-adapted basis sets automatic generation for problems in chemistry and physics

    CERN Document Server

    Avery, John Scales; Avery, James Emil

    2012-01-01

    In theoretical physics, theoretical chemistry and engineering, one often wishes to solve partial differential equations subject to a set of boundary conditions. This gives rise to eigenvalue problems of which some solutions may be very difficult to find. For example, the problem of finding eigenfunctions and eigenvalues for the Hamiltonian of a many-particle system is usually so difficult that it requires approximate methods, the most common of which is expansion of the eigenfunctions in terms of basis functions that obey the boundary conditions of the problem. The computational effort needed

  18. Basis set effects on coupled cluster benchmarks of electronically excited states: CC3, CCSDR(3) and CC2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva-Junior, Mario R.; Sauer, Stephan P. A.; Schreiber, Marko

    2010-01-01

    Vertical electronic excitation energies and one-electron properties of 28 medium-sized molecules from a previously proposed benchmark set are revisited using the augmented correlation-consistent triple-zeta aug-cc-pVTZ basis set in CC2, CCSDR(3), and CC3 calculations. The results are compared...... to those obtained previously with the smaller TZVP basis set. For each of the three coupled cluster methods, a correlation coefficient greater than 0.994 is found between the vertical excitation energies computed with the two basis sets. The deviations of the CC2 and CCSDR(3) results from the CC3 reference...... values are very similar for both basis sets, thus confirming previous conclusions on the intrinsic accuracy of CC2 and CCSDR(3). This similarity justifies the use of CC2- or CCSDR(3)-based corrections to account for basis set incompleteness in CC3 studies of vertical excitation energies. For oscillator...

  19. Many-body calculations of molecular electric polarizabilities in asymptotically complete basis sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monten, Ruben; Hajgató, Balázs; Deleuze, Michael S.

    2011-10-01

    The static dipole polarizabilities of Ne, CO, N2, F2, HF, H2O, HCN, and C2H2 (acetylene) have been determined close to the Full-CI limit along with an asymptotically complete basis set (CBS), according to the principles of a Focal Point Analysis. For this purpose the results of Finite Field calculations up to the level of Coupled Cluster theory including Single, Double, Triple, Quadruple and perturbative Pentuple excitations [CCSDTQ(P)] were used, in conjunction with suited extrapolations of energies obtained using augmented and doubly-augmented Dunning's correlation consistent polarized valence basis sets of improving quality. The polarizability characteristics of C2H4 (ethylene) and C2H6 (ethane) have been determined on the same grounds at the CCSDTQ level in the CBS limit. Comparison is made with results obtained using lower levels in electronic correlation, or taking into account the relaxation of the molecular structure due to an adiabatic polarization process. Vibrational corrections to electronic polarizabilities have been empirically estimated according to Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamical simulations employing Density Functional Theory. Confrontation with experiment ultimately indicates relative accuracies of the order of 1 to 2%.

  20. MRD-CI potential surfaces using balanced basis sets. IV. The H2 molecule and the H3 surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, J.S.; Kruus, E.

    1986-01-01

    The utility of midbond functions in molecular calculations was tested in two cases where the correct results are known: the H 2 potential curve and the collinear H 3 potential surface. For H 2 , a variety of basis sets both with and without bond functions was compared to the exact nonrelativistic potential curve of Kolos and Wolniewicz [J. Chem. Phys. 43, 2429 (1965)]. It was found that optimally balanced basis sets at two levels of quality were the double zeta single polarization plus sp bond function basis (BF1) and the triple zeta double polarization plus two sets of sp bond function basis (BF2). These gave bond dissociation energies D/sub e/ = 4.7341 and 4.7368 eV, respectively (expt. 4.7477 eV). Four basis sets were tested for basis set superposition errors, which were found to be small relative to basis set incompleteness and therefore did not affect any conclusions regarding basis set balance. Basis sets BF1 and BF2 were used to construct potential surfaces for collinear H 3 , along with the corresponding basis sets DZ*P and TZ*PP which contain no bond functions. Barrier heights of 12.52, 10.37, 10.06, and 9.96 kcal/mol were obtained for basis sets DZ*P, TZ*PP, BF1, and BF2, respectively, compared to an estimated limiting value of 9.60 kcal/mol. Difference maps, force constants, and relative rms deviations show that the bond functions improve the surface shape as well as the barrier height

  1. Polarization functions for the modified m6-31G basis sets for atoms Ga through Kr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitin, Alexander V

    2013-09-05

    The 2df polarization functions for the modified m6-31G basis sets of the third-row atoms Ga through Kr (Int J Quantum Chem, 2007, 107, 3028; Int J. Quantum Chem, 2009, 109, 1158) are proposed. The performances of the m6-31G, m6-31G(d,p), and m6-31G(2df,p) basis sets were examined in molecular calculations carried out by the density functional theory (DFT) method with B3LYP hybrid functional, Møller-Plesset perturbation theory of the second order (MP2), quadratic configuration interaction method with single and double substitutions and were compared with those for the known 6-31G basis sets as well as with the other similar 641 and 6-311G basis sets with and without polarization functions. Obtained results have shown that the performances of the m6-31G, m6-31G(d,p), and m6-31G(2df,p) basis sets are better in comparison with the performances of the known 6-31G, 6-31G(d,p) and 6-31G(2df,p) basis sets. These improvements are mainly reached due to better approximations of different electrons belonging to the different atomic shells in the modified basis sets. Applicability of the modified basis sets in thermochemical calculations is also discussed. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Relativistic double-zeta, triple-zeta, and quadruple-zeta basis sets for the lanthanides La–Lu

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dyall, K.G.; Gomes, A.S.P.; Visscher, L.

    2010-01-01

    Relativistic basis sets of double-zeta, triple-zeta, and quadruple-zeta quality have been optimized for the lanthanide elements La-Lu. The basis sets include SCF exponents for the occupied spinors and for the 6p shell, exponents of correlating functions for the valence shells (4f, 5d and 6s) and the

  3. 42 CFR 415.170 - Conditions for payment on a fee schedule basis for physician services in a teaching setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... physician services in a teaching setting. 415.170 Section 415.170 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... BY PHYSICIANS IN PROVIDERS, SUPERVISING PHYSICIANS IN TEACHING SETTINGS, AND RESIDENTS IN CERTAIN SETTINGS Physician Services in Teaching Settings § 415.170 Conditions for payment on a fee schedule basis...

  4. Velocity-gauge real-time TDDFT within a numerical atomic orbital basis set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pemmaraju, C. D.; Vila, F. D.; Kas, J. J.; Sato, S. A.; Rehr, J. J.; Yabana, K.; Prendergast, David

    2018-05-01

    The interaction of laser fields with solid-state systems can be modeled efficiently within the velocity-gauge formalism of real-time time dependent density functional theory (RT-TDDFT). In this article, we discuss the implementation of the velocity-gauge RT-TDDFT equations for electron dynamics within a linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) basis set framework. Numerical results obtained from our LCAO implementation, for the electronic response of periodic systems to both weak and intense laser fields, are compared to those obtained from established real-space grid and Full-Potential Linearized Augmented Planewave approaches. Potential applications of the LCAO based scheme in the context of extreme ultra-violet and soft X-ray spectroscopies involving core-electronic excitations are discussed.

  5. Dynamic sensitivity analysis of long running landslide models through basis set expansion and meta-modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohmer, Jeremy

    2016-04-01

    Predicting the temporal evolution of landslides is typically supported by numerical modelling. Dynamic sensitivity analysis aims at assessing the influence of the landslide properties on the time-dependent predictions (e.g., time series of landslide displacements). Yet two major difficulties arise: 1. Global sensitivity analysis require running the landslide model a high number of times (> 1000), which may become impracticable when the landslide model has a high computation time cost (> several hours); 2. Landslide model outputs are not scalar, but function of time, i.e. they are n-dimensional vectors with n usually ranging from 100 to 1000. In this article, I explore the use of a basis set expansion, such as principal component analysis, to reduce the output dimensionality to a few components, each of them being interpreted as a dominant mode of variation in the overall structure of the temporal evolution. The computationally intensive calculation of the Sobol' indices for each of these components are then achieved through meta-modelling, i.e. by replacing the landslide model by a "costless-to-evaluate" approximation (e.g., a projection pursuit regression model). The methodology combining "basis set expansion - meta-model - Sobol' indices" is then applied to the La Frasse landslide to investigate the dynamic sensitivity analysis of the surface horizontal displacements to the slip surface properties during the pore pressure changes. I show how to extract information on the sensitivity of each main modes of temporal behaviour using a limited number (a few tens) of long running simulations. In particular, I identify the parameters, which trigger the occurrence of a turning point marking a shift between a regime of low values of landslide displacements and one of high values.

  6. Peptide dynamics by molecular dynamics simulation and diffusion theory method with improved basis sets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Po Jen; Lai, S. K., E-mail: sklai@coll.phy.ncu.edu.tw [Complex Liquids Laboratory, Department of Physics, National Central University, Chungli 320, Taiwan and Molecular Science and Technology Program, Taiwan International Graduate Program, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Rapallo, Arnaldo [Istituto per lo Studio delle Macromolecole (ISMAC) Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), via E. Bassini 15, C.A.P 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2014-03-14

    Improved basis sets for the study of polymer dynamics by means of the diffusion theory, and tests on a melt of cis-1,4-polyisoprene decamers, and a toluene solution of a 71-mer syndiotactic trans-1,2-polypentadiene were presented recently [R. Gaspari and A. Rapallo, J. Chem. Phys. 128, 244109 (2008)]. The proposed hybrid basis approach (HBA) combined two techniques, the long time sorting procedure and the maximum correlation approximation. The HBA takes advantage of the strength of these two techniques, and its basis sets proved to be very effective and computationally convenient in describing both local and global dynamics in cases of flexible synthetic polymers where the repeating unit is a unique type of monomer. The question then arises if the same efficacy continues when the HBA is applied to polymers of different monomers, variable local stiffness along the chain and with longer persistence length, which have different local and global dynamical properties against the above-mentioned systems. Important examples of this kind of molecular chains are the proteins, so that a fragment of the protein transthyretin is chosen as the system of the present study. This peptide corresponds to a sequence that is structured in β-sheets of the protein and is located on the surface of the channel with thyroxin. The protein transthyretin forms amyloid fibrils in vivo, whereas the peptide fragment has been shown [C. P. Jaroniec, C. E. MacPhee, N. S. Astrof, C. M. Dobson, and R. G. Griffin, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 16748 (2002)] to form amyloid fibrils in vitro in extended β-sheet conformations. For these reasons the latter is given considerable attention in the literature and studied also as an isolated fragment in water solution where both experimental and theoretical efforts have indicated the propensity of the system to form β turns or α helices, but is otherwise predominantly unstructured. Differing from previous computational studies that employed implicit

  7. Peptide dynamics by molecular dynamics simulation and diffusion theory method with improved basis sets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, Po Jen; Lai, S. K.; Rapallo, Arnaldo

    2014-01-01

    Improved basis sets for the study of polymer dynamics by means of the diffusion theory, and tests on a melt of cis-1,4-polyisoprene decamers, and a toluene solution of a 71-mer syndiotactic trans-1,2-polypentadiene were presented recently [R. Gaspari and A. Rapallo, J. Chem. Phys. 128, 244109 (2008)]. The proposed hybrid basis approach (HBA) combined two techniques, the long time sorting procedure and the maximum correlation approximation. The HBA takes advantage of the strength of these two techniques, and its basis sets proved to be very effective and computationally convenient in describing both local and global dynamics in cases of flexible synthetic polymers where the repeating unit is a unique type of monomer. The question then arises if the same efficacy continues when the HBA is applied to polymers of different monomers, variable local stiffness along the chain and with longer persistence length, which have different local and global dynamical properties against the above-mentioned systems. Important examples of this kind of molecular chains are the proteins, so that a fragment of the protein transthyretin is chosen as the system of the present study. This peptide corresponds to a sequence that is structured in β-sheets of the protein and is located on the surface of the channel with thyroxin. The protein transthyretin forms amyloid fibrils in vivo, whereas the peptide fragment has been shown [C. P. Jaroniec, C. E. MacPhee, N. S. Astrof, C. M. Dobson, and R. G. Griffin, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 16748 (2002)] to form amyloid fibrils in vitro in extended β-sheet conformations. For these reasons the latter is given considerable attention in the literature and studied also as an isolated fragment in water solution where both experimental and theoretical efforts have indicated the propensity of the system to form β turns or α helices, but is otherwise predominantly unstructured. Differing from previous computational studies that employed implicit

  8. Numerical Aspects of Atomic Physics: Helium Basis Sets and Matrix Diagonalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jentschura, Ulrich; Noble, Jonathan

    2014-03-01

    We present a matrix diagonalization algorithm for complex symmetric matrices, which can be used in order to determine the resonance energies of auto-ionizing states of comparatively simple quantum many-body systems such as helium. The algorithm is based in multi-precision arithmetic and proceeds via a tridiagonalization of the complex symmetric (not necessarily Hermitian) input matrix using generalized Householder transformations. Example calculations involving so-called PT-symmetric quantum systems lead to reference values which pertain to the imaginary cubic perturbation (the imaginary cubic anharmonic oscillator). We then proceed to novel basis sets for the helium atom and present results for Bethe logarithms in hydrogen and helium, obtained using the enhanced numerical techniques. Some intricacies of ``canned'' algorithms such as those used in LAPACK will be discussed. Our algorithm, for complex symmetric matrices such as those describing cubic resonances after complex scaling, is faster than LAPACK's built-in routines, for specific classes of input matrices. It also offer flexibility in terms of the calculation of the so-called implicit shift, which is used in order to ``pivot'' the system toward the convergence to diagonal form. We conclude with a wider overview.

  9. On the effects of basis set truncation and electron correlation in conformers of 2-hydroxy-acetamide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szarecka, A.; Day, G.; Grout, P. J.; Wilson, S.

    Ab initio quantum chemical calculations have been used to study the differences in energy between two gas phase conformers of the 2-hydroxy-acetamide molecule that possess intramolecular hydrogen bonding. In particular, rotation around the central C-C bond has been considered as a factor determining the structure of the hydrogen bond and stabilization of the conformer. Energy calculations include full geometiy optimization using both the restricted matrix Hartree-Fock model and second-order many-body perturbation theory with a number of commonly used basis sets. The basis sets employed ranged from the minimal STO-3G set to [`]split-valence' sets up to 6-31 G. The effects of polarization functions were also studied. The results display a strong basis set dependence.

  10. The Raman Spectrum of the Squarate (C4O4-2 Anion: An Ab Initio Basis Set Dependence Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miranda Sandro G. de

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The Raman excitation profile of the squarate anion, C4O4-2 , was calculated using ab initio methods at the Hartree-Fock using Linear Response Theory (LRT for six excitation frequencies: 632.5, 514.5, 488.0, 457.9, 363.8 and 337.1 nm. Five basis set functions (6-31G*, 6-31+G*, cc-pVDZ, aug-cc-pVDZ and Sadlej's polarizability basis set were investigated aiming to evaluate the performance of the 6-31G* set for numerical convergence and computational cost in relation to the larger basis sets. All basis sets reproduce the main spectroscopic features of the Raman spectrum of this anion for the excitation interval investigated. The 6-31G* basis set presented, on average, the same accuracy of numerical results as the larger sets but at a fraction of the computational cost showing that it is suitable for the theoretical investigation of the squarate dianion and its complexes and derivatives.

  11. Atomic Cholesky decompositions: A route to unbiased auxiliary basis sets for density fitting approximation with tunable accuracy and efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquilante, Francesco; Gagliardi, Laura; Pedersen, Thomas Bondo; Lindh, Roland

    2009-04-01

    Cholesky decomposition of the atomic two-electron integral matrix has recently been proposed as a procedure for automated generation of auxiliary basis sets for the density fitting approximation [F. Aquilante et al., J. Chem. Phys. 127, 114107 (2007)]. In order to increase computational performance while maintaining accuracy, we propose here to reduce the number of primitive Gaussian functions of the contracted auxiliary basis functions by means of a second Cholesky decomposition. Test calculations show that this procedure is most beneficial in conjunction with highly contracted atomic orbital basis sets such as atomic natural orbitals, and that the error resulting from the second decomposition is negligible. We also demonstrate theoretically as well as computationally that the locality of the fitting coefficients can be controlled by means of the decomposition threshold even with the long-ranged Coulomb metric. Cholesky decomposition-based auxiliary basis sets are thus ideally suited for local density fitting approximations.

  12. Expressing clinical data sets with openEHR archetypes: a solid basis for ubiquitous computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garde, Sebastian; Hovenga, Evelyn; Buck, Jasmin; Knaup, Petra

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyse the feasibility and usefulness of expressing clinical data sets (CDSs) as openEHR archetypes. For this, we present an approach to transform CDS into archetypes, and outline typical problems with CDS and analyse whether some of these problems can be overcome by the use of archetypes. Literature review and analysis of a selection of existing Australian, German, other European and international CDSs; transfer of a CDS for Paediatric Oncology into openEHR archetypes; implementation of CDSs in application systems. To explore the feasibility of expressing CDS as archetypes an approach to transform existing CDSs into archetypes is presented in this paper. In case of the Paediatric Oncology CDS (which consists of 260 data items) this lead to the definition of 48 openEHR archetypes. To analyse the usefulness of expressing CDS as archetypes, we identified nine problems with CDS that currently remain unsolved without a common model underpinning the CDS. Typical problems include incompatible basic data types and overlapping and incompatible definitions of clinical content. A solution to most of these problems based on openEHR archetypes is motivated. With regard to integrity constraints, further research is required. While openEHR cannot overcome all barriers to Ubiquitous Computing, it can provide the common basis for ubiquitous presence of meaningful and computer-processable knowledge and information, which we believe is a basic requirement for Ubiquitous Computing. Expressing CDSs as openEHR archetypes is feasible and advantageous as it fosters semantic interoperability, supports ubiquitous computing, and helps to develop archetypes that are arguably of better quality than the original CDS.

  13. Generalized Stokes eignefunctions: a new trial basis for the solution of incompressible Navier-Stokes equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batcho, P.F.; Karniadakis, G.E.

    1994-01-01

    The present study focuses on the solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in general, non-separable domains, and employs a Galerkin projection of divergence-free vector functions as a trail basis. This basis is obtained from the solution of a generalized constrained Stokes eigen-problem in the domain of interest. Faster convergence can be achieved by constructing a singular Stokes eigen-problem in which the Stokes operator is modified to include a variable coefficient which vanishes at the domain boundaries. The convergence properties of such functions are advantageous in a least squares sense and are shown to produce significantly better approximations to the solution of the Navier-Stokes equations in post-critical states where unsteadiness characterizes the flowfield. Solutions for the eigen-systems are efficiently accomplished using a combined Lanczos-Uzawa algorithm and spectral element discretizations. Results are presented for different simulations using these global spectral trial basis on non-separable and multiply-connected domains. It is confirmed that faster convergence is obtained using the singular eigen-expansions in approximating stationary Navier-Stokes solutions in general domains. It is also shown that 100-mode expansions of time-dependent solutions based on the singular Stokes eigenfunctions are sufficient to accurately predict the dynamics of flows in such domains, including Hopf bifurcations, intermittency, and details of flow structures

  14. Basis set effects on the energy and hardness profiles of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    maximum hardness principle (MHP); spurious stationary points; hydrogen fluoride dimer. 1. Introduction ... This error can be solved when accounting for the basis ..... DURSI for financial support through the Distinguished. University Research ...

  15. The static response function in Kohn-Sham theory: An appropriate basis for its matrix representation in case of finite AO basis sets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kollmar, Christian; Neese, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The role of the static Kohn-Sham (KS) response function describing the response of the electron density to a change of the local KS potential is discussed in both the theory of the optimized effective potential (OEP) and the so-called inverse Kohn-Sham problem involving the task to find the local KS potential for a given electron density. In a general discussion of the integral equation to be solved in both cases, it is argued that a unique solution of this equation can be found even in case of finite atomic orbital basis sets. It is shown how a matrix representation of the response function can be obtained if the exchange-correlation potential is expanded in terms of a Schmidt-orthogonalized basis comprising orbitals products of occupied and virtual orbitals. The viability of this approach in both OEP theory and the inverse KS problem is illustrated by numerical examples

  16. Ab initio localized basis set study of structural parameters and elastic properties of HfO2 polymorphs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caravaca, M A; Casali, R A

    2005-01-01

    The SIESTA approach based on pseudopotentials and a localized basis set is used to calculate the electronic, elastic and equilibrium properties of P 2 1 /c, Pbca, Pnma, Fm3m, P4 2 nmc and Pa3 phases of HfO 2 . Using separable Troullier-Martins norm-conserving pseudopotentials which include partial core corrections for Hf, we tested important physical properties as a function of the basis set size, grid size and cut-off ratio of the pseudo-atomic orbitals (PAOs). We found that calculations in this oxide with the LDA approach and using a minimal basis set (simple zeta, SZ) improve calculated phase transition pressures with respect to the double-zeta basis set and LDA (DZ-LDA), and show similar accuracy to that determined with the PPPW and GGA approach. Still, the equilibrium volumes and structural properties calculated with SZ-LDA compare better with experiments than the GGA approach. The bandgaps and elastic and structural properties calculated with DZ-LDA are accurate in agreement with previous state of the art ab initio calculations and experimental evidence and cannot be improved with a polarized basis set. These calculated properties show low sensitivity to the PAO localization parameter range between 40 and 100 meV. However, this is not true for the relative energy, which improves upon decrease of the mentioned parameter. We found a non-linear behaviour in the lattice parameters with pressure in the P 2 1 /c phase, showing a discontinuity of the derivative of the a lattice parameter with respect to external pressure, as found in experiments. The common enthalpy values calculated with the minimal basis set give pressure transitions of 3.3 and 10.8?GPa for P2 1 /c → Pbca and Pbca → Pnma, respectively, in accordance with different high pressure experimental values

  17. Ab initio localized basis set study of structural parameters and elastic properties of HfO{sub 2} polymorphs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caravaca, M A [Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional del Nordeste, Avenida Las Heras 727, 3500-Resistencia (Argentina); Casali, R A [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales y Agrimensura, Universidad Nacional del Nordeste, Avenida Libertad, 5600-Corrientes (Argentina)

    2005-09-21

    The SIESTA approach based on pseudopotentials and a localized basis set is used to calculate the electronic, elastic and equilibrium properties of P 2{sub 1}/c, Pbca, Pnma, Fm3m, P4{sub 2}nmc and Pa3 phases of HfO{sub 2}. Using separable Troullier-Martins norm-conserving pseudopotentials which include partial core corrections for Hf, we tested important physical properties as a function of the basis set size, grid size and cut-off ratio of the pseudo-atomic orbitals (PAOs). We found that calculations in this oxide with the LDA approach and using a minimal basis set (simple zeta, SZ) improve calculated phase transition pressures with respect to the double-zeta basis set and LDA (DZ-LDA), and show similar accuracy to that determined with the PPPW and GGA approach. Still, the equilibrium volumes and structural properties calculated with SZ-LDA compare better with experiments than the GGA approach. The bandgaps and elastic and structural properties calculated with DZ-LDA are accurate in agreement with previous state of the art ab initio calculations and experimental evidence and cannot be improved with a polarized basis set. These calculated properties show low sensitivity to the PAO localization parameter range between 40 and 100 meV. However, this is not true for the relative energy, which improves upon decrease of the mentioned parameter. We found a non-linear behaviour in the lattice parameters with pressure in the P 2{sub 1}/c phase, showing a discontinuity of the derivative of the a lattice parameter with respect to external pressure, as found in experiments. The common enthalpy values calculated with the minimal basis set give pressure transitions of 3.3 and 10.8?GPa for P2{sub 1}/c {yields} Pbca and Pbca {yields} Pnma, respectively, in accordance with different high pressure experimental values.

  18. Nuclear-electronic orbital reduced explicitly correlated Hartree-Fock approach: Restricted basis sets and open-shell systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brorsen, Kurt R.; Sirjoosingh, Andrew; Pak, Michael V.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear electronic orbital (NEO) reduced explicitly correlated Hartree-Fock (RXCHF) approach couples select electronic orbitals to the nuclear orbital via Gaussian-type geminal functions. This approach is extended to enable the use of a restricted basis set for the explicitly correlated electronic orbitals and an open-shell treatment for the other electronic orbitals. The working equations are derived and the implementation is discussed for both extensions. The RXCHF method with a restricted basis set is applied to HCN and FHF − and is shown to agree quantitatively with results from RXCHF calculations with a full basis set. The number of many-particle integrals that must be calculated for these two molecules is reduced by over an order of magnitude with essentially no loss in accuracy, and the reduction factor will increase substantially for larger systems. Typically, the computational cost of RXCHF calculations with restricted basis sets will scale in terms of the number of basis functions centered on the quantum nucleus and the covalently bonded neighbor(s). In addition, the RXCHF method with an odd number of electrons that are not explicitly correlated to the nuclear orbital is implemented using a restricted open-shell formalism for these electrons. This method is applied to HCN + , and the nuclear densities are in qualitative agreement with grid-based calculations. Future work will focus on the significance of nonadiabatic effects in molecular systems and the further enhancement of the NEO-RXCHF approach to accurately describe such effects

  19. Nuclear-electronic orbital reduced explicitly correlated Hartree-Fock approach: Restricted basis sets and open-shell systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brorsen, Kurt R.; Sirjoosingh, Andrew; Pak, Michael V.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon, E-mail: shs3@illinois.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 South Mathews Ave., Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2015-06-07

    The nuclear electronic orbital (NEO) reduced explicitly correlated Hartree-Fock (RXCHF) approach couples select electronic orbitals to the nuclear orbital via Gaussian-type geminal functions. This approach is extended to enable the use of a restricted basis set for the explicitly correlated electronic orbitals and an open-shell treatment for the other electronic orbitals. The working equations are derived and the implementation is discussed for both extensions. The RXCHF method with a restricted basis set is applied to HCN and FHF{sup −} and is shown to agree quantitatively with results from RXCHF calculations with a full basis set. The number of many-particle integrals that must be calculated for these two molecules is reduced by over an order of magnitude with essentially no loss in accuracy, and the reduction factor will increase substantially for larger systems. Typically, the computational cost of RXCHF calculations with restricted basis sets will scale in terms of the number of basis functions centered on the quantum nucleus and the covalently bonded neighbor(s). In addition, the RXCHF method with an odd number of electrons that are not explicitly correlated to the nuclear orbital is implemented using a restricted open-shell formalism for these electrons. This method is applied to HCN{sup +}, and the nuclear densities are in qualitative agreement with grid-based calculations. Future work will focus on the significance of nonadiabatic effects in molecular systems and the further enhancement of the NEO-RXCHF approach to accurately describe such effects.

  20. Gaussian basis sets for use in correlated molecular calculations. XI. Pseudopotential-based and all-electron relativistic basis sets for alkali metal (K-Fr) and alkaline earth (Ca-Ra) elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, J. Grant; Peterson, Kirk A.

    2017-12-01

    New correlation consistent basis sets based on pseudopotential (PP) Hamiltonians have been developed from double- to quintuple-zeta quality for the late alkali (K-Fr) and alkaline earth (Ca-Ra) metals. These are accompanied by new all-electron basis sets of double- to quadruple-zeta quality that have been contracted for use with both Douglas-Kroll-Hess (DKH) and eXact 2-Component (X2C) scalar relativistic Hamiltonians. Sets for valence correlation (ms), cc-pVnZ-PP and cc-pVnZ-(DK,DK3/X2C), in addition to outer-core correlation [valence + (m-1)sp], cc-p(w)CVnZ-PP and cc-pwCVnZ-(DK,DK3/X2C), are reported. The -PP sets have been developed for use with small-core PPs [I. S. Lim et al., J. Chem. Phys. 122, 104103 (2005) and I. S. Lim et al., J. Chem. Phys. 124, 034107 (2006)], while the all-electron sets utilized second-order DKH Hamiltonians for 4s and 5s elements and third-order DKH for 6s and 7s. The accuracy of the basis sets is assessed through benchmark calculations at the coupled-cluster level of theory for both atomic and molecular properties. Not surprisingly, it is found that outer-core correlation is vital for accurate calculation of the thermodynamic and spectroscopic properties of diatomic molecules containing these elements.

  1. Gaussian basis sets for use in correlated molecular calculations. XI. Pseudopotential-based and all-electron relativistic basis sets for alkali metal (K-Fr) and alkaline earth (Ca-Ra) elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, J Grant; Peterson, Kirk A

    2017-12-28

    New correlation consistent basis sets based on pseudopotential (PP) Hamiltonians have been developed from double- to quintuple-zeta quality for the late alkali (K-Fr) and alkaline earth (Ca-Ra) metals. These are accompanied by new all-electron basis sets of double- to quadruple-zeta quality that have been contracted for use with both Douglas-Kroll-Hess (DKH) and eXact 2-Component (X2C) scalar relativistic Hamiltonians. Sets for valence correlation (ms), cc-pVnZ-PP and cc-pVnZ-(DK,DK3/X2C), in addition to outer-core correlation [valence + (m-1)sp], cc-p(w)CVnZ-PP and cc-pwCVnZ-(DK,DK3/X2C), are reported. The -PP sets have been developed for use with small-core PPs [I. S. Lim et al., J. Chem. Phys. 122, 104103 (2005) and I. S. Lim et al., J. Chem. Phys. 124, 034107 (2006)], while the all-electron sets utilized second-order DKH Hamiltonians for 4s and 5s elements and third-order DKH for 6s and 7s. The accuracy of the basis sets is assessed through benchmark calculations at the coupled-cluster level of theory for both atomic and molecular properties. Not surprisingly, it is found that outer-core correlation is vital for accurate calculation of the thermodynamic and spectroscopic properties of diatomic molecules containing these elements.

  2. Simulating the oxygen content of ambient organic aerosol with the 2D volatility basis set

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. N. Murphy

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A module predicting the oxidation state of organic aerosol (OA has been developed using the two-dimensional volatility basis set (2D-VBS framework. This model is an extension of the 1D-VBS framework and tracks saturation concentration and oxygen content of organic species during their atmospheric lifetime. The host model, a one-dimensional Lagrangian transport model, is used to simulate air parcels arriving at Finokalia, Greece during the Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiment in May 2008 (FAME-08. Extensive observations were collected during this campaign using an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS and a thermodenuder to determine the chemical composition and volatility, respectively, of the ambient OA. Although there are several uncertain model parameters, the consistently high oxygen content of OA measured during FAME-08 (O:C = 0.8 can help constrain these parameters and elucidate OA formation and aging processes that are necessary for achieving the high degree of oxygenation observed. The base-case model reproduces observed OA mass concentrations (measured mean = 3.1 μg m−3, predicted mean = 3.3 μg m−3 and O:C (predicted O:C = 0.78 accurately. A suite of sensitivity studies explore uncertainties due to (1 the anthropogenic secondary OA (SOA aging rate constant, (2 assumed enthalpies of vaporization, (3 the volatility change and number of oxygen atoms added for each generation of aging, (4 heterogeneous chemistry, (5 the oxidation state of the first generation of compounds formed from SOA precursor oxidation, and (6 biogenic SOA aging. Perturbations in most of these parameters do impact the ability of the model to predict O:C well throughout the simulation period. By comparing measurements of the O:C from FAME-08, several sensitivity cases including a high oxygenation case, a low oxygenation case, and biogenic SOA aging case are found to unreasonably depict OA aging, keeping in mind that this study does not consider

  3. Zeroth-order exchange energy as a criterion for optimized atomic basis sets in interatomic force calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varandas, A.J.C.

    1980-01-01

    A suggestion is made for using the zeroth-order exchange term, at the one-exchange level, in the perturbation development of the interaction energy as a criterion for optmizing the atomic basis sets in interatomic force calculations. The approach is illustrated for the case of two helium atoms. (orig.)

  4. Formation and physical characteristics of van der Waals molecules, cations, and anions: Estimates of complete basis set values

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zahradník, Rudolf; Šroubková, Libuše

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 104, č. 1 (2005), s. 52-63 ISSN 0020-7608 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : intermolecular complexes * van der Waals species * ab initio calculations * complete basis set values * estimates Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.192, year: 2005

  5. Straightening the Hierarchical Staircase for Basis Set Extrapolations: A Low-Cost Approach to High-Accuracy Computational Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varandas, António J. C.

    2018-04-01

    Because the one-electron basis set limit is difficult to reach in correlated post-Hartree-Fock ab initio calculations, the low-cost route of using methods that extrapolate to the estimated basis set limit attracts immediate interest. The situation is somewhat more satisfactory at the Hartree-Fock level because numerical calculation of the energy is often affordable at nearly converged basis set levels. Still, extrapolation schemes for the Hartree-Fock energy are addressed here, although the focus is on the more slowly convergent and computationally demanding correlation energy. Because they are frequently based on the gold-standard coupled-cluster theory with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations [CCSD(T)], correlated calculations are often affordable only with the smallest basis sets, and hence single-level extrapolations from one raw energy could attain maximum usefulness. This possibility is examined. Whenever possible, this review uses raw data from second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory, as well as CCSD, CCSD(T), and multireference configuration interaction methods. Inescapably, the emphasis is on work done by the author's research group. Certain issues in need of further research or review are pinpointed.

  6. Geometrical correction for the inter- and intramolecular basis set superposition error in periodic density functional theory calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandenburg, Jan Gerit; Alessio, Maristella; Civalleri, Bartolomeo; Peintinger, Michael F; Bredow, Thomas; Grimme, Stefan

    2013-09-26

    We extend the previously developed geometrical correction for the inter- and intramolecular basis set superposition error (gCP) to periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We report gCP results compared to those from the standard Boys-Bernardi counterpoise correction scheme and large basis set calculations. The applicability of the method to molecular crystals as the main target is tested for the benchmark set X23. It consists of 23 noncovalently bound crystals as introduced by Johnson et al. (J. Chem. Phys. 2012, 137, 054103) and refined by Tkatchenko et al. (J. Chem. Phys. 2013, 139, 024705). In order to accurately describe long-range electron correlation effects, we use the standard atom-pairwise dispersion correction scheme DFT-D3. We show that a combination of DFT energies with small atom-centered basis sets, the D3 dispersion correction, and the gCP correction can accurately describe van der Waals and hydrogen-bonded crystals. Mean absolute deviations of the X23 sublimation energies can be reduced by more than 70% and 80% for the standard functionals PBE and B3LYP, respectively, to small residual mean absolute deviations of about 2 kcal/mol (corresponding to 13% of the average sublimation energy). As a further test, we compute the interlayer interaction of graphite for varying distances and obtain a good equilibrium distance and interaction energy of 6.75 Å and -43.0 meV/atom at the PBE-D3-gCP/SVP level. We fit the gCP scheme for a recently developed pob-TZVP solid-state basis set and obtain reasonable results for the X23 benchmark set and the potential energy curve for water adsorption on a nickel (110) surface.

  7. Core domain and outcome measurement sets for shoulder pain trials are needed: Systematic review of physical therapy trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Page (Matthew J.); J.E. McKenzie (Joanne E.); S.E. Green (Sally E.); D.E. Beaton (Dorcas E.); N.B. Jain (Nitin B.); M. Lenza (Mario); A.P. Verhagen (Arianne); S. Surace (Stephen); J. Deitch (Jessica); R. Buchbinder (Rachelle)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjectives To explore the outcome domains and measurement instruments reported in published randomized controlled trials of physical therapy interventions for shoulder pain (rotator cuff disease, adhesive capsulitis, or nonspecific shoulder pain). Study Design and Setting We included

  8. Typed Sets as a Basis for Object-Oriented Database Schemas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balsters, H.; de By, R.A.; Zicari, R.

    The object-oriented data model TM is a language that is based on the formal theory of FM, a typed language with object-oriented features such as attributes and methods in the presence of subtyping. The general (typed) set constructs of FM allow one to deal with (database) constraints in TM. The

  9. Optimization of metabolite basis sets prior to quantitation in magnetic resonance spectroscopy: an approach based on quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazariev, A; Graveron-Demilly, D; Allouche, A-R; Aubert-Frécon, M; Fauvelle, F; Piotto, M; Elbayed, K; Namer, I-J; Van Ormondt, D

    2011-01-01

    High-resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is playing an increasingly important role for diagnosis. This technique enables setting up metabolite profiles of ex vivo pathological and healthy tissue. The need to monitor diseases and pharmaceutical follow-up requires an automatic quantitation of HRMAS 1 H signals. However, for several metabolites, the values of chemical shifts of proton groups may slightly differ according to the micro-environment in the tissue or cells, in particular to its pH. This hampers the accurate estimation of the metabolite concentrations mainly when using quantitation algorithms based on a metabolite basis set: the metabolite fingerprints are not correct anymore. In this work, we propose an accurate method coupling quantum mechanical simulations and quantitation algorithms to handle basis-set changes. The proposed algorithm automatically corrects mismatches between the signals of the simulated basis set and the signal under analysis by maximizing the normalized cross-correlation between the mentioned signals. Optimized chemical shift values of the metabolites are obtained. This method, QM-QUEST, provides more robust fitting while limiting user involvement and respects the correct fingerprints of metabolites. Its efficiency is demonstrated by accurately quantitating 33 signals from tissue samples of human brains with oligodendroglioma, obtained at 11.7 tesla. The corresponding chemical shift changes of several metabolites within the series are also analyzed

  10. Optimization of metabolite basis sets prior to quantitation in magnetic resonance spectroscopy: an approach based on quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazariev, A.; Allouche, A.-R.; Aubert-Frécon, M.; Fauvelle, F.; Piotto, M.; Elbayed, K.; Namer, I.-J.; van Ormondt, D.; Graveron-Demilly, D.

    2011-11-01

    High-resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is playing an increasingly important role for diagnosis. This technique enables setting up metabolite profiles of ex vivo pathological and healthy tissue. The need to monitor diseases and pharmaceutical follow-up requires an automatic quantitation of HRMAS 1H signals. However, for several metabolites, the values of chemical shifts of proton groups may slightly differ according to the micro-environment in the tissue or cells, in particular to its pH. This hampers the accurate estimation of the metabolite concentrations mainly when using quantitation algorithms based on a metabolite basis set: the metabolite fingerprints are not correct anymore. In this work, we propose an accurate method coupling quantum mechanical simulations and quantitation algorithms to handle basis-set changes. The proposed algorithm automatically corrects mismatches between the signals of the simulated basis set and the signal under analysis by maximizing the normalized cross-correlation between the mentioned signals. Optimized chemical shift values of the metabolites are obtained. This method, QM-QUEST, provides more robust fitting while limiting user involvement and respects the correct fingerprints of metabolites. Its efficiency is demonstrated by accurately quantitating 33 signals from tissue samples of human brains with oligodendroglioma, obtained at 11.7 tesla. The corresponding chemical shift changes of several metabolites within the series are also analyzed.

  11. Many-Body Energy Decomposition with Basis Set Superposition Error Corrections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, István; Bakó, Imre

    2017-05-09

    The problem of performing many-body decompositions of energy is considered in the case when BSSE corrections are also performed. It is discussed that the two different schemes that have been proposed go back to the two different interpretations of the original Boys-Bernardi counterpoise correction scheme. It is argued that from the physical point of view the "hierarchical" scheme of Valiron and Mayer should be preferred and not the scheme recently discussed by Ouyang and Bettens, because it permits the energy of the individual monomers and all the two-body, three-body, etc. energy components to be free of unphysical dependence on the arrangement (basis functions) of other subsystems in the cluster.

  12. Efficient G0W0 using localized basis sets: a benchmark for molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koval, Petr; Per Ljungberg, Mathias; Sanchez-Portal, Daniel

    Electronic structure calculations within Hedin's GW approximation are becoming increasingly accessible to the community. In particular, as it has been shown earlier and we confirm by calculations using our MBPT_LCAO package, the computational cost of the so-called G0W0 can be made comparable to the cost of a regular Hartree-Fock calculation. In this work, we study the performance of our new implementation of G0W0 to reproduce the ionization potentials of all 117 closed-shell molecules belonging to the G2/97 test set, using a pseudo-potential starting point provided by the popular density-functional package SIESTA. Moreover, the ionization potentials and electron affinities of a set of 24 acceptor molecules are compared to experiment and to reference all-electron calculations. PK: Guipuzcoa Fellow; PK,ML,DSP: Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (SFB1083); PK,DSP: MINECO MAT2013-46593-C6-2-P.

  13. The prefabricated building risk decision research of DM technology on the basis of Rough Set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Z. L.; Zhang, W. B.; Ma, L. H.

    2017-08-01

    With the resources crises and more serious pollution, the green building has been strongly advocated by most countries and become a new building style in the construction field. Compared with traditional building, the prefabricated building has its own irreplaceable advantages but is influenced by many uncertainties. So far, a majority of scholars have been studying based on qualitative researches from all of the word. This paper profoundly expounds its significance about the prefabricated building. On the premise of the existing research methods, combined with rough set theory, this paper redefines the factors which affect the prefabricated building risk. Moreover, it quantifies risk factors and establish an expert knowledge base through assessing. And then reduced risk factors about the redundant attributes and attribute values, finally form the simplest decision rule. This simplest decision rule, which is based on the DM technology of rough set theory, provides prefabricated building with a controllable new decision-making method.

  14. Perturbation expansion theory corrected from basis set superposition error. I. Locally projected excited orbitals and single excitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Takeshi; Iwata, Suehiro

    2004-02-22

    The locally projected self-consistent field molecular orbital method for molecular interaction (LP SCF MI) is reformulated for multifragment systems. For the perturbation expansion, two types of the local excited orbitals are defined; one is fully local in the basis set on a fragment, and the other has to be partially delocalized to the basis sets on the other fragments. The perturbation expansion calculations only within single excitations (LP SE MP2) are tested for water dimer, hydrogen fluoride dimer, and colinear symmetric ArM+ Ar (M = Na and K). The calculated binding energies of LP SE MP2 are all close to the corresponding counterpoise corrected SCF binding energy. By adding the single excitations, the deficiency in LP SCF MI is thus removed. The results suggest that the exclusion of the charge-transfer effects in LP SCF MI might indeed be the cause of the underestimation for the binding energy. (c) 2004 American Institute of Physics.

  15. Kohn-Sham potentials from electron densities using a matrix representation within finite atomic orbital basis sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xing; Carter, Emily A.

    2018-01-01

    We revisit the static response function-based Kohn-Sham (KS) inversion procedure for determining the KS effective potential that corresponds to a given target electron density within finite atomic orbital basis sets. Instead of expanding the potential in an auxiliary basis set, we directly update the potential in its matrix representation. Through numerical examples, we show that the reconstructed density rapidly converges to the target density. Preliminary results are presented to illustrate the possibility of obtaining a local potential in real space from the optimized potential in its matrix representation. We have further applied this matrix-based KS inversion approach to density functional embedding theory. A proof-of-concept study of a solvated proton transfer reaction demonstrates the method's promise.

  16. Approaching the theoretical limit in periodic local MP2 calculations with atomic-orbital basis sets: the case of LiH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usvyat, Denis; Civalleri, Bartolomeo; Maschio, Lorenzo; Dovesi, Roberto; Pisani, Cesare; Schütz, Martin

    2011-06-07

    The atomic orbital basis set limit is approached in periodic correlated calculations for solid LiH. The valence correlation energy is evaluated at the level of the local periodic second order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2), using basis sets of progressively increasing size, and also employing "bond"-centered basis functions in addition to the standard atom-centered ones. Extended basis sets, which contain linear dependencies, are processed only at the MP2 stage via a dual basis set scheme. The local approximation (domain) error has been consistently eliminated by expanding the orbital excitation domains. As a final result, it is demonstrated that the complete basis set limit can be reached for both HF and local MP2 periodic calculations, and a general scheme is outlined for the definition of high-quality atomic-orbital basis sets for solids. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  17. Lithium photoionization cross-section and dynamic polarizability using square integrable basis sets and correlated wave functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollauer, E.; Nascimento, M.A.C.

    1985-01-01

    The photoionization cross-section and dynamic polarizability for lithium atom are calculated using a discrete basis set to represent both the bound and the continuum-states of the atom, to construct an approximation to the dynamic polarizability. From the imaginary part of the complex dynamic polarizability one extracts the photoionization cross-section and from its real part the dynamic polarizability. The results are in good agreement with the experiments and other more elaborate calculations (Author) [pt

  18. Basis Set Convergence of Indirect Spin-Spin Coupling Constants in the Kohn-Sham Limit for Several Small Molecules

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kupka, T.; Nieradka, M.; Stachów, M.; Pluta, T.; Nowak, P.; Kjaer, H.; Kongsted, J.; Kaminský, Jakub

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 116, č. 14 (2012), s. 3728-3738 ISSN 1089-5639 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP208/10/P356 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : consistent basis-sets * density-functional methods * ab-inition calculations * polarization propagator approximation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.771, year: 2012

  19. Calculations of wavefunctions and energies of electron system in Coulomb potential by variational method without a basis set

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bykov, V.P.; Gerasimov, A.V.

    1992-08-01

    A new variational method without a basis set for calculation of the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of Hamiltonians is suggested. The expansion of this method for the Coulomb potentials is given. Calculation of the energy and charge distribution in the two-electron system for different values of the nuclear charge Z is made. It is shown that at small Z the Coulomb forces disintegrate the electron cloud into two clots. (author). 3 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  20. Method and basis set dependence of anharmonic ground state nuclear wave functions and zero-point energies: Application to SSSH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolmann, Stephen J.; Jordan, Meredith J. T.

    2010-02-01

    One of the largest remaining errors in thermochemical calculations is the determination of the zero-point energy (ZPE). The fully coupled, anharmonic ZPE and ground state nuclear wave function of the SSSH radical are calculated using quantum diffusion Monte Carlo on interpolated potential energy surfaces (PESs) constructed using a variety of method and basis set combinations. The ZPE of SSSH, which is approximately 29 kJ mol-1 at the CCSD(T)/6-31G∗ level of theory, has a 4 kJ mol-1 dependence on the treatment of electron correlation. The anharmonic ZPEs are consistently 0.3 kJ mol-1 lower in energy than the harmonic ZPEs calculated at the Hartree-Fock and MP2 levels of theory, and 0.7 kJ mol-1 lower in energy at the CCSD(T)/6-31G∗ level of theory. Ideally, for sub-kJ mol-1 thermochemical accuracy, ZPEs should be calculated using correlated methods with as big a basis set as practicable. The ground state nuclear wave function of SSSH also has significant method and basis set dependence. The analysis of the nuclear wave function indicates that SSSH is localized to a single symmetry equivalent global minimum, despite having sufficient ZPE to be delocalized over both minima. As part of this work, modifications to the interpolated PES construction scheme of Collins and co-workers are presented.

  1. Method and basis set dependence of anharmonic ground state nuclear wave functions and zero-point energies: application to SSSH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolmann, Stephen J; Jordan, Meredith J T

    2010-02-07

    One of the largest remaining errors in thermochemical calculations is the determination of the zero-point energy (ZPE). The fully coupled, anharmonic ZPE and ground state nuclear wave function of the SSSH radical are calculated using quantum diffusion Monte Carlo on interpolated potential energy surfaces (PESs) constructed using a variety of method and basis set combinations. The ZPE of SSSH, which is approximately 29 kJ mol(-1) at the CCSD(T)/6-31G* level of theory, has a 4 kJ mol(-1) dependence on the treatment of electron correlation. The anharmonic ZPEs are consistently 0.3 kJ mol(-1) lower in energy than the harmonic ZPEs calculated at the Hartree-Fock and MP2 levels of theory, and 0.7 kJ mol(-1) lower in energy at the CCSD(T)/6-31G* level of theory. Ideally, for sub-kJ mol(-1) thermochemical accuracy, ZPEs should be calculated using correlated methods with as big a basis set as practicable. The ground state nuclear wave function of SSSH also has significant method and basis set dependence. The analysis of the nuclear wave function indicates that SSSH is localized to a single symmetry equivalent global minimum, despite having sufficient ZPE to be delocalized over both minima. As part of this work, modifications to the interpolated PES construction scheme of Collins and co-workers are presented.

  2. Three-body problem in quantum mechanics: Hyperspherical elliptic coordinates and harmonic basis sets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aquilanti, Vincenzo; Tonzani, Stefano

    2004-01-01

    Elliptic coordinates within the hyperspherical formalism for three-body problems were proposed some time ago [V. Aquilanti, S. Cavalli, and G. Grossi, J. Chem. Phys. 85, 1362 (1986)] and recently have also found application, for example, in chemical reaction theory [see O. I. Tolstikhin and H. Nakamura, J. Chem. Phys. 108, 8899 (1998)]. Here we consider their role in providing a smooth transition between the known 'symmetric' and 'asymmetric' parametrizations, and focus on the corresponding hyperspherical harmonics. These harmonics, which will be called hyperspherical elliptic, involve products of two associated Lame polynomials. We will provide an expansion of these new sets in a finite series of standard hyperspherical harmonics, producing a powerful tool for future applications in the field of scattering and bound-state quantum-mechanical three-body problems

  3. Feasibility of a multicentre, randomised controlled trial of laparoscopic versus open colorectal surgery in the acute setting: the LaCeS feasibility trial protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harji, Deena; Marshall, Helen; Gordon, Katie; Crow, Hannah; Hiley, Victoria; Burke, Dermot; Griffiths, Ben; Moriarty, Catherine; Twiddy, Maureen; O'Dwyer, John L; Verjee, Azmina; Brown, Julia; Sagar, Peter

    2018-02-22

    Acute colorectal surgery forms a significant proportion of emergency admissions within the National Health Service. There is limited evidence to suggest minimally invasive surgery may be associated with improved clinical outcomes in this cohort of patients. Consequently, there is a need to assess the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of laparoscopic surgery in the acute colorectal setting. However,emergency colorectal surgical trials have previously been difficult to conduct due to issues surrounding recruitment and equipoise. The LaCeS (randomised controlled trial of Laparoscopic versus open Colorectal Surgery in the acute setting) feasibility trial will determine the feasibility of conducting a definitive, phase III trial of laparoscopic versus open acute colorectal resection. The LaCeS feasibility trial is a prospective, multicentre, single-blinded, parallel group, pragmatic randomised controlled feasibility trial. Patients will be randomised on a 1:1 basis to receive eitherlaparoscopic or open surgery. The trial aims to recruit at least 66 patients from five acute general surgical units across the UK. Patients over the age of 18 with a diagnosis of acute colorectal pathology requiring resection on clinical and radiological/endoscopic investigations, with a National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death classification of urgent will be considered eligible for participation. The primary outcome is recruitment. Secondary outcomes include assessing the safety profile of laparoscopic surgery using intraoperative and postoperative complication rates, conversion rates and patient-safety indicators as surrogate markers. Clinical and patient-reported outcomes will also be reported. The trial will contain an embedded qualitative study to assess clinician and patient acceptability of trial processes. The LaCeS feasibility trial is approved by the Yorkshire and The Humber, Bradford Leeds Research Ethics Committee (REC reference: 15/ YH/0542). The

  4. Kinetic energy classification and smoothing for compact B-spline basis sets in quantum Monte Carlo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogel, Jaron T.; Reboredo, Fernando A.

    2018-01-01

    Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of defect properties of transition metal oxides have become feasible in recent years due to increases in computing power. As the system size has grown, availability of on-node memory has become a limiting factor. Saving memory while minimizing computational cost is now a priority. The main growth in memory demand stems from the B-spline representation of the single particle orbitals, especially for heavier elements such as transition metals where semi-core states are present. Despite the associated memory costs, splines are computationally efficient. In this work, we explore alternatives to reduce the memory usage of splined orbitals without significantly affecting numerical fidelity or computational efficiency. We make use of the kinetic energy operator to both classify and smooth the occupied set of orbitals prior to splining. By using a partitioning scheme based on the per-orbital kinetic energy distributions, we show that memory savings of about 50% is possible for select transition metal oxide systems. For production supercells of practical interest, our scheme incurs a performance penalty of less than 5%.

  5. Optimization of auxiliary basis sets for the LEDO expansion and a projection technique for LEDO-DFT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götz, Andreas W; Kollmar, Christian; Hess, Bernd A

    2005-09-01

    We present a systematic procedure for the optimization of the expansion basis for the limited expansion of diatomic overlap density functional theory (LEDO-DFT) and report on optimized auxiliary orbitals for the Ahlrichs split valence plus polarization basis set (SVP) for the elements H, Li--F, and Na--Cl. A new method to deal with near-linear dependences in the LEDO expansion basis is introduced, which greatly reduces the computational effort of LEDO-DFT calculations. Numerical results for a test set of small molecules demonstrate the accuracy of electronic energies, structural parameters, dipole moments, and harmonic frequencies. For larger molecular systems the numerical errors introduced by the LEDO approximation can lead to an uncontrollable behavior of the self-consistent field (SCF) process. A projection technique suggested by Löwdin is presented in the framework of LEDO-DFT, which guarantees for SCF convergence. Numerical results on some critical test molecules suggest the general applicability of the auxiliary orbitals presented in combination with this projection technique. Timing results indicate that LEDO-DFT is competitive with conventional density fitting methods. (c) 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Setting up a randomized clinical trial in the UK: approvals and process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Louise Eleanor; Bearn, David R

    2013-06-01

    Randomized clinical trials are considered the 'gold standard' in primary research for healthcare interventions. However, they can be expensive and time-consuming to set up and require many approvals to be in place before they can begin. This paper outlines how to determine what approvals are required for a trial, the background of each approval and the process for obtaining them.

  7. Recommended patient-reported core set of symptoms to measure in adult cancer treatment trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reeve, B.B.; Mitchell, S.A.; Dueck, A.C.; Basch, E.; Cella, D.; Miller Reilly, C.; Minasian, L.M.; Denicoff, A.M.; O'Mara, A.M.; Fisch, M.J.; Chauhan, C.; Aaronson, N.K.; Coens, C.; Watkins Bruner, D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The National Cancer Institute’s Symptom Management and Health-Related Quality of Life Steering Committee held a clinical trials planning meeting (September 2011) to identify a core symptom set to be assessed across oncology trials for the purposes of better understanding treatment

  8. Push it to the limit: Characterizing the convergence of common sequences of basis sets for intermolecular interactions as described by density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witte, Jonathon [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Neaton, Jeffrey B. [Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Kavli Energy Nanosciences Institute at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Head-Gordon, Martin, E-mail: mhg@cchem.berkeley.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2016-05-21

    With the aim of systematically characterizing the convergence of common families of basis sets such that general recommendations for basis sets can be made, we have tested a wide variety of basis sets against complete-basis binding energies across the S22 set of intermolecular interactions—noncovalent interactions of small and medium-sized molecules consisting of first- and second-row atoms—with three distinct density functional approximations: SPW92, a form of local-density approximation; B3LYP, a global hybrid generalized gradient approximation; and B97M-V, a meta-generalized gradient approximation with nonlocal correlation. We have found that it is remarkably difficult to reach the basis set limit; for the methods and systems examined, the most complete basis is Jensen’s pc-4. The Dunning correlation-consistent sequence of basis sets converges slowly relative to the Jensen sequence. The Karlsruhe basis sets are quite cost effective, particularly when a correction for basis set superposition error is applied: counterpoise-corrected def2-SVPD binding energies are better than corresponding energies computed in comparably sized Dunning and Jensen bases, and on par with uncorrected results in basis sets 3-4 times larger. These trends are exhibited regardless of the level of density functional approximation employed. A sense of the magnitude of the intrinsic incompleteness error of each basis set not only provides a foundation for guiding basis set choice in future studies but also facilitates quantitative comparison of existing studies on similar types of systems.

  9. A quantum molecular similarity analysis of changes in molecular electron density caused by basis set flotation and electric field application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Sílvia; Duran, Miquel

    1997-08-01

    Quantum molecular similarity (QMS) techniques are used to assess the response of the electron density of various small molecules to application of a static, uniform electric field. Likewise, QMS is used to analyze the changes in electron density generated by the process of floating a basis set. The results obtained show an interrelation between the floating process, the optimum geometry, and the presence of an external field. Cases involving the Le Chatelier principle are discussed, and an insight on the changes of bond critical point properties, self-similarity values and density differences is performed.

  10. Structural basis for inhibition of the histone chaperone activity of SET/TAF-Iβ by cytochrome c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Arzola, Katiuska; Díaz-Moreno, Irene; Cano-González, Ana; Díaz-Quintana, Antonio; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Moreno-Beltrán, Blas; López-Rivas, Abelardo; De la Rosa, Miguel A

    2015-08-11

    Chromatin is pivotal for regulation of the DNA damage process insofar as it influences access to DNA and serves as a DNA repair docking site. Recent works identify histone chaperones as key regulators of damaged chromatin's transcriptional activity. However, understanding how chaperones are modulated during DNA damage response is still challenging. This study reveals that the histone chaperone SET/TAF-Iβ interacts with cytochrome c following DNA damage. Specifically, cytochrome c is shown to be translocated into cell nuclei upon induction of DNA damage, but not upon stimulation of the death receptor or stress-induced pathways. Cytochrome c was found to competitively hinder binding of SET/TAF-Iβ to core histones, thereby locking its histone-binding domains and inhibiting its nucleosome assembly activity. In addition, we have used NMR spectroscopy, calorimetry, mutagenesis, and molecular docking to provide an insight into the structural features of the formation of the complex between cytochrome c and SET/TAF-Iβ. Overall, these findings establish a framework for understanding the molecular basis of cytochrome c-mediated blocking of SET/TAF-Iβ, which subsequently may facilitate the development of new drugs to silence the oncogenic effect of SET/TAF-Iβ's histone chaperone activity.

  11. An expanded calibration study of the explicitly correlated CCSD(T)-F12b method using large basis set standard CCSD(T) atomization energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, David; Peterson, Kirk A

    2013-08-28

    The effectiveness of the recently developed, explicitly correlated coupled cluster method CCSD(T)-F12b is examined in terms of its ability to reproduce atomization energies derived from complete basis set extrapolations of standard CCSD(T). Most of the standard method findings were obtained with aug-cc-pV7Z or aug-cc-pV8Z basis sets. For a few homonuclear diatomic molecules it was possible to push the basis set to the aug-cc-pV9Z level. F12b calculations were performed with the cc-pVnZ-F12 (n = D, T, Q) basis set sequence and were also extrapolated to the basis set limit using a Schwenke-style, parameterized formula. A systematic bias was observed in the F12b method with the (VTZ-F12/VQZ-F12) basis set combination. This bias resulted in the underestimation of reference values associated with small molecules (valence correlation energies 0.5 E(h)) and an even larger overestimation of atomization energies for bigger systems. Consequently, caution should be exercised in the use of F12b for high accuracy studies. Root mean square and mean absolute deviation error metrics for this basis set combination were comparable to complete basis set values obtained with standard CCSD(T) and the aug-cc-pVDZ through aug-cc-pVQZ basis set sequence. However, the mean signed deviation was an order of magnitude larger. Problems partially due to basis set superposition error were identified with second row compounds which resulted in a weak performance for the smaller VDZ-F12/VTZ-F12 combination of basis sets.

  12. Symmetry Adapted Basis Sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avery, John Scales; Rettrup, Sten; Avery, James Emil

    automatically with computer techniques. The method has a wide range of applicability, and can be used to solve difficult eigenvalue problems in a number of fields. The book is of special interest to quantum theorists, computer scientists, computational chemists and applied mathematicians....

  13. Chemical bonding analysis for solid-state systems using intrinsic oriented quasiatomic minimal-basis-set orbitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Y.X.; Wang, C.Z.; Ho, K.M.

    2010-01-01

    A chemical bonding scheme is presented for the analysis of solid-state systems. The scheme is based on the intrinsic oriented quasiatomic minimal-basis-set orbitals (IO-QUAMBOs) previously developed by Ivanic and Ruedenberg for molecular systems. In the solid-state scheme, IO-QUAMBOs are generated by a unitary transformation of the quasiatomic orbitals located at each site of the system with the criteria of maximizing the sum of the fourth power of interatomic orbital bond order. Possible bonding and antibonding characters are indicated by the single particle matrix elements, and can be further examined by the projected density of states. We demonstrate the method by applications to graphene and (6,0) zigzag carbon nanotube. The oriented-orbital scheme automatically describes the system in terms of sp 2 hybridization. The effect of curvature on the electronic structure of the zigzag carbon nanotube is also manifested in the deformation of the intrinsic oriented orbitals as well as a breaking of symmetry leading to nonzero single particle density matrix elements. In an additional study, the analysis is performed on the Al 3 V compound. The main covalent bonding characters are identified in a straightforward way without resorting to the symmetry analysis. Our method provides a general way for chemical bonding analysis of ab initio electronic structure calculations with any type of basis sets.

