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Sample records for treatment project appendix

  1. Mixed and Low-Level Treatment Facility Project. Appendix B, Waste stream engineering files, Part 1, Mixed waste streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-01

    This appendix contains the mixed and low-level waste engineering design files (EDFS) documenting each low-level and mixed waste stream investigated during preengineering studies for Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility Project. The EDFs provide background information on mixed and low-level waste generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. They identify, characterize, and provide treatment strategies for the waste streams. Mixed waste is waste containing both radioactive and hazardous components as defined by the Atomic Energy Act and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, respectively. Low-level waste is waste that contains radioactivity and is not classified as high-level waste, transuranic waste, spent nuclear fuel, or 11e(2) byproduct material as defined by DOE 5820.2A. Test specimens of fissionable material irradiated for research and development only, and not for the production of power or plutonium, may be classified as low-level waste, provided the concentration of transuranic is less than 100 nCi/g. This appendix is a tool that clarifies presentation format for the EDFS. The EDFs contain waste stream characterization data and potential treatment strategies that will facilitate system tradeoff studies and conceptual design development. A total of 43 mixed waste and 55 low-level waste EDFs are provided.

  2. Mixed and low-level waste treatment project: Appendix C, Health and safety criteria for the mixed and low-level waste treatment facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Part 1, Waste streams and treatment technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neupauer, R.M.; Thurmond, S.M.

    1992-09-01

    This report describes health and safety concerns associated with the Mixed and Low-level Waste Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Various hazards are described such as fire, electrical, explosions, reactivity, temperature, and radiation hazards, as well as the potential for accidental spills, exposure to toxic materials, and other general safety concerns.

  3. 25 CFR Appendix A to Subpart C - IRR High Priority Project Scoring Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false IRR High Priority Project Scoring Matrix A Appendix A to Subpart C Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION...—IRR High Priority Project Scoring Matrix Score 10 5 3 1 0 Accident and fatality rate for candidate...

  4. Roong Aroon Wastewater Treatment Project

    OpenAIRE

    Tongthai Taotong; Kittinan Thanissaranon; Tanasit Tuangcharoentip; Montien Athiworakul

    2015-01-01

    We are the water treatment project team from Roong Aroon High School in Bangkok, Thailand. Our team consists of four grade 12 science major students, and every one of us has been studying and working on developing our school’s water treatment system. This article explains how the “Problem Based Learning” (PBL) process proceeds throughout our project.

  5. 16 CFR Appendix F to Part 436 - Sample Item 20(5) Table-Projected New Franchised Outlets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sample Item 20(5) Table-Projected New Franchised Outlets F Appendix F to Part 436 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION TRADE REGULATION RULES DISCLOSURE REQUIREMENTS AND PROHIBITIONS CONCERNING FRANCHISING Pt. 436, App. F Appendix F to Part...

  6. Mixed and low-level waste treatment project: Appendix C, Health and safety criteria for the mixed and low-level waste treatment facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neupauer, R.M.; Thurmond, S.M.

    1992-09-01

    This report contains health and safety information relating to the chemicals that have been identified in the mixed waste streams at the Waste Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Information is summarized in two summary sections--one for health considerations and one for safety considerations. Detailed health and safety information is presented in material safety data sheets (MSDSs) for each chemical.

  7. Mixed and low-level waste treatment project: Appendix C, Health and safety criteria for the mixed and low-level waste treatment facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Part 2, Chemical constituents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neupauer, R.M.; Thurmond, S.M.

    1992-09-01

    This report contains health and safety information relating to the chemicals that have been identified in the mixed waste streams at the Waste Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Information is summarized in two summary sections--one for health considerations and one for safety considerations. Detailed health and safety information is presented in material safety data sheets (MSDSs) for each chemical.

  8. Mixed and low-level waste treatment project: Appendix C, Health and safety criteria for the mixed and low-level waste treatment facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neupauer, R.M.; Thurmond, S.M.

    1992-09-01

    This report describes health and safety concerns associated with the Mixed and Low-level Waste Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Various hazards are described such as fire, electrical, explosions, reactivity, temperature, and radiation hazards, as well as the potential for accidental spills, exposure to toxic materials, and other general safety concerns

  9. Mixed and low-level waste treatment project: Appendix C, Health and safety criteria for the mixed and low-level waste treatment facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neupauer, R.M.; Thurmond, S.M.

    1992-09-01

    This report contains health and safety information relating to the chemicals that have been identified in the mixed waste streams at the Waste Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Information is summarized in two summary sections--one for health considerations and one for safety considerations. Detailed health and safety information is presented in material safety data sheets (MSDSs) for each chemical

  10. Mixed and low-level waste treatment project: Appendix C, Health and safety criteria for the mixed and low-level waste treatment facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neupauer, R.M.; Thurmond, S.M.

    1992-09-01

    This report describes health and safety concerns associated with the Mixed and Low-level Waste Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Various hazards are described such as fire, electrical, explosions, reactivity, temperature, and radiation hazards, as well as the potential for accidental spills, exposure to toxic materials, and other general safety concerns.

  11. Vector bundles on complex projective spaces with an appendix by S. I. Gelfand

    CERN Document Server

    Okonek, Christian; Spindler, Heinz

    1980-01-01

    This expository treatment is based on a survey given by one of the authors at the Séminaire Bourbaki in November 1978 and on a subsequent course held at the University of Göttingen. It is intended to serve as an introduction to the topical question of classification of holomorphic vector bundles on complex projective spaces, and can easily be read by students with a basic knowledge of analytic or algebraic geometry. Short supplementary sections describe more advanced topics, further results, and unsolved problems. This is a corrected third printing with an Appendix by S. I. Gelfand.  ------   The present book is the first one, within the extensive literature on algebraic vector bundles, to give both a self-contained introduction to the basic methods and an exposition of the current state of the classification theory of algebraic vector bundles over Pn(C). (…) The reviewer thinks that readers should be grateful to the authors for presenting the first detailed, self-contained and systematic textbook on ve...

  12. Appendix A, Plan Projects as amended for Financial Constraint

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-04-13

    The Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana Regional Council of Governments (OKI) provides : coordinated regional transportation planning for an eight county area. This : document contains tables showing, by county, statistical data on road project : projections for o...

  13. 24 CFR Appendix A to Part 570 - Guidelines and Objectives for Evaluating Project Costs and Financial Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... processing loans, many private financial lenders do not finance commercial projects that are less than $100... market share and revenue projections and has downplayed its profits. ii. In addition to the financial... Evaluating Project Costs and Financial Requirements A Appendix A to Part 570 Housing and Urban Development...

  14. Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-04-01

    Mixed and low-level wastes generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are required to be managed according to applicable State and Federal regulations, and Department of Energy Orders that provide for the protection of human health and the environment. The Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility Project was chartered in 1991, by the Department of Energy to provide treatment capability for these mixed and low-level waste streams. The first project task consisted of conducting engineering studies to identify the waste streams, their potential treatment strategies, and the requirements that would be imposed on the waste streams and the facilities used to process them. This report documents those studies so the project can continue with an evaluation of programmatic options, system tradeoff studies, and the conceptual design phase of the project. This report, appendix B, comprises the engineering design files for this project study. The engineering design files document each waste steam, its characteristics, and identified treatment strategies

  15. Mixed and Low-Level Treatment Facility Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-01

    This appendix contains the mixed and low-level waste engineering design files (EDFS) documenting each low-level and mixed waste stream investigated during preengineering studies for Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility Project. The EDFs provide background information on mixed and low-level waste generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. They identify, characterize, and provide treatment strategies for the waste streams. Mixed waste is waste containing both radioactive and hazardous components as defined by the Atomic Energy Act and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, respectively. Low-level waste is waste that contains radioactivity and is not classified as high-level waste, transuranic waste, spent nuclear fuel, or 11e(2) byproduct material as defined by DOE 5820.2A. Test specimens of fissionable material irradiated for research and development only, and not for the production of power or plutonium, may be classified as low-level waste, provided the concentration of transuranic is less than 100 nCi/g. This appendix is a tool that clarifies presentation format for the EDFS. The EDFs contain waste stream characterization data and potential treatment strategies that will facilitate system tradeoff studies and conceptual design development. A total of 43 mixed waste and 55 low-level waste EDFs are provided.

  16. Mixed and Low-Level Treatment Facility Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-04-01

    This appendix contains the mixed and low-level waste engineering design files (EDFS) documenting each low-level and mixed waste stream investigated during preengineering studies for Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility Project. The EDFs provide background information on mixed and low-level waste generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. They identify, characterize, and provide treatment strategies for the waste streams. Mixed waste is waste containing both radioactive and hazardous components as defined by the Atomic Energy Act and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, respectively. Low-level waste is waste that contains radioactivity and is not classified as high-level waste, transuranic waste, spent nuclear fuel, or 11e(2) byproduct material as defined by DOE 5820.2A. Test specimens of fissionable material irradiated for research and development only, and not for the production of power or plutonium, may be classified as low-level waste, provided the concentration of transuranic is less than 100 nCi/g. This appendix is a tool that clarifies presentation format for the EDFS. The EDFs contain waste stream characterization data and potential treatment strategies that will facilitate system tradeoff studies and conceptual design development. A total of 43 mixed waste and 55 low-level waste EDFs are provided

  17. Final environmental impact statement, Beaufort Sea oil and gas development/Northstar Project. Appendix A: BP Exploration (Alaska) Inc. Final project description - Revision 1, March 27, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-02-01

    BP Exploration (Alaska) Inc. (BPXA) submitted a permit application to the US Army Engineer District, Alaska to initiate the review process for BPXA's plans to develop and produce oil and gas from the Northstar Unit. This report contains Appendix A of an Environmental Impact Statement which was undertaken to identify and evaluate the potential effects the proposed project may have on the environment. This document is the Northstar Development Project, Final Project Description, Revision 1 for BPXA Northstar Project

  18. Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-04-01

    Mixed and low-level wastes generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are required to be managed according to applicable State and Federal regulations, and Department of Energy Orders that provide for the protection of human health and the environment. The Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility Project was chartered in 1991, by the Department of Energy to provide treatment capability for these mixed and low-level waste streams. The first project task consisted of conducting engineering studies to identify the waste streams, their potential treatment strategies, and the requirements that would be imposed on the waste streams and the facilities used to process them. This report, Appendix A, Environmental ampersand Regulatory Planning ampersand Documentation, identifies the regulatory requirements that would be imposed on the operation or construction of a facility designed to process the INEL's waste streams. These requirements are contained in five reports that discuss the following topics: (1) an environmental compliance plan and schedule, (2) National Environmental Policy Act requirements, (3) preliminary siting requirements, (4) regulatory justification for the project, and (5) health and safety criteria

  19. Waste Treatment & Immobilization Plant Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — In southeastern Washington State, Bechtel National, Inc. is designing, constructing and commissioning the world's largest radioactive waste treatment plant for the...

  20. 45 CFR Appendix to Part 1340 - Interpretative Guidelines Regarding 45 CFR 1340.15-Services and Treatment for Disabled Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...-Services and Treatment for Disabled Infants Appendix to Part 1340 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to...—Interpretative Guidelines Regarding 45 CFR 1340.15—Services and Treatment for Disabled Infants Explanatory Note... of 1984 relating to services and treatment for disabled infants included a number of proposed...

  1. Manual on early medical treatment of possible radiation injury with an appendix on sodium burns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The manual covers the following topics: 1) Background information and general principles; 2) New methods in the treatment of internal contamination by alpha emitters; 3) Emergency local decontamination; 4) Precautions to be taken in the event of hospitalization; 5) Assessment of fitness to resume work after contamination of irradiation accidents; 6) Organization, planning and training. The appendixes are concerned with: A) Samples to be taken in cases of external irradiation or internal contamination; B) Techniques for local decontamination of the skin; C) Basic treatment information for the physician; D) Standard first-aid kits; E) Decontamination room supplies

  2. 40 CFR Appendix J to Part 122 - NPDES Permit Testing Requirements for Publicly Owned Treatment Works (§ 122.21(j))

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Publicly Owned Treatment Works (§ 122.21(j)) J Appendix J to Part 122 Protection of Environment... POLLUTANT DISCHARGE ELIMINATION SYSTEM Pt. 122, App. J Appendix J to Part 122—NPDES Permit Testing Requirements for Publicly Owned Treatment Works (§ 122.21(j)) Table 1A—Effluent Parameters for All POTWS...

  3. Procedure for matching synfuel users with potential suppliers. Appendix B. Proposed and ongoing synthetic fuel production projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-08-07

    To assist the Department of Energy, Office of Fuels Conversion (OFC), in implementing the synthetic fuel exemption under the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act (FUA) of 1978, Resource Consulting Group, Inc. (RCG), has developed a procedure for matching prospective users and producers of synthetic fuel. The matching procedure, which involves a hierarchical screening process, is designed to assist OFC in: locating a supplier for a firm that wishes to obtain a synthetic fuel exemption; determining whether the fuel supplier proposed by a petitioner is technically and economically capable of meeting the petitioner's needs; and assisting the Synthetic Fuels Corporation or a synthetic fuel supplier in evaluating potential markets for synthetic fuel production. A data base is provided in this appendix on proposed and ongoing synthetic fuel production projects to be used in applying the screening procedure. The data base encompasses a total of 212 projects in the seven production technologies.

  4. Final report from VFL technologies for the pilot-scale thermal treatment of Lower East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain soils: LEFPC appendices, volume 1, appendix I-IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-09-01

    This document contains Appendix I-IV for the pilot-scale thermal treatment of lower East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain soils. Included are calibration records; quality assurance; soils characterization; pilot scale trial runs.

  5. Final report from VFL technologies for the pilot-scale thermal treatment of Lower East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain soils: LEFPC appendices, volume 1, appendix I-IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    This document contains Appendix I-IV for the pilot-scale thermal treatment of lower East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain soils. Included are calibration records; quality assurance; soils characterization; pilot scale trial runs

  6. BPA/Lower Valley transmission project. Final environmental impact statement. Appendix C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-06-01

    Bonneville Power Administration is investigating the feasibility of constructing an additional transmission line, which for the most part will be adjacent to the existing transmission line. This would require the construction or acquisition of additional access roads, used for routine and emergency maintenance and construction activities. A survey was conducted to map any occurrences of threatened, endangered and sensitivity plant species and weed species along the Swan Valley-Teton Line. This report contains Appendix C

  7. BPA/Lower Valley transmission project. Final environmental impact statement. Appendix F

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-06-01

    Bonneville Power Administration is investigating the feasibility of constructing an additional transmission line, which for the most part will be adjacent to the existing transmission line. This would require the construction or acquisition of additional access roads, used for routine and emergency maintenance and construction activities. A survey was conducted to map any occurrences of threatened, endangered and sensitivity plant species and weed species along the Swan Valley-Teton Line. This report contains Appendix F

  8. Mixed Waste Treatment Project -- Scope and status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, J.; Cowan, S.; Harmon, L.H.; Rhoderick, J.; Musgrave, B.C.; Ross, W.A.

    1992-03-01

    Department of Energy (DOE) facilities currently store and generate significant quantities of mixed wastes - mixtures of materials containing both radioactive and hazardous chemical contamination. These wastes must be managed in compliance with DOE requirements and EPA Land Disposal Restrictions. To help meet these requirements for low-level mixed wastes, the DOE Office of Waste Operations has established The Mixed Waste Treatment Project (MWTP). The overall goal of the MWTP is demonstration of effective treatment of low-level mixed wastes in a full-scale prototype plant. The MWTP staff, supported by a technical committee comprised of waste operations representatives from Hanford, Idaho, Los Alamos, Oak Ridge, Rocky Flats and Savannah River have reviewed the three major DOE data bases, the Integrated Data Base, the National Report on Prohibited Wastes and the Waste Management Information System data base managed by HAZWRAP. Database upgrades to meet MWTP needs are being pursued by field visits to the major mixed waste generators. A reference flowsheet was developed for treatment of low level contact handled mixed wastes. Technology gaps identified by these analyses are being used by DOE Waste Operations, and the Office of Technology Development to define technology development needs. A brief analysis of options for deployment of capabilities to treat mixed wastes at DOE facilities nationwide has been conducted

  9. The Philadelphia Glaucoma Detection and Treatment Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waisbourd, Michael; Pruzan, Noelle L.; Johnson, Deiana; Ugorets, Angela; Crews, John E.; Saaddine, Jinan B.; Henderer, Jeffery D.; Hark, Lisa A.; Katz, L. Jay

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the detection rates of glaucoma-related diagnoses and the initial treatments received in the Philadelphia Glaucoma Detection and Treatment Project, a community-based initiative aimed at improving the detection, treatment, and follow-up care of individuals at risk for glaucoma. Design Retrospective analysis. Participants A total of 1649 individuals at risk for glaucoma who were examined and treated in 43 community centers located in underserved communities of Philadelphia. Methods Individuals were enrolled if they were African American aged ≥50 years, were any other adult aged ≥60 years, or had a family history of glaucoma. After attending an informational glaucoma workshop, participants underwent a targeted glaucoma examination including an ocular, medical, and family history; visual acuity testing, intraocular pressure (IOP) measurement, and corneal pachymetry; slit-lamp and optic nerve examination; automated visual field testing; and fundus color photography. If indicated, treatments included selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT), laser peripheral iridotomy (LPI), or IOP-lowering medications. Follow-up examinations were scheduled at the community sites after 4 to 6 weeks or 4 to 6 months, depending on the clinical scenario. Main Outcome Measures Detection rates of glaucoma-related diagnoses and types of treatments administered. Results Of the 1649 individuals enrolled, 645 (39.1%) received a glaucoma-related diagnosis; 20.0% (n = 330) were identified as open-angle glaucoma (OAG) suspects, 9.2% (n = 151) were identified as having narrow angles (or as a primary angle closure/suspect), and 10.0% (n = 164) were diagnosed with glaucoma, including 9.0% (n = 148) with OAG and 1.0% (n = 16) with angle-closure glaucoma. Overall, 39.0% (n = 64 of 164) of those diagnosed with glaucoma were unaware of their diagnosis. A total of 196 patients (11.9%) received glaucoma-related treatment, including 84 (5.1%) who underwent LPI, 13 (0.8%) who underwent SLT

  10. Status Report of Environmental Evaluations Trinity River Project Texas. Appendix B. Biological Inventory with Effect Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-06-01

    U) LU).. ’AM 0 t 0 O C 4) 0’r- 0 O .C 0 0C04 4) 000𔃺 C W - 0) 4" 4) 0 W 4j 0 MOOC (x .d aC U)) w L"i 2: Lii 0) ) V ) 0Ci) 0 : m0 ~3:t Un ~3: 4 Lii IV...River Drainage I -- I ITE I -lU AK GRAVL PI -- -- - - - LANCASTER V ~CLU LAKE( Area I Appendix ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ -- CB- Shwn ie-,2,ad3adtepsiino rne wihi...04 -4 07%* 00 cic ’ ’ - - 4- 00 C% o r-3 E! ~:1E 000 1 C lo 14 ..1. 0 *1 04 Ca0’-4C) Li0 4 0 .4 01 C14- C)-- 0 ~ 0 C)". C a V ’ 00 - 4 (f) -,a ci 0 42R

  11. Evaluation of the Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy A Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupfer, Carl

    1973-01-01

    Evaluated is the treatment of diabetic retinopathy (blindness due to ruptured vessels of the retina as a side effect of diabetes), and described is a research project comparing two types of photocoagulation treatment. (DB)

  12. FY-1981 project status for the Transuranic Waste Treatment Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedetti, R.L.; Tait, T.D.

    1981-11-01

    The primary objective of the Transuranic Waste Treatment Facility (TWTF) Project is to provide a facility to process low-level transuranic waste stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) into a form acceptable for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. This report provides brief summary descriptions of the project objectives and background, project status through FY-1981, planned activities for FY-1982, and the EG and G TWTF Project office position on processing INEL transuranic waste

  13. Projection operator treatment of single particle resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lev, A.; Beres, W.P.

    1976-01-01

    A projection operator method is used to obtain the energy and width of a single particle resonance. The resonance energy is found without scanning. An example of the first g/sub 9/2/ neutron resonance in 40 Ca is given and compared with the traditional phase shift method. The results of both approaches are quite similar. 4 figures

  14. Independent management and financial review, Yucca Mountain Project, Nevada. Final report, Appendix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (Public Law 97-425), as amended by Public Law 100-203, December 22, 1987, established the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) within the Department of Energy (DOE), and directed the Office to investigate a site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to determine if this site is suitable for the construction of a repository for the disposal of high level nuclear waste. Work on site characterization has been under way for several years. Thus far, about $1.47 billion have been spent on Yucca Mountain programs. This work has been funded by Congressional appropriations from a Nuclear Waste Fund to which contributions have been made by electric utility ratepayers through electric utilities generating power from nuclear power stations. The Secretary of Energy and the Governor of the State of Nevada have appointed one person each to a panel to oversee an objective, independent financial and management evaluation of the Yucca Mountain Project. The Requirements for the work will include an analysis of (1) the Yucca Mountain financial and, contract management techniques and controls; (2) Project schedules and credibility of the proposed milestones; (3) Project organizational effectiveness and internal planning processes, and (4) adequacy of funding levels and funding priorities, including the cost of infrastructure and scientific studies. The recipient will provide monthly progress report and the following reports/documents will be presented as deliverables under the contract: (1) Financial and Contract Management Preliminary Report; (2) Project Scheduling Preliminary Report; (3)Project Organizational Effectiveness Preliminary Report; (4) Project Funding Levels and Funding Priorities Preliminary Report; and (5) Final Report

  15. Independent management and financial review, Yucca Mountain Project, Nevada. Final report, Appendix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-15

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (Public Law 97-425), as amended by Public Law 100-203, December 22, 1987, established the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) within the Department of Energy (DOE), and directed the Office to investigate a site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to determine if this site is suitable for the construction of a repository for the disposal of high level nuclear waste. Work on site characterization has been under way for several years. Thus far, about $1.47 billion have been spent on Yucca Mountain programs. This work has been funded by Congressional appropriations from a Nuclear Waste Fund to which contributions have been made by electric utility ratepayers through electric utilities generating power from nuclear power stations. The Secretary of Energy and the Governor of the State of Nevada have appointed one person each to a panel to oversee an objective, independent financial and management evaluation of the Yucca Mountain Project. The Requirements for the work will include an analysis of (1) the Yucca Mountain financial and, contract management techniques and controls; (2) Project schedules and credibility of the proposed milestones; (3) Project organizational effectiveness and internal planning processes, and (4) adequacy of funding levels and funding priorities, including the cost of infrastructure and scientific studies. The recipient will provide monthly progress report and the following reports/documents will be presented as deliverables under the contract: (1) Financial and Contract Management Preliminary Report; (2) Project Scheduling Preliminary Report; (3)Project Organizational Effectiveness Preliminary Report; (4) Project Funding Levels and Funding Priorities Preliminary Report; and (5) Final Report.

  16. Final environmental impact statement, Beaufort Sea oil and gas development/Northstar Project. Appendix K (continued)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-02-01

    BP Exploration (Alaska) Inc. (BPXA) submitted a permit application to the US Army Engineer District, Alaska to initiate the review process for BPXA's plans to develop and produce oil and gas from the Northstar Unit. This report contains Appendices K (continued) of an Environmental Impact Statement which was undertaken to identify and evaluate the potential effects the proposed project may have on the environment

  17. PERMEABLE TREATMENT WALL EFFECTIVENESS MONITORING PROJECT, NEVADA STEWART MINE

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report summarizes the results of Mine Waste Technology Program (MWTP) Activity III, Project 39, Permeable Treatment Wall Effectiveness Monitoring Project, implemented and funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and jointly administered by EPA and the U.S. De...

  18. Project SAFE. Update of the SFR-1 safety assessment. Phase 1. Appendix A1: Inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riggare, P.

    1998-01-01

    One of the aims in the safety assessment of SFR-1 is to estimate the release to the environment. In order to make these calculations there is a need to describe the inventory in greater detail. The new computerised database of waste in SFR-1 gives a good possibility to achieve this. The aim for project SAFE is to make both conservative and realistic radionuclide transport calculations. To achieve this goal there must be two inventories. The conservative inventory is the inventory used in the design of the repository, which in most parts is identical with the limits in the licence for SFR-1. There is a great interest to have good estimates of the volumes of the different waste types. A thorough prognosis should be made in 1999, but until then the latest one from 1995 could be used in the calculations. The total (actual) inventory of nuclides is calculated from the measurements of the easy-to-measure nuclides since, in principle, all hard-to-measure nuclides are calculated by correlation factors to 60 Co and 137 Cs . These factors should be reviewed since there are quite large uncertainties involved. 14 C dominates the individual doses after a few hundred years and the collective dose in the inland-scenario. The amount of the nuclide is uncertain since the correlation factor is very uncertain. The chemical speciation of 14 C is also of interest due to different properties of organic and inorganic carbon. 36 Cl is very hard to measure. Although the authorities in their reviews of the safety reports say that there probably are small doses from chlorine, the inventory should be improved. 59 Ni is a long-lived nuclide that sets a limit to the close-to-the-core metal scrap that can be taken to SFR- 1. There is an ongoing research project to provide a better measuring method for 59 Ni. This should make it possible to improve the knowledge about 59 Ni inventory. The assumption that 90 % of the inventory is collected in the ion-exchange resins should be checked. Actinides

  19. Conceptual project of waste treatment plant of CDTN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriel, J.L.; Astolfi, D.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents the conceptual project of the waste treatment plant of CDTN. Several areas, such as: process area, material entrance and exit area are studied. The treatment processes are: evaporation, filtration, cementation, cutting and processing of solid wastes. (C.M.)

  20. The Role of Export Credit Agencies in the Financing of Nuclear Power Projects. Appendix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear new build projects are very particular investment proposals, which are unlikely to be undertaken on a straightforward economic basis by equity shareholders and by lenders. This is due to, inter alia, their extended life cycles, their very long term underlying commitments vis-à-vis waste management and decommissioning, the evolving nature of their risk management and the magnitude of their financing requirements. In addition, other factors also apply, all implying a degree of political involvement that makes the investment case even more complicated. As a result of the recent financial and economic crisis, the availability of sizable budgets from public sector players for long term investments in NPPs has been under stress in various parts of the world for a number of years now, and the situation is unlikely to change dramatically in the near future with many State budgets in need of rebalancing, particularly in Europe. The capacity of private sector stakeholders to take over the responsibility for funding such investments has also been challenged following the impact of, inter alia, the liquidity crunch on banks’ funding strategies in Europe during summer 2011, the recent macroeconomic policies on leverage, or the latest regulation that, ultimately, tends to re-direct the banks’ debt lending activities towards transactions requiring financing with shorter maturities. Within this context and among the range of financing instruments that are available and that offer long term maturities, export finance remains a tool of reference for various stakeholders, including the providers (e.g. sellers) of equipment and services and the lending banks. Furthermore, the characteristics of this product make it also perfectly compatible with the requirements of the financing plans typically put in place to fund large, capital intensive investments in infrastructure, such as NPPs.

  1. Project SAFE. Update of the SFR-1 safety assessment. Phase 1. Appendix A4: Far-field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Follin, S.; Andersson, Johan; Holmen, J.; Axelsson, C.L.

    1998-01-01

    This appendix has identified potential needs for updated hydrogeological modelling of the SFR in connection to the planned update of the performance assessment of the SFR within the framework of the SAFE-project. The objectives of such updated modelling should be to present a credible representation of the hydrogeological system, to explore effects of seals and repository extensions and to provide input to the release and transport calculations of the assessment. The last objective has led to the conclusion that an important focus of the modelling should be to determine the flow through the vaults under different conditions as this flow appear to be a very important quantity in the radionuclide release calculations. The suggested modelling should use relevant data and apply modern modelling tools and techniques, but should be geared towards the objectives. For this reasons it is suggested to apply a set of complementary and sometimes nested approaches, where each model approach is set up in order to address a specific set of questions. Answering these questions would motivate simplifications made in subsequent steps of the modelling. To the extent possible the models should be compared with existing data on flow and Baltic water breakthrough. However, in making such comparisons the accuracy of the measurements and the precision of the models need to be considered. A one-to-one match cannot be expected. It appears that careful geochemical evaluation of the site would only be necessary if more credit is placed on migration in the geosphere. If such an evaluation is considered it should be co-ordinated with the regional groundwater modelling. The issue of gas production should be reconsidered in a scenario and process analysis of SFR. However, given the strong conclusions already made it appears that gas migration in the rock will still remain as a minor issue. The major assumptions going into the analysis of the near-field in the final safety report and the deepened

  2. Final report from VFL Technologies for the pilot-scale thermal treatment of Lower East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain soils. LEFPC appendices. Volume 6. Appendix VI-X

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    This final report from VFL Technologies for the pilot-scale thermal treatment of lower East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain soils dated September 1994 contains LEFPC Appendices, Volume 6, Appendix VI - X. These appendices cover the following areas: chain of custody, miscellaneous process calculations (residence time and orifice plate calculations), waste management (mercury and radiation confirmatory testing before and after final verification run), health and safety (training, respirator fit test and radiation work permits), and transportation (soil receipt documentation)

  3. Cytoreductive surgery with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy: an emerging treatment option for advanced goblet cell tumors of the appendix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Yarrow J; Mack, Lloyd A; Gui, Xianyong; Carr, Norman J; Sideris, Lucas; Temple, Walley J; Dubé, Pierre; Chandrakumaran, Kandiah; Moran, Brendan J; Cecil, Tom D

    2014-06-01

    The debate remains whether appendiceal goblet cell cancers behave as classical carcinoid or adenocarcinoma. Treatment options are unclear and reports of outcomes are scarce. Cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (CRS+HIPEC) is considered optimal treatment for peritoneal involvement of other epithelial appendiceal tumors. Prospective cohorts of patients treated for advanced appendiceal tumors from three peritoneal malignancy centres were collected (1994-2011). All patients underwent complete CRS+HIPEC, when possible, or tumor debulking. Demographic and outcome data for patients with goblet cell cancers were compared to patients with low- or high-grade epithelial appendiceal tumors treated during the same time period. Details on 45 goblet cell cancer patients were compared to 708 patients with epithelial appendix lesions. In the goblet cell group, 57.8 % were female, median age was 53 years, median peritoneal cancer index (PCI) was 24, and CRS+HIPEC was achieved in 71.1 %. These details were similar in patients with low- or high-grade epithelial tumors. Lymph nodes were involved in 52 % of goblet cell patients, similar to rates in high-grade cancers, but significantly higher than in low-grade lesions (6.4 %; p concept that appendiceal goblet cell cancers behave more as high-grade adenocarcinomas than as low-grade lesions. These patients have reasonable long-term survival when treated using CRS+HIPEC, and this strategy should be considered.

  4. Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-04-01

    Mixed and low-level wastes generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are required to be managed according to applicable State and Federal regulations, and Department of Energy Orders that provide for the protection of human health and the environment. The Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility Project was chartered in 1991, by the Department of Energy to provide treatment capability for these mixed and low-level waste streams. The first project task consisted of conducting engineering studies to identify the waste streams, their potential treatment strategies, and the requirements that would be imposed on the waste streams and the facilities used to process them. The engineering studies, initiated in July 1991, identified 37 mixed waste streams, and 55 low-level waste streams. This report documents the waste stream information and potential treatment strategies, as well as the regulatory requirements for the Department of Energy-owned treatment facility option. The total report comprises three volumes and two appendices. This report consists of Volume 1, which explains the overall program mission, the guiding assumptions for the engineering studies, and summarizes the waste stream and regulatory information, and Volume 2, the Waste Stream Technical Summary which, encompasses the studies conducted to identify the INEL's waste streams and their potential treatment strategies

  5. U1/U2 crib groundwater biological treatment demonstration project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koegler, S.S.; Brouns, T.M.; Heath, W.O.

    1989-11-01

    The primary objective of the biological treatment project is to develop and demonstrate a process for Hanford groundwater remediation. Biodenitrification using facultative anaerobic microorganisms is a promising technology for the simultaneous removal of nitrates and organics from contaminated aqueous streams. During FY 1988, a consortium of Hanford groundwater microorganisms was shown to degrade both nitrates and carbon tetrachloride (CC1 4 ). A pilot-scale treatment system was designed and constructed based on the results of laboratory-and-bench-scale testing. This report summarizes the results of biological groundwater treatment studies performed during FY 1989 at the pilot-scale. These tests were conducted using a simulated Hanford groundwater with a continuous stirred-tank bioreactor, and a fluidized-bed bioreactor that was added to the pilot-scale treatment system in FY 1989. The pilot-scale system demonstrated continuous degradation of nitrates and CC1 4 in a simulated groundwater. 4 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  6. SNF sludge treatment system preliminary project execution plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flament, T.A.

    1998-01-01

    The Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. (FDH) Project Director for the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project has requested Numatec Hanford Company (NHC) to define how Hanford would manage a new subproject to provide a process system to receive and chemically treat radioactive sludge currently stored in the 100 K Area fuel retention basins. The subproject, named the Sludge Treatment System (STS) Subproject, provides and operates facilities and equipment to chemically process K Basin sludge to meet Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) requirements. This document sets forth the NHC management approach for the STS Subproject and will comply with the requirements of the SNF Project Management Plan (HNF-SD-SNFPMP-011). This version of this document is intended to apply to the initial phase of the subproject and to evolve through subsequent revision to include all design, fabrication, and construction conducted on the project and the necessary management and engineering functions within the scope of the subproject. As Project Manager, NHC will perform those activities necessary to complete the STS Subproject within approved cost and schedule baselines and turn over to FDH facilities, systems, and documentation necessary for operation of the STS

  7. Treatment of Berkeley boilers in Studsvik. Project description and experiences - Berkeley Boilers Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saul, Dave; Davidson, Gavin; Wirendal, Bo

    2014-01-01

    In November 2011 Studsvik was awarded a contract to transport five decommissioned boilers from the Berkeley Nuclear Licensed Site in the UK to the Studsvik Nuclear Site in Sweden for metal treatment and recycling. A key objective of the project was to remove the boilers from the site by 31 March 2012 and this was successfully achieved with all boilers off site by 22 March and delivered to Studsvik on 6 April. In November 2012 Studsvik was awarded a further contract for the remaining ten Berkeley Boilers with the requirement to remove all boilers from the Berkeley site by 31 March 2013. Again this was successfully achieved ahead of programme with all boilers in Sweden by 1 April 2013. A total of nine boilers have now been processed and all remaining boilers will be completed by end of September 2014. The projects have had many challenges including a very tight timescale and both have been successfully delivered to cost and ahead of the baseline programme. This paper describes the project and the experience gained from treatment of the boilers to date. (authors)

  8. Overview of a large-scale bioremediation soil treatment project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stechmann, R.

    1991-01-01

    How long does it take to remediate 290,000 yd 3 of impacted soil containing an average total petroleum hydrocarbon concentration of 3,000 ppm? Approximately 15 months from start to end of treatment using bioremediation. Mittelhauser was retained by the seller of the property (a major oil company) as technical manager to supervise remediation of a 45-ac parcel in the Los Angeles basin. Mittelhauser completed site characterization, negotiated clean-up levels with the regulatory agencies, and prepared the remedial action plan (RAP) with which the treatment approach was approved and permitted. The RAP outlined the excavation, treatment, and recompaction procedures for the impacted soil resulting from leakage of bunker fuel oil from a large surface impoundment. The impacted soil was treated on site in unline Land Treatment Units (LTUs) in 18-in.-thick lifts. Due to space restraints, multiple lifts site. The native microbial population was cultivated using soil stabilization mixing equipment with the application of water and agricultural grade fertilizers. Costs on this multimillion dollar project are broken down as follows: general contractor cost (47%), bioremediation subcontractor cost (35%), site characterization (10%), technical management (7%), analytical services (3%), RAP preparation and permitting (1%), and civil engineering subcontractor cost (1%). Start-up of field work could have been severely impacted by the existence of Red Fox habitation. The foxes were successfully relocated prior to start of field work

  9. Treatment planning systems dosimetry auditing project in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, M C; Cavaco, A; Jacob, K; Madureira, L; Germano, S; Faustino, S; Lencart, J; Trindade, M; Vale, J; Batel, V; Sousa, M; Bernardo, A; Brás, S; Macedo, S; Pimparel, D; Ponte, F; Diaz, E; Martins, A; Pinheiro, A; Marques, F; Batista, C; Silva, L; Rodrigues, M; Carita, L; Gershkevitsh, E; Izewska, J

    2014-02-01

    The Medical Physics Division of the Portuguese Physics Society (DFM_SPF) in collaboration with the IAEA, carried out a national auditing project in radiotherapy, between September 2011 and April 2012. The objective of this audit was to ensure the optimal usage of treatment planning systems. The national results are presented in this paper. The audit methodology simulated all steps of external beam radiotherapy workflow, from image acquisition to treatment planning and dose delivery. A thorax CIRS phantom lend by IAEA was used in 8 planning test-cases for photon beams corresponding to 15 measuring points (33 point dose results, including individual fields in multi-field test cases and 5 sum results) in different phantom materials covering a set of typical clinical delivery techniques in 3D Conformal Radiotherapy. All 24 radiotherapy centers in Portugal have participated. 50 photon beams with energies 4-18 MV have been audited using 25 linear accelerators and 32 calculation algorithms. In general a very good consistency was observed for the same type of algorithm in all centres and for each beam quality. The overall results confirmed that the national status of TPS calculations and dose delivery for 3D conformal radiotherapy is generally acceptable with no major causes for concern. This project contributed to the strengthening of the cooperation between the centres and professionals, paving the way to further national collaborations. Copyright © 2013 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. 33 CFR Appendix - List of FPC Standard Articles Forms Used in Permits and Licenses for Hydroelectric Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false List of FPC Standard Articles Forms Used in Permits and Licenses for Hydroelectric Projects Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF... Forms Used in Permits and Licenses for Hydroelectric Projects The following FPC standard articles Forms...

  11. The Plasma Hearth Process demonstration project for mixed waste treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geimer, R.; Dwight, C.; McClellan, G.

    1994-01-01

    The Plasma Hearth Process (PHP) demonstration project is one of the key technology projects in the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development (OTD) Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP). Testing to date has yielded encouraging results in displaying potential applications for the PHP technology. Early tests have shown that a wide range of waste materials can be readily processed in the PHP and converted to a vitreous product. Waste materials can be treated in their original container as received at the treatment facility, without pretreatment. The vitreous product, when cooled, exhibits excellent performance in leach resistance, consistently exceeding the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) requirements. Performance of the Demonstration System during test operations has been shown to meet emission requirements. An accelerated development phase, being conducted at both bench- and pilot-scale on both nonradioactive and radioactive materials, will confirm the viability of the process. It is anticipated that, as a result of this accelerated technology development and demonstration phase, the PHP will be ready for a final field-level demonstration within three years

  12. Technical specifications, South Texas Project, Unit No. 1 (Docket No. 50-498): Appendix ''A'' to License No. NPF-71

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-08-01

    This report presents specifications for the South Texas Project, Unit No. 1 concerning: safety limits, and limiting safety system settings; limiting conditions for operation and surveillance requirements; design features; and administrative controls

  13. Treatment Facility F: Accelerated Removal and Validation Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweeney, J.J.; Buettner, M.H.; Carrigan, C.R. [and others

    1994-04-01

    The Accelerated Removal and Validation (ARV) phase of remediation at the Treatment Facility F (TFF) site at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was designed to accelerate removal of gasoline from the site when compared to normal, single shift, pump-and-treat operations. The intent was to take advantage of the in-place infrastructure plus the increased underground temperatures resulting from the Dynamic Underground Stripping Demonstration Project (DUSDP). Operations continued 24-hours (h) per day between October 4 and December 12, 1993. Three contaminant removal rate enhancement approaches were explored during the period of continuous operation. First, we tried several configurations of the vapor pumping system to maximize the contaminant removal rate. Second, we conducted two brief trials of air injection into the lower steam zone. Results were compared with computer models, and the process was assessed for contaminant removal rate enhancement. Third, we installed equipment to provide additional electrical heating of contaminated low-permeability soil. Four new electrodes were connected into the power system. Diagnostic capabilities at the TFF site were upgraded so that we could safely monitor electrical currents, soil temperatures, and water treatment system processes while approximately 300 kW of electrical energy was being applied to the subsurface.

  14. Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford site facilities: Progress report for January 1 to March 31, 1988: Volume 9: Appendix C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-05-01

    The appendix is one of nine volumes, and presents data describing wells completed at the Hanford Site during the first quarter of calendar year 1988 (January through March). The data in this volume of Appendix C cover the following wells: 199-N-58; 199-N-59; 199-N-60; 199-N-61; 199-N-67. The data are presented in the following order: Well Completion Report/Title III Inspection List, As-Built Diagram, Logging Charts, and Drill Logs.

  15. Appendix A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, M. S.; Brincker, Rune; Heshe, Gert

    1999-01-01

    In this appendix a brief summary of experiments on reinforced concrete beams in three-point bending performed at Aalborg University is given. The aim of the investigation is to determine the full load-deflection curves for different beam sizes, different types of concrete and different amounts...

  16. Appendix B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, F. A.; Brincker, Rune

    1999-01-01

    In this appendix the failure behaviour of lightly reinforced concrete beams is investigated. A numerical model based on the fictitious crack approach according to Hillerborg [1] is established in order to estimate the load-deflection curve for lightly reinforced concrete beams. The debonding...

  17. Appendix C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, F. A.; Henriksen, M. S.; Brincker, Rune

    1999-01-01

    In this appendix a model is formulated for the rotational capacity of reinforced concrete beams assuming rebar tension failure. The model is based on a classical approach and establishes the load-deflection curve of a reinforced concrete beam. The rotational capacity is then obtained as the area...

  18. 7 CFR Appendix D to Subpart E of... - Alcohol Production Facilities Planning, Performing, Development and Project Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... commercial operation but have been operated on a scale such that all design and material problems have been..., without recourse to the Government, for the settlement and satisfaction of all contractual and... essential to the successful operation of the project during the life of the loan, such right will be...

  19. [Cadaveric topography and morphometry of the vermiform appendix].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndoye, J M N; Ndiaye, As; Ndiaye, Ab; Dia, A; Fall, B; Diop, M; Sow, M L

    2005-06-01

    Our study justified by the frequency of acute appendicitis and the possibility of anatomic variations of the caecoappendicular area attempt to index the topographic variations of the vermiform appendix (v.a.). On 80 fresh native cadavers (62 men and 18 women) without surgical antecedent whose mean age was 36 years (range between 16 and 78 years) we note the morphotype and the height. More over we study the intraperitoneal projection of the Mac Burney point, topography and shape of the cecum and the situation, shape and dimensions of the v.a. We note also the level of implantation of this latter on the cecum, appearance of the mesoappendix and the distance separating the base of the appendix to the ileo-caecal junction. Mac Burney's point permitted to localize appendix in 66%; the cecum has more often than not the form of a bulb (98.7%) and sited in right fossa iliaca. We noted 7 types of topographic disposition; front varieties were more frequent (68.7%) notably the pelvic direction (51.2%) with a medial (72.5%) or a posteromedial (27.5%) establishment on the cecum. The v.a. was more often in the form of worm with a long mesoappendix; his mean length was 106.4 mm (between 65 and 160 mm) and the mean diameter 6.77 mm (range between 4 and 10 mm). The distance which separated the base of the appendix to the ileo-cecal junction varied between 15 to 40 mm with a mean distance of 24.2 mm. Thus in this study, dimensions of the v.a. were very variables. Located in right fossa iliaca he adopted a front topography with pelvic direction and medial establishment on bulbar cecum. In spite of scarcity of ectopic situation of the appendix for which laparoscopic approach is salutary, a similar topographic study during surgical treatment of acute appendicitis will be interesting.

  20. 7 CFR Appendix B to Part 4280 - Technical Reports for Projects With Total Eligible Project Costs Greater Than $200,000

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., liquid, and gaseous emissions or effluents and the schedule for securing those permits and agreements. (5... balances, and material balances as part of the unit operations flowchart. (2) Describe the project site and... in § 4280.103, systems that use geothermal energy to produce high pressure steam for electric power...

  1. An environmentally safe treatment scheme for gases to be produced in the in situ combustion pilot project (Mucura District, Orinoco belt, Venezuela)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perozo, H.; Sena, A.; Vasquez, P.; Harner, R. [PDVSA Petroleos de Venezuela SA, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of). INTEVEP

    2009-07-01

    The in situ combustion pilot project (ISCPP) to be conducted in the Bare field, in the Orinoco oil belt of Venezuela is a technological project lead by Petroleos de Venezuela (PDVSA) Intevep together with the Exploration and Production Division of Faja. The project is expected to increase the recovery factor to values between 20 and 60 per cent. By its execution, it is expected that relevant quantities of gases such as sulphur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), hydrogen sulphide (H{sub 2}S), and carbon monoxide (CO) will be produced. These gases require proper treatment to meet Venezuelan environmental standards. It was therefore necessary to develop a taylor made scheme in order to adjust the process for the environmentally safe management of noxious gases according to a non-producing-waste approach. This paper described the experimental methodology and laboratory results that led to the development of an environmentally sound flue gas treatment system that could be scaled up for the ISCPP. The paper discussed the thermal oxidation process and flue gas desulphurization. The laboratory tests regarding thermal oxidation were also discussed. The preparation of the gas mixture and results were then presented. The laboratory tests conducted by PDVSA Intevep demonstrated that at 300 degrees Celsius or more, a high yield of H{sub 2}S to SO{sub 2} conversion can be achieved. 5 refs., 6 tabs., 4 figs., 1 appendix.

  2. Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects electric power marketing final environmental impact statement. Volume 3: Appendix A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The Colorado River Storage Project Customer Service Office of the Western Area Power Administration (Western) markets electricity produced at hydroelectric facilities operated by the Bureau of Reclamation. The facilities are known collectively as the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP) and include dams equipped for power generation on the Colorado, Green, Gunnison, and Rio Grande rivers and on Plateau Creek in Arizona, Colorado, Utah, Wyoming, and New Mexico. Of these facilities, only the Glen Canyon Unit, the Flaming Gorge Unit, and the Aspinall Unit (which includes Blue Mesa, Morrow Point, and Crystal dams) are influenced by Western power scheduling and transmission decisions. The environmental impact statement (EIS) alternatives, called commitment-level alternatives, reflect combinations of capacity and energy that would feasibly and reasonably fulfill Western's firm power marketing responsibilities, needs, and statutory obligations. The viability of these alternatives relates directly to the combination of generation capability of the SLCA/IP with energy purchases and interchange. The economic and natural resource assessments in this EIS include an analysis of commitment-level alternatives. Impacts of the no-action alternative are also assessed. Supply options, which include combinations of electrical power purchases and hydropower operational scenarios reflecting different operations of the dams, are also assessed. The EIS evaluates the impacts of these scenarios relative to socioeconomics, air resources, water resources, ecological resources, cultural resources, land use, recreation, and visual resources. Western has identified commitment-level alternative 1, the Post-1989 commitment level, as its preferred alternative. The impact evaluations indicate that this commitment level is also the environmentally preferred alternative

  3. Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects electric power marketing final environmental impact statement. Volume 4: Appendixes B-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The Colorado River Storage Project Customer Office of the Western Area Power Administration (Western) markets electricity produced at hydroelectric facilities operated by the Bureau of Reclamation. The facilities are known collectively as the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP) and include dams equipped for power generation on the Colorado, Green, Gunnison, and Rio Grande rivers and on Plateau Creek in Arizona, Colorado, Utah, Wyoming, and New Mexico. Of these facilities, only the Glen Canyon Unit, the Flaming Gorge Unit, and the Aspinall Unit (which includes Blue Mesa, Morrow Point, and Crystal dams) are influenced by Western power scheduling and transmission decisions. The environmental impact statement (EIS) alternatives, called commitment-level alternatives, reflect combinations of capacity and energy that would feasibly and reasonably fulfill Western's firm power marketing responsibilities, needs, and statutory obligations. The viability of these alternatives relates directly to the combination of generation capability of the SLCA/IP with energy purchases and interchange. The economic and natural resource assessments in this EIS include an analysis of commitment-level alternatives. Impacts of the no-action alternative are also assessed. Supply options, which include combinations of electrical power purchases and hydropower operational scenarios reflecting different operations of the dams, are also assessed. The EIS evaluates the impacts of these scenarios relative to socioeconomics, air resources, water resources, ecological resources, cultural resources, land use, recreation, and visual resources. Western has identified commitment-level alternative 1, the Post-1989 commitment level, as its preferred alternative. The impact evaluations indicate that this commitment level is also the environmentally preferred alter native

  4. Salt Lake City Utah Integrated Projects electric power marketing. Final environmental impact statement, Volume 5: Appendix E

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The Colorado River Storage Project Customer Service Office of the Western Area Power Administration (Western) markets electricity produced at hydroelectric facilities operated by the Bureau of Reclamation. The facilities are known collectively as the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP) and include dams equipped for power generation on the Colorado, Green, Gunnison, and Rio Grande rivers and on Plateau Creek in Arizona, Colorado, Utah, Wyoming, and New Mexico. Of these facilities, only the Glen Canyon Unit, the Flaming Gorge Unit, and the Aspinall Unit (which includes Blue Mesa, Morrow Point, and Crystal dams) are influenced by Western power scheduling and transmission decisions. The environmental impact statement (EIS) alternatives, called commitment-level alternatives, reflect combinations of capacity and energy that would feasibly and reasonably fulfill Western's firm power marketing responsibilities, needs, and statutory obligations. The viability of these alternatives relates directly to the combination of generation capability of the SLCA/IP with energy purchases and interchange. The economic and natural resource assessments in this EIS include an analysis of commitment-level alternatives. Impacts of the no-action alternative are also assessed. Supply options, which include combinations of electrical power purchases and hydropower operational scenarios reflecting different operations of the dams, are also assessed. The EIS evaluates the impacts of these scenarios relative to socioeconomics, air resources, water resources, ecological resources, cultural resources, land use, recreation, and visual resources. Western has identified commitment-level alternative 1, the Post-1989 commitment level, as its preferred alternative. The impact evaluations indicate that this commitment level is also the environmentally preferred alternative

  5. Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford Site facilities: Progress report, January 1-March 31, 1988: Volume 3, Appendix A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-05-01

    This appendix is one of nine volumes, and presents data describing wells completed at the Hanford Site during the fourth quarter of calendar year 1987 (October through December). The data in this volume of Appendix A cover the following wells: 299-E32-2; 299-E32-3; 299-E32-4; 299-E33-28; 299-E33-29. The data are presented in the following order: Well Completion Report/Title III Inspection List, Inspection Plan, As-Built Diagram, Logging Charts, and Drill Logs

  6. Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford site facilities: Progress report for the period, January 1-March 31, 1988: Volume 6, Appendix (contd)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-05-01

    This appendix is one of nine volumes, and presents data describing wells completed at the Hanford Site during the fourth quarter of calendar year 1987 (October through December). The data in this volume of Appendix B cover the following wells: 299-W7-5; 299-W7-6; 299-W8-1; 299-W9-1; 299-W10-13. The data are presented in the following order: Well Completion Report/Title III Inspection List, Inspection Plan, As-Built Diagram, Logging Charts, and Drill Logs

  7. Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford site facilities: Progress report for the period January 1 to March 31, 1988: Volume 5, Appendix B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1988-05-01

    This appendix is one of nine volumes, and presents data describing wells completed at the Hanford Site during the fourth quarter of calendar year 1987 (October through December). The data in this volume of Appendix B cover the following wells: 299-W6-2; 299-W7-1; 299-W7-2; 299-W7-3; 299-W7-4. The data are presented in the following order: Well Completion Report/Title III Inspection List, Inspection Plan, As-Built Diagram, Logging Charts, and Drill Logs.

