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Sample records for travelers visiting geosentinel

  1. Travel-associated disease among US residents visiting US GeoSentinel clinics after return from international travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagmann, Stefan H F; Han, Pauline V; Stauffer, William M; Miller, Andy O; Connor, Bradley A; Hale, DeVon C; Coyle, Christina M; Cahill, John D; Marano, Cinzia; Esposito, Douglas H; Kozarsky, Phyllis E

    2014-12-01

    US residents make 60 million international trips annually. Family practice providers need to be aware of travel-associated diseases affecting this growing mobile population. To describe demographics, travel characteristics and clinical diagnoses of US residents who present ill after international travel. Descriptive analysis of travel-associated morbidity and mortality among US travellers seeking care at 1 of the 22 US practices and clinics participating in the GeoSentinel Global Surveillance Network from January 2000 to December 2012. Of the 9624 ill US travellers included in the analysis, 3656 (38%) were tourist travellers, 2379 (25%) missionary/volunteer/research/aid workers (MVRA), 1580 (16%) travellers visiting friends and relatives (VFRs), 1394 (15%) business travellers and 593 (6%) student travellers. Median (interquartile range) travel duration was 20 days (10-60 days). Pre-travel advice was sought by 45%. Hospitalization was required by 7%. Compared with other groups of travellers, ill MVRA travellers returned from longer trips (median duration 61 days), while VFR travellers disproportionately required higher rates of inpatient care (24%) and less frequently had received pre-travel medical advice (20%). Illnesses of the gastrointestinal tract were the most common (58%), followed by systemic febrile illnesses (18%) and dermatologic disorders (17%). Three deaths were reported. Diagnoses varied according to the purpose of travel and region of exposure. Returning ill US international travellers present with a broad spectrum of travel-associated diseases. Destination and reason for travel may help primary health care providers to generate an accurate differential diagnosis for the most common disorders and for those that may be life-threatening. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Expatriates ill after travel: Results from the Geosentinel Surveillance Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim Poh-Lian

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expatriates are a distinct population at unique risk for health problems related to their travel exposure. Methods We analyzed GeoSentinel data comparing ill returned expatriates with other travelers for demographics, travel characteristics, and proportionate morbidity (PM for travel-related illness. Results Our study included 2,883 expatriates and 11,910 non-expatriates who visited GeoSentinel clinics ill after travel. Expatriates were more likely to be male, do volunteer work, be long-stay travelers (>6 months, and have sought pre-travel advice. Compared to non-expatriates, expatriates returning from Africa had higher proportionate morbidity (PM for malaria, filariasis, schistosomiasis, and hepatitis E; expatriates from the Asia-Pacific region had higher PM for strongyloidiasis, depression, and anxiety; expatriates returning from Latin America had higher PM for mononucleosis and ingestion-related infections (giardiasis, brucellosis. Expatriates returning from all three regions had higher PM for latent TB, amebiasis, and gastrointestinal infections (other than acute diarrhea compared to non-expatriates. When the data were stratified by travel reason, business expatriates had higher PM for febrile systemic illness (malaria and dengue and vaccine-preventable infections (hepatitis A, and volunteer expatriates had higher PM for parasitic infections. Expatriates overall had higher adjusted odds ratios for latent TB and lower odds ratios for acute diarrhea and dermatologic illness. Conclusions Ill returned expatriates differ from other travelers in travel characteristics and proportionate morbidity for specific diseases, based on the region of exposure and travel reason. They are more likely to present with more serious illness.

  3. Expatriates ill after travel: results from the Geosentinel Surveillance Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Poh-Lian; Han, Pauline; Chen, Lin H; MacDonald, Susan; Pandey, Prativa; Hale, DeVon; Schlagenhauf, Patricia; Loutan, Louis; Wilder-Smith, Annelies; Davis, Xiaohong M; Freedman, David O

    2012-12-31

    Expatriates are a distinct population at unique risk for health problems related to their travel exposure. We analyzed GeoSentinel data comparing ill returned expatriates with other travelers for demographics, travel characteristics, and proportionate morbidity (PM) for travel-related illness. Our study included 2,883 expatriates and 11,910 non-expatriates who visited GeoSentinel clinics ill after travel. Expatriates were more likely to be male, do volunteer work, be long-stay travelers (>6 months), and have sought pre-travel advice. Compared to non-expatriates, expatriates returning from Africa had higher proportionate morbidity (PM) for malaria, filariasis, schistosomiasis, and hepatitis E; expatriates from the Asia-Pacific region had higher PM for strongyloidiasis, depression, and anxiety; expatriates returning from Latin America had higher PM for mononucleosis and ingestion-related infections (giardiasis, brucellosis). Expatriates returning from all three regions had higher PM for latent TB, amebiasis, and gastrointestinal infections (other than acute diarrhea) compared to non-expatriates. When the data were stratified by travel reason, business expatriates had higher PM for febrile systemic illness (malaria and dengue) and vaccine-preventable infections (hepatitis A), and volunteer expatriates had higher PM for parasitic infections. Expatriates overall had higher adjusted odds ratios for latent TB and lower odds ratios for acute diarrhea and dermatologic illness. Ill returned expatriates differ from other travelers in travel characteristics and proportionate morbidity for specific diseases, based on the region of exposure and travel reason. They are more likely to present with more serious illness.

  4. Business travel-associated illness: a GeoSentinel analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin H; Leder, Karin; Barbre, Kira A; Schlagenhauf, Patricia; Libman, Michael; Keystone, Jay; Mendelson, Marc; Gautret, Philippe; Schwartz, Eli; Shaw, Marc; MacDonald, Sue; McCarthy, Anne; Connor, Bradley A; Esposito, Douglas H; Hamer, Davidson; Wilson, Mary E

    2018-01-01

    Analysis of a large cohort of business travelers will help clinicians focus on frequent and serious illnesses. We aimed to describe travel-related health problems in business travelers. GeoSentinel Surveillance Network consists of 64 travel and tropical medicine clinics in 29 countries; descriptive analysis was performed on ill business travelers, defined as persons traveling for work, evaluated after international travel 1 January 1997 through 31 December 2014. Among 12 203 business travelers seen 1997-2014 (14 045 eligible diagnoses), the majority (97%) were adults aged 20-64 years; most (74%) reported from Western Europe or North America; two-thirds were male. Most (86%) were outpatients. Fewer than half (45%) reported a pre-travel healthcare encounter. Frequent regions of exposure were sub-Saharan Africa (37%), Southeast Asia (15%) and South Central Asia (14%). The most frequent diagnoses were malaria (9%), acute unspecified diarrhea (8%), viral syndrome (6%), acute bacterial diarrhea (5%) and chronic diarrhea (4%). Species was reported for 973 (90%) of 1079 patients with malaria, predominantly Plasmodium falciparum acquired in sub-Saharan Africa. Of 584 (54%) with malaria chemoprophylaxis information, 92% took none or incomplete courses. Thirteen deaths were reported, over half of which were due to malaria; others succumbed to pneumonia, typhoid fever, rabies, melioidosis and pyogenic abscess. Diarrheal illness was a major cause of morbidity. Malaria contributed substantial morbidity and mortality, particularly among business travelers to sub-Saharan Africa. Underuse or non-use of chemoprophylaxis contributed to malaria cases. Deaths in business travelers could be reduced by improving adherence to malaria chemoprophylaxis and targeted vaccination for vaccine-preventable diseases. Pre-travel advice is indicated for business travelers and is currently under-utilized and needs improvement.

  5. Malaria after international travel: a GeoSentinel analysis, 2003-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelo, Kristina M; Libman, Michael; Caumes, Eric; Hamer, Davidson H; Kain, Kevin C; Leder, Karin; Grobusch, Martin P; Hagmann, Stefan H; Kozarsky, Phyllis; Lalloo, David G; Lim, Poh-Lian; Patimeteeporn, Calvin; Gautret, Philippe; Odolini, Silvia; Chappuis, François; Esposito, Douglas H

    2017-07-20

    More than 30,000 malaria cases are reported annually among international travellers. Despite improvements in malaria control, malaria continues to threaten travellers due to inaccurate perception of risk and sub-optimal pre-travel preparation. Records with a confirmed malaria diagnosis after travel from January 2003 to July 2016 were obtained from GeoSentinel, a global surveillance network of travel and tropical medicine providers that monitors travel-related morbidity. Records were excluded if exposure country was missing or unascertainable or if there was a concomitant acute diagnosis unrelated to malaria. Records were analyzed to describe the demographic and clinical characteristics of international travellers with malaria. There were 5689 travellers included; 325 were children travel visit. More than half (62%) were hospitalized; children were hospitalized more frequently than adults (73 and 62%, respectively). Ninety-two per cent had a single Plasmodium species diagnosis, most frequently Plasmodium falciparum (4011; 76%). Travellers with P. falciparum were most frequently VFRs (60%). More than 40% of travellers with a trip duration ≤7 days had Plasmodium vivax. There were 444 (8%) travellers with severe malaria; 31 children had severe malaria. Twelve travellers died. Malaria remains a serious threat to international travellers. Efforts must focus on preventive strategies aimed on children and VFRs, and chemoprophylaxis access and preventive measure adherence should be emphasized.

  6. Travel-Associated Zika Virus Disease Acquired in the Americas Through February 2016: A GeoSentinel Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamer, Davidson H.; Barbre, Kira A.; Chen, Lin H.; Grobusch, Martin P.; Schlagenhauf, Patricia; Goorhuis, Abraham; van Genderen, Perry J. J.; Molina, Israel; Asgeirsson, Hilmir; Kozarsky, Phyllis E.; Caumes, Eric; Hagmann, Stefan H.; Mockenhaupt, Frank P.; Eperon, Gilles; Barnett, Elizabeth D.; Bottieau, Emmanuel; Boggild, Andrea K.; Gautret, Philippe; Hynes, Noreen A.; Kuhn, Susan; Lash, R. Ryan; Leder, Karin; Libman, Michael; Malvy, Denis J. M.; Perret, Cecilia; Rothe, Camilla; Schwartz, Eli; Wilder-Smith, Annelies; Cetron, Martin S.; Esposito, Douglas H.

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus has spread rapidly in the Americas and has been imported into many nonendemic countries by travelers. To describe clinical manifestations and epidemiology of Zika virus disease in travelers exposed in the Americas. Descriptive, using GeoSentinel records. 63 travel and tropical medicine

  7. Illness in travelers returned from Brazil: the GeoSentinel experience and implications for the 2014 FIFA World Cup and the 2016 Summer Olympics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Mary E; Chen, Lin H; Han, Pauline V; Keystone, Jay S; Cramer, Jakob P; Segurado, Aluisio; Hale, DeVon; Jensenius, Mogens; Schwartz, Eli; von Sonnenburg, Frank; Leder, Karin

    2014-05-01

    Brazil will host the 2014 FIFA World Cup and the 2016 Olympic and Paralympic Games, events that are expected to attract hundreds of thousands of international travelers. Travelers to Brazil will encounter locally endemic infections as well as mass event-specific risks. We describe 1586 ill returned travelers who had visited Brazil and were seen at a GeoSentinel Clinic from July 1997 through May 2013. The most common travel-related illnesses were dermatologic conditions (40%), diarrheal syndromes (25%), and febrile systemic illness (19%). The most common specific dermatologic diagnoses were cutaneous larva migrans, myiasis, and tungiasis. Dengue and malaria, predominantly Plasmodium vivax, were the most frequently identified specific causes of fever and the most common reasons for hospitalization after travel. Dengue fever diagnoses displayed marked seasonality, although cases were seen throughout the year. Among the 28 ill returned travelers with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, 11 had newly diagnosed asymptomatic infection and 9 had acute symptomatic HIV. Our analysis primarily identified infectious diseases among travelers to Brazil. Knowledge of illness in travelers returning from Brazil can assist clinicians to advise prospective travelers and guide pretravel preparation, including itinerary-tailored advice, vaccines, and chemoprophylaxis; it can also help to focus posttravel evaluation of ill returned travelers. Travelers planning to attend mass events will encounter other risks that are not captured in our surveillance network.

  8. Acute and potentially life-threatening tropical diseases in western travelers--a GeoSentinel multicenter study, 1996-2011

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jensenius, Mogens; Han, Pauline V.; Schlagenhauf, Patricia; Schwartz, Eli; Parola, Philippe; Castelli, Francesco; von Sonnenburg, Frank; Loutan, Louis; Leder, Karin; Freedman, David O.; Simon, Fabrice; Delmont, Jean; Carosi, Giampiero; Chappuis, François; Caumes, Eric; Pérignon, Alice; Burchard, Gerd-Dieter; Torresi, Joseph; Brown, Graham; Kain, Kevin; Boggild, Andrea; Keystone, Jay S.; Pandey, Prativa; Pradhan, Rashila; Murphy, Holly; Coyle, Christina M.; Wittner, Murray; de Vries, Peter; Grobusch, Martin C.; Gadroen, Kartini; Rapp, Christophe; Aoun, Olivier; Kanagawa, Shuzo; Kato, Yasuyuki; Mizunno, Yasutaka; Gkrania-Klotsas, Effrossyni; McCarthy, Anne; Weber, Rainer; Steffen, Robert; Hagmann, Stefan; Henry, Michael; Miller, Andy O.; Hale, Devon C.; Anand, Rahul; Gelman, Stephanie S.; Kozarsky, Phyllis E.; Fairley, Jessica; Franco-Paredes, Carlos; Barnett, Elizabeth D.; Libman, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    We performed a descriptive analysis of acute and potentially life-threatening tropical diseases among 82,825 ill western travelers reported to GeoSentinel from June of 1996 to August of 2011. We identified 3,655 patients (4.4%) with a total of 3,666 diagnoses representing 13 diseases, including

  9. Differential diagnosis of illness in travelers arriving from Sierra Leone, Liberia, or Guinea: a cross-sectional study from the GeoSentinel Surveillance Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggild, Andrea K; Esposito, Douglas H; Kozarsky, Phyllis E; Ansdell, Vernon; Beeching, Nicholas J; Campion, Daniel; Castelli, Francesco; Caumes, Eric; Chappuis, Francois; Cramer, Jakob P; Gkrania-Klotsas, Effrossyni; Grobusch, Martin P; Hagmann, Stefan H F; Hynes, Noreen A; Lim, Poh Lian; López-Vélez, Rogelio; Malvy, Denis J M; Mendelson, Marc; Parola, Philippe; Sotir, Mark J; Wu, Henry M; Hamer, Davidson H

    2015-06-02

    The largest-ever outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD), ongoing in West Africa since late 2013, has led to export of cases to Europe and North America. Clinicians encountering ill travelers arriving from countries with widespread Ebola virus transmission must be aware of alternate diagnoses associated with fever and other nonspecific symptoms. To define the spectrum of illness observed in persons returning from areas of West Africa where EVD transmission has been widespread. Descriptive, using GeoSentinel records. 57 travel or tropical medicine clinics in 25 countries. 805 ill returned travelers and new immigrants from Sierra Leone, Liberia, or Guinea seen between September 2009 and August 2014. Frequencies of demographic and travel-related characteristics and illnesses reported. The most common specific diagnosis among 770 nonimmigrant travelers was malaria (n = 310 [40.3%]), with Plasmodium falciparum or severe malaria in 267 (86%) and non-P. falciparum malaria in 43 (14%). Acute diarrhea was the second most common diagnosis among nonimmigrant travelers (n = 95 [12.3%]). Such common diagnoses as upper respiratory tract infection, urinary tract infection, and influenza-like illness occurred in only 26, 9, and 7 returning travelers, respectively. Few instances of typhoid fever (n = 8), acute HIV infection (n = 5), and dengue (n = 2) were encountered. Surveillance data collected by specialist clinics may not be representative of all ill returned travelers. Although EVD may currently drive clinical evaluation of ill travelers arriving from Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Guinea, clinicians must be aware of other more common, potentially fatal diseases. Malaria remains a common diagnosis among travelers seen at GeoSentinel sites. Prompt exclusion of malaria and other life-threatening conditions is critical to limiting morbidity and mortality. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

  10. Zika beyond the Americas: Travelers as sentinels of Zika virus transmission. A GeoSentinel analysis, 2012 to 2016

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leder, Karin; Grobusch, Martin P.; Gautret, Philippe; Chen, Lin H.; Kuhn, Susan; Lim, Poh Lian; Yates, Johnnie; McCarthy, Anne E.; Rothe, Camilla; Kato, Yasuyuki; Bottieau, Emmanuel; Huber, Kristina; Schwartz, Eli; Stauffer, William; Malvy, Denis; Shaw, Marc T. M.; Rapp, Christophe; Blumberg, Lucille; Jensenius, Mogens; van Genderen, Perry J. J.; Hamer, Davidson H.

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) was first isolated in Africa; decades later, caused large outbreaks in the Pacific, and is considered endemic in Asia. We aim to describe ZIKV disease epidemiology outside the Americas, the importance of travelers as sentinels of disease transmission, and discrepancies in travel

  11. Travel-associated sexually transmitted infections: an observational cross-sectional study of the GeoSentinel surveillance database

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matteelli, Alberto; Schlagenhauf, Patricia; Carvalho, Anna C. C.; Weld, Leisa; Davis, Xiaohong M.; Wilder-Smith, Annelies; Barnett, Elizabeth D.; Parola, Philippe; Pandey, Prativa; Han, Pauline; Castelli, Francesco; Murphy, Holly; Weber, Rainer; Steffen, Robert; von Sonnenburg, Frank; Jenks, Nancy Piper; Kerr, Christine A.; Borwein, Sarah; Leder, Karin; Torresi, Joseph; Brown, Graham V.; Keystone, Jay S.; Kain, Kevin C.; Jensenius, Mogens; Wang, Andy; Eason, Jane; MacDonald, Susan; McCarthy, Anne E.; Anderson, Nicole L.; Batchelor, Trish; Meisch, Dominique; López-Vélez, Rogelio; Pérez-Molina, Jose A.; Field, Vanessa; Schwartz, Eli; Gkrania-Klotsas, Effrossyni; Loutan, Louis; Chappuis, François; Caumes, Eric; Pérignon, Alice; Lim, Poh Lian; Burchard, Gerd-Dieter; Libman, Michael D.; Ward, Brian J.; Maclean, J. Dick; Stauffer, William M.; Walker, Patricia F.; Hale, Devon C.; Anand, Rahul; de Vries, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Travel is thought to be a risk factor for the acquisition of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), but no multicentre analyses have been done. We aimed to describe the range of diseases and the demographic and geographical factors associated with the acquisition of travel-related STIs through

  12. The Use of Travel Guidebooks by Tourist Visiting Yogyakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Intani Putri

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to know to what extend tourist use travel guidebooks for their visit to Yogyakarta, as one of tourism destination in Indonesia. This research was conducted by taking tourist who has been to or during their visit to Yogyakarta. Qualitative interviews with three travel experts precede this research in order to gather the purpose of using travel guidebooks by tourist visiting Yogyakarta. The results are 31 purposes of using travel guidebooks. After conducting factor analysis and reliability tests, seven factors comprising 26 statements were extracted which are: functional needs, forward-looking needs, learning needs, autonomy needs, tension reduction needs, security needs, and objectification needs.

  13. Travel websites: Changing visits, evaluations and posts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronner, Fred; de Hoog, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Many studies concerning the role of web-based information in tourism measure one-time interactions. This paper presents results of a longitudinal study. Data collected in 2014 about website visits, evaluations and posts, are compared with data from 2007. The main finding is the advance of sites

  14. Arboviral and other illnesses in travellers returning from Brazil, June 2013 to May 2016: implications for the 2016 Olympic and Paralympic Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gautret, Philippe; Mockenhaupt, Frank; Grobusch, Martin P.; Rothe, Camilla; von Sonnenburg, Frank; van Genderen, Perry J.; Chappuis, Francois; Asgeirsson, Hilmir; Caumes, Eric; Bottieau, Emmanuel; Malvy, Denis; Lopez-Vélez, Rogelio; Jensenius, Mogens; Larsen, Carsten Schade; Castelli, Francesco; Rapp, Christophe; Field, Vanessa; Molina, Israel; Gkrania-Klotsas, Effrossyni; Florescu, Simin; Lalloo, David; Schlagenhauf, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated EuroTravNet (a GeoSentinel subnetwork) data from June 2013 to May 2016 on 508 ill travellers returning from Brazil, to inform a risk analysis for Europeans visiting the 2016 Olympic and Paralympic Games in Brazil. Few dengue fever cases (n = 3) and no cases of chikungunya were

  15. Meningococcal vaccination for international travellers from Greece visiting developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavli, Androula; Katerelos, Panagiotis; Smeti, Paraskevi; Maltezou, Helena C

    2016-01-01

    Meningococcal meningitis is a serious disease. Travel-associated infection for the general traveller is low; however regular epidemics in indigenous population, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality. Our aim was to assess meningococcal vaccination for international travellers from Greece. A prospective questionnaire-based study was conducted during 2009-2013. A total of 5283 travellers were studied (median age: 39.2 years); Meningococcal tetravalent vaccine (A,C,W135,Y) was delivered to 1150 (21.8%) of them. Of those who travelled to the Middle East and sub-Saharan Africa, 73.1% and 21.2% received meningococcal vaccine, respectively. Of those travellers who travelled to sub-Saharan Africa from November to June and from July to October, 22.1% and 20.6% were vaccinated with meningococcal vaccine, respectively. Of all travellers who travelled for travelled for recreation, and 13.8% of those who travelled for work. Of travellers who stayed in urban, in rural, and in urban and rural areas, 32%, 11.6% and 12.7% were vaccinated, respectively. Meningococcal vaccine was delivered to 29.2%, 21.1%, 19.4% and 5.1% of those who stayed in hotels, at local people's home, in camps, and on ships, respectively. The association of meningococcal vaccine administration with the destination, duration and purpose of travel, area of stay and type of accommodation was statistically significant. There is a need to improve meningococcal vaccine recommendations for travellers from Greece, particularly for high risk populations, such as VFRs, business travellers and those visiting sub-Saharan Africa especially during the dry season. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Pretravel health advice among international travelers visiting Cuzco, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabada, Miguel M; Maldonado, Fernando; Quispe, Wanda; Serrano, Edson; Mozo, Karen; Gonzales, Elsa; Seas, Carlos; Verdonck, Kristien; Echevarria, Juan I; Gotuzzo, Eduardo

    2005-01-01

    Cuzco, a Peruvian city of historical interest located 3,326 m above sea level, is a frequent destination for tourists. We conducted a descriptive study to assess the extent and sources of pretravel health advice received by international travelers before their arrival to Cuzco. Data were collected as part of a health survey among travelers. Between August and November 2002, travelers between 15 and 65 years old were invited to fill out a questionnaire in the departing area of Cuzco's international airport. A total of 5,988 travelers participated. The mean age was 35.4 years (SD 11.4 yr); 50.6% were female and 50.8% were single. Tourism was the reason for traveling in 90.2% of the participants, and 89.3% of them were traveling with companions. Pretravel health information was received by 93.6%. The median number of information sources was two, with books (41.5%), travel medicine clinics (38.8%), the Internet (23.3%), and general practitioners (22.7%) as the main sources. Most frequently received recommendations were about safe food and water consumption (85%), use of insect repellents (66.0%), sunburn protection (64.4%), and condom use (22%). Only 16.5% took medication to prevent altitude sickness, and 14.2% took medication to prevent traveler's diarrhea. Variables independently associated with receiving pretravel health information from a health care professional were female gender, country of residence other than the United States, length of stay in Cuzco > 7 days, length of stay in other Peruvian cities > 7 days, tourism as the main reason for visiting Cuzco, traveling with companions, and consulting of more than one source of information. Most travelers arriving to Cuzco had received pretravel health information, and the majority obtained it from more than one source. Recommendations addressed for specific health risks, such as altitude sickness prophylaxis, were received by few travelers.

  17. Illness in Travelers Returned From Brazil: The GeoSentinel Experience and Implications for the 2014 FIFA World Cup and the 2016 Summer Olympics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilson, Mary E.; Chen, Lin H.; Han, Pauline V.; Keystone, Jay S.; Cramer, Jakob P.; Segurado, Aluisio; Hale, DeVon; Jensenius, Mogens; Schwartz, Eli; von Sonnenburg, Frank; Leder, Karin; Burchard, Gerd-Dieter; Anand, Rahul; Gelman, Stephanie S.; Kain, Kevin; Boggild, Andrea; Perret, Cecilia; Valdivieso, Francisca; Loutan, Louis; Chappuis, François; Schlagenhauf, Patricia; Weber, Rainer; Steffen, Robert; Caumes, Eric; Pérignon, Alice; Libman, Michael D.; Ward, Brian; Maclean, J. Dick; Grobusch, Martin C.; Goorhuis, Abram; de Vries, Peter; Gadroen, Kartini; Mockenhaupt, Frank; Harms, Gunder; Parola, Philippe; Simon, Fabrice; Delmont, Jean; Carosi, Giampiero; Castelli, Francesco; Connor, Bradley A.; Kozarsky, Phyllis E.; Wu, Henry; Fairley, Jessica; Franco-Paredes, Carlos; Using, Johan; Fröberg, Gabrielle; Askling, Helena Hervius; Bronner, Ulf; Haulman, N. Jean; Roesel, David

    2014-01-01

    Background. Brazil will host the 2014 FIFA World Cup and the 2016 Olympic and Paralympic Games, events that are expected to attract hundreds of thousands of international travelers. Travelers to Brazil will encounter locally endemic infections as well as mass event-specific risks. Methods. We

  18. Differential Diagnosis of Illness in Travelers Arriving From Sierra Leone, Liberia, or Guinea: A Cross-sectional Study From the GeoSentinel Surveillance Network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boggild, Andrea K.; Esposito, Douglas H.; Kozarsky, Phyllis E.; Ansdell, Vernon; Beeching, Nicholas J.; Campion, Daniel; Castelli, Francesco; Caumes, Eric; Chappuis, Francois; Cramer, Jakob P.; Gkrania-Klotsas, Effrossyni; Grobusch, Martin P.; Hagmann, Stefan H. F.; Hynes, Noreen A.; Lim, Poh Lian; López-Vélez, Rogelio; Malvy, Denis J. M.; Mendelson, Marc; Parola, Philippe; Sotir, Mark J.; Wu, Henry M.; Hamer, Davidson H.; Field, Vanessa; Libman, Michael D.; Rothe, Camilla; Barnett, Elizabeth D.; Schwartz, Eli; Gautret, Philippe; von Sonnenburg, Frank; van Genderen, Perry; Jensenius, Mogens; Stauffer, William M.; Mockenhaupt, Frank; Kain, Kevin C.; Kanagawa, Shuzo; Coyle, Christina M.; Connor, Bradley A.; Ursing, Johan; Leder, Karin; Haulman, Jean; Schlagenhauf, Patricia; Vincelette, Jean; McCarthy, Anne; Pandey, Prativa; Chen, Lin H.; Cahill, John D.; Rapp, Christophe; Kendall, Brian; Lalloo, David; Yoshimura, Yukihiro

    2015-01-01

    Background: The largest-ever outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD), ongoing in West Africa since late 2013, has led to export of cases to Europe and North America. Clinicians encountering ill travelers arriving from countries with widespread Ebola virus transmission must be aware of alternate

  19. Health challenges of young travelers visiting friends and relatives compared with those traveling for other purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Pauline; Yanni, Emad; Jentes, Emily S; Hamer, Davidson H; Chen, Lin H; Wilson, Mary E; Macleod, William B; Ooi, Winnie W; Kogelman, Laura; Karchmer, Adolf W; Barnett, Elizabeth D

    2012-09-01

    The study objective was to assess differences in demographics and travel health challenges between youths ≤18 years old traveling internationally to visit friends and relatives (VFRs) compared with those traveling for other purposes (non-VFR). The Boston Area Travel Medicine Network consists of 5 clinics collecting anonymous data from international pretravel consultations. Data on all travelers ≤18 years of age seen between January 2008 and July 2010 were used. VFRs were compared with non-VFRs on demographics, primary language, trip characteristics, travel vaccinations administered, malaria prophylaxis and antidiarrheal medications prescribed. Thirty-five percent (610/1731) listed VFR as their purpose of travel. Almost half of VFRs were travel to countries that were yellow fever holoendemic, had malaria risk and were high-risk for typhoid (44% versus 20%, 39% versus 12%, 25% versus 15%, P travel-related morbidity, healthcare providers should be prepared to give travel advice to parents of VFR infants and children, particularly those US-born VFRs with foreign-born parents, regarding antimalarial and antidiarrheal medications and preventing yellow fever, malaria and typhoid.

  20. Challenges to providing pre-travel care for travellers visiting friends and relatives: an audit of a specialist travel medicine clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Kate; Chaves, Nadia; Leder, Karin

    2017-09-01

    Travellers visiting friends and relatives (VFRs) often have complex pre-travel needs. We identified the characteristics, destinations, vaccinations and pre-travel advice provided to VFRs and compared these with non-VFR travellers. The significant differences we found suggest that future research should focus on improving the uptake of recommended interventions in VFR travellers. © International Society of Travel Medicine, 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Pre-travel advice concerning vector-borne diseases received by travelers prior to visiting Cuzco, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia, Christian R; Centeno, Emperatriz; Cruz, Briggitte; Cvetkovic-Vega, Aleksandar; Delgado, Edison; Rodriguez-Morales, Alfonso J

    2016-01-01

    Peru is an increasingly popular tourist destination that poses a risk to travelers due to endemic vector-borne diseases (VBDs). The objective of our study was to determine which factors are associated with receiving pre-travel advice (PTA) for VBDs among travelers visiting Cuzco, Peru. A cross-sectional secondary analysis based on data from a survey among travelers departing Cuzco at Alejandro Velazco Astete International Airport during the period January-March 2012 was conducted. From the 1819 travelers included in the original study, 1717 were included in secondary data analysis. Of these participants, 42.2% received PTA and 2.9% were informed about vector-borne diseases, including yellow fever (1.8%), malaria (1.6%) and dengue fever (0.1%). Receiving information on VBDs was associated with visiting areas endemic to yellow fever and dengue fever in Peru. The only disease travelers received specific recommendations for before visiting an endemic area for was yellow fever. Only 1 in 30 tourists received information on VBD prevention; few of those who traveled to an endemic area were warned about specific risks for infectious diseases prior to their trip. These important findings show that most tourists who travel to Peru do not receive PTA for the prevention of infectious and VBD, which can affect not only the travelers but their countries of origin as well. Copyright © 2015 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Impact of traveling to visit friends and relatives on chronic disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurgle, Holly E; Roesel, David J; Erickson, Tiffany N; Devine, Emily Beth

    2013-01-01

    Travelers visiting friends and relatives (VFR) are known to be at high risk of acquiring infectious diseases during travel. However, little is known about the impact of VFR travel on chronic diseases. This was a nonrandomized, retrospective observational study. Patients were adult VFR travelers who received care from an internal medical clinic serving immigrants and refugees. The primary objective was to determine the impact of VFR travel on markers of chronic disease management including: blood pressure, glycosylated hemoglobin, body mass index, serum creatinine, and anticoagulation. Of the 110 VFR travelers in our study, N = 48 traveled to Africa and N = 62 traveled to Asia for a mean duration of 59 (range 21-303) days. Of the 433 counseling points discussed at pre-travel visits, 71% were infectious disease prevention, 16% chronic disease related, and 13% travel safety. A total of 63 patients (57%) reported one or more health problems while traveling. Of these, 35 patients (32%) experienced a problem related to a chronic condition. In comparison, 24 (22%) patients experienced an acute infection. Sixty percent of patients were nonadherent to medications during travel. An average increase in diastolic blood pressure of 3.6 mmHg among patients with hypertension was the only statistically significant change in a chronic disease marker when values before and after travel were compared. Subgroup analysis revealed that travel to Africa and nonadherence to medications were also associated with worsening blood pressure control, and patients traveling to Africa experienced a decrease in body mass index. This study identified a high proportion of problems related to chronic conditions experienced during VFR travel, while pre-travel appointments tended to focus on infectious disease prevention. A greater emphasis on medication adherence and chronic disease management during VFR travel is also needed during pre-travel preparations. © 2013 International Society of

  3. The visiting internet Fiancé/ée (VIF): an emerging group of international travelers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofarelli, Theresa A; Birich, Holly K; Hale, DeVon C

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe an emerging category of travelers called the Visiting Internet Fiancé/ée (VIF), characterized by their travel to pursue a romantic relationship with an individual they have only encountered online. The VIF is not well identified in travel medicine literature despite having a higher risk for several travel-related issues including sexually transmitted infections, monetary fraud, and international scams. We also propose specific counseling interventions designed to minimize the adverse outcomes faced by the VIF traveler. © 2014 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  4. Muscular Sarcocystosis in travelers returning from Tioman Island, Malaysia — 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    In October 2011, the GeoSentinel global surveillance system for travel-related morbidity detected an unusual cluster of illnesses among travelers returning from Tioman Island, Malaysia. Complete information was received for 17 of 32 (53%) patients reported to GeoSentinel; 9 probable and 1 confirmed ...

  5. Surveillance for travel-related disease--GeoSentinel Surveillance System, United States, 1997-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Kira; Esposito, Douglas H; Han, Pauline; Kozarsky, Phyllis; Freedman, David O; Plier, D Adam; Sotir, Mark J

    2013-07-19

    probable travel-related diagnoses. Of these, 23,006 (16%) patients were evaluated in the United States, 10,032 (44%) of whom were evaluated after returning from travel outside of the United States (i.e., after-travel patients). Of the 10,032 after-travel patients, 4,977 (50%) were female, 4,856 (48%) were male, and 199 (2%) did not report sex; the median age was 34 years. Most were evaluated in outpatient settings (84%), were born in the United States (76%), and reported current U.S. residence (99%). The most common reasons for travel were tourism (38%), missionary/volunteer/research/aid work (24%), visiting friends and relatives (17%), and business (15%). The most common regions of exposure were Sub-Saharan Africa (23%), Central America (15%), and South America (12%). Fewer than half (44%) reported having had a pretravel visit with a health-care provider. Of the 13,059 diagnoses among the 10,032 after-travel patients, the most common diagnoses were acute unspecified diarrhea (8%), acute bacterial diarrhea (5%), postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome (5%), giardiasis (3%), and chronic unknown diarrhea (3%). The most common diagnostic groupings were acute diarrhea (22%), nondiarrheal gastrointestinal (15%), febrile/systemic illness (14%), and dermatologic (12%). Among 1,802 patients with febrile/systemic illness diagnoses, the most common diagnosis was Plasmodium falciparum malaria (19%). The rapid communication component of the GeoSentinel network has allowed prompt responses to important health events affecting travelers; during 2010 and 2011, the notification capability of the GeoSentinel network was used in the identification and public health response to East African trypanosomiasis in Eastern Zambia and North Central Zimbabwe, P. vivax malaria in Greece, and muscular sarcocystosis on Tioman Island, Malaysia. The GeoSentinel Global Surveillance System is the largest repository of provider-based data on travel-related illness. Among ill travelers evaluated in U.S. GeoSentinel

  6. Vaccination knowledge, attitude and practice among Chinese travelers who visit travel clinics in Preparation for international travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Zhang, Jianming; Hao, Yutong; Fan, ZhengXing; Li, Lei; Li, Yiguang; Ju, Wendong; Zhang, Hong; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Mengzhang; Wu, Di; He, Hongtao

    2016-06-01

    Although international travel has become increasingly more common in main land China, few data are available on vaccination knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) among Chinese travelers. In each of 14 International Travel Healthcare Centers (ITHCs) situated in mainland China 200 volunteers were recruited for a cross-sectional investigation by questionnaire on KAP related to travel vaccinations. For the evaluation the study subjects were grouped by demographic data, past travel experience, travel destination, duration of stay abroad, purpose of travel. Among the 2,800 Chinese travelers who participated in the study, 67.1% were aware of national and travel vaccination recommendations. The knowledge about vaccine preventable diseases was low. The most common sources (73.4%) of information were requirements by destination countries obtained in connection with the visa application, Chinese companies employing workers/laborers for assignments overseas, and foreign schools. The overall acceptance rate of recommended vaccines was 68.7%, but yellow fever was accepted by 99.8% of the participants when recommended. Among 81.1% respondents who recalled to have received vaccinations in the past, only 25.9% of them brought the old vaccination records with them to their ITHC consultations. The results indicate that increased awareness of the importance of pre-travel vaccination is needed among the travellers in order to improve their KAP. © International Society of Travel Medicine, 2016. All rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Quantifying recreational value and the functional relationship between travel cost and visiting national park

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kawsar, Mahidi Hasan; Al Pavel, Muha Abdullah; Uddin, Mohammad Belal

    2015-01-01

    Estimation of recreational benefits is an important tool for both biodiversity conservation and ecotourism development in national parks and sanctuaries. The design of this work is to estimate the recreational value and to establish functional relationship between travel cost and visitation...... of Lawachara National Park (LNP) in Bangladesh. This study employed zonal approach of the travel cost method. The work is grounded on a sample of 422 visitors of the LNP. Results showed that the total value of environmental assets of the LNP is 55,694,173 Taka/Year. Moreover, our suggestion based on visitors...

  8. Tick-borne encephalitis: What travelers should know when visiting an endemic country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrdle, Aleš; Chmelík, Václav; Růžek, Daniel

    2016-10-02

    Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) is an acute febrile illness with neurological manifestations that is prevalent in forested areas of moderate climate in Europe and Asia. TBE virus is transmitted by ticks and rarely by unpasteurized milk and dairy products. The disease burden is attributed mainly to resulting long-term disability, especially in individuals over 50 y of age. Currently, there is no causative treatment, but a very effective vaccination is available with a good safety profile. The vaccination requires 3 basic doses to be fully effective and regular boosters afterwards. An accelerated vaccination schedule enables a patient to reach reasonably protective titres within 3 to 4 weeks from the first injection. The risk of travel-related TBE is estimated to be less than the risk of acquiring typhoid fever while visiting highly endemic regions in South Asia, but more than the risk of acquiring Japanese encephalitis, meningococcal invasive disease, or rabies. The pre-travel risk assessment of acquiring TBE should consider known risk factors which include 1) the country and regions to be visited; 2) April to November season; 3) altitude less than 1500 m above the sea level; 4) duration of stay; 5) the extent of tick-exposure associated activities including leisure and professional outdoor activities within the endemic area; and 6) age and comorbidities of the traveler. A major challenge, however, is the very low awareness of the risk of contracting TBE in those who travel to industrialized European countries.

  9. GPS or travel diary: Comparing spatial and temporal characteristics of visits to fast food restaurants and supermarkets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Y Scully

    Full Text Available To assess differences between GPS and self-reported measures of location, we examined visits to fast food restaurants and supermarkets using a spatiotemporal framework. Data came from 446 participants who responded to a survey, filled out travel diaries of places visited, and wore a GPS receiver for seven consecutive days. Provided by Public Health Seattle King County, addresses from food permit data were matched to King County tax assessor parcels in a GIS. A three-step process was used to verify travel-diary reported visits using GPS records: (1 GPS records were temporally matched if their timestamps were within the time window created by the arrival and departure times reported in the travel diary; (2 the temporally matched GPS records were then spatially matched if they were located in a food establishment parcel of the same type reported in the diary; (3 the travel diary visit was then GPS-sensed if the name of food establishment in the parcel matched the one reported in the travel diary. To account for errors in reporting arrival and departure times, GPS records were temporally matched to three time windows: the exact time, +/- 10 minutes, and +/- 30 minutes. One third of the participants reported 273 visits to fast food restaurants; 88% reported 1,102 visits to supermarkets. Of these, 77.3 percent of the fast food and 78.6 percent supermarket visits were GPS-sensed using the +/-10-minute time window. At this time window, the mean travel-diary reported fast food visit duration was 14.5 minutes (SD 20.2, 1.7 minutes longer than the GPS-sensed visit. For supermarkets, the reported visit duration was 23.7 minutes (SD 18.9, 3.4 minutes longer than the GPS-sensed visit. Travel diaries provide reasonably accurate information on the locations and brand names of fast food restaurants and supermarkets participants report visiting.

  10. GPS or travel diary: Comparing spatial and temporal characteristics of visits to fast food restaurants and supermarkets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Jason Y; Vernez Moudon, Anne; Hurvitz, Philip M; Aggarwal, Anju; Drewnowski, Adam

    2017-01-01

    To assess differences between GPS and self-reported measures of location, we examined visits to fast food restaurants and supermarkets using a spatiotemporal framework. Data came from 446 participants who responded to a survey, filled out travel diaries of places visited, and wore a GPS receiver for seven consecutive days. Provided by Public Health Seattle King County, addresses from food permit data were matched to King County tax assessor parcels in a GIS. A three-step process was used to verify travel-diary reported visits using GPS records: (1) GPS records were temporally matched if their timestamps were within the time window created by the arrival and departure times reported in the travel diary; (2) the temporally matched GPS records were then spatially matched if they were located in a food establishment parcel of the same type reported in the diary; (3) the travel diary visit was then GPS-sensed if the name of food establishment in the parcel matched the one reported in the travel diary. To account for errors in reporting arrival and departure times, GPS records were temporally matched to three time windows: the exact time, +/- 10 minutes, and +/- 30 minutes. One third of the participants reported 273 visits to fast food restaurants; 88% reported 1,102 visits to supermarkets. Of these, 77.3 percent of the fast food and 78.6 percent supermarket visits were GPS-sensed using the +/-10-minute time window. At this time window, the mean travel-diary reported fast food visit duration was 14.5 minutes (SD 20.2), 1.7 minutes longer than the GPS-sensed visit. For supermarkets, the reported visit duration was 23.7 minutes (SD 18.9), 3.4 minutes longer than the GPS-sensed visit. Travel diaries provide reasonably accurate information on the locations and brand names of fast food restaurants and supermarkets participants report visiting.

  11. Travel characteristics and yellow fever vaccine usage among US Global TravEpiNet travelers visiting countries with risk of yellow fever virus transmission, 2009-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jentes, Emily S; Han, Pauline; Gershman, Mark D; Rao, Sowmya R; LaRocque, Regina C; Staples, J Erin; Ryan, Edward T

    2013-05-01

    Yellow fever (YF) vaccine-associated serious adverse events and changing YF epidemiology have challenged healthcare providers to vaccinate only travelers whose risk of YF during travel is greater than their risk of adverse events. We describe the travel characteristics and YF vaccine use among US travelers visiting Global TravEpiNet clinics from January of 2009 to March of 2011. Of 16,660 travelers, 5,588 (34%) had itineraries to areas with risk of YF virus transmission. Of those travelers visiting one country with YF risk (N = 4,517), 71% were vaccinated at the visit, and 20% were presumed to be immune from prior vaccination. However, travelers visiting friends and relatives (odds ratio [OR] = 2.57, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 1.27-5.22) or going to Nigeria (OR = 3.01, 95% CI = 1.37-6.62) were significantly more likely to decline vaccination. To optimize YF vaccine use, clinicians should discuss an individual's risk-benefit assessment of vaccination and close knowledge gaps regarding vaccine use among at-risk populations.

  12. Travel Characteristics and Yellow Fever Vaccine Usage Among US Global TravEpiNet Travelers Visiting Countries with Risk of Yellow Fever Virus Transmission, 2009–2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jentes, Emily S.; Han, Pauline; Gershman, Mark D.; Rao, Sowmya R.; LaRocque, Regina C.; Staples, J. Erin; Ryan, Edward T.

    2013-01-01

    Yellow fever (YF) vaccine-associated serious adverse events and changing YF epidemiology have challenged healthcare providers to vaccinate only travelers whose risk of YF during travel is greater than their risk of adverse events. We describe the travel characteristics and YF vaccine use among US travelers visiting Global TravEpiNet clinics from January of 2009 to March of 2011. Of 16,660 travelers, 5,588 (34%) had itineraries to areas with risk of YF virus transmission. Of those travelers visiting one country with YF risk (N = 4,517), 71% were vaccinated at the visit, and 20% were presumed to be immune from prior vaccination. However, travelers visiting friends and relatives (odds ratio [OR] = 2.57, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 1.27–5.22) or going to Nigeria (OR = 3.01, 95% CI = 1.37–6.62) were significantly more likely to decline vaccination. To optimize YF vaccine use, clinicians should discuss an individual's risk–benefit assessment of vaccination and close knowledge gaps regarding vaccine use among at-risk populations. PMID:23458961

  13. Arboviral and other illnesses in travellers returning from Brazil, June 2013 to May 2016: implications for the 2016 Olympic and Paralympic Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautret, Philippe; Mockenhaupt, Frank; Grobusch, Martin P; Rothe, Camilla; von Sonnenburg, Frank; van Genderen, Perry J; Chappuis, Francois; Asgeirsson, Hilmir; Caumes, Eric; Bottieau, Emmanuel; Malvy, Denis; Lopez-Vélez, Rogelio; Jensenius, Mogens; Larsen, Carsten Schade; Castelli, Francesco; Rapp, Christophe; Field, Vanessa; Molina, Israel; Gkrania-Klotsas, Effrossyni; Florescu, Simin; Lalloo, David; Schlagenhauf, Patricia

    2016-07-07

    We evaluated EuroTravNet (a GeoSentinel subnetwork) data from June 2013 to May 2016 on 508 ill travellers returning from Brazil, to inform a risk analysis for Europeans visiting the 2016 Olympic and Paralympic Games in Brazil. Few dengue fever cases (n = 3) and no cases of chikungunya were documented during the 2013-15 Brazilian winter months, August and September, the period when the Games will be held. The main diagnoses were dermatological (37%), gastrointestinal (30%), febrile systemic illness (29%) and respiratory (11%). This article is copyright of The Authors, 2016.

  14. Rabies post-exposure prophylaxis in travellers returning from Bali, Indonesia, November 2008 to March 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautret, P; Lim, P L; Shaw, M; Leder, K

    2011-03-01

    Since 2008, when the outbreak of rabies in Bali began, 45 patients have attended GeoSentinel or EuroTravNet sites for rabies post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP), representing 12.6% of all travellers seen for PEP in all network clinics during the same time period. This suggests that Bali is emerging as a commonly visited destination among travellers presenting for rabies PEP. The data demonstrate that the majority of animal-related injuries in travellers returning from Bali are associated with exposure to monkeys, and not dog bites/scratches. The clinical implications of this are discussed. © 2010 The Authors. Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2010 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  15. [Characteristics associated with pre travel medical consultation in tourists visiting Cuzco, Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia, Christian R; Cvetkovic-Vega, Aleksandar; Cruz, Briggite; Cárdenas, Matlin M; Quiñones-Laveriano, Dante M; Rodríguez-Morales, Alfonso J

    2016-02-01

    International tourism is increasing. Preventive Medicine remains important, especially the Pre-Travel Consultation (PTC). To determinate, the characteristics of tourists associated with PTC in tourists at Cuzco, Peru. A cross-sectional, analytical study, a secondary analysis of data from a database generated by survey of foreign tourists who visited Cuzco, in the waiting room of the airport was performed. The main variable was to have had a PTC at the tourist's country of residence, the area of residence was categorized according to health/risk of acquiring infectious diseases as traveler's diarrhea during their stay. These and other variables were analyzed and statistical association with generalized linear models were done. Of the 1827 tourists, 875 (48%) were men, with a median age of 33 years (range 18-88 years); 42% had a PTC. In the multivariate analysis, it was found that a PTC lower frequency was associated with male gender (aPR: 0.84; 95% CI: 0.75-0.94), and a higher frequency was associated with have born (aPR: 1.77; 95% CI: 1.39-2.27) and reside in an area of low risk of acquiring infectious diseases (aPR: 1.95; 95% CI: 1.26-3.00), adjusted for the history of a disease. Sex, region of birth and residence of tourists (as risk of acquiring infectious diseases) are associated with having a PTC. These findings may serve the health and government attending tourists who come to our country.

  16. GPS or travel diary: Comparing spatial and temporal characteristics of visits to fast food restaurants and supermarkets

    OpenAIRE

    Scully, Jason Y.; Vernez Moudon, Anne; Hurvitz, Philip M.; Aggarwal, Anju; Drewnowski, Adam

    2017-01-01

    To assess differences between GPS and self-reported measures of location, we examined visits to fast food restaurants and supermarkets using a spatiotemporal framework. Data came from 446 participants who responded to a survey, filled out travel diaries of places visited, and wore a GPS receiver for seven consecutive days. Provided by Public Health Seattle King County, addresses from food permit data were matched to King County tax assessor parcels in a GIS. A three-step process was used to v...

  17. Constraints to leisure travel and visitation to natural areas: An international comparison of four cities.In: Chavez, Deborah J.; Winter, Patricia L.; Absher, James D., eds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick T. Tierney; Deborah J. Chavez; James D. Absher

    2008-01-01

    Leisure travel and visitation to natural areas and constraints to undertaking these activities are important concerns for recreation resource managers and tourism businesses. Surveys were administered to Los Angeles, Barcelona, Glasgow, and Morelia, Mexico, residents to ascertain leisure travel and undeveloped natural area visitation levels and constraints. A...

  18. Effects of travel cost and participation in recreational activities on national forest visits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong-Hoon Cho; J.M. Bowker; Donald B.K. English; Roland K. Roberts; Taeyoung Kim

    2014-01-01

    In the face of higher travel costs due to rising gasoline prices and scarce budget resources,we explored differences in the impacts of travel costs on recreational demand for visitors participating in various recreational activities. Five individual travel cost models were estimated, one for each of 5 national forests (i.e., Allegheny, Coconino, Mount Baker-Snoqualmie...

  19. Role of Travel Motivations, Perceived Risks and Travel Constraints on Destination Image and Visit Intention in Medical Tourism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammad J.; Chelliah, Shankar; Haron, Mahmod S.; Ahmed, Sahrish

    2017-01-01

    Travel motivations, perceived risks and travel constraints, along with the attributes and characteristics of medical tourism destinations, are important issues in medical tourism. Although the importance of these factors is already known, a comprehensive theoretical model of the decision-making process of medical tourists has yet to be established, analysing the intricate relationships between the different variables involved. This article examines a large body of literature on both medical and conventional tourism in order to propose a comprehensive theoretical framework of medical tourism decision-making. Many facets of this complex phenomenon require further empirical investigation. PMID:28417022

  20. Role of Travel Motivations, Perceived Risks and Travel Constraints on Destination Image and Visit Intention in Medical Tourism: Theoretical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammad J; Chelliah, Shankar; Haron, Mahmod S; Ahmed, Sahrish

    2017-02-01

    Travel motivations, perceived risks and travel constraints, along with the attributes and characteristics of medical tourism destinations, are important issues in medical tourism. Although the importance of these factors is already known, a comprehensive theoretical model of the decision-making process of medical tourists has yet to be established, analysing the intricate relationships between the different variables involved. This article examines a large body of literature on both medical and conventional tourism in order to propose a comprehensive theoretical framework of medical tourism decision-making. Many facets of this complex phenomenon require further empirical investigation.

  1. Role of Travel Motivations, Perceived Risks and Travel Constraints on Destination Image and Visit Intention in Medical Tourism; Theoretical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad J. Khan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Travel motivations, perceived risks and travel constraints, along with the attributes and characteristics of medical tourism destinations, are important issues in medical tourism. Although the importance of these factors is already known, a comprehensive theoretical model of the decision-making process of medical tourists has yet to be established, analysing the intricate relationships between the different variables involved. This article examines a large body of literature on both medical and conventional tourism in order to propose a comprehensive theoretical framework of medical tourism decision-making. Many facets of this complex phenomenon require further empirical investigation.

