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Sample records for traumatised hind foot

  1. Functional result of the surgical treatment of the fractures opened up in the severely traumatised hind foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos Tovar, William Domingo; Arroyo Sanchez, Carlos Augusto

    2006-01-01

    Present study plans to carry out an evaluation of the functional result of the surgical treatment of the open fractures of the severely traumatised hind foot, in the Hospital Militar Central during 1998 to 2002 for the above-mentioned we plane a descriptive retrospective study type: series of cases. We also think about specific objectives in relation to demographic aspects, aspects of the treatment and of the complications that are presented in these patients. For the functional evaluation we used the AOFAS (American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society Scale) scale for the hind foot. 60 patients were included. 95% was men. The age average was of 26 years. The mechanism in 51% of the cases was trauma due to high-speed firearm (rifle), 27% trauma for mine, 12% fall of height, 7% has an accident of traffic, and 3% of firearm of low speed (gun). The presentation frequency according to the classification of Gustilo was type ll 12%, type lllA 63% and type IIIB 25%. In all the cases the initial care was begin with surgical debridement and take of cultures and I. V. antibiotics. The interval of time between the lesion and the definitive surgery was of 6 months (1 month to 24 months). The initial handling was orthopedic in 23 cases, open reduction and internal fixation in 16 cases, external fixation in 19 cases, and external fixation plus internal fixation in 2 cases. Additional surgeries were required in 48 cases, 8 of these were tibiotalar arthrodesis, 26 subtalar arthrodesis, 5 tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis, 5 panarthrodesis, 4 arthrodesis of the mid foot. The final average score according to the AOFAS scale for the hind foot was 81 points

  2. Introduction of hind foot coronal alignment view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Il Bong; Jeon, Ju Seob; Yoon, Kang Cheol; Choi, Nam Kil; Kim, Seung Kook

    2006-01-01

    Accurate clinical evaluation of the alignment of the calcaneus relative to the tibia in the coronal plane is essential in the evaluation and treatment of hind foot pathologic condition. Previously described standard anteroposterior, lateral, and oblique radiographic methods of the foot or ankle do not demonstrate alignment of the tibia relation to the calcaneus in the coronal plane. The purpose of this study was to introduce hind foot coronal alignment view. Both feet were imaged simultaneously on an elevated, radiolucent foot stand equipment. Both feet stood on a radiolucent platform with equal weight on both feet. Both feet are located foot axis longitudinal perpendicular to the platform. Silhouette tracing around both feet are made, and line is then drawn to bisect the silhouette of the second toe and the outline of the heel. The x-ray beam is angled down approximately 15 .deg. to 20 .deg. This image described tibial axis and medial, lateral tuberosity of calcaneus. Calcaneus do not rotated. The view is showed by talotibial joint space. Although computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging techniques are capable of demonstrating coronal hind foot alignment, they lack usefulness in most clinical situations because the foot is imaged in a non-weight bearing position. But hind foot coronal alignment view is obtained for evaluating position changing of inversion, eversion of the hind foot and varus, valgus deformity of calcaneus

  3. Introduction of hind foot coronal alignment view

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Il Bong; Jeon, Ju Seob; Yoon, Kang Cheol; Choi, Nam Kil [Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seung Kook [Gwangju Health College, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-12-15

    Accurate clinical evaluation of the alignment of the calcaneus relative to the tibia in the coronal plane is essential in the evaluation and treatment of hind foot pathologic condition. Previously described standard anteroposterior, lateral, and oblique radiographic methods of the foot or ankle do not demonstrate alignment of the tibia relation to the calcaneus in the coronal plane. The purpose of this study was to introduce hind foot coronal alignment view. Both feet were imaged simultaneously on an elevated, radiolucent foot stand equipment. Both feet stood on a radiolucent platform with equal weight on both feet. Both feet are located foot axis longitudinal perpendicular to the platform. Silhouette tracing around both feet are made, and line is then drawn to bisect the silhouette of the second toe and the outline of the heel. The x-ray beam is angled down approximately 15 .deg. to 20 .deg. This image described tibial axis and medial, lateral tuberosity of calcaneus. Calcaneus do not rotated. The view is showed by talotibial joint space. Although computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging techniques are capable of demonstrating coronal hind foot alignment, they lack usefulness in most clinical situations because the foot is imaged in a non-weight bearing position. But hind foot coronal alignment view is obtained for evaluating position changing of inversion, eversion of the hind foot and varus, valgus deformity of calcaneus.

  4. Hindlimb suspension and hind foot reversal in Varecia variegata and other arboreal mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meldrum, D J; Dagosto, M; White, J

    1997-05-01

    The foot, perhaps more than any other region of the primate body reflects the interaction of positional behaviors with the geometric properties of available supports. The ability to reverse the hind foot during hindlimb suspension while hanging from a horizontal support or descending a large diameter vertical trunk has been noted in many arboreal mammals, including primates. Observations of Varecia variegata in the wild and under seminatural conditions document hindlimb suspension in this lemurid primate. The kinematics and skeletal correlates of this behavior are examined. Analogy is made with the form and function exhibited by nonprimate mammalian taxa employing this behavior. Examples of carnivores and rodents display very similar adaptations of the tarsals while other mammals, such as the xenarthrans, accomplish a similar end by means of different morphologies. However, a suite of features is identified that is shared by mammals capable of hind foot reversal. Hindlimb suspension effectively increases the potential feeding space available to a foraging mammal and represents a significant, and often unrecognized, alternative adaptive strategy to forelimb suspension and prehensile-tail suspension in primates.

  5. THE FEASIBILITY OF HIND FOOT AMPUTATION IN SELECTED SARCOMAS OF THE FOOT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HAM, SJ; HOEKSTRA, HJ; EISMA, WH; OLDHOFF, J; KOOPS, HS

    The treatment of foot sarcomas is generally a below knee amputation. In selected sarcomas of the forefoot, however, a transtarsal amputation according to Chopart, a calcaneotibial arthrodesis according to Pirogoff, or a supramalleolar amputation according to Syme can be considered the treatment of

  6. A gigantic new dinosaur from Argentina and the evolution of the sauropod hind foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Riga, Bernardo J; Lamanna, Matthew C; Ortiz David, Leonardo D; Calvo, Jorge O; Coria, Juan P

    2016-01-18

    Titanosauria is an exceptionally diverse, globally-distributed clade of sauropod dinosaurs that includes the largest known land animals. Knowledge of titanosaurian pedal structure is critical to understanding the stance and locomotion of these enormous herbivores and, by extension, gigantic terrestrial vertebrates as a whole. However, completely preserved pedes are extremely rare among Titanosauria, especially as regards the truly giant members of the group. Here we describe Notocolossus gonzalezparejasi gen. et sp. nov. from the Upper Cretaceous of Mendoza Province, Argentina. With a powerfully-constructed humerus 1.76 m in length, Notocolossus is one of the largest known dinosaurs. Furthermore, the complete pes of the new taxon exhibits a strikingly compact, homogeneous metatarsus--seemingly adapted for bearing extraordinary weight--and truncated unguals, morphologies that are otherwise unknown in Sauropoda. The pes underwent a near-progressive reduction in the number of phalanges along the line to derived titanosaurs, eventually resulting in the reduced hind foot of these sauropods.

  7. Hind-foot correction and stabilization by pins in plaster after surgical release of talipes equino varus feet in older children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sayed, Mohamed M; Seleem, Osama A

    2010-07-02

    Congenital talipes equino varus (CTEV) is a three dimensional deformity and is one of the most common congenital abnormalities affecting the lower limb and can be challenging to manage. Hind-foot deformity is considered the most difficult to treat. Unfortunately, the calcaneus is often small and thus difficult to control during casting after surgical release in severe or relapsed cases. We used three pins to control and maintain the hind foot correction, after surgical release, during casting in 47 cases (59 feet). We introduced a modified, coronal plane, transverse calcaneal pin. This pin is inserted from medial to lateral through the calcaneus to correct the varus mal-positioning of the calcaneus in the sagittal plane and to provide a better control on the small sized, hind-foot during casting. We paid special attention to the final hind-foot deformity after surgery, and the results were favorable after the application of this transverse pin.

  8. Hind-foot correction and stabilization by pins in plaster after surgical release of talipes equino varus feet in older children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seleem Osama A

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Congenital talipes equino varus (CTEV is a three dimensional deformity and is one of the most common congenital abnormalities affecting the lower limb and can be challenging to manage. Hind-foot deformity is considered the most difficult to treat. Unfortunately, the calcaneus is often small and thus difficult to control during casting after surgical release in severe or relapsed cases. We used three pins to control and maintain the hind foot correction, after surgical release, during casting in 47 cases (59 feet. We introduced a modified, coronal plane, transverse calcaneal pin. This pin is inserted from medial to lateral through the calcaneus to correct the varus mal-positioning of the calcaneus in the sagittal plane and to provide a better control on the small sized, hind-foot during casting. We paid special attention to the final hind-foot deformity after surgery, and the results were favorable after the application of this transverse pin.

  9. Hind-foot correction and stabilization by pins in plaster after surgical release of talipes equino varus feet in older children

    OpenAIRE

    El-Sayed, Mohamed M; Seleem, Osama A

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Congenital talipes equino varus (CTEV) is a three dimensional deformity and is one of the most common congenital abnormalities affecting the lower limb and can be challenging to manage. Hind-foot deformity is considered the most difficult to treat. Unfortunately, the calcaneus is often small and thus difficult to control during casting after surgical release in severe or relapsed cases. We used three pins to control and maintain the hind foot correction, after surgical release, durin...

  10. Foot strike patterns and hind limb joint angles during running in Hadza hunter-gatherers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman Pontzer

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: Unlike other habitually barefoot populations which prefer FFS while running, Hadza men preferred MFS, and Hadza women and juveniles preferred RFS. Sex and age differences in foot strike behavior among Hadza adults may reflect differences in running experience, with men learning to prefer MFS as they accumulate more running experience.

  11. Amputation versus functional reconstruction in the management of complex hind foot injuries caused by land-mine explosions: a long-term retrospective comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiralp, Bahtiyar; Ege, Tolga; Kose, Ozkan; Yurttas, Yuksel; Basbozkurt, Mustafa

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the long-term clinical outcomes of patients who were treated with either hind foot reconstruction or amputation in complex hind foot injuries accompanied with bone and soft tissue loss due to land-mine explosions. Between 1994 and 2004, all patients with hind foot complex injuries due to land-mine explosion, who were operated in our clinic, were enrolled to the study. All patients were evaluated with Short-Form 36 (SF-36), Foot and Ankle Disability Index (FADI) and Body Image Quality of Life Inventory (BIQLI) after a mean of 15.1 ± 2.2 (range 9-19) years of follow-up. Demographic characteristics, number of operations, necessity of psychiatric treatment and all complications were compared between groups. There were a total of 42 patients [21 in reconstruction group (Gr I) and 21 in amputation group (Gr II)]. The mean age at the time of final follow-up was 38.4 ± 3.04 years in Gr I and 38.2 ± 4.24 years in Gr II (p = 0.732). The mean follow-up duration was 15.7 ± 2.07 years in Gr I and 14.57 ± 2.29 years in Gr II (p = 0.081). The number of operations was significantly higher in Gr I (8.66 ± 10.2 times vs. 4.42 ± 7.7 times, respectively, p = 0.001). The mean FADI score at the final follow-up was 64.3 ± 18.1 in Gr I. In amputation group, more patients needed psychotherapy due to major depression (12 patients vs. 4 patients, p = 0.012). Major complications in Gr I were musculocutaneous flap atrophy in calcaneal region (n = 8 patients), limited ankle motion (n = 11) and painful osteophytes on plantar region (n = 6). In Gr II, stump problems were dominating (pain and tenderness n = 10, ulcer n = 2, allergic skin lesions n = 7, painful neuroma n = 10, bony spur n = 5, paresthesia n = 1, excessive sweating n = 12). At the final visit, although SF-36 scores were similar between groups (p = 0.182), extremity reconstruction group had significantly higher BIQLI scores than the amputation group (p = 0.016). If the dorsalis pedis is

  12. Tips for splinting traumatised teeth

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Leith, Rona

    2017-11-01

    A splint is required when teeth are mobile or need to be repositioned following a traumatic injury. The aim of splinting is to stabilise the injured tooth and maintain its position throughout the splinting period, improve function and provide comfort. Current best practice guidelines from the International Association for Dental Traumatology (IADT) recommend splinting for luxated, avulsed, root fractured and traumatically loosened permanent teeth.1,2 Splinting of primary teeth is usually not feasible. In general, the prognosis of a traumatised tooth is determined by the type of injury rather than the type of splint.3 However, correct splinting is important to maximise healing of the soft and hard tissues, and prevent further injury.1

  13. Tips for splinting traumatised teeth

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Leith, Rona

    2017-10-01

    A splint is required when teeth are mobile or need to be repositioned following a traumatic injury. The aim of splinting is to stabilise the injured tooth and maintain its position throughout the splinting period, improve function and provide comfort. Current best practice guidelines from the International Association for Dental Traumatology (IADT) recommend splinting for luxated, avulsed, root fractured and traumatically loosened permanent teeth.1,2 Splinting of primary teeth is usually not feasible. In general, the prognosis of a traumatised tooth is determined by the type of injury rather than the type of splint.3 However, correct splinting is important to maximise healing of the soft and hard tissues, and prevent further injury.1-6

  14. Secondary traumatisation and systemic traumatic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klarić, Miro; Kvesić, Ante; Mandić, Vjekoslav; Petrov, Božo; Frančišković, Tanja

    2013-06-01

    Traditionally, research has been focused on the development of symptoms in direct trauma survivors. However, during the last two decades researchers and clinicians have started exploring the way individual traumatic stress exposure affects trauma victims' spouses, children and professional caregivers. Studying trauma within the family is a part of what is called systemic traumatology, a study of groups, institutions and other human systems that show stress reactions directly caused by a traumatic event or series of events. The effect of an individual's traumatic stress on family members and on persons in direct contact is conceptualized as secondary traumatisation. In its narrow sense, secondary traumatisation involves a transfer of nightmares, intrusive thoughts, flashbacks and other Posttraumatic Stress Disorder symptoms, which are typically experienced by individuals suffering from PTSD, onto their immediate surroundings. In its broader sense, the term refers to any kind of distress transfer from a trauma victim to their immediate surroundings, and includes a broad spectrum of distress manifestation along with that resembling Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. Beyond that, a family member's PTSD is potentially transferable to subsequent generations, interfering with the psychological development of children.

  15. Imaging diagnostics of the foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szeimies, Ulrike; Staebler, Axel; Walther, Markus

    2012-01-01

    The book on imaging diagnostics of the foot contains the following chapters: (1) Imaging techniques. (2) Clinical diagnostics. (3) Ankle joint and hind foot. (4) Metatarsus. (5) Forefoot. (6) Pathology of plantar soft tissue. (7) Nervous system diseases. (8) Diseases without specific anatomic localization. (9) System diseases including the foot. (10) Tumor like lesions. (11) Normative variants.

  16. Attachment Patterns and Reflective Functioning in traumatised refugees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber, Karin

    2013-01-01

    Traumatized refugees have often suffered severe, prolonged, repeated traumas and pose a challenge to treatment. Attachment patterns and level of mentalizing seem to work as protection mechanisms in traumatizing events and to be important for positively utilizing the therapeutic alliance which...... psychotherapy research has shown is central to change and effect. Aims: 1) To examine attachment patterns and reflective functioning in traumatised refugees with PTSD, and 2) shed light on their significance to therapeutic alliance and treatment effect. Methods: All Arabic speaking patients in the study...

  17. Psychosocial family services for traumatised refugees in Denmark?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singla, Rashmi

    youth and families as well as Ethnic Resource Team (ERT) Multi faith chaplaincy, a mental health service use the resources of refugees and other ethnic minorities, as they are involved as initiators, professionals and volunteers. However the economic basis is/ has been rather precarious. Intricately...... constructive eclectic theoretical framework invoking local practices is also presented. Despite formal rights to mental healthcare for ethnic minorities including the traumatised refugees, there is no national strategy in Denmark aimed at ensuring that. Still in 1980s as services for treatment of refugees who...

  18. Developing a self-help guide for traumatised university students in Iraq

    OpenAIRE

    Jaber, Saad Sabet

    2012-01-01

    Background: Iraqi people have been experiencing traumatic events continually for several decades. Consequently, high prevalence rates of trauma-related symptoms have been documented. In contrast, there is a clear lack in mental health services available for traumatised people. This study aimed to screen for PTSD, depression, and anxiety, assess related variables (e.g. coping strategies, posttraumatic cognitions, and social support), and develop a self-help guide (SHG) for traumatised universi...

  19. Psychotherapy with traumatised refugees – the design of a randomised clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vindbjerg, Erik; Carlsson, Jessica Mariana; Klimpke, Christoph Axel

    2014-01-01

    of this paper is to discuss some of the challenges in adapting Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) to the treatment of traumatised refugees, as well as describe a randomised clinical trial designed to test two such adaptations. In the described trial one group receives CBT with a focus on cognitive...... restructuring while the other group receives CBT focusing on Stress Management. A main goal of this setup is to test whether some, perhaps even most, of the traumatised refugees referred to treatment, may benefit from a more direct focus on current stress, and its alleviation through simple, repetitive...

  20. ANATOMICAL DESCRIPTION OF MUSCLES IN THE HIND LIMB AND TAIL OF CEBUS ALBIFRONS

    OpenAIRE

    Quevedo U., Miriam; Laboratorio de Anatomía y Fauna Silvestre, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima; Cisneros S., Jannet; Laboratorio de Anatomía y Fauna Silvestre, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima; Navarette Z., Miluska; Laboratorio de Anatomía y Fauna Silvestre, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima; Torres G., Juan Pablo; Laboratorio de Anatomía y Fauna Silvestre, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima; Sato S., Alberto; Laboratorio de Anatomía y Fauna Silvestre, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to perform the anatomic description of the muscles located in the hind limb and tail of Cebus albifrons. Four adult monkeys older than 3 years of age and castrated were used. The animals were euthanized and embalmed; then, after six days, the dissection of the hind limb and tail was carried out. Muscles were described in comparison with the Rhesus monkey (Maccaca mullata). The pelvis and thigh, leg and foot region presented 18, 12 and 11 muscles respectively. P...

  1. Psychotherapy with traumatised refugees – the design of a randomised clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vindbjerg, Erik; Carlsson, Jessica Mariana; Klimpke, Christoph Axel

    2014-01-01

    There is little evidence as to which kind of psychotherapy is the most effective in the treatment of traumatised refugees. At the Competence Center for  Transcultural Psychiatry, a series of clinical trials have been conducted since 2008. The first results are pending publication. The aim...

  2. Imaging diagnostics of the foot; Bildgebende Diagnostik des Fusses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szeimies, Ulrike; Staebler, Axel [Radiologie in Muenchen-Harlaching, Muenchen (Germany); Walther, Markus (eds.) [Schoen-Klinik Muenchen-Harlaching, Muenchen (Germany). Zentrum fuer Fuss- und Sprunggelenkchirurgie

    2012-11-01

    The book on imaging diagnostics of the foot contains the following chapters: (1) Imaging techniques. (2) Clinical diagnostics. (3) Ankle joint and hind foot. (4) Metatarsus. (5) Forefoot. (6) Pathology of plantar soft tissue. (7) Nervous system diseases. (8) Diseases without specific anatomic localization. (9) System diseases including the foot. (10) Tumor like lesions. (11) Normative variants.

  3. Foot placement cues used by chameleons while walking and climbing

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Whenever vision was impaired, the animal utilized touch. Placement of the forelimb was the locator for the hind limb. Regardless of perch diameter, the hind foot was placed fully or partially overlapping the position that the ipsilateral forefoot had just occupied. (Journal of the Ghana Science Association: 2001 3(3): 22-29) ...

  4. The effect of flexible cognitive-behavioural therapy and medical treatment, including antidepressants on post-traumatic stress disorder and depression in traumatised refugees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhmann, Caecilie Böck; Nordentoft, Merete; Ekstrøm, Morten

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little evidence exists on the treatment of traumatised refugees. AIMS: To estimate treatment effects of flexible cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) and antidepressants (sertraline and mianserin) in traumatised refugees. METHOD: Randomised controlled clinical trial with 2 × 2 factorial...... clinical setting, there was no effect of flexible CBT and antidepressants on PTSD, and there was a small-to-moderate effect of antidepressants and psychoeducation on depression in traumatised refugees....

  5. CT guided diagnostic foot injections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saifuddin, A.; Abdus-Samee, M.; Mann, C.; Singh, D.; Angel, J.C.

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To describe a CT technique for guiding diagnostic and therapeutic injections in the hind- and mid-foot. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Over a period of 50 months, 28 individuals were referred for diagnostic and therapeutic hind- and mid-foot injections before possible arthrodesis. A CT technique was developed that allowed entry into the various joints using a vertical approach. Numbers of joints injected were as follows: posterior subtalar, 21; talonavicular, 4; calcaneonavicular, calcaneocuboid, navicular-cuneiform and 5th metatarsocuboid joints, 1 each. RESULTS: All injections but one were technically successful. Significant relief of symptoms was noted by 16 participants, whereas for 9 there was no improvement and for 3 a partial response was achieved. CONCLUSION: CT is a simple and safe alternative to fluoroscopy for guiding diagnostic and therapeutic foot injections, and may be the technique of choice in cases of disordered anatomy

  6. EMDR versus stabilisation in traumatised asylum seekers and refugees: results of a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf J. Kleber

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Traumatised asylum seekers and refugees are clinically considered a complex population. Discussion exists on whether with this population treatment guidelines for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD should be followed and Trauma-Focused Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy (TF-CBT or Eye Movement Desensitisation and Reprocessing (EMDR should be applied, or whether a phased model starting with stabilisation is preferable. Some clinicians fear that trauma-focused interventions may lead to unmanageable distress or may be ineffective. While cognitive-behavioural interventions have been found to be effective with traumatised refugees, no studies concerning the efficacy of EMDR with this population have been conducted as yet.In preparation for a randomised trial comparing EMDR and stabilisation with traumatised refugees, a pilot study with 20 participants was conducted. The objective was to examine feasibility of participation in a randomised trial for this complex population and to examine acceptability and preliminary efficacy of EMDR.Participants were randomly allocated to 11 sessions of either EMDR or stabilisation. Symptoms of PTSD (SCID-I, HTQ, depression and anxiety (HSCL-25, and quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF were assessed at pre- and post-treatment and 3-month follow-up.Participation of traumatised refugees in the study was found feasible, although issues associated with complex traumatisation led to a high pre-treatment attrition and challenges in assessments. Acceptability of EMDR was found equal to that of stabilisation with a high drop-out for both conditions. No participants dropped out of the EMDR condition because of unmanageable distress. While improvement for EMDR participants was small, EMDR was found to be no less efficacious than stabilisation. Different symptom courses between the two conditions, with EMDR showing some improvement and stabilisation showing some deterioration between pre-treatment and post-treatment, justify the conduct

  7. Somatisation and anger are associated with symptom severity of posttraumatic stress disorder in severely traumatised refugees and asylum seekers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiller, Tobias R; Schick, Matthis; Schnyder, Ulrich; Bryant, Richard A; Nickerson, Angela; Morina, Naser

    2016-01-01

    Most research on refugee mental health has focused on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Besides PTSD, however, traumatised refugees are often burdened by comorbid somatic and psychiatric conditions, as well as postmigration living difficulties (PMLD). It is unclear how these conditions interfere with presentation and treatment of PTSD. This preliminary cross-sectional study investigated 134 severely traumatised refugees and asylum seekers in treatment in two psychiatric outpatient units in Switzerland. Trauma exposure, PMLD, somatisation and explosive anger were assessed and related to symptom severity of PTSD using correlation and regression analyses. PTSD symptoms were significantly related to somatisation, anger, PMLD and trauma exposure. Regression analysis revealed that PTSD symptoms were mainly predicted by somatisation and anger. Symptom severity of PTSD is associated with somatisation, explosive anger and, to a lesser extent, PMLD. Standard PTSD treatment may benefit from implementing targeted strategies to assess and address these factors in traumatised refugees.