  8. Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford site facilities: Progress report for the period January 1 to March 31, 1988: Volume 8, Appendix B (contd)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-05-01

    This appendix is one of nine volumes, and presents data describing wells completed at the Hanford Site during the fourth quarter of calendar year 1987 (October through December). The data in this volume of Appendix B cover the following wells: 299-W18-21; 299-W18-22; 299-W18-23; 299-W18-24. The data are presented in the following order: Well Completion Report/Title III Inspection List, Inspection Plan, As-Built Diagram, Logging Charts, and Drill Logs.

  9. Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford Site facilities: Progress report, January 1-March 31, 1988: Volume 3, Appendix A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-05-01

    This appendix is one of nine volumes, and presents data describing wells completed at the Hanford Site during the fourth quarter of calendar year 1987 (October through December). The data in this volume of Appendix A cover the following wells: 299-E32-2; 299-E32-3; 299-E32-4; 299-E33-28; 299-E33-29. The data are presented in the following order: Well Completion Report/Title III Inspection List, Inspection Plan, As-Built Diagram, Logging Charts, and Drill Logs.

  10. Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford site facilities: Progress report for the period January 1 to March 31, 1988: Volume 7, Appendix B (contd)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-05-01

    This appendix is one of nine volumes, and presents data describing wwlls completed at the Hanford Site during the fourth quarter of calendar year 1987 (October through December). The data in this volume of Appendix B cover the following wells: 299-W10-14; 299-W15-15; 299-W15-16; 299-W15-17; 299-W15-18. The data are presented in the following order: Well Completion Report/Title III Inspection List, Inspection Plan, As-Built Diagram, Logging Charts, and Drill Logs.

  11. Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford site facilities: Progress report for the period January 1 to March 31, 1988: Volume 4, Appendix A (contd)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-05-01

    This appendix is one of nine volumes, and presents data describing wells completed at the Hanford Site during the fourth quarter of calendar year 1987 (October through December). The data in this volume of Appendix A cover the following wells: 299-E33-30; 299-E34-2; 299-E34-3; 299-E34-4; 299-E34-5; 299-E34-6. The data are presented in the following order: Well Completion Report/Title III Inspection List, Inspection Plan, As-Built Diagram, Logging Charts, and Drill Logs.

  12. Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford site facilities: Progress report for the period, January 1-March 31, 1988: Volume 6, Appendix B (contd)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-05-01

    This appendix is one of nine volumes, and presents data describing wells completed at the Hanford Site during the fourth quarter of calendar year 1987 (October through December). The data in this volume of Appendix B cover the following wells: 299-W7-5; 299-W7-6; 299-W8-1; 299-W9-1; 299-W10-13. The data are presented in the following order: Well Completion Report/Title III Inspection List, Inspection Plan, As-Built Diagram, Logging Charts, and Drill Logs.

  13. NEOPLASTIC LESIONS OF THE APPENDIX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Bryk

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was to present the clinical observations of neoplastic lesions of the appendix (one carcinoid and two mucous cysts and to discuss various manners of treatment and prognosis. Material and methods: The authors of the following paper present a description of three cases of appendix tumours, two patients with a mucous cyst and a patient with carcinoid, against the background of all the appendectomies performed at the Clinical Department of General, Endocrine and Oncological Surgery of the Provincial Polyclinical Hospital in Kielce in the years 2005–2011. Results : Within the 7-year period, a total of 11 719 surgical operations have been performed, where 834 (7.1% were that of appendectomy. Among all of the removed vermiform appendixes, neoplastic lesions occurred in three cases constituting a mere 0.3% of all of the appendectomies performed within that period. In two of the cases there was a suspicion of mucous cysts before the surgical operation. In none of the above-mentioned cases was is possible to ultimately establish the diagnosis before the operation. The patients were subjected to a simple appendectomy. The patients are in good clinical health, with no signs of relapse. Conclusions : The presented cases of patients with appendix tumours illustrate the difficulty of preoperative detection of a neoplastic lesion. This is mainly due to a scantily symptomatic course or symptoms typical of appendicitis. In light of this, histopathological examination of each appendix should be treated as obligatory.

  14. Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects Electric Power Marketing. Draft environmental impact statement: Volume 4, Appendixes B-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    The Salt Lake City Area Office of the Western Area Power Administration (Western) markets electricity produced at hydroelectric facilities operated by the Bureau of Reclamation. The facilities are known collectively as the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP) and include dams equipped for power generation on the Green, Gunnison, Rio Grande, and Colorado rivers and on Deer and Plateau creeks in the states of Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. Of these facilities, only the Glen Canyon Unit, the Flaming Gorge Unit, and the Aspinall Unit (which includes Blue Mesa, Morrow Point, and Crystal dams;) are influenced by Western power scheduling and transmission decisions. The EIS alternatives, called commitment-level alternatives, reflect combinations of capacity and energy that would feasibly and reasonably fulfill Westerns firm power marketing responsibilities, needs, and statutory obligations. The viability of these alternatives relates directly to the combination of generation capability of the SLCA/IP with energy purchases and interchange. The economic and natural resource assessments in this environmental impact statement (EIS) include an analysis of commitment-level alternatives. Impacts of the no-action alternative are also assessed. Supply options, which include combinations of electrical power purchases and hydropower operational scenarios reflecting different operations of the dams, are also assessed. The EIS evaluates the impacts of these scenarios relative to socioeconomics, air resources, water resources, ecological resources, cultural resources, land use, recreation, and visual resources.

  15. Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects Electric Power Marketing. Draft environmental impact statement: Volume 3, Appendix A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    The Salt Lake City Area Office of the Western Area Power Administration (Western) markets electricity produced at hydroelectric facilities operated by the Bureau of Reclamation. The facilities are known collectively as the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP) and include dams equipped for power generation on the Green, Gunnison, Rio Grande, and Colorado rivers and on Deer and Plateau creeks in the states of Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. Of these facilities, only the Glen Canyon Unit, the Flaming Gorge Unit, and the Aspinall Unit (which includes Blue Mesa, Morrow Point, and Crystal dams;) are influenced by Western power scheduling and transmission decisions. The EIS alternatives, called commitment-level alternatives, reflect combinations of capacity and energy that would feasibly and reasonably fulfill Westerns firm power marketing responsibilities, needs, and statutory obligations. The viability of these alternatives relates directly to the combination of generation capability of the SLCA/IP with energy purchases and interchange. The economic and natural resource assessments in this environmental impact statement (EIS) include an analysis of commitment-level alternatives. Impacts of the no-action alternative are also assessed. Supply options, which include combinations of electrical power purchases and hydropower operational scenarios reflecting different operations of the dams, are also assessed. The EIS evaluates the impacts of these scenarios relative to socioeconomics, air resources, water resources, ecological resources, cultural resources, land use, recreation, and visual resources.

  16. Sprinkle Treatment experimental project construction and first-year evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-07-01

    The Department's Research Section recognized the need for alternatives to the friction course materials. One such alternative which appeared promising was Sprinkle Treatment. Sprinkle Treatment, initiated in 1977 by the Federal Highway Administration...

  17. Technical solutions for waste treatment in the Belene project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Büttner, K.; Eichhorn, H.

    2011-01-01

    Outline: In June 2010 NUKEM Technologies GmbH was awarded a contract from ATOMSTROYEXPORT JSC to perform the complete work package related to designing and completion of the equipment for treatment of radioactive waste on the turn-key basis for Belene NPP. Technical Solutions: Waste Streams and Technologies at UKC and UKS; Concentration Plant; Thermal Treatment of Resins Sorting Facility; Biological Waste Water Treatment; Conditioning – Cementation • Sorting of Radwaste; Plasma Facility; Grouting; Filter Press; Monitoring and Tracking

  18. Radiation technology for sewage sludge treatment: The Argentine project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graino, J.G.

    2001-01-01

    Within the environmental applications of ionizing radiation, disinfection of wastewaters or sewage sludges is one of the most best known. Argentina based the project of a full scale irradiation plant on the gamma irradiation application, utilizing Argentine made Cobalt-60 sources. The design characteristics, process descriptions and costs are included. The research project developed information about the irradiation effects on the sludges with respect to plant performance. For the purpose of oxi-irradiation experiments, a lab-scale pool irradiator was constructed and is described. (author)

  19. Content and Formation Cause of VOCs in Medical Waste Non-incineration Treatment Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dengchao, Jin; Hongjun, Teng; Zhenbo, Bao; Yang, Li

    2018-02-01

    When medical waste is treated by non-incineration technology, volatile organic compounds in the waste will be volatile out and form odor pollution. This paper studied VOCs productions in medical waste steam treatment project, microwave treatment project and chemical dinifection project. Sampling and analysis were carried out on the waste gas from treatment equipment and the gas in treatment workshop. The contents of nine VOCs were determined. It was found that the VOCs content in the exhaust gas at the outlet of steam treatment unit was much higher than that of microwave and chemical treatment unit, while the content of VOCs in the chemical treatment workshop was higher than that in the steam and microwave treatment workshop. The formation causes of VOCs were also analyzed and discussed in this paper.

  20. [Consequences of a Failed Project: Introduction and Management of a Hospitalization-Substituting Treatment Model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Uwe

    2018-01-01

    This article is a report on a psychiatric project introducing services that substitute in-patient treatment and a new control and management system. The implementation of the project was a failure. Nevertheless, the project has made a contribution to further development of community-based psychiatry. Design, organization and course of the project are described and analyzed from the point of view of the communal actors involved. Effects going beyond the time course of the project have been taken into consideration. The results show that the contracting authority, project developer and local actors involved had differing ideas on the weight attached to different parts of the project as well as on the project goal and resources for carrying out the project. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Report to Congress on the U.S. Department of Energy's Environmental Management Science Program. Research funded and its linkages to environmental cleanup problems. High out-year cost environmental management project descriptions. Volume 3 of 3 - Appendix C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-04-01

    The Department of Energy's Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) serves as a catalyst for the application of scientific discoveries to the development and deployment of technologies that will lead to reduction of the costs and risks associated with cleaning up the nation's nuclear complex. Appendix C provides details about each of the Department's 82 high cost projects and lists the EMSP research awards with potential to impact each of these projects. The high cost projects listed are those having costs greater than $50 million in constant 1998 dollars from the year 2007 and beyond, based on the March 1998 Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure Draft data, and having costs of quantities of material associated with an environmental management problem area. The high cost project information is grouped by operations office and organized by site and project code. Each operations office section begins with a list of research needs associated with that operations office. Potentially related research awards are listed by problem area in the Index of Research Awards by Environmental Management Problem Area, which can be found at the end of appendices B and C. For projects that address high risks to the public, workers, or the environment, refer also the Health/Ecology/Risk problem area awards. Research needs are programmatic or technical challenges that may benefit from knowledge gained through basic research

  2. Sprinkle Treatment experimental project construction and three year evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-06-01

    This report documents the construction of a Sprinkle Treatment field trial on a high speed/high volume roadway (55 mph/8520 ADT) and presents the performance data obtained for three years after construction. Normal plant and roadway production rates ...

  3. Appendix A : literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    This appendix contains a review of the literature and other background information : germane to the experimental and analytical research presented in subsequent appendices. Table : 1 lists the sections and topics contained in this appendix and those ...

  4. Southeast Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant Facilities Improvements Project and Geysers Effluent Pipeline Project. Draft EIR/EIS: Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Southeast Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant (SERWTP) Facilities Improvement Plan and Geysers Effluent Pipeline and Effluent Injection Project are proposed as a plan to provide expanded wastewater treatment capabilities and to dispose of the effluent by injection in The Geysers geothermal field for purposes of power production. The project is located predominantly in the County of Lake, California, and also in part of Sonoma County. The plan includes various conventional facilities improvements in wastewater treatment to a secondary level of treatment at the SWERWTP. The plan includes facilities to convey the treated effluent in a 26-mile, 24-inch inside diameter pipeline to the Southeast Geysers. The wastewater from the SERWTP would be supplemented by raw lake water diverted from nearby Clear Lake. At The Geysers, the effluent would be directed into a system of distribution lines to wells. In the geothermal reservoir, the water will be converted to steam and collected in production wells that will direct the steam to six existing power plants. This document is a summary of a combined full Environmental Impact Report (EIR) and Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The EIR/EIS describes the environmental impacts of the various components of the project. Mitigation measures are suggested for reducing impacts to a less than significant level

  5. Mixed and low-level waste treatment facility project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-01

    The technology information provided in this report is only the first step toward the identification and selection of process systems that may be recommended for a proposed mixed and low-level waste treatment facility. More specific information on each technology will be required to conduct the system and equipment tradeoff studies that will follow these preengineering studies. For example, capacity, maintainability, reliability, cost, applicability to specific waste streams, and technology availability must be further defined. This report does not currently contain all needed information; however, all major technologies considered to be potentially applicable to the treatment of mixed and low-level waste are identified and described herein. Future reports will seek to improve the depth of information on technologies.

  6. Mixed and low-level waste treatment facility project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-04-01

    The technology information provided in this report is only the first step toward the identification and selection of process systems that may be recommended for a proposed mixed and low-level waste treatment facility. More specific information on each technology will be required to conduct the system and equipment tradeoff studies that will follow these preengineering studies. For example, capacity, maintainability, reliability, cost, applicability to specific waste streams, and technology availability must be further defined. This report does not currently contain all needed information; however, all major technologies considered to be potentially applicable to the treatment of mixed and low-level waste are identified and described herein. Future reports will seek to improve the depth of information on technologies

  7. Advanced mixed waste treatment project draft environmental impact statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-07-01

    The AMWTP DEIS assesses the potential environmental impacts associated with four alternatives related to the construction and operation of a proposed waste treatment facility at the INEEL. Four alternatives were analyzed: The No Action Alternative, the Proposed Action, the Non-Thermal Treatment Alternative, and the Treatment and Storage Alternative. The proposed AMWTP facility would treat low-level mixed waste, alpha-contaminated low-level mixed waste, and transuranic waste in preparation for disposal. Transuranic waste would be disposed of at the Waste isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico. Low-level mixed waste would be disposed of at an approval disposal facility depending on decisions to be based on DOE's Final Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement. Evaluation of impacts on land use, socio-economics, cultural resources, aesthetic and scenic resources, geology, air resources, water resources, ecological resources, noise, traffic and transportation, occupational and public health and safety, INEEL services, and environmental justice were included in the assessment. The AMWTP DEIS identifies as the Preferred Alternative the Proposed Action, which is the construction and operation of the AMWTP facility

  8. Coal Mines, Reclamation Sites - Mine Drainage Treatment/Land Recycling Project Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — Mine Drainage Treatment/Land Reclamation Locations are clean-up projects that are working to eliminate some form of abandoned mine. The following sub-facility types...

  9. Bilateral Same-day Laser Peripheral Iridotomy in the Philadelphia Glaucoma Detection and Treatment Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waisbourd, Michael; Shafa, Anousheh; Delvadia, Radha; Sembhi, Harjeet; Molineaux, Jeanne; Henderer, Jeffery; Pizzi, Laura T; Myers, Jonathan S; Hark, Lisa A; Katz, L Jay

    2016-10-01

    To report the outcomes of bilateral, same-day laser peripheral iridotomy (LPI) in the Philadelphia Glaucoma Detection and Treatment Project. The Philadelphia Glaucoma Detection and Treatment Project was a community-based initiative aimed to improve detection, management, treatment, and follow-up care of individuals at high risk for glaucoma. This novel project performed LPI, where 2 eyes received laser therapy on the same day. Of the 1649 patients examined between January 1, 2013 and May 31, 2014, patients who underwent bilateral, same-day LPI were included in our analysis. Main outcome measures were visual acuity, intraocular pressure (IOP), and postoperative complication rates. A total of 132 eyes of 66 patients underwent bilateral, same-day LPI. Mean visual acuity remained unchanged following treatment (P=0.85). Eight patients (12.1%) had IOP spikes >5 mm Hg following treatment, and 4 patients (6.1%) spiked >10 mm Hg. IOP returned to normal in all but 1 patient, who was diagnosed with chronic angle-closure glaucoma. Hyphema was reported in 2 patients (3%) and glare in 1 patient (1.5%). Thirteen patients (19.7%) had repeat LPI treatment. All patients successfully tolerated LPI treatment without serious complications. Performing bilateral, same-day LPI was well tolerated in a large community-based, glaucoma detection and treatment project. Applying this treatment strategy may be considered in similar settings, where patients' access to eye care is limited and it may be a cost-effective strategy.

  10. Alkaline Waterflooding Demonstration Project, Ranger Zone, Long Beach Unit, Wilmington Field, California. Fourth annual report, June 1979-May 1980. Volume 2. Appendix I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmichael, J.D.

    1981-03-01

    This appendix to the 1979-1980 annual report contains basic laboratory test reports, detailed instructions, plans and procedures, and various calculated data derived from operating observations. These are considered to be of sufficient interest to warrant their publication, but because of their bulk, to be of too much detail for inclusion in the body of the report. The table of contents specifies each group of data or description as a section which is believed to be complete in itself. The order of inclusion of the various sections has been dictated by the sequence of their reference in the body of the 1979-1980 annual report.

  11. Energy 21. Preconditions and results. Appendix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    This appendix comprises the following 5 scenarios: Reference scenario for electricity and district heating supply; Action plan scenario for electricity and district heat supply; Energy balances for reference and action plan scenarios; Investments and operating costs for user installations; Projection of CO{sub 2} emissions from the transport sector. (EG)

  12. Environmental assessment for the Waste Water Treatment Facility at the West Valley Demonstration Project and finding of no significant impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The possible environmental impacts from the construction and operation of a waste water treatment facility for the West Valley Demonstration Project are presented. The West Valley Project is a demonstration project on the solidification of high-level radioactive wastes. The need for the facility is the result of a rise in the work force needed for the project which rendered the existing sewage treatment plant incapable of meeting the nonradioactive waste water treatment needs

  13. Environmental assessment for the Waste Water Treatment Facility at the West Valley Demonstration Project and finding of no significant impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    The possible environmental impacts from the construction and operation of a waste water treatment facility for the West Valley Demonstration Project are presented. The West Valley Project is a demonstration project on the solidification of high-level radioactive wastes. The need for the facility is the result of a rise in the work force needed for the project which rendered the existing sewage treatment plant incapable of meeting the nonradioactive waste water treatment needs.

  14. Duplication of Vermiform Appendix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Gulzar Ahmad; Reshi, Tarooq Ahmad; Rashid, Asiya

    2016-02-01

    The vermiform appendix is a tubular, narrow, worm-shaped part of the alimentary canal that lies near the ileocecal junction and communicates with the caecum. Duplication of the vermiform appendix is rare, with a reported incidence of 0.004 %. Till now, fewer than 100 cases have been reported. We present a case of an 8-year-old male child with duplex appendix who presented to the emergency department of our institution with features of acute appendicitis.

  15. Treatment for primary HIV infection: projecting outcomes of immediate, interrupted, or delayed therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walensky, Rochelle P; Goldie, Sue J; Sax, Paul E; Weinstein, Milton C; Paltiel, A David; Kimmel, April D; Seage, George R; Losina, Elena; Zhang, Hong; Islam, Runa; Freedberg, Kenneth A

    2002-09-01

    With limited data available on the optimal treatment of primary HIV infection, disease modeling can be used to project clinical outcomes and inform decision makers. The authors developed a simulation model to evaluate the clinical outcomes and life expectancy projections for three primary HIV infection treatment strategies: 1) continuous antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiated at CD4 count ART initiated immediately on diagnosis of primary HIV infection; and 3) ART initiated on diagnosis followed by structured treatment interruption. Projected life expectancies for the three strategies were 23.92, 24.46, and 26.07 years, respectively. The impact of key variables was assessed in sensitivity analysis, with the structured treatment interruption strategy remaining the most effective over a broad range of inputs. The immunologic benefit associated with immediate therapy and the potential for antiretroviral resistance due to structured treatment interruption have the most important impact on the optimal strategy. Based on current data, immediate treatment on diagnosis of primary HIV infection followed by structured treatment interruption will likely yield the best outcome. These results can assist decision makers and those planning clinical trials in defining evidence-based performance measures for primary HIV infection treatment and future trials.

  16. Feasibility study for alternate fuels production: unconventional natural gas from wastewater treatment plants. Volume II, Appendix D. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overly, P.; Tawiah, K.

    1981-12-01

    Data are presented from a study performed to determined the feasibility of recovering methane from sewage at a typical biological secondary wastewater treatment plant. Three tasks are involved: optimization of digester gas; digester gas scrubbing; and application to the East Bay Municipal Utility District water pollution control plant. Results indicate that excess digester gas can be used economically at the wastewater treatment plant and that distribution and scrubbing can be complex and costly. (DMC) 193 references, 93 figures, 26 tables.

  17. Transition plan: Project C-018H, 200-E Area Effluent Treatment Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, M.D.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this transition plan is to ensure an orderly transfer of project information to operations to satisfy Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) operational requirements and objectives, and ensure safe and efficient operation of Project C-018H, the 200-E Area Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). This plan identifies the deliverables for Project C-018H upon completion of construction and turnover to WHC for operations, and includes acceptance criteria to objectively assess the adequacy of the contract deliverables in relation to present requirements. The scope of this plan includes a general discussion of the need for complete and accurate design basis documentation and design documents as project deliverables. This plan also proposes that a configuration management plan be prepared to protect and control the transferred design documents and reconstitute the design basis and design requirements, in the event that the deliverables and project documentation received from the contractor are less than adequate at turnover

  18. Sludge treatment facility preliminary siting study for the sludge treatment project (A-13B)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WESTRA, A.G.

    1999-01-01

    This study evaluates various sites in the 100 K area and 200 areas of Hanford for locating a treatment facility for sludge from the K Basins. Both existing facilities and a new standalone facility were evaluated. A standalone facility adjacent to the AW Tank Farm in the 200 East area of Hanford is recommended as the best location for a sludge treatment facility

  19. Project ADAPT: a program to assess depression and provide proactive treatment in rural areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luptak, Marilyn; Kaas, Merrie J; Artz, Margaret; McCarthy, Teresa

    2008-08-01

    We describe and evaluate a project designed to pilot test an evidence-based clinical intervention for assessing and treating depression in older adults in rural primary care clinics. Project ADAPT-Assuring Depression Assessment and Proactive Treatment-utilized existing primary care resources to overcome barriers to sustainability experienced by similar projects. This multifaceted intervention, which was structured after the successful IMPACT (Improving Mood/Promoting Access to Collaborative Treatment) research intervention, used on-site geriatric depression specialists, clinic staff training, team collaboration, and depression practice guidelines to improve depression care for rural elders. IMPACT screening and assessment instruments and treatment protocols were modified for use by less highly trained staff already employed by the rural primary care clinics. Patient and provider depression educational materials and depression screening and monitoring protocols were provided by means of regional training sessions and phone contact. Evaluation data were collected by mail and phone surveys. Although Project ADAPT materials and training were initially developed for providers in rural primary care clinics, most participants came from long-term-care facilities, hospitals, home care, and public health and social service agencies. Forty-four sites sent 56 staff to Project ADAPT regional trainings, but many did not participate after the initial training. Participants who did continue reported that training improved geriatric depression screening and communication with the primary provider. Outcomes suggest that provider, patient, and system issues have to be addressed differently in rural areas to improve geriatric depression treatment in primary care settings.

  20. [Perforation of the appendix and observation of Enterobius vermicularis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schou-Jensen, Katrine; Antipina, Elena Nikolaevna; Brisling, Steffen Kirstein; Azawi, Nessn

    2014-12-15

    A nine-year-old girl was admitted to the paediatric ward due to fever and lower abdomen pain through a day. Acute laparoscopic exploration showed a large necrotic perforation at the distal end of the appendix. During the appendectomy multiple small, live Enterobius vermicularis (pinworms) were observed. The patient was admitted for three days of observation and received relevant treatment with intravenous antibiotics and antihelminthic treatment. The histology showed numerous pinworms in the lumen of the appendix and invasion of the pinworms of the submucosal layer and the wall of the appendix.

  1. Effects of childhood malignancy treatment on quality of life: Preliminary results of the QOLOP project

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Blatný, Marek; Kepák, T.; Jelínek, Martin; Slezáčková, Alena; Vlčková, I.; Navrátilová, P.; Pilát, M.; Kárová, Š.; Hrstková, H.; Štěrba, J.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 1 (2008), s. 10-15 R&D Projects: GA ČR 406/07/1384 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70250504 Keywords : cancer * quality of life * childhood Subject RIV: AN - Psychology http://www.spao.eu/archive/2008/spao2008_effects_of_childhood_malignancy_treatment_on_quality_of_life.pdf

  2. Synthesis and Integration of Pre-treatment Results from the Missouri Ozark Forest Ecosystem Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendy K. Gram; Victoria L. Sork; Robert J. Marquis

    1997-01-01

    Integrating results across disciplines is a critical component of ecosystem management and research. The common research sites, landscape-scale experimental design, and breadth of research subjects in Missouri Ozark Forest Ecosystem Project provide circumstances conducive for addressing multidisciplinary questions. Our objectives were to (1) summarize the treatment and...

  3. The integrated melter off-gas treatment systems at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vance, R.F. [West Valley Nuclear Services Co., Inc., NY (United States)

    1995-02-01

    The West Valley Demonstration Project was established by Public Law 96-368, the {open_quotes}West Valley Demonstration Project Act, {close_quotes} on October 1, l980. Under this act, Congress directed the Department of Energy to carry out a high level radioactive waste management demonstration project at the Western New York Nuclear Service Center in West Valley, New York. The purpose of this project is to demonstrate solidification techniques which can be used for preparing high level radioactive waste for disposal. In addition to developing this technology, the West Valley Demonstration Project Act directs the Department of Energy to: (1) develop containers suitable for permanent disposal of the high level waste; (2) transport the solidified high level waste to a Federal repository; (3) dispose of low level and transuranic waste produced under the project; and (4) decontaminate and decommission the facilities and materials associated with project activities and the storage tanks originally used to store the liquid high level radioactive waste. The process of vitrification will be used to solidify the high level radioactive liquid wastes into borosilicate glass. This report describes the functions, the controlling design criteria, and the resulting design of the melter off-gas treatment systems which are used in the vitrification process.

  4. Ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters (Phase 3 B of -42-foot project). Volume 2, Appendixes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohn, N.P.; Ward, J.A.; Mayhew, H.L.; Word, J.Q.; Barrows, E.S.; Goodwin, S.M.; Lefkovitz, L.F. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1992-06-01

    The Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-662) authorized the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) San Francisco District, to deepen and widen the navigational channels of the Oakland Inner and Outer Harbors to accommodate deeper-draft vessels. The USACE is considering several disposal options for the dredged material removed during these channel improvements including open-water disposal. Dredged material proposed for open-water disposal must be evaluated to determine the potential impacts of the disposal activity on the water column and disposal site environments. The USACE requested that Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) conduct studies to evaluate open-water disposal options for Oakland Harbor sediments. This request developed into the Oakland Harbor Phase III Program. This is Volume 2 of a two-volume report that presents information gathered to determine the suitability of ocean disposal of sediments dredged from Oakland Harbor. This volume contains the Appendixes (A through N), which provide details of the data analyses and full presentation of the data and results.

  5. Mixed and low-level waste treatment facility project. Volume 3, Waste treatment technologies (Draft)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-01

    The technology information provided in this report is only the first step toward the identification and selection of process systems that may be recommended for a proposed mixed and low-level waste treatment facility. More specific information on each technology will be required to conduct the system and equipment tradeoff studies that will follow these preengineering studies. For example, capacity, maintainability, reliability, cost, applicability to specific waste streams, and technology availability must be further defined. This report does not currently contain all needed information; however, all major technologies considered to be potentially applicable to the treatment of mixed and low-level waste are identified and described herein. Future reports will seek to improve the depth of information on technologies.

  6. Results of the European research project 'Improving the effectiveness of cancer treatment with 3D Brachytherapy'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solc, J.; Sochor, V.; Selbach, H.-J.; Aubineau-Laniec, I.; Lourenco, V.; Gabris, F.; Grindborg, J.-E.; Kosunen, A.; Jarvinen, H.; Sipila, P.; Gouldstone, C.; Sander, T.; Sharpe, P.; Zeman, J.; Portugal, L.; Rodrigues, M.; Carlsson Tedgren, A.; Pooter de, M

    2011-01-01

    The project iMERA + T2.J06 'Improving the effectiveness of cancer treatment using 3D brachytherapy' was solved in the period 2008-2011 in collaboration of metrology institutes from 10 European Union countries, including participation of the Czech Republic. Its main objective was to create a means to ensure metrological quantity absorbed dose in water from brachyterapeutical (BT) sources enabling more accurate assessment of therapeutic benefit than using existing dosimetry protocols that are based on the quantity kerma in the air. This project is discussed on the poster.

  7. CLIMEX project: Report on the third year of treatment. May 1996 - December 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, A. [ed.

    1997-10-10

    CLIMEX (Climate change experiment) is an international, cooperative whole-ecosystem research project studying the response of entire forested catchments to increased CO{sub 2} and temperature. The project is located at Risdalsheia in the southernmost Norway and involves five catchments and employs multiple treatments and controls. These whole-catchment manipulation experiments are designed to allow quantification of the links between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and provide direct experimental evidence of the effect of climatic change on natural forests, terrestrial ecosystems and water resources. This report describes results from the third year of treatment, which was 1996. Significant responses in vegetation, soils and waters were measured. 41 refs., 35 figs., 11 tabs.

  8. Hepatitis C testing and treatment among active drug users in Amsterdam: results from the DUTCH-C project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindenburg, Catharina E. A.; Lambers, Femke A. E.; Urbanus, Anouk T.; Schinkel, Janke; Jansen, Peter L. M.; Krol, Anneke; Casteelen, Gerty; van Santen, Gerrit; van den Berg, Charlotte H. S. B.; Coutinho, Roel A.; Prins, Maria; Weegink, Christine J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Although hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment has shown to be effective, uptake of treatment among active drug users is still low. The Drug Users Treatment for Chronic Hepatitis-C project aims to offer active drug users in Amsterdam HCV testing and treatment using a multidisciplinary

  9. Sludge Treatment Project Engineered Container Retrieval And Transfer System Preliminary Design Hazard Analysis Supplement 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franz, G.R.; Meichle, R.H.

    2011-01-01

    This 'What/If' Hazards Analysis addresses hazards affecting the Sludge Treatment Project Engineered Container Retrieval and Transfer System (ECRTS) NPH and external events at the preliminary design stage. In addition, the hazards of the operation sequence steps for the mechanical handling operations in preparation of Sludge Transport and Storage Container (STSC), disconnect STSC and prepare STSC and Sludge Transport System (STS) for shipping are addressed.

  10. SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT ENGINEERED CONTAINER RETRIEVAL AND TRANSFER SYSTEM PRELIMINARY DESIGN HAZARD ANALYSIS SUPPLEMENT 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FRANZ GR; MEICHLE RH

    2011-07-18

    This 'What/If' Hazards Analysis addresses hazards affecting the Sludge Treatment Project Engineered Container Retrieval and Transfer System (ECRTS) NPH and external events at the preliminary design stage. In addition, the hazards of the operation sequence steps for the mechanical handling operations in preparation of Sludge Transport and Storage Container (STSC), disconnect STSC and prepare STSC and Sludge Transport System (STS) for shipping are addressed.

  11. The integrated melter off-gas treatment systems at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vance, R.F.

    1991-12-01

    The West Valley Demonstration project was established by an act of Congress in 1980 to solidify the high level radioactive liquid wastes produced from operation of the Western New York Nuclear Services Center from 1966 to 1972. The waste will be solidified as borosilicate glass. This report describes the functions, the controlling design criteria, and the resulting design of the melter off-gas treatment systems

  12. Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford Site facilities: Volume 1, The report and Appendix A, Progress report for the period October 1 to December 31, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-02-01

    This report documents recent progress on ground-water monitoring projects for four Hanford Site facilities: the 300 Area Process Trenches, the 183-H Solar Evaporation Basins, the 200 Area Low-Level Burial Grounds, and the Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste (NRDW) Landfill. The existing ground-water monitoring projects for the first two facilities named in the paragraph above are currently being expanded by adding new wells to the networks. During the reporting period, sampling of the existing wells continued on a monthly basis, and the analytical results for samples collected from September through November 1986 are included and discussed in this document. 8 refs., 41 figs., 7 tabs.

  13. Post Waterflood CO2 Miscible Flood in Light Oil, Fluvial-Dominated Deltaic Reservoir (Pre-Work and Project Proposal - Appendix)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bou-Mikael, Sami

    2002-02-05

    The main objective of the Port Neches Project was to determine the feasibility and producibility of CO2 miscible flooding techniques enhanced with horizontal drilling applied to a Fluvial Dominated Deltaic reservoir. The second was to disseminate the knowledge gained through established Technology Transfer mechanisms to support DOE's programmatic objectives of increasing domestic oil production and reducing abandonment of oil fields.

  14. Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project melter system preliminary design technical review meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eddy, T.L.; Raivo, B.D.; Soelberg, N.R.; Wiersholm, O.

    1995-02-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project sponsored a plasma are melter technical design review meeting to evaluate high-temperature melter system configurations for processing heterogeneous alpha-contaminated low-level radioactive waste (ALLW). Thermal processing experts representing Department of Energy contractors, the Environmental Protection Agency, and private sector companies participated in the review. The participants discussed issues and evaluated alternative configurations for three areas of the melter system design: plasma torch melters and graphite arc melters, offgas treatment options, and overall system configuration considerations. The Technical Advisory Committee for the review concluded that graphite arc melters are preferred over plasma torch melters for processing ALLW. Initiating involvement of stakeholders was considered essential at this stage of the design. For the offgas treatment system, the advisory committee raised the question whether to a use wet-dry or a dry-wet system. The committee recommended that the waste stream characterization, feed preparation, and the control system are essential design tasks for the high-temperature melter treatment system. The participants strongly recommended that a complete melter treatment system be assembled to conduct tests with nonradioactive surrogate waste material. A nonradioactive test bed would allow for inexpensive design and operational changes prior to assembling a system for radioactive waste treatment operations

  15. Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project melter system preliminary design technical review meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eddy, T.L.; Raivo, B.D.; Soelberg, N.R.; Wiersholm, O.

    1995-02-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project sponsored a plasma are melter technical design review meeting to evaluate high-temperature melter system configurations for processing heterogeneous alpha-contaminated low-level radioactive waste (ALLW). Thermal processing experts representing Department of Energy contractors, the Environmental Protection Agency, and private sector companies participated in the review. The participants discussed issues and evaluated alternative configurations for three areas of the melter system design: plasma torch melters and graphite arc melters, offgas treatment options, and overall system configuration considerations. The Technical Advisory Committee for the review concluded that graphite arc melters are preferred over plasma torch melters for processing ALLW. Initiating involvement of stakeholders was considered essential at this stage of the design. For the offgas treatment system, the advisory committee raised the question whether to a use wet-dry or a dry-wet system. The committee recommended that the waste stream characterization, feed preparation, and the control system are essential design tasks for the high-temperature melter treatment system. The participants strongly recommended that a complete melter treatment system be assembled to conduct tests with nonradioactive surrogate waste material. A nonradioactive test bed would allow for inexpensive design and operational changes prior to assembling a system for radioactive waste treatment operations.

  16. The Hanford Site solid waste treatment project; Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    The Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility will provide treatment and temporary storage (consisting of in-process storage) for radioactive and radioactive/hazardous mixed waste. This facility must be constructed and operated in compliance with all appropriate US Department of Energy (DOE) orders and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations. The WRAP Facility will examine and certify, segregate/sort, and treat for disposal suspect transuranic (TRU) wastes in drums and boxes placed in 20-yr retrievable storage since 1970; low-level radioactive mixed waste (RMW) generated and placed into storage at the Hanford Site since 1987; designated remote-handled wastes; and newly generated TRU and RMW wastes from high-level waste (HLW) recovery and processing operations. In order to accelerated the WRAP Project, a partitioning of the facility functions was done in two phases as a means to expedite those parts of the WRAP duties that were well understood and used established technology, while allowing more time to better define the processing functions needed for the remainder of WRAP. The WRAP Module 1 phase one, is to provide the necessary nondestructive examination and nondestructive assay services, as well as all transuranic package transporter (TRUPACT-2) shipping for both WRAP Project phases, with heating, ventilation, and air conditioning; change rooms; and administrative services. Phase two of the project, WRAP Module 2, will provide all necessary waste treatment facilities for disposal of solid wastes. 1 tab

  17. One System Integrated Project Team Progress in Coordinating Hanford Tank Farms and the Waste Treatment Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skwarek, Raymond J.; Harp, Ben J.; Duncan, Garth M.

    2013-01-01

    The One System Integrated Project Team (IPT) was formed at the Hanford Site in late 2011 as a way to improve coordination and itegration between the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and the Tank Operations Contractor (TOC) on interfaces between the two projects, and to eliminate duplication and exploit opportunities for synergy. The IPT is composed of jointly staffed groups that work on technical issues of mutal interest, front-end design and project definition, nuclear safety, plant engineering system integration, commissioning, planning and scheduling, and environmental, safety, health and quality (ESH&Q) areas. In the past year important progress has been made in a number of areas as the organization has matured and additional opportunities have been identified. Areas covered in this paper include: Support for development of the Office of Envirnmental Management (EM) framework document to progress the Office of River Protection's (ORP) River Protection Project (RPP) mission; Stewardship of the RPP flowsheet; Collaboration with Savannah River Site (SRS), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Operations programs integration; and, Further development of the waste acceptance criteria

  18. Cesium Ion Exchange Program at the Hanford River Protection Project Waste Treatment Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CHARLES, NASH

    2004-01-01

    The River Protection Project - Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant will use cesium ion exchange to remove 137Cs from Low Activity Waste down to 0.3 Ci/m3 in the Immobilized LAW, ILAW product. The project baseline for cesium ion exchange is the elutable SuperLig, R, 644, SL-644, resin registered trademark of IBC Advanced Technologies, Inc., American Fork, UT or the Department of Energy approved equivalent. SL-644 is solely available through IBC Advanced Technologies. To provide an alternative to this sole-source resin supply, the RPP--WTP initiated a three-stage process for selection and qualification of an alternative ion exchange resin for cesium removal in the RPPWTP. It was recommended that resorcinol formaldehyde RF be pursued as a potential alternative to SL-644

  19. Acute appendicitis in a duplicated appendix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christodoulidis, Grigorios; Symeonidis, Dimitrios; Spyridakis, Michail; Koukoulis, Georgios; Manolakis, Anastasios; Triantafylidis, Georgios; Tepetes, Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Double appendix represents an extremely rare and commonly “missed” diagnosis, often with life threatening consequences. PRESENTATION OF CASE In this case report we present an interesting case of operative treatment of acute appendicitis in a doubled vermiform appendix stemming operative pitfalls. A 23-year-old female was admitted to the emergency room department complaining of diffuse abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting over the past 36 h. As soon as the diagnosis of acute appendicitis was established a laparotomy via a McBurney incision was decided. Intraoperative findings included the presence of mild quantity of free fluid and surprisingly a thin non-inflamed appendiceal process. It was the preoperative ultrasound findings suggestive of acute appendicitis that dictated a more thorough investigation of the lower abdomen that led to the discovery of a second retrocecal inflamed appendix. Formal appendectomy was then performed for both processes. The patient had an uneventful recovery and was discharged on the fourth postoperative day. DISCUSSION Double appendix represents a challenging clinical scenario in cases of right lower quadrant pain. CONCLUSION Life threatening consequences with legal extensions can arise from the incomplete removal of both stumps. PMID:22922359

  20. CLIMEX project: Report on the second year of treatment. May 1995 - December 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, A. [ed.

    1996-09-01

    CLIMEX is an integrated, whole-ecosystem research project studying the response of entire forested catchments to increased CO{sub 2} and temperature. The whole-catchment manipulation experiments are designed to allow quantification of the links between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and provide direct experimental evidence on the effect of climate change on natural forests, terrestrial ecosystems and water resources. The site is located at Risdalsheia, southernmost Norway. Treatment began in April 1994. This report describes results obtained during 1995, the second year of treatment. Significant responses in vegetation, soils and waters were measured: (1) changes in plant CO{sub 2} uptake, gas exchange and community phenology, (2) changes in forest growth and nutrient status, (3) changes in ground vegetation and nutrients, (4) changes in mineralization of soil organic matter, (5) changes in soil fauna and biologically-mediated processes, (6) the effects on runoff water quality and quantity. 64 refs., 33 figs., 11 tabs.

  1. Field grouting summary report on the WAG 4 seeps 4 and 6 removal action project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 2: Appendixes A--D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-05-01

    During the summer of 1996, a unique multi-phase, multi-stage, low-pressure permeation grouting pilot program was performed inside portions of four unlined waste disposal trenches at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 4 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The project was deemed a non-time-critical removal action under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA); however, due to a history of heavy precipitation in the fall, the schedule was fast-tracked to meet an October 31, 1996 grouting completion data. The technical objective of the removal action was to reduce the off-site transport of Strontium 90 ( 90 Sr) by grouting portions of four waste disposal trenches believed to be responsible for over 70% of the 90 Sr leaving the site. A goal of the grouting operation was to reduce the average in situ hydraulic conductivity of the grouted waste materials to a value equal to or less than 1 X 10 -6 cm/sec. This target hydraulic conductivity value was established to be at least two orders of magnitude lower than that of the surrounding natural ground. The main report describes brief background to the project, describes and analyzes the grouting operations, draws conclusions from the work performed, and presents some of the lessons learned. Appendices contain: (A) pipe driving records; (B) casing grout injection records; (C) in-situ hydraulic conductivity testing records; and (D) grout quality control testing records

  2. Project ECHO: A Telementoring Program for Cervical Cancer Prevention and Treatment in Low-Resource Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa S. Lopez

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer incidence and mortality rates are significantly higher in low- and middle-income countries compared with the United States and other developed countries. This disparity is caused by decreased access to screening, often coupled with low numbers of trained providers offering cancer prevention and treatment services. However, similar disparities are also found in underserved areas of the United States, such as the Texas-Mexico border, where cervical cancer mortality rates are 30% higher than in the rest of Texas. To address these issues, we have adopted the Project ECHO (Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes program, a low-cost telementoring model previously proven to be successful in increasing local capacity, improving patient management skills, and ultimately improving patient outcomes in rural and underserved areas. We use the Project ECHO model to educate local providers in the management of cervical dysplasia in a low-resource region of Texas and have adapted it to inform strategies for the management of advanced cervical and breast cancer in Latin America and sub-Saharan Africa. This innovative approach, using ECHO, is part of a larger strategy to enhance clinical skills and develop collaborative projects between academic centers and partners in low-resource regions.

  3. A simple method to back-project isocenter dose of radiotherapy treatments using EPID transit dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silveira, T.B.; Cerbaro, B.Q.; Rosa, L.A.R. da, E-mail: thiago.fisimed@gmail.com, E-mail: tbsilveira@inca.gov.br [Instituto de Radioproteção e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro - RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this work was to implement a simple algorithm to evaluate isocenter dose in a phantom using the back-projected transmitted dose acquired using an Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) available in a Varian Trilogy accelerator with two nominal 6 and 10 MV photon beams. This algorithm was developed in MATLAB language, to calibrate EPID measured dose in absolute dose, using a deconvolution process, and to incorporate all scattering and attenuation contributions due to photon interactions with phantom. Modeling process was simplified by using empirical curve adjustments to describe the contribution of scattering and attenuation effects. The implemented algorithm and method were validated employing 19 patient treatment plans with 104 clinical irradiation fields projected on the phantom used. Results for EPID absolute dose calibration by deconvolution have showed percent deviations lower than 1%. Final method validation presented average percent deviations between isocenter doses calculated by back-projection and isocenter doses determined with ionization chamber of 1,86% (SD of 1,00%) and -0,94% (SD of 0,61%) for 6 and 10 MV, respectively. Normalized field by field analysis showed deviations smaller than 2% for 89% of all data for 6 MV beams and 94% for 10 MV beams. It was concluded that the proposed algorithm possesses sufficient accuracy to be used for in vivo dosimetry, being sensitive to detect dose delivery errors bigger than 3-4% for conformal and intensity modulated radiation therapy techniques. (author)

  4. TAX TREATMENT OF CARBON CREDIT OPERATIONS IN BRAZILIAN COMPANIES WITH CDM PROJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanderlei dos Santos

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim in this study is to identify the tax treatment applied to carbon credit operations in Brazilian companies that are developing projects in the context of the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM. Therefore, an exploratory research with a qualitative approach was developed. Data were collected with the help of questionnaire, forwarded to all Brazilian companies with CDM projects that received approval from the Inter-Ministerial Commission on Global Climate Change (CIMGC without safeguards, according to the list of the Brazilian Ministry of Science and Technology. Out of 117 companies listed, only five answered the research instrument, which represents an accessibility sample. The results show that, as for the tax treatment applied in the companies under analysis, IRPJ and CSLL should be charged on carbon credit operations. Regarding PIS, COFINS, ISS, some companies considered that these taxes are due and others that they are not. There is a consensus, though, about the fact that ICMS and IOF should not be charged. In conclusion, no uniform understanding exists as of yet about due taxes in the research sample, as no specific fiscal legislation exists yet on carbon credits in Brazil.

  5. Project C-018H, 242-A Evaporator/PUREX Plant Process Condensate Treatment Facility, functional design criteria. Revision 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, N.

    1995-01-01

    This document provides the Functional Design Criteria (FDC) for Project C-018H, the 242-A Evaporator and Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant Condensate Treatment Facility (Also referred to as the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility [ETF]). The project will provide the facilities to treat and dispose of the 242-A Evaporator process condensate (PC), the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant process condensate (PDD), and the PUREX Plant ammonia scrubber distillate (ASD)

  6. Project C-018H, 242-A Evaporator/PUREX Plant Process Condensate Treatment Facility, functional design criteria. Revision 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, N.

    1995-05-02

    This document provides the Functional Design Criteria (FDC) for Project C-018H, the 242-A Evaporator and Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant Condensate Treatment Facility (Also referred to as the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility [ETF]). The project will provide the facilities to treat and dispose of the 242-A Evaporator process condensate (PC), the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant process condensate (PDD), and the PUREX Plant ammonia scrubber distillate (ASD).

  7. Report on the behalf of the Commission for sustainable development and land planning on the bill project, in new reading, putting an end to the search for as well as to the exploitation of hydrocarbons, and bearing various applications related to energy and to the environment (nr 370) + Appendix to the report: Text from the Commission on Sustainable Development and Land Planning - Nr 417

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colas-Roy, Jean-Charles

    2017-01-01

    While considering objectives of limitation of temperature increase, and in order to limit the use of fossil energies likes conventional and non-conventional hydrocarbons, the exploitation of which would result in an increase of CO 2 emissions, France has to modify its rules related to hydrocarbon extraction. This bill project therefore aims at programming the end of the exploration and of the exploitation of hydrocarbons. As mentioned, some articles of this bill project concern energy regulation, or can be a transposition of a European directive. This document reports the exchanges between the members of the Commission for sustainable development and land planning during the examination of the bill project and the examination of each articles. The modifications made to each article are reported in the appendix

  8. Field grouting summary report on the WAG 4 seeps 4 and 6 removal action project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 3. Appendixes E and F

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    During the summer of 1996, a unique multi-phase, multi-stage, low-pressure permeation grouting pilot program was performed inside portions of four unlined waste disposal trenches at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 4 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The project was deemed a non-time-critical removal action under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA); however, due to a history of heavy precipitation in the fall, the schedule was fast-tracked to meet an October 31, 1996 grouting completion date. The technical objective of the removal action was to reduce the off-site transport of j Strontium 90 ({sup 90}Sr) by grouting portions of four waste disposal trenches believed to be responsible for over 70 percent of the {sup 90}Sr leaving the site. A goal of the grouting operation was to reduce the average in situ hydraulic conductivity of the grouted waste materials to a value equal to or less than 1 x 10{sup -6} cm/sec. This target hydraulic conductivity value was established to be at least two orders of magnitude lower than that of the surrounding natural ground.

  9. Carbon dioxide and climate. [Appendix includes names and addresses of the Principal Investigators for the research projects funded in FY1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    Global climate change is a serious environmental concern, and the US has developed An Action Agenda'' to deal with it. At the heart of the US effort is the US Global Change Research Program (USGCRP), which has been developed by the Committee on Earth and Environmental Sciences (CEES) of the Federal Coordinating Council for Sciences, Engineering, and Technology (FCCSET). The USGCRP will provide the scientific basis for sound policy making on the climate-change issue. The DOE contribution to the USGCRP is the Carbon Dioxide Research Program, which now places particular emphasis on the rapid improvement of the capability to predict global and regional climate change. DOE's Carbon Dioxide Research Program has been addressing the carbon dioxide-climate change connection for more than twelve years and has provided a solid scientific foundation for the USGCRP. The expansion of the DOE effort reflects the increased attention that the Department has placed on the issue and is reflected in the National Energy Strategy (NES) that was released in 1991. This Program Summary describes projects funded by the Carbon Dioxide Research Program during FY 1991 and gives a brief overview of objectives, organization, and accomplishments. The Environmental Sciences Division of the Office of Health and Environmental Research, Office of Energy Research supports a Carbon Dioxide Research Program to determine the scientific linkage between the rise of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, especially carbon dioxide, and climate and vegetation change. One facet is the Core CO{sub 2} Program, a pioneering program that DOE established more than 10 years ago to understand and predict the ways that fossil-fuel burning could affect atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration, global climate, and the Earth's biosphere. Major research areas are: global carbon cycle; climate detection and models of climate change; vegetation research; resource analysis; and, information and integration.

  10. Combining Motivational Interviewing with Cognitive-Behavioral Treatments for Substance Abuse: Lessons from the COMBINE Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyers, Theresa B.; Houck, Jon

    2011-01-01

    Motivational Interviewing began as a treatment for substance misuse and has strong empirical support as an intervention for these disorders. It is very common for MI to be combined with other types of treatment when it is used for substance abuse, and this article focuses on one example of this: the COMBINE Research Project. We examine the…

  11. The Sagebrush Steppe Treatment Evaluation Project (SageSTEP): a test of state-and-transition theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    James D. McIver; Mark Brunson; Steve C. Bunting; Jeanne Chambers; Nora Devoe; Paul Doescher; James Grace; Dale Johnson; Steve Knick; Richard Miller; Mike Pellant; Fred Pierson; David Pyke; Kim Rollins; Bruce Roundy; Eugene Schupp; Robin Tausch; David Turner

    2010-01-01

    The Sagebrush Steppe Treatment Evaluation Project (SageSTEP) is a comprehensive, integrated, long-term study that evaluates the ecological effects of fire and fire surrogate treatments designed to reduce fuel and to restore sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) communities of the Great Basin and surrounding areas. SageSTEP has several features that make it ideal for testing...