  2. Multicenter EuroTravNet/GeoSentinel Study of Travel-related Infectious Diseases in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautret, Philippe; Schlagenhauf, Patricia; Gaudart, Jean; Castelli, Francesco; Brouqui, Philippe; von Sonnenburg, Frank; Loutan, Louis

    2009-01-01

    We analyzed prospective data on 17,228 European patients who sought treatment at GeoSentinel sites from 1997 to 2007. Gastrointestinal illness (particularly in tourists), fever (those visiting friends and relatives [VFRs]), and skin disorders (in tourists) were the most common reasons for seeking medical care. Diagnoses varied by country of origin, region visited, or categories of travelers. VFRs who returned from sub-Saharan Africa and Indian Ocean islands were more likely to experience falciparum malaria than any other group. Multiple correspondence analysis identified Italian, French, and Swiss VFRs and expatriate travelers to sub-Saharan Africa and Indian Ocean Islands as most likely to exhibit febrile illnesses. German tourists to Southeast and south-central Asia were most likely to seek treatment for acute diarrhea. Non-European travelers (12,663 patients from other industrialized countries) were less likely to acquire certain travel-associated infectious diseases. These results should be considered in the practice of travel medicine and development of health recommendations for European travelers. PMID:19891866

  3. Educating international students about tuberculosis and infections associated with travel to visit friends and relatives (VFR-travel).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibney, Katherine B; Brass, Amanda; Hume, Sam C; Leder, Karin

    2014-01-01

    International students in Victoria, Australia, originate from over 140 different countries. They are over-represented in disease notifications for tuberculosis and travel-associated infections, including enteric fever, hepatitis A, and malaria. We describe a public health initiative aimed to increase awareness of these illnesses among international students and their support staff. We identified key agencies including student support advisors, medical practitioners, health insurers, and government and professional organisations. We developed health education materials targeting international students regarding tuberculosis and travel-related infections to be disseminated via a number of different media, including electronic and printed materials. We sought informal feedback from personnel in all interested agencies regarding the materials developed, their willingness to deliver these materials to international students, and their preferred media for disseminating these materials. Education institutions with dedicated international student support staff and on-campus health clinics were more easily engaged to provide feedback and disseminate the health education materials than institutions without such dedicated personnel. Response to contacting off-campus medical practices was poor. Delivery of educational materials via electronic and social media was preferred over face-to-face education. It is feasible to provide health education messages targeting international students for dissemination via appropriately-staffed educational institutions. This initiative could be expanded in terms of age-group, geographic range, and health issues to be targeted. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A Study of Tourist Perceptions of Overseas Travel Stress While Visiting Bangkok, Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Adarsh Batra

    2011-01-01

    Traveling has long been considered one of the best ways to release the stress caused by work and life. But in fact, uncertainties and negative experiences can break down the benefits and may make travelers feel stressed. A considerable amount of literature in tourism focuses on topic areas like destination building, market operation, and consumer satisfaction, but ignores one important aspect which negates many of the positive benefits of tourism—stress. Thus, the main purpose of this study...

  5. Retrospective search for dengue vector mosquito Aedes albopictus in areas visited by a German traveler who contracted dengue in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutsuo Kobayashi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A German traveler developed dengue fever in late August 2013, following a direct flight from Germany. Autochthonous dengue virus (DENV infection has not been reported in Japan. To evaluate the risk of autochthonous DENV transmission in Japan, the authors performed a retrospective search of the five areas visited by the German patient to determine the population density of dengue vector mosquito, Aedes albopictus. The annual mean temperature of each area was higher than 12 °C, which is considered suitable for the establishment of A. albopictus populations. Our retrospective search revealed the population density of A. albopictus to be high in the urban areas of Japan.

  6. Tick-borne encephalitis: What travelers should know when visiting an endemic country

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chrdle, A.; Chmelík, V.; Růžek, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 10 (2016), s. 2694-2699 ISSN 2164-5515 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NV16-34238A Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : endemic country * flavivirus * tick-borne encephalitis * tick-borne encephalitis virus * travel medicine * vaccination Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.157, year: 2016

  7. Profile of illness in Syrian refugees: A GeoSentinel analysis, 2013 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mockenhaupt, Frank P; Barbre, Kira A; Jensenius, Mogens; Larsen, Carsten S; Barnett, Elizabeth D; Stauffer, William; Rothe, Camilla; Asgeirsson, Hilmir; Hamer, Davidson H; Esposito, Douglas H; Gautret, Philippe; Schlagenhauf, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Screening of 488 Syrian unaccompanied minor refugees (Syrian refugees examined at GeoSentinel clinics worldwide, cutaneous leishmaniasis affected one in three patients; other noteworthy infections were active tuberculosis (11%) and chronic hepatitis B or C (9%). These data can contribute to evidence-based guidelines for infectious disease screening of Syrian refugees.

  8. Predictors for the Uptake of Recommended Vaccinations in Mecca Travelers Who Visited the Public Health Service Amsterdam for Mandatory Meningitis Vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keles, Havva; Sonder, Gerard J. B.; van den Hoek, Anneke

    2011-01-01

    Methods. We extracted all data from the PHS database pertaining to Muslims who visited the clinic before travel to Mecca. From 2001 to 2009, the characteristics are described and trends are analyzed retrospectively. Acceptance of dTP vaccine was used as a proxy for acceptance of recommended

  9. Travelling

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    homes very soon becomes a misplaced sentiment. However well planned a journey may be and how- ever important and tiring the attendances at meet- ings are, at some stage of every day the traveller finds himself in an hotel room and loneliness starts closing in from all four walls. No matter how luxu- rious the hotel may ...

  10. Environmental hazards in Nepal: altitude illness, environmental exposures, injuries, and bites in travelers and expatriates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggild, Andrea K; Costiniuk, Cecilia; Kain, Kevin C; Pandey, Prativa

    2007-01-01

    Adventure travel necessarily places travelers at risk of environmental hazards. We assessed the burden of "environmental" hazards among a cohort of travelers and expatriates presenting to a large travel clinic in Nepal. Data on travelers and expatriates seen at the Canadian International Water and Energy Consultants (CIWEC) clinic in Kathmandu were prospectively collected and entered into the GeoSentinel Surveillance Network database. Data on individuals receiving predefined diagnoses related to environmental hazards were extracted and analyzed. Of 10,499 travelers and 4,854 expatriates in the database, 2,160 were diagnosed with 2,533 environment-related illnesses. Injuries were common among both travelers and expatriates [N= 788 (6.1%) and 328 (4.9%), respectively], while altitude illness was seen almost exclusively in travelers [N= 611 (4.7%) vs N= 8 (0.1%)]. Factors independently associated with environmental diagnoses include male gender (p tourism (p educational impact in others.

  11. Visiting Astronomers Travel Guide | CTIO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norwegian Persian Polish Portuguese Punjabi Romanian Russian Serbian Sesotho Sinhala Slovak Slovenian Somali Marathi Mongolian Myanmar (Burmese) Nepali Norwegian Persian Polish Portuguese Punjabi Romanian Russian

  12. Travelers' diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett-Connor, E

    1973-03-01

    On the average, one-fourth of North Americans visiting developing countries experience a self-limited diarrheal illness that interferes with holiday or business activities. Recent work suggests that these episodes are caused by a small inoculum of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli which are common in the country visited and rare in the country of origin. Neither antimicrobial treatment nor anti-diarrheal agents have proven benefit once the illness has begun. Despite its frequent use, iodochlorhydroxyquin has not been shown in double blind studies to be effective as a preventive agent, and may be dangerous. The status of furazolidone for prevention of tourist diarrhea is questionable. Both neomycin sulfate and phythalylsulfathiazole have demonstrated efficacy as chemoprophylactics in Mexico. However, their use should be restricted to limited types of travel and travelers. General admonitions concerning avoidance of certain ingestibles are recommended; despite questionable value in preventing travelers' diarrhea such precautions may prevent more serious gastrointestinal illness.

  13. Influence of Host Interleukin-10 Polymorphisms on Development of Traveler's Diarrhea Due to Heat-Labile Enterotoxin-Producing Escherichia coli in Travelers from the United States Who Are Visiting Mexico▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Jose; DuPont, Herbert L.; Lee, Stephanie A.; Belkind-Gerson, Jaime; Paredes, Mercedes; Mohamed, Jamal A.; Armitige, Lisa Y.; Guo, Dong-Chuan; Okhuysen, Pablo C.

    2008-01-01

    Up to 60% of U.S. visitors to Mexico develop traveler's diarrhea (TD), mostly due to enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains that produce heat-labile (LT) and/or heat-stable (ST) enterotoxins. Distinct single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the interleukin-10 (IL-10) promoter have been associated with high, intermediate, or low production of IL-10. We conducted a prospective study to investigate the association of SNPs in the IL-10 promoter and the occurrence of TD in ETEC LT-exposed travelers. Sera from U.S. travelers to Mexico collected on arrival and departure were studied for ETEC LT seroconversion by using cholera toxin as the antigen. Pyrosequencing was performed to genotype IL-10 SNPs. Stools from subjects who developed diarrhea were also studied for other enteropathogens. One hundred twenty-one of 569 (21.3%) travelers seroconverted to ETEC LT, and among them 75 (62%) developed diarrhea. Symptomatic seroconversion was more commonly seen in subjects who carried a genotype producing high levels of IL-10; it was seen in 83% of subjects with the GG genotype versus 54% of subjects with the AA genotype at IL-10 gene position −1082 (P, 0.02), in 71% of those with the CC genotype versus 33% of those with the TT genotype at position −819 (P, 0.005), and in 71% of those with the CC genotype versus 38% of those with the AA genotype at position −592 (P, 0.02). Travelers with the GCC haplotype were more likely to have symptomatic seroconversion than those with the ATA haplotype (71% versus 38%; P, 0.002). Travelers genetically predisposed to produce high levels of IL-10 were more likely to experience symptomatic ETEC TD. PMID:18579697

  14. Influence of host interleukin-10 polymorphisms on development of traveler's diarrhea due to heat-labile enterotoxin-producing Escherichia coli in travelers from the United States who are visiting Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Jose; DuPont, Herbert L; Lee, Stephanie A; Belkind-Gerson, Jaime; Paredes, Mercedes; Mohamed, Jamal A; Armitige, Lisa Y; Guo, Dong-Chuan; Okhuysen, Pablo C

    2008-08-01

    Up to 60% of U.S. visitors to Mexico develop traveler's diarrhea (TD), mostly due to enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains that produce heat-labile (LT) and/or heat-stable (ST) enterotoxins. Distinct single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the interleukin-10 (IL-10) promoter have been associated with high, intermediate, or low production of IL-10. We conducted a prospective study to investigate the association of SNPs in the IL-10 promoter and the occurrence of TD in ETEC LT-exposed travelers. Sera from U.S. travelers to Mexico collected on arrival and departure were studied for ETEC LT seroconversion by using cholera toxin as the antigen. Pyrosequencing was performed to genotype IL-10 SNPs. Stools from subjects who developed diarrhea were also studied for other enteropathogens. One hundred twenty-one of 569 (21.3%) travelers seroconverted to ETEC LT, and among them 75 (62%) developed diarrhea. Symptomatic seroconversion was more commonly seen in subjects who carried a genotype producing high levels of IL-10; it was seen in 83% of subjects with the GG genotype versus 54% of subjects with the AA genotype at IL-10 gene position -1082 (P, 0.02), in 71% of those with the CC genotype versus 33% of those with the TT genotype at position -819 (P, 0.005), and in 71% of those with the CC genotype versus 38% of those with the AA genotype at position -592 (P, 0.02). Travelers with the GCC haplotype were more likely to have symptomatic seroconversion than those with the ATA haplotype (71% versus 38%; P, 0.002). Travelers genetically predisposed to produce high levels of IL-10 were more likely to experience symptomatic ETEC TD.

  15. Human travel and traveling bedbugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaunay, Pascal

    2012-12-01

    A dramatic increase of reported bedbug (Cimex lectularius and Cimex hemipterus) infestations has been observed worldwide over the past decade. Bedbug infestations have also been detected across a wide range of travel accommodations, regardless of their comfort and hygiene levels. Travelers are increasingly exposed to the risks of bedbug bites, infestation of personal belongings, and subsequent contamination of newly visited accommodations and their homes. We searched Medline publications via the PubMed database. National bedbug recommendations, textbooks, newspapers, and Centers for Disease Control websites were also searched manually. To detect infested sites, avoid or limit bedbug bites, and reduce the risk of contaminating one's belongings and home, bedbug biology and ecology must be understood. A detailed search of their most classic hiding niches is a key to finding adult bedbugs, nymphs, eggs, and feces or traces of blood from crushed bedbugs. Locally, bedbugs move by active displacement to feed (bite) during the night. Bed, mattress, sofa, and/or curtains are the most frequently infested places. If you find bedbugs, change your room or, even better, the hotel. Otherwise, travelers should follow recommendations for avoiding bedbugs and their bites during the night and apply certain simple rules to avoid infesting other sites or their home. Travelers exposed to bedbugs can minimize the risks of bites and infestation of their belongings, and must also do their civic duty to avoid contributing to the subsequent contamination of other hotels and, finally, home. © 2012 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  16. Visit safety

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Experiment areas, offices, workshops: it is possible to have co-workers or friends visit these places.     You already know about the official visits service, the VIP office, and professional visits. But do you know about the safety instruction GSI-OHS1, “Visits on the CERN site”? This is a mandatory General Safety Instruction that was created to assist you in ensuring safety for all your visits, whatever their nature—especially those that are non-official. Questions? The HSE Unit will be happy to answer them. Write to safety-general@cern.ch.   The HSE Unit

  17. Travel-related health problems in Japanese travelers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Yasutaka; Kudo, Koichiro

    2009-09-01

    Although the number of Japanese individuals traveling abroad has increased steadily, reaching approximately 17.3 million in 2007, the incidence of various travel-related health problems in Japan remains unknown. The travel-related health problems of Japanese travelers returning to Japan from abroad are analyzed by assessing the records. Data were collected retrospectively on returning travelers who visited the authors' travel clinic during the period from January 2005 through to December 2006 with any health problem acquired overseas. A total of 345 patients were included in this study (200 male, 145 female; average age, 34+/-12.3 years). Reasons for travel included leisure (45.8%); business (39.1%); visiting friends and relatives or accompanying other travelers (8.7%); volunteering (3.8%); and long stays in order to study or live (2.6%). The most visited destination was Asia (n=260), followed by Africa (n=105). The most commonly reported health problems were gastro-intestinal infections (39.1%), followed by respiratory tract infections (16.2%), animal bites (8.1%), and skin problems (5.8%). Together, malaria and dengue accounted for 10% of diagnoses in 125 febrile patients (36.2%). Although the profile of travel-related health problems in Japanese travelers is similar to that of Western travelers, the characteristics of travel were quite different. Therefore Japanese travel advice should be tailored to suit the Japanese traveler.

  18. Visit ISOLDE!

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2013-01-01

    CERN Internal Communication is organising a visit to ISOLDE – an opportunity for you to see the CERN set-up that can produce over 1000 different isotopes!   If you wish to participate, you can sign up for a visit by sending us an e-mail. Note that the visits will take place between 18 and 22 February, and will be open only to CERN access-card holders.   The visit will include an introduction by experts and a tour of the ISOLDE set-up. NB: For security reason, pregnant women and kids under the age of 16 can not take the tour.  

  19. Travel personae of American pleasure travelers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, S.; Tussyadiah, Iis; Mazanec, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Travel style has been shown to be a useful concept for understanding travelers. In this study it is argued that the portfolio of trips (specifically, the portfolio of various trip styles) one takes can be used to describe his/her overall travel persona. Network analysis was used to examine...... personae which, in turn, are related to their choices of places visited and their response to advertising materials. It was concluded that the framework provided by these findings along with new tools on the Internet offer the potential to develop highly personalized communications with existing...

  20. Visit Itinerary

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The visit itinerary includes five area of halls 191 and 180:. End-Cap Toroid Integration Area . Barrel Toroid Integration Area . Cryogenic Test Facility for Toroid Magnets and Helium Pumps . Liquid Argon Cryostats Assembly Area . Central Solenoid Magnet Test Station

  1. Croatian visit

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    On 11 December, President Stjepan Mesic of the Republic of Croatia visited CERN. He was welcomed by Director General, Robert Aymar, and the President of CERN Council, Maurice Bourquin. Afterwards he met, among others, the Directors of CERN and Croatian scientists working here. He finished his tour by visiting the underground cavern for the ATLAS experiment. The arrival at CERN of the President of the Republic of Croatia, Stjepan Mesic. In the first row, from left to right: Maurice Bourquin, President of CERN Council, Stjepan Mesic, President of the Republic of Croatia and Robert Aymar, Director General of CERN.

  2. Polish visit

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    On 6 October, Professor Michal Kleiber, Polish Minister of Science and Chairman of the State Committee for Scientific Research, visited CERN and met both the current and designated Director General, Luciano Maiani and Robert Aymar. Professor Kleiber visited the CMS and ATLAS detector assembly halls, the underground cavern for ATLAS, and the LHC superconducting magnet string test hall. Michal Kleiber (left), Polish minister of science and Jan Krolikowski, scientist at Warsaw University and working for CMS, who shows the prototypes of the Muon Trigger board of CMS.

  3. European visit

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The European Commissioner for Science and Research, Janez Potočnik, (on the right) visited the CMS assembly hall accompanied by Jim Virdee, Deputy Spokesman of CMS (on the left), and Robert Aymar, Director-General of CERN. The European Commissioner for Science and Research, Janez Potočnik, visited CERN on Tuesday 31 January. He was welcomed by the Director-General, Robert Aymar, who described the missions and current activities of CERN to him, in particular the realisation of the LHC with its three components: accelerator, detectors, storage and processing of data. The European Commissioner then visited the CMS assembly hall, then the hall for testing the LHC magnets and the ATLAS cavern. During this first visit since his appointment at the end of 2004, Janez Potočnik appeared very interested by the operation of CERN, an example of successful scientific co-operation on a European scale. The many projects (30 on average) that CERN and the European Commission carry out jointly for the benefit of res...

  4. Characteristics and pre-travel preparation of travelers at a Canadian pediatric tertiary care travel clinic: A retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiao Wei; Pell, Lisa G; Akseer, Nadia; Khan, Sarah; Lam, Ray E; Louch, Debra; Science, Michelle; Morris, Shaun K

    2016-01-01

    International travelers are susceptible to a wide spectrum of travel related morbidities. Despite rising number of international travelers in Canada, the demographics, risk profiles, and preventative strategies of high-risk traveler groups, including pediatric travelers visiting friends and relatives (VFRs) are not well described. A descriptive analysis was conducted on pre-travel consultations completed between January 2013 and August 2014 at a large pediatric tertiary care center in Toronto, Canada. Data on demographics, travel characteristics, and pre-travel interventions were extracted from 370 pre-travel consultations. Results were compared between all VFR and non-VFR travelers, as well as between children traveling to visit friends and relatives, for vacation, and for education and/or volunteer purposes. Forty-eight percent of consultations were for children travel to visit friends and/or relatives than for other purposes (29% vs 9%, p travel for >28 days than children traveling for vacation (43% vs 1%, p traveling for education/volunteer purposes (43% vs 21%, p = 0.03). Around half of cVFRs traveled to destinations in Asia (51%). The majority stayed with locals, friends and/or relatives (85%), and nearly all traveled to urban destinations (98%). The most prescribed interventions for children were azithromycin (84%), Dukoral (66%), and the hepatitis A vaccine (60%). Atovaquone/proguanil was the most commonly prescribed antimalarial for children. Children that travel to visit friends and relatives represent a unique travel group and may require specific considerations during pre-travel preparations. Our findings can help develop targeted pre-travel strategies for children VFRs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Cosmic visits

    CERN Multimedia

    Stefania Pandolfi

    2015-01-01

    On Saturday, 19 September, ESA astronaut Luca Parmitano and Amalia Ercoli Finzi, Principal Investigator of the SD2 experiment on board the ESA Rosetta spacecraft, visited the AMS Control Centre and other CERN installations.   From left to right: Sergio Bertolucci (CERN Director of Research and Computing), Amalia Ercoli Finzi (Emeritus Professor in the Aerospace department of the Polytechnic University of Milan and Principal Investigator of the SD2 experiment on board the ESA Rosetta spacecraft), Maurice Bourquin (AMS-02 Senior Scientist and Honorary Professor in the Nuclear and Corpuscular Physics department of the University of Geneva) and Luca Parmitano (Major in the Italian Air Force and European Space Agency astronaut) in the AMS Payload and Operation Control Centre. They were welcomed in the early morning by Sergio Bertolucci and then headed to the Prévessin site to visit the CERN Control Centre and the Payload and Operation Control Centre (POCC) of the Alpha Magnetic Sp...

  6. Armenian visit

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    During his visit to CERN on 4 July 2003, Karen Chshmaritian, Armenian Minister for Trade and Economic Development, toured the ATLAS experimental cavern and assembly hall. From left to right: Aram Kotzinian, from the international organization JINR from Dubna, Marzio Nessi from ATLAS, Karen Chshmaritian, Armenian Minister for Trade and Economic Development, Zohrab Mnatsakanian, Ambassador at the Permanent Mission of the Republic of Armenia to the United Nations in Geneva, Alexandre Sissakian, Vice-Director of JINR and Peter Jenni, ATLAS spokesman.

  7. Trends and characteristics among HIV-infected and diabetic travelers seeking pre-travel advice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfrink, Floor; van den Hoek, Anneke; Sonder, Gerard J B

    2014-01-01

    The number of individuals with a chronic disease increases. Better treatment options have improved chronic patients' quality of life, likely increasing their motivation for travel. This may have resulted in a change in the number of HIV-infected travelers and/or travelers with Diabetes Mellitus (DM) visiting our travel clinic. We retrospectively analyzed the database of the travel clinic of the Public Health Service Amsterdam, between January 2001 and December 2011 and examined the records for patients with these conditions. Of the 25,000 travelers who consult our clinic annually, the proportion of travelers with HIV or DM has increased significantly. A total of 564 HIV-infected travelers visited our clinic. The mean age was 41 years, 86% were male, 43% visited a yellow fever endemic country and 46.5% had a CD4 count Travelers with low CD4 counts traveled significantly more often to visit friends or relatives. A total of 3704 diabetics visited our clinic. The mean age was 55 years, 52% were male, 27% visited a yellow fever endemic country and 36% were insulin-dependent. Insulin-dependent diabetics traveled more often for work than non-insulin-dependent diabetics. Adequately trained and qualified travel health professionals and up-to-date guidelines for travelers with chronic diseases are of increasing importance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Spanish Visit

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    On 23 January, CERN welcomed a visit by Pedro Morenés Eulate, Spanish Secretary of State for Scientific and Technological Policy. He was taken on a tour of the LHC Superconducting test facility, the CMS magnet assembly hall and the civil engineering works at Point 5. After a brief presentation on the AMS (Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer) experiment, delivered by Sam Ting, and lunch hosted by Director General Robert Aymar, he continued his tour of the ATLAS assembly hall and the ISOLDE experimental hall. Pedro Morenés finished his visit by meeting with the Spanish scientific community working at CERN. From left to right: Juan-Antonio Rubio, CERN, Responsible for the Education & Communication, Technology transfer and Scientific Information groups; Gonzalo León, General Secretary of the Spanish Ministry; Joaquín Pérez-Villanueva y Tovar, Ambassador, Permanent Representative of Spain to the United Nations Office; Robert Aymar, CERN Director General; Maria-José Garcia-Borge, ISOLDE and NTOF, CSIC Madrid Tea...

  9. Travel health prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzeniewski, Krzysztof

    All around the world there has been a rapid growth in the number of international travels. According to the World Tourism Organisation the number of international tourist arrivals reached 1,235 billion in 2016 and continues to grow at a high rate. This has been much due to the development of air transport (including low-cost airlines), increasingly common economic migration, a growing number of travellers visiting friends and relatives, and an increase in medical tourism. With tropical destinations becoming increasingly popular among travellers, doctors have seen a rising number of patients who seek medical advice on health risks prevalent in hot countries and health prevention measures to be taken in tropical destinations, especially where sanitation is poor. The risk for developing a medical condition while staying abroad depends on a variety of factors, including the traveller's general health condition, health prevention measures taken before or during travel (vaccinations, antimalarial chemoprophylaxis, health precautions during air, road and sea travel, proper acclimatisation, prevention of heat injuries, protection against local flora and fauna, personal hygiene, water, food and feeding hygiene), as well as the prevalence of health risk factors in a given location. Health prevention is a precondition for safe travel and maintaining good physical health; in the era of a rapid growth in international tourism it has become of key importance for all travellers.

  10. Stennis visits Lake Cormorant school

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Alexis Harry, assistant director of Astro Camp at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center, talks with students at Lake Cormorant (Miss.) Elementary School during a 'Living and Working in Space' presentation March 30. Stennis hosted the school presentation during a visit to the Oxford area. Harry, who also is a high school biology teacher in Slidell, La., spent time discussing space travel with students and answering questions they had about the experience, including queries about how astronauts eat, sleep and drink in space. The presentation was sponsored by the NASA Office of External Affairs and Education at Stennis. For more information about NASA education initiatives, visit: http://education.ssc.nasa.gov/.

  11. Travel expenses

    OpenAIRE

    Pištěková, Petra

    2014-01-01

    The thesis "Travel expenses" is dedicated to the travel expenses according to Czech legislation. The aim is to describe the travel reimbursement and to analyze the providing of compensation travel expenses on example of the elementary art school Zruč nad Sázavou. The purpose of this analysis is primarily to find an optimal solution to the problem of determining the place of regular workplace for the travel expenses. The theoretical part focuses on the identification and definition of all prin...

  12. Travel medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aw, Brian; Boraston, Suni; Botten, David; Cherniwchan, Darin; Fazal, Hyder; Kelton, Timothy; Libman, Michael; Saldanha, Colin; Scappatura, Philip; Stowe, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To define the practice of travel medicine, provide the basics of a comprehensive pretravel consultation for international travelers, and assist in identifying patients who might require referral to travel medicine professionals. Sources of information Guidelines and recommendations on travel medicine and travel-related illnesses by national and international travel health authorities were reviewed. MEDLINE and EMBASE searches for related literature were also performed. Main message Travel medicine is a highly dynamic specialty that focuses on pretravel preventive care. A comprehensive risk assessment for each individual traveler is essential in order to accurately evaluate traveler-, itinerary-, and destination-specific risks, and to advise on the most appropriate risk management interventions to promote health and prevent adverse health outcomes during travel. Vaccinations might also be required and should be personalized according to the individual traveler’s immunization history, travel itinerary, and the amount of time available before departure. Conclusion A traveler’s health and safety depends on a practitioner’s level of expertise in providing pretravel counseling and vaccinations, if required. Those who advise travelers are encouraged to be aware of the extent of this responsibility and to refer all high-risk travelers to travel medicine professionals whenever possible. PMID:25500599

  13. Connected Traveler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-06-01

    The Connected Traveler framework seeks to boost the energy efficiency of personal travel and the overall transportation system by maximizing the accuracy of predicted traveler behavior in response to real-time feedback and incentives. It is anticipated that this approach will establish a feedback loop that 'learns' traveler preferences and customizes incentives to meet or exceed energy efficiency targets by empowering individual travelers with information needed to make energy-efficient choices and reducing the complexity required to validate transportation system energy savings. This handout provides an overview of NREL's Connected Traveler project, including graphics, milestones, and contact information.

  14. Intergalactic Travel Bureau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koski, Olivia; Rosin, Mark; Guerilla Science Team

    2014-03-01

    The Intergalactic Travel Bureau is an interactive theater outreach experience that engages the public in the incredible possibilities of space tourism. The Bureau is staffed by professional actors, who play the role of space travel agents, and professional astrophysicists, who play the role of resident scientists. Members of the public of all ages were invited to visit with bureau staff to plan the vacation of their dreams-to space. We describe the project's successful nine day run in New York in August 2013. Funded by the American Physical Society Public Outreach and Informing the Public Grants.

  15. [Pre-travel advice and patient education of Hungarian travellers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengyel, Ingrid; Felkai, Péter

    2018-03-01

    , our survey clearly points out the importance of the propagation of doctor's advice before trips, even if the travellers visit exclusively non-endemic countries like the European Union. Orv Hetil. 2018; 159(9): 357-362.

  16. About an Optimal Visiting Problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagagiolo, Fabio, E-mail: bagagiol@science.unitn.it; Benetton, Michela [Unversita di Trento, Dipartimento di Matematica (Italy)

    2012-02-15

    In this paper we are concerned with the optimal control problem consisting in minimizing the time for reaching (visiting) a fixed number of target sets, in particular more than one target. Such a problem is of course reminiscent of the famous 'Traveling Salesman Problem' and brings all its computational difficulties. Our aim is to apply the dynamic programming technique in order to characterize the value function of the problem as the unique viscosity solution of a suitable Hamilton-Jacobi equation. We introduce some 'external' variables, one per target, which keep in memory whether the corresponding target is already visited or not, and we transform the visiting problem in a suitable Mayer problem. This fact allows us to overcome the lacking of the Dynamic Programming Principle for the originary problem. The external variables evolve with a hysteresis law and the Hamilton-Jacobi equation turns out to be discontinuous.

  17. Travel risk behaviors as a determinants of receiving pre-travel health consultation and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shady, Ibrahim; Gaafer, Mohammed; Bassiony, Lamiaa

    2015-01-01

    An estimated 30-60 % of travelers experience an illness while traveling. The incidence of travel-related illness can be reduced by preventive measures such as those provided by the Traveler Health Clinic (THC) in Kuwait. The present study is an analytical comparative study between groups of travelers visiting the THC during the study period (May 2009 - December 2010) and an age- and gender-matched control group of non-visitors (800 people). Both groups completed a modified pre-departure questionnaire. Bivariate analysis revealed that Kuwaitis (68.2 %), those traveling for work (25.3 %) or leisure (59.5 %), those living in camps (20.4 %) or hotels (64.0 %), and those with knowledge of the THC from the media (28.1 %) or other sources (57.3 %), were more likely to be associated with a high frequency of visits to the THC ( p  travelers heading to Africa (47 %) and South America (10 %) visited the THC more than did others ( P  travel, duration of stay, and choice of travel destination are independent predictors of receiving pre-travel consultation from the THC. Nationality, purpose of travel, length of stay, and travel destination are predictors for receiving a pre-travel consultation from the THC.

  18. Risk factors and pre-travel healthcare of international travellers attending a Dutch travel clinic: a cross-sectional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieten, Rosanne W; van der Schalie, Maurice; Visser, Benjamin J; Grobusch, Martin P; van Vugt, Michèle

    2014-01-01

    The number of international travellers is currently estimated to exceed one billion annually. To address travel related health risks and facilitate risk reduction strategies, detailed knowledge of travellers' characteristics is important. In this cross-sectional study, data of a 20% sample of travellers visiting the Academic Medical Center (AMC) travel clinic Amsterdam from July 2011 to July 2012 was collected. Itineraries and protection versus exposure rates of preventable infectious diseases were mapped and reported according to STROBE guidelines. 1749 travellers were included. South-Eastern Asia, South-America and West-Africa were most frequently visited. 26.2% of the population had pre-existing medical conditions (often cardiovascular). Young and VFR travellers had a longer median travel time (28 and 30 days) compared to the overall population (21 days). Young adult travellers were relatively often vaccinated against hepatitis B (43.9% vs. 20.5%, p travellers. Pre-travel guidelines were well adhered to. Young adult travellers had high-risk itineraries but were adequately protected. Improvement of hepatitis B and rabies protection would be desirable, specifically for VFRs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Travel Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Search the Division of Finance site DOF State of Alaska Finance Home Content Area Accounting Charge Cards Top Department of Administration logo Alaska Department of Administration Division of Finance Search You are here Administration / Finance / Travel Travel The Department of Administration administers the

  20. Good information cuts medical risk of travel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clyde, J.D.

    1996-01-01

    Today the oil industry is seeking exploration, production, and business opportunities around the globe. A result is that its employees are traveling more and visiting distant and remote locations. This travel significantly increases the level of their exposure to illness and accident. This paper discusses the information needs for oil company personnel which will be visiting foreign countries. It describes the medical preparation, immunizations, sanitary conditions, medical facilities, auto accidents, and other hazards which should be known about

  1. Japanese Visit CERN's Jardin d'Enfants

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    On 1 November twenty four Japanese teachers from the Association of Private Kindergartens in Osaka visited CERN’s Jardin d’Enfants to exchange experience and learn more about the Swiss educational system. The delegation was lead by Mrs. Nobuko Shirae, President of the Association, and Mr. Takeshi Kakimoto from the Japan Travel Bureau.

  2. Declining national park visitation: An economic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas H. Stevens; Thomas A. More; Marla. Markowski-Lindsay

    2014-01-01

    Visitation to the major nature-based national parks has been declining. This paper specifies an econometric model that estimates the relative impact of consumer incomes, travel costs, entry fees and other factors on per capita attendance from 1993 to 2010. Results suggest that entrance fees have had a statistically significant but small impact on per capita attendance...

  3. Arctic Visiting Speakers Series (AVS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, S. E.; Griswold, J.

    2011-12-01

    The Arctic Visiting Speakers (AVS) Series funds researchers and other arctic experts to travel and share their knowledge in communities where they might not otherwise connect. Speakers cover a wide range of arctic research topics and can address a variety of audiences including K-12 students, graduate and undergraduate students, and the general public. Host applications are accepted on an on-going basis, depending on funding availability. Applications need to be submitted at least 1 month prior to the expected tour dates. Interested hosts can choose speakers from an online Speakers Bureau or invite a speaker of their choice. Preference is given to individuals and organizations to host speakers that reach a broad audience and the general public. AVS tours are encouraged to span several days, allowing ample time for interactions with faculty, students, local media, and community members. Applications for both domestic and international visits will be considered. Applications for international visits should involve participation of more than one host organization and must include either a US-based speaker or a US-based organization. This is a small but important program that educates the public about Arctic issues. There have been 27 tours since 2007 that have impacted communities across the globe including: Gatineau, Quebec Canada; St. Petersburg, Russia; Piscataway, New Jersey; Cordova, Alaska; Nuuk, Greenland; Elizabethtown, Pennsylvania; Oslo, Norway; Inari, Finland; Borgarnes, Iceland; San Francisco, California and Wolcott, Vermont to name a few. Tours have included lectures to K-12 schools, college and university students, tribal organizations, Boy Scout troops, science center and museum patrons, and the general public. There are approximately 300 attendees enjoying each AVS tour, roughly 4100 people have been reached since 2007. The expectations for each tour are extremely manageable. Hosts must submit a schedule of events and a tour summary to be posted online

  4. A profile of travelers--an analysis from a large swiss travel clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bühler, Silja; Rüegg, Rolanda; Steffen, Robert; Hatz, Christoph; Jaeger, Veronika K

    2014-01-01

    Globally, the Swiss have one of the highest proportions of the population traveling to tropical and subtropical countries. Large travel clinics serve an increasing number of customers with specific pre-travel needs including uncommon destinations and preexisting medical conditions. This study aims to identify health characteristics and travel patterns of travelers seeking advice in the largest Swiss travel clinic so that tailored advice can be delivered. A descriptive analysis was performed on pre-travel visits between July 2010 and August 2012 at the Travel Clinic of the Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Zurich, Switzerland. A total of 22,584 travelers sought pre-travel advice. Tourism was the main reason for travel (17,875, 81.5%), followed by visiting friends and relatives (VFRs; 1,715, 7.8%), traveling for business (1,223, 5.6%), and "other reasons" (ie, volunteer work, pilgrimage, study abroad, and emigration; 1,112, 5.1%). The main travel destination was Thailand. In the VFR group, the highest proportions of traveling children (258, 15.1%) and of pregnant or breastfeeding women (23, 3.9%) were observed. Mental disorders were more prominent in VFRs (93, 5.4%) and in travel for "other reasons" (63, 5.7%). The latter stayed for the longest periods abroad; 272 (24.9%) stayed longer than 6 months. VFR travelers received the highest percentage of yellow fever vaccinations (523, 30.5%); in contrast, rabies (269, 24.2%) and typhoid vaccinations (279, 25.1%) were given more often to the "other travel reasons" group. New insights into the characteristics of a selected and large population of Swiss international travelers results in improved understanding of the special needs of an increasingly diverse population and, thus, in targeted preventive advice and interventions. © 2014 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  5. Travellers' diarrhoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericsson, Charles D

    2003-02-01

    Risk of travellers' diarrhoea is about 7% in developed countries and 20-50% in the developing world. Options for prevention include education and chemoprophylaxis. Vaccination is a promising but incomplete option. Achieving behaviour modification of food and water choices among tourists is difficult. Bismuth subsalicylate (BSS)-containing compounds are about 62% effective in the prevention of travellers' diarrhoea. Antibiotics are about 84% effective in preventing travellers' diarrhoea. Routine prophylaxis of travellers' diarrhoea, especially with antibiotics, should be discouraged. Oral rehydration is generally important in the treatment of diarrhoea, but travellers' diarrhoea is only infrequently dehydrating in adults. The addition of oral rehydration solutions confers no additional benefit to loperamide in the treatment of travellers' diarrhoea in adults. Presently, the most active of the antibiotics routinely available for treatment are members of the fluoroquinolone group. Antibiotics that are not absorbed such as aztreonam and a rifampicin-like agent, rifaximin, are both effective. The latter might become a therapy of choice once it is routinely available, due to predictably less adverse reactions with a non-absorbed antibiotic. Preliminary results with azithromycin look very promising. Less severe disease can be treated with a variety of non-antibiotic agents (e.g. BSS-containing compounds, loperamide and a calmodulin inhibitor, zaldaride). The combination of an antibiotic and loperamide is superior to treatment with either agent alone in a several studies and is arguably the treatment of choice for distressing travellers' diarrhoea.

  6. Travel itinerary uncertainty and the pre-travel consultation--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, Gerard; Md Nor, Muhammad Najmi

    2016-01-01

    Risk assessment relies on the accuracy of the information provided by the traveller. A questionnaire was administered to 83 consecutive travellers attending a travel medicine clinic. The majority of travellers was uncertain about destinations within countries, transportation or type of accommodation. Most travellers were uncertain if they would be visiting malaria regions. The degree of uncertainty about itinerary potentially impacts on the ability of the travel medicine specialist to perform an adequate risk assessment, select appropriate vaccinations and prescribe malaria prophylaxis. This study reveals high levels of traveller uncertainty about their itinerary which may potentially reduce the effectiveness of their pre-travel consultation. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of International society of travel medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. The Quadratic Selective Travelling Salesman Problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomadsen, Tommy; Stidsen, Thomas K.

    2003-01-01

    A well-known extension of the Travelling Salesman Problem (TSP) is the Selective TSP (STSP): Each node has an associated profit and instead of visiting all nodes, the most profitable set of nodes, taking into account the tour cost, is visited. The Quadratic STSP (QSTSP) adds the additional...

  8. Travelers' Diarrhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safety Road Safety - 8 Steps MERS Health Advisory poster MERS Pictogram CDC Guide for Healthy Travel Website ... alcohol-based hand sanitizer. In general, it’s a good idea to keep your hands away from your ...

  9. Travelers' Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 3, Avoid Nonessential Travel Health Infrastructure Breakdown in Venezuela May 15, 2018 More Alert Level 2, Practice ... Vision Using this Site Legal Link to Us Policies FOIA Accessibility Privacy No FEAR Act Inspector General ...

  10. Travelling Concepts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Karen-Margrethe

    2013-01-01

    Review of "Travelling Concepts, Metaphors, and Narratives: Literary and Cultural Studies in an Age of Interdisciplinary Research" ed. by Sibylle Baumgarten, Beatrice Michaelis and Ansagar Nünning, Trier; Wissenschaftlicher Verlag Trier, 2012......Review of "Travelling Concepts, Metaphors, and Narratives: Literary and Cultural Studies in an Age of Interdisciplinary Research" ed. by Sibylle Baumgarten, Beatrice Michaelis and Ansagar Nünning, Trier; Wissenschaftlicher Verlag Trier, 2012...

  11. HIV in elderly women after travelling abroad

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Sanne; Thorsteinsson, Kristina; David, Kim Peter

    2016-01-01

    We report two cases of HIV infection among female travellers of older age. A Danish woman in her eighties was diagnosed with acute HIV infection after travelling to West Africa. A sexual history was not recorded before her third hospital visit. A West African woman in her seventies who had been...... living in Denmark for 40 years was diagnosed with advanced HIV after having been to West Africa for family visits. We want to emphasize that women of older age also have sex that may put them at risk of HIV, that febrile returning travellers should be tested for HIV, and that presence of HIV indicator...

  12. Pre-Travel Health Preparation of Pediatric International Travelers: Analysis From the Global TravEpiNet Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagmann, Stefan; LaRocque, Regina C; Rao, Sowmya R; Jentes, Emily S; Sotir, Mark J; Brunette, Gary; Ryan, Edward T

    2013-12-01

    Children frequently travel internationally. Health-related data on such children are limited. We sought to investigate the demographics, health characteristics, and preventive interventions of outbound US international pediatric travelers. We analyzed data from 32 099 travelers presenting for pre-travel healthcare at the Global TravEpiNet (GTEN), a national consortium of 19 travel clinics, from January 1, 2009 to June 6, 2012. A total of 3332 (10%) of all GTEN travelers were children (traveled mostly for leisure (36%) or to visit friends or relatives (VFR) (36%). Most popular destination regions were Africa (41%), Southeast Asia (16%), Central America (16%), and the Caribbean (16%). Compared with children traveling for leisure, VFR children were more likely to present travel consultation (44% vs 28%), intended to travel for 28 days or longer (70% vs 22%), and to travel to Africa (62% vs 32%). Nearly half of the pediatric travelers (46%) received at least 1 routine vaccine, and most (83%) received at least 1 travel-related vaccine. Parents or guardians of one third of the children (30%) refused at least 1 recommended travel-related vaccine. Most pediatric travelers visiting a malaria-endemic country (72%) received a prescription for malaria chemoprophylaxis. Ten percent of travelers seeking pre-travel healthcare at GTEN sites are children. VFR-travel, pre-travel consultation close to time of departure, and refusal of recommended vaccines may place children at risk for travel-associated illness. Strategies to engage pediatric travelers in timely, pre-travel care and improve acceptance of pre-travel healthcare interventions are needed. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Travelers' Health: Rubella

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stamaril clinics Disease Directory Resources Resources for Travelers Adventure Travel Animal Safety Blood Clots Bug Bites Evite ... Minute Travel Long-Term Travel Mass Gatherings Medical Tourism Mental Health Motion Sickness Natural Disasters Pregnant Travelers ...

  14. SEGMENTING THE U.S.A. NON-TRAVEL MARKET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne W. Smith

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Tourism marketers focus on understanding the many different segments that comprise their visitors. Understanding these segments’ motivations for travel is important in order to motivate repeat visitation and to attract like-minded consumers to visit. But how about those who do not travel? This surprisingly large percentage of the population is a lost opportunity for the industry. The research that follows, based upon a very significant USA-based sample of non-travelers, suggests that non-travelers can be effectively segmented and targeted. Understanding these segments will better allow vacation marketers to craft their product and their message, hopefully bringing more travelers to the mix.

  15. Health risks, travel preparation, and illness among public health professionals during international travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaban, Victor; Warnock, Eli; Ramana Dhara, V; Jean-Louis, Lee Ann; Sotir, Mark J; Kozarsky, Phyllis

    2014-01-01

    Few data currently exist on health risks faced by public health professionals (PHP) during international travel. We conducted pre- and post-travel health surveys to assess knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP), and illnesses among PHP international travelers. Anonymous surveys were completed by PHP from a large American public health agency who sought a pre-travel medical consult from September 1, 2009, to September 30, 2010. Surveys were completed by 122 participants; travelers went to 163 countries. Of the 122 respondents, 97 (80%) reported at least one planned health risk activity (visiting rural areas, handling animals, contact with blood or body fluids, visiting malarious areas), and 50 (41%) reported exposure to unanticipated health risks. Of the 62 travelers who visited malarious areas, 14 (23%) reported inconsistent or no use of malaria prophylaxis. Illness during travel was reported by 33 (27%) respondents. Most of the PHP travelers in our study reported at least one planned health risk activity, and almost half reported exposure to unanticipated health risks, and one-quarter of travelers to malarious areas reported inconsistent or no use of malaria chemoprophylaxis. Our findings highlight that communication and education outreach for PHP to prevent travel-associated illnesses can be improved. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Demographics, health and travel characteristics of international travellers at a pre-travel clinic in Marseille, France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubry, Camille; Gaudart, Jean; Gaillard, Catherine; Delmont, Jean; Parola, Philippe; Brouqui, Philippe; Gautret, Philippe

    2012-09-01

    With the aim to identify at-risk individuals among a cohort of international travellers, 3442 individuals who sought advice at Marseille travel health centre in 2009 were prospectively included. Demographics, travel characteristics, chronic medical conditions, vaccinations and antimalarial chemoprophylaxis were documented. Chronic medical conditions were reported by 11% of individuals, including hypertension (39%), asthma (20%), thyroid disease (15%) and depression (13%). 4% reported taking a daily medication, and psychotropic and cardiovascular medications were the most commonly used. Older travellers (≥60 years) accounted for 10% of the travellers and the prevalence of chronic medical conditions was 27% in this group. Individuals aged 15 years or less accounted for 13% of the travellers. Age, last minute travel (17%) and neurological and psychiatric diseases were the most frequent factors that influenced Yellow fever vaccination and malaria chemoprophylaxis, with more than one tenth of the travellers reporting at least one risk factor for which adjusted advice may be necessary. Migrants visiting their relatives in their origin country accounted for 14% of travellers and 73% of this group travelled with their family including young children. We demonstrate that a significant proportion of travellers are at-risk (43%) because of their travel conditions (VFR), their age, or their health status, and should be targeted for risk reduction strategies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Malaria: prevention in travellers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, Ashley M

    2010-07-12

    Malaria transmission occurs most frequently in environments with humidity greater than 60% and ambient temperature of 25 °C to 30 °C. Risks increase with longer visits and depend on activity. Infection can follow a single mosquito bite. Incubation is usually 10 to 14 days but can be up to 18 months depending on the strain of parasite. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of non-drug preventive interventions in non-pregnant adult travellers? What are the effects of drug prophylaxis in non-pregnant adult travellers? What are the effects of antimalaria vaccines in adult and child travellers? What are the effects of antimalaria interventions in child travellers, pregnant travellers, and in airline pilots? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to November 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 79 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: aerosol insecticides, amodiaquine, air conditioning and electric fans, atovaquone-proguanil, biological control measures, chloroquine (alone or with proguanil), diethyltoluamide (DEET), dietary supplementation, doxycycline, electronic mosquito repellents, full-length and light-coloured clothing, insecticide-treated clothing/nets, mefloquine, mosquito coils and vapourising mats, primaquine, pyrimethamine-dapsone, pyrimethamine-sulfadoxine, smoke, topical (skin-applied) insect repellents, and vaccines.

  18. UK school visit: Alfriston School for girls

    CERN Multimedia

    Sophie Louise Hetherton

    2014-01-01

    Pupils with learning disabilities from Alfriston School in the UK visited the CMS detector last week. This visit was funded by the UK's Science and Technologies Facilities Council (STFC) as part of a grant awarded to support activities that will help to build the girls’ self-esteem and interest in physics.   Alfriston School students at CMS. On Friday, 10 October, pupils from Alfriston School – a UK secondary school catering for girls with a wide range of special educational needs and disabilities – paid a special visit to CERN. Dave Waterman, a science teacher at the school, recently received a Public Engagement Small Award from the STFC, which enabled the group of girls and accompanying teachers to travel to Switzerland and visit CERN. The awards form part of a project to boost the girls’ confidence and interest in physics. The aim is to create enthusiastic role models with first-hand experience of science who can inspire their peers back hom...

  19. Recommended vaccines for international travelers to India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Ramesh; Khanna, Pardeep; Chawla, Suraj

    2015-01-01

    India's tourism industry generated 6.6% of the nation's Gross Domestic Product (GDP) during 2012. International travel to India is predicted to grow at an average annual rate of ∼ 8% over the next decade. The number of foreign tourists has increased by 9% to 5.8 million. Approximately 8% of travelers to developing countries require medical care during or after travel; the main diagnoses are vaccine-preventable diseases. Travelers to India can be exposed to various infectious diseases; water-borne, water-related, and zoonotic diseases may be imported to India where the disease is not endemic. The World Health Organization (WHO) emphasizes that all international travelers should be up to date with routine vaccinations. The recommended vaccinations for travelers to India vary according to the traveler's age, immunization history, existing medical conditions, duration, legal requirements for entry into countries being visited, travelers preferences, and values. Travelers should consult with a doctor so that there is sufficient time for completion of optimal vaccination schedules. No matter where traveling, one should be aware of potential exposure to certain organisms that can cause severely illnesses, even death. There is no doubt that vaccines have reduced or virtually eliminated many diseases that killed or severely disabled children and adults just a few generations ago. Thus, travelers must take recommended vaccines per schedule before traveling to India.

  20. Travellers' profile, travel patterns and vaccine practices--a 10-year prospective study in a Swiss Travel Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boubaker, Rim; Meige, Pierrette; Mialet, Catherine; Buffat, Chantal Ngarambe; Uwanyiligira, Mediatrice; Widmer, Francine; Rochat, Jacynthe; Fossati, Annie Hérard; Souvannaraj-Blanchant, Manisinh; Payot, Sylvie; Rochat, Laurence; de Vallière, Serge; Genton, Blaise; D'Acremont, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    The travel clinic in Lausanne serves a catchment area of 700 000 of inhabitants and provides pre- and post-travel consultations. This study describes the profile of attendees before departure, their travel patterns and the travel clinic practices in terms of vaccination over time. We included all pre-travel first consultation data recorded between November 2002 and December 2012 by a custom-made program DIAMM/G. We analysed client profiles, travel characteristics and vaccinations prescribed over time. Sixty-five thousand and forty-six client-trips were recorded. Fifty-one percent clients were female. Mean age was 32 years. In total, 0.1% were aged travellers had pre-existing medical conditions. Forty-six percent were travelling to Africa, 35% to Asia, 20% to Latin America and 1% (each) to Oceania and Europe; 19% visited more than one country. India was the most common destination (9.6% of travellers) followed by Thailand (8.6%) and Kenya (6.4%). Seventy-three percent of travellers were planning to travel for ≤ 4 weeks. The main reasons for travel were tourism (75%) and visiting friends and relatives (18%). Sixteen percent were backpackers. Pre-travel advice were sought a median of 29 days before departure. Ninety-nine percent received vaccine(s). The most frequently administered vaccines were hepatitis A (53%), tetanus-diphtheria (46%), yellow fever (39%), poliomyelitis (38%) and typhoid fever (30%). The profile of travel clinic attendees was younger than the general Swiss population. A significant proportion of travellers received vaccinations that are recommended in the routine national programme. These findings highlight the important role of travel clinics to (i) take care of an age group that has little contact with general practitioners and (ii) update vaccination status. The most commonly prescribed travel-related vaccines were for hepatitis A and yellow fever. The question remains to know whether clients do attend travel clinics because of compulsory

  1. Travel agents and the prevention of health problems among travelers in Québec.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provost, Sylvie; Gaulin, Colette; Piquet-Gauthier, Blandine; Emmanuelli, Julien; Venne, Sylvie; Dion, Réjean; Grenier, Jean-Luc; Dessau, Jean-Claude; Dubuc, Martine

    2002-01-01

    Among the factors influencing travelers to seek preventive health advice before departure, the travel agent's recommendation plays an important role. The objective of our study was to document the practices and needs of travel agents in Québec (Canada) in relation to the prevention of health problems among travelers. In June 2000, a cross-sectional descriptive survey was carried out among travel agents from all travel agencies in Québec. One agent per agency was asked to answer our questions. Data were collected using a 32-item telephone questionnaire. Altogether, 708 travel agents from the 948 agencies contacted answered our questionnaire (participation rate: 75%). Most respondents (81%) believed that the travel agent has a role to play in the prevention of health problems among travelers, especially to recommend that travelers consult a travel clinic before departure. Although over 80% of the agents interviewed mentioned recommending a visit to a travel clinic before an organized tour to Thailand or a backpacking trip in Mexico, less than half said they make the same recommendation for a stay in a seaside resort in Mexico. The majority of respondents were acquainted with the services offered in travel health clinics, and these clinics were the source of travel health information most often mentioned by travel agents. However, nearly 60% of the agents questioned had never personally consulted a travel clinic. When asked about the best way to receive information about travelers' health, more than 40% of respondents favoured receiving information newsletters from public health departments regularly whereas 28% preferred the Internet. Despite the limits of this study, our results should help the public health network better target its interventions aimed to inform travel agents on prevention of health problems among travelers.

