WorldWideScience

Sample records for tree frog hyla

  1. Helminth parasites of the lemon-yellow tree frog, Hyla savignyi (Hylidae), from Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    YILDIRIMHAN, Hikmet Sami; SÜMER, Nurhan; İNCEDOĞAN, Sezen; BURSEY, Charles Robert

    2012-01-01

    Forty lemon-yellow tree frogs, Hyla savignyi, collected from Kırıkhan, Turkey (25 in April 2009, 15 in April 2010), were examined for helminths, and 21 frogs were found to be infected. One species of Monogenea (Polystoma integerrimum), 3 species of Digenea (Diplodiscus subclavatus, Halipegus kessleri, and Pleurogenoides medians), 1 species of Cestoda (Nematotaenia dispar), and 2 species of Nematoda (Aplectana brumpti and Cosmocerca commutata) were found. Hyla savignyi represents a new host ...

  2. Ghrelin Receptor in Two Species of Anuran Amphibian, Bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana), and Japanese Tree Frog (Hyla japonica)

    OpenAIRE

    Kaiya, Hiroyuki; Koizumi, Yasushi; Konno, Norifumi; Yamamoto, Kazutoshi; Uchiyama, Minoru; Kangawa, Kenji; Miyazato, Mikiya

    2011-01-01

    We identified cDNA encoding a functional growth hormone secretagogue-receptor 1a (GHS-R1a, ghrelin receptor) in two species of anuran amphibian, bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) and Japanese tree frog (Hyla japonica). Deduced receptor protein for bullfrog and Japanese tree frog (tree frog) was comprised of 374- and 371-amino acids, respectively. The two receptors showed 86% identity with each other, and phylogenetic analysis revealed that the two receptors belong to the same category with tetrapod...

  3. Taxon-specific zeta -crystallin in Japanese tree frog (Hyla japonica) lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Y; Kimoto, H; Ishikawa, K; Watanabe, K; Yokota, Y; Nakai, N; Taketo, A

    2001-07-27

    The present study demonstrated that the 38-kDa protein, instead of rho-crystallin (36 kDa), is expressed taxon specifically in the lens of Japanese tree frog (Hyla japonica). The 38-kDa protein was distinguished from rho-crystallin expressed in the lenses of bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) and European common frog (Rana temporaria) immunochemically. Although the N terminus of the 38-kDa protein was blocked, the analyses of partial amino acid sequences showed that the protein was zeta-crystallin. Analysis of cDNA sequence encoding zeta-crystallin of the tree frog lens demonstrated that the deduced protein consisted of 329 amino acids including initial methionine and having 62.2 and 62.9% identity with zeta-crystallin of camel and guinea pig lenses, respectively. The molecular mass of the deduced structure was calculated to be 35,564 Da. zeta-Crystallin of the tree frog lens exhibited the intrinsic enzymatic activity of quinone reductase (EC, NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase). The crystallin specifically catalyzed the reduction of 9,10-phenanthrenequinone (Km, 42 microm) using NADPH (Km, 60 microm) as a cofactor. The enzymatic activity was inhibited by dicumarol, anti-coagulant drug, with IC50 of 4 microm. On gel filtration chromatography, the crystallin was recovered as 150-kDa molecular mass complex, indicating that the crystallin was homotetramer consisting of 38-kDa subunits. The crystallin gene was expressed specifically in the lens. These results show that taxon-specific crystallins such as zeta- and rho-crystallins may be available for the biochemical discrimination of Hyla- and Rana groups among frogs.

  4. Biomarker analysis of American toad (Anaxyrus americanus) and grey tree frog (Hyla versicolor) tadpoles following exposure to atrazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of the current study was to use a biomarker-based approach to investigate the influence of atrazine exposure on American toad (Anaxyrus americanus) and grey tree frog (Hyla versicolor) tadpoles. Atrazine is one of the most frequently detected herbicides in environme...

  5. Loss of limb regenerative capacity during postmetamorphic growth in the tree frog, Hyla arborea japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurabuchi, S

    1990-01-01

    Anuran limb regenerative capacity was investigated in froglets of various sizes (snout-vent length) and adults of the Japanese tree frog, Hyla arborea japonica by amputating forelimbs through the zeugopodium and stylopodium. Almost all limbs amputated through the zeugopodium showed heteromorphic regeneration in postmetamorphic froglets 14 to 18 mm in length. However, the larger the froglet, the lower the capacity of limb regeneration. Regenerative capacity was completely lost in adults of more than about 30 mm in length. When froglet and adult limbs were amputated through the stylopodium, no signs of limb regeneration were observed. Complete denervation of limb stumps resulted in no regeneration in all cases examined. When partial denervation was performed on limbs amputated through the zeugopodium, there were signs of regeneration in the presence of the remaining nerves, but this was limited to very young froglets. Nevertheless, the regenerates obtained were limited in gross structure compared with normal limb regenerates. However, when the nerve supply to the distal forelimb was augmented by surgically diverting ipsilateral sciatic nerve bundles, the limbs of normally nonregenerating adults regenerated after amputation through the zeugopodium. Furthermore, normally nonregenerating limbs amputated through the stylopodium also regained a limited regenerative capacity, if supported by an ipsilaterally augmented nerve. These results show that the loss of limb regenerative capacity in Hyla arborea japonica during postmetamorphic growth is caused by a deficiency in the quantity of innervation.

  6. Colour and pattern change against visually heterogeneous backgrounds in the tree frog Hyla japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Changku; Kim, Ye Eun; Jang, Yikweon

    2016-03-02

    Colour change in animals can be adaptive phenotypic plasticity in heterogeneous environments. Camouflage through background colour matching has been considered a primary force that drives the evolution of colour changing ability. However, the mechanism to which animals change their colour and patterns under visually heterogeneous backgrounds (i.e. consisting of more than one colour) has only been identified in limited taxa. Here, we investigated the colour change process of the Japanese tree frog (Hyla japonica) against patterned backgrounds and elucidated how the expression of dorsal patterns changes against various achromatic/chromatic backgrounds with/without patterns. Our main findings are i) frogs primarily responded to the achromatic differences in background, ii) their contrasting dorsal patterns were conditionally expressed dependent on the brightness of backgrounds, iii) against mixed coloured background, frogs adopted intermediate forms between two colours. Using predator (avian and snake) vision models, we determined that colour differences against different backgrounds yielded perceptible changes in dorsal colours. We also found substantial individual variation in colour changing ability and the levels of dorsal pattern expression between individuals. We discuss the possibility of correlational selection on colour changing ability and resting behaviour that maintains the high variation in colour changing ability within population.

  7. Sexually dimorphic basal water absorption at the isolated pelvic patch of Japanese tree frog, Hyla japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, Satomi; Fujime, Makoto; Kamishima, Yoshihisa; Iguchi, Taisen

    2004-05-01

    Frogs ingest little water orally, but absorb the majority of the water needed for normal physiological performance through a specific region of the ventral skin, the pelvic patch. We observed non-stimulated (basal water absorption, BWA) water flux through the isolated pelvic patch in vitro in Japanese tree frog (Hyla japonica). We found that water flux through non-stimulated skin from the pelvic patch was greater in males than females. This water flux was confirmed as BWA by observing no effect following the in vitro administration of propranolol and [adamantaneacetyl(1), O-Et-D-Tyr(2), Val(1), aminobutyryl(6), Arg(8, 9)] vasopressin, which are a beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist and a vasopressin V2 receptor antagonist, respectively. We further examined this phenomenon following gonadectomy, treatment with sex hormones (E2, 17beta-estradiol; TP, testosterone propionate), estrogenic chemicals (BPA, bisphenol A; MTX, methoxychlor) or prolactin (PRL, a hormone regulated by sex hormones that has osmoregulatory activity). Ovariectomy increased BWA in females. Injection (in vivo treatment) of E2 or PRL reduced BWA in males, whereas TP injection increased BWA in females. However, the in vitro addition of E2, TP, or PRL to the Ringer's solution on the serosal side of the ventral skin patch did not alter BWA. Subsequently, we injected (in vivo treatment) BPA or MTX, environmental chemical contaminants with known hormonal actions in mammals. Injection of BPA or MTX reduced BWA in males as observed following treatment with E2. These results provide the first evidence of sexual dimorphism in BWA through the isolated pelvic patch. The gonad appears essential for observed sexual dimorphism in BWA, and we hypothesize that sex hormones regulate the release of PRL, that in turn influences BWA indirectly. E2 is known to exert a specific stimulatory effect on PRL secretion. In addition, we have observed that some endocrine disrupting contaminants also eliminate the sexual

  8. Ghrelin receptor in two species of anuran amphibian, bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana and Japanese tree frog (Hyla japonica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki eKaiya

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We identified cDNA encoding a functional growth hormone secretagogue-receptor 1a (GHS-R1a, ghrelin receptor in two species of anuran amphibian, bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana and Japanese tree frog (Hyla japonica. Deduced receptor protein for bullfrog and Japanese tree frog (tree frog was comprised of 374- and 371-amino acids, respectively. The two receptors showed 86% identity with each other, and phylogenetic analysis revealed that the two receptors belong to the same category with tetrapods. In functional analyses, ghrelin and GHS-R1a agonists increased intracellular Ca2+ concentration in HEK293 cell that transfected each receptor cDNA, but ligand selectivity of ghrelin with Ser3 and Thr3 was not observed between the two receptors. Bullfrog GHS-R1a mRNA was mainly expressed in the brain, stomach and testis. In the brain, the gene expression was detected in the diencephalon and mesencephalon, but not in the pituitary. Tree frog GHS-R1a mRNA was predominantly expressed in the gastrointestinal tract and ovary, but not detected in the pituitary. In bullfrog stomach, GHS-R1a mRNA expression increased at 10 days after fasting, but not in the brain. In tree frog, GHS-R1a mRNA expression increased in the brain, stomach and ventral skin by 10-days fasting, and in the stomach and ventral skin by a dehydration treatment. Intracerebroventricular injection of ghrelin in dehydrated tree frog did not affect water absorption from the ventral skin. These results suggest that ghrelin is involved in energy homeostasis and possibly in osmoregulation in frogs.

  9. Ghrelin Receptor in Two Species of Anuran Amphibian, Bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana), and Japanese Tree Frog (Hyla japonica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiya, Hiroyuki; Koizumi, Yasushi; Konno, Norifumi; Yamamoto, Kazutoshi; Uchiyama, Minoru; Kangawa, Kenji; Miyazato, Mikiya

    2011-01-01

    We have identified cDNA encoding a functional growth hormone secretagogue-receptor 1a (GHS-R1a, ghrelin receptor) in two species of anuran amphibian, the bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana), and the Japanese tree frog (Hyla japonica). Deduced receptor protein for bullfrog and Japanese tree frog (tree frog) was comprised of 374- and 371-amino acids, respectively. The two receptors shared 86% identity, and are grouped to the clade of the tetrapod homologs by phylogenetic analysis. In functional analyses, ghrelin and GHS-R1a agonists increased intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in GHS-R1a-transfected-HEK293 cell, but ligand selectivity of ghrelin with Ser(3) and Thr(3) was not observed between the two receptors. Bullfrog GHS-R1a mRNA was mainly expressed in the brain, stomach, and testis. In the brain, the gene expression was detected in the diencephalon and mesencephalon, but not in the pituitary. Tree frog GHS-R1a mRNA was predominantly expressed in the gastrointestinal tract and ovary, but not detected in the pituitary. In bullfrog stomach but not the brain, GHS-R1a mRNA expression increased after 10 days of fasting. For tree frog, GHS-R1a mRNA expression was increased in the brain, stomach and ventral skin by 10 days of fasting, and in the stomach and ventral skin by a dehydration treatment. Intracerebroventricular injection of ghrelin in dehydrated tree frog did not affect water absorption from the ventral skin. These results suggest that ghrelin is involved in energy homeostasis and possibly in osmoregulation in frogs.

  10. The Japanese tree frog (Hyla japonica), one of the most cold-resistant species of amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, D I; Meshcheryakova, E N; Bulakhova, N A

    2016-11-01

    The Japanese tree frog, a representative of the Manchurian fauna, is characterized by an outstanding cold resistance among the anuran amphibian species studied so far. Almost 70% of the specimens from the population inhabiting the middle Amur River withstand the cooling down to-30°C; some animals, down to-35°C. This exceeds more than twofold the cold hardiness of the wood frog (Lithobates sylvaticus LeConte, 1825), which has been considered earlier to be the most cold-resistant species. The ability of H. japonica to survive for four months in the frozen state at low temperatures makes this species independent of the temperature overwintering conditions.

  11. Second species of tree frog, Hyla orientalis (formely H. arborea) from Iran confirmed by acoustic data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gvoždík, Václav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 3, - (2010), s. 41-44 ISSN 2071-5773 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : Hyla orientalis * Hyla savignyi * Distribution Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  12. Hylins: bombinins H structurally related peptides from the skin secretion of the Brazilian tree-frog Hyla biobeba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Mariana S; Matsushita, Rubens H; Sebben, Antonio; Sousa, Marcelo V; Fontes, Wagner

    2005-01-01

    Two hemolytic peptides were isolated from the skin secretion of the Brazilian Hylidae frog Hyla biobeba, using reversed-phase chromatographic procedures. Hylins b1 and b2 exhibit short linear polypeptide chains, a large number of hydrophobic residues, amidated C termini and hemolytic properties. These two novel peptides are the first examples of bombinins H-like peptides isolated from anurans species not related to Bombina species.

  13. Green tree frog (Hyla cinerea) and ground squirrel (Xerospermophilus spilosoma) mortality attributed to inland brevetoxin transportation at Padre Island National Seashore, Texas, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttke, Danielle E.; Walker, Alicia; Huang, I-Shuo; Flewelling, Leanne; Lankton, Julia S.; Ballmann, Anne E.; Clapp, Travis; Lindsay, James; Zimba, Paul V.

    2018-01-01

    On 16 September 2015, a red tide (Karenia brevis) bloom impacted coastal areas of Padre Island National Seashore Park. Two days later and about 0.9 km inland, 30–40 adult green tree frogs (Hyla cinerea) were found dead after displaying tremors, weakness, labored breathing, and other signs of neurologic impairment. A rainstorm, accompanied by high winds, rough surf, and high tides, which could have aerosolized brevetoxin, occurred on the morning of the mortality event. Frog carcasses were healthy but contained significant brevetoxin in tissues. Tissue brevetoxin was also found in two dead or dying spotted ground squirrels (Xerospermophilus spilosoma) and a coyote (Canis latrans). Rainwater collected from the location of the mortality event contained brevetoxin. Mortality of green tree frog and ground squirrel mortality has not been previously attributed to brevetoxin exposure and such mortality suggested that inland toxin transport, possibly through aerosols, rainfall, or insects, may have important implications for coastal species.

  14. Paracosmocercella rosettae n. gen. et n. sp. (Nematoda: Cosmocercoidea: Cosmocercidae) collected from the Japanese tree frog, Hyla japonica (Anura: Hylidae), in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Hideo; Ikeda, Yatsukaho

    2007-08-01

    A new genus, Paracosmocercella (Nematoda: Cosmocercoidea: Cosmocercidae), is proposed with monotypic Paracosmocercella rosettae n. sp. from the Japanese tree frog, Hyla japonica Günther, 1859, in Oita, Kyushu Island, Japan. Paracosmocercella resembles Cosmocercella and Cosmocercoides by having 2 rows of rosette papillae without plectanes ventrally in preanal region of male, but it is readily distinguished from Cosmocercella by lacking clear vesicle supporting rosette papillae and from Cosmocercoides by lacking rosette papillae in perianal region and having large-sized eggs, which hatch in uterus.

  15. Frog atrial natriuretic peptide and cGMP activate amiloride-sensitive Na(+) channels in urinary bladder cells of Japanese tree frog, Hyla japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Toshiki; Konno, Norifumi; Matsuda, Kouhei; Uchiyama, Minoru

    2007-07-01

    In our previous study, it was suggested that ANP and cGMP may increase Na(+) absorption in the urinary bladder of the Japanese tree frog, Hyla japonica. Thus, Na(+) transport activated by ANP was investigated electrophysiologically by using a cell-attached patch-clamp technique in freshly isolated cells from the urinary bladder. A predominant channel expressed was a low conductance Na(+) channel in the epithelial cells. The channel exhibited conductance for inward currents of 4.9 +/- 0.2 pS, long open and closed times (c.a. 190 ms), and positive reversal potential. The channel activity was decreased under the pipette solution including 10(-6) M amiloride. These characteristics were similar to those of amiloride-sensitive Na(+) channels (ENaC). Addition of 10(-9) M ANP activated and significantly increased the ENaC activity from 0.58 +/- 0.09 to 1.47 +/- 0.34. On the other hand, mean amplitudes and conductance of single channel did not change significantly after the addition of ANP. Addition of 10(-5) M 8-Br-cGMP also activated the ENaC and significantly increased the channel activity from 0.56 +/- 0.10 to 2.00 +/- 0.33. The addition of ANP failed to activate the ENaC in the presence of 10(-6) M amiloride. These results suggested that ANP and cGMP activate Na(+) transport via ENaC in the epithelial cells of frog urinary bladder.

  16. Central angiotensin II stimulates cutaneous water intake behavior via an angiotensin II type-1 receptor pathway in the Japanese tree frog Hyla japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maejima, Sho; Konno, Norifumi; Matsuda, Kouhei; Uchiyama, Minoru

    2010-08-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) stimulates oral water intake by causing thirst in all terrestrial vertebrates except anurans. Anuran amphibians do not drink orally but absorb water osmotically through ventral skin. In this study, we examined the role of Ang II on the regulation of water-absorption behavior in the Japanese tree frog (Hyla japonica). In fully hydrated frogs, intracerebroventricular (ICV) and intralymphatic sac (ILS) injection of Ang II significantly extended the residence time of water in a dose-dependent manner. Ang II-dependent water uptake was inhibited by ICV pretreatment with an angiotensin II type-1 (AT(1)) receptor antagonist but not a type-2 (AT(2)) receptor antagonist. These results suggest that Ang II stimulates water-absorption behavior in the tree frog via an AT(1)-like but not AT(2)-like receptor. We then cloned and characterized cDNA of the tree frog AT(1) receptor from the brain. The tree frog AT(1) receptor cDNA encodes a 361 amino acid residue protein, which is 87% identical to the toad (Bufo marinus) AT(1) receptor and exhibits the functional characteristics of an Ang II receptor. AT(1) receptor mRNAs were found to be present in a number of tissues including brain (especially in the diencephalon), lung, large intestine, kidney and ventral pelvic skin. When tree frogs were exposed to dehydrating conditions, AT(1) receptor mRNA significantly increased in the diencephalon and the rhombencephalon. These data suggest that central Ang II may control water intake behavior via an AT(1) receptor on the diencephalon and rhombencephalon in anuran amphibians and may have implications for water consumption in vertebrates. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Taxonomy Icon Data: Japanese tree frog [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Japanese tree frog Hyla japonica Chordata/Vertebrata/Amphibia Hyla_japonica_L.png Hyla_jap...onica_NL.png Hyla_japonica_S.png Hyla_japonica_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Hyla+jap...onica&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Hyla+japonica&t=NL http://biosciencedbc....jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Hyla+japonica&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Hyla+jap

  18. Frog ANP increases the amiloride-sensitive Na(+) channel activity in urinary bladder cells of Japanese tree frog, Hyla japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Toshiki; Matsuda, Kouhei; Uchiyama, Minoru

    2007-01-01

    We examined the mechanism of amiloride-sensitive Na(+) channels (ENaC) activated by fANP in epithelial cells of frog urinary bladder by using a cell-attached patch-clamp technique. ENaC activities in the epithelial cells were significantly increased following administration of both 10(-9)M fANP and 10(-5)M 8-Br-cGMP. Both fANP and 8-Br-cGMP, however, failed to activate the ENaC in the presence of 10(-6)M amiloride. In addition, 8-Br-cGMP failed to activate the ENaC in the presence of a PKA inhibitor, KT-5720. In the next experiment, we measured both cGMP and cAMP production levels after treatment of fANP on the frog urinary bladder cells. Frog ANP significantly increased cGMP production, but not the cAMP production. Taken together, these results suggest that fANP activates ENaC through increases in cGMP production and activation of PKA.

  19. Nonlinear dynamics and bifurcations of a coupled oscillator model for calling behavior of Japanese tree frogs (Hyla japonica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aihara, Ikkyu; Tsumoto, Kunichika

    2008-01-01

    Synchronization has been observed in various systems, including living beings. In a previous study, we reported a new phenomenon with antisynchronization in calling behavior of two interacting Japanese tree frogs. In this paper, we theoretically analyse nonlinear dynamics in a system of three coupled oscillators, which models three interacting frogs, where the oscillators of each pair have the property of antisynchronization; in particular, we perform bifurcation analysis and Lyapunov function analysis.

  20. Molecular cloning of an anuran V(2) type [Arg(8)] vasotocin receptor and mesotocin receptor: functional characterization and tissue expression in the Japanese tree frog (Hyla japonica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, Satomi; Kamishima, Yoshihisa; Iguchi, Taisen

    2003-07-01

    In most amphibians, [Arg(8)] vasotocin (VT) has an antidiuretic effect that is coupled to the activation of adenylate cyclase. In contrast, mesotocin (MT) has a diuretic effect and acts via the inositol phosphate/calcium signaling pathway in amphibians. To further clarify the mechanisms of VT and MT activation, we report the molecular cloning of a VT receptor (VTR) and a MT receptor (MTR) from the Japanese tree frog, Hyla japonica. Tree frog VTR or MTR cDNA encoded 363 or 389 amino acids, and their amino acid sequences revealed close similarity to the mammalian vasopressin V(2) (51-52% identity) or toad MT (94% identity) receptors, respectively. Using CHO-K1 cells transfected with tree frog VTR, we observed elevated concentrations of intracellular cAMP following exposure of the cells to VT or other neurohypophysial hormones, whereas the cells transfected with MTR did not exhibit altered cAMP concentrations. The cells transfected with VTR exhibited the following efficiency for cAMP accumulation: VT = hydrin 1 > or = vasopressin > or = hydrin 2 > MT = oxytocin > isotocin. VTR or MTR mRNA exhibits a single 2.2- or 5.5-kb transcription band, respectively, and both are expressed in various tissues. VTR mRNA is clearly expressed in brain, heart, kidney, pelvic patch of skin, and urinary bladder, whereas brain, fat body, heart, kidney, and urinary bladder express MTR mRNA. Specifically, VTR mRNA in the pelvic patch or MTR mRNA in the dorsal skin is present at elevated levels in the skin. Characteristic distribution of VTR and MTR on osmoregulating organs indicates the ligands for these receptors would mediate a variety of functions. Further, the distribution of VTR in the skin would make the regional difference on cutaneous water absorption in response to VT in the Japanese tree frog.

  1. Phylogeography of the Middle Eastern tree frogs (Hyla, Hylidae, Amphibia) as inferred from nuclear and mitochondrial DNA variation, with a description of a new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvozdík, Václav; Moravec, Jirí; Klütsch, Cornelya; Kotlík, Petr

    2010-06-01

    Evolutionary relationships of the tree frogs from the Middle East and the demographic histories of their populations were studied using a combination of mitochondrial and nuclear genes. Hyla savignyi and neighboring populations of H. orientalis (former eastern populations of H. arborea) were the main focus taxa. Within H. savignyi, a deep phylogenetic divergence dated about 8.4Ma was discovered. Southern populations from Yemen, Jordan, southern Syria and extreme north-eastern Israel are hereby described as a new species, H. felixarabica sp. nov. Our study points to a biogeographic connection of the south-western Arabian Peninsula and southern Levant and to the importance of the Dead Sea Rift as a historical barrier geographically separating the new species from H. savignyi. Major genetic breaks revealed within species (H. felixarabica: Yemen vs. Jordan-Syria; H. savignyi sensu stricto: Levant vs. Turkey-Iran) are probably connected to climate changes during the Plio-Pleistocene boundary, while the finer phylogeographic structuring probably resulted from the Quaternary climate oscillations. The Cypriote population of H. savignyi originated from southern Anatolia relatively recently. Hyla orientalis from the southern Black Sea region seems to be genetically quite uniform, although two phylogeographic units with western Turkish and Caucasus-Caspian affinities might be detected. Hyla savignyi and H. orientalis carry signals of population expansions dated to the middle to late Pleistocene, while populations of H. felixarabica seem to have rather been constant in size, which might indicate more stable climatic conditions in the southern regions during the Quaternary. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Speciation history and widespread introgression in the European short-call tree frogs (Hyla arborea sensu lato, H. intermedia and H. sarda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvoždík, Václav; Canestrelli, Daniele; García-París, Mario; Moravec, Jiří; Nascetti, Giuseppe; Recuero, Ernesto; Teixeira, José; Kotlík, Petr

    2015-02-01

    European tree frogs (Hyla) characterized by short temporal parameters of the advertisement call form six genetically differentiated but morphologically cryptic taxa, H. arborea sensu stricto, H. orientalis and H. molleri from across Europe to western Asia (together referred to as H. arborea sensu lato), two putative taxa within H. intermedia (Northern and Southern) from the Italian Peninsula and Sicily, and H. sarda from Sardinia and Corsica. Here, we assess species limits and phylogenetic relationships within these 'short-call tree frogs' based on mitochondrial DNA and nuclear protein-coding markers. The mitochondrial and nuclear genes show partly incongruent phylogeographic patterns, which point to a complex history of gene flow across taxa, particularly in the Balkans. To test the species limits in the short-call tree frogs and to infer the species tree, we used coalescent-based approaches. The monophyly of H. arborea sensu lato is supported by the mtDNA as well as by the all-gene species tree. The Northern and Southern lineages of H. intermedia have been connected by nuclear gene flow (despite their deep mtDNA divergence) and should be treated as conspecific. On the contrary, the parapatric taxa within H. arborea sensu lato should be considered distinct species (H. arborea, H. orientalis, H. molleri) based on the coalescent analysis, although signs of hybridization were detected between them (H. arborea×H. orientalis; H. arborea×H. molleri). A mitochondrial capture upon secondary contact appears to explain the close mtDNA relationship between the geographically remote Iberian H. molleri and H. orientalis from around the Black Sea. Introgressive hybridization occurred also between the Balkan H. arborea and northern Italian H. intermedia, and between the Minor Asiatic H. orientalis and Arabian H. felix arabica (the latter belonging to a different acoustic group/clade). Our results shed light on the species limits in the European short-call tree frogs and show

  3. Characterization of a hemolytic protein, identified as histone H4, from the skin of the Japanese tree frog Hyla japonica (Hylidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Hiroaki; Iwamuro, Shawichi; Goto, Yuta; Nielsen, Per F; Conlon, J Michael

    2008-01-01

    An extract of the skin of the Japanese tree frog, Hyla japonica Günther, 1859 (Anura: Hylidae) did not inhibit the growth of the bacteria Escherichia coli or Staphylococcus aureus, but contained a protein that was strongly hemolytic against human erythrocytes. The protein was purified to near homogeneity by reverse-phase HPLC, and its N-terminal amino acid sequence (SGRGKGGKGL...) identified it as histone H4. The complete primary structure of the 102-amino-acid-residue histone H4 was determined by a combination of molecular cloning of genomic and complementary DNAs encoding the protein. The molecular mass of the purified histone H4 determined by electrospray mass spectrometry was 71+/-2 Daltons greater than that predicted from the deduced amino acid sequence of the protein. The +71 mass units is consistent with the proposal that the protein isolated from the skin was post-translationally modified by addition of one acetyl and two methyl groups. The stem-loop structure at the 3' flanking region of the H. japonica histone H4 gene, which acts as a transcription termination signal, contained a nucleotide sequence (5'-GGCTCTCCTCAGAGCC-3') with unusual structural features not seen in other histone genes.

  4. Serous cutaneous glands of the Pacific tree-frog Hyla regilla (Anura, Hylidae): patterns of secretory release induced by nor-epinephrine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delfino, G; Drewes, R C; Magherini, S; Malentacchi, C; Nosi, D; Terreni, A

    2006-02-01

    The serous (poison) cutaneous glands of the Pacific tree-frog Hyla regilla were induced to release their product by 10(-3)M nor-epinephrine stimulation. After discharge structural and ultrastructural features of the cutaneous glands involved in release were observed. Furthermore, the discharged product, consisting of discrete, secretory granules, was collected and processed for transmission electron microscope analysis. As indicated by patterns found in the myoepithelium encircling the syncytial secretory unit, gland discharge is caused by contraction of the peripheral myocytes. Muscle cell compression dramatically affects the syncytium and results in degenerative changes, including expulsion of the secretory unit nuclei. Therefore, the structural collapse in depleted glands has been ascribed to the mechanical activity performed by the myoepithelium during discharge, rather than cytoplasm involution described in conventional, holocrine glands. TEM investigation revealed that the secretory granules collected after discharge maintain their peculiar traits: they consist of recurrent patterns of thin subunits, acquired during serous maturation and provided with remarkable structural stability.

  5. Distribution and present numbers of the Tree Frog Hyla arborea in Zealand Flanders, The Netherlands (Amphibia, Hylidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stumpel, Anton H.P.

    1987-01-01

    A distribution survey of Hyla arborea has been carried out in the western part of Zealand Flanders over a period of six years. Additional data on the eastern part and the neighbouring Belgian area have been collected. The relationship between the maximum number of males calling on one evening/night

  6. Ameliorative effects of sodium chloride on acute copper toxicity among Cope's gray tree frog (Hyla chrysoscelis) and green frog (Rana clamitans) embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Maria G; Dobbs, Emily K; Snodgrass, Joel W; Ownby, David R

    2012-04-01

    Urban stormwater runoff is composed of a mixture of components, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, metals, deicing agents, and many others. The fate of these chemicals is often in stormwater detention ponds that are used by amphibians for breeding. Among aquatic organisms, the toxic mechanism for many metals involves interference with active Na(+) and Cl(-) uptake. Addition of cations has been shown to reduce the toxicity of metals among some aquatic organisms through competitive inhibition, but no studies have investigated the interaction between NaCl and Cu among amphibian embryos and larvae. To determine the degree to which NaCl may ameliorate the toxicity of Cu to amphibian embryos and larvae, the authors exposed Hyla chrysoscelis (Cope's gray treefrogs) and Rana (Lithobates) clamitans (green frogs) to seven levels of Cu and NaCl in fully factorial experiments. When exposure was in artificial hard water, Cu was highly toxic to both species (96-h median lethal concentration [LC50] of 44.7 µg/L and 162.6 µg/L for H. chrysoscelis and R. clamitans, respectively). However, approximately 500 mg/L of NaCl eliminated Cu toxicity over the range of Cu concentrations used in the experiments (maximum 150 µg Cu/L for H. chrysoscelis and 325 µg Cu/L for R. clamitans). The current results suggest that NaCl is likely responsible for the toxic effects of NaCl and metal mixtures that might be typical of runoff from road surfaces in northern latitudes. Copyright © 2012 SETAC.

  7. Evolutionary history and population genetic structure of the endemic tree frog Hyla tsinlingensis (Amphibia: Anura: Hylidae) inferred from mitochondrial gene analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan-Hua; Zhao, Yan-Yu; Li, Xue-Ying; Li, Xiao-Chen

    2016-01-01

    The influence of topography and Pleistocenic climatic fluctuations on the population genetic structure of amphibians in the Tsinling-Dabieshan Mountains of China is poorly investigated. Hyla tsinlingensis is a tree frog endemic to the Tsinling-Dabieshan Mountains, with a restricted and patchy distribution that is currently shrinking. We speculated on the evolutionary history of amphibians in this region by studying the population genetic structure of H. tsinlingensis. Using a total of 212 samples, 32 haplotypes and four haplogroups were found in the present study. Population genetic structure showed significant differentiation (F(ST)) between most populations of H. tsinlingensis in the Tsinling-Dabieshan Mountains. An analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) suggested that most of the observed genetic variation occurs between the two regions (the Tsinling and Dabieshan Mountains). Mantel tests indicated that the genetic divergence was induced through isolation by distance. Using Monmonier's maximum difference algorithm to predict the genetic barrier, two putative barriers in gene flow that separate lineages of H. tsinlingensis were identified. Mismatch distribution and neutrality tests found a sudden population expansion in all haplogroups except the Tsinling population and total population. This population expansion was identified between 0.5 Myr to 0.1 Myr (Quaternary) by Bayesian skyline plot (BSP). Divergence dating indicated the divergence time between the Tsinling population and Dabieshan population to be 3.26 MYA (Pliocene). In conclusion, the topography of the Tsinling and Dabieshan Mountains exerts a significant impact on the population genetic structure of H. tsinlingensis, and climatic oscillations during glacial periods in the Quaternary affected the distribution of H. tsinlingensis.

  8. Molecular Cloning of cDNA Encoding an Aquaglyceroporin, AQP-h9, in the Japanese Tree Frog, Hyla japonica: Possible Roles of AQP-h9 in Freeze Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, Atsushi; Takiya, Yu; Sakamoto, Joe; Shiojiri, Nobuyoshi; Suzuki, Masakazu; Tanaka, Shigeyasu; Okada, Reiko

    2015-06-01

    In order to study the freeze-tolerance mechanism in the Japanese tree frog, Hyla japonica, wecloned a eDNA encoding aquaporin (AQP) 9 from its liver. The predicted amino acid sequence ofH. japonica AQP9 (AQP-h9) contained six putative transmembrane domains and two conservedAsn-Pro-Aia motifs, which are characteristic of AQPs. A swelling assay using Xenopus laevisoocytes injected with AQP-h9 cRNA showed that AQP-h9 facilitated water and glycerol permeation,confirming its property as an aquaglyceroporin. Subsequently, glycerol concentrations in serumand tissue extracts were compared among tree frogs that were hibernating, frozen, or thawed afterfreezing. Serum glycerol concentration of thawed frogs was significantly higher than that of hibernatingfrogs. Glycerol content in the liver did not change in the freezing experiment, whereas thatin the skeletal muscle was elevated in thawed frogs as compared with hibernating or frozen frogs. Histological examination of the liver showed that erythrocytes aggregated in the sinusoids during hibernation and freezing, and immunoreactive AQP-h9 protein was detected over the erythrocytes. The AQP-h9 labeling was more intense in frozen frogs than in hibernating frogs, but nearly undetectable in thawed frogs. For the skeletal muscle, weak labels for AQP-h9 were observed in the cytoplasm of myocytes of hibernating frogs. AQP-h9 labeling was markedly enhanced by freezing and was decreased by thawing. These results indicate that glycerol may act as a c;:ryoprotectant in H. japonica and that during hibernation, particularly during freezing, AQP-h9 may be involved in glycerol uptake in erythrocytes in the liver and in intracellular glycerol transport in the skeletal muscle cells.

  9. Phylogeography of the Middle Eastern tree frogs (Hyla, Hylidae, Amphibia) as an inferred from nuclear and mitochondrial DNA variation, with a description of a new species

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gvoždík, Václav; Moravec, J.; Klütsch, C.; Kotlík, Petr

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 3 (2010), s. 1146-1166 ISSN 1055-7903 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : Hyla savignyi * Hyla felixarabica sp. nov. * Hyla orientalis Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 3.889, year: 2010

  10. Effects of long-term exposure to two fungicides, pyrimethanil and tebuconazole, on survival and life history traits of Italian tree frog (Hyla intermedia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabò, Ilaria; Guardia, Antonello; Macirella, Rachele; Sesti, Settimio; Crescente, Antonio; Brunelli, Elvira

    2016-03-01

    Over the last few years, the hazards associated with the extensive use of fungicides have become an issue of great concern but, at present, the effects of these substances on amphibians remain poorly understood. The goal of the present study was to assess the effects of two commonly used fungicides, tebuconazole and pyrimethanil, on Italian Tree Frog (Hyla intermedia), a species frequently found in agricultural areas. Tadpoles were exposed to fungicides from developmental Gosner stage 25 (GS 25) to completion of metamorphosis (GS 46) and the whole exposure period lasted 78 days. For both tested fungicides we used two concentrations (5 and 50μg/L) that are comparable to those detected in surface waters, near agricultural fields. A variety of sublethal effects-on growth, development, behavior, and physiology-may be used for evaluating alterations induced by pollutants in amphibians. We estimated whether pyrimethanil and tebuconazole exposure impacted on H. intermedia life history traits. For this purpose, survival, growth, development, initiation of metamorphosis, success and size at metamorphosis, time to metamorphosis, and frequency of morphological abnormalities were evaluated. We showed, for all considered endpoints, that the exposure to tebuconazole exerts more harmful effects on H. intermedia than does exposure to pyrimethanil. Before the onset of metamorphic climax we showed, for both fungicides, that the low concentrations (5μg/L) induced significantly greater effects than the higher ones (50μg/L) on survival and deformity incidence. During the metamorphic climax, a complete reversal of this nonlinear trend takes place, and the percentage of animals initiating metamorphosis was reduced in fungicide-exposed groups in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, a strong correlation emerged between fungicide exposure and the incidence of morphological abnormalities such as tail malformations, scoliosis, edema, mouth and limb deformities. Exposure to tested

  11. Phylogeography reveals an ancient cryptic radiation in East-Asian tree frogs (Hyla japonica group) and complex relationships between continental and island lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufresnes, Christophe; Litvinchuk, Spartak N; Borzée, Amaël; Jang, Yikweon; Li, Jia-Tang; Miura, Ikuo; Perrin, Nicolas; Stöck, Matthias

    2016-11-23

    In contrast to the Western Palearctic and Nearctic biogeographic regions, the phylogeography of Eastern-Palearctic terrestrial vertebrates has received relatively little attention. In East Asia, tectonic events, along with Pleistocene climatic conditions, likely affected species distribution and diversity, especially through their impact on sea levels and the consequent opening and closing of land-bridges between Eurasia and the Japanese Archipelago. To better understand these effects, we sequenced mitochondrial and nuclear markers to determine phylogeographic patterns in East-Asian tree frogs, with a particular focus on the widespread H. japonica. We document several cryptic lineages within the currently recognized H. japonica populations, including two main clades of Late Miocene divergence (~5 Mya). One occurs on the northeastern Japanese Archipelago (Honshu and Hokkaido) and the Russian Far-East islands (Kunashir and Sakhalin), and the second one inhabits the remaining range, comprising southwestern Japan, the Korean Peninsula, Transiberian China, Russia and Mongolia. Each clade further features strong allopatric Plio-Pleistocene subdivisions (~2-3 Mya), especially among continental and southwestern Japanese tree frog populations. Combined with paleo-climate-based distribution models, the molecular data allowed the identification of Pleistocene glacial refugia and continental routes of postglacial recolonization. Phylogenetic reconstructions further supported genetic homogeneity between the Korean H. suweonensis and Chinese H. immaculata, suggesting the former to be a relic population of the latter that arose when the Yellow Sea formed, at the end of the last glaciation. Patterns of divergence and diversity were likely triggered by Miocene tectonic activities and Quaternary climatic fluctuations (including glaciations), causing the formation and disappearance of land-bridges between the Japanese islands and the continent. Overall, this resulted in a ring

  12. Structure of the mating calls and relationships of the European tree frogs (Hylidae, anura).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Hans

    1974-03-01

    As an extension of earlier investigations, the mating calls ofHyla arborea kretensis, Hyla a. molleri, andHyla a. sarda were studied, and variations in the calls with air temperature were determined. The mating calls of these species exhibit the typical structure, made up of short pulses of varying amplitude. The call duration and the inter-call interval decrease linearly with increasing temperature (over the range in which calls can occur), whereas the number of pulses per call does not change. Comparisons of the structure of the mating calls make it possible to assess the relationships among the European tree frogs, which so far have been regarded as subspecies of just one species.Hyla meridionalis represents a valid species; this is certainly also true ofHyla a. savignyi of the Middle East.Hyla arborea arborea andHyla a. sarda can be considered as subspecies, whereasHyla a. kretensis andHyla a. molleri cannot.

  13. Speciation history and widespread introgression in the European short-call tree frogs (Hyla arborea sensu lato, H. intermedia and H. sarda)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gvoždík, Václav; Canestrelli, D.; García-París, M.; Moravec, J.; Nascetti, G.; Recuero, E.; Teixeira, J.; Kotlík, P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 83, February (2015), s. 143-155 ISSN 1055-7903 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Bayesian species delimitation * Cryptic species complex * Gene flow * Phylogeography * Species tree * Systematics * Hylidae Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 3.792, year: 2015

  14. Abundance of Green Tree Frogs and Insects in Artificial Canopy Gaps in a Bottomland Hardwood Forest.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horn, Scott; Hanula, James, L.; Ulyshen, Michael D.; Kilgo, John, C.

    2005-04-01

    ABSTRACT - We found more green tree frogs ( Hyla cinerea) n canopv gaps than in closed canopy forest. Of the 331 green tree frogs observed, 88% were in canopv gaps. Likewise, higher numbers and biomasses of insects were captured in the open gap habitat Flies were the most commonlv collected insect group accounting for 54% of the total capture. These data suggest that one reason green tree frogs were more abundant in canopy gaps was the increased availability of prey and that small canopy gaps provide early successional habitats that are beneficial to green tree frog populations.

  15. Modeling synchronized calling behavior of Japanese tree frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aihara, Ikkyu

    2009-07-01

    We experimentally observed synchronized calling behavior of male Japanese tree frogs Hyla japonica; namely, while isolated single frogs called nearly periodically, a pair of interacting frogs called synchronously almost in antiphase or inphase. In this study, we propose two types of phase-oscillator models on different degrees of approximations, which can quantitatively explain the phase and frequency properties in the experiment. Moreover, it should be noted that, although the second model is obtained by fitting to the experimental data of the two synchronized states, the model can also explain the transitory dynamics in the interactive calling behavior, namely, the shift from a transient inphase state to a stable antiphase state. We also discuss the biological relevance of the estimated parameter values to calling behavior of Japanese tree frogs and the possible biological meanings of the synchronized calling behavior.

  16. Abundance of green tree frogs and insects in artificial canopy gaps in a bottomland hardwood forest.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horn, Scott; Hanula, James L.; Ulyshen, Michael D.; Kilgo, John C.

    2005-01-01

    Horn, Scott, James L. Hanula, Michael D. Ulyshen, and John C. Kilgo. 2005. Abundance of green tree frogs and insects in artificial canopy gaps in a bottomland hardwood forest. Am. Midl. Nat. 153:321-326. Abstract: We found more green tree frogs (Hyla cinerea) in canopy gaps than in closed canopy forest. Of the 331 green tree frogs observed, 88% were in canopy gaps. Likewise, higher numbers and biomasses of insects were captured in the open gap habitat. Flies were the most commonly collected insect group accounting for 54% of the total capture. These data suggest that one reason green tree frogs were more abundant in canopy gaps was the increased availability of prey and that small canopy gaps provide early successional habitats that are beneficial to green tree frog populations.

  17. Behavior of Japanese tree frogs under microgravity on MIR and in parabolic flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi-Kurotani, A.; Yamashita, M.; Kawasaki, Y.; Kurotani, T.; Mogami, Y.; Okuno, M.; Oketa, A.; Shiraishi, A.; Ueda, K.; Wassersug, R. J.; Naitoh, T.

    1994-08-01

    Japanese tree frogs (Hyla japonica) were flown to the space station MIR and spent eight days in orbit during December, 1990/1/. Under microgravity, their postures and behaviors were observed and recorded. On the MIR, floating frogs stretched four legs out, bent their bodies backward and expanded their abdomens. Frogs on a surface often bent their neck backward and walked backwards. This behavior was observed on parabolic flights and resembles the retching behavior of sick frogs on land- a possible indicator of motion sickness. Observations on MIR were carried out twice to investigate the frog's adaptation to space. The frequency of failure in landing after a jump decreased in the second observation period. After the frogs returned to earth, readaptation processes were observed. The frogs behaved normally as early as 2.5 hours after landing.

  18. Body wiping behaviors associated with cutaneous lipids in hylid tree frogs of Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbeau, Tamatha R; Lillywhite, Harvey B

    2005-06-01

    Body wiping behavior, integumentary secretions and rates of evaporative water loss (EWL) were examined in six species of Florida tree frogs (Anura: Hylidae). Additionally, morphology of the integument and dermal glands were compared among these and one other Florida tree frog (Hyla andersonii), an arid-adapted tree frog (Phyllomedusa hypochondrialis), and a highly aquatic frog (Rana utricularia). An extra-epidermal layer of lipid and mucus, presumably secreted from dermal granular glands, was detected on the skin of all Florida hylid frogs examined. Distinct body wiping behaviors were observed in the hylid frogs, but these were less complex than those described previously in phyllomedusine frogs, which occupy arid habitats, secrete lipids onto their skin, and are regarded as relatively 'waterproof'. Florida hylids occupy seasonally arid habitats and appear to have reduced rates of EWL. The suite of traits we observed in these frogs have been previously documented in a rhacophorid tree frog from seasonally arid regions of India and likely represent an evolutionary convergent response to periodic dehydration stress. The presence of lipids that are spread by simple wiping behaviors to form an extra-epidermal water barrier may represent an early stage of the more advanced adaptations described in more waterproof arboreal frogs.

  19. Angiotensin II suppresses water absorption through the ventral skin of Japanese tree-frogs in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuda, C; Kimura, K; Kamishima, Y

    1995-04-01

    We previously described two different water absorption systems in the ventral skin of the Japanese tree-frog, Hyla arborea japonica: i.e., a rapid enhanced flow, which is observed in dehydrated tree-frogs or those stimulated by adrenaline beta-agonists or vasotocin, and a slow basal flow, which is observed in normally hydrated frogs during the non-breeding season. The rapid flow is completely blocked by ouabain, which has no effects on the slow basal flow. In the present experiment, we show that the vaso-constrictive hormone angiotensin II completely inhibits basal water absorption, but has no effect on rapid water absorption. These results confirm our previous finding that the two water absorption systems in the ventral skin of the Japanese tree-frog are independent of each other.

  20. The distributions of the gladiator frogs (Hyla boans group in Colombia, with comments on size variations and sympatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynch John Douglas

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available En Colombia se encuentran cinco especies de ranas gladiadoras (del grupo Hyla boans. Hyla wavrini apenas entra a Colombia (se encuentra en el límite oriental del país e H. rosenbergi es endémica del Chocó biogeográfico. Las otras tres especies tienen distribuciones más amplias. Hyla boans se encuentra en el Chocó biogeográfico, Magdalena Medio y en la región cisandina por debajo de los 1000 m. "Hyla crepitans" se encuentra en el drenaje del Río Magdalena, así como en la parte occidental de los Llanos Orientales y con menor frecuencia en la región Caribe; la especie se distribuye desde el nivel del mar hasta un poco más de los 2000 m. Hyla pugnax se encuentra en las tierras bajas de la región Caribe, Magdalena Medio y también en algunos sitios de la Orinoquia, siempre por debajo de los 500 m. Es bastante común la simpatría entre H. boans e H. rosenbergi pero menos común entre H. boans e "H. crepitans" o H. pugnax. Se han registrado hasta tres especies simpátricas (H. boans, H. pugnax e H. rosenbergi pero en general no coexisten más de dos especies. El dimorfismo sexual en tamaño es evidente en la especie más pequeña (uH. crepitans " pero no en las otras. Cada especie muestra variación geográfica en tamaño, tal vez relacionada con la combinación de especies simpátricas.Five species of gladiator frogs (the Hyla boans group occur in Colombia. Hyla wavrini barely enters Colombia (it is confined to the extreme eastern edge ofthe country and H. rosenbergi is endemic to the biogeographic Chocó. The other three species are more widely distributed. Hyla boans is found in the Chocó, Middle Magdalena, and Amazonas-Orinoquia below 1QOO m. "Hyla crepitans" is found in the Magdalena drainage as well as the western edge ofthe Orinoquia and less commonly along the Caribbean coast and in the Maracaibo Basin. This species occurs from sea level to more than 2000 m. Hyla pugnax occurs across the Caribbean lowlands and up the Magdalena

  1. Immune challenges and visual signalling in tree frogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desprat, Julia L.; Lengagne, Thierry; Mondy, Nathalie

    2017-04-01

    In animals, mate-choice is often based on sexual signals that carry information and help the receiver make the best choice to improve the receiver's fitness. Orange visual sexual signals have been hypothesised to carry immune information because they are often due to carotenoid pigments which are also involved in immunity response. Although many studies have focused on the direct relationships between coloration and immunocompetence, few studies have simultaneously studied immunocompetent response and coloration variation after an immune challenge. We tested this hypothesis on starved and ad libitum-fed males of the European tree frog Hyla arborea. Our results show that male coloration is not a reliable indicator of its immune response capacity in this species. However, after an immune challenge induced by a PHA ( Phaseolus vulgaris phytohaemagglutinin) injection, starved males presented a significant coloration loss and this alteration was related to the immune response intensity. Taken together, these results suggest that the brighter (lighter) coloration may be used as a cue by female to exclude males with a recent immune challenge, due to diseases or parasites for example.

  2. Feeding kinematics of phyllomedusine tree frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, L A; Nishikawa, K C

    1995-02-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the phyllomedusine hylids possess highly protrusible tongues, a derived characteristic within the family Hylidae. In the present study, the kinematics of the feeding behavior of a phyllomedusine species, Pachymedusa dacnicolor, was analyzed using high-speed video (180 frames s-1). Its behavior was compared with that of Hyla cinerea, a species with a weakly protrusible tongue. P. dacnicolor exhibits a faster rate of tongue protraction, a longer gape cycle and more variable feeding kinematics than H. cinerea. In addition, the tongue is used in a unique 'fly-swatter' fashion, to pin the prey to the substratum as the frog completes the lunge. The rapid tongue protraction, extended gape cycle and fly-swatter action may have evolved in response to a diet of large, rapidly moving insects. In addition, several duration variables of the feeding cycle were greater for misses than for captures and drops, which suggests that sensory feedback rather than biomechanics controls gape cycle duration.

  3. Enhanced call effort in Japanese tree frogs infected by amphibian chytrid fungus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Deuknam; Waldman, Bruce

    2016-03-01

    Some amphibians have evolved resistance to the devastating disease chytridiomycosis, associated with global population declines, but immune defences can be costly. We recorded advertisement calls of male Japanese tree frogs (Hyla japonica) in the field. We then assessed whether individuals were infected by Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), the causal agent of the disease. This allowed us to analyse call properties of males as a function of their infection status. Infected males called more rapidly and produced longer calls than uninfected males. This enhanced call effort may reflect pathogen manipulation of host behaviour to foster disease transmission. Alternatively, increased calling may have resulted from selection on infected males to reproduce earlier because of their shortened expected lifespan. Our results raise the possibility that sublethal effects of Bd alter amphibian life histories, which contributes to long-term population declines. © 2016 The Author(s).

  4. Trypanosome transmission by Corethrella wirthi (Diptera: Chaoboridae) to the green treefrog, Hyla cinerea (Anura: Hylidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R N; Young, D G; Butler, J F

    1993-09-01

    Seventy-two percent of 215 male green tree frog, Hyla cinerea (Schneider), captured in Alachua and Levy counties, FL, between April and mid-September 1978 and 1979 were infected with an undescribed Trypanosoma sp. None of the 31 female frogs captured concurrently was infected. Periodic sampling of the peripheral blood from the infected male frogs showed that the trypanosomes were present in high numbers only at night. Conspecific trypanosomes also were found in the mid and hind guts of female Corethrella wirthi Stone flies collected on or near male frogs in the field. Transmission of the parasite to uninfected frogs was demonstrated by exposure of male and female frogs to naturally infected flies and to parasites injected subdermally. This is the first report of parasite transmission by a species of Corethrella.

  5. Sequencing and analysis of the complete mitochondrial genome of Hyla ussuriensis (Anura: Hylidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qinglin; Xie, Yuhui; Zhao, Wenge; Liu, Peng

    2017-05-01

    In this study, the complete mitogenome sequence of Hyla ussuriensis (Anura: Hylidae) is first determined using long PCR. It is a circular molecule of 18 023 bp in length (GenBank accession no. KT964710). Similar to the typical mtDNA of amphibians, the complete mtDNA sequence of Hyla ussuriensis contained two rRNA genes (12S rRNA and 16S rRNA), 22 tRNA genes, 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), and a control region (D-loop). The nucleotide composition was 29.9% A, 25.4% C, 14.5% G, and 30.2% T. Mitochondrial genomes analyses based on NJ method yield phylogenetic trees, indicating 13 reported Anura frogs belonging to five families (Hylidae, Bufonidae, Microhylidae, Ranidae, and Rhacophoridae). These molecular data presented here provide a useful tool for systematic analyses of genus Hyla and family Hylidae.

  6. Muscles of the pes of hylid frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Thomas C

    2004-05-01

    Complete or partial dissection of the foot musculature of 404 hylid frogs representing 247 species and 33 genera, along with representatives of eight other families, revealed a number of apomorphic characters that distinguish the hyloid frogs (Hylidae plus Allophryne and Centrolenidae) from other bufonoid frogs. Additional characters were found to define some of the hylid subfamilies. Addition of characters from the foot musculature to Duellman's phylogenetic tree of the hyloids produced a tree in which Allophryne and Centrolenidae are nested within Hylidae. Support was found for the monophyly of the 30-chromosome group within Hyla, and for a large number of the groups that comprise "Boana," viz., the Hyla albomarginata, H. albopunctata, H. boans (except H. vasta), H. geographica, and H. pulchella groups, but foot muscle characters provide no information relating to relationships of the West Indies hylines. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Helminth Community of Tree frogs at the Okomu National Park, Edo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The tree frogs of the Okomu National Park were investigated for their helminth parasitic infections. The 24 species of tree frogs encountered belonged to the families Arthroleptidae, Hyperoliidae, Ranidae and Rhacophoridae. The helminth parasites encountered in the study included: Cestoda: Baerietta sp. (7.4%); ...

  8. [Meiotic chromosomes of the tree frog Smilisca baudinii (Anura: Hylidae)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Guzmán, Javier; Arias-Rodriguez, Lenin; Indy, Jeane Rimber

    2011-03-01

    The Mexican tree frog Smilisca baudinii, is a very common frog in Central America. In spite their importance to keep the ecological equilibrium of the rainforest, its biology and genetics are poorly known. In order to contribute with its biological knowledge, we described the typical meiotic karyotype based in standard cytogenetic protocols to specimens collected in Tabasco, Mexico. The study was centered in the analysis of 131 chromosome spreads at meiotic stage from two adults of the species (one female and one male). The metaphase analysis allowed the establishment of the modal haploid number of 1n = 12 bivalent chromosomes. The chromosomic formulae from the haploid bivalent karyotype was integrated by 12 biarmed chromosomes characterized by twelve pairs of metacentric-submetacentric (msm) chromosomes. The meiotic counting gives the idea that diploid chromosome number is integrated by a complement of 2n = 24 biarmed chromosomes. The presence of sex chromosomes from female and male meiotic spreads was not observed. Current results suggest that S. baudinii chromosome structure is well shared among Hylidae family and "B" chromosomes are particular structures that have very important evolutionary consequences in species diversification.

  9. Asymmetrical permeability of the integument of tree frogs (Hylidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorio, T; Bentley, P J

    1977-04-01

    The skin from four species of North American tree frogs (Hylidae) was found in vitro, to be remarkably permeable to water in the presence or absence of the neurohypophysial hormone vasotocin. This property was, however, only seen in preparations from the ventral integument; osmotic water movement across the dorsal skin was negligible. The ionic permeability, reflected by the electrical resistance, was also much greater in the ventral skin. Unidirectional fluxes of 22Na, 36Cl, 14C-urea and tritiated water were measured in vitro in a single species, Agalychnis dacnicolor Cope. The ventral skin was 10-20 times more permeable to these molecules than the dorsal skin. The short-circuit current (usually reflecting active transmural Na transport) across the ventral skin was increased by aldosterone and vasotocin but these responses were absent on the dorsal side. The lipid content of the dorsal skin was four times greater than that on the ventral surface.

  10. Prevalence of endo-parasites of common tree frog Rana saharica ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The current study was conducted to detect the prevalence of parasitic infection among (62) common tree frogs (Rana Saharica), of different ages, with weights ranged between 1 and 25g. Results: The results revealed that 61 (98%) out of 62 examined common frogs were infected with endo-parasites. The prevalence of ...

  11. Isolation of Brucella inopinata-Like Bacteria from White's and Denny's Tree Frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Masanobu; Une, Yumi; Suzuki, Michio; Park, Eun-Sil; Imaoka, Koichi; Morikawa, Shigeru

    2017-05-01

    Brucella inopinata strain BO1 and B. sp. strain BO2 isolated from human patients, respectively, are genetically different from classical Brucella species. We isolated bacteria of the genus Brucella from two species of wild-caught tropical frogs kept in the facilities in Japan: White's tree frog, which inhabits Oceania, and Denny's tree frog, which inhabits Southeast Asia. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA and recA gene sequences and multilocus sequence analysis showed that two isolates of Brucella spp. showed significant similarity to BO1, BO2, and the isolates from other wild-caught frogs. These results suggest that a variety of frog species are susceptible to a novel clade of Brucella bacteria, including B. inopinata.

  12. Frankixalus, a New Rhacophorid Genus of Tree Hole Breeding Frogs with Oophagous Tadpoles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S D Biju

    Full Text Available Despite renewed interest in the biogeography and evolutionary history of Old World tree frogs (Rhacophoridae, this family still includes enigmatic frogs with ambiguous phylogenetic placement. During fieldwork in four northeastern states of India, we discovered several populations of tree hole breeding frogs with oophagous tadpoles. We used molecular data, consisting of two nuclear and three mitochondrial gene fragments for all known rhacophorid genera, to investigate the phylogenetic position of these new frogs. Our analyses identify a previously overlooked, yet distinct evolutionary lineage of frogs that warrants recognition as a new genus and is here described as Frankixalus gen. nov. This genus, which contains the enigmatic 'Polypedates' jerdonii described by Günther in 1876, forms the sister group of a clade containing Kurixalus, Pseudophilautus, Raorchestes, Mercurana and Beddomixalus. The distinctiveness of this evolutionary lineage is also corroborated by the external morphology of adults and tadpoles, adult osteology, breeding ecology, and life history features.

  13. Geographic morphological variation in parapatric Western Palearctic tree frogs, Hyla arborea and Hyla savignyi: are related species similarly affected by climatic conditions?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gvoždík, Václav; Moravec, J.; Kratochvíl, L.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 95, - (2008), s. 539-556 ISSN 0024-4066 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06073 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GA206/05/2334 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : amphibians * body shape * character displacement Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 2.019, year: 2008

  14. Atrial natriuretic peptide and cGMP activate sodium transport through PKA-dependent pathway in the urinary bladder of the Japanese tree frog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Toshiki; Matsuda, Kouhei; Uchiyama, Minoru

    2006-03-01

    The effects of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and cGMP on transepithelial ion transport were examined in the urinary bladder of the Japanese tree frog, Hyla japonica, using Ussing chamber voltage-clamp and whole-cell patch-clamp techniques. When the bladders were exposed to 4.4 x 10(-11) to 10(-6) M ANP or 10(-7) to 3 x 10(-4) M 8-Br-cGMP, both the transepithelial potential difference (PD) and the short-circuit current (Isc) were significantly increased in a concentration-response manner. The cGMP-dependent responses were inhibited in a Na+-free bath solution and in the presence of amiloride. The cGMP-dependent increases in Isc were significantly inhibited by specific PKA inhibitors (5 x 10(-7) M KT-5720 and >10(-5) M H-89), but not by a specific PKG inhibitor (5 x 10(-7) M KT-5823). ANP-dependent increases in Isc were also significantly inhibited by KT-5720. In the patch-clamp study, ANP and cGMP significantly increased in inward currents involving Na+ uptake. These results suggest that a cross-talk mechanism exists between cAMP and cGMP signaling pathways, which leads to Na+ transport in the frog urinary bladder. In addition, the cGMP-dependent increases in Isc were partially inhibited by 10(-4) M l-cis-diltiazem, a specific inhibitor of cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels. These results also suggest a relation between CNG channels and the cGMP-dependent increases in Na+ absorption of the frog urinary bladder.

