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Sample records for treating psoriatic arthritis

  1. Psoriatic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, L.H.; Espinoza, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 11 chapters. Some of the titles are: The history and epidemiologic definition of psoriatic arthritis as a distinct entity; Psoriatic arthritis: Further epidemiologic and genetic considerations; The radiologic features of psoriatic arthritis; and Laboratory findings and pathology of psoriatic arthritis

  2. Psoriatic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinoza, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    In the past 10 years, a number of well-controlled surveys of psoriatic patients selective for the presence of arthritis have been conducted. A Canadian group reported that of 100 patients admitted to the hospital for treatment of psoriasis, 32 had clinical or radiologic evidence of psoriatic arthritis, and 17 had both types of evidence. Eighty patients with radiologic evidence of spinal or sacroiliac involvement were asymptomatic, and seven had clinical evidence of peripheral arthritis but without radiologic evidence. The authors concluded that psoriatic arthritis is a common event in patients with severe psoriasis and that it is associated with more extensive skin disease than is found in patients without arthritis. The information gathered from these epidemiologic studies coupled with clinical, radiologic, and serologic characteristics have provided the basis for the current belief that psoriatic arthritis is indeed a distinct entity

  3. Tofacitinib in psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting-Shun; Tsai, Tsen-Fang

    2017-11-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is a heterogeneous disease that has been difficult to manage until the recent advent of biologics. However, there are still unmet medical needs for newer agents. Tofacitinib is a Janus family of kinases inhibitor approved for treating rheumatoid arthritis in many countries and psoriasis in Russia. We reviewed the evidences of tofacitinib in psoriatic arthritis treatment. The efficacy and safety profiles result from Phase III clinical trials (OPAL BROADEN and OPAL BEYOND) and one open-label extension study (OPAL BALANCE). Both tofacitinib 5 or 10 mg twice a day were superior to placebo for American College of Rheumatology 20% improvement criteria response at 3 months and showed significant improvement of skin, enthesitis and dactylitis. Tofacitinib is a promising treatment option for psoriatic arthritis.

  4. Psoriatic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankowski, Artur Jacek; Łebkowska, Urszula Maria; Ćwikła, Jarosław; Walecka, Irena; Walecki, Jerzy

    2013-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic inflammatory joint disease which develops in patients with psoriasis. It is characteristic that the rheumatoid factor in serum is absent. Etiology of the disease is still unclear but a number of genetic associations have been identified. Inheritance of the disease is multilevel and the role of environmental factors is emphasized. Immunology of PsA is also complex. Inflammation is caused by immunological reactions leading to release of kinins. Destructive changes in bones usually appear after a few months from the onset of clinical symptoms. Typically PsA involves joints of the axial skeleton with an asymmetrical pattern. The spectrum of symptoms include inflammatory changes in attachments of articular capsules, tendons, and ligaments to bone surface. The disease can have divers clinical course but usually manifests as oligoarthritis. Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis of PsA. Classical radiography has been used for this purpose for over a hundred years. It allows to identify late stages of the disease, when bone tissue is affected. In the last 20 years many new imaging modalities, such as ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR), have been developed and became important diagnostic tools for evaluation of rheumatoid diseases. They enable the assessment and monitoring of early inflammatory changes. As a result, patients have earlier access to modern treatment and thus formation of destructive changes in joints can be markedly delayed or even avoided

  5. Psoriatic Arthritis: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Handouts Psoriatic arthritis (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Psoriatic Arthritis updates ... this? GO MEDICAL ENCYCLOPEDIA Psoriatic arthritis Related Health Topics Arthritis Psoriasis National Institutes of Health The primary ...

  6. Imaging in Psoriatic Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poggenborg, René Panduro; Østergaard, Mikkel; Terslev, Lene

    2015-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an inflammatory joint disease characterized by arthritis and often enthesitis in patients with psoriasis, presenting a wide range of manifestations in various patterns. Imaging procedures are primarily conventional radiography, ultrasonography (US), and magnetic...... resonance imaging (MRI); other modalities such as computed tomography are not used routinely. Imaging is an integral part of management of PsA. In this article, we provide an overview of the status, virtues, and limitations of imaging modalities in PsA, focusing on radiography, US, and MRI....

  7. IMAGING OF PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. D'Angelo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Imaging of psoriatic arthritis (PsA is important for two reasons: the differential diagnosis from other arthritides and the assessment of structural damage that can be inhibited by the new drugs such as the anti-TNFα agents. Plain film radiographic findings of peripheral arthritis have been important in elaborating the concept of PsA as a separate disease entity. Characteristic aspects of psoriatic peripheral arthritis help the differentiation from rheumatoid arthritis. High-resolution ultrasonography (US, US combined with power Doppler (PDUS and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI can be used to image joint synovitis of PsA. Radiologic features of spondylitis associated with psoriasis are similar to spondylitis associated with reactive arthritis and differ from those of primary ankylosing spondylitis (AS and the spondylitis associated with inflammatory bowel disease. MRI is very sensitive for the early diagnosis of sacroiliitis. There have been no MRI studies on the spine of patients with PsA. In primary AS bone oedema in the vertebral bodies is an indicator of active disease and can ameliorate during anti-TNFα therapy. Historically, plain film radiography have played a pivotal role in defining enthesitis lesions of SpA. However, entheseal bone changes appear late. US and MRI have proved to be a highly sensitive and non invasive tools. Recent US and MRI studies on both finger and toe dactylitis have established that dactylitis is due to flexor tenosynovitis and marked adjacent soft tissue swelling with a variable degree of small joint synovitis. There is no evidence of enthesitis of the insertion of the flexor digitorum tendons and of the attachment of the caspsule of the digit joints. Key words: Enthesitis, dactylitis, spondyloarthritis, ultrasound, magnetic resonance, imaging

  8. Psoriatic arthritis: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Ferrer, A; Laiz-Alonso, A

    2014-12-01

    Advances in our understanding of the pathogenesis of psoriatic arthritis and clinical aspects of the disease justify the present review. Studies have identified common inflammatory pathways related to the innate immune response, such as the IL-12/IL-23 axis, along with numerous genes that affect susceptibility to both diseases and influence phenotypic development. Interest has grown in biomarkers that can be used for early diagnosis or prognosis or to predict joint destruction and the response to treatment. Recent reports describe important differences between the effects of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and biologics on the process of new bone formation. Other issues that have been discussed include the need for reliable screening methods, particularly for early detection of oligoarticular arthritis, and for protocols to guide referral to specialists, especially in newly created multidisciplinary practices. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y AEDV. All rights reserved.

  9. Nail involvement in psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Sobolewski

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Nail psoriasis is considered a significant psychological and social problem causing functional impairment in affected patients. Nail changes hamper their daily and occupational activities and contribute to a worse quality of life. Almost 50% of patients with psoriasis vulgaris and up to 80% of patients with psoriatic arthritis are afflicted with nail lesions. The important correlation between psoriatic arthritis and nail changes is well established – the presence of the latter is a strong predictor of the development of arthritis. There is a broad spectrum of nail dystrophies associated with psoriasis, ranging from the common pitting, subungual hyperkeratosis and loosening of the nail plate to less frequent discolouration and splinter haemorrhages. Some of these symptoms are also observed in other nail diseases, and further diagnostics should be performed. The assessment tools NAPSI (Nail Psoriasis Severity Index, mNAPSI (Modified Nail Psoriasis Severity Index, and PNSS (Psoriasis Nail Severity Score are most commonly used to grade the severity of nail involvement in psoriasis and enable the evaluation of therapy effectiveness. The treatment of nail psoriasis is a major clinical challenge. It should be adjusted to the extent of dermal, articular and ungual lesions. Systemic therapies of psoriasis, especially biological agents, are most likely to be effective in treating nail psoriasis. However, as their use is limited in scope and safety, topical therapy remains a mainstay, and the combination of corticosteroids and vitamin D3 analogues is considered to be most helpful.

  10. Yellow fever vaccine used in a psoriatic arthritis patient treated with methotrexate: a case report:

    OpenAIRE

    Štuhec, Matej

    2014-01-01

    The yellow fever vaccines on the market are contraindicated for immunocompromised and elderly patients. A case of yellow fever vaccine used in a 27-year-old Slovenian male with psoriatic arthritis during treatment with methotrexate is described. We demonstrate a positive case, since there were noadverse effects in concurrent administration of yellow fever vaccine and methotrexate. This patient did not show severe adverse reactions and did not contract yellow fever despite potential exposure. ...

  11. Yellow fever vaccine used in a psoriatic arthritis patient treated with methotrexate

    OpenAIRE

    Štuhec, Matej

    2015-01-01

    The yellow fever vaccines on the market are contraindicated for immunocompromised and elderly patients. A case of yellow fever vaccine used in a 27-year-old Slovenian male with psoriatic arthritis during treatment with methotrexate is described. We demonstrate a positive case, since there were noadverse effects in concurrent administration of yellow fever vaccine and methotrexate. This patient did not show severe adverse reactions and did not contract yellow fever despite potential exposure. ...

  12. [Active psoriatic arthritis during pregnancy: challenges and limitations of pharmacotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matuszewska, Agnieszka; Misterska-Skóra, Maria; Wiland, Piotr

    2010-01-01

    Cases of psoriatic arthritis coexisting with pregnancy are sparse and therefore little is known about the fetal effect of medication in women with psoriatic arthritis. As a rule, drugs and dosages are minimized in these patients. Among disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, cyclosporine and sulphasalazine are preferred. Methotrexate and leflunomide are strictly contraindicated and must be withdrawn 3 months or 2 years, respectively, before a pregnancy is planned. Psoriatic arthritis may be treated during pregnancy with glucocorticosteroids, especially with prednisone or prednisolone. We present the case ofa 40-year-old gravida with psoriatic arthritis which exacerbated during the first trimester of pregnancy. Therapeutic implications in such cases are discussed.

  13. Psoriatic arthritis: imaging techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Lubrano

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Imaging techniques to assess psoriatic arthritis (PsA include radiography, ultrasonography (US, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, computed tomography (CT and bone scintigraphy. The radiographic hallmark of PsA is the combination of destructive changes (joint erosions, tuft resorption, osteolysis with bone proliferation (including periarticular and shaft periostitis, ankylosis, spur formation and non-marginal syndesmophytes. US has an increasing important role in the evaluation of PsA. In fact, power Doppler US is useful mainly for its ability to assess musculoskeletal (joints, tendons, entheses and cutaneous (skin and nails involvement, to monitor efficacy of therapy and to guide steroid injections at the level of inflamed joints, tendon sheaths and entheses. MRI allows direct visualization of inflammation in peripheral and axial joints, and peripheral and axial entheses, and has dramatically improved the possibilities for early diagnosis and objective monitoring of the disease process in PsA. MRI has allowed explaining the relationships among enthesitis, synovitis and osteitis in PsA, supporting a SpA pattern of inflammation where enthesitis is the primary target of inflammation. CT has little role in assessment of peripheral joints, but it may be useful in assessing elements of spine disease. CT accuracy is similar to MRI in assessment of erosions in sacroiliac joint involvement, but CT is not as effective in detecting synovial inflammation. Bone scintigraphy lacks specificity and is now supplanted with US and MRI techniques.

  14. Yellow fever vaccine used in a psoriatic arthritis patient treated with methotrexate: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuhec, Matej

    2014-01-01

    The yellow fever vaccines on the market are contraindicated for immunocompromised and elderly patients. A case of yellow fever vaccine used in a 27-year-old Slovenian male with psoriatic arthritis during treatment with methotrexate is described. We demonstrate a positive case, since there were no adverse effects in concurrent administration of yellow fever vaccine and methotrexate. This patient did not show severe adverse reactions and did not contract yellow fever despite potential exposure. More research is needed on possible adverse effects of concurrent administration of yellow fever vaccine and methotrexate to determine the potential of this method for more frequent use.

  15. Uveitis and Juvenile Psoriatic Arthritis or Psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salek, Sherveen S; Pradeep, Archana; Guly, Catherine; Ramanan, Athimalaipet V; Rosenbaum, James T

    2018-01-01

    To describe the phenotype of the uveitis that accompanies juvenile psoriatic arthritis or psoriasis. Observational case series. Setting: Two university-based referral clinics: 1 in England, 1 in the United States. Five children with uveitis and psoriatic arthritis and 1 with uveitis and psoriasis Observational Procedure: Retrospective chart review. Demographics of subjects such as age and sex; description of ocular and joint disease; surgical and other complications; medical treatment. Five of the 6 children in this series had the onset of disease at or before age 6 (P = .0008 compared to expected age of onset for psoriatic arthritis in childhood). All children in this series had an inadequate response to topical corticosteroids. Most of the children were treated with systemic corticosteroids for many months, yet all of them went on to require methotrexate. Therapy with systemic methotrexate did not suffice, as all the patients also required some form of biologic therapy. Five of 6 had surgeries such as vitrectomy, cataract extraction, or a procedure for glaucoma control. The observations suggest that the uveitis that accompanies juvenile psoriatic arthritis might be a distinct disease that is particularly severe when its onset affects children aged 6 years or younger. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The joint in psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortezavi, Mahta; Thiele, Ralph; Ritchlin, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA), a chronic inflammatory joint disease associated with psoriasis, is notable for diversity in disease presentation, course and response to treatment. Equally varied are the types of musculoskeletal involvement which include peripheral and axial joint disease, dactylitis and enthesitis. In this review, we focus on the psoriatic joint and discuss pathways that underlie synovial, cartilage and bone inflammation and highlight key histopathologic features. The pivotal inflammatory mechanisms and pathobiology of PsA parallel findings in other forms of spondyloarthritis but are distinct from disease pathways described in rheumatoid synovitis and bone disease. The diagnosis of PsA from both a clinical and imaging perspective is also discussed.

  17. How early should psoriatic arthritis be treated with a TNF-blocker?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harty, Leonard

    2012-02-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is the second most commonly identified inflammatory arthropathy in early arthritis clinics. It is a complex multisystem disease involving the skin and joints, but may also present with inflammation of the spine - spondylitis, digits - dactylitis, eyes - uveitis and ligamentous insertions - enthesitis. The skin manifestations may be mild or patchy and often precede the joint inflammation. Joint erosions, however, may occur within the first 2 years in up to half of PsA patients and an erosion rate of 11% per annum has been reported suggesting it is not a benign disease as it was once regarded. RECENT FINDINGS: Therapy with mild anti-inflammatories is only beneficial in very mild or localized disease. In cases of more widespread joint involvement systemic therapy with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) such as methotrexate may be required and in the case of extra-articular or spinal disease, in which DMARDs have failed to show efficacy, biologic therapy may be highly effective. SUMMARY: The question of how early treatment should be instituted should be decided in a specialist rheumatology referral centre following appropriate assessment. Optimal therapy with combination DMARD and biologics may result in remission rates of up to 60%.

  18. Psoriatic arthritis as a mountain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Berthelot

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available There is no doubt that inflammatory arthritis/enthesitis and psoriasis coexist more frequently than would be expected by chance: for instance, in a study of 1285 patients with psoriasis seen in an hospital, 483 (38% were suffering from arthritis/ enthesitis, including 40 patients classified as Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA (3%, 177 (14% as undifferentiated arthritis (UA, and 266 (21% as Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA (1. Although lower percentages have been noticed in the general population with psoriasis (6% of PsA in an extensive study of 1844 patients with psoriasis (2, they were superior to 5% (i.e. at least 5 times greater than the figures found for patients without psoriasis (3-7.

  19. Candida infections in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis patients treated with IL-17 inhibitors and their practical management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saunte, D M; Mrowietz, U; Puig, L

    2017-01-01

    infections, especially those due to Candida sp., as evidenced by findings in patients with genetic defects in IL-17 related immune responses. To assess the potential of anti-Il-17 treatment to promote Candida infections, here we have systematically reviewed published clinical trials of patients...... with psoriasis or psoriatic arthritis. Candida infections were reported in 4.0% of patients treated with brodalumab, 2.1% with secukinumab, and 3.3% with ixekizumab, compared with 0.3%, 2.3% and 0.8% of those assigned to placebo, ustekinumab or etanercept, respectively. Although the incidence of Candida...... infection was found to be increased by a only small degree during anti-IL-17 therapy, patients undergoing such treatment should be monitored for fungal infection and treated as necessary. We propose to adopt the recently updated recommendations for the practical management of Candida infection in patients...

  20. Psoriatic arthritis: from pathogenesis to therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzgerald, Oliver

    2012-02-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is a multigenic autoimmune disease that involves synovial tissue, entheseal sites and skin, and that may result in significant joint damage. Although there are no diagnostic tests for psoriatic arthritis, research has identified consistent features that help to distinguish the condition from other common rheumatic diseases. Comparison of HLA-B and HLA-C regions in psoriatic arthritis with those in psoriasis without joint involvement demonstrates significant differences, such that psoriatic arthritis cannot be viewed simply as a subset of genetically homogeneous psoriasis. T-cell receptor phenotypic studies have failed to identify antigen-driven clones, and an alternative hypothesis for CD8 stimulation involving innate immune signals is proposed. Finally, imaging studies have highlighted entheseal involvement in psoriatic arthritis, and it is possible that entheseal-derived antigens may trigger an immune response that is critically involved in disease pathogenesis.

  1. Innovative medicines for treatment of psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levitan A.l.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The problem of effective treatment of psoriatic arthritis has not been solved yet. The search for new therapeutic options is very active in many directions. At the stage of clinical trials are drugs that block interleukin-17-a (secukinumab, ixekizumab, brodalumab, drugs that suppress interleukin-12 and interleukin-23 (ustekinumab. To modern means to ensure psoriatic arthritis include drugs that are inhibitors of small molecules orkinase pathways (apremilast, tofacitinib.

  2. Adverse effects of methotrexate in three psoriatic arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maejima, Hideki; Watarai, Akira; Nakano, Toshiaki; Katayama, Chieko; Nishiyama, Hiromi; Katsuoka, Kensei

    2014-04-01

    Methotrexate, a folic acid analogue with anti-proliferative and anti-inflammatory effects, is commonly used to treat patients with severe destructive psoriatic arthritis and has considerable efficacy. Combined anti-tumor necrosis factor and MTX therapy result in less treatment discontinuation due to adverse events. Despite its efficacy, MTX may result in adverse effects including hepatic, pulmonary, and renal toxicity as well as lymphoproliferative disorders and predisposition to infection. We herein report rare adverse effects of MTX treatment, specifically asymptomatic pulmonary tuberculosis, renal cell carcinoma, and lateral uveitis, in three psoriatic arthritis patients treated with MTX. MTX is an important drug for the treatment for psoriatic arthritis patient, but an awareness of the possible adverse effects is needed.

  3. Psoriatic arthritis mutilans (PAM) in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudbjornsson, B; Ejstrup, L; Gran, J T

    2013-01-01

    To determine the prevalence and clinical characteristics of psoriatic arthritis mutilans (PAM) in the Nordic countries.......To determine the prevalence and clinical characteristics of psoriatic arthritis mutilans (PAM) in the Nordic countries....

  4. Recurrent erythema nodosum and pulmonary lymph node tuberculosis in a patient treated for psoriatic arthritis and psoriasis with TNF inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Parcheta

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease affecting approximately 2% of the population. Biologic agents are the new treatment options for patients with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis who have failed traditional systemic therapies. The therapy with tumor necrosis factor antagonists significantly increases the risk of reactivation of latent tuberculosis; therefore, screening is important before the introduction of biological treatment. Objective. Presentation of diagnostic difficulties in establishing an etiological factor of recurrent erythema nodosum in a 46-year-old woman treated with anti-TNF-α agents (etanercept and adalimumab for plaque psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Case report. We present a case of a 46-year-old woman, treated with etanercept and adalimumab for plaque psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Despite prophylactic antituberculosis treatment before introduction of biological therapy, the patient developed erythema nodosum most likely caused by lymph node tuberculosis. Conclusions . The development of erythema nodosum, especially the recurrent form, in a patient with a positive tuberculin skin test and negative IGRA test treated with anti-TNF should always prompt increased vigilance and exclusion of active tuberculosis, which may develop even in patients who have undergone prophylactic antituberculosis treatment.

  5. Th17 Inhibitors in Active Psoriatic Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naik, Girish S; Ming, Wai K; Magodoro, Itai M

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several biologics targeting the Th17 pathway have been developed for the treatment of psoriatic arthritis (PsA), a disabling disease with moderate response and an increased incidence of serious infections to first-line biologics (TNF-α antagonists). Th17 inhibitors could replace TNF-α...

  6. Temporomandibular joint involvement in psoriatic arthritis | Okkesim ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Psoriasis is a chronic, papulosquamous, and an inflammatory skin disease. It has been found that between 5% and 24% of patients develop psoriatic arthritis (PA) at the same time after or even prior to skin findings. The involvement of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a rare condition. In this report, a-46-year-old male ...

  7. Relationship of Psoriatic Arthritis to Other Spondyloarthritides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivieri, Ignazio; D'Angelo, Salvatore; Gilio, Michele; Palazzi, Carlo; Lubrano, Ennio; Padula, Angela

    2015-11-01

    In the early 1970s, Moll and co-workers formulated the unified concept of spondyloarthritides, a group of conditions sharing similar clinical features. Subsequently, criteria for their classification have been proposed by Amor and coworkers, the European Spondylarthropathy Study Group, and the Assessment in SpondyloArthritis international Society. Opinion, however, is divided between those who believe that the different entities of the complex represent the variable expression of the same disease ("lumpers") and those who think that these should be considered separately but under the same umbrella ("splitters"). Several sets of criteria have been proposed for psoriatic arthritis (PsA), the most recent being the ClASsification for Psoriatic Arthritis (CASPAR) criteria. According to some authors, there are persuasive arguments to support the view of PsA as a distinct entity.

  8. Psoriatic arthritis: A retrospective study of 162 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlica Ljiljana

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of our study was to determine the prevalence of psoriatic arthritis in the patients with psoriasis and to analyze retrospectively the results of a 34-year multidisciplinary management of the patients with psoriatic arthritis. Methods. The study included 162 out of 183 treated patients with psoriatic arthritis, aged 48 ± 15 years. All the patients satisfied the current diagnostic criteria for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis according to the American College of Rheumatology. Results. Psoriatic arthritis developed in 183 (9.3% out of 1976 patients with psoriasis. Time interval for establishing the diagnosis was 4 years. A positive family history of the disease had 15.0% of the studied patients. Its onset was most often at 42 years of age in 70.4% of the cases, and 2 months to 59 years after the appearance of psoriasis. Psoriatic arthritis without psoriasis appeared in 1.8% of the patients. A severe form of arthritis had 64.2% of the patients, mainly the patients with scalp psoriasis (χ2=3.2; p<0.05. Nail changes had 35% of the patients. Distal interphalangeal joints were involved in 63.6%, axial skeleton in 36.4%, oligoarthritis in 45.0%, polyarthritis in 55.0%, and mutilating form in 6.8% of the patients. Elevated Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate was reveald in 61.7% of the patients. Immunoglobulin M (IgM rheumatoid factor was altered in 4.3% of the patients. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA typing in the 28 patients were: A2 32.0%, A3 18.0%, Al and A9 14.0%, A28 and A29 3.5%, B8 and B16 14.0%, B5 and B12 11.0%, B13,B15, B18, B27 and B35 7.0%. Radiologic changes were most often in hand and foot joints, less frequently in the knees and quite infrequently in hips and shoulders joints. Sacroiliitis was found in 46.4% of the patients. Psoriasis was treated with topical corticosteroids and salicylic ointments in all the patients, ultraviolet (PUVA therapy in 5.6% and retinoids in 4.3% of them. Artrithis was treated with nonsteroidal anti

  9. Psoriatic arthritis: treatment strategies using biologic agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Palazzi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The traditional management of psoriatic arthritis (PsA includes NSAIDs, corticosteroids and DMARDs. Advancement in the knowledge of the immunopathogenesis of PsA has been associated with the development of biologic agents which have revolutionized the management of the disease. Among biologics drugs, there are the 4 currently availablee anti-TNFα blocking agents (etanercept, infliximab, adalimumab and golimumab which are more effective than traditional DMARDs on symptoms/signs of inflammation, quality of life, function, and in inhibiting the progression of the structural joint damage. Despite of the high cost, TNF inhibitors are costeffective on both the musculoskeletal and skin manifestations of psoriatic disease.

  10. PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS: CLASSIFICATION, CLINICAL PRESENTATION, DIAGNOSIS, TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Korotaeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The lecture gives basic information about psoriatic arthritis (PsA, a chronic inflammatory disease of the joints, spine, and enthesises from a group of spondyloarthritis. It describes the epidemiology of the disease and considers current ideas on its pathogenesis and factors influencing the development of PsA in psoriatic patients. The classification and clinical forms of PsA are presented. The major clinical manifestations of the disease are indicated to include peripheral arthritis, enthesitis, dactylitis, and spondylitis. The diagnosis of the disease is noted to be established on the basis of its detected typical clinical and radiological signs, by applying the CASPAR criteria. A dermatologist, rheumatologist, and general practitioner screen PsA, by actively detecting complaints, characteristic clinical and radiological signs of damage to the joints, and/or spine, and/or enthesises and by using screening questionnaires. There are data that patients with PsA are observed to be at higher risk for a number of diseases type 2 diabetes mellitus hypertension, coronary heart disease, obesity, metabolic syndrome, inflammatory bowel diseases, etc. The aim of current pharmacotherapy for PsA is to achieve remission or minimal activity of clinical manifestations of the disease, to delay or prevent its X-ray progression, to increase survival, to improve quality of life in patients, and to reduce the risk of comorbidities. The paper considers groups of medicines used to treat the disease, among other issues, information about biological agents (BA registered in the Russian Federation for the treatment of PsA. Most patients are mentioned to show a good response to this therapy option just 3–6 months after treatment initiation; however, some of them develop primary inefficiency. In this case, switching one BA to another is recommended. Some patients using a BA develop secondary treatment inefficiency, which is firstly due to the appearance of

  11. Early biomarkers of joint damage in rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mc Ardle, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Joint destruction, as evidenced by radiographic findings, is a significant problem for patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis. Inherently irreversible and frequently progressive, the process of joint damage begins at and even before the clinical onset of disease. However, rheumatoid and psoriatic arthropathies are heterogeneous in nature and not all patients progress to joint damage. It is therefore important to identify patients susceptible to joint destruction in order to initiate more aggressive treatment as soon as possible and thereby potentially prevent irreversible joint damage. At the same time, the high cost and potential side effects associated with aggressive treatment mean it is also important not to over treat patients and especially those who, even if left untreated, would not progress to joint destruction. It is therefore clear that a protein biomarker signature that could predict joint damage at an early stage would support more informed clinical decisions on the most appropriate treatment regimens for individual patients. Although many candidate biomarkers for rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis have been reported in the literature, relatively few have reached clinical use and as a consequence the number of prognostic biomarkers used in rheumatology has remained relatively static for several years. It has become evident that a significant challenge in the transition of biomarker candidates to clinical diagnostic assays lies in the development of suitably robust biomarker assays, especially multiplexed assays, and their clinical validation in appropriate patient sample cohorts. Recent developments in mass spectrometry-based targeted quantitative protein measurements have transformed our ability to rapidly develop multiplexed protein biomarker assays. These advances are likely to have a significant impact on the validation of biomarkers in the future. In this review, we have comprehensively compiled a list of candidate

  12. PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS: CLASSIFICATION, CLINICAL PRESENTATION, DIAGNOSIS, TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Korotaev

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available soriatic arthritis (PsA is a chronic inflammatory disease of the joints, spine and entheses from a group of spondyloarthritis (SpA, which is usually observed in patients with psoriasis (Ps. The diagnosis of PsA is based on the CASPAR criteria for psoriatic arthritis. The disease results from interactions between genetic, immunological and environmental factors. The main clinical manifestations of PsA include peripheral arthritis, enthesitis, dactylitis, and spondylitis. PsA must be differentiated from rheumatoid arthritis, gout, reactive arthritis, osteoarthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis. Due to the fact that PsA is a clinically heterogeneous disease, its activity is assessed using complex indices, by taking into account that the patient has arthritis, enthesitis, dactylitis, and spondylitis. The goal of treatment for PsA is to achieve remission or minimal activity of the main clinical manifestations of the disease, to slow down or prevent radiographic progression, to increase life expectancy and quality of life in the patients, and to reduce the risk of comorbidities, which is achieved through a wide range of drugs of different classes. Therapy should be chosen based on the clinical manifestations of PsA and comorbidities in the patients. 

  13. Psoriatic arthritis management update - biotherapeutic options.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Saber, Tajvur P

    2012-02-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a seronegative spondyloarthropathy (SpA) occurring in up to 30% of patients with psoriasis. It has a wide variation of annual incidence (median 6.4, range 0.1-3.1 per 10(5) people), based on analysis of 13 incidence and prevalence reviews published between 1987 and December 2006. Conventional treatments with antiinflammatory and disease modifying or antirheumatic drugs are not efficacious in all patients, in particular those with axial disease. This review examines new pharmacological developments in the treatment of PsA with a focus on biologic therapies.

  14. Comorbidities in Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Haddad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have shown that patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA are often affected by numerous comorbidities that carry significant morbidity and mortality. Reported comorbidities include diabetes mellitus, obesity, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular diseases, osteoporosis, inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmune eye disease, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, depression, and fibromyalgia. All health care providers for patients with PsA should recognize and monitor those comorbidities, as well as understand their effect on patient management to ensure an optimal clinical outcome.

  15. Current views on the pharmacotherapy of psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. G. Taradin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The review deals with current pharmacological approaches to treating psoriatic arthritis (PsA. It gives data on the prevalence of psoriasis and psoriatic joint injury that is a common cause of early patient disability. Approaches to evaluating the efficacy of drugs are given on the basis of developed and used criteria with regard to the standardized assessment of the dynamics of joint injury in rheumatic diseases and PSA in particular. The review gives brief information on the mechanism of drug actions and the results of clinical trials evaluating the efficacy and safety of different medicaments in PsA. It also covers the experience in using nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, glucocorticoids, synthetic diseasemodifying antirheumatic drugs (methotrexate, cyclosporine, leflunomide, sulfasalazine, and also a promising group of biologicals. Particular emphasis is placed on the results of using tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (etanercept, infliximab, golimumab, certolizumab pegol, adalimumab, interleukin inhibitors (ustekinumab, brodalumab, and phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitors (apremilast.

  16. A sonographic spectrum of psoriatic arthritis: "the five targets".

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gutierrez, Marwin

    2010-02-01

    Ultrasound is a rapidly evolving technique that is gaining an increasing success in the assessment of psoriatic arthritis. Most of the studies have been aimed at investigating its ability in the assessment of joints, tendons, and entheses in psoriatic arthritis patients. Less attention has been paid to demonstrate the potential of ultrasound in the evaluation of skin and nail. The aim of this pictorial essay was to show the main high-frequency grayscale and power Doppler ultrasound findings in patients with psoriatic arthritis at joint, tendon, enthesis, skin, and nail level.

  17. IFN-αα induced psoriatic arthritis and HCV-related liver cirrhosis. Therapeutic options and patient’s opinion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Piga

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection in the setting of Psoriatic Arthritis is an additional variable to be considered in the therapeutic approach to the disease because of the complications of an immunosuppressive treatment in the course of a chronic infection and the possible hepatotoxicity of many drugs conventionally used to treat psoriatic arthritis. The case reported explores the therapeutic options in a patient with IFN-α induced psoriatic arthritis, characterised by severe arthritis and psoriasis but also the concomitant presence of HCV chronic hepatitis, in light of the patient’s concerns

  18. The occurrence of psoriatic arthritis in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ole Birger Vesterager; Svendsen, Anders Jørgen; Ejstrup, Leif

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To apply and compare different classification criteria on a representative nationwide sample of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) twins and to estimate the prevalence and incidence of PsA. METHODS: The study comprised three Danish nationwide twin cohorts. In 1994 37,388 Danish twin individuals...... and in 2002 46,418 twin individuals received a questionnaire including questions on rheumatic diseases. Twins reporting PsA and their co-twins were classified according to the Moll and Wright (M&W) and CASPAR criteria based on interview, clinical examination, and scrutiny of medical records. RESULTS: A total...... of 228 twin individuals reported PsA and 184 (81%) participated in clinical validation. By using the M&W and CASPAR criteria 54 and 50 cases were diagnosed with PsA respectively. The positive predictive value of self-reported PsA was 31%. According to the M&W and CASPAR criteria the prevalence was 0...

  19. Biomarkers in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanova, Federica; Di Meglio, Paola; Nestle, Frank O

    2013-04-01

    Psoriasis is a common immune-mediated disease of the skin, which associates in 20-30% of patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). The immunopathogenesis of both conditions is not fully understood as it is the result of a complex interaction between genetic, environmental and immunological factors. At present there is no cure for psoriasis and there are no specific markers that can accurately predict disease progression and therapeutic response. Therefore, biomarkers for disease prognosis and response to treatment are urgently needed to help clinicians with objective indications to improve patient management and outcomes. Although many efforts have been made to identify psoriasis/PsA biomarkers none of them has yet been translated into routine clinical practice. In this review we summarise the different classes of possible biomarkers explored in psoriasis and PsA so far and discuss novel strategies for biomarker discovery.

  20. Psoriasis, Psoriatic Arthritis, and Thyroid Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Ruffilli

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis (PsO is a chronic relapsing/remitting autoimmune skin disease, associated with an increased risk of other autoimmune disorders. Psoriatic arthritis (PsA is a chronic inflammatory arthritis occurring approximately in 30% of PsO patients. Sporadic cases of association between PsO and autoimmune thyroid disorders (AITDs have been reported. However, two different recent studies did not find any association between them. In patients with PsO and PsA, an association with AITD has been shown by most of the studies in adults, but not in the juvenile form. In PsA women and men, thyroid autoimmunity [positive antithyroid peroxidase (AbTPO antibodies, hypoechoic thyroid pattern] and subclinical hypothyroidism were more prevalent than in the general population. An association has been shown also in patients with PsO, arthritis, and inflammatory bowel disease, who have more frequently AITD. A Th1 immune predominance has been shown in early PsO, and PsA, with high serum CXCL10 (Th1 prototype chemokine, overall in the presence of autoimmune thyroiditis. This Th1 immune predominance might be the immunopathogenetic base of the association of these disorders. A raised incidence of new cases of hypothyroidism, thyroid dysfunction, positive AbTPO, and appearance of a hypoechoic thyroid pattern in PsA patients, especially in women, has been shown recently, suggesting to evaluate AbTPO levels, thyroid function, and thyroid ultrasound, especially in PsA women. Thyroid function follow-up and suitable treatments should be performed regularly in PsA female patients at high risk (thyroid-stimulating hormone within the normal range but at the higher limit, positive AbTPO, hypoechoic, and small thyroid.

  1. Psoriatic Arthritis and Diabetes: A Population-Based Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreiher, Jacob; Freud, Tamar; Cohen, Arnon D.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Diabetes has been associated with psoriasis, but little is known about the association between psoriatic arthritis and diabetes. Methods. Patients diagnosed with psoriatic arthritis by a rheumatologist were compared to age- and sex-matched patients without psoriatic arthritis regarding the prevalence of diabetes in a population-based cross-sectional study using logistic multivariate models. The study was performed utilizing the medical database of Clalit, the largest healthcare provider organization in Israel. Results. The study included 549 patients with psoriatic arthritis ≥21 years and 1,098 patients without psoriatic arthritis. The prevalence of diabetes in patients with psoriatic arthritis was increased as compared to the prevalence in patients without psoriatic arthritis (15.3% versus 10.7%, P value = 0.008). The difference was prominent among females (18.7% versus 10.3%, P < 0.001) but not among males (11.2% in patients with and without psoriatic arthritis, P = 1.000). In a multivariate analysis, psoriatic arthritis was associated with diabetes among females (OR = 1.60, 95% CI: 1.02–2.52, P = 0.040) but not among males (OR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.42–1.22, P = 0.213). Conclusion. Our study suggests a possible association between psoriatic arthritis and diabetes in women. Women with psoriatic arthritis might be candidates for diabetes screening. PMID:23843781

  2. MRI findings of juvenile psoriatic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Edward Y.; Kleinman, Paul K.; Sundel, Robert P.; Kim, Susan; Zurakowski, David

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of juvenile psoriatic arthritis (JpsA) in children in order to facilitate early diagnosis and proper management. Two pediatric radiologists retrospectively reviewed in consensus a total of 37 abnormal MRI examinations from 31 pediatric patients (nine boys, 22 girls; age range 1-17 years; mean age 9.4 years) who had a definite diagnosis of JpsA and underwent MRI. Each MRI was evaluated for synovium abnormality (thickening and enhancement), joint effusion (small, moderate, and large), bone marrow abnormality (edema, enhancement, and location of abnormality), soft tissue abnormality (edema, enhancement, atrophy, and fatty infiltration), tendon abnormality (thickening, edema, tendon sheath fluid, and enhancement), and articular abnormality (joint space narrowing and erosion). The distribution of abnormal MRI findings among the six categories for the 37 MRI examinations was evaluated. The number of abnormal MRI findings for each MRI examination was assessed. Age at MRI examination and all six categories of abnormal MRI findings according to gender were evaluated. There were a total 96 abnormal MRI findings noted on 37 abnormal MRI examinations from 31 pediatric patients. The 37 abnormal MRI examinations included MRI of the hand (n=8), knee (n = 8), ankle (n = 5), pelvis (n = 5), temporomandibular joint (n = 4), wrist (n = 3), foot (n = 2), elbow (n = 1), and shoulder (n = 1). Twenty-eight diffuse synovial thickening and/or enhancement were the most common MRI abnormality (29.2%). Joint effusion comprised 22 abnormal MRI findings (22.9%). There were 16 abnormal MRI bone marrow edema and/or enhancement findings (16.7%), and in seven (7.3%) the edema involved non-articular sites. Soft tissue abnormality manifested as edema and/or enhancement constituted 14 abnormal MRI findings (14.5%). There were ten MRI abnormalities (10.4%) involving tendons. Articular abnormality seen as joint space

  3. MRI findings of juvenile psoriatic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Edward Y.; Kleinman, Paul K. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Children' s Hospital Boston, MA (United States); Sundel, Robert P.; Kim, Susan [Harvard Medical School, Rheumatology Program, Division of Immunology and the Department of Pediatrics, Boston, MA (United States); Children' s Hospital Boston, MA (United States); Zurakowski, David [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Boston, MA (United States); Children' s Hospital Boston, MA (United States)

    2008-11-15

    The aim of this study was to describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of juvenile psoriatic arthritis (JpsA) in children in order to facilitate early diagnosis and proper management. Two pediatric radiologists retrospectively reviewed in consensus a total of 37 abnormal MRI examinations from 31 pediatric patients (nine boys, 22 girls; age range 1-17 years; mean age 9.4 years) who had a definite diagnosis of JpsA and underwent MRI. Each MRI was evaluated for synovium abnormality (thickening and enhancement), joint effusion (small, moderate, and large), bone marrow abnormality (edema, enhancement, and location of abnormality), soft tissue abnormality (edema, enhancement, atrophy, and fatty infiltration), tendon abnormality (thickening, edema, tendon sheath fluid, and enhancement), and articular abnormality (joint space narrowing and erosion). The distribution of abnormal MRI findings among the six categories for the 37 MRI examinations was evaluated. The number of abnormal MRI findings for each MRI examination was assessed. Age at MRI examination and all six categories of abnormal MRI findings according to gender were evaluated. There were a total 96 abnormal MRI findings noted on 37 abnormal MRI examinations from 31 pediatric patients. The 37 abnormal MRI examinations included MRI of the hand (n=8), knee (n = 8), ankle (n = 5), pelvis (n = 5), temporomandibular joint (n = 4), wrist (n = 3), foot (n = 2), elbow (n = 1), and shoulder (n = 1). Twenty-eight diffuse synovial thickening and/or enhancement were the most common MRI abnormality (29.2%). Joint effusion comprised 22 abnormal MRI findings (22.9%). There were 16 abnormal MRI bone marrow edema and/or enhancement findings (16.7%), and in seven (7.3%) the edema involved non-articular sites. Soft tissue abnormality manifested as edema and/or enhancement constituted 14 abnormal MRI findings (14.5%). There were ten MRI abnormalities (10.4%) involving tendons. Articular abnormality seen as joint space

  4. The psychosocial burden of psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husni, M Elaine; Merola, Joseph F; Davin, Sara

    2017-12-01

    To assess the psychosocial impact of psoriatic arthritis (PsA), describe how health-related quality of life (QoL) is affected in patients with PsA, discuss measures used to evaluate the psychosocial impact of PsA, and review studies examining the effect of therapy on QoL. A targeted review on the impact of PsA on QoL and the role of tailored psychosocial management in reducing the psychosocial burden of the disease was performed. PubMed literature searches were conducted using the terms PsA, psychosocial burden, QoL, and mood/behavioral changes. Articles were deemed relevant if they presented information regarding the psychosocial impact of PsA, methods used to evaluate these impacts, or ways to manage/improve management of PsA and its resulting comorbidities. The findings of this literature search are descriptively reviewed and the authors׳ expert opinion on their interpretation is provided. The psychosocial burden of PsA negatively affects QoL. Patients suffer from sleep disorders, fatigue, low-level stress, depression and mood/behavioral changes, poor body image, and reduced work productivity. Additionally, each patient responds to pain differently, depending on a variety of psychological factors including personality structure, cognition, and attention to pain. Strategies for evaluating the burdens associated with PsA and the results of properly managing patients with PsA are described. PsA is associated with a considerable psychosocial burden and new assessment tools, specific to PsA, have been developed to help quantify this burden in patients. Future management algorithms of PsA should incorporate appropriate assessment and management of psychological and physical concerns of patients. Furthermore, patients with PsA should be managed by a multidisciplinary team that works in coordination with the patient and their family or caregivers. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Improvements in diagnostic tools for early detection of psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, Salvatore; Palazzi, Carlo; Gilio, Michele; Leccese, Pietro; Padula, Angela; Olivieri, Ignazio

    2016-11-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a heterogeneous chronic inflammatory disease characterized by a wide clinical spectrum. The early diagnosis of PsA is currently a challenging topic. Areas covered: The literature was extensively reviewed for studies addressing the topic area "diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis". This review will summarize improvements in diagnostic tools, especially referral to the rheumatologist, the role of patient history and clinical examination, laboratory tests, and imaging techniques in getting an early and correct diagnosis of PsA. Expert commentary: Due to the heterogeneity of its expression, PsA may be easily either overdiagnosed or underdiagnosed. A diagnosis of PsA should be taken into account every time a patient with psoriasis or a family history of psoriasis shows peripheral arthritis, especially if oligoarticular or involving the distal interphalangeal joints, enthesitis or dactylitis. Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography are useful for diagnosing PsA early, particularly when isolated enthesitis or inflammatory spinal pain occur.

  6. The Cost of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis in 5 European Countries: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos-Pol, R; Martínez-Sesmero, J M; Ventura-Cerdá, J M; Elías, I; Caloto, M T; Casado, M Á

    2016-09-01

    While the introduction of biologics has improved the quality of life of patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, it may have increased the economic burden of these diseases. To perform a systematic review of studies on the costs associated with managing and treating psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis in 5 European countries: Germany, Spain, France, Italy, and the United Kingdom. We undertook a systematic review of the literature (up to May 2015) using the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases. The methodological quality of the studies identified was evaluated using the Consolidated Health Economic Evaluation Reporting Standards checklist. We considered both direct costs (medical and nonmedical) and indirect costs, adjusted for country-specific inflation and converted to international dollars using purchasing power parity exchange rates for 2015 ($US PPP). The search retrieved 775 studies; 68.3% analyzed psoriasis and 31.7% analyzed psoriatic arthritis. The total annual cost per patient ranged from US $2,077 to US $13,132 PPP for psoriasis and from US $10,924 to US $17,050 PPP for psoriatic arthritis. Direct costs were the largest component of total expenditure in both diseases. The severity of these diseases was associated with higher costs. The introduction of biologics led to a 3-fold to 5-fold increase in direct costs, and consequently to an increase in total costs. We have analyzed the economic burden of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis and shown that costs increase with the treatment and management of more severe disease and the use of biologics. Copyright © 2016 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. HLA associations reveal genetic heterogeneity in psoriatic arthritis and in the psoriasis phenotype.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Winchester, Robert

    2012-04-01

    Rigorously ascertained cases of psoriatic arthritis in subjects presenting to a rheumatology unit were compared with cases of psoriasis in subjects presenting to a dermatology unit, where subjects with musculoskeletal features were excluded, to address 1) the extent to which the contribution of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) to psoriatic arthritis susceptibility resembles that in psoriasis, and 2) whether MHC genes determine quantitative traits within the psoriatic arthritis phenotype.

  8. High prevalence of psoriatic arthritis in patients with severe psoriasis with suboptimal performance of screening questionnaires.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Haroon, Muhammad

    2013-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to: (1) assess the prevalence of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) among Psoriasis (Ps) patients attending dermatology clinics; (2) identify clinical predictors of the development of PsA; and (3) compare the performance of three PsA screening questionnaires: Psoriatic Arthritis Screening and Evaluation (PASE), Psoriasis Epidemiology Screening Tool (PEST) and Toronto Psoriatic Arthritis Screening (ToPAS).

  9. Why golimumab in the treatment of psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and rheumatoid arthritis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rossini

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Golimumab is an anti-TNF monoclonal antibody administred subcutaneously once a month and produced with an innovative technology that minimizes immunogenicity. This paper reviews and updates the main studies on the efficacy, safety and pharmacoeconomic aspects of treatment with golimumab of psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and rheumatoid arthritis.

  10. Comprehensive assessment of rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility loci in a large psoriatic arthritis cohort.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bowes, John

    2012-08-01

    A number of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) susceptibility genes have been identified in recent years. Given the overlap in phenotypic expression of synovial joint inflammation between RA and psoriatic arthritis (PsA), the authors explored whether RA susceptibility genes are also associated with PsA.

  11. In etanercept-treated psoriatic arthritis patients clinical improvement correlated with an increase of serum cortisol relative to other adrenal hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atzeni, F; Sarzi-Puttini, P; DePortu, S; Cutolo, M; Carrabba, M; Straub, R H

    2008-01-01

    In patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), long-term therapy with anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antibodies sensitizes the pituitary gland and improves adrenal androgen secretion in prednisolone-naïve patients. However, whether this is similar in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is not known. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of 12 weeks of etanercept treatment upon the function of the HPA axis in patients with PsA. Eleven prednisolone-naïve patients (mean age 47.3+/-8.9 years) with PsA were included. We measured serum levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17OHP), cortisol, and androstenedione (ASD), at baseline and at 4 and 12 weeks after initiation of anti-TNF therapy (etanercept, 50 mg every week as a single dose by sc. injection). Clinical improvement was assessed using the Disease Activity Score-28 (DAS-28). Mean levels of serum ACTH, serum cortisol, serum 17OHP and serum ASD did not markedly change during 12 weeks of etanercept treatment. Similarly, the ratio of serum cortisol divided by serum ACTH did not change during 12 weeks of anti-TNF treatment. However, an increase of serum cortisol relative to serum 17OHP or ASD was related to clinical improvement. This indicates that improvement was linked to higher serum cortisol levels relative to others adrenal hormones. This is the first study to demonstrate baseline serum levels and the course of HPA axis-related hormones in patients with PsA. An increase of serum cortisol relative to others adrenocortical hormones (i.e., androstenedione and ACTH) was accompanied by clinical improvement.

  12. Risk of periodontitis in patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg, A; Mallbris, L; Gislason, G

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Psoriasis and periodontitis are chronic inflammatory disorders with overlapping inflammatory pathways, but data on risk of periodontitis in psoriasis are scarce and a possible pathogenic link is poorly understood. OBJECTIVE: We investigated the association between psoriasis...... and periodontitis in a nationwide cohort study. METHODS: All Danish individuals aged ≥18 years between 1 January 1997 and 31 December 2011 (n = 5,470,428), including 54 210 and 6988 patients with mild and severe psoriasis, and 6428 with psoriatic arthritis, were linked through administrative registers. Incidence...... rate ratios (IRRs) were estimated by Poisson regression. RESULTS: Incidence rates of periodontitis per 10 000 person-years were 3.07 (3.03-3.12), 5.89 (1.07-6.84), 8.27 (5.50-12.45) and 11.12 (7.87-15.73) for the reference population, mild psoriasis, severe psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis...

  13. Golimumab in the treatment of psoriatic arthritis: efficacy and safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Viktorovna Korotaeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α holds a central position in the pathogenesis of autoimmune inflammatory diseases of the locomotor apparatus. A separate class of drugs, namely, TNF-α inhibitors, that are effective against multicomponent diseases, such as psoriatic arthritis (PsA, is now available to physicians. The paper reviews the results of clinical trials of the TNF-α inhibitor golimumab, a human TNF-α monoclonal antibody. Golimumab exerts a positive effect on all manifestations of PsA: arthritis, psoriatic skin and nail lesions, dactylitis, enthesitis, and quality of life. The drug is noted for its convenient route of administration – its standard dose is 50 mg injected subcutaneously once a month and for its low molecular immunogenicity. Recent data suggest that golimumab is an effective drug with a safety profile similar to that of the entire class of TNF-α inhibitors.

  14. Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in a patient on etanercept for psoriatic arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lahiff, C

    2007-12-01

    Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) is a rare form of pneumonia associated with immune-suppression. It is common in patients with AIDS and with a CD4 count of less than 200 cells\\/mm(3). We report a case of PCP secondary to immune-suppression in a 41-year-old man with psoriatic arthritis being treated with the immune-modulatory agent etanercept.

  15. Long term efficacy and safety of etanercept in the treatment of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kivelevitch D

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Dario Kivelevitch, Bobbak Mansouri, Alan Menter Department of Dermatology, Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA Abstract: Psoriasis is a chronic, immune-mediated inflammatory disease affecting both the skin and joints. Approximately 20% of patients suffer a moderate to severe form of skin disease and up to 30% have joint involvement. Standard therapies for psoriasis include topical medications, phototherapy, and both oral systemic and biological therapies whereas therapies for psoriatic arthritis include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs followed by disease modifying antirheumatic drugs and/or tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α inhibitors and interleukin-12/23p40 inhibitors. Treatment of both diseases is typically driven by disease severity. In the past decade, major advances in the understanding of the immunopathogenesis of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis have led to the development of numerous biological therapies, which have revolutionized the treatment for moderate to severe plaque psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Anti-TNF-α agents are currently considered as first line biological therapies for the treatment of moderate to severe psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Currently approved anti-TNF-α agents include etanercept, adalimumab, and infliximab for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis as well as golimumab and certolizumab for psoriatic arthritis. In this article, we aim to evaluate the long term safety and efficacy of etanercept in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Keywords: psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, etanercept, biological therapy, tumor necrosis factor, safety

  16. Osteoscintigraphy in the diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milevskaya, S.G.; Borodulin, V.F.

    1989-01-01

    The authors presented the results of clinical, X-ray and osteoscintigraphic investigations of 133 psoriasic arthritis patients and 72 patients with common psoriasis. Osteoscintigraphy was performed using a routine method with 99m Tc-pyrophos (USSR) and 99m Tc-phosphone (Hungary) on gamma-camera LFOV (Nuclear-Chicago, USA). X-ray signs of the involvement of the osteoarticular system were noted in 69 (51%) patients with psoriasic arthritis and in 16 (22%) patients with common psoriasis. The method permitted the detection of the foci of RP hyperfixation in 129 (97%) potients with psoriasic arthritis and in 51 (70.8%) patients with common psoriasis. They were observed mostly in large and small limb joints, less frequently-in the vertebral column, cranial bones, thorax, and ribs. Thus, osteoscintigraphy is a highly sensitive method for the detection of active inflammatory foci of the osteoarticular system in psoriasis at all stages of arthritis development. It makes it possible to detect the spreading of arthritis and its preclinical forms

  17. Minimal Disease Activity as a Treatment Target in Psoriatic Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gossec, Laure; McGonagle, Dennis; Korotaeva, Tatiana

    2018-01-01

    As in other inflammatory rheumatic diseases, the objective of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) treatment is the achievement of a defined target. Recent recommendations propose aiming for remission or low disease activity; however, a consensual definition of remission is lacking. A state of minimal disease....... Since its development, MDA has been used increasingly in studies and clinical trials. In this article, the potential use of MDA as a treatment target in PsA is reviewed. The frequencies of MDA achievement with biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs are summarized based on data from registries...

  18. Association of systemic sclerosis and psoriatic arthritis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Musio

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The association of Systemic Sclerosis (SSc and Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA is unfrequent; only few cases are reported in literature. We describe a case of a patient with SSc following the onset of PsA. The disease begun with tenosynovitis, polyarthritis in association with psoriasis. After two years, Raynaud’s phenomenon and sclerodactyly appeared, and, later, pulmonary interstizial fibrosis and esophageal dysfunction. The existence of a common pathogenesis of the two diseases, SSc and PsA, is discussed.

  19. Diagnostic imaging of psoriatic arthritis. Part II: magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Sudoł-Szopińska

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Plain radiography reveals specific, yet late changes of advanced psoriatic arthritis. Early inflammatory changes are seen both on magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound within peripheral joints (arthritis, synovitis, tendons sheaths (tenosynovitis, tendovaginitis and entheses (enthesitis, enthesopathy. In addition, magnetic resonance imaging enables the assessment of inflammatory features in the sacroiliac joints (sacroiliitis, and the spine (spondylitis. In this article, we review current opinions on the diagnostics of some selective, and distinctive features of psoriatic arthritis concerning magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound and present some hypotheses on psoriatic arthritis etiopathogenesis, which have been studied with the use of magnetic resonance imaging. The following elements of the psoriatic arthritis are discussed: enthesitis, extracapsular inflammation, dactylitis, distal interphalangeal joint and nail disease, and the ability of magnetic resonance imaging to differentiate undifferentiated arthritis, the value of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

  20. Sensitivity and specificity of plain radiographic features of peripheral enthesopathy at major sites in psoriatic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helliwell, P.S.; Porter, G.

    2007-01-01

    It has been proposed that the defining difference between rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthropathy (including psoriatic arthritis) is the initial pathological lesion where the emphasis in psoriatic arthritis is on the enthesis and in rheumatoid arthritis on the synovium. Classical radiological descriptions of seronegative spondyloarthropathy include enthesopathy at major entheseal insertions characterised by erosions and exuberant new bone formation. In this study, the plain radiographic features of spondyloarthropathy are compared between psoriatic arthritis, other spondyloarthropathies and rheumatoid arthritis. The CASPAR study collected clinical, radiological and laboratory data on 588 patients with physician diagnosed psoriatic arthritis and 525 controls with other inflammatory arthritis, 70% of which had rheumatoid arthritis. Plain radiographs of the pelvis and heels were part of the study protocol, although radiographs of other potential entheseal sites such as the knee, elbow and shoulder, were interpreted if available. All radiographs were read blind by two observers working in tandem. Significant differences in entheseal erosion and entheseal new bone formation were found between psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, undifferentiated spondyloarthropathy, rheumatoid arthritis and other diagnoses (entheseal erosion, chi-squared 20.8, p = 0.008; entheseal new bone formation, chi-squared 24.5, p = 0.001). These differences were mainly due to a higher proportion of these features in ankylosing spondylitis. No differences in the plain radiographic features of enthesopathy were found between psoriatic arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis except in the case of entheseal new bone formation at sites of attachment of inguinal ligament, sartorius and rectus femoris muscles to the ilium (OR 3.01, 95% CI 1.13-8.02). Very few subjects with symptomatic heel involvement had radiographic changes and minimal differences were found between those with and without

  1. Sensitivity and specificity of plain radiographic features of peripheral enthesopathy at major sites in psoriatic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helliwell, P.S. [University of Leeds, Academic Unit of Musculoskeletal and Rehabilitation Medicine, Leeds (United Kingdom); Porter, G. [Airedale Hospital NHS Trust, Keighley, West Yorkshire (United Kingdom)

    2007-11-15

    It has been proposed that the defining difference between rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthropathy (including psoriatic arthritis) is the initial pathological lesion where the emphasis in psoriatic arthritis is on the enthesis and in rheumatoid arthritis on the synovium. Classical radiological descriptions of seronegative spondyloarthropathy include enthesopathy at major entheseal insertions characterised by erosions and exuberant new bone formation. In this study, the plain radiographic features of spondyloarthropathy are compared between psoriatic arthritis, other spondyloarthropathies and rheumatoid arthritis. The CASPAR study collected clinical, radiological and laboratory data on 588 patients with physician diagnosed psoriatic arthritis and 525 controls with other inflammatory arthritis, 70% of which had rheumatoid arthritis. Plain radiographs of the pelvis and heels were part of the study protocol, although radiographs of other potential entheseal sites such as the knee, elbow and shoulder, were interpreted if available. All radiographs were read blind by two observers working in tandem. Significant differences in entheseal erosion and entheseal new bone formation were found between psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, undifferentiated spondyloarthropathy, rheumatoid arthritis and other diagnoses (entheseal erosion, chi-squared 20.8, p = 0.008; entheseal new bone formation, chi-squared 24.5, p = 0.001). These differences were mainly due to a higher proportion of these features in ankylosing spondylitis. No differences in the plain radiographic features of enthesopathy were found between psoriatic arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis except in the case of entheseal new bone formation at sites of attachment of inguinal ligament, sartorius and rectus femoris muscles to the ilium (OR 3.01, 95% CI 1.13-8.02). Very few subjects with symptomatic heel involvement had radiographic changes and minimal differences were found between those with and without

  2. Duration of Psoriatic Skin Disease as Risk Factor for Subsequent Onset of Psoriatic Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg, Alexander; Skov, Lone; Zachariae, Claus

    2018-01-01

    It is unclear whether psoriasis is a progressive disease that requires early aggressive intervention. This population-based study identified patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Survival analysis and Kaplan-Meier life table techniques were used. The study comprised 10,011 psoria......It is unclear whether psoriasis is a progressive disease that requires early aggressive intervention. This population-based study identified patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Survival analysis and Kaplan-Meier life table techniques were used. The study comprised 10......,011 psoriasis patients (severe n = 4,618), and 1,269 patients also had PsA. Incidence of PsA increased with duration of cutaneous symptoms (p = 0.0001). Psoriasis diagnosed before age 20 or 30 years, respectively, suggested a lower risk of PsA than psoriasis diagnosed after age 50 years, yet age at first...... cutaneous symptoms did not predict development of PsA. No clear association with disease severity was found. PsA incidence appeared stable with longer duration of psoriasis, but further data are needed to firmly establish the relationship with age of psoriasis onset....

  3. A comparison of disease burden in rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and axial spondyloarthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigitte Michelsen

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study was to compare disease burden in rheumatoid arthritis (RA, psoriatic arthritis (PsA and axial spondyloarthritis (ax-SpA.In this cross-sectional study, all the RA (1093, PsA (365 and ax-SpA (333 patients who visited the out-patient clinic of the Hospital of Southern Norway Trust during the year 2013 were included; the RA patients all had a RA diagnosis verified by the treating rheumatologist, the PsA patients all fulfilled the ClASsification for Psoriatic ARthritis (CASPAR criteria and the ax-SpA patients all fulfilled the Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society (ASAS classification criteria for ax-SpA. Patient-reported health status, demographic variables, medications, and composite scores of disease activity were assessed. The main analyses were performed using General Linear Models adjusted for age, sex and multiple comparisons. Correlation analyses were performed using Spearman's rho.The reported pain, joint pain, patient's global assessment and fatigue were similar in PsA and ax-SpA, but significantly lower in RA. The 28-joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28 (0.3±0.1, p = 0.003, Clinical Disease Activity Index (CDAI (1.0±0.4, p = 0.028 and Routine Assessment of Patient Index Data 3 (RAPID3 (0.4±0.1, p = 0.004 were all significantly higher in PsA vs. RA. RAPID3 showed moderate to high correlation with DAS28 (rho = 0.521, p<0.001 and CDAI (rho = 0.768, p<0.001 in RA and PsA, and with Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI (rho = 0.902, p<0.001 and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI (0.865, p<0.001 in ax-SpA and PsA.In conclusion, patient- reported outcome measures were similar in our population of PsA and ax-SpA patients, but significantly lower for the RA patients. Composite disease activity measures were lower in RA than in PsA and ax-SpA, but the magnitude of these differences was small and probably not of clinical significance. Our study indicates that

  4. Characteristic and Outcome of Psoriatic Arthritis Patients with Hyperuricemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlJohani, Roa'A; Polachek, Ari; Ye, Justine Yang; Chandran, Vinod; Gladman, Dafna D

    2018-02-01

    To determine the characteristics of patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) who have hyperuricemia (HUC) and their outcomes, especially cardiovascular (CVD) and kidney diseases. Patients have been followed prospectively at the PsA clinic according to a standard protocol at 6- to 12-month intervals. We defined HUC in men > 450 µ mol/l or women > 360 µ mol/l. We matched patients with HUC based on sex and age ± 5 years with normal uric acid patients. Demographics information and disease characteristics were reviewed. Outcomes of patients with HUC, especially CVD and kidney diseases, were recorded. Conditional logistic regression was performed to determine factors independently associated with HUC in patients with PsA. There were 325 (31.9%) out of 1019 patients with PsA who had HUC. Of these, 318 cases were matched to 318 controls. There were 11 (3.4%) out of 325 patients with HUC who had gout. Patients with HUC had longer disease duration and a higher Psoriasis Area and Severity Index. They had more concurrent comorbidities, including CVD and metabolic diseases, as well as higher prevalence of kidney stones and higher creatinine. Only 1 patient with HUC was treated with allopurinol at first evaluation visit and 7 patients during followup. Over the followup, 163 of the 318 patients had persistent HUC (pHUC) for more than 2 visits. Patients with pHUC developed more myocardial infarction, heart failure, and renal impairment. Multivariate analysis showed an association between pHUC, PsA disease duration, and obesity. HUC is common in patients with PsA, especially in those with longer disease duration and obesity. Proper control of HUC and metabolic diseases may play a preventive role in improving PsA outcomes.

  5. Autoimmune Arthritides, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Psoriatic Arthritis, or Peripheral Spondyloarthritis Following Lyme Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvikar, Sheila L; Crowley, Jameson T; Sulka, Katherine B; Steere, Allen C

    2017-01-01

    To describe systemic autoimmune joint diseases that develop following Lyme disease, and to compare their clinical features with those of Lyme arthritis (LA). We reviewed records of all adult patients referred to our LA clinic over a 13-year period, in whom we had diagnosed a systemic autoimmune joint disease following Lyme disease. For comparison, records of patients enrolled in our LA cohort over the most recent 2-year period were analyzed. Levels of IgG antibodies to Borrelia burgdorferi and to 3 Lyme disease-associated autoantigens were measured. We identified 30 patients who had developed a new-onset systemic autoimmune joint disorder a median of 4 months after Lyme disease (usually manifested by erythema migrans [EM]). Fifteen had rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 13 had psoriatic arthritis (PsA), and 2 had peripheral spondyloarthritis (SpA). The 30 patients typically had polyarthritis, and those with PsA or SpA often had previous psoriasis, axial involvement, or enthesitis. In the comparison group of 43 patients with LA, the usual clinical picture was monoarticular knee arthritis, without prior EM. Most of the patients with systemic autoimmune joint disorders were positive for B burgdorferi IgG antibodies, as detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, but had significantly lower titers and lower frequencies of Lyme disease-associated autoantibodies than patients with LA. Prior to our evaluation, these patients had often received additional antibiotics for presumed LA, without benefit. We prescribed antiinflammatory agents, most commonly disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, resulting in improvement. Systemic autoimmune joint diseases (i.e., RA, PsA, SpA) may follow Lyme disease. Development of polyarthritis after antibiotic-treated EM, previous psoriasis, or low-titer B burgdorferi antibodies may provide insight into the correct diagnosis. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  6. Psoralen-UVA-treated psoriatic lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, K.; Kohda, H.; Kumakiri, M.; Blender, S.L.; Willis, I.

    1978-01-01

    Psoralen-ultraviolet light (PUVA)-treated psoriatic lesions were studied for ultrastructural changes. In early stages of treatment, sunburn cells in the epidermis and bizarre giant cells in the dermis were more frequently observed. When clinical improvement was apparent, these changes had subsided. Dermal abnormality in long-term therapy consisted of a thick perivascular cost of amorphous substance. No abnormality was found in the epidermal keratinocytes in long-term therapy, except a clustering and giant cell formation of melanocytes, a heavy melanization of keratinocytes, and hyperkeratosis. Low-dose initiation and slow increment of both 8-methoxypsoralen and UVA is probably a reasonable regimen for benign dermatoses such as psoriasis because it will allow enough time for the skin to become more protected, while the therapeutic results are as satisfactory as in a high-dose schedule

  7. Subpopulations Within Juvenile Psoriatic Arthritis: A Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew L. Stoll

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The presentation of juvenile psoriatic arthritis (JPsA has long been recognized to be clinically heterogeneous. As the definition of JPsA expanded to accommodate atypical manifestations of psoriasis in young children, studies began to reflect an increasingly clear biphasic distribution of age of onset, with peaks in the first few years of life and again in early adolescence. These two subpopulations differ in gender ratio, pattern of joint involvement, laboratory findings and potentially response to therapy. Intriguingly, a similar distribution of age of onset has been observed in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA, and correlates with patterns of HLA association. While a secure classification of subpopulations within JPsA awaits improved pathophysiologic understanding, future research must consider the possibility that different disease mechanisms may be operative in distinct subsets of patients with this disorder.

  8. Duration of Psoriatic Skin Disease as Risk Factor for Subsequent Onset of Psoriatic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Egeberg

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available It is unclear whether psoriasis is a progressive disease that requires early aggressive intervention. This population-based study identified patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA. Survival analysis and Kaplan–Meier life table techniques were used. The study comprised 10,011 psoriasis patients (severe n = 4,618, and 1,269 patients also had PsA. Incidence of PsA increased with duration of cutaneous symptoms (p = 0.0001. Psoriasis diagnosed before age 20 or 30 years, respectively, suggested a lower risk of PsA than psoriasis diagnosed after age 50 years, yet age at first cutaneous symptoms did not predict development of PsA. No clear association with disease severity was found. PsA incidence appeared stable with longer duration of psoriasis, but further data are needed to firmly establish the relationship with age of psoriasis onset.

  9. Tofacitinib or Adalimumab versus Placebo for Psoriatic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mease, Philip; Hall, Stephen; FitzGerald, Oliver; van der Heijde, Désirée; Merola, Joseph F; Avila-Zapata, Francisco; Cieślak, Dorota; Graham, Daniela; Wang, Cunshan; Menon, Sujatha; Hendrikx, Thijs; Kanik, Keith S

    2017-10-19

    Tofacitinib is an oral Janus kinase inhibitor that is under investigation for the treatment of psoriatic arthritis. We evaluated tofacitinib in patients with active psoriatic arthritis who previously had an inadequate response to conventional synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). In this 12-month, double-blind, active-controlled and placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial, we randomly assigned patients in a 2:2:2:1:1 ratio to receive one of the following regimens: tofacitinib at a 5-mg dose taken orally twice daily (107 patients), tofacitinib at a 10-mg dose taken orally twice daily (104), adalimumab at a 40-mg dose administered subcutaneously once every 2 weeks (106), placebo with a blinded switch to the 5-mg tofacitinib dose at 3 months (52), or placebo with a blinded switch to the 10-mg tofacitinib dose at 3 months (53). Placebo groups were pooled for analyses up to month 3. Primary end points were the proportion of patients who had an American College of Rheumatology 20 (ACR20) response (≥20% improvement from baseline in the number of tender and swollen joints and at least three of five other important domains) at month 3 and the change from baseline in the Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index (HAQ-DI) score (scores range from 0 to 3, with higher scores indicating greater disability) at month 3. ACR20 response rates at month 3 were 50% in the 5-mg tofacitinib group and 61% in the 10-mg tofacitinib group, as compared with 33% in the placebo group (P=0.01 for the comparison of the 5-mg dose with placebo; Ptofacitinib group and -0.40 in the 10-mg tofacitinib group, as compared with -0.18 in the placebo group (P=0.006 for the comparison of the 5-mg dose with placebo; Ptofacitinib group, 71% in the 10-mg tofacitinib group, 72% in the adalimumab group, 69% in the placebo group that switched to the 5-mg tofacitinib dose, and 64% in the placebo group that switched to the 10-mg tofacitinib dose. There were four cases of cancer, three serious

  10. Remission in psoriatic arthritis: is it possible and how can it be predicted?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Saber, Tajvur P

    2010-01-01

    Since remission is now possible in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) we wished to examine remission rates in PsA patients following anti tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) therapy and to examine possible predictors of response.

