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Sample records for treat autoimmune lymphoproliferative

  1. Recurrent Oral Inflammation in Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome

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    Pac, Malgorzata; Olczak-Kowalczyk, Dorota; Wolska-Kuśnierz, Beata; Piątosa, Barbara; Górska, Renata; Bernatowska, Ewa

    2014-01-01

    Abstract   Background and aim: Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a disorder of abnormal lymphocyte survival caused by dysregulation of the Fas apoptotic pathway. In ALPS defective lymphocyte apoptosis manifests as a chronic, nonmalignant lymphadenopathy and/or splenomegaly/hepatosplenomegaly, expansion of double negative T cell (DNTC) – CD4-CD8-TCRαβ+ T cells, autoimmune cytopenias and other autoimmune diseases.  Patients demonstrate oral lesions which have not yet been repo...

  2. Tubulointerstitial Nephritis in a Patient With Probable Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glerup, Mia; Herlin, Troels; Rittig, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is caused by a nonmalignant defective Fas-mediated apoptosis. The main clinical manifestations are chronic lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, and autoimmune cytopenia. Most patients with ALPS have a FAS germline mutation. ALPS has occasionally been......-vessel vasculitis with normal glomeruli and inflammation in the interstitium. The patient responded to prednisolone treatment and obtained a full renal recovery. Symptoms of connective tissue disorder supervened and after the development of more pronounced splenomegaly, a diagnosis of ALPS was confirmed....

  3. Approaches to managing cytopenias in Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Koneti eRao

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS is a rare disorder frequently due to mutations in FAS (TNFRSF6 gene. Unlike most of the self limiting autoimmune cytopenias sporadically seen in childhood, multi lineage cytopenias due to ALPS are often refractory as their inherited genetic defect is not going to go away. Historically more ALPS patients have died due to overwhelming sepsis following splenectomy to manage their chronic cytopenias than due to any other cause, including malignancies. Hence current recommendations underscore the importance of avoiding splenectomy in ALPS, by long-term use of corticosteroid sparing immunosuppressive agents like mycophenolate mofetil and sirolimus. Paradigms learnt from managing ALPS patients in recent years is highlighted here and can be extrapolated to manage refractory cytopenias in patients with as yet undetermined genetic bases for their ailments. It is also desirable to develop international registries for children with rare and complex immune problems associated with chronic multilineage cytopenias in order to elucidate their natural history and long-term comorbidities due to their disease and its treatments.

  4. Diagnosis of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome caused by FAS deficiency in adults

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    Lambotte, Olivier; Neven, Bénédicte; Galicier, Lionel; Magerus-Chatinet, Aude; Schleinitz, Nicolas; Hermine, Olivier; Meyts, Isabelle; Picard, Capucine; Godeau, Bertrand; Fischer, Alain; Rieux-Laucat, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    A diagnosis of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome caused by FAS deficiency during adulthood is unusual. We analyzed 17 cases of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome caused by FAS deficiency diagnosed during adulthood in French reference centers for hereditary immunodeficiencies and for immune cytopenias. Twelve of the 17 patients had developed their first symptoms during childhood. The diagnosis of autoimmune lymphopro-liferative syndrome had been delayed for a variety of reasons, including unusual clinical manifestations, late referral to a reference center, and the occurrence of somatic FAS mutations. The 5 other patients presented their first symptoms after the age of 16 years. In these patients, three germline heterozygous FAS mutations were predicted to be associated with haploinsufficiency and a somatic event on the second FAS allele was observed in 2 cases. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome may well be diagnosed in adulthood. The occurrence of additional genetic events may account for the delayed disease onset. PMID:22983577

  5. Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome: A Rare Cause of Disappearing HDL Syndrome

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    Swetha Sriram

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The term disappearing HDL syndrome refers to development of severe high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C deficiency in noncritically ill patients with previously normal HDL-C and triglyceride levels. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS is a disorder of the immune system due to an inability to regulate lymphocyte homeostasis resulting in lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly. We describe a 17-year-old boy who was evaluated in the lipid clinic for history of undetectable or low HDL-C and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C levels. Past medical history was significant for ALPS IA diagnosed at 10 years of age when he presented with bilateral cervical adenopathy. He was known to have a missense mutation in one allele of the FAS protein extracellular domain consistent with ALPS type 1A. HDL-C and LDL-C levels had been undetectable on multiple occasions, though lipids had not been measured prior to the diagnosis of ALPS. He had been receiving sirolimus for immunosuppression. The HDL-C and LDL-C levels correlated with disease activity and improved to normal levels during times when the activity of ALPS was controlled. This case highlights the importance of considering ALPS as a cause of low HDL-C and LDL-C levels in a child with evidence of lymphoproliferation.

  6. Deregulation of Fas ligand expression as a novel cause of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome-like disease.

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    Nabhani, Schafiq; Ginzel, Sebastian; Miskin, Hagit; Revel-Vilk, Shoshana; Harlev, Dan; Fleckenstein, Bernhard; Hönscheid, Andrea; Oommen, Prasad T; Kuhlen, Michaela; Thiele, Ralf; Laws, Hans-Jürgen; Borkhardt, Arndt; Stepensky, Polina; Fischer, Ute

    2015-09-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome is frequently caused by mutations in genes involved in the Fas death receptor pathway, but for 20-30% of patients the genetic defect is unknown. We observed that treatment of healthy T cells with interleukin-12 induces upregulation of Fas ligand and Fas ligand-dependent apoptosis. Consistently, interleukin-12 could not induce apoptosis in Fas ligand-deficient T cells from patients with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome. We hypothesized that defects in the interleukin-12 signaling pathway may cause a similar phenotype as that caused by mutations of the Fas ligand gene. To test this, we analyzed 20 patients with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome of unknown cause by whole-exome sequencing. We identified a homozygous nonsense mutation (c.698G>A, p.R212*) in the interleukin-12/interleukin-23 receptor-component IL12RB1 in one of these patients. The mutation led to IL12RB1 protein truncation and loss of cell surface expression. Interleukin-12 and -23 signaling was completely abrogated as demonstrated by deficient STAT4 phosphorylation and interferon γ production. Interleukin-12-mediated expression of membrane-bound and soluble Fas ligand was lacking and basal expression was much lower than in healthy controls. The patient presented with the classical symptoms of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome: chronic non-malignant, non-infectious lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, hepatomegaly, elevated numbers of double-negative T cells, autoimmune cytopenias, and increased levels of vitamin B12 and interleukin-10. Sanger sequencing and whole-exome sequencing excluded the presence of germline or somatic mutations in genes known to be associated with the autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome. Our data suggest that deficient regulation of Fas ligand expression by regulators such as the interleukin-12 signaling pathway may be an alternative cause of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome-like disease. Copyright© Ferrata Storti

  7. Association of severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI with probable autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome-variant

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    A. Berio

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper reported on a case of severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI associated with a probable autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome variant (Dianzani autoimmune lymphoproliferative disease (DALD. A male patient with typical features of SMEI and a SCN1A gene variant presented in the first year of life with multiple lymph nodes, palpable liver at 2 cm from the costal margin, neutropenia, dysgammaglobulinemia, relative and sometimes absolute lymphocytosis. Subsequently the patient presented with constantly raised IgA in serum and positive antinuclear and thyroid antimicrosomal antibodies. The diagnosis of probable autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome was made; arthritis, skin and throat blisters, which appeared subsequently led to the diagnosis of linear IgA disease. On the basis of these unique associations, the Authors hypothesized that autoimmunity may be partly responsible of the severe epileptic symptomatology, perhaps mediated by autoantibodies against sodium channels or by accompanying cytotoxic T-lymphocytes. Corticosteroid treatment ameliorated the epilepsy and laboratory tests. Future studies will be necessary to evaluate the relevance of autoimmunity in SMEI.

  8. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome: more than a FAScinating disease [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Bride

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS is an inherited syndrome characterized by abnormal lymphocyte survival caused by failure of apoptotic mechanisms to maintain lymphocyte homeostasis. This failure leads to the clinical manifestations of non-infectious and non-malignant lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, and autoimmune pathology, most commonly, autoimmune cytopenias. Since ALPS was first characterized in the early 1990s, insights in disease biology have improved both diagnosis and management of this syndrome. Sirolimus is the best-studied and most effective corticosteroid-sparing therapy for ALPS and should be considered first-line for patients in need of chronic treatment. This review highlights practical clinical considerations for the diagnosis and management of ALPS. Further studies could reveal new proteins and regulatory pathways that are critical for lymphocyte activation and apoptosis.

  9. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder in the pelvis successfully treated with consolidative radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habibeh, Omar; Elsayad, Khaled; Kriz, Jan; Haverkamp, Uwe; Eich, Hans Theodor [University Hospital of Muenster, Department of Radiation Oncology, Muenster (Germany)

    2017-01-15

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) are aggressive malignancies which represent one of the major post-transplant complications. However, treatment options vary significantly and localized disease may be curatively treated with radiotherapy (RT) or surgery. We report a case of recurrent rectal PTLD, which was successfully treated by chemoimmunotherapy followed by RT. We describe a patient who developed a rectal lymphoproliferative lesion 11 years after kidney transplant, which was successfully treated with consolidative RT using 25.4 Gy sequential to chemoimmunotherapy (R-CHOP). RT was well tolerated and the patient showed no signs of grade 3 or 4 toxicity. This patient is free of recurrence 52 months after RT, with an overall survival of 62 months since diagnosis. Conventionally fractionated moderate-dose RT appears to be a tolerable and effective treatment option for localized PTLD if a sufficient systemic treatment cannot be applied. (orig.) [German] Posttransplantationslymphoproliferative Erkrankungen (PTLDs) sind eine haeufige Komplikation nach einer Organtransplantation. Nichtdestotrotz unterscheiden sich die Behandlungsmoeglichkeiten signifikant und vor allem lokalisierte Stadien koennen kurativ entweder mit Strahlentherapie (RT) und/oder Operation behandelt werden. Wir berichten ueber einen Fall einer rezidivierten rektalen PTLD, die erfolgreich mit einer Chemoimmuntherapie mit anschliessender RT behandelt wurde. Wir beschreiben einen Patienten der 11 Jahre nach einer Nierentransplantation eine PTLD entwickelte. Diese wurde erfolgreich mit konsolidierender RT (25,4 Gy) im Anschluss an eine Chemoimmuntherapie (R-CHOP) behandelt. Die RT wurde komplikationslos vertragen und es zeigten sich keine Nebenwirkungen. Das rezidivfreie Ueberleben betrug zum Zeitpunkt der letzten Nachsorgeuntersuchung 52 Monate mit einer Gesamtueberlebenszeit von 62 Monaten seit der Diagnose. Die konventionelle fraktionierte moderat dosierte RT scheint eine gut

  10. Sirolimus for Autoimmune Disease of Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-02

    Autoimmune Pancytopenia; Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS); Evans Syndrome; Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune; Autoimmune Neutropenia; Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic; Inflammatory Bowel Disease; Rheumatoid Arthritis

  11. Oral cyclophosphamide was effective for Coombs-negative autoimmune hemolytic anemia in CD16+CD56- chronic lymphoproliferative disorder of NK-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiguchi, Nodoka; Nishina, Sayaka; Kawakami, Toru; Sakai, Hitoshi; Senoo, Noriko; Senoo, Yasushi; Ito, Toshiro; Saito, Hiroshi; Nakazawa, Hideyuki; Koizumi, Tomonobu; Ishida, Fumihiro

    2017-06-01

    An 84-year-old woman was referred to our hospital presenting anemia. Her hemoglobin level was 5.8 g/dL, and white blood cell count was 9400/μL, consisting of 82% lymphocytes. Given the lymphocyte phenotype (CD2+, CD3-, CD16+, and CD56-) and negative whole blood EBV viral load, we made a diagnosis of chronic lymphoproliferative disorder of NK cells (CLPD-NK). We suspected hemolytic anemia because of the high levels of reticulocytes in the peripheral blood and the low haptoglobin value. Although the direct Coombs test was negative and there was no cold agglutination, we examined her red-blood-cell-bound IgG (RBC-IgG), which was elevated. She was diagnosed as having as Coombs-negative autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). We report the effectiveness of oral cyclophosphamide for Coombs-negative autoimmune hemolytic anemia in CLPD-NK.

  12. Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS)

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  13. Development of an Epstein-Barr virus-associated lymphoproliferative disorder in a patient treated with azacitidine for chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia.

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    Menter, T; Schlageter, M; Bastian, L; Haberthür, R; Rätz Bravo, A E; Tzankov, A

    2014-03-01

    Some chemotherapeutic agents can cause iatrogenic lymphoproliferative disorders. In analogy to what has been observed with other nucleoside analogues such as cladribine and fludarabine, we document the first case of an Epstein-Barr virus-positive, iatrogenic immunodeficiency-associated, lymphoproliferative disease, formally resembling polymorphic post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease in a patient treated with azacitidine (Vidaza) for chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia (CMML). A 78-year-old female patient was diagnosed with CMML in January 2012, and treatment with azacitidine was initiated, which lasted for five cycles from February until June 2012. The patient was hospitalized in June 2012 under the suspicion of pneumonia. Transformation of the CMML was suspected at that time too. During hospitalization, a generalized enlargement of the lymph nodes and the spleen was noticed. The patient rapidly deteriorated and finally died of respiratory insufficiency. At autopsy, an Epstein-Barr virus-associated lymphoproliferative disorder, resembling polymorphic post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease with involvement of the lymph nodes, the spleen and the lung and causing necrotizing pneumonia, was diagnosed. Diagnostic criteria for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma or infectious mononucleosis-like lymphoproliferative disease were not met. This is the first documented case of an azacitidine-associated lymphoproliferative disease, raising awareness for possible not yet known side effects of this drug, which should be kept in mind by oncologists and pathologists. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Yttrium Y 90 Ibritumomab Tiuxetan and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-24

    Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  15. How I treat autoimmune hemolytic anemias in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, Klaus; Jäger, Ulrich

    2010-09-16

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a heterogeneous disease with respect to the type of the antibody involved and the absence or presence of an underlying condition. Treatment decisions should be based on careful diagnostic evaluation. Primary warm antibody autoimmune hemolytic anemias respond well to steroids, but most patients remain steroid-dependent, and many require second-line treatment. Currently, splenectomy can be regarded as the most effective and best-evaluated second-line therapy, but there are still only limited data on long-term efficacy and adverse effects. The monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody rituximab is another second-line therapy with documented short-term efficacy, but there is limited information on long-term efficacy and side effects. The efficacy of immunosuppressants is poorly evaluated. Primary cold antibody autoimmune hemolytic anemias respond well to rituximab but are resistant to steroids and splenectomy. The most common causes of secondary autoimmune hemolytic anemias are malignancies, immune diseases, or drugs. They may be treated in a way similar to primary autoimmune hemolytic anemias, by immunosuppressants or by treatment of the underlying disease.

  16. Frequency of a FAS ligand gene variant associated with inherited feline autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome in British shorthair cats in New Zealand.

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    Aberdein, D; Munday, J S; Dittmer, K E; Heathcott, R W; Lyons, L A

    2017-11-01

    AIMS To determine the frequency of the FAS-ligand gene (FASLG) variant associated with feline autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (FALPS) and the proportion of carriers of the variant in three British shorthair (BSH) breeding catteries in New Zealand. METHODS Buccal swabs were collected from all cats in two BSH breeding catteries from the South Island and one from the North Island of New Zealand. DNA was extracted and was tested for the presence of the FASLG variant using PCR. Cats with the FASLG variant were identified and the frequency of the FASLG variant allele calculated. Pedigree analysis was performed and inbreeding coefficients were calculated for cats with the FASLG variant. RESULTS Of 32 BSH cats successfully tested for the presence of the FASLG variant, one kitten (3%) was homozygous (FALPS-affected), and seven (22%) cats were heterozygous (carriers) for the FASLG variant allele, and 24 (75%) cats were homozygous for the wild type allele. The overall frequency of the FASLG variant allele in these 32 cats was 0.14. Cats carrying the FASLG variant were from all three breeding catteries sampled, including two catteries that had not previously reported cases of FALPS. Pedigree analysis revealed common ancestry of FALPS-affected and carrier cats within six generations, as well as frequent inbreeding, with inbreeding coefficients >0.12 for five cats with the FASLG variant. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE There was a high frequency of the FASLG variant allele (0.14) in this small sample of BSH cats, with 22% of healthy cats identified as carriers of the FASLG variant. For an inherited disease, lethal at a young age, in a small population in which inbreeding is common, these results are significant. To prevent future cases of disease and stop further spread of the FASLG variant allele within the BSH population in New Zealand, it is recommended that all BSH and BSH-cross cats be tested for the presence of the FASLG variant before mating. Cats identified as

  17. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome and non-Hodgkin lymphoma: what 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography can do in the management of these patients? Suggestions from a case report.

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    Cistaro, A; Pazè, F; Durando, S; Cogoni, M; Faletti, R; Vesco, S; Vallero, S; Quartuccio, N; Treglia, G; Ramenghi, U

    2014-01-01

    A young patient with undefined autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS-U) and low back pain underwent a CT and MRI study that showed enhancing vertebral lesions, some pulmonary nodules and diffuse latero-cervical lymphadenopathy. A (18)F-FDG-PET/CT scan showed many areas of intense (18)F-FDG uptake in multiple vertebrae, in some ribs, in the sacrum, in the liver, in both lungs, in multiple lymph nodes spread in the cervical, thoracic and abdominal chains. A bone marrow biopsy showed a "lymphomatoid granulomatosis", a rare variant of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). After the treatment, the (18)F-FDG-PET/CT scan showed a complete metabolic response. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  18. Treating autoimmune disorders with venom-derived peptides.

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    Shen, Bingzheng; Cao, Zhijian; Li, Wenxin; Sabatier, Jean-Marc; Wu, Yingliang

    2017-09-01

    The effective treatment of autoimmune diseases remains a challenge. Voltage-gated potassium Kv1.3 channels, which are expressed in lymphocytes, are a new therapeutic target for treating autoimmune disease. Consequently, Kv1.3 channel-inhibiting venom-derived peptides are a prospective resource for new drug discovery and clinical application. Area covered: Preclinical and clinical studies have produced a wealth of information on Kv1.3 channel-inhibiting venom-derived peptides, especially from venomous scorpions and sea anemones. This review highlights the advances in screening and design of these peptides with diverse structures and potencies. It focuses on representative strategies for improving peptide selectivity and discusses the preclinical research on those venom-derived peptides as well as their clinical developmental status. Expert opinion: Encouraging results indicate that peptides isolated from the venom of venomous animals are a large resource for discovering immunomodulators that act on Kv1.3 channels. Since the structural diversity of venom-derived peptides determines the variety of their pharmacological activities, the design and optimization of venom-peptides for improved Kv1.3 channel-specificity has been advanced through some representative strategies, such as peptide chemical modification, amino acid residue truncation and binding interface modulation. These advances should further accelerate research, development and the future clinical application of venom-derived peptides selectively targeting Kv1.3 channels.

  19. Complement inhibitors to treat IgM-mediated autoimmune hemolysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, Diana; Zeerleder, Sacha

    2015-01-01

    Complement activation in autoimmune hemolytic anemia may exacerbate extravascular hemolysis and may occasionally result in intravascular hemolysis. IgM autoantibodies as characteristically found in cold autoantibody autoimmune hemolytic anemia, in cold agglutinin disease but also in a considerable

  20. Outpatient management of steroid-induced hyperglycaemia and steroid-induced diabetes in people with lymphoproliferative disorders treated with intermittent high dose steroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Vidler

    2017-09-01

    Eighty-three people were diagnosed with a lymphoproliferative disorder, of whom 6 had known Type 2 diabetes. Fifty-three people without known diabetes were screened by HbA1c and random venous plasma glucose. All patients (n = 34 subsequently prescribed HDS checked capillary blood glucose (CBG pre-breakfast and pre-evening meal. Treatment algorithms used initiation and/or dose titration of gliclazide or human NPH insulin, aiming for pre-meal CBG 5–11 mmol/l. Type 2 diabetes was identified in 4/53 people screened (7.5%. Of 34 people treated with HDS, 17 (44% developed SIH/SID. All 7 people with Type 2 diabetes developed SIH and 3 required insulin. Of 27 people without known diabetes, 8 (30% developed SID and 1 required insulin. Pre-treatment HbA1c was higher in people who developed SID compared to those that did not (p = 0.002. This is the first report of a SID/SIH detection and treatment protocol for use in people with lymphoproliferative disorders receiving intermittent HDS, demonstrating its feasibility and safety.

  1. Pulmonary aspergillosis and central nervous system hemorrhage as complications of autoimmune hemolytic anemia treated with corticosteroids.

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    Cleri, Dennis J; Moser, Robert L; Villota, Francisco J; Wang, Yue; Husain, Syed A; Nadeem, Shahzinah; Anjari, Tarek; Sajed, Mohammad

    2003-06-01

    Warm, active antibody adult autoimmune hemolytic anemia is the most common form of hemolytic anemia not related to drug therapy. Mortality in adult autoimmune hemolytic anemia is related to the inability to successfully treat patients' underlying disease, or the infectious complications of splenectomy and prolonged steroid therapy. Predisposing factors for invasive aspergillosis are neutropenia and steroid therapy. We present a fatal case of aspergillosis complicating a nonneutropenic case of warm active antibody adult autoimmune hemolytic anemia treated with prolonged steroid therapy.

  2. Harnessing Apoptotic Cell Clearance to Treat Autoimmune Arthritis

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    Philippe Saas

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Early-stage apoptotic cells possess immunomodulatory properties. Proper apoptotic cell clearance during homeostasis has been shown to limit subsequent immune responses. Based on these observations, early-stage apoptotic cell infusion has been used to prevent unwanted inflammatory responses in different experimental models of autoimmune diseases or transplantation. Moreover, this approach has been shown to be feasible without any toxicity in patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation to prevent graft-versus-host disease. However, whether early-stage apoptotic cell infusion can be used to treat ongoing inflammatory disorders has not been reported extensively. Recently, we have provided evidence that early-stage apoptotic cell infusion is able to control, at least transiently, ongoing collagen-induced arthritis. This beneficial therapeutic effect is associated with the modulation of antigen-presenting cell functions mainly of macrophages and plasmacytoid dendritic cells, as well as the induction of collagen-specific regulatory CD4+ T cells (Treg. Furthermore, the efficacy of this approach is not altered by the association with two standard treatments of rheumatoid arthritis (RA, methotrexate and tumor necrosis factor (TNF inhibition. Here, in the light of these observations and recent data of the literature, we discuss the mechanisms of early-stage apoptotic cell infusion and how this therapeutic approach can be transposed to patients with RA.

  3. Severe infections in patients with autoimmune diseases treated with cyclophosphamide.

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    Cavallasca, Javier A; Costa, Cecilia A; Maliandi, Maria Del Rosario; Contini, Liliana E; Fernandez de Carrera, Elena; Musuruana, Jorge L

    2015-01-01

    Infectious diseases are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with connective tissue diseases. Corticosteroids and immunosuppressive drugs, such as cyclophosphamide (CYC), increases the risk of infections. The objective of this study was to estimate the incidence rates of severe infections in patients who received treatment with CYC. The records of 60 patients with systemic autoimmune diseases who received treatment with CYC were retrospectively reviewed. We evaluated the rate of severe infections that occurred during CYC therapy and the 3 subsequent months. Systemic lupus erythematosus was the most common disease, and diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis the most frequent indication. Severe infection occurred in 9 patients (15%). Community acquired pneumonia was the most frequent infection with 3 cases (33%) followed by Herpes Zoster with 2 reports (22%). The cumulative dose of corticosteroid was the only significant risk factor for infection 32.8±16.7 vs. 20.1±15.3 P=.007. The use of lower doses of corticosteroids and an aggressive management of infectious complications, allows for an acceptable safety profile in patients treated with CYC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Autoimmune antibodies and recurrence-free interval in melanoma patients treated with adjuvant interferon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouwhuis, Marna G; Suciu, Stefan; Collette, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Appearance of autoantibodies and clinical manifestations of autoimmunity in melanoma patients treated with adjuvant interferon (IFN)-alpha2b was reported to be associated with improved prognosis. We assessed the association of the appearance of autoantibodies after initiation of treat......BACKGROUND: Appearance of autoantibodies and clinical manifestations of autoimmunity in melanoma patients treated with adjuvant interferon (IFN)-alpha2b was reported to be associated with improved prognosis. We assessed the association of the appearance of autoantibodies after initiation...

  5. Lack of evidence for post-vaccine onset of autoimmune/lymphoproliferative disorders, during a nine-month follow-up in multiply vaccinated Italian military personnel.

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    Ferlito, Claudia; Barnaba, Vincenzo; Abrignani, Sergio; Bombaci, Mauro; Sette, Alessandro; Sidney, John; Biselli, Roberto; Tomao, Enrico; Cattaruzza, Maria Sofia; Germano, Valentina; Biondo, Michela Ileen; Salerno, Gerardo; Lulli, Patrizia; Caporuscio, Sara; Picchianti Diamanti, Andrea; Falco, Mirella; Biselli, Valentina; Cardelli, Patrizia; Autore, Alberto; Lucertini, Elena; De Cesare, Donato Pompeo; Peragallo, Mario Stefano; Lista, Florigio; Martire, Carmela; Salemi, Simonetta; Nisini, Roberto; D'Amelio, Raffaele

    2017-08-01

    Anecdotal case reports, amplified by mass media and internet-based opinion groups, have recently indicated vaccinations as possibly responsible for autoimmunity/lymphoproliferation development. Multiply vaccinated Italian military personnel (group 1, operating in Italy, group 2, operating in Lebanon) were followed-up for nine months to monitor possible post-vaccine autoimmunity/lymphoproliferation onset. No serious adverse event was noticed in both groups. Multivariate analysis of intergroup differences only showed a significant association between lymphocyte increase and tetanus/diphtheria vaccine administration. A significant post-vaccine decrease in autoantibody positivity was observed. Autoantibodies were also studied by microarray analysis of self-proteins in subjects exposed to ≥4 concurrent vaccinations, without observing significant difference among baseline and one and nine months post-vaccine. Moreover, HLA-A2 subjects have been analyzed for the possible CD8T-cell response to apoptotic self-epitopes, without observing significant difference between baseline and one month post-vaccine. Multiple vaccinations in young adults are safe and not associated to autoimmunity/lymphoproliferation onset during a nine-month-long follow-up. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Biomimetic Nanosponges for Treating Antibody-Mediated Autoimmune Diseases.

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    Jiang, Yao; Fang, Ronnie H; Zhang, Liangfang

    2018-04-18

    Autoimmune diseases are characterized by overactive immunity, where the body's defense system launches an attack against itself. If left unchecked, this can result in the destruction of healthy tissue and significantly affect patient well-being. In the case of type II autoimmune hypersensitivities, autoreactive antibodies attack the host's own cells or extracellular matrix. Current clinical treatment modalities for managing this class of disease are generally nonspecific and face considerable limitations. In this Topical Review, we cover emerging therapeutic strategies, with an emphasis on novel nanomedicine platforms. Specifically, the use of biomimetic cell membrane-coated nanosponges that are capable of specifically binding and neutralizing pathological antibodies will be explored. There is significant untapped potential in the application of nanotechnology for the treatment of autoimmune diseases, and continued development along this line may help to eventually change the clinical landscape.

  7. Stem cell transplantation and mesenchymal cells to treat autoimmune diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tyndall, Alan; van Laar, Jacob M.

    2016-01-01

    Since the start of the international stem cell transplantation project in 1997, over 2000 patients have received a haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT), mostly autologous, as treatment for a severe autoimmune disease, the majority being multiple sclerosis (MS), systemic sclerosis (SSc) and

  8. Composite cutaneous lymphoma (iatrogenic immunodeficiency-associated lymphoproliferative disorder) in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis treated with methotrexate: Staging and evaluation of response to therapy with 1'8F-FDG PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makis, William; Ciarallo, Anthony; Gonzalez-Verdecia, Milene; Wang, Beatrice; Probst, Stehan

    2017-01-01

    A 67 year old woman with a 10 year history of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated with methotrexate and prednisone, presented with a 2 year history of worsening multiple cutaneous plaques of variable appearance. Two distinct skin lesions were biopsied to reveal a composite cutaneous lymphoma, possibly caused by long term methotrexate therapy. An [18F] fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ( 18 F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) was performed to stage the malignancy, and was later repeated to evaluate response to chemotherapy, which guided subsequent management. We present the PET/CT imaging findings of this very rare iatrogenic (methotrexate induced) immunodeficiency-associated lymphoproliferative disorder

  9. Genetics Home Reference: autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NBK1108/ Citation on PubMed Dowdell KC, Niemela JE, Price S, Davis J, Hornung RL, Oliveira JB, Puck JM, ... on PubMed or Free article on PubMed Central Price S, Shaw PA, Seitz A, Joshi G, Davis J, ...

  10. Pharmacological targeting of IDO-mediated tolerance for treating autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penberthy, W Todd

    2007-04-01

    established mechanisms of necrosis. Chronic elevation of TNFalpha leading to necrotic events by NAD depletion in autoimmune disease likely occurs via combination of persistent IDO activation and iNOS-peroxynitrate activation of PARP1 both of which deplete NAD. Pharmacological doses of NAD precursors repeatedly provide dramatic therapeutic benefit for rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis, colitis, other autoimmune diseases, and schizophrenia in either the clinic or animal models. Collectively these observations support the idea that autoimmune disease may in part be considered as localized pellagra manifesting symptoms particular to the inflamed target tissues. Thus pharmacological doses of NAD precursors (nicotinic acid/niacin, nicotinamide/niacinamide, or nicotinamide riboside) should be considered as potentially essential to the therapeutic success of any IDO-inducing regimen for treating autoimmune diseases. Distinct among the NAD precursors, nicotinic acid specifically activates the g-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) GPR109a to produce the IDO-inducing tolerogenic prostaglandins PGE(2) and PGD(2). Next, PGD(2) is converted to the anti-inflammatory prostaglandin, 15d-PGJ(2). These prostaglandins exert potent anti-inflammatory activities through endogenous signaling mechanisms involving the GPCRs EP2, EP4, and DP1 along with PPARgamma respectively. Nicotinamide prevents type 1 diabetes and ameliorates multiple sclerosis in animal models, while nothing is known about the therapeutic potential of nicotinamide riboside. Alternatively the direct targeting of the non-redox NAD-dependent proteins using resveratrol to activate SIRT1 or PJ34 in order to inhibit PARP1 and prevent autoimmune pathogenesis are also given consideration.

  11. Composite cutaneous lymphoma (iatrogenic immunodeficiency-associated lymphoproliferative disorder) in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis treated with methotrexate: Staging and evaluation of response to therapy with {sup 1}'8F-FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makis, William [Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, CCI, Diagnostic Imaging, Edmonton (Canada); Ciarallo, Anthony; Gonzalez-Verdecia, Milene [MUHC Glen Site, Montreal (Canada); Wang, Beatrice [MUHC, Dermatology, Westmount (Canada); Probst, Stehan [MUHC Jewish General Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Montreal (Canada)

    2017-09-15

    A 67 year old woman with a 10 year history of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated with methotrexate and prednisone, presented with a 2 year history of worsening multiple cutaneous plaques of variable appearance. Two distinct skin lesions were biopsied to reveal a composite cutaneous lymphoma, possibly caused by long term methotrexate therapy. An [18F] fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) was performed to stage the malignancy, and was later repeated to evaluate response to chemotherapy, which guided subsequent management. We present the PET/CT imaging findings of this very rare iatrogenic (methotrexate induced) immunodeficiency-associated lymphoproliferative disorder.

  12. Amelioration of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in Lewis rats treated with fucoidan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Heechul; Moon, Changjong; Park, Eun-jin; Jee, Youngheun; Ahn, Meejung; Wie, Myung Bok; Shin, Taekyun

    2010-03-01

    We examined whether fucoidan affected the clinical symptoms of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in rats. EAE was induced in Lewis rats that were immunized with guinea-pig myelin basic protein (MBP) and complete Freund's adjuvant. Fucoidan (50 mg/kg, daily) was administered to rats with EAE intraperitoneally, either in the EAE induction phase from either 1 day before immunization to day 7 post-immunization (PI), or the effector phase from day 8 to 14 PI, to test which phase of rat EAE is affected by fucoidan treatment.The onset, severity and duration of EAE paralysis in the fucoidan-treated group in the days 8-14 PI-treated rats, but not in days -1-7 PI-treated rats, were significantly delayed, suppressed and reduced, respectively, compared with the vehicle-treated controls. Treatment with fucoidan reduced the encephalitogenic response and TNF-alpha production during EAE. Moreover, the clinical amelioration coincided with decreased infiltration of inflammatory cells in the EAE-affected spinal cord. The ameliorative effect of fucoidan on clinical paralysis in EAE-affected rats may be mediated, in part, by the suppression of the autoreactive T cell response and inflammatory cytokine production. (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Is Alzheimer's Disease Autoimmune Inflammation of the Brain That Can be Treated With Nasal Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrer, Steven; Rheinstein, Peter H

    2015-05-01

    The Alzheimer's Association recently reported that a woman's estimated lifetime risk of developing Alzheimer's at age 65 is 1 in 6, compared to nearly 1 in 11 for a man (ie, female to male ratio 1.8). Based on female to male ratio, Alzheimer's disease could well be an autoimmune disorder. Like Alzheimer's, multiple sclerosis, an autoimmune inflammation of the central nervous system, has a female to male ratio of 2.3. Also based on female to male ratio, Alzheimer's resembles the autoimmune inflammatory disease rheumatoid arthritis, which has a female to male ratio of 2.7. The reasons for the female preponderance in autoimmune disease are unclear, but nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely and successfully employed to treat autoimmune anti-inflammatory disease and dramatically relieve symptoms. Moreover, oral NSAIDs consistently reduce the risk of Alzheimer's disease, although they have been totally ineffective as a treatment in multiple failed clinical trials. A basis for this failure might well be that the brain dose after oral administration is too small and not sufficiently early in the pathogenesis of the disorder. But NSAID brain dose could be significantly increased by delivering the NSAIDs intranasally. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Emphysematous Cystitis Occurred in the Case Treated with Steroid for Autoimmune Hepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tateki Yoshino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Emphysematous cystitis is a rare clinically entity, more commonly seen in diabetic, immunocompromised patients, which was characterized by air within the bladder wall and lumen. A 83-year-old woman was introduced to our department with fever elevation and abnormal findings of computed tomography (CT. She took orally prednisolone for autoimmune hepatitis. Pelvic CT revealed diffuse air throughout the bladder wall. Urinalysis showed combined hematuria and pyuria. Escherichia coli was detected in blood culture. Abnormal findings of complete blood count and laboratory examination included an elevated WBC count (12,200/L, C-reactive protein (11.7 mg/dL, and creatinine (1.07 mg/dL. Cystoscopy confirmed diffuse submucosal emphysema throughout. On the basis of diagnosis with emphysematous cystitis, she was treated with antibiotics based on the results of blood culture and indwelling Foley catheter. After treatment, the improvement of inflammatory findings and submucosal emphysema on cystoscopy and CT were achieved.

  15. The hygiene theory harnessing helminths and their ova to treat autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ami Shor, Dana; Harel, Michal; Eliakim, Rami; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2013-10-01

    The incidence of autoimmune diseases is increasing in Western countries, possibly due to the improved sanitary conditions and reduced exposure to infections in childhood (the hygiene hypothesis). There is an ongoing debate whether infection prevents or precipitates autoimmune diseases. Various helminths species used in several animal models were shown to limit inflammatory activity in a variety of diseases including inflammatory bowel disease, multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and systemic lupus erythematosus. At present the scientific data is based mostly on experimental animal models; however, there is an increasing body of evidence in a number of clinical trials being conducted. Herein we review several clinical trials evaluating the anti-inflammatory effects of helminths and assessing their association with different autoimmune diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease, multiple sclerosis, and autoimmune liver diseases. We also describe the common pathways by which helminths induce immune modulation and the key changes observed in the host immune system following exposure to helminths. These common pathways include the inhibition of IFN-γ and IL-17 production, promotion of IL-4, IL-10 and TGF-β release, induction of CD4(+) T cell FoxP3(+) expression, and generation of regulatory macrophages, dendritic cells, and B cells. Helminths products are becoming significant candidates for anti-inflammatory agents in this context. However, further research is needed for synthetic analogues of helminths' potent products that mimic the parasite-mediated immunomodulation effect.

  16. Mapping the x-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skare, J.C.; Milunsky, A.; Byron, K.S.; Sullivan, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    The X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome is triggered by Epstein-Barr virus infection and results in fatal mononucleosis, immunodeficiency, and lymphoproliferative disorders. This study shows that the mutation responsible for X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome is genetically linked to a restriction fragment length polymorphism detected with the DXS42 probe (from Xq24-q27). The most likely recombination frequency between the loci is 4%, and the associated logarithm of the odds is 5.26. Haplotype analysis using flanking restriction fragment length polymorphism markers indicates that the locus for X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome is distal to probe DXS42 but proximal to probe DXS99 (from Xq26-q27). It is now possible to predict which members of a family with X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome are carrier females and to diagnose the syndrome prenatally

  17. Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 2 in patient with severe allergic asthma treated with omalizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rams, Anna; Żółciński, Marek; Zastrzeżyńska, Weronika; Polański, Stanisław; Serafin, Agnieszka; Wilańska, Joanna; Musiał, Jacek; Bazan-Socha, Stanisława

    2018-01-04

    Asthma therapy with monoclonal antibodies is a promising and effective approach for those with a severe and refractory type of disease. Although such a targeted therapy is considered to be safe, unusual complications may occur. We present a case of a 45 year-old female patient with severe allergic asthma and chronic spontaneous urticaria, who developed autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 2 (APS-2) after 26 months of omalizumab administration. The patient was diagnosed with primary adrenal insufficiency (Addison's disease) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis accompanied by autoimmune atrophic gastritis. According to our knowledge this is the first description of APS-2 that developed in conjunction with omalizumab treatment, although we have no evidence that the observed phenomenon indicated a cause-effect relationship to omalizumab.

  18. Autoimmune Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with type 1 autoimmune hepatitis commonly have other autoimmune disorders, such as celiac disease, an autoimmune disease in ... 2 can also have any of the above autoimmune disorders. What are the symptoms of autoimmune hepatitis? The ...

  19. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davorin Dajčman

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autoimmune pancreatitis is a recently described type of pancreatitis of presumed autoimmune etiology. Autoimmune pancreatitis is often misdiagnosed as pancreatic cancer difficult, since their clinical presentations are often similar. The concept of autoimmune pancreatitis was first published in 1961. Since then, autoimmune pancreatitis has often been treated not as an independent clinical entity but rather as a manifestation of systemic disease. The overall prevalence and incidence of the disease have yet to be determined, but three series have reported the prevalence as between 5 and 6 % of all patients with chronic pancreatitis. Patient vary widely in age, but most are older than 50 years. Patients with autoimmune pancreatitis usually complain of the painless jaundice, mild abdominal pain and weight loss. There is no laboratory hallmark of the disease, even if cholestatic profiles of liver dysfunction with only mild elevation of amylase and lipase levels have been reported.Conclusions: Proposed diagnostic criteria contains: (1 radiologic imaging, diffuse enlargement of the pancreas and diffusely irregular narrowing of the main pancreatic duct, (2 laboratory data, elevated levels of serum ã-globulin and/or IgG, specially IgG4, or the presence of autoantibodies and (3 histopathologic examination, fibrotic change with dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltration in the pancreas. For correct diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis, criterion 1 must be present with criterion 2 and/or 3. Autoimmune pancreatitis is frequently associated with rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren’s syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, tubulointersticial nephritis, primary sclerosing cholangitis and idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis. Pancreatic biopsy using an endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy is the most important diagnostic method today. Treatment with corticosteroids leads to the and resolution of pancreatic inflamation, obstruction and

  20. [Infectious events during the course of autoimmune diseases treated with rituximab: A retrospective study of 93 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catroux, M; Lauda-Maillen, M; Pathe, M; De Boisgrollier de Ruolz, A-C; Cazenave-Roblot, F; Roblot, P; Souchaud-Debouverie, O

    2017-03-01

    Describe the occurring infections in patients treated with rituximab for an autoimmune disease. Retrospective and monocentric study of 93 adult patients treated with rituximab for autoimmune indications over a nine years period. Thirty-eight patients suffered from a total of 95 infections. Out of them, 18 patients (19 %) had had at least an infectious episode triggering a hospital admission and/or intravenous treatment. The infections occurred mainly during the first year of the treatment (65 %) and if the courses are repeated (P=0.04). They were mainly pulmonary infections. Severe infections, recorded in 79 % of the cases, were mostly of bacterial origin (43 %) and viral (23 %). Two cases of pneumocystis pneumonia and one case of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis were also recorded. The notion of vaccination was present in less than half of the cases, and 39 % of the patients were already receiving a prophylactic treatment against pneumocystis pneumonia. Patients over the age of 65 years (40 %) had developed less infections (P<0.05). Eight of the initial 93 patients died, half of them because of infectious complications. Infectious complications are frequent, become early and are potentially severe. Imputability to rituximab is not certain. However, this could lead to better codify rituximab prescriptions and take adapted and associated measures in order to facilitate infection prevention and, if an infection does occur, to treat it at the earliest stage possible. The age doesn't seem to be a risk factor. Copyright © 2016 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Type I/II cytokines, JAKs, and new strategies for treating autoimmune diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Daniella M.; Bonelli, Michael; Gadina, Massimo; O’Shea, John J.

    2015-01-01

    Cytokines are major drivers of autoimmunity, and biologic agents targeting cytokines have revolutionized the treatment of immune-mediated diseases. Despite the effectiveness of these drugs, they do not induce complete remission in all patients, prompting the development of alternative strategies—including targeting of intracellular signal transduction pathways downstream of cytokines. Many cytokines that bind type I and type II cytokine receptors are critical regulators of immune-mediated diseases and employ the Janus kinase (JAK) and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathway to exert their effect. Pharmacological inhibition of JAKs block the actions of type I/II cytokines, and within the past 3 years therapeutic JAK inhibitors, or Jakinibs, have become available to rheumatologists. Jakinibs have proven effective for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory diseases. Adverse effects of these agents are largely related to their mode of action and include infections and hyperlipidemia. Jakinibs are currently being investigated for a number of new indications, and second-generation selective Jakinibs are being developed and tested. Targeting STATs could be a future avenue for the treatment of rheumatic diseases, although substantial challenges remain. Nonetheless, the ability to therapeutically target intracellular signalling pathways has already created a new paradigm for the treatment of rheumatologic disease. PMID:26633291

  2. Paraneoplastic Pemphigus. A Life-Threatening Autoimmune Blistering Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirado-Sánchez, A; Bonifaz, A

    2017-12-01

    Paraneoplastic pemphigus (PNP), a subset of pemphigus, is a unique autoimmune blistering condition that can affect multiple organs other than the skin. It is a life-threatening disease associated with an underlying malignancy, most commonly of lymphoproliferative origin. The clinical picture may resemble pemphigus, pemphigoid, erythema multiforme, graft-versus-host disease, or lichen planus. The earliest and most consistent finding is a painful, severe, chronic and often recalcitrant stomatitis. Treatment of PNP is difficult. Immunosuppressive agents are required to decrease blistering, and treating the underlying tumor may control autoantibody production. In this review, we included essential diagnostic aspects of PNP and the most useful treatment options in the dermatologist practice. Copyright © 2017 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Treated Autoimmune Thyroid Disease Is Associated with a Decreased Quality of Life among Young Persons with Type 1 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alena Spirkova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes (T1D in children and adolescents is relatively often accompanied by other immunopathological diseases, autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD or celiac disease (CD. Our aim was to assess whether these conditions are associated with changes in the health-related quality of life (HRQOL in pediatric patients with T1D. In a cross-sectional study we identified eligible 332 patients with T1D aged 8–18 years, of whom 248 (75% together with their parents responded to the PedsQL Generic and Diabetes Modules. Compared to 143 patients without thyroid autoantibodies, 40 patients with a thyroxine-treated AITD scored lower in the overall generic HRQOL (P=0.014, as well as in the overall diabetes-specific HRQOL (P=0.013. After adjustment for age, gender, duration of diabetes, type of diabetes treatment, and diabetes control, this association remained statistically significant for the generic HRQOL (P=0.023. Celiac disease was not associated with a change in the generic or diabetes-specific HRQOL (P=0.07  and   P=0.63, resp.. Parental scores showed no association with AITD or celiac disease, except a marginally significant decrease in the overall generic HRQOL (P=0.039 in the T1D + AITD compared to T1D group. Our study indicates that, in pediatric patients with T1D, concomitant thyroxine-treated AITD is associated with lower quality of life.

  4. B-Cell-Activating Factor Affects the Occurrence of Thyroid Autoimmunity in Chronic Hepatitis C Patients Treated with Interferon Alpha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Kajiyama

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic hepatitis C (CHC patients frequently suffer from thyroid disorders during interferon therapy. However, the mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the association between serum B-cell-activating factor belonging to the TNF family (BAFF levels and the presence of antithyroid peroxidase antibody (anti-TPO in CHC patients treated with pegylated interferon alpha and ribavirin combination therapy. Six months after the therapy, anti-TPO antibody was detected in 10 (males, 1; females, 9 of 50 patients. The mean age of these patients was higher than that of the anti-TPO-negative patients (61 yr versus 55 yr. Before treatment, the serum BAFF levels of the anti-TPO-positive patients were higher than those of the anti-TPO-negative patients. After starting therapy, the serum BAFF levels of both the anti-TPO-positive and -negative patient groups were elevated. Our findings suggest that the serum BAFF concentration before therapy can predict the risk of thyroid autoimmunity in elderly female patients with CHC.

  5. Rapidly progressive post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of patients, and just over half of these affect only the brain.1,2. Presentation is often late, with mortality rates in excess of 60%.2. PTLD comprises a heterogeneous group of lymphoproliferative diseases, ranging from the early indolent disorders that resemble infectious mononucleosis, through to polymorphic PTLD and onto.

  6. Hodgkin’s lymphoma presenting as autoimmune hemolytic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohaila Fatima

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hodgkin’s lymphoma is a B-cell neoplasm, which usually presents with painless lymphadenopathy. Its presentation with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA is rare, although the association of AIHA with other lymphoproliferative disorders is well known. Here, we report a case of a patient with warm AIHA who presented in a critical condition to hospital and was diagnosed with HL.

  7. Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder: a pictorial review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burney, K.; Bradley, M.; Lyburn, I.; Hopkins, R.; Buckley, A.; Rye, A.

    2006-01-01

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a serious and potentially fatal complication after solid organ and haemopoietic stem cell transplantation. The frequency of PTLD varies with the type of organ transplant but overall it affects 2-10% of all solid organ transplant recipients. Most cases develop within 1 year after the transplant, although occasional cases present 5-10 years later. Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder is clinically and pathologically heterogeneous - the majority are of the non-Hodgkin's lymphoma type, whereas Hodgkin's lymphoma arising after transplantation is rare. We have retrospectively reviewed patients with a histological diagnosis of PTLD after a solid organ transplant. We present the imaging features and a clinical review of this condition. Early diagnosis of PTLD may alter the management and outcome of the disease. The radiologist can play a vital role in establishing the diagnosis by imaging features supplemented with percutaneous biopsy and also in monitoring the disease response to treatment

  8. Mutlifocal osseous posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, Ryan [University of Chicago, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Michalicek, Zachary [Northshore University Healthsystems, Department of Pathology, Evanston, IL (United States); Lazarus, Martin [Northshore University Healthsystems, Department of Radiology, Evanston, IL (United States)

    2015-02-14

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a known complication of organ transplantation, but musculoskeletal involvement of PTLD remains very rare. We present a case of recurrent PTLD of the bone in a heart transplant patient that was misdiagnosed as gout for several years. There are only a few cases of osseous PTLD in the literature, and we hope to better characterize its imaging findings on multiple imaging modalities. (orig.)

  9. Gene expression profiling of anti-CTLA4-treated metastatic melanoma in patients with treatment-induced autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresler, Scott C; Min, Le; Rodig, Scott J; Walls, Andrew C; Xu, Shuyun; Geng, Songmei; Hodi, F Stephen; Murphy, George F; Lian, Christine G

    2017-02-01

    Ipilimumab (IPI) is a monoclonal antibody that targets the inhibitory CTLA4 receptor of T cells, enhancing T-cell-driven antitumor responses. IPI therapy in metastatic melanoma results in significant improvement in disease-free and overall survival, although after initial responses disease progression generally ensues. Identification of specific responses in tissue where melanoma tumor cells are subjected to IPI-driven immune attack may reveal mechanisms of treatment efficacy or resistance, permitting refinement of targeted therapeutic approaches. We used NanoString digital barcoding chemistry to identify changes in the transcriptome of metastatic melanoma cells before and after IPI treatment using two comprehensive panels containing a total of 1330 unique genes. Only patients who developed autoimmune disorders following treatment, signifying a robust immune response, were included. Despite evidence of an enhanced immune response, most patients eventually exhibited disease progression. Overall, data from five pre-IPI tumors and four post-IPI tumor samples (from three patients) permitted identification of several candidate genes that showed increased expression based on normalized counts after therapy. These included TTK (~3.1-fold, P=1.18e-4), which encodes a dual-specificity protein tyrosine kinase, a known cell cycle regulator, and BIRC5 (~3.0-fold, P=9.36e-4), which encodes the antiapoptotic protein survivin. Both TTK (MPS1) and survivin are targetable proteins against which a number of pharmacologic agents have been developed. CDK1, which encodes a protein tyrosine kinase known to phosphorylate survivin, was also upregulated (~3.2-fold, P=2.80-3). Tumor cell expression of TTK and survivin proteins was confirmed using immunohistochemistry in an expanded patient cohort. Differences in gene expression for several commonly encountered immune antigens, such as CD3, CD4, CD8, and CTLA4, were not statistically significant, likely reflecting the long length of time

  10. Hydrothermally modified slow release corn starch: a potential new therapeutic option for treating hypoglycemia in autoimmune hypoglycemia (Hirata's disease).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, K; Aulinger, B; Brand, S; Waldmann, E; Parhofer, K G

    2015-12-01

    We report the successful treatment of autoimmune hypoglycemia in an 82-year-old non-diabetic Caucasian male with hydrothermally modified slow release corn starch, a product which is used in other conditions associated with hypoglycemia, most typically glycogen storage disease type I. An 82-year-old-Caucasian male presented with recurrent spontaneous hypoglycemia as low as 30 mg/dl following in-patient treatment for community acquired pneumonia. During a fasting-test, symptomatic hypoglycemia occurred. Plasma concentrations of c-peptide and insulin were considerably elevated. Autoimmune hypoglycemia was confirmed by the presence of insulin autoantibodies. While dietary restriction alone did not result in sufficient glucose control in this patient with autoimmune hypoglycemia, treatment with hydrothermally modified slow release corn starch led to stable euglycemia. This easy, well tolerated and non-invasive treatment may constitute a new therapeutic option for hypoglycemia in patients with autoimmune hypoglycemia who do not achieve sufficient control of hypoglycemia by dietary restriction alone.

  11. Relative adrenal insufficiency in post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinclair R

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder is treated with rapid decrement of immunosuppressive therapy. This cannot be achieved with ease in patients on long-term glucocorticoid therapy, as chronically suppressed adrenal glands may not be capable of mounting adequate response to stress. A 52-year-old Caucasian male presented with fever, orthostatic hypotension, lymphadenopathy and hyponatraemia. Serum cortisol levels were within normal levels with a sub optimal response to stimulation by ACTH. Hyponatraemia and orthostasis responded poorly to fluid restriction, saline and salt repletion but corrected after increasing the steroid dose. The normal baseline cortisol levels represented a stimulated adrenal gland, however, the ACTH stimulation had inadequate response. This sub optimal stimulation and a good response to increased steroids suggest the presence of relative or occult adrenal insufficiency. Relative adrenal insufficiency must be considered in patients who have received prolonged glucocorticoid therapy and have symptoms such as hypotension and/or hyponatraemia.

  12. The Effect of Vitamin D on Thyroid Autoimmunity in Levothyroxine-Treated Women with Hashimoto's Thyroiditis and Normal Vitamin D Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krysiak, Robert; Szkróbka, Witold; Okopień, Bogusław

    2017-04-01

    Background: Low vitamin D status is associated with autoimmune thyroid disease. Oral vitamin D supplementation was found to reduce titers of thyroid antibodies in levothyroxine-treated women with postpartum thyroiditis and low vitamin D status. Methods: The study included 34 women with Hashimoto's thyroiditis and normal vitamin D status (serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels above 30 ng/mL) who had been treated for at least 6 months with levothyroxine. On the basis of patient preference, women were divided into 2 groups, receiving (n=18) or not receiving (n=16) oral vitamin D preparations (2000 IU daily). Serum levels of thyrotropin, free thyroxine, free triiodothyronine and 25-hydroxyvitamin D, as well as titers of thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin antibodies were measured at the beginning of the study and 6 months later. Results: There were no significant differences in baseline values between both study groups. 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels inversely correlated with titers of thyroid antibodies. No changes in hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis activity and thyroid antibody titers were observed in vitamin-naïve patients. Vitamin D increased serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, as well as reduced titers of thyroid antibodies. This effect was more pronounced for thyroid peroxidase than for thyroglobulin antibodies and correlated with their baseline titers. Conclusions: Vitamin D preparations may reduce thyroid autoimmunity in levothyroxine-treated women with Hashimoto's thyroiditis and normal vitamin D status. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Alopecia universalis, hypothyroidism and pituitary hyperplasia: polyglandular autoimmune syndrome III in a patient in remission from treated Hodgkin lymphoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quintyne, K I

    2010-10-01

    We herein report a case of a 33-year-old man in remission from Hodgkin lymphoma, who presented with reduced potency and hair loss. Initial endocrine tests revealed autoimmune hypothyroidism. An MRI of his pituitary gland at onset revealed hyperplasia. He tolerated replacement endocrine therapy with good response, but with no improvement in his alopecia universalis. A repeat MRI, 6 months after his initial endocrine manipulation, showed resolution of his pituitary hyperplasia.

  14. Peptide-based approaches to treat asthma, arthritis, other autoimmune diseases and pathologies of the central nervous system

    OpenAIRE

    Hauff, K.; Zamzow, C.; Law, W. J.; De Melo, J.; Kennedy, K.; Los, Marek Jan

    2005-01-01

    In this review we focus on peptide- and peptidomimetic-based approaches that target autoimmune diseases and some pathologies of the central nervous system. Special attention is given to asthma, allergic rhinitis, osteoarthritis, and Alzheimer's disease, but other related pathologies are also reviewed, although to a lesser degree. Among others, drugs like Diacerhein and its active form Rhein, Pralnacasan, Anakinra (Kineret), Omalizumab, an antibody "BION-1", directed against the common beta-ch...

  15. Lacrimal sac lymphoproliferative lesion: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coloma-González, I; Ruíz-García, L; Ceriotto, A; Corredor-Casas, S; Salcedo-Casillas, G

    2015-03-01

    The case is presented of a 51 year-old woman with a firm mass at the medial canthus of the right eye of five years onset. A low-grade lymphoproliferative lesion (reactive lymphoid hyperplasia) was diagnosed from an excisional biopsy Lacrimal sac tumors are rare, with a peak incidence in the fifth decade of life. The initial clinical features are epiphora and medial canthus swelling. As it mimics nasolacrimal duct obstruction, up to 40% of these tumors are misdiagnosed until undergoing surgery. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Emergence of long-lived autoreactive plasma cells in the spleen of primary warm auto-immune hemolytic anemia patients treated with rituximab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahévas, Matthieu; Michel, Marc; Vingert, Benoit; Moroch, Julien; Boutboul, David; Audia, Sylvain; Cagnard, Nicolas; Ripa, Julie; Menard, Cédric; Tarte, Karin; Mégret, Jérôme; Le Gallou, Simon; Patin, Pauline; Thai, Lan; Galicier, Lionel; Bonnotte, Bernard; Godeau, Bertrand; Noizat-Pirenne, France; Weill, Jean-Claude; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès

    2015-08-01

    Primary warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (wAIHA) is a rare autoimmune disease in which red blood cells are eliminated by IgG autoantibodies. We analyzed the antibody-secreting cells in the spleen and the peripheral blood of wAIHA patients in various contexts of treatment. Plasmablasts were observed in peripheral blood of newly diagnosed wAIHA patients and, accordingly, active germinal center reactions were present in the spleen of patients receiving short-term corticosteroid therapy. Long-term corticosteroid regimens markedly reduced this response while splenic plasma cells were able to persist, a fraction of them secreting anti-red blood cell IgG in vitro. In wAIHA patients treated by rituximab and who underwent splenectomy because of treatment failure, plasma cells were still present in the spleen, some of them being autoreactive. By using a set of diagnostic genes that allowed us to assess the plasma cell maturation stage, we observed that these cells displayed a long-lived program, differing from the one of plasma cells from healthy donors or from wAIHA patients with various immunosuppressant treatments, and more similar to the one of normal long-lived bone-marrow plasma cells. Interestingly, an increased level of B-cell activating factor (BAFF) was observed in the supernatant of spleen cell cultures from such rituximab-treated wAIHA patients. These results suggest, in line with our previous report on primary immune thrombocytopenia, that the B-cell depletion induced by rituximab promoted a suitable environment for the maturation and survival of auto-immune long-lived plasma cells in the spleen. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Update in endocrine autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark S

    2008-10-01

    The endocrine system is a common target in pathogenic autoimmune responses, and there has been recent progress in our understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of autoimmune endocrine diseases. Rapid progress has recently been made in our understanding of the genetic factors involved in endocrine autoimmune diseases. Studies on monogenic autoimmune diseases that include endocrine phenotypes like autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1 and immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked have helped reveal the role of key regulators in the maintenance of immune tolerance. Highly powered genetic studies have found and confirmed many new genes outside of the established role of the human leukocyte antigen locus with these diseases, and indicate an essential role of immune response pathways in these diseases. Progress has also been made in identifying new autoantigens and the development of new animal models for the study of endocrine autoimmunity. Finally, although hormone replacement therapy is still likely to be a mainstay of treatment in these disorders, there are new agents being tested for potentially treating and reversing the underlying autoimmune process. Although autoimmune endocrine disorders are complex in etiology, these recent advances should help contribute to improved outcomes for patients with, or at risk for, these disorders.

  18. Autoimmune disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000816.htm Autoimmune disorders To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. An autoimmune disorder occurs when the body's immune system attacks and ...

  19. Schistosome-Derived Molecules as Modulating Actors of the Immune System and Promising Candidates to Treat Autoimmune and Inflammatory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Janssen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is long known that some parasite infections are able to modulate specific pathways of host’s metabolism and immune responses. This modulation is not only important in order to understand the host-pathogen interactions and to develop treatments against the parasites themselves but also important in the development of treatments against autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Throughout the life cycle of schistosomes the mammalian hosts are exposed to several biomolecules that are excreted/secreted from the parasite infective stage, named cercariae, from their tegument, present in adult and larval stages, and finally from their eggs. These molecules can induce the activation and modulation of innate and adaptive responses as well as enabling the evasion of the parasite from host defense mechanisms. Immunomodulatory effects of helminth infections and egg molecules are clear, as well as their ability to downregulate proinflammatory cytokines, upregulate anti-inflammatory cytokines, and drive a Th2 type of immune response. We believe that schistosomes can be used as a model to understand the potential applications of helminths and helminth-derived molecules against autoimmune and inflammatory diseases.

  20. Thymoma-associated multi-organ autoimmunity: A case of graft-versus-host disease-like erythroderma complicated by Good syndrome successfully treated by thymectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Ayano; Ichimura, Yoshiko; Obata, Shoko; Kinoshita-Ise, Misaki; Fujio, Yumi; Takeno, Mitsuhiro; Konohana, Izumi

    2017-07-01

    Thymoma-associated multi-organ autoimmunity disease (TAMA) is a rare paraneoplastic disorder, clinicopathologically similar to graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Many reported cases follow a difficult course; half of them die from serious infectious diseases subsequent to immunosuppression induced by chemotherapy for unresectable thymoma, or intensive therapies including systemic steroids for complicating autoimmune diseases and GVHD-like symptoms. We report a patient whose skin symptoms were improved subsequently to total thymectomy. The patient also presented with hypogammaglobulinemia, which led to the diagnosis of complicated Good syndrome. Taking account of her immunodeficient condition, antibiotics and i.v. immunoglobulin were administrated promptly on onset of bacterial pneumonia, which was successfully treated. According to a review of the published work, treatments with systemic steroids for skin symptoms have limited effects and may contribute to serious infection. Our case indicates that successful treatment of thymoma itself may lead to the amelioration of the disease. The management priority should be given to the treatment of thymoma and the control of subsequent immune abnormality other than GVHD-like erythroderma. © 2017 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  1. Lymphoproliferative disorders in Oxford renal transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, W D; Gray, D W R; Dada, M A; Chetty, R; Gatter, K C; Davies, D R; Morris, P J

    2003-06-01

    Increased cancer incidence, particularly lymphoproliferative disease, is a complication of immunosuppression in organ transplantation. Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHLs) occur frequently during the first year after transplantation, more so in North America than in Europe. This study audited and correlated the demographic, clinical, pathological, and outcome features of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) in a large centre in Oxford, and assessed whether the time of onset fitted more with the European or North American pattern. There were 1383 renal transplants in the study period and 27 patients developed lymphoma: 26 NHLs and one Hodgkin's disease (1.95%). Four of the patients never received cyclosporin. The mean time of diagnosis after transplant was 46 months. Most tumours (21/27) presented extranodally. Management included reduction of immunosuppression, surgical excision, antiviral treatment, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. Three patients presented in the first post-transplant year-0.34% of cyclosporin managed patients-similar to the North American incidence, although the incidence of extranodal late PTLDs was also high (mean onset, 36 months v 15 months international mean). Post-transplant lymphomas were the most common malignancy associated with death in transplant patients. PTLDs occurred in 2% of renal transplant patients, presenting both in the first year in association with cyclosporin use, as in North America, but also in subsequent years, giving an overall presentation time later than the international mean. The disease usually presented extranodally, accounting for the wide range of symptoms and signs. Despite awareness and active management, the disease contributed to death in more that 50% of patients with PTLDs.

  2. Genetically Engineered Islets and Alternative Sources of Insulin-Producing Cells for Treating Autoimmune Diabetes: Quo Vadis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Cheng Chou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Islet transplantation is a promising therapy for patients with type 1 diabetes that can provide moment-to-moment metabolic control of glucose and allow them to achieve insulin independence. However, two major problems need to be overcome: (1 detrimental immune responses, including inflammation induced by the islet isolation/transplantation procedure, recurrence autoimmunity, and allorejection, can cause graft loss and (2 inadequate numbers of organ donors. Several gene therapy approaches and pharmaceutical treatments have been demonstrated to prolong the survival of pancreatic islet grafts in animal models; however, the clinical applications need to be investigated further. In addition, for an alternative source of pancreatic β-cell replacement therapy, the ex vivo generation of insulin-secreting cells from diverse origins of stem/progenitor cells has become an attractive option in regenerative medicine. This paper focuses on the genetic manipulation of islets during transplantation therapy and summarizes current strategies to obtain functional insulin-secreting cells from stem/progenitor cells.

  3. Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases in Patients Treated with Alemtuzumab for Multiple Sclerosis: An Example of Selective Anti-TSH-Receptor Immune Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Rotondi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Alemtuzumab, a humanized anti-CD52 monoclonal antibody, is approved for the treatment of active relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS. Alemtuzumab induces a rapid and prolonged depletion of lymphocytes from the circulation, which results in a profound immuno-suppression status followed by an immune reconstitution phase. Secondary to reconstitution autoimmune diseases represent the most common side effect of Alemtuzumab treatment. Among them, Graves’ disease (GD is the most frequent one with an estimated prevalence ranging from 16.7 to 41.0% of MS patients receiving Alemtuzumab. Thyrotropin (TSH receptor (R-reactive B cells are typically observed in GD and eventually present this autoantigen to T-cells, which, in turn, secrete several pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Given that reconstitution autoimmunity is more frequently characterized by autoantibody-mediated diseases rather than by destructive Th1-mediated disorders, it is not surprising that GD is the most commonly reported side effect of Alemtuzumab treatment in patients with MS. On the other hand, immune reconstitution GD was not observed in a large series of patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with Alemtuzumab. This negative finding supports the view that patients with MS are intrinsically more at risk for developing Alemtuzumab-related thyroid dysfunctions and in particular of GD. From a clinical point of view, Alemtuzumab-induced GD is characterized by a surprisingly high rate of remission, both spontaneous and after antithyroid drugs, as well as by a spontaneous shift to hypothyroidism, which is supposed to result from a change from stimulating to blocking TSH-receptor antibodies. These immune and clinical peculiarities support the concept that antithyroid drugs should be the first-line treatment in Alemtuzumab-induced Graves’ hyperthyroidism.

  4. Autoimmune gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulnigg-Dabsch, Stefanie

    2016-10-01

    Autoimmune gastritis is a chronic inflammatory disease with destruction of parietal cells of the corpus and fundus of the stomach. The known consequence is vitamin B12 deficiency and, consequently, pernicious anemia. However, loss of parietal cells reduces secretion of gastric acid which is also required for absorption of inorganic iron; thus, iron deficiency is commonly found in patients with autoimmune gastritis. This usually precedes vitamin B12 deficiency and is found mainly in young women. Patients with chronic iron deficiency, especially those refractory to oral iron therapy, should therefore be evaluated for the presence of autoimmune gastritis.