  12. The Philadelphia Glaucoma Detection and Treatment Project: Detection Rates and Initial Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waisbourd, Michael; Pruzan, Noelle L; Johnson, Deiana; Ugorets, Angela; Crews, John E; Saaddine, Jinan B; Henderer, Jeffery D; Hark, Lisa A; Katz, L Jay

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate the detection rates of glaucoma-related diagnoses and the initial treatments received in the Philadelphia Glaucoma Detection and Treatment Project, a community-based initiative aimed at improving the detection, treatment, and follow-up care of individuals at risk for glaucoma. Retrospective analysis. A total of 1649 individuals at risk for glaucoma who were examined and treated in 43 community centers located in underserved communities of Philadelphia. Individuals were enrolled if they were African American aged ≥50 years, were any other adult aged ≥60 years, or had a family history of glaucoma. After attending an informational glaucoma workshop, participants underwent a targeted glaucoma examination including an ocular, medical, and family history; visual acuity testing, intraocular pressure (IOP) measurement, and corneal pachymetry; slit-lamp and optic nerve examination; automated visual field testing; and fundus color photography. If indicated, treatments included selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT), laser peripheral iridotomy (LPI), or IOP-lowering medications. Follow-up examinations were scheduled at the community sites after 4 to 6 weeks or 4 to 6 months, depending on the clinical scenario. Detection rates of glaucoma-related diagnoses and types of treatments administered. Of the 1649 individuals enrolled, 645 (39.1%) received a glaucoma-related diagnosis; 20.0% (n = 330) were identified as open-angle glaucoma (OAG) suspects, 9.2% (n = 151) were identified as having narrow angles (or as a primary angle closure/suspect), and 10.0% (n = 164) were diagnosed with glaucoma, including 9.0% (n = 148) with OAG and 1.0% (n = 16) with angle-closure glaucoma. Overall, 39.0% (n = 64 of 164) of those diagnosed with glaucoma were unaware of their diagnosis. A total of 196 patients (11.9%) received glaucoma-related treatment, including 84 (5.1%) who underwent LPI, 13 (0.8%) who underwent SLT, and 103 (6.2%) who were prescribed IOP

  13. Treatment techniques for removing natural radionuclides from drinking water. Final report of the TENAWA project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annanmaeki, M.; Turtiainen, T.

    2000-01-01

    TENAWA project (Treatment Techniques for Removing Natural Radionuclides from Drinking Water) was carried out on a cost-shared basic with the European Commission (CEC) under the supervision of Directorate-General XII, Radiation Protection Unit. TENAWA project was started because in several European countries ground water supplies may contain high amounts of natural radionuclides. During the project both laboratory and field research was performed in order to test the applicability of different equipment and techniques for removing natural radionuclides from drinking water. The measurable objectives of the project were: to give recommendations on the most suitable methods for removing radon ( 222 Rn), uranium ( 238,234 U), radium ( 226 , 228 Ra), lead ( 210 Pb) and polonium ( 210 Po) from drinking water of different qualities (i.e. soft, hard, iron-, manganese- and humus-rich, acidic) to test commercially available equipment for its ability to remove radionuclides; to find new materials, absorbents and membranes effective in the removal of radionuclides and to issue guidelines for the treatment and disposal of radioactive wastes produced in water treatment. Radon could be removed efficiently (>95%) from domestic water supplies by both aeration and granular activated carbon (GAC) filtration. Defects in technical reliability or radon removal efficiency were observed in some aerators. The significant drawback of GAC filtration was the elevated gamma dose rates (up to 120 μSv/h) near the filter and the radioactivity of spent GAC. Aeration was found to be a suitable method for removing radon at waterworks, too. The removal efficiencies at waterworks where the aeration process was designed to remove radon or carbon dioxide were 67-99%. If the aeration process was properly designed, removal efficiencies higher than 95% could be attained. Uranium could best be removed (>95%) with strong basic anion exchange resins and radium by applying strong acidic cation exchange resins

  14. Treatment techniques for removing natural radionuclides from drinking water. Final report of the TENAWA project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annanmaeki, M.; Turtiainen, T. [eds.

    2000-01-01

    TENAWA project (Treatment Techniques for Removing Natural Radionuclides from Drinking Water) was carried out on a cost-shared basic with the European Commission (CEC) under the supervision of Directorate-General XII, Radiation Protection Unit. TENAWA project was started because in several European countries ground water supplies may contain high amounts of natural radionuclides. During the project both laboratory and field research was performed in order to test the applicability of different equipment and techniques for removing natural radionuclides from drinking water. The measurable objectives of the project were: to give recommendations on the most suitable methods for removing radon ({sup 222}Rn), uranium ({sup 238,234}U), radium ({sup 226}, {sup 228}Ra), lead ({sup 210}Pb) and polonium ({sup 210}Po) from drinking water of different qualities (i.e. soft, hard, iron-, manganese- and humus-rich, acidic) to test commercially available equipment for its ability to remove radionuclides; to find new materials, absorbents and membranes effective in the removal of radionuclides and to issue guidelines for the treatment and disposal of radioactive wastes produced in water treatment. Radon could be removed efficiently (>95%) from domestic water supplies by both aeration and granular activated carbon (GAC) filtration. Defects in technical reliability or radon removal efficiency were observed in some aerators. The significant drawback of GAC filtration was the elevated gamma dose rates (up to 120 {mu}Sv/h) near the filter and the radioactivity of spent GAC. Aeration was found to be a suitable method for removing radon at waterworks, too. The removal efficiencies at waterworks where the aeration process was designed to remove radon or carbon dioxide were 67-99%. If the aeration process was properly designed, removal efficiencies higher than 95% could be attained. Uranium could best be removed (>95%) with strong basic anion exchange resins and radium by applying strong

  15. Mixed Waste Treatment Project: LLNL and LANL computer simulations of integrated flowsheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camp, D.W.; Dietsche, L.J.; Upadhye, R.S.; Borduin, L.C.; Pendergrass, J.A.; Thompson, T.K.

    1994-01-01

    Computer simulations of mixed waste processing flowsheets using ASPEN PLUS process simulation software were completed by a joint Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory/Los National Laboratory (LLNL/LANL) effort for the US Department of Energy Mixed Waste Treatment Project. The LLNL model used relatively detailed synthesized chemical ''cocktails'' to simulate waste streams. The LANL approach used less detail but made extensive use of simple steam splitters and thermodynamic coal models for combustible waste compositions. The two modeling approaches agreed within 16% for the product streams and within 25% for the auxiliary fuel rate. The discrepancy between the auxiliary fuel rates was traced to different methods of handling organics in lab packs and scintillation vials with the process models. The ASPEN models are valuable tools for evaluating waste processing flowsheets

  16. Appendix C: GLEES Macroinvertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    B. C. Kondratieff

    1994-01-01

    This Appendix identifies macroinvertebrate species found in streams and lakes at GLEES during a preliminary qualitative survey conducted in the summer of 1988 by Dr. Boris Kondratieff. The littoral zones of each lake and each stream were sampled by hand-picking and with a triangle net. Insect voucher specimens are maintained in the Gillette Entomological Museum at...

  17. Community-based MDR-TB care project improves treatment initiation in patients diagnosed with MDR-TB in Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wai, Pyae Phyo; Shewade, Hemant Deepak; Kyaw, Nang Thu Thu; Thein, Saw; Si Thu, Aung; Kyaw, Khine Wut Yee; Aye, Nyein Nyein; Phyo, Aye Mon; Maung, Htet Myet Win; Soe, Kyaw Thu; Aung, Si Thu

    2018-01-01

    The Union in collaboration with national TB programme (NTP) started the community-based MDR-TB care (CBMDR-TBC) project in 33 townships of upper Myanmar to improve treatment initiation and treatment adherence. Patients with MDR-TB diagnosed/registered under NTP received support through the project staff, in addition to the routine domiciliary care provided by NTP staff. Each township had a project nurse exclusively for MDR-TB and 30 USD per month (max. for 4 months) were provided to the patient as a pre-treatment support. To assess whether CBMDR-TBC project's support improved treatment initiation. In this cohort study (involving record review) of all diagnosed MDR-TB between January 2015 and June 2016 in project townships, CBMDR-TBC status was categorized as "receiving support" if date of project initiation in patient's township was before the date of diagnosis and "not receiving support", if otherwise. Cox proportional hazards regression (censored on 31 Dec 2016) was done to identify predictors of treatment initiation. Of 456 patients, 57% initiated treatment: 64% and 56% among patients "receiving support (n = 208)" and "not receiving support (n = 228)" respectively (CBMDR-TBC status was not known in 20 (4%) patients due to missing diagnosis dates). Among those initiated on treatment (n = 261), median (IQR) time to initiate treatment was 38 (20, 76) days: 31 (18, 50) among patients "receiving support" and 50 (26,101) among patients "not receiving support". After adjusting other potential confounders (age, sex, region, HIV, past history of TB treatment), patients "receiving support" had 80% higher chance of initiating treatment [aHR (0.95 CI): 1.8 (1.3, 2.3)] when compared to patients "not receiving support". In addition, age 15-54 years, previous history of TB and being HIV negative were independent predictors of treatment initiation. Receiving support under CBMDR-TBC project improved treatment initiation: it not only improved the proportion initiated but also

  18. The vermiform appendix: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Andrew; Muhleman, Mitchel; Gielecki, Jerzy; Matusz, Petru; Tubbs, R Shane; Loukas, Marios

    2013-10-01

    New research on the vermiform appendix has shed light on its function. In further understanding the function of the appendix, this information should not negatively impact the clinical judgment in the event of appendicitis. Although the appendix and its pathology have been noted for centuries, it still presents a challenge in the operating room. The most common emergency surgical procedure performed is an appendectomy. Its highly variable position within the abdomen can cause confusion for clinicians. However, improved imaging modalities have heightened the physician's ability to diagnose disease of this organ. This article reviews germane literature regarding the human vermiform appendix. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Final Treatment Center Project for Liquid and Wet Radioactive Waste in Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravarik, K.; Stubna, M.; Pekar, A.; Krajc, T.; Zatkulak, M.; Holicka, Z.; Slezak, M.

    2006-01-01

    The Final Treatment Center (FTC) for Mochovce nuclear power plant (NPP) is designed for treatment and final conditioning of radioactive liquid and wet waste produced from plant operation. Mochovce NNP uses a Russian VVER-440 type reactor. Treated wastes comprise radioactive concentrates, spent resin and sludge. VUJE Inc. as an experienced company in field of treatment of radioactive waste in Slovakia has been chosen as main contractor for technological part of FTC. This paper describes the capacity, flow chart, overall waste flow and parameters of the main components in the FTC. The initial project was submitted for approval to the Slovak Electric plc. in 2003. The design and manufacture of main components were performed in 2004 and 2005. FTC construction work started early in 2004. Initial non-radioactive testing of the system is planned for summer 2006 and then radioactive tests are to be followed. A one-year trial operation of facility is planned for completion in 2007. SE - VYZ will be operates the FTC during trial operation and after its completion. SE - VYZ is subsidiary company of Slovak Electric plc. and it is responsible for treatment with radioactive waste and spent fuel in the Slovak republic. SE - VYZ has, besides of other significant experience with operation of Jaslovske Bohunice Treatment Centre. The overall capacity of the FTC is 870 m 3 /year of concentrates and 40 m 3 /year of spent resin and sludge. Bituminization and cementation were provided as main technologies for treatment of these wastes. Treatment of concentrate is performed by bituminization. Concentrate and bitumen are metered into a thin film evaporator with rotating wiping blades. Surplus water is evaporated and concentrate salts are embedded in bitumen. Bitumen product is discharged into 200 l steel drums. Spent resin and sludge are decanted, dried and mixed with bitumen. These mixtures are also discharged into 200 l steel drums. Drums are moved along bituminization line on a roller

  20. Report to Congress on the U.S. Department of Energy`s Environmental Management Science Program: Research funded and its linkages to environmental cleanup problems, and high out-year cost environmental management project descriptions. Volume 3 of 3 -- Appendix C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-04-01

    The Department of Energy`s Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) serves as a catalyst for the application of scientific discoveries to the development and deployment of technologies that will lead to reduction of the costs and risks associated with cleaning up the nation`s nuclear complex. Appendix C provides details about each of the Department`s 82 high cost projects and lists the EMSP research awards with potential to impact each of these projects. The high cost projects listed are those having costs greater than $50 million in constant 1998 dollars from the year 2007 and beyond, based on the March 1998 Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure Draft data, and having costs of quantities of material associated with an environmental management problem area. The high cost project information is grouped by operations office and organized by site and project code. Each operations office section begins with a list of research needs associated with that operations office. Potentially related research awards are listed by problem area in the Index of Research Awards by Environmental Management Problem Area, which can be found at the end of appendices B and C. For projects that address high risks to the public, workers, or the environment, refer also the Health/Ecology/Risk problem area awards. Research needs are programmatic or technical challenges that may benefit from knowledge gained through basic research.

  1. SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT PHASE 1 SLUDGE STORAGE OPTIONS ASSESSMENT OF T PLANT VERSUS ALTERNATE STORAGE FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RUTHERFORD WW; GEUTHER WJ; STRANKMAN MR; CONRAD EA; RHOADARMER DD; BLACK DM; POTTMEYER JA

    2009-04-29

    The CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) has recommended to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) a two phase approach for removal and storage (Phase 1) and treatment and packaging for offsite shipment (Phase 2) of the sludge currently stored within the 105-K West Basin. This two phased strategy enables early removal of sludge from the 105-K West Basin by 2015, allowing remediation of historical unplanned releases of waste and closure of the 100-K Area. In Phase 1, the sludge currently stored in the Engineered Containers and Settler Tanks within the 105-K West Basin will be transferred into sludge transport and storage containers (STSCs). The STSCs will be transported to an interim storage facility. In Phase 2, sludge will be processed (treated) to meet shipping and disposal requirements and the sludge will be packaged for final disposal at a geologic repository. The purpose of this study is to evaluate two alternatives for interim Phase 1 storage of K Basin sludge. The cost, schedule, and risks for sludge storage at a newly-constructed Alternate Storage Facility (ASF) are compared to those at T Plant, which has been used previously for sludge storage. Based on the results of the assessment, T Plant is recommended for Phase 1 interim storage of sludge. Key elements that support this recommendation are the following: (1) T Plant has a proven process for storing sludge; (2) T Plant storage can be implemented at a lower incremental cost than the ASF; and (3) T Plant storage has a more favorable schedule profile, which provides more float, than the ASF. Underpinning the recommendation of T Plant for sludge storage is the assumption that T Plant has a durable, extended mission independent of the K Basin sludge interim storage mission. If this assumption cannot be validated and the operating costs of T Plant are borne by the Sludge Treatment Project, the conclusions and recommendations of this study would change. The following decision-making strategy, which is

  2. SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT PHASE 1 SLUDGE STORAGE OPTIONS. ASSESSMENT OF T PLANT VERSUS ALTERNATE STORAGE FACILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutherford, W.W.; Geuther, W.J.; Strankman, M.R.; Conrad, E.A.; Rhoadarmer, D.D.; Black, D.M.; Pottmeyer, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    The CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) has recommended to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) a two phase approach for removal and storage (Phase 1) and treatment and packaging for offsite shipment (Phase 2) of the sludge currently stored within the 105-K West Basin. This two phased strategy enables early removal of sludge from the 105-K West Basin by 2015, allowing remediation of historical unplanned releases of waste and closure of the 100-K Area. In Phase 1, the sludge currently stored in the Engineered Containers and Settler Tanks within the 105-K West Basin will be transferred into sludge transport and storage containers (STSCs). The STSCs will be transported to an interim storage facility. In Phase 2, sludge will be processed (treated) to meet shipping and disposal requirements and the sludge will be packaged for final disposal at a geologic repository. The purpose of this study is to evaluate two alternatives for interim Phase 1 storage of K Basin sludge. The cost, schedule, and risks for sludge storage at a newly-constructed Alternate Storage Facility (ASF) are compared to those at T Plant, which has been used previously for sludge storage. Based on the results of the assessment, T Plant is recommended for Phase 1 interim storage of sludge. Key elements that support this recommendation are the following: (1) T Plant has a proven process for storing sludge; (2) T Plant storage can be implemented at a lower incremental cost than the ASF; and (3) T Plant storage has a more favorable schedule profile, which provides more float, than the ASF. Underpinning the recommendation of T Plant for sludge storage is the assumption that T Plant has a durable, extended mission independent of the K Basin sludge interim storage mission. If this assumption cannot be validated and the operating costs of T Plant are borne by the Sludge Treatment Project, the conclusions and recommendations of this study would change. The following decision-making strategy, which is

  3. HANFORD DST THERMAL & SEISMIC PROJECT DYTRAN ANALYSIS OF SEISMICALLY INDUCED FLUID STRUCTURE INTERACTION IN A HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL PRIMARY TANK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MACKEY TC; RINKER MW; ABATT FG

    2007-02-14

    Revision 0A of this document contains new Appendices C and D. Appendix C contains a re-analysis of the rigid and flexible tanks at the 460 in. liquid level and was motivated by recommendations from a Project Review held on March 20-21, 2006 (Rinker et al Appendix E of RPP-RPT-28968 Rev 1). Appendix D contains the benchmark solutions in support of the analyses in Appendix C.

  4. Test Plan: Sludge Treatment Project Corrosion Process Chemistry Follow-on Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Poloski, Adam P.

    2007-08-17

    This test plan was prepared by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under contract with Fluor Hanford (FH). The test plan describes the scope and conditions to be used to perform laboratory-scale testing of the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) hydrothermal treatment of K Basin sludge. The STP, managed for the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) by FH, was created to design and operate a process to eliminate uranium metal from the sludge prior to packaging for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) by using high temperature liquid water to accelerate the reaction, produce uranium dioxide from the uranium metal, and safely discharge the hydrogen. The proposed testing builds on the approach and laboratory test findings for both K Basin sludge and simulated sludge garnered during prior testing from September 2006 to March 2007. The outlined testing in this plan is designed to yield further understanding of the nature of the chemical reactions, the effects of compositional and process variations and the effectiveness of various strategies to mitigate the observed high shear strength phenomenon observed during the prior testing. These tests are designed to provide process validation and refinement vs. process development and design input. The expected outcome is to establish a level of understanding of the chemistry such that successful operating strategies and parameters can be implemented within the confines of the existing STP corrosion vessel design. In July 2007, the DOE provided direction to FH regarding significant changes to the scope of the overall STP. As a result of the changes, FH directed PNNL to stop work on most of the planned activities covered in this test plan. Therefore, it is unlikely the testing described here will be performed. However, to preserve the test strategy and details developed to date, the test plan has been published.

  5. Hydrothermal Testing of K Basin Sludge and N Reactor Fuel at Sludge Treatment Project Operating Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Thornton, Brenda M.

    2007-03-30

    The Sludge Treatment Project (STP), managed for the U. S. DOE by Fluor Hanford (FH), was created to design and operate a process to eliminate uranium metal from K Basin sludge prior to packaging for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The STP process uses high temperature liquid water to accelerate the reaction, produce uranium dioxide from the uranium metal, and safely discharge the hydrogen. Under nominal process conditions, the sludge will be heated in pressurized water at 185°C for as long as 72 hours to assure the complete reaction (corrosion) of up to 0.25-inch diameter uranium metal pieces. Under contract to FH, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted bench-scale testing of the STP hydrothermal process in November and December 2006. Five tests (~50 ml each) were conducted in sealed, un-agitated reaction vessels under the hydrothermal conditions (e.g., 7 to 72 h at 185°C) of the STP corrosion process using radioactive sludge samples collected from the K East Basin and particles/coupons of N Reactor fuel also taken from the K Basins. The tests were designed to evaluate and understand the chemical changes that may be occurring and the effects that any changes would have on sludge rheological properties. The tests were not designed to evaluate engineering aspects of the process. The hydrothermal treatment affected the chemical and physical properties of the sludge. In each test, significant uranium compound phase changes were identified, resulting from dehydration and chemical reduction reactions. Physical properties of the sludge were significantly altered from their initial, as-settled sludge values, including, shear strength, settled density, weight percent water, and gas retention.

  6. Parcperdue Geopressure -- Geothermal Project: Appendix E

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweezy, L.R.

    1981-10-05

    The mechanical and transport properties and characteristics of rock samples obtained from DOW-DOE L.R. SWEEZY NO. 1 TEST WELL at the Parcperdue Geopressure/Geothermal Site have been investigated in the laboratory. Elastic moduli, compressibility, uniaxial compaction coefficient, strength, creep parameters, permeability, acoustic velocities (all at reservoir conditions) and changes in these quantities induced by simulated reservoir production have been obtained from tests on several sandstone and shale samples from different depths. Most important results are that the compaction coefficients are approximately an order of magnitude lower than those generally accepted for the reservoir sand in the Gulf Coast area and that the creep behavior is significant. Geologic characterization includes lithological description, SEM micrographs and mercury intrusion tests to obtain pore distributions. Petrographic analysis shows that approximately half of the total sand interval has excellent reservoir potential and that most of the effective porosity in the Cib Jeff Sand is formed by secondary porosity development.

  7. Parcperdue Geopressure--Geothermal Project: Appendix B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweezy, L.R.

    1981-10-05

    The reservoir models used to perform the drawdown and buildup pressure analyses consist of analytic forms in lieu of the finite difference or numeric simulator types. Analytic models are derived from solutions of the diffusion equation which relate a pressure response with time and distance in the reservoir for a specified flow system. Solutions of the diffusion equation are obtained through mathematical methods such as Laplace transforms, Fourier transforms, Neuman's product techniques and Green's functions. Before an analytic solution is derived, the diffusivity equation is expressed in terms of dimensionless potential (m{sub D}), dimensionless distance (r{sub D}) and dimensionless time (t{sub D}). For the cylindrical coordinate case, the diffusivity equation in dimensionless form for a geopressured system is given.

  8. Treatment plan for aqueous/organic/decontamination wastes under the Oak Ridge Reservation FFCA Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Backus, P.M.; Benson, C.E.; Gilbert, V.P.

    1994-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-Region IV have entered into a Federal Facility Compliance Agreement (FFCA) which seeks to facilitate the treatment of low-level mixed wastes currently stored at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in violation of the Resource, Conservation and Recovery Act Land Disposal Restrictions. The FFCA establishes schedules for DOE to identify treatment for wastes, referred to as Appendix B wastes, that current have no identified or existing capacity for treatment. A development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation (DDT ampersand E) program was established to provide the support necessary to identify treatment methods for mixed was meeting the Appendix B criteria. The Program has assembled project teams to address treatment development needs for major categories of the Appendix B wastes based on the waste characteristics and possible treatment technologies. The Aqueous, Organic, and Decontamination (A OE D) project team was established to identify pretreatment options for aqueous and organic wastes which will render the waste acceptable for treatment in existing waste treatment facilities and to identify the processes to decontaminate heterogeneous debris waste. In addition, the project must also address the treatment of secondary waste generated by other DDT ampersand E projects. This report details the activities to be performed under the A OE D Project in support of the identification, selection, and evaluation of treatment processes. The goals of this plan are (1) to determine the major aqueous and organic waste streams requiring treatment, (2) to determine the treatment steps necessary to make the aqueous and organic waste acceptable for treatment in existing treatment facilities on the ORR or off-site, and (3) to determine the processes necessary to decontaminate heterogeneous wastes that are considered debris

  9. MDR-TB treatment as prevention: The projected population-level impact of expanded treatment for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kendall, Emily A.; Azman, Andrew S.; Cobelens, Frank G.; Dowdy, David W.

    2017-01-01

    In 2013, approximately 480,000 people developed active multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), while only 97,000 started MDR-TB treatment. We sought to estimate the impact of improving access to MDR-TB diagnosis and treatment, under multiple diagnostic algorithm and treatment regimen scenarios,

  10. Evaluation of surface water treatment and discharge options for the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyette, M.L.; MacDonell, M.M.

    1992-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), under its Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program, is responsible for conducting response actions at the Weldon Spring site in St. Charles County, Missouri. The site consists of two noncontiguous areas: (1) the chemical plant area, which includes four raffinate pits and two small ponds, and (2) a 3.6-ha (9-acre) quarry located about 6.4 km (4 mi) southwest of the chemical plant area. Both of these areas became chemically and radioactively contaminated as a result of processing and disposal activities that took place from the 1940s through 1960s. The Weldon Spring site, located about 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis, is listed on the National Priorities List of the US Environmental Protection Agency. Nitroaromatic explosives were processed by the Army at the chemical plant area during the 1940s, and radioactive materials were processed by DOE's predecessor agency (the Atomic Energy Commission) during the 1950s and 1960s. Overall remediation of the Weldon Spring site is being addressed through the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project, and it consists of several components. One component is the management of radioactively and chemically contaminated surface water impoundments at the chemical plant area -- i.e., the four raffinate pits, Frog Pond, and Ash Pond which was addressed under a separate action and documented in an engineering evaluation/cost analysis report. This report discusses the evaluation of surface water treatment at the Weldon Spring site

  11. Performance of predictors: evaluating sustainability in community-directed treatment projects of the African programme for onchocerciasis control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amazigo, Uche; Okeibunor, Joseph; Matovu, Victoria; Zouré, Honorat; Bump, Jesse; Seketeli, Azodoga

    2007-05-01

    The predictors of sustainability of community-directed treatment with ivermectin (CDTI) at four implementation levels were evaluated in 41 African Programme for Onchocerciasis Control (APOC) projects, encompassing 492 communities in 10 countries. A model protocol provided information on indicators corresponding to nine aspects of a project that is likely to be sustainable at community level after the cessation of external support. Six of the nine aspects had components of community ownership as predictors of project sustainability. Quantitative and qualitative assessments were used to obtain individual community scores and an overall sustainability score for each project graded on a scale of 0-4. Of the 41 projects evaluated, 70% scored "satisfactorily" to "highly sustainable" at the community level. We found variations among countries and that health system weaknesses could hamper community efforts in sustaining a project, such as when ivermectin was delivered late. Community ownership was of primary importance to the community score, and the community-level scores correlated with overall project sustainability. The therapeutic coverage achieved in each project correlated with the ratio of volunteer ivermectin distributors per population served. Surprisingly, the performance of these distributors was not affected by the direct incentives offered, and coverage appeared to be highest when cash or in-kind compensation was not given at all. Although further research is required, anecdotal evidence pointed to diverse indirect benefits for distributors-political goodwill, personal satisfaction and altruistic fulfillment. The results demonstrate that community ownership is among the important determining factors of sustainability of community-based programmes.

  12. TINY HOUSE VILLAGE PROJECT : Creating a community development project

    OpenAIRE

    Toivainen, Jukka

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Toivainen, Jukka. Tiny house village project. Creating a community development project. 40 p., 1 appendix. Language: English. Helsinki, Autumn 2015. Diaconia University of Applied Sciences. Degree Programme in Social Services, Option in Diaconal Social Work. Degree: Bachelor of Social Services (UAS) + Qualification for the office of diaconia worker in the Church of Finland. This thesis is telling about creating a project idea and a project proposal of producing wooden wall...

  13. Operational Control Procedures for the Activated Sludge Process: Appendix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Alfred W.

    This document is the appendix for a series of documents developed by the National Training and Operational Technology Center describing operational control procedures for the activated sludge process used in wastewater treatment. Categories discussed include: control test data, trend charts, moving averages, semi-logarithmic plots, probability…

  14. 77 FR 12002 - Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest Site-Specific Invasive Plant Treatment Project and Forest...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-28

    ... Invasive Plant Treatment Project and Forest Plan Amendment Number 28 AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of intent to prepare an environmental impact statement. SUMMARY: Invasive plants are currently... management techniques became available with the Pacific Northwest Region Invasive Plant Program, Preventing...

  15. Hanford Waste Simulants Created to Support the Research and Development on the River Protection Project - Waste Treatment Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eibling, R.E.

    2001-07-26

    The development of nonradioactive waste simulants to support the River Protection Project - Waste Treatment Plant bench and pilot-scale testing is crucial to the design of the facility. The report documents the simulants development to support the SRTC programs and the strategies used to produce the simulants.

  16. Research cooperation project on environmentally friendly technology for highly efficient mineral resources extraction and treatment. Detail design for pilot plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    Photographs and drawings were edited into a book in relation with a joint project for environment preservation technologies in high-efficiency extraction and treatment of mineral resources, and detail design for a pilot plant. The book classified the related devices into fabricated devices, purchased devices and electrical devices, and contains detailed drawings and photographs thereof. (NEDO)

  17. Targeted Expansion Project for Outreach and Treatment for Substance Abuse and HIV Risk Behaviors in Asian and Pacific Islander Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemoto, Tooru; Iwamoto, Mariko; Kamitani, Emiko; Morris, Anne; Sakata, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Access to culturally competent HIV/AIDS and substance abuse treatment and prevention services is limited for Asian and Pacific Islanders (APIs). Based on the intake data for a community outreach project in the San Francisco Bay Area (N = 1,349), HIV risk behaviors were described among the targeted API risk groups. The self-reported HIV prevalence…

  18. SEISMIC DESIGN REQUIREMENTS SELECTION METHODOLOGY FOR THE SLUDGE TREATMENT and M-91 SOLID WASTE PROCESSING FACILITIES PROJECTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RYAN GW

    2008-01-01

    In complying with direction from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL) (07-KBC-0055, 'Direction Associated with Implementation of DOE-STD-1189 for the Sludge Treatment Project,' and 08-SED-0063, 'RL Action on the Safety Design Strategy (SDS) for Obtaining Additional Solid Waste Processing Capabilities (M-91 Project) and Use of Draft DOE-STD-I 189-YR'), it has been determined that the seismic design requirements currently in the Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) will be modified by DOE-STD-1189, Integration of Safety into the Design Process (March 2007 draft), for these two key PHMC projects. Seismic design requirements for other PHMC facilities and projects will remain unchanged. Considering the current early Critical Decision (CD) phases of both the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) and the Solid Waste Processing Facilities (M-91) Project and a strong intent to avoid potentially costly re-work of both engineering and nuclear safety analyses, this document describes how Fluor Hanford, Inc. (FH) will maintain compliance with the PHMC by considering both the current seismic standards referenced by DOE 0 420.1 B, Facility Safety, and draft DOE-STD-1189 (i.e., ASCE/SEI 43-05, Seismic Design Criteria for Structures, Systems, and Components in Nuclear Facilities, and ANSI ANS 2.26-2004, Categorization of Nuclear Facility Structures, Systems and Components for Seismic Design, as modified by draft DOE-STD-1189) to choose the criteria that will result in the most conservative seismic design categorization and engineering design. Following the process described in this document will result in a conservative seismic design categorization and design products. This approach is expected to resolve discrepancies between the existing and new requirements and reduce the risk that project designs and analyses will require revision when the draft DOE-STD-1189 is finalized

  19. Functional design criteria for project W-252, phase II liquid effluent treatment and disposal. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatch, C.E.

    1995-05-01

    This document is the Functional Design Criteria for Project W-252. Project W-252 provides the scope to provide BAT/AKART (best available technology...) to 200 Liquid Effluent Phase II streams (B-Plant). This revision (Rev. 2) incorporates a major descoping of the project. The descoping was done to reflect a combination of budget cutting measures allowed by a less stringent regulatory posture toward the Phase II streams

  20. Expected Impact of Agricultural Nonpoint Sources Special Land Treatment (AgNPS-SALT) Projects

    OpenAIRE

    Anonymous

    2006-01-01

    This set of reports describes the computer based evaluation of 6 AgNPS-SALT Projects in Missouri and assesses the use of SWAT as an evaluation tool. The analyses estimates nutrient, sediment, and pesticide loading reductions for each project. Titles include: Final Report, Computer Based Evaluation of the AgNPS-SALT Project (19-06); Long Branch Lake Watershed, Computer Based Evaluation of the AgNPS-SALT Project (20-06); Upper and Lower Big Maries River Watersheds Computer Based Evaluation of t...

  1. SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT COST COMPARISON BETWEEN HYDRAULIC LOADING AND SMALL CANISTER LOADING CONCEPTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GEUTHER J; CONRAD EA; RHOADARMER D

    2009-08-24

    The Sludge Treatment Project (STP) is considering two different concepts for the retrieval, loading, transport and interim storage of the K Basin sludge. The two design concepts under consideration are: (1) Hydraulic Loading Concept - In the hydraulic loading concept, the sludge is retrieved from the Engineered Containers directly into the Sludge Transport and Storage Container (STSC) while located in the STS cask in the modified KW Basin Annex. The sludge is loaded via a series of transfer, settle, decant, and filtration return steps until the STSC sludge transportation limits are met. The STSC is then transported to T Plant and placed in storage arrays in the T Plant canyon cells for interim storage. (2) Small Canister Concept - In the small canister concept, the sludge is transferred from the Engineered Containers (ECs) into a settling vessel. After settling and decanting, the sludge is loaded underwater into small canisters. The small canisters are then transferred to the existing Fuel Transport System (FTS) where they are loaded underwater into the FTS Shielded Transfer Cask (STC). The STC is raised from the basin and placed into the Cask Transfer Overpack (CTO), loaded onto the trailer in the KW Basin Annex for transport to T Plant. At T Plant, the CTO is removed from the transport trailer and placed on the canyon deck. The CTO and STC are opened and the small canisters are removed using the canyon crane and placed into an STSC. The STSC is closed, and placed in storage arrays in the T Plant canyon cells for interim storage. The purpose of the cost estimate is to provide a comparison of the two concepts described.

  2. Adherence to Follow-up Recommendations Among Individuals in the Philadelphia Glaucoma Detection and Treatment Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hark, Lisa A; Leiby, Benjamin E; Waisbourd, Michael; Myers, Jonathan S; Fudemberg, Scott J; Mantravadi, Anand V; Dai, Yang; Gilligan, John P; Resende, Arthur F; Katz, L Jay

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate rates of adherence to free follow-up eye exam appointments among participants in the Philadelphia Glaucoma Detection and Treatment Project. Ophthalmologists and testing equipment were brought directly to participants at risk for glaucoma at 43 community sites in Philadelphia. Those diagnosed with glaucoma-related pathology were recommended to return for follow-up to be reexamined on site. Rates of adherence and clinical and demographic risk factors for adherence were evaluated. Five hundred thirty-one participants were diagnosed with glaucoma-related conditions and recommended to attend community-based follow-up exams. Follow-up adherence rate was 61.2% (n=325/531). Significant factors associated with greater eye exam appointment adherence, based on our univariable analysis, included final diagnosis of glaucoma (risk ratio [RR]=1.33; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.13-1.57), male sex (RR=1.19; 95% CI, 1.04-1.36), white race (RR=1.26; 95% CI, 1.08-1.48), age (RR=1.17; 95% CI, 1.00-1.37) recommendation for glaucoma medication (RR=1.52; 95% CI, 1.35-1.71), recommendation for laser peripheral iridotomy (RR=1.18; 95% CI, 1.02-1.35), diagnosis of age-related macular degeneration (RR=1.42; 95% CI, 1.13-1.77) and an increased intraocular pressure (>22 mm Hg in the worse eye) (RR=1.23; 95% CI, 1.06-1.42). On the basis of our multivariable model, diagnosis, sex, and recommended glaucoma medications were significantly associated with follow-up adherence. This study demonstrates that individuals living in underserved urban communities would take advantage of free eye exams in community sites and return for follow-up eye exams in these same settings. Future studies could investigate interventions to improve eye exam appointment adherence in community-based settings to detect glaucoma-eye conditions.

  3. SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT COST COMPARISON BETWEEN HYDRAULIC LOADING AND SMALL CANISTER LOADING CONCEPTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geuther, J.; Conrad, E.A.; Rhoadarmer, D.

    2009-01-01

    The Sludge Treatment Project (STP) is considering two different concepts for the retrieval, loading, transport and interim storage of the K Basin sludge. The two design concepts under consideration are: (1) Hydraulic Loading Concept - In the hydraulic loading concept, the sludge is retrieved from the Engineered Containers directly into the Sludge Transport and Storage Container (STSC) while located in the STS cask in the modified KW Basin Annex. The sludge is loaded via a series of transfer, settle, decant, and filtration return steps until the STSC sludge transportation limits are met. The STSC is then transported to T Plant and placed in storage arrays in the T Plant canyon cells for interim storage. (2) Small Canister Concept - In the small canister concept, the sludge is transferred from the Engineered Containers (ECs) into a settling vessel. After settling and decanting, the sludge is loaded underwater into small canisters. The small canisters are then transferred to the existing Fuel Transport System (FTS) where they are loaded underwater into the FTS Shielded Transfer Cask (STC). The STC is raised from the basin and placed into the Cask Transfer Overpack (CTO), loaded onto the trailer in the KW Basin Annex for transport to T Plant. At T Plant, the CTO is removed from the transport trailer and placed on the canyon deck. The CTO and STC are opened and the small canisters are removed using the canyon crane and placed into an STSC. The STSC is closed, and placed in storage arrays in the T Plant canyon cells for interim storage. The purpose of the cost estimate is to provide a comparison of the two concepts described

  4. Annual energy outlook 1995, with projections to 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-01-01

    The Annual Energy Outlook 1995 (AEO95) presents the midterm energy forecasts of the Energy Information Administration (EIA). This year`s report presents projections and analyses of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2010, based on results from the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). Quarterly forecasts of energy supply and demand for 1995 and 1996 are published in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (February 1995). Forecast tables for the five cases examined in the AEO95 are provided in Appendixes A through C. Appendix A gives historical data and forecasts for selected years from 1992 through 2010 for the reference case. Appendix B presents two additional cases, which assume higher and lower economic growth than the reference case. Appendix C presents two cases that assume higher and lower world oil prices. Appendix D presents a summary of the forecasts in units of oil equivalence. Appendix E presents a summary of household energy expenditures. Appendix F provides detailed comparisons of the AEO95 forecasts with those of other organizations. Appendix G briefly describes NEMS and the major AEO95 forecast assumptions. Appendix H presents a stand-alone high electricity demand case. Appendix 1 provides a table of energy conversion factors and a table of metric conversion factors. 89 figs., 23 tabs.

  5. Types of treatment collaboration between conventional and alternative practitioners-results from a research project at a Danish MS hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skovgaard, Lasse; Haahr, Niels; Bjerre, Liv; Launsø, Laila

    2010-12-23

    More than 50% of People with Multiple Sclerosis (PwMS) in Denmark use alternative treatment. Most of them combine alternative and conventional treatment, but PwMS often find that they engage in parallel courses of treatment between which there is no dialogue, coordination or synergy. For this reason the Danish Multiple Sclerosis Society conducted a research project to develop and examine different models for collaboration between conventional and alternative treatment providers. The empirical material consisted of 10 individual interviews with practitioners, a group interview with practitioners, a group interview with professional staff at the Danish Multiple Sclerosis hospital that provided the organisational framework for the project, interviews with 59 patients and written responses from participating treatment providers in connection with 29 practitioner-researcher seminars held during the period 2004-2010. Collaboration between researchers and the treatment team resulted in the development and examination of several models which describe the strengths and weaknesses of various types of collaboration. The models show that the various types of collaboration place different requirements on the degree of 1) mutual acknowledgement and understanding among practitioners and 2) flexibility and resources in the organizational framework. The analyses also point to the fact that the degree of patient activity must be considered in relation to a given type of collaboration. The relationship between integration and pluralism can contribute to a fruitful discussion in regards to the value of treatment collaboration. In addition to the many positive perspectives that characterise integration of different treatment modalities the project points to the importance of not overlooking the opportunities, values and potential inherent in a pluralistic ideal in the form of patients' own active efforts and the dynamism that can arise when the patient becomes a co-informant, co

  6. Types of treatment collaboration between conventional and alternative practitioners – results from a research project at a Danish MS hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lasse Skovgaard

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: More than 50% of the People with Multiple Sclerosis (PwMS in Denmark use alternative treatment. Most of them combine alternative and conventional treatment, but PwMS often find that there is no dialogue, coordination or synergy between the parallel courses of treatment offered. For this reason the Danish Multiple Sclerosis Society conducted a research project to develop and examine different models for collaboration between conventional and alternative treatment providers. Materials and methods: Empirical material consist of individual interviews with practitioners, a group interview with practitioners, a group interview with professional staff at the Danish MS hospital that provided the organisational framework for the project, interviews with patients as well as written responses from participating treatment providers in connection with practitioner-researcher seminars held. Results: Collaboration between researchers and the treatment team resulted in the development examination of several models which describe the strengths and weaknesses of various types of collaboration. The models also show that the various types of collaboration place different requirements on the degree of 1 mutual acknowledgement and understanding among practitioners, 2 flexibility and resources in the organizational framework, and 3 patients' activities and own efforts, respectively.    Perspectives: The relationship between integration and pluralism can contribute to a fruitful discussion in regards to the value of treatment collaboration. In addition to the many positive perspectives the characterise integration of different treatment modalities the project points to the importance of not overlooking the opportunities, values and potential inherent in a pluralistic ideal in the form of patients' own active efforts and the dynamism that can arise when the patient becomes a co-informant, co-coordinator and/or co-integrator. 

  7. Comparison of forward- and back-projection in vivo EPID dosimetry for VMAT treatment of the prostate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedford, James L.; Hanson, Ian M.; Hansen, Vibeke N.

    2018-01-01

    In the forward-projection method of portal dosimetry for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), the integrated signal at the electronic portal imaging device (EPID) is predicted at the time of treatment planning, against which the measured integrated image is compared. In the back-projection method, the measured signal at each gantry angle is back-projected through the patient CT scan to give a measure of total dose to the patient. This study aims to investigate the practical agreement between the two types of EPID dosimetry for prostate radiotherapy. The AutoBeam treatment planning system produced VMAT plans together with corresponding predicted portal images, and a total of 46 sets of gantry-resolved portal images were acquired in 13 patients using an iViewGT portal imager. For the forward-projection method, each acquisition of gantry-resolved images was combined into a single integrated image and compared with the predicted image. For the back-projection method, iViewDose was used to calculate the dose distribution in the patient for comparison with the planned dose. A gamma index for 3% and 3 mm was used for both methods. The results were investigated by delivering the same plans to a phantom and repeating some of the deliveries with deliberately introduced errors. The strongest agreement between forward- and back-projection methods is seen in the isocentric intensity/dose difference, with moderate agreement in the mean gamma. The strongest correlation is observed within a given patient, with less correlation between patients, the latter representing the accuracy of prediction of the two methods. The error study shows that each of the two methods has its own distinct sensitivity to errors, but that overall the response is similar. The forward- and back-projection EPID dosimetry methods show moderate agreement in this series of prostate VMAT patients, indicating that both methods can contribute to the verification of dose delivered to the patient.

  8. Vermiform appendix within incisional hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kler, Aaron; Hossain, Naveed; Singh, Sandeep; Scarpinata, Rosaria

    2017-08-20

    The vermiform appendix (whether inflamed or not) within a hernia is very rare occurrence. We present the unprecedented case of a normal appendix found within a Pfannenstiel incisional hernia. A diagnostic laparoscopy was performed as appendicitis was suspected. However, the tip of a normal appendix was visualised within a previous Pfannenstiel incision. Laparoscopic appendicectomy was carried successfully and the patient was discharged. The patient later returned for a successful elective laparoscopic incisional hernia repair. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. Progress and Lessons Learned in Transuranic Waste Disposition at The Department of Energy's Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J.D. Mousseau; S.C. Raish; F.M. Russo

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and operated by Bechtel BWXT Idaho, LLC(BBWI) It describes the results to date in meeting the 6,000-cubic-meter Idaho Settlement Agreement milestone that was due December 31, 2005. The paper further describes lessons that have been learned from the project in the area of transuranic (TRU) waste processing and waste certification. Information contained within this paper would be beneficial to others who manage TRU waste for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)

  10. Quality Assurance Project Plan for Closure of the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant Lagoon 3 and Land Application Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Michael G. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-10-01

    This quality assurance project plan describes the technical requirements and quality assurance activities of the environmental data collection/analyses operations to close Central Facilities Area Sewage treatment Plant Lagoon 3 and the land application area. It describes the organization and persons involved, the data quality objectives, the analytical procedures, and the specific quality control measures to be employed. All quality assurance project plan activities are implemented to determine whether the results of the sampling and monitoring performed are of the right type, quantity, and quality to satisfy the requirements for closing Lagoon 3 and the land application area.

  11. Mucocele of the appendix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Tovar, J; Teruel, D García; Castiñeiras, V Morales; Dehesa, A Sanjuanbenito; Quindós, P López; Molina, E Martínez

    2007-03-01

    Mucocele of the appendix is an infrequent event, representing 0.3%-0.7% of appendiceal pathology and 8% of appendiceal tumors. It is characterized by a located or diffuse distension of the appendix with a mucus-filled lumen. We describe 35 cases of mucocele of the appendix diagnosed at Ramón y Cajal Hospital between January 1985 and January 2006. A total of 21 males and 14 females with a mean age of 52.7 years are described. Most cases manifested as abdominal pain located in right iliac fossa, but 2 cases were incidental findings at CT-scan and 1 at ultrasonography, performed for other reasons. In 4 cases, mucocele coexisted with colorectal cancer and was an incidental finding during laparotomy performed for tumor resection. Ultrasonography and computed tomography (CT) scan helped to achieve a correct diagnosis. Preoperative diagnosis of mucocele was achieved in 29% of the cases; 88% of patients underwent appendectomy, 2 had ileocecal resection, and 2 others underwent right hemicolectomy. Pathology revealed mucous hyperplasia in 34% of the cases, simple mucocele in 29%, cystadenoma in 31%, and cystadenocarcinoma in 2 patients. Two other patients developed adenocarcinoma of the cecum 12 and 33 months after surgery, and one patient developed pseudomyxoma peritonei after 62 months, causing his death. The pathologist is forced to do an exhaustive study, looking for inadvertent perforations that can change the good prognosis of mucocele. We recommend follow-up of all patients with mucoceles, because sometimes they are associated with colorectal neoplasms and recurrence as pseudomyxoma peritonei.

  12. Sludge Treatment Project Engineered Container Retrieval And Transfer System Prelminary Design Hazard And Operability Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carro, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    This Hazard and Operability (HAZOP) study addresses the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) Engineered Container Retrieval and Transfer System (ECRTS) preliminary design for retrieving sludge from underwater engineered containers located in the 105-K West (KW) Basin, transferring the sludge as a sludge-water slurry (hereafter referred to as 'slurry') to a Sludge Transport and Storage Container (STSC) located in a Modified KW Basin Annex, and preparing the STSC for transport to T Plant using the Sludge Transport System (STS). There are six, underwater engineered containers located in the KW Basin that, at the time of sludge retrieval, will contain an estimated volume of 5.2 m 3 of KW Basin floor and pit sludge, 18.4 m 3 of 105-K East (KE) Basin floor, pit, and canister sludge, and 3.5 m 3 of settler tank sludge. The KE and KW Basin sludge consists of fuel corrosion products (including metallic uranium, and fission and activation products), small fuel fragments, iron and aluminum oxide, sand, dirt, operational debris, and biological debris. The settler tank sludge consists of sludge generated by the washing of KE and KW Basin fuel in the Primary Clean Machine. A detailed description of the origin of sludge and its chemical and physical characteristics can be found in HNF-41051, Preliminary STP Container and Settler Sludge Process System Description and Material Balance. In summary, the ECRTS retrieves sludge from the engineered containers and hydraulically transfers it as a slurry into an STSC positioned within a trailer-mounted STS cask located in a Modified KW Basin Annex. The slurry is allowed to settle within the STSC to concentrate the solids and clarify the supernate. After a prescribed settling period the supernate is decanted. The decanted supernate is filtered through a sand filter and returned to the basin. Subsequent batches of slurry are added to the STSC, settled, and excess supernate removed until the prescribed quantity of sludge is collected. The sand

  13. SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT ENGINEERED CONTAINER RETRIEVAL AND TRANSFER SYSTEM PRELMINARY DESIGN HAZARD AND OPERABILITY STUDY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CARRO CA

    2011-07-15

    This Hazard and Operability (HAZOP) study addresses the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) Engineered Container Retrieval and Transfer System (ECRTS) preliminary design for retrieving sludge from underwater engineered containers located in the 105-K West (KW) Basin, transferring the sludge as a sludge-water slurry (hereafter referred to as 'slurry') to a Sludge Transport and Storage Container (STSC) located in a Modified KW Basin Annex, and preparing the STSC for transport to T Plant using the Sludge Transport System (STS). There are six, underwater engineered containers located in the KW Basin that, at the time of sludge retrieval, will contain an estimated volume of 5.2 m{sup 3} of KW Basin floor and pit sludge, 18.4 m{sup 3} of 105-K East (KE) Basin floor, pit, and canister sludge, and 3.5 m{sup 3} of settler tank sludge. The KE and KW Basin sludge consists of fuel corrosion products (including metallic uranium, and fission and activation products), small fuel fragments, iron and aluminum oxide, sand, dirt, operational debris, and biological debris. The settler tank sludge consists of sludge generated by the washing of KE and KW Basin fuel in the Primary Clean Machine. A detailed description of the origin of sludge and its chemical and physical characteristics can be found in HNF-41051, Preliminary STP Container and Settler Sludge Process System Description and Material Balance. In summary, the ECRTS retrieves sludge from the engineered containers and hydraulically transfers it as a slurry into an STSC positioned within a trailer-mounted STS cask located in a Modified KW Basin Annex. The slurry is allowed to settle within the STSC to concentrate the solids and clarify the supernate. After a prescribed settling period the supernate is decanted. The decanted supernate is filtered through a sand filter and returned to the basin. Subsequent batches of slurry are added to the STSC, settled, and excess supernate removed until the prescribed quantity of sludge is

  14. Treatment of liquid effluent from uranium mines and mills. Report of a co-ordinated research project 1996-2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-10-01

    Treatment and control of liquid effluents produced during uranium mining and milling operations is an integral part of environmental project management. Research has continued to add to the large body of science that has been built up around the treatment of radioactive and non-radioactive effluents to minimize their long-term environmental impact. The objective of the meetings on which this publication is based was to exchange information on active effluent treatment technologies that have application during operations and passive treatment techniques such as constructed wetlands and use of micro-organisms that are applicable during project reclamation and long-term care and maintenance. Papers describe effluent treatment case histories from active uranium mining and processing operations as well as effluent treatment research on both active and passive systems that have potential application under a wide range of operating and post-operational conditions including new information on high-density sludge from effluent neutralization (Australia), aerated manganese hydroxide for removal of radium (China), nanofiltration and macropore resins to treat mine water (Australia and China), in situ microbial treatment and permeable reactive walls for treatment of contaminated groundwater (Germany), construction of wetlands to treat mine water runoff (Australia and Germany), biogenic granules to remove 226 Ra from mill effluent (India), self-remediation of acidic in situ leach aquifers (Kazakhstan) and sorption characteristics of soil for self-remediation of contaminated groundwater (Hungary). These and other topics presented in this publication will be of interest to technical personnel who deal with day-to-day practical aspects of liquid effluent control and treatment at uranium production facilities worldwide

  15. TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT: TORONTO HARBOUR COMMISSIONERS (THC) SOIL RECYCLE TREATMENT TRAIN. Project Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    A demonstration of the Toronto Harbour Commissioners' (THC) Soil Recycle Treatment Train was performed under the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program at a pilot plant facility in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. The Soil Recycle Treatment Train, which consists of s...

  16. CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES--INTEGRATED LIFE-CYCLE OPTIMIZATION INITIATIVES FOR THE HANFORD RIVER PROTECTION PROJECT--WASTE TREATMENT PLANT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auclair, K. D.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the ongoing integrated life-cycle optimization efforts to achieve both design flexibility and design stability for activities associated with the Waste Treatment Plant at Hanford. Design flexibility is required to support the Department of Energy Office of River Protection Balance of Mission objectives, and design stability to meet the Waste Treatment Plant construction and commissioning requirements in order to produce first glass in 2007. The Waste Treatment Plant is a large complex project that is driven by both technology and contractual requirements. It is also part of a larger overall mission, as a component of the River Protection Project, which is driven by programmatic requirements and regulatory, legal, and fiscal constraints. These issues are further complicated by the fact that both of the major contractors involved have a different contract type with DOE, and neither has a contract with the other. This combination of technical and programmatic drivers, constraints, and requirements will continue to provide challenges and opportunities for improvement and optimization. The Bechtel National, Inc. team is under contract to engineer, procure, construct, commission and test the Waste Treatment Plant on or ahead of schedule, at or under cost, and with a throughput capacity equal to or better than specified. The Department of Energy is tasked with the long term mission of waste retrieval, treatment, and disposal. While each mission is a compliment and inextricably linked to one another, they are also at opposite ends of the spectrum, in terms of expectations of one another. These mission requirements, that are seemingly in opposition to one another, pose the single largest challenge and opportunity for optimization: one of balance. While it is recognized that design maturation and optimization are the normal responsibility of any engineering firm responsible for any given project, the aspects of integrating requirements and the management

  17. Hanford DST Thermal and Seismic Project - Dytran Analysis Of Seismically Induced Fluid-Structure Interaction In A Hanford Double-Shell Primary Tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackey, T.C.; Rinker, M.W.; Abatt, F.G.