  14. Need for reaction coordinates to ensure a complete basis set in an adiabatic representation of ion-atom collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabli, Djamal; McCarroll, Ronald

    2018-02-01

    This review surveys the different theoretical approaches, used to describe inelastic and rearrangement processes in collisions involving atoms and ions. For a range of energies from a few meV up to about 1 keV, the adiabatic representation is expected to be valid and under these conditions, inelastic and rearrangement processes take place via a network of avoided crossings of the potential energy curves of the collision system. In general, such avoided crossings are finite in number. The non-adiabatic coupling, due to the breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer separation of the electronic and nuclear variables, depends on the ratio of the electron mass to the nuclear mass terms in the total Hamiltonian. By limiting terms in the total Hamiltonian correct to first order in the electron to nuclear mass ratio, a system of reaction coordinates is found which allows for a correct description of both inelastic channels. The connection between the use of reaction coordinates in the quantum description and the electron translation factors of the impact parameter approach is established. A major result is that only when reaction coordinates are used, is it possible to introduce the notion of a minimal basis set. Such a set must include all avoided crossings including both radial coupling and long range Coriolis coupling. But, only when reactive coordinates are used, can such a basis set be considered as complete. In particular when the centre of nuclear mass is used as centre of coordinates, rather than the correct reaction coordinates, it is shown that erroneous results are obtained. A few results to illustrate this important point are presented: one concerning a simple two-state Landau-Zener type avoided crossing, the other concerning a network of multiple crossings in a typical electron capture process involving a highly charged ion with a neutral atom.

  15. Analysing malaria drug trials on a per-individual or per-clone basis: a comparison of methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaki, Thomas; Parry, Alice; Winter, Katherine; Hastings, Ian

    2013-07-30

    There are a variety of methods used to estimate the effectiveness of antimalarial drugs in clinical trials, invariably on a per-person basis. A person, however, may have more than one malaria infection present at the time of treatment. We evaluate currently used methods for analysing malaria trials on a per-individual basis and introduce a novel method to estimate the cure rate on a per-infection (clone) basis. We used simulated and real data to highlight the differences of the various methods. We give special attention to classifying outcomes as cured, recrudescent (infections that never fully cleared) or ambiguous on the basis of genetic markers at three loci. To estimate cure rates on a per-clone basis, we used the genetic information within an individual before treatment to determine the number of clones present. We used the genetic information obtained at the time of treatment failure to classify clones as recrudescence or new infections. On the per-individual level, we find that the most accurate methods of classification label an individual as newly infected if all alleles are different at the beginning and at the time of failure and as a recrudescence if all or some alleles were the same. The most appropriate analysis method is survival analysis or alternatively for complete data/per-protocol analysis a proportion estimate that treats new infections as successes. We show that the analysis of drug effectiveness on a per-clone basis estimates the cure rate accurately and allows more detailed evaluation of the performance of the treatment. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Simulations of smog-chamber experiments using the two-dimensional volatility basis set: linear oxygenated precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacon-Madrid, Heber J; Murphy, Benjamin N; Pandis, Spyros N; Donahue, Neil M

    2012-10-16

    We use a two-dimensional volatility basis set (2D-VBS) box model to simulate secondary organic aerosol (SOA) mass yields of linear oxygenated molecules: n-tridecanal, 2- and 7-tridecanone, 2- and 7-tridecanol, and n-pentadecane. A hybrid model with explicit, a priori treatment of the first-generation products for each precursor molecule, followed by a generic 2D-VBS mechanism for later-generation chemistry, results in excellent model-measurement agreement. This strongly confirms that the 2D-VBS mechanism is a predictive tool for SOA modeling but also suggests that certain important first-generation products for major primary SOA precursors should be treated explicitly for optimal SOA predictions.

  17. New STO(II-3Gmag family basis sets for the calculations of the molecules magnetic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Kapusta

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available An efficient approach for construction of physically justified STO(II-3Gmag family basis sets for calculation of molecules magnetic properties has been proposed. The procedure of construction based upon the taken into account the second order of perturbation theory in the magnetic field case. Analytical form of correction functions has been obtained using the closed representation of the Green functions by the solution of nonhomogeneous Schrödinger equation for the model problem of "one-electron atom in the external uniform magnetic field". Their performance has been evaluated for the DFT level calculations carried out with a number of functionals. The test calculations of magnetic susceptibility and 1H nuclear magnetic shielding tensors demonstrated a good agreement of the calculated values with the experimental data.

  18. Density functional theory calculations of the lowest energy quintet and triplet states of model hemes: role of functional, basis set, and zero-point energy corrections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khvostichenko, Daria; Choi, Andrew; Boulatov, Roman

    2008-04-24

    We investigated the effect of several computational variables, including the choice of the basis set, application of symmetry constraints, and zero-point energy (ZPE) corrections, on the structural parameters and predicted ground electronic state of model 5-coordinate hemes (iron(II) porphines axially coordinated by a single imidazole or 2-methylimidazole). We studied the performance of B3LYP and B3PW91 with eight Pople-style basis sets (up to 6-311+G*) and B97-1, OLYP, and TPSS functionals with 6-31G and 6-31G* basis sets. Only hybrid functionals B3LYP, B3PW91, and B97-1 reproduced the quintet ground state of the model hemes. With a given functional, the choice of the basis set caused up to 2.7 kcal/mol variation of the quintet-triplet electronic energy gap (DeltaEel), in several cases, resulting in the inversion of the sign of DeltaEel. Single-point energy calculations with triple-zeta basis sets of the Pople (up to 6-311G++(2d,2p)), Ahlrichs (TZVP and TZVPP), and Dunning (cc-pVTZ) families showed the same trend. The zero-point energy of the quintet state was approximately 1 kcal/mol lower than that of the triplet, and accounting for ZPE corrections was crucial for establishing the ground state if the electronic energy of the triplet state was approximately 1 kcal/mol less than that of the quintet. Within a given model chemistry, effects of symmetry constraints and of a "tense" structure of the iron porphine fragment coordinated to 2-methylimidazole on DeltaEel were limited to 0.3 kcal/mol. For both model hemes the best agreement with crystallographic structural data was achieved with small 6-31G and 6-31G* basis sets. Deviation of the computed frequency of the Fe-Im stretching mode from the experimental value with the basis set decreased in the order: nonaugmented basis sets, basis sets with polarization functions, and basis sets with polarization and diffuse functions. Contraction of Pople-style basis sets (double-zeta or triple-zeta) affected the results

  19. The challenges and opportunities of conducting a clinical trial in a low resource setting: The case of the Cameroon mobile phone SMS (CAMPS trial, an investigator initiated trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ongolo-Zogo Pierre

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Conducting clinical trials in developing countries often presents significant ethical, organisational, cultural and infrastructural challenges to researchers, pharmaceutical companies, sponsors and regulatory bodies. Globally, these regions are under-represented in research, yet this population stands to gain more from research in these settings as the burdens on health are greater than those in developed resourceful countries. However, developing countries also offer an attractive setting for clinical trials because they often have larger treatment naive populations with higher incidence rates of disease and more advanced stages. These factors can present a reduction in costs and time required to recruit patients. So, balance needs to be found where research can be encouraged and supported in order to bring maximum public health benefits to these communities. The difficulties with such trials arise from problems with obtaining valid informed consent, ethical compensation mechanisms for extremely poor populations, poor health infrastructure and considerable socio-economic and cultural divides. Ethical concerns with trials in developing countries have received attention, even though many other non-ethical issues may arise. Local investigator initiated trials also face a variety of difficulties that have not been adequately reported in literature. This paper uses the example of the Cameroon Mobile Phone SMS trial to describe in detail, the specific difficulties encountered in an investigator-initiated trial in a developing country. It highlights administrative, ethical, financial and staff related issues, proposes solutions and gives a list of additional documentation to ease the organisational process.

  20. The challenges and opportunities of conducting a clinical trial in a low resource setting: the case of the Cameroon mobile phone SMS (CAMPS) trial, an investigator initiated trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbuagbaw, Lawrence; Thabane, Lehana; Ongolo-Zogo, Pierre; Lang, Trudie

    2011-06-09

    Conducting clinical trials in developing countries often presents significant ethical, organisational, cultural and infrastructural challenges to researchers, pharmaceutical companies, sponsors and regulatory bodies. Globally, these regions are under-represented in research, yet this population stands to gain more from research in these settings as the burdens on health are greater than those in developed resourceful countries. However, developing countries also offer an attractive setting for clinical trials because they often have larger treatment naive populations with higher incidence rates of disease and more advanced stages. These factors can present a reduction in costs and time required to recruit patients. So, balance needs to be found where research can be encouraged and supported in order to bring maximum public health benefits to these communities. The difficulties with such trials arise from problems with obtaining valid informed consent, ethical compensation mechanisms for extremely poor populations, poor health infrastructure and considerable socio-economic and cultural divides. Ethical concerns with trials in developing countries have received attention, even though many other non-ethical issues may arise. Local investigator initiated trials also face a variety of difficulties that have not been adequately reported in literature. This paper uses the example of the Cameroon Mobile Phone SMS trial to describe in detail, the specific difficulties encountered in an investigator-initiated trial in a developing country. It highlights administrative, ethical, financial and staff related issues, proposes solutions and gives a list of additional documentation to ease the organisational process.

  1. Successional position of dry Andean dwarf forest species as a basis for restoration trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenendijk, J.P.; Duivenvoorden, J.F.; Cleef, A.M.; Rietman, N.

    2005-01-01

    The successional affinity of nine woody species was inferred from the structure, diversity and disturbance history of the vegetation where these occurred. This was done in order to obtain a basis for a restoration experiment, currently in execution, in the dry Andean dwarf forest zone on the edge of

  2. International patient and physician consensus on a psoriatic arthritis core outcome set for clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orbai, Ana-Maria; de Wit, Maarten; Mease, Philip

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify a core set of domains (outcomes) to be measured in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) clinical trials that represent both patients' and physicians' priorities. METHODS: We conducted (1) a systematic literature review (SLR) of domains assessed in PsA; (2) international focus groups t...

  3. Design of cognitive engine for cognitive radio based on the rough sets and radial basis function neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanchao; Jiang, Hong; Liu, Congbin; Lan, Zhongli

    2013-03-01

    Cognitive radio (CR) is an intelligent wireless communication system which can dynamically adjust the parameters to improve system performance depending on the environmental change and quality of service. The core technology for CR is the design of cognitive engine, which introduces reasoning and learning methods in the field of artificial intelligence, to achieve the perception, adaptation and learning capability. Considering the dynamical wireless environment and demands, this paper proposes a design of cognitive engine based on the rough sets (RS) and radial basis function neural network (RBF_NN). The method uses experienced knowledge and environment information processed by RS module to train the RBF_NN, and then the learning model is used to reconfigure communication parameters to allocate resources rationally and improve system performance. After training learning model, the performance is evaluated according to two benchmark functions. The simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the model and the proposed cognitive engine can effectively achieve the goal of learning and reconfiguration in cognitive radio.

  4. Geometric Energy Derivatives at the Complete Basis Set Limit: Application to the Equilibrium Structure and Molecular Force Field of Formaldehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, W James; Matthews, Devin A; Ringholm, Magnus; Agarwal, Jay; Gong, Justin Z; Ruud, Kenneth; Allen, Wesley D; Stanton, John F; Schaefer, Henry F

    2018-03-13

    Geometric energy derivatives which rely on core-corrected focal-point energies extrapolated to the complete basis set (CBS) limit of coupled cluster theory with iterative and noniterative quadruple excitations, CCSDTQ and CCSDT(Q), are used as elements of molecular gradients and, in the case of CCSDT(Q), expansion coefficients of an anharmonic force field. These gradients are used to determine the CCSDTQ/CBS and CCSDT(Q)/CBS equilibrium structure of the S 0 ground state of H 2 CO where excellent agreement is observed with previous work and experimentally derived results. A fourth-order expansion about this CCSDT(Q)/CBS reference geometry using the same level of theory produces an exceptional level of agreement to spectroscopically observed vibrational band origins with a MAE of 0.57 cm -1 . Second-order vibrational perturbation theory (VPT2) and variational discrete variable representation (DVR) results are contrasted and discussed. Vibration-rotation, anharmonicity, and centrifugal distortion constants from the VPT2 analysis are reported and compared to previous work. Additionally, an initial application of a sum-over-states fourth-order vibrational perturbation theory (VPT4) formalism is employed herein, utilizing quintic and sextic derivatives obtained with a recursive algorithmic approach for response theory.

  5. Basis and Statistical Design of the Passive HIV-1 Antibody Mediated Prevention (AMP) Test-of-Concept Efficacy Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Peter B; Juraska, Michal; deCamp, Allan C; Karuna, Shelly; Edupuganti, Srilatha; Mgodi, Nyaradzo; Donnell, Deborah J; Bentley, Carter; Sista, Nirupama; Andrew, Philip; Isaacs, Abby; Huang, Yunda; Zhang, Lily; Capparelli, Edmund; Kochar, Nidhi; Wang, Jing; Eshleman, Susan H; Mayer, Kenneth H; Magaret, Craig A; Hural, John; Kublin, James G; Gray, Glenda; Montefiori, David C; Gomez, Margarita M; Burns, David N; McElrath, Julie; Ledgerwood, Julie; Graham, Barney S; Mascola, John R; Cohen, Myron; Corey, Lawrence

    2017-01-01

    Anti-HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) have been developed as potential agents for prevention of HIV-1 infection. The HIV Vaccine Trials Network and the HIV Prevention Trials Network are conducting the Antibody Mediated Prevention (AMP) trials to assess whether, and how, intravenous infusion of the anti-CD4 binding site bnAb, VRC01, prevents HIV-1 infection. These are the first test-of-concept studies to assess HIV-1 bnAb prevention efficacy in humans. The AMP trials are two parallel phase 2b HIV-1 prevention efficacy trials conducted in two cohorts: 2700 HIV-uninfected men and transgender persons who have sex with men in the United States, Peru, Brazil, and Switzerland; and 1500 HIV-uninfected sexually active women in seven countries in sub-Saharan Africa. Participants are randomized 1:1:1 to receive an intravenous infusion of 10 mg/kg VRC01, 30 mg/kg VRC01, or a control preparation every 8 weeks for a total of 10 infusions. Each trial is designed (1) to assess overall prevention efficacy (PE) pooled over the two VRC01 dose groups vs. control and (2) to assess VRC01 dose and laboratory markers as correlates of protection (CoPs) against overall and genotype- and phenotype-specific infection. Each AMP trial is designed to have 90% power to detect PE > 0% if PE is ≥ 60%. The AMP trials are also designed to identify VRC01 properties (i.e., concentration and effector functions) that correlate with protection and to provide insight into mechanistic CoPs. CoPs are assessed using data from breakthrough HIV-1 infections, including genetic sequences and sensitivities to VRC01-mediated neutralization and Fc effector functions. The AMP trials test whether VRC01 can prevent HIV-1 infection in two study populations. If affirmative, they will provide information for estimating the optimal dosage of VRC01 (or subsequent derivatives) and identify threshold levels of neutralization and Fc effector functions associated with high-level protection, setting a benchmark

  6. Whose data set is it anyway? Sharing raw data from randomized trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vickers Andrew J

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sharing of raw research data is common in many areas of medical research, genomics being perhaps the most well-known example. In the clinical trial community investigators routinely refuse to share raw data from a randomized trial without giving a reason. Discussion Data sharing benefits numerous research-related activities: reproducing analyses; testing secondary hypotheses; developing and evaluating novel statistical methods; teaching; aiding design of future trials; meta-analysis; and, possibly, preventing error, fraud and selective reporting. Clinical trialists, however, sometimes appear overly concerned with being scooped and with misrepresentation of their work. Both possibilities can be avoided with simple measures such as inclusion of the original trialists as co-authors on any publication resulting from data sharing. Moreover, if we treat any data set as belonging to the patients who comprise it, rather than the investigators, such concerns fall away. Conclusion Technological developments, particularly the Internet, have made data sharing generally a trivial logistical problem. Data sharing should come to be seen as an inherent part of conducting a randomized trial, similar to the way in which we consider ethical review and publication of study results. Journals and funding bodies should insist that trialists make raw data available, for example, by publishing data on the Web. If the clinical trial community continues to fail with respect to data sharing, we will only strengthen the public perception that we do clinical trials to benefit ourselves, not our patients.

  7. Whose data set is it anyway? Sharing raw data from randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Andrew J

    2006-05-16

    Sharing of raw research data is common in many areas of medical research, genomics being perhaps the most well-known example. In the clinical trial community investigators routinely refuse to share raw data from a randomized trial without giving a reason. Data sharing benefits numerous research-related activities: reproducing analyses; testing secondary hypotheses; developing and evaluating novel statistical methods; teaching; aiding design of future trials; meta-analysis; and, possibly, preventing error, fraud and selective reporting. Clinical trialists, however, sometimes appear overly concerned with being scooped and with misrepresentation of their work. Both possibilities can be avoided with simple measures such as inclusion of the original trialists as co-authors on any publication resulting from data sharing. Moreover, if we treat any data set as belonging to the patients who comprise it, rather than the investigators, such concerns fall away. Technological developments, particularly the Internet, have made data sharing generally a trivial logistical problem. Data sharing should come to be seen as an inherent part of conducting a randomized trial, similar to the way in which we consider ethical review and publication of study results. Journals and funding bodies should insist that trialists make raw data available, for example, by publishing data on the Web. If the clinical trial community continues to fail with respect to data sharing, we will only strengthen the public perception that we do clinical trials to benefit ourselves, not our patients.

  8. Consistent gaussian basis sets of double- and triple-zeta valence with polarization quality of the fifth period for solid-state calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laun, Joachim; Vilela Oliveira, Daniel; Bredow, Thomas

    2018-02-22

    Consistent basis sets of double- and triple-zeta valence with polarization quality for the fifth period have been derived for periodic quantum-chemical solid-state calculations with the crystalline-orbital program CRYSTAL. They are an extension of the pob-TZVP basis sets, and are based on the full-relativistic effective core potentials (ECPs) of the Stuttgart/Cologne group and on the def2-SVP and def2-TZVP valence basis of the Ahlrichs group. We optimized orbital exponents and contraction coefficients to supply robust and stable self-consistent field (SCF) convergence for a wide range of different compounds. The computed crystal structures are compared to those obtained with standard basis sets available from the CRYSTAL basis set database. For the applied hybrid density functional PW1PW, the average deviations of calculated lattice constants from experimental references are smaller with pob-DZVP and pob-TZVP than with standard basis sets. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Adaptive local basis set for Kohn–Sham density functional theory in a discontinuous Galerkin framework II: Force, vibration, and molecular dynamics calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Gaigong [Computational Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Lin, Lin, E-mail: linlin@math.berkeley.edu [Department of Mathematics, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Computational Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Hu, Wei, E-mail: whu@lbl.gov [Computational Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Yang, Chao, E-mail: cyang@lbl.gov [Computational Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Pask, John E., E-mail: pask1@llnl.gov [Physics Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Recently, we have proposed the adaptive local basis set for electronic structure calculations based on Kohn–Sham density functional theory in a pseudopotential framework. The adaptive local basis set is efficient and systematically improvable for total energy calculations. In this paper, we present the calculation of atomic forces, which can be used for a range of applications such as geometry optimization and molecular dynamics simulation. We demonstrate that, under mild assumptions, the computation of atomic forces can scale nearly linearly with the number of atoms in the system using the adaptive local basis set. We quantify the accuracy of the Hellmann–Feynman forces for a range of physical systems, benchmarked against converged planewave calculations, and find that the adaptive local basis set is efficient for both force and energy calculations, requiring at most a few tens of basis functions per atom to attain accuracies required in practice. Since the adaptive local basis set has implicit dependence on atomic positions, Pulay forces are in general nonzero. However, we find that the Pulay force is numerically small and systematically decreasing with increasing basis completeness, so that the Hellmann–Feynman force is sufficient for basis sizes of a few tens of basis functions per atom. We verify the accuracy of the computed forces in static calculations of quasi-1D and 3D disordered Si systems, vibration calculation of a quasi-1D Si system, and molecular dynamics calculations of H{sub 2} and liquid Al–Si alloy systems, where we show systematic convergence to benchmark planewave results and results from the literature.

  10. Estimation of isotropic nuclear magnetic shieldings in the CCSD(T) and MP2 complete basis set limit using affordable correlation calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kupka, Teobald; Stachów, Michal; Kaminsky, Jakub

    2013-01-01

    , estimated from calculations with the family of polarizationconsistent pcS-n basis sets is reported. This dependence was also supported by inspection of profiles of deviation between CBS estimated nuclear shieldings and obtained with significantly smaller basis sets pcS-2 and aug-cc-pVTZ-J for the selected......A linear correlation between isotropic nuclear magnetic shielding constants for seven model molecules (CH2O, H2O, HF, F2, HCN, SiH4 and H2S) calculated with 37 methods (34 density functionals, RHF, MP2 and CCSD(T) ), with affordable pcS-2 basis set and corresponding complete basis set results...... set of 37 calculation methods. It was possible to formulate a practical approach of estimating the values of isotropic nuclear magnetic shielding constants at the CCSD(T)/CBS and MP2/CBS levels from affordable CCSD(T)/pcS-2, MP2/pcS-2 and DFT/CBS calculations with pcS-n basis sets. The proposed method...

  11. On what basis are medical cost-effectiveness thresholds set? Clashing opinions and an absence of data: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, David; Ubels, Jasper; Norström, Fredrik

    2018-01-01

    The amount a government should be willing to invest in adopting new medical treatments has long been under debate. With many countries using formal cost-effectiveness (C/E) thresholds when examining potential new treatments and ever-growing medical costs, accurately setting the level of a C/E threshold can be essential for an efficient healthcare system. The aim of this systematic review is to describe the prominent approaches to setting a C/E threshold, compile available national-level C/E threshold data and willingness-to-pay (WTP) data, and to discern whether associations exist between these values, gross domestic product (GDP) and health-adjusted life expectancy (HALE). This review further examines current obstacles faced with the presently available data. A systematic review was performed to collect articles which have studied national C/E thresholds and willingness-to-pay (WTP) per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) in the general population. Associations between GDP, HALE, WTP, and C/E thresholds were analyzed with correlations. Seventeen countries were identified from nine unique sources to have formal C/E thresholds within our inclusion criteria. Thirteen countries from nine sources were identified to have WTP per QALY data within our inclusion criteria. Two possible associations were identified: C/E thresholds with HALE (quadratic correlation of 0.63), and C/E thresholds with GDP per capita (polynomial correlation of 0.84). However, these results are based on few observations and therefore firm conclusions cannot be made. Most national C/E thresholds identified in our review fall within the WHO's recommended range of one-to-three times GDP per capita. However, the quality and quantity of data available regarding national average WTP per QALY, opportunity costs, and C/E thresholds is poor in comparison to the importance of adequate investment in healthcare. There exists an obvious risk that countries might either over- or underinvest in healthcare if they

  12. Performance assessment of density functional methods with Gaussian and Slater basis sets using 7σ orbital momentum distributions of N2O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Pang, Wenning; Duffy, Patrick

    2012-12-01

    Performance of a number of commonly used density functional methods in chemistry (B3LYP, Bhandh, BP86, PW91, VWN, LB94, PBe0, SAOP and X3LYP and the Hartree-Fock (HF) method) has been assessed using orbital momentum distributions of the 7σ orbital of nitrous oxide (NNO), which models electron behaviour in a chemically significant region. The density functional methods are combined with a number of Gaussian basis sets (Pople's 6-31G*, 6-311G**, DGauss TZVP and Dunning's aug-cc-pVTZ as well as even-tempered Slater basis sets, namely, et-DZPp, et-QZ3P, et-QZ+5P and et-pVQZ). Orbital momentum distributions of the 7σ orbital in the ground electronic state of NNO, which are obtained from a Fourier transform into momentum space from single point electronic calculations employing the above models, are compared with experimental measurement of the same orbital from electron momentum spectroscopy (EMS). The present study reveals information on performance of (a) the density functional methods, (b) Gaussian and Slater basis sets, (c) combinations of the density functional methods and basis sets, that is, the models, (d) orbital momentum distributions, rather than a group of specific molecular properties and (e) the entire region of chemical significance of the orbital. It is found that discrepancies of this orbital between the measured and the calculated occur in the small momentum region (i.e. large r region). In general, Slater basis sets achieve better overall performance than the Gaussian basis sets. Performance of the Gaussian basis sets varies noticeably when combining with different Vxc functionals, but Dunning's augcc-pVTZ basis set achieves the best performance for the momentum distributions of this orbital. The overall performance of the B3LYP and BP86 models is similar to newer models such as X3LYP and SAOP. The present study also demonstrates that the combinations of the density functional methods and the basis sets indeed make a difference in the quality of the

  13. Global health trials methodological research agenda:results from a priority setting exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Blazeby, Jane; Nasser, Mona; Soares-Weiser, Karla; Sydes, Matthew R.; Zhang, Junhua; Williamson, Paula R

    2018-01-01

    BackgroundMethodological research into the design, conduct, analysis and reporting of trials is essential to optimise the process. UK specialists in the field have established a set of top priorities in aid of this research. These priorities however may not be reflected in the needs of similar research in low to middle income countries (LMICs) with different healthcare provision, resources and research infrastructure. The aim of the study was to identify the top priorities for methodological ...

  14. Adaptive local basis set for Kohn–Sham density functional theory in a discontinuous Galerkin framework I: Total energy calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Lin; Lu Jianfeng; Ying Lexing; Weinan, E

    2012-01-01

    Kohn–Sham density functional theory is one of the most widely used electronic structure theories. In the pseudopotential framework, uniform discretization of the Kohn–Sham Hamiltonian generally results in a large number of basis functions per atom in order to resolve the rapid oscillations of the Kohn–Sham orbitals around the nuclei. Previous attempts to reduce the number of basis functions per atom include the usage of atomic orbitals and similar objects, but the atomic orbitals generally require fine tuning in order to reach high accuracy. We present a novel discretization scheme that adaptively and systematically builds the rapid oscillations of the Kohn–Sham orbitals around the nuclei as well as environmental effects into the basis functions. The resulting basis functions are localized in the real space, and are discontinuous in the global domain. The continuous Kohn–Sham orbitals and the electron density are evaluated from the discontinuous basis functions using the discontinuous Galerkin (DG) framework. Our method is implemented in parallel and the current implementation is able to handle systems with at least thousands of atoms. Numerical examples indicate that our method can reach very high accuracy (less than 1 meV) with a very small number (4–40) of basis functions per atom.

  15. Ab initio calculation of reaction energies. III. Basis set dependence of relative energies on the FH2 and H2CO potential energy surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frisch, M.J.; Binkley, J.S.; Schaefer, H.F. III

    1984-01-01

    The relative energies of the stationary points on the FH 2 and H 2 CO nuclear potential energy surfaces relevant to the hydrogen atom abstraction, H 2 elimination and 1,2-hydrogen shift reactions have been examined using fourth-order Moller--Plesset perturbation theory and a variety of basis sets. The theoretical absolute zero activation energy for the F+H 2 →FH+H reaction is in better agreement with experiment than previous theoretical studies, and part of the disagreement between earlier theoretical calculations and experiment is found to result from the use of assumed rather than calculated zero-point vibrational energies. The fourth-order reaction energy for the elimination of hydrogen from formaldehyde is within 2 kcal mol -1 of the experimental value using the largest basis set considered. The qualitative features of the H 2 CO surface are unchanged by expansion of the basis set beyond the polarized triple-zeta level, but diffuse functions and several sets of polarization functions are found to be necessary for quantitative accuracy in predicted reaction and activation energies. Basis sets and levels of perturbation theory which represent good compromises between computational efficiency and accuracy are recommended

  16. On assessing surrogacy in a single trial setting using a semi-competing risks paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Debashis

    2009-01-01

    Summary There has been a recent emphasis on the identification of biomarkers and other biologic measures that may be potentially used as surrogate endpoints in clinical trials. We focus on the setting of data from a single clinical trial. In this paper, we consider a framework in which the surrogate must occur before the true endpoint. This suggests viewing the surrogate and true endpoints as semi-competing risks data; this approach is new to the literature on surrogate endpoints and leads to an asymmetrical treatment of the surrogate and true endpoints. However, such a data structure also conceptually complicates many of the previously considered measures of surrogacy in the literature. We propose novel estimation and inferential procedures for the relative effect and adjusted association quantities proposed by Buyse and Molenberghs (1998, Biometrics, 1014 – 1029). The proposed methodology is illustrated with application to simulated data, as well as to data from a leukemia study. PMID:18759839

  17. Developing an OMERACT Core Outcome Set for Assessing Safety Components in Rheumatology Trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klokker, Louise; Tugwell, Peter; Furst, Daniel E

    2016-01-01

    in such COS. The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Filter 2.0 emphasizes the importance of measuring harms. The Safety Working Group was reestablished at the OMERACT 2016 with the objective to develop a COS for assessing safety components in trials across rheumatologic conditions. METHODS: The safety......OBJECTIVE: Failure to report harmful outcomes in clinical research can introduce bias favoring a potentially harmful intervention. While core outcome sets (COS) are available for benefits in randomized controlled trials in many rheumatic conditions, less attention has been paid to safety...... that patients consider relevant so that they will be able to make informed decisions. CONCLUSION: The OMERACT Safety Working Group will advance the work previously done within OMERACT using a new patient-driven approach....

  18. Vibrational frequency scaling factors for correlation consistent basis sets and the methods CC2 and MP2 and their spin-scaled SCS and SOS variants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friese, Daniel H., E-mail: daniel.h.friese@uit.no [Centre for Theoretical and Computational Chemistry CTCC, Department of Chemistry, University of Tromsø, N-9037 Tromsø (Norway); Törk, Lisa; Hättig, Christof, E-mail: christof.haettig@rub.de [Lehrstuhl für Theoretische Chemie, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44801 Bochum (Germany)

    2014-11-21

    We present scaling factors for vibrational frequencies calculated within the harmonic approximation and the correlated wave-function methods coupled cluster singles and doubles model (CC2) and Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) with and without a spin-component scaling (SCS or spin-opposite scaling (SOS)). Frequency scaling factors and the remaining deviations from the reference data are evaluated for several non-augmented basis sets of the cc-pVXZ family of generally contracted correlation-consistent basis sets as well as for the segmented contracted TZVPP basis. We find that the SCS and SOS variants of CC2 and MP2 lead to a slightly better accuracy for the scaled vibrational frequencies. The determined frequency scaling factors can also be used for vibrational frequencies calculated for excited states through response theory with CC2 and the algebraic diagrammatic construction through second order and their spin-component scaled variants.

  19. The trials methodological research agenda: results from a priority setting exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Research into the methods used in the design, conduct, analysis, and reporting of clinical trials is essential to ensure that effective methods are available and that clinical decisions made using results from trials are based on the best available evidence, which is reliable and robust. Methods An on-line Delphi survey of 48 UK Clinical Research Collaboration registered Clinical Trials Units (CTUs) was undertaken. During round one, CTU Directors were asked to identify important topics that require methodological research. During round two, their opinion about the level of importance of each topic was recorded, and during round three, they were asked to review the group’s average opinion and revise their previous opinion if appropriate. Direct reminders were sent to maximise the number of responses at each round. Results are summarised using descriptive methods. Results Forty one (85%) CTU Directors responded to at least one round of the Delphi process: 25 (52%) responded in round one, 32 (67%) responded in round two, 24 (50%) responded in round three. There were only 12 (25%) who responded to all three rounds and 18 (38%) who responded to both rounds two and three. Consensus was achieved amongst CTU Directors that the top three priorities for trials methodological research were ‘Research into methods to boost recruitment in trials’ (considered the highest priority), ‘Methods to minimise attrition’ and ‘Choosing appropriate outcomes to measure’. Fifty other topics were included in the list of priorities and consensus was reached that two topics, ‘Radiotherapy study designs’ and ‘Low carbon trials’, were not priorities. Conclusions This priority setting exercise has identified the research topics felt to be most important to the key stakeholder group of Directors of UKCRC registered CTUs. The use of robust methodology to identify these priorities will help ensure that this work informs the trials methodological research agenda, with

  20. Implications for paediatric shock management in resource-limited settings: a perspective from the FEAST trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Kirsty Anne; George, Elizabeth C; Maitland, Kathryn

    2018-05-04

    Although the African "Fluid Expansion as Supportive therapy" (FEAST) trial showed fluid resuscitation was harmful in children with severe febrile illness managed in resource-limited hospitals, the most recent evidence reviewed World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines continue to recommend fluid boluses in children with shock according to WHO criteria "WHO shock", arguing that the numbers included in the FEAST trial were too small to provide reasonable certainty. We re-analysed the FEAST trial results for all international definitions for paediatric shock including hypotensive (or decompensated shock) and the WHO criteria. In addition, we examined the clinical relevance of the WHO criteria to published and unpublished observational studies reporting shock in resource-limited settings. We established that hypotension was rare in children with severe febrile illness complicating only 29/3170 trial participants (0.9%). We confirmed that fluid boluses were harmful irrespective of the definitions of shock including the very small number with WHO shock (n = 65). In this subgroup 48% of bolus recipients died at 48 h compared to 20% of the non-bolus control group, an increased absolute risk of 28%, but translating to an increased relative risk of 240% (p = 0.07 (two-sided Fisher's exact test)). Examining studies describing the prevalence of the stringent WHO shock criteria in children presenting to hospital we found this was rare (~ 0.1%) and in these children mortality was very high (41.5-100%). The updated WHO guidelines continue to recommend boluses for a very limited number of children presenting at hospital with the strict definition of WHO shock. Nevertheless, the 3% increased mortality from boluses seen across FEAST trial participants would also include this subgroup of children receiving boluses. Recommendations aiming to differentiate WHO shock from other definitions will invariably lead to "slippage" at the bedside, with the potential of exposing a wider group

  1. Will the changes proposed to the conceptual framework’s definitions and recognition criteria provide a better basis for the IASB standard setting?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, A.; Hoogendoorn, M.; Naarding, E.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we evaluate the International Accounting Standards Board’s (IASB) efforts, in a discussion paper (DP) of 2013, to develop a new conceptual framework (CF) in the light of its stated ambition to establish a robust and consistent basis for future standard setting, thereby guiding standard

  2. On the Convergence of the ccJ-pVXZ and pcJ-n Basis Sets in CCSD Calculations of Nuclear Spin-Spin Coupling Constants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Rasmus; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2018-01-01

    The basis set convergence of nuclear spin-spin coupling constants (SSCC) calculated at the coupled cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) level has been investigated for ten difficult molecules. Eight of the molecules contain fluorine atoms and nine contain double or triple bonds. Results obtained...

  3. Simulating Metabolite Basis Sets for in vivo MRS Quantification; Incorporating details of the PRESS Pulse Sequence by means of the GAMMA C++ library

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Veen, J.W.; Van Ormondt, D.; De Beer, R.

    2012-01-01

    In this work we report on generating/using simulated metabolite basis sets for the quantification of in vivo MRS signals, assuming that they have been acquired by using the PRESS pulse sequence. To that end we have employed the classes and functions of the GAMMA C++ library. By using several

  4. Involving patients in setting priorities for healthcare improvement: a cluster randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, Antoine; Lehoux, Pascale; Lacombe, Réal; Burgers, Jako; Grol, Richard

    2014-02-20

    Patients are increasingly seen as active partners in healthcare. While patient involvement in individual clinical decisions has been extensively studied, no trial has assessed how patients can effectively be involved in collective healthcare decisions affecting the population. The goal of this study was to test the impact of involving patients in setting healthcare improvement priorities for chronic care at the community level. Cluster randomized controlled trial. Local communities were randomized in intervention (priority setting with patient involvement) and control sites (no patient involvement). Communities in a canadian region were required to set priorities for improving chronic disease management in primary care, from a list of 37 validated quality indicators. Patients were consulted in writing, before participating in face-to-face deliberation with professionals. Professionals established priorities among themselves, without patient involvement. A total of 172 individuals from six communities participated in the study, including 83 chronic disease patients, and 89 health professionals. The primary outcome was the level of agreement between patients' and professionals' priorities. Secondary outcomes included professionals' intention to use the selected quality indicators, and the costs of patient involvement. Priorities established with patients were more aligned with core generic components of the Medical Home and Chronic Care Model, including: access to primary care, self-care support, patient participation in clinical decisions, and partnership with community organizations (p Priorities established by professionals alone placed more emphasis on the technical quality of single disease management. The involvement intervention fostered mutual influence between patients and professionals, which resulted in a 41% increase in agreement on common priorities (95%CI: +12% to +58%, p priorities. Patient involvement can change priorities driving healthcare

  5. Development of a core outcome set for clinical trials in facial aging: study protocol for a systematic review of the literature and identification of a core outcome set using a Delphi survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlessinger, Daniel I; Iyengar, Sanjana; Yanes, Arianna F; Henley, Jill K; Ashchyan, Hovik J; Kurta, Anastasia O; Patel, Payal M; Sheikh, Umar A; Franklin, Matthew J; Hanna, Courtney C; Chen, Brian R; Chiren, Sarah G; Schmitt, Jochen; Deckert, Stefanie; Furlan, Karina C; Poon, Emily; Maher, Ian A; Cartee, Todd V; Sobanko, Joseph F; Alam, Murad

    2017-08-01

    Facial aging is a concern for many patients. Wrinkles, loss of volume, and discoloration are common physical manifestations of aging skin. Genetic heritage, prior ultraviolet light exposure, and Fitzpatrick skin type may be associated with the rate and type of facial aging. Although many clinical trials assess the correlates of skin aging, there is heterogeneity in the outcomes assessed, which limits the quality of evaluation and comparison of treatment modalities. To address the inconsistency in outcomes, in this project we will develop a core set of outcomes that are to be evaluated in all clinical trials relevant to facial aging. A long list of measureable outcomes will be created from four sources: (1) systematic medical literature review, (2) patient interviews, (3) other published sources, and (4) stakeholder involvement. Two rounds of Delphi processes with homogeneous groups of physicians and patients will be performed to prioritize and condense the list. At a consensus meeting attended by physicians, patients, and stakeholders, outcomes will be further condensed on the basis of participant scores. By the end of the meeting, members will vote and decide on a final recommended set of core outcomes. Subsequent to this, specific measures will be selected or created to assess these outcomes. The aim of this study is to develop a core outcome set and relevant measures for clinical trials relevant to facial aging. We hope to improve the reliability and consistency of outcome reporting of skin aging, thereby enabling improved evaluation of treatment efficacy and patient satisfaction. Core Outcome Measures in Effectiveness Trials (COMET) Initiative, accessible at http://www.comet-initiative.org/studies/details/737 . Core Outcomes Set Initiative, (CSG-COUSIN) accessible at https://www.uniklinikum-dresden.de/de/das-klinikum/universitaetscentren/zegv/cousin/meet-the-teams/project-groups/core-outcome-set-for-the-appearance-of-facial-aging . Protocol version date is 28

  6. Relaxation of functions of STO-3G and 6-31G* basis sets in the series of isoelectronic to LiF molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermakov, A.I.; Belousov, V.V.

    2007-01-01

    Relaxation effect of functions of the basis sets (BS) STO-3G and 6-31G* on their equilibration in the series of isoelectron molecules: LiF, BeO, BN and C 2 is considered. Values of parameters (exponential factor of basis functions, orbital exponents of Gauss primitives and coefficients of their grouping) of basis functions in molecules are discovered using the criterion of minimum of energy by the unlimited Hartree-Fock method calculations (UHF) with the help of direct optimization of parameters: the simplex-method and Rosenbrock method. Certain schemes of optimization differing by the amount of varying parameters have been done. Interaction of basis functions parameters of concerned sets through medium values of the Gauss exponents is established. Effects of relaxation on the change of full energy and relative errors of the calculations of interatomic distances, normal oscillations frequencies, dissociation energy and other properties of molecules are considered. Change of full energy during the relaxation of basis functions (RBF) STO-3G and 6-31G* amounts 1100 and 80 kJ/mol correspondingly, and it is in need of the account during estimation of energetic characteristics, especially for systems with high-polar chemical bonds. The relaxation BS STO-3G practically in all considered cases improves description of molecular properties, whereas the relaxation BS 6-31G* lightly effects on its equilibration [ru

  7. Benefits and problems of health-care robots in aged care settings: A comparison trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbent, Elizabeth; Kerse, Ngaire; Peri, Kathryn; Robinson, Hayley; Jayawardena, Chandimal; Kuo, Tony; Datta, Chandan; Stafford, Rebecca; Butler, Haley; Jawalkar, Pratyusha; Amor, Maddy; Robins, Ben; MacDonald, Bruce

    2016-03-01

    This study investigated whether multiple health-care robots could have any benefits or cause any problems in an aged care facility. Fifty-three residents and 53 staff participated in a non-randomised controlled trial over 12 weeks. Six robots provided entertainment, communication and health-monitoring functions in staff rooms and activity lounges. These settings were compared to control settings without robots. There were no significant differences between groups in resident or staff outcomes, except a significant increase in job satisfaction in the control group only. The intervention group perceived the robots had more agency and experience than the control group did. Perceived agency of the robots decreased over time in both groups. Overall, we received very mixed responses with positive, neutral and negative comments. The robots had no major benefits or problems. Future research could give robots stronger operational roles, use more specific outcome measures, and perform cost-benefit analyses. © 2015 AJA Inc.

  8. Childhood obesity prevention interventions in childcare settings: systematic review of randomized and nonrandomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuan E; Emerson, Janice S; Levine, Robert S; Kihlberg, Courtney J; Hull, Pamela C

    2014-01-01

    Childcare settings are an opportune location for early intervention programs seeking to prevent childhood obesity. This article reports on a systematic review of controlled trials of obesity prevention interventions in childcare settings. The review was limited to English language articles published in PubMed, Web of Science, and Education Resources Information Center (ERIC) between January 2000 and April 2012. childhood obesity prevention interventions in childcare settings using controlled designs that reported adiposity and behavior outcomes. no interventions, non-childcare settings, clinical weight loss programs, non-English publications. Publications were identified by key word search. Two authors reviewed eligible studies to extract study information and study results. Qualitative synthesis was conducted, including tabulation of information and a narrative summary. Fifteen studies met the eligibility criteria. Seven studies reported improvements in adiposity. Six of the 13 interventions with dietary components reported improved intake or eating behaviors. Eight of the 12 interventions with physical activity components reported improved activity levels or physical fitness. Evidence was mixed for all outcomes. Results should be interpreted cautiously given the high variability in study designs and interventions. Further research needs long-term follow-up, multistrategy interventions that include changes in the nutrition and physical activity environment, reporting of cost data, and consideration of sustainability.

  9. Comparison of some dispersion-corrected and traditional functionals with CCSD(T) and MP2 ab initio methods: Dispersion, induction, and basis set superposition error

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Dipankar; Marianski, Mateusz; Maitra, Neepa T.; Dannenberg, J. J.

    2012-10-01

    We compare dispersion and induction interactions for noble gas dimers and for Ne, methane, and 2-butyne with HF and LiF using a variety of functionals (including some specifically parameterized to evaluate dispersion interactions) with ab initio methods including CCSD(T) and MP2. We see that inductive interactions tend to enhance dispersion and may be accompanied by charge-transfer. We show that the functionals do not generally follow the expected trends in interaction energies, basis set superposition errors (BSSE), and interaction distances as a function of basis set size. The functionals parameterized to treat dispersion interactions often overestimate these interactions, sometimes by quite a lot, when compared to higher level calculations. Which functionals work best depends upon the examples chosen. The B3LYP and X3LYP functionals, which do not describe pure dispersion interactions, appear to describe dispersion mixed with induction about as accurately as those parametrized to treat dispersion. We observed significant differences in high-level wavefunction calculations in a basis set larger than those used to generate the structures in many of the databases. We discuss the implications for highly parameterized functionals based on these databases, as well as the use of simple potential energy for fitting the parameters rather than experimentally determinable thermodynamic state functions that involve consideration of vibrational states.

  10. Basis set effects on the energy of intramolecular O-H...halogen hydrogen bridges in ortho-halophenols and 2,4-dihalo-malonaldehyde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buemi, Giuseppe

    2004-01-01

    Ab initio calculations of hydrogen bridge energies (E HB ) of 2-halophenols were carried out at various levels of sophistication using a variety of basis sets in order to verify their ability in reproducing the experimentally-determined gas phase ordering, and the related experimental frequencies of the O-H vibration stretching mode. The semiempirical AM1 and PM3 approaches were adopted, too. Calculations were extended to the O-H...X bridge of a particular conformation of 2,4-dihalo-malonaldehyde. The results and their trend with respect to the electronegativity of the halogen series are highly dependant on the basis set. The less sophisticated 3-21G, CEP121G and LANL2DZ basis sets (with and without correlation energy inclusion) predict E HB decreasing on decreasing the electronegativity power whilst the opposite is generally found when more extended bases are used. However, all high level calculations confirm the nearly negligible energy differences between the examined O-H...X bridges

  11. Modified Motor Vehicles Travel Speed Models on the Basis of Curb Parking Setting under Mixed Traffic Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenyu Mei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The ongoing controversy about in what condition should we set the curb parking has few definitive answers because comprehensive research in this area has been lacking. Our goal is to present a set of heuristic urban street speed functions under mixed traffic flow by taking into account impacts of curb parking. Two impacts have been defined to classify and quantify the phenomena of motor vehicles' speed dynamics in terms of curb parking. The first impact is called Space impact, which is caused by the curb parking types. The other one is the Time impact, which results from the driver maneuvering in or out of parking space. In this paper, based on the empirical data collected from six typical urban streets in Nanjing, China, two models have been proposed to describe these phenomena for one-way traffic and two-way traffic, respectively. An intensive experiment has been conducted in order to calibrate and validate these proposed models, by taking into account the complexity of the model parameters. We also provide guidelines in terms of how to cluster and calculate those models' parameters. Results from these models demonstrated promising performance of modeling motor vehicles' speed for mixed traffic flow under the influence of curb parking.

  12. A pilot cluster randomized controlled trial of structured goal-setting following stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, William J; Brown, Melanie; William, Levack; McPherson, Kathryn M; Reed, Kirk; Dean, Sarah G; Weatherall, Mark

    2012-04-01

    To determine the feasibility, the cluster design effect and the variance and minimal clinical importance difference in the primary outcome in a pilot study of a structured approach to goal-setting. A cluster randomized controlled trial. Inpatient rehabilitation facilities. People who were admitted to inpatient rehabilitation following stroke who had sufficient cognition to engage in structured goal-setting and complete the primary outcome measure. Structured goal elicitation using the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure. Quality of life at 12 weeks using the Schedule for Individualised Quality of Life (SEIQOL-DW), Functional Independence Measure, Short Form 36 and Patient Perception of Rehabilitation (measuring satisfaction with rehabilitation). Assessors were blinded to the intervention. Four rehabilitation services and 41 patients were randomized. We found high values of the intraclass correlation for the outcome measures (ranging from 0.03 to 0.40) and high variance of the SEIQOL-DW (SD 19.6) in relation to the minimally importance difference of 2.1, leading to impractically large sample size requirements for a cluster randomized design. A cluster randomized design is not a practical means of avoiding contamination effects in studies of inpatient rehabilitation goal-setting. Other techniques for coping with contamination effects are necessary.

  13. A geometrical correction for the inter- and intra-molecular basis set superposition error in Hartree-Fock and density functional theory calculations for large systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Holger; Grimme, Stefan

    2012-04-21

    A semi-empirical counterpoise-type correction for basis set superposition error (BSSE) in molecular systems is presented. An atom pair-wise potential corrects for the inter- and intra-molecular BSSE in supermolecular Hartree-Fock (HF) or density functional theory (DFT) calculations. This geometrical counterpoise (gCP) denoted scheme depends only on the molecular geometry, i.e., no input from the electronic wave-function is required and hence is applicable to molecules with ten thousands of atoms. The four necessary parameters have been determined by a fit to standard Boys and Bernadi counterpoise corrections for Hobza's S66×8 set of non-covalently bound complexes (528 data points). The method's target are small basis sets (e.g., minimal, split-valence, 6-31G*), but reliable results are also obtained for larger triple-ζ sets. The intermolecular BSSE is calculated by gCP within a typical error of 10%-30% that proves sufficient in many practical applications. The approach is suggested as a quantitative correction in production work and can also be routinely applied to estimate the magnitude of the BSSE beforehand. The applicability for biomolecules as the primary target is tested for the crambin protein, where gCP removes intramolecular BSSE effectively and yields conformational energies comparable to def2-TZVP basis results. Good mutual agreement is also found with Jensen's ACP(4) scheme, estimating the intramolecular BSSE in the phenylalanine-glycine-phenylalanine tripeptide, for which also a relaxed rotational energy profile is presented. A variety of minimal and double-ζ basis sets combined with gCP and the dispersion corrections DFT-D3 and DFT-NL are successfully benchmarked on the S22 and S66 sets of non-covalent interactions. Outstanding performance with a mean absolute deviation (MAD) of 0.51 kcal/mol (0.38 kcal/mol after D3-refit) is obtained at the gCP-corrected HF-D3/(minimal basis) level for the S66 benchmark. The gCP-corrected B3LYP-D3/6-31G* model

  14. A geometrical correction for the inter- and intra-molecular basis set superposition error in Hartree-Fock and density functional theory calculations for large systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Holger; Grimme, Stefan

    2012-04-01

    A semi-empirical counterpoise-type correction for basis set superposition error (BSSE) in molecular systems is presented. An atom pair-wise potential corrects for the inter- and intra-molecular BSSE in supermolecular Hartree-Fock (HF) or density functional theory (DFT) calculations. This geometrical counterpoise (gCP) denoted scheme depends only on the molecular geometry, i.e., no input from the electronic wave-function is required and hence is applicable to molecules with ten thousands of atoms. The four necessary parameters have been determined by a fit to standard Boys and Bernadi counterpoise corrections for Hobza's S66×8 set of non-covalently bound complexes (528 data points). The method's target are small basis sets (e.g., minimal, split-valence, 6-31G*), but reliable results are also obtained for larger triple-ζ sets. The intermolecular BSSE is calculated by gCP within a typical error of 10%-30% that proves sufficient in many practical applications. The approach is suggested as a quantitative correction in production work and can also be routinely applied to estimate the magnitude of the BSSE beforehand. The applicability for biomolecules as the primary target is tested for the crambin protein, where gCP removes intramolecular BSSE effectively and yields conformational energies comparable to def2-TZVP basis results. Good mutual agreement is also found with Jensen's ACP(4) scheme, estimating the intramolecular BSSE in the phenylalanine-glycine-phenylalanine tripeptide, for which also a relaxed rotational energy profile is presented. A variety of minimal and double-ζ basis sets combined with gCP and the dispersion corrections DFT-D3 and DFT-NL are successfully benchmarked on the S22 and S66 sets of non-covalent interactions. Outstanding performance with a mean absolute deviation (MAD) of 0.51 kcal/mol (0.38 kcal/mol after D3-refit) is obtained at the gCP-corrected HF-D3/(minimal basis) level for the S66 benchmark. The gCP-corrected B3LYP-D3/6-31G* model

  15. Laser-Doppler-Velocimetry on the basis of frequency selective absorption: set-up and test of a Doppler Gloval Velocimeter; Laser-Doppler-Velocimetry auf der Basis frequenzselektiver Absorption: Aufbau und Einsatz eines Doppler Global Velocimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roehle, I.

    1999-11-01

    A Doppler Global Velocimeter was set up in the frame of a PhD thesis. This velocimeter is optimized to carry out high accuracy, three component, time averaged planar velocity measurements. The anemometer was successfully applied to wind tunnel and test rig flows, and the measurement accuracy was investigated. A volumetric data-set of the flow field inside an industrial combustion chamber was measured. This data field contained about 400.000 vectors. DGV measurements in the intake of a jet engine model were carried out applying a fibre bundle boroskope. The flow structure of the wake of a car model in a wind tunnel was investigated. The measurement accuracy of the DGV-System is {+-}0.5 m/s when operated under ideal conditions. This study can serve as a basis to evaluate the use of DGV for aerodynamic development experiments. (orig.) [German] Im Rahmen der Dissertation wurde ein auf hohe Messgenauigkeit optimiertes DGV-Geraet fuer zeitlich gemittelte Drei-Komponenten-Geschwindigkeitsmessungen entwickelt und gebaut, an Laborstroemungen, an Teststaenden und an Windkanaelen erfolgreich eingesetzt und das Potential der Messtechnik, insbesondere im Hinblick auf Messgenauigkeit, untersucht. Im Fall einer industriellen Brennkammer konnte ein Volumen-Datensatz des Stroemungsfeldes erstellt werden, dessen Umfang bei ca. 400.000 Vektoren lag. Es wurden DGV-Messungen mittels eines flexiblen Endoskops auf Basis eines Faserbuendels durchgefuehrt und damit die Stroemung in einem Flugzeugeinlauf vermessen. Es wurden DGV-Messungen im Nachlauf eines PKW-Modells in einem Windkanal durchgefuehrt. Die Messgenauigkeit des erstellten DGV-Systems betraegt unter Idealbedingungen {+-}0,5 m/s. Durch die Arbeit wurde eine Basis zur Beurteilung des Nutzens der DGV-Technik fuer aerodynamische Entwicklungsarbeiten geschaffen. (orig.)

  16. Discovery and Molecular Basis of a Diverse Set of Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 Inhibitors Recognition by EED.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Li

    Full Text Available Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2, a histone H3 lysine 27 methyltransferase, plays a key role in gene regulation and is a known epigenetics drug target for cancer therapy. The WD40 domain-containing protein EED is the regulatory subunit of PRC2. It binds to the tri-methylated lysine 27 of the histone H3 (H3K27me3, and through which stimulates the activity of PRC2 allosterically. Recently, we disclosed a novel PRC2 inhibitor EED226 which binds to the K27me3-pocket on EED and showed strong antitumor activity in xenograft mice model. Here, we further report the identification and validation of four other EED binders along with EED162, the parental compound of EED226. The crystal structures for all these five compounds in complex with EED revealed a common deep pocket induced by the binding of this diverse set of compounds. This pocket was created after significant conformational rearrangement of the aromatic cage residues (Y365, Y148 and F97 in the H3K27me3 binding pocket of EED, the width of which was delineated by the side chains of these rearranged residues. In addition, all five compounds interact with the Arg367 at the bottom of the pocket. Each compound also displays unique features in its interaction with EED, suggesting the dynamics of the H3K27me3 pocket in accommodating the binding of different compounds. Our results provide structural insights for rational design of novel EED binder for the inhibition of PRC2 complex activity.

  17. A Preliminary Core Domain Set for Clinical Trials of Shoulder Disorders: A Report from the OMERACT 2016 Shoulder Core Outcome Set Special Interest Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchbinder, Rachelle; Page, Matthew J; Huang, Hsiaomin; Verhagen, Arianne P; Beaton, Dorcas; Kopkow, Christian; Lenza, Mario; Jain, Nitin B; Richards, Bethan; Richards, Pamela; Voshaar, Marieke; van der Windt, Danielle; Gagnier, Joel J

    2017-12-01

    The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Shoulder Core Outcome Set Special Interest Group (SIG) was established to develop a core outcome set (COS) for clinical trials of shoulder disorders. In preparation for OMERACT 2016, we systematically examined all outcome domains and measurement instruments reported in 409 randomized trials of interventions for shoulder disorders published between 1954 and 2015. Informed by these data, we conducted an international Delphi consensus study including shoulder trial experts, clinicians, and patients to identify key domains that should be included in a shoulder disorder COS. Findings were discussed at a stakeholder premeeting of OMERACT. At OMERACT 2016, we sought consensus on a preliminary core domain set and input into next steps. There were 13 and 15 participants at the premeeting and the OMERACT 2016 SIG meeting, respectively (9 attended both meetings). Consensus was reached on a preliminary core domain set consisting of an inner core of 4 domains: pain, physical function/activity, global perceived effect, and adverse events including death. A middle core consisted of 3 domains: emotional well-being, sleep, and participation (recreation and work). An outer core of research required to inform the final COS was also formulated. Our next steps are to (1) analyze whether participation (recreation and work) should be in the inner core, (2) conduct a third Delphi round to finalize definitions and wording of domains and reach final endorsement for the domains, and (3) determine which instruments fulfill the OMERACT criteria for measuring each domain.

  18. Evolution in time of an N-atom system. I. A physical basis set for the projection of the master equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freedhoff, Helen

    2004-01-01

    We study an aggregate of N identical two-level atoms (TLA's) coupled by the retarded interatomic interaction, using the Lehmberg-Agarwal master equation. First, we calculate the entangled eigenstates of the system; then, we use these eigenstates as a basis set for the projection of the master equation. We demonstrate that in this basis the equations of motion for the level populations, as well as the expressions for the emission and absorption spectra, assume a simple mathematical structure and allow for a transparent physical interpretation. To illustrate the use of the general theory in emission processes, we study an isosceles triangle of atoms, and present in the long wavelength limit the (cascade) emission spectrum for a hexagon of atoms fully excited at t=0. To illustrate its use for absorption processes, we tabulate (in the same limit) the biexciton absorption frequencies, linewidths, and relative intensities for polygons consisting of N=2,...,9 TLA's

  19. Excited state nuclear forces from the Tamm-Dancoff approximation to time-dependent density functional theory within the plane wave basis set framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutter, Jürg

    2003-03-01

    An efficient formulation of time-dependent linear response density functional theory for the use within the plane wave basis set framework is presented. The method avoids the transformation of the Kohn-Sham matrix into the canonical basis and references virtual orbitals only through a projection operator. Using a Lagrangian formulation nuclear derivatives of excited state energies within the Tamm-Dancoff approximation are derived. The algorithms were implemented into a pseudo potential/plane wave code and applied to the calculation of adiabatic excitation energies, optimized geometries and vibrational frequencies of three low lying states of formaldehyde. An overall good agreement with other time-dependent density functional calculations, multireference configuration interaction calculations and experimental data was found.

  20. The Efficacy of Goal Setting in Cardiac Rehabilitation-a Gender-Specific Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamm-Balderjahn, Sabine; Brünger, Martin; Michel, Anne; Bongarth, Christa; Spyra, Karla

    2016-08-08

    Patients with coronary heart disease undergo cardiac rehabilitation in order to reduce their cardiovascular risk factors. Often, however, the benefit of rehabilitation is lost over time. It is unclear whether this happens in the same way to men and women. We studied whether the setting of gender-specific behavior goals with an agreement between the doctor and the patient at the end of rehabilitation can prolong its positive effects. This study was performed with a mixed-method design. It consisted of qualitative interviews and group discussions with patients, doctors and other treating personnel, and researchers, as well as a quantitative, randomized, controlled intervention trial in which data were acquired at four time points (the beginning and end of rehabilitation and then 6 and 12 months later). 545 patients, 262 of them women (48.1%), were included. The patients were assigned to a goal checking group (n = 132), a goal setting group (n = 143), and a control group (n = 270). The primary endpoints were health-related behavior (exercise, diet, tobacco consumption), subjective state of health, and medication adherence. The secondary endpoints included physiological protection and risk factors such as blood pressure, cholesterol (HDL, LDL, and total), blood sugar, HbA1c, and body-mass index. The intervention had no demonstrable effect on the primary or secondary endpoints. The percentage of smokers declined to a similar extent in all groups from the beginning of rehabilitation to 12 months after its end (overall figures: 12.4% to 8.6%, p exercise behavior, diet, and subjective state of health also improved over the entire course of the study. Women had a healthier diet than men. Subgroup analyses indicated a possible effect of the intervention on exercise behavior in women who were employed and in men who were not (pgoal setting was not demonstrated. Therefore, no indication for its routine provision can be derived from the study results.

  1. The 'Outcome Reporting in Brief Intervention Trials: Alcohol' (ORBITAL) framework: protocol to determine a core outcome set for efficacy and effectiveness trials of alcohol screening and brief intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorter, G W; Heather, N; Bray, Jeremy W; Giles, E L; Holloway, A; Barbosa, C; Berman, A H; O'Donnell, A J; Clarke, M; Stockdale, K J; Newbury-Birch, D

    2017-12-22

    The evidence base to assess the efficacy and effectiveness of alcohol brief interventions (ABI) is weakened by variation in the outcomes measured and by inconsistent reporting. The 'Outcome Reporting in Brief Intervention Trials: Alcohol' (ORBITAL) project aims to develop a core outcome set (COS) and reporting guidance for its use in future trials of ABI in a range of settings. An international Special Interest Group was convened through INEBRIA (International Network on Brief Interventions for Alcohol and Other Drugs) to inform the development of a COS for trials of ABI. ORBITAL will incorporate a systematic review to map outcomes used in efficacy and effectiveness trials of ABI and their measurement properties, using the COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments (COSMIN) criteria. This will support a multi-round Delphi study to prioritise outcomes. Delphi panellists will be drawn from a range of settings and stakeholder groups, and the Delphi study will also be used to determine if a single COS is relevant for all settings. A consensus meeting with key stakeholder representation will determine the final COS and associated guidance for its use in trials of ABI. ORBITAL will develop a COS for alcohol screening and brief intervention trials, with outcomes stratified into domains and guidance on outcome measurement instruments. The standardisation of ABI outcomes and their measurement will support the ongoing development of ABI studies and a systematic synthesis of emerging research findings. We will track the extent to which the COS delivers on this promise through an exploration of the use of the guidance in the decade following COS publication.