  5. Headache in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Seby; Hajj-Ali, Rula A

    2014-03-01

    Autoimmune diseases are a group of heterogeneous inflammatory disorders characterized by systemic or localized inflammation, leading to ischemia and tissue destruction. These include disorders like systemic lupus erythematosus and related diseases, systemic vasculitides, and central nervous system (CNS) vasculitis (primary or secondary). Headache is a very common manifestation of CNS involvement of these diseases. Although headache characteristics can be unspecific and often non-diagnostic, it is important to recognize because headache can be the first manifestation of CNS involvement. Prompt recognition and treatment is necessary not only to treat the headache, but also to help prevent serious neurological sequelae that frequently accompany autoimmune diseases. In this review, we discuss headache associated with autoimmune diseases along with important mimics. © 2014 American Headache Society.

  6. Relation between infection and autoimmunity in mixed cryoglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, C; Zignego, A L

    2000-01-01

    Mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC) is a systemic vasculitis of small to medium-sized vessels due to the vascular deposition of circulating immune-complexes (CIC) and complement. A leukocytoclastic vasculitis is the histologic hallmark of cutaneous manifestations of the disease, while a clonal B lymphocyte expansion in blood, bone marrow, liver, and spleen represents the underlying pathologic alteration responsible for the production of cryo-CIC and non-cryo CIC with rheumatoid factor activity. A causative role of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has been demonstrated in the large majority of MC patients. Hepatitis C virus is both a hepatotropic and a lymphotropic virus; due to this latter biological peculiarity, HCV may trigger a constellation of autoimmune-lymphoproliferative disorders. Besides MC, other important HCV-related diseases are porphyria cutanea tarda, autoimmune hepatitis, membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, and B cell neoplasias. Hepatitis C virus-related MC represents a link between autoimmune and lymphoproliferative disorders; moreover, MC is an important model to study the complex relation between infections and immune system alterations in humans. During the last years many other autoimmune manifestations have been correlated with HCV infection; namely, sicca syndrome, chronic polyarthritis, polydermatomyositis, fibromyalgia, autoimmune thyroiditis, lung fibrosis, and diabetes mellitus. It is often difficult to verify whether the above associations are coincidental or a pathogenetic link actually exists. At least for particular patients' subsets and in some geographic areas, a causative role of HCV seems to be likely. The geographically heterogeneous distribution of HCV-related autoimmune diseases suggests the contribution of important environmental and genetic factors in the pathogenesis of such conditions. In clinical practice, patients with recent-onset, atypical rheumatic and autoimmune disorders should be carefully investigated for possible

  7. Understanding Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What are they? Points To Remember About Autoimmune Diseases Autoimmune diseases refer to problems with the immune system, ... Infectious Diseases Website: https://www.niaid.nih.gov/diseases-conditions/autoimmune-diseases American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association Website: https:// ...

  8. Is Tolerance Broken in Autoimmunity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dama Laxminarayana

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases are classified into about 80 different types based on their specificity related to system, organ and/or tissue. About 5% of the western population is affected by this anomaly, but its worldwide incidence is unknown. Autoimmune diseases are heterogeneous in nature and clinical manifestations range from benign disorders to life-threatening conditions. Autoimmunity strikes at any stage of life, but age and/or gender also play role in onset of some of these anomalies. The autoimmune pathogenesis is initiated by the origination of autoantigens, which leads to the development of autoantibodies followed by auto-immunogenicity and the ultimate onset of autoimmunity. There is a lack of suitable therapies to treat autoimmune diseases, because mechanisms involved in the onset of these anomalies were poorly understood. Present therapies are limited to symptomatic treatment and come with severe side effects. Here, I described the molecular mechanisms and cellular events involved in the initiation of autoimmunity and proposed better strategies to modulate such molecular and cellular anomalies, which will help in preventing and/or controlling autoimmune pathogenesis and ultimately aid in enhancing the quality of life.

  9. Frequent hypermethylation of DBC1 in malignant lymphoproliferative neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbæk, Karin Elmegård; Ralfkiaer, U.; Dahl, C.

    2008-01-01

    Allelic loss at chromosome 9q31-34 is a frequent event in many lymphoproliferative malignancies. Here, we examined DBC1 at 9q33.1 as a potential target in lymphomagenesis. DBC1 is a putative tumor suppressor that has been shown to be involved in the regulation of cell growth and programmed cell d...

  10. Autoimmun hypophysitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Therese; Hagen, Claus

    2010-01-01

    during pregnancy or postpartum, but also occurs in males and children. AH is often associated with other autoimmune diseases, most frequently with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The symptoms are caused by enlargement of the pituitary gland and disturbances of the hormone function. Treatment is either......Autoimmune hypophysitis (AH) - often referred to as lymphocytic hypophysitis - is a rare disease that affects the pituitary gland and causes inflammation. The disease enlarges the pituitary gland and the clinical presentations are lack of pituitary function and headaches. AH is mostly seen in women...

  11. Autoimmun hypophysitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Therese; Hagen, Claus

    2010-01-01

    during pregnancy or postpartum, but also occurs in males and children. AH is often associated with other autoimmune diseases, most frequently with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The symptoms are caused by enlargement of the pituitary gland and disturbances of the hormone function. Treatment is either......Autoimmune hypophysitis (AH) - often referred to as lymphocytic hypophysitis - is a rare disease that affects the pituitary gland and causes inflammation. The disease enlarges the pituitary gland and the clinical presentations are lack of pituitary function and headaches. AH is mostly seen in women...... immunosuppressive treatment or surgery....

  12. Autoimmun hypophysitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Therese; Hagen, Claus

    2010-01-01

    during pregnancy or postpartum, but also occurs in males and children. AH is often associated with other autoimmune diseases, most frequently with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The symptoms are caused by enlargement of the pituitary gland and disturbances of the hormone function. Treatment is either...

  13. Autoimmune sialadenitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guntinas-Lichius, O.; Vissink, A.; Ihrler, S.

    Using the European-American classification criteria the diagnosis of autoimmune sialadenitis in Sjogren's syndrome can generally be easily established or excluded. In addition, sonography performed by the ENT physician is helpful in diagnosing and especially in follow-up screening for MALT

  14. EBV-Associated Lymphoproliferative Disorder and Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis in a Patient with Severe Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Jacob Kinross-Wright

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Epstein-Barr virus- (EBV- associated lymphoproliferative disease (LPD is a rare condition, usually occurring in immunocompromised patients. We report a case of EBV-associated LPD in a patient with severe celiac disease, the first report to describe this syndrome in a patient with this diagnosis. Case Summary. A 69-year-old Caucasian woman with recent diagnosis of celiac sprue presented to our hospital with persistent diarrhea, abdominal pain, weight loss, and fatigue despite adherence to gluten-free diet for a number of weeks prior to presentation. She underwent evaluation for occult malignancy and was found to have diffuse intra-abdominal mesenteric lymphadenopathy on CT scan. Biopsy of mesenteric nodes revealed an EBV positive, CD20 positive mixed lymphoproliferative process with T-cell predominance, but without a monoclonal cell population felt to be consistent with EBV-associated LPD. Bone marrow biopsy revealed hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, complicating her course. She was treated with steroids and rituximab but continued to decline, eventually developing MSSA bacteremia and succumbing to her disease. Conclusion. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the constellation of celiac sprue, EBV-associated LPD, and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. Providers caring for patients with severe, uncontrolled celiac disease and adenopathy should consider EBV-associated LPD.

  15. [Autoimmune channelopathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, M; Delrieu, J; Astudillo, L

    2011-12-01

    Autoimmune channelopathies are rare neuromuscular diseases that have been characterized clinically for several decades but for which the evidence of associated antibodies has only been recently demonstrated. Ion channels have an important role of activation, inhibition and regulation in neuromuscular transmission. Myasthenia gravis, generally associated with the presence of anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody, is the best-known channelopathy. Other anti-channel antibodies, including voltage-dependent, are associated with several neurological diseases, as illustrated by anti-voltage-gated calcium channels found in Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome and paraneoplastic cerebellar ataxia, and anti-voltage-gated potassium channels found in neuromyotonia, Morvan's syndrome and limbic encephalitis. The treatment of autoimmune channelopathies is logically based on corticosteroids, immunosuppressant drugs, intravenous immunoglobulins and plasmapheresis. Copyright © 2011 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Autoimmun pankreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjordside, Eva; Novovic, Srdan; Schmidt, Palle Nordblad

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare inflammatory disease. AIP has characteristic histology, serology and imaging findings. Two types of AIP exist, type 1, which is a part of the systemic immunoglobulin G4-related disease, and type 2, which is only localized to the pancreas. Patients with type...... are predominantly older men, have involvement of other organs and more often experience relapse than patients with type 2. Both types respond well to steroid treatment. The most important differential diagnose is pancreatic cancer....

  17. Hepatitis C virus-related lymphoproliferative disorders: An overview

    OpenAIRE

    Zignego, Anna Linda; Giannini, Carlo; Ferri, Clodoveo

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a global health problem affecting 3% of the world's population (about 180 million) and a cause of both hepatic and extrahepatic diseases. B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders, whose prototype is mixed cryoglobulinemia, represent the most closely related as well as the most investigated HCV-related extrahepatic disorder. The association between extrahepatic (lymphoma) as well as hepatic malignancies (hepatocellular carcinoma) has justified the inclusion of HCV among ...

  18. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia as an initial manifestation of Hodgkin’s Disease: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Augusto Urrego-Díaz

    2016-07-01

    Through this paper, the authors intend to remind the medical community about the importance of a prompt and deep study of all autoimmune hemolytic anemia cases found in pediatric patients, without overlooking possible malignant causes related to this condition such as a lymphoproliferative disorder. Thus, before diagnosing a hemolytic anemia as idiopathic, the practitioner must be certain that the condition is not a clinical manifestation of an underlying disease.

  19. Splenectomy in two children with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome and massive splenomegaly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glerup, Mia; Thelle, Thomas; Grønbaek, Kirsten

    2009-01-01

    Treatment of patients with ALPS has varied but presently there is no consensus about the optimal therapy. Splenectomy is an option but data regarding the postsplenectomy outcome in pediatric ALPS patients remain very limited. We present two children who suffered from anemia and physical discomfort...... from the large spleen. Both patients underwent uneventful splenectomy and experienced significant improvement in cytopenia, daily activity and well-being. Furthermore the youngest patient showed a significant catch-up growth. We conclude that in selected patients with marked splenomegaly and ALPS......, splenectomy may be considered a treatment option....

  20. AUTOIMMUNE HEPATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusri Dianne Jurnalis

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakHepatitis autoimun merupakan penyakit inflamasi hati yang berat dengan penyebab pasti yang tidak diketahui yang mengakibatkan morbiditas dan mortalitas yang tinggi. Semua usia dan jenis kelamin dapat dikenai dengan insiden tertinggi pada anak perempuan usia prepubertas, meskipun dapat didiagnosis pada usia 6 bulan. Hepatitis autoimun dapat diklasifikasikan menjadi 2 bagian berdasarkan adanya antibodi spesifik: Smooth Muscle Antibody (SMA dengan anti-actin specificity dan/atau Anti Nuclear Antibody (ANA pada tipe 1 dan Liver-Kidney Microsome antibody (LKM1 dan/atau anti-liver cytosol pada tipe 2. Gambaran histologisnya berupa “interface hepatitis”, dengan infiltrasi sel mononuklear pada saluran portal, berbagai tingkat nekrosis, dan fibrosis yang progresf. Penyakit berjalan secara kronik tetapi keadaan yang berat biasanya menjadi sirosis dan gagal hati.Tipe onset yang paling sering sama dengan hepatitis virus akut dengan gagal hati akut pada beberapa pasien; sekitar sepertiga pasien dengan onset tersembunyi dengan kelemahan dan ikterik progresif ketika 10-15% asimptomatik dan mendadak ditemukan hepatomegali dan/atau peningkatan kadar aminotransferase serum. Adanya predominasi perempuan pada kedua tipe. Pasien LKM1 positif menunjukkan keadaan lebih akut, pada usia yang lebih muda, dan biasanya dengan defisiensi Immunoglobulin A (IgA, dengan durasi gejala sebelum diagnosis, tanda klinis, riwayat penyakit autoimun pada keluarga, adanya kaitan dengan gangguan autoimun, respon pengobatan dan prognosis jangka panjang sama pada kedua tipe.Kortikosteroid yang digunakan secara tunggal atau kombinasi azathioprine merupakan terapi pilihan yang dapat menimbulkan remisi pada lebih dari 90% kasus. Strategi terapi alternatif adalah cyclosporine. Penurunan imunosupresi dikaitkan dengan tingginya relap. Transplantasi hati dianjurkan pada penyakit hati dekom-pensata yang tidak respon dengan pengobatan medis lainnya.Kata kunci : hepatitis Autoimmune

  1. Associated Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... celiac disease are type 1 diabetes and autoimmune thyroid disease. The tendency to develop autoimmune diseases is believed ... confusion, weight loss, and coma (if left untreated). Thyroid Disease There are two common forms of autoimmune thyroid ...

  2. Autoimmune liver disease panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liver disease test panel - autoimmune ... Autoimmune disorders are a possible cause of liver disease. The most common of these diseases are autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cholangitis (formerly called primary biliary cirrhosis). This group of tests ...

  3. Update in Endocrine Autoimmunity

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Mark S.

    2008-01-01

    Context: The endocrine system is a common target in pathogenic autoimmune responses, and there has been recent progress in our understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of autoimmune endocrine diseases.

  4. Analysis of incidence of thromboembolic complications in patients with chronic lymphoproliferative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolovski Srđan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: An increased risk for thromboembolism in cancer patients has been observed in patients with solid tumours, whereas little data exist on malignant lymphoma. Aim: Determination of the incidence of TE in patients with non Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL, Hodgkin lymphoma (HL and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL treated in our institution. Material and methods: We reviewed medical records of patients with NHL, HL and CLL diagnosed according to the WHO classification and treated at our institution between January 2006. and December 2014. Results: A total of 1054 patients, 48.4% had high-grade NHL, 20.0% low-grade NHL, 14.5% HL, 7.1% other forms of lymphoma and 10.0% CLL. In group of lymphoma patients, 72 (6.8 % had at least one TE. TE included deep vein thrombosis (38.9%, jugular vein thrombosis (12.5%, pulmonary embolism (11.1%, CNS thrombosis (6.9%, superficial vein thrombosis (2.8%, acute myocardial infarction (1.4% and other (26.4%. In 49 patients thrombosis occurred during treatment or up to three months after therapy completion, whereas in 23 patients thrombosis was diagnosed prior to therapy. Patients with aggressive NHL and CLL had significantly higher incidence of TE (8.63%, 8.57% compared to other types of lymphoma patients (p = 0.009. There is no statistical significance of impact of different types of lymphoproliferative diseases on increased risk for TE. Conclusion: This study confirmed findings of some earlier studies of increased risk of thromboembolic events (TE in patients with aggressive forms of chronic lymphoproliferative diseasses, but there is no significantly impact of gender or age on that risk.

  5. Isolated Post-Transplantation Lymphoproliferative Disease Involving the Breast and Axilla as Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Ji-Young [Department of Radiology, Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul 150-950 (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Eun Suk; Lee, Jee Eun [Department of Radiology, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul 158-710 (Korea, Republic of); Sung, Sun Hee [Department of Pathology, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul 158-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) are a heterogeneous group of diseases that represent serious complications following immunosuppressive therapy for solid organ or hematopoietic-cell recipients. In contrast to B-cell PTLD, T-cell PTLD is less frequent and is not usually associated with Epstein Barr Virus infection. Moreover, to our knowledge, isolated T-cell PTLD involving the breast is extremely rare and this condition has never been reported previously in the literature. Herein, we report a rare case of isolated T-cell PTLD of the breast that occurred after a patient had been treated for allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation due to acute myeloblastic leukemia.

  6. Post-kidney transplant large bowel lymphoproliferative disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV-associated post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD is a serious complication of organ transplantation. The gastrointestinal (GI tract is a common site involved, but non-specific signs and symptoms often delay the diagnosis. We report a case of EBV-associated GI-PTLD in a 68-year-old kidney transplant patient who received the kidney ten months earlier. He presented with chronic diarrhea and developed massive pneumo-peritoneum secondary to multiple colonic perforations.

  7. Thymic Hyperplasia after Lung Transplantation Imitating Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steger, Christina Maria; Semsroth, Severin; Hager, Thomas; Rieker, Ralf; Müller, Ludwig

    2011-01-01

    Thymic hyperplasia is usually associated with the treatment of malignant tumours and is sometimes linked with endocrine diseases. For the first time, we report a case of thymic hyperplasia in a patient 2 years after bilateral lung transplantation. Contrast-enhanced chest CT scan was highly suspicious for a posttransplant lymphoma or thymoma. Therefore, the patient received total thymectomy. Excised specimens were sent to the Department of Pathology. Unexpectedly, the histological examination revealed hyperplastic thymic tissue without evidence for a posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder or malignancy. PMID:23213605

  8. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder following kidney transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maksten, Eva Futtrup; Vase, Maja Ølholm; Kampmann, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) incidence is difficult to determine, mainly because both early and other lesions may go unrecognized and unregistered. Few studies have included systematic pathology review to maximize case identification and decide more accurately PTLD frequency...... after long-term post-transplantation follow-up. A retrospective population-based cohort study including all kidney transplant recipients at two Danish centres (1990-2011; population covered 3.1 million; 2175 transplantations in 1906 patients). Pathology reports were reviewed for all patient biopsies...

  9. Thymic Hyperplasia after Lung Transplantation Imitating Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Maria Steger

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Thymic hyperplasia is usually associated with the treatment of malignant tumours and is sometimes linked with endocrine diseases. For the first time, we report a case of thymic hyperplasia in a patient 2 years after bilateral lung transplantation. Contrast-enhanced chest CT scan was highly suspicious for a posttransplant lymphoma or thymoma. Therefore, the patient received total thymectomy. Excised specimens were sent to the Department of Pathology. Unexpectedly, the histological examination revealed hyperplastic thymic tissue without evidence for a posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder or malignancy.

  10. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin in lymphoproliferative disorders and rituximab-related secondary hypogammaglobulinemia: a single-center experience in 61 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compagno, Nicolò; Cinetto, Francesco; Semenzato, Gianpietro; Agostini, Carlo

    2014-06-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin replacement therapy represents the standard treatment for hypogammaglobulinemia secondary to B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin infusion is an effective, safe and well-tolerated treatment approach in primary immunodeficiencies but no extensive data are available on their use in secondary hypogammaglobulinemia, a frequent phenomenon occurring after treatment with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies in lymphoproliferative disorders. In this retrospective study we evaluated efficacy (serum IgG trough levels, incidence of infections per year, need for antibiotics) and safety (number of adverse events) of intravenous (300 mg/kg/4 weeks) versus subcutaneous (75 mg/kg/week) immunoglobulin replacement therapy in 61 patients. In addition, the impact of the infusion methods on quality of life was compared. All patients were treated with subcutaneous immunoglobulin, and 33 out of them had been previously treated with intravenous immunoglobulin. Both treatments appeared to be effective in replacing Ig production deficiency and in reducing the incidence of infectious events and the need for antibiotics. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin obtained a superior benefit when compared to intravenous immunoglobulin achieving higher IgG trough levels, lower incidence of overall infection and need for antibiotics. The incidence of serious bacterial infections was similar with both infusion ways. As expected, a lower number of adverse events was registered with subcutaneous immunoglobulin, compared to intravenous immunoglobulin, with no serious adverse events. Finally, we observed an improvement in health-related quality of life parameters after the switch to subcutaneous immunoglobulin. Our results suggest that subcutaneous immunoglobulin is safe and effective in patients with hypogammaglobulinemia associated to lymphoproliferative disorders. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  11. "How I treat" autoimmune diseases: State of the art on the management of rare rheumatic diseases and ANCA-associated systemic idiopathic vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roccatello, Dario

    2017-10-01

    This Special Issue of Autoimmunity Reviews constitutes summaries of presentations at the 20th International Meeting on Immunopathology and Orphan Diseases, held in Torino, Italy, 25-28th January 2017. As such, these presentations represent the state of the art on the pathophysiology of autoimmune diseases as well as the most recent insights into the management of these pathologic conditions. The latter includes both the optimal use of established drugs and approaches as well as novel knowledge on the means and consequences of targeted blocking of molecules or cellular mechanisms. The 2nd Turin Congress on systemic idiopathic vasculitis concluded the works of the International Meeting on Immune Pathology and Orphan Diseases. This Satellite Congress was mainly addressed to the management of antineutrophil cytoplasm antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis: advances on induction therapy and maintenance treatment. Guidelines and recommendations were critically discussed, reviewing available evidence and providing experts' insights. New intensive therapeutic approaches had been also reported. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Helminth Immunomodulation in Autoimmune Disease

    OpenAIRE

    John J. Miles; John J. Miles; John J. Miles; John J. Miles; Taylor B. Smallwood; Paul R. Giacomin; Alex Loukas; Jason P. Mulvenna; Jason P. Mulvenna; Jason P. Mulvenna; Richard J. Clark

    2017-01-01

    Helminths have evolved to become experts at subverting immune surveillance. Through potent and persistent immune tempering, helminths can remain undetected in human tissues for decades. Redirecting the immunomodulating “talents” of helminths to treat inflammatory human diseases is receiving intensive interest. Here, we review therapies using live parasitic worms, worm secretions, and worm-derived synthetic molecules to treat autoimmune disease. We review helminth therapy in both mouse models ...

  13. A Rare Presentation of Isolated CNS Posttransplantation Lymphoproliferative Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Morris

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD is a recognized and extremely morbid complication of solid organ transplantation, but central nervous system involvement, particularly in isolation, is rare. There are no standardized treatment strategies for PTLD, though commonly used strategies include reduction of immunosuppression, chemotherapy, rituximab, radiation, and surgery. We present a case of an unusual morphologic variant of primary central nervous system PTLD with successful response to rituximab and cranial radiation. A 69-year-old Asian male, who underwent postrenal transplant nine years earlier, presented with a one-month history of new onset seizure activity. His evaluation revealed multiple brain lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, as well as serologic and cerebrospinal fluid studies which were positive for Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV infection. Ultimately, he underwent craniotomy with tissue biopsy with the final pathology report showing posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder, polymorphic type. The patient was managed with reduction in immunosuppression, rituximab therapy, and cranial radiation treatments. He had demonstrated marked improvement in his neurologic function and was ultimately discharged to inpatient rehabilitation facility.

  14. Autoimmune Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Shounak; Takahashi, Naoki; Chari, Suresh T

    2017-07-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a chronic fibroinflammatory disease of the pancreas that belongs to the spectrum of immunoglobulin G-subclass4-related diseases (IgG4-RD) and typically presents with obstructive jaundice. Idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) is a closely related but distinct disease that mimics AIP radiologically but manifests clinically most commonly as recurrent acute pancreatitis in young individuals with concurrent inflammatory bowel disease. IgG4 levels are often elevated in AIP and normal in IDCP. Histologically, lymphoplasmacytic acinar inflammation and storiform fibrosis are seen in both. In addition, the histologic hallmark of IDCP is the granulocyte epithelial lesion: intraluminal and intraepithelial neutrophils in medium-sized and small ducts with or without granulocytic acinar inflammation often associated with destruction of ductal architecture. Initial treatment of both AIP and IDCP is with oral corticosteroids for duration of 4 weeks followed by a gradual taper. Relapses are common in AIP and relatively uncommon in IDCP, a relatively rare disease for which the natural history is not well understood. For patients with relapsing AIP, treatment with immunomodulators and more recently rituximab has been recommended. Although rare instances of pancreaticobiliary malignancy has been reported in patients with AIP, overall the lifetime risk of developing pancreatic cancer does not appear to be elevated.

  15. Leflunomide/teriflunomide inhibit Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)- induced lymphoproliferative disease and lytic viral replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilger, Andrea; Plowshay, Julie; Ma, Shidong; Nawandar, Dhananjay; Barlow, Elizabeth A; Romero-Masters, James C; Bristol, Jillian A; Li, Zhe; Tsai, Ming-Han; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques; Kenney, Shannon C

    2017-07-04

    EBV infection causes mononucleosis and is associated with specific subsets of B cell lymphomas. Immunosuppressed patients such as organ transplant recipients are particularly susceptible to EBV-induced lymphoproliferative disease (LPD), which can be fatal. Leflunomide (a drug used to treat rheumatoid arthritis) and its active metabolite teriflunomide (used to treat multiple sclerosis) inhibit de novo pyrimidine synthesis by targeting the cellular dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, thereby decreasing T cell proliferation. Leflunomide also inhibits the replication of cytomegalovirus and BK virus via both "on target" and "off target" mechanisms and is increasingly used to treat these viruses in organ transplant recipients. However, whether leflunomide/teriflunomide block EBV replication or inhibit EBV-mediated B cell transformation is currently unknown. We show that teriflunomide inhibits cellular proliferation, and promotes apoptosis, in EBV-transformed B cells in vitro at a clinically relevant dose. In addition, teriflunomide prevents the development of EBV-induced lymphomas in both a humanized mouse model and a xenograft model. Furthermore, teriflunomide inhibits lytic EBV infection in vitro both by preventing the initial steps of lytic viral reactivation, and by blocking lytic viral DNA replication. Leflunomide/teriflunomide might therefore be clinically useful for preventing EBV-induced LPD in patients who have high EBV loads yet require continued immunosuppression.

  16. Autoimmunity and Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizzaro, Nicola; Antico, Antonio; Villalta, Danilo

    2018-01-01

    Alterations in the immune response of patients with autoimmune diseases may predispose to malignancies, and a link between chronic autoimmune gastritis and gastric cancer has been reported in many studies. Intestinal metaplasia with dysplasia of the gastric corpus-fundus mucosa and hyperplasia of chromaffin cells, which are typical features of late-stage autoimmune gastritis, are considered precursor lesions. Autoimmune gastritis has been associated with the development of two types of gastric neoplasms: intestinal type and type I gastric carcinoid. Here, we review the association of autoimmune gastritis with gastric cancer and other autoimmune features present in gastric neoplasms. PMID:29373557

  17. Autoimmunity and Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Bizzaro

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in the immune response of patients with autoimmune diseases may predispose to malignancies, and a link between chronic autoimmune gastritis and gastric cancer has been reported in many studies. Intestinal metaplasia with dysplasia of the gastric corpus-fundus mucosa and hyperplasia of chromaffin cells, which are typical features of late-stage autoimmune gastritis, are considered precursor lesions. Autoimmune gastritis has been associated with the development of two types of gastric neoplasms: intestinal type and type I gastric carcinoid. Here, we review the association of autoimmune gastritis with gastric cancer and other autoimmune features present in gastric neoplasms.

  18. Polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proust-Lemoine, Emmanuelle; Saugier-Veber, Pascale; Wémeau, Jean-Louis

    2012-12-01

    Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrom type 1 (PAS-1) or Autoimmune PolyEndocrinopathy Candidiasis-Ectodermal-Dystrophy (APECED) is a rare recessive autosomal disease related to Autoimmune Regulator (AIRE) gene mutations. AIRE is mainly implicated in central and peripheric immune tolerance. Diagnosis was classically based on presence of at least two out of three "majors" criterions of Whitaker's triad (candidiasis, autoimmune hypoparathyroidism and adrenal insufficiency). Presence of one criterion was sufficient when a sibling was previously diagnosed. However, some atypic or poorly symptomatic variants do not correspond to these criterions. As a matter of fact, digestive (malabsorption, pernicious anemia, hepatitis), cutaneous (alopecia, vitiligo, enamel dysplasia) or ophtalmological (keratitis) components could prevail. In these cases, diagnosis could be made by molecular genetics. Prognosis is influenced by genetic (AIRE mutations, HLA), hormonal and environmental (infections) factors. Potentially letal components (hepatitis and severe malabsorption) could be treated by immunosuppressors. Candidiasis and other infections should be carefully screened and treated before beginning those therapies, in order to avoid severe systemic infections. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. A typical aspects of intrathoracic posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beigelman, C. [Dept. of Radiology, Hopital Pitie-Salpetriere, 75 Paris (France); Leblond, V. [Dept. of Hematology, Hopital Pitie-Salpetriere, 75 Paris (France); Suberbielle, C. [Dept. of Hematology, Hopital Pitie-Salpetriere, 75 Paris (France); Lenoir, S. [Dept. of Radiology, Hopital Pitie-Salpetriere, 75 Paris (France); Dorent, R. [Dept. of Thoracic Surgery, Hopital Pitie-Salpetriere, 75 Paris (France); Grenier, P. [Dept. of Radiology, Hopital Pitie-Salpetriere, 75 Paris (France)

    1995-11-01

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD), developing after immunosuppressive therapy in human organ-graft recipients, are, for the most part, Epstein-Barr virus-induced. The earlier the diagnosis is made, the greater the potential for reversibility. The chest radiographs and CT scans of 10 patients with thoracic locations of PTLD were reviewed. Mediastinal and hilar adenopathy, pulmonary nodules, and pleural thickening or effusion were encountered. The incidence of partial resolution with clinical remission appears to be noteworthy, and in all likelihood is related to the extensive necrosis that is frequently seen. Slow regression, transitory deterioration in one case, and localization only on the graft side in two cases, were observed. These morphological and evolutionary peculiarities must be known in order to optimize the diagnosis, and thus the prognosis, of these very original disorders. (orig.)

  20. Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder: the spectrum of imaging appearances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scarsbrook, A.F. [Department of Radiology, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford (United Kingdom); Warakaulle, D.R. [Department of Radiology, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford (United Kingdom); Dattani, M. [Department of Radiology, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford (United Kingdom); Traill, Z. [Department of Radiology, Churchill Hospital, Oxford (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: zoe.traill@orh.nhs.uk

    2005-01-01

    Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a serious complication of chronic immunosuppression following solid organ transplantation. Clinical presentation is non-specific and almost any organ can be affected. Early diagnosis is associated with a better prognosis but requires tissue sampling to ascertain the histopathological subtype of disease which cannot be predicted on imaging features alone. The radiologist has a key role in detecting the disorder, guiding biopsy and monitoring response to treatment which often only involves a reduction in immunosuppressive therapy. The aim of this paper is to illustrate the wide spectrum of imaging features in PTLD and emphasize the more specific findings which allow the diagnosis to be suggested at an early stage.

  1. Lymphoproliferative disorders after renal transplantation: role of medical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claudon, M.; Lefevre, F. [Service de Radiologie, Hopital de Brabois, Vandoeuvre les Nancy (France); Kessler, M.; Hestin, D.; Renoult, E. [Service de Nephrologie, Hopital de Brabois, Vandoeuvre les Nancy (France); Champigneulle, J. [Laboratoire d`Anatomopathologie, Hopital de Brabois, Vandoeuvre les Nancy (France)

    1998-12-01

    Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) are a complication of immunosuppressed transplant recipients, and their incidence is reported to be 20-120 times greater than the rate in the general population. After kidney transplantation, PTLD more likely arise within the renal transplant fossa. Radiological patterns of these forms are presented and discussed, according to a review of the literature, and illustrated by cases from our institution. Ultrasound plays an essential role in the early diagnosis of PTLD by detecting a urinary obstruction associated with adenopathy or an ill-defined mass not previously seen. However, in the case of an inconclusive US examination, CT or MRI should be performed to confirm the presence of a mass. Both techniques are useful in evaluating the extension of the process within the transplantation fossa; MRI seems more accurate and can be used for the follow-up, especially after reduction in immunosuppressive therapy without transplant removal. (orig.) With 4 figs., 1 tab., 38 refs.

  2. Familial Lymphoproliferative Malignancies and Tandem Duplication of NF1 Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Fernandes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Neurofibromatosis type 1 is a genetic disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in a tumor suppressor gene (NF1 which codifies the protein neurofibromin. The frequent genetic alterations that modify neurofibromin function are deletions and insertions. Duplications are rare and phenotype in patients bearing duplication of NF1 gene is thought to be restricted to developmental abnormalities, with no reference to cancer susceptibility in these patients. We evaluated a patient who presented with few clinical signs of neurofibromatosis type 1 and a conspicuous personal and familiar history of different types of cancer, especially lymphoproliferative malignancies. The coding region of the NF-1 gene was analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification was performed to detect the number of mutant copies. The NF1 gene analysis showed the following alterations: mosaic duplication of NF1, TRAF4, and MYO1D. Fluorescence in situ hybridization using probes (RP5-1002G3 and RP5-92689 flanking NF1 gene in 17q11.2 and CEP17 for 17q11.11.1 was performed. There were three signals (RP5-1002G3conRP5-92689 in the interphases analyzed and two signals (RP5-1002G3conRP5-92689 in 93% of cells. These findings show a tandem duplication of 17q11.2. Conclusion. The case suggests the possibility that NF1 gene duplication may be associated with a phenotype characterized by lymphoproliferative disorders.

  3. Updates on GMSCs treatment for autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Feng; Liu, Zhong-Min; Zheng, Song Guo

    2018-02-20

    Autoimmune disease is a refractory disease. Accumulating Evidence has revealed that the manipulation of mesenchymal stem cells may have the potential to control or even treat autoimmune diseases. Human gingiva-derived mesenchymal stem cells (GMSCs) are emerging as a new line of mesenchymal stem cells that have displayed some potential advantages in controlling and treating autoimmune diseases. In this review, we briefly update the current understanding on the biology of GMSCs and their effects on preventing and treating autoimmune diseases. The availability of gingival mesenchymal stem cells (GMSCs), together with their potent capacity of multi-directional differentiation and inflammatory modulation, making GMSCs an ideal subtype of MSCs in treating autoimmune disease. Our and other studies have launched the earliest appraisal on GMSCs and carried out a lot of biological researches. The clinical trial of GMSCs on patients with autoimmune diseases will further approve their therapeutic effects, as well as its cellular and molecular mechanisms. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. Autoimmunity and Gastric Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Nicola Bizzaro; Antonio Antico; Danilo Villalta

    2018-01-01

    Alterations in the immune response of patients with autoimmune diseases may predispose to malignancies, and a link between chronic autoimmune gastritis and gastric cancer has been reported in many studies. Intestinal metaplasia with dysplasia of the gastric corpus-fundus mucosa and hyperplasia of chromaffin cells, which are typical features of late-stage autoimmune gastritis, are considered precursor lesions. Autoimmune gastritis has been associated with the development of two types of gastri...

  5. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebman, Howard A; Weitz, Ilene C

    2017-03-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is an acquired autoimmune disorder resulting in the production of antibodies directed against red blood cell antigens causing shortened erythrocyte survival. The disorders can present as a primary disorder (idiopathic) or secondary to other autoimmune disorders, malignancies, or infections. Treatment involves immune modulation with corticosteroids and other agents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Recent advances in the risk factors, diagnosis and management of Epstein-Barr virus post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paibel Aguayo-Hiraldo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fifty years after the first reports of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV-associated endemic Burkitt's lymphoma, EBV has emerged as the third most prevalent oncogenic virus worldwide. EBV infection is associated with various malignancies including Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, NK/T-cell lymphoma and nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Despite the highly specific immunologic control in the immunocompetent host, EBV can cause severe complications in the immunocompromised host (namely, post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease. This is particularly a problem in patients with delayed immune reconstitution post-hematopoietic stem cell transplant or solid organ transplant. Despite advances in diagnostic techniques and treatment algorithms allowing earlier identification and treatment of patients at highest risk, mortality rates remain as high as 90% if not treated early. The cornerstones of treatment include reduction in immunosuppression and in vivo B cell depletion with an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody. However, these treatment modalities are not always feasible due to graft rejection, emergence of graft vs. host disease, and toxicity. Newer treatment modalities include the use of adoptive T cell therapy, which has shown promising results in various EBV-related malignancies. In this article we will review recent advances in risk factors, diagnosis and management of EBV-associated malignancies, particularly post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease. We will also discuss new and innovative treatment options including adoptive T cell therapy as well as management of special situations such as chronic active EBV and EBV-associated hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis.

  7. Epstein-Barr Virus-Negative Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Diseases: Three Distinct Cases from a Single Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şule Mine Bakanay

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Three cases of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV-negative post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease that occurred 6 to 8 years after renal transplantation are reported. The patients respectively had gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma, gastric diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and atypical Burkitt lymphoma. Absence of EBV in the tissue samples was demonstrated by both in situ hybridization for EBV early RNA and polymerase chain reaction for EBV DNA. Patients were treated with reduction in immunosuppression and combined chemotherapy plus an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, rituximab. Despite the reduction in immunosuppression, patients had stable renal functions without loss of graft functions. The patient with atypical Burkitt lymphoma had an abnormal karyotype, did not respond to treatment completely, and died due to disease progression. The other patients are still alive and in remission 5 and 3 years after diagnosis, respectively. EBV-negative post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases are usually late-onset and are reported to have poor prognosis. Thus, reduction in immunosuppression is usually not sufficient for treatment and more aggressive approaches like rituximab with combined chemotherapy are required.

  8. Recurrent posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder involving the larynx and trachea: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Caroline A; Meier, Jeremy D; Stallworth, Christina R; White, David R

    2012-05-01

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a well-recognized complication of solid organ transplantation and commonly affects upper airway lymphoid tissue. Tracheal and laryngeal involvement in patients with PTLD, however, is rare. We present one such case. We report the case of a patient with recurrent PTLD involving the larynx and trachea and describe the presentation, evaluation, management, and outcome. An 11-year-old boy who underwent bilateral nephrectomy and renal transplantation as an infant was admitted to the hospital with chronic cough, fever, stridor, and dyspnea. His post-transplantation course was complicated by PTLD in cervical lymph nodes at 9 years of age that was successfully treated with chemotherapy. A computed tomographic scan during his present admission revealed supraglottic swelling, a distal tracheal mass, and paratracheal lymph node enlargement. The patient underwent laryngoscopy and bronchoscopy with biopsy specimens taken from the right laryngeal ventricle and distal trachea. Pathologic examination yielded a diagnosis of Epstein-Barr virus-positive PTLD. The patient was treated with chemotherapy, which resulted in resolution of the airway lesions, as seen on repeat bronchoscopy. This is the first report, to our knowledge, of recurrent PTLD involving simultaneous lesions in the larynx and the trachea. PTLD in the head and neck can present as lymphoid hypertrophy, airway obstruction, stridor, or cough. A high degree of clinical suspicion is essential for prompt diagnosis of this life-threatening complication.

  9. Autoimmune hepatitis: an uncommon presentation of thymoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendogni, Paolo; Rosso, Lorenzo; Tosi, Davide; Palleschi, Alessandro; Righi, Ilaria; Minonzio, Francesca; Fusco, Nicola; Nosotti, Mario

    2016-11-11

    In a substantial proportion of patients with thymoma, many different types of paraneoplastic syndromes are observed. The association between thymoma and autoimmune liver diseases, however, has been found in very few cases. We report the case of a 31-year-old man affected by autoimmune hepatitis associated with myasthenia gravis and thymoma, successfully treated with extended thymectomy. The patient is free from neoplastic and hepatic disease 4 years after surgery. Eighteen months after thymectomy, an exacerbation of hepatitis was successfully treated with steroids. To the authors' knowledge, only 7 cases of myasthenia gravis associated with thymoma and autoimmune hepatitis have been reported in the English-language literature. The exact role of thymoma in immune-mediated hepatitis is unclear. It seems likely that thymoma-associated T-cell abnormalities, due to the presence of thymoma, may have a role in the development of this rare clinical triad of autoimmune hepatitis, thymoma and myasthenia gravis.

  10. Early onset post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease is associated with allograft localization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, NA; van Imhoff, GW; Verschuuren, EAM; van Son, WJ; van der Heide, JJH; Veeger, NJGM; Kluin, PM; Kluin-Nelemans, HC

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) is a major complication after solid organ transplantation. We analyzed incidence, patient characteristics, clinical presentation, and prognostic factors for treatment outcome and survival of PTLD patients transplanted at our center. Records from

  11. Early onset post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease is associated with allograft localization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Nicolaas A.; van Imhoff, Gustaaf W.; Verschuuren, Erik A. M.; van Son, Willem J.; Homan van der Heide, Jaap J.; Veeger, Nic J. G. M.; Kluin, Philip M.; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.

    2005-01-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) is a major complication after solid organ transplantation. We analyzed incidence, patient characteristics, clinical presentation, and prognostic factors for treatment outcome and survival of PTLD patients transplanted at our center. Records from

  12. Cerebral Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder Occurring after Renal Transplantation: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Jang Ho; Byun, Woo Mok; Kim, Hong Chul; Hwang, Min Su [Dept. of Radiology, Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-04-15

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a complication of organ transplantation and immunosuppression. A 36-year-old woman with a history of renal transplantation visited the hospital complaining of headache and on pathology was diagnosed with cerebral PTLD manifesting as multiple rim enhanced masses in both hemispheres. We report here a case of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder involving the cerebrum occurring after renal transplantation, and describe the MRI findings for this patient

  13. Cerebral Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder Occurring after Renal Transplantation: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, Jang Ho; Byun, Woo Mok; Kim, Hong Chul; Hwang, Min Su

    2012-01-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a complication of organ transplantation and immunosuppression. A 36-year-old woman with a history of renal transplantation visited the hospital complaining of headache and on pathology was diagnosed with cerebral PTLD manifesting as multiple rim enhanced masses in both hemispheres. We report here a case of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder involving the cerebrum occurring after renal transplantation, and describe the MRI findings for this patient

  14. Leaky gut and autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasano, Alessio

    2012-02-01

    Autoimmune diseases are characterized by tissue damage and loss of function due to an immune response that is directed against specific organs. This review is focused on the role of impaired intestinal barrier function on autoimmune pathogenesis. Together with the gut-associated lymphoid tissue and the neuroendocrine network, the intestinal epithelial barrier, with its intercellular tight junctions, controls the equilibrium between tolerance and immunity to non-self antigens. Zonulin is the only physiologic modulator of intercellular tight junctions described so far that is involved in trafficking of macromolecules and, therefore, in tolerance/immune response balance. When the zonulin pathway is deregulated in genetically susceptible individuals, autoimmune disorders can occur. This new paradigm subverts traditional theories underlying the development of these diseases and suggests that these processes can be arrested if the interplay between genes and environmental triggers is prevented by re-establishing the zonulin-dependent intestinal barrier function. Both animal models and recent clinical evidence support this new paradigm and provide the rationale for innovative approaches to prevent and treat autoimmune diseases.

  15. Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder After Clinical Islet Transplantation: Report of the First Two Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, A; Olateju, T; Deschenes, J; Shankarnarayan, S H; Chua, N; Shapiro, A M J; Senior, P

    2017-09-01

    We report the first two cases of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) in recipients of islet transplants worldwide. First, a 44-year-old recipient of three islet infusions developed PTLD 80 months after his initial transplantation, presenting with abdominal pain and diffuse terminal ileum thickening on imaging. He was treated with surgical excision, reduction of immunosuppression, and rituximab. Seven months later, he developed central nervous system PTLD, presenting with vertigo and diplopia; immunosuppression was discontinued, resulting in graft loss, and he was given high-dose methotrexate and underwent consolidative autologous stem cell transplantation. He remains in remission 37 months after the initial diagnosis. Second, a 58-year-old female recipient of two islet infusions developed PTLD 24 months after initial islet infusion, presenting with pancytopenia secondary to extensive bone marrow involvement. Immunosuppression was discontinued, resulting in graft loss, and she received rituximab and chemotherapy, achieving complete remission. Both patients were monomorphic B cell PTLD subtype by histology and negative for Epstein-Barr virus in tissue or blood. These cases document the first occurrences of this rare complication in islet transplantation, likely secondary to prolonged, intensive immunosuppression, and highlight the varying clinical manifestations of PTLD. Further studies are needed to determine incidence rate and risk factors in islet transplantation. © 2017 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  16. Low incidence of lymphoproliferative disease post kidney transplantation with prevalent use of alemtuzumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Fredy Nieto-Ríos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It is well known that the incidence of malignancy is significantly higher in transplanted patients than in general population. The incidence of lymphoproliferative disease post-transplantation (PTLD is approximately of 1% to 2% in kidney transplantation recipients. Objective: The main objective of this study was to evaluate the PTLD incidence when monitoring kidney transplanted patients between the years 2005 and 2010. Methods: Kidney transplanted patients’ data was retrospectively taken between the years 2005 to 2010 in order to determine the number of PTLD cases according to the inductor scheme used. Results: 425 patients were transplanted between 2005 and 2010. They received alemtuzumab 76.2%, daclizumab 10.7%, basiliximab 3.6% and thymoglobulin 2.4%. The 7% did not receive antibody induction. During this period 2 cases of PTLD ocurred: One with multiple myeloma and the other with lymphoma. One of them had been treated with alemtuzumab and the other with thymoglobulin. Conclusions: The PTLD incidence in our group, where alemtuzumab was used predominantly as inductor, was very low; this might suggest that alemtuzumab is a medication that does not increase the risk of this kind of neoplasia.

  17. Galectin-3 in autoimmunity and autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Felipe L; Gatto, Mariele; Bassi, Nicola; Luisetto, Roberto; Ghirardello, Anna; Punzi, Leonardo; Doria, Andrea

    2015-08-01

    Galectin-3 (gal-3) is a β-galactoside-binding lectin, which regulates cell-cell and extracellular interactions during self/non-self-antigen recognition and cellular activation, proliferation, differentiation, migration and apoptosis. It plays a significant role in cellular and tissue pathophysiology by organizing niches that drive inflammation and immune responses. Gal-3 has some therapeutic potential in several diseases, including chronic inflammatory disorders, cancer and autoimmune diseases. Gal-3 exerts a broad spectrum of functions which differs according to its intra- or extracellular localization. Recombinant gal-3 strategy has been used to identify potential mode of action of gal-3; however, exogenous gal-3 may not reproduce the functions of the endogenous gal-3. Notably, gal-3 induces monocyte-macrophage differentiation, interferes with dendritic cell fate decision, regulates apoptosis on T lymphocytes and inhibits B-lymphocyte differentiation into immunoglobulin secreting plasma cells. Considering the influence of these cell populations in the pathogenesis of several autoimmune diseases, gal-3 seems to play a role in development of autoimmunity. Gal-3 has been suggested as a potential therapeutic agent in patients affected with some autoimmune disorders. However, the precise role of gal-3 in driving the inflammatory process in autoimmune or immune-mediated disorders remains elusive. Here, we reviewed the involvement of gal-3 in cellular and tissue events during autoimmune and immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. © 2015 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  18. Helminth Immunomodulation in Autoimmune Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallwood, Taylor B; Giacomin, Paul R; Loukas, Alex; Mulvenna, Jason P; Clark, Richard J; Miles, John J

    2017-01-01

    Helminths have evolved to become experts at subverting immune surveillance. Through potent and persistent immune tempering, helminths can remain undetected in human tissues for decades. Redirecting the immunomodulating "talents" of helminths to treat inflammatory human diseases is receiving intensive interest. Here, we review therapies using live parasitic worms, worm secretions, and worm-derived synthetic molecules to treat autoimmune disease. We review helminth therapy in both mouse models and clinical trials and discuss what is known on mechanisms of action. We also highlight current progress in characterizing promising new immunomodulatory molecules found in excretory/secretory products of helminths and their potential use as immunotherapies for acute and chronic inflammatory diseases.

  19. Autoimmune cytopenias related to common variable immunodeficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlasta Petric

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Common variable immunodeficiency disorders are characterised by defective antibody production leading to recurrent infections. Noninfective complications are a consequence of autoimmunity, granuloma and polyclonal lymphoid infiltration. We often detect autoimmune cytopenias before primary immunodefciency is confirmed. Patients and methods: We report a case of 39-year old man with recurrent respiratory infections, autoimmune thrombocytopenia and haemolytic anemia who had common varible immunodeficiency confirmed. He had a lack of serum IgG, IgA and IgM, bronchiectasis, lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, hepatic granuloma, autoimmune gastritis with B12 deficiency and Evans syndrome. We treated autoimmune cytopenias with methylprednisolon and cyclosporine. After substitution therapy with intravenous immunoglobulin the frequency of espiratory infections decreased. Occurrence of diarrhea is suspected for enteropathy, however, hystologic identification is required. Because of patologically changed gastric mucosa and signs of polyclonal lymphoid infiltration, the patient is at high risk for malignancy and the outcome of the disease remains unpredictable. Conclusions: Generally, we discover common variable immunodeficiency at management of noninfective complications, in wich intravenous immunoglobulin are not effective. Autoimmune cytopenias and some other complications are successfully treated with glucocorticoids. Careful monitorig of these patients is important because of a high risk for malignancy.

  20. Indolent T-cell lymphoproliferative disease of the gastrointestinal tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Anamarija M.; Warnke, Roger A.; Hu, Qinglong; Gaulard, Philippe; Copie-Bergman, Christiane; Alkan, Serhan; Wang, Huan-You; Cheng, Jason X.; Bacon, Chris M.; Delabie, Jan; Ranheim, Erik; Kucuk, Can; Hu, XiaoZhou; Weisenburger, Dennis D.

    2013-01-01

    Primary gastrointestinal (GI) T-cell lymphoma is an infrequent and aggressive disease. However, rare indolent clonal T-cell proliferations in the GI tract have been described. We report 10 cases of GI involvement by an indolent T-cell lymphoproliferative disease, including 6 men and 4 women with a median age of 48 years (range, 15-77 years). Presenting symptoms included abdominal pain, diarrhea, vomiting, food intolerance, and dyspepsia. The lesions involved oral cavity, esophagus, stomach, small intestine, and colon. The infiltrates were dense, but nondestructive, and composed of small, mature-appearing lymphoid cells. Eight cases were CD4−/CD8+, 1 was CD4+/CD8−, and another was CD4−/CD8−. T-cell receptor-γ chain gene rearrangement identified a clonal population in all 10 cases. There was no evidence of STAT3 SH2 domain mutation or activation. Six patients received chemotherapy because of an initial diagnosis of peripheral T-cell lymphoma, with little or no response, whereas the other 4 were followed without therapy. After a median follow-up of 38 months (range, 9-175 months), 9 patients were alive with persistent disease and 1 was free of disease. We propose the name “indolent T-LPD of the GI tract” for these lesions that can easily be mistaken for intestinal peripheral T-cell lymphoma, and lead to aggressive therapy. PMID:24009234

  1. Ultra-early onset post-transplantation Lymphoproliferative disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Khedmat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD can present as early as days to as late as several decades after transplantation. This study, however, tries to research PTLD characteristics including histopathological and clinical features, predictors and prognosis of the disease when occurring within the first month post-transplantation. We conducted a comprehensive search for the available data using the Pubmed and Google scholar search engines for reports indicating presentation time in PTLD patients. Data from 25 previously published studies were included in the analysis. Finally, we found 355 recipients of organs presenting with "ultra-early onset PTLD." Transplant recipients with ultra-early onset PTLD were significantly more likely to have kidney allografts (P = 0.032. Transplant recipients with ultra-early onset PTLD were comparable to their counterparts in the control group in their demographics, histopathological findings and survival. Patients with ultra-early onset PTLD were significantly more likely to receive induction therapy (100% vs. 49%, respectively; P = 0.013. Pancreas transplant recipients were at a significantly higher risk for development of ultra-early onset PTLD (20% vs. 1%, respectively; P <0.001. Our findings emphasize the importance of immunosuppression potency as well as the type of allograft transplanted on the incidence of PTLD in the early stages after transplantation. However, we found no histopathological or outcome disparities for patients with ultra-early PTLD compared with controls. Further prospective studies with more comparable approaches to the patients are needed to confirm our findings.

  2. Ultra-early onset post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khedmat, Hossein; Taheri, Saeed

    2013-11-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) can present as early as days to as late as several decades after transplantation. This study, however, tries to research PTLD characteristics including histopathological and clinical features, predictors and prognosis of the disease when occurring within the first month post-transplantation. We conducted a comprehensive search for the available data using the Pubmed and Google scholar search engines for reports indicating presentation time in PTLD patients. Data from 25 previously published studies were included in the analysis. Finally, we found 355 recipients of organs presenting with "ultra-early onset PTLD." Transplant recipients with ultra-early onset PTLD were significantly more likely to have kidney allografts (P = 0.032). Transplant recipients with ultra-early onset PTLD were comparable to their counterparts in the control group in their demographics, histopathological findings and survival. Patients with ultra-early onset PTLD were significantly more likely to receive induction therapy (100% vs. 49%, respectively; P = 0.013). Pancreas transplant recipients were at a significantly higher risk for development of ultra-early onset PTLD (20% vs. 1%, respectively; P <0.001). Our findings emphasize the importance of immunosuppression potency as well as the type of allograft transplanted on the incidence of PTLD in the early stages after transplantation. However, we found no histopathological or outcome disparities for patients with ultra-early PTLD compared with controls. Further prospective studies with more comparable approaches to the patients are needed to confirm our findings.

  3. A nuclear proliferation antigen in chronic lymphoproliferative disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassab, A.H.; Nafae, M.H.

    1998-01-01

    To determine whether the proliferation rates of tumour cells, in chronic lymphoproliferative disorders may reflect disease activity and relate to prognosis, we studied the expression of Ki-67% (a nuclear proliferation marker) by alkaline phosphatase anti-alkaline phosphatase technique (APAAP), in peripheral blood and bone marrow mononuclear cells (separated on ficoll-hypaque) and in lymph-node biopsies, from patients with chronic lymphatic leukemia (Cll), chronic lymphatic leukemia/prolymphocytic leukemia (CLL/PLL), prolymphocytic leukemia (PLL) and non-hodgkin's lymphoma with leukemic plase. The proliferation rate was determined for these patients at presentation and again two months after therapy (to detect any change with therapy). We found that the highest rate of proliferation in each group was parallel to the degree of malignancy i.e. PLL showed higher proliferation than CLL/PLL, and CLL/PLL showed higher proliferation than CLL. In the NHL group the highest proliferation rate was found in the high high-grade NHL, followed by intermediate grade NHL then the low grade NHL. Lymph node biopsies also showed the same relation between proliferation rates and degree of malignancy. Bone marrow cells did not show a particular pattern probably due to interference from the erythroid element and contamination by peripheral blood. Ki-67% was compared to other proliferation markers serum B2 microglobulin and lactate dehydrogenase. It was found to be an independent marker of proliferation it is unaffected by hepatic, renal and gastrointestinal elements and thus its specificity for the tumour proliferation

  4. Cancer immunotherapy in patients with preexisting autoimmune disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donia, Marco; Pedersen, Magnus; Svane, Inge Marie

    2017-01-01

    Patients with preexisting active autoimmune disorders were excluded from clinical trials of immune checkpoint inhibitors. However, patients with autoimmune disorders are diagnosed with cancer at least as frequently as the global population, and clinicians treating patients outside clinical trials...... have generally been reluctant to offer cancer immunotherapy to this patient group. In this brief article, we review the most recent literature on the efficacy and safety of CTLA-4- and PD-1-blocking antibodies in patients with preexisting autoimmune disorders....

  5. [Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollak, Felipe; Vásquez, Tatiana

    2012-11-01

    Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults (LADA) is the term used to describe adults who have a slowly progressive form of diabetes mellitus (DM) of autoimmune etiology, but that may be treated initially without insulin. Although it shares some immunological and genetic aspects with type 1 DM, it affects an age group that is typically affected by type 2 DM. Therefore, it could be considered an intermediate type. Diagnosis is based on clinical and laboratory criteria: age of onset, initial response to oral hypoglycemic agents and the presence of specific antibodies for diabetes. Although the definitive treatment is insulin, glitazones may be useful in early stages of the disease. Currently, its management represents a challenge for the physician, including specialists, and it is a form of DM to keep in mind.

  6. [Thymoma and autoimmune diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamilloux, Y; Frih, H; Bernard, C; Broussolle, C; Petiot, P; Girard, N; Sève, P

    2018-01-01

    The association between thymoma and autoimmunity is well known. Besides myasthenia gravis, which is found in 15 to 20% of patients with thymoma, other autoimmune diseases have been reported: erythroblastopenia, systemic lupus erythematosus, inflammatory myopathies, thyroid disorders, Isaac's syndrome or Good's syndrome. More anecdotally, Morvan's syndrome, limbic encephalitis, other autoimmune cytopenias, autoimmune hepatitis, and bullous skin diseases (pemphigus, lichen) have been reported. Autoimmune diseases occur most often before thymectomy, but they can be discovered at the time of surgery or later. Two situations require the systematic investigation of a thymoma: the occurrence of myasthenia gravis or autoimmune erythroblastopenia. Nevertheless, the late onset of systemic lupus erythematosus or the association of several autoimmune manifestations should lead to look for a thymoma. Neither the characteristics of the patients nor the pathological data can predict the occurrence of an autoimmune disease after thymectomy. Thus, thymectomy usefulness in the course of the autoimmune disease, except myasthenia gravis, has not been demonstrated. This seems to indicate the preponderant role of self-reactive T lymphocytes distributed in the peripheral immune system prior to surgery. Given the high infectious morbidity in patients with thymoma, immunoglobulin replacement therapy should be considered in patients with hypogammaglobulinemia who receive immunosuppressive therapy, even in the absence of prior infection. Copyright © 2017 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Bistability in autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, Nicolas; Mosekilde, Erik; Lund, Ole

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases damage host tissue, which, in turn, may trigger a stronger immune response. Systems characterized by such positive feedback loops can display co-existing stable steady states. In a mathematical model of autoimmune disease, one steady state may correspond to the healthy state...... and another to an autoimmune steady state characterized by widespread tissue damage and immune activation. We show how a triggering event may move the system from the healthy to the autoimmune state and how transient immunosuppressive treatment can move the system back to the healthy state....

  8. Preventing acute rejection, Epstein-Barr virus infection, and posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders after kidney transplantation: Use of aciclovir and mycophenolate mofetil in a steroid-free immunosuppressive protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkeland, S.A.; Andersen, H.K.; Hamilton-Dutoit, Stephen Jacques

    1999-01-01

    Background: A widely held view is that any increase in the potency of an immunosuppressive agent will lead to an increase in infection and malignancy, such as life-threatening Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) induced posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD), We tested this paradigm by studying......; the effect of adding mofetil to a steroid-free protocol under cover of high-dose aciclovir prophylaxis on the number of acute rejections, EBV infections and PTLDs after kidney transplantation. Methods: EBV serology was performed in 267 consecutive renal transplantations (1990-1997), All were treated...

  9. American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... List Common Thread Women & Autoimmunity Diagnosis Tips Coping Tools Support Groups Education Modules Caregivers Patient/Caregiver Relationship The Male Caregiver AD Knowledge Base Autoimmune Disease List Common ...

  10. THE AUTOIMMUNE ECOLOGY.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan-Manuel eAnaya

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases (ADs represent a heterogeneous group of disorders that affect specific target organs or multiple organ systems. These conditions share common immunopathogenic mechanisms (i.e., the autoimmune tautology, which explain the clinical similarities they have among them as well as their familial clustering (i.e., coaggregation. As part of the autoimmune tautology, the influence of environmental exposure on the risk of developing ADs is paramount (i.e., the autoimmune ecology. In fact, environment, more than genetics, shapes immune system. Autoimmune ecology is akin to exposome, that is all the exposures - internal and external - across the lifespan, interacting with hereditary factors (both genetics and epigenetics to favor or protect against autoimmunity and its outcomes. Herein we provide an overview of the autoimmune ecology, focusing on the immune response to environmental agents in general, and microbiota, cigarette smoking, alcohol and coffee consumption, socioeconomic status, gender and sex hormones, vitamin D, organic solvents and vaccines in particular. Inclusion of the autoimmune ecology in disease etiology and health will improve the way personalized medicine is currently conceived and applied.

  11. Regulatory T-cells and autoimmunity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ni Choileain, Niamh

    2012-02-03

    Approximately 20% of the population is affected by autoimmune or inflammatory diseases mediated by an abnormal immune response. A characteristic feature of autoimmune disease is the selective targeting of a single cell type, organ or tissue by certain populations of autoreactive T-cells. Examples of such diseases include rheumatoid arthritis, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), all of which are characterized by chronic inflammation, tissue destruction and target organ malfunction. Although strong evidence links most autoimmune diseases to specific genes, considerable controversy prevails regarding the role of regulatory T-cell populations in the disease process. These cells are now also believed to play a key role in mediating transplantation tolerance and inhibiting the induction of tumor immunity. Though the concept of therapeutic immune regulation aimed at treating autoimmune pathology has been validated in many animal models, the development of strategies for the treatment of human autoimmune disorders remains in its infancy. The main obstacles to this include the conflicting findings of different model systems, as well as the contrasting functions of regulatory T-cells and cytokines involved in the development of such disorders. This review examines the role of regulatory T-cells in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity and describes the therapeutic potential of these cells for the prevention of immune-mediated pathologies in the future. Although much remains to be learned about such pathologies, a clearer understanding of the mechanisms by which regulatory T-cells function will undoubtedly lead to exciting new possibilities for immunotherapeutics.

  12. The MicroRNA-21 in Autoimmune Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaowen; Wan, Xiaochun; Ruan, Qingguo

    2016-06-03

    MicroRNA-21 (miR-21) is an oncomiR and significantly upregulated in a wide range of cancers. It is strongly involved in apoptosis and oncogenesis, since most of its reported targets are tumor suppressors. Recently, miR-21 was found to be correlated with the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases and may play an essential role in regulating autoimmune responses. In particular, miR-21 promotes Th17 cell differentiation, which mediates the development of multiple autoimmune diseases. In this article, we review the current research on the mechanisms that regulate miR-21 expression, the potential of miR-21 as a diagnostic biomarker for autoimmune disease and the mechanisms by which miR-21 promotes the development of autoimmune disease. We also discussed the therapeutic potential of targeting miR-21 in treating patients with autoimmune disease.

  13. Pulmonary lymphoproliferative disorders with affinity to lymphoma: a clinicopathoradiologic study of 16 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Cruz, J.; Gonzalez Garcia, A.; Escobar Casas, P.; Gomez Benitez, S.; Gonzalez Guirao, M.A.; Borderas, F.

    1993-01-01

    Pulmonary lymphoproliferative disorders include plasma cell granuloma, Castleman's disease, pseudolymphoma, lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia, angioimmunoblastic lymphadenopathy and lymphomatoid granulomatosis. We carried out a retrospective study for the purpose of analysing the clinical and radiological findings of 16 cases of pulmonary lymphoproliferative disorders seen during the decade 1980-1990. The cases comprised 8 lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia, 5 lymphomatoid granulomatosis, 2 plasma cell granuloma and 1 angioimmunoblastic lymphadenopathy. Owing to the overlap and low specificity of the radiological patterns in these processes, histopathological examination is required. In view of the frequent evolution of pulmonary lymphoproliferative disorders to malignant lymphoma (4 cases, 1 of lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia and 3 of lymphomatoid granulomatosis, in our series) we provide a description of the radiological changes that occur during this process. (orig.)

  14. Psoriasis and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sticherling, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Psoriasis is one of the most common chronic inflammatory human skin diseases. Though clinically well characterized, the exact etiological and pathogenic mechanisms are still not known in detail. Current knowledge indicates distinct overlap to other inflammatory as well as autoimmune disorders. However, the one or more relevant autoantigens could not be characterized so-far. On the other side, several autoimmune diseases were shown to be associated with psoriasis. In addition, serological autoimmune phenomena, namely diverse circulating specific autoantibodies could be demonstrated in the past. A matter of current debate is if psoriasis is a primary autoimmune disease or secondarily evolving into autoimmunity as seen in other chronic inflammatory diseases. Related to this aspect is the concept of autoinflammation versus autoimmunity where psoriasis shares mechanisms of both entities. Though T-cells remain among the most important cellular players in the pathogenesis of psoriasis and current therapeutic strategies successfully target these cells or their products irrespective of these concepts, autoimmunity if relevant will add to the treatment armamentarium by using protective and prophylactic antigen-specific modalities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Stress proteins, autoimmunity, and autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winfield, J B; Jarjour, W N

    1991-01-01

    At birth, the immune system is biased toward recognition of microbial antigens in order to protect the host from infection. Recent data suggest that an important initial line of defense in this regard involves autologous stress proteins, especially conserved peptides of hsp60, which are presented to T cells bearing gamma delta receptors by relatively nonpolymorphic class lb molecules. Natural antibodies may represent a parallel B cell mechanism. Through an evolving process of "physiological" autoreactivity and selection by immunodominant stress proteins common to all prokaryotes, B and T cell repertoires expand during life to meet the continuing challenge of infection. Because stress proteins of bacteria are homologous with stress proteins of the host, there exists in genetically susceptible individuals a constant risk of autoimmune disease due to failure of mechanisms for self-nonself discrimination. That stress proteins actually play a role in autoimmune processes is supported by a growing body of evidence which, collectively, suggests that autoreactivity in chronic inflammatory arthritis involves, at least initially, gamma delta cells which recognize epitopes of the stress protein hsp60. Alternate mechanisms for T cell stimulation by stress proteins undoubtedly also exist, e.g., molecular mimicry of the DR beta third hypervariable region susceptibility locus for rheumatoid arthritis by a DnaJ stress protein epitope in gram-negative bacteria. While there still is confusion with respect to the most relevant stress protein epitopes, a central role for stress proteins in the etiology of arthritis appears likely. Furthermore, insight derived from the work thus far in adjuvant-induced arthritis already is stimulating analyses of related phenomena in autoimmune diseases other than those involving joints. Only limited data are available in the area of humoral autoimmunity to stress proteins. Autoantibodies to a number of stress proteins have been identified in SLE and

  16. TRICHLOROETHYLENE ACCELERATES AN AUTOIMMUNE RESPONSE IN ASSOCIATION WITH TH1 T-CELL ACTIVATION IN MRL+/+ MICE. (R826409)

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbstractTrichloroethylene (1,1,2-trichloroethene) is a major environmental contaminant. There is increasing evidence relating exposure to trichloroethylene with autoimmunity. To investigate potential mechanisms, we treated the autoimmune-prone MRL+/+ mice with trichlo...