  11. Updating the Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) Core Domain Set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orbai, Ana-Maria; de Wit, Maarten; Mease, Philip J

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To include the patient perspective in accordance with the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Filter 2.0 in the updated Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) Core Domain Set for randomized controlled trials (RCT) and longitudinal observational studies (LOS). METHODS: At OMERACT 2016, research...... conducted to update the PsA Core Domain Set was presented and discussed in breakout groups. The updated PsA Core Domain Set was voted on and endorsed by OMERACT participants. RESULTS: We conducted a systematic literature review of domains measured in PsA RCT and LOS, and identified 24 domains. We conducted...... and breakout groups at OMERACT 2016 in which findings were presented and discussed. The updated PsA Core Domain Set endorsed with 90% agreement by OMERACT 2016 participants included musculoskeletal disease activity, skin disease activity, fatigue, pain, patient's global assessment, physical function, health...

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging in psoriatic arthritis: a review of the literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McQueen, F.M.; Lassere, M.; Østergaard, Mikkel

    2006-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is a diverse condition that may be characterized by peripheral inflammatory arthritis, axial involvement, dactylitis and enthesitis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows visualization of soft tissue, articular and entheseal lesions, and provides a unique picture of the dise....../sacroiliitis and subclinical arthropathy. Comparisons have been drawn with the more extensive literature describing the MRI features of rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis....... of the disease process that cannot be gained using other imaging modalities. This review focuses on the literature on MRI in psoriatic arthritis published from 1996 to July 2005. The MRI features discussed include synovitis, tendonitis, dactylitis, bone oedema, bone erosions, soft tissue oedema, spondylitis...

  13. Disparity between ultrasound and clinical findings in psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husic, Rusmir; Gretler, Judith; Felber, Anja; Graninger, Winfried B; Duftner, Christina; Hermann, Josef; Dejaco, Christian

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the association between psoriatic arthritis (PsA)-specific clinical composite scores and ultrasound-verified pathology as well as comparison of clinical and ultrasound definitions of remission. We performed a prospective study on 70 consecutive PsA patients. Clinical assessments included components of Disease Activity Index for Psoriatic Arthritis (DAPSA) and the Composite Psoriatic Disease Activity Index (CPDAI). Minimal disease activity (MDA) and the following remission criteria were applied: CPDAI joint, entheses and dactylitis domains (CPDAI-JED)=0, DAPSA≤3.3, Boolean's remission definition and physician-judged remission (rem-phys). B-mode and power Doppler (PD-) ultrasound findings were semiquantitatively scored at 68 joints (evaluating synovia, peritendinous tissue, tendons and bony changes) and 14 entheses. Ultrasound remission and minimal ultrasound disease activity (MUDA) were defined as PD-score=0 and PD-score ≤1, respectively, at joints, peritendinous tissue, tendons and entheses. DAPSA but not CPDAI correlated with B-mode and PD-synovitis. Ultrasound signs of enthesitis, dactylitis, tenosynovitis and perisynovitis were not linked with clinical composites. Clinical remission or MDA was observed in 15.7% to 47.1% of PsA patients. Ultrasound remission and MUDA were present in 4.3% and 20.0% of patients, respectively. Joint and tendon-related PD-scores were higher in patients with active versus inactive disease according to CPDAI-JED, DAPSA, Boolean's and rem-phys, whereas no difference was observed regarding enthesitis and perisynovitis. DAPSA≤3.3 (OR 3.9, p=0.049) and Boolean's definition (OR 4.6, p=0.03) were more useful to predict MUDA than other remission criteria. PsA-specific composite scores partially reflect ultrasound findings. DAPSA and Boolean's remission definitions better identify MUDA patients than other clinical criteria. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted

  14. Role of golimumab, a TNF-alpha inhibitor, in the treatment of the psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa A Michelon

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Melissa A Michelon1, Alice B Gottlieb1,21Tufts University School of Medicine, 2Department of Dermatology, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA is an inflammatory arthritis that affects many psoriasis patients and can often have a debilitating disease progression. Golimumab is a new tumor necrosis factor (TNF antagonist recently approved by the FDA for controlling signs and symptoms of psoriatic arthritis. In a Phase III clinical trial in patients with PsA, patients receiving golimumab showed significant improvement in the signs and symptoms of disease. It was usually well tolerated, but adverse events generally occurred more in patients receiving golimumab compared to placebo. Golimumab has also recently shown efficacy in slowing structural damage in PsA. This new biologic therapy provides physicians with another option in the treatment of this inflammatory arthritis while offering patients certain advantages over other TNF antagonists.Keywords: golimumab, psoriatic arthritis, TNF-alpha inhibitor

  15. Patient Participation in Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis Outcome Research: A Report from the GRAPPA 2013 Annual Meeting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wit, M.P.T.; Campbell, W.; Fitzgerald, O.; Gladman, D.D.; Helliwell, P.S.; James, J.; Lindsay, C.; MacDonald, R.; McHugh, N.J.; Mease, P.J.; Orbai, A.M.; Palominos, P.; Parkinson, A.; Tillett, W.; Goel, N.

    2014-01-01

    For the first time, 8 patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) participated as full delegates at the 2013 Annual Meeting of the Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA). Patients were invited to provide their perspective for different sessions of the conference

  16. Validity and Reliability of the Dutch Adaptation of the Psoriatic Arthritis Quality of Life (PsAQoL) Questionnaire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wink, Freke; Arends, Suzanne; McKenna, Stephen P; Houtman, Pieternella M; Brouwer, Elisabeth; Spoorenberg, Anneke

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The Psoriatic Arthritis Quality of Life (PsAQoL) questionnaire is a disease-specific instrument developed to measure quality of life (QoL) in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). The aim of this study was to translate the measure into Dutch and to determine its psychometric

  17. AUTONOMIC CARDIOVASCULAR REGULATION DISORDERS IN PATIENTS WITH PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Rebrov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim – to identify disorders of autonomic regulation of cardiac activity in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA by determining the heart rate variability (HRV, and also establish the relationship of HRV with systemic inflammation and traditional cardiovascular risk factors.Materials and methods. The study included 53 patients with PsA (mean age 43.64 ± 12.1 years, including 48.2 % men, mean disease durationwas 10.32 ± 10.2 years. The control group included 25 healthy volunteers (average age 46.7 ± 12.45 years, 49.1 % – men. Time andfrequency measures of HRV were analyzed. Active PsA was determined by an index DAS4, rate erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, levels of C-reactive protein (CRP and fibrinogen. Patients with clinical manifestations of cardiovascular disease, and patients with symptomsof carotid atherosclerosis, detected by duplex study were excluded.Results. Deterioration of HRV in patients with PsA compared with those in patients of the control group, the availability of statistically significant reverse relationship of temporal and spectral parameters of HRV with PsA activity (ESR, CRP, entezit score, DAS4, duration of arthritis, the classical factors of cardiovascular risk were established.Conclusion. Patients with PsA had noted a violation of autonomic regulation of cardiac activity in the form of reduced HRV and activation of the sympathetic part of it. Identified changes were associated with activity of systemic inflammation and classical factors of cardiovascular risk.

  18. AUTONOMIC CARDIOVASCULAR REGULATION DISORDERS IN PATIENTS WITH PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Rebrov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim – to identify disorders of autonomic regulation of cardiac activity in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA by determining the heart rate variability (HRV, and also establish the relationship of HRV with systemic inflammation and traditional cardiovascular risk factors.Materials and methods. The study included 53 patients with PsA (mean age 43.64 ± 12.1 years, including 48.2 % men, mean disease durationwas 10.32 ± 10.2 years. The control group included 25 healthy volunteers (average age 46.7 ± 12.45 years, 49.1 % – men. Time andfrequency measures of HRV were analyzed. Active PsA was determined by an index DAS4, rate erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, levels of C-reactive protein (CRP and fibrinogen. Patients with clinical manifestations of cardiovascular disease, and patients with symptomsof carotid atherosclerosis, detected by duplex study were excluded.Results. Deterioration of HRV in patients with PsA compared with those in patients of the control group, the availability of statistically significant reverse relationship of temporal and spectral parameters of HRV with PsA activity (ESR, CRP, entezit score, DAS4, duration of arthritis, the classical factors of cardiovascular risk were established.Conclusion. Patients with PsA had noted a violation of autonomic regulation of cardiac activity in the form of reduced HRV and activation of the sympathetic part of it. Identified changes were associated with activity of systemic inflammation and classical factors of cardiovascular risk.

  19. Dactylitis in psoriatic arthritis: clinical features, diagnosis, immunopathogenesis, and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Korotaeva

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available When dactylitis is detected in a patient with psoriatic arthritis (PsA, it is necessary to use active treatment as soon as possible, since in the absence of therapy the disease progresses to joint erosion and  functional disorders. The paper considers the clinical signs and  diagnosis of PsA and notes the importance of differential diagnosis in this sign with other joint inflammatory diseases. It points to the  necessity of elaborating common approaches to an objective  assessment of the severity of dactylitis. Its immunopathogenesis and main treatment areas, including the use of biological agents (BAs,  are detailed. There are data of clinical trials that have evaluated the  efficiency of treatment for dactylitis and established that in most  cases, the use of BAs considerably reduce not only the severity of its clinical signs, but also concomitant bone marrow edema. It is noted  that the development of new pathogenetic treatments targeting a number of currently established biologically active molecules that  play an important role in the pathogenesis of dactylitis will enhance  the efficiency of treatment in patients with PsA.

  20. Multidisciplinary Care Models for Patients With Psoriatic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiro, Rubén; Coto, Pablo; Rodríguez, Jesús; Notario, Jaume; Navío Marco, Teresa; de la Cueva, Pablo; Pujol Busquets, Manel; García Font, Mercè; Joven, Beatriz; Rivera, Raquel; Alvarez Vega, Jose Luis; Chaves Álvarez, Antonio Javier; Sánchez Parera, Ricardo; Ruiz Carrascosa, Jose Carlos; Rodríguez Martínez, Fernando José; Pardo Sánchez, José; Feced Olmos, Carlos; Pujol, Conrad; Galindez, Eva; Pérez Barrio, Silvia; Urruticoechea Arana, Ana; Hergueta, Mercedes; Luelmo, Jesús; Gratacós, Jordi

    To describe (structure, processes) of the multidisciplinary care models in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in Spain, as well as barriers and facilitators of their implementation. A qualitative study was performed following structured interviews with 24 professionals (12 rheumatologists, 12 dermatologists who provide multidisciplinary care for patients with PsA). We collected data related to the hospital, department, population and multidisciplinary care model (type, physical and human resources, professional requirements, objectives, referral criteria, agendas, protocols, responsibilities, decision- making, research and education, clinical sessions, development and planning of the model, advantages and disadvantages of the model, barriers and facilitators in the implementation of the model. The models characteristics are described. We analyzed 12 multidisciplinary care models in PsA, with at least 1-2 years of experience, and 3 subtypes of models, face-to-face, parallel, and preferential circuit. All are adapted to the hospital and professionals characteristics. A proper implementation planning is essential. The involvement and empathy between professionals and an access and well-defined referral criteria are important facilitators in the implementation of a model. The management of agendas and data collection to measure the multidisciplinary care models health outcomes are the main barriers. There are different multidisciplinary care models in PsA that can improve patient outcomes, system efficiency and collaboration between specialists. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  1. Optimal management of dactylitis in patients with psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamamoto T

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Toshiyuki YamamotoDepartment of Dermatology, Fukushima Medical University, Fukushima, JapanAbstract: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA is an inflammatory arthropathy associated with cutaneous psoriasis, which is currently classified as a seronegative spondyloarthropathy. The presence of cutaneous psoriasis is important for correct and early diagnosis of PsA, because the onset of cutaneous lesions usually precedes the appearance of joint manifestation. Thus, dermatologists are able to detect the condition at its inception. PsA has several unique characteristics such as enthesopathy, dactylitis, and abnormal bone remodeling. In particular, dactylitis occurs on the easily observed sites such as digits, and is thus a significant indicator of PsA. It is important to observe not only the fingers but also the toes, because dactylitis involves both digits of the hands and feet. Recently, new ideas regarding the involvement of the interleukin (IL-23/Th17 axis have emerged, and the dramatic effects of targeting therapies have highlighted the physiological roles of key cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-17A, and IL-23 in psoriasis. As recent insights are shedding light on the pathogenesis of PsA, understanding of the pathogenesis of dactylitis and enthesitis are also progressing. In this article, current views on the optimal management of dactylitis are discussed.Keywords: pathogenesis, therapy, enthesitis, tenosynovitis

  2. Incidence and prevalence of psoriatic arthritis in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg, Alexander; Kristensen, Lars Erik; Thyssen, Jacob P.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the incidence and temporal trends of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in the general population in Denmark. Methods: Using nationwide registry data, we estimated the number of patients with incident PsA within each 1-year period between 1997 and 2011 and calculated the rate of PsA...... cases within gender and age subgroups. Incidence rates were presented per 100 000 person-years. Results: There was a female predominance ranging from 50.3% (1998) to 59.2% (2010), and the mean age at time of diagnosis was 47-50 years. We identified a total of 12 719 patients with PsA (prevalence=0.......22%), including 9034 patients where the PsA diagnosis was made by a rheumatologist (prevalence=0.16%). Incidence rates of PsA (per 100 000 person-years) increased from 7.3 in 1997 to a peak incidence of 27.3 in 2010. Incidence rates were highest for women and patients aged 50-59 years, respectively. The use...

  3. Interaction between microbiome and host genetics in psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimenti, Maria Sole; Perricone, Carlo; Novelli, Lucia; Caso, Francesco; Costa, Luisa; Bogdanos, Dimitrios; Conigliaro, Paola; Triggianese, Paola; Ciccacci, Cinzia; Borgiani, Paola; Perricone, Roberto

    2018-03-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic inflammatory joint disease, seen in combination with psoriasis. Both genetic and environmental factors are responsible for the development of PsA, however little is known about the different weight of these two distinctive components in the pathogenesis of the disease. Genomic variability in PsA is associated with the disease and/or some peculiar clinical phenotypes. Candidate genes involved are crucial in inflammation, immune system, and epithelial permeability. Moreover, the genesis and regulation of inflammation are influenced by the composition of the human intestinal microbiome that is able to modulate both mucosal and systemic immune system. It is possible that pro-inflammatory responses initiated in gut mucosa could contribute to the induction and progression of autoimmune conditions. Given such premises, the aim of this review is to summarize immune-mediated response and specific bacterial changes in the composition of fecal microbiota in PsA patients and to analyze the relationships between bacterial changes, immune system, and host genetic background. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The ultrasound assessment of the psoriatic arthritis: from joint to skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ariani

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing number of papers investigating the diagnostic potential of ultrasonography in the assessment of patients with psoriatic arthritis and supporting its higher sensitivity over clinical examination in the diagnosis of synovitis, enthesitis and tenosynovitis. Less attention has been paid on both skin and nail, frequently involved in this condition. The aim of this paper is to show the potential of ultrasound in a multi-target assessment (joints, tendons, entesis, skin and nails in patients with psoriatic arthritis, using the last generation ultrasound equipment.

  5. Incidence and Prognosis of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis in Patients Undergoing Bariatric Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg, Alexander; Sørensen, Jens Ahm; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar

    2017-01-01

    and psoriatic arthritis in patients undergoing bariatric surgery (gastric bypass and gastric banding). Design, Setting, and Participants: This population-based cohort study used individual-level linkage of administrative and public health registers in Denmark. All Danish citizens who received gastric bypass.......29 (95% CI, 0.12-0.71) and 0.53 (95% CI, 0.08-3.56) for gastric bypass and gastric banding, respectively. Conclusions and Relevance: Gastric bypass was associated with a significantly reduced risk and improved prognosis of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, whereas gastric banding was not. This finding...

  6. Employment is maintained and sick days decreased in psoriasis/psoriatic arthritis patients with etanercept treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boggs, Robert L; Kárpáti, Sarolta; Li, Wenzhi

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) impair quality of life, including reduction in employment or job duties. The PRESTA (Psoriasis Randomized Etanercept STudy in Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis) study, a randomized, double-blind, two-dose trial, examined the efficacy of etanerce...... at baseline, week 12 and week 24 of treatment. The questionnaire included employment status and changing job responsibilities and sick time taken due to psoriasis or PsA. The statistical methods included analysis of covariance, t-test, Fisher's exact test and McNemar's test. Last...

  7. Generalised pustular psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis and nephrotic syndrome associated with systemic amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, M; Abraham, D; Weinberger, A; Feuerman, E J

    1982-09-01

    The case report is presented of a psoriatic patient with arthropathy, generalised pustular psoriasis and nephrotic syndrome, in whom systemic amyloidosis developed. The literature reports 13 cases of psoriasis associated with amyloidosis, 3 of whom suffered from pustular psoriasis as does our case. With the addition of our case, 12 of these 14 had concomitant arthropathy. This seems to suggest that arthritis is an important factor in the appearance of amyloidosis. Rectal biopsy and/or renal biopsy may be helpful in establishing the diagnosis of amyloidosis relatively early in patients with psoriatic arthritis.

  8. Long-term survival of methotrexate in psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Battafarano

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term survival rate of Methotrexate (MTX in the peripheral joint involvement of psoriatic arthritis (PsA in a setting of everyday clinical practice. Methods. This was an observational restrospective study performed using the data from a dermatological-rheumatological PsA clinic. All of the patients evaluated at this clinic from March 1997 to December 2007 who were started on MTX alone, had a three-year follow-up time or had discontinued the therapy were included into the survey. Results. Of the 174 evaluable patients, 104 (59.8% were still taking MTX after three years of treament. The reasons of therapy discontinuation in the remaining 70 (40.2% patients were: 34 (19.5% lost-to-follow-up, 18 (10.3% adverse events, 14 (8% inefficacies, and 4 (2.3% deaths (none related to the therapy. MTX was effective in controlling joint inflammation but not in preventing their deterioration. Overall, adverse events were recorded in 43 patients (36.4% of the 114 patients with a three-year follow-up. No serious side effect occurred in the study population. Conclusions. The results of this study showed that, in a setting of clinical pratice, MTX had a good three-year performance in patients with peripheral PsA. Almost 60% of them were still taking this drug at the end of the study period and the toxicity was more than acceptable. In our opinion, MTX might be considered the non-biological DMARD of choice for the treatment of this condition. However it should be used earlier and at higher doses.

  9. Concepts of pathogenesis in psoriatic arthritis: genotype determines clinical phenotype.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    FitzGerald, Oliver

    2015-05-07

    This review focuses on the genetic features of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and their relationship to phenotypic heterogeneity in the disease, and addresses three questions: what do the recent studies on human leukocyte antigen (HLA) tell us about the genetic relationship between cutaneous psoriasis (PsO) and PsA - that is, is PsO a unitary phenotype; is PsA a genetically heterogeneous or homogeneous entity; and do the genetic factors implicated in determining susceptibility to PsA predict clinical phenotype? We first discuss the results from comparing the HLA typing of two PsO cohorts: one cohort providing the dermatologic perspective, consisting of patients with PsO without evidence of arthritic disease; and the second cohort providing the rheumatologic perspective, consisting of patients with PsA. We show that these two cohorts differ considerably in their predominant HLA alleles, indicating the heterogeneity of the overall PsO phenotype. Moreover, the genotype of patients in the PsA cohort was shown to be heterogeneous with significant elevations in the frequency of haplotypes containing HLA-B*08, HLA-C*06:02, HLA-B*27, HLA-B*38 and HLA-B*39. Because different genetic susceptibility genes imply different disease mechanisms, and possibly different clinical courses and therapeutic responses, we then review the evidence for a phenotypic difference among patients with PsA who have inherited different HLA alleles. We provide evidence that different alleles and, more importantly, different haplotypes implicated in determining PsA susceptibility are associated with different phenotypic characteristics that appear to be subphenotypes. The implication of these findings for the overall pathophysiologic mechanisms involved in PsA is discussed with specific reference to their bearing on the discussion of whether PsA is conceptualised as an autoimmune process or one that is based on entheseal responses.

  10. Clinical and immunogenetic characterization in psoriatic arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneeberger, Emilce Edith; Citera, Gustavo; Rodríguez Gil, Gustavo; Granel, Amelia; Arturi, Alfredo; Rosemffet, Gabriel Marcos; Maldonado Cocco, José Antonio; Berman, Alberto; Spindler, Alberto; Morales, Victor Hugo

    2015-08-01

    In psoriatic arthritis (PsA), genetic factors play a substantial role in disease susceptibility as well as in its expression. This study aims to determine the distribution of class I and class II HLA antigens in PsA patients and secondly to analyze the influence of genetic factors in the clinical expression of the disease. Consecutive PsA patients (CASPAR criteria) with less than 1 year of disease duration were included. Sociodemographic and clinical data were recorded. Blood samples were obtained, DNA was extracted by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and class I (A, B, and C) and class II (DR) HLA antigens were determined by oligotyping. A control group of 100 nonrelated healthy controls from the general population served as control. p values were corrected (pc) according to the number of alleles tested. A total of 73 patients were included, 37 were females (50.7 %) with a median disease duration of 72 months (interquartile range (IQR) 24-149). Thirty-three patients (45.2 %) had a family history of psoriasis. When analyzing all the class I and class II HLA antigens, a significantly higher frequency of B38 (odds ratio (OR) 2.95, p = 0.03) and Cw6 (OR 2.78, p = 0.009) was found in PsA patients compared to the control group. On the contrary, the HLA-A11 (OR 0.14, p = 0.04) and B7 (OR 0.31, p = 0.03) were significantly more frequent among healthy controls. Furthermore, B18 was significantly more frequent in patients with early arthritis onset (less than 40 years): seven patients (22.6 %) with early onset compared to two patients (4.8 %) with late onset (p = 0.03). No association between HLA-B27 and spondylitis or HLA-DR4 with polyarticular involvement was observed. The HLA-B38 and Cw6 alleles are associated with a greater PsA susceptibility in Argentine population.

  11. Application of the GRAPPA psoriatic arthritis treatment recommendations in clinical practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mumtaz, Aizad

    2012-02-01

    Psoriatic disease presents with a complex array of clinical features, including peripheral synovitis and skin psoriasis, but there is also variable involvement of the nail, dactylitis, enthesitis, and spinal disease. Composite assessment of disease activity and response taking into account the impact of the disease as a whole on an individual\\'s health and quality of life is of vital importance. Following an extensive literature review, discussions, and consensus, the Group for Research in Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA) published guidelines to help clinicians make treatment decisions. The utility of these guidelines in routine clinical practice is further enhanced by incorporating them into a Composite Psoriatic Disease Activity Index (CPDAI). The potential application of the CPDAI in typical psoriatic disease patients is presented and discussed. Validation and possible modification of a composite disease activity and responder index is currently being undertaken by GRAPPA.

  12. International patient and physician consensus on a psoriatic arthritis core outcome set for clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orbai, Ana-Maria; de Wit, Maarten; Mease, Philip

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify a core set of domains (outcomes) to be measured in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) clinical trials that represent both patients' and physicians' priorities. METHODS: We conducted (1) a systematic literature review (SLR) of domains assessed in PsA; (2) international focus groups t...

  13. Assessment of enthesitis in patients with psoriatic arthritis using clinical examination and ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Salome; Christensen, Jeppe Hagstrup; Schmidt, Erik Berg

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Enthesitis is a major feature of psoriatic arthritis. However, clinical assessment of enthesitis is known to lack accuracy and have poor interobserver reliability. OBJECTIVE: To determine effect of training on clinical assessment of enthesitis and to compare ultrasonography with clini...

  14. Successful ustekinumab treatment of noninfectious uveitis and concomitant severe psoriatic arthritis and plaque psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugheddu, Cristina; Atzori, Laura; Del Piano, Maria; Lappi, Astrid; Pau, Monica; Murgia, Severino; Zucca, Ignazio; Rongioletti, Franco

    2017-09-01

    We report the first successful treatment of noninfectious uveitis with ustekinumab in a patient with severe concomitant psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis who failed to respond to conventional immune suppressants and with contraindications to tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Modification of a sonographic enthesitis score to differentiate between psoriatic arthritis and young healthy volunteers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wervers, K. (K.); M. Vis (M.); Rasappu, N. (N.); M. van der Ven (Myrthe); I. Tchetverikov (Ilja); Kok, M. (M.); A.H. Gerards (Andreas); J.M.W. Hazes (Mieke); J.J. Luime (Jolanda)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: We aimed to describe sonographic structural and inflammatory changes in entheses of patients with recently diagnosed psoriatic arthritis (PsA), patients with established PsA, and young healthy volunteers, and to investigate whether the MAdrid Sonographic Enthesitis Index

  16. Confirmation of TNIP1 and IL23A as susceptibility loci for psoriatic arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bowes, John

    2011-09-01

    To investigate a shared genetic aetiology for skin involvement in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) by genotyping single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), reported to be associated in genome-wide association studies of psoriasis, in patients with PsA.

  17. Value of Entheseal Ultrasonography and Serum Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein in the Preclinical Diagnosis of Psoriatic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moataz Mohammed Samy Elbeblawy

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the utility of entheseal ultrasonography and serum COMP in the preclinical diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis. Methods: 60 psoriatic patients were divided into: 30 patients with psoriasis (group I and 30 patients with psoriatic arthritis as control (group II. They underwent independent clinical and ultrasonographic examination of both lower limbs at the calcaneal insertions of Achilles tendons. Psoriatic arthritis disease activity and severity was assessed by modified DAS28 and Steinbrockers scores. Serum levels of COMP were measured for all patients by ELISA. Results: On clinical examination, no entheseal abnormalities were detected in group I while they were present in 23.3% of group II with statistically significant difference between them (P 0.05. Serum COMP were significantly elevated in group I and II with no statistically significant difference between them (mean ± SD 5.9 ± 3 and 6.8 ± 12 respectively, P > 0.05. Entheseal ultrasound was more specific (67% while serum COMP was more sensitive (87% in the preclinical diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis. Serum COMP levels were significantly correlated with CRP in both groups and with DAS28 and Steinbrockers scores in group II (P < 0.01. Conclusion: Entheseal ultrasonography and serum COMP levels may be used complementary to each other for preclinical diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis. Serum COMP seems to be promising prognostic marker for psoriatic arthritis patients.

  18. X-ray diagnosis of mutilating arthritis in patients with psoriatic arthritis Smirnov A.V.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Smirnov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The typical X-ray symptoms of psoriatic arthritis (PsA in joints of hands and distal sections of feet (asymmetric lesions; isolated lesion of distal interphalangeal joints (DIJ of hands with no changes in other small joints of hands; axial lesion of three joints in a single finger; transverse lesion of joints of the hand at the same level; destruction of distal phalanges; narrowing of the distal epiphysis of hand finger phalanges and metacarpal bones; cup-shaped deformity of the proximal portion of hand finger phalanges and narrowing of distal epiphysis; osseous ankyloses; multiple osteolytic lesions and destruction of bone epiphysis and joint deformities; inflammatory changes in the sacroiliac joints; and typical degenerative changes in the spine are described. It is especially important to know X-ray manifestations of PsA when there are no typical cutaneous manifestations of psoriasis. 

  19. Secukinumab in the Treatment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis: A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrouk, M; Gandy, J; Nakamura, M; Lee, K; Brodsky, M; Singh, R; Zhu, H; Farahnik, B; Bhutani, T; Koo, J

    2017-07-01

    While there are several commercially available treatment options for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, there remains a large number of individuals who are refractory to current modalities. In the recent past, there has been increasing evidence that interleukin (IL)-17 plays a vital role in the pathophysiology of psoriasis. Preclinical, phase II, and phase III studies of secukinumab (Cosentyx®) targeting IL-17 and its receptor have thus far proved to be promising. We reviewed the results of phase II and phase III clinical trials for secukinumab in the treatment of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Only published studies were considered in the present review. We also performed an English language literature search from January 2003 to September 2015 using PubMed with any of the following key words: (secukinumab OR AIN457) AND (psoriasis OR psoriatic arthritis). In our review of the literature, seven phase III and five phase II clinical trials, as well as open-label extension studies with unpublished findings were found. Results from phase III clinical trials indicated secukinumab to be efficacious and safe for the treatment of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis according to Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) and American College of Rheumatology (ACR) scores. The safety profile of this agent was similar across all studies, with the most frequently reported adverse events of nasopharyngitis, upper respiratory infections, headache, and injection site reaction. Secukinumab demonstrates rapid and robust clinical improvement accompanied by a favorable short- term safety profile. The results of the phase III trials continue to reinforce the theory that the IL-17 pathway is an essential target in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis treatment. Additional extension studies of lower level evidence are needed to further understand the safety profile of the drug.

  20. Occurrence of Psoriatic Arthritis during Interferon Beta 1a Treatment for Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éric Toussirot

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Interferon beta (IFN-β is the first line therapy of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. IFN-β is a cytokine that can contribute to the development of systemic autoimmune disease including psoriasis. The development or the exacerbation of psoriasis during IFN-β treatment has been previously observed. We report the occurrence of arthritis and dactylitis in a multiple sclerosis patient with preexisting psoriasis diagnosed as a psoriatic arthritis. The IL-23/Th17 pathway is involved in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis and it has been suggested that IFN-β therapy in patients with Th17-mediated disease may be detrimental. Together with previous similar reports, our case suggests that IFN-β should certainly be used with caution in patients with concomitant systemic autoimmune disease with IL-23/Th17 involvement.

  1. Sacroiliac joint pain as an important element of psoriatic arthritis diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk-Wasielewska, Agnieszka; Skorupska, Elżbieta; Samborski, Włodzimierz

    2013-04-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by the coexistence of arthritis with psoriasis of the skin and nails. The sacroiliac joints were observed in 34-78% of patients with psoriatic arthritis. Due to such a high prevalence of SIJ dysfunction, understanding pathophysiology of pain and the associated pain pattern becomes a very important aspect of PsA diagnosis. As far as the etiology of SI joint dysfunction is concerned, it has not been disambiguated yet. Among the main causative factors, injuries and strains of the structures surrounding the joint are noted. Joint pathology usually manifests itself by pain occurring within the area of the joint. The causes of pain may be divided into two categories: intra-articular and extra-articular. Pain caused by the SI joint may be nociceptive or neural in nature, whereas the pain pattern characteristic of the joint correlates with its innervation and is consistent with S2 dorsal rami.

  2. Genetic polymorphisms associated with psoriasis and development of psoriatic arthritis in patients with psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft, Nikolai Dyrberg; Skov, Lone; Rasmussen, Mads Kirchheiner

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Psoriasis (PsO) is a chronic inflammatory disease with predominantly cutaneous manifestations. Approximately one third of patients with PsO develop psoriatic arthritis (PsA), whereas the remaining proportion of patients has isolated cutaneous psoriasis (PsC). These two phenotypes share...... (rs6887695) was associated with PsO. CONCLUSION: Among a cohort of Danish patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis, two SNPs in the IL12B and TNF genes were associated with susceptibility of psoriasis. None of the SNPs were specifically associated with isolated cutaneous psoriasis or psoriatic...

  3. The Role of Smoking in the Development of Psoriatic Arthritis and Psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.Yu. Golovach

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper covers the new data on smoking effects on the development of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. It was found that smoking aggravates the severity of psoriasis, worsens the prognosis, and makes the smoking patients less sensitive to treatment. Pathogenic links indicate that smoke induces oxidative damage, promotes inflammatory chan­ges and increases the expression of genes associated with psoriasis. In addition, nicotine binds acetylcholine receptors on dendritic cells, macrophages, endothelial cells, and keratinocytes. This leads to inflammation and immune stimulation of Th1-cells and later severe leukocyte migration to skin due to the increased expression of intercellular adhesion molecule‑1 and vascular adhesion molecule‑1 on endothelial cells; to the increased angiogenesis and uncontrolled keratinocyte proli­feration as well. Information about the genetic predisposition to the development of arthritis and psoriasis, and the role of smoking in the modification of genetic factors is provi­ded. Smoking causes a specific metabolic and genetic psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis comorbidity, which determines the frequency of diseases flare, its severity and complications. Currently, physicians can prevent exacerbation of smoking-related di­seases such as psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis by persuading their patients to quit smoking.

  4. Challenges of biological therapy in patients with pustular psoriasis coexisting with psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Narbutt

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction . Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease affecting approximately 2–3% of the general population. It is a condition with immunological and genetic background, coexisting with psoriatic arthritis in about 25% of cases. Biologic drugs have brought a significant improvement in managing the disease, however they are not approved for the treatment of pustular psoriasis. An increasing number of reports indicate the efficacy of biological drugs in pustular psoriasis. In some patients there are factors responsible for a worse clinical response to biologic therapy. Objective . Presentation of therapeutic difficulties identified in a patient with pustular psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Case report . We report a case of a 48-year-old man with generalized pustular psoriasis coexisting with psoriatic arthritis in whom therapy with multiple biologic drugs (adalimumab, infliximab, golimumab, ustekinumab has failed to bring a satisfactory improvement. Conclusions . Further studies are needed to verify the efficacy and pos­sibly approve biological drugs for the treatment of pustular psoriasis. Also, attempts should be made to identify predictors of poorer response to treatment in order to individualize therapy and prevent the loss of efficacy of biologic drugs during prolonged use.

  5. Radiographic development during three decades in a patient with psoriatic arthritis mutilans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laasonen, Leena; Gudbjornsson, Björn; Ejstrup, Leif; Iversen, Lars; Ternowitz, Thomas; Ståhle, Mona; Lindqvist, Ulla

    2015-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis mutilans (PAM) is the most severe and rare form of psoriatic arthritis (PsA). We describe radiological development in a typical case of PAM covering three decades in order to elucidate the need for early diagnosis of PAM. Radiographs of hands and feet, taken from 1981 to 2010, were evaluated using the Psoriatic Arthritis Ratingen Score (PARS). When PsA was diagnosed, in 1981, gross deformity was observed in the second PIP joint of the left foot. Several pencil-in-cup deformities and gross osteolysis were present in the feet in the first decade of the disease. Over 10 years, many joints had reached maximum scores. During the follow-up, other joints became involved and the disease developed clinically. Reporting early signs suggestive of PAM, e.g. pencil-in cup deformities and gross osteolysis in any joint, should be mandatory and crucial. This would heighten our awareness of PAM, accelerate the diagnosis, and lead to improved effective treatment in order to minimize joint damages resulting in PAM

  6. Cardiovascular disease and risk factors in patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tobin, Anne-Marie

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) have an increased incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cardiovascular risk factors such as smoking, hypertension, and metabolic syndrome compared to the normal population. Patients with psoriasis and PsA may also have increased risk from nonconventional risk factors such as raised levels of homocysteine and excessive alcohol consumption. We conducted a comprehensive review of the literature on CVD and all cardiovascular risk factors in patients with psoriasis and PsA. METHODS: Data sources: All studies identified from a Medline (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov) search pertaining to CVD, individual risk factors in psoriasis, and PsA were included. Study selection: Studies included a healthy reference population, were published between 1975 and 2009, and were written in English. RESULTS: Our search yielded 14 studies that documented rates of CVD in patients with psoriasis and PsA compared to controls. Substantial evidence points to elevated risk of CVD in patients with psoriasis and PsA. CONCLUSION: It remains difficult to conclude if risk factors are caused by psoriasis or share a common pathogenesis. Physicians treating patients with psoriasis and PsA must be aware of all potential cardiovascular risk factors in their patients.

  7. MRI bone oedema scores are higher in the arthritis mutilans form of psoriatic arthritis and correlate with high radiographic scores for joint damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Yu M; Østergaard, Mikkel; Doyle, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to investigate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of bone disease in the arthritis mutilans (AM) form of psoriatic arthritis (PsA). METHODS: Twenty-eight patients with erosive PsA were enrolled (median disease duration of 14 years). Using x-rays ...

  8. Secukinumab, a human anti-interleukin-17A monoclonal antibody, in patients with psoriatic arthritis (FUTURE 2): a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McInnes, Iain B.; Mease, Philip J.; Kirkham, Bruce; Kavanaugh, Arthur; Ritchlin, Christopher T.; Rahman, Proton; van der Heijde, Désirée; Landewé, Robert; Conaghan, Philip G.; Gottlieb, Alice B.; Richards, Hanno; Pricop, Luminita; Ligozio, Gregory; Patekar, Manmath; Mpofu, Shephard; Bird, Paul; Hall, Stephen; Nash, Peter; Zochling, Jane; de Vlam, Kurt; Langenaken, Christine; Geusens, Piet; Beaulieu, Andre; Tremblay, Jean-Luc; McCarthy, Tim; Papp, Kim; Poulin, Yves; Cohen, Martin; Galatikova, Dagmar; Dokoupilova, Eva; Dvorak, Zdenek; Mann, Herman; Sieper, Joachim; Spieler, Wolfgang; Kurthen, Reiner; Braun, Juergen; Wollenhaupt, Juergen; Tony, Hans-Peter; Schuch, Florian; Schulze-Koops, Hendrik; Rech, Juergen; Leszczynski, Piotr; Adamski, Zygmunt; Szepietowski, Jacek; Tlustochowicz, Witold; Kaszuba, Andrzej; Szymanska, Malgorzata; Stanislav, Marina; Nesmeyanova, Olga; Vezikova, Natalia; Ershova, Olga; Izmozherova, Nadezda; Zotkin, Eugeny; Petrova, Marianna; Kastanayan, Alexander; Yakupova, Svetlana; Agafina, Alina; Asavatanabodee, Paijit; Suwannalai, Parawee; Kerrane, Jerome; Tahir, Hasan; McInnes, Iain; Edwards, Christopher; Chinoy, Hector; Marzo-Ortega, Helena; Kaul, Arvind; Sheeran, Thomas; Clunie, Gavin; Schechtman, Joy; Gaylis, Norman; Kaine, Jeffrey; Lawson, Jeffrey; El-Kadi, Hisham; Flint, Kathleen; Kivitz, Alan; Churchhill, Melvin; Sikes, David; Lowenstein, Mitchell; Halpert, Elias; Abdulky, Mary; Palmer, William; Codding, Christine; Legerton, Clarence; Singhal, Atul; Sunkureddi, Prashanth; Gough, William; Forman, Seth; Box, Jane; Khan, Mohamed; Barranco, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Background Interleukin 17A is a proinflammatory cytokine that is implicated in the pathogenesis of psoriatic arthritis. We assessed the efficacy and safety of subcutaneous secukinumab, a human anti-interleukin-17A monoclonal antibody, in patients with psoriatic arthritis. Methods In this phase 3,

  9. Clinical response, drug survival, and predictors thereof among 548 patients with psoriatic arthritis who switched tumor necrosis factor α inhibitor therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glintborg, Bente; Ostergaard, Mikkel; Krogh, Niels Steen

    2013-01-01

    To describe the frequency of treatment switching and outcomes among patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) who switched tumor necrosis factor α inhibitor (TNFi) agents in routine care.......To describe the frequency of treatment switching and outcomes among patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) who switched tumor necrosis factor α inhibitor (TNFi) agents in routine care....

  10. Perioperative Management of Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis: Case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... glucocorticoids, prophylactic antibiotics, and postoperative follow up, including patient education and rehabilitation. Case presentation: We report the case of a 32 year old lady on treatment for skin psoriasis and arthritis who presents with bilateral hip pain. Investigations reveal grade 2 avascular necrosis of femoral head

  11. Ultrasonography of the nail unit reveals quantitative and qualitative alterations in patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idolazzi, Luca; Gisondi, Paolo; Fassio, Angelo; Viapiana, Ombretta; Giollo, Alessandro; Rossini, Maurizio; Girolomoni, Giampiero; Gatti, Davide

    2018-05-02

    The nail unit is a matter of interest both for dermatologist and rheumatologist. The nail is considered one of the possible targets of assessment, especially when ultrasonography is performed. The aim of the study is to highlight peculiar features and alterations of the nail unit in patients affected by psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis versus healthy controls using ultrasonography. The study sample included 82 patients affected by psoriasis and/or psoriatic arthritis and 50 healthy controls. The patients were consecutively enrolled during their routine visit in the outpatient clinic and they performed clinical and ultrasonographic evaluation of the nail. The evaluationof disease activity was done using Disease Activity in Psoriatic Arthritis (DAPSA), Psoriasis Activity Severity Index (PASI), and Nail Psoriasi Severity Index (NAPSI). Multivariate analysis of variance was performed between groups. Post hoc analysis underlined the differences between healthy and affected regarding nail plate thickness (0.063±0.011 cm for patients with psoriasis, 0.065±0.014 cm for patients with psoriatic arthritis and 0.051±0.006 cm for healthy controls, p<0.05). Elementary lesions of nail plate and nail bed were compared using Pearson's chi square test between patients in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis groups, with no differences except for a trend for onycholisis and crumbling (p=0.07 and 0.06, respectively) in the psoriatic arthritis group. ROC curves were calculated (AUC = 0.68) obtaining also quantitative cut offs for nail plate andnail bed thickness in the affected vs healthy patients. Our study shows that ultrasonography may be a potential advantage in clinical practice. Our results strengthen the information already available in the literature and add quantitative parameters for ultrasonography of the nail.

  12. Reliability and Validity of the Turkish Adaptation of VITACORA-19 in Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tander, Berna; Ulus, Yasemin; Terzi, Yüksel; Zahiroğlu, Yeliz; Kesmen, Hakan; Farisoğullari, Bayram; Akyol, Yeşim; Bilgici, Ayhan; Kuru, Ömer

    2016-12-01

    This study aims to evaluate the reliability and validity of the Turkish language version of VITACORA-19 (psoriatic arthritis quality of life questionnaire) in patients with psoriatic arthritis. The Turkish version of VITACORA-19 questionnaire was obtained after a translation and back translation process. The study sample included 61 PsA patients (22 males, 39 females; mean age 46.5±12.2 years; range 19 to 71 years). To assess the test-retest reliability of the Turkish VITACORA-19, the questionnaire was reapplied 10 to 15 days after the first interview (interclass correlation coefficient). Cronbach's alpha (a) was used to evaluate the internal consistency. VITACORA-19 was compared with visual analog scale for physician and patient global assessments, the Health Assessment Questionnaire, and Nottingham Health Profile for construct validity. The internal structure of VITACORA-19 was examined by factor analysis. The individual item intraclass correlation coefficient ranged from 0.77 to 0.98 and Cronbach's alpha ranged from 0.77 to 0.98. The Cronbach's alpha value for whole scale was determined as 0.96. The Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin measure of sampling adequacy was 0.90, and Bartlett's test of sphericity had a p<0.001. Turkish VITACORA-19 total scores were correlated negatively with Health Assessment Questionnaire, visual analog scale for pain, and Nottingham Health Profile subgroups, and positively with physician and patient global assessments (p<0.01). Turkish version of VITACORA-19 questionnaire is a reliable and valid measure for health-related quality of life in Turkish patients with psoriatic arthritis.

  13. Cardiovascular and metabolic risks in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis: pragmatic clinical management based on available evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsson, Hanna; McInnes, Iain B; Sattar, Naveed

    2012-04-01

    Several studies suggest that patients with psoriasis and, in particular, psoriatic arthritis (PsA) are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease. These patients are also more likely to be obese and to have diabetes and fatty liver disease. This article discusses the association between psoriasis and PsA and cardiometabolic disorders, emphasising the need for better consideration of simple lifestyle interventions. It also highlights areas for future research and proposes a simple and pragmatic test portfolio to screen for cardiovascular risk and metabolic disorders in patients at higher risk.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging for diagnosing, monitoring and prognostication in psoriatic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poggenborg, René Panduro; Sørensen, Inge Juul; Pedersen, Susanne Juhl

    2015-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic systemic, inflammatory disease associated with skin psoriasis. PsA may be difficult to assess with clinical examination and blood tests because of its complex and multifaceted clinical presentation. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can visualise all peripheral...... and axial joints and entheses involved in PsA, and allow the rheumatologist to assess inflammation and structural damage in detail. In the present paper, we provide a brief overview of MRI to diagnose, monitor and prognosticate in PsA in clinical care....

  15. Radiographic changes in the condyle of the temporomandibular joint in psoriatic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenoenen, M.; Helsinki Univ.

    1987-01-01

    One hundred and ten patients with psoriatic arthritis (PA) and 100 matched control patients were examined by using orthopantomography to discover radiographic changes in the condyle of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). 31% of the PA patients and 13% of the control patients had radiographic changes in the condyle of the TMJ. The most common radiographic finding in PA patients was unilateral erosion of the condyle. Of the radiographic changes in the PA group, cortical erosions correlated negatively with age, whereas osteophytes correlated positively with the duration of PA. (orig.)

  16. Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis/Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Consensus-Based Recommendations and Research Agenda for Use of Composite Measures and Treatment Targets in Psoriatic Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coates, Laura C; FitzGerald, Oliver; Merola, Joseph F

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A meeting was convened by the Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA) and Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) to further the development of consensus among physicians and patients regarding composite disease activity measures and targets i...

  17. The efficacy and tolerability of leflunomide (Arava® in therapy for psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Vasilyevich Badokin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives data on differentiated disease-modifying anti-rheumatic therapy for psoriatic arthritis (PsA. When performing the therapy, account must be taken of the presence and magnitude of the major manifestations of this disease: the pattern of arthritis and spondylosis, the number of inflamed entheses, the number of swollen fingers or toes, the pattern of psoriasis in terms of its extent and stage, the presence and magnitude of systemic manifestations and the functional state of involved organs. There are data on the biological activity of leflunomide, its effect on the main manifestations of PsA with an analysis of its efficacy and tolerability, as well as the results of a comparative investigation of disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs used for the therapy of this disease.

  18. [Pharmaceutical care of patients with rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis receiving etanercept].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero Crespo, I; Antón Torres, R; Borrás Blasco, J; Navarro Ruiz, A

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate a pharmaceutical care protocol for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or psoriatic arthritis who begin treatment with etanercept with the objective of identifying potential medication-related problems and implementing therapeutic measures to improve the way this drug is used. An observational, prospective, 3-month study of patients with RA receiving etanercept therapy from March to December 2003 was conducted and a pharmaceutical care protocol was set up. During the first visit, a pharmacotherapeutic record was initiated for each patient, including socio-demographic data, personal history, diagnosis, DMARDs (disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs) previously received, and concomitant therapies for other underlying conditions. Patients were briefed on dosage, administration route, and potential adverse events both orally and in writing. Correct drug administration and preservation were verified during the second visit, where potential adverse effects were identified, treatment adherence was confirmed, and, if needed, potential drug interactions with other ongoing medications were disclosed. During the third visit, adherence was assessed, adverse events were recorded, and patients evaluated their response to treatment. Fifty patients were included, 40 with a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (80%) and 10 diagnosed with psoriatic arthritis (20%). In all, 72% had received previous treatment with methotrexate (MTX), 40% with leflunomide, 20% with infliximab, 56% with corticoids, 2% with analgesics, 56% with NSAIDs, and 30% with other DMARDs. No significant drug interactions were found. Regarding adherence to treatment, 7.7% of patients skipped one or more doses, with travelling being the most common reason. Adverse events reported included: injection site reaction (27%), headache (7.7%) and nausea (7.7%). At 3 months after treatment onset, a reduction of MTX doses was seen in 18% of patients, of leflunomide dosage in 8%, of corticoids in 18%, of

  19. Prevalence and clinical patterns of psoriatic arthritis in Indian patients with psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence and clinical patterns of psoriatic arthritis (PsA varies in different parts of the world and there is little clinical and epidemiological data from the Indian subcontinent. Aims: Our study was designed to evaluate the prevalence and clinical patterns of PsA in Indian patients. Methods: This was a non-interventional, cross-sectional study, in which 1149 consecutive psoriasis patients seen over 1 year were screened for PsA according to classification of psoriatic arthritis (CASPAR criteria. Demographic and disease parameters were recorded including Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI, Nail Psoriasis Severity Index (NAPSI, and number of swollen and tender joints. Results: Among 1149 patients with psoriasis, 100 (8.7% patients had PsA, of which 83% were newly diagnosed. The most common pattern was symmetrical polyarthritis (58%, followed by spondyloarthropathy 49%, asymmetric oligoarthritis (21%, isolated spondyloarthropathy (5%, predominant distal interphalangeal arthritis (3%, and arthritis mutilans (1%. Enthesitis and dactylitis were present in 67% and 26% of cases, respectively. The mean number of swollen and tender joints were 3.63 ± 3.59 (range, 0-22 and 7.76 ± 6.03 (range, 1-26, respectively. Nail changes were present in 87% of the cases. The median PASI and NAPSI of the subjects with PsA was 3.6 and 20, respectively. There was no significant correlation of number of swollen/tender joints with PASI or NAPSI. Conclusion: There is a relatively low prevalence of PsA among Indian psoriasis patients presenting to dermatologists. No correlation was found between the severity of skin and nail involvement and articular disease.

  20. Disease activity in and quality of life of patients with psoriatic arthritis mutilans: the Nordic PAM Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindqvist, U; Gudbjornsson, B; Iversen, L; Laasonen, L; Ejstrup, L; Ternowitz, T; Ståhle, M

    2017-11-01

    To describe the social status and health-related quality of life of patients with psoriatic arthritis mutilans (PAM) in the Nordic countries. Patients with at least one mutilated joint confirmed by radiology were studied. Disease activity involving joints and skin, physician-assessed disease activity, and patient's education and work status were recorded. Data from the 36-item Short Form Health Survey, Health Assessment Questionnaire and Dermatology Life Quality Index questionnaire were gathered and correlated with disease duration, pain, and general well-being (visual analogue scale). The controls were 58 Swedish patients with long-standing psoriatic arthritis sine PAM. Sixty-seven patients were included. Patients with PAM had a protracted disease history (33 ± 14 years) and disease onset at a relatively early age (30 ± 12 years). Overall inflammatory activity at inclusion was mild to moderate. The mean number of mutilated joints was 8.2 and gross deformity was found in 16% of patients. Forty per cent were treated with biological and 32% with conventional synthetic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs. Forty-two per cent had retired early or were on sick leave. Impaired functional capacity with little or no ability to perform self-care or everyday tasks was reported by 21% of the patients. Patients between 45 and 60 years of age reported the most impaired quality of life in comparison to the control group. PAM seriously affects social functioning. Whether early recognition of PAM and new forms of therapy can improve disease outcome and quality of life remains to be studied.

  1. Whole-body MR imaging in psoriatic arthritis: Additional value for therapeutic decision making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weckbach, Sabine; Schewe, Stefan; Michaely, Henrik J.; Steffinger, Denise; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Glaser, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In psoriatic arthritis (PsA) multiple locations may show inflammatory changes not always readily accessible to clinical exam. Often, clinical exam is inconclusive and the decision to initiate or adapt therapy is difficult. Whole body (WB)-MRI may help in this situation by providing a comprehensive overview of affected areas/joints. The purpose of this study was to make a proof of concept whether WB-MRI in psoriatic arthritis is feasible and can provide additional information compared to clinical examination alone with regard to therapeutic decision making in patients with PsA and inconclusive clinical situation. Materials and Methods: 30 patients with PsA and diffuse musculoskeletal pain were examined. A WB-MRI protocol was implemented on a 1.5 Tesla scanner using coronal and sagittal STIR- (TR: 5800, TE: 54, matrix 384 2 pixels, FOV 400 mm) and pre- and steady-state-post-Gadolinium-VIBE sequences (TR: 9.82, TE: 4.53, matrix 384 x 307 pixels, FOV: 400 mm). MRI was evaluated for image quality and inflammatory findings by two readers in consensus and compared to clinical exam. Results: The WB-MR-exam was well tolerated by all patients. Image quality was rated good to excellent in 26 of 30 patients (86.6%). WB-MRI detected significantly (p < 0.001) more areas of synovitis/enthesitis than clinical exam except for the hands and feet. MRI was able to detect unknown destructive bony changes in 10 patients (53%). In 22 patients (73.3%) the therapy regimen was modified, in 18 patients (62%) TNF-alpha-inhibitors were started. Conclusion: Whole-body MRI (WB-MRI) may be integrated in the diagnostic work-up of patients with psoriatic arthropathy facilitating individual adaptation of therapeutic strategy.

  2. Genetic polymorphisms associated with psoriasis and development of psoriatic arthritis in patients with psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loft, Nikolai Dyrberg; Skov, Lone; Rasmussen, Mads Kirchheiner; Gniadecki, Robert; Dam, Tomas Norman; Brandslund, Ivan; Hoffmann, Hans Jürgen; Andersen, Malene Rohr; Dessau, Ram Benny; Bergmann, Ann Christina; Andersen, Niels Møller; Abildtoft, Mikkel Kramme; Andersen, Paal Skytt; Hetland, Merete Lund; Glintborg, Bente; Bank, Steffen; Vogel, Ulla; Andersen, Vibeke

    2018-01-01

    Psoriasis (PsO) is a chronic inflammatory disease with predominantly cutaneous manifestations. Approximately one third of patients with PsO develop psoriatic arthritis (PsA), whereas the remaining proportion of patients has isolated cutaneous psoriasis (PsC). These two phenotypes share common immunology, but with different heredity that might in part be explained by genetic variables. Using a candidate gene approach, we studied 53 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 37 genes that regulate inflammation. In total, we assessed 480 patients with PsO from DERMBIO, of whom 151 had PsC for 10 years or more (PsC10), 459 patients with PsA from DANBIO, and 795 healthy controls. Using logistic regression analysis, crude and adjusted for age and gender, we assessed associations between genetic variants and PsO, PsC10, and PsA, as well as associations between genetic variants and development of PsA in PsO. Eleven polymorphisms in 10 genes were nominally associated with PsO and/or PsC and/or PsA (P psoriasis, two SNPs in the IL12B and TNF genes were associated with susceptibility of psoriasis. None of the SNPs were specifically associated with isolated cutaneous psoriasis or psoriatic arthritis.

  3. The prevalence of sacroilitis in psoriatic arthritis: new perspectives from a large, multicenter cohort. A Department of Veterans Affairs Cooperative Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battistone, M.J.; Clegg, D.O.; Manaster, B.J.; Reda, D.J.

    1999-01-01

    Objective. To determine the prevalence of radiographic evidence of sacroiliitis in a large population of patients with psoriatic arthritis. Patients and design. Patients were recruited from 15 clinical centers. This was part of a large, multicenter study of patients with an established diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis, or reactive arthritis. For this cohort, an established diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis was required, with cutaneous manifestations and involvement of at least three appendicular joints. At entry, patients were not selected for the presence of axial involvement. Radiographs - one anteroposterior view of the pelvis and one oblique view of each sacroiliac joint - were graded using the New York classification scale by a musculoskeletal radiologist masked to the specific diagnosis and clinical symptoms. Re-evaluation of 10% of the films 3 years later quantified intraobserver variability. Results. Two hundred and two patients with psoriatic arthritis were studied. Duration of the disease averaged 12 years; all patients had psoriasis and peripheral arthritis. The prevalence of radiographic evidence of sacroiliitis (grade 2 or higher) was 78%; 71% of these had grade 3 disease. Conclusions. Previously reported prevalence of sacroiliitis in patients with psoriatic arthritis ranges from 30% to 50%. The prevalence of radiographic evidence of sacroiliitis in this large multicenter cohort of patients with appendicular psoriatic arthritis was substantially higher. (orig.)

  4. The prevalence of sacroilitis in psoriatic arthritis: new perspectives from a large, multicenter cohort. A Department of Veterans Affairs Cooperative Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battistone, M.J.; Clegg, D.O. [Division of Rheumatology, University of Utah Medical Center, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)]|[Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Manaster, B.J. [Department of Radiology, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging, Medical College of Virginia/Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Reda, D.J. [Cooperative Studies Program Coordinating Center, VA Hospital, Hines, IL (United States)

    1999-04-01

    Objective. To determine the prevalence of radiographic evidence of sacroiliitis in a large population of patients with psoriatic arthritis. Patients and design. Patients were recruited from 15 clinical centers. This was part of a large, multicenter study of patients with an established diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis, or reactive arthritis. For this cohort, an established diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis was required, with cutaneous manifestations and involvement of at least three appendicular joints. At entry, patients were not selected for the presence of axial involvement. Radiographs - one anteroposterior view of the pelvis and one oblique view of each sacroiliac joint - were graded using the New York classification scale by a musculoskeletal radiologist masked to the specific diagnosis and clinical symptoms. Re-evaluation of 10% of the films 3 years later quantified intraobserver variability. Results. Two hundred and two patients with psoriatic arthritis were studied. Duration of the disease averaged 12 years; all patients had psoriasis and peripheral arthritis. The prevalence of radiographic evidence of sacroiliitis (grade 2 or higher) was 78%; 71% of these had grade 3 disease. Conclusions. Previously reported prevalence of sacroiliitis in patients with psoriatic arthritis ranges from 30% to 50%. The prevalence of radiographic evidence of sacroiliitis in this large multicenter cohort of patients with appendicular psoriatic arthritis was substantially higher. (orig.) With 3 figs., 4 tabs., 29 refs.

  5. Treating rheumatoid arthritis to target

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smolen, Josef S; Breedveld, Ferdinand C; Burmester, Gerd R

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Reaching the therapeutic target of remission or low-disease activity has improved outcomes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) significantly. The treat-to-target recommendations, formulated in 2010, have provided a basis for implementation of a strategic approach towards this t...

  6. Psoriatic Arthritis Quality of Life questionnaire: translation, cultural adaptation and validation into Portuguese language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcelos, Anabela; Ambrósio, Catarina; Pereira da Silva, J A; McKenna, Stephen; Wilburn, Jeanette; Lopes Ferreira, Pedro

    2018-02-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) has a strong negative impact on the quality of life of patients. The Psoriatic Arthritis Quality of Life (PsAQoL) questionnaire is a disease-specific instrument developed to measure the quality of life in patients with PsA. The aims of this study were to culturally adapt the questionnaire for Portugal and evaluate its reliability and validity in patients with PsA. The original UK English version of the PsAQoL was translated into Portuguese by a bilingual and lay panel. Structured cognitive debriefing interviews were conducted with ten PsA patients. The Portuguese PsAQoL was subsequently applied to PsA patients followed at the Rheumatology Department of Centro Hospitalar do Baixo Vouga, E.P.E. To assess reproducibility, 30 patients with PsA completed the Portuguese PsAQoL on two occasions, 2 weeks apart. A larger sample was recruited to determine internal consistency and construct validity. The Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) was used as a comparator instrument. Translation and adaptation were successful. Cronbach´s alpha for the Portuguese version of the PsAQoL was 0.91 and the test-retest reliability was 0.93. The PsAQoL could distinguish between groups of patients defined by self-reported general health status, self-reported severity of PsA and flare of arthritis. There was a positive correlation between the total score of the PsAQoL and each of the sections of the NHP. The Portuguese version of the PsAQoL was found to be relevant, understandable and easy to complete, reliable and valid.

  7. Prologue: 2017 Annual Meeting of the Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helliwell, Philip S; Gladman, Dafna D; Gottlieb, Alice B

    2018-06-01

    The 2017 Annual Meeting of the Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA) was held in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, and was attended by rheumatologists, dermatologists, representatives of biopharmaceutical companies, and patients. As in previous years, GRAPPA members held a symposium for trainees to discuss their research in psoriatic disease with experts in the field. Other subjects featured during the annual meeting included a discussion of the history, clinical features, controversies, and immunogenetics of juvenile psoriatic arthritis; updates from working groups in Outcome Measures in Rheumatology and International Dermatology Outcome Measures; a discussion of the benefits and challenges of setting up a longitudinal psoriatic arthritis (PsA) database; 3 separate discussions of the effects of the microbiome on skin and joints in psoriasis and PsA; a discussion of options for assessing joints and entheses in PsA by ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging; an update on GRAPPA's research and educational projects; a discussion of patient centricity, including the incorporation of patient research partners (PRP) into psoriasis and PsA research and educational efforts, from GRAPPA's PRP; and a discussion of the GRAPPA-Collaborative Research Network's inaugural meeting. In this prologue, we introduce the papers that summarize that meeting.

  8. Tofacitinib for Psoriatic Arthritis in Patients with an Inadequate Response to TNF Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladman, Dafna; Rigby, William; Azevedo, Valderilio F; Behrens, Frank; Blanco, Ricardo; Kaszuba, Andrzej; Kudlacz, Elizabeth; Wang, Cunshan; Menon, Sujatha; Hendrikx, Thijs; Kanik, Keith S

    2017-10-19

    Tofacitinib is an oral Janus kinase inhibitor that is under investigation for the treatment of psoriatic arthritis. We evaluated tofacitinib in patients with active psoriatic arthritis who had previously had an inadequate response to tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors. In this 6-month randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, phase 3 trial, we randomly assigned 395 patients, in a 2:2:1:1 ratio, to four regimens: 5 mg of tofacitinib administered orally twice daily (132 patients); 10 mg of tofacitinib twice daily (132 patients); placebo, with a switch to 5 mg of tofacitinib twice daily at 3 months (66 patients); or placebo, with a switch to 10 mg of tofacitinib twice daily at 3 months (65 patients). Data from the patients who received placebo during the first 3 months of the trial were pooled. The primary end points were the percentage of patients who had at least 20% improvement according to the criteria of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR20 response) and the change from baseline score on the Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index (HAQ-DI; scores range from 0 to 3, with higher scores indicating greater disability) at the month 3 analysis. At 3 months, the rates of ACR20 response were 50% with the 5-mg dose of tofacitinib and 47% with the 10-mg dose, as compared with 24% with placebo (Ptofacitinib continuously and in 6% who received the 10-mg dose continuously. Over the course of 6 months, there were four serious infections, three herpes zoster infections, one myocardial infarction, and one ischemic stroke among the patients who received tofacitinib continuously. Elevations of aspartate and alanine aminotransferase concentrations of three or more times the upper limit of the normal range occurred in more patients who received tofacitinib continuously than in patients who received placebo followed by tofacitinib. In this trial involving patients with active psoriatic arthritis who had had an inadequate response to TNF inhibitors, tofacitinib

  9. The relationship between vitamin D, vertebral deformity and quality of life in psoriatic arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bedriye Baskan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study is to investigate the relation between vitamin D levels, vertebral deformities, functional status, quality of life, acute phase reactants and enthesopathy in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA. Patients and Methods: Fifty-two patients with PsA and 52 controls were enrolled to the study. Routine blood tests and serums 25-(OHD3 were measured. The thoracic and lumbar vertebrae deformities identified in the radiographies were evaluated by a radiologist. Psoriatic Arthritis Quality of Life (PSAQoL was used for evaluating quality of life and disease activity parameters for PsA were assessed. In PsA patients, correlations was performed between the 25(OH-D3 levels and PGE (patient global assessment, PHGE (Physician global assessment, tender JC (joint count, HAQ-S (Health Assessment Questionnaire for the Spondyloarthropathies, PSAQoL, MASES (Maastricht Ankylosing Spondylitis Enthesitis Score and BASDAI(Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index values. Results: The results showed that 25(OH-D3 levels was not correlated with these values. (p>0.05 for r = -0.171, r = -0.167, r=-0.069, r=-0.236, r=-0.062, r= -0.058 and r = -0.106 respectively. It was determined that the PSAQoL score had a positive and statistically significant correlation with the DGD, swollen JC, CRP, HGD, tender JC, VAS-pain, HAQ-S, MASES and BASDAI values in PsA patients. (p>0.05 for r=0.291, r=0.324, r=0.346, r=0.312; and p=0.001 for r=0.472, r=0.380, r=0.565, r=0.696, r=0.359, r=0.633, respectively Statistical analyses demonstrated that PsA patients with vertebral deformities had higher numbers of tender joints, more prolonged periods of morning stiffness, higher DAS28-ESR (Disease Activity Score scores, and higher levels of vitamin D (p<0.05, p<0.05, p=0.05 and p<0.05, respectively. The multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that the only factor which had an effect on the development of vertebral deformities was the use of steroids

  10. Profile of certolizumab and its potential in the treatment of psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chimenti MS

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Maria Sole Chimenti,1 Rosita Saraceno,2 Andrea Chiricozzi,2,3 Alessandro Giunta,2 Sergio Chimenti,2 Roberto Perricone11Unit of Rheumatology, Allergology, and Clinical Immunology, 2Unit of Dermatology, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy; 3Laboratory for Investigative Dermatology, Rockefeller University, New York, NY, USAAbstract: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA is a chronic inflammatory arthropathy associated with psoriasis (PsO. PsA could be considered an enthesal disease because of the link between mechanical stress (entheses and immunologically active tissue (synovium. Evidence of efficacy of anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α is supported by reduction of histological vascularity and immune cell infiltrates in synovial tissue after treatment. Certolizumab pegol (CZP is a polyethylene glycolylated (PEGylated Fab′ fragment of a humanized monoclonal antibody that binds and neutralizes human TNF-α. The PEG moiety of the Fab fragment, markedly increases the half-life of CZP and confers to the drug a unique structure that differs from the other anti-TNF-α agents tested for the treatment of Crohn’s disease, rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, axial spondyloarthritis, nonradiographic spondyloarthritis, PsO, and PsA. In contrast to other anti-TNF-α agents, CZP did not mediate increased levels of apoptosis, suggesting that these mechanisms are not essential for the anti-TNF-α efficacy in Crohn’s disease. As CZP, infliximab, and adalimumab, but not etanercept, almost completely inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced interleukin-1 beta release from monocytes, this cytokine-production inhibition may be relevant for drug efficacy. Due to these characteristics, it has been demonstrated in clinical studies that CZP effectively improves signs and symptoms of arthritis and physical function and skin manifestations of PsO, with a safety profile similar to rheumatoid arthritis. This drug can be considered as a valid treatment in patients

  11. The OMERACT Psoriatic Arthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score (PsAMRIS) is reliable and sensitive to change: results from an OMERACT workshop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøyesen, Pernille; McQueen, Fiona M; Gandjbakhch, Frédérique

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this multireader exercise was to assess the reliability and sensitivity to change of the psoriatic arthritis magnetic resonance imaging score (PsAMRIS) in PsA patients followed for 1 year.......The aim of this multireader exercise was to assess the reliability and sensitivity to change of the psoriatic arthritis magnetic resonance imaging score (PsAMRIS) in PsA patients followed for 1 year....

  12. Development of a preliminary composite disease activity index in psoriatic arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mumtaz, Aizad

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVES: To develop a preliminary composite psoriatic disease activity index (CPDAI) for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. METHODS: Five domains were assessed and specific instruments were employed for each domain to determine the extent of domain involvement and the effect of that involvement on quality of life\\/function. Disease activity for each domain was then graded from 0 to 3 giving a CPDAI range of 0-15. Patient and physician global disease activity measures were also recorded and an independent physician was asked to indicate if treatment change was required. Bivariate correlation analysis was performed. Factor, tree analysis and standardised response means were also calculated. RESULTS: Significant correlation was seen between CPDAI and both patient (r = 0.834) and physician (r = 0.825) global disease activity assessments (p = 0.01). Tree analysis revealed that 96.3% of patients had their treatment changed when CPDAI values were greater than 6; no patient had their treatment changed when CPDAI values were less than 5. CONCLUSION: CPDAI correlates well with patient and physician global disease activity assessments and is an effective tool that clearly distinguishes those who require a treatment change from those who do not.