  15. Mycobacterium marinum infection in Japanese forest green tree frogs (Rhacophorus arboreus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haridy, M; Tachikawa, Y; Yoshida, S; Tsuyuguchi, K; Tomita, M; Maeda, S; Wada, T; Ibi, K; Sakai, H; Yanai, T

    2014-01-01

    Four Japanese forest green tree frogs (Rhacophorus arboreus) were presented with emaciation, abdominal distention and ulcerative and nodular cutaneous lesions affecting the brisket, limbs, digits and ventral abdomen. Another three frogs had been found dead in the same tank 1 year previously. Necropsy examination of these seven frogs revealed splenomegaly and hepatomegaly, with multiple tan-yellow nodular foci present in the liver, spleen, heart, lungs, ovaries and kidneys. Microscopically, five frogs had necrosis and surrounding granulomatous inflammation in the liver, spleen, kidneys, lungs, intestine and ovaries, with numerous acid-fast bacilli in the areas of necrosis. Two frogs had granulomatous lesions in the lungs, liver, spleen, heart, coelomic membrane, stomach and intestinal wall. These lesions had no or minimal necrosis and few acid-fast bacilli. Mycobacterium spp. was cultured from three frogs and identified as Mycobacterium marinum by colony growth rate and photochromogenicity and DNA sequencing. This is the first report of M. marinum infection in Japanese forest green tree frogs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Biomarker Analysis of American Toad (Anaxyrus Americanus) and Grey Tree Frog (Hyla Versicolor) Tadpoles Following Exposure to Atrazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    To better understand the mode of action of atrazine in amphibians, we utilized mass spectrometry-based metabolomics to investigate the biochemical changes in two species of larval amphibians exposed to atrazine. Our objectives were to 1) Use changes in endogenous metabolites to f...

  17. Schellackia (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae of the brazilian tree-frog, Phrynohyas venulosa (Amphibia: Anura from Amazonian Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Paperna

    1995-10-01

    Full Text Available Endogenous stages of a Schellackia species are described in histological sections of the intestine of the tree-frog, Phrynohyas venulosa, from North Brazil. Most oocysts sporulate within the epithelial cells of the gut, but a few were detected in the lamina propria.

  18. Isolation and identification of intestinal bacteria from Japanese tree frog (Hlya japonica) with the special reference to anaerobic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benno, Y; Izumi-Kurotani, A; Yamashita, M

    1992-08-01

    The bacteria in the large intestines of eight Japanese tree frogs (Hlya japonica) were enumerated by using an anaerobic culture system. The microorganisms at approximately 3.1 x 10(9) bacteria per g (wet weight) of intestinal contents were present in the intestine of all the frogs tested. No difference of the total bacteria in the frog intestine was observed between two different incubation-temperatures (room temperature and 37 degrees C). Eleven genera and 16 species were isolated from the frog intestine. In most frogs, Bacteroides (B.) caccae and B. vulgatus were detected as the predominant organisms. Escherichia coli was also present in greater numbers in the intestine. Other bacteria isolated at high dilutions were strict anaerobes, including Fusobacterium and Clostridium. Enterococcus faecalis was frequently isolated from the frog intestine. However, four genera of Bifidobacterium, Eubacterium, Peptostreptococcus, and Lactobacillus were not isolated from the frog intestine.

  19. Complex and transitive synchronization in a frustrated system of calling frogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aihara, Ikkyu; Takeda, Ryu; Mizumoto, Takeshi; Otsuka, Takuma; Takahashi, Toru; Okuno, Hiroshi G.; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2011-03-01

    This letter reports synchronization phenomena and mathematical modeling on a frustrated system of living beings, or Japanese tree frogs (Hyla japonica). While an isolated male Japanese tree frog calls nearly periodically, he can hear sounds including calls of other males. Therefore, the spontaneous calling behavior of interacting males can be understood as a system of coupled oscillators. We construct a simple but biologically reasonable model based on the experimental results of two frogs, extend the model to a system of three frogs, and theoretically predict the occurrence of rich synchronization phenomena, such as triphase synchronization and 1:2 antiphase synchronization. In addition, we experimentally verify the theoretical prediction by ethological experiments on the calling behavior of three frogs and time series analysis on recorded sound data. Note that the calling behavior of three male Japanese tree frogs is frustrated because almost perfect antiphase synchronization is robustly observed in a system of two male frogs. Thus, nonlinear dynamics of the three-frogs system should be far from trivial.

  20. Functional analysis for gut microbes of the brown tree frog (Polypedates megacephalus) in artificial hibernation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Francis Cheng-Hsuan; Yang, Yi-Ju; Wang, Daryi

    2016-12-22

    Annual hibernation is an adaptation that helps many animals conserve energy during food shortage in winter. This natural cycle is also accompanied by a remodeling of the intestinal immune system, which is an aspect of host biology that is both influenced by, and can itself influence, the microbiota. In amphibians, the bacteria in the intestinal tract show a drop in bacterial counts. The proportion of pathogenic bacteria is greater in hibernating frogs than that found in nonhibernating frogs. This suggests that some intestinal gut microbes in amphibians can be maintained and may contribute to the functions in this closed ecosystem during hibernation. However, these results were derived from culture-based approaches that only covered a small portion of bacteria in the intestinal tract. In this study, we use a more comprehensive analysis, including bacterial appearance and functional prediction, to reveal the global changes in gut microbiota during artificial hibernation via high-throughput sequencing technology. Our results suggest that artificial hibernation in the brown tree frog (Polypedates megacephalus) could reduce microbial diversity, and artificially hibernating frogs tend to harbor core operational taxonomic units that are rarely distributed among nonhibernating frogs. In addition, artificial hibernation increased significantly the relative abundance of the red-leg syndrome-related pathogenic genus Citrobacter. Furthermore, functional predictions via PICRUSt and Tax4Fun suggested that artificial hibernation has effects on metabolism, disease, signal transduction, bacterial infection, and primary immunodeficiency. We infer that artificial hibernation may impose potential effects on primary immunodeficiency and increase the risk of bacterial infections in the brown tree frog.

  1. Vasotocin has the potential to inhibit basolateral Na(+)/K (+)-pump current across isolated skin of tree frog in vitro, via its V(2)-type receptor/cAMP pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Makoto; Fujimaki, Kayo; Hokari, Shigeru

    2008-11-01

    Adult frog skin transports Na(+) from the apical to the basolateral side across the skin. Antidiuretic hormone (ADH) is involved in the regulation of Na(+) transport in both mammals and amphibians. We investigated the effect of arginine vasotocin (AVT), the ADH of amphibians, on the short-circuit current (SCC) across intact skin and on the basolateral Na(+)/K(+)-pump current across apically nystatin-permeabilized skin of the tree frog, Hyla japonica, in which the V(2)-type ADH receptor is expressed in vitro. In intact skin, 1 pM AVT had no effect on the SCC, but 10 nM AVT was sufficient to stimulate the SCC since 10 nM and 1 microM of AVT increased the SCC 3.2- and 3.4-fold, respectively (P > 0.9). However, in permeabilized skin, AVT (1 microM) decreased the Na(+)/K(+)-pump current to 0.79 times vehicle control. Similarly, 500 microM of 8Br-cAMP increased the SCC 3.2-fold, yet 1 mM of 8Br-cAMP decreased the Na(+)/K(+)-pump current to 0.76 times vehicle control. Arachidonic acid (10(-5) M) tended to decrease the Na(+)/K(+)-pump current. To judge from these in vitro experiments, AVT has the potential to inhibit the basolateral Na(+)/K(+)-pump current via the V(2)-type receptor/cAMP pathway in the skin of the tree frog.

  2. Wet adhesion with application to tree frog adhesive toe pads and tires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, B N J

    2007-01-01

    Strong adhesion between solids with rough surfaces is only possible if at least one of the solids is elastically very soft. Some lizards and spiders are able to adhere (dry adhesion) and move on very rough vertical surfaces due to very compliant surface layers on their attachment pads. Flies, bugs, grasshoppers and tree frogs have less compliant pad surface layers, and in these cases adhesion to rough surfaces is only possible because the animals inject a wetting liquid into the pad-substrate contact area, which generates a relative long-range attractive interaction due to the formation of capillary bridges. In this presentation I will discuss some aspects of wet adhesion for tree frogs and give some comments related to tire applications

  3. Sticking like sticky tape: tree frogs use friction forces to enhance attachment on overhanging surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endlein, Thomas; Ji, Aihong; Samuel, Diana; Yao, Ning; Wang, Zhongyuan; Barnes, W Jon P; Federle, Walter; Kappl, Michael; Dai, Zhendong

    2013-03-06

    To live and clamber about in an arboreal habitat, tree frogs have evolved adhesive pads on their toes. In addition, they often have long and slender legs to facilitate not only long jumps, but also to bridge gaps between leaves when climbing. Both adhesive pads and long limbs are used in conjunction, as we will show in this study. Previous research has shown that tree frogs change from a crouched posture (where the limbs are close to the body) to a sprawled posture with extended limbs when clinging on to steeper inclines such as vertical or overhanging slopes. We investigated this change in posture in White's tree frogs (Litoria caerulea) by challenging the frogs to cling onto a tiltable platform. The platform consisted of an array of 24 three-dimensional force transducers, which allowed us to measure the ground reaction forces of the frogs during a tilt. Starting from a crouched resting position, the normal forces on the forelimbs changed sign and became increasingly negative with increasing slope angle of the platform. At about 106° ± 12°, tilt of the platform the frogs reacted by extending one or two of their limbs outwards. At a steeper angle (131° ± 11°), the frogs spread out all their limbs sideways, with the hindlimbs stretched out to their maximum reach. Although the extension was strongest in the lateral direction, limbs were significantly extended in the fore-aft direction as well. With the extension of the limbs, the lateral forces increased relative to the normal forces. The large contribution of the in-plane forces helped to keep the angle between the force vector and the platform small. The Kendall theory for the peeling of adhesive tape predicts that smaller peel angles lead to higher attachment forces. We compare our data with the predictions of the Kendall model and discuss possible implications of the sliding of the pads on the surface. The forces were indeed much larger for smaller angles and thus can be explained by peeling theory.

  4. Species tree estimation of North American chorus frogs (Hylidae: Pseudacris) with parallel tagged amplicon sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, Lisa N; Ralicki, Hannah F; Emme, Sandra A; Lemmon, Emily Moriarty

    2014-06-01

    The field of phylogenetics is changing rapidly with the application of high-throughput sequencing to non-model organisms. Cost-effective use of this technology for phylogenetic studies, which often include a relatively small portion of the genome but several taxa, requires strategies for genome partitioning and sequencing multiple individuals in parallel. In this study we estimated a multilocus phylogeny for the North American chorus frog genus Pseudacris using anonymous nuclear loci that were recently developed using a reduced representation library approach. We sequenced 27 nuclear loci and three mitochondrial loci for 44 individuals on 1/3 of an Illumina MiSeq run, obtaining 96.5% of the targeted amplicons at less than 20% of the cost of traditional Sanger sequencing. We found heterogeneity among gene trees, although four major clades (Trilling Frog, Fat Frog, crucifer, and West Coast) were consistently supported, and we resolved the relationships among these clades for the first time with strong support. We also found discordance between the mitochondrial and nuclear datasets that we attribute to mitochondrial introgression and a possible selective sweep. Bayesian concordance analysis in BUCKy and species tree analysis in (*)BEAST produced largely similar topologies, although we identify taxa that require additional investigation in order to clarify taxonomic and geographic range boundaries. Overall, we demonstrate the utility of a reduced representation library approach for marker development and parallel tagged sequencing on an Illumina MiSeq for phylogenetic studies of non-model organisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Establishment of a sticky, large, oval-shaped thrombocyte cell line from tree frog as an ancestor of mammalian megakaryocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Kenkichi

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance of blood vessels is important for homeostasis. Many types of cells and cytokines are involved in angiogenesis and blood vessel repair. In mammals, platelets, which are produced from megakaryocytes, play a major role in hemostasis. Other vertebrates have no platelets in their bloodstream. In these animals, thrombocytes aggregate to form a thrombus. Therefore, I established a frog hematopoietic cell line to elucidate the mechanism of hematopoiesis in this species. The frog-derived thrombocytic cell line was established from a long-term bone marrow culture of Hyla japonica and was designated as a frog-derived unique hematopoietic non-adherent (FUHEN) cell line. The FUHEN cells had unique characteristics in that they proliferated in suspension culture without adherence to the culture flask, and the shapes of the FUHEN cells changed drastically to become very large ovals with growth. These cells reached more than 40 µm in length and had multi-lobed nuclei. The FUHEN cells expressed CD41, a specific surface marker of thrombocytes. These results indicated that the FUHEN cells were thrombocytes. Deprivation of divalent ions quickly induced adherence of the cells to the petri dish. This characteristic may be important for hemostasis. Furthermore, some of the FUHEN cells survived at 16 °C for 1 month and re-established proliferation when the cells were moved to 28 °C. Taken together, this new thrombocytic frog cell line, as an ancestor of mammalian megakaryocytes, could provide useful material to study the functions of thrombocytes and the hemostasis mechanism of amphibians.

  6. Environmental and Cultural Impact. Proposed Tennessee Colony Reservoir, Trinity River, Texas. Volume III. Appendices D and E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    mouthed frog Bufonidae Bufo, speciosus Texas toad Bufo vallices Gulf Coast toad Bufo woodhousei woodhousei Rocky Mt. toad Hylidae Acris, crepitans...crepitans Northern cricket frog Hyla cinera cinera Green tree frog Hyla chrysoscelis Gray tree frog Pseudacris clarki Spotted chorus frog Pseudacris...salamander Manculus guadridigitatus Dwarf salamander Notophthalmus viridescens Central newt Frogs Hyla cinera Green treefrog Hyla chrysoscelis Gray

  7. Comparative Cryo-SEM and AFM studies of hylid and rhacophorid tree frog toe pads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, W Jon P; Baum, Martina; Peisker, Henrik; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2013-12-01

    Cryo-scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) offer new avenues for the study of the morphology of tree frog adhesive toe pads. Using these techniques, we compare toe pad microstructure in two distantly related species of tree frog, Litoria caerulea, White (Hylidae) and Rhacophorus prominanus, Smith (Rhacophoridae), in which the toe pads are considered to be convergent. AFM demonstrates the extraordinary similarity of both surface microstructures (largely hexagonal epithelial cells surrounded by deep channels) and nanostructures (an array of nanopillars, ca. 350 nm in diameter, all with a small dimple at the apex). The cryo-SEM studies examined the distribution of the fibrillar cytoskeleton within the different layers of the stratified toe pad epithelium, demonstrating that the cytoskeletal elements (keratin tonofilaments) that lie at an angle to the surface are relatively poorly developed in L. caerulea, clearly so in comparison to R. prominanus. Cryo-SEM also enabled the visualization of the fluid layer that is critical to a toe pad's adhesive function. This was achieved by examination of the frozen fluid residues left behind after removal of a toe within the cryo-SEM's experimental chamber. Such 'toeprints' demonstrated the presence of a wedge of fluid surrounding each toe pad, as well as fluid filling the channels that surround each epithelial cell. Cryo-SEM was used to examine epithelial cell shape. In a sample of 582 cells, 59.5% were hexagonal, the remainder being mainly pentagonal (23.1%) or heptagonal (16.1%). The distribution of differently-shaped cells was not random, but was not associated with either pad curvature or the distribution of mucous pores that provide fluid for the frogs' wet adhesion mechanism. Our main finding, the great similarity of toe pad structure in these two species, has important implications for biomimetics, for such convergent evolution suggests a good starting point for attempts to develop

  8. Visual and acoustic signaling in three species of Brazilian nocturnal tree frogs (Anura, Hylidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Felipe Toledo

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Visual communication seems to be widespread among nocturnal anurans, however, reports of these behaviors in many Neotropical species are lacking. Therefore, we gathered information collected during several sporadic field expeditions in central and southern Brazil with three nocturnal tree frogs: Aplastodiscus perviridis, Hypsiboas albopunctatus and H. bischoffi. These species displayed various aggressive behaviors, both visual and acoustic, towards other males. For A. perviridis we described arm lifting and leg kicking; for H. albopunctatus we described the advertisement and territorial calls, visual signalizations, including a previously unreported behavior (short leg kicking, and male-male combat; and for H. bischoffiwe described the advertisement and fighting calls, toes and fingers trembling, leg lifting, and leg kicking. We speculate about the evolution of some behaviors and concluded that the use of visual signals among Neotropical anurans may be much more common than suggested by the current knowledge.

  9. Triclosan exposure alters postembryonic development in a Pacific tree frog (Pseudacris regilla) Amphibian Metamorphosis Assay (TREEMA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marlatt, Vicki L.; Veldhoen, Nik; Lo, Bonnie P.; Bakker, Dannika; Rehaume, Vicki; Vallée, Kurtis; Haberl, Maxine; Shang, Dayue; Aggelen, Graham C. van; Skirrow, Rachel C.; Elphick, James R.; Helbing, Caren C.

    2013-01-01

    The Amphibian Metamorphosis Assay (AMA), developed for Xenopus laevis, is designed to identify chemicals that disrupt thyroid hormone (TH)-mediated biological processes. We adapted the AMA for use on an ecologically-relevant North American species, the Pacific tree frog (Pseudacris regilla), and applied molecular endpoints to evaluate the effects of the antibacterial agent, triclosan (TCS). Premetamorphic (Gosner stage 26–28) tadpoles were immersed for 21 days in solvent control, 1.5 μg/L thyroxine (T 4 ), 0.3, 3 and 30 μg/L (nominal) TCS, or combined T 4 /TCS treatments. Exposure effects were scored by morphometric (developmental stage, wet weight, and body, snout-vent and hindlimb lengths) and molecular (mRNA abundance using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction) criteria. T 4 treatment alone accelerated development concomitant with altered levels of TH receptors α and β, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and gelatinase B mRNAs in the brain and tail. We observed TCS-induced perturbations in all of the molecular and morphological endpoints indicating that TCS exposure disrupts coordination of postembryonic tadpole development. Clear alterations in molecular endpoints were evident at day 2 whereas the earliest morphological effects appeared at day 4 and were most evident at day 21. Although TCS alone (3 and 30 μg/L) was protective against tadpole mortality, this protection was lost in the presence of T 4 . The Pacific tree frog is the most sensitive species examined to date displaying disruption of TH-mediated development by a common antimicrobial agent.

  10. Triclosan exposure alters postembryonic development in a Pacific tree frog (Pseudacris regilla) Amphibian Metamorphosis Assay (TREEMA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marlatt, Vicki L. [Nautilus Environmental, 8864 Commerce Court, Burnaby, B.C. V5A 4N7 (Canada); Veldhoen, Nik [Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055 Stn CSC, Victoria, B.C. V8W 3P6 (Canada); Lo, Bonnie P. [Nautilus Environmental, 8864 Commerce Court, Burnaby, B.C. V5A 4N7 (Canada); Bakker, Dannika; Rehaume, Vicki; Vallee, Kurtis [Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055 Stn CSC, Victoria, B.C. V8W 3P6 (Canada); Haberl, Maxine; Shang, Dayue; Aggelen, Graham C. van; Skirrow, Rachel C. [Pacific and Yukon Laboratory for Environmental Testing, Emergencies Operational Analytical Laboratories and Research Support Division, Environment Canada, 2645 Dollarton Highway, North Vancouver, B.C. V7H 1B1 (Canada); Elphick, James R. [Nautilus Environmental, 8864 Commerce Court, Burnaby, B.C. V5A 4N7 (Canada); Helbing, Caren C., E-mail: chelbing@uvic.ca [Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055 Stn CSC, Victoria, B.C. V8W 3P6 (Canada)

    2013-01-15

    The Amphibian Metamorphosis Assay (AMA), developed for Xenopus laevis, is designed to identify chemicals that disrupt thyroid hormone (TH)-mediated biological processes. We adapted the AMA for use on an ecologically-relevant North American species, the Pacific tree frog (Pseudacris regilla), and applied molecular endpoints to evaluate the effects of the antibacterial agent, triclosan (TCS). Premetamorphic (Gosner stage 26-28) tadpoles were immersed for 21 days in solvent control, 1.5 {mu}g/L thyroxine (T{sub 4}), 0.3, 3 and 30 {mu}g/L (nominal) TCS, or combined T{sub 4}/TCS treatments. Exposure effects were scored by morphometric (developmental stage, wet weight, and body, snout-vent and hindlimb lengths) and molecular (mRNA abundance using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction) criteria. T{sub 4} treatment alone accelerated development concomitant with altered levels of TH receptors {alpha} and {beta}, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and gelatinase B mRNAs in the brain and tail. We observed TCS-induced perturbations in all of the molecular and morphological endpoints indicating that TCS exposure disrupts coordination of postembryonic tadpole development. Clear alterations in molecular endpoints were evident at day 2 whereas the earliest morphological effects appeared at day 4 and were most evident at day 21. Although TCS alone (3 and 30 {mu}g/L) was protective against tadpole mortality, this protection was lost in the presence of T{sub 4}. The Pacific tree frog is the most sensitive species examined to date displaying disruption of TH-mediated development by a common antimicrobial agent.

  11. Within-population variation in ejaculate characteristics in a prolonged breeder, Peron's tree frog, Litoria peronii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Craig D. H.; Uller, Tobias; Wapstra, Erik; Olsson, Mats

    2008-11-01

    Sperm number is often a good predictor of success in sperm competition; however, it has become increasingly clear that, for some species, variation in probability of paternity cannot be explained by sperm number alone. Intraspecific variation in ejaculate characteristics, such as the number of viable sperm and sperm longevity, may play an equally important role in determining fertilization success. Here, we assess variation among ejaculates in three factors that may contribute to fertilization success (number of sperm per ejaculate, viability, and longevity), in a population of Peron’s tree frog ( Litoria peronii). We detected large variation among males in the number of sperm per ejaculate and the proportion of viable sperm within ejaculates, which could not be explained by variation in either male size or body condition. However, the proportion of viable sperm released by males increased over the season. Finally, we assessed sperm longevity (proportion viable sperm determined using a dual-fluorochrome vital dye) at two different temperatures. At 23°C, on average, 75% of sperm remained viable after 2 h, but there were significant differences amongst males with the percentage of viable sperm ranging from 43% to 95%. For sperm incubated at 4°C, ejaculates varied fivefold in sperm longevity with some males having 50% viable sperm after 5 days. Our data suggest that ejaculate characteristics (sperm number, viability, and longevity) vary widely in Peron’s tree frog and may therefore play an important role in determining siring success both in the presence and absence of sperm competition. We discuss the results in relation to selection on ejaculate traits via natural and sexual selection in this and other amphibians.

  12. Frog experiment onboard space station Mir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi-Kurotani, A; Mogami, Y; Okuno, M; Yamashita, M

    1997-01-01

    Japanese tree frogs (Hyla japonica) showed unique postures and behavior during an 8-day flight to the Russian space station Mir. When floating in the air, the animals arched their back and extended their four limbs. This posture resembles that observed during jumping or parachuting of the animals on the ground. Frog sitting on a surface bent their neck backward sharply, did not fold their hind limbs completely, and pressed their abdomen against the substrate. They walked backwards in this posture. The typical posture resembles that adopted during the emetic behavior process on the ground, although the posture in space lasts much longer. The possible mechanism of induction of this unique posture in orbit is discussed. Frogs in this posture might be in an emetic state, possibly due to motion sickness. Response behavior to some stimuli was observed in orbit. Body color change in response to the background color appeared to be delayed or slowed down. Response behavior to other stimuli showed little change as long as the animal maintained contact with a substrate. Once it left the surface, the floating frog could not control its movements so as to provide coordinated motility for locomotion and orientation. Adaptation to microgravity was observed in the landing behavior after jumping. Readaptation of the frogs to the Earth environment took place within a few hours after return. Postflight histological and biochemical analysis of organs and tissues showed some changes after the 8-day spaceflight. Weakening and density loss in vertebrae was noted. The beta-adrenoreceptor activity of the gastrocnemius was natriuretic decreased. Skin collagen and liver protein synthesis were lowered. The distribution of the atrial factor-like peptides in the brain was changed.

  13. Purification and characterization of a tachykinin-like peptide from skin secretions of the tree frog, Theloderma kwangsiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Wei, Lin; Zou, Chengda; Bai, Jeff Jinfeng; Song, Yuzhu; Liu, Huan

    2013-07-01

    Most amphibians belonging to Rhacophoridae have an arboreal life. A large amount of bioactive peptides have been identified from amphibian skin, but none from amphibians belonging to Rhacophoridae have been reported to date. A tachykinin-like peptide, tachykinin-Thel, was purified and characterized from skin secretions of the tree frog, Theloderma kwangsiensis. Its primary structure was determined as KPSPDRFYGLM-NH2 by Edman degradation and mass spectrometry analysis. cDNA sequence encoding the precursor of tachykinin-Thel was cloned from the skin cDNA library. Tachykinin-Thel induced the contraction of isolated ileum smooth muscle in a dose-dependent manner. The current work reported a bioactive peptide, tachykinin-Thel, from Rhacophoridae amphibians and confirmed the presence of tachykinin-like peptide in the skin of the tree frog, which may facilitate their arboreal life.

  14. Hyla inermis (Peters), a species hitherto erroneously referred to the Leptodactylid genus Cyclorana (Anura, Hylidae/Leptodactylidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Straughan, I.R.

    1969-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Extensive collections of frogs from Queensland (reported in detail, Straughan, 1966) failed to include the species Cyclorana inermis (Peters), although Slevin (1955) recorded it as abundant in central Queensland. However a widely ranging species of ground Hyla (undescribed in that

  15. A new species of tree frog genus Rhacophorus from Sumatra, Indonesia Amphibia, Anura).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidy, Amir; Kurniati, Hellen

    2015-04-14

    A small-sized tree frog of the genus Rhacophorus is described on the basis of 18 specimens collected from three different localities on Sumatra Island, Indonesia. Rhacophorus indonesiensis sp. nov. is divergent from all other Rhacophorus species genetically and morphologically. The new species is distinguished from its congeners by a combination of: the presence of black spots on the ventral surfaces of the hand and foot webbing, an absence of vomerine teeth, a venter with a white kite-shaped marking, raised white spots on the dorsum or on the head, and a reddish brown dorsum with irregular dark brown blotches and distinct black dots. With the addition of this new species, fifteen species of Rhacophorus are now known from Sumatra, the highest number of species of this genus in the Sundaland region. However, with the increasing conversion of forest to oil palm cultivation or mining, the possibility of the extinction of newly described or as yet undiscovered species is of great concern.

  16. Comparative cytogenetic analysis on four tree frog species (Anura, Hylidae, Hylinae) from Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasahara, S; Zampieri Silva, A P; Gruber, S L; Haddad, C F B

    2003-01-01

    A comparative cytogenetic analysis was carried out on four Hylinae tree frogs from Brazil ((Aparasphenodon brunoi, Corythomantis greeningi, Osteocephalus langsdorffii, and Scinax fuscovarius) using Giemsa staining, BrdU replication banding, Ag-NOR staining, C-banding, DAPI and CMA(3) fluorochrome staining, and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with an rDNA probe. All the species share closely similar 2n = 24 karyotypes, almost indistinguishable by standard staining. The technique of BrdU incorporation allowed the identification of each pair of homologs and the establishment of extensive homeology for the great majority of the chromosomes, mainly of A. brunoi, C. greeningi, and O. langsdorffii. Despite highly conserved replication banding patterns, the use of the other banding techniques disclosed some minor differences, which reinforces the importance of extensive cytogenetic analyses for the karyotypic characterization of Anuran species. The present cytogenetic data confirm the closer proximity of A. brunoi, C. greeningi, and O. langsdorffii, whereas S. fuscovarius is phylogenetically more distant. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  17. Speciation history and widespread introgression in the European short-call tree frogs (Hyla arborea sensu lato, H. intermedia and H. sarda)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gvoždík, Václav; Canestrelli, D.; García-París, M.; Moravec, J.; Nascetti, G.; Recuero, E.; Teixeira, J.; Kotlík, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 83, č. 1 (2015), s. 143-155 ISSN 1055-7903 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : cryptic species complex * bayesian species delimination * gene flow Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 3.792, year: 2015

  18. Effects of non-native trout on Pacific treefrogs (Hyla regilla) in the Sierra Nevada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    K.R. Matthews; K.L. Pope; H. K. Preisler; R.A. Knapp

    2001-01-01

    We used analyses based on surveys of . 1700 water bodies in a 100,000-ha area in the John Muir Wilderness (JMW) and Kings Canyon National Park (KCNP) to determine the influence of nonnative trout on the distribution and abundance of Hyla regilla in the High Sierra Nevada. At the landscape scale (JMW compared to KCNP), a negative relationship between trout and frogs in...

  19. Human-assisted invasions of pacific islands by litoria frogs: a case study of the bleating tree frog on Lord Howe Island.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Lynette Plenderleith

    Full Text Available There are substantial differences among taxonomic groups in their capacity to reach remote oceanic islands via long-distance overwater dispersal from mainland regions. Due to their permeable skin and intolerance of saltwater, amphibians generally require human-assisted dispersal to reach oceanic islands. Several Litoria frog species have been introduced to remote islands throughout the Pacific Ocean region. Lord Howe Island (LHI is an oceanic island that lies approximately 600 km east of the Australian mainland and has a diverse, endemic biota. The bleating tree frog (Litoria dentata is native to mainland eastern Australia, but was accidentally introduced to LHI in the 1990s, yet its ecology and potential impact on LHI has remained unstudied. We used a mitochondrial phylogeographical approach to determine that L. dentata was introduced from the Ballina region in northeastern New South Wales. The founding population was likely accidentally introduced with cargo shipped from the mainland. We also completed the first detailed investigation of the distribution, ecology and habitat use of L. dentata on LHI. The species is widespread on LHI and is prevalent in human habitat, cattle pasture and undisturbed forest. We discuss the potential impact of introduced Litoria species on Pacific islands and outline what biosecurity protocols could be implemented to prevent the introduction of further amphibian species to the ecologically sensitive oceanic area.

  20. Human-assisted invasions of pacific islands by litoria frogs: a case study of the bleating tree frog on Lord Howe Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plenderleith, T Lynette; Smith, Katie L; Donnellan, Stephen C; Reina, Richard D; Chapple, David G

    2015-01-01

    There are substantial differences among taxonomic groups in their capacity to reach remote oceanic islands via long-distance overwater dispersal from mainland regions. Due to their permeable skin and intolerance of saltwater, amphibians generally require human-assisted dispersal to reach oceanic islands. Several Litoria frog species have been introduced to remote islands throughout the Pacific Ocean region. Lord Howe Island (LHI) is an oceanic island that lies approximately 600 km east of the Australian mainland and has a diverse, endemic biota. The bleating tree frog (Litoria dentata) is native to mainland eastern Australia, but was accidentally introduced to LHI in the 1990s, yet its ecology and potential impact on LHI has remained unstudied. We used a mitochondrial phylogeographical approach to determine that L. dentata was introduced from the Ballina region in northeastern New South Wales. The founding population was likely accidentally introduced with cargo shipped from the mainland. We also completed the first detailed investigation of the distribution, ecology and habitat use of L. dentata on LHI. The species is widespread on LHI and is prevalent in human habitat, cattle pasture and undisturbed forest. We discuss the potential impact of introduced Litoria species on Pacific islands and outline what biosecurity protocols could be implemented to prevent the introduction of further amphibian species to the ecologically sensitive oceanic area.

  1. Ex situ diet influences the bacterial community associated with the skin of red-eyed tree frogs (Agalychnis callidryas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachael E Antwis

    Full Text Available Amphibians support symbiotic bacterial communities on their skin that protect against a range of infectious pathogens, including the amphibian chytrid fungus. The conditions under which amphibians are maintained in captivity (e.g. diet, substrate, enrichment in ex situ conservation programmes may affect the composition of the bacterial community. In addition, ex situ amphibian populations may support different bacterial communities in comparison to in situ populations of the same species. This could have implications for the suitability of populations intended for reintroduction, as well as the success of probiotic bacterial inoculations intended to provide amphibians with a bacterial community that resists invasion by the chytrid fungus. We aimed to investigate the effect of a carotenoid-enriched diet on the culturable bacterial community associated with captive red-eyed tree frogs (Agalychnis callidryas and make comparisons to bacteria isolated from a wild population from the Chiquibul Rainforest in Belize. We successfully showed carotenoid availability influences the overall community composition, species richness and abundance of the bacterial community associated with the skin of captive frogs, with A. callidryas fed a carotenoid-enriched diet supporting a greater species richness and abundance of bacteria than those fed a carotenoid-free diet. Our results suggest that availability of carotenoids in the diet of captive frogs is likely to be beneficial for the bacterial community associated with the skin. We also found wild A. callidryas hosted more than double the number of different bacterial species than captive frogs with very little commonality between species. This suggests frogs in captivity may support a reduced and diverged bacterial community in comparison to wild populations of the same species, which could have particular relevance for ex situ conservation projects.

  2. Ex situ diet influences the bacterial community associated with the skin of red-eyed tree frogs (Agalychnis callidryas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antwis, Rachael E; Haworth, Rachel L; Engelmoer, Daniel J P; Ogilvy, Victoria; Fidgett, Andrea L; Preziosi, Richard F

    2014-01-01

    Amphibians support symbiotic bacterial communities on their skin that protect against a range of infectious pathogens, including the amphibian chytrid fungus. The conditions under which amphibians are maintained in captivity (e.g. diet, substrate, enrichment) in ex situ conservation programmes may affect the composition of the bacterial community. In addition, ex situ amphibian populations may support different bacterial communities in comparison to in situ populations of the same species. This could have implications for the suitability of populations intended for reintroduction, as well as the success of probiotic bacterial inoculations intended to provide amphibians with a bacterial community that resists invasion by the chytrid fungus. We aimed to investigate the effect of a carotenoid-enriched diet on the culturable bacterial community associated with captive red-eyed tree frogs (Agalychnis callidryas) and make comparisons to bacteria isolated from a wild population from the Chiquibul Rainforest in Belize. We successfully showed carotenoid availability influences the overall community composition, species richness and abundance of the bacterial community associated with the skin of captive frogs, with A. callidryas fed a carotenoid-enriched diet supporting a greater species richness and abundance of bacteria than those fed a carotenoid-free diet. Our results suggest that availability of carotenoids in the diet of captive frogs is likely to be beneficial for the bacterial community associated with the skin. We also found wild A. callidryas hosted more than double the number of different bacterial species than captive frogs with very little commonality between species. This suggests frogs in captivity may support a reduced and diverged bacterial community in comparison to wild populations of the same species, which could have particular relevance for ex situ conservation projects.

  3. Diversification in a biodiversity hotspot--the evolution of Southeast Asian rhacophorid tree frogs on Borneo (Amphibia: Anura: Rhacophoridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertwig, Stefan T; Schweizer, Manuel; Das, Indraneil; Haas, Alexander

    2013-09-01

    The tree-frog family Rhacophoridae is a major group contributing to the high pecies richness and reproductive diversity among vertebrates of Sundaland. Nonetheless, rhacophorid evolution, specially on Borneo, has not been studied within a phylogenetic context. In this study, we examine the phylogenetic relationships of 38 (out of 41) Bornean species of Rhacophoridae, in combination with data from previous phylogenetic studies. In the final super matrix of 91 species, we analyse sequence data from two mitochondrial and three nuclear genes. The resulting trees show the genus Rhacophorus as a paraphyletic assemblage. As a consequence, we transfer Rhacophorus appendiculatus and R. kajau to two other genera and propose the new phylogeny-based combinations--Kurixalus appendiculatus and Feihyla kajau, respectively. Furthermore, we use our phylogenetic hypotheses to reconstruct the evolution of reproductive modes in rhacophorid tree frogs. Direct development to the exclusion of a free larval stage evolved twice independently, once in an ancestor of the Pseudophilautus+Raorchestes clade in India and Sri Lanka, and once within Philautus in Southeast Asia. The deposition of egg clutches covered by a layer of jelly in Feihyla is also present in F. kajau and thus confirms our generic reassignment. The remarkably high diversity of rhacophorid tree frogs on Borneo is the outcome of a complex pattern of repeated vicariance and dispersal events caused by past changes in the climatic and geological history of the Sunda shelf. We identified geographic clades of closely related endemic species within Rhacophorus and Philautus, which result from local island radiations on Borneo. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. MEASURING INTRAOCULAR PRESSURE IN WHITE'S TREE FROGS (LITORIA CAERULEA) BY REBOUND TONOMETRY: COMPARING DEVICE, TIME OF DAY, AND MANUAL VERSUS CHEMICAL RESTRAINT METHODS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausmann, Jennifer C; Krisp, Ashley; Sladky, Kurt; Miller, Paul E; Mans, Christoph

    2017-06-01

    Ocular diseases reported in frogs include uveitis and glaucoma, which are associated with changes in intraocular pressure (IOP). The objectives of this study were to characterize the normal IOP for White's tree frogs ( Litoria caerulea ) using two types of rebound tonometers, and to assess whether time of day or method of restraint affected IOP. Eighteen conscious, unrestrained, ophthalmologically normal frogs were used to measure IOP using TonoVet® and TonoLab® tonometers, at three time points during the day. In a subset of 12 frogs, IOP was measured while under manual restraint using the TonoVet. Anesthesia was induced in 9 frogs using two different concentrations of MS-222 (0.5 g/L and 2 g/L) in order to evaluate for changes in IOP with the TonoVet. Mean (± SD) IOP values for the TonoLab (16.8 ± 3.9 mm Hg) were significantly higher than TonoVet values (14.7 ± 1.6 mm Hg; P frogs had significantly lower IOP (13.4 ± 1.5 mm Hg) compared with unrestrained frogs (15.3 ± 1.2 mm Hg; P frogs, but time of day and manual restraint can affect IOP values.

  5. Effect of magnetic fields on green color formation in frog skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwagi, H.; Kashiwagi, A.; Iwasaka, M.

    2017-05-01

    The present work is focused on a dynamic and efficient optical control system that is made possible by investigation of the body surfaces of various animals. Specifically, we expect Japanese tree frog (Hyla japonica) skin to provide a model for a flexible display device actuator mechanism. Tree frogs change body color from their original green to other colors in response to background colors. The color formation is controlled not only by chromatophores, but also by guanine microcrystals in iridophores. We collected sample microcrystals from the frog's dorsal skin and made a model display sheet using the green skin layers. The transparent chamber that contained the crystal suspension was layered to enhance light reflection. Sheet color was observed while the angle of light incidence was varied, with and without magnetic field exposure at 0.3 T. A slight increase in red and green intensity was detected. Additionally, reflected intensity increased with increasing angle of incidence. These results indicate that the guanine crystal platelets in frog skin can efficiently switch the reflected light direction under application of a magnetic field. This in turn suggests that a several-micron-sized microcrystal of this type is a candidate material for development of flexible optical chips for ambient light control.

  6. Effect of magnetic fields on green color formation in frog skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kashiwagi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The present work is focused on a dynamic and efficient optical control system that is made possible by investigation of the body surfaces of various animals. Specifically, we expect Japanese tree frog (Hyla japonica skin to provide a model for a flexible display device actuator mechanism. Tree frogs change body color from their original green to other colors in response to background colors. The color formation is controlled not only by chromatophores, but also by guanine microcrystals in iridophores. We collected sample microcrystals from the frog’s dorsal skin and made a model display sheet using the green skin layers. The transparent chamber that contained the crystal suspension was layered to enhance light reflection. Sheet color was observed while the angle of light incidence was varied, with and without magnetic field exposure at 0.3 T. A slight increase in red and green intensity was detected. Additionally, reflected intensity increased with increasing angle of incidence. These results indicate that the guanine crystal platelets in frog skin can efficiently switch the reflected light direction under application of a magnetic field. This in turn suggests that a several-micron-sized microcrystal of this type is a candidate material for development of flexible optical chips for ambient light control.

  7. First record of the tree-frog genus Chiromantis from Borneo with the description of a new species (Amphibia: Rhacophoridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Masafumi; Shimada, Tomohiko; Sudin, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    We record a tree frog of the genus Chiromantis for the first time from outside the Southeast Asian continent and describe it as a new species, Chiromantis inexpectatus. The new species from the Malaysian state of Sabah, Borneo, is a small-sized Chiromantis (male snout-vent length ca. 22 mm), and is distinguished from all other members of the genus by the combination of the following morphological characteristics: dark stripes absent, but dark spots present on dorsum; a dark-brown lateral band present from snout tip to half of body, bordered ventrally by white stripe; third and fourth fingers less than half webbed; third finger disk wider than tympanum diameter; and inner metatarsal tubercle present. Significance of findings of this species from Borneo Island, as well as phylogeny and breeding habit of the genus Chiromantis, are briefly discussed.

  8. The Frog in Space (FRIS) experiment onboard Space Station Mir: final report and follow-on studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, M; Izumi-Kurotani, A; Mogami, Y; Okuno, M; Naitoh, T; Wassersug, R J

    1997-12-01

    The "Frog in Space" (FRIS) experiment marked a major step for Japanese space life science, on the occasion of the first space flight of a Japanese cosmonaut. At the core of FRIS were six Japanese tree frogs, Hyla japonica, flown on Space Station Mir for 8 days in 1990. The behavior of these frogs was observed and recorded under microgravity. The frogs took up a "parachuting" posture when drifting in a free volume on Mir. When perched on surfaces, they typically sat with their heads bent backward. Such a peculiar posture, after long exposure to microgravity, is discussed in light of motion sickness in amphibians. Histological examinations and other studies were made on the specimens upon recovery. Some organs, such as the liver and the vertebra, showed changes as a result of space flight; others were unaffected. Studies that followed FRIS have been conducted to prepare for a second FRIS on the International Space Station. Interspecific diversity in the behavioral reactions of anurans to changes in acceleration is the major focus of these investigations. The ultimate goal of this research is to better understand how organisms have adapted to gravity through their evolution on earth.

  9. Evaporative water loss and oxygen uptake in two casque-headed tree frogs, Aparasphenodon brunoi and Corythomantis greeningi (Anura, Hylidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrade, D V; Abe, A S

    1997-11-01

    Evaporative water loss (EWL) and oxygen uptake (Vo2) was measured in two species of tree frogs with cranial co-ossification, Aparasphenodon brunoi and Corythomantis greeningi. Both species use their head to seal the entrance of bromeliads, tree holes or rocky crevices used as shelters. EWL was significantly reduced in sheltered individuals of both species as compared with those exposed nude to desiccation. EWL per unit area through the head surface was significantly lower than the body skin for A. brunoi but not for C. greeningi, EWL per unit surface area through C. greeningi body skin was about 50% that of A. brunoi, indicating a less permeable skin in the former species. The relationship between cranial coossification and EWL is discussed. Vo2 in A. brunoi was comparable with other anurans of similar size, whereas in C. greeningi, it was lower than predicted from body mass. Moreover, Vo2 in C. greeningi showed less sensitivity to temperature increase than in A. brunoi. C. greeningi occurs in a drier environment than A. brunoi, and this appears to be reflected in their EWL and Vo2 characteristics.

  10. Impact of plant cover on fitness and behavioural traits of captive red-eyed tree frogs (Agalychnis callidryas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Michaels

    Full Text Available Despite the importance of ex situ conservation programmes as highlighted in the Amphibian Conservation Action Plan, there are few empirical studies that examine the influence of captive conditions on the fitness of amphibians, even for basic components of enclosure design such as cover provision. Maintaining the fitness of captive amphibian populations is essential to the success of ex situ conservation projects. Here we examined the impact of plant cover on measures of fitness and behaviour in captive red-eyed tree frogs (Agalychnis callidryas. We found significant effects of plant provision on body size, growth rates and cutaneous bacterial communities that together demonstrate a compelling fitness benefit from cover provision. We also demonstrate a strong behavioural preference for planted rather than non-planted areas. We also assessed the impact of plant provision on the abiotic environment in the enclosure as a potential driver of these behavioural and fitness effects. Together this data provides valuable information regarding enclosure design for a non-model amphibian species and has implications for amphibian populations maintained in captivity for conservation breeding programmes and research.

  11. Origin of somatic cells and histogenesis in the primordial gonad of the Japanese tree frog Rhacophorus arboreus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimura, A; Iwasawa, H

    1989-01-01

    Gonadal development in Rhacophorus arboreus, a sexually semidifferentiated type of tree frog, was observed by means of the electron microscope, and cell proliferation kinetics were examined autoradiographically. The genital ridge consisted of coelomic epithelial cells and primordial germ cells. The gonadal medulla was formed by the segregation of epithelial cells within the primordial gonad. Thereafter, the medullary cell mass was well developed and oogenesis began in the gonadal cortex, irrespective of genetic sex. During metamorphosis, the ovarian cavity was formed in the medullary mass. This ovarian structure developed further in females. In males, on the other hand, a layer of medullary cells comprising the epithelium of the ovarian cavity proliferated rapidly and reformed a large cell mass. The degeneration of ovarian follicles and the formation of cell cords (rudimentary seminiferous tubules) were seen in the cortex. These cell cords were separated from the superficial epithelium and continued to the medullary mass (rudimentary testicular rete). These results clearly indicate that both the cortical and medullary cells are derived from the coelomic epithelium and that the development of the cortex and medulla is not always antagonistic in the course of sexual differentiation.

  12. Vitamin A values of wild-caught Cuban tree frogs (Osteopilus septentrionalis) and marine toads (Rhinella marina) in whole body, liver, and serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Kathleen E; Fleming, Greg; Terrell, Scott; Smith, Dustin; Ridgley, Frank; Valdes, Eduardo V

    2014-12-01

    Recent issues surrounding captive amphibians are often nutritionally related problems, such as hypovitaminosis A. Although supplementation of frogs with vitamin A is a topic of investigation, the underlying issue is understanding vitamin A metabolism in amphibian species. To develop a range of "normal" vitamin A concentrations for captive amphibians, baseline vitamin A concentrations must be established in wild amphibian species. In this study, two species, Cuban tree frogs (Osteopilus septentrionalis; n = 59) and marine toads (Rhinella marina; n = 20) were collected from the wild as part of an invasive species control program at Zoo Miami, Miami, Florida. Serum, liver, and whole body samples were analyzed for vitamin A content. The Cuban tree frogs showed higher concentrations on average of vitamin A in serum (82.8 ppb), liver (248.3 IU/g), and whole body (5474.7 IU/kg) samples compared with marine toads (60.1 ppb; 105.3 IU/g; 940.7 IU/kg, respectively), but differences were not significant (P = 0.22). What can be considered "normal" values of vitamin A concentrations across different amphibian species requires further investigation. Although all amphibians collected in this study appeared healthy, a larger sample size of animals, with known health histories and diets, may provide stronger evidence of normal expectations.

  13. Comparative Postembryonic Skeletal Ontogeny in Two Sister Lineages of Old World Tree Frogs (Rhacophoridae: Taruga, Polypedates)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senevirathne, Gayani; Kerney, Ryan

    2017-01-01

    Rhacophoridae, a family of morphologically cryptic frogs, with many genetically distinct evolutionary lineages, is understudied with respect to skeletal morphology, life history traits and skeletal ontogeny. Here we analyze two species each from two sister lineages, Taruga and Polypedates, and compare their postembryonic skeletal ontogeny, larval chondrocrania and adult osteology in the context of a well-resolved phylogeny. We further compare these ontogenetic traits with the direct-developing Pseudophilautus silus. For each species, we differentially stained a nearly complete developmental series of tadpoles from early postembryonic stages through metamorphosis to determine the intraspecific and interspecific differences of cranial and postcranial bones. Chondrocrania of the four species differ in 1) size; 2) presence/absence of anterolateral and posterior process; and 3) shape of the suprarostral cartilages. Interspecific variation of ossification sequences is limited during early stages, but conspicuous during later development. Early cranial ossification is typical of other anuran larvae, where the frontoparietal, exoccipital and parasphenoid ossify first. The ossification sequences of the cranial bones vary considerably within the four species. Both species of Taruga show a faster cranial ossification rate than Polypedates. Seven cranial bones form when larvae near metamorphic climax. Ossification of all 18 cranial bones is initiated by larval Gosner stage 46 in T. eques. However, some cranial bone formation is not initiated until after metamorphosis in the other three species. Postcranial sequence does not vary significantly. The comparison of adult osteology highlights two characters, which have not been previously recorded: presence/absence of the parieto-squamosal plates and bifurcated base of the omosternum. This study will provide a starting point for comparative analyses of rhacophorid skeletal ontogeny and facilitate the study of the evolution of

  14. High levels of diversity uncovered in a widespread nominal taxon: continental phylogeography of the neotropical tree frog Dendropsophus minutus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehara, Marcelo; Crawford, Andrew J; Orrico, Victor G D; Rodríguez, Ariel; Lötters, Stefan; Fouquet, Antoine; Barrientos, Lucas S; Brusquetti, Francisco; De la Riva, Ignacio; Ernst, Raffael; Urrutia, Giuseppe Gagliardi; Glaw, Frank; Guayasamin, Juan M; Hölting, Monique; Jansen, Martin; Kok, Philippe J R; Kwet, Axel; Lingnau, Rodrigo; Lyra, Mariana; Moravec, Jiří; Pombal, José P; Rojas-Runjaic, Fernando J M; Schulze, Arne; Señaris, J Celsa; Solé, Mirco; Rodrigues, Miguel Trefaut; Twomey, Evan; Haddad, Celio F B; Vences, Miguel; Köhler, Jörn

    2014-01-01

    Species distributed across vast continental areas and across major biomes provide unique model systems for studies of biotic diversification, yet also constitute daunting financial, logistic and political challenges for data collection across such regions. The tree frog Dendropsophus minutus (Anura: Hylidae) is a nominal species, continentally distributed in South America, that may represent a complex of multiple species, each with a more limited distribution. To understand the spatial pattern of molecular diversity throughout the range of this species complex, we obtained DNA sequence data from two mitochondrial genes, cytochrome oxidase I (COI) and the 16S rhibosomal gene (16S) for 407 samples of D. minutus and closely related species distributed across eleven countries, effectively comprising the entire range of the group. We performed phylogenetic and spatially explicit phylogeographic analyses to assess the genetic structure of lineages and infer ancestral areas. We found 43 statistically supported, deep mitochondrial lineages, several of which may represent currently unrecognized distinct species. One major clade, containing 25 divergent lineages, includes samples from the type locality of D. minutus. We defined that clade as the D. minutus complex. The remaining lineages together with the D. minutus complex constitute the D. minutus species group. Historical analyses support an Amazonian origin for the D. minutus species group with a subsequent dispersal to eastern Brazil where the D. minutus complex originated. According to our dataset, a total of eight mtDNA lineages have ranges >100,000 km2. One of them occupies an area of almost one million km2 encompassing multiple biomes. Our results, at a spatial scale and resolution unprecedented for a Neotropical vertebrate, confirm that widespread amphibian species occur in lowland South America, yet at the same time a large proportion of cryptic diversity still remains to be discovered.

  15. High levels of diversity uncovered in a widespread nominal taxon: continental phylogeography of the neotropical tree frog Dendropsophus minutus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Gehara

    Full Text Available Species distributed across vast continental areas and across major biomes provide unique model systems for studies of biotic diversification, yet also constitute daunting financial, logistic and political challenges for data collection across such regions. The tree frog Dendropsophus minutus (Anura: Hylidae is a nominal species, continentally distributed in South America, that may represent a complex of multiple species, each with a more limited distribution. To understand the spatial pattern of molecular diversity throughout the range of this species complex, we obtained DNA sequence data from two mitochondrial genes, cytochrome oxidase I (COI and the 16S rhibosomal gene (16S for 407 samples of D. minutus and closely related species distributed across eleven countries, effectively comprising the entire range of the group. We performed phylogenetic and spatially explicit phylogeographic analyses to assess the genetic structure of lineages and infer ancestral areas. We found 43 statistically supported, deep mitochondrial lineages, several of which may represent currently unrecognized distinct species. One major clade, containing 25 divergent lineages, includes samples from the type locality of D. minutus. We defined that clade as the D. minutus complex. The remaining lineages together with the D. minutus complex constitute the D. minutus species group. Historical analyses support an Amazonian origin for the D. minutus species group with a subsequent dispersal to eastern Brazil where the D. minutus complex originated. According to our dataset, a total of eight mtDNA lineages have ranges >100,000 km2. One of them occupies an area of almost one million km2 encompassing multiple biomes. Our results, at a spatial scale and resolution unprecedented for a Neotropical vertebrate, confirm that widespread amphibian species occur in lowland South America, yet at the same time a large proportion of cryptic diversity still remains to be discovered.

  16. High Levels of Diversity Uncovered in a Widespread Nominal Taxon: Continental Phylogeography of the Neotropical Tree Frog Dendropsophus minutus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehara, Marcelo; Crawford, Andrew J.; Orrico, Victor G. D.; Rodríguez, Ariel; Lötters, Stefan; Fouquet, Antoine; Barrientos, Lucas S.; Brusquetti, Francisco; De la Riva, Ignacio; Ernst, Raffael; Urrutia, Giuseppe Gagliardi; Glaw, Frank; Guayasamin, Juan M.; Hölting, Monique; Jansen, Martin; Kok, Philippe J. R.; Kwet, Axel; Lingnau, Rodrigo; Lyra, Mariana; Moravec, Jiří; Pombal, José P.; Rojas-Runjaic, Fernando J. M.; Schulze, Arne; Señaris, J. Celsa; Solé, Mirco; Rodrigues, Miguel Trefaut; Twomey, Evan; Haddad, Celio F. B.; Vences, Miguel; Köhler, Jörn

    2014-01-01

    Species distributed across vast continental areas and across major biomes provide unique model systems for studies of biotic diversification, yet also constitute daunting financial, logistic and political challenges for data collection across such regions. The tree frog Dendropsophus minutus (Anura: Hylidae) is a nominal species, continentally distributed in South America, that may represent a complex of multiple species, each with a more limited distribution. To understand the spatial pattern of molecular diversity throughout the range of this species complex, we obtained DNA sequence data from two mitochondrial genes, cytochrome oxidase I (COI) and the 16S rhibosomal gene (16S) for 407 samples of D. minutus and closely related species distributed across eleven countries, effectively comprising the entire range of the group. We performed phylogenetic and spatially explicit phylogeographic analyses to assess the genetic structure of lineages and infer ancestral areas. We found 43 statistically supported, deep mitochondrial lineages, several of which may represent currently unrecognized distinct species. One major clade, containing 25 divergent lineages, includes samples from the type locality of D. minutus. We defined that clade as the D. minutus complex. The remaining lineages together with the D. minutus complex constitute the D. minutus species group. Historical analyses support an Amazonian origin for the D. minutus species group with a subsequent dispersal to eastern Brazil where the D. minutus complex originated. According to our dataset, a total of eight mtDNA lineages have ranges >100,000 km2. One of them occupies an area of almost one million km2 encompassing multiple biomes. Our results, at a spatial scale and resolution unprecedented for a Neotropical vertebrate, confirm that widespread amphibian species occur in lowland South America, yet at the same time a large proportion of cryptic diversity still remains to be discovered. PMID:25208078

  17. Bacteria May Cope Differently from Similar Membrane Damage Caused by the Australian Tree Frog Antimicrobial Peptide Maculatin 1.1*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sani, Marc-Antoine; Henriques, Sónia Troeira; Weber, Daniel; Separovic, Frances

    2015-01-01

    Maculatin 1.1 (Mac1) is an antimicrobial peptide from the skin of Australian tree frogs and is known to possess selectivity toward Gram-positive bacteria. Although Mac1 has membrane disrupting activity, it is not known how Mac1 selectively targets Gram-positive over Gram-negative bacteria. The interaction of Mac1 with Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and human red blood cells (hRBC) and with their mimetic model membranes is here reported. The peptide showed a 16-fold greater growth inhibition activity against S. aureus (4 μm) than against E. coli (64 μm) and an intermediate cytotoxicity against hRBC (30 μm). Surprisingly, Sytox Green uptake monitored by flow cytometry showed that Mac1 compromised both bacterial membranes with similar efficiency at ∼20-fold lower concentration than the reported minimum inhibition concentration against S. aureus. Mac1 also reduced the negative potential of S. aureus and E. coli membrane with similar efficacy. Furthermore, liposomes mimicking the cell membrane of S. aureus (POPG/TOCL) and E. coli (POPE/POPG) were lysed at similar concentrations, whereas hRBC-like vesicles (POPC/SM/Chol) remained mostly intact in the presence of Mac1. Remarkably, when POPG/TOCL and POPE/POPG liposomes were co-incubated, Mac1 did not induce leakage from POPE/POPG liposomes, suggesting a preference toward POPG/TOCL membranes that was supported by surface plasma resonance assays. Interestingly, circular dichroism spectroscopy showed a similar helical conformation in the presence of the anionic liposomes but not the hRBC mimics. Overall, the study showed that Mac1 disrupts bacterial membranes in a similar fashion before cell death events and would preferentially target S. aureus over E. coli or hRBC membranes. PMID:26100634

  18. Bacteria May Cope Differently from Similar Membrane Damage Caused by the Australian Tree Frog Antimicrobial Peptide Maculatin 1.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sani, Marc-Antoine; Henriques, Sónia Troeira; Weber, Daniel; Separovic, Frances

    2015-08-07

    Maculatin 1.1 (Mac1) is an antimicrobial peptide from the skin of Australian tree frogs and is known to possess selectivity toward Gram-positive bacteria. Although Mac1 has membrane disrupting activity, it is not known how Mac1 selectively targets Gram-positive over Gram-negative bacteria. The interaction of Mac1 with Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and human red blood cells (hRBC) and with their mimetic model membranes is here reported. The peptide showed a 16-fold greater growth inhibition activity against S. aureus (4 μM) than against E. coli (64 μM) and an intermediate cytotoxicity against hRBC (30 μM). Surprisingly, Sytox Green uptake monitored by flow cytometry showed that Mac1 compromised both bacterial membranes with similar efficiency at ∼20-fold lower concentration than the reported minimum inhibition concentration against S. aureus. Mac1 also reduced the negative potential of S. aureus and E. coli membrane with similar efficacy. Furthermore, liposomes mimicking the cell membrane of S. aureus (POPG/TOCL) and E. coli (POPE/POPG) were lysed at similar concentrations, whereas hRBC-like vesicles (POPC/SM/Chol) remained mostly intact in the presence of Mac1. Remarkably, when POPG/TOCL and POPE/POPG liposomes were co-incubated, Mac1 did not induce leakage from POPE/POPG liposomes, suggesting a preference toward POPG/TOCL membranes that was supported by surface plasma resonance assays. Interestingly, circular dichroism spectroscopy showed a similar helical conformation in the presence of the anionic liposomes but not the hRBC mimics. Overall, the study showed that Mac1 disrupts bacterial membranes in a similar fashion before cell death events and would preferentially target S. aureus over E. coli or hRBC membranes. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Establishment of a sticky, large, oval-shaped thrombocyte cell line from tree frog as an ancestor of mammalian megakaryocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Sugimoto, Kenkichi

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance of blood vessels is important for homeostasis. Many types of cells and cytokines are involved in angiogenesis and blood vessel repair. In mammals, platelets, which are produced from megakaryocytes, play a major role in hemostasis. Other vertebrates have no platelets in their bloodstream. In these animals, thrombocytes aggregate to form a thrombus. Therefore, I established a frog hematopoietic cell line to elucidate the mechanism of hematopoiesis in this species. The frog-derived t...