    2007-01-01

    Revision 0A of this document contains new Appendices C and D. Appendix C contains a re-analysis of the rigid and flexible tanks at the 460 in. liquid level and was motivated by recommendations from a Project Review held on March 20-21, 2006 (Rinker et al Appendix E of RPP-RPT-28968 Rev 1). Appendix D contains the benchmark solutions in support of the analyses in Appendix C.

  18. 40 CFR Appendix B to Subpart E of... - Federal Guidelines-User Charges for Operation and Maintenance of Publicly Owned Treatment Works

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... characteristics; i.e., levels of biochemical oxygen demand, suspended solids, etc. Each class is then assigned its... all users per unit of time. Bc = O&M cost for treatment of a unit of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD...

  19. Clinical implications of diverticular disease of the appendix. Experience over the past 10 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcacuzco, Alberto A; Manrique, Alejandro; Calvo, Jorge; Loinaz, Carmelo; Justo, Iago; Caso, Oscar; Cambra, Felix; Fakih, Naim; Sanabria, Rebeca; Jimenez-Romero, Luis C

    2016-01-01

    Diverticular disease of the appendix is an uncommon condition, with an incidence from 0.004 to 2.1%. It usually occurs between the fourth or fifth decades of life, does not present gastrointestinal symptoms but only insidious abdominal pain. Patients usually delay consultation, leading to increased morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical features of diverticular disease of the appendix. A retrospective study of all patients undergoing appendectomy in a tertiary hospital between September 2003 and September 2013 was performed. During this period, 7,044 appendectomies were performed, and 42 cases of diverticular disease of the appendix were found, which represents an incidence of 0.59%. A total of 27 patients were male. The mean age was 46.6±21 years. The average hospital stay was 4.5 days. A perforated appendix was identified in 46% of patients. In 80% of the cases, a complementary imaging test was performed. The incidence of neoplastic disease with diverticulum of the appendix was 7.1%. Diverticular disease of the appendix is an incidental finding. In its acute phase, it presents as an acute appendicitis. The treatment of choice is appendectomy. It presents a higher risk of developing neoplastic disease of the appendix. Copyright © 2014 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Mucinous Cystadenoma of the Appendix in a Patient with Systemic Lupus Erthematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debrah A Wirtzfeld

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A 38-year-old female with systemic lupus erythematosus presented with abdominal pain, diarrhea and iron-deficient anemia. Computed tomogram showed a 2x4 cm inhomogeneous lesion of the right adnexa. An unusual mass was identified extending from the appendiceal orifice at colonoscopy, and an 8 cm tubular appendix, apparently prolapsed into the cecum, was identified at celiotomy. An appendectomy with cecectomy was performed. On cut section, mucin was extruded from the lumen of the appendix. A mucinous neoplasm of the appendix with mucinous dissection to the serosal surface was reported at the time of frozen section. No gross ovarian pathology or peritoneal implants were noted. Cystadenoma with associated mucocele formation was verified by permanent histology. Mucocele of the vermiform appendix is a rare condition associated with neoplastic transformation in approximately 75% of all cases. Benign mucinous cystadenoma of the appendix should be differentiated from cystadenocarcinoma by frozen section at the time of celiotomy to ensure appropriate treatment. While systemic lupus erythematosus can lead to cutaneous mucinosis, an association with mucinous cystadenoma of the appendix has not been previously reported. Surveillance for metachronous colonic neoplasms is warranted in patients diagnosed with a mucinous neoplasm of the appendix.

  1. Surrogate formulations for thermal treatment of low-level mixed waste, Part II: Selected mixed waste treatment project waste streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bostick, W.D.; Hoffmann, D.P.; Chiang, J.M.; Hermes, W.H.; Gibson, L.V. Jr.; Richmond, A.A.; Mayberry, J.; Frazier, G.

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes the formulation of surrogate waste packages, representing the major bulk constituent compositions for 12 waste stream classifications selected by the US DOE Mixed Waste Treatment Program. These waste groupings include: neutral aqueous wastes; aqueous halogenated organic liquids; ash; high organic content sludges; adsorbed aqueous and organic liquids; cement sludges, ashes, and solids; chloride; sulfate, and nitrate salts; organic matrix solids; heterogeneous debris; bulk combustibles; lab packs; and lead shapes. Insofar as possible, formulation of surrogate waste packages are referenced to authentic wastes in inventory within the DOE; however, the surrogate waste packages are intended to represent generic treatability group compositions. The intent is to specify a nonradiological synthetic mixture, with a minimal number of readily available components, that can be used to represent the significant challenges anticipated for treatment of the specified waste class. Performance testing and evaluation with use of a consistent series of surrogate wastes will provide a means for the initial assessment (and intercomparability) of candidate treatment technology applicability and performance. Originally the surrogate wastes were intended for use with emerging thermal treatment systems, but use may be extended to select nonthermal systems as well

  2. Surrogate formulations for thermal treatment of low-level mixed waste, Part II: Selected mixed waste treatment project waste streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bostick, W.D.; Hoffmann, D.P.; Chiang, J.M.; Hermes, W.H.; Gibson, L.V. Jr.; Richmond, A.A. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mayberry, J. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Frazier, G. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes the formulation of surrogate waste packages, representing the major bulk constituent compositions for 12 waste stream classifications selected by the US DOE Mixed Waste Treatment Program. These waste groupings include: neutral aqueous wastes; aqueous halogenated organic liquids; ash; high organic content sludges; adsorbed aqueous and organic liquids; cement sludges, ashes, and solids; chloride; sulfate, and nitrate salts; organic matrix solids; heterogeneous debris; bulk combustibles; lab packs; and lead shapes. Insofar as possible, formulation of surrogate waste packages are referenced to authentic wastes in inventory within the DOE; however, the surrogate waste packages are intended to represent generic treatability group compositions. The intent is to specify a nonradiological synthetic mixture, with a minimal number of readily available components, that can be used to represent the significant challenges anticipated for treatment of the specified waste class. Performance testing and evaluation with use of a consistent series of surrogate wastes will provide a means for the initial assessment (and intercomparability) of candidate treatment technology applicability and performance. Originally the surrogate wastes were intended for use with emerging thermal treatment systems, but use may be extended to select nonthermal systems as well.

  3. Impact of a Student Pharmacist Driven Medication Reconciliation and Antidepressant Treatment History Project at a Depression Clinic: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Stella S.; Jaward, Leanna; Ward, Kristen; Parikh, Sagar V.; Bostwick, Jolene R.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To improve treatment of patients with depression, a new pilot service project involving student pharmacists who would conduct medication reconciliation and review of antidepressant treatment history was created and evaluated. Experimental design A prospective study conducted at the University of Michigan Depression Center. Principal observations From an initial sample of 78 referrals, 41 subjects were reached by phone, with 34 completing medication reconciliation and antidepressant treatment history. Of the 34 patients, 25 (73.5%) had at least one discrepancy identified in their medication list, resulting in 164 medication changes in the electronic medical record (EMR). A total of 105 past antidepressant trials were documented in the 34 individuals, with 34 (32.4%) trials found to be inadequate. Thirteen (38.2%) patients reported failure to respond to two different antidepressants from different classes. All 34 patients participated well in the phone calls and were willing to consult a pharmacist at their upcoming clinic visit. Conclusions A student pharmacist pilot was feasible, identified many discrepancies in the medication record, and identified important medication treatment history in patients with depression in advance of the clinic visit. The project provides support for a specialized role for student pharmacists and demonstrates that interprofessional care can contribute to improved treatment of depression. PMID:28626270

  4. Intussusception of the vermiform appendix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson-Lowe, Richard A; Ibrahim, Sherine; Munthali, Lamios; Hasan, Fazal

    2015-07-16

    Appendicitis is a common presentation to an acute general surgical on call team. It can be a difficult diagnosis at times, particularly in sexually active young women, in whom it is often surgically challenging. This case is of a relatively straightforward diagnosis, taken for laparoscopic appendicectomy that resulted in performing an open right hemicolectomy for a necrotic, intussuscepted appendix. Histology ultimately revealed the cause of intussusception and resultant infarction of the appendix to be endometriosis. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  5. Torsion of an appendix epiploica present at the vermiform appendix: a rare cause of acute abdomen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Muhammad Babar; Hasan, Noori

    2009-09-01

    An extremely rare case of torsion of an appendix epiploica attached to the vermiform appendix is reported in a 57-year-old male who presented with acute abdominal pain and tender right inguinal fossa. An infarcted appendix epiploica was seen attached near the tip of an otherwise unremarkable vermiform appendix through a narrow stalk. The histological examination revealed lobulated fibrofatty tissue showing congestion, acute inflammation and fat necrosis. The appendix was otherwise unremarkable.

  6. SU-E-J-52: Validation of 3D Structure Projection Onto 2D DRR in Commercial Treatment Planning Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Court, L; Balter, P; Dong, L

    2012-06-01

    The use of structure overlay on setup DRRs can aid the image alignment procedure for daily image-guided setup procedures. However, the accuracy of a 3D region-of-interest (ROI) projected on a 2D digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) has rarely been evaluated quantitatively. The goal of this study is to test the accuracy of two commercial treatment planning systems (TPS) in producing overlay structures on setup DRRs. We designed a novel method to identify landmarks which were on the boundary of the projected ROI on a DRR. The 3D ROIvolume is composed of a stack of 2D curves. We first mathematically project each 2D curve onto a beams-eye-view (BEV) plane. Next, we detectthe boundary points of the projected curves. Those boundary points serve aslandmarks. Finally, we project the binary mask of the 3D ROI volume using ray tracing method onto the BEV plane. This projected binary mask is used to exclude the false landmarks. Once those landmarks are detected, wecompute the distance between the landmarks and ROI outlines from the TPS. We applied our validation method to 13 ROIs from a lung patient and 4 simulated ROIs on 2 BEV DRRs for two different TPS (Eclipse and Pinnacle). Average distance between the landmarks and ROIoutlines was 0.5mm for both Eclipse and Pinnacle approaches, which is close to the pixel resolution of the DRR. The maximum distance andaverage maximum distance was 2mm and 1 mm, respectively, for both TPS.The maximum distance occurred at points where the ROI curve has a sharpchange between slices. The accuracy of Eclipse and Pinnacle ROI projection method seems to be acceptable to within 1mm althoughprojection error can be as large as 2mm when structure shape has a sharp variation from one slice to the next. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  7. UNIQUE 28 CM LONG VERMIFORM APPENDIX

    OpenAIRE

    Ravindra Kumar Boddeti; Roopa Kulkarni; Pradeep Kumar H Murudkar

    2013-01-01

    Vermiform appendix is a vestigial organ in human beings and situated at the ileocaecal junction. It opens into the caecum. It is a narrow tube of varying length. The normal, average length is about 5 cm to 10 cm. The longest vermiform appendix has been reported to be measuring about 25 cm. In the present case a long vermiform appendix was observed in female, formalin fixed, adult cadaver during the routine dissection for medical undergraduates. The Vermiform appendix was retrocaecal and exten...

  8. Waste-Management Education and Research Consortium (WERC) annual progress report, 1991--1992. Appendixes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-07

    This report contains the following appendices: Appendix A - Requirements for Undergraduate Level; Appendix B - Requirements for Graduate Level; Appendix C - Graduate Degree In Environmental Engineering; Appendix D - Non-degree Certificate Program; Appendix E - Curriculum for Associate Degree Program; Appendix F - Curriculum for NCC Program; Appendix G - Information 1991 Teleconference Series; Appendix H - Information on 1992 Teleconference Series; Appendix I - WERC interactive Television Courses; Appendix J - WERC Research Seminar Series; Appendix K - Sites for Hazardous/Radioactive Waste Management Series; Appendix L- Summary of Technology Development of the Second Year; Appendix M - List of Major Publications Resulting from WERC; Appendix N - Types of Equipment at WERC Laboratories.

  9. SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT KOP DISPOSITION - THERMAL AND GAS ANALYSIS FOR THE COLD VACUUM DRYING FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SWENSON JA; CROWE RD; APTHORPE R; PLYS MG

    2010-03-09

    The purpose of this document is to present conceptual design phase thermal process calculations that support the process design and process safety basis for the cold vacuum drying of K Basin KOP material. This document is intended to demonstrate that the conceptual approach: (1) Represents a workable process design that is suitable for development in preliminary design; and (2) Will support formal safety documentation to be prepared during the definitive design phase to establish an acceptable safety basis. The Sludge Treatment Project (STP) is responsible for the disposition of Knock Out Pot (KOP) sludge within the 105-K West (KW) Basin. KOP sludge consists of size segregated material (primarily canister particulate) from the fuel and scrap cleaning process used in the Spent Nuclear Fuel process at K Basin. The KOP sludge will be pre-treated to remove fines and some of the constituents containing chemically bound water, after which it is referred to as KOP material. The KOP material will then be loaded into a Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO), dried at the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) and stored in the Canister Storage Building (CSB). This process is patterned after the successful drying of 2100 metric tons of spent fuel, and uses the same facilities and much of the same equipment that was used for drying fuel and scrap. Table ES-l present similarities and differences between KOP material and fuel and between MCOs loaded with these materials. The potential content of bound water bearing constituents limits the mass ofKOP material in an MCO load to a fraction of that in an MCO containing fuel and scrap; however, the small particle size of the KOP material causes the surface area to be significantly higher. This relatively large reactive surface area represents an input to the KOP thermal calculations that is significantly different from the calculations for fuel MCOs. The conceptual design provides for a copper insert block that limits the volume available to

  10. Integrating fuel treatment into ecosystem management: A proposed project planning process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith D. Stockmann; Kevin D. Hyde; J. Greg Jones; Dan R. Loeffler; Robin P. Silverstein

    2010-01-01

    Concern over increased wildland fire threats on public lands throughout the western United States makes fuel reduction activities the primary driver of many management projects. This single-issue focus recalls a management planning process practiced frequently in recent decades - a least-harm approach where the primary objective is first addressed and then plans are...

  11. Multiple treatments yield early success in a shortleaf pine woodland restoration project in the Missouri Ozarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew G. Olson; Elizabeth K. Olson

    2016-01-01

    Shortleaf pine woodland communities were more extensive in the southeastern Missouri Ozarks prior to Euro-American settlement than today. In 2000, the Missouri Department of Conservation initiated a shortleaf pine woodland restoration project on state land in the Ozarks of southeast Missouri at an area called the Midco Pine Flats Restoration Area. The purpose of this...

  12. Process engineering considerations in the design of the water treatment plant for the Rum Jungle rehabilitation project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackland, M.C.

    1983-01-01

    The Rum Jungle rehabilitation programme includes the treatment of around 4 million cubic metres of water that has been polluted by previous treatment operations and acidic seepage containing heavy metal salts from slowly oxidising overburden dumps. The water to be treated is of low pH and contains high sulphate levels. Project rehabilitation criteria and the basic chemistry of metal salts in solution were considered in arriving at the final process design. In order to achieve a cost effective plant design, the process was translated into a flow sheet that used unit operations that are more typical of the extractive metallurgical than the traditional water treatment industry. Consideration of the unit operations and the operating aspects of the plant are discussed

  13. Atresia of the appendix vermiformis: A rare case of developmental abnormality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaylak, Faik; Algin, Mustafa Cem; Gungor, Yesim; Korkmaz, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    Acute appendicitis, which requires immediate surgical intervention, is an important diagnosis in patients with acute abdomen. However, developmental abnormalities may interfere with the preoperative diagnosis and surgical treatment in some cases. Agenesis and atresia of the cecal vermiform appendix is an extremely rare clinical diagnosis. In addition, preoperative diagnosis may be difficult in some cases. Thus, diagnosis of the congenital absence of the vermiform appendix requires a thorough exploration of the retrocecal and ileocecal regions. A 59-year-old male was admitted from the emergency services with right lower abdominal pain. A celiotomy was performed with the suspicion of acute appendicitis. However, an atresia of the vermiform appendix was observed. The patient’s appendix was thus removed. Pathological examination confirmed suppurative appendicitis. This case underlines the importance of the clinical entity for surgeons who may deal with a similar case. PMID:23326173

  14. Atresia of the appendix vermiformis: a rare case of developmental abnormality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaylak, Faik; Algin, Mustafa Cem; Gungor, Yesim; Korkmaz, Mehmet

    2013-01-07

    Acute appendicitis, which requires immediate surgical intervention, is an important diagnosis in patients with acute abdomen. However, developmental abnormalities may interfere with the preoperative diagnosis and surgical treatment in some cases. Agenesis and atresia of the cecal vermiform appendix is an extremely rare clinical diagnosis. In addition, preoperative diagnosis may be difficult in some cases. Thus, diagnosis of the congenital absence of the vermiform appendix requires a thorough exploration of the retrocecal and ileocecal regions. A 59-year-old male was admitted from the emergency services with right lower abdominal pain. A celiotomy was performed with the suspicion of acute appendicitis. However, an atresia of the vermiform appendix was observed. The patient's appendix was thus removed. Pathological examination confirmed suppurative appendicitis. This case underlines the importance of the clinical entity for surgeons who may deal with a similar case.

  15. Specific application for Oak Ridge National Laboratory dismantlement of Building 3004. Appendix A - Quality assurance plan; Appendix B - Records management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-03-01

    This quality assurance (QA) plan defines the QA requirements for the dismantlement and removal of Building 3004 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The building is a four-story wooden trained structure with wooden siding, which resides approximately 150 ft west of the Bulk Shielding Reactor, and only several feet away from the visitors entrance to the Graphite Reactor museum. Complete descriptions and sketches are in the Performance Specification document for this project. This project is being conducted as a non-CERCLA maintenance action. This plan is an appendix to the QA plan for the ORNL Environmental Restoration (ER) Program. ORNL/ER-225, which is the source of the project QA requirements, tailors those QA requirements to the specific needs of this project as defined in ORNL/ER-225. Project-specific description and organization are also provided in this plan. Appendix B, Records Management Plan, is included

  16. A service evaluation and improvement project: a three year systematic audit cycle of the physiotherapy treatment for Lateral Epicondylalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barratt, Paul A; Selfe, James

    2017-09-22

    To improve outcomes of physiotherapy treatment for patients with Lateral Epicondylalgia. A systematic audit and quality improvement project over three phases, each of one year duration. Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust Teaching Hospital Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy out-patients department. n=182. Phase one - individual discretion; Phase two - strengthening as a core treatment however individual discretion regarding prescription and implementation; Phase three - standardised protocol using high load isometric exercise, progressing on to slow combined concentric & eccentric strengthening. Global Rating of Change Scale, Pain-free grip strength, Patient Rated Tennis Elbow Evaluation, Tampa Scale of Kinesophobia-11. Phase three demonstrated a reduction in the average number of treatments by 42% whilst improving the number of responders to treatment by 8% compared to phase one. Complete cessation of non-evidence based treatments was also observed by phase three. Strengthening should be a core treatment for LE. Load setting needs to be sufficient. In phase three of the audit a standardised tendon loading programme using patient specific high load isometric exercises into discomfort/pain demonstrated a higher percentage of responders compared to previous phases. Copyright © 2017 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Drinking-water treatment, climate change, and childhood gastrointestinal illness projections for northern Wisconsin (USA) communities drinking untreated groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uejio, Christopher K.; Christenson, Megan; Moran, Colleen; Gorelick, Mark

    2017-06-01

    This study examined the relative importance of climate change and drinking-water treatment for gastrointestinal illness incidence in children (age first quantified the observed (1991-2010) precipitation and gastrointestinal illness associations after controlling for seasonality and temporal trends. Precipitation likely transported pathogens into drinking-water sources or into leaking water-distribution networks. Building on observed relationships, the second analysis projected how climate change and drinking-water treatment installation may alter gastrointestinal illness incidence. Future precipitation values were modeled by 13 global climate models and three greenhouse-gas emissions levels. The second analysis was rerun using three pathways: (1) only climate change, (2) climate change and the same slow pace of treatment installation observed over 1991-2010, and (3) climate change and the rapid rate of installation observed over 2011-2016. The results illustrate the risks that climate change presents to small rural groundwater municipalities without drinking water treatment. Climate-change-related seasonal precipitation changes will marginally increase the gastrointestinal illness incidence rate (mean: ˜1.5%, range: -3.6-4.3%). A slow pace of treatment installation somewhat decreased precipitation-associated gastrointestinal illness incidence (mean: ˜3.0%, range: 0.2-7.8%) in spite of climate change. The rapid treatment installation rate largely decreases the gastrointestinal illness incidence (mean: ˜82.0%, range: 82.0-83.0%).

  18. Developing and implementing a positive behavioral reinforcement intervention in prison-based drug treatment: Project BRITE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdon, William M; St De Lore, Jef; Prendergast, Michael L

    2011-09-01

    Within prison settings, the reliance on punishment for controlling inappropriate or noncompliant behavior is self-evident. What is not so evident is the similarity between this reliance on punishment and the use of positive reinforcements to increase desired behaviors. However, seldom do inmates receive positive reinforcement for engaging in prosocial behaviors or, for inmates receiving drug treatment, behaviors that are consistent with or support their recovery. This study provides an overview of the development and implementation of a positive behavioral reinforcement intervention in male and female prison-based drug treatment programs. The active involvement of institutional staff, treatment staff, and inmates enrolled in the treatment programs in the development of the intervention along with the successful branding of the intervention were effective at promoting support and participation. However, these factors may also have ultimately impacted the ability of the randomized design to reliably demonstrate the effectiveness of the intervention.

  19. Guidelines for Acceptable Project Expenditures

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC CRDI

    This appendix describes how to categorize allowable project expenditures by budget category. Specific limitations to what is allowable in a few categories are included in Part 2 of IDRC's standard grant agreement (see the section on Allowable Expenses) and should have been read prior to the submission of a budget ...

  20. Centralized treatment facility for low level radioactive waste produced in Belgium. The CILVA project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renard, Cl.; Detilleux, M.; Debieve, P.

    1993-01-01

    Due to rather limited amount of waste produced and the small size of the Belgian territory (30 x 10 3 km 2 ), ONDRAF/NIRAS strategy aims at centralizing treatment conditioning and storage of radioactive waste. ONDRAF/NTRAS has decided to set up a new infrastructure: the CILVA unit. The CILVA facility is focused on the supercompaction and the incineration treatment, so that ONDRAF/NIRAS can safely manage all radioactive wastes produced in Belgium. (2 figs.)

  1. Advanced conceptual design report. Phase II. Liquid effluent treatment and disposal Project W-252

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This Advanced Conceptual Design Report (ACDR) provides a documented review and analysis of the Conceptual Design Report (CDR), WHC-SD-W252-CDR-001, June 30, 1993. The ACDR provides further design evaluation of the major design approaches and uncertainties identified in the original CDR. The ACDR will provide a firmer basis for the both the design approach and the associated planning for the performance of the Definitive Design phase of the project

  2. Advanced conceptual design report. Phase II. Liquid effluent treatment and disposal Project W-252

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-01-31

    This Advanced Conceptual Design Report (ACDR) provides a documented review and analysis of the Conceptual Design Report (CDR), WHC-SD-W252-CDR-001, June 30, 1993. The ACDR provides further design evaluation of the major design approaches and uncertainties identified in the original CDR. The ACDR will provide a firmer basis for the both the design approach and the associated planning for the performance of the Definitive Design phase of the project.

  3. Congenital absence of the vermiform appendix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Aniruddha

    2012-09-01

    Agenesis of the vermiform appendix is very rare. The incidence is estimated to be one in 100,000 laparotomies for suspected appendicitis. During a routine dissection of the abdomen in a 60-year-old donated male cadaver, the vermiform appendix was found to be absent. The ileocaecal junction and retrocaecal area were thoroughly searched, but the vermiform appendix was not found or appeared to resemble a tubercle. This is likely the first reported case of agenesis of a vermiform appendix in India. This suggests the possibility that the human vermiform appendix would ultimately become rudimentary or absent in the course of evolution.

  4. Grand Junction projects office mixed-waste treatment program, VAC*TRAX mobile treatment unit process hazards analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, R.R.

    1996-04-01

    The objective of this report is to demonstrate that a thorough assessment of the risks associated with the operation of the Rust Geotech patented VAC*TRAX mobile treatment unit (MTU) has been performed and documented. The MTU was developed to treat mixed wastes at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Albuquerque Operations Office sites. The MTU uses an indirectly heated, batch vacuum dryer to thermally desorb organic compounds from mixed wastes. This process hazards analysis evaluated 102 potential hazards. The three significant hazards identified involved the inclusion of oxygen in a process that also included an ignition source and fuel. Changes to the design of the MTU were made concurrent with the hazard identification and analysis; all hazards with initial risk rankings of 1 or 2 were reduced to acceptable risk rankings of 3 or 4. The overall risk to any population group from operation of the MTU was determined to be very low; the MTU is classified as a Radiological Facility with low hazards

  5. Recent findings from the Human Proteome Project: opening the mass spectrometry toolbox to advance cancer diagnosis, surveillance and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantor, David I; Nice, Edouard C; Baker, Mark S

    2015-06-01

    The Human Proteome Project stands to eclipse the Human Genome Project in terms of scope, content and interpretation. Its outputs, in conjunction with recent developments across the proteomics community, provide new tools for cancer research with the potential of providing clinically relevant insights into the disease. These collectively may guide the development of future diagnosis, surveillance and treatment strategies. Having established a robust organizational framework within the international community, the Human Proteome Organization and the proteomics community at large have made significant advances in biomarker discovery, detection, molecular imaging and in exploring tumor heterogeneity. Here, the authors discuss some developments in cancer proteomics and how they can be implemented to reduce the global burden of the disease.

  6. The Controlled Ecological Life Support System Antarctic Analog Project: Prototype Crop Production and Water Treatment System Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubenheim, David L.; Flynn, Michael T.; Bates, Maynard; Schlick, Greg; Kliss, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) Antarctic Analog Project (CAAP), is a joint endeavor between the National Science Foundation, Office of Polar Programs (NSF-OPP) and the NASA. The fundamental objective is to develop, deploy, and operate a testbed of advanced life support technologies at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station that enable the objectives of both the NSF and NASA. The functions of food production, water purification, and waste treatment, recycle and reduction provided by CAAP will improve the quality of life for the South Pole inhabitants, reduce logistics dependence, enhance safety and minimize environmental impacts associated with human presence on the polar plateau. Because of the analogous technical, scientific, and mission features with Planetary missions such as a mission to Mars, CAAP provides NASA with a method for validating technologies and overall approaches to supporting humans. Prototype systems for sewage treatment, water recycle and crop production are being evaluated at Ames Research Center. The product water from sewage treatment using a Wiped-Film Rotating Disk is suitable for input to the crop production system. The crop production system has provided an enhanced level of performance compared with projected performance for plant-based life support: an approximate 50% increase in productivity per unit area, more than a 65% decrease in power for plant lighting, and more than a 75% decrease in the total power requirement to produce an equivalent mass of edible biomass.

  7. Report on the third meeting of the project advisory committee (technical) for IAEA/WHO Project EGY/6/004 (Egyptian Cancer Project) 27-29 April 1985, at NEMROCK, Cairo. PACT(3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, C.B.G.

    1985-06-01

    The Project was launched in March 1983, with the first meeting of the Committee (PACT(I)). It was planned for a duration of four years. Now, after two years experience, PACT(III) met to review results so far and to advise on actions for the remaining two years. Appendix 1 lists those present at the meeting. Since 1983 a Pilot Project has been running at NEMROCK, the Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Oncology Centre at Cairo University Hospital, at which the Project is based. Two training courses have been given, in November 1983 and November 1984, and treatment has been given using protocols developed under the project. PACT(III) examined clinical results obtained so far and made recommendations for the extension of the scheme to other hospitals in Egypt

  8. Variational treatment of the Shastry-Sutherland antiferromagnet using Projected Entangled Pair States (PEPS)

    OpenAIRE

    Isacsson, A.; Syljuasen, O. F.

    2006-01-01

    We have applied a variational algorithm based on Projected Entangled Pair States (PEPS) to a two dimensional frustrated spin system, the spin-1/2 antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model on the Shastry-Sutherland lattice. We use the class of PEPS with internal tensor dimension D=2, the first step beyond product states (D=1 PEPS). We have found that the D=2 variational PEPS algorithm is able to capture the physics in both the valence-bond crystal and the Neel ordered state. Also the spin-textures gi...

  9. Software Configuration Management Plan for the K West Basin Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) Project A.9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GREEN, J.W.

    2000-05-01

    This document provides a configuration control plan for the software associated with the operation and control of the Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS). It establishes requirements for ensuring configuration item identification, configuration control, configuration status accounting, defect reporting and resolution of computer software. It is written to comply with HNF-SD-SNF-CM-001, Spent Nuclear Fuel Configuration Management Plan (Forehand 1998) and HNF-PRO-309 Computer Software Quality Assurance Requirements, and applicable sections of administrative procedure CM-6-037-00, SNF Project Process Automation Software and Equipment.

  10. Software Configuration Management Plan for the K West Basin Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) - Project A.9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GREEN, J.W.

    2000-01-01

    This document provides a configuration control plan for the software associated with the operation and control of the Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS). It establishes requirements for ensuring configuration item identification, configuration control, configuration status accounting, defect reporting and resolution of computer software. It is written to comply with HNF-SD-SNF-CM-001, Spent Nuclear Fuel Configuration Management Plan (Forehand 1998) and HNF-PRO-309 Computer Software Quality Assurance Requirements, and applicable sections of administrative procedure CM-6-037-00, SNF Project Process Automation Software and Equipment

  11. Training Needs for Substance Abuse Treatment and Assessment among Rehabilitation Counselors: California State Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Lee Za; Lee, Dal-Yob; Cha, Grace; Arokiasamy, Charles

    2008-01-01

    One hundred rehabilitation counselors in California reported that about 90% of consumers with whom they worked with had substance abuse and cooccurring issues, yet about half rated their graduate training in substance abuse treatment and assessment as poor and their practices as marginally proficient. The correlation analysis revealed that…

  12. Centralized treatment facility for low level radioactive waste produced in Belgium. The CILVA project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detilleux; Debieve; Renard, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    The CILVA unit is designed for β γ low level nuclear wastes treatments. CILVA is made of five units: the reception/storage/distribution unit, the waste preconditioning unit, the supercompaction unit, the incineration unit and the conditioning unit. Each unit will be controlled by a decentralized system connected to a central waste management monitoring system. (A.B.). 2 figs

  13. Borehole Summary Report for Core Hole C4998 – Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Boreholes Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, D. BRENT; Garcia, Benjamin J.

    2006-12-15

    Seismic borehole C4998 was cored through the upper portion of the Columbia River Basalt Group and Ellensburg Formation to provide detailed lithologic information and intact rock samples that represent the geology at the Waste Treatment Plant. This report describes the drilling of borehole C4998 and documents the geologic data collected during the drilling of the cored portion of the borehole.

  14. Project Impact: a pharmacotherapy pilot trial investigating the abstinence and treatment adherence of Latino light smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Dios, Marcel A; Anderson, Bradley J; Stanton, Cassandra; Audet, Daniel A; Stein, Michael

    2012-10-01

    Light smoking is particularly prevalent among Latino smokers. Nicotine replacement (NRT) and varenicline are effective medications for smoking cessation for moderate-heavy smokers but have not been tested in light smokers, and thus, there are no treatment guidelines for use with light smokers. This pilot trial tested the efficacy of NRT and varenicline in increasing smoking abstinence among Latino light smokers. A 3-group (NRT, varenicline, and varenicline-placebo) randomized design was used, and Latino light smokers (≤10 cigarettes per day) received 12 weeks of treatment, which included a culturally informed behavioral health session and ongoing medication management visits. At follow-up, there were no abstinent participants in the placebo and NRT groups. However, 30% of participants in the varenicline group were abstinent at the 3-, 4-, and 6-month follow-up. This study represents the only investigation that specifically targets Latino light smokers using these treatments and characterizing their treatment adherence. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Aggregation of Distributed Generation Assets in New York State: Appendix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2004-04-01

    This report appendix describes aspects of a project to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of aggregating distributed generating resources in New York State. This project demonstrates a system that allows distributed generation (DG) to participate in competitive markets in much the same way as large central-station power plants. This approach involves aggregating the distributed demand-side resources into a single transaction entity consistent with the requirements of the New York Independent System Operator (NYISO). This single entity then buys or sells capacity and energy (i.e., curtailment) in NYISO markets.

  16. Unusual Presentations of Actinomycosis; Anterior Abdominal Wall and Appendix: Report of Three Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faruk Karateke

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Primary actinomycosis of the anterior abdominal wall and appendix are very rare clinical entities. An accurate diagnosis is generally obtained by histological examination, and treatment often requires surgical resection. Case Report: In this study we presented two cases of primary actinomycosis involving the anterior abdominal wall and a third one located in the appendix. Conclusion: Actinomyces Israelii can involve all anatomic structures of the abdomen. Although preoperative diagnosis is difficult, the combination of surgery and antibiotic treatment results in complete treatment in the majority of cases.

  17. Cooling water treatment for heavy water project (Paper No. 6.9)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valsangkar, H.N.

    1992-01-01

    With minor exceptions, water is the preferred industrial medium for the removal of unwanted heat from process systems. The application of various chemical treatments is required to protect the system from water related and process related problems of corrosion, scale and deposition and biofouling. The paper discusses the cooling water problems for heavy water industries along with the impact caused by associated fertilizer units. (author). 6 figs

  18. Spasticity: its physiology and management. Part IV. Current and projected treatment procedures for spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, B

    1977-04-01

    Today's prescriptions for treating spasticity may include pharmacological, surgical, or physical procedures. All derive their rationale from the classical concepts of decerebrate rigidity and of brain organization as discussed in Part I. This paper describes the advantages and disadvantages of these current treatment procedures and proposes that recent discoveries about the "recovery" capabilities of the central nervous system may influence the means for managing spasticity in the future.

  19. EB treatment of wastewater and progress of on-going project in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhiguang

    2006-01-01

    Electron beam processing has been widely used in China in the fields of radiation crosslinking cables and wires, heat shrinkable material, foam materials, irradiated latex and polymers, sterilization, removal SOx and NOx of flue gas, chemical industry, industrial CT, electron instrument, and so on. However, EB treatment of wastewater is mostly under study in laboratory. The manufacture of electron accelerators has also become a comparatively independent industry in China. (author)

  20. Yield Responses of Black Spruce to Forest Vegetation Management Treatments: Initial Responses and Rotational Projections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter F. Newton

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to (1 quantitatively summarize the early yield responses of black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill. B.S.P. to forest vegetation management (FVM treatments through a meta-analytical review of the scientific literature, and (2 given (1, estimate the rotational consequences of these responses through model simulation. Based on a fixed-effects meta-analytic approach using 44 treated-control yield pairs derived from 12 experiments situated throughout the Great Lakes—St. Lawrence and Canadian Boreal Forest Regions, the resultant mean effect size (response ratio and associated 95% confidence interval for basal diameter, total height, stem volume, and survival responses, were respectively: 54.7% (95% confidence limits (lower/upper: 34.8/77.6, 27.3% (15.7/40.0, 198.7% (70.3/423.5, and 2.9% (−5.5/11.8. The results also indicated that early and repeated treatments will yield the largest gains in terms of mean tree size and survival. Rotational simulations indicated that FVM treatments resulted in gains in stand-level operability (e.g., reductions of 9 and 5 yr for plantations established on poor-medium and good-excellent site qualities, resp.. The challenge of maintaining coniferous forest cover on recently disturbed sites, attaining statutory-defined free-to-grow status, and ensuring long-term productivity, suggest that FVM will continue to be an essential silvicultural treatment option when managing black spruce plantations.

  1. Predicting response to antiretroviral treatment by machine learning: the EuResist project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zazzi, Maurizio; Incardona, Francesca; Rosen-Zvi, Michal; Prosperi, Mattia; Lengauer, Thomas; Altmann, Andre; Sonnerborg, Anders; Lavee, Tamar; Schülter, Eugen; Kaiser, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    For a long time, the clinical management of antiretroviral drug resistance was based on sequence analysis of the HIV genome followed by estimating drug susceptibility from the mutational pattern that was detected. The large number of anti-HIV drugs and HIV drug resistance mutations has prompted the development of computer-aided genotype interpretation systems, typically comprising rules handcrafted by experts via careful examination of in vitro and in vivo resistance data. More recently, machine learning approaches have been applied to establish data-driven engines able to indicate the most effective treatments for any patient and virus combination. Systems of this kind, currently including the Resistance Response Database Initiative and the EuResist engine, must learn from the large data sets of patient histories and can provide an objective and accurate estimate of the virological response to different antiretroviral regimens. The EuResist engine was developed by a European consortium of HIV and bioinformatics experts and compares favorably with the most commonly used genotype interpretation systems and HIV drug resistance experts. Next-generation treatment response prediction engines may valuably assist the HIV specialist in the challenging task of establishing effective regimens for patients harboring drug-resistant virus strains. The extensive collection and accurate processing of increasingly large patient data sets are eagerly awaited to further train and translate these systems from prototype engines into real-life treatment decision support tools. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Streptococcus milleri in the appendix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, P M; Wilson, G

    1977-10-01

    The appendix was investigated as a possible habitat of Streptococcus milleri. Both normal and inflamed appendices were examined and the isolation rates compared. S. milleri was present in a quarter of the normal appendices and more than half of those associated with apendicitis--a difference that was statistically highly significant. The isolation rates throughout were indepencent of age. There was a pronounced connection between the presence of S. milleri in the appendix and the purulent manifestations of appendicitis. S. milleri was isolated from other abdominal sites associated with appendicitis. The frequency of isolation was increased by culture in an enrichment broth containing nalidixic acid and sulphadimidine.

  3. The Native Inmate Substance Abuse Pre-Treatment Program: A Demonstration Project (January 1990-December 1990). Final Report. Aboriginal Peoples Collection. Corrections Branch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ministry of the Solicitor General, Ottawa (Ontario).

    The Native Inmate Substance Abuse Pre-Treatment Project, a 1-year research and development demonstration project, was pilot tested at Mountain Federal Penitentiary and William Head Federal Penitentiary in British Columbia (Canada). Ten inmates volunteered to participate in the Mountain program, and 14 inmates were required to attend at William…

  4. Application of the ecosystem diagnosis and treatment method to the Grande Ronde Model Watershed project. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mobrand, L.; Lestelle, L.

    1997-01-01

    In the spring of 1994 a technical planning support project was initiated by the Grande Ronde Model Watershed Board of Directors (Board) with funding from the Bonneville Power Administration. The project was motivated by a need for a science based method for prioritizing restoration actions in the basin that would promote effectiveness and accountability. In this section the authors recall the premises for the project. The authors also present a set of recommendations for implementing a watershed planning process that incorporates a science-based framework to help guide decision making. This process is intended to assist the Grande Ronde Model Watershed Board in its effort to plan and implement watershed improvement measures. The process would also assist the Board in coordinating its efforts with other entities in the region. The planning process is based on an approach for developing an ecosystem management strategy referred to as the Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) method (Lichatowich et al. 1995, Lestelle et al. 1996). The process consists of an on-going planning cycle. Included in this cycle is an assessment of the ability of the watershed to support and sustain natural resources and other economic and societal values. This step in the process, which the authors refer to as the diagnosis, helps guide the development of actions (also referred to as treatments) aimed at improving the conditions of the watershed to achieve long-term objectives. The planning cycle calls for routinely reviewing and updating, as necessary, the basis for the diagnosis and other analyses used by the Board in adopting actions for implementation. The recommendations offered here address this critical need to habitually update the information used in setting priorities for action

  5. Application of the Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment Method to the Grande Ronde Model Watershed project : Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mobrand, Lars Erik; Lestelle, Lawrence C.

    1997-01-01

    In the spring of 1994 a technical planning support project was initiated by the Grande Ronde Model Watershed Board of Directors (Board) with funding from the Bonneville Power Administration. The project was motivated by a need for a science based method for prioritizing restoration actions in the basin that would promote effectiveness and accountability. In this section the authors recall the premises for the project. The authors also present a set of recommendations for implementing a watershed planning process that incorporates a science-based framework to help guide decision making. This process is intended to assist the Grande Ronde Model Watershed Board in its effort to plan and implement watershed improvement measures. The process would also assist the Board in coordinating its efforts with other entities in the region. The planning process is based on an approach for developing an ecosystem management strategy referred to as the Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) method (Lichatowich et al. 1995, Lestelle et al. 1996). The process consists of an on-going planning cycle. Included in this cycle is an assessment of the ability of the watershed to support and sustain natural resources and other economic and societal values. This step in the process, which the authors refer to as the diagnosis, helps guide the development of actions (also referred to as treatments) aimed at improving the conditions of the watershed to achieve long-term objectives. The planning cycle calls for routinely reviewing and updating, as necessary, the basis for the diagnosis and other analyses used by the Board in adopting actions for implementation. The recommendations offered here address this critical need to habitually update the information used in setting priorities for action.

  6. Conceptual Site Treatment Plan Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research Environmental Restoration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, T.E.

    1993-10-01

    The Federal Facilities Compliance Act (the Act) of 1992 waives sovereign immunity for federal facilities for fines and penalties under the provisions of the Resource Recovery and Conservation Act, state, interstate, and local hazardous and solid waste management requirements. However, for three years the Act delays the waiver for violations involving US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The Act, however, requires that the DOE prepare a Conceptual Site Treatment Plan (CSTP) for each of its sites that generate or store mixed wastes (MWs). The purpose of the CSTP is to present DOE`s preliminary evaluations of the development of treatment capacities and technologies for treating a site`s MW. This CSTP presents the preliminary capacity and technology evaluation for the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR). The five identified MW streams at LEHR are evaluated to the extent possible given available information. Only one MW stream is sufficiently well defined to permit a technology evaluation to be performed. Two other MW streams are in the process of being characterized so that an evaluation can be performed. The other two MW streams will be generated by the decommissioning of inactive facilities onsite within the next five years.

  7. Conceptual Site Treatment Plan Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research Environmental Restoration Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, T.E.

    1993-10-01

    The Federal Facilities Compliance Act (the Act) of 1992 waives sovereign immunity for federal facilities for fines and penalties under the provisions of the Resource Recovery and Conservation Act, state, interstate, and local hazardous and solid waste management requirements. However, for three years the Act delays the waiver for violations involving US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The Act, however, requires that the DOE prepare a Conceptual Site Treatment Plan (CSTP) for each of its sites that generate or store mixed wastes (MWs). The purpose of the CSTP is to present DOE's preliminary evaluations of the development of treatment capacities and technologies for treating a site's MW. This CSTP presents the preliminary capacity and technology evaluation for the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR). The five identified MW streams at LEHR are evaluated to the extent possible given available information. Only one MW stream is sufficiently well defined to permit a technology evaluation to be performed. Two other MW streams are in the process of being characterized so that an evaluation can be performed. The other two MW streams will be generated by the decommissioning of inactive facilities onsite within the next five years

  8. Treatment of Displaced Indigenous Populations in Two Large Hydro Projects in Panama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Finley-Brook

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Consultation practices with affected populations prior to hydro concessions often remained poor in the decade since the World Commission on Dams (WCD although, in some cases the involvement of local people in the details of resettlement has improved. Numerous international and national actors, such as state agencies, multilateral banks, corporate shareholders, and pro-business media, support the development of dams, but intergovernmental agencies struggle to assure the protection of fundamental civil, human, and indigenous rights at the permitting and construction stages. We analyse two large-scale Panamanian dams with persistent disrespect for indigenous land tenure. Free, prior, and informed consent was sidestepped even though each dam required or will require Ngöbe, Emberá, or Kuna villages to relocate. When populations protested, additional human rights violations occurred, including state-sponsored violence. International bodies are slowly identifying and denouncing this abuse of power. Simultaneously, many nongovernmental organisations (NGOs seek change in Panama consistent with WCD’s good-practice guidelines. A number of NGOs have tied hydro projects to unethical greenhouse gas (GHG emissions trade. As private and state institutions market formerly collective water and carbon resources for profit, these Panamanian cases have become central to a public debate over equitable and green hydro development. Media communication feeds disputes through frontline coverage of cooperation and confrontation.

  9. Integrated Project Management System description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The Integrated Program Management System (IPMS) Description is a ''working'' document that describes the work processes of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Office (UMTRA) and IPMS Group. This document has undergone many revisions since the UMTRA Project began; this revision not only updates the work processes but more clearly explains the relationships between the Project Office, contractors, and other participants. The work process flow style has been revised to better describe Project work and the relationships of participants. For each work process, more background and guidance on ''why'' and ''what is expected'' is given. For example, a description of activity data sheets has been added in the work organization and the Project performance and reporting processes, as well as additional detail about the federal budget process and funding management and improved flow charts and explanations of cost and schedule management. A chapter has been added describing the Cost Reduction/Productivity Improvement Program. The Change Control Board (CCB) procedures (Appendix A) have been updated. Project critical issues meeting (PCIM) procedures have been added as Appendix B. Budget risk assessment meeting procedures have been added as Appendix C. These appendices are written to act as stand-alone documentation for each process. As the procedures are improved and updated, the documentation can be updated separately

  10. 23 CFR Appendix A to Subpart B of... - Guide Letter of Certification by State Engineer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Guide Letter of Certification by State Engineer A Appendix A to Subpart B of Part 637 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... State Engineer Date Project No. This is to certify that: The results of the tests used in the acceptance...

  11. Durability of Dukovany shallow land repository engineered barriers. Appendix 7: Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vokal, A.; Nachmilner, L.; Wasserbauer, R.; Dohnalek, J.

    2001-01-01

    The main aim of this project was to explore the durability of engineering barriers used at Dukovany shallow land repository as a support of safety assessments. This appendix summarises the principal results focused on durability of asphaltopropyleneconcrete (APC) hydroisolation and steel reinforced concrete construction

  12. Engineering evaluation of solids/liquids separation processes applicable to sludge treatment project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, J.B.

    1998-01-01

    This engineering study looks at the solids/liquids separation unit operations after the acid dissolution of the K Basin sludge treatment. Unit operations considered were centrifugation, filtration (cartridge, cross flow, and high shear filtration) and gravity settling. The recommended unit operations for the solids/liquids separations are based upon the efficiency, complexity, and off-the-shelf availability and adaptability. The unit operations recommended were a Robatel DPC 900 centrifuge followed by a nuclearized 31WM cartridge filter. The Robatel DPC 900 has been successfully employed in the nuclear industry on a world wide scale. The 31WM cartridge filter has been employed for filtration campaigns in both the government and civilian nuclear arenas

  13. Engineering evaluation of solids/liquids separation processes applicable to sludge treatment project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, J.B.

    1998-08-25

    This engineering study looks at the solids/liquids separation unit operations after the acid dissolution of the K Basin sludge treatment. Unit operations considered were centrifugation, filtration (cartridge, cross flow, and high shear filtration) and gravity settling. The recommended unit operations for the solids/liquids separations are based upon the efficiency, complexity, and off-the-shelf availability and adaptability. The unit operations recommended were a Robatel DPC 900 centrifuge followed by a nuclearized 31WM cartridge filter. The Robatel DPC 900 has been successfully employed in the nuclear industry on a world wide scale. The 31WM cartridge filter has been employed for filtration campaigns in both the government and civilian nuclear arenas.

  14. Antecedent and progress of the project on the treatment of chimney gases with electrons in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pina V, G.

    1991-10-01

    After the realization of the chimney gases treatment seminar with electrons, organized jointly among the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), in August of 1990 and following one of the received recommendations, it was elaborated an economic technical feasibility study of this process in Mexico, using technical data of a thermoelectric power station of Federal Commission of Electricity, where is being consumed fuel oil. This study is good to know some technical parameters of a plant of this process, proposed to settle in Mexico, so as some economic estimates of installation and operation costs of this plant; also, it is traced about the construction of a demonstration plant of the process, with capacity of 20,000 m 3 N/h, using the same data of the thermoelectric power station considered previously, as the first step in the scaling of this process toward industrial level. (Author)

  15. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart H of... - Requirements for Diagnostic-Feasibility Studies and Environmental Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...)(10) and the monitoring procedures stated in paragraph (b)(3) of this appendix may be modified to conform to specific project requirements to reduce project costs without jeopardizing adequacy of... of historical lake uses, including recreational uses up to the present time, and how these uses may...

  16. Appendix C: safety design rationale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghose, S.

    1985-01-01

    A brief discussion of the rationale for safety design of fusion plants is presented in the main text. Further detail safety considerations are presented in this appendix in the form of charts and tables. The author present some of the major safety criteria and other criteria used in blanket selection here

  17. One System Integrated Project Team: Retrieval And Delivery Of The Hanford Tank Wastes For Vitrification In The Waste Treatment Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harp, Benton J. [Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Richland, Washington (United States); Kacich, Richard M. [Bechtel National, Inc., Richland, WA (United States); Skwarek, Raymond J. [Washington River Protection Solutions LLC, Richland, WA (United States)

    2012-12-20

    The One System Integrated Project Team (IPT) was formed in late 2011 as a way for improving the efficiency of delivery and treatment of highly radioactive waste stored in underground tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) 586-square-mile Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The purpose of the One System IPT is to improve coordination and integration between the Hanford's Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) contractor and the Tank Operations Contractor (TOC). The vision statement is: One System is a WTP and TOC safety conscious team that, through integrated management and implementation of risk-informed decision and mission-based solutions, will enable the earliest start of safe and efficient treatment of Hanford's tank waste, to protect the Columbia River, environment and public. The IPT is a formal collaboration between Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI), which manages design and construction of the WTP for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (DOEORP), and Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), which manages the TOC for ORP. More than fifty-six (56) million gallons of highly radioactive liquid waste are stored in one hundred seventy-seven (177) aging, underground tanks. Most of Hanford's waste tanks - one hundred forty-nine (149) of them - are of an old single-shell tank (SST) design built between 1944 and 1964. More than sixty (60) of these tanks have leaked in the past, releasing an estimated one million gallons of waste into the soil and threatening the nearby Columbia River. There are another twenty-eight (28) new double-shelled tanks (DSTs), built from 1968 to 1986, that provide greater protection to the environment. In 1989, DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) signed a landmark agreement that required Hanford to comply with federal and state environmental standards. It also paved the way for agreements that set deadlines for retrieving the tank

  18. One System Integrated Project Team: Retrieval And Delivery Of The Hanford Tank Wastes For Vitrification In The Waste Treatment Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harp, Benton J.; Kacich, Richard M.; Skwarek, Raymond J.

