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Sample records for treating plantar fasciitis

  1. Sonographic evaluation of plantar fasciitis

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    Yoon, Sook Ja; Choi, Yun Sun; Tien, Kuang Lung; Jung, Hye Jeon; Lee, Kyoung Tae; Yoon, Yong Kyu [Eulji College of Medicine Eulji Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-03-01

    To evaluate the sonographic findings of plantar fasciitis. Both feet of 30 patients(mean age, 44years) in whom plantar fasciitis had been clinically diagnosed, and those of healthy volunteers(mean age, 34years) were evaluated with ultrasound(US) using a 7.0MHz linear array transducer. Heel pain was unilateral in 26 patients and bilateral in four. Sagittal sonograms were obtained in the prone position, and the thickness of the plantar fascia was measured at its proximal end near its insertion into the calcaneus. We also evaluated hypoechoic fascia, perifascial fluid collection, fiber rupture, calcaneal spur and calcifications. Plantar fascia thickness was significantly greater in the heels of patients with plantar fasciitis(3.2-8mm; mean, 5.1{+-}1.12) than in their asymptomatic heels(1.3-5mm; mean, 3.5{+-}0.78)(p<0.0001), in which it was similar to that of heels of patients in the control group(1.8-5mm; mean, 3.0{+-}0.71)(p<0.0001). The proximal plantar fascia was hypoechoic in 31 symptomatic heels(91.2%), in four asymptomatic heels(15.4%), and in none of the patients in the control group. Calcaneal spurs were identified in sixteen symptomatic heels(47.1%), and in two which were asymptomatic(7.7%). Perifascial fluid collection was identified in only two symptomatic heels(5.9%). In plantar fasciitis, sonography demonstrates that the fascia is thicker as well as hypoechic. For the clinical diagnosis of planter fasciitis, US can therefore be used as an adjunct to clinical diagnosis.

  2. Comparison of radial shockwaves and conventional physiotherapy for treating plantar fasciitis

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    Júlia Maria D'Andréa Greve

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare radial shockwave treatment and conventional physiotherapy for plantar fasciitis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-two patients with plantar fasciitis were included in this study. They were randomly divided into two groups. Group 1 was composed of 16 patients who underwent 10 physiotherapy sessions each, consisting of ultrasound, kinesiotherapy and instruction for stretching exercises at home. Group 2 was composed of 16 patients who underwent three applications of radial shockwaves (once a week and received instruction for stretching exercises at home. Pain and ability to function were evaluated before treatment, immediately afterwards, and three months later. The mean age of the patients was 47.3 ± 10.3 years (range 25-68; 81% were female, 87% were overweight, 56% had bilateral impairment, and 75% used analgesics regularly. RESULTS: Both treatments were effective for pain reduction and for improving the functional abilities of patients with plantar fasciitis. The effect of the shockwaves was apparent sooner than physiotherapy after the onset of treatment. CONCLUSION: Shockwave treatment was no more effective than conventional physiotherapy treatment when evaluated three months after the end of treatment.

  3. Comparison Of Medial Arch-Supporting Insoles And Heel Pads In The Treatment Of Plantar Fasciitis

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    Malkoc Melih

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Plantar fasciitis is a disorder caused by inflammation of the insertion point of the plantar fascia over the medial tubercle of the calcaneus. Foot orthotics are used to treat plantar fasciitis. Heel pads medialise the centre of force, whereas medial arch supporting insoles lateralise the force. We assessed the clinical results of the treatment of plantar fasciitis with silicone heel pads and medial arch-supported silicone insoles.

  4. Plantar pain is not always fasciitis

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    N. Romano

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The case is described of a patient with chronic plantar pain, diagnosed as fasciitis, which was not improved by conventional treatment. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed flexor hallucis longus tenosynovitis, which improved after local glucocorticoid injection.

  5. Complications of extracorporeal shockwave therapy in plantar fasciitis : Systematic review

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    Roerdink, R L; Dietvorst, M; van der Zwaard, B; van der Worp, H; Zwerver, J

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) seems to be an effective treatment for plantar fasciitis (PF) and is assumed to be safe. No systematic reviews have been published that specifically studied the complications and side effects of ESWT in treating PF. Aim of this systematic review is

  6. Plantar fascia softening in plantar fasciitis with normal B-mode sonography.

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    Wu, Chueh-Hung; Chen, Wen-Shiang; Wang, Tyng-Guey

    2015-11-01

    To investigate plantar fascia elasticity in patients with typical clinical manifestations of plantar fasciitis but normal plantar fascia morphology on B-mode sonography. Twenty patients with plantar fasciitis (10 unilateral and 10 bilateral) and 30 healthy volunteers, all with normal plantar fascia morphology on B-mode sonography, were included in the study. Plantar fascia elasticity was evaluated by sonoelastographic examination. All sonoelastograms were quantitatively analyzed, and less red pixel intensity was representative of softer tissue. Pixel intensity was compared among unilateral plantar fasciitis patients, bilateral plantar fasciitis patients, and healthy volunteers by one-way ANOVA. A post hoc Scheffé's test was used to identify where the differences occurred. Compared to healthy participants (red pixel intensity: 146.9 ± 9.1), there was significantly less red pixel intensity in the asymptomatic sides of unilateral plantar fasciitis (140.4 ± 7.3, p = 0.01), symptomatic sides of unilateral plantar fasciitis (127.1 ± 7.4, p fascia thickness or green or blue pixel intensity among these groups. Sonoelastography revealed that the plantar fascia is softer in patients with typical clinical manifestations of plantar fasciitis, even if they exhibit no abnormalities on B-mode sonography.

  7. Strength training for plantar fasciitis and the intrinsic foot musculature: A systematic review.

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    Huffer, Dean; Hing, Wayne; Newton, Richard; Clair, Mike

    2017-03-01

    The aim was to critically evaluate the literature investigating strength training interventions in the treatment of plantar fasciitis and improving intrinsic foot musculature strength. A search of PubMed, CINHAL, Web of Science, SPORTSDiscus, EBSCO Academic Search Complete and PEDRO using the search terms plantar fasciitis, strength, strengthening, resistance training, intrinsic flexor foot, resistance training. Seven articles met the eligibility criteria. Methodological quality was assessed using the modified Downs and Black checklist. All articles showed moderate to high quality, however external validity was low. A comparison of the interventions highlights significant differences in strength training approaches to treating plantar fasciitis and improving intrinsic strength. It was not possible to identify the extent to which strengthening interventions for intrinsic musculature may benefit symptomatic or at risk populations to plantar fasciitis. There is limited external validity that foot exercises, toe flexion against resistance and minimalist running shoes may contribute to improved intrinsic foot musculature function. Despite no plantar fascia thickness changes being observed through high-load plantar fascia resistance training there are indications that it may aid in a reduction of pain and improvements in function. Further research should use standardised outcome measures to assess intrinsic foot musculature strength and plantar fasciitis symptoms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Ultrasound-guided injection for plantar fasciitis: A brief review

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    A S Nair

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Plantar fasciitis (PF is a distressing condition experienced by many patients. Although self-limiting, it tends to become a chronic ailment if the precipitating factors are not addressed. One of the modality of treating PF is intra-lesional corticosteroid injection. This was done using palpation technique earlier but nowadays many specialists use ultrasound (US imaging as a guide to give injection accurately instead of inadvertently damaging the plantar fascia or injecting into surrounding soft tissue, both of which can have serious implications. We did a literature search in Medline, Scopus, and Embase databases to find out articles describing US-guided corticosteroid injection for treating PF and whether guided injection was effective than injection given by palpation.

  9. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy for treatment of plantar fasciitis

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    Dastgir, N.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effect of extracorporeal shock wave therapy in patients with chronic plantar faciitis. Methods: The prospective study was conducted at Department of Orhopaedic, Regional Hospital, Limerick, Ireland from January to December 2004 and comprised 70 heels in 62 patients with chronic plantar fasciitis in whom conventional conservative treatment consisting of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, heel cup, orthoses and/or shoe modifications, local steroid injections had failed, and they were treated with low energy extracorporeal shock wave therapy. Patients were reviewed at 6, 12 and 24 weeks post treatment. Results: At follow-up there was significant decrease in pain on the visual analogue scale (p<0.027), with significant improvement in pain score (p<0.009) and in functional score (p<0.001). The comfortable walking distance had increased significantly and there were no reported side effects. Conclusion: Extracorporeal shock wave therapy is a new modality providing good pain relief and a satisfactory clinical outcome in patients with chronic plantar fasciitis. (author)

  10. Lateral plantar nerve release with or without calcaneal drilling for resistant plantar fasciitis.

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    Sadek, Ahmed Fathy; Fouly, Ezzat Hassan; Elian, Mostafa Mohammed

    2015-08-01

    To compare the outcome following lateral plantar nerve release with or without calcaneal drilling for resistant plantar fasciitis. 30 women and 3 men aged 30 to 60 (mean, 45) years with resistant plantar fasciitis were randomised to undergo release of the first branch of the lateral plantar nerve with (group 1, n=18) or without (group 2, n=15) calcaneal drilling. Patients were followed up for a mean of 27 months. According to the modified Mayo scoring system for plantar fasciotomy, group 1 was superior to group 2 in terms of score (93.9±6.97 vs. 83±8.2, pcalcaneal drilling to release of the first branch of the lateral plantar nerve achieves better outcome than release alone in patients with resistant plantar fasciitis.

  11. [Percutaneous surgery for plantar fasciitis due to a calcaneal spur].

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    Apóstol-González, Saúl; Herrera, Jesús

    2009-01-01

    Determine the efficacy of percutaneous surgical treatment for talalgia due to a calcaneal spur. This is an observational, descriptive, clinical series analyzing the outcomes of 10 patients with a diagnosis of talalgia due to plantar fasciitis with a calcaneal spur treated with percutaneous foot surgery. The end result was assessed with a visual analog scale (VAS) to measure pain, the patients' opinion and their return to activities of daily living. Central tendency and scatter measurements were calculated. The inferential analysis was done with the non-parametric chi square (chi2) test. Most patients were females (90%) and mean age was 40.5 years. Follow-up was 12 months. One patient had bleeding of the approached area. Pain was reduced from 8 to 1.5 in the VAS. Nine patients returned to their activities. Two patients had occasional mild pain upon prolonged bipedestation. Ninety percent of results were satisfactory. Percutaneous foot surgery in talalgias caused by plantar fasciitis due to a calcaneal spur is a simple and effective method. It reduces the operative time and allows for an early return of patients to their activities of daily living.

  12. Classification of Calcaneal Spurs and Their Relationship With Plantar Fasciitis.

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    Zhou, Binghua; Zhou, You; Tao, Xu; Yuan, Chengsong; Tang, Kanglai

    2015-01-01

    Calcaneal spurs, as a cause of plantar fasciitis, are currently debatable. A prospective study was performed to classify calcaneal spurs according to the findings from an investigation of the relationship between calcaneal spurs and plantar fasciitis. Thirty patients with calcaneal spurs and plantar heel pain underwent calcaneal spur removal and endoscopic plantar fasciotomy. The relationship between the classification of calcaneal spurs and plantar fasciitis was evaluated by endoscopic findings, clinical symptoms, radiographic images, and biopsy findings. The visual analog scale for pain and the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot scores for functional evaluation were used preoperatively and postoperatively, respectively. The mean follow-up period was 24 months. Two separate types of calcaneal spurs were recognized. Type A calcaneal spurs were located superior to the plantar fascia insertion, and type B calcaneal spurs were located within the plantar fascia. Magnetic resonance imaging results showed a more severe plantar fasciitis grade in type B calcaneal spurs preoperatively. Histologic examination showed that the numbers of granulocytes per image in type B spurs were significantly increased compared with those in type A spurs. Statistically significant improvements were found in the mean visual analog scale and American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society scores and magnetic resonance imaging results in both groups. The amount of change in the visual analog scale score and American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society score, the number of granulocytes per image, and calcaneal spur length showed a high association with the classification of the calcaneal spurs. Calcaneal spurs were completely removed and did not recur in any of the patients on radiographic assessment during the follow-up period. Calcaneal spurs can be classified into 2 distinct types that are indicative of the severity of plantar fasciitis. Copyright © 2015 American College of

  13. Heel lipoma mimicking plantar fasciitis in a ballroom dancer.

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    Taweel, Nicholas R; Raikin, Steven M

    2015-01-01

    The present case illustrates a lipoma as an unusual cause of heel pain. A 64-year-old female ballroom dancer presented with 8 months of pain that was unresponsive to previous treatment of plantar fasciitis. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a heel lipoma. Her pain was fully resolved after surgical excision. Soft tissue tumors should be included in the differential diagnosis of heel pain, especially when symptoms and treatment response do not follow the typical course of plantar fasciitis. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. LOCAL CORTICOSTEROID VS. AUTOLOGOUS BLOOD FOR PLANTAR FASCIITIS

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    Syam Sunder B

    2017-01-01

    corticosteroid injection. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of 120 patients who attended Orthopaedic OPD at Government General Hospital, Kakinada, during the time spanning January 2015 to December 2015, who were suffering from plantar fasciitis were randomly allocated either autologous blood injection or corticosteroid injection as treatment. Both groups were analysed with VAS and Nirschl pain staging at presentation, 1 st week, 4 th week, 12 th week and at six-month intervals. Results were tabulated and analysed statistically. All patients were treated on OPD basis. No inpatient care was needed in any patient. RESULTS In this study, slight male preponderance was seen in both the groups (53.33%. The mean in group A was 41.80±10.96 years and in group B the mean age was 40.68±10.47 years. Most of the patients in group A and B presented with right foot involvement (51.67% and 65.00%. The mean duration in group A was 10.88 weeks compared to 8.62 weeks in group B. The mean VAS scores at the beginning were comparable in both the groups (7.55±1.40 vs. 7.70±1.14. At fourth week, the mean VAS score in group A significantly reduced to 3.18±2.38 and at 12 weeks and six months to 0.3±1.37 suggesting significantly less pain in group A compared to group B. Similar trend of reduction among patients is group A was observed with Nirschl staging scores. No patient in group A reported complications and recurrence was not observed in patients with group A. CONCLUSION Based on the results of our present study, it maybe concluded that autologous blood injection significantly reduced the pain based on VAS and Nirschl staging without complications there by lowering the recurrence rate up to six months in patients with plantar fasciitis. It also provided complete relief of pain for the period of six months without any complication. Autologous blood is simple to acquire and prepare, easy to carry out. Hence, autologous blood provides intermediate and long-term results in term of pain relief when

  15. Plantar fasciitis/calcaneal spur among security forces personnel.

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    Sadat-Ali, M

    1998-01-01

    A prospective single survey was conducted among Security Forces personnel at the Mobile Hospital, Ministry of Interior, Makkah Al-Mukarramah, Saudi Arabia. One hundred three patients presented to the orthopedic clinic with painful heel. A control group of patients from the other clinics without painful heel was also screened. The average age was 38.81 years and 38.1 years in the patient and the control group, respectively. The mean Quetelet index of body mass in the patient group was 30.36 kg/m2 and in the control group it was 26.71 kg/m2. There was a statistically significant difference of p spur on the calcaneum. The prevalence of painful heel attributable to plantar fasciitis/calcaneum spur was 1.18%. This study suggests that obesity is a cause and initiator of heel pain and plantar fasciitis/calcaneal spur and that improper footwear aggravates the condition.

  16. The Effects of Prolotherapy in Recreational Athletes with Plantar Fasciitis

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    Ali Haydar Apaydın

    2018-03-01

    Results: When pre- and post-treatment values were compared; a statistically significant difference was found between the scores of visual pain scale, foot and ankle outcome score and balance coordination test (p<0.01. Conclusion: According to the results of the research, one can conclude that the application of prolotherapy provides symptomatic and functional improvement in recreational athletes with plantar fasciitis. Prolotherapy application seems to be an alternative treatment method in patients who have not been healed by conservative treatment.

  17. Plantar fasciitis and the calcaneal spur: Fact or fiction?

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    Johal, K S; Milner, S A

    2012-03-01

    Plantar fasciitis is a common diagnosis in patients presenting with heel pain. The presence of co-existing calcaneal spurs has often been reported but confusion exists as to whether it is a casual or significant association. The lateral heel radiographs of nineteen patients with a diagnosis of plantar fasciitis and nineteen comparison subjects with a lateral ankle ligament sprain matched for age and sex, were reviewed independently by two observers. Objective measurements of calcaneal spur length and a subjective grading of spur size were recorded. There was a significantly higher prevalence of calcaneal spurs in the cases than the comparison group (89% versus 32%; McNemar chi-square=9.09, df=2, p=0.00257). There was good inter- and intra-observer agreement. The current study has demonstrated a significant association between plantar fasciitis and calcaneal spur formation. Further research is warranted to assess whether the association is causal. Copyright © 2011 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Sonographic evaluation of plantar fasciitis and relation to body mass index

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    Ozdemir, Huseyin; Yilmaz, Erhan; Murat, Ayse; Karakurt, Lokman; Poyraz, A. Kursad; Ogur, Erkin

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: We have investigated the role of sonography in the diagnosis of plantar fasciitis. Materials and methods: This study evaluates 39 patients with plantar fasciitis and control group of 22 healthy volunteers. The plantar fascia thickness was measured 5 mm distal to the insertion of the calcaneus of plantar aponeurosis. Qualitative parameters such as decreased echogenity, biconvexity, perifascial fluid and calcification of plantar fascia were also noted. Results: Mean plantar fascia thickness was measured 2.9 mm in patients with unilateral heel pain, 2.2 mm for contralateral normal heel and 2.5 mm for control group. There was a statistically significant difference between heel with plantar fasciitis, contralateral normal heel and control groups (p = 0.009 and 0.0001, respectively). Mean body mass index was 28 kg/m 2 in patients with heel pain and 25 kg/m 2 in control group. Body mass index measurements were significantly different between plantar fasciitis and control groups. We found reduced plantar fascia echogenity in 16 cases (41%), calcaneal spur in 20 cases (51%), biconvex appearance in two cases (5.1%) and perifascial fluid in one case (2.5%). Conclusion: We conclude that in patients with plantar fasciitis, ultrasound may detect relatively small differences in plantar fascia thickness even in clinically unequivocal plantar fasciitis

  19. Sonographic evaluation of plantar fasciitis and relation to body mass index

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    Ozdemir, Huseyin [Department of Radiology Firat University, Faculty of Medicine, Elazig 23119 (Turkey)]. E-mail: ozdemir@firat.edu.tr; Yilmaz, Erhan [Department Orthopedic Firat University, Faculty of Medicine, Elazig (Turkey); Murat, Ayse [Department of Radiology Firat University, Faculty of Medicine, Elazig 23119 (Turkey); Karakurt, Lokman [Department Orthopedic Firat University, Faculty of Medicine, Elazig (Turkey); Poyraz, A. Kursad [Department of Radiology Firat University, Faculty of Medicine, Elazig 23119 (Turkey); Ogur, Erkin [Department of Radiology Firat University, Faculty of Medicine, Elazig 23119 (Turkey)

    2005-06-01

    Purpose: We have investigated the role of sonography in the diagnosis of plantar fasciitis. Materials and methods: This study evaluates 39 patients with plantar fasciitis and control group of 22 healthy volunteers. The plantar fascia thickness was measured 5 mm distal to the insertion of the calcaneus of plantar aponeurosis. Qualitative parameters such as decreased echogenity, biconvexity, perifascial fluid and calcification of plantar fascia were also noted. Results: Mean plantar fascia thickness was measured 2.9 mm in patients with unilateral heel pain, 2.2 mm for contralateral normal heel and 2.5 mm for control group. There was a statistically significant difference between heel with plantar fasciitis, contralateral normal heel and control groups (p = 0.009 and 0.0001, respectively). Mean body mass index was 28 kg/m{sup 2} in patients with heel pain and 25 kg/m{sup 2} in control group. Body mass index measurements were significantly different between plantar fasciitis and control groups. We found reduced plantar fascia echogenity in 16 cases (41%), calcaneal spur in 20 cases (51%), biconvex appearance in two cases (5.1%) and perifascial fluid in one case (2.5%). Conclusion: We conclude that in patients with plantar fasciitis, ultrasound may detect relatively small differences in plantar fascia thickness even in clinically unequivocal plantar fasciitis.

  20. Effectiveness of local tenoxicam versus corticosteroid injection for plantar fasciitis treatment.

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    Guner, Savas; Onder, Haci; Guner, Sukriye Ilkay; Ceylan, Mehmet Fethi; Gökalp, Mehmet Ata; Keskin, Siddik

    2013-10-01

    Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common causes of foot pain in adults. In this prospective study, the outcomes of local tenoxicam injection and corticosteroid therapy for the treatment of plantar fasciitis were compared. Patients were randomly assigned to either the tenoxicam or corticosteroid group. The tenoxicam group (n=31) was treated using a local injection of 1 mL of tenoxicam (20 mg/2 mL) and 1 mL of 2% lidocaine, whereas the steroid group (n=30) was treated with a local 1-mL injection containing 40 mg of methylprednisolone acetate and 1 mL of 2% lidocaine. Clinical evaluations, which were performed before the injection and 6 and 12 months after the injection, consisted of patient-assessed pain using a visual analog scale. In addition, patient satisfaction was measured using the Roles and Maudsley score. Comparison of pre- and posttreatment visual analog scale scores demonstrated a statistically significant difference in both groups (P.05). The tenoxicam injection was not significantly more effective than the corticosteroid injection. However, both methods were effective and successful in treating patients with plantar fasciitis. Tenoxicam therapy appears to provide pain relief, but its effectiveness in the long term should be explored in additional studies. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Ultrasound guided injection of dexamethasone versus placebo for treatment of plantar fasciitis: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

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    Gilheany Mark F

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plantar fasciitis is the most commonly reported cause of chronic pain beneath the heel. Management of this condition commonly involves the use of corticosteroid injection in cases where less invasive treatments have failed. However, despite widespread use, only two randomised trials have tested the effect of this treatment in comparison to placebo. These trials currently offer the best available evidence by which to guide clinical practice, though both were limited by methodological issues such as insufficient statistical power. Therefore, the aim of this randomised trial is to compare the effect of ultrasound-guided corticosteroid injection versus placebo for treatment of plantar fasciitis. Methods The trial will be conducted at the La Trobe University Podiatry Clinic and will recruit 80 community-dwelling participants. Diagnostic ultrasound will be used to diagnose plantar fasciitis and participants will be required to meet a range of selection criteria. Participants will be randomly allocated to one of two treatment arms: (i ultrasound-guided injection of the plantar fascia with 1 mL of 4 mg/mL dexamethasone sodium phosphate (experimental group, or (ii ultrasound-guided injection of the plantar fascia with 1 mL normal saline (control group. Blinding will be applied to participants and the investigator performing procedures, measuring outcomes and analysing data. Primary outcomes will be pain measured by the Foot Health Status Questionnaire and plantar fascia thickness measured by ultrasound at 4, 8 and 12 weeks. All data analyses will be conducted on an intention-to-treat basis. Conclusion This will be a randomised trial investigating the effect of dexamethasone injection on pre-specified treatment outcomes in people with plantar fasciitis. Within the parameters of this protocol, the trial findings will be used to make evidence-based recommendations regarding the use of corticosteroid injection for treatment of this

  2. Physiotherapy for plantar fasciitis: a UK-wide survey of current practice.

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    Grieve, Rob; Palmer, Shea

    2017-06-01

    To identify how United Kingdom (UK) physiotherapists currently diagnose, assess and manage plantar fasciitis in routine practice. Online questionnaire survey. Practising physiotherapists across the UK who treat patients with plantar fasciitis. Physiotherapists were approached via 'interactive Chartered Society of Physiotherapy (CSP)' online networks and an email database of clinical educators in South West England. An online questionnaire was developed by reviewing similar existing physiotherapy surveys and consultation with experienced musculoskeletal researchers/clinicians. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse the data. 285 physiotherapists responded, with 257 complete survey responses. Pain on palpation and early morning pain were the most common diagnostic criteria, with some physiotherapists using no formal test criteria. Advice (237/257, 92%), plantar fasciitis pathology education (207/257, 81%) and general stretching exercises (189/257, 74%) were most routinely used. Prefabricated orthotics, custom made orthotics and night splints were seldom always used. For the manual therapy approach, the most frequently used modalities were massage, myofascial release, specific soft tissue mobilisations and myofascial trigger point therapy. Commonly used outcome measures were pain assessment, functional tests and range of movement. Physiotherapists appeared to follow most of the established diagnostic criteria for PF, but have not followed established outcome measure guidelines. Advice as well as education with an emphasis on self-management including calf/hamstring stretching was the most commonly reported treatment approach. There was uncertainty whether this approach accurately reflected clinical practice used throughout the UK, owing to potential response bias/unknown response rate and the low number of patients with PF treated by the respondents. Copyright © 2016 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. How effective is acupuncture for reducing pain due to plantar fasciitis?

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    Thiagarajah, Anandan Gerard

    2017-02-01

    Plantar fasciitis is a commonly seen outpatient condition that has numerous treatment modalities of varying degrees of efficacy. This systematic review aimed to determine the effectiveness of acupuncture in reducing pain caused by plantar fasciitis. Online literature searches were performed on the PubMed and Cochrane Library databases for studies on the use of acupuncture for pain caused by plantar fasciitis. Studies designed as randomised controlled trials and that compared acupuncture with standard treatments or had real versus sham acupuncture arms were selected. The Delphi list was used to assess the methodological quality of the studies retrieved. Three studies that compared acupuncture with standard treatment and one study on real versus sham acupuncture were found. These showed that acupuncture significantly reduced pain levels in patients with plantar fasciitis, as measured on the visual analogue scale and the Plantar Fasciitis Pain/Disability Scale. These benefits were noted between four and eight weeks of treatment, with no further significant reduction in pain beyond this duration. Side effects were found to be minimal. Although acupuncture may reduce plantar fasciitis pain in the short term, there is insufficient evidence for a definitive conclusion regarding its effectiveness in the longer term. Further research is required to strengthen the acceptance of acupuncture among healthcare providers. Copyright: © Singapore Medical Association

  4. [Case-control study of stretching exercise on treatment of plantar fasciitis].

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    Wu, Chun-wei; Zheng, Ping; Wu, Jian; Lu, Jie; Yan, An

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate the effect of different methods of physical therapy on plantar fasciitis. From June 2009 to March 2012,30 patients with plantar fasciitis were randomly divided into 3 groups including phonophoresis (PH) combined with stretching exercise, ultrasound (US) combined with stretching exercise,stretching exercise, 10 patiens in each group. In stretching exercise group, there were 2 males and 8 females with an average age of (46.7+/-6.5) years old,the mean constitutional index duration was (26.7+/-2.8) kg/m2. In US combined with stretching exercise group, there were 4 males and 6 females with an average age of (45.8+/-6.1) years old,the mean constitutional index duration was (26.4+/-3.4) kg/m2. In PH combined with stretching exercise group,there were 3 males and 7 females with an average age of (48.4+/-8.0) years old,the mean constitutional index duration was (25.4+/-3.0) kg/m2. Patients in PH and US were treated for 10 min everyday by ultrasound, 5 times per week, lasted for 4 weeks; and patients by ultrasound therapy in PH were treated with diclofenac diethylamine at the same time. All the 30 patients received instruction for stretching exercises at home. Pain and ability to function were evaluated before treatment, immediately afterwards,and three months later. Morning pain was evaluated by VAS, and the sub-scale of FFI evaluated the affected foot function. Patients's general status and original pain state of plantar fasciitis before treatment had no significant difference among three groups. There were statistical differences of morning pain and FFI-disability score between PH group and stretching exercise group at 1 month (P0.05). Compared with before therapy,the pain and disability score of three groups significantly improved in the three points of time (PStretching exercises and combining with PH or US are effective for pain and disability in patients with plantar fasciitis and that addition of PH to exercise therapy betters the effectiveness.

  5. Effectiveness of Plantar Fascia-Specific Stretching Exercises in Plantar Fasciitis

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    Devrim Özer

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Plantar fasciitis (PF is a painful and disabling disease that affects the quality of life and daily activities of patients and it is the most common cause of heel pain in adults. In primary treatment, conservative treatment is suggested and different conservative options are described in the literature. In our study, we evaluated the efficacy of plantar fascia-specific stretching exercises in the treatment of PF. Methods: Twenty-nine feet - 21 patients with the mean age of 49.3 years were included in the study. The mean length of follow-up was 19.8 months and the mean length of exercise period was 4.94 months. Non-weight bearing plantar fascia-specific stretching exercise was done twice daily, for 10 times at each session. In addition to exercises, silicone heel pad and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID were added. Visual analog scale (VAS was used for pain evaluation. Results: Full recovery detected in 15 feet in 10 patients (52% and a decrease in pain was seen in 10 feet in 8 patients (34%. There was no response in 4 feet in 3 patients (14%. There was statistically significant difference between pre-treatment and post-treatment visual analog scale scores (p=0.0001. Conclusion: Plantar fascia-specific stretching exercise is an effective treatment option in PF.

  6. Relationship between tightness of the posterior muscles of the lower limb and plantar fasciitis.

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    Bolívar, Yolanda Aranda; Munuera, Pedro V; Padillo, Juan Polo

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether tightness of the posterior muscles of the lower extremity was associated with plantar fasciitis. A total of 100 lower limbs of 100 subjects, 50 with plantar fasciitis and 50 matching controls were recruited. Hamstring and calf muscles were evaluated through the straight leg elevation test, popliteal angle test, and ankle dorsiflexion (knee extended and with the knee flexed). All variables were compared between the 2 groups. In addition, ROC curves, sensitivity, and specificity of the muscle contraction tests were also calculated to determine their potential predictive powers. Differences between the 2 groups for the tests used to assess muscular shortening were significant (P muscles of the lower limb was present in the plantar fasciitis patients, but not in the unaffected participants. The results of this study suggest that therapists who are going to employ a stretching protocol for treatment of plantar fasciitis should look for both hamstring as well as triceps surae tightness. Stretching exercise programs could be recommended for treatment of plantar fasciitis, focusing on stretching the triceps surae and hamstrings, apart from an adequate tissue-specific plantar fascia-stretching protocol. Level III, case control study.

  7. Dry cupping for plantar fasciitis: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Weiqing; Leson, Chelsea; Vukovic, Corey

    2017-05-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of dry cupping on pain and function of patients with plantar fasciitis. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-nine subjects (age 15 to 59 years old, 20 females and 9 males), randomly assigned into the two groups (dry cupping therapy and electrical stimulation therapy groups), participated in this study. The research design was a randomized controlled trial (RCT). Treatments were provided to the subjects twice a week for 4 weeks. Outcome measurements included the Visual Analogue Pain Scale (VAS) (at rest, first in the morning, and with activities), the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM), the Lower Extremity Functional Scale (LEFS), as well as the pressure pain threshold. [Results]The data indicated that both dry cupping therapy and electrical stimulation therapy could reduce pain and increase function significantly in the population tested, as all the 95% Confidence Intervals (CIs) did not include 0 except for the pressure pain threshold. There was no significant difference between the dry cupping therapy and electrical stimulation groups in all the outcome measurements. [Conclusion] These results support that both dry cupping therapy and electrical stimulation therapy could reduce pain and increase function in the population tested.

  8. Finite element modelling of radial shock wave therapy for chronic plantar fasciitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhamaali, Zaied K; Crocombe, Andrew D; Solan, Matthew C; Cirovic, Srdjan

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic use of high-amplitude pressure waves, or shock wave therapy (SWT), is emerging as a popular method for treating musculoskeletal disorders. However, the mechanism(s) through which this technique promotes healing are unclear. Finite element models of a shock wave source and the foot were constructed to gain a better understanding of the mechanical stimuli that SWT produces in the context of plantar fasciitis treatment. The model of the shock wave source was based on the geometry of an actual radial shock wave device, in which pressure waves are generated through the collision of two metallic objects: a projectile and an applicator. The foot model was based on the geometry reconstructed from magnetic resonance images of a volunteer and it comprised bones, cartilage, soft tissue, plantar fascia, and Achilles tendon. Dynamic simulations were conducted of a single and of two successive shock wave pulses administered to the foot. The collision between the projectile and the applicator resulted in a stress wave in the applicator. This wave was transmitted into the soft tissue in the form of compression-rarefaction pressure waves with an amplitude of the order of several MPa. The negative pressure at the plantar fascia reached values of over 1.5 MPa, which could be sufficient to generate cavitation in the tissue. The results also show that multiple shock wave pulses may have a cumulative effect in terms of strain energy accumulation in the foot.

  9. [Calcaneus fractures as a complication of the percutaneous treatment of plantar fasciitis. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apóstol-González, S; Herrera, J; Herrera, I

    2014-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis, a self-limiting pathologic entity, is a common cause of heel pain in adult patients. Surgical treatment is indicated when the patient does not improve after receiving conservative treatment for 4-6 months with proper surveillance. The complications of percutaneous techniques include: infection, persistent pain, and neurologic injuries, among others. We report the case of a patient with calcaneus fracture following percutaneous plantar fasciotomy and resection of a calcaneal spur. We conducted a review and discussion of the literature.

  10. Dry needling in patients with chronic heel pain due to plantar fasciitis: A single-blinded randomized clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftekharsadat, Bina; Babaei-Ghazani, Arash; Zeinolabedinzadeh, Vahideh

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study examined the effects of dry needling on chronic heel pain due to plantar fasciitis. Methods: During this single-blinded clinical trial, 20 eligible patients were randomized into two groups: A case group treated with dry needling and a control group. Patients’ plantar pain severity, (using modified visual analog scale [VAS] scoring system), range of motion of ankle joint in dorsiflexion [ROMDF] and plantar extension[ROMPE] and foot function index (using standard questionnaires of SEM5 and MDC7) were assessed at baseline, four weeks after intervention and four weeks after withdrawing treatment. Independent sample t-test, Mann-Whitney U test, paired t-test, Wilcoxon signed rank tests, and chi square test were used for data analysis. Results: The mean VAS scores in the case group was significantly lower than the control group after four weeks of intervention (pdry needling, by improving the severity of heel pain, can be used as a good alternative option before proceeding to more invasive therapies of plantar fasciitis. PMID:27683642

  11. A COMPARITIVE STUDY ON EFFECTIVENESS OF TAPING WITH IONTOPHORESIS AND TAPING ALONE IN CHRONIC PLANTAR FASCITIS

    OpenAIRE

    Biju Chetri; U.T. Ifthikar Ali; Madhusmita Koch; Abhijit Dutta

    2016-01-01

    Background: Plantar fasciitis is a painful condition caused by microtrauma to plantar fascia due to overuse. It is a most common cause of heel pain in runners. Various studies proved taping and Iontophoresis as effective in the treating plantar fasciitis. But there are no studies comparing the combined effect of iontophoresis with taping and taping alone in the treatment of plantar fasciitis. Methods: 50 patients suffering from plantar fasciitis who met the inclusion criteria were selected...

  12. Applicability of contrast-enhanced ultrasound in the diagnosis of plantar fasciitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broholm, Rikke; Pingel, Jessica; Simonsen, Lene

    2017-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) is used to visualize the microvascularisation in various tissues. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether CEUS could be used to visualize the microvascular volume (MV) in the plantar fascia, and to compare the method to clinical symptoms and B......-mode ultrasound (US) in patients with plantar fasciitis (PF). 20 patients with unilateral PF were included and were divided by US in insertional thickening (10), midsubstance thickening (5) and no US changes (5). The MV was measured simultaneously in both heels. Four areas in the plantar fascia and plantar fat...... pad were measured independently by two observers. Inter- and intra-observer correlation analyses were performed. The asymptomatic heels showed a constantly low MV, and for the whole group of patients a significantly higher MV was found in the symptomatic plantar fascia and plantar fat pad. Inter...

  13. Efficiency of Combined Treatment of Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy and Kinesiotape Application on Patients with Plantar Fasciitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabriye Ercan

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions: Extracorporeal shock wave therapy lowers pain scores of plantar fasciitis patients in three weeks. Kinesiotape application in addition to extracorporeal shock wave therapy treatment does not provide additional profit.

  14. Plantar fasciitis and calcaneal spur formation are associated with abductor digiti minimi atrophy on MRI of the foot

    OpenAIRE

    Chundru, Usha; Liebeskind, Amy; Seidelmann, Frank; Fogel, Joshua; Franklin, Peter; Beltran, Javier

    2008-01-01

    Objective To determine the association of atrophy of the abductor digiti minimi muscle (ADMA), an MRI manifestation of chronic compression of the inferior calcaneal nerve suggesting the clinical diagnosis of Baxter?s neuropathy, with MRI markers of potential etiologies, including calcaneal spur formation, plantar fasciitis, calcaneal edema, Achilles tendinosis and posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD). Materials and methods Prevalence of calcaneal spur formation, plantar fasciitis, calca...

  15. EFFECTIVENESS OF INSTUMENTAL ASSISTED SOFT TISSUE MOBILIZATION TECHNIQUE WITH STATIC STRETCHING IN SUBJECTS WITH PLANTAR FASCIITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Babu. K

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Instrumental assisted soft tissue mobilization and static stretching found to be effective in plantar fasciitis, however the combined effectiveness of these techniques were unknown. The purpose of this study is to find the effect of Instrumental assisted soft tissue mobilization technique for plantar fascia combined with static stretching of triceps surae for subjects with chronic stage of Plantar Fasciitis on pain intensity, ankle dorsiflexion range of motion and functional disability. Methods: An experimental study design, selected subjects with chronic Plantar Fasciitis randomized subjects into each Study and Control group. Total of 40 subject’s data who completed study, 20 in each group, was used for analysis. Control group received conventional exercise while Study group received conventional exercises with Instrumental assisted soft tissue mobilization combined with static stretching of triceps surae muscle. Outcome measurements such as Intensity of pain using Numerical Pain Rating Scale-101 (NPRS-101, function disability using Foot Function Index Pain Subscale (FFI and ankle dorsiflexion active range of motion using Goniometer was measured before and after 2 weeks of intervention. Results: There is statistically significant improvement in means of NRS-101, ankle dorsiflexion active range of motion and Foot Function Index Pain Subscale after intervention in both groups. When the post-intervention means were compared between Study and Control group after 2 weeks of treatment there is statistically significant difference in means between the groups whereas study group showed greater percentage of improvement than control group. Conclusion: It is concluded that Instrumental assisted soft tissue mobilization technique combined with static stretching of triceps surae muscle is significantly effective than conventional exercises on reducing pain, improving ankle dorsiflexion range of motion and functional disability for subjects

  16. The effect of extracorporeal shock wave therapy for the treatment of plantar fasciitis in regard to middle-aged patients' activity level and pain localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanada, M.; Takahashi, M.; Matsuyama, Y.

    2017-12-01

    In this retrospective cohort study, we compared the efficacy of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) for plantar fasciitis in patients with different activity levels and different pain locations. In total, 92 patients (99 feet) who were over 40 years old with chronic plantar fasciitis were treated with ESWT after being categorized as participating in recreational sports(group R) or only activities of daily living (group D). On the other hand, patients were categorized as having pain in the plantar fascia enthesis (group E) or the entire plantar fascia (group W). Pain during activity and general tenderness were evaluated by using the visual analog scale (VAS) before and after ESWT. Although the VAS for pain score during activity significantly improved in both groups R and D after ESWT (Ppain score in group R was not significantly different from that in group D (P=0.061 ). The VAS for tenderness score also significantly improved in both groups R and D (Ppain and VAS for tenderness scores was significantly greater in group E than that in group W (Ppain in the plantar fascia enthesis than in patients with pain in the entire plantar fascia.

  17. Plantar fasciitis and calcaneal spur formation are associated with abductor digiti minimi atrophy on MRI of the foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chundru, Usha; Liebeskind, Amy; Seidelmann, Frank; Fogel, Joshua; Franklin, Peter; Beltran, Javier

    2008-06-01

    To determine the association of atrophy of the abductor digiti minimi muscle (ADMA), an MRI manifestation of chronic compression of the inferior calcaneal nerve suggesting the clinical diagnosis of Baxter's neuropathy, with MRI markers of potential etiologies, including calcaneal spur formation, plantar fasciitis, calcaneal edema, Achilles tendinosis and posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD). Prevalence of calcaneal spur formation, plantar fasciitis, calcaneal edema, Achilles tendinosis and PTTD was assessed retrospectively on 100 MRI studies with ADMA and 100 MRI studies without ADMA. Patients ranged in age from 10-92 years. Pearson chi-square analyses and Fisher's exact test were used to compare prevalence of the above findings in patients with and without ADMA. Logistic regression was used to determine which variables were significantly associated with ADMA. Among patients with ADMA, there was significantly greater age (57.2 years vs 40.8 years, pcalcaneal edema (15.0% vs 3.0%, P=0.005), calcaneal spur (48.0% vs 7.0%, Pcalcaneal spur (OR 3.60, 95% CI 1.28, 10.17), and plantar fasciitis (OR 3.35, 95% CI 1.31, 8.56) remained significant. Advancing age, calcaneal spur, and plantar fasciitis are significantly associated with ADMA. Their high odds ratios support the notion of a possible etiologic role for calcaneal spur and plantar fasciitis in the progression to Baxter's neuropathy.

  18. Autologous whole blood versus corticosteroid local injection in treatment of plantar fasciitis: A randomized, controlled multicenter clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimzadeh, Afshin; Raeissadat, Seyed Ahmad; Erfani Fam, Saleh; Sedighipour, Leyla; Babaei-Ghazani, Arash

    2017-03-01

    Plantar fasciitis is the most common cause of heel pain. Local injection modalities are among treatment options in patients with resistant pain. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of local autologous whole blood compared with corticosteroid local injection in treatment of plantar fasciitis. In this randomized controlled multicenter study, 36 patients with chronic plantar fasciitis were recruited. Patients were allocated randomly into three treatment groups: local autologous blood, local corticosteroid injection, and control groups receiving no injection. Patients were assessed with visual analog scale (VAS), pressure pain threshold (PPT), and plantar fasciitis pain/disability scale (PFPS) before treatment, as well as 4 and 12 weeks post therapy. Variables of pain and function improved significantly in both corticosteroid and autologous blood groups compared to control group. At 4 weeks following treatment, patients in corticosteroid group had significantly lower levels of pain than patients in autologous blood and control groups (higher PPT level, lower PFPS, and VAS). After 12 weeks of treatment, both corticosteroid and autologous blood groups had lower average levels of pain than control group. The corticosteroid group showed an early sharp and then more gradual improvement in pain scores, but autologous blood group had a steady gradual drop in pain. Autologous whole blood and corticosteroid local injection can both be considered as effective methods in the treatment of chronic plantar fasciitis. These treatments decrease pain and significantly improve function compared to no treatment.

  19. Plantar fasciitis and calcaneal spur formation are associated with abductor digiti minimi atrophy on MRI of the foot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chundru, Usha [Maimonides Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Brooklyn, NY (United States); Liebeskind, Amy; Beltran, Javier [Maimonides Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Brooklyn, NY (United States); Beachwood, Franklin and Seidelmann Subspecialty Radiology, Beachwood, OH (United States); Seidelmann, Frank; Franklin, Peter [Beachwood, Franklin and Seidelmann Subspecialty Radiology, Beachwood, OH (United States); Fogel, Joshua [Maimonides Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Brooklyn, NY (United States); Brooklyn College, Department of Economics, Brooklyn, NY (United States)

    2008-06-15

    To determine the association of atrophy of the abductor digiti minimi muscle (ADMA), an MRI manifestation of chronic compression of the inferior calcaneal nerve suggesting the clinical diagnosis of Baxter's neuropathy, with MRI markers of potential etiologies, including calcaneal spur formation, plantar fasciitis, calcaneal edema, Achilles tendinosis and posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD). Prevalence of calcaneal spur formation, plantar fasciitis, calcaneal edema, Achilles tendinosis and PTTD was assessed retrospectively on 100 MRI studies with ADMA and 100 MRI studies without ADMA. Patients ranged in age from 10-92 years. Pearson chi-square analyses and Fisher's exact test were used to compare prevalence of the above findings in patients with and without ADMA. Logistic regression was used to determine which variables were significantly associated with ADMA. Among patients with ADMA, there was significantly greater age (57.2 years vs 40.8 years, p < 0.001), presence of Achilles tendinosis (22.0% vs 3.0%, P<0.001), calcaneal edema (15.0% vs 3.0%, P = 0.005), calcaneal spur (48.0% vs 7.0%, P < 0.001), plantar fasciitis (52.5% vs 11.0%, P<0.001), and PTTD (32.0% vs 11.0%, P<0.001). After multivariate logistic regression analysis, only age [odds ratio (OR) 1.06, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03, 1.09], calcaneal spur (OR 3.60, 95% CI 1.28, 10.17), and plantar fasciitis (OR 3.35, 95% CI 1.31, 8.56) remained significant. Advancing age, calcaneal spur, and plantar fasciitis are significantly associated with ADMA. Their high odds ratios support the notion of a possible etiologic role for calcaneal spur and plantar fasciitis in the progression to Baxter's neuropathy. (orig.)

  20. Low-level laser therapy in the management of plantar fasciitis: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinar, Eda; Saxena, Shikha; Uygur, Fatma

    2017-12-23

    This study aimed at estimating the extent to which a combination therapy of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) with exercise and orthotic support (usual care) affects functional ability in the patient with plantar fasciitis (PF) when compared to usual care alone. Participants with PF were randomly allocated into two groups: LLLT (n = 27) and control (n = 22). All the participants received home exercise program with orthotic support. In addition, the LLLT group received a gallium-aluminum-arsenide laser with a 850-nm wavelength for ten sessions, three times a week. Functional outcomes were measured by function subscale of American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society Score (AOFAS-F) and 12-min walking test including walking speed, cadence, and activity-related pain using visual analog scale (VAS).The scores were recorded at baseline, third week, and third month after the treatment. Analysis was performed using repeated measures ANOVA and an intention to treat approach using multiple imputations. There was a significant improvement in AOFAS-F total score at 3 weeks in both groups (LLLT, p  0.05). Both groups showed significant reduction in pain over 3 months (LLLT, p < 0.001; control, p = 0.01); however, the LLLT group had lower pain than the control group at 3 months (p = 0.03). The combination therapy of LLLT with usual care is more effective to improve functional outcomes and activity-related pain when compared to usual care alone.

  1. The association of calcaneal spur length and clinical and functional parameters in plantar fasciitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuyucu, Ersin; Koçyiğit, Figen; Erdil, Mehmet

    2015-09-01

    Plantar fasciitis (PF)is the most common cause of plantar heel pain. Despite many treatment alternatives for heel spur, the association of calcaneal spur size with clinical and functional parameters is inconclusive. The objective of this study to investigate the correlation of calcaneal spur length with clinical findings and functional status documented with Foot Function Index in patients with plantar fasciitis. We performed power analysis for the sample size estimation. 87 patients with PF were scrutinized to reach the estimated patient number 75. Computer-aided linear measurements were done for spur length from tip to base in milimeters. Perceived pain intensity was evaluated by visual analog scale (VAS). Patients were asked to rate the pain experienced on a 10-cm VAS. Foot function index was applied to the patients to evaluate pain, disability and activity limitation of the patients. Of the 75 participants, 24 were males (32%) and 51 were females (68%). The mean age was 47 ± 10 years (range 30-65 years). The mean calcaneal spur length was 3.86 ± 3.36 mm (range between 0 and 12.2). Calcaneal spur length was significantly correlated with age (p = 0.003), BMI (p = 0.029), symptom duration, (p = 0.001) VAS (p = 0.003), and FFI total score (p calcaneal spur is significantly correlated with age, BMI, symptom duration, perceived pain, FFI pain and disability subscores, and FFI total scores. The size of the calcaneal spur is an important parameter correlated with pain and functional scores in PF. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Multi-segment foot kinematics and ground reaction forces during gait of individuals with plantar fasciitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ryan; Rodrigues, Pedro A; Van Emmerik, Richard E A; Hamill, Joseph

    2014-08-22

    Clinically, plantar fasciitis (PF) is believed to be a result and/or prolonged by overpronation and excessive loading, but there is little biomechanical data to support this assertion. The purpose of this study was to determine the differences between healthy individuals and those with PF in (1) rearfoot motion, (2) medial forefoot motion, (3) first metatarsal phalangeal joint (FMPJ) motion, and (4) ground reaction forces (GRF). We recruited healthy (n=22) and chronic PF individuals (n=22, symptomatic over three months) of similar age, height, weight, and foot shape (p>0.05). Retro-reflective skin markers were fixed according to a multi-segment foot and shank model. Ground reaction forces and three dimensional kinematics of the shank, rearfoot, medial forefoot, and hallux segment were captured as individuals walked at 1.35 ms(-1). Despite similarities in foot anthropometrics, when compared to healthy individuals, individuals with PF exhibited significantly (pplane forefoot motion, (4) greater maximum FMPJ dorsiflexion, and (5) decreased vertical GRF during propulsion. These data suggest that compared to healthy individuals, individuals with PF exhibit significant differences in foot kinematics and kinetics. Consistent with the theoretical injury mechanisms of PF, we found these individuals to have greater total rearfoot eversion and peak FMPJ dorsiflexion, which may put undue loads on the plantar fascia. Meanwhile, increased medial forefoot plantar flexion at initial contact and decreased propulsive GRF are suggestive of compensatory responses, perhaps to manage pain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Plantar fasciitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MD, Thompson SR, eds. DeLee and Drez's Orthopaedic Sports Medicine . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap ... by: C. Benjamin Ma, MD, Assistant Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, ...

  4. Plantar Fasciitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the floor and your foot pointed straight ahead, lean slowly forward, bending the other leg. You should ... Men Seniors In The News Your Health Resources Healthcare Management End-of-Life Issues Insurance & Bills Self ...

  5. EFFECT OF KINESIO TAPING IN ADJUNCT TO CONVENTIONAL THERAPY IN REDUCING PAIN AND IMPROVING FUNCTIONAL ABILITY IN INDIVIDUALS WITH PLANTAR FASCIITIS A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Tulasi Ratna

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common musculoskeletal disorders of foot. The pain and discomfort associated with this condition has a dramatic impact on physical mobility and function. Treatment of this condition is usually conservative; however, review of literature revealed no clinical studies demonstrating the efficacy of any targeted treatment for this condition. Methods: This was a prospective study which included 60 subjects with plantar fasciitis, who were randomly divided into two groups. Subjects in group I received ultrasound and exercise therapy while subjects in group II received kinesio tape in addition to ultrasound and exercise therapy. Patients were evaluated at the beginning of the study and at the end of three weeks using VAS (visual analogue scale for pain intensity, PFPS (plantar fasciitis pain / disability scale for functional ability and ultra sonography for any change in the caliber of plantar fascia. Results: A statistically significant difference in improvement was noted within the groups and between the groups in terms of visual analogue scale and plantar fasciitis pain /disability scale score (p0.05. Conclusion: Kinesio taping can be used as an adjunct to conventional therapy in clinical application for greater improvement in pain levels and functional ability in patients with plantar fasciitis.

  6. Treatment of chronic plantar fasciitis with extra corporeal shock wave therapy: ultrasonographic morphological aspect and functional evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Androson

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This paper has the purpose to analyze prospectively the treatment results in patients with chronic plantar fasciitis resistant to conservative treatment who underwent extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT. Methods: We evaluated 30 patients (36 feet; 16 (53.3% patients were male and 14 (47.7% female with mean age of 48.7 y.o., varying from 33 to 78 y.o.; 16 (53.3% present the problem on the left side, 14 (46.7% on the right ones and 6 (20% bilateral; the symptomatology varied from 6 to 60 months, with the average of 13.58 months. These patients were submitted to a weekly ESWT session for 4 consecutive weeks. We measured the plantar fascia thickness millimeters with ultrasound and we applied American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS scale for ankle and hindfoot, and Roles & Maudsley scales in pre ESWT, after one, three and six months after and decrease in the plantar fascia thickness by the ultrasound (p = 0.011 along the different moments studied. Results: We observed improvement of the evaluated criteria (p < 0.001 and plantar fascia thickness by ultrasound (p = 0.011 at different time points studied. Conclusion: The ESWT can be considered an important tool in the primary or adjuvant treatment of the chronic plantar fasciitis when associated with conventional therapies. This methodology is safe, non-invasive and provides precocious rehabilitation and return to regular activities considering the results of the statistical analysis. This resource provides decrease in the thickness of the plantar fascia.

  7. Static, dynamic balance and functional performance in subjects with and without plantar fasciitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geiseane Aguiar Gonçalves

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Plantar fasciitis (PF is characterized by non-inflammatory degeneration and pain under the heel, and is one of the most common foot complaints. The compensations and adjustments made to decrease the discomfort caused by the disease are clinical findings and can be a factor that contributes to impaired balance and decreased functional performance. Objective: To compare functional performance as well as static and dynamic balance among subjects with and without PF. Methods: The sample consisted of 124 subjects of both sexes aged 20-60 years. Participants were divided into two groups: a bilateral PF group (PFG; n = 62 and a control group (CG, n = 62. The following outcomes were analyzed: static and dynamic balance (using functional tests and functional performance (using a questionnaire. We used Student’s t test for independent samples to compare variables between the groups. The alpha error was set at 0.05. Results: Subjects with PF showed greater impairment in their overall dynamic balance performance (p < 0.001 than the control group, except for left posteromedial movement (p = 0.19. The CG showed showed better functional performance (p < 0.001 than the PF group. There was no difference between groups for the variable static balance on stable (p = 0.160 and unstable surfaces (p = 0.085. Conclusion: Subjects with PF displayed smaller reach distances in the overall Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT, demonstrating a deficit in dynamic balance and functional performance when compared with healthy subjects.

  8. Prospective Randomized Comparison of the Effectiveness of Radiation Therapy and Local Steroid Injection for the Treatment of Plantar Fasciitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canyilmaz, Emine; Canyilmaz, Fatih; Aynaci, Ozlem; Colak, Fatma; Serdar, Lasif; Uslu, Gonca Hanedan; Aynaci, Osman; Yoney, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to conduct a randomized trial of radiation therapy for plantar fasciitis and to compare radiation therapy with local steroid injections. Methods and Materials: Between March 2013 and April 2014, 128 patients with plantar fasciitis were randomized to receive radiation therapy (total dose of 6.0 Gy applied in 6 fractions of 1.0 Gy three times a week) or local corticosteroid injections a 1 ml injection of 40 mg methylprednisolone and 0.5 ml 1% lidocaine under the guidance of palpation. The results were measured using a visual analog scale, a modified von Pannewitz scale, and a 5-level function score. The fundamental phase of the study was 3 months, with a follow-up period of up to 6 months. Results: The median follow-up period for all patients was 12.5 months (range, 6.5-18.6 months). For the radiation therapy patients, the median follow-up period was 13 months (range, 6.5-18.5 months), whereas in the palpation-guided (PG) steroid injection arm, it was 12.1 months (range, 6.5-18.6 months). After 3 months, results in the radiation therapy arm were significantly superior to those in the PG steroid injection arm (visual analog scale, P<.001; modified von Pannewitz scale, P<.001; 5-level function score, P<.001). Requirements for a second treatment did not significantly differ between the 2 groups, but the time interval for the second treatment was significantly shorter in the PG steroid injection group (P=.045). Conclusion: This study confirms the superior analgesic effect of radiation therapy compared to mean PG steroid injection on plantar fasciitis for at least 6 months after treatment

  9. Prospective Randomized Comparison of the Effectiveness of Radiation Therapy and Local Steroid Injection for the Treatment of Plantar Fasciitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canyilmaz, Emine, E-mail: dremocan@ktu.edu.tr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Karadeniz Technical University, Trabzon (Turkey); Canyilmaz, Fatih [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Yavuz Selim Bone Disease and Rehabilitation Hospital, Trabzon (Turkey); Aynaci, Ozlem; Colak, Fatma; Serdar, Lasif [Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Karadeniz Technical University, Trabzon (Turkey); Uslu, Gonca Hanedan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kanuni Research and Education Hospital, Trabzon (Turkey); Aynaci, Osman [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Faculty of Medicine, Karadeniz Technical University, Trabzon (Turkey); Yoney, Adnan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Karadeniz Technical University, Trabzon (Turkey)

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to conduct a randomized trial of radiation therapy for plantar fasciitis and to compare radiation therapy with local steroid injections. Methods and Materials: Between March 2013 and April 2014, 128 patients with plantar fasciitis were randomized to receive radiation therapy (total dose of 6.0 Gy applied in 6 fractions of 1.0 Gy three times a week) or local corticosteroid injections a 1 ml injection of 40 mg methylprednisolone and 0.5 ml 1% lidocaine under the guidance of palpation. The results were measured using a visual analog scale, a modified von Pannewitz scale, and a 5-level function score. The fundamental phase of the study was 3 months, with a follow-up period of up to 6 months. Results: The median follow-up period for all patients was 12.5 months (range, 6.5-18.6 months). For the radiation therapy patients, the median follow-up period was 13 months (range, 6.5-18.5 months), whereas in the palpation-guided (PG) steroid injection arm, it was 12.1 months (range, 6.5-18.6 months). After 3 months, results in the radiation therapy arm were significantly superior to those in the PG steroid injection arm (visual analog scale, P<.001; modified von Pannewitz scale, P<.001; 5-level function score, P<.001). Requirements for a second treatment did not significantly differ between the 2 groups, but the time interval for the second treatment was significantly shorter in the PG steroid injection group (P=.045). Conclusion: This study confirms the superior analgesic effect of radiation therapy compared to mean PG steroid injection on plantar fasciitis for at least 6 months after treatment.

  10. Cryotherapy usage to treat plantar warts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda Diaz, BelkisTamara

    2010-01-01

    Treating dermatosis with liquid nitrogen as cryogen (substance generating cold) allows cellular destruction in more than 5 mm depth, making it indispensable to use it treating cutaneous cancers; besides that, it is cheap, easy to conserve and manage, and it is not considered flammable or toxic. Its applying retains the growth factor inside the injury, the collagen is not damaged as it is in burning by hot, there is not almost injury contraction, the perineurium is not altered, and when the tissue necrosis takes place, it retains tissue necrosis factor, helping to increase the necrosis of tissues. Taking into account the high incidence of dermatosis that can be treated with cryogen, in our consultation; we decided to generalize this treatment at the Provincial Interior Ministry Clinic. Plantar warts represent a big percent, limiting our patients in developing their working activities. This cutaneous viral disease is favored by the patients' systemic immunodepressions, hyperhidrosis and podalic disturbances. We selected the patients assisting to our extern al consultation with plantar wart clinical diagnosis in the period from September 2006 to September 2007. They signed an act of informed consent where the possible side effects are explained. Liquid nitrogen was applied with cotton applicators once a week after mechanical reduction. We made a clinical evolving evaluation fortnightly during the treatment, according to the elements and clinical characteristics referred by the patient, and proved by the physical examination carried out by the main investigator, because of the likelihood of short and long time side effects. This investigation demonstrated that cryotherapy is efficacious in treating plantar warts, since all the patients were healed in a short time period, most of them without side effects

  11. Effect of Field Size and Length of Plantar Spur on Treatment Outcome in Radiation Therapy of Plantar Fasciitis: The Bigger the Better?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermann, Robert Michael; Meyer, Andreas; Becker, Alexandra; Schneider, Michael; Reible, Michael; Carl, Ulrich Martin; Christiansen, Hans; Nitsche, Mirko

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy is well established in the treatment of painful plantar fasciitis or heel spur. A retrospective analysis was conducted to investigate the effect of field definition on treatment outcome and to determine the impact of factors potentially involved. Methods and Materials: A review of treatment data of 250 patients (285 heels) with a mean follow-up time of 11 months showed that complete symptom remission occurred in 38%, partial remission in 32%, and no change in 19% (11% were lost to follow-up). Variables such as radiologic evidence of plantar spurs, their length, radiation dose, field size, age, sex, and onset of pain before administration of radiation therapy were investigated in univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Results: Treatment response depended upon age >53 years, length of heel spur ≤6.5 mm (or no radiologic evidence of a heel spur), and onset of pain <12 months before radiation therapy. Patients with these clinical prerequisites stood a 93% chance of clinical response. Without these prerequisites, only 49% showed any impact. No influence of field size on treatment outcome became evident. Conclusion: Patients with short plantar heel spurs benefit from radiation therapy equally well as patients without any radiologic evidence. Moreover, smaller field sizes have the same positive effect as commonly used large field definitions covering the entire calcaneal bone. This leads to a recommendation of a considerable reduction of field size in future clinical practice

  12. Effect of Field Size and Length of Plantar Spur on Treatment Outcome in Radiation Therapy of Plantar Fasciitis: The Bigger the Better?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann, Robert Michael, E-mail: hermann@strahlentherapie-westerstede.com [Zentrum für Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Bremen/Westerstede (Germany); Abteilung Strahlentherapie und Spezielle Onkologie, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany); Meyer, Andreas [Abteilung Strahlentherapie und Spezielle Onkologie, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany); Gemeinschaftspraxis für Strahlentherapie Hildesheim/Goslar (Germany); Becker, Alexandra [Zentrum für Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Bremen/Westerstede (Germany); Schneider, Michael [Orthopaedic Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, University of Würzburg (Germany); Reible, Michael; Carl, Ulrich Martin [Zentrum für Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Bremen/Westerstede (Germany); Christiansen, Hans [Abteilung Strahlentherapie und Spezielle Onkologie, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany); Nitsche, Mirko [Zentrum für Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Bremen/Westerstede (Germany); Klinik für Strahlentherapie, Karl-Lennert-Krebscentrum, Universität Kiel (Germany)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy is well established in the treatment of painful plantar fasciitis or heel spur. A retrospective analysis was conducted to investigate the effect of field definition on treatment outcome and to determine the impact of factors potentially involved. Methods and Materials: A review of treatment data of 250 patients (285 heels) with a mean follow-up time of 11 months showed that complete symptom remission occurred in 38%, partial remission in 32%, and no change in 19% (11% were lost to follow-up). Variables such as radiologic evidence of plantar spurs, their length, radiation dose, field size, age, sex, and onset of pain before administration of radiation therapy were investigated in univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Results: Treatment response depended upon age >53 years, length of heel spur ≤6.5 mm (or no radiologic evidence of a heel spur), and onset of pain <12 months before radiation therapy. Patients with these clinical prerequisites stood a 93% chance of clinical response. Without these prerequisites, only 49% showed any impact. No influence of field size on treatment outcome became evident. Conclusion: Patients with short plantar heel spurs benefit from radiation therapy equally well as patients without any radiologic evidence. Moreover, smaller field sizes have the same positive effect as commonly used large field definitions covering the entire calcaneal bone. This leads to a recommendation of a considerable reduction of field size in future clinical practice.

  13. Relationships between static foot alignment and dynamic plantar loads in runners with acute and chronic stages of plantar fasciitis: a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Ana P.; Sacco, Isabel C. N.; Dinato, Roberto C.; João, Silvia M. A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The risk factors for the development of plantar fasciitis (PF) have been associated with the medial longitudinal arch (MLA), rearfoot alignment and calcaneal overload. However, the relationships between the biomechanical variables have yet to be determined. OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to investigate the relationships between the MLA, rearfoot alignment, and dynamic plantar loads in runners with unilateral PF in acute and chronic phases. METHOD: Cross-sectional study which thirty-five runners with unilateral PF were evaluated: 20 in the acute phase (with pain) and 15 with previous chronic PF (without pain). The MLA index and rearfoot alignment were calculated using digital images. The contact area, maximum force, peak pressure, and force-time integral over three plantar areas were acquired with Pedar X insoles while running at 12 km/h, and the loading rates were calculated from the vertical forces. RESULTS: The multiple regression analyses indicated that both the force-time integral (R 2=0.15 for acute phase PF; R 2=0.17 for chronic PF) and maximum force (R 2=0.35 for chronic PF) over the forefoot were predicted by an elevated MLA index. The rearfoot valgus alignment predicted the maximum force over the rearfoot in both PF groups: acute (R 2=0.18) and chronic (R 2=0.45). The rearfoot valgus alignment also predicted higher loading rates in the PF groups: acute (R 2=0.19) and chronic (R 2=0.40). CONCLUSION: The MLA index and the rearfoot alignment were good predictors of plantar loads over the forefoot and rearfoot areas in runners with PF. However, rearfoot valgus was demonstrated to be an important clinical measure, since it was able to predict the maximum force and both loading rates over the rearfoot. PMID:26786073

  14. A COMPARITIVE STUDY ON EFFECTIVENESS OF TAPING WITH IONTOPHORESIS AND TAPING ALONE IN CHRONIC PLANTAR FASCITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biju Chetri

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Plantar fasciitis is a painful condition caused by microtrauma to plantar fascia due to overuse. It is a most common cause of heel pain in runners. Various studies proved taping and Iontophoresis as effective in the treating plantar fasciitis. But there are no studies comparing the combined effect of iontophoresis with taping and taping alone in the treatment of plantar fasciitis. Methods: 50 patients suffering from plantar fasciitis who met the inclusion criteria were selected. The subjects were randomly divided into two groups i.e. Group A and Group B. Group A received taping, iontophoresis with plantar fascia stretching. Group B received taping and plantar fascia stretching. A total of 6 treatment sessions were given on alternate days over a period of two weeks for both the groups. Results: VAS and FFI scores across baseline and post intervention showed a significant improvement statistically in their mean scores between Groups A and B (P<0.05. Between group comparison of VAS and FFI scores, it showed that subject treated with Iontophoresis in combination with taping and plantar fascia stretch (Group A had significant improvement in VAS and functional ability when compared to subjects treated with taping and plantar fascia stretching alone (Group B. Conclusion: Iontophoresis along with Taping and plantar fascia stretching gave an additional benefit when compared with Taping and plantar fascia stretching alone in reducing pain and improving function in plantar fasciitis.