  20. Echoing Hylas: A Study in Hellenistic and Roman Metapoetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heerink, M.

    2015-01-01

    In Echoing Hylas, Mark Heerink argues that the story of Hylas—a famous episode of the Argonauts’ voyage—was used by poets throughout classical antiquity to reflect symbolically on the position of their poetry in the literary tradition. Certain elements of the story, including the characters of Hylas

  1. Aquatic Plant Control Research Program. Large-Scale Operations Management Test of Use of the White Amur for Control of Problem Aquatic Plants. Report 5. Synthesis Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-06-01

    were the green tree frog , Florida cricket frog , pennisula cooter, and southern leopard frog , which comprised 22.0, 11.4, 7.5, and 4.1 percent of the... frog HYLIDAE Acris gryllus Florida cricket frog Hyla cinerea Green treefrog Hyla femoralis Pinewoods treefrog Hyla squirella Squirel treefrog REPTILIA...American coot, Florida gallinule, herring gull, mallard duck, least tern, tree swallow, red-winged blackbird, and boat-tailed grackle. Each of these

  2. Temporal and spatial changes in the diet of Hyla pulchella (Anura, Hylidae in southern Uruguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inés da Rosa

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article we report the diet of a population of the hylid frogHyla pulchella from southeastern Uruguay. We collected the specimens in ponds, where we identified microenvironments defined by the invertebrate assemblage, during one year divided into two seasons (warm and cold. We taxonomically determined 10365 invertebrates belonging to 21 categories in the digestive tracts of frogs. Weestimated the diversity of the diet and alimentary preference according to microenvironments and seasons. We estimated the expected richness of both diet and prey availability using a null model based on the hypergeometric distribution. We performed Discriminant Analyses and Kruskal-Wallis tests to detect changes in prey availability among microenvironments and between seasons. The overall diet in terms of frequencies was composed primarily of arthropods (mainly Araneae, Diptera, Hymenoptera, and Coleoptera and in terms of volume, by larvae. The most relevantitems to study the microenvironmental and seasonal variation in the available preys were Araneae, Collembola, Homoptera, Hymenoptera, Diptera, Dictioptera, Lepidoptera, Coleoptera, and larvae. Based on the null model curves and preference indexes we inferred positive selection by larvae, Isopoda, Dictioptera, Lepidoptera, and Diptera, and negative selection by Collembola and Hymenoptera. The diversityof diet and the null model curves indicated that the diet changes among microenvironments and seasons. This frog may be considered as a middle generalist predator, with some selective behavior and a combined search strategy (active and sit-and-wait. We conclude that the knowledge about the availability of preys is a relevant tool for trophic studies.

  3. A new and possibly critically endangered species of casque-headed tree frog Aparasphenodon Miranda-Ribeiro, 1920 (Anura, Hylidae) from southeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Assis, Clodoaldo Lopes; Santana, Diego José; Da Silva, Fabiano Aguiar; Quintela, Fernando Marques; Feio, Renato Neves

    2013-01-01

    A new species of casque-headed tree frog of the genus Aparasphenodon is described from the municipality of Cataguases (21°20'S, 42°45'W; 288 m a.s.l.) in the Atlantic Rain Forest of Minas Gerais State, southeastern Brazil. Aparasphenodon pomba sp. nov. is characterized by medium size (males, snout-vent length, SVL 51.6-60.5 mm; females, SVL 58.7-62.1 mm); snout almost round in dorsal view; dorsum and limbs with cream-colored reticulation on dark-brown background; spots on ventral surface cream-colored; lips white; cream-colored dorsolateral stripe originating on the snout, crossing the upper eyelid and extending posteriorly to the axilla level; and red iris.

  4. Final Environmental Impact Statement. Permit Application by United States Steel Corp., Proposed Lake Front Steel Mill, Conneaut, Ohio. Volume 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Hylidae * Spring Peeper Hyla crucifer * Gray Tree Frog Hyla versicoZor Ranidae * Leopard Frog Rana...red spotted newt, red backed salamander, spring peeper, gray tree frog , leopard frog , wood frog , green frog , bullfrog, brown snake, northern water...Commission, 1975. I.l 2-629 3.. m . Table 2-295 Distribution of Land Use on the Proposed Site -- 1977 Acres Z Trees 2199 40.4% Shrubs 2395 44.0 Herbs 315

  5. Hylid frog phylogeny and sampling strategies for speciose clades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, John J; Fetzner, James W; Parkinson, Christopher L; Reeder, Tod W

    2005-10-01

    How should characters and taxa be sampled to resolve efficiently the phylogeny of ancient and highly speciose groups? We addressed this question empirically in the treefrog family Hylidae, which contains > 800 species and may be nonmonophyletic with respect to other anuran families. We sampled 81 species (54 hylids and 27 outgroups) for two mitochondrial genes (12S, ND1), two nuclear genes (POMC, c-myc), and morphology (144 characters) in an attempt to resolve higher-level relationships. We then added 117 taxa to the combined data set, many of which were sampled for only one gene (12S). Despite the relative incompleteness of the majority of taxa, the resulting trees placed all taxa in the expected higher-level clades with strong support, despite some taxa being > 90% incomplete. Furthermore, we found no relationship between the completeness of a taxon and the support (parsimony bootstrap or Bayesian posterior probabilities) for its localized placement on the tree. Separate analysis of the data set with the most taxa (12S) gives a somewhat problematic estimate of higher-level relationships, suggesting that data sets scored only for some taxa (ND1, nuclear genes, morphology) are important in determining the outcome of the combined analysis. The results show that hemiphractine hylids are not closely related to other hylids and should be recognized as a distinct family. They also show that the speciose genus Hyla is polyphyletic, but that its species can be arranged into three monophyletic genera. A new classification of hylid frogs is proposed. Several potentially misleading signals in the morphological data are discussed.

  6. A new species of small tree frog, genus Dendropsophus (Anura: Hylidae) from the eastern Amazon lowlands of Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Andrade, H Mauricio; Ron, Santiago R

    2013-01-01

    We describe a new species of the hylid frog genus Dendropsophus from Amazonian Ecuador. The new species, Dendropsophus shiwiarum sp. nov., appears to be part of the D. microcephalus species group. Dendropsophus shiwiarum differs from its congeners by a combination of: (1) tympanic membrane non-differentiated and annulus evident only ventrally, (2) disc of Finger III and Toe IV with pointed tip, (3) dorsal surfaces of digital discs with a conical tubercle as result of projection of distal phalanx, and (4) small size (SVL < 19 mm). The new species is morphologically most similar to Dendropsophus riveroi. Examination of the type material of the latter suggests that some Ecuadorian populations reported as D. riveroi were misidentified and in fact belong to D. shiwiarum sp. nov.

  7. The relative roles of vicariance versus elevational gradients in the genetic differentiation of the high Andean tree frog, Dendropsophus labialis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarnizo, Carlos E; Amézquita, Adolfo; Bermingham, Eldredge

    2009-01-01

    There are two main competing hypotheses (vicariance and vertical ecotones) that attempt to explain the tremendous diversity of the tropical Andes. We test these hypotheses at the intraspecific level by analyzing mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences from 24 populations of the high Andean frog, Dendropsophus labialis (Anura: Hylidae). This species displays geographic variation in a number of phenotypic traits. Most of these traits covary with elevation, while few vary along the horizontal (latitudinal) axis. We found that, both, vicariance and elevation had important effects on the genetic differentiation in this species. We detected two highly divergent clades along the south-north axis using independent information from mitochondrial and nuclear genes, suggesting that this differentiation was the result of long-term barriers to gene flow rather than stochastic processes. We hypothesize mechanisms for D. labialis strong differentiation in light of geological and paleoenvironmental models of evolution in the northern Andean highlands.

  8. Differential predation on tadpoles influences the potential effects of hybridization between Hyla cinerea and Hyla gratiosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunzburger, M.S.

    2005-01-01

    Long-term effects of hybridization and introgression are influenced by performance of hybrids in habitats of parental species. The treefrogs Hyla cinerea and Hyla gratiosa, which typically breed in permanent and temporary habitats, respectively, have occasionally hybridized throughout the Southeastern United States. To predict in which of the parental habitats effects of hybridization might be strongest, I performed experiments to evaluate predation on tadpoles of H. cinerea, H. gratiosa, and F1 hybrids with predators typical of the breeding habitats of the parental species. Hybrid tadpoles had lower survival with sunfish than odonate naiad (dragonfly) predators and tended to increase hiding behavior in response to sunfish predation. Tadpoles of H. gratiosa also had higher survival with odonates than sunfish, but H. cinerea had similar survival with both predator types. These results suggest that hybrids are most likely to survive and return to breed in temporary habitats used by H. gratiosa. Thus, hybridization and introgression might be more likely to have adverse effects on populations of H. gratiosa than H. cinerea. Copyright 2005 Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles.

  9. Environmental Compliance Assessment and Management System (ECAMP), U.S. Air Force - German Supplement

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-10-01

    hasitanica Goldstreifensaiamander gold-stinped salamander Dendrobates spp. Baumsteigerfroesche tree frogs *Hyla. arborea Laubtroscb tree frog *Pelobats...anguinus Grottenolm cave salamander *Rana anrajis Moorfrosch marsh frog *Rana daimatina Springfrossch agile frog Rana hexadactyla Sechszebenfrosch six...toed frog *Rana latastei Italienischer Springfroscb Italian agile frog Rana tigerina. Asiatischer Ochsenfrosch Asiatic bullfrog * Salamandra luscharn

  10. Schooling and swimming behaviors of Hyla semilineata tadpoles (Anura, Hylidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne d' Heursel

    Full Text Available The schooling behavior of Hyla semilineata Spix, 1824 tadpoles is described. Experiments were carried out both in the natural environment and under controlled conditions to quantify the constant movement of these tadpoles. Bullfrog tadpoles (Rana catesbeiana Shaw, 1802, similar in size to the H. semilineata larvae, were used as controls in the experiments. Hyla semilineata tadpoles remained stationary for one sixth of the time that the bullfrog tadpoles did and the number of individuals of H. semilineata moving at any given moment was about seven times greater. The schooling behavior and constant swimming behavior of these tadpoles may enhance the effect of their warning coloration.

  11. The reanalysis of biogeography of the Asian tree frog, Rhacophorus (Anura: Rhacophoridae: geographic shifts and climatic change influenced the dispersal process and diversification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Pan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Rapid uplifts of the Tibetan Plateau and climate change in Asia are thought to have profoundly modulated the diversification of most of the species distributed throughout Asia. The ranoid tree frog genus Rhacophorus, the largest genus in the Rhacophoridae, is widely distributed in Asia and especially speciose in the areas south and east of the Tibetan Plateau. Here, we infer phylogenetic relationships among species and estimate divergence times, asking whether the spatiotemporal characteristics of diversification within Rhacophorus were related to rapid uplifts of the Tibetan Plateau and concomitant climate change. Phylogenetic analysis recovered distinct lineage structures in Rhacophorus, which indicated a clear distribution pattern from Southeast Asia toward East Asia and India. Molecular dating suggests that the first split within the genus date back to the Middle Oligocene (approx. 30 Ma. The Rhacophorus lineage through time (LTT showed that there were periods of increased speciation rate: 14–12 Ma and 10–4 Ma. In addition, ancestral area reconstructions supported Southeast Asia as the ancestral area of Rhacophorus. According to the results of molecular dating, ancestral area reconstructions and LTT we think the geographic shifts, the staged rapid rises of the Tibetan Plateau with parallel climatic changes and reinforcement of the Asian monsoons (15 Ma, 8 Ma and 4–3 Ma, possibly prompted a burst of diversification in Rhacophorus.

  12. Echoing Hylas : metapoetics in Hellenistic and Roman poetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heerink, Mark Antonius Johannes

    2010-01-01

    I have argued in my thesis that poets throughout classical antiquity used this myth to reflect allegorically on their own poetry. Certain elements of the myth as well as Hylas himself function as metaphors of the art of poetry as such. In the Hellenistic age, for example, Theocritus employs the

  13. FROGS report

    Science.gov (United States)

    FROGS Reports present information on current research relevant to felsic magmatism, including commentaries on problems of current interest. Please contact Calvin Miller, Geology, 6028B, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235; tel. 615-322-2986 about your own research, conferences, and ideas for stimulating commentaries.

  14. Parapharyngodon hugoi n. sp., a new nematode (Oxyuroidea: Pharyngodonidae) of the tree frog Trachycephalus typhonius (Linnaeus) from the Brazilian Pantanal, including a key to the congeners from amphibians of the American continent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Felipe B; Campião, Karla M; Luque, José L; Tavares, Luiz E R

    2017-06-01

    A new nematode Parapharyngodon hugoi n. sp. (Oxyuroidea: Pharyngodonidae) is described parasitising the large intestine of the tree frog Trachycephalus typhonius (Linnaeus) (Anura: Hylidae) from the wetlands of Pantanal, State of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. The new species exhibits a unique structure of the posterior cloacal lip in males, which is supported by a rigid V-shaped structure. Parapharyngodon hylidae parasitic in hylid frogs, including T. typhonius, from Mexico, is the most similar congener to P. hugoi n. sp. but is distinguished from the new species by the presence of a gubernaculum (vs absence), by the lateral alae in males ending far anterior to cloacal opening (vs near to it) and because in gravid females the ovaries encircle the oesophageal corpus. Additionally, the new species differs from its congeners as well as from species of Thelandros Wedl, 1862, a very closely related genus, by the combination of features such as spicule length, number of caudal papillae, morphology of the anterior cloacal lip, which is echinate, and position of ovaries. The geographical distribution of hosts seems to play an important role in the speciation process of Parapharyngodon spp.; however, due the lack of molecular data this issue along with the validity of both Thelandros and Parapharyngodon are still questions to be solved in the future, after improvement of the genetic database. A key to the species of Parapharyngodon parasitic in amphibians from the American continent is provided.

  15. Naturally occurring fluorescence in frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taboada, Carlos; Brunetti, Andrés E; Pedron, Federico N; Carnevale Neto, Fausto; Estrin, Darío A; Bari, Sara E; Chemes, Lucía B; Peporine Lopes, Norberto; Lagorio, María G; Faivovich, Julián

    2017-04-04

    Fluorescence, the absorption of short-wavelength electromagnetic radiation reemitted at longer wavelengths, has been suggested to play several biological roles in metazoans. This phenomenon is uncommon in tetrapods, being restricted mostly to parrots and marine turtles. We report fluorescence in amphibians, in the tree frog Hypsiboas punctatus, showing that fluorescence in living frogs is produced by a combination of lymph and glandular emission, with pigmentary cell filtering in the skin. The chemical origin of fluorescence was traced to a class of fluorescent compounds derived from dihydroisoquinolinone, here named hyloins. We show that fluorescence contributes 18-29% of the total emerging light under twilight and nocturnal scenarios, largely enhancing brightness of the individuals and matching the sensitivity of night vision in amphibians. These results introduce an unprecedented source of pigmentation in amphibians and highlight the potential relevance of fluorescence in visual perception in terrestrial environments.

  16. Frog eat frog: exploring variables influencing anurophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. John Measey

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. Frogs are generalist predators of a wide range of typically small prey items. But descriptions of dietary items regularly include other anurans, such that frogs are considered to be among the most important of anuran predators. However, the only existing hypothesis for the inclusion of anurans in the diet of post-metamorphic frogs postulates that it happens more often in bigger frogs. Moreover, this hypothesis has yet to be tested.Methods. We reviewed the literature on frog diet in order to test the size hypothesis and determine whether there are other putative explanations for anurans in the diet of post-metamorphic frogs. In addition to size, we recorded the habitat, the number of other sympatric anuran species, and whether or not the population was invasive. We controlled for taxonomic bias by including the superfamily in our analysis.Results. Around one fifth of the 355 records included anurans as dietary items of populations studied, suggesting that frogs eating anurans is not unusual. Our data showed a clear taxonomic bias with ranids and pipids having a higher proportion of anuran prey than other superfamilies. Accounting for this taxonomic bias, we found that size in addition to being invasive, local anuran diversity, and habitat produced a model that best fitted our data. Large invasive frogs that live in forests with high anuran diversity are most likely to have a higher proportion of anurans in their diet.Conclusions. We confirm the validity of the size hypothesis for anurophagy, but show that there are additional significant variables. The circumstances under which frogs eat frogs are likely to be complex, but our data may help to alert conservationists to the possible dangers of invading frogs entering areas with threatened anuran species.

  17. Phylogeography of four frog species in forest fragments of northeastern Brazil--a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnaval, Ana Carolina O Q

    2002-11-01

    I contrast mitochondrial DNA genealogies based on 612 bp of the cytochrome b gene across four co-distributed species of frogs in Northeastern Brazil. They are Hyla albomarginata, Hyla branneri, Proceratophrys boiei, and Scinax nebulosus. Samples were collected from the core or edge of six rainforest remnants in the states of Pernambuco and Alagoas. Three fragments are located within the humid Atlantic Forest morphoclimatic domain (municipalities of Cabo de Santo Agostinho, Ibateguara, and Jaqueira), two are located in the transition zone between the Atlantic Forest domain and the semi-arid Caatinga (Caruaru and Timbaúba), and one is found within the Caatinga (Brejo da Madre de Deus). Results show that local patterns and levels of genetic diversity are influenced by taxon-specific habitat requirements. Populations of the montane, closed-canopy species P. boiei show strong geographical structure, reflecting barriers to gene flow that predate human-driven habitat destruction. Species occurring along forest edges, such as H. albomarginata and S. nebulosus, show genetic patterns similar to those of P. boiei, but lower levels of genetic divergence. The more generalist Hyla branneri shows no geographic pattern. The data are in agreement with distribution and fossil data gathered for other groups of organisms, suggesting that mesic forests occupied the currently arid Caatinga in the recent past.

  18. The status of Leptopelis barbouri Ahl, 1929 and eleven other nomina of the current tree-frog genus Leptopelis (Arthroleptidae) described from East Africa, with a redescription of Leptopelis grandiceps Ahl, 1929.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvoždík, Václav; Tillack, Frank; Menegon, Michele; Loader, Simon P

    2014-04-28

    An investigation of name-bearing types and other relevant type specimens of twelve nominal Leptopelis taxa described from or distributed in the Eastern Arc Mountains in East Africa was carried out. Our aim was to clarify their status and where necessary revise respective nomina. We suggest several nomenclatural and taxonomic actions: 1) Leptopelis barbouri Ahl, 1929 is transferred to the synonymy of Leptopelis flavomaculatus (Günther, 1864) as a junior subjective synonym; 2) Leptopelis grandiceps Ahl, 1929 is resurrected from the synonymy of Leptopelis uluguruensis Barbour & Loveridge, 1928 as a valid species conforming to the tree frogs which have been known as 'L. barbouri' and a lectotype is designated; 3) Leptopelis usambarae Ahl, 1929 is transferred from the synonymy of L. uluguruensis Barbour & Loveridge, 1928 to the synonymy of L. grandiceps Ahl, 1929 as a subjective synonym; 4) a lectotype of Leptopelis amaniensis Ahl, 1929 (synonym of L. uluguruensis), Hylambates johnstoni Boulenger, 1897 (synonym of L. flavomaculatus) and Leptopelis signifer Ahl, 1929 (synonym of L. vermiculatus) is designated to stabilize identity of the nomina; and 5) the type locality of Leptopelis martiensseni Ahl, 1929 and Leptopelis tanganus Ahl, 1929 is corrected.

  19. Frogs host faecal bacteria typically associated with humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibb, Karen; Schobben, Xavier; Christian, Keith

    2017-07-01

    Tree frogs commonly access drinking water tanks; this may have human health implications. Although amphibians might not be expected to host mammalian faecal indicator bacteria (FIB), it is possible that they may have human FIB on their skin after exposure to human waste. We collected faeces and skin wash from green tree frogs (Litoria caerulea) from a natural environment, a suburban site, and a suburban site near a creek occasionally contaminated with sewage effluent. We used molecular techniques to test for FIB that are routinely used to indicate human faecal contamination. Enterococci colonies were isolated from both faecal and skin wash samples, and specific markers (Enterococcus faecium and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron) were found in frog faeces, demonstrating that these markers are not human- or mammalian-specific. Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron was detected in frogs from both natural and urban sites, but E. faecium was only associated with the sewage impacted site.

  20. Leap frog in slow motion: Divergent responses of tree species and life stages to climatic warming in Great Basin subalpine forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithers, Brian V; North, Malcolm P; Millar, Constance I; Latimer, Andrew M

    2018-02-01

    In response to climate warming, subalpine treelines are expected to move up in elevation since treelines are generally controlled by growing season temperature. Where treeline is advancing, dispersal differences and early life stage environmental tolerances are likely to affect how species expand their ranges. Species with an establishment advantage will colonize newly available habitat first, potentially excluding species that have slower establishment rates. Using a network of plots across five mountain ranges, we described patterns of upslope elevational range shift for the two dominant Great Basin subalpine species, limber pine and Great Basin bristlecone pine. We found that the Great Basin treeline for these species is expanding upslope with a mean vertical elevation shift of 19.1 m since 1950, which is lower than what we might expect based on temperature increases alone. The largest advances were on limber pine-dominated granitic soils, on west aspects, and at lower latitudes. Bristlecone pine juveniles establishing above treeline share some environmental associations with bristlecone adults. Limber pine above-treeline juveniles, in contrast, are prevalent across environmental conditions and share few environmental associations with limber pine adults. Strikingly, limber pine is establishing above treeline throughout the region without regard to site characteristic such as soil type, slope, aspect, or soil texture. Although limber pine is often rare at treeline where it coexists with bristlecone pine, limber pine juveniles dominate above treeline even on calcareous soils that are core bristlecone pine habitat. Limber pine is successfully "leap-frogging" over bristlecone pine, probably because of its strong dispersal advantage and broader tolerances for establishment. This early-stage dominance indicates the potential for the species composition of treeline to change in response to climate change. More broadly, it shows how species differences in dispersal

  1. Yet More Frogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shutler, Paul M. E.

    2011-01-01

    Extending a recent paper by Derek Holton, we show how to represent the algorithm for the Frog Problem diagrammatically. This diagrammatic representation suggests a simpler proof of the symmetrical case (equal numbers of frogs of each colour) by allowing the even and odd cases to be treated together. It also provides a proof in the asymmetrical…

  2. Courtship in Frogs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vertebrate vocalization came into existence for the first time in frogs. Acoustic signals produced by the frogs have well-defined physical characteristics and a clear biological meaning. The signals are meant to attract and assess the sex, species identity and genetic quality of potential mates. Acoustic communication plays a ...

  3. Hercules en Hylas: metapoëzie in de Hellenistische tijd

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heerink, M.A.J.

    2014-01-01

    In this article I will argue that the Hellenistic poets Apollonius of Rhodes (Argonautica 1.1153-1363) and Theocritus (Idyll 13) used the myth of Hylas and Heracles to express allegorically their “Callimachean” ideas about poetry. In similar but different ways, these poets offer an alternative to

  4. Heracles en Hylas: metapoëzie in de hellenistische tijd

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heerink, M.

    2014-01-01

    In this article I will argue that the Hellenistic poets Apollonius of Rhodes (Argonautica 1.1153-1363) and Theocritus (Idyll 13) used the myth of Hylas and Heracles to express allegorically their "Callimachean" ideas about poetry. In similar but different ways, these poets offer an alternative to

  5. Landing on branches in the frog Trachycephalus resinifictrix (Anura: Hylidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijma, Nienke N; Gorb, Stanislav N; Kleinteich, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Frogs (Lissamphibia: Anura) are famous for their saltatory or hopping locomotion, which is related to numerous anatomical specialisations that are characteristic for the group. However, while the biomechanics of take-off in frogs have been studied in detail, much less is known on how frogs land after a jump. Besides terrestrial and aquatic species, several lineages of frogs adopted an arboreal lifestyle and especially the biomechanics of landing on challenging, small, and unpredictable substrates, such as leaves or branches, are virtually unknown. Here we studied the landing kinematics of the arboreal frog Trachycephalus resinifictrix (Hylidae) on a wooden stick that was used to mimic a small tree branch. We observed two different landing behaviours: (1) landing on the abdomen and (2) attachment with the toes of either the forelimb or the hindlimb. In the latter case, the frogs performed a cartwheel around the stick, while they were only attached by their adhesive toe pads. We estimated the forces that act on the toes during this behaviour to be up to fourteen times the body weight of the animals. This behaviour demonstrates the remarkable adhesive capabilities of the toe pads and the body control of the frogs.

  6. Ecological Assessment of Vandenburg Air Force Base, California. Volume 2. Biological Inventory 1974/75

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-05-01

    8217 Family Hylidae Hyla regilla (Pacific Treefrog)+ Hyla Califomiae (California Treefrog)0 Family Ran idae Eana aurora (Red-legged Frog ) Rana boy...califomicus Ensatina Slender Salamander Arboreal Salamander Pacific Tree Frog Western Fence Lizard Coast Horned Lizard Western Skink Southern...Verification of Vegetation Map 77 3.1.8. Aging of Trees and Shrubs 79 1 ^jB^ 3.2. AddJtlonal Vegetation Data Summaries 8° 3.2.1. Presence and

  7. Reproducción de la rana Hyla labialis Reproducción del rana Hvla labialis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hunter Alice S.

    1962-11-01

    Full Text Available 1. Se estudió la ovogénesis en la Hyla labialis para compararla con el mismo proceso en las ranas que viven en países con estaciones climatéricas definidas. Por inyección de glándula pituitaria se pueden obtener huevos fertilizados durante los meses de octubre a junio, y rara vez en los otros meses. 2. Se midieron y se contaron ovocitos enteros en muestras de ovarios maduros, inmaduros y después de la ovulación, Hay ovocitos de todos los tamaños presentes en los ovarios maduros; en los ovarios no maduros, y después de la ovulación hay células de todos los tamaños hasta 1.200 mm. de diámetro. 3. En secciones de ovarios se midió el diámetro de las células y de los núcleos y plaquetas vitelinas. Se estudiaron los cambios citológicos de los núcleos y también del citoplasma. Las plaquetas vitelinas aparecen en células que tienen un diámetro de 0.350 a 0.400 mm, La melanina aparece en ovocitos que tienen 0.700 mm. o más de diámetro. En general, los cambios citológicos son muy semejantes a los descritos por otros investigadores en otras especies. 4. La diferencia más obvia e interesante entre la ovogénesis de la Hyla Iabialis y la de otras especies descritas es la presencia de ovocitos de todos los tamaños y en cantidades grandes en el ovario inmediatamente después de la ovulación. Se piensa que los resultados demuestran que el proceso de ovogénesis sigue durante todos los meses sin detenerse como se hace en países con estaciones climatéricas definidas. 1. Oögenesis of the frog, Hyla labialis has been studied in order to Compare it with the same process in frogs which live in countries with definite climatic seasons. Fertilized eggs can be obtained after pituitary injection during the months of October through June and occasionally during the rest of the year. 2. Whole oöcytes were measured and counted in samples taken from mature ovaries, immature ovaries and ovaries after ovulation had taken place. There are o

  8. New species of Hyla from the "Serra da Mantiqueira, Itatiaia, Rio de Janeiro" State - (Amphibia, Anura, Hylidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Peixoto, Oswaldo Luiz; Cruz, Carlos Alberto Gonçalves da

    1992-01-01

    Hyla gouveai n. sp. is described and illustrated and it is closest to the bigger individuals of the species in the group "circumdata", not presenting, however, the characteristic pattern of dark transversal bands on the posterior inner coxal surface.

  9. Courtship in Frogs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 12. Courtship in Frogs Role of Acoustic Communication in Amphibian Courtship Behaviour. Debjani Roy. General Article Volume 1 Issue 12 December 1996 pp 39-48 ...

  10. ニホンアマガエルの体サイズと広告音の関係

    OpenAIRE

    高橋, 康太; 下岡, ゆき子; 篠原, 正典

    2016-01-01

    Japanese tree frog, Hyla japonica is one of the most popular frogs in Japan. Though, less is known about their callcharacteristics and vocal communications. We collected 40 different advertisement calls at their natural habitats during thereproductive season(June and July, 2015), analyzed relationships between those characteristics and body size, and revealedthat bigger frog songs more longer and more lower.

  11. Population genetic structure and phylogeographical pattern of rice grasshopper, Oxya hyla intricata, across Southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Zhang, Min; Qu, Yanhua; Ren, Zhumei; Zhang, Jianzhen; Guo, Yaping; Heong, K L; Villareal, Bong; Zhong, Yang; Ma, Enbo

    2011-04-01

    The rice grasshopper, Oxya hyla intricata, is a rice pest in Southeast Asia. In this study, population genetic diversity and structure of this Oxya species was examined using both DNA sequences and AFLP technology. The samples of 12 populations were collected from four Southeast Asian countries, among which 175 individuals were analysed using mitochondrial DNA cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) sequences, and 232 individuals were examined using amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) to test whether the phylogeographical pattern and population genetics of this species are related to past geological events and/or climatic oscillations. No obvious trend of genetic diversity was found along a latitude/longitude gradient among different geographical groups. Phylogenetic analysis indicated three deep monophyletic clades that approximately correspond to three geographical regions separated by high mountains and a deep strait, and TCS analysis also revealed three disconnected networks, suggesting that spatial and temporal separations by vicariance, which were also supported by AMOVA as a source of the molecular variance presented among groups. Gene flow analysis showed that there had been frequent historical gene flow among local populations in different regions, but the networks exhibited no shared haplotype among populations. In conclusion, the past geological events and climatic fluctuations are the most important factor on the phylogeographical structure and genetic patterns of O. hyla intricata in Southeast Asia. Habitat, vegetation, and anthropogenic effect may also contribute to gene flow and introgression of this species. Moreover, temperature, abundant rainfall and a diversity of graminaceous species are beneficial for the migration of O. hyla intricata. High haplotype diversity, deep phylogenetic division, negative Fu's F (s) values and unimodal and multimodal distribution shapes all suggest a complicated demographic expansion pattern of these O. hyla

  12. It's a Frog's Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Audrey L.; Sterling, Donna R.

    2003-01-01

    When a preschool teacher unexpectedly found tadpoles in the school's outdoor baby pool, she recognized an unusual opportunity for her students to study pond life up close. By following the tadpoles' development, students learned about frogs, life cycles, habitats. (Contains 1 resource.)

  13. 福井県あわら市御簾尾からのニホンアマガエル(Hyla japonica)の青色変異個体の記録

    OpenAIRE

    川内, 一憲; 奥野, 宏樹; 田中, 幸枝; 川崎, 隆徳; 田中, 俊之; 小鍛治, 優; 藤井, 豊; KAWAUTI, Kazunori; OKUNO, Hiroki; TANAKA, Yukie; KAWASAKI, Takanori; TANAKA, Toshiyuki; KOKAJI, Masaru; FUJII, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Although the information on the blue color variants of the Japanese tree frog in Fukui Prefecture was reported bymedia several times, formal records such as journal report was not kept.In order to keep the first formal data, we prepared a record of the blue color variant captured in Misunoo area,Awara city in 2013.

  14. Did true frogs 'dispersify'?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kin Onn; Brown, Rafe M

    2017-08-01

    The interplay between range expansion and concomitant diversification is of fundamental interest to evolutionary biologists, particularly when linked to intercontinental dispersal and/or large scale extinctions. The evolutionary history of true frogs has been characterized by circumglobal range expansion. As a lineage that survived the Eocene-Oligocene extinction event (EOEE), the group provides an ideal system to test the prediction that range expansion triggers increased net diversification. We constructed the most densely sampled, time-calibrated phylogeny to date in order to: (i) characterize tempo and patterns of diversification; (ii) assess the impact of the EOEE; and (iii) test the hypothesis that range expansion was followed by increased net diversification. We show that late Eocene colonization of novel biogeographic regions was not affected by the EOEE and surprisingly, global expansion was not followed by increased net diversification. On the contrary, the diversification rate declined or did not shift following geographical expansion. Thus, the diversification history of true frogs contradicts the prevailing expectation that amphibian net diversification accelerated towards the present or increased following range expansion. Rather, our results demonstrate that despite their dynamic biogeographic history, true frogs diversified at a relatively constantly rate, even as they colonized the major land masses of Earth. © 2017 The Author(s).

  15. Nova espécie de Hyla da Serra da Mantiqueira, Itatiaia, Estado do Rio de Janeiro, (Amphibia, Anura, Hylidae New species of Hyla from the "Serra da Mantiqueira, Itatiaia, Rio de Janeiro" State - (Amphibia, Anura, Hylidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oswaldo Luiz Peixoto

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyla gouveai n. sp. is described and illustrated and it is closest to the bigger individuals of the species in the group "circumdata", not presenting, however, the characteristic pattern of dark transversal bands on the posterior inner coxal surface.

  16. Geographic variation in the advertisement calls of Hyla eximia and its possible explanations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth E. Rodríguez-Tejeda

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Populations of species occupying large geographic ranges are often phenotypically diverse as a consequence of variation in selective pressures and drift. This applies to attributes involved in mate choice, particularly when both geographic range and breeding biology overlap between related species. This condition may lead to interference of mating signals, which would in turn promote reproductive character displacement (RCD. We investigated whether variation in the advertisement call of the mountain treefrog (Hyla eximia is linked to geographic distribution with respect to major Mexican river basins (Panuco, Lerma, Balsas and Magdalena, or to coexistence with its sister (the canyon treefrog, Hyla arenicolor or another related species (the dwarf treefrog, Tlalocohyla smithii. We also evaluated whether call divergence across the main river basins could be linked to genetic structure. We found that the multidimensional acoustic space of calls from two basins where H. eximia currently interacts with T. smithii, was different from the acoustic space of calls from H. eximia elsewhere. Individuals from these two basins were also distinguishable from the rest by both the phylogeny inferred from mitochondrial sequences, and the genetic structure inferred from nuclear markers. The discordant divergence of H. eximia advertisement calls in the two separate basins where its geographic range overlaps that of T. smithii can be interpreted as the result of two independent events of RCD, presumably as a consequence of acoustic interference in the breeding choruses, although more data are required to evaluate this possibility.

  17. Differences found in the macroinvertebrate community composition in the presence or absence of the invasive alien crayfish, Orconectes hylas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeland-Riggert, Brandye T.; Cairns, Stefan H.; Poulton, Barry C.; Riggert, Chris M.

    2016-01-01

    Introductions of alien species into aquatic ecosystems have been well documented, including invasions of crayfish species; however, little is known about the effects of these introductions on macroinvertebrate communities. The woodland crayfish (Orconectes hylas (Faxon)) has been introduced into the St. Francis River watershed in southeast Missouri and has displaced populations of native crayfish. The effects of O. hylas on macroinvertebrate community composition were investigated in a fourth-order Ozark stream at two locations, one with the presence of O. hylas and one without. Significant differences between sites and across four sampling periods and two habitats were found in five categories of benthic macroinvertebrate metrics: species richness, percent/composition, dominance/diversity, functional feeding groups, and biotic indices. In most seasons and habitat combinations, the invaded site had significantly higher relative abundance of riffle beetles (Coleoptera: Elmidae), and significantly lower Missouri biotic index values, total taxa richness, and both richness and relative abundance of midges (Diptera: Chironomidae). Overall study results indicate that some macroinvertebrate community differences due to the O. hylas invasion were not consistent between seasons and habitats, suggesting that further research on spatial and temporal habitat use and feeding ecology of Ozark crayfish species is needed to improve our understanding of the effects of these invasions on aquatic communities.

  18. Differences Found in the Macroinvertebrate Community Composition in the Presence or Absence of the Invasive Alien Crayfish, Orconectes hylas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeland-Riggert, Brandye T; Cairns, Stefan H; Poulton, Barry C; Riggert, Christopher M

    2016-01-01

    Introductions of alien species into aquatic ecosystems have been well documented, including invasions of crayfish species; however, little is known about the effects of these introductions on macroinvertebrate communities. The woodland crayfish (Orconectes hylas (Faxon)) has been introduced into the St. Francis River watershed in southeast Missouri and has displaced populations of native crayfish. The effects of O. hylas on macroinvertebrate community composition were investigated in a fourth-order Ozark stream at two locations, one with the presence of O. hylas and one without. Significant differences between sites and across four sampling periods and two habitats were found in five categories of benthic macroinvertebrate metrics: species richness, percent/composition, dominance/diversity, functional feeding groups, and biotic indices. In most seasons and habitat combinations, the invaded site had significantly higher relative abundance of riffle beetles (Coleoptera: Elmidae), and significantly lower Missouri biotic index values, total taxa richness, and both richness and relative abundance of midges (Diptera: Chironomidae). Overall study results indicate that some macroinvertebrate community differences due to the O. hylas invasion were not consistent between seasons and habitats, suggesting that further research on spatial and temporal habitat use and feeding ecology of Ozark crayfish species is needed to improve our understanding of the effects of these invasions on aquatic communities.

  19. Differences Found in the Macroinvertebrate Community Composition in the Presence or Absence of the Invasive Alien Crayfish, Orconectes hylas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandye T Freeland-Riggert

    Full Text Available Introductions of alien species into aquatic ecosystems have been well documented, including invasions of crayfish species; however, little is known about the effects of these introductions on macroinvertebrate communities. The woodland crayfish (Orconectes hylas (Faxon has been introduced into the St. Francis River watershed in southeast Missouri and has displaced populations of native crayfish. The effects of O. hylas on macroinvertebrate community composition were investigated in a fourth-order Ozark stream at two locations, one with the presence of O. hylas and one without. Significant differences between sites and across four sampling periods and two habitats were found in five categories of benthic macroinvertebrate metrics: species richness, percent/composition, dominance/diversity, functional feeding groups, and biotic indices. In most seasons and habitat combinations, the invaded site had significantly higher relative abundance of riffle beetles (Coleoptera: Elmidae, and significantly lower Missouri biotic index values, total taxa richness, and both richness and relative abundance of midges (Diptera: Chironomidae. Overall study results indicate that some macroinvertebrate community differences due to the O. hylas invasion were not consistent between seasons and habitats, suggesting that further research on spatial and temporal habitat use and feeding ecology of Ozark crayfish species is needed to improve our understanding of the effects of these invasions on aquatic communities.

  20. The lung-eardrum pathway in three treefrog and four dendrobatid frog species: some properties of sound transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehret, G; Keilwerth, E; Kamada, T

    1994-10-01

    Frequency-response curves of the tympanum and lateral body wall (lung area) were measured by laser Doppler vibrometry in three treefrog (Smilisca baudini, Hyla cinerea, Osteopilus septentrionalis) and four dendrobatid frog (Dendrobates tinctorius, D. histrionicus, Epipedobates tricolor, E. azureiventris) species. The high-frequency cut-off of the body wall response was always lower than that of the tympanum. The best response frequencies of the lateral body wall were lower than those of the tympanum in some species (S. baudini, O. septentrionalis, D. tinctorius), while in the others they were rather similar. Best tympanic frequencies and best body wall response frequencies tended to differ more with increasing body size. Stimulation of the tympanum by sound transfer through 3.14 mm2 areas of the lateral body wall showed that the lung-eardrum pathway can be in two states, depending on breathing activity within the lungs: 44% (in Smilisca), 39% (in Hyla) and 31% (in Osteopilus) of the eardrum vibrations were 2.5-8 times (8-18 dB) larger when the frogs were breathing with the lungs compared with non-breathing conditions. The vibration amplitudes of the tympanum and lateral body wall of the treefrogs followed the same dependence on sound intensity, only absolute amplitudes differed between species. Our results suggest that the lung-eardrum pathway attenuates high-frequency components of species-specific calls and enhances low-frequency components. In addition, an amplitude modulation is imposed on the low frequencies during the rhythm of breathing.

  1. Lithobates sylvaticus (wood frog)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Pam

    2016-01-01

    A single specimen found southwest of Hattiesburg in Timberton (31.270391oN, 89.327675oW; WGS 84). 23 July 2015. Gary, Kat, and Ron Lukens. Verifi ed by Kenneth Krysko, Florida Museum of Natural History (UF-Herpetology 176455). This species has never been recorded from the state of Mississippi before (Dodd 2013. Frogs of the United States and Canada – Volume 2. John Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Maryland. 982 pp.). According to Dodd (2013), the closest population is located in east central Alabama, approximately 400 km to the northeast, as documented by Davis and Folkerts (1986. Brimleyana 12:29-50).

  2. Museum material reveals a frog parasite emergence after the invasion of the cane toad in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phalen David N

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A parasite morphologically indistinguishable from Myxidium immersum (Myxozoa: Myxosporea found in gallbladders of the invasive cane toad (Bufo marinus was identified in Australian frogs. Because no written record exists for such a parasite in Australian endemic frogs in 19th and early 20th century, it was assumed that the cane toad introduced this parasite. While we cannot go back in time ourselves, we investigated whether material at the museum of natural history could be used to retrieve parasites, and whether they were infected at the time of their collection (specifically prior to and after the cane toad translocation to Australia in 1935. Results Using the herpetological collection at the Australian Museum we showed that no myxospores were found in any animals (n = 115 prior to the cane toad invasion (1879-1935. The green and golden bell frog (Litoria aurea, the Peron's tree frog (Litoria peronii, the green tree frog (Litoria caerulea and the striped marsh frog (Limnodynastes peronii were all negative for the presence of the parasite using microscopy of the gallbladder content and its histology. These results were sufficient to conclude that the population was free from this disease (at the expected minimum prevalence of 5% at 99.7% confidence level using the 115 voucher specimens in the Australian Museum. Similarly, museum specimens (n = 29 of the green and golden bell frog from New Caledonia, where it was introduced in 19th century, did not show the presence of myxospores. The earliest specimen positive for myxospores in a gallbladder was a green tree frog from 1966. Myxospores were found in eight (7.1%, n = 112 frogs in the post cane toad introduction period. Conclusion Australian wildlife is increasingly under threat, and amphibian decline is one of the most dramatic examples. The museum material proved essential to directly support the evidence of parasite emergence in Australian native frogs. This parasite can be

  3. Evaluation of uranium anomalies in the Hylas zone and northern Richmond basin, east-central Virginia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baillieul, T.A.; Dexter, J.J.

    1982-01-01

    Conclusions from this study are: (1) Radon values in ground water from the Hylas Zone and the adjacent Richmomd Basin are anomalous and may indicate nearby uranium-enriched source rocks. (2) Pegmatites, protomylonitic granite, and the Petersburg Granite can be good sources of uranium for ground water. The pegmatites described in this report appear to be the best source rocks because of uranium values ranging from 82 to 235 ppM eU and corresponding low values of Th as well (average Th/U = 0.18). The protomylonitic granite has an average Th/U ratio of 0.5. Ground-water samples (ranging from 70 to 270 ppB uranium) from southwest Richmond are believed to have originated from a major ground-water system at the contact of the Petersburg Granite and overlying coastal plain sediments. Thus, the Petersburg Granite may be considered a possible source of uranium available to ground water entering the Richmond Basin. (3) The Richmond Basin could host uranium deposits of the sandstone class. As mentioned above, there appears to be an adequate supply of uranium in rocks surrounding the basin. The basin environment is presently classified as unevaluated. Further work is warranted on the basis of this study. (4) Pegmatites in the Hylas Zone could be favorable for the occurrence of uranium deposits of the pegmatitic class. However, it is not known how the uranium occurs in the pegmatites, and only pegmatites exposed in the Boscobel quarry were examined. Therefore, this environment remains unevaluated. 3 figures, 4 tables

  4. A Comparison of V-Frog[C] to Physical Frog Dissection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalley, James P.; Piotrowski, Phillip S.; Battaglia, Barbara; Brophy, Keith; Chugh, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine and compare the effectiveness of virtual frog dissection using V-Frog[C] and physical frog dissection on learning, retention, and affect. Subjects were secondary students enrolled in year-long life science classes in a suburban high school (N=102). Virtual dissections were done with V-Frog[C], a…

  5. 49 CFR 213.137 - Frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frogs. 213.137 Section 213.137 Transportation... TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Track Structure § 213.137 Frogs. (a) The flangeway depth measured from a plane across the wheel-bearing area of a frog on Class 1 track shall not be less than 13/8 inches, or...

  6. Dry-season retreat and dietary shift of the dart-poison frog Dendrobates tinctorius (Anura: Dendrobatidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marga Born

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Seasonal rainfall affects tropical forest dynamics and behaviorof species that are part of these ecosystems. The positive correlation between amphibian activity patterns and rainfall has been demonstrated repeatedly. Members of Dendrobatidae, a clade of Neotropical dart-poison frogs, are well known for their habitat use and behavior during the rainy season, but their behavior during the dry season has received little attention. We studied habitat use and diet of the dendrobatid frog Dendrobates tinctorius in French Guiana during the rainy and dry seasons. Unlike many other dendrobatid frogs, D. tinctorius does not maintain territories for the entire rainy season. Both sexes colonize recently formed canopy-gaps and stay in these forest patches for only a few weeks. The frogs inthese patches consume a great diversity of prey, consisting of ants, beetles, wasps, insect larvae, and mites. During the dry season, frogs move to retreat sites in mature forest, such as palm bracts and tree holes. The frogs are less active and consume fewer prey items in the dry season, and they consume fewer wasps and insect larvae, but more termites. Ants are the most common prey items during both the wet and dry seasons. We discuss the effects of shifts in seasonal habitat use on the territorial behavior of dendrobatid frogs.

  7. Deforestation and the structure of frog communities in the Humedale Terraba-Sierpe, Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlani, Dario; Francesco Ficetola, Gentile; Colombo, Giorgio; Ugurlucan, Murat; De Bernardi, Fiorenza

    2009-03-01

    Loss of tropical forests is a major cause of biodiversity loss worldwide. Although drastic modification of the habitat has been shown to negatively affect amphibians, we are far from a complete understanding of the response of amphibian communities to deforestation. We studied frog assemblages in a gradient of forest modification in a humid area of Costa Rica, where the primary forest has been partially converted into pasture. The study area is a mosaic of primary palm forest, abandoned pasture covered by secondary forest, and pasture. Species richness was assessed by randomized walk surveys and audio strip transects. We also measured ecological features to evaluate the relationship between landscape alteration and amphibian distribution. The study area hosted a large number of amphibian species. We focused our monitoring on six anurans: Leptodactylus labialis, Eleutherodactylus fitzingeri, E. diastema, Hyla rosenbergi, H. microcephale, and Cochranella granulosa. Three species (L. labialis, H. rosenbergi, and H. microcephala) were most abundant in pasture areas with livestock presence, while E. fitzingeri, E. diastema, and C. granulosa were associated with primary forest. Most of the variation in community structure was explained by the joint effect of forest alteration and presence of livestock. Whereas forest specialists suffer direct negative effect from deforestation, generalist species can take advantage of forest alteration and the presence of farm animals. Species that are able to take advantage of the new environmental characteristics associated with human modifications of landscapes will come to prevail in the new communities.

  8. Salmonella Infection and Water Frogs

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-01-12

    This podcast, featuring lead investigator Shauna Mettee, discusses the first known outbreak of Salmonella in people due to contact with water frogs.  Created: 1/12/2010 by National Center for Zoonotic, Vector-Borne, and Enteric Diseases (NCZVED).   Date Released: 1/12/2010.

  9. Guinea Worm in a Frog

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-03-09

    Dr. Mark Eberhard, a retired parasitologist and CDC guest researcher, discusses Guinea worm infection in a wild-caught frog.  Created: 3/9/2017 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 3/9/2017.

  10. FROGS (Friends of Granites) report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Calvin

    This VGP News, which is devoted to petrology, is a good one for noting the existence of FROGS. FROGS is, as the name suggests, an informal organization of people whose research relates in one way or another to granitic rocks. Its purpose has been to promote communication among geoscientists with different perspectives and concerns about felsic plutonism. Initially, a major focus was experimental petrology and integration of field-oriented and lab-oriented viewpoints; now that there is the opportunity to communicate with the Eos readership, an obvious additional goal will be to bring together volcanic and plutonic views of felsic magmatism.FROGS first gathered in late 1982 under the guidance of E-an Zen and Pete Toulmin (both at U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Reston, Va.), who saw a need for greater interaction among those interested in granites and for renewed, focused experimental investigations. They produced two newsletters (which were sent out by direct mail) and organized an informal meeting at the Geological Society of America meeting at Indianapolis, Ind., and then turned over the FROG reins to Sue Kieffer (USGS, Flagstaff, Ariz.) and John Clemens (Arizona State University, Tempe). They generated another newsletter, which was directly mailed to a readership that had grown beyond 200.

  11. Mechanics of the frog ear

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dijk, Pim; Mason, Matthew J.; Schoffelen, Richard L. M.; Narins, Peter M.; Meenderink, Sebastiaan W. F.

    The frog inner ear contains three regions that are sensitive to airborne sound and which are functionally distinct. (1) The responses of nerve fibres innervating the low-frequency, rostral part of the amphibian papilla (AP) are complex. Electrical tuning of hair cells presumably contributes to the

  12. Habitat use by a tree frog species of Scinax (Amphibia, Hylidae at an urban forest fragment from south-eastern Brazil Uso do hábitat por uma espécie de Scinax (Amphibia, Hylidae em um fragmento florestal urbano no sudeste do Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conrado A. B. Galdino

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available We studied the pattern of habitat use by the tree frog Scinax aff. perereca. Fieldworks were performed from August 1996 to August 1997 at Parque das Mangabeiras, Belo Horizonte, State of Minas Gerais, southeastern Brazil. Calling males were observed in September, October and December 1996, February to April and June 1997. Females were found only in October 1996. Specimens were found perched on vegetation, on the ground or on stones near waterfall. At Parque das Mangabeiras, S. aff. perereca occupied nine types of substrata. The most frequently used substrata were shrubs, stones at the stream edges, and fallen trunks. The pattern of spatial occupation varied among months. Males were found calling in aggregations on the vegetation and spatial niche breadth was related to species abundance.No presente estudo é tratado o uso do hábitat por Scinax aff. perereca, durante o período de agosto de 1996 a agosto de 1997 em uma área de mata urbana em Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, sudeste do Brasil. Machos em atividade de vocalização foram encontrados em setembro, outubro e dezembro de 1996 e de fevereiro a abril e junho de 1997. As fêmeas foram capturadas apenas em outubro de 1996. Os indivíduos foram encontrados em galhos da vegetação no solo ou em pedras próximas a quedas de água. Na área estudada, S. aff. perereca usa nove tipos de substratos, sendo os mais freqüentes a vegetação herbácea, pedras na margem do riacho e troncos caídos. O padrão de ocupação espacial variou ao longo dos meses. Os machos foram encontrados vocalizando em agregados e a largura de nicho espacial foi diretamente relacionada a abundância da espécie.

  13. Comment: 200 [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 合データベースセンター) Photo: Takeru Nakazato (Database Center for Life Science) nakazato 2009/11/04 17:26:47 2010/01/14 20:11:35 ... ...Japanese tree frog Hyla japonica Hyla_japonica_L.png 200.png Takeru Nakazato (Database Center for Life Scien...ce) licensed under CC Attribution2.1 Japan ニホンアマガエル Hyla japonica 撮影:仲里猛留(ライフサイエンス統

  14. CARE AND FEEDING OF FROGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Margaret; Chiang, Eugene, E-mail: mpan@astro.berkeley.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2012-01-15

    'Propellers' are features in Saturn's A ring associated with moonlets that open partial gaps. They exhibit non-Keplerian motion (Tiscareno et al.); the longitude residuals of the best-observed propeller, 'Bleriot', appear consistent with a sinusoid of period {approx}4 years. Pan and Chiang proposed that propeller moonlets librate in 'frog resonances' with co-orbiting ring material. By analogy with the restricted three-body problem, they treated the co-orbital material as stationary in the rotating frame and neglected non-co-orbital material. Here we use simple numerical experiments to extend the frog model, including feedback due to the gap's motion, and drag associated with the Lindblad disk torques that cause Type I migration. Because the moonlet creates the gap, we expect the gap centroid to track the moonlet, but only after a time delay t{sub delay}, the time for a ring particle to travel from conjunction with the moonlet to the end of the gap. We find that frog librations can persist only if t{sub delay} exceeds the frog libration period P{sub lib}, and if damping from Lindblad torques balances driving from co-orbital torques. If t{sub delay} << Pl{sub ib}, then the libration amplitude damps to zero. In the case of Bleriot, the frog resonance model can reproduce the observed libration period P{sub lib} {approx_equal} 4 yr. However, our simple feedback prescription suggests that Bleriot's t{sub delay} {approx} 0.01P{sub lib}, which is inconsistent with the observed libration amplitude of 260 km. We urge more accurate treatments of feedback to test the assumptions of our toy models.

  15. CARE AND FEEDING OF FROGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Margaret; Chiang, Eugene

    2012-01-01

    'Propellers' are features in Saturn's A ring associated with moonlets that open partial gaps. They exhibit non-Keplerian motion (Tiscareno et al.); the longitude residuals of the best-observed propeller, 'Blériot', appear consistent with a sinusoid of period ∼4 years. Pan and Chiang proposed that propeller moonlets librate in 'frog resonances' with co-orbiting ring material. By analogy with the restricted three-body problem, they treated the co-orbital material as stationary in the rotating frame and neglected non-co-orbital material. Here we use simple numerical experiments to extend the frog model, including feedback due to the gap's motion, and drag associated with the Lindblad disk torques that cause Type I migration. Because the moonlet creates the gap, we expect the gap centroid to track the moonlet, but only after a time delay t delay , the time for a ring particle to travel from conjunction with the moonlet to the end of the gap. We find that frog librations can persist only if t delay exceeds the frog libration period P lib , and if damping from Lindblad torques balances driving from co-orbital torques. If t delay ib , then the libration amplitude damps to zero. In the case of Blériot, the frog resonance model can reproduce the observed libration period P lib ≅ 4 yr. However, our simple feedback prescription suggests that Blériot's t delay ∼ 0.01P lib , which is inconsistent with the observed libration amplitude of 260 km. We urge more accurate treatments of feedback to test the assumptions of our toy models.

  16. Spatio-Temporal Dynamics in Collective Frog Choruses Examined by Mathematical Modeling and Field Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aihara, Ikkyu; Mizumoto, Takeshi; Otsuka, Takuma; Awano, Hiromitsu; Nagira, Kohei; Okuno, Hiroshi G.; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports theoretical and experimental studies on spatio-temporal dynamics in the choruses of male Japanese tree frogs. First, we theoretically model their calling times and positions as a system of coupled mobile oscillators. Numerical simulation of the model as well as calculation of the order parameters show that the spatio-temporal dynamics exhibits bistability between two-cluster antisynchronization and wavy antisynchronization, by assuming that the frogs are attracted to the edge of a simple circular breeding site. Second, we change the shape of the breeding site from the circle to rectangles including a straight line, and evaluate the stability of two-cluster and wavy antisynchronization. Numerical simulation shows that two-cluster antisynchronization is more frequently observed than wavy antisynchronization. Finally, we recorded frog choruses at an actual paddy field using our sound-imaging method. Analysis of the video demonstrated a consistent result with the aforementioned simulation: namely, two-cluster antisynchronization was more frequently realized.

  17. From frog integument to human skin: dermatological perspectives from frog skin biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haslam, I.S.; Roubos, E.; Mangoni, M.L.; Yoshizato, K.; Vaudry, H.; Kloepper, J.E.; Pattwell, D.M.; Maderson, P.F.A.; Paus, R.

    2014-01-01

    For over a century, frogs have been studied across various scientific fields, including physiology, embryology, neuroscience, (neuro)endocrinology, ecology, genetics, behavioural science, evolution, drug development, and conservation biology. In some cases, frog skin has proven very successful as a

  18. Snoring puddle frog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, Mark Anthony

    2000-01-01

    Full text: The purpose of this paper is to hold a biological mirror in front of ourselves, the nuclear energy community, and to suggest that the reflection we will see there will help us both professionally and as members of a broader society. Let us start with sex. For sex to function as a means of reproduction, a male and a female of a particular species have to recognise each other and mate. The important terms here are 'particular species' and 'recognise'. Within most species, extraordinarily precise mate recognition systems have evolved. The precise frequency of the croak of a particular species of frog; the precise seasonal coloration of a particular species of salmon; the precise length of the tail of a particular species of bird; each is recognisable instantly to a prospective mate, though not to untrained human ears or eyes. 'The Recognition Concept of Species' (1985) is a monograph that has become something of a 'classic' in annals of evolutionary biology. Its author, HEH Paterson, suggests that a species can be defined as a group of organisms that share a common mate recognition system. Mating is an exchange of genes, and creatures that do not recognise each other do not exchange genes. A mate recognition system closes off the gene pool and may increasingly isolate its participants from even their nearest relatives. Biological evolution has numerous links and parallels with the evolution of human cultures. Some of our recognition systems seem to have a knack for drawing everyone in - American popular culture, for example, is now inescapable. Other recognition systems repel all but a few - take, or rather don't take, the Hell's Angels or the Ku Klux Klan. We, as members of the nuclear energy culture, are members of a closed and even repellent gene pool. We share a recognition system by which we perpetuate ourselves from generation to generation, from Hiroshima to Chernobyl. Outsiders do not understand our language: terms like 'credit for fission products

  19. Early-Life Diet Affects Host Microbiota and Later-Life Defenses Against Parasites in Frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutie, Sarah A; Shea, Lauren A; Kupselaitis, Marinna; Wilkinson, Christina L; Kohl, Kevin D; Rohr, Jason R

    2017-10-01

    Food resources can affect the health of organisms by altering their symbiotic microbiota and affecting energy reserves for host defenses against parasites. Different diets can vary in their macronutrient content and therefore they might favor certain bacterial communities of the host and affect the development and maintenance of the immune system, such as the inflammatory or antibody responses. Thus, testing the effect of diet, especially for animals with wide diet breadths, on host-associated microbiota and defenses against parasites might be important in determining infection and disease risk. Here, we test whether the early-life diet of Cuban tree frogs (Osteopilus septentrionalis) affects early- and later-life microbiota as well as later-life defenses against skin-penetrating, gut worms (Aplectana hamatospicula). We fed tadpoles two ecologically common diets: a diet of conspecifics or a diet of algae (Arthrospira sp.). We then: (1) characterized the gut microbiota of tadpoles and adults; and (2) challenged adult frogs with parasitic worms and measured host resistance (including the antibody-mediated immune response) and tolerance of infections. Tadpole diet affected bacterial communities in the guts of tadpoles but did not have enduring effects on the bacterial communities of adults. In contrast, tadpole diet had enduring effects on host resistance and tolerance of infections in adult frogs. Frogs that were fed a conspecific-based diet as tadpoles were more resistant to worm penetration compared with frogs that were fed an alga-based diet as tadpoles, but less resistant to worm establishment, which may be related to their suppressed antibody response during worm establishment. Furthermore, frogs that were fed a conspecific-based diet as tadpoles were more tolerant to the effect of parasite abundance on host mass during worm establishment. Overall, our study demonstrates that the diet of Cuban tree frog tadpoles affects the gut microbiota and defenses against

  20. The Ups and Downs of Frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Janice Schnake; Tamme, Tina

    2001-01-01

    Presents a science activity in which students simulate increases and decreases in frog populations to get a better understanding of different environmental issues affecting animal populations. Includes simulations for both natural frog populations as well as populations affected by human activities. (YDS)

  1. Semi-automated identification of leopard frogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovska-Delacrétaz, Dijana; Edwards, Aaron; Chiasson, John; Chollet, Gérard; Pilliod, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Principal component analysis is used to implement a semi-automatic recognition system to identify recaptured northern leopard frogs (Lithobates pipiens). Results of both open set and closed set experiments are given. The presented algorithm is shown to provide accurate identification of 209 individual leopard frogs from a total set of 1386 images.