  2. Randomized controlled clinical trial on the three-dimensional accuracy of fast-set impression materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Heike; Quaas, Sebastian; Haim, Manuela; Preißler, Jörg; Walter, Michael H; Koch, Rainer; Luthardt, Ralph G

    2013-06-01

    The use of fast-setting impression materials with different viscosities for the one-stage impression technique demands precise working times when mixing. We examined the effect of varying working time on impression precision in a randomized clinical trial. Focusing on tooth 46, three impressions were made from each of 96 volunteers, using either a polyether (PE: Impregum Penta H/L DuoSoft Quick, 3 M ESPE) or an addition-curing silicone (AS: Aquasil Ultra LV, Dentsply/DeTrey), one with the manufacturer's recommended working time (used as a reference) and two with altered working times. All stages of the impression-taking were subject to randomization. The three-dimensional precision of the non-standard working time impressions was digitally analyzed compared to the reference impression. Statistical analysis was performed using multivariate models. The mean difference in the position of the lower right first molar (vs. the reference impression) ranged from ±12 μm for PE to +19 and -14 μm for AS. Significantly higher mean values (+62 to -40 μm) were found for AS compared to PE (+21 to -26 μm) in the area of the distal adjacent tooth. Fast-set impression materials offer high precision when used for single tooth restorations as part of a one-stage impression technique, even when the working time (mixing plus application of the light- and heavy-body components) diverges significantly from the manufacturer's recommended protocol. Best accuracy was achieved with machine-mixed heavy-body/light-body polyether. Both materials examined met the clinical requirements regarding precision when the teeth were completely syringed with light material.

  3. Randomized trial of plastic bags to prevent term neonatal hypothermia in a resource-poor setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belsches, Theodore C; Tilly, Alyssa E; Miller, Tonya R; Kambeyanda, Rohan H; Leadford, Alicia; Manasyan, Albert; Chomba, Elwyn; Ramani, Manimaran; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam; Carlo, Waldemar A

    2013-09-01

    Term infants in resource-poor settings frequently develop hypothermia during the first hours after birth. Plastic bags or wraps are a low-cost intervention for the prevention of hypothermia in preterm and low birth weight infants that may also be effective in term infants. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that placement of term neonates in plastic bags at birth reduces hypothermia at 1 hour after birth in a resource-poor hospital. This parallel-group randomized controlled trial was conducted at University Teaching Hospital, the tertiary referral center in Zambia. Inborn neonates with both a gestational age ≥37 weeks and a birth weight ≥2500 g were randomized 1:1 to either a standard thermoregulation protocol or to a standard thermoregulation protocol with placement of the torso and lower extremities inside a plastic bag within 10 minutes after birth. The primary outcome was hypothermia (plastic bag (n = 135) or to standard thermoregulation care (n = 136) had similar baseline characteristics (birth weight, gestational age, gender, and baseline temperature). Neonates in the plastic bag group had a lower rate of hypothermia (60% vs 73%, risk ratio 0.76, confidence interval 0.60-0.96, P = .026) and a higher axillary temperature (36.4 ± 0.5°C vs 36.2 ± 0.7°C, P plastic bag at birth reduced the incidence of hypothermia at 1 hour after birth in term neonates born in a resource-poor setting, but most neonates remained hypothermic.

  4. Improving parenting skills for families of young children in pediatric settings: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Ellen C; Sheldrick, R Christopher; McMenamy, Jannette M; Henson, Brandi S; Carter, Alice S

    2014-01-01

    Disruptive behavior disorders, such as attention-deficient/hyperactivity disorder and oppositional defiant disorder, are common and stable throughout childhood. These disorders cause long-term morbidity but benefit from early intervention. While symptoms are often evident before preschool, few children receive appropriate treatment during this period. Group parent training, such as the Incredible Years program, has been shown to be effective in improving parenting strategies and reducing children's disruptive behaviors. Because they already monitor young children's behavior and development, primary care pediatricians are in a good position to intervene early when indicated. To investigate the feasibility and effectiveness of parent-training groups delivered to parents of toddlers in pediatric primary care settings. This randomized clinical trial was conducted at 11 diverse pediatric practices in the Greater Boston area. A total of 273 parents of children between 2 and 4 years old who acknowledged disruptive behaviors on a 20-item checklist were included. A 10-week Incredible Years parent-training group co-led by a research clinician and a pediatric staff member. Self-reports and structured videotaped observations of parent and child behaviors conducted prior to, immediately after, and 12 months after the intervention. A total of 150 parents were randomly assigned to the intervention or the waiting-list group. An additional 123 parents were assigned to receive intervention without a randomly selected comparison group. Compared with the waiting-list group, greater improvement was observed in both intervention groups (P parenting practices and child disruptive behaviors that were attributable to participation in the Incredible Years groups. This study demonstrated the feasibility and effectiveness of parent-training groups conducted in pediatric office settings to reduce disruptive behavior in toddlers. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00402857.

  5. Phase I/II randomized trial of aerobic exercise in Parkinson disease in a community setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uc, Ergun Y; Doerschug, Kevin C; Magnotta, Vincent; Dawson, Jeffrey D; Thomsen, Teri R; Kline, Joel N; Rizzo, Matthew; Newman, Sara R; Mehta, Sonya; Grabowski, Thomas J; Bruss, Joel; Blanchette, Derek R; Anderson, Steven W; Voss, Michelle W; Kramer, Arthur F; Darling, Warren G

    2014-07-29

    To (1) investigate effects of aerobic walking on motor function, cognition, and quality of life in Parkinson disease (PD), and (2) compare safety, tolerability, and fitness benefits of different forms of exercise intervention: continuous/moderate intensity vs interval/alternating between low and vigorous intensity, and individual/neighborhood vs group/facility setting. Initial design was a 6-month, 2 × 2 randomized trial of different exercise regimens in independently ambulatory patients with PD. All arms were required to exercise 3 times per week, 45 minutes per session. Randomization to group/facility setting was not feasible because of logistical factors. Over the first 2 years, we randomized 43 participants to continuous or interval training. Because preliminary analyses suggested higher musculoskeletal adverse events in the interval group and lack of difference between training methods in improving fitness, the next 17 participants were allocated only to continuous training. Eighty-one percent of 60 participants completed the study with a mean attendance of 83.3% (95% confidence interval: 77.5%-89.0%), exercising at 46.8% (44.0%-49.7%) of their heart rate reserve. There were no serious adverse events. Across all completers, we observed improvements in maximum oxygen consumption, gait speed, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale sections I and III scores (particularly axial functions and rigidity), fatigue, depression, quality of life (e.g., psychological outlook), and flanker task scores (p improvements on the flanker task and quality of life (p improves aerobic fitness, motor function, fatigue, mood, executive control, and quality of life in mild to moderate PD. This study provides Class IV evidence that in patients with PD, an aerobic exercise program improves aerobic fitness, motor function, fatigue, mood, and cognition. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  6. Effectiveness of traditional bone setting in chronic neck pain: randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaproudina, Nina; Hänninen, Osmo O P; Airaksinen, Olavi

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluates the effectiveness of traditional bone setting (TBS) in chronic neck pain (cNP) compared with conventional physiotherapy (PT) and massage (M). This was a randomized clinical trial. Working-aged employed subjects with cNP (n = 105; 37 men and 68 women; mean age, 41.5 years) were randomized into TBS, PT, and M groups. Follow-up times were 1, 6, and 12 months after the treatments. Neck pain intensity (visual analog scale), perceived disability (Neck Disability Index [NDI]), and neck spine mobility measurements were used as outcomes. Global assessment was evaluated by the subjects (scale from -1 to +10). Data were analyzed using time (pre and post) by group (TBS, PT and M), 2- way analysis of variance for repeated measures. Neck pain decreased and NDI scores improved in all groups 1 month after the treatment (P better after TBS. Neck spine mobility in rotation movements tended to improve significantly better and the frons-knee distance improved more after TBS. One year later, both NDI and neck pain were significantly better after TBS than in reference groups. A significant improvement was reported by 40% to 45.5% of subjects in the PT and M groups and by 68.6% in the TBS group. Bone setters' ability to communicate and to interact with patients was evaluated significantly higher. In the TBS group, the number of sick days was minimal as was the use of painkillers during 1-year follow-up compared to that in the reference groups. Traditional bone setting, which is a soft manual mobilization technique focusing on the muscles, joints, and ligaments, appears to be effective in cNP. Two thirds of subjects experienced it as beneficial, and it seems to be able to improve disability and pain in patients with cNP. Subjective and partially objective benefits of TBS were found in those patients more than after other interventions, and the effects lasted at least for 1 year.

  7. Handbook of Gaussian basis sets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poirier, R.; Kari, R.; Csizmadia, I.G.

    1985-01-01

    A collection of a large body of information is presented useful for chemists involved in molecular Gaussian computations. Every effort has been made by the authors to collect all available data for cartesian Gaussian as found in the literature up to July of 1984. The data in this text includes a large collection of polarization function exponents but in this case the collection is not complete. Exponents for Slater type orbitals (STO) were included for completeness. This text offers a collection of Gaussian exponents primarily without criticism. (Auth.)

  8. Evaluation of one-dimensional and two-dimensional volatility basis sets in simulating the aging of secondary organic aerosol with smog-chamber experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bin; Wang, Shuxiao; Donahue, Neil M; Chuang, Wayne; Hildebrandt Ruiz, Lea; Ng, Nga L; Wang, Yangjun; Hao, Jiming

    2015-02-17

    We evaluate the one-dimensional volatility basis set (1D-VBS) and two-dimensional volatility basis set (2D-VBS) in simulating the aging of SOA derived from toluene and α-pinene against smog-chamber experiments. If we simulate the first-generation products with empirical chamber fits and the subsequent aging chemistry with a 1D-VBS or a 2D-VBS, the models mostly overestimate the SOA concentrations in the toluene oxidation experiments. This is because the empirical chamber fits include both first-generation oxidation and aging; simulating aging in addition to this results in double counting of the initial aging effects. If the first-generation oxidation is treated explicitly, the base-case 2D-VBS underestimates the SOA concentrations and O:C increase of the toluene oxidation experiments; it generally underestimates the SOA concentrations and overestimates the O:C increase of the α-pinene experiments. With the first-generation oxidation treated explicitly, we could modify the 2D-VBS configuration individually for toluene and α-pinene to achieve good model-measurement agreement. However, we are unable to simulate the oxidation of both toluene and α-pinene with the same 2D-VBS configuration. We suggest that future models should implement parallel layers for anthropogenic (aromatic) and biogenic precursors, and that more modeling studies and laboratory research be done to optimize the "best-guess" parameters for each layer.

  9. Electronic structure of crystalline uranium nitrides UN, U{sub 2}N{sub 3} and UN{sub 2}: LCAO calculations with the basis set optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evarestov, R A; Panin, A I; Bandura, A V; Losev, M V [Department of Quantum Chemistry, St. Petersburg State University, University Prospect 26, Stary Peterghof, St. Petersburg, 198504 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: re1973@re1973.spb.edu

    2008-06-01

    The results of LCAO DFT calculations of lattice parameters, cohesive energy and bulk modulus of the crystalline uranium nitrides UN, U{sub 2}N{sub 3} and UN{sub 2} are presented and discussed. The LCAO computer codes Gaussian03 and Crystal06 are applied. The calculations are made with the uranium atom relativistic effective small core potential by Stuttgart-Cologne group (60 electrons in the core). The calculations include the U atom basis set optimization. Powell, Hooke-Jeeves, conjugated gradient and Box methods are implemented in the author's optimization package, being external to the codes for molecular and periodic calculations. The basis set optimization in LCAO calculations improves the agreement of the lattice parameter and bulk modulus of UN crystal with the experimental data, the change of the cohesive energy due to the optimization is small. The mixed metallic-covalent chemical bonding is found both in LCAO calculations of UN and U{sub 2}N{sub 3} crystals; UN{sub 2} crystal has the semiconducting nature.

  10. Electronic structure of crystalline uranium nitrides UN, U2N3 and UN2: LCAO calculations with the basis set optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evarestov, R A; Panin, A I; Bandura, A V; Losev, M V

    2008-01-01

    The results of LCAO DFT calculations of lattice parameters, cohesive energy and bulk modulus of the crystalline uranium nitrides UN, U 2 N 3 and UN 2 are presented and discussed. The LCAO computer codes Gaussian03 and Crystal06 are applied. The calculations are made with the uranium atom relativistic effective small core potential by Stuttgart-Cologne group (60 electrons in the core). The calculations include the U atom basis set optimization. Powell, Hooke-Jeeves, conjugated gradient and Box methods are implemented in the author's optimization package, being external to the codes for molecular and periodic calculations. The basis set optimization in LCAO calculations improves the agreement of the lattice parameter and bulk modulus of UN crystal with the experimental data, the change of the cohesive energy due to the optimization is small. The mixed metallic-covalent chemical bonding is found both in LCAO calculations of UN and U 2 N 3 crystals; UN 2 crystal has the semiconducting nature

  11. The 6-31B(d) basis set and the BMC-QCISD and BMC-CCSD multicoefficient correlation methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Benjamin J; Zhao, Yan; Truhlar, Donald G

    2005-03-03

    Three new multicoefficient correlation methods (MCCMs) called BMC-QCISD, BMC-CCSD, and BMC-CCSD-C are optimized against 274 data that include atomization energies, electron affinities, ionization potentials, and reaction barrier heights. A new basis set called 6-31B(d) is developed and used as part of the new methods. BMC-QCISD has mean unsigned errors in calculating atomization energies per bond and barrier heights of 0.49 and 0.80 kcal/mol, respectively. BMC-CCSD has mean unsigned errors of 0.42 and 0.71 kcal/mol for the same two quantities. BMC-CCSD-C is an equally effective variant of BMC-CCSD that employs Cartesian rather than spherical harmonic basis sets. The mean unsigned error of BMC-CCSD or BMC-CCSD-C for atomization energies, barrier heights, ionization potentials, and electron affinities is 22% lower than G3SX(MP2) at an order of magnitude less cost for gradients for molecules with 9-13 atoms, and it scales better (N6 vs N,7 where N is the number of atoms) when the size of the molecule is increased.

  12. Molecular Properties by Quantum Monte Carlo: An Investigation on the Role of the Wave Function Ansatz and the Basis Set in the Water Molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zen, Andrea; Luo, Ye; Sorella, Sandro; Guidoni, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Quantum Monte Carlo methods are accurate and promising many body techniques for electronic structure calculations which, in the last years, are encountering a growing interest thanks to their favorable scaling with the system size and their efficient parallelization, particularly suited for the modern high performance computing facilities. The ansatz of the wave function and its variational flexibility are crucial points for both the accurate description of molecular properties and the capabilities of the method to tackle large systems. In this paper, we extensively analyze, using different variational ansatzes, several properties of the water molecule, namely, the total energy, the dipole and quadrupole momenta, the ionization and atomization energies, the equilibrium configuration, and the harmonic and fundamental frequencies of vibration. The investigation mainly focuses on variational Monte Carlo calculations, although several lattice regularized diffusion Monte Carlo calculations are also reported. Through a systematic study, we provide a useful guide to the choice of the wave function, the pseudopotential, and the basis set for QMC calculations. We also introduce a new method for the computation of forces with finite variance on open systems and a new strategy for the definition of the atomic orbitals involved in the Jastrow-Antisymmetrised Geminal power wave function, in order to drastically reduce the number of variational parameters. This scheme significantly improves the efficiency of QMC energy minimization in case of large basis sets. PMID:24526929

  13. Internet-versus group-administered cognitive behaviour therapy for panic disorder in a psychiatric setting: a randomised trial

    OpenAIRE

    Bergstrom, Jan; Andersson, Gerhard; Ljotsson, Brjann; Ruck, Christian; Andreewitch, Sergej; Karlsson, Andreas; Carlbring, Per; Andersson, Erik; Lindefors, Nils

    2010-01-01

    Background: Internet administered cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) is a promising new way to deliver psychological treatment, but its effectiveness in regular care settings and in relation to more traditional CBT group treatment has not yet been determined. The primary aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of Internet- and group administered CBT for panic disorder (with or without agoraphobia) in a randomised trial within a regular psychiatric care setting. The second aim of the...

  14. Sea ice in the Baltic Sea - revisiting BASIS ice, a~historical data set covering the period 1960/1961-1978/1979

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löptien, U.; Dietze, H.

    2014-06-01

    The Baltic Sea is a seasonally ice-covered, marginal sea, situated in central northern Europe. It is an essential waterway connecting highly industrialised countries. Because ship traffic is intermittently hindered by sea ice, the local weather services have been monitoring sea ice conditions for decades. In the present study we revisit a historical monitoring data set, covering the winters 1960/1961. This data set, dubbed Data Bank for Baltic Sea Ice and Sea Surface Temperatures (BASIS) ice, is based on hand-drawn maps that were collected and then digitised 1981 in a joint project of the Finnish Institute of Marine Research (today Finish Meteorological Institute (FMI)) and the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI). BASIS ice was designed for storage on punch cards and all ice information is encoded by five digits. This makes the data hard to access. Here we present a post-processed product based on the original five-digit code. Specifically, we convert to standard ice quantities (including information on ice types), which we distribute in the current and free Network Common Data Format (NetCDF). Our post-processed data set will help to assess numerical ice models and provide easy-to-access unique historical reference material for sea ice in the Baltic Sea. In addition we provide statistics showcasing the data quality. The website www.baltic-ocean.org hosts the post-prossed data and the conversion code. The data are also archived at the Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science PANGEA (doi:10.1594/PANGEA.832353).

  15. Sea ice in the Baltic Sea - revisiting BASIS ice, a historical data set covering the period 1960/1961-1978/1979

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löptien, U.; Dietze, H.

    2014-12-01

    The Baltic Sea is a seasonally ice-covered, marginal sea in central northern Europe. It is an essential waterway connecting highly industrialised countries. Because ship traffic is intermittently hindered by sea ice, the local weather services have been monitoring sea ice conditions for decades. In the present study we revisit a historical monitoring data set, covering the winters 1960/1961 to 1978/1979. This data set, dubbed Data Bank for Baltic Sea Ice and Sea Surface Temperatures (BASIS) ice, is based on hand-drawn maps that were collected and then digitised in 1981 in a joint project of the Finnish Institute of Marine Research (today the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI)) and the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI). BASIS ice was designed for storage on punch cards and all ice information is encoded by five digits. This makes the data hard to access. Here we present a post-processed product based on the original five-digit code. Specifically, we convert to standard ice quantities (including information on ice types), which we distribute in the current and free Network Common Data Format (NetCDF). Our post-processed data set will help to assess numerical ice models and provide easy-to-access unique historical reference material for sea ice in the Baltic Sea. In addition we provide statistics showcasing the data quality. The website http://www.baltic-ocean.org hosts the post-processed data and the conversion code. The data are also archived at the Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science, PANGAEA (doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.832353).

  16. Identifying trial recruitment uncertainties using a James Lind Alliance Priority Setting Partnership - the PRioRiTy (Prioritising Recruitment in Randomised Trials) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Patricia; Galvin, Sandra; Williamson, Paula R; Treweek, Shaun; Whiting, Caroline; Maeso, Beccy; Bray, Christopher; Brocklehurst, Peter; Moloney, Mary Clarke; Douiri, Abdel; Gamble, Carrol; Gardner, Heidi R; Mitchell, Derick; Stewart, Derek; Jordan, Joan; O'Donnell, Martin; Clarke, Mike; Pavitt, Sue H; Guegan, Eleanor Woodford; Blatch-Jones, Amanda; Smith, Valerie; Reay, Hannah; Devane, Declan

    2018-03-01

    Despite the problem of inadequate recruitment to randomised trials, there is little evidence to guide researchers on decisions about how people are effectively recruited to take part in trials. The PRioRiTy study aimed to identify and prioritise important unanswered trial recruitment questions for research. The PRioRiTy study - Priority Setting Partnership (PSP) included members of the public approached to take part in a randomised trial or who have represented participants on randomised trial steering committees, health professionals and research staff with experience of recruiting to randomised trials, people who have designed, conducted, analysed or reported on randomised trials and people with experience of randomised trials methodology. This partnership was aided by the James Lind Alliance and involved eight stages: (i) identifying a unique, relevant prioritisation area within trial methodology; (ii) establishing a steering group (iii) identifying and engaging with partners and stakeholders; (iv) formulating an initial list of uncertainties; (v) collating the uncertainties into research questions; (vi) confirming that the questions for research are a current recruitment challenge; (vii) shortlisting questions and (viii) final prioritisation through a face-to-face workshop. A total of 790 survey respondents yielded 1693 open-text answers to 6 questions, from which 1880 potential questions for research were identified. After merging duplicates, the number of questions was reduced to 496. Questions were combined further, and those that were submitted by fewer than 15 people and/or fewer than 6 of the 7 stakeholder groups were excluded from the next round of prioritisation resulting in 31 unique questions for research. All 31 questions were confirmed as being unanswered after checking relevant, up-to-date research evidence. The 10 highest priority questions were ranked at a face-to-face workshop. The number 1 ranked question was "How can randomised trials become

  17. The Effect of Distributed Practice in Undergraduate Statistics Homework Sets: A Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crissinger, Bryan R.

    2015-01-01

    Most homework sets in statistics courses are constructed so that students concentrate or "mass" their practice on a certain topic in one problem set. Distributed practice homework sets include review problems in each set so that practice on a topic is distributed across problem sets. There is a body of research that points to the…

  18. Power, fairness and trust: understanding and engaging with vaccine trial participants and communities in the setting up the EBOVAC-Salone vaccine trial in Sierra Leone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Enria

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper discusses the establishment of a clinical trial of an Ebola vaccine candidate in Kambia District, Northern Sierra Leone during the epidemic, and analyses the role of social science research in ensuring that lessons from the socio-political context, the recent experience of the Ebola outbreak, and learning from previous clinical trials were incorporated in the development of community engagement strategies. The paper aims to provide a case study of an integrated social science and communications system in the start-up phase of the clinical trial. Methods The paper is based on qualitative research methods including ethnographic observation, interviews with trial participants and key stakeholder interviews. Results Through the case study of EBOVAC Salone, the paper suggests ways in which research can be used to inform communication strategies before and during the setting up of the trial. It explores notions of power, fairness and trust emerging from analysis of the Sierra Leonean context and through ethnographic research, to reflect on three situations in which social scientists and community liaison officers worked together to ensure successful community engagement. Firstly, a section on “power” considers the pitfalls of considering communities as homogeneous and shows the importance of understanding intra-community power dynamics when engaging communities. Secondly, a section on “fairness” shows how local understandings of what is fair can help inform the design of volunteer recruitment strategies. Finally, a section on “trust” highlights how historically rooted rumours can be effectively addressed through active dialogue rather than through an approach focused on correcting misinformation. Conclusion The paper firstly emphasises the value of social science in the setting up of clinical trials, in terms of providing an in depth understanding of context and social dynamics. Secondly, the paper suggests

  19. On the accuracy of density-functional theory exchange-correlation functionals for H bonds in small water clusters: Benchmarks approaching the complete basis set limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santra, Biswajit; Michaelides, Angelos; Scheffler, Matthias

    2007-11-01

    The ability of several density-functional theory (DFT) exchange-correlation functionals to describe hydrogen bonds in small water clusters (dimer to pentamer) in their global minimum energy structures is evaluated with reference to second order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2). Errors from basis set incompleteness have been minimized in both the MP2 reference data and the DFT calculations, thus enabling a consistent systematic evaluation of the true performance of the tested functionals. Among all the functionals considered, the hybrid X3LYP and PBE0 functionals offer the best performance and among the nonhybrid generalized gradient approximation functionals, mPWLYP and PBE1W perform best. The popular BLYP and B3LYP functionals consistently underbind and PBE and PW91 display rather variable performance with cluster size.

  20. Dependence of QSAR models on the selection of trial descriptor sets: a demonstration using nanotoxicity endpoints of decorated nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Chi-Yu; Chen, Sing-Zuo; Su, Bo-Han; Tseng, Yufeng J; Esposito, Emilio Xavier; Hopfinger, Anton J

    2013-01-28

    Little attention has been given to the selection of trial descriptor sets when designing a QSAR analysis even though a great number of descriptor classes, and often a greater number of descriptors within a given class, are now available. This paper reports an effort to explore interrelationships between QSAR models and descriptor sets. Zhou and co-workers (Zhou et al., Nano Lett. 2008, 8 (3), 859-865) designed, synthesized, and tested a combinatorial library of 80 surface modified, that is decorated, multi-walled carbon nanotubes for their composite nanotoxicity using six endpoints all based on a common 0 to 100 activity scale. Each of the six endpoints for the 29 most nanotoxic decorated nanotubes were incorporated as the training set for this study. The study reported here includes trial descriptor sets for all possible combinations of MOE, VolSurf, and 4D-fingerprints (FP) descriptor classes, as well as including and excluding explicit spatial contributions from the nanotube. Optimized QSAR models were constructed from these multiple trial descriptor sets. It was found that (a) both the form and quality of the best QSAR models for each of the endpoints are distinct and (b) some endpoints are quite dependent upon 4D-FP descriptors of the entire nanotube-decorator complex. However, other endpoints yielded equally good models only using decorator descriptors with and without the decorator-only 4D-FP descriptors. Lastly, and most importantly, the quality, significance, and interpretation of a QSAR model were found to be critically dependent on the trial descriptor sets used within a given QSAR endpoint study.

  1. Electronic structure of thin films by the self-consistent numerical-basis-set linear combination of atomic orbitals method: Ni(001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.S.; Freeman, A.J.

    1979-01-01

    We present the self-consistent numerical-basis-set linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) discrete variational method for treating the electronic structure of thin films. As in the case of bulk solids, this method provides for thin films accurate solutions of the one-particle local density equations with a non-muffin-tin potential. Hamiltonian and overlap matrix elements are evaluated accurately by means of a three-dimensional numerical Diophantine integration scheme. Application of this method is made to the self-consistent solution of one-, three-, and five-layer Ni(001) unsupported films. The LCAO Bloch basis set consists of valence orbitals (3d, 4s, and 4p states for transition metals) orthogonalized to the frozen-core wave functions. The self-consistent potential is obtained iteratively within the superposition of overlapping spherical atomic charge density model with the atomic configurations treated as adjustable parameters. Thus the crystal Coulomb potential is constructed as a superposition of overlapping spherically symmetric atomic potentials and, correspondingly, the local density Kohn-Sham (α = 2/3) potential is determined from a superposition of atomic charge densities. At each iteration in the self-consistency procedure, the crystal charge density is evaluated using a sampling of 15 independent k points in (1/8)th of the irreducible two-dimensional Brillouin zone. The total density of states (DOS) and projected local DOS (by layer plane) are calculated using an analytic linear energy triangle method (presented as an Appendix) generalized from the tetrahedron scheme for bulk systems. Distinct differences are obtained between the surface and central plane local DOS. The central plane DOS is found to converge rapidly to the DOS of bulk paramagnetic Ni obtained by Wang and Callaway. Only a very small surplus charge (0.03 electron/atom) is found on the surface planes, in agreement with jellium model calculations

  2. Obtaining valid laboratory data in clinical trials conducted in resource diverse settings: lessons learned from a microbicide phase III clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Crucitti

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade several phase III microbicides trials have been conducted in developing countries. However, laboratories in resource constrained settings do not always have the experience, infrastructure, and the capacity to deliver laboratory data meeting the high standards of clinical trials. This paper describes the design and outcomes of a laboratory quality assurance program which was implemented during a phase III clinical trial evaluating the efficacy of the candidate microbicide Cellulose Sulfate 6% (CS [1].In order to assess the effectiveness of CS for HIV and STI prevention, a phase III clinical trial was conducted in 5 sites: 3 in Africa and 2 in India. The trial sponsor identified an International Central Reference Laboratory (ICRL, responsible for the design and management of a quality assurance program, which would guarantee the reliability of laboratory data. The ICRL provided advice on the tests, assessed local laboratories, organized trainings, conducted supervision visits, performed re-tests, and prepared control panels. Local laboratories were provided with control panels for HIV rapid tests and Chlamydia trachomatis/Neisseria gonorrhoeae (CT/NG amplification technique. Aliquots from respective control panels were tested by local laboratories and were compared with results obtained at the ICRL.Overall, good results were observed. However, discordances between the ICRL and site laboratories were identified for HIV and CT/NG results. One particular site experienced difficulties with HIV rapid testing shortly after study initiation. At all sites, DNA contamination was identified as a cause of invalid CT/NG results. Both problems were timely detected and solved. Through immediate feedback, guidance and repeated training of laboratory staff, additional inaccuracies were prevented.Quality control guidelines when applied in field laboratories ensured the reliability and validity of final study data. It is essential that sponsors

  3. Involving patients in setting priorities for healthcare improvement: a cluster randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boivin, A.; Lehoux, P.; Lacombe, R.; Burgers, J.; Grol, R.P.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients are increasingly seen as active partners in healthcare. While patient involvement in individual clinical decisions has been extensively studied, no trial has assessed how patients can effectively be involved in collective healthcare decisions affecting the population. The goal

  4. Regulatory challenges associated with conducting multicountry clinical trials in resource-limited settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndebele, Paul; Blanchard-Horan, Christina; Shahkolahi, Akbar; Sanne, Ian

    2014-01-01

    International public health and infectious diseases research has expanded to become a global enterprise transcending national and continental borders in organized networks addressing high-impact diseases. In conducting multicountry clinical trials, sponsors and investigators have to ensure that they meet regulatory requirements in all countries in which the clinical trials will be conducted. Some of these requirements include review and approval by national drug regulatory authorities and recognized research ethics committees. A limiting factor to the efficient conduct of multicountry clinical trials is the regulatory environment in each collaborating country, with significant differences determined by various factors including the laws and the procedures used in each country. The long regulatory processes in resource-limited countries may hinder the efficient implementation of multisite clinical trials, delaying research important to the health of populations in these countries and costing millions of dollars a year.

  5. Goal-setting to Promote a Healthier Lifestyle in Later Life: Qualitative Evaluation of the AgeWell Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelis, Sharon M; Thom, Jeanette M; Jones, Ian Rees; Hindle, John V; Clare, Linda

    2017-12-15

    We report a mixed method evaluation of the feasibility and implementation of the AgeWell goal-setting intervention to promote healthy ageing later life. Researcher field notes, goal-setting interview content, and semi-structured interviews with participants were content analysed to review trial implementation and participants' perspective on the goal-setting and mentoring intervention. 75 people were recruited: 21 in the goal-setting and 22 in the goal-setting with mentoring arms of the intervention. Goal-setting was feasible in the main domains of interest. Adherence to the protocol was good and the mentoring schedule was adhered to. Participants reported satisfaction with their goal attainment, but barriers for non-achievement were also identified. Recommendations for small changes to the intervention included reducing the number of goals. Participants understood the goal-setting process, and were able to set realistic and achievable lifestyle goals. The intervention and the procedures were acceptable but changes in how goal-setting is both introduced and monitored are needed for wider implementation. Goal-setting can be a useful process to help people alter their lifestyle to allow them to age more successfully and reduce risk factors associated with dementia.

  6. Computerized cognitive training to improve mood in senior living settings: design of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith M

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Marianne Smith,1 Michael P Jones,2 Megan M Dotson,1 Fredric D Wolinsky3 1College of Nursing, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA; 2Department of Biostatistics, College of Public Health, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA; 3Department of Health, Management and Policy, College of Public Health, the University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA Purpose: This two-arm, randomized controlled trial was designed to evaluate a computerized cognitive speed of processing (SOP training known as Road Tour in the generally older group of adults residing in assisted living (AL and related senior housing. Study aims focused on depression-related outcomes that were observed in earlier SOP studies using Road Tour with younger, home-dwelling seniors. Study design and baseline outcomes are discussed. Participants and methods: A community-based design engaged AL and related senior living settings as partners in research. Selected staff served as on-site research assistants who were trained to recruit, consent, and train a target of 300 participants from AL and independent living (IL programs to use the intervention and attention control computerized training. Ten hours of initial computerized training was followed by two booster sessions at 5 and 11 months. Outcome measures included Useful Field of View, 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire, 12-item Centers for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale, 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorders, Brief Pain Inventory, and SF-36 Health Survey. Assessments occurred before randomization (pretraining and posttraining, 26 and 52 weeks. Results: A total of 351 participants were randomized to the intervention (n = 173 and attention control (n = 178 groups. There were no significant differences between groups in demographic characteristics, with the exception of education and reported osteoporosis. There were no significant differences in study outcomes between groups at baseline. Participants in AL had significantly lower

  7. Pressure mapping to prevent pressure ulcers in a hospital setting: A pragmatic randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunningberg, Lena; Sedin, Inga-Maj; Andersson, Sara; Pingel, Ronnie

    2017-07-01

    Pressure ulcers cause suffering to patients and costs to society. Reducing pressure at the interface between the patient's body and the support surface is a valid clinical intervention for reducing the risk of pressure ulcers. However, studies have shown that knowledge of how to reduce pressure and shear and to prevent pressure ulcers is lacking. To evaluate the effect of a pressure mapping system on pressure ulcer prevalence and incidence in a hospital setting. Pragmatic randomised controlled trial. A geriatric/internal medical ward with 26 beds in a Swedish university hospital. 190 patients were recruited (intervention: n=91; control: n=99) over a period of 9 months. Patients were eligible if they were over 50 years old, admitted to the ward between Sunday 4pm and Friday 4pm, and expected to stay in the ward ≥3 days. The continuous bedside pressure mapping system displays the patient's pressure points in real-time colour imagery showing how pressure is distributed at the body-mat interface. The system gives immediate feedback to staff about the patient's pressure points, facilitating preventive interventions related to repositioning. It was used from admittance to discharge from the ward (or 14 days at most). Both intervention and control groups received standard pressure ulcer prevention care. No significant difference in the prevalence and incidence of pressure ulcers was shown between intervention and control groups. The prevalence of pressure ulcers in the intervention group was 24.2% on day 1 and 28.2% on day 14. In the control group the corresponding numbers were 18.2% and 23.8%. Seven of 69 patients (10.1%) in the intervention group and seven of 81 patients (8.6%) in the control group who had no pressure ulcers on admission developed category 1 and category 2 ulcers during their hospital stay. The incidence rate ratio between the intervention and control groups was 1.13 (95% CI: 0.34-3.79). This study failed to demonstrate a beneficial effect of a

  8. The role of therapeutic optimism in recruitment to a clinical trial in a peripartum setting: balancing hope and uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallowell, Nina; Snowdon, Claire; Morrow, Susan; Norman, Jane E; Denison, Fiona C; Lawton, Julia

    2016-06-01

    Hope has therapeutic value because it enables people to cope with uncertainty about their future health. Indeed, hope, or therapeutic optimism (TO), is seen as an essential aspect of the provision and experience of medical care. The role of TO in clinical research has been briefly discussed, but the concept, and whether it can be transferred from care to research and from patients to clinicians, has not been fully investigated. The role played by TO in research emerged during interviews with staff involved in a peripartum trial. This paper unpacks the concept of TO in this setting and considers the role it may play in the wider delivery of clinical trials. The Got-it trial is a UK-based, randomised placebo-controlled trial that investigates the use of sublingual glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) spray to treat retained placenta. Qualitative data were collected in open-ended interviews with obstetricians, research and clinical midwives (n =27) involved in trial recruitment. Data were analysed using the method of constant comparison. TO influenced staff engagement with Got-it at different points in the trial and in different ways. Prior knowledge of, and familiarity with, GTN meant that from the outset staff perceived the trial as low risk. TO facilitated staff involvement in the trial; staff who already understood GTN's effects were optimistic that it would work, and staff collaborated because they hoped that the trial would address what they identified as an important clinical need. TO could fluctuate over the course of the trial, and was sustained or undermined by unofficial observation of clinical outcomes and speculations about treatment allocation. Thus, TO appeared to be influenced by key situational factors: prior knowledge and experience, clinical need and observed participant outcomes. Situational TO plays a role in facilitating staff engagement with clinical research. TO may affect trial recruitment by enabling staff to sustain the levels of uncertainty, or

  9. Treatment of retained placenta with misoprostol: a randomised controlled trial in a low-resource setting (Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fauteck Heiner

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retained placenta is one of the common causes of maternal mortality in developing countries where access to appropriate obstetrical care is limited. Current treatment of retained placenta is manual removal of the placenta under anaesthesia, which can only take place in larger health care facilities. Medical treatment of retained placenta with prostaglandins E1 (misoprostol could be cost-effective and easy-to-use and could be a life-saving option in many low-resource settings. The aim of this study is to assess the efficacy and safety of sublingually administered misoprostol in women with retained placenta in a low resource setting. Methods Design: Multicentered randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, to be conducted in 5 hospitals in Tanzania, Africa. Inclusion criteria: Women with retained placenta, at a gestational age of 28 weeks or more and blood loss less than 750 ml, 30 minutes after delivery of the newborn despite active management of third stage of labour. Trial Entry & Randomisation & Study Medication: After obtaining informed consent, eligible women will be allocated randomly to the treatment groups using numbered envelopes that will be randomized in variable blocks containing identical capsules with either 800 microgram of misoprostol or placebo. The drugs will be given sublingually. The women, maternal care providers and researchers will be blinded to treatment allocation. Sample Size: 117 women, to show a 40% reduction in manual removals of the placenta (p = 0.05, 80% power. The randomization will be misoprostol: placebo = 2:1 Primary Study Outcome: Expulsion of the placenta without manual removal. Secondary outcome is the number of blood transfusions. Discussion This is a protocol for a randomized trial in a low resource setting to assess if medical treatment of women with retained placenta with misoprostol reduces the incidence of manual removal of the placenta. Clinical Trial Registration Current

  10. Translating U-500R Randomized Clinical Trial Evidence to the Practice Setting: A Diabetes Educator/Expert Prescriber Team Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergen, Paula M; Kruger, Davida F; Taylor, April D; Eid, Wael E; Bhan, Arti; Jackson, Jeffrey A

    2017-06-01

    Purpose The purpose of this article is to provide recommendations to the diabetes educator/expert prescriber team for the use of human regular U-500 insulin (U-500R) in patients with severely insulin-resistant type 2 diabetes, including its initiation and titration, by utilizing dosing charts and teaching materials translated from a recent U-500R clinical trial. Conclusions Clinically relevant recommendations and teaching materials for the optimal use and management of U-500R in clinical practice are provided based on the efficacy and safety results of and lessons learned from the U-500R clinical trial by Hood et al, current standards of practice, and the authors' clinical expertise. This trial was the first robustly powered, randomized, titration-to-target trial to compare twice-daily and three-times-daily U-500R dosing regimens. Modifications were made to the initiation and titration dosing algorithms used in this trial to simplify dosing strategies for the clinical setting and align with current glycemic targets recommended by the American Diabetes Association. Leveraging the expertise, resources, and patient interactions of the diabetes educator who can provide diabetes self-management education and support in collaboration with the multidisciplinary diabetes team is strongly recommended to ensure patients treated with U-500R receive the timely and comprehensive care required to safely and effectively use this highly concentrated insulin.

  11. Developing an OMERACT Core Outcome Set for Assessing Safety Components in Rheumatology Trials: The OMERACT Safety Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klokker, Louise; Tugwell, Peter; Furst, Daniel E; Devoe, Dan; Williamson, Paula; Terwee, Caroline B; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E; Strand, Vibeke; Woodworth, Thasia; Leong, Amye L; Goel, Niti; Boers, Maarten; Brooks, Peter M; Simon, Lee S; Christensen, Robin

    2017-12-01

    Failure to report harmful outcomes in clinical research can introduce bias favoring a potentially harmful intervention. While core outcome sets (COS) are available for benefits in randomized controlled trials in many rheumatic conditions, less attention has been paid to safety in such COS. The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Filter 2.0 emphasizes the importance of measuring harms. The Safety Working Group was reestablished at the OMERACT 2016 with the objective to develop a COS for assessing safety components in trials across rheumatologic conditions. The safety issue has previously been discussed at OMERACT, but without a consistent approach to ensure harms were included in COS. Our methods include (1) identifying harmful outcomes in trials of interventions studied in patients with rheumatic diseases by a systematic literature review, (2) identifying components of safety that should be measured in such trials by use of a patient-driven approach including qualitative data collection and statistical organization of data, and (3) developing a COS through consensus processes including everyone involved. Members of OMERACT including patients, clinicians, researchers, methodologists, and industry representatives reached consensus on the need to continue the efforts on developing a COS for safety in rheumatology trials. There was a general agreement about the need to identify safety-related outcomes that are meaningful to patients, framed in terms that patients consider relevant so that they will be able to make informed decisions. The OMERACT Safety Working Group will advance the work previously done within OMERACT using a new patient-driven approach.

  12. PRagmatic trial Of Video Education in Nursing homes: The design and rationale for a pragmatic cluster randomized trial in the nursing home setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mor, Vincent; Volandes, Angelo E; Gutman, Roee; Gatsonis, Constantine; Mitchell, Susan L

    2017-04-01

    Background/Aims Nursing homes are complex healthcare systems serving an increasingly sick population. Nursing homes must engage patients in advance care planning, but do so inconsistently. Video decision support tools improved advance care planning in small randomized controlled trials. Pragmatic trials are increasingly employed in health services research, although not commonly in the nursing home setting to which they are well-suited. This report presents the design and rationale for a pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial that evaluated the "real world" application of an Advance Care Planning Video Program in two large US nursing home healthcare systems. Methods PRagmatic trial Of Video Education in Nursing homes was conducted in 360 nursing homes (N = 119 intervention/N = 241 control) owned by two healthcare systems. Over an 18-month implementation period, intervention facilities were instructed to offer the Advance Care Planning Video Program to all patients. Control facilities employed usual advance care planning practices. Patient characteristics and outcomes were ascertained from Medicare Claims, Minimum Data Set assessments, and facility electronic medical record data. Intervention adherence was measured using a Video Status Report embedded into electronic medical record systems. The primary outcome was the number of hospitalizations/person-day alive among long-stay patients with advanced dementia or cardiopulmonary disease. The rationale for the approaches to facility randomization and recruitment, intervention implementation, population selection, data acquisition, regulatory issues, and statistical analyses are discussed. Results The large number of well-characterized candidate facilities enabled several unique design features including stratification on historical hospitalization rates, randomization prior to recruitment, and 2:1 control to intervention facilities ratio. Strong endorsement from corporate leadership made randomization

  13. Exploring patients' treatment journeys following randomisation in mental health trials to improve future trial conduct: a synthesis of multiple qualitative data sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Katrina M; Percival, John; Kessler, David; Donovan, Jenny

    2017-06-15

    The way in which pragmatic trials are designed suggests that there are differences between the experiences of participants randomised to usual care and intervention arms. These potential differences relate not only to which treatment participants receive but also how they access and engage with their allocated treatment. Such differences could affect trial results. The aim of this study was to assess whether such differences exist and, if they do, to consider their implications for the design of future trials. Interview transcripts were sampled from data sets gathered during three qualitative studies, all of which had been nested within large, primary care depression trials. Each study had explored trial participants' views and experiences of treatments received following randomisation. Transcripts from 37 participants were purposefully sampled, 20 of which were from interviews held with individuals allocated to receive usual GP care. Data were analysed thematically. There was evidence of differences between trial arms across all three data sets. Intervention participants were willing and able to engage with the treatment to which they had been allocated. Randomisation had led to them embarking upon a clear treatment pathway and receiving care in a context where they felt comfortable discussing their mental health and had sufficient time to do so. Intervention participants also had continuity with and confidence in the practitioners they saw. A few usual-care participants talked about having continuity with and confidence in their GPs. However, most of the usual-care participants reported a reluctance to consult GPs about mental health, difficulties in securing treatment appointments, and little or no changes in care following randomisation. Additionally, most reported a lack of continuity of care and a lack confidence in the treatment available to them. There are important differences between usual-care and intervention arms that go beyond treatment received, and

  14. Trial-Based Functional Analysis and Functional Communication Training in an Early Childhood Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Joseph M.; Bloom, Sarah E.; Irvin, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Problem behavior is common in early childhood special education classrooms. Functional communication training (FCT; Carr & Durand, 1985) may reduce problem behavior but requires identification of its function. The trial-based functional analysis (FA) is a method that can be used to identify problem behavior function in schools. We conducted…

  15. Methodological basis for the optimization of a marine sea-urchin embryo test (SET) for the ecological assessment of coastal water quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saco-Alvarez, Liliana; Durán, Iria; Ignacio Lorenzo, J; Beiras, Ricardo

    2010-05-01

    The sea-urchin embryo test (SET) has been frequently used as a rapid, sensitive, and cost-effective biological tool for marine monitoring worldwide, but the selection of a sensitive, objective, and automatically readable endpoint, a stricter quality control to guarantee optimum handling and biological material, and the identification of confounding factors that interfere with the response have hampered its widespread routine use. Size increase in a minimum of n=30 individuals per replicate, either normal larvae or earlier developmental stages, was preferred to observer-dependent, discontinuous responses as test endpoint. Control size increase after 48 h incubation at 20 degrees C must meet an acceptability criterion of 218 microm. In order to avoid false positives minimums of 32 per thousand salinity, 7 pH and 2mg/L oxygen, and a maximum of 40 microg/L NH(3) (NOEC) are required in the incubation media. For in situ testing size increase rates must be corrected on a degree-day basis using 12 degrees C as the developmental threshold. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Roothaan’s approach to solve the Hartree-Fock equations for atoms confined by soft walls: Basis set with correct asymptotic behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Bautista, Mariano; Díaz-García, Cecilia; Navarrete-López, Alejandra M.; Vargas, Rubicelia; Garza, Jorge, E-mail: jgo@xanum.uam.mx [Departamento de Química, División de Ciencias Básicas e Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, Iztapalapa C. P. 09340, México D. F., México (Mexico)

    2015-07-21

    In this report, we use a new basis set for Hartree-Fock calculations related to many-electron atoms confined by soft walls. One- and two-electron integrals were programmed in a code based in parallel programming techniques. The results obtained with this proposal for hydrogen and helium atoms were contrasted with other proposals to study just one and two electron confined atoms, where we have reproduced or improved the results previously reported. Usually, an atom enclosed by hard walls has been used as a model to study confinement effects on orbital energies, the main conclusion reached by this model is that orbital energies always go up when the confinement radius is reduced. However, such an observation is not necessarily valid for atoms confined by penetrable walls. The main reason behind this result is that for atoms with large polarizability, like beryllium or potassium, external orbitals are delocalized when the confinement is imposed and consequently, the internal orbitals behave as if they were in an ionized atom. Naturally, the shell structure of these atoms is modified drastically when they are confined. The delocalization was an argument proposed for atoms confined by hard walls, but it was never verified. In this work, the confinement imposed by soft walls allows to analyze the delocalization concept in many-electron atoms.

  17. Roothaan's approach to solve the Hartree-Fock equations for atoms confined by soft walls: Basis set with correct asymptotic behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Bautista, Mariano; Díaz-García, Cecilia; Navarrete-López, Alejandra M; Vargas, Rubicelia; Garza, Jorge

    2015-07-21

    In this report, we use a new basis set for Hartree-Fock calculations related to many-electron atoms confined by soft walls. One- and two-electron integrals were programmed in a code based in parallel programming techniques. The results obtained with this proposal for hydrogen and helium atoms were contrasted with other proposals to study just one and two electron confined atoms, where we have reproduced or improved the results previously reported. Usually, an atom enclosed by hard walls has been used as a model to study confinement effects on orbital energies, the main conclusion reached by this model is that orbital energies always go up when the confinement radius is reduced. However, such an observation is not necessarily valid for atoms confined by penetrable walls. The main reason behind this result is that for atoms with large polarizability, like beryllium or potassium, external orbitals are delocalized when the confinement is imposed and consequently, the internal orbitals behave as if they were in an ionized atom. Naturally, the shell structure of these atoms is modified drastically when they are confined. The delocalization was an argument proposed for atoms confined by hard walls, but it was never verified. In this work, the confinement imposed by soft walls allows to analyze the delocalization concept in many-electron atoms.

  18. Accurate Ionization Potentials and Electron Affinities of Acceptor Molecules I. Reference Data at the CCSD(T) Complete Basis Set Limit

    KAUST Repository

    Richard, Ryan M.

    2016-01-05

    © 2016 American Chemical Society. In designing organic materials for electronics applications, particularly for organic photovoltaics (OPV), the ionization potential (IP) of the donor and the electron affinity (EA) of the acceptor play key roles. This makes OPV design an appealing application for computational chemistry since IPs and EAs are readily calculable from most electronic structure methods. Unfortunately reliable, high-accuracy wave function methods, such as coupled cluster theory with single, double, and perturbative triples [CCSD(T)] in the complete basis set (CBS) limit are too expensive for routine applications to this problem for any but the smallest of systems. One solution is to calibrate approximate, less computationally expensive methods against a database of high-accuracy IP/EA values; however, to our knowledge, no such database exists for systems related to OPV design. The present work is the first of a multipart study whose overarching goal is to determine which computational methods can be used to reliably compute IPs and EAs of electron acceptors. This part introduces a database of 24 known organic electron acceptors and provides high-accuracy vertical IP and EA values expected to be within ±0.03 eV of the true non-relativistic, vertical CCSD(T)/CBS limit. Convergence of IP and EA values toward the CBS limit is studied systematically for the Hartree-Fock, MP2 correlation, and beyond-MP2 coupled cluster contributions to the focal point estimates.

  19. Development of a core outcome set for orthodontic trials using a mixed-methods approach: protocol for a multicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsichlaki, Aliki; O'Brien, Kevin; Johal, Ama; Marshman, Zoe; Benson, Philip; Colonio Salazar, Fiorella B; Fleming, Padhraig S

    2017-08-04

    Orthodontic treatment is commonly undertaken in young people, with over 40% of children in the UK needing treatment and currently one third having treatment, at a cost to the National Health Service in England and Wales of £273 million each year. Most current research about orthodontic care does not consider what patients truly feel about, or want, from treatment, and a diverse range of outcomes is being used with little consistency between studies. This study aims to address these problems, using established methodology to develop a core outcome set for use in future clinical trials of orthodontic interventions in children and young people. This is a mixed-methods study incorporating four distinct stages. The first stage will include a scoping review of the scientific literature to identify primary and secondary outcome measures that have been used in previous orthodontic clinical trials. The second stage will involve qualitative interviews and focus groups with orthodontic patients aged 10 to 16 years to determine what outcomes are important to them. The outcomes elicited from these two stages will inform the third stage of the study in which a long-list of outcomes will be ranked in terms of importance using electronic Delphi surveys involving clinicians and patients. The final stage of the study will involve face-to-face consensus meetings with all stakeholders to discuss and agree on the outcome measures that should be included in the final core outcome set. This research will help to inform patients, parents, clinicians and commissioners about outcomes that are important to young people undergoing orthodontic treatment. Adoption of the core outcome set in future clinical trials of orthodontic treatment will make it easier for results to be compared, contrasted and combined. This should translate into improved decision-making by all stakeholders involved. The project has been registered on the Core Outcome Measures in Effectiveness Trials ( COMET ) website

  20. Return of individual research results and incidental findings in the clinical trials cooperative group setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferriere, Michael; Van Ness, Brian

    2012-04-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI)-funded cooperative group cancer clinical trial system develops experimental therapies and often collects samples from patients for correlative research. The cooperative group bank (CGB) system maintains biobanks with a current policy not to return research results to individuals. An online survey was created, and 10 directors of CGBs completed the surveys asking about understanding and attitudes in changing policies to consider return of incidental findings (IFs) and individual research results (IRRs) of health significance. The potential impact of the 10 consensus recommendations of Wolf et al. presented in this issue are examined. Reidentification of samples is often not problematic; however, changes to the current banking and clinical trial systems would require significant effort to fulfill an obligation of recontact of subjects. Additional resources, as well as a national advisory board would be required to standardize implementation.

  1. Recruitment for a Guided Self-Help Binge Eating Trial: Potential Lessons for Implementing Programs in Everyday Practice Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBar, Lynn L.; Yarborough, Bobbi Jo; Striegel-Moore, Ruth H.; Rosselli, Francine; Perrin, Nancy; Wilson, G. Terence; Kraemer, Helena C.; Green, Rory; Lynch, Frances

    2009-01-01

    Objective To explore effects of various recruitment strategies on randomized clinical trial (RCT)-entry characteristics for patients with eating disorders within an everyday health-plan practice setting. Methods Randomly selected women, aged 25-50, in a Pacific Northwest HMO were invited to complete a self-report binge-eating screener for two treatment trials. We publicized the trials within the health plan to allow self-referral. Here, we report differences on eating-disorder status by mode and nature of recruitment (online, mail, self-referred) and assessment (comprehensive versus abbreviated) and on possible differences in enrollee characteristics between those recruited by strategy (self-referred versus study-outreach efforts). Results Few differences emerged among those recruited through outreach who responded by different modalities (internet versus mail), early-versus-late responders, and those enrolling under more comprehensive or abbreviated assessment. Self-referred were more likely to meet binge-eating thresholds and reported higher average BMI than those recruited by outreach and responding by mail; however, in most respects the groups were more similar than anticipated. Fewer than 1% of those initially contacted through outreach enrolled. Conclusions Aggressive outreach and screening is likely not feasible for broader dissemination in everyday practice settings and recruits individuals with more similar demographic and clinical characteristics to those recruited through more abbreviated and realistic screening procedures than anticipated. PMID:19275947

  2. Uganda gets set for vaccine trials, but the ethical debate continues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-04-01

    An HIV vaccine trial scheduled for 1997 involves 2000 male and female members of the Uganda People's Defence Force. The volunteers are 18-40 years old and have been evaluated for 18 months. The trial of Alvac-HIV vaccine developed by Pasteur Manieux Connaught will be conducted by the Joint Clinical Research Council, a joint venture of Makerere University and the Ministries of Health and Defence, in collaboration with the Johns Hopkins University. The vaccine has already been tested on 300 volunteers in France and the US. The initial stage of testing will involve a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial comparing the safety and immunogenicity of four successive injections in 20 HIV-negative and 20 HIV-positive volunteers. Follow-up will continue for a year. While volunteers will get free medical attention if they develop a severe reaction to the vaccine and will receive a full explanation about the experimental nature of the vaccine, it has not been determined how volunteers will be compensated if something unforeseen goes wrong. Additional concerns revolve around Uganda's readiness to institute proper legal controls and ethical standards in cases of biomedical research.

  3. Individual energy use and feedback in an office setting: A field trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murtagh, Niamh; Nati, Michele; Headley, William R.; Gatersleben, Birgitta; Gluhak, Alexander; Imran, Muhammad Ali; Uzzell, David

    2013-01-01

    Despite national plans to deploy smart meters in small and medium businesses in the UK, there is little knowledge of occupant energy use in offices. The objectives of the study were to investigate the effect of individual feedback on energy use at the workdesk, and to test the relationship between individual determinants, energy use and energy reduction. A field trial is presented, which monitored occupant energy use and provided individual feedback to 83 office workers in a university. The trial comprised pre- and post-intervention surveys, energy measurement and provision of feedback for 18 weeks post-baseline, and two participant focus groups. The main findings were: statistically significant energy reduction was found, but not for the entire measurement period; engagement with feedback diminished over time; no measured individual variables were related to energy reduction and only attitudes to energy conservation were related to energy use; an absence of motivation to undertake energy reduction actions was in evidence. The implications for energy use in offices are considered, including the need for motivations beyond energy reduction to be harnessed to realise the clear potential for reduced energy use at workdesks. -- Highlights: •First study on individual energy use and feedback in offices. •Field trial with 83 office workers, measuring plug load at desks over 18 weeks. •Feedback resulted in energy reduction although not consistently. •Sizeable minority did not engage with the feedback. •Lack of motivation to conserve energy evident in focus groups

  4. Evaluation of the volatility basis-set approach for the simulation of organic aerosol formation in the Mexico City metropolitan area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Tsimpidi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available New primary and secondary organic aerosol modules have been added to PMCAMx, a three dimensional chemical transport model (CTM, for use with the SAPRC99 chemistry mechanism based on recent smog chamber studies. The new modelling framework is based on the volatility basis-set approach: both primary and secondary organic components are assumed to be semivolatile and photochemically reactive and are distributed in logarithmically spaced volatility bins. This new framework with the use of the new volatility basis parameters for low-NOx and high-NOx conditions tends to predict 4–6 times higher anthropogenic SOA concentrations than those predicted with the older generation of models. The resulting PMCAMx-2008 was applied in Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA for approximately a week during April 2003 during a period of very low regional biomass burning impact. The emission inventory, which uses as a starting point the MCMA 2004 official inventory, is modified and the primary organic aerosol (POA emissions are distributed by volatility based on dilution experiments. The predicted organic aerosol (OA concentrations peak in the center of Mexico City, reaching values above 40 μg m−3. The model predictions are compared with the results of the Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF analysis of the Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (AMS observations. The model reproduces both Hydrocarbon-like Organic Aerosol (HOA and Oxygenated Organic Aerosol (OOA concentrations and diurnal profiles. The small OA underprediction during the rush-hour periods and overprediction in the afternoon suggest potential improvements to the description of fresh primary organic emissions and the formation of the oxygenated organic aerosols, respectively, although they may also be due to errors in the simulation of dispersion and vertical mixing. However, the AMS OOA data are not specific enough to prove that the model reproduces the organic aerosol

  5. Evaluation of the Volatility Basis-Set Approach for Modeling Primary and Secondary Organic Aerosol in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsimpidi, A. P.; Karydis, V. A.; Pandis, S. N.; Zavala, M.; Lei, W.; Molina, L. T.

    2007-12-01

    Anthropogenic air pollution is an increasingly serious problem for public health, agriculture, and global climate. Organic material (OM) contributes ~ 20-50% to the total fine aerosol mass at continental mid-latitudes. Although OM accounts for a large fraction of PM2.5 concentration worldwide, the contributions of primary and secondary organic aerosol have been difficult to quantify. In this study, new primary and secondary organic aerosol modules were added to PMCAMx, a three dimensional chemical transport model (Gaydos et al., 2007), for use with the SAPRC99 chemistry mechanism (Carter, 2000; ENVIRON, 2006) based on recent smog chamber studies (Robinson et al., 2007). The new modeling framework is based on the volatility basis-set approach (Lane et al., 2007): both primary and secondary organic components are assumed to be semivolatile and photochemically reactive and are distributed in logarithmically spaced volatility bins. The emission inventory, which uses as starting point the MCMA 2004 official inventory (CAM, 2006), is modified and the primary organic aerosol (POA) emissions are distributed by volatility based on dilution experiments (Robinson et al., 2007). Sensitivity tests where POA is considered as nonvolatile and POA and SOA as chemically reactive are also described. In all cases PMCAMx is applied in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area during March 2006. The modeling domain covers a 180x180x6 km region in the MCMA with 3x3 km grid resolution. The model predictions are compared with Aerodyne's Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (AMS) observations from the MILAGRO Campaign. References Robinson, A. L.; Donahue, N. M.; Shrivastava, M. K.; Weitkamp, E. A.; Sage, A. M.; Grieshop, A. P.; Lane, T. E.; Pandis, S. N.; Pierce, J. R., 2007. Rethinking organic aerosols: semivolatile emissions and photochemical aging. Science 315, 1259-1262. Gaydos, T. M.; Pinder, R. W.; Koo, B.; Fahey, K. M.; Pandis, S. N., 2007. Development and application of a three- dimensional aerosol

  6. A simple and efficient dispersion correction to the Hartree-Fock theory (2): Incorporation of a geometrical correction for the basis set superposition error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Tatsusada; Hayashi, Takahisa; Mashima, Akira; Chuman, Hiroshi

    2015-10-01

    One of the most challenging problems in computer-aided drug discovery is the accurate prediction of the binding energy between a ligand and a protein. For accurate estimation of net binding energy ΔEbind in the framework of the Hartree-Fock (HF) theory, it is necessary to estimate two additional energy terms; the dispersion interaction energy (Edisp) and the basis set superposition error (BSSE). We previously reported a simple and efficient dispersion correction, Edisp, to the Hartree-Fock theory (HF-Dtq). In the present study, an approximation procedure for estimating BSSE proposed by Kruse and Grimme, a geometrical counterpoise correction (gCP), was incorporated into HF-Dtq (HF-Dtq-gCP). The relative weights of the Edisp (Dtq) and BSSE (gCP) terms were determined to reproduce ΔEbind calculated with CCSD(T)/CBS or /aug-cc-pVTZ (HF-Dtq-gCP (scaled)). The performance of HF-Dtq-gCP (scaled) was compared with that of B3LYP-D3(BJ)-bCP (dispersion corrected B3LYP with the Boys and Bernadi counterpoise correction (bCP)), by taking ΔEbind (CCSD(T)-bCP) of small non-covalent complexes as 'a golden standard'. As a critical test, HF-Dtq-gCP (scaled)/6-31G(d) and B3LYP-D3(BJ)-bCP/6-31G(d) were applied to the complex model for HIV-1 protease and its potent inhibitor, KNI-10033. The present results demonstrate that HF-Dtq-gCP (scaled) is a useful and powerful remedy for accurately and promptly predicting ΔEbind between a ligand and a protein, albeit it is a simple correction procedure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Antiferromagnetic vs. non-magnetic ε phase of solid oxygen. Periodic density functional theory studies using a localized atomic basis set and the role of exact exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Solís, A; Zicovich-Wilson, C M; Hernández-Lamoneda, R; Ochoa-Calle, A J

    2017-01-25

    The question of the non-magnetic (NM) vs. antiferromagnetic (AF) nature of the ε phase of solid oxygen is a matter of great interest and continuing debate. In particular, it has been proposed that the ε phase is actually composed of two phases, a low-pressure AF ε 1 phase and a higher pressure NM ε 0 phase [Crespo et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A., 2014, 111, 10427]. We address this problem through periodic spin-restricted and spin-polarized Kohn-Sham density functional theory calculations at pressures from 10 to 50 GPa using calibrated GGA and hybrid exchange-correlation functionals with Gaussian atomic basis sets. The two possible configurations for the antiferromagnetic (AF1 and AF2) coupling of the 0 ≤ S ≤ 1 O 2 molecules in the (O 2 ) 4 unit cell were studied. Full enthalpy-driven geometry optimizations of the (O 2 ) 4 unit cells were done to study the pressure evolution of the enthalpy difference between the non-magnetic and both antiferromagnetic structures. We also address the evolution of structural parameters and the spin-per-molecule vs. pressure. We find that the spin-less solution becomes more stable than both AF structures above 50 GPa and, crucially, the spin-less solution yields lattice parameters in much better agreement with experimental data at all pressures than the AF structures. The optimized AF2 broken-symmetry structures lead to large errors of the a and b lattice parameters when compared with experiments. The results for the NM model are in much better agreement with the experimental data than those found for both AF models and are consistent with a completely non-magnetic (O 2 ) 4 unit cell for the low-pressure regime of the ε phase.