  17. Autoimmunity and primary immunodeficiency: two sides of the same coin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Reinhold E; Grimbacher, Bodo; Witte, Torsten

    2017-12-19

    Autoimmunity and immunodeficiency were previously considered to be mutually exclusive conditions; however, increased understanding of the complex immune regulatory and signalling mechanisms involved, coupled with the application of genetic analysis, is revealing the complex relationships between primary immunodeficiency syndromes and autoimmune diseases. Single-gene defects can cause rare diseases that predominantly present with autoimmune symptoms. Such genetic defects also predispose individuals to recurrent infections (a hallmark of immunodeficiency) and can cause primary immunodeficiencies, which can also lead to immune dysregulation and autoimmunity. Moreover, risk factors for polygenic rheumatic diseases often exist in the same genes as the mutations that give rise to primary immunodeficiency syndromes. In this Review, various primary immunodeficiency syndromes are presented, along with their pathogenetic mechanisms and relationship to autoimmune diseases, in an effort to increase awareness of immunodeficiencies that occur concurrently with autoimmune diseases and to highlight the need to initiate appropriate genetic tests. The growing knowledge of various genetically determined pathologic mechanisms in patients with immunodeficiencies who have autoimmune symptoms opens up new avenues for personalized molecular therapies that could potentially treat immunodeficiency and autoimmunity at the same time, and that could be further explored in the context of autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

  18. Vaccines, adjuvants and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Luísa Eça; Baker, Britain; Perricone, Carlo; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2015-10-01

    Vaccines and autoimmunity are linked fields. Vaccine efficacy is based on whether host immune response against an antigen can elicit a memory T-cell response over time. Although the described side effects thus far have been mostly transient and acute, vaccines are able to elicit the immune system towards an autoimmune reaction. The diagnosis of a definite autoimmune disease and the occurrence of fatal outcome post-vaccination have been less frequently reported. Since vaccines are given to previously healthy hosts, who may have never developed the disease had they not been immunized, adverse events should be carefully accessed and evaluated even if they represent a limited number of occurrences. In this review of the literature, there is evidence of vaccine-induced autoimmunity and adjuvant-induced autoimmunity in both experimental models as well as human patients. Adjuvants and infectious agents may exert their immune-enhancing effects through various functional activities, encompassed by the adjuvant effect. These mechanisms are shared by different conditions triggered by adjuvants leading to the autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA syndrome). In conclusion, there are several case reports of autoimmune diseases following vaccines, however, due to the limited number of cases, the different classifications of symptoms and the long latency period of the diseases, every attempt for an epidemiological study has so far failed to deliver a connection. Despite this, efforts to unveil the connection between the triggering of the immune system by adjuvants and the development of autoimmune conditions should be undertaken. Vaccinomics is a field that may bring to light novel customized, personalized treatment approaches in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Yersinia enterocolitica Infection Simulating Lymphoproliferative Disease, after Liver Transplant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Jakobovich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a 14-year-old girl, who was 13 y after liver transplantation for biliary atresia with an unremarkable postoperative course. She presented with fever of up to 40°C, extreme fatigue, malaise, anorexia, and occasional vomiting. On physical examination the only finding was splenomegaly. Lab results showed hyperglobulinemia and an elevated sedimentation rate. Liver function tests were normal except for mild elevation of γGTP. Abdominal U/S and CT demonstrated an enlarged spleen with retroperitoneal and mesenteric lymph nodes enlargement. An exhaustive evaluation for infectious causes, autoimmune conditions, and malignancy was negative. A full recovery after 5 months prompted testing for self-limited infectious etiologies. Yersinia enterocolitica infection was diagnosed.

  20. Eosinophils in Autoimmune Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diny, Nicola L; Rose, Noel R; Čiháková, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    Eosinophils are multifunctional granulocytes that contribute to initiation and modulation of inflammation. Their role in asthma and parasitic infections has long been recognized. Growing evidence now reveals a role for eosinophils in autoimmune diseases. In this review, we summarize the function of eosinophils in inflammatory bowel diseases, neuromyelitis optica, bullous pemphigoid, autoimmune myocarditis, primary biliary cirrhosis, eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, and other autoimmune diseases. Clinical studies, eosinophil-targeted therapies, and experimental models have contributed to our understanding of the regulation and function of eosinophils in these diseases. By examining the role of eosinophils in autoimmune diseases of different organs, we can identify common pathogenic mechanisms. These include degranulation of cytotoxic granule proteins, induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, release of proteases degrading extracellular matrix, immune modulation through cytokines, antigen presentation, and prothrombotic functions. The association of eosinophilic diseases with autoimmune diseases is also examined, showing a possible increase in autoimmune diseases in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis, hypereosinophilic syndrome, and non-allergic asthma. Finally, we summarize key future research needs.

  1. Prolactin and Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vânia Vieira Borba

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The great asymmetry of autoimmune diseases between genders represents one of the most enigmatic observations among the mosaic of autoimmunity. Sex hormones are believed to play a crucial role on this dimorphism. The higher prevalence of autoimmunity among women at childbearing ages, disease onset/relapses during pregnancy, and post-partum are some of the arguments that support this hypothesis. Certainly, motherhood represents one of the most remarkable challenges for the immune system, which not only has to allow for the conceptus, but also has to deal with complex endocrine alterations. Hormonal homeostasis is known to exert a crucial influence in achieving a competent and healthy immune system. Prolactin (PRL has a bioactive function acting as a hormone and a cytokine. It interferes with immune system modulation, mainly inhibiting the negative selection of autoreactive B lymphocytes. Likewise, hyperprolactinemia has been described in relation to the pathogenesis and activity of several autoimmune disorders. Dopamine is an effective inhibitor of PRL secretion due to either a direct influence on the hypophysis or stimulation of postsynaptic dopamine receptors in the hypothalamus, arousing the release of the PRL inhibitory factor. Hence, dopamine agonists have proven to offer clinical benefits among autoimmune patients and represent a promising therapy to be explored. In this review, we attempt to provide a critical overview of the link between PRL, autoimmune diseases, and motherhood.

  2. Eosinophils in Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Čiháková

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophils are multifunctional granulocytes that contribute to initiation and modulation of inflammation. Their role in asthma and parasitic infections has long been recognized. Growing evidence now reveals a role for eosinophils in autoimmune diseases. In this review, we summarize the function of eosinophils in inflammatory bowel diseases, neuromyelitis optica, bullous pemphigoid, autoimmune myocarditis, primary biliary cirrhosis, eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, and other autoimmune diseases. Clinical studies, eosinophil-targeted therapies, and experimental models have contributed to our understanding of the regulation and function of eosinophils in these diseases. By examining the role of eosinophils in autoimmune diseases of different organs, we can identify common pathogenic mechanisms. These include degranulation of cytotoxic granule proteins, induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, release of proteases degrading extracellular matrix, immune modulation through cytokines, antigen presentation, and prothrombotic functions. The association of eosinophilic diseases with autoimmune diseases is also examined, showing a possible increase in autoimmune diseases in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis, hypereosinophilic syndrome, and non-allergic asthma. Finally, we summarize key future research needs.

  3. X-Linked Lymphoproliferative Disease Presenting as Pancytopenia in a 10-Month-Old Boy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nicole Chadha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available X-linked lymphoproliferative disease, also known as Duncan's syndrome, is a rare genetic disorder that causes exaggerated immune responses to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV infection and often leads to death. Patient presentation varies but can include signs and symptoms typical of EBV, pancytopenia, and fulminant hepatitis.

  4. Nodal Involvement by CD30+ Cutaneous Lymphoproliferative Disorders and Its Challenging Differentiation From Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lezama, Lhara Sumarriva; Gratzinger, Dita

    2018-01-01

    Primary cutaneous lymphomas are defined as non-Hodgkin lymphomas that present in the skin with no evidence of extracutaneous disease at the time of diagnosis. Mycosis fungoides is the most common type of primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, representing almost 50% of primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas, and primary cutaneous CD30 + T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders are the second most common group (30%). Transformed mycosis fungoides is usually CD30 + and can involve multiple nodal sites; other primary cutaneous CD30 + T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders can also involve draining regional nodes. Nodal involvement by CD30 + T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders can mimic classical Hodgkin lymphoma, which can aberrantly express T-cell antigens. The aim of this article is to briefly review salient clinical, histologic, immunophenotypic, and molecular features that can be used to distinguish lymph node involvement by CD30 + cutaneous T-cell lymphomas and lymphoproliferative disorders from classical Hodgkin lymphoma, a clinically important differential diagnosis that represents a challenging task for the pathologist.

  5. Presentation and early detection of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder after solid organ transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Nicolaas A.; van Imhoff, Gustaaf W.; Verschuuren, Erik A. M.; van Son, Willem J.

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a serious and still frequently observed complication of solid organ transplantation. Despite the recent introduction of anti B-cell monoclonal antibody therapy (rituximab) for treatment of PTLD, mortality rates remain high. Because PTLD often

  6. Association of human leukocyte antigen haplotypes with posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease after solid organ transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Subklewe, Marion; Marquis, Rene; Choquet, Sylvain; Leblond, Veronique; Garnier, Jeanne-Luce; Hetzer, Roland; Swinnen, Lode J.; Oertel, Stephan; Papp-Vary, Matthias; Gonzalez-Barca, Eva; Hepkema, Bouke G.; Schoenemann, Constanze; May, Juergen; Pezzutto, Antonio; Riess, Hanno

    2006-01-01

    Background. Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) after solid organ transplantation (SOT) is commonly characterized by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-driven proliferation of recipient B cells due to impaired immune surveillance in the context of immunosuppression. Because EBV-specific T-cell

  7. Extradural thoracic spinal cord compression : Unusual initial presentation of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Nicholas. A.; van Dijk, J. Marc C.; Slart, Riemer. H. J. A.; Coppes, Maarten. H.; van Imhoff, Gustaaf. W.; Verschuuren, Eric. A. M.

    2008-01-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a serious complication after solid-organ transplantation. We report a lung transplant recipient presenting with lower limb weakness as a result of extradural cord compression from PTLD. Diagnosis was made by laminectomy of T-3 with partial

  8. Donor Monoclonal Gammopathy May Cause Lymphoproliferative Disorders in Solid Organ Transplant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felldin, M; Ekberg, J; Polanska-Tamborek, D; Hansson, U; Sender, M; Rizell, M; Svanvik, J; Mölne, J

    2016-09-01

    Prior research on donor monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) has been inadequate regarding the risk for lymphoproliferative disease in solid organ transplantation recipients. Seven organ recipients from two different donors developed lymphoproliferative disease. The origin of the malignancy was determined by use of microsatellite analysis, and the plasma of the two donors was analyzed with the use of electrophoresis. The clinical courses of the seven recipients were followed for 36-60 months. One donor transmitted lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma to two kidney recipients and MGUS to a liver recipient, all IgMκ. A second donor caused IgGλ myeloma in two kidney and one liver recipient, and IgGλ gammopathy in a heart recipient. Transplant nephrectomy was performed in three kidney recipients and remission was achieved. The fourth kidney recipient has kept the graft and the disease has progressed. The liver recipient died from myeloma. There were no clinical signs of lymphoproliferative disease in the donors, but retrospective serum analyses showed M-components, IgMκ (37 g/L) and IgGλ (8 g/L). Donors with MGUS may cause donor-transmitted malignancies via passenger lymphocytes/plasma cells in solid organ recipients. The results call for a large register study of the incidence of donor MGUS and lymphoproliferative disease in their recipients. © Copyright 2016 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  9. Lymphadenopathy driven by TCR-Vγ8Vδ1 T-cell expansion in FAS-related autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vavassori, Stefano; Galson, Jacob D; Trück, Johannes; van den Berg, Anke; Tamminga, Rienk Y J; Magerus-Chatinet, Aude; Pellé, Olivier; Camenisch Gross, Ulrike; Marques Maggio, Ewerton; Prader, Seraina; Opitz, Lennart; Nüesch, Ursina; Mauracher, Andrea; Volkmer, Benjamin; Speer, Oliver; Suda, Luzia; Röthlisberger, Benno; Zimmermann, Dieter Robert; Müller, Rouven; Diepstra, Arjan; Visser, Lydia; Haralambieva, Eugenia; Neven, Bénédicte; Rieux-Laucat, Frédéric; Pachlopnik Schmid, Jana

    2017-01-01

    FAS-dependent apoptosis in Vδ1 T cells makes the latter possible culprits for the lymphadenopathy observed in patients with FAS mutations.Rapamycin and methylprednisolone resistance should prompt clinicians to look for Vδ1 T cell proliferation in ALPS-FAS patients.

  10. [Thymoma and autoimmune thyroiditis. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkane, A; Bellamy, J; Leroy-Terquem, E; Levy, R

    2003-09-01

    We report an association between a thymus tumor and autoimmune thyroiditis. This association is probably related to loss of immune control secondary to loss of thymus integrity. A 48-year-old woman was hospitalized for thoracic pain. Her past history included thyroiditis treated by L-thyroxin for two years. The chest x-ray demonstrated a mediastinal opacity which was confirmed by computed tomography. Surgical resection was performed and histological analysis of the surgical specimen confirmed the diagnosis of lympho-epithelial thymoma. Thyroid immunity tests demonstrated the presence of anti-peroxidase antibodies confirming the diagnosis of Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Chest x-ray and CT-scan are indicated in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis to search for a thymic mass. Conversely, search for autoimmune thyroiditis is warranted in patients with an identified thymic mass.

  11. Prevalence and patterns of renal involvement in imaging of malignant lymphoproliferative diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bach, Andreas Gunter; Behrmann, Curd; Spielmann, Rolf Peter; Surov, Alexey; Holzhausen, Hans Jurgen; Katzer, Michaela; Arnold, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Background: Renal involvement in patients with lymphoproliferative disease is an uncommon radiological finding. Purpose: To determine its prevalence and radiological appearances in a patient population. Material and Methods: All forms of lymphoproliferative disease (ICD: C81-C96) were considered. From January 2005 to January 2010, 668 consecutive patients with lymphoproliferative disease were identified with the help of the radiological database and patient records. Inclusion criteria were complete staging including appropriate CT scan and/or MRI. All stored images (initial staging and follow-up examinations) were reviewed. Results: Review of all stored images revealed renal infiltration in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (11 of 364 = 3.0%; median age = 65 years, m:f = 6:5) but also multiple myeloma (2 of 162 = 1.2%; median age = 72 years; m:f = 1:1) and leukemia (5 of 101 4.9%; median age = 12 years; m:f = 2:3). There were no cases of renal infiltration in 41 patients with Hodgkin's disease. In total there were six patients with solitary lesions, five patients with diffuse renal enlargement, four patients with perirenal lesions, and two patients with direct invasion of the kidney. Conclusion: In leukemia the most common imaging pattern is diffuse enlargement. In the other subtypes of lymphoproliferative disease no specific correlation between typical CT patterns and subtype of lymphoproliferative disease can be found. The prevalence of renal involvement is in line with earlier studies. Contrary to earlier reports, multiple lesions were not found to be a common pattern

  12. Helminth Immunomodulation in Autoimmune Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J. Miles

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Helminths have evolved to become experts at subverting immune surveillance. Through potent and persistent immune tempering, helminths can remain undetected in human tissues for decades. Redirecting the immunomodulating “talents” of helminths to treat inflammatory human diseases is receiving intensive interest. Here, we review therapies using live parasitic worms, worm secretions, and worm-derived synthetic molecules to treat autoimmune disease. We review helminth therapy in both mouse models and clinical trials and discuss what is known on mechanisms of action. We also highlight current progress in characterizing promising new immunomodulatory molecules found in excretory/secretory products of helminths and their potential use as immunotherapies for acute and chronic inflammatory diseases.

  13. [Treatment and results of therapy in autoimmune hemolytic anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasić, J; Macukanović, L; Pavlović, M; Koraćević, S; Govedarević, N; Kitić, Lj; Tijanić, I; Bakić, M

    1994-01-01

    Basic principles in the therapy of idiopathic autoimmune hemolytic anemia induced by warm antibody were glucocorticoides and splenectomy. Immunosupresive drugs, plasmaferesis and intravenous high doses gamma globulin therapy are also useful. In secundary autoimmune hemolytic anemia induced by warm antibody we treated basic illness. During the period of 1990-1992 we treated 21 patients with primary autoimmune hemolytic anemia and 6 patients with secondary /4 CLL and 2 Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma/. Complete remission we found as a normalisation of reticulocites and hemoglobin level respectively. Complete remission by corticoides we got in 14/21 patients, partial response in 2/21 respectively. Complete response by splenectomy we got in 2/3 splenoctomized patients (idiopathic type). For successful treatment secondary hemolytic anemias we treated primary diseases (CLL and malignant lymphoma) and we got in 4/6 patients complete remission. Our results were standard in both type of autoimmune hemolytic anaemias induced by warm antibody.

  14. Autoimmune gastritis: Pathologist's viewpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coati, Irene; Fassan, Matteo; Farinati, Fabio; Graham, David Y; Genta, Robert M; Rugge, Massimo

    2015-11-14

    Western countries are seeing a constant decline in the incidence of Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis, coupled with a rising epidemiological and clinical impact of autoimmune gastritis. This latter gastropathy is due to autoimmune aggression targeting parietal cells through a complex interaction of auto-antibodies against the parietal cell proton pump and intrinsic factor, and sensitized T cells. Given the specific target of this aggression, autoimmune gastritis is typically restricted to the gastric corpus-fundus mucosa. In advanced cases, the oxyntic epithelia are replaced by atrophic (and metaplastic) mucosa, creating the phenotypic background in which both gastric neuroendocrine tumors and (intestinal-type) adenocarcinomas may develop. Despite improvements in our understanding of the phenotypic changes or cascades occurring in this autoimmune setting, no reliable biomarkers are available for identifying patients at higher risk of developing a gastric neoplasm. The standardization of autoimmune gastritis histology reports and classifications in diagnostic practice is a prerequisite for implementing definitive secondary prevention strategies based on multidisciplinary diagnostic approaches integrating endoscopy, serology, histology and molecular profiling.

  15. Nutrition, geoepidemiology, and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selmi, Carlo; Tsuneyama, Koichi

    2010-03-01

    As well represented by the impaired immune function of malnourished individuals encountered in developing countries and the incidence of specific diseases following local nutrient deficiencies, nutrition and immunity have been linked to each other for centuries while the specific connection between dietary factors and autoimmunity onset or modulation is a more recent acquisition. Autoimmune diseases manifest limited prevalence rates in developing countries while numerous immunity-related claims have been proposed in the field of functional foods. Nevertheless, over the past years multiple lines of evidence have supported a major role for specific dietary factors (including vitamin D, vitamin A, selenium, zinc, omega-3 fatty acids, probiotics, and flavanols) in determining the immune responses involved in infections, allergies, and autoimmune diseases. Interestingly, the link between nutrition and autoimmunity may well contribute to the geoepidemiology observed for numerous conditions. In general terms, most data that will be discussed herein were obtained in experimental or animal models while human data from real-life clinical settings or randomized clinical trials remain largely unsatisfactory. Our current knowledge on the beneficial impact of nutrition on autoimmunity prompts us to encourage the search for evidence-based nutrition to support the everyday diet choices of patients. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia: From lab to bedside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R K Chaudhary

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA is not an uncommon clinical disorder and requires advanced, efficient immunohematological and transfusion support. Many AIHA patients have underlying disorder and therefore, it is incumbent upon the clinician to investigate these patients in detail, as the underlying condition can be of a serious nature such as lymphoproliferative disorder or connective tissue disorder. Despite advances in transfusion medicine, simple immunohematological test such as direct antiglobulin test (DAT still remains the diagnostic hallmark of AIHA. The sensitive gel technology has enabled the immunohematologist not only to diagnose serologically such patients, but also to characterize red cell bound autoantibodies with regard to their class, subclass and titer in a rapid and simplified way. Detailed characterization of autoantibodies is important, as there is a relationship between in vivo hemolysis and strength of DAT; red cell bound multiple immunoglobulins, immunoglobulin G subclass and titer. Transfusing AIHA patient is a challenge to the immunohematologist as it is encountered with difficulties in ABO grouping and cross matching requiring specialized serological tests such as alloadsorption or autoadsorption. At times, it may be almost impossible to find a fully matched unit to transfuse these patients. However, transfusion should not be withheld in a critically ill patient even in the absence of compatible blood. The "best match" or "least incompatible units" can be transfused to such patients under close supervision without any serious side-effects. All blood banks should have the facilities to perform the necessary investigations required to issue "best match" packed red blood cells in AIHA. Specialized techniques such as elution and adsorption, which at times are helpful in enhancing blood safety in AIHA should be established in all transfusion services.

  17. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia: From lab to bedside

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, R. K.; Das, Sudipta Sekhar

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is not an uncommon clinical disorder and requires advanced, efficient immunohematological and transfusion support. Many AIHA patients have underlying disorder and therefore, it is incumbent upon the clinician to investigate these patients in detail, as the underlying condition can be of a serious nature such as lymphoproliferative disorder or connective tissue disorder. Despite advances in transfusion medicine, simple immunohematological test such as direct antiglobulin test (DAT) still remains the diagnostic hallmark of AIHA. The sensitive gel technology has enabled the immunohematologist not only to diagnose serologically such patients, but also to characterize red cell bound autoantibodies with regard to their class, subclass and titer in a rapid and simplified way. Detailed characterization of autoantibodies is important, as there is a relationship between in vivo hemolysis and strength of DAT; red cell bound multiple immunoglobulins, immunoglobulin G subclass and titer. Transfusing AIHA patient is a challenge to the immunohematologist as it is encountered with difficulties in ABO grouping and cross matching requiring specialized serological tests such as alloadsorption or autoadsorption. At times, it may be almost impossible to find a fully matched unit to transfuse these patients. However, transfusion should not be withheld in a critically ill patient even in the absence of compatible blood. The “best match” or “least incompatible units” can be transfused to such patients under close supervision without any serious side-effects. All blood banks should have the facilities to perform the necessary investigations required to issue “best match” packed red blood cells in AIHA. Specialized techniques such as elution and adsorption, which at times are helpful in enhancing blood safety in AIHA should be established in all transfusion services. PMID:24678166

  18. [Autoimmune thyroid disease and other non-endocrine autoimmune diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilas, Ljiljana Todorović; Icin, Tijana; Paro, Jovanka Novaković; Bajkin, Ivana

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are chronic conditions initiated by the loss of immunological tolerance to self-antigens. They constitute heterogeneous group of disorders, in which multiple alterations in the immune system result in a spectrum of syndromes that either target specific organs or affect the body systematically. Recent epidemiological studies have shown a possible shift of one autoimmune disease to another or the fact that more than one autoimmune disease may coexist in a single patient or in the same family. Numerous autoimmune diseases have been shown to coexist frequently with thyroid autoimmune diseases. AUTOIMMNUNE THYROID DISEASE AND OTHER ORGAN SPECIFIC NON-ENDOCRINE AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES: This part of the study reviews the prevalence of autoimmune thyroid disease coexisting with: pernicious anaemia, vitiligo, celiac disease, autoimmune liver disease, miastenia gravis, alopecia areata and sclerosis multiplex, and several recommendations for screening have been given. AUTOIMMUNE THYROID DISEASE AND OTHER ORGAN NON-SPECIFIC NON-ENDOCRINE AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES: Special attention is given to the correlation between autoimmune thyroid disease and rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, syndrome Sjögren, systemic sclerosis and mixed connective tissue disease. Screening for autoimmune thyroid diseases should be recommended in everyday clinical practice, in patients with primary organ-specific or organ non-specific autoimmune disease. Otherwise, in patients with primary thyroid autoimmune disease, there is no good reason of seeking for all other autoimmune diseases, although these patients have a greater risk of developing other autoimmune disease. Economic aspects of medicine require further analyzing of these data, from cost/benefit point of view to justified either mandatory screening or medical practitioner judgment.

  19. Epigenetics and Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero-Ronderos, Paula; Montoya-Ortiz, Gladis

    2012-01-01

    Epigenetics is defined as the study of all inheritable and potentially reversible changes in genome function that do not alter the nucleotide sequence within the DNA. Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation, histone modification, nucleosome positioning, and microRNAs (miRNAs) are essential to carry out key functions in the regulation of gene expression. Therefore, the epigenetic mechanisms are a window to understanding the possible mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of complex diseases such as autoimmune diseases. It is noteworthy that autoimmune diseases do not have the same epidemiology, pathology, or symptoms but do have a common origin that can be explained by the sharing of immunogenetic mechanisms. Currently, epigenetic research is looking for disruption in one or more epigenetic mechanisms to provide new insights into autoimmune diseases. The identification of cell-specific targets of epigenetic deregulation will serve us as clinical markers for diagnosis, disease progression, and therapy approaches. PMID:22536485

  20. Bell's palsy and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, A; Gallo, A; Fusconi, M; Marinelli, C; Macri, G F; de Vincentiis, M

    2012-12-01

    To review our current knowledge of the etiopathogenesis of Bell's palsy, including viral infection or autoimmunity, and to discuss disease pathogenesis with respect to pharmacotherapy. Relevant publications on the etiopathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis and histopathology of Bell's palsy from 1975 to 2012 were analysed. Bell's palsy is an idiopathic peripheral nerve palsy involving the facial nerve. It accounts for 60 to 75% of all cases of unilateral facial paralysis. The annual incidence of Bell's palsy is 15 to 30 per 100,000 people. The peak incidence occurs between the second and fourth decades (15 to 45 years). The aetiology of Bell's palsy is unknown but viral infection or autoimmune disease has been postulated as possible pathomechanisms. Bell's palsy may be caused when latent herpes viruses (herpes simplex, herpes zoster) are reactivated from cranial nerve ganglia. A cell-mediated autoimmune mechanism against a myelin basic protein has been suggested for the pathogenesis of Bell's palsy. Bell's palsy may be an autoimmune demyelinating cranial neuritis, and in most cases, it is a mononeuritic variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome, a neurologic disorder with recognised cell-mediated immunity against peripheral nerve myelin antigens. In Bell's palsy and GBS, a viral infection or the reactivation of a latent virus may provoke an autoimmune reaction against peripheral nerve myelin components, leading to the demyelination of cranial nerves, especially the facial nerve. Given the safety profile of acyclovir, valacyclovir, and short-course oral corticosteroids, patients who present within three days of the onset of symptoms should be offered combination therapy. However it seems logical that in fact, steroids exert their beneficial effect via immunosuppressive action, as is the case in some other autoimmune disorders. It is to be hoped that (monoclonal) antibodies and/or T-cell immunotherapy might provide more specific treatment guidelines in the

  1. Risk of Hematopoietic and Lymphoproliferative Malignancies among U. S. Radiologic Technologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linet, M. S.; Fredman, D. M.; Mohan, A.; Morin Doody, M.; Ron, E.; Mabuchi, K.; Alexander, B. B.; Sigurdson, A.; Matanoski, G.; Hauptmann, M.

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate risks of hematopoietic and lymphoproliferative malignancies among medical workers exposed to protracted low-to-moderate-dose radiation exposures, a follow-up investigation was conducted in a nation wide cohort of U. S. radiologic technologists. eligible for this study were 71.894 technologists (78% female) certified for at least 2 years during 1926-82, who had responded to a baseline mail questionnaire during 1983-89, were cancer-free except for non-melanoma skin cancer at completion of the questionnaire, and completed a second questionnaire during 1994-98 or died through August 1998. There were 241 technologists with hematopoietic or lymphoproliferative malignancies, including 41 with leukemia subtypes associated with radiation exposures (specifically acute myeloid, acute lymphoid and chronic myeloid leukemias, hereafter designated radiogenic leukemias), 23 with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, 28 with multiple myeloma, 118 with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and 31 with Hodgkin lymphoma. Of the 241 hematopoietic or lymphoproliferative malignancies identified among radiologic technologists, 85 percent were confirmed by medical records or death certificates, including 98 percent of radiogenic leukemia. Risks of the hematopoietic or lymphoproliferative malignancies were evaluated in relation to questionnaire-derived information on employment as a radiologic technologist, including procedures, work practices, and protective measures. cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to compute relative risks and 95% confidence intervals, using age at diagnosis as the response, stratifying at baseline for birth cohort in 5-year intervals, and adjusting for potential confounding. Risks were not increased for any of the hematopoietic or lymphoproliferative neoplasms according to year first worked or total duration of years worked as radiologic technologist. For the combined radiogenic leukemias, risks rose significantly with an increasing number of years worked

  2. Risk of Hematopoietic and Lymphoproliferative Malignancies among U. S. Radiologic Technologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linet, M. S.; Fredman, D. M.; Mohan, A.; Morin Doody, M.; Ron, E.; Mabuchi, K.; Alexander, B. B.; Sigurdson, A.; Matanoski, G.; Hauptmann, M.

    2004-07-01

    To evaluate risks of hematopoietic and lymphoproliferative malignancies among medical workers exposed to protracted low-to-moderate-dose radiation exposures, a follow-up investigation was conducted in a nation wide cohort of U. S. radiologic technologists. eligible for this study were 71.894 technologists (78% female) certified for at least 2 years during 1926-82, who had responded to a baseline mail questionnaire during 1983-89, were cancer-free except for non-melanoma skin cancer at completion of the questionnaire, and completed a second questionnaire during 1994-98 or died through August 1998. There were 241 technologists with hematopoietic or lymphoproliferative malignancies, including 41 with leukemia subtypes associated with radiation exposures (specifically acute myeloid, acute lymphoid and chronic myeloid leukemias, hereafter designated radiogenic leukemias), 23 with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, 28 with multiple myeloma, 118 with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and 31 with Hodgkin lymphoma. Of the 241 hematopoietic or lymphoproliferative malignancies identified among radiologic technologists, 85 percent were confirmed by medical records or death certificates, including 98 percent of radiogenic leukemia. Risks of the hematopoietic or lymphoproliferative malignancies were evaluated in relation to questionnaire-derived information on employment as a radiologic technologist, including procedures, work practices, and protective measures. cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to compute relative risks and 95% confidence intervals, using age at diagnosis as the response, stratifying at baseline for birth cohort in 5-year intervals, and adjusting for potential confounding. Risks were not increased for any of the hematopoietic or lymphoproliferative neoplasms according to year first worked or total duration of years worked as radiologic technologist. For the combined radiogenic leukemias, risks rose significantly with an increasing number of years worked

  3. Correlation between flow cytometry and histologic findings: ten year experience in the investigation of lymphoproliferative diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Bezerra, Alanna Mara Pinheiro Sobreira; Pasqualin, Denise da Cunha; Guerra, João Carlos de Campos; Colombini, Marjorie Paris; Velloso, Elvira Deolinda Rodrigues Pereira; Silveira, Paulo Augusto Achucarro; Mangueira, Cristovão Luis Pitangueira; Kanayama, Ruth Hissae; Nozawa, Sonia Tsukasa; Correia, Rodolfo; Apelle, Ana Carolina; Pereira, Welbert de Oliveira; Garcia, Rodrigo Gobbo; Bacal, Nydia Strachman

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To demonstrate the advantages of correlating flow cytometry immunophenotyping with the pathology/ immunohistochemistry of lymph nodes or nodules in the diagnosis of lymphoproliferative diseases. Methods: A retrospective study was carried out of 157 biopsy or fine-needle aspiration lymph nodes/ nodule specimens taken from 142 patients, from 1999 and 2009. The specimens were simultaneously studied with fow cytometry and pathology at Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein. The specimens ...

  4. Patogenetic correction of anemia with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents in lymphoproliferative disorders (literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Romanenko

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Literature review of anemia pathogenesis in patients with lymphatic system malignancies is presented. Advantages and disadvanta ges of eritropoiesis-stimulating preparations (ESP used for anemia correction are shown. Efficacy of anemia treatment with ESP in various types of lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD is presented. Prognostic factors that predict positive response on ESP in LPD pati ents and reduce treatment cost are identified.

  5. Patogenetic correction of anemia with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents in lymphoproliferative disorders (literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Romanenko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Literature review of anemia pathogenesis in patients with lymphatic system malignancies is presented. Advantages and disadvanta ges of eritropoiesis-stimulating preparations (ESP used for anemia correction are shown. Efficacy of anemia treatment with ESP in various types of lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD is presented. Prognostic factors that predict positive response on ESP in LPD pati ents and reduce treatment cost are identified.

  6. HLA associations and risk of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder in Danish population-based cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vase, Maja Ølholm; Maksten, Eva Futtrup; Strandhave, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Background: Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a feared complication to organ transplantation, associated with substantial morbidity and inferior survival. Risk factors for PTLD include T cell–depleting induction therapy and primary infection or reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus....... Possible associations between certain HLA types and the risk of developing PTLD have been reported by other investigators; however, results are conflicting. Methods: We conducted a retrospective, population-based study on 4295 Danish solid organ transplant patients from the Scandiatransplant database...

  7. Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder Arising from Renal Allograft Parenchyma: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Byung Kwan; Kim, Chan Kyo; Kwon, Ghee Young [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a rare but serious complication that occurs in patients undergoing kidney transplantation. PTLD usually manifests as a renal hilar mass comprised of histologically B-lymphocytes. We report our experience of managing a patient with PTLD arising from renal parenchyma. Ultrasonographic and MR imaging features of this unusual PTLD suggested differentiated renal cell carcinoma arising from the renal allograft

  8. Occurrence and prognostic relevance of CD30 expression in post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vase, Maja Ølholm; Maksten, Eva Futtrup; Bendix, Knud

    2015-01-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) are potentiallyfatal, often Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-driven neoplasias developing in immunocompromised hosts. Initial treatment usually consists of a reduction in immunosuppressive therapy and/or rituximab with or without chemotherapy. However...... favorable outcome. For diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL)-type PTLD this was regardless of EBV status, and remained significant in multivariate analysis. Cell-of-origin had no independent prognostic value in our series of DLBCL PTLD....

  9. Patogenetic correction of anemia with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents in lymphoproliferative disorders (literature review)

    OpenAIRE

    N. A. Romanenko; K. M. Abdulkadyrov

    2014-01-01

    Literature review of anemia pathogenesis in patients with lymphatic system malignancies is presented. Advantages and disadvanta ges of eritropoiesis-stimulating preparations (ESP) used for anemia correction are shown. Efficacy of anemia treatment with ESP in various types of lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD) is presented. Prognostic factors that predict positive response on ESP in LPD pati ents and reduce treatment cost are identified.

  10. Psychosis: an autoimmune disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Diwani, Adam A J; Pollak, Thomas A; Irani, Sarosh R; Lennox, Belinda R

    2017-11-01

    Psychotic disorders are common and disabling. Overlaps in clinical course in addition to epidemiological and genetic associations raise the possibility that autoimmune mechanisms may underlie some psychoses, potentially offering novel therapeutic approaches. Several immune loci including the major histocompatibility complex and B-cell markers CD19 and CD20 achieve genome-wide significance in schizophrenia. Emerging evidence suggests a potential role via neurodevelopment in addition to classical immune pathways. Additionally, lymphocyte biology is increasingly investigated. Some reports note raised peripheral CD19 + and reduced CD3 + lymphocyte counts, with altered CD4 : CD8 ratios in acute psychosis. Also, post-mortem studies have found CD3 + and CD20 + lymphocyte infiltration in brain regions that are of functional relevance to psychosis. More specifically, the recent paradigm of neuronal surface antibody-mediated (NSAb) central nervous system disease provides an antigen-specific model linking adaptive autoimmunity to psychopathology. NSAbs bind extracellular epitopes of signalling molecules that are classically implicated in psychosis such as NMDA and GABA receptors. This interaction may cause circuit dysfunction leading to psychosis among other neurological features in patients with autoimmune encephalitis. The detection of these cases is crucial as autoimmune encephalitis is ameliorated by commonly available immunotherapies. Meanwhile, the prevalence and relevance of these antibodies in people with isolated psychotic disorders is an area of emerging scientific and clinical interest. Collaborative efforts to achieve larger sample sizes, comparison of assay platforms, and placebo-controlled randomized clinical trials are now needed to establish an autoimmune contribution to psychosis. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Lymphoproliferative disorders in non-AIDS associated Kaposi's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The association of the non-AIDS-related, classic fonn of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) with secondary malignancies, especially Iymphoproliferative disorders, has frequently been noted. However, in endemic: African-type KS, such an association has been reported only rarely. A review of 62 non-AIDS-related cases of KS treated ...

  12. Lymphoproliferative disorders in non-AIDS- associated Kaposi's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    62 non-AiDS-related cases of KS treated and followed up at Johannesburg General Hospital between 1980 ... Non-AIDS-associated Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is a rare vascular tumour, affecting mainly the skin but also ..... Further investigation of patients may well show the occurrence of common pathogenetic mechanisms.

  13. [Polyglandular autoimmune syndromes : An overview].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komminoth, P

    2016-05-01

    Polyglandular autoimmune syndromes (PGAS), also known as autoimmune polyendocrinopathy syndromes (APS), are a heterogeneous group of rare, genetically caused diseases of the immune system which lead to inflammatory damage of various endocrine glands resulting in malfunctions. In addition, autoimmune diseases of non-endocrine organs may also be found. Early diagnosis of PGAS is often overlooked because of heterogeneous symptoms and the progressive occurrence of the individual diseases. The two most important forms of PGAS are the juvenile and adult types. The juvenile type (PGAS type 1) is caused by mutations in the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene on chromosome 21, exhibits geographic variations in incidence and is defined by the combination of mucocutaneous candidiasis, Addison's disease and hypoparathyroidism. In addition, autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) syndrome and other autoimmune diseases can also occur. The adult form of PGAS (PGAS type 2) is a multigenetic disorder associated with some HLA haplotypes, is more common than the juvenile type, shows female predominance and exhibits the combination of type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroid disease, Addison's disease and other autoimmune disorders. The histological alterations in affected organs of PGAS patients are similar to findings in sporadically occurring autoimmune diseases of these organs but there are no pathognomic fine tissue findings. If patients exhibit autoimmune changes in two different endocrine glands or if there are indications of several autoimmune disorders from the patient history, it is important to consider PGAS and inform the clinicians of this suspicion.

  14. ROLE OF SERUM EOSINOPHILIC CATIONIC PROTEIN AND TRYPTASE IN MYELOPROLIFERATIVE AND LYMPHOPROLIFERATIVE DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. S. Komarova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. A role of intracellular proteins of eosinophils and mast cells remains unclear in the patients with hematological neoplasia. There is a substantial evidence that eosinophils possess some common mechanisms of cooperation with mast cells. Therapeutic interventions into key events controlling eosinophil migration may be a leading factor in treatment of hypereosinophylic states in onco-hematological disorders. Due to unknown functions of eosinophils in majority of eosinophilia-associated diseases, it would be useful to establish an algorithm of accurate diagnostics in the patients with eosinophilia, in order to choose more effective treatment in future.We studied serum levels of secretable eosinophil and mast cells proteins in oncohematological patients with increased eosinophil counts. The aim of our study was to test a significance of quantitative assay for tryptase and ECP in the patients with myelo- and lymphoproliferative diseases. The study group included thirty-eight patients with oncohematological diseases, accompanied by a marked eosinophilia (> 0.4 x 109/L. Eighteen patients with bronchial asthma (BA, and eight cases of solid tumors comprised a reference group for polyclonal eosinophilia. The levels of ECP and tryptase were measured in blood serum using a commercial fluoroimmunoenzyme assay («Pharmacia», Uppsala, Sweden. Total ECP levels were markedly increased in general group with hematological malignancies (p < 0.03, , and in cases of chronic GvHD (p < 0.03, and in a sub-group with lymphoproliferative disorders (р = 0.007 as compared to the group of non-hematological diseases.Serum levels of tryptase were significantly increased in the patients with chronic GvHD after allo-HSCT and lymphoproliferative diseases, as compared to the group of patients with solid tumors (р = 0.03, as well in GvHD compared with lymphoproliferative disorders (р < 0.05.A direct correlation was found between serum ECP levels and absolute

  15. Recent advances in understanding autoimmune thyroid disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bliddal, Sofie; Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) is often observed together with other autoimmune diseases. The coexistence of two or more autoimmune diseases in the same patient is referred to as polyautoimmunity, and AITD is the autoimmune disease most frequently involved. The occurrence of polyautoimmunity has...... led to the hypothesis that the affected patients suffer from a generalized dysregulation of their immune system. The present review summarizes recent discoveries unravelling the immunological mechanisms involved in autoimmunity, ranging from natural autoimmunity to disease-specific autoimmunity...

  16. Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrome Type III with Primary Hypoparathyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Jin Kim

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Polyglandular autoimmune syndrome is defined as multiple endocrine gland insufficiencies accompanied by autoimmune diseases of the endocrine and nonendocrine system. After Schmidt introduced a case of nontuberculosis adrenal gland dysfunction with thyroiditis in 1926, Neufeld defined polyglandular autoimmune syndrome by I, II, and III subtypes in 1980 by their presentation of occurrence age, heredity methods, relationship with human leukocyte antigen, and accompanying diseases. We report a case of a 32-year-old female with polyglandular autoimmune syndrome III accompanied by type 1 diabetes mellitus that was treated with insulin (36 units per day for 11 years. She had insulin deficiency and Hashimoto thyroiditis as an autoimmune disorder. In addition, she had several features similar to Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy including short stature, truncal obesity, round face, short neck, low intelligence (full IQ 84, and decreased memory. Although Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy is morphological evidence of pseudohypoparathyroidism or pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism, she had primary hypoparathyroidism on laboratory results. Here, we report a case of polyglandular autoimmune syndrome III with type 1 diabetes mellitus, autoimmune thyroiditis, and primary hypoparathyroidism, accompanied by clinical features similar to Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy.

  17. [Oral diseases in auto-immune polyendocrine syndrome type 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proust-Lemoine, Emmanuelle; Guyot, Sylvie

    2017-09-01

    Auto-immune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS1) also called Auto-immune Polyendocrinopathy Candidiasis Ectodermal Dystrophy (APECED) is a rare monogenic childhood-onset auto-immune disease. This autosomal recessive disorder is caused by mutations in the auto-immune regulator (AIRE) gene, and leads to autoimmunity targeting peripheral tissues. There is a wide variability in clinical phenotypes in patients with APSI, with auto-immune endocrine and non-endocrine disorders, and chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis. These patients suffer from oral diseases such as dental enamel hypoplasia and candidiasis. Both are frequently described, and in recent series, enamel hypoplasia and candidiasis are even the most frequent components of APS1 together with hypoparathyroidism. Both often occur during childhood (before 5 years old for canrdidiasis, and before 15 years old for enamel hypoplasia). Oral candidiasis is recurrent all life long, could become resistant to azole antifungal after years of treatment, and be carcinogenic, leading to severe oral squamous cell carcinoma. Oral components of APS1 should be diagnosed and rigorously treated. Dental enamel hypoplasia and/or recurrent oral candidiasis in association with auto-immune diseases in a young child should prompt APS1 diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Sarcoidosis and Thyroid Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piera Fazzi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Most of the studies have shown a higher risk for subclinical and clinical hypothyroidism, antithyroid autoantibodies [overall antithyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb], and in general, thyroid autoimmunity, overall in the female gender in patients with sarcoidosis (S. A significantly higher prevalence of clinical hypothyroidism and Graves’ disease was also described in female S patients with respect to controls. Gallium-67 (Ga-67 scyntigraphy in S patients, in the case of thyroid uptake, suggests the presence of aggressive autoimmune thyroiditis and hypothyroidism. For this reason, ultrasonography and thyroid function should be done in the case of Ga-67 thyroid uptake. In conclusion, thyroid function, TPOAb measurement, and ultrasonography should be done to assess the clinical profile in female S patients, and the ones at high risk (female individuals, with TPOAb positivity, and hypoechoic and small thyroid should have periodically thyroid function evaluations and suitable treatments.

  19. Gangliosides and autoimmune diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misasi, R; Dionisi, S; Farilla, L; Carabba, B; Lenti, L; Di Mario, U; Dotta, F

    1997-09-01

    Gangliosides are sialic acid-containing glycolipids which are formed by a hydrophobic portion, the ceramide, and a hydrophilic part, i.e. the oligosaccharide chain. First described in neural tissue, several studies have shown that gangliosides are almost ubiquitous molecules expressed in all vertebrate tissues. Within cells, gangliosides are usually associated with plasma membranes, where they can act as receptors for a variety of molecules and have been shown to take part in cell-to-cell interaction and in signal transduction. In addition, gangliosides are expressed in cytosol membranes like those of secretory granules of some endocrine cells (adrenal medulla, pancreatic islets). As far as the role of gangliosides in diseases is concerned, there are some cases in which an aberrant ganglioside expression plays a crucial role in the disease pathogenetic process. These diseases include two major forms of ganglioside storage, namely GM2-gangliosidosis (Tay-Sachs and its beta-hexosaminidase deficiency) and GM1-gangliosidosis (beta-galactosidase deficiency), where the most prominent pathological characteristic is the lysosomal ganglioside accumulation in neurons. Other inflammatory or degenerative diseases both within and outside the nervous system have been shown to be associated with an altered pattern of ganglioside expression in the target organ. Since monoclonal antibodies have been discovered and used in immunology, a large variety of ganglioside antigens has been described both as blood group antigens and as tumour-related antigens. Several studies have also indicated that gangliosides can act not only as antigens, but also as autoantigens. As a matter of fact, auto-antibodies to gangliosides, detected by immunostaining methods performed directly on TLC plates or by ELISA, have been described in several autoimmune disorders such as Guillain-Barré syndrome, multiple sclerosis, lupus erythematosus, Hashimoto's thyroiditis and, last but not least, insulin

  20. Thymoma and autoimmunity

    OpenAIRE

    Shelly, Shahar; Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Altman, Arie; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2011-01-01

    The thymus is a central lymphatic organ that is responsible for many immunological functions, including the production of mature, functional T cells and the induction of self-tolerance. Benign or malignant tumors may originate from the thymus gland, with thymoma being the most common and accounting for 50% of anterior mediastinal tumors. Malignancies linked to thymoma include the loss of self-tolerance and the presence of autoimmunity. In this review, we compiled the current scientific eviden...

  1. Autoimmune liver disease 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratori, Paolo; Granito, Alessandro; Pappas, Georgios; Muratori, Luigi; Lenzi, Marco; Bianchi, Francesco B

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune liver disease (ALD) includes a spectrum of diseases which comprises both cholestatic and hepatitic forms: autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and the so called "overlap" syndromes where hepatitic and cholestatic damage coexists. All these diseases are characterized by an extremely high heterogeneity of presentation, varying from asymptomatic, acute (as in a subset of AIH) or chronic (with aspecific symptoms such as fatigue and myalgia in AIH or fatigue and pruritus in PBC and PSC). The detection and characterization of non organ specific autoantibodies plays a major role in the diagnostic approach of autoimmune liver disease; anti nuclear reactivities (ANA) and anti smooth muscle antibodies (SMA) mark type 1 AIH, liver kidney microsomal antibody type 1 (LKM1) and liver cytosol type 1 (LC1) are the serological markers of type 2 AIH; antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA) are associated with PBC, while no specific marker is found in PSC, since anticytoplasmic neutrophil antibodies with perinuclear pattern (atypical p-ANCA or p-ANNA) are also detected in a substantial proportion of type 1 AIH cases. Treatment options rely on immunosoppressive therapy (steroids and azathioprine) in AIH and on ursodeoxycholic acid in cholestatic conditions; in all these diseases liver transplantation remains the only therapeutical approach for the end stage of liver disease.

  2. [Autoimmune blistering diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvert-Lehembre, S; Joly, P

    2014-03-01

    Autoimmune blistering diseases are characterized by the production of pathogenic autoantibodies that are responsible for the formation of epidermal blisters. Major advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of these disorders have allowed the development of new therapeutic agents. Recent epidemiologic data showed that bullous pemphigoid mainly affects elderly patients. Bullous pemphigoid is often associated with degenerative neurologic disorders. A major increase in the incidence of bullous pemphigoid has been observed in France. Treatment of bullous pemphigoid is mainly based on superpotent topical corticosteroids. The role of desmosomal proteins has been demonstrated in the initiation, propagation and persistence of the autoimmune response in pemphigus. Several studies have shown a correlation between anti-desmoglein antibody titers and disease activity. Pemphigus susceptibility genes have been identified. Oral corticosteroids remain the mainstay of pemphigus treatment. Dramatic and long-lasting improvement has been recently obtained with rituximab in recalcitrant types of pemphigus. Other autoimmune junctional blistering diseases are rare entities, whose prognosis can be severe. Their diagnosis has been improved by the use of new immunological assays and immunoelectronic microscopy. Immunosupressants are widely used in severe types in order to prevent mucosal sequelae. Copyright © 2013 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Thymoma and autoimmunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelly, Shahar; Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Altman, Arie; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2011-01-01

    The thymus is a central lymphatic organ that is responsible for many immunological functions, including the production of mature, functional T cells and the induction of self-tolerance. Benign or malignant tumors may originate from the thymus gland, with thymoma being the most common and accounting for 50% of anterior mediastinal tumors. Malignancies linked to thymoma include the loss of self-tolerance and the presence of autoimmunity. In this review, we compiled the current scientific evidence detailing the various interactions between thymoma and autoimmune diseases, including myasthenia gravis, systemic lupus erythematosus, inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion, pure red cell aplasia, pernicious anemia, pemphigus and autoimmune thyroid diseases. In recent years, several mechanisms have been proposed to explain these interactions. Most are based on the assumption that the ‘sick' thymus, like the ‘normal' thymus, can generate mature T cells; however, the T cells generated by the sick thymus are impaired and thus may exert cellular autoreactivity. Here, we present several theories that may shed light on the loss of self-tolerance associated with this epithelial tumor of the thymus. PMID:21317916

  4. Is selenium supplementation in autoimmune thyroid diseases justified?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Kristian H.; Bonnema, Steen; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review provides an appraisal of recent evidence for or against selenium supplementation in patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases, and discusses possible effect mechanisms. RECENT FINDINGS: Epidemiological data suggest an increased prevalence of autoimmune thyroid...... diseases under conditions of low dietary selenium intake. Two systematic reviews have evaluated controlled trials among patients with autoimmune thyroiditis and report that selenium supplementation decreases circulating thyroid autoantibodies. The immunomodulatory effects of selenium might involve reducing...... supplementation in the standard treatment of patients with autoimmune thyroiditis or Graves’ disease. However, correction of moderate to severe selenium deficiency may offer benefits in preventing, as well as treating, these disorders. Molecular mechanisms have been proposed, but further studies are needed....

  5. Autoimmunity in differentiated thyroid cancer: significance and related clinical problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Rasmussen, Ase Krogh

    2011-01-01

    Coexistence of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) and thyroid autoimmune diseases could represent a mere coincidence due to the frequent occurrence of autoimmunity, but there may also be a pathological and causative link between the two conditions. The coincidence of DTC with Hashimoto's disease...... has been variably reported at between 0.5 and 22.5% and of DTC with Graves' disease between 0 and 9.8%. In this review available evidence for thyroid autoimmunity in DTC is summarized and it is concluded that thyroid cancer does coexist with thyroid autoimmunity, implying that patients treated...... TgAb measurements may be used as a surrogate marker for recurrence of thyroid cancer during the long-term monitoring of DTC patients....

  6. Autoimmunity in differentiated thyroid cancer: significance and related clinical problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Rasmussen, Ase Krogh

    2010-01-01

    Coexistence of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) and thyroid autoimmune diseases could represent a mere coincidence due to the frequent occurrence of autoimmunity, but there may also be a pathological and causative link between the two conditions. The coincidence of DTC with Hashimoto's disease...... has been variably reported at between 0.5 and 22.5% and of DTC with Graves' disease between 0 and 9.8%. In this review available evidence for thyroid autoimmunity in DTC is summarized and it is concluded that thyroid cancer does coexist with thyroid autoimmunity, implying that patients treated...... TgAb measurements may be used as a surrogate marker for recurrence of thyroid cancer during the long-term monitoring of DTC patients....

  7. [Treatment of autoimmune hepatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueverov, A O

    2004-01-01

    The immunosuppresive drugs, primarily glucocorticosteroids, serve as the basis for the pathogenetic treatment of autoimmune diseases of the liver. In autoimmune hepatitis, immunosuppressive therapy induces and maintains persistent remission in most patients while in primary biliary cirrhosis and primary sclerosing cholangitis, its capacities are substantially limited. Ursodeoxycholic acid is used as the basic drug in predominantly occurring intrahepatic cholestasis. The treatment of cross autoimmune syndromes generally requires the choice of a combination of drugs.

  8. B Cells in Autoimmune Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Hampe, Christiane S.

    2012-01-01

    The role of B cells in autoimmune diseases involves different cellular functions, including the well-established secretion of autoantibodies, autoantigen presentation and ensuing reciprocal interactions with T cells, secretion of inflammatory cytokines, and the generation of ectopic germinal centers. Through these mechanisms B cells are involved both in autoimmune diseases that are traditionally viewed as antibody mediated and also in autoimmune diseases that are commonly classified as T cell...

  9. [Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becheur, M; Bouslama, B; Slama, H; Toumi, N E H

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare condition in children which differs from the adult form. It is defined by immune-mediated destruction of red blood cells caused by autoantibodies. Characteristics of the autoantibodies are responsible for the various clinical entities. Classifications of autoimmune hemolytic anemia include warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia, cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia, and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria. For each classification, this review discusses the epidemiology, etiology, clinical presentation, laboratory evaluation, and treatment options. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Therapeutic approach to metastatic myelo-lymphoproliferative malignancies in spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Dominguez

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Myeloproliferative metastatic tumors (leukemia, multiple myeloma and lymphoma are a problem that the spinal surgeon faces increasingly due to longer survival periods associated with their slower growth rates and improved oncological treatments available.Currently there is not consensus about any classifications that establish a prognosis and a treatment plan for the management of these pathologiesObjectiveTo apply and evaluate specific survival scale (ECOG and SCMMM and treatment (Sins for this type of spinal metastases. Material and MethodsPatients with diagnosis of metastatic spine myeloproliferative diseases had the above scale applied and also adding visual analog scale (VAS and Oswestry (ODI to quantify the evolution of treatment. Were included in this sample 5 patients with a minimum follow up of 6 months. ResultsOf the patients sampled 4 patients had a diagnosis of multiple myeloma and one a diagnosis of leukemia, 2 were operated and 3 were treated with radiotherapy, chemotherapy and corset; all improved EVA and Oswestry except one who died at 7 days by an extraspinal complication. ConclusionThe scales used are very useful for therapeutic decision of these patients to be more specific for these metastases.

  11. Prevention of Human Lymphoproliferative Tumor Formation in Ovarian Cancer Patient-Derived Xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina A. Butler

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Interest in preclinical drug development for ovarian cancer has stimulated development of patient-derived xenograft (PDX or tumorgraft models. However, the unintended formation of human lymphoma in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mice from Epstein-Barr virus (EBV–infected human lymphocytes can be problematic. In this study, we have characterized ovarian cancer PDXs which developed human lymphomas and explore methods to suppress lymphoproliferative growth. Fresh human ovarian tumors from 568 patients were transplanted intraperitoneally in SCID mice. A subset of PDX models demonstrated atypical patterns of dissemination with mediastinal masses, hepatosplenomegaly, and CD45-positive lymphoblastic atypia without ovarian tumor engraftment. Expression of human CD20 but not CD3 supported a B-cell lineage, and EBV genomes were detected in all lymphoproliferative tumors. Immunophenotyping confirmed monoclonal gene rearrangements consistent with B-cell lymphoma, and global gene expression patterns correlated well with other human lymphomas. The ability of rituximab, an anti-CD20 antibody, to suppress human lymphoproliferation from a patient's ovarian tumor in SCID mice and prevent growth of an established lymphoma led to a practice change with a goal to reduce the incidence of lymphomas. A single dose of rituximab during the primary tumor heterotransplantation process reduced the incidence of CD45-positive cells in subsequent PDX lines from 86.3% (n = 117 without rituximab to 5.6% (n = 160 with rituximab, and the lymphoma rate declined from 11.1% to 1.88%. Taken together, investigators utilizing PDX models for research should routinely monitor for lymphoproliferative tumors and consider implementing methods to suppress their growth.

  12. Long-term follow-up of kidney transplant patients with posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkeland, S A; Hamilton-Dutoit, Stephen Jacques; Bendtzen, K

    2003-01-01

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) can be resolved in many transplant patients by the reduction or cessation of immunosuppression, after which many grafts continue to function as the result of a form of operational tolerance. When graft function deteriorates, retransplantation may...... be an option. Cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-10 and IL-18 may play a role in PTLD tolerance induction and tumor regression. We report long-term follow-up on the duration of graft tolerance and the course of retransplantation in a series of patients who underwent kidney transplantation and demonstrated PTLD...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: autoimmune Addison disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of each kidney. It is classified as an autoimmune disorder because it results from a malfunctioning immune system ... disease or their family members can have another autoimmune disorder, most commonly autoimmune thyroid disease or type 1 ...

  14. [Keratitis - Infectious or Autoimmune?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messmer, E M

    2016-07-01

    Histopathological evaluation of ocular tissues is important in differentiating between infectious and autoimmune disease. Inflammation, necrosis and keratolysis are common to most forms of keratitis. Histopathology can be of great help in identifying the causative organism, establishing a final diagnosis and/or managing the patient with herpes simplex virus keratitis, mycotic keratitis, acanthamoeba keratitis or microsporidia keratoconjunctivitis. Important pathogenetic knowledge with therapeutic relevance has been gained from histopathological studies in nummular keratitis after epidemic keratoconjunctivitis and atopic keratoconjunctivitis. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Rakhi

    2015-06-01

    Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is defined as the destruction of circulating red blood cells (RBCs) in the setting of anti-RBC autoantibodies that optimally react at 37°C. The pathophysiology of disease involves phagocytosis of autoantibody-coated RBCs in the spleen and complement-mediated hemolysis. Thus far, treatment is aimed at decreasing autoantibody production with immunosuppression or reducing phagocytosis of affected cells in the spleen. The role of complement inhibitors in warm AIHA has not been explored. This article addresses the diagnosis, etiology, and treatment of warm AIHA and highlights the role of complement in disease pathology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Hyposalivation in autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Maeshima, Etsuko; Furukawa, Kanako; Maeshima, Shinichiro; Koshiba, Hiroya; Sakamoto, Wataru

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the prevalence of dry mouth among patients with autoimmune diseases other than Sj?gren?s syndrome. One hundred and forty-four patients, excluding patients with primary Sj?gren?s syndrome, were enrolled in this study. The volume of saliva secreted was measured with the screening technique for estimation of salivary flow, which uses a filter paper for diagnosing dry mouth. Disturbed salivary secretion was observed in 84 (58.3?%) of the 144 patients. In the case of patients ...

  17. Autoimmune diseases and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komrokji, Rami S; Kulasekararaj, Austin; Al Ali, Najla H; Kordasti, Shahram; Bart-Smith, Emily; Craig, Benjamin M; Padron, Eric; Zhang, Ling; Lancet, Jeffrey E; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier; List, Alan F; Mufti, Ghulam J; Epling-Burnette, Pearlie K

    2016-05-01

    Immune dysregulation and altered T-cell hemostasis play important roles in the pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Recent studies suggest an increased risk of MDS among patients with autoimmune diseases. Here, we investigated the prevalence of autoimmune diseases among MDS patients, comparing characteristics and outcomes in those with and without autoimmune diseases. From our study group of 1408 MDS patients, 391 (28%) had autoimmune disease, with hypothyroidism being the most common type, accounting for 44% (n = 171) of patients (12% among all MDS patients analyzed). Other autoimmune diseases with ≥5% prevalence included idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura in 12% (n = 46), rheumatoid arthritis in 10% (n = 41), and psoriasis in 7% (n = 28) of patients. Autoimmune diseases were more common in female MDS patients, those with RA or RCMD WHO subtype, and those who were less dependent on red blood cell transfusion. Median overall survival (OS) was 60 months (95% CI, 50-70) for patients with autoimmune diseases versus 45 months (95% CI, 40-49) for those without (log-rank test, P = 0.006). By multivariate analysis adjusting for revised IPSS and age >60 years, autoimmune diseases were a statistically significant independent factor for OS (HR 0.78; 95% CI, 0.66-0.92; P = 0.004). The rate of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) transformation was 23% (n = 89) in MDS patients with autoimmune disease versus 30% (n = 301) in those without (P = 0.011). Patient groups did not differ in response to azacitidine or lenalidomide treatment. Autoimmune diseases are prevalent among MDS patients. MDS patients with autoimmune diseases have better OS and less AML transformation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Autoimmune liver disease and concomitant extrahepatic autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratori, Paolo; Fabbri, Angela; Lalanne, Claudine; Lenzi, Marco; Muratori, Luigi

    2015-10-01

    To assess the frequency and clinical impact of associated extrahepatic autoimmune diseases (EAD) on autoimmune liver diseases (ALD). We investigated 608 patients with ALD (327 autoimmune hepatitis - AIH and 281 primary biliary cirrhosis - PBC) for concomitant EAD. In both AIH and PBC, we observed a high prevalence of EAD (29.9 and 42.3%, respectively); both diseases showed a significant association with autoimmune thyroid disease, followed by autoimmune skin disease, celiac disease, and vasculitis in AIH patients and sicca syndrome, CREST syndrome, and celiac disease in PBC patients. At diagnosis, AIH patients with concurrent EAD were more often asymptomatic than patients with isolated AIH (Pautoimmune thyroid disease. In the light of our results, all patients with an EAD should be assessed for the concomitant presence of an asymptomatic ALD.

  19. The Janus faces of acquired angioedema: C1-inhibitor deficiency, lymphoproliferation and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Maddalena Alessandra; Castelli, Roberto

    2016-02-01

    Several clinical and biological features of lymphoproliferative diseases have been associated with an increased risk of developing autoimmune manifestations. Acquired deficiency of C1-inhibitor (C1-INH) (AAE) is a rare syndrome clinically similar to hereditary angioedema (HAE) characterized by local increase in vascular permeability (angioedema) of the skin and the gastrointestinal and oro-pharyngo-laryngeal mucosa. Bradykinin, a potent vasoactive peptide, released from high molecular weight kininogen when it is cleaved by plasma kallikrein (a serine protease controlled by C1-INH), is the mediator of symptoms. In total 46% of AAE patients carry an underlying hematological disorder including monoclonal gammopathy of uncertain significance (MGUS) or B cell malignancies. However, 74% of AAE patients have anti-C1-INH autoantibodies without hematological, clinical or instrumental evidence of lymphoproliferative disease. Unlike HAE patients, AAE patients usually have late-onset symptoms, do not have a family history of angioedema and present variable response to treatment due to the hypercatabolism of C1-INH. Experiments show that C1-INH and/or the classical complement pathway were consumed by the neoplastic lymphatic tissues and/or anti-C1-INH neutralizing autoantibodies. Therapy of AAE follows two directions: 1) prevention/reversal of the symptoms of angioedema; and 2) treatment of the associated disease. Different forms of B cell disorders coexist and/or evolve into each other in AAE and seem to be dominated by an altered control of B cell proliferation, thus AAE represents an example of the strict link between autoimmunity and lymphoproliferation.

  20. Rapid infusion with rituximab: short term safety in systemic autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Janni Lisander; Jacobsen, Soren

    2013-01-01

    To describe the incidence, types and severity of adverse events, related to an accelerated regime of rituximab infusion in patients with various autoimmune diseases. Fifty-four patients with systemic autoimmune disease, to be treated with 1,000 mg of rituximab twice 2 weeks apart, participated. Pre...

  1. Cacao polyphenols ameliorate autoimmune myocarditis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zempo, Hirofumi; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Watanabe, Ryo; Wakayama, Kouji; Kumagai, Hidetoshi; Ikeda, Yuichi; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Komuro, Issei; Isobe, Mitsuaki

    2016-04-01

    Myocarditis is a clinically severe disease; however, no effective treatment has been established. The aim of this study was to determine whether cacao bean (Theobroma cacao) polyphenols ameliorate autoimmune myocarditis. We used an experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) model in Balb/c mice. Mice with induced EAM were treated with a cacao polyphenol extract (CPE, n=12) or vehicle (n=12). On day 21, hearts were harvested and analyzed. Elevated heart weight to body weight and fibrotic area ratios as well as high cardiac cell infiltration were observed in the vehicle-treated EAM mice. However, these increases were significantly suppressed in the CPE-treated mice. Reverse transcriptase-PCR revealed that mRNA expressions of interleukin (Il)-1β, Il-6, E-selectin, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and collagen type 1 were lower in the CPE group compared with the vehicle group. The mRNA expressions of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase (Nox)2 and Nox4 were increased in the vehicle-treated EAM hearts, although CPE treatment did not significantly suppress the transcription levels. However, compared with vehicle treatment of EAM hearts, CPE treatment significantly suppressed hydrogen peroxide concentrations. Cardiac myeloperoxidase activity, the intensity of dihydroethidium staining and the phosphorylation of nuclear factor-κB p65 were also lower in the CPE group compared with the vehicle group. Our data suggest that CPE ameliorates EAM in mice. CPE is a promising dietary supplement to suppress cardiovascular inflammation and oxidative stress.