  2. The frog inner ear : picture perfect?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mason, Matthew J.; Segenhout, Johannes M.; Cobo-Cuan, Ariadna; Quiones, Patricia M.; van Dijk, Pim

    Many recent accounts of the frog peripheral auditory system have reproduced Wever's (1973) schematic cross-section of the ear of a leopard frog. We sought to investigate to what extent this diagram is an accurate and representative depiction of the anuran inner ear, using three-dimensional

  3. On the Uniqueness of FROG Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendory, Tamir; Sidorenko, Pavel; Eldar, Yonina C.

    2017-05-01

    The problem of recovering a signal from its power spectrum, called phase retrieval, arises in many scientific fields. One of many examples is ultra-short laser pulse characterization in which the electromagnetic field is oscillating with ~10^15 Hz and phase information cannot be measured directly due to limitations of the electronic sensors. Phase retrieval is ill-posed in most cases as there are many different signals with the same Fourier transform magnitude. To overcome this fundamental ill-posedness, several measurement techniques are used in practice. One of the most popular methods for complete characterization of ultra-short laser pulses is the Frequency-Resolved Optical Gating (FROG). In FROG, the acquired data is the power spectrum of the product of the unknown pulse with its delayed replica. Therefore the measured signal is a quartic function of the unknown pulse. A generalized version of FROG, where the delayed replica is replaced by a second unknown pulse, is called blind FROG. In this case, the measured signal is quadratic with respect to both pulses. In this letter we introduce and formulate FROG-type techniques. We then show that almost all band-limited signals are determined uniquely, up to trivial ambiguities, by blind FROG measurements (and thus also by FROG), if in addition we have access to the signals power spectrum.

  4. Evolutionary radiation of earless frogs in the Andes: molecular phylogenetics and habitat shifts in high-elevation terrestrial breeding frogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf von May

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The loss of hearing structures and loss of advertisement calls in many terrestrial breeding frogs (Strabomantidae living at high elevations in South America are common and intriguing phenomena. The Andean frog genus Phrynopus Peters, 1873 has undergone an evolutionary radiation in which most species lack the tympanic membrane and tympanic annulus, yet the phylogenetic relationships among species in this group remain largely unknown. Here, we present an expanded molecular phylogeny of Phrynopus that includes 24 nominal species. Our phylogeny includes Phrynopus peruanus, the type species of the genus, and 10 other species for which genetic data were previously unavailable. We found strong support for monophyly of Phrynopus, and that two nominal species—Phrynopus curator and Phrynopus nicoleae—are junior synonyms of Phrynopus tribulosus. Using X-ray computed tomography (CT imaging, we demonstrate that the absence of external hearing structures is associated with complete loss of the auditory skeletal elements (columella in at least one member of the genus. We mapped the tympanum condition on to a species tree to infer whether the loss of hearing structures took place once or multiple times. We also assessed whether tympanum condition, body size, and body shape are associated with the elevational distribution and habitat use. We identified a single evolutionary transition that involved the loss of both the tympanic membrane and tympanic annulus, which in turn is correlated with the absence of advertisement calls. We also identified several species pairs where one species inhabits the Andean grassland and the other montane forest. When accounting for phylogenetic relatedness among species, we detected a significant pattern of increasing body size with increasing elevation. Additionally, species at higher elevations tend to develop shorter limbs, shorter head, and shorter snout than species living at lower elevations. Our findings strongly suggest

  5. Eleutherodactylus frog introductions to Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Fred; Campbell, Earl W.; Allison, Allen; Pratt, Thane K.

    1999-01-01

    As an oceanic archipelago isolated from continental source areas, Hawaii lacks native terrestrial reptiles and amphibians, Polynesians apparently introduced seven gecko and skink species after discovering the islands approximately 1500 years ago, and another 15 reptiles and five frogs have been introduced in the last century and a half (McKeown 1996). The Polynesian introductions are probably inadvertent because the species involved are known stowaway dispersers (Gibbons 1985; Dye and Steadman 1990), In contrast, most of the herpetological introductions since European contact with Hawaii have been intentional. Several frog species were released for biocontrol of insects (e.g., Dendrobates auratus, Bufo marinus, Rana rugosa, Bryan 1932; Oliver and Shaw 1953), and most of the remaining species are released or escaped pets (e.g., Phelsuma spp., Chamaeleo jacksonii, Iguana iguana, McKeown 1996), Government-approved releases have not occurred for many years, but the rate of establishment of new species has increased in the past few decades because of the importation and subsequent release of pets.

  6. Molecular Confirmation of Frogs (Anura) as Hosts of Corethrellidae (Diptera) in the Southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irby, William S

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Flies in the family Corethrellidae Edwards 1932 (Diptera) are known to be attracted to the mating calls of male frogs. For the first time, the hosts of corethrellids were identified to species by analyzing bloodmeals taken from resting female flies. A portion of the cytochrome b gene was amplified and sequenced from blood-engorged flies using vertebrate-specific primers. The flies were collected over 6 yr at two locations in the southeastern United States from resting boxes and natural resting sites (rodent burrows). Potential host abundance focused on frog surveillance, and estimation relied on visual encounters, passive trapping (artificial refugia), and call surveys. This study confirms that corethrellids take blood from tree frogs (Hylidae); however, it was found that true frogs (Lithobates Fitzinger 1843 (Ranidae: Anura) sp.) were the principal host selected by Corethrella brakeleyi (Coquillett 1902) (~73% of identified bloodmeals). These preliminary data suggest that host selection of Corethrella Freeman 1962 sp. is not necessarily correlated with host calling abundance. PMID:29117370

  7. Reproductive isolating mechanisms and molecular phylogenetic relationships among Palearctic and Oriental brown frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumida, Masayuki; Ueda, Hiroaki; Nishioka, Midori

    2003-05-01

    Crossing experiments were made among various brown frog species and populations collected from Japan, China, Russia and Taiwan. The main purpose of these experiments was to confirm the existence of reproductive isolating mechanisms among Rana pirica from Japan, R. chensinensis from China and R. chensinensis from Russia, and between these three taxa and the other brown frogs distributed in the Palearctic and Oriental regions. It was found that there was no or a slight gametic isolation among the three taxa. While there was a nearly equal number of male and female offspring in the control groups, the hybrid frogs were all males, and completely sterile upon attaining sexual maturity. Thus, each of the Japanese R. pirica and the Russian R. chensinensis is a valid species, distinct from the Chinese R. chensinensis. The phylogenetic tree based on nucleotide sequence data from the mitochondrial 12S and 16S rRNA genes of the Palearctic and Oriental brown frogs showed that the three taxa are included in a cluster together with the other species with 2n=24 chromosomes. The present crossing experiments and molecular data support the hypothesis that each of them is a separate but closely related species.

  8. Molecular Confirmation of Frogs (Anura) as Hosts of Corethrellidae (Diptera) in the Southeastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Jeremy V; Irby, William S

    2017-09-01

    Flies in the family Corethrellidae Edwards 1932 (Diptera) are known to be attracted to the mating calls of male frogs. For the first time, the hosts of corethrellids were identified to species by analyzing bloodmeals taken from resting female flies. A portion of the cytochrome b gene was amplified and sequenced from blood-engorged flies using vertebrate-specific primers. The flies were collected over 6 yr at two locations in the southeastern United States from resting boxes and natural resting sites (rodent burrows). Potential host abundance focused on frog surveillance, and estimation relied on visual encounters, passive trapping (artificial refugia), and call surveys. This study confirms that corethrellids take blood from tree frogs (Hylidae); however, it was found that true frogs (Lithobates Fitzinger 1843 (Ranidae: Anura) sp.) were the principal host selected by Corethrella brakeleyi (Coquillett 1902) (~73% of identified bloodmeals). These preliminary data suggest that host selection of Corethrella Freeman 1962 sp. is not necessarily correlated with host calling abundance. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America.

  9. A NEW TREE-FROG FROM MALAWI (HYPEROLIINAEt AMPHIBIA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All the Type material was collected by the author from dense vegetation surrounding an over- grown pool in a dambo area on Chisambo Tea Estate, Mlanje, Malawi, at ca. 655 metres above sea-level and is deposited in the Umtali Museum, Rhodesia. HOLOTYPE: An adult male (UM. 19815), collected on 19th January 1969 ...

  10. Meeting the "Standards" with Vanishing Frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Cindy B.; Matthews, Catherine E.; Patrick, Patricia

    2001-01-01

    Explains methods for introducing high school students to the issue of the declining amphibian population. Plays the game Frogs' Futures following a seminar as an instructional strategy. Describes the game, procedures, and rules. (YDS)

  11. FROGS Report Friends of Granite Summer 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    FROGS Reports present information on current research relevant to felsic magmatism, including commentaries on problems of current interest. Please contact Calvin Miller (6028B, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235) concerning your own research, conferences, and ideas for stimulating commentaries.

  12. Development of the pseudothumb in frogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokita, Masayoshi; Iwai, Noriko

    2010-01-01

    Frogs have highly conserved hand and foot morphology, possessing four fingers and five toes. As an exception, two Japanese ranid frog species, the Otton frog Babina subaspera and the dagger frog Babina holsti, possess a unique thumb-like structure (the pseudothumb) in the forelimb, giving an appearance of a total of five fingers on the hand. To obtain insights into the developmental mechanisms that generate this novel character, we investigated the hand morphogenesis of the Otton frog. The unique morphological pattern of the pseudothumb was already established in juveniles. Surprisingly, the bud-like structure, which is similar to the area of inductive activity (e.g. feather buds in birds and the carapacial ridge in turtles), was detected over the site where the future prepollex develops in larvae. By contrast, this bud-like structure was not found in larvae of other ranid species. We discuss possible scenarios that would favour the evolution of this very unusual trait in frogs. PMID:20147308

  13. Tree Contractions and Evolutionary Trees

    OpenAIRE

    Kao, Ming-Yang

    2001-01-01

    An evolutionary tree is a rooted tree where each internal vertex has at least two children and where the leaves are labeled with distinct symbols representing species. Evolutionary trees are useful for modeling the evolutionary history of species. An agreement subtree of two evolutionary trees is an evolutionary tree which is also a topological subtree of the two given trees. We give an algorithm to determine the largest possible number of leaves in any agreement subtree of two trees T_1 and ...

  14. Anfíbios Anuros da coleção Adolpho Lutz: III - Hyla claresignata Lutz & B. Lutz, 1939

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertha Lutz

    1948-12-01

    Full Text Available Hyla claresignata Lutz & Lutz, 1939, is a large species apparently not closely allied to the other known Brazilian hylas. It is characterized by the very small tympanum; the head is short and the snout rounded; the legs are long, the hands and feet unusually large, the latter extensively webbbed. The specific name is derived from the insular, irregular, or roughly triangular, dark spots, with a light halo, found mostly in the dorso-lateral region and on the legs. It belongs to the rain-forest fauna of the Marítime Range. The adult is a bromeliad-dweller and the tadpole rhyacophilous. DESCRIPTION. Vomerine teeth in two separate, oblique, groups, behind the large choanae, parallel to the posterior half of their inner border. Tongue entire, short, very broad and hardly free behind. Snout short, rounded, with distinct canthus rostralis and gradually sloping loreal region. Eye very large and prominent, its horizontal diameter almost equal to the distance between its anterior corner and the tip of the snout. Tympanum very small, less than one third of the diameter of the eye, but distinct, partly covered by a short, heavy ridge. Lateral fingers less than one third webbed; fourth finger slightly longer than the second, just reaching the base of the disk of the third; subarticular tubercles well developed; an angular pollex rudiment, more noticeable in the males. Toes almost completely webbed, the edge of the web inserted at the base of the disk on the third and the fifth; an inner metatarsal tubercle. Skin smooth above, granular beneath, on the throat minutely so. No dermal appendage on the hell. Habit robust, head broader than long, body rather heavy, slightly narrowed in the postaxillary region. Legs long, the tibiotarsal articulation reaching beyond the tip of the snout when adpressed. Type (female: 61 mm. (Fig. 1. DIAGNOSIS of TADPOLE (by G. Orton. "A large specialized, mountain-stream tadpole, with wide head an elongated, flattened snout, greatly

  15. 49 CFR 213.139 - Spring rail frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Spring rail frogs. 213.139 Section 213.139..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Track Structure § 213.139 Spring rail frogs. (a) The... wing rail shall be solidly tamped and fully and tightly bolted. (c) Each frog with a bolt hole defect...

  16. 49 CFR 213.141 - Self-guarded frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Self-guarded frogs. 213.141 Section 213.141..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Track Structure § 213.141 Self-guarded frogs. (a) The raised guard on a self-guarded frog shall not be worn more than three-eighths of an inch. (b) If repairs...

  17. Prototype next generation frog foundation - preliminary evaluation : research results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Conventional wisdom suggests that a solid or rigid one-piece frog is preferred because it is easy to maintain. However, testing and subsequent modeling demonstrated that a flexible frog (i.e., a two-piece frog split in the flangeway) produced signifi...

  18. THE PROPELLER AND THE FROG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Margaret; Chiang, Eugene

    2010-01-01

    'Propellers' in planetary rings are disturbances in ring material excited by moonlets that open only partial gaps. We describe a new type of co-orbital resonance that can explain the observed non-Keplerian motions of propellers. The resonance is between the moonlet underlying the propeller and co-orbiting ring particles downstream of the moonlet where the gap closes. The moonlet librates within the gap about an equilibrium point established by co-orbiting material and stabilized by the Coriolis force. In the limit of small libration amplitude, the libration period scales linearly with the gap azimuthal width and inversely as the square root of the co-orbital mass. The new resonance recalls but is distinct from conventional horseshoe and tadpole orbits; we call it the 'frog' resonance, after the relevant term in equine hoof anatomy. For a ring surface density and gap geometry appropriate for the propeller Bleriot in Saturn's A ring, our theory predicts a libration period of ∼4 years, similar to the ∼3.7 year period over which Bleriot's orbital longitude is observed to vary. These librations should be subtracted from the longitude data before any inferences about moonlet migration are made.

  19. Visual mate choice in poison frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, K; Symula, R; Clough, M; Cronin, T

    1999-11-07

    We investigated female mate choice on the basis of visual cues in two populations of Dendrobates pumilio, the strawberry poison frog, from the Bocas del Toro Archipelago in Panama, Central America. Mate choice experiments were carried out by presenting subject females of each of two morphs of this species (orange and green) from two different island populations (Nancy Key and Pope Island) with object frogs (one of each morph) under glass at one end of a terrarium. Recorded calls were played simultaneously from behind both object frogs. The experiments were carried out under two light regimes: (i) white light, and (ii) relatively monochromatic filtered blue light. Subject females from each population displayed a significant preference for their own morph under white light, but not under blue light. These results indicate that female D. pumilio use visual cues in mate choice, and suggest that colour may be the visual cue they use.

  20. FROG The Fast and Realistic OPENGL Displayer

    CERN Document Server

    Quertenmont, Loic

    2009-01-01

    FROG is a generic framework dedicated to visualisation of events in high energy experiment. It is suitable to any particular physics experiment or detector design. The code is light ($<3\\textrm{MB}$) and fast (browsing time ~20 events per second for a large High Energy Physics experiment) and can run on various operating systems, as its object-oriented structure (C++) relies on the cross-platform OPENGL and GLUT libraries. Moreover, FROG does not require installation of third party libraries for the visualisation. This document describes the features and principles of FROG version 1.106, its working scheme and numerous functionalities such as: 3D and 2D visualisations, graphical user interface, mouse interface, configuration files, production of pictures of various format, integration of personal objects, etc. Finally, several examples of its current applications are presented for illustration.

  1. FROGS (Friends of Granites) Report, summer 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeYoreo, J. J.; Wickham, Stephen M.; Miller, Calvin

    This is the second Eos-published FROGS Report. Our purpose is to disseminate information and stimulate thinking concerning felsic magmatism in general and granitoids in particular. We intend to publish semiannually information about events and publications that are relevant to the study of felsic rocks, brief updates on research being done by granitoid researchers, and commentaries on important new and/or controversial themes. FROGS Reports is critically dependent upon response by those with an interest in research on felsic rocks. Please keep me (Calvin Miller, 6028B, Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville TN 37235) informed about upcoming or recent conferences, major publications, etc. Also, send me your suggestions for topics for (and/or volunteer to write) pertinent commentaries for FROGS Reports.

  2. Breeding Guild Determines Frog Distributions in Response to Edge Effects and Habitat Conversion in the Brazil's Atlantic Forest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo B Ferreira

    Full Text Available Understanding the response of species with differing life-history traits to habitat edges and habitat conversion helps predict their likelihood of persistence across changing landscape. In Brazil's Atlantic Forest, we evaluated frog richness and abundance by breeding guild at four distances from the edge of a reserve: i 200 m inside the forest, ii 50 m inside the forest, iii at the forest edge, and iv 50 m inside three different converted habitats (coffee plantation, non-native Eucalyptus plantation, and abandoned pastures, hereafter matrix types. By sampling a dry and a wet season, we recorded 622 individual frogs representing 29 species, of which three were undescribed. Breeding guild (i.e. bromeliad, leaf-litter, and water-body breeders was the most important variable explaining frog distributions in relation to edge effects and matrix types. Leaf-litter and bromeliad breeders decreased in richness and abundance from the forest interior toward the matrix habitats. Water-body breeders increased in richness toward the matrix and remained relatively stable in abundance across distances. Number of large trees (i.e. DBH > 15 cm and bromeliads best explained frog richness and abundance across distances. Twenty species found in the interior of the forest were not found in any matrix habitat. Richness and abundance across breeding guilds were higher in the rainy season but frog distributions were similar across the four distances in the two seasons. Across matrix types, leaf-litter species primarily used Eucalyptus plantations, whereas water-body species primarily used coffee plantations. Bromeliad breeders were not found inside any matrix habitat. Our study highlights the importance of primary forest for bromeliad and leaf-litter breeders. We propose that water-body breeders use edge and matrix habitats to reach breeding habitats along the valleys. Including life-history characteristics, such as breeding guild, can improve predictions of frog

  3. Breeding Guild Determines Frog Distributions in Response to Edge Effects and Habitat Conversion in the Brazil's Atlantic Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Rodrigo B; Beard, Karen H; Crump, Martha L

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the response of species with differing life-history traits to habitat edges and habitat conversion helps predict their likelihood of persistence across changing landscape. In Brazil's Atlantic Forest, we evaluated frog richness and abundance by breeding guild at four distances from the edge of a reserve: i) 200 m inside the forest, ii) 50 m inside the forest, iii) at the forest edge, and iv) 50 m inside three different converted habitats (coffee plantation, non-native Eucalyptus plantation, and abandoned pastures, hereafter matrix types). By sampling a dry and a wet season, we recorded 622 individual frogs representing 29 species, of which three were undescribed. Breeding guild (i.e. bromeliad, leaf-litter, and water-body breeders) was the most important variable explaining frog distributions in relation to edge effects and matrix types. Leaf-litter and bromeliad breeders decreased in richness and abundance from the forest interior toward the matrix habitats. Water-body breeders increased in richness toward the matrix and remained relatively stable in abundance across distances. Number of large trees (i.e. DBH > 15 cm) and bromeliads best explained frog richness and abundance across distances. Twenty species found in the interior of the forest were not found in any matrix habitat. Richness and abundance across breeding guilds were higher in the rainy season but frog distributions were similar across the four distances in the two seasons. Across matrix types, leaf-litter species primarily used Eucalyptus plantations, whereas water-body species primarily used coffee plantations. Bromeliad breeders were not found inside any matrix habitat. Our study highlights the importance of primary forest for bromeliad and leaf-litter breeders. We propose that water-body breeders use edge and matrix habitats to reach breeding habitats along the valleys. Including life-history characteristics, such as breeding guild, can improve predictions of frog distributions in

  4. FROGS (Friends of Granites) Report, Fall 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Calvin F.; Lawford, J.

    This is the first official FROGS report in Eos. Our purpose is to disseminate information about the status of felsic igneous petrology, providing information and opinions about research, ideas, and problems that relate especially to granitoids but also, clearly, to felsic volcanic rocks. A major goal has been to bridge the gap between field-based and experimental approaches. For several years, FROGS reports have existed as occasional informal newsletters, but we feel that our purposes will be better served by semiannual publication as a section of the VGP News. A briefer companion report will also be published in The Lattice, the newsletter of the Mineralogical Society of America.

  5. Birds and frogs in mathematics and physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyson, Freeman J

    2010-01-01

    Some scientists are birds, others are frogs. Birds fly high in the air and survey broad vistas of mathematics out to the far horizon. They delight in concepts that unify our thinking and bring together diverse problems from different parts of the landscape. Frogs live in the mud below and see only the flowers that grow nearby. They delight in the details of particular objects, and they solve problems one at a time. A brief history of mathematics and its applications in physics is presented in this article. (from the history of physics)

  6. Finding your mate at a cocktail party: frequency separation promotes auditory stream segregation of concurrent voices in multi-species frog choruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Nityananda

    Full Text Available Vocal communication in crowded social environments is a difficult problem for both humans and nonhuman animals. Yet many important social behaviors require listeners to detect, recognize, and discriminate among signals in a complex acoustic milieu comprising the overlapping signals of multiple individuals, often of multiple species. Humans exploit a relatively small number of acoustic cues to segregate overlapping voices (as well as other mixtures of concurrent sounds, like polyphonic music. By comparison, we know little about how nonhuman animals are adapted to solve similar communication problems. One important cue enabling source segregation in human speech communication is that of frequency separation between concurrent voices: differences in frequency promote perceptual segregation of overlapping voices into separate "auditory streams" that can be followed through time. In this study, we show that frequency separation (ΔF also enables frogs to segregate concurrent vocalizations, such as those routinely encountered in mixed-species breeding choruses. We presented female gray treefrogs (Hyla chrysoscelis with a pulsed target signal (simulating an attractive conspecific call in the presence of a continuous stream of distractor pulses (simulating an overlapping, unattractive heterospecific call. When the ΔF between target and distractor was small (e.g., ≤3 semitones, females exhibited low levels of responsiveness, indicating a failure to recognize the target as an attractive signal when the distractor had a similar frequency. Subjects became increasingly more responsive to the target, as indicated by shorter latencies for phonotaxis, as the ΔF between target and distractor increased (e.g., ΔF = 6-12 semitones. These results support the conclusion that gray treefrogs, like humans, can exploit frequency separation as a perceptual cue to segregate concurrent voices in noisy social environments. The ability of these frogs to segregate

  7. Do all frogs swim alike? The effect of ecological specialization on swimming kinematics in frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robovska-Havelkova, Pavla; Aerts, Peter; Rocek, Zbynek; Prikryl, Tomas; Fabre, Anne-Claire; Herrel, Anthony

    2014-10-15

    Frog locomotion has attracted wide scientific interest because of the unusual and derived morphology of the frog pelvic girdle and hind limb. Previous authors have suggested that the design of the frog locomotor system evolved towards a specialized jumping morphology early in the radiation of the group. However, data on locomotion in frogs are biased towards a few groups and most of the ecological and functional diversity remains unexplored. Here, we examine the kinematics of swimming in eight species of frog with different ecologies. We use cineradiography to quantify movements of skeletal elements from the entire appendicular skeleton. Our results show that species with different ecologies do differ in the kinematics of swimming, with the speed of limb extension and especially the kinematics of the midfoot being different. Our results moreover suggest that this is not a phylogenetic effect because species from different clades with similar ecologies converge on the same swimming kinematics. We conclude that it is important to analyze frog locomotion in a broader ecological and evolutionary context if one is to understand the evolutionary origins of this behavior. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  8. A new species of Hyla (Anura: Hylidae) from the Sierra Mixes, Oaxaca, Mexico, with comments on ontogenetic variation in the tadpoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustach, P.C.; Mendelson, J.R.; McDiarmid, R.W.; Campbell, J.A.

    2000-01-01

    We describe a new species of Hyla that differs from the similar-loohng species H. pentheter by reaching a larger size, ha\\iing a smaller tympanum, more webbing on the feet, more extensive nuptial excrescences, and a different color pattern on the flanks. \\Ve tentatively place this new species in the phenetic assemblage commonly referred to as the H. bistincta group. \\Ve describe and illlistrate the tadpole and discuss ontogenetic variation among tadpoles, with reference to existing information on tadpoles of other species from the H. bistincta group.

  9. Unusually high genetic diversity in the Bornean Limnonectes kuhlii-like fanged frogs (Anura: Dicroglossidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Masafumi; Kuraishi, Norihiro; Eto, Koshiro; Hamidy, Amir; Nishikawa, Kanto; Shimada, Tomohiko; Yambun, Paul; Vairappan, Charles Santhanaraju; Hossman, Mohamad Yazid Bin

    2016-09-01

    A fanged frog Limnonectes kuhlii was once thought to be wide-ranging in Southeast Asia, but is now confined to its type locality Java through recent phylogenetic studies, which clarified heterospecific status of non-Javanese populations, and monophyly of Bornean populations. However, large genetic differences among Bornean populations suggest occurrence of cryptic species, which we test using dense geographic sampling. We estimated the phylogenetic relationships among samples of Bornean populations together with their putative relatives from the continental Southeast Asia, using 2517bp sequences of the 12S rRNA, tRNA(val), and 16S rRNA of mitochondrial DNA, and 2367bp sequences of the NCX1, POMC, and RAG1 of nuclear genes. In the mtDNA trees, Bornean L. kuhlii-like frogs formed a monophyletic group split into 18 species lineages including L. hikidai, with the deepest phylogenetic split separating L. cintalubang from the remaining species. Almost all of these lineages co-occur geographically, and two to three lineages were found syntopically in each locality. Co-occurrence of more than one lineage may be maintained by differential morphology and microhabitat selection. These syntopic lineages should be regarded as distinct species. Our results clearly indicate that taxonomic revision is urgent to clarify many evolutionary problems of Bornean L. kuhlii-like frogs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Anfíbios Anuros do Distrito Federal The Frogs of the Federal District of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertha Lutz

    1954-03-01

    Full Text Available The frogs of the Federal District of Brazil are listed and discussed as to habit, biology and ecology. The F. D is situated 22° 54' 24" S. & 43° 10' 21" W Gr. and comprises 1.356 km². Its topography includes sea-shore, maritime scrub, lagoons, plains and marsh, open slopes, forested mountains and great heads of rock. Three thousand feet of altitude are attained at two points. Fifty two different frogs occur in the F.D. Three fifths of them live in open country. Two fifths of these have never been found above the plains; the others range higher but mostly in open country. Their environment offers conditions suitable for average tadpoles and adults. these frogs are more or less unspecialized. There are six genera and thirty species. Two thirds of the latter belong to the type genera of the large neotropical families Bufonidae, Leptodactylidae and Hylidae. Only in the maritime scrub formation are conditions somewhat different. Water for average tadpoles is provided by the lagoons. The xerophytism of the vegetation is, however, so marked that bromeliads growing on the ground provide almost the only appropriate shelter for adult tree-frogs used to sleeping upright on the vegetation. One large Hylid genus lives entirely in them. It is casque-headed and phragmotic, shutting the lumen of the leaf-cup with head used as a plug. Another large Hylid genus shows a lesser degree of the same specialization. (Lutz A & Lutz B, 1939 II. One genus with two species is entirely saxicolous; it lives on wet ledges of rock at all phases of its life history. (B. Lutz 1948. The other two fifths of the frogs from F. D. are montane forest forms. Their environment offers numerous and varied biotopes and is near optimum for adults. There is,however, hardly any standing water available for larvae. These frogs are ecologically diversified. They also show a general trend towards spawning in the adult biotipe, which leads to delayed hatching, semi-aquatic and terrestrial

  11. Vectorcardiogram of the 'Man-Frog'

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TYDSKRIF. Vectorcardiogram of the 'Man-Frog'. 1095. A. SKOWRON,. SUMMARY. New experimental evidence is adduced to show that the hypothesis of the single instantaneous equivalent or resul- tant cardiac vector-which forms the basic concept of vectorcardiography - no matter whether this is produced by a dipole or a ...

  12. Water Frogs, Aquariums, and Salmonella -- Oh My!

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-12-09

    This CDC Kidtastics podcast discusses how people can get Salmonella from water frogs and aquariums.  Created: 12/9/2009 by National Center for Zoonotic, Vector-Borne, and Enteric Diseases (NCZVED).   Date Released: 12/9/2009.

  13. Of volcanoes, saints, trash, and frogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Astrid Oberborbeck

    , at the same time as political elections and economic hardship. During one year of ethnographic fieldwork volcanoes, saints, trash and frogs were among the nonhuman entities referred to in conversations and engaged with when responding to the changes that trouble the world and everyday life of Arequipans...

  14. A new grass frog from Namibia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A new species of grass frog of the genus Ptychadena is described from northern Namibia. Although superficially similar to Ptychadena schilJukorum and Ptychadsna mossambica. the new species differs In advenisemen1 call, and erlernal charaders. An examination of a series of published sonagrams indicates.

  15. Frogs report: Friends of Granite, Winter 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    FROGS reports present information on current research relevant to felsic magmatism, including commentaries on problems of current interest. Please contact Calvin Miller (Geology, 6028B, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235, tel. 615-322-2986) about your own research, conferences, and ideas for stimulating commentaries.

  16. Return of the Tarahumara frog to Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    James C. Rorabaugh; Stephen F. Hale; Michael J. Sredl; Craig Ivanyi

    2005-01-01

    The last wild Tarahumara frog (Rana tarahumarae) in Arizona was found dead in Big Casa Blanca Canyon, Santa Rita Mountains, in May 1983. However, the species is still well represented in the majority of its range in the northern Sierra Madre Occidental and adjacent Sky Islands of Sonora and Chihuahua. Plans to re-establish R. tarahumarae...

  17. Frog egg growth, experiment S003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, R. S.; Tremor, J. W.

    1971-01-01

    The objective of experiment was to determine the effect of weightlessness on the ability of a fertilized frog egg to divide normally and to differentiate and form a normal embryo. This experiment was first attempted on the Gemini 8 mission and was completed only partially because of the early termination of that mission.

  18. Complete nucleotide sequence and gene rearrangement of the mitochondrial genome of the Japanese pond frog Rana nigromaculata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumida, M; Kanamori, Y; Kaneda, H; Kato, Y; Nishioka, M; Hasegawa, M; Yonekawa, H

    2001-10-01

    In this study, we determined the complete nucleotide sequence of the mitochondrial genome of the Japanese pond frog Rana nigromaculata. The length of the sequence of the frog was 17,804 bp, though this was not absolute due to length variation caused by differing numbers of repetitive units in the control regions of individual frogs. The gene content, base composition, and codon usage of the Japanese pond frog conformed to those of typical vertebrate patterns. However, the comparison of gene organization between three amphibian species (Rana, Xenopus and caecilian) provided evidence that the gene arrangement of Rana differs by four tRNA gene positions from that of Xenopus or caecilian, a common gene arrangement in vertebrates. These gene rearrangements are presumed to have occurred by the tandem duplication of a gene region followed by multiple deletions of redundant genes. It is probable that the rearrangements start and end at tRNA genes involved in the initial production of a tandemly duplicated gene region. Putative secondary structures for the 22 tRNAs and the origin of the L-strand replication (OL) are described. Evolutionary relationships were estimated from the concatenated sequences of the 12 proteins encoded in the H-strand of mtDNA among 37 vertebrate species. A quartet-puzzling tree showed that three amphibian species form a monophyletic clade and that the caecilian is a sister group of the monophyletic Anura.

  19. Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dolichandrone atrovirens (Roth) K. Schum. (Spathe Trumpet Tree) of Bignoniaceae is a medium-sized handsome tree with a straight bole that branches at the top. Leaves are once pinnate, with two to three pairs of leaflets. Young parts of the tree are velvety. Inflorescence is a branched raceme borne at the branch ends.

  20. Hyperspectral analysis of columbia spotted frog habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shive, J.P.; Pilliod, D.S.; Peterson, C.R.

    2010-01-01

    Wildlife managers increasingly are using remotely sensed imagery to improve habitat delineations and sampling strategies. Advances in remote sensing technology, such as hyperspectral imagery, provide more information than previously was available with multispectral sensors. We evaluated accuracy of high-resolution hyperspectral image classifications to identify wetlands and wetland habitat features important for Columbia spotted frogs (Rana luteiventris) and compared the results to multispectral image classification and United States Geological Survey topographic maps. The study area spanned 3 lake basins in the Salmon River Mountains, Idaho, USA. Hyperspectral data were collected with an airborne sensor on 30 June 2002 and on 8 July 2006. A 12-year comprehensive ground survey of the study area for Columbia spotted frog reproduction served as validation for image classifications. Hyperspectral image classification accuracy of wetlands was high, with a producer's accuracy of 96 (44 wetlands) correctly classified with the 2002 data and 89 (41 wetlands) correctly classified with the 2006 data. We applied habitat-based rules to delineate breeding habitat from other wetlands, and successfully predicted 74 (14 wetlands) of known breeding wetlands for the Columbia spotted frog. Emergent sedge microhabitat classification showed promise for directly predicting Columbia spotted frog egg mass locations within a wetland by correctly identifying 72 (23 of 32) of known locations. Our study indicates hyperspectral imagery can be an effective tool for mapping spotted frog breeding habitat in the selected mountain basins. We conclude that this technique has potential for improving site selection for inventory and monitoring programs conducted across similar wetland habitat and can be a useful tool for delineating wildlife habitats. ?? 2010 The Wildlife Society.

  1. Large intestine bacterial flora of nonhibernating and hibernating leopard frogs (Rana pipiens).

    OpenAIRE

    Gossling, J; Loesche, W J; Nace, G W

    1982-01-01

    The bacteria in the large intestines of 10 northern leopard frogs (Rana pipiens) were enumerated and partially characterized. Four nonhibernating frogs were collected in the summer, four hibernating frogs were collected in the winter, and two frogs just emerged from hibernation were collected in the spring. All frogs had about 10(10) bacteria per g (wet weight) of intestinal contents and about 10(9) bacteria per g (wet weight) of mucosal scraping, although the counts from the winter frogs wer...

  2. Tree compression with top trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li; Landau, Gad M.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a new compression scheme for labeled trees based on top trees [3]. Our compression scheme is the first to simultaneously take advantage of internal repeats in the tree (as opposed to the classical DAG compression that only exploits rooted subtree repeats) while also supporting fast...

  3. Tree compression with top trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li; Landau, Gad M.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new compression scheme for labeled trees based on top trees. Our compression scheme is the first to simultaneously take advantage of internal repeats in the tree (as opposed to the classical DAG compression that only exploits rooted subtree repeats) while also supporting fast...

  4. The Concept of Cosmic Tree in Armenian and Iranian Cosmologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmanyan, S. V.; Mickaelian, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    Cosmic Tree or Tree of Life is a common motif in various world theologies, mythologies, and philosophies. In the present study we focus on Armenian and Iranian Cosmic Tree. In ancient Armenia, the Tree of Life (Կենաց Ծառ) is a religious symbol and is drawn on walls of fortresses and carved on the armour of warriors. According to ancient Armenians the center of the Universe is located at the crown of the tree or the column, which is the closest to the sky. We explore the idea of cosmic tree in the riddles, prayers, medieval rituals and miniatures. In the riddles, the tree mostly symbolizes the celestial phenomena (Sun, Stars, and Heavens), different units of time (years, months, weeks, days, and seasons), the people, Jerusalem, the apostles and Jesus Christ. The branches of the tree were equally divided on the right and left sides of the stem, with each branch having one leaf, and one leaf on the apex of the tree. Servants stood on each side of the tree with one of their hands up as if they are taking care of the tree. In pre-Islamic Persian mythology, the Gaokerena world tree is a large, sacred Haoma tree which bears all seeds. Ahriman created a frog to invade the tree and destroy it, aiming at preventing all trees from growing on the Earth. As a reaction, God (Ahura Mazda) created two kar fish staring at the frog to guard the tree. The concept of world tree in Persian Mythology is very closely related to the concept of the Tree of Life. Another related issue in ancient mythology of Iran is the myth of Mashya and Mashyane, two trees who were the ancestors of all living beings. This myth can be considered as a prototype for the creation myth where living beings are created by Gods (who have human forms). We come to the conclusion that in both cultures, no matter of the present different religions, the perception of Cosmic Tree is interconnected to the life on our planet and served as a metaphor for common descent in the evolutionary sense.

  5. The role of the egg jelly coat in protecting Hyla regilla and Bufo canorus embryos from Ultraviolet B radiation during development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, L.J.; Fabacher, D.L.; Calfee, R.

    2002-01-01

    Background. Previous studies have suggested that Ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation may play a role in amphibian population declines. Some of these studies also indicate that egg hatching success is unaltered in some species of anurans as a result of UVB exposure. It has been proposed that the egg mass jelly provides photoprotection to the developing embryos. Methods. Direct spectrophotometric scans of egg jelly, scans of egg jelly methanol extracts, and experimental manipulation in a solar simulator during development were all used to assess the role of egg mass jelly as a photoprotective agent. Results/Discussion. For Hyla regilla, scans of egg jelly and methanolic extracts (for mycosporine-like amino acid content) both displayed no absorption in the UV range. Experimental manipulation (removal of egg mass jelly) with both Hyla regilla and Bufo canorus egg masses in a solar simulator demonstrated that egg mass jelly played no apparent role in photoprotection of either of these species. Conclusions. Based on the results in this study it seems unlikely that the egg jelly coat is playing a crucial role in protecting developing embryos from the impact of UVB radiation.

  6. Cloning of Interleukin-10 from African Clawed Frog (Xenopus tropicalis, with the Finding of IL-19/20 Homologue in the IL-10 Locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhitao Qi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin-10 (IL-10 is a pleiotropic cytokine that plays an important role in immune system. In the present study, the IL-10 gene of African clawed frog (Xenopus tropicalis was first cloned, and its expression pattern and 3D structure were also analyzed. The frog IL-10 mRNA encoded 172 amino acids which possessed several conserved features found in IL-10s from other species, including five-exon/four-intron genomic structure, conserved four cysteine residues, IL-10 family motif, and six α-helices. Real-time PCR showed that frog IL-10 mRNA was ubiquitous expressed in all examined tissues, highly in some immune related tissues including kidney, spleen, and intestine and lowly in heart, stomach, and liver. The frog IL-10 mRNA was upregulated at 24 h after LPS stimulation, indicating that it plays a part in the host immune response to bacterial infection. Another IL, termed as IL-20, was identified from the frog IL-10 locus, which might be the homologue of mammalian IL-19/20 according to the analysis results of the phylogenetic tree and the sequence identities.

  7. Phylogeny and comparative substitution rates of frogs inferred from sequences of three nuclear genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoegg, Simone; Vences, Miguel; Brinkmann, Henner; Meyer, Axel

    2004-07-01

    Phylogenetic relationships among major clades of anuran amphibians were studied using partial sequences of three nuclear protein coding genes, Rag-1, Rag-2, and rhodopsin in 26 frog species from 18 families. The concatenated nuclear data set comprised 2,616 nucleotides and was complemented by sequences of the mitochondrial 12S and 16S rRNA genes for analyses of evolutionary rates. Separate and combined analyses of the nuclear markers supported the monophyly of modern frogs (Neobatrachia), whereas they did not provide support for the monophyly of archaic frog lineages (Archaeobatrachia), contrary to previous studies based on mitochondrial data. The Neobatrachia contain two well supported clades that correspond to the subfamilies Ranoidea (Hyperoliidae, Mantellidae, Microhylidae, Ranidae, and Rhacophoridae) and Hyloidea (Bufonidae, Hylidae, Leptodactylidae, and Pseudidae). Two other families (Heleophrynidae and Sooglossidae) occupied basal positions and probably represent ancient relicts within the Neobatrachia, which had been less clearly indicated by previous mitochondrial analyses. Branch lengths of archaeobatrachians were consistently shorter in all separate analyses, and nonparametric rate smoothing indicated accelerated substitution rates in neobatrachians. However, relative rate tests confirmed this tendency only for mitochondrial genes. In contrast, nuclear gene sequences from our study and from an additional GenBank survey showed no clear phylogenetic trends in terms of differences in rates of molecular evolution. Maximum likelihood trees based on Rag-1 and using only one neobatrachian and one archaeobatrachian sequence, respectively, even had longer archaeobatrachian branches averaged over all pairwise comparisons. More data are necessary to understand the significance of a possibly general assignation of short branches to basal and species-poor taxa by tree-reconstruction algorithms.

  8. An uptake system for dietary alkaloids in poison frogs (Dendrobatidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, J W; Secunda, S I; Garraffo, H M; Spande, T F; Wisnieski, A; Cover, J F

    1994-06-01

    The skin of poison frogs (Dendrobatidae) contains a wide variety of alkaloids that presumably serve a defensive role. These alkaloids persist for years in captivity, but are not present in captive-raised frogs. Alkaloids fed to poison frogs (Dendrobates, Phyllobates, Epipedobates) are readily accumulated into skin, where they remain for months. The process can be selective; an ant indolizidine is accumulated, while an ant pyrrolidine is not. Frogs (Colostethus) of the same family, which do not normally contain alkaloids, do not accumulate alkaloids. Such an alkaloid uptake system provides a means of maintaining skin alkaloids and suggests that some if not all such 'dendrobatid alkaloids' may have a dietary origin.

  9. Reducing outage times: a FROG perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    In 1992, the Framatome Owners Group (FROG) was set up. It provides a forum for the members, who are all users of Framatome nuclear steam supply systems, to share and benefit from each others experience. Joint activities have been focused on safety and economic performance. Through effective control of outage duration, the average capability factor for the 60 plus nuclear units operated by the members rose from 74% in 1992 to 81.5% in 1993, while the average unplanned capability loss factor reduced from 9% to 3.5%. The specific measures now being taken by three FROG members to improve these results still further are described. The members concerned are Electrabel of Belgium, Electrite de France and the Korea Electric Power Co. (UK)

  10. Environmental constraints and call evolution in torrent-dwelling frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goutte, Sandra; Dubois, Alain; Howard, Samuel D; Marquez, Rafael; Rowley, Jodi J L; Dehling, J Maximilian; Grandcolas, Philippe; Rongchuan, Xiong; Legendre, Frédéric

    2016-04-01

    Although acoustic signals are important for communication in many taxa, signal propagation is affected by environmental properties. Strong environmental constraints should drive call evolution, favoring signals with greater transmission distance and content integrity in a given calling habitat. Yet, few empirical studies have verified this prediction, possibly due to a shortcoming in habitat characterization, which is often too broad. Here we assess the potential impact of environmental constraints on the evolution of advertisement call in four groups of torrent-dwelling frogs in the family Ranidae. We reconstruct the evolution of calling site preferences, both broadly categorized and at a finer scale, onto a phylogenetic tree for 148 species with five markers (∼3600 bp). We test models of evolution for six call traits for 79 species with regard to the reconstructed history of calling site preferences and estimate their ancestral states. We find that in spite of existing morphological constraints, vocalizations of torrent-dwelling species are most probably constrained by the acoustic specificities of torrent habitats and particularly their high level of ambient noise. We also show that a fine-scale characterization of calling sites allows a better perception of the impact of environmental constraints on call evolution. © 2016 The Author(s). Evolution © 2016 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  11. Cellular mechanisms of nociception in the frog

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kuffler, D. P.; Lyfenko, Alla; Vyklický st., Ladislav; Vlachová, Viktorie

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 88, č. 4 (2002), s. 1843-1850 ISSN 0022-3077 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/00/1639; GA MŠk LN00B122 Grant - others:NATO(XX) Grant 977062 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : cellular mechanisms of nociception * frog Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.743, year: 2002

  12. Yolk pigments of the Mexican leaf frog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinetti, G V; Bagnara, J T

    1983-02-25

    Eggs of the Mexican leaf frog contain blue and yellow pigments identified as biliverdin and lutein, respectively. Both pigments are bound to proteins that occur in crystalline form in the yolk platelet. The major blue pigment is biliverdin IX alpha. The eggs vary in color from brilliant blue to pale yellow-green depending on the amount of each pigment. These pigments may provide protective coloration to the eggs.

  13. Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Flowering Trees. Acrocarpus fraxinifolius Wight & Arn. (PINK CEDAR, AUSTRALIAN ASH) of. Caesalpiniaceae is a lofty unarmed deciduous native tree that attains a height of 30–60m with buttresses. Bark is thin and light grey. Leaves are compound and bright red when young. Flowers in dense, erect, axillary racemes.

  14. Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Brachichiton acerifolius F. Muell., commonly called as the Illawara flame tree is a member of Malvaceae family and is native to sub-tropical parts of Australia. Due to its spectacular flowers and tolerance to wide range of climates, it's now cultivated all over the world for its beauty. The tree produces flowers during the.

  15. Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cassia siamia Lamk. (Siamese tree senna) of Caesalpiniaceae is a small or medium size handsome tree. Leaves are alternate, pinnately compound and glandular, upto 18 cm long with 8–12 pairs of leaflets. Inflorescence is axillary or terminal and branched. Flowering lasts for a long period from March to February.

  16. Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srimath

    Grevillea robusta A. Cunn. ex R. Br. (Sil- ver Oak) of Proteaceae is a daintily lacy ornamental tree while young and growing into a mighty tree (45 m). Young shoots are silvery grey and the leaves are fern- like. Flowers are golden-yellow in one- sided racemes (10 cm). Fruit is a boat- shaped, woody follicle.

  17. Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Baccaurea courtallensis Muell.-Arg. of Euphorbiaceae is an evergreen tree that is very attractive when in flower. Leaves are alternate. Male and female flowers are borne on separate trees. Inflorescences bearing several flowers arise in tufts on tubercles on the stem. Fruits are crimson red in colour. Seeds are covered.

  18. Assessment of frog meat utilisation in Ibadan, Oyo state, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Frogs are among the most threatened species of wildlife in IUCN red list. Its utilisation in Ibadan, a major depot in western Nigeria was therefore conducted with the aim of assessing the forms and trend of use; and amongst others, reasons for frog meat consumption. Data for the study were collected through questionnaire, ...

  19. Modeling potential river management conflicts between frogs and salmonids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven F. Railsback; Bret C. Harvey; Sarah J. Kupferberg; Margaret M. Lang; Scott McBain; Hart H. Welsh

    2016-01-01

    Management of regulated rivers for yellow-legged frogs (Rana boylii) and salmonids exemplifies potential conflicts among species adapted to different parts of the natural flow and temperature regimes. Yellow-legged frogs oviposit in rivers in spring and depend on declining flows and warming temperatures for egg and tadpole survival and growth,...

  20. Using a Phototransduction System to Monitor the Isolated Frog Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Philip J.

    2015-01-01

    A simple and inexpensive method of monitoring the movement of an isolated frog heart provides comparable results to those obtained with a force transducer. A commercially available photoresistor is integrated into a Wheatstone bridge circuit, and the output signal is interfaced directly with a recording device. An excised, beating frog heart is…

  1. Coleman Revisited: School Segregation, Peers, and Frog Ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Pat Rubio

    2011-01-01

    Students from minority segregated schools tend to achieve and attain less than similar students from White segregated schools. This study examines whether peer effects can explain this relationship using normative models and frog-pond models. Normative models (where peers become alike) suggest that minority schoolmates are a liability. Frog-pond…

  2. Neuroendocrine regulation of frog adrenocortical cells by neurotensin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sicard, F.; D, D.E.G.; Gras, M.; Leprince, J.; Conlon, J.M.; Roubos, E.W.; Vaudry, H.; Delarue, C.

    2005-01-01

    We previously characterized the primary structure of neurotensin (NT) from an extract of the intestine of the frog Rana esculenta. In this study, we provide evidence for the involvement of NT in the neurocrine regulation of the secretory activity of frog adrenocortical cells. Immunohistochemical

  3. Foothill yellow-legged frog conservation assessment in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marc P. Hayes; Clara A. Wheeler; Amy J. Lind; Gregory A. Green; Diane C. Macfarlane

    2016-01-01

    The foothill yellow-legged frog (Rana boylii) is a stream-breeding amphibian that has experienced significant population declines over a large portion of its historical range. This frog is nearing extirpation in much of the Sierra Nevada region where existing populations are sparse. Water development and diversions are likely to be the primary...

  4. Foraging behaviour in tadpoles of the bronze frog Rana temporalis ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Amphibia; anura; bronze frog; foraging strategy; frog; ideal free distribution; Rana temporalis; tadpoles ... less competition. Then on, both patches will be occupied. The expected mean gain will thus be the same across the food patches. Evidence supporting the IFD ... tat A or B. However the next forager would benefit by.

  5. Evolutionary relationships among Japanese pond frogs inferred from mitochondrial DNA sequences of cytochrome b and 12S ribosomal RNA genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumida, M; Ogata, M; Kaneda, H; Yonekawa, H

    1998-04-01

    The evolutionary relationships among Japanese pond frogs (Rana nigromaculata, R.porosa porosa, and R. p. brevipoda) were investigated by analyzing nucleotide sequences of mitochondrial cytochrome b (cyt b) and 12S rRNA genes. The nucleotide sequences of 444-bp segment of the cyt b gene and 410-bp segment of 12S rRNA gene were determined by the PCR-direct sequencing method using 18 frogs from 13 populations of Japanese pond frogs, and phylogenetic trees were constructed by the neighbor-joining and maximum likelihood methods using R. catesbeiana as an outgroup. The sequenced 444-bp segment of cyt b gene provided 69 variables sites, and the sequenced 410-bp segment of 12S rRNA gene provided 21 variables sites. The numbers of nucleotide substitutions per site of the cyt b gene within ingroup were 0.0022-0.0205 at the populational level, 0.0368-0.0462 at the racial or subspecific level, and 0.1038-0.1244 at the specific level, whereas those of the 12S rRNA gene were 0-0.0074 at the populational or subspecific level, and 0.0378-0.0456 at the specific level. Most nucleotide substitutions within ingroup occurred at the third codon position of the cyt b gene and were silent mutations. High frequencies of transitions relative to transversions were shown at cyt b and 12S rRNA genes within ingroup. The phylogenetic trees constructed from the nucleotide sequences of the cyt b gene showed that after outgroup R. catesbeiana separated from ingroup frogs, ingroup Japanese pond frogs diverged into R.nigromaculata and R.porosa, then the latter diverged into R.p. porosa, R.p. brevipoda (the typical Okayama race), and the Nagoya race of R.p.porosa. The phylogenetic trees constructed from the nucleotide sequences of the 12S rRNA gene also showed distinct divergence between two species, but not any divergence within species.

  6. Tongue adhesion in the horned frog Ceratophrys sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinteich, Thomas; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2014-06-01

    Frogs are well-known to capture elusive prey with their protrusible and adhesive tongues. However, the adhesive performance of frog tongues and the mechanism of the contact formation with the prey item remain unknown. Here we measured for the first time adhesive forces and tongue contact areas in living individuals of a horned frog (Ceratophrys sp.) against glass. We found that Ceratophrys sp. generates adhesive forces well beyond its own body weight. Surprisingly, we found that the tongues adhered stronger in feeding trials in which the coverage of the tongue contact area with mucus was relatively low. Thus, besides the presence of mucus, other features of the frog tongue (surface profile, material properties) are important to generate sufficient adhesive forces. Overall, the experimental data shows that frog tongues can be best compared to pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs) that are of common technical use as adhesive tapes or labels.

  7. La larva de Hyla uruguaya Schmidt, 1944 (Anura: Hylidae, con comentarios sobre su biología y su status taxonómico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolenc, Francisco

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Hyla uruguaya es una especie poco conocida y con relaciones taxonómicas discutidas. Su hallazgo en Uruguay ha sido esporádico. En el presente trabajo se describen su morfología larval, aspectos sobre su biología reproductiva, geonemia y ecología en Uruguay. La larva tiene cuerpo de tipo robusto y elíptico, con ojos laterales, aletas altas con dorsal expandida, espiráculo izquierdo, tubo proctodeal dextrógiro y corto, y fórmula de queratodontes [(1(1-1/(1-1(2], con una fila simple de papilas orales con claro rostral y varias papilas intramarginales subangulares. Una puesta obtenida en el laboratorio consistió de 398 huevos de 1,3 mm de diámetro. El canto de anuncio consta de una sucesión de notas multipulsadas de 22 ms de duración, con una frecuencia dominante promedio de 4146 Hz, emitidas a una frecuencia de 4,2 - 4,8 notas/s. El tren de notas puede durar hasta 13 minutos. Su canto fue registrado en la naturaleza desde fines de agosto y sus larvas se encontraron hasta fines de febrero en charcos de áreas abiertas en paisajes serranos del NE, E y SE del Uruguay. Los resultados obtenidos permitirían reconsiderar el estado de conservación de la especie en Uruguay. Sugerimos su afinidad taxonómica con las especies de Scinax del clado ruber sobre la base de caracteres larvales y discutimos su relación con la especie críptica Hyla pinima. Hyla uruguaya is a poorly known species with controversial taxonomic status. Its finding in Uruguay has been sporadic. In the present work larval morphology, some aspects of reproductive biology, geographical distribution and ecology in Uruguay are addressed. The tadpole has a robust and elliptic body, lateral eyes, high fins, left spiracle, vent tube short and dextral, labial tooth row formula of [(1(1-1/(1-1(2], a single row of oral papillae with a dorsal gap and some submarginal subangular papillae. A spawn of 398 eggs of 1,3 mm diameter was obtained in the laboratory. The advertisement call

  8. Pathogenesis of Frog Virus 3 ( Ranavirus, Iridoviridae) Infection in Wood Frogs ( Rana sylvatica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forzán, M J; Jones, K M; Ariel, E; Whittington, R J; Wood, J; Markham, R J Frederick; Daoust, P-Y

    2017-05-01

    Wood frogs ( Rana sylvatica) are highly susceptible to infection with Frog virus 3 (FV3, Ranavirus, Iridoviridae), a cause of mass mortality in wild populations. To elucidate the pathogenesis of FV3 infection in wood frogs, 40 wild-caught adults were acclimated to captivity, inoculated orally with a fatal dose of 10 4.43 pfu/frog, and euthanized at 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 9, and 14 days postinfection (dpi). Mild lesions occurred sporadically in the skin (petechiae) and bone marrow (necrosis) during the first 2 dpi. Severe lesions occurred 1 to 2 weeks postinfection and consisted of necrosis of medullary and extramedullary hematopoietic tissue, lymphoid tissue in spleen and throughout the body, and epithelium of skin, mucosae, and renal tubules. Viral DNA was first detected (polymerase chain reaction) in liver at 4 dpi; by dpi 9 and 14, all viscera tested (liver, kidney, and spleen), skin, and feces were positive. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) first detected viral antigen in small areas devoid of histologic lesions in the oral mucosa, lung, and colon at 4 dpi; by 9 and 14 dpi, IHC labeling of viral antigen associated with necrosis was found in multiple tissues. Based on IHC staining intensity and lesion severity, the skin, oral, and gastrointestinal epithelium and renal tubular epithelium were important sites of viral replication and shedding, suggesting that direct contact (skin) and fecal-oral contamination are effective routes of transmission and that skin tissue, oral, and cloacal swabs may be appropriate antemortem diagnostic samples in late stages of disease (>1 week postinfection) but poor samples to detect infection in clinically healthy frogs.

  9. The response of Rana muscosa, the mountain yellow-legged frog, to short distance translocations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    K. R. Matthews

    2003-01-01

    ABSTRACT.—To determine the response of Mountain Yellow-Legged Frogs to short distance translocations, I placed transmitters on 20 adult frogs and moved them short distances from 144–630 m and monitored their responses for up to 30 days. Of the 20 translocated frogs, seven frogs returned to their original capture site, four frogs moved in the direction of their capture...

  10. The Observation of Frog Species at State University of Malang as a Preliminary Effort on Frog Conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dian Ratri Wulandari

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Frog is an amphibian which is widely spread around the world. Indonesia houses 450 species which represent 11% of frog species in the world. In Java Island alone, there live 42 species of frogs and toads. Frogs can be used as an environment indicator in that the presence of frog in a particular place indicates that the place stays natural and unpolluted. The 1st Campus of State University of Malang, which is located in the heart of Malang District, has been developing rapidly currently. Thus, it requires the construction of new various facilities to support its huge activities. Extensive construction can be destructive even damaging to the habitat of frog, which potentially threats the frog’s life, if it does not take the environmental impact into careful consideration. This study is aimed to identify the species of frog which survives at State University of Malang with, particularly the frog species found in 1995. Species identification was conducted by observing the morphological character. This study found that there were four species with three species remained survived in 1995; those were Duttaphrynus melanostictus, Polypedates leucomystax, and Kaloula baleta; and one new species called Rana chalconota. This study also revealed that there were four species which were extinct; those were Fejervarya cancrivora, Fejervarya limnocharis, Ingerophrynus biporcatus, and Occidoziga lima. This situation shows the decreasing amount of species from 7 to 4 within the last 17 years. This result indicates that there is a serious environmental degradation which causes the losing of frog habitats. Further research is needed to study the ecological condition changing in order to save the frog species.

  11. Hylid frogs from Mount Ayanganna, Guyana: new species, redescriptions, and distributional records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross D. MacCulloch

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available A new species of Osteocephalus, one species of Hyla, three species of Hypsiboas and one of Myersiohyla were collected on Mount Ayanganna, a sandstone Guiana Shield tepui. Hyla warreni, Hypsiboas roraima, H. sibleszi, Myersiohyla kanaima and the new Osteocephalus were collected in high-tepui forest at 1500 m elevation, while Hypsiboas lemai, H. roraima and M. kanaima were also collected in lower montane forest at 870 m. Supplementary descriptions of adults of all species of Hyla, Hypsiboas and Myersiohyla based on the newly collected specimens are provided. Tadpoles of M. kanaima are described. The specimens from Ayanganna represent significant distributional records for several species. This is the first record of Osteocephalus as a member of the Guiana Shield high-tepui herpetofauna.

  12. Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srimath

    shaped corolla. Fruit is large, ellipsoidal, green with a hard and smooth shell containing numerous flattened seeds, which are embedded in fleshy pulp. Calabash tree is commonly grown in the tropical gardens of the world as a botanical oddity.

  13. Electron Tree

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelt, Ane L; Rønde, Heidi S

    2013-01-01

    The photo shows a close-up of a Lichtenberg figure – popularly called an “electron tree” – produced in a cylinder of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA). Electron trees are created by irradiating a suitable insulating material, in this case PMMA, with an intense high energy electron beam. Upon discharge......, during dielectric breakdown in the material, the electrons generate branching chains of fractures on leaving the PMMA, producing the tree pattern seen. To be able to create electron trees with a clinical linear accelerator, one needs to access the primary electron beam used for photon treatments. We...... appropriated a linac that was being decommissioned in our department and dismantled the head to circumvent the target and ion chambers. This is one of 24 electron trees produced before we had to stop the fun and allow the rest of the accelerator to be disassembled....