    2012-01-01

    The One System Integrated Project Team (IPT) was formed in late 2011 as a way for improving the efficiency of delivery and treatment of highly radioactive waste stored in underground tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) 586-square-mile Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The purpose of the One System IPT is to improve coordination and integration between the Hanford's Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) contractor and the Tank Operations Contractor (TOC). The vision statement is: One System is a WTP and TOC safety conscious team that, through integrated management and implementation of risk-informed decision and mission-based solutions, will enable the earliest start of safe and efficient treatment of Hanford's tank waste, to protect the Columbia River, environment and public. The IPT is a formal collaboration between Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI), which manages design and construction of the WTP for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (DOEORP), and Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), which manages the TOC for ORP. More than fifty-six (56) million gallons of highly radioactive liquid waste are stored in one hundred seventy-seven (177) aging, underground tanks. Most of Hanford's waste tanks - one hundred forty-nine (149) of them - are of an old single-shell tank (SST) design built between 1944 and 1964. More than sixty (60) of these tanks have leaked in the past, releasing an estimated one million gallons of waste into the soil and threatening the nearby Columbia River. There are another twenty-eight (28) new double-shelled tanks (DSTs), built from 1968 to 1986, that provide greater protection to the environment. In 1989, DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) signed a landmark agreement that required Hanford to comply with federal and state environmental standards. It also paved the way for agreements that set deadlines for retrieving the tank

  19. Constructed wetlands and solar-driven disinfection technologies for sustainable wastewater treatment and reclamation in rural India: SWINGS project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, J A; Ávila, C; Otter, P; Kilian, R; Istenič, D; Rolletschek, M; Molle, P; Khalil, N; Ameršek, I; Mishra, V K; Jorgensen, C; Garfi, A; Carvalho, P; Brix, H; Arias, C A

    2017-09-01

    SWINGS was a cooperation project between the European Union and India, aiming at implementing state of the art low-cost technologies for the treatment and reuse of domestic wastewater in rural areas of India. The largest wastewater treatment plant consists of a high-rate anaerobic system, followed by vertical and horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands with a treatment area of around 1,900 m 2 and a final step consisting of solar-driven anodic oxidation (AO) and ultraviolet (UV) disinfection units allowing direct reuse of the treated water. The implementation and operation of two pilot plants in north (Aligarh Muslim University, AMU) and central India (Indira Gandhi National Tribal University, IGNTU) are shown in this study. The overall performance of AMU pilot plant during the first 7 months of operation showed organic matter removal efficiencies of 87% total suspended solids, 95% 5-day biological oxygen demand (BOD 5 ) and 90% chemical oxygen demand, while Kjeldahl nitrogen removal reached 89%. The UV disinfection unit produces water for irrigation and toilet flushing with pathogenic indicator bacteria well below WHO guidelines. On the other hand, the AO disinfection unit implemented at IGNTU and operated for almost a year has been shown to produce an effluent of sufficient quality to be reused by the local population for agriculture and irrigation.

  20. Development, implementation and evaluation of a multidisciplinary cancer rehabilitation programme : The CANSURVIVOR Project : meeting post-treatment cancer survivors’ needs

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ivers, Mary E.

    2009-01-01

    Cancer survivor numbers in Ireland are increasing due to the success of modern treatments. Although most survivors have a good quality of life not all survivors return to \\'normal\\' after treatment. The HSE funded CANSURVIVOR research project has found that many survivors have difficulties and need help to recover and adjust after cancer treatment. Over a number of exploratory studies using interviews, focus groups and a survey of 262 breast, prostate, colorectal and lung cancer survivors, the researchers found that over 25% of survivors experienced significant difficulties with physical, emotional and social functioning, including symptoms such as insomnia and fatigue, while 33% experienced high levels of anxiety. Of particular concern were the findings that over 50% of survivors were overweight, 35% had reduced their physical activity levels and 13% continued to smoke after cancer, putting them at risk for further health problems. This evidence led to the development of an 8-week multi-disciplinary pilot rehabilitation programme. Significant quality of life improvements were achieved with increases in strength and fitness as well as a reduction in anxiety levels and dietary improvements. The researchers highlight the need for a structured, co-ordinated survivorship service, education of health professionals about survivorship and the provision of high quality information to survivors. This research was led by the School of Psychology at UCD in collaboration with the Physiotherapy and Nutrition departments of St. Vincent\\'s hospital.

  1. Appendix mass: conservative management without interval appendectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, J; Lindhard, A; Jensen, H E

    1984-09-01

    Forty-nine patients had conservative treatment of an appendix mass without interval appendectomy. Five were lost to follow-up within 6 months, and 44 patients were followed for between 6 months and 22 years. In nine patients (20 percent) recurrent appendicitis developed, and six (14 percent) suffered chronic pain not thought to be due to appendicitis. Of the recurrences, 66 percent occurred within 2 years of the initial attack. Barium examination of the cecum was successful in diagnosing two of three additional patients in whom a right iliac fossa mass was not due to appendicitis. The morbidity and expense of routine interval appendectomy was thus eliminated in 80 percent of the patients.

  2. Diameter of the lymphoid follicles in the vermiform appendix of Bangladeshi cadaver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M A; Parash, T H; Banu, L A

    2014-04-01

    Appendicitis is the most common clinical condition of the appendix. Many cases of acute appendicitis result from obstruction of the lumen of the appendix by lymphoid hyperplasia. The vermiform appendix is a worm-like, closed-ended, narrow, small tubular structure, projecting from posteromedial wall of cecum. It is an integral part of the Gut Associated Lymphoid Tissue (GALT) system. The lymphoid follicles of the vermiform appendix vary in respect to their number, diameter and location in different ages. This study was done to measure and establish the normal diameter with age related variation of the lymphoid follicles of vermiform appendix in Bangladeshi population. This descriptive cross sectional study was carried out in the Department of Anatomy, Sir Salimullah Medical College, Dhaka, from January 2008 to June 2009. Sixty (60) postmortem vermiform appendices of different age groups of Bangladeshi cadavers. For studying the diameter of lymphoid follicles in the vermiform appendix in relation to age, the collected samples were divided into five groups namely Group-A between age ranges 0-20 years, Group-B between age ranges 21-30 years, Group-C between age ranges 31-40 years, Group-D 41-50 years and Group-E age above 50 years. From each age group, six (6) fresh samples were selected for histological study. From each vermiform appendix three slides were prepared each from its base, middle part and near the tip and were stained with routine H & E stain. The normal diameter of the follicles of the vermiform appendix ranged from 0.40 mm to 0.66 mm. The highest average group diameter was 0.62±1.10mm in Group-A and the lowest value was 0.45±2.73mm in Group-E. It was obvious that the diameter decreased gradually with advancing age. The average normal diameter of the lymphoid follicles per histological section of vermiform appendix reduced with advancing age and showed a significant negative correlation with age (pvermiform appendix reduced significantly with advancing

  3. Nutrition and physical activity programs for obesity treatment (PRONAF study: methodological approach of the project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zapico Augusto G

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background At present, scientific consensus exists on the multifactorial etiopatogenia of obesity. Both professionals and researchers agree that treatment must also have a multifactorial approach, including diet, physical activity, pharmacology and/or surgical treatment. These two last ones should be reserved for those cases of morbid obesities or in case of failure of the previous ones. The aim of the PRONAF study is to determine what type of exercise combined with caloric restriction is the most appropriate to be included in overweigth and obesity intervention programs, and the aim of this paper is to describe the design and the evaluation methods used to carry out the PRONAF study. Methods/design One-hundred nineteen overweight (46 males and 120 obese (61 males subjects aged 18–50 years were randomly assigned to a strength training group, an endurance training group, a combined strength + endurance training group or a diet and physical activity recommendations group. The intervention period was 22 weeks (in all cases 3 times/wk of training for 22 weeks and 2 weeks for pre and post evaluation. All subjects followed a hypocaloric diet (25-30% less energy intake than the daily energy expenditure estimated by accelerometry. 29–34% of the total energy intake came from fat, 14–20% from protein, and 50–55% from carbohydrates. The mayor outcome variables assesed were, biochemical and inflamatory markers, body composition, energy balance, physical fitness, nutritional habits, genetic profile and quality of life. 180 (75.3% subjects finished the study, with a dropout rate of 24.7%. Dropout reasons included: personal reasons 17 (28.8%, low adherence to exercise 3 (5.1%, low adherence to diet 6 (10.2%, job change 6 (10.2%, and lost interest 27 (45.8%. Discussion Feasibility of the study has been proven, with a low dropout rate which corresponds to the estimated sample size. Transfer of knowledge is foreseen as a spin-off, in order

  4. Projected costs of colorectal cancer treatment in New Zealand in the absence of population screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheerin, Ian; Green, Terri; Sarfati, Diana; Cox, Brian

    2015-01-30

    To estimate volumes and costs of health services required for new cases of colorectal cancers in New Zealand from 2014 to 2026 in the absence of population screening. Annual incidence of colorectal cancer, by stage, location and age was estimated for 2006-2026 based on NZ cancer registry data for 2001-2005. Treatment protocols were determined based on current best practice. An economics forecasting model was developed to estimate annual volumes and costs of health services to treat new cases of colorectal cancer expected to present each year from 2014 to 2026. Survival rates and other model parameters were drawn from the literature. Costs are presented at 2011 prices. Annual health service costs of new colorectal cancer presentations in New Zealand are estimated to increase from approximately $83.6 million in 2014 to $100.2 million by 2026, if no systematic screening programme is introduced. The majority of these costs will be for surgery and colonoscopies. These results provide a baseline against which to compare the level of resources required if a population screening programme is introduced. Planning is necessary to manage costs and services for colorectal cancer, even without a systematic population screening programme.

  5. Effectiveness, efficiency and efficacy in the multidimensional treatment of schizophrenia: Rethinking project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Bernardo, Miguel; Argimon, Josep Maria; Arrojo, Manuel; Bravo-Ortiz, Maria Fe; Cabrera-Cifuentes, Ana; Carretero-Román, Julián; Franco-Martín, Manuel A; García-Portilla, Paz; Haro, Josep Maria; Olivares, José Manuel; Penadés, Rafael; Del Pino-Montes, Javier; Sanjuán, Julio; Arango, Celso

    Schizophrenia is a clinically heterogeneous syndrome affecting multiple dimensions of patients' life. Therefore, its treatment might require a multidimensional approach that should take into account the efficacy (the ability of an intervention to get the desired result under ideal conditions), the effectiveness (the degree to which the intended effect is obtained under routine clinical practice conditions or settings) and the efficiency (value of the intervention as relative to its cost to the individual or society) of any therapeutic intervention. In a first step of the process, a group of 90 national experts from different areas of health-care and with a multidimensional and multidisciplinary perspective of the disease, defined the concepts of efficacy, effectiveness and efficiency of established therapeutic interventions within 7 key dimensions of the illness: symptomatology; comorbidity; relapse and adherence; insight and subjective experience; cognition; quality of life, autonomy and functional capacity; and social inclusion and associated factors. The main conclusions and recommendations of this stage of the work are presented herein. Copyright © 2016 SEP y SEPB. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Technical Appendix for Development for Modified Streamflows 1928-1989 : Columbia River & Coastal Basin.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; A.G. Crook Company

    1993-06-01

    The report ``Adjusted Streamflow and Storage 1928-1989`` contains listings of historical flows for the sites in the Columbia River and Coastal Basins. This section of the Technical Appendix provides for the site specific procedures used to determine those historical flows. The study purpose, authority, and definitions are given in the main report. The purpose of this section of the Technical Appendix is to document the computational procedures used at each of the project sites to develop historical flows for the period July 1928--September 1989.

  7. New Mexico Southwest Regional Geothermal Development Operations Research Project. Appendix 9 of regional operations research program for development of geothermal energy in the Southwest United States. Final technical report, June 1977--August 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz, Thomas A.; Fedor, Dennis

    1979-01-01

    This final report describes the findings and conclusions of the New Mexico Team during the first project year of the Southwest Regional Geothermal Development Operations Research Project. The purpose of this project is to help realize a goal of the USDOE , Division of Geothermal Energy (DOE/DGE), to accelerate the actual commercial utilization of geothermal energy. This was done by: (1) identifying the potential for development of geothermal energy in the five-state regions of Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Nevada and Utah; and (2) identifying the actions needed to accomplish that development.

  8. Report on the Study of the Tax and Rate Treatment of Renewable Energy Projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadley, S.W.

    1993-01-01

    technologies. We did not speculate on the technological evolution of the generating options, consequent changes in their costs, and changes in their attractiveness to IOUs and NUGs in the future. Consistent with the direction provided by the legislation, this study was limited to the portions of the electric power industry that make decisions on generating technologies. We did not investigate barriers or incentives that may result from tax policies affecting other segments of the fuel cycle, such as incentives for production of fossil fuels. It was also not possible to quantify the ratemaking treatment of risks. For example, the ratemaking procedure of passing through the costs of fuel to customers removes the risk of unexpected fuel price fluctuations for decisionmakers selecting conventional technologies. The structure of financial, labor, materials, fuel, and purchased power contracts are also beyond the scope of this ,study. Finally, the transmission and distribution of electric power was not studied

  9. [Improved Blood Pressure Control to Reduce Cardiovascular Disease Morbidity and Mortality: The Standardized Hypertension Treatment and Prevention Project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Pragna; Ordunez, Pedro; DiPette, Donald; Escobar, María Cristina; Hassell, Trevor; Wyss, Fernando; Hennis, Anselm; Asma, Samira; Angell, Sonia

    2017-06-08

    Hypertension is the leading remediable risk factor for cardiovascular disease, affecting more than 1 billion people worldwide, and is responsible for more than 10 million preventable deaths globally each year. While hypertension can be successfully diagnosed and treated, only one in seven persons with hypertension have controlled blood pressure. To meet the challenge of improving the control of hypertension, particularly in low- and middle-income countries, the authors developed the Standardized Hypertension Treatment and Prevention Project, which involves a health systems-strengthening approach that advocates for standardized hypertension management using evidence-based interventions. These interventions include the use of standardized treatment protocols, a core set of medications along with improved procurement mechanisms to increase the availability and affordability of these medications, registries for cohort monitoring and evaluation, patient empowerment, team-based care (task shifting), and community engagement. With political will and strong partnerships, this approach provides the groundwork to reduce high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease-related morbidity and mortality.

  10. Post-diagnosis social networks, and lifestyle and treatment factors in the After Breast Cancer Pooling Project (ABCPP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroenke, Candyce H; Michael, Yvonne; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Kwan, Marilyn L.; Nechuta, Sarah; Caan, Bette J.; Pierce, John; Chen, Wendy Y.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Larger social networks have been associated with better breast cancer survival. To investigate potential mediators, we evaluated associations of social network size and diversity with lifestyle and treatment factors associated with prognosis. Methods We included 9,331 women from the After Breast Cancer Pooling Project who provided data on social networks within approximately two years following diagnosis. A social network index was derived from information about the presence of a spouse or intimate partner, religious ties, community participation, friendship ties, and numbers of living relatives. Diversity was assessed as variety of ties, independent of size. We used logistic regression to evaluate associations with outcomes and evaluated whether effect estimates differed using meta-analytic techniques. Results Associations were similar across cohorts though analyses of smoking and alcohol included US cohorts only due to low prevalence of these behaviors in the Shanghai cohort. Socially isolated women were more likely to be obese (OR=1.21, 95% CI:1.03-1.42), have low physical activity (social networks measured post-diagnosis were associated with more adverse lifestyle factors and less intensive cancer treatment. PMID:26749519

  11. Improved Blood Pressure Control to Reduce Cardiovascular Disease Morbidity and Mortality: The Standardized Hypertension Treatment and Prevention Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Pragna; Ordunez, Pedro; DiPette, Donald; Escobar, Maria Cristina; Hassell, Trevor; Wyss, Fernando; Hennis, Anselm; Asma, Samira; Angell, Sonia

    2016-12-01

    Hypertension is the leading remediable risk factor for cardiovascular disease, affecting more than 1 billion people worldwide, and is responsible for more than 10 million preventable deaths globally each year. While hypertension can be successfully diagnosed and treated, only one in seven persons with hypertension have controlled blood pressure. To meet the challenge of improving the control of hypertension, particularly in low- and middle-income countries, the authors developed the Standardized Hypertension Treatment and Prevention Project, which involves a health systems-strengthening approach that advocates for standardized hypertension management using evidence-based interventions. These interventions include the use of standardized treatment protocols, a core set of medications along with improved procurement mechanisms to increase the availability and affordability of these medications, registries for cohort monitoring and evaluation, patient empowerment, team-based care (task shifting), and community engagement. With political will and strong partnerships, this approach provides the groundwork to reduce high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease-related morbidity and mortality. ©2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Post-diagnosis social networks, and lifestyle and treatment factors in the After Breast Cancer Pooling Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroenke, Candyce H; Michael, Yvonne L; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Poole, Elizabeth M; Kwan, Marilyn L; Nechuta, Sarah; Caan, Bette J; Pierce, John P; Chen, Wendy Y

    2017-04-01

    Larger social networks have been associated with better breast cancer survival. To investigate potential mediators, we evaluated associations of social network size and diversity with lifestyle and treatment factors associated with prognosis. We included 9331 women from the After Breast Cancer Pooling Project who provided data on social networks within approximately two years following diagnosis. A social network index was derived from information about the presence of a spouse or intimate partner, religious ties, community participation, friendship ties, and numbers of living relatives. Diversity was assessed as variety of ties, independent of size. We used logistic regression to evaluate associations with outcomes and evaluated whether effect estimates differed using meta-analytic techniques. Associations were similar across cohorts though analyses of smoking and alcohol included US cohorts only because of low prevalence of these behaviors in the Shanghai cohort. Socially isolated women were more likely to be obese (OR = 1.21, 95% CI:1.03-1.42), have low physical activity (socially integrated women. Among node positive cases from three cohorts, socially isolated women were more likely not to receive chemotherapy (OR = 2.10, 95% CI:1.30-3.39); associations differed in a fourth cohort. Other associations (nonsignificant) were consistent with less intensive treatment in socially isolated women. Low social network diversity was independently associated with more adverse lifestyle, but not clinical, factors. Small, less diverse social networks measured post-diagnosis were associated with more adverse lifestyle factors and less intensive cancer treatment. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. The SCIDOTS Project: evidence of benefits of an integrated tobacco cessation intervention in tuberculosis care on treatment outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awaisu, Ahmed; Nik Mohamed, Mohamad Haniki; Mohamad Noordin, Noorliza; Abd Aziz, Noorizan; Syed Sulaiman, Syed Azhar; Muttalif, Abdul Razak; Ahmad Mahayiddin, Aziah

    2011-09-23

    There is substantial evidence to support the association between tuberculosis (TB) and tobacco smoking and that the smoking-related immunological abnormalities in TB are reversible within six weeks of cessation. Therefore, connecting TB and tobacco cessation interventions may produce significant benefits and positively impact TB treatment outcomes. However, no study has extensively documented the evidence of benefits of such integration. SCIDOTS Project is a study from the context of a developing nation aimed to determine this. An integrated TB-tobacco intervention was provided by trained TB directly observed therapy short-course (DOTS) providers at five chest clinics in Malaysia. The study was a prospective non-randomized controlled intervention using quasi-experimental design. Using Transtheoretical Model approach, 120 eligible participants who were current smokers at the time of TB diagnosis were assigned to either of two treatment groups: conventional TB DOTS plus smoking cessation intervention (integrated intervention or SCIDOTS group) or conventional TB DOTS alone (comparison or DOTS group). At baseline, newly diagnosed TB patients considering quitting smoking within the next 30 days were placed in the integrated intervention group, while those who were contemplating quitting were assigned to the comparison group. Eleven sessions of individualized cognitive behavioral therapy with or without nicotine replacement therapy were provided to each participant in the integrated intervention group. The impacts of the novel approach on biochemically validated smoking cessation and TB treatment outcomes were measured periodically as appropriate. A linear effect on both 7-day point prevalence abstinence and continuous abstinence was observed over time in the intervention group. At the end of 6 months, patients who received the integrated intervention had significantly higher rate of success in quitting smoking when compared with those who received the conventional TB

  14. The SCIDOTS Project: Evidence of benefits of an integrated tobacco cessation intervention in tuberculosis care on treatment outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Sulaiman Syed Azhar

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is substantial evidence to support the association between tuberculosis (TB and tobacco smoking and that the smoking-related immunological abnormalities in TB are reversible within six weeks of cessation. Therefore, connecting TB and tobacco cessation interventions may produce significant benefits and positively impact TB treatment outcomes. However, no study has extensively documented the evidence of benefits of such integration. SCIDOTS Project is a study from the context of a developing nation aimed to determine this. Methods An integrated TB-tobacco intervention was provided by trained TB directly observed therapy short-course (DOTS providers at five chest clinics in Malaysia. The study was a prospective non-randomized controlled intervention using quasi-experimental design. Using Transtheoretical Model approach, 120 eligible participants who were current smokers at the time of TB diagnosis were assigned to either of two treatment groups: conventional TB DOTS plus smoking cessation intervention (integrated intervention or SCIDOTS group or conventional TB DOTS alone (comparison or DOTS group. At baseline, newly diagnosed TB patients considering quitting smoking within the next 30 days were placed in the integrated intervention group, while those who were contemplating quitting were assigned to the comparison group. Eleven sessions of individualized cognitive behavioral therapy with or without nicotine replacement therapy were provided to each participant in the integrated intervention group. The impacts of the novel approach on biochemically validated smoking cessation and TB treatment outcomes were measured periodically as appropriate. Results A linear effect on both 7-day point prevalence abstinence and continuous abstinence was observed over time in the intervention group. At the end of 6 months, patients who received the integrated intervention had significantly higher rate of success in quitting smoking when

  15. [Retrospective evaluation of carcinoid tumors of the appendix in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Vicente, B; Bardají, C; Rigol, S; Obiols, P; Melo, M; Bella, R

    2009-04-01

    Carcinoids of the appendix are rare in children. Usually diagnosed incidentally on histologic investigation following appendectomy for acute apendicitis. To investigate the significance of the diagnosis of appendiceal carcinoid tumors in children, we conducted a retrospective study in our institution. Between 1990 and 2007 a total of 1158 appendectomy were done. In four patients the diagnosis was appendiceal carcinoid. We studied treatment, follow-up and prognosis of this patients. Indicacion for appendectomy was acute pain in lower right quadrant. The median tumor diameter was lower than 1 cm and the appropriate treatment was appendectomy. The prognosis was excellent in all the patients.

  16. Application of life cycle assessment for an evaluation of wastewater treatment and reuse project--case study of Xi'an, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Q H; Wang, X C; Xiong, J Q; Chen, R; Cao, B

    2010-03-01

    In order to illuminate the benefit of a wastewater treatment and reuse project, a life cycle assessment (LCA) model was proposed by combining the process-based LCA and the input-output based LCA in one framework and using energy consumption as the sole parameter for quantitative evaluation of the project. The life cycle consumption was evaluated mainly by life cycle inventory (LCI) analysis taking into account the construction phase, operation phase and demolishment phase of the project. For evaluating the life cycle benefit of treated water reuse, attention was paid to the decrease of secondary effluent discharge and water saving. As a result of comprehensive LCA analysis of a case project in Xi'an, China, it was understood that the life cycle benefit gained from treated wastewater reuse much surpassed the life cycle energy consumption. The advantage of wastewater treatment and reuse was well shown by LCA analysis using the proposed model. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Mucinous adenocarcinona of the appendix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton Roberto Furst Crenitte

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis of malignancy in the vermiform appendix is quite rare. The most common histological malignant neoplasia found in this tiny portion of the gastrointestinal tract is represented by the mucinous adenocarcinoma. This entity predominates in males around 50 years of age, and clinical presentation usually mimics or occurs along with an acute appendicitis. Early diagnosis is outside the rule since most cases at this stage are symptomless. The authors present the case of a 59-year-old female patient who looked for medical attention complaining of abdominal pain. Physical examination and laboratory workup were poor in diagnostic findings. The computed tomography images were compatible with the diagnosis of appendicitis and/or appendiceal neoplasia. The patient underwent a laparotomy and right hemicolectomy. The histological examination disclosed a moderately differentiated mucinous adenocarcinoma of the appendix stage T4a, N0, M0. The patient outcome was uneventful and was referred to an oncological center.

  18. Duplication of appendix: an accidental finding

    OpenAIRE

    Varshney, Manoranjan; Shahid, Mohammad; Maheshwari, Veena; Mubeen, Aysha; Gaur, Kavita

    2011-01-01

    Duplication of appendix is extremely rare anomaly. The reported incidence is 0.004–0.009%. In most of the cases the finding is accidental. Here the authors are presenting a case of type A duplex appendix in a 25-year male patient.

  19. Interval Appendicectomy and Management of Appendix Mass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A wholly conservative management without interval appendicectomy was instituted for 13 patients diagnosed as having appendix mass between 1998 and 2002 in the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria. Within three days of admission, one patient developed clinical features of ruptured appendix and ...

  20. Necrotizing arteritis of the appendix

    OpenAIRE

    Ciudad Cavero, Adriana; Purón del Aguila, Ramón

    2014-01-01

    In the pathological study of prophylactically removed appendices or appendicular present clinical pictures , you may find lesions of necrotizing arteritis. In 1932 , Plaut (13 ) described for the first time , this appendix necrotizing lesion at the level of small arteries and arterioles , as a specific and focal manifestation. From then until now , several authors have presented their contribution in this regard, sometimes describing the injury, individual personality , and others , relating ...

  1. Technical specifications, South Texas Project, Unit Nos. 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-498 and 50-499): Appendix ''A'' to License Nos. NPF-76 and NPF-78

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The South Texas Project, Unit Nos. 1 and 2, Technical Specifications were prepared by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to set forth the limits, operating conditions, and other requirements applicable to a nuclear reactor facility as set forth in Section 50.36 of 10 CFR Part 50 for the protection of the health and safety of the public

  2. Technical Specifications, South Texas Project, Unit Nos. 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-498 and 50-499): Appendix ''A'' to License Nos. NPF-76 and NPF-80

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-03-01

    The South Texas Project, Unit Nos. 1 and 2, Technical Specifications were prepared by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to set forth the limits, operating conditions, and other requirements applicable to a nuclear reactor facility as set forth in Section 50.36 of 10 CFR Part 50 for the protection of the health and safety of the public

  3. Model projections on the impact of HCV treatment in the prevention of HCV transmission among people who inject drugs in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fraser, Hannah; Martin, Natasha K; Brummer-Korvenkontio, Henrikki

    2018-01-01

    (NSP) across Europe over the next 10 years. METHODS: We collected data on PWID HCV treatment rates, PWID prevalence, HCV prevalence, OST and NSP coverage from 11 European settings. We parameterized a HCV transmission model to setting-specific data that projects chronic HCV prevalence and incidence...... in Sweden and Finland. Scaling-up OST and NSP to 80% coverage with current treatment rates using DAAs could achieve observable reductions in HCV prevalence (18-79%) in all sites. Using DAAs, Slovenia and Amsterdam are projected to reduce incidence to 2 per 100pyrs or less in 10 years. Moderate...

  4. Association between dialysis treatment and cognitive decline: A study from the Project in Sado for Total Health (PROST), Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yumi; Kitamura, Kaori; Nakamura, Kazutoshi; Sanpei, Kazuhiro; Wakasugi, Minako; Yokoseki, Akio; Kabasawa, Keiko; Onodera, Osamu; Ikeuchi, Takeshi; Kuwano, Ryozo; Momotsu, Takeshi; Narita, Ichiei; Endo, Naoto

    2017-10-01

    Evidence for the association between dialysis treatment and cognitive decline is limited. The present study aimed to determine whether dialysis treatment is associated with cognitive decline in adult outpatients of a general hospital in Japan. This was a cross-sectional substudy of the Project in Sado for Total Health (PROST). Total Health PROST targeted adult outpatients of a general hospital in Sado City, Niigata, Japan. Among 753 patients (mean age 68.1 ± 11.6 years) analyzed, 66 received dialysis. Cognitive state was evaluated using the Mini-Mental State Examination, and those with a Mini-Mental State Examination score <24 were considered "cognitively declined." The prevalence of cognitive decline was compared by odds ratios calculated with multiple logistic regression analysis. Variables included in the analyses were dialysis, age, sex and self-reported histories of hypertension, diabetes, stroke and ischemic heart disease. Of the 66 dialysis patients, 24 (36.4%) showed cognitive decline, whereas 172 (25.0%) of 687 non-dialysis patients showed cognitive decline. The age and sex-adjusted odds ratio for cognitive decline in dialysis patients was 2.57 (95% confidence interval 1.43-4.61), relative to non-dialysis patients. The odds ratio remained significant (odds ratio 2.69, 95% confidence interval 1.49-4.88) even after adjusting for all covariates. The prevalence of cognitive decline was high in dialysis patients relative to non-dialysis patients among outpatients of a general hospital in Japan. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 1584-1587. © 2016 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  5. Using simulated historical time series to prioritize fuel treatments on landscapes across the United States: The LANDFIRE prototype project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Robert E.; Rollins, Matthew; Zhu, Zhi-Liang

    2007-01-01

    Canopy and surface fuels in many fire-prone forests of the United States have increased over the last 70 years as a result of modern fire exclusion policies, grazing, and other land management activities. The Healthy Forest Restoration Act and National Fire Plan establish a national commitment to reduce fire hazard and restore fire-adapted ecosystems across the USA. The primary index used to prioritize treatment areas across the nation is Fire Regime Condition Class (FRCC) computed as departures of current conditions from the historical fire and landscape conditions. This paper describes a process that uses an extensive set of ecological models to map FRCC from a departure statistic computed from simulated time series of historical landscape composition. This mapping process uses a data-driven, biophysical approach where georeferenced field data, biogeochemical simulation models, and spatial data libraries are integrated using spatial statistical modeling to map environmental gradients that are then used to predict vegetation and fuels characteristics over space. These characteristics are then fed into a landscape fire and succession simulation model to simulate a time series of historical landscape compositions that are then compared to the composition of current landscapes to compute departure, and the FRCC values. Intermediate products from this process are then used to create ancillary vegetation, fuels, and fire regime layers that are useful in the eventual planning and implementation of fuel and restoration treatments at local scales. The complex integration of varied ecological models at different scales is described and problems encountered during the implementation of this process in the LANDFIRE prototype project are addressed.

  6. Nevada Southwest Regional Geothermal Development Operations Research Project. Appendix 8 of regional operations research program for development of geothermal energy in the Southwest United States. Final technical report, June 1977--August 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, Noel A.; Booth, G. Martin, III; Weber, Dorismae; Helseth, Barbara K.

    1979-01-01

    By the end of the first year of the Southwest Regional Geothermal Project, the Nevada State Team has defined over 300 geothermal sites. Because of the multitude of sites and data, scenarios for this first project-year have been completed for the twenty-six Nevada Geothermal Areas, which include all the specific sites. It is not improbable that fully one-third of the sites will eventually prove to be of high to intermediate temperature (i.e. > 150 C and 90-150 C) resources. Low temperature sites are also prominent, not only in number, but also in their distribution--each of Nevada's 17 counties has several such sites.

  7. Evaluation of the anatomical position of the vermiform appendix in Iranian cadavers in 2013: brief report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azadeh Meamarian

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: Majority of appendices examined in the present study were positioned at the posterior (Retrocecal of pelvis. According to different positions of appendices in different populations and different races, the knowledge of appendix position in various populations is necessary for early diagnosis and treatment and fewer complications for related disease.

  8. [Project REMISSION(PLUS): clinical and radiological remission : new treatment goals in the management of rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostendorf, B; Scherer, A; Kellner, H; Backhaus, M

    2008-12-01

    In a large number of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), chronic inflammatory processes cause joint changes and loss of function even in the early stages of disease. Early, targeted use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs [DMARDs and TNF-alpha blockers ("biologicals")] can significantly reduce the risk of aggressive progression and irreversible joint damage. Hence, early identification of disease-specific processes of joint inflammation and erosion - at the onset of disease or later - is of key importance for the patient's prognosis and therapeutic strategy. This can be achieved today with great precision and reliability through the use of modern imaging methods like arthrosonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The REMISSION(PLUS) initiative aspire to integrate modern imaging technologies as standard methods in the care and management of RA patients. The main areas on which this initiative will be focusing are the conceptualization and implementation of educational programs and training seminars on sonography and MRI, the development and establishment of case report forms for standardized documentation of findings, and the systematic monitoring of patients on treatment, with the aim of producing very precise documentation of structural change processes in RA and also, if possible, to document radiological remission or even progression. The REMISSION(PLUS) project also includes the setting up of specialized centers of excellence, which will network to support the implementation and access to the various imaging procedures at hospitals, rheumatology clinics and rheumatology practices nationwide.

  9. Assessment of new radiation oncology technology and treatments in radiation oncology the ANROTAT project and collection of IMRT specific data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haworth, A.; Corry, J.; Kron, T.; Duchesne, G.; Ng, M.; Burmeister, B.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Medical physicists (MP) are familiar with assessing new radiation oncology technology and treatments ( ROT A T) for their own departments but are not usually involved in providing advice to government for funding these technologies. This paper describes the role of the MP within the Commonwealth Government Department of Health and Aging initiative to develop a generic framework for assessment of ROTAT and the collection of data to support Med care Benefits Scheme (MBS) funding of IMRT. The clinical trials group TROG is developing a generic framework for the assessment of NROTAT. This will be tested and data collected to support applications for MBS funding of IMRT and IGRT. The tumour sites of nasopharynx, post-prostatectomy and anal canal have been selected to represent sites that are commonly, occasionally and rarely treated with IMRT respectively. Site selection for data collection will represent a broad range of clinical practices. Data quality is assured through TROG QA procedures and will include dosimetry audits. The final report will assess the clinical efficacy, cost effectiveness and safety of IMRT compared to 3DCRT. Existing clinical trial protocols form the basis for data collection and surrogate endpoints are being developed. Key publications have been identified that correlate specific dose-volume histogram parameters with clinical end-points, recognising limitations of these data in the 1MRT setting. Engagement of MPs within this project will help ensure collection of high quality data that ultimately aims to secure appropriate funding to ensure our patients receive best clinical care. (author)

  10. Radon-safe new buildings, documentation and technology development. Appendix; Radonsikring i nybyggeri, documentation og teknologiudvikling. Bilag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breddam Overgaard, L.; Bruun Petersen, J.; Neerup Jeppesen, M.

    2011-07-01

    The project is carried out as three separate subprojects, with subproject 1 as the principal project. Subproject 1 deals with field tests of radon penetration of different floor design (1A) and the effect of passive sub slab ventilation (1B). Subproject 2 deals with laboratory tests of material and design permeability, and subproject 3 deals with mapping of the radon potential and variation of a defined area. The appendix volume presents the detailed data for the results achieved in the project. (ln)

  11. Appendix 1: SAEK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graeslund, C.; Hannus, M.; Silvennoinen, P.; Hellstrand, E.; Malnes, D.; Marcus, F.; Michelsen, B.

    1980-01-01

    Detailed proposals for 7 projects in the field of reactor safety are presented. The proposals are on probability-based risk analysis and licensing, the limitation of radioactivity after core melting, the development of computer codes for the simulation of small fractures, the corrosion of reactor materials, heat transfer relationships for accident analyses, a small scale two-phase heat transfer experiment and an operational review system. The aspects treated are:- background, objective, main tasks, time plan and costs. (jiw)

  12. Projection of hospital and clinic health care risk waste generation quantities and treatment capacities for the national waste management strategy implementation project

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rogers, DEC

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the need for quantitative data for planning health care risk waste (HCRW) management from hospitals and clinics in South Africa. Quantitative estimates of HCRW generation and treatment capacity are determined for hospitals...

  13. Duplex vermiform appendix: case report of a ruptured second appendix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis, John R; Weppner, Justin L; Paugh, James C

    2008-09-01

    Although the finding of appendiceal duplication is uncommon, its misdiagnosis and mismanagement may yield poor clinical outcomes and serious medicolegal consequences. Laparoscopic surgical exploration was performed on a 17-year-old male patient with right lower quadrant pain and a history of a previous appendectomy. Inspection of the cecum revealed a second appendix, which was retrocecal, ruptured, and gangrenous. Appendiceal duplication should be considered in all cases of lower abdominal pain, and careful inspection of the cecum for appendiceal anomalies should be performed. The Cave-Wallbridge classification system will be presented to assist surgeons in diagnosing appendiceal duplications.

  14. Southeast Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant Facilities Improvements Project and Geysers Effluent Pipeline Project. Draft EIR/EIS, Volume 1 of 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The primary focus of this environmental analysis is on improvements to the Southeast Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant (SRWTP) facilities and disposal to the Geysers for injection. This analysis will be incorporated with an earlier EIR which evaluated system improvements to the SRWTP and twelve disposal alternatives. In July 1993, the Lake County Sanitation District Board of Directors (LACOSAN) selected the Geysers Effluent Pipeline as the preferred alternative to be analyzed in this EIR/EIS. This environmental analysis will primarily focus on improvements to the SRWTP facilities and a 24 inch pipeline designed to carry up to 5,400 gallons per minute of secondarily treated wastewater. The wastewater will be transported from the Lake County Sanitation District's Southeast Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant, Middletown Wastewater Treatment Plant with additional make-up water from Clear Lake to the Southeast portion of the Geysers Geothermal Field in Lake and Sonoma Counties, California

  15. Projects from Federal Region IX: Department of Energy Appropriate Energy Technology Program. Part II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Case, C.W.; Clark, H.R.; Kay, J.; Lucarelli, F.B.; Rizer, S.

    1980-01-01

    Details and progress of appropriate energy technology programs in Region IX are presented. In Arizona, the projects are Solar Hot Water for the Prescott Adult Center and Solar Prototype House for a Residential Community. In California, the projects are Solar AquaDome Demonstration Project; Solar Powered Liquid Circulating Pump; Appropriate Energy Technology Resource Center; Digester for Wastewater Grown Aquatic Plants; Performance Characteristics of an Anaerobic Wastewater Lagoon Primary Treatment System; Appropriate Energy/Energy Conservation Demonstration Project; Solar Energy for Composting Toilets; Dry Creek Rancheria Solar Demonstration Projects; Demonstration for Energy Retrofit Analysis and Implementation; and Active Solar Space Heating System for the Integral Urban House. In Hawaii, the projects are: Java Plum Electric; Low-Cost Pond Digesters for Hawaiian Pig Farm Energy Needs; Solar Beeswax Melter; Methane Gas Plant for Operating Boilers and Generating Steam; and Solar Water Heating in Sugarcane Seed-Treatment Plants. A Wind-Powered Lighted Navigation Buoys Project for Guam is also described. A revised description of the Biogas Energy for Hawaiian Small Farms and Homesteads is given in an appendix.

  16. [The challenge of administering anti-tuberculosis treatment in infants and pre-school children. pTBred Magistral Project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñeiro Pérez, Roi; Santiago García, Begoña; Fernández Llamazares, Cecilia M; Baquero Artigao, Fernando; Noguera Julian, Antoni; Mellado Peña, María José

    2016-07-01

    There are no paediatric formulations of anti-tuberculous drugs in Spain, with the only exception being rifampicin. Some paediatricians often prescribe composite formulations (CF), while others prefer to give crushed tablets. Nevertheless, there is no consensus in this regard, or any pharmacokinetic studies validating these procedures. In this situation, the Spanish Network for the Study of Paediatric Tuberculosis (pTBred) has launched the Magistral Project, which has as its first phase aims to analyse the desirability of developing child-friendly pharmaceutical formulations and other aspects regarding the anti-tuberculous drug prescription in children. A cross-sectional, multicentre, nationwide study was conducted, based on an online questionnaire sent to members of pTBred between February and March 2015. Fifty-four responses from 67 consulted institutions were received. Most of the respondents reported prescribing crushed tablets. A significant number of those surveyed, although being fewer, prescribe CF, for which availability varies widely among institutions. Eighty-three percent replied that it would be essential to have fixed dose combinations of anti-tuberculous drugs, specifically adapted to paediatric doses and administered by CF or tablets. Among the surveyed institutions, differences were found in the management of latent tuberculosis infection, in the use of directly observed therapy, and in the monitoring of adverse events. Our survey reveals great diversity in anti-tuberculous drug prescription in children, due to the lack of suitable infant formulations, which could have an impact on treatment adherence and outcomes. pTBred intends to develop a pioneering and useful consensus document on the management of anti-tuberculous medication in children. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Appendix - A small scale research review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lea Lund

    A small scale research review This appendix provides an analysis of a small scale search for empirical studies regarding the efficacy of adult teacher training. The appendix is a part of a paper delivered at the ASEM conference, June 2009, Bergisch Gladbach, Germany. The paper tries to shed light...... training? This will be illustrated by describing a research design in progress at the National Centre of Competence Development, DK, regarding a program where teachers are taught Cooperative Learning as a pedagogical and didactical method. This appendix concerns the first question. In search for empiric results concerning: What do...

  18. Spent nuclear fuel project quality assurance program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacey, R.E.

    1997-01-01

    This main body of this document describes how the requirements of 10 CFR 830.120 are met by the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project through implementation of WHC-SP-1131. Appendix A describes how the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P are met by the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project through implementation of specific policies, manuals, and procedures

  19. Actinide Partitioning-Transmutation Program Final Report. V. Preconceptual designs and costs of partitioning facilities and shipping casks (appendix 3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    This Appendix contains cost estimate documents for the Fuels Reprocessing Plant Waste Treatment Facility. Plant costs are summarized by Code of Accounts and by Process Function. Costs contribution to each account are detailed. Process equipment costs are detailed for each Waste Treatment Process. Service utility costs are also summarized and detailed.

  20. Actinide partitioning-transmutation program. V. Preconceptual designs and costs of partitioning facilities and shipping casks, Appendix 4. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    This Appendix contains cost estimate documents for the Fuels Fabrication Plant Waste Treatment Facility. Plant costs are summarized by Code of Accounts and by Process Function. Costs contributing to each account are detailed. Process equipment costs are detailed for each Waste Treatment Process. Service utility costs are also summarized and detailed. Shipping cask costs are provided.

  1. Actinide partitioning-transmutation program. V. Preconceptual designs and costs of partitioning facilities and shipping casks, Appendix 4. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-06-01

    This Appendix contains cost estimate documents for the Fuels Fabrication Plant Waste Treatment Facility. Plant costs are summarized by Code of Accounts and by Process Function. Costs contributing to each account are detailed. Process equipment costs are detailed for each Waste Treatment Process. Service utility costs are also summarized and detailed. Shipping cask costs are provided

  2. Actinide Partitioning-Transmutation Program Final Report. V. Preconceptual designs and costs of partitioning facilities and shipping casks (appendix 3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-06-01

    This Appendix contains cost estimate documents for the Fuels Reprocessing Plant Waste Treatment Facility. Plant costs are summarized by Code of Accounts and by Process Function. Costs contribution to each account are detailed. Process equipment costs are detailed for each Waste Treatment Process. Service utility costs are also summarized and detailed

  3. 23 CFR Appendix B to Subpart B of... - Required Contract Provisions, Appalachian Development Highway System and Local Access Roads...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Assigning the Contract. X. Safety: Accident Prevention. XI. False Statements Concerning Highway Projects... shall apply to labor performed on all work encompassed by the request. X. Safety: Accident prevention... Highway System and Local Access Roads Construction Contracts B Appendix B to Subpart B of Part 633...

  4. Progress and Lessons Learned in Transuranic Waste Disposition at The Department of Energy's Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.D. Mousseau; S.C. Raish; F.M. Russo

    2006-05-18

    This paper provides an overview of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and operated by Bechtel BWXT Idaho, LLC(BBWI) It describes the results to date in meeting the 6,000-cubic-meter Idaho Settlement Agreement milestone that was due December 31, 2005. The paper further describes lessons that have been learned from the project in the area of transuranic (TRU) waste processing and waste certification. Information contained within this paper would be beneficial to others who manage TRU waste for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP).

  5. Villous adenoma of the distal appendix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, J V; Thomas, M G; Kelly, S; Sutton, R

    1997-04-01

    Villous adenoma confined to the distal appendix has not been previously reported in conjunction with acute apendicitis. The presence of an adenoma indicates a need for further investigation due to an association with neoplasia elsewhere.

  6. The vermiform appendix: not a useless organ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahid, Aliya

    2004-04-01

    The appendix has often been seen more as a nuisance rather than an important part of the human anatomy. Early misconceptions have led to the indiscriminate removal of the appendix from the body. Long thought to be an evolutionary remnant of little significance to normal physiology, the appendix has more recently been identified as an important component of mammalian mucosal immune function, particularly B-lymphocyte-mediated immune responses and extrathymically derived T-lymphocytes. This structure helps in the proper movement and removal of waste matter in the digestive system, contains lymphatic vessels that regulate pathogens, and lastly, might even produce early defences that prevent deadly diseases. The appendix is one of the guardians of the internal environment of the body from the hostile external environment.

  7. 13 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 113

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    .... International Trade Program Small Business Act, sec. 22 and Pub. L. 96-481. Service Corps of Retired Executives... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 113 A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 113 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION...

  8. 13 CFR Appendix A to Part 1171 - Appendix A to Part 1171

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    .... International Trade Program Small Business Act, section 22. Technical and Management Assistance Small Business... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Appendix A to Part 1171 A Appendix A to Part 1171 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NONDISCRIMINATION IN...

  9. 13 CFR Appendix A to Part 112 - Appendix A to Part 112

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... development centers Small Business Act, sec. 21 and Pub. L. 96-302. International Trade Program Small Business... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Appendix A to Part 112 A Appendix A to Part 112 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NONDISCRIMINATION IN...

  10. 40 CFR Appendix I to Subpart B of... - Appendix I to Subpart B of Part 205

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Appendix I to Subpart B of Part 205 I Appendix I to Subpart B of Part 205 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Medium and Heavy Trucks Pt...

  11. ONE OF THE LONGEST APPENDIX: A RARE CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkat Rao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The vermiform appendix is an organ that can have variable sizes. We are prompted to report here one of the longest appendix removed, measuring about 16cm in length. INTRODUCTION : The vermiform appendix is an organ that can vary in size, site, and presence, as well as in other clinical and functional aspects. We describe here one of the longest appendix removed, measuring about 16cm in length in a case of acute appendicitis

  12. Comments for the Cape Wind Associates, LLC, Horseshoe Shoal, Nantucket Sound (Offshore Renewable Energy Project/OCS Air Permit)

    Science.gov (United States)

    List of comments for the Cape Wind Associates, LLC, Horseshoe Shoal, Nantucket Sound (Offshore Renewable Energy Project/OCS Air Permit: Massachusetts Plan Approval including nonattainment NSR Appendix A requirements).

  13. Model projections on the impact of HCV treatment in the prevention of HCV transmission among people who inject drugs in Europe"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fraser, Hannah; Martin, Natasha K; Brummer-Korvenkontio, Henrikki

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prevention of hepatitis C virus (HCV) transmission among people who inject drugs (PWID) is critical to eliminating HCV in Europe. We estimate impact of current and scaled-up HCV treatment with and without scaling-up opioid substitution therapy (OST) and needle and syringe programmes...... (NSP) across Europe over the next 10 years. METHODS: We collected data on PWID HCV treatment rates, PWID prevalence, HCV prevalence, OST and NSP coverage from 11 European settings. We parameterized a HCV transmission model to setting-specific data that projects chronic HCV prevalence and incidence...... among PWID. RESULTS: At baseline, chronic HCV prevalence varied from 55% (Finland/Sweden), and

  14. Drug prescribing data used in the assessment of general practitioners’ treatment of asthma and urinary tract infection – Experience from the European Drug Education Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Lagerløv

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available  ABSTRACTDescribing drug treatment given by general practitioners, and quantifying changes in their prescribingbehaviour due to educational intervention, were important parts of the method developed and appliedby the European Drug Education Project. Based on the physicians’ prescription data, individual patientswere defined as having either asthma or urinary tract infections. Prescribing indicators were establishedfor assessing the quality (acceptable or unacceptable of the drug treatment. The diagnose definitionsand prescribing indicators are discussed in more detail in relation to feeding back individual prescribingdata to educational groups of physicians to improve the quality of their drug therapy.

  15. 14 CFR Appendix G to Part 135 - Extended Operations (ETOPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... this appendix, (after completing the wind calculation in G135.2.7(a)(2) of this appendix), the... anticipation of possible icing during the diversion: (i) Fuel that would be burned as a result of airframe... completing the wind calculation in paragraph G135.2.7(a)(2) of this appendix), the certificate holder must...

  16. 32 CFR Appendix B to Part 275 - Obtaining Customer Authorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Obtaining Customer Authorization B Appendix B to... OF 1978 Pt. 275, App. B Appendix B to Part 275—Obtaining Customer Authorization A. A DoD law... feasible, obtain the customer's consent. B. Any authorization obtained under paragraph A. of this appendix...

  17. 40 CFR Appendix A to Part 66 - Technical Support Document

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Technical Support Document A Appendix A to Part 66 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS...—Technical Support Document Note: For text of appendix A see appendix A to part 67. ...

  18. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 66 - Instruction Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Instruction Manual B Appendix B to Part 66 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED... Manual Note: For text of appendix B see appendix B to part 67. ...

  19. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 172 - Trefoil Symbol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Trefoil Symbol B Appendix B to Part 172... SECURITY PLANS Pt. 172, App. B Appendix B to Part 172—Trefoil Symbol 1. Except as provided in paragraph 2 of this appendix, the trefoil symbol required for RADIOACTIVE labels and placards and required to be...

  20. Mucinous cystadenoma of the appendix: a case report | Alese ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tumours of the appendix are emerging as diseases of increasing concern due to a rising incidence1. We present a case of mucinous cystadenoma of the appendix in an elderly patient. To our knowledge, this is the first report of mucinous cystadenoma of the appendix from Nigeria. Key Words: Appendiceal tumour, ...

  1. Management of appendix mass in a Nigerian rural district | Umunna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The traditional management of an appendix mass is conservative, followed by interval appendicectomy. Interval appendicectomy is now controversial. Aim: To present an experience with the management of appendix mass among a rural people in Nigeria. Methods: Patients presenting with appendix masses ...

  2. Use of GIS at treatment of risk analysis of the project Remediation of uranium liabilities in Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grand, T.; Daniel, S.; Thorne, M.C.; Baker, A.C.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to show of use of the geographic information system (GIS) at solving of the projects with evaluation of influence of mining on the environment. This work is consequent with the PHARE project on the territory of Slovakia in 1998-1999 in the region of Novoveska Huta. The main aim of the project was to evaluate of effectiveness of the re-cultivation measures in the space of former uranium deposits, localised in adjacent around of Novoveska Huta and their present influence on the environment. Constitution of the space oriented database in GIS enable identification of sources, receptors and migration ways as well as obtaining of introductory data for quantification of ecologically weight in the frame of EIA and MUAU methods.The possibilities of use of GIS at the quantification and evaluation of influence of mining on the environment was showed

  3. Improving Access to Eye Care among Persons at High-Risk of Glaucoma in Philadelphia--Design and Methodology: The Philadelphia Glaucoma Detection and Treatment Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hark, Lisa; Waisbourd, Michael; Myers, Jonathan S; Henderer, Jeffrey; Crews, John E; Saaddine, Jinan B; Molineaux, Jeanne; Johnson, Deiana; Sembhi, Harjeet; Stratford, Shayla; Suleiman, Ayman; Pizzi, Laura; Spaeth, George L; Katz, L Jay

    2016-01-01

    The Wills Eye Glaucoma Research Center initiated a 2-year demonstration project to develop and implement a community-based intervention to improve detection and management of glaucoma in Philadelphia. The glaucoma detection examination consisted of: ocular, medical, and family history; visual acuity testing; corneal pachymetry; biomicroscopy of the anterior segment; intraocular pressure (IOP) measurement; gonioscopy; funduscopy; automated visual field testing; and fundus-color photography. Treatment included laser surgery and/or IOP-lowering medication. A cost analysis was conducted to understand resource requirements. Outcome measures included; prevalence of glaucoma-related pathology and other eye diseases among high-risk populations; the impact of educational workshops on level of knowledge about glaucoma (assessed by pre- and post-test evaluation); and patient satisfaction of the glaucoma detection examinations in the community (assessed by satisfaction survey). Treatment outcome measures were change in IOP at 4-6 weeks and 4-6 months following selective laser trabeculoplasty treatment, deepening of the anterior chamber angle following laser-peripheral iridotomy treatment, and rate of adherence to recommended follow-up examinations. Cost outcomes included total program costs, cost per case of glaucoma detected, and cost per case of ocular disease detected. This project enrolled 1649 participants (African Americans aged 50+ years, adults 60+ years and individuals with a family history of glaucoma). A total of 1074 individuals attended a glaucoma educational workshop and 1508 scheduled glaucoma detection examination appointments in the community setting. The Philadelphia Glaucoma Detection and Treatment Project aimed to improve access and use of eye care and to provide a model for a targeted community-based glaucoma program.