  2. Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisand, Kai; Peterson, Pärt

    2015-07-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene. This review focuses on the clinical and immunological features of APECED, summarizes the current knowledge on the function of AIRE and discusses the importance of autoantibodies in disease diagnosis and prognosis. Additionally, we review the outcome of recent immunomodulatory treatments in APECED patients.

  3. Current topics in autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratori, Luigi; Muratori, Paolo; Granito, Alessandro; Pappas, Giorgios; Cassani, Fabio; Lenzi, Marco

    2010-11-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic liver disease of unknown aetiology characterized by interface hepatitis, hypergammaglobulinaemia and circulating autoantibodies. In the last decade a number of advancements have been made in the field of clinical and basic research: the simplified diagnostic criteria, the complete response defined as normalization of transaminase levels, the molecular identification of the antigenic targets of anti-liver cytosol antibody type 1 and anti-soluble liver antigen, the detection of anti-actin antibodies, the description of de novo autoimmune hepatitis after liver transplantation for non-autoimmune liver diseases, the characterization of autoimmune hepatitis with overlapping features of primary biliary cirrhosis or primary sclerosing cholangitis, the preliminary experience with novel treatment strategies based on cyclosporine, mycophenolate mofetil and budesonide, the role played by "impaired" regulatory T cells and the development of novel animal models of autoimmune hepatitis. Copyright © 2010 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Recalcitrant hypocalcaemia in autoimmune enteropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyer, Myfanwy; Fairchild, Jan; Moore, David; Moore, Lynette; Henning, Paul; Tham, Elaine

    2014-12-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy syndrome is a monogenic disorder associated with autoimmune destruction of both endocrine and nonendocrine tissues. The classic triad includes candidiasis, hypoparathyroidism, and Addison disease. Up to 25% of patients with autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy syndrome also have gastrointestinal manifestations, which can have an impact on the management of other aspects of the disease. The management of the case discussed was challenging because of the complex interplay between the manifestations and treatment of his hypoparathyroidism, Addison disease, and autoimmune enteropathy. Attempts at management of hypocalcemia were largely unsuccessful until the introduction of immunosuppressive therapy for autoimmune enteropathy. This case supports early consideration of immunosuppression in this condition. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  5. Autoimmune comorbidity in achalasia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Hernández, Fernanda; Furuzawa-Carballeda, Janette; Hernández-Molina, Gabriela; Alejandro-Medrano, Edgar; Núñez-Álvarez, Carlos A; Hernández-Ramírez, Diego F; Azamar-Llamas, Daniel; Olivares-Martínez, Elizabeth; Breña, Blanca; Palacios, Axel; Valdovinos, Miguel A; Coss-Adame, Enrique; Ramos-Ávalos, Bárbara; Torres-Landa, Samuel; Hernández-Ávila, Axel A; Flores-Nájera, Athenea; Torres-Villalobos, Gonzalo

    2018-01-01

    Idiopathic achalasia is a rare esophageal motor disorder. The disease state manifests local and systemic inflammation, and it appears that an autoimmune component and specific autoantibodies participate in the pathogenesis. The study aims to determine the prevalence of autoimmune and chronic inflammatory diseases in patients with achalasia and compare the results with those from patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). It was a cross-sectional and included 114 patients with idiopathic achalasia and 114 age-matched and sex-matched control patients with GERD. Data on the presence of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, the time of presentation, and any family history of autoimmune disease were obtained from the hospital's medical records. Seventy three (64%) were female patients (mean age: 42.3 ± 15.5; median disease duration: 12 months). We identified the presence of autoimmune disease in 19 patients with achalasia (16.7%), hypothyroidism was the main diagnosis, and it was present in 52.6% of patients compared with 4.2% in controls. Thirteen of the 19 achalasia patients (68.4%) with autoimmune disease had history of familial autoimmunity. We identified 11 achalasia (9.6%) and 5 GERD patients (4.16%) with an inflammatory condition. Compared with the GERD, the achalasia group was 3.8 times more likely to have an autoimmune disease (95% CI: 1.47-9.83), 3.0 times more likely to have thyroidopathies (95% CI: 1.00-9.03), and 3.02 times more likely to suffer from any chronic inflammatory disease (95% CI: 1.65-6.20). The non-negligible number of patients with autoimmune diseases identified among the patients with idiopathic achalasia supports the hypothesis that achalasia has an autoimmune component. © 2017 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  6. Immunotherapy Treatments of Warm Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bainan Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (WAIHA is one of four clinical types of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA, with the characteristics of autoantibodies maximally active at body temperature. It produces a variable anemia—sometimes mild and sometimes severe. With respect to the absence or presence of an underlying condition, WAIHA is either idiopathic (primary or secondary, which determines the treatment strategies in practice. Conventional treatments include immune suppression with corticosteroids and, in some cases, splenectomy. In recent years, the number of clinical studies with monoclonal antibodies and immunosuppressants in the treatment of WAIHA increased as the knowledge of autoimmunity mechanisms extended. This thread of developing new tools of treating WAIHA is well exemplified with the success in using anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, Rituximab. Following this success, other treatment methods based on the immune mechanisms of WAIHA have emerged. We reviewed these newly developed immunotherapy treatments here in order to provide the clinicians with more options in selecting the best therapy for patients with WAIHA, hoping to stimulate researchers to find more novel immunotherapy strategies.

  7. Lymphoproliferative disorders in inflammatory bowel disease patients on immunosuppression: Lessons from other inflammatory disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Grace Y; Halloran, Brendan P; Peters, Anthea C; Fedorak, Richard N

    2015-11-15

    Immunosuppressive agents, such as thiopurines, methotrexate, and biologics, have revolutionized the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, a number of case reports, case control studies and retrospective studies over the last decade have identified a concerning link between immunosuppression and lymphoproliferative disorders (LPDs), the oncological phenomenon whereby lymphocytes divide uncontrollably. These LPDs have been associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in which the virus provides the impetus for malignant transformation while immunosuppression hampers the immune system's ability to detect and clear these malignant cells. As such, the use of immunosuppressive agents may come at the cost of increased risk of developing LPD. While little is known about the LPD risk in IBD, more is known about immunosuppression in the post-transplantation setting and the development of EBV associated post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD). In review of the PTLD literature, evidence is available to demonstrate that certain immune suppressants such as cyclosporine and T-lymphocyte modulators in particular are associated with an increased risk of PTLD development. As well, high doses of immunosuppressive agents and multiple immunosuppressive agent use are also linked to increased PTLD development. Here, we discuss these findings in context of IBD and what future studies can be taken to understand and reduce the risk of EBV-associated LPD development from immunosuppression use in IBD.

  8. Epstein-Barr Virus-related post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders: pathogenetic insights for targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourse, J P; Jones, K; Gandhi, M K

    2011-05-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a spectrum of major, life-threatening lymphoproliferative diseases occurring in the post-transplant setting. The majority of PTLD is of B-cell origin and is associated with several risk factors, the most significant being Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. EBV's in vitro transforming abilities, distinctive latency, clonality within the malignant cells and response to targeted therapies implicate a critical role in the biology of PTLD. This minireview focuses on EBV-related PTLD pathogenesis, in particular the interplay between aspects of the EBV life cycle and latency with nonviral factors resulting in the wide spectrum of histology and clinical presentations encountered in PTLD. With the increased prevalence of transplantation a rise in the incidence of PTLD may be expected. Therefore the importance of laboratory and animal models in the understanding of PTLD and the development of novel therapeutic approaches is discussed. © 2011 The Authors Journal compilation © 2011 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  9. Post-translational modified proteins are biomarkers of autoimmune-processes: NETosis and the inflammatory-autoimmunity connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruschi, Maurizio; Petretto, Andrea; Bertelli, Roberta; Galetti, Maricla; Bonanni, Alice; Pratesi, Federico; Migliorini, Paola; Candiano, Giovanni; Vaglio, Augusto; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco

    2017-01-01

    Basic research is showing new mechanisms involved in early immune responses and Neutrophil Extracellular Trap (NET) formation (or NETosis) is of key importance as first line defense against bacteria, virus and protozoa. Enzymatic modification of arginine in citrulline in histones is the prerequisite of NETosis being it necessary for decondensation and extrusion of DNA from cells; it is conceivable that other post translational modifications may occur during this event. There is consensus in considering that post translational modified proteins may elicit an autoimmune response that leads to the formation of autoantibodies. Several autoimmune diseases seem to share these pathogenic mechanisms, in particular Rheumatoid arthritis, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Small Vessel Vasculitis and Anti-Phospholipid Syndrome, which are all characterized by high levels of circulating autoantibodies. Autoimmunity has, however, different targets and elicits different clinical responses. It seems reasonable to hypothesize that although NETosis is common to all the conditions above, NET components are different and potentially responsible for different autoimmune responses. On the other hand also showing whether circulating NET remnants are present as free structures in blood/biological fluids and determine their levels is relevant to autoimmunity. This review is intended to discuss the rationale for utilizing new discoveries that could be of rapid clinical application and lead to the development of early biomarkers of autoimmunity to predict and treat otherwise serious conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Autoimmune premature ovarian failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Komorowska

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Premature ovarian failure (POF, also termed as primary ovarian insufficiency (POI, is a highly heterogenous condition affecting 0.5-3.0% of women in childbearing age. These young women comprise quite a formidable group with unique physical and psychological needs that require special attention. Premature ovarian senescence (POS in all of its forms evolves insidiously as a basically asymptomatic process, leading to complete loss of ovarian function, and POI/POF diagnoses are currently made at relatively late stages. Well-known and well-documented risk factors exist, and the presence or suspicion of autoimmune disorder should be regarded as an important one. Premature ovarian failure is to some degree predictable in its occurrence and should be considered while encountering young women with loss of menstrual regularity, especially when there is a concomitant dysfunction in the immune system.

  11. Autoimmun hypophysitis--en differentialdiagnose til hypofyseadenomer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Therese; Hagen, Claus

    2010-01-01

    A 66-year-old man with a headache in the left temporal region which had persisted for eight months is presented. The patient developed polydipsia and polyuria and also suffered from tinnitus, impaired hearing and episodes of double vision. The patient was diagnosed with autoimmune hypophysitis (A......) in 2007. This case story displays the importance of knowing AH, as it is an important differential diagnosis to pituitary gland adenomas and to diseases in the hypothalamus because it can be treated medically as opposed to surgically....

  12. Selfie: Autoimmunity, boon or bane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahsan, Haseeb

    2017-01-01

    The immune system provides protection to tissues damaged by infectious microrganisms or physical damage. In autoimmune diseases, the immune system recognizes and attacks its own tissues, i.e., self-destruction. Various agents such as genetic factors and environmental triggers are thought to play a major role in the development of autoimmune diseases. A common feature of all autoimmune diseases is the presence of autoantibodies and inflammation, including mononuclear phagocytes, autoreactive T lymphocytes, and autoantibody producing B cells (plasma cells). It has long been known that B cells produce autoantibodies and, thereby, contribute to the pathogenesis of many autoimmune diseases. Autoimmune diseases can be classified as organ-specific or non-organ specific depending on whether the autoimmune response is directed against a particular tissue or against widespread antigens as in chronic inflammatory autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Both SLE and RA are characterized by the presence of autoantibodies which play a major role in their etiopathogenesis. SLE is characterized by circulating antibodies and immune complex deposition that can trigger an inflammatory damage in organs. RA is a progressive inflammatory disease in which T cells, B cells, and pro-inflammatory cytokines play a key role in its pathophysiology.

  13. A case of recurrent autoimmune hemolytic anemia during remission associated with acute pure red cell aplasia and hemophagocytic syndrome due to human parvovirus B19 infection successfully treated by steroid pulse therapy with a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiguchi, Yasunobu; Shimada, Asami; Imai, Hidenori; Wakabayashi, Mutsumi; Sugimoto, Keiji; Nakamura, Noriko; Sawada, Tomohiro; Komatsu, Norio; Noguchi, Masaaki

    2014-01-01

    The patient was a 47-year-old man diagnosed as having autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) in April 2011. He also had a congenital chromosomal abnormality, a balanced translocation. Treatment with prednisolone (PSL) 60 mg/day resulted in resolution of the AIHA, and the treatment was completed in November 2011. While the patient no longer had anemia, the direct and indirect Coombs tests remained positive. In May 2013, he developed recurrent AIHA associated with acute pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) and hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) caused by human parvovirus B19 (HPV B19) infection. Tests for anti-erythropoietin and anti-erythropoietin receptor antibodies were positive. Steroid pulse therapy resulted in resolution of the AIHA, PRCA, as well as HPS. The serum test for anti-erythropoietin antibodies also became negative after the treatment. However, although the serum was positive for anti-HPV B19 IgG antibodies, the patient continued to have a low CD4 lymphocyte count (CD4, <300/μL) and persistent HPV B19 infection (HPV B19 DNA remained positive), suggesting the risk of recurrence and bone marrow failure.

  14. Bone Marrow and Peripheral Blood Leptin Levels in Lymphoproliferative Diseases - Relation to the Bone Marrow Fat and Infiltration

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gaja, A.; Churý, Z.; Pecen, Ladislav; Fraňková, H.; Jandáková, H.; Hejlová, N.

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 5 (2000), s. 307-312 ISSN 0028-2685 Institutional research plan: AV0Z1030915 Keywords : leptin * bone marrow fat * bone marrow infiltration * lymphoproliferative disease Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.579, year: 2000

  15. The role of molecular analysis of immunoglobulin and T cell receptor gene rearrangements in the diagnosis of lymphoproliferative disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langerak, AW; van Krieken, JHJM; Wolvers-Tettero, ILM; Kerkhof, E; Mulder, AH; Vrints, LWMA; Coebergh, JW; Schuuring, E; Kluin, PM; van Dongen, JJM

    Aims-To investigate whether the analysis of immunoglobulin (Ig)/T cell receptor (TCR) rearrangements is useful in the diagnosis of lymphoproliferative disorders. Methods-In a series of 107 consecutive cases with initial suspicion of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), Southern blot (SB) analysis of Ig/TCR

  16. Treatment of the X-linked lymphoproliferative, Griscelli and Chédiak-Higashi syndromes by HLH directed therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trottestam, Helena; Beutel, Karin; Meeths, Marie

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Griscelli syndrome type 2 (GS2), the X-linked lymphoproliferative (XLP) and the Chédiak-Higashi (CHS) syndromes are diseases that all may develop hemophagocytic syndromes. We wanted to investigate whether the treatment protocols for hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) can also...

  17. Epstein-Barr Virus-Positive Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disease After Solid Organ Transplantation: Pathogenesis, Clinical Manifestations, Diagnosis, and Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijland, Marieke L.; Kersten, Marie José; Pals, Steven T.; Bemelman, Frederike J.; ten Berge, Ineke J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) is a potentially fatal complication after (solid organ) transplantation, which is highly associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). The EBV-specific cytotoxic T cell response that is essential in controlling the virus in healthy individuals is

  18. Effect of anti-CD 20 antibody rituximab in patients with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oertel, SHK; Verschuuren, E; Reinke, P; Zeidler, K; Papp-Vary, M; Babel, N; Trappe, RU; Jonas, S; Hummel, M; Anagnostopoulos, [No Value; Dorken, B; Riess, HB

    2005-01-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) are a life-threatening complication following solid organ transplantation. Treatment with rituximab, a humanized anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, has proved to be a promising approach and shown a low toxicity profile. Between February 1999 and April

  19. Gene therapy in nonhuman primate models of human autoimmune disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    t'Hart, B. A.; Vervoordeldonk, M.; Heeney, J. L.; Tak, P. P.

    2003-01-01

    Before autoimmune diseases in humans can be treated with gene therapy, the safety and efficacy of the used vectors must be tested in valid experimental models. Monkeys, such as the rhesus macaque or the common marmoset, provide such models. This publication reviews the state of the art in monkey

  20. Epigenetic alterations underlying autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslani, Saeed; Mahmoudi, Mahdi; Karami, Jafar; Jamshidi, Ahmad Reza; Malekshahi, Zahra; Nicknam, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Recent breakthroughs in genetic explorations have extended our understanding through discovery of genetic patterns subjected to autoimmune diseases (AID). Genetics, on the contrary, has not answered all the conundrums to describe a comprehensive explanation of causal mechanisms of disease etiopathology with regard to the function of environment, sex, or aging. The other side of the coin, epigenetics which is defined by gene manifestation modification without DNA sequence alteration, reportedly has come in to provide new insights towards disease apprehension through bridging the genetics and environmental factors. New investigations in genetic and environmental contributing factors for autoimmunity provide new explanation whereby the interactions between genetic elements and epigenetic modifications signed by environmental agents may be responsible for autoimmune disease initiation and perpetuation. It is aimed through this article to review recent progress attempting to reveal how epigenetics associates with the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases.

  1. [Stress and auto-immunity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delévaux, I; Chamoux, A; Aumaître, O

    2013-08-01

    The etiology of auto-immune disorders is multifactorial. Stress is probably a participating factor. Indeed, a high proportion of patients with auto-immune diseases report uncommon stress before disease onset or disease flare. The biological consequences of stress are increasingly well understood. Glucocorticoids and catecholamines released by hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis during stress will alter the balance Th1/Th2 and the balance Th17/Treg. Stress impairs cellular immunity, decreases immune tolerance and stimulates humoral immunity exposing individuals to autoimmune disease among others. The treatment for autoimmune disease should include stress management. Copyright © 2012 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Psoriasis as an autoimmune disease

    OpenAIRE

    Agnieszka Owczarczyk-Saczonek; Waldemar Placek

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays it is known that psoriasis belongs to the group of autoimmune diseases and may coexist with other diseases in this group. Most often patients have psoriatic arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmune thyroid diseases and multiple sclerosis. The coexistence of these disorders can be a diagnostic and therapeutic problem (there is controversy over the use of corticosteroids). The common pathogenesis is still not explained. We know that the loss of immunotole...

  3. Celiac disease and endocrine autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahaly, George J; Schuppan, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a small-intestinal inflammatory disease that is triggered by the ingestion of the storage proteins (gluten) of wheat, barley and rye. Endocrine autoimmunity is prevalent in patients with CD and their relatives. The genes that predispose to endocrine autoimmune diseases, e.g. type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroid diseases, and Addison's disease, i.e. DR3-DQ2 and DR4-DQ8, are also the major genetic determinants of CD, which is the best understood HLA-linked disease. Thus, up to 30% of first-degree relatives both of patients with CD and/or endocrine autoimmunity are affected by the other disease. In CD, certain gluten proteins bind with high affinity to HLA-DQ2 or -DQ8 in the small-intestinal mucosa, to activate gluten-specific T cells which are instrumental in the destruction of the resorptive villi. Here, the autoantigen tissue transglutaminase increases the T cell response by generating deamidated gluten peptides that bind more strongly to DQ2 or DQ8. Classical symptoms such as diarrhea and consequences of malabsorption like anemia and osteoporosis are often absent in patients with (screening-detected) CD, but this absence does not significantly affect these patients' incidence of endocrine autoimmunity. Moreover, once autoimmunity is established, a gluten-free diet is not able to induce remission. However, ongoing studies attempt to address how far a gluten-free diet may prevent or retard the development of CD and endocrine autoimmunity in children at risk. The close relationship between CD and endocrine autoimmunity warrants a broader immune genetic and endocrine screening of CD patients and their relatives. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Diagnostic and functional imaging of thymic and mediastinal involvement in lymphoproliferative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priola, Adriano Massimiliano; Galetto, Giorgio; Priola, Sandro Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Lymphoproliferative disorders of the anterior mediastinum may involve the thymus or lymph nodes as part of disseminated disease or as an isolated site. Imaging is crucial in managing patients with mediastinal lymphoma and is employed in pretreatment assessment, midtreatment evaluation of response, posttreatment restaging, and surveillance during follow-up. For decades, computed tomography (CT) has been the standard imaging technique, although in the last years, positron emission tomography (PET)-CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been introduced. We discuss the role of different imaging techniques in the assessment of patients with mediastinal lymphoma, focusing on novel aspects of PET-CT and diffusion-weighted/MRI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder in a Patient with Worsening Ascites after Liver Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsh D. Patel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD is a spectrum of diseases that involves abnormal lymphoid and/or plasmacytic proliferation in patients with solid organ or hematopoietic cell transplantation. It is a condition with a low incidence of 3.5–4.3% in liver transplant (LT recipients. This case involves a 63-year-old male with history of LT for chronic HCV induced cirrhosis who presented with abdominal distension related to worsening ascites. Cytological ascitic fluid analysis revealed EBV (+ malignant cells without a malignant focal point on imaging. Diagnosis of monomorphic PTLD with primary effusion lymphoma-like morphology and immunophenotype was established. This case highlights the complexity in diagnosis, different diagnostic modalities, and rare clinical presentations of PTLD.

  6. Diagnosis of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder in solid organ transplant recipients - BCSH and BTS Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Anne; Bowles, Kristin; Bradley, J Andrew; Emery, Vincent; Featherstone, Carrie; Gupte, Girish; Marcus, Robert; Parameshwar, Jayan; Ramsay, Alan; Newstead, Charles

    2010-06-01

    A joint working group established by the Haemato-oncology subgroup of the British Committee for Standards in Haematology (BCSH) and the British Transplantation Society (BTS) has reviewed the available literature and made recommendations for the diagnosis and management of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) in adult recipients of solid organ transplants. This review details the risk factors predisposing to development, initial features and diagnosis. It is important that the risk of developing PTLD is considered when using post transplant immunosuppression and that the appropriate investigations are carried out when there are suspicions of the diagnosis. These must include tissue for histology and computed tomography scan to assess the extent of disease. These recommendations have been made primarily for adult patients, there have been some comments made with regard to paediatric practice.

  7. Suppressed peripheral and placental blood lymphoproliferative responses in first pregnancies: relevance to malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasheed, F N; Bulmer, J N; Dunn, D T

    1993-01-01

    .003, and 190N P = 0.10). Reduced proliferative capacity of placental mononuclear cells may contribute to heavy parasite colonization of this organ. Proliferation to malarial and PPD but not Candida antigens was selectively suppressed in peripheral and placental blood of primiparae relative to multiparae (F32 P...... protein derivative [PPD]) were examined in the peripheral and placental blood of 102 Gambian women at the time of delivery. The lymphoproliferative responses of placental cells were poor to all antigens compared with those of peripheral blood (Candida P ... comparable among women of different parities and between peripheral and placental blood. Primigravidae may be more susceptible to malaria because of unique physiologic factors, such as higher levels of circulating immunosuppressive corticosteroids (P

  8. [Smoking and chronic autoimmune thyroiditis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzoianu, Ioana Cristina; Arghir, Oana Cristina; Circo, E

    2010-01-01

    The chronic autoimmune thyroiditis are heterogeneous entities by the functional, lesional and evolutive point of view. Ethiopathogenic factors involved in chronic autoimmune thyroiditis are genetical factors, combines with environmental factors, hormonal factors, infectious factors etc. The exact role of smoking on the autoimmune mechanism is unclear, but smoking is known to have an antithyroid effect. Our study tries to estimate the influence of smoking on serum levels of antithyroid peroxidase antibodies and antithyroglobulin antibodies, in a group of patients with various clinical forms of chronic autoimmune thyroiditis. We studied a group consists of 310 patients with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis, hospitalised in the Endocrinology Department of Constanta County Hospital, between January 2006 - December 2009. We detected serum values of antithyroidperoxidase antibodies and antithyroglobulin antibodies of our patients. We also followed the age, sex and presence of smoking in our study group. For statistical processing of the data we use Student's t-test. In our study group 24.28% of patients were smokers. Serum levels of antithyroid peroxidase antibodies were significantly increased (p < 0.001) in the smokers patients, compared with the nonsmokers patients. Serum levels of antithyroglobulin antibodies were significantly increased (p < 0.01) in smokers patients, compared with those who were nonsmokers. Smoking increased the serum levels of antithyroid antibodies in patients with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis.

  9. Use of flow cytometry in the diagnosis of lymphoproliferative disorders in fluid specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Gordon H; Vergara, Norge; Moore, Erika M; King, Rebecca L

    2014-08-01

    The diagnostic evaluation of fluid specimens, including serous effusions and cerebrospinal fluids (CSFs), can be challenging for a number of reasons. The evaluation of lymphoid proliferations in these specimens can be particularly problematic, given the frequent presence of coexisting inflammatory conditions and the manner in which these specimens are processed. As a result, immunophenotypic analysis of hematopoietic cell populations by flow cytometry has emerged as a useful ancillary study in the diagnosis of these specimens, both in patients with and without a previous history of a lymphoproliferative disorder. In this study, we review our experience with flow cytometry in fluid specimens over a four-year period. Flow cytometry was performed in 184 of 6,925 total cases (2.7% of all fluids). Flow cytometry was performed in 4.8% of pleural fluids (positive findings in 38%, negative in 40%, and atypical in 18%), 1.1% of peritoneal fluids (positive in 40%, negative in 50%, and atypical in 10%), 1.9% of pericardial fluids (positive in 67%, negative in 33%), and 1.9% of CSFs (positive in 23%, negative in 55%, atypical in 3%). The specimen submitted was inadequate for analysis in 9.2% of cases, most commonly with CSF specimens, but was not related to the volume of fluid submitted. Atypical flow cytometry findings and atypical morphologic findings in the context of negative flow cytometry results led to the definitive diagnosis of a lymphoproliferative disorder in a significant number of cases when repeat procedures and ancillary studies were performed. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in patients with advanced indolent lymphoproliferative disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Marcela Rojas Fonseca-Hial

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: The role of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for advanced indolent lymphoproliferative disorders remains to be established. OBJECTIVE: This paper aims to describe the results of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in patients with advanced indolent lymphoproliferative disorders. METHODS: This article reports on 29 adult patients submitted to allogeneic transplantations from 1997 to 2010. RESULTS: Most had follicular non-Hodgkin lymphoma (n = 14 or chronic lymphocytic leukemia (n = 12. The median age was 44 years (range: 24-53 years and 65% of patients were male. Only 21% had had access to rituximab and 45% to fludarabine. All had advanced disease (stage IV with partial response or stable disease. Most underwent myeloablative conditioning n = 17 - 59%. In this scenario, refractory disease was observed in seven (24% patients, the 100-day mortality rate was 17% (n = 5 and relapse occurred in four patients (18%. The main cause of death throughout the follow up was refractory disease in six of the 12 patients who died. Moderate and severe chronic graft-versus-host disease was frequent; about 41% of 24 patients analyzed. The overall survival rates and disease free survival at 42 months were 56.7% and 45.4%, respectively. According to Kaplan-Meyer analysis, the median time from diagnosis to transplant predicted the overall survival; however age, gender and conditioning regimen did not predict the prognosis. It was impossible to reach other conclusions because of the small sample size in this study. CONCLUSIONS: The role of allogeneic transplantations should be re-evaluated in the era of targeted therapy.

  11. Expression of proliferation markers and cell cycle regulators in T cell lymphoproliferative skin disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambichler, Thilo; Bischoff, Stefan; Bechara, Falk G; Altmeyer, Peter; Kreuter, Alexander

    2008-02-01

    Abnormal cell proliferation, which results from deregulation of the cell cycle, is fundamental in tumorigenesis. To investigate the expression of proliferation markers and cell cycle regulators in a range of T cell lymphoproliferative skin diseases. We studied skin specimens of 51 patients with parapsoriasis (PP), mycosis fungiodes (MF), or lymphomatoid papulosis (LyP). Immunohistochemistry was performed for Ki-67, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), minichromosome maintenance protein 7 (MCM7), and p21. MF with stage IIB-IV and LyP showed a significantly greater number of Ki-67-positive cells than PP (P=0.02 and 0.001) and MF I-IIA (P=0.019 and 0.003), respectively. MCM7 staining revealed significantly higher labeling indices for MF IIB-IV and LyP when compared to PP (P=0.002 and 0.04) and MF I-IIA (P=0.0005 and 0.01), respectively. Compared to PP and MF I-IIA, MF IIB-IV was associated with significantly higher labeling indices for PCNA (P=0.006 and 0.0004). p21 staining was significantly increased in MF IIB-IV and LyP when compared to PP (P=0.006 and 0.003) and MF I-IIA (P=0.003). However, p21 staining was all in all very weak. Ki-67 and PCNA seem to be useful immunohistological parameters for the correlation with the clinical stage of MF. In the differentiation and prognostication of T cell lymphoproliferative skin disorders, MCM7 may serve as a novel biomarker which is, in contrast to Ki-67 and PCNA, stable throughout the cell cycle.

  12. EBV-positive mucocutaneous ulcer in organ transplant recipients: a localized indolent posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Melissa; Thakral, Beenu; Yohe, Sophia; Balfour, Henry H; Singh, Charanjeet; Spears, Michael; McKenna, Robert W

    2014-11-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive mucocutaneous ulcer (EBV MCU) is a B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder occurring in elderly or iatrogenic immunocompromised patients. It has not been reported in solid organ transplant recipients. We observed 7 patients with EBV MCU in a cohort of 70 transplant recipients with EBV posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD). Transplants included: 5 renal, 1 heart, and 1 lung. Median patient age was 61; 5 were male. EBV MCU was observed in oral mucosa in 4 and gastrointestinal tract in 3. Duration of immunosuppressive therapy before EBV MCU was 0.6 to 13 years. Ulcers were undermined by inflammatory cells and polymorphic or monomorphic large cell lymphoproliferation. Reed-Sternberg-like cells were present in 5/7. Large B cells were CD20, CD30, and EBV-encoded RNA positive in all cases. Diagnosis in 3 recent patients was EBV MCU; 4 patients diagnosed before familiarity with EBV MCU were classified as monomorphic large cell (n=3) and polymorphic (n=1) PTLD. None of the patients had EBV DNA in their blood (<1000 copies/mL) at diagnosis or follow-up versus 35/44 transplant patients with systemic PTLD (P<0.001). All lesions resolved with reduced immunosuppression (7/7), change in immunosuppression (2/7), and rituximab (3/7). Five patients are living: 4 healthy, 1 awaiting second renal transplant. Two patients died 3 and 5 years after resolution of EBV MCU. No patient recurred with EBV MCU or other PTLDs. EBV MCU mimics more aggressive categories of PTLD but lacks EBV DNA in blood, which may be a useful distinguishing feature. Lesions are likely to resolve with conservative management. Awareness of EBV MCU in the posttransplant setting is necessary for appropriate diagnosis and treatment.

  13. Nitrosative stress and nitrated proteins in trichloroethene-mediated autoimmunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gangduo Wang

    Full Text Available Exposure to trichloroethene (TCE, a ubiquitous environmental contaminant, has been linked to a variety of autoimmune diseases (ADs including SLE, scleroderma and hepatitis. Mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of ADs are largely unknown. Earlier studies from our laboratory in MRL+/+ mice suggested the contribution of oxidative/nitrosative stress in TCE-induced autoimmunity, and N-acetylcysteine (NAC supplementation provided protection by attenuating oxidative stress. This study was undertaken to further evaluate the contribution of nitrosative stress in TCE-mediated autoimmunity and to identify proteins susceptible to nitrosative stress. Groups of female MRL +/+ mice were given TCE, NAC or TCE + NAC for 6 weeks (TCE, 10 mmol/kg, i.p., every 4th day; NAC, ∼ 250 mg/kg/day via drinking water. TCE exposure led to significant increases in serum anti-nuclear and anti-histone antibodies together with significant induction of iNOS and increased formation of nitrotyrosine (NT in sera and livers. Proteomic analysis identified 14 additional nitrated proteins in the livers of TCE-treated mice. Furthermore, TCE exposure led to decreased GSH levels and increased activation of NF-κB. Remarkably, NAC supplementation not only ameliorated TCE-induced nitrosative stress as evident from decreased iNOS, NT, nitrated proteins, NF-κB p65 activation and increased GSH levels, but also the markers of autoimmunity, as evident from decreased levels of autoantibodies in the sera. These findings provide support to the role of nitrosative stress in TCE-mediated autoimmune response and identify specific nitrated proteins which could have autoimmune potential. Attenuation of TCE-induced autoimmunity in mice by NAC provides an approach for designing therapeutic strategies.

  14. A Case of Peripheral Ulcerative Keratitis Associated with Autoimmune Hepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamoon Eshraghi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To describe a case of peripheral ulcerative keratitis in the setting of autoimmune hepatitis and possible overlap syndrome with primary sclerosing cholangitis. Case Report. A 48-year-old African American female with autoimmune hepatitis with possible overlap syndrome with primary sclerosing cholangitis presented with tearing, irritation, and injection of the left eye that was determined to be peripheral ulcerative keratitis. The patient was treated with topical and systemic steroids, immunosuppressant drugs (azathioprine and mycophenolate mofetil, a biologic (rituximab, and surgery (conjunctival resection, and the peripheral ulcerative keratitis epithelialized but ultimately led to corneal perforation. Conclusion. In this unique case, a patient with peripheral ulcerative keratitis who underwent treatment ultimately had a corneal perforation. This case may suggest a possible relationship between autoimmune hepatitis and peripheral ulcerative keratitis.

  15. Small intestinal involvement by lymphoproliferative disorders post-renal transplantation: A report from the post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder international survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Khedmat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, data on post-renal transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD collected from the existing literature were pooled and analyzed to compare the characteristics, predictors and prognosis of small intestinal PTLDs. We performed a comprehensive search for the available data by Pubmed and Google scholar search engines for reports on this subject. Data from 18 previously published studies, comprising 120 renal allograft recipients, were included in the analysis. Renal transplant recipients with intestinal PTLD were significantly less likely to have Hogkin′s and Hogkin′s-like lesions (P = 0.044 and to be younger at the time of transplan-tation (P = 0.07. Except for Hodgkin′s-like lesions, histopathological evaluations elsewhere were comparable between the group with PTLD in the small intestine and age- and sex-matched renal transplant recipients with PTLD in other sites. The overall mortality was relatively higher in the control group (P = 0.09. When death only due to PTLD was used as the outcome, a trend toward better outcome was seen for the intestinal PTLD group compared with the other localizations (P = 0.1. The 1- and 5-year survival rates for intestinal PTLD patients were 57% and 37%, respectively, compared with 54% and 21%, respectively, for the control group. According to our findings based on analysis of international data, renal transplant patients with small intestinal PTLD are more likely to be of younger age but less frequently represent Hodgkin′s and Hodgkin′s-like lesions. They also have better patient survival compared with transplant recipients with PTLD in other locations. Further multi-center prospective studies are needed to confirm our results.

  16. Understanding mechanisms of autoimmunity through translational research in vitiligo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strassner, James P; Harris, John E

    2016-01-01

    Vitiligo is an autoimmune disease of the skin that leads to life-altering depigmentation and remains difficult to treat. However, clinical observations and translational studies over 30-40 years have led to the development of an insightful working model of disease pathogenesis: Genetic risk spanning both immune and melanocyte functions is pushed over a threshold by known and suspected environmental factors to initiate autoimmune T cell-mediated killing of melanocytes. While under cellular stress, melanocytes appear to signal innate immunity to activate T cells. Once the autoimmune T cell response is established, the IFN-γ-STAT1-CXCL10 signaling axis becomes the primary inflammatory pathway driving both progression and maintenance of vitiligo. This pathway is a tempting target for both existing and developing pharmaceuticals, but further detailing how melanocytes signal their own demise may also lead to new therapeutic targets. Research in vitiligo may be the future key to understand the pathogenesis of organ-specific autoimmunity, as vitiligo is common, reversible, progresses over the life of the individual, has been relatively well-defined, and is quite easy to study using translational and clinical approaches. What is revealed in these studies can lead to innovative treatments and also help elucidate the principles that underlie similar organ-specific autoimmune diseases, especially in cases where the target organ is less accessible. PMID:27764715

  17. Combined treatment with lisofylline and exendin-4 reverses autoimmune diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zandong; Chen Meng; Carter, Jeffrey D.; Nunemaker, Craig S.; Garmey, James C.; Kimble, Sarah D.; Nadler, Jerry L.

    2006-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is an autoimmune disease leading to near complete pancreatic β-cell destruction. New evidence suggests that β-cell regeneration is possible, but ongoing autoimmune damage prevents restoration of β-cell mass. We tested the hypothesis that simultaneously blocking autoimmune cytokine damage and supplying a growth-promoting stimulus for β-cells would provide a novel approach to reverse T1DM. Therefore, in this study we combined lisofylline to suppress autoimmunity and exendin-4 to enhance β-cell proliferation for treating autoimmune-mediated diabetes in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model. We found that this combined therapy effectively reversed new-onset diabetes within a week of therapy, and even maintained euglycemia up to 145 days after treatment withdrawal. The therapeutic effect of this regimen was associated with improved β-cell metabolism and insulin secretion, while reducing β-cell apoptosis. It is possible that such combined therapy could become a new strategy to defeat T1DM in humans

  18. Use of Rituximab in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia Associated with Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fozza, Claudio; Longinotti, Maurizio

    2011-01-01

    The association between non-Hodgkin lymphomas and autoimmune disorders is a well-known event. Also autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AHA), although much more frequent in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), has been described in this group of patients. In recent years, among the more traditional therapeutic options, rituximab, an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, has shown interesting results in the treatment of primary AHA. Although this drug has been frequently used for AHA in patients with CLL, much less data are available on its use in NHL patients. However, considering that the main pathogenetic mechanism of AHA in course of lymphoproliferative disorders seems to be an antibody production directly or indirectly mediated by the neoplastic clone, this monoclonal antibody represents an ideal therapeutic approach. In this paper we will briefly describe some biological and clinical features of NHL-patients with AHA. We will then analyze some studies focusing on rituximab in primary AHA, finally reviewing the available literature on the use of this drug in NHL related AHA. PMID:21547266

  19. AUTOIMMUNE EPIDERMAL BLISTERING DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune bullous skin diseases (ABDs are uncommon, potentially fatal diseases of skin and mucous membranes which are associated with deposits of autoantibodies and complement against distinct molecules of the epidermis and dermal/epidermal basement membrane zone (BMZ. These autoantibodies lead to a loss in skin molecular integrity, which manifests clinically as formation of blisters or erosions. In pemphigus vulgaris, loss of adhesion occurs within the epidermis. The pioneering work of Ernst H. Beutner, Ph.D. and Robert E. Jordon, M.D. confirmed the autoimmune nature of these diseases. Walter F. Lever, M.D. contributed significantly to our understanding of the histopathologic features of these diseases. Walter Lever, M.D. and Ken Hashimoto, M.D. contributed electron microscopic studies of these diseases, especially in pemphigus vulgaris and bullous pemphigoid. In bullous pemphigoid (BP, linear IgA bullous dermatosis, epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA and dermatitis herpetiformis (DH, loss of adhesion takes place within or underneath the BMZ. Classic EBA demonstrates extensive skin fragility; DH is commonly associated with gluten-sensitive enteropathy, and manifests clinically with pruritic papulovesicles on the extensor surfaces of the extremities and the lumbosacral area. The clinical spectrum of bullous pemphigoid includes tense blisters, urticarial plaques, and prurigo-like eczematous lesions. Pemphigoid gestationis mostly occurs during the last trimester of pregnancy, and mucous membrane pemphigoid primarily involves the oral mucosa and conjunctivae and leads to scarring. Linear IgA bullous dermatosis manifests with tense blisters in a „cluster of jewels”-like pattern in childhood (chronic bullous disease of childhood and is more clinically heterogeneous in adulthood. Many of the autoantigens in these disorders are known and have been well characterized. ABDs may be influenced by both genetic and exogenous factors. The diagnoses of

  20. Autoimmune hepatitis in association with lymphocytic colitis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cronin, Edmond M

    2012-02-03

    Autoimmune hepatitis is a rare, chronic inflammatory disorder which has been associated with a number of other auto-immune conditions. However, there are no reports in the medical literature of an association with microscopic (lymphocytic) colitis. We report the case of a 53-year-old woman with several autoimmune conditions, including lymphocytic colitis, who presented with an acute hepatitis. On the basis of the clinical features, serology, and histopathology, we diagnosed autoimmune hepatitis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of autoimmune hepatitis in association with lymphocytic colitis, and lends support to the theory of an autoimmune etiology for lymphocytic colitis.

  1. Autoimmune diseases and pregnancy: analysis of a series of cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Vânia; Mesquita, Alexandra; Capela, Carlos

    2015-06-04

    An autoimmune disease is characterized by tissue damage, caused by self-reactivity of different effector mechanisms of the immune system, namely antibodies and T cells. All autoimmune diseases, to some extent, have implications for fertility and obstetrics. Currently, due to available treatments and specialised care for pregnant women with autoimmune disease, the prognosis for both mother and child has improved significantly. However these pregnancies are always high risk. The purpose of this study is to analyse the fertility/pregnancy process of women with systemic and organ-specific autoimmune diseases and assess pathological and treatment implications. The authors performed an analysis of the clinical records and relevant obstetric history of five patients representing five distinct autoimmune pathological scenarios, selected from Autoimmune Disease Consultation at the Hospital of Braga, and reviewed the literature. The five clinical cases are the following: Case 1-28 years old with systemic lupus erythematosus, and clinical remission of the disease, under medication with hydroxychloroquine, prednisolone and acetylsalicylic acid, with incomplete miscarriage at 7 weeks of gestation without signs of thrombosis. Case 2-44 years old with history of two late miscarriages, a single preterm delivery (33 weeks) and multiple thrombotic events over the years, was diagnosed with antiphospholipid syndrome after acute myocardial infarction. Case 3-31 years old with polymyositis, treated with azathioprine for 3 years with complete remission of the disease, took the informed decision to get pregnant after medical consultation and full weaning from azathioprine, and gave birth to a healthy term new-born. Case 4-38 years old pregnant woman developed Behcet's syndrome during the final 15 weeks of gestation and with disease exacerbation after delivery. Case 5-36 years old with autoimmune thyroiditis diagnosed during her first pregnancy, with difficult control over the thyroid

  2. PTEN and PI-3 kinase inhibitors control LPS signaling and the lymphoproliferative response in the CD19+ B cell compartment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Alok R.; Peirce, Susan K.; Joshi, Shweta; Durden, Donald L.

    2014-01-01

    Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), e.g. toll receptors (TLRs) that bind ligands within the microbiome have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cancer. LPS is a ligand for two TLR family members, TLR4 and RP105 which mediate LPS signaling in B cell proliferation and migration. Although LPS/TLR/RP105 signaling is well-studied; our understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms controlling these PRR signaling pathways remains incomplete. Previous studies have demonstrated a role for PTEN/PI-3K signaling in B cell selection and survival, however a role for PTEN/PI-3K in TLR4/RP105/LPS signaling in the B cell compartment has not been reported. Herein, we crossed a CD19cre and PTEN fl/fl mouse to generate a conditional PTEN knockout mouse in the CD19+ B cell compartment. These mice were further crossed with an IL-14α transgenic mouse to study the combined effect of PTEN deletion, PI-3K inhibition and expression of IL-14α (a cytokine originally identified as a B cell growth factor) in CD19+ B cell lymphoproliferation and response to LPS stimulation. Targeted deletion of PTEN and directed expression of IL-14α in the CD19+ B cell compartment (IL-14+PTEN-/-) lead to marked splenomegaly and altered spleen morphology at baseline due to expansion of marginal zone B cells, a phenotype that was exaggerated by treatment with the B cell mitogen and TLR4/RP105 ligand, LPS. Moreover, LPS stimulation of CD19+ cells isolated from these mice display increased proliferation, augmented AKT and NFκB activation as well as increased expression of c-myc and cyclinD1. Interestingly, treatment of LPS treated IL-14+PTEN-/- mice with a pan PI-3K inhibitor, SF1126, reduced splenomegaly, cell proliferation, c-myc and cyclin D1 expression in the CD19+ B cell compartment and normalized the splenic histopathologic architecture. These findings provide the direct evidence that PTEN and PI-3K inhibitors control TLR4/RP105/LPS signaling in the CD19+ B cell compartment and that pan PI-3

  3. PTEN and PI-3 kinase inhibitors control LPS signaling and the lymphoproliferative response in the CD19+ B cell compartment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Alok R. [UCSD Department of Pediatrics, Moores UCSD Cancer Center, University of California School of Medicine, San Diego, CA 92093 (United States); Peirce, Susan K. [Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Joshi, Shweta [UCSD Department of Pediatrics, Moores UCSD Cancer Center, University of California School of Medicine, San Diego, CA 92093 (United States); Durden, Donald L., E-mail: ddurden@ucsd.edu [UCSD Department of Pediatrics, Moores UCSD Cancer Center, University of California School of Medicine, San Diego, CA 92093 (United States); Division of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, UCSD Rady Children' s Hospital, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2014-09-10

    Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), e.g. toll receptors (TLRs) that bind ligands within the microbiome have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cancer. LPS is a ligand for two TLR family members, TLR4 and RP105 which mediate LPS signaling in B cell proliferation and migration. Although LPS/TLR/RP105 signaling is well-studied; our understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms controlling these PRR signaling pathways remains incomplete. Previous studies have demonstrated a role for PTEN/PI-3K signaling in B cell selection and survival, however a role for PTEN/PI-3K in TLR4/RP105/LPS signaling in the B cell compartment has not been reported. Herein, we crossed a CD19cre and PTEN{sup fl/fl} mouse to generate a conditional PTEN knockout mouse in the CD19+ B cell compartment. These mice were further crossed with an IL-14α transgenic mouse to study the combined effect of PTEN deletion, PI-3K inhibition and expression of IL-14α (a cytokine originally identified as a B cell growth factor) in CD19+ B cell lymphoproliferation and response to LPS stimulation. Targeted deletion of PTEN and directed expression of IL-14α in the CD19+ B cell compartment (IL-14+PTEN-/-) lead to marked splenomegaly and altered spleen morphology at baseline due to expansion of marginal zone B cells, a phenotype that was exaggerated by treatment with the B cell mitogen and TLR4/RP105 ligand, LPS. Moreover, LPS stimulation of CD19+ cells isolated from these mice display increased proliferation, augmented AKT and NFκB activation as well as increased expression of c-myc and cyclinD1. Interestingly, treatment of LPS treated IL-14+PTEN-/- mice with a pan PI-3K inhibitor, SF1126, reduced splenomegaly, cell proliferation, c-myc and cyclin D1 expression in the CD19+ B cell compartment and normalized the splenic histopathologic architecture. These findings provide the direct evidence that PTEN and PI-3K inhibitors control TLR4/RP105/LPS signaling in the CD19+ B cell compartment and that pan PI

  4. Systemic Epstein-Barr Virus-positive T-Cell Lymphoproliferative Disease of Childhood With Good Response to Steroid Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do-Hoon; Kim, Myungshin; Kim, Yonggoo; Han, Kyungja; Han, Eunhee; Lee, Jae Wook; Chung, Nack-Gyun; Cho, Bin

    2017-11-01

    Systemic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disease of childhood is a rare disease and has a very fulminant clinical course with high mortality. A 21-month-old female patient was referred to our hospital with a 1 week history of fever and was subsequently diagnosed with systemic Epstein-Barr virus-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disease of childhood. After starting treatment with dexamethasone, she showed early defervescence and improvement of laboratory parameters, and has remained disease-free after stopping steroid treatment, although longer follow-up is necessary. Our report underscores the possibility that this disease entity may be heterogenous in terms of prognosis.

  5. Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zen, Yoh; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P; Kawa, Shigeyuki

    2011-12-07

    Before the concept of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) was established, this form of pancreatitis had been recognized as lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis or non-alcoholic duct destructive chronic pancreatitis based on unique histological features. With the discovery in 2001 that serum IgG4 concentrations are specifically elevated in AIP patients, this emerging entity has been more widely accepted. Classical cases of AIP are now called type 1 as another distinct subtype (type 2 AIP) has been identified. Type 1 AIP, which accounts for 2% of chronic pancreatitis cases, predominantly affects adult males. Patients usually present with obstructive jaundice due to enlargement of the pancreatic head or thickening of the lower bile duct wall. Pancreatic cancer is the leading differential diagnosis for which serological, imaging, and histological examinations need to be considered. Serologically, an elevated level of IgG4 is the most sensitive and specific finding. Imaging features include irregular narrowing of the pancreatic duct, diffuse or focal enlargement of the pancreas, a peri-pancreatic capsule-like rim, and enhancement at the late phase of contrast-enhanced images. Biopsy or surgical specimens show diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration containing many IgG4+ plasma cells, storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis. A dramatic response to steroid therapy is another characteristic, and serological or radiological effects are normally identified within the first 2 or 3 weeks. Type 1 AIP is estimated as a pancreatic manifestation of systemic IgG4-related disease based on the fact that synchronous or metachronous lesions can develop in multiple organs (e.g. bile duct, salivary/lacrimal glands, retroperitoneum, artery, lung, and kidney) and those lesions are histologically identical irrespective of the organ of origin. Several potential autoantigens have been identified so far. A Th2-dominant immune reaction and the activation of regulatory T-cells are assumed

  6. Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zen Yoh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Before the concept of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP was established, this form of pancreatitis had been recognized as lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis or non-alcoholic duct destructive chronic pancreatitis based on unique histological features. With the discovery in 2001 that serum IgG4 concentrations are specifically elevated in AIP patients, this emerging entity has been more widely accepted. Classical cases of AIP are now called type 1 as another distinct subtype (type 2 AIP has been identified. Type 1 AIP, which accounts for 2% of chronic pancreatitis cases, predominantly affects adult males. Patients usually present with obstructive jaundice due to enlargement of the pancreatic head or thickening of the lower bile duct wall. Pancreatic cancer is the leading differential diagnosis for which serological, imaging, and histological examinations need to be considered. Serologically, an elevated level of IgG4 is the most sensitive and specific finding. Imaging features include irregular narrowing of the pancreatic duct, diffuse or focal enlargement of the pancreas, a peri-pancreatic capsule-like rim, and enhancement at the late phase of contrast-enhanced images. Biopsy or surgical specimens show diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration containing many IgG4+ plasma cells, storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis. A dramatic response to steroid therapy is another characteristic, and serological or radiological effects are normally identified within the first 2 or 3 weeks. Type 1 AIP is estimated as a pancreatic manifestation of systemic IgG4-related disease based on the fact that synchronous or metachronous lesions can develop in multiple organs (e.g. bile duct, salivary/lacrimal glands, retroperitoneum, artery, lung, and kidney and those lesions are histologically identical irrespective of the organ of origin. Several potential autoantigens have been identified so far. A Th2-dominant immune reaction and the activation of

  7. Autoimmune pancreatitis. An update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmberger, T.

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare disease, the pathophysiological understanding of which has been greatly improved over the last years. The most common form, type 1 AIP belongs to the IgG4-related diseases and must be distinguished from type 2 AIP, which is a much rarer entity associated with chronic inflammatory bowel disease. Clinically, there is an overlap with pancreatic cancer. Imaging and further criteria, such as serological and histological parameters are utilized for a differentiation between both entities in order to select the appropriate therapy and to avoid the small but ultimately unnecessary number of pancreatectomies. The diagnostics of AIP are complex, whereby the consensus criteria of the International Association of Pancreatology have become accepted as the parameters for discrimination. These encompass five cardinal criteria and one therapeutic criterion. By applying these criteria AIP can be diagnosed with a sensitivity of 84.9 %, a specificity of 100 % and an accuracy of 93.8 %. The diagnosis of AIP is accomplished by applying several parameters of which two relate to imaging. As for the routine diagnostics of the pancreas these are ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Important for the differential diagnosis is the exclusion of signs of local and remote tumor spread for which CT and MRI are established. The essential diagnostic parameter of histology necessitates sufficient sample material, which cannot usually be acquired by a fine needle biopsy. CT or MRI are the reference standard methods for identification of the optimal puncture site and imaging-assisted (TruCut) biopsy. In patients presenting with unspecific upper abdominal pain, painless jaundice combined with the suspicion of a pancreatic malignancy in imaging but a mismatch of secondary signs of malignancy, AIP should also be considered as a differential diagnosis. As the diagnosis of AIP only partially relies on imaging radiologists also

  8. [Drug-induced autoimmune hemolytic anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homberg, J C

    1999-04-03

    AUTOANTIBODY PRODUCTION: The production of autoantibodies can only occur if immune tolerance is circumvented. Thus drug-induced autoimmune hemolytic anemia requires that the drug have an effect on both autoantigens and on the immune system. AN EXAMPLE, METHYLDOPA: Methyldopa is a hypotensive agent which induces major production of anti-Rh IgG anti-erythrocyte autoantibodies, anti-nuclear antibodies and anti-actin antibodies. These autoantibodies generally appear 6 months after treatment onset and are observed in 20% of treated patients. Hemolysis is however exceptional and is only clinically or biologically perceptible in 1 to 2% of the patients who become immunized. Induced lupus has been reported as have been several dozen cases of drug-induced hepatitis with anti-actin autoantibodies. DRUGS INDUCING HEMOLYTIC ANEMIA: Besides methyldopa, other drugs known to induce hemolytic anemia include levodopa used for Parkinson's disease, mefenamic acid, a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug, interferon-alpha, used in chronic viral hepatitis, cyclosporin used for the prevention of graft rejection and the treatment of certain autoimmune diseases, and fludarabin, used in chronic lymphoid leukemia. If there is no clinical or biological expression, the drug can be continued, excepting fludarabin where regular controls are needed. If hemolytic anemia is patent, the drug must be discontinued, transfusion and corticosteroid therapy should be envisaged.

  9. Shaking Out Clues to Autoimmune Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... into how an immune cell involved in several autoimmune disorders is regulated. Among their findings was a potential ... but they’ve also been linked with several autoimmune disorders. Th17 cells, along with other types of helper ...

  10. Multiple autoimmune syndrome with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpreet, Singh; Deepak, Jain; Kiran, B

    Multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS) is a condition characterised by three or more autoimmune disorders in a same individual. Familial, immunologic and infectious factors are implicated in the development of MAS. Here we report a case of a 32-year-old woman with co-existence of four auto-immune diseases, namely autoimmune hypothyroidism, Sjögren's syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and celiac disease which leads to the final diagnosis of multiple autoimmune syndrome type 3 with celiac disease. Patients with single autoimmune disorder are at 25% risk of developing other autoimmune disorders. The present case emphasises to clinicians that there is a need for continued surveillance for the development of new autoimmune disease in predisposed patients.

  11. [Therapeutic options for autoimmune encephalomyelitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisow, N; Prüss, H; Paul, F

    2013-04-01

    Autoantibodies to neuronal tissue are becoming increasingly more important in the evaluation and classification of several neurological diseases, e.g. neuromyelitis optica, paraneoplastic syndromes of the central nervous system (CNS), stiff person syndrome or autoimmune epilepsy. As these disorders are rare, no evidence-based recommendations for therapy are available. Currently, immunomodulating or immunosuppressive drugs are administered in most cases. In paraneoplastic syndromes treatment of the underlying cancer is of considerable importance. This overview summarizes current experiences and recommendations in the treatment of autoimmune neurological disorders.

  12. Angioedema adquirido autoimune de difícil controle em paciente com lúpus eritematoso sistêmico Intractable acquired autoimmune angioedema in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilson Furlanetto Junior

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available O angioedema adquirido é causado por diferentes medicamentos e doenças linfoproliferativas, e tem sido raramente relacionado com a presença de doenças autoimunes. Descrevemos aqui uma paciente de 47 anos com lúpus eritematoso sistêmico (LES com envolvimento cutâneo importante que desenvolveu angioedema recorrente localizado em face incluindo lábios e pálpebras, membros superiores e tórax, não acompanhado de urticária e com dosagem do inibidor de C1 esterase reduzida. A utilização de antimaláricos, glicocorticoides e pulsoterapia com metilprednisolona associada ao uso de azatioprina não determinou melhora. A paciente utilizou também danazol sem sucesso, e apresentou resposta clínica somente após ter sido submetida a múltiplas sessões de plasmaferese, ocorrendo inclusive resolução de extenso angioedema na mucosa do trato gastrointestinal.Acquired angioedema is caused by different drugs and lymphoproliferative diseases, and rarely it has also been related to the presence of auto-immune disorders. We report the case of a 47 year old female with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and severe cutaneous involvement who developed recurrent localized angioedema of the face, including lips and eye lids, upper limbs, and thorax, not associated with urticaria, and with reduced levels of C1 esterase inhibitor. Treatment with antimalarials, glucocorticoids, and pulse therapy with methylprednisolone associated with azathioprine did not improve her condition. The patient was also unsuccessfully treated with danazol, and she only showed clinical response after several sessions of plasmapheresis, including resolution of the extensive edema of the gastrointestinal tract.

  13. Very late onset lymphoproliferative disorders occurring over 10 years post-renal transplantation: PTLD.Int. Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khedmat, Hossein; Taheri, Saeed

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of the significance of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) that occur "very late" or more 10 years after renal transplantation is limited. thus, we analysed and compared characteristics and prognosis of the disease in renal transplant patients with very late onset PTLD vs. early- and late-onset PTLD. Retrospective study of data obtained from comprehensive search of medical literature We searched for available data using the Pubmed and Google scholar search engines for reports of lymphoproliferative disorders occurring in renal transplant patients by disease presentation time. We analyzed data from 27 studies that included 303 patients with lymphoproliferative disorders after renal transplantation. Renal graft recipients with very late onset PTLD were significantly less likely to be under mycophenolate mofetil (MMF)- and/or tacrolimus (FK-506) (vs. azathioprine) -based immunosuppression (P=.035) and less likely to have a history of antibody induction immunosuppression (P.1 for all). Older renal transplant patients are at increased risk for development of very late onset PTLD, and should be strictly followed. further multi-institutional prospective studies are needed to confirm our results.

  14. Treatment of post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders after kidney transplant with rituximab and conversion to m-TOR inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto-Rios, John Fredy; Gómez de Los Ríos, Sandra Milena; Serna-Higuita, Lina María; Ocampo-Kohn, Catalina; Aristizabal-Alzate, Arbey; Gálvez-Cárdenas, Kenny Mauricio; Zuluaga-Valencia, Gustavo Adolfo

    2016-12-30

    Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders are serious complications of organ transplantation which treatment is not yet standardized. To describe the clinical response, overall and graft survival of patients in our center with this complication after kidney transplantation, which received rituximab as part of their treatment as well as conversion to m-TOR. Retrospective study, which included patients, diagnosed with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders after kidney transplantation from January 2011 to July 2014. Eight cases were found with a wide spectrum of clinical presentations. Most had monomorphic histology, 85% were associated with Epstein-Barr virus, 25% of patients had tumor involvement of the renal graft, and 12.5% ​​had primary central nervous system lymphoma. All patients were managed with reduction of immunosuppression, conversion to m-TOR (except one who lost the graft at diagnosis) and rituximab-based therapy. The overall response rate was 87.5% (62.5% complete response, 25% partial response). Survival was 87.5% with a median follow-up of 34 months. An additional patient lost the graft, with chronic nephropathy already known. All the remaining patients had stable renal function. There are no standardized treatment regimens for lymphoproliferative disorders after kidney transplantation, but these patients can be managed successfully with reduction of immunosuppression, conversion to m-TOR and rituximab-based schemes.

  15. An autosomal locus causing autoimmune disease: Autoimmune polyglandular disease type I assigned to chromosome 21

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Aaltonen (Johanna); P. Björses (Petra); L.A. Sandkuijl (Lodewijk); J. Perheentupa (Jaakko); L. Peltonen (Leena Johanna)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractAutoimmune polyglandular disease type I (APECED) is an autosomal recessive autoimmune disease characterized by a variable combination of the failure of the endocrine glands. The pathogenesis of this unique autoimmune disease is unknown; unlike many other autoimmune diseases, APECED does

  16. Correlation between flow cytometry and histologic findings: ten year experience in the investigation of lymphoproliferative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alanna Mara Pinheiro Sobreira Bezerra

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To demonstrate the advantages of correlatingflow cytometry immunophenotyping with the pathology/immunohistochemistry of lymph nodes or nodules in the diagnosisof lymphoproliferative diseases. Methods: A retrospective studywas carried out of 157 biopsy or fine-needle aspiration lymph nodes/nodule specimens taken from 142 patients, from 1999 and 2009.The specimens were simultaneously studied with flow cytometryand pathology at Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein. The specimenswere prepared in hematoxylin/eosin, Giemsa, or monoclonal antibodystained slides for detecting specific antibodies for the purposesof pathology/immunohistochemical analysis. The samples werehemolyzed and marked with different monoclonal antibody panels fordifferent antigens in flow cytometry immunophenotyping. Results:The diagnostic results of pathology/immunohistochemical studiesand flow cytometry immunophenotyping agreed in 115 patients(81%, corresponding to 127 specimens, as follows according tothe pathologic diagnosis: 63 patients with non-Hodgkin’s B-celllymphoma; 26 patients with reactive lymphoid hyperplasia; 5 patientswith non-Hodgkin’s T-cell lymphoma; 4 patients with atypical lymphoidproliferation; 5 patients with a chronic granulomatous inflammatoryprocess; 5 patients with a non-hematologic diagnosis; 2 patientswith granulocytic sarcoma; 2 patients with thymoma; 1 patientwith byphenotypic leukemia; 1 patient with kappa plasmocytoma;1 patient with Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Subtypes of lymphomas couldbe classified by associating the two techniques: 19 patients withfollicular lymphoma; 15 patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma; 7patients with small lymphocytic B-cell lymphoma/chronic lymphocyticleukemia; 3 patients with mantle cell lymphoma; 1 patient withBurkitt’s lymphoma; 1 patient with MALT type lymphoma; 1 patientwith post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease; 2 patients with highgrade non-Hodgkin’s B-cell lymphoma; 1 patient with low grade

  17. A minimum number of autoimmune T cells to induce autoimmunity?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bosch, A.J.T.; Bolinger, B.; Keck, S.; Štěpánek, Ondřej; Ozga, A.J.; Galati-Fournier, V.; Stein, J.V.; Palmer, E.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 316, jaro (2017), s. 21-31 ISSN 0008-8749 R&D Projects: GA ČR GJ16-09208Y Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : T cell * Tolerance * Autoimmunity Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Immunology Impact factor: 3.172, year: 2016

  18. Hypogonadism and the risk of rheumatic autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillargeon, Jacques; Al Snih, Soham; Raji, Mukaila A; Urban, Randall J; Sharma, Gulshan; Sheffield-Moore, Melinda; Lopez, David S; Baillargeon, Gwen; Kuo, Yong-Fang

    2016-12-01

    Testosterone deficiency has been linked with autoimmune disease and an increase in inflammatory markers, such as C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor, and interleukin-6 (IL-6). However, no large-scale longitudinal studies have examined this association. We examined whether untreated hypogonadism was associated with an increased risk of rheumatic autoimmune disease in a large nationally representative cohort. Using one of the nation's largest commercial insurance databases, we conducted a retrospective cohort study in which we identified 123,460 men diagnosed with hypogonadism between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2014 and with no prior history of rheumatic autoimmune disease. We matched this cohort to 370,380 men without hypogonadism, at a 1 to 3 ratio, on age and index/diagnosis date. All patients were followed until December 31, 2014 or until they lost insurance coverage or were diagnosed with a rheumatic autoimmune disease. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to calculate adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs). Untreated hypogonadism was associated with an increased risk of developing any rheumatic autoimmune disease (HR = 1.33, 95 % CI = 1.28, 1.38), rheumatoid arthritis (HR = 1.31, 95 % CI = 1.22, 1.44), and lupus (HR = 1.58, 95 % CI = 1.28, 1.94). These findings persisted using latency periods of 1 and 2 years. Hypogonadism was not associated with the control outcome, epilepsy (HR = 1.04, 95 % CI = 0.96, 1.15). Patients diagnosed with hypogonadism who were not treated with testosterone had an increased risk of developing any rheumatic autoimmune disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and lupus. Future research should further examine this association, with particular attention to underlying mechanisms.