  2. Pre-travel care for immunocompromised and chronically ill travellers: A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Aalst, Mariëlle; Verhoeven, Roos; Omar, Freshta; Stijnis, Cornelis; van Vugt, Michèle; de Bree, Godelieve J; Goorhuis, Abraham; Grobusch, Martin P

    2017-09-01

    Immunocompromised and chronically ill travellers (ICCITs) are susceptible to travel related diseases. In ICCITs, pre-travel care regarding vaccinations and prophylactics is complex. We evaluated the protection level by preventive measures in ICCITs by analysing rates of vaccination protection, antibody titres, and the prescription of standby antibiotics. We analysed, and reported according to STROBE guidelines, pre-travel care data for ICCITs visiting the medical pre-travel clinic at the Academic Medical Centre, The Netherlands from 2011 to 2016. We analysed 2104 visits of 1826 ICCITs. Mean age was 46.6 years and mean travel duration 34.5 days. ICCITs on immunosuppressive treatment (29.7%), HIV (17.2%) or diabetes mellitus (10.2%) comprised the largest groups. Most frequently visited countries were Suriname, Indonesia, and Ghana. Most vaccination rates were >90%. Of travellers in high need of hepatitis A and B protection, 56.6 and 75.7%, underwent titre assessments, respectively. Of ICCITs with a respective indication, 50.6% received a prescription for standby antibiotics. Vaccination rates in our study population were overall comparable to those of healthy travellers studied previously in our centre. However, regarding antibody titre assessments and prescription of standby antibiotics, this study demonstrates that uniform pre-travel guidelines for ICCITs are highly needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Travel Experience in hotels for the MICE Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Gurkina, Anastasija

    2013-01-01

    The following report is a research-oriented bachelor thesis that investigates the travel experience in the business oriented concentrated in MICE Industry. The objective of this thesis was to assess and measure the level of satisfaction of the MICE travellers in hotels, as well as to find out what are the services and aspects of the hotel that influences the most on the travel experience. The MICE travellers due to the purposes of their visit require specific services from the hotel t...

  4. VISIT - Virtual visits to nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mollaret, Jean-Christophe

    2001-01-01

    For more than twenty years, EDFs Communication Division has conducted a policy of opening its generation sites to the general public. Around 300,000 people visit a nuclear power plant every year. However, for the security of persons and the safety of facilities, those parts of the plant situated in controlled areas are not accessible to visitors. For the sake of transparency, EDF has taken an interest in the technologies offered by virtual reality to show the general public what a nuclear power plant is really like, so as to initiate dialogue on nuclear energy, particularly with young people. Visit has been developed with virtual reality technologies. It serves to show the invisible (voyage to the core of fission), the inaccessible and to immerse the visitors in environments which are usually closed to the general public (discovery of the controlled area of a nuclear power plant). Visit is used in Public Information Centres which receive visitors to EDF power plants and during international exhibitions and conferences. Visit allows a virtual tour of the following controlled areas: locker room hot area/cold area, a necessary passage before entering the controlled areas; reactor building; fuel building; waste auxiliary building (liquid, solid and gaseous effluents). It also includes a tour of the rooms or equipment usually accessible to the general public: control room, turbine hall, transformer, air cooling tower

  5. Infectious Risks of Traveling Abroad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin H; Blair, Barbra M

    2015-08-01

    A popular leisure activity, international travel can be associated with some infections. The most common travel-related illnesses appear to be gastrointestinal, dermatologic, respiratory, and systemic febrile syndromes. The pretravel medical consultation includes immunizations, malaria chemoprophylaxis, self-treatment for traveler's diarrhea, and advice on the prevention of a myriad of other infectious causes including dengue, chikungunya, rickettsiosis, leptospirosis, schistosomiasis, and strongyloidiasis. Travel to locations experiencing outbreaks such as Ebola virus disease, Middle East respiratory syndrome, avian influenza, and chikungunya call for specific alerts on preventive strategies. After travel, evaluation of an ill traveler must explore details of exposure, including destinations visited; activities; ingestion of contaminated food or drinks; contact with vectors, animals, fresh water, or blood and body fluids; and other potential exposures. Knowledge of the geographic distribution of infectious diseases is important in generating the differential diagnoses and testing accordingly. Empiric treatment is sometimes necessary when suspicion of a certain diagnosis is strong and confirmatory tests are delayed or lacking, particularly for infections that are rapidly progressive (for example, malaria) or for which timing of testing is prolonged (such as leptospirosis).

  6. Traveling questions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoeyer, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, I argue that uncertainty and nonknowledge, and not just research results, can be important vehicles of translation through which genetic research participation comes to affect the lives of research participants. Based on interviews with participants in a genetic research project, I....... Research questions, and not just results, may serve as a generative form of knowledge that can travel as fast as any answer....

  7. What proportion of international travellers acquire a travel-related illness? A review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelo, Kristina M; Kozarsky, Phyllis E; Ryan, Edward T; Chen, Lin H; Sotir, Mark J

    2017-09-01

    As international travel increases, travellers may be at increased risk of acquiring infectious diseases not endemic in their home countries. Many journal articles and reference books related to travel medicine cite that between 22-64% of international travellers become ill during or after travel; however, this information is minimal, outdated and limited by poor generalizability. We aim to provide a current and more accurate estimate of the proportion of international travellers who acquire a travel-related illness. We identified studies via PubMed or travel medicine experts, published between January 1, 1976-December 31, 2016 that included the number of international travellers acquiring a travel-related illness. We excluded studies that focused on a single disease or did not determine a rate based on the total number of travellers. We abstracted information on traveller demographics, trip specifics, study enrollment and follow-up and number of ill travellers and their illnesses. Of 743 studies, nine met the inclusion criteria. The data sources were from North America (four studies) and Europe (five studies). Most travellers were tourists, the most frequent destination regions were Asia and Africa, and the median trip duration ranged from 8-21 days. Six studies enrolled participants at the travellers' pre-travel consultation. All studies collected data through either extraction from the medical record, weekly diaries, or pre- and post-travel questionnaires. Data collection timeframes varied by study. Between 6-87% of travellers became ill across all studies. Four studies provided the best estimate: between 43-79% of travellers who frequently visited developing nations (e.g. India, Tanzania, and Kenya) became ill; travellers most frequently reported diarrhoea. This is the most comprehensive assessment available on the proportion of international travellers that develop a travel-related illness. Additional cohort studies would provide needed data to more precisely

  8. Berliner Philarmoniker ATLAS visit

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Berliner Philarmoniker in on tour through Europe. They stopped on June 27th in Geneva, for a concert at the Victoria Hall. An ATLAS visit was organised the morning after, lead by the ATLAS spokesperson Karl Jakobs (welcome and overview talk) and two ATLAS guides (AVC visit and 3D movie).

  9. Visiting Filmmakers: Why Bother?

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Scott

    1995-01-01

    Argues that visits by independent filmmakers to campus are exciting and intellectually invigorating for students and teachers, and these visits add to the cultural energy of the college. Notes that a commitment to independent cinema challenges the assumptions and the economics of conventional cinema. Discusses how much independent filmmakers are…

  10. Business Model Development for travel agency : Case company - Goh Travel Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Manuilova, Mariia

    2016-01-01

    Millions of tourists visit South Korea every year to experience the culture and a different life style. Moreover, due to economic development, the country has become popular as a study and work destination. As the tourism market is growing, there are many opportunities for travel agencies to find niches in the market. The purpose of this study is to develop a business model for Goh travel Korea – a travel agency for foreign low budget travelers around Korea, to make it more efficient and incr...

  11. Hepatitis B Vaccination Status among Japanese Travelers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaita, Kenichiro; Yahara, Koji; Sakai, Yoshiro; Iwahashi, Jun; Masunaga, Kenji; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2017-05-08

    This study clarified the characteristics of travelers who received hepatitis B vaccinations. Subjects were 233 Japanese travelers who visited our clinic prior to travel. We summarized the characteristics of the clients and performed two comparative studies: first, we compared a hepatitis B-vaccinated group with an unvaccinated group; second, we compared a group that had completed the hepatitis B vaccine series with a group that did not complete the series. The hepatitis B vaccine was administered to 152 clients. Factors positively associated with the hepatitis B vaccination (after adjusting for age and sex) included the following: travel for business or travel as an accompanying family member; travel to Asia; travel for a duration of a month or more; and, inclusion of the vaccine in a company or organization's payment plan. Meanwhile, factors negatively associated with the vaccination were travel for leisure or education, and travel to North America or Africa. Among 89 record-confirmed cases, only 53 completed 3 doses. The completion rate was negatively associated with the scheduled duration of travel if it was from a month to less than a year (after adjusting for age and sex). The present study provides a basis for promoting vaccination compliance more vigorously among Japanese adults.

  12. Visiting Mom: A pilot evaluation of a prison-based visiting program serving incarcerated mothers and their minor children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Erin C; Duininck, Megan; Shlafer, Rebecca J

    2016-01-01

    We describe an evaluation of a prison visiting program, Extended Visiting (EV), for incarcerated mothers and their children. Mothers ( N = 24) and caregivers ( N = 19) were interviewed regarding experiences with the program. Mothers identified benefits including maintaining a relationship with children, physical contact, motivation, privacy, peer support, and personal growth. Caregivers echoed mothers' appreciation for the opportunity to maintain mother-child relationships and physical contact. Mothers identified barriers including desire for overnight visits and more age-appropriate activities. Caregivers perceived travel time and costs and children's adverse reactions as barriers. When comparing EV to typical visiting, participants unanimously preferred EV.

  13. "Golden Walk" Gets a Makeover from an Auditor of Campus Visits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Eric

    2009-01-01

    A consultant on an endless road trip, Jeff Kallay travels the nation visiting colleges and universities that hire him to conduct a "campus visit audit." After each tour, he discusses his first impressions with admissions officials. Later he sends them a detailed report, with recommendations covering the logistical aspects of visits, such…

  14. International travel patterns and travel risks for stem cell transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikati, Tarek; Griffin, Kenneth; Lane, Dakotah; Matasar, Matthew; Shah, Monika K

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell transplantation (SCT) is being increasingly utilized for multiple medical illnesses. However, there is limited knowledge about international travel patterns and travel-related illnesses of stem cell transplant recipients (SCTRs). An observational cross-sectional study was conducted among 979 SCTRs at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center using a previously standardized and validated questionnaire. International travel post SCT, pre-travel health advice, exposure risks, and travel-related illnesses were queried. A total of 516 SCTRs completed the survey (55% response rate); of these, 40% were allogeneic SCTRs. A total of 229 (44.3%) respondents reported international travel outside the United States and Canada post SCT. The international travel incidence was 32% [95% confidence interval CI 28-36] within 2 years after SCT. Using multivariable Cox regression analysis, variables significantly associated with international travel within first 2 years after SCT were history of international travel prior to SCT [hazard ratio (HR) = 5.3, 95% CI 2.3-12.0], autologous SCT (HR = 2.6, 95% CI 1.6-2.8), foreign birth (HR = 2.3, 95% CI 1.5-3.3), and high income (HR = 2.0, 95% CI 1.8-3.7). During their first trip, 64 travelers (28%) had traveled to destinations that may have required vaccination or malaria chemoprophylaxis. Only 56% reported seeking pre-travel health advice. Of those who traveled, 16 travelers (7%) became ill enough to require medical attention during their first trip after SCT. Ill travelers were more likely to have visited high-risk areas (60 vs 26%, p = 0.005), to have had a longer mean trip duration (24 vs 12 days, p = 0.0002), and to have visited friends and relatives (69 vs 21%, p travel was common among SCTRs within 2 years after SCT and was mainly to low-risk destinations. Although the overall incidence of travel-related illnesses was low, certain subgroups of travelers were at a significantly higher risk. Pre-travel

  15. Travelers' health problems and behavior: prospective study with post-travel follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilkman, Katri; Pakkanen, Sari H; Lääveri, Tinja; Siikamäki, Heli; Kantele, Anu

    2016-07-13

    The annual number of international tourist arrivals has recently exceeded one billion, yet surprisingly few studies have characterized travelers' behavior, illness, and risk factors in a prospective setting. Particularly scarce are surveys of data spanning travel, return, and follow-up of the same cohort. This study examines behavior and illness among travelers while abroad, after return home, and at follow-up. Patterns of behavior connected to type of travel and illness are characterized so as to identify risk factors and provide background data for pre-travel advice. Volunteers to this prospective cohort study were recruited at visits to a travel clinic prior to departure. Data on the subjects' health and behavior were collected by questionnaires before and after journeys and over a three-week follow-up. In addition, the subjects were asked to fill in health diaries while traveling. The final study population consisted of 460 subjects, 79 % of whom reported illness during travel or on arrival: 69 % had travelers' diarrhea (TD), 17 % skin problems, 17 % fever, 12 % vomiting, 8 % respiratory tract infection, 4 % urinary tract infection, 2 % ear infection, 4 % gastrointestinal complaints other than TD or vomiting, and 4 % other symptoms. Of all subjects, 10 % consulted a doctor and 0.7 % were hospitalized; 18 % took antimicrobials, with TD as the most common indication (64 %). Ongoing symptoms were reported by 25 % of all travelers upon return home. During the three-week follow-up (return rate 51 %), 32 % of respondents developed new-onset symptoms, 20 % visited a doctor and 1.7 % were hospitalized. Factors predisposing to health problems were identified by multivariable analysis: certain regions (Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, and Eastern Africa), female gender, young age, and long travel duration. Despite proper preventive measures like vaccinations, malaria prophylaxis, and travel advice, the majority of our subjects fell ill during or

  16. Visit by two Ministers

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Last December CERN received visits from two Ministers. Bulgaria’s Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Science and Education, Daniel Vylchev, visited the CMS experiment in the company of the CMS Spokesman, T. Virdee, and several Bulgarian physicists. From left to right: J. Stamenov, M. Mateev, S. Stavrev, T. Virdee, V. Genchev, the Minister Daniel Vylchev, A. Hristova Vutsova, L. Litov and G. Soultanov. CERN Director-General, Robert Aymar, and Montenegro’s Minister of Education and Science, Slobodan Backović. On 18 December, Robert Aymar welcomed Bulgaria’s Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Science and Education, Daniel Vylchev. A particular highlight of his visit was a tour of the CMS site, during which he met the many Bulgarian physicists working on the experiment. He also attended a presentation of the LHC Computing Grid and visited the Computer Centre. Bulgaria has been a CERN ...

  17. Unplanned Hospital Visits - National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Unplanned Hospital Visits – national data. This data set includes national-level data for the hospital return days (or excess days in acute care) measures, the...

  18. Pediatric travel consultation in an integrated clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson , J C; Fischer , P R; Hale , D C; Derrick , D

    2001-01-01

    In May 1997, a pediatric travel service was created within a larger integrated University-County Health Department international travel clinic. The purpose of the service was to further enhance the travel advice and care provided to children and their parents or guardians. The current study was designed to describe the care of children in this setting and to compare the care of children seen in the Pediatric Travel Service with that of children seen by other providers. All pediatric patients (defined as individuals Mexico, South America, and Southeast Asia. When compared to travelers seen in the Regular Clinic, individuals in the Pediatric Travel Service group were more likely to travel for humanitarian work, and for parental work relocation. Persons in the Regular Clinic were more likely to travel to Mexico and Central America. They were also more likely to travel on vacation and for missionary work or study. Hepatitis B and tetanus-diphtheria booster vaccinations were given more frequently to travelers seen in the Regular Clinic. Also, ciprofloxacin and antimotility agents were more commonly prescribed in this group. No differences were noted in the duration of travel or in the time interval between clinic visit and departure. While general travel advice was considered to be similar in both clinic groups, some differences were observed in the frequency of administration of certain vaccines and prescriptions of medications. These differences were likely due to a difference in age in the two study groups. The high volume and success of the clinic suggest that integrated pediatric and adult travel services in a coordinated setting can be effective.

  19. Cuba: U.S. Restrictions on Travel and Legislative Initiatives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sullivan, Mark P

    2003-01-01

    .... In March 2003, the Administration eased restrictions on those visiting close family members in Cuba, while at the same time it eliminated travel for people-to-people educational exchanges unrelated...

  20. Morbidity among Israeli paediatric travellers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinowicz, Shira; Schwartz, Eli

    2017-09-01

    International travel, particularly to developing countries, is becoming increasingly common among the Israeli population, including an increase in the number of travelling children. Since children are a distinct travellers' population, data about their post-travel morbidity are needed. A retrospective study which examined all children (0-19 years old) who presented to our centre after international travel from 1999 to 2015. About 314 children were seen. The mean age was 10 years (SD ± 5.8). Most of the patients (80.6%) were tourists, and the rest were expatriates. The main destinations visited were South-Asia (46.5%), Sub-Saharan Africa (33.4%), Latin-America (7%) and Europe (6.4%). Overall, the most common diagnoses were gastrointestinal (GI) (mainly chronic) disorders (30.6%), followed by febrile diseases (26.4%), among which 18.1% of patients were diagnosed with dengue fever and 12% with malaria. Dermatologic conditions accounted for 25.2%. Additional diagnoses were schistosomiasis (6.4%) and neuropsychiatric symptoms (2.2%). A substantial part, 10.8%, had eosinophilia, either symptomatic or asymptomatic. Travellers to Asia, compared to travellers to Africa, presented more commonly with GI illness (OR 2.02, 95% confidence interval 1.13-3.61), and dermatologic conditions (OR 1.94, 95% confidence interval 1.05-3.61). Morbidity was associated with a variety of transmission modes, such as food-borne illnesses (30.9%), bite and sting wounds (10.2%), mosquito-borne infections (8%), freshwater contact (6.7%) and tick-borne infections (2.2%). The main conditions seen in paediatric returning travellers were GI, febrile and dermatologic illnesses, some may be rare in their country of origin. Targeting care for the suspected pathogens based on updated knowledge of epidemiology and thorough travel history is essential. © International Society of Travel Medicine, 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  1. Sociodemographic Analysis of the Profile and the Motivations of Tourists Visiting Quito, Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guzmán Muñoz Fernández

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a fieldwork-based analysis on the sociodemographic characteristics, travel arrangements, motivations and travel experience evaluation of tourists visiting Quito, Ecuador. The results of this research show differences in the profile of tourists in terms of travel arrangements, their motivation and their evaluation of the destination, based on tourists’ geographical origin. The main practical implication of this research is to better understand the characteristics of tourists who visit Quito, with the purpose of designing cultural and touristic products that meet the needs of different groups of travelers.

  2. NOTE FROM VISITS SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    ETT Division; Division ETT; Service des visites

    2000-01-01

    The Visit Service noticed that for many years countries such as Great Britain, Germany, Spain, Portugal, the Netherlands and the Scandinavian countries visit CERN less than other member countries and that is due to the high price of the trip for the students. To improve the situation the Visit Service plans to create a network of 'Family-Accommodation' ('Famille-Accueil') in Geneva and in France nearbywith the aim to facilitate the trip to foreign students especially from the more distant member countries and to encourage them to visit our unique laboratory. We expect this exchange to be an interesting experience for both the students and the welcoming family ('famille d'accueil'). If you are interested in participating in this family network, please fill in the questionnaire below. The questionnaire is to be returned to the Visit Service, Mrs Christine Fromm, e-mail Christine.Fromm@cern.ch.Name: First name: CERN address: E-mail: Portable phone number: Home address...

  3. Travelers' Health: HIV Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Last-Minute Travel Long-Term Travel Mass Gatherings Medical Tourism Mental Health Motion Sickness Natural Disasters Pregnant Travelers ... for purposes of medical treatment (see Chapter 2, Medical Tourism ), the blood and blood products used in the ...

  4. Prolonged carriage and potential onward transmission of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in Dutch travelers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hattem, Jarne M; Arcilla, Maris S; Bootsma, Martin Cj; van Genderen, Perry J; Goorhuis, Abraham; Grobusch, Martin P; Molhoek, Nicky; Oude Lashof, Astrid Ml; Schultsz, Constance; Stobberingh, Ellen E; Verbrugh, Henri A; de Jong, Menno D; Melles, Damian C; Penders, John

    2016-07-01

    The aim was to study acquisition and persistence of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) among travelers. Stools from 2001 travelers and 215 nontraveling household members, collected before and immediately post-travel as well as 1, 3, 6 and 12 months upon return, were screened for CPE. Five travelers, all visiting Asia outside the Indian subcontinent, acquired CPE. One traveler persistently carried the same OXA-244 CPE up to 6 months post-travel. Three months after travel, her co-traveling spouse also became positive for this OXA-244 CPE strain, suggesting clonal transmission within this household. Acquisition of CPE is not restricted to travelers to the Indian subcontinent and/or to travelers seeking healthcare during travel and can persist up to at least 6 months post-travel.

  5. Dutch ministerial visit

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Dutch Minister of Education, Culture and Science R. Plasterk (third from left) in the ATLAS cavern with NIKHEF Director F. Linde, CERN Chief Scientific Officer J. Engelen, Ambassador J. van Eenennaam, ATLAS Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni, Mission Representative G. Vrielink and ATLAS Magnet Project Leader H. ten Kate.Minister of Education, Culture and Science from the Kingdom of the Netherlands, Ronald Plasterk, visited CERN on 25th October. With Jos Engelen, CERN Scientific Director, as his guide he visited Point 1 of the LHC tunnel and ATLAS, where Nikhef (the national institute for subatomic physics, a Dutch government and university collaboration) constructed all 96 of the largest muon drift chambers in the barrel as well as parts of the magnet system, the inner detector, the DAQ and triggering. Overall the Netherlands contribute 4.5% to the annual CERN budget and the minister’s visit celebrated the contributions of the 79 ...

  6. International travel and vaccinations.

    OpenAIRE

    Rizvon, M K; Qazi, S; Ward, L A

    1999-01-01

    With the increase in global travel, no disease is beyond the reach of any population. Traveling patients should be advised to follow food and water precautions and encouraged to receive the recommended immunizations. Travel medicine plays a vital role not only in limiting the morbidity of travel-related illnesses but also in limiting the spread of diseases. This article addresses the common issues related to travel, reviews the care of the immunocompromised traveler, and updates the available...

  7. Advice for families traveling to developing countries with young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doan, Sylvia; Steele, Russell W

    2013-09-01

    Young children are most likely to travel to developing countries with their parents to visit relatives. Preparation for such travel must include careful counseling and optimal use of preventive vaccines and chemoprophylaxis. For infants and very young children, data defining safety and efficacy of these agents are often limited. However, accumulated experience suggests that young travelers may be managed similarly to older children and adults.

  8. German travelers' preferences for travel vaccines assessed by a discrete choice experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulos, Christine; Curran, Desmond; Anastassopoulou, Anastassia; De Moerlooze, Laurence

    2018-02-08

    Many travelers to regions with endemic infectious diseases do not follow health authorities' recommendations regarding vaccination against vaccine-preventable infectious diseases, before traveling. The determinants of individual travelers' decisions to vaccinate before traveling are largely unknown. This study aimed to provide this information using a discrete choice experiment (DCE) administered to four types of German travelers: (1) business travelers; (2) travelers visiting friends and relatives (VFR); (3) leisure travelers; and (4) backpackers. A DCE survey was developed, pretested and administered online. It included a series of choice questions in which respondents chose between two hypothetical vaccines, each characterized by four disease attributes with varying levels describing the of risk, health impact, curability and transmissibility of the disease they would prevent (described with four disease attributes with varying levels of risk, health impact, curability and transmissibility), and varying levels of four vaccine attributes (duration of protection, number of doses required, time required for vaccination, and vaccine cost). A random-parameters logit model was used to estimate the importance weights each traveler type placed on the various attribute levels. These weights were used to calculate mean monetary equivalents (MMEs) of changes in each attribute (holding all others constant) and of hypothetical disease-vaccine combinations. All traveler types' choices indicated that they attached the greatest importance to the risk and health impact of disease and to the vaccine cost whereas the other disease and vaccine attributes were less important for their decisions about travel vaccines. An option of not choosing any of the vaccine-pairs presented was rarely selected indicating that travelers' generally prefer to be vaccinated rather than not. The MMEs of changes in vaccine attributes indicated a very high variability between the individual travelers

  9. The Connected Traveler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Stanley

    2017-04-24

    The Connected Traveler project is a multi-disciplinary undertaking that seeks to validate potential for transformative transportation system energy savings by incentivizing energy efficient travel behavior.

  10. IAEA Director General to Visit Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Full text: The Director General of the IAEA, Yukiya Amano, will travel to Tehran this Sunday, 20 May 2012, to discuss issues of mutual interest with high Iranian officials. In the course of his one-day working visit, on Monday 21 May 2012 the Director General will meet the Secretary of Iran's Supreme National Security Council, His Excellency Saeed Jalili, and other senior representatives of the Iranian government. Herman Nackaerts, Deputy Director General for Safeguards, and Rafael Mariano Grossi, Assistant Director General for Policy, will accompany the Director General. (IAEA)

  11. Sick-visit immunizations and delayed well-baby visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robison, Steve G

    2013-07-01

    Giving recommended immunizations during sick visits for minor and acute illness such as acute otitis media has long been an American Academy of Pediatrics/Advisory Committee on Immunization Practice recommendation. An addition to the American Academy of Pediatrics policy in 2010 advised considering whether giving immunizations at the sick visit would discourage making up missed well-baby visits. This study quantifies the potential tradeoff between sick-visit immunizations and well-baby visits. This study was a retrospective cohort analysis with a case-control component of sick visits for acute otitis media that supplanted normal well-baby visits at age 2, 4, or 6 months. Infants were stratified for sick-visit immunization, no sick-visit immunization but quick makeup well-baby visits, or no sick-visit immunizations or quick makeup visits. Immunization rates and well-baby visit rates were assessed through 24 months of age. For 1060 study cases, no significant difference was detected in immunization rates or well-baby visits through 24 months of age between those with or without sick-visit immunizations. Thirty-nine percent of infants without a sick-visit shot failed to return for a quick makeup well-baby visit; this delayed group was significantly less likely to be up-to-date for immunizations (relative risk: 0.66) and had fewer well-baby visits (mean: 3.8) from 2 through 24 months of age compared with those with sick-visit shots (mean: 4.7). The substantial risk that infants will not return for a timely makeup well-baby visit after a sick visit should be included in any consideration of whether to delay immunizations.

  12. Auger Physicists visit CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    Hoch, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Visit at CERN P5 CMS in the experimental cavern Alan Watson, Auger Spokesperson Emeritus, University of Leeds; Jim Cronin, Nobel Laureate, Auger Spokesperson Emeritus, University of Chicago; Jim Virdee, CMS Former Spokesperson, Imperial College; Jim Matthews, Auger Co-Spokesperson, Louisiana State University

  13. Thomas Kibble visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Rosaria Marraffino

    2014-01-01

    Emeritus Professor Sir Thomas W.B. Kibble, from Imperial College London visited LHC for the first time last week and delivered a colloquium on the genesis of electroweak unification and the Brout-Englert-Higgs mechanism.   From left to right: Jim Virdee, Tiziano Camporesi, Tom Kibble and Austin Ball on the visit to CMS. On his way back from Trieste, where he received the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics' Dirac Medal, Tom Kibble stopped by CERN for his first visit to the LHC. Kibble had a standing invitation from Jim Virdee, former CMS spokesperson, who is also a researcher from Imperial College London. Peter Jenni (left) and Tom Kibble tour the ATLAS detector. (Image: Erwan Bertrand) Kibble made the trip to CERN a family outing and brought along 14 relatives,  including his children and grandchildren. He visited the ATLAS detector with Peter Jenni, its former spokesperson, on Friday 10 October. In the afternoon, Kibble delivered a colloquium in the...

  14. Preventing infections when visiting

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... need.) When you visit a patient in the hospital, keep your hands away from your face. Cough or sneeze into a tissue or into the crease of your elbow, not into the air. References Calfee DP. Prevention and control of health care-associated infections. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil ...

  15. TRAVEL IN THE SCHENGEN AREA

    CERN Multimedia

    Relations with the Host States Service

    2001-01-01

    You are reminded that holders of French residence permits (for example, the carte spéciale issued by the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs, a resident's card, a temporary residence card or a receipt issued during the renewal of such residence documents) do not need visas for tourist travel (including conferences) to countries applying the provisions of the Schengen Convention, provided that the duration of the travel is less than three months. The countries applying the provisions of the Schengen Convention are Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Portugal and Spain; and since 25 March 2001 Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. For longer stays and for other than tourist visits, you are strongly advised to make enquiries at the relevant consulates.http://www.cern.ch/relations/

  16. One-visit endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkenaz, P J

    1984-10-01

    I would like to conclude with some personal observations and comments on the use of single-visit endodontics in private practice based on my 12 years of experience utilizing this procedure. I cannot stress in strong enough terms that one-visit endodontics should not be undertaken by the novice. As an evolutionary philosophy of treatment, its use grows out of a full understanding of fundamental endodontic principles by the experienced practitioner. It is only after considering all of the indications and contraindications in each case on an individual basis, that a decision should be made as to whether or not it can be completed in a single visit. However, it is also important for the practitioner to have a clinical sense of what can be accomplished once the rubber dam has been placed and work commenced on the tooth. I submit to you that this very important clinical sense can be gained only after many years of clinical experience. Therefore, the endodontic competence of the practicing dentist becomes the overriding factor in determining the outcome of any one particular case. This is not to say that only a specialized few can and should perform this procedure. However, it does mean that a high degree of clinical skill is necessary to perform it in a successful manner. The performance of better endodontics in multiple visits will ensure success in single visits. Therefore, it is incumbent upon the individual practitioner to objectively evaluate his or her endodontic skills. The clinician should critically evaluate every aspect of his or her endodontic practice by determining the incidences of biomechanical errors such as ledging, perforations, overinstrumentation, broken instruments, interappointment flare-ups, and failures. For only after evaluating these areas will the clinician have an indication as to his or her level of endodontic skill and whether or not future study and practice need be done in one or more specific aspects of endodontic practice. Once a high

  17. Injecting risk behavior among traveling young injection drug users: travel partner and city characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Martha E; Fatch, Robin S; Evans, Jennifer L; Yu, Michelle; Davidson, Peter J; Page, Kimberly; Hahn, Judith A

    2013-06-01

    Young injection drug users (IDUs), a highly mobile population, engage in high levels of injecting risk behavior, yet little is understood about how such risk behavior may vary by the characteristics of the cities to which they travel, including the existence of a syringe exchange program (SEP), as well as travel partner characteristics. In 2004-2005, we conducted a 6-month prospective study to investigate the risk behavior of 89 young IDUs as they traveled, with detailed information gathered about 350 city visits. In multivariable analyses, travel to larger urban cities with a population of 500,000-1,000,000 was significantly associated with injecting drugs (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 3.71; 95 % confidence interval (CI), 1.56-8.82), ancillary equipment sharing (AES; AOR = 7.05; 95 % CI, 2.25-22.06) and receptive needle sharing (RNS; AOR = 5.73; 95 % CI, 1.11-27.95), as compared with visits to smaller cities with populations below 50,000. Region of the country, and the existence of a SEP within the city visited, were not independently associated with injecting drugs, AES, or RNS during city visits. Traveling with more than one injecting partner was associated with injecting drugs during city visits (AOR = 2.77; 95 % CI, 1.46-5.27), when compared with traveling alone. Additionally, both non-daily and daily/almost daily alcohol use during city visits were associated with AES (AOR = 3.37; 95 % CI, 1.42-7.68; AOR = 3.03; 95 % CI, 1.32-6.97, respectively) as compared with no alcohol consumption. Traveling young IDUs are more likely to inject when traveling with other IDUs and to engage in higher risk injection behavior when they are in large cities. Risk behavior occurring in city visits, including equipment sharing and alcohol consumption, suggests further need for focused interventions to reduce risk for viral infection among this population.

  18. Belgian Firms Visit CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Fifteen Belgian firms visited CERN last 2 and 3 April to present their know-how. Industrial sectors ranging from precision machining to electrical engineering and electronics were represented. And for the first time, companies from the Flemish and Brussels regions of the country joined their Walloon compatriots, who have come to CERN before. The visit was organised by Mr J.-M. Warêgne, economic and commercial attaché at the Belgian permanent mission for the French-speaking region, Mr J. Van de Vondel, his opposite number for the Flemish region, and Mrs E. Solowianiuk, economic and commercial counsellor at the Belgian permanent mission for the Brussels-Capital region.

  19. German visits to CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    State secretary to Germany's Federal Ministry of Education and Research, Frieder Meyer-Krahmer, with CERN's Director-General Robert Aymar.On 21 February, Professor Frieder Meyer-Krahmer, State Secretary to Germany's Federal Ministry of Education and Research, came to CERN. He visited the ALICE and ATLAS experiments and the computing centre before meeting the CERN's Director-General, some German physicists and members of the top management. The Minister of Science, Research and the Arts of the Baden-Württemberg regional government, Peter Frankenberg, and CERN's Director-General, Robert Aymar, signing an agreement on education. In the background: Sigurd Lettow, CERN's Director of Finance and Human Resources, and Karl-Heinz Meisel, Rector of the Fachhochschule Karlsruhe. The Minister of Science, Research and the Arts of the Baden-Württemberg regional government, Prof. Peter Frankenberg, visited CERN on 23 February. He was accompanied by the Rector of the Fachhochschule Karlsruhe, Prof. Karl-Heinz Meisel, and b...

  20. Romanian President Visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Director General Luciano Maiani watches as Romanian President Ion Iliescu signs the CERN guest book. On Friday the 12th of October, Romanian President Ion Iliescu arrived at CERN and was warmly greeted by Director General Luciano Maiani at the steps of building 500. After initial greetings and a general presentation of the laboratory, President Iliescu and his entourage embarked on a whistle stop tour of the CERN facilities. They visited the CMS magnet assembly hall and civil engineering work where presentations were made by CMS spokesperson Michel Della Negra and the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter where the president was introduced to Romanian physicists working here at CERN. Michel Della Negra explains some of the general principles behind CMS to President Iliescu during his visit last week. The Romanian teams working on CERN projects make very visible contributions, for example to the construction of the ATLAS experiment and to the preparation of its eventual scientific exploitation. 'Those of us on the ATLAS ...

  1. Indian President visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2011-01-01

    On 1 October, her Excellency Mrs Pratibha Devisingh Patil, President of India, picked CERN as the first stop on her official state visit to Switzerland. Accompanied by a host of Indian journalists, a security team, and a group of presidential delegates, the president left quite an impression when she visited CERN’s Point 2!   Upon arrival, Pratibha Patil was greeted by CERN Director General Rolf Heuer, as well as senior Indian scientists working at CERN, and various department directors. After a quick overview of the Organization, Rolf Heuer and the President addressed India’s future collaboration with CERN. India is currently an Observer State of the Organization, and is considering becoming an Associate Member State. A short stop in LHC operations gave Steve Myers and the Accelerator team the opportunity to take the President on a tour through the LHC tunnel. From there, ALICE’s Tapan Nayak and Spokesperson Paolo Giubellino took Pratibha Patil to the experiment&am...

  2. A royal visit

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2014-01-01

    On Wednesday, 21 May, CERN received His Majesty Philippe, King of the Belgians, for a full-day visit of the Laboratory.   From left to right: Tiziano Camporesi, CMS Spokesperson; François Englert, Nobel Prize in Physics 2013; Rolf Heuer, CERN Director-General; His Majesty Philippe, King of the Belgians; Philippe Courard, Belgium's State Secretary for Scientific Policy and Walter Van Doninck, CERN Council Vice-President. Director-General Rolf Heuer welcomed King Philippe to CERN at Point 5 (Cessy). This was to be no small visit, with His Majesty accompanied by a host of diplomats, prominent Belgian physicists - including François Englert - and even members of Belgium's press corps. After quick introductions, the morning began with a tour of the CMS underground experimental area and the LHC tunnel at Point 5, guided by the CMS Collaboration Spokesperson, Tiziano Camporesi, and the Director for Accelerators and Technology, Frédérick Bord...

  3. 76 FR 58243 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Survey of International Air Travelers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-20

    ... on state and local economies, providing visitation estimates, key market intelligence, and identifying traveler and trip characteristics. The U.S. Department of Commerce assists travel industry...) has been developed that reflects input from over 70 respondents, including: Travel Industry (airlines...

  4. Compliance with malaria chemoprophylaxis and preventative measures against mosquito bites among Dutch travellers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cobelens, F. G.; Leentvaar-Kuijpers, A.

    1997-01-01

    Self-reported compliance with a malaria chemoprophylaxis regimen of proguanil (PG) plus chloroquine (CQ) was assessed in a cohort of 547 Dutch travellers who visited a single travel clinic when travelling to various areas endemic for falciparum malaria. 503 (92%) had taken PG/CQ prophylaxis, but

  5. Towards improved uptake of malaria chemoprophylaxis among West African travellers: identification of behavioural determinants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieten, Rosanne W.; Harting, Janneke; Biemond, Pieter M.; Grobusch, Martin P.; van Vugt, Michèle

    2013-01-01

    Malaria is a potentially lethal illness for which preventive measures are not optimally used among all travellers. Travellers visiting friends and relatives in their country of origin (VFRs) are known to use chemoprophylaxis less consistently compared to tourist travellers. In this study, factors

  6. Supriya Jindal visits school

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Louisiana First Lady Supriya Jindal (left) speaks to teachers and students at A.P. Tureaud Elementary School in New Orleans during a March 19 visit. At the school, Jindal was joined by retired NASA astronaut Sally Ride, the first American woman in space. Ride was a crew member on space shuttle Challenger during its STS-7 mission in 1983. She also was a crew member of space shuttle discovery on the STS-41 mission in 1984.

  7. Visiting 'J' Village

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomek, J.

    2012-01-01

    Prior to entrance into twenty km evacuated zone of Fukushima Daiichi, there is so called 'J' Village. Until now, it was a centre used by the Japan football representation. Today, employees working at this locality as well as all visits pass this village. They can only enter the evacuated area in a bus, equipped with an electronic dosimeter, with a face mask, gloves, and shoe covers. (author)

  8. Spanish Visit to CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Last week CERN was visited by the Spanish Minister of Science and Technology, Josep Piqué i Camps. While here, he was able to visit the ATLAS assembly hall where many items of equipment are being built in collaboration with Spanish academic institutions or firms. These include the vacuum vessels for the ATLAS barrel toroid magnets supplied by the Spanish firm Felguera Construcciones Mechanics. Similarly, the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid is participating in the manufacture of the electromagnetic calorimeter endcaps, while the Barcelona Institute for High Energy Physics and the Valencia IFIC (Instituto de Física Corpuscular) are highly involved in the production of barrel modules for the tile calorimeter. The delegation, accompanied by Spanish scientists at CERN, also visited the LHC superconducting magnet test hall (photo). From left to right: Felix Rodriguez Mateos of CERN LHC Division, Josep Piqué i Camps, Spanish Minister of Science and Technology, César Dopazo, Director-General of CIEMAT (Spanish ...

  9. Serbian President visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2012-01-01

    On Tuesday 10 January, Serbian President Boris Tadić visited the Laboratory to sign the Agreement of granting the status of Associate Membership as the pre-stage to full Membership of CERN.    Before the signing ceremony, the President, welcomed by Director-General Rolf Heuer at CERN’s Point 5, took the opportunity to visit CERN. After a general introduction, the President took advantage of the shutdown to visit the LHC’s underground caverns. Leading the President through their respective experiments were spokespersons Fabiola Gianotti (ATLAS) and Joe Incandela (CMS).  After a morning of tours, President Tadić and Rolf Heuer signed the Agreement. Serbia’s status as an Associate Member as pre-stage to full Membership is expected to come into force following ratification by the Serbian Parliament. After a maximum period of five years, the CERN Council will decide on the admission of Serbia to full Membership. This new agreement continues Serbia&a...

  10. A boost to visits

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Several guides were rewarded by CERN's Director-General and Secretary-General for their contributions in 2004. Left to right: Géraldine Chuste, the Director-General Robert Aymar, Klaus Batzner, Philippe Moret, Joanna Weng, Alberto Ribon, Head of the Visits Service, Emma Sanders, and the Secretary-General, Maximilian Metzger. Three other guides not in the photograph, Antonio Francano, Christoph Ilgner and Tzanko Spassoff, were also rewarded for their contributions. As every year, the CERN Visits Service has paid tribute to its guides, all of whom are volunteers and devote some of their time to showing people around their Laboratory. The guides were invited to a get-together in Microcosm during which the Director-General, Robert Aymar, expressed his special gratitude for their efforts and presented awards to the most dedicated among them. He encouraged members of the Laboratory to become guides and underlined that 2004 had been an exceptional year for visits, which had risen by 15% to almost 22,000. Including ...

  11. EU Commissioner visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    European Commissioner Viviane Reding in front of one of the computers showing how the Grid works and, from left to right, Robert Aymar, CERN's Director-General, Wolfgang von Rüden, Head of the Information Technology Department, and Bob Jones, the newly appointed director of the EGEE project since 1st November. Viviane Reding, European Commissioner for Information Society and Media, visited CERN on 28 October. Accompanied throughout by CERN's Director-General, Robert Aymar, and the Head of the Information Technology Department, Wolfgang von Rüden, the Commissioner visited the ATLAS cavern before going on to the Information Technology Department, where she was given a complete overview of CERN's activities in the strategic field of Grid computing. Viviane Reding's visit coincided with the end of the EGEE (Enabling Grids for E-sciencE) conference, which took place in Pisa in Italy. Co-ordinated by CERN and funded by the European Commission, the EGEE project aims to set up a worldwide grid infrastructure for sc...

  12. EUCYS prizewinner visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Jennifer Toes

    2016-01-01

    Young Turkish student Baris Volkan Gürses visited CERN from 4 to 8 July after winning the prize in the 2015 European Contest for Young Scientists (EUCYS).    Baris Volkan Gürses, EUCYS prizewinner, visiting the Microcosm. After winning both regional and national competitions in Turkey, 18-year-old student Baris Volkan Gürses competed against 169 young scientists and was awarded a visit to CERN by EIROforum for his physics project in EUCYS 2015. His project, entitled “Generation of artificial gravity by using electrostatic force for prevention of muscle atrophy and osteoporosis occurring in gravity-free environments”, focused on the design of a mechanism to help with the impact of spaceflight on the human body. “My objective was to eliminate the negative effects of a gravity-free environment on astronauts who stay in space for longer periods of time, like in the International Space Station,” explained Volkan. &...

  13. Enquiries to the United Kingdom National Travel Advice Line by healthcare professionals regarding immunocompromised travellers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Joanna E; Patel, Dipti

    2016-03-01

    People who travel while immunocompromised are more at risk of serious travel-related infection. Their condition, medications or treatments can contraindicate, decrease the effectiveness of or increase the toxicity of vaccinations or malaria chemoprophylaxis. Therefore, immunocompromised travellers require careful assessment and specialized pre-travel advice. The aims of this study were to investigate enquiries by healthcare professionals (HCPs) to the UK National Travel Health Network and Centre (NaTHNaC) advice line regarding travellers with immunocompromise and to identify their most common concerns. Documentation for all calls taken by advisers at the London office during 2013 was reviewed. Of the 4910 enquiries to the London NaTHNaC advice line, 397 calls concerned immunocompromised travellers (8.1%). The majority of immunocompromised travellers were planning to visit Sub-Saharan Africa (53%) for the purpose of tourism (43%). Sixty-seven percent of enquiries concerned vaccine use, 11% were about malaria chemoprophylaxis, 20% were about both and 2% were for other reasons. Causes of immunocompromise included inflammatory or autoimmune conditions (43%), cancer (18%), splenic dysfunction (13%), immunosuppressive drugs (12%), human immunodeficiency virus (11%), primary immunodeficiency (1%), neutropenia (0.5%) and thymus abnormalities (0.5%). There were frequent enquires to the advice line by UK HCPs regarding immunocompromised travellers. The travellers in this study had a wide range of underlying medical conditions and varying levels of immunocompromise. These enquiries may reflect a lack of clarity in current national guidelines, difficulties in interpreting them or both. Establishing the reasons for these deficiencies as well as the reasons behind UK HCP concerns and lack of confidence requires further investigation. This research has highlighted potential knowledge gaps and will help inform future guidance and educational activities for UK HCPs advising

  14. Essential travel medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Zuckerman, Jane N; Leggat, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This 1st edition of Essential Travel Medicine provides an excellent concise introduction to the specialty of Travel Medicine. This core text will enable health care practitioners particularly those new to the clinical practice of Travel Medicine, to gain a fundamental understanding of the diverse and complex issues which can potentially affect the health of the many millions of people who undertake international travel. Jane N Zuckerman is joined by Gary W Brunette from CDC and Peter A Leggat from Australia as Editors. Leading international specialists in their fields have contributed authoritative chapters reflecting current knowledge to facilitate best clinical practice in the different aspects of travel medicine. The aim of Essential Travel Medicine is to provide a comprehensive guide to Travel Medicine as well as a fundamental knowledge base to support international undergraduate and postgraduate specialty training programmes in the discipline of Travel Medicine. The 1st edition of Essential Travel ...

  15. Travel characteristics and risk-taking attitudes in youths traveling to nonindustrialized countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Pauline; Balaban, Victor; Marano, Cinzia

    2010-01-01

    International travel to developing countries is increasing with rising levels of disposable income; this trend is seen in both adults and children. Risk-taking attitude is fundamental to research on the prevention of risky health behaviors, which can be an indicator of the likelihood of experiencing illness or injury during travel. The aim of this study is to investigate whether risk-taking attitudes of youths are associated with travel characteristics and likelihood of experiencing illness or injury while traveling to nonindustrialized countries. Data were analyzed from the 2008 YouthStyles survey, an annual mail survey gathering demographics and health knowledge, attitudes, and practices of individuals from 9 through 18 years of age. Travelers were defined as respondents who reported traveling in the last 12 months to a destination other than the United States, Canada, Europe, Japan, Australia, or New Zealand. Risk-taking attitude was measured by using a four-item Brief Sensation-Seeking Scale. All p values ≤ 0.05 were considered significant. Of 1,704 respondents, 131 (7.7%) traveled in the last 12 months. Females and those with higher household income were more likely to travel (odds ratio = 1.6,1.1). Of those who traveled, 16.7% reported seeking pretravel medical care, with most visiting a family doctor for that care (84.0%). However, one-fifth of respondents reported illness and injury during travel; of these, 83.3% traveled with their parents. Males and older youths had higher mean sensation-seeking scores. Further, travelers had a higher mean sensation-seeking score than nontravelers. Those who did not seek pretravel medical care also had higher mean sensation-seeking scores (p = 0.1, not significant). Our results show an association between risk-taking attitudes and youth travel behavior. However, adult supervision during travel and parental directives prior to travel should be taken into consideration. Communication messages should emphasize the

  16. The CERN Visits Service proposes: Lab Visits for CERN People

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The CMS assembly hall at point 5 - one of the new Visits Service itineraries. Discover the new visits itineraries of your laboratory with the Visits Service! The recently completed visitors platform in the CMS detector assembly hall at point 5, first of a series of new visit tours, will be the destination for special summer visits organised by the Visits Service for CERN people. Each week the Visits Service will reserve a slot to take CERN people to visit the CMS assembly hall and get first hand experience of the magnitude of the LHC endeavour. Tours will be shorter than the public visit programme, and will include a short introduction in the bus along with a guided tour of the CMS visitor platform. Visits will start at 3.30 pm from the visits meeting point in the reception of building 33, and the bus will be back at reception at 5 pm. Up to 24 people can take part in each visit. The calendar for the coming weeks is: Friday 27 July in French Thursday 2 August in English Wednesday 8 August in French Booking...

  17. The traveling salesman problem a computational study

    CERN Document Server

    Applegate, David L; Chvatal, Vasek; Cook, William J

    2006-01-01

    This book presents the latest findings on one of the most intensely investigated subjects in computational mathematics--the traveling salesman problem. It sounds simple enough: given a set of cities and the cost of travel between each pair of them, the problem challenges you to find the cheapest route by which to visit all the cities and return home to where you began. Though seemingly modest, this exercise has inspired studies by mathematicians, chemists, and physicists. Teachers use it in the classroom. It has practical applications in genetics, telecommunications, and neuroscience.

  18. Pregnancy course and outcome in women traveling to developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammour, Rami N; Bahous, Rabia; Grupper, Moti; Ohel, Gonen; Steinlauf, Shmuel; Schwartz, Eli; Potasman, Israel

    2012-01-01

    The issue of travel to developing countries during pregnancy has not been sufficiently studied. The aim of this study is to investigate the rate, course, and outcome of pregnancies in women who traveled to developing countries while pregnant, or became pregnant during such travel. Women visiting two major travel clinics in Israel for consultation within the years 2004 to 2009, who were pregnant or declared an intention of becoming pregnant during travel were contacted. This was followed by a telephone interview by an obstetrician with those women who were actually pregnant. Background characteristics, morbidity during travel, and pregnancy course and outcome were collected. Overall 52,430 travelers' records had been screened. Of these, we identified 49 women who were pregnant during their trip, but 3 declined participation. Of the remaining 46 women, 33 were pregnant at departure, and 13 conceived during travel. The incidence of pregnancy during travel was thus 0.93/1000 travelers. Thirty-three women traveled to East Asia, 8 to South and Central America, 5 to Africa. More than two thirds of women received pretravel vaccinations. Adherence to the World Health Organization recommendations regarding food and drink was high (87%) and travelers' diarrhea occurred in only 11% of women. Five of 22 women traveling to malarious areas had taken antimalarial prophylaxis. Six women required medical therapy during travel. Pregnancy outcome was not different from the normal population except for an unusually low rate of preterm delivery. In this cohort, travel to developing countries was not associated with adverse pregnancy outcome. Larger studies are needed to support these findings. © 2012 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  19. Emergency presurgical visit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Castro Díaz

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective has been to create a Protocol of Structured Presurgical Visit applicable to the patients who are undergoing an emergency surgery, to provide the user and his family all the necessary cares on the basis of those nursing diagnosis that prevail in all the cases of surgical emergency interventions. The used method has been an analysis of the emergency surgical interventions more prevalent from February 2007 until October 2008 in our area (a regional hospital, and statistic of those nursing diagnosis that more frequently appeared in these interventions, the previous moment to the intervention and in addition common to all of them. The results were the following ones: the more frequent emergency operations were: Caesarean, ginecological curettage, laparotomy, help in risk childbirth, orthopaedic surgery and appendectomy. The more frequent nursing diagnosis in all the emergency operations at the previous moment of the intervention were: risk of falls, pain, anxiety, deficit of knowledge, risk of infection, movement stress syndrome, risk of hemorrhage, cutaneous integrity deterioration. The conclusion is that users present at the previous moment to an emergency operation several problems, which force to the emergency surgical ward nurse to the introduction of the nursing methodology, in order to identify the problems, to mark results and to indicate the interventions to achieve those results, besides in a humanitarian way and with quality. This can be obtained by performing a Structured Emergency Presurgical Visit.