  13. Cost-effectiveness analysis of secukinumab for the treatment of active psoriatic arthritis: a Canadian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goeree, Ron; Chiva-Razavi, Sima; Gunda, Praveen; Graham, Christopher N; Miles, LaStella; Nikoglou, Efthalia; Jugl, Steffen M; Gladman, Dafna D

    2018-02-01

    The study evaluates the cost-effectiveness of secukinumab, a fully human monoclonal antibody that selectively neutralizes interleukin (IL)-17A, vs currently licensed biologic treatments in patients with active psoriatic arthritis (PsA) from a Canadian healthcare system perspective. A decision analytic semi-Markov model evaluated the cost-effectiveness of secukinumab 150 mg and 300 mg compared to subcutaneous biologics adalimumab, certolizumab pegol, etanercept, golimumab, and ustekinumab, and intravenous biologics infliximab and infliximab biosimilar in biologic-naive and biologic-experienced patients over a lifetime horizon. The response to treatments was evaluated after 12 weeks by PsA Response Criteria (PsARC) response rates. Non-responders or patients discontinuing initial-line of biologic treatment were allowed to switch to subsequent-line biologics. Model input parameters (Psoriasis Area Severity Index [PASI], Health Assessment Questionnaire [HAQ], withdrawal rates, costs, and resource use) were collected from clinical trials, published literature, and other Canadian sources. Benefits were expressed as quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). An annual discount rate of 5% was applied to costs and benefits. The robustness of the study findings were evaluated via sensitivity analyses. Biologic-naive patients treated with secukinumab achieved the highest number of QALYs (8.54) at the lowest cost (CAD 925,387) over a lifetime horizon vs all comparators. Secukinumab dominated all treatments, except for infliximab and its biosimilar, which achieved minimally more QALYs (8.58). However, infliximab and its biosimilar incurred more costs than secukinumab (infliximab: CAD 1,015,437; infliximab biosimilar: CAD 941,004), resulting in higher cost-effectiveness estimates relative to secukinumab. In the biologic-experienced population, secukinumab dominated all treatments as it generated more QALYs (8.89) at lower costs (CAD 954,692). Deterministic sensitivity analyses

  14. Diagnostic imaging of psoriatic arthritis. Part I: etiopathogenesis, classifications and radiographic features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Sudoł-Szopińska

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Psoriatic arthritis is one of the spondyloarthritis. It is a disease of clinical heterogenicity, which may affect peripheral joints, as well as axial spine, with presence of inflammatory lesions in soft tissue, in a form of dactylitis and enthesopathy. Plain radiography remains the basic imaging modality for PsA diagnosis, although early inflammatory changes affecting soft tissue and bone marrow cannot be detected with its use, or the image is indistinctive. Typical radiographic features of PsA occur in an advanced disease, mainly within the synovial joints, but also in fibrocartilaginous joints, such as sacroiliac joints, and additionally in entheses of tendons and ligaments. Moll and Wright classified PsA into 5 subtypes: asymmetric oligoarthritis, symmetric polyarthritis, arthritis mutilans, distal interphalangeal arthritis of the hands and feet and spinal column involvement. In this part of the paper we discuss radiographic features of the disease. The next one will address magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography.

  15. Comparison of three radiographic methods in screening of temporomandibular joint involvement in patients with psoriatic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenoenen, M.; Kilpinen, E.

    1990-01-01

    Fifty-three randomly selected subjects with psoriatic arthritis (PA) were examined radiographically by means of orthopantomography, transcranial radiography, and transmaxillary radiography. Two examiners graded the radiographic signs of flattening, osteophytes, erosion, and sclerosis. The findings obtained were then compared to determine the best technique for screening of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) bone changes. Together the techniques showed definite (24%) and possible (6%) changes, suggesting TMJ involvement in 31 of 106 joints. In all projections, radiographic signs suggesting TMJ involvement were most frequent in the condyle. Erosion in the condyle was the most frequent finding. Agreement with regard to definite changes in the condyle was found in only one-third to half of the cases. It is concluded that in radiography of the TMJ in subjects with PA, a combination of radiographic techniques should be used to obtain maximum information. However, orthopantomography is well suited for screening of TMJ involvement in subjects with PA. 30 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  16. On the heritability of psoriatic arthritis. Disease concordance among monozygotic and dizygotic twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ole Birger; Svendsen, Anders Jørgen; Ejstrup, Leif

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In a nationwide unselected twin population to estimate the relative importance of genetic and environmental effectors in the etiopathogenesis of psoriatic arthritis (PsA). METHODS: The study comprised three Danish nationwide twin cohorts. In 1994 and 2002 a total of 37,388 and 46......,418 Danish twin individuals respectively were asked by questionnaire if they had PsA. Twins reporting PsA were invited to participate in a clinical examination. Patients were classified according to the Moll and Wright (M&W) and the CASPAR criteria. Heritability was estimated by probandwise concordance rates...... and variance component analysis. RESULTS: 228 twin individuals reported PsA. Following diagnostic validation in 184 (81%), 50 probands were diagnosed with PsA according to the M&W criteria. Five of their co-twins were either dead, had emigrated, or did not participate in the twin study and nine did not respond...

  17. Societal costs and patients' experience of health inequities before and after diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Lars Erik; Jørgensen, Tanja S.; Christensen, Robin

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To comprehensively study the comorbidities, healthcare and public transfer (allowance) costs in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) before and after diagnosis. Methods Nationwide cohort study, using data from Danish registries from January 1998 through December 2014. A total of 10â...... 525 patients with PsA and 20â 777 matched general population comparator (GPC) subjects were included. Societal costs, employment status and occurrence of comorbidities in patients with PsA both before and after diagnosis were compared with GPC subjects. Results At baseline, patients with PsA had...... significantly more comorbidities, including cardiovascular disease (OR 1. 70 95% CI 1. 55 to 1. 86), respiratory diseases (OR 1. 73 95% CI 1. 54 to 1. 96) and infectious diseases (OR 2. 03 95% CI 1. 69 to 2. 42) compared with GPC subjects. At all time points, patients with PsA had higher total healthcare...

  18. Evidence to support IL-13 as a risk locus for psoriatic arthritis but not psoriasis vulgaris.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bowes, John

    2011-06-01

    There is great interest in the identification of genetic factors that differentiate psoriatic arthritis (PsA) from psoriasis vulgaris (PsV), as such discoveries could lead to the identification of distinct underlying aetiological pathways. Recent studies identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the interleukin 13 (IL-13) gene region as risk factors for PsV. Further investigations in one of these studies found the effect to be primarily restricted to PsA, thus suggesting the discovery of a specific genetic risk factor for PsA. Given this intriguing evidence, association to this gene was investigated in large collections of PsA and PsV patients and healthy controls.

  19. A systematic review of measurement properties of patient reported outcome measures in psoriatic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højgaard, Pil; Klokker, Louise; Orbai, Ana Maria

    2018-01-01

    Background: An updated psoriatic arthritis (PsA) core outcome set (COS) for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was endorsed at the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) meeting in 2016. Objectives: To synthesize the evidence on measurement properties of patient reported outcome measures...... (PROMs) for PsA and thereby contribute to development of a PsA core outcome measurement set (COMS) as described by the OMERACT Filter 2.0. Methods: A systematic literature search was performed in EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO on Jan 1, 2017 to identify full-text articles with an aim of assessing...... the measurement properties of PROMs in PsA. Two independent reviewers rated the quality of studies using the COnsensus based standards for the Selection of health Measurement INstruments (COSMIN) checklist, and performed a qualitative evidence synthesis. Results: Fifty-five studies were included in the systematic...

  20. Administration of phospholipide hepatoprotective drug Phosphogliv in patients with psoriatic arthritis (preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Korotaeva

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering membrane-reparative properties of a new phospholipid hepatoprotector Phosphogliv (FG its therapeutic efficacy was assessed in 9 pts with psoriatic arthritis (PA accompanied by prominent disturbances of blood rheology. FG was given 0,6 g a day during 3 months. Significant decrease of erythrocyte aggregation resulting in increase of erythrocyte aggregation formation time and diminishment of their hydrodynamic resistance without changes of whole blood general caisson viscosity was achieved. Significant improvement of Richie index, tender joint count and pt assessment was noted. The results prove availability of PG administration in PA therapy and possibility of enlargement PG application area owing to membrane-reparative properties of contained in it polyunsaturated phosphatidilcholin in combination with immunomodulating and anti-inflammatory action of glycyrrhizinic acid.

  1. Nail findings in patients with psoriatic arthritis: A cross-sectional study with special reference to transverse grooves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenke, Yukari; Ohara, Yuri; Kobayashi, Daiki; Arai, Satoru; Kishimoto, Mitsumasa; Okada, Masato; Eto, Hikaru

    2017-11-01

    Patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) commonly present with nail manifestations; however, little is known about these manifestations. This study investigated whether nail findings can be used to discriminate between PsA and psoriasis without arthritis. We performed a retrospective analysis of 118 patients with PsA and 974 patients with psoriasis without arthritis who visited St. Luke's International Hospital (Tokyo, Japan) between July 2003 and February 2015. Patients with PsA were classified according to the Classification of Psoriatic Arthritis criteria. Skin lesion severity was assessed by using the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index, and 9 types of nail findings were investigated. The incidence of nail involvement in patients with PsA was 67.6%. Female sex, presence of transverse grooves, onycholysis, and splinter hemorrhages were significantly related to PsA, with transverse grooves demonstrating the strongest association (odds ratio, 5.01; 95% confidence interval, 2.31-10.8; P transverse grooves was strongly related to both distal interphalangeal arthritis and enthesitis. The PsA population was relatively small. Nail findings enabled us to distinguish patients with PsA from those without arthritis. The presence of transverse grooves is significantly associated with PsA and may be associated with distal interphalangeal arthritis and enthesitis. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Ultrasound imaging for the rheumatologist. XXXII. Sonographic assessment of the foot in patients with psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delle Sedie, A; Riente, L; Filippucci, E; Scirè, C A; Iagnocco, A; Meenagh, G; Gutierrez, M; Valesini, G; Montecucco, C; Grassi, W; Bombardieri, S

    2011-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an arthropathy associated with psoriasis, which is part of the spondyloarthropathy family, and which may present with various forms, from mono-oligoarthritis to symmetric polyarthritis mimicking rheumatoid arthritis. In longstanding disease, the symmetric polyarthritis is the most common pattern of PsA, involving the small joints of hands, feet (the involvement of which seems to be very common, ranging from 50 to 100% of patients), wrists, ankles and knees. Other common features are represented by the inflammation of enthesis and tendons. Its exact prevalence, in Italy, should be about 30% in psoriatic subjects or 0.42% when considering the general population. The aims of our study were to investigate, by US examination, the prevalence and the features of foot involvement in PsA and to describe their correlations with clinical findings. Ultrasound (US) examinations were performed using a Logiq 9 (General Electric Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI) equipped with a multifrequency linear probe, working at 14 MHz. One hundred and eighty feet were investigated in a total of 101 patients. Prior to US assessment, all patients underwent a clinical examination by an expert rheumatologist who recorded the presence/absence of pain, tenderness (detected by palpation and/or active or passive mobilisation of the feet) and swelling. US finding indicative of metatarsophalangeal joint inflammation were obtained in 77 (76.2%) patients, while only 34 (33.7%) patients were positive to the clinical examination. This study demonstrates that US detected a higher number of inflamed joints with respect to clinical assessment in PsA patients.

  3. Psoriatic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this research; and the dissemination of information on research progress in these diseases. Contact Us NIAMS Archive Viewers and Players Social Media Moderation Policy FOIA Privacy Statement Accessibility Disclaimer Digital Strategy ...

  4. Psoriatic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... OII) Timed Up & Go (TUG) Western Ontario & McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) Young Investigators Resources for Doctoral Students/Post-Doctoral Fellows Evidence-Based Practice for Academic Researchers Responsible Data Management in Research Career Planning Treatments Patient ...

  5. High 3-year golimumab survival in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis: real world data from 328 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Konstantinos; Flouri, Irini; Repa, Argiro; Fragiadaki, Kalliopi; Sfikakis, Petros P; Koutsianas, Christos; Kaltsonoudis, Evripidis; Voulgari, Paraskevi V; Drosos, Alexandros A; Petrikkou, Evangelia; Sidiropoulos, Prodromos; Vassilopoulos, Dimitrios

    2018-01-01

    Our primary objective was to study the long-term survival on drug (SOD) of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) treated with golimumab (GLM) in real life settings. This was a retrospective, observational study of all patients treated with GLM in 4 Academic Centres in Greece during a 4-year period (09/2010-06/2014). SOD was analysed using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, while Cox regression analysis estimating hazard ratios (HRs) for different baseline variables associated with drug discontinuation was performed for each disease. 328 patients (RA: 166, PsA: 82, AS: 80) were included. The estimated SOD at 2 and 3 years was 68% and 62% overall and was better for AS (79% and 76%) compared to RA (69% and 60%, p=0.067) and PsA (58% and 53%, p=0.001) patients; no difference was noted between RA and PsA patients (p=0.204). There was no difference in SOD between biologic-naïve and experienced nor between non-biologic co-treated or GLM monotherapy treated patients. Seropositivity (rheumatoid factor and/or anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies) was associated with a lower risk for GLM discontinuation by multivariate analysis (HR=0.5, 95% CI=0.0.25-1.1, p=0.05) in RA patients. During 606 patient-years of follow-up, 11 (3.3%) patients discontinued GLM due to adverse events (AE), accounting for 11% of treatment discontinuations. The rates of serious AEs and serious infections were 2.3 and 1.0/100-patient-years, respectively. In this real-life study, GLM showed a high 3-year SOD in patients with inflammatory arthritides with a low rate of discontinuation due to AEs.

  6. Treating rheumatoid arthritis to target

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smolen, Josef S; Aletaha, Daniel; Bijlsma, Johannes W J

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Aiming at therapeutic targets has reduced the risk of organ failure in many diseases such as diabetes or hypertension. Such targets have not been defined for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). OBJECTIVE: /st> To develop recommendations for achieving optimal therapeutic outcomes in RA. METHODS....... Levels of evidence, strength of recommendations and levels of agreement were derived. RESULTS: The treat-to-target activity resulted in 10 recommendations. The treatment aim was defined as remission with low disease activity being an alternative goal in patients with long-standing disease. Regular follow...

  7. A Phase III, Randomized, Controlled Trial of Apremilast in Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis: Results of the PALACE 2 Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutolo, Maurizio; Myerson, Gary E; Fleischmann, Roy M; Lioté, Frédéric; Díaz-González, Federico; Van den Bosch, Filip; Marzo-Ortega, Helena; Feist, Eugen; Shah, Kamal; Hu, ChiaChi; Stevens, Randall M; Poder, Airi

    2016-09-01

    Apremilast, an oral phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor, downregulates intracellular inflammatory mediator synthesis by elevating cyclic adenosine monophosphate levels. The PALACE 2 trial evaluated apremilast efficacy and safety in patients with active psoriatic arthritis (PsA) despite prior conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and/or biologic therapy. Eligible patients were randomized (1:1:1) to placebo, apremilast 20 mg BID, or apremilast 30 mg BID. At Week 16, patients with swollen and tender joint count improvement 20% improvement in American College of Rheumatology response criteria (ACR20) at Week 16. In the intent-to-treat population (N = 484), ACR20 at Week 16 was achieved by more patients receiving apremilast 20 mg BID [37.4% (p = 0.0002)] and 30 mg BID [32.1% (p = 0.0060)] versus placebo (18.9%). Clinically meaningful improvements in signs and symptoms of PsA, physical function, and psoriasis were observed with apremilast through Week 52. The most common adverse events were diarrhea, nausea, headache, and upper respiratory tract infection. Diarrhea and nausea generally occurred early and usually resolved spontaneously with continued treatment. Laboratory abnormalities were infrequent and transient. Apremilast demonstrated clinical improvements in PsA for up to 52 weeks, including signs and symptoms, physical function, and psoriasis. No new safety signals were observed. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01212757.

  8. Calprotectin and TNF trough serum levels identify power Doppler ultrasound synovitis in rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis patients in remission or with low disease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inciarte-Mundo, José; Ramirez, Julio; Hernández, Maria Victoria; Ruiz-Esquide, Virginia; Cuervo, Andrea; Cabrera-Villalba, Sonia Raquel; Pascal, Mariona; Yagüe, Jordi; Cañete, Juan D; Sanmarti, Raimon

    2016-07-08

    Serum levels of calprotectin, a major S100 leucocyte protein, are associated with disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) patients. Higher drug trough serum levels are associated with good response in patients treated with tumour necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFi). Power Doppler ultrasound (PDUS) synovitis is predictive of flare and progression of structural damage in patients in clinical remission. The purpose of this study was to analyse the accuracy of calprotectin and TNFi trough serum levels in detecting PDUS synovitis in RA and PsA patients in clinical remission or with low disease activity who were receiving TNFi. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 92 patients (42 with RA, 50 with PsA) receiving adalimumab (ADA), etanercept (ETN) or infliximab who were in remission or had low disease activity (28-joint Disease Activity Score based on erythrocyte sedimentation rate ultrasound scores (all r coefficients >0.50 in RA). Calprotectin correlated with the PDUS synovitis score in patients treated with ADA and ETN. Using PDUS synovitis (yes or no) as the reference variable, calprotectin had an AUC of 0.826. The best cut-off was ≥1.66 μg/ml, with a likelihood ratio of 2.77. C-reactive protein (AUC 0.673) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (AUC 0.731) had a lower discriminatory capacity. TNFi trough serum levels were significantly associated with PDUS synovitis (OR 0.67, 95 % CI 0.52-0.85, p < 0.001) but their accuracy (AUC <0.5) was less than that of calprotectin. TNFi trough serum levels were inversely correlated with calprotectin and PDUS synovitis in RA and PsA patients receiving ADA and ETN. Calprotectin and TNFi trough serum levels may help identify PDUS synovitis in RA and PsA patients in clinical remission or with low disease activity.

  9. Risk of Incident Liver Disease in Patients with Psoriasis, Psoriatic Arthritis, and Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogdie, Alexis; Grewal, Sungat K; Noe, Megan H; Shin, Daniel B; Takeshita, Junko; Chiesa Fuxench, Zelma C; Carr, Rotonya M; Gelfand, Joel M

    2018-04-01

    Relatively little is known about the risk for incident liver disease in psoriasis (PsO), psoriatic arthritis (PsA), and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We performed a cohort study among patients with PsO, PsA, or RA and matched controls in The Health Improvement Network from 1994 to 2014. Outcomes of interest were any liver disease, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and cirrhosis (any etiology). Among patients with PsO (N = 197,130), PsA (N = 12,308), RA (N = 54,251), and matched controls (N = 1,279,754), the adjusted hazard ratios for any liver disease were elevated among patients with PsO (without systemic therapy [ST] 1.37; with ST 1.97), PsA (without ST 1.38; with ST 1.67), and RA without an ST (1.49) but not elevated in patients with RA prescribed an ST (0.96). Incident nonalcoholic fatty liver disease was highest in patients with PsO prescribed an ST (2.23) and PsA with an ST (2.11). The risk of cirrhosis was highest among patients with PsO with an ST (2.62) and PsA without an ST (3.15). Additionally, the prevalence of liver disease and cirrhosis increased in a stepwise fashion with increasing body surface area affected by PsO (P for trend <0.001). More so than RA, PsO and PsA are associated with liver disease, particularly nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and cirrhosis, and this was true even among patients without ST exposure. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Assessing physician and patient acceptance of infliximab biosimilars in rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondyloarthritis and psoriatic arthritis across Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waller J

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available John Waller,1 Emma Sullivan,1 James Piercy,1 Christopher M Black,2 Sumesh Kachroo2 1Adelphi Real World, Manchester, UK; 2Center for Observational and Real-World Evidence (CORE, Merck & Co., Inc., Kenilworth, NJ, USA Objectives: We examined rheumatologists’ motivation for prescribing biosimilars, assessed their treatment preferences in relation to prescribing behavior and explored patient attitudes to biosimilars. Methods: Data were taken from the Adelphi Real World Biosimilars Programme, a real-world, cross-sectional study undertaken with German rheumatologists and patients with rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondyloarthritis or psoriatic arthritis in 2015–2016. Rheumatologists provided data on their prescribing behavior and attitudes toward biosimilars and invited the next eight eligible consecutive consulting patients to complete a questionnaire. Rheumatologists were split into “investigative”, “conservative” and “other” groups. Results: Overall, 50 rheumatologists and 261 patients participated. Biosimilars accounted for <10% of all biologic therapy prescriptions, and >95% of rheumatologists would prescribe a biooriginator rather than biosimilar as the first- or second-line therapy if unrestricted. Patients showed some reluctance to accept biosimilars, and a small proportion of patients were unhappy when switched from a biooriginator to a biosimilar. Satisfaction with treatment was highest in patients who started treatment with a biooriginator prior to biosimilar availability. Patient concerns when starting treatment with a biooriginator or a biosimilar included not knowing enough about the drug (25%–41%, potential side effects (26%–32% and potential long-term problems (19%–30%. Conclusion: Study results demonstrate that there is some reluctance from patients to accept biosimilars and the need to educate patients who are unsure to allow them to be involved in decision making, highlighting the importance of patient and

  11. First Report of Psoriatic-Like Dermatitis and Arthritis in a 4-Year-Old Female Spayed Pug Mix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie A. Regan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis manifests as chronic dermatitis and arthritis (PsA in people. Psoriasis with concurrent PsA is characterized by erythematous, silvery, scaly plaques, especially on the extremities, and concurrent arthritis with enthesitis, tenosynovitis, and dactylitis. To date, no such disease has spontaneously occurred in domestic animals. This case report aims to describe the clinical, radiographic, and histologic appearance of a psoriasis-like dermatitis and psoriatic-like arthritis in a dog. A 4-year-old female spayed pug mix presented for the evaluation of chronic history of hyperkeratotic footpads and deforming arthritis. After ruling out other differential diagnoses and based on the similarity of clinical, radiographic, and histologic findings to human psoriasis and PsA, a tentative diagnosis of psoriasis-like disease was made. Treatment was begun to control pain (tramadol, gabapentin, and carprofen and psoriatic dermatitis (clobetasol propionate 0.05%, calcipotriene 0.005%, and urea 40% ointment twice daily. Dramatic positive response to treatment was achieved confirming the tentative diagnosis. This case may provide preliminary evidence for the existence of a psoriasis-like condition in dogs and may elucidate treatment options in otherwise refractory cases of chronic dermatitis and polyarthropathy in dogs.

  12. Crossreactive autoantibodies directed against cutaneous and joint antigens are present in psoriatic arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzia Dolcino

    Full Text Available Psoriatic arthritis (PsA is a chronic inflammatory disease of unknown origin, characterized by erosions and new bone formation. Diagnosis of PsA is mainly clinical and there are no biomarkers available. Moreover in PsA autoantibodies have not been described so far. Indeed an autoimmune origin has been suggested but never proven. Aim of the study was to investigate the possible presence of autoantibodies typically associated with PsA.We used pooled IgG immunoglobulins derived from 30 patients with PsA to screen a random peptide library in order to identify disease relevant autoantigen peptides.Among the selected peptides, one was recognised by nearly all the patients' sera. The identified peptide (PsA peptide: TNRRGRGSPGAL shows sequence similarities with skin autoantigens, such as fibrillin 3, a constituent of actin microfibrils, desmocollin 3, a constituent of the desmosomes and keratin 78, a component of epithelial cytoskeleton. Interestingly the PsA peptide shares homology with the nebulin-related anchoring protein (N-RAP, a protein localized in the enthesis (point of insertion of a tendon or ligament to the bone, which represents the first affected site during early PsA. Antibodies affinity purified against the PsA peptide recognize fibrillin, desmocollin, keratin and N-RAP. Moreover antibodies directed against the PsA peptide are detectable in 85% of PsA patients. Such antibodies are not present in healthy donors and are present in 13/100 patients with seroposive rheumatoid arthritis (RA. In seronegative RA these antibodies are detectable only in 3/100 patients.Our results indicate that PsA is characterized by the presence of serum autoantibodies crossreacting with an epitope shared by skin and joint antigens.

  13. Psoriatic arthritis mutilans (PAM) in the Nordic countries: demographics and disease status. The Nordic PAM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudbjornsson, B; Ejstrup, L; Gran, J T; Iversen, L; Lindqvist, U; Paimela, L; Ternowitz, T; Ståhle, M

    2013-01-01

    To determine the prevalence and clinical characteristics of psoriatic arthritis mutilans (PAM) in the Nordic countries. Patients with putative PAM aged ≥ 18 years were recruited. Fifty-nine patients were included after clinical examination. The prevalence of PAM in the adult Nordic population was estimated to be 3.69 per million inhabitants [95% confidence interval (CI) 2.75-4.63]. The female to male ratio was close to 1:1. The mean age of skin disease onset was 25 years and the mean age of onset of joint disease was 30 years. The onset of skin disease was 2 years earlier among female patients. At inclusion, the mean duration of arthritis was 27 ± 11 years for male patients and 33 ± 11 years for female patients. PAM was most frequently seen in the distal interphalangeal (DIP) joints of the toes, followed by the IP joint of the thumb and the DIP joint of the little finger on the left hand. Female and male patients had similar numbers of painful and swollen joints. Enthesitis was found in 19 patients (32%), while 38 patients (64%) had a history of dactylitis. Twenty-three of these 38 patients (61%) had a history of dactylitis in the same finger/toe as they had PAM. At the time of inclusion, 45% of the patients were found to have clear or almost clear skin. PAM in the Nordic countries has a low prevalence, with only three to five cases per million inhabitants. The majority of the patients present with mild skin disease.

  14. Improving the Management of Psoriatic Arthritis and Axial Spondyloarthritis: Roundtable Discussions with Healthcare Professionals and Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido-Cumbrera, Marco; Hillmann, Ottfrid; Mahapatra, Raj; Trigos, David; Zajc, Petra; Weiss, Luisa; Bostynets, Galya; Gossec, Laure; Coates, Laura C

    2017-12-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and axial spondyloarthritis (AxSpA) are both chronic, inflammatory conditions that result in a substantial burden of disease and reduced quality of life for patients. Patient involvement in developing optimal disease management strategies, including defining appropriate goals, therapies, and treatment options, as well as in setting policy priorities and agendas, is key. A working group of patient organization representatives and rheumatologists explored what patients consider to be unmet needs, important treatment gaps, and future priorities in PsA and AxSpA management. Reducing pain and fatigue, and improving physical and social functioning and work productivity were identified as important treatment goals for patients. Although the major treatment target for both PsA and AxSpA is remission, with low/minimal disease activity an alternative target for patients with established or long-standing disease, the meaning of remission from the patient's perspective needs to be explored further as it may differ considerably from the physician's perspective. Key recommendations from the working group to tackle unmet needs included reducing time to diagnosis, increasing patient and physician disease awareness, focusing on patients' priorities for treatment goals, and improving patient-physician communication. By addressing these key action points moving forward, the hope is that outcomes will continue to improve for patients with PsA and AxSpA.

  15. The indirect costs of psoriatic arthritis: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawalec, Paweł; Malinowski, Krzysztof Piotr

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this systematic review is to collect all current data on the indirect costs (IC) related to psoriatic arthritis (PsA). The search was conducted using MEDLINE (via PubMed), Embase and Centre for Reviews and Dissemination databases. We considered original studies, systematic reviews, economic evaluations, conference abstracts and posters. All collected data were recalculated to average annual cost per patient, expressed using the consumer price index for 2013 and converted to US dollars using purchasing power parity. Eight of the identified publications presented IC of PsA. Average annual IC per patient calculated using the friction cost approach range from US$1693.83 to $12,318.45, while using the human capital approach they range from US$1750.68 to $50,270.52. Result of the meta-analysis was a basis for calculating cost of work disability equaled US$10,754.04 per patient per year in 2013 prices. This systematic review revealed a great economic burden of the disease to the society. A small number of studies on IC in PsA justify further investigations.

  16. Cartilage collagen type II seromarker patterns in axial spondyloarthritis and psoriatic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Heidi Lausten; Gudmann, Natasja Staehr; Christensen, Anne Friesgaard

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the possible association between type II collagen turnover seromarkers and disease profile in patients with axial spondyloarthritis (SpA) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Outpatients with axial SpA (n = 110) or PsA (n = 101) underwent clinical examination including......-smokers, 0.43 ng/ml (p = 0.02), while PIIANP was higher in HLA-B27 positive, 2312 ng/ml versus negative patients, 2021 ng/ml (p = 0.03). In PsA, PIIANP and C2M did not differ between patients and controls, but PIIANP was elevated in patients not receiving DMARDs, 2726 ng/ml. In PsA, PIIANP and C2M did...... not differ according to smoking and HLA-B27. Cartilage degradation assessed by C2M is increased in SpA irrespective of treatment but not in PsA. Cartilage synthesis reflected by PIIANP is increased in untreated SpA and PsA. PIIANP correlates with CRP in SpA while not in PsA. In DMARD-naïve SpA but not in PsA...

  17. KIF3A and IL-4 are disease-specific biomarkers for psoriatic arthritis susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragazzo, Michele; Manzo, Laura; Costanza, Gaetana; Bowes, John; Hüffmeier, Ulrike; Potenza, Saverio; Sangiuolo, Federica; Reis, André; Barton, Anne; Novelli, Giuseppe; Orlandi, Augusto; Giardina, Emiliano

    2017-01-01

    To date, the genes associated with Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) are principally involved in inflammation, immune response and epidermal differentiation, without any information about the relationship between disease and bone metabolism genes. Our work was focused on 5q31 locus, which contains several genetic variants significantly associated with PsA. The study involved 1526 subjects (500 PsA, 426 PsV, 600 controls). The region was evaluated by selecting and genotyping the SNPs of interest by Real Time PCR and direct sequencing. The results were subjected to biostatistic and bioinformatic analysis. The case-control study highlighted a significant association between KIF3A/IL-4 and PsA, but not with PsV (Psoriasis Vulgaris) patients. In addition, the haplotype analysis revealed two haplotypes significantly associated with PsA susceptibility. The Linkage Disequilibrium (LD) study showed the presence of a specific block in high LD within 132,692,628-132,737,638 bp of 5q31, giving additional evidence of specific association of the 5q31 region in PsA patients. Moreover, KIF3A expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry assays which showed a marked and significant difference of KIF3A expression between pathological and normal tissues. Our analysis described KIF3A and IL-4 as novel susceptibility genes for PsA, suggesting a clear implication of bone metabolism genes in the disease etiopathogenesis. PMID:29221136

  18. Standards of care and quality indicators for multidisciplinary care models for psoriatic arthritis in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratacós, Jordi; Luelmo, Jesús; Rodríguez, Jesús; Notario, Jaume; Marco, Teresa Navío; de la Cueva, Pablo; Busquets, Manel Pujol; Font, Mercè García; Joven, Beatriz; Rivera, Raquel; Vega, Jose Luis Alvarez; Álvarez, Antonio Javier Chaves; Parera, Ricardo Sánchez; Carrascosa, Jose Carlos Ruiz; Martínez, Fernando José Rodríguez; Sánchez, José Pardo; Olmos, Carlos Feced; Pujol, Conrad; Galindez, Eva; Barrio, Silvia Pérez; Arana, Ana Urruticoechea; Hergueta, Mercedes; Coto, Pablo; Queiro, Rubén

    2018-06-01

    To define and give priority to standards of care and quality indicators of multidisciplinary care for patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). A systematic literature review on PsA standards of care and quality indicators was performed. An expert panel of rheumatologists and dermatologists who provide multidisciplinary care was established. In a consensus meeting group, the experts discussed and developed the standards of care and quality indicators and graded their priority, agreement and also the feasibility (only for quality indicators) following qualitative methodology and a Delphi process. Afterwards, these results were discussed with 2 focus groups, 1 with patients, another with health managers. A descriptive analysis is presented. We obtained 25 standards of care (9 of structure, 9 of process, 7 of results) and 24 quality indicators (2 of structure, 5 of process, 17 of results). Standards of care include relevant aspects in the multidisciplinary care of PsA patients like an appropriate physical infrastructure and technical equipment, the access to nursing care, labs and imaging techniques, other health professionals and treatments, or the development of care plans. Regarding quality indicators, the definition of multidisciplinary care model objectives and referral criteria, the establishment of responsibilities and coordination among professionals and the active evaluation of patients and data collection were given a high priority. Patients considered all of them as important. This set of standards of care and quality indicators for the multidisciplinary care of patients with PsA should help improve quality of care in these patients.

  19. Assessing the effectiveness of synthetic and biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in psoriatic arthritis – a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kingsley GH

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Gabrielle H Kingsley, David L Scott Rheumatology Unit, Kings College London, London, UK Background: Psoriatic arthritis is an inflammatory arthritis the primary manifestations of which are locomotor and skin disease. Although a number of guidelines have been published citing strategies for reducing disease progression, the evidence base for disease-modifying agents is unclear. This forms the focus of this systematic review. Methods: The systematic review was undertaken according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses 2009 checklist. We selected randomized controlled trials (RCTs that looked at the impact of interventions with disease-modifying agents, either synthetic drugs or biologics on musculoskeletal outcomes, notably American College of Rheumatology 20 percent responders. Results were analyzed using Review Manager 5.1.6 (Cochrane Collaboration, Oxford, UK. Whilst our primary focus was on published trials, we also looked at new trials presented in abstract form in 2013–2014 that were not yet published to avoid omitting important and up-to-date information on developing treatments. Results: Our in-depth analysis included 28 trials overall enrolling 5,177 patients published between the 1980s and now as well as limited analysis of some studies in abstract form as described earlier. The most frequently available locomotor outcome measure was the American College of Rheumatology 20 percent responders. The risk ratio for achieving an American College of Rheumatology 20 percent responders response was positive in favor of treatment (risk ratio 2.30; 95% confidence interval 1.78–2.96; however, there was evidence of considerable heterogeneity between trials. Overall randomized controlled trials of established synthetic disease-modifying agents were largely negative (methotrexate, ciclosporin and sulfasalazine though leflunomide showed a small positive effect. A new synthetic agent, apremilast, did show a

  20. Psychometric properties of the painDETECT questionnaire in rhuematoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and spondyloarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rifbjerg-Madsen, Signe; Wæhrens, Eva Elisabet Ejlersen; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente

    2017-01-01

    that can identify underlying pain mechanisms are needed. The painDETECT questionnaire (PDQ) was originally designed to differentiate between pain phenotypes. The objectives were to evaluate the psychometric properties of the PDQ in patients with inflammatory arthritis by applying Rasch analysis...... and to explore the reliability of pain classification by test-retest. METHODS: For the Rasch analysis 900 questionnaires from patients with RA, PsA and SpA (300 per diagnosis) were extracted from 'the DANBIO painDETECT study'. The analysis was directed at the seven items assessing somatosensory symptoms...... and included: 1) the performance of the six-category Likert scale; 2) whether a unidimensional construct was defined; 3) the reliability and precision of estimates. Another group of 30 patients diagnosed with RA, PsA or SpA participated in a test-retest study. Intraclass Correlation Coefficients (ICC...

  1. Marine n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Psoriatic Arthritis – Inflammation and Cardiac Autonomic and Hemodynamic Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Salome

    This thesis is based on three studies of patients with established psoriatic arthritis (PsA) aiming at investigating the effect of marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) on clinical symptoms and selected measures of inflammation, cardiac autonomic and hemodynamic function in these patients...... with either 3 g of marine n-3 PUFA (6 capsules of fish oil) or 3 g of olive oil daily for 24 weeks. A total of 133 patients (92%) completed the study. The difference in the outcomes between baseline and 24 weeks was analysed within and between the two supplemented groups. In Study II, the effects of n-3 PUFA...

  2. Anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF drugs for the treatment of psoriatic arthritis: an indirect comparison meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorlund K

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Kristian Thorlund,1 Eric Druyts,2 J Antonio Aviña-Zubieta,3,4 Edward J Mills1,21Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada; 2Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; 3Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; 4Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, CanadaObjective: To evaluate the comparative effectiveness of available tumor necrosis factor-a inhibitors (anti-TNFs for the management of psoriatic arthritis (PsA in patients with an inadequate response to disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs.Methods: We used an exhaustive search strategy covering randomized clinical trials, systematic reviews and health technology assessments (HTA published on anti-TNFs for PsA. We performed indirect comparisons of the available anti-TNFs (adalimumab, etanercept, golimumab, and infliximab measuring relative risks (RR for the psoriatic arthritis response criteria (PsARC, mean differences (MDs for improvements from baseline for the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ by PsARC responders and non-responders, and MD for the improvements from baseline for the psoriasis area and severity index (PASI. When the reporting of data on intervention group response rates and improvements were incomplete, we used straightforward conversions based on the available data.Results: We retrieved data from 20 publications representing seven trials, as well as two HTAs. All anti-TNFs were significantly better than control, but the indirect comparison did not reveal any statistically significant difference between the anti-TNFs. For PsARC response, golimumab yielded the highest RR and etanercept the second highest; adalimumab and infliximab both yielded notably smaller RRs. For HAQ improvement, etanercept and infliximab yielded the largest MD among PsARC responders

  3. Variants in linkage disequilibrium with the late cornified envelope gene cluster deletion are associated with susceptibility to psoriatic arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bowes, John

    2010-12-01

    A common deletion mapping to the psoriasis susceptibility locus 4 on chromosome 1q21, encompassing two genes of the late cornified envelope (LCE) gene cluster, has been associated with an increased risk of psoriasis vulgaris (PsV). One previous report found no association of the deletion with psoriatic arthritis (PsA), suggesting it may be a specific risk factor for PsV. Given the genetic overlap between PsA and PsV, a study was undertaken to investigate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) mapping to this locus are risk factors for PsA in a UK and Irish population.

  4. Development and testing of new candidate psoriatic arthritis screening questionnaires combining optimal questions from existing tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Laura C; Walsh, Jessica; Haroon, Muhammad; FitzGerald, Oliver; Aslam, Tariq; Al Balushi, Farida; Burden, A D; Burden-Teh, Esther; Caperon, Anna R; Cerio, Rino; Chattopadhyay, Chandrabhusan; Chinoy, Hector; Goodfield, Mark J D; Kay, Lesley; Kelly, Stephen; Kirkham, Bruce W; Lovell, Christopher R; Marzo-Ortega, Helena; McHugh, Neil; Murphy, Ruth; Reynolds, Nick J; Smith, Catherine H; Stewart, Elizabeth J C; Warren, Richard B; Waxman, Robin; Wilson, Hilary E; Helliwell, Philip S

    2014-09-01

    Several questionnaires have been developed to screen for psoriatic arthritis (PsA), but head-to-head studies have found limitations. This study aimed to develop new questionnaires encompassing the most discriminative questions from existing instruments. Data from the CONTEST study, a head-to-head comparison of 3 existing questionnaires, were used to identify items with a Youden index score of ≥0.1. These were combined using 4 approaches: CONTEST (simple additions of questions), CONTESTw (weighting using logistic regression), CONTESTjt (addition of a joint manikin), and CONTESTtree (additional questions identified by classification and regression tree [CART] analysis). These candidate questionnaires were tested in independent data sets. Twelve individual questions with a Youden index score of ≥0.1 were identified, but 4 of these were excluded due to duplication and redundancy. Weighting for 2 of these questions was included in CONTESTw. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis showed that involvement in 6 joint areas on the manikin was predictive of PsA for inclusion in CONTESTjt. CART analysis identified a further 5 questions for inclusion in CONTESTtree. CONTESTtree was not significant on ROC curve analysis and discarded. The other 3 questionnaires were significant in all data sets, although CONTESTw was slightly inferior to the others in the validation data sets. Potential cut points for referral were also discussed. Of 4 candidate questionnaires combining existing discriminatory items to identify PsA in people with psoriasis, 3 were found to be significant on ROC curve analysis. Testing in independent data sets identified 2 questionnaires (CONTEST and CONTESTjt) that should be pursued for further prospective testing. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  5. Experience and Satisfaction With a Multidisciplinary Care Unit for Patients With Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urruticoechea-Arana, Ana; Serra Torres, Marta; Hergueta Diaz, Mercedes; González Guerrero, María Eugenia; Fariñas Padron, Leslie; Navarro Martín, Sara; Vargas Osorio, Kelly; Palacios Abufón, Andrés; García de Yébenes, María Jesús; Loza, Estíbaliz

    2017-08-24

    To describe patient's characteristics, the activity and patient's satisfaction with a multidisciplinary care unit in patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). A retrospective medical records review of patients with psoriasis or PsA attended in a multidisciplinary care unit was performed. Included patients were contacted to fulfill a satisfaction questionnaire. A specific electronic database was set up. Data regarding to patients and their baseline characteristics and the activity of the unit were collected. Descriptive analysis were performed. A total of 112 patients with 154 visits were included in almost 3 years, 54% women, with a mean age of 51 years, 43.7% presented hyperlipidemia and 30.4% arterial hypertension. Half of patients were referred due to diagnostic doubts and the other half for therapeutic problems. After the evaluation of the patients, 66 patients (58.9%) met diagnostic criteria for PsA, and 13 (11.6%) of an inflammatory disease other than PsA, and 95% came back to their usual physician. The most ordered test were laboratory tests (75.6% of patients), followed by X-rays in 57 patients (51.3%). In general the number of patients with different treatments increased, and 55.4% and 42% of patients changed their topic and systemic treatments respectively. The level of satisfaction was very high and all of patients considered that their disease was better controlled in this multidisciplinary care unit. This multidisciplinary care unit has improved the care and satisfaction of patients with psoriasis or PsA, and increased collaboration between rheumatology and dermatology departments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  6. Current Status of Multidisciplinary Care in Psoriatic Arthritis in Spain: NEXUS 2.0 Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiro, Rubén; Coto, Pablo; Joven, Beatriz; Rivera, Raquel; Navío Marco, Teresa; de la Cueva, Pablo; Alvarez Vega, Jose Luis; Narváez Moreno, Basilio; Rodriguez Martínez, Fernando José; Pardo Sánchez, José; Feced Olmos, Carlos; Pujol, Conrad; Rodríguez, Jesús; Notario, Jaume; Pujol Busquets, Manel; García Font, Mercè; Galindez, Eva; Pérez Barrio, Silvia; Urruticoechea-Arana, Ana; Hergueta, Merce; López Montilla, M Dolores; Vélez García-Nieto, Antonio; Maceiras, Francisco; Rodríguez Pazos, Laura; Rubio Romero, Esteban; Rodríguez Fernandez Freire, Lourdes; Luelmo, Jesús; Gratacós, Jordi

    2018-02-26

    1) To analyze the implementation of multidisciplinary care models in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) patients, 2) To define minimum and excellent standards of care. A survey was sent to clinicians who already performed multidisciplinary care or were in the process of undertaking it, asking: 1) Type of multidisciplinary care model implemented; 2) Degree, priority and feasibility of the implementation of quality standards in the structure, process and result for care. In 6 regional meetings the results of the survey were presented and discussed, and the ultimate priority of quality standards for care was defined. At a nominal meeting group, 11 experts (rheumatologists and dermatologists) analyzed the results of the survey and the regional meetings. With this information, they defined which standards of care are currently considered as minimum and which are excellent. The simultaneous and parallel models of multidisciplinary care are those most widely implemented, but the implementation of quality standards is highly variable. In terms of structure it ranges from 22% to 74%, in those related to process from 17% to 54% and in the results from 2% to 28%. Of the 25 original quality standards for care, 9 were considered only minimum, 4 were excellent and 12 defined criteria for minimum level and others for excellence. The definition of minimum and excellent quality standards for care will help achieve the goal of multidisciplinary care for patients with PAs, which is the best healthcare possible. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  7. Power of crowdsourcing: novel methods of data collection in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, April W; Harskamp, Caitlin T; Cheeney, Safia; Wu, Julie; Schupp, Clayton W

    2012-12-01

    Crowdsourcing is a novel method of collecting research data from diverse patient populations. The quality of research data obtained through crowdsourcing is unknown. The primary aim of this pilot study was to examine how data collected from an online crowdsourcing World Wide Web site compare with those from published literature in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Crowdsourced data were collected from a health crowdsourcing site from August 23, 2008, to June 27, 2011. The crowdsourced data were compared with findings from systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and clinical trials. A total of 160 online patients with psoriasis or PsA were included in the analysis. Among them, 127 patients with psoriasis provided 313 complete responses on psoriasis symptoms and 276 complete responses to psoriasis treatments; 33 patients with PsA provided 91 complete responses on PsA symptoms and 79 responses to PsA treatments. We compared topical treatments, phototherapy, and systemic treatments for psoriasis and PsA from crowdsourced data with the published literature. For the treatment with the largest response rates, equivalency testing was performed comparing crowdsourced data and the published literature. Overall, crowdsourced data were not equivalent to those published in the medical literature. Crowdsourcing sites used different outcomes measures from those reported in clinical trials. Differences existed in assessment of treatment effectiveness between crowdsourced data and those published in the literature. With improvements in the collection of crowdsourced data, crowdsourcing can be a valuable tool for collecting patient data in real-world settings for psoriasis and PsA. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Immunogenicity induced by biologicals in the treatment of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis: View of the problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Korotaeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present-day views of the immunogenicity of biological agents (BAs used to in the treatment of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis are analyzed. The immunogenicity of these medicaments is noted to depend on their molecular structure, individual patient characteristics, and used treatment regimens. As this takes place, the primary structure of the drug and its posttranslation modifications during manufacture are key factors. It is pointed out that a number of antigenic structures may give rise to the body's BA antibodies – murine epitopes, idiotopes, and allotropes, neoantigens forming in the coupling area of hybrid proteins, nonlinear epitopes present in the aggregated preparations. BAs that tend to form large immune complexes with these antibodies are most immunogenic. The antibodies to most BAs, except drugs based on soluble tumor necrosis factor-α receptors (etanercept, are neutralizing, i.e. they affect the efficiency of therapy, particularly when used over a long period of time.The results of trials evaluating the impact of antibodies to BAs on their clinical value are considered. It is believed that immunogenicity is itself of great importance in respect to the occurrence of the escape phenomenon of a response to BA therapy and to its safety. Attention is drawn to immunogenicity diagnostic problems; at the same it is noted that none of the used laboratory diagnostic techniques can reveal individual BA antibody forms and isotypes. It is concluded that there is a need for further investigations to standardize optimal methods for diagnosing neutralizing antibodies, to elaborate criteria for predicting a response to therapy in terms of an immunogenicity factor, and to reveal pathogenetic mechanisms responsible for the production of antibodies to BAs. The design of novel medicaments with minimal immunogenicity will depend on whether these mechanisms are common to all drugs or specific.

  9. Is there subclinical enthesitis in early psoriatic arthritis? A clinical comparison with power doppler ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeston, J E; Coates, L C; Helliwell, P S; Hensor, E M A; Wakefield, R J; Emery, P; Conaghan, P G

    2012-10-01

    Enthesitis is a recognized feature of spondylarthritides (SpA), including psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Previously, ultrasound imaging has highlighted the presence of subclinical enthesitis in established SpA, but there are little data on ultrasound findings in early PsA. The aim of our study was to compare ultrasound and clinical examination (CE) for the detection of entheseal abnormalities in an early PsA cohort. Forty-two patients with new-onset PsA and 10 control subjects underwent CE of entheses for tenderness and swelling, as well as gray-scale (GS) and power Doppler (PD) ultrasound of a standard set of entheses. Bilateral elbow lateral epicondyles, Achilles tendons, and plantar fascia were assessed by both CE and ultrasound, the latter scored using a semiquantitative (SQ) scale. Inferior patellar tendons were assessed by ultrasound alone. A GS SQ score of >1 and/or a PD score of >0 was used to describe significant ultrasound entheseal abnormality. A total of 24 (57.1%) of 42 patients in the PsA group and 0 (0%) of 10 controls had clinical evidence of at least 1 tender enthesis. In the PsA group, for sites assessed by both CE and ultrasound, 4% (7 of 177) of nontender entheses had a GS score >1 and/or a PD score >0 compared to 24% (9 of 37) of tender entheses. CE overestimated activity in 28 (13%) of 214 of entheses. All the nontender ultrasound-abnormal entheses were in the lower extremity. The prevalence of subclinical enthesitis in this early PsA cohort was low. CE may overestimate active enthesitis. The few subclinically inflamed entheses were in the lower extremity, where mechanical stress is likely to be more significant. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  10. Valuation of scleroderma and psoriatic arthritis health states by the general public

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hays Ron D

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Psoriatic arthritis (PsA and scleroderma (SSc are chronic rheumatic disorders with detrimental effects on health-related quality of life. Our objective was to assess health values (utilities from the general public for health states common to people with PsA and SSc for economic evaluations. Methods Adult subjects from the general population in a Midwestern city (N = 218 completed the SF-12 Health Survey and computer-assisted 0-100 rating scale (RS, time trade-off (TTO, range: 0.0-1.0 and standard gamble (SG, range: 0.0-1.0 utility assessments for several hypothetical PsA and SSc health states. Results Subjects included 135 (62% females, 143 (66% Caucasians, and 62 (28% African-Americans. The mean (SD scores for the SF-12 Physical Component Summary scale were 52.9 (8.3 and for the SF-12 Mental Component Summary scale were 49.0 (9.1, close to population norms. The mean RS, TTO, and SG scores for PsA health states varied with severity, ranging from 20.2 to 63.7 (14.4-20.3 for the RS 0.29 to 0.78 (0.24-0.31 for the TTO, and 0.48 to 0.82 (0.24-0.34 for the SG. The mean RS, TTO, and SG scores for SSc health states were 25.3-69.7 (15.2-16.3 for the RS, 0.36-0.80 (0.25-0.31 for the TTO, and 0.50-0.81 (0.26-0.32 for the SG, depending on disease severity. Conclusion Health utilities for PsA and SSc health states as assessed from the general public reflect the severity of the diseases. These descriptive findings could have implications regarding comparative effectiveness research for tests and treatments for PsA and SSc.

  11. Impact of Disease Severity, Illness Beliefs, and Coping Strategies on Outcomes in Psoriatic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howells, Laura; Chisholm, Anna; Cotterill, Sarah; Chinoy, Hector; Warren, Richard B; Bundy, Christine

    2018-02-01

    Little is known about how people with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) cope with and manage their condition, but data show that psychological problems are underrecognized and undertreated. The Common Sense Self-Regulatory Model (CS-SRM) suggests illness beliefs, mediated by coping, may influence health outcomes. The study aimed to investigate the roles of disease severity, illness beliefs, and coping strategies in predicting depression, anxiety, and quality of life (QoL) in people with PsA. Additionally, we aimed to assess the role of depression and anxiety in predicting QoL. We conducted a cross-sectional observational study, where adults with PsA (n = 179) completed validated measures of predictor (illness beliefs, coping strategies, disease severity) and outcome variables (depression, anxiety, QoL) using an online survey distributed via social media. The participants were a community sample of 179 adults with PsA, ages 20 to 72 years (77.1% female). After controlling for disease severity, hierarchical multiple regression models indicated that more negative beliefs about consequences and behavioral disengagement as a coping method predicted levels of depression, and self-blame predicted anxiety. Beliefs about consequences and the presence of depression predicted quality of life scores after controlling for disease severity. This study offers support for the use of the CS-SRM in explaining variation on psychological outcomes in individuals with PsA. The illness beliefs and coping strategies identified as predictors in this article are potential targets for interventions addressing PsA-related distress and QoL. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  12. Effectiveness of early adalimumab therapy in psoriatic arthritis patients from Reuma.pt - EARLY PsA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Helena; Eusébio, Mónica; Borges, Joana; Gonçalves, Diana; Ávila-Ribeiro, Pedro; Faria, Daniela Santos; Lopes, Carina; Rovisco, João; Águeda, Ana; Nero, Patrícia; Valente, Paula; Cravo, Ana Rita; Santos, Maria José

    2017-01-01

    Objective To compare outcomes in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) patients initiating adalimumab (ADA), with short- and long-term disease duration and to evaluate the potential effect of concomitant conventional synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (csDMARD) or glucocorticoids. Methods Analyses included adult PsA patients registered in the Rheumatic Diseases Portuguese Register (Reuma.pt) between June 2008-June 2016 who received ADA for ≥3 months. Psoriatic Arthritis Response Criteria (PsARC) response, tender and swollen joint count, inflammatory parameters, patient (PtGA) and physician global assessment (PhGA), Disease Activity Score-28 joints (DAS28), and Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index (HAQ-DI) were compared between patients with PsA) and those with ≥5 years of disease duration (late PsA). Time to achieving PsARC response was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results Of 135 PsA patients treated with ADA, 126 had information on disease duration (earlyPsA, n=41). PsARC response was achieved by 72.9% of the patients (88.0% early PsA vs 62.2% late PsA; P=0.022) after 3 months and by 85.4% after 24 months (100% early PsA vs 75.9% late PsA; P=0.044). Early PsA patients achieved significantly less painful joints (2.7 vs 6.7, p=0.006), lower mean C-reactive protein (0.5 mg/dL vs 1.3 mg/dL; P=0.011), and PhGA (18.3 vs 28.1; P=0.020) at 3 months. In the long term, early PsA patients also had fewer swollen joints (0.3 vs 1.7; P=0.030) and lower PhGA (6.3 vs 21.9; PPsA, respectively. Early PsA patients obtained PsARC response more rapidly than late PsA (3.8 and 7.4 months, respectively; P=0.008). Concomitant csDMARDs showed clinical benefit (2-year PsARC response, 88.3% vs 60.0%; P=0.044). Concomitant glucocorticoids had no effect on PsARC response over 2 years of follow-up. Persistence on ADA was similar in both groups. Conclusion Early PsA patients had a greater chance of improvement after ADA therapy and better functional outcome, and

  13. Cardiovascular risk profiles in a hospital-based population of patients with psoriatic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Christoffer B; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim; Primdahl, Jette

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the frequency of traditional risk factors for the cardiovascular (CV) disease, to calculate the Systematic COronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE) for CV-related mortality in Danish patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS......), and to compare with results from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) from the same settlement. All PsA and AS patients aged 18-85 years from one outpatient clinic were invited. A rheumatology nurse conducted 30-min screening consultation, preceded by a lipid and glucose profile. High SCORE risk led...... to recommendation of follow-up by general practitioners. Multiple and logistic regression analyses, adjusted for age and gender, were performed, to compare risk factors and risk SCOREs. Participants were 116 AS (29.3% female) and 170 PsA (54.7% female). AS had opposed PsA patients' lower 10-year risk SCOREs of CV...

  14. Imaging in the diagnosis and management of peripheral psoriatic arthritis-The clinical utility of magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Eder, Lihi; Christiansen, Sara Nysom

    2016-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an inflammatory joint disease characterised by the presence of arthritis and often enthesitis and/or spondylitis in patients with psoriasis. However, it presents a wide range of disease manifestations in various patterns. Imaging is an important part of management of PsA...... or clinical studies. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows detailed assessment of all peripheral and axial joints involved in PsA, and can visualise both inflammation and structural changes. Ultrasonography (US) can visualise many of the peripheral heterogeneous tissue compartments affected by PsA....... In contrast to MRI, US is not useful for assessing axial involvement in the spine and sacroiliac joints. In this paper, we will provide an overview of the status, strengths and limitations of MRI and US in peripheral PsA in routine clinical practice and clinical trials....

  15. Review of the treatment of psoriatic arthritis with biological agents: choice of drug for initial therapy and switch therapy for non-responders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D'Angelo S

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Salvatore D’Angelo,1 Giuseppina Tramontano,1 Michele Gilio,1 Pietro Leccese,1 Ignazio Olivieri1,2 1Rheumatology Institute of Lucania (IRel - Rheumatology Department of Lucania, San Carlo Hospital of Potenza and Madonna delle Grazie Hospital of Matera, Potenza and Matera, 2Basilicata Ricerca Biomedica (BRB Foundation, Potenza, Italy Abstract: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA is a heterogeneous chronic inflammatory disease with a broad clinical spectrum and variable course. It can involve musculoskeletal structures as well as skin, nails, eyes, and gut. The management of PsA has changed tremendously in the last decade, thanks to an earlier diagnosis, an advancement in pharmacological therapies, and a wider application of a multidisciplinary approach. The commercialization of tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (adalimumab, certolizumab pegol, etanercept, golimumab, and infliximab as well as interleukin (IL-12/23 (ustekinumab and IL-17 (secukinumab inhibitors is representative of a revolution in the treatment of PsA. No evidence-based strategies are currently available for guiding the rheumatologist to prescribe biological drugs. Several international and national recommendation sets are currently available with the aim to help rheumatologists in everyday clinical practice management of PsA patients treated with biological therapy. Since no specific biological agent has been demonstrated to be more effective than others, the drug choice should be made according to the available safety data, the presence of extra-articular manifestations, the patient’s preferences (e.g., administration route, and the drug price. However, future studies directly comparing different biological drugs and assessing the efficacy of treatment strategies specific for PsA are urgently needed. Keywords: psoriatic arthritis, treatment, biological drugs, TNF inhibitors, ustekinumab, secukinumab

  16. PTPN22 is associated with susceptibility to psoriatic arthritis but not psoriasis: evidence for a further PsA-specific risk locus.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bowes, John

    2015-04-28

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic inflammatory arthritis associated with psoriasis; it has a higher estimated genetic component than psoriasis alone, however most genetic susceptibility loci identified for PsA to date are also shared with psoriasis. Here we attempt to validate novel single nucleotide polymorphisms selected from our recent PsA Immunochip study and determine specificity to PsA.

  17. The OMERACT psoriatic arthritis magnetic resonance imaging scoring system (PsAMRIS): definitions of key pathologies, suggested MRI sequences, and preliminary scoring system for PsA Hands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; McQueen, Fiona; Wiell, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a preliminary OMERACT psoriatic arthritis magnetic resonance image scoring system (PsAMRIS) for evaluation of inflammatory and destructive changes in PsA hands, which was developed by the international OMERACT MRI in inflammatory arthritis group. MRI definitions of important...... pathologies in peripheral PsA and suggestions concerning appropriate MRI sequences for use in PsA hands are also provided....

  18. Interleukin-9 Overexpression and Th9 Polarization Characterize the Inflamed Gut, the Synovial Tissue, and the Peripheral Blood of Patients With Psoriatic Arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ciccia, Francesco; Guggino, Giuliana; Ferrante, Angelo; Raimondo, Stefania; Bignone, Rodolfo; Rodolico, Vito; Peralta, Sergio; van Tok, Melissa; Cannizzaro, Alessandra; Schinocca, Claudia; Ruscitti, Piero; Cipriani, Paola; Giacomelli, Roberto; Alessandro, Riccardo; Dieli, Francesco; Rizzo, Aroldo; Baeten, Dominique; Triolo, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the expression and tissue distribution of Th9-related cytokines in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Quantitative gene expression analysis of Th1, Th17, and Th9 cytokines was performed in intestinal biopsy samples obtained from patients with PsA, HLA-B27-positive patients with

  19. Enthesopathic reactions at the wrist in psoriatic arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis. Results of low-kV radiographs in three views

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, E.

    1989-01-01

    Twenty-six sites of muscle and ligament attachment around the wrist were evaluated for enthesopathic proliferative bone changes in psoriatic arthritis (PA), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH). Proliferations were found to be most frequent, most irregular, and largest in PA, followed in declining order by RA and DISH. In PA only, the bony proliferations and the underlying bone often had the appearance of mineralized woven bone, though smooth proliferations with a regular bone structure do occur in PA as well as in RA. The entheses of the trapezium, scaphoid and the radial styloid process are most frequently affected, followed by the bases of the first and fifth metacarpals and the pisiform. It is exceptional for huge bony proliferations to be observed at the entheses in DISH. (orig.) [de

  20. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Appointments • Support Our Research Arthritis Information Disease Information Rheumatoid Arthritis Psoriatic Arthritis Ankylosing Spondylitis Osteoarthritis Gout Lyme Disease Osteoporosis News Rheumatoid Arthritis News ...

  1. Persistence with golimumab in immune-mediated rheumatic diseases: a systematic review of real-world evidence in rheumatoid arthritis, axial spondyloarthritis, and psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svedbom A

    2017-04-01

    estimates of OLE trials.Conclusion: The data reviewed in this study indicate that golimumab may have higher persistence than other TNFis, a notion that is supported by indirect comparisons of persistence data from OLEs of randomized controlled trials (RCTs. Furthermore, the study suggests that persistence may be lower in biologic-experienced compared with biologic-naive patients and higher in axial spondyloarthritis compared with rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis. Keywords: golimumab, Simponi, Treatment persistence, drug survival, retention rates, real-world evidence (RWE

  2. Bioboosters in the treatment of rheumatic diseases: a comprehensive review of currently available biologics in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Cantini

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Fabrizio Cantini, Carlotta Nannini, Laura NiccoliSecond Division of Medicine, Rheumatology Unit, Hospital of Prato, ItalyAbstract: Immunologic research has clarified many aspects of the pathogenesis of inflammatory rheumatic disorders. Biologic drugs acting on different steps of the immune response, including cytokines, B- and T-cell lymphocytes, have been marketed over the past 10 years for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA, ankylosing spondylitis (AS, and psoriatic arthritis (PsA. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs of anti-cytokine agents in RA (including the anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα drugs infliximab, etanercept, adalimumab, golimumab, certolizumab, anti-interleukin (IL-1 anakinra, and anti-IL-6 tocilizumab demonstrated a significant efficacy compared to traditional therapies, if combined with methotrexate (MTX, as measured by ACR 20, 50 and 70 response criteria. The new therapies have also been demonstrated to be superior to MTX in slowing or halting articular damage. RCTs have shown the efficacy of anti-TNFα in AS patients through significant improvement of symptoms and function. Trials of anti-TNFα in PsA patients showed marked improvement of articular symptoms for psoriasis and radiological disease progression. More recent studies have demonstrated the efficacy of B-cell depletion with rituximab, and T-cell inactivation with abatacept. All these drugs have a satisfactory safety profile. This paper reviews the different aspects of efficacy and tolerability of biologics in the therapy of RA, AS, and PsA.Keywords: anti-TNF, anti-cytokine agents, rituximab, abatacept, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis

  3. Detailed analysis of contrast-enhanced MRI of hands and wrists in patients with psoriatic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tehranzadeh, Jamshid; Ashikyan, Oganes; Anavim, Arash; Shin, John

    2008-01-01

    The objective was to perform detailed analysis of the involved soft tissues, tendons, joints, and bones in the hands and wrists of patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). We reviewed 23 contrast-enhanced MR imaging studies (13 hands and 10 wrists) in 10 patients with the clinical diagnosis of PsA. We obtained clinical information from medical records and evaluated images for the presence of erosions, bone marrow edema, joint synovitis, tenosynovitis, carpal tunnel, and soft tissue involvement. Two board-certified musculoskeletal radiologists reviewed all images independently. Differences were resolved during a subsequent joint session. The average duration of disease was 71.3 months, ranging from 1 month to 25 years. Eight of the 10 wrists (80%) and 6 of the 13 hands demonstrated bone erosions. Bone marrow abnormalities were shown in 5 of the 10 wrists (50%) and 4 of the 14 hands (31%). Triangular fibrocartilage tears were seen in 6 of the 10 wrists (60%). Wrist and hand joint synovitis were present in all studies (67 wrist joints and 101 hand joints). Wrist soft tissue involvement was detected in 9 of the 10 wrists (90%) and hand soft tissue involvement was present in 12 of the 13 wrists (92%). Findings adjacent to the region of soft tissue involvement included synovitis (4 wrists) and tenosynovitis (3 wrists). Bone marrow edema adjacent to the region of soft tissue involvement was seen in one wrist. Bulge of the flexor retinaculum was seen in 4 of the 10 wrists (40%) and median nerve enhancement was seen in 8 of the 10 wrists (80%). Tenosynovitis was seen in all studies (all 10 of the hands and all 13 of the wrists). The ''rheumatoid'' type of distribution of bony lesions was common in our study. Interobserver agreement for various findings ranged from 83% to 100%. Contrast-enhanced MRI unequivocally demonstrated bone marrow edema, erosions, tendon and soft-tissue disease, and median nerve involvement, with good interobserver reliability in patients with PsA of

  4. Detailed analysis of contrast-enhanced MRI of hands and wrists in patients with psoriatic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tehranzadeh, Jamshid [University of California, Department of Radiological Sciences, Irvine (United States); University of California Medical Center, Department of Radiological Sciences R-140, Orange, CA (United States); Ashikyan, Oganes; Anavim, Arash; Shin, John [University of California, Department of Radiological Sciences, Irvine (United States)

    2008-05-15

    The objective was to perform detailed analysis of the involved soft tissues, tendons, joints, and bones in the hands and wrists of patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). We reviewed 23 contrast-enhanced MR imaging studies (13 hands and 10 wrists) in 10 patients with the clinical diagnosis of PsA. We obtained clinical information from medical records and evaluated images for the presence of erosions, bone marrow edema, joint synovitis, tenosynovitis, carpal tunnel, and soft tissue involvement. Two board-certified musculoskeletal radiologists reviewed all images independently. Differences were resolved during a subsequent joint session. The average duration of disease was 71.3 months, ranging from 1 month to 25 years. Eight of the 10 wrists (80%) and 6 of the 13 hands demonstrated bone erosions. Bone marrow abnormalities were shown in 5 of the 10 wrists (50%) and 4 of the 14 hands (31%). Triangular fibrocartilage tears were seen in 6 of the 10 wrists (60%). Wrist and hand joint synovitis were present in all studies (67 wrist joints and 101 hand joints). Wrist soft tissue involvement was detected in 9 of the 10 wrists (90%) and hand soft tissue involvement was present in 12 of the 13 wrists (92%). Findings adjacent to the region of soft tissue involvement included synovitis (4 wrists) and tenosynovitis (3 wrists). Bone marrow edema adjacent to the region of soft tissue involvement was seen in one wrist. Bulge of the flexor retinaculum was seen in 4 of the 10 wrists (40%) and median nerve enhancement was seen in 8 of the 10 wrists (80%). Tenosynovitis was seen in all studies (all 10 of the hands and all 13 of the wrists). The 'rheumatoid' type of distribution of bony lesions was common in our study. Interobserver agreement for various findings ranged from 83% to 100%. Contrast-enhanced MRI unequivocally demonstrated bone marrow edema, erosions, tendon and soft-tissue disease, and median nerve involvement, with good interobserver reliability in patients with

  5. Validity and reliability of the Dutch adaptation of the Psoriatic Arthritis Quality of Life (PsAQoL Questionnaire.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freke Wink

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The Psoriatic Arthritis Quality of Life (PsAQoL questionnaire is a disease- specific instrument developed to measure quality of life (QoL in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA. The aim of this study was to translate the measure into Dutch and to determine its psychometric properties. METHOD: Translation of the original English PsAQoL into Dutch was performed by bilingual and lay panel. Ten field-test interviews with PsA patients were performed to assess face and content validity. In total, 211 PsA patients were included in a test-retest postal survey to investigate the reliability and construct validity of the Dutch adaptation of the PsAQoL. The PsAQoL, Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ and Skindex-17 were administered on two different occasions approximately two weeks apart. RESULTS: The Dutch version of the PsAQoL was found to be relevant, understandable and easy to complete in only a few minutes. It correlated as expected with the HAQ (Spearman's ρ = 0.72 and the 2 subscales of the Skindex-17 (ρ = 0.40 for the psychosocial and ρ = 0.46 for the symptom scale. Furthermore, the measure had good internal consistency (Cronbach's α = 0.92 and test-retest reliability (ρ = 0.89. The PsAQoL was able to define groups of patients based on self-reported general health status, self-reported severity of PsA and flare of arthritis. Duration of PsA did not influence PsAQoL scores. CONCLUSIONS: The Dutch version of the PsAQoL is a valid and reliable questionnaire suitable for use in clinical or research settings to asses PsA-specific QoL.

  6. A genome-wide association study of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis identifies new disease loci.

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    Ying Liu

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available A genome-wide association study was performed to identify genetic factors involved in susceptibility to psoriasis (PS and psoriatic arthritis (PSA, inflammatory diseases of the skin and joints in humans. 223 PS cases (including 91 with PSA were genotyped with 311,398 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, and results were compared with those from 519 Northern European controls. Replications were performed with an independent cohort of 577 PS cases and 737 controls from the U.S., and 576 PSA patients and 480 controls from the U.K.. Strongest associations were with the class I region of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC. The most highly associated SNP was rs10484554, which lies 34.7 kb upstream from HLA-C (P = 7.8x10(-11, GWA scan; P = 1.8x10(-30, replication; P = 1.8x10(-39, combined; U.K. PSA: P = 6.9x10(-11. However, rs2395029 encoding the G2V polymorphism within the class I gene HCP5 (combined P = 2.13x10(-26 in U.S. cases yielded the highest ORs with both PS and PSA (4.1 and 3.2 respectively. This variant is associated with low viral set point following HIV infection and its effect is independent of rs10484554. We replicated the previously reported association with interleukin 23 receptor and interleukin 12B (IL12B polymorphisms in PS and PSA cohorts (IL23R: rs11209026, U.S. PS, P = 1.4x10(-4; U.K. PSA: P = 8.0x10(-4; IL12B:rs6887695, U.S. PS, P = 5x10(-5 and U.K. PSA, P = 1.3x10(-3 and detected an independent association in the IL23R region with a SNP 4 kb upstream from IL12RB2 (P = 0.001. Novel associations replicated in the U.S. PS cohort included the region harboring lipoma HMGIC fusion partner (LHFP and conserved oligomeric golgi complex component 6 (COG6 genes on chromosome 13q13 (combined P = 2x10(-6 for rs7993214; OR = 0.71, the late cornified envelope gene cluster (LCE from the Epidermal Differentiation Complex (PSORS4 (combined P = 6.2x10(-5 for rs6701216; OR 1.45 and a region of LD at 15q21 (combined P = 2.9x10(-5 for rs

  7. Immune-Mediated Inflammation Promotes Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Recent-Onset Psoriatic Arthritis Patients without Conventional Cardiovascular Risk Factors

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    Rodolfo A. Kolliker Frers

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Studies on the inflammatory burden in recent-onset psoriatic arthritis (PsA patients without conventional cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs are not available. This preliminary study focuses on cardiovascular risk in cutaneous psoriasis (CPs and recent-onset PsA patients. Blood biochemistry (glucose, cholesterol, uric acid, lipid profile and apolipoprotein B was analyzed using standard kits. Proatherogenic inflammation markers, C-reactive protein (CRP and interleukin-6 (IL-6, and endothelial activators monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1, were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Ultrasound images allowed measuring carotid intima–media thickness (cIMT. Our study first shows an increase in cIMT, and in serum levels of sICAM-1 and CRP in recent-onset PsA patients not presenting conventional CVRFs over the non-medicated time-period, from disease diagnosis to the beginning of pharmacological treatment, compared with healthy subjects. The outcome highlights the importance of monitoring serum level of sICAM1, CRP, and cIMT, and the value of primary prevention in psoriatic patients even with no history of cardiovascular events.