  8. Picasso kõrge hind / Riina Robinson

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Robinson, Riina

    2007-01-01

    Pablo Picassost, tema loomingust, 2003.a Malagas Picasso muuseumi ja kunstniku sünnikodu avamisest, maailma kallemailt müüdud maalide TOP 10-sse kuuluvatest maalidest "Poiss piibuga" (1905) ja "Dora Maar kassiga" (1941), hindadest. Maailma kalleimad oksjonil müüdud maalid: I - Jackson Pollocki "Nr.5, 1948" (hind:140 miljonit dollarit), II - William De Kooningi "Woman III" (1952-53), III - Gustav Klimti "Adele Bloch-Bauer I portree" (1907)

  9. Vicarious resilience and vicarious traumatisation: Experiences of working with refugees and asylum seekers in South Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puvimanasinghe, Teresa; Denson, Linley A; Augoustinos, Martha; Somasundaram, Daya

    2015-12-01

    The negative psychological impacts of working with traumatised people are well documented and include vicarious traumatisation (VT): the cumulative effect of identifying with clients' trauma stories that negatively impacts on service providers' memory, emotions, thoughts, and worldviews. More recently, the concept of vicarious resilience (VR) has been also identified: the strength, growth, and empowerment experienced by trauma workers as a consequence of their work. VR includes service providers' awareness and appreciation of their clients' capacity to grow, maintaining hope for change, as well as learning from and reassessing personal problems in the light of clients' stories of perseverance, strength, and growth. This study aimed at exploring the experiences of mental health, physical healthcare, and settlement workers caring for refugees and asylum seekers in South Australia. Using a qualitative method (data-based thematic analysis) to collect and analyse 26 semi-structured face-to-face interviews, we identified four prominent and recurring themes emanating from the data: VT, VR, work satisfaction, and cultural flexibility. These findings-among the first to describe both VT and VR in Australians working with refugee people-have important implications for policy, service quality, service providers' wellbeing, and refugee clients' lives. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Computerized identification and classification of stance phases as made by front og hind feet of walking cows based on 3-dimensional ground reaction forces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjøth, F; Thorup, Vivi Mørkøre; do Nascimento, Omar Feix

    2013-01-01

    Lameness is a frequent disorder in dairy cows and in large dairy herds manual lameness detection is a time-consuming task. This study describes a method for automatic identification of stance phases in walking cows, and their classification as made by a front or a hind foot based on ground reacti...

  11. A new model for the immobilization of the rat hind limb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coutinho E.L.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available An alternative device for the immobilization of the hind limb of the rat was developed to study the effects of chronic disuse on the soleus and tibialis anterior muscles, maintained for 3 weeks in the shortening and the stretching positions, respectively. The proposed device is made of steel mesh and cotton materials, and has some advantages when compared to cast or plaster cast: it is cheaper, lighter (12 g or 4% of the body weight of the rat and the same unit can be easily adjusted and used several times in the same animal or in animals of similar size. Immobilization is also useful to restrain the movements of the hip, knee, and ankle joints. Male rats (291 ± 35 g and aged 14 ± 2 weeks were used to develop and test the model. The soleus muscle of 18 rats was maintained in a shortened position for 21 consecutive days and lost 19 ± 7% of its length (P = 0.008 and 44 ± 6% of its weight (P = 0.002 compared to the contralateral intact muscle. No difference (P = 0.67 was found in the stretched tibialis anterior of the same hind limb when compared to the contralateral muscle. No ulcer, sore or foot swelling was observed in the animals. Immobilization was effective in producing chronic muscle disuse in the hind limbs of rats and is an acceptable alternative to the traditional methods of immobilization such as cast or plaster cast.

  12. Battles on women's bodies: war, rape and traumatisation in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenholm, J E; Olsson, P; Ahlberg, B M

    2011-01-01

    Rape has been used as a weapon in the conflict in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) in unprecedented ways. Research into the phenomenon of war-rape is limited, particularly in this context. The aim of this study was to explore perceptions of local leaders in eastern DRC concerning rape and raped women in the war context. Local leaders were chosen for their ability to both reflect and influence their constituencies. Interviews were conducted with 10 local leaders and transcripts subjected to qualitative content analysis. The study suggests that mass raping and the methods of perpetration created a chaos effectively destroying communities and the entire society and that humanitarian aid was often inappropriate. Furthermore, an exclusive focus on raped women missed the extent of traumatisation entire communities suffered. More significantly, the lack of political will, corruption, greed and inappropriate aid creates a tangled web serving to intensify the war. This complexity has implications for humanitarian interventions including public health.

  13. Foot pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain - foot ... Foot pain may be due to: Aging Being on your feet for long periods of time Being overweight A ... sports activity Trauma The following can cause foot pain: Arthritis and gout . Common in the big toe, ...

  14. Radiographic protocol and normal anatomy of the hind feet in the white rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Robert J; Wood, Simon P; Hutchinson, John R; Weller, Renate

    2015-01-01

    Foot pathology is a common and important health concern in captive rhinoceroses worldwide, but osteopathologies are rarely diagnosed, partly because of a lack of radiographic protocols. Here, we aimed to develop the first radiographic protocol for rhinoceros feet and describe the radiographic anatomy of the white rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum) hind foot (pes). Computed tomographic images were obtained of nine cadaver pedes from seven different white rhinoceroses and assessed for pathology. A single foot deemed free of pathology was radiographed using a range of different projections and exposures to determine the best protocol. 3D models were produced from the CT images and were displayed with the real radiographs to describe the normal radiographic anatomy of the white rhinoceros pes. An optimal radiographic projection was determined for each bone in the rhinoceros pes focusing on highlighting areas where pathology has been previously described. The projections deemed to be most useful were D60Pr-PlDiO (digit III), D45Pr45M-PlDiLO (digit II), and D40Pr35L-PlDiLO (digit IV). The primary beam was centered 5-7 cm proximal to the cuticle on the digit of interest. Articular surfaces, ridges, grooves, tubercles, processes and fossae were identified. The radiographic protocol we have developed along with the normal radiographic anatomy we have described will allow for more accessible and effective diagnosis of white rhinoceros foot osteopathologies. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  15. Genetic regulation of canine skeletal traits: trade-offs between the hind limbs and forelimbs in the fox and dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharlamova, Anastasia V; Trut, Lyudmila N; Carrier, David R; Chase, Kevin; Lark, Karl G

    2007-09-01

    Genetic variation in functionally integrated skeletal traits can be maintained over 10 million years despite bottlenecks and stringent selection. Here, we describe an analysis of the genetic architecture of the canid axial skeleton using populations of the Portuguese Water Dog Canis familiaris) and silver fox (Vulpes vulpes). Twenty-one skeletal metrics taken from radiographs of the forelimbs and hind limbs of the fox and dog were used to construct separate anatomical principal component (PC) matrices of the two species. In both species, 15 of the 21 PCs exhibited significant heritability, ranging from 25% to 70%. The second PC, in both species, represents a trade-off in which limb-bone width is inversely correlated with limb-bone length. PC2 accounts for approximately 15% of the observed skeletal variation, approximately 30% of the variation in shape. Many of the other significant PCs affect very small amounts of variation (e.g., 0.2-2%) along trade-off axes that partition function between the forelimbs and hind limbs. These PCs represent shape axes in which an increase in size of an element of the forelimb is associated with a decrease in size of an element of the hind limb and vice versa. In most cases, these trade-offs are heritable in both species and genetic loci have been identified in the Portuguese Water Dog for many of these. These PCs, present in both the dog and the fox, include ones that affect lengths of the forelimb versus the hind limb, length of the forefoot versus that of the hind foot, muscle moment (i.e., lever) arms of the forelimb versus hind limb, and cortical thickness of the bones of the forelimb versus hind limb. These inverse relationships suggest that genetic regulation of the axial skeleton results, in part, from the action of genes that influence suites of functionally integrated traits. Their presence in both dogs and foxes suggests that the genes controlling the regulation of these PCs of the forelimb versus hind limb may be found in

  16. Ten years of helicopter emergency medical services in Germany: do we still need the helicopter rescue in multiple traumatised patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andruszkow, Hagen; Hildebrand, Frank; Lefering, Rolf; Pape, Hans-Christoph; Hoffmann, Reinhard; Schweigkofler, Uwe

    2014-10-01

    Helicopter emergency medical service (HEMS) has been established in the preclinical treatment of multiple traumatised patients despite an ongoing controversy towards the potential benefit. Celebrating the 20th anniversary of TraumaRegister DGU(®) of the German Trauma Society (DGU) the presented study intended to provide an overview of HEMS rescue in Germany over the last 10 years analysing the potential beneficial impact of a nationwide helicopter rescue in multiple traumatised patients. We analysed TraumaRegister DGU(®) including multiple traumatised patients (ISS ≥ 16) between 2002 and 2012. In-hospital mortality was defined as main outcome. An adjusted, multivariate regression with 13 confounders was performed to evaluate the potential survival benefit. 42,788 patients were included in the present study. 14,275 (33.4%) patients were rescued by HEMS and 28,513 (66.6%) by GEMS. Overall, 66.8% (n=28,569) patients were transported to a level I trauma centre and 28.2% (n=12,052) to a level II trauma centre. Patients rescued by HEMS sustained a higher injury severity compared to GEMS (ISS HEMS: 29.5 ± 12.6 vs. 27.5 ± 11.8). Helicopter rescue teams performed more on-scene interventions, and mission times were increased in HEMS rescue (HEMS: 77.2 ± 28.7 min. vs. GEMS: 60.9 ± 26.9 min.). Linear regression analysis revealed that the frequency of HEMS rescue has decreased significantly between 2002 and 2012. In case of transportation to level I trauma centres a decrease of 1.7% per year was noted (plogistic regression HEMS was proven a positive independent survival predictor between 2002 and 2012 (OR 0.863; 95%-CI 0.800-0.930; Nagelkerkes-R(2) 0.539) with only little differences between each year. This study was able to prove an independent survival benefit of HEMS in multiple traumatised patients during the last 10 years. Despite this fact, a constant decline of HEMS rescue missions was found in multiple trauma patients due to unknown reasons. We concluded that

  17. The effectiveness of Narrative Exposure Therapy with traumatised firefighters in Saudi Arabia: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Mohammed; Hunt, Nigel; Thomas, Shirley

    2015-03-01

    Firefighters are exposed to many traumatic events. The psychological costs of this exposure increase the risk of Post-Traumatic Stress disorder (PTSD), depression and anxiety. This study examined the effectiveness of Narrative Exposure Therapy (NET) as a short-term treatment for reducing PTSD symptoms among Saudi firefighters. A randomized waiting-list control study was conducted with 34 traumatized firefighters were randomly allocated to NET or Waiting-list Control (WLC). The NET group received four therapy sessions of 60-90 min over a three-week period; those in the WLC condition received the same sessions after a three-week waiting period. Participants in both groups were assessed at baseline, immediately post-intervention and at 3 and 6 month follow ups. NET led to significant reductions in PTSD symptoms, anxiety and depression compared with WLC. After the WLC group received treatment, it showed the same improvements as the NET group. This occurred immediately post-treatment in both groups, but was not sustained at 3 and 6 month follow ups. Coping strategies and social support led to significant changes only in follow up times. NET was effective in reducing PTSD symptoms in traumatised Saudi firefighters. This finding could be helpful in the management of PTSD among people who work as first responders such as firefighters, police officers and emergency medical personal, as well as security officers. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Arboreal Day Geckos (Phelsuma madagascariensis Differentially Modulate Fore- and Hind Limb Kinematics in Response to Changes in Habitat Structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingna V Zhuang

    Full Text Available By using adhesion, geckos can move through incredibly challenging habitats. However, continually changing terrain may necessitate modulation of the adhesive apparatus in order to maximize its effectiveness over a range of challenges. Behaviorally modulating how the adhesive system is applied can occur by altering the alignment of the foot relative to the long axis of the body and/or the angles between the digits (interdigital angle. Given the directionality of the adhesive system, geckos likely vary the application of the system via these mechanisms as they run. We quantified 3D movements (using high-speed video of the day gecko, Phelsuma madagascariensis, running on a range of ecologically relevant inclines (0°, 45°, 90° and perch diameters (1.5 cm, 10 cm and broad. We measured the instantaneous sum of interdigital angles and foot alignment relative to the body, as well as other kinematic variables, throughout each stride and across treatments. Modulation of foot alignment at 45° and 90° was similar between the forelimb and hind limb, but differed at 0°, suggesting that P. madagascariensis is able to exert an adhesive force using multiple strategies. Both the sum of interdigital angles and alignment in the fore- and hind foot were modulated. Differences in modulation between the limbs are likely related to the underlying morphology. The modulation of interdigital angle and foot alignment suggests that aspects other than the mechanism of adhesion, such as joint morphology, are important for arboreal movement in geckos. Our study of foot usage in arboreal locomotion reveals patterns that may be widespread across pad-bearing lizards. In addition to understanding the constraints exerted by the adhesive apparatus, we highlight how biomechanical traits may respond to the evolution of novel adaptations and morphologies.

  19. Arboreal Day Geckos (Phelsuma madagascariensis) Differentially Modulate Fore- and Hind Limb Kinematics in Response to Changes in Habitat Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Mingna V; Higham, Timothy E

    2016-01-01

    By using adhesion, geckos can move through incredibly challenging habitats. However, continually changing terrain may necessitate modulation of the adhesive apparatus in order to maximize its effectiveness over a range of challenges. Behaviorally modulating how the adhesive system is applied can occur by altering the alignment of the foot relative to the long axis of the body and/or the angles between the digits (interdigital angle). Given the directionality of the adhesive system, geckos likely vary the application of the system via these mechanisms as they run. We quantified 3D movements (using high-speed video) of the day gecko, Phelsuma madagascariensis, running on a range of ecologically relevant inclines (0°, 45°, 90°) and perch diameters (1.5 cm, 10 cm and broad). We measured the instantaneous sum of interdigital angles and foot alignment relative to the body, as well as other kinematic variables, throughout each stride and across treatments. Modulation of foot alignment at 45° and 90° was similar between the forelimb and hind limb, but differed at 0°, suggesting that P. madagascariensis is able to exert an adhesive force using multiple strategies. Both the sum of interdigital angles and alignment in the fore- and hind foot were modulated. Differences in modulation between the limbs are likely related to the underlying morphology. The modulation of interdigital angle and foot alignment suggests that aspects other than the mechanism of adhesion, such as joint morphology, are important for arboreal movement in geckos. Our study of foot usage in arboreal locomotion reveals patterns that may be widespread across pad-bearing lizards. In addition to understanding the constraints exerted by the adhesive apparatus, we highlight how biomechanical traits may respond to the evolution of novel adaptations and morphologies.

  20. John Bowlby and ethology: an annotated interview with Robert Hinde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowlby, John

    2007-12-01

    From the 1950s, John Bowlby, one of the founders of attachment theory, was in personal and scientific contact with leading European scientists in the field of ethology (e.g., Niko Tinbergen, Konrad Lorenz, and especially Robert Hinde). In constructing his new theory on the nature of the bond between children and their caregivers, Bowlby profited highly from their new approach to (animal) behavior. Hinde and Tinbergen in their turn were influenced and inspired by Bowlby's new thinking. On the basis of extensive interviews with bowlby's colleague and lifelong friend Robert Hinde and on the basis of archival materials, both the relationship between John Bowlby and Robert Hinde and the cross-fertilization of ethology and attachment theory are described.

  1. Athlete's Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athlete's foot is a common infection caused by a fungus. It most often affects the space between the toes. ... skin between your toes. You can get athlete's foot from damp surfaces, such as showers, swimming pools, ...

  2. Foot Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can also cause foot problems. The Most Common Types of Foot Problems In older adults, the foot complaints encountered ... people include: Arch pain . From fallen arches (flat feet), or abnormally high arches. Tarsal tunnel syndrome . A type of pinched nerve disorder. Achilles tendonitis . Inflammation of ...

  3. Foot pain

    OpenAIRE

    Formosa, Aaron

    2005-01-01

    Foot complaints are very common in general practice and their incidence increases with age. Three out of four people complain of foot pain during the course of a lifetime, while approximately 20% of people aged 65 years or older complain of non-traumatic foot problems.

  4. Foot Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... straight across and not too short Your foot health can be a clue to your overall health. For example, joint stiffness could mean arthritis. Tingling ... foot checks are an important part of your health care. If you have foot problems, be sure ...

  5. Treatment of traumatised refugees with basic body awareness therapy versus mixed physical activity as add-on treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordbrandt, Maja Sticker; Carlsson, Jessica; Lindberg, Laura Glahder

    2015-01-01

    . In clinical studies, physical activity has shown a positive effect on psychiatric illnesses such as depression and anxiety and for patients with chronic pain. However, scientific knowledge about physical activity as part of the treatment for traumatised refugees is very limited and no guidelines exist......, for the duration of 20 weeks. The study is being conducted at the Competence Centre for Transcultural Psychiatry, Mental Health Centre Ballerup in the Capital Region of Denmark. The primary endpoint of the study is symptoms of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder; the secondary endpoints are depression and anxiety...

  6. Social rank affects the haematologic profile in red deer hinds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceacero, Francisco; Gaspar-López, Enrique; Landete-Castillejos, Tomás; Gallego, Laureano; García, Andrés J

    2018-01-26

    We studied the effects of social rank on the haematologic profile in a herd of 24 female Iberian red deer hinds. Social rank hierarchy was determined and blood samples were taken and analysed. After adjusting for age and body mass, dominance ranking showed a significant negative effect (ie, lower values in dominant hinds) on white blood cell (WBC) count, haemoglobin and haematocrit. Our results are similar to those reported for stressed individuals due to physical immobilisation, but do not support the predicted enhanced erythropoiesis due to higher levels of androgens. The results for WBC numbers may also reflect that subordinate hinds must allocate a higher amount of resources to immunity as a result of injuries incurred from dominant hinds, while simultaneously facing restricted access to food sources. For red blood cell (RBC) counts, the results may be due to subordinate hinds likely needing increased haematocrit and haemoglobin levels for fast flight responses. Our data show that social rank influences haematologic profile, and thus it should be considered when correctly interpreting blood analyses in social cervid species. © British Veterinary Association (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  7. HD 38452 - J. R. Hind's star that changed colour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Brian; Sneden, Christopher

    1988-01-01

    In 1851, John Russell Hind announced that a star previously observed by him to be very red had become bluish white in color. It is shown that this star, HD 38451, is a ninth magnitude shell star which presumably was ejecting a shell when Hind first observed it. From high dispersion coude spectra, low dispersion IUE spectra, and ground-based photometry, HD 38451 is found to be a normal A21V shell star. Its current values of E(B-V) of about 0.14 is probably caused by interstellar rather than circumstellar reddening. There remains a problem to reconcile the large amount of reddening present when Hind first observed the star with its evidently small diminution in visual brightness at that time.

  8. Adult attachment in the context of refugee traumatisation : the impact of organized violence and forced separation on parental states of mind regarding attachment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Haene, L.; Grietens, Hans; Verschueren, K.

    2010-01-01

    Starting from an outline of the refugee experience as a process of cumulative traumatisation, we review research literature on mental health outcomes in refugees. Next, an integration of findings on relational processes in refugee families documents the role of the family unit as a key interactive

  9. "Peek-a-Boo. How "Can" You Be There?" Analytic Work with a Severely Traumatised Two-and-a-Half-Year-Old Girl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strati, Katerina

    2010-01-01

    This paper traces the analytic work with a severely traumatised two-and-a-half-year-old girl Phoebe, whose early life was marked by chronic abuse and a violent murder she witnessed a few months prior to the beginning of treatment. Bringing the trauma in the room in a dissociative form, in line with post-traumatic stress disorder presentation, was…

  10. Mis on papa Jannseni hind ? / Sven Sildnik ; interv. Grete Naaber

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Sildnik, Sven, 1964-

    2006-01-01

    Sven Kivisildnik kirjutas Pärnu linnavalitsuse tellimusel Jannseni sünniaastapäeva peoks näidendi "Johann Woldemar Jannsen ehk Rahvavaenlase hind", mis kantakse ette Koidula muuseumi klassitoas 16. mail. Intervjuu näidendi autori ja esitajaga

  11. Athlete's foot

    OpenAIRE

    Crawford, Fay

    2009-01-01

    Fungal infection of the feet can cause white and soggy skin between the toes, dry and flaky soles, or reddening and blistering of the skin all over the foot. Around 15% to 25% of people are likely to have athlete's foot at any one time.The infection can spread to other parts of the body and to other people.

  12. Athlete's Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Athlete's Foot? Athlete's foot is a type of fungal skin infection. Fungi (the plural of fungus) are microscopic plant-like organisms that thrive in damp, warm environments. They're usually not dangerous, but sometimes can cause disease. When they infect the skin, they cause mild ...

  13. Adult Foot Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Overview of Foot & Ankle / Adult Foot Health Adult Foot Health Page Content The Normal Foot There are 26 bones and 33 joints in ... Pay attention to cuts and bruises of the foot. Like any other injury they should be cleansed ...

  14. Club foot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engell, V; Damborg, F; Andersen, M

    2006-01-01

    The aetiology of congenital club foot is unclear. Although studies on populations, families and twins suggest a genetic component, the mode of inheritance does not comply with distinctive patterns. The Odense-based Danish Twin Registry contains data on all 73,000 twin pairs born in Denmark over...... the last 130 years. In 2002 all 46 418 twins born between 1931 and 1982 received a 17-page questionnaire, one question of which was 'Were you born with club foot?' A total of 94 twins answered 'Yes', giving an overall self-reported prevalence of congenital club foot of 0.0027 (95% confidence interval (CI.......09 (95% CI 0.01 to 0.32) for DZss and 0.05 (95% CI 0.006 to 0.18) for all dizygotic (DZtot) twins. We have found evidence of a genetic component in congenital club foot, although non-genetic factors must play a predominant role....

  15. Foot Drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is being done? The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) conducts research related to the neurological conditions that cause foot drop in its laboratories at the National ...

  16. Diabetic Foot

    OpenAIRE

    Halil Akbulut; Umit Aydogan; Y. Cetin Doganer

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus is a multisystemic disease progressively seen more frequently in the general population. Diabetes foot, seen in patients suffering from diabetes mellitus, is a frequent result of improper foot care and requires long and serious treatment. The disease plays an important role in terms of public health and can be a cause for high morbidity and mortality rates. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2010; 9(4.000): 375-382

  17. Mycetoma foot

    OpenAIRE

    Gooptu, Somnath; Ali, Iqbal; Singh, Gurjit; Mishra, R. N.

    2013-01-01

    Mycetoma is an uncommon chronic granulomatous infective disease of the skin, dermis and subcutaneous tissues predominantly seen in tropical countries. A patient presented to our hospital with the swelling of the left foot with a healed sinus and a painful nodule. He gave a history of sinuses in the left foot from which there was discharge of yellow granules. Culture of the ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration cytology of the nodule revealed growths of Nocardia species. The patient was tre...

  18. Acoustic Tonal and Vector Properties of Red Hind Grouper Vocalizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Cameron Anthony

    Vertebrates are the most prodigious vocalizing animals in existence, and the most diverse methods of acoustic communication among vertebrates can be found in the ocean. Relatively many teleost fish are gifted with the ability to communicate acoustically, and the family of serranidae often performs this as a function of the swim bladder. Epinephelus Guttatus (E. guttatus), or more commonly the red hind grouper, is equipped with a drum shaped swim bladder acting as a monopole under typical ocean conditions. This configuration allows for what is understood to be omnidirectional projection of tones approximately centered between 40 and 440 Hz and spanning anywhere from 40 to 200 Hz of bandwidth and modulation effects based on observed data provided by researchers. Prior studies on many other fish show correlation in acoustic communication profile with length, size and sexual identity. In the red hind, sexual dimorphism leads to an inherent female identity in all juvenile fish which converts to male according to environmental factors, recommending at least consistent organs across both sexes be assumed even if not in use. Much research has been performed on male fish vocalization in terms of spectral content. Communication in fish is a complex multi-modal process, with acoustic communication being important for many of the species, particularly those in the littoral regions of the worlds' oceans. If identifying characteristics of the red hind vocalization can be isolated based on detection, classification, tracking and localizing methodologies, then these identifying characteristics may indeed lead to passive feature identification that allows for estimation of individual fish mass. Hypotheses based on vector, cyclostationary and classical tonal mechanics are presented for consideration. A battery of test data collection events, applying pre-recorded fish vocalizations to a geolocated undersea sound source were conducted. The results are supplied with the intent of

  19. Ubx regulates differential enlargement and diversification of insect hind legs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najmus Mahfooz

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Differential enlargement of hind (T3 legs represents one of the hallmarks of insect evolution. However, the actual mechanism(s responsible are yet to be determined. To address this issue, we have now studied the molecular basis of T3 leg enlargement in Oncopeltus fasciatus (milkweed bug and Acheta domesticus (house cricket. In Oncopeltus, the T3 tibia displays a moderate increase in size, whereas in Acheta, the T3 femur, tibia, and tarsus are all greatly enlarged. Here, we show that the hox gene Ultrabithorax (Ubx is expressed in the enlarged segments of hind legs. Furthermore, we demonstrate that depletion of Ubx during embryogenesis has a primary effect in T3 legs and causes shortening of leg segments that are enlarged in a wild type. This result shows that Ubx is regulating the differential growth and enlargement of T3 legs in both Oncopeltus and Acheta. The emerging view suggests that Ubx was co-opted for a novel role in regulating leg growth and that the transcriptional modification of its expression may be a universal mechanism for the evolutionary diversification of insect hind legs.