  4. Closing loops for material flows in surface treatment processes. Pt. 14: ecological and economic assessment and optimization. Final report and appendix; Stoffkreislaufschliessung bei abtragenden Verfahren in Prozessloesungen. Teilprojekt 14: Oekologische und oekonomische Beurteilung und Optimierung. Endbericht und Anhang

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleischer, G.; Ackermann, R.; Scholz, C. [and others

    2001-09-01

    The industrial surface treatment of metallic and non-metallic materials is a relevant area in environmental protection. The surface-treatment industry causes polluted waste water and in addition sludges contaminated with heavy metals, which often have to be deposited as hazardous waste. Improvement of process techniques of the surface treatment is therefore an effective possibility decreasing the environmental impact. Target of this section of the research project was the ecological and economic evaluation of potential optimization possibilities for the involved enterprises and the co-operation during the optimization. For this research assignment it was determined to operate with a bottom-up methodology as in the systems analysis. The general instrument results thus as a derivative from the analysis of the methodologies with the special examples, which are processed as sample solutions. Within the framework of the work took place a use of methodical items from the LCI and the business administration. Additionally methods of process engineering and of systems analysis were applied. For the fulfillment of the target within this research assignment an objective evaluation and optimization instrument was developed and tested. With the help of this instrument it is possible to judge whether modifications on system actually reduce the ecological and economic impacts within the total system boundaries. For the support of the instrument several software-programs were used and developed. In addition, generalizable process models were elaborated and algorithms for determination and conversion to flow of material-minimizing technologies were derived and represented in generally. (orig.) [German] Die industrielle Oberflaechenbehandlung mit den zahlreichen Moeglichkeiten der Beschichtung und Abtragung von vorwiegend metallischen Werkstoffen ist ein relevanter Bereich im Umweltschutz. Es fallen neben belasteten Abwaessern auch schwermetallhaltige Schlaemme an, die oft als

  5. APPLYING LCC METHODOLOGY FOR THE EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF AN INVESTMENT OF PROJECTS OF THE SEWAGE TREATMENT PLANT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoli Hurynovich

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article is referring to the current problems of the evaluation of the effectiveness of an investment of new plans and of the modernization of existing sewage treatment plants including aspects of the optimization of costs of the sewage treatment. He shows the modernization of the sewage treatment plant the Evaluation of the life cycle as the adequate tool assisting choice of the best variant or the level. He is presenting characteristics of LCС methodology and examples of using to the technology assessment the sewage treatment.

  6. Radioactive wastes. Management prospects. Appendixes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillaumont, R.

    2003-01-01

    These appendixes complete the article BN3661 entitled 'Radioactive wastes. Management prospects'. They develop the principles of the different separation processes under study and make a status of the conditioning matrices that are envisaged: 1 - principles of advanced separation (separation of U, Np, Pu, Tc and I; separation of Am and Cm in two extraction steps (Diamex and Sanex processes); separation of Am and Cm in a single extraction step (Paladin process); separation of Am and Cm (Sesame process); separation of Cs (Calixarene process); 2 - principles of separation in pyro-chemistry: separation under inert atmosphere (non-oxidizing); separation in oxidizing conditions; 3 - conditioning matrices under study for separate elements: objectives and methodology, matrices for iodine, for cesium and for actinides. (J.S.)

  7. INEL Operable Unit 7-13 Retrieval/Ex Situ Thermal Treatment configuration options: INEL Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Systems Analysis project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, J.G.; Rudin, M.J.; O`Brien, M.C.; Morrison, J.L.; Raivo, B.

    1992-07-01

    The mission of the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) Systems Analysis project is to identify and evaluate cradle-to-grave systems for the remediation of Transuranic (TRU)Contaminated Waste Pits and Trenches within the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The BWID program will use the results of the BWID Systems Analysis in conjunction with identified Department of Energy (DOE) Complex buried waste needs to develop a long-term strategy for improving buried waste remediation capabilities throughout the DOE system. This report presents Buried Waste Retrieval/Ex Situ Thermal Treatment configuration option concepts in the form of block diagrams. These configuration options are: Retrieval/Melter Treatment; Retrieval/Metal Sort/Thermal Treatment; Retrieval/No Sort/Incineration/Melter Treatment; Retrieval/Interim Storage/Melter Treatment; Retrieval/Interim Storage/Metal Sort/Thermal Treatment; and Retrieval/Interim Storage/No Sort/Incineration/Melter Treatment. Each option is presented as a complete end-to-end system.

  8. No appendix necessary: Fecal transplants and antibiotics can resolve Clostridium difficile infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Tejas; Elderd, Bret D; Abbott, Karen C

    2018-04-07

    The appendix has been hypothesized to protect the colon against Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) by providing a continuous source of commensal bacteria that crowd out the potentially unhealthy bacteria and/or by contributing to defensive immune dynamics. Here, a series of deterministic systems comprised of ordinary differential equations, which treat the system as an ecological community of microorganisms, model the dynamics of colon microbiome. The first model includes migration of commensal bacteria from the appendix to the gut, while the second model expands this to also include immune dynamics. Simulations and simple analytic techniques are used to explore dynamics under biologically relevant parameters values. Both models exhibited bistability with steady states of a healthy state and of fulminant CDI. However, we find that the appendix size was much too small for migration to affect the stability of the system. Both models affirm the use of fecal transplants in conjunction with antibiotic use for CDI treatment, while the second model also suggests that anti-inflammatory drugs may protect against CDI. Ultimately, in general neither the appendiceal migration rate of commensal microbiota nor the boost to antibody production could exert an appreciable impact on the stability of the system, thus failing to support the proposed protective role of the appendix against CDI. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Chapter 4: Overview of the vegetation management treatment economic analysis module in the integrated landscape assessment project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaoping Zhou; Miles A. Hemstrom

    2014-01-01

    Forest land provides various ecosystem services, including timber, biomass, and carbon sequestration. Estimating trends in these ecosystem services is essential for assessing potential outcomes of landscape management scenarios. However, the state-and transition models used in the Integrated Landscape Assessment Project for simulating landscape changes over time do not...

  10. Treatment of patients with first-episode psychosis: two-year outcome data from the Danish National Schizophrenia Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaum, Bent; Valbak, Kristian; Harder, Susanne

    2006-01-01

    First episode psychosis interventions have been in focus in the last two decades in an attempt to improve the course and outcome of schizophrenic disorders. The Danish National Schizophrenia Project began in 1997 its intake of patients, aged 16-35, with a first psychotic episode of a schizophrenic...

  11. Project 2010 Project Management

    CERN Document Server

    Happy, Robert

    2010-01-01

    The ideal on-the-job reference guide for project managers who use Microsoft Project 2010. This must-have guide to using Microsoft Project 2010 is written from a real project manager's perspective and is packed with information you can use on the job. The book explores using Project 2010 during phases of project management, reveals best practices, and walks you through project flow from planning through tracking to closure. This valuable book follows the processes defined in the PMBOK Guide, Fourth Edition , and also provides exam prep for Microsoft's MCTS: Project 2010 certification.: Explains

  12. Initial Findings From Project Recover: Overcoming Co-Occurring Eating Disorders and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Through Integrated Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trottier, Kathryn; Monson, Candice M; Wonderlich, Stephen A; Olmsted, Marion P

    2017-04-01

    This pilot study is the initial investigation of an integrated cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for co-occurring eating disorders (ED) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Following a course of intensive hospital-based ED treatment focused on ED behavioral symptom interruption, 10 individuals with ED-PTSD received 16 sessions of CBT that focused on maintaining improvements in ED symptoms outside of the hospital environment and integrated cognitive processing therapy for PTSD. We hypothesized that the treatment would be associated with significant improvements in PTSD symptoms, depression, and anxiety, as well as sustained improvements in ED symptomatology. There were statistically significant improvements in clinician-rated PTSD symptoms (gav = 4.58), depression (gav = 1.37), and anxiety (gav = 1.00). As expected, there was no statistically significant change in ED cognitions (gav = .28). Reliable change analyses revealed that only 1 participant experienced deterioration in ED cognitions over the course of the integrated treatment. Of the 9 participants who were remitted from behavioral ED symptoms at the end of intensive treatment/beginning of the integrated treatment, 8 remained behaviorally remitted at poststudy treatment, which is encouraging given the high rate of rapid relapse following intensive ED treatment. Findings from this study provide preliminary support for the efficacy of an integrated CBT for ED-PTSD. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies.

  13. Radiological, physical, and chemical characterization of additional alpha contaminated and mixed low-level waste for treatment at the advanced mixed waste treatment project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchinson, D.P.

    1995-07-01

    This document provides physical, chemical, and radiological descriptive information for a portion of mixed waste that is potentially available for private sector treatment. The format and contents are designed to provide treatment vendors with preliminary information on the characteristics and properties for additional candidate portions of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and offsite mixed wastes not covered in the two previous characterization reports for the INEL-stored low-level alpha-contaminated and transuranic wastes. This report defines the waste, provides background information, briefly reviews the requirements of the Federal Facility Compliance Act (P.L. 102-386), and relates the Site Treatment Plans developed under the Federal Facility Compliance Act to the waste streams described herein. Each waste is summarized in a Waste Profile Sheet with text, charts, and tables of waste descriptive information for a particular waste stream. A discussion of the availability and uncertainty of data for these waste streams precedes the characterization descriptions

  14. Radiological, physical, and chemical characterization of additional alpha contaminated and mixed low-level waste for treatment at the advanced mixed waste treatment project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchinson, D.P.

    1995-07-01

    This document provides physical, chemical, and radiological descriptive information for a portion of mixed waste that is potentially available for private sector treatment. The format and contents are designed to provide treatment vendors with preliminary information on the characteristics and properties for additional candidate portions of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and offsite mixed wastes not covered in the two previous characterization reports for the INEL-stored low-level alpha-contaminated and transuranic wastes. This report defines the waste, provides background information, briefly reviews the requirements of the Federal Facility Compliance Act (P.L. 102-386), and relates the Site Treatment Plans developed under the Federal Facility Compliance Act to the waste streams described herein. Each waste is summarized in a Waste Profile Sheet with text, charts, and tables of waste descriptive information for a particular waste stream. A discussion of the availability and uncertainty of data for these waste streams precedes the characterization descriptions.

  15. Bifid vermiform appendix: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Ewen A; Jagadeesan, Jayaraman; Fasih, Tarannum; Mercer-Jones, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Appendiceal anomalies are extremely rare: they have a reported incidence of between 0.004% and 0.009% of appendectomy specimens. The authors report a case of a patient who was found to have 2 appendices at emergency laparotomy, review the classification system used, and discuss the potential clinical pitfalls of similar cases. A 23-year-old man was admitted as an emergency with abdominal pain and vomiting. The operative finding was of a bifid appendix. One appendix was grossly gangrenous and lacked a mesoappendix, whereas the other had a mesoappendix and appeared macroscopically normal. The appendices shared a common base that arose from the cecum in the typical anatomical position. No other intra-abdominal malformations were present at inspection during laparotomy. Histology confirmed features of gangrenous appendicitis. His postoperative recovery was uneventful, and he was discharged after 4 days. Although rare, it is important for several reasons that surgeons are aware of the potential anatomical anomalies and malpositions of the vermiform appendix: first, a missed second appendix may result in serious clinical and medico-legal consequences; second, a double appendix can be confused with other intra-abdominal conditions; and finally, they can be associated with other congenital abnormalities.

  16. Presenting features of Enterobius vermicularis in the vermiform appendix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodergren, Mikael H; Jethwa, Paras; Wilkinson, Simon; Kerwat, Rajab

    2009-01-01

    Enterobius vermicularis (pinworm) infestation can present with symptoms resembling acute appendicitis, although current evidence suggests that it does not necessarily cause acute appendicitis. The purpose of this study was to characterize the clinical presentation of patients with pinworms in the vermiform appendix and to establish features suggestive of this condition. A retrospective analysis of all patients undergoing appendicectomy with appendicular pinworms between 1998 and 2003 was undertaken. Patients were compared against 54 controls with confirmed acute suppurative appendicitis from the same time period. Presenting features, vital signs and modified Alvarado scores were obtained from the patients' records. Eighteen out of 1150 patients (1.5%) undergoing appendicectomy were proven to have pinworms (age range 8-37 years, 12 F, 6 M). Two of 18 appendices containing pinworms showed evidence of inflammation. Patients with pinworms had significantly lower white cell counts (WCCs) than the control group (median 8.9 versus 14.7, p=0.045), lower total Alvarado scores (median 5.5 versus 7, p=0.01) and were more likely to have had recurrent episodes of right iliac fossa (RIF) pain and previous hospital admissions (p<0.001). E. vermicularis infestation of the appendix should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients who present with recurrent RIF pain but do not have a significantly raised WCCs, or high Alvarado scores. These patients should be investigated with early fecal sampling and night-time application of cellophane tape, and they may benefit from empirical antiparasitic treatment.

  17. Effect of hydrocele on appendix testis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Józsa, Tamás; Telek, Andrea; Kutasy, Balázs; Benyó, Mátyás; Csanádi, Gábor; Kovács, Ilona; Balla, György; Flaskó, Tibor; Csernoch, László; Kiss, Csongor

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of an elevated hydrostatic pressure of hydrocele on the structural integrity and steroid receptor expression pattern of the appendix testis in children. Twenty-six testicular appendages were obtained from boys (aged between 13 and 79 months, mean 40 months) who underwent surgical exploration because of hydrocele or congenital inguinal hernia. The tissue sections of testicular appendages were stained with hematoxylin-eosin. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence laser microscopy were performed using monoclonal mouse anti-human receptors against androgen and estrogen receptors. Patients were divided into three groups: group A (n = 8) represented patients with groin hernia without hydrocele, who served as control group; group B (n = 7) represented patients with communicating hydrocele; and group C (n = 11) represented patients with noncommunicating hydrocele. The tissue sections of appendix testis expressed both androgen and estrogen receptors in all patients in groups A and B, and epithelial destruction was not present. The presence of androgen receptor (two of 11, P hydrocele did not influence the receptor expression pattern and the anatomic structure of testicular appendages, whereas noncommunicating hydrocele caused damage as indicated by the absence of steroid receptors and destruction of the epithelial surface. A better understanding of the physiological role of testicular appendages may change the indications of surgical treatment in patients with noncommunicating hydrocele.

  18. Adenocarcinoma of the appendix presenting as bilateral ureteric obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Tawil Sherif

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adenocarcinoma of the vermiform appendix is a rare neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract. Presentation mimics acute appendicitis, but right iliac fossa mass and intestinal obstruction have also been reported. These presentations reflect various stages of a locally expanding tumour causing luminal obstruction of appendix. The investigation and subsequent management with a review of the literature is presented. Case presentation We report a case of appendicular adenocarcinoma found unexpectedly in a 43 year old male who presented with urinary symptoms. Cystoscopy and uretero-renoscopy showed normal bladder but external compression of the ureters and therefore bilateral stents were inserted. CT scan showed a caecal mass. After colonoscopy, that showed external compression, and diagnostic laparoscopy the patient underwent right hemicolectomy. Histopathology revealed well differentiated adenocarcinoma with signet ring morphology with multiple lymph node involvement. The patient was referred for chemotherapy where he received infusional 5 fluorouracil but died 7 months after surgery. Conclusion Patients with atypical manifestations related to right lower abdominal quadrant should be thoroughly investigated with an open mind. Every attempt should be made to make a precise diagnosis through all the available means to direct the treatment along correct lines.

  19. New Orleans to Venice, Louisiana. Hurricane Protection Project. Appendixes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-03-01

    released in 4 f 6 elutriates. Cadmium was released from the sediments in 1 of 6 lutriates. No mercury, PCB, or chlorinated pesticide release was ndicated...views the HEP analysis as a more appropriate measure of mitigation requirements. Mitigation and Compensation The President’s Council on Enviromental ...caused by pesticide accumulation through the food chain. It appears that high residue levels, especially of dieldrin, have resulted in thin eggshells

  20. Optimal Conventional and Semi-Natural Treatments for the Upper Yakima Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project; Treatment Definitions and Descriptions and Biological Specifications for Facility Design, 1995-1999 Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hager, Robert C. (Hatchery Operations Consulting); Costello, Ronald J. (Mobrand Biometrics, Inc., Vashon Island, WA)

    1999-10-01

    This report describes the Yakima Fisheries Project facilities (Cle Elum Hatchery and acclimation satellites) which provide the mechanism to conduct state-of-the-art research for addressing questions about spring chinook supplementation strategies. The definition, descriptions, and specifications for the Yakima spring chinook supplementation program permit evaluation of alternative fish culture techniques that should yield improved methods and procedures to produce wild-like fish with higher survival that can be used to rebuild depleted spring chinook stocks of the Columbia River Basin. The definition and description of three experimental treatments, Optimal Conventional (OCT), Semi-Natural (SNT), Limited Semi-Natural (LSNT), and the biological specifications for facilities have been completed for the upper Yakima spring chinook salmon stock of the Yakima Fisheries Project. The task was performed by the Biological Specifications Work Group (BSWG) represented by Yakama Indian Nation, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, National Marine Fisheries Service, and Bonneville Power Administration. The control and experimental variables of the experimental treatments (OCT, SNT, and LSNT) are described in sufficient detail to assure that the fish culture facilities will be designed and operated as a production scale laboratory to produce and test supplemented upper Yakima spring chinook salmon. Product specifications of the treatment groups are proposed to serve as the generic templates for developing greater specificity for measurements of product attributes. These product specifications will be used to monitor and evaluate treatment effects, with respect to the biological response variables (post release survival, long-term fitness, reproductive success and ecological interactions).

  1. Optimal Conventional and Semi-Natural Treatments for the Upper Yakima Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project, Treatment Definitions and Descriptions, and Biological Specifications for Facility Design, Final Report 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hager, Robert C.; Costello, Ronald J.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the Yakima Fisheries Project facilities (Cle Elum Hatchery and acclimation satellites) which provide the mechanism to conduct state-of-the-art research for addressing questions about spring chinook supplementation strategies. The definition, descriptions, and specifications for the Yakima spring chinook supplementation program permit evaluation of alternative fish culture techniques that should yield improved methods and procedures to produce wild-like fish with higher survival that can be used to rebuild depleted spring chinook stocks of the Columbia River Basin. The definition and description of three experimental treatments, Optimal Conventional (OCT), Semi-Natural (SNT), Limited Semi-Natural (LSNT), and the biological specifications for facilities have been completed for the upper Yakima spring chinook salmon stock of the Yakima Fisheries Project. The task was performed by the Biological Specifications Work Group (BSWG) represented by Yakama Indian Nation, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, National Marine Fisheries Service, and Bonneville Power Administration. The control and experimental variables of the experimental treatments (OCT, SNT, and LSNT) are described in sufficient detail to assure that the fish culture facilities will be designed and operated as a production scale laboratory to produce and test supplemented upper Yakima spring chinook salmon. Product specifications of the treatment groups are proposed to serve as the generic templates for developing greater specificity for measurements of product attributes. These product specifications will be used to monitor and evaluate treatment effects, with respect to the biological response variables (post release survival, long-term fitness, reproductive success and ecological interactions)

  2. Crohn's disease limited to the vermiform appendix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Martin; Andersen, J C

    1987-01-01

    Thirteen cases of Crohn's disease confined to the vermiform appendix were seen during a 12-year period. They constituted 16.9% of patients with primary resection of the bowel for Crohn's disease in the same period, but only 0.4% of the cases of acute appendicitis. In 10 of the 13 cases there was ......Thirteen cases of Crohn's disease confined to the vermiform appendix were seen during a 12-year period. They constituted 16.9% of patients with primary resection of the bowel for Crohn's disease in the same period, but only 0.4% of the cases of acute appendicitis. In 10 of the 13 cases...... to approach that of recurrence after resection in other parts of the intestines. Collective review of this and three other relatively large case series gave an estimated recurrence rate of 3.5%. We conclude that in Crohn's disease initially confined to the appendix the course appears to be indolent....

  3. Step-down versus outpatient psychotherapeutic treatment for personality disorders: 6-year follow-up of the Ullevål personality project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Although psychotherapy is considered the treatment of choice for patients with personality disorders (PDs), there is no consensus about the optimal level of care for this group of patients. This study reports the results from the 6-year follow-up of the Ullevål Personality Project (UPP), a randomized clinical trial comparing outpatient individual psychotherapy with a long-term step-down treatment program that included a short-term day hospital treatment followed by combined group and individual psychotherapy. Methods The UPP included 113 patients with PDs. Outcome was evaluated after 8 months, 18 months, 3 years and 6 years and was based on a wide range of clinical measures, such as psychosocial functioning, interpersonal problems, symptom severity, and axis I and II diagnoses. Results At the 6-year follow-up, there were no statistically significant differences in outcome between the treatment groups. Effect sizes ranged from medium to large for all outcome variables in both treatment arms. However, patients in the outpatient group had a marked decline in psychosocial functioning during the period between the 3- and 6-year follow-ups; while psychosocial functioning continued to improve in the step-down group during the same period. This difference between groups was statistically significant. Conclusions The findings suggest that both hospital-based long-term step-down treatment and long-term outpatient individual psychotherapy may improve symptoms and psychosocial functioning in poorly functioning PD patients. Social and interpersonal functioning continued to improve in the step-down group during the post-treatment phase, indicating that longer-term changes were stimulated during treatment. Trial registration NCT00378248. PMID:24758722

  4. FY98 final report for the expedited technology demonstration project: demonstration test results for the integrated MSO waste treatment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamson, M G; Hipple, D L; Hopper, R W; Hsu, P C.

    1998-01-01

    Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) is a promising alternative to incineration for the treatment of a variety of organic wastes. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has prepared a facility in which an integrated pilot-scale MSO treatment system is being tested and demonstrated. The system consists of a MSO vessel with a dedicated off-gas treatment system, a salt recycle system, feed preparation equipment, and a ceramic final waste forms immobilization system. This integrated system was designed and engineered based on operational experience with an engineering-scale reactor unit and extensive laboratory development on salt recycle and final forms preparation. The MSO/off-gas system has been operational since December 1997. The salt recycle system and the ceramic final forms immobilization became operational in May and August, 1998, respectively. We have tested the MSO facility with various organic feeds, including chlorinated solvents, tributyl phosphate/kerosene, PCB-contaminated waste oils ampersand solvents, booties, plastic pellets, ion exchanged resins, activated carbon, radioactive-spiked organics, and well-characterized low-level liquid mixed wastes. MSO is shown to be a versatile technology for hazardous waste treatment and may be a solution to many waste disposal problems in DOE sites. This report presents the results obtained from operation of the integrated pilot-scale MSO treatment system through September 1998, and therefore represents a final report for fiscal year 1998 activities

  5. Appendix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Ib; Thulin, Mats

    2009-01-01

    A taxonomic and floristic account of all the additional or new species in Etyhiopia and/or Eritrea that have been discovered while Vols 2 - 7 of the Flora of Ethiopia and Eritrea were being published.......A taxonomic and floristic account of all the additional or new species in Etyhiopia and/or Eritrea that have been discovered while Vols 2 - 7 of the Flora of Ethiopia and Eritrea were being published....

  6. Appendix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potter, W.C.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on a database on international nuclear trade started in 1986 at the UCLA Center for International and Strategic Affairs (CISA). The basic premise underlying the CISA database is that the core of the problem with respect to knowledge of the behavior of the emerging nuclear supplier states is less one of data availability and more one of systematic data collection and analysis. The major problem is that the data are scattered throughout different nuclear energy, trade, and financial publications---many of which are exceedingly expensive and not readily available even at major research libraries. Moreover, with the exception of data on power reactors, the information is not reported in a format that facilitates comparative analysis over time or across states. The CISA database is designed to remedy these deficiencies

  7. Appendix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Ib; Thulin, Mats

    2009-01-01

    A taxonomic and floristic account of all the additional or new species in Etyhiopia and/or Eritrea that have been discovered while Vols 2 - 7 of the Flora of Ethiopia and Eritrea were being published....

  8. Primary signet-ring cell carcinoma of vermiform appendix clinically and pathologically presenting as acute appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadashi Terada, MD, PhD

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Primary signet-ring cell carcinoma (SRCC of vermiform appendix is extremely rare; only three cases have been reported in the English literature. An 89-year-old man suddenly presented right lower abdominal pain, and transferred to a hospital, where he was diagnosed with acute appendicitis by physical data, blood data, and CT. He was further transferred to our hospital for emergency operation. Physical examination showed positive abdominal pain, Blunberg sign, and Rosenstein sign. Blood test showed leukocytosis and increased C-reactive protein. An appendectomy was performed. Gross examination during operation showed inflamed appendix, appendiceal adhesion, and acute peritonitis. Gross pathological examination showed no apparent tumor, but the proximal appendix showed wall thickening and luminal occlusion. The appendix was cut into three sections, and was observed under microscopically. Nests of carcinoma cells were seen in the proximal appendix. The carcinoma was composed of SRCC (70% and mucinous carcinoma (30%. The size of carcinoma was 6 × 7 mm. The carcinoma cells invaded into muscular layer. No lymphovascular permeation was seen. The cut margins were negative for carcinoma cells. Immunohistochemically, SRCC cells were positive for cytokeratin (CK AE1/3, CK CAM5.2, CK8, CK18, CK19, CK20, EMA, CEA, CA19-9, p53, Ki-67 (labeling = 30%, CDX2, MUC2, and MUC5AC. They were negative for CK34PE1, CK5/6, CK7, CK14, p63, vimentin, TTF-1, MUC1, MUC 5AC, NSE, synaptophysin, chromogranin, and CD56. No further treatments were performed, because the appendiceal carcinoma was small, the surgical margins were negative and the patient was very old. He was followed up by various imaging modalities. No recurrence or metastasis is found 17 months after the operation.

  9. Combined methods for liquid radioactive waste treatment. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1997-2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-02-01

    The report contains 13 papers presented at the final research co-ordination meeting of the CRP. The subjects covered include processes and technologies for treatment and conditioning of liquid radioactive wastes. It quite often includes the application of several steps, such as filtration, precipitation, sorption, ion exchange, evaporation and/or membrane separation to meet the requirements both for the release of decontaminated effluents into the environment and the conditioning of waste concentrates for disposal. Combination of the processes and their consecutive or simultaneous application is also described. It results in an improved decontamination, waste volume reduction, safety and overall cost effectiveness in the treatment, conditioning and disposal of these wastes

  10. Barriers to Receiving Follow-Up Eye Care and Detection of Non-Glaucomatous Ocular Pathology in the Philadelphia Glaucoma Detection and Treatment Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Cindy X; Hu, Wanda D; Tran, Judie; Siam, Linda; Berardi, Giuliana G; Sembhi, Harjeet; Hark, Lisa A; Katz, L Jay; Waisbourd, Michael

    2016-04-01

    This cross-sectional study aimed to evaluate adherence rates and identify barriers to receiving follow-up eye care in participants diagnosed with significant non-glaucomatous eye pathology in the Philadelphia Glaucoma Detection and Treatment Project. This community-based project aimed to improve detection, management, treatment, and follow-up eye care of individuals at high risk for glaucoma in community-based settings. Participants throughout Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA were enrolled. After a comprehensive eye examination, follow-up recommendations were given to each participant. A telephone survey was administered to individuals diagnosed with non-glaucomatous ocular pathology 3 months after initial eye examination to assess rates of follow-up and to evaluate potential barriers to follow-up. Of the 1649 participants enrolled in this project, 249 (15 %) were diagnosed with significant non-glaucomatous ocular pathology requiring follow-up care. There were 143 (57 %) who responded to the telephone survey. Respondents had a median age of 72 years, and were predominately female (69 %) and African-American (64 %). Of the respondents, 36 (25 %) attended a follow-up appointment. Participants who did not remember the results of their examinations, did not remember their recommendations, and had not seen an eye doctor within the past year were less likely to make a follow-up appointment (P = 0.04, 0.001 and 0.005, respectively). The Philadelphia Glaucoma Detection and Treatment Program was able to detect a significant amount of non-glaucomatous ocular pathology requiring follow-up care. Actual follow-up rates were sub-optimal. Further research is needed to determine interventions to overcome barriers and increase adherence with follow-up recommendations.

  11. Infarcted epiploic appendage of the vermiform appendix masquerading as acute appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnuson, April; Reber, Heather; Reyna, Petra; Ries, David; Aanning, H L

    2006-12-01

    Infrequent causes of right lower quadrant pain that mimic acute appendicitis include infarcted epiploic appendages. Although usually located in the colon, we report the very rare case of an infarcted epiploic appendage located directly on the serosal surface of the appendix itself. In a patient with right lower quadrant pain, the diagnosis of infarcted epiploic appendages is rarely made preoperatively and the incidence is rare. Definitive treatment is excision.

  12. CO2 and H2O: Understanding Different Stakeholder Perspectives on the Use of Carbon Credits to Finance Household Water Treatment Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Sarah K; Rainey, Rochelle; Kaur, Maneet; Graham, Jay P

    2015-01-01

    Carbon credits are an increasingly prevalent market-based mechanism used to subsidize household water treatment technologies (HWT). This involves generating credits through the reduction of carbon emissions from boiling water by providing a technology that reduces greenhouse gas emissions linked to climate change. Proponents claim this process delivers health and environmental benefits by providing clean drinking water and reducing greenhouse gases. Selling carbon credits associated with HWT projects requires rigorous monitoring to ensure households are using the HWT and achieving the desired benefits of the device. Critics have suggested that the technologies provide neither the benefits of clean water nor reduced emissions. This study explores the perspectives of carbon credit and water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) experts on HWT carbon credit projects. Thirteen semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted with key informants from the WASH and carbon credit development sectors. The interviews explored perceptions of the two groups with respect to the procedures applied in the Gold Standard methodology for trading Voluntary Emission Reduction (VER) credits. Agreement among the WASH and carbon credit experts existed for the concept of suppressed demand and parameters in the baseline water boiling test. Key differences, however, existed. WASH experts' responses highlighted a focus on objectively verifiable data for monitoring carbon projects while carbon credit experts called for contextualizing observed data with the need for flexibility and balancing financial viability with quality assurance. Carbon credit projects have the potential to become an important financing mechanism for clean energy in low- and middle-income countries. Based on this research we recommend that more effort be placed on building consensus on the underlying assumptions for obtaining carbon credits from HWT projects, as well as the approved methods for monitoring correct and

  13. CO2 and H2O: Understanding Different Stakeholder Perspectives on the Use of Carbon Credits to Finance Household Water Treatment Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Sarah K.; Rainey, Rochelle; Kaur, Maneet; Graham, Jay P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Carbon credits are an increasingly prevalent market-based mechanism used to subsidize household water treatment technologies (HWT). This involves generating credits through the reduction of carbon emissions from boiling water by providing a technology that reduces greenhouse gas emissions linked to climate change. Proponents claim this process delivers health and environmental benefits by providing clean drinking water and reducing greenhouse gases. Selling carbon credits associated with HWT projects requires rigorous monitoring to ensure households are using the HWT and achieving the desired benefits of the device. Critics have suggested that the technologies provide neither the benefits of clean water nor reduced emissions. This study explores the perspectives of carbon credit and water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) experts on HWT carbon credit projects. Methods Thirteen semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted with key informants from the WASH and carbon credit development sectors. The interviews explored perceptions of the two groups with respect to the procedures applied in the Gold Standard methodology for trading Voluntary Emission Reduction (VER) credits. Results Agreement among the WASH and carbon credit experts existed for the concept of suppressed demand and parameters in the baseline water boiling test. Key differences, however, existed. WASH experts’ responses highlighted a focus on objectively verifiable data for monitoring carbon projects while carbon credit experts called for contextualizing observed data with the need for flexibility and balancing financial viability with quality assurance. Conclusions Carbon credit projects have the potential to become an important financing mechanism for clean energy in low- and middle-income countries. Based on this research we recommend that more effort be placed on building consensus on the underlying assumptions for obtaining carbon credits from HWT projects, as well as the approved

  14. CO2 and H2O: Understanding Different Stakeholder Perspectives on the Use of Carbon Credits to Finance Household Water Treatment Projects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah K Summers

    Full Text Available Carbon credits are an increasingly prevalent market-based mechanism used to subsidize household water treatment technologies (HWT. This involves generating credits through the reduction of carbon emissions from boiling water by providing a technology that reduces greenhouse gas emissions linked to climate change. Proponents claim this process delivers health and environmental benefits by providing clean drinking water and reducing greenhouse gases. Selling carbon credits associated with HWT projects requires rigorous monitoring to ensure households are using the HWT and achieving the desired benefits of the device. Critics have suggested that the technologies provide neither the benefits of clean water nor reduced emissions. This study explores the perspectives of carbon credit and water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH experts on HWT carbon credit projects.Thirteen semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted with key informants from the WASH and carbon credit development sectors. The interviews explored perceptions of the two groups with respect to the procedures applied in the Gold Standard methodology for trading Voluntary Emission Reduction (VER credits.Agreement among the WASH and carbon credit experts existed for the concept of suppressed demand and parameters in the baseline water boiling test. Key differences, however, existed. WASH experts' responses highlighted a focus on objectively verifiable data for monitoring carbon projects while carbon credit experts called for contextualizing observed data with the need for flexibility and balancing financial viability with quality assurance.Carbon credit projects have the potential to become an important financing mechanism for clean energy in low- and middle-income countries. Based on this research we recommend that more effort be placed on building consensus on the underlying assumptions for obtaining carbon credits from HWT projects, as well as the approved methods for monitoring

  15. Appendix to Power Dissipation in Division

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Wei; Nannarelli, Alberto

    This document is an appendix to the paper: Wei Liu and Alberto Nannarelli, ”Power Dissipation in Division”, Proc. of 42nd Asilomar Conference on Signals, Systems, and Computers, October 2008. The purpose of the document is to provide the necessary information for the implementation of the archite......This document is an appendix to the paper: Wei Liu and Alberto Nannarelli, ”Power Dissipation in Division”, Proc. of 42nd Asilomar Conference on Signals, Systems, and Computers, October 2008. The purpose of the document is to provide the necessary information for the implementation...

  16. Outreach-based drug treatment for sex trading women: the Cal-Pep risk-reduction demonstration project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowser, Benjamin P; Ryan, Lisa; Smith, Carla Dillard; Lockett, Gloria

    2008-12-01

    California Prevention Education Program (Cal-Pep) provides street outreach services to injection drugs users and sex traders in Oakland and San Francisco, CA, to reduce their chances of contracting HIV/AIDS. Drug treatment is an effective barrier to HIV infections, but only clients who are ready for total abstinence from drug use can be referred to traditional treatment. Drug treatment readiness is currently defined by funding policies in the U.S. as a client's willingness to totally abstain from alcohol and illegal drug use. This policy and practice eliminates a major harm reduction opportunity to reach drug users who are just contemplating recovery with treatment. With a CSAT grant to demonstrate an effective innovation in treatment, Cal-Pep started a harm reduction outpatient program for women who were active drug users. Over the course of 1 year, actively drug-using clients came to the program house during the day for meals, for risk-reduction education sessions, group discussions, and one-on-one psychological counselling. From April 2001 to March 2006, 37 clients per year were interviewed at program entry and after 6 and 12 months to see if the intervention activities had an impact on their drug use and readiness for abstinence drug treatment. By the 6th and 12th month of clients' progression through the risk-reduction program, they reported a statistically significant reduction in their poly-drug use (cocaine, cannabis, heroin, PCP) in the 30 days prior to their interviews (p<.000). There were also significant reductions in poly-drug use with alcohol (p<.000) and use of crack cocaine alone (p<.003). There was also an added benefit: clients significantly improved their living circumstances from the streets and shelters to rooms and apartments while in the program (p<.034). There was no significant improvement in employment. This intervention shows that a harm reduction intermediate treatment program for actively using drug users can significantly reduce their

  17. TRISTAN, electron-positron colliding beam project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-03-01

    In this report e + e - colliding beam program which is now referred to as TRISTAN Project will be described. A brief chronology and outline of TRISTAN Project is given in Chapter 1. Chapter 2 of this article gives a discussion of physics objectives at TRISTAN. Chapter 3 treats the overall description of the accelerators. Chapter 4 describes design of each of the accelerator systems. In Chapter 5, detector facilities are discussed in some detail. A description of accelerator tunnels, experimental areas, and utilities are given in Chapter 6. In the Appendix, the publications on the TRISTAN Project are listed. (author)

  18. A systems study of the waste management system in Gothenburg. Part of the project: Thermal and biological waste treatment in a systems perspective; Systemstudie Avfall i Goeteborg. Delprojekt i Termisk och biologisk avfallsbehandling i ett systemperspektiv

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisaillon, Mattias; Sundberg, Johan; Haraldsson, Maarten; Norrman Eriksson, Ola

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of the project A system study of waste management in Gothenburg is to evaluate new waste treatment options for municipal and industrial waste from a system perspective. The project has been carried out as a part of the project Thermal and biological waste treatment in a systems perspective - WR21. The focus is set to the waste and district heating system in Gothenburg. The project has been running for 2,5 years with an active group consisting of persons from Renova, Kretsloppskontoret, Goeteborg Energi, Gryaab and Profu. The work on development of models and of methods of handling strategic questions within the field has gone back and forth within the group. This report focuses on presenting the final results from the project, which means that the process in which we've excluded several treatment options and scenarios are only briefly described

  19. A simple method for 3D lesion reconstruction from two projected angiographic images: implementation to a stereotactic radiotherapy treatment planning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theodorou, K.; Kappas, C.; Gaboriaud, G.; Mazal, A.D.; Petrascu, O.; Rosenwald, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    Introduction: The most used imaging modality for diagnosis and localisation of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) treated with stereotactic radiotherapy is angiography. The fact that the angiographic images are projected images imposes the need of the 3D reconstruction of the lesion. This, together with the 3D head anatomy from CT images could provide all the necessary information for stereotactic treatment planning. We have developed a method to combine the complementary information provided by angiography and 2D computerized tomography, matching the reconstructed AVM structure with the reconstructed head of the patient. Materials and methods: The ISIS treatment planning system, developed at Institute Curie, has been used for image acquisition, stereotactic localisation and 3D visualisation. A series of CT slices are introduced in the system as well as two orthogonal angiographic projected images of the lesion. A simple computer program has been developed for the 3D reconstruction of the lesion and for the superposition of the target contour on the CT slices of the head. Results and conclusions: In our approach we consider that the reconstruction can be made if the AVM is approximated with a number of adjacent ellipses. We assessed the method comparing the values of the reconstructed and the actual volumes of the target using linear regression analysis. For treatment planning purposes we overlapped the reconstructed AVM on the CT slices of the head. The above feature is to our knowledge a feature that the majority of the commercial stereotactic radiotherapy treatment planning system could not provide. The implementation of the method into ISIS TPS shows that we can reliably approximate and visualize the target volume

  20. Proton ejection project for Saturne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronca, G.; Gendreau, G.

    1959-01-01

    The reasons for choosing the ejection system are given. The characteristics required for the ejected beam are followed by a description of the ejection process, in chronological order from the viewpoint of the protons: movement of the particles, taking into account the various elements which make up the system (internal magnet, external magnet, quadrupoles, ejection correction coils, thin and thick cables,...) and specification of these elements. Then follows an estimation of the delay in manufacture and the cost of the project. Finally, the characteristics of the magnets and quadrupoles are listed in an appendix. (author) [fr

  1. HANFORD SITE RIVER PROTECTION PROJECT (RPP) TRANSURANIC (TRU) TANK WASTE IDENTIFICATION & PLANNING FOR REVRIEVAL TREATMENT & EVENTUAL DISPOSAL AT WIPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRISTOFZSKI, J.G.; TEDESCHI, R.; JOHNSON, M.E.; JENNINGS, M

    2006-01-18

    The CH2M HILL Manford Group, Inc. (CHG) conducts business to achieve the goals of the Office of River Protection (ORP) at Hanford. As an employee owned company, CHG employees have a strong motivation to develop innovative solutions to enhance project and company performance while ensuring protection of human health and the environment. CHG is responsible to manage and perform work required to safely store, enhance readiness for waste feed delivery, and prepare for treated waste receipts for the approximately 53 million gallons of legacy mixed radioactive waste currently at the Hanford Site tank farms. Safety and environmental awareness is integrated into all activities and work is accomplished in a manner that achieves high levels of quality while protecting the environment and the safety and health of workers and the public. This paper focuses on the innovative strategy to identify, retrieve, treat, and dispose of Hanford Transuranic (TRU) tank waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP).

  2. Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safaa M. Raghab

    2013-08-01

    The main goal of this study is to utilize a natural low cost material “as an accelerator additive to enhance the chemical treatment process using Alum coagulant and the accelerator substances were Perlite and Bentonite. The performance of the chemical treatment was enhanced using the accelerator substances with 90 mg/l Alum as a constant dose. Perlite gave better performance than the Bentonite effluent. The removal ratio for conductivity, turbidity, BOD and COD for Perlite was 86.7%, 87.4%, 89.9% and 92.8% respectively, and for Bentonite was 83.5%, 85.0%, 86.5% and 85.0% respectively at the same concentration of 40 mg/l for each.

  3. Data Summary Report for the Annual Fourmile Branch and F- and H-Area Seeplines, Appendix IX Metals and Radionuclides, 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, J.

    1999-01-01

    This report presents a summary of the definitive data validation and verification for the 1998 RFI/RI annual Appendix IX metals and radionuclides survey for Fourmile Branch and the F- and H-Area Seeplines. The validation process began with project mobilization and continued through the delivery of EDDs and this report

  4. The IMEA project: an intervention based on microfinance, entrepreneurship, and adherence to treatment for women with HIV/AIDS living in poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrivillaga, Marcela; Salcedo, Juan Pablo; Pérez, Mauricio

    2014-10-01

    A number of issues affect adherence to treatment and quality of life among women living with HIV/AIDS. In particular, women living in poverty have a higher risk of mortality due to their vulnerable conditions and socioeconomic exclusion. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an intervention that combines microfinance, entrepreneurship and adherence to treatment (IMEA) for women with HIV/AIDS and living in poverty in Cali, Colombia. A pre-post research design without a control was utilized, and 48 women were included in the study. The evaluation showed effectiveness of the program in the majority of the results (knowledge of HIV and treatment, adherence to treatment, self-efficacy, and the formation of a microenterprise) (p < 0.001); the global indicator increased from 28.3% to 85.5% (p < 0.001). The findings of this study demonstrate that the intervention was partially effective; the health outcomes showed beneficial effects. However, at the end of the study and throughout the follow-up phase, only one third of the participants were able to develop and maintain a legal operating business. It is concluded that the IMEA project should be tested in other contexts and that its consequent results should be analyzed; so it could be converted into a large scale public health program.

  5. [THE RESULTS OF IMPLEMENTATION OF THE INTERNATIONAL BANK FOR RECONSTRUCTION AND DEVELOPMENT LOAN PROJECT "PREVENTION, DIAGNOSIS, AND TREATMENT OF TUBERCULOSIS AND AIDS", A "TUBERCULOSIS" COMPONENT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Due to the implementation of the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD) loan project "Prevention, diagnosis, treatment of tuberculosis and AIDS", a "Tuberculosis" component that is an addition to the national tuberculosis control program in 15 subjects of the Russian Federation, followed up by the Central Research Institute of Tuberculosis, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, the 2005-2008 measures stipulated by the Project have caused substantial changes in the organization of tuberculosis control: implementation of Orders Nos. 109, 50, and 690 and supervision of their implementation; modernization of the laboratories of the general medical network and antituberbulosis service (404 kits have been delivered for clinical diagnostic laboratories and 12 for bacteriological laboratories, including BACTEC 960 that has been provided in 6 areas); 91 training seminars have been held at the federal and regional levels; 1492 medical workers have been trained in the detection, diagnosis, and treatment of patients with tuberculosis; 8 manuals and guidelines have been prepared and sent to all areas. In the period 2005-2008, the tuberculosis morbidity and mortality rates in the followed-up areas reduced by 1.2 and 18.6%, respectively. The analysis of patient cohorts in 2007 and 2005 revealed that the therapeutic efficiency evaluated from sputum smear microscopy increased by 16.3%; there were reductions in the proportion of patients having ineffective chemotherapy (from 16.1 to 11.1%), patients who died from tuberculosis (from 11.6 to 9.9%), and those who interrupted therapy ahead of time (from 11.8 to 7.8%). Implementation of the IBR project has contributed to the improvement of the national strategy and the enhancement of the efficiency of tuberculosis control.

  6. The environmental survey manual: Appendix D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-08-01

    The purpose of this manual is to provide guidance to the Survey and Sampling and Analysis teams that conduct the one-time Environmental Survey of the major US Department of Energy operating facilities. This appendix contains procedures for chemical analysis of organics, inorganics, and radioisotopes

  7. Primary lymphoma of appendix: Ultrasound finding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sotillos Parra, V.E.; Belda Serrano, J.; Mota Castilla, A.; Falomir Gil, G.; Abreu Maqueda, V.; Trigueris Sanchez, M.; Hernandez Barcelo, J.E.; Martinez Diaz, F.

    1994-01-01

    We present an uncommon case of primary lymphoma of the appendix in a patient who complained of discomfort in lower right quadrant. The findings revealed by ultrasound, barium enema and CT scan are reported and the diagnostic aspects of this appendiceal tumor and others are discussed. (Author) 6 refs

  8. Pilot plant environmental conditions (OPDD Appendix C)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randall, C.M.; Whitson, M.E.; Coggi, J.V.

    1978-08-15

    This is Appendix C to the Pilot Plant Overall Plant design description document for the 10-MW pilot central receiver plant to be located at Barstow, California. The environmental design criteria to be used for plant design day performance, operational limits, and survival environmental limits are specified. Data are presented on insolation, wind, temperature, and other meteorological conditions. (WHK)

  9. 76 FR 30250 - Share Insurance and Appendix

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-25

    ... should update its website regarding the share insurance coverage for noninterest-bearing transaction... share insurance coverage and the conditions under which it is available. NCUA will update its website in... APPENDIX 0 1. The authority citation for Part 745 continues to read as follows: Authority: 12 U.S.C. 1752(5...

  10. report appendix | Overview | Publications | Indian Academy of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Report on University Science Education. APPENDIX: LIST OF 1994 PANEL MEMBERS. V. G. Bhide (now deceased); J. Chandrasekhar; M. K. Chandrashekaran; S. Datta Gupta; B. M. Deb; R. Gadagkar; N. Mukunda; A. Sitaram; V. Srinivas; R. Srinivasan; M. Vidyasagar ...

  11. Clinicopathological review of surgically removed appendix in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Babatunde M. Duduyemi

    2014-09-17

    Sep 17, 2014 ... Appendix;. Appendicectomy;. Histology. Abstract Background: Acute appendicitis is a disease of the young presenting in children and early adolescents although no age group is exempt. It is the most common cause of acute surgical abdomen worldwide. This clinicopathological study aims to determine the ...

  12. Dyslipidemia in primary care – prevalence, recognition, treatment and control: data from the German Metabolic and Cardiovascular Risk Project (GEMCAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasem Jürgen

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current guidelines from the European Society of Cardiology (ESC define low thresholds for the diagnosis of dyslipidemia using total cholesterol (TC and LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C to guide treatment. Although being mainly a prevention tool, its thresholds are difficult to meet in clinical practice, especially primary care. Methods In a nationwide study with 1,511 primary care physicians and 35,869 patients we determined the prevalence of dyslipidemia, its recognition, treatment, and control rates. Diagnosis of dyslipidemia was based on TC and LDL-C. Basic descriptive statistics and prevalence rate ratios, as well as 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Results Dyslipidemia was highly frequent in primary care (76% overall. 48.6% of male and 39.9% of female patients with dyslipidemia was diagnosed by the physicians. Life style intervention did however control dyslipidemia in about 10% of patients only. A higher proportion (34.1% of male and 26.7% female was controlled when receiving pharmacotherapy. The chance to be diagnosed and subsequently controlled using pharmacotherapy was higher in male (PRR 1.15; 95%CI 1.12–1.17, in patients with concomitant cardiovascular risk factors, in patients with hypertension (PRR 1.20; 95%CI 1.05–1.37 and cardiovascular disease (PRR 1.46; 95%CI 1.29–1.64, previous myocardial infarction (PRR 1.32; 95%CI 1.19–1.47, and if patients knew to be hypertensive (PRR 1.18; 95%CI 1.04–1.34 or knew about their prior myocardial infarction (PRR 1.17; 95%CI 1.23–1.53. Conclusion Thresholds of the ESC seem to be difficult to meet. A simple call for more aggressive treatment or higher patient compliance is apparently not enough to enhance the proportion of controlled patients. A shift towards a multifactorial treatment considering lifestyle interventions and pharmacotherapy to reduce weight and lipids may be the only way in a population where just to be normal is certainly not ideal.