  8. Formation of organic aerosol in the Paris region during the MEGAPOLI summer campaign: evaluation of the volatility-basis-set approach within the CHIMERE model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. J. Zhang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Simulations with the chemistry transport model CHIMERE are compared to measurements performed during the MEGAPOLI (Megacities: Emissions, urban, regional and Global Atmospheric POLlution and climate effects, and Integrated tools for assessment and mitigation summer campaign in the Greater Paris region in July 2009. The volatility-basis-set approach (VBS is implemented into this model, taking into account the volatility of primary organic aerosol (POA and the chemical aging of semi-volatile organic species. Organic aerosol is the main focus and is simulated with three different configurations with a modified treatment of POA volatility and modified secondary organic aerosol (SOA formation schemes. In addition, two types of emission inventories are used as model input in order to test the uncertainty related to the emissions. Predictions of basic meteorological parameters and primary and secondary pollutant concentrations are evaluated, and four pollution regimes are defined according to the air mass origin. Primary pollutants are generally overestimated, while ozone is consistent with observations. Sulfate is generally overestimated, while ammonium and nitrate levels are well simulated with the refined emission data set. As expected, the simulation with non-volatile POA and a single-step SOA formation mechanism largely overestimates POA and underestimates SOA. Simulation of organic aerosol with the VBS approach taking into account the aging of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOC shows the best correlation with measurements. High-concentration events observed mostly after long-range transport are well reproduced by the model. Depending on the emission inventory used, simulated POA levels are either reasonable or underestimated, while SOA levels tend to be overestimated. Several uncertainties related to the VBS scheme (POA volatility, SOA yields, the aging parameterization, to emission input data, and to simulated OH levels can be responsible for

  9. Ethical aspects in clinical trials in the CIS, in particular the setting up of ethical committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubar, Olga

    2005-01-01

    The ethical aspects of clinical trials in the CIS are based on the development of systematic ethical review and ethical insight and responsibility on the part of researchers, sponsors, and government agencies and society. This is the main purpose of the Forum for Ethics Committees in the Commonwealth of Independent States (FECCIS) whose establishment and activities are focused on the integration of the CIS into the world system of biomedical research with regard to safeguarding ethical standards of human rights protection and harmonization of regulative and methodological space to safeguard protection of human rights and the dignity of biomedical research participants in the CIS.

  10. A jackknife approach to quantifying single-trial correlation between covariance-based metrics undefined on a single-trial basis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Craig G; Thompson, William H; Bosman, Conrado A; Fries, Pascal

    2015-07-01

    The quantification of covariance between neuronal activities (functional connectivity) requires the observation of correlated changes and therefore multiple observations. The strength of such neuronal correlations may itself undergo moment-by-moment fluctuations, which might e.g. lead to fluctuations in single-trial metrics such as reaction time (RT), or may co-fluctuate with the correlation between activity in other brain areas. Yet, quantifying the relation between moment-by-moment co-fluctuations in neuronal correlations is precluded by the fact that neuronal correlations are not defined per single observation. The proposed solution quantifies this relation by first calculating neuronal correlations for all leave-one-out subsamples (i.e. the jackknife replications of all observations) and then correlating these values. Because the correlation is calculated between jackknife replications, we address this approach as jackknife correlation (JC). First, we demonstrate the equivalence of JC to conventional correlation for simulated paired data that are defined per observation and therefore allow the calculation of conventional correlation. While the JC recovers the conventional correlation precisely, alternative approaches, like sorting-and-binning, result in detrimental effects of the analysis parameters. We then explore the case of relating two spectral correlation metrics, like coherence, that require multiple observation epochs, where the only viable alternative analysis approaches are based on some form of epoch subdivision, which results in reduced spectral resolution and poor spectral estimators. We show that JC outperforms these approaches, particularly for short epoch lengths, without sacrificing any spectral resolution. Finally, we note that the JC can be applied to relate fluctuations in any smooth metric that is not defined on single observations. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Natalizumab treatment reduces fatigue in multiple sclerosis. Results from the TYNERGY trial; a study in the real life setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenningsson, Anders; Falk, Eva; Celius, Elisabeth G

    2013-01-01

    . The TYNERGY study aimed to further evaluate the effects of natalizumab treatment on MS-related fatigue. In this one-armed clinical trial including 195 MS patients, natalizumab was prescribed in a real-life setting, and a validated questionnaire, the Fatigue Scale for Motor and Cognitive functions (FSMC......), was used both before and after 12 months of treatment to evaluate a possible change in the fatigue experienced by the patients. In the treated cohort all measured variables, that is, fatigue score, quality of life, sleepiness, depression, cognition, and disability progression were improved from baseline...

  12. Effectiveness of individualized fall prevention program in geriatric rehabilitation hospital setting: a cluster randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizen, Efraim; Lutsyk, Galina; Wainer, Lea; Carmeli, Sarit

    2015-10-01

    There is no conclusive evidence that hospital fall prevention programs can reduce the number of falls. We aimed to investigate the effect of a targeted individualized falls prevention program in a geriatric rehabilitation hospital. This was a two-stage cluster-controlled trial carried out in five geriatric rehabilitation wards. Participants were 752 patients with mean age 83.2 years. The intervention was a two-phase targeted intervention falls prevention program. The intervention included an assessment of patient's risk by a risk assessment tool and an individual management that includes medical, behavioral, cognitive and environmental modifications. Patients with moderate risk received additionally orientation guidance, and mobility restriction. Patients determined as high risk were additionally placed under permanent personal supervision. Outcome measures were falls during hospital stay. In both stages of the trial, intervention and control wards were almost similar at baseline for individual patient characteristics. Overall, 37 falls occurred during the study. No significant difference was found in fall rates during follow-up between intervention and control wards: 1.306 falls per 1000 bed days in the intervention groups and 1.763-1.826 falls per 1000 bed days in the control groups. The adjusted hazard ratio for falls in the intervention groups was 1.36 (95 % confidence interval 0.89-1.77) (P = 0.08) in the first stage and 1.27 (95 % confidence interval 0.92-1.67) (P = 0.12) in the second stage. These results suggest that in a geriatric rehabilitation hospital a targeted individualized intervention falls prevention program is not effective in reducing falls.

  13. HANDBOOK: GUIDANCE ON SETTING PERMIT CONDITIONS AND REPORTING TRIAL BURN RESULTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Handbook provides guidance for establishing operational conditions for incinerators. he document provides a means for state and local agencies to achieve a level of consistency in setting permit conditions that will result in establishment of more uniform permit conditions n...

  14. A randomised controlled trial of extended brief intervention for alcohol dependent patients in an acute hospital setting (ADPAC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williamson Paula

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alcohol dependence affects approximately 3% of the English population, and accounts for significant medical and psychiatric morbidity. Only 5.6% of alcohol-dependent individuals ever access specialist treatment and only a small percentage ever seek treatment. As people who are alcohol dependent are more likely to have experienced health problems leading to frequent attendance at acute hospitals it would seem both sensible and practical to ensure that this setting is utilised as a major access point for treatment, and to test the effectiveness of these treatments. Methods/Design This is a randomised controlled trial with a primary hypothesis that extended brief interventions (EBI delivered to alcohol-dependent patients in a hospital setting by an Alcohol Specialist Nurse (ASN will be effective when compared to usual care in reducing overall alcohol consumption and improving on the standard measures of alcohol dependence. Consecutive patients will be screened for alcohol misuse in the Emergency Department (ED of a district general hospital. On identification of an alcohol-related problem, following informed written consent, we aim to randomize 130 patients per group. The ASN will discharge to usual clinical care all control group patients, and plan a programme of EBI for treatment group patients. Follow-up interview will be undertaken by a researcher blinded to the intervention at 12 and 24 weeks. The primary outcome measure is level of alcohol dependence as determined by the Severity of Alcohol Dependence Questionnaire (SADQ score. Secondary outcome measures include; Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT score, quantity and frequency of alcohol consumption, health-related quality of life measures, service utilisation, and patient experience. The trial will also allow an assessment of the cost-effectiveness of EBI in an acute hospital setting. In addition, patient experience will be assessed using qualitative methods

  15. Dancing for Parkinson Disease: A Randomized Trial of Irish Set Dancing Compared With Usual Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanahan, Joanne; Morris, Meg E; Bhriain, Orfhlaith Ni; Volpe, Daniele; Lynch, Tim; Clifford, Amanda M

    2017-09-01

    To examine the feasibility of a randomized controlled study design and to explore the benefits of a set dancing intervention compared with usual care. Randomized controlled design, with participants randomized to Irish set dance classes or a usual care group. Community based. Individuals with idiopathic Parkinson disease (PD) (N=90). The dance group attended a 1.5-hour dancing class each week for 10 weeks and undertook a home dance program for 20 minutes, 3 times per week. The usual care group continued with their usual care and daily activities. The primary outcome was feasibility, determined by recruitment rates, success of randomization and allocation procedures, attrition, adherence, safety, willingness of participants to be randomized, resource availability, and cost. Secondary outcomes were motor function (motor section of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale), quality of life (Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire-39), functional endurance (6-min walk test), and balance (mini-BESTest). Ninety participants were randomized (45 per group). There were no adverse effects or resource constraints. Although adherence to the dancing program was 93.5%, there was >40% attrition in each group. Postintervention, the dance group had greater nonsignificant gains in quality of life than the usual care group. There was a meaningful deterioration in endurance in the usual care group. There were no meaningful changes in other outcomes. The exit questionnaire showed participants enjoyed the classes and would like to continue participation. For people with mild to moderately severe PD, set dancing is feasible and enjoyable and may improve quality of life. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. How to set the stage for a full-fledged clinical trial testing 'incremental haemodialysis'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casino, Francesco Gaetano; Basile, Carlo

    2017-07-21

    Most people who make the transition to maintenance haemodialysis (HD) therapy are treated with a fixed dose of thrice-weekly HD (3HD/week) regimen without consideration of their residual kidney function (RKF). The RKF provides an effective and naturally continuous clearance of both small and middle molecules, plays a major role in metabolic homeostasis, nutritional status and cardiovascular health, and aids in fluid management. The RKF is associated with better patient survival and greater health-related quality of life. Its preservation is instrumental to the prescription of incremental (1HD/week to 2HD/week) HD. The recently heightened interest in incremental HD has been hindered by the current limitations of the urea kinetic model (UKM), which tend to overestimate the needed dialysis dose in the presence of a substantial RKF. A recent paper by Casino and Basile suggested a variable target model (VTM), which gives more clinical weight to the RKF and allows less frequent HD treatments at lower RKF as opposed to the fixed target model, based on the wrong concept of the clinical equivalence between renal and dialysis clearance. A randomized controlled trial (RCT) enrolling incident patients and comparing incremental HD (prescribed according to the VTM) with the standard 3HD/week schedule and focused on hard outcomes, such as survival and health-related quality of life of patients, is urgently needed. The first step in designing such a study is to compute the 'adequacy lines' and the associated fitting equations necessary for the most appropriate allocation of the patients in the two arms and their correct and safe follow-up. In conclusion, the potentially important clinical and financial implications of the incremental HD render it highly promising and warrant RCTs. The UKM is the keystone for conducting such studies. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  17. Warm ambient temperature decreases food intake in a simulated office setting: A pilot randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molly eBernhard

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: We hypothesized that exposure to temperatures above the thermoneutral zone would decrease food intake in young adults in a sedentary office environment over a 2-hour period. Methods: Participants wearing standardized clothing were randomized to perform routine office work in either within the thermoneutral zone, considered control (19-20°C, or above the thermoneutral zone considered warmer (26-27°C treatment in parallel-group design (n=11 and 9, respectively. Thermal images of the inner canthus of their eye and middle finger nail bed, representing proxies of core and peripheral temperatures, respectively, were taken at baseline, 1st, and 2nd hour during this lunchtime study. Relative heat dissipation was estimated as peripheral temperature. General linear models were conducted to examine the effects of thermal treatment the calories intake and potential mediation. Researchers conducted the trial registered as NCT02386891 at Clinicaltrials.gov during April- May 2014. Results: During the 2 hours stay in different ambient temperatures, the participants in the control conditions ate 99.5 kcal more than those in the warmer conditions; however, the difference was not statistically significant. Female participants ate about 350 kcal less than the male participants (P=0.024 in both groups and there was no significant association between calories intake and participant’s BMI. After controlling for thermal treatment, gender and BMI, the participant’s peripheral temperature was significantly associated with calories intake (p=0.002, suggesting a mediating effect. Specifically, for every 1°C increase in peripheral temperature indicating reduced heat dissipation, participants ate 85.9 kcal less food. Conclusions: This pilot study provided preliminary evidence of effects of thermal environment on food intake and the decreased food intake in the experimental (warmer environment is potentially mediated through thermoregulatory mechanisms.

  18. Warm Ambient Temperature Decreases Food Intake in a Simulated Office Setting: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhard, Molly C; Li, Peng; Allison, David B; Gohlke, Julia M

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that exposure to temperatures above the thermoneutral zone (TNZ) would decrease food intake in young adults in a sedentary office environment over a 2-h period. Participants wearing standardized clothing were randomized to perform routine office work in the TNZ, considered control (19-20°C), or above the TNZ considered warmer (26-27°C) using a parallel-group design (n = 11 and 9, respectively). Thermal images of the inner canthus of their eye and middle finger nail bed, representing proxies of core and peripheral temperatures, respectively, were taken at baseline, first, and second hour during this lunchtime study. Heat dissipation was estimated using peripheral temperature. General linear models were built to examine the effects of thermal treatment on caloric intake and potential mediation by heat dissipation. Researchers conducted the trial registered as NCT02386891 at Clinicaltrials.gov during April to May 2014. During the 2-h stay in different ambient temperatures, the participants in the control conditions ate 99.5 kcal more than those in the warmer conditions; however, the difference was not statistically significant. Female participants ate about 350 kcal less than the male participants (p = 0.024) in both groups and there was no significant association between caloric intake and participant's body mass index (BMI). After controlling for thermal treatment, gender and BMI, the participant's peripheral temperature was significantly associated with caloric intake (p = 0.002), suggesting a mediating effect. Specifically, for every 1°C increase in peripheral temperature suggesting increased heat dissipation, participants ate 85.9 kcal less food. This pilot study provided preliminary evidence of effects of thermal environment on food intake. It suggests that decreased food intake in the experimental (warmer) environment is potentially mediated through thermoregulatory mechanisms.

  19. The efficacy of early language intervention in mainstream school settings: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke, Silke; Burgoyne, Kelly; Bowyer-Crane, Claudine; Kyriacou, Maria; Zosimidou, Alexandra; Maxwell, Liam; Lervåg, Arne; Snowling, Margaret J; Hulme, Charles

    2017-10-01

    Oral language skills are a critical foundation for literacy and more generally for educational success. The current study shows that oral language skills can be improved by providing suitable additional help to children with language difficulties in the early stages of formal education. We conducted a randomized controlled trial with 394 children in England, comparing a 30-week oral language intervention programme starting in nursery (N = 132) with a 20-week version of the same programme starting in Reception (N = 133). The intervention groups were compared to an untreated waiting control group (N = 129). The programmes were delivered by trained teaching assistants (TAs) working in the children's schools/nurseries. All testers were blind to group allocation. Both the 20- and 30-week programmes produced improvements on primary outcome measures of oral language skill compared to the untreated control group. Effect sizes were small to moderate (20-week programme: d = .21; 30-week programme: d = .30) immediately following the intervention and were maintained at follow-up 6 months later. The difference in improvement between the 20-week and 30-week programmes was not statistically significant. Neither programme produced statistically significant improvements in children's early word reading or reading comprehension skills (secondary outcome measures). This study provides further evidence that oral language interventions can be delivered successfully by trained TAs to children with oral language difficulties in nursery and Reception classes. The methods evaluated have potentially important policy implications for early education. © 2017 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  20. Antibiotic prophylaxis at elective cesarean section: a randomized controlled trial in a low resource setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandil, Mohamed; Sanad, Zakaria; Gaber, Wael

    2014-04-01

    To determine the best time to administer prophylactic antibiotics at Cesarean delivery in order to reduce the postoperative maternal infectious morbidity in a low resource setting. One hundred term primigravidae with singleton pregnancy were recruited and randomly allocated to two equal groups. Each woman received 2 g intravenous Cefazoline. Women in Group I received it prior to skin incision while those in Group II had it immediately after cord clamping. We measured the following outcome parameters: (1) Surgical site wound infection; (2) Endometritis and (3) Urinary tract infection. There was no significant difference in any of the patients' characteristics between both groups. In Group I, three cases developed surgical site infections but four in Group II (p > 0.05). In Group I, the infected cases had Cesarean because of malpresentations while in Group II, two cases had Cesarean because of patients' request, one because of maternal heart disease and one due to intra-uterine growth restriction. Seven and nine cases had urinary tract infection in Groups I and II, respectively, (p > 0.05). Prophylactic antibiotic administration either prior to surgery or after cord clamping is probably equally effective in reducing the postoperative infectious morbidity after Cesarean in low resource settings.

  1. Protocol for the development of a core domain set for hidradenitis suppurativa trial outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlacius, Linnea; Ingram, John R; Garg, Amit

    2017-01-01

    . A recent systematic review found a total of 30 outcome measure instruments in 12 RCTs. This use of a broad range of outcome measures can increase difficulties in interpretation and comparison of results and may potentially obstruct appropriate evidence synthesis by causing reporting bias. One strategy...... of candidate items will be obtained by combining three data sets: (1) a systematic review of the literature, (2) US and Danish qualitative interview studies involving patients with HS and (3) an online healthcare professional (HCP) item generation survey. To reach consensus on the COS, 4 anonymous online...... Delphi rounds are then planned together with 2 face-to-face consensus meetings (1 in Europe and 1 in the USA) to ensure global representation. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The study will be performed according to the Helsinki declaration. All results from the study, including inconclusive or negative...

  2. Internet-versus group-administered cognitive behaviour therapy for panic disorder in a psychiatric setting: a randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlsson Andreas

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Internet administered cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT is a promising new way to deliver psychological treatment, but its effectiveness in regular care settings and in relation to more traditional CBT group treatment has not yet been determined. The primary aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of Internet-and group administered CBT for panic disorder (with or without agoraphobia in a randomised trial within a regular psychiatric care setting. The second aim of the study was to establish the cost-effectiveness of these interventions. Methods Patients referred for treatment by their physician, or self-referred, were telephone-screened by a psychiatric nurse. Patients fulfilling screening criteria underwent an in-person structured clinical interview carried out by a psychiatrist. A total of 113 consecutive patients were then randomly assigned to 10 weeks of either guided Internet delivered CBT (n = 53 or group CBT (n = 60. After treatment, and at a 6-month follow-up, patients were again assessed by the psychiatrist, blind to treatment condition. Results Immediately after randomization 9 patients dropped out, leaving 104 patients who started treatment. Patients in both treatment conditions showed significant improvement on the main outcome measure, the Panic Disorder Severity Scale (PDSS after treatment. For the Internet treatment the within-group effect size (pre-post on the PDSS was Cohen's d = 1.73, and for the group treatment it was d = 1.63. Between group effect sizes were low and treatment effects were maintained at 6-months follow-up. We found no statistically significant differences between the two treatment conditions using a mixed models approach to account for missing data. Group CBT utilised considerably more therapist time than did Internet CBT. Defining effect as proportion of PDSS responders, the cost-effectiveness analysis concerning therapist time showed that Internet treatment had superior cost

  3. Comment on "Rethinking first-principles electron transport theories with projection operators: The problems caused by partitioning the basis set" [J. Chem. Phys. 139, 114104 (2013)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandbyge, Mads

    2014-01-01

    , different from what would be obtained by using an orthogonal basis, and dividing surfaces defined in real-space. We argue that this assumption is not required to be fulfilled to get exact results. We show how the current/transmission calculated by the standard Greens function method is independent...

  4. Use of a goal setting intervention to increase adherence to low back pain rehabilitation: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppack, Russell J; Kristensen, Jakob; Karageorghis, Costas I

    2012-11-01

    To examine the effects of a goal setting intervention on self-efficacy, treatment efficacy, adherence and treatment outcome in patients undergoing low back pain rehabilitation. A mixed-model 2 (time) × 3 (group) randomized controlled trial. A residential rehabilitation centre for military personnel. UK military personnel volunteers (N = 48); mean age was 32.9 (SD 7.9) with a diagnosis of non-specific low back pain. Subjects were randomly assigned to either a goal setting experimental group (Exp, n = 16), therapist-led exercise therapy group (C1, n = 16) or non-therapist-led exercise therapy group (C2, n = 16). Treatment duration for all groups was three weeks. Self-efficacy, treatment efficacy and treatment outcome were recorded before and after the treatment period. Adherence was rated during regularly scheduled treatment sessions using the Sports Injury Rehabilitation Adherence Scale (SIRAS). The Biering-Sørensen test was used as the primary measure of treatment outcome. ANCOVA results showed that adherence scores were significantly higher in the experimental group (13.70 ± 1.58) compared with C2 (11.74 ± 1.35), (P goal setting to enhance adherence in clinical rehabilitation.

  5. Setting ventilation parameters guided by electrical impedance tomography in an animal trial of acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaplik, Michael; Biener, Ingeborg; Leonhardt, Steffen; Rossaint, Rolf

    2014-03-01

    Since mechanical ventilation can cause harm to lung tissue it should be as protective as possible. Whereas numerous options exist to set ventilator parameters, an adequate monitoring is lacking up to date. The Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) provides a non-invasive visualization of ventilation which is relatively easy to apply and commercially available. Although there are a number of published measures and parameters derived from EIT, it is not clear how to use EIT to improve clinical outcome of e.g. patients suffering from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), a severe disease with a high mortality rate. On the one hand, parameters should be easy to obtain, on the other hand clinical algorithms should consider them to optimize ventilator settings. The so called Global inhomogeneity (GI) index bases on the fact that ARDS is characterized by an inhomogeneous injury pattern. By applying positive endexpiratory pressures (PEEP), homogeneity should be attained. In this study, ARDS was induced by a double hit procedure in six pigs. They were randomly assigned to either the EIT or the control group. Whereas in the control group the ARDS network table was used to set the PEEP according to the current inspiratory oxygen fraction, in the EIT group the GI index was calculated during a decremental PEEP trial. PEEP was kept when GI index was lowest. Interestingly, PEEP was significantly higher in the EIT group. Additionally, two of these animals died ahead of the schedule. Obviously, not only homogeneity of ventilation distribution matters but also limitation of over-distension.

  6. Effective and cost-effective clinical trial recruitment strategies for postmenopausal women in a community-based, primary care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Debra A; Lock, Michael; Harvey, Bart J

    2010-09-01

    Little evidence exists to guide investigators on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of various recruitment strategies in primary care research. The purpose of this study is to describe the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of eight clinical trial recruitment methods for postmenopausal women in a community-based setting. A retrospective analysis of the yield and cost of eight different recruitment methods: 1) family physician (FP) recruiters, 2) FP referrals, 3) community presentations, 4) community events, 5) newsletters, 6) direct mailings, 7) posters, and 8) newspaper advertisements that were used to recruit postmenopausal women to a randomized clinical trial (RCT) evaluating the effectiveness of gabapentin in treating hot flashes. We recruited 197 postmenopausal women from a total of 904 screened, with 291 of the remainder being ineligible and 416 declining to participate. Of the 904 women screened, 34 (3.8%) were from FP recruiters and 35 (3.9%) were from other FP referrals while 612 (67.7%) resulted from newspaper advertisements. Of the 197 women enrolled, 141 (72%) were from newspaper advertisements, with 26 (13%) following next from posters. Word of mouth was identified as an additional unanticipated study recruitment strategy. Metropolitan newspaper advertising at $112.73 (Canadian) per enrolled participant and posters at $119.98 were found to be cost-effective recruitment methods. Newspaper advertisements were the most successful method to recruit postmenopausal women into a community-based, primary care RCT. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A cost analysis of implementing a behavioral weight loss intervention in community mental health settings: Results from the ACHIEVE trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Ellen M; Jerome, Gerald J; Dalcin, Arlene T; Gennusa, Joseph V; Goldsholl, Stacy; Frick, Kevin D; Wang, Nae-Yuh; Appel, Lawrence J; Daumit, Gail L

    2017-06-01

    In the ACHIEVE randomized controlled trial, an 18-month behavioral intervention accomplished weight loss in persons with serious mental illness who attended community psychiatric rehabilitation programs. This analysis estimates costs for delivering the intervention during the study. It also estimates expected costs to implement the intervention more widely in a range of community mental health programs. Using empirical data, costs were calculated from the perspective of a community psychiatric rehabilitation program delivering the intervention. Personnel and travel costs were calculated using time sheet data. Rent and supply costs were calculated using rent per square foot and intervention records. A univariate sensitivity analysis and an expert-informed sensitivity analysis were conducted. With 144 participants receiving the intervention and a mean weight loss of 3.4 kg, costs of $95 per participant per month and $501 per kilogram lost in the trial were calculated. In univariate sensitivity analysis, costs ranged from $402 to $725 per kilogram lost. Through expert-informed sensitivity analysis, it was estimated that rehabilitation programs could implement the intervention for $68 to $85 per client per month. Costs of implementing the ACHIEVE intervention were in the range of other intensive behavioral weight loss interventions. Wider implementation of efficacious lifestyle interventions in community mental health settings will require adequate funding mechanisms. © 2017 The Obesity Society.

  8. Provider Training to Screen and Initiate Evidence-Based Pediatric Obesity Treatment in Routine Practice Settings: A Randomized Pilot Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolko, Rachel P; Kass, Andrea E; Hayes, Jacqueline F; Levine, Michele D; Garbutt, Jane M; Proctor, Enola K; Wilfley, Denise E

    This randomized pilot trial evaluated two training modalities for first-line, evidence-based pediatric obesity services (screening and goal setting) among nursing students. Participants (N = 63) were randomized to live interactive training or Web-facilitated self-study training. Pretraining, post-training, and 1-month follow-up assessments evaluated training feasibility, acceptability, and impact (knowledge and skill via simulation). Moderator (previous experience) and predictor (content engagement) analyses were conducted. Nearly all participants (98%) completed assessments. Both types of training were acceptable, with higher ratings for live training and participants with previous experience (ps pediatric obesity services. Copyright © 2016 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. What is the best density functional to describe water clusters: evaluation of widely used density functionals with various basis sets for (H2O)n (n = 1-10)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Li, F.; Wang, L.; Zhao, J.; Xie, J. R. H.; Riley, Kevin Eugene; Chen, Z.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 130, 2/3 (2011), s. 341-352 ISSN 1432-881X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : water cluster * density functional theory * MP2 . CCSD(T) * basis set * relative energies Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.162, year: 2011

  10. Best strategies to implement clinical pathways in an emergency department setting: study protocol for a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbour, Mona; Curran, Janet; Scott, Shannon D; Guttman, Astrid; Rotter, Thomas; Ducharme, Francine M; Lougheed, M Diane; McNaughton-Filion, M Louise; Newton, Amanda; Shafir, Mark; Paprica, Alison; Klassen, Terry; Taljaard, Monica; Grimshaw, Jeremy; Johnson, David W

    2013-05-22

    The clinical pathway is a tool that operationalizes best evidence recommendations and clinical practice guidelines in an accessible format for 'point of care' management by multidisciplinary health teams in hospital settings. While high-quality, expert-developed clinical pathways have many potential benefits, their impact has been limited by variable implementation strategies and suboptimal research designs. Best strategies for implementing pathways into hospital settings remain unknown. This study will seek to develop and comprehensively evaluate best strategies for effective local implementation of externally developed expert clinical pathways. We will develop a theory-based and knowledge user-informed intervention strategy to implement two pediatric clinical pathways: asthma and gastroenteritis. Using a balanced incomplete block design, we will randomize 16 community emergency departments to receive the intervention for one clinical pathway and serve as control for the alternate clinical pathway, thus conducting two cluster randomized controlled trials to evaluate this implementation intervention. A minimization procedure will be used to randomize sites. Intervention sites will receive a tailored strategy to support full clinical pathway implementation. We will evaluate implementation strategy effectiveness through measurement of relevant process and clinical outcomes. The primary process outcome will be the presence of an appropriately completed clinical pathway on the chart for relevant patients. Primary clinical outcomes for each clinical pathway include the following: Asthma--the proportion of asthmatic patients treated appropriately with corticosteroids in the emergency department and at discharge; and Gastroenteritis--the proportion of relevant patients appropriately treated with oral rehydration therapy. Data sources include chart audits, administrative databases, environmental scans, and qualitative interviews. We will also conduct an overall process

  11. Implementing trials of complex interventions in community settings: The USC – Rancho Los Amigos Pressure Ulcer Prevention Study (PUPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Florence; Pyatak, Elizabeth A.; Carlson, Mike; Blanche, Erna Imperatore; Vigen, Cheryl; Hay, Joel; Mallinson, Trudy; Blanchard, Jeanine; Unger, Jennifer B.; Garber, Susan L.; Diaz, Jesus; Florindez, Lucia I.; Atkins, Michal; Rubayi, Salah; Azen, Stanley Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background Randomized trials of complex, non-pharmacologic interventions implemented in home and community settings, such as the University of Southern California (USC)–Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center (RLANRC) Pressure Ulcer Prevention Study (PUPS), present unique challenges with respect to: (a) participant recruitment and retention, (b) intervention delivery and fidelity, (c) randomization and assessment, and (d) potential inadvertent treatment effects. Purpose We describe the methods employed to address the challenges confronted in implementing PUPS. In this randomized controlled trial, we are assessing the efficacy of a complex, preventive intervention in reducing the incidence of, and costs associated with, the development of medically serious pressure ulcers in people with spinal cord injury. Method Individuals with spinal cord injury recruited from RLANRC were assigned to either a 12-month preventive intervention group or a standard care control group. The primary outcome is the incidence of serious pressure ulcers with secondary endpoints including ulcer-related surgeries, medical treatment costs, and quality of life. These outcomes are assessed at 12 and 24 months after randomization. Additionally, we are studying the mediating mechanisms that account for intervention outcomes. Results PUPS has been successfully implemented, including recruitment of the target sample size of 170 participants, assurance of the integrity of intervention protocol delivery with an average 90% treatment adherence rate, and enactment of the assessment plan. However, implementation has been replete with challenges. To meet recruitment goals, we instituted a five-pronged approach customized for an underserved, ethnically diverse population. In intervention delivery, we increased staff time to overcome economic and cultural barriers to retention and adherence. To ensure treatment fidelity and replicability, we monitored intervention protocol delivery in accord

  12. Implementing trials of complex interventions in community settings: the USC-Rancho Los Amigos pressure ulcer prevention study (PUPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Florence; Pyatak, Elizabeth A; Carlson, Mike; Blanche, Erna Imperatore; Vigen, Cheryl; Hay, Joel; Mallinson, Trudy; Blanchard, Jeanine; Unger, Jennifer B; Garber, Susan L; Diaz, Jesus; Florindez, Lucia I; Atkins, Michal; Rubayi, Salah; Azen, Stanley Paul

    2014-04-01

    Randomized trials of complex, non-pharmacologic interventions implemented in home and community settings, such as the University of Southern California (USC)-Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center (RLANRC) Pressure Ulcer Prevention Study (PUPS), present unique challenges with respect to (1) participant recruitment and retention, (2) intervention delivery and fidelity, (3) randomization and assessment, and (4) potential inadvertent treatment effects. We describe the methods employed to address the challenges confronted in implementing PUPS. In this randomized controlled trial, we are assessing the efficacy of a complex, preventive intervention in reducing the incidence of, and costs associated with, the development of medically serious pressure ulcers in people with spinal cord injury. Individuals with spinal cord injury recruited from RLANRC were assigned to either a 12-month preventive intervention group or a standard care control group. The primary outcome is the incidence of serious pressure ulcers with secondary endpoints including ulcer-related surgeries, medical treatment costs, and quality of life. These outcomes are assessed at 12 and 24 months after randomization. Additionally, we are studying the mediating mechanisms that account for intervention outcomes. PUPS has been successfully implemented, including recruitment of the target sample size of 170 participants, assurance of the integrity of intervention protocol delivery with an average 90% treatment adherence rate, and enactment of the assessment plan. However, implementation has been replete with challenges. To meet recruitment goals, we instituted a five-pronged approach customized for an underserved, ethnically diverse population. In intervention delivery, we increased staff time to overcome economic and cultural barriers to retention and adherence. To ensure treatment fidelity and replicability, we monitored intervention protocol delivery in accordance with a rigorous plan. Finally, we

  13. On the property of being a basis for a denumerable set of solutions of a nonlinear Schroedinger-type boundary-value problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhidkov, P.E.

    1998-01-01

    We consider the problem u''=f(u 2 )u (0 2 ) (for r→∞) = -∞. It is known that this problem possesses a sequence of solutions {u n } n=0,1,2... such that the nth solution u x (x) has precisely n roots in the interval (0,1). We prove the existence of a constant s 0 0 , an arbitrary above-described sequence of solutions of our problem is a basis of the space H s (0, 1)

  14. Can children identify and achieve goals for intervention? A randomized trial comparing two goal-setting approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vroland-Nordstrand, Kristina; Eliasson, Ann-Christin; Jacobsson, Helén; Johansson, Ulla; Krumlinde-Sundholm, Lena

    2016-06-01

    The efficacy of two different goal-setting approaches (children's self-identified goals and goals identified by parents) were compared on a goal-directed, task-oriented intervention. In this assessor-blinded parallel randomized trial, 34 children with disabilities (13 males, 21 females; mean age 9y, SD 1y 4mo) were randomized using concealed allocation to one of two 8-week, goal-directed, task-oriented intervention groups with different goal-setting approaches: (1) children's self-identified goals (n=18) using the Perceived Efficacy and Goal-Setting System, or (2) goals identified by parents (n=16) using the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM). Participants were recruited through eight paediatric rehabilitation centres and randomized between October 2011 and May 2013. The primary outcome measure was the Goal Attainment Scaling and the secondary measure, the COPM performance scale (COPM-P). Data were collected pre- and post-intervention and at the 5-month follow-up. There was no evidence of a difference in mean characteristics at baseline between groups. There was evidence of an increase in mean goal attainment (mean T score) in both groups after intervention (child-goal group: estimated mean difference [EMD] 27.84, 95% CI 22.93-32.76; parent-goal group: EMD 21.42, 95% CI 16.16-26.67). There was no evidence of a difference in the mean T scores post-intervention between the two groups (EMD 6.42, 95% CI -0.80 to 13.65). These results were sustained at the 5-month follow-up. Children's self-identified goals are achievable to the same extent as parent-identified goals and remain stable over time. Thus children can be trusted to identify their own goals for intervention, thereby influencing their involvement in their intervention programmes. © 2015 Mac Keith Press.

  15. Screen-and-treat approaches for cervical cancer prevention in low-resource settings: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Lynette; Kuhn, Louise; De Souza, Michelle; Pollack, Amy E; Dupree, William; Wright, Thomas C

    2005-11-02

    Non-cytology-based screen-and-treat approaches for cervical cancer prevention have been developed for low-resource settings, but few have directly addressed efficacy. To determine the safety and efficacy of 2 screen-and-treat approaches for cervical cancer prevention that were designed to be more resource-appropriate than conventional cytology-based screening programs. Randomized clinical trial of 6555 nonpregnant women, aged 35 to 65 years, recruited through community outreach and conducted between June 2000 and December 2002 at ambulatory women's health clinics in Khayelitsha, South Africa. All patients were screened using human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA testing and visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA). Women were subsequently randomized to 1 of 3 groups: cryotherapy if she had a positive HPV DNA test result; cryotherapy if she had a positive VIA test result; or to delayed evaluation. Biopsy-confirmed high-grade cervical cancer precursor lesions and cancer at 6 and 12 months in the HPV DNA and VIA groups compared with the delayed evaluation (control) group; complications after cryotherapy. The prevalence of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and cancer (CIN 2+) was significantly lower in the 2 screen-and-treat groups at 6 months after randomization than in the delayed evaluation group. At 6 months, CIN 2+ was diagnosed in 0.80% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.40%-1.20%) of the women in the HPV DNA group and 2.23% (95% CI, 1.57%-2.89%) in the VIA group compared with 3.55% (95% CI, 2.71%-4.39%) in the delayed evaluation group (Pcryotherapy, major complications were rare. Both screen-and-treat approaches are safe and result in a lower prevalence of high-grade cervical cancer precursor lesions compared with delayed evaluation at both 6 and 12 months. Trial Registration http://clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00233727.

  16. How many research nurses for how many clinical trials in an oncology setting? Definition of the Nursing Time Required by Clinical Trial-Assessment Tool (NTRCT-AT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, Alessandra; Mazzocco, Ketti; Stucchi, Sara; Magon, Giorgio; Pravettoni, Gabriella; Passoni, Claudia; Ciccarelli, Chiara; Tonali, Alessandra; Profeta, Teresa; Saiani, Luisa

    2017-02-01

    Few resources are available to quantify clinical trial-associated workload, needed to guide staffing and budgetary planning. The aim of the study is to describe a tool to measure clinical trials nurses' workload expressed in time spent to complete core activities. Clinical trials nurses drew up a list of nursing core activities, integrating results from literature searches with personal experience. The final 30 core activities were timed for each research nurse by an outside observer during daily practice in May and June 2014. Average times spent by nurses for each activity were calculated. The "Nursing Time Required by Clinical Trial-Assessment Tool" was created as an electronic sheet that combines the average times per specified activities and mathematic functions to return the total estimated time required by a research nurse for each specific trial. The tool was tested retrospectively on 141 clinical trials. The increasing complexity of clinical research requires structured approaches to determine workforce requirements. This study provides a tool to describe the activities of a clinical trials nurse and to estimate the associated time required to deliver individual trials. The application of the proposed tool in clinical research practice could provide a consistent structure for clinical trials nursing workload estimation internationally. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  17. Randomised controlled trial of a psychiatric consultation model for treatment of common mental disorder in the occupational health setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Jong Fransina J

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Common mental disorders are the most prevalent of all mental disorders, with the highest burden in terms of work absenteeism and utilization of health care services. Evidence-based treatments are available, but recognition and treatment could be improved, especially in the occupational health setting. The situation in this setting has recently changed in the Netherlands because of new legislation, which has resulted in reduced sickness absence. Severe mental disorder has now become one of the main causes of work absenteeism. Occupational physicians (OPs are expected to take an active role in diagnosis and treatment, and seem to be in need of support for a new approach to handle cases of more complex mental disorders. Psychiatric consultation can be a collaborative care model to achieve this. Methods/design This is a two-armed cluster-randomized clinical trial, with randomization among OPs. Forty OPs in two big companies providing medical care for multiple companies will be randomized to either the intervention group, i.e. psychiatric consultation embedded in a training programme, or the control group, i.e. only training aimed at recognition and providing Care As Usual. 60 patients will be included who have been absent from work for 6–52 weeks and who, after screening and a MINI interview, are diagnosed with depressive disorder, anxiety disorder or somatoform disorder based on DSM-IV criteria. Baseline measurements and follow up measurements (at 3 months and 6 months will be assessed with questionnaires and an interview. The primary outcome measure is level of general functioning according to the SF-20. Secondary measures are severity of the mental disorder according to the PHQ and the SCL-90, quality of life (EQ-D5, measures of Return To Work and cost-effectiveness of the treatment assessed with the TiC-P. Process measures will be adherence to the treatment plan and assessment of the treatment provided by the Psychiatric

  18. A core outcome set for clinical trials on non-specific low back pain: study protocol for the development of a core domain set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiarotto, Alessandro; Terwee, Caroline B; Deyo, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    on randomized controlled trials (RCTs) included in a Cochrane systematic review on the effectiveness of constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) for stroke patients. METHODS: We extracted data on the functional independence measure (FIM) and the action research arm test (ARAT) from RCTs that compared CIMT...

  19. Physical aspects of an electronuclear set-up on the basis of the subcritical zone of the IBR-30 reactor and the 660 MeV proton phasotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barashenkov, V.S.; Pogodaev, G.N.; Polanski, A.; Popov, Yu.P.; Puzynin, I.V.; Sisakyan, A.N.; Sosnin, A.N.

    1998-01-01

    Mathematical modeling and thermal flux estimations show that a combination of installations available at present at JINR - the plutonium reactor IBR-30 and the 660 MeV proton phasotron with the current of the extracted beam 0.25 mkA, i.e. 10% of its average value, - allows one to construct an air-cooled electronuclear set-up with the multiplication coefficient K eff ≅ 0.94, the neutron yield N tot ≅ 10 14 - 10 15 and the heat generation about to 10 kW. This set-up will demonstrate a possibility to construct subcritical transmutation-power generating electronuclear systems safe and stable in operation and applicable for utilization of weapon grade and technical plutonium. Kinetics of the electronuclear system will be investigated, in particular, fluctuations of the value of K eff for various parameters of the proton beam. Cross sections of nuclear reactions which are important for the estimations of an efficiency of various conditions of the nuclear waste transmutation and the neutron fluxes together with the heat distributions inside and outside the plutonium core will be measured. A comparison of these data with theoretical calculations allows one to check up and to develop significantly the methods of mathematical modeling of electronuclear systems. We suppose also to estimate the possibilities of ARC-method for the burning of radioactive wastes and to study the influence of various reflectors and multipartitioning of the core which increases the neutron yield. (author)

  20. Application of Incident Command Structure to clinical trial management in the academic setting: principles and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Penny S; Michael, Mary J; Spiess, Bruce D

    2017-02-09

    Clinical trial success depends on appropriate management, but practical guidance to trial organisation and planning is lacking. The Incident Command System (ICS) is the 'gold standard' management system developed for managing diverse operations in major incident and public health arenas. It enables effective and flexible management through integration of personnel, procedures, resources, and communications within a common hierarchical organisational structure. Conventional ICS organisation consists of five function modules: Command, Planning, Operations, Logistics, and Finance/Administration. Large clinical trials will require a separate Regulatory Administrative arm, and an Information arm, consisting of dedicated data management and information technology staff. We applied ICS principles to organisation and management of the Prehospital Use of Plasma in Traumatic Haemorrhage (PUPTH) trial. This trial was a multidepartmental, multiagency, randomised clinical trial investigating prehospital administration of thawed plasma on mortality and coagulation response in severely injured trauma patients. We describe the ICS system as it would apply to large clinical trials in general, and the benefits, barriers, and lessons learned in utilising ICS principles to reorganise and coordinate the PUPTH trial. Without a formal trial management structure, early stages of the trial were characterised by inertia and organisational confusion. Implementing ICS improved organisation, coordination, and communication between multiple agencies and service groups, and greatly streamlined regulatory compliance administration. However, unfamiliarity of clinicians with ICS culture, conflicting resource allocation priorities, and communication bottlenecks were significant barriers. ICS is a flexible and powerful organisational tool for managing large complex clinical trials. However, for successful implementation the cultural, psychological, and social environment of trial participants must be

  1. Preliminary evaluation of a telephone-based smoking cessation intervention in the lung cancer screening setting: A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Kathryn L; Hagerman, Charlotte J; Luta, George; Bellini, Paula G; Stanton, Cassandra; Abrams, David B; Kramer, Jenna A; Anderson, Eric; Regis, Shawn; McKee, Andrea; McKee, Brady; Niaura, Ray; Harper, Harry; Ramsaier, Michael

    2017-06-01

    Incorporating effective smoking cessation interventions into lung cancer screening (LCS) programs will be essential to realizing the full benefit of screening. We conducted a pilot randomized trial to determine the feasibility and efficacy of a telephone-counseling (TC) smoking cessation intervention vs. usual care (UC) in the LCS setting. In collaboration with 3 geographically diverse LCS programs, we enrolled current smokers (61.5% participation rate) who were: registered to undergo LCS, 50-77 years old, and had a 20+ pack-year smoking history. Eligibility was not based on readiness to quit. Participants completed pre-LCS (T0) and post-LCS (T1) telephone assessments, were randomized to TC (N=46) vs. UC (N=46), and completed a final 3-month telephone assessment (T2). Both study arms received a list of evidence-based cessation resources. TC participants also received up to 6 brief counseling calls with a trained cessation counselor. Counseling calls incorporated motivational interviewing and utilized the screening result as a motivator for quitting. The outcome was biochemically verified 7-day point prevalence cessation at 3-months post-randomization. Participants (56.5% female) were 60.2 (SD=5.4) years old and reported 47.1 (SD=22.2) pack years; 30% were ready to stop smoking in the next 30 days. TC participants completed an average of 4.4 (SD=2.3) sessions. Using intent-to-treat analyses, biochemically verified quit rates were 17.4% (TC) vs. 4.3% (UC), p<.05. This study provides preliminary evidence that telephone-based cessation counseling is feasible and efficacious in the LCS setting. As millions of current smokers are now eligible for lung cancer screening, this setting represents an important opportunity to exert a large public health impact on cessation among smokers who are at very high risk for multiple tobacco-related diseases. If this evidence-based, brief, and scalable intervention is replicated, TC could help to improve the overall cost

  2. Setting up a clinical trial for a novel disease: a case study of the Doxycycline for the Treatment of Nodding Syndrome Trial - challenges, enablers and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anguzu, Ronald; Akun, Pamela R; Ogwang, Rodney; Shour, Abdul Rahman; Sekibira, Rogers; Ningwa, Albert; Nakamya, Phellister; Abbo, Catherine; Mwaka, Amos D; Opar, Bernard; Idro, Richard

    2018-01-01

    A large amount of preparation goes into setting up trials. Different challenges and lessons are experienced. Our trial, testing a treatment for nodding syndrome, an acquired neurological disorder of unknown cause affecting thousands of children in Eastern Africa, provides a unique case study. As part of a study to determine the aetiology, understand pathogenesis and develop specific treatment, we set up a clinical trial in a remote district hospital in Uganda. This paper describes our experiences and documents supportive structures (enablers), challenges faced and lessons learned during set-up of the trial. Protocol development started in September 2015 with phased recruitment of a critical study team. The team spent 12 months preparing trial documents, procurement and training on procedures. Potential recruitment sites were pre-visited, and district and local leaders met as key stakeholders. Key enablers were supportive local leadership and investment by the district and Ministry of Health. The main challenges were community fears about nodding syndrome, adverse experiences of the community during previous research and political involvement. Other challenges included the number and delays in protocol approvals and lengthy procurement processes. This hard-to-reach area has frequent power and Internet fluctuations, which may affect cold chains for study samples, communication and data management. These concerns decreased with a pilot community engagement programme. Experiences and lessons learnt can reduce the duration of processes involved in trial-site set-up. A programme of community engagement and local leader involvement may be key to the success of a trial and in reducing community opposition towards participation in research.

  3. Dose Relations between Goal Setting, Theory-Based Correlates of Goal Setting and Increases in Physical Activity during a Workplace Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dishman, Rod K.; Vandenberg, Robert J.; Motl, Robert W.; Wilson, Mark G.; DeJoy, David M.

    2010-01-01

    The effectiveness of an intervention depends on its dose and on moderators of dose, which usually are not studied. The purpose of the study is to determine whether goal setting and theory-based moderators of goal setting had dose relations with increases in goal-related physical activity during a successful workplace intervention. A…

  4. School-based intervention for childhood disruptive behavior in disadvantaged settings: A randomized controlled trial with and without active teacher support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liber, J.M.; de Boo, G.M.; Huizenga, H.; Prins, P.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: In this randomized controlled trial, we investigated the effectiveness of a school-based targeted intervention program for disruptive behavior. A child-focused cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) program was introduced at schools in disadvantaged settings and with active teacher support

  5. Effectiveness of a Web 2.0 Intervention to Increase Physical Activity in Real-World Settings: Randomized Ecological Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandelanotte, Corneel; Kolt, Gregory S; Caperchione, Cristina M; Savage, Trevor N; Rosenkranz, Richard R; Maeder, Anthony J; Van Itallie, Anetta; Tague, Rhys; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Mummery, W Kerry; Duncan, Mitch J

    2017-11-13

    The translation of Web-based physical activity intervention research into the real world is lacking and becoming increasingly important. To compare usage and effectiveness, in real-world settings, of a traditional Web 1.0 Web-based physical activity intervention, providing limited interactivity, to a Web 2.0 Web-based physical activity intervention that includes interactive features, such as social networking (ie, status updates, online "friends," and personalized profile pages), blogs, and Google Maps mash-ups. Adults spontaneously signing up for the freely available 10,000 Steps website were randomized to the 10,000 Steps website (Web 1.0) or the newly developed WALK 2.0 website (Web 2.0). Physical activity (Active Australia Survey), quality of life (RAND 36), and body mass index (BMI) were assessed at baseline, 3 months, and 12 months. Website usage was measured continuously. Analyses of covariance were used to assess change over time in continuous outcome measures. Multiple imputation was used to deal with missing data. A total of 1328 participants completed baseline assessments. Only 3-month outcomes (224 completers) were analyzed due to high attrition at 12 months (77 completers). Web 2.0 group participants increased physical activity by 92.8 minutes per week more than those in the Web 1.0 group (95% CI 28.8-156.8; P=.005); their BMI values also decreased more (-1.03 kg/m2, 95% CI -1.65 to -0.41; P=.001). For quality of life, only the physical functioning domain score significantly improved more in the Web 2.0 group (3.6, 95% CI 1.7-5.5; PWeb 2.0 group compared to the Web 1.0 group. The difference in time-to-nonusage attrition was not statistically significant between groups (Hazard Ratio=0.97, 95% CI 0.86-1.09; P=.59). Only 21.99% (292/1328) of participants (n=292 summed for both groups) were still using either website after 2 weeks and 6.55% (87/1328) were using either website after 10 weeks. The website that provided more interactive and social features

  6. Expanding the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network to address the management of substance use disorders in general medical settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai B

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Betty Tai, Steven Sparenborg, Udi E Ghitza, David Liu Center for the Clinical Trials Network, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA Abstract: The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (2010 and the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act (2008 expand substance use disorder (SUD care services in the USA into general medical settings. Care offered in these settings will engage substance-using patients in an integrated and patient-centered environment that addresses physical and mental health comorbidities and follows a chronic care model. This expansion of SUD services presents a great need for evidence-based practices useful in general medical settings, and reveals several research gaps to be addressed. The National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network of the National Institute on Drug Abuse can serve an important role in this endeavor. High-priority research gaps are highlighted in this commentary. A discussion follows on how the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network can transform to address changing patterns in SUD care to efficiently generate evidence to guide SUD treatment practice within the context of recent US health care legislation. Keywords: Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network, substance use disorders, practice-based research network, electronic health records

  7. The impact of negative attentional set upon target processing in RSVP : An ERP study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Dexuan; Zhou, Xiaolin; Martens, Sander

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates whether the negative attentional set, a form of top-down attentional bias, can be set up on a trial-by-trial basis and impair online target processing in an RSVP (Rapid Serial Visual Presentation) task in which two targets are to be identified. Using the N2pc (N2 posterior

  8. [Shared decision-making and individualized goal setting - a pilot trial using PRISM (Pictorial Representation of Illness and Self Measure) in psychiatric inpatients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büchi, S; Straub, S; Schwager, U

    2010-12-01

    Although there is much talk about shared decision making and individualized goal setting, there is a lack of knowledge and knowhow in their realization in daily clinical practice. There is a lack in tools for easy applicable tools to ameliorate person-centred individualized goal setting processes. In three selected psychiatric inpatients the semistructured, theory driven use of PRISM (Pictorial Representation of Illness and Self Measure) in patients with complex psychiatric problems is presented and discussed. PRISM sustains a person-centred individualized process of goal setting and treatment and reinforces the active participation of patients. The process of visualisation and synchronous documentation is validated positively by patients and clinicians. The visual goal setting requires 30 to 45 minutes. In patients with complex psychiatric illness PRISM was used successfully to ameliorate individual goal setting. Specific effects of PRISM-visualisation are actually evaluated in a randomized controlled trial.

  9. Development of a core outcome set for clinical trials in inflammatory bowel disease: study protocol for a systematic review of the literature and identification of a core outcome set using a Delphi survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Christopher; Panaccione, Remo; Fedorak, Richard N; Parker, Claire E; Khanna, Reena; Levesque, Barrett G; Sandborn, William J; Feagan, Brian G; Jairath, Vipul

    2017-06-09

    Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), the main forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), are chronic, progressive and disabling disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. Although data from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) provide the foundation of evidence that validates medical therapy for IBD, considerable heterogeneity exists in the measured outcomes used in these studies. Furthermore, in recent years, there has been a paradigm shift in IBD treatment targets, moving from symptom-based scoring to improvement or normalisation of objective measures of inflammation such as endoscopic appearance, inflammatory biomarkers and histological and radiographic end points. The abundance of new treatment options and evolving end points poses opportunities and challenges for all stakeholders involved in drug development. Accordingly, there exists a need to harmonise measures used in clinical trials through the development of a core outcome set (COS). The development of an IBD-specific COS includes four steps. First, a systematic literature review is performed to identify outcomes previously used in IBD RCTs. Second, semistructured qualitative interviews are conducted with key stakeholders, including patients, clinicians, researchers, pharmaceutical industry representatives, healthcare payers and regulators to identify additional outcomes of importance. Using the outcomes generated from literature review and stakeholder interviews, an international two-round Delphi survey is conducted to prioritise outcomes for inclusion in the COS. Finally, a consensus meeting is held to ratify the COS and disseminate findings for application in future IBD trials. Given that over 30 novel therapeutic compounds are in development for IBD treatment, the design of robust clinical trials measuring relevant and standardised outcomes is crucial. Standardising outcomes through a COS will reduce heterogeneity in trial reporting, facilitate valid comparisons of new therapies and improve

  10. The fastest of three trials is recommended for Timed Up & Go testing of functional mobility in an outpatient geriatric setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloch, Mette Linding

    trials are needed to produce the best performance. Purpose: To examine if the fastest of three timed TUG trials producesbetter (faster) results than the recording of the second trial in elderly people when following an outpatient geriatric rehabilitation programme. Material and Methods: A total of 32...... to 5.5 seconds in difference between the two recordings. Subjects using walking aids (n=10) were the oldest (P=0.057, mean age of 87.7 versus 81.5 years), and performed worse (P=0.033, 26.3 versus 17.3seconds) when using the best of the three TUG trials. Also, this score was significantly correlated...... elderly people (20 women), at a mean (SD) age of 83.4 (8.6) years were included. All subjects performed three timed TUG trials as fast as safely possible with their normal walking aid (if using). In addition, 30 of the 32 subjects performed the Chair Stand Test (CST) (number of sit to stands in 30 seconds...

  11. Antithrombotic Utilization Trends after Noncardioembolic Ischemic Stroke or TIA in the Setting of Large Antithrombotic Trials (2002–2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Amir S.; Qureshi, Adnan I.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Several large trials published over the last decade have significantly altered recommended guidelines for therapy following a noncardioembolic ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). The impact of these studies on patient usage of alternative antithrombotic agents has hitherto not been evaluated. We examined the usage of these agents in the United States over the last decade, with regard to the publication of the Management of Atherothrombosis with Clopidogrel in High-Risk Patients (MATCH), European/Australasian Stroke Prevention in Reversible Ischaemia Trial (ESPRIT), and Prevention Regimen for Effectively Avoiding Second Strokes (PRoFESS) clinical trials, in order to test the hypothesis that resulting recommendations are reflected in usage trends. Methods Antithrombotic utilization was prospectively collected as part of the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) on a total of 53,608,351 patients in the United States between 2002 and 2009. Patients with a history of ischemic stroke or TIA were included. Patients were excluded if there was a prior history of subarachnoid or intracerebral hemorrhage, or if other indications for antithrombotic treatment were present, including deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, atrial fibrillation or flutter, mechanical cardiac valve replacement, congestive heart failure, coronary artery disease, peripheral arterial disease, and rheumatoid arthritis. Annual utilization of the following antithrombotic strategies was compared in 53,608,351 patients: 1) aspirin monotherapy, 2) clopidogrel monotherapy, 3) combined clopidogrel and aspirin, 4) combined extended-release dipyridamole (ERDP) and aspirin, and 5) warfarin. Annual utilization was compared before and after publication of MATCH, ESPRIT, and PRoFESS in 2004, 2006, and 2008, respectively. Trend analysis was performed with the Mantel–Haenszel test for trends. Sensitivity analysis of demographic and clinical characteristics

  12. Economic evaluation of adult rehabilitation: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials in a variety of settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusco, Natasha Kareem; Taylor, Nicholas F; Watts, Jennifer J; Shields, Nora

    2014-01-01

    To report if there is a difference in costs from a societal perspective between adults receiving rehabilitation in an inpatient rehabilitation setting versus an alternative setting. If there are cost differences, to report whether opting for the least expensive program setting adversely affects patient outcomes. Electronic databases from the earliest possible date until May 2011. All languages were included. Multiple reviewers identified randomized controlled trials with a full economic evaluation that compared adult inpatient rehabilitation with an alternative. There were 29 included trials with 6746 participants. Multiple observers extracted data independently. Trial appraisal included a risk of bias assessment and a checklist to report the strength of the economic evaluation. Results were synthesized using standardized mean differences (SMDs) and meta-analyses for the primary outcome of cost. The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation was applied to assess for risk of bias across studies for meta-analyses. There was high-quality evidence that cost was significantly reduced for rehabilitation in the home versus inpatient rehabilitation in a meta-analysis of 732 patients poststroke (pooled SMD [δ]=-.28; 95% confidence interval [CI], -.47 to -.09), without compromise to patient outcomes. Results of individual trials in other patient groups (orthopedic, rheumatoid arthritis, and geriatric) receiving rehabilitation in the home or community were generally consistent with the meta-analysis. There was moderate quality evidence that cost was significantly reduced for inpatient rehabilitation (stroke unit) versus general acute care in a meta-analysis of 463 patients poststroke (δ=.31; 95% CI, .15-.48), with improvement to patient outcomes. These results were not replicated in 2 individual trials with a geriatric and a mixed cohort, where costs did not differ between general acute care and inpatient rehabilitation. Three of the 4 individual

  13. A core outcome set for localised prostate cancer effectiveness trials: protocol for a systematic review of the literature and stakeholder involvement through interviews and a Delphi survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLennan, Steven; Bekema, Hendrika J; Williamson, Paula R; Campbell, Marion K; Stewart, Fiona; MacLennan, Sara J; N'Dow, James M O; Lam, Thomas B L

    2015-03-04

    Prostate cancer is a growing health problem worldwide. The management of localised prostate cancer is controversial. It is unclear which of several surgical, radiotherapeutic, ablative, and surveillance treatments is the most effective. All have cost, process and recovery, and morbidity implications which add to treatment decision-making complexity for patients and healthcare professionals. Evidence from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) is not optimal because of uncertainty as to what constitutes important outcomes. Another issue hampering evidence synthesis is heterogeneity of outcome definition, measurement, and reporting. This project aims to determine which outcomes are the most important to patients and healthcare professionals, and use these findings to recommend a standardised core outcome set for comparative effectiveness trials of treatments for localised prostate cancer, to optimise decision-making. The range of potentially important outcomes and measures will be identified through systematic reviews of the literature and semi-structured interviews with patients. A consultation exercise involving representatives from two key stakeholder groups (patients and healthcare professionals) will ratify the list of outcomes to be entered into a three round Delphi study. The Delphi process will refine and prioritise the list of identified outcomes. A methodological substudy (nested RCT design) will also be undertaken. Participants will be randomised after round one of the Delphi study to one of three feedback groups, based on different feedback strategies, in order to explore the potential impact of feedback strategies on participant responses. This may assist the design of a future core outcome set and Delphi studies. Following the Delphi study, a final consensus meeting attended by representatives from both stakeholder groups will determine the final recommended core outcome set. This study will inform clinical practice and future trials of interventions of

  14. Basis and Design of a Randomized Clinical Trial to Evaluate the Effect of Levosulpiride on Retinal Alterations in Patients With Diabetic Retinopathy and Diabetic Macular Edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles-Osorio, Ma Ludivina; García-Franco, Renata; Núñez-Amaro, Carlos D; Mira-Lorenzo, Ximena; Ramírez-Neria, Paulina; Hernández, Wendy; López-Star, Ellery; Bertsch, Thomas; Martínez de la Escalera, Gonzalo; Triebel, Jakob; Clapp, Carmen

    2018-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) and diabetic macular edema (DME) are potentially blinding, microvascular retinal diseases in people with diabetes mellitus. Preclinical studies support a protective role of the hormone prolactin (PRL) due to its ocular incorporation and conversion to vasoinhibins, a family of PRL fragments that inhibit ischemia-induced retinal angiogenesis and diabetes-derived retinal vasopermeability. Here, we describe the protocol of an ongoing clinical trial investigating a new therapy for DR and DME based on elevating the circulating levels of PRL with the prokinetic, dopamine D2 receptor blocker, levosulpiride. It is a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial enrolling male and female patients with type 2 diabetes having DME, non-proliferative DR (NPDR), proliferative DR (PDR) requiring vitrectomy, and DME plus standard intravitreal therapy with the antiangiogenic agent, ranibizumab. Patients are randomized to receive placebo (lactose pill, orally TID) or levosulpiride (75 mg/day orally TID) for 8 weeks (DME and NPDR), 1 week (the period before vitrectomy in PDR), or 12 weeks (DME plus ranibizumab). In all cases the study medication is taken on top of standard therapy for diabetes, blood pressure control, or other medical conditions. Primary endpoints in groups 1 and 2 (DME: placebo and levosulpiride), groups 3 and 4 (NPDR: placebo and levosulpiride), and groups 7 and 8 (DME plus ranibizumab: placebo and levosulpiride) are changes from baseline in visual acuity, retinal thickness assessed by optical coherence tomography, and retinal microvascular abnormalities evaluated by fundus biomicroscopy and fluorescein angiography. Changes in serum PRL levels and of PRL and vasoinhibins levels in the vitreous between groups 5 and 6 (PDR undergoing vitrectomy: placebo and levosulpiride) serve as proof of principle that PRL enters the eye to counteract disease progression. Secondary endpoints are changes during the follow-up of health

  15. Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Fornaro

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mental Retardation (MR is a developmental disability characterized by impairments in adaptive daily life skills and difficulties in social and interpersonal functioning. Since multiple causes may contribute to MR, associated clinical pictures may vary accordingly. Nevertheless, when psychiatric disorders as Treatment Resistant Depression (TRD and/or alcohol abuse co-exist, their proper detection and management is often troublesome, essentially due to a limited vocabulary MR people could use to describe their symptoms, feelings and concerns, and the lack of reliable screening tools. Furthermore, MR people are among the most medicated subjects, with (over prescription of antidepressants and/or typical antipsychotics being the rule rather than exception. Thus, treatment resistance or even worsening of depression, constitute frequent occurrences. This report describes the case of a person with MR who failed to respond to repetitive trials of antidepressant monotherapies, finally recovering using aripiprazole to fluvoxamine augmentation upon consideration of a putative bipolar diathesis for “agitated” TRD. Although further controlled investigations are needed to assess a putative bipolar diathesis in some cases of MR associated to TRD, prudence is advised in the long-term prescription of antidepressant monotherapies in such conditions.