  20. Ubx Regulates Differential Enlargement and Diversification of Insect Hind Legs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfooz, Najmus; Turchyn, Nataliya; Mihajlovic, Michelle; Hrycaj, Steven; Popadić, Aleksandar

    2007-01-01

    Differential enlargement of hind (T3) legs represents one of the hallmarks of insect evolution. However, the actual mechanism(s) responsible are yet to be determined. To address this issue, we have now studied the molecular basis of T3 leg enlargement in Oncopeltus fasciatus (milkweed bug) and Acheta domesticus (house cricket). In Oncopeltus, the T3 tibia displays a moderate increase in size, whereas in Acheta, the T3 femur, tibia, and tarsus are all greatly enlarged. Here, we show that the hox gene Ultrabithorax (Ubx) is expressed in the enlarged segments of hind legs. Furthermore, we demonstrate that depletion of Ubx during embryogenesis has a primary effect in T3 legs and causes shortening of leg segments that are enlarged in a wild type. This result shows that Ubx is regulating the differential growth and enlargement of T3 legs in both Oncopeltus and Acheta. The emerging view suggests that Ubx was co-opted for a novel role in regulating leg growth and that the transcriptional modification of its expression may be a universal mechanism for the evolutionary diversification of insect hind legs. PMID:17848997

  1. The effect of foot arch on plantar pressure distribution during standing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periyasamy, R; Anand, Sneh

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to explore how foot type affects plantar pressure distribution during standing. In this study, 32 healthy subjects voluntarily participated and the subject feet were classified as: normal feet (n = 23), flat feet (n = 14) and high arch feet (n = 27) according to arch index (AI) values obtained from foot pressure intensity image analysis. Foot pressure intensity images were acquired by a pedopowergraph system to obtain a foot pressure distribution parameter-power ratio (PR) during standing in eight different regions of the foot. Contact area and mean PR were analysed in hind foot, mid-foot and fore foot regions. One-way analysis of variance was used to determine statistical differences between groups. The contact area and mean PR value beneath the mid-foot was significantly increased in the low arch foot when compared to the normal arch foot and high arch foot (p foot PR value were positively (r = 0.54) correlated with increased arch index (AI) value. A significant (p foot of low arch feet when compared with other groups in both feet. The findings suggest that there is an increased mid-foot PR value in the low arch foot as compared to the normal arch foot and high arch foot during standing. Therefore, individuals with low arch feet could be at high risk for mid-foot collapse and Charcot foot problems, indicating that foot type should be assessed when determining an individual's risk for foot injury.

  2. "After all the traumas my body has been through, I feel good that it is still working." - Basic Body Awareness Therapy for traumatised refugees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarønæs, Kajsa Stade; Skammeritz, Signe; Hjortkjær, Inga Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    the participants' movement harmony using the Body Awareness Rating Scale-Movement Harmony (BARS-MH) test. At the end of the study, the participants filled out anonymous questionnaires about treatment satisfaction. RESULTS: The results showed that the participants had a high compliance, acceptability and treatment......UNLABELLED: Basic Body Awareness Therapy (BBAT) is a form of physiotherapy that is often used for psychiatric patients in Scandinavian countries. To our knowledge there has not been any studies investigating BBAT as a treatment for traumatised refugees until now. OBJECTIVE: To explore...... the compliance, acceptability and treatment satisfaction using group BBAT in traumatised refugees. To study changes in psychiatric and somatic symptoms as well as quality of life, level of functioning and quality of movement during treatment with BBAT. METHOD: All Arabic speaking patients that previously had...

  3. A Reliable Mouse Model of Hind limb Gangrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Punam P; Castilla, Diego; Lassance-Soares, Roberta M; Shao, Hongwei; Regueiro, Manuela; Li, Yan; Vazquez-Padron, Roberto; Webster, Keith A; Liu, Zhao-Jun; Velazquez, Omaida C

    2018-04-01

    Lack of a reliable hind limb gangrene animal model limits preclinical studies of gangrene, a severe form of critical limb ischemia. We develop a novel mouse hind limb gangrene model to facilitate translational studies. BALB/c, FVB, and C57BL/6 mice underwent femoral artery ligation (FAL) with or without administration of N G -nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), an endothelial nitric oxide synthase inhibitor. Gangrene was assessed using standardized ischemia scores ranging from 0 (no gangrene) to 12 (forefoot gangrene). Laser Doppler imaging (LDI) and DiI perfusion quantified hind limb reperfusion postoperatively. BALB/c develops gangrene with FAL-only (n = 11/11, 100% gangrene incidence), showing mean limb ischemia score of 12 on postoperative days (PODs) 7 and 14 with LDI ranging from 0.08 to 0.12 on respective PODs. Most FVB did not develop gangrene with FAL-only (n = 3/9, 33% gangrene incidence) but with FAL and L-NAME (n = 9/9, 100% gangrene incidence). Mean limb ischemia scores for FVB undergoing FAL with L-NAME were significantly higher than for FVB receiving FAL-only. LDI score and capillary density by POD 28 were significantly lower in FVB undergoing FAL with L-NAME. C57BL/6 did not develop gangrene with FAL-only or FAL and L-NAME. Reproducible murine gangrene models may elucidate molecular mechanisms for gangrene development, facilitating therapeutic intervention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Diabetic Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or blood sugar, levels are too high. Over time, this can damage your nerves or blood vessels. Nerve damage from diabetes can cause you to lose feeling in your feet. You may not feel a cut, a blister or a sore. Foot injuries such as these can cause ulcers and infections. ...

  5. Role of Cone Beam Computed Tomography in Rehabilitation of a Traumatised Deficient Maxillary Alveolar Ridge Using Symphyseal Block Graft Placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shipra Arora

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Deficiencies in the alveolar ridges cause multiple problems in achieving aesthetic and functional outcome of implant therapy and are commonly restored by using onlay graft from intraoral source. Careful assessment of the recipient as well as the donor site using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT is a prerequisite to ideal treatment planning. This paper highlights the critical role of CBCT in planning a successful rehabilitation of traumatised deficient anterior maxillary alveolar ridge using autogenous block graft from mandibular symphysis, followed by implant placement. A 21-year-old male reported with missing right maxillary lateral incisor due to traumatic avulsion 6 months back. A concavity was found on the labial aspect of edentulous area. Serial transplanar images on CBCT revealed gross irregular radiolucency in place of labial cortical plate. Using CBCT, size of the required block was estimated, and mandibular symphyseal area was evaluated for the feasibility of harvesting a graft of suitable dimension. Onlay block graft was harvested from mandibular symphysis and placed at the edentulous site to augment the alveolar ridge. Implants were placed 5 months later and loaded successfully after osseointegration. After 1 year of followup, implant-based prosthesis is working well, without any complications.

  6. Bone morphology of the hind limbs in two caviomorph rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo, F A P; Sesoko, N F; Rahal, S C; Teixeira, C R; Müller, T R; Machado, M R F

    2013-04-01

    In order to evaluate the hind limbs of caviomorph rodents a descriptive analysis of the Cuniculus paca (Linnaeus, 1766) and Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris (Linnaeus, 1766) was performed using anatomical specimens, radiography, computed tomography (CT) and full-coloured prototype models to generate bone anatomy data. The appendicular skeleton of the two largest rodents of Neotropical America was compared with the previously reported anatomical features of Rattus norvegicus (Berkenhout, 1769) and domestic Cavia porcellus (Linnaeus, 1758). The structures were analyzed macroscopically and particular findings of each species reported. Features including the presence of articular fibular projection and lunulae were observed in the stifle joint of all rodents. Imaging aided in anatomical description and, specifically in the identification of bone structures in Cuniculus paca and Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris. The imaging findings were correlated with the anatomical structures observed. The data may be used in future studies comparing these animals to other rodents and mammalian species. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  7. Cavus Foot Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Toes All Site Content AOFAS / FootCareMD / Treatments Cavus Foot Surgery Page Content What is a cavus foot? A cavus or high-arched foot may have ... related problems. What are the goals of cavus foot surgery? The main goal of surgery is to ...

  8. Hind limb bones and locomotion in the Old World monkeys | Yirga ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A functional morphological study of the hind limbs of 49 species of cercopithecids reveals their respective positional behaviour. The result of the principal component analysis, based on sixty indices of the hind limb bones brings Colobus, Cercopithecus (including Miopithecus and Allenopithecus), Cercocebus,and ...

  9. Value of orientating computed-tomographical evaluations of the thorax as compared to thoracic X-rays in patients showing severe multiple traumatisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baehren, W.; Biehl, C.

    1990-01-01

    In a total of 68 subjects showing multiple traumatisation or isolated craniocerebral injuries the usual CT examination of the cranium was followed by orientating computed-tomographical studies of the thoracic organs, which were invariably carried out in connection with the diagnostic X-ray routine and then compared to conventional thoracic X-rays obtained from supine patients. Computed-tomographical imaging offered adavantages over conventional X-rays taken of supine patients, as it provided more accurate diagnostic information as to the presence of pneumothorax, haemothorax and pulmonary infiltration. (orig./GDG) [de

  10. Foot sprain - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mid-foot sprain ... Most foot sprains happen due to sports or activities in which your body twists and pivots but your feet ... snowboarding, and dance. There are three levels of foot sprains. Grade I, minor. You have small tears ...

  11. Foot amputation - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amputation - foot - discharge; Trans-metatarsal amputation - discharge ... You have had a foot amputation. You may have had an accident, or your foot may have had an infection or disease and doctors could ...

  12. Pelvic and hind limb musculature of Staurikosaurus pricei (Dinosauria: Saurischia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando N. Grillo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The study of pelvic and hind limb bones and muscles in basal dinosaurs is important for understanding the early evolution of bipedal locomotion in the group. The use of data from both extant and extinct taxa placed into a phylogenetic context allowed to make well-supported inferences concerning most of the hind limb musculature of the basal saurischian Staurikosaurus pricei Colbert, 1970 (Santa Maria Formation, Late Triassic of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Two large concavities in the lateral surface of the ilium represent the origin of the muscles iliotrochantericus caudalis plus iliofemoralis externus (in the anterior concavity and iliofibularis (in the posterior concavity. Muscle ambiens has only one head and originates from the pubic tubercle. The origin of puboischiofemoralis internus 1 possibly corresponds to a fossa in the ventral margin of the pré-acetabular iliac process. This could represent an intermediate stage prior to the origin of a true pré-acetabular fossa. Muscles caudofemorales longus et brevis were likely well developed, and Staurikosaurus is unique in bearing a posteriorly projected surface for the origin of caudofemoralis brevis.O estudo da musculatura pelvica e do membro posterior em dinossauros basais e importante para entender a evolução inicial do bipedalismo em dinossauros Saurischia. Empregando uma metodologia que tem como base dados obtidos a partir de taxons viventes e extintos posicionados em um contexto filogenetico, foi possivel fazer inferencias bem suportadas relativas a maior parte dos musculos do membro posterior do dinossauro Saurischia basal Staurikosaurus pricei Colbert, 1970 (Formação Santa Maria, Triassico Superior do Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil. Duas grandes concavidades na superficie lateral do ilio correspondem a origem dos musculos iliotrochantericus caudalis e iliofeoralis externus (compartilhando a concavidade anterior e para o musculo iliofibularis (na concavidade posterior. O musculo ambiens

  13. Foot Disorders, Foot Posture, and Foot Function: The Framingham Foot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, Thomas J.; Dufour, Alyssa B.; Riskowski, Jody L.; Hillstrom, Howard J.; Menz, Hylton B.; Casey, Virginia A.; Hannan, Marian T.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Foot disorders are common among older adults and may lead to outcomes such as falls and functional limitation. However, the associations of foot posture and foot function to specific foot disorders at the population level remain poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to assess the relation between specific foot disorders, foot posture, and foot function. Methods Participants were from the population-based Framingham Foot Study. Quintiles of the modified arch index and center of pressure excursion index from plantar pressure scans were used to create foot posture and function subgroups. Adjusted odds ratios of having each specific disorder were calculated for foot posture and function subgroups relative to a referent 3 quintiles. Results Pes planus foot posture was associated with increased odds of hammer toes and overlapping toes. Cavus foot posture was not associated with the foot disorders evaluated. Odds of having hallux valgus and overlapping toes were significantly increased in those with pronated foot function, while odds of hallux valgus and hallux rigidus were significantly decreased in those with supinated function. Conclusions Foot posture and foot function were associated with the presence of specific foot disorders. PMID:24040231

  14. Risk factors for major amputation in hospitalised diabetic foot patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namgoong, Sik; Jung, Suyoung; Han, Seung-Kyu; Jeong, Seong-Ho; Dhong, Eun-Sang; Kim, Woo-Kyung

    2016-03-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers are the main cause of non-traumatic lower extremity amputation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the risk factors for major amputation in diabetic foot patients. Eight hundred and sixty diabetic patients were admitted to the diabetic wound centre of the Korea University Guro Hospital for foot ulcers between January 2010 and December 2013. Among them, 837 patients were successfully monitored until complete healing. Ulcers in 809 patients (96·7%) healed without major amputation and those in 28 patients (3·3%) healed with major amputation. Data of 88 potential risk factors including demographics, ulcer condition, vascularity, bioburden, neurology and serology were collected from patients in the two groups and compared. Among the 88 potential risk factors, statistically significant differences between the two groups were observed in 26 risk factors. In the univariate analysis, which was carried out for these 26 risk factors, statistically significant differences were observed in 22 risk factors. In a stepwise multiple logistic analysis, six of the 22 risk factors remained statistically significant. Multivariate-adjusted odds ratios were 11·673 for ulcers penetrating into the bone, 8·683 for dialysis, 6·740 for gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, 6·158 for hind foot ulcers, 0·641 for haemoglobin levels and 1·007 for fasting blood sugar levels. The risk factors for major amputation in diabetic foot patients were bony invasions, dialysis, GI disorders, hind foot locations, low levels of haemoglobin and elevated fasting blood sugar levels. © 2015 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Planus Foot Posture and Pronated Foot Function are Associated with Foot Pain: The Framingham Foot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menz, Hylton B.; Dufour, Alyssa B.; Riskowski, Jody L.; Hillstrom, Howard J.; Hannan, Marian T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the associations of foot posture and foot function to foot pain. Methods Data were collected on 3,378 members of the Framingham Study who completed foot examinations in 2002–2008. Foot pain (generalized and at six locations) was based on the response to the question “On most days, do you have pain, aching or stiffness in either foot?” Foot posture was categorized as normal, planus or cavus using static pressure measurements of the arch index. Foot function was categorized as normal, pronated or supinated using the center of pressure excursion index from dynamic pressure measurements. Sex-specific multivariate logistic regression models were used to examine the effect of foot posture and function on generalized and location-specific foot pain, adjusting for age and weight. Results Planus foot posture was significantly associated with an increased likelihood of arch pain in men (odds ratio [OR] 1.38, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01 – 1.90), while cavus foot posture was protective against ball of foot pain (OR 0.74, 95% CI 0.55 – 1.00) and arch pain (OR 0.64, 95% CI 0.48 – 0.85) in women. Pronated foot function was significantly associated with an increased likelihood of generalized foot pain (OR 1.28, 95% CI 1.04 – 1.56) and heel pain (OR 1.54, 95% CI 1.04 – 2.27) in men, while supinated foot function was protective against hindfoot pain in women (OR 0.74, 95% CI 0.55 – 1.00). Conclusion Planus foot posture and pronated foot function are associated with foot symptoms. Interventions that modify abnormal foot posture and function may therefore have a role in the prevention and treatment of foot pain. PMID:23861176

  16. Association of planus foot posture and pronated foot function with foot pain: the Framingham foot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menz, Hylton B; Dufour, Alyssa B; Riskowski, Jody L; Hillstrom, Howard J; Hannan, Marian T

    2013-12-01

    To examine the associations of foot posture and foot function to foot pain. Data were collected on 3,378 members of the Framingham Study cohort who completed foot examinations in 2002-2008. Foot pain (generalized and at 6 locations) was based on the response to the following question: "On most days, do you have pain, aching or stiffness in either foot?" Foot posture was categorized as normal, planus, or cavus using static pressure measurements of the arch index. Foot function was categorized as normal, pronated, or supinated using the center of pressure excursion index from dynamic pressure measurements. Sex-specific multivariate logistic regression models were used to examine the effect of foot posture and function on generalized and location-specific foot pain, adjusting for age and weight. Planus foot posture was significantly associated with an increased likelihood of arch pain in men (odds ratio [OR] 1.38, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.01-1.90), while cavus foot posture was protective against ball of foot pain (OR 0.74, 95% CI 0.55-1.00) and arch pain (OR 0.64, 95% CI 0.48-0.85) in women. Pronated foot function was significantly associated with an increased likelihood of generalized foot pain (OR 1.28, 95% CI 1.04-1.56) and heel pain (OR 1.54, 95% CI 1.04-2.27) in men, while supinated foot function was protective against hindfoot pain in women (OR 0.74, 95% CI 0.55-1.00). Planus foot posture and pronated foot function are associated with foot symptoms. Interventions that modify abnormal foot posture and function may therefore have a role in the prevention and treatment of foot pain. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  17. Briti tantsufilm küsib, mis on elu hind / Tiit Tuumalu

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tuumalu, Tiit, 1971-

    2006-01-01

    Tantsufilm "Elu hind" ("The Cost of Living") : lavastaja ja koreograaf Lloyd Newson : peaosades jalutu tantsija David Toole ja Eddie Kay : Suurbritannia 2004. Filmi aluseks on Londoni tantsuteatri DV 8 Physical Theatre' 2000.a. valminud lavastus

  18. Physiotherapeutic treatment in domestic dogs with lameness of the hind limbs

    OpenAIRE

    Pilco P., Marelsy; Hinostroza M., Elizabeth; Serrano-Martínez, Enrique

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of a physiotherapy treatment (massage, thermotherapy, electrotherapy and ultrasound) in the recovery of canine patients with hind limb injuries. The dogs (n=15) were of both sexes, with ages ranging from 5 months to 12 years, who attended the veterinary consultation with claudication of the hind limbs due to hip dysplasia, spondylarthrosis and traumatic neuropathies. The animals were treated for up to a maximum of 12 sessions, where the fi...

  19. Changes in the foot angle after calcaneal fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frahm, R.; Fritz, H.; Drescher, E.

    1989-01-01

    Forty fractured calcanei (13 without and 27 with involvement of the joint) were examined by CT and the angle of the hind foot measured. Following a typical compression fracture there is a negative calcaneusvalgus angle, i.e. varus deformity of the tuberosity fragment. The sustentaculum angle is increased. There are changes in the talo-calcaneal and calcaneo-cuboidal angles. The length ratio of calcaneus to talus is reduced. Reproducible measurements make it possible to compare the results of operative correction and of changes in shape following conservative treatment, e.g. during weight-bearing. (orig.) [de

  20. Tumours of the foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohndorf, K.

    1983-01-01

    The radiological diagnosis of tumours of the foot is difficult, especially, since these tumours are rare and the bones of the foot are small. The latter leads to a more uniform radiographic manifestation of the tumours. We differentiate tumours of the foot arising in the foot primarily and soft tissue tumours, affecting the bones secondarily. Cystic lesions of the calcaneus are discussed in further detail. (orig.) [de

  1. The Hydraulic Mechanism of the Unfolding of Hind Wings in Dorcus titanus platymelus (Order: Coleoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyu Sun

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In most beetles, the hind wings are thin and fragile; when at rest, they are held over the back of the beetle. When the hind wing unfolds, it provides the necessary aerodynamic forces for flight. In this paper, we investigate the hydraulic mechanism of the unfolding process of the hind wings in Dorcus titanus platymelus (Oder: Coleoptera. The wing unfolding process of Dorcus titanus platymelus was examined using high speed camera sequences (400 frames/s, and the hydraulic pressure in the veins was measured with a biological pressure sensor and dynamic signal acquisition and analysis (DSA during the expansion process. We found that the total time for the release of hydraulic pressure during wing folding is longer than the time required for unfolding. The pressure is proportional to the length of the wings and the body mass of the beetle. A retinal camera was used to investigate the fluid direction. We found that the peak pressures correspond to two main cross-folding joint expansions in the hind wing. These observations strongly suggest that blood pressure facilitates the extension of hind wings during unfolding.

  2. The hydraulic mechanism in the hind wing veins of Cybister japonicus Sharp (order: Coleoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyu Sun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The diving beetles (Dytiscidae, Coleoptera are families of water beetles. When they see light, they fly to the light source directly from the water. Their hind wings are thin and fragile under the protection of their elytra (forewings. When the beetle is at rest the hind wings are folded over the abdomen of the beetle and when in flight they unfold to provide the necessary aerodynamic forces. In this paper, the unfolding process of the hind wing of Cybister japonicus Sharp (order: Coleoptera was investigated. The motion characteristics of the blood in the veins of the structure system show that the veins have microfluidic control over the hydraulic mechanism of the unfolding process. A model is established, and the hind wing extending process is simulated. The blood flow and pressure changes are discussed. The driving mechanism for hydraulic control of the folding and unfolding actions of beetle hind wings is put forward. This can assist the design of new deployable micro air vehicles and bioinspired deployable systems.

  3. The hydraulic mechanism in the hind wing veins of Cybister japonicus Sharp (order: Coleoptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiyu; Wu, Wei; Ling, Mingze; Bhushan, Bharat; Tong, Jin

    2016-01-01

    The diving beetles (Dytiscidae, Coleoptera) are families of water beetles. When they see light, they fly to the light source directly from the water. Their hind wings are thin and fragile under the protection of their elytra (forewings). When the beetle is at rest the hind wings are folded over the abdomen of the beetle and when in flight they unfold to provide the necessary aerodynamic forces. In this paper, the unfolding process of the hind wing of Cybister japonicus Sharp (order: Coleoptera) was investigated. The motion characteristics of the blood in the veins of the structure system show that the veins have microfluidic control over the hydraulic mechanism of the unfolding process. A model is established, and the hind wing extending process is simulated. The blood flow and pressure changes are discussed. The driving mechanism for hydraulic control of the folding and unfolding actions of beetle hind wings is put forward. This can assist the design of new deployable micro air vehicles and bioinspired deployable systems.

  4. Reliability of foot caliper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janchai, Siriporn; Tantisiriwat, Natthiya

    2005-09-01

    To determine the reliability of foot caliper Descriptive study. Rehabilitation Medicine Outpatient Department, King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital. Fifteen volunteers were recruited from Rehabilitation residents and health care professionals of Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital. The authors created 3 sets of simple Foot Caliper and measured foot dimension including foot width, foot length and toe depth while subjects stood with equal weight bearing to both feet. The authors set 3 examiners to measure foot dimension by the same method. To determine reliability of 3 sets of foot caliper, one examiner was assigned to measure foot dimension of 30 feet with all calipers. To determine the reliability of examiners, all examiners measured foot dimension of the same 30 feet. All parameters were recorded in millimeters. The data was analyzed and presented as intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) with 95% CI. There were fifteen volunteers (8 men and 7 women). The average age was 28.6 +/- 4.11 years (range 22-39). Average foot width,length and great toe depth (millimeters) were 9.64 +/- 0.63, 24.17 +/- 1.10 and 1.91 +/- 0.24 respectively. For reliability analysis of 3 sets off foot caliper, the intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) with 95% CI were 0.985 (0.972-0.992), 0.996 (0.992-0.998) and 0.982 (0.968-991) for foot width, length and great toe depth, respectively. For Inter-examiner reliability, intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were 0.941 (0.864-0.969), 0.850 (0.46-0.920) and 0.834 (0.721-0.910) for foot width, length and great toe depth, respectively. These results showed high agreement of data. These simple foot calipers have high reliability forf oot measurement. These devices are appropriate for clinical use.