  8. IgA deficiency evidence after anti-TNF-α treatment in a psoriatic arthritis patient: case report

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    R. Scarpa

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available It is known that the use of anti-TNF-α drugs is related to an increased incidence of infective diseases. This therapy can not be administered to patients having active infections and it has to be considered with caution in case of acquired or congenital immunodeficiency diseases. We report the case of a 28-years-old man affected by psoriatic arthritis; he developed some infections during treatment with TNF-α blockers. The infections were caused by a selective IgA deficiency, that was not evident before the anti-TNF-α blockers administration and disappeared after withdrawing the biological therapy. This case-report draws our attention to the possibility of cases of subclinical immunodeficiency, unknown by the patients, but important in the prognosis and in the therapeutic approach to these diseases. Therefore, it is important to evaluate carefully the immunologic status of patients during the pre-therapeutic screening for TNF-α blocking therapy.

  9. Self-reported health outcomes in patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis randomized to two etanercept regimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gniadecki, R; Robertson, David; Molta, C T

    2012-01-01

    the impact of skin disease on QoL; the Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index (HAQ-DI), an assessment of physical function; the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), which screens for anxiety and depression symptoms; and individual questions on general health, disease activity, fatigue......Background Moderate/severe psoriasis combined with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) impairs health-related quality of life (QoL). Etanercept, a fully human tumour necrosis factor-a receptor fusion protein, is approved for treatment of both diseases. Objective To compare patient-reported health outcomes...... additional weeks. PROs included: the EuroQOL-5D (EQ-5D), which measures general health status and consists of the utility index measuring five dimensions of health, and a visual analogue scale (VAS) allowing patients to assess health status; the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI), which measures...

  10. Effectiveness and Feasibility Associated with Switching to a Second or Third TNF Inhibitor in Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Lars Erik; Lie, Elisabeth; Jacobsson, Lennart T H

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Because new modes of action for the treatment of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) are emerging, it is important to understand the use of switching to a second or third antitumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) agent. This study investigated drug survival and treatment response rates of patients...... with PsA undergoing second- and third-line anti-TNF therapy. METHODS: Patients with PsA were monitored in a prospective, observational study. Patients who switched anti-TNF therapy once (first-time switchers, n = 217) or twice (second-time switchers, n = 57) between January 2003 and March 2012 were...... studied. American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) good response at 3 and 6 months, as well as drug survival, were reported and further analyzed using the Cox and logistic regression models. RESULTS: Median age for first-time switchers was 47 years and 42% were...

  11. The risk of depression, suicidal ideation and suicide attempt in patients with psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis or ankylosing spondylitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, J J; Penfold, R B; Primatesta, P

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sparse information is available concerning mental health issues in psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients. OBJECTIVE: To estimate risk of depression, suicidal ideation and suicide attempt in patients with psoriasis, PsA and AS, respectively......, compared with the general population. METHODS: This population-based cohort study analysed 36 214 psoriasis patients, 5138 PsA patients and 1878 AS patients who were frequency-matched with a general population cohort. Annual incidence rate of depression, suicidal ideation and suicide attempt was calculated...... separately for psoriasis, PsA and AS. RESULTS: There was an increased risk of depression in the three cohorts; adjusted IRR: psoriasis, 1.14 (95% CI, 1.11, 1.17); PsA, 1.22 (95% CI, 1.16, 1.29); AS, 1.34 (95% CI, 1.23, 1.47). There was no significantly increased risk for suicidal ideations or suicide attempt...

  12. PREVALENCE OF METABOLIC SYNDROME IN PATIENTS WITH PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS: ITS ASSOCIATION WITH INFLAMMATION AND SUBCLINICAL ATHEROSCLEROSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Markelova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome (MS is a cluster of metabolic disorders giving rise to atherosclerotic  cardiovascular diseases (CVD. The combination  of inflammatory activity and a high spread of traditional  risk factors (RF for CVD in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA permits them to be referred to as a higher cardiovascular risk group as compared to the general population.Objective: to estimate the spread of MS and its association with inflammation and subclinical atherosclerosis in patients with PsA.Subjects and methods. This investigation enrolled 128 patients with PsA (61.7% women and 38.3% men; their median age was 43 [34; 49.5] years; the duration of PsA and psoriasis – 7 [3; 13] and 15 [6; 26] years, respectively. There was a preponderance of patients with moderate (3.7 ≥ DAS > 2.4 and high (DAS > 3.7 disease activity: 33 (25.8% and 74 (57.8%, respectively. MS was diagnosed on the basis of the 2011 National  Guidelines of the Russian Cardiology Society for Cardiovascular Prevention.  All the patients underwent carotid Doppler ultrasound (CDU for the diagnosis of subclinical atherosclerosis. Results and discussion. MS was diagnosed in 49 (38.3% patients with PsA. The most common  MS criteria were abdominal  obesity in 72 (56.3% and dyslipidemia [an elevation of low-density lipoproteins (LDL  level in 101 (78.9%, and a decrease in high-density lipoproteins (HDL  level in 65 (50.8]. Hypertension was diagnosed in 32 (25%. 65 (50.8% patients were found to have subclinical atherosclerosis,  as evidenced by CDU.The patients with MS were older than those without this condition  (46 [43; 52] and 39 [31; 46] years, respectively; p < 0.0001. These groups did not differ in PsA duration (15 [7; 29] and 15 [5.5; 25] years respectively; p = 0.47. The patients with MS had higher DAS values (4.4 [3.2; 5.6] and 3.6 [2.5; 4.7], respectively; p = 0.02; mean intima media thickness (IMT  (0.78 [0.72; 0.86] and 0.73 [0.66; 0.77] mm; p < 0.0001 and

  13. Insight into the Endocrine System and the Immune System: A Review of the Inflammatory Role of Prolactin in Rheumatoid Arthritis and Psoriatic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man W. Tang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic autoimmune disease that affects females three times more frequently than males. A potential role for hormones, such as prolactin (PRL, may in part explain this phenomenon. The risk of developing RA is increased in women who are lactating after the first pregnancy, which might be related to breastfeeding and the release of PRL. Other studies found a protective effect of PRL on RA development. Some studies have reported that hyperprolactinemia is more common in RA and serum PRL levels are correlated with several disease parameters, although others could not confirm these findings. Overall the plasma PRL levels are on average not elevated in RA. Previously, a small number of open-label clinical trials using bromocriptine, which indirectly decreases PRL levels, were performed in RA patients and showed clinical benefit, although others found the opposite effect. Locally produced PRL at the site of inflammation may have a crucial role in RA as well, as it has been shown that PRL can be produced by synovial macrophages. Locally produced PRL has both pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory effects in arthritis. Psoriatic arthritis (PsA is also an autoinflammatory disease, in which the prolactin receptor is also expressed in macrophages. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the potential role of PRL signaling in inflammatory joint diseases (RA and PsA and its potential as a therapeutic target.

  14. The beneficial effect of total glucosides of paeony on psoriatic arthritis links to circulating Tregs and Th1 cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi Na; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Yan; Zhu, Ding Xian; Xu, Li Qin; Fang, Hong; Wu, Wei

    2014-03-01

    Total glycosides of peony (TGP) is a natural immuno-modulatory drug extracted from traditional Chinese herb peony. It has been approved by State Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. However, data of TGP effect on psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is still scarce. In this study, 19 patients with PsA received 12-week treatment of TGP, and clinical efficacy in joint manifestations was evaluated by DAS28 at weeks 0, 4, 8 and 12. Peripheral percentages of Tregs, Th1, Th2 and NK cells were analyzed, and serum Th1-type cytokines (IL-12, IFN-γ and TNF-α), Th2-type cytokines (IL-4, IL-5 and IL-10) as well as pro-inflammatory factors (IL-2, IL-6 and IL-8) were concomitantly examined. Six patients (32%) exhibited ≥25% decrease of DAS28 (responders). Interestingly, all responders displayed a continuous decrease in Treg and Th1 numbers during TGP treatment, concomitant with significant decreases in Th1-type cytokine levels. Serum IL-6 also showed a significant decline in responders. Non-responders lacked these sequential alterations. Thus, TGP merits further consideration as a promising therapeutic option for PsA. The result indicated that recovery of Tregs and Th1 may serve as prognostic markers to assess responsiveness to TGP treatment in PsA. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Novel approach to utilizing electronic health records for dermatologic research: developing a multi-institutional federated data network for clinical and translational research in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, April W; Reddy, Shalini B; Garg, Amit

    2012-05-15

    The implementation of Electronic Health Records (EHR) in the United States has created new opportunities for research using automated data extraction methods. A large amount of information from the EHR can be utilized for clinical and translational research. To date, a number of institutions have the capability of extracting clinical data from EHR to create local repositories of de-identified data amenable to research queries through the Informatics for Integrated Biology and the Bedside (i2b2) platform. Collaborations among institutions sharing a common i2b2 platform hold exciting opportunities for research in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. With the automated extraction of patient-level data from multiple institutions, this novel informatics network has the ability to address high-priority research questions. With commitment to high-quality data through applied algorithms for cohort identification and validation of outcomes, the creation of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis Integrated Research Data Network (PIONEER) will make a significant contribution to psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis research.

  16. Thermotherapy for treating rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, V; Brosseau, L; Casimiro, L; Judd, M; Shea, B; Wells, G; Tugwell, P

    2002-01-01

    Thermotherapy is often used as adjunct in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) by rehabilitation specialists. To evaluate the effectiveness of different thermotherapy applications on objective and subjective measures of disease activity in patients with RA. We searched Medline, EMBASE, Pedro, Current Contents, Sports Discus and CINAHL up to and including September 2001. The Cochrane Field of Rehabilitation and related therapies and the Cochrane Musculoskeletal Review Group were also contacted for a search of their specialized registers. Hand searching was conducted on all retrieved articles for additional articles. Comparative controlled studies, such as randomized controlled trials, controlled clinical trials, cohort studies or case/control studies, of thermotherapy compared to control or active interventions in patients with RA were eligible. No language restrictions were applied. Abstracts were accepted. Two independent reviewers identified potential articles from the literature search (VR, LB). These reviewers extracted data using pre-defined extraction forms. Consensus was reached on all data extraction. Quality was assessed by two reviewers using a 5 point scale that measured the quality of randomization, double-blinding and description of withdrawals. Seven studies (n=328 subjects) met the inclusion criteria. The results of this systematic review of thermotherapy for RA found that there was no significant effect of hot and ice packs applications (Ivey 1994), cryotherapy (Rembe 1970) and faradic baths (Hawkes 1986) on objective measures of disease activity including joint swelling, pain, medication intake, range of motion (ROM), grip strength, hand function compared to a control (no treatment) or active therapy. There is no significant difference between wax and therapeutic ultrasound as well as between wax and faradic bath combined to ultrasound for all the outcomes measured after 1, 2 or 3 week(s) of treatment (Hawkes 1986). There was no difference in

  17. Review of the treatment of psoriatic arthritis with biological agents: choice of drug for initial therapy and switch therapy for non-responders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, Salvatore; Tramontano, Giuseppina; Gilio, Michele; Leccese, Pietro; Olivieri, Ignazio

    2017-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a heterogeneous chronic inflammatory disease with a broad clinical spectrum and variable course. It can involve musculoskeletal structures as well as skin, nails, eyes, and gut. The management of PsA has changed tremendously in the last decade, thanks to an earlier diagnosis, an advancement in pharmacological therapies, and a wider application of a multidisciplinary approach. The commercialization of tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (adalimumab, certolizumab pegol, etanercept, golimumab, and infliximab) as well as interleukin (IL)-12/23 (ustekinumab) and IL-17 (secukinumab) inhibitors is representative of a revolution in the treatment of PsA. No evidence-based strategies are currently available for guiding the rheumatologist to prescribe biological drugs. Several international and national recommendation sets are currently available with the aim to help rheumatologists in everyday clinical practice management of PsA patients treated with biological therapy. Since no specific biological agent has been demonstrated to be more effective than others, the drug choice should be made according to the available safety data, the presence of extra-articular manifestations, the patient's preferences (e.g., administration route), and the drug price. However, future studies directly comparing different biological drugs and assessing the efficacy of treatment strategies specific for PsA are urgently needed.

  18. Comprehensive evaluation of finger flexor tendon entheseal soft tissue and bone changes by ultrasound can differentiate psoriatic arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinazzi, Ilaria; McGonagle, Dennis; Zabotti, Alen; Chessa, Donatella; Marchetta, Antonio; Macchioni, Pierluigi

    2018-02-28

    To determine whether a detailed sonographic evaluation of the hand flexor tendon compartment could help differentiate between psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Thirty-seven patients with PsA, 47 with RA and 10 healthy controls (HC) had flexor tendon (FT) compartment imaging of the dominant hand 2nd to 4th tendons using grey scale (GS) and power Doppler (PD) ultrasound (US) with evaluation for tenosynovitis, peri-tendinous lesions, soft tissue oedema and bony changes at FT insertions. 24/37 PsA and 19/47 RA cases had morning stiffness and 19/37 PsA and 10/47 RA had swollen and/or tender fingers. Tenosynovitis was more common in PsA (25/37) despite higher DAS28 scores in RA (25/37 versus 10/45; pthe insertional site was significantly more common in PsA (p=0.001). Considering a total inflammatory score per patient summing up the three modifications of the flexor tendon (tenosynovitis, peri-tendinous oedema and insertional enthesophytes) the difference between PsA and RA remained statistically significant (pthe growing body of literature that high resolution US of the hand FT compartment may help differentiate between RA and PsA, which needs assessment in the diagnostic setting.

  19. Discriminant validity, responsiveness and reliability of the arthritis-specific Work Productivity Survey assessing workplace and household productivity in patients with psoriatic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The novel arthritis-specific Work Productivity Survey (WPS) was developed to estimate patient productivity limitations associated with arthritis within and outside the home, which is an unmet need in psoriatic arthritis (PsA). The WPS has been validated in rheumatoid arthritis. This report assesses the discriminant validity, responsiveness and reliability of the WPS in adult-onset PsA. Methods Psychometric properties were assessed using data from the RAPID-PsA trial (NCT01087788) investigating certolizumab pegol (CZP) efficacy and safety in PsA. WPS was completed at baseline and every 4 weeks until Week 24. Validity was evaluated at baseline via known-groups defined using first and third quartiles of patients’ Disease Activity Score 28 based on C-reactive protein (DAS28(CRP)), Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index (HAQ-DI), Short Form-36 (SF-36) items and PsA Quality of Life (PsAQoL) scores. Responsiveness and reliability were assessed by comparing WPS mean changes at Week 12 in American College of Rheumatology 20% improvement criteria (ACR20) or HAQ-DI Minimal Clinically Important Difference (MCID) 0.3 responders versus non-responders, as well as using standardized response means (SRM). All comparisons were conducted on the observed cases in the Randomized Set, regardless of the randomization group, using a non-parametric bootstrap-t method. Results Compared with patients with a better health state, patients with a worse health state had on average 2 to 6 times more household work days lost, more days with reduced household productivity, more days missed of family/social/leisure activities, more days with outside help hired and a significantly higher interference of arthritis per month. Among employed patients, those with a worse health state had 2 to 4 times more workplace days lost, more days with patient workplace productivity reduced, and a significantly higher interference of arthritis on patient workplace productivity versus

  20. Comparison of screening questionnaires to identify psoriatic arthritis in a primary-care population: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, L C; Savage, L; Waxman, R; Moverley, A R; Worthington, S; Helliwell, P S

    2016-09-01

    Many questionnaires are available for assessment of psoriatic arthritis (PsA), but there is little evidence comparing them. To test the proposed CONTEST questionnaire, which was developed to identify patients with psoriasis who have undiagnosed PsA, and compare it with the validated Psoriasis Epidemiology Screening Tool (PEST) questionnaire in a primary-care setting. A random sample of adult patients with psoriasis and no diagnosis of arthritis was identified from five general practice surgeries in Yorkshire, U.K. Consenting patients completed both questionnaires and were assessed by a dermatologist and rheumatologist. Diagnosis of PsA was made by the assessing rheumatologist. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis examined the sensitivity and specificity of potential cut points. In total 932 packs were sent to recruit 191 (20·5%) participants. Of these, 169 (88·5%) were confirmed to have current or previous psoriasis. Using physician diagnosis 17 (10·1%) were found to have previously undiagnosed PsA, while 90 (53·3%) had another musculoskeletal complaint and 62 (36·7%) had no musculoskeletal problems. Using ROC curve analysis, all of the questionnaires showed a significant ability to identify PsA. The area under the curve (AUC) for the CONTEST questionnaires was slightly higher than that of PEST (0·69 and 0·70 vs. 0·65), but there was no significant difference identified. Examining the sensitivities and specificities for the different cut points suggested that a PEST score ≥ 2 would perform better in this dataset, and the optimal scores for CONTEST and CONTEST plus joint manikin were 3 and 4, respectively. The accuracy of the questionnaires to identify PsA appeared similar, with a slightly higher AUC for the CONTEST questionnaires. The optimal cut points in this study appeared lower than in previous studies. © 2016 British Association of Dermatologists.

  1. Impact of training on concordance among rheumatologists and dermatologists in the assessment of patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvarani, Carlo; Girolomoni, Giampiero; Di Lernia, Vito; Gisondi, Paolo; Tripepi, Giovanni; Egan, Colin Gerard; Marchesoni, Antonio

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the impact of training on the reliability among dermatologists and rheumatologists in the assessment of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) patients. Overall, 9 hospital-based rheumatologists and 8 hospital-based dermatologists met in Reggio Emilia, Italy on October 2015 to assess 17 PsA patients. After 1 month, physicians underwent a 3-h training session by 4 recognized experts and then assessed 19 different PsA patients according to a modified Latin square design. Measures included tender (TJC) and swollen joint count (SJC), dactylitis, enthesitis, Schober test, psoriasis body surface area (BSA), Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI), Nail Psoriasis Severity Index (NAPSI), and static physician's global assessment of PsA disease activity (sPGA). Variance components analyses were performed to estimate the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). TJC and enthesitis-measured pre-training by dermatologists or rheumatologists revealed moderate-substantial agreement (ICC: 0.4-0.8). In contrast, SJC and Schober test showed fair (ICC: 0.2-0.4) and moderate agreement, respectively (ICC: 0.4-0.6), while poor agreement (ICC: 0-0.2) was represented by dactylitis. Moderate-substantial (ICC: 0.4-0.8) agreement was observed for most skin measures by dermatologists and rheumatologists, apart from BSA, where fair agreement (ICC: 0.2-0.4) was observed. Agreement levels were similar before and after training for arthritis measures. In contrast, levels of agreement after training for 3 of the 4 skin measures were increased for dermatologists and all 4 skin measures were increased for rheumatologists. Substantial to excellent agreement was observed for TJC, enthesitis, PASI, and sPGA. Rheumatologists benefited from training to a greater extent. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Identification and management of comorbidity in psoriatic arthritis: evidence- and expert-based recommendations from a multidisciplinary panel from Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre-Alonso, Juan Carlos; Carmona, Loreto; Moreno, Mireia; Galíndez, Eva; Babío, Jesús; Zarco, Pedro; Linares, Luis; Collantes-Estevez, Eduardo; Barrial, Manuel Fernández; Hermosa, Juan Carlos; Coto, Pablo; Suárez, Carmen; Almodóvar, Raquel; Luelmo, Jesús; Castañeda, Santos; Gratacós, Jordi

    2017-08-01

    The objective is to establish recommendations, based on evidence and expert opinion, for the identification and management of comorbidities in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). The following techniques were applied: discussion group, systematic review, and Delphi survey for agreement. A panel of professionals from four specialties defined the users, the sections of the document, possible recommendations, and what systematic reviews should be performed. A second discussion was held with the results of the systematic reviews. Recommendations were formulated in the second meeting and voted online from 1 (total disagreement) to 10 (total agreement). Agreement was considered if at least 70% voted ≥7. The level of evidence and grade of recommendation were assigned using the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine guidance. The full document was critically appraised by the experts, and the project was supervised at all times by a methodologist. In a final step, the document was reviewed and commented by a patient and a health management specialist. Fourteen recommendations were produced, together with a checklist to facilitate the implementation. The items with the largest support from evidence were those related to cardiovascular disease and risk factors. The panel recommends paying special attention to obesity, smoking, and alcohol consumption, as they are all modifiable factors with an impact on treatment response or complications of PsA. Psychological and organizational aspects were also deemed important. We herein suggest practical recommendations for the management of comorbidities in PsA based on evidence and expert opinion.

  3. Golimumab therapy-induced indicators of X-ray inflammation progression and magnitude according to magnetic resonance imaging evidence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, or psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr Viktorovich Smirnov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives data on the progression of X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging changes in the hand and foot joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthropathy and in the axial skeleton of those with ankylosing spondylitis when golimumab is used. Golimumab therapy is shown to retard the progression of structural changes in the peripheral joints and vertebral column. There is a significant correlation between magnetic resonance imaging evidence and blood C-reactive protein concentrations.

  4. Incidence of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and polymyalgia rheumatica in an inland area of central Italy: results of the CAMPO-RHE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Socio, Antonia; Perrotta, Fabio Massimo; Grasso, Guido Maria; Lubrano, Ennio

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the CAMPO-RHE study was to determine the incidence of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) in patients attending a rheumatologic outpatient's clinic of a new institution in Campobasso, Italy. Campobasso is a small town of approximately 50,000 inhabitants located in the inland territory of central Italy (Molise), and Public Health is managed from a single health authority. In Italy, all citizens are registered with a National Health System of General Practitioner (GP) Physicians. Between the 1 st of June 2014 and the 31 st of May 2016, all consecutive adult patients, sent by a GP, of Campobasso with any diagnosis of musculoskeletal symptoms/signs/complaints were evaluated in a single rheumatology outpatient clinic of our Academic Unit. The clinic represents the first and unique reference for GPs about rheumatic diseases in the territory. Subjects were classified using the 2010 EULAR criteria for RA, the CASPAR criteria for PsA and the 2012 ACR classification criteria for PMR. 1003 adult patients, sent by GPs, with articular or musculoskeletal complaints visited our clinic. Of these, 409 inhabitants of the municipality of Campobasso were evaluated for the study. During the 2-year study period we diagnosed 18, 19 and 12 new cases of RA, PsA and PMR respectively, with a new incident cases rate of 21.4, 22.59 and 27.43/100,000/year on the population at risk. The results of our study could contribute to better define the incidence of these rheumatic diseases classified with the new classification criteria.

  5. Do depression and anxiety reduce the likelihood of remission in rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis? Data from the prospective multicentre NOR-DMARD study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelsen, Brigitte; Kristianslund, Eirik Klami; Sexton, Joseph; Hammer, Hilde Berner; Fagerli, Karen Minde; Lie, Elisabeth; Wierød, Ada; Kalstad, Synøve; Rødevand, Erik; Krøll, Frode; Haugeberg, Glenn; Kvien, Tore K

    2017-11-01

    To investigate the predictive value of baseline depression/anxiety on the likelihood of achieving joint remission in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) as well as the associations between baseline depression/anxiety and the components of the remission criteria at follow-up. We included 1326 patients with RA and 728 patients with PsA from the prospective observational NOR-DMARD study starting first-time tumour necrosis factor inhibitors or methotrexate. The predictive value of depression/anxiety on remission was explored in prespecified logistic regression models and the associations between baseline depression/anxiety and the components of the remission criteria in prespecified multiple linear regression models. Baseline depression/anxiety according to EuroQoL-5D-3L, Short Form-36 (SF-36) Mental Health subscale ≤56 and SF-36 Mental Component Summary ≤38 negatively predicted 28-joint Disease Activity Score anxiety was associated with increased patient's and evaluator's global assessment, tender joint count and joint pain in RA at follow-up, but not with swollen joint count and acute phase reactants. Depression and anxiety may reduce likelihood of joint remission based on composite scores in RA and PsA and should be taken into account in individual patients when making a shared decision on a treatment target. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  6. Change in CD3 positive T-cell expression in psoriatic arthritis synovium correlates with change in DAS28 and magnetic resonance imaging synovitis scores following initiation of biologic therapy--a single centre, open-label study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Pontifex, Eliza K

    2011-01-01

    With the development of increasing numbers of potential therapeutic agents in inflammatory disease comes the need for effective biomarkers to help screen for drug efficacy and optimal dosing regimens early in the clinical trial process. This need has been recognized by the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Clinical Trials (OMERACT) group, which has established guidelines for biomarker validation. To seek a candidate synovial biomarker of treatment response in psoriatic arthritis (PsA), we determined whether changes in immunohistochemical markers of synovial inflammation correlate with changes in disease activity scores assessing 28 joints (ΔDAS28) or magnetic resonance imaging synovitis scores (ΔMRI) in patients with PsA treated with a biologic agent.

  7. Validation of the OMERACT Psoriatic Arthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score (PsAMRIS) for the Hand and Foot in a Randomized Placebo-controlled Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glinatsi, Daniel; Bird, Paul; Gandjbakhch, Frederique

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To assess changes following treatment and the reliability and responsiveness to change of the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Psoriatic Arthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score (PsAMRIS) in a randomized controlled trial. Methods. Forty patients with PsA randomized to either...... placebo or abatacept (ABA) had MRI of either 1 hand (n = 20) or 1 foot (n = 20) at baseline and after 6 months. Images were scored blindly twice by 3 independent readers according to the PsAMRIS (for synovitis, tenosynovitis, periarticular inflammation, bone edema, bone erosion, and bone proliferation...

  8. MRI findings of treated bacterial septic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bierry, Guillaume; Huang, Ambrose J.; Chang, Connie Y.; Torriani, Martin; Bredella, Miriam A. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to report the MRI findings that can be encountered in successfully treated bacterial septic arthritis. The study included 12 patients (8 male and 4 female; mean age 38 years, range 9-85) with 13 proven cases of bacterial septic arthritis. The joints involved were hip (n = 3), knee (n = 3), shoulder (n = 2), sacroiliac (n = 2), ankle (n = 1), wrist (n = 1), and elbow (n = 1). MRI examinations following surgical debridement and at initiation of antibiotic therapy and after successful treatment were compared for changes in effusion, synovium, bone, and periarticular soft tissues. Imaging findings were correlated with microbiological and clinical findings. Joint effusions were present in all joints at baseline and regressed significantly at follow-up MRI (p = 0.001). Abscesses were present in 5 cases (38 %), and their sizes decreased significantly at follow-up (p = 0.001). Synovial enhancement and thickening were observed in all joints at both baseline and follow-up MRI. Myositis/cellulitis was present in 10 cases (77 %) at baseline and in 8 cases (62 %) at follow-up MRI. Bone marrow edema was present in 10 joints (77 %) at baseline and persisted in 8 joints (62 %). Bone erosions were found in 8 joints (62 %) and persisted at follow-up MRI in all cases. The sizes of joint effusions and abscesses appear to be the factors with the most potential for monitoring therapy for septic arthritis, since both decreased significantly following successful treatment. Synovial thickening and enhancement, periarticular myositis/cellulitis, and bone marrow edema can persist even after resolution of the infection. (orig.)

  9. MRI findings of treated bacterial septic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bierry, Guillaume; Huang, Ambrose J.; Chang, Connie Y.; Torriani, Martin; Bredella, Miriam A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the MRI findings that can be encountered in successfully treated bacterial septic arthritis. The study included 12 patients (8 male and 4 female; mean age 38 years, range 9-85) with 13 proven cases of bacterial septic arthritis. The joints involved were hip (n = 3), knee (n = 3), shoulder (n = 2), sacroiliac (n = 2), ankle (n = 1), wrist (n = 1), and elbow (n = 1). MRI examinations following surgical debridement and at initiation of antibiotic therapy and after successful treatment were compared for changes in effusion, synovium, bone, and periarticular soft tissues. Imaging findings were correlated with microbiological and clinical findings. Joint effusions were present in all joints at baseline and regressed significantly at follow-up MRI (p = 0.001). Abscesses were present in 5 cases (38 %), and their sizes decreased significantly at follow-up (p = 0.001). Synovial enhancement and thickening were observed in all joints at both baseline and follow-up MRI. Myositis/cellulitis was present in 10 cases (77 %) at baseline and in 8 cases (62 %) at follow-up MRI. Bone marrow edema was present in 10 joints (77 %) at baseline and persisted in 8 joints (62 %). Bone erosions were found in 8 joints (62 %) and persisted at follow-up MRI in all cases. The sizes of joint effusions and abscesses appear to be the factors with the most potential for monitoring therapy for septic arthritis, since both decreased significantly following successful treatment. Synovial thickening and enhancement, periarticular myositis/cellulitis, and bone marrow edema can persist even after resolution of the infection. (orig.)

  10. Musculoskeletal ultrasonography for psoriatic arthritis and psoriasis patients: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabotti, Alen; Bandinelli, Francesca; Batticciotto, Alberto; Scirè, Carlo Alberto; Iagnocco, Annamaria; Sakellariou, Garifallia

    2017-09-01

    To systematically review the role of musculoskeletal US in patients suffering from PsA or psoriasis (Pso) in terms of prevalence, diagnosis, prognosis, monitoring and treatment. A systematic literature review was conducted through medical databases (MEDLINE via PubMed, Embase) and the grey literature up to September 2015 to inform a new study of the Musculoskeletal Ultrasound Study Group of the Italian Society for Rheumatology. All articles reporting data on musculoskeletal US in PsA or Pso were included and extracted according to the underlying clinical question. A total of 86 publications were included. The prevalence of US abnormalities showed a wide range for each examined feature (e.g. 37-95% for entheses thickness of the lower limbs). The performance of US for diagnosis of disease or elementary lesions was variable across studies, but no study evaluated the overall performance of US in addition to clinical findings for diagnosing PsA. Considering US in defining PsA and Pso prognosis, several works focused on US of entheses of lower limbs in Pso, while for the monitoring of PsA activity five different scoring systems were identified. Last, the results of the role of US in guiding intra-articular interventions were controversial for the clinical outcomes, but in favour of US for accuracy. despite the recognized importance of US in the management of PsA and Pso, this review clearly demonstrated the need of pivotal research in order to optimize the use of US in the diagnosis and monitoring of psoriatic disease. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  11. A systematic review of measurement properties of patient reported outcome measures in psoriatic arthritis: A GRAPPA-OMERACT initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Højgaard, Pil; Klokker, Louise; Orbai, Ana-Maria; Holmsted, Kim; Bartels, Else M; Leung, Ying Ying; Goel, Niti; de Wit, Maarten; Gladman, Dafna D; Mease, Philip; Dreyer, Lene; Kristensen, Lars E; FitzGerald, Oliver; Tillett, William; Gossec, Laure; Helliwell, Philip; Strand, Vibeke; Ogdie, Alexis; Terwee, Caroline B; Christensen, Robin

    2018-04-01

    An updated psoriatic arthritis (PsA) core outcome set (COS) for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was endorsed at the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) meeting in 2016. To synthesize the evidence on measurement properties of patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) for PsA and thereby contribute to development of a PsA core outcome measurement set (COMS) as described by the OMERACT Filter 2.0. A systematic literature search was performed in EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO on Jan 1, 2017 to identify full-text articles with an aim of assessing the measurement properties of PROMs in PsA. Two independent reviewers rated the quality of studies using the COnsensus based standards for the Selection of health Measurement INstruments (COSMIN) checklist, and performed a qualitative evidence synthesis. Fifty-five studies were included in the systematic review. Forty-four instruments and a total of 89 scales were analyzed. PROMs measuring COS domains with at least fair quality evidence for good validity and reliability (and no evidence for poor properties) included the Stockerau Activity Score for PsA (German), Psoriasis Symptom Inventory, visual analogue scale for Patient Global, 36 Item Short Form Health Survey Physical Function subscale, Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index, PsA Impact of Disease questionnaire, PsA Quality of Life questionnaire, VITACORA-19, Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy Fatigue scale and Social Role Participation Questionnaire. At least one PROM with some evidence for aspects of validity and reliability was available for six of the eight mandatory domains of the PsA COS. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. An indirect comparison and cost per responder analysis of adalimumab, methotrexate and apremilast in the treatment of methotrexate-naïve patients with psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, Keith A; Griffith, Jenny; Friedman, Alan; Zhou, Zheng-Yi; Signorovitch, James E; Ganguli, Arijit

    2016-01-01

    Apremilast was recently approved for the treatment of active psoriatic arthritis (PsA). However, no studies compare apremilast with methotrexate or biologic therapies, so its relative comparative efficacy remains unknown. This study compared the response rates and incremental costs per responder associated with methotrexate, apremilast, and biologics for the treatment of active PsA. A systematic literature review was performed to identify phase 3 randomized controlled clinical trials of approved biologics, methotrexate, and apremilast in the methotrexate-naïve PsA population. Using Bayesian methods, a network meta-analysis was conducted to indirectly compare rates of achieving a ≥20% improvement in American College of Rheumatology component scores (ACR20). The number needed to treat (NNT) and the incremental costs per ACR20 responder (2014 US$) relative to placebo were estimated for each of the therapies. Three trials (MIPA for methotrexate, PALACE-4 for apremilast, and ADEPT for adalimumab) met all inclusion criteria. The NNTs relative to placebo were 2.63 for adalimumab, 6.69 for apremilast, and 8.31 for methotrexate. Among methotrexate-naïve PsA patients, the 16 week incremental costs per ACR20 responder were $3622 for methotrexate, $26,316 for adalimumab, and $45,808 for apremilast. The incremental costs per ACR20 responder were $222,488 for apremilast vs. methotrexate. Among methotrexate-naive PsA patients, adalimumab was found to have the lowest NNT for one additional ACR20 response and methotrexate was found to have the lowest incremental costs per ACR20 responder. There was no statistical evidence of greater efficacy for apremilast vs. methotrexate. A head-to-head trial between apremilast and methotrexate is recommended to confirm this finding.

  13. Low starting dosage of infliximab with possible escalating dosage in psoriatic arthritis gives the same treatment results as standard dosage of adalimumab or etanercept: results from the nationwide Icelandic ICEBIO registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gudbjornsson B

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Bjorn Gudbjornsson,1,2 Arni Jon Geirsson,3,4 Niels Steen Krogh5 1Centre for Rheumatology Research, University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland; 2Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland; 3Department of Rheumatology, University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland; 4Laeknasetrid - Medical Clinic, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland; 5Zitelab Aps, Copenhagen, Denmark Objective: To explore differences in response to a low dosage regimen of infliximab with an escalating dosage in comparison to a standard dosage of etanercept and adalimumab in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA. Methods: Biologically naïve PsA patients who were beginning anti-TNF-α therapy were selected from the ICEBIO registry. Demographics and clinical differences were compared in four treatment groups: infliximab <4 mg/kg; infliximab >4 mg/kg; etanercept or adalimumab at baseline and on follow-up (6 and 12 months, last visit. The Kruskal–Wallis rank sum test was used for comparison of the groups and the Wilcoxon test to compare the two infliximab dosage regimens. Results: One hundred and eighty-five patients (61% female were identified; 84 patients received infliximab, 66 etanercept, and 35 adalimumab. A total of 19% of the patients treated with infliximab escalated their dosage ≥4 mg/kg. No significant differences were observed at baseline in respect to visual analog scale (VAS pain, VAS fatigue, Health Assessment Questionnaire, C-reactive protein (CRP, numbers of swollen or tender joints, or Disease Activity Score (DAS 28-CRP values. A similar treatment response was observed in all four treatment groups on follow-up. Conclusion: In respect to treatment effects, a low dosage of infliximab with possible escalating dosage is acceptable for the majority of PsA patients who are in need of biological treatment. Keywords: psoriatic arthritis, outcome, biological treatment, routine care, clinical nationwide registry

  14. Development and validation of a new instrument to measure health-related quality of life in patients with psoriatic arthritis: the VITACORA-19.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre-Alonso, Juan Carlos; Gratacós, Jordi; Rey-Rey, José Santos; Valdazo de Diego, Juan Pablo; Urriticoechea-Arana, Ana; Daudén, Esteban; Moreno, Mireia; Zarco-Montejo, Pedro; Collantes-Estévez, Eduardo; Fernández-López, Juan Antonio

    2014-10-01

    To develop/validate an instrument to measure health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA), for use in clinical studies. An item pool of 35 items was generated following standardized procedures. Item reduction was performed using clinimetric and psychometric approaches after administration to 66 patients with PsA. The resulting instrument, the VITACORA-19, consists of 19 items. Its validity content, internal consistency, test-retest reliability, known groups/convergent validity, and sensitivity to change were tested in a longitudinal and multicenter study conducted in 10 hospitals in Spain, with 323 patients who also completed the EuroQol 5-dimensional questionnaire (EQ-5D) and a health status transition item. There were 3 study groups: group A (n = 209, patients with PsA), group B (n = 71, patients with arthritis without psoriatic aspect, patients with arthrosis, and patients with dermatitis), and group C (n = 43, healthy controls). The questionnaire was considered easy/very easy to answer by 94.7% of the patients with PsA. The factorial analysis clearly identified only 1 factor. Cronbach's alpha coefficient and interclass correlation coefficients exceeded 0.90. Statistically significant differences (p measure HRQoL in patients with PsA, has good validity, reliability, and sensitivity to change.

  15. Patients' perspectives in the management of psoriasis: the Italian results of the Multinational Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (MAPP) survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisondi, Paolo; Girolomoni, Giampiero

    2017-08-01

    The perspective of patients with psoriasis about medical care treatment goals and strategies is receiving increasing attention. Here, we performed a country-based analysis of the Multinational Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (MAPP) survey, in order to provide specific information on patients' perspective of treatment of psoriasis in Italy. This was a systematic household telephone survey recruiting subjects by random digit dialing. Household members ≥18 years were included if they had ever been diagnosed with psoriasis. About 12,785 households were screened in Italy. 132 patients were ineligible for the analysis, including patients with psoriatic arthritis. 359 patients were surveyed. About half of the patients had very mild disease with less than 1 palm skin involvement, and 38% had 1-10 palm skin disease. It is noteworthy that 48% of patients with widespread disease were not taking any medication. Patients indicated the relief of symptoms, including itching (54.9%), as the main goal for their current therapy, whereas 14.2% reported no specific expectation from their medication. Overall, 70% of patients declared to be satisfied by their therapy, in terms of primary goal reached. Our findings suggest that most psoriasis patients have mild/moderate disease in Italy, and that a portion of patients with severe disease does not receive an adequate treatment.

  16. A role for b-cell-depleting agents in treating psoriatic skin lesions induced by tumor necrosis factor-alpha antagonists: A case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ancuta Codrina Mihaela

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite recent advances in understanding the pathological pathways, clinical pattern and management opportunities for new-onset psoriasis as a paradoxical adverse event in patients receiving TNF inhibitors for their immune-mediated disorder, there is a subset of patients who are either partial responders or non-responders, whatever the therapeutic scenario. We present the case of new-onset psoriasis and severe alopecia development in a case study of long-standing rheumatoid arthritis (RA treated with adalimumab (ADA and leflunomide. Since skin lesions and alopecia are resistant to the classic protocol (topical treatment, ADA discontinuation and RA becomes highly active, rituximab (RTX was started. Dramatic improvement in joint disease, total remission of alopecia and partial remission of pustular psoriasis were described after the first RTX cycle. Although B-cell-depleting agents result in controversial effects on psoriatic skin lesions, this is the first case of ADA-induced psoriasis and alopecia that improved under RTX, suggesting a possible role in treating such a patient population.

  17. Characterization of changes in IgG associated oligosaccharide profiles in rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis using fluorophore linked carbohydrate electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, K; Talukder, R; Hay, F C; Axford, J S

    2001-07-01

    To investigate fluorophore linked carbohydrate electrophoresis (FCE) as a method of analyzing serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) oligosaccharides in healthy individuals and those with rheumatic disease and compare with lectin binding assays of carbohydrate composition. IgG was isolated from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) (n = 21), ankylosing spondylitis (AS) (n = 20), psoriatic arthritis (PsA) (n = 20), and healthy adults (n = 36). IgG oligosaccharides were released enzymatically, fluorescently labelled using 8 aminonaphthalene-136 trisulfonic acid; and identification of the oligosaccharide bands was by stepwise enzymatic degradation. Comparison of FCE was made with lectin binding analysis in which the lectins Ricinus communis (RCA1) and Bandeiraea simplicifolia (BSII) were used to detect galactose (Gal) and N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), respectively. Each disease could be differentiated from healthy adults on the basis of Band 1 asialodigalacto core fucosylated oligosaccharide (gf2) intensity (p = 0.001), but not from each other. Reduced levels of different sugars were associated with specific diseases: reduced gf2 with RA (p < 0.001), PsA (p < 0.001) and AS (p < 0.02), reduced Band 5 disialo-digalacto core fucosylated (a2f) oligosaccharide with AS (p < 0.001), reduced Band 6 disialo-digalacto (a2) oligosaccharide with AS (p < 0.001) and PsA (p = 0.021). All diseases were associated with a significant increase in Band 4 asialo-agalacto core fucosylated oligosaccharide (g0f) (p < 0.001). In RA, FCE band intensities correlated with sugar quantity when identified using lectin binding analysis (p < 0.003). In contrast, there was no correlation between the same bands in healthy individuals. FCE is an accurate method of analyzing IgG associated oligosaccharides and reveals unique band patterns or sugar prints associated with healthy adults and patients with RA, PsA, and AS, and comparison with lectin binding analysis suggests undetected RA glycoprotein structural

  18. Smoking paradox in the development of psoriatic arthritis among patients with psoriasis: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Uyen-Sa D T; Zhang, Yuqing; Lu, Na; Louie-Gao, Qiong; Niu, Jingbo; Ogdie, Alexis; Gelfand, Joel M; LaValley, Michael P; Dubreuil, Maureen; Sparks, Jeffrey A; Karlson, Elizabeth W; Choi, Hyon K

    2018-01-01

    Smoking is associated with an increased risk of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in the general population, but not among patients with psoriasis. We sought to clarify the possible methodological mechanisms behind this paradox. Using 1995-2015 data from The Health Improvement Network, we performed survival analysis to examine the association between smoking and incident PsA in the general population and among patients with psoriasis. We clarified the paradox using mediation analysis and conducted bias sensitivity analyses to evaluate the potential impact of index event bias and quantify its magnitude from uncontrolled/unmeasured confounders. Of 6.65 million subjects without PsA at baseline, 225 213 participants had psoriasis and 7057 developed incident PsA. Smoking was associated with an increased risk of PsA in the general population (HR 1.27; 95% CI 1.19 to 1.36), but with a decreased risk among patients with psoriasis (HR 0.91; 95% CI 0.84 to 0.99). Mediation analysis showed that the effect of smoking on the risk of PsA was mediated almost entirely through its effect on psoriasis. Bias-sensitivity analyses indicated that even when the relation of uncontrolled confounders to either smoking or PsA was modest (both HRs=~1.5), it could reverse the biased effect of smoking among patients with psoriasis (HR=0.9). In this large cohort representative of the UK general population, smoking was positively associated with PsA risk in the general population, but negatively associated among patients with psoriasis. Conditioning on a causal intermediate variable (psoriasis) may even reverse the association between smoking and PsA, potentially explaining the smoking paradox for the risk of PsA among patients with psoriasis. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  19. C5a and C5aR are elevated in joints of rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis patients, and C5aR blockade attenuates leukocyte migration to synovial fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornum, Lars; Hansen, Anker Jon; Tornehave, Ditte

    2017-01-01

    synovial fluid was significantly inhibited by anti-C5aR. The data support that the C5a-C5aR axis may be driving the infiltration of inflammatory cells into the synovial fluid and synovium in both rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis, and suggest that C5a or C5aR may be a promising treatment target in both...... a Boyden chamber. Appropriate statistical tests were applied for comparisons. C5aR+ cells were detected in most rheumatoid arthritis, in all psoriatic arthritis, but not in non-inflammatory control synovia. C5aR+ cells were primarily neutrophils and macrophages. C5aR+ macrophages were mainly found...

  20. The effect of psoriasis treatment on body composition, components of metabolic syndrome and psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Funda Tamer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory immun mediated skin disorder with unknown etiology. The chronic inflammation in psoriasis have role in the development of metabolic and vascular disorders related with associating comorbidities. Recent studies have suggested a strong association exists between metabolic syndrome, obesity and complexity of the association between psoriasis, body mass index (BMI and psoriasis tratment. In this study, our aim was to investigate the effect of psoriasis treatment with methotrexate, cyclosporine and biological agents on body composition, comorbidities and associated laboratory findings. Materials and Methods: Seventy-nine patients treated with methotrexate, cyclosporin and biological agents were included in our study. Demographic characteristics, body composition analysis, psoriasis related comorbidities and laboratory examinations were evaluated before and after 12 weeks of systemic treatment. Results: Comorbidities and metabolic syndrome tended to be more frequent in the anti tumor necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNF-α treated group. Increase in body fat and weight detected in patiens receiving biologic drug therapy. Conclusion: The results of our study showed that severe psoriasis patients with longer disease duration were more likely to have metabolic syndrome because of severe and long term inflammation in pathogenesis of comorbidities.

  1. Juvenil idiopatisk arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herlin, Troels

    2002-01-01

    The new classification of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is described in this review. Clinical characteristics divide JIA in to subtypes: systemic, oligoarticular (persistent and extended type), RF-positive and--negative polyarticular, enthesitis-related arthritis and psoriatic arthritis...

  2. Significance of clinical evaluation of the metacarpophalangeal joint in relation to synovial/bone pathology in rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis detected by magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Millicent A; White, Lawrence M; Gladman, Dafna D; Inman, Robert D; Chaya, Sam; Lax, Matthew; Salonen, David; Weber, Deborah A; Guthrie, Judy A; Pomeroy, Emma; Podbielski, Dominik; Keystone, Edward C

    2009-12-01

    Rheumatologists base many clinical decisions regarding the management of inflammatory joint diseases on joint counts performed at clinic. We investigated the reliability and accuracy of physically examining the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints to detect inflammatory synovitis using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as the gold standard. MCP joints 2 to 5 in both hands of 5 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 5 with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) were assessed by 5 independent examiners for joint-line swelling (visually and by palpation); joint-line tenderness by palpation (tender joint count, TJC) and stress pain; and by MRI (1.5 Tesla superconducting magnet). Interrater reliability was assessed using kappa statistics, and agreement between examination and corresponding MRI assessment was assessed by Fisher's exact tests (p 0.8) and positive predictive value (= 0.8). For PsA, significant associations exist between TJC and MRI synovitis scores (p < 0.01) and stress pain and MRI edema scores (p < 0.04). Assessment of swelling by palpation was not significantly associated with synovitis or edema as determined by MRI in RA or PsA (p = 0.54-1.0). In inflammatory arthritis, disease activity in MCP joints can be reliably assessed at the bedside by examining for joint-line tenderness (TJC) and visual inspection for swelling. Clinical assessment may have to be complemented by other methods for evaluating disease activity in the joint, such as MRI, particularly in patients with PsA.

  3. A Patient with Psoriatic Arthritis Imaged with FDG PET/CT Demonstrated an Unusual Imaging Pattern with Muscle and Fascia Involvement: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bains, Sukharn; Khan, Sana; Aparici, Carina Mari [Univ. of California, San Francisco (United States); Win, Aung Zaw; Reimert, Matthew [San Fracisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco (United States)

    2012-06-15

    We describe the case of a patient with known history of psoriasis that presented with 1 year of unexplained fever, muscle weakness and marked weight loss, suspicious for B symptoms of a malignant origin. [{sup 18}F]-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) scans demonstrated an unusual serpiginous pattern of uptake in the fascia and muscles as well as lymph node activity. Multiple histological samples, including a final PET-probe guided lymph node surgical resection, excluded malignancy and confirmed the diagnosis of reactive inflammatory changes, with a plausible diagnosis of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome with associated lymphadenitis, fasciitis and myositis, possibly mediated by tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor. To our knowledge, there is no evidence of a previously reported FDG uptake pattern of fascia and muscle involvement in psoriatic arthritis.

  4. Psoriatic arthritis in patients with psoriasis: evaluation of clinical and epidemiological features in 133 patients followed at the University Hospital of Brasília Artrite psoriásica em pacientes com psoríase: avaliação de características clínicas e epidemiológicas em 133 pacientes atendidos no Hospital Universitário de Brasília

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamille Nascimento Carneiro

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Psoriatic arthritis is an inflammatory arthritis associated with psoriasis. Its prevalence in patients with psoriasis varies from 7 to 42% but its exact prevalence is unknown. OBJECTIVES: Considering the lack of national data related to its diagnosis in patients with psoriasis, this study aims to describe the clinical, laboratorial and radiological manifestations of psoriatic arthritis in these patients. METHODS: We evaluated 133 patients with psoriasis, treated as outpatients. These patients were asked to fill in the forms with data about the disease and were submitted to a clinical evaluation by a dermatologist and a rheumatologist. Suspected cases of arthritis were referred for further investigation and were classified according to presence or absence of psoriatic arthritis according to CASPAR criteria. RESULTS: The number of patients with psoriatic arthritis was 47 (35%, 17 of them were new cases. There was no difference between the groups regarding the type of psoriasis, nail involvement, presence of scalp lesions and psoriatic arthritis. Patients with psoriatic arthritis had more enthesitis and dactylitis (46.7% than those without arthritis. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the high prevalence of arthritis found, we know that results from epidemiological studies are variable, which limits their use and interpretation. We conclude that more studies are needed to draw a profile of rheumatic manifestations in our population of psoriasis patients.FUNDAMENTOS: A artrite psoriásica é uma artrite inflamatória associada à psoríase. Sua prevalência nos pacientes com psoríase de 7 a 42% mas sua exata prevalência ainda é desconhecida. OBJETIVOS: Considerando a escassez de dados nacionais relacionados ao seu diagnóstico em pacientes com psoríase o presente estudo visa descrever o quadro clínico, laboratorial e radiológico da doença nesses pacientes. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados 133 pacientes com diagnóstico de psoríase acompanhados no

  5. The number needed to treat for second-generation biologics when treating established rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, L. E.; Jakobsen, A. K.; Bartels, E. M.

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the number needed to treat (NNT) and the number needed to harm (NNH) of the second-generation biologics abatacept, certolizumab, golimumab, rituximab, and tocilizumab in patients with established rheumatoid arthritis (RA) taking concomitant methotrexate (MTX)....

  6. The number needed to treat for second-generation biologics when treating established rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, L E; Jakobsen, A K; Bartels, E M

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the number needed to treat (NNT) and the number needed to harm (NNH) of the second-generation biologics abatacept, certolizumab, golimumab, rituximab, and tocilizumab in patients with established rheumatoid arthritis (RA) taking concomitant methotrexate (MTX).......To evaluate the number needed to treat (NNT) and the number needed to harm (NNH) of the second-generation biologics abatacept, certolizumab, golimumab, rituximab, and tocilizumab in patients with established rheumatoid arthritis (RA) taking concomitant methotrexate (MTX)....

  7. The Psoriatic Arthritis Impact of Disease 12-item questionnaire: equivalence, reliability, validity, and feasibility of the touch-screen administration versus the paper-and-pencil version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaffi, Fausto; Di Carlo, Marco; Carotti, Marina; Farah, Sonia; Gutierrez, Marwin

    2016-01-01

    Background Over the last few years, there has been a shift toward a more patient-centered perspective of the disease by adopting patient-reported outcomes. Touch-screen formats are increasingly being used for data collection in routine care and research. Objectives The aim of this study is to examine the equivalence, reliability, validity and respondent preference for a computerized touch-screen version of the Psoriatic Arthritis Impact of Disease 12-item (PsAID-12) questionnaire in comparison with the original paper-and-pencil version, in a cohort of patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Methods One hundred and fifty-nine patients with PsA completed both the touch screen- and the conventional paper-and-pencil administered PsAID-12 questionnaire. Agreement between formats was assessed by intraclass correlation coefficients. Spearman’s rho correlation coefficient was used to test convergent validity of the touch screen format of PsAID-12, while receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was performed to test discriminant validity. In order to assess the patient’s preference, the participants filled in an additional questionnaire. The time taken to complete both formats was measured. Results A high concordance between the responses to the two modes of the PsAID-12 tested was found, with no significant mean differences. Intraclass correlation coefficients between data obtained for touch-screen and paper versions ranged from 0.801 to 0.962. There was a very high degree of correlation between the touch-screen format of PsAID-12 and composite disease activity indices (all at a P level touch-screen format of PsAID-12, assessed using the minimal disease activity – Outcome Measurements in Rheumatology Clinical Trials criteria, was very good, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.937 and a resulting cutoff value of 2.5. The touch-screen questionnaire was readily accepted and preferred. The mean time spent for completing the

  8. Initial Experience of Using Dual-Energy CT with an Iodine Overlay Image for Hand Psoriatic Arthritis: Comparison Study with Contrast-enhanced MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Takeshi; Umezawa, Yoshinori; Tojo, Shinjiro; Yonenaga, Takenori; Asahina, Akihiko; Nakagawa, Hidemi; Fukuda, Kunihiko

    2017-07-01

    Purpose To determine the feasibility of dual-energy (DE) computed tomography (CT) with an iodine overlay image (IOI) for evaluation of psoriatic arthritis in the hand. Materials and Methods Approval from the institutional ethics committee and written informed consent from all patients were obtained. This prospective study included 16 patients who had psoriasis with finger joint symptoms from January 2015 to January 2016. Contrast material-enhanced (CE) DE CT and 1.5-T CE magnetic resonance (MR) imaging were performed within 1 month of each other. DE CT was performed with a tube voltage of 80 kV and 140 kV with use of a 0.4-mm tin filter. Images acquired with both modalities were evaluated by two radiologists independently by using a semiquantitative scoring system. Interreader agreement was calculated for each modality: Weighted κ values were calculated for synovitis, flexor tenosynovitis, and extensor peritendonitis, and κ values were calculated for periarticular inflammation. With consensus scores and CE MR images as the reference, the sensitivity and specificity of IOI DE CT for inflammatory lesions were calculated. Statistical analysis of discordant readings was performed by using the McNemar test. Results Interreader agreement for inflammatory lesions was excellent or good (weighted κ = 0.83 and κ = 0.75 in IOI DE CT; weighted κ = 0.81 and κ = 0.87 in CE MR imaging). The sensitivity and specificity of IOI DE CT were 0.78 and 0.87, respectively. Total agreement was 86.3%; however, there were significantly more lesions detected with IOI DE CT than with CE MR imaging alone (134 vs 20 lesions in 1120 evaluated items; P the abnormalities detected with IOI DE CT alone were located in distal interphalangeal joints. Conclusion IOI DE CT is a new imaging modality that may be useful for evaluating psoriatic arthritis in the hand, particularly in the detection of inflammatory lesions in small joints, and may be more useful than CE MR imaging, within the limitation

  9. THE RISK OF CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE DEVELOPMENT IN PATIENTS WITH ANKYLOSING SPONDYLITIS (BECHTEREW’S DISEASE AND PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS: A 10-YEAR PROSPECTIVE FOLLOW-UP STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Z. Gaidukova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: assessment of coronary artery disease (CAD incidence among patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS and psoriatic arthritis (PsA without manifestation of cardiovascular diseases.Materials and methods. We analyzed the data of 10-year prospective follow-up of the patient with AS (n = 278, psoriatic arthritis (n = 85 and healthy controls (n = 150 without any cardiovascular diseases. All groups were comparable in regard to cardiovascular risk factors. During these 10 years all new cases of CAD (verified by cardiologist in the study population were tracked.Results. New cases of CAD were fixed in 64 out of 278 patietns with AS and in 16 out of 150 controls (p = 0.0017. Using log-rank MantelCox test and logrank test for trend we demonstrated statistically significant differences in CAD incidence between patients without spondyloarthritis (SpA and patients with AS and PsA (p < 0,0001. The risk of CAD development was higher in PsA group than in the control group; relative risk was 4.16 (95 % confidence interval (CI 2.36–7.33, RR 6.1 (95 % CI 3.05–12.44 (p < 0.05. Increased risk of myocardial infarction was observed both in patients with AS (RR 4.98; 95 % CI 1.54–6.12 and patients with PsA (RR 5.2; 95 % CI 2.4–7.8 comparing to healthy controls. There was no significant difference between the AS-group and the control group in terms of risk of stenocardia development (p > 0.05.Conclusion. The risk of exertional stenocardia in patients with AS was not higher than that in individuals without SpA. However, patients with AS have higher risk of myocardial infarction than those without SpA. PsA patients have increased risk of CAD development comparing to healthy controls and individuals with AS.

  10. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Body Weight in Osteoarthritis Educational Videos for Patients Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Psoriatic Arthritis 101 ... Patient to an Adult Rheumatologist Drug Information for Patients Arthritis Drug Information Sheets Benefits and Risks of ...

  11. Uso do abatacepte em uma paciente com artrite psoriásica Use of the abatacept in a patient with psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Ewerton Maia Rodrigues

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Artrite psoriásica (AP é uma artrite inflamatória soronegativa de causa desconhecida. Classicamente, a AP apresenta cinco formas clínicas, sendo a oligoartrite assimétrica a mais comum. Descrevemos o caso de uma paciente com AP refratária às drogas modificadoras da doença, que evoluiu com hepatite medicamentosa após quimioprofilaxia com isoniazida, administrada previamente ao tratamento com anti-TNFα. Em virtude do risco de ativação de tuberculose (TB latente pela administração de anti-TNFα, da hepatotoxicidade decorrente do tratamento da TB, e baseado no fato de o tratamento da AP se assemelhar ao da artrite reumatoide, optou-se pelo tratamento empírico com abatacepte. Aproximadamente vinte dias após a segunda dose do biológico, a paciente evoluiu com importante melhora clínica, resolução da artrite, regressão das lesões de pele e melhora da anemia e das provas de atividade inflamatória.Psoriatic arthritis (PA is an inflammatory seronegative arthritis of unknown origin. Classically, PA has five clinical forms, and asymmetric oligoarthritis is the most common type. We describe the case of a patient with PA refractory to disease-modifying drugs, who developed drug-induced hepatitis after chemoprophylaxis with isoniazid, administered prior to the treatment with an anti-TNFα agent. Due to the risk of activating latent tuberculosis with the administration of anti-TNFα and hepatotoxicity onset caused by the TB treatment and based on the fact that the treatment of PA is similar to the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, a decision was made to use the empirical treatment with abatacept. Approximately twenty days after the second infusion of the drug, the patient showed clinical improvement, resolution of the arthritis, almost complete disappearance of the skin lesions and improvement of anemia and inflammatory tests.

  12. Clustered multistate models with observation level random effects, mover-stayer effects and dynamic covariates: modelling transition intensities and sojourn times in a study of psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiu, Sean; Farewell, Vernon T; Tom, Brian D M

    2018-02-01

    In psoriatic arthritis, it is important to understand the joint activity (represented by swelling and pain) and damage processes because both are related to severe physical disability. The paper aims to provide a comprehensive investigation into both processes occurring over time, in particular their relationship, by specifying a joint multistate model at the individual hand joint level, which also accounts for many of their important features. As there are multiple hand joints, such an analysis will be based on the use of clustered multistate models. Here we consider an observation level random-effects structure with dynamic covariates and allow for the possibility that a subpopulation of patients is at minimal risk of damage. Such an analysis is found to provide further understanding of the activity-damage relationship beyond that provided by previous analyses. Consideration is also given to the modelling of mean sojourn times and jump probabilities. In particular, a novel model parameterization which allows easily interpretable covariate effects to act on these quantities is proposed.

  13. Exploring the existence of a stayer population with mover-stayer counting process models: application to joint damage in psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiu, Sean; Farewell, Vernon T; Tom, Brian D M

    2017-08-01

    Many psoriatic arthritis patients do not progress to permanent joint damage in any of the 28 hand joints, even under prolonged follow-up. This has led several researchers to fit models that estimate the proportion of stayers (those who do not have the propensity to experience the event of interest) and to characterize the rate of developing damaged joints in the movers (those who have the propensity to experience the event of interest). However, when fitted to the same data, the paper demonstrates that the choice of model for the movers can lead to widely varying conclusions on a stayer population, thus implying that, if interest lies in a stayer population, a single analysis should not generally be adopted. The aim of the paper is to provide greater understanding regarding estimation of a stayer population by comparing the inferences, performance and features of multiple fitted models to real and simulated data sets. The models for the movers are based on Poisson processes with patient level random effects and/or dynamic covariates, which are used to induce within-patient correlation, and observation level random effects are used to account for time varying unobserved heterogeneity. The gamma, inverse Gaussian and compound Poisson distributions are considered for the random effects.

  14. Evaluation of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Responsiveness in Active Psoriatic Arthritis at Multiple Timepoints during the First 12 Weeks of Antitumor Necrosis Factor Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feletar, Marie; Hall, Stephen; Bird, Paul

    2016-01-01

    To assess the responsiveness of high- and low-field extremity magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) variables at multiple timepoints in the first 12 weeks post-antitumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) therapy initiation in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and active dactylitis. Twelve patients with active PsA and clinical evidence of dactylitis involving at least 1 digit were recruited. Patients underwent sequential high-field conventional (1.5 Tesla) and extremity low-field MRI (0.2 Tesla) of the affected hand or foot, pre- and postgadolinium at baseline (pre-TNF), 2 weeks (post-TNF), 6 weeks, and 12 weeks. A blinded observer scored all images on 2 occasions using the PsA MRI scoring system. Eleven patients completed the study, but only 6 patients completed all high-field and low-field MRI assessments. MRI scores demonstrated rapid response to TNF inhibition with score reduction in tenosynovitis, synovitis, and osteitis at 2 weeks. Intraobserver reliability was good to excellent for all variables. High-field MRI demonstrated greater sensitivity to tenosynovitis, synovitis, and osteitis and greater responsiveness to change posttreatment. Treatment responses were maintained to 12 weeks. This study demonstrates the use of MRI in detecting early response to biologic therapy. MRI variables of tenosynovitis, synovitis, and osteitis demonstrated responsiveness posttherapy with high-field scores more responsive to change than low-field scores.

  15. Use of aspirin, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and acetaminophen (paracetamol), and risk of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shaowei; Han, Jiali; Qureshi, Abrar A

    2015-02-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been reported to induce or exacerbate psoriasis. We aimed to evaluate the association between several widely used analgesics, including aspirin, non-aspirin NSAIDs, and acetaminophen (paracetamol), and risk of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in a large cohort of US women, the Nurses' Health Study II (1991-2005). Information on regular use of aspirin, NSAIDs, and acetaminophen was collected for 95,540 participants during the follow-up. During 1,321,280 person-years of follow-up, we documented 646 incident psoriasis cases and 165 concomitant PsA cases. Compared to women who reported no use, regular acetaminophen and NSAIDs users with more than 10 years of use had multivariate hazard ratios of 3.60 [95% confidence interval (CI): 2.02-6.41] and 2.10 (95% CI: 1.11-3.96) for PsA, respectively. There was no clear association between aspirin and risk of psoriasis or PsA. In conclusion, long-term acetaminophen and NSAIDs use may be associated with an increased risk of PsA. Special attention on psoriasis and PsA screening may be needed for those who are prescribed for acetaminophen and NSAIDs for long-term periods.

  16. Bone mineral density status and frequency of osteoporosis and clinical fractures in 155 patients with psoriatic arthritis followed in a university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busquets, Noemi; Vaquero, Carmen Gómez; Moreno, Jesús Rodríguez; Vilaseca, Daniel Roig; Narváez, Javier; Carmona, Loreto; Nolla, Joan M

    2014-01-01

    To assess the bone mineral density (BMD) and the frequency of osteoporosis and clinical fractures in a large group of Spanish patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). BMD was determined by DXA in all the patients who were willing to participate and had peripheral PsA regularly evaluated in a tertiary university hospital. All patients underwent a physical examination and general laboratory analysis. We gathered demographic and clinical variables related with BMD and risk of fractures. We also recorded the history of clinical low impact fractures. The population of reference to calculate T-score and Z-score came from a Spanish database. One hundred and fifty-five patients were included (64 postmenopausal women, 26 premenopausal women and 65 men). The clinical forms of PsA were: 46% oligoarticular and 54% polyarticular. Mean disease duration was 13.7±9.4 years and mean ESR was 21.8±13.9mm/h; 66% of patients had received glucocorticoid treatment. We found no differences in BMD status between the patients and the Spanish general population, neither in the whole series nor in each defined subgroup. Frequency of osteoporosis was 16%; it was higher in postmenopausal women (28%) than in men (9%) or premenopausal women (4%). Frequency of clinical fractures was 13%; it accounted specially in postmenopausal women. The magnitude of the problem of osteoporosis in PsA seems to be mild. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  17. Infliximab plus methotrexate is superior to methotrexate alone in the treatment of psoriatic arthritis in methotrexate-naive patients: the RESPOND study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranauskaite, Asta; Raffayová, Helena; Kungurov, N V; Kubanova, Anna; Venalis, Algirdas; Helmle, Laszlo; Srinivasan, Shankar; Nasonov, Evgeny; Vastesaeger, Nathan

    2012-04-01

    To compare the efficacy and safety of treatment with infliximab plus methotrexate with methotrexate alone in methotrexate-naive patients with active psoriatic arthritis (PsA). In this open-label study, patients 18 years and older with active PsA who were naive to methotrexate and not receiving disease-modifying therapy (N=115) were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive either infliximab (5 mg/kg) at weeks 0, 2, 6 and 14 plus methotrexate (15 mg/week); or methotrexate (15 mg/week) alone. The primary assessment was American College of Rheumatology (ACR) 20 response at week 16. Secondary outcome measures included psoriasis area and severity index (PASI), disease activity score in 28 joints (DAS28) and dactylitis and enthesitis assessments. At week 16, 86.3% of patients receiving infliximab plus methotrexate and 66.7% of those receiving methotrexate alone achieved an ACR20 response (palone experienced a 75% or greater improvement in PASI (palone group. Treatment with infliximab plus methotrexate in methotrexate-naive patients with active PsA demonstrated significantly greater ACR20 response rates and PASI75 improvement compared with methotrexate alone and was generally well tolerated. This trial is registered in the US National Institutes of Health clinicaltrials.gov database, identifier NCT00367237.

  18. Severe glandular tularemia in a patient treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor for psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calin, Ruxandra; Caumes, Eric; Reibel, Florence; Ali Mohamed, Anzime; Brossier, Florence; Foltz, Violaine; Boussouar, Samia; Fautrel, Bruno; Maurin, Max; Katlama, Christine; Pourcher, Valérie

    2017-07-01

    A case of severe glandular tularemia in a patient receiving anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) therapy is reported here. The patient required prolonged treatment with doxycycline-ciprofloxacin due to early relapse after ciprofloxacin was stopped. Tularemia may have a more severe course in patients receiving anti-TNF. This may thus be an indication for more aggressive treatment. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Severe glandular tularemia in a patient treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor for psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruxandra Calin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A case of severe glandular tularemia in a patient receiving anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF therapy is reported here. The patient required prolonged treatment with doxycycline–ciprofloxacin due to early relapse after ciprofloxacin was stopped. Tularemia may have a more severe course in patients receiving anti-TNF. This may thus be an indication for more aggressive treatment.

  20. Insight into the Endocrine System and the Immune System: A Review of the Inflammatory Role of Prolactin in Rheumatoid Arthritis and Psoriatic Arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, Man W.; Garcia, Samuel; Gerlag, Danielle M.; Tak, Paul P.; Reedquist, Kris A.