  20. Steven Weinberg visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Steven Weinberg visiting the ATLAS cavern accompanied by Peter JenniIt was no surprise that the CERN audience arrived early in the Globe of Science and Innovation for the colloquium on 7 July. Nobel laureate Steven Weinberg is one of the major contributors to the Standard Model of particle physics. He received the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1979 for his work on the unified theory of the electromagnetic and weak interactions, one of the essential pillars of the Standard Model. After lunch at CERN and a visit to ATLAS, Weinberg gave a colloquium on "The Quantum Theory of Fields: Effective or Fundamental" to a packed audience. In his talk, he looked at how the use of quantum field theory in particle physics has fluctuated in popularity since Paul Dirac first introduced the approach to describe the interaction of particles with electromagnetic fields in the late 1920s. In particular, he posed the question: Is quantum field theory fundamental or does it a...

  1. Kofi Annan visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2011-01-01

    On Tuesday 13 September, former Secretary-General of the United Nations and Nobel Peace Laureate Kofi Annan paid a visit to CERN.   Arriving in the early afternoon, Kofi Annan and his family were greeted by Director-General Rolf Heuer on the steps of Building 500. After a quick introduction to the Laboratory, they were whisked off to SM18 for a tour of the LHC’s superconducting magnet test hall, guided by Technology Department Head Frédérick Bordry. After a light lunch in Restaurant 2, Kofi Annan added his signature to CERN’s Guest Book. He is the second UN Secretary-General to add their name to CERN’s roster; his successor Ban Ki-Moon’s visited CERN in 2008.  Kofi Annan was then guided by spokesperson Fabiola Gianotti on a tour of ATLAS’s Visitor Centre. This was an opportunity for some of the younger members of the ATLAS collaboration to meet the former Secretary-General and to answer his questions about the exper...

  2. Immunocompromised Travelers: Demographic Characteristics, Travel Destinations, and Pretravel Health Care from the U.S. Global TravEpiNet Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Brian S; Rosen, Jessica; Han, Pauline V; Hynes, Noreen A; Hagmann, Stefan H; Rao, Sowmya R; Jentes, Emily S; Ryan, Edward T; LaRocque, Regina C

    2015-11-01

    An increasing number of immunocompromised individuals are pursuing international travel, and a better understanding of their international travel patterns and pretravel health care is needed. We evaluated the clinical features, itineraries, and pretravel health care of 486 immunocompromised international travelers seen at Global TravEpiNet sites from January 2009 to June 2012. We used bivariate analyses and logistic regressions using random intercept models to compare demographic and travel characteristics, vaccines administered, and medications prescribed for immunocompromised travelers versus 30,702 immunocompetent travelers. Immunocompromised travelers pursued itineraries that were largely similar to those of immunocompetent travelers, with nearly one-third of such travelers visiting countries with low human development indices. Biological agents, including tumor necrosis factor blockers, were commonly used immunosuppressive medications among immunocompromised travelers. A strong collaboration between travel-medicine specialists, primary care doctors, and specialist physicians is needed to prepare immunocompromised people for international travel. Incorporating routine questioning and planning regarding travel into the primary care visits of immunocompromised people may be useful. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  3. Travelling with HIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulla S; Jensen-Fangel, Søren; Pedersen, Gitte

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We aimed to describe travel patterns, extent of professional pre-travel advice and health problems encountered during travel among HIV-infected individuals. METHODS: During a six-month period a questionnaire was handed out to 2821 adult HIV-infected individuals attending any...... of the eight Danish medical HIV care centers. RESULTS: A total of 763 individuals responded. During the previous two years 49% had travelled outside Europe; 18% had travelled less and 30% were more cautious when choosing travel destination than before the HIV diagnosis. Pre-travel advice was sought by only 38......%, and travel insurance was taken out by 86%. However, 29%/74% did not inform the advisor/the insurance company about their HIV status. Nearly all patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) were adherent, but 58% worried about carrying HIV-medicine and 19% tried to hide it. Only 19% experienced...

  4. End to End Travel

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — E2 Solutions is a web based end-to-end travel management tool that includes paperless travel authorization and voucher document submissions, document approval...

  5. Traveling with Food Allergies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on traveling and dining out at restaurants with food allergies. Travel Tips for the U.S. and Other Countries Get information about medications and food labeling practices in select countries. Spam Control Text: ...

  6. HIV and travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuhwerk, M A; Richens, J; Zuckerman, Jane N

    2006-01-01

    There is a high demand for travel among HIV-positive individual. This demand arises partly from those who have benefited from advances in antiretroviral therapy as well as those with disease progression. The key to a successful and uneventful holiday lies in careful pre-trip planning, yet many patients fail to obtain advice before travelling. Travel advice for HIV patients is becoming increasingly specialized. In addition to advice on common travel-related infectious diseases, HIV-positive travellers are strongly advised to carry information with them and they need specific advice regarding country entry restrictions, HIV inclusive travel insurance, safety of travel vaccinations and highly active antiretroviral therapy-related issues. A wide range of relevant issues for the HIV-positive traveller are discussed in this review and useful websites can be found at the end.

  7. Traveling Safely with Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medications Safely My Medicine List How to Administer Traveling Safely with Medicines Planes, trains, cars – even boats ... your trip, ask your pharmacist about how to travel safely with your medicines. Make sure that you ...

  8. Travelers' Health: Leishmaniasis, Visceral

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... such as the United States reflects travel and immigration patterns. VL is uncommon in US travelers and ... whqlibdoc.who.int/trs/WHO_TRS_949_eng.pdf . Chapter 3 - Leishmaniasis, Cutaneous Chapter 3 - Leptospirosis File ...

  9. Traveling and Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Traveling and Asthma KidsHealth / For Kids / Traveling and Asthma Print en ... pack it, too. How Can I Avoid My Asthma Triggers? Staying at a hotel Ask for a ...

  10. The CERN Visits Service proposes: Lab Visits for CERN People

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    The CMS assembly hall at point 5 - one of the new Visits Service itineraries. Discover the new visits itineraries of your laboratory with the Visits Service! The recently completed visitors platform in the CMS detector assembly hall at point 5, first of a series of new visit itineraries, will be the destination for special summer visits organised by the Visits Service for CERN people. Each week the Visits Service will reserve a slot to take CERN people to visit the CMS assembly hall and get first hand experience of the magnitude of the LHC endeavour. Tours will be shorter than the public visit programme, and will include a short introduction in the bus along with a guided tour of the CMS visitor platform. Visits will start at 3.30 pm from the reception of building 33, and the bus will be back at reception at 5 pm. Up to 22 people can take part in each visit. The calendar for the coming weeks is: Wednesday 15 August in English Wednesday 22 August in French Wednesday 29 August in English Bookings should be m...

  11. The CERN Visits Service proposes: Lab Visits for CERN People

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    The CMS assembly hall at point 5 - one of the new Visits Service itineraries. Discover the new visits itineraries of your laboratory with the Visits Service! The recently completed visitors platform in the CMS detector assembly hall at point 5, first of a series of new visit itineraries, will be the destination for special summer visits organised by the Visits Service for CERN people. Each week the Visits Service will reserve a slot to take CERN people to visit the CMS assembly hall and get first hand experience of the magnitude of the LHC endeavour. Tours will be shorter than the public visit programme, and will include a short introduction in the bus along with a guided tour of the CMS visitor platform. Visits will start at 3.30 pm from the reception of building 33, and the bus will be back at reception at 5 pm. Up to 22 people can take part in each visit. The calendar for the coming weeks is: Wednesday 8 August in French Wednesday 15 August in English Wednesday 22 August in French Bookings should be mad...

  12. The CERN Visits Service proposes: Lab Visits for CERN People

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    The CMS assembly hall at point 5 - one of the new Visits Service itineraries. Discover the new visits itineraries of your laboratory with the Visits Service! The recently completed visitors platform in the CMS detector assembly hall at point 5, first of a series of new visit itineraries, will be the destination for special summer visits organised by the Visits Service for CERN people. Each week the Visits Service will reserve a slot to take CERN people to visit the CMS assembly hall and get first hand experience of the magnitude of the LHC endeavour. Tours will be shorter than the public visit programme, and will include a short introduction in the bus along with a guided tour of the CMS visitor platform. Visits will start at 3.30 pm from the reception of building 33, and the bus will be back at reception at 5 pm. Up to 22 people can take part in each visit. The calendar for the coming weeks is: Thursday 2 August in English Wednesday 8 August in French Wednesday 15 August in English Bookings should be made...

  13. k-visit Attribute Grammars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielson, Hanne Riis; Skyum, S.

    1981-01-01

    It is shown that any well-defined attribute grammar is k-visit for some k. Furthermore, it is shown that given a well-defined grammar G and an integer k, it is decidable whether G is k-visit. Finally it is shown that the k-visit grammars specify a proper hierarchy with respect to translations...

  14. Traveling wave laser system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregg, D.W.; Kidder, R.E.; Biehl, A.T.

    1975-01-01

    A method is described for generating a traveling wave laser pulse of almost unlimited energy content wherein a gain medium is pumped into a traveling wave mode, the traveling wave moving at essentially the velocity of light to generate an amplifying region or zone which moves through the medium at the velocity of light in the presence of directed stimulating radiation, thereby generating a traveling coherent, directed radiation pulse moving with the amplification zone through the gain medium. (U.S.)

  15. Travel, infection and immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Soonawala, Darius

    2016-01-01

    Preface: The content of this thesis is based on research that was conducted at the travel and vaccination clinic at Leiden University Medical Centre (LUMC). This clinic provides pre-travel care to the general population, and to special groups of travellers, such as patients who use immunosuppressants or who have chronic diseases. The clinic is closely connected to the department of Infectious Diseases at LUMC. The setting of a travel clinic within an academic medical hospital, provides unique...

  16. Post-Travel Consultations in a Regional Hub City Hospital, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaita, Kenichiro; Sakai, Yoshiro; Iwahashi, Jun; Masunaga, Kenji; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    To clarify the characteristics of post-travel consultation services in Japan, particularly in the provinces, we analyzed our post-travel patients in the travel clinic of Kurume University Hospital located in Kurume City (a regional hub City in southwestern Japan). Sixty post-travel patients visited our clinic between April 2008 and October 2014 and participated in this study: 55 were Japanese and five were foreign. We summarized and compared the characteristics of the patients after dividing the Japanese participants into long-term travelers (>14 days) and short-term travelers (≤14 days). The foreign travelers were described in a separate analysis. Of the 55 Japanese travelers, the mean age (± standard deviation) was 37.3 ± 16.3 years, and 36 patients (65%) were men. Southeast Asia was the major destination (30/55, 55%), and business was stated as the major reason for travel (16/55, 29%). Post-exposure rabies prophylaxis (16/55, 29%) was the most common purpose for the consultations. There were 34 participants (62%) who were classified as short-term travelers. Fewer of the short-term travelers stated receiving pre-travel consultations compared with long-term travelers (11% vs. 79%, p=0.0002). The five foreign travelers included one dengue fever patient and two malaria patients. Most post-travel Japanese patients visited our clinic were short-term travelers who had not received any pre-travel consultation. One of the most common complaints, post-exposure rabies prophylaxis, could have been avoided to some extent by appropriate pre-travel consultations. The results of this study suggest that pre-travel consultations should therefore be encouraged for both long- and short-term travelers.

  17. Travel, infection and immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soonawala, Darius

    2016-01-01

    Preface: The content of this thesis is based on research that was conducted at the travel and vaccination clinic at Leiden University Medical Centre (LUMC). This clinic provides pre-travel care to the general population, and to special groups of travellers, such as patients who use

  18. Travel Agent Course Outline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    British Columbia Dept. of Education, Victoria.

    Written for college entry-level travel agent training courses, this course outline can also be used for inservice training programs offered by travel agencies. The outline provides information on the work of a travel agent and gives clear statements on what learners must be able to do by the end of their training. Material is divided into eight…

  19. Modelling urban travel times

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zheng, F.

    2011-01-01

    Urban travel times are intrinsically uncertain due to a lot of stochastic characteristics of traffic, especially at signalized intersections. A single travel time does not have much meaning and is not informative to drivers or traffic managers. The range of travel times is large such that certain

  20. Traveling wave laser system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregg, D.W.; Kidder, R.E.; Biehl, A.T.

    1975-01-01

    The invention broadly involves a method and means for generating a traveling wave laser pulse and is basically analogous to a single pass light amplifier system. However, the invention provides a traveling wave laser pulse of almost unlimited energy content, wherein a gain medium is pumped in a traveling wave mode, the traveling wave moving at essentially the velocity of light to generate an amplifying region or zone which moves through the medium at the velocity of light in the presence of directed stimulating radiation, thereby generating a traveling coherent, directed radiation pulse moving with the amplification zone through the gain medium. (U.S.)

  1. Concorde Re-visited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Peter; Moore, Peter

    This year marks the twentieth anniversary of the introduction of Concorde into commercial airline service. The first commercial flights were on 21 January 1976 - British Airways from Heathrow to Bahrain and Air France from Paris to Rio via Dakar. Later in that year commercial flights to Washington/Dulles began on 24 May. Services to New York were delayed until 22 November 1977. The first flight of Concorde was some seven years earlier. The prototype took off out of Toulouse on 2 March 1969 and this was followed by 002 from Filton to Fairford on 9 April. At the time it was anticipated that this was the beginning of an era when supersonic flight would be the normal way to travel long distances. Now, in 1996, Concorde is still the world's only supersonic commercial passenger airliner in airline service. This is an extraordinary achievement. The Boeing SST proved to be too ambitious and the programme was halted in 1971 after the United States Government withdrew support, while the Russian TU 144 was beset with problems. One TU 144 crashed at the Paris Air Show in 1973. The aircraft entered internal airline service in December 1975, flying supersonically between Moscow and Alma-Ata, capital of Kazakhstan, carrying mail and freight, but it did not have the range to operate viable intercontinental passenger serives. Certainly by 1985, if not many years before, the TU 144 was out of service.

  2. Travel risk behaviours and uptake of pre-travel health preventions by university students in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heywood, Anita E; Zhang, Meng; MacIntyre, C Raina; Seale, Holly

    2012-02-17

    Forward planning and preventative measures before travelling can significantly reduce the risk of many vaccine preventable travel-related infectious diseases. Higher education students may be at an increased risk of importing infectious disease as many undertake multiple visits to regions with higher infectious disease endemicity. Little is known about the health behaviours of domestic or international university students, particularly students from low resource countries who travel to high-resource countries for education. This study aimed to assess travel-associated health risks and preventative behaviours in a sample of both domestic and international university students in Australia. In 2010, a 28 item self-administered online survey was distributed to students enrolled at the University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia. Multiple methods of distributing links to the online survey were utilised. The survey examined the international travel history, travel intentions, infection control behaviours and self-reported vaccination history. A total of 1663 respondents completed the online survey, 22.1% were international students and 83.9% were enrolled at an undergraduate level. Half had travelled internationally in the previous 12 months, with 69% of those travelling only once during that time with no difference in travel from Australia between domestic and international students (p = 0.8). Uptake of pre-travel health advice was low overall with 68% of respondents reporting they had not sought any advice from a health professional prior to their last international trip. Domestic students were more likely to report uptake of a range of preventative travel health measures compared to international students, including diarrhoeal medication, insect repellent, food avoidance and condoms (P students reported low risk perception of travel threats and a low corresponding concern for these threats. Our study highlights the need to educate students about the risk

  3. Travelers' Health: Water Disinfection for Travelers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safety Road Safety - 8 Steps MERS Health Advisory poster MERS Pictogram CDC Guide for Healthy Travel Website ... compressed carbon, or large-pore hollow-fiber filter elements are sufficient to remove bacteria and protozoan cysts ...

  4. Pre-travel advice: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Christopher

    2002-12-01

    The message of the pre-travel provider is necessarily paradoxic. First the provider lists a score of causes of illness and premature demise, and then states, "But it sounds like a great trip and I think you'll have fun." Pre-travel providers need to walk a fine line: they must encourage patients to be cautious but not paranoid, optimistic but realistic. This discussion is complicated further by the fact that risk reduction is not the only consideration; if it were, practitioners would advise patients to remain in the developed world and foray from their homes only to visit health clubs and the fruit-and-vegetable section of grocery stores. A tacit assumption in travel medicine is that some degree of acceptance of heightened risk is tolerated for the benefit of improved quality of life offered by travel abroad. The amount of risk that is reasonable to accept for a given benefit in quality of life yielded by travel cannot be quantified, however. Providers must render judgments on what is "reasonable" and what is not, and this complex decision is based on equal parts medical knowledge and intuition. At one extreme, mountaineers in Nepal have been found to have a 2.4% mortality rate per expedition [83,84]. The travel provider might make the reasonable decision to counsel these travelers to avoid that activity. These travelers most likely will ignore that advice, at which point the provider must endeavor to reduce risk to the extent possible. Other situations in which the provider should advise a change in itinerary or activities include counseling parents who plan to take an infant to high altitude or a pregnant woman who plans to scuba dive. If travelers remain cloistered in their hotel rooms, eating all meals from room service and watching CNN, then it could be suggested that they are overly risk-adverse and might consider foraying out of the hotel, despite the potential associated increased risks to health. Conversely, if travelers find themselves on motorcycles

  5. Topic Map for Authentic Travel

    OpenAIRE

    Wandsvik, Atle; Zare, Mehdi

    2007-01-01

    E-business is a new trend in Internet use. Authentic travel is an approach to travel and travel business which helps the traveler experience what is authentic in the travel destination. But how can the traveler find those small authentic spots and organize them together to compose a vacation? E-business techniques, combined withTopic Maps, can help.

  6. Commissaire Moulin visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2014-01-01

    The French actor and film-maker Yves Rénier was shown around the Laboratory on Friday 6 June by friends at CERN.   Yves Rénier at LEIR. (Photo: Ludwig Pregernig) A keen diver and star of the long-running French television police drama Commissaire Moulin, Yves Rénier took advantage of a stopover in Geneva on his way to the Red Sea to meet up with his friends from the CERN Diving Club, who were only too pleased to take him on a tour of the Laboratory. In the morning, Yves Rénier visited the CERN Control Centre (CCC), Linac2 and LEIR. After lunch at the brasserie in Restaurant No. 2, the actor continued his tour with the CERN Computer Centre, the SM18 superconducting magnet test facility, and lastly the ATLAS experiment. “Thank you so much for showing me around and introducing me to a world I knew so little about,” confided Yves Rénier. “It’s fascinating to see so many scientists of different cultures,...

  7. Claude Nicollier visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Jordan Juras

    2011-01-01

    Switzerland’s first astronaut, Claude Nicollier, paid a short visit to CERN on Thursday 22 June, to lead a colloquium about the Hubble Space Telescope. With the Shuttle programme soon coming to an end. Nicollier recalled the enriching experience he had at NASA and gave us a preview of the futuristic project that he is currently involved in.   The colloquium, Hubble, the astronomer, the telescope, the results, surveyed the three themes suggested by its title: the fundamental discoveries made by Edwin Hubble in the early 20th century, servicing the telescope in orbit and the main results recently obtained relating to the structure and history of our universe. Nicollier spoke from the rare perspective of an astronaut who has had real contact with Hubble in orbit and included some of his own photography from the missions. Nicollier has an intimate relationship with the telescope that very few astrophysicists share. “I had the opportunity to service Hubble twice, both from the comf...

  8. Spaceflight participant visits CERN!

    CERN Multimedia

    Kathryn Coldham

    2016-01-01

    On 15 July, CERN welcomed spaceflight participant Anousheh Ansari.   Anousheh Ansari’s grin stretches from ear to ear, during an intriguing conversation with Nobel laureate Samuel C.C. Ting at AMS POCC. (Image: Maximilien Brice/CERN) Iranian-American Anousheh Ansari was the first-ever female spaceflight participant, spending eight days on the International Space Station (ISS) in 2006. She now has a new addition to her list of extraordinary sights ­– the home of the world’s largest particle accelerator: CERN.   On 15 July, Anousheh Ansari came to CERN and, unsurprisingly, visited the control room of the experiment attached to the ISS: the AMS. At the AMS Payload Operations Control Centre (AMS POCC) on CERN’s Prévessin site, she met the Nobel laureate Samuel Ting, spokesperson of the AMS experiment. Ansari and her accompanying guests were thrilled to expand their knowledge about CERN, its research and its...

  9. A royal visit

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    On 19 February Albert II, King of the Belgians, visited CERN. He took a very active interest during his tour of the tunnel and the CMS cavern, in particular the pixel detector, which was made in Belgium. var flash_video_player=get_video_player_path(); insert_player_for_external('Video/Public/Movies/2009/CERN-MOVIE-2009-002/CERN-MOVIE-2009-002-0753-kbps-640x360-25-fps-audio-64-kbps-44-kHz-stereo', 'mms://mediastream.cern.ch/MediaArchive/Video/Public/Movies/2009/CERN-MOVIE-2009-002/CERN-MOVIE-2009-002-Multirate-200-to-753-kbps-640x360-25-fps.wmv', 'false', 533, 300, 'https://mediastream.cern.ch/MediaArchive/Video/Public/Movies/2009/CERN-MOVIE-2009-002/CERN-MOVIE-2009-002-posterframe-640x360-at-10-percent.jpg', '1164771', true, 'Video/Public/Movies/2009/CERN-MOVIE-2009-002/CERN-MOVIE-2009-002-0600-kbps-maxH-360-25-fps-audio-128-kbps-48-kHz-stereo.mp4'); Watch the video! Albert II, King of the Belgians receiving a souvenir from Sergio Bertolucci, Director for Research and...

  10. STUK visited Chelyabinsk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reponen, H.

    1994-01-01

    Early this year, experts of the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK) visited the Chelyabinsk reprocessing plant in Russia to get an idea of the safety of the plant and the state of its environment. The plant is used, among other things, to process spent fuel from the Loviisa nuclear power plant. Chelyabinsk was originally established for the development of nuclear weapons. At the time, after the Second World War, safety was grossly neglected. Later the plant concentrated on the production of raw materials for bombs, and then safety was also taken into account as an issue of concern. Production of weapon grade plutonium ceased at Chelyabinsk in 1990. STUK's experts did not find any safety reasons that would justify stopping the transport of spent fuel. The principal threat to the area is by untended waste within the plant site. The waste was produced during the initial years of the plant's operation; it should be isolated from the environment quickly. Greenpeace has disclosed that the hospitals of the area have many cancer patients. Mismanagement during the early years of operation and two major accidents at Chelyabinsk resulted in radiation doses dangerous to the health of the population. It has not, however, been shown to what extent the current health problems are caused by the Chelyabinsk plant, and to what extent by other factors, for instance, the heavy-metal industry in the area. (orig.)

  11. Travel characteristics and health practices among travellers at the travellers' health and vaccination clinic in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Vernon J; Wilder-Smith, Annelies

    2006-10-01

    Singapore has a fast-growing travel industry, but few studies have been done on travel characteristics and travel health practices. This study describes the profile and healthseeking behaviour of travellers attending a travel health clinic in Singapore. A cross-sectional survey was conducted on travellers attending the Traveller's Health and Vaccination Centre (THVC) between September and November 2002 using a standardised questionnaire. Information obtained included individual demographic and medical information, travel patterns, vaccination status and travel health practices. Four hundred and ninetyfive (74%) eligible travellers seen at THVC responded to the questionnaire. Their mean age was 36 years; 77% were professionals, managers, executives, and businessmen, students, and white collar workers. Asia was the main travel destination, and most travelled for leisure and resided in hotels or hostels. The median duration of travel was 16 days. Although >90% had previously travelled overseas, only 20% had previously sought pre-travel advice. Malays were significantly underrepresented (P travel advice compared with Chinese, Indians and Malays. Factors associated with seeking pre-travel advice included travel outside of Asia, especially Africa and South America. Singaporean travellers travel more often to cities rather than rural areas, compared with non-Asian travellers. Asia is the preferred destination, and travel outside of Asia is perceived as more risky and is associated with seeking pre-travel advice and vaccinations. Travel patterns and behaviours need to be taken into account when developing evidence-based travel medicine in Asia.

  12. Are we there yet? Travel vaccinations for Australian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slonim, Marnie; Starr, Mike; Blashki, Grant

    2014-06-01

    Australians travel overseas frequently and general practitioners (GPs) are often asked to provide detailed advice on travel vaccinations for children. Planning a safe and effective vaccination schedule is dependent on the context: where and when the family is travelling, the individual child's medical needs and past vaccination history, and if they are visiting family and friends. In this paper we provide an overview of the issues to consider when vaccinating Australian children for overseas travel. We also list the suite of common travel vaccinations and discuss some clinical scenarios that are likely to present in Australian general practice. Australians love to travel overseas and, increasingly, GPs are asked by patients to provide detailed advice on travel vaccinations for their children. Decisions regarding vaccinations for travelling children can be complex and the advice often differs from that provided for adults. Children differ from adults in their vulnerability to illnesses and side effects of medications. These differences, as well as their status regarding routine childhood vaccinations, all need to be taken into account. As with adults, it is important to consider the location and duration of travel and time until departure. The age of the child is also important and there may be a case for accelerating the routine childhood vaccinations in some children. The aim of this paper is to provide a clear and simple outline of the vaccination recommendations for children travelling overseas from Australia.

  13. Previous exposure in a high-risk area for travellers' diarrhoea within the past year is associated with a significant protective effect for travellers' diarrhoea: a prospective observational cohort study in travellers to South Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuenzli, Esther; Juergensen, David; Kling, Kerstin; Jaeger, Veronika K; DeCrom, Susan; Steffen, Robert; Widmer, Andreas F; Battegay, Manuel; Hatz, Christoph; Neumayr, Andreas

    2017-09-01

    Travellers' diarrhoea is the most common health problem in travellers. Depending on the region visited, up to 40% of travellers develop diarrhoea during a 2-week trip. The aim of this study was to assess risk factors for TD among travellers to the Indian subcontinent. An observational prospective multicentre cohort study investigated travellers to the Indian subcontinent. Participants completed questionnaires assessing the incidence of travellers' diarrhoea and identifying potential risk factors. Covariates were assessed univariately, followed by a multivariate regression. Two-hundred and twenty-six travellers were enrolled into the study, 178 filled in both pre- and post-travel questionnaires. Overall, the attack rate of travellers' diarrhoea was 38.2%. Travel destination is a key risk factor for the occurrence of TD. Travelling to India or Nepal vs Bhutan is associated with an increased risk for TD (OR 6.68 and 6.62, respectively). A length of stay of more than 3 weeks compared to less than 2 weeks is also associated with a significantly increased risk (OR 5.45). Having stayed in a high-risk area for travellers' diarrhoea within the past year before the current trip is associated with a significantly decreased risk (OR 0.19). No association was found between consumption of high risk food (i.e. tap water, ice cream, raw meat and hamburgers) and travellers' diarrhoea. Travellers' diarrhoea is a frequent problem in travellers to the Indian subcontinent. Previous exposure in a high-risk area for travellers' diarrhoea within the past year appears to have a significant protective effect. Furthermore, an association between the occurrence of travellers' diarrhoea and travel destination and length of stay, respectively, was observed. Consumption of risk food did not confer a TD risk in our study. © International Society of Travel Medicine, 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  14. The Medicare Annual Wellness Visit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colburn, Jessica L; Nothelle, Stephanie

    2018-02-01

    The Medicare Annual Wellness Visit is an annual preventive health benefit, which was created in 2011 as part of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. The visit provides an opportunity for clinicians to review preventive health recommendations and screen for geriatric syndromes. In this article, the authors review the requirements of the Annual Wellness Visit, discuss ways to use the Annual Wellness Visit to improve the care of geriatric patients, and provide suggestions for how to incorporate this benefit into a busy clinic. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Travel risk behaviours and uptake of pre-travel health preventions by university students in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heywood Anita E

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Forward planning and preventative measures before travelling can significantly reduce the risk of many vaccine preventable travel-related infectious diseases. Higher education students may be at an increased risk of importing infectious disease as many undertake multiple visits to regions with higher infectious disease endemicity. Little is known about the health behaviours of domestic or international university students, particularly students from low resource countries who travel to high-resource countries for education. This study aimed to assess travel-associated health risks and preventative behaviours in a sample of both domestic and international university students in Australia. Methods In 2010, a 28 item self-administered online survey was distributed to students enrolled at the University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia. Multiple methods of distributing links to the online survey were utilised. The survey examined the international travel history, travel intentions, infection control behaviours and self-reported vaccination history. Results A total of 1663 respondents completed the online survey, 22.1% were international students and 83.9% were enrolled at an undergraduate level. Half had travelled internationally in the previous 12 months, with 69% of those travelling only once during that time with no difference in travel from Australia between domestic and international students (p = 0.8. Uptake of pre-travel health advice was low overall with 68% of respondents reporting they had not sought any advice from a health professional prior to their last international trip. Domestic students were more likely to report uptake of a range of preventative travel health measures compared to international students, including diarrhoeal medication, insect repellent, food avoidance and condoms (P Conclusions Our study highlights the need to educate students about the risk associated with travel and improve preventative

  16. Fecal-orally transmitted diseases among travelers are decreasing due to better hygienic standards at travel destination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baaten, Gijs G; Sonder, Gerard J B; Van Der Loeff, Maarten F Schim; Coutinho, Roel A; Van Den Hoek, Anneke

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate whether changes in attack rates of fecal-orally transmitted diseases among travelers are related to changes in pretravel vaccination practices or better hygienic standards at travel destination. National surveillance data on all laboratory-confirmed cases of travel-related hepatitis A, shigellosis, and typhoid fever diagnosed in the Netherlands from 1995 to 2006 were matched with the number of Dutch travelers to developing countries to calculate region-specific annual attack rates. Trends in attack rates of non-vaccine-preventable shigellosis were compared with those of vaccine-preventable hepatitis A and typhoid fever. Trends were also compared with three markers for hygienic standards of the local population at travel destinations, drawn from the United Nations Development Programme database: the human development index, the sanitation index, and the water source index. Attack rates among Dutch travelers to developing regions declined for hepatitis A, shigellosis, and typhoid fever. Region-specific trends in attack rates of shigellosis resembled trends of hepatitis A and typhoid fever. Declining attack rates of the three fecal-orally transmitted diseases correlated with improvements in socioeconomic, sanitary, and water supply conditions of the local population at travel destination. These findings suggest that improved hygienic standards at travel destination strongly contributed to the overall decline in attack rates of fecal-orally transmitted diseases among visiting travelers. © 2010 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  17. Common Health Risks, Required Precautions of Travelers and their Customs Towards the Use of Travel Medicine Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roupa, Zoe; Zikos, Dimitrios; Vasilopoulos, Aristides; Diomidous, Marianna

    2012-01-01

    There is an increasing number of people who travel around the world. Every traveler is exposed to nearly all infectious risks which may occur during his travel time. Some of the main risk factors can be water quality, temperature and high humidity and the exposure to multi-resistant microorganisms. To tackle the upcoming problem there is an imperative need to develop a new branch of medicine with the name of travel medicine. A consultation prior to departure for an upcoming trip is required, focusing to a personalized healthcare plan, based on international scientific protocols and epidemiological studies.Travelers must acquire essential information about the prevailing hygiene conditions and climatic differentiations that occur in the region. Additionally there are several health risks upon the arrival at destination. A scheduled visit to a health professional is necessary, especially in the case of travelers suffering from chronic diseases or those taking medication, while vaccination is considered essential for specific destination countries. Healthcare professionals should be able to inform travelers and evaluate their needs. According to research studies on notion and attitudes travelers' specific risks, only few of them are well-informed during a trip. While most studies indicate that travelers have some kind of pre travel medical consultation, not all of them proceed to the required vaccinations and medications. Travelling for business or leisure around the world may be unhealthy. The importance of proper preparation prior to the travel requires to be adequately informed by specialized healthcare professionals, and to receive appropriate vaccinations and medications, when required. The results of the review of notions and attitudes of travelers during the trip indicate not only the need for further development of the branch of travel medicine but especially the need for the expansion and the availability of health services.

  18. Pre-travel preparation practices among business travellers to tropical and subtropical destinations: results from the Athens International Airport Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavli, Androula; Silvestros, Chrysovalantis; Patrinos, Stavros; Lymperi, Ioanna; Maltezou, Helena C

    2014-01-01

    The number of business travellers from Greece to tropical and subtropical areas has recently increased. The study aimed to assess travel health preparation practices of business travellers departing to Africa, the Middle East and Asia. A questionnaire-based survey was conducted at Athens International Airport, from 1st of November 2011 to 30th of April 2013. A total of 684 business travellers participated in the study; the majority were men (86.1%), of Greek nationality (95.3%), with tertiary education (90.8%) and employed (98%). Their mean age was 40 years; 62% and 26% of them were 35-49 and 19-34 years of age respectively. 84.8% were travelling alone. Most frequent destinations were the Middle East (46.8%) and sub-Saharan Africa (16%). For 23.5% of the travellers it was their first trip to a tropical or subtropical country. Only 58.8% pursued pre-travel health consultation; vaccination and malaria chemoprophylaxis were administered to 24.7% and 25.7% of the travellers, respectively. Hepatitis A and typhoid vaccination rates were lower than expected (70% and 35%, respectively). Nearly half of the travellers who visited malaria endemic areas did not receive any chemoprophylaxis. Having elementary education level, travelling to the Middle East or North Africa, travelling for less than 1 month duration, and staying in a house or a hotel were associated with a higher probability of not pursuing health consultation. Significant gaps were found in pre-travel health practices of business travellers departing to Africa, the Middle East and Asia. Strategies should be developed in order to improve awareness of business travellers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. TRAVEL AND HOME LEAVE

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2002-01-01

    Administrative procedures for : Travel to the home station and home leave (hl) Additional travel to the home station (at) Travel to the home station and home leave for family reasons (hlf) As part of the process of simplifying administrative procedures, HR and AS Divisions have devised a new, virtually automatic procedure for payment of travel expenses to the home station. The changes are aimed at rationalising administrative procedures and not at reducing benefits. The conditions of eligibility are unchanged. The new procedure, which will be operational with effect from 1st June 2002, will greatly simplify the administrative processing of claims for travel expenses and the recording of home leaves. Currently, requests for payment are introduced manually into the Advances and Claims system (AVCL) by divisional secretariats. All travel to the home station starting prior to 1st June 2002 will be processed according to the existing system whereas that starting on 1st June and after will be processed accordi...

  20. FORMS OF YOUTH TRAVEL

    OpenAIRE

    Moisã Claudia Olimpia; Moisã Claudia Olimpia

    2011-01-01

    Taking into account the suite of motivation that youth has when practicing tourism, it can be said that the youth travel takes highly diverse forms. These forms are educational tourism, volunteer programs and “work and travel”, cultural exchanges or sports tourism and adventure travel. In this article, we identified and analyzed in detail the main forms of youth travel both internationally and in Romania. We also illustrated for each form of tourism the specific tourism products targeting you...

  1. Travelling or not?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helles, Rasmus; Lai, Signe Sophus

    2017-01-01

    -12) travelling to multiple countries on several continents. The article shows that there are systematic differences in terms of formal characteristics, themes, and characters’ communicative style between the series that travel and the series that do not. Especially, the analysis finds that the presence of strong...... female lead characters is systematically linked to the positive travel patterns of the series, and that this cuts across different genres of series. The analysis also finds that series, which have explicitly low production values and simple narrative structure, systematically travels poorer....

  2. Pre-Travel Medical Preparation of Business and Occupational Travelers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nomana M.; Jentes, Emily S.; Brown, Clive; Han, Pauline; Rao, Sowmya R.; Kozarsky, Phyllis; Hagmann, Stefan H.F.; LaRocque, Regina C.; Ryan, Edward T.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to understand more about pre-travel preparations and itineraries of business and occupational travelers. Methods: De-identified data from 18 Global TravEpiNet clinics from January 2009 to December 2012 were analyzed. Results: Of 23,534 travelers, 61% were non-occupational and 39% occupational. Business travelers were more likely to be men, had short times to departure and shorter trip durations, and commonly refused influenza, meningococcal, and hepatitis B vaccines. Most business travelers indicated that employers suggested the pre-travel health consultation, whereas non-occupational travelers sought consultations because of travel health concerns. Conclusions: Sub-groups of occupational travelers have characteristic profiles, with business travelers being particularly distinct. Employers play a role in encouraging business travelers to seek pre-travel consultations. Such consultations, even if scheduled immediately before travel, can identify vaccination gaps and increase coverage. PMID:26479857

  3. Cluster of Imported Vivax Malaria in Travelers Returning From Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitzel, Thomas; Labarca, Jaime; Cortes, Claudia P; Rosas, Reinaldo; Balcells, M Elvira; Perret, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    We report a cluster of imported vivax malaria in three of five Chilean travelers returning from Peru in March 2015. The cluster highlights the high risk of malaria in the Loreto region in northern Peru, which includes popular destinations for international nature and adventure tourism. According to local surveillance data, Plasmodium vivax is predominating, but Plasmodium falciparum is also present, and the incidence of both species has increased during recent years. Travelers visiting this region should be counseled about the prevention of malaria and the options for chemoprophylaxis. © 2015 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  4. Pharmacist home visits: A 1-year experience from a community pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monte, Scott V; Passafiume, Sarah N; Kufel, Wesley D; Comerford, Patrick; Trzewieczynski, Dean P; Andrus, Kenneth; Brody, Peter M

    2016-01-01

    To provide experience on the methods and costs for delivering a large-scale community pharmacist home visit service. Independent urban community pharmacy, Buffalo, NY. Mobile Pharmacy Solutions provides traditional community pharmacy walk-in service and a suite of clinically oriented services, including outbound adherence calls linked to home delivery, payment planning, medication refill synchronization, adherence packaging, and pharmacist home visits. Pharmacist daily staffing included three dispensing pharmacists, one residency-trained pharmacist, and two postgraduate year 1 community pharmacy residents. A large-scale community pharmacy home visit service delivered over a 1-year period. Pharmacist time and cost to administer the home visit service as well as home visit request sources and description of patient demographics. A total of 172 visits were conducted (137 initial, 35 follow-up). Patients who received a home visit averaged 9.8 ± 5.2 medications and 3.0 ± 1.6 chronic disease states. On average, a home visit required 2.0 ± 0.8 hours, which included travel time. The percentages of visits completed by pharmacists and residents were 60% and 40%, respectively. The amounts of time to complete a visit were similar. Average home visit cost including pharmacist time and travel was $119 ($147 for a pharmacist, $77 for a resident). In this community pharmacy-based home visit service, costs are an important factor, with each pharmacist visit requiring 2 hours to complete. This experience provides a blueprint and real-world perspective for community pharmacies endeavoring to implement a home visit service and sets a foundation for future prospective trials to evaluate the impact of the service on important indicators of health and cost. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The Dynamics of Online Purchase Visits: Inertia or Switching?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zelin Zhang; Xia Wang; Peter T.L.Popkowski Leszczyc; Xiao Zuo

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies the dynamics of online purchase patterns,focusing on the impact of the channel used on conversion probability,as well as the transition of channel use over time.A novel data set from a major Chinese online travel agency is used for analysis,consisting of four months of data with 24,337 store visits through three types of channels:direct visit,search advertising and referral.Results of a Bayesian multinomial logit model show that the search channel significantly affects consumers' conversion probability,and show a high degree of inertia in channel use.This finding contrasts sharply with suggestions of previous research that most future purchases will converge to the direct-visit channel.

  6. 150 Bulgarian students visit CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Alizée Dauvergne

    2010-01-01

    Between 27 March and 8 April 2010, 150 Bulgarian students from the Astronomical Observatory in Varna visited CERN as part of the “From Galileo to CERN” programme. Bulgarian students participating in the "From Galileo to CERN" educational programme. “It’s interesting to combine astronomy and particle physics”, explains Svejina Dimitrova, organiser of the programme and Director of Varna Astronomical Observatory. The three groups, each one comprising 50 students, first visited Pisa, Padua and other places in Italy  related to Galileo’s life. “Thanks to the visit, students understood telescopes and why Galileo is such an important scientist”, says Svejina. After Italy, they came to CERN for three days and visited several sites: Linac, the Computer Centre CCC, etc. Another group of Bulgarian students in their visit to CERN. “They became aware that particle physics is not only the...

  7. Characteristics of HIV infected individuals traveling abroad. Results from the +REDIVI Collaborative Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Molina, Jose A; Martinez-Perez, Angela; Serre, Nuria; Treviño, Begoña; Ruiz-Giardín, José Manuel; Torrús, Diego; Goikoetxea, Josune; Echevarría, Esteban Martín; Malmierca, Eduardo; Rojo, Gerardo; Calabuig, Eva; Gutierrez, Belén; Norman, Francesca; Lopez-Velez, Rogelio

    2016-02-01

    The improvement in the prognosis of HIV infection, coupled with the increase in international travel and migration, has led to a rising number of HIV infected travelers. The objective of this study was to describe the epidemiological and clinical features of returning travelers, according to their HIV status. An observational prospective study was conducted including travelers and immigrants who traveled to visit friends and relatives (VFRs) registered in the +REDIVI collaborative network (January-2009; October-2014). +REDIVI is a national network that registers information regarding infections imported by travelers and immigrants at 21 different centers using a standardized protocol. A total of 3464 travellers were identified: 72 were HIV+ (2.1%) and 3.392 HIV- (98%). HIV+ vs. HIV- travelers were often older (40.5y vs. 34.2y P=.001), VFRs (79.1% vs. 44.4%; Ptravel advice (27% vs. 37%; P=.078). The main destinations for both groups were sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America. The most frequent reasons for consultation after travel were fever, request for a health examination, gastrointestinal complaints, and abnormal laboratory tests (mainly eosinophilia and anemia), which differed between groups. The most frequent diagnoses in HIV+ travelers were malaria (38.8%), newly diagnosed HIV infection (25%), and intestinal parasites (19.4%), while for HIV- travelers the main diagnoses were "healthy" (17.9%), malaria (14%), and intestinal parasites (17.3%). The typical profile of an HIV+ traveler in +REDIVI was that of a VFR traveler who did not seek pre-travel advice and made high-risk trips. This may increase the chance of acquiring travel-related infections which may pose a special risk for HIV-infected travelers. The post-travel visit was a good opportunity for HIV infection screening. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  8. CARLSON WAGONLIT TRAVEL

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    CARLSON WAGONLIT TRAVEL informs you that our agency will be closed from 22 December 2006 at 16:30 until 8 January 2007 at 8:30. For all URGENT MATTERS you can contact our CARLSON WAGONLIT TRAVEL branch at W.H.O. (Mr Pierre Plumettaz), phone: 022 791 55 95. We wish you already a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

  9. CARLSON WAGONLIT TRAVEL

    CERN Document Server

    CARLSON WAGONLIT TRAVEL

    2004-01-01

    CARLSON WAGONLIT TRAVEL informs you that our agency will be closed from 17 December 2004 at 16:30 until 3 January 2005 at 8:30. For all URGENT MATTERS you can contact our CARLSON WAGONLIT TRAVEL branch at WHO (Mr Pierre Plumettaz), phone: 022 788 10 65 We wish you already a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

  10. Value of travel time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Knowingly or not, people generally place economic value on their time. Wage workers are paid a rate per hour, and service providers may charge per hour of their time. In the transportation realm, travelers place a value on their travel time and have ...

  11. Travel and transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bill, Jan; Roesdahl, Else

    2007-01-01

    On the interrelationship between travel, transport and society; on land transport, sea and river transport, and on winter transport;  on the related technologies and their developments......On the interrelationship between travel, transport and society; on land transport, sea and river transport, and on winter transport;  on the related technologies and their developments...

  12. Travel/Travelers and Parasitic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the world and specific country. Many infectious diseases transmitted in food and water can also be acquired directly through the fecal-oral route. Parasitic Illnesses That Can Be Acquired During Travel* From Contaminated Food and Water More ... filariasis African sleeping sickness Onchoceriasis *This list ...

  13. Skin disorders among travellers returning from tropical and non-tropical countries consulting a travel medicine clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbinger, K-H; Siess, C; Nothdurft, H D; von Sonnenburg, F; Löscher, T

    2011-11-01

    To evaluate the causes and risks for imported skin disorders among travellers. Data of 34,162 travellers returning from tropical and non-tropical countries and presenting at the outpatient travel medicine clinic of the University of Munich, Germany, between 1999 and 2009 were analyzed for this study. Of these, 12.2% were diagnosed with skin disorders. Main destinations visited were Asia (40%), Africa (27%) and Latin America (21%). Tourism in the form of adventure travel/backpacking (47%) and package holidays (23%) was the most common purpose of travel. The leading causes of skin disorders were arthropodal (23%), bacterial (22%), helminthic (11%), protozoan (6%), viral (6%), allergic (5%) and fungal (4%). The 10 most frequently diagnosed specific skin diseases associated with specific destinations were insect bites (17%, Southern Europe), cutaneous larva migrans (8%, Asia and Latin America), cutaneous leishmaniasis (2.4%, Mediterranean Region/Middle East), dengue fever (1.5%, Asia), rickettsioses (1.3%, Southern Africa), myiasis (0.8%, Central America), filarioses (0.7%, Africa), tick bites (0.6%, Central/Eastern Europe), schistosomiasis (0.6%, Africa) and tungiasis (0.6%, Africa). Travellers in sub-Saharan Africa had the highest relative risk of acquiring skin disorders. As more than 20% of all skin disorders among returned travellers were caused by arthropods and about 50% by infectious pathogens, pre-travel consultations should include specific prophylaxis and consider the most important risk factor for the travel destination. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. NADIM-Travel: A Multiagent Platform for Travel Services Aggregation

    OpenAIRE

    Ben Ameur, Houssein; Bédard, François; Vaucher, Stéphane; Kropf, Peter; Chaib-draaa, Brahim; Gérin-Lajoie, Robert

    2010-01-01

    With the Internet as a growing channel for travel services distribution, sophisticated travel services aggregators are increasingly in demand. A travel services aggregation platform should be able to manage the heterogeneous characteristics of the many existing travel services. It should also be as scalable, robust, and flexible as possible. Using multiagent technology, we designed and implemented a multiagent platform for travel services aggregation called NADIM-Travel. In this platform, a p...

  15. SM18 Visits and Access

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

      VISITS The rules and conditions to be followed for visits in the SM18 Hall are laid out in the EDMS 1205328 document. No visit is allowed without prior reservation.   ACCESS Special access right is needed ONLY from 7 p.m. to 7 a.m. and during week-ends. From 1 December, the current SM18 access database will be closed and a new one “SM18-OWH outside normal hours” started from scratch. Requests, via EDH SM18-OWH, will have to be duly justified.   For further information, please contact Evelyne Delucinge.

  16. Risk activities and pre-travel health seeking practices of notified cases of imported infectious diseases in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, Prakash; Raina, C; Zwar, Nicholas; Seale, Holly; Worth, Heather; Sheikh, Mohamud; Heywood, Anita E

    2017-09-01

    Travellers are at risk of acquiring infectious diseases during travel, with risks differing by destination, travel and traveller characteristics. A pre-travel health consultation may minimize this risk. However, uptake of pre-travel health advice remains low. We investigated pre-travel health preparations and disease-specific risk behaviours among notified cases of selected travel-associated infectious diseases imported into Australia. Prospective enhanced surveillance of notified cases of typhoid, paratyphoid, measles, hepatitis A, hepatitis E, malaria and chikungunya was conducted in two Australian states between February 2013 and January 2014. Details of pre-travel health preparation and disease-specific risk behaviours were collected. Among 180 cases associated with international travel, 28% were travellers and 22% were frequent travellers, having travelled ≥5 times in the past 5 years. 25% had sought pre-travel advice from a healthcare provider, and 16% reported a pre-travel vaccine. Seeking pre-travel health advice did not differ by immigrant status ( P  = 0.22) or by reason for travel ( P  = 0.13) but was more commonly sought by first time travellers ( P  = 0.03). Travellers visiting friends and relatives were more likely to report at-risk activities of brushing teeth with tap water ( P  food ( P  = 0.03) during travel compared to other travellers. Pre-travel health advice seeking practices and vaccine uptake was suboptimal among cases of notified disease. The results of this study highlight the need for a better understanding of barriers to pre-travel health seeking, particularly among high risk travellers, to reduce the importation of infectious diseases into Australia. © International Society of Travel Medicine, 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  17. The elderly, the young and the pregnant traveler -- A retrospective data analysis from a large Swiss Travel Center with a special focus on malaria prophylaxis and yellow fever vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Veronika K; Tschudi, Nadine; Rüegg, Rolanda; Hatz, Christoph; Bühler, Silja

    2015-01-01

    Vulnerable individuals such as elderly, children/adolescents and pregnant/breastfeeding women increasingly travel overseas. We describe the travel and vaccination patterns of these groups at the largest Travel Clinic in Switzerland especially focusing on travel to yellow fever and malaria-endemic countries, and yellow fever vaccination (YFV) and malaria medications. An analysis of pre-travel visits between 2010 and 2012 at the Travel Clinic of the University of Zurich, was performed assessing differences between the elderly, young and middle-aged travelers as well as between pregnant/breastfeeding and other female travelers. Overall, the vulnerable groups did not differ from other travelers regarding their travel patterns. YFV was the most often administered vaccine to elderly travelers; half of them received it for the first time. More than 30% of children/adolescents received YFV, but no child below six months was vaccinated. 80% of young travelers and a similar percentage of pregnant women went to malaria-endemic regions. Twenty-five pregnant/breastfeeding women traveled to YF endemic areas. Travel patterns of vulnerable travelers are comparable to those of other travelers. In view of the limited data on malaria medications and precautions against YFV during pregnancy and at the extreme ages of life, giving travel advice to these groups is challenging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Travel time data collection handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-03-01

    This Travel Time Data Collection Handbook provides guidance to transportation : professionals and practitioners for the collection, reduction, and presentation : of travel time data. The handbook should be a useful reference for designing : travel ti...

  19. Current State of Travel Industry in the Republic of Abkhazia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irma V. Tsulaya

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of travel industry activity of the last few years showed that the popularity of Abkhazia as a tourist destination tends to increase, which is indicated by the figures of Abkhazia visits by tourists. Besides, the number of tour routes increase and the service sector develops.