  16. Effect of a tailored physical activity intervention delivered in general practice settings: results of a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluijs, van E.M.F.; Poppel - Bruinvels, van M.N.M.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Paw, M.J.M. Chin A; Calfas, K.J.; Mechelen, van W.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We evaluated the effectiveness of a minimal intervention physical activity strategy (physician-based assessment and counseling for exercise [PACE]) applied in general practice settings in the Netherlands. METHODS: Randomization took place at the general practice level. Participants were

  17. Effect of a tailored physical activity intervention delivered in general practice settings: results of a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Sluijs, E.M.F.; van Poppel-Bruinvels, M.N.M.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Chin A Paw, M.J.M.; Calfas, K.J.; van Mechelen, W.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives. We evaluated the effectiveness of a minimal intervention physical activity strategy (physician-based assessment and counseling for exercise [PACE]) applied in general practice settings in the Netherlands. Methods. Randomization took place at the general practice level. Participants were

  18. Comparing of goal setting strategy with group education method to increase physical activity level: A randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiryaee, Nasrin; Siadat, Zahra Dana; Zamani, Ahmadreza; Taleban, Roya

    2015-10-01

    Designing an intervention to increase physical activity is important to be based on the health care settings resources and be acceptable by the subject group. This study was designed to assess and compare the effect of the goal setting strategy with a group education method on increasing the physical activity of mothers of children aged 1 to 5. Mothers who had at least one child of 1-5 years were randomized into two groups. The effect of 1) goal-setting strategy and 2) group education method on increasing physical activity was assessed and compared 1 month and 3 months after the intervention. Also, the weight, height, body mass index (BMI), waist and hip circumference, and well-being were compared between the two groups before and after the intervention. Physical activity level increased significantly after the intervention in the goal-setting group and it was significantly different between the two groups after intervention (P goal-setting group after the intervention. In the group education method, only the well-being score improved significantly (P goal-setting strategy to boost physical activity, improving the state of well-being and decreasing BMI, waist, and hip circumference.

  19. Comparing of goal setting strategy with group education method to increase physical activity level: A randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrin Jiryaee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Designing an intervention to increase physical activity is important to be based on the health care settings resources and be acceptable by the subject group. This study was designed to assess and compare the effect of the goal setting strategy with a group education method on increasing the physical activity of mothers of children aged 1 to 5. Materials and Methods: Mothers who had at least one child of 1-5 years were randomized into two groups. The effect of 1 goal-setting strategy and 2 group education method on increasing physical activity was assessed and compared 1 month and 3 months after the intervention. Also, the weight, height, body mass index (BMI, waist and hip circumference, and well-being were compared between the two groups before and after the intervention. Results: Physical activity level increased significantly after the intervention in the goal-setting group and it was significantly different between the two groups after intervention (P < 0.05. BMI, waist circumference, hip circumference, and well-being score were significantly different in the goal-setting group after the intervention. In the group education method, only the well-being score improved significantly (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Our study presented the effects of using the goal-setting strategy to boost physical activity, improving the state of well-being and decreasing BMI, waist, and hip circumference.

  20. XZP + 1d and XZP + 1d-DKH basis sets for second-row elements: application to CCSD(T) zero-point vibrational energy and atomization energy calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Cesar T; Jorge, Francisco E; Alves, Júlia M A

    2012-09-01

    Recently, segmented all-electron contracted double, triple, quadruple, quintuple, and sextuple zeta valence plus polarization function (XZP, X = D, T, Q, 5, and 6) basis sets for the elements from H to Ar were constructed for use in conjunction with nonrelativistic and Douglas-Kroll-Hess Hamiltonians. In this work, in order to obtain a better description of some molecular properties, the XZP sets for the second-row elements were augmented with high-exponent d "inner polarization functions," which were optimized in the molecular environment at the second-order Møller-Plesset level. At the coupled cluster level of theory, the inclusion of tight d functions for these elements was found to be essential to improve the agreement between theoretical and experimental zero-point vibrational energies (ZPVEs) and atomization energies. For all of the molecules studied, the ZPVE errors were always smaller than 0.5 %. The atomization energies were also improved by applying corrections due to core/valence correlation and atomic spin-orbit effects. This led to estimates for the atomization energies of various compounds in the gaseous phase. The largest error (1.2 kcal mol(-1)) was found for SiH(4).

  1. Use of an android phone application for automated text messages in international settings: A case study in an HIV clinical trial in St. Petersburg, Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, Leah S; Patts, Gregory J; Coleman, Sharon M; Blokhina, Elena; Lu, John; Yaroslavtseva, Tatiana; Gnatienko, Natalia; Krupitsky, Evgeny; Samet, Jeffrey H; Chaisson, Christine E

    2018-02-01

    Reproducible outcomes in clinical trials depend on adherence to study protocol. Short message service (also known as text message) reminders have been shown to improve clinical trial adherence in the United States and elsewhere. However, due to systematic differences in mobile data plans, languages, and technology, these systems are not easily translated to international settings. To gauge technical capabilities for international projects, we developed SMSMessenger, an automated Android application that uses a US server to send medication reminders to participants in a clinical trial in St. Petersburg, Russia (Zinc for HIV disease among alcohol users-a randomized controlled trial in the Russia Alcohol Research Collaboration on HIV/AIDS cohort). The application is downloaded once onto an Android study phone. When it is time for the text message reminders to be sent, study personnel access the application on a local phone, which in turn accesses the existing clinical trial database hosted on a US web server. The application retrieves a list of participants with the following information: phone number, whether a message should be received at that time, and the appropriate text of the message. The application is capable of storing multiple outgoing messages. With a few clicks, text messages are sent to study participants who can reply directly to the message. Study staff can check the local phone for incoming messages. The SMSMessenger application uses an existing clinical trial database and is able to receive real-time updates. All communications between the application and server are encrypted, and phone numbers are stored in a secure database behind a firewall. No sensitive data are stored on the phone, as outgoing messages are sent through the application and not by messaging features on the phone itself. Messages are sent simultaneously to study participants, which reduces the burden on local study staff. Costs and setup are minimal. The only local requirements

  2. Multiple-level stakeholder engagement in malaria clinical trials: addressing the challenges of conducting clinical research in resource-limited settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mtove, George; Kimani, Joshua; Kisinza, William; Makenga, Geofrey; Mangesho, Peter; Duparc, Stephan; Nakalembe, Miriam; Phiri, Kamija S; Orrico, Russell; Rojo, Ricardo; Vandenbroucke, Pol

    2018-03-22

    Multinational clinical trials are logistically complex and require close coordination between various stakeholders. They must comply with global clinical standards and are accountable to multiple regulatory and ethical bodies. In resource-limited settings, it is challenging to understand how to apply global clinical standards to international, national, and local factors in clinical trials, making multiple-level stakeholder engagement an important element in the successful conduct of these clinical trials. During the planning and implementation of a large multinational clinical trial for intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy in resource-limited areas of sub-Saharan Africa, we encountered numerous challenges, which required implementation of a range of engagement measures to ensure compliance with global clinical and regulatory standards. These challenges included coordination with ongoing global malaria efforts, heterogeneity in national regulatory structures, sub-optimal healthcare infrastructure, local practices and beliefs, and perspectives that view healthcare providers with undue trust or suspicion. In addition to engagement with international bodies, such as the World Health Organization, the Malaria in Pregnancy Consortium, the Steve Biko Centre for Bioethics, and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, in order to address the challenges just described, Pfizer Inc. and Medicines for Malaria Venture (the "Sponsoring Entities" for these studies) and investigators liaised with national- and district-level stakeholders such as health ministers and regional/local community health workers. Community engagement measures undertaken by investigators included local meetings with community leaders to explain the research aims and answer questions and concerns voiced by the community. The investigators also engaged with family members of prospective trial participants in order to be sensitive to local practices and beliefs. Engagement

  3. Health on the web: randomised controlled trial of online screening and brief alcohol intervention delivered in a workplace setting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarnie Khadjesari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Alcohol misuse in England costs around £7.3 billion (US$12.2 billion annually from lost productivity and absenteeism. Delivering brief alcohol interventions to employees as part of a health check may be acceptable, particularly with online delivery which can provide privacy for this stigmatised behaviour. Research to support this approach is limited and methodologically weak. The aim was to determine the effectiveness of online screening and personalised feedback on alcohol consumption, delivered in a workplace as part of a health check. METHODS AND FINDINGS: This two-group online individually randomised controlled trial recruited employees from a UK-based private sector organisation (approx. 100,000 employees. 3,375 employees completed the online health check in the three week recruitment period. Of these, 1,330 (39% scored five or more on the AUDIT-C (indicating alcohol misuse and were randomised to receive personalised feedback on their alcohol intake, alongside feedback on other health behaviours (n = 659, or to receive feedback on all health behaviours except alcohol intake (n = 671. Participants were mostly male (75%, with a median age of 48 years and half were in managerial positions (55%. Median Body Mass Index was 26, 12% were smokers, median time undertaking moderate/vigorous physical activity a week was 173 minutes and median fruit and vegetable consumption was three portions a day. Eighty percent (n = 1,066 of participants completed follow-up questionnaires at three months. An intention to treat analysis found no difference between experimental groups for past week drinking (primary outcome (5.6% increase associated with the intervention (95% CI -4.7% to 16.9%; p = .30, AUDIT (measure of alcohol-related harm and health utility (EQ-5D. CONCLUSIONS: There was no evidence to support the use of personalised feedback within an online health check for reducing alcohol consumption among employees in this

  4. Health on the Web: Randomised Controlled Trial of Online Screening and Brief Alcohol Intervention Delivered in a Workplace Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadjesari, Zarnie; Freemantle, Nick; Linke, Stuart; Hunter, Rachael; Murray, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Background Alcohol misuse in England costs around £7.3 billion (US$12.2 billion) annually from lost productivity and absenteeism. Delivering brief alcohol interventions to employees as part of a health check may be acceptable, particularly with online delivery which can provide privacy for this stigmatised behaviour. Research to support this approach is limited and methodologically weak. The aim was to determine the effectiveness of online screening and personalised feedback on alcohol consumption, delivered in a workplace as part of a health check. Methods and Findings This two-group online individually randomised controlled trial recruited employees from a UK-based private sector organisation (approx. 100,000 employees). 3,375 employees completed the online health check in the three week recruitment period. Of these, 1,330 (39%) scored five or more on the AUDIT-C (indicating alcohol misuse) and were randomised to receive personalised feedback on their alcohol intake, alongside feedback on other health behaviours (n = 659), or to receive feedback on all health behaviours except alcohol intake (n = 671). Participants were mostly male (75%), with a median age of 48 years and half were in managerial positions (55%). Median Body Mass Index was 26, 12% were smokers, median time undertaking moderate/vigorous physical activity a week was 173 minutes and median fruit and vegetable consumption was three portions a day. Eighty percent (n = 1,066) of participants completed follow-up questionnaires at three months. An intention to treat analysis found no difference between experimental groups for past week drinking (primary outcome) (5.6% increase associated with the intervention (95% CI −4.7% to 16.9%; p = .30)), AUDIT (measure of alcohol-related harm) and health utility (EQ-5D). Conclusions There was no evidence to support the use of personalised feedback within an online health check for reducing alcohol consumption among employees in this organisation

  5. Perceived autonomy and activity choices among physically disabled older people in nursing home settings: a randomized trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Mette; Runge, Ulla; Hoff, Morten

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. To evaluate the effect of individually tailored programs on perceived autonomy in institutionalized physically disabled older people and to describe participants' activity wishes and content of the programs. METHOD. This blinded randomized trial with follow up included a total of nine...... the correspondence between the individual wishes for activities and the concrete content of the programs was not obvious, results indicate potential for enabling the perception of autonomy among physically disabled older nursing home residents. The clinical consequences may suggest a focus on existing traditions...... nursing homes and 50 nursing home residents who were randomized into either a control group or an intervention group. Perceived autonomy was measured at baseline (T1), after 12 weeks (T2) of intervention and after 24 weeks (T3) Wishes for daily activities was identified at T1. Weekly reports of individual...

  6. Patent Foramen Ovale Closure in the Setting of Cryptogenic Stroke: A Meta-Analysis of Five Randomized Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Lohit; Haleem, Affan; Varade, Shweta; Sivakumar, Keithan; Shah, Mahek; Patel, Brijesh; Agarwal, Manyoo; Agrawal, Sahil; Leary, Megan; Kluck, Bryan

    2018-05-24

    The clinical benefit of patent foramen ovale (PFO) closure after cryptogenic stroke has been a topic of debate for decades. Recently, 3 randomized controlled trials of PFO closure in patients with cryptogenic stroke demonstrated a significantly reduced risk of recurrent stroke compared with standard medical therapy alone. This meta-analysis was performed to clarify the efficacy of PFO closure for future stroke prevention in this population. A systematic literature search was undertaken. Published pooled data from 5 large randomized clinical trials (CLOSE, RESPECT, Gore REDUCE, CLOSURE I, and PC) were combined and then subsequently analyzed. Enrolled patients with cryptogenic stroke were assigned to receive standard medical care or to undergo endovascular PFO closure, with a primary outcome of reduction in stroke recurrence rate. Secondary outcomes included rates of transient ischemic attack (TIA), composite outcome of stroke, TIA, and death from all causes, and rates of atrial fibrillation events. We analyzed data for 3412 patients. Transcatheter PFO closure resulted in a statistically significant reduced rate of recurrent stroke, compared with medication alone. Patients undergoing closure were 58% less likely to have another stroke. The number needed to treat with PFO closure to reduce recurrent stroke for 1 patient was 40. Endovascular PFO closure was associated with a reduced risk of recurrent stroke in patients with a prior cryptogenic cerebral infarct. Although the absolute stroke reduction was small, these findings are clinically significant, given the young age of this patient population and the patients' lifetime risk of recurrent stroke. Copyright © 2018 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Analysing data from patient-reported outcome and quality of life endpoints for cancer clinical trials: a start in setting international standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottomley, Andrew; Pe, Madeline; Sloan, Jeff; Basch, Ethan; Bonnetain, Franck; Calvert, Melanie; Campbell, Alicyn; Cleeland, Charles; Cocks, Kim; Collette, Laurence; Dueck, Amylou C; Devlin, Nancy; Flechtner, Hans-Henning; Gotay, Carolyn; Greimel, Eva; Griebsch, Ingolf; Groenvold, Mogens; Hamel, Jean-Francois; King, Madeleine; Kluetz, Paul G; Koller, Michael; Malone, Daniel C; Martinelli, Francesca; Mitchell, Sandra A; Moinpour, Carol M; Musoro, Jammbe; O'Connor, Daniel; Oliver, Kathy; Piault-Louis, Elisabeth; Piccart, Martine; Pimentel, Francisco L; Quinten, Chantal; Reijneveld, Jaap C; Schürmann, Christoph; Smith, Ashley Wilder; Soltys, Katherine M; Taphoorn, Martin J B; Velikova, Galina; Coens, Corneel

    2016-11-01

    Measures of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and other patient-reported outcomes generate important data in cancer randomised trials to assist in assessing the risks and benefits of cancer therapies and fostering patient-centred cancer care. However, the various ways these measures are analysed and interpreted make it difficult to compare results across trials, and hinders the application of research findings to inform publications, product labelling, clinical guidelines, and health policy. To address these problems, the Setting International Standards in Analyzing Patient-Reported Outcomes and Quality of Life Endpoints Data (SISAQOL) initiative has been established. This consortium, directed by the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC), was convened to provide recommendations on how to standardise the analysis of HRQOL and other patient-reported outcomes data in cancer randomised trials. This Personal View discusses the reasons why this project was initiated, the rationale for the planned work, and the expected benefits to cancer research, patient and provider decision making, care delivery, and policy making. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Time from prior chemotherapy enhances prognostic risk grouping in the second-line setting of advanced urothelial carcinoma: a retrospective analysis of pooled, prospective phase 2 trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonpavde, Guru; Pond, Gregory R; Fougeray, Ronan; Choueiri, Toni K; Qu, Angela Q; Vaughn, David J; Niegisch, Guenter; Albers, Peter; James, Nicholas D; Wong, Yu-Ning; Ko, Yoo-Joung; Sridhar, Srikala S; Galsky, Matthew D; Petrylak, Daniel P; Vaishampayan, Ulka N; Khan, Awais; Vogelzang, Nicholas J; Beer, Tomasz M; Stadler, Walter M; O'Donnell, Peter H; Sternberg, Cora N; Rosenberg, Jonathan E; Bellmunt, Joaquim

    2013-04-01

    Outcomes for patients in the second-line setting of advanced urothelial carcinoma (UC) are dismal. The recognized prognostic factors in this context are Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status (PS) >0, hemoglobin level (Hb) 0, LM, Hb statistic=0.638). Setting of prior chemotherapy (metastatic disease vs perioperative) and prior platinum agent (cisplatin or carboplatin) were not prognostic factors. External validation demonstrated a significant association of TFPC with PFS on univariable and most multivariable analyses, and with OS on univariable analyses. Limitations of retrospective analyses are applicable. Shorter TFPC enhances prognostic classification independent of ECOG-PS >0, Hb advanced UC. These data may facilitate drug development and interpretation of trials. Copyright © 2012 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Are exergames promoting mobility an attractive alternative to conventional self-regulated exercises for elderly people in a rehabilitation setting? Study protocol of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselmann, Viviane; Oesch, Peter; Fernandez-Luque, Luis; Bachmann, Stefan

    2015-09-07

    Maintaining mobility in elderly persons has become a primary goal within healthcare services. In older adults, exercise programs significantly reduce the risk of falling and death. Long-lasting and high-intensive multi-component exercises are most effective. In a rehabilitation setting, self-regulated exercises are conventionally taught by physiotherapists, using handouts. However, the adherence of elderly persons to executing these self-administered programs varies considerably. They are often considered tedious and boring, and thus prematurely stopped. The primary aim of this clinical trial is to determine whether elderly persons in a rehabilitation setting show higher adherence to self-regulated training when using exergames than when performing conventional exercises. The second objective is to explore which mode of exercise leads to greater improvement in balance performance. The study consists of a single blind, stratified, randomized control trial with two parallel groups. Once included, study participants will be stratified according to their balance and computer skills and randomly allocated to self-regulated training with conventional exercise programs or with exergames played with the Windows Kinect® sensor and FitBit® pedometer. In both groups, self-administered exercise programs will be taught by experienced physiotherapists and performed at the patient's own discretion during the ten days of intervention. The primary outcome is the performed daily training volume, collected by the participants in a logbook. Secondary outcomes are objective and subjective balance skills measured by an activity tracker and the Fall Efficacy Scale self-administered questionnaire. Both assessments will be performed at pre- and post-intervention. According to the available literature, this study is the first to compare conventional self-regulated exercises with exergames among older patients in a rehabilitation setting. Results of this study will contribute to our

  10. Adaptive goal setting and financial incentives: a 2 × 2 factorial randomized controlled trial to increase adults’ physical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc A. Adams

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Emerging interventions that rely on and harness variability in behavior to adapt to individual performance over time may outperform interventions that prescribe static goals (e.g., 10,000 steps/day. The purpose of this factorial trial was to compare adaptive vs. static goal setting and immediate vs. delayed, non-contingent financial rewards for increasing free-living physical activity (PA. Methods A 4-month 2 × 2 factorial randomized controlled trial tested main effects for goal setting (adaptive vs. static goals and rewards (immediate vs. delayed and interactions between factors to increase steps/day as measured by a Fitbit Zip. Moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA minutes/day was examined as a secondary outcome. Results Participants (N = 96 were mainly female (77%, aged 41 ± 9.5 years, and all were insufficiently active and overweight/obese (mean BMI = 34.1 ± 6.2. Participants across all groups increased by 2389 steps/day on average from baseline to intervention phase (p < .001. Participants receiving static goals showed a stronger increase in steps per day from baseline phase to intervention phase (2630 steps/day than those receiving adaptive goals (2149 steps/day; difference = 482 steps/day, p = .095. Participants receiving immediate rewards showed stronger improvement (2762 step/day increase from baseline to intervention phase than those receiving delayed rewards (2016 steps/day increase; difference = 746 steps/day, p = .009. However, the adaptive goals group showed a slower decrease in steps/day from the beginning of the intervention phase to the end of the intervention phase (i.e. less than half the rate compared to the static goals group (−7.7 steps vs. -18.3 steps each day; difference = 10.7 steps/day, p < .001 resulting in better improvements for the adaptive goals group by study end. Rate of change over the intervention phase did not differ between reward groups. Significant goal phase x goal

  11. EDUCORE project: a clinical trial, randomised by clusters, to assess the effect of a visual learning method on blood pressure control in the primary healthcare setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garrido-Elustondo Sofia

    2010-07-01

    EDUCORE method could provide a simple, inexpensive means of improving blood pressure control, and perhaps other health problems, in the primary healthcare setting; Trial registration The trial was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01155973 [http://ClinicalTrials.gov].

  12. Influences on recruitment to randomised controlled trials in mental health settings in England: a national cross-sectional survey of researchers working for the Mental Health Research Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borschmann, Rohan; Patterson, Sue; Poovendran, Dilkushi; Wilson, Danielle; Weaver, Tim

    2014-02-17

    Recruitment to trials is complex and often protracted; selection bias may compromise generalisability. In the mental health field (as elsewhere), diverse factors have been described as hindering researcher access to potential participants and various strategies have been proposed to overcome barriers. However, the extent to which various influences identified in the literature are operational across mental health settings in England has not been systematically examined. A cross-sectional, online survey of clinical studies officers employed by the Mental Health Research Network in England to recruit to trials from National Health Service mental health services. The bespoke questionnaire invited participants to report exposure to specified influences on recruitment, the perceived impact of these on access to potential participants, and to describe additional positive or negative influences on recruitment. Analysis employed descriptive statistics, the framework approach and triangulation of data. Questionnaires were returned by 98 (58%) of 170 clinical studies officers who reported diverse experience. Data demonstrated a disjunction between policy and practice. While the particulars of trial design and various marketing and communication strategies could influence recruitment, consensus was that the culture of NHS mental health services is not conducive to research. Since financial rewards for recruitment paid to Trusts and feedback about studies seldom reaching frontline services, clinicians were described as distanced from research. Facing continual service change and demanding clinical workloads, clinicians generally did not prioritise recruitment activities. Incentives to trial participants had variable impact on access but recruitment could be enhanced by engagement of senior investigators and integrating referral with routine practice. Comprehensive, robust feasibility studies and reciprocity between researchers and clinicians were considered crucial to

  13. Classroom-based Interventions and Teachers' Perceived Job Stressors and Confidence: Evidence from a Randomized Trial in Head Start Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Fuhua; Raver, C Cybele; Li-Grining, Christine

    2011-09-01

    Preschool teachers' job stressors have received increasing attention but have been understudied in the literature. We investigated the impacts of a classroom-based intervention, the Chicago School Readiness Project (CSRP), on teachers' perceived job stressors and confidence, as indexed by their perceptions of job control, job resources, job demands, and confidence in behavior management. Using a clustered randomized controlled trial (RCT) design, the CSRP provided multifaceted services to the treatment group, including teacher training and mental health consultation, which were accompanied by stress-reduction services and workshops. Overall, 90 teachers in 35 classrooms at 18 Head Start sites participated in the study. After adjusting for teacher and classroom factors and site fixed effects, we found that the CSRP had significant effects on the improvement of teachers' perceived job control and work-related resources. We also found that the CSRP decreased teachers' confidence in behavior management and had no statistically significant effects on job demands. Overall, we did not find significant moderation effects of teacher race/ethnicity, education, teaching experience, or teacher type. The implications for research and policy are discussed.

  14. The effect of basis set and exchange-correlation functional on time-dependent density functional theory calculations within the Tamm-Dancoff approximation of the x-ray emission spectroscopy of transition metal complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roper, Ian P E; Besley, Nicholas A

    2016-03-21

    The simulation of X-ray emission spectra of transition metal complexes with time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is investigated. X-ray emission spectra can be computed within TDDFT in conjunction with the Tamm-Dancoff approximation by using a reference determinant with a vacancy in the relevant core orbital, and these calculations can be performed using the frozen orbital approximation or with the relaxation of the orbitals of the intermediate core-ionised state included. Both standard exchange-correlation functionals and functionals specifically designed for X-ray emission spectroscopy are studied, and it is shown that the computed spectral band profiles are sensitive to the exchange-correlation functional used. The computed intensities of the spectral bands can be rationalised by considering the metal p orbital character of the valence molecular orbitals. To compute X-ray emission spectra with the correct energy scale allowing a direct comparison with experiment requires the relaxation of the core-ionised state to be included and the use of specifically designed functionals with increased amounts of Hartree-Fock exchange in conjunction with high quality basis sets. A range-corrected functional with increased Hartree-Fock exchange in the short range provides transition energies close to experiment and spectral band profiles that have a similar accuracy to those from standard functionals.

  15. International Neurocognitive Normative Study: Neurocognitive Comparison Data in Diverse Resource Limited Settings: AIDS Clinical Trials Group A5271

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, K; Jiang, H; Evans, SR; Marra, CM; Berzins, B; Hakim, J; Sacktor, N; Silva, M Tulius; Campbell, TB; Nair, A; Schouten, J; Kumwenda, J; Supparatpinyo, K; Tripathy, S.; Kumarasamy, N; La Rosa, A; Montano, S; Mwafongo, A; Firnhaber, C; Sanne, I; Naini, L.; Amod, F; Walawander, A

    2016-01-01

    Summary ACTG A5271 collected neurocognitive normative comparison test data in 2400 at-risk HIV seronegative participants from Brazil, India, Malawi, Peru, South Africa, Thailand and Zimbabwe. The participants were enrolled in strata by site (10 levels), age (2 levels), education (2 levels), and gender (2 levels). These data provide necessary normative data infrastructure for future clinical research and care in these diverse resource limited settings. Infrastructure for conducting neurological research in resource limited settings (RLS) is limited. The lack of neurological and neuropsychological (NP) assessment, and normative data needed for clinical interpretation impede research and clinical care. Here we report on ACTG 5271, which provided neurological training of clinical site personnel, and collected neurocognitive normative comparison data in diverse settings. At 10 sites in seven RLS countries, we provided training for NP assessments. We collected normative comparison data on HIV- participants from Brazil (n=240), India (n=480), Malawi (n=481), Peru (n=239), South Africa (480), Thailand (n=240) and Zimbabwe (n=240). Participants had a negative HIV test within 30 days before standardized NP exams were administered at baseline, and 770 at six-months. Participants were enrolled in 8 strata, gender (female and male), education (<10 years and ≥ 10 years), and age (<35 years and ≥35 years). Of 2400 enrolled, 770 completed the six-month follow up. As expected, significant between-country differences were evident in all the neurocognitive test scores (p<.0001). There was variation between the age, gender and education strata on the neurocognitive tests. Age and education were important variables for all tests; older participants had poorer performance and those with higher education had better performance. Women had better performance on verbal learning/memory and speed of processing tests, while men performed better on motor tests. This study provides the

  16. Can we decide which outcomes should be measured in every clinical trial? A scoping review of the existing conceptual frameworks and processes to develop core outcome sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idzerda, Leanne; Rader, Tamara; Tugwell, Peter; Boers, Maarten

    2014-05-01

    The usefulness of randomized control trials to advance clinical care depends upon the outcomes reported, but disagreement on the choice of outcome measures has resulted in inconsistency and the potential for reporting bias. One solution to this problem is the development of a core outcome set: a minimum set of outcome measures deemed critical for clinical decision making. Within rheumatology the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) initiative has pioneered the development of core outcome sets since 1992. As the number of diseases addressed by OMERACT has increased and its experience in formulating core sets has grown, clarification and update of the conceptual framework and formulation of a more explicit process of area/domain core set development has become necessary. As part of the update process of the OMERACT Filter criteria to version 2, a literature review was undertaken to compare and contrast the OMERACT conceptual framework with others within and outside rheumatology. A scoping search was undertaken to examine the extent, range, and nature of conceptual frameworks for core set outcome selection in health. We searched the following resources: Cochrane Library Methods Group Register; Medline; Embase; PsycInfo; Environmental Studies and Policy Collection; and ABI/INFORM Global. We also conducted a targeted Google search. Five conceptual frameworks were identified: the WHO tripartite definition of health; the 5 Ds (discomfort, disability, drug toxicity, dollar cost, and death); the International Classification of Functioning (ICF); PROMIS (Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement System); and the Outcomes Hierarchy. Of these, only the 5 Ds and ICF frameworks have been systematically applied in core set development. Outside the area of rheumatology, several core sets were identified; these had been developed through a limited range of consensus-based methods with varying degrees of methodological rigor. None applied a framework to ensure content validity of

  17. A combined community- and facility-based approach to improve pregnancy outcomes in low-resource settings: a Global Network cluster randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasha, Omrana; McClure, Elizabeth M; Wright, Linda L; Saleem, Sarah; Goudar, Shivaprasad S; Chomba, Elwyn; Patel, Archana; Esamai, Fabian; Garces, Ana; Althabe, Fernando; Kodkany, Bhala; Mabeya, Hillary; Manasyan, Albert; Carlo, Waldemar A; Derman, Richard J; Hibberd, Patricia L; Liechty, Edward K; Krebs, Nancy; Hambidge, K Michael; Buekens, Pierre; Moore, Janet; Jobe, Alan H; Koso-Thomas, Marion; Wallace, Dennis D; Stalls, Suzanne; Goldenberg, Robert L

    2013-10-03

    Fetal and neonatal mortality rates in low-income countries are at least 10-fold greater than in high-income countries. These differences have been related to poor access to and poor quality of obstetric and neonatal care. This trial tested the hypothesis that teams of health care providers, administrators and local residents can address the problem of limited access to quality obstetric and neonatal care and lead to a reduction in perinatal mortality in intervention compared to control locations. In seven geographic areas in five low-income and one middle-income country, most with high perinatal mortality rates and substantial numbers of home deliveries, we performed a cluster randomized non-masked trial of a package of interventions that included community mobilization focusing on birth planning and hospital transport, community birth attendant training in problem recognition, and facility staff training in the management of obstetric and neonatal emergencies. The primary outcome was perinatal mortality at ≥28 weeks gestation or birth weight ≥1000 g. Despite extensive effort in all sites in each of the three intervention areas, no differences emerged in the primary or any secondary outcome between the intervention and control clusters. In both groups, the mean perinatal mortality was 40.1/1,000 births (P = 0.9996). Neither were there differences between the two groups in outcomes in the last six months of the project, in the year following intervention cessation, nor in the clusters that best implemented the intervention. This cluster randomized comprehensive, large-scale, multi-sector intervention did not result in detectable impact on the proposed outcomes. While this does not negate the importance of these interventions, we expect that achieving improvement in pregnancy outcomes in these settings will require substantially more obstetric and neonatal care infrastructure than was available at the sites during this trial, and without them provider training

  18. Feedback GAP: study protocol for a cluster-randomized trial of goal setting and action plans to increase the effectiveness of audit and feedback interventions in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivers, Noah M; Tu, Karen; Francis, Jill; Barnsley, Jan; Shah, Baiju; Upshur, Ross; Kiss, Alex; Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Zwarenstein, Merrick

    2010-12-17

    Audit and feedback to physicians is commonly used alone or as part of multifaceted interventions. While it can play an important role in quality improvement, the optimal design of audit and feedback is unknown. This study explores how feedback can be improved to increase acceptability and usability in primary care. The trial seeks to determine whether a theory-informed worksheet appended to feedback reports can help family physicians improve quality of care for their patients with diabetes and/or ischemic heart disease. Two-arm cluster trial was conducted with participating primary care practices allocated using minimization to simple feedback or enhanced feedback group. The simple feedback group receives performance feedback reports every six months for two years regarding the proportion of their patients with diabetes and/or ischemic heart disease who are meeting quality targets. The enhanced feedback group receives these same reports as well as a theory-informed worksheet designed to facilitate goal setting and action plan development in response to the feedback reports. Participants are family physicians from across Ontario who use electronic medical records; data for rostered patients are used to produce the feedback reports and for analysis. The primary disease outcomes are the blood pressure (BP), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) levels. The primary process measure is a composite score indicating the number of recommended activities (e.g., tests and prescriptions) conducted by the family physicians for their patients with diabetes and/or ischemic heart disease within the appropriate timeframe. Secondary outcomes are the proportion of patients whose results meet targets for glucose, LDL, and BP as well as the percent of patients receiving relevant prescriptions. A qualitative process evaluation using semi-structured interviews will explore perceived barriers to behaviour change in response to feedback reports and preferences with regard to

  19. Randomized clinical trial: Effective gluten degradation by Aspergillus niger-derived enzyme in a complex meal setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Julia; Holster, Savanne; Bruins, Maaike J; Brummer, Robert J

    2017-10-12

    The Aspergillus niger-derived prolyl endoprotease (AN-PEP) has previously been shown to degrade gluten in healthy subjects when added to an intragastrically infused meal. The current study investigated the efficacy of AN-PEP in a physiological meal setting. In this randomized placebo-controlled crossover study, 18 gluten-sensitive subjects consumed a porridge containing 0.5 g gluten together with two tablets either containing a high or low dose of AN-PEP, or placebo. Gastric and duodenal content was sampled over 180 minutes, and areas under the curve of gluten concentrations were calculated. The primary outcome, i.e. success rate of high dose AN-PEP defined as at least 50% gluten degradation compared to placebo in the duodenum, was achieved in 10 of 13 comparisons. In the stomach, gluten levels were reduced from 176.9 (median, interquartile range 73.5-357.8) to 22.0 (10.6-50.8, p = 0.001) in the high dose and to 25.4 μg × min/ml (16.4-43.7, p = 0.001) in the low dose. In the duodenum, gluten levels were reduced from 14.1 (8.3-124.7) in the placebo to 6.3 (3.5-19.8, p = 0.019) in the high dose and to 7.4 μg × min/ml in the low dose (3.8-12.0, p = 0.015). Thus even in a physiological meal setting, AN-PEP significantly degraded most gluten in the stomach before it entered the duodenum.

  20. The effectiveness of physical activity monitoring and distance counseling in an occupational setting – Results from a randomized controlled trial (CoAct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reijonsaari Karita

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lack of physical activity (PA is a known risk factor for many health conditions. The workplace is a setting often used to promote activity and health. We investigated the effectiveness of an intervention on PA and productivity-related outcomes in an occupational setting. Methods We conducted a randomized controlled trial of 12 months duration with two 1:1 allocated parallel groups of insurance company employees. Eligibility criteria included permanent employment and absence of any condition that risked the participant’s health during PA. Subjects in the intervention group monitored their daily PA with an accelerometer, set goals, had access to an online service to help them track their activity levels, and received counseling via telephone or web messages for 12 months. The control group received the results of a fitness test and an information leaflet on PA at the beginning of the study. The intervention’s aim was to increase PA, improve work productivity, and decrease sickness absence. Primary outcomes were PA (measured as MET minutes per week, work productivity (quantity and quality of work; QQ index, and sickness absence (SA days at 12 months. Participants were assigned to groups using block randomization with a computer-generated scheme. The study was not blinded. Results There were 544 randomized participants, of which 521 were included in the analysis (64% female, mean age 43 years. At 12 months, there was no significant difference in physical activity levels between the intervention group (n = 264 and the control group (n = 257. The adjusted mean difference was −206 MET min/week [95% Bayesian credible interval −540 to 128; negative values favor control group]. There was also no significant difference in the QQ index (−0.5 [−4.4 to 3.3] or SA days (0.0 [−1.2 to 0.9]. Of secondary outcomes, body weight (0.5 kg [0.0 to 1.0] and percentage of body fat (0.6% [0.2% to 1.1%] were slightly

  1. Feedback GAP: pragmatic, cluster-randomized trial of goal setting and action plans to increase the effectiveness of audit and feedback interventions in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivers, Noah M; Tu, Karen; Young, Jacqueline; Francis, Jill J; Barnsley, Jan; Shah, Baiju R; Upshur, Ross E; Moineddin, Rahim; Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Zwarenstein, Merrick

    2013-12-17

    Audit and feedback to physicians is a commonly used quality improvement strategy, but its optimal design is unknown. This trial tested the effects of a theory-informed worksheet to facilitate goal setting and action planning, appended to feedback reports on chronic disease management, compared to feedback reports provided without these worksheets. A two-arm pragmatic cluster randomized trial was conducted, with allocation at the level of primary care clinics. Participants were family physicians who contributed data from their electronic medical records. The 'usual feedback' arm received feedback every six months for two years regarding the proportion of their patients meeting quality targets for diabetes and/or ischemic heart disease. The intervention arm received these same reports plus a worksheet designed to facilitate goal setting and action plan development in response to the feedback reports. Blood pressure (BP) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) values were compared after two years as the primary outcomes. Process outcomes measured the proportion of guideline-recommended actions (e.g., testing and prescribing) conducted within the appropriate timeframe. Intention-to-treat analysis was performed. Outcomes were similar across groups at baseline. Final analysis included 20 physicians from seven clinics and 1,832 patients in the intervention arm (15% loss to follow up) and 29 physicians from seven clinics and 2,223 patients in the usual feedback arm (10% loss to follow up). Ten of 20 physicians completed the worksheet at least once during the study. Mean BP was 128/72 in the feedback plus worksheet arm and 128/73 in the feedback alone arm, while LDL was 2.1 and 2.0, respectively. Thus, no significant differences were observed across groups in the primary outcomes, but mean haemoglobin A1c was lower in the feedback plus worksheet arm (7.2% versus 7.4%, ptheory-informed goal setting and action planning worksheet to an externally produced audit and

  2. Effectiveness of a self-management program for dual sensory impaired seniors in aged care settings: study protocol for a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roets-Merken, Lieve M; Graff, Maud J L; Zuidema, Sytse U; Hermsen, Pieter G J M; Teerenstra, Steven; Kempen, Gertrudis I J M; Vernooij-Dassen, Myrra J F J

    2013-10-07

    Five to 25 percent of residents in aged care settings have a combined hearing and visual sensory impairment. Usual care is generally restricted to single sensory impairment, neglecting the consequences of dual sensory impairment on social participation and autonomy. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a self-management program for seniors who acquired dual sensory impairment at old age. In a cluster randomized, single-blind controlled trial, with aged care settings as the unit of randomization, the effectiveness of a self-management program will be compared to usual care. A minimum of 14 and maximum of 20 settings will be randomized to either the intervention cluster or the control cluster, aiming to include a total of 132 seniors with dual sensory impairment. Each senior will be linked to a licensed practical nurse working at the setting. During a five to six month intervention period, nurses at the intervention clusters will be trained in a self-management program to support and empower seniors to use self-management strategies. In two separate diaries, nurses keep track of the interviews with the seniors and their reflections on their own learning process. Nurses of the control clusters offer care as usual. At senior level, the primary outcome is the social participation of the seniors measured using the Hearing Handicap Questionnaire and the Activity Card Sort, and secondary outcomes are mood, autonomy and quality of life. At nurse level, the outcome is job satisfaction. Effectiveness will be evaluated using linear mixed model analysis. The results of this study will provide evidence for the effectiveness of the Self-Management Program for seniors with dual sensory impairment living in aged care settings. The findings are expected to contribute to the knowledge on the program's potential to enhance social participation and autonomy of the seniors, as well as increasing the job satisfaction of the licensed practical nurses. Furthermore, an

  3. Effects of a complex intervention on fall risk in the general practitioner setting: a cluster randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freiberger E

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Ellen Freiberger,1 Wolfgang A Blank,2 Johannes Salb,1 Barbara Geilhof,3 Christian Hentschke,1 Peter Landendoerfer,2 Martin Halle,3 Monika Siegrist31Institute of Sport Science and Sport Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Nuremberg, Germany; 2Institute of General Practice, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany; 3Department of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Sports Medicine, Technische Universität München, Munich, GermanyPurpose: To study the feasibility of first, reaching functionally declined, but still independent older persons at risk of falls through their general practitioner (GP and second, to reduce their physiological and psychological fall risk factors with a complex exercise intervention. We investigated the effects of a 16-week exercise intervention on physiological (function, strength, and balance and psychological (fear of falling outcomes in community-dwelling older persons in comparison with usual care. In addition, we obtained data on adherence of the participants to the exercise program.Methods: Tests on physical and psychological fall risk were conducted at study inclusion, and after the 16-week intervention period in the GP office setting. The 16-week intervention included progressive and challenging balance, gait, and strength exercise as well as changes to behavioral aspects. To account for the hierarchical structure in the chosen study design, with patients nested in GPs and measurements nested in patients, a three-level linear mixed effects model was determined for analysis.Results: In total, 33 GPs recruited 378 participants (75.4% females. The mean age of the participants was 78.1 years (standard deviation 5.9 years. Patients in the intervention group showed an improvement in the Timed-Up-and-Go-test (TUG that was 1.5 seconds greater than that showed by the control group, equivalent to a small to moderate effect. For balance, a relative improvement of 0.8 seconds was accomplished, and anxiety about falls was

  4. Effects of gut-directed hypnotherapy on IBS in different clinical settings-results from two randomized, controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindfors, Perjohan; Unge, Peter; Arvidsson, Patrik; Nyhlin, Henry; Björnsson, Einar; Abrahamsson, Hasse; Simrén, Magnus

    2012-02-01

    Gut-directed hypnotherapy has been found to be effective in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). However, randomized, controlled studies are rare and few have been performed outside highly specialized research centers. The objective of this study was to study the effect of gut-directed hypnotherapy in IBS in different clinical settings outside the traditional research units. The study population included IBS patients refractory to standard management. In study 1, patients were randomized to receive gut-directed hypnotherapy (12 sessions, 1 h/week) in psychology private practices or supportive therapy, whereas patients were randomized to receive gut-directed hypnotherapy in a small county hospital or to serve as waiting list controls in study 2. Gastrointestinal symptom severity and quality of life were evaluated at baseline, at 3 months follow-up and after 1 year. We randomized 138 IBS patients refractory to standard management, 90 in study 1 and 48 in study 2. In both the studies, IBS-related symptoms were improved at 3 months in the gut-directed hypnotherapy groups (Phypnotherapy group than in the control group (Phypnotherapy is an effective treatment alternative for patients with refractory IBS, but the effectiveness is lower when the therapy is given outside the highly specialized research centers.

  5. Repeatability and response to therapy of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging biomarkers in rheumatoid arthritis in a large multicentre trial setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waterton, John C. [University of Manchester, Stopford Building, Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, Manchester (United Kingdom); Personalised Healthcare and Biomarkers, AstraZeneca, Macclesfield (United Kingdom); Ho, Meilien [AstraZeneca, Global Medicines Development, Macclesfield (United Kingdom); Nordenmark, Lars H. [AstraZeneca, Global Medicines Development, Moelndal (Sweden); Jenkins, Martin [AstraZeneca, Global Medicines Development, Cambridge (United Kingdom); DiCarlo, Julie; Peterfy, Charles [Spire Sciences Inc, Boca Raton, FL (United States); Guillard, Gwenael; Bowes, Michael A. [Imorphics, Manchester (United Kingdom); Roberts, Caleb; Buonaccorsi, Giovanni [Bioxydyn, Manchester (United Kingdom); Parker, Geoffrey J.M. [University of Manchester, Stopford Building, Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, Manchester (United Kingdom); Bioxydyn, Manchester (United Kingdom); Kellner, Herbert [Private Practice and Division of Rheumatology KHI Neuwittelsbach, Muenchen (Germany); Taylor, Peter C. [University of Oxford, Kennedy Institute, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2017-09-15

    To determine the repeatability and response to therapy of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI biomarkers of synovitis in the hand and wrist of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, and in particular the performance of the transfer constant K{sup trans}, in a multicentre trial setting. DCE-MRI and RA MRI scoring (RAMRIS) were performed with meticulous standardisation at baseline and 6 and 24 weeks in a substudy of fostamatinib monotherapy in reducing synovitis compared with placebo or adalimumab. Analysis employed statistical shape modelling to avoid biased regions-of-interest, kinetic modelling and heuristic analyses. Repeatability was also evaluated. At early study termination, DCE-MRI data had been acquired from 58 patients in 19 imaging centres. K{sup trans} intra-subject coefficient of variation (N = 14) was 30%. K{sup trans} change demonstrated inferiority of fostamatinib (N = 11) relative to adalimumab (N = 10) after 6 weeks (treatment ratio = 1.92, p = 0.003), and failed to distinguish fostamatinib from placebo (N = 10, p = 0.79). RAMRIS showed superiority of fostamatinib relative to placebo at 6 weeks (p = 0.023), and did not distinguish fostamatinib from adalimumab at either 6 (p = 0.175) or 24 (p = 0.230) weeks. This demonstrated repeatability of K{sup trans} and its ability to distinguish treatment groups show that DCE-MRI biomarkers are suitable for use in multicentre RA trials. (orig.)

  6. Provision of mental health services in resource-poor settings: a randomised trial comparing counselling with routine medical treatment in North Afghanistan (Mazar-e-Sharif

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayoughi Sarah

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Psychosocial stress caused by war, ongoing conflict, lack of security, and restricted access to resources promotes mental suffering and diseases in many resource-poor countries. In an exemplary setting, the present study compares the efficacy of psychosocial counselling with routine pharmacological treatment in a randomised trial in Mazar-e-Sharif (Afghanistan. Methods Help seeking Afghan women (N = 61, who were diagnosed with mental health symptoms by local physicians either received routine medical treatment(treatment as usual or psychosocial counselling (5-8 sessions following a specifically developed manualised treatment protocol. Primary outcome measures were symptoms of depression and anxiety assessed before treatment and at follow-up using the Hopkins Symptom Checklist and the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Secondary outcome measures were psychosocial stressors and coping mechanisms. Results At 3-month follow-up, psychosocial counselling patients showed high improvements with respect to the severity of symptoms of depression and anxiety. In addition, they reported a reduction of psychosocial stressors and showed an enhancement of coping strategies. At the same time, the severity of symptoms, the quantity of psychosocial stressors and coping mechanisms did not improve in patients receiving routine medical treatment. Conclusion These results indicate that psychosocial counselling can be an effective treatment for mental illnesses even for those living in ongoing unsafe environments. Trial registration NCT01155687

  7. Evaluation of novel disposable, light-weight radiation protection devices in an interventional radiology setting: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uthoff, Heiko; Peña, Constantino; West, James; Contreras, Francisco; Benenati, James F; Katzen, Barry T

    2013-04-01

    Radiation exposure to interventionalists is increasing. The currently available standard radiation protection devices are heavy and do not protect the head of the operator. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and comfort of caps and thyroid collars made of a disposable, light-weight, lead-free material (XPF) for occupational radiation protection in a clinical setting. Up to two interventional operators were randomized to wear a XPF or standard 0.5-mm lead-equivalent thyroid collars in 60 consecutive endovascular procedures requiring fluoroscopy. Simultaneously a XPF cap was worn by all operators. Radiation doses were measured using dosimeters placed outside and underneath the caps and thyroid collars. Wearing comfort was assessed at the end of each procedure on a visual analog scale (0-100 [100 = optimal]). Patient and procedure data did not differ between the XPF and standard protection groups. The cumulative radiation dose measured outside the cap was 15,700 μSv and outside the thyroid collars 21,240 μSv. Measured radiation attenuation provided by the XPF caps (n = 70), XPF thyroid collars (n = 40), and standard thyroid collars (n = 38) was 85.4% ± 25.6%, 79.7% ± 25.8% and 71.9% ± 34.2%, respectively (mean difference XPF vs standard thyroid collars, 7.8% [95% CI, -5.9% to 21.6%]; p = 0.258). The median XPF cap weight was 144 g (interquartile range, 128-170 g), and the XPF thyroid collars were 27% lighter than the standard thyroid collars (p disposable caps and thyroid collars made of XPF were assessed as being comfortable to wear, and they provide radiation protection similar to that of standard 0.5-mm lead-equivalent thyroid collars.

  8. Improved Neuropsychological and Neurological Functioning Across Three Antiretroviral Regimens in Diverse Resource-Limited Settings: AIDS Clinical Trials Group Study A5199, the International Neurological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, K.; Jiang, H.; Kumwenda, J.; Supparatpinyo, K.; Evans, S.; Campbell, T. B.; Price, R.; Tripathy, S.; Kumarasamy, N.; La Rosa, A.; Santos, B.; Silva, M. T.; Montano, S.; Kanyama, C.; Faesen, S.; Murphy, R.; Hall, C.; Marra, C. M.; Marcus, C.; Berzins, B.; Allen, R.; Housseinipour, M.; Amod, F.; Sanne, I.; Hakim, J.; Walawander, A.; Nair, A.

    2012-01-01

    Background. AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) A5199 compared the neurological and neuropsychological (NP) effects of 3 antiretroviral regimens in participants infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in resource-limited settings. Methods. Participants from Brazil, India, Malawi, Peru, South Africa, Thailand, and Zimbabwe were randomized to 3 antiretroviral treatment arms: A (lamivudine-zidovudine plus efavirenz, n = 289), B (atazanavir, emtricitabine, and didanosine-EC, n = 293), and C (emtricitabine-tenofovir-disoproxil fumarate plus efavirenz, n = 278) as part of the ACTG PEARLS study (A5175). Standardized neurological and neuropsychological (NP) screening examinations (grooved pegboard, timed gait, semantic verbal fluency, and finger tapping) were administered every 24 weeks from February 2006 to May 2010. Associations with neurological and neuropsychological function were estimated from linear and logistic regression models using generalized estimating equations. Results. The median weeks on study was 168 (Q1 = 96, Q3 = 192) for the 860 participants. NP test scores improved (P  .10). Significant country effects were noted on all NP tests and neurological outcomes (P < .01). Conclusions. The study detected no significant differences in neuropsychological and neurological outcomes between randomized ART regimens. Significant improvement occurred in neurocognitive and neurological functioning over time after initiation of ARTs. The etiology of these improvements is likely multifactorial, reflecting reduced central nervous system HIV infection, better general health, and practice effects. This study suggests that treatment with either of the World Health Organization –recommended first-line antiretroviral regimens in resource-limited settings will improve neuropsychological functioning and reduce neurological dysfunction. Clinical trials registration.  NCT00096824. PMID:22661489

  9. A randomized controlled trial of physical activity with individual goal-setting and volunteer mentors to overcome sedentary lifestyle in older adults at risk of cognitive decline: the INDIGO trial protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Kay L; Cyarto, Elizabeth V; Etherton-Beer, Christopher; Ellis, Kathryn A; Alfonso, Helman; Clare, Linda; Liew, Danny; Ames, David; Flicker, Leon; Almeida, Osvaldo P; LoGiudice, Dina; Lautenschlager, Nicola T

    2017-09-13

    Increasing physical activity (PA) effectively in those who are inactive is challenging. For those who have subjective memory complaints (SMC) or mild cognitive impairment (MCI) this is a greater challenge necessitating the need for more engaging and innovative approaches. The primary aim of this trial is to determine whether a home-based 6-month PA intervention with individual goal-setting and peer mentors (GM-PA) can significantly increase PA levels in insufficiently active older adults at increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD). Community living 60-80 year olds with SMC or MCI who do not engage in more than 60 min per week of moderate intensity PA will be recruited from memory clinics and the community via media advertisements to participate in this randomized, single-blind controlled trial. All participants will receive an individually tailored home-based PA program of 150 min of moderate intensity walking/week for 6 months. The intervention group will undertake individual goal-setting and behavioral education workshops with mentor support via telephone (GM-PA). Those randomized to the control group will have standard education workshops and Physical Activity Liaison (PAL) contact via telephone (CO-PA). Increase in PA is the primary outcome, fitness, cognitive, personality, demographic and clinical parameters will be measured and a health economic analysis performed. A saliva sample will be collected for APOE e4 genotyping. All participants will have a goal-setting interview to determine their PA goals. Active volunteers aged 50-85 years will be recruited from the community randomized and trained to provide peer support as mentors (intervention group) or PALS (control group) for the 6-month intervention. Mentors and PALS will have PA, exercise self-efficacy and mentoring self-efficacy measured. Participants in both groups are asked to attend 3 workshops in 6 months. At the first workshop, they will meet their allocated Mentor or PAL who will

  10. Cognitive behaviour therapy for older adults experiencing insomnia and depression in a community mental health setting: Study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Paul; McLaren, Suzanne; Klein, Britt; Jenkins, Megan; Harvey, Jack

    2015-11-27

    Cognitive behaviour therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is a well-established treatment; however, the evidence is largely limited to homogenous samples. Although emerging research has indicated that CBT-I is also effective for comorbid insomnia, CBT-I has not been tested among a complex sample of older adults with comorbid insomnia and depression. Furthermore, no study has explored whether modifying CBT-I to target associated depressive symptoms could potentially enhance sleep and mood outcomes. Therefore, this study aims to report a protocol designed to test whether an advanced form of CBT for insomnia and depression (CBT-I-D) is more effective at reducing insomnia and depressive symptoms compared to a standard CBT-I and psychoeducation control group (PCG) for older adults in a community mental health setting. We aim to recruit 150 older adults with comorbid insomnia who have presented to community mental health services for depression. Eligible participants will be randomly allocated via block/cluster randomisation to one of three group therapy conditions: CBT-I, CBT-I-D, or PCG. Participants who receive CBT-I will only practice strategies designed to improve their sleep, whereas participants who receive CBT-I-D will practice additional strategies designed to also improve their mood. This trial will implement a mixed-methods design involving quantitative outcome measures and qualitative focus groups. The primary outcome measures are insomnia and depression severity, and secondary outcomes are anxiety, hopelessness, beliefs about sleep, comorbid sleep conditions, and health. Outcomes will be assessed at pre-intervention (week 0), post-intervention (week 8), and 3-month follow-up (week 20). This CBT study protocol has been designed to address comorbid insomnia and depression for older adults receiving community mental health services. The proposed trial will determine whether CBT-I is more effective for older adults with comorbid insomnia and depression compared to a PCG

  11. Effectiveness of Goal-Setting Telephone Follow-Up on Health Behaviors of Patients with Ischemic Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Li-Hong; Zhang, Xiao-Pei; Mo, Miao-Miao; Xiong, Xiao-Ni; Ou, Cui-Ling; You, Li-Ming; Chen, Shao-Xian; Zhang, Min

    2016-09-01

    Adopting healthy behaviors is critical for secondary stroke prevention, but many patients fail to follow national guidelines regarding diet, exercise, and abstinence from risk factors. Compliance often decreases with time after hospital discharge, yet few studies have examined programs promoting long-term adherence to health behaviors. Goal setting and telephone follow-up have been proven to be effective in other areas of medicine, so this study evaluated the effectiveness of a guideline-based, goal-setting telephone follow-up program for patients with ischemic stroke. This was a multicenter, assessor-blinded, parallel-group, randomized controlled trial. Ninety-one stroke patients were randomized to either a control group or an intervention group. Intervention consisted of predischarge education and 3 goal-setting follow-up sessions conducted by phone. Data were collected at baseline and during the third and sixth months after hospital discharge. Six months after discharge, patients in the intervention group exhibited significantly higher medication adherence than patients in the control group. There were no statistically significant differences in physical activity, nutrition, low-salt diet adherence, blood pressure monitoring, smoking abstinence, unhealthy use of alcohol, and modified Rankin Scale (mRS) scores between the 2 groups. Goal-setting telephone follow-up intervention for ischemic stroke patients is feasible and leads to improved medication adherence. However, the lack of group differences in other health behavior subcategories and in themRS score indicates a need for more effective intervention strategies to help patients reach guideline-recommended targets. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. An integrated intervention to reduce intimate partner violence and psychological distress with refugees in low-resource settings: study protocol for the Nguvu cluster randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tol, Wietse A; Greene, M Claire; Likindikoki, Samuel; Misinzo, Lusia; Ventevogel, Peter; Bonz, Ann G; Bass, Judith K; Mbwambo, Jessie K K

    2017-05-18

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a critical public health and human rights concern globally, including for refugee women in low-resource settings. Little is known about effective interventions for this population. IPV and psychological distress have a bi-directional relationship, indicating the potential benefit of a structured psychological component as part of efforts to reduce IPV for women currently in violent relationships. This protocol describes a cluster randomized controlled trial aimed at evaluating an 8-session integrated psychological and advocacy intervention (Nguvu) with female adult survivors of past-year IPV displaying moderate to severe psychological distress. Outcomes are reductions in: recurrence of IPV; symptoms of anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress (primary); and functional impairment (secondary). Hypothesized mediators of the intervention are improvements in social support, coping skills and support seeking. We will recruit 400 participants from existing women's support groups operating within villages in Nyarugusu refugee camp, Tanzania. Women's groups will be randomized to receive the intervention (Nguvu and usual care) or usual care alone. All eligible women will complete a baseline assessment (week 0) followed by a post-treatment (week 9) and a 3-month post-treatment assessment (week 20). The efficacy of the intervention will be determined by between-group differences in the longitudinal trajectories of primary outcomes evaluated using mixed-effects models. Study procedures have been approved by Institutional Review Boards in the United States and Tanzania. This trial will provide evidence on the efficacy of a novel integrated group intervention aimed at secondary prevention of IPV that includes a structured psychological component to address psychological distress. The psychological and advocacy components of the proposed intervention have been shown to be efficacious for their respective outcomes when delivered in

  13. The REVAMP trial to evaluate HIV resistance testing in sub-Saharan Africa: a case study in clinical trial design in resource limited settings to optimize effectiveness and cost effectiveness estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siedner, Mark J; Bwana, Mwebesa B; Moosa, Mahomed-Yunus S; Paul, Michelle; Pillay, Selvan; McCluskey, Suzanne; Aturinda, Isaac; Ard, Kevin; Muyindike, Winnie; Moodley, Pravikrishnen; Brijkumar, Jaysingh; Rautenberg, Tamlyn; George, Gavin; Johnson, Brent; Gandhi, Rajesh T; Sunpath, Henry; Marconi, Vincent C

    2017-07-01

    In sub-Saharan Africa, rates of sustained HIV virologic suppression remain below international goals. HIV resistance testing, while common in resource-rich settings, has not gained traction due to concerns about cost and sustainability. We designed a randomized clinical trial to determine the feasibility, effectiveness, and cost-effectiveness of routine HIV resistance testing in sub-Saharan Africa. We describe challenges common to intervention studies in resource-limited settings, and strategies used to address them, including: (1) optimizing generalizability and cost-effectiveness estimates to promote transition from study results to policy; (2) minimizing bias due to patient attrition; and (3) addressing ethical issues related to enrollment of pregnant women. The study randomizes people in Uganda and South Africa with virologic failure on first-line therapy to standard of care virologic monitoring or immediate resistance testing. To strengthen external validity, study procedures are conducted within publicly supported laboratory and clinical facilities using local staff. To optimize cost estimates, we collect primary data on quality of life and medical resource utilization. To minimize losses from observation, we collect locally relevant contact information, including Whatsapp account details, for field-based tracking of missing participants. Finally, pregnant women are followed with an adapted protocol which includes an increased visit frequency to minimize risk to them and their fetuses. REVAMP is a pragammatic randomized clinical trial designed to test the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of HIV resistance testing versus standard of care in sub-Saharan Africa. We anticipate the results will directly inform HIV policy in sub-Saharan Africa to optimize care for HIV-infected patients.