  15. Effect of field size and length of plantar spur on treatment outcome in radiation therapy of plantar fasciitis: the bigger the better?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Robert Michael; Meyer, Andreas; Becker, Alexandra; Schneider, Michael; Reible, Michael; Carl, Ulrich Martin; Christiansen, Hans; Nitsche, Mirko

    2013-12-01

    Radiation therapy is well established in the treatment of painful plantar fasciitis or heel spur. A retrospective analysis was conducted to investigate the effect of field definition on treatment outcome and to determine the impact of factors potentially involved. A review of treatment data of 250 patients (285 heels) with a mean follow-up time of 11 months showed that complete symptom remission occurred in 38%, partial remission in 32%, and no change in 19% (11% were lost to follow-up). Variables such as radiologic evidence of plantar spurs, their length, radiation dose, field size, age, sex, and onset of pain before administration of radiation therapy were investigated in univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Treatment response depended upon age >53 years, length of heel spur ≤6.5 mm (or no radiologic evidence of a heel spur), and onset of pain spurs benefit from radiation therapy equally well as patients without any radiologic evidence. Moreover, smaller field sizes have the same positive effect as commonly used large field definitions covering the entire calcaneal bone. This leads to a recommendation of a considerable reduction of field size in future clinical practice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Injected corticosteroids for treating plantar heel pain in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Judy A; Sankarapandian, Venkatesan; Christopher, Prince Rh; Chatterjee, Ahana; Macaden, Ashish S

    2017-06-11

    Plantar heel pain, commonly resulting from plantar fasciitis, often results in significant morbidity. Treatment options include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), orthoses, physical therapy, physical agents (e.g. extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT), laser) and invasive procedures including steroid injections. To assess the effects (benefits and harms) of injected corticosteroids for treating plantar heel pain in adults. We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (the Cochrane Library), MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, clinical trials registries and conference proceedings. Latest search: 27 March 2017. Randomised and quasi-randomised trials of corticosteroid injections in the treatment of plantar heel pain in adults were eligible for inclusion. At least two review authors independently selected studies, assessed risk of bias and extracted data. We calculated risk ratios (RRs) for dichotomous outcomes and mean differences (MDs) for continuous outcome measures. We used a fixed-effect model unless heterogeneity was significant, when a random-effects model was considered. We assessed the overall quality of evidence for individual outcomes using the GRADE approach. We included a total of 39 studies (36 randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and 3 quasi-RCTs) that involved a total of 2492 adults. Most studies were small (median = 59 participants). Participants' mean ages ranged from 34 years to 59 years. When reported, most participants had heel pain for several months. The trials were usually conducted in outpatient specialty clinics of tertiary care hospitals in 17 countries. Steroid injection was given with a local anaesthetic agent in 34 trials. Follow-up was from one month to over two years. With one exception, trials were assessed at high risk of bias in one or more domains, mostly relating to lack of blinding, including lack of confirmation of allocation concealment

  17. Effeciency of extracorporeal shock wave therapy in patients with plantar fasciitis and the relationship with subcalcaneal spur length

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serpil Tuna

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: ESWT is widely used in the treatment of plantar fascitis. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effect of ESWT on heel pain and symptoms in the short and medium term. We also compared the subcalcaneal spur length and the heel pain severity and examined the effect of the subcalcaneal spur length on the efficiency of ESWT therapy. Methods: The efficiency of ESWT applied to 59 heel of 48 patients compared retrospectively . We used Visual Analog Scale (VAS and Wolgin scale to evaluate the treatment outcomes. We measure the subcalcaneal spurs length of the patients with foot x-ray . Correlation between the VAS scores and the length of subcalcaneal spur were also evaluated. Results: Improvement in VAS in the first week and 3 months after ESWT treatment was statistically significant. There was no correlation between subcalcaneal spur length and the severity of pain. The number of patients in the'' medium, bad'' group decreased while the number of patients in the '' good'' group incresed according to WDS after ESWT treatment. Conclusion: As a result of this study we concluded that ESWT is effective in the treatment of plantar fasciitis in the short and medium term.

  18. Ultra-som contínuo no tratamento da fasciíte plantar crônica Continuous ultrasound for chronic plantar fasciitis treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Graciele Zanon

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho avaliou-se a eficácia do ultra-som contínuo e alta intensidade como tratamento na fasciíte plantar. Foram avaliadas 22 pessoas, com dor a mais de seis meses, através de questionário funcional e escala visual para a dor no primeiro apoio matinal. Vinte e sete pés foram distribuídos nos grupos: grupo 1 (alongamento + ultra-som desligado e grupo 2 (alongamento + ultra-som 2 w/cm². Após 15 sessões de tratamento, foi realizada análise dos valores absolutos e das porcentagens de melhora das variáveis coletadas. Houve melhora funcional para os dois grupos, sem diferença entre eles. A análise dos valores absolutos de intensidade de dor (primeira, oitava e última sessão mostrou semelhança entre os grupos. A porcentagem de melhora nas 15 sessões não apresentou diferença entre os grupos. Esta porcentagem também foi calculada para dois períodos (antes e após a oitava sessão. Notou-se que a porcentagem de melhora das 15 sessões do grupo2 (46,5% foi inferior à porcentagem das oito primeiras sessões do grupo1 (54,6%. Portanto, o ultra-som contínuo com alta intensidade não acrescentou ganhos em relação à função e à dor; além disso, apenas a realização de alongamentos específicos foi eficaz para a redução de mais de 50% da dor na fasciíte plantar crônica.In this study, the efficiency of continuous high-power ultrasound was assessed for plantar fasciitis treatment. Twenty two individuals were assessed, reporting pain lasting more than six months, through a functional questionnaire and visual scale for pain at the first morning load. Twenty seven feet were distributed into two groups: group 1 (stretching + ultrasound turned off and group 2 (stretching + 2 w/cm² ultrasound. After 15 treatment sessions, an analysis of the absolute values and improvement percentages for collected variables was performed. A functional improvement was seen for both groups, with no difference between them. The analysis of the

  19. Effect of stretching with and without muscle strengthening exercises for the foot and hip in patients with plantar fasciitis: A randomized controlled single-blind clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamonseki, Danilo H; Gonçalves, Geiseane A; Yi, Liu C; Júnior, Império Lombardi

    2016-06-01

    To compare the effect of stretching with and without muscle strengthening of the foot alone or foot and hip on pain and function in patients with plantar fasciitis. Single blind randomized controlled trial. Eighty-three patients with plantar fasciitis were allocated to one of three treatment options for an eight-week period: Foot Exercise Group (FEG - extrinsic and intrinsic foot muscles), Foot and Hip Exercise Group (FHEG - abductor and lateral rotator muscles) and Stretching Alone Exercise Group (SAEG). A visual analog scale for pain, the Foot and Ankle Outcome Score and the Star Excursion Balance Test. All evaluations were performed before treatment and after the last treatment session. Improvements were found in all groups regarding the visual analog scale, the pain, activities of daily living, sports and recreation, quality of life (p  0.05). All three exercise protocols analyzed led to improvements at eight-week follow-up in pain, function and dynamic lower limb stability in patients with plantar fasciitis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Square, Random Fasciocutaneous Plantar Flaps for Treating Noninfected Diabetic Plantar Ulcers: A Patient Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravaggi, Carlo Maria Ferdinando; Sganzaroli, Adriana Barbara; Bona, Fosca; Galenda, Paolo; Ferraresi, Roberto; Gherardi, Piero; Reho, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    In patients with diabetes, the off-loading cast has not been widely used to treat plantar ulcers because of its poor acceptance by patients and the high risk of side effects. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of an alternative surgical treatment: a square, fasciocutaneous random plantar flap to cover plantar ulcers. From December 2012 to February 2013, we enrolled 23 consecutive diabetic patients with deep neuropathic or neuroischemic plantar ulcers. Of these 23 patients, 9 underwent percutaneous transluminal angioplasty, 10 had the metatarsal removed, 3 underwent dorsiflexory, distal metatarsal osteotomies, 2 underwent first metatarsophalangeal joint resection and ray stabilization with Kirschner wires, and 1 each underwent midfoot exostectomy, sesamoidectomy, and partial calcanectomy. A square random fasciocutaneous plantar flap was created for all 23 patients. Two patients were excluded from the analysis for weightbearing on the involved foot within 24 hours of surgery. The healing rate was 100% for the remaining 21 patients, with healing by first intention in 15 (mean ± standard deviation time to healing 30 ± 13 days), by second intention in 5 (86 ± 40 days), and by surgical revision in 1. The overall mean healing time was 44 ± 31 days. During a mean follow-up of 724 ± 275 days, no ulcer recurred; however, 1 transfer ulcer appeared on an adjacent metatarsal head. The use of a square random fasciocutaneous plantar flap is a safe and effective surgical option for treating neuropathic plantar ulcers, offering a high healing rate, a short healing time, and a low rate of recurrence. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effectiveness and relevant factors of platelet-rich plasma treatment in managing plantar fasciitis:A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seet Khing Chiew

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Plantar fasciitis (PF is a common foot complaint, affects both active sportsmen and physically inactive middle age group. It is believed that PF results from degenerative changes rather than inflammation. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP therapy has been introduced as an alternative therapy for PF. This study is aimed to systematically review to the effectiveness and relevant factors of PRP treatment in managing PF. Materials and Methods: A search was conducted in electronic databases, including PubMed, Scopus, and Google Scholar using different keywords. Publications in English-language from 2010 to 2015 were included. Two reviewers extracted data from selected articles after the quality assessment was done. Results: A total of 1126 articles were retrieved, but only 12 articles met inclusion and exclusion criteria. With a total of 455 patients, a number of potentially influencing factors on the effectiveness of PRP for PF was identified. In all these studies, PRP had been injected directly into the plantar fascia, with or without ultrasound guidance. Steps from preparation to injection were found equally crucial. Amount of collected blood, types of blood anti-coagulant, methods in preparing PRP, speed, and numbers of time the blood samples were centrifuged, activating agent added to the PRP and techniques of injection, were varied between different studies. Regardless of these variations, superiority of PRP treatment compared to steroid was reported in all studies. Conclusion: In conclusion, PRP therapy might provide an effective alternative to conservative management of PF with no obvious side effect or complication. The onset of action after PRP injection also greatly depended on the degree of degeneration.

  2. Targeting the Plantar Fascia for Corticosteroid Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvi, Andrea Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis is often a difficult condition to treat. It is related to repetitive strain of the fascia at its attachment to the heel bone. This condition quite often appears with the concomitant presence of a plantar calcaneal heel spur. Corticosteroid injection is a popular treatment choice for plantar fasciitis, and accurate localization of the injected medication is essential for successful resolution of symptoms after the injection. In the present brief technical communication, a method for targeting the attachment of the plantar fascia to the medial tubercle of the tuberosity of the calcaneus is described. The targeting method uses the lateral radiograph of the foot to aid in localization of the proximal attachment of the plantar fascia to the calcaneus. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparative trial of the foot pressure patterns between corrective orthotics,formthotics, bone spur pads and flat insoles in patients with chronic plantar fasciitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Kok Kiong Jason; Suresh, Sanjay; Kuah, Angeline; Ong, Jean L J; Phua, Jessie M T; Seah, Ai Ling

    2009-10-01

    The objective of the study is to compare the efficacy of fl at insoles, bone spur pads, pre-fabricated orthotics and customised orthotics in reducing plantar contact pressure of subjects with plantar fasciitis. This is a controlled non-blinded comparative study conducted in a tertiary medical institute. Thirty subjects with unilateral plantar fasciitis between the ages of 20 and 65 years were recruited at the sports medicine clinic. The contact pressures and pressure distribution patterns in both feet for each subject were measured with sensor pressure mats while standing. Repeat measurements were made with the subjects wearing shoes, fl at insoles, bone spur heel pads, pre-fabricated insoles and customised orthotics on both feet. The asymptomatic side was used as the control. Contact pressure measurements of the symptomatic and asymptomatic feet and power ratio of the pressure distribution pattern of the rearfoot were then compared. Contact pressure was higher on the asymptomatic side due to unequal distribution of weight. Bone spur heel pads were ineffective in reducing rearfoot pressure while formthotics and customised orthotics reduced peak rearfoot pressures significantly. The power ratio of the rearfoot region decreased with the use of formthotics and customised orthotics. Pre-fabricated orthotics and customised orthotics reduced rearfoot peak forces on both sides while bone spurs heel pad increase rearfoot peak pressures. Pre-fabricated and customised orthotics are useful in distributing pressure uniformly over the rearfoot region.

  4. Combination Therapy Versus Exercise and Orthotic Support in the Management of Pain in Plantar Fasciitis: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinar, Eda; Saxena, Shikha; Uygur, Fatma

    2018-04-01

    This study aimed at estimating the effectiveness of two commonly used modalities-extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) and low-level laser therapy (LLLT)-each combined with usual care (exercises and orthotic supports) in comparison to only usual care to relieve pain in patients with plantar fasciitis (PF). Participants with PF were randomly allocated into 3 groups: ESWT (n = 25), LLLT (n = 24), and control (n = 17). All participants received a home exercise program with orthotic support. The ESWT group received 2000 shock waves with 0.02 mJ/mm 2 for 3 sessions, once a week; LLLT group received gallium-aluminum-arsenide laser with 850 nm wavelength for 10 sessions, 3 times a week. Pain was measured by Foot Function Index-pain subscale (FFI-p) and Numerical Rating Scale for pain (NRS-p). The scores were recorded at baseline, third week, and third month after the treatment. Analysis was performed using repeated measures ANOVA. There was a significant improvement in pain over the 3 months in all groups on both FFI-p ( P < .001) and NRS-p ( P < .001). In NRS-p, LLLT group had significantly lower pain than ESWT ( P = .002) at the third week and control ( P = .043) and ESWT ( P = .003) at third month. In FFI-p total score, ESWT group had higher pain than LLLT ( P = .003) and control ( P = .035) groups at third week and LLLT ( P = .010) group at third month. When LLLT and ESWT were combined with usual care, LLLT was found to be more effective than ESWT in reducing pain in PF at short-term follow-up. Level II, comparative study.

  5. Joint Mobilization and Stretching Exercise vs Steroid Injection in the Treatment of Plantar Fasciitis: A Randomized Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Derya; Kuş, Gamze; Sırma, Serkan Önder

    2016-02-01

    This study compared the effectiveness of joint mobilization combined with stretching exercises (JM&Str) vs steroid injection (SI) in the treatment of plantar fasciitis (PF). A total of 43 patients (mean age, 45.5 ± 8.5 years; range, 30-60 years; 23 females) with PF were randomly assigned to receive either JM&Str (n = 22) or SIs (n = 21). JM&Str was applied 3 times per week for 3 weeks for a total of 9 visits. The SI group received 1 injection at baseline. The patients' functional scores were assessed using the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM), and pain was evaluated using the Visual Analog Scale (VAS). Outcomes of interest were captured at baseline and at 3-week, 6-week, 12-week, and 1-year follow-ups. The primary aim was examined using a mixed-model analysis of variance (ANOVA). Pairwise comparisons were performed to examine differences between the baseline and follow-up periods using Bonferroni equality at an alpha level of 0.05. Age, sex, body mass index, and dorsiflexion range of motion did not significantly impact pain relief or functional outcome (P > .05) at the 3-, 6- or 12-week follow-ups compared to baseline. Planned pairwise comparisons demonstrated significant improvements in pain relief and functional outcomes in both groups (P < .05) at the 3-, 6-, and 12-week follow-ups compared to baseline. However, at the 12-week and 1-year follow-ups, pain and functional outcomes were significantly improved in only the JM&Str group (P = .002). The overall group-by-time interaction was statistically significant for both FAAM (P = .001; F = 7.0) and VAS (P = .001; F = 8.3) scores. Between-group differences favored the SI group at the 3-week (P = .001, P = .001), 6-week (P = .002, P = .001), and 12-week (P = .008, P = .001) follow-ups for pain relief and functional outcomes. However, no significant differences (P = .62, P = .57) were detected in the measured outcomes at the 1-year follow-up. Our study demonstrated that while both groups achieved significant

  6. Intracorporeal pneumatic shock application for the treatment of chronic plantar fasciitis: a randomized, double blind prospective clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogramaci, Yunus; Kalaci, Aydiner; Emir, Anil; Yanat, Ahmet Nedim; Gökçe, Ahmet

    2010-04-01

    Plantar fasciitis (PF) is a common clinical condition that usually resolves with non-operative treatments. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) has been used in the treatment of chronic PF not responding to other conservative measures; however, ESWT devices are expensive and available for daily practice in only few centers (In developing countries). A pneumatic lithotripter is a cheap and readily available device which uses pneumatic shock application for the intracorporeal lithotripsy. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical efficacy of intracorporeal pneumatic shock therapy (IPST) application for the treatment of chronic PF using a cheap and readily available pneumatic lithotripter. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted. A total of 50 patients with clinically and radiologically confirmed PF were randomly allocated to either an active- (treatment) (n = 25) or inactive (placebo) (n = 25) group. Under local anesthesia and posterior tibial nerve block, a rigid probe was directly introduced into the calcaneal spur under fluoroscopic control; a standard protocol of 1,000 shock was applied during a single session into the calcaneal spur. The main outcome measure was the patients' subjective assessment of pain by means of a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and the Roles and Maudsley Score before the treatment and 6 months later. At the 6 months, the rate of successful outcomes (excellent + good results) in the treatment group (92%) were significantly higher comparing to the control group (24%) (P < 0.001). Heel pain measured 6 months after using the VAS were 2.04 +/- 1.67 in treatment group and 7.16 +/- 1.57 in control group as compared to 8.92 +/- 1.22 and 9.12 +/- 1.23 before the commencement of the treatment. No complications attributable to the procedure such as rupture of the planter fascia, hematoma, or infection were observed during the study. This pilot study showed that IPST is an effective and safe method of treatment of

  7. Plantar Fascia Rupture in a Professional Soccer Player

    OpenAIRE

    Suzue, Naoto; Iwame, Toshiyuki; Kato, Kenji; Takao, Shoichiro; Tateishi, Tomohiko; Takeda, Yoshitsugu; Hamada, Daisuke; Goto, Tomohiro; Takata, Yoichiro; Matsuura, Tetsuya; Sairyo, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 29-year-old male professional soccer player who presented with symptoms of plantar fasciitis. His symptoms occurred with no remarkable triggers and gradually worsened despite conservative treatments including taping, use of insoles, and physical therapy. Local corticosteroid injection was given twice as a further intervention, but his plantar fascia partially ruptured 49 days after the second injection. He was treated conservatively with platelet-rich plasma, and magne...

  8. Randomized multicenter follow-up trial on the effect of radiotherapy for plantar fasciitis (painful heels spur) depending on dose and fractionation – a study protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holtmann, Henrik; Niewald, Marcus; Prokein, Benjamin; Graeber, Stefan; Ruebe, Christian

    2015-01-01

    An actual clinical trial showed the effect of low dose radiotherapy in painful heel spur (plantar fasciitis) with single doses of 1.0 Gy and total doses of 6.0 Gy applied twice weekly. Furthermore, a lot of animal experimental and in vitro data reveals the effect of lower single doses of 0.5 Gy which may be superior in order to ease pain and reduce inflammation in patients with painful heel spur. Our goal is therefore to transfer this experimentally found effect into a randomized multicenter trial. This was a controlled, prospective, two-arm phase III-multicenter trial. The standard arm consisted of single fractions of 1.0 Gy applied two times a week, for a total dose of 6.0 Gy (total therapy time: 3 weeks). The experimental arm consisted of single fractions of 0.5 Gy applied 3 times a week, for a total dose of 6.0 Gy (total therapy time: 4 weeks). Following a statistical power calculation, there were 120 patients for each investigation arm. The main inclusion criteria were: age > = 40 years, clinical and radiologically diagnosed painful heel spur (plantar fasciitis), and current symptoms for at least 6 months. The main exclusion criteria were: former local trauma, surgery or radiotherapy of the heel; pregnant or breastfeeding women; and a pre-existing severe psychiatric or psychosomatic disorder. After approving a written informed consent the patients are randomized by a statistician into one of the trial arms. After radiotherapy, the patients are seen after six weeks, after twelve weeks and then every twelve weeks up to 48 weeks. Additionally, they receive a questionnaire every six weeks after the follow-up examinations up to 48 weeks. The effect is measured using the visual analogue scale of pain (VAS), the calcaneodynia score according to Rowe and the SF-12 score. The primary endpoint is the pain relief three months after therapy. Patients of both therapy arms with an insufficient result are offered a second radiotherapy series applying the standard dose

  9. Autologous platelet-rich plasma compared with whole blood for the treatment of chronic plantar fasciitis; a comparative clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Vahdatpour

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Significant improvement in pain and function, as well as decrease in plantar fascia thickness, was observed by intralesional injection of the PRP and WB in patients with chronic PF. The study results indicate similar effectiveness between PRP and WB for the treatment of chronic PF in short-term.

  10. Necrotising fasciitis of the shoulder in association with rheumatoid arthritis treated with etanercept: a case report

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smyth, Andrew

    2010-11-17

    Abstract Introduction Necrotising fasciitis is a severe infection characterised by the fulminant destruction of tissue with associated systemic signs of sepsis and toxicity. Etanercept is a fully human fusion protein that inhibits tumor necrosis factor and the inflammatory cascade. It is effective in the treatment of many disorders but concerns regarding severe life threatening infections have been raised in multiple reports. Case presentation We present the case of a 39-year-old Caucasian man, who presented with sudden onset of severe and progressive neck and left shoulder pain, with a two-year history of seronegative rheumatoid arthritis treated with azathoprine and etanercept. On examination the left side of his neck and his left shoulder were oedematous, tender with an erythematous rash and his active range of movement was limited. Magnetic resonance imaging of his shoulder showed extensive oedema of the subcutaneous and intramuscular fat of the left lower neck consistent with fasciitis. He was treated medically and made a good recovery. Conclusion Our patient, while having a pre-existing increased mortality risk, had a serious infection which responded well to optimum medical treatment without the need for surgery. As anti tumor necrosis factor agents are frequently associated with infection, including tuberculous infection, this case highlights the need for a high index of suspicion for other severe bacterial infections in patients on immunosuppressants.

  11. Randomized multicenter trial on the effect of radiotherapy for plantar Fasciitis (painful heel spur) using very low doses – a study protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niewald, Marcus; Seegenschmiedt, M Heinrich; Micke, Oliver; Gräber, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    A lot of retrospective data concerning the effect of radiotherapy on the painful heel spur (plantar fasciitis) is available in the literature. Nevertheless, a randomized proof of this effect is still missing. Thus, the GCGBD (German cooperative group on radiotherapy for benign diseases) of the DEGRO (German Society for Radiation Oncology) decided to start a randomized multicenter trial in order to find out if the effect of a conventional total dose is superior compared to that of a very low dose. In a prospective, controlled and randomized phase III trial two radiotherapy schedules are to be compared: standard arm: total dose 6.0 Gy in single fractions of 1.0 Gy applied twice a week experimental arm: total dose 0.6 Gy in single fractions of 0.1 Gy applied twice a week (acting as a placebo) Patients aged over 40 years who have been diagnosed clinically and radiologically to be suffering from a painful heel spur for at least six months can be included. Former trauma, surgery or radiotherapy to the heel are not allowed nor are patients with a severe psychiatric disease or women during pregnancy and breastfeeding. According to the statistical power calculation 100 patients have to be enrolled into each arm. After having obtaining a written informed consent a patient is randomized by the statistician to one of the arms mentioned above. After radiotherapy, the patients are seen first every six weeks, then regularly up to 48 months after therapy, they additionally receive a questionnaire every six weeks after the follow-up examinations. The effect is measured using several target variables (scores): Calcaneodynia-score according to Rowe et al., SF-12 score, and visual analogue scale of pain. The most important endpoint is the pain relief three months after therapy. Patients with an inadequate result are offered a second radiotherapy series applying the standard dose (equally in both arms). This trial protocol has been approved by the expert panel of the DEGRO as well as

  12. Platelet-rich plasma versus dry needling of myofascial meridian trigger points in the treatment of plantar fasciitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reem El Mallah

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion PRP injection is a promising line of treatment for chronic PF with documented ultrasonographic healing effect. Dry needling is a simple and safe technique for treating pain associated with PF, yet it is more invasive and less effective compared with PRP injection.

  13. Getting to the heel of the problem: plantar fascia lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeswani, T. [Department of Radiology, Worthing and Southlands Hospitals, West Sussex (United Kingdom); Morlese, J. [Department of Radiology, Royal Free Hospital, Pond street, London, NW3 2QG (United Kingdom); McNally, E.G. [Department of Radiology, Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Oxford (United Kingdom)], E-mail: eugene.mcnally@gmail.com

    2009-09-15

    Heel pain is a frequent disabling symptom. Clinical diagnosis is often difficult with a large range of possible diagnoses. Lesions of the plantar fascia form an important group. We present a review describing the common lesions of the plantar fascia, including plantar fasciitis, plantar fascia rupture, plantar fibromatosis, and plantar xanthoma, and illustrate them with appropriate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound imaging. We also address foreign-body reactions, enthesopathy, and diabetic fascial disease.

  14. Ultrasound diagnosis and evaluation of plantar heel pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argerakis, Nicholas G; Positano, Rock G; Positano, Rock C J; Boccio, Ashley K; Adler, Ronald S; Saboeiro, Gregory R; Dines, Joshua S

    2015-03-01

    One of the most common causes of heel pain is plantar fasciitis; however, there are other pathologic disorders that can mimic the symptoms and clinical presentation of this disorder. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively review the prevalence of various pathologic disorders on ultrasound in patients with proximal plantar heel pain. The medical records and diagnostic ultrasound reports of patients presenting with plantar heel pain between March 1, 2006, and March 31, 2007, were reviewed retrospectively, and the prevalence of various etiologies was collected. The inclusion criteria were based on their clinical presentation of plantar fasciitis or previous diagnosis of plantar fasciitis from an unknown source. Ultrasound evaluation was then performed to confirm the clinical diagnosis. We examined 175 feet of 143 patients (62 males and 81 females; age range, 16-79 years). Plantar fibromas were present in 90 feet (51%). Plantar fasciitis was diagnosed in 128 feet (73%). Coexistent plantar fibroma and plantar fascial thickening was found in 63 feet (36%). Of the 47 feet that were negative for plantar fasciitis on ultrasound, 27 (57%) revealed the presence of plantar fibroma. Diagnostic ultrasound can effectively and safely identify the prevalence of various etiologies of heel pain. The high prevalence of plantar fibromas and plantar fascial tears cannot be determined by clinical examination alone, and, therefore, ultrasound evaluation should be performed for confirmation of diagnosis.

  15. An Eye Popping Case of Orbital Necrotizing Fasciitis Treated with Antibiotics, Surgery, and Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singam, Narayanasarma V; Rusia, Deepam; Prakash, Rajan

    2017-04-01

    BACKGROUND Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) of the orbit is a rare and deadly condition that requires prompt surgical and medical management to decrease morbidity and mortality.  CASE REPORT Here we present an interesting case of an individual who developed fulminant NF of the left orbit requiring emergent surgical intervention, antibiotics, and subsequent hyperbaric oxygen therapy in an attempt to save the eye.  CONCLUSIONS With an early and aggressive multifaceted approach using antibiotics, surgery, and hyperbaric oxygen it may be possible to preserve eye structure and function. Without treatment NF is a rapidly progressive condition and can result in significant morbidity.

  16. Plantar fascia release and calcaneal spur excision for sub-calcaneal heel pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torudom, Yingyong

    2009-06-01

    Aim of this study was to evaluate the results of open plantar fascia release and calcaneal spur excision in patients with plantar fasciitis. The author studied retrospectively the results in 16 patients who had been treated with open plantar fascia release and calcaneal spur excision from 2002 to 2008. Two patients were men and fourteen were women. Their mean age was 43.3 years (39 to 52). Based on visual analog scale the results were pain free in 12 feet and some pain in four. There are two patients with superficial skin infection which can be manage with local wound care and oral antibiotic. We conclude that open plantar fascia release and calcaneal spur excision can relieve pain in patients who resist conservative treatment.

  17. Risk factors affecting chronic rupture of the plantar fascia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ho Seong; Choi, Young Rak; Kim, Sang Woo; Lee, Jin Yong; Seo, Jeong Ho; Jeong, Jae Jung

    2014-03-01

    Prior to 1994, plantar fascia ruptures were considered as an acute injury that occurred primarily in athletes. However, plantar fascia ruptures have recently been reported in the setting of preexisting plantar fasciitis. We analyzed risk factors causing plantar fascia rupture in the presence of preexisting plantar fasciitis. We retrospectively reviewed 286 patients with plantar fasciitis who were referred from private clinics between March 2004 and February 2008. Patients were divided into those with or without a plantar fascia rupture. There were 35 patients in the rupture group and 251 in the nonrupture group. The clinical characteristics and risk factors for plantar fascia rupture were compared between the 2 groups. We compared age, gender, the affected site, visual analog scale pain score, previous treatment regimen, body mass index, degree of ankle dorsiflexion, the use of steroid injections, the extent of activity, calcaneal pitch angle, the presence of a calcaneal spur, and heel alignment between the 2 groups. Of the assessed risk factors, only steroid injection was associated with the occurrence of a plantar fascia rupture. Among the 35 patients with a rupture, 33 had received steroid injections. The odds ratio of steroid injection was 33. Steroid injections for plantar fasciitis should be cautiously administered because of the higher risk for plantar fascia rupture. Level III, retrospective comparative study.

  18. Plantar fascia rupture in a professional soccer player.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzue, Naoto; Iwame, Toshiyuki; Kato, Kenji; Takao, Shoichiro; Tateishi, Tomohiko; Takeda, Yoshitsugu; Hamada, Daisuke; Goto, Tomohiro; Takata, Yoichiro; Matsuura, Tetsuya; Sairyo, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 29-year-old male professional soccer player who presented with symptoms of plantar fasciitis. His symptoms occurred with no remarkable triggers and gradually worsened despite conservative treatments including taping, use of insoles, and physical therapy. Local corticosteroid injection was given twice as a further intervention, but his plantar fascia partially ruptured 49 days after the second injection. He was treated conservatively with platelet-rich plasma, and magnetic resonance imaging showed regenerative change of the ruptured fascia. Five months after the rupture, he returned to his original level of training. If professional athletes find it difficult to refrain from athletic activity, as in the present case, the risk of rupture due to corticosteroid injection should not be overlooked.

  19. Eosinophilic fasciitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Niklas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic fasciitis is a rare connective tissue disease with unclear etiology and pathogenesis. It is classified as a scleroderma-like syndrome. The disease is characterized by fibrosis of the skin and subcutaneous tissues with significant thickening of fascia. Visceral involvement is rare. Characteristic feature in laboratory tests is peripheral blood eosinophilia. Differential diagnosis should be performed, including ruling out systemic sclerosis, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, eosinophilia-myalgia syndrome, scleromyxedema, hypereosinophilic syndrome or Churg-Strauss syndrome. Final diagnosis is confirmed by histopathological examination. In treatment of the disease corticosteroids and/or immunosuppressive drugs are used. Some other drugs showed activity in this disease e.g. dapsone, infiximab or rituximab. Prognosis is rather good but sometimes a long-term treatment is necessary. In this paper we summarized the current knowledge on eosinophilic fasciitis.

  20. Endoscopic plantar fascia release, calcaneal drilling and calcaneal spur removal for management of painful heel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Shazly, Ossama; El Beltagy, Atef

    2010-12-01

    The pathogenesis of painful heel syndrome is multifactorial including plantar fasciitis, increased intra-osseous pressure of the os calcis, calcaneal periostitis and presence of calcaneal spur. The currently used endoscopic treatment of painful heel syndromes involves endoscopic plantar fascia release alone without addressing other pathological changes. To evaluate the clinical outcome of endoscopic plantar fascia release, calcaneal drilling and calcaneal spur removal. The study was conducted on 22 cases/24 feet with idiopathic painful heel syndrome resistant to conservative treatment. All cases were treated by plantar fasciotomy; calcaneal drilling and calcaneal spur removal using a modified cannula trocar system. Evaluation of pain was done using VAS and functional evaluation was done using the Modified Mayo Scoring System for Plantar Fasciotomy. Also patient's satisfaction was evaluated by direct questionnaire. There was statistically significant improvement in the mean VAS from 82.81 (±7.8 std) preoperative to 6.63 (±2.75 std) and the Mayo score form 7.05 (±3.67 std) preoperative to 87.5 (±4.81 std) at 2 years follow up (Pcalcaneal drilling and calcaneal spur removal has high success rate and patient's satisfaction rate when compared to published reports on isolated endoscopic plantar release. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Long-Term Prognosis of Plantar Fasciitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Liselotte; Krogh, Thøger Persson; Ellingsen, Torkell

    2018-01-01

    , exercise-induced symptoms, bilateral heel pain, fascia thickness, and presence of a heel spur) could predict long-term outcomes, (3) to assess the long-term ultrasound (US) development in the fascia, and (4) to assess whether US-guided corticosteroid injections induce atrophy of the heel fat pad. Study....... The risk was significantly greater for women (P Fascia thickness decreased significantly in both the asymptomatic and symptomatic groups (P Fascia thickness (P =.49) and presence of a heel...... spur (P =.88) at baseline had no impact on prognosis. At follow-up, fascia thickness and echogenicity had normalized in only 24% of the asymptomatic group. The mean fat pad thickness was 9.0 mm in patients who had received a US-guided corticosteroid injection and 9.4 mm in those who had not been given...

  2. Plantar Fibroma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you hurt? Interactive Foot Diagram Soft-Tissue Biopsy What Is a Soft-Tissue Biopsy? A soft-tissue biopsy is the removal ... sample of soft tissue for diagnostic purposes. Soft tissue includes... Plantar Wart (Verruca Plantaris) What Is a Plantar Wart? A wart is a ...

  3. A retrospective study of 22 patients with necrotising fasciitis treated at the University Clinical Center of Kosovo (2005-2010).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arifi, Hysni M; Duci, Shkelzen B; Zatriqi, Violeta K; Ahmeti, Hasan R; Ismajli, Vildane H; Gashi, Musli M; Zejnullahu, Ylber M; Mekaj, Agon Y

    2013-08-01

    Necrotising fasciitis (NF) is a destructive invasive infection of skin, subcutaneous tissue and deep fascia. The aim of the study is to determine the causative agents of NF, its localisation, predisposing factors and comorbid conditions, duration of treatment and distribution of NF in different age groups and over the years. We conducted a retrospective study including 22 patients with NF from 2005 to 2010 in the University Clinical Center of Kosovo. The data were collected and analysed from the archives and protocols of the University Clinical Center of Kosovo. The average age of patients was 56·9 years. In eight cases or 36·4% of total patients studied, NF was caused by monobacterial agents with a predominance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (five cases or 22·7% of total infections). Polybacterial agents were responsible for NF infection in other 14 cases (63·6%). Majority of the patients had other comorbidities like diabetes, trauma and prior history of surgical interventions. Diabetes was present in 17 patients or 77·3%. The remaining five patients (22·7%) had previous trauma and recent surgical intervention. Average length of treatment was 43 days. The hospital mortality rate in our case series was 22·6%. Early identification and diagnosis of NF significantly improves outcome and reduces mortality. © 2012 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Medicalhelplines.com Inc.

  4. Plantar Fibroma and Plantar Fibromatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... also wrap around the local digital nerves and arteries. How is plantar fibroma diagnosed? There are a ... Society ® Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Foundation 9400 W. Higgins Road, Suite 220, Rosemont, IL 60018 800-235-4855 ...

  5. Eosinophilic fasciitis after parasite infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Oliveira

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic fasciitis is a systemic inflammatory disease characterized by symmetrical swelling and skin induration of the distal portions of the arms and/or legs, evolving into a scleroderma-like appearance, accompanied by peripheral blood eosinophilia. It is a rare disease with a poorly understood etiology. Corticosteroid treatment remains the standard therapy, either taken alone or in association with an immunosuppressive drug. This paper presents a case of a male patient with palpebral edema and marked eosinophilia, diagnosed with intestinal parasitic infection in October 2006. He was treated with an antiparasitic drug, but both the swelling and the analytical changes remained. This was followed by a skin and muscle biopsy, which turned out to be compatible with eosinophilic fasciitis. There was progressive worsening of the clinical state, with stiffness of the abdominal wall and elevated inflammatory parameters, and the patient was referred to the Immunology Department, medicated with corticosteroids and methotrexate. Over the years there were therapeutic adjustments and other causes were excluded. Currently the patient continues to be monitored, and there is no evidence of active disease. The case described in this article is interesting because of the diagnosis of eosinophilic fasciitis probably associated/coexisting with a parasite infection. This case report differs from others in that there is an uncommon cause associated with the onset of the disease, instead of the common causes such as trauma, medication, non-parasitic infections or cancer.

  6. Effectiveness of trigger point dry needling for plantar heel pain: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landorf Karl B

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plantar heel pain (plantar fasciitis is a common and disabling condition, which has a detrimental impact on health-related quality of life. Despite the high prevalence of plantar heel pain, the optimal treatment for this disorder remains unclear. Consequently, an alternative therapy such as dry needling is increasingly being used as an adjunctive treatment by health practitioners. Only two trials have investigated the effectiveness of dry needling for plantar heel pain, however both trials were of a low methodological quality. This manuscript describes the design of a randomised controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of dry needling for plantar heel pain. Methods Eighty community-dwelling men and woman aged over 18 years with plantar heel pain (who satisfy the inclusion and exclusion criteria will be recruited. Eligible participants with plantar heel pain will be randomised to receive either one of two interventions, (i real dry needling or (ii sham dry needling. The protocol (including needling details and treatment regimen was formulated by general consensus (using the Delphi research method using 30 experts worldwide that commonly use dry needling for plantar heel pain. Primary outcome measures will be the pain subscale of the Foot Health Status Questionnaire and "first step" pain as measured on a visual analogue scale. The secondary outcome measures will be health related quality of life (assessed using the Short Form-36 questionnaire - Version Two and depression, anxiety and stress (assessed using the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale - short version. Primary outcome measures will be performed at baseline, 2, 4, 6 and 12 weeks and secondary outcome measures will be performed at baseline, 6 and 12 weeks. Data will be analysed using the intention to treat principle. Conclusion This study is the first randomised controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of dry needling for plantar heel pain. The trial will

  7. Effectiveness of dry needling and injections of myofascial trigger points associated with plantar heel pain: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cotchett Matthew P

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plantar heel pain (plantar fasciitis is one of the most common musculoskeletal pathologies of the foot. Plantar heel pain can be managed with dry needling and/or injection of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs however the evidence for its effectiveness is uncertain. Therefore, we aimed to systematically review the current evidence for the effectiveness of dry needling and/or injections of MTrPs associated with plantar heel pain. Methods We searched specific electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus and AMI in April 2010 to identify randomised and non-randomised trials. We included trials where participants diagnosed with plantar heel pain were treated with dry needling and/or injections (local anaesthetics, steroids, Botulinum toxin A and saline alone or in combination with acupuncture. Outcome measures that focussed on pain and function were extracted from the data. Trials were assessed for quality using the Quality Index tool. Results Three quasi-experimental trials matched the inclusion criteria: two trials found a reduction in pain for the use of trigger point dry needling when combined with acupuncture and the third found a reduction in pain using 1% lidocaine injections when combined with physical therapy. However, the methodological quality of the three trials was poor, with Quality Index scores ranging form 7 to 12 out of a possible score of 27. A meta-analysis was not conducted because substantial heterogeneity was present between trials. Conclusions There is limited evidence for the effectiveness of dry needling and/or injections of MTrPs associated with plantar heel pain. However, the poor quality and heterogeneous nature of the included studies precludes definitive conclusions being made. Importantly, this review highlights the need for future trials to use rigorous randomised controlled methodology with measures such as blinding to reduce bias. We also recommend that such trials adhere to the

  8. Fascitis plantar: efectividad de la punción seca y otros tratamientos

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno Cabello, María

    2018-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis is a common cause of heel pain in adults, mostly in women. There exist different treatments for plantar fasciitis, although full effectiveness based on the evidence has not been demonstrated for none of them. Dry needling of myofascial trigger points is an emergent method that is being used in the last years for the treatment of this pathology. The aim of this work is to carry out a bibliographic review of the different treatments used in the current practice, and to analyze...

  9. Fascitis plantar

    OpenAIRE

    López Pérez, Diego

    2014-01-01

    La fascitis plantar (FP) es una de las causas más frecuentes de dolor en el pie, afectando al talón. Es un síndrome degenerativo de la fascia plantar que se produce como resultado de traumas repetidos en el origen de ésta, en el calcáneo, y es la causa más común de dolor en el talón en las personas adultas. Suele presentarse en atletas y corredores, aunque también aparece en la población general, afectando aproximadamente a un 10% en ambos casos. La función que desempeña la fascia es doble...

  10. [Necrotizing fasciitis after varicella].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, E; Furtado, F; Estrada, J; Vale, M C; Pinto, M; Santos, M; Moura, G; Vasconcelos, C

    2001-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare and severe infection characterised by extremely rapid progressive involvement of the superficial fascias and deep dermal layers of the skin, with resultant vasculitis and necrosis. The authors present three clinical cases of necrotizing fasciitis; all three patients previously had varicella rash, rapid progressive spreading erythema with severe pain and toxic shock syndrome. Two patients had positive cultures of b-haemolytic streptococcus. Early stage differential diagnosis with celulitis, aggressive antibiotic treatment and pediatric intensive care support are essential. However, the main therapy is early extensive surgical approach involving all indurate areas, down to and including the muscle fascia.

  11. Cervical Necrotizing Fasciitis Caused by Dental Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alcides Arruda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical necrotizing fasciitis is an unusual infection characterized by necrosis of the subcutaneous tissue and fascial layers. Risk factors for the development of necrotizing fasciitis include diabetes mellitus, chronic renal disease, peripheral vascular disease, malnutrition, advanced age, obesity, alcohol abuse, intravenous drug use, surgery, and ischemic ulcers. This report presents a case of necrotizing fasciitis in the cervical area caused by dental extraction in a 73-year-old woman. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis in geriatric patient is rare, and even when establishing the diagnosis and having it timely treated, the patient can suffer irreversible damage or even death. Clinical manifestations in the head and neck usually have an acute onset characterized by severe pain, swelling, redness, erythema, presence of necrotic tissue, and in severe cases obstruction of the upper airways. Therefore, the presentation of this clinical case can serve as guidance to dentists as a precaution to maintain an aseptic chain and be aware of the clinical condition of older patients and the systemic conditions that may increase the risk of infections.

  12. Tube Thoracostomy-Related Necrotizing Fasciitis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun-Pin Hsu

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous pneumothorax is a serious complication of pulmonary tuberculosis that requires immediate treatment. Necrotizing fasciitis is a serious, rapidly progressive infection of the subcutaneous tissue and fascia, most related to trauma or surgery. Here, we report a case of pulmonary tuberculosis with spontaneous pneumothorax. A standard procedure of tube thoracostomy was performed for lung re-expansion. Two days after the tube was removed, necrotizing fasciitis developed from the puncture site. Computed tomography of the chest showed focal thickness with gas formation and loss of the fat plane over the chest wall, which is compatible with the diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis. Aggressive treatment was given, including emergency fasciectomy and adequate systemic antibiotic and antituberculous treatment. The necrotizing fasciitis was successfully treated. The patient was discharged and sent home with maintenance antituberculous therapy.

  13. Eosinophilic fasciitis (Shulman syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Sueli; Brotas, Arles; Lamy, Fabrício; Lisboa, Flávia; Lago, Eduardo; Azulay, David; Cuzzi, Tulia; Ramos-e-Silva, Marcia

    2005-04-01

    We present a case of eosinophilic fasciitis, or Shulman syndrome, in a 35-year-old man and discuss its clinical and histopathologic aspects, as well as its relationship to scleroderma. Although controversial, the tendency is to set Shulman syndrome apart from all other sclerodermiform states.

  14. Odontogenic cervical necrotizing fasciitis, etiological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juncar, M; Bran, S; Juncar, R I; Baciut, M F; Baciut, G; Onisor-Gligor, F

    2016-01-01

    Cervical necrotizing fasciitis is a rare but very severe infection that affects the soft-tissues of the cephalic extremity. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis most frequently occurs secondarily to inflammatory odontogenic disorders and represents the most severe infection of maxillofacial spaces, with a high lethal potential. In this study, we selected 55 patients with confirmed cervical necrotizing fasciitis of odontogenic origin, treated in the Clinic of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery in Cluj-Napoca during January 1996-December 2012. In the majority of cases, the disease evolved without the presence of associated systemic disorders (60% [45.49-72.69]), the rest of the patients having 1-4 types of systemic disorders; type 2 diabetes mellitus was the most frequent type of underlying systemic disorder. From the appearance of the first symptoms until the presentation for treatment, a time interval of 2-30 days elapsed. During this time period, 78.18% (95% confidence interval [CI] [65.49-89.06]) of the patients received antibiotic treatment, but without results. Mandibular molars were the most frequent starting point of the disease, and the submandibular space was the first affected by the disease, 47.27% (95% CI [32.76-61.79]). Bacteriological exams showed that facultatively aerobic/anaerobic G + bacteria were the most frequently identified (72.22% [58.21-83.60]). The odontogenic lesions of the lower molars, complicated by submandibular space infections, are the most frequent starting point of odontogenic cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis. Delayed surgical treatment and strict antibiotic therapy play an important role in favoring the development of odontogenic necrotizing fasciitis.

  15. Finite element analysis of plantar fascia during walking: a quasi-static simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Nien; Chang, Chih-Wei; Li, Chun-Ting; Chang, Chih-Han; Lin, Cheng-Feng

    2015-01-01

    The plantar fascia is a primary arch supporting structure of the foot and is often stressed with high tension during ambulation. When the loading on the plantar fascia exceeds its capacity, the inflammatory reaction known as plantar fasciitis may occur. Mechanical overload has been identified as the primary causative factor of plantar fasciitis. However, a knowledge gap exists between how the internal mechanical responses of the plantar fascia react to simple daily activities. Therefore, this study investigated the biomechanical responses of the plantar fascia during loaded stance phase by use of the finite element (FE) modeling. A 3-dimensional (3-D) FE foot model comprising bones, cartilage, ligaments, and a complex-shaped plantar fascia was constructed. During the stance phase, the kinematics of the foot movement was reproduced and Achilles tendon force was applied to the insertion site on the calcaneus. All the calculations were made on a single healthy subject. The results indicated that the plantar fascia underwent peak tension at preswing (83.3% of the stance phase) at approximately 493 N (0.7 body weight). Stress concentrated near the medial calcaneal tubercle. The peak von Mises stress of the fascia increased 2.3 times between the midstance and preswing. The fascia tension increased 66% because of the windlass mechanism. Because of the membrane element used in the ligament tissue, this FE model was able to simulate the mechanical structure of the foot. After prescribing kinematics of the distal tibia, the proposed model indicated the internal fascia was stressed in response to the loaded stance phase. Based on the findings of this study, adjustment of gait pattern to reduce heel rise and Achilles tendon force may lower the fascia loading and may further reduce pain in patients with plantar fasciitis. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Post-aural Nodular Fasciitis

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    Mohammed Al Rahbi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nodular fasciitis is a rare benign lesion. Here we report a case of post-auricular nodular fasciitis, which was misdiagnosed by fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC as pleomorphic adenoma. An 18-year-old male presented at Al-Nahdha Hospital, physical examination revealed a right post aural firm immobile mass. Radiology suggested the presence of a hypo-dense to iso-dense subcutaneous mass. The swelling was excised and sent for histopathological examination which suggested the diagnosis of nodular fasciitis. FNAC reported pleomorphic adenoma of unusual location should raise the suspicion of nodular fasciitis.

  17. Treatment of necrotizing fasciitis with quinolones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.T.; Tahmeedullah; Obaidullah

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of high dose quinolones therapy in patients with necrotizing fasciitis. Subjects and Methods: Twenty consecutive patients, diagnosed with necrotizing fasciitis, were treated with intravenous quinolones, (400 mg 8 hourly). The response was evaluated in terms of subsidence of fever and C-reactive proteins levels. Results: Majority of the patients was male (60%). Lower limb involvement was most commonly involved (70%). The most common initiating cause was injection abscess (45%). Majority of the cultures showed polymicrobial infection (90%). The most common isolate was streptococcus pyogenes (65%). Majority of the patients showed excellent response with intravenous quinolones (Ciprofloxacin) in high doses in 24-48 hours. Only two patients (10%) failed to respond to therapy due to severe infection and delay in seeking treatment. Conclusion: intravenous quinolones (Ciprofloxacin) in high doses are effective in controlling necrotizing soft tissue infections. (author)

  18. Clinical Characteristics of the Causes of Plantar Heel Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Tae Im; Seo, In Seok; Huh, Won Seok; Yoon, Tae Hee; Kim, Bo Ra

    2011-01-01

    Objective The objectives of this study were to investigate the causes of plantar heel pain and find differences in the clinical features of plantar fasciitis (PF) and fat pad atrophy (FPA), which are common causes of plantar heel pain, for use in differential diagnosis. Method This retrospective study analyzed the medical records of 250 patients with plantar heel pain at the Foot Clinic of Rehabilitation Medicine at Bundang Jesaeng General Hospital from January to September, 2008. Results The subjects used in this study were 114 men and 136 women patients with a mean age of 43.8 years and mean heel pain duration of 13.3 months. Causes of plantar heel pain were PF (53.2%), FPA (14.8%), pes cavus (10.4%), PF with FPA (9.2%), pes planus (4.8%), plantar fibromatosis (4.4%), plantar fascia rupture (1.6%), neuropathy (0.8%), and small shoe syndrome (0.8%). PF and FPA were most frequently diagnosed. First-step pain in the morning, and tenderness on medial calcaneal tuberosity correlated with PF. FPA mainly involved bilateral pain, pain at night, and pain that was aggravated by standing. Heel cord tightness was the most common biomechanical abnormality of the foot. Heel spur was frequently seen in X-rays of patients with PF. Conclusion Plantar heel pain can be provoked by PF, FPA, and other causes. Patients with PF or FPA typically show different characteristics in clinical features. Plantar heel pain requires differential diagnosis for appropriate treatment. PMID:22506166

  19. Mortality in necrotizing fasciitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waseem, A.R.; Samad, A.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the mortality rate in patients presenting with Necrotizing Fasciitis. This prospective study was conducted at ward 26, JPMC Karachi over a period of two years from March 2001 to Feb 2003. All patients above the age of 12 years diagnosed to be having Necrotizing Fasciitis and admitted through the Accident and emergency department were included in this study. After resuscitation, the patients underwent the emergency exploration and aggressive surgical debridement. Post-operatively, the patients were managed in isolated section of the ward. The patients requiring grafting were referred to plastic surgery unit. The patients were followed up in outpatients department for about two years. Over all, 25 male and 5 female patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were included in this study. The common clinical manifestations include redness, swelling, discharging abscess, pain, fever, skin necrosis and foul smelling discharge etc. The most common predisposing factor was Diabetes mellitus whereas the most commonly involved site was perineum. All patients underwent aggressive and extensive surgical debridements. The common additional procedures included Skin grafting, Secondary suturing, Cystostomy and Orchidectomy. Bacteroides and E. coli were the main micro-organisms isolated in this study. Bacteroides was the most common microorganism isolated among the eight patients who died. Necrotizing Fasciitis is a potentially life threatening emergency condition and carries the mortality rate of about 26.6%. The major contributing factors to increase the mortality missed initially diagnosed, old age, diabetes mellitus truncal involvement and late presentation. Anorectal involvement of disease carry worse prognosis. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy and proper use of unprocessed honey reduced the mortality rate. (author)

  20. Plantar Wart (Verruca Plantaris)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you hurt? Interactive Foot Diagram Soft-Tissue Biopsy What Is a Soft-Tissue Biopsy? A soft-tissue biopsy is the removal ... sample of soft tissue for diagnostic purposes. Soft tissue includes... Plantar Fibroma What Is the Plantar Fibroma? A plantar fibroma is ...

  1. Necrotizing fasciitis: strategies for diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taviloglu, Korhan; Yanar, Hakan

    2007-08-07

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is uncommon and difficult to diagnose, and it cause progressive morbidity until the infectious process is diagnosed and treated medically and surgically. The literature addressed NF contains confusing information, inaccurate bacteriologic data, and antiquated antibiotic therapy. A delay in diagnosis is associated with a grave prognosis and increased mortality. The main goal of the clinician must be to establish the diagnosis and initially treat the patient within the standard of care. This review is planned as a guide for the clinician in making an early diagnosis of NF and initiating effective medical and surgical therapy.

  2. Necrotizing fasciitis: strategies for diagnosis and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanar Hakan

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Necrotizing fasciitis (NF is uncommon and difficult to diagnose, and it cause progressive morbidity until the infectious process is diagnosed and treated medically and surgically. The literature addressed NF contains confusing information, inaccurate bacteriologic data, and antiquated antibiotic therapy. A delay in diagnosis is associated with a grave prognosis and increased mortality. The main goal of the clinician must be to establish the diagnosis and initially treat the patient within the standard of care. This review is planned as a guide for the clinician in making an early diagnosis of NF and initiating effective medical and surgical therapy.

  3. Necrotizing Fasciitis: An Unusual Sequela Of Injections In Children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Necrotising fasciitis (NF) of the head and the trunk in children is a serious infection that carries high morbidity and mortality. We recently managed two infants with NF from injection mishap of the head and the trunk, respectively. The aim of this report is to highlight ways of effectively treating and/preventing ...

  4. Necrotising fasciitis of the submandibular region | Nyako | Ghana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two cases of necrotizing fasciitis (NF) complicating different conditions of the maxillofacial region, treated at the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital are reported. These were managed by an early diagnosis, aggressive surgical exploration, fasciotomies and debridement of necrotic tissue. In addition, frequent irrigation within the ...

  5. Retrospective evaluation of necrotizing fasciitis in university college ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: Cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis (CNF), although a potentially fatal fulminant infection has been largely under‑reported in the dental literature. Aims: To report our experience with cases seen and treated at the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria. Settings and Design: A descriptive retrospective clinical ...

  6. Necrotizing fasciitis - Report of two unusual cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamulegeya, Adriane

    2008-01-01

    Cervico-facial necrotizing fasciitis is a potential complication of odontogenic infection that can lead to mediastinitis and septic shock. A delay or inappropriate treatment of simple infections and immunocompromise increase the risk of developing the disease and in turn increase the morbidity and mortality of the disease. We present two cases one of which we believe developed due to delayed treatment and the other due to immunocompromise. Both cases were successfully treated with surgical debridement and broad spectrum antibiotics. There is need to rethink certain clinical judgments such as treatment during pregnancy and the usefulness of an informative medical history from patients. (author)

  7. Eosinophilic Fasciitis Induced by Fire Ant Bites

    OpenAIRE

    Mallepalli, Jyothi R.; Quinet, Robert J.; Sus, Rachana

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To describe a case of eosinophilic fasciitis likely related to proximate fire ant bites and review the literature to summarize the etiology and clinical, laboratory, histopathological, and therapeutic aspects of eosinophilic fasciitis.

  8. Nonodontogenic Cervical Necrotizing Fasciitis Caused by Sialadenitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alper Yenigun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is a rapidly progressive infectious disease of the soft tissue with high mortality and morbidity rates. Necrotizing fasciitis is occasionally located in the head and neck region and develops after odontogenic infections. Factors affecting treatment success rates are early diagnosis, appropriate antibiotic treatment, and surgical debridement. We present a necrotizing fasciitis case located in the neck region that developed after sialoadenitis. It is important to emphasize that necrotizing fasciitis to be seen in the neck region is very rare. Nonodontogenic necrotizing fasciitis is even more rare.

  9. Calcaneal attachment of the plantar fascia: MR findings in asymptomatic volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrmann, Christine; Maier, Matthias; Mengiardi, Bernard; Pfirrmann, Christian W A; Sutter, Reto

    2014-09-01

    To determine the spectrum of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings at the calcaneal attachment of the plantar fascia in asymptomatic volunteers. The study was approved by the institutional review board, and informed consent was obtained from all subjects. MR imaging was performed in 77 asymptomatic volunteers (mean age, 48.0 years; age range, 23-83 years) with use of a 1.5-T system. There were 40 women (mean age, 49.0 years; age range, 24-83 years) and 37 men (mean age, 48.0 years; age range, 23-83 years). Signal intensity characteristics and thickness of the medial, central, and lateral fascicles of the plantar fascia were assessed independently by two radiologists. The presence of soft-tissue edema, bone marrow edema, and bone spur formation at the attachment of the plantar fascia was noted. Datasets were analyzed with inferential statistic procedures. The mean thickness of the plantar fascia was 0.6 mm (medial fascicle), 4.0 mm (central fascicle), and 2.3 mm (lateral fascicle). Increased signal intensity in the plantar fascia was seen with the T1-weighted sequence in 16 of the 77 volunteers (21%), the T2-weighted sequence in six (7.8%), and the short inversion time inversion-recovery sequence in six (7.8%). Soft-tissue edema was seen deep to the plantar fascia in five of the 77 volunteers (6.5%) and superficial to the plantar fascia in 16 (21%). A calcaneal spur was detected in 15 of the 77 volunteers (19%). Calcaneal bone marrow edema was present in four volunteers (5.2%). T1-weighted signal intensity changes in the plantar fascia, soft-tissue edema superficial to the plantar fascia, and calcaneal spurs are common findings in asymptomatic volunteers and should be used with caution in the diagnosis of plantar fasciitis. Increased signal intensity within the plantar fascia with fluid-sensitive sequences is uncommon in asymptomatic volunteers.

  10. Atypical presentations of eosinophilic fasciitis

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    Tulin Ergun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic fasciitis is an uncommon connective tissue disease that may mimic and overlap with other sclerosing disorders such as morphea and lichen sclerosus. Herein, we report four patients (two men and two women, aged 16-64 yeas with eosinophilic fasciitis. There was overlap with both morphea and lichen sclerosus in 2 patients and with morphoea alone in 1 patient. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI was used for diagnosis in three patients and for assessing treatment response in one patient. Eosinophilic fasciitis may co-exist with morhoea and lichen sclerosus. In view of the overlapping clinical and histopathological features of these disorders, MRI may be helful in delineating the conditions by detecting involvement of fascia.

  11. Giant VAC in a patient with extensive necrotizing fasciitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinstraesser, Lars; Sand, Michael; Steinau, Hans-Ulrich

    2009-03-01

    The authors present a case of an extensive fulminant necrotizing fasciitis of the left flank, thigh, and lower parts of the leg treated with debridement, split-thickness skin grafting, and a giant negative pressure wound dressing covering 0.53 m( 2) or 18% of the body surface. To the authors' knowledge, this is the largest split-thickness grafted body surface successfully treated with negative pressure wound dressing documented in the literature.

  12. Sonographically guided deep plantar fascia injections: where does the injectate go?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maida, Eugene; Presley, James C; Murthy, Naveen; Pawlina, Wojciech; Smith, Jay

    2013-08-01

    To determine the distribution of sonographically guided deep plantar fascia injections in an unembalmed cadaveric model. A single experienced operator completed 10 sonographically guided deep plantar fascia injections in 10 unembalmed cadaveric specimens (5 right and 5 left) obtained from 6 donors (2 male and 4 female) aged 49 to 95 years (mean, 77.5 years) with a mean body mass index of 23.2 kg/m(2) (range, 18.4-26.3 kg/m(2)). A 12-3-MHz linear array transducer was used to direct a 22-gauge, 38-mm stainless steel needle deep to the plantar fascia at the anterior aspect of the calcaneus using an in-plane, medial-to-lateral approach. In each case, 1.5 mL of 50% diluted colored latex was injected deep to the plantar fascia. After a minimum of 72 hours, study coinvestigators dissected each specimen to assess injectate placement. All 10 injections accurately placed latex adjacent to the deep side of the plantar fascia at the anterior calcaneus. However, the flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) origin from the plantar fascia variably limited direct latex contact with the plantar fascia, and small amounts of latex interdigitated with the FDB origin in 90% (9 of 10). In all 10 specimens, latex also covered the traversing first branch of the lateral plantar nerve (FBLPN, ie, Baxter nerve) between the FDB and quadratus plantae muscles. No latex was found in the plantar fat pad or plantar fascia in any specimen. Sonographically guided deep plantar fascia injections reliably deliver latex deep to the plantar fascia while avoiding intrafascial injection. However, the extent of direct plantar fascia contact is variable due to the intervening FDB. On the contrary, the traversing FBLPN is reliably covered by the injection. Deep plantar fascia injections may have a role in the management of refractory plantar fasciitis, particularly following failed superficial perifascial or intrafascial injections, in cases of preferential deep plantar fascia involvement, or when entrapment

  13. [Necrotizing fasciitis. 2011 update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herr, M; Grabein, B; Palm, H-G; Efinger, K; Riesner, H-J; Friemert, B; Willy, C

    2011-03-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis belongs to a group of complicated soft tissue infections that can be even life threatening. Despite growing knowledge about its etiology, predictors, and the clinical progression, the mortality remains at a high level with 20%. A relevant reduction can be achieved only by an early diagnosis followed by consistent therapy. The clinical findings in about 75% of the cases are pain out of proportion, edema and tenderness, blisters, and erythema. It is elementary to differentiate a necrotizing or a non-necrotizing soft tissue infection early. In uncertain cases it can be necessary to perform a surgical exploration to confirm the diagnosis. The histopathologic characteristics are the fascial necrosis, vasculitis, thrombosis of perforating veins, the presence of the disease-causing bacteria as well as inflammatory cells like macrophages and polymorphonuclear granulocytes. Secondly, both the cutis and the muscle can be affected. In many cases there is a disproportion of the degree of local and systemic symptoms. Depending on the infectious agents there are two main types: type I is a polymicrobial infection and type II is a more invasive, serious, and fulminant monomicrobial infection mostly caused by group A Streptococcus pyogenes.Invasive, severe forms of streptococcal infections seem to occur more often in recent years. Multimodal and interdisciplinary therapy should be based on radical surgical débridement, systemic antibiotic therapy as well as enhanced intensive care therapy, which is sometimes combined with immunoglobulins (in streptococcal or staphylococcal infections) or hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT, in clostridial infections). For wound care of extensive soft tissue defects vacuum-assisted closure has shown its benefit.

  14. Fulminant necrotizing fasciitis following the use of herbal concoction: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasir Abdulrasheed A

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare and life-threatening rapidly progressive soft tissue infection. A fulminant case could involve muscle and bone. Necrotizing fasciitis after corticosteroid therapy and intramuscular injection of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs has been reported. We present a case of fulminant necrotizing fasciitis occurring in a patient who used a herbal concoction to treat a chronic leg ulcer. Case presentation A 20-year-old Ibo woman from Nigeria presented with a three-year history of recurrent chronic ulcer of the right leg. She started applying a herbal concoction to dress the wound two weeks prior to presentation. This resulted in rapidly progressive soft tissue necrosis that spread from the soft tissue to the bone, despite aggressive emergency debridement. As a result she underwent above-knee amputation. Conclusion The herbal concoction used is toxic, and can initiate and exacerbate necrotizing fasciitis. Its use for wound dressing should be discouraged.

  15. Fatal Necrotizing Fasciitis following Episiotomy

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    Faris Almarzouqi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Necrotizing fasciitis is an uncommon condition in general practice but one that provokes serious morbidity. It is characterized by widespread fascial necrosis with relative sparing of skin and underlying muscle. Herein, we report a fatal case of necrotizing fasciitis in a young healthy woman after episiotomy. Case Report. A 17-year-old primigravida underwent a vaginal delivery with mediolateral episiotomy. Necrotizing fasciitis was diagnosed on the 5th postpartum day, when the patient was referred to our tertiary care medical center. Surgical debridement was initiated together with antibiotics and followed by hyperbaric oxygen therapy. The patient died due to septic shock after 16 hours from the referral. Conclusion. Delay of diagnosis and consequently the surgical debridement were most likely the reasons for maternal death. In puerperal period, a physician must consider necrotizing fasciitis as a possible diagnosis in any local sings of infection especially when accompanied by fever and/or tenderness. Early diagnosis is the key for low mortality and morbidity.

  16. Plantar fascia (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The plantar fascia is a very thick band of tissue that covers the bones on the bottom of the foot. It ... band of tissue causes a high arch. This fascia can become inflamed and painful in some people, ...

  17. A Fatal Case of Multidrug Resistant Acinetobacter Necrotizing Fasciitis: The Changing Scary Face of Nosocomial Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nupur Sinha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is an uncommon soft-tissue infection, associated with high morbidity and mortality. Early recognition and treatment are crucial for survival. Acinetobacter baumannii is rarely associated with necrotizing fasciitis. Wound infections due to A. baumannii have been described in association with severe trauma in soldiers. There are only sporadic reports of monomicrobial A. baumannii necrotizing fasciitis. We report a unique case of monomicrobial necrotizing fasciitis caused by multidrug resistant (MDR A. baumannii, in absence of any preceding trauma, surgery, or any obvious breech in the continuity of skin or mucosa. A 48-year-old woman with history of HIV, asthma, hypertension, and tobacco and excocaine use presented with acute respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. She was treated for pneumonia for 7 days and was successfully extubated. All septic work-up was negative. Two days later, she developed rapidly spreading nonblanching edema with bleb formation at the lateral aspect of right thigh. Emergent extensive debridement and fasciotomy were performed. Operative findings and histopathology were consistent with necrotizing fasciitis. Despite extensive debridement, she succumbed to septic shock in the next few hours. Blood, wound, and tissue cultures grew A. baumannii, sensitive only to amikacin and polymyxin. Histopathology was consistent with necrotizing fasciitis.