  20. 2016-2017 Travel Expense Report for Sylvain Dufour, Vice ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Beata Bialic

    Purpose: Visit to IDRC's Regional Office in Montevideo. Date(s):. 2016-04-01 to 2016-04-10. Destination(s):. Montevideo. Airfare: $5,886.83. Other. Transportation: $67.50. Accommodation: $952.70. Meals and. Incidentals: $1,163.44. Other: $121.80. Total: $8,192.27. Comments: 2016-2017 Travel Expense Report for ...

  1. On the Core of Multiple Longest Traveling Salesman Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Estevez Fernandez, M.A.; Borm, P.E.M.; Hamers, H.J.M.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we introduce multiple longest traveling salesman (MLTS) games. An MLTS game arises from a network in which a salesman has to visit each node (player) precisely once, except its home location, in an order that maximizes the total reward.First it is shown that the value of a coalition of

  2. Three European ministers visit CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    There have been three ministerial visits to CERN this month. Gediminas Kirkilas, Prime Minister of Lithuania, and Robert Aymar, CERN’s Director-General.On 2 July, the Prime Minister of Lithuania, Gediminas Kirkilas, was welcomed by CERN’s Director-General, Robert Aymar, before being taken on a visit of the ATLAS cavern at Point 2 and the LHC tunnel. Michal Sewerynski, Poland’s Minister for Science and Higher Education, and Robert Aymar, CERN’s Director-General.Ten days later, Poland’s Minister for Science and Higher Education, Michal Sewerynski, visited the CMS cavern and assembly hall and the LHC tunnel. He was also given a tour of the LHC Computer Centre and the CERN Control Centre. His visit was rounded off with a presentation of Polish companies involved in CERN’s activities, followed by a meeting with Polish personnel working at CERN. J�...

  3. Nikolai Katanov in China: Unpublished Travel Diaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia A. Martynova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article summarizes the results of Xinjiang expedition by N.F. Katanov, conducted in 1889–1892 by order of the Russian Academy of Sciences. The core materials and undifferentiated diaries remained unpublished and are deposited in the National Archives of the Republic of Tatarstan. N.F. Katanov’s data in the National Archives of the Republic of Tatarstan (Fund 969 includes 551 files, covering the period of 1878 – 1919. We are talking about three documents: - Fund 969, Inv. 1, d. 10: Journey to Siberia, Dzungaria and East Turkestan, committed in 1890 (241 pages; - F. 969, Inv. 1, d. 11: Trip to the Seven Rivers and Tarbagatai, 1891 (558 p. - F. 969, Inv. 1, d. 76: Travel to Central Asia, Western China (Turfan and Mongolia (487 p.. N.F. Katanov travelled across the territory of Qing China several times. In 1890 he visited eight Chinese centers – Hotan, Kashgar, Aksu, Kuchar, Karakash, Baya, Lo-gucheng and Turpan, the language and folklore of the Turkic peoples of Eastern Turkestan were of his primarily concern. Then he visited mainly Seven Rivers (Zhetysu, settled in Chuguchak, starting from May 13 to November 7, 1891, and in Chuguchak (where he settled from May 13 to November 7. Since November 8, 1891 to March 7, 1892, he visited Xinjiang, where he lived mainly in Hami. Then he went to Kulja, and returned to the Russian Empire in May 1892, staying within the China territory 18 months in total.

  4. Intercity Travel Demand Analysis Model

    OpenAIRE

    Ming Lu; Hai Zhu; Xia Luo; Lei Lei

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that intercity travel is an important component of travel demand which belongs to short distance corridor travel. The conventional four-step method is no longer suitable for short distance corridor travel demand analysis for the time spent on urban traffic has a great impact on traveler's main mode choice. To solve this problem, the author studied the existing intercity travel demand analysis model, then improved it based on the study, and finally established a combined model...

  5. Visit of Spanish Government delegation

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1982-01-01

    A Spanish Government delegation visited CERN before Spain rejoined CERN as a Member State(in 1983). Delegates interested in advanced technologies visited the ISR workshop clean room, where Romeo Perin explained fabrication and properties of stainless steel, titanium and inconel components of vacuum chambers for experiments at the ISR. Left to right: Technical Director Giorgio Brianti, the Spanish Minister of Industry and Energy Mr.Ignacio Bayon Marine , Romeo Perin, a delegate and Director-General Herwig Schopper. See also 8202369.

  6. Towards improved uptake of malaria chemoprophylaxis among West African travellers: identification of behavioural determinants

    OpenAIRE

    Wieten, Rosanne W; Harting, Janneke; Biemond, Pieter M; Grobusch, Martin P; van Vugt, Mich?le

    2013-01-01

    Background Malaria is a potentially lethal illness for which preventive measures are not optimally used among all travellers. Travellers visiting friends and relatives in their country of origin (VFRs) are known to use chemoprophylaxis less consistently compared to tourist travellers. In this study, factors explaining the low use of chemoprophylaxis were pursued to contribute to improving uptake of preventive measures among VFRs. Methods Following in-depth interviews with Ghanaians living in ...

  7. Visiting Vehicle Ground Trajectory Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Dustin

    2013-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Visiting Vehicle Group needed a targeting tool for vehicles that rendezvous with the ISS. The Visiting Vehicle Ground Trajectory targeting tool provides the ability to perform both realtime and planning operations for the Visiting Vehicle Group. This tool provides a highly reconfigurable base, which allows the Visiting Vehicle Group to perform their work. The application is composed of a telemetry processing function, a relative motion function, a targeting function, a vector view, and 2D/3D world map type graphics. The software tool provides the ability to plan a rendezvous trajectory for vehicles that visit the ISS. It models these relative trajectories using planned and realtime data from the vehicle. The tool monitors ongoing rendezvous trajectory relative motion, and ensures visiting vehicles stay within agreed corridors. The software provides the ability to update or re-plan a rendezvous to support contingency operations. Adding new parameters and incorporating them into the system was previously not available on-the-fly. If an unanticipated capability wasn't discovered until the vehicle was flying, there was no way to update things.

  8. International travel in the immunocompromised patient: a cross-sectional survey of travel advice in 254 consecutive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialy, C; Horne, K; Dendle, C; Kanellis, J; Littlejohn, G; Ratnam, I; Woolley, I

    2015-06-01

    Our primary aim was to determine the rate of overseas travel in immunocompromised individuals attending appropriate clinics at an Australian tertiary care hospital. We also aimed to characterise health-seeking behaviour prior to travel and investigated sources of pre-travel advice, compared travel patterns and activities between three specific immunosuppressed groups, and examined pre-immunosuppression patient serology. We implemented a cross-sectional survey of patients between February and August 2012. This survey was implemented among three outpatient populations at Monash Medical Centre, an Australian tertiary care hospital. We recruited 254 immunosuppressed adults from three patient populations: human immunodeficiency virus-positive individuals, renal transplant patients and rheumatology patients requiring immunosuppressive therapy. No clinical intervention was performed. In the 10 years preceding the survey, 153 (60.2%) participants reported international travel. Of these, 105 (68.6%) were immunosuppressed at the time of travel. These patients were 47.6% male and 60% Australian born. Forty per cent were visiting friends and relatives as part of their travel. Fifty-four per cent of those immunocompromised at the time of travel were going to high-risk destinations. Pathology files indicated that serological screening was frequently not performed prior to immunosuppression in the renal transplant and rheumatology groups. Immunocompromised patients often travel to high-risk destinations with limited or inadequate pre-travel preparations. Doctors caring for the immunocompromised should be aware of travel risks, suitable vaccination protocols and when to refer to specialist travel clinics. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  9. The Home Care Crew Scheduling Problem: Preference-based visit clustering and temporal dependencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Matias Sevel; Justesen, Tor Fog; Dohn, Anders Høeg

    2012-01-01

    In the Home Care Crew Scheduling Problem a staff of home carers has to be assigned a number of visits to patients’ homes, such that the overall service level is maximised. The problem is a generalisation of the vehicle routing problem with time windows. Required travel time between visits and time...... preference constraints. The algorithm is tested both on real-life problem instances and on generated test instances inspired by realistic settings. The use of the specialised branching scheme on real-life problems is novel. The visit clustering decreases run times significantly, and only gives a loss...... windows of the visits must be respected. The challenge when assigning visits to home carers lies in the existence of soft preference constraints and in temporal dependencies between the start times of visits.We model the problem as a set partitioning problem with side constraints and develop an exact...

  10. Providing Cardiology Care in Rural Areas Through Visiting Consultant Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruca, Thomas S; Pyo, Tae-Hyung; Nelson, Gregory C

    2016-06-30

    Workforce experts predict a future shortage of cardiologists that is expected to impact rural areas more severely than urban areas. However, there is little research on how rural patients are currently served through clinical outreach. This study examines the impact of cardiology outreach in Iowa, a state with a large rural population, on participating cardiologists and on patient access. Outreach clinics are tracked annually in the Office of Statewide Clinical Education Programs Visiting Medical Consultant Database (University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine). Data from 2014 were analyzed. In 2014, an estimated 5460 visiting consultant clinic days were provided in 96 predominantly rural cities by 167 cardiologists from Iowa and adjoining states. Forty-five percent of Iowa cardiologists participated in rural outreach. Visiting cardiologists from Iowa and adjoining states drive an estimated 45 000 miles per month. Because of monthly outreach clinics, the average driving time to the nearest cardiologist falls from 42.2±20.0 to 14.7±11.0 minutes for rural Iowans. Cardiology outreach improves geographic access to office-based cardiology care for more than 1 million Iowans out of a total population of 3 million. Direct travel costs and opportunity costs associated with physician travel are estimated to be more than $2.1 million per year. Cardiologists in Iowa and adjoining states have expanded access to office-based cardiology care from 18 to 89 of the 99 counties in Iowa. In these 71 counties without a full-time cardiologist, visiting consultant clinics can accommodate more than 50% of office visits in the patients' home county. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  11. Management of the returning traveler with diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Saussure, Philippe P H

    2009-11-01

    Traveler's diarrhea (TD) strikes 20-60% of travelers visiting developing countries. It occurs shortly after the return and can be distinguished into two categories: acute and persistent TD. Acute TD, mostly caused by bacterial and viral pathogens, is usually mild and self-limited, and deserves empirical symptomatic and/or antibiotic therapy in selected cases. Fluoroquinolones are progressively superseded in this indication by azithromycin, a well tolerated macrolide active against most bacteria responsible for TD, including the quinolone-resistant species of Campylobacter jejuni that are now pervasive, especially in Southeast Asia and India. Persistent TD in the returning traveler is much rarer than its acute counterpart and may be associated with three types of causes. Persistent infections, among which Giardia and possibly Entamoeba predominate, account for a significant proportion of cases. Postinfectious processes represent a second cause and comprise temporary lactose malabsorption and postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome, now considered a major cause of persistent TD. Finally, apparently unrelated chronic diseases causing diarrhea are occasionally unmasked by TD and represent a third type of persistent TD, among which the well established case of incident inflammatory bowel disease poses intriguing pathogenesis questions. This review discusses recent advances in the field and provides practical recommendations for the management of TD in adult, immunocompetent returning travelers.

  12. Facets for the Cardinality Constrained Quadratic Knapsack Problem and the Quadratic Selective Travelling Salesman Problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mak, Vicky; Thomadsen, Tommy

    2004-01-01

    A well-known extension of the Travelling Salesman Problem (TSP) is the Selective (or Prize-collecting) TSP: In addition to the edge-costs, each node has an associated reward (denoted the node-reward) and instead of visiting all nodes, only profitable nodes are visited. The Quadratic Selective TSP...

  13. Travelers' Health: Meningococcal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Zika Travel Information World Map of Zika Country Classification Technical Guidance Risk of Zika Virus at Your ... Meningococcal meningitis is characterized by sudden onset of headache, fever, and stiffness of the neck, sometimes accompanied ...

  14. Travel during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 36 weeks of pregnancy. Some domestic airlines restrict travel completely or require a medical certificate during the last month of pregnancy. For international flights, the cutoff point often is earlier, sometimes as early as 28 ...

  15. Tips for Travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avoid bringing bed bugs home by taking precautions when traveling such as inspecting bedding and luggage racks in hotel rooms, and upon returning home unpacking directly into a washing machine and dry at high temperatures.

  16. Pregnancy and travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    When traveling by land: You should be on the road no more than 5 to 6 hours a day. Always wear your seatbelt. ... of fluids. Women with health problems may need extra oxygen when flying. Talk to your provider before ...

  17. Caregiving and travel patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    This study explored the impact of caregiving for older adults on mobility and travel : patterns. Specifically, the focus was on how caregivers managed trips on behalf of : another who receives care. Caregiving is becoming increasingly common as the :...

  18. Malaria and Tropical Travel

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Malaria is a serious mosquito-borne disease that can lead to death. This podcast discusses malaria risk when traveling to tropical areas, as well as how to protect yourself and your family from malaria infection.

  19. Traveling-wave photodetector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hietala, V.M.; Vawter, G.A.

    1993-12-14

    The traveling-wave photodetector of the present invention combines an absorptive optical waveguide and an electrical transmission line, in which optical absorption in the waveguide results in a photocurrent at the electrodes of the electrical transmission line. The optical waveguide and electrical transmission line of the electrically distributed traveling-wave photodetector are designed to achieve matched velocities between the light in the optical waveguide and electrical signal generated on the transmission line. This velocity synchronization provides the traveling-wave photodetector with a large electrical bandwidth and a high quantum efficiency, because of the effective extended volume for optical absorption. The traveling-wave photodetector also provides large power dissipation, because of its large physical size. 4 figures.

  20. Malaria and Travelers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Providers, Emergency Consultations, and General Public. Contact Us Malaria and Travelers for U.S. Residents Recommend on Facebook ... may be at risk for infection. Determine if malaria transmission occurs at the destinations Obtain a detailed ...

  1. Travelers' Health: Scabies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Books, Journals, Articles & Websites Resources for the Travel Industry Yellow Book Contents Chapter 3 (83) Scabies more ... have crusted scabies. Contact with items such as clothing and bed linens that have been used by ...

  2. Carlson Wagonlit Travel

    CERN Multimedia

    Carlson Wagonlit Travel

    2005-01-01

    Dear customers, On 3 January we informed you that the airlines had decided to cease paying commission to travel agencies in Switzerland. This measure has since been progressively introduced, with rare exceptions. Consequently, in agreement with CERN, we are obliged to apply new transaction fees for private travel, with immediate effect. Carlson Wagonlit Travel (CWT) offers: A personalized, professional and competent consultancy service To seek the most economical and best solution adapted to your needs Neutrality in comparing prices and benefits Additional information concerning e.g. visa regulations, insurance, vaccinations, etc. Support in the event of problems We draw your attention to the fact that, in spite of the increase, these prices remain very competitive on today's market. Thank you for your trust and understanding. Yours truly, Carlson Wagonlit Travel CERN agency

  3. Illinois travel statistics, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The 2008 Illinois Travel Statistics publication is assembled to provide detailed traffic : information to the different users of traffic data. While most users of traffic data at this level : of detail are within the Illinois Department of Transporta...

  4. Illinois travel statistics, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The 2009 Illinois Travel Statistics publication is assembled to provide detailed traffic : information to the different users of traffic data. While most users of traffic data at this level : of detail are within the Illinois Department of Transporta...

  5. Illinois travel statistics, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The 2010 Illinois Travel Statistics publication is assembled to provide detailed traffic : information to the different users of traffic data. While most users of traffic data at this level : of detail are within the Illinois Department of Transporta...

  6. Travelling with football teams

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ultimately on the performance of the teams on the playing field and not so much ... However, travelling with a football team presents the team physician .... physician to determine the nutritional ..... diarrhoea in elite athletes: an audit of one team.

  7. Travelers' Health: Cryptosporidiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... associated diarrhea; cryptosporidiosis was associated with travel to Asia, particularly India, and Latin America. Another study found ... immunochromatographic cartridge assays, and microscopy with modified acid-fast staining. ... and water precautions (see Chapter 2, Food & Water ...

  8. Business travel and sustainability

    OpenAIRE

    AGUILERA, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Although it contributes significantly to the demand for transport, in particular air transport, business travel has been relatively neglected in thinking about the strategies needed to promote more sustainable mobility practices. This paper provides a two-stage approach to this subject. We begin by showing how the sustainability of business travel is relevant not only in environmental terms, but also from an economic and social perspective. In the second stage, we consider the strategies that...

  9. Travel Market Switzerland 2007

    OpenAIRE

    Laesser, Christian; Bieger, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Technical Report and Results - In 2007, for the seventeenth time since 1972, a survey on the travel behaviour of the Swiss population was conducted. The database resulting from this project (Travel Market Switzerland 2007) is still the most extensive on private trips by the Swiss resident population. Private trips are defined/ delimited as all journeys by private persons with at least one overnight stay outside their home and their normal life and work environment. They include all types of l...

  10. Advice to Travelers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth

    1975-01-01

    Travelers, particularly those whose tastes or occupations lead to deviation from the usual tourist routes, are at a small but significant risk of acquiring certain diseases they would be unlikely to encounter had they remained in the continental United States. Many of these infections can be rendered unlikely even for the most adventuresome traveler through the appropriate use of immunization and chemoprophylaxis. Other infections are currently unpreventable and the physician's responsibility lies in their premorbid detection. PMID:1154779

  11. The New England travel market: changes in generational travel patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodney B. Warnick

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine and explore the New England domestic travel market trends, from 1979 through 1991 within the context of generations. The existing travel markets, who travel to New England, are changing by age cohorts and specifically within different generations. The New England changes in generational travel patterns do not reflect national...

  12. Travels in Architectural History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Deriu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Travel is a powerful force in shaping the perception of the modern world and plays an ever-growing role within architectural and urban cultures. Inextricably linked to political and ideological issues, travel redefines places and landscapes through new transport infrastructures and buildings. Architecture, in turn, is reconstructed through visual and textual narratives produced by scores of modern travellers — including writers and artists along with architects themselves. In the age of the camera, travel is bound up with new kinds of imaginaries; private records and recollections often mingle with official, stereotyped views, as the value of architectural heritage increasingly rests on the mechanical reproduction of its images. Whilst students often learn about architectural history through image collections, the place of the journey in the formation of the architect itself shifts. No longer a lone and passionate antiquarian or an itinerant designer, the modern architect eagerly hops on buses, trains, and planes in pursuit of personal as well as professional interests. Increasingly built on a presumption of mobility, architectural culture integrates travel into cultural debates and design experiments. By addressing such issues from a variety of perspectives, this collection, a special 'Architectural Histories' issue on travel, prompts us to rethink the mobile conditions in which architecture has historically been produced and received.

  13. The visit is the medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haller, P [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France). Service de la Production Thermique

    1990-12-31

    In France the number of visitors to nuclear plants every year is comparable to the number of annual visitors to the Musee de l`Homme (approximately 300,000). Plant visits play an important role in the nuclear industry`s commnications and should be made as effective as possible. An appropriate discourse consisting of the following should be available: a warm reception; an open attitude; an ability to listen; and a willingness to inform. During the tour, the message received by the public should be positive. This message should consist of the benefits of electronuclear energy, and that the people working within the industry are ordinary people with concerns similar to the public. The words used during the visit should be chosen to avoid words with negative connotations. The use of measurement figures should be put in a comparative mode that can be understoood by the visitors. The site itself should be well signed with various amenities available. There are two stages to any visit: getting to the site and the actual site visit. Proper signage to the visitor center is important. Once there, two types of signage are important: directional and informationl. For the visit, have someone available to greet visitors. The visitor should receive an itinerary of the tour, with the end providing an opportunity for questions and answers, and refreshments. An adequate program for children should be available.

  14. UN Secretary General visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    UN Secretary General praises CERN in recent visit. Ban Ki-moon, Robert Aymar, CERN Director-General, and Sergei Ordzhonikidze, Director-General of the United Nations Office in Geneva at the CMS site.On Sunday 31 August, Ban Ki-moon, the UN Secretary General, made an important visit to CERN. Arriving in the late afternoon, he was warmly greeted at Point 5 by Robert Aymar, the Director-General, and the Sous-préfet of Gex, Olivier Laurens-Bernard. Accompanied by a UN delegation, Ban Ki-moon was also introduced to Jos Engelen, the Chief Scientific Officer, and Jim Virdee, the CMS spokesperson. He then took the opportunity to visit CMS and the machine tunnel. At the end of his short trip, Ban Ki-moon signed the Guest Book in the tradition of important dignitaries visiting CERN. Expressing his admiration for CERN’s spirit of collaboration, Ban Ki-moon said, "I am very honored to visit CERN, an invaluable scientific institution a...

  15. Virtual Travel Agencies - Tourist Value through Travel Information Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Anckar, Bill

    1999-01-01

    Anckar, B. (1999), ?Virtual Travel Agencies - Tourist Value through Travel Information Systems?. IAMSR Research Report 5/99. Institute for Advanced Management Systems Research, ?bo Akademi University. As electronic commerce enables the tourist service providers to sell their products directly to the consumer, travel agencies are faced with the imminent threat of being by-passed in the travel industry chain in the information age. This paper suggests that virtual travel agencies can compete su...

  16. Italy's Prime Minister visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Stefania Pandolfi

    2015-01-01

    On Tuesday, 7 July 2015, the Prime Minister of the Italian Republic, Matteo Renzi, visited CERN. He was accompanied by a delegation that included Italy's Minister for Education, University and Research, Stefania Giannini.   From left to right: Fernando Ferroni, President of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN); Sergio Bertolucci, CERN Director for Research and Scientific Computing; Stefania Giannini, Italy's Minister of Education, University and Research; Matteo Renzi, Prime Minister of the Italian Republic; Fabiola Gianotti, CERN Director-General Designate; Rolf Heuer, CERN Director-General.   The Prime Minister was welcomed by members of the CERN Management together with former CERN Director-General and Senator for Life of the Italian Republic, Carlo Rubbia. After a brief general introduction to CERN’s activities by Rolf Heuer, the Italian delegation visited LHC Point 1. After a tour of the ATLAS control room, they donned helmets to visit th...

  17. Visits from Croatia and Belarus

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    On 23 September, CERN was visited by two Ministers, Anatoly Rusetsky, Chairman of the Committee on Science and Technology of the Republic of Belarus, and Professor Gvozden Flego, Croatian Minister of Science and Technology. Mr Rusetsky met with Roger Cashmore, Research Director for Collider Programmes, and Michel Della Negra, spokesperson of the CMS experiment, and visited the CMS detector assembly hall. Professor Flego also met Mr Cashmore and visited the NA49 and CAST experiments, the LHC superconducting magnet test hall, the ALICE experiment cavern, and the assembly hall for the CMS experiment. From left to right: Nikola Godinovic, working at CMS, Jürgen Schukraft, ALICE spokesperson, Gordan Markotic, Ambassador and Permanent Representative of Croatia to the United Nations and other international organisations in Geneva, Professor Gvozden Flego, Minister of Science and Technology, Republic of Croatia.

  18. Visit of the Italian President

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "CERN stands as the demonstration of the great results that science can achieve [...] when it succeeds in getting all the main players in international scientific cooperation involved," stated the President of the Italian Republic, Carlo Azeglio Ciampi, in front of an overcrowded and enthusiastic Main Auditorium. The President visited CERN on 2nd December, and met the CERN directorate as well as the Italians at CERN. With about 1500 Italians working at CERN, which is one sixth of the total personnel, they are the second largest nationality at CERN. The Italian President visited the CMS assembly hall and the LHC superconducting magnet test hall before meeting the CERN community, in particular Italian personnel, in the main auditorium. There he emphasised the role of CERN as a transnational model for research which not only achieved great results in science but is also a powerful vehicle for progress in other fields. President Ciampi visits the LHC superconducting test hall together with Luciano Maiani and Lu...

  19. Hepatitis B vaccination in travelers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonder, Gerard J. B.

    2008-01-01

    An increasing number of travelers travel to hepatitis B-endemic countries. In travel medicine, vaccinations should be advised according to risks. The actual incidence of hepatitis B infection in short-term tourists is very low and probably not higher than it is for people who do not travel. There is

  20. Travel health attitudes among Turkish business travellers to African countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selcuk, Engin Burak; Kayabas, Uner; Binbasioglu, Hulisi; Otlu, Baris; Bayindir, Yasar; Bozdogan, Bulent; Karatas, Mehmet

    The number of international travellers is increasing worldwide. Although health risks related to international travel are important and generally well-understood, the perception of these risks was unclear among Turkish travellers. We aimed to evaluate the attitudes and health risk awareness of Turkish travellers travelling to African countries. A survey was performed of Turkish travellers bound for Africa from Istanbul International Ataturk Airport in July 2013. A total of 124 travellers were enrolled in the study. Among them, 62.9% had information about their destination but only 11.3% had looked for information on health problems related to travel and their destination. Of all travellers, 53.2% had at least one vaccination before travelling. The most commonly administered vaccine was for typhoid. Among the travellers, 69.3% and 80.6% had "no idea" about yellow fever vaccination and malaria prophylaxis, respectively. A positive correlation was found between a higher level of travellers' education and receiving the recommended vaccination for the destination. Our study revealed significant gaps in the vaccination and chemoprophylaxis uptake of Turkish travellers departing to Africa. An awareness and training program should be developed for travellers, as well as public health workers, to address health risks related to travel. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Visiting the Republic of Cuba: An Experience to Remember.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Geraldine

    2015-01-01

    A few years ago, I was privileged to visit the Republic of Cuba as a summer vacation. Officially, this Spanish island is the largest island in the Caribbean, with more than 12 million people. It is only second as being most populous after Hispaniola with its people, culture and customs. Havana is the capital and Cuba's largest city. The United States lies to the immediate north only about 95 miles away, and the Bahamas and Mexico to the west, the Cayman Islands and Jamaica are on the southern end, and Haiti and the Dominion Republic are in the southeastern area. The history of this island is truly amazing. I was able to vist a hospital, and ride public transportation (bus). The trip was made at the time when Cuba was not open to travelers coming direct from the United States. I traveled to Montreal, Canada to board Cabana Arlines to Havana, Cuba.

  2. Willingness to travel to avoid conflicts in Danish forests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakhtiari, Fatemeh; Jacobsen, Jette Bredahl; Jensen, Frank Søndergaard

    2014-01-01

    were identified. Furthermore, a choice experiment was constructed to estimate the distance visitors are willing to travel to encounter few visitors as opposed to many visitors, and thereby potentially experience fewer conflicts. Comparing the marginal willingness to travel (WTT) of different user...... groups suggests that some groups have a WTT further than the average to reach a forest with ‘Few’ visitors. The average WTT to reach a forest area with ‘Few’ visitors. ‘Mountain bikers,’ ‘Peace and nature lovers’ and ‘Horse riders’ are willing to travel 4 km more than the average per visit to reach...... a less crowded forest. At the other end of the scale, we find that people who are doing physical exercise are willing to travel 2 km less than the average to reach a less crowded forest....

  3. Brucellosis in a group of travelers to Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnow, P M; Smaron, M; Ormiste, V

    1984-01-27

    An epidemiologic investigation, initiated when Brucella melitensis infection was detected in a high school student, identified five unrecognized cases in classmates. Before the investigation, four infected students had symptoms of brucellosis for one to ten weeks, made nine visits to physicians, and were confined to the school infirmary or hospitals for 27 days. The other two students were asymptomatic when Brucella agglutination testing demonstrated elevated titers, and treatment was quickly instituted when symptoms occurred. Travel to Spain was implicated because cases were clustered in six of 27 travelers compared with none of 23 control students. Food-history questionnaires showed more frequent consumption of cheese by infected than noninfected travelers. This cluster of cases demonstrates the risk of brucellosis in travelers to endemic areas and illustrates the value of an epidemiologic investigation of cases.

  4. Back or to the future? Preferences of time travelers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph Hertwig

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Popular culture reflects whatever piques our imagination. Think of the myriad movies and books that take viewers and readers on an imaginary journey to the past or the future (e.g., Gladiator, The Time Machine. Despite the ubiquity of time travel as a theme in cultural expression, the factors that underlie people's preferences concerning the direction of time travel have gone unexplored. What determines whether a person would prefer to visit the (certain past or explore the (uncertain future? We identified three factors that markedly affect people's preference for (hypothetical travel to the past or the future, respectively. Those who think of themselves as courageous, those with a more conservative worldview, and---perhaps counterintuitively---those who are advanced in age prefer to travel into the future. We discuss implications of these initial results.

  5. Travel Health Advisory Group: a joint travel industry and travel health Special Interest Group promoting healthy travel in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggat, Peter A; Zwar, Nicholas; Hudson, Bernie

    2012-09-01

    The Travel Health Advisory Group (THAG), established in 1997, is a joint initiative between the travel industry and travel health professionals in Australia that aims to promote healthy travel. THAG seeks to promote cooperation in improving the health of travellers between the travel industry and travel medicine professionals and to raise public awareness of the importance of travel health. From 2011, THAG has been a Special Interest Group of The Australasian College of Tropical Medicine and its membership has been active in several areas, including web-based travel health information, travel health promotion, media releases, research and education in Australia. Information is given on the objectives, membership and an overview of the various activities of the group. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Travelers' Health: Trypanosomiasis, American (Chagas Disease)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stamaril clinics Disease Directory Resources Resources for Travelers Adventure Travel Animal Safety Blood Clots Bug Bites Evite ... Minute Travel Long-Term Travel Mass Gatherings Medical Tourism Mental Health Motion Sickness Natural Disasters Pregnant Travelers ...

  7. 41 CFR 301-11.10 - Am I required to record departure/arrival dates and times on my travel claim?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... departure/arrival dates and times on my travel claim? 301-11.10 Section 301-11.10 Public Contracts and... dates and times on my travel claim? You must record the date of departure from, and arrival at, the... visited. You do not have to record departure/arrival times, but you must annotate your travel claim when...

  8. Travel Time Reliability in Indiana

    OpenAIRE

    Martchouk, Maria; Mannering, Fred L.; Singh, Lakhwinder

    2010-01-01

    Travel time and travel time reliability are important performance measures for assessing traffic condition and extent of congestion on a roadway. This study first uses a floating car technique to assess travel time and travel time reliability on a number of Indiana highways. Then the study goes on to describe the use of Bluetooth technology to collect real travel time data on a freeway and applies it to obtain two weeks of data on Interstate 69 in Indianapolis. An autoregressive model, estima...

  9. Travel Agencies in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionel Marian

    2017-01-01

    If the hotel service provider does not provide quality services then the intermediary is guilty of this and consequently the tourists are dissatisfied. In Romania, this situation has reduced the number of foreign tourists who visited our country.

  10. Travelers' Health: Varicella (Chickenpox)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... varicella vaccine, visit www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd-vac/varicella/default.htm . POSTEXPOSURE PROPHYLAXIS Vaccine Varicella vaccine ... chickenpox BIBLIOGRAPHY American Academy of Pediatrics. Varicella-zoster infections. In: Kimberlin DW, Brady MT, Jackson MA, Long SS, ...

  11. “VICO”, Visiting Colleagues

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    “Hello, I am your delegate” – have you heard this line? Maybe you have already had the pleasure of receiving a visit from a Staff Association delegate – then you know what this is all about. As for those of you, who have not yet heard these words, it’s time to get curious. The Staff Association has decided to embark upon an adventure called “VICO”, Visiting Colleagues. From past experience, we have understood the value of personal, direct contact with the people we represent. We believe that the best way to achieve this is to knock on your office door and pay you a short visit.  We do not want to make you fill in yet another online questionnaire and would much rather collect your feedback in a short conversation face to face. Of course, we have prepared ourselves thoroughly for these visit rounds, because we do not want to waste your time. We welcome criticism because it can make us aware of our shortcomings, tell us about how y...

  12. Prenatal Care: First Trimester Visits

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... care provider will discuss the importance of proper nutrition and prenatal vitamins. Your first prenatal visit is a good time to discuss exercise, sex during pregnancy and other lifestyle issues. You might also discuss your work environment and the use of medications during pregnancy. If ...

  13. Visiting School Campuses: Reporter Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Spending time in schools and classrooms can be one of the best ways for novice reporters to dive into the education beat, and for veteran journalists to find fresh inspiration. While it is certainly not necessary for every story, education journalists should try their best to make time to visit schools. Classroom observations and campus tours help…

  14. Visit of the Austrian Ambassador

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    The Austrian Ambassador Wolfgang Petritsch (light raincoat) learns about superconducting magnets at the LHC magnet test facility in building SM18 during a visit to CERN. The blue pipe-like structure in the left background is String 2: the 120-m long full-scale model of an LHC cell, which is used to test LHC systems.

  15. President of Ecuador visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Rosaria Marraffino

    2014-01-01

    On Friday, 24 October, Dr. Rafael Correa Delgado, President of the Republic of Ecuador, visited CERN.   Visiting Geneva to deliver a lecture at the UN, Ecuadorian President Rafael Correa Delgado seized the chance to have a short but intense visit of the Laboratory. The President was met at LHC Point 1 by the Director for Research and Scientific Computing Sergio Bertolucci, who gave him an introduction to CERN’s activities.He was also introduced to the Director for Accelerators and Technology, Frédérick Bordry, and Department Heads José Miguel Jiménez (TE), Livio Mapelli (PH) and Roberto Saban (EN). President Correa Delgado also met with Martijn Mulders, co-organiser of the CERN Latin America School of High-Energy Physics, which will be held in Ecuador from 4 to 17 March 2015. Shortly after that, he visited the ATLAS experimental cavern which he toured with ATLAS Collaboration Spokesperson David Charlton and Fernando Monticelli of t...

  16. Beautiful Science: Worth a Visit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Frederick M.

    2013-01-01

    For those in the profession of teaching physics who reside in or plan to visit the Los Angeles area, I would highly recommend a trip to the Huntington Library in San Marino, specifically to a permanent exhibit entitled "Beautiful Science: Ideas that Changed the World" in the Dibner Hall of the History of Science. The exhibit contains…

  17. Child Custody, Visitation and Maintenance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigussie Afesha

    2017-12-30

    Dec 30, 2017 ... The important thing here is fixing or determining which custody arrangement is ..... assuring the child's safety.86 Hence, supervised visitation can be ordered to ... safety, physical or mental health or other adverse effects on the feelings and emotional .... However, “In case of death, disability, unworthiness or.

  18. Dr. John Marburger visits DESY

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Dr. John Marburger, Director of the United States Office of Science and Technology Policy, visited the research center DESY in Hamburg. The American physicist wanted to inform himself about the status of the TESLA X-ray laser and the TESLA linear collider as well as the international collaboration at DESY (1/2 page).

  19. Swiss President to visit CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Pascal Couchepin, President of the Swiss Confederation, will visit CERN on 4 June to participate in the official inauguration of the underground cavern for the laboratory's ATLAS experiment. As the first new experimental cavern to be handed over to CERN by civil engineering contractors, this represents an important milestone for the Laboratory" (1 page).

  20. Knowledge, attitudes and practices of business travelers regarding malaria risk and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Roger; Schlagenhauf, Patricia; Amsler, Lorenz; Steffen, Robert

    2003-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the knowledge, attitudes and practices of Swiss business travelers with regard to malaria. Questionnaires printed in three languages were distributed by employers, travel agencies and tropical medicine specialists to business travelers with destinations in malaria endemic countries. In total, 401 questionnaires were evaluated. Thirty-three percent visited high-risk areas, 27% visited low-risk areas, and 40% visited only malaria-free areas within endemic countries. Among the investigated business travelers, 6% had experienced malaria infection, and 29% had previously had blood smears tested for malaria at least once. Almost all business travelers, 95%, knew that mosquitoes are the main vectors of malaria. The infection risk between dusk and dawn was known to 71%, and the incubation time to 36%. Apart from fever (99%) and headache (63%), other malaria symptoms were known to only 13% to 36% of the travelers. If signs of illness such as fever and headache occurred, 63% would react adequately and seek medical advice within 24 h. Only 16% of the travelers to African high-risk areas followed the recommended behavior concerning anti-mosquito and antimalarial strategies; 31% of those on trips to low-risk areas used an adequate protective strategy. Of the business travelers using chemoprophylaxis during travel, just 50% continued intake post travel, as requested, after leaving the endemic area. Business travelers are well informed regarding the mode of transmission and the risk of malaria at specific destinations but tend to comply poorly with anti-mosquito and chemoprophylactic strategies. The knowledge, attitudes and practices of business travelers with regard to malaria prevention need to be improved.

  1. Malaria chemoprophylaxis recommendations for immigrants to Europe, visiting relatives and friends - a Delphi method study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calleri, G.; Behrens, R.H.; Schmid, M.L.; Gobbi, F.; Grobusch, M.P.; Castelli, F.; Gascon, J.; Bisoffi, Z.; Jelinek, T.; Caramello, P.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Numbers of travellers visiting friends and relatives (VFRs) from Europe to malaria endemic countries are increasing and include long-term and second generation immigrants, who represent the major burden of malaria cases imported back into Europe. Most recommendations for malaria

  2. Malaria chemoprophylaxis recommendations for immigrants to Europe, visiting relatives and friends--a Delphi method study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calleri, Guido; Behrens, Ron H.; Schmid, Matthias L.; Gobbi, Federico; Grobusch, Martin P.; Castelli, Francesco; Gascon, Joaquim; Bisoffi, Zeno; Jelinek, Tomas; Caramello, Pietro; Atouguia, J.; Berg, A.; Clerinx, J.; Cuadros, J.; da Cunha, S.; Develoux, M.; Fry, G.; Genton, B.; Gjorup, I.; Hatz, C.; Hellgren, U.; Kern, P.; Kapaun, A.; Lucchini, A.; Morch, K.; Munoz, J.; Myrvang, B.; Paul, M.; Puente, S.; Siikamaki, H.

    2011-01-01

    Numbers of travellers visiting friends and relatives (VFRs) from Europe to malaria endemic countries are increasing and include long-term and second generation immigrants, who represent the major burden of malaria cases imported back into Europe. Most recommendations for malaria chemoprophylaxis

  3. Schistosomiasis and international travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corachan, Manuel

    2002-08-15

    Infection with Schistosoma species is acquired by exposure to fresh water that harbors cercariae released by infected snails. Although the route of infection is clear, clinical presentation of the established infection in the nonimmune tourist typically differs from that in the local population of areas of endemicity. For the health care practitioner, the traveler's syndrome presents distinctive management problems: water-transmitted bacterial and viral infections may coexist, and identification of the stage of disease at presentation, along with identification of the causative species, will maximize treatment options. Travel medicine clinics serve as epidemiological antennae, helping to identify the dynamics of species transmission in geographically distinct areas. Education of persons traveling to areas of endemicity and the development of mechanical protection against exposure are needed.

  4. [Viral hepatitis in travellers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Cândida

    2007-01-01

    Considering the geographical asymmetric distribution of viral hepatitis A, B and E, having a much higher prevalence in the less developed world, travellers from developed countries are exposed to a considerable and often underestimated risk of hepatitis infection. In fact a significant percentage of viral hepatitis occurring in developed countries is travel related. This results from globalization and increased mobility from tourism, international work, humanitarian and religious missions or other travel related activities. Several studies published in Europe and North America shown that more than 50% of reported cases of hepatitis A are travel related. On the other hand frequent outbreaks of hepatitis A and E in specific geographic areas raise the risk of infection in these restricted zones and that should be clearly identified. Selected aspects related with the distribution of hepatitis A, B and E are reviewed, particularly the situation in Portugal according to the published studies, as well as relevant clinical manifestations and differential diagnosis of viral hepatitis. Basic prevention rules considering enteric transmitted hepatitis (hepatitis A and hepatitis E) and parenteral transmitted (hepatitis B) are reviewed as well as hepatitis A and B immunoprophylaxis. Common clinical situations and daily practice "pre travel" advice issues are discussed according to WHO/CDC recommendations and the Portuguese National Vaccination Program. Implications from near future availability of a hepatitis E vaccine, a currently in phase 2 trial, are highlighted. Potential indications for travellers to endemic countries like India, Nepal and some regions of China, where up to 30% of sporadic cases of acute viral hepatitis are caused by hepatitis E virus, are considered. Continued epidemiological surveillance for viral hepatitis is essential to recognize and control possible outbreaks, but also to identify new viral hepatitis agents that may emerge as important global health

  5. Carlson Wagonlit Travel

    CERN Document Server

    2008-01-01

    We would like to inform you that our agency will be closed from 21st December 2008 at 16:30 until 5th January 2009 at 8:30. For all URGENT MATTERS you can contact our CARLSON WAGONLIT TRAVEL at Rue du Nant in Geneva (Team 3), phone: 058 322 26 20. The agency will be open on 22nd, 23rd, 29th and 30th December. We wish you a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year! CARLSON WAGONLIT TRAVEL CERN Agency

  6. Have eggs. Will travel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kroløkke, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Feminist scholars have critically questioned the practices and ethics of reproductive mobility. While the reproductive mobility of fertility patients has been foregrounded, little is known of egg donor mobility including the experiences of travelling internationally to donate eggs. Based on written...... stories and photographic material provided by forty-two egg donors, this article uses feminist cluster analysis and the concept of eggpreneurship to illustrate how global egg donors negotiate reproductive agency and choice when they travel internationally to donate their eggs. In their stories, global egg...

  7. 28 CFR 540.41 - Visiting facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Visiting facilities. 540.41 Section 540... WITH PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Visiting Regulations § 540.41 Visiting facilities. The Warden shall have... have a portion of the visiting room equipped and set up to provide facilities for the children of...

  8. Travel and migration associated infectious diseases morbidity in Europe, 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopez-Velez Rogelio

    2010-11-01

    diagnoses such as Chagas disease in immigrant travellers from South America and P. falciparum malaria in immigrants from sub-Saharan Africa. Travel within Europe was also associated with health risks with distinctive profiles for Eastern and Western Europe. Conclusions In 2008, a broad spectrum of travel associated diseases were diagnosed at EuroTravNet core sites. Diagnoses varied according to regions visited by ill travellers. The spectrum of travel associated morbidity also shows that there is a need to dispel the misconception that travel, close to home, in Europe, is without significant health risk.

  9. Flu and Holiday Travel

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-12-13

    This podcast explains the ways people can stay healthy and avoid the flu when traveling this winter.  Created: 12/13/2010 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 12/13/2010.

  10. Travel time reliability modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    This report includes three papers as follows: : 1. Guo F., Rakha H., and Park S. (2010), "A Multi-state Travel Time Reliability Model," : Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, n 2188, : pp. 46-54. : 2. Park S.,...

  11. Young EIROforum prizewinner visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2015-01-01

    On 27 to 31 July, CERN welcomed Paul Clarke, an 18-year-old Irish mathematician who won a CERN EIROforum prize (second place) at EUCYS 2014 (European Union Contest for Young Scientists).   Paul Clarke, visiting the new Microcosm exhibit. In addition to a €5000 prize, Paul visited the Laboratory and its experiments, meeting and speaking with CERN physicists and computer scientists. Paul's winning project is entitled "Contributions to cyclic graph theory." As the summary of the project suggests, graph theory is an area of pure mathematics which studies properties of linkages and networks. It has applications in several areas including computing, molecular structure, neuroscience, search engines, engineering etc. This project makes a profound contribution to the study of graphs. It identifies key concepts and provides the methodology to apply them to some long-standing major problems in the subject with great success. Paul has just finished high sc...

  12. An Algerian Minister visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The Algerian Minister of Higher Education and Scientific Research, Rachid Haraoubia, visited CERN on 14 November. His party included the Rector of the University of Blida and the Director of the Algerian Ecole Nationale Polytechnique. Welcomed by CERN's Director-General, Robert Aymar, and Secretary-General, Maximilien Metzger, he signed the VIP Visitors' Book before going on to visit the ATLAS experiment and the LHC tunnel. He then had the opportunity to meet Algerian scientists working at CERN. Some fifteen Algerian physicists attached to European and US institutes are participating in the LHC experiments, in particular ATLAS. A formal collaboration agreement between Algeria and CERN is expected to be drawn up in the near future.

  13. DPT Researchers’ Visit to Moscow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singla, Rashmi; Popova, Margarita

    2018-01-01

    to three colleagues from MSUPE. Our staff members’ presentations focused on presenting Problem-oriented Project Learning and group work, RUC’s Social Psychology of Everyday Life study program, as well as research on diversity, migration and cross-cultural psychology in the joint seminars with MSUPE staff......Four researchers from our department (DPT/IMT) Hans S. Andersen, Margarita Popova, Niklas Chimmiri & Rashmi Singla spent five intellectually, geographically and socially stimulating days at Moscow State University of Psychology and Education (MSUPE), as part of an Erasmus+ staff knowledge exchange...... visit. Conceptually grounded discussions of psychological and educational research projects building on the Cultural-Historical School of Psychology, founded in Russia (L. S. Vygotsky, A. N. Leontiev, A. R. Luria), formed the main framing for the visit. In April 2017, RUC had already acted as host...

  14. Two pioneering artists visit CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2015-01-01

    On Monday, 19 January, CERN physicists welcomed musician Tim Blake - progressive rock keyboard and theremin player - and architectural lighting designer Patrice Warrener - inventor of the Chromolithe Polychromatic Illumination system, used in Lyon’s “Fête des Lumières”. Together, they make up the musical duo "Crystal Machine".   The artists visit the Antiproton Decelerator. (Image: Django Manglunki.)   Their visit began with an introduction to CERN by their friend Django Manglunki, project leader for the ion injector chain, and an improvised discussion on the LHC extraction system with Roger Barlow, kicker magnet controls expert and progressive rock fan. This was followed by a quick trip to the CCC, the server room and the SPS RF amplifiers in BA3. Next on the itinerary was a tour of the AD and anti-hydrogen experiments led by Michael Doser, AEgIS Spokesperson. A leisurely lunch followed, in the company ...

  15. Annual patient and caregiver burden of oncology clinic visits for granulocyte-colony stimulating factor therapy in the US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, J Mark; Li, Xiaoyan; Reiner, Maureen; Tzivelekis, Spiros

    2016-01-01

    Prophylactic treatment with granulocyte-colony stimulating factors (G-CSFs) is indicated for chemotherapy patients with a significant risk of febrile neutropenia. This study estimates the annual economic burden on patients and caregivers of clinic visits for prophylactic G-CSF injections in the US. Annual clinic visits for prophylactic G-CSF injections (all cancers) were estimated from national cancer incidence, chemotherapy treatment and G-CSF utilization data, and G-CSF sales and pricing information. Patient travel times, plus time spent in the clinic, were estimated from patient survey responses collected during a large prospective cohort study (the Prospective Study of the Relationship between Chemotherapy Dose Intensity and Mortality in Early-Stage (I-III) Breast Cancer Patients). Economic models were created to estimate travel costs, patient co-pays and the economic value of time spent by patients and caregivers in G-CSF clinic visits. Estimated total clinic visits for prophylactic G-CSF injections in the US were 1.713 million for 2015. Mean (SD) travel time per visit was 62 (50) min; mean (SD) time in the clinic was 41 (68) min. Total annual time for travel to and from the clinic, plus time at the clinic, is estimated at 4.9 million hours, with patient and caregiver time valued at $91.8 million ($228 per patient). The estimated cumulative annual travel distance for G-CSF visits is 60.2 million miles, with a total transportation cost of $28.9 million ($72 per patient). Estimated patient co-pays were $61.1 million, ∼$36 per visit, $152 per patient. The total yearly economic impact on patients and caregivers is $182 million, ∼$450 per patient. Data to support model parameters were limited. Study estimates are sensitive to the assumptions used. The burden of clinic visits for G-CSF therapy is a significant addition to the total economic burden borne by cancer patients and their families.

  16. A Croatian delegation visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Professor Hrvoje Kraljeviç signing the Golden book with Professor Roger Cashmore. A Croatian delegation composed of the Minister of Science and Technology, Professor Hrvoje Kraljeviç, his deputy for international collaboration Prof. Davor Butkovic have visited CERN on the 12 and 13th of February and held talks with the CERN authorities, ALICE and CMS spokespersons on the possibilities to increase the participation of Croatia to the LHC related activities.

  17. US Cub Scouts visit CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    A group of young American Cub Scouts from Den 10, Pack 130 (based in Geneva) at the Microcosm last Saturday. On their trip to CERN, which included the first Visits Service tour of the ATLAS construction site, the scouts were able to satisfy most of the requirements for the Cub Scout engineering badge. From left to right: Edouard Vincent, Ariel Litke, Alexander Richter, Antoine Vidal de Saint Phalle, Jason Iredale and Daniel Reghelini.

  18. Do British travel agents provide adequate health advice for travellers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawlor, D A; Burke, J; Bouskill, E; Conn, G; Edwards, P; Gillespie, D

    2000-01-01

    Travel-related illness is a burden for primary care, with more than two million travellers consulting a general practitioner each year. The annual cost of travel-related illness in the United Kingdom is 11 million Pounds. Travel agents are in a unique position to influence this burden as the most common and most serious problems are preventable with simple advice and/or immunisation. This study, using covert researchers, suggests this potential is not being fully utilised. PMID:10954940

  19. The Tourist Itinerary Travel Loop: historical and contemporary travel characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Lundgren, Jan O.

    2012-01-01

    In today’s tourist travel, the travel loop represents a very popular itinerary design, although the circumstances under which it is applied, as well as its geographic scale, often differ from the grandiose loop designs of centuries past. During the past couple of decades, a popular kind of new travel has emerged, the cruise-ship travel phenomenon, which often is arranged as quite an extensive itinerary loop. . However, the cruises can also be transoceanic, even global, with the tourist flying...

  20. Validation of a multimodal travel simulator with travel information provision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chorus, C.G.; Molin, E.J.E.; Arentze, T.A.; Hoogendoorn, S.P.; Timmermans, H.J.P.; Wee, van G.P.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a computer based travel simulator for collecting data concerning the use of next-generation ATIS and their effects on traveler decision making in a multimodal travel environment. The tool distinguishes itself by presenting a completely abstract multimodal transport network, where

  1. Valuation of Travel Time and TravelIer Information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietveld, Piet

    2003-01-01

    The value of travel time plays an important role in cost benefit analysis of infrastructureprojects. However, the issue of uncertainty on travel times and the implications this has forestimations of travel time values has received much less attention in the literature. In thispaper we compare

  2. Writing Travel in the Anthropocene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graulund, Rune

    2016-01-01

    the Anthropocene - which is to say an age in which nowhere, not the furthest reachest of the stratosphere nor the lowest point in the marine abyss, are untouched by the activities and detritus of humankind. The essay will give a short overview of the manner in which the notion of 'travel' has been contested......Travel writing critics have proclaimed the end of travel since at least the beginning of the 20th Century. Yet the global age of the 21st century presents us with a range a problems that challenge the notion of travel in manners that neither travellers, travel writers, nor travel writing critics...... could have imagined just a century ago. Globalisation and increased mobility, whether it is that of the privileged few who can travel on holiday on jet airplanes, or that of the immigrant labourer seeking employment by crossing borders on foot, have meant millions (if not indeed billions) are constantly...

  3. Knowledge Representation in Travelling Texts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mousten, Birthe; Locmele, Gunta

    2014-01-01

    Today, information travels fast. Texts travel, too. In a corporate context, the question is how to manage which knowledge elements should travel to a new language area or market and in which form? The decision to let knowledge elements travel or not travel highly depends on the limitation...... and the purpose of the text in a new context as well as on predefined parameters for text travel. For texts used in marketing and in technology, the question is whether culture-bound knowledge representation should be domesticated or kept as foreign elements, or should be mirrored or moulded—or should not travel...... at all! When should semantic and pragmatic elements in a text be replaced and by which other elements? The empirical basis of our work is marketing and technical texts in English, which travel into the Latvian and Danish markets, respectively....