  14. Tasimelteon for non-24-hour sleep-wake disorder in totally blind people (SET and RESET): two multicentre, randomised, double-masked, placebo-controlled phase 3 trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockley, Steven W; Dressman, Marlene A; Licamele, Louis; Xiao, Changfu; Fisher, Dennis M; Flynn-Evans, Erin E; Hull, Joseph T; Torres, Rosarelis; Lavedan, Christian; Polymeropoulos, Mihael H

    2015-10-31

    Most totally blind people have non-24-hour sleep-wake disorder (non-24), a rare circadian rhythm disorder caused by an inability of light to reset their circadian pacemaker. In two consecutive placebo-controlled trials (SET and RESET), we assessed safety and efficacy (in terms of circadian entrainment and maintenance) of once-daily tasimelteon, a novel dual-melatonin receptor agonist. We undertook the placebo-controlled, randomised, double-masked trials in 27 US and six German clinical research centres and sleep centres. We screened totally blind adults (18-75 years of age), who were eligible for the randomisation phase of SET if they had a non-24-hour circadian period (τ) of 24·25 h or longer (95% CI greater than 24·0 and up to 24·9 h), as calculated from measurements of urinary 6-sulphatoxymelatonin rhythms. For SET, we used block randomisation to assign patients (1:1) to receive tasimelteon (20 mg) or placebo every 24 h at a fixed clock time 1 h before target bedtime for 26 weeks. Patients who entered the open-label group receiving tasimelteon in SET or who did not meet the SET inclusion criteria but did meet the RESET inclusion criteria were screened for RESET. A subset of the patients who entered the open-label group before the RESET study and who had eligible τ values were screened for RESET after completing the open-label treatment. In RESET, we withdrew tasimelteon in a randomised manner (1:1) in patients who responded (ie, entrained) after a tasimelteon run-in period. Entrainment was defined as having τ of 24·1 h or less and a 95% CI that included 24·0 h. In SET, the primary endpoint was the proportion of entrained patients, assessed in the intention-to-treat population. The planned step-down primary endpoint assessed the proportion of patients who had a clinical response (entrainment at month 1 or month 7 plus clinical improvement, measured by the Non-24 Clinical Response Scale). In RESET, the primary endpoint was the proportion of non

  15. Cost-effectiveness of collaborative care for chronically ill patients with comorbid depressive disorder in the general hospital setting, a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beekman Aartjan TF

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depressive disorder is one of the most common disorders, and is highly prevalent in chronically ill patients. The presence of comorbid depression has a negative influence on quality of life, health care costs, self-care, morbidity, and mortality. Early diagnosis and well-organized treatment of depression has a positive influence on these aspects. Earlier research in the USA has reported good results with regard to the treatment of depression with a collaborative care approach and an antidepressant algorithm. In the UK 'Problem Solving Treatment' has proved to be feasible. However, in the general hospital setting this approach has not yet been evaluated. Methods/Design CC: DIM (Collaborative Care: Depression Initiative in the Medical setting is a two-armed randomised controlled trial with randomisation at patient level. The aim of the trial is to evaluate the treatment of depressive disorder in general hospitals in the Netherlands based on a collaborative care framework, including contracting, 'Problem Solving Treatment', antidepressant algorithm, and manual-guided self-help. 126 outpatients with diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or cardiovascular diseases will be randomised to either the intervention group or the control group. Patients will be included if they have been diagnosed with moderate to severe depression, based on the DSM-IV criteria in a two-step screening method. The intervention group will receive treatment based on the collaborative care approach; the control group will receive 'care as usual'. Baseline and follow-up measurements (after 3, 6, 9, and 12 months will be performed by means of questionnaires. The primary outcome measure is severity of depressive symptoms, as measured with the PHQ-9. The secondary outcome measure is the cost-effectiveness of these treatments according to the TiC-P, the EuroQol and the SF-36. Discussion Earlier research has indicated that depressive disorder is

  16. Comparison of a high and a low intensity smoking cessation intervention in a dentistry setting in Sweden – a randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenblad Andreas

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tobacco is still the number one life style risk factor for ill health and premature death and also one of the major contributors to oral problems and diseases. Dentistry may be a potential setting for several aspects of clinical public health interventions and there is a growing interest in several countries to develop tobacco cessation support in dentistry setting. The aim of the present study was to assess the relative effectiveness of a high intensity intervention compared with a low intensity intervention for smoking cessation support in a dental clinic setting. Methods 300 smokers attending dental or general health care were randomly assigned to two arms and referred to the local dental clinic for smoking cessation support. One arm received support with low intensity treatment (LIT, whereas the other group was assigned to high intensity treatment (HIT support. The main outcome measures included self-reported point prevalence and continuous abstinence (≥ 183 days at the 12-month follow-up. Results Follow-up questionnaires were returned from 86% of the participants. People in the HIT-arm were twice as likely to report continuous abstinence compared with the LIT-arm (18% vs. 9%, p = 0.02. There was a difference (not significant between the arms in point prevalence abstinence in favour of the HIT-protocol (23% vs. 16%. However, point prevalence cessation rates in the LIT-arm reporting additional support were relatively high (23% compared with available data assessing abstinence in smokers trying to quit without professional support. Conclusion Screening for willingness to quit smoking within the health care system and offering smoking cessation support within dentistry may be an effective model for smoking cessation support in Sweden. The LIT approach is less expensive and time consuming and may be appropriate as a first treatment option, but should be integrated with other forms of available support in the community. The

  17. Constraining a hybrid volatility basis-set model for aging of wood-burning emissions using smog chamber experiments: a box-model study based on the VBS scheme of the CAMx model (v5.40)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarelli, Giancarlo; El Haddad, Imad; Bruns, Emily; Aksoyoglu, Sebnem; Möhler, Ottmar; Baltensperger, Urs; Prévôt, André S. H.

    2017-06-01

    In this study, novel wood combustion aging experiments performed at different temperatures (263 and 288 K) in a ˜ 7 m3 smog chamber were modelled using a hybrid volatility basis set (VBS) box model, representing the emission partitioning and their oxidation against OH. We combine aerosol-chemistry box-model simulations with unprecedented measurements of non-traditional volatile organic compounds (NTVOCs) from a high-resolution proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) and with organic aerosol measurements from an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS). Due to this, we are able to observationally constrain the amounts of different NTVOC aerosol precursors (in the model) relative to low volatility and semi-volatile primary organic material (OMsv), which is partitioned based on current published volatility distribution data. By comparing the NTVOC / OMsv ratios at different temperatures, we determine the enthalpies of vaporization of primary biomass-burning organic aerosols. Further, the developed model allows for evaluating the evolution of oxidation products of the semi-volatile and volatile precursors with aging. More than 30 000 box-model simulations were performed to retrieve the combination of parameters that best fit the observed organic aerosol mass and O : C ratios. The parameters investigated include the NTVOC reaction rates and yields as well as enthalpies of vaporization and the O : C of secondary organic aerosol surrogates. Our results suggest an average ratio of NTVOCs to the sum of non-volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds of ˜ 4.75. The mass yields of these compounds determined for a wide range of atmospherically relevant temperatures and organic aerosol (OA) concentrations were predicted to vary between 8 and 30 % after 5 h of continuous aging. Based on the reaction scheme used, reaction rates of the NTVOC mixture range from 3.0 × 10-11 to 4. 0 × 10-11 cm3 molec-1 s-1. The average enthalpy of vaporization of secondary organic aerosol

  18. Constraining a hybrid volatility basis-set model for aging of wood-burning emissions using smog chamber experiments: a box-model study based on the VBS scheme of the CAMx model (v5.40

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ciarelli

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, novel wood combustion aging experiments performed at different temperatures (263 and 288 K in a ∼ 7 m3 smog chamber were modelled using a hybrid volatility basis set (VBS box model, representing the emission partitioning and their oxidation against OH. We combine aerosol–chemistry box-model simulations with unprecedented measurements of non-traditional volatile organic compounds (NTVOCs from a high-resolution proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS and with organic aerosol measurements from an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS. Due to this, we are able to observationally constrain the amounts of different NTVOC aerosol precursors (in the model relative to low volatility and semi-volatile primary organic material (OMsv, which is partitioned based on current published volatility distribution data. By comparing the NTVOC ∕ OMsv ratios at different temperatures, we determine the enthalpies of vaporization of primary biomass-burning organic aerosols. Further, the developed model allows for evaluating the evolution of oxidation products of the semi-volatile and volatile precursors with aging. More than 30 000 box-model simulations were performed to retrieve the combination of parameters that best fit the observed organic aerosol mass and O : C ratios. The parameters investigated include the NTVOC reaction rates and yields as well as enthalpies of vaporization and the O : C of secondary organic aerosol surrogates. Our results suggest an average ratio of NTVOCs to the sum of non-volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds of ∼ 4.75. The mass yields of these compounds determined for a wide range of atmospherically relevant temperatures and organic aerosol (OA concentrations were predicted to vary between 8 and 30 % after 5 h of continuous aging. Based on the reaction scheme used, reaction rates of the NTVOC mixture range from 3.0 × 10−11 to 4. 0 × 10−11 cm3 molec−1 s−1

  19. Video-games used in a group setting is feasible and effective to improve indicators of physical activity in individuals with chronic stroke: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givon, Noa; Zeilig, Gabi; Weingarden, Harold; Rand, Debbie

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the feasibility of using video-games in a group setting and to compare the effectiveness of video-games as a group intervention to a traditional group intervention for improving physical activity in individuals with chronic stroke. A single-blind randomized controlled trial with evaluations pre and post a 3-month intervention, and at 3-month follow-up. Compliance (session attendance), satisfaction and adverse effects were feasibility measures. Grip strength and gait speed were measures of physical activity. Hip accelerometers quantified steps/day and the Action Research Arm Test assessed the functional ability of the upper extremity. Forty-seven community-dwelling individuals with chronic stroke (29-78 years) were randomly allocated to receive video-game (N=24) or traditional therapy (N=23) in a group setting. There was high treatment compliance for both interventions (video-games-78%, traditional therapy-66%), but satisfaction was rated higher for the video-game (93%) than the traditional therapy (71%) (χ(2)=4.98, P=0.026). Adverse effects were not reported in either group. Significant improvements were demonstrated in both groups for gait speed (F=3.9, P=0.02), grip strength of the weaker (F=6.67, P=0.002) and stronger hands (F=7.5, P=0.001). Daily steps and functional ability of the weaker hand did not increase in either group. Using video-games in a small group setting is feasible, safe and satisfying. Video-games improve indicators of physical activity of individuals with chronic stroke. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Virtual endoscopy of the upper urinary tract based on contrast material-enhanced MR urography data sets; Virtuelle Endoskopie des oberen Harntraktes auf der Basis kontrastangehobener MR-Urographie Datensaetze

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nolte-Ernsting, C.C.A.; Krombach, G.; Staatz, G.; Kilbinger, M.; Adam, G.B.; Guenther, R.W. [RWTH Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik

    1999-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of reconstructing a virtual endoscopy from MR imaging data sets of the upper urinary tract. Method: The data obtained from 28 contrast-enhanced MR urographic examinations (5 normal; 23 pathologic) were post-processed to reconstruct a virtual ureterorenoscopy (VURS) using a threshold image segmentation. The visualization of the upper urinary tract was based on the acquisition of T{sub 1}-weighted 3D gradient-echo sequences after intravenous administration of gadolinium-DTPA and a prior injection of low-dose furosemide. Results: The employed MR urography technique created in all 28 cases a complete and strong contrast enhancement of the urinary tract. These 3D sequence data allowed the reconstruction of a VURS, even when the collecting system was not dilated. The best accuracy was provided by the MR urography sequences with the smallest voxel size. Moreover, the data acquisition based on a breath-hold technique has proved superior to that using a respiratory gating. Inside the renal pelvis, all calices could be assessed by turning the virtual endoscope in the appropriate direction. The visualization of the ureteral orifices in the bladder was also possible. All filling defects that were diagnosed by MR urography could be evaluated from the endoluminal view using the VURS. The exact characterization of the lesions based only on the assessment of the surface structure was difficult. Conclusion: A virtual endoscopy of the upper urinary tract can be successfully reconstructed using the data sets of high-resolution 3D MR urography sequences. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Untersuchungen zur Anwendung der virtuellen Endoskopie auf MR-tomographische Datensaetze des oberen Harntraktes. Methoden: Die Daten von 28 kontrastangehobenen MR-Urographien (5 normal; 23 pathologisch) wurden zur Erstellung einer virtuellen Ureterorenoskopie (VURS) mittels Schwellenwert-Bildsegmentierung nachverarbeitet. Als Grundlage fuer die Darstellung des Harntraktes

  1. Coaching Older Adults and Carers to have their preferences Heard (COACH): A randomised controlled trial in an intermediate care setting (study protocol).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Stacey; Gordon, Jason; Whitehead, Craig; Davies, Owen; Giles, Lynne C; Ratcliffe, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Frail older people who are considering movement into residential aged care or returning home following a hospital admission often face complex and difficult decisions.Despite research interest in this area, a recent Cochrane review was unable to identify any studies of interventions to support decision-making in this group that met the experimental or quasi-experimental study design criteria. This study tests the impact of a multi-component coaching intervention on the quality of preparation for care transitions, targeted to older adults and informal carers. In addition, the study assesses the impact of investing specialist geriatric resources into consultations with families in an intermediate care setting where decisions about future care needs are being made. This study was a randomised controlled trial of 230 older adults admitted to intermediate care in Australia. Masked assessment at 3 and 12 months examined physical functioning, health-related quality of life and utilisation of health and aged care resources. A geriatrician and specialist nurse delivered a coaching intervention to both the older person and their carer/family. Components of the intervention included provision of a Question Prompt List prior to meeting with a geriatrician (to clarify medical conditions and treatments, medications, 'red flags', end of life decisions and options for future health care) and a follow-up meeting with a nurse who remained in telephone contact. Participants received a printed summary and an audio recording of the meeting with the geriatrician. The costs and outcomes of the intervention are compared with usual care. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN12607000638437).

  2. Protocol for a feasibility randomised controlled trial of the use of Physical ACtivity monitors in an Exercise Referral Setting: the PACERS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Jemma; Edwards, Michelle; Charles, Joanna; Jago, Russell; Kelson, Mark; Morgan, Kelly; Murphy, Simon; Oliver, Emily; Simpson, Sharon; Edwards, Rhiannon Tudor; Moore, Graham

    2017-01-01

    Exercise referral schemes are recommended by the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) for physical activity promotion among inactive patients with health conditions or risk factors. Whilst there is evidence for the initial effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of such schemes for increasing physical activity, evidence of long-term effects is limited. Techniques such as goal setting, self-monitoring and personalised feedback may support motivation for physical activity. Technologies such as activity monitoring devices provide an opportunity to enhance delivery of motivational techniques. This paper describes the PACERS study protocol, which aims to assess the feasibility and acceptability of implementing an activity monitor within the existing Welsh National Exercise Referral Scheme (NERS) and proposed evaluation methodology for a full-scale randomised controlled trial. The PACERS study consists of a pilot randomised controlled trial, process evaluation and exploratory economic analyses. Participants will be recruited from the generic pathway of the Welsh NERS and will be randomly assigned to receive the intervention or usual practice. Usual practice is a 16-week structured exercise programme; the intervention consists of an accelerometry-based activity monitor (MyWellnessKey) and an associated web platform (MyWellnessCloud). The primary outcomes are predefined progression criteria assessing the acceptability and feasibility of the intervention and feasibility of the proposed evaluation methodology. Postal questionnaires will be completed at baseline (time 0: T0), 16 weeks after T0 (T1) and 12 months after T0 (T2). Routinely collected data will also be accessed at the same time points. A sub-sample of intervention participants and exercise referral staff will be interviewed following initiation of intervention delivery and at the end of the study. The PACERS study seeks to assess the feasibility of adding a novel motivational component to an existing

  3. Multidisciplinary Collaborative Care for Depressive Disorder in the Occupational Health Setting: design of a randomised controlled trial and cost-effectiveness study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beekman Aartjan TF

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Major depressive disorder (MDD has major consequences for both patients and society, particularly in terms of needlessly long sick leave and reduced functioning. Although evidence-based treatments for MDD are available, they show disappointing results when implemented in daily practice. A focus on work is also lacking in the treatment of depressive disorder as well as communication of general practitioners (GPs and other health care professionals with occupational physicians (OPs. The OP may play a more important role in the recovery of patients with MDD. Purpose of the present study is to tackle these obstacles by applying a collaborative care model, which has proven to be effective in the USA, with a focus on return to work (RTW. From a societal perspective, the (costeffectiveness of this collaborative care treatment, as a way of transmural care, will be evaluated in depressed patients on sick leave in the occupational health setting. Methods/Design A randomised controlled trial in which the treatment of MDD in the occupational health setting will be evaluated in the Netherlands. A transmural collaborative care model, including Problem Solving Treatment (PST, a workplace intervention, antidepressant medication and manual guided self-help will be compared with care as usual (CAU. 126 Patients with MDD on sick leave between 4 and 12 weeks will be included in the study. Care in the intervention group will be provided by a multidisciplinary team of a trained OP-care manager and a consultant psychiatrist. The treatment is separated from the sickness certification. Data will be collected by means of questionnaires at baseline and at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after baseline. Primary outcome measure is reduction of depressive symptoms, secondary outcome measure is time to RTW, tertiary outcome measure is the cost effectiveness. Discussion The high burden of MDD and the high level of sickness absence among people with MDD contribute to

  4. Simplified antibiotic regimens for treatment of clinical severe infection in the outpatient setting when referral is not possible for young infants in Pakistan (Simplified Antibiotic Therapy Trial [SATT]): a randomised, open-label, equivalence trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, Fatima; Nisar, Imran; Tikmani, Shiyam S; Baloch, Benazir; Shakoor, Sadia; Jehan, Fyezah; Ahmed, Imran; Cousens, Simon; Zaidi, Anita K M

    2017-02-01

    Parenteral antibiotic therapy for young infants (aged 0-59 days) with suspected sepsis is sometimes not available or feasible in countries with high neonatal mortality. Outpatient treatment could save lives in such settings. We aimed to assess the equivalence of two simplified antibiotic regimens, comprising fewer injections and oral rather than parenteral administration, compared with a reference treatment for young infants with clinical severe infection. We undertook the Simplified Antibiotic Therapy Trial (SATT), a three-arm, randomised, open-label, equivalence trial in five communities in Karachi, Pakistan. We enrolled young infants (aged 0-59 days) who either presented at a primary health-care clinic or were identified by a community health worker with signs of clinical severe infection. We included infants who were not critically ill and whose family refused admission. We randomly assigned infants to either intramuscular procaine benzylpenicillin and gentamicin once a day for 7 days (reference); oral amoxicillin twice daily and intramuscular gentamicin once a day for 7 days; or intramuscular procaine benzylpenicillin and gentamicin once a day for 2 days followed by oral amoxicillin twice daily for 5 days. The primary outcome was treatment failure within 7 days of enrolment and the primary analysis was per protocol. We judged experimental treatments as efficacious as the reference if the upper bound of the 95% CI for the difference in treatment failure was less than 5·0. This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01027429. Between Jan 1, 2010, and Dec 26, 2013, 2780 infants were deemed eligible for the trial, of whom 2453 (88%) were enrolled. Because of inadequate clinical follow-up or treatment adherence, 2251 infants were included in the per-protocol analysis. 820 infants (747 per protocol) were assigned the reference treatment of procaine benzylpenicillin and gentamicin, 816 (751 per protocol) were allocated amoxicillin and gentamicin, and

  5. Efficacy and Safety of Three Antiretroviral Regimens for Initial Treatment of HIV-1: A Randomized Clinical Trial in Diverse Multinational Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Thomas B.; Smeaton, Laura M.; Kumarasamy, N.; Flanigan, Timothy; Klingman, Karin L.; Firnhaber, Cynthia; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Kumwenda, Johnstone; Lalloo, Umesh; Riviere, Cynthia; Sanchez, Jorge; Melo, Marineide; Supparatpinyo, Khuanchai; Tripathy, Srikanth; Martinez, Ana I.; Nair, Apsara; Walawander, Ann; Moran, Laura; Chen, Yun; Snowden, Wendy; Rooney, James F.; Uy, Jonathan; Schooley, Robert T.; De Gruttola, Victor; Hakim, James Gita; Swann, Edith; Barnett, Ronald L.; Brizz, Barbara; Delph, Yvette; Gettinger, Nikki; Mitsuyasu, Ronald T.; Eshleman, Susan; Safren, Steven; Fiscus, Susan A.; Andrade, Adriana; Haas, David W.; Amod, Farida; Berthaud, Vladimir; Bollinger, Robert C.; Bryson, Yvonne; Celentano, David; Chilongozi, David; Cohen, Myron; Collier, Ann C.; Currier, Judith Silverstein; Cu-Uvin, Susan; Eron, Joseph; Flexner, Charles; Gallant, Joel E.; Gulick, Roy M.; Hammer, Scott M.; Hoffman, Irving; Kazembe, Peter; Kumwenda, Newton; Lama, Javier R.; Lawrence, Jody; Maponga, Chiedza; Martinson, Francis; Mayer, Kenneth; Nielsen, Karin; Pendame, Richard B.; Ramratnam, Bharat; Sanne, Ian; Severe, Patrice; Sirisanthana, Thira; Solomon, Suniti; Tabet, Steve; Taha, Taha; van der Horst, Charles; Wanke, Christine; Gormley, Joan; Marcus, Cheryl J.; Putnam, Beverly; Loeliger, Edde; Pappa, Keith A.; Webb, Nancy; Shugarts, David L.; Winters, Mark A.; Descallar, Renard S.; Steele, Joseph; Wulfsohn, Michael; Said, Farideh; Chen, Yue; Martin, John C; Bischofberger, Norbert; Cheng, Andrew; Jaffe, Howard; Sharma, Jabin; Poongulali, S.; Cardoso, Sandra Wagner; Faria, Deise Lucia; Berendes, Sima; Burke, Kelly; Mngqibisa, Rosie; Kanyama, Cecelia; Kayoyo, Virginia; Samaneka, Wadzanai P.; Chisada, Anthony; Faesen, Sharla; Chariyalertsak, Suwat; Santos, Breno; Lira, Rita Alves; Joglekar, Anjali A.; Rosa, Alberto La; Infante, Rosa; Jain, Mamta; Petersen, Tianna; Godbole, Sheela; Dhayarkar, Sampada; Feinberg, Judith; Baer, Jenifer; Pollard, Richard B.; Asmuth, David; Gangakhedkar, Raman R; Gaikwad, Asmita; Ray, M. Graham; Basler, Cathi; Para, Michael F.; Watson, Kathy J.; Taiwo, Babafemi; McGregor, Donna; Balfour, Henry H.; Mullan, Beth; Kim, Ge-Youl; Klebert, Michael K.; Cox, Gary Matthew; Silberman, Martha; Mildvan, Donna; Revuelta, Manuel; Tashima, Karen T.; Patterson, Helen; Geiseler, P. Jan; Santos, Bartolo; Daar, Eric S; Lopez, Ruben; Frarey, Laurie; Currin, David; Haas, David H.; Bailey, Vicki L.; Tebas, Pablo; Zifchak, Larisa; Noel-Connor, Jolene; Torres, Madeline; Sha, Beverly E.; Fritsche, Janice M.; Cespedes, Michelle; Forcht, Janet; O'Brien, William A.; Mogridge, Cheryl; Hurley, Christine; Corales, Roberto; Palmer, Maria; Adams, Mary; Luque, Amneris; Lopez-Detres, Luis; Stroberg, Todd

    2012-01-01

    Background Antiretroviral regimens with simplified dosing and better safety are needed to maximize the efficiency of antiretroviral delivery in resource-limited settings. We investigated the efficacy and safety of antiretroviral regimens with once-daily compared to twice-daily dosing in diverse areas of the world. Methods and Findings 1,571 HIV-1-infected persons (47% women) from nine countries in four continents were assigned with equal probability to open-label antiretroviral therapy with efavirenz plus lamivudine-zidovudine (EFV+3TC-ZDV), atazanavir plus didanosine-EC plus emtricitabine (ATV+DDI+FTC), or efavirenz plus emtricitabine-tenofovir-disoproxil fumarate (DF) (EFV+FTC-TDF). ATV+DDI+FTC and EFV+FTC-TDF were hypothesized to be non-inferior to EFV+3TC-ZDV if the upper one-sided 95% confidence bound for the hazard ratio (HR) was ≤1.35 when 30% of participants had treatment failure. An independent monitoring board recommended stopping study follow-up prior to accumulation of 472 treatment failures. Comparing EFV+FTC-TDF to EFV+3TC-ZDV, during a median 184 wk of follow-up there were 95 treatment failures (18%) among 526 participants versus 98 failures among 519 participants (19%; HR 0.95, 95% CI 0.72–1.27; p = 0.74). Safety endpoints occurred in 243 (46%) participants assigned to EFV+FTC-TDF versus 313 (60%) assigned to EFV+3TC-ZDV (HR 0.64, CI 0.54–0.76; p<0.001) and there was a significant interaction between sex and regimen safety (HR 0.50, CI 0.39–0.64 for women; HR 0.79, CI 0.62–1.00 for men; p = 0.01). Comparing ATV+DDI+FTC to EFV+3TC-ZDV, during a median follow-up of 81 wk there were 108 failures (21%) among 526 participants assigned to ATV+DDI+FTC and 76 (15%) among 519 participants assigned to EFV+3TC-ZDV (HR 1.51, CI 1.12–2.04; p = 0.007). Conclusion EFV+FTC-TDF had similar high efficacy compared to EFV+3TC-ZDV in this trial population, recruited in diverse multinational settings. Superior safety, especially in HIV-1-infected

  6. Evaluation of a WeChat-based dementia-specific training program for nurses in primary care settings: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feilong; Xiao, Lily Dongxia; Wang, Kaifa; Li, Min; Yang, Yanni

    2017-12-01

    Community nurses play a crucial role in early detection and timely diagnosis of dementia. However, they are usually not prepared for the role through their formal education, particularly in low- and middle-income countries due to undeveloped nursing curriculum in dementia care. This paper describes a two-arm cluster-randomized controlled trial to improve community nurses' knowledge, attitudes, and practice changes using an innovative and interactive mobile phone applet-based activity in primary care settings. The intervention sites received dementia-specific training and control sites received care training for older people with disability. Both groups completed measures assessing dementia knowledge, attitudes, and intentions to make changes to achieve early detection and a timely diagnosis of dementia immediately after training and at 3-month follow-up. The intervention group provided feedback immediately after training and at 3-month follow-up. The main results show that the intervention group demonstrated significant improvement in dementia knowledge and attitudes from baseline immediately after training and at the 3-month follow-up. The intervention group also showed more intentions to make changes to achieve early detection of dementia. Feedback suggested the program was well-received. Overall, the program showed acceptability and feasibility in improving nurses' dementia knowledge, attitudes, and intentions to achieve early detection of dementia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Subdissociative intranasal ketamine plus standard pain therapy versus standard pain therapy in the treatment of paediatric sickle cell disease vaso-occlusive crises in resource-limited settings: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, James R; Sawe, Hendry Robert; Mfinanga, Juma A; Nshom, Ernest; Helm, Ethan; Moore, Charity G; Runyon, Michael S; Reynolds, Stacy L

    2017-07-10

    Pediatric sickle cell disease, highly prevalent in sub-Saharan Africa, carries great morbidity and mortality risk. Limited resources and monitoring make management of acute vaso-occlusive crises challenging. This study aims to evaluate the efficacy and safety of subdissociative intranasal ketamine as a cheap, readily available and easily administered adjunct to standard pain therapy. We hypothesise that subdissociative, intranasal ketamine may significantly augment current approaches to pain management in resource-limited settings in a safe and cost-effective manner. This is a multicentred, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial enrolling children 4-16 years of age with sickle cell disease and painful vaso-occlusive pain crises. Study sites include two sub-Saharan teaching and referral hospitals with acute intake areas. All patients receive standard analgesic therapy during evaluation. Patients randomised to the treatment arm receive 1 mg/kg intranasal ketamine at onset of therapy, while placebo arm participants receive volume-matched intranasal normal saline. All participants and clinical staff are blinded to the treatment allocation. Data will be analysed on an intention-to-treat basis. Primary endpoints are changes in self-report pain scales (Faces Pain Scale-Revised) at 30, 60 and 120 minutes and rates of adverse events. Secondary endpoints include hospital length of stay, total analgesia use and quality of life assessment 2-3 weeks postintervention. The research methods for this study have been approved by the Cameroon Baptist Convention Health Board Institutional Review Board (IRB2015-07), the Tanzanian National Institute for Medical Research (NIMR/HQ/R.8a/Vol. IX/2299), Muhimbili National Hospital IRB (MNH/IRB/I/2015/14) and the Tanzanian Food and Drugs Authority (TFDA0015/CTR/0015/9). Data reports will be provided to the Data and Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB) periodically throughout the study as well as all reports of adverse events. All

  8. A group randomized trial of a complexity-based organizational intervention to improve risk factors for diabetes complications in primary care settings: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noel Polly H

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most patients with type 2 diabetes have suboptimal control of their glucose, blood pressure (BP, and lipids – three risk factors for diabetes complications. Although the chronic care model (CCM provides a roadmap for improving these outcomes, developing theoretically sound implementation strategies that will work across diverse primary care settings has been challenging. One explanation for this difficulty may be that most strategies do not account for the complex adaptive system (CAS characteristics of the primary care setting. A CAS is comprised of individuals who can learn, interconnect, self-organize, and interact with their environment in a way that demonstrates non-linear dynamic behavior. One implementation strategy that may be used to leverage these properties is practice facilitation (PF. PF creates time for learning and reflection by members of the team in each clinic, improves their communication, and promotes an individualized approach to implement a strategy to improve patient outcomes. Specific objectives The specific objectives of this protocol are to: evaluate the effectiveness and sustainability of PF to improve risk factor control in patients with type 2 diabetes across a variety of primary care settings; assess the implementation of the CCM in response to the intervention; examine the relationship between communication within the practice team and the implementation of the CCM; and determine the cost of the intervention both from the perspective of the organization conducting the PF intervention and from the perspective of the primary care practice. Intervention The study will be a group randomized trial conducted in 40 primary care clinics. Data will be collected on all clinics, with 60 patients in each clinic, using a multi-method assessment process at baseline, 12, and 24 months. The intervention, PF, will consist of a series of practice improvement team meetings led by trained facilitators over 12

  9. Large Cancer Drug Trial Helps Move Precision Medicine Toward the Mainstream | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    A landmark cancer drug trial is helping set the stage for moving precision medicine into the mainstream of clinical practice, according to a new study. The study, reported in the Journal of Molecular Diagnostics, validates a procedure used in the drug trial that identifies the unique genetic mutations in a patient’s tumor, which is then used as the basis for selecting targeted

  10. A health dialogue intervention reduces cardiovascular risk factor levels: a population based randomised controlled trial in Swedish primary care setting with 1-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mats Hellstrand

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The total number of cardiovascular (CVD deaths accounted for almost a third of all deaths globally in 2013. Population based randomised controlled trials, managed within primary care, on CVD risk factor interventions are scarce. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of a health dialogue intervention in a primary care setting offered to a population at the age of 55 years, focusing on CVD risk factors. Methods The study was performed in five primary health care centres in the county of Västmanland, Sweden between April 2011 and December 2012. Men and women were randomly assigned to intervention (n = 440 and control groups (n = 440. At baseline, both groups filled in a health questionnaire and serum cholesterol, fasting plasma glucose, glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c, weight, height, waist (WC and hip circumference, waist hip ratio (WHR and systolic/diastolic blood pressure were measured. Intervention group attended a health dialogue, supported by a visualised health profile, with a possibility for further activities. Participation rates at baseline were 53% and 52% respectively. A 1-year follow-up was carried out. Results The intervention group (n = 165 showed reductions compared to the control group (n = 177 concerning body mass index (BMI (0.3 kg/m2, p = .031, WC (2.1 cm, p ≤ .001 and WHR (.002, p ≤ .001 at the 1-year follow-up. No differences between the intervention and control groups were found in other variables. Intervention group, compared to baseline, had reduced weight, BMI, WC, WHR, HbA1c, and diet, while the men in the control group had reduced their alcohol consumption. Conclusions A health dialogue intervention at the age of 55 years, conducted in ordinary primary care, showed a moderate effect on CVD risk factor levels, in terms of BMI, WC and WHR. Trial registration number BioMed Central, ISRCTN22586871 , date assigned; 10/12/2015

  11. Patient perspectives with abbreviated versus standard pre-test HIV counseling in the prenatal setting: a randomized-controlled, non-inferiority trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohan, Deborah; Gomez, Elvira; Greenberg, Mara; Washington, Sierra; Charlebois, Edwin D

    2009-01-01

    In the US, an unacceptably high percentage of pregnant women do not undergo prenatal HIV testing. Previous studies have found increased uptake of prenatal HIV testing with abbreviated pre-test counseling, however little is known about patient decision making, testing satisfaction and knowledge in this setting. A randomized-controlled, non-inferiority trial was conducted from October 2006 through February 2008 at San Francisco General Hospital (SFGH), the public teaching hospital of the City and County of San Francisco. A total of 278 English- and Spanish-speaking pregnant women were randomized to receive either abbreviated or standard nurse-performed HIV test counseling at the initial prenatal visit. Patient decision making experience was compared between abbreviated versus standard HIV counseling strategies among a sample of low-income, urban, ethnically diverse prenatal patients. The primary outcome was the decisional conflict score (DCS) using O'Connor low-literacy scale and secondary outcomes included satisfaction with test decision, basic HIV knowledge and HIV testing uptake. We conducted an intention-to-treat analysis of 278 women--134 (48.2%) in the abbreviated arm (AA) and 144 (51.8%) in the standard arm (SA). There was no significant difference in the proportion of women with low decisional conflict (71.6% in AA vs. 76.4% in SA, p = .37), and the observed mean difference between the groups of 3.88 (95% CI: -0.65, 8.41) did not exceed the non-inferiority margin. HIV testing uptake was very high (97. 8%) and did not differ significantly between the 2 groups (99.3% in AA vs. 96.5% in SA, p = .12). Likewise, there was no difference in satisfaction with testing decision (97.8% in AA vs. 99.3% in SA, p = .36). However, women in AA had significantly lower mean HIV knowledge scores (78.4%) compared to women in SA (83.7%, pprocess, while associated with slightly lower knowledge, does not compromise patient decision making or satisfaction regarding HIV testing

  12. Protocol for a randomised controlled trial of 90% kanuka honey versus 5% aciclovir for the treatment of herpes simplex labialis in the community setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semprini, Alex; Singer, Joseph; Shortt, Nicholas; Braithwaite, Irene; Beasley, Richard

    2017-08-03

    Worldwide, about 90% of people are infected with the herpes simplex virus, 30% of whom will experience recurrent herpes simplex labialis, commonly referred to as 'cold sores', which can last up to 10 days. The most common treatment is aciclovir cream which reduces healing time by just half a day compared with no specific treatment. This is a protocol for a randomised controlled trial (RCT) to determine the efficacy of medical grade kanuka honey-based topical treatment (Honevo) in reducing the healing time and pain of cold sores, compared with topical aciclovir treatment (Viraban). This open-label, parallel-group, active comparator superiority RCT will compare the efficacy of medical grade kanuka honey with 5% aciclovir cream in the treatment of cold sores in the setting of a pharmacy research network of 60 sites throughout New Zealand. Adults presenting with a cold sore (N=950) will be randomised by pharmacy-based investigators. The pharmacy-based investigators will dispense the investigational product to randomised participants and both study groups apply the treatment five times daily until their skin returns to normal or for 14 days, whichever occurs first. In response to a daily SMS message, participants complete an assessment of their cold sore healing, with reference to a visual guide, and transmit it to the investigators by a smartphone eDiary in real time. The primary outcome variable is time (in days) from randomisation to return to normal skin. Secondary endpoints include total healing time stratified by stage of the lesion at onset of treatment, highest pain severity and time to pain resolution. New Zealand Ethics Registration 15/NTB/93. Results will be published in a peer-reviewed medical journal, presented at academic meetings and reported to participants. Australia New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12615000648527, pre-results.SCOTT Registration: 15/SCOTT/14 PROTOCOL VERSION: 4.0 (12 June 2017). © Article author(s) (or their employer

  13. A pragmatic cluster randomised controlled trial to evaluate the safety, clinical effectiveness, cost effectiveness and satisfaction with point of care testing in a general practice setting – rationale, design and baseline characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glastonbury Briony

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Point of care testing (PoCT may be a useful adjunct in the management of chronic conditions in general practice (GP. The provision of pathology test results at the time of the consultation could lead to enhanced clinical management, better health outcomes, greater convenience and satisfaction for patients and general practitioners (GPs, and savings in costs and time. It could also result in inappropriate testing, increased consultations and poor health outcomes resulting from inaccurate results. Currently there are very few randomised controlled trials (RCTs in GP that have investigated these aspects of PoCT. Design/Methods The Point of Care Testing in General Practice Trial (PoCT Trial was an Australian Government funded multi-centre, cluster randomised controlled trial to determine the safety, clinical effectiveness, cost effectiveness and satisfaction of PoCT in a GP setting. The PoCT Trial covered an 18 month period with the intervention consisting of the use of PoCT for seven tests used in the management of patients with diabetes, hyperlipidaemia and patients on anticoagulant therapy. The primary outcome measure was the proportion of patients within target range, a measure of therapeutic control. In addition, the PoCT Trial investigated the safety of PoCT, impact of PoCT on patient compliance to medication, stakeholder satisfaction, cost effectiveness of PoCT versus laboratory testing, and influence of geographic location. Discussion The paper provides an overview of the Trial Design, the rationale for the research methodology chosen and how the Trial was implemented in a GP environment. The evaluation protocol and data collection processes took into account the large number of patients, the broad range of practice types distributed over a large geographic area, and the inclusion of pathology test results from multiple pathology laboratories. The evaluation protocol developed reflects the complexity of the Trial setting

  14. Efficacy and safety of three antiretroviral regimens for initial treatment of HIV-1: a randomized clinical trial in diverse multinational settings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas B Campbell

    Full Text Available Antiretroviral regimens with simplified dosing and better safety are needed to maximize the efficiency of antiretroviral delivery in resource-limited settings. We investigated the efficacy and safety of antiretroviral regimens with once-daily compared to twice-daily dosing in diverse areas of the world.1,571 HIV-1-infected persons (47% women from nine countries in four continents were assigned with equal probability to open-label antiretroviral therapy with efavirenz plus lamivudine-zidovudine (EFV+3TC-ZDV, atazanavir plus didanosine-EC plus emtricitabine (ATV+DDI+FTC, or efavirenz plus emtricitabine-tenofovir-disoproxil fumarate (DF (EFV+FTC-TDF. ATV+DDI+FTC and EFV+FTC-TDF were hypothesized to be non-inferior to EFV+3TC-ZDV if the upper one-sided 95% confidence bound for the hazard ratio (HR was ≤1.35 when 30% of participants had treatment failure. An independent monitoring board recommended stopping study follow-up prior to accumulation of 472 treatment failures. Comparing EFV+FTC-TDF to EFV+3TC-ZDV, during a median 184 wk of follow-up there were 95 treatment failures (18% among 526 participants versus 98 failures among 519 participants (19%; HR 0.95, 95% CI 0.72-1.27; p = 0.74. Safety endpoints occurred in 243 (46% participants assigned to EFV+FTC-TDF versus 313 (60% assigned to EFV+3TC-ZDV (HR 0.64, CI 0.54-0.76; p<0.001 and there was a significant interaction between sex and regimen safety (HR 0.50, CI 0.39-0.64 for women; HR 0.79, CI 0.62-1.00 for men; p = 0.01. Comparing ATV+DDI+FTC to EFV+3TC-ZDV, during a median follow-up of 81 wk there were 108 failures (21% among 526 participants assigned to ATV+DDI+FTC and 76 (15% among 519 participants assigned to EFV+3TC-ZDV (HR 1.51, CI 1.12-2.04; p = 0.007.EFV+FTC-TDF had similar high efficacy compared to EFV+3TC-ZDV in this trial population, recruited in diverse multinational settings. Superior safety, especially in HIV-1-infected women, and once-daily dosing of EFV+FTC-TDF are

  15. Influence of basis-set size on the X Σ 1 /2 +2 , A Π 1 /2 2 , A Π 3 /2 2 , and B Σ 1 /2 +2 potential-energy curves, A Π 3 /2 2 vibrational energies, and D1 and D2 line shapes of Rb+He

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, L. Aaron; Sharma, Amit R.; Weeks, David E.

    2018-03-01

    The X Σ 1 /2 +2 , A Π 1 /2 2 , A Π 3 /2 2 , and B2Σ1/2 + potential-energy curves for Rb+He are computed at the spin-orbit multireference configuration interaction level of theory using a hierarchy of Gaussian basis sets at the double-zeta (DZ), triple-zeta (TZ), and quadruple-zeta (QZ) levels of valence quality. Counterpoise and Davidson-Silver corrections are employed to remove basis-set superposition error and ameliorate size-consistency error. An extrapolation is performed to obtain a final set of potential-energy curves in the complete basis-set (CBS) limit. This yields four sets of systematically improved X Σ 1 /2 +2 , A Π 1 /2 2 , A Π 3 /2 2 , and B2Σ1/2 + potential-energy curves that are used to compute the A Π 3 /2 2 bound vibrational energies, the position of the D2 blue satellite peak, and the D1 and D2 pressure broadening and shifting coefficients, at the DZ, TZ, QZ, and CBS levels. Results are compared with previous calculations and experimental observation.

  16. Investigation of the Study Characteristics Affecting Clinical Trial Quality Using the Protocol Deviations Leading to Exclusion of Subjects From the Per Protocol Set Data in Studies for New Drug Application: A Retrospective Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohara, Norihito; Kaneko, Masayuki; Narukawa, Mamoru

    2018-01-01

    The concept of the risk-based approach has been introduced as an effort to secure the quality of clinical trials. In the risk-based approach, identification and evaluation of risk in advance are considered important. For recently completed clinical trials, we investigated the relationship between study characteristics and protocol deviations leading to the exclusion of subjects from Per Protocol Set (PPS) efficacy analysis. New drugs approved in Japan in the fiscal year 2014-2015 were targeted in the research. The reasons for excluding subjects from the PPS efficacy analysis were described in 102 trials out of 492 in the summary of new drug application documents, which was publicly disclosed after the drug's regulatory approval. The author extracted these reasons along with the numbers of the cases and the study characteristics of each clinical trial. Then, the direct comparison, univariate regression analysis, and multivariate regression analysis was carried out based on the exclusion rate. The study characteristics for which exclusion of subjects from the PPS efficacy analysis were frequently observed was multiregional clinical trials in study region; inhalant and external use in administration route; Anti-infective for systemic use; Respiratory system, Dermatologicals, and Nervous system in therapeutic drug under the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Classification. In the multivariate regression analysis, the clinical trial variables of inhalant, Respiratory system, or Dermatologicals were selected as study characteristics leading to a higher exclusion rate. The characteristics of the clinical trial that is likely to cause protocol deviations that will affect efficacy analysis were suggested. These studies should be considered for specific attention and priority observation in the trial protocol or its monitoring plan and execution, such as a clear description of inclusion/exclusion criteria in the protocol, development of training materials to site staff, and

  17. School-based intervention for childhood disruptive behavior in disadvantaged settings: a randomized controlled trial with and without active teacher support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liber, Juliette M; De Boo, Gerly M; Huizenga, Hilde; Prins, Pier J M

    2013-12-01

    In this randomized controlled trial, we investigated the effectiveness of a school-based targeted intervention program for disruptive behavior. A child-focused cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) program was introduced at schools in disadvantaged settings and with active teacher support (ATS) versus educational teacher support (ETS) (CBT + ATS vs. CBT + ETS). Screening (n = 1,929) and assessment (n = 224) led to the inclusion of 173 children ages 8-12 years from 17 elementary schools. Most of the children were boys (n = 136, 79%) of low or low-to-middle class socioeconomic status (87%); the sample was ethnically diverse (63% of non-Western origin). Children received CBT + ATS (n = 29) or CBT + ETS (n = 41) or were entered into a waitlist control condition (n = 103) to be treated afterward (CBT + ATS, n = 39, and CBT + ETS, n = 64). Effect sizes (ES), clinical significance (reliable change), and the results of multilevel modeling are reported. Ninety-seven percent of children completed treatment. Teachers and parents reported positive posttreatment effects (mean ES = .31) for CBT compared with the waitlist control condition on disruptive behavior. Multilevel modeling showed similar results. Clinical significance was modest. Changes had remained stable or had increased at 3-months follow-up (mean ES = .39). No consistent effect of teacher condition was found at posttreatment; however, at follow-up, children who received ETS fared significantly better. This study shows that a school-based CBT program is beneficial for difficult-to-reach children with disruptive behavior: The completion rate was remarkably high, ESs (mean ES = .31) matched those of previous studies with targeted intervention, and effects were maintained or had increased at follow-up.

  18. Self-perceived ability to cope with stress without smoking predicts successful smoking cessation 12 months later in a quitline setting: a randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Nohlert

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Telephone-based smoking cessation services ('quitlines' are both effective and cost-effective. Knowledge of modifiable baseline factors in real-life settings with heterogeneous participants is essential for the development and improvement of treatment protocols to assist in telephone-based smoking cessation. The aim was to assess self-efficacy as a predictor for abstinence at the 12-month follow-up at the Swedish National Tobacco Quitline (SNTQ. Methods The data were collected from a randomized controlled trial comparing the effectiveness of proactive and reactive service at the SNTQ. Included were 612 clients calling the SNTQ between February 2009 and September 2010. Outcome measures were self-reported point prevalence and 6-month continuous abstinence at the 12-month follow-up. Plausible predictors of smoking cessation were assessed at the first call and in a baseline questionnaire. Self-efficacy was measured by three questions: (1 the likelihood of being smoking free in 1 year; (2 the ability to handle stress and depressive mood without smoking; and (3 the likelihood of using medication against craving if necessary. The associations between predictors and outcome were subjected to logistic regression analysis. Results Of the three self-efficacy predictors for abstinence at month 12, only the perceived ability to handle stress and depressive mood without smoking remained significant in the adjusted analyses (odds ratio, OR, 1.1 for point prevalence and 1.2 for 6-month continuous abstinence. The overall strongest predictor in the adjusted analyses was smoking status in the week before baseline (OR 2.7 for point prevalence and 3.1 for 6-month continuous abstinence. Conclusions The perceived ability to handle stress and depressive mood without smoking at baseline predicted the subjects' abstinence at the 12-month follow-up. An assessment of/adjustment for stress and depressive mood may be appropriate in future smoking cessation

  19. Analysis of regional timelines to set up a global phase III clinical trial in breast cancer: the adjuvant lapatinib and/or trastuzumab treatment optimization experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger-Filho, Otto; de Azambuja, Evandro; Bradbury, Ian; Saini, Kamal S; Bines, José; Simon, Sergio D; Dooren, Veerle Van; Aktan, Gursel; Pritchard, Kathleen I; Wolff, Antonio C; Smith, Ian; Jackisch, Christian; Lang, Istvan; Untch, Michael; Boyle, Frances; Xu, Binghe; Baselga, Jose; Perez, Edith A; Piccart-Gebhart, Martine

    2013-01-01

    This study measured the time taken for setting up the different facets of adjuvant lapatinib and/or trastuzumab treatment optimization (ALTTO), an nternational phase III study being conducted in 44 participating countries. Time to regulatory authority (RA) approval, time to ethics committee/institutional review board (EC/IRB) approval, time from study approval by EC/IRB to first randomized patient, and time from first to last randomized patient were prospectively collected in the ALTTO study. Analyses were conducted by grouping countries into either geographic regions or economic classes as per the World Bank's criteria. South America had a significantly longer time to RA approval (median: 236 days, range: 21-257 days) than Europe (median: 52 days, range: 0-151 days), North America (median: 26 days, range: 22-30 days), and Asia-Pacific (median: 62 days, range: 37-75 days). Upper-middle economies had longer times to RA approval (median: 123 days, range: 21-257 days) than high-income (median: 47 days, range: 0-112 days) and lower-middle income economies (median: 57 days, range: 37-62 days). No significant difference was observed for time to EC/IRB approval across the studied regions (median: 59 days, range 0-174 days). Overall, the median time from EC/IRB approval to first recruited patient was 169 days (range: 26-412 days). This study highlights the long time intervals required to activate a global phase III trial. Collaborative research groups, pharmaceutical industry sponsors, and regulatory authorities should analyze the current system and enter into dialogue for optimizing local policies. This would enable faster access of patients to innovative therapies and enhance the efficiency of clinical research.

  20. The effects of a life goal-setting technique in a preventive care program for frail community-dwelling older people: a cluster nonrandomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuri, Yoshimi; Takabatake, Shinichi; Nishikawa, Tomoko; Oka, Mari; Fujiwara, Taro

    2016-05-12

    Frailty among older people is associated with an increased risk of needing care. There have been many reports on preventive care programs for frail older people, but few have shown positive effects on disability prevention. Physical exercise programs for frail older people affect elements such as physical fitness and balance, but are less effective for disability outcomes and are not followed up in the longer term. We developed a life goal-setting technique (LGST). Our objective was to determine the effect of a LGST plus standard preventive care program for community-dwelling frail older people. We used a cluster nonrandomized controlled trial with seven intervention and nine matched control groups, with baseline assessment and follow-up at 3, 6, and 9 months. Participants were 176 frail older people, aged 65 years or over, living in the community in Izumi, Osaka, Japan. All participants attended regular 120 min preventive care exercise classes each week, over 3 months. They also received oral care and nutrition education. The intervention groups alone received life goal-setting support. We assessed outcomes longitudinally, comparing pre-intervention with follow-up. The primary outcome measure was health improvement according to the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare's "Kihon Checklist" for assessment of frailty and quality of life (QOL), analyzed with a two-way ANOVA and post-test comparison. Secondary outcomes included physical functions and assessment of life goals. The improvement on the Kihon Checklist for the intervention group was approximately 60 % from baseline to 9-months follow-up; the control group improved by approximately 40 %. The difference between groups was significant at 3-month (p = 0.043) and 6-month (p = 0.015) follow-ups but not at 9-month (p = 0.098) follow-up. Analysis of QOL yielded a significant time × group interaction effect (p = 0.022). The effect was significant at 3 months in the intervention

  1. The Impact of Web-Based Feedback on Physical Activity and Cardiovascular Health of Nurses Working in a Cardiovascular Setting: A Randomized Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. Reed

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A disconcerting proportion of Canadian nurses are physically inactive and report poor cardiovascular health. Web-based interventions incorporating feedback and group features may represent opportune, convenient, and cost-effective methods for encouraging physical activity (PA in order to improve the levels of PA and cardiovascular health of nurses. The purpose of this parallel-group randomized trial was to examine the impact of an intervention providing participants with feedback from an activity monitor coupled with a web-based individual, friend or team PA challenge, on the PA and cardiovascular health of nurses working in a cardiovascular setting.Methods: Nurses were randomly assigned in a 1:1:1 ratio to one of the following intervention “challenge” groups: (1 individual, (2 friend or (3 team. Nurses wore a Tractivity® activity monitor throughout a baseline week and 6-week intervention. Height, body mass, body fat percentage, waist circumference, resting blood pressure (BP and heart rate were assessed, and body mass index (BMI was calculated, during baseline and within 1 week post-intervention. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and general linear model procedures for repeated measures.Results: 76 nurses (97% female; age: 46 ± 11 years participated. Weekly moderate-to-vigorous intensity PA (MVPA changed over time (F = 4.022, df = 4.827, p = 0.002, η2 = 0.055, and was greater during intervention week 2 when compared to intervention week 6 (p = 0.011. Daily steps changed over time (F = 7.668, df = 3.910, p < 0.001, η2 = 0.100, and were greater during baseline and intervention weeks 1, 2, 3, and 5 when compared to intervention week 6 (p < 0.05. No differences in weekly MVPA or daily steps were observed between groups (p > 0.05. No changes in body mass, BMI or waist circumference were observed within or between groups (p > 0.05. Decreases in body fat percentage (−0.8 ± 4.8%, p = 0.015 and resting systolic BP (−2.6 ± 8

  2. Effect of a Quality Improvement Intervention With Daily Round Checklists, Goal Setting, and Clinician Prompting on Mortality of Critically Ill Patients: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, Alexandre B; Bozza, Fernando Augusto; Machado, Flavia R; Salluh, Jorge I F; Campagnucci, Valquiria Pelisser; Vendramim, Patricia; Guimaraes, Helio Penna; Normilio-Silva, Karina; Damiani, Lucas Petri; Romano, Edson; Carrara, Fernanda; Lubarino Diniz de Souza, Juliana; Silva, Aline Reis; Ramos, Grazielle Viana; Teixeira, Cassiano; Brandão da Silva, Nilton; Chang, Chung-Chou H; Angus, Derek C; Berwanger, Otavio

    2016-04-12

    The effectiveness of checklists, daily goal assessments, and clinician prompts as quality improvement interventions in intensive care units (ICUs) is uncertain. To determine whether a multifaceted quality improvement intervention reduces the mortality of critically ill adults. This study had 2 phases. Phase 1 was an observational study to assess baseline data on work climate, care processes, and clinical outcomes, conducted between August 2013 and March 2014 in 118 Brazilian ICUs. Phase 2 was a cluster randomized trial conducted between April and November 2014 with the same ICUs. The first 60 admissions of longer than 48 hours per ICU were enrolled in each phase. Intensive care units were randomized to a quality improvement intervention, including a daily checklist and goal setting during multidisciplinary rounds with follow-up clinician prompting for 11 care processes, or to routine care. In-hospital mortality truncated at 60 days (primary outcome) was analyzed using a random-effects logistic regression model, adjusted for patients' severity and the ICU's baseline standardized mortality ratio. Exploratory secondary outcomes included adherence to care processes, safety climate, and clinical events. A total of 6877 patients (mean age, 59.7 years; 3218 [46.8%] women) were enrolled in the baseline (observational) phase and 6761 (mean age, 59.6 years; 3098 [45.8%] women) in the randomized phase, with 3327 patients enrolled in ICUs (n = 59) assigned to the intervention group and 3434 patients in ICUs (n = 59) assigned to routine care. There was no significant difference in in-hospital mortality between the intervention group and the usual care group, with 1096 deaths (32.9%) and 1196 deaths (34.8%), respectively (odds ratio, 1.02; 95% CI, 0.82-1.26; P = .88). Among 20 prespecified secondary outcomes not adjusted for multiple comparisons, 6 were significantly improved in the intervention group (use of low tidal volumes, avoidance of heavy sedation, use of

  3. An alcohol-focused intervention versus a healthy living intervention for problem drinkers identified in a general hospital setting (ADAPTA): study protocol for a randomized, controlled pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Judith; Tober, Gillian; Raistrick, Duncan; Mdege, Noreen; Dale, Veronica; Crosby, Helen; Godfrey, Christine; Lloyd, Charlie; Toner, Paul; Parrott, Steve

    2013-04-30

    Alcohol misuse is a major cause of premature mortality and ill health. Although there is a high prevalence of alcohol problems among patients presenting to general hospital, many of these people are not help seekers and do not engage in specialist treatment. Hospital admission is an opportunity to steer people towards specialist treatment, which can reduce health-care utilization and costs to the public sector and produce substantial individual health and social benefits. Alcohol misuse is associated with other lifestyle problems, which are amenable to intervention. It has been suggested that the development of a healthy or balanced lifestyle is potentially beneficial for reducing or abstaining from alcohol use, and relapse prevention. The aim of the study is to test whether or not the offer of a choice of health-related lifestyle interventions is more acceptable, and therefore able to engage more problem drinkers in treatment, than an alcohol-focused intervention. This is a pragmatic, randomized, controlled, open pilot study in a UK general hospital setting with concurrent economic evaluation and a qualitative component. Potential participants are those admitted to hospital with a diagnosis likely to be responsive to addiction interventions who score equal to or more than 16 on the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT). The main purpose of this pilot study is to evaluate the acceptability of two sorts of interventions (healthy living related versus alcohol focused) to the participants and to assess the components and processes of the design. Qualitative research will be undertaken to explore acceptability and the impact of the approach, assessment, recruitment and intervention on trial participants and non-participants. The effectiveness of the two treatments will be compared at 6 months using AUDIT scores as the primary outcome measure. There will be additional economic, qualitative and secondary outcome measurements. Development of the study was a

  4. A pragmatic cluster randomised controlled trial to evaluate the safety, clinical effectiveness, cost effectiveness and satisfaction with point of care testing in a general practice setting - rationale, design and baseline characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurence, Caroline; Gialamas, Angela; Yelland, Lisa; Bubner, Tanya; Ryan, Philip; Willson, Kristyn; Glastonbury, Briony; Gill, Janice; Shephard, Mark; Beilby, Justin

    2008-08-06

    Point of care testing (PoCT) may be a useful adjunct in the management of chronic conditions in general practice (GP). The provision of pathology test results at the time of the consultation could lead to enhanced clinical management, better health outcomes, greater convenience and satisfaction for patients and general practitioners (GPs), and savings in costs and time. It could also result in inappropriate testing, increased consultations and poor health outcomes resulting from inaccurate results. Currently there are very few randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in GP that have investigated these aspects of PoCT. The Point of Care Testing in General Practice Trial (PoCT Trial) was an Australian Government funded multi-centre, cluster randomised controlled trial to determine the safety, clinical effectiveness, cost effectiveness and satisfaction of PoCT in a GP setting.The PoCT Trial covered an 18 month period with the intervention consisting of the use of PoCT for seven tests used in the management of patients with diabetes, hyperlipidaemia and patients on anticoagulant therapy. The primary outcome measure was the proportion of patients within target range, a measure of therapeutic control. In addition, the PoCT Trial investigated the safety of PoCT, impact of PoCT on patient compliance to medication, stakeholder satisfaction, cost effectiveness of PoCT versus laboratory testing, and influence of geographic location. The paper provides an overview of the Trial Design, the rationale for the research methodology chosen and how the Trial was implemented in a GP environment. The evaluation protocol and data collection processes took into account the large number of patients, the broad range of practice types distributed over a large geographic area, and the inclusion of pathology test results from multiple pathology laboratories.The evaluation protocol developed reflects the complexity of the Trial setting, the Trial Design and the approach taken within the funding

  5. Transition of a Text-Based Insulin Titration Program From a Randomized Controlled Trial Into Real-World Settings: Implementation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orzeck-Byrnes, Natasha A; Aidasani, Sneha R; Moloney, Dana N; Nguyen, Lisa H; Park, Agnes; Hu, Lu; Langford, Aisha T; Wang, Binhuan; Sevick, Mary Ann; Rogers, Erin S

    2018-01-01

    Background The Mobile Insulin Titration Intervention (MITI) program helps patients with type 2 diabetes find their correct basal insulin dose without in-person care. Requiring only basic cell phone technology (text messages and phone calls), MITI is highly accessible to patients receiving care in safety-net settings. MITI was shown in a randomized controlled trial (RCT) to be efficacious at a New York City (NYC) safety-net clinic where patients often have challenges coming for in-person care. In 2016, MITI was implemented as usual care at Bellevue Hospital (the site of the original RCT) and at Gouverneur Health (a second NYC safety-net clinic) under 2 different staffing models. Objective This implementation study examined MITI’s transition into real-world settings. To understand MITI’s flexibility, generalizability, and acceptability among patients and providers, we evaluated whether MITI continued to produce positive outcomes in expanded underserved populations, outside of an RCT setting. Methods Patients enrolled in MITI received weekday text messages asking for their fasting blood glucose (FBG) values and a weekly titration call. The goal was for patients to reach their optimal insulin dose (OID), defined either as the dose of once-daily basal insulin required to achieve either an FBG of 80-130 mg/dL (4.4-7.2 mmol/L) or as the reaching of the maximum dose of 50 units. After 12 weeks, if OID was not reached, the patients were asked to return to the clinic for in-person care and titration. MITI program outcomes, clinical outcomes, process outcomes, and patient satisfaction were assessed. Results MITI was successful at both sites, each with a different staffing model. Providers referred 170 patients to the program—129 of whom (75.9%, 129/170) were eligible. Of these, 113 (87.6%, 113/129) enrolled. Moreover, 84.1% (95/113) of patients reached their OID, and they did so in an average of 24 days. Clinical outcomes show that mean FBG levels fell from 209 mg

  6. The effect of providing feedback on inhaler technique and adherence from an electronic audio recording device, INCA®, in a community pharmacy setting: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dwyer, Susan Mary; MacHale, Elaine; Sulaiman, Imran; Holmes, Martin; Hughes, Cian; D'Arcy, Shona; Rapcan, Viliam; Taylor, Terence; Boland, Fiona; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia; Reilly, Richard B; Ryder, Sheila A; Costello, Richard W

    2016-05-04

    time relative to the prescribed interval. Secondary outcomes include exacerbation rates and quality of life measures. Differences in the timing and technique of inhaler use as altered by the interventions will also be assessed. Data will be analysed on an intention-to-treat and a per-protocol basis. Sample size has been calculated with reference to comparisons to be made between the intervention and comparator clusters and indicates 75 participants per cluster. With an estimated 10 % loss to follow-up we will be able to show a 20 % difference between the population means of the intervention and comparator groups with a power of 0.8. The Type I error probability associated with the test of the null hypothesis is 0.05. This clinical trial will establish whether providing personalised feedback to individuals on their inhaler use improves adherence. It may also be possible to enhance the role of pharmacists in clinical care by identifying patients in whom alteration of either therapy or inhaler device is appropriate. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02203266 .