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disease that affects females three times more frequently than males. A potential role for hormones, such as prolactin (PRL), may in part explain this phenomenon. The risk of developing RA is increased in women who are lactating after the first

  1. Validation of the OMERACT Psoriatic Arthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score (PsAMRIS) for the Hand and Foot in a Randomized Placebo-controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glinatsi, Daniel; Bird, Paul; Gandjbakhch, Frederique; Mease, Philip J; Bøyesen, Pernille; Peterfy, Charles G; Conaghan, Philip G; Østergaard, Mikkel

    2015-12-01

    To assess changes following treatment and the reliability and responsiveness to change of the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Psoriatic Arthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score (PsAMRIS) in a randomized controlled trial. Forty patients with PsA randomized to either placebo or abatacept (ABA) had MRI of either 1 hand (n = 20) or 1 foot (n = 20) at baseline and after 6 months. Images were scored blindly twice by 3 independent readers according to the PsAMRIS (for synovitis, tenosynovitis, periarticular inflammation, bone edema, bone erosion, and bone proliferation). Inflammatory features improved numerically but statistically nonsignificantly in the ABA group but not the placebo group. Baseline intrareader intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were good (≥ 0.50) to very good (≥ 0.80) for all features in both hand and foot. Baseline interreader ICC were good (ICC 0.72-0.96) for all features, except periarticular inflammation and bone proliferation in the hand and tenosynovitis in the foot (ICC 0.25-0.44). Intrareader and interreader ICC for change scores varied. Guyatt's responsiveness index (GRI) was high for inflammatory features in the hand and metatarsophalangeal joints (GRI -0.67 to -3.13; bone edema not calculable). Minimal change and low prevalence resulted in low ICC and GRI for bone damage. PsAMRIS showed overall good intrareader agreement in the hand and foot, and inflammatory feature scores were responsive to change, suggesting that PsAMRIS may be a valid tool for MRI assessment of hands and feet in PsA clinical trials.

  2. Income disparities in healthcare use remain after controlling for healthcare need: evidence from Swedish register data on psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löfvendahl, Sofia; Jöud, Anna; Petersson, Ingemar F; Theander, Elke; Svensson, Åke; Carlsson, Katarina Steen

    2018-04-01

    We used a southern Swedish cohort of psoriasis (PSO) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) patients and population-based referents (N = 57,800) to investigate the influence of socioeconomic and demographic factors on the probability of healthcare use and on healthcare costs when controlling for need as measured by PSO/PsA and common additional morbidities such as diabetes, depression and myocardial infarction. People with PSO/PsA were identified by ICD-10 codes in the Skåne Healthcare Register 1998-2007. Resource use and costs for years 2008-2011 were retrieved from the Skåne Healthcare Register and the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register, and socioeconomic data were retrieved from Statistics Sweden. After controlling for PSO/PsA and common additional morbidities, income, and to some extent education, had significant effects on the probability of five types of healthcare use. Overall, income showed a bell-shaped relationship to healthcare costs, with patients in income quintiles 2 and 3 having the highest mean annualized cost irrespective of model specification. Education did not have a significant effect in most specifications. Analyses including interaction effects indicated similarly higher costs across income quintiles in the PSO and PsA subgroups, though these cost differences were lower in magnitude for patients with PSO in quintile 5 and with PsA in quintile 1. In conclusion, our results show persistent socioeconomic disparities in healthcare use among a cohort of chronically ill patients and referents, even after controlling for the presence of PSO/PsA and common additional morbidities. These disparities persist even in a country with general healthcare coverage and low out-of-pocket payments.

  3. Updating the Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) Core Domain Set: A Report from the PsA Workshop at OMERACT 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbai, Ana-Maria; de Wit, Maarten; Mease, Philip J; Callis Duffin, Kristina; Elmamoun, Musaab; Tillett, William; Campbell, Willemina; FitzGerald, Oliver; Gladman, Dafna D; Goel, Niti; Gossec, Laure; Hoejgaard, Pil; Leung, Ying Ying; Lindsay, Chris; Strand, Vibeke; van der Heijde, Désirée M; Shea, Bev; Christensen, Robin; Coates, Laura; Eder, Lihi; McHugh, Neil; Kalyoncu, Umut; Steinkoenig, Ingrid; Ogdie, Alexis

    2017-10-01

    To include the patient perspective in accordance with the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Filter 2.0 in the updated Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) Core Domain Set for randomized controlled trials (RCT) and longitudinal observational studies (LOS). At OMERACT 2016, research conducted to update the PsA Core Domain Set was presented and discussed in breakout groups. The updated PsA Core Domain Set was voted on and endorsed by OMERACT participants. We conducted a systematic literature review of domains measured in PsA RCT and LOS, and identified 24 domains. We conducted 24 focus groups with 130 patients from 7 countries representing 5 continents to identify patient domains. We achieved consensus through 2 rounds of separate surveys with 50 patients and 75 physicians, and a nominal group technique meeting with 12 patients and 12 physicians. We conducted a workshop and breakout groups at OMERACT 2016 in which findings were presented and discussed. The updated PsA Core Domain Set endorsed with 90% agreement by OMERACT 2016 participants included musculoskeletal disease activity, skin disease activity, fatigue, pain, patient's global assessment, physical function, health-related quality of life, and systemic inflammation, which were recommended for all RCT and LOS. These were important, but not required in all RCT and LOS: economic cost, emotional well-being, participation, and structural damage. Independence, sleep, stiffness, and treatment burden were on the research agenda. The updated PsA Core Domain Set was endorsed at OMERACT 2016. Next steps for the PsA working group include evaluation of PsA outcome measures and development of a PsA Core Outcome Measurement Set.

  4. A hot spot for systemic lupus erythematosus, but not for psoriatic arthritis, identified by spatial analysis suggests an interaction between ethnicity and place of residence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Maini, Mustafa; Jeyalingam, Thurarshen; Brown, Patrick; Lee, Jennifer J Y; Li, Lennon; Su, Jiandong; Gladman, Dafna D; Fortin, Paul R

    2013-06-01

    To describe the spatial distribution of incident cases of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) using geographic information systems (GIS). Spatial analyses were carried out on 890 SLE patients and 541 psoriatic arthritis (PsA) patients (controls). Age- and sex-adjusted rates for SLE/PsA for each census tract were calculated using denominator population values from the Canadian census. Spatial variations in relative risk were estimated by modeling risk as the product of a time effect, an age effect, and a spatially autocorrelated risk surface to identify hot spots. Patients within the detected hot spot were compared to those outside the hot spot to identify explanatory factors. SLE patients were predominantly female (87.75%) and the incidence rate was highest among those 15-19 years of age (2.4 cases/100,000 person-years). In an SLE hot spot containing 59 patients, 100% of the patients were female and 49.1% (n = 29) were Caucasian, while outside of the hot spot, 86.9% (n = 722) of the patients were female and 68.4% (n = 568) were Caucasian. The proportion of cases of Chinese ethnicity was significantly greater within the hot spot. An interaction was found between Chinese ethnicity and residence within the hot spot, with the risk of SLE to the Chinese population found to be twice the risk to the non-Chinese population. GIS was used to map SLE cases and a hot spot was identified after adjustment for age and sex. Ethnicity by itself did not confer an increased risk of SLE, but the interaction of ethnicity with location of residence significantly increased the risk of SLE. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  5. Subjective Health Complaints in Individuals with Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis: Associations with the Severity of the Skin Condition and Illness Perceptions - A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordbø, Emma Charlott Andersson; Aamodt, Geir; Ihlebæk, Camilla Martha

    2017-06-01

    High comorbidity has been reported among persons with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA), but the occurrence of subjective health complaints (SHCs) in these patient groups is poorly understood. The study aimed to describe the prevalence of SHCs among individuals with psoriasis and PsA in Norway, and investigate whether the severity of their skin condition and their illness perceptions were associated with the number and severity of health complaints. Participants were recruited through the Psoriasis and Eczema Association of Norway (PEF) (n = 942). The participants answered a self-administered questionnaire covering subjective health complaints, the severity of their skin condition, and their illness perceptions measured with the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (BIPQ-R). The prevalence and severity of SHCs were high. Participants with PsA reported more complaints and higher severity of complaints compared with participants with psoriasis. In both groups, the severity of the skin condition was associated with the number and severity of SHCs. Cognitive illness perceptions (consequences) and emotional illness perceptions (emotional affect) were associated with SHCs in participants with psoriasis, whereas only cognitive illness perceptions (consequences and identity) were associated with SHCs in participants with PsA. The high prevalence and severity of SHCs among individuals with psoriasis and PsA were associated with the severity of the skin condition and illness perceptions. Somatic and cognitive sensitizations are proposed as possible mechanisms. The findings suggest that holistic approaches are essential when managing these patient groups in health care institutions and clinical practice.

  6. Two-year survival rates of anti-TNF-α therapy in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) patients with either polyarticular or oligoarticular PsA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannone, F; Lopriore, S; Bucci, R; Scioscia, C; Anelli, M G; Notarnicola, A; Lapadula, G

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the 2-year drug survival rates of the tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α blockers adalimumab, etanercept, and infliximab in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) patients with either oligoarticular (oligo-PsA) or polyarticular PsA (poly-PsA). We studied a prospective cohort of 328 PsA patients with peripheral arthritis (213 with poly-PsA and 115 with oligo-PsA), beginning their first ever anti-TNF-α treatment with adalimumab, etanercept, or infliximab. The aim of the study was to evaluate the drug survival rates and possible baseline predictors at 2 years. After 24 months, persistence in therapy with the first anti-TNF-α blocker was not statistically different in the oligo-PsA (70.4%) and poly-PsA (65.7%) subsets. Predictors of drug discontinuation were female sex [hazard ratio (HR) 1.63, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.00-2.68, p = 0.04] and starting the therapy in years 2003-8 (HR 0.51, 95% CI 0.33-0.80, p = 0.003). In poly-PsA, the persistence of etanercept (68.3%) was significantly higher than that of adalimumab (51.9%, p = 0.01), whereas in oligo-PsA no significant difference was detected. In poly-PsA, the period 2003-8 was a negative predictor (HR 0.36, 95% CI 0.21-0.62, p = 0.0001) whereas in oligo-PsA female gender was a positive predictor of drug discontinuation (HR 2.08, 95% CI 1.02-4.24, p = 0.04). With regard to clinical outcomes, the best responses in terms of European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) 'good' response or Disease Activity Score (DAS28) remission, crude or adjusted according to the LUND Efficacy indeX (LUNDEX), were seen in patients on etanercept or infliximab. Our study provides some evidence that anti-TNF-α drugs may perform differently in PsA, and that the analysis of clinical disease subsets may improve our knowledge and promote better management of PsA.

  7. THE DIAGNOSTIC VALUE OF CLINICAL EXAMINATION AND ULTRASOUND STUDY OF ENTHESES FOR EARLY DETECTION OF PSORIATIC AND RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS: REMARC STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Viktorovna Korotaeva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of enthesitis can help in differentiating early psoriatic arthritis (ePsA from early rheumatoid arthritis (eRA.Objective. To estimate the diagnostic value of detecting enthesitis during clinical examination and ultrasound in ePsA and eRA.Subjects and methods. The trial included 36 patients with ePsA and 33 with eRA. Entheses were evaluated using the Leeds Enthesitis Index (LEI: lateral humeral epicondyle and medial femoral condyle (MFC, Achilles tendon insertion site (ATAP, and plantar fascia (PF point on the right and on the left. Enthesitis (on ultrasound presented with thickening, reduced echo density, and vascularization at Doppler energy imaging. DAS, DAS28, SDAI, CDAI, M±SD, Me [25th, 75th percentile], t-test, Fisher's exact test, χ2test, U test, and Spearman correlation coefficients (R were calculated; the value p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant.Results. Clinical examination revealed enthesitis in 41.6% of the patients with ePsA and in 39.4% of those with eRA (p >0.05. No significant differences were found between ePsA and eRA according to LEI (0.5 [0; 2] and 1 [0; 2] and to LEI+PF (1 [0; 2] and 1 [0; 2], respectively. Enthesitis of MFC and PF was significantly more frequently detected in ePsA than in eRA – 12 (33.3%/2 (6.1% and 10 (27.8%/2 (6.1% patients, respectively. In eRA versus ePsA, enthesitis of MFC was more frequently found (16 (48.4% and 8 (22.2% patients, respectively. Ultrasound revealed no significant differences between the groups in enthesitis. In ePsA, there was a significant correlation between DAS, DAS28, SDAI, CDAI, LEI, and LEI+PF.Conclusion. Enthesis ultrasound cannot differentiate ePsA from eRA. Clinical examination more frequently detects enthesitis in the knee joints in eRA and in the calcaneal region in ePsA.

  8. Association between use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and diabetes in patients with ankylosing spondylitis, rheumatoid arthritis, or psoriasis/psoriatic arthritis: a nationwide, population-based cohort study of 84,989 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen HH

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Hsin-Hua Chen,1–7 Der-Yuan Chen,1–6 Chi-Chen Lin,1,2 Yi-Ming Chen,1–4 Kuo-Lung Lai,3,4 Ching-Heng Lin1 1Department of Medical Research, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, 2Institute of Biomedical Science and Rong Hsing Research Center for Translational Medicine, Chung-Hsing University, Taichung, 3School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, 4Division of Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, 5School of Medicine, Chung-Shan Medical University, 6Department of Medical Education, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, 7Institute of Public Health and Community Medicine Research Center, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan Purpose: The aim of this study is to investigate the association between the use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs and diabetes mellitus (DM in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS, rheumatoid arthritis (RA, or psoriasis/psoriatic arthritis (PS/PSA.Patients and methods: This retrospective cohort study used a nationwide, population-based administrative database to enroll 84,989 cases with AS, RA, or PS/PSA who initiated treatment with anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF drugs or nonbiologic DMARDs. Multivariable analysis was used to estimate the effect of different therapies on the risk of DM.Results: The incidence rates of DM per 1,000 person-years were 8.3 for users of anti-TNF drugs, 13.3 for users of cyclosporine (CSA, 8.4 for users of hydroxychloroquine (HCQ, and 8.1 for users of other nonbiologic DMARDs. Compared with the users of nonbiologic DMARDs, the multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs for DM were significantly lower for those who used anti-TNF drugs with HCQ (aHR: 0.49, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.36–0.66 and those who used HCQ alone (aHR: 0.70, 95% CI: 0.63–0.78, but not for those who used anti-TNFs without HCQ (aHR: 1.23, 95% CI: 0.94–1.60 or CSA (aHR: 1.14, 95% CI: 0.77–1

  9. Psoriatic arthropathy in a 17th century archaeological protestant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Besides a plague epidemic that appeared as soon as 1636 or even before in the area of the Marne mander, and more precisely in Saint-Maurice, psoriatic arthropathy (or psoriatic arthritis) lesions were diagnosed on the skeletons of an important population that had never been described before. The lesion symptoms of this ...

  10. Functional bone marrow scintigraphy in psoriatics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munz, D.; Altmeyer, P.; Chilf, G.; Schlesinger, G.; Holzmann, H.; Hoer, G.

    1982-01-01

    24 psoriatics as well as 24 normal healthy adults were studied by functional bone marrow scintigraphy using Tc-99m-labeled human serum albumin millimicrospheres (Tc-99m-HSA-MM). Functional bone marrow scintigraphy is an in vivo test system for the assessment of various functional properties of fixed macrophages. 58% of psoriatics who had no systemic drug treatment demonstrated peripheral extension of the bone marrow space indicating hyperplasia of bone marrow macrophages. This phenomenon could be observed only in one normal subject who was a high-performance sportsman. 83% (n=6) of psoriatics with cirrhosis of liver demonstrated bone marrow extension. The 'capacity' of bone marrow macrophages to engulf Tc-99m-HSA-MM ('uptake ratio') was diminished in 42% of non-treated as well as 66% of psoriatics treated with aromatic retinoid. The phagocytic and proteolytic turnover of Tc-99m-HSA-MM in bone marrow, spleen, and liver was found to be accelerated in 66% of non-treated psoriatics, normal, accelerated or delayed in psoriatics treated with aromatic retinoid as well as considerably delayed in all of the psoriatics with cirrhosis of liver. Functional bone marrow scintigraphy proved to be an appropriate in vivo test system to reveal abnormalities of fixed macrophages in psoriatics. Furthermore, theratpeutic effects as well as influences of pre-existing disorders on different macrophage populations can be assessed. (Author)

  11. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and what other conditions are associated with RA. Learning more about your condition will allow you to ... Arthritis Educational Video Series Psoriatic Arthritis 101 2010 E.S.C.A.P.E. Study Patient Update Transitioning ...

  12. Comorbidity and economic burden among moderate-to-severe psoriasis and/or psoriatic arthritis patients in the US Department of Defense population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seina; Xie, Lin; Wang, Yuexi; Vaidya, Neel; Baser, Onur

    2018-06-01

    To examine the comorbidity and economic burden among moderate-to-severe psoriasis (PsO) and/or psoriatic arthritis (PsA) patients in the US Department of Defense (DoD) population. This retrospective cohort claims analysis was conducted using DoD data from November 2010 to October 2015. Adult patients with ≥2 diagnoses of PsO and/or PsA (cases) were identified, and the first diagnosis date from November 2011 to October 2014 was defined as the index date. Patients were considered moderate-to-severe if they had ≥1 non-topical systemic therapy or phototherapy during the 12 months pre- or 1 month post-index date. Patients without a PsO/PsA diagnosis during the study period (controls) were matched to cases on a 10:1 ratio based on age, sex, region, and index year; the index date was randomly selected. One-to-one propensity score matching (PSM) was conducted to compare study outcomes in the first year post-index date, including healthcare resource utilization (HRU), costs, and comorbidity incidence. A total of 7,249 cases and 72,490 controls were identified. The mean age was 48.1 years. After PSM, comorbidity incidence was higher among cases, namely dyslipidemia (18.3% vs 13.5%, p < .001), hypertension (13.8% vs 8.7%, p < .001), and obesity (8.8% vs 6.1%, p < .001). Case patients had significantly higher HRU and costs, including inpatient ($2,196 vs $1,642; p < .0016), ambulatory ($8,804 vs 4,642; p < .001), emergency room ($432 vs $350; p < .001), pharmacy ($6,878 vs $1,160; p < .001), and total healthcare costs ($18,311 vs $7,795; p < .001). Claims data are collected for payment purposes; therefore, such data may have limitations for clinical research. During follow-up, DoD patients with moderate-to-severe PsO and/or PsA experienced significantly higher HRU, cost, and comorbidity burden.

  13. Early and sustained efficacy with apremilast monotherapy in biological-naïve patients with psoriatic arthritis: a phase IIIB, randomised controlled trial (ACTIVE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Peter; Ohson, Kamal; Walsh, Jessica; Delev, Nikolay; Nguyen, Dianne; Teng, Lichen; Gómez-Reino, Juan J; Aelion, Jacob A

    2018-05-01

    Evaluate apremilast efficacy across various psoriatic arthritis (PsA) manifestations beginning at week 2 in biological-naïve patients with PsA. Patients were randomised (1:1) to apremilast 30 mg twice daily or placebo. At week 16, patients whose swollen and tender joint counts had not improved by ≥10% were eligible for early escape. At week 24, all patients received apremilast through week 52. Among 219 randomised patients (apremilast: n=110; placebo: n=109), a significantly greater American College of Rheumatology 20 response at week 16 (primary outcome) was observed with apremilast versus placebo (38.2% (42/110) vs 20.2% (22/109); P=0.004); response rates at week 2 (first assessment) were 16.4% (18/110) versus 6.4% (7/109) (P=0.025). Improvements in other efficacy outcomes, including 28-joint count Disease Activity Score (DAS-28) using C reactive protein (CRP), swollen joint count, Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index (HAQ-DI), enthesitis and morning stiffness severity, were observed with apremilast at week 2. At week 16, apremilast significantly reduced PsA disease activity versus placebo, with changes in DAS-28 (CRP) (P<0.0001), HAQ-DI (P=0.023) and Gladman Enthesitis Index (P=0.001). Improvements were maintained with continued treatment through week 52. Over 52 weeks, apremilast's safety profile was consistent with prior phase 3 studies in psoriasis and PsA. During weeks 0-24, the incidence of protocol-defined diarrhoea was 11.0% (apremilast) and 8.3% (placebo); serious adverse event rates were 2.8% (apremilast) and 4.6% (placebo). In biological-naïve patients with PsA, onset of effect with apremilast was observed at week 2 and continued through week 52. The safety profile was consistent with previous reports. NCT01925768; Results. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  14. Simultaneous Response in Several Domains in Patients with Psoriatic Disease Treated with Etanercept as Monotherapy or in Combination with Conventional Synthetic Disease-modifying Antirheumatic Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Frank; Meier, Lothar; Prinz, Jörg C; Jobst, Jürgen; Lippe, Ralph; Löschmann, Peter-Andreas; Lorenz, Hanns-Martin

    2018-04-01

    To evaluate patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) receiving etanercept (ETN) monotherapy or ETN plus conventional synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (csDMARD) to determine the proportion achieving a clinically meaningful response in arthritis, psoriasis, and quality of life simultaneously. A prospective, multicenter, 52-week observational study in patients with active PsA evaluated treatment with ETN in clinical practice (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00293722). This analysis assessed simultaneous achievement of 3 treatment targets: low disease activity (LDA) based on 28-joint count Disease Activity Score (DAS28); body surface area (BSA) involvement ≤ 3%; and a score > 45 on the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-12 (SF-12) physical component summary. Of 579 patients, 380 received ETN monotherapy and 199 received combination ETN plus csDMARD. At 52 weeks, data for all 3 disease domains were available for 251 patients receiving monotherapy and 151 receiving combination therapy. In the monotherapy and combination therapy groups, 61 (24.3%) and 37 (24.5%) patients, respectively, achieved all 3 treatment targets simultaneously. A significantly greater proportion of patients receiving monotherapy versus combination therapy achieved SF-12 > 45 (43.0% vs 31.8%; p < 0.05) and DAS28 LDA (72.5% vs 62.3%; p < 0.05). Conversely, BSA ≤ 3% was reached by a significantly greater proportion receiving combination therapy (75.5% vs 56.6%; p < 0.001). However, baseline BSA involvement was higher for the monotherapy group. While nearly half the patients achieved arthritis and psoriasis treatment targets simultaneously and one-fourth reached all 3 treatment targets, combining ETN and csDMARD did not substantially improve clinical response compared with ETN monotherapy in this real-world PsA patient population.

  15. Harnessing Apoptotic Cell Clearance to Treat Autoimmune Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Saas

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Early-stage apoptotic cells possess immunomodulatory properties. Proper apoptotic cell clearance during homeostasis has been shown to limit subsequent immune responses. Based on these observations, early-stage apoptotic cell infusion has been used to prevent unwanted inflammatory responses in different experimental models of autoimmune diseases or transplantation. Moreover, this approach has been shown to be feasible without any toxicity in patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation to prevent graft-versus-host disease. However, whether early-stage apoptotic cell infusion can be used to treat ongoing inflammatory disorders has not been reported extensively. Recently, we have provided evidence that early-stage apoptotic cell infusion is able to control, at least transiently, ongoing collagen-induced arthritis. This beneficial therapeutic effect is associated with the modulation of antigen-presenting cell functions mainly of macrophages and plasmacytoid dendritic cells, as well as the induction of collagen-specific regulatory CD4+ T cells (Treg. Furthermore, the efficacy of this approach is not altered by the association with two standard treatments of rheumatoid arthritis (RA, methotrexate and tumor necrosis factor (TNF inhibition. Here, in the light of these observations and recent data of the literature, we discuss the mechanisms of early-stage apoptotic cell infusion and how this therapeutic approach can be transposed to patients with RA.

  16. Synovial features of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis in clinical and ultrasound remission differ under anti-TNF therapy: a clue to interpret different chances of relapse after clinical remission?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alivernini, Stefano; Tolusso, Barbara; Petricca, Luca; Bui, Laura; Di Sante, Gabriele; Peluso, Giusy; Benvenuto, Roberta; Fedele, Anna Laura; Federico, Franco; Ferraccioli, Gianfranco; Gremese, Elisa

    2017-07-01

    To define the synovial characteristics of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in clinical and ultrasound remission achieved by combination therapy with methotrexate (MTX) and tumour necrosis factor (TNF) blockers. Patients with RA in remission (n=25) (disease activity score (DAS)<1.6 for at least 6 months), patients with RA in low disease activity (LDA) (n=10) (1.6

  17. Impact of different infliximab dose regimens on treatment response and drug survival in 462 patients with psoriatic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glintborg, Bente; Gudbjornsson, Bjorn; Krogh, Niels Steen

    2014-01-01

    Icelandic patients at baseline [median 3.1 (interquartile range 3.0-3.8) vs 2.3 (2.1-2.9) mg/kg, P drug survival than...... Icelandic patients (1183 vs 483 days). In univariate analyses stratified by country, time until dose escalation, response rates, drug survival and 1-year's disease activity were independent of starting dose. Drug survival was shorter among patients not receiving concomitant MTX. CONCLUSION: In clinical...... practice, > 70% of Icelandic and Danish PsA patients treated with infliximab received sustained doses below the 5 mg/kg every 8 weeks recommended in international guidelines. Lower starting doses did not affect drug survival or response....

  18. Change in CD3 positive T-cell expression in psoriatic arthritis synovium correlates with change in DAS28 and magnetic resonance imaging synovitis scores following initiation of biologic therapy - a single centre, open-label study

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Pontifex, Eliza K

    2011-01-27

    Abstract Introduction With the development of increasing numbers of potential therapeutic agents in inflammatory disease comes the need for effective biomarkers to help screen for drug efficacy and optimal dosing regimens early in the clinical trial process. This need has been recognized by the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Clinical Trials (OMERACT) group, which has established guidelines for biomarker validation. To seek a candidate synovial biomarker of treatment response in psoriatic arthritis (PsA), we determined whether changes in immunohistochemical markers of synovial inflammation correlate with changes in disease activity scores assessing 28 joints (ΔDAS28) or magnetic resonance imaging synovitis scores (ΔMRI) in patients with PsA treated with a biologic agent. Methods Twenty-five consecutive patients with PsA underwent arthroscopic synovial biopsies and MRI scans of an inflamed knee joint at baseline and 12 weeks after starting treatment with either anakinra (first 10 patients) or etanercept (subsequent 15 patients) in two sequential studies of identical design. DAS28 scores were measured at both time points. Immunohistochemical staining for CD3, CD68 and Factor VIII (FVIII) was performed on synovial samples and scored by digital image analysis (DIA). MRI scans performed at baseline and at 12 weeks were scored for synovitis semi-quantitatively. The ΔDAS28 of the European League Against Rheumatism good response definition (>1.2) was chosen to divide patients into responder and non-responder groups. Differences between groups (Mann Whitney U test) and correlations between ΔDAS28 with change in immunohistochemical and MRI synovitis scores (Spearman\\'s rho test) were calculated. Results Paired synovial samples and MRI scans were available for 21 patients (8 anakinra, 13 etanercept) and 23 patients (8 anakinra, 15 etanercept) respectively. Change in CD3 (ΔCD3) and CD68 expression in the synovial sublining layer (ΔCD68sl) was significantly greater in

  19. Genetics Home Reference: psoriatic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease to fight microbial invaders and facilitate tissue repair. When this has been accomplished, the body ordinarily stops the inflammatory response to prevent damage to its own cells and tissues. Mechanical stress on the joints, such as occurs ...

  20. HLA-B27 frequency in a group of patients with psoriatic arthritis Freqüência de HLA-B27 em uma amostra de pacientes com artrite psoriática

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Garcia Ruiz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HLA-B27 is associated with spondyloarthritis, a group of diseases that includes psoriatic arthritis. OBJECTIVES: To describe the HLA-B27 frequency in a group of Brazilian patients with psoriatic arthritis and correlate its presence or absence with their clinical manifestations. METHODS: Cross-sectional study with 44 psoriatic arthritis patients of a Rheumatology clinic. Demographic and social data were recorded, as were skin and joints clinical examination. HLA-B27 was tested. All data were processed descriptively and comparatively by appropriate software. Parametric and non parametric tests were used with 5% statistical significance. RESULTS: HLA-B27 was negative in 32 of the 44 patients (72,7%. Most of them were male, Caucasian, living in Rio de Janeiro, with plaque type psoriasis and average age of 52,9 years. There was statistical significant correlation between positive HLA-B27 and male gender (p=0,004. Negative HLA-B27 had a tendency to correlate with hands and wrists arthritis (p=0,07. There was an inverse significant correlation between HLA values and Schöber's test (p=0,02. CONCLUSION: Although HLA-B27 is negative in most of patients, it is significantly associated to male gender and inversely correlated with Schöber's test.FUNDAMENTOS: O HLA-B27 está associado às espondiloartrites, grupo de doenças que engloba, entre outras, a artrite psoriásica. OBJETIVOS: Descrever a freqüência de HLA-B27 em uma amostra de pacientes brasileiros com artrite psoriásica e correlacionar sua presença ou ausência com as manifestações clínicas dos mesmos. MÉTODOS: Estudo transversal avaliando 44 pacientes com artrite psoriásica de um ambulatório de Reumatologia. A avaliação consistia em registro de informações demográficas e sociais, exame clínico da pele e das articulações e pesquisa de HLA-B27. Os dados gerados foram tratados por meio de estatística descritiva e comparativa em Software apropriado. Foram utilizados

  1. Clinical and Patient-reported Outcomes in Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) by Body Surface Area Affected by Psoriasis: Results from the Corrona PsA/Spondyloarthritis Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mease, Philip J; Karki, Chitra; Palmer, Jacqueline B; Etzel, Carol J; Kavanaugh, Arthur; Ritchlin, Christopher T; Malley, Wendi; Herrera, Vivian; Tran, Melody; Greenberg, Jeffrey D

    2017-08-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is commonly comorbid with psoriasis; the extent of skin lesions is a major contributor to psoriatic disease severity/burden. We evaluated whether extent of skin involvement with psoriasis [body surface area (BSA) > 3% vs ≤ 3%] affects overall clinical and patient-reported outcomes (PRO) in patients with PsA. Using the Corrona PsA/Spondyloarthritis Registry, patient characteristics, disease activity, and PRO at registry enrollment were assessed for patients with PsA aged ≥ 18 years with BSA > 3% versus ≤ 3%. Regression models were used to evaluate associations of BSA level with outcome [modified minimal disease activity (MDA), Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) score, patient-reported pain and fatigue, and the Work Productivity and Activity Impairment questionnaire score]. Adjustments were made for age, sex, race, body mass index, disease duration, and history of biologics, disease-modifying antirheumatic drug, and prednisone use. This analysis included 1240 patients with PsA with known BSA level (n = 451, BSA > 3%; n = 789, BSA ≤ 3%). After adjusting for potential confounding variables, patients with BSA > 3% versus ≤ 3% had greater patient-reported pain and fatigue and higher HAQ scores (p = 2.33 × 10 -8 , p = 0.002, and p = 1.21 × 10 -7 , respectively), were 1.7× more likely not to be in modified MDA (95% CI 1.21-2.41, p = 0.002), and were 2.1× more likely to have overall work impairment (1.37-3.21, p = 0.0001). These Corrona Registry data show that substantial skin involvement (BSA > 3%) is associated with greater PsA disease burden, underscoring the importance of assessing and effectively managing psoriasis in patients with PsA because this may be a contributing factor in PsA severity.

  2. Identifying Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis Patients in Retrospective Databases When Diagnosis Codes Are Not Available: A Validation Study Comparing Medication/Prescriber Visit-Based Algorithms with Diagnosis Codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson-Belaire, Wendy; Goodfield, Jason; Borrelli, Richard; Liu, Fei Fei; Khan, Zeba M

    2018-01-01

    Using diagnosis code-based algorithms is the primary method of identifying patient cohorts for retrospective studies; nevertheless, many databases lack reliable diagnosis code information. To develop precise algorithms based on medication claims/prescriber visits (MCs/PVs) to identify psoriasis (PsO) patients and psoriatic patients with arthritic conditions (PsO-AC), a proxy for psoriatic arthritis, in Canadian databases lacking diagnosis codes. Algorithms were developed using medications with narrow indication profiles in combination with prescriber specialty to define PsO and PsO-AC. For a 3-year study period from July 1, 2009, algorithms were validated using the PharMetrics Plus database, which contains both adjudicated medication claims and diagnosis codes. Positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), sensitivity, and specificity of the developed algorithms were assessed using diagnosis code as the reference standard. Chosen algorithms were then applied to Canadian drug databases to profile the algorithm-identified PsO and PsO-AC cohorts. In the selected database, 183,328 patients were identified for validation. The highest PPVs for PsO (85%) and PsO-AC (65%) occurred when a predictive algorithm of two or more MCs/PVs was compared with the reference standard of one or more diagnosis codes. NPV and specificity were high (99%-100%), whereas sensitivity was low (≤30%). Reducing the number of MCs/PVs or increasing diagnosis claims decreased the algorithms' PPVs. We have developed an MC/PV-based algorithm to identify PsO patients with a high degree of accuracy, but accuracy for PsO-AC requires further investigation. Such methods allow researchers to conduct retrospective studies in databases in which diagnosis codes are absent. Copyright © 2018 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of articular and extraarticular synovial structures of the hands in patients with psoriatic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cimmino, Marco Amedeo; Barbieri, Francesca; Boesen, Mikael

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic, contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), the quantification of enhancement within the synovial membrane and bone by extracting curves using fast T1-weighted sequences during intravenous administration of contrast agent, evaluates synovitis and bone marrow edema in psoriati...... arthritis (PsA). In this pilot study, we looked at possible differences between joint synovitis and tenosynovitis in PsA as compared with rheumatoid arthritis (RA)....

  4. Attempts at treating rheumatoid arthritis with radioactive yttrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, J.T.

    1979-01-01

    Two years' observations on 33 knee joints in 33 patients with rheumatoid arthritis did not prove a therapeutic effect of Y 90 , which was tested in a randomized study against non-radioactive yttrium. It was noticable that 9 knee joints of the isotope group but only one of the control group became unstable. Independent of the yttrium treatment, significant improvement was noticed in patients where fibrin clots had been washed out of the joints in the course of arthroscopies. (orig.) [de

  5. Psoriasis and psoriasic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortes Vera, Sandra Liliana; Iglesias Gamarra, Antonio; Restrepo Suarez, Jose Felix

    2003-01-01

    The psoriasis is an skin inflammatory disease characterized by chronic and recurrent red skin covered with silver scales. In their pathogenesis, immunogenetic and environmental factors are conjugated. Psoriatic arthritis. That is a seronegative arthropathy. In the greater part of cases follow to a chronic course of cutaneous psoriasis. In this paper, we analyzed the most frequent forms of presentation of cutaneous psoriasis and we revised the psoriatic arthropathy, with some indications about its treatment

  6. The sesamoid index in psoriatic arthropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitehouse, Richard W.; Aslam, Rizwan; Bukhari, Marwan; Groves, Clare; Cassar-Pullicino, Victor

    2005-01-01

    The sesamoid index was originally described as an aid to the diagnosis of acromegaly. We performed this study to assess the value of the thumb sesamoid index in the diagnosis of psoriatic arthropathy. Retrospective measurement of the sesamoid index (length x width of the medial thumb sesamoid), along with the age and sex were recorded for patients as described below. Patients with psoriasis were subdivided into those with or without radiographic evidence of hand arthropathy. Fifty-nine consecutive patients attending rheumatology clinics with arthralgia and psoriasis were studied. Comparison groups with radiographic evidence of rheumatoid arthritis (52 patients), osteoarthritis (44) or normal hands (55) were also recorded. Twenty-one of 59 patients with psoriasis and arthropathy had a sesamoid index >40, compared with two of 52 with rheumatoid arthritis, none of 44 with osteoarthritis and none of 55 normals. Psoriatic arthropathy is a recognised cause of bone enlargement, usually in the phalanges due to periostitis and proliferative enthesopathy. We have confirmed that psoriatic hand arthropathy can cause significant enlargement of the thumb sesamoids, a feature which is easily quantified and may assist diagnosis. (orig.)

  7. The sesamoid index in psoriatic arthropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehouse, Richard W.; Aslam, Rizwan [Manchester Royal Infirmary, Department of Clinical Radiology, Manchester (United Kingdom); Bukhari, Marwan [Manchester Royal Infirmary, Department of Rheumatology, Manchester (United Kingdom); Groves, Clare; Cassar-Pullicino, Victor [Agnes Hunt and Robert Jones Hospital, Department of Radiology, Oswestry (United Kingdom)

    2005-04-01

    The sesamoid index was originally described as an aid to the diagnosis of acromegaly. We performed this study to assess the value of the thumb sesamoid index in the diagnosis of psoriatic arthropathy. Retrospective measurement of the sesamoid index (length x width of the medial thumb sesamoid), along with the age and sex were recorded for patients as described below. Patients with psoriasis were subdivided into those with or without radiographic evidence of hand arthropathy. Fifty-nine consecutive patients attending rheumatology clinics with arthralgia and psoriasis were studied. Comparison groups with radiographic evidence of rheumatoid arthritis (52 patients), osteoarthritis (44) or normal hands (55) were also recorded. Twenty-one of 59 patients with psoriasis and arthropathy had a sesamoid index >40, compared with two of 52 with rheumatoid arthritis, none of 44 with osteoarthritis and none of 55 normals. Psoriatic arthropathy is a recognised cause of bone enlargement, usually in the phalanges due to periostitis and proliferative enthesopathy. We have confirmed that psoriatic hand arthropathy can cause significant enlargement of the thumb sesamoids, a feature which is easily quantified and may assist diagnosis. (orig.)

  8. Major cost savings associated with biologic dose reduction in patients with inflammatory arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, C L

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore whether patients with Inflammatory Arthritis (IA) (Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) or Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS)) would remain in remission following a reduction in biologic dosing frequency and to calculate the cost savings associated with dose reduction. This prospective non-blinded non-randomised study commenced in 2010. Patients with Inflammatory Arthritis being treated with a biologic agent were screened for disease activity. A cohort of those in remission according to standardized disease activity indices (DAS28 < 2.6, BASDAI < 4) was offered a reduction in dosing frequency of two commonly used biologic therapies (etanercept 50 mg once per fortnight instead of weekly, adalimumab 40 mg once per month instead of fortnightly). Patients were assessed for disease activity at 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months following reduction in dosing frequency. Cost saving was calculated. 79 patients with inflammatory arthritis in remission were recruited. 57% had rheumatoid arthritis (n = 45), 13% psoriatic arthritis (n = 10) and 30% ankylosing spondylitis (n = 24). 57% (n = 45) were taking etanercept and 43% (n = 34) adalimumab. The percentage of patients in remission at 24 months was 56% (n = 44). This resulted in an actual saving to the state of approximately 600,000 euro over two years. This study demonstrates the reduction in biologic dosing frequency is feasible in Inflammatory Arthritis. There was a considerable cost saving at two years. The potential for major cost savings in biologic usage should be pursued further.

  9. Ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging, radiography, and clinical assessment of inflammatory and destructive changes in fingers and toes of patients with psoriatic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiell, Charlotte; Szkudlarek, Marcin; Hasselquist, Maria

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess ultrasonography (US) for the detection of inflammatory and destructive changes in finger and toe joints, tendons, and entheses in patients with psoriasis-associated arthritis (PsA) by comparison with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), projection radiography...... (x-ray), and clinical findings. Fifteen patients with PsA, 5 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and 5 healthy control persons were examined by means of US, contrast-enhanced MRI, x-ray, and clinical assessment. Each joint of the 2nd-5th finger (metacarpophalangeal joints, proximal interphalangeal [PIP...... tendons of the fingers were assessed for the presence of insertional changes and tenosynovitis. One hand was assessed by means of MRI for the aforementioned changes. X-rays of both hands and feet were assessed for bone erosions and proliferations. US was repeated in 8 persons by another ultrasonographer...

  10. Myelofibrosis-Related Arthritis Successfully Treated with Hydroxyurea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Guillot

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 62-year-old woman suffering from one-year lasting, nonerosive peripheral arthritides with general health impairment and high acute-phase reactant levels was admitted to rheumatology department. The patient had suffered from chronic polyarthralgia and a thrombocytosis had been discovered 9 years before, with a recent increase in platelet count. All immunological blood tests were negative. Corticosteroid and methotrexate treatments improved pain, swollen joint count, and systemic inflammation. However, joints remained stiff and painful with two swollen wrists and persistent thrombocytosis. An iliac bone marrow biopsy was performed, showing primary myelofibrosis. Hydroxyurea treatment (500 mg per day allowed to achieve complete and prolonged clinical and biological remission. After 6 months, a new disease flare occurred. The patient reached remission again after hydroxyurea dose increased to 1500 mg per day. This supports the hypothesis of idiopathic myelofibrosis-associated seronegative polyarthritis. This is the first reported case in which haemopathy-targeted treatment using hydroxyurea induced arthritis remission.

  11. Factors secreted from dental pulp stem cells show multifaceted benefits for treating experimental rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Jun; Takahashi, Nobunori; Matsumoto, Takuya; Yoshioka, Yutaka; Yamamoto, Noriyuki; Nishikawa, Masaya; Hibi, Hideharu; Ishigro, Naoki; Ueda, Minoru; Furukawa, Koichi; Yamamoto, Akihito

    2016-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by synovial hyperplasia and chronic inflammation, which lead to the progressive destruction of cartilage and bone in the joints. Numerous studies have reported that administrations of various types of MSCs improve arthritis symptoms in animal models, by paracrine mechanisms. However, the therapeutic effects of the secreted factors alone, without the cell graft, have been uncertain. Here, we show that a single intravenous administration of serum-free conditioned medium (CM) from human deciduous dental pulp stem cells (SHED-CM) into anti-collagen type II antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA), a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), markedly improved the arthritis symptoms and joint destruction. The therapeutic efficacy of SHED-CM was associated with an induction of anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages in the CAIA joints and the abrogation of RANKL expression. SHED-CM specifically depleted of an M2 macrophage inducer, the secreted ectodomain of sialic acid-binding Ig-like lectin-9 (ED-Siglec-9), exhibited a reduced ability to induce M2-related gene expression and attenuate CAIA. SHED-CM also inhibited the RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro. Collectively, our findings suggest that SHED-CM provides multifaceted therapeutic effects for treating CAIA, including the ED-Siglec-9-dependent induction of M2 macrophage polarization and inhibition of osteoclastogenesis. Thus, SHED-CM may represent a novel anti-inflammatory and reparative therapy for RA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Overview of the radiology of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, P.A.; Job-Deslandre, C.H.; Lalande, G.; Adamsbaum, C.

    2000-01-01

    Plain films remain the basic tool for diagnosis and follow-up evaluation of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). In this paper, we review the new classification of JIA: systemic arthritis, oligoarthritis (persistent), oligoarthritis (extended), polyarticular arthritis (rheumatoid factor negative), polyarticular arthritis (rheumatoid factor positive), enthesitis related arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and unclassified arthritis. We will also review regional abnormalities of three stages: an early stage, an intermediate stage, a late stage, as well as the differential diagnosis

  13. Vertebral fractures in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with corticosteroids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lems, W. F.; Jahangier, Z. N.; Jacobs, J. W.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    1995-01-01

    To examine the relationship between roentgenological deformities of the vertebral column and clinical manifestations of vertebral fractures in patients with RA, treated with glucocorticosteroids (Cs). In all outpatients of Utrecht University Hospital with RA, who were currently using Cs (n = 52),

  14. Interval between onset of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis comparing the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink with a hospital-based cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillett, William; Charlton, Rachel; Nightingale, Alison; Snowball, Julia; Green, Amelia; Smith, Catherine; Shaddick, Gavin; McHugh, Neil

    2017-12-01

    To describe the time interval between the onset of psoriasis and PsA in the UK primary care setting and compare with a large, well-classified secondary care cohort. Patients with PsA and/or psoriasis were identified in the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD). The secondary care cohort comprised patients from the Bath PsA longitudinal observational cohort study. For incident PsA patients in the CPRD who also had a record of psoriasis, the time interval between PsA diagnosis and first psoriasis record was calculated. Comparisons were made with the time interval between diagnoses in the Bath cohort. There were 5272 eligible PsA patients in the CPRD and 815 in the Bath cohort. In both cohorts, the majority of patients (82.3 and 61.3%, respectively) had psoriasis before their PsA diagnosis or within the same calendar year (10.5 and 23.8%), with only a minority receiving their PsA diagnosis first (7.1 and 14.8%). Excluding those who presented with arthritis before psoriasis, the median time between diagnoses was 8 years [interquartile range (IQR) 2-15] in the CPRD and 7 years (IQR 0-20) in the Bath cohort. In the CPRD, 60.1 and 75.1% received their PsA diagnosis within 10 and 15 years of their psoriasis diagnosis, respectively; this was comparable with 57.2 and 67.7% in the Bath cohort. A similar distribution for the time interval between psoriasis and arthritis was observed in the CPRD and secondary care cohort. These data can inform screening strategies and support the validity of data from each cohort. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  15. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Patients from Johns Hopkins Stategies to Increase your Level of Physical Activity Role of Body Weight in Osteoarthritis Educational Videos for Patients Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Psoriatic Arthritis 101 2010 E.S.C.A.P.E. Study Patient Update Transitioning the JRA ...

  16. A commentary on TREAT: The trial of early aggressive drug therapy in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baildam Eileen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA is a category of JIA where multiple joints are affected by chronic inflammation, and where serious and lasting damage to joints is the expected natural history in untreated disease. There is evidence of response to disease-modifying antirheumatic and biologic drugs, but little evidence of permanent remission from any of the existing therapeutic trials. The TREAT trial by Wallace et al., recently published in Arthritis and Rheumatism, used a collaborative multicenter approach to studying early aggressive treatment of polyarticular JIA in an attempt to achieve full clinical inactive disease after 6 months of treatment. The study's main finding that the earlier in the disease course that treatment is started, the better the chance of disease control, has provided evidence that there is a 'window of opportunity' for treating JIA as there is in adult rheumatoid arthritis (RA. The study provides both a platform and an impetus for concentrating future treatment trials on early rather than established disease and investigating a standard of starting treatment within 10 to 12 weeks.

  17. Case report: AREB in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis treated with methotrexate and infliximab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Rossi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Anti TNF-a drugs seem to be the new frontier of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA therapy. The association infliximab methotrexate has been approved for the treatment of RA not responding to the classic therapy, but the short clinical experience in using antiTNF-a molecules brings to segnalation of new risks or adverse events. We describe a case of a patient, treated for many years with classic RA therapy, which developed a refractory anemia after treatment with association infliximab-methotrexate.

  18. Visceral leishmaniasis in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis treated with methotrexate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loarce-Martos, Jesús; Garrote-Corral, Sandra; Gioia, Francesca; Bachiller-Corral, Javier

    2017-09-25

    A large number of complications have been associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), those of infectious etiology being of special relevance. Their high incidence is closely linked to the use of immunosuppressive medication. The spectrum of agents causing opportunistic infections in patients with RA is very broad; however, there are relatively few cases of Leishmania infection, especially in patients not being treated with biological drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  19. Guidelines of care for the management of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis Section 3. Guidelines of care for the management and treatment of psoriasis with topical therapies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menter, A.; Korman, N.J.; Elmets, C.A.; Feldman, S.R.; Gelfand, J.M.; Gordon, K.B.; Gottlieb, A.; Koo, J.Y.M.; Lebwohl, M.; Lim, H.W.; Van Voorhees, A.S.; Beutner, K.R.; Bhushan, R. [University of Texas South West Medical Center Dallas, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2009-04-15

    Psoriasis is a common, chronic, inflammatory, multi-system disease with predominantly skin and joint manifestations affecting approximately 2% of the Population. In this third of 6 sections of the guidelines of care for psoriasis, we discuss the use of topical medications for the treatment of psoriasis. The majority of patients with psoriasis have limited disease (<5% body surface area involvement) and can be treated with topical agents, which generally provide a high efficacy-to-safety ratio. Topical agents may also be used adjunctively for patients with more extensive psoriasis undergoing therapy with either ultraviolet light, systemic or biologic medications. However, the use of topical agents as monotherapy in the setting of extensive disease or in the setting of limited, but recalcitrant, disease is not routinely recommended. Treatment should be tailored to meet individual patients' needs. We will discuss the efficacy and safety of as well as offer recommendations for the use of topical corticosteroids, vitamin D analogues, tazarotene, tacrolimus, pimecrolimus, emollients, salicylic acid, anthralin, coal tar, as well as combination therapy.

  20. Myeloproliferative disorders in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with total body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urowitz, M.B.; Rider, W.D.

    1985-01-01

    Four patients with refractory rheumatoid arthritis were treated with total body irradiation administered in two sittings, 300 to 400 rads to each half of the body. All four patients had taken antimetabolites prior to receiving total body irradiation, and two continued to use them after total body irradiation. Two patients had taken alkylating agents before, and one had used them after total body irradiation. All patients showed clinical improvement. However, in two patients myeloproliferative disorders developed: a myelodysplastic preleukemia at 40 months after total body irradiation in one and acute myelogenous leukemia at 25 months in the other. Total body irradiation differs from total nodal irradiation in the total dose of irradiation (300 to 400 rads versus 2,000 to 3,000), and in the duration of the therapy (two sittings versus treatment over several weeks to months). Furthermore, the patients in the total body irradiation study frequently used cytotoxic drugs before and/or after irradiation, whereas in one total nodal irradiation study, azathioprine (2 mg/kg per day or less) was permitted, but no other cytotoxic agents were allowed. Rheumatologists may therefore face a binding decision when deciding to treat a patient with rheumatoid arthritis with either a cytotoxic drug or irradiation

  1. QUALITY OF LIFE IN CHILDREN WITH JUVENILE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS TREATED WITH INFLIXIMAB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.V. Denisova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA is chronic disease, leading to early incapacitating injury in patients. Treatment of JRA with new expensive biological agents allows obtaining long term remission of disease and improving its prognosis. Estimation of quality of life is one of the main effectiveness criteria of treatment. A quality of life in children who were 2–4 years old treated with infliximab was estimated. 43 patients with different types of JRA were examined. A quality of life was estimated with the help of questionnaire PEDSQL generic core scale, PEDSQL rheumatology module. Index of functional disability was estimated by childhood health assessment questionnaire (CHAQ. Significant increase of quality of life rates and decrease of index of functional disability was registered in 6 weeks of therapy with infliximab. The rates of quality of life in patients with JRA treated with infliximab were significantly equal to that in healthy children in the same age in 6, 12 and 24 months of treatment. Thus, treatment with infliximab significantly increases quality of life in children in 2–4 years old with JRA and their families, decreases negative influence of disease on child's living, improves physical activity and emotional state of patients, and allows improving contact between patients and healthy children in the same age.Key words: children, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, quality of life, infliximab.

  2. Arthritis in the buff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothschild, B.; Williams, E.M.; Poteat, G.B.; Woods, R.

    1987-01-01

    Understanding the significance of radiologic perturbations in articular diseases is facilitated by correlation with its representation in intact macerated skeletons (from the collections of the Cleveland Museum of Natural History). Classic skeletal involvement is illustrated grossly and radiographically for the following conditions: rheumatoid arthritis calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease, osteoarthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, reactive (Reiter syndrome, psoriatic arthritis) diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis, and infectious arthritis. Distribution and lesion character is reviewed. Visualization of the gross bone lesion ''in the buff'' provides clear explanation of its radiologic appearance and facilitates the transition from x-ray image to the pathophysiology proposed in the interpretation

  3. perioperative management of patients with psoriatic arthritis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    She also had dyslipidemia, obesity and osteoporosis that may be the consequence of long term steroid ... blood pressure, and elevated fasting glucose (5). Psoriasis is an .... dull, intermittent initially worse in the mornings with an associated ...

  4. Temporomandibular Joint Involvement in Psoriatic Arthritis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Maxillofacial Radiology,. Faculty of Dentistry,. Kirikkale University, Turkey. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons ... Figure 2: Panoramic radiograph revealed bilaterally decreased joint spaces, erosion and the loss of cortical edge on condylar heads. [Downloaded free from ...

  5. Arthritis mutilans due to chronic tophaceous gout | Akintayo | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Arthritis mutilans is a form of destructive arthritis which is often characterized with severe osteolysis. It is more commonly described in association with the most severe forms of psoriatic and rheumatoid arthritis. Case presentation: A 69-year old man presented with a fifteen-year history of recurrent inflammatory ...

  6. The effect of smartphone addiction on hand joints in psoriatic patients: an ultrasound-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megna, M; Gisonni, P; Napolitano, M; Orabona, G Dell'Aversano; Patruno, C; Ayala, F; Balato, N

    2018-01-01

    Distal interphalangeal (DIP) arthritis is a frequent form of psoriatic arthritis being often linked to nail psoriasis. Modern society is characterized by overuse of smartphones. Indeed, literature has recently focalized on research into smartphone addiction and health-related problems. As smartphone addiction is able to determine overuse and repeated movements of DIP joints and nails, the aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of smartphone use on hand joints of young psoriatic patients. An observational study involving four different groups such as non-smartphone-addicted (SA) psoriatic patients, SA psoriatic patients, non-SA controls and SA controls was performed. Each subject underwent an ultrasound examination of both hands by three independent and blinded to group assignment radiologists. A specific score was used to evaluate the inflammatory state of the analysed joints. The total ultrasound score was statistically significantly higher in SA controls respect to non-SA controls (3.4 vs. 1.4; P Smartphone overuse was found to be linked with higher signs of inflammation of musculoskeletal structures of hands joints in both psoriasis and controls through ultrasound examination. Therefore, smartphone overuse may be a factor which facilitate or speed up the possible development of psoriatic arthritis. © 2017 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  7. Treating people with arthritis with traditional Chinese medicine (TCM): an examination of the perception of TCM practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lu; Peng, Wenbo; Adams, Jon; Sibbritt, David William

    2018-03-08

    Emerging evidence has shown that traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has a positive effect on arthritis. This research provides the first critical, systematic examination of TCM practitioners' perceptions of TCM use for people with arthritis. An online survey was distributed to all TCM professionals including acupuncturists and Chinese herbal medicine practitioners registered with the Practitioner Research and Collaborate Initiative (PRACI) practitioner database. The survey questions focus on practitioner characteristics, practice characteristics and clinical management approaches regarding arthritis care. The survey attracted a response rate of 53% (n=52). The average age of the respondents was 49.9 years, more than half were female, and the majority held a bachelor degree or higher qualification. More than two thirds of TCM practitioners in our study worked with other health professionals, while they had a high level of referral relationships with a wide range of conventional, allied health and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) providers. Most of the TCM practitioners reported that their patients with arthritis used other treatments alongside TCM and a large number of the TCM practitioners who participated believed that TCM was effective for treating arthritis. The TCM profession represents a substantial component of the healthcare field in Australia, and treating patients with arthritis appears to be an important area of TCM practice, among others. Further detailed research is needed to help ensure effective, safe patient care for those with arthritis who may be utilising TCM alongside a broader range of conventional medicine, allied health, and other CAM treatments. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  8. Dynamics of body composition and bone in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis treated with growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtold, Susanne; Ripperger, Peter; Dalla Pozza, Robert; Roth, Johannes; Häfner, Renate; Michels, Hartmut; Schwarz, Hans Peter

    2010-01-01

    GH has a positive impact on growth, bone, and muscle development. The objectives of this study were to demonstrate the effects of GH treatment on regional body composition and bone geometry at final height in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). In this longitudinal study, parameters of bone mineral density and geometry as well as muscle and fat cross-sectional area (CSA) in the nondominant forearm were recorded using peripheral quantitative computed tomography at yearly intervals until final height in 12 patients (seven females) receiving GH treatment. Data at final height were compared with 13 patients (nine females) with JIA not treated with GH. Patients were treated with GH for a mean of 5.35 +/- 0.7 yr. Correcting for height, total bone CSA (+0.89 +/- 0.5 sd) and muscle CSA (+1.14 +/- 0.6 sd) increased significantly and normalized at final height. Compared with JIA patients without GH at final height, there was a significantly higher muscle CSA and a lower fat CSA in GH-treated patients. Additionally, in relation to total bone CSA, there was significantly more cortical and less marrow CSA in boys with GH treatment. During GH treatment, there was a significant increase and normalization of total bone and muscle CSA at final height. In accordance with an anabolic effect of GH, fat mass stabilized at the lower limit of healthy children. At final height, cortical and marrow CSA, relative to total bone CSA, were normalized in GH-treated patients.

  9. Experiences and needs for work participation in employees with rheumatoid arthritis treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, Marrit; Hoving, Jan L.; Vermeulen, Marjolein I. M.; Herenius, Marieke M. J.; Tak, Paul P.; Sluiter, Judith K.; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the experiences and needs with respect to work participation of employees with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) therapy. Face-to-face interviews in 14 employees with RA on anti-TNF therapy focused on experiences, offered support and needs with

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of the femoral head to detect avascular necrosis in active rheumatoid arthritis treated with methylprednisolone pulse therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vugt, R. M.; Sijbrandij, E. S.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    1996-01-01

    Efficacious management of patients with avascular necrosis of bone (AVN) necessitates the identification of patients with a high risk of collapse of the femoral head. In this prospective study we imaged both hips of 10 patients with active rheumatoid arthritis, who were treated with

  11. Necrotising fasciitis of the shoulder in association with rheumatoid arthritis treated with etanercept: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuite Helen

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Necrotising fasciitis is a severe infection characterised by the fulminant destruction of tissue with associated systemic signs of sepsis and toxicity. Etanercept is a fully human fusion protein that inhibits tumor necrosis factor and the inflammatory cascade. It is effective in the treatment of many disorders but concerns regarding severe life threatening infections have been raised in multiple reports. Case presentation We present the case of a 39-year-old Caucasian man, who presented with sudden onset of severe and progressive neck and left shoulder pain, with a two-year history of seronegative rheumatoid arthritis treated with azathoprine and etanercept. On examination the left side of his neck and his left shoulder were oedematous, tender with an erythematous rash and his active range of movement was limited. Magnetic resonance imaging of his shoulder showed extensive oedema of the subcutaneous and intramuscular fat of the left lower neck consistent with fasciitis. He was treated medically and made a good recovery. Conclusion Our patient, while having a pre-existing increased mortality risk, had a serious infection which responded well to optimum medical treatment without the need for surgery. As anti tumor necrosis factor agents are frequently associated with infection, including tuberculous infection, this case highlights the need for a high index of suspicion for other severe bacterial infections in patients on immunosuppressants.

  12. Necrotising fasciitis of the shoulder in association with rheumatoid arthritis treated with etanercept: a case report

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smyth, Andrew

    2010-11-17

    Abstract Introduction Necrotising fasciitis is a severe infection characterised by the fulminant destruction of tissue with associated systemic signs of sepsis and toxicity. Etanercept is a fully human fusion protein that inhibits tumor necrosis factor and the inflammatory cascade. It is effective in the treatment of many disorders but concerns regarding severe life threatening infections have been raised in multiple reports. Case presentation We present the case of a 39-year-old Caucasian man, who presented with sudden onset of severe and progressive neck and left shoulder pain, with a two-year history of seronegative rheumatoid arthritis treated with azathoprine and etanercept. On examination the left side of his neck and his left shoulder were oedematous, tender with an erythematous rash and his active range of movement was limited. Magnetic resonance imaging of his shoulder showed extensive oedema of the subcutaneous and intramuscular fat of the left lower neck consistent with fasciitis. He was treated medically and made a good recovery. Conclusion Our patient, while having a pre-existing increased mortality risk, had a serious infection which responded well to optimum medical treatment without the need for surgery. As anti tumor necrosis factor agents are frequently associated with infection, including tuberculous infection, this case highlights the need for a high index of suspicion for other severe bacterial infections in patients on immunosuppressants.

  13. A case of surgically treated peristomal pyoderma gangrenosum in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khajehnoori, Masoomeh; O'Brien, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Peristomal pyoderma gangrenosum (PPG) is a rare subtype of pyoderma gangrenosum that is difficult to diagnose and treat. It is characterized by the rapid progression of painful necrotic ulcer surrounding an area of abdominal stoma. It is almost exclusively associated with inflammatory bowel disease even after bowel surgery and is associated with significant morbidity. Diagnosis of pyoderma gangrenosum is based on exclusion of other disorders replicating some of its clinical features and histopathological evidence. This is a case report of a 56-year-old lady with rheumatoid arthritis who presented with rapidly progressing abdominal ulcer 8 months after a Hartmanns procedure for perforated diverticulitis. The ulcer had formed a large cavity causing faecal filling in the dependent defect. The other causes of ulcer were excluded with negative histopathology, negative polymerase chain reaction for Mycobacterium ulcerans and negative acid fast bacillus (AFB) test. She was diagnosed with PPG which is routinely treated medically due to risk of setting off a second focus of pyoderma if surgically intervened. However due to increased risk of faecal peritonitis, it was decided to proceed with surgical debridement. This article will discuss the case in more detail and briefly discuss diagnosis and treatment options for PPG. PMID:27302499

  14. Treating rheumatoid arthritis to target: Revision of the 2014 International Expert Group Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. T. Vatutin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a new edition (2014 of basic approaches to therapy of rheumatoid arthritis (RA based on the principle of «Treat to target », which has been elaborated by the experts of the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR and the American College of Rheumatology (ACR. The revised recommendations consider the results of numerous randomized controlled and cohort studies, as well as the data of an extensive systematic review of the literature. The new 2014 version contains 4 basic principles and 10 recommendations for the management of patients with RA. When making the updated recommendations, the experts took into account particularly issues, such as criteria for defining a remission, the need to minimize comorbidities in patients with RA and to individualize its therapy, as well as their working ability. The basic principles in the management of patients with RA, by using a treat-to-target strategy, are discussed in detail and the rewording of the main points of the 2010 recommendations and their new edition are substantiated.

  15. Can magnetic resonance imaging differentiate undifferentiated arthritis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Duer, Anne; Hørslev-Petersen, K

    2005-01-01

    A high sensitivity for the detection of inflammatory and destructive changes in inflammatory joint diseases makes magnetic resonance imaging potentially useful for assigning specific diagnoses, such as rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis in arthritides, that remain undifferentiated after...... conventional clinical, biochemical and radiographic examinations. With recent data as the starting point, the present paper describes the current knowledge on magnetic resonance imaging in the differential diagnosis of undifferentiated arthritis....

  16. Treating juvenile idiopathic arthritis to target: recommendations of an international task force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravelli, Angelo; Consolaro, Alessandro; Horneff, Gerd; Laxer, Ronald M; Lovell, Daniel J; Wulffraat, Nico M; Akikusa, Jonathan D; Al-Mayouf, Sulaiman M; Antón, Jordi; Avcin, Tadej; Berard, Roberta A; Beresford, Michael W; Burgos-Vargas, Ruben; Cimaz, Rolando; De Benedetti, Fabrizio; Demirkaya, Erkan; Foell, Dirk; Itoh, Yasuhiko; Lahdenne, Pekka; Morgan, Esi M; Quartier, Pierre; Ruperto, Nicolino; Russo, Ricardo; Saad-Magalhães, Claudia; Sawhney, Sujata; Scott, Christiaan; Shenoi, Susan; Swart, Joost F; Uziel, Yosef; Vastert, Sebastiaan J; Smolen, Josef S

    2018-06-01

    Recent therapeutic advances in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) have made remission an achievable goal for most patients. Reaching this target leads to improved outcomes. The objective was to develop recommendations for treating JIA to target. A Steering Committee formulated a set of recommendations based on evidence derived from a systematic literature review. These were subsequently discussed, amended and voted on by an international Task Force of 30 paediatric rheumatologists in a consensus-based, Delphi-like procedure. Although the literature review did not reveal trials that compared a treat-to-target approach with another or no strategy, it provided indirect evidence regarding an optimised approach to therapy that facilitated development of recommendations. The group agreed on six overarching principles and eight recommendations. The main treatment target, which should be based on a shared decision with parents/patients, was defined as remission, with the alternative target of low disease activity. The frequency and timeline of follow-up evaluations to ensure achievement and maintenance of the target depend on JIA category and level of disease activity. Additional recommendations emphasise the importance of ensuring adequate growth and development and avoiding long-term systemic glucocorticoid administration to maintain the target. All items were agreed on by more than 80% of the members of the Task Force. A research agenda was formulated. The Task Force developed recommendations for treating JIA to target, being aware that the evidence is not strong and needs to be expanded by future research. These recommendations can inform various stakeholders about strategies to reach optimal outcomes for JIA. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  17. Effects of Biologic Agents in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Amyloidosis Treated with Hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Takeshi; Tanabe, Naohito; Nozawa, Yukiko; Sato, Hiroe; Nakatsue, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Wada, Yoko; Saeki, Takako; Nakano, Masaaki; Narita, Ichiei

    Objective Our objective was to examine the safety and effects of therapy with biologics on the prognosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with reactive amyloid A (AA) amyloidosis on hemodialysis (HD). Methods Twenty-eight patients with an established diagnosis of reactive AA amyloidosis participated in the study. The survival was calculated from the date of HD initiation until the time of death, or up to end of June 2015 for the patients who were still alive. HD initiation was according to the program of HD initiation for systemic amyloidosis patients associated with RA. Results Ten patients had been treated with biologics before HD initiation for a mean of 28.2 months (biologic group), while 18 had not (non-biologic group). HD was initiated in patients with similar characteristics except for the tender joint count, swollen joint count, and disease activity score (DAS)28-C-reactive protein (CRP). History of biologics showed that etanercept was frequently used for 8 patients as the first biologic. There was no significant difference in the mortality rate according to a Kaplan-Meier analysis (p=0.939) and or associated risk of death in an age-adjusted Cox proportional hazards model (p=0.758) between both groups. Infections were significantly more frequent causes of death in the biologic group than in the non-biologic group (p=0.021). However, treatment with biologics improved the DAS28-CRP score (p=0.004). Conclusion Under the limited conditions of AA amyloidosis treated with HD, the use of biologics might affect infection and thus may not improve the prognosis. Strict infection control is necessary for the use of biologics with HD to improve the prognosis.

  18. Cardiovascular safety findings in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with tofacitinib, an oral Janus kinase inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles-Schoeman, Christina; Wicker, Pierre; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A; Boy, Mary; Zuckerman, Andrea; Soma, Koshika; Geier, Jamie; Kwok, Kenneth; Riese, Richard

    2016-12-01

    Tofacitinib is an oral Janus kinase inhibitor for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The implications of treatment with tofacitinib on cardiovascular (CV) risk in RA are unknown. Therefore, CV adverse events (AEs), and blood pressure and lipid level changes, in tofacitinib-treated patients with RA were evaluated. Data were pooled from six Phase (P)3 studies (24 months) and two open-label long-term extension (LTE) studies (60 months) of tofacitinib in patients with RA and inadequate response to DMARDs. Tofacitinib was administered alone or with non-biologic DMARDs. CV events, including major adverse CV events (MACE: CV death and non-fatal CV events) and congestive heart failure (CHF), were assessed by a blinded adjudication committee. Overall, 4271 patients from P3 studies and 4827 enrolled from P2/P3 studies into LTE studies were evaluated, representing 3942 and 8699 patient-years of exposure to tofacitinib, respectively. Blood pressure remained stable over time across studies. The number of investigator-reported hypertension-related AEs in tofacitinib-treated patients was low in P3 studies (Months 0-3: 2.8%; Months 3-6: 1.4%; >6 months: 2.8%). Across studies, lipid level increases were generally observed within 1-3 months of treatment and stabilized thereafter. Patients with events (incidence rate [IR]/100 patient-years) for MACE and CHF, respectively, were: 23 (0.58) and 9 (0.23) in P3 studies, and 32 (0.37) and 8 (0.09) in LTE studies; IRs were comparable with placebo (P3) and did not increase over time (LTE). Tofacitinib was associated with a low incidence of CV events in a large Phase 3 program, including LTE studies. Further long-term studies are underway. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Ayurveda-modern medicine interface: A critical appraisal of studies of Ayurvedic medicines to treat osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Arvind; Saluja, Manjit; Tillu, Girish

    2010-07-01

    The potential of Ayurvedic philosophy and medicines needs to be recognized and converted into real life treatment paradigm. This article describes a comprehensive therapeutic approach used in Ayurveda and modern medicine to treat arthritis. We present concise summary of various controlled drug trials carried out by us to validate standardized Ayurvedic drugs using modern medicine protocol to treat Rheumatoid Arthritis and Osteoarthritis knees. Several of the latter are published. The trials consistently demonstrate excellent safety of Ayurvedic medicines but often fail to unequivocally show superior efficacy. Some key findings of a recently unpublished trial in OA knees are also presented to show equivalence between Ayurvedic medicine and celecoxib and glucosamine, and we speculate that equivalence trials may be a way forward. The data from the trials also supports the Ayurvedic 'Rasayana' concept of immune-modulation and healing. We need to interpret logic of Ayurveda when, adopting modern science tools in drug development and validation and much research is required. Validation of Ayurvedic medicines using the latter approach may lead to an evidence based Ayurveda - Modern Medicine interface. Also, in pursuit of finding better treatment solutions, we ought to step beyond the realm of only drugs and attempt validation of comprehensive specific treatment package as per classical Ayurveda. Finally, validation of a combined (Ayurveda and modern medicine) therapeutic approach with superior efficacy and safety is likely to be a major leap in overcoming some of the current frustrations to treat difficult disorders like arthritis using only modern medicines.