  18. Infant with MRSA necrotizing fasciitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panglao Rajan M

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Maria Panglao Rajan,1 Pinkal Patel,1 Lori Cash,1 Anjali Parish,2 Scott Darby,1 Jack Yu,3 Jatinder Bhatia11Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Georgia, Augusta, GA, USA; 2Medical Center of Central Georgia, Augusta, GA, USA; 3Department of Plastic Surgery, Children's Hospital of Georgia, Augusta, GA, USAAbstract: This is an unusual case of necrotizing fasciitis caused by methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in this premature infant, which highlights severity, rapid progression of this disease and shows outcome if intervention is initiated at an early stage. This case also highlights one of the possible serious complications of percutaneous inserted central catheter (PICC line, which can be life threatening.Keywords: necrotizing fasciitis, methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus, PICC, premature infant

  19. Survival from Cervical Necrotizing Fasciitis

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    Gausepohl, Jeniffer S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical necrotizing fasciitis (CNF is an uncommon, yet clinically significant infection that rapidly progresses to involve the deep neck spaces. Early recognition and aggressive surgical intervention and debridement are important, as this disease is associated with a high morbidity and mortality. In this report, we present a case of CNF and descending mediastinitis from a non-odontogenic source in a patient presenting with neck swelling and odynophagia. [West J Emerg Med. 2015;16(1:172–174.

  20. Odontogenic cervical necrotizing fasciitis, etiological aspects ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Cervical necrotizing fasciitis is a rare but very severe infection that affects the soft‑tissues of the cephalic extremity. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis most frequently occurs secondarily to inflammatory odontogenic disorders and represents the most severe infection of maxillofacial spaces, with a high lethal potential.

  1. Multifocal necrotizing fasciitis following Hirshsprung's disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Multifocal necrotizing fasciitis following Hirshsprung's disease surgery away from the surgical wound site. Ahmed A. Haseeb, Shadi Okasha and Atef Elbarawi. Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a life-threatening infection with rapidly progressive necrosis. Escherichia coli is rarely reported as causative agent of type 2 NF.

  2. Necrotizing Fasciitis Associated with Staphylococcus lugdunensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Hung

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is a life-threatening soft tissue infection that results in rapid local tissue destruction. Type 1 necrotizing fasciitis is characterized by polymicrobial, synergistic infections that are caused by non-Group A streptococci, aerobic and anaerobic organisms. Type 2 necrotizing fasciitis involves Group A Streptococcus (GAS with or without a coexisting staphylococcal infection. Here we provide the first report of necrotizing fasciitis jointly associated with the microbes Group B Streptococcus and Staphylococcus lugdunensis. S. lugdunensis is a commensal human skin bacterium known to cause often painful and prolonged skin and soft tissue infections. To our knowledge, however, this is the first case of Staph. lugdunensis-associated necrotizing fasciitis to be reported in the literature.

  3. Plantar Hyperhidrosis: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahovic, Tracey C

    2016-07-01

    Plantar hyperhidrosis, excessive sweating on the soles of feet, can have a significant impact on patients' quality of life and emotional well-being. Hyperhidrosis is divided into primary and secondary categories, depending on the cause of the sweating, with plantar hyperhidrosis typically being primary and idiopathic. There is an overall increased risk of cutaneous infection in the presence of hyperhidrosis, including fungal, bacterial, and viral infections. This article discusses a range of treatment options including topical aluminum chloride, iontophoresis, injectable botulinum toxin A, glycopyrrolate, oxybutynin, laser, and endoscopic lumbar sympathectomy. Lifestyle changes regarding hygiene, shoe gear, insoles, and socks are also discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Necrotizing fasciitis of the lower extremity: a case report and current concept of diagnosis and management.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Naqvi, G A

    2012-02-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a severe soft tissue infection characterized by rapidly progressing necrosis, involving subcutaneous tissues. This rare condition carries high mortality rate and require prompt diagnosis and urgent treatment with radical debridement and antibiotics. We describe a case of 21-year old man who presented with the history of trivial injury to the knee. Initially he was admitted and treated for septic arthritis but later was diagnosed as necrotizing fasciitis which was successfully treated with no ill effects what so ever from this devastating condition. This rare condition has been reported in literature but still early diagnosis, which is a key for successful treatment, remains a challenge.

  5. Extended retroperitoneal necrotizing fasciitis with genital involvement, resembling fournier gangrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Motokazu; Matsuura, Kenji; Takayama, Hiroshi; Kayo, Munefumi; Ie, Tomotsugu

    2010-10-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a serious infection that originates in the subcutaneous tissues. Although many reports have been published about necrotizing infections of other anatomical sites, retroperitoneal necrotizing soft tissue infection is a rare entity that has been described in only a few case reports. The etiology and clinical course of retroperitoneal necrotizing fasciitis can be variable and it is often difficult to identify the etiology of the infective process. We report a 58-year-old man with rapidly progressive, gas-producing, necrotizing inflammation in the retroperitoneum, complicated with genital involvement resembling Fournier gangrene. The patient was managed successfully by aggressive drainage, debridement, and sequential laparotomies to track and control the extensive necrosis of the retroperitoneum and perineum, in addition to systemic care to control sepsis. After his general condition stabilized, early rectosigmoid adenocarcinoma was identified and resected curatively. He remained well at follow up, six months after discharge. In retrospect, the trigger of the disease process was unclear. Although it was believed possibly to be due to the colon lesion, adenocarcinoma of the rectosigmoid colon was identified and the patient was managed successfully. Similar to necrotizing infections at other anatomical sites, early diagnosis and timely surgical intervention and systemic antimicrobial therapy are mandatory for treating patients with retroperitoneal necrotizing fasciitis.

  6. Necrotizing fasciitis: an urgent diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paz Maya, Silvia; Dualde Beltran, Delfina [Hospital Clinico Universitario de Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Lemercier, Pierre; Leiva-Salinas, Carlos [Hospital Politecnico y Universitario La Fe, Valencia (Spain)

    2014-05-15

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a rare, life-threatening soft-tissue infection and a medical and surgical emergency, with increasing incidence in the last few years. It is characterized by a rapidly spreading, progressive necrosis of the deep fascia and subcutaneous tissue. Necrotizing fasciitis is often underestimated because of the lack of specific clinical findings in the initial stages of the disease. Many adjuncts such as laboratory findings, bedside tests - e.g., the ''finger test'' or biopsy - and imaging tests have been described as being helpful in the early recognition of the disease. Imaging is very useful to confirm the diagnosis, but also to assess the extent of the disorder, the potential surgical planning, and the detection of underlying etiologies. The presence of gas within the necrotized fasciae is characteristic, but may be lacking. The main finding is thickening of the deep fasciae due to fluid accumulation and reactive hyperemia, best seen on magnetic resonance imaging. (orig.)

  7. Compressive neuropathy of the first branch of the lateral plantar nerve: a study by magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogéria Nobre Rodrigues

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To assess the prevalence of isolated findings of abnormalities leading to entrapment of the lateral plantar nerve and respective branches in patients complaining of chronic heel pain, whose magnetic resonance imaging exams have showed complete selective fatty atrophy of the abductor digiti quinti muscle. Materials and Methods: Retrospective, analytical, and cross-sectional study. The authors selected magnetic resonance imaging of hindfoot of 90 patients with grade IV abductor digiti quinti muscle atrophy according to Goutallier and Bernageau classification. Patients presenting with minor degrees of fatty muscle degeneration (below grade IV and those who had been operated on for nerve decompression were excluded. Results: A female prevalence (78.8% was observed, and a strong correlation was found between fatty muscle atrophy and plantar fasciitis in 21.2%, and ankle varices, in 16.8% of the patients. Conclusion: Fatty atrophy of the abductor digiti quinti muscle is strongly associated with neuropathic alterations of the first branch of the lateral plantar nerve. The present study showed a significant association between plantar fasciitis and ankle varices with grade IV atrophy of the abductor digiti quinti muscle.

  8. Hospital epidemiology of emergent cervical necrotizing fasciitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaikh Nissar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Necrotizing fasciitis (NF is a surgical emergency. It is a rapidly progressing infection of the fascia and subcutaneous tissue and could be fatal if not diagnosed early and treated properly. NF is common in the groin, abdomen, and extremities but rare in the neck and the head. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis (CNF is an aggressive infection of the neck and the head, with devastating complications such as airway obstruction, pneumonia, pulmonary abscess, jugular venous thrombophlebitis, mediastinitis, and septic shock associated with high mortality. Aim : To assess the presentation, comorbidities, type of infection, severity of disease, and intensive care outcome of CNF. Methods : Medical records of the patients treated for NF in the surgical intensive care unit (SICU from January 1995 to February 2005 were reviewed retrospectively. Results : Out of 94 patients with NF, 5 (5.3% had CNF. Four patients were male. The mean age of our patients was 41.2 ± 14.8 years. Sixty percent of patients had an operative procedure as the predisposing factor and 80% of patients received nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs. The only comorbidity associated was diabetes mellitus (DM in 3 patients (60%. Sixty percent of the cases had type1 NF. Mean sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA score on admission to the ICU was 8.8 ± 3.6. All patients had undergone debridement at least two times. During the initial 24 h our patients received 5.8 ± 3.0 l of fluid, 2.0 ± 1.4 units of packed red blood cells (PRBC, 4.8 ± 3.6 units of fresh frozen plasma (FFP, and 3.0 ± 4.5 units of platelet concentrate. The mean number of days patients were intubated was 5.2 ± 5.1 days and the mean ICU stay was 6.4 ± 5.2 days. Sixty percent of cases had multiorgan dysfunction (MODS and one patient died, resulting in a mortality rate of 20%. Conclusion : According to our study, CNF represents around 5% of NF patients. CNF was higher among male patients and in

  9. Necrotizing fasciitis of odontogenic origin in a nonimmunocompromised patient: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N C Sangamesh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is a rapidly spreading infection involving the superficial fat, fascial layers with necrosis of skin and is a disfiguring condition that is fatal. Head and neck are an unusual site, which is rarely affected. It is characterized by its fulminating, devastating and rapid progressive course. It usually occurs in patients with systemic conditions such as diabetes mellitus, renal disease, cardiovascular disease, HIV infections, etc. A case of cervical necrotizing fasciitis of odontogenic origin occurring in a nonimmunocompromised patient is reported here who was treated successfully by surgical debridement and antibiotic therapy.

  10. Resection of a plantar calcaneal spur using the holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Ho:YAG) laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, W K; Noriega, J A; Smith, W K

    2001-03-01

    Many procedures have been described for the resection of plantar calcaneal spurs as treatment of heel spur syndrome and chronic plantar fasciitis. Most of these techniques involve a medial incision of between 2 and 6 cm for adequate exposure of the calcaneal spur. This article describes a new technique for resecting a calcaneal spur with a smaller medial incision using the holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Ho:YAG) laser. This laser permits adequate resection of a plantar calcaneal spur as well as coagulation of the bone and surrounding tissues. This minimally invasive procedure has been used with good results over the past year by the senior author (W.K.S.) for the resection of calcaneal spurs.

  11. Mini-Invasive floating metatarsal osteotomy for resistant or recurrent neuropathic plantar metatarsal head ulcers

    OpenAIRE

    Tamir, Eran; Finestone, Aharon S.; Avisar, Erez; Agar, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with peripheral neuropathy and pressure under a relatively plantar deviated metatarsal head frequently develop plantar foot ulcers. When conservative management with orthotics and shoes does not cure the ulcer, surgical metatarsal osteotomy may be indicated to relieve the pressure and enable the ulcer to heal. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the use of a mini-invasive floating metatarsal osteotomy in treating recalcitrant ulcers or recurrent ulcers plantar to the ...

  12. CT imaging of necrosive fasciitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulze, M.; Overkamp, D.; Joanoviciu, S.; Horger, M.

    2008-01-01

    NF is a rare but dramatic and often fatal infection of the fascii and adjoining soft tissues. Contrary to the Fournier's definition, it is most common in elderly people. Patients with immune problems have a higher risk (e.g. Diabetes mellitus, alcohol or drug abuse, AIDS, leukaemia, chemotherapy and immunosuppressive medication). Predisposition factors are diverticulitis, insect bites, or surgical interventions (Uppot RN, Levy HM, PLatel PH, Radiology 2003; 226; 115; Wysoki MG, Santora TA, Shah RM et al. Necrotizing fasciitis: CT characteristics, Radiology 1997; 203;859). Men are affected more frequently than women. In principle, NF may occur everywhere in the body but incidence in the region of the scrotum, perineum and lower extremities are the most common. (orig.)

  13. Scleroderma mimicker – Eosinophilic fasciitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debanjali Sinha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic fasciitis is an uncommon connective tissue disorder characterized by thickening of the deep fascia and overlying skin and subcutaneous tissue. It may mimic scleroderma and other scleroderma-like conditions. It may be a manifestation of paraneoplastic disorders or may be associated with hematological disorders including lymphomas. Definitive diagnosis is made on histological examination of a deep skin biopsy revealing thickened deep fascia and infiltration by lymphocytes and eosinophils. Enhancement of deep fascia on Gadolinium contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging may be used as a substitute for skin biopsy. Ultrasound imaging is an evolving imaging tool for diagnosing it. Glucocorticoids with or without immunosuppressive agents remains the mainstay of therapy with good response, generally. A younger age of onset, morphea like lesions and dermal fibrosclerosis is more likely to be associated with the refractory disease. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment may result in better outcomes in terms of morbidity and quality of life of the patients.

  14. Necrotizing fasciitis after internal fixation of fracture of femoral trochanteric ? ??

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Leandro Em?lio Nascimento; Pires, Robinson Esteves Santos; Figueiredo, Leonardo Brand?o; Soares, Eduardo Augusto Marques

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare and potentially lethal soft tissue infection. We report a case of trochanteric femur fracture in a patient who underwent fracture fixation and developed necrotizing fasciitis. A literature review on the topic will be addressed.

  15. Plantar vein thrombosis: a rare cause of plantar foot pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegal, Daniel S.; Wu, Jim S.; Brennan, Darren D.; Hochman, Mary G. [Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Challies, Tracy [Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2008-03-15

    Plantar vein thrombosis is a rare condition, with only a handful of cases reported in the literature. The cause is unknown; however, the disease has been attributed to prior surgery, trauma, and paraneoplastic conditions. We present a case of a 32-year-old female runner with plantar vein thrombosis diagnosed on contrast-enhanced MRI and confirmed on ultrasound. The symptoms resolved with conservative treatment and evaluation revealed the presence of a prothrombin gene mutation and use of oral contraceptive pills. To our knowledge, this is the first case of plantar vein thrombosis diagnosed initially by MRI. Moreover, this case suggests that plantar vein thrombosis should be considered in patients with hypercoagulable states and plantar foot pain. (orig.)

  16. Plantar vein thrombosis: a rare cause of plantar foot pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegal, Daniel S.; Wu, Jim S.; Brennan, Darren D.; Hochman, Mary G.; Challies, Tracy

    2008-01-01

    Plantar vein thrombosis is a rare condition, with only a handful of cases reported in the literature. The cause is unknown; however, the disease has been attributed to prior surgery, trauma, and paraneoplastic conditions. We present a case of a 32-year-old female runner with plantar vein thrombosis diagnosed on contrast-enhanced MRI and confirmed on ultrasound. The symptoms resolved with conservative treatment and evaluation revealed the presence of a prothrombin gene mutation and use of oral contraceptive pills. To our knowledge, this is the first case of plantar vein thrombosis diagnosed initially by MRI. Moreover, this case suggests that plantar vein thrombosis should be considered in patients with hypercoagulable states and plantar foot pain. (orig.)

  17. T* reatment of vulgar and plantar warts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Khlebnikova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents data on clinical forms of warts associated with different types of human papillomavirus. The authors analyze the following wart treatment methods: excision, chemical and immune. Based on literature sources, the authors assess the efficacy, advantages and disadvantages of well-known treatment methods. The authors describe their own experience of treating primary and recurrent vulgar and plantar warts with an up-to-date chemical destruction drug - Mardil Zinc Max, a solution containing a complex compound of 1.5% zinc 2-chloropropionate in 2-chloropropionic acid. The efficacy of treatment of vulgar warts was 100%, and that of plantar ones - 62.5%. Clinical recovery was observed both in case of primary and recurrent processes. The treatment had no adverse effects or complications and was characterized by a low injury rate, good tolerance and full tissue recovery without any cosmetic defects.

  18. Necrotizing fasciitis in nephritic syndrome: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junaedi, I.; Pasaribu, A. P.

    2018-03-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is an infection of any layer of tissue compartment; it can be in the dermis, subcutaneous tissue, superficial fascia, deep fascia, or even muscle. Usually, necrotizing fasciitis is associated with necrotizing process caused by the single bacterial organism. The most common pathogen is group A Streptococcus. Delayed in the diagnosis and surgical treatment of necrotizing fasciitis will lead to increased tissue loss and high mortality risk. Here we report a case of necrotizing fasciitis which has a great outcome since the surgical exploration of tissue and debridement was done as soon as the patient is suspected of necrotizing fasciitis.

  19. Metatarsophalangeal joint stability: A systematic review on the plantar plate of the lesser toes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, N.M.G. (Nico M.G.); M. van der Grinten (Margot); W.M. Bramer (Wichor); G.J. Kleinrensink (Gert Jan)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Instability of the metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joints of the lesser toes (digiti 2-5) is increasingly being treated by repair of the plantar plate (PP). This systematic review examines the anatomy of the plantar plate of the lesser toes, and the relation between the integrity

  20. NECROTIZING FASCIITIS OF LIMB: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhaarna

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is a severe, rare, potentially lethal, soft tissue infection that tends to develop in scrotum, perineum, abdominal wall or the extremities. It is a medical emergency that threatens both patient’s limb and life. Necrotizing fasciitis has the potential to become quite severe - in such cases a radical debridement amounting to amputation of the limb may be required to save the patient’s life. Early diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion. We describe a case of a 49-year-old obese woman who developed necrotizing fasciitis in her left lower limb for which she underwent multiple radical surgical debridement, followed by skin grafting for reconstruction of the limb defects. Our main focus was to salvage the limb with the help of antibiotics and multiple debridements. This report emphasizes the need to have a relook at the use of Parenteral Crystalline Penicillin and diligent management of wounds resulting from repeated debridements.

  1. [Abdominal necrotizing fasciitis after caesarean delivery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barant, S; Radbata, D; Oberweis, D; Jacobs, D; Marecaux, G; Zielonka, E; Maréchal, M

    2016-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a rare infection (0,2 to 0,4/100,000 adults) of the dermis and hypodermis extending along muscular fascia1. The absence of pathognomonic symptoms makes its diagnosis difficult. Rapidly progressive, it is a life-threatening emergency whose prognosis is letal in 30 % of cases. Treatment of necrotizing fasciitis is mixed and involves aggressive surgical debridement and medical treatment with antibiotics and supportive agents. This article is presenting the case of a young woman who developed abdominal necrotizing fasciitis following a caesarean section. In forty-eight hours, the patient developed septic shock with an extensive and rapid destruction of her abdominal wall. After hysterectomy and multiple surgical debridements, evolution was favorable. After one month, a reconstruction of the abdominal wall could be performed.

  2. Plantar fibromatosis. Ultrasound assessment; La fibromatosi plantare: risultati ecografici

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solivetti, F.R.; Luzi, F.; Bucher, S.; Thorel, M.F.; Muscardin, L. [Rome Ospedale Santa Maria e San Gallicano, Rome (Italy)

    1999-05-01

    In 1998-99, six patients with plantar fibromatosis were submitted to US (ultrasound) with plantar fibromatosis were submitted to US with 13 MHz linear array and 20 MHz mechanical annular array probes. All patients were examined in prone recumbency with the probe positioned on the sole of the foot. Only some of them were subsequently submitted to surgery. Plantar fibromatosis exhibited an almost pathognomonic pattern and US proved to be a quick, noninvasive and cost-effective technique to confirm clinical diagnosis. The nodule is typically single and iso echoic, with maximum diameter of about 1 cm, inhomogeneous internal structure and few thin hyperechoic septa. The nodular fibrous proliferation adheres with the major axis along the plantar fascia; it exhibits clear-cut margins and US beam transmission is good. No calcifications or fluid collections are seen within the nodule. Color and power Doppler show no flow inside. It is demonstrated that US is an adequate tool for the study of plantar fibromatosis. [Italian] Negli anni 1998-99 sono stati osservati ben sei casi di fibromatosi plantare, solo in parte trattati chirurgicamente. Tutti sono stati studiati con ecografia, con apparecchiatura in tempo reale e sonde lineari da 13 MHz e anulari da 20 MHz. Si puo' descrivere un quadro tipico della malattia diagnosticabile con l'ecografia, specie in associazione con sintomi clinici caratteristici.

  3. Cervical necrotising fasciitis and descending mediastinitis secondary to unilateral tonsillitis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islam Asad

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Cervical necrotizing fasciitis is an aggressive infection with high morbidity and mortality. We present a case of cervical necrotizing fasciitis and descending mediastinitis in a healthy young man, caused by unilateral tonsillitis with a successful outcome without aggressive debridement. Case presentation A 41-year-old man was admitted to our unit with a diagnosis of severe acute unilateral tonsillitis. On admission, he had painful neck movements and the skin over his neck was red, hot and tender. Computed tomography scan of his neck and chest showed evidence of cervical necrotizing fasciitis and descending mediastinitis secondary to underlying pharyngeal disease. He was treated with broad-spectrum intravenous antibiotics. His condition improved over the next 3 days but a tender and fluctuant swelling appeared in the suprasternal region. A repeat scan showed the appearance of an abscess extending from the pretracheal region to the upper mediastinum which was drained through a small transverse anterior neck incision. After surgery, the patient's condition quickly improved and he was discharged on the 18th day of admission. Conclusion Less invasive surgical techniques may replace conventional aggressive debridement as the treatment of choice for cervical necrotizing fasciitis and descending necrotizing mediastinitis.

  4. Necrotizing Fasciitis Secondary to Aeromonas Infection Presenting with Septic Shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil Bhatia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This report describes a case of necrotizing fasciitis presenting with septic shock due to an Aeromonas infection. The patient cut his foot while mowing the lawn and then spent time in a pool with black mold. He began feeling ill and developed swelling and a quarter-sized black area on his right lower extremity. Despite being hemodynamically unstable with systolic blood pressure in the low 70s, the patient was transferred to our facility from outside hospital 100 miles away. Upon arriving to facility, the patient appeared to be septic and the infected area of skin had grown. Irrigation and debridement were performed and appropriate antibiotic therapy was given; however, the patient subsequently died on hospital day 8. On review of the literature, cases of necrotizing fasciitis due to Aeromonas infection have been treated successfully with the aforementioned therapy; however, there is high mortality associated with these infections, many times related to a delayed diagnosis. Our patient also had multiple poor prognostic factors including hepatic dysfunction and immunosuppression.

  5. Orbital compressed air and petroleum injury mimicking necrotizing fasciitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellington, Faye E; Bacon, Annette S; Abu-Bakra, Mohammed A J; Martinez-Devesa, Pablo; Norris, Jonathan H

    2014-09-01

    Orbital injury secondary to petroleum-based products is rare. We report the first case, to our knowledge, of a combined compressed air and chemical orbital injury, which mimicked necrotizing fasciitis. A 58-year-old man was repairing his motorcycle engine when a piston inadvertently fired, discharging compressed air and petroleum-based carburetor cleaner into his left eye. He developed surgical emphysema, skin necrosis, and a chemical cellulitis, causing an orbital compartment syndrome. He was treated initially with antibiotics and subsequently with intravenous steroid and orbital decompression surgery. There was almost complete recovery by 4 weeks postsurgery. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Petroleum-based products can cause severe skin irritation and necrosis. Compressed air injury can cause surgical emphysema. When these two mechanisms of injury are combined, the resulting orbitopathy and skin necrosis can mimic necrotizing fasciitis and cause diagnostic confusion. A favorable outcome is achievable with aggressive timely management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Disseminated mucormycosis and necrotizing fasciitis in immune ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Laparotomy revealed extensive abdominal wall necrosis, bowel, liver, kidney and subsequent retroperitoneal, posterior diaphragm and inferior vena cava involvement. Second, a 3-year-old on chemotherapy for Burkitt's lymphoma presented with pancytopenia, sepsis, abdominal wall-necrotizing fasciitis and left lower limb ...

  7. Traumatic abdominal hernia complicated by necrotizing fasciitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Pérez, Aleix; Garrigós-Ortega, Gonzalo; Gómez-Abril, Segundo Ángel; Martí-Martínez, Eva; Torres-Sánchez, Teresa

    2014-11-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a critical illness involving skin and soft tissues, which may develop after blunt abdominal trauma causing abdominal wall hernia and representing a great challenge for physicians. A 52-year-old man was brought to the emergency department after a road accident, presenting blunt abdominal trauma with a large non-reducible mass in the lower-right abdomen. A first, CT showed abdominal hernia without signs of complication. Three hours after ICU admission, he developed hemodynamic instability. Therefore, a new CT scan was requested, showing signs of hernia complication. He was moved to the operating room where a complete transversal section of an ileal loop was identified. Five hours after surgery, he presented a new episode of hemodynamic instability with signs of skin and soft tissue infection. Due to the high clinical suspicion of necrotizing fasciitis development, wide debridement was performed. Following traumatic abdominal wall hernia (TAWH), patients can present unsuspected injuries in abdominal organs. Helical CT can be falsely negative in the early moments, leading to misdiagnosis. Necrotizing fasciitis is a potentially fatal infection and, consequently, resuscitation measures, wide-spectrum antibiotics, and early surgical debridement are required. This type of fasciitis can develop after blunt abdominal trauma following wall hernia without skin disruption.

  8. Multifocal necrotizing fasciitis following Hirshsprung's disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a life-threatening infection with rapidly progressive necrosis. Escherichia coli is rarely reported as causative agent of type 2 NF. NF typically arises in a single area usually secondary to penetrating injury. NF was only reported as a postoperative complication of Hirshsprung's disease in one report, ...

  9. Necrotizing fasciitis : plain radiographic and CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang Dae; Park, Jeong Hee; Jeon, Hae Jeong; Lim, Jong Nam; Heo, Tae Haeng; Park, Dong Rib [Konkuk Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-11-01

    To evaluate the plain radiographic and CT findings of the necrotizing fasciitis. We retrospectively reviewed the radiologic findings of 4 cases with necrotizing fasciitis. Three cases were proven pathologically. We evaluated pattern and extent of the gas shadows in plain films. CT findings were analysed, with emphasis on : (a) gas pattern, (b) extent, (c) location and involved site, (d) associated focal abscess, and (e) swelling of the adjacent muscles. On plain radiographs, four cases showed streaky or mottled gas densities in the pelvis, three cases in the perineum, one case in the abdomen, and two cases in the thigh. On CT images, gas pattern was mottled and streaky appearance with swelling of the adjacent muscles. Gas shadows located in the extraperitoneal space in four cases, fascial layer in four cases, and subcutaneous layer in four cases. There were gas shadows in pelvic wall, perineum, abdominal wall, buttock, thigh, and scrotum. Focal low density lesion suggestive of focal abscess was not visualized. Plain radiography is useful for early diagnosis of the necrotizing fasciitis and CT is very useful for detection of precise location and extent of the disease. CT is also useful for differentiation of necrotizing fasciitis from focal abscess and cellulitis.

  10. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis in infant: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schiavetto, Renata Rennó

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Necrotizing fasciitis is a bacterial infection characterized by extensive necrosis of tissues, and may include skin and muscles. It's more frequent in adults than in children and generally involves the trunk and extremities. Head and neck area is less commonly affected. The most frequently isolated pathogens are the Streptococcus pyogenes (group A and Staphylococcus aureus. The anatomopathological exam is the best diagnostic method, which early identifies the disease. The clinical support, surgical debridement, and the intravenous antibiotic therapy, are fundamental for the treatment. Objective: To report a case of an infant who suffered from Cervical Necrotizing Fasciitis. Case Report: Infant, male sex, white, 2 months old, previously healthy, with Necrotizing Fasciitis involving the frontal and right lateral cervical regions. After adequate treatment the patient obtained excellent recovery without presenting important aesthetic or functional alterations. Conclusion: The Cervical Necrotizing Fasciitis is uncommon in children. The early surgical debridement is necessary to control the infection, even if it may result in great and deep injuries. The wide spectrum antibiotic therapy and hemodynamic support are also basic for the therapeutic success.

  11. Nekrotiserende fasciitis hos børn

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karsten Gjessing; Kristensen, Kim

    2009-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a serious condition with infection of the muscular fascia causing rapidly spreading necrosis. NF rarely affects children, and we here report two paediatric cases of NF. The first developed NF after a joint puncture, the other after surgical extirpation of a lymph node...

  12. An exploratory study on differences in cumulative plantar tissue stress between healing and non-healing plantar neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Netten, Jaap J; van Baal, Jeff G; Bril, Adriaan; Wissink, Marieke; Bus, Sicco A

    2018-02-19

    Mechanical stress is important in causing and healing plantar diabetic foot ulcers, but almost always studied as peak pressure only. Measuring cumulative plantar tissue stress combines plantar pressure and ambulatory activity, and better defines the load on ulcers. Our aim was to explore differences in cumulative plantar tissue stress between people with healing and non-healing plantar diabetic foot ulcers. We analyzed a subgroup of 31 patients from a randomized clinical trial, treated with a removable offloading device for their plantar diabetic forefoot ulcer. We measured in-device dynamic plantar pressure and daily stride count to calculate cumulative plantar tissue stress at the ulcer location and associated this with ulcer healing and ulcer surface area reduction at four weeks (Student's t and chi-square test for significance, Cohen's d for effect size). In 12 weeks, 68% (n = 21) of the ulcers healed and 32% (n = 10) did not. No statistically significant differences were found for cumulative plantar tissue stress, plantar pressure or ambulatory activity between people with healed and not-healed ulcers. Cumulative plantar tissue stress was 25% lower for people with healed ulcers (155 vs. 207 MPa·s/day; P = 0.71; Effect size: d = 0.29). Post-hoc analyses in the 27 patients who self-reported to be adherent to wearing the device showed that cumulative plantar tissue stress was 49% lower for those who reached ≥75% ulcer surface area reduction at four weeks (140 vs. 275 MPa·s/day; P = 0.09; d = 0.76); smaller differences and effect sizes were found for peak pressure (24%), peak pressure-time integral (30%) and ambulatory activity (26%); (P-value range: 0.14-0.97; Cohen's d range: 0.14-0.70). Measuring cumulative plantar tissue stress may provide insight beyond that obtained from plantar pressure or ambulatory activity alone, with regard to diabetic foot ulcer healing using removable offloading devices. These explorative findings

  13. The influence of high-heeled shoes on strain and tension force of the anterior talofibular ligament and plantar fascia during balanced standing and walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jia; Wong, Duo Wai-Chi; Zhang, Hongtao; Luo, Zong-Ping; Zhang, Ming

    2016-10-01

    High-heeled shoes have the capability to alter the strain and tension of ligamentous structures between the foot and ankle, which may result in ankle instability. However, high-heeled shoes can also reduce the strain on plantar fascia, which may be beneficial for the treatment of plantar fasciitis. In this study, the influence of heel height on strain and tension force applied to the anterior talofibular ligament (ATL) and plantar fascia were investigated. A three-dimensional finite element model of coupled foot-ankle-shoe complex was constructed. Four heel heights were studied in balanced standing: 0 in. (0cm), 1 in. (2.54cm), 2 in. (5.08cm), and 3 in. (7.62cm). A walking analysis was performed using 2-in. (5.08cm) high-heeled shoes. During balanced standing, the tension force on the ATL increased from 14.8N to 97.0N, with a six-fold increase in strain from 0 in. to 3 in. (0-7.62cm). The tension force and the average strain on the plantar fascia decreased from 151.0N (strain: 0.74%) to 59.6N (strain: 0.28%) when the heel height increased from 0 in. to 2 in. (0-5.08cm). When heel height reached 3 in. (7.62cm), the force and average strain increased to 278.3N (strain: 1.33%). The walking simulation showed that the fascia stretched out while the ATL loading decreased during push off. The simulation outcome demonstrated the influence of heel height on ATL alteration and plantar fascia strain, which implies risks for ankle injury and suggests guidance for the treatment of plantar fasciitis. Copyright © 2016 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Detection of normal plantar fascia thickness in adults via the ultrasonographic method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abul, Kadir; Ozer, Devrim; Sakizlioglu, Secil Sezgin; Buyuk, Abdul Fettah; Kaygusuz, Mehmet Akif

    2015-01-01

    Heel pain is a prevalent concern in orthopedic clinics, and there are numerous pathologic abnormalities that can cause heel pain. Plantar fasciitis is the most common cause of heel pain, and the plantar fascia thickens in this process. It has been found that thickening to greater than 4 mm in ultrasonographic measurements can be accepted as meaningful in diagnoses. Herein, we aimed to measure normal plantar fascia thickness in adults using ultrasonography. We used ultrasonography to measure the plantar fascia thickness of 156 healthy adults in both feet between April 1, 2011, and June 30, 2011. These adults had no previous heel pain. The 156 participants comprised 88 women (56.4%) and 68 men (43.6%) (mean age, 37.9 years; range, 18-65 years). The weight, height, and body mass index of the participants were recorded, and statistical analyses were conducted. The mean ± SD (range) plantar fascia thickness measurements for subgroups of the sample were as follows: 3.284 ± 0.56 mm (2.4-5.1 mm) for male right feet, 3.3 ± 0.55 mm (2.5-5.0 mm) for male left feet, 2.842 ± 0.42 mm (1.8-4.1 mm) for female right feet, and 2.8 ± 0.44 mm (1.8-4.3 mm) for female left feet. The overall mean ± SD (range) thickness for the right foot was 3.035 ± 0.53 mm (1.8-5.1 mm) and for the left foot was 3.053 ± 0.54 mm (1.8-5.0 mm). There was a statistically significant and positive correlation between plantar fascia thickness and participant age, weight, height, and body mass index. The plantar fascia thickness of adults without heel pain was measured to be less than 4 mm in most participants (~92%). There was no statistically significant difference between the thickness of the right and left foot plantar fascia.

  15. Plantar fascia anatomy and its relationship with Achilles tendon and paratenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecco, Carla; Corradin, Marco; Macchi, Veronica; Morra, Aldo; Porzionato, Andrea; Biz, Carlo; De Caro, Raffaele

    2013-01-01

    thick (99%CI and SD = 0.95), as opposed to 2.09 ± 0.24 mm (99%CI, SD = 0.47) in the patients in which the MRI revealed no Achilles tendon diseases; this difference in thickness of 1.29 ± 0.57 mm (99%CI) was statistically significant (P fascia has a role not only in supporting the longitudinal arch of the foot, but also in its proprioception and peripheral motor coordination. Its relationship with the paratenon of the Achilles tendon is consistent with the idea of triceps surae structures being involved in the PF pathology, so their rehabilitation can be considered appropriate. Finally, the high concentration of hyaluronan in the PF points to the feasibility of using hyaluronan injections in the fascia to treat plantar fasciitis. PMID:24028383

  16. EFFECT OF LOW ENERGY VERSUS MEDIUM ENERGY RADIAL SHOCK WAVE THERAPY IN THE TREATMENT OF CHRONIC PLANTER FASCIITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Z. Fouda

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Plantar fasciitis (PF is the most common cause of heel pain and it can often be a challenge for clinicians to treat successfully. Radial shock wave therapy (RSWT has been introduced recently for treatment of musculoskeletal disorders. Different energy levels of shock wave therapy have been used in the literatures for treatment of PF with no clear settled parameters. Therefore, the purpose of this study was intended to investigate and compare the efficacy of two different energy levels of RSWT on PF patients. Methods: Forty patients having unilateral chronic PF were recruited for the study from orthopedic outpatient clinics of Cairo University hospitals and National Institute of Neuromotor System Cairo Egypt, with a mean age of (47.15±4.57 years. Patients were randomly assigned into two equal groups. Group (A treated with low intensity level of 1.6 bars (0.16 mJ/mm2 RSWT and group (B treated with medium intensity level of 4 bars (0.38 mJ/mm2 RSWT. Functional assessment of the foot based on Foot Function Index (FFI and Present pain intensity was measured during rest by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS. Results: There was as significant decreased in the total FFI scores from (118.42 ±6.51 to (81.37 ±3.46 for group (A and from (118.93 ±6.85 to (58.50 ±3.22 for group (B. Also regarding VAS Scores there was as significant decreased in the pain intensity from (5.11 ±0.41 to (2.85 ±0.31 for group (A and from (4.95 ±0.39 to (2.05 ±0.22 for group (B. Conclusion: Radial shock wave therapy is an effective modality that should be considered in the treatment of chronic PF, while the medium energy level RSWT is better than the low energy level RSWT in regarding to the measured treatment outcomes.

  17. The plantar calcaneal spur: a review of anatomy, histology, etiology and key associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Joshua; Yassaie, Omid; Mirjalili, Seyed Ali

    2017-06-01

    The plantar calcaneal spur (PCS) is a bony outgrowth from the calcaneal tuberosity and has been studied using various methods including cadavers, radiography, histology and surgery. However, there are currently a number of discrepancies in the literature regarding the anatomical relations, histological descriptions and clinical associations of PCS. Historically, authors have described the intrinsic muscles of the foot and/or the plantar fascia as attaching to the PCS. In this article we review the relationship between the PCS and surrounding soft tissues as well as examining the histology of the PCS. We identify a number of key associations with PCS, including age, weight, gender, arthritides, plantar fasciitis and foot position; these factors may function as risk factors in PCS formation. The etiology of these spurs is a contentious issue and it has been explained through a number of theories including the degenerative, inflammatory, traction, repetitive trauma, bone-formers and vertical compression theories. We review these and finish by looking clinically at the evidence that PCS causes heel pain. © 2017 Anatomical Society.

  18. Necrotizing fasciitis caused by Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regev, A; Weinberger, M; Fishman, M; Samra, Z; Pitlik, S D

    1998-02-01

    Two patients with rapidly progressive necrotizing fasciitis of a lower extremity due to Staphylococcus aureus as a single pathogen are described. In both patients the portal of entry was attributed to needle puncture (intra-articular injection and intravenous catheter, respectively), followed by bacteremia. Necrotizing fasciitis occurred in a site remote from the needle puncture, suggesting metastatic infection. One patient developed toxic shock syndrome and the other a sunburn-like rash and erythematous mucosae with strawberry tongue. One patient died, and the other required above-knee amputation due to secondary infectious complications. Staphylococcus aureus may mimic the presentation of invasive group A streptococcal infections. A history of needle puncture should alert the physician to the possibility of Staphylococcus aureus infection.

  19. Periorbital nodular fasciitis arising during pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon N Phillips

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nodular fasciitis (NF is a benign proliferation of fibroblasts and myofibroblasts that rarely occurs in the periorbital region. We report what we believe to be the first case of periorbital NF associated with pregnancy. A case of intravascular fasciitis, a NF variant, has been reported during pregnancy, but it was not located in the periorbital region. A weak presence of estrogen receptors has been reported in NF. This may make it more susceptible to the hormone-related changes during pregnancy and contribute to the development of the lesion by stimulating fibroblasts and smooth muscle cell types. Although rare, NF should be considered in the differential diagnosis of periorbital soft-tissue masses arising during pregnancy.

  20. Quantitative scintigraphy in diagnosis and management of plantar fasciitis (Calcaneal periostitis): concise communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sewell, J.R.; Black, C.M.; Chapman, A.H.; Statham, J.; Hughes, G.R.V.; Lavender, J.P.

    1980-01-01

    We have found that Tc-99m methylene diphosphonate imaging of the heel is of diagnostic value in the painful heel syndrome, permitting positive identification of the site of inflammation in cases where radiography is unhelpful. With this technique, tracer uptake in the heel is susceptible to quantification, allowing a serial and objective assessment of response to therapy

  1. Surgical management of necrotizing fasciitis due to odontogenic infection with sepsis: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saka Setiono Nugroho

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective:To perform surgical operation on necrotizing fasciitis due to odontegenic infection with sepsis. Methods: In this case an odontogenic infection was accompanied by a large open wound on the face and sepsis. Patient was hospitalized in the Dr.HasanSadikin General Hospital. Management of this patient in the emergency room were administration of appropriate broad-spectrum empiric antibiotic, incision and pus drainage, and extraction of the infected tooth, followed by fluid resuscitation with strict observation. Surgical debridement was then performed. Results:After being treated for 12 days the patient’s condition improved. We planned closure of defects of the facial area, but the patient refused. Conclusion: Necrotizing fasciitis is an uncommon but potentially lethal condition associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Early diagnosis coupled with emergent surgical debridement, appropriate broad-spectrum empiric antibiotic treatment, and a multidisciplinary team approach is essential for successful treatment.

  2. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis: A potentially fatal disease with varied ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Necrotizing fasciitis was recognized centuries ago by physicians. It is a rapidly progressive and potentially fatal soft‑tissue infection that is typified by soft‑tissue necrosis, especially affecting the subcutaneous tissues and fascia. Cervico‑facial necrotizing fasciitis is said to be uncommon, but when it occurs, it is often of ...

  3. Review of 58 patients with necrotizing fasciitis in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stigt, S.F. van; Vries, J. de; Bijker, J.B.; Mollen, R.M.; Hekma, E.J.; Lemson, S.M.; Tan, E.C.T.H.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare, life threatening soft tissue infection, primarily involving the fascia and subcutaneous tissue. In a large cohort of patients presenting with Necrotizing fasciitis in the Netherlands we analysed all available data to determine the causative pathogens and

  4. Necrotizing fasciitis of breast | Salati | East and Central African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Necrotizing fasciitis is an uncommon and rapidly progressive, life-threatening soft tissue infection. Necrotizing fasciitis of breast is even rarely encountered. We managed one such 32 years old nondiabetic, obese lady who developed necrotising fascitis of right breast after lumpectomy. Management involved wide ...

  5. Early experience with endoscopic lumbar sympathectomy for plantar hyperhidrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sanjay; Kaur, Simranjit; Wilson, Paul

    2016-05-01

    We describe our endoscopic lumbar sympathectomy technique and our early experience using it to treat plantar hyperhidrosis. We reviewed 20 lumbar sympathectomies performed in our vascular unit for plantar hyperhidrosis in 10 patients from 2011 and 2014. Demographics and outcomes were analyzed and a review of the literature conducted. All procedures were carried out endoscopically with no intraoperative or postoperative morbidity. Plantar anhidrosis was achieved in all the patients, although two patients (20%) suffered a relapse. Unwanted side-effects occurred in the form of compensatory sweating in three patients (30%) and post-sympathectomy neuralgia in two patients (20%). None of the patients experienced sexual dysfunction. Management of plantar hyperhidrosis may be based upon a therapeutic ladder starting with conservative measures and working up to surgery depending on the severity of the disease. Minimally invasive (endoscopic) sympathectomy for the thoracic chain is well established, but minimally invasive sympathectomy for the lumbar chain is a relatively new technique. Endoscopic lumbar sympathectomy provides an effective, minimally invasive method of surgical management, but long-term data are lacking. © 2016 Japan Society for Endoscopic Surgery, Asia Endosurgery Task Force and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  6. The plantar fasciotomy: MR imaging findings in asymptomatic volunteers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, J.S.; Ashman, C. [Ohio State Univ. Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Columbus, OH (United States); Smith, G.; Kaeding, C. [Ohio State Univ. Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1999-08-01

    Objective. To determine the postoperative appearance of the plantar fascia on MR imaging after a fasciotomy has been performed, and to compare the postsurgical appearance of the fascia after an open and endoscopic procedure.< rate at head-abs-p1.lf>Design and patients. Fifteen asymptomatic volunteers (12 women, 3 men; age range 22-49 years, mean age 33 years) with prior fasciotomies for treatment of longstanding plantar fasciitis were studied. Fourteen volunteers had a unilateral release and one volunteer had bilateral releases, allowing for assessment of 16 ankles. Eight fasciotomies were performed through an open incision and eight were performed endoscopically. The average time between surgery and imaging was 24 months (range 11-46 months). The site of surgery was established from the operative reports. Proton density (PD)-weighted and T2-weighted images in three orthogonal planes were obtained on a 1.5-T magnet. In eight studies, T1-weighted sagittal and STIR sagittal images were included. The fascia in each ankle was assessed for morphology and signal intensity. Perifascial soft tissues and bone marrow were assessed for edema. Preoperative MR studies were available in five volunteers.< rate at head-abs-p1.lf>Results. There was no apparent difference in the postoperative appearance of the ankle after an open or endoscopic procedure except for scar formation in the subcutaneous fat which was common after an open procedure (P<0.05). Three ankles had a gap in the fascia (one open, two endoscopic). The plantar fascia measured a mean of 7.0 mm (range 5-10 mm) at the fasciotomy, and 8.3 mm (range 6-12 mm) at the enthesis. At the fasciotomy, 11 of 13 ankles had an indistinct deep contour and 9 of 13 had an indistinct superficial contour. At the enthesis, 13 of 16 ankles had an indistinct deep contour and 6 of 16 had an indistinct superficial contour. Compared with preoperative MR studies there was an average reduction in the fascial thickness at the enthesis of 14

  7. Necrotizing fasciitis caused by group A streptococcus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikić Dragan

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The first case of the confirmed necrotizing fasciitis caused by Group A Streptococcus in Yugoslavia was presented. Male patient, aged 28, in good health, suddenly developed symptoms and signs of severe infective syndrome and intensive pain in the axillary region. Parenteral antibiotic, substitution and supportive therapy was conducted along with the radical surgical excision of the necrotizing tissue. The patient did not develop streptococcal toxic shock syndrome thanks to the early established diagnosis and timely applied aggressive treatment. He was released from the hospital as completely cured two months after the admission.

  8. Cryotherapy versus salicylic acid for the treatment of plantar warts (verrucae): a randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Catherine; Hicks, Kate; Jayakody, Shalmini; Kang’ombe, Arthur Ricky; Stamuli, Eugena; Turner, Gwen; Thomas, Kim; Curran, Mike; Denby, Gary; Hashmi, Farina; McIntosh, Caroline; McLarnon, Nichola; Torgerson, David; Watt, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Objective To compare the clinical effectiveness of cryotherapy versus salicylic acid for the treatment of plantar warts. Design A multicentre, open, two arm randomised controlled trial. Setting University podiatry school clinics, NHS podiatry clinics, and primary care in England, Scotland, and Ireland. Participants 240 patients aged 12 years and over, with a plantar wart that in the opinion of the healthcare professional was suitable for treatment with both cryotherapy and salicylic acid. Interventions Cryotherapy with liquid nitrogen delivered by a healthcare professional, up to four treatments two to three weeks apart. Patient self treatment with 50% salicylic acid (Verrugon) daily up to a maximum of eight weeks. Main outcome measures Complete clearance of all plantar warts at 12 weeks. Secondary outcomes were (a) complete clearance of all plantar warts at 12 weeks controlling for age, whether the wart had been treated previously, and type of wart, (b) patient self reported clearance of plantar warts at six months, (c) time to clearance of plantar wart, (d) number of plantar warts at 12 weeks, and (e) patient satisfaction with the treatment. Results There was no evidence of a difference between the salicylic acid and cryotherapy groups in the proportions of participants with complete clearance of all plantar warts at 12 weeks (17/119 (14%) v 15/110 (14%), difference 0.65% (95% CI –8.33 to 9.63), P=0.89). The results did not change when the analysis was repeated but with adjustment for age, whether the wart had been treated previously, and type of plantar wart or for patients’ preferences at baseline. There was no evidence of a difference between the salicylic acid and cryotherapy groups in self reported clearance of plantar warts at six months (29/95 (31%) v 33/98 (34%), difference –3.15% (–16.31 to 10.02), P=0.64) or in time to clearance (hazard ratio 0.80 (95% CI 0.51 to 1.25), P=0.33). There was also no evidence of a difference in the number of plantar

  9. Minimally invasive surgery for diabetic plantar foot ulcerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caio Nery

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Complications of diabetes mellitus constitute the most common indications for hospitalization and non-traumatic amputations in the USA. The most important risk factors for the development of diabetic foot ulcerations include the presence of peripheral neuropathy, vasculopathy, limited joint mobility, and pre-existing foot deformities. In our study, 500 diabetic patients treated for plantar forefoot ulcerations were enrolled in a prospective study from 2000 to 2008 at the Federal University of São Paulo, Brazil. Fifty-two patients in the study met the criteria and underwent surgical treatment consisting of percutaneous Achilles tendon lengthening to treat plantar forefoot ulcerations. The postoperative follow-up demonstrated prevention of recurrent foot ulcerations in 92% of these diabetic patients that maintained an improved foot function. In conclusion, our study supports that identification and treatment of ankle equinus in the diabetic population may potentially lead to decreased patient morbidity, including reduced risk for both reulceration, and potential lower extremity amputation.

  10. Development of Eosinophilic Fasciitis during Infliximab Therapy for Psoriatic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Hariman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic fasciitis (EF is a rare disorder involving chronic inflammation of the fascia and connective tissue surrounding muscles, nerves, and blood vessels. While its pathogenesis is not entirely understood, this disorder is thought to be autoimmune or allergic in nature. We present here a case of a 59-year-old male who developed peripheral eosinophilia and subsequent eosinophilic fasciitis during treatment with infliximab. To our knowledge, eosinophilic fasciitis has not been previously described in patients during treatment with an inhibitor of tumor necrosis factor α.

  11. Necrotizing Fasciitis of the Nose Complicated with Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Swaminath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is a rapidly progressive life threatening bacterial infection of the skin, the subcutaneous tissue, and the fascia. We present a case of necrotizing fasciitis involving the nose complicated by cavernous sinus thrombosis. Few cases of septic cavernous sinus thrombosis have been reported to be caused by cellulitis of the face but necrotizing fasciitis of the nose is rare. It is very important to recognize the early signs of cavernous thrombosis. Treatment for septic cavernous sinus thrombosis is controversial but early use of empirical antibiotics is imperative.

  12. Nodular Fasciitis of the Chest in a Young Woman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Joo Seo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Nodular fasciitis is a benign reactive proliferation that usually involves the deep fascia. Although it is relatively common in the adult population, it is often misdiagnosed as sarcoma due to its rapid growth and pathological features. It rarely presents as a chest wall tumor in young patients. Here, we report a case of nodular fasciitis involving the chest wall of an 18-year-old woman and its surgical management. This case underscores the need to consider nodular fasciitis in the differential diagnosis of chest wall tumors in young patients.

  13. Periorbital Necrotising Fasciitis after Minor Skin Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceren Günel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis (NF is a fatal and rare disease, mainly located in extremity and body. Due to the good blood supply, the occurrence of this infective disease of skin and subcutaneous tissue/fascia is much rarer in the head and neck region. In this study, we represent periorbital necrotizing fasciitis case in a patient with normal immune system. The patient applied the emergency clinic with the complaints of swelling and redness on the left eye. It was found out that a skin incision occurred at 2 cm below the left eye with razor blade 2 days ago. After taking swab culture sample, patient was started on parenteral Vancomycin + Ampicillin-Sulbactam treatment. It was observed that necrosis spread within hours and an emergent deep surgical debridement was performed. Following the debridement, it was observed that periorbital edema began to regress prominently on the 1st day of the treatment. Treatment was carried on with daily wound care and parenteral antibiotherapy. The patient was discharged from the hospital with slightly cosmetic defect.

  14. Case Report of Necrotizing Fasciitis Associated with Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Jiao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis, caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, is an extremely rare and life-threatening bacterial soft tissue infection. We report a case of early necrotizing fasciitis associated with Streptococcus pneumoniae infection in a 26-year-old man who was immunocompromised with mixed connective tissue disease. The patient presented with acute, painful, erythematous, and edematous skin lesions of his right lower back, which rapidly progressed to the right knee. The patient underwent surgical exploration, and a diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis was confirmed by pathological evidence of necrosis of the fascia and neutrophil infiltration in tissue biopsies. Cultures of fascial tissue biopsies and blood samples were positive for Streptococcus pneumoniae. To our knowledge, this is the first report of necrotizing fasciitis resulting from Streptococcus pneumoniae diagnosed at early phase; the patient recovered well without surgical debridement.

  15. Psychological distress in patients with morphea and eosinophilic fasciitis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroft, Ilse; Jong, E.M.G.J. de; Evers, A.W.M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the level of psychological distress and factors contributing to distress in patients with morphea or eosinophilic fasciitis. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Dermatology outpatient clinic of a university hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Of 120 patients with morphea or

  16. Necrotizing Fasciitis of vulva: A report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal A

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Vulvar necrotizing fascitis is an uncommon infectious disorder. Since the first reported cases almost 100 years, ago, necrotizing fasciitis continues to present a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. What usually begins as a subtle infection can become life-threatening. We report two cases of vulvar necrotizing fasciitis, one after posterior colporrhaphy in a woman with four risk factors and the other in a young woman without any risk factor.

  17. Post-traumatic unilateral plantar hyperhidrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, Y; Yavasoglu, N G; Comoglu, S S

    2016-02-01

    Localized unilateral hyperhidrosis is rare and poorly understood, sometimes stemming from trauma. Feet, quite vulnerable to trauma are affected by disease-mediated plantar hyperhidrosis, usually bilaterally. This report describes partial hyperhidrosis developing post-traumatically on the left plantar region of a 52-year-old male.

  18. Necrotizing fasciitis in a patient receiving tocilizumab for rheumatoid arthritis - Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa-Gonçalves, Diana; Bernardes, Miguel; Costa, Lúcia

    2016-12-29

    We present a case of necrotizing fasciitis in a 66-year-old Caucasian woman with rheumatoid arthritis receiving tocilizumab, and provide a review of published cases. The patient exhibited no systemic symptoms and discreet cutaneous inflammatory signals at presentation. She was successfully treated with broad-spectrum empiric antibiotic therapy and surgical debridement. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  19. Family medicine residents' perceived level of comfort in treating common sports injuries across residency programs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoako, Adae O; Amoako, Agyenim B; Pujalte, George Ga

    2015-01-01

    Family physicians are expected to be comfortable in treating common sports injuries. Evidence shows a limited level of comfort in treating these injuries in pediatric and internal medicine residents. Studies are lacking, however, in family medicine residents. The purpose of this study is to assess the comfort level of family medicine residents in treating common sports injuries in adults and children based on their perceived level of knowledge and attitudes. This is a cross-sectional study of family medicine residents in the United Sates. A written survey of 25 questions related to sports injury knowledge and factors affecting comfort level were collected. A chi-square test was implemented in calculating P-values. Five hundred and fifty-seven residents responded to the survey. A higher percentage of doctors of osteopathy (86.6%, 82.5%, 69.6%, and 68.7%) compared to doctors of medicine (78.5%, 71.6%, 53.4%, and 52.8%) respectively identified ankle sprain, concussion, plantar fasciitis, and lateral epicondylitis as common injuries, and felt comfortable in treating them (P-values =0.015, 0.004, 0.0001, and 0.0002, respectively). Residents with high interest in sports medicine correctly identified the injuries as common and felt comfortable treating them as well (knowledge, P=0.027, 0.0029, sports medicine contribute to residents' knowledge and comfort level in treatment of common sports injuries.

  20. Family medicine residents’ perceived level of comfort in treating common sports injuries across residency programs in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoako, Adae O; Amoako, Agyenim B; Pujalte, George GA

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective Family physicians are expected to be comfortable in treating common sports injuries. Evidence shows a limited level of comfort in treating these injuries in pediatric and internal medicine residents. Studies are lacking, however, in family medicine residents. The purpose of this study is to assess the comfort level of family medicine residents in treating common sports injuries in adults and children based on their perceived level of knowledge and attitudes. Methods This is a cross-sectional study of family medicine residents in the United Sates. A written survey of 25 questions related to sports injury knowledge and factors affecting comfort level were collected. A chi-square test was implemented in calculating P-values. Results Five hundred and fifty-seven residents responded to the survey. A higher percentage of doctors of osteopathy (86.6%, 82.5%, 69.6%, and 68.7%) compared to doctors of medicine (78.5%, 71.6%, 53.4%, and 52.8%) respectively identified ankle sprain, concussion, plantar fasciitis, and lateral epicondylitis as common injuries, and felt comfortable in treating them (P-values =0.015, 0.004, 0.0001, and 0.0002, respectively). Residents with high interest in sports medicine correctly identified the injuries as common and felt comfortable treating them as well (knowledge, P=0.027, 0.0029, sports medicine contribute to residents’ knowledge and comfort level in treatment of common sports injuries. PMID:25848326

  1. PERIORBITAL NECROTIZING FASCIITIS DUE TO CRYPTOCOCCUS NEOFORMANS IN A HEALTHY-YOUNG MAN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DOORENBOSBOT, ACC; HOOYMANS, JMM; BLANKSMA, LJ

    1990-01-01

    A case report is presented of a healthy 25-year-old man who developed a periorbital necrotising fasciitis after a trivial trauma with a wooden splinter. Necrotising fasciitis of the eyelids occurs rarely. Cryptococcus neoformans is not described as a causative factor of necrotizing fasciitis.

  2. Necrotizing fasciitis: 11-year retrospective case review in South Auckland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulasegaran, Suheelan; Cribb, Benjamin; Vandal, Alain C; McBride, Stephen; Holland, David; MacCormick, Andrew D

    2016-10-01

    The aims of this paper were to review our experience with necrotizing fasciitis at Middlemore Hospital and to define the trends in incidence, inpatient mortality and microbiological profile. A computerized search of the electronic medical records was undertaken to identify adult patients with a diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis between January 2000 and December 2010. A retrospective review of the clinical records was performed. Of the 138 patients with necrotizing fasciitis identified, 129 had their diagnosis confirmed at operation. The mortality at 30 days was 20.3% (95% confidence interval (CI) 13.9%-28.0%). There was a significant reduction in hospital mortality in each successive year of the study period with an odds ratio of 0.84 (95% CI 0.71-0.98, P = 0.03). A pattern of increasing incidence was noted until February 2004 (95% CI September 2002-July 2005). This was followed by a significant decrease in incidence. The empirical antibiotic regime of clindamycin, gentamicin and penicillin provides satisfactory cover against 95% of the causative pathogens. This represents the largest single-centre published case series in New Zealand. Despite concerns of increasing incidence and mortality associated with necrotizing fasciitis in New Zealand, the experience in South Auckland shows a decrease in incidence of necrotizing fasciitis since 2004 and a statistically significant decreasing trend in hospital mortality. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  3. Medial and Lateral Plantar Nerve Entrapment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Foot Problems Overview of Foot Problems Achilles Tendon Bursitis Achilles Tendon Enthesopathy Bunion Corns and Calluses Damage ... the Foot Freiberg Disease Hammer Toe Inferior Calcaneal Bursitis Medial and Lateral Plantar Nerve Entrapment Metatarsal Joint ...

  4. Vendaje funcional para la fascitis plantar

    OpenAIRE

    Rochina, Iván

    2013-01-01

    El profesor Vicente Tormo aplica un vendaje funcional que aproxima a su centro geométrico las estructuras que configuran la planta del pie, con el objetivo de mantener relajada la fascia plantar durante la bipedestación.

  5. Combination of diagnostic medial calcaneal nerve block followed by pulsed radiofrequency for plantar fascitis pain: A new modality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, Deepak; Ahuja, Vanita

    2014-03-01

    Plantar fasciitis (PF) is the most common cause of chronic heel pain which may be bilateral in 20 to 30% of patients. It is a very painful and disabling condition which can affect the quality of life. The management includes both pharmacological and operative procedures with no single proven effective treatment modality. In the present case series, we managed three patients with PF (one with bilateral PF). Following a diagnostic medial calcaneal nerve (MCN) block at its origin, we observed reduction in verbal numerical rating scale (VNRS) in all the three patients. Two patients has relapse of PF pain which was managed with MCN block followed with pulsed radio frequency (PRF). All the patients were pain-free at the time of reporting. This case series highlights the possible role of combination of diagnostic MCN block near its origin followed with PRF as a new modality in management of patients with PF.

  6. Combination of diagnostic medial calcaneal nerve block followed by pulsed radiofrequency for plantar fascitis pain: A new modality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Thapa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Plantar fasciitis (PF is the most common cause of chronic heel pain which may be bilateral in 20 to 30% of patients. It is a very painful and disabling condition which can affect the quality of life. The management includes both pharmacological and operative procedures with no single proven effective treatment modality. In the present case series, we managed three patients with PF (one with bilateral PF. Following a diagnostic medial calcaneal nerve (MCN block at its origin, we observed reduction in verbal numerical rating scale (VNRS in all the three patients. Two patients has relapse of PF pain which was managed with MCN block followed with pulsed radio frequency (PRF. All the patients were pain-free at the time of reporting. This case series highlights the possible role of combination of diagnostic MCN block near its origin followed with PRF as a new modality in management of patients with PF.

  7. Nodular Fasciitis of the Breast Mimicking Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinya Yamamoto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nodular fasciitis is a benign proliferative lesion that is usually found in the soft tissue of the upper extremity and trunk in young to middle-aged persons. It has rarely been described in the breast. A 35-year-old woman had noticed a mass in her left breast. It was elastic-hard, 13 mm in size, and located mainly in the upper inner quadrant of the left breast. Mammography did not detect the mass. Ultrasonography revealed a hypoechoic lesion with an irregular margin. Neither fine-needle aspiration cytology nor core needle biopsy established a definitive diagnosis. Excisional biopsy was therefore performed. Histologically, the excised tumor tissue results were consistent with a diagnosis of nodular fasciitis of the breast. We report a case of nodular fasciitis of the breast, a rare histological type of breast tumor.

  8. Necrotizing Fasciitis in Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pusem Patir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH is a rare, progressive, and life-threatening hematopoietic stem cell disorder characterized by complement-mediated intravascular hemolysis and a prothrombotic state. Patients with PNH might have slightly increased risk of infections due to complement-associated defects subsequent to CD59 deficiency. Here, we report a rare case of a 65-year-old male patient with necrotic ulcers on both legs, where the recognition of pancytopenia and microthrombi led to the diagnosis of PNH based on FLAER (FLuorescent AERolysin flow cytometric analysis. He was subsequently started on eculizumab therapy, with starting and maintenance doses set as per drug labelling. Progression of the patient’s leg ulcers during follow-up, with fulminant tissue destruction, purulent discharge, and necrotic patches, led to a later diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumonia infection. Courses of broad-spectrum antibiotics, surgical debridement, and superficial skin grafting were applied with successful effect during ongoing eculizumab therapy. This case highlights the point that it is important to maintain treatment of underlying disorders such as PNH in the presence of life-threatening infections like NF.

  9. Growth factor-enriched autologous plasma improves wound healing after surgical debridement in odontogenic necrotizing fasciitis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinez-Fong Daniel

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Odontogenic necrotizing fasciitis of the neck is a fulminant infection of odontogenic origin that quickly spreads along the fascial planes and results in necrosis of the affected tissues. It is usually polymicrobial, occurs frequently in immunocompromised patients, and has a high mortality rate. Case presentation A 69-year old Mexican male had a pain in the maxillar right-canine region and a swelling of the submental and submandibular regions. Our examination revealed local pain, tachycardia, hyperthermia (39°C, and the swelling of bilateral submental and submandibular regions, which also were erythematous, hyperthermic, crepitant, and with a positive Godet sign. Mobility and third-degree caries were seen in the right mandibular canine. Bacteriological cultures isolated streptococcus pyogenes and staphylococcus aureus. The histopathological diagnosis was odontogenic necrotizing fasciitis of the submental and submandibular regions. The initial treatment was surgical debridement and the administration of antibiotics. After cultures were negative, the surgical wound was treated with a growth factor-enriched autologous plasma eight times every third day until complete healing occurred. Conclusions The treatment with a growth factor-enriched autologous plasma caused a rapid healing of an extensive surgical wound in a patient with odontogenic necrotizing fasciitis. The benefits were rapid tissue regeneration, an aesthetic and a functional scar, and the avoidance of further surgery and possible complications.

  10. Human papillomaviruses genotyping in plantar warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Planell-Mas, Elena; Martínez-Garriga, Blanca; Zalacain, Antonio Jesús; Vinuesa, Teresa; Viñas, Miguel

    2017-05-01

    Plantar warts are caused by human papillomaviruses (HPVs) and have been associated with several HPV genotypes. However, there are few studies focused exclusively on plantar warts. In this work, we aim to identify the HPV genotypes of plantar warts and explore their relation to demographic and clinical characteristics of patients. A total of 72 patients diagnosed with plantar warts were recruited at the Laser unit at Podiatric Hospital, University of Barcelona, Spain. Inner hyperkeratosis laminar sections of warts were collected and DNA of samples were extracted. Amplification of a conserved region of the HPV L1 gene was performed with the SK-Polymerase chain reaction method. DNA amplicons were sequenced and HPV types identified. The most prevalent genotypes detected among the 105 analyzed plantar warts were HPV-57 (37.1%), HPV-27 (23.8%), HPV-1a (20.9%), HPV-2 (15.2%), and HPV-65 (2.8%). The majority of patients (78%) presented one single plantar wart, whereas multiple warts were detected in 22.2% of patients. One patient with multiple warts presented HPV types from two different genera, suggesting the spread of warts by self-inoculation as well as by de novo infection. No significant differences between the number of warts in toes, midfoot and heel were found. The most prevalent HPV types detected in all areas belonged to the alpha genus. This work provides new insight on plantar warts and their associated HPV genotypes, and evidences the usefulness and reliability of both the sample collection procedure and the PCR method used for HPV detection and typing. J. Med. Virol. 89:902-907, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Sonographic and MRI evaluation of the plantar plate: a prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregg, Julie; Silberstein, Morry; Schneider, Timothy; Marks, Paul

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish the accuracy of ultrasound in the examination of the plantar plate by comparing it with MRI, or if available, surgical findings. The lesser metatarsophalangeal joint plantar plates of 40 symptomatic and 40 asymptomatic feet (160 asymptomatic and 160 symptomatic plantar plates) were examined with ultrasound and MRI. Patients treated with surgery were chosen on a clinical basis and provided surgical correlation for the imaging techniques. Symptomatic patients with metatatarsalgia and suspected metatarsophalangeal joint instability were referred by an orthopedic foot specialist; asymptomatic feet were obtained either through examination of the contralateral foot of the symptomatic patients or volunteers. Ultrasound detected 75/160 and 139/160 plantar plates torn in the asymptomatic and symptomatic groups, respectively. MRI detected 56/160 and 142/160 tears in the symptomatic and asymptomatic groups, respectively. The sensitivity of MRI and ultrasound with surgical correlation was calculated to be 87 and 96%, respectively, with poor specificity. Ultrasound correlates moderately with MRI in the evaluation of the plantar plate. Surgical correlations, although limited (n=10), indicate ultrasound is superior to MRI with more accurate detection of tears. (orig.)