  5. Heart Allograft Tolerance Induced and Maintained by Vascularized Hind-Limb Transplant in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Organ/tissue transplantation has become an effective therapy for end-stage diseases. However, immunosuppression after transplantation may cause severe side effects. Donor-specific transplant tolerance was proposed to solve this problem. In this study, we report a novel method for inducing and maintaining heart allograft tolerance rats. First, we induced indefinite vascularized hind-limb allograft survival with a short-term antilymphocyte serum + Cyclosporine A treatment. Peripheral blood chimerism disappeared 6-7 weeks after immunosuppression was withdrawn. Then the recipients accepted secondary donor-strain skin and heart transplantation 200 days following vascularized hind-limb transplantation without any immunosuppression, but rejected third party skin allografts, a status of donor-specific tolerance. The ELISPOT results suggested a mechanism of clone deletion. These findings open new perspectives for the role of vascularized hind-limb transplant in the induction and maintenance of organ transplantation tolerance.

  6. Hox gene expression leads to differential hind leg development between honeybee castes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomtorin, Ana Durvalina; Barchuk, Angel Roberto; Moda, Livia Maria; Simoes, Zila Luz Paulino

    2012-01-01

    Beyond the physiological and behavioural, differences in appendage morphology between the workers and queens of Apis mellifera are pre-eminent. The hind legs of workers, which are highly specialized pollinators, deserve special attention. The hind tibia of worker has an expanded bristle-free region used for carrying pollen and propolis, the corbicula. In queens this structure is absent. Although the morphological differences are well characterized, the genetic inputs driving the development of this alternative morphology remain unknown. Leg phenotype determination takes place between the fourth and fifth larval instar and herein we show that the morphogenesis is completed at brown-eyed pupa. Using results from the hybridization of whole genome-based oligonucleotide arrays with RNA samples from hind leg imaginal discs of pre-pupal honeybees of both castes we present a list of 200 differentially expressed genes. Notably, there are castes preferentially expressed cuticular protein genes and members of the P450 family. We also provide results of qPCR analyses determining the developmental transcription profiles of eight selected genes, including abdominal-A, distal-less and ultrabithorax (Ubx), whose roles in leg development have been previously demonstrated in other insect models. Ubx expression in workers hind leg is approximately 25 times higher than in queens. Finally, immunohistochemistry assays show that Ubx localization during hind leg development resembles the bristles localization in the tibia/basitarsus of the adult legs in both castes. Our data strongly indicate that the development of the hind legs diphenism characteristic of this corbiculate species is driven by a set of caste-preferentially expressed genes, such as those encoding cuticular protein genes, P450 and Hox proteins, in response to the naturally different diets offered to honeybees during the larval period.

  7. Femoral head and neck excision in a dog that had previously undergone contralateral hind limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, L G; Oulton, S A; Piermattei, D L

    1996-03-01

    A German Shepherd Dog that underwent left hind limb amputation at 6 weeks of age because of quadriceps contracture developed arthritis of the remaining coxofemoral joint when it was 6 months old. The dog subsequently underwent femoral head and neck excision, and following rehabilitation that included intensive physical therapy, the dog was able to walk and run without signs of pain or disability. Strength and agility were maintained during a 4.5-year follow-up period. This case demonstrates the importance of postoperative management in the successful outcome of femoral head and neck excision in a large dog with only 1 hind limb.

  8. Haemorheology in diabetic foot.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karandikar S

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available A prospective study was undertaken to study the haemorheology in patients with diabetic foot lesions. Haemorheology of 30 patients with foot lesions and 30 age and sex matched controls was studied. The haemorheological parameters evaluated were whole blood and plasma viscosity and RBC filter ability. Plasma viscosity was significantly increased (p < 0.05. It substantiates the need for using rheomodulators in management of diabetic foot lesions.

  9. Foot Health Facts for Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... about common foot problems affecting athletes: Prevent Foot & Ankle Running Injuries (downloadable PDF) Back-to-School Soccer Season Surgeons ... Foot Diagram Soccer Injuries to the Foot and Ankle Soccer is hard on the feet! Injuries to the foot and ankle can occur from ...

  10. An Interview with Dan Hind: Media Reform is a Precondition of Social Changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sašo Slaček Brlek

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Dan Hind, an advocate for media reform towards the public tender model, talks about his proposals for media democratization, the entanglement of these proposals in a broader vision of progressive social change, and implications of the digital revolution for citizen participation in the media.

  11. Malignant Melanoma of the Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Javascript in your browser. Malignant Melanoma of the Foot What Is Malignant Melanoma? Melanoma is a cancer ... age groups, even the young. Melanoma in the Foot Melanoma that occurs in the foot or ankle ...

  12. Steroid hormones profile during an ovarian synchronization procedure in different age categories of red deer hinds (Cervus elaphus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šperanda Marcela

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to compare estradiol/progesterone ratios of different age categories of red deer hinds and use it as a predictor of estrus synchronization success and consequently conception rate. To accomplish this we used 38 red deer hinds to establish serum progesterone and estradiol levels in young (21 animals, mature (10 animals and old (7 animals hinds during the estrus synchronization procedure (transvaginal/cervical AI. The following estrus synchronization was used: at the start of the experiment each hind received a controlled intravaginal drug-releasing device (CIDR, Pharmacia&Upjohn, New Zealand containing 0.3 g of progesterone. The device was removed on day 11, simultaneously with an application of 250 IU of Pregnant Mare Serum Gonadotropin (PMSG, Folligon® Intervet International, Boxmeer, Holland. Transvaginal/ cervical AI (artificial insemination was performed 48 hours after CIDR withdrawal (day 13. Blood samples were obtained from the jugular vein using a Venoject® vacutainer without an anticoagulant for hormonal tests on the same experimental day (0, 11th and 13th day. A statistically (p<0.01 higher progesterone level was found in young hinds on the 11th day after controlled intravaginal drug-releasing device insertion. A significantly higher (p<0.01 estrogen level was observed in the young in regard to mature and old hinds on the expected day of estrus (13th day. Estradiol/progesterone ratios showed a statistically significant difference (p<0.01 on insemination day (13th day between old and young hinds (98.67 : 46.59 and between old and mature hinds (98.67 : 51.79. Out of a total of 38 hinds only 9 had their offspring, 6 of the young and 3 of the mature hinds.

  13. The foot and ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berquist, T.H.

    1985-01-01

    Imaging of the foot and ankle can be difficult because of the complex anatomy. Familiarity with the bony and ligamentous anatomy is essential for proper evaluation of radiographic findings. Therefore, pertinent anatomy is discussed as it applies to specific injuries. Special views, tomography, arthrography, and other techniques may be indicated for complete evaluation of foot and ankle trauma

  14. Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease (HFMD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or cups with infected people Commonly Confused With Foot-and-Mouth Disease Hand, foot, and mouth disease ... Library, Foot-and-Mouth Disease . Outbreaks of Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease Large outbreaks of hand, foot, ...

  15. Foot morphology of Turkish football players according to foot ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-06-13

    Jun 13, 2011 ... Football is the most popular sport in the world. Foot morphology and foot preference are important factors in football player's performance. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the foot morphology of elite football players with different foot preferences. 407 male football players participated in ...

  16. Foot morphology of Turkish football players according to foot ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Football is the most popular sport in the world. Foot morphology and foot preference are important factors in football player's performance. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the foot morphology of elite football players with different foot preferences. 407 male football players participated in this study. 328 of ...

  17. Effects of Ankle Arthrodesis on Biomechanical Performance of the Entire Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Li, Zengyong; Wong, Duo Wai-Chi; Zhang, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Background/Methodology Ankle arthrodesis is one popular surgical treatment for ankle arthritis, chronic instability, and degenerative deformity. However, complications such as foot pain, joint arthritis, and bone fracture may cause patients to suffer other problems. Understanding the internal biomechanics of the foot is critical for assessing the effectiveness of ankle arthrodesis and provides a baseline for the surgical plan. This study aimed to understand the biomechanical effects of ankle arthrodesis on the entire foot and ankle using finite element analyses. A three-dimensional finite element model of the foot and ankle, involving 28 bones, 103 ligaments, the plantar fascia, major muscle groups, and encapsulated soft tissue, was developed and validated. The biomechanical performances of a normal foot and a foot with ankle arthrodesis were compared at three gait instants, first-peak, mid-stance, and second-peak. Principal Findings/Conclusions Changes in plantar pressure distribution, joint contact pressure and forces, von Mises stress on bone and foot deformation were predicted. Compared with those in the normal foot, the peak plantar pressure was increased and the center of pressure moved anteriorly in the foot with ankle arthrodesis. The talonavicular joint and joints of the first to third rays in the hind- and mid-foot bore the majority of the loading and sustained substantially increased loading after ankle arthrodesis. An average contact pressure of 2.14 MPa was predicted at the talonavicular joint after surgery and the maximum variation was shown to be 80% in joints of the first ray. The contact force and pressure of the subtalar joint decreased after surgery, indicating that arthritis at this joint was not necessarily a consequence of ankle arthrodesis but rather a progression of pre-existing degenerative changes. Von Mises stress in the second and third metatarsal bones at the second-peak instant increased to 52 MPa and 34 MPa, respectively, after

  18. A hind limb disuse model inducing extensor digitorum longus atrophy in rats: tail suspension-immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Fangying; Wang, Jun; Gao, Yunfang; Wang, Huiping; Wang, Qi; Jiang, Shanfeng; Goswami, Nandu

    2011-07-01

    This study aimed to examine the effects of a new hind limb disuse model on the morphology and fiber type distribution of the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) of rats. Quicker onset of disuse atrophy would reduce the amount of time the animals have to be subjected to tail suspension. The new hind limb disuse mode was achieved by tail suspension (TS) and one hind limb fixed by plaster-casting (tail suspension-immobilization, TS+Im). There were 42 female Sprague-Dawley rats randomly divided into 7 groups (6 rats in each group) and exposed to the conditions for 0-6 wk, respectively. The cross-sectional area (CSA) and the types of muscle fiber of the rats' EDL were measured and classified by histochemical staining. The decrease of EDL's CSA caused by TS+Im was more obvious (significant change was observed after 4 wk and Type I fiber's CSA decreased 27.3% after 6 wk) than that caused by TS only (significant change occurred after 6 wk and Type I fiber's CSA diminished 18.01% at that time). TS lead to the transition of Type IIB fibers to Type I and IIA fibers while TS+Im led to Type I and IIA fibers getting converted to Type IIB fibers. When compared to TS only, TS+Im caused faster and greater reduction of the EDL's CSA in rats. TS+Im can also lead to a shift from oxidative to glycolytic metabolism of the EDL muscle fiber. Tail suspension-immobilization is a new hind limb disuse model for the EDL and may be more effective.

  19. Seasonal foraging behavioural compensation in reproductive wapiti hinds (Cervus elaphus canadensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedir; Hudson

    2000-03-22

    Captive wapiti hinds were observed during seven periods between June 1996 and November 1997. We investigated their activity and foraging behaviour on two pastures, heavily and lightly grazed, during four phases of the reproductive cycle (early gestation, late gestation, peak lactation, and late lactation). Within season, differences in forage availability between pastures had little apparent effect on wapiti feeding behaviour (p0.05). However, within each pasture, hinds tended to select locations of higher phytomass than the pasture average. Among seasons, effects of forage availability on feeding behaviour were pronounced. Hinds grazed longest in late lactation (12.8 h/day), when they spent 94% of their active time foraging, whereas during early gestation they foraged fewer hours (8.2 h/day) and less intensively (66% of active time). The longest foraging bouts also occurred in late lactation (100 min) and decreased linearly as the number of bouts per day increased (R(2)=0.88). The annual peak bite rate (BR) was in late lactation (62 bites/min), whereas the annual nadir occurred in early gestation (37 bites/min). Smallest bite sizes (BS) (mg) were recorded in late gestation (127 mg), and increased linearly with forage availability (R(2)=0.46), with largest BS occurring during peak lactation (280 mg). This study demonstrated how seasonal modifications in activity and foraging behaviour enabled gestating and lactating wapiti hinds to satisfy their changing nutritional requirements on seasonal pastures. Knowledge of behavioural compensation in response to nutritional demand and pasture conditions will be useful in designing supplementation program for farmed wapiti.

  20. The effects of a hind-gut fermentation on urea kinetics in sheep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oncuer, A.

    1988-01-01

    Four female sheep were fitted with rumen cannulas and abomasal and ileal infusion catheters; one of the sheep was also fitted with a cannula at the caecum. All animals were nourished wholly by intragastric infusion of nutrients to the rumen and abomasum and received in addition three levels of nutrient infusion into the terminal ileum in order to achieve different levels of hind-gut fermentation. The ileal infusion treatments were (1) water infusion; (2) 25 g/d starch and 50 g/d cellulose infusion; (3) 50 g/d starch and 50 g/d cellulose infusion. In each 2 week period, the first 7 days served as the preliminary period infusion. Days 8-12 inclusive were used for quantitative collection of faeces and urine for digestibility and nitrogen balance measurement and on day 14 an injection of ( 14 C)-urea was given into a jugular vein for measurement of urea kinetics. Hind-gut fermentation did not significantly affect any parameters of urea metabolism. Although degradation of urea did not differ significantly between treatments an increase of over 2 g/d was observed in progressing from the lowest to the highest level of hind-gut infusion. Faecal nitrogen excretion increased significantly from 21.8 to 74.7 mg N/kg 0.75 /d (P 0.01) and urinary urea-N decreased significantly from 278.9 to 252.3 mg/kg 0.75 /d (P 0.05) in the presence of a hind-gut fermentation. Close relationships were observed between various parameters of urea metabolism

  1. Diabetes and Foot Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... because they do not stretch or “breathe.” When buying shoes, make sure they feel good and have ... thorough foot exam, including a check of the feeling and pulses in your feet. Get a thorough ...

  2. Education for diabetic foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Batista

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this investigation was to stratify the risk in a consecutive group of diabetic patients presenting, for the first time, in a diabetic foot clinic. Additional aims were to investigate the preventive measures in the local health system and to evaluate the level of patient’s awareness about diabetic foot-associated morbidity. Methods: Fifty consecutive adult diabetic patients referred to a Diabetic Foot Clinic of a Municipal Public Hospital comprised the sample for this observational study. The enrollment visit was considered as the first health-system intervention for potential foot morbidity. The average time elapsed since a diagnosis of diabetes among patients was five years. Rresults: At the time of presentation, 94% of sample was not using appropriate footwear. Pedal pulses (dorsalis pedis and/or posterior tibial arteries were palpable in 76% of patients. Thirty subjects (60% had signs of peripheral neuropathy. Twenty-one subjects (42% had clinical deformity. There was a positive correlation between a history of foot ulcer, the presence of peripheral neuropathy, and the presence of foot deformity (p < 0.004 in each correlation. Cconclusions: Informing and educating the patients and those interested in this subject and these problems is essential for favorable outcomes in this scenario.

  3. [Minor foot amputations in diabetic foot syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biehl, C; Eckhard, M; Szalay, G; Heiss, C

    2016-10-01

    The treatment strategy for diabetic foot syndrome must take into account protective sensibility of the foot, open wounds, infection status, and the rules of septic bone surgery. Interventions are classified as elective, prophylactic, curative, or emergency. Amputations in the forefoot and midfoot region are performed as ray amputations (including metatarsal), which can often be carried out as "inner" amputations. Gentle tissue treatment mandatory because of greater risk of revision with re-amputation compared to classical amputation. Good demarcation of infection, acute osteomyelitis, osteolytic lesions, neurotropic ulcer, arterial and venous blood flow to the other toes, gangrene of other toes with metatarsal affection. Arterial occlusive disease, infection of neighboring areas, avoidable amputations, poorly healing ulcers on the lower leg. Primary dorsal approach; minimal incisional distance (5 cm) to minimize skin necrosis risk. Atraumatic preparation, minimize hemostasis to not compromise the borderline perfusion situation. In amputations, plantar skin preparation and longer seams placed as dorsal as possible, either disarticulated and maintain cartilage, or round the cortical metatarsal bone after resection. Diabetes control. Braun splint, mobilization in a shoe with forefoot decompression and hindfoot support, physiotherapy. Antibiotics based on resistance testing. If no complications, dressing change on postoperative day 1. Optimal wound drainage by lowering foot several times a day; drainage removal after 12-24 h. Insoles and footwear optimization. Amputations require continued attention and if necessary treatment to avoid sequelae. Insufficient treatment associated with recurrent ulceration and altered anatomy.

  4. The detailed measurement of foot clearance by young adults during stair descent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telonio, A; Blanchet, S; Maganaris, C N; Baltzopoulos, V; McFadyen, B J

    2013-04-26

    Foot clearance is an important variable for understanding safe stair negotiation, but few studies have provided detailed measures of it. This paper presents a new method to calculate minimal shoe clearance during stair descent and compares it to previous literature. Seventeen healthy young subjects descended a five step staircase with step treads of 300 mm and step heights of 188 mm. Kinematic data were collected with an Optotrak system (model 3020) and three non-colinear infrared markers on the feet. Ninety points were digitized on the foot sole prior to data collection using a 6 marker probe and related to the triad of markers on the foot. The foot sole was reconstructed using the Matlab (version 7.0) "meshgrid" function and minimal distance to each step edge was calculated for the heel, toe and foot sole. Results showed significant differences in minimum clearance between sole, heel and toe, with the shoe sole being the closest and the toe the furthest. While the hind foot sole was closest for 69% of the time, the actual minimum clearance point on the sole did vary across subjects and staircase steps. This new method, and the findings on healthy young subjects, can be applied to future studies of other populations and staircase dimensions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Geometric morphometrics analysis of the hind wing of leaf beetles: proximal and distal parts are separate modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Ren

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The success of beetles is mainly attributed to the possibility to hide the hindwings under the sclerotised elytra. The acquisition of the transverse folding function of the hind wing is an important event in the evolutionary history of beetles. In this study, the morphological and functional variances in the hind wings of 94 leaf beetle species (Coleoptera: Chrysomelinae is explored using geometric morphometrics based on 36 landmarks. Principal component analysis and Canonical variate analysis indicate that changes of apical area, anal area, and middle area are three useful phylogenetic features at a subtribe level of leaf beetles. Variances of the apical area are the most obvious, which strongly influence the entire venation variance. Partial least squares analysis indicates that the proximal and distal parts of hind wings are weakly associated. Modularity tests confirm that the proximal and distal compartments of hind wings are separate modules. It is deduced that for leaf beetles, or even other beetles, the hind wing possibly exhibits significant functional divergences that occurred during the evolution of transverse folding that resulted in the proximal and distal compartments of hind wings evolving into separate functional modules.

  6. Imaging of Charcot foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erlemann, Rainer; Schmitz, Annette

    2014-01-01

    The onset of a Charcot foot ist a feared complication of a long lasting diabetes mellitus. A peripheral neuropathy and continuous weight bearing of the foot subsequent to repeated traumas depict the conditions. There exist three types of a Charcot foot, an atrophic, a hypertophic and a mixed type. In early stages a differentiation from osteoarthritis is difficult. Subluxation or luxation within the Lisfranc's joint is typical. The joints of the foot could rapidly and extensively be destroyed or may present the morphology of a 'superosteoarthritis'. Often, soft tissue infections or osteomyelitis evolve from ulcers of the skin as entry points. Diagnosis of osteomyelitis necessitate MR imaging as plain radiography offers only low sensitivity for detection of an osteomyelitis. The existence of periosteal reactions is not a proof for osteomyelitis. Bone marrow edema and soft tissue edema also appear in a non infected Charcot foot. The range of soft tissue infections goes from cellulitis over phlegmon to abscesses. The ghost sign is the most suitable diagnostic criterion for osteomyelitis. In addition, the penumbra sign or the existence of a sinus tract between a skin ulcer and the affected bone may be helpful. (orig.)

  7. Spatial distribution and conservation of speckled hind and warsaw grouper in the Atlantic Ocean off the southeastern U.S.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas A Farmer

    Full Text Available There is broad interest in the development of efficient marine protected areas (MPAs to reduce bycatch and end overfishing of speckled hind (Epinephelus drummondhayi and warsaw grouper (Hyporthodus nigritus in the Atlantic Ocean off the southeastern U.S. We assimilated decades of data from many fishery-dependent, fishery-independent, and anecdotal sources to describe the spatial distribution of these data limited stocks. A spatial classification model was developed to categorize depth-grids based on the distribution of speckled hind and warsaw grouper point observations and identified benthic habitats. Logistic regression analysis was used to develop a quantitative model to predict the spatial distribution of speckled hind and warsaw grouper as a function of depth, latitude, and habitat. Models, controlling for sampling gear effects, were selected based on AIC and 10-fold cross validation. The best-fitting model for warsaw grouper included latitude and depth to explain 10.8% of the variability in probability of detection, with a false prediction rate of 28-33%. The best-fitting model for speckled hind, per cross-validation, included latitude and depth to explain 36.8% of the variability in probability of detection, with a false prediction rate of 25-27%. The best-fitting speckled hind model, per AIC, also included habitat, but had false prediction rates up to 36%. Speckled hind and warsaw grouper habitats followed a shelf-edge hardbottom ridge from North Carolina to southeast Florida, with speckled hind more common to the north and warsaw grouper more common to the south. The proportion of habitat classifications and model-estimated stock contained within established and proposed MPAs was computed. Existing MPAs covered 10% of probable shelf-edge habitats for speckled hind and warsaw grouper, protecting 3-8% of speckled hind and 8% of warsaw grouper stocks. Proposed MPAs could add 24% more probable shelf-edge habitat, and protect an additional

  8. Pathophysiology diabetic foot ulcer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syafril, S.

    2018-03-01

    Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is known to have many complications. Diabetes and its complications are rapidly becoming the world’s most significant cause of morbidity and mortality, and one of the most distressing is Diabetic Foot Ulcer (DFU). Chronic wound complications are a growing concern worldwide, and the effect is a warning to public health and the economy. The etiology of a DFU is multifaceted, and several components cause added together create a sufficient impact on ulceration: neuropathy, vasculopathy, immunopathy, mechanical stress, and neuroarthropathy. There are many classifications of the diabetic foot. About 50% of patients with foot ulcers due to DM present clinical signs of infection. It is essential to manage multifactorial etiology of DFU to get a good outcome.

  9. Foot muscles strengthener

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris T. Glavač

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Previous experience in the correction of flat feet consisted of the use of insoles for shoes and exercises with toys, balls, rollers, inclined planes, etc. A device for strengthening foot muscles is designed for the correction of flat feet in children and, as its name suggests, for strengthening foot muscles in adults. The device is made of wood and metal, with a mechanism and technical solutions, enabling the implementation of specific exercises to activate muscles responsible for the formation of the foot arch. It is suitable for home use with controlled load quantities since it has calibrated springs. The device is patented with the Intellectual Property Office, Republic of Serbia, as a petty patent.

  10. Anisotropy and non-homogeneity of an Allomyrina Dichotoma beetle hind wing membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, N S; Jin, T L; Goo, N S; Park, H C, E-mail: nsgoo@konkuk.ac.kr [Biomimetics and Intelligent Microsystem Laboratory, Department of Advanced Technology Fusion, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    Biomimetics is one of the most important paradigms as researchers seek to invent better engineering designs over human history. However, the observation of insect flight is a relatively recent work. Several researchers have tried to address the aerodynamic performance of flapping creatures and other natural properties of insects, although there are still many unsolved questions. In this study, we try to answer the questions related to the mechanical properties of a beetle's hind wing, which consists of a stiff vein structure and a flexible membrane. The membrane of a beetle's hind wing is small and flexible to the point that conventional methods cannot adequately quantify the material properties. The digital image correlation method, a non-contact displacement measurement method, is used along with a specially designed mini-tensile testing system. To reduce the end effects, we developed an experimental method that can deal with specimens with as high an aspect ratio as possible. Young's modulus varies over the area in the wing and ranges from 2.97 to 4.5 GPa in the chordwise direction and from 1.63 to 2.24 GPa in the spanwise direction. Furthermore, Poisson's ratio in the chordwise direction is 0.63-0.73 and approximately twice as large as that in the spanwise direction (0.33-0.39). From these results, we can conclude that the membrane of a beetle's hind wing is an anisotropic and non-homogeneous material. Our results will provide a better understanding of the flapping mechanism through the formulation of a fluid-structure interaction analysis or aero-elasticity analysis and meritorious data for biomaterial properties database as well as a creative design concept for a micro aerial flapper that mimics an insect.