  20. Ayurveda–modern medicine interface: A critical appraisal of studies of Ayurvedic medicines to treat osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Arvind; Saluja, Manjit; Tillu, Girish

    2010-01-01

    The potential of Ayurvedic philosophy and medicines needs to be recognized and converted into real life treatment paradigm. This article describes a comprehensive therapeutic approach used in Ayurveda and modern medicine to treat arthritis. We present concise summary of various controlled drug trials carried out by us to validate standardized Ayurvedic drugs using modern medicine protocol to treat Rheumatoid Arthritis and Osteoarthritis knees. Several of the latter are published. The trials consistently demonstrate excellent safety of Ayurvedic medicines but often fail to unequivocally show superior efficacy. Some key findings of a recently unpublished trial in OA knees are also presented to show equivalence between Ayurvedic medicine and celecoxib and glucosamine, and we speculate that equivalence trials may be a way forward. The data from the trials also supports the Ayurvedic ‘Rasayana’ concept of immune-modulation and healing. We need to interpret logic of Ayurveda when, adopting modern science tools in drug development and validation and much research is required. Validation of Ayurvedic medicines using the latter approach may lead to an evidence based Ayurveda – Modern Medicine interface. Also, in pursuit of finding better treatment solutions, we ought to step beyond the realm of only drugs and attempt validation of comprehensive specific treatment package as per classical Ayurveda. Finally, validation of a combined (Ayurveda and modern medicine) therapeutic approach with superior efficacy and safety is likely to be a major leap in overcoming some of the current frustrations to treat difficult disorders like arthritis using only modern medicines. PMID:21547047

  1. The number needed to treat for adalimumab, etanercept, and infliximab based on ACR50 response in three randomized controlled trials on established rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, L E; Christensen, R; Bliddal, H

    2011-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of adalimumab, etanercept, and infliximab in patients with established rheumatoid arthritis (RA) taking concomitant methotrexate (MTX) by calculating the number needed to treat (NNT) using three different methods.......To compare the efficacy of adalimumab, etanercept, and infliximab in patients with established rheumatoid arthritis (RA) taking concomitant methotrexate (MTX) by calculating the number needed to treat (NNT) using three different methods....

  2. The number needed to treat for adalimumab, etanercept, and infliximab based on ACR50 response in three randomized controlled trials on established rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, L E; Christensen, R; Bliddal, H

    2007-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of adalimumab, etanercept, and infliximab in patients with established rheumatoid arthritis (RA) taking concomitant methotrexate (MTX) by calculating the number needed to treat (NNT) using three different methods.......To compare the efficacy of adalimumab, etanercept, and infliximab in patients with established rheumatoid arthritis (RA) taking concomitant methotrexate (MTX) by calculating the number needed to treat (NNT) using three different methods....

  3. Arthritis associated with calcium oxalate crystals in an anephric patient treated with peritoneal dialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenthal, A.; Ryan, L.M.; McCarty, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    The authors report a case of calcium oxalate arthropathy in a woman undergoing intermittent peritoneal dialysis who was not receiving pharmacologic doses of ascorbic acid. She developed acute arthritis, with calcium oxalate crystals in Heberden's and Bouchard's nodes, a phenomenon previously described in gout. Intermittent peritoneal dialysis may be less efficient than hemodialysis in clearing oxalate, and physicians should now consider calcium oxalate-associated arthritis in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis who are not receiving large doses of ascorbic acid

  4. Improvements in productivity at paid work and within the household, and increased participation in daily activities after 24 weeks of certolizumab pegol treatment of patients with psoriatic arthritis: results of a phase 3 double-blind randomised placebo-controlled study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanaugh, A; Gladman, D; van der Heijde, D; Purcaru, O; Mease, P

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the effect of certolizumab pegol (CZP) on productivity outside and within the home, and on participation in family, social and leisure activities in adult patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Methods RAPID-PsA (NCT01087788) is a phase 3, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. 409 patients with active PsA were randomised 1:1:1 to placebo, CZP 200 mg every 2 weeks (Q2W) or CZP 400 mg every 4 weeks (Q4W). The arthritis-specific Work Productivity Survey (WPS) assessed the impact of PsA on paid work and household productivity, and participation in social activities during the preceding month. WPS responses were compared between treatment arms using a non-parametric bootstrap-t method. Results At baseline, 56.6%, 60.1% and 61.5% of placebo, CZP 200 mg Q2W and CZP 400 mg Q4W patients were employed. By week 24, employed CZP patients reported an average of 1.0–1.8 and 3.0–3.9 fewer days of absenteeism and presenteeism, respectively, per month compared with 1.0 and 0.3 fewer days for placebo patients (pproductivity or days lost for participation in family, social and leisure activities. Improvements with CZP were seen as early as week 4 and continued to week 24. Conclusions CZP treatment significantly improved productivity at paid work and within the home, and resulted in greater participation in social activities for PsA patients. Trial registration number NCT01087788. PMID:24942382

  5. Aggressive treatment of early rheumatoid arthritis: recognizing the window of opportunity and treating to target goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resman-Targoff, Beth H; Cicero, Marco P

    2010-11-01

    Evidence supports the use of aggressive therapy for patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Clinical outcomes in patients with early RA can improve with a treat-to-target approach that sets the goal at disease remission. The current selection of antirheumatic therapies, including conventional and biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), has made disease remission a realistic target for patients with early RA. The challenge is selecting the optimal antirheumatic drug or combination of drugs for initial and subsequent therapy to balance the clinical benefits, risks, and economic considerations. In some cases, the use of biologic agents as part of the treatment regimen has shown superior results compared with conventional DMARDs alone in halting the progression of disease, especially in reducing radiographic damage. However, the use of biologic agents as initial therapy is challenged by cost-effectiveness analyses, which favor the use of conventional DMARDs. The use of biologic agents may be justified in certain patients with poor prognostic factors or those who experience an inadequate response to conventional DMARDs as a means to slow or halt disease progression and its associated disability. In these cases, the higher cost of treatment with biologic agents may be offset by decreased societal costs, such as lost work productivity, and increased health-related quality of life. Further research is needed to understand optimal strategies for balancing costs, benefits, and risks of antirheumatic drugs. Some key questions are (1) when biologic agents are appropriate for initial therapy, and (2) when to conclude that response to conventional DMARDs is inadequate and biologic agents should be initiated.

  6. Chronic arthritis of the hip joint: an unusual complication of an inadequately treated fistula-in-ano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunath, Rajat; Varghese, Gigi; Simon, Betty

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of chronic arthritis of the right hip joint in an otherwise healthy young male athlete as a complication of inadequately treated anal fistula. A young male athlete presented with symptoms of right hip pain and difficulty in walking and intermittent fever for 2 months. He had a history of perianal abscess drainage. On examination he was found to have a tender right hip joint with severe restriction of movements. He was also found to have a partially drained right ischiorectal abscess. X-ray and MRI of the hip joint revealed chronic arthritis of the right hip joint, which was communicating with a complex fistula-in-ano. He underwent a diversion sigmoid colostomy and right ischiorectal abscess drainage along with appropriate antibiotics with a plan for definitive hip joint procedure later. He was lost to follow-up and succumbed to severe perianal sepsis within a few months. PMID:25414226

  7. The OMERACT MRI inflammatory arthritis group: advances and future research priorities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conaghan, Philip G; Bird, Paul; McQueen, Fiona

    2009-01-01

    The OMERACT magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in inflammatory arthritis group previously developed the rheumatoid arthritis MRI score (RAMRIS) for use in clinical studies, evaluated the use of extremity MRI, and initiated development of a psoriatic arthritis MRI score (PsAMRIS). At OMERACT 9 the g...

  8. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenan Barut

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is the most common chronic rheumatic disease of unknown aetiology in childhood and predominantly presents with peripheral arthritis. The disease is divided into several subgroups, according to demographic characteristics, clinical features, treatment modalities and disease prognosis. Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis, which is one of the most frequent disease subtypes, is characterized by recurrent fever and rash. Oligoarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis, common among young female patients, is usually accompanied by anti-nuclear antibodie positivity and anterior uveitis. Seropositive polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis, an analogue of adult rheumatoid arthritis, is seen in less than 10% of paediatric patients. Seronegative polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis, an entity more specific for childhood, appears with widespread large- and small-joint involvement. Enthesitis-related arthritis is a separate disease subtype, characterized by enthesitis and asymmetric lower-extremity arthritis. This disease subtype represents the childhood form of adult spondyloarthropathies, with human leukocyte antigen-B27 positivity and uveitis but commonly without axial skeleton involvement. Juvenile psoriatic arthritis is characterized by a psoriatic rash, accompanied by arthritis, nail pitting and dactylitis. Disease complications can vary from growth retardation and osteoporosis secondary to treatment and disease activity, to life-threatening macrophage activation syndrome with multi-organ insufficiency. With the advent of new therapeutics over the past 15 years, there has been a marked improvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis treatment and long-term outcome, without any sequelae. The treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients involves teamwork, including an experienced paediatric rheumatologist, an ophthalmologist, an orthopaedist, a paediatric psychiatrist and a physiotherapist. The primary goals

  9. Treating rheumatoid arthritis to target: 2014 update of the recommendations of an international task force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolen, Josef S; Breedveld, Ferdinand C; Burmester, Gerd R; Bykerk, Vivian; Dougados, Maxime; Emery, Paul; Kvien, Tore K; Navarro-Compán, M Victoria; Oliver, Susan; Schoels, Monika; Scholte-Voshaar, Marieke; Stamm, Tanja; Stoffer, Michaela; Takeuchi, Tsutomu; Aletaha, Daniel; Andreu, Jose Louis; Aringer, Martin; Bergman, Martin; Betteridge, Neil; Bijlsma, Hans; Burkhardt, Harald; Combe, Bernard; Durez, Patrick; Fonseca, Joao Eurico; Gibofsky, Alan; Gomez-Reino, Juan J; Graninger, Winfried; Hannonen, Pekka; Haraoui, Boulos; Kouloumas, Marios; Landewe, Robert; Martin-Mola, Emilio; Nash, Peter; Ostergaard, Mikkel; Östör, Andrew; Richards, Pam; Sokka-Isler, Tuulikki; Thorne, Carter; Tzioufas, Athanasios G; van Vollenhoven, Ronald; de Wit, Martinus

    2016-01-01

    Background Reaching the therapeutic target of remission or low-disease activity has improved outcomes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) significantly. The treat-to-target recommendations, formulated in 2010, have provided a basis for implementation of a strategic approach towards this therapeutic goal in routine clinical practice, but these recommendations need to be re-evaluated for appropriateness and practicability in the light of new insights. Objective To update the 2010 treat-to-target recommendations based on systematic literature reviews (SLR) and expert opinion. Methods A task force of rheumatologists, patients and a nurse specialist assessed the SLR results and evaluated the individual items of the 2010 recommendations accordingly, reformulating many of the items. These were subsequently discussed, amended and voted upon by >40 experts, including 5 patients, from various regions of the world. Levels of evidence, strengths of recommendations and levels of agreement were derived. Results The update resulted in 4 overarching principles and 10 recommendations. The previous recommendations were partly adapted and their order changed as deemed appropriate in terms of importance in the view of the experts. The SLR had now provided also data for the effectiveness of targeting low-disease activity or remission in established rather than only early disease. The role of comorbidities, including their potential to preclude treatment intensification, was highlighted more strongly than before. The treatment aim was again defined as remission with low-disease activity being an alternative goal especially in patients with long-standing disease. Regular follow-up (every 1–3 months during active disease) with according therapeutic adaptations to reach the desired state was recommended. Follow-up examinations ought to employ composite measures of disease activity that include joint counts. Additional items provide further details for particular aspects of the

  10. The expression of selected molecular markers of immune tolerance in psoriatic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartosińska, Joanna; Purkot, Joanna; Kowal, Małgorzata; Michalak-Stoma, Anna; Krasowska, Dorota; Chodorowska, Grażyna; Giannopoulos, Krzysztof

    2018-04-24

    Psoriasis is a chronic autoinflammatory disease whose underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. The disease is mediated by the cells and molecules of both the innate and adaptive immune systems. Some T cell surface molecules, including neuropilin-1 (NRP1), programmed death 1 (PD-1) and the human leukocyte antigen G (HLA-G), are known to play a role in the maintenance of immune tolerance. The aim of this study was to investigate HLA-G, NRP1 and programmed cell death gene (PDCD1) mRNA expression in psoriatic patients. The study included 72 psoriatic patients and 35 healthy individuals. Twentyone patients (29.17%) suffered from concomitant psoriatic arthritis. The mRNA expression of HLA-G, NRP1, and PDCD1 were determined using quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The severity of skin lesions was assessed by means of the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI), Body Surface Area (BSA), the Patient Global Assessment (PGA), and the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI). The median value of the PASI was 11.5, and of BSA was 15.8%. The expressions of NRP1 and PDCD1, but not HLA-G, were significantly lower in psoriatic patients in comparison with the control group. The expression of HLA-G, NRP1 and PDCD1 were not significantly different in the psoriatic arthritis and psoriasis vulgaris patients. The results of this study suggest that the molecular markers of immune tolerance, i.e., HLA-G, NRP1, and PD-1, may be involved in the immune response in psoriatic patients.

  11. Epigenetics of psoriatic disease: A systematic review and critical appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Remy A; Abji, Fatima; Gladman, Dafna D

    2017-03-01

    Psoriasis is an inflammatory disease of the skin that is sometimes accompanied by an auto-inflammatory arthritis called psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Psoriasis and PsA are multifactorial diseases that result from complex interactions of environmental and genetic risk factors. Epigenetic marks, which are labile chemical marks with diverse functions, form a layer of biological information that sits at the interface of genetics and the environment. Aberrant epigenetic regulation has been previously implicated in other rheumatological disorders. The purpose of this review is to summarize and critically evaluate the nascent literature on epigenetics in psoriasis and PsA. A systematic review yielded 52 primary articles after applying inclusion and exclusion criteria. Data were extracted using a standardized template and study quality assessed using a methodological quality checklist. Studies reflect a broad range of epigenetic sub-disciplines, the most common being DNA methylation, followed by the parent of origin effect or genomic imprinting, expression or activity of epigenetic modifying enzymes, and histone modifications. Epidemiological studies demonstrating excessive paternal transmission provided the earliest evidence of epigenetic deregulation in psoriatic disease, however few studies have examined its molecular mechanisms. Methylation studies evolved rapidly from low resolution global to targeted analyses of known psoriatic disease susceptibility loci such as HLA-C*0602. The recent explosion of epigenome-wide association studies has provided us with novel insights into psoriasis pathogenesis, and the mechanism of action of UVB, methotrexate, and anti-TNF therapies, as well as molecular signatures of psoriasis that may have clinical relevance. Finally, recent studies of pharmacological inhibitors of epigenetic modifier enzymes demonstrate their potential applicability as novel treatment modalities for psoriasis. Challenges of epigenetics research in psoriasis and Ps

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of the femoral head to detect avascular necrosis in active rheumatoid arthritis treated with methylprednisolone pulse therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vugt, R.M. van; Sijbrandij, E.S.; Bijlsma, J.W.J. [Univ. Hospital Utrecht (Netherlands)

    1996-03-01

    Efficacious management of patients with avascular necrosis of bone (AVN) necessitates the identification of patients with a high risk of collapse of the femoral head. In this prospective study we imaged both hips of 10 patients with active rheumatoid arthritis, who were treated with methylprednisolone pulse therapy. MRI and conventional radiography were performed before MP-pulse therapy and 6 and 12 months thereafter. Two patients showed unilateral changes compatible with AVN. One patient became symptomatic and revealed characteristic radiographic abnormalities. The other patient remained asymptomatic and the MRI appearance returned to normal after 6 months. 18 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of the femoral head to detect avascular necrosis in active rheumatoid arthritis treated with methylprednisolone pulse therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vugt, R.M. van; Sijbrandij, E.S.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.

    1996-01-01

    Efficacious management of patients with avascular necrosis of bone (AVN) necessitates the identification of patients with a high risk of collapse of the femoral head. In this prospective study we imaged both hips of 10 patients with active rheumatoid arthritis, who were treated with methylprednisolone pulse therapy. MRI and conventional radiography were performed before MP-pulse therapy and 6 and 12 months thereafter. Two patients showed unilateral changes compatible with AVN. One patient became symptomatic and revealed characteristic radiographic abnormalities. The other patient remained asymptomatic and the MRI appearance returned to normal after 6 months. 18 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  14. Hypermobility of the first metatarsal bone in patients with Rheumatoid arthritis treated by lapidus procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popelka Stanislav

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Foot deformities and related problems of the forefoot are very common in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The laxity of the medial cuneometatarsal joint and its synovitis are important factors in the development of forefoot deformity. The impaired joint causes the first metatarsal bone to become unstable in the frontal and sagittal planes. In this retrospective study we evaluated data of patients with rheumatoid arthritis who underwent Lapidus procedure. We evaluated the role of the instability in a group of patients, focusing mainly on the clinical symptoms and X-ray signs of the instability. Methods The study group included 125 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The indications of the Lapidus procedure were a hallux valgus deformity greater than 15 degrees and varus deformity of the first metatarsal bone with the intermetatarsal angle greater than 15 degrees on anterio-posterior weight-bearing X-ray. Results Data of 143 Lapidus procedures of 125 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, who underwent surgery between 2004 and 2010 was evaluated. Signs and symptoms of the first metatarsal bone instability was found in 92 feet (64.3% in our group. The AOFAS score was 48.6 before and 87.6 six months after the foot reconstruction. Nonunion of the medial cuneometatarsal joint arthrodesis on X-rays occurred in seven feet (4.9%. Conclusion The Lapidus procedure provides the possibility to correct the first metatarsal bone varus position and its instability, as well as providing the possibility to achieve a painless foot for walking. We recommend using the procedure as a preventive surgery in poorly symptomatic patients with rheumatoid arthritis in case of the first metatarsal bone hypermobility.

  15. The Danish nationwide clinical register for patients with rheumatoid arthritis: DANBIO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibfelt EH

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Else Helene Ibfelt,1 Dorte Vendelbo Jensen,2,3 Merete Lund Hetland2,4 1Registry Support Centre (East, Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Research Centre for Prevention and Health, Rigshospitalet, Glostrup University Hospital, 2DANBIO Registry and Copenhagen Center for Arthritis Research, Center for Rheumatology and Spine Diseases, Centre of Head and Orthopedics, Rigshospitalet, Glostrup, 3Department of Rheumatology, Herlev and Gentofte University Hospital, Hellerup, 4Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark Introduction: DANBIO is a research register and a data source for rheumatologic diseases (rheumatoid arthritis [RA], axial spondyloarthritis, and psoriatic arthritis for monitoring clinical quality at the national, regional, and hospital levels. Study population: The register includes patients with rheumatologic diseases who are treated at a hospital or a private rheumatologic clinic. Registration is mandatory for all patients with RA regardless of treatment and also for patients with other diagnoses if treated with biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. Since 2006, the registration has been done electronically, including patient-reported outcome measures registered electronically by the patients with the use of touch screens. Main variables: Core variables such as diagnosis, year of diagnosis, age, and sex are registered at the beginning. Data entered at later visits included the following: patient-reported outcomes for disease activity, pain, fatigue, functional status, and physician-reported objective measures of disease activity, treatment, C-reactive protein, and, when indicated, imaging. For subgroups of patients, the variables such as quality of life, sociodemographic factors, lifestyle, and comorbidity are also registered. Descriptive data: The DANBIO cohort comprised ~26,000 patients with RA, 3,200 patients with axial spondyloarthritis, and 6

  16. Long-term changes in the quality of life of patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with biological therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Valín, Luis; Mayorga-Bajo, Isabel; Prieto-Fernández, Carolina; Del Pozo-Ruiz, Javier; Gutiérrez-Gutiérrez, Esperanza; Pérez-Sandoval, Trinidad

    2017-02-27

    To analyze the changes in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated with biological therapies. Observational prospective study performed from October 2006 to May 2011. The inclusion criteria were adult patients, diagnosed with RA, treated for at least one year with anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy (infliximab or etanercept), who had not received other biological treatments previously. A total of 41 patients who completed the study undertook the specific and validated questionnaire QoL-RA Scale 3 times: E1 (September 2006-February 2007), E2 (April 2008-January 2009) and E3 (July 2010- May 2011). Data analysis was conducted using Epi-Info version 3.3 2004 for Windows® and Excel 2007; mean comparisons were evaluated by Student's t-test and the relationship between the 3 outcomes for each patient by lineal regression. Overall results show a downward trend which was not statistically significant: 7.09 (standard deviation [SD]=1.15) in E1; 6.90 (SD=1.60) in E2; and 6.52 (SD=1.59) in E3. Items with higher scores were those related to psychosocial aspects (help from family, interaction with family and friends), whereas the physical dimension was valued more poorly (physical ability, arthritis pain, arthritis). Between E2 and E3 there was a significant increase in help from family (P=.0008), whereas level of tension (P=.0119) and mood (P=.0451) decreased significantly. In all, HRQoL reported by patients is good and has remained unchanged after approximately 6 years of study. The stability of HRQoL is probably partly attributable to treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of Biologic Agents in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Amyloidosis Treated with Hemodialysis

    OpenAIRE

    Kuroda, Takeshi; Tanabe, Naohito; Nozawa, Yukiko; Sato, Hiroe; Nakatsue, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Wada, Yoko; Saeki, Takako; Nakano, Masaaki; Narita, Ichiei

    2016-01-01

    Objective Our objective was to examine the safety and effects of therapy with biologics on the prognosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with reactive amyloid A (AA) amyloidosis on hemodialysis (HD). Methods Twenty-eight patients with an established diagnosis of reactive AA amyloidosis participated in the study. The survival was calculated from the date of HD initiation until the time of death, or up to end of June 2015 for the patients who were still alive. HD initiation was according ...

  18. Rehabilitation of patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated in stationary spa treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amila Jaganjac

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Rheumatic diseases are nonsurgical diseases of the locomotor system and connective tissue. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a systemic inflammatory disease of connective tissue of unknown cause, with progressive chronic or subacute course. The aim of the research is to determine whether stationary spa treatment leads to improvement of the functional status in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Methods: We included 35 patients with diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis, referred for treatment at the spa " Ilidža " Gradačac from February to April 2014. Patients not adhering to treatment protocols were excluded. We used Visual analogue pain scale (VAS, HAQ questionnaire and assessment of the clinical condition before and after the treatment based on the scores 1-5.Results: There were 32 female and 3 male patients. The average age was 62.28±8.31 years. Based on the HAQ, 12 patients had no difficulties, 9 of them perform activities with little difficulties, 10 with many difficulties, and 4 patients cannot perform certain activities. Before treatment VAS was 6.63±2.36, and after treatment the 2.51±2.27. Ratings of clinical condition before treatment was 2.38±0.74, and after the treatment 3.64±0.98. The most frequently used therapies were kinesitherapy, magnetotherapy and interferential electricity. Conclusions: Stationary treatment at the spa „Ilidža“ Gradačac leads to an improvement of the functional status in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

  19. Quantitative imaging by pixel-based contrast-enhanced ultrasound reveals a linear relationship between synovial vascular perfusion and the recruitment of pathogenic IL-17A-F+IL-23+ CD161+ CD4+ T helper cells in psoriatic arthritis joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiocco, Ugo; Stramare, Roberto; Martini, Veronica; Coran, Alessandro; Caso, Francesco; Costa, Luisa; Felicetti, Mara; Rizzo, Gaia; Tonietto, Matteo; Scanu, Anna; Oliviero, Francesca; Raffeiner, Bernd; Vezzù, Maristella; Lunardi, Francesca; Scarpa, Raffaele; Sacerdoti, David; Rubaltelli, Leopoldo; Punzi, Leonardo; Doria, Andrea; Grisan, Enrico

    2017-02-01

    To develop quantitative imaging biomarkers of synovial tissue perfusion by pixel-based contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS), we studied the relationship between CEUS synovial vascular perfusion and the frequencies of pathogenic T helper (Th)-17 cells in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) joints. Eight consecutive patients with PsA were enrolled in this study. Gray scale CEUS evaluation was performed on the same joint immediately after joint aspiration, by automatic assessment perfusion data, using a new quantification approach of pixel-based analysis and the gamma-variate model. The set of perfusional parameters considered by the time intensity curve includes the maximum value (peak) of the signal intensity curve, the blood volume index or area under the curve, (BVI, AUC) and the contrast mean transit time (MTT). The direct ex vivo analysis of the frequencies of SF IL17A-F + CD161 + IL23 + CD4 + T cells subsets were quantified by fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS). In cross-sectional analyses, when tested for multiple comparison setting, a false discovery rate at 10%, a common pattern of correlations between CEUS Peak, AUC (BVI) and MTT parameters with the IL17A-F + IL23 + - IL17A-F + CD161 + - and IL17A-F + CD161 + IL23 + CD4 + T cells subsets, as well as lack of correlation between both peak and AUC values and both CD4 + T and CD4 + IL23 + T cells, was observed. The pixel-based CEUS assessment is a truly measure synovial inflammation, as a useful tool to develop quantitative imaging biomarker for monitoring target therapeutics in PsA.

  20. Real-life experience of using conventional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) in psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Retrospective analysis of the efficacy of methotrexate, sulfasalazine, and leflunomide in PsA in comparison to spondyloarthritides other than PsA and literature review of the use of conventional DMARDs in PsA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussou, Euthalia; Bouraoui, Aicha

    2017-01-01

    Objective With the aim of assessing the response to treatment with conventional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) used in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA), data on methotrexate, sulfasalazine (SSZ), and leflunomide were analyzed from baseline and subsequent follow-up (FU) questionnaires completed by patients with either PsA or other spondyloarthritides (SpAs). Material and Methods A single-center real-life retrospective analysis was performed by obtaining clinical data via questionnaires administered before and after treatment. The indices used were erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP) level, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Function Index (BASFI), wellbeing (WB), and treatment effect (TxE). The indices measured at baseline were compared with those measured on one occasion in a FU visit at least 1 year later. Results A total of 73 patients, 51 with PsA (mean age 49.8±12.8 years; male-to-female ratio [M:F]=18:33) and 22 with other SpAs (mean age 50.6±16 years; M:F=2:20), were studied. BASDAI, BASFI, and WB displayed consistent improvements during FU assessments in both PsA patients and controls in comparison to baseline values. SSZ exhibited better efficacy as confirmed by TxE in both PsA patients and controls. ESR and CRP displayed no differences in either the PsA or the SpA group between the cases before and after treatment. Conclusion Real-life retrospective analysis of three DMARDs used in PsA (and SpAs other than PsA) demonstrated that all three DMARDs that were used brought about improvements in BASDAI, BASFI, TxE, and WB. However, the greatest improvements at FU were seen with SSZ use in both PsA and control cohorts. PMID:28293446

  1. Radiosynovectomy in the treatment of arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liepe, Knut

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Radiosynovectomy is a useful therapeutic option that involves radiopharmaceutical injections into joints, especially to treat rheumatoid arthritis. The indications included different kinds of arthritis, such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, Bechterew's disease, hemophiliac arthritis, osteoarthritis, but also patients with joint prosthesis and synovial effusion. There are three commercial available radiopharmaceuticals for the treatment: yttrium-90 for the knee (185 to 250 MBq), rhenium-186 for larger joints (shoulder and hip with 111 MBq; elbow, wrist, ankle joint with can also rederbium-169 for smaller joints (acromioclavicular joint with 37 MBq, thumb base and MTP I with 30 MBq, MCP and MTP II-V with 22 MBq, PIP with 18.5 MBq, and DIP with 15 MBq, respectively). Decisive for the treatment is a positive sign for arthritis in the two-phase bone scan with 99mTc-HMDP (high uptake in the blood pool phase). Only for radiosynovecotmy in the knee an ultrasound with an evidence of effusion is sufficient. Side effects by the treatment are rare, such as temporary radiation or crystal synovitis, tissue necrosis (extra articular fraction or intra-articular), joint infection (1 of 35,000 joints) or effects due to the immobilisation (thrombosis, pulmonary embolism (immobilization of the knee), lymphoedema or loss of motion. In the treatment of the knee a prophylaxis with heparin is necessary to protect the patients for a pulmonary embolism. The clinical outcome is depending from the primary disease and the stage of arthrosis. Kresnik at al reported in 2190 treated joints an overall response rate of 73 ± 17%. A higher response rate was observed in patients with early stage of arthrosis (73 ± 12%) to patients with advance stage (52 ± 24%). The best results had patients with hemophiliac arthritis (91 ± 4%). In our hospital were treated up to 10.000 joints with a mean response rate of 70-80%. There was a higher response rate in larger joints with 81 ± 5

  2. Radiosynovectomy in the treatment of arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liepe, K.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Radiosynovectomy is a useful therapeutic option that involves radiopharmaceutical injections into joints, especially to treat rheumatoid arthritis. The indications included different kinds of arthritis, such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, Bechterew's disease, hemophiliac arthritis, osteoarthritis, but also patients with joint prosthesis and synovial effusion. There are three commercial available radiopharmaceuticals for the treatment: yttrium-90 for the knee (185 to 250 MBq), rhenium-186 for larger joints (shoulder and hip with 111 MBq; elbow, wrist, ankle joint with 74 MBq) and erbium- 169 for smaller joints (acromioclavicular joint with 37 MBq, thumb base and MTP I with 30 MBq, MCP and MTP II-V with 22 MBq, PIP with 18.5 MBq, and DIP with 15 MBq, respectively). Decisive for the treatment is a positive sign for arthritis in the two-phase bone scan with 99mTc- HMDP (high uptake in the blood pool phase). Only for radiosynovectomy in the knee an ultrasound with an evidence of effusion is sufficient. Side effects by the treatment are rare, such as temporary radiation or crystal synovitis, tissue necrosis (extra-articular fraction or intraarticular), joint infection (1 of 35,000 joints) or effects due to the immobilization (thrombosis, pulmonary embolism (immobilization of the knee), lymph edema or loss of motion. In the treatment of the knee, a prophylaxis with heparin is necessary to protect the patients for pulmonary embolism. The radiation absorbed dose to the patients are low because a low leakage rate from the treated joint (lymphogenic uptake of 1.8%ID (0.45 to 4.78). These leads to a radiation exposure to the testis of 0.1mSv (0.05 to 0.18) and to the ovary of 0.2 mSv (0.1 to 0.38). Significantly is the radiation exposure of the physician, here especially at the finger pulp. A high beta dose of 22.1 μSv/MBq for the forefinger was observed using only a syringe protection in treatments of knees ( 90 Y), this resulted in a annual

  3. Long-term followup of rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with total lymphoid irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanay, A.; Field, E.H.; Hoppe, R.T.; Strober, S.

    1987-01-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation was administered to 32 patients with intractable rheumatoid arthritis. Twenty-four patients showed at least a 25% improvement in 3 of 4 disease activity parameters, which persisted during the followup period of up to 48 months. Eight of the 32 patients required adjunctive immunosuppressive drug therapy to maintain improvement. Four patients died after total lymphoid irradiation; the causes of death were acute myocardial infarction (1 patient), pulmonary embolism (1 patient), and rheumatoid lung disease complicated by respiratory infection (2 patients). After therapy, patients exhibited a prolonged reduction in the number and function of circulating T helper cells

  4. Raman spectroscopy detects deterioration in biomechanical properties of bone in a glucocorticoid-treated mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Jason R.; Takahata, Masahiko; Awad, Hani A.; Berger, Andrew J.

    2011-08-01

    Although glucocorticoids are frequently prescribed for the symptomatic management of inflammatory disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, extended glucocorticoid exposure is the leading cause of physician-induced osteoporosis and leaves patients at a high risk of fracture. To study the biochemical effects of glucocorticoid exposure and how they might affect biomechanical properties of the bone, Raman spectra were acquired from ex vivo tibiae of glucocorticoid- and placebo-treated wild-type mice and a transgenic mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis. Statistically significant spectral differences were observed due to both treatment regimen and mouse genotype. These differences are attributed to changes in the overall bone mineral composition, as well as the degree of phosphate mineralization in tibial cortical bone. In addition, partial least squares regression was used to generate a Raman-based prediction of each tibia's biomechanical strength as quantified by a torsion test. The Raman-based predictions were as accurate as those produced by microcomputed tomography derived parameters, and more accurate than the clinically-used parameter of bone mineral density. These results suggest that Raman spectroscopy could be a valuable tool for monitoring bone biochemistry in studies of bone diseases such as osteoporosis, including tests of drugs being developed to combat these diseases.

  5. X-ray microanalysis of psoriatic skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grundin, T.G.; Roomans, G.M.; Forslind, B.; Lindberg, M.; Werner, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Electron probe x-ray microanalysis was used to study elemental distribution in uninvolved and involved skin from patients with psoriasis, and in skin from healthy controls. Significant differences were found between the involved and uninvolved psoriatic skin. In the involved skin, the concentrations of Mg, P, and K were higher in the stratum germinativum, spinosum, and granulosum, compared to the corresponding strata in uninvolved skin. Neither involved nor uninvolved psoriatic stratum germinativum differed markedly from nonpsoriatic control stratum germinativum. In uninvolved psoriatic skin only a lower level of K was noted. In comparison to uninvolved psoriatic skin, the elemental composition of the various strata of involved psoriatic skin shows a pattern typical for highly proliferative, nonneoplastic cells

  6. Predictors of satisfactory improvements in pain for patients with early rheumatoid arthritis in a treat-to-target study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Klooster, Peter M; Vonkeman, Harald E; Oude Voshaar, Martijn A H; Siemons, Liseth; van Riel, Piet L C M; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to identify baseline predictors of achieving patient-perceived satisfactory improvement (PPSI) in pain after 6 months of treat to target in patients with early RA. Baseline and 6 month data were used from patients included in the Dutch Rheumatoid Arthritis Monitoring remission induction cohort study. Simple and multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to identify significant predictors of achieving an absolute improvement of 30 mm or a relative improvement of 50% on a visual analogue scale for pain. At 6 months, 125 of 209 patients (59.8%) achieved an absolute PPSI and 130 patients (62.2%) achieved a relative PPSI in pain. Controlling for baseline pain, having symmetrical arthritis was the strongest independent predictor of achieving an absolute [odds ratio (OR) 3.17, P = 0.03] or relative (OR 3.44, P = 0.01) PPSI. Additionally, anti-CCP positivity (OR 2.04, P = 0.04) and having ≤12 tender joints (OR 0.29, P = 0.01) were predictive of achieving a relative PPSI. The total explained variance of baseline predictors was 30% for absolute and 18% for relative improvements, respectively. Symmetrical joint involvement, anti-CCP positivity and fewer tender joints at baseline are prognostic signs for achieving satisfactory improvement in pain after 6 months of treat to target in patients with early RA. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Folate, homocysteine, and cobalamin status in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with methotrexate, and the effect of low dose folic acid supplement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornung, Nete; Ellingsen, Torkell; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of methotrexate (MTX) treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on folate metabolism, and to determine the effect of low dose folic acid on toxicity, efficacy, and folate status. METHODS: A 52-week prospective study of 81 patients with RA treated with MTX and self...

  8. The OMERACT MRI in Arthritis Working Group - Update on Status and Future Research Priorities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Bird, Paul; Gandjbakhch, Frédérique

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide an update on the status and future research priorities of the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in arthritis working group. METHODS: A summary is provided of the activities of the group within rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic...

  9. Arthritis - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources - arthritis ... The following organizations provide more information on arthritis : American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons -- orthoinfo.aaos.org/menus/arthritis.cfm Arthritis Foundation -- www.arthritis.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www. ...

  10. Radiographic outcome in Hispanic early rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with conventional disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contreras-Yanez, Irazu; Rull-Gabayet, Marina; Vazquez-LaMadrid, Jorge; Pascual-Ramos, Virginia

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To determine rates of incident erosive disease in early rheumatoid arthritis patients, to identify baseline predictors and to evaluate erosion's impact on patient-reported outcomes. Methods: 82 patients with ≤12 months of disease duration, ≥3 years of follow-up and conventional treatment were included. Consecutive evaluations assessed swollen and tender joint counts, treatment and comorbidity, acute reactant-phase determinations and patient-reported outcomes. Digitized radiographs of the hands and feet were obtained at baseline and yearly thereafter. RA was defined as erosive when at least one unequivocal cortical bone defect was detected. Descriptive statistics and Cox regression analysis were performed. Results: At baseline, 71 of the patients were Female Sign , population median (range) age was of 38.7 (16-78.2) years, 58 patients had antibodies and all the patients had active disease and substantial disability. Follow-up cohort was of 299.3 person-years. At last follow-up (49 ± 13.8 months), 28 patients developed erosions. Erosion's location was the feet, in 12 patients. Incident rates of erosive disease at one, two, three and four years were of 8.1, 12.8, 13.8 and 5.6 per 100 person-years, respectively. Higher C-reactive protein (HR: 1.20, 95%CI: 1.04-1.4, p = 0.01) and positive antibodies (HR: 5.09, 95%CI: 1.08-23.86, p = 0.04) were baseline predictors of incident erosive disease. Erosions had minor impact on patient-reported outcomes. Conclusion: Rheumatoid arthritis patients with antibodies and higher C reactive protein at baseline are at risk for incident erosions which appear most frequently at the feet. Up to 1/3 patients conventionally treated develop incident erosions, which minimally impact function.

  11. Radiographic outcome in Hispanic early rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with conventional disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras-Yanez, Irazu, E-mail: uzari02@hotmail.com.mx [Department of Immunology and Rheumatology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga 15, Seccion XVI, C.P. 14000, Tlalpan, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Rull-Gabayet, Marina, E-mail: rull.marina@gmail.com [Department of Immunology and Rheumatology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga 15, Seccion XVI, C.P. 14000, Tlalpan, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Vazquez-LaMadrid, Jorge, E-mail: docjvlradiologo@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga 15, Seccion XVI, C.P. 14000, Tlalpan, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Pascual-Ramos, Virginia, E-mail: virtichu@gmail.com.mx [Department of Immunology and Rheumatology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga 15, Seccion XVI, C.P. 14000, Tlalpan, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2011-08-15

    Objectives: To determine rates of incident erosive disease in early rheumatoid arthritis patients, to identify baseline predictors and to evaluate erosion's impact on patient-reported outcomes. Methods: 82 patients with {<=}12 months of disease duration, {>=}3 years of follow-up and conventional treatment were included. Consecutive evaluations assessed swollen and tender joint counts, treatment and comorbidity, acute reactant-phase determinations and patient-reported outcomes. Digitized radiographs of the hands and feet were obtained at baseline and yearly thereafter. RA was defined as erosive when at least one unequivocal cortical bone defect was detected. Descriptive statistics and Cox regression analysis were performed. Results: At baseline, 71 of the patients were Female Sign , population median (range) age was of 38.7 (16-78.2) years, 58 patients had antibodies and all the patients had active disease and substantial disability. Follow-up cohort was of 299.3 person-years. At last follow-up (49 {+-} 13.8 months), 28 patients developed erosions. Erosion's location was the feet, in 12 patients. Incident rates of erosive disease at one, two, three and four years were of 8.1, 12.8, 13.8 and 5.6 per 100 person-years, respectively. Higher C-reactive protein (HR: 1.20, 95%CI: 1.04-1.4, p = 0.01) and positive antibodies (HR: 5.09, 95%CI: 1.08-23.86, p = 0.04) were baseline predictors of incident erosive disease. Erosions had minor impact on patient-reported outcomes. Conclusion: Rheumatoid arthritis patients with antibodies and higher C reactive protein at baseline are at risk for incident erosions which appear most frequently at the feet. Up to 1/3 patients conventionally treated develop incident erosions, which minimally impact function.

  12. Experiences and needs for work participation in employees with rheumatoid arthritis treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Meer, Marrit; Hoving, Jan L; Vermeulen, Marjolein I M; Herenius, Marieke M J; Tak, Paul P; Sluiter, Judith K; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the experiences and needs with respect to work participation of employees with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) therapy. Face-to-face interviews in 14 employees with RA on anti-TNF therapy focused on experiences, offered support and needs with respect to work participation. Experiences regarding work participation varied and ranged from fatigue at work, having no job control, not being understood by the work environment or difficulty dealing with emotions as a result of interaction within the work environment. Support by health care professionals for work participation was considered important, especially concerning social or psychological issues. Advice in becoming aware of one's changes in abilities was highly appreciated, as was the availability of professional advice in times of an urgent work issue due to RA. Employees mentioned an increase in social support at work and job control as important facilitating factors for work participation. Although patients with RA report improvement in their work functioning after starting anti-TNF therapy, employees continue facing challenges in working life due to RA. For support concerning work participation, it is recommended that health care professionals are more aware of work-related problems in patients with RA treated with anti-TNF therapy.

  13. Total pubertal growth in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis treated with growth hormone: analysis of a single center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtold, S; Beyerlein, A; Ripperger, P; Roeb, J; Dalla Pozza, R; Häfner, R; Haas, J P; Schmidt, H

    2012-10-01

    Growth failure is a permanent sequelae in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). The aim of the study was to compare pubertal growth in control and growth hormone (GH) treated JIA subjects. 64 children with JIA at a mean age of 10.38 ± 2.80 years were enrolled and followed until final height (measured in standard deviation (SD) scores). 39 children (20 m) received GH therapy and 24 (9 m) served as controls. GH dose was 0.33 mg/kg/week. Linear regression analysis was performed to identify factors influencing total pubertal growth. Mean total pubertal growth was 21.1 ± 1.3 cm (mean ± SD) in GH treated JIA patients and 13.8 ± 1.5 cm in controls. Final height was significantly higher with GH treatment (-1.67 ± 1.20 SD) compared to controls (-3.20 ± 1.84 SD). Linear regression model identified age at onset of puberty (ß=-4.2,CI: -5.9, -2.6 in controls and ß=-2.3,CI: -3.6, -1.1 in GH treated) as the main factor for total pubertal growth. Final height SDS was determined by the difference to target height at onset of puberty (ß=-0.59;CI: -0.80, -0.37 in controls and ß=-0.30,CI: -0.52, -0.08 in GH treated), age at onset of puberty (ß=0.47;CI:0.02,0.93 in controls and 0.23;CI: -0.00,0.46 in GH treated) and height gain during puberty (ß=0.13;CI:0.05,0.21 in controls and ß=0.11;CI:0.07,0.16 in GH treated). Total pubertal growth in JIA patients treated with GH was increased by a factor of 1.5 greater in comparison to controls leading to a significantly better final height. To maximize final height GH treatment should be initiated early to reduce the height deficit at onset of puberty. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Early rheumatoid arthritis and its differentiation from other joint abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutry, Nathalie; Carmo, Clarissa Canella Moraes do; Flipo, Rene-Marc; Cotten, Anne

    2009-01-01

    The introduction of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs has created new demands on imaging to early identify patients with rheumatoid arthritis and opened new prospects in therapeutic management of patients with aggressive disease. Therefore, new imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound have developed during the past few years in this field. In some cases, both magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound may be also useful in making the distinction between early rheumatoid arthritis and other joints abnormalities, including early psoriatic arthritis. This article will review key aspects of important advances in imaging in rheumatoid arthritis, particularly focusing on magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound.

  15. Gouty arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthelemy, C.R.; Nakayama, D.A.; Lightfoot, R.W. Jr.; Wortmann, R.L.; Carrera, G.F.

    1984-01-01

    A prospective analysis of 60 patients with gout was undertaken to evaluate the radiographic spectrum of gouty arthritis in patients treated in the era of hypouricemic therapy. Twenty-two of these patients were clinically tophaceous; 36 were considered to have radiographic findings diagnostic of gouty arthritis by strict radiographic criteria. Up to 24% of the patients denied symptoms in joints with radiographic changes of gout; 42% with no evidence of tophi on clinical examination had radiographic changes characteristic of gout. Radiographic assessment can be extremely helpful in the management of gout by documenting the degree and extent of bony involvement, particularly in patients with limited symptoms or without clinical tophi. (orig.)

  16. Sexual dysfunctions in psoriatic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Isabela Sarbu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is a chronic, immune-mediated disorder with a worldwide occurrence characterized by well-defined infiltrated erythematous papules and plaques, covered by silvery white or yellowish scales. It is a physically, socially and emotionally invalidating disorder that affects 1-2% of the population. Sexual health is an important part of general health and sexual dysfunctions can negatively affect self-esteem, confidence, interpersonal relationships and the quality of life. Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI, Psoriasis Disability Index (PDI and the Impact of Psoriasis on Quality of Life (IPSO questionnaire are all questionnaires used to assess the quality of life of patients with psoriasis and each has one question regarding sexual dysfunction. Several scales were also designed to particularly assess sexual satisfaction in men and women. The aim of this paper is to perform an overview of the existing studies on sexual dysfunction in psoriatic patients.

  17. The Danish nationwide clinical register for patients with rheumatoid arthritis: DANBIO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibfelt, Else Helene; Jensen, Dorte Vendelbo; Hetland, Merete Lund

    2016-01-01

    DANBIO is a research register and a data source for rheumatologic diseases (rheumatoid arthritis [RA], axial spondyloarthritis, and psoriatic arthritis) for monitoring clinical quality at the national, regional, and hospital levels. The register includes patients with rheumatologic diseases who are treated at a hospital or a private rheumatologic clinic. Registration is mandatory for all patients with RA regardless of treatment and also for patients with other diagnoses if treated with biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. Since 2006, the registration has been done electronically, including patient-reported outcome measures registered electronically by the patients with the use of touch screens. Core variables such as diagnosis, year of diagnosis, age, and sex are registered at the beginning. Data entered at later visits included the following: patient-reported outcomes for disease activity, pain, fatigue, functional status, and physician-reported objective measures of disease activity, treatment, C-reactive protein, and, when indicated, imaging. For subgroups of patients, the variables such as quality of life, sociodemographic factors, lifestyle, and comorbidity are also registered. The DANBIO cohort comprised ∼26,000 patients with RA, 3,200 patients with axial spondyloarthritis, and 6,200 patients with psoriatic arthritis in 2015. DANBIO has high nationwide coverage and completeness on key data variables. More than 60 original papers as well as annual reports of clinical quality (since 2005) have been published. DANBIO is a powerful register for research in rheumatologic diseases and furthermore serves as a Clinical Quality Register with the aim of monitoring treatment quality in patients with RA in Denmark.

  18. A case of surgically treated peristomal pyoderma gangrenosum in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Khajehnoori, Masoomeh; O'Brien, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Peristomal pyoderma gangrenosum (PPG) is a rare subtype of pyoderma gangrenosum that is difficult to diagnose and treat. It is characterized by the rapid progression of painful necrotic ulcer surrounding an area of abdominal stoma. It is almost exclusively associated with inflammatory bowel disease even after bowel surgery and is associated with significant morbidity. Diagnosis of pyoderma gangrenosum is based on exclusion of other disorders replicating some of its clinical features and histo...

  19. Periodontal and serum protein profiles in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with tumor necrosis factor inhibitor adalimumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Tetsuo; Yokoyama, Tomoko; Ito, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Yamagata, Akira; Okada, Moe; Oofusa, Ken; Narita, Ichiei; Murasawa, Akira; Nakazono, Kiyoshi; Yoshie, Hiromasa

    2014-11-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α inhibitor has been shown to affect the periodontal condition of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of the present study is to assess the effect of a fully humanized anti-TNF-α monoclonal antibody, adalimumab (ADA), on the periodontal condition of patients with RA and to compare serum protein profiles before and after ADA therapy. The study participants consisted of 20 patients with RA treated with ADA. Clinical periodontal and rheumatologic parameters and serum cytokine levels were evaluated at baseline and 3 months later. Serum protein spot volume was examined with two-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Proteins with significant difference in abundance before and after ADA therapy were found and identified using mass spectrometry and protein databases. The patients showed a significant decrease in gingival index (P = 0.002), bleeding on probing (P = 0.003), probing depth (P = 0.002), disease activity score including 28 joints using C-reactive protein (P protein spots obtained, nine spots were significantly decreased in abundance at reassessment, corresponding to complement factor H, phospholipase D, serum amyloid A, complement component 4, and α-1-acid glycoprotein (P periodontal condition of patients with RA, which might be related to differences in serum protein profiles before and after ADA therapy.

  20. Obstacles to the implementation of the treat-to-target strategy for rheumatoid arthritis in clinical practice in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Yuko; Koike, Takao; Oda, Hiromi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Miyasaka, Nobuyuki; Harigai, Masayoshi; Yamanaka, Hisashi; Ishiguro, Naoki; Tanaka, Yoshiya; Takeuchi, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    To clarify the obstacles preventing the implementation of the treat-to-target (T2T) strategy for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in clinical practice. A total of 301 rheumatologists in Japan completed a questionnaire. In the first section, participants were indirectly questioned on the implementation of basic components of T2T, and in the second section, participants were directly questioned on their level of agreement and application. Although nearly all participants set treatment targets for the majority of RA patients with moderate to high disease activity, the proportion who set clinical remission as their target was 59%, with only 45% of these using composite measures. The proportion of participants who monitored X-rays and Health Assessment Questionnaires for all their patients was 44% and 14%, respectively. The proportion of participants who did not discuss treatment strategies was 44%, with approximately half of these reasoning that this was due to a proportion of patients having a lack of understanding of the treatment strategy or inability to make decisions. When participants were directly questioned, there was a high level of agreement with the T2T recommendations. Although there was a high level of agreement with the T2T recommendations, major obstacles preventing its full implementation still remain.

  1. Comparing Effects of Biologic Agents in Treating Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Multiple Treatment Comparison Regression Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingunn Fride Tvete

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis patients have been treated with disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs and the newer biologic drugs. We sought to compare and rank the biologics with respect to efficacy. We performed a literature search identifying 54 publications encompassing 9 biologics. We conducted a multiple treatment comparison regression analysis letting the number experiencing a 50% improvement on the ACR score be dependent upon dose level and disease duration for assessing the comparable relative effect between biologics and placebo or DMARD. The analysis embraced all treatment and comparator arms over all publications. Hence, all measured effects of any biologic agent contributed to the comparison of all biologic agents relative to each other either given alone or combined with DMARD. We found the drug effect to be dependent on dose level, but not on disease duration, and the impact of a high versus low dose level was the same for all drugs (higher doses indicated a higher frequency of ACR50 scores. The ranking of the drugs when given without DMARD was certolizumab (ranked highest, etanercept, tocilizumab/ abatacept and adalimumab. The ranking of the drugs when given with DMARD was certolizumab (ranked highest, tocilizumab, anakinra/rituximab, golimumab/ infliximab/ abatacept, adalimumab/ etanercept [corrected]. Still, all drugs were effective. All biologic agents were effective compared to placebo, with certolizumab the most effective and adalimumab (without DMARD treatment and adalimumab/ etanercept (combined with DMARD treatment the least effective. The drugs were in general more effective, except for etanercept, when given together with DMARDs.

  2. A treat-to-target strategy with methotrexate and intra-articular triamcinolone with or without adalimumab effectively reduces MRI synovitis, osteitis and tenosynovitis and halts structural damage progression in early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, Mette Bjørndal; Eshed, Iris; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim

    2014-01-01

    To investigate whether a treat-to-target strategy with methotrexate and intra-articular glucocorticosteroid injections suppresses MRI inflammation and halts structural damage progression in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (ERA), and whether adalimumab provides an additional effect....

  3. Cluster-Randomized Trial of a Behavioral Intervention to Incorporate a Treat-to-Target Approach to Care of US Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrold, Leslie R; Reed, George W; John, Ani; Barr, Christine J; Soe, Kevin; Magner, Robert; Saunders, Katherine C; Ruderman, Eric M; Haselkorn, Tmirah; Greenberg, Jeffrey D; Gibofsky, Allan; Harrington, J Timothy; Kremer, Joel M

    2018-03-01

    To assess the feasibility and efficacy of implementing a treat-to-target approach versus usual care in a US-based cohort of rheumatoid arthritis patients. In this behavioral intervention trial, rheumatology practices were cluster-randomized to provide treat-to-target care or usual care. Eligible patients with moderate/high disease activity (Clinical Disease Activity Index [CDAI] score >10) were followed for 12 months. Both treat-to-target and usual care patients were seen every 3 months. Treat-to-target providers were to have monthly visits with treatment acceleration at a minimum of every 3 months in patients with CDAI score >10; additional visits and treatment acceleration were at the discretion of usual care providers and patients. Coprimary end points were feasibility, assessed by rate of treatment acceleration conditional on CDAI score >10, and achievement of low disease activity (LDA; CDAI score ≤10) by an intent-to-treat analysis. A total of 14 practice sites per study arm were included (246 patients receiving treat-to-target and 286 receiving usual care). The groups had similar baseline demographic and clinical characteristics. Rates of treatment acceleration (treat-to-target 47% versus usual care 50%; odds ratio [OR] 0.92 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.64, 1.34]) and achievement of LDA (treat-to-target 57% versus usual care 55%; OR 1.05 [95% CI 0.60, 1.84]) were similar between groups. Treat-to-target providers reported patient reluctance and medication lag time as common barriers to treatment acceleration. This study is the first to examine the feasibility and efficacy of a treat-to-target approach in typical US rheumatology practice. Treat-to-target care was not associated with increased likelihood of treatment acceleration or achievement of LDA, and barriers to treatment acceleration were identified. © 2017, The Authors. Arthritis Care & Research published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American College of Rheumatology.

  4. Implementation of treat-to-target in rheumatoid arthritis through a Learning Collaborative: Rationale and design of the TRACTION trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Daniel H; Lee, Sara B; Zak, Agnes; Corrigan, Cassandra; Agosti, Jenifer; Bitton, Asaf; Harrold, Leslie; Losina, Elena; Lu, Bing; Pincus, Ted; Radner, Helga; Smolen, Josef; Katz, Jeffrey N; Fraenkel, Liana

    2016-08-01

    Treat-to-target (TTT) is a recommended strategy in the management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but various data sources suggest that its uptake in routine care in the US is suboptimal. Herein, we describe the design of a randomized controlled trial of a Learning Collaborative to facilitate implementation of TTT. We recruited 11 rheumatology sites from across the US and randomized them into the following two groups: one received the Learning Collaborative intervention in Phase 1 (month 1-9) and the second formed a wait-list control group to receive the intervention in Phase 2 (months 10-18). The Learning Collaborative intervention was designed using the Model for Improvement, consisting of a Change Package with corresponding principles and action phases. Phase 1 intervention practices had nine learning sessions, collaborated using a web-based tool, and shared results of plan-do-study-act cycles and monthly improvement metrics collected at each practice. The wait-list control group sites had no intervention during Phase 1. The primary trial outcome is the implementation of TTT as measured by chart review, comparing the differences from baseline to end of Phase 1, between intervention and control sites. All intervention sites remained engaged in the Learning Collaborative throughout Phase 1, with a total of 38 providers participating. The primary trial outcome measures are currently being collected by the study team through medical record review. If the Learning Collaborative is an effective means for improving implementation of TTT, this strategy could serve as a way of implementing disseminating TTT more widely. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Implementation of Treat-to-Target in Rheumatoid Arthritis Through a Learning Collaborative: Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Daniel H; Losina, Elena; Lu, Bing; Zak, Agnes; Corrigan, Cassandra; Lee, Sara B; Agosti, Jenifer; Bitton, Asaf; Harrold, Leslie R; Pincus, Theodore; Radner, Helga; Yu, Zhi; Smolen, Josef S; Fraenkel, Liana; Katz, Jeffrey N

    2017-07-01

    Treat-to-target (TTT) is an accepted paradigm for the management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but some evidence suggests poor adherence. The purpose of this study was to test the effects of a group-based multisite improvement learning collaborative on adherence to TTT. We conducted a cluster-randomized quality-improvement trial with waitlist control across 11 rheumatology sites in the US. The intervention entailed a 9-month group-based learning collaborative that incorporated rapid-cycle improvement methods. A composite TTT implementation score was calculated as the percentage of 4 required items documented in the visit notes for each patient at 2 time points, as evaluated by trained staff. The mean change in the implementation score for TTT across all patients for the intervention sites was compared with that for the control sites after accounting for intracluster correlation using linear mixed models. Five sites with a total of 23 participating rheumatology providers were randomized to intervention and 6 sites with 23 participating rheumatology providers were randomized to the waitlist control. The intervention included 320 patients, and the control included 321 patients. At baseline, the mean TTT implementation score was 11% in both arms; after the 9-month intervention, the mean TTT implementation score was 57% in the intervention group and 25% in the control group (change in score of 46% for intervention and 14% for control; P = 0.004). We did not observe excessive use of resources or excessive occurrence of adverse events in the intervention arm. A learning collaborative resulted in substantial improvements in adherence to TTT for the management of RA. This study supports the use of an educational collaborative to improve quality. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  6. Patellofemoral arthritis treated with resurfacing implant: Clinical outcome and complications at a minimum two-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zicaro, Juan Pablo; Yacuzzi, Carlos; Astoul Bonorino, Juan; Carbo, Lisandro; Costa-Paz, Matias

    2017-12-01

    This study evaluated the clinical and radiographic outcomes of a series of patients treated with an anatomic inlay resurfacing implant, with a minimum two-year follow-up. Fifteen patients underwent patellofemoral-resurfacing procedures using a HemiCAP Wave Patellofemoral Inlay Resurfacing implant from 2010 to 2013. Clinical outcomes included: Visual Analog Scale (VAS), Lysholm score, Knee Society Score (KSS), and evaluation of Kujala, and Hospital for Special Surgery Patellofemoral score (HSS-PF). The postoperative complications were analyzed. Nineteen knees were evaluated; the average follow-up was 35.2months. Fourteen were women, with an average age of 54years. The pre-operative/postoperative clinical results presented a significant improvement: VAS 8/2.5, Lysholm 31.9/85.8, KSS 39.8/82.5, Kujala 32.1/79.3 and Hospital for Special Surgery Patellofemoral score (HSS-PF) 15.9/90.6. A total of 87% of patients were either satisfied or very satisfied with the overall outcome. There were no radiographic signs of loosening. Seven postoperative complications were recorded: two presented ongoing knee pain, one postoperative stiffness, one patellar bounce due to maltracking, two ilio-tibial band syndrome, and one tibial anterior tuberosity osteotomy nonunion. Two patients underwent a total knee arthroplasty conversion and were considered a failure. None of these complications were implant related. Patellofemoral inlay resurfacing for isolated patellofemoral arthritis was an effective and safe procedure with high levels of patient satisfaction. No mechanical implant failure was seen at a minimum two-year follow-up. This implant design appeared to be an alternative to the traditional patellofemoral prostheses. Concomitant osteochondral lesions, patellofemoral dysplasia or patellar maltracking might be poor prognostic factors for this type of implant. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Psoriatic arthritis: An assessment of clinical, biochemical and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1 Department of Internal Medicine, Prince Mshiyeni Memorial Hospital and School of Clinical Medicine, College of Health Sciences, .... Five patients had uveitis as the .... methotrexate monotherapy at an average dose of 17.5 mg/week.

  8. Nail Assessment in Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (NAPPA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Augustin, M; Blome, C; Costanzo, A

    2013-01-01

    assessing quality of life (NAPPA-QoL), a two-part questionnaire assessing patient-relevant treatment benefits (the Patient Benefit Index, NAPPA-PBI) and a psoriasis Clinical Assessment of Severity (NAPPA-CLIN). METHODS: Development of the questionnaires involved multiple steps: (i) collection of items about......%) and comprehensible (95%). NAPPA-QoL and NAPPA-PBI scores correlated moderately with clinical outcomes [e.g. Nail Psoriasis Severity Index (NAPSI)] and markedly with other quality-of-life questionnaires (e.g. EQ-5D™). Both questionnaires were sensitive to change. Internal consistency was good (Cronbach α ≥ 0...

  9. Development of Eosinophilic Fasciitis during Infliximab Therapy for Psoriatic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Hariman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic fasciitis (EF is a rare disorder involving chronic inflammation of the fascia and connective tissue surrounding muscles, nerves, and blood vessels. While its pathogenesis is not entirely understood, this disorder is thought to be autoimmune or allergic in nature. We present here a case of a 59-year-old male who developed peripheral eosinophilia and subsequent eosinophilic fasciitis during treatment with infliximab. To our knowledge, eosinophilic fasciitis has not been previously described in patients during treatment with an inhibitor of tumor necrosis factor α.

  10. Psoriatic arthritis: An assessment of clinical, biochemical and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , epidemiological, clinical and radiological studies of South African (SA) patients are scarce. Objectives. To assess clinical, biochemical and radiological features in a single-centre SA cohort. Methods. We conducted a prospective assessment ...

  11. Chondrocyte activity is increased in psoriatic arthritis and axial spondyloarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmann, Natasja Stæhr; Munk, Heidi Lausten; Christensen, Anne Friesgaard

    2016-01-01

    . There is a need for biomarkers reflecting core disease pathways for diagnosis and disease mapping. Pro-C2 reflects mature cartilage collagen type IIB formation, while C-Col10 represents turnover of type X collagen, which is exclusively expressed by hypertrophic chondrocytes. The objectives of this study were......SpA undergoing TNFi treatment may reflect that hypertrophic chondrocytes in axSpA are targeted by TNFi. ROC curve analysis showed a diagnostic potential for Pro-C2 in axSpA and PsA....

  12. Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA): Treatment and Causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Treatment and Causes Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table of Contents How Is Rheumatoid Arthritis Treated? Doctors have many ways to treat this ...

  13. Biologics or tofacitinib for people with rheumatoid arthritis unsuccessfully treated with biologics: a systematic review and network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jasvinder A; Hossain, Alomgir; Tanjong Ghogomu, Elizabeth; Mudano, Amy S; Maxwell, Lara J; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Lopez-Olivo, Maria Angeles; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E; Tugwell, Peter; Wells, George A

    2017-03-10

    Biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs: referred to as biologics) are effective in treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA), however there are few head-to-head comparison studies. Our systematic review, standard meta-analysis and network meta-analysis (NMA) updates the 2009 Cochrane overview, 'Biologics for rheumatoid arthritis (RA)' and adds new data. This review is focused on biologic or tofacitinib therapy in people with RA who had previously been treated unsuccessfully with biologics. To compare the benefits and harms of biologics (abatacept, adalimumab, anakinra, certolizumab pegol, etanercept, golimumab, infliximab, rituximab, tocilizumab) and small molecule tofacitinib versus comparator (placebo or methotrexate (MTX)/other DMARDs) in people with RA, previously unsuccessfully treated with biologics. On 22 June 2015 we searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in CENTRAL, MEDLINE, and Embase; and trials registries (WHO trials register, Clinicaltrials.gov). We carried out article selection, data extraction, and risk of bias and GRADE assessments in duplicate. We calculated direct estimates with 95% confidence intervals (CI) using standard meta-analysis. We used a Bayesian mixed treatment comparison (MTC) approach for NMA estimates with 95% credible intervals (CrI). We converted odds ratios (OR) to risk ratios (RR) for ease of understanding. We have also presented results in absolute measures as risk difference (RD) and number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNTB). Outcomes measured included four benefits (ACR50, function measured by Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) score, remission defined as DAS tofacitinib (399 participants). The majority of the trials (10/12) lasted less than 12 months.We judged 33% of the studies at low risk of bias for allocation sequence generation, allocation concealment and blinding, 25% had low risk of bias for attrition, 92% were at unclear risk for selective reporting; and 92% had low risk

  14. Value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound in rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zordo, Tobias de; Mlekusch, Sabine P.; Feuchtner, Gudrun M. [Department of Radiology II, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Mur, Erich [Department of Internal Medicine, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Schirmer, Michael [Department of Internal Medicine, Hospital of the Elisabethines Klagenfurt, Voelkermarkter Strasse 15-19, 9020 Klagenfurt (Austria); Klauser, Andrea S. [Department of Radiology II, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria)], E-mail: andrea.klauser@i-med.ac.at

    2007-11-15

    The purpose of this review is to describe the spectrum of sonographic findings in rheumatic diseases with respect to the diagnostic potential using US contrast media which prove activity or inactivity in synovial tissue where new treatment regimes target. Synovial activity can be found in non-erosive and erosive forms of primary and secondary osteoarthritis, and in inflammatory forms of joint diseases like rheumatoid arthritis and peripheral manifestations of spondyloarthritis including, ankylosing spondylitis, Reiter's syndrome, psoriatic arthritis and enteropathic arthritis. It can also be present in metabolic and endocrine forms of arthritis, in connective tissue arthropathies like systemic lupus erythematosus or scleroderma and in infectious arthritis. Ultrasound should be used as first-line imaging modality in suspected early cases of RA and other forms of arthritis, whereas contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) can further enable for sensitive assessment of vascularity which correlates with disease activity.

  15. Value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zordo, Tobias de; Mlekusch, Sabine P.; Feuchtner, Gudrun M.; Mur, Erich; Schirmer, Michael; Klauser, Andrea S.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to describe the spectrum of sonographic findings in rheumatic diseases with respect to the diagnostic potential using US contrast media which prove activity or inactivity in synovial tissue where new treatment regimes target. Synovial activity can be found in non-erosive and erosive forms of primary and secondary osteoarthritis, and in inflammatory forms of joint diseases like rheumatoid arthritis and peripheral manifestations of spondyloarthritis including, ankylosing spondylitis, Reiter's syndrome, psoriatic arthritis and enteropathic arthritis. It can also be present in metabolic and endocrine forms of arthritis, in connective tissue arthropathies like systemic lupus erythematosus or scleroderma and in infectious arthritis. Ultrasound should be used as first-line imaging modality in suspected early cases of RA and other forms of arthritis, whereas contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) can further enable for sensitive assessment of vascularity which correlates with disease activity

  16. Power Doppler Ultrasound Evaluation of Peripheral Joint, Entheses, Tendon, and Bursa Abnormalities in Psoriatic Patients: A Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yuanjiao; Yang, Yujia; Xiang, Xi; Wang, Liyun; Zhang, Lingyan; Qiu, Li

    2018-04-15

    To evaluate the prevalence rates of peripheral joint, enthesis, tendon, and bursa abnormalities by power Doppler (PD) ultrasonic examination in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA), psoriatic patients without clinical signs of arthritis (non-PsA psoriasis group), and healthy individuals, to detect subclinical PsA. A total of 253 healthy volunteers, 242 non-PsA psoriatic patients, and 86 patients with PsA were assessed by 2-dimensional and power Doppler (PD) ultrasound. Peripheral joint, enthesis, tendon, and bursa abnormalities were observed, characterizing abnormal PD. The affected patients and sites with abnormalities in various ages were compared among groups; PD signal grades for the abnormalities were also compared. In the PsA group, significantly higher percentages of sites showing joint effusion/synovitis, enthesitis, and tenosynovitis in all age groups, and markedly higher rates of sites with bursitis were found in young and middle age groups, compared with the non-PsA and control groups (all p the non-PsA group showed significantly higher rates of joint effusion/synovitis and enthesitis sites, and elevated PD signal grades of synovitis, enthesitis, and tenosynovitis in comparison with the control group, both in young and middle age groups (all p tenosynovitis.