  12. Perforated diverticulitis presenting as necrotising fasciitis of the leg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talbot Robert

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Diverticulosis of the colon is a common condition of increasing age. Complications of diverticulitis including stricture, perforation and fistula formation often require surgery. Perforated diverticulitis may rarely present with spreading superficial sepsis. We describe for the first time, to our knowledge, a case of retroperitoneal diverticula perforation presenting as necrotising fasciitis of the leg necessitating hind-quarter amputation.

  13. Life-threatening necrotizing fasciitis due to 'bath salts' injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Russell; Marks, Noah; Morris, Katy; King, Heather; Gelvin, Angelle; Rooney, Ronald

    2012-01-16

    Necrotizing fasciitis is an orthopedic emergency. The ability to quickly and accurately diagnose this rapidly spreading disease can save a patient's life and limb. However, the diagnosis is complex because necrotizing fasciitis usually manifests as a less severe cellulitis or abscess while the majority of the damages rage beneath the surface of the skin. Although the diagnosis is not new, the potential causes and vectors continually change. This article reports a new source of necrotizing fasciitis in an intramuscular injection of "bath salts," a rapidly emerging street drug that is legal in some states and evades authorities with its innocuous name. The patient presented 2 days after injection of bath salts with extensive cellulitis extending to the mid portion of her upper arm. The cellulitis initially responded to broad-spectrum intravenous antibiotics, but rapidly deteriorated 48 hours later, leading to a forequarter amputation with radical mastectomy and chest wall debridement to obtain healthy tissue margins and control the disease. The patient made a full recovery after further minor debridements, negative pressure dressings, directed antibiotic therapy, and skin grafting. The recent emerging popularity of this highly obtainable, injectable substance may lead to an increase in cases of necrotizing fasciitis. Orthopedic surgeons should be vigilant in diagnosing this process early and should perform an extensive debridement. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Negative pressure treatment for necrotizing fasciitis after chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fraia Melchionda

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe 2 cases of children with malignant disease who developed severe mucositis with perineal necrotizing fasciitis during severe neutropenia after chemotherapy. Treatment with topical negative pressure therapy with silver foam dressing, together with large spectrum antibiotics, resolved the problem with complete closure of the wound after 30 and 36 days of treatment, respectively.

  15. Necrotizing Fasciitis In A Preterm, HIV Infected Baby | Olutekunbi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a rapidly progressive life threatening bacterial infection of the soft tissues. It is commoner in the adult population where it is associated with systemic and local disease conditions such as diabetes mellitus, intravenous drug abuse, dental lesions, trauma and immunosuppression. It is rare in ...

  16. Fasciitis necroticans efter artroskopi af præpatellar bursitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlesinger, NH; Friis-Møller, Alice; Hvolris, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a life-threatening soft tissue infection in superficial and deep fascias. NF is most often caused by mixed aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. The treatment is early and aggressive surgical debridement, antibiotics and hyperbaric oxygen. In this case description, a nearly...

  17. Triple diagnostics for early detection of ambivalent necrotizing fasciitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hietbrink, Falco; Bode, Lonneke G.; Riddez, Louis; Leenen, Luke P H; van Dijk, MR

    2016-01-01

    Background: Necrotizing fasciitis is an uncommon, rapidly progressive and potential lethal condition. Over the last decade time to surgery decreased and outcome improved, most likely due to increased awareness and more timely referral. Early recognition is key to improve mortality and morbidity.

  18. Cervical Necrotizing Fasciitis: A Potentially Fatal Disease with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    She was referred from a primary health-care facility. Dental and medical history revealed no relevant. Cervical Necrotizing Fasciitis: A Potentially Fatal. Disease with Varied Etiology. Abdurrazaq TO, Ibikunle AA, Braimah RO. Department of Dental and Maxillofacial Surgery, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Usmanu Danfodiyo ...

  19. Unusual presentation of necrotizing fasciitis in an HIV exposed infant

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Necrotizing fasciitis(NF) is a potentially life threatening soft tissue infection characterized by rapidly spreading inflammation with necrosis of fascia, subcutaneous tissues and overlying skin and is associated with signs of systemic toxicity. We present a case report of an uncommon presentation of NF in an HIV exposed infant.

  20. Nekrotiserende fasciitis i hoved-hals-området

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolf, Henning; Ovesen, Therese

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the clinical, microbiological, serological and radiological findings including the results of treatment in a Danish patient population with necrotizing fasciitis (NF) in the head and neck region. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data were retrieved from patient records with the ICD3...

  1. Cervico-facial necrotising fasciitis occurring with facial paralysis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... first molar, developed a cervico-facial necrotising fasciitis with facial nerve paralysis. Bacteriological investigations revealed the presence of Klebsiella spp and viridans streptococci. It is emphasised that early detection of this disease followed by aggressive surgical debridement and antibiotic therapy are most important.

  2. Unusual presentation of necrotizing fasciitis in an HIV exposed infant

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof Ezechukwu

    The child was discharged home after 31 days of hospital stay and was commenced on cotrimoxazole for pneumocystic carini pneumonia (PCP) prophylaxis. .... bacterium. 17. Edlich RF, Winters KL,. Woodard CR, Britt LD,. Long WB 3rd. Massive soft tissue infections: necrotizing fasciitis and purpura fulminans. 18. 19.

  3. Plantar hyperhidrosis: A review of current management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sanjay; Kaur, Simranjit; Wilson, Paul

    2016-11-01

    To critically appraise current literature regarding the management of plantar hyperhidrosis in the form of a structured review. A literature search was conducted using various databases and search criteria. The literature reports the use of conservative, medical and surgical treatment modalities for the management of plantar hyperhidrosis. However, long-term follow-up data are rare and some treatment modalities currently available are not fully understood. There is a considerable dearth in the literature on the management of plantar hyperhidrosis. Further study in larger populations with longer follow-up times is critical to access the long-term effects of treatment. Nonetheless, iontophoresis, botulinum toxin injection and lumbar sympathectomy are promising treatment modalities for this disorder.

  4. Necrotizing fasciitis due to Serratia marcescens: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Rohit; Crum-Cianflone, Nancy F

    2016-06-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a severe, life-threatening infection.  Serratia marcescens, a Gram-negative bacterium, is an extremely rare cause of necrotizing fasciitis. A case of S. marcescens necrotizing fasciitis is described, and a comprehensive review of the literature (1966-2015) of monomicrobial cases due to this organism performed. We report the first case of S. marcescens necrotizing fasciitis in the setting of calciphylaxis associated with end-stage renal disease.  A comprehensive review of the literature of S. marcescens necrotizing fasciitis is provided to enhance the awareness of this increasingly recognized infection, and to provide a concise summary of risk factors, treatment, and outcome. Our case and review highlight the potential risk factors for S. marcescens necrotizing fasciitis, including underlying renal disease and open wounds, and demonstrate the emergence of this organism as a cause of severe, life-threatening soft tissue infections.

  5. Morphea and Eosinophilic Fasciitis: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, Jorre S; Seyger, Marieke M B; Thurlings, Rogier M; Radstake, Timothy R D J; de Jong, Elke M G J

    2017-08-01

    Morphea, also known as localized scleroderma, encompasses a group of idiopathic sclerotic skin diseases. The spectrum ranges from relatively mild phenotypes, which generally cause few problems besides local discomfort and visible disfigurement, to subtypes with severe complications such as joint contractures and limb length discrepancies. Eosinophilic fasciitis (EF, Shulman syndrome) is often regarded as belonging to the severe end of the morphea spectrum. The exact driving mechanisms behind morphea and EF pathogenesis remain to be elucidated. However, extensive extracellular matrix formation and autoimmune dysfunction are thought to be key pathogenic processes. Likewise, these processes are considered essential in systemic sclerosis (SSc) pathogenesis. In addition, similarities in clinical presentation between morphea and SSc have led to many theories about their relatedness. Importantly, morphea may be differentiated from SSc based on absence of sclerodactyly, Raynaud's phenomenon, and nailfold capillary changes. The diagnosis of morphea is often based on characteristic clinical findings. Histopathological evaluation of skin biopsies and laboratory tests are not necessary in the majority of morphea cases. However, full-thickness skin biopsies, containing fascia and muscle tissue, are required for the diagnosis of EF. Monitoring of disease activity and damage, especially of subcutaneous involvement, is one of the most challenging aspects of morphea care. Therefore, data harmonization is crucial for optimizing standard care and for comparability of study results. Recently, the localized scleroderma cutaneous assessment tool (LoSCAT) has been developed and validated for morphea. The LoSCAT is currently the most widely reported outcome measure for morphea. Care providers should take disease subtype, degree of activity, depth of involvement, and quality-of-life impairments into account when initiating treatment. In most patients with circumscribed superficial subtypes

  6. Deaths from Necrotizing Fasciitis in the United States, 2003–2013

    OpenAIRE

    Arif, N.; Yousfi, S.; Vinnard, C.

    2015-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a life-threatening infection requiring urgent surgical and medical therapy. Our objective was to estimate the mortality burden of necrotizing fasciitis in the United States, and to identify time trends in the incidence rate of necrotizing fasciitis-related mortality. We obtained data from the National Center for Health Statistics, which receives information from death certificates from all states, including demographic information and cause of death. The U.S. Multiple...

  7. Concurrent emphysematous pyelonephritis and thigh necrotizing fasciitis after intramuscular administration of diclofenac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fateme Shamekhi Amiri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis (NF is a rapidly progressive, life-threatening soft tissue infec-tion. NF may result from any injury to the skin or from hematogenous spread. However, con-current emphysematous pyelonephritis and necrotizing fasciitis of the left thigh has not been reported. We report a case of emphysematous pyelonephritis and necrotizing fasciitis of the left thigh after intramuscular administration of diclofenac that improved with aggressive management including broad-spectrum antibiotics, nephrectomy and surgical intervention.

  8. Necrotizing Fasciitis Caused by Hypermucoviscous Klebsiella pneumoniae in a Filipino Female in North America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ng, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae has been described in Southeast Asia, but has only recently begun to emerge in North America. The hypermucoviscous strain of K. pneumoniae is a particularly virulent strain known to cause devastatingly invasive infections, including necrotizing fasciitis. Here we present the first known case of necrotizing fasciitis caused by hypermucoviscous K. pneumoniae in North America. [West J Emerg Med. 2015;16(1:165–168.

  9. Effectiveness of trigger point dry needling for plantar heel pain: a meta-analysis of seven randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chunhui; Ma, Hua

    2017-01-01

    Plantar heel pain can be managed with dry needling of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs); however, whether MTrP needling is effective remains controversial. Thus, we conducted this meta-analysis to evaluate the effect of MTrP needling in patients with plantar heel pain. PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, SinoMed (Chinese BioMedical Literature Service System, People's Republic of China), and CNKI (National Knowledge Infrastructure, People's Republic of China) databases were systematically reviewed for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that assessed the effects of MTrP needling. Pooled weighted mean difference (WMD) with 95% CIs were calculated for change in visual analog scale (VAS) score, and pooled risk ratio (RR) with 95% CIs were calculated for success rate for pain and incidence of adverse events. A fixed-effects model or random-effects model was used to pool the estimates, depending on the heterogeneity among the included studies. Extensive literature search yielded 1,941 articles, of which only seven RCTs met the inclusion criteria and were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled results showed that MTrP needling significantly reduced the VAS score (WMD =-15.50, 95% CI: -19.48, -11.53; P <0.001) compared with control, but it had a similar success rate for pain with control (risk ratio [RR] =1.15, 95% CI: 0.87, 1.51; P =0.320). Moreover, MTrP needling was associated with a similar incidence of adverse events with control (RR =1.89, 95% CI: 0.38, 9.39; P =0.438). MTrP needling effectively reduced the heel pain due to plantar fasciitis. However, considering the potential limitations in this study, more large-scale, adequately powered, good-quality placebo-controlled trials are needed to provide more trustworthy evidence in this area.

  10. The effect of foot orthoses with forefoot cushioning or metatarsal pad on forefoot peak plantar pressure in running

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Hähni

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Foot orthoses are frequently used in sports for the treatment of overuse complaints with sufficient evidence available for certain foot-related overuse pathologies like plantar fasciitis, rheumatoid arthritis and foot pain (e.g., metatarsalgia. One important aim is to reduce plantar pressure under prominent areas like metatarsal heads. For the forefoot region, mainly two common strategies exist: metatarsal pad (MP and forefoot cushioning (FC. The aim of this study was to evaluate which of these orthosis concepts is superior in reducing plantar pressure in the forefoot during running. Methods Twenty-three (13 female, 10 male asymptomatic runners participated in this cross-sectional experimental trial. Participants ran in a randomised order under the two experimental (MP, FC conditions and a control (C condition on a treadmill (2.78 ms−1 for 2 min, respectively. Plantar pressure was measured with the in-shoe plantar pressure measurement device pedar-x®-System and mean peak pressure averaged from ten steps in the forefoot (primary outcome and total foot was analysed. Insole comfort was measured with the Insole Comfort Index (ICI, sum score 0–100 after each running trial. The primary outcome was tested using the Friedman test (α = 0.05. Secondary outcomes were analysed descriptively (mean ± SD, lower & upper 95%-CI, median and interquartile-range (IQR. Results Peak pressure [kPa] in the forefoot was significantly lower wearing FC (281 ± 80, 95%-CI: 246–315 compared to both C (313 ± 69, 95%-CI: 283–343; p = .003 and MP (315 ± 80, 95%-CI: 280–350; p = .001. No significant difference was found between C and MP (p = .858. Peak pressures under the total foot were: C: 364 ± 82, 95%-CI: 328–399; MP: 357 ± 80, 95%-CI: 326–387; FC: 333 ± 81 95%-CI: 298–368. Median ICI sum scores were: C 50, MP 49, FC 64. Conclusions In contrast to the metatarsal pad orthosis, the

  11. Biomechanical consequences of adding plantar fascia release to metatarsal osteotomies: Changes in forefoot plantar pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydogan, Umur; Roush, Evan P; Moore, Blake E; Andrews, Seth H; Lewis, Gregory S

    2017-04-01

    Destruction of the normal metatarsal arch by a long metatarsal is often a cause for metatarsalgia. When surgery is warranted, distal oblique, or proximal dorsiflexion osteotomies of the long metatarsal bones are commonly used. The plantar fascia has anatomical connection to all metatarsal heads. There is controversial scientific evidence on the effect of plantar fascia release on forefoot biomechanics. In this cadaveric biomechanical study, we hypothesized that plantar fascia release would augment the plantar metatarsal pressure decreasing effects of two common second metatarsal osteotomy techniques. Six matched pairs of foot and ankle specimens were mounted on a pressure mat loading platform. Two randomly assigned surgery groups, which had received either distal oblique, or proximal dorsiflexion osteotomy of the second metatarsal, were evaluated before and after plantar fasciectomy. Specimens were loaded up to a ground reaction force of 400 N at varying Achilles tendon forces. Average pressures, peak pressures, and contact areas were analyzed. Supporting our hypothesis, average pressures under the second metatarsal during 600 N Achilles load were decreased by plantar fascia release following proximal osteotomy (p fascia release following modified distal osteotomy, under multiple Achilles loading conditions (p < 0.05). Plantar fasciotomy should not be added to distal metatarsal osteotomy in the treatment of metatarsalgia. If proximal dorsiflexion osteotomy would be preferred, plantar fasciotomy should be approached cautiously not to disturb the forefoot biomechanics. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:800-804, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Adapting a Vacuum Assisted Closure dressing to challenging wounds: negative pressure treatment for perineal necrotizing fasciitis with rectal prolapse in a newborn affected by acute myeloid leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negosanti, Luca; Aceti, Arianna; Bianchi, Tommaso; Corvaglia, Luigi; Negosanti, Francesca; Sgarzani, Rossella; Morselli, Paolo Giovanni; Cipriani, Riccardo; Negosanti, Massimino; Patrizi, Annalisa; Faldella, Giacomo

    2010-01-01

    We report the case of a newborn with acute myeloid leukaemia, who developed perineal necrotizing fasciitis due to Pseudomonas Aeruginosa, after twenty days of life. Following surgical debridement, she was effectively treated with topical negative pressure therapy (V.A.C.(R) device) with silver foam dressings, this achieved complete closure in thirteen days. Negative pressure therapy should be considered when conventional wound care fails to achieve complete wound closure, even in neonates.

  13. Plantar fascia coronal length: a new parameter for plantar fascia assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Ahmet Sinan; Demircay, Emre; Cakmak, Gokhan; Sahin, M Sukru; Tuncay, I Cengiz; Altun, Suleyman

    2015-01-01

    The effects of gender and various anthropometric variables were previously reported as significant predictors of plantar fascia thickness. Although a strong correlation between either the body weight or body mass index (BMI) and plantar fascia thickness were not demonstrated, a moderate relation was stated. We retrospectively investigated the role of gender, height, weight, and body mass index on plantar fascia thickness at the calcaneal origin (PFCO) and 1 cm distal from the calcaneal origin (PF1cm) and the coronal length of the plantar fascia at the calcaneal origin (CLPF) in healthy subjects. The PFCO, PF1cm, and CLPF were retrospectively measured from magnetic resonance images of 100 healthy subjects. The gender, height, weight, and body mass index of the participants were also noted. Gender was a predictive factor for the length of the CLPF. The subjects with a BMI >25 kg/m(2) had a significantly greater PFCO, PF1cm, and CLPF. Height was mildly and BMI and weight were moderately related to the PFCO. However the CLPF showed a better correlation with height, BMI, and weight than that of plantar fascia thickness. CLPF better reflected the role of weight, BMI, and height than its thickness. It is a new parameter that could be valuable in the evaluation of plantar fascia disorders. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Application of radiographic images in diagnosis and treatment of deep neck infections with necrotizing fasciitis: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Joo; Kim, Ju Dong; Ryu, Hye In; Cho, Yeon Hee; Kong, Jun Ha; Ohe, Joo Young; Kwon, Yong Dae; Choi, Byung Joon; Kim, Gyu Tae [School of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    The advent and wide use of antibiotics have decreased the incidence of deep neck infection. When a deep neck infection does occur, however, it can be the cause of significant morbidity and death, resulting in airway obstruction, mediastinitis, pericarditis, epidural abscesses, and major vessel erosion. In our clinic, a patient with diffuse chronic osteomyelitis of mandible and fascial space abscess and necrotic fasciitis due to odontogenic infection at the time of first visit came. We successfully treated the patient by early diagnosis using contrast-enhanced CT and follow up dressing through the appropriate use of radiographic images.

  15. Pyoderma Gangrenosum Masquerading as Necrotizing Fasciitis: Stepping Away from Cognitive Shortcuts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachael Hilton

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A patient with post-Cesarean wound complication was treated for necrotizing fasciitis (NF with sharp debridement and broad-spectrum antibiotics. Several operations and three weeks later, her abdominal skin, subcutaneous fat, right-sided rectus abdominus, and underlying fascia had been removed without any improvement in granulation tissue. Original pathology samples demonstrated sheets of necrosis consistent with NF, but were re-reviewed by a dermatopathologist who diagnosed the patient with pyoderma gangrenosum (PG. She was started on high-dose steroids and dapsone, and her wound quickly showed signs of improvement. Anchor bias delayed the initiation of steroids and diagnosis of PG as the surgical, medical, and consulting teams were hesitant to stray from the diagnosis of NF.

  16. Necrotizing Fasciitis: Diagnostic Challenges in a Mute Bedridden Patient with Atypical Laboratory Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghan-Shyam Lohiya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 27-year-old mute bedridden patient required parenteral corticosteroids and antibiotics, and hospitalization for an acute respiratory illness. After 2 days, staff noted a ~0.3 cm blister on the patient’s right heel. Within 19 hours, blistering increased and the foot became partly gangrenous. The patient developed high fever (40.3°C, and leukocytosis (count: 13×109/L; was 6.5×109/L ten days earlier. Necrotizing fasciitis (NF was diagnosed and treated with emergency leg amputation. Histopathology revealed necrosis of fascia, muscle, subcutaneous tissue, and skin. In bedridden patients, corticosteroids may particularly facilitate serious infections, and initial NF blistering may be mistaken for pressure ulcers. Vigilant and frequent whole body monitoring is necessary for all patients incapable of verbalizing their symptoms.

  17. Necrotizing fasciitis: unreliable MRI findings in the preoperative diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arslan, Arzu E-mail: arzuarslan@netscape.net; Pierre-Jerome, Claude; Borthne, Arne

    2000-12-01

    The authors present two cases of necrotizing fasciitis (NF), one case of dermatomyositis and one case of posttraumatic muscle injury, which have similar magnetic resonance imaging findings in terms of skin, subcutaneous fat, superficial and deep fasciae and muscle involvement. These cases highlight the need for cautious interpretation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, for they are nonspecific and the preoperative decision should be based mostly on the evolution of the clinical status.

  18. Damage control apronectomy for necrotising fasciitis and strangulated umbilical hernia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Coyle, P

    2012-01-31

    We present a case of a 50-year-old morbidly obese woman who presented with a case of necrotizing fasciitis of the anterior abdominal wall due to a strangulated umbilical hernia. The case was managed through damage control surgery (DCS) with an initial surgery to stabilise the patient and a subsequent definitive operation and biological graft hernia repair. We emphasise the relevance of DCS principles in the management of severe abdominal sepsis.

  19. Neonatal scrotal wall necrotizing fasciitis (Fournier gangrene: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zgraj Oskar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Necrotizing fasciitis in neonates is rare and is associated with almost 50% mortality. Although more than 80 cases of neonates (under one month of age with necrotizing fasciitis have been reported in the literature, only six of them are identified as originating in the scrotum. Case presentation We report the case of a four-week-old, full-term, otherwise-healthy Caucasian baby boy who presented with an ulcerating lesion of his scrotal wall. His scrotum was explored because of a provisional diagnosis of missed torsion of the testis. He was found to have necrotizing fasciitis of the scrotum. We were able to preserve the testis and excise the necrotic tissue, and with intravenous antibiotics there was a successful outcome. Conclusions Fournier gangrene is rarely considered as part of the differential diagnosis in the clinical management of the acute scrotum. However, all doctors who care for small babies must be aware of this serious condition and, if it is suspected, should not hesitate in referring the babies to a specialist pediatric surgical center immediately.

  20. Neonatal scrotal wall necrotizing fasciitis (Fournier gangrene): a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zgraj, Oskar; Paran, Sri; O'Sullivan, Maureen; Quinn, Feargal

    2011-12-12

    Necrotizing fasciitis in neonates is rare and is associated with almost 50% mortality. Although more than 80 cases of neonates (under one month of age) with necrotizing fasciitis have been reported in the literature, only six of them are identified as originating in the scrotum. We report the case of a four-week-old, full-term, otherwise-healthy Caucasian baby boy who presented with an ulcerating lesion of his scrotal wall. His scrotum was explored because of a provisional diagnosis of missed torsion of the testis. He was found to have necrotizing fasciitis of the scrotum. We were able to preserve the testis and excise the necrotic tissue, and with intravenous antibiotics there was a successful outcome. Fournier gangrene is rarely considered as part of the differential diagnosis in the clinical management of the acute scrotum. However, all doctors who care for small babies must be aware of this serious condition and, if it is suspected, should not hesitate in referring the babies to a specialist pediatric surgical center immediately.

  1. Neonatal scrotal wall necrotizing fasciitis (Fournier gangrene): a case report

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Zgraj, Oskar

    2011-12-12

    Abstract Introduction Necrotizing fasciitis in neonates is rare and is associated with almost 50% mortality. Although more than 80 cases of neonates (under one month of age) with necrotizing fasciitis have been reported in the literature, only six of them are identified as originating in the scrotum. Case presentation We report the case of a four-week-old, full-term, otherwise-healthy Caucasian baby boy who presented with an ulcerating lesion of his scrotal wall. His scrotum was explored because of a provisional diagnosis of missed torsion of the testis. He was found to have necrotizing fasciitis of the scrotum. We were able to preserve the testis and excise the necrotic tissue, and with intravenous antibiotics there was a successful outcome. Conclusions Fournier gangrene is rarely considered as part of the differential diagnosis in the clinical management of the acute scrotum. However, all doctors who care for small babies must be aware of this serious condition and, if it is suspected, should not hesitate in referring the babies to a specialist pediatric surgical center immediately.

  2. Stenosing Tenosynovitis of the Flexor Hallucis Longus Tendon Associated with the Plantar Capsular Accessory Ossicle at the Interphalangeal Joint of the Great Toe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Ho Chang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This report presents a case of stenosing tenosynovitis of the flexor hallucis longus tendon associated with the plantar capsular accessory ossicle at the interphalangeal joint of the great toe, which was confirmed by intraoperative observation and was successfully treated with surgical resection of the ossicle. As the plantar capsular accessory ossicle was not visible radiographically due to the lack of ossification, ultrasonography was helpful for diagnosing this disorder.

  3. Bilateral Necrotizing Fasciitis around the Hips Differentiated from Fournier Gangrene: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo Kyu; Yi, Seung Rim; Lee, Ye Hyun; Kim, Hyun See; Nam, Seok Woo; Ahn, Young Joon; Kim, Seong Wan; Yang, Sung Wook; Im, Se Hyuk

    2014-12-01

    As an emergency encountered in orthopedic practice requiring prompt diagnosis and aggressive treatment, necrotizing fasciitis around the hip must be discriminated from Fournier gangrene. The current case report describes a patient who suffered from bilateral type I necrotizing fasciitis around the hips, which was alleviated by prompt surgical debridement and intensive postoperative care.

  4. Nodular fasciitis: A pseudomalignant clonal neoplasm characterized by USP gene rearrangements and spontaneous regression

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hennebry, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Nodular fasciitis (NF) is a rapidly growing, self-limited, myofibroblastic neoplasm that typically arises in subcutaneous tissues of young adults and regresses spontaneously. Nodular fasciitis mimics sarcoma on clinical, radiological, and histological grounds and is usually, diagnosed following excision.\\r\

  5. [A patient with muscular torticollis caused by nodular fasciitis in the sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmi, Shoji; Murakami, Tatufumi; Shirabe, Teruo; Sunada, Yoshihide

    2002-09-01

    Nodular fasciitis is a benign pseudosarcomatous proliferative lesion which is frequently misdiagnosed as malignant tumor clinically and microscopically. It usually occurs as a rapidly enlarging subcutaneous mass on the upper extremities, especially on the forearm. Here we report a patient showing muscular torticollis caused by nodular fasciitis in the sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM). A 17-year-old woman was hospitalized because of rapidly progressive torticollis. The right SCM was markedly enlarged and firm on palpation. Muscle biopsy taken from the right SCM revealed massive proliferation of spindle shaped fibroblasts infiltrating into the endomysium. These findings coincided with the intramuscular nodular fasciitis. However, different from typical nodular fasciitis, no apparent nodule formation was found in this patient. Instead, diffuse proliferative lesion extended widely into the neck soft tissue. To our knowledge, this is the first report of muscular torticollis caused by nodular fasciitis involving the SCM.

  6. Research on Normal Human Plantar Pressure Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Xi Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available FSR400 pressure sensor, nRF905 wireless transceiver and MSP40 SCM are used to design the insole pressure collection system, LabVIEW is used to make HMI of data acquisition, collecting a certain amount of normal human foot pressure data, statistical analysis of pressure distribution relations about five stages of swing phase during walking, using the grid closeness degree to identify plantar pressure distribution pattern recognition, and the algorithm simulation, experimental results demonstrated this method feasible.

  7. Mechanical Information of Plantar Fascia during Normal Gait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yaodong; Li, Zhiyong

    The plantar fascia is an important foot tissue in stabilizing the longitudinal arch of human foot. Direct measurement to monitor the mechanical situation of plantar fascia at human locomotion is difficult. The purpose of this study was to construct a three-dimensional finite element model of the foot to calculate the internal stress/strain value of plantar fascia during different stage of gait. The simulated stress distribution of plantar fascia was the lowest at heel-strike, which concentrated on the medial side of calcaneal tubercle. The peak stress of plantar fascia was appeared at push-off, and the value is more than 5 times of the heel-strike position. Current FE model was able to explore the plantar fascia tension trend at the main sub-phases of foot. More detailed fascia model and intrinsic muscle forces could be developed in the further study.

  8. Effectiveness of trigger point dry needling for plantar heel pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotchett, Matthew P; Munteanu, Shannon E; Landorf, Karl B

    2014-08-01

    Plantar heel pain can be managed with dry needling of myofascial trigger points; however, there is only poor-quality evidence supporting its use. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of dry needling for plantar heel pain. The study was a parallel-group, participant-blinded, randomized controlled trial. The study was conducted in a university health sciences clinic. Study participants were 84 patients with plantar heel pain of at least 1 month's duration. Participants were randomly assigned to receive real or sham trigger point dry needling. The intervention consisted of 1 treatment per week for 6 weeks. Participants were followed for 12 weeks. Primary outcome measures included first-step pain, as measured with a visual analog scale (VAS), and foot pain, as measured with the pain subscale of the Foot Health Status Questionnaire (FHSQ). The primary end point for predicting the effectiveness of dry needling for plantar heel pain was 6 weeks. At the primary end point, significant effects favored real dry needling over sham dry needling for pain (adjusted mean difference: VAS first-step pain=-14.4 mm, 95% confidence interval [95% CI]=-23.5 to -5.2; FHSQ foot pain=10.0 points, 95% CI=1.0 to 19.1), although the between-group difference was lower than the minimal important difference. The number needed to treat at 6 weeks was 4 (95% CI=2 to 12). The frequency of minor transitory adverse events was significantly greater in the real dry needling group (70 real dry needling appointments [32%] compared with only 1 sham dry needling appointment [Dry needling provided statistically significant reductions in plantar heel pain, but the magnitude of this effect should be considered against the frequency of minor transitory adverse events. © 2014 American Physical Therapy Association.

  9. OA03.12. Herbal socks an effective medication against plantar hyperkeratosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geethadevi, C; Rajendran, R; Radhai, R

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Plantar hyperkeratosis commonly called cracked heel is a common condition among adults. Causes for plantar hyperkeratosis are many and include genetic defects reflected in skin structure, allergic dermatoses, and paraneoplastic syndromes seen with particular forms of internal malignancy. Treatment for this condition could be possibly done using traditional herbs. The current study throws light on the cure of plantar hyperkeratosis using socks worn daily. Method: Solanum xanthocarpum powder and Aleo vera were subjected to different solvent extracts and its antimicrobial activity against isolated organism was studied. The solvent extract showing highest zone of inhibition was chosen and nanoparticle was synthesized by ionic gelification method and characterized physically and chemically. Synthesized nanoparticles were coated onto the socks using pad dry cure method. The antibacterial activity of the socks was then studied using AATCC 100 and 147. The nanoparticle treated socks was chemically characterized using FTIR analysis. The socks were then analyzed in vivo. Result: The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized using HRTEM analysis and it was spherical. The nanoparticles coated socks showed a better activity against the organisms isolated from patients having plantar hyperkeratosis. The activity of the socks was tested in vivo among 20 patients and this proved to be promising cure. The wash durability of the socks was effective until 20 washes. Conclusion: The results showed that the formulated socks were effective against treatment of cracked heel and it also proves to be antimicrobial in nature. The effective durability of the socks was due the control and sustained release of herbal extracts from nanoparticle. Plantar hyperkeratosis could burden immune compromised patients such as diabetes, these kinds of herbal socks would be a better option for this treatment than the conventionally used time consuming treatments.

  10. Outcome of Limited Video-Assisted Lumbar Sympathetic Block for Plantar Hyperhidrosis Using Clipping Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Seok Won; Kim, Yun Seok; Lee, Yongjik; Lim, Han Jung; Park, Soon Ik; Jung, Jong Pil; Park, Chang Ryul

    2017-01-01

    There are many ways to treat focal hyperhidrosis, including surgeries for palmar and axillary hyperhidrosis. However, doctors and patients tend to be reluctant to perform surgery for plantar hyperhidrosis due to misconceptions and prejudices about surgical treatment. In addition, few studies have reported the outcome of surgeries for plantar hyperhidrosis. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the outcome (early and late postoperative satisfaction, complication, compensatory hyperhidrosis, recurrence rate, and efficiency) of surgical treatment for plantar hyperhidrosis. From August 2014 to October 2015, lumbar sympathetic block (LSB) was performed in 82 patients with plantar hyperhidrosis using clipping method. Limited video-assisted LSB was performed using 5 mm ligamax-clip or 3 mm horizontal-clip after identifying L3-4 sympathetic ganglion through finger-touch and endoscopic vision. Of the 82 patients, 45 were male and 37 were female. Their mean age was 26.38 years (range, 14-51 years). Mean follow-up time was 6.60 ± 3.56 months. Mean early postoperative satisfaction score was 9.6 on the 10th day postoperative evaluation. At more than 1 month later, the mean late postoperative satisfaction score was 9.2. There was no significant difference in early postoperative satisfaction score between clipping level L3 and L4/5. However, late postoperative satisfaction score was significantly better in the L3 group than that in the L4/5 group. Patient's age and body mass index did not affect the satisfaction score. However, male patients and patients who had history of hyperhidrosis operation showed higher satisfaction score than others. Limited video-assisted LSB using clip provided good results with minimal complications and low compensatory hidrosis, contrary to the prejudice toward it. Therefore, surgical treatment is recommended for plantar hyperhidrosis.

  11. Effectiveness of trigger point dry needling for plantar heel pain: a meta-analysis of seven randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He C

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Chunhui He,1,* Hua Ma2,* 1Internal Medicine of Traditional Chinese Medicine, 2Medical Image Center, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xinjiang Medical University, Wulumuqi, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Plantar heel pain can be managed with dry needling of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs; however, whether MTrP needling is effective remains controversial. Thus, we conducted this meta-analysis to evaluate the effect of MTrP needling in patients with plantar heel pain. Materials and methods: PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, SinoMed (Chinese BioMedical Literature Service System, People’s Republic of China, and CNKI (National Knowledge Infrastructure, People’s Republic of China databases were systematically reviewed for randomized controlled trials (RCTs that assessed the effects of MTrP needling. Pooled weighted mean difference (WMD with 95% CIs were calculated for change in visual analog scale (VAS score, and pooled risk ratio (RR with 95% CIs were calculated for success rate for pain and incidence of adverse events. A fixed-effects model or random-effects model was used to pool the estimates, depending on the heterogeneity among the included studies. Results: Extensive literature search yielded 1,941 articles, of which only seven RCTs met the inclusion criteria and were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled results showed that MTrP needling significantly reduced the VAS score (WMD =–15.50, 95% CI: –19.48, –11.53; P<0.001 compared with control, but it had a similar success rate for pain with control (risk ratio [RR] =1.15, 95% CI: 0.87, 1.51; P=0.320. Moreover, MTrP needling was associated with a similar incidence of adverse events with control (RR =1.89, 95% CI: 0.38, 9.39; P=0.438. Conclusion: MTrP needling effectively reduced the heel pain due to plantar fasciitis. However, considering the potential limitations in this study, more large-scale, adequately powered, good

  12. [Effect of T4 thoracoscopic sympathectomy on 
plantar hyperhidrosis in patients with 
primary palmoplantar hyperhidrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Peng; Liu, Aizhong; Liu, Wenliang

    2016-03-28

    To evaluate the effect of video-assisted thoracoscopic sympathectomy at the T4 level on plantar hyperhidrosis in the treatment of palmoplantar hyperhidrosis.
 The clinical data of 28 patients with primary palmoplantar hyperhidrosis, who were admited in our hospital from June 2009 to May 2014, was analyzed. All patients were qualified to bilateral thoracoscopic transaction of the sympathetic chain at the thoracic level T4. Patients completed a self-administered hyperhidrosis questionnaire and scoring before and after procedure. Follow-up data were obtained at 1 and 6 months after the surgery.
 Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy at the thoracic level T4 was performed successfully for all cases. Palmar hyperhidrosis was completely alleviated after the operation and no recurrence was observed during follow-up. The ratio for initial improvement of plantar hyperhidrosis was 28.6% (8/28) at 1 month after the surgery followed by a recurrence of plantar hyperhidrosis. No case continued to show the improvement of palmoplantar hyperhidrosis at 6 months after the sympathectomy. Twenty-seven patients (96.4%) were very satisfied with the outcome of the operation, 1 patient (3.6%) satisfied and no patient regretted the surgical procedure.
 T4 thoracoscopic sympathectomy could initialliy alleviate plantar hyperhidrosis in some patients with palmoplantar hyperhidrosis, but the improvement was not sustained over a long period. It could not be used to treat plantar hyperhidrosis.

  13. Development and evaluation of a new measure for muscle tone of ankle plantar flexors: the ankle plantar flexors tone scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Nobuyuki; Kuwabara, Takeya; Usuda, Shigeru

    2009-12-01

    Takeuchi N, Kuwabara T, Usuda S. Development and evaluation of a new measure for muscle tone of ankle plantar flexors: the Ankle Plantar Flexors Tone Scale. To develop and evaluate the reliability and concurrent validity of a clinically feasible measure for muscle tone of the ankle plantar flexors. Cross-sectional reliability and validity study of the Ankle Plantar Flexors Tone Scale. Department of rehabilitation in a general hospital. Patients (N=74) with cerebrovascular disease. Not applicable. Muscle tone of the ankle plantar flexors was measured using the Ankle Plantar Flexors Tone Scale, the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS), quality of muscle reaction with the Modified Tardieu Scale, and passive resistive joint torque with a handheld dynamometer. Intrarater and interrater reliabilities were assessed using the Cohen kappa coefficient (kappa). Internal consistency was assessed using the Cronbach alpha (alpha). Concurrent validity was assessed with the Spearman rank correlation coefficient (rho). The Ankle Plantar Flexors Tone Scale included 3 items: stretch reflex, middle range resistance, and final range resistance. Intrarater and interrater reliabilities and internal consistency of the Ankle Plantar Flexors Tone Scale showed moderate to excellent agreement (kappa=.63-.94; alpha=.81). Concurrent validity of the Ankle Plantar Flexors Tone Scale was low to very high among the 3 items of the Ankle Plantar Flexors Tone Scale and existing measures. The Spearman rank correlation coefficient showed high to very high correlation between stretch reflex and quality of muscle reaction as indices of the central component (rho=.85-.94). Middle range resistance and final range resistance as indices of the peripheral component had low to moderate correlation with passive resistive joint torque using a handheld dynamometer and MAS (rho=.44-.68). The Ankle Plantar Flexors Tone Scale allows measurement of ankle plantar flexor tone in greater detail than existing subjective measures

  14. Fasciitis necroticans efter artroskopi af præpatellar bursitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlesinger, NH; Friis-Møller, Alice; Hvolris, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a life-threatening soft tissue infection in superficial and deep fascias. NF is most often caused by mixed aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. The treatment is early and aggressive surgical debridement, antibiotics and hyperbaric oxygen. In this case description, a nearly...... 60-year-old man developed NF after arthroscopic synovectomy of an infected prepatellar bursa. We stress the point that the endoscopic technique itself might be responsible for the spreading of bacteria to the fascias. This is a subject for further investigation Udgivelsesdato: 30. april...

  15. [Necrotizing fasciitis of the upper limb. Apropos of 4 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rifai, R; el Yazidi, A; Ameziane, L; Berrada, M S; el Bardouni, A; el Yaacoubi, M; el Manouar, M

    1999-01-01

    This article is based on the retrospective study of 4 cases of necrotic fasciitis of the upper extremity, in adult patients with a mean age of 57 years (range: 36 to 78 years) and with a male predominance (3 M/1 F). Presenting signs were variable: pain, febrile and inflammatory oedema, ecchymoses with inflammatory masses containing clear or haemorrhagic fluid. Treatment with antibiotics and anti-inflammatory drugs did not prevent progression to painless, necrotic ulcers. Rapid medical and surgical treatment constitutes an element essential of the prognosis and must include wide large debridement, antibiotics and intensive care.

  16. Generalized morphea/eosinophilic fasciitis overlap after epoxy exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren H. Chan, MS

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Generalized morphea is associated with epoxy resin vapors and is characterized by the development of lesions shortly after exposure. Morphea presenting along with eosinophilic fasciitis (EF, or morphea/EF overlap, is rare and an indicator of poor prognosis and resistance to treatment. Here we present a case of generalized morphea/EF overlap linked to epoxy exposure. Our patient received multiple therapies—ultraviolet A1 phototherapy, prednisone, methotrexate, azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil, cyclophosphamide, cyclosporine, and rituximab—none of which led to a significant response. The refractory nature of this disease warrants vigilance in its association with epoxy exposure.

  17. First Necrotizing Fasciitis Caused by Haemophilus influenza Serotype a

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quach, Giang T.; Frisby, Jared; Kralovich, Kurt; Bohra, Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is an infrequently encountered skin infection that has high morbidity and mortality, even with prompt medical and surgical intervention. We describe the case of a 67-year-old male presenting with significant NF in his left lower extremity, despite aggressive surgical intervention, and included multiple surgical debridements, ACell Matrix, split-thickness, and negative wound VAC therapy. Ultimately, this patient required a below the knee amputation. This is the first documented case of Haemophilus influenza type a causing NF. PMID:29124073

  18. Effect of invertor/evertor and plantar-/dorsiflexor fatigue on plantar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Running induced lower limb muscle fatigue does not identify which loading alterations relate to fatigue of specific muscles. The purpose of the present study was to compare the effect of selectively induced fatigue of the lower limb muscles on plantar pressure distribution. Twelve male participants were assessed.

  19. Saltwater nectotizing fasciitis following coral reef laceration possibly exacerbated by a long-haul flight: a case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Byrne, Ann-Maria

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Necrotising fasciits is a rapidly progressive disease characterised by extensive necrosis of the fascia, skin, and subcutaneous tissue, with relative sparing of the underlying muscle. CASE PRESENTATION: We present the case of a 24-year old Irish male student who sustained a laceration to his right shin from contact with a coral reef while swimming in the Phuket region, off the west coast of Thailand. The following day, he returned to Ireland and presented with an aggressive and destructive variant of group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal necrotising fasciitis originating at the site of the coral reef injury, and exacerbated by the long-haul flight. He was successfully treated with aggressive surgical debridement, vacuum-assisted dressings, split skin grafting and broad spectrum antibiotics. CONCLUSION: Necrotising fasciitis can progress rapidly to systemic toxicity and even death without expedient diagnosis and aggressive treatment. Long-haul flights induce significant fluid accumulation in the lower extremity. These physiological fluid shifts may have contributed to the severity of our patient\\'s necrotizing condition following his flight from Thailand.

  20. Low Incidence Of Extensor Plantar Reflex In Newborns In An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Healthy term newborns with Apgar score of 8 and above at one minute were recruited into the study consecutively in a maternity hospital in Ibadan, Nigeria. The plantar reflex was elicited by stroking the lateral side of the sole with firm pressure, between 24 - 48 hours after delivery. Results Of 461 newborns, the plantar reflex ...

  1. Normal plantar weight distribution pattern and its variations with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Early osteoarthritic changes at the knee result in altered plantar weight distribution pattern during stand, minisquat, squat and one leg stand positions. To study and quantify these plantar weight distribution variations with changes in static functional position, a cross-sectional study was conducted. A total of 202 subjects, ...

  2. Increased plantar foot pressure in persons affected by leprosy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slim, Frederik J.; van Schie, Carine H.; Keukenkamp, Renske; Faber, William R.; Nollet, Frans

    2012-01-01

    Although foot pressure has been reported to be increased in people affected by leprosy, studies on foot pressure and its determinants are limited. Therefore, the aim was to assess barefoot plantar foot pressure and to identify clinical determinants of increased plantar foot pressure in leprosy

  3. Reactive eccrine syringofibroadenomatosis presenting as bilateral plantar hyperkeratosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Eccrine syringofibroadenoma (ESFA is a rare cutaneous tumor with eccrine differentiation with varied clinical manifestations. We report a case of reactive eccrine syringofibroadenomatosis associated with chronic bilateral plantar ulcers in a patient with diabetes mellitus presenting as plantar hyperkeratosis and verrucous growth at margins.

  4. Reactive Eccrine Syringofibroadenomatosis Presenting as Bilateral Plantar Hyperkeratosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nidhi; Chandrashekar, Laxmisha; Shakthi, Pragasam; Thappa, Devinder Mohan; Badhe, Bhawana Ashok; Sylvia, Mary Theresa

    2015-01-01

    Eccrine syringofibroadenoma (ESFA) is a rare cutaneous tumor with eccrine differentiation with varied clinical manifestations. We report a case of reactive eccrine syringofibroadenomatosis associated with chronic bilateral plantar ulcers in a patient with diabetes mellitus presenting as plantar hyperkeratosis and verrucous growth at margins.

  5. Fulminant Necrotizing Fasciitis and Toxic Shock Syndrome Caused by Streptococcus agalactiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emin UYSAL

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare and life-threatening soft tissue infection that spreads rapidly and involves the skin, subcutaneous tissue, fascia, and muscle layer. The treatment is possible by initiating appropriate antibiotherapy for the clinically suspected cause and by performing surgical intervention quickly and aggressively. However, it should be known that necrotizing fasciitis is a disease that is difficult to manage despite all interventions, effective treatment protocols, and patient care. This article presents the case of a 60-year-old patient with diabetes mellitus who died of toxic shock syndrome with fulminant necrotizing fasciitis caused by Streptococcus agalactiae.

  6. Nodular Fasciitis of the Posterior Chest Wall With Bone Invasion Mimicking a Malignant Neoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Nicholas J; Finley, David J; Tsapakos, Michael J; Wong, Sandra L; Linos, Konstantinos

    2017-05-01

    Nodular fasciitis is a self-limiting benign fibroblastic/myofibroblastic proliferation, which typically presents as a rapidly growing mass resembling an aggressive lesion clinically. It can also mimic a sarcoma histologically, hence the frequent characterization as "pseudosarcoma." We describe a case of a 53-year-old man who presented with a posterior chest wall mass that on imaging showed erosion into the adjacent ribs. After resection, the diagnosis of nodular fasciitis was rendered. Bone erosion by nodular fasciitis is extremely rare and can resemble a malignant neoplasm radiologically. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Iontophoresis for palmar and plantar hyperhidrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pariser, David M; Ballard, Angela

    2014-10-01

    Iontophoresis is a safe, efficacious, and cost-effective primary treatment of palmar and plantar hyperhidrosis. Decades of clinical experience and research show significant reduction in palmoplantar excessive sweating with minimal side effects. To get the best results from iontophoresis, health care professionals need to provide education on the mechanism of action and benefits, evidence of its use, and creation of a future patient-specific plan of care for continued treatments at home or in the physician's office. Iontophoresis may be combined with other hyperhidrosis treatments, such as topical antiperspirants and botulinum toxin injections. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Plantar pressure cartography reconstruction from 3 sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Ghaida, Hussein; Mottet, Serge; Goujon, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    Foot problem diagnosis is often made by using pressure mapping systems, unfortunately located and used in the laboratories. In the context of e-health and telemedicine for home monitoring of patients having foot problems, our focus is to present an acceptable system for daily use. We developed an ambulatory instrumented insole using 3 pressures sensors to visualize plantar pressure cartographies. We show that a standard insole with fixed sensor position could be used for different foot sizes. The results show an average error measured at each pixel of 0.01 daN, with a standard deviation of 0.005 daN.

  9. Plantar fat pad atrophy after corticosteroid injection for an interdigital neuroma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basadonna, P T; Rucco, V; Gasparini, D; Onorato, A

    1999-01-01

    A case of bilateral interdigital (Morton's) neuroma treated with steroid injection therapy developed plantar fat pad atrophy, shown on magnetic resonance imaging. Some pathologic changes at the site of injection (such as subcutaneous fat atrophy, depigmentation of the skin, and telangiectasias) are well known disadvantages of local steroid injection for the treatment of the Morton's neuroma. Scientific literature reports these problems (mainly as an aesthetic problem) in the dorsal aspect of the foot. In this work, the authors describe a case in which the steroid injection therapy has caused some changes in the plantar aspect of the feet, with serious functional problems. Fat pad atrophy is a serious problem in the foot and can cause a painful metatarsal syndrome with some important effects on the gait.

  10. Rationales and treatment approaches underpinning the use of acupuncture and related techniques for plantar heel pain: a critical interpretive synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Maria T; Clark, Richard J; Toohey, Shane; Bradbury-Jones, Caroline

    2017-03-01

    Acupuncture shows promise as a treatment for plantar heel pain (PHP) or plantar fasciitis (PF), but data heterogeneity has undermined demonstration of efficacy. Recognising that acupuncture is a diverse field of practice, the aim of this study was to gain a broader, global perspective on the different approaches and rationales used in the application of acupuncture in PHP. We built upon an earlier systematic review (which was limited by the necessity of a methodological focus on efficacy) using the critical interpretive synthesis (CIS) method to draw upon a wider international sample of 25 clinical sources, including case reports and case series. Multiple tracks of analysis led to an emergent synthesis. Findings are presented at three levels: primary (summarised data); secondary (patterns observed); and tertiary (emergent synthesis). Multiple treatments and rationales were documented but no single approach dominated. Notable contradictions emerged such as the application of moxibustion by some authors and ice by others. Synthesis of findings revealed a 'patchwork' of factors influencing the approaches taken. The complexity of the field of acupuncture was illustrated through the 'lens' of PHP. The 'patchwork' metaphor provides a unifying framework for a previously divergent community of practice and research. Several directions for future research were identified, such as: importance of prior duration; existence of diagnostic subgroups; and how practitioners make clinical decisions and report their findings. CIS was found to provide visibility for multiple viewpoints in developing theory and modelling the processes of 'real world' practice by acupuncturists addressing the problem of PHP. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  11. Mini-Invasive floating metatarsal osteotomy for resistant or recurrent neuropathic plantar metatarsal head ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamir, Eran; Finestone, Aharon S; Avisar, Erez; Agar, Gabriel

    2016-07-11

    Patients with peripheral neuropathy and pressure under a relatively plantar deviated metatarsal head frequently develop plantar foot ulcers. When conservative management with orthotics and shoes does not cure the ulcer, surgical metatarsal osteotomy may be indicated to relieve the pressure and enable the ulcer to heal. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the use of a mini-invasive floating metatarsal osteotomy in treating recalcitrant ulcers or recurrent ulcers plantar to the metatarsal heads in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) related neuropathy. Computerized medical files of patients with diabetic neuropathy treated with an osteotomy during 2013 and 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. There were 20 osteotomies performed on 17 patients (mean age 58 years). The patients had a diagnosis of DM for a mean of 17 years. All ulcers were University of Texas grade 1A; mean ulcer age was 19 months. After 17/20 operations, the ulcer completely resolved after 6 weeks and did not recur after a mean follow-up of 11.5 months. One patient developed an early post-operative infection with osteomyelitis at the osteotomy site (proximal shaft of the fifth metatarsal) that needed debridement and IV antibiotics. In the other 19 cases, the surgical wound healed within 1 week. Asymptomatic radiological non-union developed in six cases (30 %). Mini-invasive floating metatarsal osteotomy can cure resistant and recurrent University of Texas grade 1A ulcerations plantar to the metatarsal heads in neuropathic patients.

  12. Intraosseous fixation compared to plantar plate fixation for first metatarsocuneiform arthrodesis: a cadaveric biomechanical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Klaus Edgar; Peters, Jennifer; Schmidtmann, Irene; Maus, Uwe; Stephan, Daniel; Augat, Peter

    2014-11-01

    Metatarsocuneiform (MTC) fusion is a treatment option for management of hallux valgus. We compared the biomechanical characteristics of an internal fixation device with plantar plate fixation. Seven matched pairs of feet from human cadavers were used to compare the intramedullary (IM) device plus compression screw to plantar plate combined with a compression screw. Specimen constructs were loaded in a cyclic 4-point bending test. We obtained initial/final stiffness, maximum load, and number of cycles to failure. Bone mineral density was measured with peripheral quantitative computed tomography. Performance was compared using time to event analysis with number of cycles as time variable, and a proportional hazard model including shared frailty model fitted with treatment and bone mineral density as covariates. On average the plates failed after 7517 cycles and a maximum load of 167 N, while the IM-implants failed on average after 2946 cycles and a maximum load of 69 N. In all pairs the 1 treated with IM-implant failed earlier than the 1 treated with a plate (hazard ratio for IM-implant versus plate was 79.9 (95% confidence interval [6.1, 1052.2], P = .0009). The initial stiffness was 131 N/mm for the plantar plate and 43.3 N/mm for the IM implant. Initial stiffness (r = .955) and final stiffness (r = .952) were strongly related to the number of cycles to failure. Bone mineral density had no effect on the number of cycles to failure. Plantar plate fixation created a stronger and stiffer construct than IM fixation. A stiffer construct can reduce the risk of nonunion and shorten the period of non-weight-bearing. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. Fournier's gangrene (necrotising fasciitis) complicated by renal and respiratory insufficiency: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisman, E; Rácz, O; Beck, J; Firment, J; Bodnárová, L

    2016-01-01

    A case report of a 68-year-old male obese diabetic patient with an abscess of left femoral region, and diffuse inflammation of abdominal wall and genital region developing sepsis, respiratory and renal failure. At admission in the regional hospital a diagnosis of polymicrobial necrotising fasciitis with suspected sepsis was declared. The patient was transferred to the special intensive care unit (SICU) of Burns and reconstructive surgery at the Kosice-Saca. The patient was treated surgically, with hyperbaric oxygen and pharmacologically to control his diabetes. The main aetiological agent of the condition was identified as Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. In addition to respiratory and metabolic acidosis and gastric bleeding occurred. Due to acute renal failure (day 38) the patient was transferred to clinic of anaesthesiology and the intensive care medicine at the University Hospital in Kosice. The patient was treated by continuous veno-venous haemodialysis, mechanical ventilation and nasogastric nutritional support. On day 48 the conscious sub-febrile patient with healed wounds was transferred back to the regional hospital with ventilation support and continuous renal replacement therapy. His diabetes was uncontrolled, and only kidney parameters remained pathological. The survival of this patient with an extremely poor prognosis was achieved through prompt transfer to a specialised centre, early identification of the aetiological agent and immediate appropriate antibiotic treatment as a result of good cooperation between surgeons and laboratory specialists.

  14. Identity and quantity of microorganisms in necrotising fasciitis determined by culture and molecular methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudkjøbing, Vibeke Børsholt; Thomsen, Trine Rolighed; Nielsen, Per Halkjær

    Necrotising fasciitis (NF), commonly known as flesh eating disease is a fast progressing, potentially lethal infection of the subcutaneous tissue/fascia. Treatment includes high doses of intravenous antibiotics and aggressive surgical debridement. Accurate identification of the microbial community...

  15. Infantile nodular fasciitis of the hand: A case report and literature review

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    I Weng Lao

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric nodular fasciitis is uncommon and has a preference for the head and neck region. Occurrence in other anatomic locations is uncommon. We describe here a case of nodular fasciitis that arose in the hand of a newborn infant who presented with a rapidly growing mass. On MRI, it was heterogeneous isointense on T1-weighted and hyperintense on T2-weighted images. Histological examination showed short intersecting fascicles of uniform spindled myofibroblasts embedded in a myxoid to collagenous stroma, consistent with a nodular fasciitis. However, the lesion was initially diagnosed as an infantile fibrosarcoma due to the rapid growth, brisk mitotic activity and focally infiltrative architecture. This study illustrates that unusual presentation of nodular fasciitis may cause diagnostic confusion.

  16. MOUTH FLOOR DIFFUSE SUPPURATION COMPLICATED BY CERVICOTHORACIC NECROTIZING FASCIITIS – A CASE REPORT

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    Violeta TRANDAFIR

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is a severe soft tissue infection, often life-threatening, characterized by necrosis of the subcutaneous and fascial tissue, which can be extended along the fascial plans, affecting the adjacent vessels, nerves and muscle tissue. The predisposing factors of the disease include: advanced age, immuno-compromised bodies, diabetes, chronic alcoholism and chronic smoking. Necrotizing fasciitis in head and neck segments is rare, usually with an odontogenic source of infection. In the early stages of evolution, a necrotizing fasciitis is difficult to differentiate from the non-necrotizing infection of the soft tissue. Due to its extremely severe evolution, an early presumptive diagnosis is necessary (based on clinical and imaging aspects, as well as a prompt aggressive surgery backed by an intensive care support. The clinical case of an immunocompromised patient admitted for a mouth floor diffuse suppuration, previously complicated with cervicothoracic necrotizing fasciitis with aggressive evolution, is discussed in the following.

  17. A Case of Postsurgical Necrotizing Fasciitis Invading the Rectus Abdominis Muscle and Review of the Literature

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    Francesco Carbonetti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is a life-threatening, soft tissue infection and an early diagnosis is needed to permit a prompt surgical and medical intervention. Due to the high fatal potential of the disease complications, the radiologist should distinguish necrotizing fasciitis from the most common soft tissue infections, in order to permit a prompt surgical and medical treatment. We present a case of a wide necrotizing fasciitis who presented at our emergency department and we also provide the basic tools, through a review of the literature, for the general radiologist to distinguish, with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, necrotizing fasciitis from the most common infections that could present during our routine practice.

  18. Methods of Sports Genetics: toe and plantar dermatoglyphic analysis (information 3)

    OpenAIRE

    Serhiyenko L.P.; Lyshevskaya V.H.

    2010-01-01

    The article summarized the data and dermatoglyphic analysis of human toe and plantar prints. It is defined that toe and plantar triradii, papillary ridge patterns, the main plantar lines, the types of dermatoglyphic patterns can be the objects of the dermatoglyphic analysis. The recommendations to use the technology of dermatoglyphic analysis of human toe and plantar prints in sport genetics are given.

  19. A Case of Rituximab-Induced Necrotizing Fasciitis and a Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Abdulkareem, Abdullateef; D’Souza, Ryan S.; Shogbesan, Oluwaseun; Donato, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a fulminant soft tissue infection characterized by rapid progression and high mortality. Rituximab is a generally well-tolerated immunosuppresive medication used for B-cell malignancies and some rheumatological disorders. We report a case of a 69-year-old male with chronic lymphocytic leukemia who suffered necrotizing fasciitis of his left lower extremity secondary to Clostridium septicum 7 weeks after treatment with rituximab. Despite immediate intravenous antimicrob...

  20. Lower extremity necrotizing fasciitis: A unique initial presentation of Crohn's disease

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    Anna Weiss

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Crohn's disease is a disease of the bowel, typically presenting with diarrhea, weight loss, and abdominal pain. Complications such as abscesses, fistulas, and strictures may require surgical intervention. We would like to report a patient with Crohn's disease who presented for the first time with left lower extremity necrotizing fasciitis. There are very few reports of necrotizing fasciitis in Crohn's disease as the initial presentation.

  1. Necrotizing Fasciitis and Toxic Shock Syndrome from Clostridium septicum following a Term Cesarean Delivery

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    B. H. Rimawi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis and toxic shock syndrome are life-threatening conditions that can be seen after any surgical procedure. With only 4 previous published case reports in the obstetrics and gynecology literature of these two conditions occurring secondary to Clostridium septicum, we describe a case of necrotizing fasciitis and toxic shock syndrome occurring after a term cesarean delivery caused by this microorganism, requiring aggressive medical and surgical intervention.

  2. Monomicrobial necrotizing fasciitis in a white male caused by hypermucoviscous Klebsiella pneumoniae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunnarsson, Gudjon L; Brandt, Pernille B; Gad, Dorte

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of monomicrobial necrotizing fasciitis caused by hypermucoviscous Klebsiella pneumoniae in an immunocompromised white male after travel to China. The K. pneumoniae isolate belonged to the K2 serotype, and carried the virulence factors RmpA and aerobactin. To the best of our...... knowledge this is the first report of necrotizing fasciitis caused by hypermucoviscous K. pneumoniae resembling the highly virulent K. pneumoniae isolates associated with liver abscess syndrome in Asia....

  3. Plantar tendons of the foot: MR imaging and US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Andrea; Rosenberg, Zehava Sadka; Bencardino, Jenny T; Velez, Zoraida Restrepo; Blonder, David B; Ciavarra, Gina A; Adler, Ronald Steven

    2013-01-01

    Tendon disorders along the plantar aspect of the foot may lead to significant symptoms but are often clinically misdiagnosed. Familiarity with the normal anatomy of the plantar tendons and its appearance at magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and ultrasonography (US) is essential for recognizing plantar tendon disorders. At MR imaging, the course of the plantar tendons is optimally visualized with dedicated imaging of the midfoot and forefoot. This imaging should include short-axis images obtained perpendicular to the long axis of the metatarsal shafts, which allows true cross-sectional evaluation of the plantar tendons. Normal plantar tendons appear as low-signal-intensity structures with all MR sequences. At US, accurate evaluation of the tendons requires that the ultrasound beam be perpendicular to the tendon. The normal tendon appears as a compact linear band of echogenic tissue that contains a fine, mixed hypoechoic and hyperechoic internal fibrillar pattern. Tendon injuries can be grouped into six major categories: tendinosis, peritendinosis, tenosynovitis, entrapment, rupture, and instability (subluxation or dislocation) and can be well assessed with both MR imaging and US. The radiologist plays an important role in the diagnosis of plantar tendon disorders, and recognizing their imaging appearances at MR imaging and US is essential.

  4. Identification of Foot Pathologies Based on Plantar Pressure Asymmetry

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    Linah Wafai

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Foot pathologies can negatively influence foot function, consequently impairing gait during daily activity, and severely impacting an individual’s quality of life. These pathologies are often painful and correspond with high or abnormal plantar pressure, which can result in asymmetry in the pressure distribution between the two feet. There is currently no general consensus on the presence of asymmetry in able-bodied gait, and plantar pressure analysis during gait is in dire need of a standardized method to quantify asymmetry. This paper investigates the use of plantar pressure asymmetry for pathological gait diagnosis. The results of this study involving plantar pressure analysis in fifty one participants (31 healthy and 20 with foot pathologies support the presence of plantar pressure asymmetry in normal gait. A higher level of asymmetry was detected at the majority of the regions in the feet of the pathological population, including statistically significant differences in the plantar pressure asymmetry in two regions of the foot, metatarsophalangeal joint 3 (MPJ3 and the lateral heel. Quantification of plantar pressure asymmetry may prove to be useful for the identification and diagnosis of various foot pathologies.

  5. Recurrent and other new foot ulcers after healed plantar forefoot diabetic ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Örneholm, Hedvig; Apelqvist, Jan; Larsson, Jan; Eneroth, Magnus

    2017-04-01

    Diabetic foot ulcer is a serious complication in patients with diabetes. In most outcome studies of this condition, there is a combination of various types of ulcer and ulcer locations. Plantar ulcers are usually localized to the forefoot, and constitute a quarter of all diabetic foot ulcers. There are a limited number of studies regarding development of new ulcers following healing of a plantar forefoot ulcer, and there are no uniform definitions of recurrent and other new ulcers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of a large cohort of consecutively treated patients with diabetes mellitus and a healed planter forefoot ulcer (n = 617) with regard to development, characteristics, and outcome of recurrent and other new ulcers. Patients were followed consecutively and prospectively with a 2-year follow-up, according to a preset protocol. Out of 617 patients, 250 (41%) did not develop any new ulcer, 262 (42%) developed a new ulcer, 87 (14%) died and 18 (3%) were lost at 2 years following healing of a plantar forefoot ulcer. Thirty-four percent developed other new ulcers (112 on the same foot and 99 on the contralateral foot), whereas 51 patients (8%) developed a recurrent ulcer (at the same site and foot). Of the patients who died within 2 years, 30 patients had developed other new ulcers. The risk of a recurrent ulcer in patients with diabetes and a healed plantar forefoot ulcer was only 8% within 2 years, whereas other new ulcers, on the same foot or on the contralateral foot, was seen in 4 out of 10 patients indicating the need for further preventive measures and surveillance in these patients. We suggest a concise definition for new ulcer to be used in future research. © 2017 by the Wound Healing Society.

  6. Minor trauma triggering cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis from odontogenic abscess

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    Jain Shraddha

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis (NF of the face and neck is a very rare complication of dental infection. Otolaryngologists and dentists should be familiar with this condition because of its similarity to odontogenic deep neck space infection in the initial stages, its rapid spread, and its life-threatening potential. Trauma has been reported to be an important predisposing factor for NF of the face. In this paper, we describe the presentation and treatment of a 62-year-old man who developed NF of the face and neck following bilateral odontogenic deep neck space abscesses. The disease progressed rapidly, with necrosis of the skin, after the patient inflicted minor trauma in the form of application of heated medicinal leaves. The organism isolated in culture from pus was Acinetobacter sp . The comorbid conditions in our patient were anemia and chronic alcoholism. The patient was managed by immediate and repeated extensive debridements and split-skin grafting.

  7. Flesh-Eating Disease: A Note on Necrotizing Fasciitis

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    H Dele Davies

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been much media attention in the past few years to the condition dubbed 'flesh-eating disease', which refers, primarily, to a form of invasive group A beta hemolytic streptococcal (GABHS infection that leads to fascia and muscle necrosis. In 1999, the Canadian Paediatric Society issued a statement on the state of knowledge and management of children, and close contacts of persons with all-invasive GABHS disease (1. The present note is intended to deal specifically with necrotizing fasciitis (NF by providing an update on the limited current state of knowledge, diagnosis and management. Surveillance to establish actual national rates and epidemiology of NF through the Canadian Paediatric Society is proposed.