  11. Muscle moment arms of the gibbon hind limb: implications for hylobatid locomotion

    OpenAIRE

    Channon, Anthony J; Crompton, Robin H; Guenther, Michael M; Vereecke, Evie

    2010-01-01

    Muscles facilitate skeletal movement via the production of a torque or moment about a joint. The magnitude of the moment produced depends on both the force of muscular contraction and the size of the moment arm used to rotate the joint. Hence, larger muscle moment arms generate larger joint torques and forces at the point of application. The moment arms of a number of gibbon hind limb muscles were measured on four cadaveric specimens (one Hylobates lar, one H. moloch and two H. syndactylus). ...

  12. Keila-Joa eliitküla hind kümnekordistunud / Villy Paimets

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Paimets, Villy, 1972-

    2006-01-01

    Ilmunud ka: Delovõje Vedomosti 6. sept. lk. 5. Kalevi omaniku Oliver Kruuda 2003. aastal 52,7 miljoni krooni eest ostetud Keila-Joal asuva 33-hektarilise maatüki hind on kolme aasta jooksul tõusnud kümme korda. Siiski on krundid juba müüdud ning AS-i Kalev REC teine omanik AS Skanska EMW koostööst loobunud. Lisa: Keila-Joa omanikud. Vt. samas: Lõviosa kruntidest said müüdud enne kinnistamist. Lisad

  13. Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Submit What's this? Submit Button Past Emails Hand, Foot & Mouth Disease Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend ... someone is sick. Is HFMD the Same as Foot-and-Mouth Disease? No. HFMD is often confused ...

  14. Hand-foot-mouth disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000965.htm Hand-foot-mouth disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hand-foot-mouth disease is a common viral infection that ...

  15. Sesamoid Injuries in the Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Javascript in your browser. Sesamoid Injuries in the Foot What Is a Sesamoid? A sesamoid is a ... contributing factor. Types of Sesamoid Injuries in the Foot There are three types of sesamoid injuries in ...

  16. Foot, leg, and ankle swelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swelling of the ankles - feet - legs; Ankle swelling; Foot swelling; Leg swelling; Edema - peripheral; Peripheral edema ... Foot, leg, and ankle swelling is common when the person also: Is overweight Has a blood clot in the leg Is older Has ...

  17. What Is a Foot and Ankle Surgeon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A A | Print | Share What is a Foot & Ankle Surgeon? Foot and ankle surgeons are the surgical ... every age. What education has a foot and ankle surgeon received? After completing undergraduate education, the foot ...

  18. Radiologic evaluation of foot deformities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erlemann, R.; Fischedick, A.R.; Peters, P.E.

    1986-01-01

    In order to analyze foot deformities, the foot is divided into three compartments. Their normal and pathological positions are defined by the alignment of the bones' axes. The various foot deformities can be put down to a malalignment of the particular compartments. X-ray analysis of the malalignment allows a diagnosis to be made. The most important congenital and acquired foot deformities are discussed. (orig.) [de

  19. Ambulatory assessment of foot dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, H. Martin; Veltink, Petrus H.; Koopman, Hubertus F.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Analysis of foot dynamics is important, especially for patients with foot impairments. However, this analysis is difficult with commonly used systems. This study presents an ambulatory system for the estimation of ankle and foot power using an instrumented shoe equipped with six degrees-of-freedom

  20. The D1 family dopamine receptor, DopR, potentiates hind leg grooming behavior in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitmon, E; Stephens, G; Parkhurst, S J; Wolf, F W; Kehne, G; Taylor, M; Lebestky, T

    2016-03-01

    Drosophila groom away debris and pathogens from the body using their legs in a stereotyped sequence of innate motor behaviors. Here, we investigated one aspect of the grooming repertoire by characterizing the D1 family dopamine receptor, DopR. Removal of DopR results in decreased hind leg grooming, as substantiated by quantitation of dye remaining on mutant and RNAi animals vs. controls and direct scoring of behavioral events. These data are also supported by pharmacological results that D1 receptor agonists fail to potentiate grooming behaviors in headless DopR flies. DopR protein is broadly expressed in the neuropil of the thoracic ganglion and overlaps with TH-positive dopaminergic neurons. Broad neuronal expression of dopamine receptor in mutant animals restored normal grooming behaviors. These data provide evidence for the role of DopR in potentiating hind leg grooming behaviors in the thoracic ganglion of adult Drosophila. This is a remarkable juxtaposition to the considerable role of D1 family dopamine receptors in rodent grooming, and future investigations of evolutionary relationships of circuitry may be warranted. © 2016 The Authors. Genes, Brain and Behavior published by International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Foot posture, foot function and low back pain: the Framingham Foot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Menz, Hylton B.; Dufour, Alyssa B.; Riskowski, Jody L.; Hillstrom, Howard J.; Hannan, Marian T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Abnormal foot posture and function have been proposed as possible risk factors for low back pain, but this has not been examined in detail. The objective of this study was to explore the associations of foot posture and foot function with low back pain in 1930 members of the Framingham Study (2002–05).

  2. Foot posture, foot function and low back pain: the Framingham Foot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menz, Hylton B; Dufour, Alyssa B; Riskowski, Jody L; Hillstrom, Howard J; Hannan, Marian T

    2013-12-01

    Abnormal foot posture and function have been proposed as possible risk factors for low back pain, but this has not been examined in detail. The objective of this study was to explore the associations of foot posture and foot function with low back pain in 1930 members of the Framingham Study (2002-05). Low back pain, aching or stiffness on most days was documented on a body chart. Foot posture was categorized as normal, planus or cavus using static weight-bearing measurements of the arch index. Foot function was categorized as normal, pronated or supinated using the centre of pressure excursion index derived from dynamic foot pressure measurements. Sex-specific multivariate logistic regression models were used to examine the associations of foot posture, foot function and asymmetry with low back pain, adjusting for confounding variables. Foot posture showed no association with low back pain. However, pronated foot function was associated with low back pain in women [odds ratio (OR) = 1.51, 95% CI 1.1, 2.07, P = 0.011] and this remained significant after adjusting for age, weight, smoking and depressive symptoms (OR = 1.48, 95% CI 1.07, 2.05, P = 0.018). These findings suggest that pronated foot function may contribute to low back symptoms in women. Interventions that modify foot function, such as orthoses, may therefore have a role in the prevention and treatment of low back pain.

  3. Foot posture, foot function and low back pain: the Framingham Foot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menz, Hylton B.; Dufour, Alyssa B.; Riskowski, Jody L.; Hillstrom, Howard J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Abnormal foot posture and function have been proposed as possible risk factors for low back pain, but this has not been examined in detail. The objective of this study was to explore the associations of foot posture and foot function with low back pain in 1930 members of the Framingham Study (2002–05). Methods. Low back pain, aching or stiffness on most days was documented on a body chart. Foot posture was categorized as normal, planus or cavus using static weight-bearing measurements of the arch index. Foot function was categorized as normal, pronated or supinated using the centre of pressure excursion index derived from dynamic foot pressure measurements. Sex-specific multivariate logistic regression models were used to examine the associations of foot posture, foot function and asymmetry with low back pain, adjusting for confounding variables. Results. Foot posture showed no association with low back pain. However, pronated foot function was associated with low back pain in women [odds ratio (OR) = 1.51, 95% CI 1.1, 2.07, P = 0.011] and this remained significant after adjusting for age, weight, smoking and depressive symptoms (OR = 1.48, 95% CI 1.07, 2.05, P = 0.018). Conclusion. These findings suggest that pronated foot function may contribute to low back symptoms in women. Interventions that modify foot function, such as orthoses, may therefore have a role in the prevention and treatment of low back pain. PMID:24049103

  4. [Prevention of diabetic foot].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metelko, Zeljko; Brkljacić Crkvencić, Neva

    2013-10-01

    Diabetic foot (DF) is the most common chronic complication, which depends mostly on the duration and successful treatment of diabetes mellitus. Based on epidemiological studies, it is estimated that 25% of persons with diabetes mellitus (PwDM) will develop the problems with DF during lifetime, while 5% do 15% will be treated for foot or leg amputation. The treatment is prolonged and expensive, while the results are uncertain. The changes in DF are influenced by different factors usually connected with the duration and regulation of diabetes mellitus. The first problems with DF are the result of misbalance between nutritional, defensive and reparatory mechanisms on the one hand and the intensity of damaging factors against DF on the other hand. Diabetes mellitus is a state of chronic hyperglycemia, consisting of changes in carbohydrate, protein and fat metabolism. As a consequence of the long duration of diabetes mellitus, late complications can develop. Foot is in its structure very complex, combined with many large and small bones connected with ligaments, directed by many small and large muscles, interconnected with many small and large blood vessels and nerves. Every of these structures can be changed by nutritional, defensive and reparatory mechanisms with consequential DE Primary prevention of DF includes all measures involved in appropriate maintenance of nutrition, defense and reparatory mechanisms.First, it is necessary to identify the high-risk population for DF, in particular for macrovascular, microvascular and neural complications. The high-risk population of PwDM should be identified during regular examination and appropriate education should be performed. In this group, it is necessary to include more frequent and intensified empowerment for lifestyle changes, appropriate diet, regular exercise (including frequent breaks for short exercise during sedentary work), regular self control of body weight, quit smoking, and appropriate treatment of glycemia

  5. Lymphatic regeneration following hind limb replantation: an experimental study in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaropoulos, E C; Papazoglou, L G; Patsikas, M N; Vretou, E; Petropoulos, A S

    2005-10-01

    Different types of trauma to the lymphatic system can often occur, but surgical intervention can be performed only in specific cases. We report on lymphatic regeneration following limb replantation in traumatic amputations and replantation of extremities. The aim of this study was to observe the progression and reaction after surgical trauma that is similar to other kinds of trauma, both in children or adults, and to monitor the possible lymphatic regeneration. Particular attention was paid to two parameters: firstly, the physical examination of the replanted limbs by checking the post-traumatic lymphoedema, and secondly, the study of the images taken from indirect lymphangiography of the replanted limbs. Histological specimens of the surgical trauma area were also examined to reconfirm or exclude lymphatic regeneration. The study population consisted of sixteen mongrel dogs, divided into two groups of eight animals each, who underwent hind limb elective amputation and replantation combined with (group A) or without (group B) sciatic nerve division. Lymphoedema formation was followed quantitatively by measurement of the circumference of the hind limb for 21 days after replantation. Indirect lymphography, never performed before in such cases, and histopathology, were performed to evaluate and confirm lymphatic regeneration. Lymphatic regeneration after replantation of the operated hind limbs was first confirmed between 7th and 11th postoperative day by indirect lymphangiography and clinical observation of the post-traumatic lymphoedema of these limbs. The mean time of visualisation of lymphatic regeneration through lymphography was 10.12 days for group A and 9.37 days for group B. However, nerve transection had no effect on lymphatic regeneration (p = 0.46). Histopathological examination showed first evidence of lymphatic regeneration on the ninth postoperative day and a network of newly formed capillary lymphatics on the 21st postoperative day. It is concluded that

  6. The cow pedogram-Analysis of gait cycle variables allows the detection of lameness and foot pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsaaod, M; Luternauer, M; Hausegger, T; Kredel, R; Steiner, A

    2017-02-01

    Changes in gait characteristics are important indicators in assessing the health and welfare of cattle. The aim of this study was to detect unilateral hind limb lameness and foot pathologies in dairy cows using 2 high-frequency accelerometers (400 Hz). The extracted gait cycle variables included temporal events (kinematic outcome = gait cycle, stance phase, and swing phase duration) and several peaks (kinetic outcome = foot load, toe-off). The study consisted of 2 independent experiments. Experiment 1 was carried out to compare the pedogram variables between the lateral claw and respective metatarsus (MT; n = 12) in sound cows (numerical rating system cows between lame cows (numerical rating system ≥3, n = 5) and sound cows (n = 12) using pedogram data that were visually compared with the synchronized cinematographic data. Experiment 2 was carried out to determine the differences across limbs within cows between cows with foot lesions (n = 12) and without foot lesions (n = 12) using only pedogram data. A receiver operator characteristic analysis was used to determine the performance of selected pedogram variables at the cow level. The pedogram of the lateral claw of sound cows revealed similarities of temporal events (gait cycle duration, stance and swing phases) but higher peaks (toe-off and foot load) as compared with the pedogram of the respective MT. In both experiments, comparison of the values between groups showed significantly higher values in lame cows and cows with foot lesions for all gait cycle variables. The optimal cutoff value of the relative stance phase duration for identifying lame cows was 14.79% and for cows with foot lesions was 2.53% with (both 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity) in experiments 1 and 2, respectively. The use of accelerometers with a high sampling rate (400 Hz) at the level of the MT is a promising tool to indirectly measure the kinematic variables of the lateral claw and to detect unilateral hind limb lameness and hind

  7. Perivertebral B-cell lymphoma in a Queensland koala (Phascolarctos cinereus adustus) with paralytic symptoms in the hind limbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kido, Nobuhide; Edamura, Kazuya; Inoue, Naomi; Shibuya, Hisashi; Sato, Tsuneo; Kondo, Masako; Shindo, Izumi

    2012-08-01

    A male Queensland koala (Phascolarctos cinereus adustus) at Kanazawa Zoological Gardens (Kanagawa, Japan) exhibited paralytic symptoms in the hind limbs. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass on the left ventral side of the 11th to 13th thoracic vertebrae, and the presence of myelitis or edema in the spinal cord. The koala was under anesthesia during the examination and suddenly developed ventricular fibrillation and died. Necropsy revealed a firm flat ovoid hemorrhagic mass on the vertebrae. Following a microscopic examination including immunohistochemistry, the perivertebral mass was diagnosed as B cell lymphoma. Therefore, neoplastic cell infiltration into the spinal cord may cause paralytic symptoms in the hind limbs.

  8. HindIII identifies a two allele DNA polymorphism of the human cannabinoid receptor gene (CNR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caenazzo, L.; Hoehe, M.R.; Hsieh, W.T.; Berrettini, W.H.; Bonner, T.I.; Gershon, E.S. (National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States))

    1991-09-11

    HCNR p5, a 0.9 kb BamHI/EcoRI fragment from the human cannabinoid receptor gene inserted into pUC19, was used as probe. The fragment is located in an intron approximately 14 kb 5{prime} of the initiation codon. This fragment is a clean single copy sequence by genomic blotting. Hybridization of human genomic DNA digested with HindIII identified a two allele RFLP with bands at 5.5 (A1) and 3.3 kb (A2). The human cannabinoid receptor gene has been genetically mapped in CEPH reference pedigrees to the centromeric/q region of chromosome 6. In situ hybridization localizes it to 6q14-q15. Codominant segregation has been observed in 26 informative two- and three-generation CEPH pedigrees and in 14 medium-sized disease families.

  9. A reproducible radiation delivery method for unanesthetized rodents during periods of hind limb unloading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walb, M. C.; Black, P. J.; Payne, V. S.; Munley, M. T.; Willey, J. S.

    2015-07-01

    Exposure to the spaceflight environment has long been known to be a health challenge concerning many body systems. Both microgravity and/or ionizing radiation can cause acute and chronic effects in multiple body systems. The hind limb unloaded (HLU) rodent model is a ground-based analogue for microgravity that can be used to simulate and study the combined biologic effects of reduced loading with spaceflight radiation exposure. However, studies delivering radiation to rodents during periods of HLU are rare. Herein we report the development of an irradiation protocol using a clinical linear accelerator that can be used with hind limb unloaded, unanesthetized rodents that is capable of being performed at most academic medical centers. A 30.5 cm × 30.5 cm × 40.6 cm rectangular chamber was constructed out of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) sheets (0.64 cm thickness). Five centimeters of water-equivalent material were placed outside of two PMMA inserts on either side of the rodent that permitted the desired radiation dose buildup (electronic equilibrium) and helped to achieve a flatter dose profile. Perforated aluminum strips permitted the suspension dowel to be placed at varying heights depending on the rodent size. Radiation was delivered using a medical linear accelerator at an accelerating potential of 10 MV. A calibrated PTW Farmer ionization chamber, wrapped in appropriately thick tissue-equivalent bolus material to simulate the volume of the rodent, was used to verify a uniform dose distribution at various regions of the chamber. The dosimetry measurements confirmed variances typically within 3%, with maximum variance academic medical centers and the reliability of their dosimetry properties, this method may find great utility in the implementation of future ground-based studies that examine the combined spaceflight challenges of reduced loading and radiation while using the HLU rodent model.

  10. Relationship between static foot posture and foot mobility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McPoil Thomas G

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is not uncommon for a person's foot posture and/or mobility to be assessed during a clinical examination. The exact relationship, however, between static posture and mobility is not known. Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the degree of association between static foot posture and mobility. Method The static foot posture and foot mobility of 203 healthy individuals was assessed and then analyzed to determine if low arched or "pronated" feet are more mobile than high arched or "supinated" feet. Results The study demonstrated that those individuals with a lower standing dorsal arch height and/or a wider standing midfoot width had greater mobility in their foot. In addition, those individuals with higher Foot Posture Index (FPI values demonstrated greater mobility and those with lower FPI values demonstrated less mobility. Finally, the amount of foot mobility that an individual has can be predicted reasonably well using either a 3 or 4 variable linear regression model. Conclusions Because of the relationship between static foot posture and mobility, it is recommended that both be assessed as part of a comprehensive evaluation of a individual with foot problems.

  11. Relationship between static foot posture and foot mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background It is not uncommon for a person's foot posture and/or mobility to be assessed during a clinical examination. The exact relationship, however, between static posture and mobility is not known. Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the degree of association between static foot posture and mobility. Method The static foot posture and foot mobility of 203 healthy individuals was assessed and then analyzed to determine if low arched or "pronated" feet are more mobile than high arched or "supinated" feet. Results The study demonstrated that those individuals with a lower standing dorsal arch height and/or a wider standing midfoot width had greater mobility in their foot. In addition, those individuals with higher Foot Posture Index (FPI) values demonstrated greater mobility and those with lower FPI values demonstrated less mobility. Finally, the amount of foot mobility that an individual has can be predicted reasonably well using either a 3 or 4 variable linear regression model. Conclusions Because of the relationship between static foot posture and mobility, it is recommended that both be assessed as part of a comprehensive evaluation of a individual with foot problems. PMID:21244705

  12. DIABETIC FOOT ULCERS MICROBIOLOGICAL STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    P. Rajagopal; S. Senthilvel; N. Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES Infections of all types are more common in patients with diabetes, on the basis of outcome of retrospective study in Canada. Many types of infections are very common in diabetic than non-diabetic patients. Foot is the most common site. Diabetic foot infections range from mild infections to limb threatening conditions. Most require emergency medical attention. Diabetic foot infection is a global burden and projected to increase from 246 million people to o...

  13. Innervation mapping of the hind paw of the rat using Evans Blue extravasation, Optical Surface Mapping and CASAM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kambiz, S.; Baas, M.; Duraku, L.S.; Kerver, A.L.; Koning, A.H.; Walbeehm, E.T.; Ruigrok, T.J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although numerous studies investigate sensory regeneration and reinnervation of the hind paw of the rat after nerve damage, no comprehensive overview of its normal innervation is present in literature. The Evans Blue extravasation technique is a well-known technique to study patterns of

  14. 77 FR 25687 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife; 90-Day Finding on a Petition to List Speckled Hind as...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    ... evaluate the source information that the classification is based upon, in light of the standards on... extremely high risk of extinction in the wild, based on: ``considerable concern about its present and future... hind in the United States as ``endangered,'' which they define as a species with a ``high risk of...

  15. Estradiol-induced, endothelial progenitor cell-mediated neovascularization in male mice with hind-limb ischemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruifrok, Willem-Peter T.; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Iwakura, Atsushi; Silver, Marcy; Kusano, Kengo; Tio, Rene A.; Losordo, Douglas W.

    We investigated whether administration of estradiol to male mice augments mobilization of bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) and incorporation into foci of neovascularization after hind-limb ischemia, thereby contributing to blood flow restoration. Mice were randomized and

  16. Haemosiderotic fibrohistiocytic lipomatous lesion/tumour of the foot: MRI and histopathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, Andrew T.; Toms, Andoni P. [Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Norwich (United Kingdom); Murphy, Joseph [The Cotman Centre, Department of Histopathology, Norwich (United Kingdom); Sultan, Mohammed [The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Department of Radiology, King' s Lynn (United Kingdom)

    2008-01-15

    A 38-year-old woman presented in 2005 with a fatty swelling over the dorsum of her left foot and was subsequently referred to our institution following initial biopsy for further management. MRI was performed before and after surgery. This demonstrated an ill-defined lesion confined to the subcutaneous tissues on the dorsum of the foot with heterogeneous intermediate and high T1 and T2 signal suggesting a complex mixture of fat and fibrous elements. The lesion recurred following initial surgery in the lateral aspect of the hind foot and along the lateral aspect of the ankle. It demonstrated extremely high signal on T2 fat-saturated sequences along the fibrous elements of the lesion and concentrated in a layer just deep to the dermis, which was mirrored on post-contrast images. A histopathological diagnosis of haemosiderotic fibrohistiocytic lipomatous lesion/tumour (HFLL/T) was made. This is a recently described and rare entity that occurs typically in the subcutaneous tissues of the foot or ankle of middle-aged women. To our knowledge this is the first description of the imaging findings in this lesion. (orig.)

  17. Haemosiderotic fibrohistiocytic lipomatous lesion/tumour of the foot: MRI and histopathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, Andrew T.; Toms, Andoni P.; Murphy, Joseph; Sultan, Mohammed

    2008-01-01

    A 38-year-old woman presented in 2005 with a fatty swelling over the dorsum of her left foot and was subsequently referred to our institution following initial biopsy for further management. MRI was performed before and after surgery. This demonstrated an ill-defined lesion confined to the subcutaneous tissues on the dorsum of the foot with heterogeneous intermediate and high T1 and T2 signal suggesting a complex mixture of fat and fibrous elements. The lesion recurred following initial surgery in the lateral aspect of the hind foot and along the lateral aspect of the ankle. It demonstrated extremely high signal on T2 fat-saturated sequences along the fibrous elements of the lesion and concentrated in a layer just deep to the dermis, which was mirrored on post-contrast images. A histopathological diagnosis of haemosiderotic fibrohistiocytic lipomatous lesion/tumour (HFLL/T) was made. This is a recently described and rare entity that occurs typically in the subcutaneous tissues of the foot or ankle of middle-aged women. To our knowledge this is the first description of the imaging findings in this lesion. (orig.)

  18. The results of Grice Green subtalar arthrodesis of valgus foot in spina bifida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Küçükdurmaz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Valgus foot is a common foot deformity in spina bifida. The most popular operation for the valgus deformity has been the Grice talocalcaneal blocking. It has not been studied primarily in children with spina bifida. We report a prospective series, we present the results of hind foot valgus deformity of children with spina bifida, using Grice talocalcaneal arthrodesis with a tricortical iliac bone graft. Materials and Methods: Between May 2000 and December 2003, 21 patients with bilateral (42 feet valgus deformity of feet underwent surgery. There were 7 males and 14 females. The mean age of patients was 67.7 months (range 50-108 months. Results: The total number of feet that had nonunion was 11, in 7 of them the grafts were completely reabsorbed and the outcome of all these feet was unsatisfactory. Four feet had partial union of which three had unsatisfactory and one had satisfactory outcome. Sixteen feet had residual valgus deformity at the last followup visit, 10 patients had nonunion, and 6 had inadequate correction. Mean preoperative talocalcaneal and calcaneal pitch angles were 48.5΀ and 31.9΀, respectively, which decreased to 38.5΀ and 29.1΀, respectively, postoperatively. The decrease in talocalcaneal angle and calcaneal pitch was significant between preoperative and postoperative measurements (P<0.05. Conclusion: Grice subtalar arthrodesis technique is still a valuable option for valgus foot in patients with spina bifida. In this study, we found more encouraging results in older patients.

  19. [Tendinopathies of the foot].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboukrat, P

    1997-01-01

    Tendinitis of the foot is frequent and is generally due to mechanical overload or inflammatory rheumatic disorders. It most often involves the posterior tibial tendon when obesity and calcaneus valgus combine to contribute to mechanical overwork, or in the early stages of rheumatoid arthritis. More rarely, the anterior tibial tendon or the fibular tendons are involved. The anatomic-clinical stages proceed from oedema to fissuration necrosis and ruptured tendon. The long-term risk is of a sinking internal arch and a fixed calcaneus valgus. A simple but effective treatment is the correction of the calcaneus valgus, but surgical arthrodesis may be necessary.

  20. Effect of ionizing radiation on the activity of restriction nucleases PvuII and HindIII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luzova, M.; Michaelidesova, A.; Davidkova, M.