  17. Minimal clinically important difference and the effect of clinical variables on the ankle osteoarthritis scale in surgically treated end-stage ankle arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, Marcus P; Sutherland, Jason M; Penner, Murray J; Younger, Alastair; Wing, Kevin J

    2015-05-20

    There is much debate regarding the best outcome tool for use in foot and ankle surgery, specifically in patients with ankle arthritis. The Ankle Osteoarthritis Scale (AOS) is a validated, disease-specific score. The goals of this study were to investigate the clinical performance of the AOS and to determine a minimal clinically important difference (MCID) for it, using a large cohort of 238 patients undergoing surgery for end-stage ankle arthritis. Patients treated with total ankle arthroplasty or ankle arthrodesis were prospectively followed for a minimum of two years at a single site. Data on demographics, comorbidities, AOS score, Short Form-36 results, and the relationship between expectations and satisfaction were collected at baseline (preoperatively), at six and twelve months, and then yearly thereafter. A linear regression analysis examined the variables affecting the change in AOS scores between baseline and the two-year follow-up. An MCID in the AOS change score was then determined by employing an anchor question, which asked patients to rate their relief from symptoms after surgery. Surgical treatment of end-stage ankle arthritis resulted in a mean improvement (and standard deviation) of 31.2 ± 22.7 points in the AOS score two years after surgery. The MCID of the AOS change score was a mean of 28.0 ± 17.9 points. The change in AOS score was significantly affected by the preoperative AOS score, smoking, back pain, and age. Patients undergoing arthroplasty or arthrodesis for end-stage ankle arthritis experienced a mean improvement in AOS score that was greater than the estimated MCID (31.2 versus 28.0 points). Copyright © 2015 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  18. Adherence to a treat-to-target strategy in early rheumatoid arthritis : results of the DREAM remission induction cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeer, Marloes; Kuper, Hillechiena H.; Moens, Hein J. Bernelot; Hoekstra, Monique; Posthumus, Marcel D.; van Riel, Piet L. C. M.; van de Laar, Mart A. F. J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Clinical trials have demonstrated that treatment-to-target (T2T) is effective in achieving remission in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the concept of T2T has not been fully implemented yet and the question is whether a T2T strategy is feasible in daily clinical practice. The

  19. A nationwide non-medical switch from originator infliximab to biosimilar CT-P13 in 802 patients with inflammatory arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glintborg, Bente; Sørensen, Inge Juul; Loft, Anne Gitte

    2017-01-01

    Objectives According to guidelines, a nationwide non-medical switch from originator (INX, Remicade) to biosimilar infliximab (Remsima, CT-P13) was conducted in Danish patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and axial spondyloarthritis (AxSpA). We investigated disease...

  20. Gonococcal arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disseminated gonococcal infection (DGI); Disseminated gonococcemia; Septic arthritis - gonococcal arthritis ... Gonococcal arthritis is an infection of a joint. It occurs in people who have gonorrhea , which is caused by ...

  1. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis – an update on its diagnosis and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-12-03

    Dec 3, 2015 ... Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common form of chronic arthritis in children and the most ... A swollen knee and uveitis in a young girl, for instance, is ..... Methotrexate for treating juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

  2. Lipid management among individuals with inflammatory arthritis in the national REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Millán, Iris; Gamboa, Christopher M; Curtis, Jeffrey R; Safford, Monika M

    2018-01-01

    Objective Hyperlipidemia guidelines do not currently identify inflammatory arthritis (IA) as a cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor. We compared hyperlipidemia treatment of individuals with and without IA (rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, or ankylosing spondylitis) in a large national cohort. Methods Participants from the REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study were classified as having IA (without diabetes or hypertension); diabetes (but no IA); hypertension (but no diabetes or IA); or no IA, diabetes, or hypertension. Multivariable logistic regression models examined the odds of medical treatment among those with hyperlipidemia. Results Thirty-nine participants had IA, 5423 had diabetes, 7534 had hypertension, and 5288 had no diabetes, hypertension, or IA. The fully adjusted odds of treatment were similar between participants with IA and those without IA, hypertension, or diabetes. Participants with diabetes and no IA and participants with hypertension and no IA were twice as likely to be treated for hyperlipidemia as those without IA, diabetes, or hypertension. Conclusion Despite their higher CVD risk, patients with IA were as likely to be treated for hyperlipidemia as those without diabetes, hypertension, or IA. Lipid guidelines should identify IA as a CVD risk factor to improve CVD risk optimization in IA.

  3. Milk-based nutraceutical for treating autoimmune arthritis via the stimulation of IL-10- and TGF-β-producing CD39+ regulatory T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Maddaloni

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases arise from the loss of tolerance to self, and because the etiologies of such diseases are largely unknown, symptomatic treatments rely on anti-inflammatory and analgesic agents. Tolerogenic treatments that can reverse disease are preferred, but again, often thwarted by not knowing the responsible auto-antigens (auto-Ags. Hence, a viable alternative to stimulating regulatory T cells (Tregs is to induce bystander tolerance. Colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I has been shown to evoke bystander immunity and to hasten Ag-specific Treg development independent of auto-Ag. To translate in treating human autoimmune diseases, the food-based Lactococcus was engineered to express CFA/I fimbriae, and Lactococcus-CFA/I fermented milk fed to arthritic mice proved highly efficacious. Protection occurred via CD39+ Tregs producing TGF-β and IL-10 to potently suppress TNF-α production and neutrophil influx into the joints. Thus, these data demonstrate the feasibility of oral nutraceuticals for treating arthritis, and potency of protection against arthritis was improved relative to that obtained with Salmonella-CFA/I.

  4. Cancer risk of anti-TNF-α at recommended doses in adult rheumatoid arthritis: a meta-analysis with intention to treat and per protocol analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Moulis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The risk of malignancies on TNF-α antagonists is controversial. The aim of this survey was to assess cancer risk on TNF-α antagonists in adult rheumatoid arthritis patients, including the five marketed drugs (infliximab, etanercept, adalimumab, golimumab and certolizumab used in line with the New Drug Application. Furthermore, the relative interest of modified intention to treat or per protocol analyses to assess such sparse events remains unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Data sources were MEDLINE, CENTRAL, ISI Web of Science, ACR and EULAR meeting abstracts, scientific evaluation of the drugs leading to their marketing approval, and clinicaltrials.gov, until 31 December 2012.We selected double-blind randomized controlled trials in adult rheumatoid arthritis patients, including at least one treatment arm in line with New Drug Application. We performed random effect meta-analysis, with modified intention to treat and per protocol analyses. Thirty-three trials were included. There was no excess risk of malignancies on anti-TNF-α administered in line with New Drug Application in the per protocol model (OR, 0.93 95%CI[0.59-1.44], as well as in the modified intention to treat model (OR, 1.27 95%CI[0.82-1.98]. There was a non-significant tendency for an excess non-melanoma skin cancer risk in both models (respectively, 1.37 [0.71-2.66] and 1.90 [0.98-3.67]. With fixed effect Peto model restricting to trials during at least 52 weeks, the overall cancer risk was respectively 1.60 [0.97-2.64] and 1.22 [0.72-2.08]. Whatever the model, modified intention to treat analysis led to higher estimations than per protocol analysis. The later may underestimate the treatment effect when assessing very sparse events and when many patients dropped out in placebo arms. In metaregression, there was no differential risk among the five drugs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study did not find any evidence for an excess cancer risk on TNF

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging and bone scintigraphy in the differential diagnosis of unclassified arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duer, Anne; Østergaard, M; Hørslev-Petersen, K

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the value in clinical practice of hand magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and whole body bone scintigraphy in the differential diagnosis of patients with unclassified arthritis. METHODS: 41 patients with arthritis (> or = 2 swollen joints, > 6 months' duration) which...... to psoriatic arthritis (RF negative + psoriasis); one to non-specific self-limiting arthritis). No patients classified as non-RA at baseline had fulfilled the ACR criteria after 2 years. The presence of MRI synovitis, MRI erosion and bone scintigraphic pattern compatible with RA showed 100% specificity...

  6. [The safety of biologics : a risk-benefit assessment of treating rheumatoid arthritis with biologics based on registry data on mortality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, O

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study is a risk-benefit assessment of treating rheumatoid arthritis with biologics based on registry data on mortality.UK, Sweden and Spain have published evaluable data on mortality. A parallel control group was conducted in the UK. Sweden and Spain used an historical cohort for comparison.Central registries supported British and Swedish research by sending details on all deaths. The variety of possible confounders prevents direct comparisons of the registers and safe predictions for individual patients.The death rate in TNF-inhibitor-treated patients is higher than in the general population but lower than in the control groups with RA. Thus comorbidities are not balanced, the weighted mortality rate scaled down the difference between exposed patients and controls. When TNF-inhibitors are given for the usual indication, mortality is reduced compared to conventional therapy.

  7. Radiographic manifestations of arthritis in AIDS patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, Z.S.; Norman, A.; Solomon, G.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to familiarize the radiologist with a newly discovered association between arthritis and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The authors retrospectively reviewed the clinical and radiographic findings in 31 patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection referred to their rheumatology clinic with musculoskeletal complaints. The patients carried a wide range of clinical diagnosis including Reiter syndrome, psoriatic arthritis, undifferentiated seronegative arthritis, isolated enthesopathies, rheumatoid arthritis and osteonecrosis. Radiographs were available in 24 of the 31 patients, and in 20 they showed radiographic features of arthritis, which included soft-tissue swelling periarticular osteoporosis, synovial effusions, sacroiliitis, periosteal reaction, joint space narrowing, marginal erosions, and osteonecrosis. Although the radiographic abnormalities were frequently mild, they were significant, given the short duration of disease in many of their patients (weeks to months) at the time radiographs were obtained. The range of radiographic findings in their series was varied and paralleled the wide range of clinical diagnoses. No findings were pathognomonic for HIV-associated arthritis. Nevertheless, HIV infection needs to be considered in any patient belonging to a recognized risk group who presents with musculoskeletal disease. This is particularly important since immunosupressive drugs used for the treatment of arthritis can be detrimental to patients with HIV infection

  8. Juvenile Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juvenile arthritis (JA) is arthritis that happens in children. It causes joint swelling, pain, stiffness, and loss of motion. It can affect any joint, but ... of JA that children get is juvenile idiopathic arthritis. There are several other forms of arthritis affecting ...

  9. A probable case of rheumatoid arthritis from the middle Anglo-Saxon period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckinnon, Katie; Van Twest, Melanie S; Hatton, Martin

    2013-06-01

    We present here a case of erosive polyarthropathy in an incomplete skeleton from a middle-Saxon period (c. AD 650-900) cemetery site in Sedgeford, Norfolk, England. After a differential diagnosis that includes erosive osteoarthritis and psoriatic arthritis, we believe rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to be the most probable cause. This example may therefore add to the evidence for an early date for the appearance of RA in Europe. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Treatment response, drug survival, and predictors thereof in 764 patients with psoriatic arthritis treated with anti-tumor necrosis factor α therapy: results from the nationwide Danish DANBIO registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glintborg, Bente; Østergaard, Mikkel; Dreyer, Lene

    2011-01-01

    Score. Male sex, CRP level >10 mg/liter, concomitant methotrexate use, and low patient health visual analog scale score at baseline were associated with longer drug survival. Improvement was achieved by 59%, 45%, 24%, and 54% of patients according to the ACR20, ACR50, ACR70 response criteria and EULAR...

  11. Bone pathology inpsoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Badokin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study different variants of osteolysis in pts with psoriatic arthritis (PA and to reveal their relationship with other clinico-radiological features of joint damage. Material and methods. 370 pts with definite PA having different variants of joint damage were included. Radiological examination of bones and joints (in some cases large picture frame was performed. Morphological evaluation of synovial biopsies was done in 34 pts with PA and 10 pts with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Results. Different types of osteolysis were revealed in 80 (21,6% pts. Osteolytic variant of joint damage was present in 29 pts. 33 pts had acral, 48 — intra-articular osteolysis and 16 - true bone atrophy. Frequency and intensity of bone resorption were associated with severity of PA. Acral osteolysis correlated with arthritis of distal interphalangeal joints and onychodystrophy. Intra-articular osteolysis was most often present in distal interphalangeal joints of hands and metacarpophalangeal joints (39,6% and 41,7% respectively. Characteristic feature of PA was combination of prominent resorption with formation of bone ankylosis and periosteal reaction. Ankylosis was present in 33,3% of pts with intra-articular osteolysis and in 60% of pts with combination of different osteolysis variants. Systemic reaction of microcirculation in synovial biopsies was most prominent in osteolytic variant: marked thickening of capillary and venule basal membrane with high level of acid phosphatase, increased capillary and precapillary blood flow with stasis features, vascular lymphocyte and macrophage infiltration, productive vasculitis with annular wall thickening, thrombovasculitis and villi deep layer sclerosis. Conclusion. Different variants of osteolysis show bone involvement in PA. Acral and intra- articular osteolysis association with bone ankylosis and periostitis proves their common pathogenetic entity.

  12. Importância do raio X e exame físico no diagnóstico da artrite psoriática e sua prevalência no Hospital Universitário Evangélico de Curitiba (HUEC The importance of radiologic evaluation and physical examination in diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis and its prevalance in the Hospital Universitário Evangélico de Curitiba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Bächtold Machado

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTOS: A artrite psoriática (AP é doença inflamatória associada com a psoríase da pele ou das unhas, com fator reumatóide (FR negativo e ausência de nódulos reumatóides. Pode ser extremamente agressiva, deixando o paciente incapacitado para realizar funções do dia-a-dia. A prevalência populacional é muito variável; historicamente oscila entre 2,6% e 7%, mas estudos recentes demonstram porcentagem variável de 23 a 69% na população com psoríase. O diagnóstico é de exclusão e, se realizado na fase inicial, oferece possibilidade de tratamento mais adequado, evitando complicações. O que define a presença da artrite é o exame físico adequado das articulações, já que o raio X pode estar normal. OBJETIVO: Este estudo tem a finalidade de avaliar a importância do raio X e do exame físico no diagnóstico da AP e sua prevalência nos pacientes com psoríase cutânea e ungueal do Hospital Universitário Evangélico de Curitiba. MATERIAL E MÉTODOS: Trinta pacientes com psoríase em acompanhamento nesse serviço foram submetidos a anamnese e exame físico minuciosos. Eles foram questionados quanto a alterações articulares, tempo e severidade de doença e comprometimento ungueal. Os que apresentavam queixas articulares foram encaminhados para investigação por exames complementares: hemograma, FR, VHS, e raio X da articulação comprometida. RESULTADOS: A maioria dos pacientes (56,5% referiu atralgia; contudo apenas três apresentavam artrite. Dos indivíduos com AP, um mostrou raio X normal, mas o exame físico estava alterado. CONCLUSÃO: O exame físico é fundamental para diagnóstico da AP; o raio X não. A prevalência de AP foi de 10%.BACKGROUND: Psoriatic arthritis (PA is an inflammatory disorder associated with skin and nail disease, negative rheumatoid factor (RF and absence of rheumatoid nodules. It can be a devastating and incapacitating condition. Its prevalence is highly variable, ranging from 2,6 to 7

  13. One year survey of hospitalized psoriatic patients and their treatment in Razi Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnaghi F

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available During one year survey, 77 psoriatic patients were hospitalized in the dermatology department of Razi Hospital. This comprised 19% of admitted patients in this period. 29% (n=22 of psoriatic patients had previous history of hospitalization. On admission, the mean age of patients was 32.8 years, the mean and peak age of disease onset were 26.46 and between 11-20 years, respectively. 14% (n=10 of the patients had a family history of psoriasis and 70% (n=7 of those with a positive family history had their age of onset under 20 years. Involvement of different regions was as follows: Scalp: 88% (n=68, nails: 53% (n=41 and joints (arthritis: 10% (n=8. Psoriasis was associated with scrotal tongue in 19% (n=13 and with geographic tongue in 10% (n=8 of patients. Regarding the medical treatment, the drugs which were used most frequently were tigason in 34% (n=41 and ditranol in 22% (n=26 of the cases. The mean duration of hospitalization was 39.29 days and most patients were discharged from the hospital in a good condition without any serious complication. During this period 9% of patients had a relapse of their disease.

  14. The impact of a revised EQ-5D population scoring on preference-based utility scores in an inflammatory arthritis cohort.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Adams, Roisin

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: It is well established that there are problems with the EQ-5D. This is due to the original scoring methods used and how negative time trade-off (TTO) values were treated. A revised scoring method has been published. This article applies this to an inflammatory arthritis cohort. The objective is to examine the impact of a revised scoring system for the EQ-5D (UK) TTO on the utility estimates and in the case of rheumatoid arthritis, to explore the impact of using different utility metrics on the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) results of an economic model. METHODS: A total of 504 patients with inflammatory arthritis were rescored using revised EQ-5D scoring, which uses an episodic random utility model to deal with negative TTO values. Differences in utility scores were compared and the new mapping coefficients were obtained. These were then used in an economic model to examine the impact on the ICER. RESULTS: In rheumatoid arthritis, the overall change is less for the revised EQ-5D scoring than with the original EQ-5D (TTO) but greater than the SF-6D: EQ-5D UK -0.22 (95% confidence interval [CI] -0.30 to -0.15), revised EQ-5D UK -0.16 (95% CI -0.21 to -0.10) and SF-6D -0.08 (95% CI -0.11 to -0.05). A similar trend is seen in the psoriatic arthritis group. The economic model produced different ICERs, when different utility measures were used; EQ-5D (TTO) euro42,402, SF-6D euro111,788, and revised EQ-5D (TTO) euro57,747. CONCLUSION: In the context of inflammatory arthritis, this article demonstrates that a revised scoring for EQ-5D may have a significant impact on utility estimates and on the output of the economic model.

  15. The 'psoriatic march': a concept of how severe psoriasis may drive cardiovascular comorbidity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Boehncke, Wolf-Henning

    2011-04-01

    There is increasing awareness that psoriasis is more than \\'skin deep\\'. Several recent reviews focussed on biomarkers indicating the systemic dimension of psoriasis and the aspect of comorbidity psoriasis shares with other chronic inflammatory diseases, such as Crohn\\'s disease and rheumatoid arthritis. Of emerging significance is the relationship to cardiovascular disease, as this contributes substantially to the patients\\' increased mortality. In this viewpoint, we examine currently available evidence favouring the concept of a causal link between psoriasis and cardiovascular disease: systemic inflammation may cause insulin resistance, which in turn triggers endothelial cell dysfunction, leading to atherosclerosis and finally myocardial infarction or stroke. While this \\'psoriatic march\\' is not yet formally proven, it raises clinically and academically relevant questions, and gains support by recent observations of numerous investigators.

  16. Infectious Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most kinds of arthritis cause pain and swelling in your joints. Joints are places where two bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Infectious arthritis is an infection in the joint. The infection ...

  17. ASSESSMENT OF THE QUALITY OF LIFE OF PATIENTS WITH THE JUVENILE IDIOPATHIC ARTHRITIS TREATED BY THE ETANERCEPT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Fetisova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the influence of the genetically engineered biologic drug etanercept on the quality of life of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA. Patients and methods: The research included 85 children with poly-and oligoarticular variant of the JIA at the age of 5 (2; 17 years. The assessment of the quality of life of patients was carried out by means of the parental version of a special questionnaireCHAQ (Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire, Health Utilities Index Mark 3 (HUI3 questionnaire. The doctor and parents of the patient also assessed the global activity of the illness by the 100-mm visual analog scale (VAS before the etanercept prescription and in 1, 6 and 12 months. All patients before the etanercept prescription received immunodepressants. Results: Fast dynamics of the increase of an average point of the quality of life (the response in 1 month after the therapy beginning was noted by the attributes of a questionnaire of HUI3 «emotions» — from 0.82 (± 0.18 to 0.90 (± 0.13, p =0.001, «cognitive abilities» — from 0.85 (± 0.17 to 0.91 (± 0.18, p =0.006, and «pain» — from 0.78 (± 0.23 to 0.91 (± 0.1, p < 0.001. In 12 months of the treatment the average point of the quality of life raised also by such attributes as «locomotivity» — from 0.85 (± 0.3 to 0.99 (± 0.06, p < 0.0001, and «fine motor skills» — from 0.9 (± 0.19 to 0.98 (± 0.05, p < 0.001. Conclusion: Treatment with the etanercept provided the improvement of the quality of life of children with the JIA and their families, improvement of physical activity and emotional state of patients.Key words: children, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, etanercept, quality of life, Health Utilities Index Mark 3.

  18. Arthritis Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vision Leadership News Partners & Sponsors Careers Code of Ethics Financials Annual Report Contact Us Privacy Policy Terms & Conditions Donate Press Store Blog Community Local Offices Kids Get Arthritis Too Español Arthritis Today Social Media Newsletters Sign Up for E-Newsletters Arthritis Foundation ...

  19. Methotrexate is an effective treatment for chronic uveitis associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foeldvari, Ivan; Wierk, Angela

    2005-02-01

    To assess the effectiveness of methotrexate (MTX) in the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) associated uveitis, which is still one of the most common causes of visual impairment. A retrospective chart review of patients with the diagnosis of uveitis associated with JIA between July 1, 2002, and December 31, 2002. Four hundred sixty-seven patients with JIA were followed. Thirty-eight had uveitis: 31 associated with oligoarticular JIA and 7 with psoriatic JIA. Twenty-five of the 38 patients received MTX; in 23 patients uveitis was the indication for MTX therapy. In the MTX treated group 46/50 eyes had uveitis, the mean (range) age at onset of uveitis was 7.82 years (1.8-15.8), and the mean age at onset of arthritis was 7.25 years (1.25-15.7). MTX treatment was started an average of 11.4 months (0-72) after the onset of uveitis. The mean MTX dose was 15.6 mg/m2. Remission occurred after 4.25 months (1-12). Mean duration of remission was 10.3 months (3-27). The total duration of MTX therapy was 661 months and patients were in remission for 417/661 months. In 6 patients MTX was discontinued after 12 months of remission. Four patients were still in remission after 7.5 months (1-14). MTX seems to be an effective therapy for JIA associated uveitis.

  20. The tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitor golimumab in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Vladimirovna Chichasova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α golimumab (GLM, that is a fully human monoclonal anti-body, was registered in Russia in 2012 to treat rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA, ankylosing spondylitis, and psoriatic arthritis. Its distinguishing characteristics are a high affinity for TNF-α and easiness-to-use: the drug as a 0.5-ml solution is injected subcutaneously once monthly. The registration of the medication was followed by the implementation of a massive program of clinical trials. The randomized placebo-controlled GO-FORWARD, GO-BEFORE, and GO-AFTER studies have indicated that GLM is effective in patients with RA from different subgroups and has a favorable safety profile as compared to that of the entire class of biological agents. According to the data of these studies, GLM had a positive effect on the functional status and quality of life in patients with RA: there was a significantly greater decrease in HAQ scores in both the early and long open treatment phases (to 5 years and in fatigability than in the control group (p=0.032, physical and mental health improvements, as shown by the SF-36 questionnaire, and a significant reduction in disability.

  1. Lymphatic albumin clearance from psoriatic skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staberg, B.; Klemp, P.; Aasted, M.; Worm, A.M.; Lund, P.

    1983-01-01

    In nine patients with untreated psoriasis vulgaris, human serum albumin labelled with 125 I or 131 I was injected intradermally in symmetrically located involved and uninvolved skin. The activity of the depots was followed by external detection, and the arrival of labelled albumin in plasma was monitored. In involved psoriatic skin the local mean half-time (T1/2) for tracer disappearance was 20.8 +/- 8.2 (S.D.) hr and in clinically normal skin, 29.1 +/- 9.6 (S.D.) hr. The difference was significant (p less than 0.002). Accordingly, the tracer from involved skin reached higher plasma levels than the tracer from uninvolved skin. However, under slight lymphatic stasis the appearance rate of radiolabelled albumin in plasma from both tissues was minimal during 1 to 2 hours after the injection, indicating that a local direct transvascular drainage of plasma albumin from the interstitium of diseased and normal skin was negligible. We conclude that the previously demonstrated increased extravasation of plasma proteins in involved psoriatic skin is compensated by an increased lymphatic drainage of plasma proteins, and not by an increased local transvascular return

  2. Psychometric properties of the painDETECT questionnaire in rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and spondyloarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rifbjerg-Madsen, Signe; Wæhrens, Eva Ejlersen; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente

    2017-01-01

    .86(0.56-0.96), PsA 0.96(0.74-0.99), SpA 0.93(0.76-98), overall 0.94(0.84-0.98). Classification consistency was: RA 70%, PsA 80%, SpA 90%, overall 80%. CONCLUSION: The results support that the PDQ can be used as a classification instrument and assist identification of underlying pain-mechanisms in patients suffering...... and to explore the reliability of pain classification by test-retest. METHODS: For the Rasch analysis 900 questionnaires from patients with RA, PsA and SpA (300 per diagnosis) were extracted from 'the DANBIO painDETECT study'. The analysis was directed at the seven items assessing somatosensory symptoms...... and included: 1) the performance of the six-category Likert scale; 2) whether a unidimensional construct was defined; 3) the reliability and precision of estimates. Another group of 30 patients diagnosed with RA, PsA or SpA participated in a test-retest study. Intraclass Correlation Coefficients (ICC...

  3. Improvement in symptoms and signs in the forefoot of patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with anti-TNF therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewbury Keith

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inhibition of tumour necrosis factor (TNF is an effective way of reducing synovitis and preventing joint damage in rheumatoid arthritis (RA, yet very little is known about its specific effect on foot pain and disability. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether anti-TNF therapy alters the presence of forefoot pathology and/or reduces foot pain and disability. Methods Consecutive RA patients starting anti-TNF therapy (infliximab, etanercept, adalimumab were assessed for presence of synovial hypertrophy and synovitis in the 2nd and 5th metatarso-phalangeal (MTP joints and plantar forefoot bursal hypertrophy before and 12 weeks after therapy. Tender MTP joints and swollen bursae were established clinically by an experienced podiatrist and ultrasound (US images were acquired and interpreted by a radiologist. Assessment of patient reported disease impact on the foot was performed using the Manchester Foot Pain and Disability Index (MFPDI. Results 31 patients (24 female, 7 male with RA (12 seronegative, 19 seropositive completed the study: mean age 59.6 (SD 10.1 years, disease duration 11.1 (SD 10.5 years, and previous number of Disease Modifying Anti Rheumatic Drugs 3.0 (1.6. Significant differences after therapy were found for Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (t = 4.014, p Presence of MTP joint synovial hypertrophy on US was noted in 67.5% of joints at baseline and 54.8% of joints at twelve weeks. Presence of plantar forefoot bursal hypertrophy on US was noted in 83.3% of feet at baseline and 75% at twelve weeks. Although there was a trend for reduction in observed presence of person specific forefoot pathology, when the frequencies were analysed (McNemar this was not significant. Conclusions Significant improvements were seen in patient reported foot pain and disability 12 weeks after commencing TNF inhibition in RA, but this may not be enough time to detect changes in forefoot pathology.

  4. Controlled release of optimized electroporation enhances the transdermal efficiency of sinomenine hydrochloride for treating arthritis in vitro and in clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shun; Zhu, Lijun; Huang, Zhisheng; Wang, Haojia; Li, Hong; Zhou, Hua; Lu, Linlin; Wang, Ying; Liu, Zhongqiu; Liu, Liang

    2017-01-01

    Sinomenine hydrochloride (SH) is an ideal drug for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. However, high plasma concentration of systemically administered SH can release histamine, which can cause rash and gastrointestinal side effects. Topical delivery can increase SH concentration in the synovial fluid without high plasma level, thus minimizing systemic side effects. However, passive diffusion of SH was found to be inefficient because of the presence of the stratum corneum layer. Therefore, an effective method is required to compensate for the low efficiency of SH passive diffusion. In this study, transdermal experiments in vitro and clinical tests were utilized to explore the optimized parameters for electroporation of topical delivery for SH. Fluorescence experiment and hematoxylin and eosin staining analysis were performed to reveal the mechanism by which electroporation promoted permeation. In vitro, optimized electroporation parameters were 3 KHz, exponential waveform, and intensity 10. Using these parameters, transdermal permeation of SH was increased by 1.9–10.1 fold in mice skin and by 1.6–47.1 fold in miniature pig skin compared with passive diffusion. After the electroporation stimulation, the intercellular intervals and epidermal cracks in the skin increased. In clinical tests, SH concentration in synovial fluid was 20.84 ng/mL after treatment with electroporation. Therefore, electroporation with optimized parameters could significantly enhance transdermal permeation of SH. The mechanism by which electroporation promoted permeation was that the electronic pulses made the skin structure looser. To summarize, electroporation may be an effective complementary method for transdermal permeation of SH. The controlled release of electroporation may be a promising clinical method for transdermal drug administration. PMID:28670109

  5. Functional evaluation of patients treated with osteochondral allograft transplantation for post-traumatic ankle arthritis: one year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berti, L; Vannini, F; Lullini, G; Caravaggi, P; Leardini, A; Giannini, S

    2013-09-01

    Severe post-traumatic ankle arthritis poses a reconstructive challenge in active patients. Whereas traditional surgical treatments, i.e. arthrodesis and arthroplasty, provide good pain relief, arthrodesis is associated to functional and psychological limitations, and arthroplasty is prone to failure in the active patient. More recently the use of bipolar fresh osteochondral allografts transplantation has been proposed as a promising alternative to the traditional treatments. Preliminary short- and long-term clinical outcomes for this procedure have been reported, but no functional evaluations have been performed to date. The clinical and functional outcomes of a series of 10 patients who underwent allograft transplantation at a mean follow-up of 14 months are reported. Clinical evaluation was performed with the AOFAS score, functional assessment by state-of-the-art gait analysis. The clinical score significantly improved from a median of 54 (range 12-65) pre-op to 76.5 (range 61-86) post-op (p=0.002). No significant changes were observed for the spatial-temporal parameters, but motion at the hip and knee joints during early stance, and the range of motion of the ankle joint in the frontal plane (control: 13.8°±2.9°; pre-op: 10.4°±3.1°, post-op: 12.9°±4.2°; p=0.02) showed significant improvements. EMG signals revealed a good recovery in activation of the biceps femoris. This study showed that osteochondral allograft transplantation improves gait patterns. Although re-evaluation at longer follow-ups is required, this technique may represent the right choice for patients who want to delay the need for more invasive joint reconstruction procedures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Real-world comparative risks of herpes virus infections in tofacitinib and biologic-treated patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Jeffrey R; Xie, Fenglong; Yun, Huifeng; Bernatsky, Sasha; Winthrop, Kevin L

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the risks of herpes zoster (HZ) and herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection associated with tofacitinib compared with biologic agents among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Using health plan data from 2010 to 2014, patients with RA initiating tofacitinib or biologics with no history of HZ or HSV were identified, as were incident cases of HZ or HSV. Crude incidence rates were calculated by drug exposure. Cox proportional hazards models evaluated the adjusted association between tofacitinib and HZ, and a composite outcome of HZ or HSV. A total of 2526 patients initiating tofacitinib were compared with initiations of other biologics: anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) (n=42 850), abatacept (n=12 305), rituximab (n=5078) and tocilizumab (n=6967). Patients receiving tofacitinib were somewhat younger (mean age 55 years) versus those on other biologics, and somewhat less likely to use concomitant methotrexate (MTX) (39% vs 43%-56%, depending on drug). Crude incidence of HZ associated with tofacitinib was 3.87/100 patient-years (py). After multivariable adjustment, HZ risk was significantly elevated, HR 2.01 (95% CI 1.40 to 2.88) compared with abatacept. Rates and adjusted HRs for all other RA biologics were comparable with each other and abatacept. Older age, female sex, prednisone >7.5 mg/day, prior outpatient infection and greater number of hospitalisations were also associated with increased HZ risk. Incidence rates for the combined outcome were greatest for tofacitinib (7.61/100 py) and also significantly elevated after adjustment (HR=1.40, 95% CI 1.09 to 1.81). The rate of zoster associated with tofacitinib was approximately double that observed in patients using biologics. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  7. Dual energy CT iodine map for delineating inflammation of inflammatory arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Takeshi; Fukuda, Kunihiko [The Jikei University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Umezawa, Yoshinori; Asahina, Akihiko; Nakagawa, Hidemi [The Jikei University School of Medicine, Department of Dermatology, Tokyo (Japan); Furuya, Kazuhiro [The Jikei University School of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology Department of Internal Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)

    2017-12-15

    Iodine mapping is an image-processing technique used with dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) to improve iodine contrast resolution. CT, because of its high spatial resolution and thin slice reconstruction, is well suited to the evaluation of the peripheral joints. Recent developments in the treatment of inflammatory arthritis that require early diagnosis and precise therapeutic assessment encourage radiological evaluation. To facilitate such assessment, we describe DECT iodine mapping as a novel modality for evaluating rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis of the hands and feet. (orig.)

  8. Predictors of satisfactory improvements in pain for patients with early rheumatoid arthritis in a treat-to-target study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klooster, P.M. ten; Vonkeman, H.E.; Voshaar, M.A.; Siemons, L.; Riel, P.L.C.M. van; Laar, M.A.F.J. van de

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to identify baseline predictors of achieving patient-perceived satisfactory improvement (PPSI) in pain after 6 months of treat to target in patients with early RA. METHODS: Baseline and 6 month data were used from patients included in the Dutch Rheumatoid

  9. Effect of statins as modulators of CD39+ tregs in patients with rheumatoid arthritis who were unsuccessfully treated with methotrexate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed H Abu-Zaid

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion Combination therapy with AV and ETA provides an added immunomodulatory benefit through enhancement of the immune suppression mediated by CD39+ Treg cells. Therefore, statins can be used safely with antitumor necrosis factor drugs to control disease activity and atherosclerotic changes in patients with RA, who are treated unsuccessfully with MTX.

  10. Quantitative and qualitative changes in leukocytes of psoriatic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahesar, S.M.; Khand, A.A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Psoriasis is a disease concerned with inflammation and scaling of skin. In psoriasis, cells of the skin come on surface quickly before their complete maturation. In psoriatic patients, T-cells produce an abnormally large amount of toxic chemicals and cause inflammation. This study was undertaken to find out values of prognostic significance for worsening of the disease at early stage and to evaluate the changes (quantitative and qualitative) occurring in white blood cells of psoriatic patients. Methods: A total of 158 subjects, 79 psoriatic patients (44 males and 35 females) and same numbers of normal control volunteers were recruited. Total and Differential Leukocyte Counts (TLC and DLC) were determined. Morphological examination was also undertaken. All results of patients were compared with normal control volunteers. Results : In 47.7% male and 54.2% female patients TLC was higher than controls while variation in differential count was observed in 61.3% male and 62.8% female patients. Overall, neutrophils in 45% patients, basophils in 30.3%, eosinophils in 65.8%, and monocytes in 15% of patients were elevated. In 77.2% psoriatic patients, lymphocytes were decreased. In volunteers total and differential leukocyte counts were within normal range. Total leukocyte count in normal males was 5,136 +- 31, and in psoriatic male subjects it was 10,498 +- 43, and it was 5,023 +- 35 against 11,390 +- 31 in normal versus psoriatic females ( p<0.001). Conclusion: Total leukocyte count was elevated in psoriatics while on DLC neutrophils, eosinophils and neutrophils were significantly raised where as lymphocytes were significantly decreased in psoriatic patients. Morphological changes were also noted. (author)

  11. Arthritis in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Arthritis Page Content Article Body Arthritis is an inflammation ... with antibiotics, even if arthritis develops. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) has previously been ...

  12. Childhood trauma and resilience in psoriatic patients: A preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosta, Maria Luigia; De Simone, Clara; Di Pietro, Salvatore; Acanfora, Mariateresa; Caldarola, Giacomo; Moccia, Lorenzo; Callea, Antonino; Panaccione, Isabella; Peris, Ketty; Rinaldi, Lucio; Janiri, Luigi; Di Nicola, Marco

    2018-03-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease with a complex etiology, involving the immune system, genetic factors, and external/internal triggers, with psychosomatic aspects. The aim of the study was to investigate childhood trauma and resilience in a psoriatic sample compared with healthy controls. Correlations between childhood trauma, resilience, quality of life, clinical data and psoriatic features were also evaluated. Seventy-seven psoriatic patients and seventy-six homogeneous healthy controls were enrolled. We used the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) to assess the severity of psoriasis and the Skindex-29 to measure health-related quality of life. The psychometric battery included the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) and the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-Risc) to assess trauma exposure and resilience, respectively. Psoriatic patients showed a significant prevalence of childhood trauma and a lower resilience level compared to healthy controls. Associations between traumatic experiences, low resilience and reduced quality of life in psoriatic subjects were also observed. A multidisciplinary approach is helpful to investigate clinical aspects, trigger factors and psychophysiological stress response in psoriatic subjects. Improving resilience with an early psychological intervention focused on self-motivation and strengthening of self-efficacy could facilitate the management of psoriasis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Improvement of reduced serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein levels in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients treated with the anti-interleukin-6 receptor monoclonal antibody tocilizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Shoko; Naruto, Takuya; Miyamae, Takako; Imagawa, Tomoyuki; Mori, Masaaki; Nishimaki, Shigeru; Yokota, Shumpei

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we determined serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) levels in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) patients during both the active and the remission phases to investigate how the growth cartilage turnover changed under tocilizumab treatment. Specimens were collected from 201 healthy children under 16 years of age with no growth impairment, and paired sera were collected from 11 sJIA patients treated with tocilizumab. Disease activity was assessed from white blood cell count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, and ferritin, and the COMP concentration was determined by sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Serum COMP concentrations were found independent of age, and the mean value in healthy children was 17.74+/-5.6 U/L. The mean serum COMP in sJIA patients during the active phase was 10.75+/-3.9 U/L, lower than that of healthy children. The mean serum COMP in the remission phase (14.89+/-3.9 U/L) was significantly higher than that in the active period (P<0.05). These results suggested that in sJIA patients, a reduced serum COMP concentration is a useful marker of active disease and growth impairment, and that the growth cartilage turnover suppressed during the active phase is improved in the remission phase under tocilizumab treatment.

  14. Recommendations by the Spanish Society of Rheumatology for the management of patients diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis who cannot be treated with methotrexate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Vicuña, Rosario; Martín-Martínez, María Auxiliadora; Gonzalez-Crespo, María Rosa; Tornero-Molina, Jesús; Fernández-Nebro, Antonio; Blanco-García, Francisco Javier; Blanco-Alonso, Ricardo; Marsal-Barril, Sara

    To establish a set of recommendations for the management of patients diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who cannot be treated with methotrexate (MTX) due to contraindications, drug toxicity or lack of adherence, and to establish therapeutic strategies more effective and safer in these RA patients. A qualitative analysis of the scientific evidence available to June 2015. The 2-round Delphi technique of consensus was used to collect and establish expert opinion based on the participants' clinical experience when only low quality evidence was available. A total of eighteen recommendations were developed for the management of this patient profile. Fourteen of these recommendations were related to drug safety aspects. Recommendations on contraindication and toxicity of MTX have been updated. The experts recommend the use of biological monotherapy, a preferred treatment option, in patients whose profiles reveal a contraindication, intolerance or circumstances that prevent us against the use of MTX. There is some high-quality scientific evidence that supports contraindication and establishes certain conditions of MTX use in RA patients with specific clinical profiles. Copyright © 2016. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  15. Reactive Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eren Erken

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Reactive arthritis is an acute, sterile, non-suppurative and inflammatory arthropaty which has occured as a result of an infectious processes, mostly after gastrointestinal and genitourinary tract infections. Reiter syndrome is a frequent type of reactive arthritis. Both reactive arthritis and Reiter syndrome belong to the group of seronegative spondyloarthropathies, associated with HLA-B27 positivity and characterized by ongoing inflammation after an infectious episode. The classical triad of Reiter syndrome is defined as arthritis, conjuctivitis and urethritis and is seen only in one third of patients with Reiter syndrome. Recently, seronegative asymmetric arthritis and typical extraarticular involvement are thought to be adequate for the diagnosis. However, there is no established criteria for the diagnosis of reactive arthritis and the number of randomized and controlled studies about the therapy is not enough. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(3.000: 283-299

  16. Preserved skeletal muscle protein anabolic response to acute exercise and protein intake in well-treated rheumatoid arthritis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Ulla Ramer; Dideriksen, Kasper; Andersen, Mads Bisgaard

    2015-01-01

    and anabolic signaling response in patients with RA compared to healthy controls. METHODS: Thirteen RA patients (age range 34-84 years; diagnosed for 1-32 years, median 8 years) were individually matched with 13 healthy controls for gender, age, BMI and activity level (CON). Plasma levels of C-reactive protein...... and in combination with physical exercise in patients with well-treated RA to a similar extent as in healthy individuals. This indicates that moderately inflamed RA patients have maintained their muscle anabolic responsiveness to physical activity and protein intake....

  17. Intestinal strongyloidiasis in a psoriatic patient following immunosuppressive therapy: Seeing the unforeseen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poongodi Lakshmi Santhana Kumaraswamy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Strongyloides stercoralis , an intestinal nematode, has a complicated life cycle. Mostly asymptomatic, if symptomatic it has nonspecific, transient clinical manifestations. The two aggressive forms of the disease are: Hyperinfection syndrome (HS or disseminated syndrome (DS. Several risk factors have been associated with strongyloidiasis including immunosuppressive therapy, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection, diabetes, alcoholism, tuberculosis, impaired bowel motility, surgically created intestinal blind loops, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and chronic renal failure. We describe a case of intestinal strongyloidiasis in a psoriatic patient treated with immunosuppressive therapy.

  18. Baricitinib for Previously Treated Moderate or Severe Rheumatoid Arthritis: An Evidence Review Group Perspective of a NICE Single Technology Appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Shijie; Bermejo, Iñigo; Simpson, Emma; Wong, Ruth; Scott, David L; Young, Adam; Stevenson, Matt

    2018-03-03

    As part of its single technology appraisal process, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence invited the manufacturer (Eli Lilly) of baricitinib (BARI; Olumiant ® ; a Janus kinase inhibitor that is taken orally) to submit evidence of its clinical and cost effectiveness for the treatment of moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA) after the failure of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). The School of Health and Related Research Technology Appraisal Group at the University of Sheffield was commissioned to act as the independent Evidence Review Group (ERG). The ERG produced a detailed review of the evidence for the clinical and cost effectiveness of the technology, based on the company's submission (CS) to NICE. The clinical-effectiveness evidence in the CS for BARI was based predominantly on three randomised controlled trials comparing the efficacy of BARI against adalimumab or placebo, as well as one long-term extension study. The clinical-effectiveness review identified no head-to-head evidence on the efficacy of BARI against all the comparators within the scope. Therefore, the company performed network meta-analyses (NMAs) in two different populations: one in patients who had experienced an inadequate response to conventional DMARDs (cDMARD-IR), and the other in patients who had experienced an inadequate response to tumour necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFi-IR). The company's NMAs concluded BARI had comparable efficacy as the majority of its comparators in both populations. The company submitted a de novo discrete event simulation model that analysed the incremental cost-effectiveness of BARI versus its comparators for the treatment of RA from the perspective of the National Health Service (NHS) in four different populations: (1) cDMARD-IR patients with moderate RA, defined as a 28-Joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28) > 3.2 and no more than 5.1; (2) cDMARD-IR patients with severe RA (defined as a DAS28 > 5.1); (3) TNFi-IR patients

  19. Septic arthritis of the hip in a Cambodian child caused by multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi with intermediate susceptibility to ciprofloxacin treated with ceftriaxone and azithromycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocock, J M; Khun, P A; Moore, C E; Vuthy, S; Stoesser, N; Parry, C M

    2014-08-01

    Septic arthritis is a rare complication of typhoid fever. A 12-year-old boy without pre-existing disease attended a paediatric hospital in Cambodia with fever and left hip pain. A hip synovial fluid aspirate grew multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica ser. Typhi with intermediate susceptibility to ciprofloxacin. Arthrotomy, 2 weeks of intravenous ceftriaxone and 4 weeks of oral azithromycin led to resolution of symptoms. The optimum management of septic arthritis in drug-resistant typhoid is undefined.

  20. Management of rheumatoid arthritis in clinical practice using treat-to-target strategy: Where do we stand in the multi-ethnic Malaysia population?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Bee Eng; Lim, Ai Lee; Kan, Sow Lai; Lim, Chong Hong; Ng, Ying Fun; Tng, Serene Li Ching; Hassin, Nur Syakirah; Chandran, Losshenee; Hamid, Norshahida Abdul; Lee, Yvonne Yin Leng

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the achievement of treat-to-target (T2T) strategy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and identify factors associated with failed treatment target in a public rheumatology center. A cross-sectional study was conducted from June 2015 to February 2016. RA patients with disease duration greater than 2 years and under T2T for over a year were invited to the study. Demographic, clinical data, disease activity score of 28 joints (DAS28), and clinical disease activity index (CDAI) were collected in a single routine clinic visit. Treatment target was defined as DAS28 review was performed to determine reasons of failed treatment target. A total of 371 patients were recruited and 87.1% were female. Mean age and duration of RA were 53.5 years (SD 10.3) and 9.1 years (SD 6.6), respectively. Ethnic distribution was 49% Chinese, 27% Malay, and 24% Indian. T2T was achieved in 81.7% of the cohort. Non-Chinese ethnicity, positive rheumatoid factor, and treatment with three disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) were associated with failed treatment target. After controlling for covariates, Malay ethnicity (OR 2.96; 95% CI 1.47-5.96) and treatment with three DMARDs (OR 2.14; 95% CI 1.06-4.35) were associated with failed treatment target. There was no association between age, gender, duration of RA, BMI, smoking status, anti-citrulinated cyclic peptide, and achievement of T2T. The most common reasons of failed treatment target were inability to escalate DMARDs due to side effects (18.8%), lack of biologics fund (15.6%), and persistent disease despite optimum treatment (14.1%). T2T was successfully implemented. Malay patients need aggressive treatment adaptation to achieve optimal outcome.

  1. Delayed wound healing and postoperative surgical site infections in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with or without biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Masahiro; Inui, Kentaro; Sugioka, Yuko; Mamoto, Kenji; Okano, Tadashi; Kinoshita, Takuya; Hidaka, Noriaki; Koike, Tatsuya

    2016-06-01

    Biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) have become more popular for treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Whether or not bDMARDs increase the postoperative risk of surgical site infection (SSI) has remained controversial. We aimed to clarify the effects of bDMARDs on the outcomes of elective orthopedic surgery. We used multivariate logistic regression analysis to analyze risk factors for SSI and delayed wound healing among 227 patients with RA (mean age, 65.0 years; disease duration, 16.9 years) after 332 elective orthopedic surgeries. We also attempted to evaluate the effects of individual medications on infection. Rates of bDMARD and conventional synthetic DMARD (csDMARD) administration were 30.4 and 91.0 %, respectively. Risk factors for SSI were advanced age (odds ratio [OR], 1.11; P = 0.045), prolonged surgery (OR, 1.02; P = 0.03), and preoperative white blood cell count >10,000/μL (OR, 3.66; P = 0.003). Those for delayed wound healing were advanced age (OR, 1.16; P = 0.001), prolonged surgery (OR, 1.02; P = 0.007), preoperative white blood cell count >10,000/μL (OR, 4.56; P = 0.02), and foot surgery (OR, 6.60; P = 0.001). Risk factors for SSI and medications did not significantly differ. No DMARDs were risk factors for any outcome examined. Biological DMARDs were not risk factors for postoperative SSI. Foot surgery was a risk factor for delayed wound healing.

  2. Benefits and Sustainability of a Learning Collaborative for Implementation of Treat to Target in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Results of the TRACTION Trial Phase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Daniel H; Lu, Bing; Yu, Zhi; Corrigan, Cassandra; Harrold, Leslie R; Smolen, Josef S; Fraenkel, Liana; Katz, Jeffrey N; Losina, Elena

    2018-01-05

    We conducted a two-phase randomized controlled trial of a Learning Collaborative (LC) to facilitate implementation of treat to target (TTT) to manage rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We found substantial improvement in implementation of TTT in Phase I. Herein, we report on a second 9 months (Phase II) where we examined maintenance of response in Phase I and predictors of greater improvement in TTT adherence. We recruited 11 rheumatology sites and randomized them to either receive the LC during Phase I or to a wait-list control group that received the LC intervention during Phase II. The outcome was change in TTT implementation score (0 to 100, 100 is best) from pre- to post-intervention. TTT implementation score is defined as a percent of components documented in visit notes. Analyses examined: 1) the extent that the Phase I intervention teams sustained improvement in TTT; and, 2) predictors of TTT improvement. The analysis included 636 RA patients. At baseline, mean TTT implementation score was 11% in Phase I intervention sites and 13% in Phase II sites. After the intervention, TTT implementation score improved to 57% in the Phase I intervention sites and to 58% in the Phase II sites. Intervention sites from Phase I sustained the improvement during the Phase II (52%). Predictors of greater TTT improvement included only having rheumatologist providers at the site, academic affiliation of the site, fewer providers per site, and the rheumatologist provider being a trainee. Improvement in TTT remained relatively stable over a post-intervention period. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Anti-inflammation effect of methyl salicylate 2-O-β-D-lactoside on adjuvant induced-arthritis rats and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated murine macrophages RAW264.7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue; Sun, Jialin; Xin, Wenyu; Li, Yongjie; Ni, Lin; Ma, Xiaowei; Zhang, Dan; Zhang, Dongming; Zhang, Tiantai; Du, Guanhua

    2015-03-01

    Methyl salicylate 2-O-β-D-lactoside (MSL) is a derivative of natural salicylate isolated from Gaultheria yunnanensis (Franch.) Rehder, which is widely used for treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA), swelling and pain. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of MSL on the progression of adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) in rat in vivo and explore the anti-inflammatory effects and mechanism of MSL in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated murine macrophages RAW264.7 cells in vitro. Our results showed that MSL significantly inhibited the arthritis progression in AIA rats, decreasing the right hind paw swelling and ankle diameter, attenuating histopathological changes and suppressing the plasma levels of TNF-α and IL-1β in AIA rats. Besides, MSL had potent anti-inflammatory effects on the LPS-activated RAW264.7. MSL dose-dependently inhibited the activity of COX-1, and COX-2. Moreover, MSL prominently inhibited LPS-induced activation of MAPK in RAW264.7 cells by blocking phosphorylation of p38 and ERK. Our study suggests that MSL may be effective in the treatment of inflammatory diseases by inhibiting the pro-inflammatory cytokine production and regulating the MAPK signal pathway. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Upregulation of cathepsin S in psoriatic keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönefuss, Alexander; Wendt, Wiebke; Schattling, Benjamin; Schulten, Roxane; Hoffmann, Klaus; Stuecker, Markus; Tigges, Christian; Lübbert, Hermann; Stichel, Christine

    2010-08-01

    Cathepsin S (CATS) is a cysteine protease, well known for its role in MHC class II-mediated antigen presentation and extracellular matrix degradation. Disturbance of the expression or metabolism of this protease is a concomitant feature of several diseases. Given this importance we studied the localization and regulation of CATS expression in normal and pathological human/mouse skin. In normal human skin CATS-immunostaining is mainly present in the dermis and is localized in macrophages, Langerhans, T- and endothelial cells, but absent in keratinocytes. In all analyzed pathological skin biopsies, i.e. atopic dermatitis, actinic keratosis and psoriasis, CATS staining is strongly increased in the dermis. But only in psoriasis, CATS-immunostaining is also detectable in keratinocytes. We show that cocultivation with T-cells as well as treatment with cytokines can trigger expression and secretion of CATS, which is involved in MHC II processing in keratinocytes. Our data provide first evidence that CATS expression (i) is selectively induced in psoriatic keratinocytes, (ii) is triggered by T-cells and (iii) might be involved in keratinocytic MHC class II expression, the processing of the MHC class II-associated invariant chain and remodeling of the extracellular matrix. This paper expands our knowledge on the important role of keratinocytes in dermatological disease.

  5. Distinctive radiological features of small hand joints in rheumatoid arthritis and seronegative spondyloarthritis demonstrated by contrast-enhanced (Gd-DTPA) magnetic resnance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jevtic, V. [Inst. of Radiology, Univ. Medical Centre, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Watt, I. [Dept. of Clinical Radiology, Bristol Royal Infirmary (United Kingdom); Rozman, B. [Dept. of Rheumatology, Univ. Medical Centre, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Kos-Golja, M. [Dept. of Rheumatology, Univ. Medical Centre, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Demsar, F. [Inst. Jozef Stefan, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jarh, O. [Inst. Jozef Stefan, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    1995-07-01

    A series of patients with clinically early inflammatory joint disease due to rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and Reiter`s syndrome were examined by plain film radiography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The spin echo T1-weighted precontrast, T2-weighted, and, especially, T1-weighted postcontrast images demonstrated distinct differences in the distribution of inflamatory changes, both within and adjacent to involved small hand joints. Two major subtypes of inflammatory arthritis were shown, thus providing a specific differential diagnosis between rheumatoid arthritis and some patients with seronegative spondyloarthritis. In particular, all the patients with Reiter`s syndrome who were studied, and half of those with psoriatic arthritis, had a distinctive pattern of extra-articular desease involvement. The need for a new classification of clinical subsets in psoriatic arthritis has been recently suggested. The present findings suggest that magnetic resonance imaging could be useful in such a reclassification of seronegative spondyloarthritis, as well as offering considerable potential for a reappraisal of pathogenesis and therapy. In this series, it was also noted that juxta-articular osteoporosis on plain film did not correlate with bone marrow oedema on MRI. Hence the aetiology of this common radiographic finding also merits further consideration. (orig.)

  6. Distinctive radiological features of small hand joints in rheumatoid arthritis and seronegative spondyloarthritis demonstrated by contrast-enhanced (Gd-DTPA) magnetic resnance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jevtic, V.; Watt, I.; Rozman, B.; Kos-Golja, M.; Demsar, F.; Jarh, O.

    1995-01-01

    A series of patients with clinically early inflammatory joint disease due to rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and Reiter's syndrome were examined by plain film radiography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The spin echo T1-weighted precontrast, T2-weighted, and, especially, T1-weighted postcontrast images demonstrated distinct differences in the distribution of inflamatory changes, both within and adjacent to involved small hand joints. Two major subtypes of inflammatory arthritis were shown, thus providing a specific differential diagnosis between rheumatoid arthritis and some patients with seronegative spondyloarthritis. In particular, all the patients with Reiter's syndrome who were studied, and half of those with psoriatic arthritis, had a distinctive pattern of extra-articular desease involvement. The need for a new classification of clinical subsets in psoriatic arthritis has been recently suggested. The present findings suggest that magnetic resonance imaging could be useful in such a reclassification of seronegative spondyloarthritis, as well as offering considerable potential for a reappraisal of pathogenesis and therapy. In this series, it was also noted that juxta-articular osteoporosis on plain film did not correlate with bone marrow oedema on MRI. Hence the aetiology of this common radiographic finding also merits further consideration. (orig.)

  7. Changes in serum lipids in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with a combination of tocilizumab and methotrexate compared with methotrexate alone for 24 weeks of observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Udachkina

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. According to the some studies tocilizumab therapy (TCZ in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA is accompanied by deterioration of blood lipid profile. Aim. To study changes in serum lipid parameters in patients with RA treated with a combination of tocilizumab and methotrexate compared with methotrexate alone for 24 weeks of observation. Material and methods. Patients (n=72 with RA were included into the pilot non-randomized 24-week study and divided in two groups: 1 TCZ+MTX group (n=39; women 30; median age 51 [43-55] years; 6 i.v. infusions of TCZ 8 mg/kg + МТX 10-20 mg/week; 2 MTX group (n=33; women 23; mеdian age 56 [48-63] years; MTX 7.5-20 mg/week. Results. At the baseline, similar proatherogenic blood profile was observed in both groups. The patients of MTX group more frequently took statins (n=19; 57.6% compared with the group TCZ+MTX (n=7; 18%, (p<0.05. The lipid levels correlated positively with traditional risk factors (p<0.05. RA activity and duration correlated negatively with high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, (p<0.05. Good/satisfactory anti-inflammatory effect was achieved in both groups after 24 weeks of treatment. Patients of TCZ+MTX group showed an increase in total cholesterol and HDL-C levels by 11% and 110%, respectively and decrease in plasma atherogenic index (PAI by 47%, (p<0.05. HDL-C level increased by 22% and PAI decreased by 16% in patients of MTX group (p<0.05. Among patients of MTX group without statin therapy HDL-C as well as non-HDL-C levels were increased by 24% and 27%, respectively (p<0.05; PAI did not change significantly in this subgroup. Among patients of MTX group treated with statins isolated increase in HDL-C level by 22% and decrease in PAI by 37.3% (p<0.05 were observed. A number of patients with achieved target levels of all studied lipid parameters did not change significantly in both groups. Conclusions. TCZ+MTX combined therapy as well as MTX monotherapy are associated

  8. Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Topics Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases Arthritis is often used to refer to any ... primary immunodeficiency syndrome March 11, 2013 Arthritis and Rheumatic Disease News Research Brief | January 9, 2017 Tofacitinib Shows ...

  9. Hand bone loss in early rheumatoid arthritis during a methotrexate-based treat-to-target strategy with or without adalimumab-a substudy of the optimized treatment algorithm in early RA (OPERA) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørnbjerg, L M; Østergaard, M; Jensen, T

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to investigate 1-year hand bone loss (HBL1-year) in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients treated with a methotrexate (MTX) and intra-articular triamcinolone treat-to-target strategy +/- adalimumab and to determine if HBL6months is associated with radiographic progression after 2...... associated with ∆TSS after 2 years (β = -0.086 (95% confidence interval = -0.15; -0.025) TSS unit/mg/cm(2) increase, p = 0.006) but not with presence of radiographic progression (∆TSS >0) (OR 0.96 (0.92-1.0), p = 0.10). In early RA patients treated with a methotrexate-based treat-to-target strategy...

  10. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Arthritis Program CDC-RFA-DP18-1803 NOFO FAQs Attachment 1 Attachment 2 Key Public Health Messages Policy Resources Partners ... mood and the ability to move. Classes take place at local Ys, parks, and community centers. These ...

  11. Rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Firestein's Textbook of Rheumatology . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 70. Garneau E. Rheumatoid arthritis. In: ... FF, ed. Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2018 . Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:1125-1128. June RR, Moreland LW. Rheumatoid ...

  12. Targeting of human interleukin-12B by small hairpin RNAs in xenografted psoriatic skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakobsen Maria

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disorder that shows as erythematous and scaly lesions. The pathogenesis of psoriasis is driven by a dysregulation of the immune system which leads to an altered cytokine production. Proinflammatory cytokines that are up-regulated in psoriasis include tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα, interleukin-12 (IL-12, and IL-23 for which monoclonal antibodies have already been approved for clinical use. We have previously documented the therapeutic applicability of targeting TNFα mRNA for RNA interference-mediated down-regulation by anti-TNFα small hairpin RNAs (shRNAs delivered by lentiviral vectors to xenografted psoriatic skin. The present report aims at targeting mRNA encoding the shared p40 subunit (IL-12B of IL-12 and IL-23 by cellular transduction with lentiviral vectors encoding anti-IL12B shRNAs. Methods Effective anti-IL12B shRNAs are identified among a panel of shRNAs by potency measurements in cultured cells. The efficiency and persistency of lentiviral gene delivery to xenografted human skin are investigated by bioluminescence analysis of skin treated with lentiviral vectors encoding the luciferase gene. shRNA-expressing lentiviral vectors are intradermally injected in xenografted psoriatic skin and the effects of the treatment evaluated by clinical psoriasis scoring, by measurements of epidermal thickness, and IL-12B mRNA levels. Results Potent and persistent transgene expression following a single intradermal injection of lentiviral vectors in xenografted human skin is reported. Stable IL-12B mRNA knockdown and reduced epidermal thickness are achieved three weeks after treatment of xenografted psoriatic skin with lentivirus-encoded anti-IL12B shRNAs. These findings mimick the results obtained with anti-TNFα shRNAs but, in contrast to anti-TNFα treatment, anti-IL12B shRNAs do not ameliorate the psoriatic phenotype as evaluated by semi-quantitative clinical scoring and by

  13. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is Happening to the Joints? Rheumatoid Arthritis: Gaining Control – Working with your Rheumatologist Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions ... Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients ...

  14. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health- ... on this website. Copyright Johns Hopkins Arthritis Center © 2018 Patient Privacy Johns Hopkins Rheumatology

  15. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Corner / Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos ... Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life ...

  16. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ...

  17. Incorporation of n-3 PUFA and γ-linolenic acid in blood lipids and red blood cell lipids together with their influence on disease activity in patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis - a randomized controlled human intervention trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Springer Monika

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and aim Marine n-3 fatty acids and γ-linolenic acid both have anti-inflammatory effects and may be useful to help treat inflammatory diseases. The effects of these alone or combined were examined in patients with arthritis in a randomized controlled trial. Design Patients with rheumatoid arthritis or psoriatic arthritis were randomized into four groups in a double-blind, placebo-controlled parallel designed study. Patients received the respective capsules (1: 3.0 g n-3 LC-PUFA/d; 2: 3.2 g γ-linolenic acid/d; 3: 1.6 g n-3 LC-PUFA + 1.8 g γ-linolenic acid/d; 4: 3.0 g olive oil for a twelve week period. Clinical status was evaluated and blood samples were taken at the beginning and at the end of the period. Differences before and after intervention were tested with paired t-test or with Wilcoxon test for non-normal data distribution. Results 60 patients (54 rheumatoid arthritis, 6 psoriatic arthritis were randomised, 47 finished per protocol. In group 1, the ratio of arachidonic acid (AA/eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA decreased from 6.5 ± 3.7 to 2.7 ± 2.1 in plasma lipids and from 25.1 ± 10.1 to 7.2 ± 4.7 in erythrocyte membranes (p ≤ 0.001. There was no significant influence on AA/EPA ratio due to interventions in group 2-4. In group 2, the intake of γ-linolenic acid resulted in a strong rise of γ-linolenic acid and dihomo-γ-linolenic acid concentrations in plasma lipids, cholesteryl esters, and erythrocyte membranes. The combination of n-3 LC-PUFA and γ-linolenic acid (group 3 led to an increase of γ-linolenic acid and dihomo-γ-linolenic acid concentrations in plasma lipids, cholesteryl esters, and erythrocyte mem-branes. This increase was only half of that in group 2. Conclusions Incorporation of eicosanoid precursor FAs was influenced by an intake of n-3 LC-PUFA and γ-linolenic acid suggesting a possible benefit for therapy of chronic inflammatory diseases. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials NCT01179971

  18. Accumulation of Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein in Psoriatic Skin and Changes of Plasma Lipid Levels in Psoriatic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilgun Solak Tekin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by an accelerated turnover of epidermal cells and an incomplete differentiation in epidermis with lesion. However, the exact etiology of psoriasis is unknown. Abnormalities in essential fatty acid metabolism, free radical generation, lipid peroxidation, and release of lymphokines have been proposed. Objective. Our purpose was to evaluate the plasma lipids and oxidized low-density lipoprotein accumulation in psoriatic skin lesion in order to ascertain the possible participation of oxidative stress and oxidative modification of lipids in pathogenesis of psoriasis. Methods. The study group included 84 patients with psoriasis, and 40 sex- and age-matched healthy volunteers. Blood lipid profile was determined. Psoriatic and nonlesional skin samples of psoriatic patients were evaluated for the presence of oxidized low-density lipoprotein by using an immune-fluorescent staining method. Results. The mean levels of lipids (total cholesterol, triglyceride, and LDL cholesterol in patients with psoriasis were found to be significantly higher than those of healthy subjects. Psoriatic skins were shown positive oxidized low-density lipoprotein staining. There was no staining in nonlesional skin samples of the same individuals. Conclusion. Lipid peroxidation mediated by free radicals is believed to be one of the important causes of cell membrane destruction and cell damage. This study shows for the first time the accumulation of oxidized low-density lipoprotein in psoriatic skin lesion. We believe that accumulation of ox-LDL in psoriatic skin may have an important role in the immune-inflammatory events that result in progressive skin damage.

  19. Adjustment in the clinical practice of treat-to-target guidelines for rheumatoid arthritis: Results of the ToARCan study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo, Antonio; Cáceres, Laura; Hernández-Beriaín, José Ángel; Francisco, Félix; Ojeda, Soledad; Talaverano, Sigrid; Nóvoa-Medina, Javier; Martín, José Adán; Delgado, Esmeralda; Trujillo, Elisa; Álvarez, Fátima; Magdalena, Laura; Rodríguez-Lozano, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    To analyze compliance with t2t clinical practice guidelines. Cross-sectional observational study in consecutive patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in 5 hospitals in the Canary Islands. Patients filled out activity scales, HAQ and answered the question of whether the doctor had explained the treatment target. The rheumatologist also collected: visits in the past year, use of activity indices and HAQ, DAS28 of current visit and date of the next visit. The percentage of compliance to indicators based on the t2t recommendations (R) 1, 3, 5-7 and 10 was analyzed. A total of 343 patients were recruited, 77% female, mean age 57, RA duration of 10 years. Median visits in the last year were 3 and mean time between last and current visit was 5.6 months. A total of 93% of the patients were treated with DMARDs and 44% were in remission by DAS (R1). In the previous visit, documented joint count was present in 85%, a HAQ in 19%, patient VAS in 41%, and a DAS28 in 35% of the patients (R6). The next visit was scheduled at an average of 4.3 months (R5). In 64% of patients with DAS28> 3.2 a visit between one and 3 months was scheduled (R5). A total of 96% of patients said they had been informed of the treatment target (R10). Variability between centers existed but was moderate. The only factor determining the performance of a DAS28 in the last visit was the patient's center of origin. The Canary Island centers studied achieved high levels of remission and low activity in their patients. The performance of composite indices and follow-up frequency recommended by the t2t are met, although there is room for improvement. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  20. Jojoba Oil Soft Colloidal Nanocarrier of a Synthetic Retinoid: Preparation, Characterization and Clinical Efficacy in Psoriatic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasr, Maha; Abdel-Hamid, Sameh; Moftah, Noha H; Fadel, Maha; Alyoussef, Abdullah A

    2017-01-01

    Nanotechnology has provided substantial benefits in drug delivery, especially in the treatment of dermatological diseases. Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease in which topical delivery of antipsoriatic agents is considered the first line treatment. To investigate whether the encapsulation of the synthetic retinoid tazarotene in a nanocarrier based on jojoba oil would decrease its irritation potential and clinically improve its therapeutic outcome in psoriatic patients. A microemulsion system based on jojoba wax and labrasol/plurol isostearique was prepared and characterized. The selected formula displayed spherical morphology, particle size of 15.49±2.41 nm, polydispersity index of 0.20 ±0.08, negative charge and low viscosity. The microemulsion provided two folds increase in skin deposition of tazarotene, correlating with higher reduction in psoriatic patients PASI scores after treatment (68% reduction in PASI scores versus 8.96% reduction with the marketed gel). No irritation was encountered in patients using microemulsion, with redness and inflammation reported with the marketed gel-treated patients. Jojoba oil microemulsion proved to be advantageous in reducing the irritancy of tazarotene, enhancing its skin deposition and achieving better therapeutic outcome in psoriatic patients. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  1. Agreement between the DAS28-CRP assessed with 3 and 4 variables in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with biological agents in the daily clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ole Rintek

    2013-01-01

    The Disease Activity Score-28-C-reactive Protein 4 [DAS28-CRP(4)] composite measure for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is based on 4 variables: tender and swollen joint counts, CRP, and patient global assessment. DAS28-CRP(3) includes only 3 variables, because patient global assessment has been omitted...

  2. The CIMESTRA study: intra-articular glucocorticosteroids and synthetic DMARDs in a treat-to-target strategy in early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hetland, Merete Lund; Horslev-Petersen, K.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. Treatment of early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) include aiming at disease control with early use of methotrexate (MTX) in monotherapy or in combination with glucocorticoids or other disease-modifying drugs (DMARDs). The CIMESTRA study applied an aggressive treatment with DMARD and intra-a...

  3. Update on research and future directions of the OMERACT MRI inflammatory arthritis group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conaghan, Philip G; McQueen, Fiona M; Bird, Paul

    2011-01-01

    of this score will require more PsA imaging datasets. As well, due to improved image resolution since the development of the original rheumatoid arthritis MRI scoring system (RAMRIS), the Task Force has worked on semiquantitative assessment of joint space narrowing, and developed a reliable method......The OMERACT Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Task Force has developed and evolved the psoriatic arthritis MRI score (PsAMRIS) over the last few years, and at OMERACT 10, presented longitudinal evaluation by multiple readers, using PsA datasets obtained from extremity MRI magnets. Further evaluation...

  4. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ...

  5. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ...