  7. Geological basis and data set for assessing the long-term safety of the final repository for low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes at the Wellenberg site (Community of Wolfenschiessen, NW)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    This report forms part of the supporting documentation for the low- and intermediate-level waste repository site selection procedure. The aim of the report is to present the site-specific geological data, and the geosphere database derived therefrom, which were used as a basis for evaluating the long-term safety of a repository at Wellenberg. These data also form a key component of other reports appearing simultaneously with the present one, first on the intercomparison of the four potential sites, (NTB 93-02) and second, on the safety assessment of the Wellenberg site itself (NTB 93-26). The level of detail of the present report is determined by the requirements of the other two reports mentioned, which would include presenting, discussing and justifying the geosphere dataset used in the performance assessment model calculations. The introductory chapter discusses procedures and goals. The second chapter provides an overview of the geographical and geological situation at Wellenberg. Chapter 3 then discusses the planning and progress of the field programme, and the current status of investigations is presented. The fourth chapter presents the geological situation at the Wellenberg site and describes the concept and models formulated on the basis of this information. Chapter 5 derives the performance assessment and engineering datasets, based on the investigations, concepts and modelling exercises described in chapter 4. In summary, it can be said that, to date, the investigation results from Wellenberg have confirmed predictions in all relevant respects and, in some cases, have even exceeded expectations (e.g. in relation to the available volume of host rock). (author) figs., tabs., 141 refs

  8. Socioeconomic risk factors for cholera in different transmission settings: An analysis of the data of a cluster randomized trial in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Amit; Hayen, Andrew; Ali, Mohammad; Rosewell, Alexander; Clemens, John D; Raina MacIntyre, C; Qadri, Firdausi

    2017-09-05

    Cholera remains a threat globally, and socioeconomic factors play an important role in transmission of the disease. We assessed socioeconomic risk factors for cholera in vaccinated and non-vaccinated communities to understand whether the socioeconomic risk factors differ by transmission patterns for cholera. We used data from a cluster randomized control trial conducted in Dhaka, Bangladesh. There were 90 geographic clusters; 30 in each of the three arms of the study: vaccine (VAC), vaccine plus behavioural change (VBC), and non-intervention. The data were analysed for the three populations: (1) vaccinees in the vaccinated communities (VAC and VBC arms), (2) non-vaccinated individuals in the vaccinated communities and (3) all individuals in the non-vaccinated communities (non-intervention arm). A generalized estimating equation with logit link function was used to evaluate the risk factors for cholera among these different populations adjusting for household level correlation in the data. A total of 528 cholera and 226 cholera with severe dehydration (CSD) in 268,896 persons were observed during the two-year follow-up. For population 1, the cholera risk was not associated with any socioeconomic factors; however CSD was less likely to occur among individuals living in a household having ≤4 members (aOR=0.55, 95% CI=0.32-0.96). Among population 2, younger participants and individuals reporting diarrhoea during registration were more likely to have cholera. Females and individuals reporting diarrhoea during registration were at increased risk of CSD. Among population 3, individuals living in a household without a concrete floor, in an area with high population density, closer to the study hospital, or not treating drinking water were at significantly higher risk for both cholera and CSD. The profile of socioeconomic factors associated with cholera varies by individuals' vaccination status as well as the transmission setting. In a vaccinated community where

  9. The Optimal Timing of Stage 2 Palliation for Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome: An Analysis of the Pediatric Heart Network Single Ventricle Reconstruction Trial Public Data Set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meza, James M; Hickey, Edward J; Blackstone, Eugene H; Jaquiss, Robert D B; Anderson, Brett R; Williams, William G; Cai, Sally; Van Arsdell, Glen S; Karamlou, Tara; McCrindle, Brian W

    2017-10-31

    In infants requiring 3-stage single-ventricle palliation for hypoplastic left heart syndrome, attrition after the Norwood procedure remains significant. The effect of the timing of stage 2 palliation (S2P), a physician-modifiable factor, on long-term survival is not well understood. We hypothesized that an optimal interval between the Norwood and S2P that both minimizes pre-S2P attrition and maximizes post-S2P survival exists and is associated with individual patient characteristics. The National Institutes of Health/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Pediatric Heart Network Single Ventricle Reconstruction Trial public data set was used. Transplant-free survival (TFS) was modeled from (1) Norwood to S2P and (2) S2P to 3 years by using parametric hazard analysis. Factors associated with death or heart transplantation were determined for each interval. To account for staged procedures, risk-adjusted, 3-year, post-Norwood TFS (the probability of TFS at 3 years given survival to S2P) was calculated using parametric conditional survival analysis. TFS from the Norwood to S2P was first predicted. TFS after S2P to 3 years was then predicted and adjusted for attrition before S2P by multiplying by the estimate of TFS to S2P. The optimal timing of S2P was determined by generating nomograms of risk-adjusted, 3-year, post-Norwood, TFS versus the interval from the Norwood to S2P. Of 547 included patients, 399 survived to S2P (73%). Of the survivors to S2P, 349 (87%) survived to 3-year follow-up. The median interval from the Norwood to S2P was 5.1 (interquartile range, 4.1-6.0) months. The risk-adjusted, 3-year, TFS was 68±7%. A Norwood-S2P interval of 3 to 6 months was associated with greatest 3-year TFS overall and in patients with few risk factors. In patients with multiple risk factors, TFS was severely compromised, regardless of the timing of S2P and most severely when S2P was performed early. No difference in the optimal timing of S2P existed when stratified by

  10. A randomised controlled trial of flow driver and bubble continuous positive airway pressure in preterm infants in a resource-limited setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazmanyan, P; Mellor, K; Doré, C J; Modi, N

    2016-01-01

    The variable-flow flow driver (FD; EME) and continuous-flow bubble (Fisher-Paykel) continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) systems are widely used. As these differ in cost and technical requirements, determining comparative efficacy is important particularly where resources are limited. We performed a randomised, controlled, equivalence trial of CPAP systems. We specified the margin of equivalence as 2 days. We analysed binary variables by logistical regression adjusted for gestation, and log transformed continuous variables by multiple linear regression adjusted for gestation, sex and antenatal steroids. A neonatal unit with no blood gas analyser or surfactant availability and limited X-ray and laboratory facilities Neonates CPAP at delivery followed by randomisation to FD or bubble (B). Primary outcome included total days receiving CPAP; secondary outcomes included days receiving CPAP, supplemental oxygen, ventilation, death, pneumothorax and nasal excoriation. We randomised 125 infants (B 66, FD 59). Differences in infant outcomes on B and FD were not statistically significant. The median (range) for CPAP days for survivors was B 0.8 (0.04 to 17.5), FD 0.5 (0.04 to 5.3). B:FD (95% CI) ratios were CPAP days 1.3 (0.9 to 2.1), CPAP plus supplementary oxygen days 1.2 (0.7 to 1.9). B:FD (95% CI) ORs were death 2.3 (0.2 to 28), ventilation 2.1 (0.5 to 9), nasal excoriation 1.2 (0.2 to 8) and pneumothorax 2.4 (0.2 to 26). In a resource-limited setting we found B CPAP equivalent to FD CPAP in the total number of days receiving CPAP within a margin of 2 days. ISRCTN22578364. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  11. Effectiveness of three interventions for secondary prevention of low back pain in the occupational health setting - a randomised controlled trial with a natural course control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantonen, J; Karppinen, J; Vehtari, A; Luoto, S; Viikari-Juntura, E; Hupli, M; Malmivaara, A; Taimela, S

    2018-05-08

    We assessed the effectiveness of three interventions that were aimed to reduce non-acute low back pain (LBP) related symptoms in the occupational health setting. Based on a survey (n = 2480; response rate 71%) on LBP, we selected a cohort of 193 employees who reported moderate LBP (Visual Analogue Scale VAS > 34 mm) and fulfilled at least one of the following criteria during the past 12 months: sciatica, recurrence of LBP ≥ 2 times, LBP ≥ 2 weeks, or previous sickness absence. A random sample was extracted from the cohort as a control group (Control, n = 50), representing the natural course of LBP. The remaining 143 employees were invited to participate in a randomised controlled trial (RCT) of three 1:1:1 allocated parallel intervention arms: multidisciplinary rehabilitation (Rehab, n = 43); progressive exercises (Physio, n = 43) and self-care advice (Advice, n = 40). Seventeen employees declined participation in the intervention. The primary outcome measures were physical impairment (PHI), LBP intensity (Visual Analogue Scale), health related quality of life (QoL), and accumulated sickness absence days. We imputed missing values with multiple imputation procedure. We assessed all comparisons between the intervention groups and the Control group by analysing questionnaire outcomes at 2 years with ANOVA and sickness absence at 4 years by using negative binomial model with a logarithmic link function. Mean differences between the Rehab and Control groups were - 3 [95% CI -5 to - 1] for PHI, - 13 [- 24 to - 1] for pain intensity, and 0.06 [0.00 to 0.12] for QoL. Mean differences between the Physio and Control groups were - 3 [95% CI -5 to - 1] for PHI, - 13 [- 29 to 2] for pain intensity, and 0.07 [0.01 to 0.13] for QoL. The main effects sizes were from 0.4 to 0.6. The interventions were not effective in reducing sickness absence. Rehab and Physio interventions improved health related quality of life, decreased

  12. Effectiveness of home-based nutritional counselling and support on exclusive breastfeeding in urban poor settings in Nairobi: a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimani-Murage, Elizabeth W; Griffiths, Paula L; Wekesah, Frederick Murunga; Wanjohi, Milka; Muhia, Nelson; Muriuki, Peter; Egondi, Thaddaeus; Kyobutungi, Catherine; Ezeh, Alex C; McGarvey, Stephen T; Musoke, Rachel N; Norris, Shane A; Madise, Nyovani J

    2017-12-19

    Exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) improves infant health and survival. We tested the effectiveness of a home-based intervention using Community Health Workers (CHWs) on EBF for six months in urban poor settings in Kenya. We conducted a cluster-randomized controlled trial in Korogocho and Viwandani slums in Nairobi. We recruited pregnant women and followed them until the infant's first birthday. Fourteen community clusters were randomized to intervention or control arm. The intervention arm received home-based nutritional counselling during scheduled visits by CHWs trained to provide specific maternal infant and young child nutrition (MIYCN) messages and standard care. The control arm was visited by CHWs who were not trained in MIYCN and they provided standard care (which included aspects of ante-natal and post-natal care, family planning, water, sanitation and hygiene, delivery with skilled attendance, immunization and community nutrition). CHWs in both groups distributed similar information materials on MIYCN. Differences in EBF by intervention status were tested using chi square and logistic regression, employing intention-to-treat analysis. A total of 1110 mother-child pairs were involved, about half in each arm. At baseline, demographic and socioeconomic factors were similar between the two arms. The rates of EBF for 6 months increased from 2% pre-intervention to 55.2% (95% CI 50.4-59.9) in the intervention group and 54.6% (95% CI 50.0-59.1) in the control group. The adjusted odds of EBF (after adjusting for baseline characteristics) were slightly higher in the intervention arm compared to the control arm but not significantly different: for 0-2 months (OR 1.27, 95% CI 0.55 to 2.96; p = 0.550); 0-4 months (OR 1.15; 95% CI 0.54 to 2.42; p = 0.696), and 0-6 months (OR 1.11, 95% CI 0.61 to 2.02; p = 0.718). EBF for six months significantly increased in both arms indicating potential effectiveness of using CHWs to provide home-based counselling to

  13. Experimental set-up for high-power pulsed X-rays on the basis of a high-current electron accelerator diode with a pointed brass cathode and an aluminum anode target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncharov, V.K.; Krekoten', O.V.; Makarov, V.V.

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of this article is to assess experimentally the possibility for the development and manufacturing of a high-power pulse X-ray source on the basis of a high-current electron accelerator of the diode type. This task was realized using a vacuum diode with the explosive plasma cathode from brass and an anode of aluminum foil 850 microns thick. As a result of the experiments performed, it is shown that, for this metal of the anode, the component of X-rays, propagating along electron beam motion, has bigger energy weight than the reflected one. The photographic paper placed in a black dense paper holder was used as a sensor. It is necessary to mark that at present the current investigations have a purely qualitative character. At the same time, the authors have succeeded to define an angle of divergence (~90°) of the generated radiation after an aluminum target. The possibility of generating bremsstrahlung and also the energy estimates indicate applicability of this installation in pure research, and application-oriented purposes, for example, for monitoring of the radiation stability of different electronic products. (authors)

  14. Written versus verbal consent: a qualitative study of stakeholder views of consent procedures used at the time of recruitment into a peripartum trial conducted in an emergency setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, J; Hallowell, N; Snowdon, C; Norman, J E; Carruthers, K; Denison, F C

    2017-05-24

    Obtaining prospective written consent from women to participate in trials when they are experiencing an obstetric emergency is challenging. Alternative consent pathways, such as gaining verbal consent at enrolment followed, later, by obtaining written consent, have been advocated by some clinicians and bioethicists but have received little empirical attention. We explored women's and staff views about the consent procedures used during the internal pilot of a trial (GOT-IT), where the protocol permitted staff to gain verbal consent at recruitment. Interviews with staff (n = 27) and participating women (n = 22). Data were analysed thematically and interviews were cross-compared to identify differences and similarities in participants' views about the consent procedures used. Women and some staff highlighted benefits to obtaining verbal consent at trial enrolment, including expediting recruitment and reducing the burden on those left exhausted by their births. However, most staff with direct responsibility for taking consent expressed extreme reluctance to proceed with enrolment until they had obtained written consent, despite being comfortable using verbal procedures in their clinical practice. To account for this resistance, staff drew a strong distinction between research and clinical care and suggested that a higher level of consent was needed when recruiting into trials. In doing so, staff emphasised the need to engage women in reflexive decision-making and highlighted the role that completing the consent form could play in enabling and evidencing this process. While most staff cited their ethical responsibilities to women, they also voiced concerns that the absence of a signed consent form at recruitment could expose them to greater risk of litigation were an individual to experience a complication during the trial. Inexperience of recruiting into peripartum trials and limited availability of staff trained to take consent also reinforced preferences for

  15. Improved participants' understanding of research information in real settings using the SIDCER informed consent form: a randomized-controlled informed consent study nested with eight clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koonrungsesomboon, Nut; Tharavanij, Thipaporn; Phiphatpatthamaamphan, Kittichet; Vilaichone, Ratha-Korn; Manuwong, Sudsayam; Curry, Parichat; Siramolpiwat, Sith; Punchaipornpon, Thanachai; Kanitnate, Supakit; Tammachote, Nattapol; Yamprasert, Rodsarin; Chanvimalueng, Waipoj; Kaewkumpai, Ruchirat; Netanong, Soiphet; Kitipawong, Peerapong; Sritipsukho, Paskorn; Karbwang, Juntra

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to test the applicability and effectiveness of the principles and informed consent form (ICF) template proposed by the Strategic Initiative for Developing Capacity in Ethical Review (SIDCER) across multiple clinical trials involving Thai research participants with various conditions. A single-center, randomized-controlled study nested with eight clinical trials was conducted at Thammasat University Hospital, Thailand. A total of 258 participants from any of the eight clinical trials were enrolled and randomly assigned to read either the SIDCER ICF (n = 130) or the conventional ICF (n = 128) of the respective trial. Their understanding of necessary information was assessed using the post-test questionnaire; they were allowed to consult a given ICF while completing the questionnaire. The primary endpoint was the proportion of the participants who had the post-test score of ≥80%, and the secondary endpoint was the total score of the post-test. The proportion of the participants in the SIDCER ICF group who achieved the primary endpoint was significantly higher than that of the conventional ICF group (60.8 vs. 41.4%, p = 0.002). The total score of the post-test was also significantly higher among the participants who read the SIDCER ICF than those who read the conventional ICF (83.3 vs. 76.0%, p study demonstrated that the SIDCER ICF was applicable and effective to improve Thai research participants' understanding of research information in diverse clinical trials. Using the SIDCER ICF methodology, clinical researchers can improve the quality of ICFs for their trials.

  16. Recruiting and consenting into a peripartum trial in an emergency setting: a qualitative study of the experiences and views of women and healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, Julia; Snowdon, Claire; Morrow, Susan; Norman, Jane E; Denison, Fiona C; Hallowell, Nina

    2016-04-11

    Recruiting and consenting women to peripartum trials can be challenging as the women concerned may be anxious, in pain, and exhausted; there may also be limited time for discussion and decision-making to occur. To address these potential difficulties, we undertook a qualitative evaluation of the internal pilot of a trial (Got-it) involving women who had a retained placenta (RP). We explored the experiences and views of women and staff about the information and consent pathway used within the pilot, in order to provide recommendations for use in future peripartum trials involving recruitment in emergency situations. In-depth interviews were undertaken with staff (n = 27) and participating women (n = 22). Interviews were analysed thematically. The accounts of women and staff were compared to identify differences and similarities in their views about recruitment and consent procedures. Women and staff regarded recruitment as having been straightforward and facilitated by the use of simplified (verbal and written) summaries of trial information. Both parties, however, conveyed discordant views about whether fully informed consent had been obtained. These differences in perspectives appeared to arise from the different factors and considerations impinging on women and staff at the time of recruitment. While staff placed emphasis on promoting understanding in the emergency situation of RP by imparting information in clear and succinct ways, women highlighted the experiential realities of their pre- and post-birthing situations, and how these had led to quick decisions being made without full engagement with the potential risks of trial participation. To facilitate informed consent, women suggested that trial information should be given during the antenatal period, and, in doing so, articulated a rights-based discourse. Staff, however, voiced opposition to this approach by emphasising a duty of care to all pregnant women, and raising concerns about causing undue

  17. Effect of Delayed Reinforcement on Skill Acquisition during Discrete-Trial Instruction: Implications for Treatment-Integrity Errors in Academic Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Regina A.; Kodak, Tiffany; Adolf, Kari J.

    2016-01-01

    We used an adapted alternating treatments design to compare skill acquisition during discrete-trial instruction using immediate reinforcement, delayed reinforcement with immediate praise, and delayed reinforcement for 2 children with autism spectrum disorder. Participants acquired the skills taught with immediate reinforcement; however, delayed…

  18. Acute Whiplash Injury Study (AWIS): a protocol for a cluster randomised pilot and feasibility trial of an Active Behavioural Physiotherapy Intervention in an insurance private setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiangkham, Taweewat; Duda, Joan; Haque, M Sayeed; Price, Jonathan; Rushton, Alison

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Whiplash-associated disorder (WAD) causes substantial social and economic burden internationally. Up to 60% of patients with WAD progress to chronicity. Research therefore needs to focus on effective management in the acute stage to prevent the development of chronicity. Approximately 93% of patients are classified as WADII (neck complaint and musculoskeletal sign(s)), and in the UK, most are managed in the private sector. In our recent systematic review, a combination of active and behavioural physiotherapy was identified as potentially effective in the acute stage. An Active Behavioural Physiotherapy Intervention (ABPI) was developed through combining empirical (modified Delphi study) and theoretical (social cognitive theory focusing on self-efficacy) evidence. This pilot and feasibility trial has been designed to inform the design of an adequately powered definitive randomised controlled trial. Methods and analysis Two parallel phases. (1) An external pilot and feasibility cluster randomised double-blind (assessor and participants), parallel two-arm (ABPI vs standard physiotherapy) clinical trial to evaluate procedures and feasibility. Six UK private physiotherapy clinics will be recruited and cluster randomised by a computer-generated randomisation sequence. Sixty participants (30 each arm) will be assessed at recruitment (baseline) and at 3 months postbaseline. The planned primary outcome measure is the neck disability index. (2) An embedded exploratory qualitative study using semistructured indepth interviews (n=3–4 physiotherapists) and a focus group (n=6–8 patients) and entailing the recruitment of purposive samples will explore perceptions of the ABPI. Quantitative data will be analysed descriptively. Qualitative data will be coded and analysed deductively (identify themes) and inductively (identify additional themes). Ethics and dissemination This trial is approved by the University of Birmingham Ethics Committee (ERN_15-0542). Trial

  19. Safety Basis Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R.J. Garrett

    2002-01-01

    As part of the internal Integrated Safety Management Assessment verification process, it was determined that there was a lack of documentation that summarizes the safety basis of the current Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) site characterization activities. It was noted that a safety basis would make it possible to establish a technically justifiable graded approach to the implementation of the requirements identified in the Standards/Requirements Identification Document. The Standards/Requirements Identification Documents commit a facility to compliance with specific requirements and, together with the hazard baseline documentation, provide a technical basis for ensuring that the public and workers are protected. This Safety Basis Report has been developed to establish and document the safety basis of the current site characterization activities, establish and document the hazard baseline, and provide the technical basis for identifying structures, systems, and components (SSCs) that perform functions necessary to protect the public, the worker, and the environment from hazards unique to the YMP site characterization activities. This technical basis for identifying SSCs serves as a grading process for the implementation of programs such as Conduct of Operations (DOE Order 5480.19) and the Suspect/Counterfeit Items Program. In addition, this report provides a consolidated summary of the hazards analyses processes developed to support the design, construction, and operation of the YMP site characterization facilities and, therefore, provides a tool for evaluating the safety impacts of changes to the design and operation of the YMP site characterization activities

  20. Safety Basis Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.J. Garrett

    2002-01-14

    As part of the internal Integrated Safety Management Assessment verification process, it was determined that there was a lack of documentation that summarizes the safety basis of the current Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) site characterization activities. It was noted that a safety basis would make it possible to establish a technically justifiable graded approach to the implementation of the requirements identified in the Standards/Requirements Identification Document. The Standards/Requirements Identification Documents commit a facility to compliance with specific requirements and, together with the hazard baseline documentation, provide a technical basis for ensuring that the public and workers are protected. This Safety Basis Report has been developed to establish and document the safety basis of the current site characterization activities, establish and document the hazard baseline, and provide the technical basis for identifying structures, systems, and components (SSCs) that perform functions necessary to protect the public, the worker, and the environment from hazards unique to the YMP site characterization activities. This technical basis for identifying SSCs serves as a grading process for the implementation of programs such as Conduct of Operations (DOE Order 5480.19) and the Suspect/Counterfeit Items Program. In addition, this report provides a consolidated summary of the hazards analyses processes developed to support the design, construction, and operation of the YMP site characterization facilities and, therefore, provides a tool for evaluating the safety impacts of changes to the design and operation of the YMP site characterization activities.

  1. Feasibility and Efficacy of the Nintendo Wii Gaming System to Improve Balance Performance Post-Stroke: Protocol of a Phase II Randomized Controlled Trial in an Inpatient Rehabilitation Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Kelly J; Clark, Ross A; McGinley, Jennifer L; Martin, Clarissa L; Miller, Kimberly J

    2013-04-01

    Balance deficits following stroke are common and debilitating. Commercially available gaming systems, such as the Nintendo(®) (Kyoto, Japan) Wii™, have been widely adopted clinically; however, there is limited evidence supporting their feasibility and efficacy for improving balance performance following stroke. The aim of this trial is to investigate the clinical feasibility and efficacy of using the Nintendo Wii gaming system as an adjunct to standard care to improve balance performance following stroke in an inpatient rehabilitation setting. Thirty participants undergoing inpatient stroke rehabilitation will be recruited into this Phase II, single-blind, randomized controlled trial. Participants will be allocated into a Balance or Upper Limb Group, and both groups will perform activities using the Nintendo Wii in addition to their standard care. Participants will attend three 45-minute sessions per week, for a minimum of 2 and a maximum of 4 weeks. The main focus of the study is to investigate the feasibility of the intervention protocol. This will be evaluated through recruitment, retention, adherence, acceptability, and safety. The Step Test and Functional Reach Test will be the primary efficacy outcomes. Secondary outcomes will include force platform, mobility, and upper limb measures. Assessments will occur at baseline, 2 weeks, and 4 weeks after study entry. To the authors' knowledge, this will be the largest randomized clinical trial to investigate the feasibility and efficacy of the Nintendo Wii gaming system for improving balance performance in a stroke population. The results will inform the design of a Phase III multicenter trial.

  2. BWR NSSS design basis documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vij, R.S.; Bates, R.E.

    2004-01-01

    programs that GE has participated in and describes the different options and approaches that have been used by various utilities in their design basis programs. Some of these variations deal with the scope and depth of coverage of the information, while others are related to the process (how the work is done). Both of these topics can have a significant effect on the program cost. Some insight into these effects is provided. The final section of the paper presents a set of lessons learned and a recommendation for an optimum approach to a design basis information program. The lessons learned reflect the knowledge that GE has gained by participating in design basis programs with nineteen domestic and international BWR owner/operators. The optimum approach described in this paper is GE's attempt to define a set of information and a work process for a utility/GE NSSS Design Basis Information program that will maximize the cost effectiveness of the program for the utility. (author)

  3. Strengthening health human resources and improving clinical outcomes through an integrated guideline and educational outreach in resource-poor settings: a cluster-randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burciul Barry

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In low-income countries, only about a third of Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS patients eligible for anti-retroviral treatment currently receive it. Providing decentralized treatment close to where patients live is crucial to a faster scale up, however, a key obstacle is limited health system capacity due to a shortage of trained health-care workers and challenges of integrating HIV/AIDS care with other primary care services (e.g. tuberculosis, malaria, respiratory conditions. This study will test an adapted primary care health care worker training and guideline intervention, Practical Approach to Lung Health and HIV/AIDS Malawi (PALM PLUS, on staff retention and satisfaction, and quality of patient care. Methods/Design A cluster-randomized trial design is being used to compare usual care with a standardized clinical guideline and training intervention, PALM PLUS. The intervention targets middle-cadre health care workers (nurses, clinical officers, medical assistants in 30 rural primary care health centres in a single district in Malawi. PALM PLUS is an integrated, symptom-based and user-friendly guideline consistent with Malawian national treatment protocols. Training is standardized and based on an educational outreach approach. Trainers will be front-line peer healthcare workers trained to provide outreach training and support to their fellow front-line healthcare workers during focused (1-2 hours, intermittent, interactive sessions on-site in health centers. Primary outcomes are health care worker retention and satisfaction. Secondary outcomes are clinical outcomes measured at the health centre level for HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, prevention-of-mother-to-child-transmission of HIV and other primary care conditions. Effect sizes and 95% confidence intervals for outcomes will be presented. Assessment of outcomes will occur at 1 year post- implementation. Discussion The PALM PLUS trial

  4. Probing community nurses' professional basis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaarup, Clara; Pape-Haugaard, Louise; Jensen, Merete Hartun

    2017-01-01

    Complicated and long-lasting wound care of diabetic foot ulcers are moving from specialists in wound care at hospitals towards community nurses without specialist diabetic foot ulcer wound care knowledge. The aim of the study is to elucidate community nurses' professional basis for treating...... diabetic foot ulcers. A situational case study design was adopted in an archetypical Danish community nursing setting. Experience is a crucial component in the community nurses' professional basis for treating diabetic foot ulcers. Peer-to-peer training is the prevailing way to learn about diabetic foot...... ulcer, however, this contributes to the risk of low evidence-based practice. Finally, a frequent behaviour among the community nurses is to consult colleagues before treating the diabetic foot ulcers....

  5. Authorization basis requirements comparison report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brantley, W.M.

    1997-08-18

    The TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) consists of a set of documents identified by TWRS management with the concurrence of DOE-RL. Upon implementation of the TWRS Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) and Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs), the AB list will be revised to include the BIO and TSRs. Some documents that currently form part of the AB will be removed from the list. This SD identifies each - requirement from those documents, and recommends a disposition for each to ensure that necessary requirements are retained when the AB is revised to incorporate the BIO and TSRs. This SD also identifies documents that will remain part of the AB after the BIO and TSRs are implemented. This document does not change the AB, but provides guidance for the preparation of change documentation.

  6. Authorization basis requirements comparison report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brantley, W.M.

    1997-01-01

    The TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) consists of a set of documents identified by TWRS management with the concurrence of DOE-RL. Upon implementation of the TWRS Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) and Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs), the AB list will be revised to include the BIO and TSRs. Some documents that currently form part of the AB will be removed from the list. This SD identifies each - requirement from those documents, and recommends a disposition for each to ensure that necessary requirements are retained when the AB is revised to incorporate the BIO and TSRs. This SD also identifies documents that will remain part of the AB after the BIO and TSRs are implemented. This document does not change the AB, but provides guidance for the preparation of change documentation

  7. The effect of automated text messaging and goal setting on pedometer adherence and physical activity in patients with diabetes: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polgreen, Linnea A; Anthony, Christopher; Carr, Lucas; Simmering, Jacob E; Evans, Nicholas J; Foster, Eric D; Segre, Alberto M; Cremer, James F; Polgreen, Philip M

    2018-01-01

    Activity-monitoring devices may increase activity, but their effectiveness in sedentary, diseased, and less-motivated populations is unknown. Subjects with diabetes or pre-diabetes were given a Fitbit and randomized into three groups: Fitbit only, Fitbit with reminders, and Fitbit with both reminders and goal setting. Subjects in the reminders group were sent text-message reminders to wear their Fitbit. The goal-setting group was sent a daily text message asking for a step goal. All subjects had three in-person visits (baseline, 3 and 6 months). We modelled daily steps and goal setting using linear mixed-effects models. 138 subjects participated with 48 in the Fitbit-only, 44 in the reminders, and 46 in the goal-setting groups. Daily steps decreased for all groups during the study. Average daily steps were 7123, 6906, and 6854 for the Fitbit-only, the goal-setting, and the reminders groups, respectively. The reminders group was 17.2 percentage points more likely to wear their Fitbit than the Fitbit-only group. Setting a goal was associated with a significant increase of 791 daily steps, but setting more goals did not lead to step increases. In a population of patients with diabetes or pre-diabetes, individualized reminders to wear their Fitbit and elicit personal step goals did not lead to increases in daily steps, although daily steps were higher on days when goals were set. Our intervention improved engagement and data collection, important goals for activity surveillance. This study demonstrates that new, more-effective interventions for increasing activity in patients with pre-diabetes and diabetes are needed.

  8. A qualitative process evaluation of a randomised controlled trial of a parenting intervention in community (school) settings for children at risk of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, John A; Valentine, Althea Z; Sellman, Edward; Bransby-Adams, Kate; Daley, David; Sayal, Kapil

    2015-11-17

    Interventions for parents of children experiencing emotional and/or behavioural difficulties can help to improve their children's health, educational and social outcomes. However, the desirability and acceptability of screening and offering such interventions for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)-type problems are currently unclear. This article is a qualitative process evaluation of a pragmatic cluster randomised controlled trial (Trial registration: ISRCTN87634685; reported elsewhere) to assess the feasibility and acceptability of a school-based parenting intervention programme for parents and teachers of children with high levels of ADHD symptoms. Parents (n = 22) and teaching staff (n = 29) took part in semi-structured group or individual interviews, either by telephone or face-to-face, following the main trial. Interviews were digitally-recorded, transcribed verbatim and subjected to thematic analysis. The parenting intervention was acceptable to parents and teachers, and they were enthusiastic about the need for parenting groups in the school environment and stressed the importance of parent-school collaboration. Parents generally stated a preference for universal recruitment approaches to such programmes whilst teachers described the need to target specific parents. Most parents who took part in the parenting intervention described it favourably and many saw benefits, at least in the short-term. Parents differed in their preferred group size, with some desiring one-to-one sessions and others favouring a larger group. Non-attending parents reported barriers to attendance such as fear of attending in a group, previous use of the programme, work and other commitments. Suggestions to improve the programme included: clearer communication; offering booster sessions; and greater collaboration with teachers. It is feasible to deliver parenting intervention programmes within or near schools. The intervention was acceptable to the majority of

  9. WALK 2.0: Examining the effectiveness of Web 2.0 features to increase physical activity in a ‘real world’ setting: an ecological trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caperchione, Cristina M; Kolt, Gregory S; Savage, Trevor N; Rosenkranz, Richard R; Maeder, Anthony J; Vandelanotte, Corneel; Duncan, Mitch J; Van Itallie, Anetta; Tague, Rhys; Mummery, W Kerry

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Low levels of health-enhancing physical activity require novel approaches that have the potential to reach broad populations. Web-based interventions are a popular approach for behaviour change given their wide reach and accessibility. However, challenges with participant engagement and retention reduce the long-term maintenance of behaviour change. Web 2.0 features present a new and innovative online environment supporting greater interactivity, with the potential to increase engagement and retention. In order to understand the applicability of these innovative interventions for the broader population, ‘real-world’ interventions implemented under ‘everyday conditions’ are required. The aim of this study is to investigate the difference in physical activity behaviour between individuals using a traditional Web 1.0 website with those using a novel Web 2.0 website. Methods and analysis In this study we will aim to recruit 2894 participants. Participants will be recruited from individuals who register with a pre-existing health promotion website that currently provides Web 1.0 features (http://www.10000steps.org.au). Eligible participants who provide informed consent will be randomly assigned to one of the two trial conditions: the pre-existing 10 000 Steps website (with Web 1.0 features) or the newly developed WALK 2.0 website (with Web 2.0 features). Primary and secondary outcome measures will be assessed by self-report at baseline, 3 months and 12 months, and include: physical activity behaviour, height and weight, Internet self-efficacy, website usability, website usage and quality of life. Ethics and dissemination This study has received ethics approval from the University of Western Sydney Human Research Ethics Committee (Reference Number H8767) and has been funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council (Reference Number 589903). Study findings will be disseminated widely through peer-reviewed publications, academic

  10. CLOPW; a mixed basis set full potential electronic structure method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekker, H.G.; Bekker, Hermie Gerhard

    1997-01-01

    This thesis is about the development of the full potental CLOPW package for electronic structure calculations. Chapter 1 provides the necessary background in the theory of solid state physics. It gives a short overview of the effective one particle model as commonly used in solid state physics. It

  11. Pragmatic trial of a multidisciplinary lung cancer care model in a community healthcare setting: study design, implementation evaluation, and baseline clinical results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeltzer, Matthew P.; Rugless, Fedoria E.; Jackson, Bianca M.; Berryman, Courtney L.; Faris, Nicholas R.; Ray, Meredith A.; Meadows, Meghan; Patel, Anita A.; Roark, Kristina S.; Kedia, Satish K.; DeBon, Margaret M.; Crossley, Fayre J.; Oliver, Georgia; McHugh, Laura M.; Hastings, Willeen; Osborne, Orion; Osborne, Jackie; Ill, Toni; Ill, Mark; Jones, Wynett; Lee, Hyo K.; Signore, Raymond S.; Fox, Roy C.; Li, Jingshan; Robbins, Edward T.; Ward, Kenneth D.; Klesges, Lisa M.

    2018-01-01

    Background Responsible for 25% of all US cancer deaths, lung cancer presents complex care-delivery challenges. Adoption of the highly recommended multidisciplinary care model suffers from a dearth of good quality evidence. Leading up to a prospective comparative-effectiveness study of multidisciplinary vs. serial care, we studied the implementation of a rigorously benchmarked multidisciplinary lung cancer clinic. Methods We used a mixed-methods approach to conduct a patient-centered, combined implementation and effectiveness study of a multidisciplinary model of lung cancer care. We established a co-located multidisciplinary clinic to study the implementation of this care-delivery model. We identified and engaged key stakeholders from the onset, used their input to develop the program structure, processes, performance benchmarks, and study endpoints (outcome-related process measures, patient- and caregiver-reported outcomes, survival). In this report, we describe the study design, process of implementation, comparative populations, and how they contrast with patients within the local and regional healthcare system. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02123797. Results Implementation: the multidisciplinary clinic obtained an overall treatment concordance rate of 90% (target >85%). Satisfaction scores were high, with >95% of patients and caregivers rating themselves as being “very satisfied” with all aspects of care from the multidisciplinary team (patient/caregiver response rate >90%). The Reach of the multidisciplinary clinic included a higher proportion of minority patients, more women, and younger patients than the regional population. Comparative effectiveness: The comparative effectiveness trial conducted in the last phase of the study met the planned enrollment per statistical design, with 178 patients in the multidisciplinary arm and 348 in the serial care arm. The multidisciplinary cohort had older age and a higher percentage of racial

  12. WALK 2.0: examining the effectiveness of Web 2.0 features to increase physical activity in a 'real world' setting: an ecological trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caperchione, Cristina M; Kolt, Gregory S; Savage, Trevor N; Rosenkranz, Richard R; Maeder, Anthony J; Vandelanotte, Corneel; Duncan, Mitch J; Van Itallie, Anetta; Tague, Rhys; Mummery, W Kerry

    2014-10-10

    Low levels of health-enhancing physical activity require novel approaches that have the potential to reach broad populations. Web-based interventions are a popular approach for behaviour change given their wide reach and accessibility. However, challenges with participant engagement and retention reduce the long-term maintenance of behaviour change. Web 2.0 features present a new and innovative online environment supporting greater interactivity, with the potential to increase engagement and retention. In order to understand the applicability of these innovative interventions for the broader population, 'real-world' interventions implemented under 'everyday conditions' are required. The aim of this study is to investigate the difference in physical activity behaviour between individuals using a traditional Web 1.0 website with those using a novel Web 2.0 website. In this study we will aim to recruit 2894 participants. Participants will be recruited from individuals who register with a pre-existing health promotion website that currently provides Web 1.0 features (http://www.10000steps.org.au). Eligible participants who provide informed consent will be randomly assigned to one of the two trial conditions: the pre-existing 10 000 Steps website (with Web 1.0 features) or the newly developed WALK 2.0 website (with Web 2.0 features). Primary and secondary outcome measures will be assessed by self-report at baseline, 3 months and 12 months, and include: physical activity behaviour, height and weight, Internet self-efficacy, website usability, website usage and quality of life. This study has received ethics approval from the University of Western Sydney Human Research Ethics Committee (Reference Number H8767) and has been funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council (Reference Number 589903). Study findings will be disseminated widely through peer-reviewed publications, academic conferences and local community-based presentations. Australian New

  13. The prevention and reduction of weight loss in an acute tertiary care setting: protocol for a pragmatic stepped wedge randomised cluster trial (the PRoWL project)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Malnutrition, with accompanying weight loss, is an unnecessary risk in hospitalised persons and often remains poorly recognised and managed. The study aims to evaluate a hospital-wide multifaceted intervention co-facilitated by clinical nurses and dietitians addressing the nutritional care of patients, particularly those at risk of malnutrition. Using the best available evidence on reducing and preventing unplanned weight loss, the intervention (introducing universal nutritional screening; the provision of oral nutritional supplements; and providing red trays and additional support for patients in need of feeding) will be introduced by local ward teams in a phased way in a large tertiary acute care hospital. Methods/Design A pragmatic stepped wedge randomised cluster trial with repeated cross section design will be conducted. The unit of randomisation is the ward, with allocation by a random numbers table. Four groups of wards (n = 6 for three groups, n = 7 for one group) will be randomly allocated to each intervention time point over the trial. Two trained local facilitators (a nurse and dietitian for each group) will introduce the intervention. The primary outcome measure is change in patient’s body weight, secondary patient outcomes are: length of stay, all-cause mortality, discharge destinations, readmission rates and ED presentations. Patient outcomes will be measured on one ward per group, with 20 patients measured per ward per time period by an unblinded researcher. Including baseline, measurements will be conducted at five time periods. Staff perspectives on the context of care will be measured with the Alberta Context Tool. Discussion Unplanned and unwanted weight loss in hospital is common. Despite the evidence and growing concern about hospital nutrition there are very few evaluations of system-wide nutritional implementation programs. This project will test the implementation of a nutritional intervention across one hospital system using a

  14. Theoretical basis for dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, G.A.

    1985-01-01

    Radiation dosimetry is fundamental to all fields of science dealing with radiation effects and is concerned with problems which are often intricate as hinted above. A firm scientific basis is needed to face increasing demands on accurate dosimetry. This chapter is an attempt to review and to elucidate the elements for such a basis. Quantities suitable for radiation dosimetry have been defined in the unique work to coordinate radiation terminology and usage by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements, ICRU. Basic definitions and terminology used in this chapter conform with the recent ''Radiation Quantities and Units, Report 33'' of the ICRU

  15. Comparison of 2-Chloroprocaine, Bupivacaine, and Lidocaine for Spinal Anesthesia in Patients Undergoing Knee Arthroscopy in an Outpatient Setting: A Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teunkens, An; Vermeulen, Kristien; Van Gerven, Elke; Fieuws, Steffen; Van de Velde, Marc; Rex, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    Knee arthroscopy is a well-established procedure in day-case surgery, which is frequently performed under spinal anesthesia. It is, however, controversial whether the choice for a specific local anesthetic translates into relevant outcomes. We hypothesized that the use of 2-chloroprocaine would be associated with a faster recovery from sensorimotor block. Ninety-nine patients were included in this prospective, double-blind, randomized controlled trial and randomly allocated to receive either 40 mg 2-chloroprocaine, 40 mg lidocaine, or 7.5 mg bupivacaine. The primary endpoint was the time until complete recovery of sensory block. Secondary endpoints included time to recovery from motor block, failure rates, incidence of hypotension/bradycardia, postoperative pain, first mobilization, voiding and discharge times, and the incidence of transient neurologic symptoms. This clinical trial was registered prior to patient enrollment (EudraCT 2011-003675-11). Patients in the chloroprocaine group had a significantly shorter time until recovery from sensory block (median, 2.6 hours; interquartile range [IQR], 2.2-2.9 hours) than patients in the lidocaine group (3.1 hours; IQR, 2.7-3.6 hours; P bupivacaine group (6.1 hours; IQR, 5.5 hours to undefined hours; P bupivacaine. Times to first mobilization, voiding, and discharge were significantly shorter for chloroprocaine when compared with bupivacaine, but not with lidocaine. In the bupivacaine group, patients needed significantly less rescue medication for postoperative pain when compared with lidocaine and chloroprocaine. Groups did not differ with respect to patient satisfaction, incidence of bradycardia/hypotension, and transient neurologic symptom rate. For spinal anesthesia in patients undergoing ambulatory knee arthroscopy, chloroprocaine has the shortest time to complete recovery of sensory and motor block compared with bupivacaine and lidocaine.

  16. Clinical feasibility of the Nintendo Wii™ for balance training post-stroke: a phase II randomized controlled trial in an inpatient setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Kelly J; Clark, Ross A; McGinley, Jennifer L; Martin, Clarissa L; Miller, Kimberly J

    2014-09-01

    To investigate the feasibility and potential efficacy of the Nintendo Wii™ for balance rehabilitation after stroke. Phase II, single-blind, randomized controlled trial. Inpatient rehabilitation facility. Thirty adults (mean age 63.6 (14.7) years) undergoing inpatient rehabilitation who were less than three months post-stroke and able to stand unsupported. Participants were allocated to a Balance Group, using the 'Wii Fit Plus' in standing, or Upper Limb Group, using the 'Wii Sports/Sports Resort' in sitting. Both groups undertook three 45 minute sessions per week over two to four weeks in addition to standard care. The primary focus was feasibility, addressed by recruitment, retention, adherence, acceptability and safety. Efficacy was evaluated by balance, mobility and upper limb outcomes. Twenty-one percent of individuals screened were recruited and 86% (n = 30) of eligible people agreed to participate. Study retention and session adherence was 90% and > 99%, respectively, at two weeks; dropping to 70% and 87% at four weeks due to early discharge. All participants reported enjoying the sessions and most felt they were beneficial. No major adverse events occurred. Wii use by the Balance Group was associated with trends for improved balance, with significantly greater improvement in outcomes including the Step Test and Wii Balance Board-derived centre of pressure scores. The Upper Limb Group had larger, non-significant changes in arm function. A Wii-based approach appears feasible and promising for post-stroke balance rehabilitation. A larger randomized controlled trial is recommended to further investigate efficacy. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Effectiveness of a self-management program for dual sensory impaired seniors in aged care settings: study protocol for a cluster randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roets-Merken, L.M.; Graff, M.J.L.; Zuidema, S.U.; Hermsen, P.G.; Teerenstra, S.; Kempen, G.I.J.M.; Vernooij-Dassen, M.J.F.J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Five to 25 percent of residents in aged care settings have a combined hearing and visual sensory impairment. Usual care is generally restricted to single sensory impairment, neglecting the consequences of dual sensory impairment on social participation and autonomy. The aim of this study

  18. Effectiveness of a self-management program for dual sensory impaired seniors in aged care settings : study protocol for a cluster randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roets-Merken, Lieve M.; Graff, Maud J. I.; Zuidema, Sytse U.; Hermsen, Pieter G. J. M.; Teerenstra, Steven; Kempen, Gertrudis I. J. M.; Vernooij-Dassen, Myrra J. F. J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Five to 25 percent of residents in aged care settings have a combined hearing and visual sensory impairment. Usual care is generally restricted to single sensory impairment, neglecting the consequences of dual sensory impairment on social participation and autonomy. The aim of this study

  19. The Effects of Evaluating Video Examples of Staffs' Own versus Others' Performance on Discrete-Trial Training Skills in a Human Service Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, W. Larry; Gallinat, Julianne

    2011-01-01

    Many studies have been conducted evaluating the use of feedback in staff training in organizational settings. Central to this literature has been the use of a variety of forms of feedback, including videotaped feedback. A distinction is outlined between video modeling and a variety of possible video feedback procedures. Previous studies have…

  20. Economic communication model set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zvereva, Olga M.; Berg, Dmitry B.

    2017-06-01

    This paper details findings from the research work targeted at economic communications investigation with agent-based models usage. The agent-based model set was engineered to simulate economic communications. Money in the form of internal and external currencies was introduced into the models to support exchanges in communications. Every model, being based on the general concept, has its own peculiarities in algorithm and input data set since it was engineered to solve the specific problem. Several and different origin data sets were used in experiments: theoretic sets were estimated on the basis of static Leontief's equilibrium equation and the real set was constructed on the basis of statistical data. While simulation experiments, communication process was observed in dynamics, and system macroparameters were estimated. This research approved that combination of an agent-based and mathematical model can cause a synergetic effect.

  1. From BASIS to MIRACLES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsapatsaris, Nikolaos; Willendrup, Peter Kjær; E. Lechner, Ruep

    2015-01-01

    Results based on virtual instrument models for the first high-flux, high-resolution, spallation based, backscattering spectrometer, BASIS are presented in this paper. These were verified using the Monte Carlo instrument simulation packages McStas and VITESS. Excellent agreement of the neutron count...... are pivotal to the conceptual design of the next generation backscattering spectrometer, MIRACLES at the European Spallation Source....

  2. Industrial demonstration trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelee, M.; Fabre, C.; Villepoix, R. de; Fra, J.; Le Foulgoc, L.; Morel, Y.; Querite, P.; Roques, R.

    1975-01-01

    Prototypes of the plant components, meeting the specifications set by the process and built by industrial firms in collaboration with the supervisor and the C.E.A., are subjected to trial runs on the UF 6 test bench of the Pierrelatte testing zone. These items of equipment (diffuser, compressor, exchanger) are placed in an industrial operation context very similar to that of an enrichment plant. Their performance is measured within a broad region around the working point and their reliability observed over periods up to several tens of thousands of hours. Between 1969 and 1973 six industrial demonstration test benches have been built, marking the stages in the technical preparation of the 1973 file on the basis of which the decision of building was taken by Eurodif [fr

  3. Pilot randomized trial of therapeutic hypothermia with serial cranial ultrasound and 18-22 month follow-up for neonatal encephalopathy in a low resource hospital setting in uganda: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costello Anthony

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is now convincing evidence that in industrialized countries therapeutic hypothermia for perinatal asphyxial encephalopathy increases survival with normal neurological function. However, the greatest burden of perinatal asphyxia falls in low and mid-resource settings where it is unclear whether therapeutic hypothermia is safe and effective. Aims Under the UCL Uganda Women's Health Initiative, a pilot randomized controlled trial in infants with perinatal asphyxia was set up in the special care baby unit in Mulago Hospital, a large public hospital with ~20,000 births in Kampala, Uganda to determine: (i The feasibility of achieving consent, neurological assessment, randomization and whole body cooling to a core temperature 33-34°C using water bottles (ii The temperature profile of encephalopathic infants with standard care (iii The pattern, severity and evolution of brain tissue injury as seen on cranial ultrasound and relation with outcome (iv The feasibility of neurodevelopmental follow-up at 18-22 months of age Methods/Design Ethical approval was obtained from Makerere University and Mulago Hospital. All infants were in-born. Parental consent for entry into the trial was obtained. Thirty-six infants were randomized either to standard care plus cooling (target rectal temperature of 33-34°C for 72 hrs, started within 3 h of birth or standard care alone. All other aspects of management were the same. Cooling was performed using water bottles filled with tepid tap water (25°C. Rectal, axillary, ambient and surface water bottle temperatures were monitored continuously for the first 80 h. Encephalopathy scoring was performed on days 1-4, a structured, scorable neurological examination and head circumference were performed on days 7 and 17. Cranial ultrasound was performed on days 1, 3 and 7 and scored. Griffiths developmental quotient, head circumference, neurological examination and assessment of gross motor function were

  4. Intensive speech and language therapy in patients with chronic aphasia after stroke: a randomised, open-label, blinded-endpoint, controlled trial in a health-care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitenstein, Caterina; Grewe, Tanja; Flöel, Agnes; Ziegler, Wolfram; Springer, Luise; Martus, Peter; Huber, Walter; Willmes, Klaus; Ringelstein, E Bernd; Haeusler, Karl Georg; Abel, Stefanie; Glindemann, Ralf; Domahs, Frank; Regenbrecht, Frank; Schlenck, Klaus-Jürgen; Thomas, Marion; Obrig, Hellmuth; de Langen, Ernst; Rocker, Roman; Wigbers, Franziska; Rühmkorf, Christina; Hempen, Indra; List, Jonathan; Baumgaertner, Annette

    2017-04-15

    Treatment guidelines for aphasia recommend intensive speech and language therapy for chronic (≥6 months) aphasia after stroke, but large-scale, class 1 randomised controlled trials on treatment effectiveness are scarce. We aimed to examine whether 3 weeks of intensive speech and language therapy under routine clinical conditions improved verbal communication in daily-life situations in people with chronic aphasia after stroke. In this multicentre, parallel group, superiority, open-label, blinded-endpoint, randomised controlled trial, patients aged 70 years or younger with aphasia after stroke lasting for 6 months or more were recruited from 19 inpatient or outpatient rehabilitation centres in Germany. An external biostatistician used a computer-generated permuted block randomisation method, stratified by treatment centre, to randomly assign participants to either 3 weeks or more of intensive speech and language therapy (≥10 h per week) or 3 weeks deferral of intensive speech and language therapy. The primary endpoint was between-group difference in the change in verbal communication effectiveness in everyday life scenarios (Amsterdam-Nijmegen Everyday Language Test A-scale) from baseline to immediately after 3 weeks of treatment or treatment deferral. All analyses were done using the modified intention-to-treat population (those who received 1 day or more of intensive treatment or treatment deferral). This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01540383. We randomly assigned 158 patients between April 1, 2012, and May 31, 2014. The modified intention-to-treat population comprised 156 patients (78 per group). Verbal communication was significantly improved from baseline to after intensive speech and language treatment (mean difference 2·61 points [SD 4·94]; 95% CI 1·49 to 3·72), but not from baseline to after treatment deferral (-0·03 points [4·04]; -0·94 to 0·88; between-group difference Cohen's d 0·58; p=0·0004). Eight patients had

  5. The PRESLO study: evaluation of a global secondary low back pain prevention program for health care personnel in a hospital setting. Multicenter, randomized intervention trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Angélique

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Common low back pain represents a major public health problem in terms of its direct cost to health care and its socio-economic repercussions. Ten percent of individuals who suffer from low back pain evolve toward a chronic case and as such are responsible for 75 to 80% of the direct cost of low back pain. It is therefore imperative to highlight the predictive factors of low back pain chronification in order to lighten the economic burden of low back pain-related invalidity. Despite being particularly affected by low back pain, Hospices Civils de Lyon (HCL personnel have never been offered a specific, tailor-made treatment plan. The PRESLO study (with PRESLO referring to Secondary Low Back Pain Prevention, or in French, PREvention Secondaire de la LOmbalgie, proposed by HCL occupational health services and the Centre Médico-Chirurgical et de Réadaptation des Massues – Croix Rouge Française, is a randomized trial that aims to evaluate the feasibility and efficiency of a global secondary low back pain prevention program for the low back pain sufferers among HCL hospital personnel, a population at risk for recurrence and chronification. This program, which is based on the concept of physical retraining, employs a multidisciplinary approach uniting physical activity, cognitive education about low back pain and lumbopelvic morphotype analysis. No study targeting populations at risk for low back pain chronification has as yet evaluated the efficiency of lighter secondary prevention programs. Methods/Design This study is a two-arm parallel randomized controlled trial proposed to all low back pain sufferers among HCL workers, included between October 2008 and July 2011 and followed over two years. The personnel following their usual treatment (control group and those following the global prevention program in addition to their usual treatment (intervention group are compared in terms of low back pain recurrence and the

  6. Observed Handwashing with Soap Practices among Cholera Patients and Accompanying Household Members in a Hospital Setting (CHoBI7 Trial)

    OpenAIRE

    Zohura, Fatema; Bhuyian, Sazzadul Islam; Monira, Shirajum; Begum, Farzana; Biswas, Shwapon K.; Parvin, Tahmina; Sack, David; Sack, R. Bradley; Leontsini, Elli; Saif-Ur-Rahman, K. M.; Rashid, Mahamud-ur; Sharmin, Rumana; Zhang, Xiaotong; Alam, Munirul; George, Christine Marie

    2016-01-01

    Household members of cholera patients are at a 100 times higher risk of cholera than the general population. Despite this risk, there are only a handful of studies that have investigated the handwashing practices among hospitalized diarrhea patients and their accompanying household members. To investigate handwashing practices in a hospital setting among this high-risk population, 444 hours of structured observation was conducted in a hospital in Dhaka, Bangladesh, among 148 cholera patients ...

  7. Analysis of Regional Timelines To Set Up a Global Phase III Clinical Trial in Breast Cancer: the Adjuvant Lapatinib and/or Trastuzumab Treatment Optimization Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Metzger-Filho, Otto; Azambuja, Evandro de; Bradbury, Ian; Saini, Kamal S.; Bines, Jose; Simon, Sergio D. [UNIFESP; Van Dooren, Veerle; Aktan, Gursel; Pritchard, Kathleen I.; Wolff, Antonio C.; Smith, Ian; Jackisch, Christian; Lang, Istvan; Untch, Michael; Boyle, Frances

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. This study measured the time taken for setting up the different facets of Adjuvant Lapatinib and/or Trastuzumab Treatment Optimization (ALTTO), an international phase III study being conducted in 44 participating countries.Methods. Time to regulatory authority (RA) approval, time to ethics committee/institutional review board (EC/IRB) approval, time from study approval by EC/IRB to first randomized patient, and time from first to last randomized patient were prospectively collected i...

  8. A group randomized trial of a complexity-based organizational intervention to improve risk factors for diabetes complications in primary care settings: study protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Noel Polly H; Culler Steven D; Pugh Jacqueline A; Parchman Michael L; Arar Nedal H; Romero Raquel L; Palmer Raymond F

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Most patients with type 2 diabetes have suboptimal control of their glucose, blood pressure (BP), and lipids – three risk factors for diabetes complications. Although the chronic care model (CCM) provides a roadmap for improving these outcomes, developing theoretically sound implementation strategies that will work across diverse primary care settings has been challenging. One explanation for this difficulty may be that most strategies do not account for the complex adapti...

  9. Brief educational interventions to improve performance on novel quality metrics in ambulatory settings in Kenya: A multi-site pre-post effectiveness trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korom, Robert Ryan; Onguka, Stephanie; Halestrap, Peter; McAlhaney, Maureen; Adam, Mary

    2017-01-01

    The quality of primary care delivered in resource-limited settings is low. While some progress has been made using educational interventions, it is not yet clear how to sustainably improve care for common acute illnesses in the outpatient setting. Management of urinary tract infection is particularly important in resource-limited settings, where it is commonly diagnosed and associated with high levels of antimicrobial resistance. We describe an educational programme targeting non-physician health care providers and its effects on various clinical quality metrics for urinary tract infection. We used a series of educational interventions including 1) formal introduction of a clinical practice guideline, 2) peer-to-peer chart review, and 3) peer-reviewed literature describing local antimicrobial resistance patterns. Interventions were conducted for clinical officers (N = 24) at two outpatient centers near Nairobi, Kenya over a one-year period. The medical records of 474 patients with urinary tract infections were scored on five clinical quality metrics, with the primary outcome being the proportion of cases in which the guideline-recommended antibiotic was prescribed. The results at baseline and following each intervention were compared using chi-squared tests and unpaired two-tailed T-tests for significance. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess for possible confounders. Clinician adherence to the guideline-recommended antibiotic improved significantly during the study period, from 19% at baseline to 68% following all interventions (Χ2 = 150.7, p quality score also improved significantly from an average of 2.16 to 3.00 on a five-point scale (t = 6.58, p educational interventions can dramatically improve the quality of care for routine acute illnesses in the outpatient setting. Measurement of quality metrics allows for further targeting of educational interventions depending on the needs of the providers and the community. Further study is needed to expand

  10. A community-based trial of educational interventions with fecal immunochemical tests for colorectal cancer screening uptake among blacks in community settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christy, Shannon M; Davis, Stacy N; Williams, Kimberly R; Zhao, Xiuhua; Govindaraju, Swapomthi K; Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Vadaparampil, Susan T; Lin, Hui-Yi; Sutton, Steven K; Roethzeim, Richard R; Shibata, David; Meade, Cathy D; Gwede, Clement K

    2016-11-15

    Intervention studies among individuals in diverse community settings are needed to reduce health disparities in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening and mortality rates. The current study compared the efficacy of 2 intervention conditions promoting CRC screening among black individuals. Black individuals ages 50 to 75 years (N = 330) were recruited in community settings in 4 Tampa Bay counties. After obtaining consent and conducting a baseline interview to assess sociodemographic and health-related variables, participants received either a culturally targeted CRC photonovella booklet plus a fecal immunochemical test (FIT) kit or a standard CRC screening brochure plus an FIT kit. The primary outcome was FIT kit screening uptake. FIT screening uptake at 6 months was 86.7% overall (90.3% in the brochure group and 81.9% in the photonovella group). Controlling for baseline between-group differences, there was no influence of intervention on FIT kit uptake (P = .756). Significant predictors of not returning an FIT kit included being unable to work (P = .010), having higher religious belief scores (P = .015), and living farther from the cancer center (P = .015). Providing FIT kits and educational print materials to black individuals in community settings resulted in high rates of CRC screening. The study also identified subgroups of participants who were less likely to return an FIT kit and provides insight for future interventions. Cancer 2016;122:3288-3296. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  11. Hands4U: the effects of a multifaceted implementation strategy on hand eczema prevalence in a healthcare setting. Results of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, Esther W C; Boot, Cécile R L; van der Gulden, Joost W J; Knol, Dirk L; Jungbauer, Frank H W; Coenraads, Pieter Jan; Anema, Johannes R

    2015-05-01

    Healthcare workers have an increased risk of developing hand eczema. A multifaceted implementation strategy was developed to implement a guideline to prevent hand eczema among healthcare workers. To investigate the effects of the implementation strategy on self-reported hand eczema and preventive behaviour. A randomized controlled trial was performed. A total of 48 departments (n = 1649) were randomly allocated to the multifaceted implementation strategy or the control group. The strategy consisted of education, participatory working groups, and role models. Outcome measures were self-reported hand eczema and preventive behaviour. Data were collected at baseline, and 3, 6, 9 and 12 months of follow-up. Participants in the intervention group were significantly more likely to report hand eczema [odds ratio (OR) 1.45; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03-2.04], and they reported significantly less hand washing (B, - 0.38; 95%CI: - 0.48 to - 0.27), reported significantly more frequent use of a moisturizer (B, 0.30; 95%CI: 0.22-0.39) and were more likely to report wearing cotton undergloves (OR 6.33; 95%CI: 3.23-12.41) than participants in the control group 12 months after baseline. The strategy implemented can be used in practice, as it showed positive effects on preventive behaviour. More research is needed to investigate the unexpected effects on hand eczema. © 2014 The Authors. Contact Dermatitis published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for Bulimia Nervosa and Eating Disorders Not Otherwise Specified: Translation from Randomized Controlled Trial to a Clinical Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, Sarah; Woodward, Debbie; Hoefkens, Antonia; Limbert, Caroline

    2015-11-01

    Enhanced Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT-E) (Fairburn, Cooper and Shafran, 2003) was developed as a treatment approach for eating disorders focusing on both core psychopathology and additional maintenance mechanisms. To evaluate treatment outcomes associated with CBT-E in a NHS Eating Disorders Service for adults with bulimia and atypical eating disorders and to make comparisons with a previously published randomized controlled trial (Fairburn et al., 2009) and "real world" evaluation (Byrne, Fursland, Allen and Watson, 2011). Participants were referred to the eating disorder service between 2002 and 2011. They were aged between 18-65 years, registered with a General Practitioner within the catchment area, and had experienced symptoms fulfilling criteria for BN or EDNOS for a minimum of 6 months. CBT-E was commenced by 272 patients, with 135 completing treatment. Overall, treatment was associated with significant improvements in eating disorder and associated psychopathology, for both treatment completers and the intention to treat sample. Findings support dissemination of CBT-E in this context, with significant improvements in eating disorder psychopathology. Improvements to global EDE-Q scores were higher for treatment completers and lower for the intention to treat sample, compared to previous studies (Fairburn et al., 2009; Byrne et al., 2011). Level of attrition was found at 40.8% and non-completion of treatment was associated with higher levels of anxiety. Potential explanations for these findings are discussed.