  14. Experimental transmission of cutaneous chytridiomycosis in dendrobatid frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, D K; Lamirande, E W; Pessier, A P; Longcore, J E

    2001-01-01

    In a series of three experiments during March-October, 1998, two species of captive-bred poison dart frogs (Dendrobates tinctorius and D. auratus) were exposed to Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, a recently-described chytridiomycete fungus (chytrid) that was originally isolated from a blue poison dart frog (D. azureus). All frogs exposed to the chytrids developed a fatal skin disease, whereas none of the control frogs developed skin lesions. The most consistent clinical sign in chytrid-exposed frogs was excessive shedding of skin. Gross lesions were subtle, usually affected the legs and ventrum, and consisted of mild skin thickening and discoloration. Microscopic examination of shed skin pieces and/or skin imprints demonstrated the presence of chytrids and was used for ante mortem and post mortem confirmation of chytrid infection. Histologically, there was epidermal hyperkeratosis, hyperplasia, and hypertrophy associated with low to moderate numbers of chytrids in the keratinized layers. These experiments demonstrated that Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis can be a fatal pathogen in poison dart frogs. The experimentally-induced disease in these frogs resembled cases of cutaneous chytridiomycosis that have recently been described in several other species of captive and wild amphibians.

  15. The gastrocoel roof plate in embryos of different frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáenz-Ponce, Natalia; Santillana-Ortiz, Juan-Diego; del Pino, Eugenia M

    2012-02-01

    The morphology of the gastrocoel roof plate and the presence of cilia in this structure were examined in embryos of four species of frogs. Embryos of Ceratophrys stolzmanni (Ceratophryidae) and Engystomops randi (Leiuperidae) develop rapidly, provide comparison for the analysis of gastrocoel roof plate development in the slow-developing embryos of Epipedobates machalilla (Dendrobatidae) and Gastrotheca riobambae (Hemiphractidae). Embryos of the analyzed frogs develop from eggs of different sizes, and display different reproductive and developmental strategies. In particular, dorsal convergence and extension and archenteron elongation begin during gastrulation in embryos of rapidly developing frogs, as in Xenopus laevis. In contrast, cells that involute during gastrulation are stored in the large circumblastoporal collar that develops around the closed blastopore in embryos of slow-developing frogs. Dorsal convergence and extension only start after blastopore closure in slow-developing frog embryos. However, in the neurulae, a gastrocoel roof plate develops, despite the accumulation of superficial mesodermal cells in the circumblastoporal collar. Embryos of all four species develop a ciliated gastrocoel roof plate at the beginning of neurulation. Accordingly, fluid-flow across the gastrocoel roof plate is likely the mechanism of left-right asymmetry patterning in these frogs, as in X. laevis and other vertebrates. A ciliated gastrocoel roof plate, with a likely origin as superficial mesoderm, is conserved in frogs belonging to four different families and with different modes of gastrulation. Copyright © 2011 International Society of Differentiation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Sexual selection in the squirrel treefrog Hyla squirella: the role of multimodal cue assessment in female choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Ryan C.; Buchanan, Bryant W.; Doherty, Jessie L.

    2007-01-01

    Anuran amphibians have provided an excellent system for the study of animal communication and sexual selection. Studies of female mate choice in anurans, however, have focused almost exclusively on the role of auditory signals. In this study, we examined the effect of both auditory and visual cues on female choice in the squirrel treefrog. Our experiments used a two-choice protocol in which we varied male vocalization properties, visual cues, or both, to assess female preferences for the different cues. Females discriminated against high-frequency calls and expressed a strong preference for calls that contained more energy per unit time (faster call rate). Females expressed a preference for the visual stimulus of a model of a calling male when call properties at the two speakers were held the same. They also showed a significant attraction to a model possessing a relatively large lateral body stripe. These data indicate that visual cues do play a role in mate attraction in this nocturnal frog species. Furthermore, this study adds to a growing body of evidence that suggests that multimodal signals play an important role in sexual selection.

  17. Active control of ultrasonic hearing in frogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gridi-Papp, Marcos; Feng, Albert S.; Shen, Jun-Xian; Yu, Zu-Lin; Rosowski, John J.; Narins, Peter M.

    2008-01-01

    Vertebrates can modulate the sound levels entering their inner ears in the face of intense external sound or during their own vocalizations. Middle ear muscle contractions restrain the motion of the middle ear ossicles, attenuating the transmission of low-frequency sound and thereby protecting the hair cells in the inner ear. Here we show that the Chinese concave-eared torrent frog, Odorrana tormota, can tune its ears dynamically by closing its normally open Eustachian tubes. Contrary to the belief that the middle ear in frogs permanently communicates with the mouth, O. tormota can close this connection by contraction of the submaxillary and petrohyoid muscles, drastically reducing the air volume behind the eardrums. Mathematical modeling and laser Doppler vibrometry revealed that the reduction of this air volume increases the middle ear impedance, resulting in an up to 20 dB gain in eardrum vibration at high frequencies (10–32 kHz) and 26 dB attenuation at low frequencies (3–10 kHz). Eustachian tube closure was observed in the field during calling and swallowing. Besides a potential role in protecting the inner ear from intense low-frequency sound and high buccal air pressure during calling, this previously unrecognized vertebrate mechanism may unmask the high-frequency calls of this species from the low-frequency stream noise which dominates the environment. This mechanism also protects the thin tympanic membranes from injury during swallowing of live arthropod prey. PMID:18658240

  18. Autometallographic tracing of mercury in frog liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loumbourdis, N.S.; Danscher, G.

    2004-01-01

    The distribution of mercury in the liver of the frog Rana ridibunda with the autometallographic method was investigated. The mercury specific autometallographic (HgS/Se AMG ) technique is a sensitive histochemical approach for tracing mercury in tissues from mercury-exposed organisms. Mercury accumulates in vivo as mercury sulphur/mercury selenium nanocrystals that can be silver-enhanced. Thus, only a fraction of the Hg can be visualized. Six animals were exposed for one day and another group of six animals for 6 days in 1 ppm mercury (as HgCI 2 ) dissolved in fresh water. A third group of six animals, served as controls, were sacrificed the day of arrival at the laboratory. First, mercury appears in the blood plasma and erythrocytes. Next, mercury moves to hepatocytes and in the apical part of the cells, that facing bile canaliculi. In a next step, mercury appears in the endothelial and Kupffer cells. It seems likely that, the mercury of hepatocytes moves through bile canaliculi to the gut, most probably bound to glutathione and/or other similar ligands. Most probably, the endothelial and Kupffer cells comprise the first line of defense against metal toxicity. - Frogs can be good bioindicators of mercury

  19. Microfungi in Drinking Water: The Role of the Frog Litoria caerulea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larelle D. Fabbro

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Microfungi were recovered from all parts of a municipal water distribution system in sub-tropical Australia even though virtually no colony-forming units were recovered from the treated water as it left the treatment plant. A study was then undertaken to determine the potential sources of the microfungal population in the distribution system. Observation of frogs (Litoria caerulea using the internal infrastructure of a reservoir as diurnal sleeping places, together with observation of visible microfungal growth on their faecal pellets, led to an investigation of the possible involvement of this animal. Old faecal pellets were collected and sporulating fungal colonies growing on their surfaces were identified. Fresh faecal pellets were collected and analysed for microfungal content, and skin swabs were analysed for yeasts. It was found that the faeces and skin of L. caerulea carried large numbers of yeasts as well as spores of various filamentous fungal genera. While there are many possible sources of microfungal contamination of municipal drinking water supplies, this study has revealed that the Australian green tree frog L. caerulea is one of the important sources of filamentous microfungi and yeasts in water storage reservoirs in sub-tropical Australia where the animal is endemic.

  20. Mitochondrial DNA differentiation in the Japanese brown frog Rana japonica as revealed by restriction endonuclease analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumida, M

    1997-04-01

    To elucidate mtDNA differentiation in the Japanese brown frog Rana japonica, and compare it with results from allozyme analysis and crossing experiments, RFLP analysis was conducted on 78 frogs from 16 populations in Honshu. Purified mtDNA was digested with eight six-base recognizing restriction enzymes and analyzed by 1% agarose-slab gel electrophoresis. Cleavage patterns of the mtDNA showed three distinct genome size classes: small (18.5 kb), middle (20.0 kb) and large (21.5 kb). Ten haplotypes (I approximately X) were observed among the 16 populations. The expected nucleotide divergences within populations ranged from 0 to 0.47% with a mean of 0.08%. The net nucleotide divergences among 16 populations ranged from 0 to 7.74% with a mean of 3.49%. The UPGMA dendrogram and NJ tree, which were constructed based on the net nucleotide divergences, showed that R. japonica diverged first into the eastern and western groups. The eastern group subsequently differentiated into a subgroup containing six populations and the Akita population, and the western group divided into several subgroups. These results, as well as the results of allozyme analysis and crossing experiments, suggest the the eastern and western groups have experienced secondary contact, and introgression has occurred in the Akita population.

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of Frog virus 3, Isolated from a Strawberry Poison Frog (Oophaga pumilio) Imported from Nicaragua into the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saucedo, Bernardo; Hughes, Joseph; van Beurden, Steven J; Suárez, Nicolás M; Haenen, Olga L M; Voorbergen-Laarman, Michal A; Gröne, Andrea; Kik, Marja J L

    2017-01-01

    Frog virus 3 was isolated from a strawberry poison frog (Oophaga pumilio) imported from Nicaragua via Germany to the Netherlands, and its complete genome sequence was determined. Frog virus 3 isolate Op/2015/Netherlands/UU3150324001 is 107,183 bp long and has a nucleotide similarity of 98.26% to the

  2. Complete genome sequence of frog virus 3, isolated from a strawberry poison frog (Oophaga pumilio) imported from nicaragua into the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saucedo, Bernardo; Hughes, Joseph; Beurden, van Steven J.; Suárez, Nicolás M.; Haenen, Olga L.M.; Voorbergen-Laarman, Michal; Gröne, Andrea; Kika, Marja J.L.

    2017-01-01

    Frog virus 3 was isolated from a strawberry poison frog (Oophaga pumilio) imported from Nicaragua via Germany to the Netherlands, and its complete genome sequence was determined. Frog virus 3 isolate Op/2015/Netherlands/UU3150324001 is 107,183 bp long and has a nucleotide similarity of 98.26% to the

  3. Evaluating methods for phylogenomic analyses, and a new phylogeny for a major frog clade (Hyloidea) based on 2214 loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streicher, Jeffrey W; Miller, Elizabeth C; Guerrero, Pablo C; Correa, Claudio; Ortiz, Juan C; Crawford, Andrew J; Pie, Marcio R; Wiens, John J

    2018-02-01

    Phylogenomic approaches offer a wealth of data, but a bewildering diversity of methodological choices. These choices can strongly affect the resulting topologies. Here, we explore two controversial approaches (binning genes into "supergenes" and inclusion of only rapidly evolving sites), using new data from hyloid frogs. Hyloid frogs encompass ∼53% of frog species, including true toads (Bufonidae), glassfrogs (Centrolenidae), poison frogs (Dendrobatidae), and treefrogs (Hylidae). Many hyloid families are well-established, but relationships among these families have remained difficult to resolve. We generated a dataset of ultraconserved elements (UCEs) for 50 ingroup species, including 18 of 19 hyloid families and up to 2214 loci spanning >800,000 aligned base pairs. We evaluated these two general approaches (binning, rapid sites only) based primarily on their ability to recover and strongly support well-established clades. Data were analyzed using concatenated likelihood and coalescent species-tree methods (NJst, ASTRAL). Binning strongly affected inferred relationships, whereas use of only rapidly evolving sites did not (indicating ∼87% of the data contributed little information). The optimal approaches for maximizing recovery and support of well-established clades were concatenated likelihood analysis and the use of a limited number of naive bins (statistical binning gave more problematic results). These two optimal approaches converged on similar relationships among hyloid families, and resolved them with generally strong support. The relationships found were very different from most previous estimates of hyloid phylogeny, and a new classification is proposed. The new phylogeny also suggests an intriguing biogeographical scenario, in which hyloids originated in southern South America before radiating throughout the world. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. 10 years of activities for the Framatome Owners Group (FROG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oullion, J.; Namy, Ph.

    2001-01-01

    FROG (Framatome owners group) was created in 1991 by 5 electricity producers Electrabel (Belgium), EDF (France), ESKOM (South-Africa), GNPJVC (Daya bay China) and KEPCO (South-Korea), since then 2 other members joined the group Vattenfall (Sweden) and LANPC ( Ling-Ao China). All the members agree to share their experience in operating nuclear reactors designed by Framatome, FROG members represent more than 80 nuclear units. FROG wants to promote the exchange of information between its members in order to improve performances in a broad sense (safety, techniques, costs and management). The FROG committee opened its 20. meeting last year in Lyon (France), among the different topics that were discussed we have: -) a review of the main events that occurred in nuclear power plants, -) actions to reduce the stress on reactor staff, -) the shortening of downtimes, -) the comparison of production costs, and -) the in-line 3-dimensional monitoring of the nuclear core. (A.C.)

  5. FROG: The Fast And Realistic OpenGL Event Displayer

    CERN Document Server

    Quertenmont, Loic

    2009-01-01

    FROG [1] [2] is a generic framework dedicated to visualisation of events in high energy experiment. It is suitable to any particular physics experiment or detector design. The code is light (< 3 MB) and fast (browsing time 20 events per second for a large High Energy Physics experiment) and can run on various operating systems, as its object-oriented structure (C++) relies on the cross-platform OPENGL [3] and GLUT [4] libraries. Moreover, FROG does not require installation of third party libraries for the visualisation. This documents describes the features and principles of FROG version 1.106, its working scheme and numerous functionalities such as: 3D and 2D visualisation, graphical user interface, mouse interface, configuration files, production of pictures of various format, integration of personal objects, etc. Finally the application of FROG for physic experiment/environement, such as Gastof, CMS, ILD, Delphes will be presented for illustration.

  6. Heavy point frog performance under passenger vehicles : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Federal Railroad Administration contracted with the Transportation Technology Center, Inc., Pueblo, Colorado, to conduct an : investigation of passenger vehicle performance running through heavy point frog (HPF) up to speeds of 110 mph. A NUCARS : ...

  7. Phylogeography of the fanged dicroglossine frog, Limnonectes fujianensis (Anura, Ranidae), in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang-Liaw, Nian-Hong; Chou, Wen-Hao

    2011-04-01

    A phylogenetic analysis of Taiwanese fanged dicroglossine frog, Limnonectes fujianensis (Anura, Ranidae), was conducted to examine its genetic diversification using sequence data from a portion of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) cytochrome b sequences. We collected genetic data from 200 individuals at 23 localities in Taiwan and three localities in China. A neighbor-joining tree of 39 haplotypes revealed two clades in Taiwan and a clade in China, each showing restricted geographical distribution. The pattern of geographical divergence suggests a single invasion into Taiwan. Divergence times between clades were inferred using molecular clock tests. The population relationship of L. fujianensis between Taiwan and mainland China, and the phylogenetic relationships with its congeners, e.g., L. bannaensis, L. fragilis and L. kuhlii, were obtained and discussed.

  8. Frog tongue surface microstructures: functional and evolutionary patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorb, Stanislav N

    2016-01-01

    Summary Frogs (Lissamphibia: Anura) use adhesive tongues to capture fast moving, elusive prey. For this, the tongues are moved quickly and adhere instantaneously to various prey surfaces. Recently, the functional morphology of frog tongues was discussed in context of their adhesive performance. It was suggested that the interaction between the tongue surface and the mucus coating is important for generating strong pull-off forces. However, despite the general notions about its importance for a successful contact with the prey, little is known about the surface structure of frog tongues. Previous studies focused almost exclusively on species within the Ranidae and Bufonidae, neglecting the wide diversity of frogs. Here we examined the tongue surface in nine different frog species, comprising eight different taxa, i.e., the Alytidae, Bombinatoridae, Megophryidae, Hylidae, Ceratophryidae, Ranidae, Bufonidae, and Dendrobatidae. In all species examined herein, we found fungiform and filiform papillae on the tongue surface. Further, we observed a high degree of variation among tongues in different frogs. These differences can be seen in the size and shape of the papillae, in the fine-structures on the papillae, as well as in the three-dimensional organization of subsurface tissues. Notably, the fine-structures on the filiform papillae in frogs comprise hair-like protrusions (Megophryidae and Ranidae), microridges (Bufonidae and Dendrobatidae), or can be irregularly shaped or absent as observed in the remaining taxa examined herein. Some of this variation might be related to different degrees of adhesive performance and may point to differences in the spectra of prey items between frog taxa. PMID:27547606

  9. Evidence of auditory insensitivity to vocalization frequencies in two frogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goutte, Sandra; Mason, Matthew J; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    The emergence and maintenance of animal communication systems requires the co-evolution of signal and receiver. Frogs and toads rely heavily on acoustic communication for coordinating reproduction and typically have ears tuned to the dominant frequency of their vocalizations, allowing discriminat...... by their high toxicity might help to explain why calling has not yet disappeared, and that visual communication may have replaced auditory in these colourful, diurnal frogs....

  10. Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    branched evergreen shrub or small tree (6–7 m) with soft whitish-yellow wood. Branches are numerous and drooping. The leaves are elliptic-lanceolate and somewhat fleshy. Flowers are in loose axillary and terminal much-branched inflorescence, ...

  11. Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    narrow towards base. Flowers are large and attrac- tive, but emit unpleasant foetid smell. They appear in small numbers on erect terminal clusters and open at night. Stamens are numerous, pink or white. Style is slender and long, terminating in a small stigma. Fruit is green, ovoid and indistinctly lobed. Flowering Trees.

  12. ~{owering 'Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Stamens are fused into a purple staminal tube that is toothed. Fruit is about 0.5 in. across, nearly globose, generally 5-seeded, green but yellow when ripe, quite smooth at first but wrinkled in drying, remaining long on the tree ajier ripening. The species is widely natural but occasionally cultivated for firewood as it grows very ...

  13. Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srimath

    quick-growing deciduous tree with a small crown. Branches are covered with dark conical prickles, which fall off after some time. The leaves are compound with three leaflets. Bright red or scarlet flowers which appear following leaf fall are in clusters at branch ends. Birds and bees visit flowers for nectar. Fruit is a cylindrical ...

  14. Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    deciduous tree with irregularly-shaped trunk, greyish-white scaly bark and milky latex. Leaves in opposite pairs are simple, oblong and whitish beneath. Flowers that occur in branched inflorescence are white, 2–. 3cm across and fragrant. Calyx is glandular inside. Petals bear numerous linear white scales, the corollary.

  15. Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Muntingia calabura L. (Singapore cherry) of. Elaeocarpaceae is a medium size handsome ever- green tree. Leaves are simple and alternate with sticky hairs. Flowers are bisexual, bear numerous stamens, white in colour and arise in the leaf axils. Fruit is a berry, edible with several small seeds embedded in a fleshy pulp ...

  16. Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srimath

    . (6-10m high) evergreen tree with a straight trunk and broad open crown. Leaves are clustered at the end of twigs. They are dark green, broadest near the rounded apex and tapering towards the base with a short stalk. Flowers are greenish or ...

  17. ~{owering 'Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    size (upto 40 ft. high) deciduous tree with thick trunk, large crown of spreading branches and furrowed greenish-brown bark. (picture shows a young specimen). Leaves are 10-20 in. long, twice compound bearing numerous dark- green ...

  18. Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Guaiacum officinale L. (LIGNUM-VITAE) of Zygophyllaceae is a dense-crowned, squat, knobbly, rough and twisted medium-sized ev- ergreen tree with mottled bark. The wood is very hard and resinous. Leaves are compound. The leaflets are smooth, leathery, ovate-ellipti- cal and appear in two pairs. Flowers (about 1.5.

  19. Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Caesalpinia coriaria (Jacq.) Willd. (THE AMERICAN SUMACH, DIVI-DIVI) of. Caesalpiniaceae is a small unarmed tree reaching up to 10 m in height with a spreading crown. Leaves are alternate and twice compound. The flowers are small, about 0.6 cm (enlarged 5 times here), greenish-yellow, fragrant and appear in dense ...

  20. Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Canthium parviflorum Lam. of Rubiaceae is a large shrub that often grows into a small tree with conspicuous spines. Leaves are simple, in pairs at each node and are shiny. Inflorescence is an axillary few-flowered cymose fascicle. Flowers are small (less than 1 cm across), 4-merous and greenish-white. Fruit is ellipsoid ...

  1. Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Diospyros peregrina (Gaertn.) Guercke Syn. Diospyros embryopteris Pers., Diospyros malabarica Desr. (PALE MOON EBONY, RIBER EBONY) of Ebenaceae is a small or mid-sized slow-growing evergreen tree with spreading branches that form a dense crown. The bark is smooth, thick, dark and flakes off in large shreds.

  2. Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Andira inermis (wright) DC. , Dog Almond of Fabaceae is a handsome lofty evergreen tree. Leaves are alternate and pinnately compound with 4–7 pairs of leaflets. Flowers are fragrant and are borne on compact branched inflorescences. Fruit is ellipsoidal one-seeded drupe that is peculiar to members of this family.

  3. :Ffowering 'Trees-

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The tree is a host of lac insects which secrete a resinous substance that yields shellac or lac. A ruby-coloured gum known as Bengal Kino is collected from the incisions made in the bark. The wood, resistant to water, is used in water-well work. The seeds are used as anthelmintic and as an antidote for snake-bite.

  4. Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Trincomali Wood of Tiliaceae is a tall evergreen tree with straight trunk, smooth brownish-grey bark and simple broad leaves. Inflorescence is much branched with white flowers. Stamens are many with golden yellow anthers. Fruit is a capsule with six spreading wings. Seeds bear short stiff hairs that cause skin irritation.

  5. Tree Mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark J. Ambrose

    2012-01-01

    Tree mortality is a natural process in all forest ecosystems. However, extremely high mortality also can be an indicator of forest health issues. On a regional scale, high mortality levels may indicate widespread insect or disease problems. High mortality may also occur if a large proportion of the forest in a particular region is made up of older, senescent stands....

  6. Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sterculia foetida L. (INDIAN ALMOND,. JAVA OLIVE) of Sterculiaceae is a tall deciduous tree reaching a height of 20 m with faintly ridged grey bark. The bole reaches up to 2m in girth. Branches are reddish, usually horizontal. Leaves are large, palmately compound (5–7 leaflets) and clustered at the branch ends. Flowers ...

  7. Prespermatogenesis and early spermatogenesis in frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haczkiewicz, Katarzyna; Rozenblut-Kościsty, Beata; Ogielska, Maria

    2017-06-01

    Spermatogenesis in frogs was for the first time divided into two phases: prespermatogenesis, when gonocytes proliferate in developing tadpole testes, and active spermatogenesis when spermatogonial stem cells (i.e. descendants of gonocytes), either self-renew or enter into meiotic cycles within cysts formed by Sertoli cells. We argue that amphibian larval gonocytes are homologues to mammalian gonocytes, whereas spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) in adult frogs are homologous to mammalian single spermatogonia (A s ). Gonocytes constitute sex cords, i.e. the precursors of seminiferous tubules; they are bigger than SSCs and differ in morphology and ultrastructure. The nuclear envelope in gonocytes formed deep finger-like invaginations absent in SSCs. All stages of male germ cells contained lipid droplets, which were surrounded by glycogen in SSCs, but not in gonocytes. Mitochondria in gonocytes had enlarged edges of cristae, and in SSCs also lamellar mitochondria appeared. Minimal duration of prespermatogenesis was 46days after gonadal sex differentiation, but usually it lasted longer. SSCs give rise to secondary spermatogonia (equal to mammalian A, In, and B). Their lowest number inside a cyst was eight and this indicated the minimal number of cell cycles (three) of secondary spermatogonia necessary to enter meiosis. We sorted them according to the number of cell cycles (from 8 to 256 cells). This number is similar to that recorded for mammals as the result of a single A s proliferation. The number of secondary spermatogonia correlates with the volume of a cyst. The general conclusion is that spermatogenesis in amphibians and mammals follows basically the same scheme. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. One step forward: contrasting the effects of Toe clipping and PIT tagging on frog survival and recapture probability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Murilo; Corrêa, Décio T; Filho, Sérgio S; Oliveira, Thiago A L; Doherty, Paul F; Sawaya, Ricardo J

    2014-04-01

    Amphibians have been declining worldwide and the comprehension of the threats that they face could be improved by using mark-recapture models to estimate vital rates of natural populations. Recently, the consequences of marking amphibians have been under discussion and the effects of toe clipping on survival are debatable, although it is still the most common technique for individually identifying amphibians. The passive integrated transponder (PIT tag) is an alternative technique, but comparisons among marking techniques in free-ranging populations are still lacking. We compared these two marking techniques using mark-recapture models to estimate apparent survival and recapture probability of a neotropical population of the blacksmith tree frog, Hypsiboas faber. We tested the effects of marking technique and number of toe pads removed while controlling for sex. Survival was similar among groups, although slightly decreased from individuals with one toe pad removed, to individuals with two and three toe pads removed, and finally to PIT-tagged individuals. No sex differences were detected. Recapture probability slightly increased with the number of toe pads removed and was the lowest for PIT-tagged individuals. Sex was an important predictor for recapture probability, with males being nearly five times more likely to be recaptured. Potential negative effects of both techniques may include reduced locomotion and high stress levels. We recommend the use of covariates in models to better understand the effects of marking techniques on frogs. Accounting for the effect of the technique on the results should be considered, because most techniques may reduce survival. Based on our results, but also on logistical and cost issues associated with PIT tagging, we suggest the use of toe clipping with anurans like the blacksmith tree frog.

  9. The Frog in Ancient Egypt, with Unpublished Frog Statues, Amulets, and other Related Objects in the Agricultural and Mallawy Museums in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    dr.Marzouk Al-sayed Aman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Frogs belong to the class of 'amphibians'. They are cold-blooded animals, and they hibernate during winter. The life cycle of frogs begins with mating, laying eggs, developing into tadpoles in eggs, and then appearing as young frogs without tails. The frog was known in ancient Egypt as abnx, abxn, and qrr. The frog had a great role in ancient Egyptian mythology. It was connected with the mythology of creation. A number of gods and goddesses were connected with the frog such as Heqet, Ptah, Heh HHw ,Kek kkw , Nun nnw, and Amun Imn. Frog amulets were worn by the living to provide fertility, and were buried with the dead to protect and rejuvenate them. Frogs were often mummified with the dead as magical amulets to ensure rebirth. An image of a frog was depicted on apotropaic wands, as its role was the protector of the house hold and guardian of pregnant women .With the official prevalence of Christianity in Egypt in the fourth century AD., the frog was still used as a Coptic symbol of resurrection and rebirth. In this paper, the author will try to publish some of the unpublished frog statues, amulets, and other related objects in the agricultural and Mallawy museums in Egypt.

  10. Ampélos, Carpos et Hylas. Nonnos face à Théocrite et Apollonios de Rhodes Ampelus, Carpus and Hyla. Nonnus face to face with Teocritus ans Apollonius of Rhodes Ampelo, Carpo e Ila. Nonno dinanzi a Teocrito e Apollonio Rodio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Christine Fayant

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available L’influence, souvent soulignée, de la poésie hellénistique sur les Dionysiaques de Nonnos de Panopolis revêt des formes diverses. Dans l’épisode d’Ampélos, lorsqu’il évoque la disparition du jeune Satyre aimé de Dionysos, dont la métamorphose posthume donne naissance à la vigne (chants 10-12, Nonnos, par un jeu subtil d’intertextualité avec le chant I des Argonautiques d’Apollonios de Rhodes et l’Idylle XIII de Théocrite, invite à rapprocher le drame d’Ampélos et la légende d’Hylas, éromène d’Héraclès dont la disparition met fin à la participation du héros à l’expédition des Argonautes. L’article analyse les procédés mis en œuvre par Nonnos pour faire référence à ses prédécesseurs hellénistiques et les significations possibles, tant littéraires que mythologiques, de ces renvois à la légende d’Hylas.The influence, often remarked upon, of hellenistic poetry on Nonnus’ Dionysiaca, assumes different forms. In the Ampelus episode, when Nonnus evokes the disappearance of the young satire, loved by Dionysus, whose posthumous metamorphosis gives birth to the vine (Books 10-12, the poet, through subtle intertextual play with Book I of Apollonius of Rhodes’ Argonautica and Theocritus’ Idyll XIII, invites his reader to compare Ampelus’ drama with the legend of Hylas, Heracles’ eromenos, whose disappearance puts an end to the participation of that hero in the Argonauts’ expedition. The article analyses the processes Nonnus uses to reference his hellenistic predecessors, and also the possible meanings, both literary and mythological, of these reflections upon the Hylas legend.L’influsso, spesso sottolineato, della poesia ellenistica sulle Dionisiache di Nonno di Panopoli si riveste di forme differenti. Nell’episodio di Ampelo, quando egli evoca la scomparsa le giovane satiro amato da Dioniso la cui metamorfosi postuma dà vita alla vigna (canti 10-12, Nonno, in un sottile

  11. Prostaglandin E2 release from dermis regulates sodium permeability of frog skin epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rytved, Klaus A.; Brodin, Birger; Nielsen, Robert

    1995-01-01

    Arachidonic acid, cAMP, epithelium, frog skin, intracellular calcium, prostaglandin E*U2, sodium transport, tight epithelium.......Arachidonic acid, cAMP, epithelium, frog skin, intracellular calcium, prostaglandin E*U2, sodium transport, tight epithelium....

  12. Resurrecting an Extinct Species: Archival DNA, Taxonomy, and Conservation of the Vegas Valley Leopard Frog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suggestions that the extinct Vegas Valley leopard frog (Rana fisheri = Lithobates fisheri) may have been synonymous with one of several declining species has complicated recovery planning for imperiled leopard frogs in southwestern North America. To address this concern, we recon...

  13. Female preferences for aposematic signal components in a polymorphic poison frog

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maan, Martine E.; Cummings, Molly E.

    Aposematic signals may be subject to conflicting selective pressures from predators and conspecifics. We studied female preferences for different components of aposematic coloration in the polymorphic poison frog Oophaga pumilio across several phenotypically distinct populations. This frog shows

  14. Serous cutaneous glands in new world hylid frogs: an ultrastructural study on skin poisons confirms phylogenetic relationships between Osteopilus septentrionalis and Phrynohyas venulosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delfino, Giovanni; Brizzi, Rossana; Nosi, Daniele; Terreni, Alessandro

    2002-08-01

    Transmission electron microscope investigations of the serous (poison) skin glands in the New World tree frogs Osteopilus septentrionalis and Phrynohyas venulosa revealed that they produce granules with closely similar substructures, namely, a dense cortex and pale medulla. In both species these features, that contrast the complex, sometimes repeating patterns described in other hylid frogs, derive from similar secretory and maturational processes starting from the Golgi phase of poison biosynthesis. Observations on secretory discharge showed that the two species share common release mechanisms, based on bulk discharge (holocrine) processes. Our data provide novel evidence of the extensive ultrastructural polymorphism of serous skin products in Hylidae and agree with phylogenies that regard this family as polyphyletic in origin. Assuming that ultrastructural features of cutaneous poison biosynthesis and maturation are adequate clues for tracking anuran phylogeny, the present findings also support a close relationship between Osteopilus and Phrynohyas taxa as previously suggested by osteological evidence. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Cold stress and light signals induce the expression of cold-inducible RNA binding protein (cirp) in the brain and eye of the Japanese treefrog (Hyla japonica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Kenkichi; Jiang, Huijie

    2008-12-01

    Hibernation is an important physiological animal behavior. However, the molecular mechanism by which hibernation is regulated remains unknown. The Japanese treefrog (Hyla japonica) usually hibernates in the winter. Since this treefrog is an ectothermic animal, its hibernation is thought to be linked to the environmental temperature. In murine cells, gene expression for the cold-inducible RNA binding protein (cirp) is induced simply by cold stress. Therefore, it was hypothesized that the treefrog would also have increased expression of cirp during the hibernation season. In this report, we describe the cloning of the treefrog cirp gene and a quantitative analysis of its expression with real-time PCR. Like its homologs, treefrog cirp was found to be expressed in response to a cold stress, and its transcript was detectable in the brain, eye and ovary. Furthermore, we found that light signals could also induce the expression of cirp, and the total amount of cirp expression in both the brain and eye was significantly higher in December than in July. These results suggest that the expression of cirp in this treefrog is physiologically induced by environmental factors, such as cold stress or light signals.

  16. Panamanian frog species host unique skin bacterial communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa K. Belden

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Vertebrates, including amphibians, host diverse symbiotic microbes that contribute to host disease resistance. Globally, and especially in montane tropical systems, many amphibian species are threatened by a chytrid fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd, that causes a lethal skin disease. Bd therefore may be a strong selective agent on the diversity and function of the microbial communities inhabiting amphibian skin. In Panamá, amphibian population declines and the spread of Bd have been tracked. In 2012, we completed a field survey in Panamá to examine frog skin microbiota in the context of Bd infection. We focused on three frog species and collected two skin swabs per frog from a total of 136 frogs across four sites that varied from west to east in the time since Bd arrival. One swab was used to assess bacterial community structure using 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing and to determine Bd infection status, and one was used to assess metabolite diversity, as the bacterial production of anti-fungal metabolites is an important disease resistance function. The skin microbiota of the three Panamanian frog species differed in OTU (operational taxonomic unit, ~bacterial species community composition and metabolite profiles, although the pattern was less strong for the metabolites. Comparisons between frog skin bacterial communities from Panamá and the US suggest broad similarities at the phylum level, but key differences at lower taxonomic levels. In our field survey in Panamá, across all four sites, only 35 individuals (~26% were Bd infected. There was no clustering of OTUs or metabolite profiles based on Bd infection status and no clear pattern of west-east changes in OTUs or metabolite profiles across the four sites. Overall, our field survey data suggest that different bacterial communities might be producing broadly similar sets of metabolites across frog hosts and sites. Community structure and function may not be as tightly coupled in

  17. Phylogeny and biogeography of South Chinese brown frogs (Ranidae, Anura).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yu; Wang, Sirui; Zhu, Hedan; Li, Pipeng; Yang, Baotian; Ma, Jianzhang

    2017-01-01

    Few studies have explored the role of Cenozoic tectonic evolution in shaping the patterns and processes of extant animal distributions in and around East Asia. In this study, we selected South Chinese brown frogs as a model to examine the phylogenetic and biogeographical consequences of Miocene tectonic events within South China and its margins. We used mitochondrial and nuclear molecular data to reconstruct phylogenetic interrelationships among Chinese brown frogs using Bayesian and maximum likelihood analyses. The phylogeny results show that there are four main clades of Chinese brown frogs. Excepting the three commonly known Chinese brown frog species groups, R. maoershanensis forms an independent clade nearest to the R. japonica group. Phylogeny and P-distance analyses confirmed R. maoershanensis as a valid species. Among South Chinese brown frogs, there are four subclades associated with four geographical areas: (I) R. maoershanensis; (II) R. japonica; (III) R. chaochiaoensis; and (IV) other species of the R. longicrus species group. Divergence times, estimated using mitochondrial sequences, place the vicariance events among the four subclades in the middle to late Miocene epoch. Our results suggest that (1) South Chinese brown frogs originated due to a vicariance event separating them from the R. chensinensis species group at the time of the Geological movement (~18 million years ago, Ma) in southern Tibet and the Himalayan region; (2) the separation and speciation of R. maoershanensis from the R. japonica group occurred due to the dry climate at approximately 16 Ma; (3) South Chinese brown frogs migrated from South China to Japan at the time (~10.8 Ma) that the global sea-level fell and the East China Sea Shelf Basin was swamp facies, when a land gallery may have formed across the sea to connect the two areas; and (4) R. chaochiaoensis separated from other species of the R. longicrus species group during the uplift of the Tibetan Plateau at approximately 9

  18. Cystic urolithiasis in captive waxy monkey frogs (Phyllomedusa sauvagii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archibald, Kate E; Minter, Larry J; Dombrowski, Daniel S; O'Brien, Jodi L; Lewbart, Gregory A

    2015-03-01

    The waxy monkey frog (Phyllomedusa sauvagii) is an arboreal amphibian native to arid regions of South America, and it has developed behavioral and physiologic adaptations to permit survival in dry environments. These adaptations include a uricotelic nitrogen metabolism and unique cutaneous lipid excretions to prevent evaporative water loss. Uroliths are a rare finding in amphibians. Six adult, presumed wild-caught waxy monkey frogs housed in a museum animal collection were diagnosed with cystic urolithiasis over a 7-yr period, and a single animal was diagnosed with four recurrent cases. Six cases were identified incidentally at routine physical or postmortem examination and four cases were identified during veterinary evaluation for coelomic distension, lethargy, anorexia, and increased soaking behavior. Calculi were surgically removed from three frogs via cystotomy, and a single frog underwent three cystotomies and two cloacotomies for recurrent urolithiasis. Two frogs died within the 24-hr postoperative period. Two representative calculi from a single frog were submitted for component analysis and found to consist of 100% ammonium urate. In the present report, cystic calculi are proposed to be the result of a high-protein diet based on a single invertebrate source, coupled with uricotelism, dehydration, increased cutaneous water loss, body temperature fluctuations facilitating supersaturation of urine, and subsequent accumulation and precipitation of urogenous wastes within the urinary bladder. Surgical cystotomy represents a short-term treatment strategy for this condition. Preventative measures, such as supplying a diversified and balanced diet in addition to environmental manipulation aimed at promoting adequate hydration, are anticipated to be more-rewarding management tools for cystic urolithiasis in the waxy monkey frog.

  19. An endogenous bile acid and dietary sucrose from skin secretions of alkaloid-sequestering poison frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Valerie C; Harinantenaina, Liva; Zeller, Martin; Ronto, William; Rocca, James; Dossey, Aaron T; Rakotondravony, Daniel; Kingston, David G I; Shaw, Chris

    2012-03-23

    The skins of Madagascar poison frogs (Mantella) and certain Neotropical poison frogs (Epipedobates, Dendrobates) secrete the new bile acid tauromantellic acid (1), which was found in both wild-caught and captive-born frogs. This is the first molecule of endogenous origin detected in skin secretions from these taxa. Sucrose was also detected in secretions from wild-caught Mantella but not in captive-born frogs, suggesting a dietary origin.

  20. [FRancilian Oncogeriatric Group (FROG)'s focus on management of elderly patients with bladder cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghebriou, Djamel; Avenin, Danièle; Caillet, Philippe; Mongiat-Artus, Pierre; Durdux, Catherine; Massard, Christophe; Culine, Stéphane

    2014-09-01

    Bladder cancer is diagnosed more often in the elderly. The most effective treatment strategies are mostly very aggressive and are not applicable to all patients in a very heterogeneous population. However, effective options exist to treat the most vulnerable subjects. A multidisciplinary approach including a geriatric assessment is essential for optimal adaptation of treatment. The FRancilian Oncogeriatric Group (FROG) conducted a comprehensive literature search in order to review the applicable therapeutic options according to oncological and geriatric settings. International recommendations are essential to harmonize the management of elderly patients with bladder cancer.

  1. Remote Sensing Survey for the Grand Isle Re-Evaluation Study and the Dredging of the Bayou Rigaud and Marsh Creation Areas, Jefferson Parish, Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    crepitans Northern cricket frog Hyla cinerea Green treefrog Hyla crucifer Spring peeper Hyla squirella Squirrel treefrog Pseudacris triseriata Upland...and durations. Because of the importance "* Encyclopedia ofAmerican Shipwrecks of anomaly patterning, accurate recording and (Berman 1972...Society, in cooperation with the Center for Louisiana Studies, University of Southwestern Louisiana, Lafayette. Berman, Bruce D. 1972 Encyclopedia of

  2. Surface tree languages and parallel derivation trees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelfriet, Joost

    1976-01-01

    The surface tree languages obtained by top-down finite state transformation of monadic trees are exactly the frontier-preserving homomorphic images of sets of derivation trees of ETOL systems. The corresponding class of tree transformation languages is therefore equal to the class of ETOL languages.

  3. Acute and chronic effects of acidic pH on four subtropical frog species

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We conducted acute (LC50) and chronic acid tolerance bioassays on embryos and tadpoles of four frog species found in the park, i.e., Chiromantis xerampelina (Southern Foam Nest Frog), Pyxicephalus edulis (African Bullfrog), Amietophrynus maculatus (Flat-backed Toad) and Hildebrandtia ornata (Ornate Frog), using ...

  4. Radioimmunoassay of plasma corticotropin in the edible Frog Rana esculenta L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaudry, Hubert; Leboulenger, Francois; Dupont, Willy; Vaillant, Rene

    1975-01-01

    In the green Frog (Rana esculenta) the plasma contains a polypeptide immunologically related to human and porcine corticotropins. A radioimmunoassay capable of detecting 4.10 -12 g hog ACTH has been used for a direct plasma ACTH assay in the Frog. Using this method the ACTH rate was determined both in untreated frogs and in animals under various experimental conditions [fr

  5. Effects of the Chytrid fungus on the Tarahumara frog (Rana tarahumarae) in Arizona and Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen F. Hale; Philip C. Rosen; James L. Jarchow; Gregory A. Bradley

    2005-01-01

    We conducted histological analyses on museum specimens collected 1975-1999 from 10 sites in Arizona and Sonora to test for the pathogenic chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis) in ranid frogs, focusing on the Tarahumara frog (Rana tarahumarae). During 1981-2000, frogs displaying disease signs were found in the field, and...

  6. 49 CFR 236.327 - Switch, movable-point frog or split-point derail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Switch, movable-point frog or split-point derail..., AND APPLIANCES Interlocking Rules and Instructions § 236.327 Switch, movable-point frog or split-point derail. Switch, movable-point frog, or split-point derail equipped with lock rod shall be maintained so...

  7. Tourism and the Conservation of Critically Endangered Frogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Clare; Simpkins, Clay; Castley, J. Guy; Buckley, Ralf C.

    2012-01-01

    Protected areas are critical for the conservation of many threatened species. Despite this, many protected areas are acutely underfunded, which reduces their effectiveness significantly. Tourism is one mechanism to promote and fund conservation in protected areas, but there are few studies analyzing its tangible conservation outcomes for threatened species. This study uses the 415 IUCN critically endangered frog species to evaluate the contribution of protected area tourism revenue to conservation. Contributions were calculated for each species as the proportion of geographic range inside protected areas multiplied by the proportion of protected area revenues derived from tourism. Geographic ranges were determined from IUCN Extent of Occurrence maps. Almost 60% (239) of critically endangered frog species occur in protected areas. Higher proportions of total range are protected in Nearctic, Australasian and Afrotopical regions. Tourism contributions to protected area budgets ranged from 5–100%. These financial contributions are highest for developing countries in the Afrotropical, Indomalayan and Neotropical regions. Data for both geographic range and budget are available for 201 critically endangered frog species with proportional contributions from tourism to species protection ranging from 0.8–99%. Tourism's financial contributions to critically endangered frog species protection are highest in the Afrotropical region. This study uses a coarse measure but at the global scale it demonstrates that tourism has significant potential to contribute to global frog conservation efforts. PMID:22984440

  8. Dietary source for skin alkaloids of poison frogs (Dendrobatidae)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, J W; Martin Garraffo, H; Spande, T F; Jaramillo, C; Stanley Rand, A

    1994-04-01

    A wide range of alkaloids, many of which are unknown elsewhere in nature, occur in skin of frogs. Major classes of such alkaloids in dendrobatid frogs are the batrachotoxins, pumiliotoxins, histrionicotoxins, gephyrotoxins, and decahydroquinolines. Such alkaloids are absent in skin of frogs (Dendrobates auratus) raised in Panama on wingless fruit flies in indoor terraria. Raised on leaf-litter arthropods that were collected in a mainland site, such terraria-raised frogs contain tricyclic alkaloids including the beetle alkaloid precoccinelline, 1,4-disubstituted quinolizidines, pyrrolizidine oximes, the millipede alkaloid nitropolyzonamine, a decahydroquinoline, a gephyrotoxin, and histrionicotoxins. The profiles of these alkaloids in the captive-raised frogs are closer to the mainland population ofDendrobates auratus at the leaf-litter site than to the parent population ofDendrobates auratus from a nearby island site. Extracts of a seven-month sampling of leaf-litter insects contained precoccinelline, pyrrolizidine oxime236 (major), and nitropolyzonamine (238). The results indicate a dietary origin for at least some "dendrobatid alkaloids," in particular the pyrrolizidine oximes, the tricyclic coccinellines, and perhaps the histrionicotoxins and gephyrotoxins.

  9. Marsh frogs, Pelophylax ridibundus, determine migratory direction by magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakhparonov, Vladimir V; Ogurtsov, Sergei V

    2017-01-01

    Orientation by magnetic cues appears to be adaptive during animal migrations. Whereas the magnetic orientation in birds, mammals, and urodele amphibians is being investigated intensively, the data about anurans are still scarce. This study tests whether marsh frogs could determine migratory direction between the breeding pond and the wintering site by magnetic cues in the laboratory. Adult frogs (N = 32) were individually tested in the T-maze 127 cm long inside the three-axis Helmholtz coil system (diameter 3 m). The arms of the maze were positioned parallel to the natural migratory route of this population when measured in accordance with magnetic field. The frogs were tested under two-motivational conditions mediated by temperature/light regime: the breeding migratory state and the wintering state. The frogs' choice in a T-maze was evident only when analyzed in accordance with the direction of the magnetic field: they moved along the migratory route to the breeding pond and followed the reversion of the horizontal component of the magnetic field. This preference has been detected in both sexes only in the breeding migratory state. This suggests that adult ranid frogs can obtain directional information from the Earth's magnetic field as was shown earlier in urodeles and anuran larvae.

  10. Sophisticated Communication in the Brazilian Torrent Frog Hylodes japi

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sá, Fábio P.; Zina, Juliana; Haddad, Célio F. B.

    2016-01-01

    Intraspecific communication in frogs plays an important role in the recognition of conspecifics in general and of potential rivals or mates in particular and therefore with relevant consequences for pre-zygotic reproductive isolation. We investigate intraspecific communication in Hylodes japi, an endemic Brazilian torrent frog with territorial males and an elaborate courtship behavior. We describe its repertoire of acoustic signals as well as one of the most complex repertoires of visual displays known in anurans, including five new visual displays. Previously unknown in frogs, we also describe a bimodal inter-sexual communication system where the female stimulates the male to emit a courtship call. As another novelty for frogs, we show that in addition to choosing which limb to signal with, males choose which of their two vocal sacs will be used for visual signaling. We explain how and why this is accomplished. Control of inflation also provides additional evidence that vocal sac movement and color must be important for visual communication, even while producing sound. Through the current knowledge on visual signaling in Neotropical torrent frogs (i.e. hylodids), we discuss and highlight the behavioral diversity in the family Hylodidae. Our findings indicate that communication in species of Hylodes is undoubtedly more sophisticated than we expected and that visual communication in anurans is more widespread than previously thought. This is especially true in tropical regions, most likely due to the higher number of species and phylogenetic groups and/or to ecological factors, such as higher microhabitat diversity. PMID:26760304

  11. Frog sound identification using extended k-nearest neighbor classifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukahar, Nordiana; Affendi Rosdi, Bakhtiar; Athiar Ramli, Dzati; Jaafar, Haryati

    2017-09-01

    Frog sound identification based on the vocalization becomes important for biological research and environmental monitoring. As a result, different types of feature extractions and classifiers have been employed to evaluate the accuracy of frog sound identification. This paper presents a frog sound identification with Extended k-Nearest Neighbor (EKNN) classifier. The EKNN classifier integrates the nearest neighbors and mutual sharing of neighborhood concepts, with the aims of improving the classification performance. It makes a prediction based on who are the nearest neighbors of the testing sample and who consider the testing sample as their nearest neighbors. In order to evaluate the classification performance in frog sound identification, the EKNN classifier is compared with competing classifier, k -Nearest Neighbor (KNN), Fuzzy k -Nearest Neighbor (FKNN) k - General Nearest Neighbor (KGNN)and Mutual k -Nearest Neighbor (MKNN) on the recorded sounds of 15 frog species obtained in Malaysia forest. The recorded sounds have been segmented using Short Time Energy and Short Time Average Zero Crossing Rate (STE+STAZCR), sinusoidal modeling (SM), manual and the combination of Energy (E) and Zero Crossing Rate (ZCR) (E+ZCR) while the features are extracted by Mel Frequency Cepstrum Coefficient (MFCC). The experimental results have shown that the EKNCN classifier exhibits the best performance in terms of accuracy compared to the competing classifiers, KNN, FKNN, GKNN and MKNN for all cases.

  12. Trees are good, but…

    Science.gov (United States)

    E.G. McPherson; F. Ferrini

    2010-01-01

    We know that “trees are good,” and most people believe this to be true. But if this is so, why are so many trees neglected, and so many tree wells empty? An individual’s attitude toward trees may result from their firsthand encounters with specific trees. Understanding how attitudes about trees are shaped, particularly aversion to trees, is critical to the business of...

  13. Prevalence of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in three species of wild frogs on Prince Edward Island, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forzán, M J; Vanderstichel, R; Hogan, N S; Teather, K; Wood, J

    2010-09-02

    Chytridiomycosis, caused by the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), has resulted in the decline or extinction of approximately 200 frog species worldwide. It has been reported throughout much of North America, but its presence on Prince Edward Island (PEI), on the eastern coast of Canada, was unknown. To determine the presence and prevalence of Bd on PEI, skin swabs were collected from 115 frogs from 18 separate sites across the province during the summer of 2009. The swabs were tested through single round end-point PCR for the presence of Bd DNA. Thirty-one frogs were positive, including 25/93 (27%) green frogs Lithobates (Rana) clamitans, 5/20 (25%) northern leopard frogs L. (R.) pipiens, and 1/2 (50%) wood frogs L. sylvaticus (formerly R. sylvatica); 12 of the 18 (67%) sites had at least 1 positive frog. The overall prevalence of Bd infection was estimated at 26.9% (7.2-46.7%, 95% CI). Prevalence amongst green frogs and leopard frogs was similar, but green frogs had a stronger PCR signal when compared to leopard frogs, regardless of age (p frogs, juveniles were more frequently positive than adults (p = 0.001). Green frogs may be the most reliable species to sample when looking for Bd in eastern North America. The 1 wood frog positive for Bd was found dead from chytridiomycosis; none of the other frogs that were positive for Bd by PCR showed any obvious signs of illness. Further monitoring will be required to determine what effect Bd infection has on amphibian population health on PEI.

  14. Prevalence and intensity of Alaria alata (Goeze, 1792) in water frogs and brown frogs in natural conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrelle, Cécile; Portier, Julien; Jouet, Damien; Delorme, Daniel; Ferté, Hubert

    2015-12-01

    In the last 15 years, the mesocercariae of Alaria alata have frequently been reported in the wild boar during routine Trichinella inspections made compulsory for the trade of venison meat in Europe. If these studies have focused primarily on mesocercariae isolated from meat, few works have been done so far to understand the circulation of the parasite in natural conditions especially in the intermediate hosts. This study focuses on the second intermediate hosts of this parasite assessing the suitability of two amphibian groups-brown frogs and water frogs sensu lato-for mesocercarial infection on an area where A. alata has already been identified in water snails and wild boars. During this study, both groups showed to be suitable for mesocercarial infection, with high prevalence and parasite burdens. Prevalence was higher in the brown frog group (56.9 versus 11.54 % for water frogs) which would indicate that it is a preferential group for infection on the study area, though reasons for this remain to be investigated. No significant difference among prevalences was observed between tadpoles and frogs. This study, the first focusing on A. alata in these amphibians in Europe, provides further information on circulation of this parasite in natura.

  15. Radiation processing for the control of Salmonella in frog legs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nerkar, D.P.; Kumta, U.S.; Sreenivasan, A.

    1976-01-01

    Large consignments of frogs legs are exported annually from India. Failure to satisfy some of the strict microbiological standards, especially in relating to Salmonellae contamination, has resulted in the rejection of large quantities of the product in recent years. This has emphasised the need for better and more effective methods than those currently in use for the elimination of Salmonellae. With a view to developing an irradiation process for the control of this public health problem, commercial samples of frog legs have been screened to assess the incidence of Salmonella. The various serotypes have been identified and their radiation sensitivities determined. Based on these data, a radiation treatment of frozen frog legs for the elimination of Salmonella has been developed. (author)

  16. Frog: The Fast & Realistic OpenGL Event Displayer

    CERN Document Server

    Quertenmont, Loic

    2009-01-01

    FROG [1] is a generic framework dedicated to visualisation of events in high energy experiment. It is suitable for any particular physics experiment or detector design. The code is light ($<3~\\textrm{MB}$) and fast (browsing time $\\sim20$ events per second for a large High Energy Physics experiment) and can run on various operating systems, as its object-oriented structure (C++) relies on the cross-platform OpenGL[2] and GLUT [3] libraries. Moreover, \\textsc{Frog} does not require installation of third party libraries for the visualisation. This documents describes the features and principles of FROG version 1.106, its working scheme and numerous functionalities such as: 3D and 2D visualisation, graphical user interface, mouse interface, configuration files, production of pictures of various format, integration of personal objects, etc. Finally, several examples of its current applications are presented for illustration.

  17. Voxel-based frog phantom for internal dose evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinase, Sakae

    2008-01-01

    A voxel-based frog phantom has been developed for radiation protection of the environment. The voxel-based frog phantom was applied to evaluating self-absorbed fractions (self-AFs), which are defined as the fraction of energy emitted by a radiation source that is absorbed within the source organ. The self-AFs were evaluated for both photons and electrons in the spleen, kidneys, and liver using Monte Carlo simulations. Furthermore, self-S values (μGy/MBq·s) for 18 F and 90 Y in the organs were calculated using the results of the self-AFs. Consequently, the voxel-based frog phantom was found to be useful for the organ dose evaluations, which have not been proposed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). It was also confirmed that the self-AFs and self-S values are largely dependent on the mass of the source organ. (author)

  18. Cytonuclear discordance and historical demography of two brown frogs, Rana tagoi and R. sakuraii (Amphibia: Ranidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eto, Koshiro; Matsui, Masafumi

    2014-10-01

    Prior studies of mitochondrial genomic variation reveal that the Japanese brown frog Rana tagoi comprises a complex of cryptic species lineages, and that R. sakuraii arose from within this complex. Neither species forms a monophyletic group on the mitochondrial haplotype tree, precluding a simple explanation for the evolutionary origins of R. sakuraii. We present a more complete sampling of mitochondrial haplotypic variation (from the ND1 and 16S genes) plus DNA sequence variation for five nuclear loci (from the genes encoding NCX1, NFIA, POMC, SLC8A3, and TYR) to resolve the evolutionary histories of these species. We test hypotheses of population assignment (STRUCTURE) and isolation-with-migration (IM) using the more slowly evolving nuclear markers. These demographic analyses of nuclear genetic variation confirm species-level distinctness and integrity of R. sakuraii despite its apparent polyphyly on the mitochondrial haplotype tree. Divergence-time estimates from both the mitochondrial haplotypes and nuclear genomic markers suggest that R. sakuraii originated approximately one million years ago, and that incomplete sorting of mitochondrial haplotype lineages best explains non-monophyly of R. sakuraii mitochondrial haplotypes. Cytonuclear discordance elsewhere in R. tagoi reveals a case of mitochondrial introgression between two species lineages on Honshu. The earliest phylogenetic divergence within this species group occurred approximately four million years ago, followed by cladogenetic events in the Pliocene and early Pleistocene yielding 10-13 extant species lineages, including R. sakuraii as one of the youngest. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Lizard and frog prestin: evolutionary insight into functional changes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Tang

    Full Text Available The plasma membrane of mammalian cochlear outer hair cells contains prestin, a unique motor protein. Prestin is the fifth member of the solute carrier protein 26A family. Orthologs of prestin are also found in the ear of non-mammalian vertebrates such as zebrafish and chicken. However, these orthologs are electrogenic anion exchangers/transporters with no motor function. Amphibian and reptilian lineages represent phylogenic branches in the evolution of tetrapods and subsequent amniotes. Comparison of the peptide sequences and functional properties of these prestin orthologs offer new insights into prestin evolution. With the recent availability of the lizard and frog genome sequences, we examined amino acid sequence and function of lizard and frog prestins to determine how they are functionally and structurally different from prestins of mammals and other non-mammals. Somatic motility, voltage-dependent nonlinear capacitance (NLC, the two hallmarks of prestin function, and transport capability were measured in transfected human embryonic kidney cells using voltage-clamp and radioisotope techniques. We demonstrated that while the transport capability of lizard and frog prestin was compatible to that of chicken prestin, the NLC of lizard prestin was more robust than that of chicken's and was close to that of platypus. However, unlike platypus prestin which has acquired motor capability, lizard or frog prestin did not demonstrate motor capability. Lizard and frog prestins do not possess the same 11-amino-acid motif that is likely the structural adaptation for motor function in mammals. Thus, lizard and frog prestins appear to be functionally more advanced than that of chicken prestin, although motor capability is not yet acquired.

  20. Simple street tree sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    David J. Nowak; Jeffrey T. Walton; James Baldwin; Jerry. Bond

    2015-01-01

    Information on street trees is critical for management of this important resource. Sampling of street tree populations provides an efficient means to obtain street tree population information. Long-term repeat measures of street tree samples supply additional information on street tree changes and can be used to report damages from catastrophic events. Analyses of...

  1. Programming macro tree transducers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahr, Patrick; Day, Laurence E.

    2013-01-01

    A tree transducer is a set of mutually recursive functions transforming an input tree into an output tree. Macro tree transducers extend this recursion scheme by allowing each function to be defined in terms of an arbitrary number of accumulation parameters. In this paper, we show how macro tree ...

  2. Modular tree automata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahr, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Tree automata are traditionally used to study properties of tree languages and tree transformations. In this paper, we consider tree automata as the basis for modular and extensible recursion schemes. We show, using well-known techniques, how to derive from standard tree automata highly modular r...

  3. The Maluti Mystery revisited: Taxonomy of African River Frogs (Pyxicephalidae, Amietia) on the Drakensberg Mountains in southern Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Channing, Alan

    2015-02-27

    The taxonomy of two similar frogs from the top of the Drakensberg escarpment, the Maluti River Frog and the Phofung River Frog is not settled. I examine the relevant types and type descriptions, and discover a number of errors in the literature. Some of the recent taxonomic changes were found to be unsupported. The Maluti River Frog is assigned to Amietia vertebralis (Hewitt, 1927), and the Phofung River Frog to Amietia hymenopus (Boulenger, 1920).

  4. Ant and Mite Diversity Drives Toxin Variation in the Little Devil Poison Frog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGugan, Jenna R; Byrd, Gary D; Roland, Alexandre B; Caty, Stephanie N; Kabir, Nisha; Tapia, Elicio E; Trauger, Sunia A; Coloma, Luis A; O'Connell, Lauren A

    2016-06-01

    Poison frogs sequester chemical defenses from arthropod prey, although the details of how arthropod diversity contributes to variation in poison frog toxins remains unclear. We characterized skin alkaloid profiles in the Little Devil poison frog, Oophaga sylvatica (Dendrobatidae), across three populations in northwestern Ecuador. Using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, we identified histrionicotoxins, 3,5- and 5,8-disubstituted indolizidines, decahydroquinolines, and lehmizidines as the primary alkaloid toxins in these O. sylvatica populations. Frog skin alkaloid composition varied along a geographical gradient following population distribution in a principal component analysis. We also characterized diversity in arthropods isolated from frog stomach contents and confirmed that O. sylvatica specialize on ants and mites. To test the hypothesis that poison frog toxin variability reflects species and chemical diversity in arthropod prey, we (1) used sequencing of cytochrome oxidase 1 to identify individual prey specimens, and (2) used liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry to chemically profile consumed ants and mites. We identified 45 ants and 9 mites in frog stomachs, including several undescribed species. We also showed that chemical profiles of consumed ants and mites cluster by frog population, suggesting different frog populations have access to chemically distinct prey. Finally, by comparing chemical profiles of frog skin and isolated prey items, we traced the arthropod source of four poison frog alkaloids, including 3,5- and 5,8-disubstituted indolizidines and a lehmizidine alkaloid. Together, the data show that toxin variability in O. sylvatica reflects chemical diversity in arthropod prey.