  6. Adalimumab added to a treat-to-target strategy with methotrexate and intra-articular triamcinolone in early rheumatoid arthritis increased remission rates, function and quality of life. The OPERA Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hørslev-Petersen, Kim; Hetland, Merete Lund; Junker, Peter

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: An investigator-initiated, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, treat-to-target protocol (Clinical Trials:NCT00660647) studied whether adalimumab added to methotrexate and intra-articular triamcinolone as first-line treatment in early rheumatoid arthritis (ERA) increased the frequency......-label biologics after 6-9 months. Efficacy was assessed primarily on the proportion of patients who reached treatment target (DAS28CRP... not increase the proportion of patients who reached the DAS28CRPtarget, but improved DAS28CRP, remission rates, function and quality of life in DMARD-naïve ERA....

  7. Comparative anti-psoriatic efficacy studies of clobetasol loaded chitin nanogel and marketed cream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panonnummal, Rajitha; Jayakumar, R; Sabitha, M

    2017-01-01

    In the present study chitin nanogel loaded with anti-psoriatic drug clobetasol was developed (CLCNG) for its topical delivery in psoriasis. CLCNG had the particle size of 132±14nm, with gel like consistency, stability in refrigerator, having higher drug release properties at acidic pH. CLCNG exhibited significant toxicity towards HaCaT and THP-1cell lines by MTT assay. The uptake of nanogel by HaCaT cell lines was confirmed by fluorescent microscopy. CLCNG at 0.35mg/ml exhibited significant anti-inflammatory activity with an average of 65% and 70% inhibition in COX and LOX activities expressed in THP-1 cells. In vitro skin permeation studies revealed the increased transdermal flux with fragmented stratum corneum and loosened epidermal layers in CLCNG treated samples, compared with control drug solution. The in vivo anti-psoriatic studies done on imiquimod model confirmed the potential benefits of the nanogel for the topical delivery of clobetasol in psoriasis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. CD1a expression in psoriatic skin following treatment with propylthiouracil, an antithyroid thioureylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barr Ronald J

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The antithyroid thioureylenes, propylthiouracil (PTU and methimazole (MMI, are effective in the treatment of patients with plaque psoriasis. The mechanism of action of the drugs in psoriasis is unknown. Since the drugs reduce circulating IL-12 levels in patients with Graves' hyperthyroidism, the effect of propylthiouracil on CD1a expression in psoriatic lesions was examined in biopsy samples of patients with plaque psoriasis. CD1a is a marker of differentiated skin antigen presenting cells (APC, Langerhans cells. Langerhans cells and skin monocyte/macrophages are the source of IL-12, a key cytokine involved in the events that lead to formation of the psoriatic plaque. Methods Biopsy specimens were obtained from six patients with plaque psoriasis who were treated with 300 mg propylthiouracil (PTU daily for three months. Clinical response to PTU as assessed by PASI scores, histological changes after treatment, and CD1a expression in lesional skin before and after treatment were studied. Results Despite significant improvement in clinical and histological parameters the expression of CD1a staining cells in the epidermis did not decline with propylthiouracil treatment. Conclusions It appears that the beneficial effect of propylthiouracil in psoriasis is mediated by mechanisms other than by depletion of skin antigen-presenting cells.

  9. Psoriatic Pseudobalanitis Circinata as a Post-Viral Koebner Phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Zampetti

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In the absence of any other lesions on the body, the diagnosis of localized genital psoriasis can be difficult, requiring further examinations including a biopsy. We report a case of psoriatic pseudobalanitis circinata triggered by a herpes virus infection, and we discuss the Koebner phenomenon and the therapeutic management of psoriasis of the genital area.

  10. Differential effects of treatment with UV-light (365 nm) and 8-methoxypsoralen on chromosomes of healthy persons and psoriatic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loeber, G.; Kittler, L.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP, 5 x 10 -5 M), near UV-light of 365 nm wavelength (UVA, 1.5 J/cm 2 ) and the combination of both (PUVA treatment) were studied on lymphocytes in vitro taken from healthy persons and patients with psoriasis vulgaris and psoriasis arthritis (psoriasis arthropathica). Chromosomes isolated from cell nuclei were visualized by means of Giemsa staining technique and analyzed for induction of chromosomal defects, i.e. premature centromere division (PCD), major coiling (MC), and formation of gaps and fragile sites. Exposure of nonpsoriatic lymphocytes to 8-MOP, UVA or PUVA increased the rate of PCD or MC generation. In experiments with psoriatic lymphocytes a much weaker effect was found, with a moderate increase of PCD and MC after UVA or PUVA treatment in the case of psoriasis vulgaris, and of MC after UVA treatment of psoriasis arthritis. On the average the number of chromosomes per metaphase plate displaying PCD did not exceed 10. No indication was obtained for the preference of certain chromosome groups or the appearance of 'fragile sites'. Under all experimental conditions the number of chromosome gaps ranged in the order of their spontaneous induction. The findings suggest PCD and MC investigations as possible sensitive tools for diagnosing latent psoriasis and for refined analysis of psoriatic cells or chromosomes. (author)

  11. Comics as an educational tool for children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelson, Amir; Rabinowicz, Noa; Reis, Yonit; Amarilyo, Gil; Harel, Liora; Hashkes, Philip J; Uziel, Yosef

    2017-09-02

    This study examined whether the comic book Neta and the Medikidz Explain JIA would improve disease-related knowledge and treatment adherence among patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). In this prospective cohort study, JIA patients answered 20 multiple-choice knowledge questions about their disease, before and after reading the comic book. Demographic, clinical, health-related quality of life and adherence data were recorded and correlated to the responses. We studied 61 patients with a mean age of 14 ± 3.3 (range 8-18) years, 67% female, 83% Jewish and 17% non-Jewish. Thirty-nine percent had oligoarthritis, 13% systemic, 32% polyarthritis 11% psoriatic and 5% enthesitis-related type JIA. The disease was active in 46%, 40% were treated with biologics/disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs, and 34% were in remission on medication. Among the 53 patients who completed before and after quizzes, average score increased from 63 to 80% (P comic book. Twenty-seven patients who also completed the quiz 1 year after the first reading retained their knowledge (79%). We did not find a statistically significant correlation between knowledge and age, sex, disease subtype, or Child Health Questionnaire quality of life scores. Adherence to medication use, physical therapy and rheumatology clinic visits were high at baseline; thus, these did not change after reading the comic. The comic booklet Neta and the Medikidz Explain JIA is a good educational tool for increasing disease-related knowledge in children with JIA.

  12. Establishment of age- and sex-adjusted reference data for hand bone mass and investigation of hand bone loss in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørnbjerg, Lykke Midtbøll; Østergaard, Mikkel; Jensen, Trine

    2016-01-01

    remission (0.0032 vs. 0.0058 g/cm(2)/year; p clinical practice, and only......BACKGROUND: Rheumatoid arthritis is characterised by progressive joint destruction and loss of periarticular bone mass. Hand bone loss (HBL) has therefore been proposed as an outcome measure for treatment efficacy. A definition of increased HBL adjusted for age- and sex-related bone loss is lacking....... In this study, we aimed to: 1) establish reference values for normal hand bone mass (bone mineral density measured by digital x-ray radiogrammetry (DXR-BMD)); and 2) examine whether HBL is normalised in rheumatoid arthritis patients during treatment with tumour necrosis factor alpha inhibitors (TNFI). METHODS...

  13. Periarticular uptake of /sup 99m/technetium diphosphonate in psoriatics. Correlation with cutaneous activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namey, T.C.; Rosenthall, L.

    1976-01-01

    The periarticular uptake of /sup 99m/technetium-labeled diphosphonate (/sup 99m/TcDP) was compared in 12 patients hospitalized for psoriasis and in 12 hospitalized for other dermatoses not associated with arthropathy. The 12 patients with psoriasis had recent onset disease of less than 5 years duration; neither group had historical or clinical evidence of arthritis. All psoriatics had markedly abnormal scans with symmetrically increased periarticular uptake about the imaged joints. None of the controls had similar findings. In 4 patients scanned with /sup 99m/technetium-pertechnetate within 24 hours of their /sup 99m/TcDP scan, no evidence of inflammatory synovitis was found. Three of these patients were serially imaged with /sup 99m/TcDP at intervals of 2 weeks to 3 months after their initial study, when obvious clinical improvement in their psoriasis was apparent. Improvement in the radionuclide joint images was demonstrated in some of the patients, but none reverted to normal during the study period. In light of recent evidence for the preferential binding of /sup 99m/TcDP to immature collagen, it is suggested that psoriasis may represent a generalized, but uncharacterized, collagen disorder present in bone as well as skin, linking the cutaneous disease with the potential for arthropathy

  14. Incorporation of 14C-linoleic acid in lipids of normal and psoriatic human skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruestow, B.; Metz, D.; Kunze, D.; Meffert, H.

    1980-01-01

    The 14 C-linoleic acid incorporation in lipids of surviving epidermis and corium of normal and psoriatic human skin was investigated. Changes of lipid metabolism were found in both epidermis and corium. Particularly the turnover of phospholipids was increased in the uninvolved psoriatic epidermis in relation to the involved psoriatic epidermis or to healthy controls. Possible reasons of these phenomena and the significance of structural lipids in psoriasis are discussed. (author)

  15. Thumb Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Thumb Arthritis Email to a friend * required fields ...

  16. UVB therapy decreases the adhesive interaction between peripheral blood mononuclear cells and dermal microvascular endothelium, and regulates the differential expression of CD54, VCAM-1, and E-selectin in psoriatic plaques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, J.-P.; Harris, K.; Chin, Y.H.

    1996-01-01

    A dermal lymphocytic infiltrate is a characteristic feature of psoriasis, and may be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. We have previously shown that specialized dermal microvascular endothelial cells (DMEC) in psoriatic lesions promote the selective adherence of the CD4 CD45Ro helper T-cell subset. In this study, we examined the adhesive interaction between peripheral blood mononuclear cells and psoriatic DMEC in patients treated with ultraviolet B light (UVB), and correlated the results with the expression and function of endothelial adhesion molecules on DMEC. (author)

  17. Calcipotriol inhibits the proliferation of hyperproliferative CD29 positive keratinocytes in psoriatic epidermis in the absence of an effect on the function and number of antigen-presenting cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, A.M.; Llado, Minna Fyhn Lykke; Skov, L.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate some of the possible mechanisms of action of the vitamin D analogue calcipotriol in vivo. Calcipotriol is finding increasing use in the treatment of psoriasis, but the primary target cell in vivo has not yet been identified. We treated psoriatic patients...... psoriatic and normal skin, calcipotriol treatment did not alter the capacity of epidermal antigen-presenting cells to stimulate the proliferation of autologous T cells, either in the absence or in the presence of exogenous antigen. Epidermal cell suspensions were analysed further by staining...... for infiltrating leucocytes (CD45+) and Langerhans cells (CD1a+). Flow cytometric analysis showed that calcipotriol did not alter the number of CD45+ cells or Langerhans cells in psoriatic skin. These results indicate that calcipotriol does not alter either the number of the function of epidermal antigen...

  18. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of ... Hopkins Rheumatology Arthritis Center Lupus Center Lyme Disease Clinical Research Center Myositis Center Scleroderma Center Sjogren’s Syndrome ...

  19. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... She is a critical member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health- ...

  20. Comparative and quantitative determination of total hemoglobin concentration in normal and psoriatic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahesar, S.M.; Dahot, M.U.; Khuhawar, M.Y.; Mahesar, H.U.

    2004-01-01

    The cyanmethaemoglobin technique is now recommended as the standard method by International Committee for Standardization in Hematology and British Standards Institution 1966. The hemoglobin is treated with reagent containing potassium ferricyanide, Potassium cyanide and potassium dihydrogen phosphate. The ferricyanide forms methamoglobin which is converted to cyanmethaemoglobin by the cyanide. The average values of hemoglobin, percent determined from the blood samples of normal and psoriatic (n=44) males and (n=35) females were 15.0, 12.7, 13.6 and 11.2 g/100ml. The decrease in hemoglobin concentration could be due to anemia resulting during the cell proliferation epidermis in inflammatory state and Keratolytic disorder which take place in psoriasis. (author)

  1. Multi-response model for rheumatoid arthritis based on delay differential equations in collagen-induced arthritic mice treated with an anti-GM-CSF antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Gilbert; Wagner, Thomas; Plater-Zyberk, Christine; Lahu, Gezim; Schropp, Johannes

    2012-02-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice is an experimental model for rheumatoid arthritis, a human chronic inflammatory destructive disease. The therapeutic effect of neutralizing the cytokine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) by an antibody was examined in the mouse disease in a view of deriving a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PKPD) model. In CIA mice the development of disease is measured by a total arthritic score (TAS) and an ankylosis score (AKS). We present a multi-response PKPD model which describes the time course of the unperturbed and perturbed TAS and AKS. The antibody acts directly on GM-CSF by binding to it. Therefore, a compartment for the cytokine GM-CSF is an essential component of the mathematical model. This compartment drives the disease development in the PKPD model. Different known properties of arthritis development in the CIA model are included in the PKPD model. Firstly, the inflammation, driven by GM-CSF, dominates at the beginning of the disease and decreases after some time. Secondly, a destructive (ankylosis) part evolves in the TAS that is delayed in time. In order to model these two properties a delay differential equation was used. The PKPD model was applied to different experiments with doses ranging from 0.1 to 100 mg/kg. The influence of the drug was modeled by a non-linear approach. The final mathematical model consists of three differential equations representing the compartments for GM-CSF, inflammation and destruction. Our mathematical model described well all available dosing schedules by a simultaneous fit. We also present an equivalent and easy reformulation as ordinary differential equation which grants the use of standard PKPD software.

  2. Arthritis in America

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Digital Press Kit Read the MMWR Science Clips Arthritis in America Time to Take Action! Language: English ( ... by about 40% by being physically active. Problem Arthritis is common and a growing health threat. Arthritis ...

  3. What Is Juvenile Arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Initiative Breadcrumb Home Health Topics English Español Juvenile Arthritis Basics In-Depth Download Download EPUB Download PDF What is it? Points To Remember About Juvenile Arthritis Juvenile arthritis is the term used to describe ...

  4. Psoriatic Alopecia in a Patient with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wimolsiri Iamsumang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is a chronic, recurrent, and relatively common inflammatory dermatologic condition, which demonstrates various clinical manifestations including hair loss. It was once believed that alopecia was not a presentation of scalp psoriasis, but it is now widely accepted that psoriatic alopecia exists. Although the majority of patients get hair regrowth, it can potentially lead to permanent hair loss. Herein, we report a case of 26-year-old female patient with systemic lupus erythematosus who presented with scalp hair loss and nonpruritic scaly plaques on the scalp. Her clinical presentation, dermoscopic, and histopathologic findings were consistent with psoriatic alopecia. Additionally, we also described a novel scalp dermoscopic pattern of “patchy dotted vessels” which we detected in the lesion of scalp psoriasis.

  5. Oral Administration of Vanillin Improves Imiquimod-Induced Psoriatic Skin Inflammation in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hui-Man; Chen, Feng-Yuan; Li, Chia-Cheng; Lo, Hsin-Yi; Liao, Yi-Fang; Ho, Tin-Yun; Hsiang, Chien-Yun

    2017-11-29

    Vanillin is one of the most widely used flavoring products worldwide. Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disorder. The interleukin-23 (IL-23)/interleukin-17 (IL-17) axis plays a critical role in psoriasis. Here, we analyzed the effect of vanillin on imiquimod (IMQ)-induced psoriatic skin inflammation in mice. Mice were treated topically with IMQ on the back skin and orally with various amounts of vanillin for 7 consecutive days. Vanillin significantly improved IMQ-induced histopathological changes of skin in a dose-dependent manner. The thickness and number of cell layers of epidermis were reduced by 29 ± 14.4 and 27.8 ± 11%, respectively, in mice given 100 mg/kg of vanillin. A microarray showed that a total of 9042 IMQ-upregulated genes were downregulated by vanillin, and the biological pathways involved in the immune system and metabolism were significantly altered by vanillin. The upregulated expressions of IL-23, IL-17A, and IL-17F genes were suppressed by vanillin, with fold changes of -3.07 ± 0.08, -2.06 ± 0.21, and -1.62 ± 0.21, respectively. Moreover, vanillin significantly decreased both the amounts of IL-17A and IL-23 and the infiltration of immune cells in the skin tissues of IMQ-treated mice. In conclusion, our findings suggested that vanillin was an effective bioactive compound against psoriatic skin inflammation. Moreover, the downregulation of IL-23 and IL-17 expression suggested that vanillin was a novel regulator of the IL-23/IL-17 axis.

  6. Psychopathological Variables and Sleep Quality in Psoriatic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luca

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is an inflammatory disease frequently associated with psychiatric disturbances and sleep disorders. The aim of the study was to assess the prevalence of depression, interaction anxiety, audience anxiety, and sleep quality in psoriatic patients. One hundred and two psoriatic patients were enrolled and underwent the following questionnaires: Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS, Interaction Anxiousness Scale (IAS, Audience Anxiousness Scale (AAS, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI. The severity of skin lesions was assessed by Psoriasis Area Severity Index (PASI. The presence of a link between clinical variables and with demographic data has been investigated. Psoriasis was linked to depression, interaction and audience anxiety, as well as to poor sleep quality; 37.5% of patients were depressed, 46.1% scored above 37 at the IAS, 47.1% scored above 33 at the AAS. Thirty-nine subjects (38.2% presented a PSQI ≥ 5. An association between interaction anxiety and lower limbs psoriasis-related erythema as well as between PSQI and head psoriasis-related erythema was found, particularly among male patients. Hence, psoriatic patients should be assessed from a holistic point of view, in order to identify associated disorders that could benefit from targeted treatments.

  7. Modeling of the clinical and economic impact of a risk-sharing agreement supporting a treat-to-target strategy in the management of patients with rheumatoid arthritis in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagnani, Francis; Pham, Thao; Claudepierre, Pascal; Berenbaum, Francis; De Chalus, Thibault; Saadoun, Carine; Joubert, Jean-Michel; Fautrel, Bruno

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a Treat-to-Target strategy with certolizumab pegol in patients with rheumatoid arthritis in the context of a pay-for-performance agreement in which medication costs are refunded in case of discontinuation during the first 3 months of treatment. The Treat-to-Target strategy consisted of a systematic switch to second-line tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α inhibitor in case of an unmet ACR50 response at 3 months compared to current routine clinical practice. A reference cohort treated first-line with certolizumab pegol according to current practice without systematic switching was considered as the comparator. A decision-tree model was constructed to estimate clinical outcome (health assessment questionnaire-disability index or HAQ-DI score), time spent in ACR50 response (ACR 50), and direct costs of treatment over a 2-year period. HAQ scores were derived from American College of Rheumatology 50 (ACR50) responses. All TNFα inhibitors were assumed to have equivalent efficacy and tolerability. Costs were estimated at 2013 French retail prices (date of the pay-for-performance agreement). The mean duration of an ACR50 response was 1.23 years in the Treat-to-Target strategy certolizumab pegol cohort vs 0.98 years in the reference cohort, resulting in a mean gain in HAQ at 24 months of 0.117. The Treat-to-Target strategy with a mix of TNFα inhibitors as second-line therapy was more expensive than the reference strategy in absolute terms, but this difference was entirely offset by the pay-for-performance agreement. The Treat-to-Target strategy was, thus, cost-neutral over a 2-year period after the payback of CZP cost for patients not achieving the target at 3 months. In the context of a pay-for-performance agreement, the management of patients with rheumatoid arthritis using a Treat-to-Target strategy with certolizumab pegol in first line is dominant compared to standard use of this drug in the French setting in 2013.

  8. Rheumatoid Arthritis: Can It Affect the Lungs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheumatoid arthritis: Can it affect the lungs? Can rheumatoid arthritis affect your lungs? Answers from April Chang-Miller, ... know. Arthritis Foundation. http://www.arthritis.org/about-arthritis/types/rheumatoid-arthritis/articles/lung-disease-rheumatoid-arthritis.php. Accessed ...

  9. Relationship Between and Laser Acupuncture Analgesia and the Function of Mast Cells in Adjuvant Arthritis Rats Treated by Acupuncture%Relationship Between and Laser Acupuncture Analgesia and the Function of Mast Cells in Adjuvant Arthritis Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程珂; 丁光宏; 沈雪勇; 吴凡

    2009-01-01

    Objective:To observe the analgesia effect and of low-level combined- and single-laser irradiation on Zusanli (ST 36) in rats and the relationship between mast cell degranulation and laser acupuncture analgesia.Methods: A total of 66 Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were randomly assigned into normal control,model control,sham irradiation,10.6 μm laser (220 mW,40 Hz) 650nm laser(36mW,continuous),combined laser (10.6 μm+ 650 nm) groups.Arthritis mode 1 was established by injection of Complete Freund's Adjuvant (0.05 mL) into the left ankle joint.The paw withdrawal latency (PWL) was detected with a radiant heat algesimeter.Zusanli (ST 36) was irradiated with sham,single or combined laser for 30 min.After sacrifice under anesthesia (1% embutal),tissues of Zusanli (ST 36) area were sampled,sliced (5 μm) and stained with Toluidine Blue for skin for observing the mast cell degranulation.Results:Compared with model control and sham group,the pain threshold increased significantly in 650nm and combined laser groups (P<0.01),while remained no significant difference in 10.6 μm group.Compared with model and sham group,the degranulation ratios of mast cells in 650nm and combined laser group were significantly higher (P<0.001),while remained no significant difference in 10.6 μm group.The linear correlation coefficient between degranulation ratios of mast cells and PWL after laser acupuncture is 0.737 (P<0.001).Conclusion:Both 650 nm and combined laser stimulation of Zusanli (ST 36) can effectively raise pain threshold,and enhance degranulation ratio of mast cells at the stimulated acupoint.The result also suggested a linear correlation between degranulation ratio of mast cell and analgesia effect.

  10. Subacromial bursitis with giant rice bodies as initial presentation of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Ramesh; Tan, Justina Wei Lyn; Chau, Cora Yuk Ping; Lee, Keng Thiam

    2012-10-01

    Rice body formation is a nonspecific response to chronic synovial inflammation associated with tuberculous arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, seronegative inflammatory arthritis, and even osteoarthritis. Such bodies were termed rice bodies because of their close resemblance to grains of polished white rice. We present a case report of a middle-aged woman with right shoulder subacromial/subdeltoid bursitis with giant rice body formation as her initial presentation of rheumatoid arthritis. Her right shoulder symptoms resolved after subacromial and subdeltoid bursectomy and removal of the rice bodies. She subsequently developed inflammatory arthritis of other joints, met the criteria for rheumatoid arthritis, and has been treated medically.

  11. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and secondary Sjögren's syndrome treated with Infliximab: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzola-Fuentes, L K; Chianelli, M; Galli, F; Glaudemans, A W J M; Martin Martin, L; Todino, V; Migliore, A; Signore, A

    2016-12-01

    Human T lymphocytes infiltrating tissues in autoimmune diseases are known to express somatostatin receptors amongst other activation markers. In this study, we evaluated whether somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) using a radiolabelled somatostatin analogue ((99m)Tc-EDDA/tricine-HYNIC-tyr(3)-octreotide ((99m)Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC)) is able to detect the presence of immune-mediated processes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and secondary Sjögren's syndrome. We also aimed to evaluate whether positivity to SRS was predictive of therapeutic response and if SRS could be used for monitoring the efficacy of immunomodulatory treatment. Eighteen patients with rheumatoid arthritis and secondary Sjögren's syndrome not responding to conventional treatment were recruited for treatment with infliximab, a monoclonal antibody against TNF-α. All patients had complete blood cell count, renal and liver function tests, measurements of ESR, CRP, ANA, ENA, and anti-dsDNA antibodies, functional salivary gland scintigraphy, labial biopsy, and ophthalmologic assessment with Schirmer's test and tear film break-up time (BUT). Diagnosis was made according to the revised criteria of the American-European Consensus Group. All patients underwent SRS at baseline and after 3-6 months of therapy with infliximab. Eleven out of 18 had repeat SRS images. Images of the salivary glands and major joints were acquired 3 h after injection of 370 MBq of (99m)Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC. Image analysis was performed semi-quantitatively. All patients showed uptake of (99m)Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC in the joints. Salivary glands also showed variable radiopharmaceutical uptake in 12 out of 18 patients, but all patients showed presence of lymphocytic infiltration at labial salivary gland biopsy. All patients, who repeated the study after treatment, showed significant reduction of somatostatin uptake in the joints but not in the salivary glands. SRS using (99m)Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC may be a useful imaging tool to assess

  12. Composite cutaneous lymphoma (iatrogenic immunodeficiency-associated lymphoproliferative disorder) in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis treated with methotrexate: Staging and evaluation of response to therapy with "1'8F-FDG PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makis, William; Ciarallo, Anthony; Gonzalez-Verdecia, Milene; Wang, Beatrice; Probst, Stehan

    2017-01-01

    A 67 year old woman with a 10 year history of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated with methotrexate and prednisone, presented with a 2 year history of worsening multiple cutaneous plaques of variable appearance. Two distinct skin lesions were biopsied to reveal a composite cutaneous lymphoma, possibly caused by long term methotrexate therapy. An [18F] fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ("1"8F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) was performed to stage the malignancy, and was later repeated to evaluate response to chemotherapy, which guided subsequent management. We present the PET/CT imaging findings of this very rare iatrogenic (methotrexate induced) immunodeficiency-associated lymphoproliferative disorder

  13. Composite cutaneous lymphoma (iatrogenic immunodeficiency-associated lymphoproliferative disorder) in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis treated with methotrexate: Staging and evaluation of response to therapy with {sup 1}'8F-FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makis, William [Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, CCI, Diagnostic Imaging, Edmonton (Canada); Ciarallo, Anthony; Gonzalez-Verdecia, Milene [MUHC Glen Site, Montreal (Canada); Wang, Beatrice [MUHC, Dermatology, Westmount (Canada); Probst, Stehan [MUHC Jewish General Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Montreal (Canada)

    2017-09-15

    A 67 year old woman with a 10 year history of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated with methotrexate and prednisone, presented with a 2 year history of worsening multiple cutaneous plaques of variable appearance. Two distinct skin lesions were biopsied to reveal a composite cutaneous lymphoma, possibly caused by long term methotrexate therapy. An [18F] fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) was performed to stage the malignancy, and was later repeated to evaluate response to chemotherapy, which guided subsequent management. We present the PET/CT imaging findings of this very rare iatrogenic (methotrexate induced) immunodeficiency-associated lymphoproliferative disorder.

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF ALOPECIA DURING TREATMENT WITH A TUMOR NECROSIS FACTOR-ALPHA INHIBITOR IN A FEMALE PATIENT WITH PSORIATIC ARTHRITS: A CLINICAL CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. G. Mukhina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to describe a case of the total development of alopecia in a female patient with psoriatic arthritis during treatment with a tumor necrosis factor-αlpha (TNF-α inhibitor. Materials and methods. Patient I., aged 36 years has been followed up at the Kazan’ Center of Rheumatic Diseases and Osteoporosis since 1998. At approximately the same time, the patient noted the appearance of skin eruptions behind the ears, on the skin of the scalp. She was examined by a dermatologist who diagnosed psoriasis. In 2005, she was admitted to Kazan’ Rheumatology Center, City Clinical Hospital Seven, for the development of obvious synovitis of the knee joint and for the inefficiency of therapy with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and diagnosed with psoriatic arthritis. During the prescribed therapy with methotrexate 10 mg/week, evident menstrual irregularities were observed in the patient who stopped using the drug herself. The second pregnancy occurred in 2008. Articular syndrome progression and eruptive psoriasis were recorded in the lactation period. After lactation cessation in 2009, she was hospitalized again. Her examination revealed high laboratory activity (erythrocyte sedimentation rate, as high as 40 mm/hr; magnetic resonance imaging of the knee joints showed the signs of bilateral synovitis; lumbar spine radiography exhibited grade II sacroiliitis. Leflunomide 20 mg/day was recommended as a basic drug. In 2012, the patient used leflunomide, her condition worsened; joint pain progressed; new joints were involved into the process, and cutaneous manifestations were aggravated. To verify a diagnosis and to choose therapy, the patient was referred to a consultation at the Moscow Research Institute of Rheumatology. Results. In connection with the high activity of the disease and with no response to the performed therapy, it was recommended to initiate therapy with biologics, such as infliximab, the drug of choice. Seven infliximab

  15. The ratio Neutrophil/Lymphocyte and Platelet/Lymphocyte in patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis that are Treating with Anti-TNF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İsmail Boyraz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic inflammatory disorder with unknown etiology. RA is characterized by a variable course of remissions and relapses, and subclinical inflammation persists between the disease exacerbations. Anti-TNF therapies have become more often preferred in recent years in the treatment of RA. The aim of the present study was to determine the relationship between N/L and P/L ratios and subclinical inflammation in patients with RA who achieved remission with anti-TNF therapy. METHODS: The present study was a retrospective, controlled and multicenter study. The present study reviewed the medical records of the patients who were on follow-up in the outpatient clinics of the Department of Physical Therapy in Abant İzzet Baysal University and Harran University due to rheumatoid arthritis (RA and who achieved remission with anti-TNF therapy.A total of 80 patients in the inactive phase of RA and 45 healthy subjects in the control group were included in the study. Hemogram results of the people were examined retrospectively. RESULTS: There was significant difference between the patient and the control group in terms of platelet ratio and lymphocyte and neutrophil ratio. There was no significant difference between the group in terms of N/L and P/L ratios.CONCLUSIONS:  In the current study, we found significant differences between the patient and the control group in terms of neutrophil, lymphocyte, and platelet counts; however, there was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of N/L and P/L ratios. These findings suggest that therapies with anti-TNF agents in patients with RA achieved complete control of inflammation. 

  16. Biologics for rheumatoid arthritis: an overview of Cochrane reviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Jasvinder A; Christensen, Robin; Wells, George A

    2010-01-01

    the biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are very effective in treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA), however there is a lack of head-to-head comparison studies.......the biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are very effective in treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA), however there is a lack of head-to-head comparison studies....

  17. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult Patients with Arthritis Complementary ...

  18. The effect of golimumab on haemoglobin levels in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis or ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furst, Daniel E; Kay, Jonathan; Wasko, Mary Chester; Keystone, Edward; Kavanaugh, Arthur; Deodhar, Atul; Murphy, Frederick T; Magnus, Jeanette H; Hsia, Elizabeth C; Hsu, Benjamin; Xu, Stephen; Rahman, Mahboob U; Doyle, Mittie K

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of golimumab on haemoglobin levels in patients with RA, PsA or AS. Secondary analysis was performed on integrated data from five randomized controlled studies: three RA, one PsA and one AS (2303 patients total). Golimumab 50 or 100 mg was injected s.c. every 4 weeks with or without MTX. Control groups received placebo injections plus MTX or background therapy. Patients with haemoglobin levels below the age- and sex-specific normal ranges were considered to have anaemia. Ferritin levels were used to distinguish anaemia of mixed aetiology (≥ 15 and <60 ng/ml) and anaemia of inflammation (≥ 60 ng/ml). Changes from baseline to weeks 14 and 24 in haemoglobin level were compared between treatment groups using an analysis of variance on the van der Waerden normal scores. At baseline, 21% of RA patients, 9% of PsA patients and 15% of AS patients had anaemia. Of these, 24%, 57% and 25%, respectively, had anaemia of inflammation. The median increase from baseline to week 14 in the haemoglobin level of anaemic patients was 0.3 g/dl in the control group and 0.9 g/dl in the golimumab group (P < 0.001). Haemoglobin levels improved within the subgroups of patients with anaemia of mixed aetiology (control, 0.4 g/dl vs golimumab, 0.7 g/dl) (P = 0.305) and with anaemia of inflammation (0.2 vs 1.4 g/dl, respectively) (P < 0.001). Compared with the control group, patients receiving golimumab treatment had significantly improved haemoglobin levels, particularly among patients with anaemia of inflammation.

  19. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of psoriatic dactylitis: status and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakewell, Catherine J; Olivieri, Ignazio; Aydin, Sibel Z; Dejaco, Christian; Ikeda, Kei; Gutierrez, Marwin; Terslev, Lene; Thiele, Ralf; D'Agostino, Maria Antionetta; Kaeley, Gurjit S

    2013-12-01

    Dactylitis, a characteristic feature of the spondyloarthropathies, occurs in up to 48% of patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). No clear consensus on the underlying components and pathogenesis of dactylitis exists in the literature. We undertook a systematic review of ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) literature to better define imaging elements that contribute to the dactylitic digit seen in PsA. Our objectives were to determine first the level of homogeneity of each imaging modality's definition of the components of dactylitis, and second, to evaluate the metric properties of each imaging modality according to the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Clinical Trials (OMERACT) filter. Searches were performed in PUBMED and EMBASE for articles pertaining to MRI, US, and dactylitis. Data regarding the reported features of dactylitis were collected and categorized, and the metrological qualities of the studies were assessed. The most commonly described features of dactylitis were flexor tendon tenosynovitis and joint synovitis (90%). Extratendinous soft tissue thickening and extensor tendonitis were described nearly equally as being present and absent. Discrepancy exists as to whether entheses proper contribute to the etiology of dactylitis. An increasing number of studies categorize abnormalities in several tissue compartments including the soft tissue, tendon sheaths, and joints, as well as ligaments. The understanding of which tissues contribute to dactylitic inflammation has evolved. However, there is a lack of literature regarding the natural history of these abnormalities. This systematic review provides guidance in defining elementary lesions that may discriminate dactylitic digits from normal digits, leading to development of a composite measure of activity and severity of dactylitis.

  20. Impact of Comorbidities on Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor Therapy in Psoriatic Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballegaard, Christine; Højgaard, Pil; Dreyer, Lene

    2017-01-01

    characteristics, disease activity and treatment response and persistence was obtained from the DANBIO registry. Information on comorbidities according to the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) was obtained through linkage with the Danish National Patient Register. Kaplan-Meier plots and Cox proportional hazard...... compared with patients without comorbidities (hazard ratio 1.72, [1.26 to 2.37], p = 0.001). A smaller proportion of patients with a CCI score ≥ 2 achieved European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) good response (p

  1. Association between tobacco smoking and response to tumour necrosis factor α inhibitor treatment in psoriatic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højgaard, Pil; Glintborg, Bente; Hetland, Merete Lund

    2015-01-01

    study based on the Danish nationwide DANBIO registry. Kaplan-Meier plots, logistic and Cox regression analyses by smoking status (current/previous/never smoker) were calculated for treatment adherence, ACR20/50/70-responses and EULAR-good-response. Additional stratified analyses were performed according...... to gender and TNFi-subtype (adalimumab/etanercept/infliximab). RESULTS: Among 1388 PsA patients included in the study, 1148 (83%) had known smoking status (33% current, 41% never and 26% previous smokers). Median follow-up time was 1.22 years (IQR 0.44-2.96). At baseline, current smokers had lower Body Mass...... Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) score (1.1 (0.7 to 1.5)/1.0 (0.5 to 1.5)) than never smokers (all psmokers had shorter treatment adherence than never smokers (1.56 years (0.97 to 2.15)/2.43 years (1.88 to 2.97), (median (95% CI)), log rank p=0.02) and poorer 6 months' EULAR-good-response rates...

  2. Is secukinumab effective for psoriatic arthritis with insufficient response to initial treatment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soledad Venegas-Iribarren

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Resumen INTRODUCCIÓN La artritis psoriática es una artritis inflamatoria sin una clara etiología, con el tratamiento biológico como un pilar fundamental en pacientes más complejos. Existen varias alternativas para tratamiento biológico, entre ellas secukinumab. Debido a su alto costo, es importante evaluar la real efectividad de estos para un buen tratamiento. MÉTODOS Para responder esta pregunta utilizamos Epistemonikos, la mayor base de datos de revisiones sistemáticas en salud a nivel mundial, la cual es mantenida mediante búsquedas en múltiples fuentes de información, incluyendo MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane, entre otras. Extrajimos los datos desde las revisiones identificadas, reanalizamos los datos de los estudios primarios, realizamos un metanálisis, preparamos tablas de resumen de los resultados utilizando el método GRADE. RESULTADOS Y CONCLUSIONES Identificamos ocho revisiones sistemáticas que en conjunto incluyen tres ensayos aleatorizados, reportados en cinco referencias. Concluimos que el uso de secukinumab en artritis psoriática lleva a una mejoría en la actividad de la enfermedad y los síntomas, y probablemente no se asocia a eventos adversos graves.

  3. Societal costs and patients' experience of health inequities before and after diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Lars Erik; Jørgensen, Tanja S.; Christensen, Robin

    2017-01-01

    . 49) compared with GPC subjects. The RR increased to 1. 60 (95% CI 1. 49 to 1. 72) at the time of diagnosis and was 2. 69 (95% CI 2. 40 to 3. 02) 10â years after diagnosis, where 21. 8% of the patients with PsA received disability pension. Conclusions Our findings are suggestive of health inequity...

  4. Head-to-toe whole-body MRI in psoriatic arthritis, axial spondyloarthritis and healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poggenborg, René Panduro; Pedersen, Susanne Juhl; Eshed, Iris

    2015-01-01

    with conventional MRI (convMRI). METHODS: WBMRI (3.0-T) of patients with peripheral PsA (n = 18) or axial SpA (n = 18) and of HS (n = 12) was examined for proportion of evaluable features (readability) and the presence and pattern of lesions in axial and peripheral joints. Furthermore, global WBMRI scores...... of inflammation and structural damage were constructed, and WBMRI findings were compared with clinical measures and convMRI (SpA/HS: spine and SI joints; PsA/HS: hand). RESULTS: The readability (92-100%) and reproducibility (intrareader intraclass correlation coefficient: 0.62-1.0) were high in spine/SI joint...

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging in psoriatic arthritis -- update on current status and future perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Poggenborg, René Panduro

    2012-01-01

    and future development of MRI and other modern imaging modalities in PsA. This review, presented at the GRAPPA 2010 annual meeting, describes the current status of MRI in PsA, with a focus on its use in diagnosis, monitoring, and prediction of the disease course and treatment response. Important areas...... for future research are also outlined....

  6. Pain mechanisms and ultrasonic inflammatory activity as prognostic factors in patients with psoriatic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højgaard, Pil; Christensen, Robin; Dreyer, Lene

    2016-01-01

    . Outcomes are composite and clinical, as well as patient reported. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The study is approved by the ethics committee of the Capital Region of Denmark (H-15009080) and has been designed in cooperation with patient research partners. The study is registered at clinicaltrials.gov (number...

  7. Disease activity in and quality of life of patients with psoriatic arthritis mutilans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindqvist, U; Gudbjornsson, B; Iversen, L.

    2017-01-01

    capacity with little or no ability to perform self-care or everyday tasks was reported by 21% of the patients. Patients between 45 and 60 years of age reported the most impaired quality of life in comparison to the control group. Conclusion: PAM seriously affects social functioning. Whether early......-assessed disease activity, and patient’s education and work status were recorded. Data from the 36-item Short Form Health Survey, Health Assessment Questionnaire and Dermatology Life Quality Index questionnaire were gathered and correlated with disease duration, pain, and general well-being (visual analogue scale...

  8. Predictors of response to intra-articular steroid injection in psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder, Lihi; Chandran, Vinod; Ueng, Joanna; Bhella, Sita; Lee, Ker-Ai; Rahman, Proton; Pope, Angela; Cook, Richard J; Gladman, Dafna D

    2010-07-01

    To assess the effectiveness of IA corticosteroid (IAS) injections in PsA and to determine the association between macrophage migration inhibition factor (MIF) gene polymorphism and response to IAS injections. A cohort analysis of PsA patients who were followed prospectively was performed. Clinical response was defined as no tenderness or effusion in the injected joint at 3 months. Relapse was defined as re-occurrence of joint pain or effusion. MIF 173C > G genotyping (rs755622) was performed. Two hundred and twenty patients with 245 IAS injections were included in the study. The probability of responding at 3 months was 41.6%. Within 12 months, 25.5% of the joints relapsed. Clinical factors that were associated with response included duration of psoriasis [Odds ratio (OR) 1.03] and the use of MTX or anti-TNF agents at the time of injection (OR 2.68). Factors that were associated with relapse included injection into large joints (OR 4.58) and elevated sedimentation rate (OR 15.0), whereas absence of clinical and/or radiographic damage (OR 0.23) and duration of PsA (OR 0.92) reduced risk of relapse. MIF polymorphism was not associated with clinical response, but was associated with relapse (OR 3.2). On multivariate analysis including clinical covariates, the association between MIF polymorphism and relapse was lost. IAS injections are effective in PsA. MIF gene polymorphism is associated with relapse. However, this effect is explained by clinical variables that reflect disease activity, suggesting that MIF gene polymorphism influences inflammatory activity.

  9. Efficacy and safety of faecal microbiota transplantation in patients with psoriatic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragsnaes, Maja Skov; Kjeldsen, Jens; Horn, Hans Christian

    2018-01-01

    assessor), placebo-controlled, parallel-group study. Eighty patients will be included and randomised (1:1) to either placebo (saline) or FMT provided from an anonymous healthy donor. Throughout the study, both groups will continue the weekly self-administered subcutaneous MTX treatment, remaining....... The number of adverse events will be registered throughout the study. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This is a proof-of-concept clinical trial and will be performed in agreement with Good Clinical Practice standards. Approvals have been obtained from the local Ethics Committee (DK-S-20150080) and the Danish Data...

  10. The influence of obesity on response to tumour necrosis factor-α inhibitors in psoriatic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højgaard, Pil; Glintborg, Bente; Kristensen, Lars Erik

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the impact of obesity on response to the first TNF-α inhibitor (TNFI) treatment course in patients with PsA followed in routine care. METHODS: We performed an observational cohort study based on the Danish and Icelandic biologics registries. Kaplan-Meier plots, Cox and ...

  11. Cytokine profile in psoriatic arthritis: search for relationships with inflammation and blood rheological properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tat'yana Viktorovna Korotaeva

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion. The enhanced clinical and laboratory activity of PSA is attended by the systemic activation of immunological mediators of inflammation and neoangiogenesis and by impaired blood rheological properties, which supports the interaction of these factors in the immunopathogenesis of the diseases.

  12. Efficacy and safety of faecal microbiota transplantation in patients with psoriatic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragsnaes, Maja Skov; Kjeldsen, Jens; Horn, Hans Christian

    2018-01-01

    . The number of adverse events will be registered throughout the study. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This is a proof-of-concept clinical trial and will be performed in agreement with Good Clinical Practice standards. Approvals have been obtained from the local Ethics Committee (DK-S-20150080) and the Danish Data...... disease who are non-responsive to methotrexate (MTX) treatment will be conducted. The objective is to explore clinical aspects associated with FMT performed in patients with PsA. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This trial is a randomised, two-centre stratified, double-blind (patient, care provider and outcome...

  13. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... is Happening to the Joints? Rheumatoid Arthritis: Gaining Control – Working with your Rheumatologist Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions ... for Patients Arthritis Drug Information Sheets Benefits and Risks of Opioids in Arthritis Management How to Give ...

  14. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos ... member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression ...

  15. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Play Rheumatoid Arthritis: Symptoms and Diagnosis Rheumatoid Arthritis: What is Happening to the Joints? Rheumatoid Arthritis: Gaining Control – Working with your Rheumatologist Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions ...

  16. Sustained Response Following Discontinuation of Methotrexate in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis Treated With Subcutaneous Tocilizumab: Results From a Randomized, Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Joel M; Rigby, William; Singer, Nora G; Birchwood, Christine; Gill, Darcy; Reiss, William; Pei, Jinglan; Michalska, Margaret

    2018-03-25

    To evaluate whether tocilizumab (TCZ) monotherapy is non-inferior to TCZ + methotrexate (MTX) in maintaining clinical response in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who achieve low disease activity with TCZ+MTX. Patients with RA who experienced an inadequate response to MTX received MTX plus TCZ 162 mg subcutaneous. At 24 weeks, patients who achieved Disease Activity Score 28-erythrocyte sedimentation rate (DAS28-ESR) ≤3.2 were randomized to receive TCZ monotherapy or continue TCZ+MTX until week 52. The primary outcome was the comparison of mean change in DAS28-ESR from weeks 24 to 40 between the TCZ monotherapy and TCZ+MTX arms (non-inferiority margin of 0.6). Secondary outcomes included DAS28-ESR worsening ≥1.2, achievement of DAS28-ESR <2.6 and ≤3.2 and safety and immunogenicity. Of 718 patients enrolled, 294 were randomized at week 24 (TCZ monotherapy, n = 147; TCZ+MTX, n = 147). The mean changes in DAS28-ESR from weeks 24 to 40 were 0.46 and 0.14 in the TCZ monotherapy and TCZ+MTX arms, respectively (weighted difference between the groups, 0.318 [95% CI 0.045, 0.592]); discontinuing MTX in TCZ responders was non-inferior to continuing MTX. Safety events were broadly similar between the randomized treatment groups; the most common serious adverse event was infection, occurring in 2.1% of patients in the TCZ monotherapy group and 2.2% in the TCZ+MTX group. Patients with RA receiving TCZ+MTX who achieve low disease activity can discontinue MTX without significant worsening of disease activity in the 16 weeks following MTX discontinuation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Similar Improvements in Patient-Reported Outcomes Among Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Treated with Two Different Doses of Methotrexate in Combination with Adalimumab: Results From the MUSICA Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeley, Gurjit S; MacCarter, Daryl K; Goyal, Janak R; Liu, Shufang; Chen, Kun; Griffith, Jennifer; Kupper, Hartmut; Garg, Vishvas; Kalabic, Jasmina

    2018-06-01

    In patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), combination treatment with methotrexate (MTX) and adalimumab is more effective than MTX monotherapy. From the patients' perspective, the impact of reduced MTX doses upon initiating adalimumab is not known. The objective was to evaluate the effects of low and high MTX doses in combination with adalimumab initiation on patient-reported outcomes (PROs), in MTX-inadequate responders (MTX-IR) with moderate-to-severe RA. MUSICA was a randomized, double-blind, controlled trial evaluating the efficacy of 7.5 or 20 mg/week MTX, in combination with adalimumab for 24 weeks in MTX-IR RA patients receiving prior MTX ≥ 15 mg/week for ≥ 12 weeks. PROs were recorded at each visit, including physical function, health-related quality-of-life, work productivity, quality-of-sleep, satisfaction with treatment medication, sexual impairment due to RA, patient global assessment of disease activity (PGA), and patient pain. Last observation carried forward was used to account for missing values. At baseline, patients in both MTX dosage groups had similar demographics, disease characteristics, and PRO scores. Overall, initiation of adalimumab led to significant improvements from baseline in the PROs assessed for both MTX dosage groups. Improvements in presenteeism from baseline were strongly correlated with corresponding improvements in SF-36 (vitality), pain, and physical function. Physical and mental well-being had a good correlation with improvement in sleep. Overall, improvements in disease activity from baseline were correlated with improvements in several PROs. The addition of adalimumab to MTX in MTX-IR patients with moderate-to-severe RA led to improvements in physical function, quality-of-life, work productivity, quality of sleep, satisfaction with treatment medication, and sexual impairment due to RA, regardless of the concomitant MTX dosage. AbbVie. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier, NCT01185288.

  18. Effect of Treat-to-target Strategies Aiming at Remission of Arterial Stiffness in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Randomized Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Lydia Ho-Pui; Shang, Qing; Li, Edmund Kwok-Ming; Wong, Priscilla Ching-Han; Kwok, Kitty Yan; Kun, Emily Wai-Lin; Yim, Isaac Cheuk-Wan; Lee, Violet Ka-Lai; Yip, Ronald Man-Lung; Pang, Steve Hin-Ting; Lao, Virginia Weng-Nga; Mak, Queenie Wah-Yan; Cheng, Isaac Tsz-Ho; Lau, Xerox Sze-Lok; Li, Tena Ka-Yan; Zhu, Tracy Yaner; Lee, Alex Pui-Wai; Tam, Lai-Shan

    2018-05-15

    To determine the efficacy of 2 tight control treatment strategies aiming at Simplified Disease Activity Score (SDAI) remission (SDAI ≤ 3.3) compared to 28-joint count Disease Activity Score (DAS28) remission (DAS28 < 2.6) in the prevention of arterial stiffness in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This was an open-label study in which 120 patients with early RA were randomized to receive 1 year of tight control treatment. Group 1 (n = 60) aimed to achieve SDAI ≤ 3.3 and Group 2 (n = 60), DAS28 < 2.6. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AIx) were measured at baseline and 12 months. A posthoc analysis was also performed to ascertain whether achieving sustained remission could prevent progression in arterial stiffness. The proportions of patients receiving methotrexate monotherapy were significantly lower in Group 1 throughout the study period. At 12 months, the proportions of patients achieving DAS28 and SDAI remission, and the change in PWV and AIx, were comparable between the 2 groups. In view of the lack of differences between the 2 groups, a posthoc analysis was performed at Month 12, including all 110 patients with PWV, to elucidate the independent predictors associated with the change in PWV. Multivariate analysis revealed that achieving sustained DAS28 remission at months 6, 9, and 12 and a shorter disease duration were independent explanatory variables associated with less progression of PWV. With limited access to biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, treatment efforts toward DAS28 and SDAI remission had similar effects in preventing the progression of arterial stiffness at 1 year. However, achieving sustained DAS28 remission was associated with a significantly greater improvement in PWV. [Clinical Trial registration: Clinicaltrial.gov NCT01768923.].

  19. Infective endocarditis following tumor necrosis factor-α antagonist therapy for management of psoriatic erythroderma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Takuro; Kiyosawa, Jun; Fukuda, Akihiro; Watanabe, Seiji; Kurose, Nozomu; Nojima, Takayuki; Kanda, Tsugiyasu

    2017-02-09

    The introduction of biological agents, such as infliximab, which act against tumor necrosis factor-α was a major advance for the treatment of an increasing number of chronic diseases. Tumor necrosis factor-α antagonists represent a major therapeutic advance for the management of chronic inflammatory diseases, such as psoriasis. Previous studies have reported that the use of tumor necrosis factor-α antagonists increased the risk of opportunistic infections and reactivation of latent bacterial infections. Cardiac involvement, such as infective endocarditis, is very rare in the literature. A 77-year-old Asian man with a 10-year history of psoriatic erythroderma was referred due to high fever and general malaise. He was treated with Predonine (prednisolone) and infliximab. After treatment, cardiac echography showed mitral valve vegetation and brain magnetic resonance imaging indicated multiple fresh infarctions. He died from large brain infarction in October 2013. An autopsy showed fresh thrombosis in his left middle cerebral artery, mitral valve vegetations, and septic micro-embolisms in multiple organs. Lethal bacterial endocarditis was revealed after administration of tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitor, infliximab, for the treatment of psoriatic erythroderma. An autopsy showed vegetation in his mitral valve and brain infarction with fresh purulent embolism in his left middle cerebral artery and septic micro-embolisms.

  20. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Corner / Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos ... Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life ...

  1. Effect of a treat-to-target strategy based on methotrexate and intra-articular betamethasone with or without additional cyclosporin on MRI-assessed synovitis, osteitis, tenosynovitis, bone erosion, and joint space narrowing in early rheumatoid arthritis: results from a 2-year randomized double

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Bisgaard, S.; Ejbjerg, B. J.; Eshed, I.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate whether a treat-to-target strategy based on methotrexate (MTX) and intra-articular (IA) betamethasone suppresses magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-determined measures of disease activity and reduces joint destruction in early rheumatoid arthritis (eRA) patients, and to i......Objectives: To investigate whether a treat-to-target strategy based on methotrexate (MTX) and intra-articular (IA) betamethasone suppresses magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-determined measures of disease activity and reduces joint destruction in early rheumatoid arthritis (eRA) patients......, and to investigate whether concomitant cyclosporin A (CyA) provides an additional effect.Method: In the 2-year randomized, double-blind, treat-to-target trial CIMESTRA, 160 patients with eRA (intra-articular betamethasone and CyA, or placebo CyA. A total of 129 patients participated...

  2. A Proposal for a Study on Treatment Selection and Lifestyle Recommendations in Chronic Inflammatory Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Vibeke; Holmskov, Uffe; Sørensen, Signe Bek

    2017-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory diseases (CIDs), including Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis (inflammatory bowel diseases, IBD), rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, spondyloarthritides, hidradenitis suppurativa, and immune-mediated uveitis, are treated with biologics targeting the pro...

  3. A Proposal for a Study on Treatment Selection and Lifestyle Recommendations in Chronic Inflammatory Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Vibeke; Holmskov, Uffe; Sørensen, Signe Bek

    2017-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory diseases (CIDs), including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis (inflammatory bowel diseases, IBD), rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, spondyloarthritides, hidradenitis suppurativa, and immune-mediated uveitis, are treated with biologics targeting the pro...

  4. Deficient SOCS3 and SHP-1 Expression in Psoriatic T Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Karsten W; Woetmann, Anders; Skov, Lone

    2010-01-01

    IFN-alpha and skin-infiltrating activated T lymphocytes have important roles in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. T cells from psoriatic patients display an increased sensitivity to IFN-alpha, but the pathological mechanisms behind the hyperresponsiveness to IFN-alpha remained unknown. In this study......-alpha signaling in psoriatic T cells. In conclusion, our data suggest that loss of regulatory control is involved in the aberrant hypersensitivity of psoriatic T cells to IFN-alpha.Journal of Investigative Dermatology advance online publication, 4 February 2010; doi:10.1038/jid.2010.6....

  5. Subclinical synovitis and tenosynovitis by ultrasonography (US) 7 score in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with synthetic drugs, in clinical remission by DAS28.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura-Ríos, Lucio; Sánchez Bringas, Guadalupe; Hernández-Díaz, Cristina; Cruz-Arenas, Esteban; Burgos-Vargas, Rubén

    2017-11-29

    To identify synovitis and tenosynovitis active by using the Ultrasound 7 (US 7) scoring system in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in clinical remission induced by synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). This is a multicentric, cross-sectional, observational study including 94 RA patients >18 years old who were in remission as defined by the 28-joints disease activity score (DAS28) <2.6 induced by synthetic DMARD during at least 6 months. Patients with a previous or current history of biologic DMARD treatment were not included in the study. Demographic and clinical data were collected by the local rheumatologist; the US evaluation was performed by a calibrated rheumatologist, who intended to detect grayscale synovitis and power Doppler (PD) using the 7-joint scale. Intra and inter-reader exercises of images between 2 ultrasonographers were realized. Patients' mean age was 49.1±13.7 years; 83% were women. The mean disease duration was 8±7 years and remission lasted for 27.5±31.8 months. The mean DAS28 score was 1.9±0.66. Grayscale synovitis was present in 94% of cases; it was mild in 87.5% and moderate in 12.5%. Only 12.8% of the patients had PD. The metatarsophalangeal, metacarpophalangeal, and carpal joints of the dominant hand were the joints more frequently affected by synovitis. Tenosynovitis by grayscale was observed in 9 patients (9.6%). The intra and inter-reading kappa value were 0.77, p<0.003 (CI 95%, 0.34-0.81) and 0.81, p<0.0001 (CI 95%, 0.27-0.83) respectively. Low percentage of synovitis and tenosynovitis active were founded according to PD US by 7 score in RA patients under synthetic DMARDs during long remission. This score has benefit because evaluate tenosynovitis, another element of subclinical disease activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  6. Forms of Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Forms of Arthritis Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of Contents Today, ... of Linda Saisselin Osteoarthritis (OA) — the form of arthritis typically occurring during middle or old age, this ...

  7. Rheumatoid arthritis (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease in which the body's immune system attacks itself. The pattern of joints ... other joints and is worse in the morning. Rheumatoid arthritis is also a systemic disease, involving other body ...

  8. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... joints. This form of JIA may turn into rheumatoid arthritis. It may involve 5 or more large and ... no known prevention for JIA. Alternative Names Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA); Juvenile chronic polyarthritis; Still disease; Juvenile spondyloarthritis ...

  9. [Management of rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiehn, C; Krüger, K

    2016-11-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is the most common inflammatory rheumatic disease. Due to the destruction of joints in the course of the disease it leads to significant morbidity in affected patients. The quality of life and even life expectancy can be severely impaired. Early diagnosis and early initiation of treatment is a decisive step towards a more benign course of the disease. New classification criteria have been published in order to help in early diagnosis. Methods of imaging, such as ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging help in the detection of synovitis, which is the major pathomorphological manifestation of arthritis and should be identified without any doubt. Treatment follows the rule of treat to target with the aim of achieving remission or if this is not realistic, at least the lowest possible level of disease activity. The first and perhaps most important step in therapy is the initiation of methotrexate or if contraindications are present, another disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) as soon as the diagnosis is made. Initial addition of glucocorticoids is recommended, which should be reduced in dose and terminated as soon as possible. Furthermore, either the combination of different DMARDs or the start of biologic DMARDs, such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) inhibitors or second generation biologic DMARDs is possible as a treatment option. The treatment follows the rule of shared decision-making and is the standard to treat comorbidities, the use an interdisciplinary approach and to treat functional deficits by rehabilitation measures, such as physiotherapy.

  10. Cardiogoniometry in psoriatic patients and its comparison with a control group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoorak Poorzand

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Abnormalities in resting ECG and CGM and their correlation with disease severity raises concerns about the need for cardiovascular follow-ups of psoriatic patients, especially those with severe disease.

  11. Certolizumab Pegol for Treating Rheumatoid Arthritis Following Inadequate Response to a TNF-α Inhibitor: An Evidence Review Group Perspective of a NICE Single Technology Appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermejo, Iñigo; Stevenson, Matt; Archer, Rachel; Stevens, John W; Goka, Edward; Clowes, Mark; Scott, David L; Young, Adam

    2017-11-01

    As part of its single technology appraisal (STA) process, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) invited the manufacturer (UCB Pharma) of certolizumab pegol (CZP; Cimzia ® ) to submit evidence of its clinical and cost effectiveness for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) following inadequate response to a tumour necrosis factor-α inhibitor (TNFi). The School of Health and Related Research Technology Appraisal Group at the University of Sheffield was commissioned to act as the independent Evidence Review Group (ERG). The ERG produced a detailed review of the evidence for the clinical and cost effectiveness of the technology, based upon the company's submission to NICE. The clinical effectiveness evidence in the company's submission for CZP was based predominantly on six randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the efficacy of CZP against placebo. The clinical effectiveness review identified no head-to-head evidence on the efficacy of CZP against the comparators within the scope; therefore, the company performed a network meta-analysis (NMA). The company's NMA concluded that CZP had a similar efficacy to that of its comparators. The company submitted a Markov model that assessed the incremental cost effectiveness of CZP versus comparator biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) for the treatment of RA from the perspective of the National Health Service for three decision problems, each of which followed an inadequate response to a TNFi. These were (1) a comparison against rituximab (RTX) in combination with methotrexate (MTX); (2) a comparison against bDMARDs when RTX was contraindicated or withdrawn due to an adverse event; and (3) a comparison against bDMARDs when MTX was contraindicated or withdrawn due to an adverse event. Results from the company's economic evaluation showed that CZP resulted in a similar number of quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) produced at similar or lower costs compared with comparator b

  12. Long-term treatment of rheumatoid arthritis with adalimumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murdaca G

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Giuseppe Murdaca, Francesca Spanò, Francesco PuppoDepartment of Internal Medicine, Clinical Immunology Unit, University of Genoa, Genoa, ItalyAbstract: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic inflammatory disease that is associated with joint damage and progressive disability, an increased risk of morbidity related to comorbid conditions and substantial socioeconomic costs. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α is a proinflammatory cytokine known to have a central role in the initial host response to infection and in the pathogenesis of various immune-mediated diseases, such as RA, ankylosing spondylitis, psoriasis and/or psoriatic arthritis, Crohn’s disease, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Five TNF-α inhibitors are available for the clinical use: infliximab; adalimumab; etanercept; golimumab; and certolizumab pegol. Infliximab is a chimeric human/murine IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb; adalimumab, and golimumab are human mAbs; certolizumab pegol is composed of the fragment antigen-binding anti-binding domain of a humanized anti-TNF-α mAb, combined with polyethylene glycol to increase its half-life in the body; etanercept is a fusion protein that acts as a “decoy receptor” for TNF-α. In this paper, we will briefly review the current data on efficacy and safety of adalimumab in patients with RA, its potential beneficial effects upon comorbid conditions, such as endothelial dysfunction and accelerated atherosclerosis in RA, and the immunogenicity.Keywords: adalimumab, efficacy, safety, rheumatoid arthritis, VEGF, immunogenicity, infections

  13. Radiosynoviorthese in the treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drozdovskij, B.Ya.; Ikonnikov, A.I.; Krylov, V.V.

    1991-01-01

    Radiosynoviorthese, a new method for the treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, was developed. Altogether 260 patients with rheumatoid arthritis were treated. The therapeutic activity of radioactive colloid Au was administered intraarticularly to all the patients. Indications and contraindications for radiation therapy of rheumatoid arthritis were developed. Good short- and long-term results were noted in most of the patients after radiation therapy. Radiosynoviorthese as a method of local active therapy of affected joints with colloid Au in the multiple modality treatment of rheumatoid arthritis is effective; its prolonged stable therapeutic effect in patients is observed

  14. Methotrexate: the emerging drug of choice for serious rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salach, R H; Cash, J M

    1994-01-01

    The recently recognized high morbidity and unexpected mortality associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has spurred new interest in more aggressive, early treatment of this disease. Methotrexate (MTX) has rapidly become the rheumatologist's drug of choice for serious RA because of its favorable efficacy to toxicity ratio and rapid onset of action compared with other second-line agents. The initial concerns about hepatic fibrosis and cirrhosis in psoriatic patients has subsided somewhat as long-term liver toxicity data are accumulating in patients with RA. Routine liver biopsy with incremental doses of MTX is no longer recommended. Potential for severe lung, hematologic, and infectious complications exists, mandating careful monitoring of RA patients taking MTX.

  15. Smoking and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Chang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Smoking has been implicated as one of the most important extrinsic risk factors for its development and severity. Recent developments have shed light on the pathophysiology of RA in smokers, including oxidative stress, inflammation, autoantibody formation and epigenetic changes. The association of smoking and the development of RA have been demonstrated through epidemiologic studies, as well as through in vivo and animal models of RA. With increased use of biological agents in addition to standard disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs, there has been interest in how smoking affects drug response in RA treatment. Recent evidence suggests the response and drug survival in people treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF therapy is poorer in heavy smokers, and possible immunological mechanisms for this effect are presented in the current paper.

  16. Histologic effects of mandibular protrusion splints in antigen-induced TMJ arthritis in rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    von Bremen, Julia; K?hler, Kernt; Siudak, Krystyna; Zahner, Daniel; Ruf, Sabine

    2017-01-01

    Background Although it is common clinical practice to treat children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) with functional appliances, the scientific evidence for this is limited. The aim of this study was to study the histologic effects of mandibular protrusion splints in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthritis in rabbits. Methods Twenty-eight ten-week old New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into four groups: AO (TMJ arthritis, no splint), AS (TMJ arthritis, mandibular splint ...

  17. Dynamic contrast-enhanced, extremity-dedicated MRI identifies synovitis changes in the follow-up of rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with rituximab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cimmino, Marco A; Parodi, Massimiliano; Zampogna, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    according to the 1987 ACR criteria were treated with a single course of RTX (2 infusions of 1000 mg, 15 days apart). MRI of the dominant hand was performed with a 0.2T extremity-dedicated machine using pre and post contrast T1 weighted SE, turbo 3D, and STIR sequences at baseline, and after 4 and 24 weeks....... MRI was analysed using the OMERACT-RAMRIS score and the dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE-MRI) technique for wrist synovitis, which calculates the enhancement ratio as both rate of early enhancement (REE) and relative enhancement (RE). The corresponding ME and IRE parameters were calculated also through...

  18. Prognostic Factors Toward Clinically Relevant Radiographic Progression in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis in Clinical Practice: A Japanese Multicenter, Prospective Longitudinal Cohort Study for Achieving a Treat-to-Target Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Tomohiro; Okada, Akitomo; Fukuda, Takaaki; Hidaka, Toshihiko; Ishii, Tomonori; Ueki, Yukitaka; Kodera, Takao; Nakashima, Munetoshi; Takahashi, Yuichi; Honda, Seiyo; Horai, Yoshiro; Watanabe, Ryu; Okuno, Hiroshi; Aramaki, Toshiyuki; Izumiyama, Tomomasa; Takai, Osamu; Miyashita, Taiichiro; Sato, Shuntaro; Kawashiri, Shin-Ya; Iwamoto, Naoki; Ichinose, Kunihiro; Tamai, Mami; Origuchi, Tomoki; Nakamura, Hideki; Aoyagi, Kiyoshi; Eguchi, Katsumi; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2016-04-01

    To determine prognostic factors of clinically relevant radiographic progression (CRRP) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in clinical practice.We performed a multicenter prospective study in Japan of biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (bDMARD)-naive RA patients with moderate to high disease activity treated with conventional synthetic DMARDs (csDMARDs) at study entry. We longitudinally observed 408 patients for 1 year and assessed disease activity every 3 months. CRRP was defined as yearly progression of modified total Sharp score (mTSS) > 3.0 U. We also divided the cohort into 2 groups based on disease duration (<3 vs ≥3 years) and performed a subgroup analysis.CRRP was found in 10.3% of the patients. A multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that the independent variables to predict the development of CRRP were: CRP at baseline (0.30 mg/dL increase, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01-1.11), time-integrated Disease Activity Score in 28 joints-erythrocyte sedimentation rate (DAS28-ESR) during the 1 year postbaseline (12.4-unit increase, 95%CI 1.17-2.59), RA typical erosion at baseline (95%CI 1.56-21.1), and the introduction of bDMARDs (95%CI 0.06-0.38). The subgroup analysis revealed that time-integrated DAS28-ESR is not a predictor whereas the introduction of bDMARDs is a significant protective factor for CRRP in RA patients with disease duration <3 years.We identified factors that could be used to predict the development of CRRP in RA patients treated with DMARDs. These variables appear to be different based on the RA patients' disease durations.

  19. Medicines, injections, and supplements for arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthritis - medications; Arthritis - steroid injections; Arthritis - supplements; Arthritis - hyaluronic acid ... the-counter pain relievers can help with your arthritis symptoms. "Over-the-counter" means you can buy ...

  20. [Tuberculosis in rheumatic patients treated with tumour necrosis factor alpha antagonists: the Portuguese experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, João Eurico; Canhão, Helena; Silva, Cândida; Miguel, Cláudia; Mediavilla, Maria Jesus; Teixeira, Ana; Castelão, Walter; Nero, Patrícia; Bernardes, Miguel; Bernardo, Alexandra; Mariz, Eva; Godinho, Fátima; Santos, Maria José; Bogas, Mónica; Oliveira, Margarida; Saavedra, Maria João; Barcelos, Anabela; Cruz, Margarida; Santos, Rui André; Maurício, Luís; Rodrigues, Mário; Figueiredo, Guilherme; Quintal, Alberto; Patto, José Vaz; Malcata, Armando; da Silva, José Canas; Araújo, Domingos; Ventura, Francisco; Branco, Jaime; Queiroz, Mário Viana

    2006-01-01

    In Portugal, 13 cases of tuberculosis (TB) were reported, in the period between 1999 and 2005, in 960 patients exposed to anti-TNFalpha treatment (1.35%), 8 females and 5 males. Mean age was 46.7 +/- 13.8 years. 9 patients had rheumatoid arthritis (RA), in 639 exposed patients (1.4%), 3 had ankylosing spondylitis (AS), in 200 exposed patients (1.5%) and 1 had psoriatic arthritis (PA), in 101 exposed patients (1%). The anti-TNFa used was in 8 cases infliximab (in 456 patients exposed, 1.5%), in 4 adalimumab (in 171 patients exposed, 2.3%) and in 1 etanercept (in 333 exposed, 0.3%). Treatment with a biological agent was started 11.1 +/- 8.7 months (min 3 and max 50) before TB onset. Tuberculin skin test (TST) was performed in 9 out of the 13 patients (the other 4 had started biological therapy before 2002). In 3 cases the TST response was 0 mm, in 3 less than 10 mm, in one was 14 mm and in two 20 mm. In the 3 cases with a TST response superior to 10 mm, isoniazid treatment 300 mg/d was prescribed, during 9 months. The time between first symptoms and TB diagnosis was 2.6 +/- 2.9 months. TB involvement was pulmonary in 6 patients, lymph node disease in 2, peritoneal and pulmonary in 2, osteoarticular in one case, lymph node disease and splenic in another and miliar TB in the last case. One death was reported; all of the other cases had a good outcome after anti-TB treatment. In two cases (one treated with adalimumab and the other with infliximab), paradoxical response to treatment occurred. None of the patients has restarted biological therapy after TB treatment.