  13. What do You Need to Get Male Partners of Pregnant Women Tested for HIV in Resource Limited Settings? The Baby Shower Cluster Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezeanolue, Echezona E; Obiefune, Michael C; Yang, Wei; Ezeanolue, Chinenye O; Pharr, Jennifer; Osuji, Alice; Ogidi, Amaka G; Hunt, Aaron T; Patel, Dina; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Ehiri, John E

    2017-02-01

    Male partner involvement has the potential to increase uptake of interventions to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT). Finding cultural appropriate strategies to promote male partner involvement in PMTCT programs remains an abiding public health challenge. We assessed whether a congregation-based intervention, the Healthy Beginning Initiative (HBI), would lead to increased uptake of HIV testing among male partners of pregnant women during pregnancy. A cluster-randomized controlled trial of forty churches in Southeastern Nigeria randomly assigned to either the HBI (intervention group; IG) or standard of care referral to a health facility (control group; CG) was conducted. Participants in the IG received education and were offered onsite HIV testing. Overall, 2498 male partners enrolled and participated, a participation rate of 88.9%. Results showed that male partners in the IG were 12 times more likely to have had an HIV test compared to male partners of pregnant women in the CG (CG = 37.71% vs. IG = 84.00%; adjusted odds ratio = 11.9; p HIV testing and counseling among male partners of pregnant women.

  14. Randomized Controlled Trial for Helicobacter pylori Eradication in a Naive Portuguese Population: Is Sequential Treatment Superior to Triple Therapy in Real World Clinical Setting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boal Carvalho, Pedro; Magalhães, Joana; Dias de Castro, Francisca; Rosa, Bruno; Cotter, José

    2017-03-31

    Helicobacter pylori eradication has become increasingly difficult as resistances to several antibiotics develop. We aimed to compare Helicobacter pylori eradication rates between triple therapy and sequential therapy in a naive Portuguese population. Prospective randomized trial including consecutive patients referred for first-line Helicobacter pylori eradication treatment. previous gastric surgery/neoplasia, pregnancy/lactancy, allergy to any of the drugs. The compared eradication regimens were triple therapy (pantoprazol, amoxicillin and clarithromycin 12/12 hours, 14 days) and sequential therapy (pantoprazol 12/12 hours for 10 days, amoxicillin 12/12 hours for days 1 - 5 and clarithromycin plus metronidazol 12/12 hours during days 6 - 10). Eradication success was confirmed with urea breath test. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS v21.0 and a p-value population, we found a satisfactory global Helicobacter pylori eradication rate of 82%, with no statistical differences observed in the efficacy of the treatment between triple and sequential regimens. These results support the use of either therapy for the first-line eradication of Helicobacter pylori.

  15. Design basis 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, G.; Soerensen, P. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1996-09-01

    Design Basis Program 2 (DBP2) is comprehensive fully coupled code which has the capability to operate in the time domain as well as in the frequency domain. The code was developed during the period 1991-93 and succeed Design Basis 1, which is a one-blade model presuming stiff tower, transmission system and hub. The package is designed for use on a personal computer and offers a user-friendly environment based on menu-driven editing and control facilities, and with graphics used extensively for the data presentation. Moreover in-data as well as results are dumped on files in Ascii-format. The input data is organized in a in-data base with a structure that easily allows for arbitrary combinations of defined structural components and load cases. (au)

  16. Brief educational interventions to improve performance on novel quality metrics in ambulatory settings in Kenya: A multi-site pre-post effectiveness trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onguka, Stephanie; Halestrap, Peter; McAlhaney, Maureen; Adam, Mary

    2017-01-01

    Background The quality of primary care delivered in resource-limited settings is low. While some progress has been made using educational interventions, it is not yet clear how to sustainably improve care for common acute illnesses in the outpatient setting. Management of urinary tract infection is particularly important in resource-limited settings, where it is commonly diagnosed and associated with high levels of antimicrobial resistance. We describe an educational programme targeting non-physician health care providers and its effects on various clinical quality metrics for urinary tract infection. Methods We used a series of educational interventions including 1) formal introduction of a clinical practice guideline, 2) peer-to-peer chart review, and 3) peer-reviewed literature describing local antimicrobial resistance patterns. Interventions were conducted for clinical officers (N = 24) at two outpatient centers near Nairobi, Kenya over a one-year period. The medical records of 474 patients with urinary tract infections were scored on five clinical quality metrics, with the primary outcome being the proportion of cases in which the guideline-recommended antibiotic was prescribed. The results at baseline and following each intervention were compared using chi-squared tests and unpaired two-tailed T-tests for significance. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess for possible confounders. Findings Clinician adherence to the guideline-recommended antibiotic improved significantly during the study period, from 19% at baseline to 68% following all interventions (Χ2 = 150.7, p < 0.001). The secondary outcome of composite quality score also improved significantly from an average of 2.16 to 3.00 on a five-point scale (t = 6.58, p < 0.001). Interventions had different effects at different clinical sites; the primary outcome of appropriate antibiotic prescription was met 83% of the time at Penda Health, and 50% of the time at AICKH, possibly reflecting

  17. Trial of a novel plasma gas disinfection system (Radica) to reduce mattress residual bacterial contamination in the acute hospital setting: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiely, F; Fallon, D; Casey, C; Kerins, D M; Eustace, J A

    2017-02-01

    In routine clinical practice, mattresses are manually cleaned using specialised cleaning and high-level disinfecting fluids. While effective against a wide range of organisms, the success of this approach is dependent on a thorough and complete application and is likely to be susceptible to human error and thus variable. The efficacy of available infection control measures to reduce such mattress contamination is unknown as it is not subject to quality control measures. There is a pressing need to identify more effective methods to prevent cross contamination within the medical environment, given the lack of available treatment strategies. The purpose of this study is to investigate the ability of a new technology, gaseous technology, to reduce colonization levels, compared to standard cleaning, and so attenuate superficial nosocomial infections. We conducted a prospective, single-centre, open-label, non-randomized trial with blinded outcome assessments, comparing the standard cleaning of hospital mattresses with a novel plasma based disinfection system Radica™, followed by a standard post-cleaning culturing protocol (five swabs/mattress). The median (interquartile range) maximal colony count per mattress for the 20 Radica versus 7 routinely cleaned mattresses was 1 (1-2.7) versus Too-Numerous-to-Count (TNTC) (32-TNTC), respectively, p = 0.002. Of the 20 Radica™ treated mattresses, 12 (60 %) had no positive culture result while all of the standard cleaned mattresses had at least two positive cultures. The plasma based Radica disinfection system reduces mattress bacterial colonization levels as compared to routine cleaning. This is a potentially important technology in the health care system to reduce surface colonisation and hence nosocomial infections.

  18. Cross-sectional evaluation of electrical impedance myography and quantitative ultrasound for the assessment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy in a clinical trial setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkove, Seward B; Geisbush, Tom R; Mijailovic, Aleksandar; Shklyar, Irina; Pasternak, Amy; Visyak, Nicole; Wu, Jim S; Zaidman, Craig; Darras, Basil T

    2014-07-01

    Electrical impedance myography and quantitative ultrasound are two noninvasive, painless, and effort-independent approaches for assessing neuromuscular disease. Both techniques have potential to serve as useful biomarkers in clinical trials in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. However, their comparative sensitivity to disease status and how they relate to one another are unknown. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of electrical impedance myography and quantitative ultrasound in 24 healthy boys and 24 with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, aged 2 to 14 years with trained research assistants performing all measurements. Three upper and three lower extremity muscles were studied unilaterally in each child, and the data averaged for each individual. Both electrical impedance myography and quantitative ultrasound differentiated healthy boys from those with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (P Duchenne muscular dystrophy boys (rho = 0.45; P = 0.029), whereas electrical impedance myography did not (rho = -0.31; P = 0.14). However, electrical impedance myography phase correlated with age in healthy boys (rho = 0.51; P = 0.012), whereas quantitative ultrasound did not (rho = -0.021; P = 0.92). In Duchenne muscular dystrophy boys, electrical impedance myography phase correlated with the North Star Ambulatory Assessment (rho = 0.65; P = 0.022); quantitative ultrasound revealed a near-significant association (rho = -0.56; P = 0.060). The two technologies trended toward a moderate correlation with one another in the Duchenne muscular dystrophy cohort but not in the healthy group (rho = -0.40; P = 0.054 and rho = -0.32; P = 0.13, respectively). Electrical impedance myography and quantitative ultrasound are complementary modalities for the assessment of boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy; further study and application of these two modalities alone or in combination in a longitudinal fashion are warranted. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of biophysical therapy on articular pain in a primary care setting compared to ibuprofen and placebo: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foletti, A; Egan, C G; Baron, P

    2018-01-01

    Articular pain is one of the most frequent complaints practitioners face in their daily work. With an aging population, many patients have multiple comorbidities that are associated with the presence of chronic diseases, while others experience allergies, side effects or do not respond to standard medications or procedures. Therefore, there is an urgent need for new effective and safe strategies to manage articular pain, especially in its chronic manifestations. This randomized controlled trial was designed to assess the efficacy of a single therapy session using a biophysical procedure matched with a common non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (ibuprofen) and placebo. Biophysical therapy was performed using a Med Select 729 device. One hundred fifty patients (mean age 56±15.6 years) diagnosed with acute or chronic articular pain at different locations were randomized into 3 groups and the Numeric Pain Rating Score (NPRS) was used to measure pain at baseline, after one week, one month, and three months. While no difference in NPRS was observed at baseline among the 3 groups, a statistically significant difference was observed at all subsequent time points, respectively, after one week (p less than 0.05), one month (p less than 0.001), and three months (p less than 0.01), for both ibuprofen and biophysical groups vs placebo. Biophysical treatment of articular pain was shown to be as effective as a conventional non-steroidal anti-inflammatory treatment over a period of 3 months compared to placebo and could, therefore, represent an integrative, safe and long-lasting therapy to be considered for the management of acute and particularly chronic articular pain in current medical practice.

  20. Brief intervention to prevent hazardous drinking in young people aged 14-15 in a high school setting (SIPS JR-HIGH): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neil, Stephanie; Coulton, Simon; Deluca, Paolo; Deverill, Mark; Drummond, Colin; Gilvarry, Eilish; Graybill, Erin; Harle, Christine; Howel, Denise; Kaner, Eileen; McArdle, Paul; McColl, Elaine; McGovern, Ruth; Speed, Chris; Stamp, Elaine; Tate, Les; Newbury-Birch, Dorothy

    2012-09-13

    Whilst the overall proportion of young people drinking alcohol in the United Kingdom has decreased in recent years, those who do drink appear to drink a larger amount, and more frequently. Early and heavy drinking by younger adolescents is a significant public health problem linked to intellectual impairment, increased risk of injuries, mental health issues, unprotected or regretted sexual experience, violence, and sometimes accidental death, which leads to high social and economic costs. This feasibility pilot trial aims to explore the feasibility of delivering brief alcohol intervention in a school setting with adolescents aged 14 and 15 and to examine the acceptability of study measures to school staff, young people and parents. Seven schools across one geographical area in the North East of England will be recruited. Schools will be randomly allocated to one of three conditions: provision of an advice leaflet (control condition, n = 2 schools); a 30-minute brief interactive session, which combines structured advice and motivational interviewing techniques delivered by the school learning mentor (level 1 condition, n = 2 schools); and a 60-minute session involving family members delivered by the school learning mentor (level 2 condition, n = 3 schools). Participants will be year 10 school pupils (aged 14 and 15) who screen positively on a single alcohol screening question and who consent to take part in the trial. Year 10 pupils in all seven schools will be followed up at 6 and 12 months. Secondary outcome measures include the ten-question Alcohol-Use Disorders Identification Test. The EQ-5D-Y and a modified short service use questionnaire will inform the health and social resource costs for any future economic evaluation.Young people recruited into the trial will also complete a 28-day timeline follow back questionnaire at 12-month follow-up. A qualitative evaluation (with young people, school staff, learning mentors, and parents) will examine

  1. Impact of physical activity on energy balance, food intake and choice in normal weight and obese children in the setting of acute social stress: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsch, Antje; Wobmann, Marion; Kriemler, Susi; Munsch, Simone; Borloz, Sylvie; Balz, Alexandra; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Borghini, Ayala; Puder, Jardena J

    2015-02-19

    Psychological stress negatively influences food intake and food choices, thereby contributing to the development of childhood obesity. Physical activity can also moderate eating behavior and influence calorie intake. However, it is unknown if acute physical activity influences food intake and overall energy balance after acute stress exposure in children. We therefore investigated the impact of acute physical activity on overall energy balance (food intake minus energy expenditure), food intake, and choice in the setting of acute social stress in normal weight (NW) and overweight/obese (OW/OB) children as well as the impact of psychological risk factors. After receiving written consent from their parents, 26 NW (BMI foods (6 sweet/6 salty; each of low/high caloric density). Energy balance, food intake/choice and obesity-related psychological risk factors were assessed. Lower overall energy balance (p = 0.019) and a decreased choice of low density salty foods (p foods (104 kcal (34 to 173), p = 0.004) following stress. They scored higher on impulsive behavior (p = 0.005), restrained eating (p stress-induced food intake/choice. Positive parenting tended to be related to lower intake of sweet high density food (-132 kcal, -277 to 2, p = 0.054). In the setting of stress, acute moderate physical activity can address energy balance in children, a benefit which is especially pronounced in the OW/OB. Positive parenting may act as a protective factor preventing stress-induced eating of comfort food. clinicaltrials.gov NCT01693926 The study was a pilot study of a project funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation (CRSII3_147673).

  2. Radioactive Waste Management Basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, B.K.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this Radioactive Waste Management Basis is to describe the systematic approach for planning, executing, and evaluating the management of radioactive waste at LLNL. The implementation of this document will ensure that waste management activities at LLNL are conducted in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and the Implementation Guide for DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Technical justification is provided where methods for meeting the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 deviate from the DOE Manual 435.1-1 and Implementation Guide.

  3. A randomised trial of Supine versus Prone breast radiotherapy (SuPr study): Comparing set-up errors and respiratory motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirby, Anna M.; Evans, Philip M.; Helyer, Sarah J.; Donovan, Ellen M.; Convery, Helen M.; Yarnold, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To test a prone position against the international-standard supine position in women undergoing whole-breast-radiotherapy (WBRT) after wide-local-excision (WLE) of early breast cancer (BC) in terms of feasibility, set-up errors, and respiratory motion. Methods: Following WLE of BC with insertion of tumour-bed clips, patients underwent 4D-CT for WBRT-planning in supine and prone positions (the latter using an in-house-designed platform). Patients were randomised to undergo WBRT fractions 1-7 in one position, switching to the alternate position for fractions 8-15 (40 Gy/15-fractions total). Cone-beam CT-images (CBCT) were acquired prior to fractions 1, 4, 7, 8, 11 and 14. CBCT data were matched to planning-CT data using (i) chest-wall and (ii) clips. Systematic and random errors were calculated. Maximal displacement of chest-wall and clips with respiration was measured on 4D-CT. Clinical- to planning-target-volume (CTV-PTV) margins were calculated. Patient-comfort-scores and treatment-times were evaluated. Results: Twenty-five patients were randomized. 192/192 (100%) planned supine fractions and 173/192 (90%) prone fractions were completed. 3D population systematic errors were 1.3-1.9 mm (supine) and 3.1-4.3 mm (prone) (p = 0.02) and random errors 2.6-3.2 mm (supine) and 3.8-5.4 mm (prone) (p = 0.02). Prone positioning reduced chest-wall and clip motion (0.5 ± 0.2 mm (prone) versus 2.7 ± 0.5 mm (supine) (p < 0.001)) with respiration. Calculated CTV-PTV margins were greater for prone (12-16 mm) than for supine treatment (10 mm). Patient-comfort-scores and treatment times were comparable (p = 0.06). Conclusions: Set-up errors were greater using our prone technique than for our standard supine technique, resulting in the need for larger CTV-PTV margins in the prone position. Further work is required to optimize the prone treatment-platform and technique before it can become a standard treatment option at our institution.

  4. Molecular basis for mitochondrial signaling

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book covers recent advances in the study of structure, function, and regulation of metabolite, protein and ion translocating channels, and transporters in mitochondria. A wide array of cutting-edge methods are covered, ranging from electrophysiology and cell biology to bioinformatics, as well as structural, systems, and computational biology. At last, the molecular identity of two important channels in the mitochondrial inner membrane, the mitochondrial calcium uniporter and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore have been established. After years of work on the physiology and structure of VDAC channels in the mitochondrial outer membrane, there have been multiple discoveries on VDAC permeation and regulation by cytosolic proteins. Recent breakthroughs in structural studies of the mitochondrial cholesterol translocator reveal a set of novel unexpected features and provide essential clues for defining therapeutic strategies. Molecular Basis for Mitochondrial Signaling covers these and many more re...

  5. Training a Chest Compression of 6-7 cm Depth for High Quality Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Hospital Setting: A Randomised Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jaehoon; Lim, Tae Ho; Cho, Youngsuk; Kang, Hyunggoo; Kim, Wonhee; Chee, Youngjoon; Song, Yeongtak; Kim, In Young; Lee, Juncheol

    2016-03-01

    During cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), chest compression (CC) depth is influenced by the surface on which the patient is placed. We hypothesized that training healthcare providers to perform a CC depth of 6-7 cm (instead of 5-6 cm) on a manikin placed on a mattress during CPR in the hospital might improve their proper CC depth. This prospective randomised controlled study involved 66 premedical students without CPR training. The control group was trained to use a CC depth of 5-6 cm (G 5-6), while the experimental group was taught to use a CC depth of 6-7 cm (G 6-7) with a manikin on the floor. All participants performed CCs for 2 min on a manikin that was placed on a bed 1 hour and then again 4 weeks after the training without a feedback. The parameters of CC quality (depth, rate, % of accurate depth) were assessed and compared between the 2 groups. Four students were excluded due to loss to follow-up and recording errors, and data of 62 were analysed. CC depth and % of accurate depth were significantly higher among students in the G 6-7 than G 5-6 both 1 hour and 4 weeks after the training (p0.05). Training healthcare providers to perform a CC depth of 6-7 cm could improve quality CC depth when performing CCs on patients who are placed on a mattress during CPR in a hospital setting.

  6. Superior Rhythm Discrimination With the SmartShock Technology Algorithm - Results of the Implantable Defibrillator With Enhanced Features and Settings for Reduction of Inaccurate Detection (DEFENSE) Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oginosawa, Yasushi; Kohno, Ritsuko; Honda, Toshihiro; Kikuchi, Kan; Nozoe, Masatsugu; Uchida, Takayuki; Minamiguchi, Hitoshi; Sonoda, Koichiro; Ogawa, Masahiro; Ideguchi, Takeshi; Kizaki, Yoshihisa; Nakamura, Toshihiro; Oba, Kageyuki; Higa, Satoshi; Yoshida, Keiki; Tsunoda, Soichi; Fujino, Yoshihisa; Abe, Haruhiko

    2017-08-25

    Shocks delivered by implanted anti-tachyarrhythmia devices, even when appropriate, lower the quality of life and survival. The new SmartShock Technology ® (SST) discrimination algorithm was developed to prevent the delivery of inappropriate shock. This prospective, multicenter, observational study compared the rate of inaccurate detection of ventricular tachyarrhythmia using the SST vs. a conventional discrimination algorithm.Methods and Results:Recipients of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD) or cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillators (CRT-D) equipped with the SST algorithm were enrolled and followed up every 6 months. The tachycardia detection rate was set at ≥150 beats/min with the SST algorithm. The primary endpoint was the time to first inaccurate detection of ventricular tachycardia (VT) with conventional vs. the SST discrimination algorithm, up to 2 years of follow-up. Between March 2012 and September 2013, 185 patients (mean age, 64.0±14.9 years; men, 74%; secondary prevention indication, 49.5%) were enrolled at 14 Japanese medical centers. Inaccurate detection was observed in 32 patients (17.6%) with the conventional, vs. in 19 patients (10.4%) with the SST algorithm. SST significantly lowered the rate of inaccurate detection by dual chamber devices (HR, 0.50; 95% CI: 0.263-0.950; P=0.034). Compared with previous algorithms, the SST discrimination algorithm significantly lowered the rate of inaccurate detection of VT in recipients of dual-chamber ICD or CRT-D.

  7. Counting SET-free sets

    OpenAIRE

    Harman, Nate

    2016-01-01

    We consider the following counting problem related to the card game SET: How many $k$-element SET-free sets are there in an $n$-dimensional SET deck? Through a series of algebraic reformulations and reinterpretations, we show the answer to this question satisfies two polynomiality conditions.

  8. Norms for healthy adults aged 18-87 years for the Cognitive Drug Research System: An automated set of tests of attention, information processing and memory for use in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesnes, Keith A; McNamara, Cynthia; Annas, Peter

    2016-03-01

    The Cognitive Drug Research (CDR) System is a set of nine computerized tests of attention, information processing, working memory, executive control and episodic memory which was designed for repeated assessments in research projects. The CDR System has been used extensively in clinical trials involving healthy volunteers for over 30 years, and a database of 7751 individuals aged 18-87 years has been accumulated for pre-treatment data from these studies. This database has been analysed, and the relationships between the various scores with factors, including age, gender and years of full-time education, have been identified. These analyses are reported in this paper, along with tables of norms for the various key measures from the core tasks stratified by age and gender. These norms can be used for a variety of purposes, including the determination of eligibility for participation in clinical trials and the everyday relevance of research findings from the system. In addition, these norms provide valuable information on gender differences and the effects of normal ageing on major aspects of human cognitive function. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. Intensive speech and language therapy in patients with chronic aphasia after stroke: a randomised, open-label, blinded-endpoint, controlled trial in a health-care setting:A randomised, open-label, blinded-endpoint, controlled trial in a health-care setting

    OpenAIRE

    Caterina, Breitenstein; Grewe, Tanja; Flöel, Agnes; Ziegler, Wolfram; Springer, Luise; Martus, Peter; Huber, Walter; Willmes, Klaus; Ringelstein, E. Bernd; Haeusler, Karl Georg; Abel, Steffie; Glindemann, Ralf; Domahs, Frank; Regenbrecht, Frank; Schlenck, Klaus-Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    BackgroundTreatment guidelines for aphasia recommend intensive speech and language therapy for chronic (≥6 months) aphasia after stroke, but large-scale, class 1 randomised controlled trials on treatment effectiveness are scarce. We aimed to examine whether 3 weeks of intensive speech and language therapy under routine clinical conditions improved verbal communication in daily-life situations in people with chronic aphasia after stroke.MethodsIn this multicentre, parallel group, superiority, ...

  10. Patient representatives' views on patient information in clinical cancer trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellson, Pia; Nilbert, Mef; Carlsson, Christina

    2016-02-01

    Patient enrolment into clinical trials is based on oral information and informed consent, which includes an information sheet and a consent certificate. The written information should be complete, but at the same time risks being so complex that it may be questioned if a fully informed consent is possible to provide. We explored patient representatives' views and perceptions on the written trial information used in clinical cancer trials. Written patient information leaflets used in four clinical trials for colorectal cancer were used for the study. The trials included phase I-III trials, randomized and non-randomized trials that evaluated chemotherapy/targeted therapy in the neoadjuvant, adjuvant and palliative settings. Data were collected through focus groups and were analysed using inductive content analysis. Two major themes emerged: emotional responses and cognitive responses. Subthemes related to the former included individual preferences and perceptions of effect, while subthemes related to the latter were comprehensibility and layout. Based on these observations the patient representatives provided suggestions for improvement, which largely included development of future simplified and more attractive informed consent forms. The emotional and cognitive responses to written patient information reported by patient representatives provides a basis for revised formats in future trials and add to the body of information that support use of plain language, structured text and illustrations to improve the informed consent process and thereby patient enrolment into clinical trials.

  11. Effects of a simple home-based exercise program on fall prevention in older adults: A 12-month primary care setting, randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boongird, Chitima; Keesukphan, Prasit; Phiphadthakusolkul, Soontraporn; Rattanasiri, Sasivimol; Thakkinstian, Ammarin

    2017-11-01

    To investigate the effects of a simple home-based exercise program on falls, physical functioning, fear of falling and quality of life in a primary care setting. Participants (n = 439), aged ≥65 years with mild-to-moderate balance dysfunction were randomly assigned to an exercise (n = 219) or control (n = 220) group. The program consisted of five combined exercises, which progressed in difficulty, and a walking plan. Controls received fall prevention education. Physical functioning and other outcomes were measured at 3- and 6-month follow-up visits. Falls were monitored with fall diaries and phone interviews at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months respectively. The 12 months of the home-based exercise program showed the incidence of falls was 0.30 falls per person year in the exercise group, compared with 0.40 in the control group. The estimated incidence rate ratio was 0.75 (95% CI 0.55-1.04), which was not statistically significant. The fear of falling (measured by the Thai fall efficacy scale) was significantly lower in the exercise than control group (24.7 vs 27.0, P = 0.003). Also, the trend of program adherence increased in the exercise group. (29.6% to 56.8%). This simple home-based exercise program showed a reduction in fear of falling and a positive trend towards exercise adherence. Further studies should focus on factors associated with exercise adherence, the benefits of increased home visits and should follow participants longer in order to evaluate the effects of the program. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 2157-2163. © 2017 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  12. Randomised controlled trial of a livestock productive asset transfer programme to improve economic and health outcomes and reduce intimate partner violence in a postconflict setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Nancy; Perrin, Nancy A; Kohli, Anjalee; Campbell, Jacquelyn; Remy, Mitima Mpanano

    2017-01-01

    Diverse economic empowerment programmes (eg, microcredit, village-led savings and loan, cash and productive asset transfers) for the poor have demonstrated mixed results as vehicles for improved economic stability, health and women's empowerment. However, limited rigorous evaluations exist on the impact of financial and non-financial outcomes of these programmes, especially in conflict-affected areas. The team evaluated the effectiveness of an innovative livestock productive asset transfer intervention-Pigs for Peace (PFP)-on economic, health and women's empowerment outcomes with participants in households in 10 villages in Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo. Residual change analysis was used to examine the amount of change from baseline to 18 months between the intervention and delayed control groups, controlling for baseline scores. The majority of the 833 household participants were women (84%), 25 years of age or older, married, had on average 3 children and had never attended school. At 18 months postbaseline, the number of participants in the PFP households having outstanding credit/loans was 24.7% lower than households in the control group (p=0.028), and they had an 8.2% greater improvement in subjective health (p=0.026), a 57.1% greater reduction in symptoms of anxiety (p=0.020) and a 5.7% greater improvement in symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (p<-0.001). At 18 months postbaseline, partnered women and men reported a reduction in experience and perpetration of all forms of intimate partner violence, although not statistically significant between groups. The findings support scalability of a livestock productive asset transfer programme in rural and conflict-affected settings where residents have extremely limited access to financial institutions or credit programmes, health or social services and where social norms that sustain gender inequality are strong. NCT02008708.

  13. ITER technical basis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-01-01

    Following on from the Final Report of the EDA(DS/21), and the summary of the ITER Final Design report(DS/22), the technical basis gives further details of the design of ITER. It is in two parts. The first, the Plant Design specification, summarises the main constraints on the plant design and operation from the viewpoint of engineering and physics assumptions, compliance with safety regulations, and siting requirements and assumptions. The second, the Plant Description Document, describes the physics performance and engineering characteristics of the plant design, illustrates the potential operational consequences foe the locality of a generic site, gives the construction, commissioning, exploitation and decommissioning schedule, and reports the estimated lifetime costing based on data from the industry of the EDA parties.

  14. ITER technical basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Following on from the Final Report of the EDA(DS/21), and the summary of the ITER Final Design report(DS/22), the technical basis gives further details of the design of ITER. It is in two parts. The first, the Plant Design specification, summarises the main constraints on the plant design and operation from the viewpoint of engineering and physics assumptions, compliance with safety regulations, and siting requirements and assumptions. The second, the Plant Description Document, describes the physics performance and engineering characteristics of the plant design, illustrates the potential operational consequences foe the locality of a generic site, gives the construction, commissioning, exploitation and decommissioning schedule, and reports the estimated lifetime costing based on data from the industry of the EDA parties

  15. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Spinal Metastases in the Postoperative Setting: A Secondary Analysis of Mature Phase 1-2 Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Randa; Bishop, Andrew J.; Brownlee, Zachary; Allen, Pamela K.; Settle, Stephen H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chang, Eric L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, USC Norris Cancer Hospital, Keck School of Medicine of USC, Los Angeles, California (United States); Wang, Xin [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Amini, Behrang [Department of Neuroradiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Tannir, Nizar M. [Department of Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Tatsui, Claudio; Rhines, Laurence D. [Department of Neurosurgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Brown, Paul D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Ghia, Amol J., E-mail: ajghia@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes in patients treated on prospective phase 1-2 protocols with postoperative stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and identify the associated prognostic variables. Methods and Materials: Sixty-six patients with 69 tumors were treated with SBRT on prospective phase 1-2 studies for spinal metastases between 2002 and 2010. All patients underwent SBRT after spine surgery, which included laminectomy, vertebrectomy, or a combination of these techniques. Renal cell carcinoma was the most common histology represented (n=35, 53%) followed by sarcomas (n=13, 20%). Thirty-one patients (47%) were treated with prior conventional radiation to the spine (median dose 30 Gy). Patients were followed up with spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies to determine the treated tumor control (TC). Pain and other symptom data were collected prospectively to determine treatment response and toxicity. Results: The median follow-up time was 30 months (range, 1-145 months) for all patients and 75 months for living patients (range, 6-145 months). The actuarial 1-year rate of TC was 85%, adjacent vertebral body control was 85%, and overall survival (OS) was 74% (median 29 months). On multivariate competing-risks analysis, sarcoma histology (subhazard ratio [SHR] = 2.38, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05-5.6, P=.04) and larger preoperative tumor volumes (SHR=1.01, 95% CI 1.0-1.01, P=.006) were significantly associated with worse TC. Karnofsky performance status was the only significant predictor for OS on multivariate analysis. There were no differences in TC between patients treated with different surgical techniques or different preoperative or postoperative Bilsky grades. There were no grade 3 or higher neurologic toxicities. Conclusion: This study represents a large series of prospective data available on patients treated with SBRT in the postoperative setting. The combination of surgery with SBRT can offer patients with metastatic disease

  16. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Spinal Metastases in the Postoperative Setting: A Secondary Analysis of Mature Phase 1-2 Trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao, Randa; Bishop, Andrew J.; Brownlee, Zachary; Allen, Pamela K.; Settle, Stephen H.; Chang, Eric L.; Wang, Xin; Amini, Behrang; Tannir, Nizar M.; Tatsui, Claudio; Rhines, Laurence D.; Brown, Paul D.; Ghia, Amol J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes in patients treated on prospective phase 1-2 protocols with postoperative stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and identify the associated prognostic variables. Methods and Materials: Sixty-six patients with 69 tumors were treated with SBRT on prospective phase 1-2 studies for spinal metastases between 2002 and 2010. All patients underwent SBRT after spine surgery, which included laminectomy, vertebrectomy, or a combination of these techniques. Renal cell carcinoma was the most common histology represented (n=35, 53%) followed by sarcomas (n=13, 20%). Thirty-one patients (47%) were treated with prior conventional radiation to the spine (median dose 30 Gy). Patients were followed up with spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies to determine the treated tumor control (TC). Pain and other symptom data were collected prospectively to determine treatment response and toxicity. Results: The median follow-up time was 30 months (range, 1-145 months) for all patients and 75 months for living patients (range, 6-145 months). The actuarial 1-year rate of TC was 85%, adjacent vertebral body control was 85%, and overall survival (OS) was 74% (median 29 months). On multivariate competing-risks analysis, sarcoma histology (subhazard ratio [SHR] = 2.38, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05-5.6, P=.04) and larger preoperative tumor volumes (SHR=1.01, 95% CI 1.0-1.01, P=.006) were significantly associated with worse TC. Karnofsky performance status was the only significant predictor for OS on multivariate analysis. There were no differences in TC between patients treated with different surgical techniques or different preoperative or postoperative Bilsky grades. There were no grade 3 or higher neurologic toxicities. Conclusion: This study represents a large series of prospective data available on patients treated with SBRT in the postoperative setting. The combination of surgery with SBRT can offer patients with metastatic disease

  17. Efficacy and Safety of Oritavancin Relative to Vancomycin for Patients with Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections (ABSSSI) in the Outpatient Setting: Results From the SOLO Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodise, Thomas P; Redell, Mark; Armstrong, Shannon O; Sulham, Katherine A; Corey, G Ralph

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this analysis was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of oritavancin compared with vancomycin for patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs) who received treatment in the outpatient setting in the Phase 3 SOLO clinical trials. SOLO I and SOLO II were 2 identically designed comparative, multicenter, double-blind, randomized studies to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a single 1200-mg dose of intravenous (IV) oritavancin versus 7-10 days of twice-daily IV vancomycin for the treatment of ABSSSI. Protocols were amended to allow enrolled patients to complete their entire course of antimicrobial therapy in an outpatient setting. The primary efficacy outcome was a composite endpoint (cessation of spread or reduction in size of the baseline lesion, absence of fever, and no rescue antibiotic at early clinical evaluation [ECE]) (48 to 72 hours). Key secondary endpoints included investigator-assessed clinical cure 7 to 14 days after end of treatment (posttherapy evaluation [PTE]) and 20% or greater reduction in lesion area at ECE. Safety was assessed until day 60. Seven hundred ninety-two patients (oritavancin, 392; vancomycin, 400) received entire course of treatment in the outpatient setting. Efficacy response rates at ECE and PTE were similar (primary composite endpoint at ECE: 80.4% vs 77.5% for oritavancin and vancomycin, respectively) as was incidence of adverse events. Five patients (1.3%) who received oritavancin and 9 (2.3%) vancomycin patients were subsequently admitted to a hospital. Oritavancin provides a single-dose alternative to multidose vancomycin for treatment of ABSSSI in the outpatient setting. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  18. The INeS study: prevention of multiple pregnancies: a randomised controlled trial comparing IUI COH versus IVF e SET versus MNC IVF in couples with unexplained or mild male subfertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beckers Nicole

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple pregnancies are high risk pregnancies with higher chances of maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity. In the past decades the number of multiple pregnancies has increased. This trend is partly due to the fact that women start family planning at an increased age, but also due to the increased use of ART. Couples with unexplained or mild male subfertility generally receive intrauterine insemination IUI with controlled hormonal stimulation (IUI COH. The cumulative pregnancy rate is 40%, with a 10% multiple pregnancy rate. This study aims to reveal whether alternative treatments such as IVF elective Single Embryo Transfer (IVF e SET or Modified Natural Cycle IVF (MNC IVF can reduce the number of multiple pregnancy rates, but uphold similar pregnancy rates as IUI COH in couples with mild male or unexplained subfertility. Secondly, the aim is to perform a cost effective analyses and assess treatment preference of these couples. Methods/Design We plan a multicentre randomised controlled clinical trial in the Netherlands comparing six cycles of intra-uterine insemination with controlled ovarian hyperstimulation or six cycles of Modified Natural Cycle (MNC IVF or three cycles with IVF-elective Single Embryo Transfer (eSET plus cryo-cycles within a time frame of 12 months. Couples with unexplained subfertility or mild male subfertility and a poor prognosis for treatment independent pregnancy will be included. Women with anovulatory cycles, severe endometriosis, double sided tubal pathology or serious endocrine illness will be excluded. Our primary outcome is the birth of a healthy singleton. Secondary outcomes are multiple pregnancy, treatment costs, and patient experiences in each treatment arm. The analysis will be performed according tot the intention to treat principle. We will test for non-inferiority of the three arms with respect to live birth. As we accept a 12.5% loss in pregnancy rate in one of the two IVF arms

  19. The Biological Basis of Learning and Individuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, Eric R.; Hawkins, Robert D.

    1992-01-01

    Describes the biological basis of learning and individuality. Presents an overview of recent discoveries that suggest learning engages a simple set of rules that modify the strength of connection between neurons in the brain. The changes are cited as playing an important role in making each individual unique. (MCO)

  20. The Emotional and Moral Basis of Rationality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boostrom, Robert

    2013-01-01

    This chapter explores the basis of rationality, arguing that critical thinking tends to be taught in schools as a set of skills because of the failure to recognize that choosing to think critically depends on the prior development of stable sentiments or moral habits that nourish a rational self. Primary among these stable sentiments are the…

  1. Monetary value of lost productivity over a five year follow up in early rheumatoid arthritis estimated on the basis of official register data on patients' sickness absence and gross income: experience from the FIN-RACo trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puolakka, K; Kautiainen, H; Pekurinen, M; Möttönen, T; Hannonen, P; Korpela, M; Hakala, M; Arkela-Kautiainen, M; Luukkainen, R; Leirisalo-Repo, M

    2006-07-01

    To explore the monetary value of rheumatoid arthritis related loss of productivity in patients with early active disease. In a prospective cohort substudy of the FIN-RACo Trial, 162 patients with recent onset rheumatoid arthritis, aged 18 to 65 years and available to the workforce, were followed up for five years. Loss of work productivity in euros 2002 was estimated by data on absence for sickness and on income (human capital approach) from official databases. Treatment responses were evaluated by area under the curve (AUC) of the ACR-N measure and by increase in number of erosions in radiographs of hands and feet. The health assessment questionnaire (HAQ) at six months was linked to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). In all, 120 (75%) patients, women more often (82%) than men (61%) (p=0.002), lost work days. The mean lost productivity per patient-year was euro7217 (95% confidence interval (CI), 5561 to 9148): for women, euro6477 (4858 to 8536) and for men, euro8443 (5389 to 12,898). There was an inverse correlation with improvement: euro1101 (323 to 2156) and euro14 952 (10,662 to 19,852) for the highest and lowest quartiles of AUC of ARC-N, respectively. Lost productivity was associated with increase in the number of erosions and with disability in "changing and maintaining body position" subcategory of the ICF. Despite remission targeted treatment with disease modifying antirheumatic drugs, early rheumatoid arthritis results in substantial loss of productivity. A good improvement in the disease reduces the loss markedly.

  2. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Clinical Trials About Clinical Trials Clinical trials are research studies that explore whether a medical strategy, treatment, or ... humans. What Are Clinical Trials? Clinical trials are research studies that explore whether a medical strategy, treatment, or ...

  3. Clinical trials of homoeopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleijnen, J; Knipschild, P; ter Riet, G

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To establish whether there is evidence of the efficacy of homoeopathy from controlled trials in humans. DESIGN--Criteria based meta-analysis. Assessment of the methodological quality of 107 controlled trials in 96 published reports found after an extensive search. Trials were scored using a list of predefined criteria of good methodology, and the outcome of the trials was interpreted in relation to their quality. SETTING--Controlled trials published world wide. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Results of the trials with the best methodological quality. Trials of classical homoeopathy and several modern varieties were considered separately. RESULTS--In 14 trials some form of classical homoeopathy was tested and in 58 trials the same single homoeopathic treatment was given to patients with comparable conventional diagnosis. Combinations of several homoeopathic treatments were tested in 26 trials; isopathy was tested in nine trials. Most trials seemed to be of very low quality, but there were many exceptions. The results showed a positive trend regardless of the quality of the trial or the variety of homeopathy used. Overall, of the 105 trials with interpretable results, 81 trials indicated positive results whereas in 24 trials no positive effects of homoeopathy were found. The results of the review may be complicated by publication bias, especially in such a controversial subject as homoeopathy. CONCLUSIONS--At the moment the evidence of clinical trials is positive but not sufficient to draw definitive conclusions because most trials are of low methodological quality and because of the unknown role of publication bias. This indicates that there is a legitimate case for further evaluation of homoeopathy, but only by means of well performed trials. PMID:1825800

  4. Acceptability of Home-Assessment Post Medical Abortion and Medical Abortion in a Low-Resource Setting in Rajasthan, India. Secondary Outcome Analysis of a Non-Inferiority Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandira Paul

    Full Text Available Studies evaluating acceptability of simplified follow-up after medical abortion have focused on high-resource or urban settings where telephones, road connections, and modes of transport are available and where women have formal education.To investigate women's acceptability of home-assessment of abortion and whether acceptability of medical abortion differs by in-clinic or home-assessment of abortion outcome in a low-resource setting in India.Secondary outcome of a randomised, controlled, non-inferiority trial.Outpatient primary health care clinics in rural and urban Rajasthan, India.Women were eligible if they sought abortion with a gestation up to 9 weeks, lived within defined study area and agreed to follow-up. Women were ineligible if they had known contraindications to medical abortion, haemoglobin < 85 mg/l and were below 18 years.Abortion outcome assessment through routine clinic follow-up by a doctor was compared with home-assessment using a low-sensitivity pregnancy test and a pictorial instruction sheet. A computerized random number generator generated the randomisation sequence (1:1 in blocks of six. Research assistants randomly allocated eligible women who opted for medical abortion (mifepristone and misoprostol, using opaque sealed envelopes. Blinding during outcome assessment was not possible.Women's acceptability of home-assessment was measured as future preference of follow-up. Overall satisfaction, expectations, and comparison with previous abortion experiences were compared between study groups.731 women were randomized to the clinic follow-up group (n = 353 or home-assessment group (n = 378. 623 (85% women were successfully followed up, of those 597 (96% were satisfied and 592 (95% found the abortion better or as expected, with no difference between study groups. The majority, 355 (57% women, preferred home-assessment in the event of a future abortion. Significantly more women, 284 (82%, in the home-assessment group preferred

  5. Achieving Good Outcomes for Asthma Living (GOAL): mixed methods feasibility and pilot cluster randomised controlled trial of a practical intervention for eliciting, setting and achieving goals for adults with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskins, Gaylor; Williams, Brian; Abhyankar, Purva; Donnan, Peter; Duncan, Edward; Pinnock, Hilary; van der Pol, Marjon; Rauchhaus, Petra; Taylor, Anne; Sheikh, Aziz

    2016-12-08

    Despite being a core component of self-management, goal setting is rarely used in routine care. We piloted a primary care, nurse-led intervention called Achieving Good Outcomes for Asthma Living (GOAL) for adults with asthma. Patients were invited to identify and prioritise their goals in preparation for discussing and negotiating an action/coping plan with the nurse at a routine asthma review. The 18-month mixed methods feasibility cluster pilot trial stratified and then randomised practices to deliver usual care (UC) or a goal-setting intervention (GOAL). Practice asthma nurses and adult patients with active asthma were invited to participate. The primary outcome was asthma-specific quality of life. Semi-structured interviews with a purposive patient sample (n = 14) and 10 participating nurses explored GOAL perception. The constructs of normalisation process theory (NPT) were used to analyse and interpret data. Ten practices participated (five in each arm), exceeding our target of eight. However, only 48 patients (target 80) were recruited (18 in GOAL practices). At 6 months post-intervention, the difference in mean asthma-related quality of life (mAQLQ) between intervention and control was 0.1 (GOAL 6.20: SD 0.76 (CI 5.76-6.65) versus UC 6.1: SD 0.81 (CI 5.63-6.57)), less than the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) of 0.5. However, change from baseline was stronger in the intervention group: at 6 months the change in the emotions sub-score was 0.8 for intervention versus 0.2 for control. Costs were higher in the intervention group by £22.17. Routine review with goal setting was considered more holistic, enhancing rapport and enabling patients to become active rather than passive participants in healthcare. However, time was a major barrier for nurses, who admitted to screening out patient goals they believed were unrelated to asthma. The difference in AQLQ score from baseline is larger in the intervention arm than the control, indicating the

  6. Automatic sets and Delone sets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbe, A; Haeseler, F von

    2004-01-01

    Automatic sets D part of Z m are characterized by having a finite number of decimations. They are equivalently generated by fixed points of certain substitution systems, or by certain finite automata. As examples, two-dimensional versions of the Thue-Morse, Baum-Sweet, Rudin-Shapiro and paperfolding sequences are presented. We give a necessary and sufficient condition for an automatic set D part of Z m to be a Delone set in R m . The result is then extended to automatic sets that are defined as fixed points of certain substitutions. The morphology of automatic sets is discussed by means of examples

  7. Auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo calculations of molecular systems with a Gaussian basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Saidi, W.A.; Zhang Shiwei; Krakauer, Henry

    2006-01-01

    We extend the recently introduced phaseless auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) approach to any single-particle basis and apply it to molecular systems with Gaussian basis sets. QMC methods in general scale favorably with the system size as a low power. A QMC approach with auxiliary fields, in principle, allows an exact solution of the Schroedinger equation in the chosen basis. However, the well-known sign/phase problem causes the statistical noise to increase exponentially. The phaseless method controls this problem by constraining the paths in the auxiliary-field path integrals with an approximate phase condition that depends on a trial wave function. In the present calculations, the trial wave function is a single Slater determinant from a Hartree-Fock calculation. The calculated all-electron total energies show typical systematic errors of no more than a few millihartrees compared to exact results. At equilibrium geometries in the molecules we studied, this accuracy is roughly comparable to that of coupled cluster with single and double excitations and with noniterative triples [CCSD(T)]. For stretched bonds in H 2 O, our method exhibits a better overall accuracy and a more uniform behavior than CCSD(T)

  8. The biological basis of radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steel, G.G.; Adams, G.E.; Horwich, A.

    1989-01-01

    The focus of this book is the biological basis of radiotherapy. The papers presented include: Temporal stages of radiation action:free radical processes; The molecular basis of radiosensitivity; and Radiation damage to early-reacting normal tissue

  9. The protocol for the Be Our Ally Beat Smoking (BOABS study, a randomised controlled trial of an intensive smoking cessation intervention in a remote Aboriginal Australian health care setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marley Julia V

    2012-03-01

    smoking however there have been few good quality studies that show what approaches work best. More evidence of strategies that could work more widely in Indigenous primary health care settings is needed if effective policy is to be developed and implemented. Our project will make an important contribution in this area. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN12608000604303

  10. The INeS study: prevention of multiple pregnancies: a randomised controlled trial comparing IUI COH versus IVF e SET versus MNC IVF in couples with unexplained or mild male subfertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensdorp, Alexandra J; Slappendel, Els; Koks, Carolien; Oosterhuis, Jur; Hoek, Annemieke; Hompes, Peter; Broekmans, Frank; Verhoeve, Harold; de Bruin, Jan Peter; van Weert, Janne Meije; Traas, Maaike; Maas, Jacques; Beckers, Nicole; Repping, Sjoerd; Mol, Ben W; van der Veen, Fulco; van Wely, Madelon

    2009-12-18

    Multiple pregnancies are high risk pregnancies with higher chances of maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity. In the past decades the number of multiple pregnancies has increased. This trend is partly due to the fact that women start family planning at an increased age, but also due to the increased use of ART.Couples with unexplained or mild male subfertility generally receive intrauterine insemination IUI with controlled hormonal stimulation (IUI COH). The cumulative pregnancy rate is 40%, with a 10% multiple pregnancy rate.This study aims to reveal whether alternative treatments such as IVF elective Single Embryo Transfer (IVF e SET) or Modified Natural Cycle IVF (MNC IVF) can reduce the number of multiple pregnancy rates, but uphold similar pregnancy rates as IUI COH in couples with mild male or unexplained subfertility. Secondly, the aim is to perform a cost effective analyses and assess treatment preference of these couples. We plan a multicentre randomised controlled clinical trial in the Netherlands comparing six cycles of intra-uterine insemination with controlled ovarian hyperstimulation or six cycles of Modified Natural Cycle (MNC) IVF or three cycles with IVF-elective Single Embryo Transfer (eSET) plus cryo-cycles within a time frame of 12 months.Couples with unexplained subfertility or mild male subfertility and a poor prognosis for treatment independent pregnancy will be included. Women with anovulatory cycles, severe endometriosis, double sided tubal pathology or serious endocrine illness will be excluded.Our primary outcome is the birth of a healthy singleton. Secondary outcomes are multiple pregnancy, treatment costs, and patient experiences in each treatment arm. The analysis will be performed according tot the intention to treat principle. We will test for non-inferiority of the three arms with respect to live birth. As we accept a 12.5% loss in pregnancy rate in one of the two IVF arms to prevent multiple pregnancies, we need 200 couples

  11. Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. E. Shropshire; K. A. Williams; W. B. Boore; J. D. Smith; B. W. Dixon; M. Dunzik-Gougar; R. D. Adams; D. Gombert; E. Schneider

    2009-12-01

    This report, commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), provides a comprehensive set of cost data supporting a cost analysis for the relative economic comparison of options for use in the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program. The report describes the AFCI cost basis development process, reference information on AFCI cost modules, a procedure for estimating fuel cycle costs, economic evaluation guidelines, and a discussion on the integration of cost data into economic computer models. This report contains reference cost data for 25 cost modules—23 fuel cycle cost modules and 2 reactor modules. The cost modules were developed in the areas of natural uranium mining and milling, conversion, enrichment, depleted uranium disposition, fuel fabrication, interim spent fuel storage, reprocessing, waste conditioning, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packaging, long-term monitored retrievable storage, near surface disposal of low-level waste (LLW), geologic repository and other disposal concepts, and transportation processes for nuclear fuel, LLW, SNF, transuranic, and high-level waste.

  12. Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. E. Shropshire; K. A. Williams; W. B. Boore; J. D. Smith; B. W. Dixon; M. Dunzik-Gougar; R. D. Adams; D. Gombert

    2007-04-01

    This report, commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), provides a comprehensive set of cost data supporting a cost analysis for the relative economic comparison of options for use in the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program. The report describes the AFCI cost basis development process, reference information on AFCI cost modules, a procedure for estimating fuel cycle costs, economic evaluation guidelines, and a discussion on the integration of cost data into economic computer models. This report contains reference cost data for 26 cost modules—24 fuel cycle cost modules and 2 reactor modules. The cost modules were developed in the areas of natural uranium mining and milling, conversion, enrichment, depleted uranium disposition, fuel fabrication, interim spent fuel storage, reprocessing, waste conditioning, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packaging, long-term monitored retrievable storage, near surface disposal of low-level waste (LLW), geologic repository and other disposal concepts, and transportation processes for nuclear fuel, LLW, SNF, and high-level waste.

  13. Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. E. Shropshire; K. A. Williams; W. B. Boore; J. D. Smith; B. W. Dixon; M. Dunzik-Gougar; R. D. Adams; D. Gombert; E. Schneider

    2008-03-01

    This report, commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), provides a comprehensive set of cost data supporting a cost analysis for the relative economic comparison of options for use in the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program. The report describes the AFCI cost basis development process, reference information on AFCI cost modules, a procedure for estimating fuel cycle costs, economic evaluation guidelines, and a discussion on the integration of cost data into economic computer models. This report contains reference cost data for 25 cost modules—23 fuel cycle cost modules and 2 reactor modules. The cost modules were developed in the areas of natural uranium mining and milling, conversion, enrichment, depleted uranium disposition, fuel fabrication, interim spent fuel storage, reprocessing, waste conditioning, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packaging, long-term monitored retrievable storage, near surface disposal of low-level waste (LLW), geologic repository and other disposal concepts, and transportation processes for nuclear fuel, LLW, SNF, transuranic, and high-level waste.

  14. Does mode of follow-up influence contraceptive use after medical abortion in a low-resource setting? Secondary outcome analysis of a non-inferiority randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandira Paul

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Post-abortion contraceptive use in India is low and the use of modern methods of contraception is rare, especially in rural areas. This study primarily compares contraceptive use among women whose abortion outcome was assessed in-clinic with women who assessed their abortion outcome at home, in a low-resource, primary health care setting. Moreover, it investigates how background characteristics and abortion service provision influences contraceptive use post-abortion. Methods A randomized controlled, non-inferiority, trial (RCT compared clinic follow-up with home-assessment of abortion outcome at 2 weeks post-abortion. Additionally, contraceptive-use at 3 months post-abortion was investigated through a cross-sectional follow-up interview with a largely urban sub-sample of women from the RCT. Women seeking abortion with a gestational age of up to 9 weeks and who agreed to a 2-week follow-up were included (n = 731. Women with known contraindications to medical abortions, Hb < 85 mg/l and aged below 18 were excluded. Data were collected between April 2013 and August 2014 in six primary health-care clinics in Rajasthan. A computerised random number generator created the randomisation sequence (1:1 in blocks of six. Contraceptive use was measured at 2 weeks among women successfully followed-up (n = 623 and 3 months in the sub-set of women who were included if they were recruited at one of the urban study sites, owned a phone and agreed to a 3-month follow-up (n = 114. Results There were no differences between contraceptive use and continuation between study groups at 3 months (76 % clinic follow-up, 77 % home-assessment, however women in the clinic follow-up group were most likely to adopt a contraceptive method at 2 weeks (62 ± 12 %, while women in the home-assessment group were most likely to adopt a method after next menstruation (60 ± 13 %. Fifty-two per cent of women who initiated a

  15. The European quality of care pathways (EQCP study on the impact of care pathways on interprofessional teamwork in an acute hospital setting: study protocol: for a cluster randomised controlled trial and evaluation of implementation processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deneckere Svin

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although care pathways are often said to promote teamwork, high-level evidence that supports this statement is lacking. Furthermore, knowledge on conditions and facilitators for successful pathway implementation is scarce. The objective of the European Quality of Care Pathway (EQCP study is therefore to study the impact of care pathways on interprofessional teamwork and to build up understanding on the implementation process. Methods/design An international post-test-only cluster Randomised Controlled Trial (cRCT, combined with process evaluations, will be performed in Belgium, Ireland, Italy, and Portugal. Teams caring for proximal femur fracture (PFF patients and patients hospitalized with an exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD will be randomised into an intervention and control group. The intervention group will implement a care pathway for PFF or COPD containing three active components: a formative evaluation of the actual teams’ performance, a set of evidence-based key interventions, and a training in care pathway-development. The control group will provide usual care. A set of team input, process and output indicators will be used as effect measures. The main outcome indicator will be relational coordination. Next to these, process measures during and after pathway development will be used to evaluate the implementation processes. In total, 132 teams have agreed to participate, of which 68 were randomly assigned to the intervention group and 64 to the control group. Based on power analysis, a sample of 475 team members per arm is required. To analyze results, multilevel analysis will be performed. Discussion Results from our study will enhance understanding on the active components of care pathways. Through this, preferred implementation strategies can be defined. Trail registration NCT01435538

  16. Auditory proactive interference in monkeys: the roles of stimulus set size and intertrial interval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, James; Poremba, Amy

    2013-09-01

    We conducted two experiments to examine the influences of stimulus set size (the number of stimuli that are used throughout the session) and intertrial interval (ITI, the elapsed time between trials) in auditory short-term memory in monkeys. We used an auditory delayed matching-to-sample task wherein the animals had to indicate whether two sounds separated by a 5-s retention interval were the same (match trials) or different (nonmatch trials). In Experiment 1, we randomly assigned stimulus set sizes of 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, or 192 (trial-unique) for each session of 128 trials. Consistent with previous visual studies, overall accuracy was consistently lower when smaller stimulus set sizes were used. Further analyses revealed that these effects were primarily caused by an increase in incorrect "same" responses on nonmatch trials. In Experiment 2, we held the stimulus set size constant at four for each session and alternately set the ITI at 5, 10, or 20 s. Overall accuracy improved when the ITI was increased from 5 to 10 s, but it was the same across the 10- and 20-s conditions. As in Experiment 1, the overall decrease in accuracy during the 5-s condition was caused by a greater number of false "match" responses on nonmatch trials. Taken together, Experiments 1 and 2 showed that auditory short-term memory in monkeys is highly susceptible to proactive interference caused by stimulus repetition. Additional analyses of the data from Experiment 1 suggested that monkeys may make same-different judgments on the basis of a familiarity criterion that is adjusted by error-related feedback.

  17. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... questions and clinical trials. Optimizing our Clinical Trials Enterprise NHLBI has a strong tradition of supporting clinical ... multi-pronged approach to Optimize our Clinical Trials Enterprise that will make our clinical trials enterprise even ...

  18. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to-kol). This plan explains how the trial will work. The trial is led by a principal ... for the clinical trial. The protocol outlines what will be done during the clinical trial and why. ...

  19. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... take part in a clinical trial. When researchers think that a trial's potential risks are greater than ... care costs for clinical trials. If you're thinking about taking part in a clinical trial, find ...

  20. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of clinical trials contribute to medical knowledge and practice. Why Clinical Trials Are Important Clinical trials are ... earlier than they would be in general medical practice. This is because late-phase trials have large ...

  1. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... clinical trials contribute to medical knowledge and practice. Why Clinical Trials Are Important Clinical trials are a ... will be done during the clinical trial and why. Each medical center that does the study uses ...

  2. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... medical strategy, treatment, or device is safe and effective for humans. What Are Clinical Trials? Clinical trials ... and Centers sponsor clinical trials. Many other groups, companies, and organizations also sponsor clinical trials. Examples include ...

  3. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and treatments that work best. How Clinical Trials Work If you take part in a clinical trial, ... kol). This plan explains how the trial will work. The trial is led by a principal investigator ( ...

  4. Accelerating GW calculations with optimal polarizability basis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umari, P.; Stenuit, G. [CNR-IOM DEMOCRITOS Theory Elettra Group, Basovizza (Trieste) (Italy); Qian, X.; Marzari, N. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States); Giacomazzi, L.; Baroni, S. [CNR-IOM DEMOCRITOS Theory Elettra Group, Basovizza (Trieste) (Italy); SISSA - Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati, Trieste (Italy)

    2011-03-15

    We present a method for accelerating GW quasi-particle (QP) calculations. This is achieved through the introduction of optimal basis sets for representing polarizability matrices. First the real-space products of Wannier like orbitals are constructed and then optimal basis sets are obtained through singular value decomposition. Our method is validated by calculating the vertical ionization energies of the benzene molecule and the band structure of crystalline silicon. Its potentialities are illustrated by calculating the QP spectrum of a model structure of vitreous silica. Finally, we apply our method for studying the electronic structure properties of a model of quasi-stoichiometric amorphous silicon nitride and of its point defects. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Pragmatic trial design elements showed a different impact on trial interpretation and feasibility than explanatory elements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuis, Joost B.; Irving, Elaine; Oude Rengerink, Katrien; Lloyd, Emily; Goetz, Iris; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Stolk, Pieter; Groenwold, Rolf H H; Zuidgeest, Mira G P

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To illustrate how pragmatic trial design elements, or inserting explanatory trial elements in pragmatic trials affect validity, generalizability, precision and operational feasibility. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: From illustrative examples identified through the IMI Get Real Consortium, we

  6. Exemestane in the prevention setting

    OpenAIRE

    Litton, Jennifer Keating; Bevers, Therese B.; Arun, Banu K.

    2012-01-01

    Aromatase inhibitors are well-established therapies in the neoadjuvant, adjuvant and metastatic settings for breast cancer. In adjuvant trials, this class of drugs has shown preventative properties by decreasing the rate of contralateral breast cancer. Recently, the National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group MAP.3 study evaluated exemestane as a breast cancer prevention agent for women with specified higher risks of developing breast cancer. We review the history of exemestane ...

  7. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Trial Protocol Each clinical trial has a master plan called a protocol (PRO-to-kol). This plan explains how the trial will work. The trial ... clinical trial; and detailed information about the treatment plan. Eligibility Criteria A clinical trial's protocol describes what ...

  8. The additional benefit of residual spraying and insecticide-treated curtains for dengue control over current best practice in Cuba: Evaluation of disease incidence in a cluster randomized trial in a low burden setting with intensive routine control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, Maria Eugenia; Vanlerberghe, Veerle; Rosales, Julio Popa; Mirabal, Mayelin; Cabrera, Pedro; Fonseca, Viviana; Gómez Padrón, Tania; Pérez Menzies, Mirtha; Montada, Domingo; Van der Stuyft, Patrick

    2017-11-01

    Aedes control interventions are considered the cornerstone of dengue control programmes, but there is scarce evidence on their effect on disease. We set-up a cluster randomized controlled trial