  8. Diagnosis and management of necrotising fasciitis: a multiparametric approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, M S

    2010-08-01

    Necrotising fasciitis (NF) is situated with myositis and myonecrosis at the severe end of a spectrum of skin and soft tissue infections but is far removed from erisepelas, impetigo and cellulitis. Inexperienced clinicians are easily misled by the protean manifestations of infection, especially exotoxin or superantigen mediated consequences from streptococcal NF. Early clinical suspicion and surgery are key to improving survival, and patients with NF need integrated multidisciplinary management, adjusted to the infecting organism(s), the site of infection, and the effects from any toxins produced. A multiparametric approach, incorporating various clinical and laboratory parameters, can aid aggressive management. This review describes the diagnosis and management of the major types of NF, emphasising important aetiological clues from the history and the appropriate usage of diagnostic investigations. The potential benefits of controversial therapeutic approaches, including hyperbaric oxygen and intravenous immunoglobulin, are discussed. Copyright 2010 The Hospital Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. [Fournier gangrene (necrotizing fasciitis) in a woman with diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamper, Lars; Piroth, W; Haage, P

    2009-08-01

    A 67-year-old woman with insuline-dependent diabetes mellitus and chronic alcohol abuse was admitted with impaired consciousness and fever. Physical examination showed a livid induration of the perineal and vaginal soft tissues with crepitations. Laboratory tests showed greatly elevated infection parameters. Abdominal computed tomography revealed perineal and vaginal subcutaneous gas accumulation extending into the ventral abdominal wall. The combination of an obscure infection and subcutaneous genital gas accumulation suggested the diagnosis of Fournier gangrene, a necrotizing fasciitis. In spite of administration of broad-spectrum antibiotics and repeated surgical removal of necrotic tissue the patient died of multiple organ failure. Successful treatment of Fournier gangrene critically depends on immediate treatment. Administration of broad-spectrum antibiotics and aggressive surgical resection of the necrotic tissue may prevent continuing spreading of the infection. Computed tomography provides an early diagnosis and guides the presurgical evaluation of the subcutaneous spread. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart * New York.

  10. Evaluating the Laboratory Risk Indicator to Differentiate Cellulitis from Necrotizing Fasciitis in the Emergency Department

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    Michael M. Neeki

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Necrotizing fasciitis (NF is an uncommon but rapidly progressive infection that results in gross morbidity and mortality if not treated in its early stages. The Laboratory Risk Indicator for Necrotizing Fasciitis (LRINEC score is used to distinguish NF from other soft tissue infections such as cellulitis or abscess. This study analyzed the ability of the LRINEC score to accurately rule out NF in patients who were confirmed to have cellulitis, as well as the capability to differentiate cellulitis from NF. Methods: This was a 10-year retrospective chart-review study that included emergency department (ED patients ≥18 years old with a diagnosis of cellulitis or NF. We calculated a LRINEC score ranging from 0–13 for each patient with all pertinent laboratory values. Three categories were developed per the original LRINEC score guidelines denoting NF risk stratification: high risk (LRINEC score ≥8, moderate risk (LRINEC score 6–7, and low risk (LRINEC score ≤5. All cases missing laboratory values were due to the absence of a C-reactive protein (CRP value. Since the score for a negative or positive CRP value for the LRINEC score was 0 or 4 respectively, a LRINEC score of 0 or 1 without a CRP value would have placed the patient in the “low risk” group and a LRINEC score of 8 or greater without CRP value would have placed the patient in the “high risk” group. These patients missing CRP values were added to these respective groups. Results: Among the 948 ED patients with cellulitis, more than one-tenth (10.7%, n=102 of 948 were moderate or high risk for NF based on LRINEC score. Of the 135 ED patients with a diagnosis of NF, 22 patients had valid CRP laboratory values and LRINEC scores were calculated. Among the other 113 patients without CRP values, six patients had a LRINEC score ≥ 8, and 19 patients had a LRINEC score ≤ 1. Thus, a total of 47 patients were further classified based on LRINEC score without a CRP value

  11. Post-partum streptococcal toxic shock syndrome associated with necrotizing fasciitis

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    Wei Chuan Chua

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a fatal case of post-partum streptococcal toxic shock syndrome in a patient who was previously healthy and had presented to the emergency department with an extensive blistering ecchymotic lesions over her right buttock and thigh associated with severe pain. The pregnancy had been uncomplicated, and the mode of delivery had been spontaneous vaginal delivery with an episiotomy. She was found to have septicemic shock requiring high inotropic support. Subsequently, she was treated for necrotizing fasciitis, complicated by septicemic shock and multiple organ failures. A consensus was reached for extensive wound debridement to remove the source of infection; however, this approach was abandoned due to the patient’s hemodynamic instability and the extremely high risks of surgery. Both the high vaginal swab and blister fluid culture revealed Group A beta hemolytic streptococcus infection. Intravenous carbapenem in combination with clindamycin was given. Other strategies attempted for streptococcal toxic removal included continuous veno-venous hemofiltration and administration of intravenous immunoglobulin. Unfortunately, the patient’s condition worsened, and she succumbed to death on day 7 of hospitalization.

  12. Necrotizing fasciitis as a complication of odontogenic infection: a review of management and case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayetto, K; Cheng, A; Sambrook, P

    2017-09-01

    The aims of the present study were to establish the incidence of head and neck necrotizing fasciitis (NF) in the Adelaide Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Unit; review the current literature regarding the management of head and neck NF; and determine the evidence for the role of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in the management of NF. A retrospective audit of all patients admitted to the Royal Adelaide Hospital Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Unit 2006-2015 with severe odontogenic infections was carried out. Patient demographics were recorded and treatment details were collected and analysed. A total of 672 patients were admitted for management of severe odontogenic infections. Of these, three were identified as NF. One case was treated using hyperbaric oxygen as an adjunct to conventional surgical and medical management. Two cases were managed using aggressive surgical management alone. Two patients survived. The incidence of head and neck NF in South Australia is 48/100 000 infections per year. The first-line treatment of severe odontogenic infections remains conventional surgical and medical management; however, hyperbaric oxygen therapy may have an additional role in the management of NF and other rare severe infections in medically complex patients. © 2017 Australian Dental Association.

  13. Sequential Extended Thoracoscopic Sympathicotomy for Palmo-Axillo-Plantar Hyperhidrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elalfy, Khaled; Emile, Sameh; Elfeki, Hossam; Elmetwally, Ahmed; Farag, Mohamed; Gado, Waleed

    2017-10-01

    Palmo-axillo-plantar hyperhidrosis (HH) exists in approximately 70% to 100% of patients complaining of HH. Many studies have documented variable effects of thoracoscopic sympathicotomy (TS) on plantar sweating. The present trial evaluated sequential extended thoracoscopic sympathicotomy for the treatment of palmo-axillo-plantar HH regarding its feasibility and outcome on each domain of HH, particularly the plantar domain METHODS: Forty-two patients with severe palmo-axillo-plantar HH underwent sequential extended (T3 to T12) thoracoscopic sympathicotomy. Improvement in HH was assessed using visual analog scale and iodine-starch test, and quality of life was evaluated using the Keller quality of life questionnaire preoperatively and 2 years postoperatively. Included were 16 men and 26 women with a mean age of 24.3 ± 5.3 years. The average preoperative VAS for the palmar, axillary, and plantar HH was 9 ± 0.66, which declined significantly (p < 0.0001) at 24 months of follow-up to a mean of 0.74 ± 0.4 for the palmar and axillary domains and to 1.26 ± 0.7 for plantar HH. Improvement in quality of life was observed in all patients at 24 months of follow-up as the overall median score decreased from 120.5 to 3.5. Sequential extended thoracoscopic sympathicotomy proved to be an effective method for the treatment of combined HH because it achieved satisfactory and sustained improvement of palmar, axillary, and plantar sweating. Although the benefits of sequential extended thoracoscopic sympathicotomy outweigh its drawbacks and technical difficulties, further prospective studies are required to ascertain the effectiveness of this new technique. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Placement of Plantar Plates for Lapidus Arthrodesis: Anatomical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaass, Christian; Claassen, Leif; Daniilidis, Kiriakos; Fumy, Mariesol; Stukenborg-Colsman, Christina; Schmiedl, Andreas; Ettinger, Sarah

    2016-04-01

    The modified Lapidus procedure is an accepted treatment option for patients with moderate to severe hallux valgus. Placing a plate plantar on the tension side of the arthrodesis has been shown to be biomechanically superior and has provided good clinical results. There is some concern about interference of the plantar placed plates on the tendon insertions. The purpose of this study was to determine a "safe zone" for plantar plate placement without irritation of the tendons. Twenty-nine embalmed right feet were used for this study. The anatomy of the insertion of the peroneus longus (PL) tendon and tibialis anterior (TA) tendon on the medial cuneiform and first metatarsal were analyzed. Six different plate designs for plantar plating of the first tarsometatarsal fusion were included. The fit to the bone and contact to tendon insertion were analyzed. The PL showed a main insertion to the first metatarsal and a lesser insertion to the medial cuneiform. The TA inserted onto the medial cuneiform and first metatarsal in all cases in our series. There was a "safe zone" between the TA and PL insertion areas for plate placement. Straight, Y- and U-shaped plates could be placed without compromising the tendon insertion. Depending on the design, even preshaped plates may have to be bent to allow a good fit to the plantar side of the first tarsometatarsal joint. Plantar plating for modified Lapidus arthrodesis can be safely performed, without damaging the plantar tendon insertion area of the PL and TA. The exact knowledge of the anatomy of the plantar region of the tarsometatarsal joint can help to improve plate placement. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. An exploratory study on differences in cumulative plantar tissue stress between healing and non-healing plantar neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Netten, Jaap J.; van Baal, Jeff G.; Bril, Adriaan; Wissink, Marieke; Bus, Sicco A.

    2018-01-01

    Mechanical stress is important in causing and healing plantar diabetic foot ulcers, but almost always studied as peak pressure only. Measuring cumulative plantar tissue stress combines plantar pressure and ambulatory activity, and better defines the load on ulcers. Our aim was to explore differences

  16. Can foot anthropometric measurements predict dynamic plantar surface contact area?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collins Natalie

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have suggested that increased plantar surface area, associated with pes planus, is a risk factor for the development of lower extremity overuse injuries. The intent of this study was to determine if a single or combination of foot anthropometric measures could be used to predict plantar surface area. Methods Six foot measurements were collected on 155 subjects (97 females, 58 males, mean age 24.5 ± 3.5 years. The measurements as well as one ratio were entered into a stepwise regression analysis to determine the optimal set of measurements associated with total plantar contact area either including or excluding the toe region. The predicted values were used to calculate plantar surface area and were compared to the actual values obtained dynamically using a pressure sensor platform. Results A three variable model was found to describe the relationship between the foot measures/ratio and total plantar contact area (R2 = 0.77, p R2 = 0.76, p Conclusion The results of this study indicate that the clinician can use a combination of simple, reliable, and time efficient foot anthropometric measurements to explain over 75% of the plantar surface contact area, either including or excluding the toe region.

  17. Plantar Pressure Detection with Fiber Bragg Gratings Sensing System

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    Tsair-Chun Liang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel fiber-optic sensing system based on fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs to measure foot plantar pressure is proposed. This study first explores the Pedar-X insole foot pressure types of the adult-size chart and then defines six measurement areas to effectively identify four foot types: neutral foot, cavus foot, supinated foot and flat foot. The plantar pressure signals are detected by only six FBGs, which are embedded in silicone rubber. The performance of the fiber optic sensing is examined and compared with a digital pressure plate of i-Step P1000 with 1024 barometric sensors. In the experiment, there are 11 participants with different foot types to participate in the test. The Pearson correlation coefficient, which is determined from the measured results of the homemade fiber-optic plantar pressure system and i-Step P1000 plantar pressure plate, reaches up to 0.671 (p < 0.01. According to the measured results from the plantar pressure data, the proposed fiber optic sensing system can successfully identify the four different foot types. Measurements of this study have demonstrated the feasibility of the proposed system so that it can be an alternative for plantar pressure detection systems.

  18. The effect of plantar flexor lengthening on foot pressure in ambulatory children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abousamra, Oussama; Schwartz, Joshua; Church, Chris; Lennon, Nancy; Henley, John; Niiler, Tim; Miller, Freeman

    2018-05-01

    This study aimed to assess the effects of plantar flexor lengthening (PFL) on dynamic foot pressures of children with cerebral palsy using pedobarographs. Of 97 enrolled, 13 children with 18 legs had PFL. Age at surgery was 4.7 (2.8-8.8) years. A significant increase in ankle dorsiflexion and heel impulse was achieved postoperatively and was maintained at 5 years. The coronal plane pressure index increased postoperatively, but reverted to preoperative levels at the 5-year follow-up. Children tend to have more valgus after PFL. In young children, there caution should be exercised to avoid over treating varus at the time of equinus correction to avoid overcorrection.

  19. MR Imaging of the Plantar Plate: Normal Anatomy, Turf Toe, and Other Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nery, Caio; Baumfeld, Daniel; Umans, Hilary; Yamada, André F

    2017-02-01

    The metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint complex is a weight-bearing structure important to the biomechanics of the standing position, walking, shoe wearing, and sport participation. Acute dorsiflexion injury of the first MTP joint, "turf toe," is common among American football and soccer players. The first and lesser MTP joint complexes can be affected by degenerative or inflammatory arthritis, infarct, and infection. These conditions can lead to plantar plate disruption. Imaging studies help physicians to properly diagnose and treat this condition. This article reviews the anatomy, diagnostic imaging, and clinical management of injury and pathology of the first and lesser MTP joint complexes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Necrotizing fasciitis – a rare complication following common obstetric operative procedures: report of two cases

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    Medhi R

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Robin Medhi, Suditi Rai, Arpana Das, Mansur Ahmed, Banani Das Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Silchar Medical College and Hospital, Silchar, Assam, India Abstract: Necrotizing fasciitis, a near-fatal soft-tissue infection complicating obstetric operative wounds, is a rare entity in obstetrics. Herein, we report two cases of necrotizing fasciitis in severely undernourished and anemic women following obstetric operative procedures. Both undernourishment and anemia compounded the already existing immune-suppressed state in pregnancy and may have lead to life-threatening necrotizing fasciitis. One of the patients developed necrotizing fasciitis following episiotomy and the other following cesarean section. Both the cases were diagnosed clinically. Management was done by total parenteral nutrition, prompt correction of anemia, and surgical debridement under broad-spectrum antibiotic coverage. The raw areas were later reconstructed by split skin grafting in the first case, whereas, in the second case, due to the patient’s refusal of skin grafting, the wound was allowed to heal by secondary intention. Both patients survived, although with morbidity. Our study aims to emphasize prompt correction of comorbidities along with aggressive management of necrotizing fasciitis for better outcomes in the obstetric population. Prompt correction of nutritional status improves the survival rate. Keywords: anemia, undernourishment, total parenteral nutrition 

  1. Plantar fibromatosis and Dupuytren’s contracture in an adolescent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Jelena

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Fibromatosis represents a wide group of benign, locally proliferative disorders of fibroblasts. Dupuytren` s disease is a benign proliferative disease of palmar aponeurosis which usually affects adults between 40 and 60 years of age. Ledderhose`s disease or plantar fibromatosis is plantar equivalent of Dupuyten`s disease most often affecting middle- aged and older men, usually bilateral, represented with painless nodule in the medial division of plantar fascia. Case report. We presented a 19-year old adolescent that turned to a plastic surgeon complaining to his small finger contracture. He noticed palmar thickening with nodule over the metacarpophalangeal joint of small finger of his right hand when he was 16 years old. A year later a finger started to band. During physical checkup we noticed plantar nodule that also had his father and grandmother. Magnetic resonance and tumor biopsy confirmed a suspicion on plantar fibromatosis - Ledderhose`s disease. Clinical exam of the hand clearly led to a conclusion that the patient had Dupuytren`s contracture with pretendinous cord over the small finger flexor tendons and lack of extension of proximal interphalangeal (PIP joint. On the extensor side of the PIP joints there were Garrod`s nodes. The patient refused surgical treatment of plantar tumor, but agreed to surgical correction of finger contracture. Conclusion. Despite the fact that Dupuytren`s disease and plantar fibromatosis are diseases of adults, the possibility of conjoint appearance of these forms of fibromatosis in adolescent period of life should be kept in mind especially in patients with strong genetic predisposition.

  2. Effectiveness and prognostic factors of radiotherapy for painful plantar heel spurs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, O.; Bosch, E.; Gott, C.; Adamietz, I.A.; Stueckle, C.A.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the effectiveness (pain relief rate and long-term results) and prognostic factors of RT for plantar heel pain have been investigated. Patients and methods: From January 2000 to October 2000, 62 patients (73 heels) with painful plantar heel spurs and a minimum pain history of 3 months were treated and evaluated in a prospective study. Mean age was 54 years (range 28-84 years). All patients were treated with a total dose of 5 Gy in seven fractions (= one series), given twice a week at a single-dose sequence of 0.25-0.25-0.5-1.0-1.0-1.0-1-0. Gy (10-MV photons, source-skin distance [SSD] 100 cm, direct portal, field size 12 x 17 cm). The mean duration of heel pain before RT was 26 weeks (= 6.5 months; range 3-120 months). By means of a visual analog scale (VAS) the patients had to self-assess the quantity of their heel pain once before, three times during and four times after RT at a long-term median follow-up of 28 and 40 months. Additionally, the patients had to assess their mechanical heel stress extent during RT. Effectiveness was estimated according to the patients' judgment of pain reduction. The results confirm the high efficacy of RT in painful plantar spur and add new aspects to formerly published data concerning the time course of changes in heel pain reduction. Pain relief can be expected during and shortly after RT. In addition, the initial success can be transformed into effective long-term results >2 years after RT; however, further improvement is not to be expected. As a new prognostic factor, the reduction of mechanical heel stress during RT may ameliorate the short-term results, whereas short heel pain history improves the long-term results. Especially for older patients, RT should be taken into consideration as primary treatment. (orig.)

  3. Treatment of Athlete's Plantar Warts Using a Botanical Blend: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Erik O; Kozin, Adam F; Ruiz, Guillermo; Lasku, Arben; Langland, Jeffrey O

    2017-05-01

    Context • Viral plantar warts, or verruca plantaris, are a benign epithelial tumor caused by various strains of the human papilloma virus (HPV). Current treatments have had mixed degrees of success, are moderately invasive, and are often incompatible with participation in sports. Objective • The study intended to examine the benefits of treating plantar warts with a topical, botanical blend that has had clinical success treating herpes simplex virus cold sores. Methods • A synergistic botanical blend was applied topically. Setting • The case report was completed at the Southwest College of Naturopathic Medicine (Tempe, Arizona, USA). Participant • The participant was a 24-y-old male soccer player, 177.8 cm tall, and weighing 69 kg with previously diagnosed, viral mosaic warts. Intervention • The patient used a pumice stone during bathing for the first week to remove dead tissue and ensure sufficient contact and entry of the botanical gel into infected tissue. After drying the area, the patient applied the botanical gel blend 1 to 2 times daily postshower, spreading it evenly across the surface of the entire lesion. The patient discontinued the exfoliation technique after the first week. Results • Within the first week of treatment, the patient noted changes to the infected area of the hallux epidermal tissue. The combination of exfoliation and application of the gel caused marked, visible differences in presentation by the fifth day of treatment. At 1-mo postintervention, or day 90, the epidermal tissue was asymptomatic and devoid of petechiae, malformations, or visible infection. Conclusions • The results of the current case study directly contrast with the drawbacks of commonly accepted, first-line interventions in the treatment of viral plantar warts and, in many respects, demonstrate better efficacy and fewer side effects than the standard of care. The positive results also highlight the necessity for additional study in the fields of sports

  4. A Case of Rituximab-Induced Necrotizing Fasciitis and a Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulkareem, Abdullateef; D'Souza, Ryan S; Shogbesan, Oluwaseun; Donato, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a fulminant soft tissue infection characterized by rapid progression and high mortality. Rituximab is a generally well-tolerated immunosuppresive medication used for B-cell malignancies and some rheumatological disorders. We report a case of a 69-year-old male with chronic lymphocytic leukemia who suffered necrotizing fasciitis of his left lower extremity secondary to Clostridium septicum 7 weeks after treatment with rituximab. Despite immediate intravenous antimicrobial therapy and emergent fasciotomy with extensive debridement, his hospital course was complicated by septic shock and he required an above-the-knee amputation. Physicians need to be aware of the possibility of necrotizing fasciitis in patients presenting with skin infections after rituximab therapy.

  5. Intra-articular Nodular Fasciitis: An Unexpected Diagnosis for a Joint Lesion: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MF Michelle Chan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Pathological lesions in and around a joint can arise from underlying dermis, subcutis, deep muscle, bone or synovium. Clinical presentation can include joint pain, joint swelling, palpable masses and mechanical restriction. Whilst giant cell tumour of tendon sheath, pigmented villonodular synovitis, synovial chondromatosis, lipoma arborescens, juxta articular myxomas and inflammatory arthritis are the better-known conditions of the joint. Intra-articular nodular fasciitis, on the other hand, is less well recognized both clinically and radiologically. It is rarely seen in routine practice and is only described in case reports in the literature. Due to the non-specific clinical and radiological findings as well as the unfamiliarity with the entity, the diagnosis of intra-articular nodular fasciitis is usually clinched only after histological examination. We present a case of intra-articular nodular fasciitis arising in the knee joint which was not suspected clinically or radiologically.

  6. Successful Treatment of Necrotizing Fasciitis and Streptococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome with the Addition of Linezolid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Rac

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is a deep-seated subcutaneous tissue infection that is commonly associated with streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (TSS. Surgical debridement plus penicillin and clindamycin are the current standard of care. We report a case of necrotizing fasciitis and streptococcal TSS where linezolid was added after a failure to improve with standard therapy. Briefly after isolation of Streptococcus pyogenes from tissue cultures, the patient underwent two surgical debridement procedures and was changed to standard of care therapy. While the patient was hemodynamically stable, the patient’s wounds, leukocytosis, and thrombocytopenia all progressively worsened. After initiation of linezolid, the patient slowly improved clinically. The present report is the first to highlight the role of linezolid in streptococcal necrotizing fasciitis and TSS not improving with standard therapy.

  7. A Case of Rituximab-Induced Necrotizing Fasciitis and a Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullateef Abdulkareem

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is a fulminant soft tissue infection characterized by rapid progression and high mortality. Rituximab is a generally well-tolerated immunosuppresive medication used for B-cell malignancies and some rheumatological disorders. We report a case of a 69-year-old male with chronic lymphocytic leukemia who suffered necrotizing fasciitis of his left lower extremity secondary to Clostridium septicum 7 weeks after treatment with rituximab. Despite immediate intravenous antimicrobial therapy and emergent fasciotomy with extensive debridement, his hospital course was complicated by septic shock and he required an above-the-knee amputation. Physicians need to be aware of the possibility of necrotizing fasciitis in patients presenting with skin infections after rituximab therapy.

  8. Necrotizing Fasciitis Complicating Pregnancy: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinos Nikolaou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare, life-threatening surgical infection in pregnancy with high rates of morbidity and mortality. A 15-year-old primigravid woman, at 28 weeks of gestation with no significant previous medical history, was admitted to our hospital complaining of severe left lower extremity pain and high fever the last 72 hours. During clinical examination, she had a swollen, erythematous and tender to palpation inflamed skin over the medial aspect of the upper thigh without any evidence of injury. Incision drainage was performed immediately and she received broad spectrum antibiotics. During initial laboratory examinations, diabetes mellitus was diagnosed. There was no clinical improvement over the following days. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed subcutaneous tissue inflammation and edema of infected tissues confirming the disease entity. Multidisciplinary therapy with immediate aggressive surgical debridement of necrotic tissues, multiple antibiotics, and intensive care monitoring was performed successfully. The patient’s postoperative course was uncomplicated and skin defect was closed with split thickness skin grafting. Our case emphasized the potential immunosuppressive role of pregnancy state in conjunction with diabetes mellitus in the development of severe necrotizing soft tissue infections.

  9. Atypical presentation of cervical necrotizing fasciitis. Case report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Moraga.

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cervical necrotizing fasciitis (NF is a soft tissue infection with a low incidence, characterized by rapid progression and high morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this report is to communicate the case of a patient diagnosed with cervical NF and its successful management. A 54-year-old male consulted after suffering from the condition for seven days. It was characterized by bilateral submandibular swelling, accompanied by fever, dysphagia, odynophagia, which were severely affecting the patient’s general health. Physical examination revealed a painful, erythematous cervical swelling. A cervical computed tomography scan was performed, revealing a gaseous collection in the left mucosal pharyngeal space, extending to the glottis, associated with significant deep plane soft tissue emphysema onon the left side of the neck and with possible involvement of the danger space; pertinent lab findings include 19,190/uL leukocytes and 219mg/L CRP. Broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy was initiated with ceftriaxone and clindamycin. Exploratory surgery, lavage and drainage of the collected material were performed. Streptococcus anginosus was isolated by culture. The patient recovered appropriately showing improvement in clinical as well as in inflammatory parameters, being discharged on the ninth day. He is currently receiving periodical checkups in the surgery polyclinic.

  10. Ascending necrotizing fasciitis of the face following odontogenic infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eugene; Hirsch, Elliot M; Steinberg, Jordan P; Olsson, Alexis B

    2012-05-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) of the face is a rare but extremely dangerous complication of dental infection associated with a nearly 30% mortality rate. This infection spreads rapidly along the superficial fascial planes of the head and neck and can lead to severe disfigurement. Reports in the literature of cases of NF of the face caused by dental infection are few. We report such a case in a 36-year-old woman and review the current standards of diagnosis and management. The patient initially presented with pain and severe swelling in the left side of her face subsequent to a dental infection. The symptoms had progressed quickly and had not improved with administration of oral antibiotics in the outpatient setting. The patient had no palpable crepitus despite its classic association with NF. The infection also took a rare, ascending route of spread with involvement of the temporalis muscle. Cultures taken during debridement grew Streptococcus anginosus and Bacteroides. Biopsies of involved muscle showed histologic evidence of necrosis. Through early surgical intervention including aggressive debridement, and the adjunctive use of appropriate antibiotics, the patient recovered with minimal loss of facial mass and no skin loss. Although NF of the face is rare, the surgeon must maintain a high index of suspicion with any patient presenting after a dental infection with rapid progression of swelling and a disproportionate amount of pain that is unresponsive to antibiotics.

  11. Delayed Diagnosis of Eosinophilic Fasciitis: A case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Aydin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic fasciitis is an uncommon entity characterized by edema, skin thickening and hyperpigmentation of extremities. Laboratory findings are variable and may include hypergammaglobulemia, peripheral eosinophilia and elevated acute phase reactants. A full-thickness skin/fascia/muscle biopsy is the gold standart for diagnosis. Since EF is an uncommon disorder and the clinic presentation mimics scleroderma, it takes a long time to make definitive diagnosis. We present a case diagnosed two years after its onset and responded well to the treatment. We also include herein the results of our literature survey regarding delayed diagnosis of Eosinophilic Fasciitis.

  12. A rare case of peritonsillar abscess resulting in cervical necrotizing fasciitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen E. Flores

    2017-11-01

    Conclusions: Necrotizing fasciitis of the head and neck demands a high index of suspicion involving a multidisciplinary team, rapid diagnostic measures and aggressive surgical and antibiotic management as the mainstay of treatment in reversing this potentially fulminant and lethal disease process. In this rare case of peritonsillar abscess resulting in cervical necrotizing fasciitis, the infection spread across cervical fascial planes onto the anterior chest wall rather than dissecting as usual to the parapharyngeal, retropharyngeal spaces or mediastinum. Extensive and potentially disfiguring debridements may be necessary to obtain negative margins with frequent reoperations until the patient is ready for reconstruction.

  13. Necrotizing fasciitis following venomous snakebites in a tertiary hospital of southwest Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-Hung Tsai

    2017-10-01

    Conclusions: Victims of venomous snakebites should be admitted for close monitoring of secondary wound infections. The risk factors of developing necrotizing fasciitis from cellulitis following snakebites were associated with chronic underlying diseases and leukocytosis (total white blood-cell counts ≥10000 cells/mm3 and ≥80% of segmented leukocyte forms. Physicians should be alert to a worsening wound condition after a snakebite, and surgical interventions should be performed for established necrotizing fasciitis with the empirical use of third-generation cephalosporins plus other regimens.

  14. Necrotizing Fasciitis of the Chest in a Neonate in Southern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwafemi Olasupo Awe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the successful saving of a male neonate with necrotizing fasciitis of the chest following a hot fomentation of the umbilicus with exposure of the ribs and the pleural space on the right side. He recovered 5 weeks after admission. We stressed the need to recognize necrotizing fasciitis extending from the upper anterior abdominal wall to the chest following hot fomentation of the umbilicus. The need for multidisciplinary cooperation for excellent outcome is very important, that is, neonatologist, medical microbiologist, and plastic and chest surgeons.

  15. Methods of Sports Genetics: toe and plantar dermatoglyphic analysis (information 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serhiyenko L.P.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The article summarized the data and dermatoglyphic analysis of human toe and plantar prints. It is defined that toe and plantar triradii, papillary ridge patterns, the main plantar lines, the types of dermatoglyphic patterns can be the objects of the dermatoglyphic analysis. The recommendations to use the technology of dermatoglyphic analysis of human toe and plantar prints in sport genetics are given.

  16. Abnormal attachments between a plantar aponeurosis and calcaneus

    Science.gov (United States)

    KALNIEV, MANOL ANASTASOV; KRASTEV, DIMO; KRASTEV, NIKOLAY; VIDINOV, KALIN; VELTCHEV, LUDMIL; MILEVA, MILKA

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims The plantar aponeurosis or fascia is a thick fascial seal located on the lower surface of the sole. It consists of three parts central, lateral, and medial. The central portion is the thickest. It is narrow behind and wider in front. The central portion has two strong vertical intermuscular septa which are directed upward into the foot. The lateral and medial portions are thinner. The medial portion is thinnest. The lateral portion is thin in front and thick behind. The main function of the plantar fascia is to support the longitudinal arch of the foot. In May 2013 during a routine dissection in the section hall of the Department of Anatomy and Histology in Medical University – Sofia, Bulgaria we came across a very interesting variation of the plantar aponeurosis. Materials and methods For the present morphological study tissues from a human corpse material were used. This unusual anatomical variation was photographed using a Nikon Coolpix 995 camera with a 3.34 Megapixels. Results We found some fibrous strands which started from the proximal portion of the plantar aponeurosis on the left foot. The fibrous strands resembled the tentacles of an octopus and started from the proximal portion of the aponeurosis. Two of fibrous strands were directed laterally to adipose tissue and one was directed medially and backward. The first lateral fibrous strand was divided into several fascicles. We found very few data in literature about the varieties of the plantar fascia. Conclusion It is very important to consider the occurrence of above mentioned variations in the plantar aponeurosis when surgical procedures are performed on the sole. PMID:26527947

  17. Management of Plantar Hyperhidrosis with Endoscopic Lumbar Sympathectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, Roman

    2016-11-01

    Primary plantar hyperhidrosis is defined as excessive secretion of the sweat glands of the feet and may lead to significant limitations in private and professional lifestyle and reduction of health-related quality of life. Conservative therapy measures usually fail to provide sufficient relieve of symptoms and do not allow long-lasting elimination of hyperhidrosis. Endoscopic lumbar sympathectomy appears to be a safe and effective procedure for eliminating excessive sweating of the feet and improves quality of life of patients with severe plantar hyperhidrosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Case of Paecilomyces lilacinus infection occurring in necrotizing fasciitis-associated skin ulcers on the face and surrounding a tracheotomy stoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamoto, Eiko; Fujisawa, Akihiko; Yoshino, Yuichiro; Yoshitsugu, Kanako; Odo, Masashi; Watanabe, Hidetaka; Igata, Toshikatsu; Noguchi, Hiromitsu

    2014-01-01

    A 28-year-old man undergoing treatment for hemophagocytic syndrome developed Paecilomyces lilacinus infection in skin ulcers on the face and in the tracheotomy stoma. While his bone marrow was suppressed by chemotherapy with dexamethasone, cyclosporin and etoposide for hemophagocytic syndrome, dental infection led to subacute necrotizing fasciitis caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa on the right side of the face, resulting in a large area of soft tissue defects. Etoposide was discontinued, and prophylactic treatment with itraconazole was initiated. The ulcers resulting from necrotizing fasciitis were treated conservatively using trafermin and alprostadil alfadex ointment 0.003 %, and near-complete re-epithelialization occurred, except on the right lower eyelid, right buccal mucosa and perioral area. However, 6 weeks later, pustules/crusts started to form and break down repeatedly, leading to expansion of tissue defects on the face. Direct microscopic examination revealed fungal elements, and fungal culture identified Paecilomyces lilacinus suspicious twice some other day. Based on DNA extraction from the isolated fungus, this fungal strain was identified as Paecilomyces lilacinus. Cyclosporin and itraconazole were discontinued, and treatment with liposomal amphotericin B and a tapering dose of steroids was initiated. Cure was achieved in approximately 2.5 months after treatment initiation, and no relapse has been observed. The most important factor that ultimately contributed to the resolution of fungal infection might have been release of immunosuppression by discontinuing cyclosporin and tapering steroids.

  19. Necrotizing Fasciitis versus Pyomyositis: Discrimination with Using MR Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seok, Jee Hyun; Jee, Won Hee; Chun, Kyung Ah; Kim, Ji Young; Jung, Chan Kwon; Kim, Yang Ree; Kim, Yang Soo; Chung, Yang Guk [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Eo, Wan Kyu [KyungHee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-04-15

    We wanted to evaluate the MR findings for differentiating between necrotizing fasciitis (NF) and pyomyositis (PM). The MR images of 19 patients with surgically confirmed NF (n = 11) and pathologically confirmed PM (n = 8) were retrospectively reviewed with regard to the presence or absence of any MRI finding criteria that could differentiate between them. The patients with NF had a significantly greater prevalence of the following MR findings (p < 0.05): a peripheral band-like hyperintense signal in muscles on fat-suppressed T2-weighted images (73% of the patients with NF vs. 0% of the patients with PM), peripheral band-like contrast enhancement (CE) of muscles (82% vs. 0%, respectively) and thin smooth enhancement of the deep fascia (82% vs. 13%, respectively). The patients with PM had a significantly greater prevalence of the following MRI findings (p < 0.05): a diffuse hyperintense signal in muscles on fat-suppressed T2-weighted images (27% of the patients with NF vs. 100% in the patients with PM), diffuse CE of muscles (18% vs. 100%, respectively), thick irregular enhancement of the deep fascia (0% vs. 75%, respectively) and intramuscular abscess (0% vs. 88%, respectively). For all patients with NF and PM, the superficial fascia and muscle showed hyperintense signals on T2- weighted images and CE was seen on fat-suppressed CE T1-weighted images. The subcutaneous tissue and deep fascia showed hyperintense signals on T2- weighted images and CE was seen in all the patients with NF and in seven (88%) of the eight patients with PM, respectively. MR imaging is helpful for differentiating between NF and PM.

  20. Necrotizing Fasciitis versus Pyomyositis: Discrimination with Using MR Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seok, Jee Hyun; Jee, Won Hee; Chun, Kyung Ah; Kim, Ji Young; Jung, Chan Kwon; Kim, Yang Ree; Kim, Yang Soo; Chung, Yang Guk; Eo, Wan Kyu

    2009-01-01

    We wanted to evaluate the MR findings for differentiating between necrotizing fasciitis (NF) and pyomyositis (PM). The MR images of 19 patients with surgically confirmed NF (n = 11) and pathologically confirmed PM (n = 8) were retrospectively reviewed with regard to the presence or absence of any MRI finding criteria that could differentiate between them. The patients with NF had a significantly greater prevalence of the following MR findings (p < 0.05): a peripheral band-like hyperintense signal in muscles on fat-suppressed T2-weighted images (73% of the patients with NF vs. 0% of the patients with PM), peripheral band-like contrast enhancement (CE) of muscles (82% vs. 0%, respectively) and thin smooth enhancement of the deep fascia (82% vs. 13%, respectively). The patients with PM had a significantly greater prevalence of the following MRI findings (p < 0.05): a diffuse hyperintense signal in muscles on fat-suppressed T2-weighted images (27% of the patients with NF vs. 100% in the patients with PM), diffuse CE of muscles (18% vs. 100%, respectively), thick irregular enhancement of the deep fascia (0% vs. 75%, respectively) and intramuscular abscess (0% vs. 88%, respectively). For all patients with NF and PM, the superficial fascia and muscle showed hyperintense signals on T2- weighted images and CE was seen on fat-suppressed CE T1-weighted images. The subcutaneous tissue and deep fascia showed hyperintense signals on T2- weighted images and CE was seen in all the patients with NF and in seven (88%) of the eight patients with PM, respectively. MR imaging is helpful for differentiating between NF and PM

  1. Retroperitoneoscopic lumbar sympathectomy for plantar hyperhidrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Sonia O; de Santana, Vanessa R; Valido, Daisy P; de Andrade, Renata L B; Fontes, Leticia M; Leite, Victor Hugo O; Neto, José M; Santos, Jéssica M; Varjão, Lucas L; Reis, Francisco P

    2017-12-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the reduction in quality of life (QoL) caused by the persistence of primary plantar hyperhidrosis (PPH) symptoms and the level of satisfaction in PPH patients after retroperitoneoscopic lumbar sympathectomy (RLS). The efficacy, safety, and procedure of bilateral RLS in both sexes are also described in this study. This is a longitudinal study of consecutive patients who sought specific treatment from a private practitioner for severe PPH as classified on the Hyperhidrosis Disease Severity Scale (HDSS) from October 2005 to October 2014. The patients were asked to report the symptoms of PPH experienced in the immediate preoperative period and to complete a standardized QoL questionnaire developed by de Campos at least 12 months after RLS. Disease outcomes, recurrence of symptoms, and any adverse effects of surgery were evaluated after 30 days and at least 12 months after RLS. Lumbar sympathectomy was performed 116 times in 58 patients; 30 days after surgery, PPH was resolved in all patients. Three patients (5.2%) reported transient thigh neuralgia, and 19 (32.7%) reported transient paresthesia in the lower limbs. There were no reports of retrograde ejaculation. At a minimum of 12 months after RLS, 49 of the 58 patients had fully and correctly answered the follow-up questionnaire and noted a mild (HDSS 2) to moderate (HDSS 3) increase in pre-existing compensatory sweating. One patient had a PPH relapse within 6 months. Improvement in QoL due to the resolution of PPH was reported in 98% of the 49 patients. None of the operations necessitated a change in the laparotomy approach, and none of the patients died. RLS is safe and effective for the treatment of severe PPH in both sexes. There were no reports of retrograde ejaculation after resection of L3 and L4 ganglia. There was a mild to moderate increase in compensatory sweating in about half of the patients, but without any regret or dissatisfaction for having undergone the

  2. Cervical nodular fasciitis in a 10-year-old girl: a case report of a rare ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nodular fasciitis (NF) is a benign fibroblastic proliferation that usually involves superficial fascia in the subcutaneous tissue or muscle. The rapid growth, high cellularity and mitotic activity can simulate sarcoma. Thus, as clinical and morphologic characteristics are similar to those of malignant tumours, this entity is often ...

  3. Facial paralysis as a result of severe cervico-facial necrotizing fasciitis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a progressive, rapidly spreading, inflammatory infection characterized by necrosis of the deep fascia, with secondary effect on the subcutaneous tissue and differing degrees of toxicity. It is a fairly rare entity in the cervico-facial region where it usually originates from odontogenic infection; gingivitis ...

  4. Necrotizing fasciitis in a plastic surgery unit: a report of ten patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Diffuse necrotizing fasciitis is the most treacherous soft tissue infection particularly because it may masquerade as simple cellulitis, thereby delaying diagnosis and treatment. Necrotizing fascitis correspond to deeper burns and require resuscitation, early debridement and skin coverage. It runs a rapid clinical ...

  5. Penile abscess and necrotizing fasciitis secondary to neglected false penile fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Reshaid Reshaid

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Penile infection and abscess formation have been described in association with priapism, cavernosography, intracavernosal injection therapy, trauma and penile prosthesis. We report a case of penile abscess and necrotizing fasciitis of penile skin in a 37-year-old male, presented 3 weeks after neglected false penile fracture.

  6. Life-threatening necrotizing fasciitis of the neck: an unusual consequence of a sore throat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Persaud, R.; Krahé, D.; Georgalas, C.; Kaniyur, S.; Das, S.; Alusi, G.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Necrotizing fasciitis is life-threatening bacterial infection which spreads with frightening speed along the fascial planes resulting in extensive tissue necrosis and often death. The infection is caused by either Group A streptococci or a combination of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria.

  7. Prognostic factors and monomicrobial necrotizing fasciitis: gram-positive versus gram-negative pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu Wei-Hsiu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Monomicrobial necrotizing fasciitis is rapidly progressive and life-threatening. This study was undertaken to ascertain whether the clinical presentation and outcome for patients with this disease differ for those infected with a gram-positive as compared to gram-negative pathogen. Methods Forty-six patients with monomicrobial necrotizing fasciitis were examined retrospectively from November 2002 to January 2008. All patients received adequate broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy, aggressive resuscitation, prompt radical debridement and adjuvant hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Eleven patients were infected with a gram-positive pathogen (Group 1 and 35 patients with a gram-negative pathogen (Group 2. Results Group 2 was characterized by a higher incidence of hemorrhagic bullae and septic shock, higher APACHE II scores at 24 h post-admission, a higher rate of thrombocytopenia, and a higher prevalence of chronic liver dysfunction. Gouty arthritis was more prevalent in Group 1. For non-survivors, the incidences of chronic liver dysfunction, chronic renal failure and thrombocytopenia were higher in comparison with those for survivors. Lower level of serum albumin was also demonstrated in the non-survivors as compared to those in survivors. Conclusions Pre-existing chronic liver dysfunction, chronic renal failure, thrombocytopenia and hypoalbuminemia, and post-operative dependence on mechanical ventilation represent poor prognostic factors in monomicrobial necrotizing fasciitis. Patients with gram-negative monobacterial necrotizing fasciitis present with more fulminant sepsis.

  8. Cervical nodular fasciitis in a 10-year-old girl: a case report of a rare ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thus, as clinical and morphologic characteristics are similar to those of malignant tumours, this entity is often misdiagnosed, with a few cases described in the literature. We present a case of nodular fasciitis involving the retropharynx and hypopharynx of a 10-year-old girl and discuss the importance of considering this rare ...

  9. Long-term outcome of eosinophilic fasciitis : A cross-sectional evaluation of 35 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mertens, JS; Thurlings, Rogier M; Kievit, Wietske; Seyger, Marieke M B; Radstake, Timothy R D; de Jong, Elke M G J

    BACKGROUND: Eosinophilic fasciitis (EF) is a connective tissue disease with an unknown long-term course. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate presence and determinants of residual disease damage in patients with EF after long-term follow-up. METHODS: Patients with biopsy-proven EF were included for this

  10. Long-term outcome of eosinophilic fasciitis: A cross-sectional evaluation of 35 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mertens, J.S.; Thurlings, R.M.; Kievit, W.; Seyger, M.M.B.; Radstake, T.R.D.J.; Jong, E.M.G.J. de

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Eosinophilic fasciitis (EF) is a connective tissue disease with an unknown long-term course. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate presence and determinants of residual disease damage in patients with EF after long-term follow-up. METHODS: Patients with biopsy-proven EF were included for this

  11. Painful plantar heel spur treatment with Co-60 teletherapy: factors influencing treatment outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koca, Timur; Aydın, Ayşen; Sezen, Duygu; Başaran, Hamit; Karaca, Sibel

    2014-01-01

    Painful plantar heel spur (PPHS) is a benign disorder with painful heels as a result of plantar calcaneal bone spur. Exact etiological factors are still unclear. Treatment typically consists of osteoarthritis tretment schedules and surgical techniques. External radiotherapy is another treatment option. This study is aimed to determine effectiveness and treatment outcomes of external radiotherapy in patients with PPHS. Sixty-two patients with PPHS were analysed for radiotherapy success and other possible prognostic factors. All patients were treated with Co-60 units from parallel opposed lateral portals, to a total dose of 8 Gy. Responses to radiotherapy was assessed by visual analogue scale (VAS) of pain. Follow-up completed in December 2012 with 28 months median duration (range 22 to 35 months). Age, sex, patient number, spur settlement site, prior treatments, time interval between diagnosis and radiotherapy, pain scores (before and after radiotherapy), plantar fat-pillow thickness (PFPT; thickness of the plantar fat pad) and Böhler's angle estimations were analysed. Study included 53 female and 9 male patients with median age 57 (range 43-70). Time interval between PPHS diagnosis and radiotherapy were median 33 months (range10-60). Radiotherapy response time interval were 6 months (range 3-10 months). Responses to radiotherapy were no response in 13 patients (21%), partial response in 13 patients (21%)- pain relief below 50% and complete response - no pain in 36 patients (58%) respectively. Median PFPT of patients were 3.5 cm (range 1.20-4.50 cm). Complete response rate was statistically significant in patients whom PFPT is greater than 3.5 cm. The Böhler's angle range is about 20-40 deg. Complete response rates were higher in patients with degree of Böhler's Angle 30 and below. Simplicity of treatment, lack of acute adverse effects and low cost, seem to make radiotherapy one of the safest, cheapest and also an effective treatment modality for PPHS.

  12. Telangiectasia hemorrágica hereditária: ácido tranexâmico no tratamento de úlcera plantar Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: tranexamic acid for plantar ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Corrêa de Albuquerque

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Relato de um caso de úlcera plantar por fístula arteriovenosa em paciente portador de telangiectasia hemorrágica hereditária ou doença de Rendu-Osler-Weber tratado com ácido tranexâmico. Este fármaco é utilizado para tratamento de epistaxe, referindo-se o principal achado deste artigo ao uso eficaz desse medicamento na terapia de úlceras plantares hemorrágicas. São descritos os aspectos fisiopatológicos e clínicos da doença e as propriedades antifibrinolíticas do ácido tranexâmico. Este foi bem tolerado e apresentou evidências de eficácia na utilização para controle do sangramento e cicatrização da úlcera.Case report of one patient with Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia, also known as Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome, treated with Tranexamic Acid for arteriovenous plantar ulcer. This drug has proved effective in controlling epistaxis, but the main point of this report is to expose the success use of this medication in the therapy of skin bleeding ulcer. The pathophysiologic and clinical features of the disease are reviewed and also the pharmacological aspects of the antifibrinolytic drugs. This drug was well tolerated by the patient and show evidence of good activity in the bleeding and healed the ulcer.

  13. Negative pressure wound therapy in preseptal orbital cellulitis complicated with necrotizing fasciitis and preseptal abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras-Ruiz, José; Ramos-Cadena, Angeles; Solis-Arias, Patricia; Lozano-Platonoff, Adriana; Lopez-García, Lirio A; Contreras-Barrera, Martha E; Saenz-Corral, Claudia; de-la-Cruz-Garcia, Isabel; Cárdenas-Mejía, Alexander; Lopez-Oliver, Rubén

    2015-01-01

    Preseptal cellulitis (PC) may be locally complicated with abscess formation and necrotizing fasciitis. If not treated promptly and adequately, it may result in further complications. The authors report a series of patients where negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) proved a safe and valuable adjunct therapy in avoiding complications of PC and in accelerating wound healing. A 4 patient case series. Four male patients (11 months to 58 years old) with unilateral complicated PC. Patients were admitted with PC and treated initially with specific intravenous antibiotic therapy. These patients did not respond adequately; therefore, surgical drainage and/or debridement were performed. After surgery, persistent edema and purulent discharge was observed prompting the need for adjunct NPWT every 48 to 72 hours. NPWT is the use of vacuum through a wound filler material covered with an airtight drape connected to a pump. Complete ophthalmologic examination was performed after each 48-hour cycle. Length of hospital stay, days from surgery to discharge, days from start of NPWT to discharge, clinical improvement, and safety. Four patients were diagnosed with PC between 2 and 5 days of evolution. Two diabetic adults developed the condition secondary to trauma, the adolescent as a result of a cosmetic piercing, and the infant associated to sinusitis. NPWT reached -125 mm·Hg, except for the infant who received -75 mm·Hg. The average number of days necessary for improvement with NPWT was 6.7 days. Only 2 patients required surgical reconstruction. Time from debridement to discharge was in average 13.5 days. No ocular complications were observed, and follow up was satisfactory with normal eyelid function and aesthetics and preserved visual acuity. NPWT proved to be safe and effective for treating locally complicated PC as an adjuvant therapy to antibiotic and surgical treatment that decreased the length of hospital stay, and the time for recovery in patients that were slow

  14. Sonographic evaluation of the plantar fascia in asymptomatic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadalla, N; Kichouh, M; Boulet, C; Machiels, F; De Mey, J; De Maeseneer, M

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the appearance of the plantar fascia in asymptomatic subjects. Thirty-one asymptomatic subjects were examined by 2 musculoskeletal radiologists. The plantar fascia was evaluated for thickness, echogenicity, vascularity on power Doppler, rupture, fluid adjacent to the fascia, andcalcifications. The study included 14 men and 17 women (age, 17-79 years; mean, 45 years). The mean thickness of the plantar fascia in men was 3.7 mm (range 2.5-7 mm), and in women 3.5 mm (range, 1.7-5.1 mm). The thickness was greater than 4 mm in 4 men (bilateral in 2). The mean thickness of fascias thicker than 4 mm in men was 5.4 mm (range, 4.3-7 mm). The thickness was greater than 4 mm in 5 women ( bilateral in 4). The mean thickness of fascias thicker than 4 mm in women was 4.7 mm (range, 4.2-5.1 mm). There was no statistically significant difference between men and women and between both heels. Hypoechogenicity was observed in 3 men (bilateral in 2), and in 5 women (bilateral in 6). Hypervascularity, rupture, fluid adjacent to the fascia, and calcifications were not observed. A thickness greater than 4 mm and hypoechogenicity, are common in the plantar fascia of asymptomatic subjects. Findings that were not seen in asymptomatic subjects include a thickness greater than 7 mm, hypervascularity on power Doppler, rupture, fluid adjacent to the fascia, and calcifications.

  15. The legend of plantar neuropraxia in long-distance athletes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    touch sensation. First, a 128 Hz tuning fork was placed on the dorsum of the great toe; the test was considered positive if the participant could not feel the vibration of the tuning fork while the examiner could, and negative otherwise. Second, a 10 g monofilament was touched to the plantar aspect of the great toe, and the ...

  16. Plantar dermatoglyphic features of the Urhobos of southern Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To establish the dermatoglyphic features of the Urhobos of southern Nigeria. Design: Cross sectional study of randomly selected Urhobo subjects. Setting: Department of Anatomy, College of Health Sciences, Univeristy of Port Harcourt, Port Harcourt, southern Nigeria. Main outcome: Plantar and digital pattern ...

  17. Nordic Walking Practice Might Improve Plantar Pressure Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Soriano, Pedro; Llana-Belloch, Salvador; Martinez-Nova, Alfonso; Morey-Klapsing, G.; Encarnacion-Martinez, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Nordic walking (NW), characterized by the use of two walking poles, is becoming increasingly popular (Morgulec-Adamowicz, Marszalek, & Jagustyn, 2011). We studied walking pressure patterns of 20 experienced and 30 beginner Nordic walkers. Plantar pressures from nine foot zones were measured during trials performed at two walking speeds (preferred…

  18. Plantar Pressure Variation during Jogging with Different Heel Height

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. D. Gu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the key testing and analysis results of an investigation on the effect of heel height on the plantar pressure over different foot areas in jogging. It is important in improving the understanding of jogging with high heels and damage/injury prevention. It can also potentially guide the development of suitable/adaptive exercise schemes in between daily activities with high heels. In this work, plantar pressure data were collected from 10 habituated healthy female subjects (aged 21–25 years at their natural jogging speed with three different conditions: flat heeled shoes (0.8 cm, low heeled shoes (4.0 cm, and high heeled shoes (6.6 cm. Data analysis showed significantly differences in plantar pressure distribution associated with the heel heights with increased pressure in the first metatarsal region and decreased pressure in the lateral metatarsal and midfoot sections. However, there is no significant alteration of plantar pressure in the central area of the forefoot with jogging gait.

  19. Dynamic plantar pressure proles of South African university students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Footscan technology allows for assessment of injury risk and walking mechanics, yet there is a dearth of normative data pertaining to the normal, injury-free foot in a South African (SA) context. Objective. To generate normative tables from plantar pressure prole data gathered from students at an SA university.

  20. Distribution and correlates of plantar hyperkeratotic lesions in older people

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    Menz Hylton B

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plantar hyperkeratotic lesions are common in older people and are associated with pain, mobility impairment and functional limitations. However, little has been documented in relation to the frequency or distribution of these lesions. The aim of this study was to document the occurrence of plantar hyperkeratotic lesions and the patterns in which they occur in a random sample of older people. Methods A medical history questionnaire was administered to a random sample of 301 people living independently in the community (117 men, 184 women aged between 70 and 95 years (mean 77.2, SD 4.9, who also underwent a clinical assessment of foot problems, including the documentation of plantar lesion locations, toe deformities and the presence and severity of hallux valgus. Results Of the 301 participants, 180 (60% had at least one plantar hyperkeratotic lesion. Those with plantar lesions were more likely to be female (χ2 = 18.75, p 2 = 6.15, p vs 36.3 ± 8.4°; t = 2.68, df = 286, p vs 4.8 ± 1.3 hours, t = -2.46, df = 299, p = 0.01. No associations were found between the presence of plantar lesions and body mass index, obesity, foot posture, dominant foot or forefoot pain. A total of 53 different lesions patterns were observed, with the most common lesion pattern being "roll-off" hyperkeratosis on the medial aspect of the 1st metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ, accounting for 12% of all lesion patterns. "Roll-off" lesions under the 1st MPJ and interphalangeal joint were significantly associated with moderate to severe hallux valgus (p p Conclusion Plantar hyperkeratotic lesions affect 60% of older people and are associated with female gender, hallux valgus, toe deformity, increased ankle flexibility and time spent on feet, but are not associated with obesity, limb dominance, forefoot pain or foot posture. Although there are a wide range of lesion distribution patterns, most can be classified into medial, central or lateral groups. Further

  1. Plantar pressure distribution in elderly subjec Ts after proprioceptive exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Marcon Alfieri

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2008v10n2p137 Changes related to aging limit cutaneous plantar perception, interfering in postural control. The aim of this study was to verify the effects of a regular program of proprioceptive intervention on plantar pressure distribution in older adults. Plantar pressure distribution was evaluated in 29 volunteers (63.06 ±2.84 years standing on both feet with eyes open (EO and eyes closed (EC. After baropodometric evaluation, the subjects attended 3 weekly proprioceptive intervention sessions of 1 hour’s duration for 3 months. Results: Prior to the intervention, participants exhibited mean EO values of 0.29 ±0.044 Kg/cm² for the right foot and 0.31 ±0.04 Kg/cm² for the left foot (p=0.0078 and post-intervention these were 0.28±0.04 Kg/cm² and 0.30±0.04 Kg/cm², respectively. Pre-intervention EC values were 0.30 ±0.044 Kg/cm² for the right and 0.31 ±0.05 Kg/cm² for the left foot and post-intervention these figures were 0.28 ±0.04 Kg/cm² and 0.29 ±0.049 Kg/cm², respectively. The results of MANOVA indicated significant differences in contact pressure between pre-intervention and post-intervention measurements. Conclusions: The intervention used here reduced the participants’ plantar pressure, but was unable to improve the distribution of plantar pressure between the right and left feet.

  2. Plantar pressure distribution in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Elif; Turan, Yasemin; Tastaban, Engin; Kurt Omurlu, Imran; Sendur, Omer Faruk

    2015-03-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is one of the most common inflammatory rheumatic diseases and is associated with alterations in posture. The aim of this study was to investigate the pedobarographic changes among ankylosing spondylitis patients, in an attempt to understand whether the alterations in the posture affect the plantar pressure distribution. The study population consisted of 38 patients with ankylosing spondylitis and 33 healthy volunteers. The static and dynamic pedobarographic measurements were performed to determine the plantar pressure distribution. Moreover, the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index, Ankylosing Spondylitis Quality of Life Questionnaire and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index were used to assess the clinical state of the patients. The static pedobarographic measurements did not reveal any intergroup difference. There were differences between the groups in the results of dynamic peak pressure measurements under the metatarsal areas and under the midfoot region. The percentage of the midfoot in the dynamic plantar contact area was higher in ankylosing spondylitis patients in comparison to the controls. No clinically significant correlation was found between the clinical scores and static pedobarographic measurements. The plantar pressures under the metatarsal heads, medial and lateral heel regions declined with increasing disease activity according to the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index scores. The lower peak pressures on the forefoot and rearfoot, were associated with the higher Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index scores of the patients. The alterations in the posture may have effects on the plantar pressures in patients with ankylosing spondylitis, especially during dynamic activities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A case report of primary necrotising fasciitis of the breast: A rare but deadly entity requiring rapid surgical management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberley Fayman

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: This is the youngest patient with primary necrotising fasciitis of the breast described in the literature. Prompt resuscitation and an aggressive surgical approach are critical to the successful management of this life threatening pathology.

  4. Family medicine residents’ perceived level of comfort in treating common sports injuries across residency programs in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amoako AO

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Adae O Amoako,1 Agyenim B Amoako,2 George GA Pujalte3 1Department of Family and Community Medicine, Penn State Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA, USA; 2Department of Family Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Northwest, Fayetteville, AR, USA; 3Sports Medicine, Divisions of Primary Care, and Orthopedics, Mayo Clinic Health System, Waycross, GA, USA Background and objective: Family physicians are expected to be comfortable in treating common sports injuries. Evidence shows a limited level of comfort in treating these injuries in pediatric and internal medicine residents. Studies are lacking, however, in family medicine residents. The purpose of this study is to assess the comfort level of family medicine residents in treating common sports injuries in adults and children based on their perceived level of knowledge and attitudes. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study of family medicine residents in the United Sates. A written survey of 25 questions related to sports injury knowledge and factors affecting comfort level were collected. A chi-square test was implemented in calculating P-values. Results: Five hundred and fifty-seven residents responded to the survey. A higher percentage of doctors of osteopathy (86.6%, 82.5%, 69.6%, and 68.7% compared to doctors of medicine (78.5%, 71.6%, 53.4%, and 52.8% respectively identified ankle sprain, concussion, plantar fasciitis, and lateral epicondylitis as common injuries, and felt comfortable in treating them (P-values =0.015, 0.004, 0.0001, and 0.0002, respectively. Residents with high interest in sports medicine correctly identified the injuries as common and felt comfortable treating them as well (knowledge, P=0.027, 0.0029, <0.0001, and 0.0001, respectively; comfort level, P=0.0016, <0.0001, 0.0897, and 0.0010, respectively. Conclusion: Medical education background, factors that affect training, and an interest in sports medicine contribute to residents' knowledge and comfort

  5. Plantar pressure differences among adults with mild flexible flatfoot, severe flexible flatfoot and normal foot when walking on level surface, walking upstairs and downstairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Jun Na; Wang, Jue; Qiu, Yu Sheng

    2017-04-01

    [Purpose] This study observed the plantar pressure between flexible flatfoot and normal foot on different walking conditions to find out if flexible flatfoot needs the treatment and how the plantar pressure change while walking upstairs and downstairs. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen adults with mild flexible flatfoot, fifteen adults with severe flexible flatfoot and fifteen adults with normal foot were examined while walking on a level surface, walking up and down 10 cm and 20 cm stairs. The max force and the arch index were acquired using the RSscan system. The repeated measures ANOVA was performed to analyze the data. [Results] Compared with normal foot, both max force and arch index of severe flatfoot were significantly increased on different walking conditions. When walking down 10 cm and 20 cm stairs, the plantar data of both normal foot and flatfoot were significantly increased. [Conclusion] The plantar pressure of severe flexible flatfoot were significantly larger than that of normal foot on different walking conditions. In addition, the arches of both normal foot and flatfoot were obviously deformed when walking downstairs. It is therefore necessary to be treated for severe flexible flatfoot to prevent further deformation.

  6. An update on the evaluation and management of plantar puncture wounds and Pseudomonas osteomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, A S; Zukin, D D; Perro, M

    1992-02-01

    The management of children who present to the ED with plantar puncture wounds is dependent upon the nature of the injury, the examination of the puncture site, and the potential risk of a retained foreign body. Not all patients will require wound enlargement and a search for a retained foreign body. Close follow-up of all children who are being treated as outpatients is of vital importance in detecting an early development of an infectious complication. Pseudomonas osteomyelitis should be suspected in all patients who present with foot pain, swelling, and a decreased ability to bear weight after sustaining a nail puncture through a sneaker. The current consensus favors open surgical débridement followed by a course of intravenous antibiotics. The exact duration of the postoperative antibiotic course is still being debated.

  7. Proteus syndrome: MRI characteristics of plantar cerebriform hyperplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanhoenacker, F.M.; Beuckeleer, L.H. de; Schepper, A.M. de; Deprettere, A.; Moor, A. de

    2000-01-01

    Proteus syndrome is a rare congenital hamartomatous syndrome with a variety of abnormalities. It shares many features with other congenital hamartomatous disorders, but cerebriform hyperplasia of the soles and the palms is known as a quite distinctive characteristic in the dermatologic literature. The purpose of this case report is to demonstrate the MRI features of plantar cerebriform hyperplasia in a 9-year-old boy with known Proteus syndrome. (orig.)

  8. Ulcera plantar secundaria a espondilolistese: registro de um caso

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    Antonio Cesar G. Borges

    1980-06-01

    Full Text Available É relatado o caso de uma paciente de 41 anos de idade com queixas de dor lombar de longa data e úlcera plantar bilateral, secundárias a espondilo-listese lombar. A laminectomia e artrodese posterior permitiram recuperação dos sinais e sintomas. São feitos breves comentários sobre os aspectos clínicos e cirúrgicos deste caso.

  9. Fournier’s Gangrene: Lessons Learned from Multimodal and Multidisciplinary Management of Perineal Necrotizing Fasciitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orestis Ioannidis

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundFournier’s gangrene (FG is a rapidly evolving necrotizing fasciitis of the perineum and the genital area, the scrotum as it most commonly affects man in the vast majority of cases. It is polymicrobial in origin, due to the synergistic action of anaerobes and aerobes and has a very high mortality. There are many predisposing factors including diabetes mellitus, alcoholism, immunosuppression, renal, and hepatic disease. The prognosis of the disease depends on a lot of factors including but not limited to patient age, disease extent, and comorbidities. The purpose of the study is to describe the experience of a general surgery department in the management of FG, to present the multimodal and multidisciplinary treatment of the disease, to identify predictors of mortality, and to make general surgeons familiar with the disease.MethodsThe current retrospective study is presenting the experience of our general surgery department in the management of FG during the last 20 years. The clinical presentation and demographics of the patients were recorded. Also we recorded the laboratory data, the comorbidities, the etiology, and microbiology and the therapeutic interventions performed, and we calculated the various severity indexes. Patients were divided to survivors and non-survivors, and all the collected data were statistically analyzed to assess mortality factors using univariate and then multivariate analysis.ResultsIn our series, we treated a total of 24 patients with a mean age 58.9 years including 20 males (83.4% and 4 females (16.6%. In most patients, a delay between disease onset and seeking of medical help was noted. Comorbidities were present in almost all patients (87.5%. All patients were submitted to extensive surgical debridements and received broad-spectrum antibiotics until microbiological culture results were received. Regarding all the collected data, there was no statistically significant difference between survivors and

  10. Changes in foot plantar pressure in pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsayed, Enas; Devreux, Isabelle; Embaby, Heba; Alsayed, Amani; Alshehri, Maram

    2017-01-01

    During pregnancy, the body undergoes many hormonal and anatomical changes causing several medical problems as the musculoskeletal system problems. To investigate the plantar pressure distribution during pregnancy. Twenty two pregnant and non-pregnant females were selected from the King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah. All females were evaluated by inspection regarding their deformities of the spine, pelvis, lower extremities and feet. Pain was assessed by the Visual Analog Scale (VAS), and the weight and height were recorded using a calibrated weighing scale. Finally, the plantar pressure distribution was examined by a Global Postural Analysis device (GPA). The results revealed significant asymmetry of weight bearing in the study group (pregnant) compared to the control group (non-pregnant) (p 0.05). Moreover, there was a significant direct relationship between the month of pregnancy and increased weight bearing on the 5th metatarsal in the study group (p= 0.04). There is an effect of pregnancy on plantar pressure distribution as well as weight symmetry which should be considered when designing an antenatal program.

  11. Plantar pitted keratolysis: a study from non-risk groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asli Feride Kaptanoglu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Pitted keratolysis is an acquired, superficial bacterial infection of the skin which is characterized by typical malodor and pits in the hyperkeratotic areas of the soles. It is more common in barefooted people in tropical areas, or those who have to wear occlusive shoes, such as soldiers, sailors and athletes. In this study, we evaluated 41 patients who had been diagnosed with plantar pitted keratolysis. The patients were of high socioeconomic status, were office-workers, and most had a university degree. Malodor and plantar hyperhydrosis were the most frequently reported symptoms. The weight-bearing metatarsal parts of the feet were those most affected. Almost half the women in the study gave a history of regular pedicure and foot care in a spa salon. Mean treatment duration was 19 days. All patients were informed about the etiology of the disease, predisposing factors and preventive methods. Recurrences were observed in only 17% of patients during the one year follow-up period. This study emphasizes that even malodorous feet among non-risk city dwellers may be a sign of plantar pitted keratolysis. A study of the real incidence of the disease in a large population-based series is needed.

  12. Cervical Necrotizing Fasciitis of Odontogenic Origin in a Diabetic Patient Complicated by Substance Abuse

    OpenAIRE

    Camino Junior,Rubens; Naclerio-Homem,Maria G.; Cabral,Lecy Marcondes; Luz,João Gualberto C.