  4. Travel opinion leaders and seekers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoo, Kyung-Hyan; Gretzel, Ulrike; Zach, Florian

    2011-01-01

    While opinion leadership has been recognized as important in tourism, there has been very little empirical research investigating the phenomenon. Given new developments in social media technologies, it is especially important to understand whether travel opinion leadership and seeking are drivers...... of specific social media perceptions and behaviours. Based on an online survey of US online travellers, this paper seeks to identify travel opinion leaders and seekers and their characteristics. Further, the research conducted investigated linkages between travel opinion leadership/seeking and travel social...... media use. The findings suggest that travel opinion leadership and seeking are distinct but connected. Both opinion leaders and seekers are technology savvy, young, educated, involved in travel planning and engaged in social media use for travel. What distinguishes opinion leaders is their greater...

  5. International business travel: impact on families and travellers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espino, C M; Sundstrom, S M; Frick, H L; Jacobs, M; Peters, M

    2002-05-01

    Spouses and staff of the World Bank Group (WBG) were questioned about the impact of international business travel on families and travellers. Dependent variables were self reported stress, concern about the health of the traveller, and negative impact on the family. We hypothesised that several travel factors (independent variables) would be associated with these impacts. These travel factors had to do with the frequency, duration, and predictability of travel and its interference with family activities. Survey forms were developed and distributed to all spouses of travelling staff as well as a small sample of operational staff. Kendall's tau b correlation coefficients of response frequencies were computed with the data from scaled items. Written responses to open ended questions were categorised. Response rates for spouses and staff were 24% and 36%, respectively. Half the spouse sample (n=533) and almost 75% of the staff sample (n=102) reported high or very high stress due to business travel. Self reported spouse stress was associated with six out of eight travel factors. Female spouses, those with children, and younger spouses reported greater stress. Self reported staff stress was significantly associated with four out of nine travel factors. Further insight into how business travel affects families and staff (including children's behavioural changes) and how families cope was gained through responses to written questions. The findings support the notion that lengthy and frequent travel and frequent changes in travel dates which affect family plans, all characteristic of WBG missions, negatively affects many spouses and children (particularly young children) and that the strain on families contributes significantly to the stress staff feel about their travel. Policies or management practices that take into consideration family activities and give staff greater leeway in controlling and refusing travel may help relieve stress.

  6. Transportation cost of anticoagulation clinic visits in an urban setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jamie M; Clemente, Jennifer; Sharma, Krishna P; Taylor, Thomas N; Garwood, Candice L

    2011-10-01

    Patients being managed on warfarin make frequent or regular visits to anticoagulation monitoring appointments. International studies have evaluated transportation cost and associated time related to anticoagulation clinic visits. To our knowledge, no studies have evaluated the cost of transportation to such clinic visits in the United States. To describe the methods of transportation and estimate the average total cost of transportation to and from an anticoagulation clinic in an urban setting. We prospectively conducted a survey of patients treated at the Harper Anticoagulation Clinic located in Detroit, Michigan, during November 2010. The survey was given to patients while waiting at their regularly scheduled clinic appointments and included questions regarding mode of transportation, distance traveled in miles, parking payment, and time missed from work for clinic appointments. The mean distance traveled was translated into cost assuming 50 cents per mile based on 2010 estimates by the Internal Revenue Service. Sixty patients responded to the 11-item survey; response rates for individual items varied because participants were instructed to skip questions that did not pertain to them. Of the 47 participants responding to demographic questions, 70.2% were female, and 46.8% were older than 60 years. Transportation by private vehicle (80.0%), either driven by patients (41.7%) or someone else (38.3%), was the most common method reported. Use of private automobile translated into a cost of $11.19 per round trip. Other means of transportation identified include a ride from a medical transportation service (10.0%), bus (5.0%), walking (3.3%), and taxi (1.7%). The mean (SD) distance traveled to the clinic for all methods of transportation was 8.34 (7.7) miles. We estimated the average cost of round-trip transportation to be $10.78 weighted for all transportation modes. This is a direct nonmedical cost that is paid for by most patients out of pocket. However, 9 of 44 (20

  7. Student travel health and the role of universities and health clinics in New Zealand to prevent imported infections: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neave, Penny E; Nair, Balakrishnan; Heywood, Anita E

    2017-05-01

    Tertiary students are at risk of acquiring infectious diseases during overseas travel as they visit low-income countries, have low perceptions of risk and are unlikely to access travel health advice. Some will visit friends and relatives abroad, a group identified as disproportionately affected by imported infections. There is no national student travel health policy in NZ. This study aimed to explore travel health training of university-based health providers; academics' practices and perceptions of travel health; reasons for travel and countries visited by NZ university students, their travel health uptake and factors affecting decision making about this. A cross-sectional study consisting of surveys sent in 2014 to university clinics, senior academics and students. Surveys were completed by 251 respondents. Three of nine clinicians had only undertaken a short course in travel health. Competing resources and time constraints in health clinics were amongst the barriers to providing optimal services. Of the senior academics, only 14% were able to confirm their university collaborated with health clinics. Sixty seven percent of students were unaware that clinics provided travel health services and 19% had or intended to seek professional travel health advice. A national policy is warranted involving all stakeholders, utilizing innovative technologies to increase uptake of student travel health services. © International Society of Travel Medicine, 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  8. Travelling without a helmet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rindrasih, Erda; Hartmann, Thomas; Witte, Patrick; Spit, Tejo; Zoomers, Annelies

    2018-01-01

    Tourists are particularly vulnerable when natural disasters occur in regions that they are visiting. It is assumed that they lack awareness and understanding of the actions that they need to take in such circumstances. This study examines the responses of tourists in times of disaster, building on

  9. Travelers' knowledge, attitudes and practices on the prevention of infectious diseases: results from a study at Johannesburg International Airport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toovey, Stephen; Jamieson, Andrew; Holloway, Michele

    2004-01-01

    Although Johannesburg International Airport (JIA) acts as a hub for travel into Africa, little was known of the knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) with respect to infectious disease prevention of departing travelers. The study was conducted among departing passengers at JIA from August to October 2003. Travelers aged at least 18 years, resident in non-malarious developed countries and departing from JIA for risk destinations, were given either a malaria (Q-mal, n=219) or vaccine-preventable disease (Q-vac, n=200) questionnaire. European Travel Health Advisory Board traveler KAP questionnaires were used. African destinations accounted for 99% of the total. Traveler mean age was 42 years, with 30% aged 50 years or above. Leisure (42%) and business (37%) were the commonest travel reasons; 8% of subjects were visiting friends or relatives. Forty-six per cent of travelers prepared for their trip at least 1 month in advance; 86% had sought pre-travel health advice, with travel clinics and the Internet being rated highest by travelers for quality of advice. World Health Organization immunization guidelines were followed poorly: only 37% and 27%, respectively, of travelers had demonstrable proof of protection against hepatitis A and B, with 40% of all Q-vac travelers unable to produce a vaccination certificate. Of travelers to yellow fever- endemic countries, 76% were able to produce a valid vaccination certificate; 22% of travelers to countries not endemic for yellow fever had nevertheless been specifically immunized against yellow fever for their journeys. Forty-nine per cent of Q-mal travelers carried either no or inappropriate antimalarials. Considerable deficiencies in KAP were documented with regard to travel vaccinations and malaria protection in travelers departing JIA. Improved vaccine uptake and antimalarial prescribing are required for travelers to Africa.

  10. PENYELESAIAN MULTI TRAVELING SALESMAN PROBLEM DENGAN ALGORITMA GENETIKA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NI KADEK MAYULIANA

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic algorithm is a part of heuristic algorithm which can be applied to solve various computational problems. This work is directed to study the performance of the genetic algorithm (GA to solve Multi Traveling Salesmen Problem (multi-TSP. GA is simulated to determine the shortest route for 5 to 10 salesmen who travelled 10 to 30 cities. The performance of this algorithm is studied based on the minimum distance and the processing time required for 10 repetitions for each of cities-salesmen combination. The result showed that the minimum distance and the processing time of the GA increase consistently whenever the number of cities to visit increase. In addition, different number of sales who visited certain number of cities proved significantly affect the running time of GA, but did not prove significantly affect the minimum distance.

  11. CARLSON WAGONLIT TRAVEL

    CERN Multimedia

    CARLSON WAGONLIT TRAVEL

    2004-01-01

    CARLSON WAGONLIT TRAVEL would like to remind you of the entry formalities applicable to those travelling to the United States. Nationals of Switzerland and of the following countries : Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brunei, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Liechtenstein, Luxemburg, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, San Marino, Singapore, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom, entering the United States under the Visa Waiver Program (no visa requirement), must be in possession of an machine-readable passport that is valid for at least six months after the date of the return trip. Children, including infants, must have their own passport. An entry in the parents' passport is not sufficient. For entry into the United States, an e-ticket (fax or e-mail confirmation or passenger receipt) or a return ticket to the departure point or a ticket to a subsequent onward destination (valid for 90 days) must be presented together with the green ...

  12. Travelers In The Night

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauer, Albert D.

    2014-11-01

    Travelers In The Night is an engaging and informative series of two minute radio programs about asteroids, comets, spacecraft, and other objects in space. The pieces are evergreen in that they are current but not dated. They are published on the Public Radio Exchange and carried by a number of radio stations. For teachers, students, and kids of all ages, the script for each piece and the start of a path for further inquiry can be found on the website travelersinthenight.org . The Travelers InThe Night Pieces are written and produced by an observing member of the Catalina Sky Survey Team at the University of Arizona. DPS members are encouraged to submit program ideas which can be developed to feature their research efforts.

  13. Patient awareness of need for hepatitis a vaccination (prophylaxis) before international travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Stephen J; Sharapov, Umid; Klevens, Monina

    2015-01-01

    Although hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection is preventable through vaccination, cases associated with international travel continue to occur. The purpose of this study was to examine the frequency of international travel and countries visited among persons infected with HAV and assess reasons why travelers had not received hepatitis A vaccine before traveling. Using data from sentinel surveillance for HAV infection in seven US counties during 1996 to 2006, we examined the role of international travel in hepatitis A incidence and the reasons for patients not being vaccinated. Of 2,002 hepatitis A patients for whom travel history was available, 300 (15%) reported traveling outside of the United States. Compared to non-travelers, travelers were more likely to be female [odds ratio (OR) = 1.74 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.35, 2.24)], aged 0 to 17 years [OR = 3.30 (1.83, 5.94)], Hispanic [OR = 3.69 (2.81, 4.86)], Asian [OR = 2.00 (1.06, 3.77)], and were less likely to be black non-Hispanic [OR = 0.30 (0.11, 0.82)]. The majority, 189 (61.6%), had traveled to Mexico. The most common reason for not getting pre-travel vaccination was "Didn't know I could [or should] get shots" [100/154 (65%)]. Low awareness of HAV vaccination was the predominant reason for not being protected before travel. Different modes of traveler education could improve prevention of hepatitis A. To highlight the risk of infection before traveling to endemic countries including Mexico, travel and consulate websites could list reminders of vaccine recommendations. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  14. Leisure and Travel Choice

    OpenAIRE

    María José Caride; Eduardo L. Giménez

    2003-01-01

    It is commonly recognized the relevance of transportation costs for studying recre- ational demand. However, these costs are related with travel and modal choice deci- sions. This paper o ers a theoretical explanation of the new generation of the demand for recreational goods at destiny after the introduction of a new transportation mode that is not the cheapest nor the fastest among the available modes. The main feature of the model deals with the transportation mode-dependent preferences. T...

  15. Choice, changeover, and travel

    OpenAIRE

    Baum, William M.

    1982-01-01

    Since foraging in nature can be viewed as instrumental behavior, choice between sources of food, known as “patches,” can be viewed as choice between instrumental response alternatives. Whereas the travel required to change alternatives deters changeover in nature, the changeover delay (COD) usually deters changeover in the laboratory. In this experiment, pigeons were exposed to laboratory choice situations, concurrent variable-interval schedules, that were standard except for the introduction...

  16. Diversity does not travel!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Rebecca; Meriläinen, Susan; Tienari, Janne

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter we offer insights into the social construction of diversity in Finnish organizations and society. In Finnish organizations, gender is highlighted while other markers of diversity are blotted out. 'Non-Finns' become subject to cultural assimilation. The US-based concept of Diversit...... Management becomes adopted and adapted in particular ways. Standardized concepts of diversity and its management do not travel, rather they become translated locally. In organizational practice, globalization is slow and laborious....

  17. Malaria and Tropical Travel

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-05-15

    Malaria is a serious mosquito-borne disease that can lead to death. This podcast discusses malaria risk when traveling to tropical areas, as well as how to protect yourself and your family from malaria infection.  Created: 5/15/2008 by National Center for Zoonotic, Vector-Borne, and Enteric Diseases (NCZVED).   Date Released: 5/29/2008.

  18. Time - A Traveler's Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickover, Clifford A.

    1999-09-01

    "Bucky Fuller thought big," Wired magazine recently noted, "Arthur C. Clarke thinks big, but Cliff Pickover outdoes them both." In his newest book, Cliff Pickover outdoes even himself, probing a mystery that has baffled mystics, philosophers, and scientists throughout history--What is the nature of time?In Time: A Traveler's Guide , Pickover takes readers to the forefront of science as he illuminates the most mysterious phenomenon in the universe--time itself. Is time travel possible? Is time real? Does it flow in one direction only? Does it have a beginning and an end? What is eternity? Pickover's book offers a stimulating blend of Chopin, philosophy, Einstein, and modern physics, spiced with diverting side-trips to such topics as the history of clocks, the nature of free will, and the reason gold glitters. Numerous diagrams ensure readers will have no trouble following along.By the time we finish this book, we understand a wide variety of scientific concepts pertaining to time. And most important, we will understand that time travel is, indeed, possible.

  19. When CERN travels abroad

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    For the first time the new CERN travelling exhibition has gone abroad. The venue is Torino, in Italy, where it is being shown at the Museum of Natural Science in the framework of the activities of the EuroScience Open Forum (ESOF 2010). Soon after the event, the exhibition will fly to Copenhagen. The CERN traveling exhibition was inaugurated in 2009. The new ‘Accelerating Science’ exhibition was inaugurated in 2009 as part of the celebrations to mark the 450th anniversary of the University of Geneva. “CERN’s travelling exhibition is an important tool for outreach in our Member states as it carries the main messages that constitute the backbone of the Laboratory’s education and communication policy”, explains Rolf Landua, head of the Education Group, which manages the exhibition. “The 2010 European Science Open Forum in Torino will gather a lot of experts and visitors from the general public who will be able to experience in an ...

  20. Carlson Wagonlit Travel

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    Carlson Wagonlit Travel wishes to remind you of the following conditions concerning travel to the USA. Passport conditions Since 26 October 2004, nationals of the countries covered by the US Visa Waiver Programme have been required to present a valid machine-readable passport when entering the United States. Failing this, they require a valid US non-immigrant visa in addition to their passport. Passports issued after 25 October 2005 must also bear a digital photograph. Passports issued after 25 October 2006 must contain biometric data to allow visa-free entry to the US. Advanced Passenger Information System (APIS) form Since 4 October 2005, all non-US citizens travelling to the USA have been required to complete the APIS form before departure and present it when they check in. This new procedure will certainly increase the time it takes to check in. We therefore advise passengers to present themselves at the respective check-in desk in good time. The APIS form can be downloaded from our homepage: w...

  1. [Travelers, mad, wandering].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaschetto, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the notion of "wandering" through the use of some phenomena enrolled at the dawn of modernity such as the Rousseau dromomanie's philosopher and writer, the origin of the first mad traveler (Albert Dadas), epidemics of mad travelers Europe and romantic tourism (with renewed acquires significance in the "beat generation" of the twentieth century). These historical facts are "mounting" as play contemporary manifestations such as loss, disorientation, to lose one's way, and wandering without reducing them only to clinical psychosis. Readings of classic psychiatrists such as Régis, Foville, Sérieux and Capgras, Tissié, go hand in hand with the current readings of the philosopher Ian Hacking and critics of pop culture as S. Reynolds and D. Diederichsen, illustrating how the travel's phenomenon can make different subjective configurations depending on historical times. In conclusion it is noted that not only psychosis exposes the wandering soul of suffering but there are also subject positions (as will be exemplified in a clinical case) and go no further nesting wandering into human existence.

  2. Update on traveler's diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strum, W B

    1988-07-01

    Traveler's diarrhea affects a substantial number of travelers to high-risk areas of the world. The key to controlling this troublesome disease is prevention. The most important preventive measures depend on educating patients to consume only safe foods and pure water. Physicians cannot overemphasize the importance of avoiding high-risk foods and of boiling water if a safe water supply is not available. Prophylactic medications are a secondary consideration and should be prescribed with discretion. In most cases, diarrhea is mild and self-limited, requiring only fluid and electrolyte replacement and perhaps an antidiarrheal agent. In moderate to severe cases, the addition of an antimicrobial agent may be of benefit. Until an efficacious polyvalent vaccine is developed, caution and common sense, together with discretionary dietary and hygienic practices, are the best defenses against traveler's diarrhea. The ultimate solution is greatly improved sanitation and personal hygiene, especially in high-risk countries. However, only dreamers will consider waiting for this transformation to occur.

  3. Importance of Wellness to the Tourists visiting Batangas Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romualdo L. Roque

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Wellness is having a healthy body, mind and spirit. Health and wellness go hand in hand. Most people link wellness to physical health condition only but the researcher found out the other dimension of wellness that matters to the tourists. This study assessed the other dimensions of wellness such as social, spiritual, intellectual, emotional and occupational wellness and reveals the most significant wellness dimension among the tourists visiting Wellness Spa in Batangas Province. The researcher aimed to present the profile of the wellness spa center along with the facilities and services they offer and how it helped wellness travelers achieve their purpose when visiting wellness spa. Descriptive design was used with 5 Wellness Spa Centers in Batangas as subject of the study with the used of adopted questionnaire; 216 enthusiastic wellness tourists were asked to sincerely answer the questions in order to collect relevant data. This study unveils that social wellness is important among tourists. They visit wellness spa to build social network, to openly communicate to others and openly express their thoughts and feelings. This wellness tourists aging from 26 – 35 years old earning an average of Php20, 000 prefer spa services and facilities to relax, use gym to shape up in order to maintain a healthy physical wellbeing. Knowing their purpose in life and discovering the true meaning of their existence is the aim of this wellness travel. People that acquire a higher educational degree, most of them are married put emphasis about what is important in life and discover the real purpose of their existence.

  4. Travellers' diarrhoea: contemporary approaches to therapy and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuPont, Herbert L

    2006-01-01

    Travellers' diarrhoea remains a major public health problem, contributing to significant morbidity and disability. Because bacterial enteropathogens cause a majority of this form of diarrhoea, antibacterial drugs are effective when used in chemoprophylaxis or for empirical treatment.A review of the MEDLINE listings for travellers' diarrhoea for the past 4 years was conducted; a library of >1,000 scientific articles on the topic was also considered in developing this review. Persons who travel from industrialised countries to developing countries of the tropical and semi-tropical world are the individuals who experience travellers' diarrhoea. While diarrhoea occurs with reduced frequency among persons travelling to low-risk areas from other low- or other high-risk areas, and there remain areas of intermediate risk, this review looks primarily at the illness occurring in persons from industrialised regions visiting high-risk regions of Latin America, Africa and Southern Asia. The material reviewed deals with the high frequency of acquiring diarrhoea during international travel to high-risk areas, seen in approximately 40%, and the expected bacterial causes of illness, of which diarrhoeagenic Escherichia coli is the most important. The host risk factors associated with increased susceptibility to diarrhoea include young age, lack of previous travel to high-risk regions in the past 6 months, indiscriminate food and beverage selection patterns, and host genetics. It appears feasible to decrease the rate of illness among the travelling public by careful food and beverage selection or through chemoprophylaxis with nonabsorbed rifaximin. Chemoprophylaxis with rifaximin should help to reduce the occurrence of travellers' diarrhoea and hopefully prevent post-diarrhoea complications, including irritable bowel syndrome. Early empirical therapy with antibacterial drugs, including rifaximin, a fluoroquinolone or azithromycin, will decrease the duration of illness and return

  5. Mental time travel: a case for evolutionary continuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corballis, Michael C

    2013-01-01

    In humans, hippocampal activity responds to the imagining of past or future events. In rats, hippocampal activity is tied to particular locations in a maze, occurs after the animal has been in the maze, and sometimes corresponds to locations the animal did not actually visit. This suggests that mental time travel has neurophysiological underpinnings that go far back in evolution, and may not be, as some (including myself) have claimed, unique to humans. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Advice on malaria and yellow fever prevention provided at travel agencies in Cuzco, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva-Meyer, Pablo G; Garcia-Jasso, Carlos A; Springer, Chelsea A; Lane, Jenna K; Su, Bonny S; Hidalgo, Idania S; Goodrich, Mary R; Deichsel, Emily L; White, A C; Cabada, Miguel M

    2015-01-01

    Travelers receive medical advice from a variety of sources, including travel agencies. The aim of this study is to describe the quality of pre-travel advice provided by travel agencies in Cuzco to travelers interested in visiting malaria and yellow fever endemic areas. Trained medical students posed as tourists and visited travel agencies in Cuzco requesting travel advice for a trip to the southern Amazon of Peru, recording advice regarding risk and prevention of malaria and yellow fever. A total of 163 registered travel agencies were included in the study. The mean proposed tour duration was 6.8 days (±1.4 days) with a median time to departure of 3 days and a median tour cost of 805 US dollars (USD) [interquartile range (IQR) 580-1,095]. Overall, 45% employees failed to mention the risk for any illness. Eighteen percent of the employees acknowledged risk of malaria and 53% risk of yellow fever. However, 36% denied malaria risk and 2% denied risk of yellow fever in the region. The price of tours from travel agencies that did not mention any health risk was significantly lower [1,009.6 ± 500.5 vs 783.9 ± 402 USD, t (152) = 3, p yellow fever (100%) were able to provide at least one recommendation for prevention. However, advice was not always accurate or spontaneously volunteered. Only 7% of the employees provided both correct scheduling and location information for administration of the yellow fever vaccine. The majority of registered travel agencies in Cuzco did not provide sufficient and accurate information regarding risk and prevention of malaria and yellow fever to travelers inquiring about trips to the southern Amazon of Peru. © 2014 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  7. Home range and travels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickel, L.F.; King, John A.

    1968-01-01

    The concept of home range was expressed by Seton (1909) in the term 'home region,' which Burr (1940, 1943) clarified with a definition of home range and exemplified in a definitive study of Peromyscus in the field. Burt pointed out the ever-changing characteristics of home-range area and the consequent absence of boundaries in the usual sense--a finding verified by investigators thereafter. In the studies summarized in this paper, sizes of home ranges of Peromyscus varied within two magnitudes, approximately from 0.1 acre to ten acres, in 34 studies conducted in a variety of habitats from the seaside dunes of Florida to the Alaskan forests. Variation in sizes of home ranges was correlated with both environmental and physiological factors; with habitat it was conspicuous, both in the same and different regions. Food supply also was related to size of home range, both seasonally and in relation to habitat. Home ranges generally were smallest in winter and largest in spring, at the onset of the breeding season. Activity and size also were affected by changes in weather. Activity was least when temperatures were low and nights were bright. Effects of rainfall were variable. Sizes varied according to sex and age; young mice remained in the parents' range until they approached maturity, when they began to travel more widely. Adult males commonly had larger home ranges than females, although there were a number of exceptions. An inverse relationship between population density and size of home range was shown in several studies and probably is the usual relationship. A basic need for activity and exploration also appeared to influence size of home range. Behavior within the home range was discussed in terms of travel patterns, travels in relation to home sites and refuges, territory, and stability of size of home range. Travels within the home range consisted of repeated use of well-worn trails to sites of food, shelter, and refuge, plus more random exploratory travels

  8. Virtual visits and Hangouts – how cool is CERN…

    CERN Multimedia

    Joannah Caborn Wengler

    2012-01-01

    New media are really making the world smaller. Using a simple lap-top and Vidyo® or Google Hangouts, you can visit experiments’ control rooms and ask physicists those questions you always wanted to ask, all from the comfort of your own home. Here’s how a few people connected with CERN recently.   Students from the Al-Quds University in the Palestinian West Bank participating in the ATLAS virtual visit. It was an old-fashioned aeroplane which took Kate Shaw of the Udine ICTP (Italy) ATLAS group to give a particle physics master class to about 20 students from Al-Quds University in the Palestinian West Bank, but it was via the ether that they were able to take a virtual visit of the ATLAS control room on 2 April. Without having to deal with with the complications of international air travel, they were able to see the experts, monitors and screens via two remote controlled cameras mounted on the ceiling of the ATLAS control room. By the door there is another screen, w...

  9. Making Travel to Cuba Work for Health and Sustainable Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorry, Conner

    2017-01-01

    In 2015, a record-breaking 3.5 million visitors-1 million from Canada alone-traveled to Cuba to explore its history, culture, natural splendor, and visit family. That same year, US President Barack Obama relaxed travel restrictions, giving general authorization for a dozen categories of legal travel by US citizens and residents. As a result, US visitors to the island ballooned by 80% between January 2015 and June 2016. And the numbers keep growing: the latest data show that foreign arrivals reached 4 million in 2016.[1] The surge in visitors highlights the potential negative impact of tourism on a developing country's infrastructure, environment, cultural patrimony and local economy-all considered important social determinants of health.

  10. International Patients' Travel Decision Making Process- A Conceptual Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammad Jamal; Chelliah, Shankar; Haron, Mahmod Sabri

    2016-02-01

    Role of information source, perceived benefits and risks, and destination image has significantly been examined in travel and tourism literature; however, in medical tourism it is yet to be examined thoroughly. The concept discussed in this article is drawn form well established models in tourism literature. The purpose of this research was to identify the source of information, travel benefits and perceived risks related to movement of international patients and develop a conceptual model based on well-established theory. Thorough database search (Science Direct, utmj.org, nih.gov, nchu.edu.tw, palgrave-journals, medretreat, Biomedcentral) was performed to fulfill the objectives of the study. International patients always concern about benefits and risks related to travel. These benefits and risks form images of destination in the minds of international patients. Different sources of information make international patients acquaint about the associated benefits and risks, which later leads to development of intention to visit. This conceptual paper helps in establishing model for decision-making process of international patients in developing visit intention. Ample amount of literature is available detailing different factors involved in travel decision making of international patients; however literature explaining relationship between these factors is scarce.

  11. International Patients’ Travel Decision Making Process- A Conceptual Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    KHAN, Mohammad Jamal; CHELLIAH, Shankar; HARON, Mahmod Sabri

    2016-01-01

    Background: Role of information source, perceived benefits and risks, and destination image has significantly been examined in travel and tourism literature; however, in medical tourism it is yet to be examined thoroughly. The concept discussed in this article is drawn form well established models in tourism literature. Methods: The purpose of this research was to identify the source of information, travel benefits and perceived risks related to movement of international patients and develop a conceptual model based on well-established theory. Thorough database search (Science Direct, utmj.org, nih.gov, nchu.edu.tw, palgrave-journals, medretreat, Biomedcentral) was performed to fulfill the objectives of the study. Results: International patients always concern about benefits and risks related to travel. These benefits and risks form images of destination in the minds of international patients. Different sources of information make international patients acquaint about the associated benefits and risks, which later leads to development of intention to visit. This conceptual paper helps in establishing model for decision-making process of international patients in developing visit intention. Conclusion: Ample amount of literature is available detailing different factors involved in travel decision making of international patients; however literature explaining relationship between these factors is scarce. PMID:27114978

  12. “GOING OFF THE BEATEN PATH: KNUT HAMSUN’S FORAYS INTO TRAVEL WRITING”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Conner

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines Knut Hamsun’s travel writing, from his many newspaper articles about America published before The Cultural Life of Modern America (Fra det moderne Amerikas aandsliv, 1889 – his idiosyncratic and very personal reckoning with America – to his only real (i.e., formal travelogue or travel book, In Wonderland (I Æventyrland, 1903, documenting his visit to the Russian Caucasus. The article focuses on some common themes as well as striking differences among these works, so as to highlight Hamsun’s creative use of the travel genre. As the term “foray” in my title suggests, there is something illicit and transgressive about Hamsun’s travel writing. He does not readily conform to the norms of the genre; rather, he transforms the genre to suit his own purposes by infusing a large dose of his idiosyncratic genius in everything he writes about the faraway lands he visits.

  13. 28 CFR 540.62 - Institutional visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....62 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT CONTACT WITH PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Contact With News Media § 540.62 Institutional visits. (a) A media representative shall make advance appointments for visits. (b) When media representatives visit the institutions...

  14. 42 CFR 409.48 - Visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... INSURANCE BENEFITS Home Health Services Under Hospital Insurance § 409.48 Visits. (a) Number of allowable... home health visits. All Medicare home health services are covered under hospital insurance unless there... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Visits. 409.48 Section 409.48 Public Health CENTERS...

  15. Disaster-related fatalities among US citizens traveling abroad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Robert; Bouslough, David; Proano, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    To describe the locations and risk of death associated with natural disaster fatalities for US citizens traveling abroad. A retrospective database review of US citizen disaster deaths occurring worldwide. None. Information on fatalities due to disasters was abstracted from the US Department of State Web site reporting deaths of US citizens abroad by non-natural causes from October 2002 through June 2012. The main outcome measures were the frequency of disaster deaths and countries where disasters occurred. Descriptive statistics and rates were used to evaluate the study data. There were 7,963 total non-natural deaths of US citizens traveling abroad during the study period. Of these, 163 (2.0 percent) were disaster-related deaths, involving 19 disaster events in 15 countries. Only two disaster-related events resulted in more than two deaths of US travelers-the 2010 earthquake in Haiti causing 121 fatalities (74.2 percent of disaster deaths), and the 2004 tsunami in Thailand causing 22 fatalities (13.5 percent of disaster deaths). The approximate annual mean death rate for US citizen travelers as a result of disaster events is 0.27 deaths/1 million travelers, compared with 1.4 deaths/1 million residents due to disaster annually within the United States. The risk of disaster-related fatality is low for US citizens traveling abroad. Although disaster-related death among travelers is unpredictable, during a period of almost 10 years, there was only one reported death due to disaster in the five countries most frequently visited by US travelers. Further investigation may identify population-, seasonal-, country-, or location-specific risks from which prevention strategies can be developed.

  16. Schistosomiasis in Scottish travellers: public health importance of laboratory testing and the need for enhanced surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Claire L; Cottom, Laura; Smith, Kitty; Perrow, Kali; Coyne, Michael; Jones, Brian L

    2018-03-01

    Imported schistosomiasis is of significant public health importance and is likely to be underestimated since infection is often asymptomatic. We describe data from travellers residing in Scotland which includes a subset of group travellers from one of the largest Health Boards in Scotland. Clotted bloods were obtained during the period 2001-15 from a total of 8163 Scottish travellers. This included seven groups comprising of 182 travellers. Sera were examined for the presence of Schistosome species antibody at the Scottish Parasite Diagnostic and Reference Laboratory (SPDRL). Of all, 25% (n = 1623) tested positive with 40% (n = 651) of those patients aged between 20 and 24 years. Although 62% (n = 1006) of those who tested positive reported travel to Africa, important information on the specific region visited was lacking in almost one-third of samples received. Overall, 62 (34%) of group travellers tested positive and 95% (n = 59) reporting travel to Africa. Globalization, affordable air travel and improved awareness, are likely to contribute towards the increasing number of imported schistosomiasis cases. Therefore, enhanced surveillance capturing detailed travel history and fresh water exposures will improve risk stratification, pre-travel advice and optimize testing and treatment regimes for this increasingly important parasitic disease.

  17. Swiss State Secretary visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    The new Swiss State Secretary for Education and Research recently visited CERN. Peter Jenni, the spokesperson for ATLAS, gave Mauro Dell’Ambrogio, the new Swiss State Secretary for Education and Research, a tour of ATLAS and the LHC tunnel.On 2 April, the newly appointed Swiss State Secretary for Education and Research, Mauro Dell’Ambrogio, was welcomed to CERN by Director-General Robert Aymar. On arrival the Swiss minister was given a guided tour of ATLAS and the adjoining LHC tunnel by Peter Jenni, the ATLAS spokesperson. Dr Dell’Ambrogio was then greeted by Swiss scientists and attended presentations by young post doc physicists about Swiss contributions to CMS and LHCb, in particular their work concerning hardware contribution and data analysis. There are 120 physicists from Swiss universities working on CERN’s experiments, and many more Swiss people working at CERN in other departments due to Switzerland’s special position as a host state. Also before ...

  18. Visits to La Plata Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinstein, A.

    1985-03-01

    La Plata Observatory will welcome visitors to ESO-La Silla that are willing to make a stop at Buenos Aires on their trip to Chile or on their way back. There is a nice guesthouse at the Observatory that can be used, for a couple of days or so, by astronomers interested in visiting the Observatory and delivering talks on their research work to the Argentine colleagues. No payments can, however, be made at present. La Plata is at 60 km from Buenos Aires. In the same area lie the Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica dei Espacio (IAFE), in Buenos Aires proper, and the Instituto Argentino de Radioastronomia (IAR). about 40 km from Buenos Aires on the way to La Plata. Those interested should contacl: Sr Decano Prof. Cesar A. Mondinalli, or Dr Alejandro Feinstein, Observatorio Astron6mico, Paseo dei Bosque, 1900 La Plata, Argentina. Telex: 31216 CESLA AR.

  19. Fellow travellers: Working memory and mental time travel in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dere, Ekrem; Dere, Dorothea; de Souza Silva, Maria Angelica; Huston, Joseph P; Zlomuzica, Armin

    2017-03-19

    The impairment of mental time travel is a severe cognitive symptom in patients with brain lesions and a number of neuropsychiatric disorders. Whether animals are also able to mentally travel in time both forward and backward is still a matter of debate. In this regard, we have proposed a continuum of mental time travel abilities across different animal species, with humans being the species with the ability to perform most sophisticated forms of mental time travel. In this review and perspective article, we delineate a novel approach to understand the evolution, characteristics and function of human and animal mental time travel. Furthermore, we propose a novel approach to measure mental time travel in rodents in a comprehensive manner using a test battery composed of well-validated and easy applicable tests. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Health hazards of international travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossar, J H; Reid, D

    1989-01-01

    The growth of travel and the increasing numbers of those affected by travel-related illnesses, some of a serious nature, will cause this subject to demand the attention of the medical profession, the travel trade, travellers themselves and the health authorities of countries receiving tourists. Provision of appropriate advice for the traveller is a shared responsibility, best channelled mainly through travel agencies; it can moreover be shown to be cost-beneficial. Continued monitoring of illness in travellers and provision of information systems geared to this problem and its prevention are fully justified. They should be based on traditional channels of communication and currently-available modern technology, and be readily accessible to medical and related workers. Increased collaboration between medical workers, health educators and those involved in the travel trade would be a positive and useful contribution towards the reduction of illness and discomfort among travellers and the associated expense incurred by the various national health services concerned. There are clearly economic benefits from the development of international tourism, but these have to be balanced in countries accepting tourists by attention to the prevention of illnesses associated with travel.

  1. Travel-related illness at a tertiary care hospital in Osaka, Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Hadano,Yoshiro; Shirano,Michinori; Goto,Tetsushi

    2016-01-01

    Yoshiro Hadano, Michinori Shirano, Tetsushi Goto Center for Infectious Diseases, Osaka City General Hospital, Osaka, Japan Abstract: We analyzed the travel-related health problems in persons returning to Japan from overseas. Data were extracted retrospectively for all patients visiting the infectious diseases department of Osaka City General Hospital, Osaka, Japan, between July 2012 and September 2013. There were 209 sick returning travelers during the period of the study. ...

  2. Branch-and-cut-and-price for the traveling salesman problem with time windows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røpke, Stefan; Madsen, Oli B.G.

    In the traveling salesman problem with time windows (TSPTW) one is given a depot and a set of nodes to be visited by a salesman. The salesman starts his trip at the depot and must visit all nodes while respecting time windows at the nodes. The objective of the problem is to minimize the total...... distance traveled by the salesman. The TSPTW is formulated as a set-partitioning problem which is solved by using combined cut and column generation. The pricing sub problem in the column generation procedure is a shortest path problem with time window constraints and 2-cycle elimination. A standard column...

  3. A pilot study using global positioning systems (GPS) devices and surveys to ascertain older adults' travel patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Irene H; Leung, Cindy W; Lan, Mars; Sarrafzadeh, Majid; Kayekjian, Karen C; Duru, O Kenrik

    2015-04-01

    Some studies indicate that older adults lead active lives and travel to many destinations including those not in their immediate residential neighborhoods. We used global positioning system (GPS) devices to track the travel patterns of 40 older adults (mean age: 69) in San Francisco and Los Angeles. Study participants wore the GPS devices for 7 days in fall 2010 and winter 2011. We collected survey responses concurrently about travel patterns. GPS data showed a mean of four trips/day, and a mean trip distance of 7.6 km. Survey data indicated that older adults commonly made trips for four activities (e.g., volunteering, work, visiting friends) at least once each week. Older adults regularly travel outside their residential neighborhoods. GPS can document the mode of travel, the path of travel, and the destinations. Surveys can document the purpose of the travel and the impressions or experiences in the specific locations. © The Author(s) 2013.

  4. Approaches to groundwater travel time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, P.; Klavetter, E.; Peters, R.

    1989-01-01

    One of the objectives of performance assessment for the Yucca Mountain Project is to estimate the groundwater travel time at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to determine whether the site complies with the criteria specified in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10 CFR 60.113 (a). The numerical standard for performance in these criteria is based on the groundwater travel time along the fastest path of likely radionuclide transport from the disturbed zone to the accessible environment. The concept of groundwater travel time as proposed in the regulations, does not have a unique mathematical statement. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the ambiguities associated with the regulatory specification of groundwater travel time, two different interpretations of groundwater travel time, and the effect of the two interpretations on estimates of the groundwater travel time

  5. Approaches to groundwater travel time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, P.; Klavetter, E.; Peters, R.

    1989-01-01

    One of the objectives of performance assessment for the Yucca Mountain Project is to estimate the groundwater travel time at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to determine whether the site complies with the criteria specified in the Code of Federal Regulations. The numerical standard for performance in these criteria is based on the groundwater travel time along the fastest path of likely radionuclide transport from the disturbed zone to the accessible environment. The concept of groundwater travel time, as proposed in the regulations, does not have a unique mathematical statement. The purpose of this paper is to discuss (1) the ambiguities associated with the regulatory specification of groundwater travel time, (2) two different interpretations of groundwater travel time, and (3) the effect of the two interpretations on estimates of the groundwater travel time. 3 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  6. Time travel a history

    CERN Document Server

    Gleick, James

    2016-01-01

    From the acclaimed author of The Information and Chaos, here is a mind-bending exploration of time travel: its subversive origins, its evolution in literature and science, and its influence on our understanding of time itself. The story begins at the turn of the previous century, with the young H. G. Wells writing and rewriting the fantastic tale that became his first book and an international sensation: The Time Machine. It was an era when a host of forces was converging to transmute the human understanding of time, some philosophical and some technological: the electric telegraph, the steam railroad, the discovery of buried civilizations, and the perfection of clocks. James Gleick tracks the evolution of time travel as an idea that becomes part of contemporary culture—from Marcel Proust to Doctor Who, from Jorge Luis Borges to Woody Allen. He investigates the inevitable looping paradoxes and examines the porous boundary between pulp fiction and modern physics. Finally, he delves into a temporal shift that...

  7. Traveling Exhibitions as Sites for Informal Learning: Assessing Different Strategies with Field Trips to Traveling Exhibitions at Non-Museum Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harker, Richard J. W.; Badger, James

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the use of different pedagogical techniques to create an intellectually engaging experience for middle school students who visited a traveling exhibition from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum at a non-museum host site: the University of North Georgia Dahlonega's Library and Technology Center. The findings of this…

  8. Anthropological Invariants in Travel Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Marchetti, C.

    1994-01-01

    Personal travel appears to be much more under the control of basic instinct than of economic drive. This may be the reason for the systematic mismatch between the results of cost benefit analysis and the actual behavior of travelers. In this paper a list of the basic instincts that drive and contain travelers' behavior has been put together, showing how they mesh with technological progress and economic constraints.

  9. Plasmodium knowlesi in travellers, update 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Mattia; Schlagenhauf, Patricia

    2014-05-01

    =3), back pain (n=3), abdominal problems (n=1), anorexia (n=2), fatigue (n=2), malaise (n=1), arthralgia (n=1), sore throat (n=1) vomiting (n=2), and jaundice (n=1). All patients were treated successfully with currently available antimalaria treatments. The identification of the pathogen by microscopy can be problematic due to the morphological similarity of P. knowlesi to Plasmodium malariae. P. knowlesi appears to be a threat not only to the local population in Malaysia, but also to the estimated 25 million annual tourists and occupational travellers to Malaysia, especially those who visit rural, forested areas of the country. The P. knowlesi risk is not limited to Malaysia, and travellers from Southeast Asia presenting with possible malaria should be considered for a diagnostic work-up that includes P. knowlesi. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Self-diagnosis of malaria by travellers: a cohort study on the use of malaria rapid diagnostic tests provided by a Swiss travel clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthod, Delphine; Rochat, Jacynthe; Voumard, Rachel; Rochat, Laurence; Genton, Blaise; D'Acremont, Valérie

    2017-10-28

    The WHO recommends that all suspect malaria cases be tested before receiving treatment. Rapid diagnostic tests (RDT) for malaria can be performed reliably by community health workers with no formal medical background and thus, RDTs could also be provided to travellers for self-diagnosis during visits to endemic regions. RDTs were proposed during pre-travel consultations to pre-defined categories of travellers. A training run on their own blood was performed and, if carried out correctly, the traveller was given a written procedure on how to perform the test and act on its result. The travellers were then proposed to buy a malaria RDT kit and were interviewed upon their return. From February 2012 to February 2017, 744 travellers were proposed RDTs and 692 performed the training run (one could not complete it due to a hand tremor). Among the 691 subjects included, 69% travelled to moderate- or low-risk areas of malaria, 18% to high-risk areas and 13% to mixed-risk areas. The two most frequent categories of travellers to whom RDTs were proposed were long-term travellers (69%) and those travelling to remote areas (57%). 543 travellers (79%) were interviewed upon return. During their trip, 17% (91/543) had a medical problem with fever and 12% (65/543) without fever. Among 91 febrile patients, 57% (52/91) performed an RDT, 22% (20/91) consulted immediately without using the test, and 21% (19/91) did neither. Four RDTs (4/52; 8%) were positive: 2 in low-risk and 2 in high-risk areas (0.7% attack rate of self-documented malaria). Two travellers could not perform the test correctly and attended a facility or took standby emergency treatment. Four travellers with negative results repeated the test after 24 h; all were still negative. Carrying RDTs made travellers feel more secure, especially when travelling with children. 1/6 travellers experienced fever and 4/5 of those reacted appropriately: more than half used RDTs and a quarter consulted immediately. Four travellers

  11. An overview: tularemia and travel medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulu-Kilic, Aysegul; Doganay, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Tularemia is a bacterial zoonotic infection. The disease is endemic in most parts of the world, has been reported through the northern hemisphere between 30 and 71° N latitude. Francisella tularensis causes infection in a wide range of vertebrates (rodents, lagomorphs) and invertebrates (ticks, mosquitoes and other arthropods). Humans can acquire this infection through several routes including; a bite from an infected tick, deerfly or mosquito, contact with an infected animal or its dead body. It can also be spread to human by drinking contaminated water or breathing contaminated dirt or aerosol. Clinical manifestation of this disease varies depending on the biotype, inoculum and port of entry. Infection is potentially life threatening, but can effectively be treated with antibiotics. Travelers visiting rural and agricultural areas in endemic countries may be at greater risk. Appropriate clothing and use of insect repellants is essential to prevent tick borne illness. Travelers also should be aware of food and waterborne disease; avoid consuming potentially contaminated water and uncooked meat. Physicians should be aware of any clinical presentation of tularemia in the patients returning from endemic areas. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Truth, Power, and Knowledge. Female Travel Writings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nara Araújo

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This article begins with a reflection about the influences of the travel reports – real or imaginary ones – on the modern discourse, diversity, and alterities. It also considers the reports as a power instrument, since, according to Foucault, the force of power resides in the production of positive effects in both knowledge and desire levels. Thus, the chroniclers responsible for the first descriptions of the New World are visited. Their books were very useful to the new travelers by revealing the mystery of the foreign lands, as well as their customs, alimentary habits, dressing ways, and familiar relationships, among others. The narratives written by women are then introduced considering the specificity of their approach. After all, when appearing to the public, they need to establish a relationship between space, knowledge and authority, and, in order to validate their discourse, they make use of history and references to the consulted sources. Marquesa Calderón de la Barca (Life in Mexico during a residence of two years in that country, de 1843; Condessa de Merlín (La Havane, de 1844; and Nísia Floresta (Itinerário de uma viagem à Alemanha, de 1857 are some of the writers analyzed here.

  13. Rickettsiae and rickettsial diseases in Croatia: Implications for travel medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzelalija, Boris; Punda-Polic, Volga; Medic, Alan; Dobec, Marinko

    To review the current state of knowledge concerning rickettsiae and rickettsioses in Croatia and to discuss their implications for travellers. The PubMed database was searched from 1991 to 2015 by combining the words "rickettsia," "rickettsiosis", "travellers" and "Croatia". Since 1969, Croatia appears to be free of epidemic typhus (ET) caused by Rickettsia prowazekii and the last case of Brill-Zinsser disease was recorded in 2008. Mediterranean spotted fever (MSF) caused by Rickettsia conorii is the most frequent human rickettsial infection in Croatia, followed by murine typhus caused by Rickettsia typhi. Human cases of MSF and murine typhus have been predominantly observed along the eastern Adriatic coast from Zadar to Dubrovnik and between Zadar and Split, respectively. Rickettsia akari, etiologic agent of rickettsialpox, was isolated from blood of a patient diagnosed with MSF in Zadar, but no cases of rickettsialpox were reported. Several species of pathogenic (Rickettsia slovaca, Rickettsia aeschlimannii, Ricketsia helvetica, and Ricketsia raoultii) and species of undetermined pathogenicity (Ricketsia hoogstraalii sp. nov.) rickettsiae were identified in ticks collected in different ecological regions of Croatia. A search of the literature revealed no evidence of rickettsial infection in travellers visiting Croatia. Three imported cases of Rickettsia africae were observed in travellers returning from South Africa. Rickettsiae and rickettsial diseases continue to be present in Croatia. As they can be acquired while travelling, physicians should consider rickettsial infection in the differential diagnosis of patients returning from Croatia and presenting with febrile illness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Tuberculosis screening of travelers to higher-incidence countries: A cost-effectiveness analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menzies Dick

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Travelers to countries with high tuberculosis incidence can acquire infection during travel. We sought to compare four screening interventions for travelers from low-incidence countries, who visit countries with varying tuberculosis incidence. Methods Decision analysis model: We considered hypothetical cohorts of 1,000 travelers, 21 years old, visiting Mexico, the Dominican Republic, or Haiti for three months. Travelers departed from and returned to the United States or Canada; they were born in the United States, Canada, or the destination countries. The time horizon was 20 years, with 3% annual discounting of future costs and outcomes. The analysis was conducted from the health care system perspective. Screening involved tuberculin skin testing (post-travel in three strategies, with baseline pre-travel tests in two, or chest radiography post-travel (one strategy. Returning travelers with tuberculin conversion (one strategy or other evidence of latent tuberculosis (three strategies were offered treatment. The main outcome was cost (in 2005 US dollars per tuberculosis case prevented. Results For all travelers, a single post-trip tuberculin test was most cost-effective. The associated cost estimate per case prevented ranged from $21,406 for Haitian-born travelers to Haiti, to $161,196 for US-born travelers to Mexico. In all sensitivity analyses, the single post-trip tuberculin test remained most cost-effective. For US-born travelers to Haiti, this strategy was associated with cost savings for trips over 22 months. Screening was more cost-effective with increasing trip duration and infection risk, and less so with poorer treatment adherence. Conclusion A single post-trip tuberculin skin test was the most cost-effective strategy considered, for travelers from the United States or Canada. The analysis did not evaluate the use of interferon-gamma release assays, which would be most relevant for travelers who received BCG

  15. Health and safety issues for travelers attending the World Cup and Summer Olympic and Paralympic Games in Brazil, 2014 to 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, Joanna; Sotir, Mark J; Cunningham, Timothy J; Harvey, Kira A; Lee, C Virginia; Stoney, Rhett J; Gershman, Mark D; Brunette, Gary W; Kozarsky, Phyllis E

    2014-08-01

    Travelers from around the globe will attend the 2014 Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) World Cup and the 2016 Olympic and Paralympic Games in Brazil. Travelers to these mass gathering events may be exposed to a range of health risks, including a variety of infectious diseases. Most travelers who become ill will present to their primary care physicians, and thus it is important that clinicians are aware of the risks their patients encountered. To highlight health and safety concerns for people traveling to these events in Brazil so that health care practitioners can better prepare travelers before they travel and more effectively diagnose and treat travelers after they return. We reviewed both peer-reviewed and gray literature to identify health outcomes associated with travel to Brazil and mass gatherings. Thirteen specific infectious diseases are described in terms of signs, symptoms, and treatment. Relevant safety and security concerns are also discussed. Travelers to Brazil for mass gathering events face unique health risks associated with their travel. Travelers should consult a health care practitioner 4 to 6 weeks before travel to Brazil and seek up-to-date information regarding their specific itineraries. For the most up-to-date information, health care practitioners can visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Travelers' Health website (http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel) or review CDC's Yellow Book online (http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/page/yellowbook-home-2014).