  19. Hypogonadism and the risk of rheumatic autoimmune disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snih, Soham Al; Raji, Mukaila A.; Urban, Randall J.; Sharma, Gulshan; Sheffield-Moore, Melinda; Lopez, David S.; Baillargeon, Gwen; Kuo, Yong-Fang

    2017-01-01

    Testosterone deficiency has been linked with autoimmune disease and an increase in inflammatory markers, such as C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor, and interleukin-6 (IL-6). However, no large-scale longitudinal studies have examined this association. We examined whether untreated hypogonadism was associated with an increased risk of rheumatic autoimmune disease in a large nationally representative cohort. Using one of the nation’s largest commercial insurance databases, we conducted a retrospective cohort study in which we identified 123,460 men diagnosed with hypogonadism between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2014 and with no prior history of rheumatic autoimmune disease. We matched this cohort to 370,380 men without hypogonadism, at a 1 to 3 ratio, on age and index/diagnosis date. All patients were followed until December 31, 2014 or until they lost insurance coverage or were diagnosed with a rheumatic autoimmune disease. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to calculate adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs). Untreated hypogonadism was associated with an increased risk of developing any rheumatic autoimmune disease (HR = 1.33, 95 % CI = 1.28, 1.38), rheumatoid arthritis (HR = 1.31, 95 % CI = 1.22, 1.44), and lupus (HR = 1.58, 95 % CI = 1.28, 1.94). These findings persisted using latency periods of 1 and 2 years. Hypogonadism was not associated with the control outcome, epilepsy (HR = 1.04, 95 % CI = 0.96, 1.15). Patients diagnosed with hypogonadism who were not treated with testosterone had an increased risk of developing any rheumatic autoimmune disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and lupus. Future research should further examine this association, with particular attention to underlying mechanisms. PMID:27325124

  20. Multiplex autoantibody detection for autoimmune liver diseases and autoimmune gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderlocht, Joris; van der Cruys, Mart; Stals, Frans; Bakker-Jonges, Liesbeth; Damoiseaux, Jan

    2017-09-01

    Autoantibody detection for autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and autoimmune gastritis (AIG) is traditionally performed by IIF on a combination of tissues. Multiplex line/dot blots (LIA/DIA) offer multiple advantages, i.e. automation, objective reading, no interfering reactivities, no coincidental findings. In the current study we evaluated automated DIA (D-Tek) for detecting autoantibodies related to autoimmune diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. We tested samples of the Dutch EQC program and compared the results with the consensus of the participating labs. For the autoimmune liver diseases and AIG, respectively, 64 and 36 samples were tested. For anti-mitochondrial and anti-smooth muscle antibodies a concordance rate of 97% and 88% was observed, respectively. The concordance rate for anti-parietal cell antibodies was 92% when samples without EQC consensus (n=15) were excluded. For antibodies against intrinsic factor a concordance of 96% was observed. For all these antibodies discrepancies were identified that relate to the different test characteristics and the preponderance of IIF utilizing labs in the EQC program. In conclusion, we observed good agreement of the tested DIA blots with the consensus results of the Dutch EQC program. Taken together with the logistic advantages these blots are a good alternative for autoantibody detection in the respective diseases. A large prospective multicenter study is warranted to position these novel tests further in the whole spectrum of assays for the detection of these antibodies in a routine autoimmune laboratory. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Hodgkin's Lymphoma in Crohn's Disease Treated with Infliximab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Carvalho

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lymphoproliferative disorders, particularly non-Hodgkin's and Hodgkin's lymphomas, are rare in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases. The use of thiopurines and infection by Epstein-Barr virus are well-known cofactors that can raise its prevalence. Other risk factors such as disease activity and biological treatment are the subject of discussion, without enough data in the literature to confirm a potential association. Methods: We report a case of Hodgkin's lymphoma in a patient who had been treated with azathioprine and was on long-term monotherapy with infliximab. Conclusions: We stress the importance of recognizing the possible occurrence of a lymphoproliferative disorder in association with anti-tumor necrosis factor-α therapy

  2. Challenges in Management of Primary Hypoparathyroidism Associated with Autoimmune Polyglandular Syndrome Type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. R. Wallace

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1 (APS1 complicated by severe vascular insufficiency due to diffuse vascular calcification. APS1 is characterised clinically by multiple autoimmune conditions and development of at least two components of the triad of mucocutaneous candidiasis, hypoparathyroidism, and autoimmune adrenal insufficiency. We highlight the problems in current serum calcium monitoring methods and suggest that fluctuations in serum calcium concentrations due to difficulties treating hypoparathyroidism may have contributed to the vascular calcification seen in this case.

  3. Rebooting autoimmunity with autologous HSCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowden, John A

    2016-01-07

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is increasingly used for severe autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, but the mechanisms involved have yet to be elucidated. In this issue of Blood, Delemarre et al report their findings in both animal and human models which provide insights into restoration of functionality and diversity within the regulatory T-cell (Treg) compartment following HSCT.

  4. Vitiligo and Autoimmune Thyroid Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enke Baldini

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Vitiligo represents the most common cause of acquired skin, hair, and oral depigmentation, affecting 0.5–1% of the population worldwide. It is clinically characterized by the appearance of disfiguring circumscribed skin macules following melanocyte destruction by autoreactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Patients affected by vitiligo usually show a poorer quality of life and are more likely to suffer from depressive symptoms, particularly evident in dark-skinned individuals. Although vitiligo is a non-fatal disease, exposure of affected skin to UV light increases the chance of skin irritation and predisposes to skin cancer. In addition, vitiligo has been associated with other rare systemic disorders due to the presence of melanocytes in other body districts, such as in eyes, auditory, nervous, and cardiac tissues, where melanocytes are thought to have roles different from that played in the skin. Several pathogenetic models have been proposed to explain vitiligo onset and progression, but clinical and experimental findings point mainly to the autoimmune hypothesis as the most qualified one. In this context, it is of relevance the strong association of vitiligo with other autoimmune diseases, in particular with autoimmune thyroid disorders, such as Hashimoto thyroiditis and Graves’ disease. In this review, after a brief overview of vitiligo and its pathogenesis, we will describe the clinical association between vitiligo and autoimmune thyroid disorders and discuss the possible underlying molecular mechanism(s.

  5. Characterization of skin blister fluids from children with Epstein-Barr virus-associated lymphoproliferative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Taizo; Toma, Tomoko; Miyazawa, Hanae; Koizumi, Eiko; Shirahashi, Tetsujiro; Matsuda, Yusuke; Yachie, Akihiro

    2018-01-20

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated T- or natural killer (NK)-cell lymphoproliferative disease (LPD) is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by chronic proliferation of EBV-infected lymphocytes. Patients may present with severe skin manifestations, including hypersensitivity to mosquito bites (HMB) and hydroa vacciniforme (HV)-like eruption, which are characterized by blister formation and necrotic ulceration. Skin biopsy specimens show inflammatory reactions comprising EBV-infected lymphocytes. However, blister fluids have not been fully assessed in patients with this disease. Blister fluids were collected from three patients with EBV-associated LPD: two with HMB and one with HV. Immunophenotyping of blister lymphocytes and measurement of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in blister fluids were performed. The patients with HMB and HV exhibited markedly increased percentages of NK and γδ T cells, respectively, in both peripheral blood and blister fluids. These NK and γδ T cells strongly expressed the activation marker human leukocyte antigen-DR and were considered to be cellular targets of EBV infections. TNF-α was highly elevated in all blister fluids. Severe local skin reactions of EBV-associated LPD may be associated with infiltrating EBV-infected lymphocytes and a high TNF-α concentration in blister fluids. © 2018 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  6. Molecular Surveillance for Lymphoproliferative Disease Virus in Wild Turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo from the Eastern United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse M Thomas

    Full Text Available Lymphoproliferative disease virus (LPDV is a poorly understood, oncogenic avian retrovirus of domestic turkeys that has historically been restricted to Europe and Israel. However, a recent study reported LPDV in multiple wild turkey diagnostic cases from throughout the eastern United States of America (USA. To better understand the distribution of LPDV in the eastern USA, we surveyed 1,164 reportedly asymptomatic hunter-harvested wild turkeys from 17 states for the presence of LPDV proviral DNA by PCR. In total, 564/1,164 (47% turkeys were positive for LPDV. Wild turkeys from each state had a relatively high prevalence of LPDV, although statewide prevalence varied from 26 to 83%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed two major clades of LPDV in the USA, although one was at a low frequency suggesting restricted transmission, as well as significant clustering by state of isolation. To determine the best tissue to target for diagnostic purposes, liver, spleen, and bone marrow were tested from a subset of 15 hunter-harvested wild turkeys and 20 wild turkey diagnostic cases. Overall, bone marrow provided the highest level of detection for both hunter-harvested turkeys and diagnostic cases. The sensitivity of LPDV detection between tissues was not significantly different for diagnostic cases, but was for hunter-harvested birds. These results indicate that LPDV infection is common and widespread in wild turkey populations throughout the eastern USA, even without overt signs of disease.

  7. LYMPHO-PROLIFERATIVE RESPONSES TO VARIOUS FASCIOLA HEPATICA WORM'S ANTIGENS: AN IN VITRO STUDY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharaf, Osama F; Amir, Elamir M; Hawash, Yousry A

    2016-04-01

    Fascioliasis is an important zoonotic disease with approximately 2-4 million people infected worldwide and a further 180 million at risk of infection. F. hepatica can survive within the bile ducts for many years through its ability to suppress the host immunity with Fasciola cathepsin L1 cysteine protease and Glutathione S transferase playing an important role. The aim of the present study is to investigate the in vitro lympho-proliferative responses of hepatic hilar lymphocytes (HLN) of infected sheep in response to different F. hepatica antigens. The suppressive effects of Fasciola excretory/secretory (ES) and tegument (TEG) and their fractions were also investigated. Our results showed that both ES and TEG had significant suppressive effects on lympho-proliferation, up to 74% and 92%, respectively. When these antigens were fractionated, fraction 3 (MW of >10000-30000) of both ES (64%) and TEG (59%) in addition to fraction 4 (MW of ≤ 10000) of TEG (38%) inherited the suppressive effects. Identification of the potential molecule(s) with such suppressive effects on lymphocytes in TEG fraction 4 could reveal vaccine candidates.

  8. Clonality assessment of lymphoproliferative lesions using the polymerase chain reaction: An analysis of two methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil Moorchung

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lymphoid malignancies are a heterogeneous group of disorders which may be difficult to differentiate from reactive proliferations even after immunohistochemistry. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR is believed to be a good adjunct tool for diagnosis. Materials and Methods: We examined 24 cases of neoplastic and non-neoplastic lymphoproliferative lesions in this study and evaluated the PCR as an additional tool in the confirmation of the diagnosis. Two different PCR methodologies were evaluated. Results: In the evaluation of the T-cell PCR, it was seen that the correlation using both the commercial kits and the custom-synthesized primers was highly significant at a P value of 0.05. Conclusions: Both the methods showed an excellent concordance for T-cell γ gene rearrangements, However, the same was not seen in the B-cell receptor rearrangements. This may be because of the small sample size or the inability of consensus V primers to recognize complementary DNA sequences in all of the V segments.

  9. Oncogenic Notch signaling in T-cell and B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Mark Y; Radojcic, Vedran; Maillard, Ivan

    2016-07-01

    This article highlights recent discoveries about Notch activation and its oncogenic functions in lymphoid malignancies, and discusses the therapeutic potential of Notch inhibition. NOTCH mutations arise in a broad spectrum of lymphoid malignancies and are increasingly scrutinized as putative therapeutic targets. In T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), NOTCH1 mutations affect the extracellular negative regulatory region and lead to constitutive Notch activation, although mutated receptors remain sensitive to Notch ligands. Other NOTCH1 mutations in T-ALL and NOTCH1/2 mutations in multiple B-cell malignancies truncate the C-terminal proline (P), glutamic acid (E), serine (S), threonine (T)-rich (PEST) domain, leading to decreased Notch degradation after ligand-mediated activation. Thus, targeting Notch ligand-receptor interactions could provide therapeutic benefits. In addition, we discuss recent reports on clinical testing of Notch inhibitors in T-ALL that influenced contemporary thinking on the challenges of targeting Notch in cancer. We review advances in the laboratory to address these challenges in regards to drug targets, the Notch-driven metabolome, and the sophisticated protein-protein interactions at Notch-dependent superenhancers that underlie oncogenic Notch functions. Notch signaling is a recurrent oncogenic pathway in multiple T- and B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. Understanding the complexity and consequences of Notch activation is critical to define optimal therapeutic strategies targeting the Notch pathway.

  10. An Animal Model Using Metallic Ions to Produce Autoimmune Nephritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxana Ramírez-Sandoval

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune nephritis triggered by metallic ions was assessed in a Long-Evans rat model. The parameters evaluated included antinuclear autoantibody production, kidney damage mediated by immune complexes detected by immunofluorescence, and renal function tested by retention of nitrogen waste products and proteinuria. To accomplish our goal, the animals were treated with the following ionic metals: HgCl2, CuSO4, AgNO3, and Pb(NO32. A group without ionic metals was used as the control. The results of the present investigation demonstrated that metallic ions triggered antinuclear antibody production in 60% of animals, some of them with anti-DNA specificity. Furthermore, all animals treated with heavy metals developed toxic glomerulonephritis with immune complex deposition along the mesangium and membranes. These phenomena were accompanied by proteinuria and increased concentrations of urea. Based on these results, we conclude that metallic ions may induce experimental autoimmune nephritis.

  11. Hemophagocytosis in Cutaneous Autoimmune Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerl, Katrin; Wolf, Ingrid H; Cerroni, Lorenzo; Wolf, Peter; French, Lars E; Kerl, Helmut

    2015-07-01

    The significance of the histological visualization of hemophagocytosis in tissues depends on the context, varying from a nonspecific phenomenon to a characteristic or diagnostic feature for certain disease entities. Hemophagocytosis is also one of the key features of macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) (hemophagocytic syndrome) a potentially life-threatening complication of underlying conditions such as infections, malignancy, and autoimmune disorders. Clinical manifestations of MAS are high fever, pancytopenia, liver dysfunction, and coagulopathy. These clinical symptoms are due to an abnormal activation of the immune system in a strong association with the cytokine milieu. The diagnosis of MAS may be easily missed; it is usually detected in the bone marrow, lymph node, liver, and spleen. Only few reports exist in the literature with histological description of cutaneous hemophagocytosis as a sign for MAS in patients with lymphoma and infection. In this report, the authors present the clinicopathological and immunohistochemical features of 3 patients with cutaneous hemophagocytosis, specifically erythrophagocytosis, associated with autoimmune disease, and discuss the relevance of these findings. The authors report 3 patients who developed cutaneous hemophagocytosis during the course of an underlying autoimmune disorder. One patient suffered from dermatomyositis, the other 2 patients from systemic lupus erythematosus, whereby one of them was a 3-month old girl with neonatal lupus erythematosus. The patient with dermatomyositis developed MAS according to the current diagnostic criteria. Although the 2 other patients had an acute flare of their autoimmune disease with histological signs of cutaneous hemophagocytosis, they did not fulfill the complete criteria for a diagnosis of MAS. Histiocyte proliferation and activation with increase of cytokines could be demonstrated by immunohistology. This report is the first to describe hemophagocytosis in cutaneous biopsies

  12. [Type 2 autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes (APS-2)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vialettes, Bernard; Dubois-Leonardon, Noémie

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes (APS-2) are the most frequent disorders associating several organ-specific autoimmune diseases. Their high prevalence is due to the fact that the main manifestations of APS-2, such as thyroidal autoimmunity, type 1 diabetes, autoimmune gastric atrophy and vitiligo, are common diseases. APS-2 represents a clinical model that can serve to help unravel the mechanisms underlying autoimmunity. Diagnosis of APS-2 is a challenge for the clinician, especially in poorly symptomatic forms, and may require systematic screening based on measurement of autoantibodies and functional markers.

  13. Amplification of Anti-Tumor Immunity Without Autoimmune Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    neu, and an unrelated self-antigen, thyroglobulin. BALB/c mice were inoculated with TUBO cells expressing an activated rat neu and treated with anti...nonspecific (12, 13) manner through a contact-dependent mechanism. In this study, rat neu is used as the model tumor-associated antigen. Overexpression...experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (24), the murine model of Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. Hashimoto’s thyroid- itis, the leading cause of hypothyroidism , is

  14. AIRE-mutations and autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruserud, Øyvind; Oftedal, Bergithe E; Wolff, Anette B; Husebye, Eystein S

    2016-12-01

    The gene causing the severe organ-specific autoimmune disease autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type-1 (APS-1) was identified in 1997 and named autoimmune regulator (AIRE). AIRE plays a key role in shaping central immunological tolerance by facilitating negative selection of T cells in the thymus, building the thymic microarchitecture, and inducing a specific subset of regulatory T cells. So far, about 100 mutations have been identified. Recent advances suggest that certain mutations located in the SAND and PHD1 domains exert a dominant negative effect on wild type AIRE resulting in milder seemingly common forms of autoimmune diseases, including pernicious anemia, vitiligo and autoimmune thyroid disease. These findings indicate that AIRE also contribute to autoimmunity in more common organ-specific autoimmune disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Association of autoimmune hepatitis and multiple sclerosis: a coincidence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Sofia Mendes Oliveira

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic liver inflammation resulting from deregulation of immune tolerance mechanisms. Multiple sclerosis is also an inflammatory disease in which the insulating covers of nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord are damaged. Here we present a case of an 18 year old female with multiple sclerosis was treated with glatiramer acetate and with interferon beta 1a at our hospital. Seven months after initiating treatment, liver dysfunction occurred. Clinical and laboratory findings were suggestive of drug-induced hepatitis, which led to discontinuation of treatment with interferon. Facing a new episode of acute hepatitis one year later, she was subjected to a liver biopsy, and the analysis of autoantibodies was positive for smooth muscle antibodies. Given the diagnosis of autoimmune hepatitis she started therapy with prednisolone and azathioprine, with good clinical and analytical response. Besides, the demyelinating lesions of multiple sclerosis became lower. In conclusion, there are only a few cases that describe the association of autoimmune hepatitis with multiple sclerosis, and there is a chance both diseases have the same autoimmune inflammatory origin.

  16. The role of the autoimmunity laboratory in autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SS Hasson

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory testing is of great value when evaluating a patient with a suspected autoimmune disease. The results can confirm a diagnosis, estimate disease severity, aid in assessing prognosis and are useful to follow disease activity. Components of the laboratory exam include complete blood count with differential, comprehensive metabolic panel, inflammatory markers, autoantibodies, and flow cytometry. Currently, autoimmunity laboratories are very vibrant owing to the constant and increasing availability of new tests, mainly due to the detection of new autoantibodies. The main characteristic that differentiates the autoimmunity laboratory from other laboratories is the use of immunoassays such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, as basic techniques which determines antibodies (autoantibodies and not antigens. For this reason, immunoassay techniques must employ antigens as reagents. However, over the last few years, a significant trend at autoimmunity laboratories has been the gradual replacement of immunofluorescence microscopy by immunoassay. Nowadays the revolution of new technology has taken place significantly, for examples; recombinant DNA technology has allowed the production of large quantities of antigens for autoantibody analysis. Flow cytometry for the analysis of microsphere-based immunoassays allows the simultaneous measurement of several autoantibodies. In the same way, autoantigen microarrays provide a practical means to analyse biological fluids in the search for a high number of autoantibodies. We are now at the beginning of an era of multiplexed analysis, with a high capacity of autoantibody specificities. The future tendency in this field will include immunoassays with greater analytical sensitivity, specificity, simultaneous multiplexed capability, the use of protein microarrays, and the use of other technologies such as microfluidics.

  17. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy of lymphoproliferative disorders--interpretations based on morphologic criteria alone: results from the College of American Pathologists Interlaboratory Comparison Program in Nongynecologic Cytopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Nancy A; Moriarty, Ann T; Haja, Jennifer C; Wilbur, David C

    2006-12-01

    Diagnosis of lymphoproliferative disorders is one of the most challenging tasks faced by the cytologist. The initial cytomorphologic evaluation of lymphoproliferative lesions directs the choice of ancillary studies that ultimately lead to a diagnosis based on the World Health Organization classification system using a composite of clinical, morphologic, immunophenotypic, and molecular features. To evaluate the ability of participating laboratories in the College of American Pathologists Interlaboratory Comparison Program in Non-Gynecologic Cytopathology to appropriately categorize lymphoproliferative lesions based solely on cytomorphologic criteria. Laboratory responses for lymph node aspirates were examined. All responses were based on review of glass slides without ancillary immunologic or molecular data available. The benchmarking data provided for each specific diagnosis were analyzed, with a focus on the performance for evaluation of lymphoproliferative lesions. Based on morphology alone, responses for lymph node aspirates in the Non-Gynecologic Cytopathology program were correct to the exact reference diagnosis for 87.1% of Hodgkin lymphoma. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma was identified in 69.5% of the large cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma cases, of which 66.8% were correctly classified as large cell type. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma was identified in 68.1% of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, other than large cell cases, and of these, 94.7% were identified as other than large cell type. The spectrum of specific responses was consistent for lymphoproliferative lesions, with a reasonable differential diagnosis based on cytomorphology alone, which, in practice, facilitates the appropriate choice of immunophenotypic markers and other ancillary studies.

  18. Management strategies for autoimmune pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamisawa, Terumi; Takuma, Kensuke; Hara, Seiichi; Tabata, Taku; Kuruma, Sawako; Inaba, Yoshihiko; Gopalakrishna, Rajesh; Egawa, Naoto; Itokawa, Fumihide; Itoi, Takao

    2011-10-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a newly developed concept for a peculiar type of pancreatitis, and at present is recognized as a pancreatic lesion reflecting IgG4-related systemic disease. It is of utmost importance to differentiate AIP from pancreatic cancer to avoid unnecessary surgery. The current management strategies for AIP, including its clinical features, diagnostic criteria, clinical subtypes, steroid therapy and prognosis are discussed, based on our 66 AIP cases and papers searched in PubMed from 1992 to March 2011, using the term 'autoimmune pancreatitis'. A new clinicopathological entity, an 'IgG4-related sclerosing disease' is also mentioned. AIP should be considered in the differential diagnosis in elderly male patients presented with obstructive jaundice and pancreatic mass. Steroids are a standard therapy for AIP, but their regimen including maintenance therapy should be evaluated in prospective trials.

  19. Autoimmune encephalitis and sleep disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan HUANG

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Research shows that autoimmune encephalitis is associated with sleep disorders. Paraneoplastic neurological syndrome (PNS with Ma2 antibodies can cause sleep disorders, particularly narcolepsy and rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD. Limbic encephalitis (LE and Morvan syndrome, associated with voltage - gated potassium channel (VGKC-complex antibodies, which include leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1 antibody and contactin-associated protein 2 (Caspr2, can result in profound insomnia and other sleep disorders. Central neurogenic hypoventilation are found in patients with anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor encephalitis, whereas obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, stridor and parasomnia are prominent features of encephalopathy associated with IgLON5 antibodies. Sleep disorders are cardinal manifestations in patients with autoimmune encephalitis. Immunotherapy possiblely can improve clinical symptoms and prognosis in a positive way. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2017.10.004

  20. Long-term follow-up of kidney transplant patients with posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder: duration of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder-induced operational graft tolerance, interleukin-18 course, and results of retransplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkeland, Søren; Dutoit, Stephen Jacques Hamilton; Bendtzen, K

    2003-01-01

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) can be resolved in many transplant patients by the reduction or cessation of immunosuppression, after which many grafts continue to function as the result of a form of operational tolerance. When graft function deteriorates, retransplantation may...... be an option. Cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-10 and IL-18 may play a role in PTLD tolerance induction and tumor regression. We report long-term follow-up on the duration of graft tolerance and the course of retransplantation in a series of patients who underwent kidney transplantation and demonstrated PTLD...

  1. Epstein-Barr virus load in transplant patients: Early detection of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellner, María Dolores; Durand, Karina A; Solernou, Veronica; Bosaleh, Andrea; Balbarrey, Ziomara; García de Dávila, María T; Rodríguez, Marcelo; Irazu, Lucía; Alonio, Lidia V; Picconi, María A

    2016-01-01

    High levels of circulating EBV load are used as a marker of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD). There is no consensus regarding the threshold level indicative of an increase in peripheral EBV DNA. The aim of the study was to clinically validate a developed EBV quantification assay for early PTLD detection. Transversal study: paired peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), plasma and oropharyngeal lymphoid tissue (OLT) from children undergoing a solid organ transplant with (n=58) and without (n=47) PTLD. Retrospective follow-up: 71 paired PBMC and plasma from recipients with (n=6) and without (n=6) PTLD history. EBV load was determined by real-time PCR. The diagnostic ability to detect all PTLD (categories 1-4), advanced PTLD (categories 2-4) or neoplastic PTLD (categories 3 and 4) was estimated by analyzing the test performance at different cut-off values or with a load variation greater than 0.5log units. The higher diagnostic performance for identifying all, advanced or neoplastic PTLD, was achieved with cut-off values of 1.08; 1.60 and 2.47log EBVgEq/10(5) PBMC or 2.30; 2.60; 4.47loggEq/10(5) OLT cells, respectively. EBV DNA detection in plasma showed high specificity but low (all categories) or high (advanced/neoplastic categories) sensitivity for PTLD identification. Diagnostic performance was greater when: (1) a load variation in PBMC or plasma was identified; (2) combining the measure of EBV load in PBMC and plasma. The best diagnostic ability to identify early PTLD stages was achieved by monitoring EBV load in PBMC and plasma simultaneously; an algorithm was proposed. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Viral induction and targeted inhibition of galectin-1 in EBV+ posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Jing; Juszczynski, Przemyslaw; Rodig, Scott J; Green, Michael R; O'Donnell, Evan; Currie, Treeve; Armant, Myriam; Takeyama, Kunihiko; Monti, Stefano; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Ritz, Jerome; Kutok, Jeffery L; Shipp, Margaret A

    2011-04-21

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) are potentially fatal, EBV-driven B-cell malignancies that develop in immunocompromised solid organ or hematopoietic stem cell recipients. In PTLD, the expression of EBV proteins, including latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) and LMP2A, viral immune evasion strategies, and impaired host immune surveillance foster the proliferation of EBV-transformed B cells. Current PTLD treatment strategies include reduction of immunosuppression, which increases the risk of graft rejection, anti-CD20 treatment, combination chemotherapy, and administration of EBV-specific cytotoxic T cells. In the present study, we report that EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid B-cell lines (LCLs) and primary PTLDs overexpress galectin-1 (Gal1), a carbohydrate-binding lectin that induces tolerogenic dendritic cells and triggers the selective apoptosis of CD4(+) Th1 and Th17 cells and cytotoxic T cells. In transcriptional reporter assays, LMP2A and LMP1 each increased Gal1-driven luciferase expression, and the combination of LMP2A and LMP1 was additive. In addition, small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated depletion of LMP2A decreased Gal1 protein abundance in EBV-transformed LCLs. Gal1 expression in LCLs was dependent on both activating protein 1 (AP-1) and PI3K. A newly developed neutralizing Gal1 mAb selectively inhibited Gal1-mediated apoptosis of EBV-specific CD8(+) T cells. Given the tolerogenic and immunosuppressive function of Gal1, antibody-mediated Gal1 neutralization may represent a novel immunotherapeutic strategy for PTLD and other Gal1-expressing tumors.

  3. Vitamin D in autoimmune liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyk, Daniel S; Orfanidou, Timoklia; Invernizzi, Pietro; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P; Lenzi, Marco

    2013-11-01

    The development of autoimmune disease is based on the interaction of genetic susceptibility and environmental causes. Environmental factors include infectious and non-infectious agents, with some of these factors being implicated in several autoimmune diseases. Vitamin D is now believed to play a role in the development (or prevention) of several autoimmune diseases, based on its immunomodulatory properties. As well, the increasing incidence of autoimmune disease as one moves away from the equator, may be due to the lack of sunlight, which is crucial for the maintenance of normal vitamin D levels. A deficiency in vitamin D levels or vitamin D receptors is commonly indicated in autoimmune diseases, with multiple sclerosis (MS) being one of the best-studied and well-known examples. However, the role of vitamin D in other autoimmune diseases is not well defined, including autoimmune liver diseases such as primary biliary cirrhosis, autoimmune hepatitis, and primary sclerosing cholangitis. This review will examine the role of vitamin D as an immunomodulator, followed by a comparison of vitamin D in MS versus autoimmune liver disease. From this comparison, it will become clear that vitamin D likely plays a role in the development of autoimmune liver disease, but this area requires further investigation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Psoriasis as an autoimmune disease

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    Agnieszka Owczarczyk-Saczonek

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays it is known that psoriasis belongs to the group of autoimmune diseases and may coexist with other diseases in this group. Most often patients have psoriatic arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmune thyroid diseases and multiple sclerosis. The coexistence of these disorders can be a diagnostic and therapeutic problem (there is controversy over the use of corticosteroids. The common pathogenesis is still not explained. We know that the loss of immunotolerance leads to formation of autoreactive Th1 and Th17 lymphocytes which recognize self-antigens and lead to their destruction in the target organ. Some features of immune mechanisms, observed in psoriasis, suggest its autoimmune background. In psoriasis the main role is played by the activation of the axis IL-12/Th1/IFN- and Th17/Il-23. Il-12 probably acts on naive T cells and the Th1 response is initiated. Il-23 maintains the Th1-mediated inflammatory reaction, stimulates maturation and effects of Th17, and maintains a certain amount of memory cells. We also observe dysfunction of Treg cells, which are responsible for the destruction of autoreactive lymphocytes. In addition, psoriatic keratinocytes have increased resistance to apoptosis, which eliminate damaged cells so that they cannot be recognized as a foreign antigen. However, researchers have suggested that initially the polyclonal activation of T lymphocytes is induced by superantigens (e.g. streptococcal M protein, peptidoglycan or skin trauma (Koebner phenomenon, whereas in the later phase self-antigens in the epidermis are recognized by autoreactive T cells (keratin K 17, HPV 5 proteins L1, Pso p27, leading to autoimmunity.

  5. Autoimmune diseases and reproductive aging

    OpenAIRE

    Bove, Riley

    2013-01-01

    As the population ages, more individuals with autoimmune diseases are experiencing reproductive senescence. Understanding the impact of menopause and age-related androgen decline on disease onset and course, as well as the potential for hormonal interventions, is critically important. In men, lupus erythematosis (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and multiple sclerosis (MS) are associated with lower androgen levels. However, the impact of age-related declines in testosterone, as well as of tes...

  6. Autoimmune Thyroiditis and Myasthenia Gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Lopomo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases (AIDs are the result of specific immune responses directed against structures of the self. In normal conditions, the molecules recognized as “self” are tolerated by immune system, but when the self-tolerance is lost, the immune system could react against molecules from the body, causing the loss of self-tolerance, and subsequently the onset of AID that differs for organ target and etiology. Autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD is caused by the development of autoimmunity against thyroid antigens and comprises Hashimoto’s thyroiditis and Graves disease. They are frequently associated with other organ or non-organ specific AIDs, such as myasthenia gravis (MG. In fact, ATD seems to be the most associated pathology to MG. The etiology of both diseases is multifactorial and it is due to genetic and environmental factors, and each of them has specific characteristics. The two pathologies show many commonalities, such as the organ-specificity with a clear pathogenic effect of antibodies, the pathological mechanisms, such as deregulation of the immune system and the implication of the genetic predisposition. They also show some differences, such as the mode of action of the antibodies and therapies. In this review that focuses on ATD and MG, the common features and the differences between the two diseases are discussed.

  7. Vitamin D and autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Potrokhova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The review discusses the effect of vitamin D on the tolerogenic modulation of an immune response, its relationship to cells of the monocyte-macrophage series, including dendritic cells, monocytes, and macrophages, in the context of the impact of the expression of anti-inflammatory proinflammatory cytokines in some autoimmune diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, systemic scleroderma, multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes mellitus, systemic lupus erythematosus, and Crohn`s disease. It discusses the role of vitamin D in the development of innate and adaptive immunity. Despite some conflicting evidence, the immune regulatory function of vitamin D is generally directed toward inhibition of the components of innate and acquired immunity, which are responsible for the induction of autoimmune reactions; in this connection there are a growing number of publications devoted to the issues of vitamin D supplementation in patients with autoimmune diseases, the preventive effect of vitamin D intake on the risk of an abnormality and that of therapeutic doses of the vitamin on its course. The maintenance of the threshold value for serum 25(OHD3 at least 30 ng/ml, which is achieved by the intake of about 2000 IU of vitamin D, is shown to be required for its immune regulatory function. The data given raise the question as to whether it is necessity to revise the Russian recommended daily dietary allowances for vitamin D through its infant food fortification.

  8. Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome and thrombocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atquet, V; Lienart, F; Vaes, M

    2015-12-01

    We describe a woman aged 37  years, affected with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, detected since the age of 17, with gonadic insufficiency with anti-ovarian antibodies since the age of 22  years and Addison's disease since 24  years old. At that moment, the diagnosis of autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome (APS) was made. Concomitant to this diagnosis, thrombocytosis was detected and aetiological assessment revealed an atrophy of the spleen. Differential diagnoses of APS and hyposplenism will be discussed. We will look at a possible association between these two pathologies. Indeed, asplenism is found in approximately 20% of adults affected by type 1 APS, also called auto-immune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) syndrome. The most likely aetiology for this atrophy of the spleen is a destruction of auto-immunological origin. However, in our patient, the search for a mutation of the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene proved negative. This mutation is commonly, but not systematically, present in type 1 APS. A type 2 APS should then be considered.

  9. Stochastic Effects in Autoimmune Dynamics

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    Farzad Fatehi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Among various possible causes of autoimmune disease, an important role is played by infections that can result in a breakdown of immune tolerance, primarily through the mechanism of “molecular mimicry”. In this paper we propose and analyse a stochastic model of immune response to a viral infection and subsequent autoimmunity, with account for the populations of T cells with different activation thresholds, regulatory T cells, and cytokines. We show analytically and numerically how stochasticity can result in sustained oscillations around deterministically stable steady states, and we also investigate stochastic dynamics in the regime of bi-stability. These results provide a possible explanation for experimentally observed variations in the progression of autoimmune disease. Computations of the variance of stochastic fluctuations provide practically important insights into how the size of these fluctuations depends on various biological parameters, and this also gives a headway for comparison with experimental data on variation in the observed numbers of T cells and organ cells affected by infection.

  10. Autoimmune Thyroiditis and Myasthenia Gravis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopomo, Angela; Berrih-Aknin, Sonia

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (AIDs) are the result of specific immune responses directed against structures of the self. In normal conditions, the molecules recognized as “self” are tolerated by immune system, but when the self-tolerance is lost, the immune system could react against molecules from the body, causing the loss of self-tolerance, and subsequently the onset of AID that differs for organ target and etiology. Autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD) is caused by the development of autoimmunity against thyroid antigens and comprises Hashimoto’s thyroiditis and Graves disease. They are frequently associated with other organ or non-organ specific AIDs, such as myasthenia gravis (MG). In fact, ATD seems to be the most associated pathology to MG. The etiology of both diseases is multifactorial and it is due to genetic and environmental factors, and each of them has specific characteristics. The two pathologies show many commonalities, such as the organ-specificity with a clear pathogenic effect of antibodies, the pathological mechanisms, such as deregulation of the immune system and the implication of the genetic predisposition. They also show some differences, such as the mode of action of the antibodies and therapies. In this review that focuses on ATD and MG, the common features and the differences between the two diseases are discussed. PMID:28751878

  11. Human Cytomegalovirus and Autoimmune Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) represents a prototypic pathogenic member of the β-subgroup of the herpesvirus family. A range of HCMV features like its lytic replication in multiple tissues, the lifelong persistence through periods of latency and intermitting reactivation, the extraordinary large proteome, and extensive manipulation of adaptive and innate immunity make HCMV a high profile candidate for involvement in autoimmune disorders. We surveyed the available literature for reports on HCMV association with onset or exacerbation of autoimmune disease. A causative linkage between HCMV and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), systemic sclerosis (SSc), diabetes mellitus type 1, and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is suggested by the literature. However, a clear association of HCMV seroprevalence and disease could not be established, leaving the question open whether HCMV could play a coresponsible role for onset of disease. For convincing conclusions population-based prospective studies must be performed in the future. Specific immunopathogenic mechanisms by which HCMV could contribute to the course of autoimmune disease have been suggested, for example, molecular mimicry by UL94 in SSc and UL83/pp65 in SLE patients, as well as aggravation of joint inflammation by induction and expansion of CD4+/CD28− T-cells in RA patients. Further studies are needed to validate these findings and to lay the grounds for targeted therapeutic intervention. PMID:24967373

  12. [A case of lymphoproliferative disorder in the entire small intestine after renal transplantation detected by wireless capsule endoscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonoda, Akira; Katsuta, Makoto; Yada, Mika; Mizukami, Kazuhiro; Okamoto, Kazuhisa; Ogawa, Ryo; Okimoto, Tadayoshi; Kodama, Masaaki; Murakami, Kazunari

    2015-04-01

    A 42-year-old woman underwent renal transplantation in 200X. After the transplant, she received tacrolimus as immunosuppressant therapy. Eleven years after the transplant, diffuse large B-cell lymphomas were detected in the duodenum and terminal ileum. Wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) revealed multiple lymphoma lesions in the entire small intestine. The patient achieved complete response through the administration of R-CHOP therapy and discontinuation of immunosuppressant therapy. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a rare complication and WCE may be useful for diagnosing PTLD of the small intestine.

  13. Management of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder in adult solid organ transplant recipients - BCSH and BTS Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Anne; Bowles, Kristin; Bradley, J Andrew; Emery, Vincent; Featherstone, Carrie; Gupte, Girish; Marcus, Robert; Parameshwar, Jayan; Ramsay, Alan; Newstead, Charles

    2010-06-01

    A joint working group established by the Haemato-oncology subgroup of the British Committee for Standards in Haematology (BCSH) and the British Transplantation Society (BTS) has reviewed the available literature and made recommendations for the diagnosis and management of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder in adult recipients of solid organ transplants. This review details the therapeutic options recommended including reduction in immunosuppression (RIS), transplant organ resection, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Effective therapy should be instituted before progressive disease results in declining performance status and multi-organ dysfunction. The goal of treatment should be a durable complete remission with retention of transplanted organ function with minimal toxicity.

  14. Does vitamin D play a role in autoimmune endocrine disorders? A proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altieri, Barbara; Muscogiuri, Giovanna; Barrea, Luigi; Mathieu, Chantal; Vallone, Carla V; Mascitelli, Luca; Bizzaro, Giorgia; Altieri, Vincenzo M; Tirabassi, Giacomo; Balercia, Giancarlo; Savastano, Silvia; Bizzaro, Nicola; Ronchi, Cristina L; Colao, Annamaria; Pontecorvi, Alfredo; Della Casa, Silvia

    2017-09-01

    In the last few years, more attention has been given to the "non-calcemic" effect of vitamin D. Several observational studies and meta-analyses demonstrated an association between circulating levels of vitamin D and outcome of many common diseases, including endocrine diseases, chronic diseases, cancer progression, and autoimmune diseases. In particular, cells of the immune system (B cells, T cells, and antigen presenting cells), due to the expression of 1α-hydroxylase (CYP27B1), are able to synthesize the active metabolite of vitamin D, which shows immunomodulatory properties. Moreover, the expression of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) in these cells suggests a local action of vitamin D in the immune response. These findings are supported by the correlation between the polymorphisms of the VDR or the CYP27B1 gene and the pathogenesis of several autoimmune diseases. Currently, the optimal plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration that is necessary to prevent or treat autoimmune diseases is still under debate. However, experimental studies in humans have suggested beneficial effects of vitamin D supplementation in reducing the severity of disease activity. In this review, we summarize the evidence regarding the role of vitamin D in the pathogenesis of autoimmune endocrine diseases, including type 1 diabetes mellitus, Addison's disease, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, Graves' disease and autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes. Furthermore, we discuss the supplementation with vitamin D to prevent or treat autoimmune diseases.

  15. Isotretinoin as a Possible Environmental Trigger to Autoimmunity in Genetically Susceptible Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jocelyn Nugroho

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Isotretinoin is commonly used to treat cystic acne. Definitive mechanisms of action for isotretinoin are not known though despite many side effects having been documented. Various case reports have noted autoimmune diseases succeeding isotretinoin treatment. Case Report. A 16-year-old female presents with symptoms of tremors, lack of focus, sleeplessness, emotional liability, bulging eyes, loose stools, heat intolerance, and missed menstrual periods. Symptoms manifested shortly after the patient finished a course of oral isotretinoin treatment for acne. Physical exam showed resting tremors, bilateral proptosis, hyperactivity, and rapid speech. A diagnosis of Graves’ Disease was made by correlating symptoms, physical exam findings, ultrasound, and positive family history of autoimmune thyroid disease. Conclusion. Emergence of autoimmune thyroid diseases depends upon genetic predisposition and environmental triggers. Mechanism of action for isotretinoin is not known but the drug may play a role in triggering autoimmunity in genetically susceptible individuals.

  16. Epigenetics as biomarkers in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haijing; Liao, Jieyue; Li, Qianwen; Yang, Ming; Zhao, Ming; Lu, Qianjin

    2018-03-21

    Autoimmune diseases are immune system disorders in which immune cells cannot distinguish self-antigens from foreign ones. The current criteria for autoimmune disease diagnosis are based on clinical manifestations and laboratory tests. However, none of these markers shows both high sensitivity and specificity. In addition, some autoimmune diseases, for example, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), are highly heterogeneous and often exhibit various manifestations. On the other hand, certain autoimmune diseases, such as Sjogren's syndrome versus SLE, share similar symptoms and autoantibodies, which also causes difficulties in diagnosis. Therefore, biomarkers that have both high sensitivity and high specificity for diagnosis, reflect disease activity and predict drug response are necessary. An increasing number of publications have proposed the abnormal epigenetic modifications as biomarkers of autoimmune diseases. Therefore, this review will comprehensively summarize the epigenetic progress in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disorders and unearth potential biomarkers that might be appropriate for disease diagnosis and prediction. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Autoimmune diseases in adults with atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Yuki M F; Egeberg, Alexander; Gislason, Gunnar H.

    2017-01-01

    Background: An increased susceptibility to autoimmune disease has been shown in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD), but data remain scarce and inconsistent. Objective: We examined the co-occurrence of selected autoimmune diseases in adult patients with AD. Methods: Nationwide health registers...... were used. Adult patients with a hospital diagnosis of AD in Denmark between 1997 and 2012 were included as cases (n = 8112) and matched with controls (n = 40,560). The occurrence of autoimmune diseases was compared in the 2 groups. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios. Results: AD...... was significantly associated with 11 of 22 examined autoimmune diseases. In addition, AD was associated with having multiple autoimmune comorbidities. Patients with a history of smoking had a significantly higher occurrence of autoimmune comorbidities compared to nonsmokers. Limitations: This study was limited...

  18. [Pulmonary arterial hypertension: a flavor of autoimmunity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perros, Frédéric; Humbert, Marc; Cohen-Kaminsky, Sylvia

    2013-01-01

    It is admitted that autoimmunity results from a combination of risks such as genetic background, environmental triggers, and stochastic events. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) shares with the so-called prototypic autoimmune diseases, genetic risk factors, female predominance and sex hormone influence, association with other chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, defects in regulatory T cells function, and presence of autoantibodies. Case reports have been published indicating the beneficial effect of some immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory therapies in PAH, supporting the potential role of immune mechanisms in the pathophysiology of the disease. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge on autoimmune mechanisms operating in PAH, especially mounting a local autoimmune response inside the pulmonary tissue, namely pulmonary lymphoid neogenesis. A better understanding of the role of autoimmunity in pulmonary vascular remodelling may help develop targeted immunomodulatory strategies in PAH. © 2013 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  19. Microbiota and Autoimmunity: exploring new avenues

    OpenAIRE

    Yurkovetskiy, Leonid; Pickard, Joseph M.; Chervonsky, Alexander V.

    2015-01-01

    Given the recognized role of the commensal microbiota in regulating host immunity to pathogens, it is not surprising that microbiota are also capable of regulating autoimmune responses. The underlying mechanisms of autoimmune regulation by the microbiota are just beginning to emerge. Here, we discuss possible pressure points towards the development of autoimmune diseases that can be influenced by the microbiota. Besides acting on the adaptive and innate arms of the immune response, the microb...

  20. Severe autoimmune hemolytic anemia with renal neoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Emily C; Parikh, Sahil P; Bhattacharyya, Nishith

    2014-02-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a type of hemolytic anemia characterized by autoantibodies directed against red blood cells shortening their survival. When autoimmune hemolytic anemia is secondary to a paraneoplastic process, severe anemia can occur leading to significant morbidity and even mortality. Here we discuss the literature and present the case of a child with autoimmune hemolytic anemia from a paraneoplastic syndrome secondary to a renal tumor.

  1. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Berentsen, Sigbj?rn

    2015-01-01

    Summary The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorder...

  2. Diagnosing autoimmune pancreatitis with the Unifying-Autoimmune-Pancreatitis-Criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Alexander; Michaely, Henrik; Rückert, Felix; Weiss, Christel; Ströbel, Philipp; Belle, Sebastian; Hirth, Michael; Wilhelm, Torsten J; Haas, Stephan L; Jesenofsky, Ralf; Schönberg, Stefan; Marx, Alexander; Singer, Manfred V; Ebert, Matthias P; Pfützer, Roland H; Löhr, J Matthias

    We had developed the Unifying-Autoimmune-Pancreatitis-Criteria (U-AIP) to diagnose autoimmune pancreatitis (AiP) within the M-ANNHEIM classification of chronic pancreatitis. In 2011, International-Consensus-Diagnostic-Criteria (ICDC) to diagnose AiP have been published. We had applied the U-AIP long before the ICDC were available. The aims of the study were, first, to describe patients with AiP diagnosed by the U-AIP; second, to compare diagnostic accuracies of the U-AIP and other diagnostic systems; third, to evaluate the clinical applicability of the U-AIP. From 1998 until 2008, we identified patients with AiP using U-AIP, Japanese-, Korean-, Asian-, Mayo-HISORt-, Revised-Mayo-HISORt- and Italian-criteria. We retrospectively verified the diagnosis by ICDC and Revised-Japanese-2011-criteria, compared diagnostic accuracies of all systems and evaluated all criteria in consecutive patients with pancreatitis (2009 until 2010, Pancreas-Outpatient-Clinic-Cohort, n = 84). We retrospectively validated our diagnostic approach in consecutive patients with a pancreatic lesion requiring surgery (Surgical-Cohort, n = 98). Overall, we identified 21 patients with AiP. Unifying-Autoimmune-Pancreatitis-Criteria and ICDC presented the highest diagnostic accuracies (each 98.8%), highest Youden indices (each 0.95238), and highest proportions of diagnosed patients (each n = 20/21, U-AIP/ICDC vs. other diagnostic systems, p Pancreatitis-Criteria revealed a satisfactory clinical applicability and offered an additional approach to diagnose AiP. Copyright © 2017 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A new combination of multiple autoimmune syndrome? Coexistence of vitiligo, autoimmune thyroid disease and ulcerative colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firdevs Topal

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of three or more autoimmune disorders in one patient defines multiple autoimmune syndrome. The pathogenesis of multiple autoimmune syndrome is not known yet and environmental triggers and genetic susceptibility have been suggested to be involved. Herein, we report a 47-year-old woman who had Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, vitiligo and newly diagnosed ulcerative colitis. Diagnosis of ulcerative colitis was confirmed with histopathologic examination. This case presents a new combination of multiple autoimmune syndrome.

  4. [Immunomodulatory properties of stem mesenchymal cells in autoimmune diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Berná, Isabel; Santiago-Díaz, Carlos; Jiménez-Alonso, Juan

    2015-01-20

    Autoimmune diseases are a cluster of disorders characterized by a failure of the immune tolerance and a hyperactivation of the immune system that leads to a chronic inflammation state and the damage of several organs. The medications currently used to treat these diseases usually consist of immunosuppressive drugs that have significant systemic toxic effects and are associated with an increased risk of opportunistic infections. Recently, several studies have demonstrated that mesenchymal stem cells have immunomodulatory properties, a feature that make them candidates to be used in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. In the present study, we reviewed the role of this therapy in the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjögren's syndrome, systemic sclerosis, Crohn's disease and multiple sclerosis, as well as the potential risks associated with its use. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Successful treatment with Ipilimumab and Interleukin‑2 in two patients with metastatic melanoma and systemic autoimmune disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Magnus; Andersen, Rikke; Larsen, Peter Nørgaard

    2014-01-01

    Two patients were treated with immunotherapy for metastatic malignant melanoma (MM) despite suffering from systemic autoimmune disease, i.e., ulcerative colitis (UC) and Behcets disease (BD), respectively. Both patients benefitted from the treatment. The patient with UC achieved partial remission...... of all measurable parameters after treatment with Ipilimumab, while the patient with BD achieved a complete remission of MM after treatment with Interleukin-2 (IL-2) and Interferon-α (IFN-α). Moreover, no aggravation of symptoms related to the autoimmune diseases was seen during treatment, in contrast......, clinical indications of improvement were observed. These two cases illustrate that the presence of autoimmune disease does not necessarily predict increased autoimmune toxicity in connection with immunotherapy. They also raise the question of whether autoimmune disease should continue to be an absolute...

  6. Clinicopathologic Assessment of Ocular Adnexal Lymphoproliferative Lesions at a Tertiary Eye Hospital in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi-Amoli, Fahimeh; Nozarian, Zohreh; Bonaki, Hirbod Nasiri; Mehrtash, Vahid; Entezari, Samaneh

    2016-01-01

    The most common type of ocular lymphoma is non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), categorized into two groups: indolent (slow growing) and aggressive (rapid growing). Differentiating benign reactive lymphoid hyperplasia (RLH) from malignant ocular adnexal lymphoma (OAL) is challenging. Histopathology, immunohistochemistry (IHC) and ow cytometry have been used as diagnostic tools in such cases. In this retrospective case series, from 2002 to 2013 at Farabi Eye Center, 110 patients with ocular lymphoproliferative disease were enrolled. Prevalence, anatomical locations, mean age at diagnosis and the nal diagnosis of the disease with IHC were assessed. Comparison between previous pathologic diagnoses and results of IHC was made. Immunoglobulin light chains and B-cell and T-cell markers and other immuno-phenotyping markers including CD20, CD3, CD5, CD23, CD10, CYCLIND1 and BCL2 were evaluated to determine the most accurate diagnosis. The lymphomas were categorized based on revised European-American lymphoma (REAL) classi cation. Mean age±SD (years) of the patients was 55.6 ±19.3 and 61% were male. Patients with follicular lymphoma, large B-cell lymphoma or chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small cell lymphoma (CLL/SLL) tended to be older. Nine patients with previous diagnoses of low grade B-cell lymphoma were re-evaluated by IHC and the new diagnoses were as follows: extranodal marginal zone lymphoma(EMZL) (n=1), SLL(n=1), mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) (n=3), reactive lymphoid hyperplasia RLH (n=2). Two cases were excluded due to poor blocks. Flow cytometry reports in these seven patients revealed SLL with positive CD5 and CD23, MCL with positive CD5 and CyclinD1 and negative CD23, EMZL with negative CD5,CD23 and CD10. One RLH patient was negative for Kappa/Lambda and positive for CD3 and CD20 and the other was positive for all of the light chains, CD3 and CD20. Orbit (49.1%), conjunctiva (16.1%) and lacrimal glands (16.1%) were the most common sites of involvement. Accurate

  7. Clinical, laboratory, and morphological characteristics of kidney damage in lymphoproliferative disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. T. Dzhumabaeva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Kidney involvement in the onset of lymphoproliferative diseases (LPD detected rarely, observed mainly at tumor progression or relapse.Objective: to determine the clinical and morphological features of kidney damage in the initial manifestation of LPD.Materials and methods: 19 patients with LPD and kidney damage were included in the study. The diagnosis of non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas was established according to 2008 WHO classification. Histological and immunohistochemical, immunofluorescent and electron microscopic studies of nephrobiopsy have been performed.Results. Patients were aged 46-83 years (median 63 years, of which 13 were men and 6 women. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia / small cell lymphocytic lymphoma was established in 12 patients, marginal zone lymphoma – in 4 pts, follicular lymphoma – in 1 patient, Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia – in 1 patient and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL in 1 patient. Proteinuria was observed in 18 patients, microhematuria – in 6 pts, arterial hypertension – in 8 pts, nephrotic syndrome – in 3 pts and renal failure in 18 patients. The mean creatinine level was 330.9 ± 52.3 µmol/L, the average glomerular filtration rate was 25.7 ± 12.9 ml/min. Monoclonal IgMκ secretion was detected in 6 patients, BJκ protein – in 9 pts, increased free light chain level – in 4 pts, cryoglobulin – in 4 pts (type II cryoglobulin in 3 of them, type I – in 1 patient.Morphological study of nephrobiopsy revealed tumor lymphoid infiltration of kidney interstitium in 10 (52.6 % cases. Diffuse small cell lymphoid proliferation was detected in 1 patient, local infiltration – in 9 pts, in 3 of them in combination with glomerulonephritis, and in 4 cases with kidney carcinoma. Local large cell lymphoid proliferation was found in 1 patient with DLBCL. Amyloidosis was detected in 2 pts and thrombotic microangiopathy – in 2 patients. Glomerulopathy was revealed in 10 patients (52.6 %: mesangioproliferative

  8. Incidence of post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disease in Andalusia (1990-2009).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govantes, M A Gentil; Esteve, A Franco; Ramos, M Toro; Gracia De Guindo, M C; Sánchez, L Fuentes; Blanca, M A Mazuecos; Rodríguez-Benot, A; Blandino, M Vidal; De la Nuez, P Castro; Rodríguez, D Burgos

    2013-01-01

    Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) is a severe complication of renal transplantation (RT) but information about its incidence and predisposing factors is diverse, varying according to geographic area and study period. We analyzed the incidence of PTLD after all RT performed at adult transplantation centers in Andalusia from January 1, 1990 to December 31, 2009, recorded in the Andalusian Transplant Co-ordination Information System (SICATA) regional computerized database (n = 5577). We calculated the risk of PTLD using the Kaplan-Meier curve, censoring for organ failure and incidence rate per patient-year of exposure. Log-rank comparisons were made by center (n = 5), decade (1990-1999 vs 2000-2009), age group, recipient gender, hepatitis C virus (HCV) serology, transplantation number, and duration of pre-RT replacement therapy (per quartiles). We identified 60 cases of PTLD. The pre-RT treatment time was 48.2 ± 60 months; 11.7% were retransplantations, and 10.4% had a positive HCV serology. The median post-RT time before diagnosis of PTLD was 5.98 years. At the time of the database analysis, only 11 patients (18%) were alive with a functioning transplant; 10% had returned to dialysis and 72% had died. The actuarial incidence of PTLD at 1, 5, 10, and 20 years post-RT was 0.2%, 0.5%, 1.6%, and 2.9%, respectively; the exposure rate was 14.71 PTLD/10,000 patient-years (95% confidence interval [CI], 12.3-17.1). Although the incidence tended to be higher in 1990-1999 than 2000-2009 (16.8 vs 12.1 cases/10,000 patient-years), in the actuarial study the difference was far from significant (at 7.5 years, 1.2 vs 0.8%; P = .4). Nor were there significant differences in the curves of incidence per RT center (1%-1.2% of patients) or recipient characteristics. The cumulative incidence of PTLD in Andalusia in patients with a functioning kidney transplant during 1990-2009 was 2.9% at 20 years. There was no significant variation between the RT centers or over

  9. Autoimmune atrophic gastritis: current perspectives

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    Minalyan A

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Artem Minalyan,1 Jihane N Benhammou,1 Aida Artashesyan,1 Michael S Lewis,2 Joseph R Pisegna1 1Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Parenteral Nutrition, 2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: At present there is no universally accepted classification for gastritis. The first successful classification (The Sydney System that is still commonly used by medical professionals was first introduced by Misiewicz et al in Sydney in 1990. In fact, it was the first detailed classification after the discovery of Helicobacter pylori by Warren and Marshall in 1982. In 1994, the Updated Sydney System was proposed during the International Workshop on the Histopathology of Gastritis followed by the publication in The American Journal of Surgical Pathology by Dixon et al. Using the new classification, distinction between atrophic and nonatrophic gastritis was revised, and the visual scale grading was incorporated. According to the Updated Sydney System Classification, atrophic gastritis is categorized into multifocal (H. pylori, environmental factors, specific diet and corpus-predominant (autoimmune. Since metaplasia is a key histological characteristic in patients with atrophic gastritis, it has been recommended to use the word “metaplastic” in both variants of atrophic gastritis: autoimmune metaplastic atrophic gastritis (AMAG and environmental metaplastic atrophic gastritis. Although there are many overlaps in the course of the disease and distinction between those two entities may be challenging, the aim of this review article was to describe the etiology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, clinical manifestations and treatment in patients with AMAG. However, it is important to mention that H. pylori is the most common etiologic factor for the development of gastritis in the world. Keywords: autoimmune gastritis, pernicious anemia, gastric carcinoid

  10. Immunoglobulin E-Mediated Autoimmunity

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    Marcus Maurer

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The study of autoimmunity mediated by immunoglobulin E (IgE autoantibodies, which may be termed autoallergy, is in its infancy. It is now recognized that systemic lupus erythematosus, bullous pemphigoid (BP, and chronic urticaria, both spontaneous and inducible, are most likely to be mediated, at least in part, by IgE autoantibodies. The situation in other conditions, such as autoimmune uveitis, rheumatoid arthritis, hyperthyroid Graves’ disease, autoimmune pancreatitis, and even asthma, is far less clear but evidence for autoallergy is accumulating. To be certain of an autoallergic mechanism, it is necessary to identify both IgE autoantibodies and their targets as has been done with the transmembrane protein BP180 and the intracellular protein BP230 in BP and IL-24 in chronic spontaneous urticaria. Also, IgE-targeted therapies, such as anti-IgE, must have been shown to be of benefit to patients as has been done with both of these conditions. This comprehensive review of the literature on IgE-mediated autoallergy focuses on three related questions. What do we know about the prevalence of IgE autoantibodies and their targets in different diseases? What do we know about the relevance of IgE autoantibodies in different diseases? What do we know about the cellular and molecular effects of IgE autoantibodies? In addition to providing answers to these questions, based on a broad review of the literature, we outline the current gaps of knowledge in our understanding of IgE autoantibodies and describe approaches to address them.

  11. Risk factors, diagnosis, and management of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder: improving patient outcomes with a multidisciplinary treatment approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligeti K

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Kinga Ligeti, Lutz P Müller, Carsten Müller-Tidow, Thomas Weber Department of Hematology and Oncology, University Hospital Halle (Saale and Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Saale, Germany Abstract: Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD is a major complication after solid organ transplantation and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The spectrum of PTLD ranges from benign hyperplasia to malignant lymphoma, representing one of the most relevant malignancies in these patients. Most PTLDs are driven by latent Epstein–Barr virus infections. The backbone of treatment is reduction of immunosuppression. Further treatment depends on the type of PTLD and the type of transplantation. A multidisciplinary approach involving transplant team, hematologists, and other disciplines is crucial for the diagnosis and treatment of PTLD and for concurrent preservation of the transplant function. In this study, known pathomechanisms, risk factors, preemptive management, and especially emerging treatment algorithms in PTLD were reviewed. Keywords: lymphoproliferative disease, Epstein-Barr virus, management, rituximab, ­preemptive therapy

  12. Prevention of EBV lymphoma development by oncolytic myxoma virus in a murine xenograft model of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Manbok, E-mail: manbok66@dankook.ac.kr [Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Rahman, Masmudur M. [Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Cogle, Christopher R. [Department of Hematology/Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); McFadden, Grant [Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States)

    2015-07-10

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) has been associated with a variety of epithelial and hematologic malignancies, including B-, T- and NK cell-lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease (HD), post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases (LPDs), nasopharyngeal and gastric carcinomas, smooth muscle tumors, and HIV-associated lymphomas. Currently, treatment options for EBV-associated malignancies are limited. We have previously shown that myxoma virus specifically targets various human solid tumors and leukemia cells in a variety of animal models, while sparing normal human or murine tissues. Since transplant recipients of bone marrow or solid organs often develop EBV-associated post-transplant LPDs and lymphoma, myxoma virus may be of utility to prevent EBV-associated malignancies in immunocompromised transplant patients where treatment options are frequently limited. In this report, we demonstrate the safety and efficacy of myxoma virus purging as a prophylactic strategy for preventing post-transplant EBV-transformed human lymphomas, using a highly immunosuppressed mouse xenotransplantation model. This provides support for developing myxoma virus as a potential oncolytic therapy for preventing EBV-associated LPDs following transplantation of bone marrow or solid organ allografts. - Highlights: • Myxoma virus effectively infects and purges EBV lymphoma cells in vivo. • Oncolytic myxoma virus effectively eradicates oncogenic EBV tumorigenesis. • Ex vivo pre-treatment of myxoma virus can be effective as a preventive treatment modality for post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases.

  13. Management of autoimmune hemolytic anemia in children and adolescents: A single center experience

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    Nazan Sarper

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To present and discuss the treatment of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA. Materials and Methods: The medical records of all patients (n=19 diagnosed in a tertiary hematology center between 1999 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed.Results: Median age at diagnosis of AIHA was 5 years (range: 4 months-17 years. In all, 13 patients had primary (idiopathic AIHA, whereas 2 had primary Evans Syndrome (ES, 2 had autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS+ES, and 1 had Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS+AIHA. Among the 13 primary idiopathic AIHA patients, 9 recovered following a 4-8-week course of prednisolone treatment without relapses, whereas 3 patients required a longer course of prednisolone. One AIHA patient that was very resistant to prednisolone recovered after cyclosporine A was added to the treatment. All patients with primary idiopathic AIHA were in remission for a median of 3 years (range: 4 months-10 years at the time this manuscript was written. Among the patients with primary ES, 2 had relapses similar to the ALPS patients. Splenectomy was performed in 1 primary ES patient, who at the time this report was written was also in remission. One ALPS patient required the addition of mycophenolate mofetil due to prednisolone resistance. The WAS patient was treatment resistant and died due to septicemia.Conclusions: Primary AIHA in pediatric patients generally has an acute onset and good response to corticosteroids. Primary or secondary ES has a chronic or relapsing course, and treatment may require other immunosuppressive agents in addition to corticosteroids. Complications of splenectomy must not be underestimated in patients with underlying immunodeficiency. AIHA often causes considerable morbidity and mortality in WAS.

  14. Regulation of an Autoimmune Model for Multiple Sclerosis in Th2-Biased GATA3 Transgenic Mice

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    Viromi Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available T helper (Th2 cells have been proposed to play a neuroprotective role in multiple sclerosis (MS. This is mainly based on “loss-of-function” studies in an animal model for MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, using blocking antibodies against Th2 related cytokines, and knockout mice lacking Th2-related molecules. We tested whether an increase of Th2 responses (“gain-of-function” approach could alter EAE, the approach of novel GATA binding protein 3 (GATA3-transgenic (tg mice that overexpress GATA3, a transcription factor required for Th2 differentiation. In EAE induced with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG35−55 peptide, GATA3-tg mice had a significantly delayed onset of disease and a less severe maximum clinical score, compared with wild-type C57BL/6 mice. Histologically, GATA3-tg mice had decreased levels of meningitis and demyelination in the spinal cord, and anti-inflammatory cytokine profiles immunologically, however both groups developed similar levels of MOG-specific lymphoproliferative responses. During the early stage, we detected higher levels of interleukin (IL-4 and IL-10, with MOG and mitogen stimulation of regional lymph node cells in GATA3-tg mice. During the late stage, only mitogen stimulation induced higher IL-4 and lower interferon-γ and IL-17 production in GATA3-tg mice. These results suggest that a preexisting bias toward a Th2 immune response may reduce the severity of inflammatory demyelinating diseases, including MS.

  15. Endocrine autoimmune disease: genetics become complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebolt, Janneke; Koeleman, Bobby P C; van Haeften, Timon W

    2010-12-01

    The endocrine system is a frequent target in pathogenic autoimmune responses. Type 1 diabetes and autoimmune thyroid disease are the prevailing examples. When several diseases cluster together in one individual, the phenomenon is called autoimmune polyglandular syndrome. Progress has been made in understanding the genetic factors involved in endocrine autoimmune diseases. Studies on monogenic autoimmune diseases such as autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1, immunodysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked and primary immune deficiencies helped uncover the role of key regulators in the preservation of immune tolerance. Alleles of the major histocompatibility complex have been known to contribute to the susceptibility to most forms of autoimmunity for more than 3 decades. Furthermore, sequencing studies revealed three non-major histocompatibility complex loci and some disease specific loci, which control T lymphocyte activation or signalling. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have enabled acceleration in the identification of novel (non-HLA) loci and hence other relevant immune response pathways. Interestingly, several loci are shared between autoimmune diseases, and surprisingly some work in opposite direction. This means that the same allele which predisposes to a certain autoimmune disease can be protective in another. Well powered GWAS in type 1 diabetes has led to the uncovering of a significant number of risk variants with modest effect. These studies showed that the innate immune system may also play a role in addition to the adaptive immune system. It is anticipated that next generation sequencing techniques will uncover other (rare) variants. For other autoimmune disease (such as autoimmune thyroid disease) GWAS are clearly needed. © 2010 The Authors. European Journal of Clinical Investigation © 2010 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  16. Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders without and with autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Bingjun; Zhong, Yi; Wang, Yanqiang; Dai, Yongqiang; Qiu, Wei; Zhang, Lei; Li, Haiyan; Lu, Zhengqi

    2014-01-01

    Background Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) can coexist with non-organ-specific or organ-specific autoimmune diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the features between NMOSD without and with autoimmune diseases, and NMOSD with non-organ-specific and organ-specific autoimmune diseases. Methods One hundred and fifty five NMOSD patients without autoimmune diseases (n = 115) and with autoimmune diseases (n = 40) were enrolled. NMOSD with autoimmune diseases ...

  17. Interferon-¿ regulates oxidative stress during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espejo, C.; Penkowa, Milena; Saez-Torres, I.

    2002-01-01

    Neurobiology, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis IFN-d, multiple sclerosis, neurodegeneration, oxidative stress......Neurobiology, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis IFN-d, multiple sclerosis, neurodegeneration, oxidative stress...