  5. Divergence among barking frogs (Eleutherodactylus augusti) in the southwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Caren S.; Sullivan, Brian K.; Malone, John H.; Schwalbe, Cecil R.

    2004-01-01

    Barking frogs (Eleutherodactylus augusti) are distributed from southern Mexico along the Sierra Madre Occidental into Arizona and the Sierra Madre Oriental into Texas and New Mexico. Barking frogs in Arizona and most of Texas live in rocky areas in oak woodland, while those in New Mexico and far western Texas live in rodent burrows in desertscrub. Barking frogs in each of the three states have distinct coloration and differ in sexually dimorphic characters, female vocalization, and skin toxicity. We analyzed advertisement call variation and conducted a phylogenetic analysis using mitochondrial DNA sequences (ND2 and tRNA regions) for barking frogs from these three states. Advertisement calls of frogs from Arizona were significantly longer in duration, higher in frequency, and had longer duration pulses than those of frogs from either New Mexico or Texas; frogs from these latter two sites were indistinguishable in these call variables. Phylogenetic analysis showed deep divisions among barking frogs from the three states. Differences in call structure, coloration, and mitochondrial DNA sequences strongly suggest that barking frogs in Arizona are reproductively isolated from those in New Mexico and Texas. Our results indicate that either northern populations are connected via gene flow through southern Mexico (i.e., they are subspecies as currently recognized), or represent independent lineages as originally described (i.e., western barking frogs, E. cactorum in AZ, and the eastern barking frogs, E. latrans in NM, TX).

  6. Genetic and developmental studies of albino chorus frogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corn, Paul Stephen

    1986-01-01

    Albino (amelanic) adult chorus frogs (Pseudacris triseriata) occurred with frequencies of 7 percent in 1981 and 12 percent in 1982 in breeding aggregations at a pond in the foothills of the Colorado Front Range. Laboratory matings and examination of albino egg masses suggest that the absence of melanin is due to a recessive allele. The albino phenotype displayed no deficiencies in survival of embryos, rates of embryo or larval development, or rates of growth of juvenile frogs. The absence of abnormalities in development or growth suggests that the a allele in P. triseriata has an action different from albino alleles studied previously in anurans.

  7. Host Defense Peptides from Asian Frogs as Potential Clinical Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vineeth T.V.; Holthausen, David; Jacob, Joshy; George, Sanil

    2015-01-01

    Host defense peptides (HDPs) are currently major focal points of medical research as infectious microbes are gaining resistance to existing drugs. They are effective against multi-drug resistant pathogens due to their unique primary target, biological membranes, and their peculiar mode of action. Even though HDPs from 60 Asian frog species belonging to 15 genera have been characterized, research into these peptides is at a very early stage. The purpose of this review is to showcase the status of peptide research in Asia. Here we provide a summary of HDPs from Asian frogs. PMID:27025618

  8. Effect of ionizing radiation on cell death in frog spleen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afonin, V.Yu.; Vojtovich, A.M.

    1998-01-01

    It was studied the number of dead cells in frog spleen by means of coloration with trypan blue which allowed to estimate last stage of apoptosis dead of cells.The investigated frogs (Rana arvalis) were caught in september 1997 at radionuclide contamination territory (the Gomel Region, the Khojniki District). Control animals were caught in village Ratamka of the Minsk District. The percent of dead cells was less in control group in 1,5 times. Under additional irradiation (2 Gy) the number of dead cells in spleen also differs significantly in the investigated and control groups

  9. Divergence of thermal physiological traits in terrestrial breeding frogs along a tropical elevational gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von May, Rudolf; Catenazzi, Alessandro; Corl, Ammon; Santa-Cruz, Roy; Carnaval, Ana Carolina; Moritz, Craig

    2017-05-01

    Critical thermal limits are thought to be correlated with the elevational distribution of species living in tropical montane regions, but with upper limits being relatively invariant compared to lower limits. To test this hypothesis, we examined the variation of thermal physiological traits in a group of terrestrial breeding frogs (Craugastoridae) distributed along a tropical elevational gradient. We measured the critical thermal maximum (CT max ; n  = 22 species) and critical thermal minimum (CT min ; n  = 14 species) of frogs captured between the Amazon floodplain (250 m asl) and the high Andes (3,800 m asl). After inferring a multilocus species tree, we conducted a phylogenetically informed test of whether body size, body mass, and elevation contributed to the observed variation in CT max and CT min along the gradient. We also tested whether CT max and CT min exhibit different rates of change given that critical thermal limits (and their plasticity) may have evolved differently in response to different temperature constraints along the gradient. Variation of critical thermal traits was significantly correlated with species' elevational midpoint, their maximum and minimum elevations, as well as the maximum air temperature and the maximum operative temperature as measured across this gradient. Both thermal limits showed substantial variation, but CT min exhibited relatively faster rates of change than CT max , as observed in other taxa. Nonetheless, our findings call for caution in assuming inflexibility of upper thermal limits and underscore the value of collecting additional empirical data on species' thermal physiology across elevational gradients.

  10. Detritus Quality and Locality Determines Survival and Mass, but Not Export, of Wood Frogs at Metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanovich, Joseph R; Barrett, Kyle; Crawford, John A

    2016-01-01

    Single-site experiments have demonstrated detritus quality in wetlands can have strongly negative, neutral, and even positive influences on wildlife. However, an examination of the influence of detritus quality across several regions is lacking and can provide information on whether impacts from variation in detritus quality are consistent across species with wide ranges. To address this gap in regional studies we examined effects of emergent and allochthonous detritus of different nutrient qualities on amphibians and assessed a mechanism that may contribute to potential impacts. We used aquatic mesocosms to raise wood frogs (Rana sylvatica) from two regions of the United States with whole plants from purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria), leaf litter from native hardwood trees, and a mixture of both. We examined several metrics of amphibian fitness and life history, including survival, number of days to metamorphosis, and size at metamorphosis. Further, we quantified whether the effects of detritus type could translate to variation in anuran biomass or standing stock of nitrogen or phosphorus export. Our results show detritus with high nutrient quality (purple loosestrife) negatively influenced survival of wood frogs, but increased size of metamorphic individuals in two different regions of the United States. Despite the decrease in survival, the increase in size of post-metamorphic anurans raised with high quality detritus resulted in anuran biomass and standing stock of N and P export being similar across treatments at both locations. These results further demonstrate the role of plant quality in shaping wetland ecosystem dynamics, and represent the first demonstration that effects are consistent within species across ecoregional boundaries.

  11. Comparative microhabitat characteristics at oviposition sites of the California red-legged frog (Rana draytonii)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Jeff A.; Cook, David G.; Yee, Julie L.; van Hattem, Michael G.; Fong, Darren R.; Fisher, Robert N.

    2013-01-01

    We studied the microhabitat characteristics of 747 egg masses of the federally-threatened Rana draytonii (California red-legged frog) at eight sites in California. our study showed that a broad range of aquatic habitats are utilized by ovipositing R. draytonii, including sites with perennial and ephemeral water sources, natural and constructed wetlands, lentic and lotic hydrology, and sites surrounded by protected lands and nested within modified urban areas. We recorded 45 different egg mass attachment types, although the use of only a few types was common at each site. These attachment types ranged from branches and roots of riparian trees, emergent and submergent wetland vegetation, flooded upland grassland/ruderal vegetation, and debris. eggs were deposited in relatively shallow water (mean 39.7 cm) when compared to maximum site depths. We found that most frogs in artificial pond, natural creek, and artificial channel habitats deposited egg masses within one meter of the shore, while egg masses in a seasonal marsh averaged 27.3 m from the shore due to extensive emergent vegetation. Rana draytonii appeared to delay breeding in lotic habitats and in more inland sites compared to lentic habitats and coastal sites. eggs occurred as early as mid-december at a coastal artificial pond and as late as mid-April in an inland natural creek. We speculate that this delay in breeding may represent a method of avoiding high-flow events and/or freezing temperatures. Understanding the factors related to the reproductive needs of this species can contribute to creating, managing, or preserving appropriate habitat, and promoting species recovery.

  12. Phylogeny of the Asian spiny frog tribe Paini (Family Dicroglossidae) sensu Dubois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Jing; Hu, Jian-sheng; Zhou, Wei-wei; Murphy, Robert W; Papenfuss, Theodore J; Chen, Ming-yong; Rao, Ding-qi; Li, Pi-peng; Zhang, Ya-ping

    2009-01-01

    The anuran tribe Paini, family Dicroglossidae, is known in this group only from Asia. The phylogenetic relationships and often the taxonomic recognition of species are controversial. In order to stabilize the classification, we used approximately 2100 bp of nuclear (rhodopsin, tyrosinase) and mitochondrial (12S, 16S rRNA) DNA sequence data to infer the phylogenetic relationships of these frogs. Phylogenetic trees reconstructed using Bayesian inference and maximum parsimony methods supported a monophyletic tribe Paini. Two distinct groups (I,II) were recovered with the mtDNA alone and the total concatenated data (mtDNA+nuDNA). The recognition of two genera, Quasipaa and Nanorana, was supported. Group I, Quasipaa, is widespread east of the Hengduan Mountain Ranges and consists of taxa from relatively low elevations in southern China, Vietnam and Laos. Group II, Nanorana, contains a mix of species occurring from high to low elevation predominantly in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau and Hengduan Mountain Ranges. The occurrence of frogs at high elevations appears to be a derived ecological condition. The composition of some major species groups based on morphological characteristics strongly conflicts with the molecular analysis. Some possible cryptic species are indicated by the molecular analyses. The incorporation of genetic data from type localities helped to resolve some of the taxonomic problems, although further combined analyses of morphological data from type specimens are required. The two nuDNA gene segments proved to be very informative for resolving higher phylogenetic relationships and more nuclear data should be explored to be more confident in the relationships.

  13. City of Pittsburgh Trees

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Trees cared for and managed by the City of Pittsburgh Department of Public Works Forestry Division. Tree Benefits are calculated using the National Tree Benefit...

  14. A Suspected Parasite Spill-Back of Two Novel Myxidium spp. (Myxosporea) Causing Disease in Australian Endemic Frogs Found in the Invasive Cane Toad

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hartigan, A.; Fiala, Ivan; Dyková, Iva; Jirků, Miloslav; Okimoto, B.; Rose, K.; Phalen, D. N.; Šlapeta, J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 4 (2011), e18871 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB600960701 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GP204/09/P519 Program:GP Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : EW-SOUTH-WALES * BUFO-MARINUS * BIOLOGICAL INVASIONS * INFECTIOUS-DISEASES * NORTH-AMERICA * TREE FROG * MYXOZOA * SEQUENCES * PHYLOGENY * ECOLOGY Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 4.092, year: 2011

  15. Morphological studies of the toe pads of the rock frog, Staurois parvus (family: Ranidae) and their relevance to the development of new biomimetically inspired reversible adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drotlef, Dirk M; Appel, Esther; Peisker, Henrik; Dening, Kirstin; Del Campo, Aránzazu; Gorb, Stanislav N; Barnes, W Jon P

    2015-02-06

    The morphology of the toe epithelium of the rock frog, Staurois parvus (Family Ranidae), was investigated using a variety of microscopical techniques. The toe pad epithelium is stratified (four to five cell layers), the apical parts of the cells of the outermost layer being separated by fluid-filled channels. The surface of these cells is covered by a dense array of nanopillars, which also cover the surface of subarticular tubercles and unspecialized ventral epithelium of the toes, but not the dorsal epithelium. The apical portions of the outer two layers contain fibrils that originate from the nanopillars and are oriented approximately normal to the surface. This structure is similar to the pad structure of tree frogs of the families Hylidae and Rhacophoridae, indicating evolutionary convergence and a common evolutionary design for reversible attachment in climbing frogs. The main adaptation to the torrent habitat seems to be the straightness of the channels crossing the toe pad, which will assist in drainage of excess water. The presence of nanopillar arrays on all ventral surfaces of the toes resembles that on clingfish suckers and may be a specific adaptation for underwater adhesion and friction. The relevance of these findings to the development of new biomimetically inspired reversible adhesives is discussed.

  16. Estimating species trees from unrooted gene trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liang; Yu, Lili

    2011-10-01

    In this study, we develop a distance method for inferring unrooted species trees from a collection of unrooted gene trees. The species tree is estimated by the neighbor joining (NJ) tree built from a distance matrix in which the distance between two species is defined as the average number of internodes between two species across gene trees, that is, average gene-tree internode distance. The distance method is named NJ(st) to distinguish it from the original NJ method. Under the coalescent model, we show that if gene trees are known or estimated correctly, the NJ(st) method is statistically consistent in estimating unrooted species trees. The simulation results suggest that NJ(st) and STAR (another coalescence-based method for inferring species trees) perform almost equally well in estimating topologies of species trees, whereas the Bayesian coalescence-based method, BEST, outperforms both NJ(st) and STAR. Unlike BEST and STAR, the NJ(st) method can take unrooted gene trees to infer species trees without using an outgroup. In addition, the NJ(st) method can handle missing data and is thus useful in phylogenomic studies in which data sets often contain missing loci for some individuals.

  17. Helminths of the two mountain frogs, banded frog, Rana camerani Boulenger, 1886 and Uludağ frog Rana macrocnemis Boulenger, 1885 (Anura: Ranidae), collected from the Antalya province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Düşen, Serdar

    2007-01-01

    In this study, two mountain frogs (Rana camerani and Rana macrocnemis) were collected in the Antalya Province in south-western Turkey during 2001 and 2002 and were examined for helminths. Out of 15 Rana camerani, 10 (66.7%) were infected with 1 or more helminths and out of 20 Rana macrocnemis, 17 (85%) were infected with 1 or more helminths. The helminth fauna of Rana camerani included 4 species of which were 3 trematode species (Haplometra cylindracea, Pleurogenoides medians, Opisthioglyphe rastellus), and 1 nematode species (Cosmocerca ornata). The helminth fauna of Rana macrocnemis included 3 species with 1 trematode species (H. cylindracea), 1 nematode species (C. ornata), and 1 acanthocephalan species (Acanthocephalus ranae). H. cylindracea and C. ornata were observed in both of the mountain frogs.

  18. Measurement and Evaluation of Wear Frogs Switches ŽSR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urda Ján

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the measurement and evaluation of wear frogs switches ZSR. One of the main problems is the oversize wear. The possibilities analysis of this problem is offered through a set of switches and monitoring of selected parameters. One of these parameters is also monitoring the vertical wear

  19. Choosing the safest route: frog orientation in an agricultural landscape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mazerolle, M.J.; Vos, C.C.

    2006-01-01

    Orientation is a key component to successful movements between habitats. We hypothesized that barren agricultural landscapes hinder the ability of frogs to orient and move between habitats. Specifically, we predicted that when presented with a choice between a short route through a hostile

  20. Noxious toads and frogs of South Africa | Pantanowitz | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toad (Bufo and Schismademra pecies), the amphibian with which man and his pets most frequently have contact, secrete potent toxins with cardiac glycoside activity. Topical and systemic intoxication, while seen in humans, remains predominantly a veterinary problem. Intoxication by the red-banded rubber frog, which ...

  1. Research on moving object detection based on frog's eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Hongwei; Li, Dongguang; Zhang, Xinyuan

    2008-12-01

    On the basis of object's information processing mechanism with frog's eyes, this paper discussed a bionic detection technology which suitable for object's information processing based on frog's vision. First, the bionics detection theory by imitating frog vision is established, it is an parallel processing mechanism which including pick-up and pretreatment of object's information, parallel separating of digital image, parallel processing, and information synthesis. The computer vision detection system is described to detect moving objects which has special color, special shape, the experiment indicates that it can scheme out the detecting result in the certain interfered background can be detected. A moving objects detection electro-model by imitating biologic vision based on frog's eyes is established, the video simulative signal is digital firstly in this system, then the digital signal is parallel separated by FPGA. IN the parallel processing, the video information can be caught, processed and displayed in the same time, the information fusion is taken by DSP HPI ports, in order to transmit the data which processed by DSP. This system can watch the bigger visual field and get higher image resolution than ordinary monitor systems. In summary, simulative experiments for edge detection of moving object with canny algorithm based on this system indicate that this system can detect the edge of moving objects in real time, the feasibility of bionic model was fully demonstrated in the engineering system, and it laid a solid foundation for the future study of detection technology by imitating biologic vision.

  2. Pouch brooding marsupial frogs transfer nutrients to developing embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warne, Robin W; Catenazzi, Alessandro

    2016-10-01

    Marsupial frogs have a unique reproductive mode in which females carry eggs enclosed in a sealed dorsal brood pouch. While most anurans are considered to be oviparous with lecithotrophic eggs, the extensively vascularized membrane of the brood pouch in marsupial frogs suggests potential opportunities for nutrient transfer. We tested for matrotrophy in the live-bearing Gastrotheca excubitor (Hemiphractidae), through feeding insects labelled with a 13 C-fatty acid and a 15 N-amino acid to brooding marsupial frogs. We observed significant increases of δ 13 C and δ 15 N in both maternal pouch tissues and embryos, suggesting nutrient transfer. Embryo dry mass also increased with developmental stage, providing further direct evidence for matrotrophy. These results suggest that in addition to gas exchange, the vascularized brood pouch membrane of G. excubitor also enables maternal nutrient transfer. This finding revealed a suspected but untested trait in the evolution of parental care in marsupial frogs, in contrast to previous work on Gastrotheca species that release tadpoles, and suggests greater complexity in reproductive and provisioning modes than previously thought. © 2016 The Author(s).

  3. A new grass frog from Namibia | Channing | African Zoology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A new species of grass frog of lhe genus Ptychadena is described from northern Namibia. Although superficially similar to Ptychadena schillukorum and Ptychadena mossambica, the new species differs In advertisement call, and external characters. An examination of a series of published sonagrams indicates that ...

  4. Biophysics of underwater hearing in the clawed frog, Xenopus laevis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Elepfandt, A

    1995-01-01

    Anesthetized clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis) were stimulated with underwater sound and the tympanic disk vibrations were studied using laser vibrometry. The tympanic disk velocities ranged from 0.01 to 0.5 mm/s (at a sound pressure of 2 Pa) in the frequency range of 0.4-4 kHz and were 20-40 dB higher...

  5. Antifungal activity of epithelial secretions from selected frog species ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed to investigate the antifungal activity of skin secretions from selected frogs (Amietia fuscigula, Strongylopus grayi and Xenopus laevis) and one toad (Amietophrynus pantherinus) of the south Western Cape Province of South Africa. Initially, different extraction techniques for the collection of skin secretions ...

  6. Vectorcardiogram of the 'Man-Frog' | Skowron | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chest electrodes from a man and from a frog are connected simultaneously to an oscilloscope - the one to the vertical and the other to the horizontal plates - and the resulting display observed. It consists of a loop, the interpretation of which is discussed, and the conclusion is reached that the presently held vector theory ...

  7. Macro and Trace Element Accumulation in Edible Crabs and Frogs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The tissue accumulation of five macroelements (Na, Mg, K, Ca, Fe) and twelve trace elements (Vd, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Mo, Ag, Cd, Pb) were assessed in the organs of the edible frogs; Xenopus laevis and Rana esculentus, and whole body of the crab, Callinestes caught from Alaro Stream Floodplain (Ibadan, ...

  8. Ranavirus in wild edible frogs Pelophylax kl. esculentus in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ariel, Ellen; Kielgast, Jos; Svart, Hans Erik

    2009-01-01

    interviewed by phone and 10 cases were examined on suspicion of diseaseinduced mortality. All samples were negative for Bd. Ranavirus was isolated from 2 samples of recently dead frogs collected during a mass mortality event in an artificial pond near Slagelse, Denmark. The identity of the virus was confirmed...

  9. One-tone suppression in the frog auditory nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Jørgensen, M B

    1996-01-01

    frequencies ranged from 700 to 1200 Hz. Spontaneous activities for the fibers showing one-tone suppression ranged from 3 to 75 spikes/s. Spontaneous activities above 40 spikes/s and the phenomenon of one-tone suppression itself has not been reported previously for frogs. The population of fibers showing one...

  10. Alkaloids from Australian frogs (Myobatrachidae): pseudophrynamines and pumiliotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, J W; Garraffo, H M; Pannell, L K; Spande, T F; Severini, C; Erspamer, V

    1990-01-01

    Australian frogs of the genus Pseudophryne contain two distinct classes of alkaloids. The pseudophrynamine class (3a-prenyl pyrrolo[2,3-b]indoles) are unique to this genus of frogs of the family Myobatrachidae, while the pumiliotoxin-A class (8-hydroxy-8-methyl-6-alkylidene-1-azabicyclo[4.3.0]nonanes) also occur in dendrobatid frogs of the genera Dendrobates, Epipedobates, and Minyobates, in ranid frogs of the genus Mantella, and in bufonid toads of the genus Melanophryniscus. All seven species of Pseudophryne examined contain both classes of alkaloids. The pseudophrynamines were the predominant class in both species (Pseudophryne guentheri and Pseudophryne occidentalis) from Western Australia, while all of the eastern species (Pseudophryne australis, Pseudophryne bibronii, Pseudophryne coriacea, Pseudophryne corroboree, and Pseudophryne semimarmorata) contained significant amounts of both pseudophrynamines and pumiliotoxins. Pumiliotoxins, in particular pumiliotoxin B, were predominant in two eastern species (P. australis and a southern population of P. corroboree), while pseudophrynamines were dominant in P. bibronii, four of six populations of P. coriacea, one population of P. semimarmorata, and a northern population of P. corroboree. Structures are proposed for several new alkaloids of the pseudophrynamine class.

  11. WEAKLY SYNCHRYRONIZED SUBPOPULATION DYNAMICS IN WISCONSIN FROGS AND TOADS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spatial synchrony in population dynamics is a topic of increasing interest in basic and applied ecology. We used data from 18 years of frog and toad calling surveys conducted throughout Wisconsin to determine the level of intraspecific synchrony among survey sites, and the relat...

  12. How Can We Tell if Frogs Jump Further?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Gordon B.; Tom, Brian D. M.

    2011-01-01

    How effective is training frogs to jump? This is perhaps the most frequent question in biology that is subjected to statistical analysis: does a treatment make a difference? One can examine whether there is indeed a training effect, by first assuming the opposite. That is, the authors assume that training has no effect on the mean distance jumped.…

  13. Foraging behaviour in tadpoles of the bronze frog Rana temporalis ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    [Veeranagoudar D K, Shanbhag B A and Saidapur S K 2004 Foraging behaviour in tadpoles of the bronze frog Rana temporalis: Experimental evidence for the ideal free distribution; J. Biosci. 29 201–207]. 1. Introduction. The ecological success of organisms largely depends on their ability to adjust their foraging tactics to ...

  14. Genomic Sequencing of Ranaviruses Isolated from Edible Frogs (Pelophylax esculentus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ariel, Ellen; Subramaniam, Kuttichantran; Imnoi, Kamonchai

    2017-01-01

    Ranaviruses were isolated from wild edible frogs (Pelophylax esculentus) during epizootics in Denmark and Italy. Phylogenomic analyses revealed that these isolates are closely related and belong to a clade of ranaviruses that includes the Andrias davidianus ranavirus (ADRV), common midwife toad...

  15. Pesticides and Population Declines of California Alpine Frogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airborne pesticides from the Central Valley of California have been implicated as a cause for population declines of several amphibian species, with the strongest evidence for the mountain yellow-legged frog complex (Rana muscosa and R. sierrae) in the Sierra Nevada. We measured ...

  16. Antimicrobial peptides from the skins of North American frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlon, J Michael; Kolodziejek, Jolanta; Nowotny, Norbert

    2009-08-01

    North America is home to anuran species belonging to the families Bufonidae, Eleutherodactylidae, Hylidae, Leiopelmatidae, Ranidae, and Scaphiopodidae but antimicrobial peptides have been identified only in skin secretions and/or skin extracts of frogs belonging to the Leiopelmatidae ("tailed frogs") and Ranidae ("true frogs"). Eight structurally-related cationic alpha-helical peptides with broad-spectrum antibacterial activity, termed ascaphins, have been isolated from specimens of Ascaphus truei (Leiopelmatidae) occupying a coastal range. Characterization of orthologous antimicrobial peptides from Ascaphus specimens occupying an inland range supports the proposal that this population should be regarded as a separate species A. montanus. Ascaphin-8 shows potential for development into a therapeutically valuable anti-infective agent. Peptides belonging to the brevinin-1, esculentin-1, esculentin-2, palustrin-1, palustrin-2, ranacyclin, ranatuerin-1, ranatuerin-2, and temporin families have been isolated from North American ranids. It is proposed that "ranalexins" represent brevinin-1 peptides that have undergone a four amino acid residue internal deletion. Current taxonomic recommendations divide North American frogs from the family Ranidae into two genera: Lithobates and Rana. Cladistic analysis based upon the amino acid sequences of the brevinin-1 peptides provides strong support for this assignment.

  17. Evidence of auditory insensitivity to vocalization frequencies in two frogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goutte, Sandra; Mason, Matthew J; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    The emergence and maintenance of animal communication systems requires the co-evolution of signal and receiver. Frogs and toads rely heavily on acoustic communication for coordinating reproduction and typically have ears tuned to the dominant frequency of their vocalizations, allowing discriminat...

  18. Frogs from the Leeward group, Venezuela and eastern Colombia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brongersma, L.D.

    1948-01-01

    The present notes deal with a small collection of frogs that was made by Dr. P. WAGENAAR HUMMELINCK during his visits to the islands of the Leeward Group, Venezuela and Eastern Colombia. I have included in this study the specimens of Pleurodema brachyops (Cope) already present in the Rijksmuseum van

  19. Strategies of water conservation in southern African frogs

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The most aquatic genus in feeding and locomotion is Xenopus (Van Dijk 1971b), yet even these frogs are known to migrate overland in response to drying of the water (Hewitt & Power 1913;. Loveridge 1953). This phenomenon has been observed in the case of Xenopus laevis in Rhodesia in recent years. On 10 April 1970 ...

  20. Polymorphic microsatellite loci in Chinese piebald odorous frog ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... for Endangered Wildlife, Ministry of Education, Hangzhou 310058,. People's Republic of China. [Wang Y. and Ding P. 2011 Polymorphic microsatellite loci in Chinese piebald odorous frog (Odorrana schmackeri). J. Genet. 90, e44–e46. Online only: http://www.ias.ac.in/jgenet/OnlineResources/90/e44.pdf]. Introduction.

  1. Colour patterning in the skin of the reed-frog

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1985-12-08

    Dec 8, 1985 ... A collec1ion 01 37 Natal reed·frogs, HyperoJius marmoratus, from a single locality was studied for their dorsal colour pattems. Data were assembled on the spectrophotometry, the structure and distribution of ttie chromato· phores by means of light and electron microscopy, and the features of colour ...

  2. Drying kinetics of pre-osmosed fresh water frog ( Dicroglossus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The drying kinetics of frog (Dicroglossus occipitalis) was conducted using convective oven dryer. The results were fitted into three thin-layer models; Lewis, Henderson and Page models. The constants and coefficients of the various models used were evaluated using non-linear regression methods, and the results show that ...

  3. Larval morphology and complex vocal repertoire of Rhacophorus helenae (Anura: Rhacophoridae), a rare flying frog from Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilieva, Anna B; Gogoleva, Svetlana S; Poyarkov, Nikolay A Jr

    2016-06-24

    We present new data on the distribution, reproduction, larval morphology and vocalization of Rhacophorus helenae (Rhacophoridae), a narrowly distributed frog from southern Vietnam. Two new populations of R. helenae were discovered during field surveys in the lowland monsoon forests in Dong Nai and Ba Ria-Vung Tau provinces in 2010-2013. Spawning was observed in May 2013. Egg clutches containing small (2.3±0.1 mm) unpigmented eggs were embedded in a foam nest and suspended high on trees above temporary ponds. The tadpoles of R. helenae have a morphology typical of pond-dwelling Rhacophorus larvae with a moderate tail length and a labial tooth row formula of 5(2-5)/3. Postmetamorphic juveniles differed from adult frogs in the features of their coloration and less developed webbing. The complex vocal repertoire of R. helenae included five types of tonal, wideband and pulsed calls and several transitional signal types differentiated by frequency and amplitude parameters. Calls were uttered as singular signals (pulsed calls) or within non-stereotyped series of variable duration (other call types). The complex structure of the advertisement call markedly distinguishes R. helenae from other members of the Rhacophorus reinwardtii species complex.

  4. Habitat use and spatial structure of a barking frog (Eleutherodactylus augusti) population in southeastern Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, C.S.; Schwalbe, C.R.

    2004-01-01

    Barking Frogs (Eleutherodactylus augusti) are the northernmost ranging member of the large tropical family Leptodactylidae. We investigated the ecology of this saxicolous species at the northern edge of its range in a canyon in southern Arizona. We captured 54 frogs on discontinuous rock outcrops; eight of nine females and 39 of 45 males were on limestone outcrops. The remaining frogs were closer to limestone outcrops by more than 200 m than would be expected if they were distributed randomly with respect to limestone formations. Seven of 10 frogs radio-tracked had core home ranges (50% fixed kernel) from 94 to 100% on limestone; the other three frogs did not have any part of their home range on limestone outcrops. During five years of mark-recapture efforts, no frogs were found on a different outcrop from the one where they were originally captured; no radio-tracked frogs moved between outcrops during the breeding season. We estimated that four to 20 Barking Frogs occupied each outcrop; these groups probably are connected primarily by juvenile dispersal. As an organism living at the edge of its range, Barking Frogs in Arizona may rely heavily on extensive underground areas such as those found in limestone to protect them from a physiologically challenging environment. To manage for the persistence of Barking Frogs in southern Arizona, we must identify and protect habitat patches and movement pathways among them.

  5. Cryoprotectant Production in Freeze-Tolerant Wood Frogs Is Augmented by Multiple Freeze-Thaw Cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Don J; Barnes, Brian M

    2016-01-01

    Ice nucleation across the skin of wood frogs (Lithobates sylvaticus) rapidly induces endogenous production of glucose, a cryoprotectant necessary for freeze tolerance. In laboratory studies of freeze tolerance, wood frogs are cooled slowly, often at -0.05°C h(-1), to facilitate high cryoprotectant production and survival. Under natural conditions in Alaska, however, wood frogs accumulate maximal tissue glucose concentrations while cooling at much faster rates, -0.35° to -1.6°C h(-1), and in addition undergo multiple successive freeze-thaw cycles before remaining frozen for the winter. We examined whether simulating these ecologically relevant cooling rates and repeated freeze-thaw events in captive wood frogs results in the high glucose concentrations found in naturally frozen wood frogs. We found that over successive freezing and thawing events, glucose concentrations increased stepwise in all measured tissues. Short thawing periods did not result in a statistically significant decline of glucose concentrations. Wood frogs that experienced three freeze-thaw events had fresh weight glucose concentrations that approached values found in tissues of wood frogs frozen in natural conditions. Laboratory wood frogs survive frozen for 2 mo, while wood frogs frozen under natural conditions survive frozen for up to 7 mo at temperatures below -18°C. We hypothesize that repeated freeze-thaw cycles with rapid cooling and warming rates allow for greater survival in Alaskan wood frogs through enhanced cryoprotectant production.

  6. Sequestered Alkaloid Defenses in the Dendrobatid Poison Frog Oophaga pumilio Provide Variable Protection from Microbial Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovey, Kyle J; Seiter, Emily M; Johnson, Erin E; Saporito, Ralph A

    2018-02-10

    Most amphibians produce their own defensive chemicals; however, poison frogs sequester their alkaloid-based defenses from dietary arthropods. Alkaloids function as a defense against predators, and certain types appear to inhibit microbial growth. Alkaloid defenses vary considerably among populations of poison frogs, reflecting geographic differences in availability of dietary arthropods. Consequently, environmentally driven differences in frog defenses may have significant implications regarding their protection against pathogens. While natural alkaloid mixtures in dendrobatid poison frogs have recently been shown to inhibit growth of non-pathogenic microbes, no studies have examined the effectiveness of alkaloids against microbes that infect these frogs. Herein, we examined how alkaloid defenses in the dendrobatid poison frog, Oophaga pumilio, affect growth of the known anuran pathogens Aeromonas hydrophila and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Frogs were collected from five locations throughout Costa Rica that are known to vary in their alkaloid profiles. Alkaloids were isolated from individual skins, and extracts were assayed against both pathogens. Microbe subcultures were inoculated with extracted alkaloids to create dose-response curves. Subsequent spectrophotometry and cell counting assays were used to assess growth inhibition. GC-MS was used to characterize and quantify alkaloids in frog extracts, and our results suggest that variation in alkaloid defenses lead to differences in inhibition of these pathogens. The present study provides the first evidence that alkaloid variation in a dendrobatid poison frog is associated with differences in inhibition of anuran pathogens, and offers further support that alkaloid defenses in poison frogs confer protection against both pathogens and predators.

  7. COMPARATIVE TOXICITY OF DIURON ON SURVIVAL AND GROWTH OF PACIFIC TREEFROG, BULLFROG, RED-LEGGED FROG, AND AFRICAN CLAWED FROG EMBRYOS AND TADPOLES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of the herbicide diuron on survival and growth of Pacific treefrog (Pseudacris regilla),bullfrog(Rana catesbeiana), red-legged frog(Rana aurora),and African clawed frog(Xenopus laevis)embryos and tadpoles were determined in static-renewal tests. P.regilla and X.laevis...

  8. Urban tree growth modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. Gregory McPherson; Paula J. Peper

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes three long-term tree growth studies conducted to evaluate tree performance because repeated measurements of the same trees produce critical data for growth model calibration and validation. Several empirical and process-based approaches to modeling tree growth are reviewed. Modeling is more advanced in the fields of forestry and...

  9. Keeping trees as assets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin T. Smith

    2009-01-01

    Landscape trees have real value and contribute to making livable communities. Making the most of that value requires providing trees with the proper care and attention. As potentially large and long-lived organisms, trees benefit from commitment to regular care that respects the natural tree system. This system captures, transforms, and uses energy to survive, grow,...

  10. Phylogeny of the Mexican coastal leopard frogs of the Rana berlandieri group based on mtDNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaldívar-Riverón, Alejandro; León-Regagnon, Virginia; Nieto-Montes de Oca, Adrián

    2004-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationships among specimens from 25 different locations for the six Mexican coastal leopard frog species of the Rana berlandieri species group were investigated using 797 bp of the mitochondrial 12S rDNA gene. Relationships among the haplotypes obtained were recovered using maximum parsimony and Bayesian analyses. Most of the clades recovered by both tree building methods are strongly supported, but conflicting clades recovered by each analysis are generally poorly supported. Both analyses reject the previously proposed subgroupings of the R. berlandieri species group. Based on the strongly supported relationships, genetic differentiation, and geographic distribution of the haplotypes examined, nine independent lineages appear to comprise the group of study. However, confirmation of the new proposed lineages will require further analyses based on other genetic markers and additional samples that cover their entire geographic distribution. Concordance was noted between Miocene-Pliocene geological and climatic events in Mexico and the relationships recovered among the lineages proposed and their geographic distribution.

  11. Classification and regression trees

    CERN Document Server

    Breiman, Leo; Olshen, Richard A; Stone, Charles J

    1984-01-01

    The methodology used to construct tree structured rules is the focus of this monograph. Unlike many other statistical procedures, which moved from pencil and paper to calculators, this text's use of trees was unthinkable before computers. Both the practical and theoretical sides have been developed in the authors' study of tree methods. Classification and Regression Trees reflects these two sides, covering the use of trees as a data analysis method, and in a more mathematical framework, proving some of their fundamental properties.

  12. Assessment of radiocesium contamination in frogs 18 months after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushima, Noe; Ihara, Sadao; Takase, Minoru; Horiguchi, Toshihiro

    2015-04-01

    We investigated the accumulation of radionuclides in frogs inhabiting radioactively contaminated areas around Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) to search for possible adverse effects due to radionuclides. We collected 5 frog species and soil samples in areas within and outside a 20-km radius from FDNPP in August and September 2012 and determined their radiocesium concentrations (134Cs and 137Cs). There was a positive correlation between radiocesium concentrations in the soil samples and frogs, and the highest concentration in frogs was 47,278.53 Bq/kg-wet. Although we conducted a histological examination of frog ovaries and testes by light microscopy to detect possible effects of radionuclides on the morphology of germ cells, there were no clear abnormalities in the gonadal tissues of frogs collected from sites with different contamination levels.

  13. Adaptive response in frogs chronically exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audette-Stuart, M.; Kim, S.B.; McMullin, D.; Festarini, A.; Yankovich, T.L.; Carr, J.; Mulpuru, S.

    2011-01-01

    Using the micronucleus assay, decreased levels of DNA damage were found after high dose ionizing radiation exposure of liver cells taken from frogs inhabiting a natural environment with above-background levels of ionizing radiation, compared to cells taken from frogs inhabiting background areas. The data obtained from a small number of animals suggest that stress present in the above-background environment could induce an adaptive response to ionizing radiation. This study did not reveal harmful effects of exposure to low levels of radioactivity. On the contrary, stress present in the above-background area may serve to enhance cellular defense mechanisms. - Highlights: → Frogs were collected from background and higher tritium level habitats. → The micronucleus assay was conducted on liver cells obtained from the frogs. → No detrimental effects were noted in frogs exposed to elevated tritium. → Adaptive responses were observed in frogs exposed to elevated tritium.

  14. Adaptive response in frogs chronically exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Audette-Stuart, M., E-mail: stuartm@aecl.ca [Environmental Technologies Branch, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1P0 (Canada); Kim, S.B.; McMullin, D.; Festarini, A.; Yankovich, T.L.; Carr, J.; Mulpuru, S. [Environmental Technologies Branch, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1P0 (Canada)

    2011-06-15

    Using the micronucleus assay, decreased levels of DNA damage were found after high dose ionizing radiation exposure of liver cells taken from frogs inhabiting a natural environment with above-background levels of ionizing radiation, compared to cells taken from frogs inhabiting background areas. The data obtained from a small number of animals suggest that stress present in the above-background environment could induce an adaptive response to ionizing radiation. This study did not reveal harmful effects of exposure to low levels of radioactivity. On the contrary, stress present in the above-background area may serve to enhance cellular defense mechanisms. - Highlights: > Frogs were collected from background and higher tritium level habitats. > The micronucleus assay was conducted on liver cells obtained from the frogs. > No detrimental effects were noted in frogs exposed to elevated tritium. > Adaptive responses were observed in frogs exposed to elevated tritium.

  15. Assessment of radiocesium contamination in frogs 18 months after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushima, Noe; Ihara, Sadao; Takase, Minoru; Horiguchi, Toshihiro

    2015-04-10

    We investigated the accumulation of radionuclides in frogs inhabiting radioactively contaminated areas around Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) to search for possible adverse effects due to radionuclides. We collected 5 frog species and soil samples in areas within and outside a 20-km radius from FDNPP in August and September 2012 and determined their radiocesium concentrations ((134)Cs and (137)Cs). There was a positive correlation between radiocesium concentrations in the soil samples and frogs, and the highest concentration in frogs was 47,278.53 Bq/kg-wet. Although we conducted a histological examination of frog ovaries and testes by light microscopy to detect possible effects of radionuclides on the morphology of germ cells, there were no clear abnormalities in the gonadal tissues of frogs collected from sites with different contamination levels.

  16. Itraconazole treatment reduces Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis prevalence and increases overwinter field survival in juvenile Cascades frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Bennett M; Pope, Karen L; Piovia-Scott, Jonah; Brown, Richard N; Foley, Janet E

    2015-01-15

    The global spread of the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) has led to widespread extirpation of amphibian populations. During an intervention aimed at stabilizing at-risk populations, we treated wild-caught Cascades frogs Rana cascadae with the antifungal drug itraconazole. In fall 2012, we collected 60 recently metamorphosed R. cascadae from 1 of the 11 remnant populations in the Cascades Mountains (CA, USA). Of these, 30 randomly selected frogs were treated with itraconazole and the other 30 frogs served as experimental controls; all were released at the capture site. Bd prevalence was low at the time of treatment and did not differ between treated frogs and controls immediately following treatment. Following release, Bd prevalence gradually increased in controls but not in treated frogs, with noticeable (but still non-significant) differences 3 wk after treatment (27% [4/15] vs. 0% [0/13]) and strong differences 5 wk after treatment (67% [8/12] vs. 13% [1/8]). We did not detect any differences in Bd prevalence and load between experimental controls and untreated wild frogs during this time period. In spring 2013, we recaptured 7 treated frogs but none of the experimental control frogs, suggesting that over-winter survival was higher for treated frogs. The itraconazole treatment did appear to reduce growth rates: treated frogs weighed 22% less than control frogs 3 wk after treatment (0.7 vs. 0.9 g) and were 9% shorter than control frogs 5 wk after treatment (18.4 vs. 20.2 mm). However, for critically small populations, increased survival of the most at-risk life stage could prevent or delay extinction. Our results show that itraconazole treatment can be effective against Bd infection in wild amphibians, and therefore the beneficial effects on survivorship may outweigh the detrimental effects on growth.

  17. Frog: Asynchronous Graph Processing on GPU with Hybrid Coloring Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Xuanhua; Luo, Xuan; Liang, Junling; Zhao, Peng; Di, Sheng; He, Bingsheng; Jin, Hai

    2018-01-01

    GPUs have been increasingly used to accelerate graph processing for complicated computational problems regarding graph theory. Many parallel graph algorithms adopt the asynchronous computing model to accelerate the iterative convergence. Unfortunately, the consistent asynchronous computing requires locking or atomic operations, leading to significant penalties/overheads when implemented on GPUs. As such, coloring algorithm is adopted to separate the vertices with potential updating conflicts, guaranteeing the consistency/correctness of the parallel processing. Common coloring algorithms, however, may suffer from low parallelism because of a large number of colors generally required for processing a large-scale graph with billions of vertices. We propose a light-weight asynchronous processing framework called Frog with a preprocessing/hybrid coloring model. The fundamental idea is based on Pareto principle (or 80-20 rule) about coloring algorithms as we observed through masses of realworld graph coloring cases. We find that a majority of vertices (about 80%) are colored with only a few colors, such that they can be read and updated in a very high degree of parallelism without violating the sequential consistency. Accordingly, our solution separates the processing of the vertices based on the distribution of colors. In this work, we mainly answer three questions: (1) how to partition the vertices in a sparse graph with maximized parallelism, (2) how to process large-scale graphs that cannot fit into GPU memory, and (3) how to reduce the overhead of data transfers on PCIe while processing each partition. We conduct experiments on real-world data (Amazon, DBLP, YouTube, RoadNet-CA, WikiTalk and Twitter) to evaluate our approach and make comparisons with well-known non-preprocessed (such as Totem, Medusa, MapGraph and Gunrock) and preprocessed (Cusha) approaches, by testing four classical algorithms (BFS, PageRank, SSSP and CC). On all the tested applications and

  18. A siphonotid millipede (Rhinotus) as the source of spiropyrrolizidine oximes of dendrobatid frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saporito, R A; Donnelly, M A; Hoffman, R L; Garraffo, H M; Daly, J W

    2003-12-01

    Poison frogs of the neotropical family Dendrobatidae contain a wide variety of lipophilic alkaloids, which are accumulated from alkaloid-containing arthropods. A small millipede, Rhinotus purpureus (Siphonotidae), occurs microsympatrically with the dendrobatid frog Dendrobates pumilio on Isla Bastimentos, Bocas del Toro Province, Panamá. Methanol extracts of this millipede contain the spiropyrrolizidine O-methyloxime 236, an alkaloid previously known only from skin extracts of poison frogs, including populations of D. pumilio. Thus, R. purpureus represents a likely dietary source of such alkaloids in dendrobatid frogs.

  19. Eugenol Anesthesia in African Clawed Frogs (Xenopus laevis) of Different Body Weights

    OpenAIRE

    Goulet, Félix; Hélie, Pierre; Vachon, Pascal

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this prospective study was to determine the duration of anesthesia in Xenopus laevis frogs of different body weights relative to exposure time in a eugenol (350 µL/L) bath. Two groups of 5 female frogs each weighing 7.5 ± 2.1 g (small frogs) or 29.2 ± 7.4 g (medium frogs) were used. The acetic acid test (AAT), withdrawal reflex, righting reflex, heart rate, and blood oxygen saturation were used to evaluate CNS depression after eugenol bath administration. No responses to the ...

  20. Fault tree handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haasl, D.F.; Roberts, N.H.; Vesely, W.E.; Goldberg, F.F.

    1981-01-01

    This handbook describes a methodology for reliability analysis of complex systems such as those which comprise the engineered safety features of nuclear power generating stations. After an initial overview of the available system analysis approaches, the handbook focuses on a description of the deductive method known as fault tree analysis. The following aspects of fault tree analysis are covered: basic concepts for fault tree analysis; basic elements of a fault tree; fault tree construction; probability, statistics, and Boolean algebra for the fault tree analyst; qualitative and quantitative fault tree evaluation techniques; and computer codes for fault tree evaluation. Also discussed are several example problems illustrating the basic concepts of fault tree construction and evaluation

  1. Consistent paternity skew through ontogeny in Peron's tree frog (Litoria peronii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig D H Sherman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A large number of studies in postcopulatory sexual selection use paternity success as a proxy for fertilization success. However, selective mortality during embryonic development can lead to skews in paternity in situations of polyandry and sperm competition. Thus, when assessment of paternity fails to incorporate mortality skews during early ontogeny, this may interfere with correct interpretation of results and subsequent evolutionary inference. In a previous series of in vitro sperm competition experiments with amphibians (Litoria peronii, we showed skewed paternity patterns towards males more genetically similar to the female. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we use in vitro fertilizations and sperm competition trials to test if this pattern of paternity of fully developed tadpoles reflects patterns of paternity at fertilization and if paternity skews changes during embryonic development. We show that there is no selective mortality through ontogeny and that patterns of paternity of hatched tadpoles reflects success of competing males in sperm competition at fertilization. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: While this study shows that previous inferences of fertilization success from paternity data are valid for this species, rigorous testing of these assumptions is required to ensure that differential embryonic mortality does not confound estimations of true fertilization success.

  2. Hematology of Wild Caught Dubois’s Tree Frog Polypedates teraiensis, Dubois, 1986 (Anura: Rhacophoridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhusmita Das

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood was analyzed from eighty (forty males and forty females adult individuals of Polypedates teraiensis to establish reference ranges for its hematological and serum biochemical parameters. The peripheral blood cells were differentiated as erythrocytes, lymphocytes, eosinophils, neutrophils, monocytes, basophils, and thrombocytes, with similar morphology to other anurans. Morphology of blood cells did not vary according to sex. The hematological investigations included morphology and morphometry of erythrocytes, morphometry of leucocytes, packed cell volume (PCV, hemoglobin content (Hb, mean corpuscular volume (MCV, mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC, erythrocyte or red blood cell (RBC count, leukocyte or white blood cell (WBC count, differential leukocyte count, and neutrophil to lymphocyte (N/L ratio. Besides, protein, cholesterol, glucose, urea, uric acid, and creatinine content of blood serum were assayed. Hematological parameters that differed significantly between sexes were RBC count, length and breadth of RBC, neutrophil %, N/L ratio, area occupied by basophils, and diameter of large lymphocyte and eosinophils. The level of glucose, urea, and creatinine in blood serum also significantly differed between sexes.

  3. THE TADPOLE OF THE MEXICAN TREE FROG CHARADRAHYLA TAENIOPUS (ANURA: HYLIDAE)

    OpenAIRE

    MOISES KAPLAN; PETER HEIMES

    2015-01-01

    The tadpole of Charadrahyla taeniopus is described. This tadpole is a typical stream-dweller with a long depressed body, oral disc completely surrounded by marginal papillae with numerous small submarginal papillae lateral to the mouth, and several rows of teeth on the posterior labium (6-7).

  4. THE TADPOLE OF THE MEXICAN TREE FROG CHARADRAHYLA TAENIOPUS (ANURA: HYLIDAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOISES KAPLAN

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The tadpole of Charadrahyla taeniopus is described. This tadpole is a typical stream-dweller with a long depressed body, oral disc completely surrounded by marginal papillae with numerous small submarginal papillae lateral to the mouth, and several rows of teeth on the posterior labium (6-7.

  5. Cytogenetic comparison of tree frogs of the genus Aplastodiscus and the Hypsiboas faber group (Anura, Hylidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, K A; Garcia, P C A; Recco-Pimentel, S M

    2009-12-18

    Four species of Aplastodiscus and two species of Hypsiboas were cytogenetically compared. Aplastodiscus perviridis, A. cochranae, H. albomarginaus, and H. faber had 2n = 24 chromosomes, while A. albosignatus and A. leucopygius had 2n = 20 and 2n = 18 chromosomes, respectively. Aplastodiscus perviridis and A. cochranae had identical karyotypes, as indicated by their chromosomal morphology, the location of the nucleolus organizer region (NOR) on chromosome pair 12, and the heterochromatin pattern. The NOR-bearing chromosomes of A. albosignatus and A. leucopygius (pair 9) were very similar in size and morphology (metacentric) when compared to A. perviridis and A. cochranae (pair 12) and to H. faber (pair 11); the NOR of these chromosomes also occurred in the same region, suggesting that these chromosomes are homologous. Although H. albomarginatus differs from the other species with regard to the location of its NOR on pair 2, this species had the same diploid number and a chromosomal morphology similar to that of A. perviridis and A. cochranae. Chromosomal differentiation among the species appears to have occurred by reduction in chromosome number.

  6. Effects of traffic noise on tree frog stress levels, immunity, and color signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troïanowski, Mathieu; Mondy, Nathalie; Dumet, Adeline; Arcanjo, Caroline; Lengagne, Thierry

    2017-10-01

    During the last decade, many studies have focused on the detrimental effects of noise pollution on acoustic communication. Surprisingly, although it is known that noise exposure strongly influences health in humans, studies on wildlife remain scarce. In order to gain insight into the consequences of traffic noise exposure, we experimentally manipulated traffic noise exposure as well as the endocrine status of animals to investigate physiological and phenotypic consequences of noise pollution in an anuran species. We showed that noise exposure increased stress hormone level and induced an immunosuppressive effect. In addition, both traffic noise exposure and stress hormone application negatively impacted H. arborea vocal sac coloration. Moreover, our results suggest profound changes in sexual selection processes because the best quality males with initial attractive vocal sac coloration were the most impacted by noise. Hence, our study suggests that the recent increases in anthropogenic noise worldwide might affect a broader range of animal species than previously thought, because of alteration of visual signals and immunity. Generalizing these results to other taxa is crucial for the conservation of biodiversity in an increasingly noisy world. © 2017 Society for Conservation Biology.

  7. Old World frog and bird vocalizations contain prominent ultrasonic harmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narins, Peter M.; Feng, Albert S.; Lin, Wenyu; Schnitzler, Hans-Ulrich; Denzinger, Annette; Suthers, Roderick A.; Xu, Chunhe

    2004-02-01

    Several groups of mammals such as bats, dolphins and whales are known to produce ultrasonic signals which are used for navigation and hunting by means of echolocation, as well as for communication. In contrast, frogs and birds produce sounds during night- and day-time hours that are audible to humans; their sounds are so pervasive that together with those of insects, they are considered the primary sounds of nature. Here we show that an Old World frog (Amolops tormotus) and an oscine songbird (Abroscopus albogularis) living near noisy streams reliably produce acoustic signals that contain prominent ultrasonic harmonics. Our findings provide the first evidence that anurans and passerines are capable of generating tonal ultrasonic call components and should stimulate the quest for additional ultrasonic species.

  8. Contractile reaction of isolated frog aorta after X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michailov, M.C.; Prechter, I.; Greimel, H.; Welscher, U.E.

    1983-01-01

    The action of X-rays (50 kV, filtered by 0.3 mm Al) on helical strip of frog aorta (rana esculenta) has been investigated. The isolated preparations have a stable basal tone and are radio-sensitive to X-rays which induce reversible, dose-dependent, contractile responses. After repeated irradiational tachyphylaxis appears. The threshold doses are about 250 R at 3 to 6 kR/min, antiadrenergic (phentolamine, propranolol), anticholinergic (atropin), antihistaminic (Neo-Bridal) and serotoninergic (Deseril) drugs have no visible influence on the X-ray induced reaction, i.e. these action mechanisms of the irradiation-induced contraction do not seem probable. Theophylline and cAMP inhibit the X-ray contraction probably non-specifically. Indometacin also inhibits the X-ray contraction: this suggests participation of prostaglandin-mechanism on the contraction of frog aorta after irradiation. (orig.) [de

  9. Effect of cattle exclosures on Columbia Spotted Frog abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Michael J.; Pearl, Christopher; Chambert, Thierry; Mccreary, Brome; Galvan, Stephanie; Rowe, Jennifer

    2018-01-01

    Livestock grazing is an important land use in the western USA and can have positive or negative effects on amphibians. Columbia Spotted Frog (Rana luteiventris) often use ponds that provide water for cattle. We conducted a long-term manipulative study on US Forest Service land in northeastern Oregon to determine the effects of full and partial exclosures that limited cattle access to ponds used by frogs. We found weak evidence of a short-term increase in abundance that did not differ between full and partial exclosures and that diminished with continuing exclusion of cattle. The benefit of exclosures was small relative to the overall decline in breeding numbers that we documented. This suggests that some protection can provide a short-term boost to populations.

  10. The rediscovered Hula painted frog is a living fossil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biton, Rebecca; Geffen, Eli; Vences, Miguel; Cohen, Orly; Bailon, Salvador; Rabinovich, Rivka; Malka, Yoram; Oron, Talya; Boistel, Renaud; Brumfeld, Vlad; Gafny, Sarig

    2013-01-01

    Amphibian declines are seen as an indicator of the onset of a sixth mass extinction of life on earth. Because of a combination of factors such as habitat destruction, emerging pathogens and pollutants, over 156 amphibian species have not been seen for several decades, and 34 of these were listed as extinct by 2004. Here we report the rediscovery of the Hula painted frog, the first amphibian to have been declared extinct. We provide evidence that not only has this species survived undetected in its type locality for almost 60 years but also that it is a surviving member of an otherwise extinct genus of alytid frogs, Latonia, known only as fossils from Oligocene to Pleistocene in Europe. The survival of this living fossil is a striking example of resilience to severe habitat degradation during the past century by an amphibian.

  11. The Genome of the Western Clawed Frog Xenopus tropicalis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellsten, Uffe; Harland, Richard M.; Gilchrist, Michael J.; Hendrix, David; Jurka, Jerzy; Kapitonov, Vladimir; Ovcharenko, Ivan; Putnam, Nicholas H.; Shu, Shengqiang; Taher, Leila; Blitz, Ira L.; Blumberg, Bruce; Dichmann, Darwin S.; Dubchak, Inna; Amaya, Enrique; Detter, John C.; Fletcher, Russell; Gerhard, Daniela S.; Goodstein, David; Graves, Tina; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Grimwood, Jane; Kawashima, Takeshi; Lindquist, Erika; Lucas, Susan M.; Mead, Paul E.; Mitros, Therese; Ogino, Hajime; Ohta, Yuko; Poliakov, Alexander V.; Pollet, Nicolas; Robert, Jacques; Salamov, Asaf; Sater, Amy K.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Terry, Astrid; Vize, Peter D.; Warren, Wesley C.; Wells, Dan; Wills, Andrea; Wilson, Richard K.; Zimmerman, Lyle B.; Zorn, Aaron M.; Grainger, Robert; Grammer, Timothy; Khokha, Mustafa K.; Richardson, Paul M.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.

    2009-10-01

    The western clawed frog Xenopus tropicalis is an important model for vertebrate development that combines experimental advantages of the African clawed frog Xenopus laevis with more tractable genetics. Here we present a draft genome sequence assembly of X. tropicalis. This genome encodes over 20,000 protein-coding genes, including orthologs of at least 1,700 human disease genes. Over a million expressed sequence tags validated the annotation. More than one-third of the genome consists of transposable elements, with unusually prevalent DNA transposons. Like other tetrapods, the genome contains gene deserts enriched for conserved non-coding elements. The genome exhibits remarkable shared synteny with human and chicken over major parts of large chromosomes, broken by lineage-specific chromosome fusions and fissions, mainly in the mammalian lineage.

  12. The genome of the Western clawed frog Xenopus tropicalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellsten, Uffe; Harland, Richard M; Gilchrist, Michael J; Hendrix, David; Jurka, Jerzy; Kapitonov, Vladimir; Ovcharenko, Ivan; Putnam, Nicholas H; Shu, Shengqiang; Taher, Leila; Blitz, Ira L; Blumberg, Bruce; Dichmann, Darwin S; Dubchak, Inna; Amaya, Enrique; Detter, John C; Fletcher, Russell; Gerhard, Daniela S; Goodstein, David; Graves, Tina; Grigoriev, Igor V; Grimwood, Jane; Kawashima, Takeshi; Lindquist, Erika; Lucas, Susan M; Mead, Paul E; Mitros, Therese; Ogino, Hajime; Ohta, Yuko; Poliakov, Alexander V; Pollet, Nicolas; Robert, Jacques; Salamov, Asaf; Sater, Amy K; Schmutz, Jeremy; Terry, Astrid; Vize, Peter D; Warren, Wesley C; Wells, Dan; Wills, Andrea; Wilson, Richard K; Zimmerman, Lyle B; Zorn, Aaron M; Grainger, Robert; Grammer, Timothy; Khokha, Mustafa K; Richardson, Paul M; Rokhsar, Daniel S

    2010-04-30

    The western clawed frog Xenopus tropicalis is an important model for vertebrate development that combines experimental advantages of the African clawed frog Xenopus laevis with more tractable genetics. Here we present a draft genome sequence assembly of X. tropicalis. This genome encodes more than 20,000 protein-coding genes, including orthologs of at least 1700 human disease genes. Over 1 million expressed sequence tags validated the annotation. More than one-third of the genome consists of transposable elements, with unusually prevalent DNA transposons. Like that of other tetrapods, the genome of X. tropicalis contains gene deserts enriched for conserved noncoding elements. The genome exhibits substantial shared synteny with human and chicken over major parts of large chromosomes, broken by lineage-specific chromosome fusions and fissions, mainly in the mammalian lineage.

  13. Covering tree with stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumbach, Jan; Guo, Jian-Ying; Ibragimov, Rashid

    2013-01-01

    We study the tree edit distance problem with edge deletions and edge insertions as edit operations. We reformulate a special case of this problem as Covering Tree with Stars (CTS): given a tree T and a set of stars, can we connect the stars in by adding edges between them such that the resulting...... tree is isomorphic to T? We prove that in the general setting, CST is NP-complete, which implies that the tree edit distance considered here is also NP-hard, even when both input trees having diameters bounded by 10. We also show that, when the number of distinct stars is bounded by a constant k, CTS...