    2014-01-01

    Cervical necrotizing fasciitis (CNF) is an uncommon, potentially fatal soft tissue infection with rapid progression characterized by necrosis in the subcutaneous tissue and fascia. A case of CNF of odontogenic origin in a diabetic patient, complicated by alcohol dependence and tobacco abuse, is presented with a literature review. The emergency procedure comprised hydration, colloid administration, glycemic control and broad spectrum antibiotic therapy, followed by aggressive surgical debridem...

  13. Necrotizing Fasciitis Caused by Inconspicuous Infection of Aeromonas hydrophila in an Immunocompromised Host

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    Kuo-Chun Liao

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of serious necrotizing fasciitis due to Aeromonas hydrophila without a suggestive history of routes of pathogen invasion in a 60-year-old male. Despite prompt broad-spectrum antibiotic and extensive surgical therapies, the patient died within 72 hours following initial presentation. Our experience suggests clinicians be highly alert to the disease when an immunocompromised patient featured fulminant soft-tissue infection in the endemic area.

  14. Community-acquired necrotizing fasciitis caused by Acinetobacter calcoaceticus: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonaka, Yuko; Nagae, Masaaki; Omae, Takahito; Yamamoto, Shuhei; Horitani, Ryosuke; Maeda, Daigen; Yoshinaga, Takayuki

    2014-05-01

    A 61-year-old man presented with pain in the abdomen and right lower limb. He had a history of hepatitis B virus-induced liver cirrhosis, but had not been visiting the outpatient clinic and did not receive any medication. Cutaneous necrosis and bulla were observed on his abdomen and right lower limb. The necrotic skin was incised, and he was diagnosed with necrotizing fasciitis. A nonfermentative Gram-negative bacillus infection was confirmed from aspirated fluid and blood cultures. Therefore, meropenem and immunoglobulins were administered. Because necrosis was widespread, surgical debridement was performed. Thereafter, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus infection was confirmed by semi-quantitative PCR using the bullous fluid and blood cultures. Meropenem was administered for 3 weeks, followed by levofloxacin alone for 1 week. The patient's condition improved; therefore, skin grafting was performed as planned and yielded a favorable response. After rehabilitation, the patient could walk without support and infection did not recur. However, he had severe liver cirrhosis and large esophageal varices, and he eventually died from sudden varix rupture. Necrotizing fasciitis is an uncommon soft tissue infection, associated with high morbidity and mortality, and early recognition and treatment are crucial for survival. Acinetobacter is rarely associated with necrotizing fasciitis. Although this is a very rare case of the occurrence of necrotizing fasciitis due to A. calcoaceticus infection, we believe that this organism can be pathogenic in immunocompromised patients such as those with liver cirrhosis by reporting this case. Copyright © 2014 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Presentation and management of cervicofacial necrotising fasciitis: report of nine cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koech, K J; Chindia, M L

    2009-10-01

    Cervicofacial necrotising fasciitis (CNF) is an acute soft tissue infection that primarily involves the subcutaneous, adipose and fascial planes of the head and neck region. Secondary ischaemia of the skin results in widespread ulceration and suppuration. It is imperative that early diagnosis is made and judicious medical and surgical intervention instituted. We present a case series of patients with CNF diagnosed and managed at the division of oral and maxillofacial surgery of the Kenyatta National Hospital in Kenya.

  16. Clinical presentations and outcomes of necrotizing fasciitis in males and females over a 13-year period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nissar Shaikh

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: Necrotizing fasciitis remains a life threatening entity. Although, NF is more common in males, Qatari females are more likely to develop NF than males. NF of abdominal wall and groin is significantly higher in females. Development of organ failure is more common in males with NF. NF remains a challenging clinical problem in Qatar with a mortality rate ranging from 25 to 27% for both genders.

  17. OA03.12. Herbal socks an effective medication against plantar hyperkeratosis

    OpenAIRE

    Geethadevi, C; Rajendran, R; Radhai, R

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Plantar hyperkeratosis commonly called cracked heel is a common condition among adults. Causes for plantar hyperkeratosis are many and include genetic defects reflected in skin structure, allergic dermatoses, and paraneoplastic syndromes seen with particular forms of internal malignancy. Treatment for this condition could be possibly done using traditional herbs. The current study throws light on the cure of plantar hyperkeratosis using socks worn daily. Method: Solanum xanthocarpum ...

  18. Plantar calcaneal spurs in older people: longitudinal traction or vertical compression?

    OpenAIRE

    Landorf Karl B; Zammit Gerard V; Menz Hylton B; Munteanu Shannon E

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Plantar calcaneal spurs are common, however their pathophysiology is poorly understood. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence and correlates of plantar calcaneal spurs in a large sample of older people. Methods Weightbearing lateral foot radiographs of 216 people (140 women and 76 men) aged 62 to 94 years (mean age 75.9, SD 6.6) were examined for plantar calcaneal and Achilles tendon spurs. Associations between the presence of spurs and sex, body mass index, radiogra...

  19. Group A Streptococci-Associated Necrotizing Fasciitis following Cat Bite in an Immunocompromised Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudheer Nambiar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing soft tissue infections are characterized clinically by fulminant tissue destruction, systemic signs of toxicity, and high mortality. Accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment must include early surgical intervention and antibiotic therapy. Mortality rate is very high and could be even higher in an immunocompromised host. We present a 57-year-old female with history of rheumatoid arthritis on oral corticosteroid and methotrexate therapy with painful swelling of the left hand following a cat bite that was diagnosed as having group A streptococcus pyogenes-associated necrotizing fasciitis. Treatment with ampicillin-sulbactam, Clindamycin, and surgical debridement was performed. In spite of all the adequate therapy she succumbed to death from streptococcal toxic shock and related complications after thirty-two days of treatment in intensive care unit. Necrotizing fasciitis is an uncommon but life-threatening complication in immunocompromised hosts. Tissue infections in cat bite wounds are commonly caused by pathogenic bacterium known as Pasteurella multocida. Group A streptococcal infections are not reported following cat bites. A high index of suspicion must be maintained to suspect group A streptococcal associated necrotizing fasciitis following cat bites and an early medical and surgical intervention should be made for any best possible outcome.

  20. Use of negative pressure wound therapy with silver base dressing for necrotizing fasciitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pour, Saman Mohammadi

    2011-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a life-threatening infection requiring urgent surgical and medical therapy. Hemodynamic stabilization and antimicrobial therapy precede aggressive surgical excision of necrotic tissue, which should be performed as soon as possible. The rapidly spreading infection and aggressive surgical intervention create challenges for wound management. Multiple dressings are available to address the various challenges associated with management of these wounds; this article discusses negative pressure therapy and antimicrobial dressings in the management of Fournier's gangrene, a form of necrotizing fasciitis that involves tissue of the genital or perianal areas. This article reviews the case of a 56-year-old man with fever, tachycardia, and perianal pain associated with necrotizing fasciitis. Extensive surgical debridement was done on the day of admission. After several irrigations, the wound was dressed by negative pressure wound therapy with a silver dressing that minimized hospital stay and enabled early reconstruction. We found that negative pressure wound therapy with a silver-based dressing promoted wound healing and provided a solid matrix for surgical reconstruction.

  1. First Tarsometatarsal Arthrodesis: An Anatomic Evaluation of Dorsomedial Versus Plantar Plating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Paul; Fröber, Rosemarie; Loracher, Clemens; Knobe, Matthias; Gras, Florian; Hofmann, Gunther O; Klos, Kajetan

    2015-01-01

    Fusion of the first tarsometatarsal joint is a widely used procedure for the correction of hallux valgus deformity. Although dorsomedial H-shaped plating systems are being increasingly used, fusion can also be achieved by plantar plating. The goal of the present study was to compare these 2 operative techniques based on the anatomic considerations and show the potential pitfalls of both procedures. Six pairs of deep-frozen human lower legs were used in the present cadaveric study. In a randomized manner, either dorsomedial arthrodesis or plantar plating through a medial incision was performed. With regard to arterial injury, the plantar technique resulted in fewer lesions (plantar, 4 injuries [66.7%] to the terminal branches of the first digital branch of the medial plantar artery; dorsomedial, 3 injuries [50%] to the main trunks of the plantar metatarsal arteries and the first dorsal metatarsal artery). With respect to injury to the veins, the plantar procedure affected significantly fewer high-caliber subcutaneous trunk veins. The nerves coursing through the operative field, such as the saphenous and superficial fibular nerves, were compromised more often by the dorsal approach. Neither the plantar plating nor the dorsomedial plating technique was associated with injury to the insertion of the tibialis anterior muscle. Both studied techniques are safe, well-established procedures. Arthrodesis with plantar plating, however, offers additional advantages and is a reliable tool in the foot and ankle surgeon's repertoire. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Plantar flexor moment arm and muscle volume predict torque-generating capacity in young men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Josh R; Piazza, Stephen J

    2014-03-01

    Muscle volume is known to correlate with maximal joint torque in humans, but the role of muscle moment arm in determining maximal torque is less clear. Moderate correlations have been reported between maximal isometric knee extensor torque and knee extensor moment arm, but no such observations have been made for the ankle joint. It has been suggested that smaller muscle moment arms may enhance force generation at high rates of joint rotation, but this has not yet been observed for ankle muscles in vivo. The purpose of the present study was to correlate plantar flexor moment arm and plantar flexor muscle volume with maximal plantar flexor torque measured at different rates of plantar flexion. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to quantify the plantar flexor moment arm and muscle volume of the posterior compartment in 20 healthy young men. Maximal plantar flexor torque was measured isometrically and at three plantar flexion speeds using an isokinetic dynamometer. Plantar flexor torque was significantly correlated with muscle volume (0.222 muscle moment arm at each speed (0.323 muscle volume was strongly correlated with body mass and stature, moment arm was not. The slope of the torque-moment arm regression line decreased as the rate of joint rotation increased, indicating that subjects with small moment arms experienced smaller reductions in torque at high speeds. The findings of this study suggest that plantar flexor moment arm is a determinant of joint strength that is at least as important as muscle size.

  3. The effect of target strain error on plantar tissue stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Shruti; Ledoux, William R

    2010-07-01

    Accurate quantification of soft tissue properties, specifically the stress relaxation behavior of viscoelastic tissues such as plantar tissue, requires precise testing under physiologically relevant loading. However, limitations of testing equipment often result in target strain errors that can contribute to large stress errors and confound comparative results to an unknown extent. Previous investigations have modeled this artifact, but they have been unable to obtain empirical data to validate their models. Moreover, there are no studies that address this issue for plantar tissue. The purpose of this research was to directly measure the difference in peak force for a series of small target strain errors within the range of our typical stress relaxation experiments for the subcutaneous plantar soft tissue. Five plantar tissue specimens were tested to seven incremental target strain error levels of -0.9%, -0.6%, -0.3%, 0.0%, 0.3%, 0.6%, and 0.9%, so as to undershoot and overshoot the target displacement in 0.3% increments. The imposed strain errors were accurately attained using a special compensation feature of our materials testing software that can drive the actuator to within 0% (1-2 microm) of the target level for cyclic tests. Since stress relaxation tests are not cyclic, we emulated the ramp portion of our stress relaxation tests with 5 Hz triangle waves. The average total stress variation for all specimens was 25+/-5%, with the highest and lowest stresses corresponding to the largest and smallest strain errors of 0.9% and -0.9%, respectively. A strain overshoot of 0.3%, the target strain error observed in our typical stress relaxation experiments, corresponded to an average stress overshoot of 3+/-1%. Plantar tissue in compression is sensitive to small target strain errors that can result in stress errors that are several fold larger. The extent to which the overshoot may affect the peak stress will likely differ in magnitude for other soft tissues and

  4. Plantar pressures in children with congenital talipes equino varus--a comparison between surgical management and the Ponseti technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Torres, J J; McDowell, B C; Humphreys, L D; Duffy, C M

    2014-01-01

    The Ponseti technique for treatment for Congenital Talipes Equinovarus (CTEV) was introduced in the authors' institution in 2001, substituting a more traditional orthopaedic approach which involved surgery. There is currently limited published information regarding the differences in clinical outcomes between these two techniques, particularly in relation to plantar pressure analysis. This study aims to determine differences in pedobarographic outcome in children with CTEV, treated with either a surgical or Ponseti approach. A high resolution pedobarograph was used to record plantar pressure distribution in 52 children with CTEV and 26 children with typical development. Data were imported into Matlab where a custom programme was developed for processing and analysing pedobarographic recordings. There were significant differences in both treatment groups compared to the typically developed group (p<0.05) for most measurements. The most salient differences between treatment groups were (i) at the hind-foot where the Ponseti group had significantly lower maximum peak pressures (p<0.05); (ii) at the lateral mid-foot where children treated by the Ponseti approach showed significantly larger peak force (p<0.001), average peak pressure (p<0.001) and maximum peak pressure (p<0.01); (iii) at the lateral fore-foot where the surgical group showed lower average peak pressure (p<0.05); and (iv) in the medial/lateral fore-foot ratio where the Ponseti group showed significantly lower values (p<0.05). Plantar pressure analysis is a complementary measurement for the assessment of gait in children with CTEV. Data presented in this study showed that while there were deviations in children with CTEV, the differences observed between treatment groups suggest children in the Ponseti group have some level of under correction or recurrence. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Brief Report: Power Doppler Ultrasonography for Detection of Increased Vascularity in the Fascia: A Potential Early Diagnostic Tool in Fasciitis of Dermatomyositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Ken; Nishioka, Makiko; Matsushima, Satoshi; Joh, Kensuke; Oto, Yosuke; Yoshiga, Masayuki; Otani, Kazuhiro; Ito, Haruyasu; Hirai, Kenichiro; Furuya, Kazuhiro; Ukichi, Taro; Noda, Kentaro; Kingetsu, Isamu; Kurosaka, Daitaro

    2016-12-01

    We previously demonstrated that fasciitis is a common lesion of dermatomyositis (DM) that is detectable early after disease onset by en bloc muscle biopsy combined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Power Doppler ultrasonography (PDUS) is a useful method for detection of inflammation and vascularity in rheumatic diseases. We undertook this study to determine whether fasciitis was detectable by PDUS in patients with DM. We prospectively evaluated 7 patients with DM and 7 patients with polymyositis (PM) for the detection of fasciitis with PDUS. MRI and PDUS were both performed in all patients. Fasciitis was histologically confirmed by en bloc biopsy. Among all patients with DM, 4 showed signs of fasciitis on MRI, while increased blood flow signals were observed along the fascia by PDUS in 6 DM patients, including 4 patients with early disease (fascia. Immunohistochemical staining for CD31 indicated abnormal neovascular proliferation in the fascia in patients with DM. None of the PM patients showed signs of fasciitis or increased vascularity by MRI, PDUS, or en bloc biopsy. In our limited population, PDUS was useful for the detection of fasciitis associated with DM, especially in the early stage of disease. The increased blood flow signal as detected by PDUS is involved in angiogenesis accompanying fasciitis in patients with DM. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  6. A STUDY ON SPECTRUM OF NECROTISING FASCIITIS IN A TERTIARY CARE CENTRE

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    V. Jeyaraman

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Necrotising Fasciitis (NF is a serious infection involving the fascia and subcutaneous tissues. Distinguishing necrotising fasciitis from a less severe infection is difficult, but crucial, since necrotising fasciitis is a surgical emergency. The treatment of choice for NF is rapid surgical debridement/fasciotomy and broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy. Since, NF occurs rarely, reports on its epidemiology, clinical features, resource utilisation and outcomes are commonly based on relatively small case series and cohorts limiting generalisation of reported findings. The aim of the study is to examine the epidemiological features and explore clinical characteristics of patients diagnosed with necrotising fasciitis. The findings may be applied in clinical evaluation, raise awareness and help in the prevention of disease complications. MATERIALS AND METHODS This was a retrospective study of 35 patients with necrotising fasciitis between 2011 to April 2015. This study was done through the periods between 2011 to April 2015. Following history taking and physical examination, patients were subjected to routine laboratory investigations, plain chest x-ray and cardiological evaluation was done when indicated. After a diagnosis of NF was made, the patient was started empirically on broad-spectrum antibiotics and underwent serial wound debridement/fasciotomy and tissue samples were sent for culture and sensitivity. Based on the quantitative growth of organism and its antibiotic sensitivity, they were started on appropriate antibiotics. Serial dressings were done at the time of admission. Data was collected in a retrospective manner and were analysed and compared with other studies. Data charting was done using MS Excel 2010. RESULTS A total of 35 patients were diagnosed to have necrotising fasciitis. Majority of these patients fell within middle age groups with most of them presenting with NF involving the lower limb extremity. Almost, all patients

  7. Plantar pressure distribution in elderly subjec Ts after proprioceptive exercises

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    Fábio Marcon Alfieri

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Changes related to aging limit cutaneous plantar perception, interfering in postural control. The aim of this study was to verify the effects of a regular program of proprioceptive intervention on plantar pressure distribution in older adults. Plantar pressure distribution was evaluated in 29 volunteers (63.06 ±2.84 years standing on both feet with eyes open (EO and eyes closed (EC. After baropodometric evaluation, the subjects attended 3 weekly proprioceptive intervention sessions of 1 hour’s duration for 3 months. Results: Prior to the intervention, participants exhibited mean EO values of 0.29 ±0.044 Kg/cm² for the right foot and 0.31 ±0.04 Kg/cm² for the left foot (p=0.0078 and post-intervention these were 0.28±0.04 Kg/cm² and 0.30±0.04 Kg/cm², respectively. Pre-intervention EC values were 0.30 ±0.044 Kg/cm² for the right and 0.31 ±0.05 Kg/cm² for the left foot and post-intervention these figures were 0.28 ±0.04 Kg/cm² and 0.29 ±0.049 Kg/cm², respectively. The results of MANOVA indicated significant differences in contact pressure between pre-intervention and post-intervention measurements. Conclusions: The intervention used here reduced the participants’ plantar pressure, but was unable to improve the distribution of plantar pressure between the right and left feet. Resumo Alterações decorrentes do envelhecimento limitam a percepção cutâneo-plantar, interferindo no controle postural. O objetivo deste trabalho foi de verificar os efeitos de um programa regular de intervenção proprioceptiva sobre a distribuição da pressão plantar em idosos. Avaliou-se a distribuição da pressão plantar em 29 indivíduos (63,06 ±2,84 anos em apoio bipodal com olhos abertos (BA e fechados (BF. Após avaliação baropodométrica, iniciou-se intervenção proprioceptiva (3 sessões semanais de 1 hora durante 3 meses. No apoio BA, os indivíduos apresentaram valor médio de 0,29±0,044 Kg/cm² no pé direito e de 0,31± 0,04 Kg

  8. A 5-year retrospective analysis of Necrotizing fasciitis: A single center experiences

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    Kiralj Aleksandar I

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Necrotizing fasciitis (NF is usually an acute infection of superficial fascia with rapid progression in around soft tissue. If not promptly recognized and aggressively treated NF usualy leads to sepsis and multiorgan failure with fatal outcome, thus early diagnosis and prompt surgical treatment are crucial for healing of these patients. The aim of this article was to evaluate the clinical presentation of all patients with acute NF diagnosed and treated in surgical clinics of Clinical Center of Vojvodina, Novi Sad, Serbia. Methods. The medical records of patients treated for acute NF localized on a different parts of the body in Clinical Center of Vojvodina, Novi Sad, Serbia, during a 5- year period (from January 2008 to December 2012 were retrospectively evaluated. This study enrolled patients admitted via Emergency Center of Vojvodina with the diagnosis of acute NF either as the primary diagnosis or with the diagnosis at discharge after surgical treatment. Results. During a 5-year period there were 216 patients with final diagnosis of acute NF. Most of our patients (140 - 64.81% were admitted with the initial diagnosis of cellulitis, abscesses, phlegmons or sepsis. Unfortunately, the clinical symptoms of acute NF were atypical at time of initial examination. Pain and swelling of the affected localization were the most presented bias of symptoms (183 - 84.72%. The majority of our patients were male (164 - 75.92%. Among the 216 patients, the most common pre-existing single factor was drug abuse (39 - 18.05%, followed by obesity (38 - 17.59% and diabetes mellitus (31 - 14.35%. Trauma was most common etiological factor (22 - 10.8% in infected wounds, followed by abdominal (15 - 6.94% and orthopedic (11 - 5.09% surgical intervention. In the present study idiopathic acute NF was diagnosed in 22 (10.18% patients and more than one etiological factor were diagnosed in 20 (9.25% patients. The majority of our patients had type I acute NF

  9. Long-term results of radiotherapy in patients with chronic palmo-plantar eczema or psoriasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumila, M.; Notter, M.; Bodis, S.; Gruber, G.; Itin, P.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) is well accepted for therapy-refractory palmo-plantar eczema or psoriasis, despite of lacking evidence regarding beneficial long term effects. Furthermore, the optimal irradiation dose is unknown. We evaluated the outcome of RT with two different RT single/total dose (SD/TD) treatment policies. Patients and Methods: 28 consecutive patients with therapy-refractory eczema (n = 22) or psoriasis (n 6) of palms and/or soles were irradiated twice a week either with a D max SD of 1 Gy (6/98-5/03; median TD: 12 Gy) or 0.5 Gy (6/03-7/04; median TD: 5 Gy). Median age was 52 years (27-71), median follow-up 20 months (4-76). Totally 88 regions were treated, 49 with 1 Gy, 39 with 0.5 Gy SD. Eight different symptoms were scored from 0 (absent) -3 (severe), giving a possible sum score of 0-24. Patients' rating of RT result was also documented (worse/stable/better/complete remission). Results: The sum score was 15 (6-23) before RT, 2 (0-16) at the end of RT, and 1 (0-21) at last follow-up, respectively. The improvement was highly significant in both treatment regimens. Better or complete remission by the patients were reported in 44 and 39 (= 83 out of 88) localisations, that was often stable during the follow-up. 5 (6%) regions in 3 (11%) patients didn't benefit from RT. Conclusion: RT reveals excellent results in palmo-plantar eczema or psoriasis. We recommend a SD of 0.5 Gy twice a week up to a TD of 4-5 Gy. (orig.)

  10. Long-term results of radiotherapy in patients with chronic palmo-plantar eczema or psoriasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumila, M.; Notter, M.; Bodis, S.; Gruber, G. [State Hospital, Aarau (Switzerland). Inst. of Radiation Oncology; Itin, P. [State Hospital, Aarau (Switzerland). Dept. of Dermatology

    2008-04-15

    Background and Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) is well accepted for therapy-refractory palmo-plantar eczema or psoriasis, despite of lacking evidence regarding beneficial long term effects. Furthermore, the optimal irradiation dose is unknown. We evaluated the outcome of RT with two different RT single/total dose (SD/TD) treatment policies. Patients and Methods: 28 consecutive patients with therapy-refractory eczema (n = 22) or psoriasis (n = 6) of palms and/or soles were irradiated twice a week either with a D{sub max} SD of 1 Gy (6/98-5/03; median TD: 12 Gy) or 0.5 Gy (6/03-7/04; median TD: 5 Gy). Median age was 52 years (27-71), median follow-up 20 months (4-76). Totally 88 regions were treated, 49 with 1 Gy, 39 with 0.5 Gy SD. Eight different symptoms were scored from 0 (absent) -3 (severe), giving a possible sum score of 0-24. Patients' rating of RT result was also documented (worse/stable/better/complete remission). Results: The sum score was 15 (6-23) before RT, 2 (0-16) at the end of RT, and 1 (0-21) at last follow-up, respectively. The improvement was highly significant in both treatment regimens. Better or complete remission by the patients were reported in 44 and 39 (= 83 out of 88) localisations, that was often stable during the follow-up. 5 (6%) regions in 3 (11%) patients didn't benefit from RT. Conclusion: RT reveals excellent results in palmo-plantar eczema or psoriasis. We recommend a SD of 0.5 Gy twice a week up to a TD of 4-5 Gy. (orig.)

  11. Effect of plantar cutaneous inputs on center of pressure during quiet stance in older adults

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    Yun Wang

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: The findings indicate that mechanical facilitation of sensation on the plantar soles enhanced postural stability in older adults. The results show that plantar cutaneous inputs provide information that leads to reduced postural sway in healthy older adults. This could have implications in clinical and rehabilitative areas.

  12. Impact of Diabetes and Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease on the Functional Microcirculation at the Plantar Foot

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    Mohammad Kabbani, MD

    2013-10-01

    Conclusions: Functional microcirculation at the plantar foot differs between healthy subjects and patients suffering from diabetes or PAOD of the same age. Patients with either diabetes or PAOD demonstrate deteriorated cutaneous oxygen saturation with equivalent blood perfusion at the plantar foot. More clinical studies have to be conducted to evaluate therapeutical methods that might ameliorate cutaneous oxygen saturation within diabetic foot disease and PAOD.

  13. Differences in foot sensitivity and plantar pressure between young adults and elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Machado, A.S.; Bombach, G.D.; Duysens, J.; Carpes, F.P.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The understanding of foot sensitivity and plantar pressure contributes to the design of insoles, shoes, as well as to guide therapeutic interventions. Here we investigate differences in plantar pressure and foot sensitivity between young adults and community-dwelling elderly. METHODS:

  14. A new method to normalize plantar pressure measurements for foot size and foot progression angle.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijsers, N.L.; Stolwijk, N.M.; Nienhuis, B.; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2009-01-01

    Plantar pressure measurement provides important information about the structure and function of the foot and is a helpful tool to evaluate patients with foot complaints. In general, average and maximum plantar pressure of 6-11 areas under the foot are used to compare groups of subjects. However,

  15. Comparison of plantar pressure between flat and normal feet when crossing an obstacle at different heights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jin-Tae; Lee, Jung-Hoon; Lee, Eun-Ju; Lim, Chang-Hun; Kim, Won-Bok

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the plantar foot pressure and the center of pressure (COP) pathway of normal and flat feet while crossing an obstacle at different heights. Nineteen subjects (10 normal feet, 9 flat feet) participated in this study. The plantar foot surface was divided into the following seven regions for pressure measurement: two toe regions, three forefoot regions, one midfoot region, and one heel region. A one-way ANOVA with repeated measurements was used to compare the plantar foot pressure of normal and flat feet according to the obstacle height. The trend analysis showed a quadratic trend during level walking for the normal foot group, but a linear trend appeared as the obstacle height increased. In the flat foot group, the trend analysis showed a linear trend regardless of the obstacle height. In the 2nd-3rd metatarsal head region, the plantar pressure of the flat foot group increased more than the normal foot group as the obstacle height increased; however, in the 4th-5th metatarsal head region, the plantar pressure in flat feet was lower than in normal feet. In the heel region, the plantar pressure in both groups generally increased as the obstacle height increased, but the plantar pressure in the flat foot group was lower than in the normal foot group. We believe that, due to a loss of longitudinal arch, the COP path and plantar pressure of flat feet may be different from normal feet when crossing obstacles of different heights.

  16. Finite element modelling of Plantar Fascia response during running on different surface types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razak, A. H. A.; Basaruddin, K. S.; Salleh, A. F.; Rusli, W. M. R.; Hashim, M. S. M.; Daud, R.

    2017-10-01

    Plantar fascia is a ligament found in human foot structure located beneath the skin of human foot that functioning to stabilize longitudinal arch of human foot during standing and normal gait. To perform direct experiment on plantar fascia seems very difficult since the structure located underneath the soft tissue. The aim of this study is to develop a finite element (FE) model of foot with plantar fascia and investigate the effect of the surface hardness on biomechanical response of plantar fascia during running. The plantar fascia model was developed using Solidworks 2015 according to the bone structure of foot model that was obtained from Turbosquid database. Boundary conditions were set out based on the data obtained from experiment of ground reaction force response during running on different surface hardness. The finite element analysis was performed using Ansys 14. The results found that the peak of stress and strain distribution were occur on the insertion of plantar fascia to bone especially on calcaneal area. Plantar fascia became stiffer with increment of Young’s modulus value and was able to resist more loads. Strain of plantar fascia was decreased when Young’s modulus increased with the same amount of loading.

  17. Necrotizing Fasciitis Secondary to a Primary Suture for Anoperineal Trauma by Motorcycle Accident in a Healthy Adult

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    Susumu Saigusa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 41-year-old man experienced a swollen scrotum three days after a motorcycle accident and presented to our hospital. He had had a primary suture repair for anoperineal trauma in an outside hospital at the time of the injury. He presented to us with general fatigue, low grade fevers, and perineal pain. Abdominal computed tomography showed subcutaneous emphysema from the scrotum to the left chest. The sutured wound had foul-smelling discharge and white exudate. We made the diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis and immediately opened the sutured wound and performed initial debridement and lavage with copious irrigation. We continued antibiotics and lavage of the wound until the infection was controlled. Fortunately, the necrotizing fasciitis did not worsen and he was discharged after 15 days. Our experience indicates that anoperineal injuries should not be closed without careful and intensive follow-up due to the potential of developing necrotizing fasciitis.

  18. Fatal necrotizing fasciitis and myositis in a captive common bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) associated with Streptococcus agalactiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappulli, Valentina; Mazzariol, Sandro; Cavicchioli, Laura; Petterino, Claudio; Bargelloni, Luca; Castagnaro, Massimo

    2005-11-01

    A common bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) was presented for necropsy after acute onset of gastrointestinal signs and cutaneous lesions that rapidly progressed to death. Gross and microscopic findings were characterized by locally extensive severe necrohemorrhagic fasciitis and cellulitis, and severe necrotizing myositis in the head and dorsocranial thorax, with numerous disseminated gram-positive cocci. Streptococcus agalactiae was isolated from the lesions and from visceral organs (liver and lung), and it was identified by standard microbiology techniques. This communication is the first report of necrotizing fasciitis in a marine mammal associated with S. agalactiae.

  19. Successful Treatment of a Case of Necrotizing Fasciitis due to Vibrio vulnificus in a Cold Climate in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Chiho; Yamauchi, Yoichi; Yamaguchi, Tomoya; Aida, Yoshihisa; Ito, Katsunori; Ishizawa, Yoshiya; Saitoh, Kyoji; Kasai, Tomonori; Ohnishi, Motoki

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus infection often occurs in warm regions, frequently leading to necrotizing fasciitis, sepsis, and death. We herein report a rare case presenting in a cold climate region in northern Japan, Aomori district, of a V. vulnificus infection complicated by necrotizing fasciitis and septic shock. The patient's prior history of injury and typical clinical course were helpful clues to the diagnosis of V. vulnificus infection, and early initiation of antimicrobial treatment saved his life. V. vulnificus infection should be considered even in cold regions, particularly if patients have risk factors.

  20. How plantar exteroceptive efficiency modulates postural and oculomotor control: inter-individual variability

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    Arnaud eFoisy

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In a previous experiment, we showed that among young and healthy subjects, thin plantar inserts improve postural control and modify vergence amplitudes. In this experiment, however, significant inter-individual variability was observed. We hypothesize that its origin could be attributed to a different reliance upon feet cutaneous afferents. In order to test this hypothesis, we re-analyzed the data relative to 31 young (age 25,7±3,8 and healthy subjects who participated in the first experiment after having classified them into two groups depending on their Plantar Quotient (PQ = Surface area of CoP foam / Surface area of CoP firm ground x100. Foam decreases the information arising from the feet, normally resulting in a PQ>100. Hence, the PQ provides information on the weight of plantar cutaneous afferents used in postural control. Twelve people were Plantar-Independent Subjects, as indicated by a PQ<100. These individuals did not behave like the Normal Plantar Quotient Subjects: they were almost insensitive to the plantar stimulations in terms of postural control and totally insensitive in terms of oculomotor control. We conclude that the inter-individual variability observed in our first experiment is explained by the subjects’ degree of plantar reliance. We propose that plantar independence is a dysfunctional situation revealing an inefficiency in plantar cutaneous afferents. The latter could be due to a latent somatosensory dysfunction generating a noise which prevents the CNS from correctly processing and using feet somatosensory afferents both for balance and vergence control: Plantar Irritating Stimulus. Considering the non-noxious nature and prevalence of this phenomenon, these results can be of great interest to researchers and clinicians who attempt to trigger postural or oculomotor responses through mechanical stimulation of the foot sole.

  1. Eosinophilic fasciitis in a military recruit: MRI evaluation with clinical correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liou, Chang-Hsien; Juan, Chun-Jung; Chen, Cheng-Yu. [Department of Radiology, Tri-Service General Hospital and National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (Taiwan); Huang, Guo-Shu [Department of Radiology, Tri-Service General Hospital and National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (Taiwan); Department of Radiology, Tri-Service General Hospital, 325, Sec. 2, Neihu 114, Cheng-Kung Road, Taipei, Taiwan (Taiwan); Taylor, John A.M. [Department of Diagnosis, New York Chiropractic College, Seneca Falls, New York (United States); Gao, Hong-Wei [Department of Pathology, Tri-Service General Hospital and National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (Taiwan)

    2003-01-01

    Eosinophilic fasciitis (EF) is an uncommon connective tissue disease. We report a patient with EF who presented with episodic swelling and stiffness of his legs and forearms in combination with peripheral eosinophilia. Imaging studies of the legs and forearms, including computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), clearly demonstrated the characteristic finding of fascial thickening. The complete clinical imaging and pathological findings are described in this report. Cross-sectional imaging is useful in diagnosing EF and in the appropriate clinical scenario may be helpful in differentiating EF from other connective tissue diseases. (orig.)

  2. Intercostobrachial nerve injury from axillary dissection resulting in necrotizing fasciitis after a burn injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Peter; Malic, Claudia; Austen, Orla

    2008-01-01

    We present here the successful management of a 50-year-old female patient who developed necrotizing fasciitis after a burn injury to her left arm. The burn injury was sustained in a minimally lymphoedematous arm, in an area of post surgical paresthesia caused by division of the intercostobrachial nerve. This is a common consequence of axillary lymph node dissection. We discuss the diagnosis, management strategies, and the available literature. We conclude that division of the intercostobrachial nerve increases the risk of morbidity significantly and support the view that its preservation at the time of axillary surgery is preferable.

  3. Total contact cast wall load in patients with a plantar forefoot ulcer and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begg, Lindy; McLaughlin, Patrick; Vicaretti, Mauro; Fletcher, John; Burns, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    The total contact cast (TCC) is an effective intervention to reduce plantar pressure in patients with diabetes and a plantar forefoot ulcer. The walls of the TCC have been indirectly shown to bear approximately 30 % of the plantar load. A new direct method to measure inside the TCC walls with capacitance sensors has shown that the anterodistal and posterolateral-distal regions of the lower leg bear the highest load. The objective of this study was to directly measure these two regions in patients with Diabetes and a plantar forefoot ulcer to further understand the mechanism of pressure reduction in the TCC. A TCC was applied to 17 patients with Diabetes and a plantar forefoot ulcer. TCC wall load (contact area, peak pressure and max force) at the anterodistal and posterolateral-distal regions of the lower leg were evaluated with two capacitance sensor strips measuring 90 cm(2) (pliance®, novel GmbH, Germany). Plantar load (contact area, peak pressure and max force) was measured with a capacitance sensor insole (pedar®, novel GmbH, Germany) placed inside the TCC. Both pedar® and pliance® collected data simultaneously at a sampling rate of 50Hz synchronised to heel strike. The magnitude of TCC wall load as a proportion of plantar load was calculated. The TCC walls were then removed to determine the differences in plantar loading between the TCC and the cut down shoe-cast for the whole foot, rearfoot, midfoot and forefoot (region of interest). TCC wall load was substantial. The anterodistal lower leg recorded 48 % and the posterolateral-distal lower leg recorded 34 % of plantar contact area. The anterodistal lower leg recorded 28 % and the posterolateral-distal lower leg recorded 12 % of plantar peak pressure. The anterodistal lower leg recorded 12 % and the posterolateral-distal lower leg recorded 4 % of plantar max force. There were significant differences in plantar load between the TCC and the cut down shoe-cast for the whole foot, rearfoot, midfoot and

  4. Temporizing surgical management improves outcome in patients with Vibrio necrotizing fasciitis complicated with septic shock on admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Guang-Liang; Dai, Xiao-Qin; Lu, Cai-Jiao; Liu, Jia-Ming; Zhao, Guang-Ju; Wu, Bin; Li, Meng-Fang; Lu, Zhong-Qiu

    2014-05-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) caused by Vibrio infection is one of the most fatal diseases, resulting in high morbidity and mortality. Early diagnosis and effective surgical intervention are the mainstays for better outcomes for affected patients. Currently, standard surgical management calls for prompt and aggressive debridement and amputation. However, due to its rapid progression and deterioration, 50-60% of Vibrio NF cases present with septic shock and multiple organ dysfunction on admission. These patients, who usually have many surgical contraindications, are unable to tolerate a prolonged aggressive surgical debridement. Therefore, determining the optimal surgical intervention for these particularly severe patients remains a formidable problem in emergency medicine. A retrospective study was conducted on patients who underwent surgery for Vibrio NF and septic shock on admission to the emergency room from April 2001 to October 2012. These patients received the same treatment protocol, with the exception of the initial surgical intervention strategy. Nineteen patients were treated with a temporizing strategy, which called for simple incisions and drainage under regional anesthesia, followed by complete debridement 24h later. Another fifteen patients underwent aggressive surgical debridement during the first operative procedure. Basic demographics, laboratory results on admission, clinical course and outcomes were compared to assess the efficacy and safety of two initial surgical treatment methods: the temporizing strategy and the aggressive strategy. Thirty-four patients were included in this study, and the average age was 51.65 years. Chronic liver disease was the most prevalent preexisting condition (50.00%) and the lower limbs were most commonly involved in infection (76.47%). In this patient population, 19 cases underwent surgery with a temporizing therapeutic strategy, while the remaining 15 cases were treated with an aggressive surgical strategy. There were

  5. Comparison of Plantar Pressure Distribution between Different Speed and Incline During Treadmill Jogging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, I-Ju; Hou, Yi-You; Yang, Chich-Haung; Wu, Wen-Lan; Chen, Sheng-Kai; Guo, Lan-Yuen

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of changes in speed and incline slope on plantar pressure distribution of the foot during treadmill jogging. Plantar pressure parameters were measured with the Pedar-X system in twenty healthy girls (mean age of 20.7 years, mean height of 1.60m, and a mean weight of 53.35kg). Because variations in walking speed or slope can significantly change the magnitude of plantar pressure, comparisons of plantar pressure distribution between the two independent protocols during treadmill jogging were considered in this study. First, the subjects ran at the same speed of 2 m·s(-1) with different incline slopes of 0%, 5%, 10%, and 15%. Second, they ran on the same slope of 0% with different speeds of 1.5 m·s(-1), 2.0 m·s(-1), and 2.5 m·s(-1). The peak pressure of the eight plantar surface areas, apart from the medial forefoot and the hallux, significantly increased (p jogging were associated with changes in plantar pressures. By systematic investigation of foot kinematics and plantar pressure during jogging with varying incline slope and speed, the results of this study provided further insight into foot biomechanics during jogging. Key pointsThe study aimed to compare the plantar pressure distribution of the foot between different incline and speed during treadmill jogging by using plantar insole measurement system.With the increase of speed, apart from the hallux and medical forefoot, the peak pressure of all regions was raised significantly.As the slope increased, there was reduced peak pressure of the heel, medial forefoot, and hallux and toes.

  6. Monomicrobial necrotizing fasciitis in a single center: the emergence of Gram-negative bacteria as a common pathogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Yahav

    2014-11-01

    Conclusions: In our center, 42% of monomicrobial necrotizing fasciitis cases were found to be caused by Gram-negative organisms, mostly E. coli. These infections usually appeared in immunocompromised or postoperative patients, often presented with normal CPK levels, and were associated with high mortality rates.

  7. Necrotizing Fasciitis in a Pediatric Patient Caused by Lancefield Group G Streptococcus: Case Report and Brief Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Rausch

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of necrotizing fasciitis with an accompanying toxic shock syndrome caused by Group G Streptococcus in a pediatric patient with a lymphatic malformation. Pediatricians need to be aware of the possibility of such infections, especially in those with vascular/lymphatic malformations, as early treatment is critical for survival.

  8. Retroperitoneal necrotizing fasciitis presenting with peritonism in a 33-year-old Nepalese man: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giri Smith

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Retroperitoneal necrotizing fasciitis is a rare, fulminant, and potentially lethal complication of intra-abdominal suppuration. A retroperitoneal origin is very rare and very few cases have been reported in the literature. To the best of our knowledge, this case is only the fourth case reported of successful management following retroperitoneal necrotizing fasciitis. Case presentation A 33-year-old Tamang man presented to our facility with a history of five days of fever and vomiting and eight days of severe left loin pain. On examination, he had features of peritonism. A laparotomy was performed, revealing extensive necrotizing fasciitis of the retroperitoneum extending to the anterior abdominal wall. Our patient survived following extensive debridement of the necrotic tissues and supportive care. Conclusions Retroperitoneal necrotizing fasciitis can rarely present with features of peritonism, and hence should be included as a possible differential diagnosis for anyone presenting with peritonism. Although a fatal condition, early intervention and aggressive management can save the life of a patient.

  9. Decreased necrotizing fasciitis capacity caused by a single nucleotide mutation that alters a multiple gene virulence axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Randall J; Sitkiewicz, Izabela; Ayeras, Ara A; Gonulal, Vedia E; Cantu, Concepcion; Beres, Stephen B; Green, Nicole M; Lei, Benfang; Humbird, Tammy; Greaver, Jamieson; Chang, Ellen; Ragasa, Willie P; Montgomery, Charles A; Cartwright, Joiner; McGeer, Allison; Low, Donald E; Whitney, Adeline R; Cagle, Philip T; Blasdel, Terry L; DeLeo, Frank R; Musser, James M

    2010-01-12

    Single-nucleotide changes are the most common cause of natural genetic variation among members of the same species, but there is remarkably little information bearing on how they alter bacterial virulence. We recently discovered a single-nucleotide mutation in the group A Streptococcus genome that is epidemiologically associated with decreased human necrotizing fasciitis ("flesh-eating disease"). Working from this clinical observation, we find that wild-type mtsR function is required for group A Streptococcus to cause necrotizing fasciitis in mice and nonhuman primates. Expression microarray analysis revealed that mtsR inactivation results in overexpression of PrsA, a chaperonin involved in posttranslational maturation of SpeB, an extracellular cysteine protease. Isogenic mutant strains that overexpress prsA or lack speB had decreased secreted protease activity in vivo and recapitulated the necrotizing fasciitis-negative phenotype of the DeltamtsR mutant strain in mice and monkeys. mtsR inactivation results in increased PrsA expression, which in turn causes decreased SpeB secreted protease activity and reduced necrotizing fasciitis capacity. Thus, a naturally occurring single-nucleotide mutation dramatically alters virulence by dysregulating a multiple gene virulence axis. Our discovery has broad implications for the confluence of population genomics and molecular pathogenesis research.

  10. Do changes in dynamic plantar pressure distribution, strength capacity and postural control after intra-articular calcaneal fracture correlate with clinical and radiological outcome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschmüller, Anja; Konstantinidis, Lukas; Baur, Heiner; Müller, Steffen; Mehlhorn, Alexander; Kontermann, Julia; Grosse, Ulrich; Südkamp, N P; Helwig, Peter

    2011-10-01

    Fractures of the calcaneus are often associated with serious permanent disability, a considerable reduction in quality of life, and high socio-economic cost. Although some studies have already reported changes in plantar pressure distribution after calcaneal fracture, no investigation has yet focused on the patient's strength and postural control. 60 patients with unilateral, operatively treated, intra-articular calcaneal fractures were clinically and biomechanically evaluated >1 year postoperatively (physical examination, SF-36, AOFAS score, lower leg isokinetic strength, postural control and gait analysis including plantar pressure distribution). Results were correlated to clinical outcome and preoperative radiological findings (Böhler angle, Zwipp and Sanders Score). Clinical examination revealed a statistically significant reduction in range of motion at the tibiotalar and the subtalar joint on the affected side. Additionally, there was a statistically significant reduction of plantar flexor peak torque of the injured compared to the uninjured limb (pvs. 7.6±2.1s, pstrength differences and the clinical questionnaires (CC 0.27-0.4) as well as between standing duration and the clinical questionnaires. Although thigh circumference was also reduced on the injured side, there was no important relationship between changes in lower leg circumference and strength suggesting that measurement of leg circumference may not be a valid assessment of maximum strength deficits. Self-selected walking speed was the parameter that showed the best correlation with clinical outcome (AOFAS score). Calcaneal fractures are associated with a significant reduction in ankle joint ROM, plantar flexion strength and postural control. These impairments seem to be highly relevant to the patients. Restoration of muscular strength and proprioception should therefore be aggressively addressed in the rehabilitation process after these fractures. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  11. [Complicated diverticular disease debuting as necrotising fasciitis of pelvic limb. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos-Sierra, Cuauhtly; Gutiérrez-Alfaro, Claudia; Evaristo-Méndez, Gerardo

    Diverticular disease, and the diverticulitis, the main complication of it, are widely studied diseases with multiple chronic cases reported in the literature, but there are no atypical presentations with extra-abdominal symptoms coupled with seemingly unrelated entities, such as necrotising fasciitis. Female 52 years old, was admitted to the emergency department with back pain of 22 days duration. History of importance: Chronic use of benzodiazepines intramuscularly. Physical examination revealed the presence of a gluteal abscess in right pelvic limb with discoloration, as well as peri-lesional cellulitis and crepitus that stretches across the back of the limb. Fasciotomy was performed with debridement of necrotic tissue. Progression was torpid with crackling in abdomen. Computed tomography showed free air in the cavity, and on being surgically explored was found to be complicated diverticular disease. It is unusual for complicated diverticular disease to present with symptoms extra-peritoneal (diagnosis, which was evident with the crackling of the abdomen and abdominal computed tomography scan showing the parietal gaseous process. All necrotising fasciitis needs an abdominal computed tomography scan to look for abdominal diseases (in this case diverticulitis), as their overlapping presentation delays the diagnosis and consequently the treatment, making a fatal outcome inevitable. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  12. Idiopathic neonatal necrotising fasciitis caused by community-acquired MSSA encoding Panton Valentine Leukocidin genes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dunlop, Rebecca L E

    2012-02-01

    Neonatal necrotising fasciitis is very rare in comparison to the adult presentation of the disease and a Plastic Surgeon may only encounter one such case during his or her career. Often this is initially misdiagnosed and managed as simple cellulitis. It generally affects previously healthy babies, the site is often the lower back area and a history of minor skin trauma may be elicited. The causative organism is usually Streptococcus or polymicrobial, as is the case in the adult population. We present the case of a previously healthy 11-day-old infant with idiopathic, rapidly progressive necrotising fasciitis of the back, cause by Methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) infection. The strain was isolated and found to encode the Panton-Valentine Leukocidin genes, which have been associated with particularly severe necrotising infections in other sites, with high mortality. These strains are the subject of specific treatment and eradication guidance in the UK but awareness of this and the importance of obtaining detailed culture typing is likely to be low amongst Plastic Surgeons.

  13. Nodular fasciitis: an uncommon disease with common medical management challenges at a remote Naval Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinelli, Nicholas; Khorassani, Nima

    2013-09-01

    Nodular fasciitis is a rare benign soft tissue lesion that is often confused with malignant sarcoma, which can make management of this pathology challenging. We present here a case of head and neck nodular fasciitis that was managed at a remote U.S. Naval Hospital with limited diagnostic and therapeutic resources. The aim of this article is to bring to light this uncommon pathology so that it can be given its due consideration in the differential diagnosis from both a clinical and pathologic perspective. However, the more important purpose of this article is to highlight the complex decision-making process that sometimes occurs when evaluating patients within a medical infrastructure that is significantly less than that of a typical military treatment facility or U.S. hospital. Young surgeons and other providers may find this discussion useful before deploying, whether it be to a remote land-based facility or to an aircraft carrier. Reprint & Copyright © 2013 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  14. Streptococcal necrotizing fasciitis with toxic shock syndrome and rapid fatal outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kojić Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Streptococcal necrotizing fasciitis (NF is a serious soft tissue infection with rapid progression of inflammatory process among superficial or deep fascia, systemic host response to infection leading to toxic shock syndrome (TSS, and multiple organ failure. Lethality is high. Case Outline. A 46-year-old male without co-morbidities was admitted to the Emergency Department with redness, swelling and pain on his right lower leg. He became sick two day s ea rlier with m alaise, chills and shivering. On admission he was hypotensive, anuric, with erythematous rash on his face, neck and chest, with acute ren al failure and elevated creatine phosphokinase level. During the next several hours, the changes on his right lower leg rapidly spread to the whole leg, followed by skin destruction and subcutaneo us bleeding, indicating NF. Aggressive antimicrobial, supportive and symptom atic therapy was initiated immediately and on the same evening surgical intervention was performed. Despite these measures, a rapid development of severe TSS, with lethal outcome, occurred in less than 40 hours after the admission. Stre ptococcus pyogenes (group A β-hemolytic Streptococcus was isolated from the throat, skin and tissue obtained duri ng the surgery. Conclusion. Necrotizing fasciitis is a very serious disease with unpre dictable course. For that reason doctors must devote a great deal of a ttention to early, i.e. timely diagnosis of this disease, whose treatment with a multid isciplinary approach is very important.

  15. Clinical parameters and challenges of managing cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis in a Sub-Saharan tertiary hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeola A Olusanya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Necrotizing fasciitis is a severe soft tissue infection. In our environment, patients presenting with this infection are usually financially incapacitated and, therefore, their management can be challenging. This paper aimed to document the pattern and challenges encountered in the management of cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis (CNF in the University College Hospital, Ibadan. Materials and Methods: Information such as biodata, site of infection, systemic conditions, widest span of defect, management provided, hospital stay, and outcome of management was prospectively collected on all patients with CNF who presented at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery between January 2007 and December 2013. The patients were managed according to a devised protocol of antibiotic therapy, serial debridement and honey dressings. Results: Twenty-four cases of CNF were seen. There were 9 males and 15 females while 70.9% of the patients belonged to the low socioeconomic class. The mean span of wound defect was 12.2 (±8.844 cm. The mean hospital stay was 27.8 (±23.1 days, and scar formation was the most common complication encountered. Conclusion: Our study represents the largest series of CNF from a Nigerian health facility presently. The management of necrotizing fascitis in the maxillofacial region poses a significant challenge to both the surgeon and the patient. However, the mortality rate of CNF in our center appears comparatively low.

  16. Fascitis necrosante bilateral: a propósito de un caso Bilateral necrotizing fasciitis: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Fernández Gómez

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available La fascitis necrosante es una enfermedad de origen infeccioso que afecta a la fascia muscular y progresa rápidamente. Para el manejo de este tipo de pacientes es clave un diagnóstico precoz y un tratamiento adecuado que combine antibioticoterapia y cirugía. Presentamos el caso de una paciente de 77 años de edad con diagnóstico de fascitis necrosante de presentación atípica por la bilateralidad de las lesiones, la ausencia de factores predisponentes y la presencia de un único germen causal.Necrotizing fasciitis is an infectious disease that involves muscular fascia and has a quickly progress. Early diagnosis and proper treatment that consists on antibiotic therapy and surgery are the key of patient management. We report the case of a 77 years old oman with necrotizing fasciitis diagnosis with atypical presentation due to bilateral skin lesions, lack of risk factors and only one germ as causal pathogen.

  17. Emphysematous Pyelonephritis Presenting as Necrotizing Fasciitis of the Leg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Xiong Ye

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a 50-year-old man with poorly controlled diabetes mellitus who presented with a painful, swollen right leg. He had also experienced right flank pain for 1 week prior to admission. Physical examination was notable for tenderness over the right flank. The right leg was diffusely swollen and exquisitely tender to touch, with palpable crepitance. Laboratory tests revealed leukocytosis and pyuria. Computed tomography showed a right ureteral stone with hydronephrosis and characteristic findings of emphysematous pyelonephritis. Furthermore, a right perirenal gas-forming abscess with extension to the right leg was noted. The patient was successfully treated with antibiotic therapy, aggressive control of blood sugar, percutaneous drainage of the hydronephrosis and perirenal abscess, and aggressive debridement of the leg.

  18. Effect of gender, age and anthropometric variables on plantar fascia thickness at different locations in asymptomatic subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pascual Huerta, Javier [Department of Podiatry, Universidad Europea de Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: javier.pascual@uem.es; Alarcon Garcia, Juan Maria [Ultrasound Unit, Hospital Nuestra Senora de America, Madrid (Spain)

    2007-06-15

    Purpose: The study was aimed to investigate plantar fascia thickness at different locations in healthy asymptomatic subjects and its relationship to the following variables: weight, height, sex and age. Material and methods: The study evaluates 96 feet of healthy asymptomatic volunteers. The plantar fascia thickness was measured at four different locations: 1 cm proximal to the insertion of the plantar fascia, at the insertion of the plantar fascia on the calcaneus and separate out 1 cm + 2 cm distal to the insertion. A 10 MHz linear-array transducer was used. Results: There were statistically significant differences in plantar fascia thickness at the four different locations (p < 0.001) although no differences in PF thickness were found between the two distal from insertion locations (1 and 2 cm). Multiple regression analysis showed sex as independent predictor of plantar fascia thickness at 1 cm proximal to the insertion. At origin and 1 cm distal to insertion weight was an independent predictor of plantar fascia thickness. Conclusions: There are differences of thickness at different locations of plantar fascia measured by ultrasonography. Thickness at 1 cm proximal to the insertion is influenced by sex and thickness at origin and at 1 cm distal to the insertion has a direct relationship with body weight. This could be attributed to the overloading effect that weight has on plantar fascia in healthy symptomatic subjects at these two locations. Height and age did not seem to influence as independent variables in plantar fascia thickness among non-painful subjects.

  19. Is the distribution of plantar forces associated with different types of feet?

    OpenAIRE

    Azevedo, Liliana Aparecida P.; Nascimento, Luiz Fernando C.

    2009-01-01

    OBJETIVO: Quantificar as forças e mensurar o arco longitudinal medial em pés de escolares. MÉTODOS: Estudo transversal envolvendo escolares da primeira série do ensino fundamental de uma escola pública de Guaratinguetá (SP). Para identificar a distribuição das pressões plantares, foram utilizadas duas plataformas de força e a impressão plantar em papel para mensurar o arco longitudinal medial. Compararam-se as forças plantares da porção medial e lateral e as forças plantares da região anterio...

  20. The relationship of pes planus and calcaneal spur to plantar heel pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prichasuk, S; Subhadrabandhu, T

    1994-09-01

    A prospective study of pes planus by using calcaneal pitch and calcaneal spur was carried out in 82 patients with plantar heel pain and in 400 normal subjects. The mean normal calcaneal pitch was 20.54 degrees. The mean calcaneal pitch in patients with plantar heel pain was 15.99 degrees, which was significantly lower than in normal subjects. The incidence of calcaneal spur in normal subjects and in patients with plantar heel pain was 15.5% percent (62 of 400) and 65.9% (54 of 82), respectively. Again, this was a highly significant difference. Excessive weight gain, aging, and gender may be important factors effecting the lowering of the pitch and the increasing of spur formation. These factors could lead to the development of plantar heel pain.

  1. Posttraumatic pseudoaneurysm of medial plantar artery in a child: treatment with percutaneous thrombin injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrício Neto Ladeira

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Pseudoaneurysms of the medial plantar artery are rare. The authors describe a case of a pseudoaneurysm of the medial plantar artery of a child who had suffered a penetrating laceration injury. Diagnosis can be confirmed using Doppler ultrasound and magnetic resonance angiography. As an alternative to the conventional surgery technique, percutaneous Doppler ultrasound-guided thrombin injection is a safe and effective treatment.

  2. Plantar flexor neuromuscular adjustments following match-play football in hot and cool conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Girard, O; Nybo, Lars; Mohr, Magni

    2015-01-01

    explosive force production declined (P force development and soleus EMG activity rise values remained unchanged. In football, match-induced alterations in maximal and rapid......We assessed neuromuscular fatigue and recovery of the plantar flexors after playing football with or without severe heat stress. Neuromuscular characteristics of the plantar flexors were assessed in 17 male players at baseline and ∼30 min, 24, and 48 h after two 90-min football matches in temperate...

  3. How to classify plantar plate injuries: parameters from history and physical examination

    OpenAIRE

    Nery, Caio; Coughlin, Michael; Baumfeld, Daniel; Raduan, Fernando; Mann, Tania Szejnfeld; Catena, Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To find the best clinical parameters for defining and classifying the degree of plantar plate injuries. METHOD: Sixty-eight patients (100 metatarsophalangeal joints) were classified in accordance with the Arthroscopic Anatomical Classification for plantar plate injuries and were divided into five groups (0 to IV). Their medical files were reviewed and the incidence of each parameter for the respective group was correlated. These parameters were: use of high heels, sport...

  4. Contributions of foot muscles and plantar fascia morphology to foot posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angin, Salih; Mickle, Karen J; Nester, Christopher J

    2018-01-27

    The plantar foot muscles and plantar fascia differ between different foot postures. However, how each individual plantar structure contribute to foot posture has not been explored. The purpose of this study was to investigate the associations between static foot posture and morphology of plantar foot muscles and plantar fascia and thus the contributions of these structures to static foot posture. A total of 111 participants were recruited, 43 were classified as having pes planus and 68 as having normal foot posture using Foot Posture Index assessment tool. Images from the flexor digitorum longus (FDL), flexor hallucis longus (FHL), peroneus longus and brevis (PER), flexor hallucis brevis (FHB), flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) and abductor hallucis (AbH) muscles, and the calcaneal (PF1), middle (PF2) and metatarsal (PF3) regions of the plantar fascia were obtained using a Venue 40 ultrasound system with a 5-13 MHz transducer. In order of decreasing contribution, PF3 > FHB > FHL > PER > FDB were all associated with FPI and able to explain 69% of the change in FPI scores. PF3 was the highest contributor explaining 52% of increases in FPI score. Decreased thickness was associated with increased FPI score. Smaller cross sectional area (CSA) in FHB and PER muscles explained 20% and 8% of increase in FPI score. Larger CSA of FDB and FHL muscles explained 4% and 14% increase in FPI score respectively. The medial plantar structures and the plantar fascia appear to be the major contributors to static foot posture. Elucidating the individual contribution of multiple muscles of the foot could provide insight about their role in the foot posture. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Analysis of modifications of the plantar parameters after the use of a proprioceptive insole: regular gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobili, Carlotta O; Mannacio, Elena; Ciccarelli, Antonello; Tajani, Filippo; Ripani, Maurizio

    2017-10-27

    The human foot is the basis of support and propulsion for gait and it provides support and flexibility for effective weight transfer. Therefore a correct distribution of loads and pressures on the surface of the foot is of fundamental importance to ensure a correct walking and maintaining balance in both static and dynamic conditions. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effects of innovative insoles, named Regular Gait, on plantar pressures distribution during standing position and walking in healthy subjects; therefore, we investigated whether these effects are maintained after insole removing. 50 subjects were tested; these were free of foot diseases or damage to the anatomical structures involved in the processes above posture. These subjects underwent rating scales and static and dynamic baropodometric examination before and after using Regular Gait. The results obtained shown that the Regular Gait, for as we have designed, are able to change the distribution of the parameters both in static and dynamic conditions. We have also shown that the best results were obtained only after a month of treatment with Regular Gait and that the results obtained persist even in the tests post-treatment without insoles. In conclusion, the data obtained in this study suggest that Regular Gait could be efficient in acting on parameters related to maintenance of upright posture and gait. This would allow the treated subjects to improve their posture both while walking and during the maintenance of the upright position.

  6. Plantar-flexion of the ankle joint complex in terminal stance is initiated by subtalar plantar-flexion: A bi-planar fluoroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Seungbum; Lee, Kyoung Min; Cha, Young Joo

    2015-10-01

    Gross motion of the ankle joint complex (AJC) is a summation of the ankle and subtalar joints. Although AJC kinematics have been widely used to evaluate the function of the AJC, the coordinated movements of the ankle and subtalar joints are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to accurately quantify the individual kinematics of the ankle and subtalar joints in the intact foot during ground walking by using a bi-planar fluoroscopic system. Bi-planar fluoroscopic images of the foot and ankle during walking and standing were acquired from 10 healthy subjects. The three-dimensional movements of the tibia, talus, and calcaneus were calculated with a three-dimensional/two-dimensional registration method. The skeletal kinematics were quantified from 9% to 86% of the full stance phase because of the limited camera speed of the X-ray system. At the beginning of terminal stance, plantar-flexion of the AJC was initiated in the subtalar joint on average at 75% ranging from 62% to 76% of the stance phase, and plantar-flexion of the ankle joint did not start until 86% of the stance phase. The earlier change to plantar-flexion in the AJC than the ankle joint due to the early plantar-flexion in the subtalar joint was observed in 8 of the 10 subjects. This phenomenon could be explained by the absence of direct muscle insertion on the talus. Preceding subtalar plantar-flexion could contribute to efficient and stable ankle plantar-flexion by locking the midtarsal joint, but this explanation needs further investigation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Integrated kinematics-kinetics-plantar pressure data analysis: a useful tool for characterizing diabetic foot biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawacha, Zimi; Guarneri, Gabriella; Cristoferi, Giuseppe; Guiotto, Annamaria; Avogaro, Angelo; Cobelli, Claudio

    2012-05-01

    The fundamental cause of lower-extremity complications in diabetes is chronic hyperglycemia leading to diabetic foot ulcer pathology. While the relationship between abnormal plantar pressure distribution and plantar ulcers has been widely investigated, little is known about the role of shear stress. Moreover, the mutual relationship among plantar pressure, shear stress, and abnormal kinematics in the etiology of diabetic foot has not been established. This lack of knowledge is determined by the lack of commercially available instruments which allow such a complex analysis. This study aims to develop a method for the simultaneous assessment of kinematics, kinetics, and plantar pressure on foot subareas of diabetic subjects by means of combining three commercial systems. Data were collected during gait on 24 patients (12 controls and 12 diabetic neuropathics) with a motion capture system synchronized with two force plates and two baropodometric systems. A four segment three-dimensional foot kinematics model was adopted for the subsegment angles estimation together with a three segment model for the plantar sub-area definition during gait. The neuropathic group exhibited significantly excessive plantar pressure, ground reaction forces on each direction, and a reduced loading surface on the midfoot subsegment (p<0.04). Furthermore the same subsegment displayed excessive dorsiflexion, external rotation, and eversion (p<0.05). Initial results showed that this methodology may enable a more appropriate characterization of patients at risk of foot ulcerations, and help planning prevention programs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Plantar-plate disruptions: "the severe turf-toe injury." three cases in contact athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drakos, Mark C; Fiore, Russell; Murphy, Conor; DiGiovanni, Christopher W

    2015-05-01

    To present 3 cases of plantar-plate rupture and turf-toe injury in contact athletes at 1 university and to discuss appropriate diagnosis and treatment algorithms for each case. Turf toe is a common injury in athletes participating in outdoor cutting sports. However, it has been used as an umbrella term to describe many different injuries of the great toe. In some cases, the injury can be so severe that the plantar plate and sesamoid apparatus may be ruptured. These patients may be better managed with surgery than with traditional nonoperative interventions. Turf toe, plantar-plate disruption, sesamoid fracture. For stable injuries in which the plantar plate is not completely disrupted, nonoperative treatment with casting or a stiff-soled shoe, gradual weight bearing, and rehabilitation is the best practice. Unstable injuries require surgical intervention and plantar-plate repair. Turf toe and injury to the first metatarsophalangeal joint are relatively common injuries in athletes, but few researchers have detailed the operative and nonoperative treatments of plantar-plate disruption in these patients. We examine 3 cases that occurred over 4 seasons on a collegiate football team. Turf toe represents a wide array of pathologic conditions involving the first metatarsophalangeal joint. Stress and instability testing are key components to assess in determining whether surgical intervention is warranted to restore optimal function. Stiffer-soled shoes or shoes with steel-plate insertions may help to prevent these injuries and are useful tools for protection during the rehabilitation period.

  9. [The design of plantar pressure distribution monitoring system and preliminary clinical application].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xianfeng; Zhao, Zilei; Xu, Donghao; Xu, Dongming

    2014-04-01

    Plantar pressure distribution can reflect the force of several key points on foot while standing and walking. A comprehensive understanding of the plantar pressure distribution makes great sense in the following aspects: the understanding of the normal foot biomechanics and function, clinical diagnosis, measurement of disease extent, postoperative efficacy evaluation, and rehabilitation research. A simple plantar pressure measurement device was designed in this study. This paper uses FlexiForce flexible sensor to pickup plantar pressure signal and USB A/D board to do data acquisition. The data are transferred into a laptop and processed by a VB-based software which can display, remember and replay the data. We chose patients with hallux valgus and normal people to measure the pressure distribution and make contrast analysis of plantar pressure with this device. It can be concluded that people with hallux valgus have higher pressure on the second metatarsophalangeal joint and the distribution move outward. The plantar pressure of patients postoperative could be greatly improved compared to the preoperative. The function of this device has been confirmed.

  10. Diabetic foot ulcer incidence in relation to plantar pressure magnitude and measurement location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledoux, William R; Shofer, Jane B; Cowley, Matthew S; Ahroni, Jessie H; Cohen, Victoria; Boyko, Edward J

    2013-01-01

    We prospectively examined the relationship between site-specific peak plantar pressure (PPP) and ulcer risk. Researchers have previously reported associations between diabetic foot ulcer and elevated plantar foot pressure, but the effect of location-specific pressures has not been studied. Diabetic subjects (n=591) were enrolled from a single VA hospital. Five measurements of in-shoe plantar pressure were collected using F-Scan. Pressures were measured at 8 areas: heel, lateral midfoot, medial midfoot, first metatarsal, second through fourth metatarsal, fifth metatarsal, hallux, and other toes. The relationship between incident plantar foot ulcer and PPP or pressure-time integral (PTI) was assessed using Cox regression. During follow-up (2.4years), 47 subjects developed plantar ulcers (10 heel, 12 metatarsal, 19 hallux, 6 other). Overall mean PPP was higher for ulcer subjects (219 vs. 194kPa), but the relationship differed by site (the metatarsals with ulcers had higher pressure, while the opposite was true for the hallux and heel). A statistical analysis was not performed on the means, but hazard ratios from a Cox survival analysis were nonsignificant for PPP across all sites and when adjusted for location. However, when the metatarsals were considered separately, higher baseline PPP was significantly associated with greater ulcer risk; at other sites, this relationship was nonsignificant. Hazard ratios for all PTI data were nonsignificant. Location must be considered when assessing the relationship between PPP and plantar ulceration. © 2013.