  18. Kaleidoscope of autoimmune diseases in HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roszkiewicz, Justyna; Smolewska, Elzbieta

    2016-11-01

    Within the last 30 years, the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has changed its status from inevitably fatal to chronic disorder with limited impact on life span. However, this breakthrough was mainly the effect of introduction of the aggressive antiviral treatment, which has led to the clinically significant increase in CD4+ cell count, resulting in fewer cases of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and improved management of opportunistic infections occurring in the course of the disease. The occurrence of a particular autoimmune disease depends on degree of immunosuppression of the HIV-positive patient. In 2002, four stages of autoimmunity were proposed in patients infected by HIV, based on the absolute CD4+ cell count, feature of AIDS as well as on the presence of autoimmune diseases. Spectrum of autoimmune diseases associated with HIV infection seems to be unexpectedly wide, involving several organs, such as lungs (sarcoidosis), thyroid gland (Graves' disease), liver (autoimmune hepatitis), connective tissue (systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, polyarteritis nodosa and other types of vasculitis, antiphospholipid syndrome) or hematopoietic system (autoimmune cytopenias). This paper contains the state of art on possible coincidences between HIV infection and a differential types of autoimmune diseases, including the potential mechanisms of this phenomenon. As the clinical manifestations of autoimmunization often mimic those inscribed in the course of HIV infection, health care providers should be aware of this rare but potentially deadly association and actively seek for its symptoms in their patients.

  19. Gender and autoimmune comorbidity in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magyari, Melinda; Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Pfleger, Claudia C

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The female preponderance in incidence of multiple sclerosis (MS) calls for investigations into sex differences in comorbidity with other autoimmune diseases (ADs). OBJECTIVES: To determine whether male and female patients with MS have a higher frequency of autoimmune comorbidity than...

  20. Autoimmune hepatitis and juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deen, M. E. J.; Porta, G.; Fiorot, F. J.; Campos, L. M. A.; Sallum, A. M. E.; Silva, C. A. A.

    Juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE) and autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) are both autoimmune disorders that are rare in children and have a widespread clinical manifestation. A few case reports have shown a JSLE-AIH associated disorder. To our knowledge, this is the first study that

  1. Autoimmune diseases in women with Turner's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kristian T; Rostgaard, Klaus; Bache, Iben

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In terms of number of X chromosomes, women with Turner's syndrome cytogenetically resemble men. An increased risk of autoimmune diseases has been observed among women with Turner's syndrome. This study was undertaken to investigate whether the autoimmune disease profile in women with T...

  2. Cardiovascular Involvement in Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya-Amaya, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (AD) represent a broad spectrum of chronic conditions that may afflict specific target organs or multiple systems with a significant burden on quality of life. These conditions have common mechanisms including genetic and epigenetics factors, gender disparity, environmental triggers, pathophysiological abnormalities, and certain subphenotypes. Atherosclerosis (AT) was once considered to be a degenerative disease that was an inevitable consequence of aging. However, research in the last three decades has shown that AT is not degenerative or inevitable. It is an autoimmune-inflammatory disease associated with infectious and inflammatory factors characterized by lipoprotein metabolism alteration that leads to immune system activation with the consequent proliferation of smooth muscle cells, narrowing arteries, and atheroma formation. Both humoral and cellular immune mechanisms have been proposed to participate in the onset and progression of AT. Several risk factors, known as classic risk factors, have been described. Interestingly, the excessive cardiovascular events observed in patients with ADs are not fully explained by these factors. Several novel risk factors contribute to the development of premature vascular damage. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of how traditional and nontraditional risk factors contribute to pathogenesis of CVD in AD. PMID:25177690

  3. Cystic Lesions in Autoimmune Pancreatitis

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    Macarena Gompertz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP can be chronic or recurrent, but frequently completely reversible after steroid treatment. A cystic lesion in AIP is a rare finding, and it can mimic a pancreatic cystic neoplasm. Difficulties in an exact diagnosis interfere with treatment, and surgery cannot be avoided in some cases. We report the history of a 63-year-old male presenting with jaundice and pruritus. AIP was confirmed by imaging and elevated IgG4 blood levels, and the patient completely recovered after corticosteroid therapy. One year later, he presented with a recurrent episode of AIP with elevated IgG4 levels, accompanied by the appearance of multiple intrapancreatic cystic lesions. All but 1 of these cysts disappeared after steroid treatment, but the remaining cyst in the pancreatic head was even somewhat larger 1 year later. Pancreatoduodenectomy was finally performed. Histology showed the wall of the cystic lesion to be fibrotic; the surrounding pancreatic tissue presented fibrosis, atrophy and lymphoplasmacytic infiltration by IgG4-positive cells, without malignant elements. Our case illustrates the rare possibility that cystic lesions can be part of AIP. These pseudocysts appear in the pancreatic segments involved in the autoimmune disease and can be a consequence of the local inflammation or related to ductal strictures. Steroid treatment should be initiated, after which these cysts can completely disappear with recovery from AIP. Surgical intervention may be necessary in some exceptional cases.

  4. Autoimmunity, infectious immunity, and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Eiji; Kobayashi, Kazuko; Matsunami, Yukana; Shen, Lianhua; Quan, Nanhu; Makarova, Marina; Suchkov, Sergey V; Ayada, Kiyoshi; Oguma, Keiji; Lopez, Luis R

    2009-11-01

    Vascular inflammation is common in certain systemic autoimmune diseases and contributes to the oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) and oxLDL/beta2-glycoprotein I (beta2GPI) complex formation. These complexes have been implicated as proatherogenic autoantigens that participate in the development of atherosclerotic disease. We have demonstrated that the in vitro macrophage uptake of oxLDL/beta2GPI complexes increases in the presence of IgG anti-beta2GPI antibodies and that IgG immune complexes containing oxLDL/beta2GPI upregulate the expression of both scavenger and Fcgamma receptors to activate beta2GPI specific T cells. Some persistent infections may cause immune responses that promote atherogenesis. Cellular immunity (Th1) against Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) derived heat shock protein 60 (Hp-HSP60) cross-reacts with endogenous HSP60 to cause cardiovascular disease likely by molecular mimicry. Infectious cellular response may be proatherogenic,while the humoral response (antibody production) maybe protective. We review the recent progress in our understanding of autoimmunity and infectious immunity that promote atherosclerosis.

  5. Warm antibody autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalfa, Theodosia A

    2016-12-02

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a rare and heterogeneous disease that affects 1 to 3/100 000 patients per year. AIHA caused by warm autoantibodies (w-AIHA), ie, antibodies that react with their antigens on the red blood cell optimally at 37°C, is the most common type, comprising ∼70% to 80% of all adult cases and ∼50% of pediatric cases. About half of the w-AIHA cases are called primary because no specific etiology can be found, whereas the rest are secondary to other recognizable underlying disorders. This review will focus on the postulated immunopathogenetic mechanisms in idiopathic and secondary w-AIHA and report on the rare cases of direct antiglobulin test-negative AIHA, which are even more likely to be fatal because of inherent characteristics of the causative antibodies, as well as because of delays in diagnosis and initiation of appropriate treatment. Then, the characteristics of w-AIHA associated with genetically defined immune dysregulation disorders and special considerations on its management will be discussed. Finally, the standard treatment options and newer therapeutic approaches for this chronic autoimmune blood disorder will be reviewed. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology. All rights reserved.

  6. Monogenic autoimmune diseases of the endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew B; Hattersley, Andrew T; Flanagan, Sarah E

    2016-10-01

    The most common endocrine diseases, type 1 diabetes, hyperthyroidism, and hypothyroidism, are the result of autoimmunity. Clustering of autoimmune endocrinopathies can result from polygenic predisposition, or more rarely, may present as part of a wider syndrome due to a mutation within one of seven genes. These monogenic autoimmune diseases show highly variable phenotypes both within and between families with the same mutations. The average age of onset of the monogenic forms of autoimmune endocrine disease is younger than that of the common polygenic forms, and this feature combined with the manifestation of other autoimmune diseases, specific hallmark features, or both, can inform clinicians as to the relevance of genetic testing. A genetic diagnosis can guide medical management, give an insight into prognosis, inform families of recurrence risk, and facilitate prenatal diagnoses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The use of stem cells for the treatment of autoimmune diseases

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    S.B. Rosa

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases constitute a heterogeneous group of conditions commonly treated with anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressant and immunomodulating drugs, with satisfactory results in most cases. Nevertheless, some patients become resistant to conventional therapy. The use of high doses of drugs in such cases results in the need for bone marrow reconstitution, a situation which has stimulated research into the use of hematopoietic stem cells in autoimmune disease therapy. Stem cell transplantation in such diseases aims to destroy the self-reacting immune cells and produce a new functional immune system, as well as substitute cells for tissue damaged in the course of the disease. Significant results, such as the reestablishment of tolerance and a decrease in the recurrence of autoimmune disease, have been reported following stem cell transplantation in patients with autoimmune disease in Brazil and throughout the world. These results suggest that stem cell transplantation has the potential to become an important therapeutic approach to the treatment of various autoimmune diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis, systemic sclerosis, Crohn's disease, autoimmune blood cytopenias, and type I diabetes mellitus.

  8. Frequent monitoring of Epstein-Barr virus DNA load in unfractionated whole blood is essential for early detection of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease in high-risk patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevens, SJC; Verschuuren, EAM; Pronk, [No Value; van der Bij, W; Harmsen, MC; The, TH; Meijer, CJLM; van den Brule, AJC; Middeldorp, JM

    2001-01-01

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) is a frequent and severe Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated complication in transplantation recipients that is caused by iatrogenic suppression of T-cell function, The diagnostic value of weekly EBV DNA load monitoring was investigated in

  9. Insulin autoimmune syndrome induced by methimazole in a Korean girl with Graves' disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Hee Lee

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypoglycemia was detected in a 15-year-old girl due to loss of consciousness. She was diagnosed with Graves' disease and was being treated with methimazole for the past 4 months. A paradoxically increased insulin levels was found when she suffered from the hypoglycemic episode. An imaging study showed no mass lesion in the pancreas, and insulin antibodies were found in the serum. She was diagnosed with insulin autoimmune syndrome. Her HLA typing was performed, and it revealed HLA-DRB1 *04:06. The patient was treated with a corticosteroid for 2 months. After discontinuing the steroid, the insulin antibody titer decreased dramatically, and she did not have any episode of hypoglycemia since. This is the first report of insulin autoimmune syndrome in a Korean girl, and we have revealed the connection between HLA type and insulin autoimmune syndrome in Korea.

  10. Interleukin-35 induces regulatory B cells that suppress autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ren-Xi; Yu, Cheng-Rong; Dambuza, Ivy M; Mahdi, Rashid M; Dolinska, Monika B; Sergeev, Yuri V; Wingfield, Paul T; Kim, Sung-Hye; Egwuagu, Charles E

    2014-06-01

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10)-producing regulatory B (Breg) cells suppress autoimmune disease, and increased numbers of Breg cells prevent host defense to infection and promote tumor growth and metastasis by converting resting CD4(+) T cells to regulatory T (Treg) cells. The mechanisms mediating the induction and development of Breg cells remain unclear. Here we show that IL-35 induces Breg cells and promotes their conversion to a Breg subset that produces IL-35 as well as IL-10. Treatment of mice with IL-35 conferred protection from experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU), and mice lacking IL-35 (p35 knockout (KO) mice) or defective in IL-35 signaling (IL-12Rβ2 KO mice) produced less Breg cells endogenously or after treatment with IL-35 and developed severe uveitis. Adoptive transfer of Breg cells induced by recombinant IL-35 suppressed EAU when transferred to mice with established disease, inhibiting pathogenic T helper type 17 (TH17) and TH1 cells while promoting Treg cell expansion. In B cells, IL-35 activates STAT1 and STAT3 through the IL-35 receptor comprising the IL-12Rβ2 and IL-27Rα subunits. As IL-35 also induced the conversion of human B cells into Breg cells, these findings suggest that IL-35 may be used to induce autologous Breg and IL-35(+) Breg cells and treat autoimmune and inflammatory disease.

  11. Autoimmune Gastrointestinal Paralysis: Failure of Conventional Treatment without Immunomodulation

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    Craig Weinkauf

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of the rare enteric nervous system (ENS manifestations of paraneoplastic syndromes, which are most frequently associated with small cell lung cancer (SCLC, is poorly understood and described. Patients with neuroendocrine-derived tumors can develop B-cell reactivity towards the tumor with cross-reactivity for neurons located in the submucosal and myenteric ganglia of the ENS. The ensuing autoimmune neuritis causes aperistalsis and severe gastrointestinal (GI dysfunction. Immune-directed therapy is not the standard of care but may be paramount for patient recovery. Our patient, a 63-year-old man with recent symptoms of esophageal dysmotility and newly diagnosed SCLC was hospitalized with nausea, emesis, and constipation. After an extensive work-up that included laparoscopy and celiotomy with bowel resection, we diagnosed what we refer to as Autoimmune Paraneoplastic Chronic Intestinal Pseudoobstruction (AP-CIPO. Unlike the few clinically similar reports, SCLC and AP-CIPO were diagnosed in our patient within weeks of each other, which presented the dilemma of treating the two processes simultaneously. In this report, we review the relevant literature and describe our patient’s course. We believe standard chemotherapy is not effective treatment for AP-CIPO. Based on evidence discussed herein, we suggest initiating autoimmune-directed therapy before or simultaneous with cancer-directed therapy.

  12. Immunomodulatory strategies prevent the development of autoimmune emphysema

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    Kraskauskiene Vita

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The presence of anti-endothelial cell antibodies and pathogenic T cells may reflect an autoimmune component in the pathogenesis of emphysema. Whether immune modulatory strategies can protect against the development of emphysema is not known. Methods Sprague Dawley rats were immunized with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC to induce autoimmune emphysema and treated with intrathymic HUVEC-injection and pristane. Measurements of alveolar airspace enlargement, cytokine levels, immuno histochemical, western blot analysis, and T cell repertoire of the lung tissue were performed. Results The immunomodulatory strategies protected lungs against cell death as demonstrated by reduced numbers of TUNEL and active caspase-3 positive cells and reduced levels of active caspase-3, when compared with lungs from HUVEC-immunized rats. Immunomodulatory strategies also suppressed anti-endothelial antibody production and preserved CNTF, IL-1alpha and VEGF levels. The immune deviation effects of the intrathymic HUVEC-injection were associated with an expansion of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells. Pristane treatment decreased the proportion of T cells expressing receptor beta-chain, Vβ16.1 in the lung tissue. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that interventions classically employed to induce central T cell tolerance (thymic inoculation of antigen or to activate innate immune responses (pristane treatment can prevent the development of autoimmune emphysema.

  13. Therapeutic effects of cisplatin on rat experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Bo; Schluesener, Hermann J

    2006-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a prototypic Th1-mediated autoimmune inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS), and serves as a model for the human demyelinating disease, multiple sclerosis. Cisplatin is a drug widely used in the treatment of a variety of human neoplasias, such as advanced bladder carcinoma, adrenal cortex carcinoma, breast cancer, head and neck or lung carcinoma. Cisplatin binds to DNA and interferes with cellular repair and other mechanism, which eventually result into cell death. It is known that cisplatin can induce immunosuppressive effects through inhibition of T cell activity. Therefore we analyzed the anti-inflammatory effects of cisplatin in a rat EAE model. EAE was induced in male LEW rats by immunizing with a synthetic peptide of guinea pig myelin basic protein. The development of EAE and neurological signs were evaluated by a standard protocol. Immunohistochemistry was applied to show immune cell infiltration into the CNS. Early treatment of EAE rats with cisplatin effectively ameliorated the development of disease and provided a significant protective effect compared to control rats. Further, histological analysis demonstrated that the formation of the typical perivascular cuffs and brain infiltration of monocytes and lymphocytes were complete absent in cisplatin treated rats, while abundant T cell infiltration was seen in the CNS of EAE rats. Our data show that cisplatin has protective effects in EAE, indicating that cisplatin could be a candidate in the treatment of human CNS autoimmunity.

  14. Elderly female with Autoimmune hemolytic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupam Dey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA is a rare disease with an estimated prevalence of around 17/100,000. It is often difficult to diagnose and treat AIHA, especially in elderly. A 60-year-old female was admitted with the complaints of low grade fever, on-off for 6 months, progressive fatigue and dyspnea on exertion. She was transfused with three units of blood within these 6 months. Examination revealed pallor, edema, hemic murmur, and palpable liver. Hb was 2.9 gm%, T Bil 5.2 mg/dl, ESR 160 mm, and reticulocyte count 44.05%. Direct Coombs test was positive, anti-nuclear antibody (ANA and Anti ds DNA were positive. A diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE with AIHA was considered and patient was transfused with two units of packed red cells and put on steroid (prednisolone at 1 mg/kg body weight daily. After 3 weeks, her Hb had increased to 10.4 gm% with gross clinical improvement.

  15. [Two families of X-linked lymphoproliferative disease type 1 characterized by agammaglobulinemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W Y; Chen, J S; Zhao, Q; Dai, R X; Wang, Y P; Zhao, H Y; Chen, X M; Xue, X H; Sun, X Y; Tang, X M; Zhang, Y; Ding, Y; Zhao, X D; Zhang, Z Y

    2017-05-04

    Objective: To investigate the clinical and immunological laboratory features, mutations in SH2D1A gene and SAP protein expression in four children of two families with X-linked lymphoproliferative disease type 1(XLP-1). Method: Four patients (Family A including Patient 1 and Patient 2, Family B including Patient 3 and Patient 4) and their maternal relatives were enrolled in this study. The clinical manifestation, EBV infection status and chest CT scan were analyzed. The absolute and relative numbers of lymphocyte subsets, T lymphocyte proliferative response, SAP protein expression were assessed by flow cytometry. Quantification of signal joint TCR rearrangementexcision circle (sjTRECs), CDR3 spectratyping of TCRvβ and gene mutation of SH2D1A were detected by PCR based on genomic DNA or cDNA. Result: Four male patients from two families were diagnosed with XLP-1. The ages of disease onset were more than 1 year, more than 1 year, more than 1 month and 6 months. The ages at diagnosis were nine years and ten months, sixteen years and eight months, fourteen years and ten months, four years and nine months. All patients had recurrent infections and EBV infection. Patients 1, 2, and 3 had agammaglobulinemia and Patient 4 had hypogammaglobulinemia. Chest CT scan showed all patients had atelectasis and pneumonia, and Patient 3 had bronchiectasis. Patient 3 was diagnosised as Burkitt lymphoma. For immunological function, all patients exhibited reduced CD4/CD8 ratios, increased numbers of exhausted T lymphocyte, decreased number of NK cell. The numbers of total B lymphocyte and naïve B lymphocyte were normal, but the number of memory B lymphocyte declined in all cases. Four patients' copy numbers of sjTRECs were low and CDR3 spectratypings of TCRvβ showed mildly skewed. But their T lymphocyte proliferative response was normal. SAP protein expression in four cases were measured by flow cytometry. Two patients from Family A were absent and two patients from Family B showed

  16. Management of Microvascular Complications in Secondary Diabetes Associated with Autoimmune Diseases — Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemes-Nagy Enikő

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The association of multiple autoimmune diseases may represent the main focus of physicians treating patients with such pathology presenting no comorbidities of different etiology. However, autoimmune diseases and side effects of drugs may lead to development of silent health-threatening diseases that should be identified promptly. We present the case of an elderly, obese, Caucasian female patient suffering of autoimmune thyroiditis, rheumatoid arthritis, and psoriasis, who developed arterial hypertension and insulin-treated secondary diabetes mellitus (due to long-term oral corticotherapy with microvascular end-organ changes. Retinal imaging for capillary anomalies identified mild non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy with apparent diabetic macular edema and hypertensive retinopathy. Laboratory investigations looking for further vascular risk factors revealed zinc deficiency, elevated serum homocysteine levels, and constantly high C-reactive protein concentration. Attention should be payed to the proper investigation of patients with autoimmune diseases, targeting the early diagnosis of microvasculopathies due to autoimmune diseases or possible medication side effects, in order to prevent end-organ damage.

  17. Pemphigus autoimmunity: Hypotheses and realities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grando, Sergei A

    2011-01-01

    The goal of contemporary research in pemphigus vulgaris and pemphigus foliaceus is to achieve and maintain clinical remission without corticosteroids. Recent advances of knowledge on pemphigus autoimmunity scrutinize old dogmas, resolve controversies, and open novel perspectives for treatment. Elucidation of intimate mechanisms of keratinocyte detachment and death in pemphigus has challenged the monopathogenic explanation of disease immunopathology. Over 50 organ-specific and non-organ-specific antigens can be targeted by pemphigus autoimmunity, including desmosomal cadherins and other adhesion molecules, PERP cholinergic and other cell membrane (CM) receptors, and mitochondrial proteins. The initial insult is sustained by the autoantibodies to the cell membrane receptor antigens triggering the intracellular signaling by Src, epidermal growth factor receptor kinase, protein kinases A and C, phospholipase C, mTOR, p38 MAPK, JNK, other tyrosine kinases, and calmodulin that cause basal cell shrinkage and ripping desmosomes off the CM. Autoantibodies synergize with effectors of apoptotic and oncotic pathways, serine proteases, and inflammatory cytokines to overcome the natural resistance and activate the cell death program in keratinocytes. The process of keratinocyte shrinkage/detachment and death via apoptosis/oncosis has been termed apoptolysis to emphasize that it is triggered by the same signal effectors and mediated by the same cell death enzymes. The natural course of pemphigus has improved due to a substantial progress in developing of the steroid-sparing therapies combining the immunosuppressive and direct anti-acantholytic effects. Further elucidation of the molecular mechanisms mediating immune dysregulation and apoptolysis in pemphigus should improve our understanding of disease pathogenesis and facilitate development of steroid-free treatment of patients. PMID:21939410

  18. Adaptive immunity in autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhi, Maria Serena; Ma, Yun; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina; Vergani, Diego

    2010-01-01

    The histological lesion of interface hepatitis, with its dense portal cell infiltrate consisting of lymphocytes, monocytes/macrophages and plasma cells, was the first to suggest an autoaggressive cellular immune attack in the pathogenesis of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). Immunohistochemical studies, focused on the phenotype of inflammatory cells infiltrating the liver parenchyma, have shown a predominance of alphabeta-T cells. Amongst these cells, the majority have been CD4 helper/inducers, while a sizeable minority have consisted of CD8 cytotoxic/suppressors. Lymphocytes on non-T cell lineage included natural killer cells, monocytes/macrophages and B lymphocytes. For autoimmunity to arise, the self-antigenic peptide, embraced by an human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II molecule, must be presented to an uncommitted T helper (T(H)0) lymphocyte by professional antigen-presenting cells. Once activated and according to the presence in the milieu of interleukin 12 (IL-12) or IL-4, T(H)0 lymphocytes can differentiate into T(H)1 cells, which are pivotal to macrophage activation; enhance HLA class I expression, rendering liver cells vulnerable to CD8 T-cell attack; and induce HLA class II expression on hepatocytes; or they can differentiate into T(H)2 cells, which produce IL-4, IL-10 and IL-13, cytokines favouring autoantibody production by B lymphocytes. Autoantigen recognition is tightly controlled by regulatory mechanisms, such as those exerted by CD4+CD25(high) regulatory T cells. Numerical and functional regulatory T cell impairment characterises AIH and permits the perpetuation of effector immune responses with ensuing persistent liver destruction. Advances in the study of autoreactive T cells stem mostly from AIH type 2, where the main autoantigen, cytochrome P450IID6 (CYP2D6), is known to enable characterisation of antigen-specific immune responses. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Criteria for Environmentally Associated Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, K. Michael; Parks, Christine G.; Germolec, Dori R.; Leung, Patrick S.C.; Selmi, Carlo; Humble, Michael C.; Rose, Noel R.

    2012-01-01

    Increasing evidence supports a role for the environment in the development of autoimmune diseases, as reviewed in the accompanying three papers from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Expert Panel Workshop. An important unresolved issue, however, is the development of criteria for identifying autoimmune disease phenotypes for which the environment plays a causative role, herein referred to as environmentally associated autoimmune diseases. There are several different areas in which such criteria need to be developed, including: 1) identifying the necessary and sufficient data to define environmental risk factors for autoimmune diseases meeting current classification criteria; 2) establishing the existence of and criteria for new environmentally associated autoimmune disorders that do not meet current disease classification criteria; and 3) identifying in clinical practice specific environmental agents that induce autoimmune disease in individual patients. Here we discuss approaches that could be useful for developing criteria in these three areas, as well as factors that should be considered in evaluating the evidence for criteria that can distinguish individuals with such disorders from individuals without such disorders with high sensitivity and specificity. Current studies suggest that multiple lines of complementary evidence will be important and that in many cases there will be clinical, serologic, genetic, epigenetic, and/or other laboratory features that could be incorporated as criteria for environmentally associated autoimmune diseases to improve diagnosis and treatment and possibly allow for preventative strategies in the future. PMID:22771005

  20. Hairy B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder and its differential diagnosis: a case with long-term follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kensuke Matsuda

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Hairy B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder (HBLD is one of chronic polyclonal B-cell lymphocytosis. We report a 47-year-old female Japanese patient diagnosed as having HBLD based on lymphocytosis with hairy cell appearance and characteristic phenotypes including CD11c+, and without B-cell monoclonalities. She was a non-smoker, and possessed HLA-DR4. She has been closely followed up without treatment and lymphoma development for over five years. Although this disease is quite rare and has been reported, to our knowledge, in only 13 Japanese cases, an accurate diagnosis, particularly differential diagnosis from persistent polyclonal B-cell lymphocytosis or hairy cell leukemia-Japanese variant is essential for the prevention of unnecessary treatments.

  1. Rituximab for lymphoproliferative disease prior to haematopoietic stem cell transplantation for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trahair, Toby N; Wainstein, Brynn; Manton, Nicholas; Bourne, Anthony J; Ziegler, John B; Rice, Michael; Russell, Susan J

    2008-02-01

    Lymphoproliferative disease (LPD) is a complication of congenital and acquired immunodeficiency states. There are a number of treatment options for LPD arising after haematopoietic stem cell or solid organ transplantation including reduction of immunosuppression, targeted therapies, such as the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, rituximab, and EBV specific cytotoxic lymphocytes. Treatment of LPD in children with congenital immunodeficiency syndromes remains unsatisfactory and is associated with a high mortality rate. We recently managed an infant found to have polymorphic LPD concurrent with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) had to be deferred because of progressive LPD. Treatment with rituximab resulted in regression of the LPD following which the patient received a 5/6 HLA matched umbilical cord blood (UCB) transplant. The patient remains well 20 months following transplantation. Rituximab treatment may have a useful role in the control of LPD associated with congenital immunodeficiency prior to HSCT. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Autoimmune pancreatocholangitis, non-autoimmune pancreatitis and primary sclerosing cholangitis: a comparative morphological and immunological analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Esposito

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Autoimmune pancreatocholangitis (AIPC is an emerging, not completely characterized disease. Aim of this study was the comprehensive evaluation of a series of AIPC patients, who were diagnosed and treated in a European institution between January 2003 and July 2006. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Thirty-three patients with histologically confirmed AIPC were analyzed and compared to 20 patients with non-autoimmune chronic pancreatitis (CP and 14 patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC. Clinical features and conventional histopathology were taken into account. Immunohistochemistry and real-time quantitative PCR were used for the characterization of the inflammatory infiltrate and the stromal reaction. AIPC was localized in the pancreatic head in 94% of the patients. Intra- and/or extrapancreatic biliary tract involvement was present in 64% of the cases. The number of infiltrating T-lymphocytes, macrophages and total plasma cells was significantly higher in AIPC than in CP (3-, 4- and 8-fold increase, respectively. The absolute number of IgG4-positive plasma cells was higher in AIPC than in CP and PSC (7-fold and 35-fold increase, respectively, but significance was only reached in comparison with PSC. CXCR5- and CXCL13-positive cells were almost exclusively detected in AIPC. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: AIPC is mainly a disease of the pancreatic head with possible extension into the periphery of the gland and/or into the biliary tract/gallbladder. The morphology of AIPC, as well as the immune- and stromal reaction is characteristic and comparable between cases with and without biliary tract involvement. Immunological markers (IgG4, CXCR5, CXCL13 can be of diagnostic relevance in specific settings.

  3. Development of a Traumatic Brain Injury Assessment Score Using Novel Biomarkers Discovered Through Autoimmune Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-03

    autoimmune processes mediating neuropathology. These include multiple sclerosis, myasthenia gravis, systemic lupus erythematosus, Guillain Barre ...the hypothesis that immune-based therapies may have a place in treating injuries of the CNS, particularly in conjunction with stem cell repair (38; 46...followed by centrifugation (3000 x g, 5 min, room temp) (35). Delipidated proteins were physically recovered as a pad positioned at the aqueous

  4. Presence of Autoimmune Antibody in Chikungunya Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wirach Maek-a-nantawat

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya infection has recently re-emerged as an important arthropod-borne disease in Thailand. Recently, Southern Thailand was identified as a potentially endemic area for the chikungunya virus. Here, we report a case of severe musculoskeletal complication, presenting with muscle weakness and swelling of the limbs. During the investigation to exclude autoimmune muscular inflammation, high titers of antinuclear antibody were detected. This is the report of autoimmunity detection associated with an arbovirus infection. The symptoms can mimic autoimmune polymyositis disease, and the condition requires close monitoring before deciding to embark upon prolonged specific treatment with immunomodulators.

  5. liver cirrhosis from autoimmune hepatitis in a nigerian woman

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    like autoimmune thyroiditis, celiac disease and ulcerative colitis, with about 25% having cirrhosis at ... to immunosuppressive therapy. Keywords: Autoimmune hepatitis, Autoimmune liver disease, Chronic liver disease, Nigeria ... who is also exposed to environmental triggering factors.2,5,8 Subsequently, the autoimmune.

  6. Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 and NALP5, parathyroid autoantigen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alimohammadi, Mohammad; Bjorklund, Peyman; Hallgren, Asa; Pontynen, Nora; Szinnai, Gabor; Shikama, Noriko; Keller, Marcel P.; Ekwall, Olov; Kinkel, Sarah A.; Husebye, Eystein S.; Gustafsson, Jan; Rorsman, Fredrik; Peltonen, Leena; Betterle, Corrado; Perheentupa, Jaakko; Akerstrom, Goran; Westin, Gunnar; Scott, Hamish S.; Hollaender, Georg A.; Kampe, Olle

    2008-01-01

    Background: Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS-1) is a multiorgan autoimmune disorder caused by mutations in AIRE, the autoimmune regulator gene. Though recent studies concerning AIRE deficiency have begun to elucidate the molecular pathogenesis of organ-specific autoimmunity in patients

  7. The autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy or autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankisch, Tim O; Jaeckel, Elmar; Strassburg, Christian P

    2009-08-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndromes are rare autoimmune endocrinopathies that are associated with nonendocrine autoimmunopathies. Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED), also named autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1 (APS-1), is distinguished from autoimmune polyglandular syndrome 2 (APS-2). Major disease components of APECED are adrenal insufficiency, hypoparathyroidism, and candidiasis. The diagnosis is established by the presence of two out of the three components. Minor clinical features include autoimmune hepatitis, which occurs in up to 20% of APECED patients, and ranges from a mild to a fulminant course. The disease mostly affects juvenile patients from Sardegna, Italy, Finland, and Iran (Iranian Jews), but it also occurs in other ethnic groups. The AIRE gene responsible for APECED is expressed in cells involved in induction and maintenance of immune tolerance. Genetic alterations of the single gene are associated with APECED. Because a specific therapy is not currently available, treatment consists of hormone replacement and caring for clinical symptoms. Copyright Thieme Medical Publishers.

  8. Cyclosporine Treatment in a Patient with Concurrent Autoimmune Urticaria and Autoimmune Hepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Ju, Hye Young; Kim, Hei Sung; Kim, Hyung Ok; Park, Young Min

    2009-01-01

    Patients with autoimmune urticaria show a higher rate of seropositivity for other autoantibodies and often have a history of autoimmune conditions. They also tend to have more severe symptoms and to have a poor response to conventional antihistamine treatment. Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic inflammatory disorder in which progressive liver injury is thought to be the result of a T-cell-mediated immunologic attack against liver cells in genetically predisposed individuals. While the associat...

  9. Treating Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patients Search FAQs Treating Infertility Page Navigation ▼ ACOG Pregnancy Book Treating Infertility Patient Education FAQs Treating Infertility Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Treating ...

  10. [Autoimmune diseases of the thyroid gland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allelein, S; Feldkamp, J; Schott, M

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases of the thyroid gland are considered to be the most frequent cause of thyroid gland disorders. Autoimmune thyroid diseases consist of two subgroups: autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT) and Graves' disease. The AIT is the most common human autoimmune disease. Infiltration of the thyroid gland with cytotoxic T‑cells can lead to an initial thyrotoxicosis und during the course to hypothyroidism due to destruction of the thyroid gland. Substitution with Levothyroxine is indicated for manifest hypothyroidism and subclinical hypothyroidism with increased thyroid antibodies with the intention of normalizing the serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). Graves' disease is characterized by the appearance of stimulating TSH receptor antibodies leading to hyperthyroidism. Endocrine ophthalmopathy may also occur. Ablative therapy with radioiodine therapy or thyroidectomy is administered to patients with Graves' disease without remission after at least 1 year of antithyroid drug therapy.

  11. Autoimmune pancreatitis : Diagnostic and immunological aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. van Heerde (Marianne)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractAutoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is the pancreatic manifestation of a systemic fibro- inflammatory disease, characterized by infiltration with lymphoplasmacytic cells and extensive fibrosis, which leads to morphological changes (swelling, mass forming) and organ dysfunction. Often, but

  12. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-01-01

    Summary The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorders. In cold agglutinin disease, efficient therapies have been developed in order to target the pathogenic B-cell clone, but complement modulation remains promising in some clinical situations. No established therapy exists for secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria, and the possibility of therapeutic complement inhibition is interesting. Currently, complement modulation is not clinically documented in any autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The most relevant candidate drugs and possible target levels of action are discussed. PMID:26696798

  13. Th17 Response and Inflammatory Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janelle C. Waite

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The proinflammatory activity of T helper 17 (Th17 cells can be beneficial to the host during infection. However, uncontrolled or inappropriate Th17 activation has been linked to several autoimmune and autoinflammatory pathologies. Indeed, preclinical and clinical data show that Th17 cells are associated with several autoimmune diseases such as arthritis, multiple sclerosis, psoriasis, and lupus. Furthermore, targeting the interleukin-17 (IL-17 pathway has attenuated disease severity in preclinical models of autoimmune diseases. Interestingly, a recent report brings to light a potential role for Th17 cells in the autoinflammatory disorder adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD. Whether Th17 cells are the cause or are directly involved in AOSD remains to be shown. In this paper, we discuss the biology of Th17 cells, their role in autoimmune disease development, and in AOSD in particular, as well as the growing interest of the pharmaceutical industry in their use as therapeutic targets.

  14. Autoimmune Cytopenias in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni D'Arena

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical course of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL may be complicated at any time by autoimmune phenomena.The most common ones are hematologic disorders, such as autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA and immune thrombocytopenia (ITP. Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA and autoimmune agranulocytosis (AG are, indeed, more rarely seen. However, they are probably underestimated due to the possible misleading presence of cytopenias secondary to leukemic bone marrow involvement or to chemotherapy cytotoxicity. The source of autoantibodies is still uncertain, despite the most convincing data are in favor of the involvement of resting normal B-cells. In general, excluding the specific treatment of underlying CLL, the managementof these complications is not different from that of idiopathic autoimmune cytopenias or of those associated to other causes. Among different therapeutic approaches, monoclonal antibody rituximab, given alone or in combination, has shown to be very effective.

  15. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-09-01

    The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorders. In cold agglutinin disease, efficient therapies have been developed in order to target the pathogenic B-cell clone, but complement modulation remains promising in some clinical situations. No established therapy exists for secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria, and the possibility of therapeutic complement inhibition is interesting. Currently, complement modulation is not clinically documented in any autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The most relevant candidate drugs and possible target levels of action are discussed.

  16. Cardiovascular disease biomarkers across autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahearn, Joseph; Shields, Kelly J; Liu, Chau-Ching; Manzi, Susan

    2015-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease is increasingly recognized as a major cause of premature mortality among those with autoimmune disorders. There is an urgent need to identify those patients with autoimmune disease who are at risk for CVD so as to optimize therapeutic intervention and ultimately prevention. Accurate identification, monitoring and stratification of such patients will depend upon a panel of biomarkers of cardiovascular disease. This review will discuss some of the most recent biomarkers of cardiovascular diseases in autoimmune disease, including lipid oxidation, imaging biomarkers to characterize coronary calcium, plaque, and intima media thickness, biomarkers of inflammation and activated complement, genetic markers, endothelial biomarkers, and antiphospholipid antibodies. Clinical implementation of these biomarkers will not only enhance patient care but also likely accelerate the pharmaceutical pipeline for targeted intervention to reduce or eliminate cardiovascular disease in the setting of autoimmunity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Alpha-Methyldopa-Induced Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia in the Third Trimester of Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charalampos Grigoriadis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-methyldopa has been demonstrated to be safe for use during pregnancy and is now used to treat gestational hypertension. In pregnancy, alpha-methyldopa-induced autoimmune hemolytic anemia does not have typical features and the severity of symptoms ranges from mild fatigue to dyspnea, respiratory failure, and death if left untreated. A case of alpha-methyldopa-induced autoimmune hemolytic anemia in a 36-year-old gravida 2, para 1 woman at 37+6 weeks of gestation is reported herein along with the differential diagnostic procedure and the potential risks to the mother and the fetus.

  18. Effect of chemotherapy on autoimmune hepatitis in thymoma: a case report and literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Mejri, Nesrine; Chabchoub, Imen; Gargouri, Ines; Belaid, Imtinen; Ezairi, Faten; Hmissa, Sihem; Ben Ahmed, Slim

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) has rarely been described as an autoimmune paraneoplastic syndrome of thymoma. This case is the seventh case of AIH revealed by cholestasis few years after the diagnosis of thymoma and the first case treated with chemotherapy alone. We report in this paper a new approach to this rare severe condition. A 29 year-old man presented with chest pain and dyspnea with a history of thymoma surgically removed 4 years ago. CT scan showed the recurrence of an anterior mediasti...

  19. Treatment of patients with severe autoimmune hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Finn Stolze

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a progressive inflammatory diseases of unknown origin that is characterised by a necro-inflammatory and fibrotic process and may result in liver failure or uncompensated liver cirrhosis. Normally AIH is responsive to immunosuppressive therapy, and treatment aims...... and tacrolimus) might salvage patients from transplantation. Mycophenolate mofetil may also improve liver tests and reduce the requirement for corticosteroids. Besides, sirolimus is effective for treatment of de novo autoimmune hepatitis that sometimes develops after liver transplantation. Initial experience...

  20. Coherent Somatic Mutation in Autoimmune Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Kenneth Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Many aspects of autoimmune disease are not well understood, including the specificities of autoimmune targets, and patterns of co-morbidity and cross-heritability across diseases. Prior work has provided evidence that somatic mutation caused by gene conversion and deletion at segmentally duplicated loci is relevant to several diseases. Simple tandem repeat (STR) sequence is highly mutable, both somatically and in the germ-line, and somatic STR mutations are observed under inflammation. Results Protein-coding genes spanning STRs having markers of mutability, including germ-line variability, high total length, repeat count and/or repeat similarity, are evaluated in the context of autoimmunity. For the initiation of autoimmune disease, antigens whose autoantibodies are the first observed in a disease, termed primary autoantigens, are informative. Three primary autoantigens, thyroid peroxidase (TPO), phogrin (PTPRN2) and filaggrin (FLG), include STRs that are among the eleven longest STRs spanned by protein-coding genes. This association of primary autoantigens with long STR sequence is highly significant (). Long STRs occur within twenty genes that are associated with sixteen common autoimmune diseases and atherosclerosis. The repeat within the TTC34 gene is an outlier in terms of length and a link with systemic lupus erythematosus is proposed. Conclusions The results support the hypothesis that many autoimmune diseases are triggered by immune responses to proteins whose DNA sequence mutates somatically in a coherent, consistent fashion. Other autoimmune diseases may be caused by coherent somatic mutations in immune cells. The coherent somatic mutation hypothesis has the potential to be a comprehensive explanation for the initiation of many autoimmune diseases. PMID:24988487

  1. Encephalopathy Associated With Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

    OpenAIRE

    li A. Raouf; Gianluca Tamagno

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATDs) are immune-endocrine disorders affecting the thyroid gland and, eventually, also a number of other systemic targets, including the brain and the nervous system. Encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease (EAATD) is a rare, heterogeneous condition arising from the background of an ATD. It is characterised by neurological and/or psychiatric symptoms with acute or sub-acute onset, and virtually any neurological or psychiatric symptom can appear. ...

  2. Automation, consolidation, and integration in autoimmune diagnostics

    OpenAIRE

    Tozzoli, Renato; D?Aurizio, Federica; Villalta, Danilo; Bizzaro, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades, we have witnessed an extraordinary change in autoimmune diagnostics, characterized by the progressive evolution of analytical technologies, the availability of new tests, and the explosive growth of molecular biology and proteomics. Aside from these huge improvements, organizational changes have also occurred which brought about a more modern vision of the autoimmune laboratory. The introduction of automation (for harmonization of testing, reduction of human error, ...

  3. Humanized in vivo Model for Autoimmune Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-07

    guinea - pig polyclonal anti-insulin (1:100 dilution, Abcam Ab7842-500, Cambridge, MA) and a secondary goat anti- guinea - pig Alexa-fluor 568 (1:100 dilu...which is reported to accelerate experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (a mouse model of multiple sclerosis). Our reasoning was that, as T cells...HL, Sobel RA, Kuchroo VK. IL-10 is critical in the regulation of autoimmune encephalomyelitis as demonstrated by studies of IL-10- and IL-4

  4. Celiac disease and autoimmune thyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ch'ng, Chin Lye; Jones, M Keston; Kingham, Jeremy G C

    2007-10-01

    Celiac disease (CD) or gluten sensitive enteropathy is relatively common in western populations with prevalence around 1%. With the recent availability of sensitive and specific serological testing, many patients who are either asymptomatic or have subtle symptoms can be shown to have CD. Patients with CD have modest increases in risks of malignancy and mortality compared to controls. The mortality among CD patients who comply poorly with a gluten-free diet is greater than in compliant patients. The pattern of presentation of CD has altered over the past three decades. Many cases are now detected in adulthood during investigation of problems as diverse as anemia, osteoporosis, autoimmune disorders, unexplained neurological syndromes, infertility and chronic hypertransaminasemia of uncertain cause. Among autoimmune disorders, increased prevalence of CD has been found in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease, type 1 diabetes mellitus, autoimmune liver diseases and inflammatory bowel disease. Prevalence of CD was noted to be 1% to 19% in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, 2% to 5% in autoimmune thyroid disorders and 3% to 7% in primary biliary cirrhosis in prospective studies. Conversely, there is also an increased prevalence of immune based disorders among patients with CD. The pathogenesis of co-existent autoimmune thyroid disease and CD is not known, but these conditions share similar HLA haplotypes and are associated with the gene encoding cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen-4. Screening high risk patients for CD, such as those with autoimmune diseases, is a reasonable strategy given the increased prevalence. Treatment of CD with a gluten-free diet should reduce the recognized complications of this disease and provide benefits in both general health and perhaps life expectancy. It also improves glycemic control in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and enhances the absorption of medications for associated hypothyroidism and osteoporosis. It

  5. Autoimmune channelopathies in paraneoplastic neurological syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joubert, Bastien; Honnorat, Jérôme

    2015-10-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes and autoimmune encephalitides are immune neurological disorders occurring or not in association with a cancer. They are thought to be due to an autoimmune reaction against neuronal antigens ectopically expressed by the underlying tumour or by cross-reaction with an unknown infectious agent. In some instances, paraneoplastic neurological syndromes and autoimmune encephalitides are related to an antibody-induced dysfunction of ion channels, a situation that can be labelled as autoimmune channelopathies. Such functional alterations of ion channels are caused by the specific fixation of an autoantibody upon its target, implying that autoimmune channelopathies are usually highly responsive to immuno-modulatory treatments. Over the recent years, numerous autoantibodies corresponding to various neurological syndromes have been discovered and their mechanisms of action partially deciphered. Autoantibodies in neurological autoimmune channelopathies may target either directly ion channels or proteins associated to ion channels and induce channel dysfunction by various mechanisms generally leading to the reduction of synaptic expression of the considered channel. The discovery of those mechanisms of action has provided insights on the regulation of the synaptic expression of the altered channels as well as the putative roles of some of their functional subdomains. Interestingly, patients' autoantibodies themselves can be used as specific tools in order to study the functions of ion channels. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Autoimmune connective tissue diseases and vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Więsik-Szewczyk

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The idea that infectious agents can induce autoimmune diseases in genetically susceptible subjects has been a matter of discussion for years. Moreover, increased incidence of autoimmune diseases and introduction of prophylactic vaccinations from early childhood suggest that these two trends are linked. In the medical literature and even non-professional media, case reports or events temporally related to vaccination are reported. It raises the issue of vaccination safety. In everyday practice medical professionals, physicians, rheumatologists and other specialists will be asked their opinion of vaccination safety. The decision should be made according to evidence-based medicine and the current state of knowledge. The purpose of this paper is to discuss a potential mechanism which links infections, vaccinations and autoimmunity. We present an overview of published case reports, especially of systemic connective tissue diseases temporally related to vaccination and results from case-nested studies. As yet, no conclusive evidence supports a causal relationship between vaccination and autoimmune diseases. It has to be determined whether the performed studies are sufficiently Epsteinasensitive to detect the link. The debate is ongoing, and new data may be required to explain the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. We would like to underscore the need for prophylactic vaccination in patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases and to break down the myth that the vaccines are contraindicated in this target group.

  7. Clinical aspects of autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldblatt, Fiona; O'Neill, Sean G

    2013-08-31

    Multisystem autoimmune rheumatic diseases are heterogeneous rare disorders associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Efforts to create international consensus within the past decade have resulted in the publication of new classification or nomenclature criteria for several autoimmune rheumatic diseases, specifically for systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjögren's syndrome, and the systemic vasculitides. Substantial progress has been made in the formulation of new criteria in systemic sclerosis and idiopathic inflammatory myositis. Although the autoimmune rheumatic diseases share many common features and clinical presentations, differentiation between the diseases is crucial because of important distinctions in clinical course, appropriate drugs, and prognoses. We review some of the dilemmas in the diagnosis of these autoimmune rheumatic diseases, and focus on the importance of new classification criteria, clinical assessment, and interpretation of autoimmune serology. In this era of improvement of mortality rates for patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases, we pay particular attention to the effect of leading complications, specifically cardiovascular manifestations and cancer, and we update epidemiology and prognosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Thyroid Autoimmunity in Girls with Turner Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkowska-Sędek, Ewelina; Borowiec, Ada; Kucharska, Anna; Chacewicz, Karolina; Rumińska, Małgorzata; Demkow, Urszula; Pyrżak, Beata

    2017-01-01

    Turner syndrome is associated with increased incidence of autoimmune diseases, especially those of the thyroid gland. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of thyroid autoimmunity among pediatric patients with Turner syndrome. The study was retrospective and included 41 girls with Turner syndrome aged 6-18 years. Free thyroxine (FT4), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), anti-thyroid peroxidase (TPO-Ab) antibodies, anti-thyroglobulin (TG-Ab) antibodies, and karyotype were investigated. The correlation between karyotype and incidence of thyroid autoimmunity was also examined. Eleven patients (26.8%) were positive for TPO-Ab and/or TG-Ab. Three girls from that subgroup were euthyroid, 5 had subclinical hypothyroidism, and 3 were diagnosed with overt hypothyroidism. Out of these 11 patients affected by thyroid autoimmunity, 6 girls had mosaic karyotype with X-isochromosome (n = 4) or with deletions (n = 2), and 5 had the 45,X karyotype. The study findings confirmed a high incidence of thyroid autoimmunity in girls with Turner syndrome, but we failed to observe an association between the incidence of thyroid autoimmunity and karyotype. We conclude that it is important to monitor thyroid function in patients with Turner syndrome because they are prone to develop hypothyroidism.

  9. Toxicogenomic analysis reveals profibrogenic effects of trichloroethylene in autoimmune-mediated cholangitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopec, Anna K; Sullivan, Bradley P; Kassel, Karen M; Joshi, Nikita; Luyendyk, James P

    2014-10-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that exposure to environmental chemicals increases the risk of developing autoimmune liver disease. However, the identity of specific chemical perpetrators and the mechanisms whereby environmental chemicals modify liver disease is unclear. Previous studies link exposure to trichloroethylene (TCE) with the development of autoimmune liver disease and exacerbation of autoimmunity in lupus-prone MRL mice. In this study, we utilized NOD.c3c4 mice, which spontaneously develop autoimmune cholangitis bearing resemblance to some features of primary biliary cirrhosis. Nine-week-old female NOD.c3c4 mice were given TCE (0.5 mg/ml) or its vehicle (1% Cremophor-EL) in drinking water for 4 weeks. TCE had little effect on clinical chemistry, biliary cyst formation, or hepatic CD3+ T-cell accumulation. Hepatic microarray profiling revealed a dramatic suppression of early growth response 1 (EGR1) mRNA in livers of TCE-treated mice, which was verified by qPCR and immunohistochemical staining. Consistent with a reported link between reduced EGR1 expression and liver fibrosis, TCE increased hepatic type I collagen (COL1A1) mRNA and protein levels in livers of NOD.c3c4 mice. In contrast, TCE did not increase COL1A1 expression in NOD.ShiLtJ mice, which do not develop autoimmune cholangitis. These results suggest that in the context of concurrent autoimmune liver disease with a genetic basis, modification of hepatic gene expression by TCE may increase profibrogenic signaling in the liver. Moreover, these studies suggest that NOD.c3c4 mice may be a novel model to study gene-environment interactions critical for the development of autoimmune liver disease. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. The increased risk for autoimmune diseases in patients with eating disorders.

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    Anu Raevuori

    Full Text Available Research suggests autoimmune processes to be involved in psychiatric disorders. We aimed to address the prevalence and incidence of autoimmune diseases in a large Finnish patient cohort with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge eating disorder.Patients (N = 2342 treated at the Eating Disorder Unit of Helsinki University Central Hospital between 1995 and 2010 were compared with general population controls (N = 9368 matched for age, sex, and place of residence. Data of 30 autoimmune diseases from the Hospital Discharge Register from 1969 to 2010 were analyzed using conditional and Poisson regression models.Of patients, 8.9% vs. 5.4% of control individuals had been diagnosed with one or more autoimmune disease (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.5-2.0, P<0.001. The increase in endocrinological diseases (OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.8-3.2, P<0.001 was explained by type 1 diabetes, whereas Crohn's disease contributed most to the risk of gastroenterological diseases (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.4-2.5, P<0.001. Higher prevalence of autoimmune diseases among patients with eating disorders was not exclusively due to endocrinological and gastroenterological diseases; when the two categories were excluded, the increase in prevalence was seen in the patients both before the onset of the eating disorder treatment (OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.1-2.1, P = 0.02 and at the end of the follow-up (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.1-1.8, P = 0.01.We observed an association between eating disorders and several autoimmune diseases with different genetic backgrounds. Our findings support the link between immune-mediated mechanisms and development of eating disorders. Future studies are needed to further explore the risk of autoimmune diseases and immunological mechanisms in individuals with eating disorders and their family members.

  11. The increased risk for autoimmune diseases in patients with eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raevuori, Anu; Haukka, Jari; Vaarala, Outi; Suvisaari, Jaana M; Gissler, Mika; Grainger, Marjut; Linna, Milla S; Suokas, Jaana T

    2014-01-01

    Research suggests autoimmune processes to be involved in psychiatric disorders. We aimed to address the prevalence and incidence of autoimmune diseases in a large Finnish patient cohort with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge eating disorder. Patients (N = 2342) treated at the Eating Disorder Unit of Helsinki University Central Hospital between 1995 and 2010 were compared with general population controls (N = 9368) matched for age, sex, and place of residence. Data of 30 autoimmune diseases from the Hospital Discharge Register from 1969 to 2010 were analyzed using conditional and Poisson regression models. Of patients, 8.9% vs. 5.4% of control individuals had been diagnosed with one or more autoimmune disease (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.5-2.0, P<0.001). The increase in endocrinological diseases (OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.8-3.2, P<0.001) was explained by type 1 diabetes, whereas Crohn's disease contributed most to the risk of gastroenterological diseases (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.4-2.5, P<0.001). Higher prevalence of autoimmune diseases among patients with eating disorders was not exclusively due to endocrinological and gastroenterological diseases; when the two categories were excluded, the increase in prevalence was seen in the patients both before the onset of the eating disorder treatment (OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.1-2.1, P = 0.02) and at the end of the follow-up (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.1-1.8, P = 0.01). We observed an association between eating disorders and several autoimmune diseases with different genetic backgrounds. Our findings support the link between immune-mediated mechanisms and development of eating disorders. Future studies are needed to further explore the risk of autoimmune diseases and immunological mechanisms in individuals with eating disorders and their family members.

  12. Chronic inflammation of the vagina: treatment and relationship to autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, John C

    2005-07-01

    To investigate noninfective, symptomatic, chronic inflammation (CI) of the vaginal mucosa to determine its prevalence and immunologic basis and to initiate an immunologic approach to treatment and assess the response. A prospective, observational, clinical study of 55 women with dyspareunia and/or discharge of vaginal mucosal origin. Vaginal biopsies and immune investigations were carried out. Treatment was instituted utilizing immune-modifying agents. The prevalence of CI of the vagina in symptom-free women was 0-4.3% and in the symptomatic group, 89%. Systemic immune activation was demonstrated in 43 of the 55, with 21 suffering from an autoimmune disease or a condition in which immune activation plays a part, including endometriosis in 20. Thirty-one were treated; intravaginal hydrocortisone acetate 10% foam was given in 24, giving full relief in 14 and inadequate relief in 10. Hydroxychloroquine, an immune-modifying, antirheumatic drug, was added and largely gave relief in these 10. Hydroxychloroquine alone was given in 4 and was effective in 3. Overall, immune-modifying drugs were successful in 97%. CI of the vaginal mucosa stems from local immune activation and is generally associated with evidence of other immune abnormalities, including autoimmune diseases and disorders in which immune activation play a part, including endometriosis. It can be successfully treated by immune modification.

  13. [Autoimmune thyroiditis and thyroid cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krátký, Jan; Jiskra, Jan

    2015-10-01

    Association between autoimmune thyroiditis (CLT) and thyroid cancer remains not clear. Although both diseases often occur simultaneously in histological samples, it is not yet clear whether CLT can be regarded as a risk factor for thyroid malignancy. This review focus on the known epidemiological and molecular genetics links between both diseases. Most studies have shown a significant association between thyroid cancer and positive antibodies to thyroglobulin and histological evidence of CLT, as well. Both disorders share some risk factors (greater incidence in women, in areas with adequate supply of iodine and in patients after radiotherapy of the neck) and molecular genetics linkage. For example: RET/PTC rearrangements could be more often found in carcinomas associated with CLT, but this mutation could be found in benign lesions such as CLT, as well. CLT seems to be a positive prognostic factor in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. It is associated with less invasive forms of tumor, lower occurrence of infiltrated lymphatic nodes and a lower risk of recurrence.

  14. Cochlear Impairment and Autoimmune Ear Disorder in a Patient with Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fioretti, Alessandra; Di Rubbo, Vittoria; Peri, Giorgia; Vitti, Elisa; Cisternino, Sara; Varakliotis, Theodoros; Eibenstein, Alberto

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to consider the possible role of autoimmune diseases and paraneoplastic syndrome in the genesis of tinnitus. The incidence of autoimmune inner ear disease (AIED) is rare, accounting for autoimmunity tests were positive and a diagnosis of mixed connective tissue disease with notes of fibromyalgia was made . Pure tone audiometry testing revealed bilateral fluctuating mild hearing loss on high frequencies. The tinnitus was successfully treated with bilateral wideband sound generators (listening 8-9 h for day) regulated at the mixing point. At 12 months follow up THI has shrunk considerably (THI: 4) and the patient has continued treatment only with the sound pillow. In conclusion significant progress is needed to better understand the role of autoantibodies in the pathogenesis and diagnosis of paraneoplastic cochleovestibulopathy. To our knowledge, our study is the first in which hearing loss and tinnitus is considered as a manifestation of a paraneoplastic syndrome.

  15. Methyldopa blocks MHC class II binding to disease-specific antigens in autoimmune diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrov, David A; Alkanani, Aimon; McDaniel, Kristen A; Case, Stephanie; Baschal, Erin E; Pyle, Laura; Ellis, Samuel; Pöllinger, Bernadette; Seidl, Katherine J; Shah, Viral N; Garg, Satish K; Atkinson, Mark A; Gottlieb, Peter A; Michels, Aaron W

    2018-02-13

    Major histocompatibility (MHC) class II molecules are strongly associated with many autoimmune disorders. In type 1 diabetes, the DQ8 molecule is common, confers significant disease risk and is involved in disease pathogenesis. We hypothesized blocking DQ8 antigen presentation would provide therapeutic benefit by preventing recognition of self-peptides by pathogenic T cells. We used the crystal structure of DQ8 to select drug-like small molecules predicted to bind structural pockets in the MHC antigen-binding cleft. A limited number of the predicted compounds inhibited DQ8 antigen presentation in vitro with one compound preventing insulin autoantibody production and delaying diabetes onset in an animal model of spontaneous autoimmune diabetes. An existing drug of similar structure, methyldopa, specifically blocked DQ8 in recent-onset patients with type 1 diabetes along with reducing inflammatory T cell responses toward insulin, highlighting the relevance of blocking disease-specific MHC class II antigen presentation to treat autoimmunity.

  16. Cricopharyngeal achalasia in connection with autoimmune disorders in a pre-adolescent patient: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urška Vučina

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Cricopharyngeal achalasia is an uncommon cause of dysphagia, especially in children. Congenital form is known in neonates and infants. In older children this disease has been reported in very rare cases and mostly in connection with neurological and muscular diseases. We present a case of a 12-year-old girl with a four-year history of dysphagia. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy, radiological contrast swallow study and esophageal manometric study confrmed the diagnosis of cricopharyngeal achalasia. Te patient was successfully treated with dilatation of the upper esophageal sphincter. An initial attempt of dilatation appears to be a safe and effective option in the management of cricopharyngeal achalasia in children, and may prevent or at least postpone the need for myotomy. Following the diagnosis of cricopharyngeal achalasia, several autoimmune conditions were diagnosed. Our case report revealed that cricopharyngeal achalasia may occur in association with some other autoimmune conditions, and that autoimmunity may also play a role in cricopharyngeal achalasia itself

  17. From Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms to Constant Immunosuppression: Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy for Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghavan Chinnadurai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The regenerative abilities and the immunosuppressive properties of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs make them potentially the ideal cellular product of choice for treatment of autoimmune and other immune mediated disorders. Although the usefulness of MSCs for therapeutic applications is in early phases, their potential clinical use remains of great interest. Current clinical evidence of use of MSCs from both autologous and allogeneic sources to treat autoimmune disorders confers conflicting clinical benefit outcomes. These varied results may possibly be due to MSC use across wide range of autoimmune disorders with clinical heterogeneity or due to variability of the cellular product. In the light of recent genome wide association studies (GWAS, linking predisposition of autoimmune diseases to single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the susceptible genetic loci, the clinical relevance of MSCs possessing SNPs in the critical effector molecules of immunosuppression is largely undiscussed. It is of further interest in the allogeneic setting, where SNPs in the target pathway of MSC's intervention may also modulate clinical outcome. In the present review, we have discussed the known critical SNPs predisposing to disease susceptibility in various autoimmune diseases and their significance in the immunomodulatory properties of MSCs.

  18. [Auto-immune disorders as a possible cause of neuropsychiatric syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Martinez, P; Molenaar, P C; Losen, M; Hoffmann, C; Stevens, J; de Witte, L D; van Amelsvoort, T; van Os, J; Rutten, B P F

    2015-01-01

    Changes that occur in the behaviour of voltage-gated ion channels and ligand-gated receptor channels due to gene mutations or auto-immune attack are the cause of channelopathies in the central and peripheral nervous system. Although the relation between molecular channel defects and clinical symptoms has been explained in the case of many neuromuscular channelopathies, the pathophysiology of auto-immunity in neuropsychiatric syndromes is still unclear. To review recent findings regarding neuronal auto-immune reactions in severe neuropsychiatric syndromes. Using PubMed, we consulted the literature published between 1990 and August 2014 relating to the occurrence of auto-immune antibodies in severe and persistent neuropsychiatric syndromes. Auto-antibodies have only limited access to the central nervous system, but if they do enter the system they can, in some cases, cause disease. We discuss recent findings regarding the occurrence of auto-antibodies against ligand-activated receptor channels and potassium channels in neuropsychiatric and neurological syndromes, including schizophrenia and limbic encephalitis. Although the occurrence of several auto-antibodies in schizophrenia has been confirmed, there is still no proof of a causal relationship in the syndrome. We still have no evidence of the prevalence of auto-immunity in neuropsychiatric syndromes. The discovery that an antibody against an ion channel is associated with some neuropsychiatric disorders may mean that in future it will be possible to treat patients by means of immunosuppression, which could lead to an improvement in a patient's cognitive abilities.

  19. From Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms to Constant Immunosuppression: Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy for Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galipeau, Jacques; Nooka, Ajay K.

    2013-01-01

    The regenerative abilities and the immunosuppressive properties of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) make them potentially the ideal cellular product of choice for treatment of autoimmune and other immune mediated disorders. Although the usefulness of MSCs for therapeutic applications is in early phases, their potential clinical use remains of great interest. Current clinical evidence of use of MSCs from both autologous and allogeneic sources to treat autoimmune disorders confers conflicting clinical benefit outcomes. These varied results may possibly be due to MSC use across wide range of autoimmune disorders with clinical heterogeneity or due to variability of the cellular product. In the light of recent genome wide association studies (GWAS), linking predisposition of autoimmune diseases to single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the susceptible genetic loci, the clinical relevance of MSCs possessing SNPs in the critical effector molecules of immunosuppression is largely undiscussed. It is of further interest in the allogeneic setting, where SNPs in the target pathway of MSC's intervention may also modulate clinical outcome. In the present review, we have discussed the known critical SNPs predisposing to disease susceptibility in various autoimmune diseases and their significance in the immunomodulatory properties of MSCs. PMID:24350294

  20. Clinical manifestations of autoimmune disease-related non-Hodgkin lymphoma: a Korean single-center, retrospective clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Young-Woo; Yoon, Jae-Ho; Lee, Sung-Eun; Eom, Ki-Seong; Kim, Yoo-Jin; Kim, Hee-Je; Lee, Seok; Min, Chang-Ki; Lee, Jong Wook; Min, Woo-Sung; Cho, Seok-Goo

    2016-09-01

    Recently, large cohort studies regarding associations between autoimmune disease and lymphomas have been reported in a few Western countries. However, Asian data concerning autoimmune-related lymphomas are limited. Therefore, we evaluated the clinical characteristics and prognostic factors of patients with autoimmune disease-related non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) in a single center in Korea. We analyzed the data from 11 patients with autoimmune-related NHL. Patients were categorized into two groups, those with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and those with non-RA-related NHL. Then patients were re-categorized into a group with methotrexate (MTX) usage and a MTX non-usage group. Histological subtype, MTX duration, autoimmune disease duration, treatment modalities, and other data were collected and analyzed. Our study revealed that older RA patients have a greater likelihood of occurrence of NHL (p = 0.042). We confirmed that MTX duration and cumulative dose of MTX have no significant correlation with autoimmune disease and NHL (p = 0.073). In the management of autoimmune disease-related NHL, all patients were directly treated with systemic chemotherapy instead of employing a wait and watch approach. Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) in all autoimmune disease-related NHL were 100% and 87.5%, with no treatment-related mortality during the 2-year follow-up period of our study. Our study suggests that patients with RA-NHL are characterized by older age at onset compared to those with non-RA-NHL. Also considering of OS and PFS, intensive treatment strategy instead of delayed watchful managements may be required for autoimmune disease-related NHL including of old age group.

  1. Dietary naringenin supplementation attenuates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by modulating autoimmune inflammatory responses in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autoimmune disease is prevalent in humans. Since conventional therapies have limited efficacy and often come with significant side effects, nutrition may provide an alternative and complementary approach to improving the autoimmune disorders. Naringenin, a flavonoid found in citrus fruits, has been ...