  14. Covering tree with stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumbach, Jan; Guo, Jiong; Ibragimov, Rashid

    2015-01-01

    We study the tree edit distance problem with edge deletions and edge insertions as edit operations. We reformulate a special case of this problem as Covering Tree with Stars (CTS): given a tree T and a set of stars, can we connect the stars in by adding edges between them such that the resulting...... tree is isomorphic to T? We prove that in the general setting, CST is NP-complete, which implies that the tree edit distance considered here is also NP-hard, even when both input trees having diameters bounded by 10. We also show that, when the number of distinct stars is bounded by a constant k, CTS...

  15. Fault-Tree Compiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Ricky W.; Boerschlein, David P.

    1993-01-01

    Fault-Tree Compiler (FTC) program, is software tool used to calculate probability of top event in fault tree. Gates of five different types allowed in fault tree: AND, OR, EXCLUSIVE OR, INVERT, and M OF N. High-level input language easy to understand and use. In addition, program supports hierarchical fault-tree definition feature, which simplifies tree-description process and reduces execution time. Set of programs created forming basis for reliability-analysis workstation: SURE, ASSIST, PAWS/STEM, and FTC fault-tree tool (LAR-14586). Written in PASCAL, ANSI-compliant C language, and FORTRAN 77. Other versions available upon request.

  16. Survival, gene and metabolite responses of Litoria verreauxii alpina frogs to fungal disease chytridiomycosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grogan, Laura F.; Mulvenna, Jason; Gummer, Joel P. A.; Scheele, Ben C.; Berger, Lee; Cashins, Scott D.; McFadden, Michael S.; Harlow, Peter; Hunter, David A.; Trengove, Robert D.; Skerratt, Lee F.

    2018-03-01

    The fungal skin disease chytridiomycosis has caused the devastating decline and extinction of hundreds of amphibian species globally, yet the potential for evolving resistance, and the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms remain poorly understood. We exposed 406 naïve, captive-raised alpine tree frogs (Litoria verreauxii alpina) from multiple populations (one evolutionarily naïve to chytridiomycosis) to the aetiological agent Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in two concurrent and controlled infection experiments. We investigated (A) survival outcomes and clinical pathogen burdens between populations and clutches, and (B) individual host tissue responses to chytridiomycosis. Here we present multiple interrelated datasets associated with these exposure experiments, including animal signalment, survival and pathogen burden of 355 animals from Experiment A, and the following datasets related to 61 animals from Experiment B: animal signalment and pathogen burden; raw RNA-Seq reads from skin, liver and spleen tissues; de novo assembled transcriptomes for each tissue type; raw gene expression data; annotation data for each gene; and raw metabolite expression data from skin and liver tissues. These data provide an extensive baseline for future analyses.

  17. Molecular phylogeny of the diversified frogs of genus Fejervarya (Anura: Dicroglossidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotaki, Manabu; Kurabayashi, Atsushi; Matsui, Masafumi; Kuramoto, Mitsuru; Djong, Tjong Hon; Sumida, Masayuki

    2010-05-01

    Consensus on the taxonomic system and phylogenetic relationships for the anuran genus Fejervarya has yet to be established. Morphological characters in this genus are generally unsuitable for species identification. To carry out molecular species identification and solve phylogenetic problems, we collected 67 Fejervarya specimens from 12 Asian countries and sequenced part of the mitochondrial (mt) Cytb gene. We also sequenced the mt 12S and 16S rRNA genes and seven nuclear genes (BDNF, CXCR4, NCX1, RAG-1, RAG-2, Rhod, and Tyr) for 25 Fejervarya taxa. These molecular markers appear to be adequate for the identification of species. We subjected the molecular data molecular to phylogenetic analyses. In the resulting trees, topotypic F. limnocharis and "F. multistriata" (from China) formed a clade. On the other hand, neither "F. limnocharis" from the Japan mainland nor "F. limnocharis" from eastern Taiwan formed a clade with the real F. limnocharis, and the genetic divergences were larger than the species threshold for frog taxa proposed in previous studies (> 3% for 16S). These results may suggest that "F. multistriata" is a junior synonym of F. limnocharis, or that only some of the populations now recognized as "F. multistriata" correspond to F. limnocharis. Our results also suggest that several cryptic species may be included among the widely distributed Fejervarya species. Finally, our datasets support paraphyly for the genus Fejervarya, although alternative phylogenetic topologies, including Fejervarya monophyly, were not rejected by KH and SH tests.

  18. Complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the Sichuan digging frog Kaloula rugifera (Anura: Microhylidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lichun; Zhao, Li; Shuai, Xiaoling; Ren, Zhilin; Shen, Han; Liu, Fuchun; Ruan, Qiping; Chen, Wei

    2017-03-01

    The Sichuan Digging Frog (Kaloula rugifera) belongs to the family Dicroglossidae, which is endemic to northeastern Sichuan and southernmost Gansu provinces, in southwestern China. In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome of K. rugifera was sequenced. The mitogenome was 17 074 bp in length, consisting of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, 2 ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, and a non-coding control region. As in other vertebrates, most mitochondrial genes are encoded on the heavy strand, except for ND6 and eight tRNA genes which are encoded on the light strand. The overall base composition of the K. rugifera is 29.7% A, 30.3% T, 25.8% C, and 14.2% G. The alignment of the Kaloula species control regions exhibited high genetic variability and rich A + T content. Phylogenetic tree demonstrated that K. rugifera was clustered together with K. borealis and K. verrucosa and they had a close relationship with each other. The complete mitogenome of K. rugifera can provide an important data for the studies on phylogenetic relationship to further explore the taxonomic status of Kaloula species.

  19. Electrophysiological evidence for an ATP-gated ion channel in the principal cells of the frog skin epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodin, Birger; Nielsen, Robert

    2000-01-01

    P2X receptor, Na+ absorption, Short circuit current, Cell potential, Microelectrodes, Frog skin, Cytosolic Ca2+......P2X receptor, Na+ absorption, Short circuit current, Cell potential, Microelectrodes, Frog skin, Cytosolic Ca2+...

  20. Correlation between chloride flux via the mitochondria-rich cells and transepithelial water movement in isolated frog skin (Rana esculenta)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Robert

    1995-01-01

    Antidiuretic hormone; chloride transport; electroosmosis; Frog skin; Intercalated cells; Local osmosis; Mitochondria-rich cells.......Antidiuretic hormone; chloride transport; electroosmosis; Frog skin; Intercalated cells; Local osmosis; Mitochondria-rich cells....

  1. Scheloribatid mites as the source of pumiliotoxins in dendrobatid frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Wataru; Sakata, Tomoyo; Shimano, Satoshi; Enami, Yoshinari; Mori, Naoki; Nishida, Ritsuo; Kuwahara, Yasumasa

    2005-10-01

    The strawberry poison frog Dendrobates pumilio (Anura: Dendrobatidae) and related poison frogs contain a variety of dendrobatid alkaloids that are considered to be sequestered through the consumption of alkaloid-containing arthropods microsympatrically distributed in the habitat. In addition to ants, beetles, and millipedes, we found that adults of two species of oribatid mites belonging to the cohort Brachypylina, trophically a lower level of animal than ants and beetles, contain dendrobatid alkaloids. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) of hexane extracts of adult Scheloribates azumaensis (Oribatida: Acari) revealed the presence of not only pumiliotoxin 251D (8-hydroxy-8-methyl-6-(2'-methylhexylidene)-1-azabicyclo[4.3.0]nonane), but also precoccinelline 193C and another coccinelline-type alkaloid. From the corresponding extracts of an unidentified Scheloribates sp., pumiliotoxin 237A (8-hydroxy-8-methyl-6-(2'-methylpentylidene)-1-azabicyclo[4.3.0]nonane) was detected as a minor component, and identified by synthesis. The presence of related alkaloids, namely deoxypumiliotoxin 193H, a 6,8-diethyl-5-propenylindolizidine, and tentatively, a 1-ethyl-4-pentenynylquinolizidine, were indicated by the GC/MS fragmentation patterns, along with at least another six unidentified alkaloid components. Thus, one possible origin of pumiliotoxins, coccinellid alkaloids, and certain izidines found in poison frogs may be mites of the genus Scheloribates and perhaps related genera in the suborder Oribatida.

  2. The role of predator selection on polymorphic aposematic poison frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noonan, Brice P; Comeault, Aaron A

    2009-02-23

    Demonstrations of interactions between diverse selective forces on bright coloration in defended species are rare. Recent work has suggested that not only do the bright colours of Neotropical poison frogs serve to deter predators, but they also play a role in sexual selection, with females preferring males similar to themselves. These studies report an interaction between the selective forces of mate choice and predation. However, evidence demonstrating phenotypic discrimination by potential predators on these polymorphic species is lacking. The possibility remains that visual (avian) predators possess an inherent avoidance of brightly coloured diurnal anurans and purifying selection against novel phenotypes within populations is due solely to non-random mating. Here, we examine the influence of predation on phenotypic variation in a polymorphic species of poison frog, Dendrobates tinctorius. Using clay models, we demonstrate a purifying role for predator selection, as brightly coloured novel forms are more likely to suffer an attack than both local aposematic and cryptic forms. Additionally, local aposematic forms are attacked, though infrequently, indicating ongoing testing/learning and a lack of innate avoidance. These results demonstrate predator-driven phenotypic purification within populations and suggest colour patterns of poison frogs may truly represent a 'magic trait'.

  3. Radioimmunoassay for plasma corticotropin in frogs (Rana esculenta L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaudry, H.; Vague, P.; Dupont, W.; Leboulenger, F.; Vaillant, R.

    1975-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay technique has been developed for measuring frog plasma corticotropin (ACTH) without prior extraction. Using synthetic porcine ACTH as a reference standard, 131 I-labeled synthetic human ACTH (sp act greater than 500 mCi/mg) as tracer and rabbit anti-porcine ACTH serum, the lower measurable value was estimated at about 4 pg ACTH. Only human and porcine ACTH, ACTH, and frog pituitary ACTH reacted with the rabbit anti-porcine ACTH serum. No cross-reactivity has been found with synthetic ACTH, αMSH, and bovine βMSH. Appearance of damaged 131 I-h ACTH components after storage in plasma solutions was followed for 7 days. The conditions making it possible to reduce ACTH damage have been ascertained. The average plasma corticotropin level (+- CI) was found to be 38.8 +- 7.8 pg/ml without any significant difference between males and females. These results suggest that frog ACTH secretion has much in common with mammalian secretions

  4. Effects of the herbicide imazapyr on juvenile Oregon spotted frogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahnke, Amy E.; Grue, Christian E.; Hayes, Marc P.; Troiano, Alexandra T.

    2013-01-01

    Conflict between native amphibians and aquatic weed management in the Pacific Northwest is rarely recognized because most native stillwater-breeding amphibian species move upland during summer, when herbicide application to control weeds in aquatic habitats typically occurs. However, aquatic weed management may pose a risk for aquatic species present in wetlands through the summer, such as the Oregon spotted frog (OSF, Rana pretiosa), a state endangered species in Washington. Acute toxicity of herbicides used to control aquatic weeds tends to be low, but the direct effects of herbicide tank mixes on OSFs have remained unexamined. We exposed juvenile OSFs to tank mixes of the herbicide imazapyr, a surfactant, and a marker dye in a 96-h static-renewal test. The tank mix was chosen because of its low toxicity to fish and its effectiveness in aquatic weed control. Concentrations were those associated with low-volume (3.5 L/ha) and high-volume (7.0 L/ha) applications of imazapyr and a clean-water control. Following exposure, frogs were reared for two months in clean water to identify potential latent effects on growth. Endpoints evaluated included feeding behavior, growth, and body and liver condition indices. We recorded no mortalities and found no significant differences for any end point between the herbicide-exposed and clean-water control frogs. The results suggest that imazapyr use in wetland restoration poses a low risk of direct toxic effects on juvenile OSFs.

  5. Internal pigment cells respond to external UV radiation in frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Belussi, Lilian; Nilsson Sköld, Helen; de Oliveira, Classius

    2016-05-01

    Fish and amphibians have pigment cells that generate colorful skins important for signaling, camouflage, thermoregulation and protection against ultraviolet radiation (UVR). However, many animals also have pigment cells inside their bodies, on their internal organs and membranes. In contrast to external pigmentation, internal pigmentation is remarkably little studied and its function is not well known. Here, we tested genotoxic effects of UVR and its effects on internal pigmentation in a neotropical frog, Physalaemus nattereri We found increases in body darkness and internal melanin pigmentation in testes and heart surfaces and in the mesenterium and lumbar region after just a few hours of UVR exposure. The melanin dispersion in melanomacrophages in the liver and melanocytes in testes increased after UV exposure. In addition, the amount of melanin inside melanomacrophages cells also increased. Although mast cells were quickly activated by UVR, only longer UVR exposure resulted in genotoxic effects inside frogs, by increasing the frequency of micronuclei in red blood cells. This is the first study to describe systemic responses of external UVR on internal melanin pigmentation, melanomacrophages and melanocytes in frogs and thus provides a functional explanation to the presence of internal pigmentation. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Antimicrobial peptide defenses of the Tarahumara frog, Rana tarahumarae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollins-Smith, Louise A; Reinert, Laura K; Miera, Verma; Conlon, J Michael

    2002-09-20

    Populations of the Tarahumara frog Rana tarahumarae have decreased markedly in recent years in the northern part of their range. Infection by the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis has been implicated in these declines. To determine whether antimicrobial peptides in the skin provide protection against this pathogen, norepinephrine-stimulated skin secretions were tested for their ability to inhibit growth of B. dendrobatidis in vitro. After concentration, crude mixtures of skin peptides inhibited the growth of the chytrid in a concentration-dependent manner. Proteomic analysis led to the identification and characterization of three peptides belonging to the brevinin-1 family of antimicrobial peptides and three belonging to the ranatuerin-2 family. The two most abundant peptides, ranatuerin-2TRa (GIMDSIKGAAKEIAGHLLDNLKCKITGC) and brevinin-1TRa (FLPVIAGIAANVLPKLFCKLTKRC), were active against B. dendrobatidis (MIC of 50 microM for ranatuerin-2TRa and 12.5 microM for brevinin-1TRa against zoospores). These data clearly show that antimicrobial peptides in the skin secretions of the Tarahumara frog are active against B. dendrobatidis and should provide some protection against infection. Therefore, the observed susceptibility of these frogs to this pathogen in the wild may be due to the effects of additional environmental factors that impair this innate defense mechanism, leading to the observed population declines.

  7. Polyandry, Predation, and the Evolution of Frog Reproductive Modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamudio, Kelly R; Bell, Rayna C; Nali, Renato C; Haddad, Célio F B; Prado, Cynthia P A

    2016-09-01

    Frog reproductive modes are complex phenotypes that include egg/clutch characteristics, oviposition site, larval development, and sometimes, parental care. Two evident patterns in the evolution of these traits are the higher diversity of reproductive modes in the tropics and the apparent progression from aquatic to terrestrial reproduction, often attributed to higher fitness resulting from decreased predation on terrestrial eggs and tadpoles. Here, we propose that sexual selection-and not only natural selection due to predation-favors terrestrial breeding by reducing the loss of fitness due to polyandry. To examine this novel selective mechanism, we reconstructed the evolution of reproductive diversity in two frog families (Hylidae and Leptodactylidae) and tested for concerted evolution of egg and tadpole development sites with specific mating behaviors. We found that oviposition and tadpole development sites are evolving independently, do not show the same diversity and/or directionality in terms of terrestriality, and thus may be diversifying due to different selective mechanisms. In both families, terrestrial egg deposition is correlated with amplexus that is hidden from competing males, and in hylids, testes mass was significantly larger and more variable in males with exposed amplexus that are vulnerable to polyandry. Our results indicate that intrasexual selection has been an underappreciated mechanism promoting diversification of frog reproductive modes.

  8. IgE antibodies of fish allergic patients cross-react with frog parvalbumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilger, C; Thill, L; Grigioni, F; Lehners, C; Falagiani, P; Ferrara, A; Romano, C; Stevens, W; Hentges, F

    2004-06-01

    The major allergens in fish are parvalbumins. Important immunoglobulin (Ig)E cross-recognition of parvalbumins from different fish species has been shown. Recently frog parvalbumin alpha has been found to be responsible for a case of IgE-mediated anaphylaxis triggered by the ingestion of frog meat. The aim of this study was to investigate whether IgE antibodies of fish allergic persons cross-react with frog parvalbumin and to appreciate its clinical relevance. The sera of 15 fish allergic patients and one fish and frog allergic patient were tested by IgE-immunoblotting against frog muscle extract. Sera were tested against recombinant parvalbumin alpha and beta from Rana esculenta. Skin prick tests were performed in selected patients with recombinant frog parvalbumin. Ca(2+) depletion experiments and inhibition studies with purified cod and frog recombinant parvalbumin were done to characterize the cross-reactive pattern. Fourteen of the sera tested had IgE antibodies recognizing low molecular weight components in frog muscle extract. Calcium depletion experiments or inhibition of patient sera with purified cod parvalbumin led to a significant or complete decrease in IgE binding. When tested against recombinant parvalbumins, three of 13 sera reacted with alpha parvalbumin and 11 of 12 reacted with beta parvalbumin from R. esculenta. Skin prick tests performed with recombinant frog parvalbumin were positive in fish allergic patients. Inhibition studies showed that a fish and frog allergic patient was primarily sensitized to fish parvalbumin. Cod parvalbumin, a major cross-reactive allergen among different fish species, shares IgE binding epitopes with frog parvalbumin. This in vitro cross-reactivity seems to be also clinically relevant. Parvalbumins probably represent a new family of cross-reactive allergens.

  9. Which frog's legs do froggies eat? The use of DNA barcoding for identification of deep frozen frog legs (Dicroglossidae, Amphibia) commercialized in France

    OpenAIRE

    Ohler, Annemarie; Nicolas, Violaine

    2017-01-01

    International audience; Several millions frogs captured in the wild in Indonesia are sold for food yearly in French supermarkets, as deep frozen frog legs. They are commercialized as Rana macrodon, but up to 15 look-alike species might also be concerned by this trade. From December 2012 to May 2013, we bought 209 specimens of deep frozen frog legs, and identified them through a barcoding approach based on the 16S gene. Our results show that 206 out of the 209 specimens belong to Fejervarya ca...

  10. Trees and highway safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    To minimize the severity of run-off-road collisions of vehicles with trees, departments of transportation (DOTs) : commonly establish clear zones for trees and other fixed objects. Caltrans clear zone on freeways is 30 feet : minimum (40 feet pref...

  11. An addition to the diversity of dendrobatid frogs in Venezuela: description of three new collared frogs (Anura: Dendrobatidae: Mannophryne

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Luis Barrio-Amorós

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Three new species of collared frogs of the genus Mannophryne are described from Venezuela. Two are newly discovered taxa from the Venezuelan Andes, whereas the third species, previously confused with M. trinitatis, is from the Caracas area in the Cordillera de la Costa. The call of the three new species and that of Mannophryne collaris are described. Taxonomic, zoogeographic, and conservation issues are discussed.

  12. 76 FR 45602 - Proposed Safe Harbor Agreement for California Red-Legged Frog, at Swallow Creek Ranch, San Luis...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-29

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Proposed Safe Harbor Agreement for California Red-Legged Frog, at Swallow... the Federally threatened California red-legged frog (Rana draytonii), under the Endangered Species Act... California red-legged frog on the property subject to the Agreement (Enrolled Property), which is owned and...

  13. Decision-Tree Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buntine, Wray

    1994-01-01

    IND computer program introduces Bayesian and Markov/maximum-likelihood (MML) methods and more-sophisticated methods of searching in growing trees. Produces more-accurate class-probability estimates important in applications like diagnosis. Provides range of features and styles with convenience for casual user, fine-tuning for advanced user or for those interested in research. Consists of four basic kinds of routines: data-manipulation, tree-generation, tree-testing, and tree-display. Written in C language.

  14. Protamine-like sperm nuclear basic proteins in the primitive frog Ascaphus truei and histone reversions among more advanced frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasinsky, H E; Gutovich, L; Kulak, D; Mackay, M; Green, D M; Hunt, J; Ausio, J

    1999-12-01

    Sperm nuclear basic proteins (SNBPs) that condense chromatin are very diverse. In animals, evolution of SNBPs has proceeded from lysine-rich histone H type in sponges to more arginine-rich protamine-like PL and protamine P types. Yet sporadic PL/P to H reversions are known to occur in both protostomes and deuterostomes. To determine why this is the case, we have examined SNBPs in eleven anuran species. We find that sperm of the primitive, internally fertilizing archeobatrachian frog A. truei (family Ascaphidae) has PL/P type (42 mol % arginine), with an electrophoretic profile similar to SNBPs in another archeobatrachian, externally fertilizing Leiopelma hochstetteri (family Leiopelmatidae). Cytochemistry of sperm nuclei in the advanced, externally fertilizing neobatrachian frogs Crinia signifera and C. deserticola (family Myobatrachidae) indicates that they have reverted to H type SNBPs. This is also known to be the case in externally fertilizing Rana (family Ranidae) and Silurana, a subgenus of Xenopus (family Pipidae). Such a trend, from PL/P type SNBPs in two archeobatrachians to sporadic reversions to H type in more advanced frogs, parallels the ultrastructural simplification from complex A. truei introsperm to neobatrachian aquasperm that Jamieson et al. (1993. Herpetologica 49:52-65) attribute as a secondary reversion to external fertilization.

  15. Winter Birch Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Debra; Rounds, Judy

    2011-01-01

    Trees are great inspiration for artists. Many art teachers find themselves inspired and maybe somewhat obsessed with the natural beauty and elegance of the lofty tree, and how it changes through the seasons. One such tree that grows in several regions and always looks magnificent, regardless of the time of year, is the birch. In this article, the…

  16. Total well dominated trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finbow, Arthur; Frendrup, Allan; Vestergaard, Preben D.

    cardinality then G is a total well dominated graph. In this paper we study composition and decomposition of total well dominated trees. By a reversible process we prove that any total well dominated tree can both be reduced to and constructed from a family of three small trees....

  17. Macro tree transducers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelfriet, Joost; Vogler, Heiko

    1985-01-01

    Macro tree transducers are a combination of top-down tree transducers and macro grammars. They serve as a model for syntax-directed semantics in which context information can be handled. In this paper the formal model of macro tree transducers is studied by investigating typical automata theoretical

  18. Determination of age, longevity and age at reproduction of the frog ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    separately in plastic bags and placed in 5 different aquaria. Each frog was anaesthetized (using anaesthetic ether), the body mass and SVL were recorded; the 4th toe of each of the hind limbs was clipped, fixed in 10% formalin and numbered serially. Six large sized frogs were used for skeletochronology of the long bones ...

  19. Flesh fly myiasis (Diptera, Sarcophagidae in Peruvian poison frogs genus Epipedobates (Anura, Dendrobatidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattias Hagman

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available In this note we review records of myiasis in poison frogs collected in various locations in Peru during 1982-2005 and present evidence that larger and medium-sized poison frogs (Epipedobates are infected with sarcophagid fly larvae.

  20. Bacterial flora on Cascades frogs in the Klamath Mountains of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karen Pope

    2013-01-01

    Amphibians are experiencing global declines due in part to the infectious disease chytridiomycosis. Some symbiotic bacteria residents on frog skin have been shown to inhibit the growth of Batrachochytrium dendrobatitis (Bd) but few studies have attempted to fully describe the resident bacterial flora of frog skin. We cultured and sequenced 130...

  1. Alkaloids in the mite Scheloribates laevigatus: further alkaloids common to oribatid mites and poison frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saporito, Ralph A; Norton, Roy A; Andriamaharavo, Nirina R; Garraffo, Hugo Martin; Spande, Thomas F

    2011-02-01

    Poison frogs are chemically defended from predators by diverse alkaloids, almost all of which are sequestered unchanged from alkaloid-containing arthropods in the frog diet. Oribatid mites recently have been proposed as a major dietary source of poison frog alkaloids. Here, we report on alkaloids common to an oribatid mite and poison frogs. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis of methanol extracts of adult Scheloribates laevigatus (Oribatida: Scheloribatidae) revealed nine alkaloids. Five of these have been detected previously in the skin glands of poison frogs: two isomers of the pumiliotoxin 291G, two isomers of the 5,6,8-trisubstituted indolizidine 209C, and the 5,6,8-trisubstituted indolizidine 195G. The other four alkaloids, a pumiliotoxin, a tricyclic (coccinelline-like), and two isomers of an izidine, were not previously known, but are similar in structure to alkaloids found in poison frogs. Alkaloids were not detected in immature S. laevigatus, suggesting that they are adult-specific and possibly the result of mite biosynthesis. Although most of the alkaloids detected in S. laevigatus are common to poison frogs, the geographic distributions of these organisms are not sympatric. The findings of this study indicate that oribatid mites, and in particular, members of the genus Scheloribates, represent a relatively unexplored arthropod repository for alkaloids and a significant dietary source of alkaloids in poison frogs.

  2. Phylogeography of Declining Relict and Lowland Leopard Frogs in the Desert Southwest of North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    We investigated the phylogeography of the closely related relict leopard frog (Rana onca) and lowland leopard frog (R. yavapaiensis) – two declining anurans from the warm-desert regions of southwestern North America. We used sequence data from two mitochondrial DNA genes to asses...

  3. Breeding chorus indices are weakly related to estimated abundance of boreal chorus frogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul Stephen Corn; Erin Muths; Amanda M. Kissel; Rick D. Scherer

    2011-01-01

    Call surveys used to monitor breeding choruses of anuran amphibians generate index values that are frequently used to represent the number of male frogs present, but few studies have quantified this relationship. We compared abundance of male Boreal Chorus Frogs (Pseudacris maculata), estimated using capture-recapture methods in two populations in Colorado, to call...

  4. How the environment shapes animal signals: a test of the acoustic adaptation hypothesis in frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goutte, S; Dubois, A; Howard, S D; Márquez, R; Rowley, J J L; Dehling, J M; Grandcolas, P; Xiong, R C; Legendre, F

    2018-01-01

    Long-distance acoustic signals are widely used in animal communication systems and, in many cases, are essential for reproduction. The acoustic adaptation hypothesis (AAH) implies that acoustic signals should be selected for further transmission and better content integrity under the acoustic constraints of the habitat in which they are produced. In this study, we test predictions derived from the AAH in frogs. Specifically, we focus on the difference between torrent frogs and frogs calling in less noisy habitats. Torrents produce sounds that can mask frog vocalizations and constitute a major acoustic constraint on call evolution. We combine data collected in the field, material from scientific collections and the literature for a total of 79 primarily Asian species, of the families Ranidae, Rhacophoridae, Dicroglossidae and Microhylidae. Using phylogenetic comparative methods and including morphological and environmental potential confounding factors, we investigate putatively adaptive call features in torrent frogs. We use broad habitat categories as well as fine-scale habitat measurements and test their correlation with six call characteristics. We find mixed support for the AAH. Spectral features of torrent frog calls are different from those of frogs calling in other habitats and are related to ambient noise levels, as predicted by the AAH. However, temporal call features do not seem to be shaped by the frogs' calling habitats. Our results underline both the complexity of call evolution and the need to consider multiple factors when investigating this issue. © 2017 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2017 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  5. Propulsive force calculations in swimming frogs I. A momentum-impulse approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nauwelaerts, S; Stamhuis, EJ; Aerts, P

    Frogs are animals that are capable of locomotion in two physically different media, aquatic and terrestrial. A comparison of the kinematics of swimming frogs in a previous study revealed a difference in propulsive impulse between jumping and swimming. To explore this difference further, we

  6. Propulsive force calculations in swimming frogs II. Application of a vortex ring model to DPIV data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stamhuis, E.J.; Nauwelaerts, S.

    Frogs propel themselves by kicking water backwards using a synchronised extension of their hind limbs and webbed feet. To understand this propulsion process, we quantified the water movements and displacements resulting from swimming in the green frog Rana esculenta, applying digital particle image

  7. The toxicity of Poison Dart Frog alkaloids against the Fire Ant (Solenopsis invicta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundreds of alkaloids, representing over 20 structural classes, have been identified from the skin of neotropical poison frogs (Dendrobatidae). These alkaloids are derived from arthropod prey of the frogs, and are generally are believed to deter vertebrate predators. We developed a method to put ind...

  8. Population estimates for the Toiyabe population of the Columbia spotted frog (Rana luteiventris), 2004–10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Michael J.; Mellison, Chad; Galvan, Stephanie K.

    2013-01-01

    The Toiyabe population of Columbia spotted frogs (Rana luteiventris, hereafter "Toiyabe frogs") is a geographically isolated population located in central Nevada (fig. 1). The Toiyabe population is part of the Great Basin Distinct Population Segment of Columbia spotted frogs, and is a candidate for listing under the Endangered Species Act (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 2011). The cluster of breeding sites in central Nevada represents the southernmost extremity of the Columbia spotted frogs' known range (Funk and others, 2008). Toiyabe frogs are known to occur in seven drainages in Nye County, Nevada: Reese River, Cow Canyon Creek, Ledbetter Canyon Creek, Cloverdale Creek, Stewart Creek, Illinois Creek, and Indian Valley Creek. Most of the Toiyabe frog population resides in the Reese River, Indian Valley Creek, and Cloverdale Creek drainages (fig. 1; Nevada Department of Wildlife, 2003). Approximately 90 percent of the Toiyabe frogs' habitat is on public land. Most of the public land habitat (95 percent) is managed by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS), while the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) manages the remainder. Additional Toiyabe frog habitat is under Yomba Shoshone Tribal management and in private ownership (Nevada Department of Wildlife, 2003). The BLM, USFS, Nevada Department of Wildlife (NDOW), Nevada Natural Heritage Program (NNHP), Nye County, and U.S Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) have monitored the Toiyabe population since 2004 using mark and recapture surveys (Nevada Department of Wildlife, 2004). The USFWS contracted with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to produce population estimates using these data.

  9. TreePics: visualizing trees with pictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Puillandre

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available While many programs are available to edit phylogenetic trees, associating pictures with branch tips in an efficient and automatic way is not an available option. Here, we present TreePics, a standalone software that uses a web browser to visualize phylogenetic trees in Newick format and that associates pictures (typically, pictures of the voucher specimens to the tip of each branch. Pictures are visualized as thumbnails and can be enlarged by a mouse rollover. Further, several pictures can be selected and displayed in a separate window for visual comparison. TreePics works either online or in a full standalone version, where it can display trees with several thousands of pictures (depending on the memory available. We argue that TreePics can be particularly useful in a preliminary stage of research, such as to quickly detect conflicts between a DNA-based phylogenetic tree and morphological variation, that may be due to contamination that needs to be removed prior to final analyses, or the presence of species complexes.

  10. Radioautographic and histologic investigation of skin in young and old frogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Kook Bon; You, Dong Soo

    1983-01-01

    Age differences in the skin structure have been studied in young (one year-old) and aged (five and a half year- old) frogs, Xenopus laevis. The epidermis in young frogs is made up of an average of 6.3 and 4.7 layers of epithelial cells at abdominal and dorsal surfaces, respectively. In aged frogs, the number of respective cell layers at abdominal and dorsal surfaces increases to 8.8 and 5.6. The thickness of the dermis (spongiosum) in aged frogs is decrease d 25% on the abdominal side (from 267 μm to 207 μm) but is increased by 11% on the dorsal side (from 275 μm to 305 μm). The nucleolar index and 3H-uridine incorporation, as judged by radioautography, by epithelial cells are drastically reduced in aged frogs.

  11. Functional evolution of jumping in frogs: Interspecific differences in take-off and landing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Stephen M; Montuelle, Stephane J; Schmidt, André; Krause, Cornelia; Naylor, Emily; Essner, Richard L

    2016-03-01

    Ancestral frogs underwent anatomical shifts including elongation of the hindlimbs and pelvis and reduction of the tail and vertebral column that heralded the transition to jumping as a primary mode of locomotion. Jumping has been hypothesized to have evolved in a step-wise fashion with basal frogs taking-off with synchronous hindlimb extension and crash-landing on their bodies, and then their limbs move forward. Subsequently, frogs began to recycle the forelimbs forward earlier in the jump to control landing. Frogs with forelimb landing radiated into many forms, locomotor modes, habitats, and niches with controlled landing thought to improve escape behavior. While the biology of take-off behavior has seen considerable study, interspecific comparisons of take-off and landing behavior are limited. In order to understand the evolution of jumping and controlled landing in frogs, data are needed on the movements of the limbs and body across an array of taxa. Here, we present the first description and comparison of kinematics of the hindlimbs, forelimbs and body during take-off and landing in relation to ground reaction forces in four frog species spanning the frog phylogeny. The goal of this study is to understand what interspecific differences reveal about the evolution of take-off and controlled landing in frogs. We provide the first comparative description of the entire process of jumping in frogs. Statistical comparisons identify both homologous behaviors and significant differences among species that are used to map patterns of trait evolution and generate hypotheses regarding the functional evolution of take-off and landing in frogs. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Dynamics of testis-ova in a wild population of Japanese pond frogs, Rana nigromaculata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Tohru; Kumakura, Masahiko; Yoshie, Sumio; Sugishima, Tomomi; Horie, Yoshifumi

    2015-02-01

    Although many studies have reported the occurrence of testis-ova in wild frog populations, the origin and trigger of testis-ova differentiation/development remain unclear. A high frequency of testis-ova has been previously reported for wild populations of the Japanese pond frog, Rana nigromaculata (cf. Iwasawa and Asai, '59). In the present study, we aimed to clarify the dynamics of testis-ova in this frog species, including the origin and artificial induction of testis-ova. Testis-ova were observed in both mature frogs and puberty-stage frogs (i.e., 0- and 1-year-old frogs). However, the early stages of testis-ova (~pachytene stage) were mostly observed in puberty-stage male frogs at the onset of spermatogenesis. The early stages of testis-ova were observed in the cysts of early secondary spermatogonia and the single cysts of the primary spermatogonium. This finding indicates that testis-ova differentiation occurs during spermatogonial proliferation and that it is correlated with the initiation of spermatogenesis. We also examined whether estrogen exposure induced testis-ova differentiation and how it is correlated with the progression of spermatogenesis. When 1-year-old frogs were exposed to estradiol-17β during spring (i.e., when spermatogenesis was initiated), testis-ova differentiation was induced in a dose-dependent manner. However, this phenomenon did not occur in 1-year-old frogs during summer, (i.e., when the transition from spermatogonia to spermatocytes mainly occurs). These results present the first evidence that testis-ova of the Japanese pond frog are derived from primary and early secondary spermatogonia, and that estrogen exposure induces testis-ova differentiation accompanied by the initiation of spermatogenesis. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Which frog's legs do froggies eat? The use of DNA barcoding for identification of deep frozen frog legs (Dicroglossidae, Amphibia commercialized in France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annemarie Ohler

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Several millions frogs captured in the wild in Indonesia are sold for food yearly in French supermarkets, as deep frozen frog legs. They are commercialized as Rana macrodon, but up to 15 look-alike species might also be concerned by this trade. From December 2012 to May 2013, we bought 209 specimens of deep frozen frog legs, and identified them through a barcoding approach based on the 16S gene. Our results show that 206 out of the 209 specimens belong to Fejervarya cancrivora, two to Limnonectes macrodon and one to F. moodiei. Thus only 0.96 % of the frogs were correctly identified. Unless misclassification was intentional, it seems that Indonesian frog leg exporters are not able to discriminate between the species. The quasi absence of L. macrodon in our samples might be an indication of its rarity, confirming that its natural populations are declining rapidly, in agreement with its “vulnerable” status according to the IUCN Red List. Our results show that the genetic and morphological diversity of the frogs in trade is much higher than the genetic and morphological diversity measured so far by scientific studies. These results underline the need for large scale studies to assess the status of wild populations.

  14. Speciation in little: the role of range and body size in the diversification of Malagasy mantellid frogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vences Miguel

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rate and mode of lineage diversification might be shaped by clade-specific traits. In Madagascar, many groups of organisms are characterized by tiny distribution ranges and small body sizes, and this high degree of microendemism and miniaturization parallels a high species diversity in some of these groups. We here investigate the geographic patterns characterizing the radiation of the frog family Mantellidae that is virtually endemic to Madagascar. We integrate a newly reconstructed near-complete species-level timetree of the Mantellidae with georeferenced distribution records and maximum male body size data to infer the influence of these life-history traits on each other and on mantellid diversification. Results We reconstructed a molecular phylogeny based on nuclear and mitochondrial DNA for 257 species and candidate species of the mantellid frog radiation. Based on this phylogeny we identified 53 well-supported pairs of sister species that we used for phylogenetic comparative analyses, along with whole tree-based phylogenetic comparative methods. Sister species within the Mantellidae diverged at 0.2-14.4 million years ago and more recently diverged sister species had geographical range centroids more proximate to each other, independently of their current sympatric or allopatric occurrence. The largest number of sister species pairs had non-overlapping ranges, but several examples of young microendemic sister species occurring in full sympatry suggest the possibility of non-allopatric speciation. Range sizes of species included in the sister species comparisons increased with evolutionary age, as did range size differences between sister species, which rejects peripatric speciation. For the majority of mantellid sister species and the whole mantellid radiation, range and body sizes were associated with each other and small body sizes were linked to higher mitochondrial nucleotide substitution rates and higher clade

  15. Leapfrogging into new territory: How Mascarene ridged frogs diversified across Africa and Madagascar to maintain their ecological niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimkus, Breda M; Lawson, Lucinda P; Barej, Michael F; Barratt, Christopher D; Channing, Alan; Dash, Katrina M; Dehling, J Maximilian; Du Preez, Louis; Gehring, Philip-Sebastian; Greenbaum, Eli; Gvoždík, Václav; Harvey, James; Kielgast, Jos; Kusamba, Chifundera; Nagy, Zoltán T; Pabijan, Maciej; Penner, Johannes; Rödel, Mark-Oliver; Vences, Miguel; Lötters, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    The Mascarene ridged frog, Ptychadena mascareniensis, is a species complex that includes numerous lineages occurring mostly in humid savannas and open forests of mainland Africa, Madagascar, the Seychelles, and the Mascarene Islands. Sampling across this broad distribution presents an opportunity to examine the genetic differentiation within this complex and to investigate how the evolution of bioclimatic niches may have shaped current biogeographic patterns. Using model-based phylogenetic methods and molecular-clock dating, we constructed a time-calibrated molecular phylogenetic hypothesis for the group based on mitochondrial 16S rRNA and cytochrome b (cytb) genes and the nuclear RAG1 gene from 173 individuals. Haplotype networks were reconstructed and species boundaries were investigated using three species-delimitation approaches: Bayesian generalized mixed Yule-coalescent model (bGMYC), the Poisson Tree Process model (PTP) and a cluster algorithm (SpeciesIdentifier). Estimates of similarity in bioclimatic niche were calculated from species-distribution models (maxent) and multivariate statistics (Principal Component Analysis, Discriminant Function Analysis). Ancestral-area reconstructions were performed on the phylogeny using probabilistic approaches implemented in BioGeoBEARS. We detected high levels of genetic differentiation yielding ten distinct lineages or operational taxonomic units, and Central Africa was found to be a diversity hotspot for these frogs. Most speciation events took place throughout the Miocene, including "out-of-Africa" overseas dispersal events to Madagascar in the East and to São Tomé in the West. Bioclimatic niche was remarkably well conserved, with most species tolerating similar temperature and rainfall conditions common to the Central African region. The P. mascareniensis complex provides insights into how bioclimatic niche shaped the current biogeographic patterns with niche conservatism being exhibited by the Central African

  16. Alkaloid 223A: the first trisubstituted indolizidine from dendrobatid frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garraffo, H M; Jain, P; Spande, T F; Daly, J W

    1997-01-01

    The structure of alkaloid 223A (1), the first member of a new class of amphibian alkaloids, purified by HPLC from a skin extract of a Panamanian population of the frog Dendrobates pumilio Schmidt (Dendrobatidae) has been established as (5R,6S,8R,9S)- or (5S,6R,8S,9R)-6,8-diethyl-5-propylindolizidine, based on GC-MS, GC-FTIR, and 1H-NMR spectral studies. Three higher homologs of 223A, namely alkaloids 237L (2), 251M (3), and 267J (4), have been detected in other extracts, and tentative structures are proposed.

  17. Tactical reproductive parasitism via larval cannibalism in Peruvian poison frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jason L; Morales, Victor; Summers, Kyle

    2009-04-23

    We report an unusual example of reproductive parasitism in amphibians. Dendrobates variabilis, an Amazonian poison frog, oviposits at the surface of the water in small pools in plants and deposits tadpoles within the pools. Tadpoles are highly cannibalistic and consume young tadpoles if they are accessible. Deposition of embryos and tadpoles in the same pool is common. Genetic analyses indicate that tadpoles are frequently unrelated to embryos in the same pool. A pool choice experiment in the field demonstrated that males carrying tadpoles prefer to place them in pools with embryos, facilitating reproductive parasitism via cannibalism.

  18. Efficiencies of different genes and different tree-building methods in recovering a known vertebrate phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, C A; Takezaki, N; Nei, M

    1996-03-01

    The relative efficiencies of different protein-coding genes of the mitochondrial genome and different tree-building methods in recovering a known vertebrate phylogeny (two whale species, cow, rat, mouse, opossum, chicken, frog, and three bony fish species) was evaluated. The tree-building methods examined were the neighbor joining (NJ), minimum evolution (ME), maximum parsimony (MP), and maximum likelihood (ML), and both nucleotide sequences and deduced amino acid sequences were analyzed. Generally speaking, amino acid sequences were better than nucleotide sequences in obtaining the true tree (topology) or trees close to the true tree. However, when only first and second codon positions data were used, nucleotide sequences produced reasonably good trees. Among the 13 genes examined, Nd5 produced the true tree in all tree-building methods or algorithms for both amino acid and nucleotide sequence data. Genes Cytb and Nd4 also produced the correct tree in most tree-building algorithms when amino acid sequence data were used. By contrast, Co2, Nd1, and Nd41 showed a poor performance. In general, large genes produced better results, and when the entire set of genes was used, all tree-building methods generated the true tree. In each tree-building method, several distance measures or algorithms were used, but all these distance measures or algorithms produced essentially the same results. The ME method, in which many different topologies are examined, was no better than the NJ method, which generates a single final tree. Similarly, an ML method, in which many topologies are examined, was no better than the ML star decomposition algorithm that generates a single final tree. In ML the best substitution model chosen by using the Akaike information criterion produced no better results than simpler substitution models. These results question the utility of the currently used optimization principles in phylogenetic construction. Relatively simple methods such as the NJ and ML

  19. The valuative tree

    CERN Document Server

    Favre, Charles

    2004-01-01

    This volume is devoted to a beautiful object, called the valuative tree and designed as a powerful tool for the study of singularities in two complex dimensions. Its intricate yet manageable structure can be analyzed by both algebraic and geometric means. Many types of singularities, including those of curves, ideals, and plurisubharmonic functions, can be encoded in terms of positive measures on the valuative tree. The construction of these measures uses a natural tree Laplace operator of independent interest.

  20. Characterisation of acid-soluble and pepsin-solubilised collagen from frog (Rana nigromaculata) skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junjie; Duan, Rui

    2017-08-01

    As the first vertebrates connecting water and land, frogs must have evolved certain specialisations. To find the difference among the collagens from amphibian, fish and mammal animals, acid-soluble collagen (ASC) and pepsin-solubilised collagen (PSC) from frog skin were isolated and characterised. The yield of PSC (19.59%, dry weight) was higher than that of ASC (1.83%, dry weight). The hydroxyproline-to-protein ratio of frog skin was 8.37%, which was higher than that of carp skin ASC (7.83%) but significantly lower than that of calf skin collagen (10.16%), which was in accordance with the living environment of frog. The denaturation temperature of frog skin collagens was approximately 31.5°C. The SDS-PAGE electrophoresis revealed that ASC and PSC were type I collagens. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy proved that the ASC and PSC retained their helical structures. The results indicated the properties of frog skin collagen were close to those of skin collagen from freshwater fish. The frog skin collagens can potentially be used in biomaterial and other fields. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Environmental and Host Effects on Skin Bacterial Community Composition in Panamanian Frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, Brandon J; Lesbarrères, David; Ibáñez, Roberto; Green, David M

    2018-01-01

    Research on the amphibian skin microbiota has focused on identifying bacterial taxa that deter a pathogenic chytrid fungus, and on describing patterns of microbiota variation. However, it remains unclear how environmental variation affects amphibian skin bacterial communities, and whether the overall functional diversity of the amphibian skin microbiota is associated to such variation. We sampled skin microbial communities from one dendrobatoid frog species across an environmental gradient along the Panama Canal, and from three dendrobatoid frog species before and after the onset of the wet season in one site. We found frog skin microbial alpha diversity to be highest in frogs from sites with low soil pH, but no clear effect of the onset of the wet season. However, we found frog skin microbial community structure to be affected by soil pH and the onset of the wet season, which also resulted in a decrease in between-sample variation. Across the sampled frog species, bacterial functional groups changed with the onset of the wet season, with certain bacterial functional groups entirely disappearing and others differing in their relative abundances. In particular, we found the proportion of Bd-inhibitory bacteria to correlate with mean soil pH, and to increase in two of the frog species with the onset of the wet season. Taken together, our results suggest that structure and predicted function of amphibian bacterial skin communities may be influenced by environmental variables such as pH and precipitation, site effects, and host effects.

  2. Poison frog colors are honest signals of toxicity, particularly for bird predators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maan, Martine E; Cummings, Molly E

    2012-01-01

    Antipredator defenses and warning signals typically evolve in concert. However, the extensive variation across taxa in both these components of predator deterrence and the relationship between them are poorly understood. Here we test whether there is a predictive relationship between visual conspicuousness and toxicity levels across 10 populations of the color-polymorphic strawberry poison frog, Dendrobates pumilio. Using a mouse-based toxicity assay, we find extreme variation in toxicity between frog populations. This variation is significantly positively correlated with frog coloration brightness, a viewer-independent measure of visual conspicuousness (i.e., total reflectance flux). We also examine conspicuousness from the view of three potential predator taxa, as well as conspecific frogs, using taxon-specific visual detection models and three natural background substrates. We find very strong positive relationships between frog toxicity and conspicuousness for bird-specific perceptual models. Weaker but still positive correlations are found for crab and D. pumilio conspecific visual perception, while frog coloration as viewed by snakes is not related to toxicity. These results suggest that poison frog colors can be honest signals of prey unpalatability to predators and that birds in particular may exert selection on aposematic signal design. © 2011 by The University of Chicago.

  3. Chasing maximal performance: a cautionary tale from the celebrated jumping frogs of Calaveras County.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astley, H C; Abbott, E M; Azizi, E; Marsh, R L; Roberts, T J

    2013-11-01

    Maximal performance is an essential metric for understanding many aspects of an organism's biology, but it can be difficult to determine because a measured maximum may reflect only a peak level of effort, not a physiological limit. We used a unique opportunity provided by a frog jumping contest to evaluate the validity of existing laboratory estimates of maximum jumping performance in bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana). We recorded video of 3124 bullfrog jumps over the course of the 4-day contest at the Calaveras County Jumping Frog Jubilee, and determined jump distance from these images and a calibration of the jump arena. Frogs were divided into two groups: 'rental' frogs collected by fair organizers and jumped by the general public, and frogs collected and jumped by experienced, 'professional' teams. A total of 58% of recorded jumps surpassed the maximum jump distance in the literature (1.295 m), and the longest jump was 2.2 m. Compared with rental frogs, professionally jumped frogs jumped farther, and the distribution of jump distances for this group was skewed towards long jumps. Calculated muscular work, historical records and the skewed distribution of jump distances all suggest that the longest jumps represent the true performance limit for this species. Using resampling, we estimated the probability of observing a given jump distance for various sample sizes, showing that large sample sizes are required to detect rare maximal jumps. These results show the importance of sample size, animal motivation and physiological conditions for accurate maximal performance estimates.

  4. Environmental and Host Effects on Skin Bacterial Community Composition in Panamanian Frogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon J. Varela

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Research on the amphibian skin microbiota has focused on identifying bacterial taxa that deter a pathogenic chytrid fungus, and on describing patterns of microbiota variation. However, it remains unclear how environmental variation affects amphibian skin bacterial communities, and whether the overall functional diversity of the amphibian skin microbiota is associated to such variation. We sampled skin microbial communities from one dendrobatoid frog species across an environmental gradient along the Panama Canal, and from three dendrobatoid frog species before and after the onset of the wet season in one site. We found frog skin microbial alpha diversity to be highest in frogs from sites with low soil pH, but no clear effect of the onset of the wet season. However, we found frog skin microbial community structure to be affected by soil pH and the onset of the wet season, which also resulted in a decrease in between-sample variation. Across the sampled frog species, bacterial functional groups changed with the onset of the wet season, with certain bacterial functional groups entirely disappearing and others differing in their relative abundances. In particular, we found the proportion of Bd-inhibitory bacteria to correlate with mean soil pH, and to increase in two of the frog species with the onset of the wet season. Taken together, our results suggest that structure and predicted function of amphibian bacterial skin communities may be influenced by environmental variables such as pH and precipitation, site effects, and host effects.

  5. Evolutionary and natural history of the turtle frog, Myobatrachus gouldii, a bizarre myobatrachid frog in the southwestern Australian biodiversity hotspot.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Vertucci

    Full Text Available Southwest Australia (SWA is a global biodiversity hotspot and a centre of diversity and endemism for the Australo-Papuan myobatrachid frogs. Myobatrachus gouldii (the turtle frog has a highly derived morphology associated with its forward burrowing behaviour, largely subterranean habit, and unusual mode of reproduction. Its sister genera Metacrinia and Arenophryne have restricted distributions in Western Australia with significant phylogeographic structure, leading to the recent description of a new species in the latter. In contrast, Myobatrachus is distributed widely throughout SWA over multiple climatic zones, but little is known of its population structure, geographic variation in morphology, or reproduction. We generated molecular and morphological data to test for genetic and morphological variation, and to assess whether substrate specialisation in this species may have led to phylogeographic structuring similar to that of other plant and animal taxa in SWA. We assembled sequence data for one mitochondrial and four nuclear DNA loci (3628 base pairs for 42 turtle frogs sampled throughout their range. Likelihood phylogenetic analyses revealed shallow phylogeographic structure in the mtDNA locus (up to 3.3% genetic distance and little variation in three of the four nDNA loci. The mtDNA haplotype network suggests five geographically allopatric groups, with no shared haplotypes between regions. These geographic patterns are congruent with several other SWA species, with genetic groups restricted to major hydrological divisions, the Swan Coastal Plain, and the Darling Scarp. The geographically structured genetic groups showed no evidence of significant morphological differentiation (242 individuals, and there was little sexual size dimorphism, but subtle differences in reproductive traits suggest more opportunistic breeding in lower rainfall zones. Call data were compared to sister genera Metacrinia and Arenophryne and found to be highly

  6. A theory of game trees, based on solution trees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.H.L.M. Pijls (Wim); A. de Bruin (Arie); A. Plaat (Aske)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper a complete theory of game tree algorithms is presented, entirely based upon the notion of a solution tree. Two types of solution trees are distinguished: max and min solution trees respectively. We show that most game tree algorithms construct a superposition of a max and a

  7. D2-tree

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Sioutas, Spyros; Pantazos, Kostas

    2015-01-01

    We present a new overlay, called the Deterministic Decentralized tree (D2-tree). The D2-tree compares favorably to other overlays for the following reasons: (a) it provides matching and better complexities, which are deterministic for the supported operations; (b) the management of nodes (peers......-balancing scheme of elements into nodes is deterministic and general enough to be applied to other hierarchical tree-based overlays. This load-balancing mechanism is based on an innovative lazy weight-balancing mechanism, which is interesting in its own right....

  8. Morocco - Fruit Tree Productivity

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millennium Challenge Corporation — Date Tree Irrigation Project: The specific objectives of this evaluation are threefold: - Performance evaluation of project activities, like the mid-term evaluation,...

  9. Effects of host species and life stage on the helminth communities of sympatric northern leopard frogs (Lithobates pipiens) and wood frogs (Lithobates sylvaticus) in the Sheyenne National Grasslands, North Dakota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, Kyle D; Newman, Robert A; Tkach, Vasyl V

    2013-08-01

    We studied helminth communities in sympatric populations of leopard frogs (Lithobates pipiens) and wood frogs (Lithobates sylvaticus) and assessed the effects of host species and life stage on helminth community composition and helminth species richness. We examined 328 amphibians including 218 northern leopard frogs and 110 wood frogs collected between April and August of 2009 and 2010 in the Sheyenne National Grasslands of southeastern North Dakota. Echinostomatid metacercariae were the most common helminths found, with the highest prevalence in metamorphic wood frogs. Host species significantly influenced helminth community composition, and host life stage significantly influenced the component community composition of leopard frogs. In these sympatric populations, leopard frogs were common hosts for adult trematodes whereas wood frogs exhibited a higher prevalence of nematodes with direct life cycles. Metamorphic frogs were commonly infected with echinostomatid metacercariae and other larval trematodes whereas juvenile and adult frogs were most-frequently infected with directly transmitted nematodes and trophically transmitted trematodes. Accordingly, helminth species richness increased with the developmental life stage of the host.

  10. New genus of diminutive microhylid frogs from Papua New Guinea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fred Kraus

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A new genus of diminutive (10.1-11.3 mm microhylid frogs is described from New Guinea that is unique in its combination ofonly seven presacral vertebrae, a reduced phalangeal formula that leaves the first fingers and first toes as vestigial nubs, and reduction of the prepollex and prehallux to single elements. Relationships to other genera are unknown, but overall similarity suggests some relationship to Cophixalus, although that genus also differs in some muscle characters and likely remains paraphyletic. The new genus contains two species, which are among the smallest known frogs in the world. Their miniaturization may be related to their inhabiting leaf litter, exploitation of which may for small size. The new genus is currently known only from one mountaintop in the southeasternmost portion of New Guinea and another on a nearby island. This region is part of the East Papuan Composite Terrane and, should this lineage prove endemic to that region, it may suggest that it originated prior to that geological unit’s docking with mainland New Guinea at 23–29 MY.

  11. LOCALIZATION OF PERMEABILITY BARRIERS IN THE FROG SKIN EPITHELIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Palomo, A.; Erlij, D.; Bracho, H.

    1971-01-01

    Ruthenium red and colloidal lanthanum were used to determine the site of the structural barriers to diffusion within the intercellular spaces of frog skin epithelium. Electron micrographs show that occluding zonules located at the outer border of the stratum corneum and at the outer layer of the stratum granulosum are true tight junctions since they are impermeable to these tracers. Measurement of 140La uptake by the living skin shows that lanthanum moves across the external surface of the skin readily, into and out of a compartment that has a limited capacity and is bounded on its internal side by a barrier impermeable to lanthanum. Examination of these skins with the electron microscope suggests that the compartment is localized between the external membrane of the cells at the outer layer of the s. granulosum and at the outermost surface of the skin. These observations and other findings described in the literature indicate that the site of the external high resistance barrier of the frog skin is localized at the outer border of the s. granulosum. PMID:4329611

  12. The genetic structure of a relict population of wood frogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Rick; Muths, Erin; Noon, Barry; Oyler-McCance, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Habitat fragmentation and the associated reduction in connectivity between habitat patches are commonly cited causes of genetic differentiation and reduced genetic variation in animal populations. We used eight microsatellite markers to investigate genetic structure and levels of genetic diversity in a relict population of wood frogs (Lithobates sylvatica) in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado, where recent disturbances have altered hydrologic processes and fragmented amphibian habitat. We also estimated migration rates among subpopulations, tested for a pattern of isolation-by-distance, and looked for evidence of a recent population bottleneck. The results from the clustering algorithm in Program STRUCTURE indicated the population is partitioned into two genetic clusters (subpopulations), and this result was further supported by factorial component analysis. In addition, an estimate of FST (FST = 0.0675, P value \\0.0001) supported the genetic differentiation of the two clusters. Estimates of migration rates among the two subpopulations were low, as were estimates of genetic variability. Conservation of the population of wood frogs may be improved by increasing the spatial distribution of the population and improving gene flow between the subpopulations. Construction or restoration of wetlands in the landscape between the clusters has the potential to address each of these objectives.

  13. Food niche overlap between two sympatric leaf-litter frog species from Central Amazonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Talione Sabagh

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We studied the feeding habits and similarities in the diet of two sympatric and syntopic Amazonian frog species, Anomaloglossus stepheni (Aromobatidae and Leptodactylus andreae (Leptodactylidae in a forested area in Central Amazonia. The breadth of the trophic niche of these species was 5.89 and 3.75, respectively, and approximately 85% of their diets were similar. Ants were main food item in the diets of both frog species. The coexistence between these frog species may be facilitated by the significant differences in the size of their mouths. This difference allows them to consume preys items of different sizes.

  14. Superficial and deep blood vessel distribution in the frog telencephalon. Reference to morphological brain asymmetries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemali, M; Sada, E; Fiorino, L

    1990-01-01

    Nine frogs of the species "Rana esculenta" were heart perfused with Microfile Silicone Rubber. The frogs were examined both after dissection (cut with a razor blade) to study the superficial blood vessel pattern, and histologically (the Nissl staining method) to study the distribution of the deep blood capillaries. While the superficial blood vary in pattern, the deep capillaries are distributed symmetrically. This finding does not support a correlation between blood vessel pattern and morphological brain asymmetry, at least in the frog, and thus other explanations must be sought to explain brain asymmetry.

  15. Inter- and intra-specific genetic divergence of Asian tiger frogs (genus Hoplobatrachus), with special reference to the population structure of H. tigerinus in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Nasrin; Igawa, Takeshi; Islam, Mohammed Mafizul; Hasan, Mahmudul; Alam, Mohammad Shafiqul; Komaki, Shohei; Kawamura, Kensuke; Khan, Md Mukhlesur Rahman; Sumida, Masayuki

    2017-03-17

    The five frog species of the genus Hoplobatrachus are widely distributed in Asia and Africa, with Asia being considered the genus' origin. However, the evolutionary relationships of Asian Hoplobatrachus species remain ambiguous. Additionally, genetic diversity and fundamental differentiation processes within species have not been studied. We conducted molecular phylogenetic analysis on Asian Hoplobatrachus frogs and population genetic analysis on H. tigerinus in Bangladesh using the mitochondrial CYTB gene and 21 microsatellite markers. The resultant phylogenetic tree revealed monophyly in each species, notwithstanding the involvement of cryptic species in H. chinensis and H. tigerinus, which are evident from the higher genetic divergence between populations. Bayesian inference of population structure revealed genetic divergence between western and eastern H. tigerinus populations in Bangladesh, suggesting restricted gene flow caused by barriers posed by major rivers. However, genetic distances among populations were generally low. A discrete population is located in the low riverine delta region, which likely reflects long-distance dispersal. These results strongly suggest that the environment specific to this river system has maintained the population structure of H. tigerinus in this region.