  16. Determinants of Adherence with Malaria Chemoprophylactic Drugs Used in a Traveler's Health Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shady, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Background. The WHO recommends mefloquine, atovaquone/proguanil, and doxycycline for malaria chemoprophylaxis. Adherence to a drug is determined by many factors. Objective. To detect the determinants of travelers' adherence to malaria chemoprophylaxis. Methods. A prospective comparative study was conducted from January 2012 to July 2013 that included travelers (928 travelers) to malaria endemic countries who visited the THC. They were classified into 3 groups: the 1st is the mefloquine group (396 travelers), the 2nd is the doxycycline group (370 travelers), and finally those who did not receive any drugs (162 travelers). The participants from the 1st and 2nd groups enrolled in the study. Results. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. The predictors for adherence in the mefloquine group were travel to an African destination [OR = 51 (6.8–2385)], higher than a secondary school education [OR = 21 (4.1–144.2)], organized travel [OR = 4 (2.1–6.5)], traveling for leisure [OR = 2.1 (1.1–0.4)], and nationality [OR = 2 (1.11–4.00)]. In the doxycycline group, the predictors included higher than a secondary education [OR = 20.1 (4.5–125.1)], organized travel [OR = 11.4 (5.5–20.9)], travel for leisure [OR = 7 (2.3–22.9)], travel to an African destination [OR = 6.1 (0.41–417)], and nationality [OR = 4.5 (2.3–9.5)]. Conclusion. Adherence with malaria chemoprophylaxis could be affected by many factors such as nationality, education, and organized travel. PMID:26379712

  17. Travelling gradient thermocouple calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broomfield, G.H.

    1975-01-01

    A short discussion of the origins of the thermocouple EMF is used to re-introduce the idea that the Peltier and Thompson effects are indistinguishable from one another. Thermocouples may be viewed as devices which generate an EMF at junctions or as integrators of EMF's developed in thermal gradients. The thermal gradient view is considered the more appropriate, because of its better accord with theory and behaviour, the correct approach to calibration, and investigation of service effects is immediately obvious. Inhomogeneities arise in thermocouples during manufacture and in service. The results of travelling gradient measurements are used to show that such effects are revealed with a resolution which depends on the length of the gradient although they may be masked during simple immersion calibration. Proposed tests on thermocouples irradiated in a nuclear reactor are discussed

  18. SUNSCEEN FOR TRAVELLERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novita Lavi N

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The sun exposure brings negative effects on the skin such like early aging, spots and skin cancer as the most terrible effect. To reduce the adverse effects of the sun, it is not enough just to behavioral therapy, but also had no protection from the outside. Especially for travellers that exposed by the sun excessively. There is sunscreen, product specially formulated to absorb or deflect ultraviolet rays. A sunscreen preparation contains chemical compounds that can absorb, scatter or reflect sunlight on the skin. This writing contains about effect of ultraviolet, skin protection from ultraviolet from behavioral aspect, variaty and contents of sunscreen and sunscreen application for travellers. Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  19. International Travelers' Sociodemographic, Health, and Travel Characteristics: An Italian Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troiano, Gianmarco; Mercone, Astrid; Bagnoli, Alessandra; Nante, Nicola

    Approximately the 8% of travelers requires medical care, with the diagnosis of a vaccine-preventable disease. The aim of our study was to analyze the socio-demographic, health and travel characteristics of the Italian international travelers. We conducted a cross sectional study from January 2015 to June 2016, at the Travel Medicine Clinic of Siena, asking the doctor to interview patients who attended the Clinic, recording socio-demographic and travel information, malaria prophylaxis, vaccinations. The data were organized in a database and processed by software Stata®. We collected 419 questionnaires. Patients chose 71 countries for their travels; the favorite destinations were: India (6.31%), Thailand (6.31%), and Brazil (5.10%). The mean length of stay was 36.17 days. Italians, students, and freelancers tended to stay abroad for a longer time (mean: 36.4 days, 59.87 days and 64.16 days respectively). 33.17% of our sample used drugs for malaria chemoprophylaxis: 71.9% of them used Atovaquone/Proguanil (Malarone®), 26.6% used Mefloquine (Lariam®), 1.5% other drugs. The vaccinations that travelers mostly got in our study were to prevent hepatitis A (n = 264), the typhoid fever (n = 187), the Tetanus + Diphtheria + Pertussis (n = 165), the Yellow fever (n = 118) and the cholera (n = 78). Twenty-eight (6.68%) refused some recommended vaccinations. The vaccines mostly refused were for Typhoid fever (n = 20), hepatitis a (n = 9), and cholera (n = 9). Our results demonstrated that Italian international travelers are at-risk because of their poor vaccinations adherence. This implies that pre-travel counseling is fundamental to increase the knowledge of the risks and the compliance of future travelers. Copyright © 2016 Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Characterizing International Travel Behavior from Geotagged Photos: A Case Study of Flickr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yihong; Medel, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in multimedia and mobile technologies have facilitated large volumes of travel photos to be created and shared online. Although previous studies have utilized geotagged photos to model travel patterns at individual locations, there is limited research on how these datasets can model international travel behavior and inter-country travel flows-a crucial indicator to quantify the interactions between countries in tourism economics. Realizing the necessity to investigate the potential of geotagged photos in tourism geography, this research investigates international travel patterns from two perspectives: 1) We apply a series of indicators (radius of gyration (ROG), number of countries visited, and entropy) to measure the descriptive characteristics of international travel in different countries; 2) By constructing a gravity model of trade, we investigate how distance decay influences the magnitude of international travel flow between geographic entities, and whether (or how much) the popularity of a given destination (defined as the percentage of tourist income in national gross domestic product (GDP)) affects travel choices in different countries. The results provide valuable input to various commercial applications such as individual travel planning and destination suggestions.

  1. Characterizing International Travel Behavior from Geotagged Photos: A Case Study of Flickr.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yihong Yuan

    Full Text Available Recent advances in multimedia and mobile technologies have facilitated large volumes of travel photos to be created and shared online. Although previous studies have utilized geotagged photos to model travel patterns at individual locations, there is limited research on how these datasets can model international travel behavior and inter-country travel flows-a crucial indicator to quantify the interactions between countries in tourism economics. Realizing the necessity to investigate the potential of geotagged photos in tourism geography, this research investigates international travel patterns from two perspectives: 1 We apply a series of indicators (radius of gyration (ROG, number of countries visited, and entropy to measure the descriptive characteristics of international travel in different countries; 2 By constructing a gravity model of trade, we investigate how distance decay influences the magnitude of international travel flow between geographic entities, and whether (or how much the popularity of a given destination (defined as the percentage of tourist income in national gross domestic product (GDP affects travel choices in different countries. The results provide valuable input to various commercial applications such as individual travel planning and destination suggestions.

  2. Pre-travel advice seeking from GPs by travellers with chronic illness seen at a travel clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagneux-Brunon, Amandine; Andrillat, Carole; Fouilloux, Pascale; Daoud, Fatiha; Defontaine, Christiane; Charles, Rodolphe; Lucht, Frédéric; Botelho-Nevers, Elisabeth

    2016-03-01

    Travellers are ageing and frequently report chronic illness. Pre-travel health advice is crucial, particularly in this subgroup, and general practitioners (GPs) are first in line for treatment adjustment before departure. Our aim is to evaluate pre-travel health advice seeking from GPs by travellers with chronic illness seen at a travel clinic. A cross-sectional observational survey using a questionnaire was conducted between August 2013 and July 2014 in travellers attending the travel medicine clinic of a tertiary university hospital in France. During the study, 2019 travellers were included. Mean age was 39.4 years (±18.8). Three hundred and ninety-one (19.4%) travellers reported a history of a chronic illness. Arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus were the most frequently reported illnesses, affecting, respectively, 168 (8.3%) travellers and 102 (5.1%). Hajj pilgrims were more likely to report a history of chronic illness than other travellers. Only 810 (40.1%) travellers sought pre-travel advice from their GP. Six hundred and fifty-two (40.1%) healthy travellers and 158 (40.5%) travellers reporting chronic illness sought pre-travel advice from their GP (P = 0.96). Travellers with a history of chronic illness do not seek pre-travel health advice from their GP more frequently than healthy travellers. Travel health specialists are generally not the best practitioners to manage the care of underlying medical conditions presenting risks during travel. However, GPs offer continuity and disease management expertise to improve the specificity of pre-travel planning. Thus, ongoing collaboration between the traveller, GP and travel health specialist is likely to yield the best outcomes. © International Society of Travel Medicine, 2016. All rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Carlson Wagonlit Travel is moving

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The renovation of the Main Building continues!   Because of this, Carlson Wagonlit Travel will move from building 62 to building 510 on 4 October and the agency will be closed in the afternoon. An emergency service will be organised for official travels only. Phone: 022 799 75 73 & 022 799 75 78 / e-mail: cern@carlsonwagonlit.ch

  4. U.S. holiday travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-11-01

    The Thanksgiving and Christmas/New Years holiday periods are among the busiest long-distance travel periods of the year. During the 6-day Thanksgiving travel period, the number of long-distance trips (to and from a destination 50 miles or more awa...

  5. Rabies and Risk to Travelers

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Each year over 55,000 people die because of rabies, mostly from being bitten by rabid dogs. Over half of all rabies infections occur in children under the age of 15 who live in developing countries, but travelers are not immune. This podcast discusses some of the activities that put travelers at risk for rabies and describes ways to prevent infection.

  6. Travel and Adult Transformative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstrom, Steven K.

    2011-01-01

    This phenomenological research study examines the lived experience of individual adult transformation in the context of travel. Adults throughout history have experienced profound personal and perception changes as a result of significant travel events. Transformative learning occurs through experience, crisis, and reflection, all of which are…

  7. U.S. business travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-10-01

    Americans make more than 405 million long-distance business trips per year, : accounting for 16% of all long-distance travel, according to a : preliminary analysis of the National Household Travel Survey (NHTS). : Conducted from 2001 to 2002, the NHT...

  8. 49 CFR 229.55 - Piston travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Piston travel. 229.55 Section 229.55... Piston travel. (a) Brake cylinder piston travel shall be sufficient to provide brake shoe clearance when... piston travel may not exceed 11/2 inches less than the total possible piston travel. The total possible...

  9. Travel time variability and rational inattention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosgerau, Mogens; Jiang, Gege

    2017-01-01

    This paper sets up a rational inattention model for the choice of departure time for a traveler facing random travel time. The traveler chooses how much information to acquire about the travel time out-come before choosing departure time. This reduces the cost of travel time variability compared...

  10. Monitoring Travel Time Reliability on Freeways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tu, Huizhao

    2008-01-01

    Travel time and travel time reliability are important attributes of a trip. The current measures of reliability have in common that in general they all relate to the variability of travel times. However, travel time reliability does not only rely on variability but also on the stability of travel

  11. ``From Earth to the Solar System'' Traveling Exhibit Visits Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantoja, C. A.; Lebrón, M. E.; Isidro, G. M.

    2013-04-01

    Puerto Rico was selected as one of the venues for the exhibit “From Earth to the Solar System” (FETTSS) during the month of October 2011. A set of outreach activities were organized to take place during the month of October aligned with the FETTSS themes. These activities included the following: 1) Main Exhibit, 2) Guided tours for school groups, 3) Planet Festival, 4) Film Festival and 5) Astronomy Conferences. We describe this experience and in particular the work with a group of undergraduate students from the University of Puerto Rico (UPR) that assisted in the outreach events. Among this group were three blind students. The FETTSS exhibit included a set of tactile and Braille images for the blind and visually impaired. A special exhibit was prepared with additional adapted materials for the visually impaired. This allowed blind visitors to participate and the general public to become more aware of the needs of this population.

  12. A systematic review of nonsurgical single-visit versus multiple-visit endodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong AWY

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Amy WY Wong, Chengfei Zhang, Chun-hung Chu Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, People's Republic of China Abstract: Conventional endodontic treatment used to require multiple visits, but some clinicians have suggested that single-visit treatment is superior. Single-visit endodontic treatment and multiple-visit endodontic treatment both have their advantages and disadvantages. This paper is a literature review of the research on nonsurgical single-visit versus multiple-visit endodontic treatment. The PubMed database was searched using the keywords (endodontic treatment OR endodontic therapy OR root canal treatment OR root canal therapy AND (single-visit OR one-visit OR 1-visit. Review papers, case reports, data studies, and irrelevant reports were excluded, and 47 papers on clinical trials were reviewed. The studies generally had small sample sizes, and the endodontic procedures varied among the studies. Meta-analysis on the selected studies was performed, and the results showed that the postoperative complications of the single-visit and multiple-visit endodontic treatment were similar. Furthermore, neither single-visit endodontic treatment nor multiple-visit treatment had superior results over the other in terms of healing or success rate. Results of limited studies on disinfection of the root canals using low-energy laser photodynamic therapy is inconclusive, and further studies are necessary to show whether laser should be used in endodontic treatment. This review also found that that neither single-visit endodontic treatment nor multiple-visit treatment could guarantee the absence of postoperative pain. Since the study design of many studies displayed significant limitation and the materials and equipment used in endodontic treatment have dramatically changed in recent years, prospective randomized clinical trials are needed to further verify the postoperative pain and success rates of

  13. Risk of potentially rabid animal exposure among foreign travelers in Southeast Asia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watcharapong Piyaphanee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Each year millions of travelers visit Southeast Asia where rabies is still prevalent. This study aimed to assess the risk of rabies exposure, i.e., by being bitten or licked by an animal, among travelers in Southeast Asia. The secondary objective was to assess their attitudes and practices related to rabies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Foreign travelers departing to the destination outside Southeast Asia were invited to fill out the study questionnaire in the departure hall of Bangkok International Airport. They were asked about their demographic profile, travel characteristics, pre-travel health preparations, their possible exposure and their practices related to rabies during this trip. From June 2010 to February 2011, 7,681 completed questionnaires were collected. Sixty-two percent of the travelers were male, and the median age was 32 years. 34.0% of the participants were from Western/Central Europe, while 32.1% were from East Asia. Up to 59.3% had sought health information before this trip. Travel clinics were the source of information for 23.6% of travelers. Overall, only 11.6% of the participants had completed their rabies pre-exposure prophylaxis, and 15.3% had received only 1-2 shots, while 73.1% had not been vaccinated at all. In this study, the risk of being bitten was 1.11 per 100 travelers per month and the risk of being licked was 3.12 per 100 travelers per month. Among those who were bitten, only 37.1% went to the hospital to get post exposure treatment. Travelers with East Asian nationalities and longer duration of stay were significantly related to higher risk of animal exposure. Reason for travel was not related to the risk of animal exposure. CONCLUSIONS: Travelers were at risk of being exposed to potentially rabid animals while traveling in Southeast Asia. Many were inadequately informed and unprepared for this life-threatening risk. Rabies prevention advice should be included in every pre-travel visit.

  14. Smart travel guide: from internet image database to intelligent system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chareyron, Ga"l.; Da Rugna, Jérome; Cousin, Saskia

    2011-02-01

    To help the tourist to discover a city, a region or a park, many options are provided by public tourism travel centers, by free online guides or by dedicated book guides. Nonetheless, these guides provide only mainstream information which are not conform to a particular tourist behavior. On the other hand, we may find several online image databases allowing users to upload their images and to localize each image on a map. These websites are representative of tourism practices and constitute a proxy to analyze tourism flows. Then, this work intends to answer this question: knowing what I have visited and what other people have visited, where should I go now? This process needs to profile users, sites and photos. our paper presents the acquired data and relationship between photographers, sites and photos and introduces the model designed to correctly estimate the site interest of each tourism point. The third part shows an application of our schema: a smart travel guide on geolocated mobile devices. This android application is a travel guide truly matching the user wishes.

  15. The Brazil of Marianne North: Memories of an English Traveler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lúcia Almeida Gazzola

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Starting from reflections about woman and femininity in the Victorian era, the explosion of literary market in the 19th century, and the access of women to education, literature, and journalism, this text introduces the work of Marianne North, English painter who used to travel aiming to paint the flora of other countries, particularly the exotic tropical flora. Marianne became one of the most famous globetrotter travelers of her time, visiting several countries such as Canada, USA, Jamaica, Brazil, Tenerife, Japan, Borneo, Java, Ceylon, Singapore, India, Wales, Australia, New Zealand, Tasmania, South Africa, Seychelles Islands, and Chile. In total, she left registers of about 272 genres (almost 1000 species of plants, some of them little known by the experts. Hence, the text deals with the dual condition of Marianne North as a painter and author of reports about the visited countries. In Brazil, for instance, she lived between 1972 and 1873. Her professionalism and objectivity distinguish her from the other travelers of 19th century.

  16. International Development Research Centre Governor Travel Policy

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    André Lavoie

    business. Governors are required to travel to conduct IDRC business, attend ... of Governors, liaise with Centre management, and perform specific representational functions on ..... Travel between Points of Origin and Destination - Air Travel.

  17. Notes on collecting flower-visiting insects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemstein, S.C.

    1974-01-01

    Flower-visiting insects may play a role in the pollination of the flowers they visit. An important indication for this is the pollen they carry on their body. The transport of pollen does not prove pollination without observations of the behaviour of the insects on the flowers, but at least it

  18. Child-Visiting and Domestic Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, Melanie

    1992-01-01

    Explains problems with child visiting in cases of domestic abuse. Data on domestic abuse, child care concerns, and child adjustment problems were collected from 25 mothers and 22 fathers at a child visiting program serving separated and abusive families. Psychological abuse of mothers correlated with child adjustment problems. (BB)

  19. An examination of constraints to wilderness visitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary T. Green; J. Michael Bowker; Cassandra Y. Johnson; H. Ken Cordell; Xiongfei Wang

    2007-01-01

    Certain social groups appear notably less in wilderness visitation surveys than their population proportion. This study examines whether different social groups in American society (minorities, women, rural dwellers, low income and less educated populations) perceive more constraints to wilderness visitation than other groups. Logistic regressions were fit to data from...

  20. Carlson Wagonlit Travel

    CERN Multimedia

    Carlson Wagonlit Travel

    2005-01-01

    Chères clientes, chers clients, Le 3 janvier dernier, nous vous avons informé de la décision des compagnies aériennes de supprimer les commissions versées aux agences de voyages suisses. Cette mesure a été introduite progressivement pour être appliquées maintenant par toutes les compagnies, à quelques rares exceptions près. En conséquence, en accord avec le CERN, nous serons dans l'obligation d'appliquer une nouvelle liste de prix de nos transactions pour les voyages privés. Elle sera applicable dès le lundi 25 juillet 2005. Carlson Wagonlit Travel (CWT) vous propose : Son service de conseil personnalisé, professionnel et compétent Sa recherche de la solution la plus économique et la mieux adaptée à vos besoins Sa neutralité dans les comparaisons de prix et prestations Des informations com...

  1. Calculation of groundwater travel time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnett, R.C.; Sagar, B.; Baca, R.G.

    1984-12-01

    Pre-waste-emplacement groundwater travel time is one indicator of the isolation capability of the geologic system surrounding a repository. Two distinct modeling approaches exist for prediction of groundwater flow paths and travel times from the repository location to the designated accessible environment boundary. These two approaches are: (1) the deterministic approach which calculates a single value prediction of groundwater travel time based on average values for input parameters and (2) the stochastic approach which yields a distribution of possible groundwater travel times as a function of the nature and magnitude of uncertainties in the model inputs. The purposes of this report are to (1) document the theoretical (i.e., mathematical) basis used to calculate groundwater pathlines and travel times in a basalt system, (2) outline limitations and ranges of applicability of the deterministic modeling approach, and (3) explain the motivation for the use of the stochastic modeling approach currently being used to predict groundwater pathlines and travel times for the Hanford Site. Example calculations of groundwater travel times are presented to highlight and compare the differences between the deterministic and stochastic modeling approaches. 28 refs

  2. Experienced travel time prediction for congested freeways

    OpenAIRE

    Yildirimoglu, Mehmet; Geroliminis, Nikolaos

    2013-01-01

    Travel time is an important performance measure for transportation systems, and dissemination of travel time information can help travelers make reliable travel decisions such as route choice or departure time. Since the traffic data collected in real time reflects the past or current conditions on the roadway, a predictive travel time methodology should be used to obtain the information to be disseminated. However, an important part of the literature either uses instantaneous travel time ass...

  3. The causes of skin lesions in the returning travelers: with special reference to Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morsy, Tosson A

    2012-04-01

    Often people yearn of a greater travel adventure like a year in Africa to get away from their routine situations and locations, for a quick vacation or as a means of finding one's self, to enjoy new experiences, to learn and experience new languages, new food, and new cultures. While most people associate Sub-Saharan Africa with safaris, there are endless other possibilities for adventure. Some African countries have actual entry requirements and won't let you in unless you have proof you've been vaccinated against a specific disease. Every African country is unique in the quality of its parks and reserves, roads and other infrastructure, visitor accommodations and receptivity to tourists. Creating an itinerary and arranging travel logistics can intimidate even the most enthusiastic tourist. Others travel more nowadays for the better economy and the advancements in transportation make it easier to do so. If family members do not reside in the same country or are probably working abroad, other family members would want to visit them and would do so as frequently as their resources would allow. Visiting families and friends in different states or countries are probably the most important reasons for taking time off to travel. No doubt, travelling to different climates, cultures and environments abroad can expose to tropical infectious diseases and health risks. This review dealt with skin lesions in the returning travelers.

  4. GH Travel & Mission Support System

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — HTRAMS is a travel data collection system for GH that collects information on both the basic details of an employee's trips (destination, length, purpose, etc.) and...

  5. PPL Travel & Mission Support System

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — PTRAMS is a travel data collection system for PPL that collects information on both the basic details of an employee's trips (destination, length, purpose, etc.) and...

  6. Traveler's Health: Avoid Bug Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safety Road Safety - 8 Steps MERS Health Advisory poster MERS Pictogram CDC Guide for Healthy Travel Website ... other accommodations that are air conditioned or have good window and door screens so bugs can’t ...

  7. Travelers' Health: Injuries and Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safety Road Safety - 8 Steps MERS Health Advisory poster MERS Pictogram CDC Guide for Healthy Travel Website ... possible, fly on larger planes (>30 seats), in good weather, during the daylight hours, and with experienced ...

  8. DCHA Travel & Mission Support System

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — DTRAMS is a travel data collection system for DCHA that collects information on both the basic details of an employee's trips (destination, length, purpose, etc.)...

  9. Transmedia storytelling on travel stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adolfo Baltar Moreno

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Travel stories form part of a great tradition inside Western Culture which has served historically to describe, to understand and to imagine other cul - tures and communities, far or near, being constituted into a real narra - tive genre. This type of story has been and is a reflection of the perception of the world based on the imaginary worlds created by the travelling narrators. How do modern authors of travel stories take advantage of the opportunities offered by transmedia storytelling? The present article explores the potential of these types of stories as a privileged object of study for transmedia storytelling studies, from the analysis of a sample of 80 narrative productions based on experiences of travel and presented in diverse editions of the Festival Le Grand Bivouac (France. It also shows the existence of a new contemporary trend inside this narrative form that transcends its literary nature.

  10. Bacterial infec tions in travellers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    namely bacterial causes of travellers' diarrhoea and skin infections, as well as .... Vaccination: protective efficacy against typhoid may be overcome by ingesting a high bacterial load. Vaccine ..... preparation such as cream sauce. Only after ...

  11. Travel time estimation using Bluetooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using a Bluetooth Probe Detection System (BPDS) to : estimate travel time in an urban area. Specifically, the study investigated the possibility of measuring overall congestion, the : ...

  12. Travel reliability inventory for Chicago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    The overarching goal of this research project is to enable state DOTs to document and monitor the reliability performance : of their highway networks. To this end, a computer tool, TRIC, was developed to produce travel reliability inventories from : ...

  13. Radiation hazard when we travel?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhamat Omar

    2003-01-01

    It is apparent that we are all exposed to natural radiation while travelling from one place to another. Air and sea travelers receive the highest and the lowest radiation dose respectively. The doses received by on-land travelers are generally low although some places near the mineral and slag heaps show high radiation levels. With proper management and enforcement, the contribution from these heaps on the roadsides can be easily removed. The other important radiation source is the tunnels built through granite rocks. However, this is more concern to the construction workers rather than to travelers. Thus, the authors are of the opinion that it is worth to look into the radiation exposures to the tunnel construction workers

  14. Long distance travel ‘today’

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Linda

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Dane’s long distance travel. It is a part of the Drivers and Limits project about long distance travel. Long distance travel is in the project defined as infrequent travel with overnight stay. Danes 15-85 years-old travel in average 5.5 long distance travel...... per year og which a third is for international destinations, a third is for domestic second homes and a third are other domestic trips. However, 87% of the kilometres are for international destinations and only 4% are for domestic second homes. Travel activity is very uneven distributed with only half...... of the population having had a journey during the last three month. At the other hand 60% have travelled internationally during the last year and only 2% have never travelled abroad. The paper presents among other things how the travel activity is distributed on travel purpose and mode and how the mode choice...

  15. Visiting CERN… like “common people”

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella del Rosso

    2012-01-01

    Paul Young, the British pop star who made his name in the 80s, came to visit CERN on 17 December. His son brought him here because of his passion for science in general and physics in particular. Father and son found the visit exciting and CERN’s activities really thrilling. We could even expect a surprise for Paul's next visit…   The visiting group in the CMS Control Room (Photo credit: P. Geeraert, ESO). Paul Young, famous for his interpretation of “Love of the Common People”, came to CERN because his teenage son is going to be studying A-level physics at school next year and wanted to visit the Laboratory. “I was fascinated by the visit. CERN is a place I didn’t know much about, but my son knows a lot more about science than I do. The explanations we got were great. We enjoyed the visit very much,” he said enthusiastically. Paul Young and his son visited the CMS underground cavern with Michael Hoch. &...

  16. A HYBRID HEURISTIC ALGORITHM FOR THE CLUSTERED TRAVELING SALESMAN PROBLEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário Mestria

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This paper proposes a hybrid heuristic algorithm, based on the metaheuristics Greedy Randomized Adaptive Search Procedure, Iterated Local Search and Variable Neighborhood Descent, to solve the Clustered Traveling Salesman Problem (CTSP. Hybrid Heuristic algorithm uses several variable neighborhood structures combining the intensification (using local search operators and diversification (constructive heuristic and perturbation routine. In the CTSP, the vertices are partitioned into clusters and all vertices of each cluster have to be visited contiguously. The CTSP is -hard since it includes the well-known Traveling Salesman Problem (TSP as a special case. Our hybrid heuristic is compared with three heuristics from the literature and an exact method. Computational experiments are reported for different classes of instances. Experimental results show that the proposed hybrid heuristic obtains competitive results within reasonable computational time.

  17. THE DUBINS TRAVELING SALESMAN PROBLEM WITH CONSTRAINED COLLECTING MANEUVERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Váňa

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we introduce a variant of the Dubins traveling salesman problem (DTSP that is called the Dubins traveling salesman problem with constrained collecting maneuvers (DTSP-CM. In contrast to the ordinary formulation of the DTSP, in the proposed DTSP-CM, the vehicle is requested to visit each target by specified collecting maneuver to accomplish the mission. The proposed problem formulation is motivated by scenarios with unmanned aerial vehicles where particular maneuvers are necessary for accomplishing the mission, such as object dropping or data collection with sensor sensitive to changes in vehicle heading. We consider existing methods for the DTSP and propose its modifications to use these methods to address a variant of the introduced DTSP-CM, where the collecting maneuvers are constrained to straight line segments.

  18. Ground-water travel time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentley, H.; Grisak, G.

    1985-01-01

    The Containment and Isolation Working Group considered issues related to the postclosure behavior of repositories in crystalline rock. This working group was further divided into subgroups to consider the progress since the 1978 GAIN Symposium and identify research needs in the individual areas of regional ground-water flow, ground-water travel time, fractional release, and cumulative release. The analysis and findings of the Ground-Water Travel Time Subgroup are presented

  19. Time travel in Goedel's space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfarr, J.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the motion of test particles in Goedel's universe. Both geodesical and nongeodesical motions are considered; the accelerations for nongeodesical motions are given. Examples for closed timelike world lines are shown and the dynamical conditions for time travel in Goedel's space-time are discussed. It is shown that these conditions alone do not suffice to exclude time travel in Goedel's space-time. (author)

  20. Sequentially pulsed traveling wave accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caporaso, George J [Livermore, CA; Nelson, Scott D [Patterson, CA; Poole, Brian R [Tracy, CA

    2009-08-18

    A sequentially pulsed traveling wave compact accelerator having two or more pulse forming lines each with a switch for producing a short acceleration pulse along a short length of a beam tube, and a trigger mechanism for sequentially triggering the switches so that a traveling axial electric field is produced along the beam tube in synchronism with an axially traversing pulsed beam of charged particles to serially impart energy to the particle beam.

  1. First tooth, first visit, zero cavities: a practical approach to the infant oral health visit

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzgerald, Kirsten

    2017-04-01

    The IDA adopted a formal policy on children’s oral health in 2011. There is increasing evidence to support early dental visits for children. The background to the infant oral health visit is discussed and a systematic approach to the practicalities of the visit is offered. General dental practitioners are encouraged to offer the first oral health visit before the first birthday, and this paper aims to give them practical advice concerning this visit. The feature is accompanied by a companion paper that reviews the literature pertaining to the topic, and serves to complement the recent clinical feature published in the Journal of the Irish Dental Association.

  2. Intercity Travel Demand Analysis Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Lu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that intercity travel is an important component of travel demand which belongs to short distance corridor travel. The conventional four-step method is no longer suitable for short distance corridor travel demand analysis for the time spent on urban traffic has a great impact on traveler's main mode choice. To solve this problem, the author studied the existing intercity travel demand analysis model, then improved it based on the study, and finally established a combined model of main mode choice and access mode choice. At last, an integrated multilevel nested logit model structure system was built. The model system includes trip generation, destination choice, and mode-route choice based on multinomial logit model, and it achieved linkage and feedback of each part through logsum variable. This model was applied in Shenzhen intercity railway passenger demand forecast in 2010 as a case study. As a result, the forecast results were consistent with the actuality. The model's correctness and feasibility were verified.

  3. Towards improved uptake of malaria chemoprophylaxis among West African travellers: identification of behavioural determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieten, Rosanne W; Harting, Janneke; Biemond, Pieter M; Grobusch, Martin P; van Vugt, Michèle

    2013-10-10

    Malaria is a potentially lethal illness for which preventive measures are not optimally used among all travellers. Travellers visiting friends and relatives in their country of origin (VFRs) are known to use chemoprophylaxis less consistently compared to tourist travellers. In this study, factors explaining the low use of chemoprophylaxis were pursued to contribute to improving uptake of preventive measures among VFRs. Following in-depth interviews with Ghanaians living in Amsterdam, a questionnaire was developed to assess which behavioural determinants were related to taking preventive measures. The questionnaire was administered at gates of departing flights from Schiphol International Airport, Amsterdam (the Netherlands) to Kotoka International Airport, Accra (Ghana). In total, 154 questionnaires were eligible for analysis. Chemoprophylaxis had been started by 83 (53.9%) and bought by 93 (60.4%) travellers. Pre-travel advice had been obtained by 104 (67.5%) travellers. Those who attended the pre-travel clinic and those who incorrectly thought they had been vaccinated against malaria were more likely to use preventive measures. Young-, business- and long-term travellers, those who had experienced malaria, and those who thought curing malaria was easier than taking preventive tablets were less likely to use preventive measures. Almost half of the VFRs travelling to West Africa had not started chemoprophylaxis; therefore, there is room for improvement. Risk reduction strategies could aim at improving attendance to travel clinics and focus on young-, business and long term travellers and VFRs who have experienced malaria during consultation. Risk reduction strategies should focus on improving self-efficacy and conceptions of response efficacy, including social environment to aim at creating the positive social context needed.

  4. Towards improved uptake of malaria chemoprophylaxis among West African travellers: identification of behavioural determinants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Malaria is a potentially lethal illness for which preventive measures are not optimally used among all travellers. Travellers visiting friends and relatives in their country of origin (VFRs) are known to use chemoprophylaxis less consistently compared to tourist travellers. In this study, factors explaining the low use of chemoprophylaxis were pursued to contribute to improving uptake of preventive measures among VFRs. Methods Following in-depth interviews with Ghanaians living in Amsterdam, a questionnaire was developed to assess which behavioural determinants were related to taking preventive measures. The questionnaire was administered at gates of departing flights from Schiphol International Airport, Amsterdam (the Netherlands) to Kotoka International Airport, Accra (Ghana). Results In total, 154 questionnaires were eligible for analysis. Chemoprophylaxis had been started by 83 (53.9%) and bought by 93 (60.4%) travellers. Pre-travel advice had been obtained by 104 (67.5%) travellers. Those who attended the pre-travel clinic and those who incorrectly thought they had been vaccinated against malaria were more likely to use preventive measures. Young-, business- and long-term travellers, those who had experienced malaria, and those who thought curing malaria was easier than taking preventive tablets were less likely to use preventive measures. Conclusion Almost half of the VFRs travelling to West Africa had not started chemoprophylaxis; therefore, there is room for improvement. Risk reduction strategies could aim at improving attendance to travel clinics and focus on young-, business and long term travellers and VFRs who have experienced malaria during consultation. Risk reduction strategies should focus on improving self-efficacy and conceptions of response efficacy, including social environment to aim at creating the positive social context needed. PMID:24107150

  5. Ethnicity predicts viral rebound after travel to the tropics in HIV-infected travelers to the tropics in the Swiss HIV Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebreselassie, H M; Kraus, D; Fux, C A; Haubitz, S; Scherrer, A; Hatz, C; Veit, O; Stoeckle, M; Fehr, J; de Lucia, S; Cavassini, M; Bernasconi, E; Schmid, P; Furrer, H; Staehelin, C

    2017-09-01

    The number of HIV-infected individuals from developed countries travelling to tropical and subtropical areas has increased as a result of the clinical and survival benefits of combination antiretroviral therapy. The aim of our study was to describe the traveler population in the SHCS and to determine the frequency of viral rebound in virologically suppressed individuals after a travel episode to the tropics compared to non-travelers. Swiss HIV Cohort Study participants with at least one follow-up visit between 1 January 1989 and 28 February 2015 were eligible for inclusion in the study. The primary outcome was the occurrence of viral rebound (viral load > 200 HIV-1 RNA copies/mL) after a travel episode compared with a nontravel episode in previously suppressed individuals (≤ 200 copies/mL). All virologically suppressed patients contributed multiple travel or nontravel episodes to the analysis. Logistic regression was performed including factors associated with viral rebound. We included 16 635 patients in the study, of whom 6084 (36.5%) had ever travelled to the tropics. Travel frequency increased over time, with travellers showing better HIV parameters than nontravellers [less advanced Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) stage and higher CD4 count nadir]. Viral rebound was seen in 477 (3.9%) of 12 265 travel episodes and in 5121 (4.5%) of 114 884 nontravel episodes [unadjusted odds ratio (OR) 0.87; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.78-0.97]. Among these 477 post-travel viral rebounds, 115 had a resistance test performed and 51 (44%) of these showed new resistance mutations. Compared with European and North American patients, the odds for viral rebound were significantly lower in Southeast Asian (OR 0.67; 95% CI 0.51-0.88) and higher in sub-Saharan African (SSA) patients (OR 1.41; 95% CI 1.22-1.62). Travel further increased the odds of viral rebound in SSA patients (OR 2.00; 95% CI 1.53-2.61). Region of origin is the main risk factor for viral rebound

  6. Inter-temporal variation in the travel time and travel cost parameters of transport models

    OpenAIRE

    Börjesson, Maria

    2012-01-01

    The parameters for travel time and travel cost are central in travel demand forecasting models. Since valuation of infrastructure investments requires prediction of travel demand for future evaluation years, inter-temporal variation of the travel time and travel cost parameters is a key issue in forecasting. Using two identical stated choice experiments conducted among Swedish drivers with an interval of 13 years, 1994 and 2007, this paper estimates the inter-temporal variation in travel time...

  7. Spatial Transformation of Equality – Generalized Travelling Salesman Problem to Travelling Salesman Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Zia

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The Equality-Generalized Travelling Salesman Problem (E-GTSP, which is an extension of the Travelling Salesman Problem (TSP, is stated as follows: given groups of points within a city, like banks, supermarkets, etc., find a minimum cost Hamiltonian cycle that visits each group exactly once. It can model many real-life combinatorial optimization scenarios more efficiently than TSP. This study presents five spatially driven search-algorithms for possible transformation of E-GTSP to TSP by considering the spatial spread of points in a given urban city. Presented algorithms are tested over 15 different cities, classified by their street-network’s fractal-dimension. Obtained results denote that the R-Search algorithm, which selects the points from each group based on their radial separation with respect to the start–end point, is the best search criterion for any E-GTSP to TSP conversion modelled for a city street network. An 8.8% length error has been reported for this algorithm.

  8. Danish long distance travel A study of Danish travel behaviour and the role of infrequent travel activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Mette Aagaard

    2014-01-01

    , this is problematic. The average travel distance has steadily increased during the latest decades together with the increasing motorisation of daily travel and international aviation. Previously most focus has been on domestic daily travel activities, but globalisation has, together with changes in price structures......), the TU overnight survey, and the Danish Tourism Statistics from the Business and Holiday Survey (HBS). This has enabled focus on infrequent travel activities segmented relative to travel purpose, distance threshold, or travelling with overnight stays. At an overall level the thesis has three main.......g. socio-economic variables. The analysis of Danish travel activities described in the three different travel surveys has outlined detailed information on Danish travel behaviour at an aggregated level during the past two decades. It has above all revealed the significant role of leisure travel. Private...

  9. Loiasis in a Japanese Traveler Returning from Central Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Hayakawa, Kayoko; Mawatari, Momoko; Itoh, Makoto; Akao, Nobuaki; Yotsu, Rie R.; Sugihara, Jun; Takeshita, Nozomi; Kutsuna, Satoshi; Fujiya, Yoshihiro; Kanagawa, Shuzo; Ohmagari, Norio; Kato, Yasuyuki

    2015-01-01

    We encountered a probable case of loiasis in a returned traveler from Central Africa. A 52-year-old Japanese woman presented to our hospital complaining of discomfort in her eyes and skin. She reported having frequently visited Central Africa over many years and having been extensively exposed to the rainforest climate and ecosystem. Although no microfilariae were found in her blood, there was an elevated level of IgG antibodies against the crude antigens of Brugia pahangi, which have cross-reactivity with Loa loa. She was treated with albendazole for 21 days, after which the antigen-specific IgG level decreased and no relapse occurred. PMID:26161033

  10. Danish long distance travel A study of Danish travel behaviour and the role of infrequent travel activities

    OpenAIRE

    Knudsen, Mette Aagaard; Rich, Jeppe; Nielsen, Otto Anker

    2014-01-01

    Historically there has been a lack of knowledge with respect to long distance travel. Due to the considerable contribution of long distance travel to total travelled kilometres and the related energy consumption from the transport sector and derived impacts on greenhouse emissions, this is problematic. The average travel distance has steadily increased during the latest decades together with the increasing motorisation of daily travel and international aviation. Previously most focus has been...

  11. Visits Service Launches New Seminar Series

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The CERN Visits Service is launching a new series of seminars for guides, and they are open to everyone. The series kicks off next week with a talk by Konrad Elsener on the CERN neutrinos to Gran Sasso, CNGS, project.

  12. Darwin-Bali Exchange School Visits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, T.

    1974-01-01

    Describes an exchange program between Indonesian language students and teachers from Darwin and a group of students and teachers from Bali. The visits related to the subject areas of history, geography, Asian studies, and Bahasa Indonesia. (RM)

  13. VIP visit of LHC Computing Grid Project

    CERN Multimedia

    Krajewski, Yann Tadeusz

    2015-01-01

    VIP visit of LHC Computing Grid Project with Dr -.Ing. Tarek Kamel [Senior Advisor to the President for Government Engagement, ICANN Geneva Office] and Dr Nigel Hickson [VP, IGO Engagement, ICANN Geneva Office

  14. Characteristics of health problems in returned overseas travelers at a tertiary teaching hospital in a suburban area in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Kazuki; Ogawa, Taku; Fujikura, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Yoshihiko; Hirai, Nobuyasu; Nakagawa-Onishi, Tomoko; Uno, Kenji; Takeyama, Masahiro; Kasahara, Kei; Nakamura-Uchiyama, Fukumi; Konishi, Mitsuru; Mikasa, Keiichi

    2018-03-01

    Few studies have analyzed the characteristics of patients who develop physical disorders after overseas travel. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 183 patients who visited Nara Medical University Hospital from 2008 to 2016 because of physical problems after traveling abroad. The main travel destinations were Southeast Asia (n = 100), Africa (n = 27), and South Asia (n = 23). The main reasons for the travel were leisure (n = 96), business (n = 51), and volunteer work (n = 19). The most common final diagnosis was gastrointestinal disease (n = 72), followed by febrile disease (n = 59) and respiratory disease (n = 19). There were eight malaria cases, including one patient who was infected after travel. Additionally, 61 of 71 cases of travelers' diarrhea and 15 of 21 cases of dengue fever occurred after travel. 26 cases of vaccine preventable diseases, such as hepatitis A, typhoid fever, and influenza, were observed. Consequently, healthcare providers should notify Japanese overseas travelers that there is a non-negligible health risk inherent to short-term travel, while stressing on the importance of pre-travel medical consultation. Copyright © 2018 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Towards More Responsible Business Travel : Green Travel Guide for Business Travellers

    OpenAIRE

    Aila, Anu

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research type thesis is to find ways how to develop sustainability in business travel. The target is increase the level of understanding and knowledge to respect natural environment and local cultures and find the right channels and ways to raise the knowledge. The study has been done to raise the awareness how business travel can be more sustainable. This thesis analyzes sustainable tourism based on the economic, environmental, and socio-cultural considerations. Green...

  16. 8 CFR 1244.15 - Travel abroad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Travel abroad. 1244.15 Section 1244.15... REGULATIONS TEMPORARY PROTECTED STATUS FOR NATIONALS OF DESIGNATED STATES § 1244.15 Travel abroad. (a) After... Status shall not constitute permission to travel abroad. Permission to travel may be granted by the...

  17. 49 CFR 230.76 - Piston travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Piston travel. 230.76 Section 230.76... Tenders Brake and Signal Equipment § 230.76 Piston travel. (a) Minimum piston travel. The minimum piston travel shall be sufficient to provide proper brake shoe clearance when the brakes are released. (b...

  18. 8 CFR 244.15 - Travel abroad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Travel abroad. 244.15 Section 244.15 Aliens... NATIONALS OF DESIGNATED STATES § 244.15 Travel abroad. (a) After the grant of Temporary Protected Status... to travel abroad. Permission to travel may be granted by the director pursuant to the Service's...

  19. A relational approach to analysing leisure travel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ettema, D.F.; Schwanen, T.

    2012-01-01

    Leisure travel makes up a very significant part of daily travel and therefore needs to be considered in any travel demand management or general land use and transportation policy. Yet, research into leisure mobility has tended to ignore important aspects of leisure travel, such as its joint

  20. Penanganan Fuzzy Time Window pada Travelling Salesman Problem (TSP dengan Penerapan Algoritma Genetika

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gusti Eka Yuliastuti

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The route of the travel tour packages offered by travel agents is not considered optimum, so the level of satisfaction the tourist is not maximal. Selection of the route of the travel packages included in the traveling salesman problem (TSP. The problem that occurs is uncertain tourists visiting destinations at the best destinations timing hereinafter be referred to as the fuzzy time window problem. Therefore, the authors apply the genetic algorithm to solve the problem. Based on test results obtained optimum solution with the fitness value of 1.3291, a population size of 100, the number of generations of 1000, a combination of CR=0,4 and MR=0.6.

  1. The value of travel time variance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosgerau, Mogens; Engelson, Leonid

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers the value of travel time variability under scheduling preferences that are defined in terms of linearly time varying utility rates associated with being at the origin and at the destination. The main result is a simple expression for the value of travel time variability...... that does not depend on the shape of the travel time distribution. The related measure of travel time variability is the variance of travel time. These conclusions apply equally to travellers who can freely choose departure time and to travellers who use a scheduled service with fixed headway. Depending...... on parameters, travellers may be risk averse or risk seeking and the value of travel time may increase or decrease in the mean travel time....

  2. Exploring the Positive Utility of Travel and Mode Choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Why do people travel? Underlying most travel behavior research is the derived-demand paradigm of travel analysis, which assumes that travel demand is derived from the demand for spatially separated activities, traveling is a means to an end (reaching...

  3. Knowledge, attitudes, and practices evaluation about travel medicine in international travelers and medical students in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Lillo, Lisette; Medrano-Díaz, Jorge; Pérez, Carmen; Chacón, Rodrigo; Silva-Urra, Juan; Rodriguez-Morales, Alfonso J

    2009-01-01

    Because information about travel medicine in Chile is lacking, a knowledge, attitudes, and practices evaluation in international travelers and medical students was done. The travelers and medical students did not know the travel medicine and sanitary conditions of their destinations, although they perceived travel-associated health risks, but <10% had any vaccination and 5% got sick during international trips.

  4. 76 FR 43236 - Federal Travel Regulation (FTR): Temporary Duty (TDY) Travel Allowances: Notice of Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-20

    ...; Sequence 5] Federal Travel Regulation (FTR): Temporary Duty (TDY) Travel Allowances: Notice of Public... public meeting. SUMMARY: The General Services Administration (GSA) is revising the Federal Travel Regulation (FTR) in an effort to streamline travel policies, increase travel efficiency and effectiveness...

  5. 76 FR 46216 - Federal Travel Regulation (FTR): Temporary Duty (TDY) Travel Allowances: Notice of Public Meeting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-02

    ...; Sequence 5] Federal Travel Regulation (FTR): Temporary Duty (TDY) Travel Allowances: Notice of Public... and the general public in an effort to streamline travel policies, incorporated travel efficiency and.... Flynn, Deputy Director, Office of Travel, Transportation & Asset Management. [FR Doc. 2011-19482 Filed 8...

  6. Costs of travel time uncertainty and benefits of travel time information: Conceptual model and numerical examples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ettema, D.F.; Timmermans, H.J.P.

    2006-01-01

    A negative effect of congestion that tends to be overlooked is travel time uncertainty. Travel time uncertainty causes scheduling costs due to early or late arrival. The negative effects of travel time uncertainty can be reduced by providing travellers with travel time information, which improves

  7. Observational Study of Travelers' Diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuris

    1995-03-01

    Background: European air travelers returning from Algeria, Egypt, Mexico, Morocco, and Tunisia were interviewed about their experience of travelers' diseases upon arrival in Brussels. Diarrhea was mentioned by 37% of the adults and 27% of the children. These subjects were questioned about the types of measures taken, type and duration of drug treatment (if any), and about duration of diarrhea and side effects experienced. Methods: Final analysis was performed based on 2160 interviews. The largest proportion of diarrhea was reported in the age group 15-24 years (46%). Results: The majority of the 2160 subjects had opted for drug treatment (81%): 927 subjects for loperamide alone, 235 for loperamide in combination with nifuroxazide, and 178 for nifuroxazide alone. Other drugs had been used less frequently. The median time to recovery was 2.4 days with loperamide compared to 3.2 days with nifuroxazide and to 3.4 days for the no-treatment group. Conclusions: A stratification of the results by severity of the diarrhea suggests a rank of antidiarrheal potency as follows: loperamide > nifuroxazide > no-drug treatment. The side effect with the highest incidence was constipation (2.4% with loperamide). (J Travel Med 2:11-15, 1995) Travelers' diarrhea is usually defined as the passage of at least three unformed stools per day or any number of such stools when accompanied by fever, abdominal cramping, or vomiting. The definition may be broadened to include more trivial bowel disturbance.1,2 The duration of this self-limited disease generally is 3 to 5 days. Medical intervention aims at shortening the duration of disease, thus allowing the sufferer to resume his or her usual activities at an early stage. A shortened period of recovery to physical well-being has obvious favorable economic implications if the traveler is on business and may help the maintenance of a desired level of quality of life while a traveler is on holiday. An observational study of various medical

  8. Health, sustainability and student travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Gill; Morris, Jenny; Wade, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    A survey of 246 pre-registration nursing students in a University in the South West of England was carried out to explore the impact of course related travel on the student experience. Results from the survey indicated that students' main mode of transport to practice placements was by car which reflects the rural nature of the South West and the relative paucity of public transport. Long distances that many students travel to their study centre and to placements, and the concurrent financial strain that this creates, impacted negatively on the student experience. Students recognised the need to travel to a place of study and clinical placements and suggestions of minimising the negative impact of travel were offered. These included the increased use of electronic delivery of lectures, attendance at local university premises, the provision of shared transport to placements and placements closer to the student's home. Few students, however, considered the environmental impact of travel. Higher Education Institutions need to address issues of sustainability through promoting student wellbeing and taking steps to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. It is therefore important that student awareness of sustainability related issues is increased as well as focusing on reducing the environmental impact through organisational change. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Antimicrobials Increase Travelers' Risk of Colonization by Extended-Spectrum Betalactamase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantele, Anu; Lääveri, Tinja; Mero, Sointu; Vilkman, Katri; Pakkanen, Sari H.; Ollgren, Jukka; Antikainen, Jenni; Kirveskari, Juha

    2015-01-01

    Background. More than 300 million travelers visit regions with poor hygiene annually. A significant percentage of them become colonized by resistant intestinal bacteria such as extended-spectrum beta-lactamase–producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-PE) and may transmit the strains to others and to medical care settings when they return home. Despite the threats to global healthcare caused by an upsurge in antimicrobial resistance, no effort has been centered on prevention of colonization while traveling. Methods. Stool samples were collected from 430 Finns before and after traveling outside Scandinavia. All specimens were analyzed for ESBL- and carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE). Questionnaires were used to survey volunteers about use of antimicrobials as well as other potential risk factors. The results were subjected to multivariable analysis. Results. Twenty-one percent (90/430) of the travelers became colonized by ESBL-PE and none by CPE. Geographic region, occurrence of travelers' diarrhea (TD), age, and use of antimicrobial (AB) for TD were identified as independent risk factors predisposing to contracting ESBL-PE. Eleven percent of those in subgroup TD−AB−, 21% in TD+AB−, and 37% in TD+AB+ acquired ESBL-PE. The risk proved to be highest in South Asia (46%); 23% became colonized in subgroup TD−AB−, 47% in TD+AB−, and 80% in TD+AB+. In Southeast Asia, the rates were 14%, 37%, and 69%, respectively. Conclusions. TD and antimicrobials for TD proved to be independent risk factors, with up to 80% of TD+AB+ travelers contracting ESBL-PE. In modern pre-travel counseling for those visiting high-risk regions, travelers should be advised against taking antibiotics for mild or moderate TD. PMID:25613287

  10. Travel-associated faecal colonization with ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae: incidence and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostholm-Balkhed, Ase; Tärnberg, Maria; Nilsson, Maud; Nilsson, Lennart E; Hanberger, Håkan; Hällgren, Anita

    2013-09-01

    To study the acquisition of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-PE) among the faecal flora during travel, with a focus on risk factors, antibiotic susceptibility and ESBL-encoding genes. An observational prospective multicentre cohort study of individuals attending vaccination clinics in south-east Sweden was performed, in which the submission of faecal samples and questionnaires before and after travelling outside Scandinavia was requested. Faecal samples were screened for ESBL-PE by culturing on ChromID ESBL and an in-house method. ESBL-PE was confirmed by phenotypic and genotypic methods. Susceptibility testing was performed with the Etest. Individuals who acquired ESBL-PE during travel (travel-associated carriers) were compared with non-carriers regarding risk factors, and unadjusted and adjusted ORs after manual stepwise elimination were calculated using logistic regression. Of 262 enrolled individuals, 2.4% were colonized before travel. Among 226 evaluable participants, ESBL-PE was detected in the post-travel samples from 68 (30%) travellers. The most important risk factor in the final model was the geographic area visited: Indian subcontinent (OR 24.8, P Asia (OR 8.63, P < 0.001) and Africa north of the equator (OR 4.94, P = 0.002). Age and gastrointestinal symptoms also affected the risk significantly. Multiresistance was seen in 77 (66%) of the ESBL-PE isolates, predominantly a combination of reduced susceptibility to third-generation cephalosporins, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and aminoglycosides. The most common species and ESBL-encoding gene were Escherichia coli (90%) and CTX-M (73%), respectively. Acquisition of multiresistant ESBL-PE among the faecal flora during international travel is common. The geographical area visited has the highest impact on ESBL-PE acquisition.