  11. Can plantar soft tissue mechanics enhance prognosis of diabetic foot ulcer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naemi, R; Chatzistergos, P; Suresh, S; Sundar, L; Chockalingam, N; Ramachandran, A

    2017-04-01

    To investigate if the assessment of the mechanical properties of plantar soft tissue can increase the accuracy of predicting Diabetic Foot Ulceration (DFU). 40 patients with diabetic neuropathy and no DFU were recruited. Commonly assessed clinical parameters along with plantar soft tissue stiffness and thickness were measured at baseline using ultrasound elastography technique. 7 patients developed foot ulceration during a 12months follow-up. Logistic regression was used to identify parameters that contribute to predicting the DFU incidence. The effect of using parameters related to the mechanical behaviour of plantar soft tissue on the specificity, sensitivity, prediction strength and accuracy of the predicting models for DFU was assessed. Patients with higher plantar soft tissue thickness and lower stiffness at the 1st Metatarsal head area showed an increased risk of DFU. Adding plantar soft tissue stiffness and thickness to the model improved its specificity (by 3%), sensitivity (by 14%), prediction accuracy (by 5%) and prognosis strength (by 1%). The model containing all predictors was able to effectively (χ 2 (8, N=40)=17.55, P<0.05) distinguish between the patients with and without DFU incidence. The mechanical properties of plantar soft tissue can be used to improve the predictability of DFU in moderate/high risk patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Saccadic Eye Movement Improves Plantar Sensation and Postural Balance in Elderly Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Youngsook

    2016-06-01

    Vision, proprioception and plantar sensation contribute to the control of postural balance (PB). Reduced plantar sensation alters postural response and is at an increased risk of fall, and eye movements reduce the postural sway. Therefore, the aim of this study was to study the improvement of plantar sensation and PB after saccadic eye movement (SEM) and pursuit eye movement (PEM) in community-dwelling elderly women. Participants (104 females; 75.11 ± 6.25 years) were randomly allocated into the SEM group (n = 52) and PEM groups (n = 52). The SEM group performed eye fixation and SEM for 5 minutes, and the PEM group performed eye fixation and PEM for 5 minutes. The plantar sensation was measured according to the plantar surface area of the feet in contact with the floor surface before and after the intervention. Before and after SEM and PEM with the eyes open and closed, PB was measured as the area (mm(2)), length (cm), and velocity (cm/s) of the fluctuation of the center of pressure (COP). The plantar sensation of both feet improved in both groups (p elderly women, with greater PB improvement after SEM.

  13. Unilateral sequential endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy for palmar hyperhidrosis: a proposed technique to overcome compensatory hyperhidrosis and improve plantar hyperhidrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Tamer; Soliman, Mosaad

    2015-05-01

    Although endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy (ETS) offers permanent cure of palmar hyperhidrosis (PH), compensatory hyperhidrosis (CH) often complicates the procedure. We analyzed the outcomes of a 2-month interval for unilateral sequential ETS (S-ETS) in comparison with simultaneous bilateral ETS (B-ETS), notably regarding CH and associated plantar hyperhidrosis, in treating patients with PH. Four hundred seven patients with intractable PH were randomly assigned into two groups: the B-ETS group (204 patients) and the S-ETS group (203 patients). Three hundred sixty-four patients completed the study. Complication rates were comparable for both groups. No patient died perioperatively, and no conversion was necessary. Treatment success on follow-up was 97.2% for S-ETS and 96.7% for B-ETS. The incidence of CH was decreased substantially from 131 (71.1%) patients in the B-ETS group to 22 (12.2%) patients in the S-ETS group (Phyperhidrosis.

  14. Fixation of lapidus arthrodesis with a plantar interfragmentary screw and medial locking plate: a report of 88 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottom, James M; Vora, Anand M

    2013-01-01

    Lapidus arthrodesis is a powerful procedure that can be used to correct pathologic features within the forefoot or midfoot. Many different methods of fixation for this procedure have been reported. The use of plating constructs has been shown to provide increased stability compared with screw-only constructs. The technique we have described consists of a plantar to dorsal retrograde lag screw across the arthrodesis site, coupled with a low-profile medial locking plate. A total of 88 consecutive patients were treated with this modification of the Lapidus procedure by 2 surgeons and were retrospectively evaluated. All patients followed an early postoperative weightbearing protocol. Patient age, gender, follow-up duration, interval to weightbearing and radiographic fusion, preoperative and postoperative intermetatarsal angle, hardware removal, preoperative and postoperative American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society midfoot scores, and adjunct procedures were analyzed. The mean follow-up period was 16.76 ± 5.9 (range 12 to 36) months, and all healed fusions demonstrated radiographic union at a mean of 51 ± 19.1 (range 40 to 89) days. The patients were treated with weightbearing starting a mean of 10.90 ± 4.1 (range 5 to 28) days postoperatively. Complications included 15 patients (17%) requiring hardware removal, 2 cases (2%) of hallux varus, 6 cases (7%) of radiographic recurrent hallux valgus, and 2 patients (2%) with first metatarsocuneiform nonunion. The results of the present study have demonstrated that plantar lag screw fixation with medial locking plate augmentation for Lapidus arthrodesis allows for early weightbearing with satisfactory outcomes, improved clinical and radiographic alignment, and improved American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society scores. Copyright © 2013 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [Necrotizing fasciitis and cellulitis of the upper limb resulting from centipede bite: two case reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzel, A-P; Steinmann, G; Bertino, R; Korsaga, A

    2009-10-01

    Centipede bites occurring in tropical countries are rare, however vigilance must be exercised during activities in the open air and dwellings should be checked in the event of rain. The bite is very painful and can be accompanied by generalised signs. An initial wound disinfection and a check of antitetanus vaccination status is all that is usually needed to ensure an uneventful outcome. There are however, rare cases where local toxicity and a bacterial super-infection, often with Gram+ cocci, can lead to a cellulitis or even necrotizing fasciitis of the hand. The diagnosis of a centipede bite can be made by the double marks made by the fangs. Wound debridement and antibiotics led to a good outcome in both our cases.

  16. Abdominal wall necrotizing fasciitis from dislodged percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tubes: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Alexandra A; Miller, George; Bamboat, Zubin M; Hiotis, Karen

    2004-09-01

    We report three cases of abdominal wall necrotizing fasciitis that occurred as a result of leakage from displaced percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tubes. This is the first report of such a series. Patients underwent extensive operative excisions of their abdominal walls down to their posterior fascia. All patients tolerated their initial surgery, however, two patients ultimately expired from respiratory complications. The surviving patient underwent multiple repeat debridements and reconstructive abdominal wall surgery. We review the epidemiology of patients at risk for this complication and discuss its presentation, as well as the appropriate workup and management. We also address the issues of closure of large abdominal wall defects and future alimentation in this patient group. Finally, abdominal wall necrotizing faciitis from gastrostomy tube leakage is a devastating complication, and the development of preventative strategies for patients at risk is of paramount importance.

  17. Fulminant limb and retroperitoneal necrotizing fasciitis in a 15-year-old girl with Fanconi anaemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Regan, Kevin

    2012-01-31

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is an uncommon soft-tissue infection in children that carries a high mortality rate. We present a 15-year-old girl with chronic pancytopenia secondary to Fanconi anaemia who developed extensive NF of the lower limb, which unfortunately resulted in a fatal outcome. Immunodeficiency is a known risk factor for the development of this condition. The findings in this case demonstrate that patients with Fanconi anaemia may be susceptible to NF and that the clinical course may be more aggressive due to underlying immunosuppression. Prompt diagnosis of NF is vital in order to initiate appropriate treatment and to optimize patient outcome. Radiological investigation demonstrated extensive soft-tissue gas and destruction affecting the entire lower limb, abdominal wall and retroperitoneum, which led to timely definitive diagnosis and management.

  18. Bilateral periorbital necrotizing fasciitis following exposure to Holi colors: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chauhan Deepender

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Holi festival is celebrated in India traditionally by applying colors on one another. Various ocular adverse effects of these colors have been reported including conjunctivitis and corneal abrasion. We report a case of bilateral periorbital necrotizing fasciitis, following exposure to Holi colors. General physicians might encounter more such cases after exposure to Holi colors. In India, these colors are prepared on a small scale and lack any quality checks. Use of such toxic colors should be discouraged, and all doctors should caution people against using synthetic dyes. This case report highlights the need to put manufacturing of Holi colors under guidelines of the Food and Drug Cosmetic Act and the Bureau of Indian Standards.

  19. Epinephrine auto-injection radically increases risk for clostridial infection and necrotizing fasciitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Larson

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Clostridial perfringens is a bacteria commonly found on skin flora. Due to the optimal growth environment intramuscular epinephrine injections predispose patients to the rapid development of clostridial myonecrosis. There have been only four cases, including this one, reported in the last 60 years of pediatric Clostridium perfringens infections post-epinephrine injection. We detail the successful management of a 16 year old, immunocompetent female who developed gas gangrene and necrotizing fasciitis on her thigh secondary to clostridial infection after utilization of an Epinephrine Auto-Injector and review the pediatric literature of patients with Clostridial perfringens secondary to epinephrine injection. We define common clinical signs and symptoms of clostridial infection from the review of the literature. The relevance of our findings is to raise awareness among emergency physicians when patients present following an injection in order to reduce diagnostic delay that could result in amputation or death.

  20. Fulminant limb and retroperitoneal necrotizing fasciitis in a 15-year-old girl with Fanconi anaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Regan, Kevin; Maher, Michael M. [Mercy University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Cork (Ireland); Cork University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Cork (Ireland); O' Mahony, Edward; MacEneaney, Peter; Fitzgerald, Edward [Mercy University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Cork (Ireland)

    2009-10-15

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is an uncommon soft-tissue infection in children that carries a high mortality rate. We present a 15-year-old girl with chronic pancytopenia secondary to Fanconi anaemia who developed extensive NF of the lower limb, which unfortunately resulted in a fatal outcome. Immunodeficiency is a known risk factor for the development of this condition. The findings in this case demonstrate that patients with Fanconi anaemia may be susceptible to NF and that the clinical course may be more aggressive due to underlying immunosuppression. Prompt diagnosis of NF is vital in order to initiate appropriate treatment and to optimize patient outcome. Radiological investigation demonstrated extensive soft-tissue gas and destruction affecting the entire lower limb, abdominal wall and retroperitoneum, which led to timely definitive diagnosis and management. (orig.)

  1. CT imaging of necrosive fasciitis; CT-Bildgebung der nekrotisierenden Fasziitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulze, M.; Overkamp, D.; Joanoviciu, S.; Horger, M.

    2008-07-15

    NF is a rare but dramatic and often fatal infection of the fascii and adjoining soft tissues. Contrary to the Fournier's definition, it is most common in elderly people. Patients with immune problems have a higher risk (e.g. Diabetes mellitus, alcohol or drug abuse, AIDS, leukaemia, chemotherapy and immunosuppressive medication). Predisposition factors are diverticulitis, insect bites, or surgical interventions (Uppot RN, Levy HM, PLatel PH, Radiology 2003; 226; 115; Wysoki MG, Santora TA, Shah RM et al. Necrotizing fasciitis: CT characteristics, Radiology 1997; 203;859). Men are affected more frequently than women. In principle, NF may occur everywhere in the body but incidence in the region of the scrotum, perineum and lower extremities are the most common. (orig.)

  2. Fulminant limb and retroperitoneal necrotizing fasciitis in a 15-year-old girl with Fanconi anaemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Regan, Kevin

    2009-10-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is an uncommon soft-tissue infection in children that carries a high mortality rate. We present a 15-year-old girl with chronic pancytopenia secondary to Fanconi anaemia who developed extensive NF of the lower limb, which unfortunately resulted in a fatal outcome. Immunodeficiency is a known risk factor for the development of this condition. The findings in this case demonstrate that patients with Fanconi anaemia may be susceptible to NF and that the clinical course may be more aggressive due to underlying immunosuppression. Prompt diagnosis of NF is vital in order to initiate appropriate treatment and to optimize patient outcome. Radiological investigation demonstrated extensive soft-tissue gas and destruction affecting the entire lower limb, abdominal wall and retroperitoneum, which led to timely definitive diagnosis and management.

  3. Comparative Effectiveness of Plantar-Massage Techniques on Postural Control in Those With Chronic Ankle Instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikstrom, Erik A; Song, Kyeongtak; Lea, Ashley; Brown, Nastassia

    2017-07-01

      One of the major concerns after an acute lateral ankle sprain is the potential for development of chronic ankle instability (CAI). The existing research has determined that clinician-delivered plantar massage improves postural control in those with CAI. However, the effectiveness of self-administered treatments and the underlying cause of any improvements remain unclear.   To determine (1) the effectiveness of a self-administered plantar-massage treatment in those with CAI and (2) whether the postural-control improvements were due to the stimulation of the plantar cutaneous receptors.   Crossover study.   University setting.   A total of 20 physically active individuals (6 men and 14 women) with self-reported CAI.   All participants completed 3 test sessions involving 3 treatments: a clinician-delivered manual plantar massage, a patient-delivered self-massage with a ball, and a clinician-delivered sensory brush massage.   Postural control was assessed using single-legged balance with eyes open and the Star Excursion Balance Test.   Static postural control improved (P ≤ .014) after each of the interventions. However, no changes in dynamic postural control after any of the interventions were observed (P > .05). No differences were observed between a clinician-delivered manual plantar massage and either a patient-delivered self-massage with a ball or a clinician-delivered sensory brush massage in any postural-control outcome.   In those with CAI, single 5-minute sessions of traditional plantar massage, self-administered massage, and sensory brush massage each resulted in comparable static postural-control improvements. The results also provide empirical evidence suggesting that the mechanism for the postural-control improvements is the stimulation of the plantar cutaneous receptors.

  4. COMPARISON OF PLANTAR PRESSURE DISTRIBUTION BETWEEN DIFFERENT SPEED AND INCLINE DURING TREADMILL JOGGING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Ju Ho

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the effect of changes in speed and incline slope on plantar pressure distribution of the foot during treadmill jogging. Plantar pressure parameters were measured with the Pedar-X system in twenty healthy girls (mean age of 20.7 years, mean height of 1.60m, and a mean weight of 53.35kg. Because variations in walking speed or slope can significantly change the magnitude of plantar pressure, comparisons of plantar pressure distribution between the two independent protocols during treadmill jogging were considered in this study. First, the subjects ran at the same speed of 2 m·s-1 with different incline slopes of 0%, 5%, 10%, and 15%. Second, they ran on the same slope of 0% with different speeds of 1.5 m·s-1, 2.0 m·s-1, and 2.5 m·s-1. The peak pressure of the eight plantar surface areas, apart from the medial forefoot and the hallux, significantly increased (p < 0.05 with an increase of 33% of peak pressure from 1.5 m·s-1 to 2.5 m·s-1 (speed at heel region. In contrast, the peak pressures at the heel, medial fore-foot, toe and hallux decreased significantly (p < 0. 05 with increasing incline slope. At the heel, peak pressure reduced by 27% from 0% to 15% incline, however, pressure at the lateral midfoot region increased as following. Different speeds and incline slopes during jogging were associated with changes in plantar pressures. By systematic investigation of foot kinematics and plantar pressure during jogging with varying incline slope and speed, the results of this study provided further insight into foot biomechanics during jogging

  5. The Role of Arch Compression and Metatarsophalangeal Joint Dynamics in Modulating Plantar Fascia Strain in Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Kirsty A; Stearne, Sarah M; Alderson, Jacqueline A; North, Ian; Pires, Neville J; Rubenson, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Elastic energy returned from passive-elastic structures of the lower limb is fundamental in lowering the mechanical demand on muscles during running. The purpose of this study was to investigate the two length-modulating mechanisms of the plantar fascia, namely medial longitudinal arch compression and metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ) excursion, and to determine how these mechanisms modulate strain, and thus elastic energy storage/return of the plantar fascia during running. Eighteen runners (9 forefoot and 9 rearfoot strike) performed three treadmill running trials; unrestricted shod, shod with restricted arch compression (via an orthotic-style insert), and barefoot. Three-dimensional motion capture and ground reaction force data were used to calculate lower limb kinematics and kinetics including MPJ angles, moments, powers and work. Estimates of plantar fascia strain due to arch compression and MPJ excursion were derived using a geometric model of the arch and a subject-specific musculoskeletal model of the plantar fascia, respectively. The plantar fascia exhibited a typical elastic stretch-shortening cycle with the majority of strain generated via arch compression. This strategy was similar in fore- and rear-foot strike runners. Restricting arch compression, and hence the elastic-spring function of the arch, was not compensated for by an increase in MPJ-derived strain. In the second half of stance the plantar fascia was found to transfer energy between the MPJ (energy absorption) and the arch (energy production during recoil). This previously unreported energy transfer mechanism reduces the strain required by the plantar fascia in generating useful positive mechanical work at the arch during running.

  6. Plantar calcaneal spurs in older people: longitudinal traction or vertical compression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menz, Hylton B; Zammit, Gerard V; Landorf, Karl B; Munteanu, Shannon E

    2008-08-11

    Plantar calcaneal spurs are common, however their pathophysiology is poorly understood. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence and correlates of plantar calcaneal spurs in a large sample of older people. Weightbearing lateral foot radiographs of 216 people (140 women and 76 men) aged 62 to 94 years (mean age 75.9, SD 6.6) were examined for plantar calcaneal and Achilles tendon spurs. Associations between the presence of spurs and sex, body mass index, radiographic measures of foot posture, self-reported co-morbidities and current or previous heel pain were then explored. Of the 216 participants, 119 (55%) had at least one plantar calcaneal spur and 103 (48%) had at least one Achilles tendon spur. Those with plantar calcaneal spurs were more likely to have Achilles tendon spurs (odds ratio [OR] = 2.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2 to 3.5). Prevalence of spurs did not differ according to sex. Participants with plantar calcaneal spurs were more likely to be obese (OR = 7.9, 95% CI 3.6 to 17.0), report osteoarthritis (OR = 2.6, 95% CI 1.6 to 4.8) and have current or previous heel pain (OR = 4.6, 95% CI 2.3 to 9.4). No relationship was found between the presence of calcaneal spurs and radiographic measures of foot posture. Calcaneal spurs are common in older men and women and are related to obesity, osteoarthritis and current or previous heel pain, but are unrelated to radiographic measurements of foot posture. These findings support the theory that plantar calcaneal spurs may be an adaptive response to vertical compression of the heel rather than longitudinal traction at the calcaneal enthesis.

  7. Musculoskeletal and activity-related factors associated with plantar heel pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Justin; Burns, Joshua; Adams, Roger; Pappas, Evangelos; Crosbie, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Despite the prevalence and impact of plantar heel pain, its etiology remains poorly understood, and there is no consensus regarding optimum management. The identification of musculoskeletal factors related to the presence of plantar heel pain could lead to the development of better targeted intervention strategies and potentially improve clinical outcomes. The aim of this study was to investigate relationships between a number of musculoskeletal and activity-related measures and plantar heel pain. In total, 202 people with plantar heel pain and 70 asymptomatic control participants were compared on a variety of musculoskeletal and activity-related measures, including body mass index (BMI), foot and ankle muscle strength, calf endurance, ankle and first metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint range of motion, foot alignment, occupational standing time, exercise level, and generalized hypermobility. Following a comparison of groups for parity of age, analyses of covariance were performed to detect differences between the 2 groups for any of the variables measured. The plantar heel pain group displayed a higher BMI, reduced ankle dorsiflexion range of motion, reduced ankle evertor and toe flexor strength, and an altered inversion/eversion strength ratio. There were no differences between groups for foot alignment, dorsiflexor or invertor strength, ankle inversion or eversion range of motion, first MTP joint extension range of motion, generalized hypermobility, occupational standing time, or exercise level. Plantar heel pain is associated with higher BMI and reductions in some foot and ankle strength and flexibility measures. Although these factors could be either causal or consequential, they are all potentially modifiable and could be targeted in the management of plantar heel pain. Level III, comparative study. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Plantar calcaneal spurs in older people: longitudinal traction or vertical compression?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landorf Karl B

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plantar calcaneal spurs are common, however their pathophysiology is poorly understood. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence and correlates of plantar calcaneal spurs in a large sample of older people. Methods Weightbearing lateral foot radiographs of 216 people (140 women and 76 men aged 62 to 94 years (mean age 75.9, SD 6.6 were examined for plantar calcaneal and Achilles tendon spurs. Associations between the presence of spurs and sex, body mass index, radiographic measures of foot posture, self-reported co-morbidities and current or previous heel pain were then explored. Results Of the 216 participants, 119 (55% had at least one plantar calcaneal spur and 103 (48% had at least one Achilles tendon spur. Those with plantar calcaneal spurs were more likely to have Achilles tendon spurs (odds ratio [OR] = 2.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2 to 3.5. Prevalence of spurs did not differ according to sex. Participants with plantar calcaneal spurs were more likely to be obese (OR = 7.9, 95% CI 3.6 to 17.0, report osteoarthritis (OR = 2.6, 95% CI 1.6 to 4.8 and have current or previous heel pain (OR = 4.6, 95% CI 2.3 to 9.4. No relationship was found between the presence of calcaneal spurs and radiographic measures of foot posture. Conclusion Calcaneal spurs are common in older men and women and are related to obesity, osteoarthritis and current or previous heel pain, but are unrelated to radiographic measurements of foot posture. These findings support the theory that plantar calcaneal spurs may be an adaptive response to vertical compression of the heel rather than longitudinal traction at the calcaneal enthesis.

  9. Management of Necrotizing Fasciitis and Fecal Peritonitis following Ostomy Necrosis and Detachment by Using NPT and Flexi-Seal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahri Yetışır

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Management of necrotizing fasciitis and severe faecal peritonitis following ostomy in elderly patient with comorbid disease is challenging. We would like to report management of frozen Open Abdomen (OA with colonic fistula following ostomy necrosis and detachment in an elderly patient with comorbid disease and malignancy. 78-year-old woman with high stage rectum carcinoma was admitted to emergency department and underwent operation for severe peritonitis and sigmoid colonic perforation. Loop sigmoidostomy was performed. At postoperative 15th day, she was transferred to our clinic with necrotizing fasciitis and severe faecal peritonitis due to ostomy necrosis and detachment. Enteric effluent was removed from the OA wound by using the Flexi-Seal Fecal Management System (FMS (ConvaTec and pesser tube in deeply located colonic fistula in conjunction with Negative Pressure Therapy (NPT. Maturation of ostomy was facilitated by using second NPT on ostomy side. After source control, delayed abdominal closure was achieved by skin flap approximation.

  10. Long-Term Efficacy of Oxybutynin for Palmar and Plantar Hyperhidrosis in Children Younger than 14 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolosker, Nelson; Teivelis, Marcelo P; Krutman, Mariana; de Paula, Rafael P; Schvartsman, Claudio; Kauffman, Paulo; de Campos, José R M; Puech-Leão, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Oxybutynin for treating hyperhidrosis in children has been evaluated only in short-term studies. We aimed to investigate the long-term effects of oxybutynin in treating children with palmar and plantar hyperhidrosis who had not undergone surgery and who were monitored for at least 6 months (median 19.6 mos). A cohort of 97 patients was evaluated retrospectively, with particular attention to 59 children (ages 4-14 yrs) who were treated for longer than 6 months. Their quality of life (QOL) was evaluated using a validated clinical questionnaire before and after 6 weeks of pharmacologic therapy. A self-assessment of hyperhidrosis was performed after 6 weeks and after the last consultation. By their final office visit, more than 91% of the children with hyperhidrosis treated with oxybutynin experienced moderate or great improvement in their level of sweating and 94.9% experienced improvement in QOL. More than 90% of children reported improvement of hyperhidrosis at other sites. Dry mouth was the most common side effect. Oxybutynin appears to be an effective treatment option for children with hyperhidrosis, and positive results are maintained over the long term (median 19.6 mos). © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Management of hindlimb proximal suspensory desmopathy by neurectomy of the deep branch of the lateral plantar nerve and plantar fasciotomy: 155 horses (2003-2008).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, S; Murray, R

    2012-05-01

    Neurectomy of the deep branch of the lateral plantar nerve and plantar fasciotomy have become accepted as methods of treatment of proximal suspensory desmopathy (PSD), but there are limited long-term studies documenting the outcome. To describe long-term follow-up in horses with PSD alone or with other injuries contributing to lameness and poor performance, including complications, following neurectomy and fasciotomy. Follow-up information was acquired for 155 horses that had undergone neurectomy and fasciotomy for treatment of PSD between 2003 and 2008. Success was classified as a horse having been in full work for >1 year post operatively. Horses were divided into 3 groups on the basis of the results of clinical assessment and diagnostic analgesia. Horses in Group 1 had primary PSD and no other musculoskeletal problem. Horses in Group 2 had primary PSD in association with straight hock conformation and/or hyperextension of the metatarsophalangeal joint. Horses in Group 3 had PSD and other problems contributing to lameness or poor performance. In Group 1, 70 of 90 horses (77.8%) had a successful outcome, whereas in Group 3, 23 of 52 horses (44.2%) returned to full function for >1 year. Complications included iatrogenic damage to the plantar aspect of the suspensory ligament, seroma formation, residual curb-like swellings and the development of white hairs. All horses in Group 2 remained lame. There is a role for neurectomy of the deep branch of the lateral plantar nerve and plantar fasciotomy for long-term management of hindlimb PSD, but a prerequisite for successful management requires recognition of risk factors for poor outcome including conformation features of straight hock or fetlock hyperextension. © 2011 EVJ Ltd.

  12. Necrotizing fasciitis due to Vibrio cholerae non-O1/non-O139 after exposure to Austrian bathing sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirk, Sonja; Huhulescu, Steliana; Allerberger, Franz; Lepuschitz, Sarah; Rehak, Sonja; Weil, Sandra; Gschwandtner, Elisabeth; Hermann, Michael; Neuhold, Stephanie; Zoufaly, Alexander; Indra, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    We report on two cases of necrotizing fasciitis of the lower leg due to nontoxigenic Vibrio cholerae (V. cholerae). A 73-year-old woman (case 1) and an 80-year-old man (case 2) were hospitalized with symptoms of necrotizing fasciitis on July 18 and August 15, 2015, respectively. In both cases, symptoms started the day after swimming in local ponds. Swabs gained intraoperatively and a blood culture from the male patient, yielded V. cholerae non-O1/non-O139, negative for cholera toxin gene ctx and positive for hemolysin genes hlyA and hlyB. Water samples taken from pond A on August 17, 2015 (32 days after exposure of case 1) and from pond B on August 20, 2015 (7 days after exposure of case 2) yielded non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae in most-probable numbers of > 11,000 per 100 ml each. The occurrence of two cases of necrotizing fasciitis within a 1 month period related to two Austrian non-saline bathing waters, previously not known to harbor V. cholerae, is probably linked to the prevailing extreme weather conditions (heat wave, drought) this summer in Austria. While case 1 was discharged in good clinical condition after 73 days, case 2 died after four months of hospitalization. Public health authorities are challenged to assess the effects of long-term climate change on pathogen growth and survival in continental bodies of fresh water.

  13. Eosinophilic fasciitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... no known prevention. Alternative Names Shulman syndrome Images Superficial anterior muscles References Lee LA, Werth VP. Skin ... the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch). The information provided herein should ...

  14. Eosinophilic Fasciitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Study ALL NEWS > Resources First Aid Videos Figures 3D Models Images Infographics Audio Pronunciations The One-Page Manual of Health Quizzes ... Commentary ALL NEWS > Resources First Aid Videos Figures 3D Models Images Infographics Audio Pronunciations The One-Page Manual of Health Quizzes ...

  15. Plantar pressure asymmetry and risk of stress injuries in the foot of young soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Renato R; da Rocha, Emmanuel S; Franco, Pedro S; Carpes, Felipe P

    2017-03-01

    Asymmetries in the magnitude of plantar pressure are considered a risk factor for stress fracture of the fifth metatarsal in soccer athletes. To investigate the presence of plantar pressure asymmetries among young soccer athletes. Observational. Laboratory. Thirty young adolescents divided into a soccer player group (n = 15) or a matched control group (n = 15). Mean plantar pressure was determined for seven different regions of the foot. Data were compared between the preferred and non-preferred foot, and between the groups, during barefoot standing on a pressure mat system. Higher pressure was found in the hallux, 5th metatarsal and medial rearfoot of the non-preferred foot in the young soccer players. These asymmetries were not observed in the control group. Magnitudes of plantar pressure did not differ between the groups. Young soccer players present asymmetries in plantar pressure in the hallux, 5th metatarsal and medial rearfoot, with higher pressure observed in the non-preferred foot. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Can the Foot Posture Index or their individual criteria predict dynamic plantar pressures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Rodríguez, Raquel; Martínez-Nova, Alfonso; Escamilla-Martínez, Elena; Pedrera-Zamorano, Juan Diego

    2012-07-01

    The Foot Posture Index (FPI) quantifies foot posture through the evaluation of six individual criteria. The objective of the present study was then to establish the plantar pressure differences between types of feet, and to study the capacity of the whole FPI value and the six individual criteria to predict the pattern of plantar pressures. In a sample of 400 healthy subjects (201 men and 199 women), the FPI was evaluated and plantar pressures were measured in 10 zones using the Footscan(®) platform. Five plantar pressures measurements were made for each foot, using for the study the mean of these measurements for each subject's left foot. The hallux and the lesser toes had lower pressure indices in highly supinated feet, with the values increasing progressively toward the highly pronated feet (pfeet, and decreased in the highly pronated feet (pfeet--pronated, neutral, and supinated. Its individual criteria predict moderate or low plantar pressures variability, with the talonavicular prominence being the most influential criterion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Plantar reflex excitability is increased in the evening in restless legs syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dafkin, Chloe; Green, Andrew; Olivier, Benita; McKinon, Warrick; Kerr, Samantha

    2017-11-01

    To investigate if diurnal changes in spinal excitability (plantar reflex) occur in restless legs syndrome (RLS) participants compared to healthy matched controls. Thirteen RLS participants and 13 healthy control participants' plantar reflex responses were evaluated in the evening (PM) and the morning (AM). Plantar reflex responses were assessed electromyographically, using motion analysis (kinematically) and by subjective nociception (Visual Analogue Scale). RLS participants showed a circadian variation in plantar reflex responses whilst control participants did not. Evening ankle angle changes were larger and faster in RLS participants compared to morning responses. In addition RLS participants displayed significantly smaller change in ankle angle and significantly slower ankle movements in the evening and the morning as well as significantly lower lateral gastrocnemius maximum amplitude in the compared to control participants. The findings of the current study support the theory of RLS circadian fluctuations in spinal excitability. An unexpected finding was decreased plantar reflex responses in RLS participants compared to healthy control participants. However this finding supports the theory of mechanical hypoesthesia in RLS. The results of this study provide further insight into the pathophysiology of RLS, highlighting that not all sensory processing is affected in the same manner. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. [Influence of gait speed on plantar pressure in subjects with unilateral knee osteoarthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Wagner Costa; Machado, Alvaro; Borella, Caio; Carpes, Felipe P

    2014-01-01

    Changing gait speed is a common strategy to manipulate exercise intensity during physical exercise, but may elicit higher impact forces and consequent joint loading. Here we analyzed the effects of increasing walking velocity on plantar pressure and asymmetries in elderly with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Our hypothesis was that the contralateral limb could receive higher loading compared to the OA limb in the different walking speeds tested. Twelve elderly with unilateral knee OA walked at different self-selected speeds along a 10 m pass way stepping on an instrumented mat for measurement of plantar pressure at preferred, slow and fast gait speeds. Five steps were recorded for each speed. Plantar pressure data were compared between the speeds and legs. speeds were significantly different between them (p<0.05). Mean and peak plantar pressure increased when speed changed from slow to fast (p<0.05). Velocity of the center of pressure increased and the single stance time decreased when walk speed was increased (p<0.05). Any asymmetries were observed. Increasing gait speed from slow to fast in subjects with unilateral knee OA significantly affected variables of plantar pressure, but asymmetries between committed and contralateral leg were not detected. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. Plantar fascia segmentation and thickness estimation in ultrasound images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boussouar, Abdelhafid; Meziane, Farid; Crofts, Gillian

    2017-03-01

    Ultrasound (US) imaging offers significant potential in diagnosis of plantar fascia (PF) injury and monitoring treatment. In particular US imaging has been shown to be reliable in foot and ankle assessment and offers a real-time effective imaging technique that is able to reliably confirm structural changes, such as thickening, and identify changes in the internal echo structure associated with diseased or damaged tissue. Despite the advantages of US imaging, images are difficult to interpret during medical assessment. This is partly due to the size and position of the PF in relation to the adjacent tissues. It is therefore a requirement to devise a system that allows better and easier interpretation of PF ultrasound images during diagnosis. This study proposes an automatic segmentation approach which for the first time extracts ultrasound data to estimate size across three sections of the PF (rearfoot, midfoot and forefoot). This segmentation method uses artificial neural network module (ANN) in order to classify small overlapping patches as belonging or not-belonging to the region of interest (ROI) of the PF tissue. Features ranking and selection techniques were performed as a post-processing step for features extraction to reduce the dimension and number of the extracted features. The trained ANN classifies the image overlapping patches into PF and non-PF tissue, and then it is used to segment the desired PF region. The PF thickness was calculated using two different methods: distance transformation and area-length calculation algorithms. This new approach is capable of accurately segmenting the PF region, differentiating it from surrounding tissues and estimating its thickness. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Predictive MRI correlates of lesser metatarsophalangeal joint plantar plate tear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umans, Rachel L. [Cornell University Medical College, New York, NY (United States); Umans, Benjamin D. [Harvard University, Cambridge, MA (United States); Umans, Hilary [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Lenox Hill Radiology and Imaging Associates, New York, NY (United States); Elsinger, Elisabeth [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States)

    2016-07-15

    To identify correlated signs on non-enhanced MRI that might improve diagnostic detection of plantar plate (PP) tear. We performed an IRB-approved, HIPAA-compliant retrospective analysis of 100 non-contrast MRI (50 PP tear, 50 controls). All were anonymized, randomized, and reviewed; 20 were duplicated to assess consistency. One musculoskeletal radiologist evaluated qualitative variables. A trained non-physician performed measurements. Consistency and concordance were assessed. Pearson's Chi-square test was used to test the correlation between qualitative findings and PP tear status. Correlation between measurements and PP status was assessed using t tests and Wilcoxon's rank-sum test (p values < 0.05 considered significant). Classification and regression trees were utilized to identify attributes that, taken together, would consistently distinguish PP tear from controls. Quantitative measurements were highly reproducible (concordance 0.88-0.99). Elevated 2nd MT protrusion, lesser MT supination and rotational divergence of >45 between the 1st-2nd MT axis correlated with PP tear. Pericapsular soft tissue thickening correlated most strongly with PP tear, correctly classifying 95 % of cases and controls. Excluding pericapsular soft tissue thickening, sequential assessment of 2nd toe enthesitis, 2nd flexor tendon subluxation, and splaying of the second and third toes accurately classified PP status in 92 %. Pericapsular soft tissue thickening most strongly correlated with PP tear. For cases in which it might be difficult to distinguish pericapsular fibrosis from neuroma, sequential assessment of 2nd toe enthesitis, flexor tendon subluxation and splaying of the 2nd and 3rd toe is most helpful for optimizing accurate diagnosis of PP tear. (orig.)

  1. Hallux valgus and plantar pressure loading: the Framingham foot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Hallux valgus (HV), a common structural foot deformity, can cause foot pain and lead to limited mobility. The purpose of this study was to evaluate differences in plantar pressure and force during gait by HV status in a large population-based cohort of men and women. Methods A trained examiner performed a validated physical examination on participants’ feet and recorded the presence of hallux valgus and other specific foot disorders. Each foot was classified into one of four mutually exclusive groups based on the foot examination. Foot groups were: (i) HV only, (ii) HV and at least one additional foot disorder (FD), (iii) no HV but at least one other FD, and (iv) neither HV nor FD (referent). Biomechanical data for both feet were collected using Tekscan Matscan. Foot posture during quiet standing, using modified arch index (MAI), and foot function during gait, using center of pressure excursion index (CPEI), were calculated per foot. Further, walking scans were masked into eight sub-regions using Novel Automask, and peak pressure and maximum force exerted in each region were calculated. Results There were 3205 participants, contributing 6393 feet with complete foot exam data and valid biomechanical measurements. Participants with HV had lower hallucal loading and higher forces at lesser toes as well as higher MAI and lower CPEI values compared to the referent. Participants with HV and other FDs were also noted to have aberrant rearfoot forces and pressures. Conclusions These results suggest that HV alters foot loading patterns and pressure profiles. Future work should investigate how these changes affect the risk of other foot and lower extremity ailments. PMID:24138804

  2. Predictive MRI correlates of lesser metatarsophalangeal joint plantar plate tear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umans, Rachel L.; Umans, Benjamin D.; Umans, Hilary; Elsinger, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    To identify correlated signs on non-enhanced MRI that might improve diagnostic detection of plantar plate (PP) tear. We performed an IRB-approved, HIPAA-compliant retrospective analysis of 100 non-contrast MRI (50 PP tear, 50 controls). All were anonymized, randomized, and reviewed; 20 were duplicated to assess consistency. One musculoskeletal radiologist evaluated qualitative variables. A trained non-physician performed measurements. Consistency and concordance were assessed. Pearson's Chi-square test was used to test the correlation between qualitative findings and PP tear status. Correlation between measurements and PP status was assessed using t tests and Wilcoxon's rank-sum test (p values < 0.05 considered significant). Classification and regression trees were utilized to identify attributes that, taken together, would consistently distinguish PP tear from controls. Quantitative measurements were highly reproducible (concordance 0.88-0.99). Elevated 2nd MT protrusion, lesser MT supination and rotational divergence of >45 between the 1st-2nd MT axis correlated with PP tear. Pericapsular soft tissue thickening correlated most strongly with PP tear, correctly classifying 95 % of cases and controls. Excluding pericapsular soft tissue thickening, sequential assessment of 2nd toe enthesitis, 2nd flexor tendon subluxation, and splaying of the second and third toes accurately classified PP status in 92 %. Pericapsular soft tissue thickening most strongly correlated with PP tear. For cases in which it might be difficult to distinguish pericapsular fibrosis from neuroma, sequential assessment of 2nd toe enthesitis, flexor tendon subluxation and splaying of the 2nd and 3rd toe is most helpful for optimizing accurate diagnosis of PP tear. (orig.)

  3. Pressure-reduction and preservation in custom-made footwear of patients with diabetes and a history of plantar ulceration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waaijman, R.; Arts, M. L. J.; Haspels, R.; Busch-Westbroek, T. E.; Nollet, F.; Bus, S. A.

    2012-01-01

    Diabet. Med. 29, 15421549 (2012) Abstract Aims To assess the value of using in-shoe plantar pressure analysis to improve and preserve the offloading properties of custom-made footwear in patients with diabetes. Methods Dynamic in-shoe plantar pressures were measured in new custom-made footwear of

  4. Effects of plantar-flexor muscle fatigue on the magnitude and regularity of center-of-pressure fluctuations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roerdink, M.; Hlavackova, P.; Vuillerme, N.

    2011-01-01

    Control of bipedal posture is highly automatized but requires attentional investment, the amount of which varies between participants and with postural constraints, such as plantar-flexor muscle fatigue. Elevated attentional demands for standing with fatigued plantar flexors have been demonstrated

  5. Range of motion, neuromechanical and architectural daptations to plantar flexor stretch training in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blazevich, Anthony John; Cannavan, Dale; Waugh, Charlie M

    2014-01-01

    flexor stretches after 3 wk of twice-daily stretch training (4×30-s). No changes were observed in a non-exercising control group (N=9), however stretch training elicited a 19.9% increase in dorsiflexion range of motion (ROM) and 28% increase in passive joint moment at end ROM (N=12). Only a trend toward......The neuromuscular adaptations in response to muscle stretch training have not been clearly described. In the present study, changes in muscle (at fascicular and whole muscle levels) and tendon mechanics, muscle activity and spinal motoneuron excitability were examined during standardized plantar...... a decrease in passive plantar flexor moment during stretch (-9.9%, p=0.15) was observed and no changes in EMG amplitudes during or at end ROM were detected. Decreases in Hmax:Mmax (tibial nerve stimulation) were observed at plantar flexed (gastrocnemius medialis and soleus) and neutral (soleus only) joint...

  6. Circumscribed palmar or plantar hypokeratosis: report of a Korean case and published work review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Eun; Kim, You Chan; Kim, Soo-Chan

    2006-06-01

    Circumscribed palmar or plantar hypokeratosis is a rare dermatosis characterized by a solitary, well-circumscribed patch with scaly borders chiefly on the palm or sole; it usually occurs in middle-aged or elderly women. We report the case of a 52-year-old Korean woman with two characteristic lesions of circumscribed palmar hypokeratosis on the left palm. Clinically, the lesions simulated porokeratosis of Mibelli, but histologically there was no cornoid lamellation in the serial sections and there were the characteristic histopathological features of circumscribed palmar or plantar hypokeratosis including a stair-like configuration with an abrupt thinning of the stratum corneum and a decreased granular layer. We also review the 16 cases of circumscribed palmar or plantar hypokeratosis reported in the published work.

  7. Increased peripherin in sympathetic axons innervating plantar metatarsal arteries in STZ-induced type I diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niloufer Jahan Johansen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A common characteristic of axonopathy is the abnormal accumulation of cytoskeletal proteins. We recently reported that streptozotocin (STZ-induced type 1 diabetes produced a change in the morphology of sympathetic nerve fibers supplying rat plantar metatarsal arteries (PMAs. Here we investigated whether these morphological changes are associated with axonal accumulation of the type III intermediate filament peripherin and the microtubule protein β-tubulin III, as both are implicated in axonal remodeling. PMAs from hyperglycemic STZ-treated rats receiving a low dose of insulin (STZ-LI were compared with those from normoglycemic STZ-treated rats receiving a high dose of insulin (STZ-HI and vehicle-treated controls. Western blotting revealed an increase in protein expression level for peripherin in PMAs from STZ-LI rats but no change in that for β-tubulin III. In addition, there was an increase in the number of peripherin immunoreactive nerve fibers in the perivascular nerve plexus of PMAs from STZ-LI rats. Co-labeling for peripherin and neuropeptide Y (a marker for sympathetic axons revealed that peripherin immunoreactivity increased in sympathetic axons. None of these changes were detected in PMAs from STZ-HI rats, indicating that increased peripherin in sympathetic axons of STZ-LI rats is likely due to hyperglycemia and provides a marker of diabetes-induced nerve damage.

  8. Reduction of plantar pressures in leprosy patients by using custom made shoes and total contact insoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Simon Fuk-Tan; Chen, Carl P C; Lin, Shih-Cherng; Wu, Chih-Kuan; Chen, Chih-Kuang; Cheng, Shun-Ping

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to observe whether our custom made shoes and total contact insoles can effectively increase the plantar contact areas and reduce peak pressures in patients with leprosy. In the rehabilitation laboratory of a tertiary medical center. Six male and two female leprosy patients were recruited in this study. In this study, parameters related to foot pressures were compared between these patients wearing commercial available soft-lining kung-fu shoes and our custom made shoes with total contact insoles. The custom made shoes were made with larger toe box and were able to accommodate both the foot and the insoles. Custom made total contact insoles were made with the subtalar joints under neutral and non-weight-bearing positions. The insole force measurement system of Novel Pedar-X (Novel, Munich, Germany) was used to measure the plantar forces. The parameters of contact area (cm(2)), peak plantar pressures (kPa), contact time (s), and pressure time integral (kPa s) were measured. There were significant contact area increases in the right and left foot heel areas, left medial arch, and second to fifth toes after wearing the custom made shoes and insoles. There were significant decreases in peak plantar pressures in bilateral heels, left lateral midfoot, bilateral second to fourth metatarsal areas, and left fifth metatarsal head after wearing the custom made shoes and insoles (pshoes and total contact insoles were proven to be effective in increasing contact areas and decreasing peak pressures in plantar surfaces, and may therefore be a feasible treatment option in preventing leprosy patients from developing plantar ulcers. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The relationship between foot posture and plantar pressure during walking in adults: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buldt, Andrew K; Allan, Jamie J; Landorf, Karl B; Menz, Hylton B

    2018-02-23

    Foot posture is a risk factor for some lower limb injuries, however the underlying mechanism is not well understood. Plantar pressure analysis is one technique to investigate the interaction between foot posture and biomechanical function of the lower limb. The aim of this review was to investigate the relationship between foot posture and plantar pressure during walking. A systematic database search was conducted using MEDLINE, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus and Embase to identify studies that have assessed the relationship between foot posture and plantar pressure during walking. Included studies were assessed for methodological quality. Meta-analysis was not conducted due to heterogeneity between studies. Inconsistencies included foot posture classification techniques, gait analysis protocols, selection of plantar pressure parameters and statistical analysis approaches. Of the 4213 citations identified for title and abstract review, sixteen studies were included and underwent quality assessment; all were of moderate methodological quality. There was some evidence that planus feet display higher peak pressure, pressure-time integral, maximum force, force-time integral and contact area predominantly in the medial arch, central forefoot and hallux, while these variables are lower in the lateral and medial forefoot. In contrast, cavus feet display higher peak pressure and pressure-time integral in the heel and lateral forefoot, while pressure-time integral, maximum force, force-time integral and contact area are lower for the midfoot and hallux. Centre of pressure was more laterally deviated in cavus feet and more medially deviated in planus feet. Overall, effect sizes were moderate, but regression models could only explain a small amount of variance in plantar pressure variables. Despite these significant findings, future research would benefit from greater methodological rigour, particularly in relation to the use of valid foot posture measurement techniques, gait analysis

  10. Fasceíte Necrotizante em Pacientes Obstétricas Necrotizing Fasciitis in Obstetric Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Carlos de Matos

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: relatar a experiência com casos de fasceíte necrotizante (FN ocorridos no Serviço de Ginecologia e Obstetrícia do Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre e analisar sua associação com alguns fatores de risco citados na literatura. Métodos: foram analisados retrospectivamente pacientes do Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre que tiveram diagnóstico de FN, no período de janeiro de 1990 a dezembro de 1997. Resultados: foram encontrados 2 casos de FN pós-cesariana e 1 caso pós-cirúrgico por gestação ectópica. Nenhuma das pacientes apresentava complicações clínicas ou fator de risco para FN e a cirurgia foi realizada em caráter emergencial em todos os casos. A freqüência de FN no estudo foi de 2,6/10.000 cesarianas e a mortalidade de zero. Conclusão: a FN é uma síndrome clínica de ocorrência não muito comum, mas com grande morbimortalidade. Na afecção há envolvimento da ferida operatória e dos planos fasciais. O rápido manejo e a instituição do tratamento precoce e intensivo levam a bons resultados e à diminuição da mortalidade.Purpose: the authors report their experience with necrotizing fasciitis (NF cases which occurred in the Gynecology and Obstetrics Service of the Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, assessing the frequency of NF and analyzing the association between NF and certain risk factors cited in the literature. Methods: a retrospective study of patients a with diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis at the Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre from January 1990 to December 1997. Results: two post-cesarean section and one post-surgical (because of ectopic pregnancy NF cases were found. None of the patients presented clinical complications nor NF risk factors and all surgeries were urgent. The NF frequency in this study was 2.6/10.000 cesarians and mortality was zero. Discussion: NF is a clinical syndrome which does not occur very often but is associated with high morbidity and mortality. This

  11. Professional technical plantar ability in students of 1er year of the Agricultural specialty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonel Areces Mireles

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The present article which approaches on the problems as to the development of professional technical plantar ability in the Agricultural Specialty Polytechnic Leonides Blanco González. Splitting of a dialectic materialistic focus various methods were utilized and techniques: Theorists and empiricists, the ones that permitted going into the background and conception assumed for the treatment of professional technical ability like formation of the personality of the future agricultural worker, as well as determining the needs of developmental students of technical plantar ability.

  12. Effects of hypothermically reduced plantar skin inputs on anticipatory and compensatory balance responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germano, Andresa M C; Schmidt, Daniel; Milani, Thomas L

    2016-06-29

    Anticipatory and compensatory balance responses are used by the central nervous system (CNS) to preserve balance, hence they significantly contribute to the understanding of physiological mechanisms of postural control. It is well established that various sensory systems contribute to the regulation of balance. However, it is still unclear which role each individual sensory system (e.g. plantar mechanoreceptors) plays in balance regulation. This becomes also evident in various patient populations, for instance in diabetics with reduced plantar sensitivity. To investigate these sensory mechanisms, approaches like hypothermia to deliberately reduce plantar afferent input have been applied. But there are some limitations regarding hypothermic procedures in previous studies: Not only plantar aspects of the feet might be affected and maintaining the hypothermic effect during data collection. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to induce a permanent and controlled plantar hypothermia and to examine its effects on anticipatory and compensatory balance responses. We hypothesized deteriorations in anticipatory and compensatory balance responses as increased center of pressure excursions (COP) and electromyographic activity (EMG) in response to the hypothermic plantar procedure. 52 healthy and young subjects (23.6 ± 3.0 years) performed balance tests (unexpected perturbations). Subjects' foot soles were exposed to three temperatures while standing upright: 25, 12 and 0 °C. COP and EMG were analyzed during two intervals of anticipatory and one interval of compensatory balance responses (intervals 0, 1 and 2, respectively). Similar plantar temperatures confirmed the successful implementation of the thermal platform. No significant COP and EMG differences were found for the anticipatory responses (intervals 0 and 1) under the hyperthermia procedure. Parameters in interval 2 showed generally decreased values in response to cooling. No changes in anticipatory

  13. Tratamiento podológico de la fascitis plantar en el deportista

    OpenAIRE

    Prats Climent, Baldiri; Vázquez Amela, F. Xavier (Francesc Xavier)

    1994-01-01

    Podemos definir la fascitis plantar como la inflamación del origen de la fascia plantar a nivel de la tuberosidad interna del calcáneo. La molestia principal que presenta es el dolor y la hipersensibilidad debajo de la porción anterior del talón, que frecuentemente se irradia a la planta del pie. Aparece frecuentemente en deportistas, principalmente aquellos que presentan marcha con pronación acentuada. Puede acompañarse con la presencia de un espolón de calcáneo que en ningún caso es la caus...

  14. Plantar pressure and EMG activity of simulated and actual ski jumping take-off.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virmavirta, M; Komi, P V

    2001-10-01

    Plantar pressures and activation of the four muscles (VL - vastus lateralis, GL - gluteus, TA - tibialis anterior and GA - lat. gastrocnemius) were measured from ten ski jumpers under simulated laboratory conditions with training shoes (Lab TS) and with jumping boots (Lab JB) as well as in actual hill jumping conditions (Hill). The most significant differences between measured conditions were found in muscle activation patterns and plantar pressures prior to take-off. The centrifugal force due to the curvature of the inrun under actual hill jumping conditions caused extra pressure under the fore and rear parts of the feet (Pknee and hip extensor muscles.

  15. [Mobile phone platform for wireless monitoring of human dynamic plantar pressure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Han, Meng; Liu, Jing

    2010-11-01

    This paper constructed a plantar pressure sensing system based on Bluetooth communication of mobile phone with embedded Windows Mobile system. With the MCU (Microprocessor Control Unit) and Bluetooth module, the pressure sensor and the data acquisition circuit was designed and integrated, with software developed under Visual Studio 2008 environment. The real-time monitoring of human dynamic plantar pressure signal, and transferring, displaying and storing the recorded data on a mobile phone were achieved. This method offers an important measure to acquire human gait information via a pervasive and low cost way.

  16. Microsurgical medial plantar flap banking: a method of choice for digital tip injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagase, T; Ohmori, K

    1998-11-01

    A tip injury of the left thumb was repaired via microsurgical medial plantar flap banking. The medial plantar flap was transferred temporarily to the lower abdominal wall and was anastomosed microsurgically to the deep inferior epigastric artery and vein as a banked flap. It was later grafted to the thumb in a manner similar to a pedicled flap. The flap was transferred successfully, and the tissue texture and bulk was sufficient, with considerable sensory recovery and minimal donor site deformity. This method may be worthwhile to consider as one of the options of digital tip reconstruction, and the concept of microsurgical flap banking may be promising in the field of reconstructive microsurgery.

  17. Plantar pressures are higher in cases with diabetic foot ulcers compared to controls despite a longer stance phase duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Malindu E; Crowther, Robert G; Lazzarini, Peter A; Sangla, Kunwarjit S; Wearing, Scott; Buttner, Petra; Golledge, Jonathan

    2016-09-15

    Current international guidelines advocate achieving at least a 30 % reduction in maximum plantar pressure to reduce the risk of foot ulcers in people with diabetes. However, whether plantar pressures differ in cases with foot ulcers to controls without ulcers is not clear. The aim of this study was to assess if plantar pressures were higher in patients with active plantar diabetic foot ulcers (cases) compared to patients with diabetes without a foot ulcer history (diabetes controls) and people without diabetes or a foot ulcer history (healthy controls). Twenty-one cases with diabetic foot ulcers, 69 diabetes controls and 56 healthy controls were recruited for this case-control study. Plantar pressures at ten sites on both feet and stance phase duration were measured using a pre-established protocol. Primary outcomes were mean peak plantar pressure, pressure-time integral and stance phase duration. Non-parametric analyses were used with Holm's correction to correct for multiple testing. Binary logistic regression models were used to adjust outcomes for age, sex and body mass index. Median differences with 95 % confidence intervals and Cohen's d values (standardised mean difference) were reported for all significant outcomes. The majority of ulcers were located on the plantar surface of the hallux and toes. When adjusted for age, sex and body mass index, the mean peak plantar pressure and pressure-time integral of toes and the mid-foot were significantly higher in cases compared to diabetes and healthy controls (p diabetic foot ulcers despite having a longer stance phase duration which would be expected to lower plantar pressure. Whether plantar pressure changes can predict ulcer healing should be the focus of future research. These results highlight the importance of offloading feet during active ulceration in addition to before ulceration.

  18. Tratamiento de necrosis plantar postsepsis neumocóccica con terapia V.A.C.® Treatment of post-pneumococcal plantar necrosis with VAC® therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Guisantes

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available La terapia VAC® es un dispositivo que favorece la curación de las heridas mediante un sistema cerrado que aplica presión negativa sobre el lecho. Este tratamiento favorece la cicatrización porque reduce el edema y el líquido intersticial, mejora la microcirculación, disminuye el riesgo de infección y favorece la granulación del tejido. Presentamos un caso clínico de un varón de 31 años con un defecto amplio plantar tras necrosis distal por sepsis neumocóccica. Tras 20 días de terapia VAC® la granulación fue adecuada y permitió la cobertura del defecto con un injerto de piel. La terapia VAC® es una opción útil para la reconstrucción de defectos plantares amplios de forma sencilla.VAC® Therapy is a device that lets promote wound healing through a closed system that applies negative pressure on the wound bed. This treatment promotes healing by reducing edema and interstitial fluid, improving microcirculation, reducing the risk of infection and promoting tissue granulation. We report the case of a 31 year old man with a large plantar defect due to distal necrosis after pneumococcal sepsis. After 20 days of VAC® therapy, the granulation was adequate and allowed the coverage of the defect with a skin graft. VAC® therapy is a useful and simple option for reconstruction of broad plantar defects.

  19. Autoimmune fasciitis triggered by the anti-programmed cell death-1 monoclonal antibody nivolumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Matthew Js; Roberts, Mark E; Lorigan, Paul C; du Plessis, Daniel G; Chinoy, Hector

    2018-02-08

    A 43-year-old woman with a history of recently diagnosed metastatic melanoma was commenced on systemic therapy with nivolumab, an anti-programmed cell death-1 monoclonal antibody and one of an increasing group of the so-called 'immune checkpoint inhibitors'. She experienced a dramatic complete response within 6 months of initiation. However, in addition to developing incident autoimmune hypothyroidism, she also developed progressive fatigue, proximal weakness, myalgia and dysphagia. Initial investigations with blood tests, electrophysiology and a muscle biopsy were non-specific or normal. Subsequent examination revealed 'woody' thickening of the subcutaneous tissues of the forearms, thighs and calves consistent with fasciitis. MRI and a full-thickness skin-muscle biopsy were ultimately diagnostic of a likely iatrogenic autoimmune myofasciitis. The clinical manifestations only responded partly to prednisolone 30 mg orally and treatment was escalated to include intravenous immunoglobulin. At 3 months, this has only resulted in a modest incremental improvement. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  20. A surgeon's nightmare: pyoderma gangrenosum with pathergy effect mimicking necrotising fasciitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocum, Amanda Mun Yee

    2017-12-20

    A 53-year-old woman was admitted for vulval swelling and fever. She was initially diagnosed with vulval cellulitis and given parenteral antibiotics. Within 1 week, she developed necrotic-looking skin lesions extending from her vulva to her buttock. Emergency surgical debridement with diversion colostomy was performed in view of suspected necrotising fasciitis. Shortly after the surgery, she developed necrotic-looking skin lesions at the peripheral venous cannula insertion site, central line insertion site, and around her surgical wounds and stoma. A second surgical debridement was performed and shortly afterwards, similar skin lesions appeared around her surgical wounds. Her clinical progression was suggestive of pyoderma gangrenosum with pathergy effect. Hence, she was started on topical steroid, systemic steroid and immunosuppressant. The skin lesions responded well to medical therapy. Further systemic workup for conditions associated with this disease revealed findings suspicious for myelodysplastic syndrome. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  1. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis of odontogenic origin in a diabetic patient complicated by substance abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camino Junior, Rubens; Naclerio-Homem, Maria G; Cabral, Lecy Marcondes; Luz, João Gualberto C

    2014-01-01

    Cervical necrotizing fasciitis (CNF) is an uncommon, potentially fatal soft tissue infection with rapid progression characterized by necrosis in the subcutaneous tissue and fascia. A case of CNF of odontogenic origin in a diabetic patient, complicated by alcohol dependence and tobacco abuse, is presented with a literature review. The emergency procedure comprised hydration, colloid administration, glycemic control and broad spectrum antibiotic therapy, followed by aggressive surgical debridement. Necrosis in the platysma muscle was verified by histopathologic analysis. Reconstructive surgery was performed after suppressing the infection, and the wound was closed with an autologous skin graft. The patient had a long hospital stay, in part because the substance abuse led to a difficult recovery. The principles of early diagnosis, aggressive surgical debridement, broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy and intensive supportive care in the treatment of CNF were confirmed in the present case. It was concluded that given the occurrence of CNF in the presence of diabetes mellitus and abuse of substances such as alcohol and tobacco, the health care professional should consider a stronger response to treatment and longer hospitalization.

  2. Bilateral Necrotizing Fasciitis of the Foot Associated with Group B Streptococcus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keitaro Fukuda

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis (NF is a severe bacterial infection involving fascia and subcutaneous tissue. It generally affects upper or lower extremities unilaterally, and there are few reports of bilateral-extremity NF. Here, we report a case of a 43-year-old male with type 1 diabetes who had NF on the left foot and subsequently developed NF on the other foot 1 week later. The patient survived with antimicrobial therapy and bilateral below-knee amputation. As group B streptococcus (GBS was isolated by blood culture and culture of excised tissues of both feet, bilateral GBS NF of the foot was diagnosed. GBS is a rare causative pathogen in NF; however, there have been two case reports of bilateral GBS NF of an extremity in which NF appeared on the opposite extremity 1 week after the primary site infection, as in our case. GBS was isolated from cultures of blood and excised tissues of both extremities in both cases. Together, these observations suggest that GBS has a potential to cause secondary NF at remote sites by hematogenous dissemination with approximately 1 week delay and thereby lead to bilateral NF.

  3. Antibacterial Derivatives of Ciprofloxacin to Inhibit Growth of Necrotizing Fasciitis Associated Penicillin Resistant Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Bartzatt

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli (E. coli is associated with necrotizing fasciitis (type I and can induce enough damage to tissue causing hypoxia. Three ester derivatives of the broad-spectrum antibiotic ciprofloxacin were placed into bacteria culture simultaneously with the parent ciprofloxacin (drug 1 to ascertain the level of antibacterial activity. The n-propyl (drug 2, n-pentyl (drug 3, and n-octyl (drug 4 esters of ciprofloxacin were synthesized under mixed phase conditions and by microwave excitation. The formation of ester derivatives of ciprofloxacin modified important molecular properties such as Log P and polar surface area which improves tissue penetration, yet preserved strong antibacterial activity. The Log P values for drugs 1, 2, 3, and 4 became −0.701, 0.437, 1.50, and 3.02, respectively. The polar surface areas for drugs 1, 2, 3, and 4 were determined to be 74.6 Angstroms2, 63.6 Angstroms2, 63.6 Angstroms2, and 63.6 Angstroms2, respectively. These values of Log P and polar surface area improved tissue penetration, as indicated by the determination of dermal permeability coefficient (Kp and subsequently into the superficial fascial layer. All drugs induced greater than 60% bacterial cell death at concentrations less than 1.0 micrograms/milliliter. The ester derivatives of ciprofloxacin showed strong antibacterial activity toward penicillin resistant E. coli.

  4. Outbreak of necrotizing fasciitis due to Clostridium sordellii among black-tar heroin users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Akiko C; Higa, Jeffrey I; Levin, Robert M; Simpson, Gail; Vargas, Yolanda; Vugia, Duc J

    2004-05-01

    In California, black tar heroin (BTH) use among injection drug users (IDUs) has resulted in an increased number of cases of wound botulism due to Clostridium botulinum, tetanus due to Clostridium tetani, and necrotizing soft-tissue infections due to a variety of clostridia. From December 1999 to April 2000, nine IDUs in Ventura County, California, developed necrotizing fasciitis; 4 died. Cultures of wound specimens from 6 case patients yielded Clostridium sordellii. Some of the patients appeared to have the toxic shock syndrome previously reported to be characteristic of toxin-mediated C. sordellii infection, which is characterized by hypotension, marked leukocytosis, and hemoconcentration. The suspected source of this outbreak was contaminated BTH that was injected subcutaneously or intramuscularly ("skin popped"). This outbreak of C. sordellii infection serves as another example of how BTH can potentially serve as a vehicle for transmitting severe and often deadly clostridial infections, and reinforces the need to educate IDUs and clinicians about the risks associated with skin popping of BTH.

  5. Pustular Palmoplantar Psoriasis Successfully Treated with Nb-UVB Monochromatic Excimer Light: A Case-Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Gianfaldoni

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Barber’s palmoplantar pustulosis (PPP is a form of localised pustular psoriasis, affecting the palmar and plantar surfaces. It is a chronic disease, with a deep impact on the patients’ quality of life. The Authors discuss a case of Baber Psoriasis successfully treated with monochromatic excimer light.

  6. Treating Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patients Search FAQs Treating Infertility Page Navigation ▼ ACOG Pregnancy Book Treating Infertility Patient Education FAQs Treating Infertility Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Treating ...

  7. Sonographic measurements of the achilles tendon, plantar fascia, and heel fat pad are reliable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Finn E; Jensen, Signe; Stallknecht, Sandra E

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine intra- and interobserver reliability and precision of sonographic (US) scanning in measuring thickness of the Achilles tendon, plantar fascia, and heel fat pad in patients with heel pain. METHODS: Seventeen consecutive patients referred with heel pain were included. Two...

  8. Tendons in the plantar aspect of the foot: MR imaging and anatomic correlation in cadavers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Rodrigo [University of California San Diego, Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Fleury Medical Center, Radiology, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Aguiar, Rodrigo; Trudell, Debra; Resnick, Donald [University of California San Diego, Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2007-02-15

    The purpose of this anatomic imaging study was to illustrate the normal complex anatomy of tendons of the plantar aspect of the ankle and foot using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with anatomic correlation in cadavers. Seven fresh cadaveric feet (obtained and used according to institutional guidelines, with informed consent from relatives of the deceased) were studied with intermediate-weighted fast-spin-echo MR imaging. For anatomic analysis, cadaveric specimens were sectioned in 3-mm-thick slices in the coronal and axial planes that approximated the sections acquired at MR imaging. The entire courses of the tendons into the plantar aspect of the foot were analyzed. The tibialis posterior tendon has a complex distal insertion. The insertions in the navicular, second, and third cuneiforms bones were identify in all cases using axial and coronal planes. A tendinous connection between the flexor hallucis longus and the flexor digitorum longus tendons was identified in five of our specimens (71%). The coronal plane provided the best evaluation. The peroneus longus tendon changes its direction at three points then obliquely crosses the sole and inserts in the base of the first metatarsal bone and the plantar aspect of the first cuneiform. MR imaging provides detailed information about the anatomy of tendons in the plantar aspect of the ankle and foot. It allows analysis of their insertions and the intertendinous connection between the flexor hallucis longus and the flexor digitorum longus tendons. (orig.)

  9. In-Shoe Plantar Pressures and Ground Reaction Forces during Overweight Adults' Overground Walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, Marcelo P.; Abreu, Sofia C.; Sousa, Helena; Machado, Leandro; Santos, Rubim; Vilas-Boas, João Paulo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Because walking is highly recommended for prevention and treatment of obesity and some of its biomechanical aspects are not clearly understood for overweight people, we compared the absolute and normalized ground reaction forces (GRF), plantar pressures, and temporal parameters of normal-weight and overweight participants during…

  10. Palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia secondary to docetaxel chemotherapy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Niaimi Amjad

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Docetaxel is a chemotherapeutic agent used alone or in combination for the management of many neoplastic conditions. Numerous side effects are well described as a consequence. Palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia, although a relatively common side effect of some types of chemotherapy, occurs infrequently with docetaxel and is often attributed to other drug agents. Case Presentation We report the case of a 66-year-old Caucasian woman who received adjuvant docetaxel monotherapy for invasive breast cancer. She developed palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia following her first cycle of treatment, which necessitated a change in management. Conclusion Palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia is a relatively common side effect of cytotoxic chemotherapy, particularly with drugs such as 5-fluorouracil, capecitabine and liposomal doxorubicin. Docetaxel is commonly used both alone and in combination with a number of these agents for the management of various malignant conditions. We would like to highlight the occurrence of palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia as a result of docetaxel monotherapy so that it can be considered as a potential cause in patients receiving combination treatment with chemotherapeutic agents better known to cause this toxicity.