  16. Early Pliocene anuran fossils from Kanapoi, Kenya, and the first fossil record for the African burrowing frog Hemisus (Neobatrachia: Hemisotidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delfino, Massimo

    2017-07-13

    Isolated amphibian bones from the early Pliocene of Kanapoi (West Turkana, Kenya) help to improve the scarce fossil record of the late Neogene and Quaternary amphibians from East Africa. All currently available 579 bones are referable exclusively to the Anura (frogs and toads). More than half of the remains (366) are identified as Hemisus cf. Hemisus marmoratus, an extant species that still inhabits Kenya, but apparently not the northwest of the country and the Turkana area in particular. The rest of the remains are identified simply as Anura indet. because of poor preservation or non congruence with the relatively few African extant taxa whose osteology is known in detail. The Hemisus material represents the first fossil record for Hemisotidae, an endemic African family of peculiar, head-first burrowing frogs, whose sister taxon relationships indicate a divergence from brevicipitids in the Late Cretaceous or early Paleocene. The ecological requirements of extant H. marmoratus suggest that the Kanapoi area surrounding the fluvial and deltaic settings, from where the fossil remains of vertebrates were buried, was likely a grassland or relatively dry, open low tree-shrub savanna. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Are trees long-lived?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin T. Smith

    2009-01-01

    Trees and tree care can capture the best of people's motivations and intentions. Trees are living memorials that help communities heal at sites of national tragedy, such as Oklahoma City and the World Trade Center. We mark the places of important historical events by the trees that grew nearby even if the original tree, such as the Charter Oak in Connecticut or...

  18. Nest structure, incubation and and hatching in the trinidadian leaf-frog Phyllomedusa trinitatis (Anura: Hylidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Roger Downie

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available New findings on nesting and hatching are reported for the leaf-nesting tree frog Phyllomedusa trinitatis. Nest height and leaf cover(one or many leaves, well or poorly covered were very variable. Contrary to a previous report, egless jelly capsules we scattered amongst the eggs, with substancial jelly plugs located above and below the egg clutch. Plugs were composed of capsules embedded in a matrix of somewhat different composition. The upper plug acted as a barrier to water entry. Contrary to previous reports, isolated eggs could develop in aquatic media, the later stage on entry the better: Aeration and salt composition of the water influences this ability. Egg clutches developes equally well whether the covering leaves were alive or dead. Single eggs incubated in water hatched prematurely; when placed in water, eggs near hatching stage hatched within a short time; such eggs on a dry or damp substrate did not hatch till much later. The hatching of any embryo in a group appeared to act as a stimulus to neighbours to hatch. Observations ons nests with the covering leaves replaced by clingfilm showed that emergence is preceded by a lenghty period of hatching behavior, with individuals hatchins, wriggling and stimulating larger and larger groups to hatch, and releasing a frothy fluid wich leads to the dissolution of the lower jelly plug and emergence of the hatchlings. Contrary to a previous report, hatching gland cells were observable on the laterodorsal surface of the head. When hatchings emerged from the nest, they were mostly at Gosner stage 25 with gills fully resorbed. When earlier embryos were induced to hatch, they rapidly shortened their external gills. These findings are discussed in comparison with observations on the related genus Agalychnis.

  19. The extraordinary biology and development of marsupial frogs (Hemiphractidae) in comparison with fish, mammals, birds, amphibians and other animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Pino, Eugenia M

    2018-01-03

    The study of oogenesis and early development of frogs belonging to the family Hemiphractidae provide important comparison to the aquatic development of other frogs, such as Xenopus laevis, because reproduction on land characterizes the Hemiphractidae. In this review, the multinucleated oogenesis of the marsupial frog Flectonotus pygmaeus (Hemiphractidae) is analyzed and interpreted. In addition, the adaptations associated with the incubation of embryos in the pouch of the female marsupial frog Gastrotheca riobambae (Hemiphractidae) and the embryonic development of this frog are summarized. Moreover, G. riobambae gastrulation is compared with the gastrulation modes of Engystomops randi and Engystomops coloradorum (Leptodactylidae); Ceratophrys stolzmanni (Ceratophryidae); Hyalinobatrachium fleischmanni and Espadarana callistomma (Centrolenidae); Ameerega bilinguis, Dendrobates auratus, Epipedobates anthonyi, Epipedobates machalilla, Epipedobates tricolor, and Hyloxalus vertebralis (Dendrobatidae); Eleutherodactylus coqui (Terrarana: Eleutherodactylidae), and X. laevis (Pipidae). The comparison indicated two modes of frog gastrulation. In X. laevis and in frogs with aquatic reproduction, convergent extension begins during gastrulation. In contrast, convergent extension occurs in the post-gastrula of frogs with terrestrial reproduction. These two modes of gastrulation resemble the transitions toward meroblastic cleavage found in ray-finned fishes (Actinopterygii). In spite of this difference, the genes that guide early development seem to be highly conserved in frogs. I conclude that the shift of convergent extension to the post-gastrula accompanied the diversification of frog egg size and terrestrial reproductive modes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Annual cycles of urinary reproductive steroid concentrations in wild and captive endangered Fijian ground frogs (Platymantis vitiana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Edward J; Molinia, Frank C; Christi, Ketan S; Morley, Craig G; Cockrem, John F

    2010-03-01

    Annual cycles of reproductive steroid metabolites were measured in urine collected from free-living and captive tropical endangered Fijian ground frogs (Platymantis vitiana) a terrestrial breeding. Free-living frogs were sampled on Viwa Island, Fiji and captive frogs were maintained in an outdoor enclosure in Suva, Fiji. Urinary estrone, progesterone and testosterone metabolite concentrations increased in male and female frogs after hCG challenges, with clear peaks in steroid concentrations 2 or 3 days after the challenges. There were annual cycles of testosterone metabolites in wild and captive males, and of estrone and progesterone metabolites in wild and captive females. Peaks of steroid concentrations in the wet season corresponded with periods of mating and egg laying in females in December and January. Steroid concentrations declined in January and February when maximum egg sizes in females were also declining. Body weights of wild male and vitellogenic female frogs showed annual cycles. Body weights of non-vitellogenic female frogs varied significantly between months, although there was no clear pattern of annual changes. Body weights of the 3 captive male frogs and 4 captive female frogs were similar to those of the wild frogs. Estrone metabolites were 80% successful in identifying non-vitellogenic females from males. The results suggest that the Fijian ground frog is a seasonal breeder with an annual gonadal cycle, and this species is likely to be photoperiodic. Urinary steroid measurements can provide useful information on reproductive cycles in endangered amphibians. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Description of the tadpoles of two endemic frogs: the Phu Luang cascade frog Odorrana aureola (Anura: Ranidae) and the Isan big-headed frog Limnonectes isanensis (Anura: Dicroglossidae) from northeastern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampai, Natee; Rujirawan, Attapol; Arkajag, Jirachai; Mcleod, David S; Aowphol, Anchalee

    2015-07-07

    We describe the external morphology of the tadpoles of two frogs endemic to Thailand: the Phu Luang cascade frog    (Odorrana aureola) and the Isan big-headed frog (Limnonectes isanensis) from the type localities in the Phu Luang Wildlife Sanctuary, Loei Province, northeastern Thailand. Morphological and genetic characters (16S rRNA) were used to identify specimen and match tadpoles to the adults. Detailed descriptions of external morphology and coloration in life are provided for both species. We provide a brief discussion of the ecology of these tadpoles and a comparison to previously published data from tadpoles of closely related taxa. Additionally, we provide evidence for the utility of larval morphology in resolving the taxonomic puzzles presented by cryptic species complexes.

  2. Decision Tree Phytoremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-12-01

    8 2.4 Irrigation, Agronomic Inputs, and...documents will provide the reader in-depth background on the science and engineering mechanisms of phytoremediation. Using the decision tree and the...ITRC – Phytoremediation Decision Tree December 1999 8 • Contaminant levels • Plant selection • Treatability • Irrigation, agronomic

  3. Tree biology and dendrochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin T. Smith; Walter C. Shortle

    1996-01-01

    Dendrochemistry, the interpretation of elemental analysis of dated tree rings, can provide a temporal record of environmental change. Using the dendrochemical record requires an understanding of tree biology. In this review, we pose four questions concerning assumptions that underlie recent dendrochemical research: 1) Does the chemical composition of the wood directly...

  4. Structural Equation Model Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandmaier, Andreas M.; von Oertzen, Timo; McArdle, John J.; Lindenberger, Ulman

    2013-01-01

    In the behavioral and social sciences, structural equation models (SEMs) have become widely accepted as a modeling tool for the relation between latent and observed variables. SEMs can be seen as a unification of several multivariate analysis techniques. SEM Trees combine the strengths of SEMs and the decision tree paradigm by building tree…

  5. Uncovering dynamic fault trees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Junges, Sebastian; Guck, Dennis; Katoen, Joost P.; Stoelinga, Mariëlle Ida Antoinette

    Fault tree analysis is a widespread industry standard for assessing system reliability. Standard (static) fault trees model the failure behaviour of systems in dependence of their component failures. To overcome their limited expressive power, common dependability patterns, such as spare management,

  6. Matching Subsequences in Trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2009-01-01

    Given two rooted, labeled trees P and T the tree path subsequence problem is to determine which paths in P are subsequences of which paths in T. Here a path begins at the root and ends at a leaf. In this paper we propose this problem as a useful query primitive for XML data, and provide new...

  7. Trees Are Terrific!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braus, Judy, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    Ranger Rick's NatureScope is a creative education series dedicated to inspiring in children an understanding and appreciation of the natural world while developing the skills they will need to make responsible decisions about the environment. Contents are organized into the following sections: (1) "What Makes a Tree a Tree?," including…

  8. Individual tree control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey A. Holt

    1989-01-01

    Controlling individual unwanted trees in forest stands is a readily accepted method for improving the value of future harvests. The practice is especially important in mixed hardwood forests where species differ considerably in value and within species individual trees differ in quality. Individual stem control is a mechanical or chemical weeding operation that...

  9. Trees and Climate Change

    OpenAIRE

    Dettenmaier, Megan; Kuhns, Michael; Unger, Bethany; McAvoy, Darren

    2017-01-01

    This fact sheet describes the complex relationship between forests and climate change based on current research. It explains ways that trees can mitigate some of the risks associated with climate change. It details the impacts that forests are having on the changing climate and discuss specific ways that trees can be used to reduce or counter carbon emissions directly and indirectly.

  10. The tree BVOC index

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.R. Simpson; E.G. McPherson

    2011-01-01

    Urban trees can produce a number of benefits, among them improved air quality. Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) emitted by some species are ozone precursors. Modifying future tree planting to favor lower-emitting species can reduce these emissions and aid air management districts in meeting federally mandated emissions reductions for these compounds. Changes...

  11. Effects of predatory fish on survival and behavior of larval gopher frogs (Rana capito) and Southern Leopard Frogs (Rana sphenocephala)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregoire, D.R.; Gunzburger, M.S.

    2008-01-01

    Southern Leopard Frogs, Rana sphenocephala, are habitat generalists occurring in virtually all freshwater habitats within their geographic range, whereas Gopher Frogs, Rana capito, typically breed in ponds that do not normally contain fish. To evaluate the potential for predation by fish to influence the distribution of these species, we conducted a randomized factorial experiment. We examined the survival rate and behavior of tadpoles when exposed to Warmouth Sunfish, Lepomis gulosus, Banded Sunfish, Enneacanthus obesus, and Eastern Mosquitofish, Gambusia holbrooki. We also conducted a choice experiment to examine the survival rate of the two species of tadpoles when a predator is given a choice of both species simultaneously. Lepomis gulosus consumed the most tadpoles and ate significantly more tadpoles of R. capito than R. sphenocephala. Gambusia holbrooki injured the most tadpoles, especially R. capito. Enneacanthus obesus did not have an effect on behavior or survival of either anuran species. Tadpoles of both anurans increased hiding when in the presence of L. gulosus and G. holbrooki, but a greater proportion of R. capito hid than did R. sphenocephala. Our results suggest that R. capito are more vulnerable to predation by fish than are R. sphenocephala. The introduction of fish may play a role in population declines of certain anurans breeding in normally fish-free wetlands, and even small fish, such as mosquitofish, may have significant negative effects on the tadpoles of R. capito. Copyright 2008 Society for the Study or Amphibians and Reptiles.

  12. Environmental tritium in trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.M.

    1979-01-01

    The distribution of environmental tritium in the free water and organically bound hydrogen of trees growing in the vicinity of the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL) has been studied. The regional dispersal of HTO in the atmosphere has been observed by surveying the tritium content of leaf moisture. Measurement of the distribution of organically bound tritium in the wood of tree ring sequences has given information on past concentrations of HTO taken up by trees growing in the CRNL Liquid Waste Disposal Area. For samples at background environmental levels, cellulose separation and analysis was done. The pattern of bomb tritium in precipitation of 1955-68 was observed to be preserved in the organically bound tritium of a tree ring sequence. Reactor tritium was discernible in a tree growing at a distance of 10 km from CRNL. These techniques provide convenient means of monitoring dispersal of HTO from nuclear facilities. (author)

  13. Coded Splitting Tree Protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jesper Hemming; Stefanovic, Cedomir; Popovski, Petar

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to multiple access control called coded splitting tree protocol. The approach builds on the known tree splitting protocols, code structure and successive interference cancellation (SIC). Several instances of the tree splitting protocol are initiated, each...... instance is terminated prematurely and subsequently iterated. The combined set of leaves from all the tree instances can then be viewed as a graph code, which is decodable using belief propagation. The main design problem is determining the order of splitting, which enables successful decoding as early...... as possible. Evaluations show that the proposed protocol provides considerable gains over the standard tree splitting protocol applying SIC. The improvement comes at the expense of an increased feedback and receiver complexity....

  14. Language trees not equal gene trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, James; Kandler, Anne

    2010-09-01

    Darwin saw similarities between the evolution of species and the evolution of languages, and it is now widely accepted that similarities between related languages can often be interpreted in terms of a bifurcating descent history ('phylogenesis'). Such interpretations are supported when the distributions of shared and unshared traits (for example, in terms of etymological roots for elements of basic vocabulary) are analysed using tree-building techniques and found to be well-explained by a phylogenetic model. In this article, we question the demographic assumption which is sometimes made when a tree-building approach has been taken to a set of cultures or languages, namely that the resulting tree is also representative of a bifurcating population history. Using historical census data relating to Gaelic- and English-speaking inhabitants of Sutherland (Highland Scotland), we have explored the dynamics of language death due to language shift, representing the extreme case of lack of congruence between the genetic and the culture-historical processes. Such cases highlight the important role of selective cultural migration (or shifting between branches) in determining the extinction rates of different languages on such trees.

  15. Sound imaging of nocturnal animal calls in their natural habitat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizumoto, Takeshi; Aihara, Ikkyu; Otsuka, Takuma; Takeda, Ryu; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Okuno, Hiroshi G

    2011-09-01

    We present a novel method for imaging acoustic communication between nocturnal animals. Investigating the spatio-temporal calling behavior of nocturnal animals, e.g., frogs and crickets, has been difficult because of the need to distinguish many animals' calls in noisy environments without being able to see them. Our method visualizes the spatial and temporal dynamics using dozens of sound-to-light conversion devices (called "Firefly") and an off-the-shelf video camera. The Firefly, which consists of a microphone and a light emitting diode, emits light when it captures nearby sound. Deploying dozens of Fireflies in a target area, we record calls of multiple individuals through the video camera. We conduct two experiments, one indoors and the other in the field, using Japanese tree frogs (Hyla japonica). The indoor experiment demonstrates that our method correctly visualizes Japanese tree frogs' calling behavior. It has confirmed the known behavior; two frogs call synchronously or in anti-phase synchronization. The field experiment (in a rice paddy where Japanese tree frogs live) also visualizes the same calling behavior to confirm anti-phase synchronization in the field. Experimental results confirm that our method can visualize the calling behavior of nocturnal animals in their natural habitat.

  16. Further Development and Validation of the Frog Embryo Teratogenesis Assay - Xenopus (FETAX). Phase III

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bantle, John

    1996-01-01

    This interlaboratory study of the Frog Embryo Teratogenesis Assay (FETAX) was undertaken in order to assess the repeatability and reliability of data collected under the guide published by the American Society for Testing and Materials...

  17. EVIDENCE FOR PHYLOGENETICALLY DISTINCT LEOPARD FROGS (RANA ONCA) FROM THE BORDER REGION OF NEVADA, UTAH, ARIZONA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remnant populations of leopard frogs exist within the Virgin River drainage and adjacent portions of the Colorado River (Black Canyon) in northwestern Arizona and southern Nevada. These populations either represent the reportedly extinct taxa Rana onca or northern, disjunct R...

  18. Effects of oxymorphazone in frogs: long lasting antinociception in vivo, and apparently irreversible binding in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benyhe, S.; Hoffman, G.; Varga, E.; Hosztafi, S.; Toth, G.; Borsodi, A.; Wollemann, M.

    1989-01-01

    Oxymorphazone was found to be a relatively weak antinociceptive drug in intact frog (Rana esculenta) when acetic acid was used as pain stimulus. Frogs remained analgesic for at least 48 hrs following oxymorphazone administration. The ligand increased the latency of wiping reflex in spinal frogs too. There effects were blocked by naloxone. In equilibrium binding studies ( 3 H)oxymorphazone had high affinity to the opioid receptors of frog brain and spinal cord as well. Kinetic experiments show that only 25% of the bound ( 3 H)oxymorphazone is readily dissociable. Preincubation of the membranes with labeled oxymorphazone results in a washing resistant inhibition of the opioid binding sites. At least 70% of the ( 3 H)oxymorphazone specific binding is apparently irreversible after reaction at 5 nM ligand concentration, and this can be enhanced by a higher concentration of tritiated ligand

  19. Levels of batrachotoxin and lack of sensitivity to its action in poison-dart frogs (Phyllobates).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, J W; Myers, C W; Warnick, J E; Albuquerque, E X

    1980-06-20

    Batrachotoxin is present in remarkably high amounts in the skin of Phyllobates terribilis. Levels of batrachotoxin tend to be reduced when P. terribilis is maintained in captivity, but even after being confined for up to 6 years, these frogs were still at least five times more toxic than other Phyllobates species used by natives for poisoning blowgun darts. Batrachotoxin was not detectable in F1 progeny reared to maturity in captivity. Nerve and muscle preparations from wild-caught frogs and from the nontoxic F1 frogs were both insensitive to batrachotoxin. The regulatory site controlling sodium-channel activation and permeability appears to have been minimally altered to prevent interaction with batrachotoxin, but is still sensitive to other sodium conductance activators (veratridine, grayanotoxin) to which the frogs arenot exposed naturally.

  20. Effects of oxymorphazone in frogs: long lasting antinociception in vivo, and apparently irreversible binding in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benyhe, S.; Hoffman, G.; Varga, E.; Hosztafi, S.; Toth, G.; Borsodi, A.; Wollemann, M.

    1989-01-01

    Oxymorphazone was found to be a relatively weak antinociceptive drug in intact frog (Rana esculenta) when acetic acid was used as pain stimulus. Frogs remained analgesic for at least 48 hrs following oxymorphazone administration. The ligand increased the latency of wiping reflex in spinal frogs too. There effects were blocked by naloxone. In equilibrium binding studies (/sup 3/H)oxymorphazone had high affinity to the opioid receptors of frog brain and spinal cord as well. Kinetic experiments show that only 25% of the bound (/sup 3/H)oxymorphazone is readily dissociable. Preincubation of the membranes with labeled oxymorphazone results in a washing resistant inhibition of the opioid binding sites. At least 70% of the (/sup 3/H)oxymorphazone specific binding is apparently irreversible after reaction at 5 nM ligand concentration, and this can be enhanced by a higher concentration of tritiated ligand.

  1. The Developmental Effects Of A Municipal Wastewater Effluent On The Northern Leopard Frog, Rana pipiens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wastewater effluents are complex mixtures containing a variety of anthropogenic compounds, many of which are known endocrine disruptors. In order to characterize the development and behavorial effects of such a complex mixture, northern leopard frogs, Rana pipiens, were e...

  2. Stormwater wetlands can function as ecological traps for urban frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sievers, Michael; Parris, Kirsten M; Swearer, Stephen E; Hale, Robin

    2018-03-01

    Around cities, natural wetlands are rapidly being destroyed and replaced with wetlands constructed to treat stormwater. Although the intended purpose of these wetlands is to manage urban stormwater, they are inhabited by wildlife that might be exposed to contaminants. These effects will be exacerbated if animals are unable to differentiate between stormwater treatment wetlands of varying quality and some function as 'ecological traps' (i.e. habitats that animals prefer despite fitness being lower than in other habitats). To examine if urban stormwater wetlands can be ecological traps for frogs, we tested if survival, metamorphosis-related measures and predator avoidance behaviours of frogs differed within mesocosms that simulated stormwater wetlands with different contaminant levels, and paired this with a natural oviposition experiment to assess breeding-site preferences. We provide the first empirical evidence that these wetlands can function as ecological traps for frogs. Tadpoles had lower survival and were less responsive to predator olfactory cues when raised in more polluted stormwater wetlands, but also reached metamorphosis earlier and at a larger size. A greater size at metamorphosis was likely a result of increased per capita food availability due to higher mortality combined with eutrophication, although other compensatory effects such as selective-mortality removing smaller individuals from low-quality mesocosms may also explain these results. Breeding adults laid comparable numbers of eggs across wetlands with high and low contaminant levels, indicating no avoidance of the former. Since stormwater treatment wetlands are often the only available aquatic habitat in urban landscapes we need to better understand how they perform as habitats to guide management decisions that mitigate their potential ecological costs. This may include improving wetland quality so that fitness is no longer compromised, preventing colonisation by animals, altering the cues

  3. Nuclear Abnormalities in Erythrocytes of Frogs From Wetlands and Croplands of Western Ghats Indicate Environmental Contaminations

    OpenAIRE

    Raghunath, Shreyas; Veerabhadrappa, Chethankumar Masaruru; Krishnamurthy, Sannanegunda Venkatarama Bhatta

    2017-01-01

    Anuran amphibians are the biological models to assess the influence of environmental contamination. We conducted nuclear abnormality assessment and micronuclei test in erythrocytes of frogs to identify an early influence of environmental contaminations. In Western Ghats of India, farmers use different agrochemicals and obviously, the amphibian habitat is contaminated with combinations of many residues. Many frog species use these agro-ecosystem for breeding and to complete early life stage. I...

  4. Interference of a short-chain phospholipid with ion transport pathways in frog skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Unmack, M A; Frederiksen, O; Willumsen, N J

    1997-01-01

    The effects of mucosal application of the short-chain phospholipid didecanoyl-L-alpha-phosphatidylcholine (DDPC; with two saturated 10-carbon acyl chains) on active Na+ transport and transepithelial conductance (G) in the frog skin (Rana temporaria) were investigated. Active Na+ transport...... of the frog skin epithelium and opens a paracellular tight junction pathway. Both effects may be caused by incorporation of DDPC in the apical cell membrane....

  5. Pecular Features of Hematopoiesis in the Liver of Mature and Immature Green Frogs (Pelophylax Esculentus Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akulenko N. M.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article describes characteristic features of the hematopoiesis in mature and immature green frogs (Pelophylax esculentus complex. Quantitative differences in liver myelograms were insignificant. However, in a sample of mature animals numerous significant correlations between the number of pigment inclusions in the liver and indicators of erythropoiesis and myelopoiesis were observed. Those correlations were absent in the immature frogs. We concluded that aft er the frogs’ breeding a lack of plastic resources, in particular, hemosiderin remains up to the hibernation.

  6. Sexual differences in prevalence of a new species of trypanosome infecting túngara frogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ximena E. Bernal

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosomes are a diverse group of protozoan parasites of vertebrates transmitted by a variety of hematophagous invertebrate vectors. Anuran trypanosomes and their vectors have received relatively little attention even though these parasites have been reported from frog and toad species worldwide. Blood samples collected from túngara frogs (Engystomops pustulosus, a Neotropical anuran species heavily preyed upon by eavesdropping frog-biting midges (Corethrella spp., were examined for trypanosomes. Our results revealed sexual differences in trypanosome prevalence with female frogs being rarely infected (<1%. This finding suggests this protozoan parasite may be transmitted by frog-biting midges that find their host using the mating calls produced by male frogs. Following previous anuran trypanosome studies, we examined 18S ribosomal RNA gene to characterize and establish the phylogenetic relationship of the trypanosome species found in túngara frogs. A new species of giant trypanosome, Trypanosoma tungarae n. sp., is described in this study. Overall the morphometric data revealed that the trypomastigotes of T. tungarae n. sp. are similar to other giant trypanosomes such as Trypanosoma rotatorium and Trypanosoma ranarum. Despite its slender and long cell shape, however, 18S rRNA gene sequences revealed that T. tungarae n. sp. is sister to the rounded-bodied giant trypanosome, Trypanosoma chattoni. Therefore, morphological convergence explains similar morphology among members of two non-closely related groups of trypanosomes infecting frogs. The results from this study underscore the value of coupling morphological identification with molecular characterization of anuran trypanosomes.

  7. Distribution and postbreeding environmental relationships of Northern leopard frogs (Rana [Lithobates] pipiens) in Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germaine, S.S.; Hays, D.W.

    2009-01-01

    Northern leopard frogs (Rana [Lithobates] pipiens) are considered sensitive, threatened, or endangered in all western states and western Canadian provinces. Historically present in eastern Washington in 6 major river drainages, leopard frogs are now only known to occur at 2 localized areas in the Crab Creek drainage in Grant County. During the summers of 2002-2005, we surveyed both areas to document extent of leopard frog distributions and to describe habitat and vertebrate community characteristics associated with leopard frog site occupancy. At Gloyd Seeps, 2 juvenile leopard frogs were observed in a total of 8.2 person-days of searching along a 5-km stream reach. At Potholes Reservoir, we surveyed 243 wetland sites in 7 management units known to have been occupied by leopard frogs during the 1980s. We confirmed leopard frog presence at only 87 sites (36%) in 4 management units. Site occupancy models for individual ponds indicated that, compared to unoccupied sites, occupied sites had slightly greater pond depths, less tall emergent vegetation, more herbaceous vegetative cover, and fewer neighboring ponds containing nonnative predatory fish. Models developed at the 1-km2 scale indicated that occupied areas had greater average midsummer pond depths, fewer ponds occupied by bullfrogs (Rana [Lithobates] catesbeiana) and carp (Cyprinus carpio), and more herbaceous vegetation surrounding ponds. The Gloyd Seeps population now appears defunct, and the Potholes Reservoir population is in sharp decline. Unless management actions are taken to reduce nonnative fish and bullfrogs and to enhance wetland vegetation, leopard frogs may soon be extirpated from both sites and possibly, therefore, from Washington.

  8. Evidence for an enantioselective pumiliotoxin 7-hydroxylase in dendrobatid poison frogs of the genus Dendrobates

    OpenAIRE

    Daly, John W.; Garraffo, H. Martin; Spande, Thomas F.; Clark, Valerie C.; Ma, Jingyuan; Ziffer, Herman; Cover, John F.

    2003-01-01

    Dendrobatid poison frogs readily accumulate alkaloids from diet into skin, where such compounds serve as a chemical defense against predators. Arthropods seem to be the source of decahydroquinolines (DHQs), several izidines, coccinellines, spiropyrrolizidines, pumiliotoxins (PTXs), and allopumiliotoxins (aPTXs). A DHQ iso-223F, and PTX (+)-251D were fed to poison frogs of the dendrobatid genera Dendrobates, Epipedobates, and Phyllobates. The two alkaloids were accumulated in skin unchanged ex...

  9. Glycogen accumulation in normal and irradiated minced muscle autografts on frog gastrocnemius

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malhotra, R.K.; Kaul, R.; Malhotra, N.

    1989-01-01

    Alterations induced in glycogen content and phosphorylase activity have been studied in normal and irradiated minced muscle autografts on frog gastrocnemius at days 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 15 and 30 postgrafting. The changes observed in the glycogen content and phosphorylase activity conform to the degeneration and regeneration phases of muscle repair. An attempt has been made to explain the altered glycogen utilizing capacities of the frog skeletal muscle during its repair and regeneration. (author)

  10. Reproduction and hybrid load in all-hybrid populations of Rana esculenta water frogs in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Ditte Guldager; Fog, Kåre; Pedersen, Bo Vest

    2005-01-01

    All-hybrid populations of the water frog, Rana esculenta, are exceptional in consisting of independently and to some extent sexually reproducing interspecific hybrids. In most of its range R. esculenta reproduces hemiclonally with one of the parental species, R. lessonae or R. ridibunda, but viable...... gametogenesis and mating between frogs with incompatible gametes induce a significant hybrid load in all-hybrid populations of R. esculenta, and we discuss compensating advantages and potential evolutionary trajectories to reduce this hybrid load....

  11. Effects of X-irradiation on some aspects of protein metabolism in the frog, Rana hexadactyla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajarami Reddy, G.; Sasira Babu, K.

    1980-01-01

    Changes in the level of total proteins and protease in brain, muscle and liver tissues of normal and X-irradiated frogs were determined. Low doses of radiation produced an increment in protein level while high doses produced decrement. However, protease activity at all doses exhibited an elevatory trend. Exposure of frogs to lethal doses resulted in increased protease activity and decreased protein content during post-irradiation periods. The results are discussed on the basis of protein destruction and lysosomal damage. (auth.)

  12. Reel Royal Diversity? The Glass Ceiling in Disney’s Mulan and Princess and the Frog

    OpenAIRE

    Lauren Dundes; Madeline Streiff

    2016-01-01

    Both in Mulan and Princess and the Frog, Disney eschews a traditional fairytale ending involving palatial opulence by substituting an alternative narrative for women of color. Mulan disguises herself as a male soldier in order to serve in her father’s place. After sharing victory with male companions, she willingly returns home to domesticity and the confines imposed by her gender. Tiana spends two thirds of the movie as a frog, substantially limiting her on-screen time as an African American...

  13. The Potential of Frog Skin-Derived Peptides for Development into Therapeutically-Valuable Immunomodulatory Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Jelena M. Pantic; Ivan P. Jovanovic; Gordana D. Radosavljevic; Nebojsa N. Arsenijevic; J. Michael Conlon; Miodrag L. Lukic

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this article is to review the immunoregulatory actions of frog skin-derived peptides in order to assess their potential as candidates for immunomodulatory or anti-inflammatory therapy. Frog skin peptides with demonstrable immunomodulatory properties have been isolated from skin secretions of a range of species belonging to the families Alytidae, Ascaphidae, Discoglossidae, Leptodactylidae, Pipidae and Ranidae. Their effects upon production of inflammatory and immunoregulatory cytok...

  14. Checklist and Simple Identification Key for Frogs and Toads from District IV of The MADA Scheme, Kedah, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaafar, Ibrahim; Chai, Teoh Chia; Sah, Shahrul Anuar Mohd; Akil, Mohd Abdul Muin Md.

    2009-01-01

    A survey was conducted to catalogue the diversity of anurans in District IV of the Muda Agriculture Development Authority Scheme (MADA) in Kedah Darul Aman, Malaysia, from July 1996 to January 1997. Eight species of anurans from three families were present in the study area. Of these, the Common Grass Frog (Fejevarya limnocharis) was the most abundant, followed by Mangrove Frog (Fejevarya cancrivora), Long-legged Frog (Hylarana macrodactyla), and Common Toad (Duttaphrynus melanostictus). Puddle Frog (Occidozyga lima), Taiwanese Giant Frog (Hoplobatrachus rugulosus), and Banded Bullfrog (Kaluola pulchra) were rare during the sampling period, and only one Paddy Frog (Hylarana erythraea) was captured. A simple identification key for the anurans of this area is included for use by scientists and laymen alike. PMID:24575178

  15. Skewed Binary Search Trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Moruz, Gabriel

    2006-01-01

    It is well-known that to minimize the number of comparisons a binary search tree should be perfectly balanced. Previous work has shown that a dominating factor over the running time for a search is the number of cache faults performed, and that an appropriate memory layout of a binary search tree...... can reduce the number of cache faults by several hundred percent. Motivated by the fact that during a search branching to the left or right at a node does not necessarily have the same cost, e.g. because of branch prediction schemes, we in this paper study the class of skewed binary search trees....... For all nodes in a skewed binary search tree the ratio between the size of the left subtree and the size of the tree is a fixed constant (a ratio of 1/2 gives perfect balanced trees). In this paper we present an experimental study of various memory layouts of static skewed binary search trees, where each...

  16. Phylogenetic trees in bioinformatics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burr, Tom L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Genetic data is often used to infer evolutionary relationships among a collection of viruses, bacteria, animal or plant species, or other operational taxonomic units (OTU). A phylogenetic tree depicts such relationships and provides a visual representation of the estimated branching order of the OTUs. Tree estimation is unique for several reasons, including: the types of data used to represent each OTU; the use ofprobabilistic nucleotide substitution models; the inference goals involving both tree topology and branch length, and the huge number of possible trees for a given sample of a very modest number of OTUs, which implies that fmding the best tree(s) to describe the genetic data for each OTU is computationally demanding. Bioinformatics is too large a field to review here. We focus on that aspect of bioinformatics that includes study of similarities in genetic data from multiple OTUs. Although research questions are diverse, a common underlying challenge is to estimate the evolutionary history of the OTUs. Therefore, this paper reviews the role of phylogenetic tree estimation in bioinformatics, available methods and software, and identifies areas for additional research and development.

  17. California red-legged frog (Rana draytonii) movement and habitat use: Implications for conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellers, G.M.; Kleeman, P.M.

    2007-01-01

    Nonbreeding habitats are critically important for Rana draytonii, especially for individuals that breed in temporary bodies of water. We radiotracked 123 frogs to evaluate seasonal habitat use. Individual frogs were continuously tracked for up to 16 months. Some individuals remained at breeding ponds all year, but 66% of female and 25% of male frogs moved to nonbreeding areas, even when the breeding site retained water. Frogs at our main study site moved 150 m (median), roughly the distance to the nearest suitable nonbreeding area. The greatest straight-line distance traveled was 1.4 km, although the presumed distance traveled was 2.8 km. Females were more likely than males to move from permanent ponds (38% of females, 16% of males), but among dispersing frogs, males and females did not differ in distance moved. Some frogs left breeding sites shortly after oviposition (median = 12 days for females, 42.5 days for males), but many individuals remained until the site was nearly dry. Fog provided moisture for dispersal or migration throughout the summer. Our data demonstrate that maintaining populations of pond-breeding amphibians requires that all essential habitat components be protected; these include (1) breeding habitat, (2) nonbreeding habitat, and (3) migration corridors. In addition, a buffer is needed around all three areas to ensure that outside activities do not degrade any of the three habitat components. Copyright 2007 Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles.

  18. The evolution of development: two portraits of skull ossification in pipoid frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Jennifer

    2002-12-01

    Development creates morphology, and the study of developmental processes has repeatedly shed light on patterns of morphological evolution. However, development itself evolves as well, often concomitantly with changes in life history or in morphology. In this paper, two approaches are used to examine the evolution of skull development in pipoid frogs. Pipoids have highly unusual morphologies and life histories compared to other frogs, and their development also proves to be remarkable. First, a phylogenetic examination of skull bone ossification sequences reveals that jaw ossification occurs significantly earlier in pipoids than in other frogs; this represents a reversal to the primitive vertebrate condition. Early jaw ossification in pipoids is hypothesized to result from the absence of certain larval specializations possessed by other frogs, combined with unusual larval feeding behaviors. Second, thin-plate spline morphometric studies of ontogenetic shape change reveal important differences between pipoid skull development and that of other frogs. In the course of frog evolution, there has been a shift away from salamander-like patterns of ontogenetic shape change. The pipoids represent the culmination of this trend, and their morphologies are highly derived in numerous respects. This study represents the first detailed examination of the evolution of skull development in a diverse vertebrate clade within a phylogenetic framework. It is also the first study to examine ossification sequences across vertebrates, and the first to use thin-plate spline morphometrics to quantitatively describe ontogenetic trajectories.

  19. Impact of Dams on Riparian Frog Communities in the Southern Western Ghats, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit Naniwadekar

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The Western Ghats is a global biodiversity hotspot and home to diverse and unique assemblages of amphibians. Several rivers originate from these mountains and hydropower is being tapped from them. The impacts of hydrological regulation of riparian ecosystems to wildlife and its habitat are poorly documented, and in particular the fate of frog populations is unknown. We examined the effects of dams on riparian frog communities in the Thamirabarani catchment in southern Western Ghats. We used nocturnal visual encounter surveys constrained for time, to document the species richness of frogs below and above the dam, and also at control sites in the same catchment. While we did not find differences in species richness below and above the dams, the frog community composition was significantly altered as a likely consequence of altered flow regime. The frog species compositions in control sites were similar to above-dam sites. Below-dam sites had a distinctly different species composition. Select endemic frog species appeared to be adversely impacted due to the dams. Below-dam sites had a greater proportion of generalist and widely distributed species. Dams in the Western Ghats appeared to adversely impact population of endemic species, particularly those belonging to the genus Nyctibatrachus that shows specialization for intact streams.

  20. Formicine ants: An arthropod source for the pumiliotoxin alkaloids of dendrobatid poison frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saporito, Ralph A; Garraffo, H Martin; Donnelly, Maureen A; Edwards, Adam L; Longino, John T; Daly, John W

    2004-05-25

    A remarkable diversity of bioactive lipophilic alkaloids is present in the skin of poison frogs and toads worldwide. Originally discovered in neotropical dendrobatid frogs, these alkaloids are now known from mantellid frogs of Madagascar, certain myobatrachid frogs of Australia, and certain bufonid toads of South America. Presumably serving as a passive chemical defense, these alkaloids appear to be sequestered from a variety of alkaloid-containing arthropods. The pumiliotoxins represent a major, widespread, group of alkaloids that are found in virtually all anurans that are chemically defended by the presence of lipophilic alkaloids. Identifying an arthropod source for these alkaloids has been a considerable challenge for chemical ecologists. However, an extensive collection of neotropical forest arthropods has now revealed a putative arthropod source of the pumiliotoxins. Here we report on the presence of pumiliotoxins in formicine ants of the genera Brachymyrmex and Paratrechina, as well as the presence of these ants in the stomach contents of the microsympatric pumiliotoxin-containing dendrobatid frog, Dendrobates pumilio. These pumiliotoxins are major alkaloids in D. pumilio, and Brachymyrmex and Paratrechina ants now represent the only known dietary sources of these toxic alkaloids. These findings further support the significance of ant-specialization and alkaloid sequestration in the evolution of bright warning coloration in poison frogs and toads.

  1. Aberrant femoral torsion presenting with frog-leg squatting mimicking gluteal muscle contracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Chia-Ling; Tsai, Meng-Yuan; Chang, Wei-Ning; Chen, Clement Kuen-Huang

    2012-04-01

    Patients with frog-leg squatting have restricted internal rotation and adduction of the affected hips during sitting or squatting. In the surgical literature, the cause generally has been presumed to arise from and be pathognomonic for gluteal muscle contracture. However, we have encountered patients with frog-leg squatting but without gluteal muscle contracture. We therefore raised the following questions: What are the imaging features of patients with frog-leg squatting? Do conditions other than gluteal muscle contracture manifest frog-leg squatting? We retrospectively reviewed the MR images of 67 patients presenting with frog-leg squatting from April 1998 to July 2010. There were four females and 63 males; their mean age was 22.2 years (range, 4-50 years). During MRI readout, we observed aberrant axes of some femoral necks and obtained additional CT to measure femoral torsion angles in 59 of the 67 patients. MR images of 27 (40%) patients had signs of gluteal muscle contracture. Twenty-two (33%) patients (40 femora) had aberrant femoral torsion, including diminished anteversion (range, 6°-0°; average, 3.9°) in 11 femora of eight patients and femoral retroversion (range, muscle contracture or aberrant femoral torsion. The observation of aberrant femoral torsion was not anticipated before imaging studies. In addition to gluteal muscle contracture, aberrant femoral torsion can be a cause of frog-leg squatting. Level II, diagnostic study. See the guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  2. Placement of intracoelomic radio transmitters and silicone passive sampling devices in northern leopard frogs (Lithobates pipiens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaw, Taylor; Swanson, Jennifer E; Pierce, Clay; Muths, Erin L.; Smalling, Kelly; Vandever, Mark; Zaffarano, Bianca Anne

    2017-01-01

    Historically, wetland toxin exposure studies have relied on single time point samples from stationary sampling devices. Development of passive sampling devices (PSDs) that can be attached to individual animals within wetland habitats has greatly improved in recent years, presenting an innovative sampling technology that can potentially yield individual-specific, quantifiable data about chemical exposure. In this study, silicone based PSDs were attached to the ventral skin of 20 northern leopard frogs (Lithobates pipiens) with polypropylene sutures after radio transmitters had been surgically implanted into the coleomic cavity. After a recovery period frogs were released back into the wetland habitat where they were acquired. The animals were located daily using radio telemetry to assess how long PSDs would remain attached in the frogs' natural habitat. After one week, PSDs remained on 18 of the original 20 frogs. At 2 weeks 17 frogs were recovered and no PSDs remained attached. Although valuable data can be obtained over a short time period, more research will be necessary to demonstrate effectiveness of externally attaching silicone PSDs to northern leopard frogs for time periods longer than 1-2 weeks.

  3. Effects of acute exposure to magnetic field on ionic composition of frog sciatic nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salem, A.; Hafedh, A.; Mohsen, S.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the possible interaction between magnetic field and cadmium on ionic composition of frog sciatic nerve. Design: The combined effect of magnetic field and cadmium (1.5mg/kg; in lymphatic sac) were studied in frog sciatic nerves (Rana Esculenta). Sciatic nerve samples were extracted, weighed and mixed in bidistilled water in order to analyze by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) ionic composition. Setting: Frogs (Rana Esculenta) were reared in swimming-pool (Faculte des Sciences de Bizerte, Tunisia). Frogs were cared for under the Tunisian Code of Practice for the Care and Use of Animals for Scientific purpose and the Experimental Protocols were approved by the Ethics Committee. Subjects: Treated and control groups (n=6) weighing 50-100g at the time of experiments were housed in the same condition three weeks before the beginning of the experiments. Results: Acute exposure to magnetic field increased significantly the calcium (+298%, p<0.05) and iron (+50%, p<0.05) contents of frog sciatic nerve, whereas magnesium and copper contents remained unchanged. The association between magnetic field and cadmium, induced marked increase of calcium (+360%, p<0.05), whereas magnesium content remained stable. Conclusions: Magnetic field exposure alters the ionic composition in the frog sciatic nerve, especially calcium and iron. Magnetic field magnifies the effect of cadmium on calcium homeostasis. (author)

  4. Gas chromatographic and electron spin resonance investigations of gamma-irradiated frog legs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morehouse, K.M.; Ku, Yuoh; Albrecht, H.L.; Yang, G.C.

    1991-01-01

    Several very sensitive techniques to measure radiation-induced products in frog legs were investigated. Presented here are results from the use of electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy and capillary gas chromatography (GC) to measure radiolysis products in γ-irradiated frog legs. When bone is irradiated, a characteristic ESR signal develops and is easily measured. The intensity of the ESR signal is dose-dependent and stable for several months at room temperature. When triglycerides or fatty acids are irradiated, some of the major stable products formed are hydrocarbons with one less carbon than the precursor fatty acids. These hydrocarbons are formed as the result of the loss of CO 2 during various free radical reactions. A capillary GC procedure was developed to monitor the formation of these hydrocarbons in γ-irradiated frog legs. Since frog legs contain large amounts of palmitic, stearic, oleic, and linoleic acids, the formation of the hydrocarbons (pentadecane, heptadecane, 8-heptadecene, and 6,9-heptadecadiene, respectively) from the decarboxylation of these fatty acids was monitored. The yields of these hydrocarbons were found to be linear with applied dose. A sample from a lot of imported frog legs that were believed to have been treated with ionizing radiation was also analyzed. The ESR technique, in conjunction with the GC data on the hydrocarbons, appears to be a useful approach for identifying and monitoring frog legs that have been treated with ionizing radiation. (author)

  5. The island rule in the Brazilian frog Phyllodytes luteolus (Anura: Hylidae: incipient gigantism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Mageski

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The island rule suggests that, when mainland animals are isolated on islands, large animals tend to become smaller, while small animals tend to become larger. A small frog in eastern Brazil, Phyllodytes luteolus (Wied-Neuwied, 1824, is widely distributed in association with bromeliads. At the end of the last glaciation, parts of the mainland became islands due to rising sea levels, thereby isolating frog populations on these islands. If the island rule holds, we predicted that frogs on islands would tend to be larger than frogs on the mainland. We compared sizes (weight and length of 30 randomly selected male frogs from the mainland with 30 from an island in the state of Espírito Santo, Brazil. We also sampled population density on the island and mainland because concurrent with changing sizes, depending on the causal relationship, density may also change. As predicted, island frogs tended to be larger (both in snout-vent length and weight and were much more abundant. While not specifically addressed in this study, the absence of predators and interspecific competitors may explain both of these trends.

  6. Rapid color evolution in an aposematic species: a phylogenetic analysis of color variation in the strikingly polymorphic strawberry poison-dart frog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ian J; Shaffer, H Bradley

    2008-11-01

    Aposematism is one of the great mysteries of evolutionary biology. The evolution of aposematic coloration is poorly understood, but even less understood is the evolution of polymorphism in aposematic signals. Here, we use a phylogeographic approach to investigate the evolution of color polymorphism in Dendrobates pumilio, a well-known poison-dart frog (family Dendrobatidae), which displays perhaps the most striking color variation of any aposematic species. With over a dozen color morphs, ranging from bright red to dull green, D. pumilio provides an ideal opportunity to examine the evolution of color polymorphism and evolutionary shifts to cryptic coloration in an otherwise aposematic species. We constructed a phylogenetic tree for all D. pumilio color morphs from 3051bp of mtDNA sequence data, reconstructed ancestral states using parsimony and Bayesian methods, and tested the recovered tree against constraint trees using parametric bootstrapping to determine the number of changes to each color type. We find strong evidence for nearly maximal numbers of changes in all color traits, including five independent shifts to dull dorsal coloration. Our results indicate that shifts in coloration in aposematic species may occur more regularly than predicted and that convergence in coloration may indicate that similar forces are repeatedly driving these shifts.

  7. Clock Tree Power Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Austbø, Knut

    2016-01-01

    The buffered clock tree structure is commonly used to distribute the clock signal to the memory elements in digital circuits. Since the clock signal is used as a temporal reference, it has to be distributed to the registers with decent timing characteristics and low skew. In order to achieve this, buffers and inverters are inserted in the clock tree, typically by a synthesis tool. The clock tree is a major contributor to the power consumption. This is a result of a combination of high swit...

  8. Origin of invasive Florida frogs traced to Cuba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinicke, Matthew P.; Diaz, Luis M.; Hedges, S. Blair

    2011-01-01

    Two of the earliest examples of successful invasive amphibians are the greenhouse frog (Eleutherodactylus planirostris) and the Cuban treefrog (Osteopilus septentrionalis) in Florida. Although both are generally assumed to be recent introductions, they are widespread on Caribbean islands and also have been proposed as natural colonizers. We obtained nucleotide sequence data for both species and their closest relatives in their native and introduced ranges. Phylogenetic analyses trace the origin of E. planirostris to a small area in western Cuba, while O. septentrionalis is derived from at least two Cuban sources, one probably a remote peninsula in western Cuba. The tropical-to-temperate invasion began with colonization of the Florida Keys followed by human-mediated dispersal within peninsular Florida. The subtropical Keys may have served as an adaptive stepping stone for the successful invasion of the North American continent. PMID:21270024

  9. Chytridiomycosis in wild frogs from southern Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lips, Karen R.; Green, D.E.; Papendick, R.

    2003-01-01

    In 1993, the amphibian fauna of Las Tablas, Costa Rica, began to decline, and by 1998 approximately 50% of the species formerly present could no longer be found. Three years later, at the Reserva Forestal Fortuna, in western Panama, a site approximately 75 km east southeast of Las Tablas, KRL encountered a mass die-off of amphibians and a subsequent decline in abundance and species richness. The epidemiological features of the anuran population declines and die-offs at both sites were similar, suggesting a similar cause. Herein we document the presence of the fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, in dead and dying wild frogs collected at Las Tablas just prior to population declines of several anuran species.

  10. Ciliary function of the frog oro-pharyngeal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, E; Sleigh, M

    1977-03-09

    The palate epithelium of the frog was examined by scanning electron microscopy, light microscopy and high speed cine micrography. The cilia remain stationary for much of time in the end-of-effective stroke position. Each beat cycle begins with a forwardly-directed recovery stroke lasting about 60 ms, followed by an effective stroke towards the oesophagus lasting about 12 ms. Activity can often be correlated with the presence of mucus, which is carried as strands on the tips of the ciliary effective strokes whilst the recovery strokes move beneath the mucus. Coordination of ciliary activity was very variable; local antiplectic metachrony of the recovery strokes could almost always be seen, and on very active epithelia effective strokes were associated with approximately diaplectic waves (either to left or right), but any particular pattern of coordinated activity was transient and quickly transformed to another pattern. Beating and coordination of these short cilia were compared with those of cilia propelling water.

  11. Endocrine control of active sodium transport across frog skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maetz, J.

    1959-01-01

    I. Action of the neurohypophyseal peptides on sodium transport. 1) On Rana Esculenta, oxytocin alone is active on the sodium transport (not vaso pressin). 2) The post hypophysis of R.e. contains an hormonal factor even more specific on Na transport (12 times more active than oxytocin). 3) This new factor must be closely related to oxytocin. II. Action of the adrenal corticoids. 1) The skin of frogs adapted to a salt-rich external medium, shows a considerable diminution in sodium uptake. 2) This decreased sodium uptake is brought back to normal by the injections of aldosterone. 3) This suggests that salt loading of amphibians (as well as mammals) inhibits the mineralocorticoid activity of the adrenals. (author) [fr

  12. Genome evolution in the allotetraploid frog Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Session, Adam M; Uno, Yoshinobu; Kwon, Taejoon; Chapman, Jarrod A; Toyoda, Atsushi; Takahashi, Shuji; Fukui, Akimasa; Hikosaka, Akira; Suzuki, Atsushi; Kondo, Mariko; van Heeringen, Simon J; Quigley, Ian; Heinz, Sven; Ogino, Hajime; Ochi, Haruki; Hellsten, Uffe; Lyons, Jessica B; Simakov, Oleg; Putnam, Nicholas; Stites, Jonathan; Kuroki, Yoko; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Michiue, Tatsuo; Watanabe, Minoru; Bogdanovic, Ozren; Lister, Ryan; Georgiou, Georgios; Paranjpe, Sarita S; van Kruijsbergen, Ila; Shu, Shengquiang; Carlson, Joseph; Kinoshita, Tsutomu; Ohta, Yuko; Mawaribuchi, Shuuji; Jenkins, Jerry; Grimwood, Jane; Schmutz, Jeremy; Mitros, Therese; Mozaffari, Sahar V; Suzuki, Yutaka; Haramoto, Yoshikazu; Yamamoto, Takamasa S; Takagi, Chiyo; Heald, Rebecca; Miller, Kelly; Haudenschild, Christian; Kitzman, Jacob; Nakayama, Takuya; Izutsu, Yumi; Robert, Jacques; Fortriede, Joshua; Burns, Kevin; Lotay, Vaneet; Karimi, Kamran; Yasuoka, Yuuri; Dichmann, Darwin S; Flajnik, Martin F; Houston, Douglas W; Shendure, Jay; DuPasquier, Louis; Vize, Peter D; Zorn, Aaron M; Ito, Michihiko; Marcotte, Edward M; Wallingford, John B; Ito, Yuzuru; Asashima, Makoto; Ueno, Naoto; Matsuda, Yoichi; Veenstra, Gert Jan C; Fujiyama, Asao; Harland, Richard M; Taira, Masanori; Rokhsar, Daniel S

    2016-10-20

    To explore the origins and consequences of tetraploidy in the African clawed frog, we sequenced the Xenopus laevis genome and compared it to the related diploid X. tropicalis genome. We characterize the allotetraploid origin of X. laevis by partitioning its genome into two homoeologous subgenomes, marked by distinct families of 'fossil' transposable elements. On the basis of the activity of these elements and the age of hundreds of unitary pseudogenes, we estimate that the two diploid progenitor species diverged around 34 million years ago (Ma) and combined to form an allotetraploid around 17-18 Ma. More than 56% of all genes were retained in two homoeologous copies. Protein function, gene expression, and the amount of conserved flanking sequence all correlate with retention rates. The subgenomes have evolved asymmetrically, with one chromosome set more often preserving the ancestral state and the other experiencing more gene loss, deletion, rearrangement, and reduced gene expression.

  13. Clinical signs, pathology and dose-dependent survival of adult wood frogs, Rana sylvatica, inoculated orally with frog virus 3 Ranavirus sp., Iridoviridae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forzn, Mara J; Jones, Kathleen M; Vanderstichel, Raphal V; Wood, John; Kibenge, Frederick S B; Kuiken, Thijs; Wirth, Wytamma; Ariel, Ellen; Daoust, Pierre-Yves

    2015-05-01

    Amphibian populations suffer massive mortalities from infection with frog virus 3 FV3, genus Ranavirus, family Iridoviridae, a pathogen also involved in mortalities of fish and reptiles. Experimental oral infection with FV3 in captive-raised adult wood frogs, Rana sylvatica Lithobates sylvaticus, was performed as the first step in establishing a native North American animal model of ranaviral disease to study pathogenesis and host response. Oral dosing was successful LD50 was 10(2.93 2.423.44) p.f.u. for frogs averaging 35mm in length. Onset of clinical signs occurred 614days post-infection p.i. median 11 days p.i. and time to death was 1014 days p.i. median 12 days p.i.. Each tenfold increase in virus dose increased the odds of dying by 23-fold and accelerated onset of clinical signs and death by approximately 15. Ranavirus DNA was demonstrated in skin and liver of all frogs that died or were euthanized because of severe clinical signs. Shedding of virus occurred in faeces 710 days p.i. 34.5days before death and skin sheds 10 days p.i. 01.5days before death of some frogs dead from infection. Most common lesions were dermal erosion and haemorrhages haematopoietic necrosis in bone marrow, kidney, spleen and liver and necrosis in renal glomeruli, tongue, gastrointestinal tract and urinary bladder mucosa. Presence of ranavirus in lesions was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies probably viral were present in the bone marrow and the epithelia of the oral cavity, gastrointestinal tract, renal tubules and urinary bladder. Our work describes a ranaviruswood frog model and provides estimates that can be incorporated into ranavirus disease ecology models. © 2015 The Authors.

  14. Muscle fatigue in frog semitendinosus: alterations in contractile function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, L. V.; Balog, E. M.; Riley, D. A.; Fitts, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the contractile properties of the frog semitendinosus (ST) muscle before and during recovery from fatigue, to relate the observed functional changes to alterations in specific steps in the crossbridge model of muscle contraction, and to determine how fatigue affects the force-frequency relationship. The frog ST (22 degrees C) was fatigued by direct electrical stimulation with 100-ms 150-Hz trains at 1/s for 5 min. The fatigue protocol reduced peak twitch (Pt) and tetanic (Po) force to 32 and 8.5% of initial force, respectively. The decline in Pt was less than Po, in part due to a prolongation in the isometric contraction time (CT), which increased to 300% of the initial value. The isometric twitch duration was greatly prolonged as reflected by the lengthened CT and the 800% increase in the one-half relaxation time (1/2RT). Both Pt and Po showed a biphasic recovery, a rapid initial phase (2 min) followed by a slower (40 min) return to the prefatigue force. CT and 1/2RT also recovered in two phases, returning to 160 and 265% of control in the first 5 min. CT returned to the prefatigue value between 35 and 40 min, whereas even at 60 min 1/2RT was 133% of control. The maximal velocity of shortening, determined by the slack test, was significantly reduced [from 6.7 +/- 0.5 to 2.5 +/- 0.4 optimal muscle length/s] at fatigue. The force-frequency relationship was shifted to the left, so that optimal frequency for generating Po was reduced.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  15. Apical Na+ permeability of frog skin during serosal Cl- replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibowich, S; DeLong, J; Civan, M M

    1988-05-01

    Gluconate substitution for serosal Cl- reduces the transepithelial short-circuit current (Isc) and depolarizes short-circuited frog skins. These effects could result either from inhibition of basolateral K+ conductance, or from two actions to inhibit both apical Na+ permeability (PapNa) and basolateral pump activity. We have addressed this question by studying whole-and split-thickness frog skins. Intracellular Na+ concentration (CcNa) and PapNa have been monitored by measuring the current-voltage relationship for apical Na+ entry. This analysis was conducted by applying trains of voltage pulses, with pulse durations of 16 to 32 msec. Estimates of PapNa and CcNa were not detectably dependent on pulse duration over the range 16 to 80 msec. Serosal Cl- replacement uniformly depolarized short-circuited tissues. The depolarization was associated with inhibition of Isc across each split skin, but only occasionally across the whole-thickness preparations. This difference may reflect the better ionic exchange between the bulk medium and the extracellular fluid in contact with the basolateral membranes, following removal of the underlying dermis in the split-skin preparations. PapNa was either unchanged or increased, and CcNa either unchanged or reduced after the anionic replacement. These data are incompatible with the concept that serosal Cl- replacement inhibits PapNa and Na,K-pump activity. Gluconate substitution likely reduces cell volume, triggering inhibition of the basolateral K+ channels, consistent with the data and conclusions of S.A. Lewis, A.G. Butt, M.J. Bowler, J.P. Leader and A.D.C. Macknight (J. Membrane Biol. 83:119-137, 1985) for toad bladder. The resulting depolarization reduces the electrical force favoring apical Na+ entry. The volume-conductance coupling serves to conserve volume by reducing K+ solute loss. Its molecular basis remains to be identified.

  16. Generalising tree traversals and tree transformations to DAGs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahr, Patrick; Axelsson, Emil

    2017-01-01

    We present a recursion scheme based on attribute grammars that can be transparently applied to trees and acyclic graphs. Our recursion scheme allows the programmer to implement a tree traversal or a tree transformation and then apply it to compact graph representations of trees instead...

  17. Big trees, old trees, and growth factor tables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin T. Smith

    2018-01-01

    The potential for a tree to reach a great size and to live a long life frequently captures the public's imagination. Sometimes the desire to know the age of an impressively large tree is simple curiosity. For others, the date-of-tree establishment can make a big diff erence for management, particularly for trees at historic sites or those mentioned in property...

  18. Structural Equation Model Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandmaier, Andreas M.; von Oertzen, Timo; McArdle, John J.; Lindenberger, Ulman

    2015-01-01

    In the behavioral and social sciences, structural equation models (SEMs) have become widely accepted as a modeling tool for the relation between latent and observed variables. SEMs can be seen as a unification of several multivariate analysis techniques. SEM Trees combine the strengths of SEMs and the decision tree paradigm by building tree structures that separate a data set recursively into subsets with significantly different parameter estimates in a SEM. SEM Trees provide means for finding covariates and covariate interactions that predict differences in structural parameters in observed as well as in latent space and facilitate theory-guided exploration of empirical data. We describe the methodology, discuss theoretical and practical implications, and demonstrate applications to a factor model and a linear growth curve model. PMID:22984789

  19. Tea Tree Oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Grants and Contracts General Award Mechanisms Small Business Research Grant Program (SBIR) Funding for: Natural Product ... cuts and wounds by the aboriginal people of Australia. Today, tea tree oil is often used externally ...

  20. A parallel buffer tree

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sitchinava, Nodar; Zeh, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    We present the parallel buffer tree, a parallel external memory (PEM) data structure for batched search problems. This data structure is a non-trivial extension of Arge's sequential buffer tree to a private-cache multiprocessor environment and reduces the number of I/O operations by the number...... of available processor cores compared to its sequential counterpart, thereby taking full advantage of multicore parallelism. The parallel buffer tree is a search tree data structure that supports the batched parallel processing of a sequence of N insertions, deletions, membership queries, and range queries...... in the optimal OhOf(psortN + K/PB) parallel I/O complexity, where K is the size of the output reported in the process and psortN is the parallel I/O complexity of sorting N elements using P processors....