  13. The Skin Picking Impact Project: phenomenology, interference, and treatment utilization of pathological skin picking in a population-based sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Benjamin T P; Woods, Douglas W; Flessner, Christopher A; Franklin, Shana A; Franklin, Martin E

    2011-01-01

    The current study examined the characteristics of pathological skin picking (PSP) in a population-based sample. Participants were recruited through several online resources for PSP and related conditions to complete a web-based survey assessing the functional and topographical phenomenology, physical and psychosocial impact, treatment utilization, and associated psychopathology of PSP. A total of 1663 participants consented, of whom 760 were over 18 and met study criteria for PSP. Results showed considerable heterogeneity in picking methods, body sites, and function (e.g., regulation of emotional, sensory, and cognitive states). Participants generally reported moderate psychosocial and physical impact from picking and tended to perceive available treatment as poor in quality. Severity of associated symptoms of psychopathology (depression, anxiety, and stress) was comparable to severity levels found in previous samples of persons with trichotillomania and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Severity of PSP was a statistically significant predictor of overall impairment after controlling for depression and anxiety symptoms. Results suggest that PSP is a significant public health concern in need of further rigorous investigation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. LIFESTAT - Living with statins: An interdisciplinary project on the use of statins as a cholesterol-lowering treatment and for cardiovascular risk reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Christa Lykke; Wulff Helge, Jørn; Krasnik, Allan; Kriegbaum, Margit; Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Hickson, Ian D; Liisberg, Kasper Bering; Oxlund, Bjarke; Bruun, Birgitte; Lau, Sofie Rosenlund; Olsen, Maria Nathalie Angleys; Andersen, John Sahl; Heltberg, Andreas Søndergaard; Kuhlman, Anja Birk; Morville, Thomas Hoffmann; Dohlmann, Tine Lovsø; Larsen, Steen; Dela, Flemming

    2016-07-01

    LIFESTAT is an interdisciplinary project that leverages approaches and knowledge from medicine, the humanities and the social sciences to analyze the impact of statin use on health, lifestyle and well-being in cohorts of Danish citizens. The impetus for the study is the fact that 10% of the population in the Scandinavian countries are treated with statins in order to maintain good health and to avoid cardiovascular disease by counteracting high blood levels of cholesterol. The potential benefit of treatment with statins should be considered in light of evidence that statin use has prevalent and unintended side effects (e.g. myalgia, and glucose and exercise intolerance). The LIFESTAT project combines invasive human experiments, biomedical analyses, nationwide surveys, epidemiological studies, qualitative interviews, media content analyses, and ethnographic participant observations. The study investigates the biological consequences of statin treatment; determines the mechanism(s) by which statin use causes muscle and mitochondrial dysfunction; and analyzes achievement of treatment goals, people's perception of disease risk, media influence on people's risk and health perception, and the way people manage to live with the risk (personally, socially and technologically). CONCLUSIONS THE ORIGINALITY AND SUCCESS OF LIFESTAT DEPEND ON AND DERIVE FROM ITS INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACH, IN WHICH THE DISCIPLINES CONVERGE INTO THOROUGH AND HOLISTIC STUDY AND DESCRIBE THE IMPACT OF STATIN USE ON THE EVERYDAY LIFE OF STATIN USERS THIS HAS THE POTENTIAL FOR MUCH GREATER BENEFIT THAN ANY ONE OF THE DISCIPLINES ALONE INTEGRATING TRADITIONAL DISCIPLINES PROVIDES NOVEL PERSPECTIVES ON POTENTIAL CURRENT AND FUTURE SOCIAL, MEDICAL AND PERSONAL BENEFITS OF STATIN USE. © 2016 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  15. National Ignition Facility Project Site Safety Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dun, C

    2003-01-01

    This Safety Program for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) presents safety protocols and requirements that management and workers shall follow to assure a safe and healthful work environment during activities performed on the NIF Project site. The NIF Project Site Safety Program (NPSSP) requires that activities at the NIF Project site be performed in accordance with the ''LLNL ES and H Manual'' and the augmented set of controls and processes described in this NIF Project Site Safety Program. Specifically, this document: (1) Defines the fundamental NIF site safety philosophy. (2) Defines the areas covered by this safety program (see Appendix B). (3) Identifies management roles and responsibilities. (4) Defines core safety management processes. (5) Identifies NIF site-specific safety requirements. This NPSSP sets forth the responsibilities, requirements, rules, policies, and regulations for workers involved in work activities performed on the NIF Project site. Workers are required to implement measures to create a universal awareness that promotes safe practice at the work site and will achieve NIF management objectives in preventing accidents and illnesses. ES and H requirements are consistent with the ''LLNL ES and H Manual''. This NPSSP and implementing procedures (e.g., Management Walkabout, special work procedures, etc.,) are a comprehensive safety program that applies to NIF workers on the NIF Project site. The NIF Project site includes the B581/B681 site and support areas shown in Appendix B

  16. TORSION OF THE VERMIFORM APPENDIX: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Imtiaz Wani

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Torsion of the vermiform appendix is a rare condition with few cases reported in the literature. Various factors predispose to torsion. Various factors predispose to torsion. We report a case of primary torsion of the vermiform appendix. The clinical presentation was indistinguishable from acute appendicitis and the diagnosis was made at operation. Appendix was preileal in position and the direction of torsion was anticlockwise. There was intrinsic torsion with no obvious factor for torsion identified. Appendectomy was performed.

  17. Growing of caecum and vermiform appendix during the fetal period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malas, M A; Gökçimen, A; Sulak, O

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the growing of the caecum and the vermiform appendix during the fetal period in human fetuses and the relation between growing and shape of the caecum and the localization of the vermiform appendix. 40 male and 40 female externally normal-looking fetuses were studied between 10 and 40 weeks of gestation and were subdivided into fetuses of the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd trimesters and full-term fetuses. The parameters of interest included covering of the caecum with peritoneum, shape of the caecum (long tube, symmetric saccule, asymmetric saccule, extremely large right side--atypical), axial length and width of the caecum localization of the vermiform appendix, length of vermiform appendix and length of the meso-appendix. There was a difference in covering of the caecum with peritoneum between males and females; the caecum was predominantly tube shaped during the fetal period, with the asymmetric saccule towards the end of the fetal period; the localization of the vermiform appendix was subcaecal (39%) during the fetal period and postileal (34%) in female fetuses and subcaecal (48%) in male fetuses--the localization of the vermiform appendix changed according to the caecum shape during the fetal period; we found significant differences in the measurements of vermiform appendix, meso-appendix, and caecum among 1st-, 2nd-, and 3rd-trimester fetuses and full-term fetuses. There was an increase in the measurements for vermiform appendix, meso-appendix, and caecum with increasing gestational age; the localization of the vermiform appendix depended on the shape of the caecum, was different from that of adults and different between sexes, and there was also a significant difference in covering of the caecum with peritoneum between both sexes. Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

  18. Real-life effectiveness of smoking-cessation treatments in general practice clinics in Denmark. The Escape Smoke project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Peter Bo; Spillemose, Heidi; Nielsen, Gerda

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The smoking prevalence has not decreased in the last years in Denmark. General practice (GP) offers smoking cessation (SC) treatment. Studies of real-life effectiveness of daily practice SC-activities from the GP-setting opposed to efficacy results from randomized clinical trials......-clinics recruited 515 (273 females, 20% COPD) daily smokers being moderately nicotine dependent and heavy smoking (19 cigarettes/day). Receiving intensive advice, 74% did use SC-medicine paid out-of-pocket (1/3 NRT and 2/3 prescription-based). After 6 months, 187 participants had remained abstinent (36%). Adjusted......-medicine were independent significant predictors for long-term abstinence. CONCLUSIONS: Smoking cessation in Danish GP-clinics with some prior SC-activity can result in rather high long-term quit rates, especially when combining counseling and prescription-based SC-medicine. The effectiveness of prescription...

  19. An electronic infrastructure for research and treatment of the thalassemias and other hemoglobinopathies: the Euro-mediterranean ITHANET project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederer, Carsten W; Basak, A Nazli; Aydinok, Yesim; Christou, Soteroula; El-Beshlawy, Amal; Eleftheriou, Androulla; Fattoum, Slaheddine; Felice, Alex E; Fibach, Eitan; Galanello, Renzo; Gambari, Roberto; Gavrila, Lucian; Giordano, Piero C; Grosveld, Frank; Hassapopoulou, Helen; Hladka, Eva; Kanavakis, Emmanuel; Locatelli, Franco; Old, John; Patrinos, George P; Romeo, Giovanni; Taher, Ali; Traeger-Synodinos, Joanne; Vassiliou, Panayiotis; Villegas, Ana; Voskaridou, Ersi; Wajcman, Henri; Zafeiropoulos, Anastasios; Kleanthous, Marina

    2009-01-01

    Hemoglobin (Hb) disorders are common, potentially lethal monogenic diseases, posing a global health challenge. With worldwide migration and intermixing of carriers, demanding flexible health planning and patient care, hemoglobinopathies may serve as a paradigm for the use of electronic infrastructure tools in the collection of data, the dissemination of knowledge, the harmonization of treatment, and the coordination of research and preventive programs. ITHANET, a network covering thalassemias and other hemoglobinopathies, comprises 26 organizations from 16 countries, including non-European countries of origin for these diseases (Egypt, Israel, Lebanon, Tunisia and Turkey). Using electronic infrastructure tools, ITHANET aims to strengthen cross-border communication and data transfer, cooperative research and treatment of thalassemia, and to improve support and information of those affected by hemoglobinopathies. Moreover, the consortium has established the ITHANET Portal, a novel web-based instrument for the dissemination of information on hemoglobinopathies to researchers, clinicians and patients. The ITHANET Portal is a growing public resource, providing forums for discussion and research coordination, and giving access to courses and databases organized by ITHANET partners. Already a popular repository for diagnostic protocols and news related to hemoglobinopathies, the ITHANET Portal also provides a searchable, extendable database of thalassemia mutations and associated background information. The experience of ITHANET is exemplary for a consortium bringing together disparate organizations from heterogeneous partner countries to face a common health challenge. The ITHANET Portal as a web-based tool born out of this experience amends some of the problems encountered and facilitates education and international exchange of data and expertise for hemoglobinopathies.

  20. Expanding access to hepatitis C virus treatment--Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes (ECHO) project: disruptive innovation in specialty care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Sanjeev; Kalishman, Summers; Thornton, Karla; Dion, Denise; Murata, Glen; Deming, Paulina; Parish, Brooke; Brown, John; Komaromy, Miriam; Colleran, Kathleen; Bankhurst, Arthur; Katzman, Joanna; Harkins, Michelle; Curet, Luis; Cosgrove, Ellen; Pak, Wesley

    2010-09-01

    The Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes (ECHO) Model was developed by the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center as a platform to deliver complex specialty medical care to underserved populations through an innovative educational model of team-based interdisciplinary development. Using state-of-the-art telehealth technology, best practice protocols, and case-based learning, ECHO trains and supports primary care providers to develop knowledge and self-efficacy on a variety of diseases. As a result, they can deliver best practice care for complex health conditions in communities where specialty care is unavailable. ECHO was first developed for the management of hepatitis C virus (HCV), optimal management of which requires consultation with multidisciplinary experts in medical specialties, mental health, and substance abuse. Few practitioners, particularly in rural and underserved areas, have the knowledge to manage its emerging treatment options, side effects, drug toxicities, and treatment-induced depression. In addition, data were obtained from observation of ECHO weekly clinics and database of ECHO clinic participation and patient presentations by clinical provider. Evaluation of the ECHO program incorporates an annual survey integrated into the ECHO annual meeting and routine surveys of community providers about workplace learning, personal and professional experiences, systems and environmental factors associated with professional practice, self-efficacy, facilitators, and barriers to ECHO. The initial survey data show a significant improvement in provider knowledge, self-efficacy, and professional satisfaction through participation in ECHO HCV clinics. Clinicians reported a moderate to major benefit from participation. We conclude that ECHO expands access to best practice care for underserved populations, builds communities of practice to enhance professional development and satisfaction of primary care clinicians, and expands sustainable

  1. Expanding Access to HCV Treatment - Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes (ECHO) Project: Disruptive Innovation in Specialty Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Sanjeev; Kalishman, Summers; Thornton, Karla; Dion, Denise; Murata, Glen; Deming, Paulina; Parish, Brooke; Brown, John; Komaromy, Miriam; Colleran, Kathleen; Bankhurst, Arthur; Katzman, Joanna; Harkins, Michelle; Curet, Luis; Cosgrove, Ellen; Pak, Wesley

    2013-01-01

    The Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes (ECHO) Model was developed by the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center (UNMHSC) as a platform to deliver complex specialty medical care to underserved populations through an innovative educational model of team-based inter-disciplinary development. Using state-of-the-art telehealth technology, best practice protocols, and case based learning, ECHO trains and supports primary care providers to develop knowledge and self-efficacy on a variety of diseases. As a result, they can deliver best practice care for complex health conditions in communities where specialty care is unavailable. ECHO was first developed for the management of hepatitis C virus (HCV), optimal management of which requires consultation with multi-disciplinary experts in medical specialties, mental health and substance abuse. Few practitioners, particularly in rural and underserved areas, have the knowledge to manage its emerging treatment options, side effects, drug toxicities and treatment-induced depression. In addition data was obtained from observation of ECHO weekly clinics and database of ECHO clinic participation and patient presentations by clinical provider, evaluation of the ECHO program incorporates annual survey integrated into the ECHO annual meeting and routine surveys of community providers about workplace learning, personal and professional experiences, systems and environmental factors associated with professional practice, self-efficacy, facilitators and barriers to ECHO. The initial survey data show a significant improvement in provider knowledge, self-efficacy and professional satisfaction through participation in ECHO HCV clinics. Clinicians reported a moderate to major benefit from participation. We conclude that ECHO expands access to best practice care for underserved populations, builds communities of practice to enhance professional development and satisfaction of primary care clinicians, and expands sustainable

  2. A unique drug treatment program for pregnant and postpartum substance-using women in New York City: results of a pilot project, 1990-1995.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurtrie, C; Rosenberg, K D; Kerker, B D; Kan, J; Graham, E H

    1999-11-01

    In the 1980s, there was virtually no drug treatment for pregnant women in New York City, especially women who used crack cocaine. The purpose of the Parent and Child Enrichment (PACE) demonstration project was to assess the effectiveness of the one-stop shopping model of drug treatment for this population. Among PACE clients, 88% were primarily users of crack cocaine. The mean total length of stay was 100.0 days (median 55.5 days). Client retention 42 days after intake was 54.3%. This paper describes the essential components of this program model. "Long-stay" and "short-stay" clients were compared using urine toxicology tests and activity logs. In addition, the birth outcomes of clients were compared to two similar populations. A strong positive correlation was found between total length of stay and low rate of positive urine drug tests (UDTs). Infants of PACE long-stay clients had greater mean birth weight, less low birth weight, and less intrauterine growth retardation than the infants of the comparison groups. Fetal exposure to cocaine was decreased dramatically among women who were enrolled for 42 or more days during their pregnancy. This model of drug treatment for pregnant and postpartum women seems to improve mothers' lives, fetal drug exposure, and birth outcome significantly.

  3. The national drug abuse treatment clinical trials network data share project: website design, usage, challenges, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmueli-Blumberg, Dikla; Hu, Lian; Allen, Colleen; Frasketi, Michael; Wu, Li-Tzy; Vanveldhuisen, Paul

    2013-01-01

    There are many benefits of data sharing, including the promotion of new research from effective use of existing data, replication of findings through re-analysis of pooled data files, meta-analysis using individual patient data, and reinforcement of open scientific inquiry. A randomized controlled trial is considered as the 'gold standard' for establishing treatment effectiveness, but clinical trial research is very costly, and sharing data is an opportunity to expand the investment of the clinical trial beyond its original goals at minimal costs. We describe the goals, developments, and usage of the Data Share website (http://www.ctndatashare.org) for the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network (CTN) in the United States, including lessons learned, limitations, and major revisions, and considerations for future directions to improve data sharing. Data management and programming procedures were conducted to produce uniform and Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)-compliant de-identified research data files from the completed trials of the CTN for archiving, managing, and sharing on the Data Share website. Since its inception in 2006 and through October 2012, nearly 1700 downloads from 27 clinical trials have been accessed from the Data Share website, with the use increasing over the years. Individuals from 31 countries have downloaded data from the website, and there have been at least 13 publications derived from analyzing data through the public Data Share website. Minimal control over data requests and usage has resulted in little information and lack of control regarding how the data from the website are used. Lack of uniformity in data elements collected across CTN trials has limited cross-study analyses. The Data Share website offers researchers easy access to de-identified data files with the goal to promote additional research and identify new findings from completed CTN studies. To maximize the utility of the website

  4. PHOTOCITYTEX - A LIFE project on the air pollution treatment in European urban environments by means of photocatalytic textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ródenas, Milagros; Fages, Eduardo; Fatarella, Enrico; Herrero, David; Castagnoli, Lidia; Borrás, Esther; Vera, Teresa; Gómez, Tatiana; Carreño, Javier; López, Ramón; Gimeno, Cristina; Catota, Marlon; Muñoz, Amalia

    2016-04-01

    In urban areas, air pollution from traffic is becoming a growing problem. In recent years the use of titanium dioxide (TiO2) based photocatalytic self-cleaning and de-polluting materials has been considered to remove these pollutants. TiO2 is now commercially available and used in construction material or paints for environmental purposes. Further work, however, is still required to clarify the potential impacts from wider TiO2 use. Specific test conditions are required to provide objective and accurate knowledge. Under the LIFE PHOTOCITYTEX project, the effectiveness of using TiO2-based photocatalytic nanomaterials in building textiles as a way of improving the air quality in urban areas will be assessed. Moreover, information on secondary products formed during the tests will be obtained, yielding a better overall understanding of the whole process and its implications. For this purpose, a series of demonstrations are foreseen, comprising 1. lab-test and development of textile prototypes at lab scale, 2. larger scale demonstration of the use of photocatalytic textiles in the depollution of urban environments employing the EUPHORE chambers to simulate a number of environmental conditions of various European cities and 3. field demonstrations installing the photocatalytic textiles in two urban locations in Quart de Poblet, a tunnel and a school. A one-year extensive passive dosimetric campaign has already being carried out to characterize the selected urban sites before the installation of the photocatalytic textile prototypes, and a similar campaign after their installation is ongoing. Also, more comprehensive intensive active measurement campaigns have been conducted to account for winter and summer conditions. In parallel, lab-tests have already been completed to determine optimal photocatalytic formulations on textiles, followed by experiments at EUPHORE. Information on the deployment of the campaigns is given together with laboratory conclusions and first

  5. Evaluation of the endocrine activity of 2,4,6-tribromophenol, benzanthrone and benzophenone-2 based on Appendix 7.8-5 of REACH guidance document

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duis, Karen; Holbech, Henrik; Velasco-Santamaría, Yohana M.

    Within a project funded by the German Federal Environment Agency, the practicability of Appendix 7.8-5 of REACH guidance document R.7b was evaluated using three case study substances. Shortcomings in the guidance were identified. An assessment of potential endocrine activity in aquatic vertebrates......, the main findings and the conclusions with regard to Appendix 7.8-5 are highlighted. (1) For benzanthrone, no binding to the estrogen receptor (ER) is predicted using QSAR methods, but potential metabolites with strong affinity to the ER were identified. At present, the endocrine activity...... of such metabolites is not considered in Appendix 7.8-5. Since many in vitro assays have limited metabolic capacity, this is a shortcoming for substances, for which no in vivo data are available. (2) Reporter gene assays indicate weak ER agonism of benzanthrone; in vitro results on androgen receptor mediated effects...

  6. Treatment plan for protection of cultural resources for the 100-KR-4 pump-and-treat project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    The 100-K Reactor Area is located on the southern shore of the Columbia River at the northern edge of the Hanford Site. The K-East and K-West reactors operated from 1955 to 1971 as part of the US efforts to produce weapons grade nuclear materials. Reactor operations required the use of water from the Columbia River to cool the reactors. Occasionally, reactor equipment would malfunction causing radioactive contamination in the cooling water. On these occasions, rather than being discharged to the Columbia River, the water was discharged to a trench, approximately 1.61 km (1 mi) long, located to the east of the reactor area. This discharged cooling water, in addition to being radioactively contaminated, also contained significant quantities of chromium that had been used to prevent corrosion within the reactors, After the cooling water had been discharged into the trench, it percolated into the ground and traveled toward the Columbia River via the groundwater flow. Current interim remediation activities planned for this part of the 100-K Area are focused on protecting the Columbia River by pumping the chromium contaminated groundwater to a treatment system. The treated water will then be pumped back into the ground upstream of the trench. This document describes how the planned construction activities have been modified to protect the extremely sensitive cultural resources in the area.

  7. Detecting the effect of bisphosphonates during osteoporosis treatment on jawbones using multidetector computed tomography: The OSTEOSYR project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barngkgei, Imad; Khattab, Razan

    2018-03-25

    The aim of the present cross-sectional study was to investigate the effects of bisphosphonates (BP), prescribed for osteoporosis, on jawbones using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). Fifty-three women who had dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry examination were scanned by MDCT. Both the cortical and the trabecular parts of the alveolar and the cortical bones were compared between BP users and non-BP users using a number of radiological measurements. Linear regression was used for the statistical analysis. The cortical part of the basal bone of the mandible revealed a significant increase in the BP group (.001 > P-value ≤ .026) after using BP for 5 years. No alternations were observed in the trabecular part of the basal bone or in the cortical or trabecular parts of the alveolar bone over the same duration. The use of BP as a treatment for osteoporosis for 5 years increased the thickness of the cortex of the basal bone of the mandible, as detected by MDCT. The other parts of the jawbones showed no influence by BP for such a purpose, as detected on MDCT images. Accordingly, models (equations) for predicting the alternations in the inferior cortex of the mandible induced by BP therapy during osteoporosis have been suggested. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  8. The trichotillomania impact project in young children (TIP-YC): clinical characteristics, comorbidity, functional impairment and treatment utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Michael R; Snorrason, Ivar; Flessner, Christopher A; Franklin, Martin E; Burkel, Rachel; Woods, Douglas W

    2014-02-01

    The aim was to investigate clinical characteristics of young children with a hair pulling problem. Parents/caregivers of young children (0-10 years old) with a hair pulling problem (N = 110) completed an online survey. The majority reported that their child experienced mild to moderate impairment/distress due to hair pulling, and overall clinical characteristics were similar to adult samples, although some differences were noted (e.g., less awareness of pulling). We also compared preschool-aged and school-aged children within the sample. Symptom severity, pleasure during pulling and gender ratio remained stable across the age groups. The preschool-aged children demonstrated less impairment/distress, comorbidity, and treatment seeking; pulled from fewer body areas; and were less likely to be aware of the act or experience tension prior to pulling. In conclusion, clinical characteristics of childhood hair pulling are largely similar to adult/adolescent hair pulling problems, but there are some notable differences, particularly among pre-school aged children.

  9. Treatment plan for protection of cultural resources for the 100-KR-4 pump-and-treat project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-11-01

    The 100-K Reactor Area is located on the southern shore of the Columbia River at the northern edge of the Hanford Site. The K-East and K-West reactors operated from 1955 to 1971 as part of the US efforts to produce weapons grade nuclear materials. Reactor operations required the use of water from the Columbia River to cool the reactors. Occasionally, reactor equipment would malfunction causing radioactive contamination in the cooling water. On these occasions, rather than being discharged to the Columbia River, the water was discharged to a trench, approximately 1.61 km (1 mi) long, located to the east of the reactor area. This discharged cooling water, in addition to being radioactively contaminated, also contained significant quantities of chromium that had been used to prevent corrosion within the reactors, After the cooling water had been discharged into the trench, it percolated into the ground and traveled toward the Columbia River via the groundwater flow. Current interim remediation activities planned for this part of the 100-K Area are focused on protecting the Columbia River by pumping the chromium contaminated groundwater to a treatment system. The treated water will then be pumped back into the ground upstream of the trench. This document describes how the planned construction activities have been modified to protect the extremely sensitive cultural resources in the area

  10. Appendix A: Energy storage technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    The project financial evaluation section of the Renewable Energy Technology Characterizations describes structures and models to support the technical and economic status of emerging renewable energy options for electricity supply.

  11. Commissioning of radiotherapy treatment planning systems: Testing for typical external beam treatment techniques. Report of the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Development of Procedures for Quality Assurance of Dosimetry Calculations in Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Quality Assurance (QA) in the radiation therapy treatment planning process is essential to ensure accurate dose delivery to the patient and to minimize the possibility of accidental exposure. Computerized radiotherapy treatment planning systems (RTPSs) are now widely available in both industrialised and developing countries so, it is of special importance to support hospitals in the IAEA Member States in developing procedures for acceptance testing, commissioning and ongoing QA of their RTPSs. Responding to these needs, a group of experts developed a comprehensive report, the IAEA Technical Reports Series No 430 'Commissioning and quality assurance of computerized planning systems for radiation treatment of cancer', that provides the general framework and describes a large number of tests and procedures to be considered by the RTPS users. To provide practical guidance for implementation of IAEA Technical Reports Series No. 430 in radiotherapy hospitals and particularly in those with limited resources, a coordinated research project (CRP E2.40.13) 'Development of procedures for dosimetry calculation in radiotherapy' was established. The main goal of the project was to create a set of practical acceptance and commissioning tests for dosimetry calculations in radiotherapy, defined in a dedicated protocol. Two specific guidance publications that were developed in the framework of the Coordinated Research Project E2.40.13 are based on guidelines described in the IAEA Technical Report Series No. 430 and provide a step-by-step description for users at hospitals or cancer centres how to implement acceptance and commissioning procedures for their RTPSs. The first publication, 'Specification and acceptance testing of radiotherapy treatment planning systems' IAEA-TECDOC-1540 uses the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) standard IEC 62083 as its basis and addresses the procedures for specification and acceptance testing of RTPSs to be used by both manufacturers and

  12. GerOSS (German Obstetric Surveillance System). A Project to Improve the Treatment of Obstetric Rare Diseases and Complications Using a Web Based Documentation and Information Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlage, S; Grüßner, S; Lack, N; Franz, H B G

    2015-01-01

    Severe and very rare obstetric complications (e.g. eclampsia, postpartum haemorrhage or uterine rupture), typically culminate in a chaotic, uncontrollable sequence of events. Outcome for mother and child depends on whether doctors and midwives are able to quickly take correct decisions and initiate optimal treatment. GerOSS (German Obstetric Surveillance System) aims at generating deeper insight into relevant risk factors to improve diagnosis and treatment of severe complications during pregnancy and delivery. As such it is primarily conceived as a system for quality improvement and less as a register. Another focus is the provision of an information and communication platform for dissemination of these insights. Finally, incidences of selected rare obstetric events may be derived. These rare events are monitored for two to five years in Lower Saxony, Bavaria and Berlin. Quantitative analyses of aggregate data are complemented with in depth case based anonymised evaluations by experts. The temporal sequence of measures taken as well as the management of care is inspected. Participants receive a feedback of comments on the synopsis of individual cases. Aggregate data results are published and made available through the GerOSS platform. A scientific advisory committee ensures the link with the professional scientific bodies. A comparison within INOSS (International Network of Obstetric Survey Systems) allows additional insights into the treatment of obstetric rare diseases and complications. More reliable estimates of the incidence of such events can be computed and compared within a larger database. Following the implementation in three federal states in Germany in 2010, participation in GerOSS-Project has increased to 100% of all hospitals with a delivery unit in Lower Saxony, 30% in Bavaria and 80% in Berlin. Feasibility of the project is shown by successful implementation of GerOSS. Quantitative analyses enable construction of risk profiles (e.g. for the

  13. ENVISION Project

    CERN Multimedia

    Ballantine, A; Dixon-Altaber, H; Dosanjh, M; Kuchina, L

    2011-01-01

    Hadrontherapy is a highly advanced technique of cancer radiotherapy that uses beams of charged particles (ions) to destroy tumour cells. While conventional X-rays traverse the human body depositing radiation as they pass through, ions deliver most of their energy at one point. Hadrontherapy is most advantageous once the position of the tumour is accurately known, so that healthy tissues can be protected. Accurate positioning is a crucial challenge for targeting moving organs, as in lung cancer, and for adapting the irradiation as the tumour shrinks with treatment. Therefore, quality assurance becomes one of the most relevant issues for an effective outcome of the cancer treatment. In order to improve the quality assurance tools for hadrontherapy, the European Commission is funding ENVISION, a 4-year project that aims at developing solutions for: real-• time non invasive monitoring • quantitative imaging • precise determination of delivered dose • fast feedback for optimal treatment planning • real-t...

  14. Environmental assessment for the treatment of Class A low-level radioactive waste and mixed low-level waste generated by the West Valley Demonstration Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently evaluating low-level radioactive waste management alternatives at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) located on the Western New York Nuclear Service Center (WNYNSC) near West Valley, New York. The WVDP's mission is to vitrify high-level radioactive waste resulting from commercial fuel reprocessing operations that took place at the WNYNSC from 1966 to 1972. During the process of high-level waste vitrification, low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed low-level waste (MILLW) will result and must be properly managed. It is estimated that the WVDP's LLW storage facilities will be filled to capacity in 1996. In order to provide sufficient safe storage of LLW until disposal options become available and partially fulfill requirements under the Federal Facilities Compliance Act (FFCA), the DOE is proposing to use U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission-licensed and permitted commercial facilities in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Clive, Utah; and Houston, Texas to treat (volume-reduce) a limited amount of Class A LLW and MLLW generated from the WVDP. Alternatives for ultimate disposal of the West Valley LLW are currently being evaluated in an environmental impact statement. This proposed action is for a limited quantity of waste, over a limited period of time, and for treatment only; this proposal does not include disposal. The proposed action consists of sorting, repacking, and loading waste at the WVDP; transporting the waste for commercial treatment; and returning the residual waste to the WVDP for interim storage. For the purposes of this assessment, environmental impacts were quantified for a five-year operating period (1996 - 2001). Alternatives to the proposed action include no action, construction of additional on-site storage facilities, construction of a treatment facility at the WVDP comparable to commercial treatment, and off-site disposal at a commercial or DOE facility

  15. Virtual patient 3D dose reconstruction using in air EPID measurements and a back-projection algorithm for IMRT and VMAT treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaciregui-Ruiz, Igor; Rozendaal, Roel; van Oers, René F M; Mijnheer, Ben; Mans, Anton

    2017-05-01

    At our institute, a transit back-projection algorithm is used clinically to reconstruct in vivo patient and in phantom 3D dose distributions using EPID measurements behind a patient or a polystyrene slab phantom, respectively. In this study, an extension to this algorithm is presented whereby in air EPID measurements are used in combination with CT data to reconstruct 'virtual' 3D dose distributions. By combining virtual and in vivo patient verification data for the same treatment, patient-related errors can be separated from machine, planning and model errors. The virtual back-projection algorithm is described and verified against the transit algorithm with measurements made behind a slab phantom, against dose measurements made with an ionization chamber and with the OCTAVIUS 4D system, as well as against TPS patient data. Virtual and in vivo patient dose verification results are also compared. Virtual dose reconstructions agree within 1% with ionization chamber measurements. The average γ-pass rate values (3% global dose/3mm) in the 3D dose comparison with the OCTAVIUS 4D system and the TPS patient data are 98.5±1.9%(1SD) and 97.1±2.9%(1SD), respectively. For virtual patient dose reconstructions, the differences with the TPS in median dose to the PTV remain within 4%. Virtual patient dose reconstruction makes pre-treatment verification based on deviations of DVH parameters feasible and eliminates the need for phantom positioning and re-planning. Virtual patient dose reconstructions have additional value in the inspection of in vivo deviations, particularly in situations where CBCT data is not available (or not conclusive). Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Process evaluation of the systematic medical appraisal, referral and treatment (SMART) mental health project in rural India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewari, Abha; Kallakuri, Sudha; Devarapalli, Siddhardha; Jha, Vivekanand; Patel, Anushka; Maulik, Pallab K

    2017-12-04

    Availability of basic mental health services is limited in rural areas of India. Health system and individual level factors such as lack of mental health professionals and infrastructure, poor awareness about mental health, stigma related to help seeking, are responsible for poor awareness and use of mental health services. We implemented a mental health services delivery model that leveraged technology and task sharing to facilitate identification and treatment of common mental disorders (CMDs) such as stress, depression, anxiety and suicide risk in rural areas of the state of Andhra Pradesh, India. The intervention was delivered by lay village health workers (Accredited Social Health Activists - ASHAs) and primary care doctors. An anti-stigma campaign was implemented prior to this activity. This paper reports the process evaluation of the intervention using mixed methods. A mixed methods pre-post evaluation assessed the intervention using quantitative service usage analytics from the server, and qualitative interviews with different stakeholders. Barriers and facilitators in implementing the intervention were identified. Health service use increased significantly at post-intervention, ASHAs could followup 78.6% of those who had screened positive, and 78.6% of the 1243 Interactive Voice Response System calls made, were successful. Most respondents were aware of the intervention. They indicated that knowledge received through the intervention empowered them to approach ASHAs and share their mental health symptoms. ASHAs and doctors opined that EDSS was useful and easy to use. Medical camps organized in villages to increase access to the doctor were received positively by all. However, some aspects or facilitators of the intervention need to be improved, including network connectivity, booster training, anti-stigma campaigns, quality of mental health services provided by doctors, provision of psychotropic medications at primary health centers and frequency of health

  17. Exposition concerning small windmills. Appendix to the main report. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-12-01

    The second appendix to the main report entitled ''Exposition Concerning Small Windmills'' contains a description of the search for literature on the subject, a survey of relevant properties and a calculation of the ''shadow'' effect of small windmills, demands on electrical technology placed on small windmills, a survey of participating institutions and consultants, descriptions of the way the project was carried out (divided into phases) and maps of developing countries with details of wind conditions and possibilities of obtaining loans from the World Bank. (AB)

  18. Salt Repository Project. FY-84 technical project plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-08-01

    The FY 84 technical plans for the Salt Repository Project (SRP) are briefly presented. The objectives of the project in relation to the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (CRWM) program are discused and the technical activities directed toward accomplishing these objectives are detailed. A budget is presented for each of the Level 2 Work Breakdown Structure Tasks (Systems, Waste Package, Site, Repository, Regulatory and Institutional, Test Facilities, Exploratory Shaft, Land Acquisition, and Program Management) in an appendix. An overall description, current status, and planned activities are presented for each of the subtasks which make up the above-mentioned Level 2 tasks. Milestones and their definitions for the plan year, as well as milestones for the outyears are also presented at this same subtask level for each subtask

  19. Crohn's disease limited to the vermiform appendix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Martin; Andersen, J C

    1987-01-01

    Thirteen cases of Crohn's disease confined to the vermiform appendix were seen during a 12-year period. They constituted 16.9% of patients with primary resection of the bowel for Crohn's disease in the same period, but only 0.4% of the cases of acute appendicitis. In 10 of the 13 cases...... to approach that of recurrence after resection in other parts of the intestines. Collective review of this and three other relatively large case series gave an estimated recurrence rate of 3.5%. We conclude that in Crohn's disease initially confined to the appendix the course appears to be indolent....... there was marked fibrous thickening of the appendiceal wall, and in 11 there were epithelioid cell granulomas. Appendectomy was performed in all cases. None had postoperative fistula or later manifestations of the disease within the observation time averaging 6.3 years. The recurrence rate was previously believed...

  20. Columbia River System Operation Review final environmental impact statement. Appendix I: Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    The System Operation Review (SOR) is a study and environmental compliance process being used by the three Federal agencies to analyze future operations of the system and river use issues. The goal of the SOR is to achieve a coordinated system operation strategy for the river that better meets the needs of all river users. This technical appendix addresses only the effects of alternative system operating strategies for managing the Columbia River system. This appendix discusses the work performed by the SOR Power Work Group. The Power Work Group (PWG) had several major responsibilities: first, to determine the effects of each of the various system operating strategies (SOS) on the Northwest regional power system; second, given these effects, to determine what, if any, actions are required to meet forecasted regional energy consumption; and finally, to estimate the cost for serving the forecasted regional energy consumption. The Northwest regional power system consists of Federal and non-Federal hydroelectric power projects (hydropower or hydro projects) on the main stem of the Columbia and Snake Rivers, numerous smaller hydro projects on other river reaches, and a number of thermal plants (coal, nuclear and combustion turbines)

  1. Thermal sludge treatment. Pilot project on the possibilities and marginal conditions; Thermische slibontsluiting. Pilot-onderzoek naar de mogelijkheden en randvoorwaarden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkhof, D.; Koornneef, E.; Janus, H. [Royal Haskoning DHV, Amersfoort (Netherlands)

    2012-09-15

    As part of the agreements within the framework of the Dutch Green Deal between Water Boards and the Ministry of Economic Affairs, Agriculture and Innovation (ELI) a research program has been set up which addresses the implementation of new developments that can improve energy efficiency in the treatment of waste water. Attention is paid to supercritical gasification, supercritical oxidation and conventional gasification. The study on conventional gasification is split into two phases: research into the economic feasibility in combination with TDH (thermal pressure hydrolysis) and drying, and next to that a pilot plant. This report concerns phase 2: pilot projects on thermal sewage treatment [Dutch] Als onderdeel van de afspraken in het kader van de Green Deal tussen Waterschappen en het ministerie van ELI is een onderzoeksprogramma opgesteld gericht op het implementeren van nieuwe ontwikkelingen die de energie efficientie bij de verwerking van afvalwater kunnen verbeteren. Daarbij wordt gekeken naar superkritische vergassing en oxidatie en naar conventionele vergassing. De studie naar conventionele vergassing is gesplitst in 2 fasen: onderzoek naar de economische haalbaarheid in combinatie met TDH (thermische druk hydrolyse), en drogen en daarnaast een onderzoek op pilot plant/praktijkschaal. In de onderhavige rapportage wordt fase 2, het onderzoek op pilot plant/praktijkschaal naar thermische slibontsluiting (TSO) beschreven.

  2. Endometriosis of the Vermiform Appendix within a Hernia Sac Infiltrating the Pubic Bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziaja, Damian; Bolkowski, Tomasz; Januszewski, Krzysztof; Skrzypulec-Plinta, Wioletta; Chudek, Jerzy; Ziaja, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Appendicular endometriosis mimicking appendicitis is a rare finding. Inguinal tumor in the course of appendicular endometriosis located within an inguinal hernia sac and infiltrating the periosteum of the pubic bone has not yet been described. Case Report. This paper describes a case of a rapidly enlarging, solid, unmovable, very painful upon palpation inguinal tumor, in a 36-year-old nulliparous woman. During surgery, a hard (approximately 4 cm in diameter) tumor infiltrating the periosteum of the right pubic bone and continuous with the inguinal hernia sac was dissected. The distal segment of the vermiform appendix was an element of the dissected tumor. Histological examination revealed endometriosis of the distal vermiform appendix. After 6 months of hormone treatment, she was referred for reoperation due to tumor recurrence. Once again histological examination of the resected tissue revealed endometriosis. There was no further recurrence of the disease with goserelin therapy. In addition to the case report, we present a review of the literature about endometriosis involving the vermiform appendix and the inguinal canal (Amyand's hernia). Conclusion. This case expands the list of differential diagnoses of nodules found in the inguinal region of women.

  3. Endometriosis of the Vermiform Appendix within a Hernia Sac Infiltrating the Pubic Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian Ziaja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Appendicular endometriosis mimicking appendicitis is a rare finding. Inguinal tumor in the course of appendicular endometriosis located within an inguinal hernia sac and infiltrating the periosteum of the pubic bone has not yet been described. Case Report. This paper describes a case of a rapidly enlarging, solid, unmovable, very painful upon palpation inguinal tumor, in a 36-year-old nulliparous woman. During surgery, a hard (approximately 4 cm in diameter tumor infiltrating the periosteum of the right pubic bone and continuous with the inguinal hernia sac was dissected. The distal segment of the vermiform appendix was an element of the dissected tumor. Histological examination revealed endometriosis of the distal vermiform appendix. After 6 months of hormone treatment, she was referred for reoperation due to tumor recurrence. Once again histological examination of the resected tissue revealed endometriosis. There was no further recurrence of the disease with goserelin therapy. In addition to the case report, we present a review of the literature about endometriosis involving the vermiform appendix and the inguinal canal (Amyand’s hernia. Conclusion. This case expands the list of differential diagnoses of nodules found in the inguinal region of women.

  4. Amyand's hernia-a vermiform appendix presenting in an inguinal hernia: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlidis Theodoros

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction A vermiform appendix in an inguinal hernia, inflamed or not, is known as Amyand's hernia. Here we present a case series of four men with Amyand's hernia. Case presentations We retrospectively studied 963 Caucasian patients with inguinal hernia who were admitted to our surgical department over a 12-year period. Four patients presented with Amyand's hernia (0.4%. A 32-year-old Caucasian man had an inflamed vermiform appendix in his hernial sac (acute appendicitis, presenting as an incarcerated right groin hernia, and underwent simultaneous appendectomy and Bassini suture hernia repair. Two patients, Caucasian men aged 36 and 43 years old, had normal appendices in their sacs, which clinically appeared as non-incarcerated right groin hernias. Both underwent a plug-mesh hernia repair without appendectomy. The fourth patient, a 25-year-old Caucasian man with a large but not inflamed appendix in his sac, had a plug-mesh hernia repair with appendectomy. Conclusion A hernia surgeon may encounter unexpected intraoperative findings, such as Amyand's hernia. It is important to be prepared and apply the appropriate treatment.

  5. Amyand's hernia-a vermiform appendix presenting in an inguinal hernia: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psarras, Kyriakos; Lalountas, Miltiadis; Baltatzis, Minas; Pavlidis, Efstathios; Tsitlakidis, Anastasios; Symeonidis, Nikolaos; Ballas, Konstantinos; Pavlidis, Theodoros; Sakantamis, Athanassios

    2011-09-19

    A vermiform appendix in an inguinal hernia, inflamed or not, is known as Amyand's hernia. Here we present a case series of four men with Amyand's hernia. We retrospectively studied 963 Caucasian patients with inguinal hernia who were admitted to our surgical department over a 12-year period. Four patients presented with Amyand's hernia (0.4%). A 32-year-old Caucasian man had an inflamed vermiform appendix in his hernial sac (acute appendicitis), presenting as an incarcerated right groin hernia, and underwent simultaneous appendectomy and Bassini suture hernia repair. Two patients, Caucasian men aged 36 and 43 years old, had normal appendices in their sacs, which clinically appeared as non-incarcerated right groin hernias. Both underwent a plug-mesh hernia repair without appendectomy. The fourth patient, a 25-year-old Caucasian man with a large but not inflamed appendix in his sac, had a plug-mesh hernia repair with appendectomy. A hernia surgeon may encounter unexpected intraoperative findings, such as Amyand's hernia. It is important to be prepared and apply the appropriate treatment.

  6. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 178 - Specifications for Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Specifications for Steel A Appendix A to Part 178.... 178, App. A Appendix A to Part 178—Specifications for Steel Table 1 [Open-hearth, basic oxygen, or electric steel of uniform quality. The following chemical composition limits are based on ladle analysis...

  7. 25 CFR Appendix B to Part 276 - Financial Reporting Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Financial Reporting Requirements B Appendix B to Part 276...—Financial Reporting Requirements A. Purpose and scope. This appendix prescribes requirements for grantee to report financial information to the Bureau and to request advances and reimbursement when a letter-of...

  8. 31 CFR Appendix D to Part 359 - Tax Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... amended. The bonds are also subject to Federal and State estate, inheritance, gift, or other excise taxes... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tax Considerations D Appendix D to..., SERIES I Pt. 359, App. D Appendix D to Part 359—Tax Considerations 1. What are some general tax...

  9. 31 CFR Appendix to Part 351 - Tax Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... estate or inheritance taxes. (See 31 U.S.C. 3124.) 2. What reporting methods are available for savings... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tax Considerations Appendix to Part.... 351, App. A Appendix to Part 351—Tax Considerations 1. What are some general tax considerations...

  10. 32 CFR Appendix A to Part 505 - References

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true References A Appendix A to Part 505 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY AID OF CIVIL AUTHORITIES AND PUBLIC RELATIONS ARMY PRIVACY ACT PROGRAM Pt. 505, App. A Appendix A to Part 505—References (a) The Privacy Act of...

  11. 32 CFR Appendix A to Part 806 - References

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false References A Appendix A to Part 806 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE ADMINISTRATION AIR FORCE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT PROGRAM Pt. 806, App. A Appendix A to Part 806—References Title 5, United States Code, Section...

  12. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - References

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false References A Appendix A to Subpart A of...) AMBIENT AIR MONITORING REFERENCE AND EQUIVALENT METHODS General Provisions Pt. 53, Subpt. A, App. A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 53—References (1) American National Standard Quality Systems—Model for...

  13. 32 CFR Appendix A to Part 513 - References

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true References A Appendix A to Part 513 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY AID OF CIVIL AUTHORITIES AND PUBLIC RELATIONS INDEBTEDNESS OF MILITARY PERSONNEL Pt. 513, App. A Appendix A to Part 513—References Section I...

  14. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart C of... - References

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false References A Appendix A to Subpart C of...) AMBIENT AIR MONITORING REFERENCE AND EQUIVALENT METHODS Procedures for Determining Comparability Between Candidate Methods and Reference Methods Pt. 53, Subpt. C, App. A Appendix A to Subpart C of Part 53...

  15. 44 CFR Appendix A to Part 18 - Certification Regarding Lobbying

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Lobbying A Appendix A to Part 18 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Pt. 18, App. A Appendix A to Part 18—Certification Regarding Lobbying Certification for Contracts, Grants, Loans, and Cooperative Agreements The...

  16. 12 CFR Appendix A to Part 411 - Certification Regarding Lobbying

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Certification Regarding Lobbying A Appendix A to Part 411 Banks and Banking EXPORT-IMPORT BANK OF THE UNITED STATES NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Pt. 411, App. A Appendix A to Part 411—Certification Regarding Lobbying Certification for Contracts...

  17. 45 CFR Appendix A to Part 604 - Certification Regarding Lobbying

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Certification Regarding Lobbying A Appendix A to... NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Pt. 604, App. A Appendix A to Part 604—Certification Regarding Lobbying... and submit Standard Form-LLL, “Disclosure Form to Report Lobbying,” in accordance with its...

  18. 22 CFR Appendix A to Part 712 - Certification Regarding Lobbying

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Certification Regarding Lobbying A Appendix A to... RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Pt. 712, App. A Appendix A to Part 712—Certification Regarding Lobbying Certification... and submit Standard Form-LLL, “Disclosure Form to Report Lobbying,” in accordance with its...

  19. 29 CFR Appendix A to Part 93 - Certification Regarding Lobbying

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Certification Regarding Lobbying A Appendix A to Part 93 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Pt. 93, App. A Appendix A to Part 93—Certification Regarding Lobbying Certification for Contracts, Grants, Loans, and Cooperative Agreements The...

  20. 10 CFR Appendix A to Part 601 - Certification Regarding Lobbying

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Certification Regarding Lobbying A Appendix A to Part 601 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Pt. 601, App. A Appendix A to Part 601—Certification Regarding Lobbying Certification for Contracts, Grants, Loans...

  1. 22 CFR Appendix A to Part 519 - Certification Regarding Lobbying

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Certification Regarding Lobbying A Appendix A to Part 519 Foreign Relations BROADCASTING BOARD OF GOVERNORS NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Pt. 519, App. A Appendix A to Part 519—Certification Regarding Lobbying Certification for Contracts, Grants, Loans, and...

  2. 45 CFR Appendix A to Part 93 - Certification Regarding Lobbying

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Certification Regarding Lobbying A Appendix A to... ON LOBBYING Pt. 93, App. A Appendix A to Part 93—Certification Regarding Lobbying Certification for... Standard Form-LLL, “Disclosure Form to Report Lobbying,” in accordance with its instructions. (3) The...

  3. 45 CFR Appendix A to Part 1158 - Certification Regarding Lobbying

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Certification Regarding Lobbying A Appendix A to... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Pt. 1158, App. A Appendix A to Part 1158—Certification Regarding Lobbying Certification for Contracts, Grants, Loans, and...

  4. 6 CFR Appendix A to Part 9 - Certification Regarding Lobbying

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Certification Regarding Lobbying A Appendix A to... LOBBYING Pt. 9, App. A Appendix A to Part 9—Certification Regarding Lobbying Certification for Contracts... Standard Form—LLL, “Disclosure Form to Report Lobbying,” in accordance with its instructions. (3) The...

  5. 45 CFR Appendix A to Part 1168 - Certification Regarding Lobbying

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Certification Regarding Lobbying A Appendix A to... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Pt. 1168, App. A Appendix A to Part 1168—Certification Regarding Lobbying Certification for Contracts, Grants...

  6. 34 CFR Appendix A to Part 82 - Certification Regarding Lobbying

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Certification Regarding Lobbying A Appendix A to Part 82 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Pt. 82, App. A Appendix A to Part 82—Certification Regarding Lobbying Certification for Contracts, Grants...

  7. 45 CFR Appendix A to Part 1230 - Certification Regarding Lobbying

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    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Certification Regarding Lobbying A Appendix A to... AND COMMUNITY SERVICE NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Pt. 1230, App. A Appendix A to Part 1230—Certification Regarding Lobbying Certification for Contracts, Grants, Loans, and Cooperative Agreements The...

  8. 14 CFR Appendix A to Part 1271 - Certification Regarding Lobbying

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Certification Regarding Lobbying A Appendix... ON LOBBYING Pt. 1271, App. A Appendix A to Part 1271—Certification Regarding Lobbying Certification... and submit Standard Form-LLL, “Disclosure Form to Report Lobbying,” in accordance with its...

  9. 22 CFR Appendix A to Part 138 - Certification Regarding Lobbying

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  10. 20 CFR Appendix A to Part 438 - Certification Regarding Lobbying

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    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Certification Regarding Lobbying A Appendix A to Part 438 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Pt. 438, App. A Appendix A to Part 438—Certification Regarding Lobbying Certification for Contracts, Grants, Loans...

  11. 18 CFR Appendix A to Part 1315 - Certification Regarding Lobbying

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Lobbying A Appendix A to Part 1315 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Pt. 1315, App. A Appendix A to Part 1315—Certification Regarding Lobbying... and submit Standard Form-LLL, “Disclosure Form to Report Lobbying,” in accordance with its...

  12. 22 CFR Appendix A to Part 311 - Certification Regarding Lobbying

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    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Certification Regarding Lobbying A Appendix A to Part 311 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Pt. 311, App. A Appendix A to Part 311—Certification Regarding Lobbying Certification for Contracts, Grants, Loans, and Cooperative...

  13. 7 CFR Appendix A to Part 3018 - Certification Regarding Lobbying

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    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Certification Regarding Lobbying A Appendix A to Part... OFFICER, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Pt. 3018, App. A Appendix A to Part 3018—Certification Regarding Lobbying Certification for Contracts, Grants, Loans, and Cooperative Agreements The...

  14. 22 CFR Appendix A to Part 227 - Certification Regarding Lobbying

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Certification Regarding Lobbying A Appendix A to Part 227 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Pt. 227, App. A Appendix A to Part 227—Certification Regarding Lobbying Certification for Contracts...

  15. 38 CFR Appendix A to Part 45 - Certification Regarding Lobbying

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Lobbying A Appendix A to Part 45 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Pt. 45, App. A Appendix A to Part 45—Certification Regarding Lobbying Certification for Contracts, Grants, Loans, and Cooperative Agreements The undersigned certifies...

  16. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 20 - Certification Regarding Lobbying

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    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Certification Regarding Lobbying A Appendix A to Part 20 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Pt. 20, App. A Appendix A to Part 20—Certification Regarding Lobbying Certification for Contracts, Grants...

  17. 32 CFR Appendix A to Part 28 - Certification Regarding Lobbying

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Certification Regarding Lobbying A Appendix A to... AGREEMENT REGULATIONS NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Pt. 28, App. A Appendix A to Part 28—Certification Regarding Lobbying Certification for Contracts, Grants, Loans, and Cooperative Agreements The undersigned...

  18. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 227 - Noise Exposure Computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Noise Exposure Computation A Appendix A to Part...—Noise Exposure Computation This appendix is mandatory. I. Computation of Employee Noise Exposure A... because they are sometimes necessary for the computation of noise dose. In the above table the duration...

  19. 16 CFR Appendix E to Part 305 - Room Air Conditioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Room Air Conditioners E Appendix E to Part 305 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULE... Appendix E to Part 305—Room Air Conditioners Range Information Manufacturer's rated cooling capacity in Btu...

  20. Torsion of the vermiform appendix: A case report | Wani | Internet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Torsion of the vermiform appendix is a rare condition with few cases reported in the literature. Various factors predispose to torsion. Various factors predispose to torsion. We report a case of primary torsion of the vermiform appendix. The clinical presentation was indistinguishable from acute appendicitis and the diagnosis ...

  1. 12 CFR Appendix F to Part 360 - Customer File Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Customer File Structure F Appendix F to Part... POLICY RESOLUTION AND RECEIVERSHIP RULES Pt. 360, App. F Appendix F to Part 360—Customer File Structure This is the structure of the data file to provide to the FDIC information related to each customer who...

  2. 32 CFR Appendix A to Part 155 - Additional Procedural Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Additional Procedural Guidance A Appendix A to Part 155 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE SECURITY DEFENSE INDUSTRIAL PERSONNEL SECURITY CLEARANCE PROGRAM Pt. 155, App. A Appendix A to Part 155—Additional Procedural...

  3. Pathways for School Finance in California. Technical Appendix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Heather; Sonstelie, Jon; Weston, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    This is a technical appendix for the report, "Pathways for School Finance in California" (ED515651). "Pathways for School Finance in California" simulates alternatives to California's current school finance system. This appendix provides more information about the revenues used in those simulations. The first section describes…

  4. 14 CFR Appendix H to Part 121 - Advanced Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Advanced Simulation H Appendix H to Part... Simulation This appendix provides guidelines and a means for achieving flightcrew training in advanced... simulator, as appropriate. Advanced Simulation Training Program For an operator to conduct Level C or D...