  11. The instantaneous torque-angular velocity relation in plantar flexion during jumping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ingen Schenau, G J; Bobbert, M F; Huijing, P A; Woittiez, R D

    Torques, angular velocities, and power of the ankle joint during plantar flexion were measured in jumping experiments in order to achieve insight into shape and magnitude of the instantaneous torque-angular velocity relation in a complex movement. Twelve trained subjects performed maximal vertical

  12. Tendon properties and muscle architecture for knee extensors and plantar flexors in boys and men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Keitaro; Teshima, Takanori; Ikebukuro, Toshihiro; Hirose, Norikazu; Tsunoda, Naoya

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the elastic properties and size of tendinous structures and muscle architecture for knee extensors and plantar flexors in boys and men. Twenty-two early pubescent boys (9.6-12.7yrs) and 23 young adult men (19.8-26.2yrs) participated in this study. The maximal strain and thickness of tendinous structures for knee extensors and plantar flexors were measured using ultrasonography. In addition, the fascicle lengths of vastus lateralis and medial gastrocnemius muscles were measured. The maximal strain of tendinous structures for plantar flexors was significantly greater in boys than in men, while there was no difference in the maximal strain for knee extensors between the two groups. The relative thickness (to body mass(1/3)) of Achilles tendon was significantly greater in boys than in men, although there was no difference in that of patellar tendon between the two groups. The relative fascicle length (to limb length) of vastus lateralis muscle was significantly lower in boys than in men, although there was no difference in that of medial gastrocnemius muscle between the two groups. These results suggest that the amount of changes in the elastic properties and sizes of tendinous structures and in the fascicle lengths from early pubescence to maturity is different for different muscle groups (in particular, the knee extensors and the plantar flexors). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Plantar flexor neuromuscular adjustments following match-play football in hot and cool conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, O; Nybo, L; Mohr, M; Racinais, S

    2015-06-01

    We assessed neuromuscular fatigue and recovery of the plantar flexors after playing football with or without severe heat stress. Neuromuscular characteristics of the plantar flexors were assessed in 17 male players at baseline and ∼30 min, 24, and 48 h after two 90-min football matches in temperate (∼20 °C and 55% rH) and hot (∼43 °C and 20% rH) environments. Measurements included maximal voluntary strength, muscle activation, twitch contractile properties, and rate of torque development and soleus EMG (i.e., root mean square activity) rise from 0 to 30, -50, -100, and -200 ms during maximal isometric contractions for plantar flexors. Voluntary activation and peak twitch torque were equally reduced (-1.5% and -16.5%, respectively; P force production declined (P force development and soleus EMG activity rise values remained unchanged. In football, match-induced alterations in maximal and rapid torque production capacities of the plantar flexors are moderate and do not differ after competing in temperate and hot environments. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. The effects of orthotic intervention on multisegment foot kinematics and plantar fascia strain in recreational runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Jonathan; Isherwood, Josh; Taylor, Paul J

    2015-02-01

    Chronic injuries are a common complaint in recreational runners. Foot orthoses have been shown to be effective for the treatment of running injuries but their mechanical effects are still not well understood. This study aims to examine the influence of orthotic intervention on multisegment foot kinematics and plantar fascia strain during running. Fifteen male participants ran at 4.0 m · s(-1) with and without orthotics. Multisegment foot kinematics and plantar fascia strain were obtained during the stance phase and contrasted using paired t tests. Relative coronal plane range of motion of the midfoot relative to the rearfoot was significantly reduced with orthotics (1.0°) compared to without (2.2°). Similarly, relative transverse plane range of motion was significantly lower with orthotics (1.1°) compared to without (1.8°). Plantar fascia strain did not differ significantly between orthotic (7.1) and nonorthotic (7.1) conditions. This study shows that although orthotics did not serve to reduce plantar fascia strain, they are able to mediate reductions in coronal and transverse plane rotations of the midfoot.

  15. Elevated plantar pressures in neuropathic diabetic patients with claw/hammer toe deformity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr Sicco Bus; Dr Marcel Levi; Dr Robert P.J. Michels; Dr. ir. A. de Lange; Dr Mario Maas

    2005-01-01

    Elevated plantar foot pressures during gait in diabetic patients with neuropathy have been suggested to result, among other factors, from the distal displacement of sub-metatarsal head (MTH) fat-pad cushions caused by to claw/hammer toe deformity. The purpose of this study was to quantitatively

  16. Risk factors for plantar foot ulcer recurrence in neuropathic diabetic patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waaijman, Roelof; de Haart, Mirjam; Arts, Mark L. J.; Wever, Daniel; Verlouw, Anke J. W. E.; Nollet, Frans; Bus, Sicco A.

    2014-01-01

    Recurrence of plantar foot ulcers is a common and major problem in diabetes but not well understood. Foot biomechanics and patient behavior may be important. The aim was to identify risk factors for ulcer recurrence and to establish targets for ulcer prevention. As part of a footwear trial, 171

  17. Plantar pressures in diabetic patients with foot ulcers which have remained healed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Owings, T. M.; Apelqvist, J.; Stenström, A.; Becker, M.; Bus, S. A.; Kalpen, A.; Ulbrecht, J. S.; Cavanagh, P. R.

    2009-01-01

    The recurrence of foot ulcers is a significant problem in people with diabetic neuropathy. The purpose of this study was to measure in-shoe plantar pressures and other characteristics in a group of neuropathic patients with diabetes who had prior foot ulcers which had remained healed. This was an

  18. Quality of life after endoscopic lumbar sympathectomy for primary plantar hyperhidrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, Roman; Pedevilla, Sonja; Lausecker, Johannes

    2015-04-01

    Primary plantar hyperhidrosis is characterised by excessive secretion of the sweat glands of the feet and may lead to significant limitations in private and professional lifestyle. The aim of this prospective study was to assess the effect of endoscopic lumbar sympathectomy (ESL) on the quality of life (QL) of patients with primary plantar hyperhidrosis. Bilateral ESL was performed on 52 patients, 31 men and 21 women with primary plantar hyperhidrosis. Perioperative morbidity and clinical results were evaluated in all patients after a mean follow-up of 15 months. Postoperative QL was examined with the SF-36V2 questionnaire and the hyperhidrosis-specific questionnaires devised by Milanez de Campos and Keller. All procedures were carried out endoscopically with no perioperative morbidity. Plantar hyperhidrosis was eliminated in 50 patients (96%) and two patients (4%) suffered a relapse. Unwanted side effects occurred in the form of compensatory sweating in 34 (65%) and in the form of postsympathectomy neuralgia in 19 patients (37%). Ninety six percentage of patients were satisfied with the postoperative result and 88% would have the surgery repeated. The SF-36V2 questionnaire revealed a significant improvement of QL after lumbar sympathectomy in physical health (physical component summary, p hyperhidrosis (p hyperhidrosis leads to the effective elimination of excessive sweat secretion of the feet and to an increase in QL.

  19. Glabrous skin reconstruction of palmar/plantar defects: A case for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: One basic fact about a Negroid race is that the nonglabrous skin is much more pigmented compared to the glabrous skin. A major disadvantage of nonglabrous skin grafts when used for reconstruction of palmar/plantar defects is the poor cosmetic appearance of the grafted skin. Aside from its normalcy of ...

  20. Reliability of in-Shoe Plantar Pressure Measurements in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidmar, Gaj; Novak, Primoz

    2009-01-01

    Plantar pressures measurement is a frequently used method in rehabilitation and related research. Metric characteristics of the F-Scan system have been assessed from different standpoints and in different patients, but not its reliability in rheumatoid arthritis patients. Therefore, our objective was to assess reliability of the F-Scan plantar…

  1. Plantar pressure with and without custom insoles in patients with common foot complaints.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolwijk, N.M.; Louwerens, J.W.; Nienhuis, B.; Duysens, J.E.J.; Keijsers, N.L.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although many patients with foot complaints receive customized insoles, the choice for an insole design can vary largely among foot experts. To investigate the variety of insole designs used in daily practice, the insole design and its effect on plantar pressure distribution were

  2. Effects of imagery motor training on torque production of ankle plantar flexor muscles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijdewind, Inge; Toering, ST; Bessem, B; van der Laan, O; Diercks, RL

    The aim of this study was to investigate in control subjects the effect of imagery training on the torque of plantar-flexor muscles of the ankle. Twenty-nine subjects were allocated to one of three groups that performed either imagery training, low-intensity strength training, or no training (only

  3. Plantar pressure distribution patterns during gait in diabetic neuropathy patients with a history of foot ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Almeida Bacarin

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate and compare the influence of a previous history of foot ulcers on plantar pressure variables during gait of patients with diabetic neuropathy. INTRODUCTION: Foot ulcers may be an indicator of worsening diabetic neuropathy. However, the behavior of plantar pressure patterns over time and during the progression of neuropathy, especially in patients who have a clinical history of foot ulcers, is still unclear. METHODS: Subjects were divided into the following groups: control group, 20 subjects; diabetic neuropathy patients without foot ulcers, 17 subjects; and diabetic neuropathy patients with at least one healed foot ulcer within the last year, 10 subjects. Plantar pressure distribution was recorded during barefoot gait using the Pedar-X system. RESULTS: Neuropathic subjects from both the diabetic neuropathy and DNU groups showed higher plantar pressure than control subjects. At midfoot, the peak pressure was significantly different among all groups: control group (139.4±76.4 kPa, diabetic neuropathy (205.3±118.6 kPa and DNU (290.7±151.5 kPa (p=0.008. The pressure-time integral was significantly higher in the ulcerated neuropathic groups at midfoot (CG: 37.3±11.4 kPa.s; DN: 43.3±9.1 kPa.s; DNU: 68.7±36.5 kPa.s; p=0.002 and rearfoot (CG: 83.3±21.2 kPa.s; DN: 94.9±29.4 kPa.s; DNU: 102.5±37.9 kPa.s; p=0.048. CONCLUSION: A history of foot ulcers in the clinical history of diabetic neuropathy subjects influenced plantar pressure distribution, resulting in an increased load under the midfoot and rearfoot and an increase in the variability of plantar pressure during barefoot gait. The progression of diabetic neuropathy was not found to influence plantar pressure distribution.

  4. Necrotising fasciitis: a fatal case of sepsis and a diagnostic challenge - case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Lekha; Yasin, Athar

    2018-04-06

    Necrotising fasciitis (NF) is a severe, devastating soft tissue infection characterised by rapidly progressing tissue necrosis. This rare condition has a high mortality rate and poses diagnostic and management challenges to the clinician. There is usually a history of trauma, which maybe trivial. Some of the premorbid conditions associated with NF are diabetes and or immunocompromised state. It requires prompt recognition and early treatment with intravenous antibiotics and extensive surgical debridement. We describe a 74-year-old lady who presented to our emergency department following 3 days' history of watery diarrhoea and feeling generally unwell. She had signs of severe sepsis and was started on broad-spectrum intravenous antibiotics and fluids for sepsis with unknown source. She was found to have an area of blackish discolouration on her thigh which was suspected as necrotising fasciitis (NF) and referred to the surgeons. She had no history of trauma or significant comorbidity. She underwent surgical exploration and debridement within few hours of arrival into the emergency department and subsequent further debridement with above-knee amputation of the affected limb. She eventually died after about 48 h of hospital stay despite an early diagnosis and prompt surgical debridement and a multidisciplinary approach. Necrotising fasciitis has been previously reported in literature but we would like to highlight through this case the importance of looking for the source of sepsis by thorough clinical examination and the need to have a high threshold of suspicion for this rare condition and urgent involvement of a surgical team for debridement.

  5. Influence of Joint Angle on Residual Force Enhancement in Human Plantar Flexors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsuki Fukutani

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Compared to pure isometric contractions, isometric muscle force at a given length is larger when the eccentric contraction is conducted before the isometric contraction. This phenomenon is widely known as residual force enhancement, and has been confirmed consistently in isolated muscle experiments. The purpose of this study was to confirm whether residual force enhancement also occurs in human plantar flexors and to examine its joint angle dependence. Eleven men participated in this study. Isometric joint torque was measured in a Control trial (pure isometric contraction and Residual force enhancement (RFE trial (isometric contraction after eccentric contraction at plantar flexion 0° (Short condition and dorsiflexion 15° (Long condition. Fascicle length and pennation angle of the medial gastrocnemius were measured simultaneously to evaluate the influence of architectural parameters on isometric joint torque. Isometric joint torque observed in the Short condition was not significantly different between the Control and RFE trials (Control: 42.9 ± 8.0 Nm, RFE: 45.1 ± 8.4 Nm (p = 0.200. In contrast, significant differences in isometric joint torque were observed in the Long condition between Control and RFE trials (Control: 40.5 ± 9.3 Nm, RFE: 47.1 ± 10.5 Nm (p = 0.001. Fascicle length and pennation angle were not different between Control and RFE trials in the Short and Long conditions. Isometric joint torque was larger when eccentric contraction was conducted before isometric contraction while architectural differences were not observed, indicating that residual force enhancement occurs in human plantar flexors. However, the influence of residual force enhancement may be limited in dorsiflexed positions because the magnitude of residual force enhancement is considered to be prominent in the descending limb (long muscle length condition and small in the ascending limb (short muscle length condition where human plantar flexors operate in

  6. The effectiveness of manual stretching in the treatment of plantar heel pain: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parish Ben

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plantar heel pain is a commonly occurring foot complaint. Stretching is frequently utilised as a treatment, yet a systematic review focusing only on its effectiveness has not been published. This review aimed to assess the effectiveness of stretching on pain and function in people with plantar heel pain. Methods Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, AMED, and The Cochrane Library were searched from inception to July 2010. Studies fulfilling the inclusion criteria were independently assessed, and their quality evaluated using the modified PEDro scale. Results Six studies including 365 symptomatic participants were included. Two compared stretching with a control, one study compared stretching to an alternative intervention, one study compared stretching to both alternative and control interventions, and two compared different stretching techniques and durations. Quality rating on the modified Pedro scale varied from two to eight out of a maximum of ten points. The methodologies and interventions varied significantly between studies, making meta-analysis inappropriate. Most participants improved over the course of the studies, but when stretching was compared to alternative or control interventions, the changes only reached statistical significance in one study that used a combination of calf muscle stretches and plantar fascia stretches in their stretching programme. Another study comparing different stretching techniques, showed a statistically significant reduction in some aspects of pain in favour of plantar fascia stretching over calf stretches in the short term. Conclusions There were too few studies to assess whether stretching is effective compared to control or other interventions, for either pain or function. However, there is some evidence that plantar fascia stretching may be more effective than Achilles tendon stretching alone in the short-term. Appropriately powered randomised controlled trials, utilizing validated outcome

  7. Plantar versus dorsomedial locked plating for Lapidus arthrodesis: a biomechanical comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klos, Kajetan; Simons, Paul; Hajduk, Anne-Sophie; Hoffmeier, Konrad Leopold; Gras, Florian; Fröber, Rosemarie; Hofmann, Gunther O; Mückley, Thomas

    2011-11-01

    Lapidus arthrodesis with a plate and a compression screw is an established procedure in hallux valgus surgery. The present study was performed to investigate the potential benefit of a compression screw combined with a plantarly applied angle-stable, anatomically precontoured plate or a dorsomedially applied angle-stable plate. In six pairs of human cadaver specimens, one specimen each was randomized to receive a dorsomedial H-shaped plate, while the other received a plantar plate. Bone mineral density was measured with peripheral quantitative computed tomography. The specimens were loaded quasi-statically, followed by cyclic loading. Finally, they were loaded to failure. In the static tests, stiffness and range of motion (ROM) data were obtained. In the cyclic tests, the constructs' displacement was studied. In the load-to-failure test, stiffness and maximum load to failure were measured. The two groups did not differ significantly with regard to BMD (p = 0.25). Any significant differences observed were in favor of the plantar constructs, which had greater initial stiffness (p = 0.028) and final stiffness (p = 0.042), a smaller ROM (p = 0.028), and a greater load to failure (p = 0.043). There was no significant difference regarding displacement (p = 0.14). In the static tests, the plantar angle-stable plate construct was superior to the dorsomedial angle-stable plate construct. Plantar plating appears to offer biomechanical benefit. Clinical studies will be required to show whether this translates into earlier resumption of weightbearing and into lower rates of nonunion.

  8. [Necrotizing fasciitis: results of a survey on management practices in French-speaking intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Prost, N; Bosc, R; Brun-Buisson, C; Chosidow, O; Decousser, J-W; Dhonneur, G; Lepeule, R; Rahmouni, A; Sbidian, E; Amathieu, R

    2014-12-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) are rare and severe soft tissue infections associated with a high mortality rate. In order to assess the management of NF in French-speaking intensive care units (ICUs), we conducted a survey endorsed by the French Society of Anesthesia and Intensive Care (SFAR). Online self-administered survey. A link to an online survey was sent by email to 4620 anesthesiologists and/or intensivists and was available online from January to February 2014. One hundred and seventy-five physicians (3.8%) who worked in 135 ICUs filled out the online survey. Among respondents, 42% reported having managed up to two patients with NF during the previous year; 59% and 72% of respondents reported not having a surgical and a medical specialist consultant, respectively. A delayed access to the operating room (OR) of more than 6hours was reported in 31% of cases and access to the OR was reported not to be routinely considered as a priority in 13% of cases. Only 17% of respondents reported that time to transfer to the OR was never a cause for delayed surgery. The main causes for delayed surgery were: delayed diagnosis (45%), delayed validation of surgical intervention (37%), and difficulty of access to the OR (8%). Finally, 83% of respondents estimated that creating dedicated multidisciplinary teams for managing NFs could lead to improving outcomes. This survey illustrates the heterogeneous management of NF in French-speaking ICUs and points out several logistical aspects that should be improved to reduce the time to the first surgical debridement. Copyright © 2014 Société française d’anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Challenges in the management of cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis in Sokoto, Northwest Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adebayo Aremu Ibikunle

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Necrotizing fasciitis (NF is a rapidly progressive, potentially fatal tissue infection with primary involvement of the subcutaneous fascia and resultant necrosis of the skin and subcutaneous tissues with relative sparing of the underlying muscles and bones. It pursues a fulminant, unrelenting course if treatment is not instituted early and aggressively. The aim of this paper was to document the clinical features and challenges encountered in the management of cervicofacial NF (CNF in Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital, Sokoto. In addition, the hypothesis that there is a correlation between the duration of disease at presentation and length of hospital stay was tested. Patients and Methods: A retrospective review of cases of CNF managed between December 2014 and November 2015 at our center was done. Demographic and clinical data were retrieved. Patients were managed in strict adherence to the established hospital protocol. Results: Thirteen cases managed for CNF were included in this study, all of whom were of low socioeconomic status. The duration of symptoms before presentation ranged from 2 to 21 days with a mean (΁standard deviation [SD] of 7.6 (5.2. The length of hospital stay ranged from 7 to 44 days, with a mean (΁SD of 19.5 (11.3. A statistically significant correlation between the duration of disease before presentation and length of hospital stay was observed (P < 0.05. Conclusion: NF, though rarely seen in some climes, is still a present health challenge in our environment. Despite improvements in healthcare indices, the associated morbidity and mortality rate is still quite high. The management of CNF in a resource-limited environment like ours presents grim challenges.

  10. Risk factors, microbiological findings and outcomes of necrotizing fasciitis in New Zealand: a retrospective chart review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das Dilip Kumar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence and mortality from necrotizing fasciitis (NF are increasing in New Zealand (NZ. Triggered by a media report that traditional Samoan tattooing was causing NF, we conducted a chart review to investigate the role of this and other predisposing and precipitating factors and to document NF microbiology, complications and interventions in NZ. Methods We conducted a retrospective review of 299 hospital charts of patients discharged with NF diagnosis codes in eight hospitals in NZ between 2000 and 2006. We documented and compared by ethnicity the prevalence of predisposing and precipitating conditions, bacteria isolated, complications and interventions used. Results Out of 299 charts, 247 fulfilled the case definition. NF was most common in elderly males. Diabetes was the most frequent co-morbid condition, followed by obesity. Nearly a quarter of patients were taking non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID. Traditional Samoan tattooing was an uncommon cause. Streptococcus pyogenes and Staphylococcus aureus were the two commonly isolated bacteria. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was implicated in a relatively small number of cases. Shock, renal failure, coagulation abnormality and multi-organ dysfunction were common complications. More than 90% of patients underwent surgical debridement, 56% were admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU and slightly less than half of all patients had blood product transfusion. One in six NF cases had amputations and 23.5% died. Conclusion This chart review found that the highest proportion of NF cases was elderly males with co-morbidities, particularly diabetes and obesity. Tattooing was an uncommon precipitating event. The role of NSAID needs further exploration. NF is a serious disease with severe complications, high case fatality and considerable use of health care resources.

  11. Necrotising fasciitis as atypical presentation of infection with emerging Neisseria meningitidis serogroup W (MenW) clonal complex 11, the Netherlands, March 2017

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Russcher, Anne; Fanoy, Ewout; van Olden, Ger D. J.; Graafland, Antonie D.; van der Ende, Arie; Knol, Mirjam J.

    2017-01-01

    In March 2017, a patient with necrotising fasciitis caused by Neisseria meningitidis serogroup W (MenW) clonal complex 11 was diagnosed in the Netherlands. Unusual and severe presentations of MenW infections are common in the current European epidemic. In the Netherlands, the incidence of MenW

  12. Two Paraneoplastic Autoimmune Syndromes: Limbic Encephalitis and Palmar Fasciitis in a Patient with Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarev, Irina; Shelef, Ilan; Refaely, Yael; Ariad, Samuel; Ifergane, Gal

    2015-09-07

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is characterized by a relatively high rate of autoimmune phenomena. Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis (PLE) is an autoimmune syndrome in which a non-neural tumor containing an antigen normally present in the nervous system precipitates an antibody attack on neural tissues. Patients with PLE usually present with rapidly progressive short-term memory deficits, confusion or even dementia. Palmar fasciitis and polyarthritis syndrome (PFPAS) is another autoimmune syndrome characterized by rheumatologic manifestations, especially involving the palms of the hands. We report a case of a 59-year old woman who presented with worsening neurological symptoms of two-week duration, and later coma. The combined clinical, serological, and imaging studies suggested a diagnosis of PLE. A chest computed tomographic scan showed a 1.2 cm-diameter mass in the upper lobe of the left lung that was surgically removed and showed SCLC. Following surgery, neurological symptoms rapidly improved, allowing the patient to receive adjuvant chemotherapy. While in remission for both SCLC and PLE, the patient developed pain, soft-tissue swelling, and stiffness in both palms, suggesting the diagnosis of PFPAS. Five months following the diagnosis of palmar fasciitis, SCLC relapsed with mediastinal and cervical lymphadenopathy. This case report underlines the continuous interaction of SCLC with the immune system, expressed by coexistence of two rare paraneoplastic diseases, PLE, and PFPAS, in a patient with SCLC. While symptoms related to PLE preceded the initial diagnosis of SCLC, other symptoms related to PFPAS preceded relapse.

  13. Two paraneoplastic autoimmune syndromes: limbic encephalitis and palmar fasciitis in a patient with small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Lazarev

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Small cell lung cancer (SCLC is characterized by a relatively high rate of autoimmune phenomena. Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis (PLE is an autoimmune syndrome in which a non-neural tumor containing an antigen normally present in the nervous system precipitates an antibody attack on neural tissues. Patients with PLE usually present with rapidly progressive short-term memory deficits, confusion or even dementia. Palmar fasciitis and polyarthritis syndrome (PFPAS is another autoimmune syndrome characterized by rheumatologic manifestations, especially involving the palms of the hands. We report a case of a 59-year old woman who presented with worsening neurological symptoms of two-week duration, and later coma. The combined clinical, serological, and imaging studies suggested a diagnosis of PLE. A chest computed tomographic scan showed a 1.2 cm-diameter mass in the upper lobe of the left lung that was surgically removed and showed SCLC. Following surgery, neurological symptoms rapidly improved, allowing the patient to receive adjuvant chemotherapy. While in remission for both SCLC and PLE, the patient developed pain, soft-tissue swelling, and stiffness in both palms, suggesting the diagnosis of PFPAS. Five months following the diagnosis of palmar fasciitis, SCLC relapsed with mediastinal and cervical lymphadenopathy. This case report underlines the continuous interaction of SCLC with the immune system, expressed by coexistence of two rare paraneoplastic diseases, PLE, and PFPAS, in a patient with SCLC. While symptoms related to PLE preceded the initial diagnosis of SCLC, other symptoms related to PFPAS preceded relapse.

  14. Effects of low-dye taping on plantar pressure pre and post exercise: an exploratory study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nolan, Damien

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low-Dye taping is used for excessive pronation at the subtalar joint of the foot. Previous research has focused on the tape\\'s immediate effect on plantar pressure. Its effectiveness following exercise has not been investigated. Peak plantar pressure distribution provides an indirect representation of subtalar joint kinematics. The objectives of the study were 1) To determine the effects of Low-Dye taping on peak plantar pressure immediately post-application. 2) To determine whether any initial effects are maintained following exercise. METHODS: 12 asymptomatic subjects participated; each being screened for excessive pronation (navicular drop > 10 mm). Plantar pressure data was recorded, using the F-scan, at four intervals during the testing session: un-taped, baseline-taped, post-exercise session 1, and post-exercise session 2. Each exercise session consisted of a 10-minute walk at a normal pace. The foot was divided into 6 regions during data analysis. Repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to assess regional pressure variations across the four testing conditions. RESULTS: Reduced lateral forefoot peak plantar pressure was the only significant difference immediately post tape application (p = 0.039). This effect was lost after 10 minutes of exercise (p = 0.036). Each exercise session resulted in significantly higher medial forefoot peak pressure compared to un-taped; (p = 0.015) and (p = 0.014) respectively, and baseline-taped; (p = 0.036) and (p = 0.015) respectively. Medial and lateral rearfoot values had also increased after the second session (p = 0.004), following their non-significant reduction at baseline-taped. A trend towards a medial-to-lateral shift in pressure present in the midfoot immediately following tape application was still present after 20 minutes of exercise. CONCLUSION: Low-Dye tape\\'s initial effect of reduced lateral forefoot peak plantar pressure was lost after a 10-minute walk. However, the tape continued

  15. Relationship between quadriceps angle (Q) and plantar pressure distribution in football players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braz, Rafael G; Carvalho, Gustavo A

    2010-01-01

    To determine whether there is an association between the Q-angle (Q) and the distribution of plantar pressure in football players, and to compare the characteristics of these athletes with non-practitioners of this sport. 121 male participants were selected: 50 football practitioners (FP) and 71 non-practitioners (NP). We concurrently evaluated the Q-angle and the plantar pressure through the software of postural assessment (SPA) and the F-Mat System, respectively. To verify the correlation between the Q-angle and peak pressure values in four segments of the foot (medial and lateral forefoot, medium-foot and hind-foot), the Pearson coefficient (r) for parametric analysis was used. The independent t-test was used to compare these variables between the groups. Data normality was verified by the skewness values, adopting a significance level of 5%. A negative and weak correlation was found (r=-0.32) between the Q-angle and the plantar pressure in the right medium-foot. The groups differed with regards to the right Q-angle (11.36º in FP versus 13.80º in NP) and the left Q-angle (11.03º in FP versus 13.96º in NP). Plantar pressure was also different between the groups, with FP showing higher mean values for the right side and for the left side of the forefoot (0.77 kg/cm² in FP versus 0.63 kg/cm² in NP, and 0.65 kg/cm² in FP versus 0.54 kg/cm² in NP, respectively). However, mean peak pressure values for the left medium-foot were higher among NP (0.37 kg/cm² in FP versus 0.46 kg/cm² in NP). There was no evidence of an association between the Q-angle and the distribution of plantar pressure in FP. The athletes showed reduced Q-angle values and higher mean peak pressure values for the right and left aspects of the forefoot, suggesting a varus malalignment and a supine distribution of plantar bases.

  16. Blood pressure and calf muscle oxygen extraction during plantar flexion exercise in peripheral artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luck, J Carter; Miller, Amanda J; Aziz, Faisal; Radtka, John F; Proctor, David N; Leuenberger, Urs A; Sinoway, Lawrence I; Muller, Matthew D

    2017-07-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is an atherosclerotic vascular disease that affects 200 million people worldwide. Although PAD primarily affects large arteries, it is also associated with microvascular dysfunction, an exaggerated blood pressure (BP) response to exercise, and high cardiovascular mortality. We hypothesized that fatiguing plantar flexion exercise that evokes claudication elicits a greater reduction in skeletal muscle oxygenation (SmO 2 ) and a higher rise in BP in PAD compared with age-matched healthy subjects, but low-intensity steady-state plantar flexion elicits similar responses between groups. In the first experiment, eight patients with PAD and eight healthy controls performed fatiguing plantar flexion exercise (from 0.5 to 7 kg for up to 14 min). In the second experiment, seven patients with PAD and seven healthy controls performed low-intensity plantar flexion exercise (2.0 kg for 14 min). BP, heart rate (HR), and SmO 2 were measured continuously using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). SmO 2 is the ratio of oxygenated hemoglobin to total hemoglobin, expressed as a percent. At fatigue, patients with PAD had a greater increase in mean arterial BP (18 ± 2 vs. vs. 10 ± 2 mmHg, P = 0.029) and HR (14 ± 2 vs. 6 ± 2 beats/min, P = 0.033) and a greater reduction in SmO 2 (-54 ± 10 vs. -12 ± 4%, P = 0.001). However, both groups had similar physiological responses to low-intensity, nonpainful plantar flexion exercise. These data suggest that patients with PAD have altered oxygen uptake and/or utilization during fatiguing exercise coincident with an augmented BP response. NEW & NOTEWORTHY In this laboratory study, patients with peripheral artery disease performed plantar flexion exercise in the supine posture until symptoms of claudication occurred. Relative to age- and sex-matched healthy subjects we found that patients had a higher blood pressure response, a higher heart rate response, and a greater reduction in skeletal muscle oxygenation as

  17. Plantar calcaneal enthesophytes: new observations regarding sites of origin based on radiographic, MR imaging, anatomic, and paleopathologic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, M.R.; Chung, C.B.; Mendes, L.; Mohana-Borges, A.; Trudell, D.; Resnick, D. [Department of Radiology, Musculoskeletal Section, VA San Diego Healthcare System, 3350 La Jolla Village Drive, San Diego, CA 92161 (United States)

    2003-01-01

    To determine the relationship between sites of calcaneal plantar enthesophytes and surrounding fascial and soft tissue structures using routine radiography, MR imaging, and data derived from cadaveric and paleopathologic specimens.Design and patients. Two observers analyzed the MR imaging studies of 40 ankles in 38 patients (35 males, 3 females; mean age 48.3 years) with plantar calcaneal enthesophytes that were selected from all the ankle MR examinations performed during the past year. Data derived from these MR examinations were the following: the size of the enthesophyte; its location in relation to the plantar fascia (PF) and flexor muscles; and the thickness and signal of the PF. The corresponding radiographs of the ankles were evaluated at a different time by the same observers for the presence or absence of plantar enthesophytes and, when present, their measurements. A third observer reviewed all the discordant observations of MR imaging and radiographic examinations. Two observers analyzed 22 calcaneal specimens with plantar enthesophytes at an anthropology museum to determine the orientation of each plantar enthesophyte. MR imaging of a cadaveric foot with a plantar enthesophyte with subsequent sagittal sectioning was performed to provide further anatomic understanding.Results. With regard to MR imaging, the mean size of the plantar enthesophytes was 4.41 mm (SD 2.4). Twenty (50%) enthesophytes were located above the PF, 16 (40%) between the fascia and abductor digiti minimi, flexor digitorum brevis and abductor hallucis muscles, and only one (3%) was located within the PF. In three (8%) cases the location was not determined. The size of enthesophytes seen with MR imaging and radiographs was highly correlated (P<0.01). The interobserver agreement for all measurements was good (Pearson >0.8, kappa >0.9). Eleven of the 22 bone specimens had plantar enthesophytes oriented in the direction of the abductor digiti minimi and 11 oriented in the direction of the

  18. Plantar calcaneal enthesophytes: new observations regarding sites of origin based on radiographic, MR imaging, anatomic, and paleopathologic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abreu, M.R.; Chung, C.B.; Mendes, L.; Mohana-Borges, A.; Trudell, D.; Resnick, D.

    2003-01-01

    To determine the relationship between sites of calcaneal plantar enthesophytes and surrounding fascial and soft tissue structures using routine radiography, MR imaging, and data derived from cadaveric and paleopathologic specimens.Design and patients. Two observers analyzed the MR imaging studies of 40 ankles in 38 patients (35 males, 3 females; mean age 48.3 years) with plantar calcaneal enthesophytes that were selected from all the ankle MR examinations performed during the past year. Data derived from these MR examinations were the following: the size of the enthesophyte; its location in relation to the plantar fascia (PF) and flexor muscles; and the thickness and signal of the PF. The corresponding radiographs of the ankles were evaluated at a different time by the same observers for the presence or absence of plantar enthesophytes and, when present, their measurements. A third observer reviewed all the discordant observations of MR imaging and radiographic examinations. Two observers analyzed 22 calcaneal specimens with plantar enthesophytes at an anthropology museum to determine the orientation of each plantar enthesophyte. MR imaging of a cadaveric foot with a plantar enthesophyte with subsequent sagittal sectioning was performed to provide further anatomic understanding.Results. With regard to MR imaging, the mean size of the plantar enthesophytes was 4.41 mm (SD 2.4). Twenty (50%) enthesophytes were located above the PF, 16 (40%) between the fascia and abductor digiti minimi, flexor digitorum brevis and abductor hallucis muscles, and only one (3%) was located within the PF. In three (8%) cases the location was not determined. The size of enthesophytes seen with MR imaging and radiographs was highly correlated (P 0.8, kappa >0.9). Eleven of the 22 bone specimens had plantar enthesophytes oriented in the direction of the abductor digiti minimi and 11 oriented in the direction of the flexor digitorum brevis and PF. The cadaveric sections revealed different

  19. Diabetic footwear: is it an assistive technology capable of reducing peak plantar pressures in elderly patients with neuropathy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Faraco de Oliveira

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Diabetes Mellitus is a chronic disease with high prevalence in the population in particular among the elderly. The longer time of diabetes, increased the chances of developing complications such as peripheral neuropathy, which is an important factor in the genesis of plantar lesions by changing the distribution and formation of plantar pressure peaks. Objective: Evaluate the influence of an Assistive Technology, therapeutic footwear for diabetics, in the peaks of plantar pressure of elderly. Methods: This was an experimental study of transversal type, composed by 10 elderly, diabetic, with peripheral neuropathy, using as an instrument to measure a baropodometry platform. Were measured peaks of plantar pressure, static and dynamic in three situations: barefoot, the participants' own standard footwear and with therapeutic footwear for diabetics. Data analysis by normal distribution as a single paired sample, applying the ANOVA test. Results: The use of therapeutic footwear for diabetics promoted a reduction in media of peak plantar pressure in the order of 22% in static analysis, and 31% in dynamic analysis. Conclusion: The therapeutic footwear for diabetics was able to produce significant reductions in peak plantar pressure, being more efficient than a common footwear. This effect may contribute to the prevention of injuries associated with the diabetic foot.

  20. Reconstruction of soft-tissue lesions of the foot with the use of the medial plantar flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jefferson Lessa Soares de Macedo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To study use of the medial plantar flap for reconstruction of the heel and foot. METHOD: The authors share their clinical experience with the use of the medial plantar artery flap for coverage of tissue defects around the foot and heel after trauma. Twelve cases of medial plantar artery flap performed from January 2001 to December 2013 were included. RESULTS: Of the 12 patients, ten were male and two were female. The indications were traumatic loss of the heel pad in ten cases and the dorsal foot in two cases. All the flaps healed uneventfully without major complications, except one case with partial flap loss. The donor site was covered with a split-thickness skin graft. The flaps had slightly inferior protective sensation compared with the normal side. CONCLUSION: From these results, the authors suggest that the medial plantar artery flap is a good addition to the existing armamentarium for coverage of the foot and heel. It is versatile flap that can cover defects on the heel, over the Achilles tendon and plantar surface, as well as the dorsal foot. It provides tissue to the plantar skin with a similar texture and intact protective sensation.

  1. Diabetic foot ulcer incidence in relation to plantar pressure magnitude and measurement location☆,☆☆,★

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledoux, William R.; Shofer, Jane B.; Cowley, Matthew S.; Ahroni, Jessie H.; Cohen, Victoria; Boyko, Edward J.

    2014-01-01

    Aims We prospectively examined the relationship between site-specific peak plantar pressure (PPP) and ulcer risk. Researchers have previously reported associations between diabetic foot ulcer and elevated plantar foot pressure, but the effect of location-specific pressures has not been studied. Methods Diabetic subjects (n = 591) were enrolled from a single VA hospital. Five measurements of in-shoe plantar pressure were collected using F-Scan. Pressures were measured at 8 areas: heel, lateral midfoot, medial midfoot, first metatarsal, second through fourth metatarsal, fifth metatarsal, hallux, and other toes. The relationship between incident plantar foot ulcer and PPP or pressure–time integral (PTI) was assessed using Cox regression. Results During follow-up (2.4 years), 47 subjects developed plantar ulcers (10 heel, 12 metatarsal, 19 hallux, 6 other). Overall mean PPP was higher for ulcer subjects (219 vs. 194 kPa), but the relationship differed by site (the metatarsals with ulcers had higher pressure, while the opposite was true for the hallux and heel). A statistical analysis was not performed on the means, but hazard ratios from a Cox survival analysis were nonsignificant for PPP across all sites and when adjusted for location. However, when the metatarsals were considered separately, higher baseline PPP was significantly associated with greater ulcer risk; at other sites, this relationship was nonsignificant. Hazard ratios for all PTI data were nonsignificant. Conclusions Location must be considered when assessing the relationship between PPP and plantar ulceration. PMID:24012295

  2. Randomized multicenter follow-up trial on the effect of radiotherapy on painful heel spur (plantar fasciitis) comparing two fractionation schedules with uniform total dose: first results after three months' follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niewald, Marcus; Holtmann, Henrik; Prokein, Benjamin; Hautmann, Matthias G; Rösler, Hans-Peter; Graeber, Stefan; Dzierma, Yvonne; Ruebe, Christian; Fleckenstein, Jochen

    2015-08-19

    Our first trial on radiotherapy for painful heel spur published in 2012 comparing the analgesic effect of a standard dose (6 × 1.0 Gy within three weeks) to that of a very low one (6 × 0.1 Gy within three weeks) resulted in a highly significant superiority of the standard dose arm. In the meantime, experimental data have shown that lower single doses in the range of 0.5 - 0.7 Gy might be even more effective than the current standard dose of 1.0 Gy. Therefore, we conducted a second trial comparing the analgesic effect of standard single doses of 1.0 Gy to that of low single doses of 0.5 Gy using uniform total doses of 6 Gy. One hundred twenty-seven patients were randomized to receive radiation therapy either with a total dose of 6.0 Gy applied in 6 fractions of 1.0 Gy twice weekly (standard dose) or with the same total dose applied in 12 fractions of 0.5 Gy three times weekly (experimental dose). In all patients lateral opposing 6MV photon beams were used. The results were measured using Visual analogue scale (VAS), Calcaneodynia score (CS) and SF-12 health survey. The first phase of this trial ended after a three months' follow-up; it will be continued up to 48 weeks. Nine patients had to be excluded after randomization either due to the withdrawal of informed consent to radiotherapy by the patients or radiotherapy with an incorrect dosage. The groups were comparable concerning biographical and disease data. The mean calcaneodynia score (CS) was higher in the experimental group (p = 0.002). After three months' follow-up, we saw a very favorable pain relief in both arms (decline of VAS score: standard arm 42 points, experimental arm 44 points (n.s.), but we did not notice any statistically significant difference between the arms neither concerning the pain parameters nor the quality of life parameters. No relevant acute side effects were recorded. Favorable laboratory results could not be translated into an enhanced pain relief in our patients. This trial was terminated after the interim analysis (127 patients randomized). Further trials will be necessary to explore the best fractionation schedule. This trial has been approved by the expert panel of the DEGRO as well as by the Ethics committee of the Saarland Physicians' chamber. Current trial registration at German Clinical Trials Register with the number DRKS00004458.

  3. Randomized, Multicenter Trial on the Effect of Radiation Therapy on Plantar Fasciitis (Painful Heel Spur) Comparing a Standard Dose With a Very Low Dose: Mature Results After 12 Months' Follow-Up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niewald, Marcus; Seegenschmiedt, M. Heinrich; Micke, Oliver; Graeber, Stefan; Muecke, Ralf; Schaefer, Vera; Scheid, Christine; Fleckenstein, Jochen; Licht, Norbert; Ruebe, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To conduct a randomized trial of radiation therapy for painful heel spur, comparing a standard dose with a very low dose. Methods and Materials: Sixty-six patients were randomized to receive radiation therapy either with a total dose of 6.0 Gy applied in 6 fractions of 1.0 Gy twice weekly (standard dose) or with a total dose of 0.6 Gy applied in 6 fractions of 0.1 Gy twice weekly (low dose). In all patients lateral opposing 4- to 6-MV photon beams were used. The results were measured using a visual analogue scale, the Calcaneodynia score, and the SF12 health survey. The fundamental phase of the study ended after 3 months, and the follow-up was continued up to 1 year. Patients with insufficient pain relief after 3 months were offered reirradiation with the standard dosage at any time afterward. Results: Of 66 patients, 4 were excluded because of withdrawal of consent or screening failures. After 3 months the results in the standard arm were highly significantly superior compared with those in the low-dose arm (visual analogue scale, P=.001; Calcaneodynia score, P=.027; SF12, P=.045). The accrual of patients was stopped at this point. Further evaluation after 12 months' follow-up showed the following results: (1) highly significant fewer patients were reirradiated in the standard arm compared with the low-dose arm (P<.001); (2) the results of patients in the low-dose arm who were reirradiated were identical to those in the standard arm not reirradiated (reirradiation as a salvage therapy if the lower dose was ineffective); (3) patients experiencing a favorable result after 3 months showed this even after 12 months, and some results even improved further between 3 and 12 months. Conclusions: This study confirms the superior analgesic effect of radiation therapy with 6-Gy doses on painful heel spur even for a longer time period of at least 1 year.

  4. Randomized, Multicenter Trial on the Effect of Radiation Therapy on Plantar Fasciitis (Painful Heel Spur) Comparing a Standard Dose With a Very Low Dose: Mature Results After 12 Months' Follow-Up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niewald, Marcus, E-mail: marcus.niewald@uks.eu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saarland University Medical Center, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Seegenschmiedt, M. Heinrich [Radiotherapy Center, Hamburg (Germany); Micke, Oliver [Franziskus Hospital, Bielefeld (Germany); Graeber, Stefan [Institute for Medical Biometry, Epidemiology and Medical Informatics, Saarland University Medical Center, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Muecke, Ralf [Lippe Hospital, Lemgo (Germany); Schaefer, Vera; Scheid, Christine; Fleckenstein, Jochen; Licht, Norbert; Ruebe, Christian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saarland University Medical Center, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To conduct a randomized trial of radiation therapy for painful heel spur, comparing a standard dose with a very low dose. Methods and Materials: Sixty-six patients were randomized to receive radiation therapy either with a total dose of 6.0 Gy applied in 6 fractions of 1.0 Gy twice weekly (standard dose) or with a total dose of 0.6 Gy applied in 6 fractions of 0.1 Gy twice weekly (low dose). In all patients lateral opposing 4- to 6-MV photon beams were used. The results were measured using a visual analogue scale, the Calcaneodynia score, and the SF12 health survey. The fundamental phase of the study ended after 3 months, and the follow-up was continued up to 1 year. Patients with insufficient pain relief after 3 months were offered reirradiation with the standard dosage at any time afterward. Results: Of 66 patients, 4 were excluded because of withdrawal of consent or screening failures. After 3 months the results in the standard arm were highly significantly superior compared with those in the low-dose arm (visual analogue scale, P=.001; Calcaneodynia score, P=.027; SF12, P=.045). The accrual of patients was stopped at this point. Further evaluation after 12 months' follow-up showed the following results: (1) highly significant fewer patients were reirradiated in the standard arm compared with the low-dose arm (P<.001); (2) the results of patients in the low-dose arm who were reirradiated were identical to those in the standard arm not reirradiated (reirradiation as a salvage therapy if the lower dose was ineffective); (3) patients experiencing a favorable result after 3 months showed this even after 12 months, and some results even improved further between 3 and 12 months. Conclusions: This study confirms the superior analgesic effect of radiation therapy with 6-Gy doses on painful heel spur even for a longer time period of at least 1 year.

  5. Dynamic plantar pressure distribution, strength capacity and postural control after Lisfranc fracture-dislocation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehlhorn, Alexander T; Walther, Markus; Yilmaz, Tayfun

    2017-01-01

    of life. 17 consecutive patients suffering from a Lisfranc fracture dislocation were registered, underwent open reduction and internal fixation and were followed-up for 50.5±25.7months (Mean±SDM). Biomechanical analysis of muscle strength capacities, postural control and plantar pressure distribution......Substantial progress has been made in the operative treatment of Lisfranc fractures, however, the prognosis remains poor. We hypothesized that Lisfranc injuries change the postural control and muscle strength of the lower limb. Both are suggested to correlate with the clinical outcome and quality...... correlated well with clinical outcome. Altered postural control was evident by a significant reduction in unilateral stance time, from which we calculated a strong correlation between stance time and the isokinetic strength measurement. Plantar pressure measurements revealed a significant reduction in peak...

  6. ¿Dónde estamos en la patología de la fascitis plantar?

    OpenAIRE

    Keenan, Anne Marie

    2014-01-01

    La fascitis plantar es uno de los problemas musculoesqueléticos más frecuentes en las extremidades inferiores. Es una de las pocas áreas de la práctica podológica donde hay un conjunto de pruebas que evalúan el tratamiento y el diagnóstico. Esta presentación le permitirá navegar a través de la investigación para explorar los problemas actuales en el diagnóstico de fascitis plantar, incluyendo la presentación clínica y diagnóstico diferencial. Universidad de Málaga. Campus de Excelencia Int...

  7. Stresses in the plantar region for long- and short-range throws in women basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pau, Massimiliano; Ciuti, Carla

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to assess plantar pressure pattern modifications caused by short- and long-distance shots in women basketball players. To this end, 24 experienced national- and regional-level basketball players performed 3 trials of 4 technical gestures (free throw, jump stop shot, three-point shot and lay-up) barefoot on a pressure platform placed in fixed positions on the court. Raw data were processed to calculate location and magnitude of pressure peaks in three sub-regions (forefoot, midfoot and rearfoot), and the increase ratio was calculated relative to plantar pressure measured during a static bipedal and unipedal upright stance. The results showed significant increases (ptraining and rehabilitation protocols.

  8. Ultrasound evaluation of foot muscles and plantar fascia in pes planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angin, Salih; Crofts, Gillian; Mickle, Karen J; Nester, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    Multiple intrinsic and extrinsic soft tissue structures that apply forces and support the medial longitudinal arch have been implicated in pes planus. These structures have common functions but their interaction in pes planus is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to compare the cross-sectional area (CSA) and thickness of the intrinsic and extrinsic foot muscles and plantar fascia thickness between normal and pes planus feet. Forty-nine adults with a normal foot posture and 49 individuals with pes planus feet were recruited from a university population. Images of the flexor digitorum longus (FDL), flexor hallucis longus (FHL), peroneus longus and brevis (PER), flexor hallucis brevis (FHB), flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) and abductor hallucis (AbH) muscles and the plantar fascia were obtained using a Venue 40 ultrasound system with a 5-13 MHz transducer. The CSA and thickness of AbH, FHB and PER muscles were significantly smaller (AbH -12.8% and -6.8%, FHB -8.9% and -7.6%, PER -14.7% and -10%), whilst FDL (28.3% and 15.2%) and FHL (24% and 9.8%) were significantly larger in the pes planus group. The middle (-10.6%) and anterior (-21.7%) portions of the plantar fascia were thinner in pes planus group. Greater CSA and thickness of the extrinsic muscles might reflect compensatory activity to support the MLA if the intrinsic foot muscle function has been compromised by altered foot structure. A thinner plantar fascia suggests reduced load bearing, and regional variations in structure and function in feet with pes planus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Morphological pattern classification system for plantar thermography of patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Taketoshi; Nagase, Takashi; Takehara, Kimie; Oe, Makoto; Ohashi, Yumiko; Amemiya, Ayumi; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Ueki, Kohjiro; Kadowaki, Takashi; Sanada, Hiromi

    2013-09-01

    A plantar temperature distribution can be obtained by thermography; however, the advantage has not been effectively utilized in the past. We previously proposed a classification method based on the angiosome concept, but the method was insufficient because it was too subjective and complicated for clinicians. In this study, we propose a new classification system of plantar forepart thermographic patterns using an image segmentation technique. A cross-sectional observational study was conducted including 32 healthy volunteers and 129 patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). Individual thermographic variations and trends were evaluated. A comparison was conducted between the patterns obtained by our previous angiosome-based research and the patterns found by the new classification system. The system objectively found wider variations of the plantar forepart thermographic patterns in the patients with DM compared with those in the control subjects. In patients with DM, the system showed that the whole-high pattern was most frequent (46%), followed by the butterfly pattern (12%). In the control group, the butterfly pattern was most frequent (44%), followed by the whole-high pattern (19%). Both ankle and toe brachial indices were higher in feet with high temperature area in the inner side of the plantar. Thermographic patterns found by the new computer-based system were similar to those obtained in our previous subjective work. The classification system found forefoot-low pattern and tiptoe-low pattern objectively. The system based on infrared thermography will be a screening tool to assess circulatory status in daily foot care of patients with DM. © 2013 Diabetes Technology Society.

  10. Activation of plantar flexor muscles is constrained by multiple muscle synergies rather than joint torques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahito Suzuki

    Full Text Available Behavioral evidence has suggested that a small number of muscle synergies may be responsible for activating a variety of muscles. Nevertheless, such dimensionality reduction may also be explained using the perspective of alternative hypotheses, such as predictions based on linear combinations of joint torques multiplied by corresponding coefficients. To compare the explanatory capacity of these hypotheses for describing muscle activation, we enrolled 12 male volunteers who performed isometric plantar flexor contractions at 10-100% of maximum effort. During each plantar flexor contraction, the knee extensor muscles were isometrically contracted at 0%, 50%, or 100% of maximum effort. Electromyographic activity was recorded from the vastus lateralis, medial gastrocnemius (MG, lateral gastrocnemius (LG, and soleus muscles and quantified using the average rectified value (ARV. At lower plantar flexion torque, regression analysis identified a clear linear relationship between the MG and soleus ARVs and between the MG and LG ARVs, suggesting the presence of muscle synergy (r2 > 0.65. The contraction of the knee extensor muscles induced a significant change in the slope of this relationship for both pairs of muscles (MG × soleus, P = 0.002; MG × LG, P = 0.006. Similarly, the slope of the linear relationship between the plantar flexion torque and the ARV of the MG or soleus changed significantly with knee extensor contraction (P = 0.031 and P = 0.041, respectively. These results suggest that muscle synergies characterized by non-mechanical constraints are selectively recruited according to whether contraction of the knee extensor muscles is performed simultaneously, which is relatively consistent with the muscle synergy hypothesis.

  11. Palmar and plantar lichen planus: a case report and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Velez, Ana Maria Abreu; Howard, Michael S; Pereyo, Neville

    2015-01-01

    AbstractPalmoplantar lichen planus is an uncommon dermatosis. We present a case of 38-year-old Caucasian male with a history of pruritic, scaly lesions on the right plantar foot. Physical examination revealed whitish plaques and numerous spiny hyperkeratotic papules and focal scaling. A biopsy demonstrated orthohyperkeratosis and acanthosis of the epidermis. Immunohistochemical staining revealed positivity within the epidermis and/or lichenoid infiltrate with CD3, CD8, CD45, CD68, myeloid his...

  12. Quantifying dynamic changes in plantar pressure gradient in diabetics with peripheral neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Wen Lung

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic foot ulcers remain one of the most serious complications of diabetes. Peak plantar pressure (PPP and peak pressure gradient (PPG during walking have been shown to be associated with the development of diabetic foot ulcers. To gain further insight into the mechanical etiology of diabetic foot ulcers, examination of the pressure gradient angle (PGA has been recently proposed. The PGA quantifies directional variation or orientation of the pressure gradient during walking, and provides a measure of whether pressure gradient patterns are concentrated or dispersed along the plantar surface. We hypothesized that diabetics at risk of foot ulceration would have smaller PGA in key plantar regions, suggesting less movement of the pressure gradient over time. A total of 27 participants were studied, including 19 diabetics with peripheral neuropathy and 8 non-diabetic control subjects. A foot pressure measurement system was used to measure plantar pressures during walking. PPP, PPG and PGA were calculated for four foot regions - 1st toe (T1, 1st metatarsal head (M1, 2nd metatarsal head (M2, and heel (HL. Consistent with prior studies, PPP and PPG were significantly larger in the diabetic group compared to non-diabetic controls in the T1 and M1 regions, but not M2 or HL. For example, PPP was 165% (P=0.02 and PPG was 214% (P<0.001 larger in T1. PGA was found to be significantly smaller in the diabetic group in T1 (46%, P=0.04, suggesting a more concentrated pressure gradient pattern under the toe. The proposed PGA may improve our understanding of the role of pressure gradient on the risk of diabetic foot ulcers.

  13. Risk factors for plantar foot ulcer recurrence in neuropathic diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waaijman, Roelof; de Haart, Mirjam; Arts, Mark L J; Wever, Daniel; Verlouw, Anke J W E; Nollet, Frans; Bus, Sicco A

    2014-06-01

    Recurrence of plantar foot ulcers is a common and major problem in diabetes but not well understood. Foot biomechanics and patient behavior may be important. The aim was to identify risk factors for ulcer recurrence and to establish targets for ulcer prevention. As part of a footwear trial, 171 neuropathic diabetic patients with a recently healed plantar foot ulcer and custom-made footwear were followed for 18 months or until ulceration. Demographic data, disease-related parameters, presence of minor lesions, barefoot and in-shoe plantar peak pressures, footwear adherence, and daily stride count were entered in a multivariate multilevel logistic regression model of plantar foot ulcer recurrence. A total of 71 patients had a recurrent ulcer. Significant independent predictors were presence of minor lesions (odds ratio 9.06 [95% CI 2.98-27.57]), day-to-day variation in stride count (0.93 [0.89-0.99]), and cumulative duration of past foot ulcers (1.03 [1.00-1.06]). Significant independent predictors for those 41 recurrences suggested to be the result of unrecognized repetitive trauma were presence of minor lesions (10.95 [5.01-23.96]), in-shoe peak pressure 80% (0.43 [0.20-0.94]), barefoot peak pressure (1.11 [1.00-1.22]), and day-to-day variation in stride count (0.91 [0.86-0.96]). The presence of a minor lesion was clearly the strongest predictor, while recommended use of adequately offloading footwear was a strong protector against ulcer recurrence from unrecognized repetitive trauma. These outcomes define clear targets for diabetic foot screening and ulcer prevention. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association.

  14. How to classify plantar plate injuries: parameters from history and physical examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caio Nery

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To find the best clinical parameters for defining and classifying the degree of plantar plate injuries. METHOD: Sixty-eight patients (100 metatarsophalangeal joints were classified in accordance with the Arthroscopic Anatomical Classification for plantar plate injuries and were divided into five groups (0 to IV. Their medical files were reviewed and the incidence of each parameter for the respective group was correlated. These parameters were: use of high heels, sports, acute pain, local edema, Mulder's sign, widening of the interdigital space, pain in the head of the corresponding metatarsal, touching the ground, "drawer test", toe grip and toe deformities (in the sagittal, coronal and transversal planes. RESULTS: There were no statistically significant associations between the degree of injury and use of high-heel shoes, sports trauma, pain at the head of the metatarsal, Mulder's sign, deformity in pronation or displacement in the transversal and sagittal planes (although their combination, i.e. "cross toe", showed a statistically significant correlation. Positive correlations with the severity of the injuries were found in relation to initial acute pain, progressive widening of the interdigital space, loss of "touching the ground", positive results from the "drawer test" on the metatarsophalangeal joint, diminished grip strength and toe deformity in supination. CONCLUSIONS: The "drawer test" was seen to be the more reliable and precise tool for classifying the degree of plantar plate injury, followed by "touching the ground" and rotational deformities. It is possible to improve the precision of the diagnosis and the predictions of the anatomical classification for plantar plate injuries through combining the clinical history and data from the physical examination.

  15. Relação entre sensibilidade plantar e controle postural em jovens e idosos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Suemi Ueda

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2013v15n2p215 A diminuição da sensibilidade plantar em idosos acarreta alterações na locomoção e no controle postural que podem aumentar o risco de quedas. Compreender o uso de aferências podais em idosos pode auxiliar na prevenção da perda de mobilidade e quedas. Contudo, a relação entre a sensibilidade de diferentes regiões do pé e alterações no controle postural representa uma lacuna na literatura. Com o propósito de investigar esta lacuna na literatura, o objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a relação entre a sensibilidade plantar e o controle postural em jovens e idosos. Foram avaliados 42 participantes, organizados em dois grupos de acordo com a faixa etária (jovens ou idosos. Os participantes foram avaliados quanto às características antropométricas, sensibilidade dos pés (usando monofilamentos e controle postural (usando plataforma de força. Os índices de sensibilidade plantar e de controle postural foram correlacionados e comparados entre os grupos. Os resultados mostraram que idosos tiveram menor sensibilidade dos pés e pior controle postural do que jovens. A amplitude ântero-posterior e a área do centro de pressão de idosos tiveram correlação com a sensibilidade plantar geral, mas não com regiões específicas do pé. Para jovens, a sensibilidade na região do antepé esteve relacionada com o melhor controle postural.

  16. Randomized trial - oxybutynin for treatment of persistent plantar hyperhidrosis in women after sympathectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Costa, Altair; Leão, Luiz Eduardo Villaça; Succi, José Ernesto; Perfeito, Joao Aléssio Juliano; Filho, Adauto Castelo; Rymkiewicz, Erika; Filho, Marco Aurelio Marchetti

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Hyperhidrosis is a common disease, and thoracoscopic sympathectomy improves its symptoms in up to 95% of cases. Unfortunately, after surgery, plantar hyperhidrosis may remain in 50% of patients, and compensatory sweating may be observed in 70%. This clinical scenario remains a challenge. Our objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of oxybutynin in the treatment of persistent plantar hyperhidrosis and compensatory sweating and its effects on quality of life in women after thoracoscopic sympathectomy. METHOD: We conducted a prospective, randomized study to compare the effects of oxybutynin at 10 mg daily and placebo in women with persistent plantar hyperhidrosis. The assessment was performed using a quality-of-life questionnaire for hyperhidrosis and sweating measurement with a device for quantifying transepidermal water loss. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01328015. RESULTS: Sixteen patients were included in each group (placebo and oxybutynin). There were no significant differences between the groups prior to treatment. After oxybutynin treatment, there was a decrease in symptoms and clinical improvement based on the quality-of-life questionnaire (before treatment, 40.4 vs. after treatment, 17.5; p = 0.001). The placebo group showed modest improvement (p = 0.09). The outcomes of the transepidermal water loss measurements in the placebo group showed no differences (p = 0.95), whereas the oxybutynin group revealed a significant decrease (p = 0.001). The most common side effect was dry mouth (100% in the oxybutynin group vs. 43.8% in the placebo group; p = 0.001). CONCLUSION: Oxybutynin was effective in the treatment of persistent plantar hyperhidrosis, resulting in a better quality of life in women who had undergone thoracoscopic sympathectomy. PMID:24519200

  17. MRI of the plantar structures of the foot after falanga torture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savnik, A.; Roegind, H.; Danneskiold-Samsoee, B.; Bliddal, H.; Boesen, J.

    2000-01-01

    Falanga is an ancient form of punishment or torture but is still commonly reported by our refugees. The late result of caning the heel and ball of the foot is a chronic painful condition with few clinical signs. The aim of the present study was to assess, by MRI, possible morphologic characteristics of the heel and ball of the foot, related to falanga and pain in correlation to clinical findings. Magnetic resonance imaging of the foot was obtained in 12 victims exposed to falanga torture and 9 healthy volunteers. Sagittal T1-weighted spin-echo images (TR 616-840 ms, TE 20 ms), T2-weighted spin-echo images (TR 1900 ms, TE 90 ms), and short tau inversion recovery (STIR) images (TR 1200 ms, TE 15 ms, TI 100 ms) were performed. The central portion of the plantar aponeurosis was generally significantly thicker in victims exposed to falanga torture as compared with that of controls (P < 0.05). In all except one of the victims, MRI demonstrated two layers of the thickened plantar aponeurosis: a deeper portion with normal homogeneous low signal intensity (SI) appearance, and a superficial layer with characteristic areas of mixed SI on both T1- and T2-weighted images. There were no signs of chronic muscular compartment syndromes, and the thickness of the plantar pad did not differ between the two groups. Magnetic resonance imaging may demonstrate morphologic characteristics of the plantar aponeurosis which may confirm falanga torture. Further imaging with more specific sequences is warranted to demonstrate the supposed injuries in the compartmental fat tissue chambers and the vascularity of the ball pad of the foot. (orig.)

  18. Morphological Pattern Classification System for Plantar Thermography of Patients with Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Taketoshi; Nagase, Takashi; Takehara, Kimie; Oe, Makoto; Ohashi, Yumiko; Amemiya, Ayumi; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Ueki, Kohjiro; Kadowaki, Takashi; Sanada, Hiromi

    2013-01-01

    Background A plantar temperature distribution can be obtained by thermography; however, the advantage has not been effectively utilized in the past. We previously proposed a classification method based on the angiosome concept, but the method was insufficient because it was too subjective and complicated for clinicians. In this study, we propose a new classification system of plantar forepart thermographic patterns using an image segmentation technique. Methods A cross-sectional observational study was conducted including 32 healthy volunteers and 129 patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). Individual thermographic variations and trends were evaluated. A comparison was conducted between the patterns obtained by our previous angiosome-based research and the patterns found by the new classification system. Results The system objectively found wider variations of the plantar forepart thermographic patterns in the patients with DM compared with those in the control subjects. In patients with DM, the system showed that the whole-high pattern was most frequent (46%), followed by the butterfly pattern (12%). In the control group, the butterfly pattern was most frequent (44%), followed by the whole-high pattern (19%). Both ankle and toe brachial indices were higher in feet with high temperature area in the inner side of the plantar. Conclusions Thermographic patterns found by the new computer-based system were similar to those obtained in our previous subjective work. The classification system found forefoot-low pattern and tiptoe-low pattern objectively. The system based on infrared thermography will be a screening tool to assess circulatory status in daily foot care of patients with DM. PMID:24124935

  19. Midfoot fusion: a biomechanical comparison of plantar planting vs intramedullary screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Ernest J; Takemoto, Richelle C; Kummer, Frederick J; Mroczek, Kenneth J

    2013-03-01

    Numerous reconstructive techniques for midfoot collapse secondary to Charcot neuroarthropathy have been described, but few have been studied biomechanically. The purpose of this study was to biomechanically compare 2 of the most common techniques. Seven paired below-knee specimens were amputated through the talonavicular and calcaneocuboid joints. The nonligamentous soft tissue was stripped proximal to the metatarsal heads and disarticulated through the tarsometatarsal (TMT) joints. For each paired specimen, the TMT joints were fused by plantar plating or intramedullary screw fixation for the contralateral side. The specimens were mounted, loaded, and cycled, and fixation stiffness was determined. Load versus displacement graphs were used to calculate overall construct stiffness, and data were analyzed by Student t tests. There was no failure of hardware. All failures were at the bone-implant interface. Failure was either by screw pull-out, bone fracture, or a combination of the two. There were no notable differences between the 2 fixation techniques with respect to stiffness or loads to failure. There was a trend toward a stiffer first TMT construct using the plantar plating method. Five of the 7 screw fixations failed by pullout of the base of the first metatarsal and the other 2 by pullout of screws from all MT bases. Seven of the 7 plantar plate fixations failed by separation of the fifth to third MT bases originating at the fifth, and 3 showed fracture of the fifth metatarsal base. There was no notable biomechanical difference between the 2 techniques. There was a trend toward a stiffer construct at the first TMT with plantar plating. This study biomechanically analyzes two common Charcot midfoot reconstruction techniques and highlights the need for further study of both techniques and combinations of these techniques.

  20. Optimal Fixation of Jones Fractures Sacrifices the Peroneal Brevis Tendon Insertion andthe Plantar Fascia

    OpenAIRE

    van Dijk, Pim A.d.; Breuking, Sofie; Vopat, Bryan G.; Guss, Daniel; Johnson, Anne H.; Hosseini, Ali; DiGiovanni, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Patients with Jones fractures (JF) frequently undergo operative management with intramedullary screw fixation. Screw insertion through the base of the fifth metatarsal potentially compromises attachment points of the plantar fascia (PF) and peroneal brevis tendon (PB), and appropriate screw length and diameter remains controversial. The aim of this study was to define the anatomy of the fifth metatarsal bone using CT modeling in order to provide better guidance regarding optimized...