    2014-01-01

    The research is focused on the influence of the ionizing radiation on the activity of the restriction enzymes PvuII and HindIII. Enzymes PvuII and HindIII are restriction endonucleases of type II. These enzymes can be found in bacteria and they have a significant role in defense mechanisms of bacteria against viruses. They cleave DNA double helix at specific recognition palindromic sequences in the presence of cofactor Mg 2+ . PvuII cleaves the sequence CAG↓CTG and HindIII cleaves the sequence A↓AGCTT in marked places. Plasmid pcDNA3 has been used as the DNA substrate for the whole experimental study. It is 5446 base pairs (bp) long, circular DNA molecule and it contains three recognition sites for enzyme PvuII and one recognition site for enzyme HindIII. After the correct interaction of pcDNA3 with PvuII, we thus have three plasmid fragments with lengths 1069, 1097 and 3280 bp. When HindIII is incubated with this plasmid, we shall obtain the linear form of the DNA plasmid.The method for processing the cleaved DNA samples is the agarose gel electrophoresis. The activity of the irradiated enzymes decreases with increasing dose of radiation, because a part of the enzymes is deactivated due to induced radiation damage. To determine effect of radiation quality, samples were irradiated using proton and gamma sources. The results of our experimental study will be presented and discussed with respect to molecular structure of both enzymes and particular sites of radical damage influencing their function. (authors)

  1. Mortality associated with acute Charcot foot and neuropathic foot ulceration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Baal, Juliette; Hubbard, Richard; Game, Fran; Jeffcoate, William

    2010-01-01

    To compare the mortality of patients with an acute Charcot foot with a matched population with uninfected neuropathic foot ulcers (NFUs). Data were extracted from a specialist departmental database, supplemented by hospital records. The findings were compared with the results of earlier populations

  2. Sports Injuries to the Foot and Ankle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... School Soccer Season Prime time for foot and ankle injuries. Parents and coaches should think twice before coaxing ... Ankle Tennis involves much foot work. Foot and ankle injuries can occur from the continuous side-to-side ...

  3. Tumors of the foot skeleton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, K.

    2007-01-01

    About 3-4% of all tumors and tumor-like lesions of the skeleton are located in the foot. Many of these lesions have a predilection for certain locations, so that the spectrum of entities occurring in the foot differs from the rest of the skeleton. Despite the fact that practically any entity can occur in the foot in rare cases, taken together the ten most frequent lesions make up for the vast majority of tumors and tumor-like lesions of the foot. The differential diagnosis of these lesions follows the general principles that apply in the rest of the skeleton. It is based on the analysis of the lesion's X-ray morphology and location, the patient's age, and in certain entities, the MR morphology. This article describes the most important tumors and tumor-like lesions of the foot, their differential diagnosis, and the principles of local staging. (orig.) [de

  4. Studies on intravenous regional analgesia of the hind limb in the bovine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoi, S N; Nigam, J M; Peshin, P K; Sharifi, D; Patil, D B

    1991-08-01

    Twenty-five buffalo calves (age: 14 +/- 1.9 months; body weight: 102 +/- 9.4 kg) were subjected to intravenous regional analgesia (IRA) of the hind limb with 2% lignocaine HCl (4 mg/kg b.w.), infused through the dorsal digital vein. In control animals 15 ml of normal saline was infused. The effect of tourniquet release after 35 (8 calves) and 65 min (7 calves) on EEG, ECG, arterial and venous pressures, blood gases and pH, respiration and temperature were studied. A detectable concentration of lignocaine occurred before the release of tourniquet. The lignocaine concentration recorded in the systemic circulation did not produce any significant nervous or cardiovascular changes before or after release of tourniquet. Transient EEG and ECG changes were seen in six (tourniquet release after 35 min) and three (tourniquet release after 65 min) IRA animals, respectively. No significant changes were seen in heart rate, respiratory rate and rectal temperature, systolic, diastolic, mean arterial and central venous pressures. Arterial blood pH, PCO2 and HCO3- concentration showed no significant differences. Animals receiving IRA did not show hypoxaemia typical to postural changes.

  5. Anatomy of the Hind Limb Skeleton of the Chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Çevik-Demirkan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to document the detailed features of the hind limb bones in chinchillas (Chinchilla lanigera. Twenty chinchillas (10 females and 10 males were used. Animals were euthanized and X-ray of appendicular skeleton of pelvis was taken immediately. Then the bones were macerated. The iliac wing was considerably long and the gluteal line formed a distinct crista. The sacropelvic surface (facies sacropelvina was not observed, however, the iliac tuberosity (tuberositas iliaca was evident. While the average distance between the midacetabulum and the tuber coxae (ventral iliac spine was 33.58 mm in males and 31.34 mm in females, the average distance between the midacetabulum and the ischial tuberosity was 15.09 mm in males and 17.18 mm in females (statistically non-significant. The caput ossis femoris was bent to medial at an average of 60 degrees angle. The differences in both the width and length of the obturator foramen between males and females were statistically significant (p III > I > II (from the largest to the smallest and the fifth metatarsal bone shaped a small bone. The comparative lengths of the other metatarsal bones were II > III > I > IV (from the longest to the shortest. Three phalanges bones were notable. The proximal phalanx was the biggest of all.

  6. La ayurveda o arte médico hindú Ayurveda or indian medical art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio Alberto Restrepo Baena

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Se hace una breve revisión acerca de la Ayurveda o arte curativo hindú, con el fin de dar información general sobre su filosofía, su estructura y sus elementos analíticos y terapéuticos, ya que en la actualidad están tomando un auge apreciable las medicinas clásicas, como alternativas Interesantes y útiles a nuestro enfoque occidental del proceso salud-enfermedad.

    This is a brief review on Ayurveda, or Hindu medical art. It intends to provide general information about Its philosophic, structural, analytic and therapeutic aspects. This article is motivated by the increasing interest in classic medicine as a useful alternative to the western approach towards the health–disease process.

  7. [Improved care of foot ulcer using foot pressure measurement and foot care method sheet].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinen, Takaaki; Iha, Hiroyuki; Miyagi, Chiaki; Yusa, Masaru; Taira, Hitomi; Matsumoto, Kinuko

    2008-09-01

    At this sanatorium, the number of foot bottom ulcer patients was 13 and the tenure of the foot bottom ulcer was average 11 years. According to the treatment that was not unified, we thought about the cause of the prolongation. Therefore, we made evaluation and care method sheet ("foot care sheet") of the ulcer for the unification. We used the foot pressure measurement system (F-scan) to 4 patients for the pressure dispersion of the ulcer. We devised the protection law of the ulcer, and an ulcer did not require pressure more than 5 kilos/cm2. We recorded the size of the ulcer, weight of the liquid from ulcer, a photograph to care sheet once a week. I performed ulcer protection law and management with the foot care sheet to 4 patients for average 4 months. As a result, the ulcers of 3 patients out of 4 patients became small.

  8. Immersion Foot: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Zachary; Kman, Nicholas

    2015-08-01

    Immersion foot (commonly called "trench foot") was originally described in the military literature during World War I. Since that time, the emergency department (ED) has become a common setting where this injury presents. However, this topic is neglected in the emergency medicine literature. The purpose of this case report is to present trench foot in a way that is relevant to emergency physicians and to provide an up-to-date summary of the history, case reports, physiology, clinical presentation, and treatment of this injury. Here we present the case of a homeless, schizophrenic patient who presented to one Midwestern ED in January for immersion foot. Photos of the actual patient are shown to illustrate the case. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Due to unfamiliarity, immersion foot can go undiagnosed during assessment of patients exposed to moist environments. In addition, patients at increased risk for developing immersion foot are frequently encountered in EDs. Most importantly, the appropriate treatment for immersion foot is different than the treatment for other freezing cold injuries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Mice Hemizygous for a Pathogenic Mitofusin-2 Allele Exhibit Hind Limb/Foot Gait Deficits and Phenotypic Perturbations in Nerve and Muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Bannerman

    Full Text Available Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2A (CMT2A, the most common axonal form of hereditary sensory motor neuropathy, is caused by mutations of mitofusin-2 (MFN2. Mitofusin-2 is a GTPase required for fusion of mitochondrial outer membranes, repair of damaged mitochondria, efficient mitochondrial energetics, regulation of mitochondrial-endoplasmic reticulum calcium coupling and axonal transport of mitochondria. We knocked T105M MFN2 preceded by a loxP-flanked STOP sequence into the mouse Rosa26 locus to permit cell type-specific expression of this pathogenic allele. Crossing these mice with nestin-Cre transgenic mice elicited T105M MFN2 expression in neuroectoderm, and resulted in diminished numbers of mitochondria in peripheral nerve axons, an alteration in skeletal muscle fiber type distribution, and a gait abnormality.

  10. Bilateral Dorsal Subluxation of the Proximal Interphalangeal Joint of the Hind Limb in a Mare: Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Pizzigatti, Dietrich; Hussni, Carlos Alberto; Rodrigues, Celso Antonio; Watanabe, Marcos Jun; Moura Alonso, Juliana de; Vulcano, Luiz Carlos; Cisneros Álvarez, Luis Emiliano

    2013-01-01

    Subluxation of the proximal interphalangeal joint is a rare and little studied condition in horses. We describe the case of a 12-year-old mare with bilateral dorsal subluxation of the proximal interphalangeal joint of the hind feet. Tenectomy of the medial digital flexor was performed in both limbs, and the patient showed signs of recovery within 14 days. Goniometry of the proximal interphalangeal joints 10 months after surgery showed diminution of 5° for the proximal interphalangeal axis of ...

  11. Benefits for dominant red deer hinds under a competitive feeding system: food access behavior, diet and nutrient selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Ceacero

    Full Text Available Social dominance is widely known to facilitate access to food resources in many animal species such as deer. However, research has paid little attention to dominance in ad libitum access to food because it was thought not to result in any benefit for dominant individuals. In this study we assessed if, even under ad libitum conditions, social rank may allow dominant hinds to consume the preferred components of food. Forty-four red deer hinds (Cervus elaphus were allowed to consume ad libitum meal consisting of pellets of sunflower, lucerne and orange, and seeds of cereals, corn, cotton, and carob tree. The meal was placed only in one feeder, which reduced accessibility to a few individuals simultaneously. During seven days, feeding behavior (order of access, time to first feeding bout, total time spent feeding, and time per feeding bout were assessed during the first hour. The relative abundance of each meal component was assessed at times 0, 1 and 5 h, as well as its nutritional composition. Social rank was positively related to the amount of time spent feeding during the 1(st h (P = 0.048. Selection indices were positively correlated with energy (P = 0.018 during the 1(st h and P = 0.047 from 1(st to 5(th and fat (only during the 1(st h; P = 0.036, but also negatively with certain minerals. Thus, dominant hinds could select high energy meal components for longer time under an ad libitum but restricted food access setting. Selection indices showed a higher selectivity when food availability was higher (1(st hour respect to 1(st to 5(th. Finally, high and low ranking hinds had longer time per feeding bout than mid ones (P = 0.011, suggesting complex behavioral feeding tactics of low ranking social ungulates.

  12. Benefits for dominant red deer hinds under a competitive feeding system: food access behavior, diet and nutrient selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceacero, Francisco; García, Andrés J; Landete-Castillejos, Tomás; Bartošová, Jitka; Bartoš, Ludek; Gallego, Laureano

    2012-01-01

    Social dominance is widely known to facilitate access to food resources in many animal species such as deer. However, research has paid little attention to dominance in ad libitum access to food because it was thought not to result in any benefit for dominant individuals. In this study we assessed if, even under ad libitum conditions, social rank may allow dominant hinds to consume the preferred components of food. Forty-four red deer hinds (Cervus elaphus) were allowed to consume ad libitum meal consisting of pellets of sunflower, lucerne and orange, and seeds of cereals, corn, cotton, and carob tree. The meal was placed only in one feeder, which reduced accessibility to a few individuals simultaneously. During seven days, feeding behavior (order of access, time to first feeding bout, total time spent feeding, and time per feeding bout) were assessed during the first hour. The relative abundance of each meal component was assessed at times 0, 1 and 5 h, as well as its nutritional composition. Social rank was positively related to the amount of time spent feeding during the 1(st) h (P = 0.048). Selection indices were positively correlated with energy (P = 0.018 during the 1(st) h and P = 0.047 from 1(st) to 5(th)) and fat (only during the 1(st) h; P = 0.036), but also negatively with certain minerals. Thus, dominant hinds could select high energy meal components for longer time under an ad libitum but restricted food access setting. Selection indices showed a higher selectivity when food availability was higher (1(st) hour respect to 1(st) to 5(th)). Finally, high and low ranking hinds had longer time per feeding bout than mid ones (P = 0.011), suggesting complex behavioral feeding tactics of low ranking social ungulates.

  13. Characterizing multisegment foot kinematics during gait in diabetic foot patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawacha, Zimi; Cristoferi, Giuseppe; Guarneri, Gabriella; Corazza, Stefano; Donà, Giulia; Denti, Paolo; Facchinetti, Andrea; Avogaro, Angelo; Cobelli, Claudio

    2009-10-23

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus has reached epidemic proportions, this condition may result in multiple and chronic invalidating long term complications. Among these, the diabetic foot, is determined by the simultaneous presence of both peripheral neuropathy and vasculopathy that alter the biomechanics of the foot with the formation of callosity and ulcerations. To diagnose and treat the diabetic foot is crucial to understand the foot complex kinematics. Most of gait analysis protocols represent the entire foot as a rigid body connected to the shank. Nevertheless the existing multisegment models cannot completely decipher the impairments associated with the diabetic foot. A four segment foot and ankle model for assessing the kinematics of the diabetic foot was developed. Ten normal subjects and 10 diabetics gait patterns were collected and major sources of variability were tested. Repeatability analysis was performed both on a normal and on a diabetic subject. Direct skin marker placement was chosen in correspondence of 13 anatomical landmarks and an optoelectronic system was used to collect the data. Joint rotation normative bands (mean plus/minus one standard deviation) were generated using the data of the control group. Three representative strides per subject were selected. The repeatability analysis on normal and pathological subjects results have been compared with literature and found comparable. Normal and pathological gait have been compared and showed major statistically significant differences in the forefoot and midfoot dorsi-plantarflexion. Even though various biomechanical models have been developed so far to study the properties and behaviour of the foot, the present study focuses on developing a methodology for the functional assessment of the foot-ankle complex and for the definition of a functional model of the diabetic neuropathic foot. It is, of course, important to evaluate the major sources of variation (true variation in the subject

  14. Characterizing multisegment foot kinematics during gait in diabetic foot patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denti Paolo

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of diabetes mellitus has reached epidemic proportions, this condition may result in multiple and chronic invalidating long term complications. Among these, the diabetic foot, is determined by the simultaneous presence of both peripheral neuropathy and vasculopathy that alter the biomechanics of the foot with the formation of callosity and ulcerations. To diagnose and treat the diabetic foot is crucial to understand the foot complex kinematics. Most of gait analysis protocols represent the entire foot as a rigid body connected to the shank. Nevertheless the existing multisegment models cannot completely decipher the impairments associated with the diabetic foot. Methods A four segment foot and ankle model for assessing the kinematics of the diabetic foot was developed. Ten normal subjects and 10 diabetics gait patterns were collected and major sources of variability were tested. Repeatability analysis was performed both on a normal and on a diabetic subject. Direct skin marker placement was chosen in correspondence of 13 anatomical landmarks and an optoelectronic system was used to collect the data. Results Joint rotation normative bands (mean plus/minus one standard deviation were generated using the data of the control group. Three representative strides per subject were selected. The repeatability analysis on normal and pathological subjects results have been compared with literature and found comparable. Normal and pathological gait have been compared and showed major statistically significant differences in the forefoot and midfoot dorsi-plantarflexion. Conclusion Even though various biomechanical models have been developed so far to study the properties and behaviour of the foot, the present study focuses on developing a methodology for the functional assessment of the foot-ankle complex and for the definition of a functional model of the diabetic neuropathic foot. It is, of course, important to evaluate

  15. Mortality Associated With Acute Charcot Foot and Neuropathic Foot Ulceration

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Baal, Juliette; Hubbard, Richard; Game, Fran; Jeffcoate, William

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare the mortality of patients with an acute Charcot foot with a matched population with uninfected neuropathic foot ulcers (NFUs). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Data were extracted from a specialist departmental database, supplemented by hospital records. The findings were compared with the results of earlier populations with Charcot foot and uninfected NFUs managed from 1980. Finally, the results of all patients with acute Charcot foot and all control subjects managed between 1980 and 2007 were compared with normative mortality data for the U.K. population. RESULTS A total of 70 patients presented with an acute Charcot foot (mean age 57.4 ± 12.0 years; 48 male [68.6%]) between 2001 and 2007; there were 66 matched control subjects. By 1 October 2008, 13 (eight male; 18.6%) patients with a Charcot foot had died, after a median of 2.1 years (interquartile range 1.1–3.3). Twenty-two (20 male; 33.3%) control subjects had also died after a median of 1.3 years (0.6–2.5). There was no difference in survival between the two groups (log-rank P > 0.05). Median survival of all 117 patients with acute Charcot foot managed between 1980 and 2007 was 7.88 years (4.0–15.4) and was not significantly different from the control NFU patients (8.43 years [3.4–15.8]). When compared with normative U.K. population data, life expectancy in the two groups was reduced by 14.4 and 13.9 years, respectively. CONCLUSIONS These data confirm that the mortality in patients presenting to our unit with either an acute Charcot foot and an uninfected neuropathic ulcer was unexpectedly high. PMID:20185744

  16. Recovery of sympathetic nerve function after lumbar sympathectomy is slower in the hind limbs than in the torso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhi-Fang; Liu, Yi-Shu; Min, Xuan; Tang, Jian-Bing; Liu, Hong-Wei; Cheng, Biao

    2017-07-01

    Local sympathetic denervation by surgical sympathectomy is used in the treatment of lower limb ulcers and ischemia, but the restoration of cutaneous sympathetic nerve functions is less clear. This study aims to explore the recovery of cutaneous sympathetic functions after bilateral L 2-4 sympathectomy. The skin temperature of the left feet, using a point monitoring thermometer, increased intraoperatively after sympathectomy. The cytoplasm of sympathetic neurons contained tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine β-hydroxylase, visualized by immunofluorescence, indicated the accuracy of sympathectomy. Iodine starch test results suggested that the sweating function of the hind feet plantar skin decreased 2 and 7 weeks after lumbar sympathectomy but had recovered by 3 months. Immunofluorescence and western blot assay results revealed that norepinephrine and dopamine β-hydroxylase expression in the skin from the sacrococcygeal region and hind feet decreased in the sympathectomized group at 2 weeks. Transmission electron microscopy results showed that perinuclear space and axon demyelination in sympathetic cells in the L 5 sympathetic trunks were found in the sympathectomized group 3 months after sympathectomy. Although sympathetic denervation occurred in the sacrococcygeal region and hind feet skin 2 weeks after lumbar sympathectomy, the skin functions recovered gradually over 7 weeks to 3 months. In conclusion, sympathetic functional recovery may account for the recurrence of hyperhidrosis after sympathectomy and the normalization of sympathetic nerve trunks after incomplete injury. The recovery of sympathetic nerve function was slower in the limbs than in the torso after bilateral L 2-4 sympathectomy.

  17. Recovery of sympathetic nerve function after lumbar sympathectomy is slower in the hind limbs than in the torso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-fang Zheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Local sympathetic denervation by surgical sympathectomy is used in the treatment of lower limb ulcers and ischemia, but the restoration of cutaneous sympathetic nerve functions is less clear. This study aims to explore the recovery of cutaneous sympathetic functions after bilateral L2–4 sympathectomy. The skin temperature of the left feet, using a point monitoring thermometer, increased intraoperatively after sympathectomy. The cytoplasm of sympathetic neurons contained tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine β-hydroxylase, visualized by immunofluorescence, indicated the accuracy of sympathectomy. Iodine starch test results suggested that the sweating function of the hind feet plantar skin decreased 2 and 7 weeks after lumbar sympathectomy but had recovered by 3 months. Immunofluorescence and western blot assay results revealed that norepinephrine and dopamine β-hydroxylase expression in the skin from the sacrococcygeal region and hind feet decreased in the sympathectomized group at 2 weeks. Transmission electron microscopy results showed that perinuclear space and axon demyelination in sympathetic cells in the L5 sympathetic trunks were found in the sympathectomized group 3 months after sympathectomy. Although sympathetic denervation occurred in the sacrococcygeal region and hind feet skin 2 weeks after lumbar sympathectomy, the skin functions recovered gradually over 7 weeks to 3 months. In conclusion, sympathetic functional recovery may account for the recurrence of hyperhidrosis after sympathectomy and the normalization of sympathetic nerve trunks after incomplete injury. The recovery of sympathetic nerve function was slower in the limbs than in the torso after bilateral L2–4 sympathectomy.

  18. MRI in long-term evaluation of reconstructed hind-feet of land-mine trauma patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanal, Hatice Tuba [Department of Radiology, Gulhane Military Medical Academy, Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: tubasanal@yahoo.com; Bulakbasi, Nail; Kocaoglu, Murat; Yildirim, Duzgun [Department of Radiology, Gulhane Military Medical Academy, Ankara (Turkey)

    2007-08-15

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to assess the flap reconstructed hind feet of patients with MRI who were traumatized by land-mine. Materials and methods: T1 and T2 weighted images were obtained in 7 patients, 12 months later the reconstruction of their hind feet by myocutaneous flaps after land-mine trauma. Results: In all patients T2 signal intensities of the myocutaneous flaps were slightly high compared to normal undisturbed muscle. Slight vascular engorgement was noted in the vicinity of the flaps in all cases. There were ankle joint ankylose (n = 1), tarsal coalition (n = 3), sklerosis within the calcaneus (n = 1), bone cortex irregularities (n = 3), absence of calcaneus (n = 4), deformity in talus and bone marrow edema (n = 1), navicular edema (n = 2), remodeling in the superior aspect of talus neck (n = 2), absence of talus (n = 2), talocalcaneal ankylose (n = 1), small collection in the superior aspect of flap (n = 1), drenage canules (n = 1). Conclusion: In reconstructed hind feet by myocutaneus flaps done for land-mine traumas, MRI presents useful information by displaying detailed anatomy of the flaps, bones, joints, soft tissues and associated complications.

  19. Osteology and radiographic anatomy of the pelvis and hind limb of healthy ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makungu, M; Groenewald, H B; du Plessis, W M; Barrows, M; Koeppel, K N

    2014-06-01

    In family Lemuridae, anatomical variations exist. Considering its conservation status (near threatened) and presence of similarities between strepsirrhines and primitive animals, it was thought to be beneficial to describe the gross osteology and radiographic anatomy of the pelvis and hind limb of ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) as a reference for clinical use and species identification. Radiography was performed in 14 captive adult ring-tailed lemurs. The radiographic findings were correlated with bone specimens from two adult animals. Additionally, computed tomography of the hind limbs was performed in one animal. The pelvic bone has a well-developed caudal ventral iliac spine. The patella has a prominent tuberosity on the cranial surface. The first metatarsal bone and digit 1 are markedly stouter than the other metatarsal bones and digits with medial divergence from the rest of the metatarsal bones and digits. Ossicles were seen in the lateral meniscus, inter-phalangeal joint of digit 1 and in the infrapatellar fat pad. Areas of mineral opacity were seen within the external genitalia, which are believed to be the os penis and os clitoris. Variations exist in the normal osteology and radiographic appearance of the pelvis and hind limb of different animal species. The use of only atlases from domestic cats and dogs for interpretative purposes may be misleading. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  20. Effects of stretching and disuse on amino acids in muscles of rat hind limbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaspers, Stephen R.; Henriksen, Erik J.; Satarug, Soisungwan; Tischler, Marc E.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of disuse and passive stretch on the concentrations of amino acids and ammonia in the unloaded soleus muscle was investigated in hindquarter-suspended (for six days by casting one foot in dorsiflexion) tail-casted rats. For a comparison with the condition of unloading, amino acids and ammonia were also measured in shortened extensor digitorum longus in the same casted limb and in denervated leg muscles. The results obtained suggest that passive stretch diminishes some of the characteristic alterations of amino acid concentrations due to unloading. This effect of stretch is considered to be due to the maintenance of muscle tension.