  5. 40 CFR Appendix A to Part 67 - Technical Support Document

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Technical Support Document A Appendix A to Part 67 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS...—Technical Support Document Note: EPA will make copies of appendix A available from: Director, Stationary...

  6. 32 CFR Appendix G to Part 154 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false G Appendix G to Part 154 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE SECURITY DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL SECURITY PROGRAM REGULATION Appendix G to Part 154 ...

  7. 31 CFR Appendix A to Subpart C of... - Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Examples A Appendix A to Subpart C of... A to Subpart C of Part 29—Examples This appendix contains sample calculations of Federal Benefit Payments in a variety of situations. Optional Retirement Examples Example 1: No Unused Sick Leave A. In...

  8. 43 CFR Appendix B to Part 2 - Internet Addresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Internet Addresses B Appendix B to Part 2 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior RECORDS AND TESTIMONY; FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT Pt. 2, App. B Appendix B to Part 2—Internet Addresses 1. Department of the Interior (DOI) Home...

  9. 10 CFR Appendix H to Part 73 - Weapons Qualification Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Weapons Qualification Criteria H Appendix H to Part 73 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PHYSICAL PROTECTION OF PLANTS AND MATERIALS Pt. 73, App. H Appendix H to Part 73—Weapons Qualification Criteria The B-27 Target or a target of equivalent...

  10. 17 CFR Appendix B to Part 160 - Sample Clauses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... FINANCIAL INFORMATION Pt. 160, App. B Appendix B to Part 160—Sample Clauses This appendix only applies to... clause is accurate for each institution that uses the notice. Note that disclosure of certain information... nonaffiliated third parties. A-1—Categories of Information You Collect (All Institutions) You may use this...

  11. 14 CFR Appendix C to Part 420 - Risk Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Risk Analysis C Appendix C to Part 420... TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LICENSE TO OPERATE A LAUNCH SITE Pt. 420, App. C Appendix C to Part 420—Risk Analysis (a... risk is minimal. (2) An applicant shall perform a risk analysis when a populated area is located within...

  12. 10 CFR Appendix D to Part 835 - Surface Contamination Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Surface Contamination Values D Appendix D to Part 835...—Surface Contamination Values The data presented in appendix D are to be used in identifying the need for posting of contamination and high contamination areas in accordance with § 835.603(e) and (f) and...

  13. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 67 - Instruction Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Instruction Manual B Appendix B to Part 67 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED... Manual Note: EPA will make copies of appendix B available from: Director, Stationary Source Compliance...

  14. 32 CFR Appendix B to Part 806 - Abbreviations and Acronyms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Abbreviations and Acronyms B Appendix B to Part 806 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE ADMINISTRATION AIR FORCE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT PROGRAM Pt. 806, App. B Appendix B to Part 806—Abbreviations and...

  15. 31 CFR Appendix to Part 341 - Tables of Redemption Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tables of Redemption Values Appendix... RETIREMENT PLAN BONDS Pt. 341, App. Appendix to Part 341—Tables of Redemption Values Table of Redemption Values Providing an Investment Yield of 33/4 Percent per Annum for Bonds Bearing Issue Dates Beginning...

  16. 48 CFR Appendix to Part 1252 - Tar Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tar Matrix Appendix to Part 1252 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Pt. 1252, App. Appendix to Part 1252—Tar Matrix ER27DE05.000...

  17. 40 CFR Appendix A to Part 423 - 126 Priority Pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true 126 Priority Pollutants A Appendix A to Part 423 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS STEAM ELECTRIC POWER GENERATING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Pt. 423, App. A Appendix A to Part 423—126...

  18. 12 CFR Appendix B to Subpart B of... - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false [Reserved] B Appendix B to Subpart B of Part 1750 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF FEDERAL HOUSING ENTERPRISE OVERSIGHT, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT SAFETY AND SOUNDNESS CAPITAL Risk-Based Capital Appendix B to Subpart B of Part 1750 [Reserved] ...

  19. Exposition concerning small windmills. Appendix to main report. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-12-01

    This appendix to the main report entitled ''Exposition Concerning Small Windmills'' includes background information on the report, profiles of the participating companies and of those visited in Denmark and abroad, questionnaires and interview schemes sent to the participating companies, surveys of producers of Danish and foreign producers of small windmills and an appendix to the economical calculations found within the report. (AB)

  20. 12 CFR Appendix D to Part 41 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false [Reserved] D Appendix D to Part 41 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FAIR CREDIT REPORTING Appendix D to Part 41[Reserved] ...

  1. 12 CFR Appendixes A-B to Part 41 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false [Reserved] A Appendixes A-B to Part 41 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FAIR CREDIT REPORTING Appendixes A-B to Part 41 [Reserved] ...

  2. 12 CFR Appendix A to Part 14 - Consumer Grievance Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Consumer Grievance Process A Appendix A to Part 14 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CONSUMER PROTECTION IN SALES OF INSURANCE Pt. 14, App. A Appendix A to Part 14—Consumer Grievance Process Any consumer who...

  3. 32 CFR Appendix A to Part 192 - Checklist for Commanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Checklist for Commanders A Appendix A to Part 192 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EQUAL OPPORTUNITY IN OFF-BASE HOUSING Pt. 192, App. A Appendix A to Part 192—Checklist for...

  4. 14 CFR Appendix A to Part 147 - Curriculum Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Curriculum Requirements A Appendix A to... to Part 147—Curriculum Requirements This appendix defines terms used in appendices B, C, and D of this part, and describes the levels of proficiency at which items under each subject in each curriculum...

  5. 31 CFR Appendix A to Part 500 - Qualifying International Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Qualifying International Institutions A Appendix A to Part 500 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS Pt. 500, App. A Appendix A to Part 500...

  6. 10 CFR Appendix G to Part 50 - Fracture Toughness Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fracture Toughness Requirements G Appendix G to Part 50..., App. G Appendix G to Part 50—Fracture Toughness Requirements I. Introduction and scope. II. Definitions. III. Fracture toughness tests. IV. Fracture toughness requirements. I. Introduction and Scope...

  7. Significance of acquired diverticular disease of the vermiform appendix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallenbach, Klaus; Hjorth, Sofie Vetli; Engel, Ulla

    2012-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of acquired diverticulum of the appendix (DA), including incipient forms and its possible significance as a marker of local/regional neoplasms.......To assess the prevalence of acquired diverticulum of the appendix (DA), including incipient forms and its possible significance as a marker of local/regional neoplasms....

  8. 10 CFR Appendix G to Part 73 - Reportable Safeguards Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reportable Safeguards Events G Appendix G to Part 73.... G Appendix G to Part 73—Reportable Safeguards Events Pursuant to the provisions of 10 CFR 73.71 (b... shall report or record, as appropriate, the following safeguards events. I. Events to be reported within...

  9. 10 CFR Appendix A to Part 70 - Reportable Safety Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reportable Safety Events A Appendix A to Part 70 Energy... Appendix A to Part 70—Reportable Safety Events Licensees must comply with reporting requirements in this... report: (a) One hour reports. Events to be reported to the NRC Operations Center within 1 hour of...

  10. Appendix B - GPRA06 biomass program documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    This appendix discusses the assumptions and methods employed in the biomass benefits analysis that is part of the fiscal year 2006 GPRA benefits analysis for all of the Department of Energy’s Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) research and deployment programs. The biomass benefits analysis focuses on the benefits of future achievements by the program and excludes retrospective benefits and benefits resulting from industry’s own initiative and funding.

  11. Effect of Agonist and Antagonist on the In Vitro Contractility of Inflamed Vermiform Appendix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Phani Bhushan; Tiwary, Pushpakant; Singh, Sanjeev K; Pandey, Ratna; Roy, Atanu; Kar, Amrita Ghosh; Basu, Somprakas; Tiwari, Anil Kumar

    2017-06-01

    Appendicitis poses a great health problem worldwide. Previous studies demonstrated structural damage to neuronal network and interstitial cell of Cajal in appendicitis. Above observations suggest for the alterations in appendicular motility/contractility in appendicitis. But the mechanisms involved in mediating the contractility in inflamed vermiform appendix is not known till date. The present in vitro study was performed to find out the mechanisms responsible for contractility in the inflamed human vermiform appendix. Contractions of the longitudinal muscle strips of inflamed appendix were recorded in vitro at 37±0.5°C. Control contractions were recorded for 30 min after an initial tension of 0.5 gram. Initially dose-response experiments of agonists (acetylcholine, serotonin and histamine) were performed separately and the dose that produced maximum contraction was determined with each agonist. This maximal dose of agonist was used to elicit contractions in next series of experiments before and after pre-treatment with appropriate antagonists like atropine, ondansetron (5-HT 3 antagonist) and chlorpheniramine maleate respectively. Acetylcholine (ACh) and serotonin (5-HT) elicited maximum amplitude of contraction at 10 µM and 1 µM concentration respectively. These contractions were significantly blocked by prior exposure of muscle strips with atropine (100 µM) and ondansetron (10 µM). Histamine produced very low amplitude of contractions in comparison to ACh or 5-HT and did not exhibit dose-response relations. The histamine induced contractions were blocked by H 1 antagonist chlorpheniramine maleate (100 µM). The observations suggested that the contractility of longitudinal muscle strips of inflamed vermiform appendix in human beings was predominantly mediated by muscarinic and serotonergic (5-HT 3 ) mechanisms, whereas, histaminergic mechanisms played a minor role in mediating the contractility.

  12. Prenatal Testosterone Treatment Leads to Changes in the Morphology of KNDy Neurons, Their Inputs, and Projections to GnRH Cells in Female Sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernea, Maria; Padmanabhan, Vasantha; Goodman, Robert L.; Coolen, Lique M.

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal testosterone (T)-treated ewes display a constellation of reproductive defects that closely mirror those seen in PCOS women, including altered hormonal feedback control of GnRH. Kisspeptin/neurokinin B/dynorphin (KNDy) neurons of the arcuate nucleus (ARC) play a key role in steroid feedback control of GnRH secretion, and prenatal T treatment in sheep causes an imbalance of KNDy peptide expression within the ARC. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that prenatal T exposure, in addition to altering KNDy peptides, leads to changes in the morphology and synaptic inputs of this population, kisspeptin cells of the preoptic area (POA), and GnRH cells. Prenatal T treatment significantly increased the size of KNDy cell somas, whereas POA kisspeptin, GnRH, agouti-related peptide, and proopiomelanocortin neurons were each unchanged in size. Prenatal T treatment also significantly reduced the total number of synaptic inputs onto KNDy neurons and POA kisspeptin neurons; for KNDy neurons, the decrease was partly due to a decrease in KNDy-KNDy synapses, whereas KNDy inputs to POA kisspeptin cells were unaltered. Finally, prenatal T reduced the total number of inputs to GnRH cells in both the POA and medial basal hypothalamus, and this change was in part due to a decreased number of inputs from KNDy neurons. The hypertrophy of KNDy cells in prenatal T sheep resembles that seen in ARC kisspeptin cells of postmenopausal women, and together with changes in their synaptic inputs and projections to GnRH neurons, may contribute to defects in steroidal control of GnRH observed in this animal model. PMID:26061725

  13. Long-term effects of the Focus on Families project on substance use disorders among children of parents in methadone treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggerty, Kevin P; Skinner, Martie; Fleming, Charles B; Gainey, Randy R; Catalano, Richard F

    2008-12-01

    This study examines the efficacy of the Focus on Families project (currently called Families Facing the Future), a preventive intervention to reduce substance use disorders among children in families with a parent in methadone treatment. One hundred and thirty families were assigned randomly to a methadone clinic treatment-as-usual control condition or treatment-as-usual plus the Focus on Families intervention between 1991 and 1993. Setting Participants were recruited from two methadone clinics in the Pacific Northwest. This study examines the development of substance use disorders among the 177 children (56.84% male) involved in the program using data from a long-term follow-up in 2005, when these participants ranged in age from 15 to 29 years. The intervention was delivered through group parent-training workshops at the methadone clinics and through individualized home-based services. The intervention taught parenting skills and skills for avoiding relapse to drug abuse. At long-term follow-up, substance use disorders were measured by the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI). Survival analyses were used to assess intervention versus control differences in the hazard of developing substance use disorders. Overall, intervention and control participants did not differ significantly in risk of developing substance use disorders. However, there was evidence of a significant difference in intervention effect by gender. There was a significant reduction in the risk of developing a substance use disorder for intervention group males compared to control group males (hazard ratio = 0.53, P = 0.03), while intervention versus control differences among females were non-significant and favored the control condition. Results from this study suggest that helping parents in recovery focus on both reducing their drug use and improving their parenting skills may have long-term effects on reducing substance use disorders among their male children. However, the overall

  14. The Nothuesli small hydro project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balachandran, S.; Jorde, K.

    2008-01-01

    This report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) discusses the project for a small 16-kilowatt hydro plant on the Gonzenbaechli stream in eastern Switzerland. The site, which was used even before 1860 for obtaining power from the stream is briefly described, as are the present remains of earlier installations. An old Francis turbine has been retrieved and could possibly be reused. Water-flow figures and fall-heights are noted. Design flows and residual water quantities required by legislation are noted and discussed, as are the geology and topology of the catchment area. The proposals for a new hydro-power plant are described, including the apparatus proposed with a power of 20 kVA. Environmental aspects are also discussed, as are the investment costs and the economic viability of the project. The paper is completed with a comprehensive appendix, including detailed cost estimates.

  15. Analysis of accident sequences and source terms at waste treatment and storage facilities for waste generated by U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Operations, Volume 3: Appendixes C-H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Roglans-Ribas, J. [and others

    1995-04-01

    This report contains the Appendices for the Analysis of Accident Sequences and Source Terms at Waste Treatment and Storage Facilities for Waste Generated by the U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Operations. The main report documents the methodology, computational framework, and results of facility accident analyses performed as a part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The accident sequences potentially important to human health risk are specified, their frequencies are assessed, and the resultant radiological and chemical source terms are evaluated. A personal computer-based computational framework and database have been developed that provide these results as input to the WM PEIS for calculation of human health risk impacts. This report summarizes the accident analyses and aggregates the key results for each of the waste streams. Source terms are estimated and results are presented for each of the major DOE sites and facilities by WM PEIS alternative for each waste stream. The appendices identify the potential atmospheric release of each toxic chemical or radionuclide for each accident scenario studied. They also provide discussion of specific accident analysis data and guidance used or consulted in this report.

  16. Prevalence and effect of pre-treatment drug resistance on the virological response to antiretroviral treatment initiated in HIV-infected children - a EuroCoord-CHAIN-EPPICC joint project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngo-Giang-Huong, Nicole; Wittkop, Linda; Judd, Ali

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Few studies have evaluated the impact of pre-treatment drug resistance (PDR) on response to combination antiretroviral treatment (cART) in children. The objective of this joint EuroCoord-CHAIN-EPPICC/PENTA project was to assess the prevalence of PDR mutations and their association...... algorithm to infer resistance to prescribed drugs. Time to virological failure (VF) was defined as the first of two consecutive HIV-RNA > 500 copies/mL after 6 months cART and was assessed by Cox proportional hazards models. All models were adjusted for baseline demographic, clinical, immunology.......7-5.7). Of 37 children (7.8 %, 95 % confidence interval (CI), 5.5-10.6) harboring a virus with ≥1 PDR mutations, 30 children had a virus resistant to ≥1 of the prescribed drugs. Overall, the cumulative Kaplan-Meier estimate for virological failure was 19.8 % (95 %CI, 16.4-23.9). Cumulative risk for VF tended...

  17. 14 CFR Appendix I to Part 151 - Appendix I to Part 151

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...) AIRPORTS FEDERAL AID TO AIRPORTS Pt. 151, App. I Appendix I to Part 151 [Lists of Advisory Circulars incorporated by § 151.72: (a) Circulars available free of charge.] Number Subject AC 150/5300-3 Adaptation of..., and Hazardous Areas on Airports. AC 150/5340-13 High Intensity Lighting System. AC 150/5340-14 Economy...

  18. 43 CFR Appendix B to Subpart A of... - Appendix B to Subpart A of Part 17

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Race, Color, or National Origin Pt. 17, Subpt. A, App. B Appendix B to Subpart A of Part 17 The following statutes authorize Federal financial assistance limited to individuals of a particular race, color.... Adult Vocational Training Act (70 Stat. 986, 25 U.S.C. 309). 3. Vocational and Trade School Act (48 Stat...

  19. 49 CFR Appendix I to Subpart B of... - Appendix I to Subpart B of Part 1139

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... REVENUE PROCEEDINGS Intercity Bus Industry Pt. 1139, Subpt. B, App. I Appendix I to Subpart B of Part 1139 Excerpt from National Bus Traffic Association's brief (pages 18-23) in I&S M-29089 increased bus passenger... Motor Carriers of Passengers At the conclusion of the hearing in this proceeding, the Administrative Law...

  20. T1 bright appendix sign to exclude acute appendicitis in pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Ilah; An, Chansik; Lim, Joon Seok; Kim, Myeong-Jin; Chung, Yong Eun

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of the T1 bright appendix sign for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis in pregnant women. This retrospective study included 125 pregnant women with suspected appendicitis who underwent magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The T1 bright appendix sign was defined as a high intensity signal filling more than half length of the appendix on T1-weighted imaging. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of the T1 bright appendix sign for normal appendix identification were calculated in all patients and in those with borderline-sized appendices (6-7 mm). The T1 bright appendix sign was seen in 51% of patients with normal appendices, but only in 4.5% of patients with acute appendicitis. The overall sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of the T1 bright appendix sign for normal appendix diagnosis were 44.9%, 95.5%, 97.6%, and 30.0%, respectively. All four patients with borderline sized appendix with appendicitis showed negative T1 bright appendix sign. The T1 bright appendix sign is a specific finding for the diagnosis of a normal appendix in pregnant women with suspected acute appendicitis. • Magnetic resonance imaging is increasingly used in emergency settings. • Acute appendicitis is the most common cause of acute abdomen. • Magnetic resonance imaging is widely used in pregnant population. • T1 bright appendix sign can be a specific sign representing normal appendix.

  1. Clinical observation of small-incision extracapsular cataract extraction with intraocular lens implantation for the treatment of cataract in the sight restoration project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Jian Cheng

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To analyze the clinical effects of small-incision extracapsular cataract extraction with intraocular lens implantation for the treatment of cataract.METHODS:Totally 642 cases 676 eyes of cataract were treated by small-incision extracapsular cataract extraction with intraocular lens implantation. Complication during and after operations and postoperative visual acuity was observed.RESULTS:Visual acuity of 670 eyes was ≥0.05 and off-blindness rate was 99.11%, and there was 627 eyes ≥0.3 and the off-disability rate was 92.75% after 1mo. Rupture of posterior capsule during surgery occurred in 24 eyes. Fifty-four eyes were corneal edema, and anterior chamber exudation were 26 eyes, and 23 eyes were hypertension after operation. CONCLUSION: There are a little complications during and after operation for cataract treated by small-incision extracapsular cataract extraction with intraocular lens implantation. Patients have good recovery after operation. This operation does not need high-standard equipments and is suitable in the sight restoration project.

  2. 47 CFR Appendix I to Subpart E of... - A Procedure for Calculating PCS Signal Levels at Microwave Receivers (Appendix E of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... at Microwave Receivers (Appendix E of the Memorandum Opinion and Order) I Appendix I to Subpart E of...—A Procedure for Calculating PCS Signal Levels at Microwave Receivers (Appendix E of the Memorandum... microwave operations from a PCS operation will be based on the sum of signals received at a microwave...

  3. Prevalence and clinical implications of diverticulosis of the vermiform appendix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Käser, Samuel Andreas; Willi, Niels; Maurer, Christoph Andreas

    2013-08-01

    The epidemiology and the aetiology of inflammatory diseases of the vermiform appendix remain poorly understood. The prevalence of appendiceal diverticulosis and diverticulitis in patients undergoing appendectomy for suspected acute appendicitis was investigated. A retrospective study was completed on patients who underwent appendectomy for suspected acute appendicitis. Pathology reports of all patients were screened for diverticula of the vermiform appendix. Patients with either diverticulitis of the vermiform appendix or normal appendicitis were compared. Out of two sets of consecutive patients (n = 1073), nine (0.8%) were identified with diverticulosis of the vermiform appendix. Two of these patients had diverticulitis of the vermiform appendix without appendicitis, three had diverticulitis with consecutive localized appendicitis, and four had proper acute appendicitis with a noninflamed diverticulum of the vermiform appendix. One patient had perforated appendicitis. Two patients had an obstructing neuroendocrine carcinoid which may have caused diverticular formation. Diverticula of the vermiform appendix are rare. If inflamed, they mimic acute appendicitis and are treated by appendectomy. If not inflamed, and diagnosed intraoperatively, incidental appendectomy is recommended.

  4. Lengths and Positions of the Vermiform Appendix among Sudanese Cadavers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehab I. El-Amin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/objective: The anatomy of vermiform appendix displays great variations in length and position between different populations. The reports relating these variations to a specific etiological factor are few. This study aims to describe the positions and lengths of vermiform appendix among Sudanese cadavers. Methods: This descriptive study was carried out in Omdurman Teaching Hospital Morgue and Omdurman Islamic University-Sudan. Sixty Sudanese cadavers (30 male and 30 female, were dissected in the period from June 2013 to June 2014. The positions and the lengths of vermiform appendix were measured in millimeters. The data was analyzed by SPSS version 20. Results: The cadavers’ age ranged between 20 to 80 years according to their medico-legal reports. Retrocaecal position was mainly observed in 60%, pelvic in 35%, post-ileal in 3.3%, and pre-ileal in 1.7%. The lengths of the appendix was found < 69 mm in 23.3%, 70-110 mm in 60%, and > 110 mm in 16.7%, also the study showed insignificant difference between the lengths and ages (p < 0.08, and between males and females (p = 0.23. Age was the influencing factor for the positions of vermiform appendixes (p = 0.04. Conclusion: The study showed that the commonest lengths of the appendix were 70-110 mm while the common position was retrocaecal regardless to age or gender. This data should be considered in surgical removal of the inflamed appendix.

  5. Leading global projects for professional and accidental project leaders

    CERN Document Server

    Moran, Robert T

    2008-01-01

    This book is a must-read for anyone responsible for projects and initiatives that span functional and geographical divides. Authors Moran and Youngdahl bring extensive experience and learning from industry practice to present a clear and straightforward treatment of the leadership skills and knowledge required to lead projects that are global in nature. They have written the first book of its kind to address the three essential skills of global project leaders - strategic project management, project leadership, and cross-cultural leadership. The authors argue that global project leadership is an essential skill in our project-based world and that we are all either intentional or accidental project leaders. Intentional project leaders pursue formal project management education and even certification whereas accidental project leaders find themselves leading global projects and initiatives as a result of a special assignment or promotion. Moran and Youndahl have found that the vast majority of global projects ...

  6. Prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension in China: data from 1·7 million adults in a population-based screening study (China PEACE Million Persons Project).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jiapeng; Lu, Yuan; Wang, Xiaochen; Li, Xinyue; Linderman, George C; Wu, Chaoqun; Cheng, Xiuyuan; Mu, Lin; Zhang, Haibo; Liu, Jiamin; Su, Meng; Zhao, Hongyu; Spatz, Erica S; Spertus, John A; Masoudi, Frederick A; Krumholz, Harlan M; Jiang, Lixin

    2017-12-09

    Hypertension is common in China and its prevalence is rising, yet it remains inadequately controlled. Few studies have the capacity to characterise the epidemiology and management of hypertension across many heterogeneous subgroups. We did a study of the prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension in China and assessed their variations across many subpopulations. We made use of data generated in the China Patient-Centered Evaluative Assessment of Cardiac Events (PEACE) Million Persons Project from Sept 15, 2014, to June 20, 2017, a population-based screening project that enrolled around 1·7 million community-dwelling adults aged 35-75 years from all 31 provinces in mainland China. In this population, we defined hypertension as systolic blood pressure of at least 140 mm Hg, or diastolic blood pressure of at least 90 mm Hg, or self-reported antihypertensive medication use in the previous 2 weeks. Hypertension awareness, treatment, and control were defined, respectively, among hypertensive adults as a self-reported diagnosis of hypertension, current use of antihypertensive medication, and blood pressure of less than 140/90 mm Hg. We assessed awareness, treatment, and control in 264 475 population subgroups-defined a priori by all possible combinations of 11 demographic and clinical factors (age [35-44, 45-54, 55-64, and 65-75 years], sex [men and women], geographical region [western, central, and eastern China], urbanity [urban vs rural], ethnic origin [Han and non-Han], occupation [farmer and non-farmer], annual household income [< ¥10 000, ¥10 000-50 000, and ≥¥50 000], education [primary school and below, middle school, high school, and college and above], previous cardiovascular events [yes or no], current smoker [yes or no], and diabetes [yes or no]), and their associations with individual and primary health-care site characteristics, using mixed models. The sample contained 1 738 886 participants with a mean age of 55·6

  7. 2018 DOE Solid-State Lighting Project Portfolio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2018-01-31

    The 2018 Solid-State Lighting Project Portfolio provides an overview of all SSL projects that have been funded by DOE since 2000. Projects that were active during 2017 are found in the main body of this report, and all historic projects can be found in the appendix. Within these sections, project profiles are sorted by technology type (i.e., LED or OLED) and then by performer name. A profile is provided on each project. Each profile includes a brief technical description, as well as information about project partners, funding, and the research period. This report is updated annually, although the research described in the Portfolio changes periodically as new projects are initiated and existing ones are concluded.

  8. Culture-Independent Evaluation of the Appendix and Rectum Microbiomes in Children with and without Appendicitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Katherine P.; Fraser, Claire M.; Sandler, Anthony D.; Zeichner, Steven L.

    2014-01-01

    appendicitis compared to the normal patients: Bulleidia (p = 0.034), Dialister (p = 0.003), and Porphyromonas (p = 0.026). Conclusion Specific taxa are more abundant in normal appendices compared to the rectum, suggesting that a distinctive appendix microbiota exists. Taxa with altered abundance in diseased and severely diseased (perforated) samples may contribute to appendicitis pathogenesis, and may provide microbial signatures in the rectum useful for guiding both treatment and diagnosis of appendicitis. PMID:24759879

  9. Lipid Treatment Assessment Project (L-TAP Study : a survey in 13 cities in Indonesia to evaluate the percentages of dyslipidemic patients achieving NCEP LDL-C target goals after treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinambaan W.M. Kaligis

    2001-06-01

    levels. Success rates were lower in CHD patients and high risk group. Atorvastatin seemed more effective in lowering the LDL-C to target levels. There are still many physicians in Indonesia who do not aware about the NCEP guidelines and LDL-C treatment goals. (Med J lndones 2001; 10: 103-9Keywords: lipid treatment assessment project (L-TAP, dyslipidemia, coronary heart disease (CHD risk, routine practice

  10. Autoamputation of the Appendix in a Chronic Adnexal Abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Michele Markey

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoamputation of the appendix has rarely been described in the literature. We present a case of a pelvic mass, thought to be a dermoid cyst based on preoperative imaging. After surgical removal and pathological examination, the mass was found to be a chronic pelvic abscess containing the right adnexa as well as an autoamputated vermiform appendix. Differentiating between gynecologic and gastrointestinal disease preoperatively can be difficult and often a definitive diagnosis cannot be made until surgical exploration and pathological review. However, to our knowledge, this is the first described case of a chronic pelvic abscess containing an autoamputated vermiform appendix.

  11. Goblet cell carcinoid of the vermiform appendix - a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptaszyński, Konrad; Bartczak, Artur; Kołodziej, Blanka; Szczepkowski, Marek

    2012-12-01

    Goblet cell carcinoid (GCC) is a rare neuroendocrine tumor of the vermiform appendix with uncertain clinical behavior. It was first described by Gagné and Subbuswamy in 1969 and 1974, respectively. The tumor occurs almost exclusively in the vermiform appendix. We present a case of a 60-year-old female, who was referred to the Bielanski Hospital with signs and symptoms of acute appendicitis. Microscopic examination of the appendix showed features of acute appendicitis, however scattered groups of cells with clear cytoplasm as well as strands of single cells with no evidence of atypia were seen. The patient underwent a right hemicolectomy due to the diagnosis of GCC.

  12. Duplication of the vermiform appendix in an adult patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, K H

    2014-07-01

    Duplication of the appendix is extremely rare. A 69-year-old woman was admitted with a 2-day history of right lower quadrant abdominal pain. Physical examination was consistent with acute appendicitis. Ultrasonography and colonoscopy gave a clinical impression of an inflammatory appendiceal mucocoele. Operative findings were an enlarged and inflamed appendix with distal cystic changes. Laparoscopic wedge resection of the caecum was performed. A tubular structure with a true lumen was found in the appendix. Haematoxylin and eosin staining and trichrome staining showed both structures had a true mucosa and a muscular layer. The duplication in this case does not belong to any of the previously described types of duplication.

  13. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix N: Wildlife.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

    1995-11-01

    The Columbia River System is a vast and complex combination of Federal and non-Federal facilities used for many purposes including power production, irrigation, navigation, flood control, recreation, fish and wildlife habitat and municipal and industrial water supply. Each river use competes for the limited water resources in the Columbia River Basin. This technical appendix addresses only the effects of alternative system operating strategies for managing the Columbia River system. The environmental impact statement (EIS) itself and some of the other appendices present analyses of the alternative approaches to the other three decisions considered as part of the SOR. This document is the product of the Wildlife Work Group, focusing on wildlife impacts but not including fishes. Topics covered include the following: scope and process; existing and affected environment, including specific discussion of 18 projects in the Columbia river basin. Analysis, evaluation, and alternatives are presented for all projects. System wide impacts to wildlife are also included.

  14. Columbia River system operation review: Final environmental impact statement. Appendix N, wildlife

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    The Columbia River System is a vast and complex combination of Federal and non-Federal facilities used for many purposes including power production, irrigation, navigation, flood control, recreation, fish and wildlife habitat and municipal and industrial water supply. Each river use competes for the limited water resources in the Columbia River Basin. This technical appendix addresses only the effects of alternative system operating strategies for managing the Columbia River system. The environmental impact statement (EIS) itself and some of the other appendices present analyses of the alternative approaches to the other three decisions considered as part of the SOR. This document is the product of the Wildlife Work Group, focusing on wildlife impacts but not including fishes. Topics covered include the following: scope and process; existing and affected environment, including specific discussion of 18 projects in the Columbia river basin. Analysis, evaluation, and alternatives are presented for all projects. System wide impacts to wildlife are also included

  15. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 503 - Pathogen Treatment Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 20 degrees Celsius and 60 days at 15 degrees Celsius. 2. Air drying—Sewage sludge is dried on sand... minimum of five turnings of the windrow. 2. Heat drying—Sewage sludge is dried by direct or indirect... of the gas in contact with the sewage sludge as the sewage sludge leaves the dryer exceeds 80 degrees...

  16. Annual energy outlook 1997 with projections to 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-12-01

    The Annual Energy Outlook 1997 (AEO97) presents midterm forecasts of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2015 prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). These projections are based on results of EIA's National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). This report begins with a summary of the reference case, followed by a discussion of the legislative assumptions and evolving legislative and regulatory issues. ''Issues in Focus'' discusses emerging energy issues and other topics of particular interest. It is followed by the analysis of energy market trends. The analysis in AEO97 focuses primarily on a reference case and four other cases that assume higher and lower economic growth and higher and lower world oil prices than in the reference case. Forecast tables for these cases are provided in Appendixes A through C. Appendixes D and E present summaries of the reference case forecasts in units of oil equivalence and household energy expenditures. Twenty-three other cases explore the impacts of varying key assumptions in NEMS--generally, technology penetration, with the major results shown in Appendix F. Appendix G briefly describes NEMS and the major AEO97 assumptions, with a summary table. 114 figs., 22 tabs

  17. Annual energy outlook 1997 with projections to 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-01

    The Annual Energy Outlook 1997 (AEO97) presents midterm forecasts of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2015 prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). These projections are based on results of EIA`s National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). This report begins with a summary of the reference case, followed by a discussion of the legislative assumptions and evolving legislative and regulatory issues. ``Issues in Focus`` discusses emerging energy issues and other topics of particular interest. It is followed by the analysis of energy market trends. The analysis in AEO97 focuses primarily on a reference case and four other cases that assume higher and lower economic growth and higher and lower world oil prices than in the reference case. Forecast tables for these cases are provided in Appendixes A through C. Appendixes D and E present summaries of the reference case forecasts in units of oil equivalence and household energy expenditures. Twenty-three other cases explore the impacts of varying key assumptions in NEMS--generally, technology penetration, with the major results shown in Appendix F. Appendix G briefly describes NEMS and the major AEO97 assumptions, with a summary table. 114 figs., 22 tabs.

  18. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix D: Exhibits.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

    1995-11-01

    The Columbia River and its tributaries are the primary water system in the Pacific Northwest, draining some 219,000 square miles in seven states and another 39,500 square miles in British Columbia. Beginning in the 1930`s, the Columbia River has been significantly modified by construction of 30 major dams on the river and its tributaries, along with dozens of non-Federal projects. Construction and subsequent operation of these water development projects have contributed to eight primary uses of the river system, including navigation, flood control, irrigation, electric power generation, fish migration, fish and wildlife habitat, recreation, and water supply and quality considerations. Increasing stress on the water development of the Columbia River and its tributaries has led primary Federal agencies to undertake intensive analysis and evaluation of the operation of these projects. These agencies are the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Bureau of Reclamation, who operate the large Federal dams on the river, and the Bonneville Power Administration who sells the power generated at the dams. This review, termed the System Operation Review (SOR), has as its ultimate goal to define a strategy for future operation of the major Columbia River projects which effectively considers the needs of all river uses. This volume, Appendix D: Cultural resources appendix, Technical imput includes the following: Development of geomorphology based framework for cultural resources management, Dworshak Reservoir, Idaho; Impact profiles for SOR reservoirs; comments from the following Native American tribes: Burns Paiute Tribe; Coville Confederated Tribes; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation; Confederated Tribes and bands of the Yakama Indian Nation (comments); Nez Perce Tribe; Coeur D`Alene Tribe; Spokane Tribe of Indians; The confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation.

  19. 29 CFR Appendix A to Subpart S of... - Decompression Tables

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Underground Construction, Caissons, Cofferdams and Compressed Air Pt. 1926, Subpt. S, App. A Appendix A to Subpart S of Part 1926...

  20. 42 CFR Appendix to Subpart F of... - Required Consent Form

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Sterilizations Pt. 441, Subpt. F, App. Appendix to Subpart F of Part 441—Required Consent Form Notice: Your... Hispanic origin); Hispanic; Asian or Pacific Islander; American Indian or Alaskan native; or White (not of...

  1. 50 CFR Appendix A to Part 635 - Species Tables

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Albacore tuna, Thunnus alalunga Bigeye tuna, Thunnus obesus Blue shark, Prionace glauca Bluefin tuna, Thunnus thynnus Dolphin fish, Coryphaena hippurus Oceanic whitetip shark, Carcharhinus longimanus..., Thunnus albacares Table 3 of Appendix A to Part 635-Demersal Species Atlantic sharpnose shark...

  2. Appendix : airborne incidents : an econometric analysis of severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-19

    This is the Appendix for Airborne Incidents: An Econometric Analysis of Severity Report. : Airborne loss of separation incidents occur when an aircraft breaches the defined separation limit (vertical and/or horizontal) with another aircraft or terrai...

  3. 32 CFR Appendix D to Part 290 - Audit Working Papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... 290, App. D Appendix D to Part 290—Audit Working Papers (a) Definition (1) Audit working papers... permanent file on each contractor is a central repository of information gathered during the course of an...

  4. RMP Guidance for Warehouses - Appendix D: OSHA Guidance on PSM

    Science.gov (United States)

    This text is taken directly from OSHA's appendix C to the Process Safety Management standard (29 CFR 1910.119). Compiled information required by this standard, including material safety data sheets (MSDS), is essential to process hazards analysis (PHA).

  5. Ingested metallic foreign body lodged in the appendix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R R Sarkar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An 8-year-old child ingested a metallic screw 3 months prior to admission. At laparotomy, the foreign body was found to be lodged inside the vermiform appendix, and was removed by appendicectomy.

  6. Histomorphometric study of lumen of human vermiform appendix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M M; Khalil, M; Sultana, S Z; Jahan, M K; Shafiquzzaman, M; Parvin, B; Islam, M T

    2012-01-01

    This study was done to find out the histomorphometry of lumen of vermiform appendix in Bangladeshi people. Total 100 fresh appendixes were collected for morphometric study of different age and sex during postmortem examination in the autopsy laboratory of Forensic Medicine Department of Mymensingh Medical College. This cross sectional descriptive study was done by convenient sampling technique. For convenience of differentiating the luminal diameter of vermiform appendix in relation to age and sex, findings were classified in four groups. Group A was up to 20 years, Group B 21-35 years, Group C 36-55 years and Group D 56-70 years. In the study the maximum diameter was in group A of female (87.00 μm) and minimum was (4.70 μm) in group B of female. The mean luminal diameter of vermiform appendix was more in female (60.71 μm) than in male (60.11 μm).

  7. Mucinous Neoplasms of the Vermiform Appendix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Shu-Yuan

    2010-06-01

    Most epithelial neoplasms of the vermiform appendix are of mucinous type and can be stratified into 3 main diagnostic categories: (1) adenoma, (2) mucinous neoplasms of uncertain malignant potential or low-grade mucinous neoplasm, and (3) adenocarcinoma. Clinically, appendiceal mucinous adenomas and adenocarcinomas may present as right lower abdominal pain mimicking acute appendicitis, a mass, or pseudomyxoma peritonei. Nomenclature currently in use to describe and diagnose mucinous tumors of the appendix, particularly those of low morphologic grade, varies among surgical pathologists and centers, resulting in different histologic and clinical features being attributed to these entities in the literature. It may be of help, as already attempted by some investigators, to simply apply algorithmic parameters for such lesions (grade of the primary lesion, extensiveness and composite of extra-appendiceal involvement, and so forth), instead of adopting rigid classification categories. This approach allows for more objective data to be collected in hopes that it will provide a more nuanced understanding of the clinical behavior of the spectrum of mucinous appendiceal tumors. Remaining focused on histopathologic parameters of the primary and secondary sites of involvement may help in avoiding circular reasoning. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. "The Goal" Project: A Group Assignment to Encourage Creative Thinking, Leadership Abilities and Communication Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Patricia Lee

    2014-01-01

    The classroom assignment described in this paper, "The Goal" Project, gives students an opportunity to develop four of the skills and abilities required to be a successful accountant. In 1990, the Accounting Education Change Commission issued Position Statement Number One, Objectives of Education for Accountants. Appendix B of that…

  9. South African programme for the SCOPE project on the ecology of biological invasions

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ferrar, AA

    1983-07-01

    Full Text Available of the international SCOPE programme. The list of current research projects together with the list of institutions conducting research in this field (appendix) is intended as a comprehensive future directory of South Africa's research activity in this field....

  10. Use of OECD/NEA Data Project Products in Probabilistic Safety Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherkas, G.; Raducu, Gheorghe; Riznic, J.; Yalaoui, S.; Huang, Hui-Wen; Holy, Jaroslav; Holmberg, Jan-Erik; Sandberg, Jorma; Balmain, Michel; Bonnevialle, Anne-Marie; Curnier, Florence; Georgescu, Gabriel; Lanore, Jeanne-Marie; Lindner, Arndt; Fujimoto, Haruo; Ahn, Kwang-Il; Hwang, Taesuk; Jang, Seung-Cheol; Husarcek, Jan; Kovacs, Zoltan; Vazquez, Teresa; Johanson, Gunnar; Liwaang, Bo; Nyman, Ralph; Dang, Vinh; Schoen, Gerhard; Brook, Kevin; Hamblen, David; Siu, Nathan; Sturzebecher, Karl; Tobin, Margaret; Wood, Jeff; Amri, Abdallah; Breest, Axel

    2014-01-01

    methodology used for this task, including a more detailed description of the survey questionnaire and task group meeting. - Chapter 5 Summarizes the analysis of survey responses, including discussion of data challenges and best practices. Also included is a discussion of enhancing project participation, new data and analysis needs, data project success factors for PSA applications, and summary of key issues and potential resolutions. - Chapter 6 Provides a summary of key conclusions from the surveys and task group meeting. - Chapter 7 Summarizes key recommendations. - Appendices Several appendices are provided to provide more detailed information on the CSNI activity proposal sheet governing this task, copies of the surveys sent to WGRISK and Data Project representatives, summary results from each survey, the complete survey responses provided by each responding organization, and contact information for task participants. The following information is provided in the Appendices: - Appendix A: CSNI Activity Proposal Sheet WGRISK (2011)-1, 'Use of OECD Data Project Products in Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA)'; - Appendix B: Survey questionnaire for WGRISK members and observers; - Appendix C: Survey questionnaire for OECD joint data project representatives; - Appendix D: Summary of OECD joint data project publicly available information; - Appendix E: Summary of WGRISK member and observer responses; - Appendix F: Survey responses from OECD joint data project representatives; - Appendix G: Complete set of WGRISK member and observer survey questionnaire responses; - Appendix H: Contact information for task participants

  11. Nondestructive verification and assay systems for spent fuels. Technical appendixes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cobb, D.D.; Phillips, J.R.; Baker, M.P.

    1982-04-01

    Six technical appendixes are presented that provide important supporting technical information for the study of the application of nondestructive measurements to spent-fuel storage. Each appendix addresses a particular technical subject in a reasonably self-contained fashion. Appendix A is a comparison of spent-fuel data predicted by reactor operators with measured data from reprocessors. This comparison indicates a rather high level of uncertainty in previous burnup calculations. Appendix B describes a series of nondestructive measurements at the GE-Morris Operation Spent-Fuel Storage Facility. This series of experiments successfully demonstrated a technique for reproducible positioning of fuel assemblies for nondestructive measurement. The experimental results indicate the importance of measuring the axial and angular burnup profiles of irradiated fuel assemblies for quantitative determination of spent-fuel parameters. Appendix C is a reasonably comprehensive bibliography of reports and symposia papers on spent-fuel nondestructive measurements to April 1981. Appendix D is a compendium of spent-fuel calculations that includes isotope production and depletion calculations using the EPRI-CINDER code, calculations of neutron and gamma-ray source terms, and correlations of these sources with burnup and plutonium content. Appendix E describes the pulsed-neutron technique and its potential application to spent-fuel measurements. Although not yet developed, the technique holds the promise of providing separate measurements of the uranium and plutonium fissile isotopes. Appendix F describes the experimental program and facilities at Los Alamos for the development of spent-fuel nondestructive measurement systems. Measurements are reported showing that the active neutron method is sensitive to the replacement of a single fuel rod with a dummy rod in an unirradiated uranium fuel assembly.

  12. [Volvulus of the vermiform appendix. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeza-Herrera, Carlos; Cortés-García, Ricardo; Velasco-Soria, Luis; Godoy-Esquivel, Arturo Hermilo; Escobar-Izquierdo, Moisés Alfredo

    2009-01-01

    Vermiform appendix torsion is a very rare condition, with only 25 cases recorded in the international literature. This patient is the second case registered in our country. A seven year-old female patient suddenly developed crampy central abdominal pain that gradually localized in the right lower quadrant. She had vomiting, but no fever. On examination there were acute abdominal signs and during surgical exploration vermiform appendix torsion was founded. The patient underwent appendectomy with an uneventful recovery.

  13. Secondary Torsion of Vermiform Appendix with Mucinous Cystadenoma

    OpenAIRE

    Maki Kitagawa; Tatsuya Kotani; Takeshi Yamano; Hideaki Tsurudome; Tomoya Hatakeyama; Yoshiaki Kuriu; Hiroshi Nishi; Masaharu Yabe

    2007-01-01

    Torsion of the vermiform appendix is a rare disorder, which causes abdominal symptoms indistinguishable from acute appendicitis. We report a case (a 34-year-old male) of secondary torsion of the vermiform appendix with mucinous cystadenoma. This case was characterized by mild inflammatory responses, pentazocine-resistant abdominal pain, and appendiceal tumor, which was not enhanced by the contrast medium on computed tomography presumably because of reduced blood flow by the torsion. These fin...

  14. LT-CFB. Applications and follow-up. CP Kelco. Appendix 1. [Low Temperature Circulating Fluid Bed gasifier]; LT-CFB. Anvendelsesmuligheder og opfoelgning. CP Kelco. Bilag 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-04-15

    This appendix describes how LT-CFB advantageously can gasify residual products at the company CP Kelco's factory. CP Kelco produces the gelation, thickeners and stabilizers carrageenan and pectin from seaweed and citrus peel. Residues from the production consist of a fiber-containing biological material, which has a calorific value of dry matter about 15 to 20 MJ / kg. In addition, there are waste products from the wastewater treatment plant, which are also proposed re-used in the project. The report describes the economic analyses, the overall data and system design for two scenarios, whereas the description of the plant capacities, sizes and detailed data etc. are described only for one scenario. In addition to savings in the purchase of natural gas the gas production also results in a significant reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions, the product gas being characterized as CO{sub 2} neutral. Since CP Kelco is subject to the CO{sub 2} quota system the saved amount of CO{sub 2} emissions represents a significant value. In the economic analyses, the value of 1 ton of CO{sub 2} is set at DKK 100. (LN)

  15. Visualization of the normal appendix with MR enterography in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovanlikaya, Arzu; Rosenbaum, Daniel; Brill, Paula W. [Weill Cornell Medical College, New York Presbyterian Hospital, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Mazumdar, Madhu; Dunning, Allison [Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Weill Cornell Medical College, Department of Public Health, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-08-15

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging may provide a radiation-sparing alternative to CT in diagnosing appendicitis in children in whom US is equivocal. However, comparability with CT in the detection of the appendix remains to be established. To determine the detection rate of the normal appendix in children on oral and IV contrast-enhanced MRI. MR imaging of 58 patients who had previously undergone MR enterography was retrospectively reviewed. Detection rate, body mass index, age and gender were recorded. The normal appendix was detected in 28 cases (48 %), with greatest detection rate on the axial fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) sequence. Children in whom the appendix was detected had significantly higher BMI compared to children in whom the appendix was not seen. Neither age nor gender demonstrated a significant association with detection rate. The detection rate of the normal appendix in children on oral and IV contrast-enhanced MRI was 48 %, which is comparable to detection rates on CT, as well as to previously reported detection rates on MR imaging with neither oral nor IV contrast agents. These findings may serve to guide the development of MRI protocols for pediatric appendicitis. (orig.)

  16. Evaluation of Subepithelial Abnormalities of the Appendix by Endoscopic Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lance T. Uradomo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The use of through-the-scope (TTS miniprobe catheter endoscopic ultrasound is a valuable technique for evaluating subepithelial lesions in the proximal colon. Few reports include the evaluation of the appendix by EUS. Objective. To describe endoscopic and endosonographic characteristics of subepithelial lesions of the appendix. Methods. Retrospective case series in a single academic medical center. Adult patients referred for evaluation of subepithelial lesions of the appendix identified by colonoscopy between April 1, 2003 to February 29, 2008. Data were abstracted from an electronic endoscopic database for all patients undergoing miniprobe endoscopic ultrasound examination of the appendix. Medical records were reviewed for patient followup and outcomes. Results. Nine cases were identified. Seven (78% patients were female. Seven (78% utilized the 12 MHz miniprobe device and two (22% used the 20 MHz device. Three mucoceles were described and confirmed by surgical resection. Cases also included one inverted appendix, one gastrointestinal stromal tumor, and one lipoma. In three cases, no abnormality was found. Conclusions. EUS evaluation of the appendix is feasible with standard miniprobe devices and may assist in the selection of patients who may benefit from surgical management.

  17. Nr 702 - Report made on the behalf of the Foreign affairs Commission on the bill project nr 138 authorizing the approval of the social security agreement under the form of an exchange of letters between the Government of the French Republic and the ITER International Fusion Energy Organization in view of the joint implementation of the ITER project, and Appendix: text of the Foreign affairs Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ameline, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    This report first presents the ITER scientific project, its history, its objective (to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion energy), and the ITER Organization which has been specifically created for this international project, and comprises as many domestic agencies as member countries. It gives an overview of the present status of the project construction in southern France. The second part addresses the agreement on social security between the ITER organization and France. The international character of this organization indeed presents risks of disadvantages for the French personnel of the organization. The report evokes the measures contained by the agreement to correct this aspect

  18. Descriptions of reference LWR facilities for analysis of nuclear fuel cycles. Appendixes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, K.J.; Kabele, T.J.

    1979-09-01

    The appendixes present the calculations that were used to derive the release factors discussed for each fuel cycle facility in Volume I. Appendix A presents release factor calculations for a surface mine, underground mine, milling facility, conversion facility, diffusion enrichment facility, fuel fabrication facility, PWR, BWR, and reprocessing facility. Appendix B contains additional release factors calculated for a BWR, PWR, and a reprocessing facility. Appendix C presents release factors for a UO 2 fuel fabrication facility

  19. Chronic, systemic treatment with a metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 antagonist produces anxiolytic-like effects and reverses abnormal firing activity of projection neurons in the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala in rats with bilateral 6-OHDA lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li; Liu, Jian; Ali, Umar; Gui, Zhen Hua; Hou, Chen; Fan, Ling Ling; Wang, Yong; Wang, Tao

    2011-02-28

    Although 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)-pyridine (MPEP), a selective metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 antagonist, improves the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD), the effects of MPEP on the psychiatric symptom of PD and the mechanism involved are still unclear. In the present study, we examined the effects of MPEP in anxiolytic-like behavior and firing activity of projection neurons in the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA) in rats with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) injected bilaterally into dorsal striatum. Rats were divided into three groups, sham-operated group, 6-OHDA lesion with vehicle treatment group and 6-OHDA lesion with MPEP treatment group. Injection of 6-OHDA (10.5 μg) into the dorsal striatum produced 31.5% loss of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive (TH-ir) neurons in the SNpc. The 6-OHDA-lesioned rats showed anxiety behavior and the firing rate of BLA projection neurons decreased significantly compared with sham-operated rats, and no difference was found in the firing pattern of these neurons. Whereas chronic, systemic treatment of MPEP (3 mg/kg/day, i.p.; 14 days) attenuated loss of TH-ir neurons, produced anxiolytic-like effect and normalized the abnormal firing rate of projection neurons of the BLA in rats with the bilateral lesions. Systemic administration of cumulative apomorphine (10-160 μg/kg, i.v.) inhibited the firing rate of BLA projection neurons in sham-operated, 6-OHDA lesion with vehicle-treated and MPEP-treated rats, but the 6-OHDA lesion decreased the response of BLA projection neurons to apomorphine stimulation, while MPEP reversed the reactivity of these neurons. These data demonstrate that the partial lesion of the nigrostriatal pathway causes anxiety symptom and decreases firing rate of BLA projection neurons in the rat. Furthermore, chronic, systemic MPEP treatment has the neuroprotective and anxiolytic-like effects, and reverses the abnormal firing rate of BLA projection neurons, suggesting that MPEP has important

  20. Project Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Project Management Theory Meets Practice contains the proceedings from the 1st Danish Project Management Research Conference (DAPMARC 2015), held in Copenhagen, Denmark, on May 21st, 2015.......Project Management Theory Meets Practice contains the proceedings from the 1st Danish Project Management Research Conference (DAPMARC 2015), held in Copenhagen, Denmark, on May 21st, 2015....