  2. Analysis of the autoimmune regulator gene in patients with autoimmune non-APECED polyendocrinopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Alessia; Gianchecchi, Elena; Palombi, Melania; Luciano, Rosa; Di Carlo, Pierluigi; Crinò, Antonino; Cappa, Marco; Fierabracci, Alessandra

    2013-09-01

    The pathogenesis of autoimmunity was derived from a complex interaction of genetic and environmental factors. Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy is a rare autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene. AIRE gene variants and, in particular, heterozygous loss-of-function mutations were also discovered in organ-specific autoimmune disorders, possibly contributing to their etiopathogenesis. It was suggested that even predisposition to develop certain autoimmune conditions may be derived from AIRE gene polymorphisms including S278R and intronic IVS9+6 G>A. In this study we unravel the hypothesis on whether AIRE gene variants may predispose individuals to associated autoimmune conditions in 41 Italian patients affected by non-APECED autoimmune polyendocrinopathies. We could not detect any heterozygous mutations of the AIRE gene. Although a trend of association was observed, heterozygous polymorphisms S278R and IVS9+6 G>A were detected in patients without statistically significant prevalence than in controls. Their putative contribution to autoimmune polyendocrinopathies and their predictive value in clinical strategies of disease development could be unravelled by analysing a larger sample of diseased patients and healthy individuals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Autoimmunity, Not a Developmental Defect, is the Cause for Subfertility of Autoimmune Regulator (Aire) Deficient Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kekäläinen, E; Pöntynen, N; Meri, S; Arstila, T P; Jarva, H

    2015-05-01

    Autoimmune regulator's (AIRE) best characterized role is in the generation immunological tolerance, but it is also involved in many other processes such as spermatogenesis. Loss-of-function mutations in AIRE cause a disease called autoimmune polyendocrinopathy, candidiasis and ectodermal dystrophy (APECED; also called autoimmune polyendocrinopathy syndrome type 1, APS-1) that is dominated by various autoimmune manifestations, mainly endocrinopathies. Both patients with APECED and Aire(-/-) mice suffer from varying levels of infertility, but it is not clear if it is a result of an autoimmune tissue damage or more of a developmental defect. In this study, we wanted to resolve whether or not the reduced fertility of Aire(-/-) mice is dependent on the adaptive immune system and therefore a manifestation of autoimmunity in these mice. We generated lymphopenic mice without Aire expression that were devoid of the autoimmune manifestations previously reported in immunocompetent Aire(-/-) mice. These Aire(-/-) Rag1(-/-) mice regained full fertility. This confirms that the development of infertility in Aire(-/-) mice requires a functional adaptive immune system. We also show that only the male Aire(-/-) mice are subfertile, whereas Aire(-/-) females produce litters normally. Moreover, the male subfertility can be adoptively transferred with lymphocytes from Aire(-/-) donor mice to previously fertile lymphopenic Aire(-/-) recipients. Our data show that subfertility in Aire(-/-) mice is dependent on a functional adaptive immune system thus confirming its autoimmune aetiology. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Complicating autoimmune diseases in myasthenia gravis: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacu, Aliona; Andersen, Jintana Bunpan; Lisnic, Vitalie; Owe, Jone Furlund; Gilhus, Nils Erik

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a rare autoimmune disease of skeletal muscle endplates. MG subgroup is relevant for comorbidity, but usually not accounted for. MG patients have an increased risk for complicating autoimmune diseases, most commonly autoimmune thyroid disease, systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. In this review, we present concomitant autoimmune disorders associated with the different MG subgroups, and show how this influences treatment and prognosis. Concomitant MG should always be considered in patients with an autoimmune disorder and developing new neuromuscular weakness, fatigue or respiratory failure. When a second autoimmune disorder is suspected, MG should be included as a differential diagnosis. PMID:25915571

  5. A case of autoimmune progesterone dermatitis in an adolescent female.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakarla, Nirupama; Zurawin, Robert K

    2006-04-01

    Progesterone-induced dermatitis is a rare disorder. It typically occurs in females due to an autoimmune phenomenon to endogenous progesterone production, but can also be caused by exogenous intake of a synthetic progestin. Here, we present a case of autoimmune progesterone dermatitis (AIPD) seen in an adolescent female. The patient is a 15-year-old Caucasian female with no significant past medical history and no prior exogenous hormone use, who presented to her primary care physician complaining of cyclic skin eruptions. She noted that her dermatologic symptoms occurred monthly, just prior to her menses. An intradermal skin test using 0.1 cc of progesterone was performed. The patient immediately developed a wheal, confirming the diagnosis of AIPD. The patient was begun on a continuous regimen of an oral contraceptive pill with 30 micrograms of ethinyl estradiol and 0.15 mg of levonorgestrel. The skin eruptions have not returned since the initiation of this therapy. Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis manifests via the occurrence of cyclic skin eruptions. Women with the disorder commonly present with dermatologic lesions in the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. Diagnosis of AIPD is confirmed by performing a skin allergen test using progesterone. Due to its rarity, AIPD should be considered a diagnosis of exclusion. In cases believed to be due to an endogenous production of progesterone, several methods of therapy have been attempted. The ultimate goal of therapy is the suppression of ovulation, which will prevent endogenous hormone production as progesterone is only produced in ovulatory cycles. Currently, the first-line choice of therapy is a combination oral contraceptive. If this treatment is ineffective, patients have been treated with danazol, gonadotropin releasing hormone analogs, tamoxifen, and oophorectomy with varying success.

  6. Different response to glucocorticoid therapy in autoimmune diseases of CNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanojević Željka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Th17 cells and interleukin (IL-17, their signature cytokine, have the main role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases of the central nervous system such as multiple sclerosis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. The effect of glucocorticoids (GC on expression and production of IL-17 has not been thoroughly tested yet. Also, the site of action of GC is not precisely defined. This paper presents the main results of the Doctoral thesis devoted to studies of GC on the production of IL-17 in the model of EAE, induced in susceptible laboratory animals. Methylprednisolone (MP, a synthetic glucocorticoid, inhibit in vitro production of IL-17 in mitogen-stimulated lymph node cells (LNC as well as in myelin basic protein (MBP-stimulated draining LNC in dose- dependent manner. However, under the same conditions inhibitory effect of the MP on production and expression of the genes for IFN-γ, a cytokine that TH1 cells generate, is significantly more pronounced. Interestingly, when we analyzed effects of MP applied in vivo in EAE, the same phenomenon was observed: the proportion of IFN-γ producing, but not all of IL-17 cells were reduced in cells isolated from MP treated rats in comparison to control rats which indicates that MP achieves its effects not only in the peripheral lymphoid tissues, but also in target tissue. Different sensitivities of Th1 and Th17 cells that are major cellular sources of IFN-γ or IL-17 in the effect of the GC has been observed in other animal models and in human disease. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the relative resistance of Th17 cells on the operation of GC is very important for the development of new strategies in the treatment of those forms of autoimmune and chronic diseases that are resistant to the effect of glucocorticoids.

  7. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia as a Complication of Nivolumab Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amruth R. Palla

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Recently, immunotherapeutic drugs, including PD-1 inhibitors (nivolumab, pembrolizumab, PD-L1 inhibitors (atezolizumab, avelumab, and CTLA4 inhibitors (ipiliumumab, have emerged as important additions to the armamentarium against certain malignancies and have been incorporated into therapeutic protocols for first-, second-, or third-line agents for these metastatic cancers. Immune checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab is currently FDA approved for the treatment of patients with metastatic malignant melanoma [Redman et al.: BMC Med 2016;14: 20], metastatic non-small cell lung cancer [Guibert and Mazières: Expert Opin Biol Ther 2015;15: 1789–1797], metastatic renal cell cancer [Farolfi et al.: Expert Opin Drug Metab Toxicol 2016;12: 1089–1096], and relapsed or refractory classic Hodgkin’s lymphoma [Villasboas and Ansell: Expert Rev Anticancer Ther 2016;16: 5–12]. Given the current and increasing indications for these drugs, it is essential for all physicians to become well versed with their common adverse effects and to be observant for other less documented clinical conditions that could be unmasked with the use of such medications. A definite association between autoimmune hemolytic anemia and the immune checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab has not been clearly documented, although a few cases have been reported recently [Kong et al.: Melanoma Res 2016;26: 202–204; Schwab et al.: Case Rep Oncol 2016;9: 373–378; Tardy et al.: Hematol Oncol 2016, DOI: 10.1002/hon.2338]. We report a case of fatal autoimmune hemolytic anemia refractory to steroids in a patient treated with nivolumab for metastatic lung cancer, and reflect on the other reported cases of autoimmune hemolytic anemia after the use of nivolumab.

  8. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia as a Complication of Nivolumab Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palla, Amruth R; Kennedy, Devin; Mosharraf, Hossain; Doll, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Recently, immunotherapeutic drugs, including PD-1 inhibitors (nivolumab, pembrolizumab), PD-L1 inhibitors (atezolizumab, avelumab), and CTLA4 inhibitors (ipiliumumab), have emerged as important additions to the armamentarium against certain malignancies and have been incorporated into therapeutic protocols for first-, second-, or third-line agents for these metastatic cancers. Immune checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab is currently FDA approved for the treatment of patients with metastatic malignant melanoma [Redman et al.: BMC Med 2016;14: 20], metastatic non-small cell lung cancer [Guibert and Mazières: Expert Opin Biol Ther 2015;15: 1789-1797], metastatic renal cell cancer [Farolfi et al.: Expert Opin Drug Metab Toxicol 2016;12: 1089-1096], and relapsed or refractory classic Hodgkin's lymphoma [Villasboas and Ansell: Expert Rev Anticancer Ther 2016;16: 5-12]. Given the current and increasing indications for these drugs, it is essential for all physicians to become well versed with their common adverse effects and to be observant for other less documented clinical conditions that could be unmasked with the use of such medications. A definite association between autoimmune hemolytic anemia and the immune checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab has not been clearly documented, although a few cases have been reported recently [Kong et al.: Melanoma Res 2016;26: 202-204; Schwab et al.: Case Rep Oncol 2016;9: 373-378; Tardy et al.: Hematol Oncol 2016, DOI: 10.1002/hon.2338]. We report a case of fatal autoimmune hemolytic anemia refractory to steroids in a patient treated with nivolumab for metastatic lung cancer, and reflect on the other reported cases of autoimmune hemolytic anemia after the use of nivolumab.

  9. Scleritis and multiple systemic autoimmune manifestations in chronic natural killer cell lymphocytosis associated with elevated TCR alpha/beta+ CD3+CD4−CD8− double-negative T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Steven; Li, Zhuqing; Sen, H. Nida; Lim, Wee-Kiak; Gill, Fred; Perkins, Katie; Rao, V. Koneti; Nussenblatt, Robert B.

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims Chronic natural killer lymphocytosis (CNKL) has been associated with systemic autoimmunity, but its association with scleritis or ocular autoimmunity has not been characterized. We evaluated the natural kill cell (NK) function and immunophenotype of a patient with CNKL who developed bilateral scleritis and multiple systemic autoimmune findings. Methods The ophthalmic records of a patient with CNKL and scleritis were reviewed over a 6-year period. Flow cytometry was performed to evaluate T-cell, NK, and B-cell populations. NK cellular functions (i.e. NK cytotoxicity and cytokine/chemokine production following IL-2 stimulation) were evaluated. Results A 56-year-old female with vitiligo, psoriatic arthritis, thyroiditis, erythema nodosum, bilateral anterior scleritis and Sjogren syndrome was managed with multiple immunosuppressive medications including prednisone, mycophenolate mofetil and methotrexate. Flow cytometry showed a persistent elevation of CD56+CD3− NK cells greater than 40%, which was consistent with CNKL. NK cell cytotoxicity assay identified a deficiency of K562 cell lysis in the patient (1.46 mean-fold greater in control vs. patient). NK cytokine/chemokine production following IL-2 stimulation was also deficient (2.5–32.5 fold greater in control). Cytokines/chemokines assessed included pro-inflammatory (IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-1, MCP-1) and immunoregulatory cytokines (IL-4, IL-5 and IL-10). An abnormal elevation of TCRα/β+ CD3+CD4−CD8− T-cells suggestive of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome was observed but apoptosis dysfunction was not found. Conclusion The association of increased but dysfunctional NK cells in the context of multiple systemic and ocular manifestations suggests a role of NK cells in the pathogenesis of our patient’s disease. Further studies regarding NK cell dysfunction and ocular autoimmunity are needed. PMID:20508050

  10. Autoimmune diseases and infections: controversial issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baio, P; Brucato, A; Buskila, D; Gershwin, M E; Giacomazzi, D; Lopez, L R; Luzzati, R; Matsuura, E; Selmi, C; Sarzi-Puttini, P; Atzeni, F

    2008-01-01

    The etiology and pathogenesis of certain types of disease remain controversial and stand like a bridge that crosses infectious, autoimmune and autoinflammatory pathways. Infection, for example, may initiate a disease, although it is the genetic regulation in the host, the interplay between virus or bacteria persistence and autoimmunity that produces the later phases of disease, the antigenic determinants responsible for inducing autoimmune disease, and the pathogenetic effector mechanisms. Infections agents cause pericarditis, but in 85% of cases it is "idiopathic". It has also been shown that persistent Clamydia pneumoniae, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Helicobacter pylori infections cause host immunity and promote atherogenesis. A number of infectious agents have been suggested as potential triggers for primary biliary cirrhosis. Infections and vaccinations have also been linked to the pathogenesis of fibromyalgia syndrome, a common, chronic syndrome of widespread pain. Many factors are also responsible for fever of unknown origin such as: infections, autoimmunity disease, etc. However, it is difficult to determine a direct correlation between the infections agents in such a large group of diseases. The aim of this review is to analyze some of the controversies about the role of infections in autoimmune diseases.

  11. Menopause in patients with autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammaritano, Lisa R

    2012-05-01

    Menopause represents a time of significant clinical and hormonal change. Given the incompletely understood interrelationship between gonadal hormones and the immune system, it is possible that menopause may affect, or be affected by, the presence of autoimmune disease. Menopause has significant effects on a number of organ systems including the cardiovascular, skeletal, central nervous and genitourinary systems. Premature ovarian failure is related to autoimmune factors in a proportion of cases, but is not generally associated with systemic autoimmune disorders unless secondary to treatment with alkylating agents such as cyclophosphamide. Gonadal hormones have been suggested to relate to both onset and activity in certain autoimmune diseases. For patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, disease activity is lower, and damage accrual higher, in the postmenopausal years, but the mechanisms responsible may relate to age, duration of disease, menopause changes, long-term effects of therapy, or some combination of these factors. Early menopause is a risk factor for rheumatoid arthritis, and post-menopausal status in RA is associated with greater damage and disability. Systemic sclerosis and giant cell arteritis may also be adversely affected by onset of menopause. Importantly, autoimmune disease and menopause may have an additive effect on risk for common comorbidities such as cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Autoimmune hepatitis in Italy: the Bologna experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratori, Paolo; Granito, Alessandro; Quarneti, Chiara; Ferri, Silvia; Menichella, Rita; Cassani, Fabio; Pappas, Georgios; Bianchi, Francesco B; Lenzi, Marco; Muratori, Luigi

    2009-06-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis affects mainly women. It is subdivided into type 1 and type 2 according to the autoantibody profile and without immunosuppression usually evolves to cirrhosis and end-stage liver failure. We evaluated clinical, biochemical, immunological and genetic features and treatment response of 163 consecutive Italian patients with autoimmune hepatitis. At diagnosis, type 1 autoimmune hepatitis showed more inflamed liver histology and more pronounced cholestasis, whereas type 2 was more common in children. Male and female patients shared similar clinical, biochemical and immunological features. Of 89 patients with 5-year follow-up or longer, 23 patients irrespective of presenting clinical, biochemical and immunological features achieved complete remission (normal transaminases and gammaglobulin levels) which was maintained with minimal steroid dosage; attempt at treatment withdrawal led to disease exacerbation. Complete responders had more often HLA DRB1*0401 (p = 0.011) and their risk of disease progression was lower (p < 0.0001). Type 1 and type 2 autoimmune hepatitis is one and the same disease. Autoimmune hepatitis has similar features in male and female patients. HLA DRB1*0401 positive patients are more likely to achieve complete remission. Continuous low-dose steroids are necessary to maintain remission, significantly reducing the risk of disease progression.

  13. Upper gastrointestinal symptoms in autoimmune gastritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carabotti, Marilia; Lahner, Edith; Esposito, Gianluca; Sacchi, Maria Carlotta; Severi, Carola; Annibale, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Autoimmune gastritis is often suspected for its hematologic findings, and rarely the diagnosis is made for the presence of gastrointestinal symptoms. Aims of this cross-sectional study were to assess in a large cohort of patients affected by autoimmune gastritis the occurrence and the pattern of gastrointestinal symptoms and to evaluate whether symptomatic patients are characterized by specific clinical features. Gastrointestinal symptoms of 379 consecutive autoimmune gastritis patients were systematically assessed and classified following Rome III Criteria. Association between symptoms and anemia pattern, positivity to gastric autoantibodies, Helicobacter pylori infection, and concomitant autoimmune disease were evaluated. In total, 70.2% of patients were female, median age 55 years (range 17–83). Pernicious anemia (53.6%), iron deficiency anemia (34.8%), gastric autoantibodies (68.8%), and autoimmune disorders (41.7%) were present. However, 56.7% of patients complained of gastrointestinal symptoms, 69.8% of them had exclusively upper symptoms, 15.8% only lower and 14.4% concomitant upper and lower symptoms. Dyspepsia, subtype postprandial distress syndrome was the most represented, being present in 60.2% of symptomatic patients. Univariate and multivariate analyses showed that age gastritis is associated in almost 60% of cases with gastrointestinal symptoms, in particular dyspepsia. Dyspepsia is strictly related to younger age, no smoking, and absence of anemia. PMID:28072728

  14. Autoimmune gastritis: Pathologist’s viewpoint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coati, Irene; Fassan, Matteo; Farinati, Fabio; Graham, David Y; Genta, Robert M; Rugge, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Western countries are seeing a constant decline in the incidence of Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis, coupled with a rising epidemiological and clinical impact of autoimmune gastritis. This latter gastropathy is due to autoimmune aggression targeting parietal cells through a complex interaction of auto-antibodies against the parietal cell proton pump and intrinsic factor, and sensitized T cells. Given the specific target of this aggression, autoimmune gastritis is typically restricted to the gastric corpus-fundus mucosa. In advanced cases, the oxyntic epithelia are replaced by atrophic (and metaplastic) mucosa, creating the phenotypic background in which both gastric neuroendocrine tumors and (intestinal-type) adenocarcinomas may develop. Despite improvements in our understanding of the phenotypic changes or cascades occurring in this autoimmune setting, no reliable biomarkers are available for identifying patients at higher risk of developing a gastric neoplasm. The standardization of autoimmune gastritis histology reports and classifications in diagnostic practice is a prerequisite for implementing definitive secondary prevention strategies based on multidisciplinary diagnostic approaches integrating endoscopy, serology, histology and molecular profiling. PMID:26576102

  15. Autoimmune Abnormalities of Postpartum Thyroid Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bari, Flavia; Granese, Roberta; Le Donne, Maria; Vita, Roberto; Benvenga, Salvatore

    2017-01-01

    The year following parturition is a critical time for the de novo appearance or exacerbation of autoimmune diseases, including autoimmune thyroid disease. The vast majority of postpartum thyroid disease consists of postpartum thyroiditis (PPT) and the minority by Graves' disease and non-autoimmune thyroiditis. PPT has a worldwide prevalence ranging from 1 to 22% and averaging 5% based on a review published in 2012. Several factors confer risk for the development of PPT. Typically, the clinical course of PPT is characterized by three phases: thyrotoxic, hypothyroid, and euthyroid phase. Approximately half of PPT women will have permanent hypothyroidism. The best humoral marker for predictivity, already during the first trimester of gestation, is considered positivity for thyroperoxidase autoantibodies (TPOAb), though only one-third to half of such TPOAb-positive pregnant women will develop PPT. Nutraceuticals (such as selenium) or omega-3-fatty acid supplements seem to have a role in prevention of PPT. In a recent study on pregnant women with stable dietary habits, we found that the fish consumers had lower rates of positivity (and lower serum levels) of both TPOAb and thyroglobulin Ab compared to meat eaters. Finally, we remind the reader of other diseases that can be observed in the postpartum period, either autoimmune or non-autoimmune, thyroid or non-thyroid.

  16. Diagnosis and Management of Pediatric Autoimmune Liver Disease : ESPGHAN Hepatology Committee Position Statement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina; Vergani, Diego; Baumann, Ulrich; Czubkowski, Piotr; Debray, Dominique; Dezsofi, Antal; Fischler, Björn; Gupte, Girish; Hierro, Loreto; Indolfi, Giuseppe; Jahnel, Jörg; Smets, Françoise; Verkade, Henkjan J; Hadžić, Nedim

    Paediatric autoimmune liver disease is characterised by inflammatory liver histology, circulating autoantibodies and increased levels of IgG, in the absence of a known etiology. Three conditions have a likely autoimmune pathogenesis: autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis

  17. Prostate cancer induction in autoimmune rats and modulation of T cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilardoni, M B; Rabinovich, G A; Oviedo, M; Depiante-Depaoli, M

    1999-12-01

    In this study we present an experimental model of prostate gland cancer induced by long term hormonal treatment with testosterone in combination with a chemical carcinogenic agent in male Wistar rats with autoimmune prostatitis (AIP). This system is particularly attractive in order to study the factors involved in the transition from a non-invasive to an invasive carcinoma, decisive in the risk of human cancer. At first, autoimmune prostatitis was induced by immunization in 3 months-old male Wistar rats with autologous accessory glands. Then, rats were treated with continuous intradermal implants of testosterone propionate (TP) and with single doses of the chemical carcinogen 7, 12 dimethylbenz (alpha) anthracene (DMBA) by intraperitoneal injection. Histopathological studies of the prostate gland revealed the presence of pre-malignant lesions, particularly the so-called prostatic intraepithelial neoplasm (PIN) in 50% of animals. Moreover, we observed the development of carcinomas in 50% of treated-animals, which could be histologically discriminated in adenocarcinomas, carcinoma of epidermal origin and undifferentiated carcinoma. In autoimmune rats which did not receive any other treatment, exposure to autoantigens gave rise to an atypical hyperplasia of the prostatic gland which could be attributed to the hyperactive state of the gland. Control groups constituted by autoimmune rats treated with TP or DMBA, and normal rats which were exposed to TP and/or DMBA evidenced the presence of PINs at different degrees, but did not develop carcinomas. Moreover, serum acid phosphatase significantly increased as treatment was accomplished, reaching its maximum levels in animals with carcinoma, in which DNA content, determined by image cytometry, showed to be aneuploid. Finally, we provided biochemical and cytofluorometrical evidence of the induction of apoptosis of spleen T cells in carcinoma-bearing hosts, and to a lesser extent in animals with PIN, but not in autoimmune or

  18. Antinuclear antibodies in autoimmune and allergic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grygiel-Górniak, Bogna; Rogacka, Natalia; Rogacki, Michał; Puszczewicz, Mariusz

    2017-01-01

    Antinuclear antibodies (ANA) are primarily significant in the diagnosis of systemic connective tissue diseases. The relationship between their occurrence in allergic diseases is poorly documented. However, the mechanism of allergic and autoimmune diseases has a common thread. In both cases, an increased production of IgE antibodies and presence of ANA in selected disease entities is observed. Equally important is the activation of basophils secreting proinflammatory factors and affecting the differentiation of TH17 lymphocytes. Both autoimmune and allergic diseases have complex multi-pathogenesis and often occur in genetically predisposed individuals. The presence of antinuclear antibodies was confirmed in many systemic connective tissue diseases and some allergic diseases. Examples include atopic dermatitis, non-allergic asthma, and pollen allergy. Co-occurring allergic and autoimmune disorders induce further search for mechanisms involved in the aetiopathogenesis of both groups of diseases.

  19. Epidemiology of autoimmune diseases in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eaton, William W.; Rose, N.R.; Kalaydijan, A.

    2007-01-01

    An epidemiologic study of the autoimmune diseases taken together has not been done heretofore. The National Patient Register of Denmark is used to estimate the population prevalence of 31 possible or probable autoimmune diseases. Record linkage is used to estimate 465 pairwise co...... diseases and weak across diseases. These data confirm the importance of the autoimmune diseases as a group and suggest that common etiopathologies exist among them......-morbidities in individuals among the 31 diseases, and familial aggregation among sibs, parents and offspring. The prevalence of any of the 31 diseases in the population is more than 5%. Within individuals, there is extensive comorbidity across the 31 diseases. Within families, aggregation is strongest for individual...

  20. Dendritic cells and aging: consequences for autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Anshu; Sridharan, Aishwarya; Prakash, Sangeetha; Agrawal, Harsh

    2012-01-01

    The immune system has evolved to mount immune responses against foreign pathogens and to remain silent against self-antigens. A balance between immunity and tolerance is required as any disturbance may result in chronic inflammation or autoimmunity. Dendritic cells (DCs) actively participate in maintaining this balance. Under steady-state conditions, DCs remain in an immature state and do not mount an immune response against circulating self-antigens in the periphery, which maintains a state of tolerance. By contrast, foreign antigens result in DC maturation and DC-induced T-cell activation. Inappropriate maturation of DCs due to infections or tissue injury may cause alterations in the balance between the tolerogenic and immunogenic functions of DCs and instigate the development of autoimmune diseases. This article provides an overview of the effects of advancing age on DC functions and their implications in autoimmunity.

  1. Pregnancy and autoimmune connective tissue diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marder, Wendy; Littlejohn, Emily A

    2016-01-01

    The autoimmune connective tissue diseases predominantly affect women and often occur during the reproductive years. Thus, specialized issues in pregnancy planning and management are commonly encountered in this patient population. This chapter provides a current overview of pregnancy as a risk factor for onset of autoimmune disease, considerations related to the course of pregnancy in several autoimmune connective tissue diseases, and disease management and medication issues before and during pregnancy and the postpartum period. A major theme that has emerged across these inflammatory diseases is that active maternal disease during pregnancy is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes, and that maternal and fetal health can be optimized when conception is planned during times of inactive disease and through maintaining treatment regimens compatible with pregnancy. PMID:27421217

  2. MicroRNAs in autoimmune rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.D. Sebastiani

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of autoimmune diseases remains largely unknown. In recent years, besides genetic factors, several studies proposed that the epigenome may hold the key to a better understanding of autoimmunity initiation and perpetuation. More specifically epigenetic regulatory mechanisms comprise DNA methylation, a variety of histone modifications, and microRNA (miRNA activity, all of which act upon gene and protein expression levels. In particular it is well known that epigenetic mechanisms are important for controlling the pattern of gene expression during development, the cell cycle, and the response to biological or environmental changes. In the present review a description of the most frequent epigenetic deregulations, in particular the role of miRNA, in rheumatic autoimmune disorders will be analyzed.

  3. Gene expression profiling in autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bovin, Lone Frier; Brynskov, Jørn; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2007-01-01

    ) patients and healthy individuals were specific for the arthritic process or likewise altered in other chronic inflammatory diseases such as chronic autoimmune thyroiditis (Hashimoto's thyroiditis, HT) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Using qPCR for 18 RA-discriminative genes, there were no significant......A central issue in autoimmune disease is whether the underlying inflammation is a repeated stereotypical process or whether disease specific gene expression is involved. To shed light on this, we analysed whether genes previously found to be differentially regulated in rheumatoid arthritis (RA...... immunoinflammatory diseases, but only if accompanied by pronounced systemic manifestations. This suggests that at least some of the genes activated in RA are predominantly or solely related to general and disease-nonspecific autoimmune processes...

  4. HTLV-1, Immune Response and Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juarez A S Quaresma

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1 infection is associated with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL. Tropical spastic paraparesis/HTLV-1-associated myelopathy (PET/HAM is involved in the development of autoimmune diseases including Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE, and Sjögren’s Syndrome (SS. The development of HTLV-1-driven autoimmunity is hypothesized to rely on molecular mimicry, because virus-like particles can trigger an inflammatory response. However, HTLV-1 modifies the behavior of CD4+ T cells on infection and alters their cytokine production. A previous study showed that in patients infected with HTLV-1, the activity of regulatory CD4+ T cells and their consequent expression of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines are altered. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms underlying changes in cytokine release leading to the loss of tolerance and development of autoimmunity.

  5. The clinical extremes of autoimmune cholangitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Campos

    Full Text Available Autoimmune cholangitis (AIC was first described in 1987 as immunocholangitis in three women who presented with signs and symptoms of primary biliary cholangitis (PBC, but who were antimitochondrial (AMA negative and antinuclear antibodies (ANA positive, and responded to immunosuppressive therapy with azathioprine and prednisolone (1. AIC is a rare chronic cholestatic inflammatory disease characterized by the presence of high ANA or smooth muscle antibodies (SMA but AMA seronegativity. Histologically, AIC exhibits bile duct injury (2. In terms of therapeutics, in addition to response to ursodeoxycholic acid, a prompt response to corticosteroids has also been reported in earlier stages, distinguishing it from PBC. Herein the authors describe two cases with mixed signs of PBC and autoimmune hepatitis (AIH. The diagnostic differentiation between these diseases (AIC, PBC and AIH is essential because of the different therapeutic strategies. Our cases highlight the importance of clinician awareness of the autoimmune spectrum of liver diseases.

  6. Clinical Aspects of IgG4-Related Orbital Inflammation in a Case Series of Ocular Adnexal Lymphoproliferative Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayuki Takahira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The most frequent ocular adnexal tumors and simulating lesions are lymphoproliferative disorders (LPDs, including malignant lymphomas and orbital inflammation with lymphoid hyperplasia or infiltration. IgG4-related orbital inflammation (IgG4-ROI often involves lacrimal glands and other orbital tissues and is an important differential diagnosis. The present study evaluated clinical aspects of IgG4-ROI in a case series of orbital LPD. Sixty-two consecutive cases of orbital LPD, pathologically diagnosed from November, 2004, through March, 2011, were investigated. Histological types were 22 cases with MALT lymphoma, 11 cases with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL, 3 cases with other malignant lymphomas, 16 cases with IgG4-ROI, and 10 cases with non-IgG4-ROI. Ages of the IgG4-ROI group (56±10?yrs were significantly lower than the MALT lymphoma (71±12?yrs and DLBCL (75±14?yrs groups. Orbital lesions other than lacrimal glands were present in six cases including extraocular muscle swelling, mass lesions surrounding the optic nerve, and supraorbital and infraorbital nerves enlargements. Although none of the malignant lymphomas were related to IgG4, previous evidence suggested that malignant lymphomas can arise from IgG4-ROI. Based on this study (26% and another report (33%, it is likely that nearly a quarter of orbital LPD are IgG4-ROI.

  7. Treatment of autoimmune anterior uveitis with recombinant TCR ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamus, Grazyna; Burrows, Gregory G; Vandenbark, Arthur A; Offner, Halina

    2006-06-01

    To determine protective properties of recombinant TCR ligands (RTLs) as a new treatment for experimental autoimmune anterior uveitis (AU). RTLs comprise the rat RT1.B beta1alpha1 domains, linked either to the guinea pig MBP69-89 peptide (RTL201), to the corresponding rat MBP69-89 peptide (RTL200), or to the cardiac myosin peptide CM-2 (RTL203). AU associated with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) was actively induced in Lewis rats by injection of myelin basic protein emulsified in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) or passively by the transfer of pathogenic T cells. Rats received five daily doses each of 300 microg RTL201 in saline, intravenously. Control rats received the same dose of RTL203 or an "empty" beta1alpha1 protein (no peptide). The rats were evaluated for the suppression of clinical and histologic signs of AU. RTL201 prevented active and passive AU and reduced the clinical symptoms of established AU. RTL201 completely prevented clinical and histologic AU in the treated rats, compared with disease progression in the untreated rats or those treated with an "empty" construct. The suppression of clinical AU correlated with a significant reduction in inflammatory cells infiltrating the eyes of the RTL201-treated rats. Furthermore, RTL201 inhibited T cell proliferation, DTH responses, and cytokine mRNA expression in the eye, in contrast to the untreated rats. In comparison with RTL201, RTL200 was less effective in protecting the eye from AU. RTL203 also significantly inhibited clinical AU, but not EAE. RTL constructs suppressed clinical and histologic AU by inhibiting the systemic activation of specific T cells and preventing the recruitment of inflammatory cells into the eye. These findings suggest a possible clinical application of this novel class of peptide/MHC class II constructs in patients with AU that is mediated by T-cell responses to known antigenic peptides.

  8. Human neutrophils in auto-immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieblemont, Nathalie; Wright, Helen L; Edwards, Steven W; Witko-Sarsat, Véronique

    2016-04-01

    Human neutrophils have great capacity to cause tissue damage in inflammatory diseases via their inappropriate activation to release reactive oxygen species (ROS), proteases and other tissue-damaging molecules. Furthermore, activated neutrophils can release a wide variety of cytokines and chemokines that can regulate almost every element of the immune system. In addition to these important immuno-regulatory processes, activated neutrophils can also release, expose or generate neoepitopes that have the potential to break immune tolerance and result in the generation of autoantibodies, that characterise a number of human auto-immune diseases. For example, in vasculitis, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) that are directed against proteinase 3 or myeloperoxidase are neutrophil-derived autoantigens and activated neutrophils are the main effector cells of vascular damage. In other auto-immune diseases, these neutrophil-derived neoepitopes may arise from a number of processes that include release of granule enzymes and ROS, changes in the properties of components of their plasma membrane as a result of activation or apoptosis, and via the release of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs). NETs are extracellular structures that contain chromatin that is decorated with granule enzymes (including citrullinated proteins) that can act as neo-epitopes to generate auto-immunity. This review therefore describes the processes that can result in neutrophil-mediated auto-immunity, and the role of neutrophils in the molecular pathologies of auto-immune diseases such as vasculitis, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We discuss the potential role of NETs in these processes and some of the debate in the literature regarding the role of this phenomenon in microbial killing, cell death and auto-immunity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Safety of vaccine adjuvants: focus on autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Laan, Jan Willem; Gould, Sarah; Tanir, Jennifer Y

    2015-03-24

    Questions have been recently raised regarding the safety of vaccine adjuvants, particularly in relation to autoimmunity or autoimmune disease(s)/disorder(s) (AID). The International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI) Health and Environmental Sciences Institute (HESI) formed a scientific committee and convened a 2-day workshop, consisting of technical experts from around the world representing academia, government regulatory agencies, and industry, to investigate and openly discuss the issues around adjuvant safety in vaccines. The types of adjuvants considered included oil-in-water emulsions and toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists. The state of science around the use of animal models and biomarkers for the evaluation and prediction of AID were also discussed. Following extensive literature reviews by the HESI committee, and presentations by experts at the workshop, several key points were identified, including the value of animal models used to study autoimmunity and AID toward studying novel vaccine adjuvants; whether there is scientific evidence indicating an intrinsic risk of autoimmunity and AID with adjuvants, or a higher risk resulting from the mechanism of action; and if there is compelling clinical data linking adjuvants and AID. The tripartite group of experts concluded that there is no compelling evidence supporting the association of vaccine adjuvants with autoimmunity signals. Additionally, it is recommended that future research on the potential effects of vaccine adjuvants on AID should consider carefully the experimental design in animal models particularly if they are to be used in any risk assessment, as an improper design and model could result in misleading information. Finally, studies on the mechanistic aspects and potential biomarkers related to adjuvants and autoimmunity phenomena could be developed. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions APECED Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy Printable PDF Open All Close All ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy ( APECED ) is an inherited condition that ...

  11. Shared genetic origins of allergy and autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waage, J. E.; Kreiner-Møller, E.; Standl, M.

    2015-01-01

    Parallel increases in allergy and autoimmune disease prevalence in recent time suggest shared, but yet unknown, etiologies. Here, we investigated shared genetic loci and molecular pathways to identify possible shared disease mechanisms between allergy and autoimmune diseases....

  12. Generalized Vitiligo Associated Autoimmune Diseases in Japanese Patients Their Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiko Narita

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions: Among Japanese vitiligo patients, there is a subgroup with strong evidence of genetically determined susceptibility to not only vitiligo, but also to autoimmune thyroid disease and other autoimmune disorders.

  13. The role of epigenetic mechanisms and processes in autoimmune disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greer JM

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Judith M Greer, Pamela A McCombeThe University of Queensland, UQ Centre for Clinical Research, Brisbane, Queensland, AustraliaAbstract: The lack of complete concordance of autoimmune disease in identical twins suggests that nongenetic factors play a major role in determining disease susceptibility. In this review, we consider how epigenetic mechanisms could affect the immune system and effector mechanisms in autoimmunity and/or the target organ of autoimmunity and thus affect the development of autoimmune diseases. We also consider the types of stimuli that lead to epigenetic modifications and how these relate to the epidemiology of autoimmune diseases and the biological pathways operative in different autoimmune diseases. Increasing our knowledge of these epigenetic mechanisms and processes will increase the prospects for controlling or preventing autoimmune diseases in the future through the use of drugs that target the epigenetic pathways.Keywords: twins, concordance, autoimmune disease, nongenetic factors, immune system, epigenetic modifications

  14. [Ludwig van Beethoven: an autoimmune deafness?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, P J

    1995-01-01

    The author reminds us of the great moments of Beethoven's life and of the different stages of his deafness onset, until to last instants. The post-mortem examination, performed by doctor Wagner, and the scientific studies of the remains, during the exhumations, are reported. Beethoven's deafness was clearly a sensorineural impairment and the previously suggested prevalent hypotheses are discussed. A new theory is emphasized, based on modern studies about autoimmune sensorineural hearing losses in relation with chronic inflammatory bowel ailment. Conclusion is that Beethoven's deafness was probably owing to a primary autoimmune degeneration of the organ of Corti, giving rise to atrophy of the auditory nerve.

  15. Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease- A Clinical Viewpoint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirala Khalessi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in medicine have given us a better insight into a group of disorders known as autoimmune diseases. In particular, advances have occurred in our understanding of the Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease (AIED. In this article, the authors review the different postulated theories in the pathogenesis of this disease. The clinical presentation, the available para-clinical diagnostic tools, and the important differential diagnoses will be summarized. The management methods, including steroid therapy, immunosuppressive medications, other biological agents and intra-tympanic injections, will be addressed. Cochlear implantation as a final solution to the advanced stages of the disease, causing total deafness, will also be discussed.

  16. Diagnosis and classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Garrett F; Tuscano, Emily T; Tuscano, Joseph M

    2014-01-01

    Uncompensated autoantibody-mediated red blood cell (RBC) consumption is the hallmark of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). Classification of AIHA is pathophysiologically based and divides AIHA into warm, mixed or cold-reactive subtypes. This thermal-based classification is based on the optimal autoantibody-RBC reactivity temperatures. AIHA is further subcategorized into idiopathic and secondary with the later being associated with a number of underlying infectious, neoplastic and autoimmune disorders. In most cases AIHA is confirmed by a positive direct antiglobulin test (DAT). The standard therapeutic approaches to treatment of AIHA include corticosteroids, splenectomy, immunosuppressive agents and monoclonal antibodies. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. The Increased Risk for Autoimmune Diseases in Patients with Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raevuori, Anu; Haukka, Jari; Vaarala, Outi; Suvisaari, Jaana M.; Gissler, Mika; Grainger, Marjut; Linna, Milla S.; Suokas, Jaana T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Research suggests autoimmune processes to be involved in psychiatric disorders. We aimed to address the prevalence and incidence of autoimmune diseases in a large Finnish patient cohort with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge eating disorder. Methods Patients (N = 2342) treated at the Eating Disorder Unit of Helsinki University Central Hospital between 1995 and 2010 were compared with general population controls (N = 9368) matched for age, sex, and place of residence. Data of 30 autoimmune diseases from the Hospital Discharge Register from 1969 to 2010 were analyzed using conditional and Poisson regression models. Results Of patients, 8.9% vs. 5.4% of control individuals had been diagnosed with one or more autoimmune disease (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.5–2.0, Pautoimmune diseases among patients with eating disorders was not exclusively due to endocrinological and gastroenterological diseases; when the two categories were excluded, the increase in prevalence was seen in the patients both before the onset of the eating disorder treatment (OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.1–2.1, P = 0.02) and at the end of the follow-up (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.1–1.8, P = 0.01). Conclusions We observed an association between eating disorders and several autoimmune diseases with different genetic backgrounds. Our findings support the link between immune-mediated mechanisms and development of eating disorders. Future studies are needed to further explore the risk of autoimmune diseases and immunological mechanisms in individuals with eating disorders and their family members. PMID:25147950

  18. Autoimmune Chronic Gastritis: New diagnostic and therapeutic approaches.

    OpenAIRE

    VALDES SOCIN, Hernan Gonzalo

    2016-01-01

    The challenge for the clinician is to detect early gastric autoimmunity markers to avoid some of its complications such as micronutriments and drug malabsorption. Indeed autoimmune gastritis may be associated with the development of neuroendocrine tumors (NET), gastric adenocarcinomas or even MALT lymphomas. In this lecture we summarize recent diagnostic tools and new therapies taylored for autoimmune gastritis.

  19. Rituximab therapy in a patient with low grade B-cell lymphoproliferative disease and concomitant acquired angioedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaur R

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ravdeep Kaur, Aerik Anthony Williams, Catherine Baker Swift, Jason W Caldwell Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC, USA Abstract: Acquired angioedema is often associated with significant morbidity. An underlying lymphatic malignancy, autoimmune disorder, adenocarcinoma, or other malignancy may be present. Screening for these disorders should occur in all patients with acquired angioedema as treatment may result in resolution of angioedema. Keywords: complement, C1-INH deficiency, ecallantide, hemopathy

  20. Premature atherosclerosis in systemic autoimmune diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuw, Karina de

    2008-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and Wegener’s granulomatosis (WG) are associated with a significantly increased prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) compared to age- and sex-matched controls. Many risk factors are involved in the pathogenesis of

  1. Checks and Balances in Autoimmune Vasculitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cadena, Rebeca Hid; Abdulahad, Wayel H.; Hospers, G. A. P.; Wind, T. T.; Boots, Annemieke M. H.; Heeringa, Peter; Brouwer, Elisabeth

    2018-01-01

    Age-associated changes in the immune system including alterations in surface protein expression are thought to contribute to an increased susceptibility for autoimmune diseases. The balance between the expression of coinhibitory and costimulatory surface protein molecules, also known as immune

  2. Immunosensors for Biomarker Detection in Autoimmune Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuezhu; Zambrano, Amarayca; Lin, Zuan-Tao; Xing, Yikun; Rippy, Justin; Wu, Tianfu

    2017-04-01

    Autoimmune diseases occur when the immune system generates proinflammatory molecules and autoantibodies that mistakenly attack their own body. Traditional diagnosis of autoimmune disease is primarily based on physician assessment combined with core laboratory tests. However, these tests are not sensitive enough to detect early molecular events, and quite often, it is too late to control these autoimmune diseases and reverse tissue damage when conventional tests show positivity for disease. It is fortunate that during the past decade, research in nanotechnology has provided enormous opportunities for the development of ultrasensitive biosensors in detecting early biomarkers with high sensitivity. Biosensors consist of a biorecognition element and a transducer which are able to facilitate an accurate detection of proinflammatory molecules, autoantibodies and other disease-causing molecules. Apparently, novel biosensors could be superior to traditional metrics in assessing the drug efficacy in clinical trials, especially when specific biomarkers are indicative of the pathogenesis of disease. Furthermore, the portability of a biosensor enables the development of point-of-care devices. In this review, various types of biomolecule sensing systems, including electrochemical, optical and mechanical sensors, and their applications and future potentials in autoimmune disease treatment were discussed.

  3. Anti-cytokine autoantibodies in autoimmune diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappellano, Giuseppe; Orilieri, Elisabetta; Woldetsadik, Abiy D; Boggio, Elena; Soluri, Maria F; Comi, Cristoforo; Sblattero, Daniele; Chiocchetti, Annalisa; Dianzani, Umberto

    2012-01-01

    An overview of the current literature is showing that autoantibodies (AutoAbs) against cytokines are produced in several pathological conditions, including autoimmune diseases, but can also be detected in healthy individuals. In autoimmune diseases, these AutoAbs may also be prognostic markers, either negative (such as AutoAbs to IL-8 and IL-1α in rheumatoid arthritis) or positive (such as AutoAbs to IL-6 in systemic sclerosis and those to osteopontin in rheumatoid arthritis). They may have neutralizing activity and influence the course of the physiological and pathological immune responses. High levels of AutoAbs against cytokines may even lead to immunodeficiency, such as those to IL-17 in autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type I or those to IFN-γ in mycobacterial infections. Their role in human therapy may be exploited not only through passive immunization but also through vaccination, which may improve the costs for long lasting treatments of autoimmune diseases. Detection and quantification of these AutoAbs can be profoundly influenced by the technique used and standardization of these methods is needed to increase the value of their analysis. PMID:23885320

  4. Autoimmune diseases: MIF as a therapeutic target

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greven, Dorothee; Leng, Lin; Bucala, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Areas covered in this review: Our aim is to discuss MIF-directed therapies as a novel therapeutic approach. The review covers literature from the past 10 years. What the reader will gain: MIF inhibition has been shown to be efficacious in many experimental and pre-clinical studies of autoimmune

  5. S2k Leitlinie Autoimmune Lebererkrankungen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strassburg, Christian P.; Beckebaum, Susanne; Geier, Andreas; Gotthardt, Daniel; Klein, Reinhild; Melter, Michael; Schott, Eckart; Spengler, Ulrich; Tacke, Frank; Trauner, Michael; Weiler-Normann, Christina; Weismüller, Tobias J.; Tannapfel, Andrea; Tischendorf, Jens J.; Schramm, Christoph; Albert, Jörg; Allescher, Hans-Dieter; Antoni, Christoph; Berg, Christoph; Bufler, Philip; Dannel, Frank; Dietrich, Christoph; Engelmann, Guido; Feist, Eugen; Fickert, Peter; Fischer, Lutz; Flechtenmacher, Christa; Friedrich-Rust, Mireen; Giek, Angelika; Görtz, Rüdiger Stephan; Herzer, Kerstin; Hofer, Harald; Hohenester, Simon; Höhn, Mariele; Hüppe, Dietrich; In der Smitten, Susanne; Jahnel, Jörg; Keitel-Anselmino, Verena; Kirchner, Gabriele; Kremer, Andreas; Lauenstein, Andreas; Lenzen, Henrike; Mayerle, Julia; Müller, Tobias; Müllhaupt, Beat; Nashan, Björn; Rust, Christian; Schattenberg, Jörn M.; Schmidt, Hartmut; Schreyer, Andreas; Sebode, Marcial; Siegmund, Britta; Terjung, Birgit; Teufel, Andreas; van Thiel, Ingo; Wirth, Stefan; Witte, Torsten; Beuers, Ulrich; Gerken, Guido; Graziadei, Ivo; Lohse, Ansgar; Manns, Michael P.; Tilg, Herbert

    2017-01-01

    The guideline was created under the leadership of the DGVS and with participation of neighbouring scientific societies and is intended as a practical aid for the diagnosis and therapy of autoimmune liver diseases. The aim is to represent the current state of science, promote the recognition of the

  6. AIDBD: AUTOIMMUNE AND INFLAMMATORY DISEASES BIOMARKER DATABASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulwinder Singh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the major challenges facing the healthcare industry is how to personalize, or tailor healthcare products and services to individuals’ unique genetic and biomarker make-ups. Biomarkers provide information about normal or patho-physiological processes to detect or define disease progression or to predict or quantify therapeutic responses. Once these footprints have been identified and measured, they can then be used to personalize or tailor treatment plans, products and services to each individual’s unique makeup and background. Autoimmune and Inflammatory Diseases Biomarker Database (AIDBD is one of the first efforts to build an easily accessible and comprehensive literature-derived database covering information on known autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, biomarkers and available medications. It allows users to link autoimmune and inflammatory diseases to protein or gene biomarkers through its user interface. Currently, AIDBD integrates 206 biomarkers for 21 autoimmune and inflammatory diseases and data on 516 launched drugs for the treatment these diseases. The database is freely accessible at http://www.aidbd.in/.

  7. Increased prevalence of autoimmunity in Turner syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, K H; Cleemann, L; Hjerrild, B E

    2009-01-01

    Individuals with Turner syndrome (TS) are prone to develop autoimmune conditions such as coeliac disease (CD), thyroiditis and type 1 diabetes (T1DM). The objective of the present study was to examine TS of various karyotypes for autoantibodies and corresponding diseases. This was investigated...

  8. Celiac disease in autoimmune cholestatic liver disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volta, Umberto; Rodrigo, Luis; Granito, Alessandro; Petrolini, Nunzio; Muratori, Paolo; Muratori, Luigi; Linares, Antonio; Veronesi, Lorenza; Fuentes, Dolores; Zauli, Daniela; Bianchi, Francesco B

    2002-10-01

    In this study, serological screening for celiac disease (CD) was performed in patients with autoimmune cholestasis to define the prevalence of such an association and to evaluate the impact of gluten withdrawal on liver disease associated with gluten sensitive enteropathy. Immunoglobulin A endomysial, human and guinea pig tissue transglutaminase antibodies, and immunoglobulin A and G gliadin antibodies were sought in 255 patients with primary biliary cirrhosis, autoimmune cholangitis, and primary sclerosing cholangitis. Immunoglobulin A endomysial and human tissue transglutaminase antibodies were positive in nine patients (seven primary biliary cirrhosis, one autoimmune cholangitis, and one primary sclerosing cholangitis), whose duodenal biopsy results showed villous atrophy consistent with CD. Two of these patients had a malabsorption syndrome, and one had iron-deficiency anemia. Clinical and biochemical signs of cholestasis did not improve after gluten withdrawal in the three patients with severe liver disease. A longer follow-up of the six celiac patients with mild liver damage is needed to clarify whether gluten restriction can contribute to slow down the progression of liver disease. The high prevalence of CD (3.5%) in autoimmune cholestasis suggests that serological screening for CD should be routinely performed in such patients by immunoglobulin A endomysial or human tissue transglutaminase antibodies.

  9. Costimulation and autoimmune diabetes in BB rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beaudette-Zlatanova, BC; Whalen, B; Zipris, D; Yagita, H; Rozing, J; Groen, H; Benjamin, CD; Hunig, T; Drexhage, HA; Ansari, MJ; Leif, J; Mordes, JP; Greiner, DL; Sayegh, MH; Rossini, AA

    Costimulatory signals regulate T-cell activation. To investigate the role of costimulation in autoimmunity and transplantation, we studied the BB rat model of type 1 diabetes. Diabetes-prone BB (BBDP) rats spontaneously develop disease when 55-120 days of age. We observed that two anti-CD28

  10. Autoimmun hepatitis. Fremtroedelsesformer, diagnostik og behandling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, L O; Tage-Jensen, U; Vyberg, M

    1992-01-01

    A retrospective study concerning ten patients with autoimmune hepatitis (AiH), diagnosed during a 2 1/2-year period is presented. The age of the patients ranged from 25 to 82 years and nine of the patients were women. Their symptoms included jaundice, pruritus, fever, anorexia and fatigue during...

  11. Autoimmune hepatitis : Pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, AP

    Background: Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a chronic necro-inflammatory disease of the liver. Early recognition is important in order to prevent the development of cirrosis. This review discusses recent developments in the fields of diagnosis, pathophysiology and management of AIH. Methods: Relevant

  12. Autoimmun hypophysitis--en differentialdiagnose til hypofyseadenomer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Therese; Hagen, Claus

    2010-01-01

    A 66-year-old man with a headache in the left temporal region which had persisted for eight months is presented. The patient developed polydipsia and polyuria and also suffered from tinnitus, impaired hearing and episodes of double vision. The patient was diagnosed with autoimmune hypophysitis (AH...

  13. Study of cytokines microenvironment during autoimmune diseases ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    22, IL-23, TNF-α and TGF-β) were determined. We used the immunoenzymatic technology to assess the titer of cytokines. We found that there was no significant variation of TNF-α level in normal controls and autoimmune diseases ...

  14. Autoimmun synaptisk encefalitis er en underdiagnosticeret sygdomsgruppe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Signe Modvig; Høi-Hansen, Christina Engel; Uldall, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The term autoimmune synaptic encephalitis (ASE) comprises encephalitides associated with autoantibodies against structures of the neuronal synapse. We review four types of ASE (anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis, anti-α-amine-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid receptor...

  15. Is Tourette's syndrome an autoimmune disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, PJ; Kallenberg, CGM; Korf, J; Minderaa, RB

    2002-01-01

    We provide a review of recent research findings which support the involvement of autoimmunity in childhood-onset tic disorders, in particular the presence of antineuronal autoantibodies, D8/17 B lymphocyte overexpression, a marker of chorea associated with streptococcal infection, and possible

  16. Is Tourette's syndrome an autoimmune disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, P; Limburg, P; Kallenberg, C; Minderaa, R; Battistin, L

    2004-01-01

    Tourette's syndrome is a childhood-onset neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by the presence of both multiple motor and vocal tics. While its pathogenesis at a molecular and cellular level remains unknown, recent research findings point to the possible involvement of autoimmunity in at least a

  17. Autoimmune hepatitis in children in Eastern Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitfell-Pedersen, Joanna; Jørgensen, Marianne Hørby; Müller, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) in childhood is a progressive chronic inflammatory liver disease. The aim of this study was to compare the clinical and biochemical characteristics of 33 paediatric patients diagnosed as having AIH with earlier described cohorts, and to examine the effect of early...

  18. Auto-immune Haemolytic Anaemia and Paroxys

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    who presented with an acute auto-immune haemolytic anaemia. In addition to a persistently positive Coombs test, with specific red cell auto-antibodies, the acidified serum test and the sucrose haemolysis test were repeatedly positive. CASE REPORT. A 24-year-old Indian woman was admitted to hospital in. July 1969.

  19. The environment and autoimmune thyroid diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prummel, Mark F.; Strieder, Thea; Wiersinga, Wilmar M.

    2004-01-01

    Genetic factors play an important role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) and it has been calculated that 80% of the susceptibility to develop Graves' disease is attributable to genes. The concordance rate for AITD among monozygotic twins is, however, well below I and

  20. Systemic autoimmune disease and Raynaud's phenomonen.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kallenberg, Cornelis

    1982-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases (AID) are clinically characterized by the involvement of multiple organ systems in the desease process, and immunologically by immune responsiveness against "self". The constitute a heterogenous group of disorders wich are presented to the clinician in a wide variety of

  1. Alopecia areata and autoimmunity: A clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Emy

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Alopecia areata (AA frequently occur in association with other autoimmune diseases such as thyroid disorders, anemias and other skin disorders with autoimmune etiology. Despite numerous studies related to individual disease associations in alopecia areata, there is paucity of literature regarding comprehensive studies on concomitant cutaneous and systemic diseases. The present study has been designed to determine if there is a significant association between alopecia areata and other autoimmune diseases. This study covers 71 patients with the diagnosis of alopecia areata as the case group and 71 patients with no evidence of alopecia areata as the control group. Among the cutaneous diseases associated with AA, atopic dermatitis (AD showed maximum frequency with an O/E ratio of 2.5, which indicates that it is two to three times more common in patients with alopecia areata. In our study, thyroid disorders showed the highest frequency with on O/E ratio of 3.2 and a P value of 0.01, which is statistically highly significant. Among the thyroid disorders, hypothyroidism was the most frequent association (14.1% in our study. Since systemic involvement is not infrequent in patients with alopecia areata, it is imperative to screen these patients for associated disorders, particularly atopy, thyroid diseases, anemias and other autoimmune disorders, especially if alopecia areata is chronic, recurrent and extensive.

  2. Cryptococcal meningitis in patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, YaLi; Sang, Junjun; Pan, Weihua; Du, Lin; Liao, Wanqing; Chen, Jianghan; Zhu, Yuanjie

    2014-08-01

    To summarize the epidemiology, clinical features, treatment, and outcome of cryptococcal meningitis (CM) in autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) patients and to provide a reference for the prevention and control of AIHA complicated with CM, we evaluated five cases of CM in patients with AIHA treated in our hospital from 2003 to 2013 and eight related foreign cases. All of the clinical isolates were Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii and grouped into the VNI genotype and serotype A. The clinical features exhibit significant features. Headache, nausea, and fever are common symptoms of AIHA complicated with CM. The early clinical manifestations lack specificity, which may lead to delayed diagnosis and treatment. Long-term use of prednisone (≥15 mg day(-1)), poor control of anemia, and splenectomy are risk factors for AIHA complicated with cryptococcal infection. The combination of intravenous amphotericin B and oral 5-fluorocytosine remains the preferred treatment for AIHA complicated with CM.

  3. Wireless capsule endoscopy as a tool in diagnosing autoimmune enteropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gram-Kampmann, Eva-Marie; Lillevang, Søren T; Detlefsen, Sönke; Laursen, Stig Borbjerg

    2015-07-06

    Autoimmune enteropathy (AE) is an immune mediated illness of the intestinal mucosa. The cause is unknown, and the diagnosis is based on typical characteristics displayed. There is no gold standard for treatment. We present two adult cases of AE and demonstrate the challenges in establishing the diagnosis. The extensive diagnostic work up excluded other more common causes of protracted diarrhoea. Wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) displayed universal small intestinal mucosal damage with shortened villi that led to the suspicion of AE in both patients. The diagnosis was confirmed with microscopy, showing shortened villi, villous blunting and hyperplasia of crypts in both patients. In one patient, deep crypt lymphocytosis with minimal intraepithelial lymphocytosis was found as well. Both patients were successfully treated with high-dose immunosuppressant therapy to induce and maintain remission. Use of WCE as a diagnostic tool was invaluable in establishing the diagnosis of AE. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  4. Impact of Autoantibodies against Glycolytic Enzymes on Pathogenicity of Autoimmune Retinopathy and Other Autoimmune Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grazyna Adamus

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Autoantibodies (AAbs against glycolytic enzymes: aldolase, α-enolase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and pyruvate kinase are prevalent in sera of patients with blinding retinal diseases, such as paraneoplastic [cancer-associated retinopathy (CAR] and non-paraneoplastic autoimmune retinopathies, as well as in many other autoimmune diseases. CAR is a degenerative disease of the retina characterized by sudden vision loss in patients with cancer and serum anti-retinal AAbs. In this review, we discuss the widespread serum presence of anti-glycolytic enzyme AAbs and their significance in autoimmune diseases. There are multiple mechanisms responsible for antibody generation, including the innate anti-microbial response, anti-tumor response, or autoimmune response against released self-antigens from damaged, inflamed tissue. AAbs against enolase, GADPH, and aldolase exist in a single patient in elevated titers, suggesting their participation in pathogenicity. The lack of restriction of AAbs to one disease may be related to an increased expression of glycolytic enzymes in various metabolically active tissues that triggers an autoimmune response and generation of AAbs with the same specificity in several chronic and autoimmune conditions. In CAR, the importance of serum anti-glycolytic enzyme AAbs had been previously dismissed, but the retina may be without pathological consequence until a failure of the blood–retinal barrier function, which would then allow pathogenic AAbs access to their retinal targets, ultimately leading to damaging effects.

  5. Recent insights into the role and molecular mechanisms of the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene in autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierabracci, Alessandra

    2011-01-01

    Since many years immunologists have being tried to answer the tantalizing enigma of immunological tolerance. Complex mechanisms in both thymus (central tolerance) and peripheral lymphoid organs (peripheral tolerance) underly lymphocyte tolerance and its maintenance. The genesis of autoimmunity involves environmental and genetic mechanisms, both contributing to the disruption and deregulation of central and peripheral tolerance, allowing autoreactive pathogenetic T and B-cell clones arising. Among genetic factors the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene is one of the best candidates to understand the complex scenario of autoimmunity. Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy syndrome type 1 is a rare autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the AIRE gene. Therefore, the disorder has certainly been a powerful model to address the question concerning how a tolerant state is achieved or maintained and to explore how it has gone lost in the context of autoimmunity. AIRE has been proposed to function as a 'non classical' transcription factor, strongly implicated in the regulation of organ-specific antigen expression in thymic epithelial cells and in the imposition of T cell tolerance, thus regulating the negative selection of autoreactive T cell clones. A plethora of proposal have been suggested for AIRE's potential mechanism of action, thus regulating the negative selection of autoreactive T cells. In this review recent discoveries are presented into the role and molecular mechanisms of the AIRE protein in APECED and other autoimmune diseases. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Rheumatic Disease Autoantibodies in Autoimmune Liver Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utiyama, Shirley R R; Zenatti, Katiane B; Nóbrega, Heloisa A J; Soares, Juliana Z C; Skare, Thelma L; Matsubara, Caroline; Muzzilo, Dominique A; Nisihara, Renato M

    2016-08-01

    Autoimmune liver diseases (ALDs) are known to be associated with systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARDs) and their autoantibodies. We aimed to study the prevalence of SARDs and related autoantibodies, as well as their prognostic implications in a group of patients with ALDs. This was a cross-sectional study. Sixty patients with ALDs (38.3% with autoimmune hepatitis; 11.7% with primary biliary cirrhosis; 25% with primary sclerosing cholangitis and 25% with overlap syndrome) were studied for the presence of SARDs and their autoantibodies. There was autoimmune rheumatic disease in 20% of the studied sample. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were the commonest (11.6% and 5%, respectively). Antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) were present in 35% of the patients, followed by anti-Ro (20.0%); anti-nucleosome (18.3%); rheumatoid factor (10%) anti-CCP (8.3%); anti-RNP (8.3%); anti-ds-DNA (6.6%); anti-La (3.3%); anti-Sm (3.3%), anti-ribosomal P (3.3%). Anti-Ro (p = 0.0004), anti-La (p = 0.03), anti-RNP (p = 0.04) and anti-Sm (p = 0.03) were commonly found in patients with SARD, but not anti-DNA, anti-nucleosome and anti-ribosomal P. No differences were found in liver function tests regarding to the presence of autoantibodies. There was a high prevalence of SARD and their autoantibodies in ALD patients. Anti-Ro, anti-La, anti-RNP and anti-Sm positivity points to an association with systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases. The presence of autoantibodies was not related to liver function tests.

  7. Eating Disorders, Autoimmune, and Autoinflammatory Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerwas, Stephanie; Larsen, Janne Tidselbak; Petersen, Liselotte; Thornton, Laura M; Quaranta, Michela; Koch, Susanne Vinkel; Pisetsky, David; Mortensen, Preben Bo; Bulik, Cynthia M

    2017-12-01

    Identifying factors associated with risk for eating disorders is important for clarifying etiology and for enhancing early detection of eating disorders in primary care. We hypothesized that autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases would be associated with eating disorders in children and adolescents and that family history of these illnesses would be associated with eating disorders in probands. In this large, nationwide, population-based cohort study of all children and adolescents born in Denmark between 1989 and 2006 and managed until 2012, Danish medical registers captured all inpatient and outpatient diagnoses of eating disorders and autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases. The study population included 930 977 individuals (48.7% girls). Cox proportional hazards regression models and logistic regression were applied to evaluate associations. We found significantly higher hazards of eating disorders for children and adolescents with autoimmune or autoinflammatory diseases: 36% higher hazard for anorexia nervosa, 73% for bulimia nervosa, and 72% for an eating disorder not otherwise specified. The association was particularly strong in boys. Parental autoimmune or autoinflammatory disease history was associated with significantly increased odds for anorexia nervosa (odds ratio [OR] = 1.13, confidence interval [CI] = 1.01-1.25), bulimia nervosa (OR = 1.29; CI = 1.08-1.55) and for an eating disorder not otherwise specified (OR = 1.27; CI = 1.13-1.44). Autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases are associated with increased risk for eating disorders. Ultimately, understanding the role of immune system disturbance for the etiology and pathogenesis of eating disorders could point toward novel treatment targets. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  8. Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibodies, Autoimmune Neutropenia, and Vasculitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayson, Peter C.; Sloan, J. Mark; Niles, John L.; Monach, Paul A.; Merkel, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Reports of an association between antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) and autoimmune neutropenia have rarely included cases of proven vasculitis. A case of ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) with recurrent neutropenia is described and relevant literature on the association between ANCA, neutropenia, and vasculitis is reviewed. Methods Longitudinal clinical assessments and laboratory findings are described in a patient with AAV and recurrent episodes of profound neutropenia from December 2008 – October 2010. A PubMed database search of the medical literature was performed for papers published from 1960 through October 2010 to identify all reported cases of ANCA and neutropenia. Results A 49 year-old man developed recurrent neutropenia, periodic fevers, arthritis, biopsy-proven cutaneous vasculitis, sensorineural hearing loss, epididymitis, and positive tests for ANCA with specificity for antibodies to both proteinase 3 and myeloperoxidase. Antineutrophil membrane antibodies were detected during an acute neutropenic phase and were not detectable in a post-recovery sample, whereas ANCA titers did not seem to correlate with neutropenia. An association between ANCA and neutropenia has been reported in 74 cases from 24 studies in the context of drug/toxin exposure, underlying autoimmune disease, or chronic neutropenia without underlying autoimmune disease. In these cases, the presence of atypical ANCA patterns and other antibodies were common; however, vasculitis was uncommon and when it occurred was usually limited to the skin and in cases of underlying toxin exposure. Conclusions ANCA is associated with autoimmune neutropenia, but systemic vasculitis rarely occurs in association with ANCA and neutropenia. The interaction between neutrophils and ANCA may provide insight into understanding both autoimmune neutropenia and AAV. PMID:21507463

  9. Genomics and proteomics: Applications in autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Hueber

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Wolfgang Hueber1,2,3, William H Robinson1,21VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, CA, USA; 2Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA; 3Novartis Institutes of Biomedical Research, Novartis, Basle, SwitzerlandAbstract: Tremendous progress has been made over the past decade in the development and refinement of genomic and proteomic technologies for the identification of novel drug targets and molecular signatures associated with clinically important disease states, disease subsets, or differential responses to therapies. The rapid progress in high-throughput technologies has been preceded and paralleled by the elucidation of cytokine networks, followed by the stepwise clinical development of pathway-specific biological therapies that revolutionized the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Together, these advances provide opportunities for a long-anticipated personalized medicine approach to the treatment of autoimmune disease. The ever-increasing numbers of novel, innovative therapies will need to be harnessed wisely to achieve optimal long-term outcomes in as many patients as possible while complying with the demands of health authorities and health care providers for evidence-based, economically sound prescription of these expensive drugs. Genomic and proteomic profiling of patients with autoimmune diseases holds great promise in two major clinical areas: (1 rapid identification of new targets for the development of innovative therapies and (2 identification of patients who will experience optimal benefit and minimal risk from a specific (targeted therapy. In this review, we attempt to capture important recent developments in the application of genomic and proteomic technologies to translational research by discussing informative examples covering a diversity of autoimmune diseases.Keywords: proteomics, genomics, autoimmune diseases, antigen microarrays, 2-Dih, rheumatoid arthritis

  10. Combined short-term immunotherapy for experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis

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    Pestronk, A.; Drachman, D.B.; Teoh, R.; Adams, R.N.