  1. Priorities in offloading the diabetic foot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bus, Sicco A.

    2012-01-01

    Biomechanical factors play an important role in diabetic foot disease. Reducing high foot pressures (i.e. offloading) is one of the main goals in healing and preventing foot ulceration. Evidence-based guidelines show the strong association between the efficacy to offload the foot and clinical

  2. The effects of allogenic stem cells in a murine model of hind limb diabetic ischemic tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Álvarez García

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Diabetes is one of the major risk factors for peripheral arterial disease. In patients in whom surgery cannot be performed, cell therapy may be an alternative treatment. Since time is crucial for these patients, we propose the use of allogenic mesenchymal cells. Methods We obtained mesenchymal cells derived from the fat tissue of a healthy Sprague-Dawley rat. Previous diabetic induction with streptozotocin in 40 male Sprague-Dawley rats, ligation plus left iliac and femoral artery sections were performed as a previously described model of ischemia. After 10 days of follow-up, macroscopic and histo-pathological analysis was performed to evaluate angiogenic and inflammatory parameters in the repair of the injured limb. All samples were evaluated by the same blind researcher. Statistical analysis was performed using the SPSS v.11.5 program (P < 0.05. Results Seventy percent of the rats treated with streptozotocin met the criteria for diabetes. Macroscopically, cell-treated rats presented better general and lower ischemic clinical status, and histologically, a better trend towards angiogenesis, greater infiltration of type 2 macrophages and a shortening of the inflammatory process. However, only the inflammatory variables were statistically significant. No immunological reaction was observed with the use of allogeneic cells. Discussion The application of allogeneic ASCs in a hind limb ischemic model in diabetic animals shows no rejection reactions and a reduction in inflammatory parameters in favor of better repair of damaged tissue. These results are consistent with other lines of research in allogeneic cell therapy. This approach might be a safe, effective treatment option that makes it feasible to avoid the time involved in the process of isolation, expansion and production of the use of autologous cells.

  3. NIRS PREDICTION FOR PROTEIN AND INTRAMUSCULAR FAT CONTENT OF RABBIT HIND LEG MEAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gy. Bázár

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to develop calibration equations to predict the chemical composition of raw, homogenized rabbit meat by means of near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS. 44 Pannon White rabbits were housed in groups in three different pen types (16 anim./m2, and were fed the same diet. Another 45 animals were housed in cages (12 anim./m2 and fed by different feeding regimes. Rabbits were slaughtered at the bodyweight of 2.4-2.5 kg. Homogenized fresh and freeze-dried left total hind leg muscles were investigated by NIRS using a NIRSystem 6500 equipment with small ring cup sample holder. The ether extract and protein content of all samples were determined chemically. Samples 44 of housing experiment were applied in producing LOCAL calibration equations tested on the 45 samples from the separate feeding experiment. Coefficients of determination (R2 of the predictions were 0.89 and 0.99 for fat, 0.85 and 0.96 for protein in fresh and freeze-dried samples, respectively. Results are reassuring, because the equations were applicable, however the analyzed samples were from independent housing and feeding systems. Therefore the chemical compositions differed in the two datasets, i.e. 9.46%, and 11.79% for fat, 85.75% and 83.44% for protein content in calibration and prediction datasets, respectively. The average of NIRS predicted values for fat and protein was 11.36%, 83.88% or 11.54%, 83.45% when using fresh or freeze-dried samples, respectively.

  4. Myocyte specific overexpression of myoglobin impairs angiogenesis after hind-limb ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazarika, Surovi; Angelo, Michael; Li, Yongjun; Aldrich, Amy J; Odronic, Shelley I; Yan, Zhen; Stamler, Jonathan S; Annex, Brian H

    2008-12-01

    In preclinical models of peripheral arterial disease the angiogenic response is typically robust, though it can be impaired in conditions such as hypercholesterolemia and diabetes where the endothelium is dysfunctional. Myoglobin (Mb) is expressed exclusively in striated muscle cells. We hypothesized that myocyte specific overexpression of myoglobin attenuates ischemia-induced angiogenesis even in the presence of normal endothelium. Mb overexpressing transgenic (MbTg, n=59) and wild-type (WT, n=56) C57Bl/6 mice underwent unilateral femoral artery ligation/excision. Perfusion recovery was monitored using Laser Doppler. Ischemia-induced changes in muscle were assessed by protein and immunohistochemistry assays. Nitrite/nitrate and protein-bound NO, and vasoreactivity was measured. Vasoreactivity was similar between MbTg and WT. In ischemic muscle, at d14 postligation, MbTg increased VEGF-A, and activated eNOS the same as WT mice but nitrate/nitrite were reduced whereas protein-bound NO was higher. MbTg had attenuated perfusion recovery at d21 (0.37+/-0.03 versus 0.47+/-0.02, P<0.05), d28 (0.40+/-0.03 versus 0.50+/-0.04, P<0.05), greater limb necrosis (65.2% versus 15%, P<0.001), a lower capillary density, and greater apoptosis versus WT. Increased Mb expression in myocytes attenuates angiogenesis after hind-limb ischemia by binding NO and reducing its bioavailability. Myoglobin can modulate the angiogenic response to ischemia even in the setting of normal endothelium.

  5. 3D reconstruction of digitized histological sections for vasculature quantification in the mouse hind limb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yiwen; Pickering, J. Geoffrey; Nong, Zengxuan; Gibson, Eli; Ward, Aaron D.

    2014-03-01

    In contrast to imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging and micro computed tomography, digital histology reveals multiple stained tissue features at high resolution (0.25μm/pixel). However, the two-dimensional (2D) nature of histology challenges three-dimensional (3D) quantification and visualization of the different tissue components, cellular structures, and subcellular elements. This limitation is particularly relevant to the vasculature, which has a complex and variable structure within tissues. The objective of this study was to perform a fully automated 3D reconstruction of histology tissue in the mouse hind limb preserving the accurate systemic orientation of the tissues, stained with hematoxylin and immunostained for smooth muscle α actin. We performed a 3D reconstruction using pairwise rigid registrations of 5μm thick, paraffin-embedded serial sections, digitized at 0.25μm/pixel. Each registration was performed using the iterative closest points algorithm on blood vessel landmarks. Landmarks were vessel centroids, determined according to a signed distance map of each pixel to a decision boundary in hue-saturation-value color space; this decision boundary was determined based on manual annotation of a separate training set. Cell nuclei were then automatically extracted and corresponded to refine the vessel landmark registration. Homologous nucleus landmark pairs appearing on not more than two adjacent slides were chosen to avoid registrations which force curved or non-sectionorthogonal structures to be straight and section-orthogonal. The median accumulated target registration errors ± interquartile ranges for the vessel landmark registration, and the nucleus landmark refinement were 43.4+/-42.8μm and 2.9+/-1.7μm, respectively (pextracted vasculature and nuclei.

  6. Athlete's Foot: How to Prevent

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... around pools, gyms, shower or locker areas, and hotel rooms. The fungus that causes athlete’s foot may ... Advertising contacts AAD logo Advertising, marketing and sponsorships Legal notice Copyright © 2018 American Academy of Dermatology. All ...

  7. Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-08-08

    Hand, foot, and mouth disease is a contagious illness that mainly affects children under five. In this podcast, Dr. Eileen Schneider talks about the symptoms of hand, foot, and mouth disease, how it spreads, and ways to help protect yourself and your children from getting infected with the virus.  Created: 8/8/2013 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 8/8/2013.

  8. Flexible Foot Test Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurita, C.H.; /Fermilab

    1987-04-27

    A test model of the flexible foot support was constructed early in the design stages to check its reactions to applied loads. The prototype was made of SS 304 and contained four vertical plates as opposed to the fourteen Inconel 718 plates which comprise the actual structure. Due to the fact that the prototype was built before the design of the support was finalized, the plate dimensions are different from those of the actual proposed design (i.e. model plate thickness is approximately one-half that of the actual plates). See DWG. 3740.210-MC-222376 for assembly details of the test model and DWG. 3740.210-MB-222377 for plate dimensions. This stanchion will be required to not only support the load of the inner vessel of the cryostat and its contents, but it must also allow for the movement of the vessel due to thermal contraction. Assuming that each vertical plate acts as a column, then the following formula from the Manual of Steel Construction (American Institute of Steel Construction, Inc., Eigth edition, 1980) can be applied to determine whether or not such columns undergoing simultaneous axial compression and transverse loading are considered safe for the given loading. The first term is representative of the axially compressive stress, and the second term, the bending stress. If the actual compressive stress is greater than 15% of the allowable compressive stress, then there are additional considerations which must be accounted for in the bending stress term.

  9. Imaging the diabetic foot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gold, R.H. [Dept. of Radiological Sciences, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Tong, D.T.F. [Dept. of Radiological Sciences, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Crim, J.R. [Durham Radiology Associates, Durham, NC (United States); Seeger, L.L. [Dept. of Radiological Sciences, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Early and accurate diagnosis of infection or neuropathy of the diabetic foot is the key to successful management. Angiopathy leads to ischemia which, in combination with peripheral neuropathy, predisposes to pedal skin ulceration, the precursor of osteomyelitis. Chronic hyperglycemia promotes production of glycosylated end products which accumulate on endothelial proteins, causing ischemia of the vasa nervorum. When combined with axonal degeneration of the sensory nerves, the result is hypertrophic neuroarthropathy. Should the sympathetic nerve fibers also be damaged, the resultant loss of vasoconstrictive impulses leads to hyperemia and atrophic neuroarthropathy. Plain radiography, although less sensitive than radionuclide, magnetic resonance (MR), and computed tomographic examinations, should be the initial procedure for imaging suspected osteomyelitis in the diabetic patient. If the radiographs are normal but the clinical suspicion of osteomyelitis is strong, a three-phase {sup 99m}Tc-MDP scan or MR imaging is recommended. An equivocal {sup 99m}Tc-MDP scan should be followed by MR imaging. To exclude osteomyelitis at a site of neuroarthropathy, a {sup 111}In white blood cell scan is preferable. To obtain a specimen of bone for bacteriological studies, percutaneous core biopsy is the procedure of choice, with the entrance of the needle well beyond the edge of the subjacent ulcer. (orig.)

  10. Novel In-Shoe Exoskeleton for Offloading of Forefoot Pressure for Individuals With Diabetic Foot Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roser, Mark C; Canavan, Paul K; Najafi, Bijan; Cooper Watchman, Marcy; Vaishnav, Kairavi; Armstrong, David G

    2017-09-01

    Infected diabetic foot ulcers are the leading cause of lower limb amputation. This study evaluated the ability of in-shoe exoskeletons to redirect forces outside of body and through an exoskeleton as an effective means of offloading plantar pressure, the major contributing factor of ulceration. We compared pressure in the forefoot and hind-foot of participants (n = 5) shod with novel exoskeleton footwear. Plantar pressure readings were taken during a 6-m walk at participant's self-selected speed, and five strides were averaged. Results were taken with Achilles exotendon springs disengaged as a baseline, followed by measurements taken with the springs engaged. When springs were engaged, all participants demonstrated a decrease in forefoot pressure, averaging a 22% reduction ( P exoskeleton solution. Results suggest that when the novel exoskeletons were deployed in footwear and exotendon springs engaged, force was successfully transferred from the lower leg through the exoskeleton-enabled shoe to ground, reducing load on the forefoot. The results need to be confirmed in a larger sample. Another study is warranted to examine the effectiveness of this offloading to prevent diabetic foot ulcer, while minimizing gait alteration in daily physical activities.

  11. Mitochondrial DNA pattern of the fine shrimp Metapenaeus elegans (De Man, 1907) in the lagoon of Segara Anakan, Central Java, using Hind III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugraha, Fitra Arya Dwi; Holil, Kholifah; Kurniawan, Nia

    2017-05-01

    Ecological damages to the Lagoon of Segara Anakan, Central Java, as well as large-scale and continuous exploitation are threatening the sustainability of fine shrimp, Metapenaeus elegans, and resources. Information in regards to genetic resources is crucial to establish long-term conservation programs and to preserve germplasm quality. This study aims to evaluate the number and size of the fragment which is digested with restriction enzyme Hind III. Seven individuals of Metapenaeus elegans from the Lagoon of Segara Anakan were examined using Hind III. Amplification of mitochondrial DNA resulted in 950 bp, and the digestion using Hind III generated four fragments consisting of 114 bp, 200 bp, 250 bp, and 386 bp, which formed a monomorphic pattern. The restriction pattern showed the probability of homozygosity of alleles that restricted using Hind III. Homozygosity indicates no variation of DNA sequence.

  12. Lumbar sympathectomy reduces vascular permeability, possibly through decreased adenosine receptor A2a expression in the hind plantar skin of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhifang; Liu, Yishu; Zhu, Lulu; Tang, Jianbing; Huang, Wenhua; Cheng, Biao

    2018-01-01

    The effect of lumbar sympathectomy for the treatment of lower limb ischemia remains a matter of controversy. Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to lumbar sympathectomy, after which Evans blue dye was injected into the hind plantar skin. Extravasation of dye was measured and compared with rats undergoing sham operation. Hind plantar skin was processed for HE staining, immunohistochemistry, and Western blot. In sympathectomized rats, blue stained areas in hind plantar skin and concentrations of Evans blue were significantly less than that of sham sympathectomy (control) rats, both 2 weeks and 3 months after surgery. Expression of prostaglandin E2, bradykinin, bradykinin B2 receptor, and adenosine triphosphate were not significantly different between the sympathectomized and control groups. Adenosine receptor A2a expression was significantly reduced in the sympathectomized group both 2 weeks and 3 months after surgery. Vascular permeability in the hind plantar skin of rats decreases following lumbar sympathectomy, possibly via reduced expression of adenosine receptor A2a.

  13. Discospondylitis caused by Staphylococcus aureus in an African black-footed penguin (Spheniscus demersus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Cara L; Beaufrère, Hugues; Wakamatsu, Nobuko; Rademacher, Nathalie; MacLean, Robert

    2012-12-01

    A 22-year-old female African black-footed penguin (Spheniscus demersus), housed indoors with other African and rockhopper penguins, was presented acutely with lethargy, ataxia, and hind limb weakness after a molt. The penguin would assume a hunched position and, when resting, sat on its hocks or lay on its keel. Physical and neurologic examination revealed hind limb paraparesis, proprioceptive deficits, and tiptoe walking. Results of a complete blood cell count and biochemical analysis revealed mild heterophilic leukocytosis, anemia, mild hypoalbuminemia, hypokalemia, and hyperuricemia. Results of whole-body radiographs and coelioscopy were unremarkable. Two computed tomographies of the spine at a 3-month interval revealed a lesion at the mobile thoracic vertebra proximal to the synsacrum with associated spinal cord compression. The penguin was treated with itraconazole, doxycycline, and meloxicam, and it initially improved with return to near normal gait and behavior. However, 5 months after the onset of clinical signs, the penguin was euthanatized after a relapse with worsening of the neurologic signs. Postmortem and histopathologic examination revealed focal granulomatous discospondylitis at the penultimate mobile thoracic vertebra, with intralesional bacteria from which Staphylococcus aureus was cultured.

  14. Oldest fossil remains of the enigmatic pig-footed bandicoot show rapid herbivorous evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travouillon, Kenny J.

    2016-08-01

    The pig-footed bandicoot, Chaeropus ecaudatus, is one of the most enigmatic Australian marsupials, which went extinct in the late 1950s probably as a result of European colonization. It is unusual in being the only marsupial to have evolved reduction of digits on both fore and hind feet, with the forefeet being pig-like (two toes) and the hind feet being horse-like (one toe). According to molecular phylogenetic analyses, Chaeropus diverged from other bandicoots (Peramelidae), and the bilbies (Thylacomyidae) by the mid-Late Oligocene. This is considerably earlier than suggested by the fossil record, with the current oldest specimens being Late Pleistocene in age. Here, I report the oldest fossils of Chaeropus, representing a new species, Chaeropus baynesi from the Late Pliocene to Early Pleistocene (2.47-2.92 Ma) Fisherman's Cliff Local Fauna, Moorna Formation, New South Wales, Australia, and extending the fossil record of the genus and family by at least 2 million years. Chaeropus baynesi is less high crowned than C. ecaudatus and lacks lateral blade development on lower molars, suggesting that it was unlikely to be grazing. This suggests that Chaeropus must have adapted rapidly to the drying conditions and changes in environments, and would have become a grazer in a very short period of time.

  15. Bacteriology of diabetic foot lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoga, R; Khairul, A; Sunita, K; Suresh, C

    2006-02-01

    Infection plays a pivotal role in enhancing a diabetic foot at risk toward amputation. Effective antibiotic therapy against the offending pathogens is an important component of treatment of diabetic foot infections. Recognition of the pathogen is always difficult as the representative deep tissue sample for culture is surrounded by ulcer surface harbouring colonies of organisms frequently labelled as skin commensals. The emergent of resistant strains represents a compounding problem standing against efforts to prevent amputation. This study was undertaken to identify the pathogens associated with diabetic foot infection in terms of their frequency and sensitivity against certain commonly used antibiotics. Forty-four consecutive patients with open diabetic foot infections had wound swab taken for culture and sensitivity testing. Cultures positive were observed in 89% of the cases with Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeroginosa encountered in 20%, 14% and 14% of cases respectively. Mixed growths were isolated in 6% of cultures. All Staphylcoccus aureus isolates were resistant to Penicillin but 80% were sensitive to Erythromycin and Co-trimoxazole. Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates were sensitive to Methicillin and Gentamycin in 80% and 60% of cases respectively, and resistant to Ampicillin and Ceftazidime in 83% and 50% respectively. All Pseudomonas aeroginosa isolates were sensitive to Amikacin and Ciprofloxacin but 50% were resistant to Gentamycin. There was no single antibiotic possessing good coverage for all common organisms isolated from diabetic foot lesions. Staphylococcus aureus remains the predominant cause of diabetic foot infections followed by Klebsiela pneumonia and Pseudomonas aeroginosa. Most infections are monomicrobial. The emergence of multiresistant organisms is a worrying feature in diabetic foot infections.

  16. Talonavicular arthrodesis for the treatment of neurological flat foot deformity in pediatric patients: clinical and radiographic evaluation of 29 feet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Coulon, Geraldo; Turcot, Katia; Canavese, Federico; Dayer, Romain; Kaelin, Andre; Ceroni, Dimitri

    2011-01-01

    Patients with cerebral palsy, syndromes, myopathies, and other forms of neurological impairment can develop planovalgus foot deformity of variable degrees of severity. Several techniques have already been described to resolve the deformity with variable results. Talonavicular arthrodesis is a well-known technique in adult patients, but to our knowledge, it has not been described in children with neurological impairment. We performed a retrospective chart and radiographic review of 18 neurological patients (10 boys, 8 girls) with a mean age of 11.3 ± 2.6 years (range, 7 to 19 y) who underwent talonavicular arthrodesis for flat foot deformity between 1998 and 2009, at our center. Of a total of 29 feet, talonavicular arthrodesis was judged satisfactory in 28 feet, whereas 1 had unsatisfactory results according to the Yoo clinical outcome scoring scale. Subjective observations reported that 3 feet from 2 patients were painful preoperatively and none after last follow-up. Functionally, 2 of 13 patients were able to stop using braces after surgery. The significant improvement achieved postoperatively in radiographic measurement angles was maintained at last follow-up without any loss of angle correction. Talonavicular arthrodesis seems to achieve a reliable hind foot fixation in flat foot in patients with neurological impairment. Case series.

  17. Kinetic, kinematic, magnetic resonance and owner evaluation of dogs before and after the amputation of a hind limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo-Zamora, Vladimir; von Babo, Verena; Eberle, Nina; Betz, Daniela; Nolte, Ingo; Wefstaedt, Patrick

    2016-01-25

    The amputation of a limb is a surgical procedure that is regularly performed in small animal practice. In spite of several clinical reports indicating high owner satisfaction after limb amputation in dogs, an amputation is still very critically seen by the owners, and even by some veterinarians, due to the lack of accurate information about the recovery of amputee patients. Thus, the objective of this study was to prospectively evaluate, both objectively and subjectively, the recovery outcome of dogs undergoing a hind limb amputation. Twelve patients in which a hind limb amputation was scheduled were studied. Kinetic and kinematic gait analyses were performed before the amputation, and 10, 30, 90 and 120 days after surgery. Magnetic resonance (MR) examination of the contralateral stifle joint was performed before and 120 days after amputation. The subjective impressions of the owners were gathered at the same examination times of the gait analyses. Kinetic data showed a redistribution of the load to all remaining limbs after the amputation; ten days after the procedure patients had already established their new locomotory pattern. Kinematic data showed significant differences between sessions in the mean angle progression curves of almost all analyzed joints; however, the ranges of motion were very similar before and after the amputation, and remained constant in the subsequent sessions after the amputation. No changes in the signal intensity of the soft tissues evaluated, and no evidence of cartilage damage or osteoarthritis was seen on the MR examination of the contralateral stifle. Owners evaluated the results of the amputation very positively, both during and at the end of the study. Dogs had a quick adaptation after a hind limb amputation, and the adaptation process began before the amputation was performed. This happened without evidence of morphologic changes in the contralateral stifle joint, and with a very positive evaluation from the owner.

  18. The migration and loss of human primordial germ stem cells from the hind gut epithelium towards the gonadal ridge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mamsen, Linn Salto; Brøchner, Christian Beltoft; Byskov, Anne Grete

    2012-01-01

    Human primordial germ cells (PGCs) can be recognized in the yolk sac wall, from 3-4 weeks post conception (wpc), in the hind gut epithelium from week 4 and in the gonadal area from early week 5. The objective of this study was to map the migration route of PGCs and elucidate the role of the nervous...... system in this process. Sixteen human specimens, 5-14 wpc obtained from legal abortions were included. On serial paraffin sections, PGCs were detected immunohistochemically by expression of OCT4 and c-Kit, nerve fibers by ß-III-tubulin and stem cell factor (SCF) as a possible chemoattractive cue for PGC...

  19. Valine partitioning and kinetics between the gastrointestinal tract and hind limbs in lambs with an adult Trichostrongylus colubriformis burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermingham, E N; McNabb, W C; Sinclair, B R; Tavendale, M H; Roy, N C

    2011-11-01

    Intestinal parasitic infection increases the demand for AA because of increased protein synthesis in the intestine and increased luminal losses of AA, and these increased demands may be supported by increased mobilization of AA from the skeletal muscles. Two experiments were conducted to determine the effects of parasitic infection on valine kinetics within the gastrointestinal tract and hind limbs of lambs fed fresh forages. On d 1, lambs were given 6,000 stage-3 Trichostrongylus colubriformis larvae per day for 6 d (n = 6) or kept as parasite-free controls (n = 6) and fed fresh lucerne (Medicago sativa; Exp. 1) or fresh sulla (Hedysarum coronarium; Exp. 2). On d 48, valine kinetics within the mesenteric- (MDV) and portal-drained viscera (PDV) and hind limbs were obtained by carrying out concurrent infusions of para-amminohippuric acid into the mesenteric vein and indocyanin green into the abdominal aorta (for blood flow), and [3,4-(3)H]valine into the jugular vein and [1-(13)C]valine into the abomasum for 8 h (for kinetics). During the infusions, blood was collected from the mesenteric and portal veins and from the mesenteric artery and vena cava, and plasma was harvested. After the 8-h infusion, lambs were euthanized, ileal digesta were collected, and tissues were sampled from the intestine and muscle (biceps femoris). Tissues, digesta, and plasma were analyzed for valine concentration, specific radioactivity, and isotopic enrichment. In both experiments, intestinal worm burdens on d 48 were greater in parasitized lambs (P = 0.0001 and 0.003). In Exp. 1, parasitic infection increased (P = 0.03) the total valine irreversible loss rate (ILR) in the MDV and PDV. In Exp. 2, luminal ILR of valine in the MDV was reduced (P = 0.01); however, ILR of valine in the PDV was unaffected. Despite these changes within the MDV and PDV, parasitic infection did not affect the ILR of valine within the hind limbs, and valine transport rates were largely unchanged. We suggest that

  20. Morphological and genetic analyses of the first record of the Niger Hind, Cephalopholis nigri (Perciformes: Serranidae, in the Mediterranean Sea and of the African Hind, Cephalopholis taeniops, in Malta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noel Vella

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-native marine species, including tropical eastern Atlantic fish species are on the increase in Malta, with shipping activities being the main vector for the movement of these alien species from the Atlantic into the Mediterranean Sea. This calls for cooperation and collaboration between various sea-users and researchers to ensure continuous monitoring of coastal biodiversity. Methods Research methods involving local fishermen cooperation in monitoring efforts to identify and track populations of alien species in the Central Mediterranean has led to new records for the genus Cephalopholis (Perciformes: Serranidae in Malta. Morphological characteristics, meristic counts and mitochondrial DNA sequences from specimens of both species sampled from Maltese waters were analysed to confirm their species identify accurately, essential for tracking their respective population expansions in the Mediterranean. Results and conclusion Results from this study have led to confirmation of the first record of the Niger Hind, Cephalopholis nigri (Günther, 1859, in the Mediterranean Sea and of the establishment of the African Hind, Cephalopholis taeniops (Valenciennes, 1828 in Maltese waters.