  11. Malaria chemoprophylaxis of 3,446 French travelers departing from Paris to eight tropical countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semaille, C; Santin, A; Prazuck, T; Bargain, P; Lafaix, C; Fisch, A

    1999-03-01

    Each year more and more French travelers are visiting areas where malaria is endemic. The aim of this study was to assess prophylactic regimens used by French travelers and to determine whether they meet current published recommendations. This 12 month transversal study (May 1, 1995 to April 31, 1996) was conducted in embarkment lounges of Roissy Charles de Gaulle Airport to eight "tropical" destinations. 3,446 French travelers were enrolled. Twenty two and three-fifths percent of travelers had not sought any advice. The percentages of travelers staying less than 3 months (n = 2899) at risk of malaria (i.e., using none or inadequate chemoprophylaxis) were, according to the destination: Brazil (20%), Gabon (83%), Ivory Coast (26%), Kenya (43%), Madagascar (39%), Thailand (22%), Venezuela (41%) and Vietnam (8%). The suitability of the prophylaxis according to the information source for travelers staying less than 3 months varied as follows: specialist physician (OR = 1), travel agent (OR = 1.01, CI = 0.9 - 1. 1), occupational physician (OR = 1.13, CI = 0.6 - 2.1), GP (OR = 1. 58, CI = 1.1 - 2.3), none (OR = 1.95, CI = 1.3 - 2.9), friends (OR = 3, CI = 1.8 - 5) and pharmacist (OR = 3.94, CI = 2.1 - 7.5). Suitability of prophylaxis also varied according to the type of trip: organized tour (OR = 1), business trip (OR = 1.04, CI = 0.8 - 1.4), adventure tourism (OR = 2.1, CI = 1.6 - 2.9) and visit to family or friends (OR = 2.3, CI = 1.7 - 3.1). This study shows that the quality of advice on antimalarial chemoprophylaxis varies markedly according to the source, and that nearly one in three French travelers (29.3 %, 850/2899) to tropical areas is at risk of malaria.

  12. Future Trends in Business Travel Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Keith J.

    2002-01-01

    This research surveys twenty large companies and their travellers to identify and evaluate the effects of pressures on the business travel market in the future. The influence of the following areas on the decision making process are addressed: (1) Corporate travel policies and increasing professionalism in corporate purchasing; (2) The development of global strategic airline alliances; (3) The emergence of low cost airlines on short haul markets; and (4) The development of internet based booking tools and travel agency IT. The survey shows differences in views between travel managers, and travellers with regard to corporate travel policies. While travel managers see policy rules, travellers interpret these as guidelines, indicating travel managers will need to take further actions to exercise true control of travel budgets. The data shows that companies are more likely to prescribe a class of airline ticket, than the choice of airline itself. Corporate hierarchical bias in travel policies is still common both for short and particularly long haul flying. Other findings show that while travel managers believe that their companies are likely to sign global deals with strategic airline groups within a five year period in a bid to consolidating spending, they also believe that nearly a third of short haul flying will be taken with low cost carriers, indicating further penetration in this business travel market by these carriers. The paper also provides other predictions about the business travel market, based on the survey findings.

  13. A stated adaptation approach to assess changes in individuals’ activity-travel behavior in presence of personalized travel information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parvaneh, Zahra; Arentze, Theo; Timmermans, Harry

    2014-01-01

    The rapid and inevitable growth of availability of travel information for travellers has increased expectations among policy makers about the benefits of travel information. It is increasingly expected that providing advanced travel information can trigger particular travel behaviors that would

  14. First dental visit of a child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meera R

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of the study was to assess the common chief complaints of the Indian children and the average age group at which they report for in their first dental visit. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study was carried out using the case records of 716 children who reported to the postgraduate section of Department of Pediatric dentistry, Meenakshi Ammal Dental College, Chennai, in 2007. The age groups of the children were divided into three categories 0-3 years, 3-6 years and 6-12 years. The various chief complaints were categorised as follows, Orientation to prevention, Routine visit, Deposits / Discoloration, Habits, Unerupted / Missing or Extra Tooth, Pain, Dental caries, Malocclusion, Trauma, others. The average age group and most common complaint at the first dental visit was assessed. A prospective study was done in January 2008, were 215 children were screened. The assessment was made as explained above. Results: Retrospective study Maximum number of children who reported for their first dental visit was between 6-12 years (59.08%. Most common chief complaint for the visit was pain (42.04%. Second common complaint being dental caries (28.49%. Prospective study Maximum number of children who reported for their first dental visit was between 6-12 years (69.77%. Most common chief complaint was dental caries (34.88%. Second common complaint being pain (27.91%. Conclusion: Children report for the first dental visit most commonly only after 6 years and for complaints like pain and dental caries. Orientation to prevention is not considered and preventive dentistry is yet to reach the common population in India.

  15. Marine Scorpaenidae Envenomation in Travelers: Epidemiology, Management, and Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, James H

    2015-01-01

    The Scorpaenidae are a large family of venomous marine fish that include scorpionfish, lionfish, and stonefish. Although most stonefish are confined to the Indo-Pacific, scorpionfish are distributed in the tropics worldwide, and two species of Indo-Pacific lionfish were inadvertently introduced into the Eastern Atlantic in the 1990s. Since then, lionfish have invaded shallow reef systems in the Eastern Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico, and Caribbean Sea. All of these regions are popular travel destinations for beachcombing, fishing, swimming, and scuba diving-recreational activities that increase risks of Scorpaenidae envenomation. To meet the objectives of describing species-specific presenting clinical manifestations, diagnostic and treatment strategies, and outcomes of Scorpaenidae envenomation in travelers, Internet search engines were queried with the key words. Well-conducted, retrospective epidemiological investigations of Scorpaenidae envenomation case series concluded: (1) most cases occurred in young adult male vacationers visiting endemic regions; (2) victims sought medical attention for pain control within 2 hours of injury and presented with intense pain, edema, and erythema in affected extremities; (3) systemic manifestations and surgical interventions were relatively uncommon following initial management with hot water soaks and parenteral analgesics; (4) all cases required tetanus prophylaxis; deeply penetrating, lacerated, and necrotic wounds required antibiotic prophylaxis; and (5) equine Fab stonefish antivenom does have antigen-neutralizing cross-reactivities with both Indo-Pacific and Atlantic Scorpaenidae species and is indicated in severe scorpionfish and stonefish envenomation worldwide. Travel medicine practitioners should counsel their patients about Scorpaenidae envenomation risks in endemic regions and maintain a high index of suspicion regarding Scorpaenidae envenomation in all travelers returning from tropical beach and ocean holidays and

  16. Visit Sunny Chernobyl: And Other Adventures in the World's Most Polluted Places

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackwell, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    This book is the French translation of 'Visit Sunny Chernobyl' published in 2012 by Random House editor. For most of us, traveling means visiting the most beautiful places on Earth. It's rare to book a plane ticket to visit the lifeless moonscape of Canada's oil sand strip mines, or to seek out the Chinese city of Linfen, legendary as the most polluted in the world. But in this book, the author embraces a different kind of travel, taking a jaunt through the most gruesomely polluted places on Earth. From the hidden bars and convenience stores of a radioactive wilderness to the sacred but reeking waters of India, the book fuses immersive first-person reporting with satire and analysis, making the case that it's time to start appreciating our planet as it is not as we wish it would be. Irreverent and reflective, the book is a love letter to our biosphere's most tainted, most degraded ecosystems, and a measured consideration of what they mean for us. Equal parts travelogue, expose, environmental memoir, and faux guidebook, the author careens through a rogue's gallery of environmental disaster areas in search of the worst the world has to offer and approaches a deeper understanding of what's really happening to our planet in the process

  17. Risk factors associated with visiting or not visiting the accident & emergency department after a fall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffer, Alice C; van Hensbroek, Pieter Boele; van Dijk, Nynke; Luitse, Jan S K; Goslings, Johannes C; Luigies, René H; de Rooij, Sophia E

    2013-07-26

    Little is known about the prevalence of modifiable risk factors of falling in elderly persons with a fall-history who do not visit the Accident and Emergency (A&E) Department after one or more falls. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of modifiable risk factors in a population that visited the A&E Department after a fall (A&E group) and in a community-dwelling population of elderly individuals with a fall history who did not visit the A&E Department after a fall (non-A&E group). Two cohorts were included in this study. The first cohort included 547 individuals 65 years and older who were visited at home by a mobile fall prevention team. The participants in this cohort had fall histories but did not visit the A&E Department after a previous fall. These participants were age- and gender-matched to persons who visited the A&E Department for care after a fall. All participants were asked to complete the CAREFALL Triage Instrument. The mean number of modifiable risk factors in patients who did not visit the A&E Department was 2.9, compared to 3.8 in the group that visited the A&E Department (pfalling, impaired vision, mood and high risk of osteoporosis were all independently associated with visiting the A&E Department. All modifiable risk factors for falling were found to be shared between community-dwelling elderly individuals with a fall history who visited the A&E Department and those who did not visit the Department, although the prevalence of these factors was somewhat lower in the A&E group. Preventive strategies aimed both at patients presenting to the A&E Department after a fall and those not presenting after a fall could perhaps reduce the number of recurrent falls, the occurrence of injury and the frequency of visits to the A&E Department.

  18. Fundamental Travel Demand Model Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanssen, Joel

    2010-01-01

    Instances of transportation models are abundant and detailed "how to" instruction is available in the form of transportation software help documentation. The purpose of this paper is to look at the fundamental inputs required to build a transportation model by developing an example passenger travel demand model. The example model reduces the scale to a manageable size for the purpose of illustrating the data collection and analysis required before the first step of the model begins. This aspect of the model development would not reasonably be discussed in software help documentation (it is assumed the model developer comes prepared). Recommendations are derived from the example passenger travel demand model to suggest future work regarding the data collection and analysis required for a freight travel demand model.

  19. Travel and disease vector ticks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarry, John W

    2011-03-01

    There are approximately twenty species of hard (ixodid) ticks worldwide that frequently affect human populations, many of which are associated with serious, sometimes fatal disease(s). When a tick travel souvenir is presented in the clinic, the risk must be immediately assessed by identifying the tick in question, ascertaining its disease vector status and determining if there has been the opportunity for the transfer of potential pathogens. This short review on identification of disease vector ticks and aspects of blood feeding and disease transmission includes the results of an examination of 59 specimens removed from UK domestic travellers and international travellers between 2002 and 2010. Sixteen tick species belonging to six genera were recorded and almost all showed evidence of blood feeding, which appears to contradict the view that because of their size, adult ticks are found early and therefore present an insignificant risk. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Elasticity of Long Distance Travelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Mette Aagaard

    2011-01-01

    With data from the Danish expenditure survey for 12 years 1996 through 2007, this study analyses household expenditures for long distance travelling. Household expenditures are examined at two levels of aggregation having the general expenditures on transportation and leisure relative to five other...... aggregated commodities at the highest level, and the specific expenditures on plane tickets and travel packages at the lowest level. The Almost Ideal Demand System is applied to determine the relationship between expenditures on transportation and leisure and all other purchased non-durables within...... packages has higher income elasticity of demand than plane tickets but also higher than transportation and leisure in general. The findings within price sensitiveness are not as sufficient estimated, but the model results indicate that travel packages is far more price elastic than plane tickets which...

  1. Toxoplasmosis as a travel risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepúlveda-Arias, Juan C; Gómez-Marin, Jorge E; Bobić, Branko; Naranjo-Galvis, Carlos A; Djurković-Djaković, Olgica

    2014-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a protozoan parasite with worldwide distribution that infects more than one third of the global population. Primary infection in immunocompetent individuals is usually asymptomatic; however, different organs can be affected in immunocompromised individuals leading to the development of encephalitis, myocarditis or pneumonitis. The prevalence of infection with Toxoplasma as well as its genetic structure varies geographically and for that reason travel may be considered as a risk factor to acquire the infection. As toxoplasmosis is a foodborne disease, health care providers should give health education on prevention measures to all prospective travelers in order to decrease the risk of infection in endemic areas. This review presents an overview of the infection with T. gondii with some considerations for travelers to and from endemic zones. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. CARACALLA AND DACIA. IMPERIAL VISIT, A REALITY OR ONLY RUMOUR?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coriolan Horatiu Opreanu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The author is challenging the Romanian historiography’s interpretation concerning the visit in 213 of the emperor Caracalla in Dacia, until to the northern frontier at Porolissum, where three inscriptions with identical text were considered as the building inscriptions of the stone fortifications of the fort from Pomet Hill. He is mentioning the new inscriptions from different part of the Roman Empire that offer today a better knowledge of the emperor’s actions and journeys during year 213. The conclusion is that he travelled to Orient after October 213 when defeated the Alamanns over the border of Raetia, along the Danube frontier visiting military bases. The journey was probably on the same route as he already done in 202 with his father, but in the other direction, returning from Orient. That time is possible Septimius Severus, Caracalla and Geta were in Dacia, at Drobeta, Tibiscum and Ulpia Traiana Sarmizegetusa, as several inscriptions attest. For this reason, it is possible that in 213 Caracalla stopped for a short period at Drobeta and maybe went to Tibiscum to pray in the temple of Apollo. However, continuing the trip to Porolissum is impossible to imagine, the time being too short, as he arrived at Nicomedia on the 17th of December 213. At the end of the article, the author rejects the theory of any connection between the tile-stamps of the seventh legion Gemina Felix from Leon and those of the third legion Gallica found at Porolissum with Caracalla’s journey. Furthermore, the author also dismisses the idea that these vexillations were taken to Dacia to replace Dacian vexillations involved in the eastern expedition of Caracalla, as there is neither no any positive evidence nor other evidence for similar examples in the history of the Roman military expeditions (e.g., Trajan’s Parthian war.

  3. Measuring outcomes of a pharmacist-run travel health clinic located in an independent community pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Karl M; Dai, Chih-Wei; Garner, Brian; Law, Anandi V

    To describe the acceptance and refusal rates of travel-related vaccine and medication recommendations in a pharmacist-run travel health clinic, to evaluate the change in patient understanding of travel-related issues, to determine patient satisfaction with this clinic, and to determine factors influencing both patient acceptance and satisfaction. Southern California (Claremont) between July 2007 and October 2008. Hendricks Pharmacy is an independently owned community pharmacy that is part of the Good Neighbor Pharmacy Provider Network. The pharmacy offers a range of services including home delivery, compounding, and blood glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol screenings. Comprehensive pharmacist-run travel health clinic. Patient acceptance and refusal rates of pharmacist-made recommendations, changes in patient understanding of travel-related issues resulting from pharmacist counseling, and patient satisfaction with this travel health clinic. In a sample of 283 patients, overall patient acceptance of pharmacist-made recommendations was 84.7%. The primary reason for patient refusal of a recommendation was self-perceived low risk for infection. A subsample of patients (n = 82) completing a patient satisfaction survey found that 96% were satisfied with their overall visit. Patient satisfaction with the clinic and pharmacist services was correlated with overall patient acceptance. The high rate of patient acceptance and satisfaction with this clinic supports adoption of pharmacists as nontraditional providers of travel health services.

  4. Father Attendance in Nurse Home Visitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmberg, John R.; Olds, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to examine the rates and predictors of father attendance at nurse home visits in replication sites of the Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP). Early childhood programs can facilitate father involvement in the lives of their children, but program improvements require an understanding of factors that predict father involvement. The sample consisted of 29,109 low-income, first-time mothers who received services from 694 nurses from 80 sites. We conducted mixed-model multiple regression analyses to identify population, implementation, site, and nurse influences on father attendance. Predictors of father attendance included a count of maternal visits (B = 0.12, SE = 0.01, F = 3101.77), frequent contact between parents (B = 0.61, SE = 0.02, F = 708.02), cohabitation (B = 1.41, SE = 0.07, F = 631.51), White maternal race (B = 0.77, SE = 0.06, F = 190.12), and marriage (B = 0.42, SE = 0.08, F = 30.08). Random effects for sites and nurses predicted father-visit participation (2.7 & 6.7% of the variance, respectively), even after controlling for population sociodemographic characteristics. These findings suggest that factors operating at the levels of sites and nurses influence father attendance at home visits, even after controlling for differences in populations served. Further inquiry about these influences on father visit attendance is likely to inform program-improvement efforts. PMID:25521707

  5. Rabies and Risk to Travelers

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-10-01

    Each year over 55,000 people die because of rabies, mostly from being bitten by rabid dogs. Over half of all rabies infections occur in children under the age of 15 who live in developing countries, but travelers are not immune. This podcast discusses some of the activities that put travelers at risk for rabies and describes ways to prevent infection.  Created: 10/1/2007 by National Center for the Prevention, Detection and Control of Infectious Diseases (NCPDCID).   Date Released: 10/5/2007.

  6. Traveling-Wave Membrane Photomixers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyss, R. A.; Martin, S. C.; Nakamura, B. J.; Neto, A.; Pasqualini, D.; Siegel, P. H.; Kadow, C.; Gossard, A. C.

    2001-01-01

    Traveling-wave photomixers have superior performance when compared with lumped area photomixers in the 1 to 3 THz frequency range. Their large active area and distributed gain mechanism assure high thermal damage threshold and elimination of the capacitive frequency roll-off. However, the losses experienced by the radio frequency wave traveling along the coplanar strips waveguide (due to underlying semi-infinite GaAs substrate) were a serious drawback. In this paper we present device designs and an experimental setup that make possible the realization of photomixers on membranes which eliminate the losses.

  7. Value of travel time savings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Masurier, P.; Polak, J.; Pawlak, Janet

    2015-01-01

    A team of specialist market researchers and Value of Time experts comprising members from SYSTRA, Imperial College London and the Technical University of Denmark has conducted a formal audit and peer review of research undertaken by Arup/ITS Leeds/Accent to derive Value of Travel Time Savings...... Preference (RP) models that were used to derive final Values of Travel Time (VTT). This report contains the findings of our audit and peer review of the procedures adopted by the research team during data collection of the three surveys (SP, RP and Employers Surveys); a peer review of the reported approach...

  8. Pre-travel care for immunocompromised and chronically ill travellers: A retrospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Aalst, Mariëlle; Verhoeven, Roos; Omar, Freshta; Stijnis, Cornelis; van Vugt, Michèle; de Bree, Godelieve J.; Goorhuis, Abraham; Grobusch, Martin P.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Immunocompromised and chronically ill travellers (ICCITs) are susceptible to travel related diseases. In ICCITs, pre-travel care regarding vaccinations and prophylactics is complex. We evaluated the protection level by preventive measures in ICCITs by analysing rates of vaccination

  9. Safe travels? HIV transmission among Britons travelling abroad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, B; Gilbart, V L; Lawrence, J; Smith, R; Kall, M; Delpech, V

    2012-05-01

    The aim of the study was to identify and describe the characteristics of persons born in the UK who acquire HIV infection abroad. Analyses using case reports and follow-up data from the national HIV database held at the Health Protection Agency were performed. Fifteen per cent (2066 of 13 891) of UK-born adults diagnosed in England, Wales and Northern Ireland between 2002 and 2010 acquired HIV infection abroad. Thailand (534), the USA (117) and South Africa (108) were the countries most commonly reported. As compared with UK-born adults acquiring HIV infection in the UK, those acquiring HIV infection abroad were significantly (P sex with a commercial sex worker (5.6% vs. 1%, respectively). Among men infected in Thailand, 11% reported sex with a commercial sex worker. A substantial number of UK-born adults are acquiring HIV infection in countries with generalized HIV epidemics, and in common holiday destinations. Of particular concern is the high proportion of men infected reporting sex with a commercial sex worker. We recommend HIV prevention and testing efforts be extended to include travellers abroad, and that sexual health advice be provided routinely in travel health consultations and in occupational health travel advice packs, particularly to those travelling to high HIV prevalence areas and destinations for sex tourism. Safer sex messages should include an awareness of the potential detrimental health and social impacts of the sex industry. © 2012 British HIV Association.

  10. Change as a travel benefit: Exploring the impact of travel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper aims, firstly, at identifying the main dimensions of perceived change induced in young people by a travel experience and, secondly, at understanding which dimensions of the tourism experience have the greatest influence on this change. A survey was designed based on the contemporary literature and ...

  11. Collection Development "Mini-Travel Guides": Traveling Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Linda M.

    2009-01-01

    Predictions regarding how much traveling Americans will be doing this year and where they might go vary, but it is expected that many will cut back on what is increasingly considered a luxury. Even so, gasoline prices are down substantially from a year ago, the stronger dollar means better prices in Europe, and there are discounts in all areas of…

  12. IAEA Director General to Visit Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Full text: IAEA Director General Yukiya Amano will travel to Tehran on 10 November 2013 to meet senior Iranian leaders on Monday, 11 November 2013, with the aim of strengthening dialogue and cooperation. Separately, as previously announced, IAEA and Iranian experts will meet in Tehran on Monday to discuss technical issues. IAEA)

  13. Emergence of new Salmonella Enteritidis phage types in Europe? Surveillance of infections in returning travellers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andersson Yvonne

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among human Salmonella Enteritidis infections, phage type 4 has been the dominant phage type in most countries in Western Europe during the last years. This is reflected in Salmonella infections among Swedish travellers returning from abroad. However, there are differences in phage type distribution between the countries, and this has also changed over time. Methods We used data from the Swedish infectious disease register and the national reference laboratory to describe phage type distribution of Salmonella Enteritidis infections in Swedish travellers from 1997 to 2002, and have compared this with national studies conducted in the countries visited. Results Infections among Swedish travellers correlate well with national studies conducted in the countries visited. In 2001 a change in phage type distribution in S. Enteritidis infections among Swedish travellers returning from some countries in southern Europe was observed, and a previously rare phage type (PT 14b became one of the most commonly diagnosed that year, continuing into 2002 and 2003. Conclusions Surveillance of infections among returning travellers can be helpful in detecting emerging infections and outbreaks in tourist destinations. The information needs to be communicated rapidly to all affected countries in order to expedite the implementation of appropriate investigations and preventive measures.

  14. Travel Behavior Change in Older Travelers: Understanding Critical Reactions to Incidents Encountered in Public Transport

    OpenAIRE

    Sundling, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Accessibility of travel may be better understood if psychological factors underlying change in travel behavior are known. This paper examines older (65+) travelers? motives for changing their travel behavior. These changes are grounded in critical incidents earlier encountered in public-transport travel. A scientific framework is developed based on cognitive and behavioral theory. In 29 individual interviews, travelers? critical reactions (i.e., cognitive, emotional, and/or behavioral) to 77 ...

  15. Mind your travel ! Motivation, time use, and intent : Three factors of travel to be investigated

    OpenAIRE

    PAPON , Francis; Meissonnier , Joël

    2013-01-01

    The objective is to investigate the drivers of travel demand beyond the need to travel to destination; travellers may engage a trip for the sake of it, at least to some extent: travel includes a share of 'primary utility'. The paper focuses on two types of data and analysis: the primary utility of travel questions passed in the last French national travel survey, and eight dimensions of a trip proposed from a sociological analysis. The paper mixes these approaches and correlate survey answ...

  16. Effect of Rainfall on Travel Time and Accuracy of Travel Time prediction with rainfall

    OpenAIRE

    CHUNG, E; EL-FAOUZI, NE; KUWAHARA, M

    2007-01-01

    Travel time is an important parameter to report to travelers. From the user's perspective, accurate predictions and an estimate of their precision are more beneficial than the current travel time since conditions may change significantly before a traveler completes the journey. Past researches have developed travel time prediction models without considering accidents and rain. Normally accident and Rain may cause to increase travel time. Therefore, it may be interesting to consider Rain and a...

  17. Contact Frequency, Travel Time, and Travel Costs for Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Sørensen, Jan; Linde, Louise; Hetland, Merete Lund

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate travel time, and travel cost related to contacts with health care providers for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) during a three-month period. Methods. Patient-reported travel time and travel cost were obtained from 2847 patients with RA. Eleven outpatient clinics across Denmark recruited patients to the study. Data collected included frequency, travel time and travel costs for contacts at rheumatology outpatient clinics, other outpatient clinics, general prac...

  18. VA Outpatient Visits by Administrative Parent, FY2010-2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Outpatient visits by Administrative Parent. A visit is counted as a visit to one or more clinics or units within 1 calendar day at the site of care level. A patient...

  19. CERT TST December 2015 Visit Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, Robert Currier [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bailey, Teresa S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gamblin, G. Todd [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Olinger, Chad Tracy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pautz, Shawn D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Williams, Alan B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-01-25

    The annual PSAAP II TST visit to Texas A&M’s CERT Center was held on December 1-3, 2015. The agenda for the visit is attached. Non-TAMU attendees were: TST Members – Teresa Bailey (LLNL), Todd Gamblin (LLNL), Bob Little (LANL) – Chair, Chad Olinger (LANL), Shawn Pautz (SNL), Alan Williams (SNL);Other Lab staff – Skip Kahler (LANL), Ana Kupresanin (LLNL), and Rob Lowrie (LANL); AST Members – Nelson Hoffman (LANL) and Bob Voigt (Leidos) The TST wishes to express our appreciation to all involved with CERT for the high-quality posters and presentations and for the attention to logistics that enabled a successful visit. We have broken our comments into four sections: (1) Kudos, (2) Recommendations, (3) Feedback on Priorities for April Review, and (4) Follow-Up Activities with Labs.

  20. This way for the new CERN visits!

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    As the LHC start-up draws near, visits to the underground experiments by members of the public are no longer possible. Still, that doesn’t mean that there will be no more CERN visits. Far from it! Three new itineraries for visits to the above-ground facilities are already available to visitors. Follow the guide… CAST: How a magnet became a telescope. Hunting axions from the sun. Visitors to the CAST experiments will see, among other things, how a prototype dipole magnet built for the LHC has been turned into an unusual telescope that tracks the sun in search of the ‘axion’ particle postulated by theory. SM18: Super-cool magnets. This strategic building, where thousands of superconducting magnets for the LHC were assembled in their cryostats and tested, lets visitors into the secret world of magnet technology, radio frequency and cryogenics, ...

  1. Managing ecotourism visitation in protected areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, J.L.; Farrell, T.A.; Lindberg, Kreg; Wood, Megan Epler; Engeldrum, David

    1998-01-01

    Ecotourism management seeks to integrate and balance several potentially conflicting objectives: protection of natural and cultural resources, provision of recreation opportunities and generation of economic benefits. In the absence of effective planning and management, ecotourism can lead to significant negative impacts on vegetation, soil, water, wildlife, historic resources, cultures, and visitor experiences. This chapter reviews visitor-related natural resource and experience impacts associated with ecotourism within protected areas. The influence of factors that control the nature and extent of impacts are also reviewed, including type and amount of use, the variable resistance and resilience of environmental attributes such as vegetation and soil types, and the role of management in shaping visitation, resources and facilities to support visitation while minimizing associated impacts. Implications for managing the effects of protected area visitation are highlighted, including carrying capacity decision frameworks and selecting management strategies and tactics.

  2. Life satisfaction and frequency of doctor visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eric S; Park, Nansook; Sun, Jennifer K; Smith, Jacqui; Peterson, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Identifying positive psychological factors that reduce health care use may lead to innovative efforts that help build a more sustainable and high-quality health care system. Prospective studies indicate that life satisfaction is associated with good health behaviors, enhanced health, and longer life, but little information about the association between life satisfaction and health care use is available. We tested whether higher life satisfaction was prospectively associated with fewer doctor visits. We also examined potential interactions between life satisfaction and health behaviors. Participants were 6379 adults from the Health and Retirement Study, a prospective and nationally representative panel study of American adults older than 50 years. Participants were tracked for 4 years. We analyzed the data using a generalized linear model with a gamma distribution and log link. Higher life satisfaction was associated with fewer doctor visits. On a 6-point life satisfaction scale, each unit increase in life satisfaction was associated with an 11% decrease in doctor visits--after adjusting for sociodemographic factors (relative risk = 0.89, 95% confidence interval = 0.86-0.93). The most satisfied respondents (n = 1121; 17.58%) made 44% fewer doctor visits than did the least satisfied (n = 182; 2.85%). The association between higher life satisfaction and reduced doctor visits remained even after adjusting for baseline health and a wide range of sociodemographic, psychosocial, and health-related covariates (relative risk = 0.96, 95% confidence interval = 0.93-0.99). Higher life satisfaction is associated with fewer doctor visits, which may have important implications for reducing health care costs.

  3. Individual traveller health priorities and the pre-travel health consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, Gerard T; Chen, Bingling; Avalos, Gloria

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the principal travel health priorities of travellers. The most frequently selected travel health concerns were accessing medical care abroad, dying abroad, insect bites, malaria, personal safety and travel security threats. The travel health risks of least concern were culture shock, fear of flying, jet lag and sexually transmitted infections. This study is the first to develop a hierarchy of self-declared travel health risk priorities among travellers. © International Society of Travel Medicine, 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. The value of travel time variance

    OpenAIRE

    Fosgerau, Mogens; Engelson, Leonid

    2010-01-01

    This paper considers the value of travel time variability under scheduling preferences that are de�fined in terms of linearly time-varying utility rates associated with being at the origin and at the destination. The main result is a simple expression for the value of travel time variability that does not depend on the shape of the travel time distribution. The related measure of travel time variability is the variance of travel time. These conclusions apply equally to travellers who can free...

  5. The epidemiology of travel-related Salmonella Enteritidis in Ontario, Canada, 2010–2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tighe Mary-Kathryn

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increases in the number of salmonellosis cases due to Salmonella Enteritidis (SE in 2010 and 2011 prompted a public health investigation in Ontario, Canada. In this report, we describe the current epidemiology of travel-related (TR SE, compare demographics, symptoms and phage types (PTs of TR and domestically-acquired (DA cases, and estimate the odds of acquiring SE by region of the world visited. Methods All incident cases of culture confirmed SE in Ontario obtained from isolates and specimens submitted to public health laboratories were included in this study. Demographic and illness characteristics of TR and DA cases were compared. A national travel survey was used to provide estimates for the number of travellers to various destinations to approximate rates of SE in travellers. Multivariate logistic regression was used to estimate the odds of acquiring SE when travelling to various world regions. Results Overall, 51.9% of SE cases were TR during the study period. This ranged from 35.7% TR cases in the summer travel period to 65.1% TR cases in the winter travel period. Compared to DA cases, TR cases were older and were less likely to seek hospital care. For Ontario travellers, the adjusted odds of acquiring SE was the highest for the Caribbean (OR 37.29, 95% CI 17.87-77.82 when compared to Europe. Certain PTs were more commonly associated with travel (e.g., 1, 4, 5b, 7a, Atypical than with domestic infection. Of the TR cases, 88.9% were associated with travel to the Caribbean and Mexico region, of whom 90.1% reported staying on a resort. Within this region, there were distinct associations between PTs and countries. Conclusions There is a large burden of TR illness from SE in Ontario. Accurate classification of cases by travel history is important to better understand the source of infections. The findings emphasize the need to make travellers, especially to the Caribbean, and health professionals who provide advice to

  6. In Pursuit of the Traveling Salesman Mathematics at the Limits of Computation

    CERN Document Server

    Cook, William J

    2011-01-01

    What is the shortest possible route for a traveling salesman seeking to visit each city on a list exactly once and return to his city of origin? It sounds simple enough, yet the traveling salesman problem is one of the most intensely studied puzzles in applied mathematics--and it has defied solution to this day. In this book, William Cook takes readers on a mathematical excursion, picking up the salesman's trail in the 1800s when Irish mathematician W. R. Hamilton first defined the problem, and venturing to the furthest limits of today's state-of-the-art attempts to solve it. Cook examines

  7. On a model of spatial spread of epidemics with long-distance travel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blyuss, Konstantin B.

    2005-01-01

    This Letter studies the dynamics of infectious diseases which are spread geographically through long-distance travel between two regions and subsequent local redistribution through a process of diffusion. A particular case of an equiproportionate travel is considered, and the model describes migration rather than short visits. We examine uniform and nonuniform steady states together with their linear stability. Numerical simulations are performed to illustrate the evolution of initial distribution of population towards its final stage, which is represented by uniform distribution of the total population among infected individuals

  8. On Labeled Traveling Salesman Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couetoux, Basile; Gourves, Laurent; Monnot, Jerome

    2008-01-01

    We consider labeled Traveling Salesman Problems, defined upon a complete graph of n vertices with colored edges. The objective is to find a tour of maximum (or minimum) number of colors. We derive results regarding hardness of approximation, and analyze approximation algorithms for both versions ...

  9. Package and Assisted Travel Arrangement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Tot

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the ordinary legislative procedure before the European Parliament and the Council, there is a proposal of the European Commission for the adoption of a new directive that would bring the regulation of the contract on organized tours into line with current market development of organized trips. The proposal is intended to regulate the various combinations of travel services that are today offered to passengers, particularly online, which are identical or comparable to the travel services provided in a classic pre-arranged package. The subject of the paper are the provisions of the proposal of the directive which govern the field of application of the proposed directive, in particular the proposed changes regarding the concept of "package" contained in the European Commission proposal and amendments of the European Parliament, as well as the analysis of the proposed new concept of "assisted travel arrangements." The paper also critically refers to the method of targeted maximum harmonization as a proposed new intensity of the harmonization. The conclusion is that, despite the welcome updating of an outdated text of the directive on package travel which is line with the current market needs, the proposed text of the new directive is burdened with technical and complex definitions that could lead to significant difficulties in their transposition into the provisions of national law of the Member States.

  10. Travel Agent. Occupational Simulation Kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Wayne

    This career exploration instructional booklet on the travel agent's occupation is one of several resulting from the rural southwestern Colorado CEPAC Project (Career Education Process of Attitude Change). Based on a job analysis and utilizing a programed instructional format, the following content is included: A brief description of what a travel…

  11. (including travel dates) Proposed itinerary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashok

    31 July to 22 August 2012 (including travel dates). Proposed itinerary: Arrival in Bangalore on 1 August. 1-5 August: Bangalore, Karnataka. Suggested institutions: Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore. St Johns Medical College & Hospital, Bangalore. Jawaharlal Nehru Centre, Bangalore. 6-8 August: Chennai, TN.

  12. Preparing Students for Travel Abroad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotny, Jeanne

    1989-01-01

    This article outlines information which can be provided by the school nurse or health educator to help make student trips abroad healthy as well as educational. Topics covered include: food and water, traveler's diarrhea, handwashing, insect and animal bites, stress, and prior health problems. (IAH)

  13. Communication from Carlson Wagonlit Travel

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    We are pleased to inform our customers that the range of tourist guides and roadmaps on sale in our offices has now been extended. We aim to help you prepare your upcoming holiday or business trip in any way we can. Please do not hesitate to contact us should you need any further information. The team at CARLSON WAGONLIT TRAVEL

  14. Travel Abroad as Culture Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantz, Richard K.; Weaver, V. Phillips

    1992-01-01

    Encourages traveling by teachers to enrich the multicultural curriculum in their classes. Includes suggestions and resources for planning overseas trips and using them to broaden teachers' perspectives and to provide background material for curriculum development. Outlines "case studies" of trips to Hungary and Greece. (CFR)

  15. Your Travel Dollar. Money Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Nancy H., Ed.

    This illustrated guide was designed to familiarize consumers with planning a vacation trip, whether domestic or abroad. The guide covers setting up a budget; package tours; cruises and charter flights; travel agencies and clubs; and arranging stays in hotels/motels, rental condominiums, bed-and-breakfasts, hostels, campsites, and private…

  16. Traveling Salesman Problem with Transportation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeriu Ungureanu

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Traveling Salesman Problem (TSP is a generic name that includes diverse practical models. Motivated by applications, a new model of TSP is examined – a synthesis of classical TSP and classical Transportation Problem. Algorithms based on Integer Programming cutting-plane methods and Branch and Bound Techniques are obvious.

  17. Twitter for travel medicine providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Deborah J; Kohl, Sarah E

    2016-03-01

    Travel medicine practitioners, perhaps more so than medical practitioners working in other areas of medicine, require a constant flow of information to stay up-to-date, and provide best practice information and care to their patients. Many travel medicine providers are unaware of the popularity and potential of the Twitter platform. Twitter use among our travellers, as well as by physicians and health providers, is growing exponentially. There is a rapidly expanding body of published literature on this information tool. This review provides a brief overview of the ways Twitter is being used by health practitioners, the advantages that are peculiar to Twitter as a platform of social media, and how the interested practitioner can get started. Some key points about the dark side of Twitter are highlighted, as well as the potential benefits of using Twitter as a way to disseminate accurate medical information to the public. This article will help readers develop an increased understanding of Twitter as a tool for extracting useful facts and insights from the ever increasing volume of health information. © International Society of Travel Medicine, 2016. All rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Time Travel in the Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Donna W.

    2005-01-01

    A Time Travel project in the library gives enthusiasm to students to connect with the past and reinforces their research skills while instilling respect for the past years. The librarian should choose one specific decade to highlight in the library and create an extravaganza that would allow memorabilia from that time period to be located without…

  19. Impact of a University-Based Outpatient Telemedicine Program on Time Savings, Travel Costs, and Environmental Pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dullet, Navjit W; Geraghty, Estella M; Kaufman, Taylor; Kissee, Jamie L; King, Jesse; Dharmar, Madan; Smith, Anthony C; Marcin, James P

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate travel-related and environmental savings resulting from the use of telemedicine for outpatient specialty consultations with a university telemedicine program. The study was designed to retrospectively analyze the telemedicine consultation database at the University of California Davis Health System (UCDHS) between July 1996 and December 2013. Travel distances and travel times were calculated between the patient home, the telemedicine clinic, and the UCDHS in-person clinic. Travel cost savings and environmental impact were calculated by determining differences in mileage reimbursement rate and emissions between those incurred in attending telemedicine appointments and those that would have been incurred if a visit to the hub site had been necessary. There were 19,246 consultations identified among 11,281 unique patients. Telemedicine visits resulted in a total travel distance savings of 5,345,602 miles, a total travel time savings of 4,708,891 minutes or 8.96 years, and a total direct travel cost savings of $2,882,056. The mean per-consultation round-trip distance savings were 278 miles, average travel time savings were 245 minutes, and average cost savings were $156. Telemedicine consultations resulted in a total emissions savings of 1969 metric tons of CO 2 , 50 metric tons of CO, 3.7 metric tons of NO x , and 5.5 metric tons of volatile organic compounds. This study demonstrates the positive impact of a health system's outpatient telemedicine program on patient travel time, patient travel costs, and environmental pollutants. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Understanding medical travel from a source country perspective: a cross sectional study of the experiences of medical travelers from the Maldives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzana, Mariyam; Walls, Helen; Smith, Richard; Hanefeld, Johanna

    2018-06-19

    The resolution adopted in 2006 by the World Health Organization on international trade and health urges Member States to understand the implications of international trade and trade agreements for health and to address any challenges arising through policies and regulations. The government of Maldives is an importer of health services (with outgoing medical travelers), through offering a comprehensive universal health care package for its people that includes subsidized treatment abroad for services unavailable in the country. By the end of the first year of the scheme approximately US$11.6 m had been spent by the government of Maldives to treat patients abroad. In this study, affordability, continuity and quality of this care were assessed from the perspective of the medical traveler to provide recommendations for safer and more cost effective medical travel policy. Despite universal health care, a substantial proportion of Maldivian travelers have not accessed the government subsidy, and a third reported not having sufficient funds for the treatment episode abroad. Among the five most visited hospitals in this study, none were JCI accredited at the time of the study period and only three from India had undergone the National Accreditation Board for Hospitals (NABH) in India. Satisfaction with treatment received was high amongst travelers but concern for the continuity of care was very high, and more than a third of the patients had experienced complications arising from the treatment overseas. Source countries can use their bargaining power in the trade of health services to offer a more comprehensive package for medical travelers. Source countries with largely public funded health systems need to ensure that medical travel is truly affordable and universal, with measures for quality control such as the use of accredited foreign hospitals to make it safer and to impose measures that ensure the continuity of care for travelers.

  1. Three visits to eternity: Freud, Wiesel, and Patient X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, S S

    1986-01-01

    Freud's experience on the Acropolis is reviewed and reappraised. Also, the experience of Elie Wiesel at the Wall in Jerusalem and Patient X's reaction visiting an Egyptian temple are examined. Carl Jung's wish to go to Rome and his inability to do so are noted. The aim of the paper is to offer deeper understanding about intense reactions many sensitive and creative people experience over travel to special places. These places are treated as idealized and ambivalently loved transference objects. Normal anticipatory pleasure prior to the trip is impaired and reality pleasure at the site cannot be enjoyed. When these spots are reached, ego regression is initiated by the intolerably intense narcissistic pleasure mobilized by the gratification of fantasies that were felt to be unrealizable. The fantasies can be conscious or unconscious and from oedipal as well as preoedipal and postoedipal developmental levels; however, they always involve the fulfillment of overwhelmingly powerful wishes. The deep ego regression, archaic fantasies, and the complex defenses mobilized are frightening since there may also be concern about ego dissolution or irreversible transformation. One highly adaptive solution which helps master these conflictual and developmental experiences is creative ego activity. While maintaining integrity for the individual ego and enhancing the self, creative work and accomplishment also enrich and advance the cultural process.

  2. Trip report: a visit to the Swedish reindeer industry, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dau, J.; Dieterich, R.A.; Thomas, W.C.; Davis, L.T.

    1987-01-01

    The State of Alaska indicated recently that it will become more strict in enforcing inspection requirements for reindeer meat that is mixed with meat from domestic animals (e.g., In sausage production). Therefore. we wanted to observe how reindeer are slaughtered to meet Swedish meat inspection requirements. Additionally, by following the processing and marketing of reindeer in Sweden, we hoped to discover alternative products that do not require blending reindeer with beef or pork. The Chernobyl tragedy further affected our decision to visit Sweden in two ways It gave us the opportunity to review the Impacts of widespread, Intense radioactive contamination on reindeer and the reindeer industry: and it created a shortage or reindeer for human consumption in Sweden which In turn appeared to open a market for Alaska reindeer products. Between 13 and 23 November 1986, we traveled to Sweden to meet suppliers and processors in the Swedish reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus) industry. Wholesale and retail marketing of reindeer were reviewed in Stockholm; corralling, slaughter, and processing of reindeer were observed in Swedish Lapland. The specific objectives of this trip were as follows: 1) to observe reindeer slaughter facilities and techniques used in Sweden; 2) to trace the marketing of reindeer from Sami herders to retail outlets; 3) to assess radioactive contamination of reindeer and their ranges and observe how the problem is being handled; 4) to observe as many reindeer husbandry techniques as possible; and 5) to explore the possibility of establishing a market for Alaskan reindeer meat in Sweden

  3. Buddhism in Sarnath: An Account of Two Chinese Travellers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr Anuradha Singh

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to draw the religious life in Sarnath (and Varanasi as accounted by the Chinese travellers—Fa-Hien and Hiuen-tsang. The accounts not only talk about the stupas, pillars, statues built by King Ashoka; vihars and monks (bhikshus living in those vihars but also contain the first preachings of Lord Buddha, establishment of Sangha and the story of Mrigajataka that remain significant. With the increased popularity of Buddha dharma in China, the Chinese were attracted towards travelling to India. They came to India mainly with the intentions to visit the places related to the fond memories of Lord Buddha, to study the Buddha religion and philosophy and carry the copies of the Buddhist compositions. Fa-Hien and Hiuen-tsang occupy significant places among these Chinese travellers. These accounts can be associated with ancient history as well as with historical geography, religion and philosophy. While Fa-hien in his journey details had described about the Buddha Empire, Hiuen-tsang highlighted the civilisation of India and its cultural landscape, albeit it has been often accepted by the historians that these accounts of their journeys should be considered as significant only when they are backed by historical evidences. They opine that these travellers were mainly influenced by the Buddha dharma and therefore, their accounts are liable to containing exaggerated journey details. It is true that the journey details contain few imaginary instances; nevertheless, these accounts have been validated by the remnants, stupas and vihars at the sites.

  4. Lifestyle counseling in hypertension-related visits – analysis of video-taped general practice visits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Dulmen Sandra

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The general practitioner (GP can play an important role in promoting a healthy lifestyle, which is especially relevant in people with an elevated risk of cardiovascular diseases due to hypertension. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the frequency and content of lifestyle counseling about weight loss, nutrition, physical activity, and smoking by GPs in hypertension-related visits. A distinction was made between the assessment of lifestyle (gathering information or measuring weight or waist circumference and giving lifestyle advice (giving a specific advice to change the patient's behavior or referring the patient to other sources of information or other health professionals. Methods For this study, we observed 212 video recordings of hypertension-related visits collected within the Second Dutch National Survey of General Practice in 2000/2001. Results The mean duration of visits was 9.8 minutes (range 2.5 to 30 minutes. In 40% of the visits lifestyle was discussed (n = 84, but in 81% of these visits this discussion lasted shorter than a quarter of the visit. An assessment of lifestyle was made in 77 visits (36%, most commonly regarding body weight and nutrition. In most cases the patient initiated the discussion about nutrition and physical activity, whereas the assessment of weight and smoking status was mostly initiated by the GP. In 35 visits (17% the GP gave lifestyle advice, but in only one fifth of these visits the patient's motivation or perceived barriers for changing behavior were assessed. Supporting factors were not discussed at all. Conclusion In 40% of the hypertension-related visits lifestyle topics were discussed. However, both the frequency and quality of lifestyle advice can be improved.

  5. Danish travel activities: do we travel more and longer – and to what extent?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Mette Aagaard

    Two separate Danish National travel surveys are analysed to outline the amount and extent of national and international travelling during the latest 15-20 years; the national travel survey (TU) describes mainly national daily travel activities, whereas the holiday and business travel survey...... describes national and international travel activities including overnight stay(s). When sampling only respondents with trips above 100 kilometres, they only accounts for around 2% of all daily travel activities, however, this share appears to increase and suggest in general that we do travel longer....... But due to this limited share of trips, the overall impacts of longer distance travelling vanish when considering all daily travel activities. Especially as about 95% of all daily travel destinations range less than 50 kilometres away and in total induce an average trip length of 20 kilometres. If focus...

  6. 77 FR 5252 - Federal Travel Regulation; GSA E-Gov Travel Service (ETS) Transition to E-Gov Travel Service 2...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-02

    ... Travel Regulation; GSA E-Gov Travel Service (ETS) Transition to E-Gov Travel Service 2 (ETS2) AGENCY..., ETS Program Manager Center for Travel Management (QMCD), Office of Travel and Transportation Services (QMC), at [email protected] or (703) 605-2151. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Federal Travel...

  7. Risk factors and pre-travel healthcare of international travellers attending a Dutch travel clinic: a cross-sectional analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieten, Rosanne W.; van der Schalie, Maurice; Visser, Benjamin J.; Grobusch, Martin P.; van Vugt, Michèle

    2014-01-01

    The number of international travellers is currently estimated to exceed one billion annually. To address travel related health risks and facilitate risk reduction strategies, detailed knowledge of travellers' characteristics is important. In this cross-sectional study, data of a 20% sample of

  8. Imperial College London mascot visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Hills, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    Boanerges (‘Son of Thunder’) is one of the mascots of Imperial College and is looked after by volunteer students of the City and Guilds College Motor Club. Team Bo visited CERN as part of a wider tour of France and Switzerland.

  9. President of the Slovak Republic visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Caroline Duc

    2012-01-01

    On 11 September 2012, the President of the Slovak Republic, Ivan Gašparovič, visited CERN accompanied by the First Lady and a delegation of 67, including the Deputy Prime Minister, the Minister of Foreign Affairs, the Minister of Economy and the Ambassadors of the Slovak Republic to Switzerland, France and the Office of the United Nations. The visit by representatives of the Slovak Republic follows the Slovak Republic’s hosting of the CERN Accelerator School in the region of Bratislava. After being welcomed to CERN in the morning by CERN Director-General Rolf Heuer, the members of the Slovak government were given the opportunity to get a glimpse of the LHC and to visit the ALICE experiment at Point 2. The President and other members of the Slovak delegation then met representatives of Slovak universities and industries at an exhibition of their work in the hall of Building 500. The President then briefly spoke to Slovak journalists and signed the VIP visitors book. The visit last...

  10. Leisure time and museums - motives of visits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medić Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Leisure time, as the time used to engage in a variety of activities, should provide a sense of satisfaction and relaxation. In order to satisfy the needs of the visitors and their desire to experience something new and authentic in tourist destination, it is very important to know what their choices are with regard to leisure activities. The aim of this paper is to determine how museum public usually spends its leisure time, which factors influence the motivation to visit museums, and to try to find a correlation between the two. The paper is based on the results of the study conducted between the end of May and the end of August, 2014 in the museums in Vojvodina Province (northern part of the Republic of Serbia. The main findings of this paper indicate that spending leisure time is primarily related to socialization and education, and that museums are visited mostly due to their educational role. The findings also indicate that there are differences between the choice of leisure activity and motivation for visiting museums and sociodemographic characteristics of the respondents. Significant correlation has been found between the choice of leisure activity and motivation for visiting museums.

  11. Unsupervised visit detection in smart homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nait Aicha, A.; Englebienne, G.; Kröse, B.

    Assistive technologies for elderly often use ambient sensor systems to infer activities of daily living (ADL). In general such systems assume that only a single person (the resident) is present in the home. However, in real world environments, it is common to have visits and it is crucial to know

  12. Unsupervised visit detection in smart homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nait Aicha, Ahmed; Englebienne, Gwenn; Kröse, B.J.A.

    2017-01-01

    Assistive technologies for elderly often use ambient sensor systems to infer activities of daily living (ADL). In general such systems assume that only a single person (the resident) is present in the home. However, in real world environments, it is common to have visits and it is crucial to know

  13. How Home Visits Transformed My Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Yaafouri-Kreuzer, Louise

    2017-01-01

    Recalling her year as the "English-speaking unicorn" in a class of refugee and immigrant students representing a myriad of languages, the author tells how visiting students at their homes was the strategy that most helped her help students. From discovering that a betel-nut habit was causing one student's hyperactivity to seeing another…

  14. 28 CFR 540.47 - Media visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT CONTACT WITH... who wishes to visit outside his or her official duties, however, must qualify as a regular visitor or, if applicable, a special visitor. [68 FR 10658, Mar. 6, 2003] ...

  15. Digital screen visits in home care services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zarakit, Mohamad; Nors Hansen, Louise; Evron, Lotte Orr

    2017-01-01

    with participant observation of three selected screen visits with older patients with a minority ethnic background. Analysis: thematic analysis based on a hermeneutic approach. Primarily results indicate that older patients with a minority ethnic background are screened out during the recruitment phase for digital...

  16. Tips for Traveling with HomePEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pump); if not, you might be able to purchase one. A well-travelled consumer cautions against using ... purposes. Bon Voyage! Oley Consumers with Significant Travel Experience Carol Pelisser* HPEN (603) 625-2362; capunique@comcast. ...

  17. Staying Healthy While You Travel (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cooked or washed well and peeled. Meats and fish should be well cooked and eaten just after ... Kids Need Vaccines Before Traveling? Ebola Typhoid Fever Flying and Your Child's Ears Active Vacations Traveling and ...

  18. Travel Recommendations for the Nursing Mother

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mothers traveling to malarious areas should ensure the antimalarial included is compatible with breastfeeding before beginning travel. ... submit" value="Submit" /> Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity About Us Nutrition Physical Activity Overweight & ...

  19. Travel vaccines: information for health care workers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-07-04

    scale epidemics mostly of type A occur ... or difficulty in breathing, chest pain for pneumonia to ear pain, ..... Pavli A, Maltezou H. Travel-acquired Japanese encephalitis and vaccination ... Society for Travel Medicine (SLAMVI).

  20. Dynamic travel time estimation using regression trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    This report presents a methodology for travel time estimation by using regression trees. The dissemination of travel time information has become crucial for effective traffic management, especially under congested road conditions. In the absence of c...