    1983-08-01

    A therapeutic strategy was designed to eliminate the humoral immune response to acetylcholine receptor (AChR) in ongoing experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG). Rats with EAMG were treated with a protocol consisting of three components: (1) A single high dose of cyclophosphamide (200 mg/kg) was used to produce a rapid and sustained fall in the anti-AChR antibody levels by preferential destruction of antibody-producing B-lymphocytes. ''Memory'' lymphocytes were not eliminated by cyclophosphamide. (2) Irradiation (600 rads) was used to eliminate the ''memory'' cells. It eliminated the anamnestic response to a challenge with the antigen AChR. (3) Bone marrow transplantation was used to repopulate the hematopoietic system after the otherwise lethal dose of cyclophosphamide. We used bone marrow from syngeneic rats with active EAMG to simulate an autologous transplant. Rats with EAMG treated with this combined protocol showed a prompt and sustained fall in the anti-AChR antibody levels and had no anamnestic response to a challenge with AChR. Thus, an affected animal's own marrow could be stored and used later for repopulation after cyclophosphamide-irradiation treatment. This treatment eliminates the animal's ongoing immune responses and reconstitutes the immune system in its original state. The success of this approach suggests that, if their safety could be established, similar ''curative'' strategies might be developed for the treatment of patients with severe antibody-mediated autoimmune disorders, such as myasthenia gravis.

  11. PEG minocycline-liposomes ameliorate CNS autoimmune disease.

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    Wei Hu

    Full Text Available Minocycline is an oral tetracycline derivative with good bioavailability in the central nervous system (CNS. Minocycline, a potent inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9, attenuates disease activity in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS. Potential adverse effects associated with long-term daily minocycline therapy in human patients are concerning. Here, we investigated whether less frequent treatment with long-circulating polyethylene glycol (PEG minocycline liposomes are effective in treating EAE.Performing in vitro time kinetic studies of PEG minocycline-liposomes in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, we determined that PEG minocycline-liposome preparations stabilized with CaCl(2 are effective in diminishing MMP-9 activity. Intravenous injections of PEG minocycline-liposomes every five days were as effective in ameliorating clinical EAE as daily intraperitoneal injections of minocycline. Treatment of animals with PEG minocycline-liposomes significantly reduced the number of CNS-infiltrating leukocytes, and the overall expression of MMP-9 in the CNS. There was also a significant suppression of MMP-9 expression and proteolytic activity in splenocytes of treated animals, but not in CNS-infiltrating leukocytes. Thus, leukocytes gaining access to the brain and spinal cord require the same absolute amount of MMP-9 in all treatment groups, but minocycline decreases the absolute cell number.Our data indicate that less frequent injections of PEG minocycline-liposomes are an effective alternative pharmacotherapy to daily minocycline injections for the treatment of CNS autoimmune diseases. Also, inhibition of MMP-9 remains a promising treatment target in EAE and patients with MS.

  12. A Case of Statin-Associated Autoimmune Myopathy

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    Alexander J Sweidan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A 70-year-old previously independent man developed progressive proximal leg weakness resulting in a fall at home suffering traumatic brain injury. He was prescribed a statin medication two years prior, but this was discontinued on admission to the hospital due to concern for statin myopathy. His weakness continued to progress while in acute rehabilitation, along with the development of dysphagia requiring placement of gastrostomy tube and respiratory failure requiring tracheostomy. Corticosteroids and intravenous immunoglobulin were administered without response. Nerve conduction study demonstrated no evidence of neuropathy; electromyography revealed spontaneous activity suggestive of myopathy. A muscle biopsy was performed and demonstrated myonecrosis. Serology was positive for autoantibodies to 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR, verifying our diagnosis of statin-associated autoimmune myopathy (SAM. The patient was subsequently treated with rituximab and methotrexate and demonstrated mild clinical improvement. He was eventually liberated from the ventilator. However, later in the course of treatment, he developed respiratory distress and required ventilator support. The patient was discharged to long-term acute care two months after his initial presentation and died due to ventilator-acquired pneumonia three months later. Since their introduction 30 years ago, statin medications have been widely prescribed to prevent cardiovascular diseases. Myalgias and/or myopathic symptoms are among the most recognized side effects of the medication. Statin-associated autoimmune myopathy is a very rare complication of statin use and estimated to affect two to three for every 100,000 patients treated. Clinically, the condition presents as progressive symmetric weakness, muscle enzyme elevations, necrotizing myopathy on muscle biopsy, and the presence of autoantibodies to HMGCR. These findings will often persist and even progress despite

  13. The skin in autoimmune diseases-Unmet needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, A; Landmann, A; Bonsmann, G

    2016-10-01

    Treatment of skin manifestations in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), systemic sclerosis (SSc), and dermatomyositis (DM) is based on the results of only few randomized controlled trials. The first-line treatment for disfiguring and widespread cutaneous involvement in SLE is antimalarials, but some patients are therapy resistant. Recently, the monoclonal antibody belimumab was approved for SLE as an adjunct therapy for patients with autoantibody-positive disease who despite standard therapy show high disease activity, intolerance of other treatments, or an unacceptably high need for corticosteroids. However, a validated skin score has not been used to confirm the efficacy of belimumab on mucocutaneous manifestations. In SSc, another multi-systemic progressive disease, involvement of the lung, kidney, and the heart is frequently treated with corticosteroids and immunosuppressives, but therapeutic modalities for cutaneous lesions, such as skin sclerosis and digital ulcers, are limited. In the past years, treatment with the endothelin-receptor antagonist bosentan has been proven to reduce the occurrence of new digital ulcers in SSc patients but has no or limited effect on healing of digital ulcers. DM is an idiopathic autoimmune disease characterized by inflammation of the muscles and skin, which is treated with immunosuppressives. Corticosteroids are the first-line treatment for muscle involvement in DM, but skin lesions often flare by reduction or discontinuation. In summary, there is a high unmet need for new therapeutic strategies focusing on skin involvement in systemic autoimmune diseases. Therefore, innovative designs of randomized controlled trials with validated skin scores are warranted to develop new therapeutic strategies for patients with cutaneous manifestations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Infections as risk factor for autoimmune diseases - A nationwide study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Philip Rising; Kragstrup, Tue Wenzel; Deleuran, Bent Winding

    2016-01-01

    Viruses, bacteria and other infectious pathogens are the major postulated environmental triggers of autoimmunity. In the present nation-wide study we describe the association between infections and 29 autoimmune diseases. We used the Danish Civil Registration System to identify 4.5 million persons...... to the etiology of autoimmune diseases together with genetic factors....... born between 1945 and 2000. Information on infections and autoimmune diseases was obtained from the Danish Hospital Register. The cohort was followed from 1977 to 2012. Incidence rate ratios for developing an autoimmune disease were estimated using poisson regression. We found an association between...

  15. Autoimmune pancreatitis associated with primary sclerosing cholangitis: MR imaging findings

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    Eerens, I.; Vanbeckevoort, D.; Van Hoe, L. [University Hospital, Leuven (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology; Vansteenbergen, W. [Dept. of Hepatology, University Hospitals KU, Leuven (Belgium)

    2001-08-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis is a relatively rare type of chronic pancreatitis that may be associated with other autoimmune disorders. The imaging features of this entity may be misleading and suggest the presence of a malignant tumour. We present a case in which MR imaging allowed us to diagnose autoimmune pancreatitis associated with primary sclerosing cholangitis, which is another autoimmune-related disease. Typical MR characteristics of autoimmune pancreatitis include focal or diffuse enlargement of the pancreas, the absence of parenchymal atrophy and significant dilation proximal to the site of stenosis, the absence of peripancreatic spread, the clear demarcation of the lesion and the presence of a peripancreatic rim. (orig.)

  16. P-glycoprotein is expressed and causes resistance to chemotherapy in EBV-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimori, Mayumi; Takada, Honami; Imadome, Ken-Ichi; Kurata, Morito; Yamamoto, Kouhei; Koyama, Takatoshi; Shimizu, Norio; Fujiwara, Shigeyoshi; Miura, Osamu; Arai, Ayako

    2015-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative diseases (EBV-T-LPDs) are rare lymphomas with poor prognosis. Although chemotherapeutic strategies such as CHOP have been often selected, they have exhibited only limited efficacy. To clarify the mechanism of chemoresistance, we examined P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression. P-gp acts as an energy-dependent efflux pump that excretes drugs from the cytoplasm, resulting in low-intracellular drug concentrations and poor sensitivity to chemotherapy. We examined P-gp expression in EBV-positive cells by immunohistochemistry staining in three patients of EBV-T-LPDs and the expression was detected in all patients. We also examined mdr1 mRNA expression by reverse-transcriptase polymerase-chain reaction (RT-PCR) in EBV-positive tumor cells from these patients and additional three patients. The expression was detected in all examined patients. In five EBV-T-LPDs patients, P-gp function was detected by Rhodamine-123 efflux assay in these cells. The efflux was inhibited by treatment with a P-gp inhibitor, cyclosporine A (CsA). We also examined and detected P-gp expression in EBV-positive T-cell lines SNT8 and SNT16 established from EBV-T-LPDs patients, by RT-PCR and western blotting. The function was also detected by Rhodamine-123 efflux in these cell lines. Inhibition and knock down of P-gp by CsA and siRNA, respectively, enhanced etoposide- and doxorubicin-induced cell death in the EBV-positive T-cell lines. Finally, we infected the T-cell line MOLT4 with EBV, and found that mdr1 mRNA expression and Rhodamine 123 efflux were upregulated after infection. These results indicated that enhanced P-gp expression contributed to the chemoresistance of EBV-T-LPDs

  17. POST-TRANSPLANT LYMPHOPROLIFERATIVE DISORDERS: ROLE OF VIRAL INFECTION, GENETIC LESIONS AND ANTIGEN STIMULATION IN THE PATHOGENESIS OF THE DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Capello

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD are a life-threatening complication of solid organ transplantation or, more rarely, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The majority of PTLD is of B-cell origin and associated with Epstein–Barr virus (EBV infection. PTLD generally display involvement of extranodal sites, aggressive histology and aggressive clinical behavior. The molecular pathogenesis of PTLD involves infection by oncogenic viruses, namely Epstein-Barr virus, as well as genetic or epigenetic alterations of several cellular genes. At variance with lymphoma arising in immunocompetent hosts, whose genome is relatively stable, a fraction of PTLD are characterized by microsatellite instability as a consequence of defects in the DNA mismatch repair mechanism. Apart from microsatellite instability, molecular alterations of cellular genes recognized in PTLD include alterations of cMYC, BCL6, TP53, DNA hypermethylation, and aberrant somatic hypermutation of protooncogenes. The occurrence of IGV mutations in the overwhelming majority of PTLD documents that malignant transformation targets germinal centre (GC B-cells and their descendants both in EBV–positive and EBV–negative cases. Analysis of phenotypic markers of B-cell histogenesis, namely BCL6, MUM1 and CD138, allows further distinction of PTLD histogenetic categories. PTLD expressing the BCL6+/MUM1+/-/CD138- profile reflect B-cells actively experiencing the GC reaction, and comprise diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL centroblastic and Burkitt lymphoma. PTLD expressing the BCL6-/MUM1+/CD138- phenotype putatively derive from B-cells that have concluded the GC reaction, and comprise the majority of polymorphic PTLD and a fraction of DLBCL immunoblastic. A third group of PTLD is reminiscent of post-GC and preterminally differentiated B-cells that show the BCL6-/MUM1+/CD138+ phenotype, and are morphologically represented by either polymorphic PTLD or DLBCL immunoblastic.

  18. Preliminary experience on the use of PET/CT in the management of pediatric post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra-García, Pilar; Hirsch, Steffen; Levine, Daniel S; Taj, Mary M

    2017-12-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a well-known complication following prolonged immunosuppression. Contrary to other lymphomas, there is no standardized imaging approach to assess PTLD either at staging or for response to therapy. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is an imaging modality that has proven to be useful in lymphoma. However, there is still limited data concerning its use in pediatric PTLD. Our study evaluates the use of PET/CT in pediatric PTLD at our institution. To assess the role of PET/CT in pediatric PTLD, we reviewed the pediatric patients with PTLD who had undergone PET/CT at our institution between 2000 and 2016. Nine patients were identified. Six had PET/CT at diagnosis. All lesions seen on CT were identified with PET/CT. Fourteen PET/CTs were done during treatment. Eight PET/CTs were negative, including three where CT showed areas of uncertain significance. In these cases, PET/CT helped us to stop treatment and the patients remain in remission after a long follow-up (mean 74.3 months; range 12.4-180.9 months). PET/CT revealed additional disease in two cases, therefore treatment was intensified. Six biopsies and close follow-up was done to confirm PET/CT results. In one case, PET/CT did not identify central nervous system involvement demonstrated on magnetic resonance imaging. PET/CT may have an important role in the staging and follow-up of pediatric PTLD. In our cohort, PET/CT was helpful in staging and assessing treatment response and in clarifying equivocal findings on other imaging modalities. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Autoimmunity in patients with selective IgA deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abolhassani, H; Gharib, B; Shahinpour, S; Masoom, S N; Havaei, A; Mirminachi, B; Arandi, N; Torabi-Sagvand, B; Khazaei, H A; Mohammadi, J; Rezaei, N; Aghamohammadi, A

    2015-01-01

    Selective immunoglobulin A deficiency (SIgAD) is the most common primary antibody deticiency. Patients with SIgAD have a greater risk of concomitant autoimmune disorders than healthy individuals. The exact mechanism underlying the relationship between autoimmunity and SIgAD is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate potential associations between autoimmunity and specific clinical or immunological findings in patients with SIgAD. The study population comprised 57 symptomatic patients (65% males) with confirmed SIgAD who were referred to our center. Demographic data and history of autoimmunity were recorded both for patients and for their relatives. Comprehensive clinical and laboratory examinations were performed to investigate autoimmune complications in all the patients. Autoimmune disorders were documented in 17 cases (29.8%; 9 males and 8 females). The most common manifestations were thyroiditis, vitiligo, and hemolytic anemia (3 cases each). Ten patients (17.5%) had a family history of autoimmunity. Significant associations were detected between autoimmunity and increased duration of follow-up (P = .003), serum level of IgM (P = .01), regulatory T-cell count (P = .03), and class-switched memory B-cell count (P = .01). Four cases of autoimmune SIgAD (23.5%) progressed to common variable immunodeficiency during the follow-up period (P = .006). Autoimmune disorders, autoimmune cytopenia, and Ig subclass deficiency can lead to severe clinical manifestations in patients with SIgAD. Therefore, immunologists and pediatricians should be aware of these conditions.

  20. Helicobacter pylori and autoimmune disease: Cause or bystander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyk, Daniel S; Koutsoumpas, Andreas L; Mytilinaiou, Maria G; Rigopoulou, Eirini I; Sakkas, Lazaros I; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the main cause of chronic gastritis and a major risk factor for gastric cancer. This pathogen has also been considered a potential trigger of gastric autoimmunity, and in particular of autoimmune gastritis. However, a considerable number of reports have attempted to link H. pylori infection with the development of extra-gastrointestinal autoimmune disorders, affecting organs not immediately relevant to the stomach. This review discusses the current evidence in support or against the role of H. pylori as a potential trigger of autoimmune rheumatic and skin diseases, as well as organ specific autoimmune diseases. We discuss epidemiological, serological, immunological and experimental evidence associating this pathogen with autoimmune diseases. Although over one hundred autoimmune diseases have been investigated in relation to H. pylori, we discuss a select number of papers with a larger literature base, and include Sjögrens syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, vasculitides, autoimmune skin conditions, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, autoimmune thyroid disease, multiple sclerosis, neuromyelitis optica and autoimmune liver diseases. Specific mention is given to those studies reporting an association of anti-H. pylori antibodies with the presence of autoimmune disease-specific clinical parameters, as well as those failing to find such associations. We also provide helpful hints for future research. PMID:24574735

  1. Induction of endogenous Type I interferon within the central nervous system plays a protective role in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khorooshi, Reza; Mørch, Marlene Thorsen; Holm, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The Type I interferons (IFN), beta (IFN-β) and the alpha family (IFN-α), act through a common receptor and have anti-inflammatory effects. IFN-β is used to treat multiple sclerosis (MS) and is effective against experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model for MS. Mice with EAE...

  2. Infections as risk factor for autoimmune diseases - A nationwide study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Philip Rising; Kragstrup, Tue Wenzel; Deleuran, Bent Winding; Benros, Michael Eriksen

    2016-11-01

    Viruses, bacteria and other infectious pathogens are the major postulated environmental triggers of autoimmunity. In the present nation-wide study we describe the association between infections and 29 autoimmune diseases. We used the Danish Civil Registration System to identify 4.5 million persons born between 1945 and 2000. Information on infections and autoimmune diseases was obtained from the Danish Hospital Register. The cohort was followed from 1977 to 2012. Incidence rate ratios for developing an autoimmune disease were estimated using poisson regression. We found an association between hospital admission for an infection and 29 autoimmune diseases. This study shows that infections are risk factors for a broad spectrum of autoimmune diseases in a dose-response and temporal manner, in agreement with the hypothesis that infections are an environmental risk factor contributing to the etiology of autoimmune diseases together with genetic factors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [Coexistence of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 with diabetes insipidus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krysiak, Robert; Okopień, Bogusław

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndromes are conditions characterized by the combination of two or more organ-specific disorders. The underestimation oftheir real frequency probable results from physicians' inadequate knowledge of these clinical entities and sometimes their atypical clinical presentation. Because they comprise a wide spectrum of autoimmune disorders, autoimmune polyglandular syndromes are divided into four types, among which type-3 is the most common one. In this article, we report the case of a young female, initially diagnosed with diabetes mellitus who several years later developed full-blown autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 consisting of autoimmune thyroid disorder and latent autoimmune diabetes in adults.The discussed case suggests that in selected patients diabetes insipidus may coexist with autoimmune endocrinopathies and nonendocrine autoimmunopathies, as well as that in some patients idiopathic diabetes insipidus may be secondary to lymphocytic infiltration and destruction of the hypothalamic supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei and/or the supraoptic-hypophyseal tract

  4. Production of reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNI) by peritoneal macrophages from rats with experimental autoimmune prostatitis (EAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsilles, M A; Depiante-Depaoli, M

    1995-08-01

    Peritoneal macrophages from experimental autoimmune prostatitis (EAP) rats were examined for their capacity to secrete reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNI), measured by the release of nitrite (NO2-). Under basal conditions, there was a significant increase of NO2- secretion by cells from autoimmune rats in relation to resident cells. After stimulation in vitro with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the NO2- production was higher in cells from autoimmune rats compared to treated and nontreated controls. The NO2- production was dependent upon the presence of L-arginine in the culture medium. The addition of L-NG-monomethyl arginine, an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthesis, to the medium reduced the amount of measurable NO2-. Kinetic studies in cells from EAP rats showed that in basal conditions there was an significant release of NO2- at day 7 of immunization that was maintained during the whole period studied. After LPS stimulation, there was a similar behavior and maximum values were reached at day 28 of immunization. These results, together with the lesion observed in the prostate gland, suggest that RNI may be of pathogenic importance in the development of early tissue inflammation and autoimmune disease of the prostate.

  5. [Type 1 polyglandular autoimmune syndrome associated with C322fsx372 mutation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncalés-Samanes, P; de Arriba Muñoz, A; Lou Francés, G M; Ferrer Lozano, M; Justa Roldán, M L; Labarta Aizpun, J I

    2015-01-01

    Polyglandular autoimmune syndromes are rare diseases based on autoimmune mechanisms in which endocrine and non-endocrine disorders coexist. In type 1 the characteristic manifestations are chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, hypoparathyroidism and adrenal insufficiency. A case is presented of a patient with typical clinical sequence, along with other changes, and in whom a mutation in homozygosis, C322fsX372, was detected after performing a molecular analysis of autoimmunity regulator gene (AIRE). Inheritance is autosomal recessive, associated with mutations in the AIRE gene, which encodes a protein involved in autoimmunity and immunodeficiency. For diagnosis, At least two of the three major clinical manifestations are required for a diagnosis. However, only one of them is necessary in the study of relatives of affected patients. These syndromes must be diagnosed early, given their high morbidity and mortality. Every manifestation needs to be treated, in order to maintain the quality of life. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Immunoglobulin heavy-chain fluorescence in situ hybridization-chromogenic in situ hybridization DNA probe split signal in the clonality assessment of lymphoproliferative processes on cytological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeppa, Pio; Sosa Fernandez, Laura Virginia; Cozzolino, Immacolata; Ronga, Valentina; Genesio, Rita; Salatiello, Maria; Picardi, Marco; Malapelle, Umberto; Troncone, Giancarlo; Vigliar, Elena

    2012-12-25

    The human immunoglobulin heavy-chain (IGH) locus at chromosome 14q32 is frequently involved in different translocations of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), and the detection of any breakage involving the IGH locus should identify a B-cell NHL. The split-signal IGH fluorescence in situ hybridization-chromogenic in situ hybridization (FISH-CISH) DNA probe is a mixture of 2 fluorochrome-labeled DNAs: a green one that binds the telomeric segment and a red one that binds the centromeric segment, both on the IGH breakpoint. In the current study, the authors tested the capability of the IGH FISH-CISH DNA probe to detect IGH translocations and diagnose B-cell lymphoproliferative processes on cytological samples. Fifty cytological specimens from cases of lymphoproliferative processes were tested using the split-signal IGH FISH-CISH DNA probe and the results were compared with light-chain assessment by flow cytometry (FC), IGH status was tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and clinicohistological data. The signal score produced comparable results on FISH and CISH analysis and detected 29 positive, 15 negative, and 6 inadequate cases; there were 29 true-positive cases (66%), 9 true-negative cases (20%), 6 false-negative cases (14%), and no false-positive cases (0%). Comparing the sensitivity of the IGH FISH-CISH DNA split probe with FC and PCR, the highest sensitivity was obtained by FC, followed by FISH-CISH and PCR. The split-signal IGH FISH-CISH DNA probe is effective in detecting any translocation involving the IGH locus. This probe can be used on different samples from different B-cell lymphoproliferative processes, although it is not useful for classifying specific entities. Cancer (Cancer Cytopathol) 2012;. © 2012 American Cancer Society. Copyright © 2012 American Cancer Society.

  7. Serum interleukin-6 levels are increased in HIV-infected patients that develop autoimmune disease during long-term follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trovato, M; Ruggeri, R M; Sciacchitano, S; Vicchio, T M; Picerno, I; Pellicanò, G; Valenti, A; Visalli, G

    2018-03-01

    Elevated IL-6 levels have been associated with both autoimmune diseases and treated HIV-seropositive (HIV + ) subjects. However, few data on classic and trans-signaling IL-6 in autoimmune thyroid diseases and HIV + subjects developing autoimmune disorders are currently available. A total of 102 patients were included in the study. They were subdivided into two groups. Group A consisted in 51 HIV + patients, who were followed-up for a period of five years in search of possible occurrence of autoimmune diseases. Ten of them, treated with antiretroviral therapy (ART), developed an autoimmune disorder, namely Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and psoriasis. Group B consisted in 51 patients affected by Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT). Serum levels of the free form of IL-6 were analyzed by ELISA in all patients and for HIV + patients at the beginning of the follow-up, before initiation of ART. Mean serum levels of IL-6 were similar in Group A and in Group B. In Group B, IL-6 levels showed a 5.8% increase compared with assay minimum detectable dose corresponding to 1% of full serum IL-6 level. However, serum levels of free IL-6 were increased in those HIV + patients who developed autoimmune disorders (5.8±2.8pg/ml) and in these patients, the highest levels of free IL-6 correlated with age and CD4 cellular counts. The present study indicates a correlation between serum free IL-6 levels and the occurrence of autoimmune disease in HIV + population, treated with ART during a long-term follow-up. The increased levels of serum free IL-6 were observed before ART treatment was initiated, indicating that IL-6 measurement in such patients may represent an early predictor of development of autoimmune disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Listeria monocytogenes Meningitis in an Immunosuppressed Patient with Autoimmune Hepatitis and IgG4 Subclass Deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaini, Shahin

    2015-01-01

    A 51-year-old Caucasian woman with Listeria monocytogenes meningitis was treated and discharged after an uncomplicated course. Her medical history included immunosuppressive treatment with prednisolone and azathioprine for autoimmune hepatitis. A diagnostic work-up after the meningitis episode...... revealed that she had low levels of the IgG4 subclass. To our knowledge, this is the first case report describing a possible association between autoimmune hepatitis and the occurrence of Listeria monocytogenes meningitis, describing a possible association between Listeria monocytogenes meningitis...... and deficiency of the IgG4 subclass and finally describing a possible association between Listeria monocytogenes meningitis and immunosuppressive therapy with prednisolone and azathioprine....

  9. Neuroelectrophysiological studies on neurological autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-hong LIU

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The neuroelectrophysiological manifestations of four clinical typical neurological autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis (MS, Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS, myasthenia gravis (MG, and polymyositis and dermatomyositis were reviewed in this paper. The diagnostic value of evoked potentials for multiple sclerosis, nerve conduction studies (NCS for Guillain-Barré syndrome, repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS and single-fiber electromyography (SFEMG for myasthenia gravis, and needle electromyography for polymyositis and dermatomyositis were respectively discussed. This review will help to have comprehensive understanding on electrophysiological examinations and their clinical significance in the diagnosis of neurological autoimmune diseases. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.09.004

  10. The mechanisms behind helminth's immunomodulation in autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashi, Tomer; Bizzaro, Giorgia; Ben-Ami Shor, Dana; Blank, Miri; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2015-02-01

    The incidence of autoimmune diseases has risen throughout the last half a century, mostly in the industrialized world. Helminths and their derivatives were found to have a protective role in autoimmunity and inflammatory conditions, as they manipulate the immune network, attenuating the host's cellular and humoral responses. Indeed, various helminth species used in several human and animal models were shown to limit inflammatory activity in a variety of diseases including inflammatory bowel disease, multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes, and rheumatoid arthritis. Our review will focus on the main mechanisms by which helminths and their secreted molecules modulate the host's immune system. The main pathways induce a shift from Th1 to Th2 phenotype, accelerate T regulatory and B regulatory phenotypes, and attenuate the levels of the inflammatory cytokines, leading to a tolerable scenario. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Hypertension as an autoimmune and inflammatory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solak, Yalcin; Afsar, Baris; Vaziri, Nosratola D; Aslan, Gamze; Yalcin, Can Ege; Covic, Adrian; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2016-08-01

    Hypertension that is considered idiopathic is called essential hypertension and accordingly has no clear culprit for its cause. However, basic research and clinical studies in recent years have expanded our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the development of essential hypertension. Of these, increased oxidative stress, both in the kidney and arterial wall, closely coupled with inflammatory infiltration now appear to have a prominent role. Discovery of regulatory and interleukin-17-producing T cells has enabled us to better understand the mechanism by which inflammation and autoimmunity, or autoinflammation, lead to the development of hypertension. Despite achieving considerable progress, the intricate interactions between oxidative stress, the immune system and the development of hypertension remain to be fully elucidated. In this review, we summarize recent developments in the pathophysiology of hypertension with a focus on the oxidant stress-autoimmunity-inflammation interaction.

  12. Eating disorders, autoimmune, and autoinflammatory disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zerwas, Stephanie; Larsen, Janne Tidselbak; Petersen, Liselotte

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Identifying factors associated with risk for eating disorders is important for clarifying etiology and for enhancing early detection of eating disorders in primary care. We hypothesized that autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases would be associated with eating disorders in children...... and adolescents and that family history of these illnesses would be associated with eating disorders in probands. METHODS: In this large, nationwide, population-based cohort study of all children and adolescents born in Denmark between 1989 and 2006 and managed until 2012, Danish medical registers captured all...... inpatient and outpatient diagnoses of eating disorders and autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases. The study population included 930 977 individuals (48.7% girls). Cox proportional hazards regression models and logistic regression were applied to evaluate associations. RESULTS: We found significantly...

  13. [Glycosylation of autoantibodies in autoimmunes diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulabchand, R; Batteux, F; Guilpain, P

    2013-12-01

    Protein glycosylation is one of the most common post-translational modifications, involved in the well described protein biosynthesis process. Protein glycosylation seems to play a major role in the pathogenesis of auto-immune diseases. Herein are described the main alterations of autoantibody glycosylation associated with autoimmunes diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, IgA glomerulonephritis, Schoenlein-Henoch purpura, Sjögren's syndrome, systemic scleroderma, systemic lupus erythematosus, myasthenia gravis and granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener). Molecular identification of altered immunoglobulin glycosylation could lead to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of those diseases, might allow an evaluation of their biological activity and could even be a new therapeutic target. Copyright © 2013 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Total lymphoid irradiation in alloimmunity and autoimmunity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strober, S.

    1987-12-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation has been used as an immunosuppressive regimen in autoimmune disease and organ transplantation. The rationale for its use originated from studies of patients with Hodgkin disease, in whom this radiotherapy regimen was noted to induce profound and long-lasting immune suppression and yet was well tolerated, with few long-term side effects. Total lymphoid irradiation is a unique immunosuppressive regimen that produces a selective (and long-lasting) reduction in the number and function of helper T cells and certain subsets of B cells. Conventional immunosuppressive drugs show little selectivity, and their effects are short-lived. The most important aspect of total lymphoid irradiation is the potential for achieving transplantation tolerance and permanent remissions in autoimmune disease in laboratory animals. Attempts are being made to achieve similar goals in humans given total lymphoid irradiation, so that immunosuppressive drugs can be ultimately withdrawn from transplant recipients and patients with lupus nephritis. 28 references.

  15. Primary biliary cirrhosis--autoimmune hepatitis overlap syndrome associated with dermatomyositis, autoimmune thyroiditis and antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamfil, Cristina; Candrea, Elisabeta; Berki, Emese; Popov, Horațiu I; Radu, Pompilia I; Rednic, Simona

    2015-03-01

    Autoimmune liver diseases may be associated with extrahepatic autoimmune pathology. We report the case of a 52-year old woman who initially presented to the gastroenterology department for extreme fatigue, pale stools, dark urine and pruritus. Laboratory tests showed significant cholestasis and elevation of aminotransferase levels. Immunological tests revealed positive antinuclear (ANA=1:320) and antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA=1:40) with negative anti-smooth muscle and liver kidney microsomal type 1 antibodies. The biopsy was compatible with overlap syndrome type 1. The patient was commenced on immunosuppressive therapy according to standard of care (azathioprine 50mg, ursodeoxycholic acid and prednisone 0.5mg/kg), with moderate biochemical improvement. She subsequently developed proximal symmetrical weakness and cutaneous involvement and was diagnosed with biopsy-proven dermatomyositis. The immunosuppressive regimen was intensified to 150 mg azathioprine. At the three-month follow-up, her symptoms subsided and aminotransferases and muscle enzymes normalized. Upon further investigation the patient was diagnosed with autoimmune thyroiditis and antiphospholipid syndrome. To our knowledge, this is the first case of primary biliary cirrhosis - autoimmune hepatitis overlap syndrome associated with dermatomyositis, autoimmune thyroiditis and antiphospholipid syndrome.

  16. Dominant Mutations in the Autoimmune Regulator AIRE Are Associated with Common Organ-Specific Autoimmune Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oftedal, Bergithe E; Hellesen, Alexander; Erichsen, Martina M; Bratland, Eirik; Vardi, Ayelet; Perheentupa, Jaakko; Kemp, E Helen; Fiskerstrand, Torunn; Viken, Marte K; Weetman, Anthony P; Fleishman, Sarel J; Banka, Siddharth; Newman, William G; Sewell, W A C; Sozaeva, Leila S; Zayats, Tetyana; Haugarvoll, Kristoffer; Orlova, Elizaveta M; Haavik, Jan; Johansson, Stefan; Knappskog, Per M; Løvås, Kristian; Wolff, Anette S B; Abramson, Jakub; Husebye, Eystein S

    2015-06-16

    The autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene is crucial for establishing central immunological tolerance and preventing autoimmunity. Mutations in AIRE cause a rare autosomal-recessive disease, autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS-1), distinguished by multi-organ autoimmunity. We have identified multiple cases and families with mono-allelic mutations in the first plant homeodomain (PHD1) zinc finger of AIRE that followed dominant inheritance, typically characterized by later onset, milder phenotypes, and reduced penetrance compared to classical APS-1. These missense PHD1 mutations suppressed gene expression driven by wild-type AIRE in a dominant-negative manner, unlike CARD or truncated AIRE mutants that lacked such dominant capacity. Exome array analysis revealed that the PHD1 dominant mutants were found with relatively high frequency (>0.0008) in mixed populations. Our results provide insight into the molecular action of AIRE and demonstrate that disease-causing mutations in the AIRE locus are more common than previously appreciated and cause more variable autoimmune phenotypes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Genetic variation associated with cardiovascular risk in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrotti, Pedro P; Aterido, Adrià; Fernández-Nebro, Antonio; Cañete, Juan D; Ferrándiz, Carlos; Tornero, Jesús; Gisbert, Javier P; Domènech, Eugeni; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Benjamín; Gomollón, Fernando; García-Planella, Esther; Fernández, Emilia; Sanmartí, Raimon; Gratacós, Jordi; Martínez-Taboada, Víctor Manuel; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Luís; Palau, Núria; Tortosa, Raül; Corbeto, Mireia L; Lasanta, María L; Marsal, Sara; Julià, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases have a higher prevalence of cardiovascular events compared to the general population. The objective of this study was to investigate the genetic basis of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in autoimmunity. We analyzed genome-wide genotyping data from 6,485 patients from six autoimmune diseases that are associated with a high socio-economic impact. First, for each disease, we tested the association of established CVD risk loci. Second, we analyzed the association of autoimmune disease susceptibility loci with CVD. Finally, to identify genetic patterns associated with CVD risk, we applied the cross-phenotype meta-analysis approach (CPMA) on the genome-wide data. A total of 17 established CVD risk loci were significantly associated with CVD in the autoimmune patient cohorts. From these, four loci were found to have significantly different genetic effects across autoimmune diseases. Six autoimmune susceptibility loci were also found to be associated with CVD risk. Genome-wide CPMA analysis identified 10 genetic clusters strongly associated with CVD risk across all autoimmune diseases. Two of these clusters are highly enriched in pathways previously associated with autoimmune disease etiology (TNFα and IFNγ cytokine pathways). The results of this study support the presence of specific genetic variation associated with the increase of CVD risk observed in autoimmunity.

  18. Genetic variation associated with cardiovascular risk in autoimmune diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro P Perrotti

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases have a higher prevalence of cardiovascular events compared to the general population. The objective of this study was to investigate the genetic basis of cardiovascular disease (CVD risk in autoimmunity. We analyzed genome-wide genotyping data from 6,485 patients from six autoimmune diseases that are associated with a high socio-economic impact. First, for each disease, we tested the association of established CVD risk loci. Second, we analyzed the association of autoimmune disease susceptibility loci with CVD. Finally, to identify genetic patterns associated with CVD risk, we applied the cross-phenotype meta-analysis approach (CPMA on the genome-wide data. A total of 17 established CVD risk loci were significantly associated with CVD in the autoimmune patient cohorts. From these, four loci were found to have significantly different genetic effects across autoimmune diseases. Six autoimmune susceptibility loci were also found to be associated with CVD risk. Genome-wide CPMA analysis identified 10 genetic clusters strongly associated with CVD risk across all autoimmune diseases. Two of these clusters are highly enriched in pathways previously associated with autoimmune disease etiology (TNFα and IFNγ cytokine pathways. The results of this study support the presence of specific genetic variation associated with the increase of CVD risk observed in autoimmunity.

  19. Extracellular Vesicles: Evolving Contributors in Autoimmunity

    OpenAIRE

    Katsiougiannis, Stergios

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles, including microvesicles, exosomes and apoptotic bodies are recognized as carriers of pathogen-associated molecules with direct involvement in immune signaling and inflammation. Those observations have enforced the way these membranous vesicles are being considered as promising immunotherapeutic targets. In this review, we discuss the emerging roles of extracellular vesicles in autoimmunity and highlights their potential use as disease biomarkers as well as targets for ...

  20. Conversion of autoimmune hypothyroidism to hyperthyroidism

    OpenAIRE

    Furqan, Saira; Haque, Naeem-ul; Islam, Najmul

    2014-01-01

    Background Graves’ disease and Hashimoto’s thyroiditis are the two autoimmune spectrum of thyroid disease. Cases of conversion from hyperthyroidism to hypothyroidism have been reported but conversion from hypothyroidism to hyperthyroidism is very rare. Although such cases have been reported rarely in the past we are now seeing such conversions from hypothyroidism to hyperthyroidism more frequently in clinical practice. Case presentation We are reporting three cases of middle aged Asian female...

  1. Oral Tolerance: Therapeutic Implications for Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M. C. Faria

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral tolerance is classically defined as the suppression of immune responses to antigens (Ag that have been administered previously by the oral route. Multiple mechanisms of tolerance are induced by oral Ag. Low doses favor active suppression, whereas higher doses favor clonal anergy/deletion. Oral Ag induces Th2 (IL-4/IL-10 and Th3 (TGF-β regulatory T cells (Tregs plus CD4+CD25+ regulatory cells and LAP+T cells. Induction of oral tolerance is enhanced by IL-4, IL-10, anti-IL-12, TGF-β, cholera toxin B subunit (CTB, Flt-3 ligand, anti-CD40 ligand and continuous feeding of Ag. In addition to oral tolerance, nasal tolerance has also been shown to be effective in suppressing inflammatory conditions with the advantage of a lower dose requirement. Oral and nasal tolerance suppress several animal models of autoimmune diseases including experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE, uveitis, thyroiditis, myasthenia, arthritis and diabetes in the nonobese diabetic (NOD mouse, plus non-autoimmune diseases such as asthma, atherosclerosis, colitis and stroke. Oral tolerance has been tested in human autoimmune diseases including MS, arthritis, uveitis and diabetes and in allergy, contact sensitivity to DNCB, nickel allergy. Positive results have been observed in phase II trials and new trials for arthritis, MS and diabetes are underway. Mucosal tolerance is an attractive approach for treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases because of lack of toxicity, ease of administration over time and Ag-specific mechanism of action. The successful application of oral tolerance for the treatment of human diseases will depend on dose, developing immune markers to assess immunologic effects, route (nasal versus oral, formulation, mucosal adjuvants, combination therapy and early therapy.

  2. The autoimmune concept of multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, Bryan; Salou, Marion; Laplaud, David-Axel; Wekerle, Hartmut

    2015-04-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory and demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS). With growing evidence for environmental and genetic factors, MS is now accepted as an autoimmune disease. This complex disease seems to implicate various cell types in both innate and adaptive compartments. Here, we discuss recent advances in the immunological field of MS research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. IgA deficiency and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Karmtej; Chang, Christopher; Gershwin, M Eric

    2014-02-01

    IgA is the most abundant immunoglobulin in the human body, and performs a very specialized role which involves mucosal immunity, development of tolerance and protection against infection. IgA is the key immunoglobulin in the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts, which provide the most intimate interface between the environment and self. Normal levels of IgA are based on early studies consisting of only small numbers of patients. The international consensus definition of IgA deficiency is a level of 0.07g/l after the age of four years in the absence of IgG and IgM deficiencies. The epidemiology of IgA deficiency reveals interesting variances between geographical regions - the incidence in Caucasians being much higher than that in Asians. IgA deficiency has also been found to co-exist with autoimmune diseases, allergies and malignancies. The association with autoimmunity is particularly interesting because it suggests a common genetic linkage that could potentially also explain the diversity in geoepidemiology. Both MHC and non-MHC associations have been described and the 8.1 haplotype has been significantly associated with autoimmunity in IgA deficiency patients over controls. Non-MHC genetic associations include IFIH1 and CLEC16A. The mutations leading to IgA deficiency have not been defined, but in some cases of IgA deficiency it has been suggested that the pathogenesis involves a failure in switched memory B cells that can lead to this cohort experiencing an increased incidence of recurrent bacterial infections or autoimmune diseases. Attempts to investigate the role of cytokines that can induce IgA synthesis in cells of patients with IgA deficiency, such as IL21 or the combination of CD40L/anti-CD40, IL-4 and IL10, are underway. © 2013.

  4. The new era of autoimmune disease research

    OpenAIRE

    Koike, Takao

    2011-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies have advanced our understanding of genetic factors that underlie systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a multifactorial autoimmune disease characterized by various clinical manifestations. SLE also has an environmental component, which can trigger or exacerbate the disease. Despite extensive efforts aimed at elucidating the cellular and biological abnormalities that arise in the immune system of patients with SLE, its pathology remains unclear. Lee and col...

  5. Fragile privileges: autoimmunity in brain and eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wekerle, Hartmut; Sun, De-ming

    2010-09-01

    Brain and eye tissues are subject to a reduced version of immune surveillance, which has evolved to protect the particularly sensitive tissues from accidental bystander damage created by regular inflammatory responses. Yet, there are autoimmune diseases in both organs. This review discusses the nature of immune reactivity in the healthy eye and brain tissues, and mechanisms that can overcome the protective barriers to create tissue specific disease.

  6. Alcoholic Cirrhosis Increases Risk for Autoimmune Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbæk, Lisbet; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Deleuran, Bent

    2015-01-01

    IRR, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.26-1.92), celiac disease (aIRR, 5.12; 95% CI, 2.58-10.16), pernicious anemia (aIRR, 2.35; 95% CI, 1.50-3.68), and psoriasis (aIRR, 4.06; 95% CI, 3.32-4.97). There was no increase in the incidence rate for rheumatoid arthritis (aIRR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.69-1.15); the incidence rate......BACKGROUND & AIMS: Alcoholic cirrhosis is associated with hyperactivation and dysregulation of the immune system. In addition to its ability to increase risk for infections, it also may increase the risk for autoimmune diseases. We studied the incidence of autoimmune diseases among patients...... (controls) of the same sex and age. The incidence rates of various autoimmune diseases were compared between patients with cirrhosis and controls and adjusted for the number of hospitalizations in the previous year (a marker for the frequency of clinical examination). RESULTS: Of the 24,679 patients...

  7. Automation, consolidation, and integration in autoimmune diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozzoli, Renato; D'Aurizio, Federica; Villalta, Danilo; Bizzaro, Nicola

    2015-08-01

    Over the past two decades, we have witnessed an extraordinary change in autoimmune diagnostics, characterized by the progressive evolution of analytical technologies, the availability of new tests, and the explosive growth of molecular biology and proteomics. Aside from these huge improvements, organizational changes have also occurred which brought about a more modern vision of the autoimmune laboratory. The introduction of automation (for harmonization of testing, reduction of human error, reduction of handling steps, increase of productivity, decrease of turnaround time, improvement of safety), consolidation (combining different analytical technologies or strategies on one instrument or on one group of connected instruments) and integration (linking analytical instruments or group of instruments with pre- and post-analytical devices) opened a new era in immunodiagnostics. In this article, we review the most important changes that have occurred in autoimmune diagnostics and present some models related to the introduction of automation in the autoimmunology laboratory, such as automated indirect immunofluorescence and changes in the two-step strategy for detection of autoantibodies; automated monoplex immunoassays and reduction of turnaround time; and automated multiplex immunoassays for autoantibody profiling.

  8. Resilience in women with autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Manuel; Rodriguez, Yhojan; Pacheco, Yovana; Zapata, Elizabeth; Monsalve, Diana M; Mantilla, Rubén D; Rodríguez-Jimenez, Monica; Ramírez-Santana, Carolina; Molano-González, Nicolás; Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2017-12-28

    To evaluate the relationship between resilience and clinical outcomes in patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases. Focus groups, individual interviews, and chart reviews were done to collect data on 188 women with autoimmune rheumatic diseases, namely rheumatoid arthritis (n=51), systemic lupus erythematosus (n=70), systemic sclerosis (n=35), and Sjögren's syndrome (n=32). Demographic, clinical, and laboratory variables were assessed including disease activity by patient reported outcomes. Resilience was evaluated by using the Brief Resilience Scale. Bivariate, multiple linear regression, and classification and regression trees were used to analyse data. Resilience was influenced by age, duration of disease, and socioeconomic status. Lower resilience scores were observed in younger patients (50years) had higher resilience scores regardless of socioeconomic status. There was no influence of disease activity on resilience. A particular behaviour was observed in systemic sclerosis in which patients with high socioeconomic status and regular physical activity had higher resilience scores. Resilience in patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases is a continuum process influenced by age and socioeconomic status. The ways in which these variables along with exercise influence resilience deserve further investigation. Copyright © 2017 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Experimental models of autoimmune inflammatory ocular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Gasparin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Ocular inflammation is one of the leading causes of blindness and loss of vision. Human uveitis is a complex and heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by inflammation of intraocular tissues. The eye may be the only organ involved, or uveitis may be part of a systemic disease. A significant number of cases are of unknown etiology and are labeled idiopathic. Animal models have been developed to the study of the physiopathogenesis of autoimmune uveitis due to the difficulty in obtaining human eye inflamed tissues for experiments. Most of those models are induced by injection of specific photoreceptors proteins (e.g., S-antigen, interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein, rhodopsin, recoverin, phosducin. Non-retinal antigens, including melanin-associated proteins and myelin basic protein, are also good inducers of uveitis in animals. Understanding the basic mechanisms and pathogenesis of autoimmune ocular diseases are essential for the development of new treatment approaches and therapeutic agents. The present review describes the main experimental models of autoimmune ocular inflammatory diseases.

  10. Successful immunotherapy of autoimmune cholangitis by adoptive transfer of forkhead box protein 3+ regulatory T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, H; Zhang, W; Yang, G-X; Ando, Y; Tomiyama, T; Tsuneyama, K; Leung, P; Coppel, R L; Ansari, A A; Lian, Z X; Ridgway, W M; Joh, T; Gershwin, M E

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) has lagged behind that of other autoimmune diseases. In this study we have addressed the potential utility of immunotherapy using regulatory T cells (Treg) to treat murine autoimmune cholangitis. In particular, we have taken advantage of our ability to produce portal inflammation and bile duct cell loss by transfer of CD8+ T cells from the dominant negative form of transforming growth factor beta receptor type II (dnTGF-βRII) mice to recombination-activating gene (Rag)1–/– recipients. We then used this robust established adoptive transfer system and co-transferred CD8+ T cells from dnTGF-βRII mice with either C57BL/6 or dnTGF-βRII forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3+) T cells. Recipient mice were monitored for histology, including portal inflammation and intralobular biliary cell damage, and also included a study of the phenotypical changes in recipient lymphoid populations and local and systemic cytokine production. Importantly, we report herein that adoptive transfer of Treg from C57BL/6 but not dnTGF-βRII mice significantly reduced the pathology of autoimmune cholangitis, including decreased portal inflammation and bile duct damage as well as down-regulation of the secondary inflammatory response. Further, to define the mechanism of action that explains the differential ability of C57BL/6 Treg versus dnTGF-βRII Treg on the ability to down-regulate autoimmune cholangitis, we noted significant differential expression of glycoprotein A repetitions predominant (GARP), CD73, CD101 and CD103 and a functionally significant increase in interleukin (IL)-10 in Treg from C57BL/6 compared to dnTGF-βRII mice. Our data reflect the therapeutic potential of wild-type CD4+ FoxP3+ Treg in reducing the excessive T cell responses of autoimmune cholangitis, which has significance for the potential immunotherapy of PBC. PMID:25041369

  11. Successful immunotherapy of autoimmune cholangitis by adoptive transfer of forkhead box protein 3(+) regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, H; Zhang, W; Yang, G-X; Ando, Y; Tomiyama, T; Tsuneyama, K; Leung, P; Coppel, R L; Ansari, A A; Lian, Z X; Ridgway, W M; Joh, T; Gershwin, M E

    2014-11-01

    Treatment of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) has lagged behind that of other autoimmune diseases. In this study we have addressed the potential utility of immunotherapy using regulatory T cells (Treg ) to treat murine autoimmune cholangitis. In particular, we have taken advantage of our ability to produce portal inflammation and bile duct cell loss by transfer of CD8(+) T cells from the dominant negative form of transforming growth factor beta receptor type II (dnTGF-βRII) mice to recombination-activating gene (Rag)1(-/-) recipients. We then used this robust established adoptive transfer system and co-transferred CD8(+) T cells from dnTGF-βRII mice with either C57BL/6 or dnTGF-βRII forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3(+) ) T cells. Recipient mice were monitored for histology, including portal inflammation and intralobular biliary cell damage, and also included a study of the phenotypical changes in recipient lymphoid populations and local and systemic cytokine production. Importantly, we report herein that adoptive transfer of Treg from C57BL/6 but not dnTGF-βRII mice significantly reduced the pathology of autoimmune cholangitis, including decreased portal inflammation and bile duct damage as well as down-regulation of the secondary inflammatory response. Further, to define the mechanism of action that explains the differential ability of C57BL/6 Treg versus dnTGF-βRII Treg on the ability to down-regulate autoimmune cholangitis, we noted significant differential expression of glycoprotein A repetitions predominant (GARP), CD73, CD101 and CD103 and a functionally significant increase in interleukin (IL)-10 in Treg from C57BL/6 compared to dnTGF-βRII mice. Our data reflect the therapeutic potential of wild-type CD4(+) FoxP3(+) Treg in reducing the excessive T cell responses of autoimmune cholangitis, which has significance for the potential immunotherapy of PBC. © 2014 British Society for Immunology.

  12. Autoimmune Arthritides, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Psoriatic Arthritis, or Peripheral Spondyloarthropathy, Following Lyme Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvikar, Sheila L.; Crowley, Jameson T.; Sulka, Katherine B.; Steere, Allen C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe systemic autoimmune joint diseases following Lyme disease and to compare their clinical features with Lyme arthritis. Methods Records of all adult patients referred to our Lyme arthritis clinic over a 13-year period in whom we diagnosed a systemic autoimmune joint disease following Lyme disease were reviewed. For comparison, records of patients enrolled in our Lyme arthritis (LA) cohort over the most recent 2-year period were analyzed. IgG antibodies to Borrelia burgdorferi and to 3 Lyme disease-associated autoantigens were measured. Results We identified 30 patients who developed a new-onset systemic autoimmune joint disorder a median of 4 months after Lyme disease, usually erythema migrans (EM). Fifteen had rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 13 had psoriatic arthritis (PsA), and 2 had peripheral spondyloarthropathy (SpA). The 30 patients typically had polyarthritis; and those with PsA/SpA often had previous psoriasis, axial involvement, or enthesitis. In the comparison group of 43 LA patients, monoarticular knee arthritis, without prior EM, was the usual clinical picture. Most systemic autoimmune patients had positive tests for B. burgdorferi IgG antibodies by ELISA, but they had significantly lower titers and lower frequencies of Lyme-associated autoantibodies than LA patients. Prior to our evaluation, the patients often received additional antibiotics for presumed Lyme arthritis without benefit. We prescribed anti-inflammatory therapies, most commonly disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs), resulting in improvement. Conclusion Systemic autoimmune joint diseases, RA, PsA/SpA, may follow Lyme disease. Development of polyarthritis after antibiotic-treated erythema migrans, previous psoriasis, or low-titer B. burgdorferi antibodies are clues to the correct diagnosis. PMID:27636905

  13. Immune dysregulation, Polyendocrinopathy, Enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX syndrome: a paradigm of immunodeficiency with autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica eBarzaghi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Immune dysregulation, Polyendocrinopathy, Enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX syndrome is a rare monogenic primary immunodeficiency (PID due to mutations of FOXP3, a key transcription factor for naturally occurring (n regulatory T (Treg cells. The dysfunction of Treg cells is the main pathogenic event leading to the multi-organ autoimmunity that characterizes IPEX syndrome, a paradigm of genetically determined PID with autoimmunity. IPEX has a severe early onset and can become rapidly fatal within the first year of life regardless of the type and site of the mutation. The initial presenting symptoms are severe enteritis and/or type 1 diabetes mellitus, alone or in combination with eczema and elevated serum IgE. Other autoimmune symptoms, such as hypothyroidism, cytopenia, hepatitis, nephropathy, arthritis, and alopecia, can develop in patients who survive the initial acute phase.The current therapeutic options for IPEX patients are limited. Supportive and replacement therapies combined with pharmacological immunosuppression are required to control symptoms at onset. However, these procedures can allow only a reduction of the clinical manifestations without a permanent control of the disease. The only known effective cure for IPEX syndrome is haematopoietic stem cell transplantation, but it is always limited by the availability of a suitable donor and the lack of specific guidelines for bone marrow transplant in the context of this disease.This review aims to summarize the clinical histories and genomic mutations of the IPEX patients described in the literature to date. We will focus on the clinical and immunological features that allow differential diagnosis of IPEX syndrome and distinguish it from other PID with autoimmunity. The efficacy of the current therapies will be reviewed, and possible innovative approaches, based on the latest highlights of the pathogenesis to treat this severe primary autoimmune disease of childhood, will be discussed.

  14. Steroid responsive encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroiditis following ipilimumab therapy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl, David; Grüllich, Carsten; Hering, Steffen; Schabet, Martin

    2015-07-26

    Ipilimumab is a cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 receptor antibody used for immunotherapy in cancer. Several immune-related adverse events are known. Steroid responsive encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroiditis is an autoimmune encephalopathy associated with Hashimoto's Disease and elevated serum levels of the related antibodies (anti-thyroid-peroxidase antibody or anti-thyroglobulin antibody). Our case implies that steroid responsive encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroiditis may be another previously unreported side effect of ipilimumab therapy. We report the case of a 64 years old caucasian patient with prostatic cancer who received ipilimumab therapy in a clinical trial. He presented with aphasia, tremor and ataxia, myocloni, hallucinations, anxiety and agitation in turns with somnolence. Cranial nerves, deep tendon reflexes, motor and sensory functions were normal. Electroencephalography showed background slowing but no epileptic discharges. Brain magnetic resonance imaging was normal and showed no signs of hypophysitis. Cerebrospinal fluid findings ruled out infection and neoplastic meningitis. Anti-thyroid antibodies (anti-thyroid-peroxidase antibody and anti-thyroglobulin antibody) were heavily increased. Assuming steroid responsive encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroiditis the patient was treated with 1,000 mg methylprednisolone i.v. for 3 days and continued with 1 mg/kg orally. On the 3rd day of treatment the patient's condition started to improve. Within the next few days he gradually returned to his previous state, and electroencephalography eventually showed only slight slowing. Seven months later the patient's condition was stable, and anti-thyroid antibodies were no more detectable. Steroid responsive encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroiditis may be a hitherto unrecognized complication of ipililumab treatment and should be taken into consideration in patients developing central nervous

  15. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in a patient with Malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonani, Rajesh; Bhatnagar, Nidhi; Maitrey, Gajjar

    2013-07-01

    Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia (AIHA), a very infrequent condition which represents a group of disorders in which presence of autoantibodies directed against self-antigens leads to shortened red cell survival. Till date, a very few cases of AIHA in Malaria patients are reported worldwide but still AIHA should be considered a relatively rare cause of anemia in malaria. A 20 year male presented with intermittent fever since seven days and yellowish discoloration of urine and sclera since 5 days. He was transfused three units of blood at a private clinic before one month. On examination, pallor, icterus and spelnomegaly were present. Hemoglobin (Hb) was 3.2 gm% and peripheral smear revealed ring forms of both Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum. Serum LDH and Serum billirubin (Indirect and Direct) were high. This patient's blood group was B +ve with positive autocontrol. Indirect Antiglobulin Test (IAT), antibody screening and antibody identification were pan-positive with reaction strength of +4 against each cell. Direct Antiglobulin Test was +4 positive anti IgG and negative with anti C3. He was treated with Artesunate and methylprednisone. Least incompatible, saline washed O Neg and B neg red cells were transfused on the 2(nd) day of starting treatment. Hb was raised to 6.1 gm% on 4(th) day. Patient was discharged on 9th day with Hb 7.0 gm% with oral tapering dose of steroids. In the above case, patient was suffering from high grade malarial parasitemia with co-existing autoimmune RBC destruction by IgG auto-antibodies which led to sudden drop in Hb and rise in serum LDH and indirect billirubin. Least incompatible packed red cells along with antimalarials and steroids led to clinical improvement. So far, one case report each from India, Korea, Canada and Germany and one case series report of three cases from India have been reported. Under-reporting or rarity of this phenomenon may be accountable for this.

  16. POST-TRANSPLANT LYMPHOPROLIFERATIVE DISORDERS: ROLE OF VIRAL INFECTION, GENETIC LESIONS AND ANTIGEN STIMULATION IN THE PATHOGENESIS OF THE DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Gaidano

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD are a life-threatening complication of solid organ transplantation or, more rarely, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The majority of PTLD is of B-cell origin and associated with Epstein–Barr virus (EBV infection. PTLD generally display involvement of extranodal sites, aggressive histology and aggressive clinical behavior. The molecular pathogenesis of PTLD involves infection by oncogenic viruses, namely Epstein-Barr virus, as well as genetic or epigenetic alterations of several cellular genes. At variance with lymphoma arising in immunocompetent hosts, whose genome is relatively stable, a fraction of PTLD are characterized by microsatellite instability as a consequence of defects in the DNA mismatch repair mechanism. Apart from microsatellite instability, molecular alterations of cellular genes recognized in PTLD include alterations of cMYC, BCL6, TP53, DNA hypermethylation, and aberrant somatic hypermutation of protooncogenes. The occurrence of IGV mutations in the overwhelming majority of PTLD documents that malignant transformation targets germinal centre (GC B-cells and their descendants both in EBV–positive and EBV–negative cases. Analysis of phenotypic markers of B-cell histogenesis, namely BCL6, MUM1 and CD138, allows further distinction of PTLD histogenetic categories. PTLD expressing the BCL6+/MUM1+/-/CD138- profile reflect B-cells actively experiencing the GC reaction, and comprise diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL centroblastic and Burkitt lymphoma. PTLD expressing the BCL6-/MUM1+/CD138- phenotype putatively derive from B-cells that have concluded the GC reaction, and comprise the majority of polymorphic PTLD and a fraction of

  17. Celiac Disease Autoimmunity in Patients with Autoimmune Diabetes and Thyroid Disease among Chinese Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyuan Zhao

    Full Text Available The prevalence of celiac disease autoimmunity or tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (TGA amongst patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D and autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD in the Chinese population remains unknown. This study examined the rate of celiac disease autoimmunity amongst patients with T1D and AITD in the Chinese population. The study included 178 patients with type 1 diabetes and 119 with AITD where 36 had both T1D and AITD, classified as autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 variant (APS3v. The study also included 145 patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D, 97 patients with non-autoimmune thyroid disease (NAITD, and 102 healthy controls. Serum islet autoantibodies, thyroid autoantibodies and TGA were measured by radioimmunoassay. TGA positivity was found in 22% of patients with either type 1 diabetes or AITD, much higher than that in patients with T2D (3.4%; p< 0.0001 or NAITD (3.1%; P < 0.0001 or healthy controls (1%; p<0.0001. The patients with APS3v having both T1D and AITD were 36% positive for TGA, significantly higher than patients with T1D alone (p = 0.040 or with AITD alone (p = 0.017. T1D and AITD were found to have a 20% and 30% frequency of overlap respectively at diagnosis. In conclusion, TGA positivity was high in the Chinese population having existing T1D and/or AITD, and even higher when both diseases were present. Routine TGA screening in patients with T1D or AITD will be important to early identify celiac disease autoimmunity for better clinical care of patients.

  18. The Epidemiologic Evidence Linking Autoimmune Diseases and Psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benros, Michael E; Eaton, William W; Mortensen, Preben B

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes the epidemiologic evidence linking autoimmune diseases and psychosis. The associations between autoimmune diseases and psychosis have been studied for more than a half century, but research has intensified within the last decades, since psychosis has been associated...... with genetic markers of the immune system and with excess autoreactivity and other immune alterations. A range of psychiatric disorders, including psychosis, have been observed to occur more frequently in some autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus and multiple sclerosis. Many autoimmune......, there is some evidence of associations of psychosis with a family history of autoimmune disorders and vice versa. Additionally, several autoimmune diseases, individually and in aggregate, have been identified as raising the risk for psychotic disorders in longitudinal studies. The associations have been...

  19. First-in-class inhibitor of the T cell receptor for the treatment of autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borroto, Aldo; Reyes-Garau, Diana; Jiménez, M Angeles; Carrasco, Esther; Moreno, Beatriz; Martínez-Pasamar, Sara; Cortés, José R; Perona, Almudena; Abia, David; Blanco, Soledad; Fuentes, Manuel; Arellano, Irene; Lobo, Juan; Heidarieh, Haleh; Rueda, Javier; Esteve, Pilar; Cibrián, Danay; Martinez-Riaño, Ana; Mendoza, Pilar; Prieto, Cristina; Calleja, Enrique; Oeste, Clara L; Orfao, Alberto; Fresno, Manuel; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Alcamí, Antonio; Bovolenta, Paola; Martín, Pilar; Villoslada, Pablo; Morreale, Antonio; Messeguer, Angel; Alarcon, Balbino

    2016-12-21

    Modulating T cell activation is critical for treating autoimmune diseases but requires avoiding concomitant opportunistic infections. Antigen binding to the T cell receptor (TCR) triggers the recruitment of the cytosolic adaptor protein Nck to a proline-rich sequence in the cytoplasmic tail of the TCR's CD3ε subunit. Through virtual screening and using combinatorial chemistry, we have generated an orally available, low-molecular weight inhibitor of the TCR-Nck interaction that selectively inhibits TCR-triggered T cell activation with an IC 50 (median inhibitory concentration) ~1 nM. By modulating TCR signaling, the inhibitor prevented the development of psoriasis and asthma and, furthermore, exerted a long-lasting therapeutic effect in a model of autoimmune encephalomyelitis. However, it did not prevent the generation of a protective memory response against a mouse pathogen, suggesting that the compound might not exert its effects through immunosuppression. These results suggest that inhibiting an immediate TCR signal has promise for treating a broad spectrum of human T cell-mediated autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  20. Risk Factors for Autoimmune Diseases Development After Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roriz, Mélanie; Landais, Mickael; Desprez, Jonathan; Barbet, Christelle; Azoulay, Elie; Galicier, Lionel; Wynckel, Alain; Baudel, Jean-Luc; Provôt, François; Pène, Frédéric; Mira, Jean-Paul; Presne, Claire; Poullin, Pascale; Delmas, Yahsou; Kanouni, Tarik; Seguin, Amélie; Mousson, Christiane; Servais, Aude; Bordessoule, Dominique; Perez, Pierre; Chauveau, Dominique; Veyradier, Agnès; Halimi, Jean-Michel; Hamidou, Mohamed; Coppo, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Autoimmune thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) can be associated with other autoimmune disorders, but their prevalence following autoimmune TTP remains unknown. To assess the prevalence of autoimmune disorders associated with TTP and to determine risk factors for and the time course of the development of an autoimmune disorder after a TTP episode, we performed a cross sectional study. Two-hundred sixty-one cases of autoimmune TTP were included in the French Reference Center registry between October, 2000 and May, 2009. Clinical and laboratory data available at time of TTP diagnosis were recovered. Each center was contacted to collect the more recent data and diagnosis criteria for autoimmunity. Fifty-six patients presented an autoimmune disorder in association with TTP, 9 years before TTP (median; min: 2 yr, max: 32 yr) (26 cases), at the time of TTP diagnosis (17 cases) or during follow-up (17 cases), up to 12 years after TTP diagnosis (mean, 22 mo). The most frequent autoimmune disorder reported was systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (26 cases) and Sjögren syndrome (8 cases). The presence of additional autoimmune disorders had no impact on outcomes of an acute TTP or the occurrence of relapse. Two factors evaluated at TTP diagnosis were significantly associated with the development of an autoimmune disorder during follow-up: the presence of antidouble stranded (ds)DNA antibodies (hazard ratio (HR): 4.98; 95% confidence interval (CI) [1.64–15.14]) and anti-SSA antibodies (HR: 9.98; 95% CI [3.59–27.76]). A follow-up across many years is necessary after an acute TTP, especially when anti-SSA or anti-dsDNA antibodies are present on TTP diagnosis, to detect autoimmune disorders early before immunologic events spread to prevent disabling complications. PMID:26496263