  1. Radiographic-directed local coordinate systems critical in kinematic analysis of walking in diabetes-related medial column foot deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, Mary K; Woodburn, James; Mueller, Michael J; Strube, Michael J; Johnson, Jeffrey E; Beckert, Krista S; Stein, Michelle L; Sinacore, David R

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic foot deformity onset and progression maybe associated with abnormal foot and ankle motion. The modified Oxford multi-segmental foot model allows kinematic assessment of inter-segmental foot motion. However, there are insufficient anatomical landmarks to accurately representation the alignment of the hindfoot and forefoot segments during model construction. This is most notable for the sagittal plane which is referenced parallel to the floor, allowing comparison of inter-segmental excursion but not capturing important sagittal hind-to-forefoot deformity associated with diabetic foot disease and can potentially underestimate true kinematic differences. The purpose of the study was to compare walking kinematics using local coordinate systems derived from the modified Oxford model and the radiographic directed model which incorporated individual calcaneal and 1st metatarsal declination pitch angles for the hindfoot and forefoot. We studied twelve participants in each of the following groups: (1) diabetes mellitus, peripheral neuropathy and medial column foot deformity (DMPN+), (2) DMPN without medial column deformity (DMPN-) and (3) age- and weight-match controls. The modified Oxford model coordinate system did not identify differences between groups in the initial, peak, final, or excursion hindfoot relative to shank or forefoot relative to hindfoot dorsiflexion/plantarflexion during walking. The radiographic coordinate system identified the DMPN+ group to have an initial, peak and final position of the forefoot relative to hindfoot that was more dorsiflexed (lower arch phenotype) than the DMPN- group (pfoot deformity reveals segmental motion occurring upon alignment indicative of a lower arch. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The Charcot Foot in Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frykberg, Robert G.; Armstrong, David G.; Boulton, Andrew J.M.; Edmonds, Michael; Van, Georges Ha; Hartemann, Agnes; Game, Frances; Jeffcoate, William; Jirkovska, Alexandra; Jude, Edward; Morbach, Stephan; Morrison, William B.; Pinzur, Michael; Pitocco, Dario; Sanders, Lee; Wukich, Dane K.; Uccioli, Luigi

    2011-01-01

    The diabetic Charcot foot syndrome is a serious and potentially limb-threatening lower-extremity complication of diabetes. First described in 1883, this enigmatic condition continues to challenge even the most experienced practitioners. Now considered an inflammatory syndrome, the diabetic Charcot foot is characterized by varying degrees of bone and joint disorganization secondary to underlying neuropathy, trauma, and perturbations of bone metabolism. An international task force of experts was convened by the American Diabetes Association and the American Podiatric Medical Association in January 2011 to summarize available evidence on the pathophysiology, natural history, presentations, and treatment recommendations for this entity. PMID:21868781

  3. Foot-and-mouth disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belsham, Graham; Charleston, Bryan; Jackson, Terry

    2009-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease is an economically important, highly contagious, disease of cloven-hoofed animals characterized by the appearance of vesicles (blisters) on the feet and in and around the mouth. The causative agent, foot-and-mouth disease virus, was the first mammalian virus to be discovere......-encoded proteases, to about 12 mature products which are required for virus replication and assembly. Some of these viral proteins modify host cell activities to block anti-virus defence systems. Thus, this small virus displays a remarkably complex array of biological activities....

  4. Fleet of Foot: Adolescent Foot and Ankle Mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legacy, Kelly Bromley

    2018-01-01

    In today's world of advanced technologies, accessible transportation, and fingertip talking, adolescents are spending too many hours each day sedentary. The purpose of this article is to underscore the importance of foot and ankle mobility in an adolescent population that spends very little time on their feet. Physical educators and athletic…

  5. A systematic review of instruments measuring foot function, foot pain, and foot-related disability in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Leeden, M.; Steultjens, M.P.M.; Terwee, C.B.; Rosenbaum, D.; Turner, D.; Woodburn, J.; Dekker, J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective. To compose an inventory of instruments that have been described to measure foot function (i.e., pressure and/or gait parameters), foot pain, and foot-related disability in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and to investigate the clinimetric quality of these measures. Methods. A systematic search

  6. Cosmetic Foot Surgery: Fashion's Pandora's Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A A A | Print | Share Cosmetic Foot Surgery: Fashion’s Pandora’s Box? Foot and ankle surgeons warn against ... a "face lift" and fit them into high-fashion shoes. But physician members of the American College ...

  7. Glossary of Foot and Ankle Terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Glossary of Foot & Ankle Terms Glossary of Foot & Ankle Terms Page Content Achilles tendon - The Achilles tendon ... research grants, humanitarian outreach and public education initiatives. Ankle instability - Chronic, repetitive sprains of the ankle. This ...

  8. American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... IFFAS / AOFAS eBook ​The AOFAS and MD Conference Express invite you to enjoy complimentary access to the ... Foundation Exhibit Privacy Statement Legal Disclosure Site Map American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society ® Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Foundation ...

  9. Development of the Tardivo Algorithm to Predict Amputation Risk of Diabetic Foot.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Paulo Tardivo

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a chronic disease that affects almost 19% of the elderly population in Brazil and similar percentages around the world. Amputation of lower limbs in diabetic patients who present foot complications is a common occurrence with a significant reduction of life quality, and heavy costs on the health system. Unfortunately, there is no easy protocol to define the conditions that should be considered to proceed to amputation. The main objective of the present study is to create a simple prognostic score to evaluate the diabetic foot, which is called Tardivo Algorithm. Calculation of the score is based on three main factors: Wagner classification, signs of peripheral arterial disease (PAD, which is evaluated by using Peripheral Arterial Disease Classification, and the location of ulcers. The final score is obtained by multiplying the value of the individual factors. Patients with good peripheral vascularization received a value of 1, while clinical signs of ischemia received a value of 2 (PAD 2. Ulcer location was defined as forefoot, midfoot and hind foot. The conservative treatment used in patients with scores below 12 was based on a recently developed Photodynamic Therapy (PDT protocol. 85.5% of these patients presented a good outcome and avoided amputation. The results showed that scores 12 or higher represented a significantly higher probability of amputation (Odds ratio and logistic regression-IC 95%, 12.2-1886.5. The Tardivo algorithm is a simple prognostic score for the diabetic foot, easily accessible by physicians. It helps to determine the amputation risk and the best treatment, whether it is conservative or surgical management.

  10. Development of the Tardivo Algorithm to Predict Amputation Risk of Diabetic Foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardivo, João Paulo; Baptista, Maurício S; Correa, João Antonio; Adami, Fernando; Pinhal, Maria Aparecida Silva

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic disease that affects almost 19% of the elderly population in Brazil and similar percentages around the world. Amputation of lower limbs in diabetic patients who present foot complications is a common occurrence with a significant reduction of life quality, and heavy costs on the health system. Unfortunately, there is no easy protocol to define the conditions that should be considered to proceed to amputation. The main objective of the present study is to create a simple prognostic score to evaluate the diabetic foot, which is called Tardivo Algorithm. Calculation of the score is based on three main factors: Wagner classification, signs of peripheral arterial disease (PAD), which is evaluated by using Peripheral Arterial Disease Classification, and the location of ulcers. The final score is obtained by multiplying the value of the individual factors. Patients with good peripheral vascularization received a value of 1, while clinical signs of ischemia received a value of 2 (PAD 2). Ulcer location was defined as forefoot, midfoot and hind foot. The conservative treatment used in patients with scores below 12 was based on a recently developed Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) protocol. 85.5% of these patients presented a good outcome and avoided amputation. The results showed that scores 12 or higher represented a significantly higher probability of amputation (Odds ratio and logistic regression-IC 95%, 12.2-1886.5). The Tardivo algorithm is a simple prognostic score for the diabetic foot, easily accessible by physicians. It helps to determine the amputation risk and the best treatment, whether it is conservative or surgical management.

  11. Structural design of isolated column footings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fathi Abdrabbo

    2016-09-01

    The study showed that shear span to depth ratio of a footing and distributions of contact stress at footing–soil interface are key factors in the structural design of the footing. ECP203-11, ACI318-08, and EC2-2004 code provisions, underestimate the structural failure loads of isolated column footings, while BS 8110.1-1997 overpredicts the failure loads of isolated column footings, if punching provisions at perimeter of column are pulled out from the code.

  12. Thermographic evaluation of hind paw skin temperature and functional recovery of locomotion after sciatic nerve crush in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Z. Sacharuk

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Peripheral nerves are often damaged by direct mechanical injury, diseases, and tumors. The peripheral nerve injuries that result from these conditions can lead to a partial or complete loss of motor, sensory, and autonomic functions, which in turn are related to changes in skin temperature, in the involved segments of the body. The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes in hind paw skin temperature after sciatic nerve crush in rats in an attempt to determine whether changes in skin temperature correlate with the functional recovery of locomotion. METHODS: Wistar rats were divided into three groups: control (n = 7, sham (n = 25, and crush (n = 25. All groups were subjected to thermographic, functional, and histological assessments. RESULTS: ΔT in the crush group was different from the control and sham groups at the 1st, 3rd and 7rd postoperative days (p<0.05. The functional recovery from the crush group returned to normal values between the 3rd and 4th week post-injury, and morphological analysis of the nerve revealed incomplete regeneration at the 4th week after injury. DISCUSSION: This study is the first demonstration that sciatic nerve crush in rats induces an increase in hind paw skin temperature and that skin temperature changes do not correlate closely with functional recovery

  13. Hind limb scaling of kangaroos and wallabies (superfamily Macropodoidea): implications for hopping performance, safety factor and elastic savings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, C P; Skinner, J; Biewener, A A

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine hind limb scaling of the musculoskeletal system in the Macropodoidea, the superfamily containing wallabies and kangaroos, to re-examine the effect of size on the locomotor mechanics and physiology of marsupial hopping. Morphometric musculoskeletal analyses were conducted of 15 species and skeletal specimens of 21 species spanning a size range from 0.8 to 80 kg that included representatives of 12 of the 16 extant genera of macropodoids. We found that unlike other groups, macropodoids are able to match force demands associated with increasing body size primarily through a combination of positive allometry in muscle area and muscle moment arms. Isometric scaling of primary hind limb bones suggests, however, that larger species experience relatively greater bone stresses. Muscle to tendon area ratios of the ankle extensors scale with strong positive allometry, indicating that peak tendon stresses also increase with increasing body size but to a lesser degree than previously reported. Consistent with previous morphological and experimental studies, large macropodoids are therefore better suited for elastic strain energy recovery but operate at lower safety factors, which likely poses an upper limit to body size. Scaling patterns for extant macropodoids suggest that extinct giant kangaroos (approximately 250 kg) were likely limited in locomotor capacity.

  14. Morphological changes induced by thermal treatment and gamma irradiation on the males' hind legs of Spodoptera littoralis (Noctuidae; Lepidoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai S. EL-Degwi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available External morphology of males' hind legs of Spodoptera littoralis subjected to thermal treatment (33 °C and 37 °C or/and irradiated with substerilizing doses of gamma radiation (75, 100 and 150 Gy were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM in the parental generation. Five types of sensilla have been distinguished; three types of trichoid sensilla (T1,T2 and T3, sensilla basiconica and sensilla auricillica, which are considered as olfactory chemoreceptors. Moreover, sensilla chaetica are contact chemoreceptors, whereas sensilla styloconica are thermo–hygro/gustatory mechanoreceptors. The impact of thermal treatment or/and gamma irradiation reflect a clear morphological change in S. littoralis legs'sensilla, claws, spurs and scales. Otherwise, the degree of deformity was thermal and dose dependent, as it increased with an increase of the degree of temperature and dose of irradiation applied. Substerilizing doses 75 and 100 Gy, either alone or combined with thermal treatment 33 °C, have low undesirable effects on the hind legs with successful mobility or courtship behavior. Consequently, synergistic effect of gamma radiation and thermal stress induced successful application in the integrated pest management program for controlling S. littoralis.

  15. Effects of intra-arterial infusion therapy or systemic chemotherapy with docetaxel for VX2 tumor in rabbit hind limb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Yuanxin; Wu Xiaomei; He Miao; Liu Tao; Deng Duo

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the efficacy and safety of intra-arterial infusion therapy with docetaxel. Methods: Animal model of VX2 tumor in rabbit hind limb was set up. Intra-arterial infusion therapy or systemic chemotherapy with docetaxel was performed. Concentrations of docetaxel in VX2 tumor, wall of stomach, liver, kidney and plasma of rabbits with VX2 tumors in hind limbs were determined. Difference of drug concentrations between intra-arterial infusion therapy and systemic chemotherapy was compared using Student t-test. Results: Concentrations of docetaxel in VX2 tumor and wall of stomach of rabbits with intra-arterial infusion therapy were significantly higher than those with systemic chemotherapy (p<0.05). The drug concentration in VX2 tumor of rabbits with intra-arterial infusion was 14 times higher than that with systemic chemotherapy. Concentration of docetaxel in plasma of rabbits with intra-arterial infusion therapy was not significantly lower than that with systemic chemotherapy (P<0.05). Conclusion: Intra-arterial infusion therapy with docetaxel for tumor is effective. However, there is increased risk of toxicity and the dose should adjusted accordingly. (authors)

  16. Starch digestion in the rumen, small intestine, and hind gut of dairy cows – A meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moharrery, A; Larsen, Mogens; Weisbjerg, Martin Riis

    2014-01-01

    publications on in vivo experiments with 290 dietary treatments involving lactating dairy cows, 284 with total tract starch digestibility (dSTtt), and 184 with rumen (dSTru), 55 with small intestinal (dSTsi) and 58 with hind gut starch digestibility (dSThg). The major starch sources were corn (n = 158), corn......The aim of the present study was to provide mechanistic prediction equations for starch digestibility in the rumen, small intestine, hind gut and total tract by conducting a meta-analysis of available data on starch digestion in lactating dairy cows. Data for starch digestion was extracted from 66...... silage (n = 151), barley (n = 55), wheat (n = 46) and sorghum (n = 23). The meta-analysis of starch digestion was conducted by multiple regression analysis. For groups of starch sources, wheat showed highest and NaOH treated barley lowest dSTtt. dSTtt was affected by starch source but not starch intake...

  17. Morphology of the pelvis and hind limb of the red panda (Ailurus fulgens) evidenced by gross osteology, radiography and computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makungu, M; du Plessis, W M; Groenewald, H B; Barrows, M; Koeppel, K N

    2015-12-01

    The red panda (Ailurus fulgens) is a quadrupedal arboreal animal primarily distributed in the Himalayas and southern China. It is a species commonly kept in zoological collections. This study was carried out to describe the morphology of the pelvis and hind limb of the red panda evidenced by gross osteology, radiography and computed tomography as a reference for clinical use and identification of skeletons. Radiography of the pelvis and right hind limb was performed in nine and seven animals, respectively. Radiographic findings were correlated with bone specimens from three adult animals. Computed tomography of the torso and hind limb was performed in one animal. The pelvic bone had a wide ventromedial surface of the ilium. The trochlea of the femur was wide and shallow. The patella was similar to that seen in feline species. The medial fabella was not seen radiographically in any animal. The cochlea grooves of the tibia were shallow with a poorly defined intermediate ridge. The trochlea of the talus was shallow and presented with an almost flattened medial ridge. The tarsal sesamoid bone was always present. The lateral process of the base of the fifth metatarsal (MT) bone was directed laterally. The MT bones were widely spaced. The morphology of the pelvis and hind limb of the red panda indicated flexibility of the pelvis and hind limb joints as an adaptation to an arboreal quadrupedal lifestyle. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  18. X-Ray Exam: Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Foot KidsHealth / For Parents / X-Ray Exam: ... Muscles, and Joints Broken Bones Getting an X-ray (Video) X-Ray (Video) View more Partner Message About Us ...

  19. What is the diabetic foot?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-01-03

    Jan 3, 2011 ... 1). These include peripheral neuropathy, peripheral vascular disease, foot deformities, external trauma and peripheral oedema. With the exception of trauma, it is usually a combination of problems ... commonly find that moving, standing or walking alleviates the pain.7 .... on specific imaging tests. Wound ...

  20. What is the diabetic foot?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    79 age group had diabetes. This estimate is expected to ... unable to detect trauma or discomfort and as a result wounds often go .... should be considered when underlying bone is exposed or can be palpated with a blunt probe or in any chronic non-healing wound. Bone is infected in up to 20% of patients with foot ulcers ...

  1. Avoiding foot complications in diabetes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ) issued a call to action in 2005 in ... by the IWGDF.4 The Diabetic Foot Working Group (DFWG), a multidisciplinary organisation, was formed in 2007, with the aim .... team management.3,8,9. This comprehensive approach works in developed ...

  2. Performance of isolated and folded footings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Samir El-kady

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Folded foundations have been used as an alternative to the conventional flat shallow foundations, in situations involving heavy loads or weak soils. They can be geometrically shaped in many forms especially for isolated footings. The purpose of this paper is introducing an alternative foundation shape that reduces the cost of foundations by reducing the amount of reinforcing steel by minimizing or even eliminating the tension zones in the folded isolated footings. Also, achieving lower soil stresses through changing the isolated footing shape will consequently reduce the expected settlements and the footing stresses. Experimental and numerical studies are performed on five (5 quarter scale footings of which one (1 footing of flat shape is tested as a reference sample and four (4 footings are of folded shape by folding angles of 10°, 20°, 30°, and 40° with the horizontal. Results showed that the folded isolated footings achieve economic design by decreasing the quantities of reinforcement. It also induced less soil settlements, and stresses. In addition, the tensile stresses in the reinforced concrete footing body are also less in folded isolated footings than the flat one. Results show that the folded isolated footing have a better load carrying capacity when compared with the conventional slab/flat footing of similar cross sectional area for both cases of experimental and numerical analysis.

  3. Management of diabetic foot infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamil, M.; Amin, Z.; Chaudhary, T. H.; Shaheen, J.; Alvi, Z. R.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To determine the infecting agent in diabetic food infection with the susceptibility pattern, and to evaluate the effect of wound infection, was culopathy, neuropathy and control of diabetes mellitus on the outcome of the patients. Design: A descriptive and observational study. Place and duration of study: Patients with diabetic foot, admitted in surgical unit 1, B.V. Hospital Bahawalpur, from April 1999 to April 2000, were included in this study. Subject and methods: A total of 60 known diabetic patients were studied, out of these 47 were males and 13 females. They were assessed for angiopathy, neuropathy and extend of foot involvement. Necessary investigations, including x-ray foot, ECG, serum urea and creatinine, pus culture and sensitivity were carried out. Diabetes was controlled on insulin of the basis of serum sugar and urine sugar chart and treated accordingly. Results: The most common age of foot involvement was between 40-70 years. Right side was involved more often than the left (67%: 37%). Most of the infections were due to staphylococcus (50%), pseudomonas (25%) and streptococci (8%). Antibiotic was started based on sensitivity report. Fluoro quinolone plus clindamycin was used in 50%, fluoro quinolone plus metronidazole in 20% and amoxicillin/clavulanate in 23%. Most of the patients (61.7%) were in grade iii or iv of Meggit wagner classification of diabetic foot. Three patients (5%) were treated by below knee amputations while 1.7% patient by above knee amputation. In twenty-four (40%) patients some form of to amputation/ray amputation had to be done,while 32(53.3%) patients had complete healing of would without any amputation. Mortality was 3.33% all the 4 patients (6.7%) who presented late, having uncontrolled diabetes, with angiopathy (absent foot pulses), neuropathy, infection of the foot (grade iii or above) resulted in major amputation sooner or latter. The 32 patients (53.3%) having controlled diabetes mellitus with no angiopathy or

  4. DIABETIC FOOT ULCERS MICROBIOLOGICAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Rajagopal

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES Infections of all types are more common in patients with diabetes, on the basis of outcome of retrospective study in Canada. Many types of infections are very common in diabetic than non-diabetic patients. Foot is the most common site. Diabetic foot infections range from mild infections to limb threatening conditions. Most require emergency medical attention. Diabetic foot infection is a global burden and projected to increase from 246 million people to over 380 million people by the year 2025. Many people with diabetes develop complications that seriously affect their quality and length of life. Lower limb complications are common, particularly foot ulcers and gangrene. Development of these complications is attributed to individual risk factors, poverty, racial and ethnic differences, and quality of local and national health care systems. The wide variations noted suggest that best practices in low incidence areas could easily be adapted in high incidence areas to reduce the burden of complications. Almost every infection begins in a wound, often as neuropathic ulceration or a traumatic break in the skin. Infections that begin as a small problem may progress to involve soft tissue, bones and joints. Because of these morbidity and occasional mortality by these foot infections several authoritative groups have recently developed guidelines for assessing and treating diabetic foot. METHODOLOGY 100 Diabetic patients with foot ulcers were admitted and wounds were classified using wagner’s classification. Pus was sent for culture and sensitivity and treated accordingly. RESULTS In our study the most common organism cultured from the wound with diabetes mellitus was staphylococcus. The most sensitive drug for these organisms was found to be chloramphenicol on most occasions. CONCLUSION The rationale of pus culture and sensitivity is not only to definitively treat the diabetic wound after the culture sensitivity report is

  5. Diabetes: foot ulcers and amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Dereck L

    2011-08-26

    Diabetic foot ulceration is full-thickness penetration of the dermis of the foot in a person with diabetes. Severity is classified using the Wagner system, which grades it from 1 to 5. The annual incidence of ulcers among people with diabetes is 2.5% to 10.7% in resource-rich countries, and the annual incidence of amputation for any reason is 0.25% to 1.8%. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of interventions to prevent foot ulcers and amputations in people with diabetes? What are the effects of treatments in people with diabetes with foot ulceration? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to September 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 50 systematic reviews and RCTs that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: debridement, human cultured dermis, human skin equivalent, patient education, pressure off-loading with felted foam or pressure-relief half-shoe, pressure off-loading with total-contact or non-removable casts, screening and referral to foot-care clinics, systemic hyperbaric oxygen for non-infected ulcers, systemic hyperbaric oxygen in infected ulcers, therapeutic footwear, topical growth factors, and wound dressings.

  6. Foot Problems in a Group of Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis: An Unmet Need for Foot Care

    OpenAIRE

    Borman, Pinar; Ayhan, Figen; Tuncay, Figen; Sahin, Mehtap

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the foot involvement in a group of RA patients in regard to symptoms, type and frequency of deformities, location, radiological changes, and foot care. Patients and Methods: A randomized selected 100 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients were recruited to the study. Data about foot symptoms, duration and location of foot pain, pain intensity, access to services related to foot, treatment, orthoses and assistive devices, and usefulness of therapie...

  7. Reliability and normative values of the foot line test: a technique to assess foot posture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brushøj, C; Larsen, Klaus; Nielsen, MB

    2007-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Test-retest reliability. OBJECTIVE: To examine the reliability and report normative values of a novel test, the foot line test (FLT), to describe foot morphology. BACKGROUND: Numerous foot examinations are performed each day, but most existing examination techniques have considerabl......). There was no significant association between foot size and FLT values. CONCLUSION: The FLT is a reproducible technique to assess foot posture....

  8. Differential constrictor responses of cephalic and caudal vasculature to α-adrenoceptor agonist after hind limb unloading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchings, Simon R; Kim, Jong Moo; Song, Dongzhe; Pang, Catherine C Y

    2010-11-01

    We examined the effects of hind limb unloading (HLU, 14 days) on constriction of carotid and iliac arterial beds in vivo in thiobutabarbital-anaesthetized rats and isolated carotid and iliac arteries in vitro. Both control and HLU rats had similar arterial pressure and carotid and iliac arterial flows. The HLU rats had increased carotid arterial but reduced iliac arterial constriction in response to methoxamine (α1-adrenoceptor agonist) in vivo. In contrast, constriction in response to methoxamine was reduced in the isolated carotid and unchanged in the iliac artery of HLU rats relative to control rats. Thus, HLU is associated with increased constriction of carotid arterial bed but reduced constriction of the isolated carotid artery, and reduced constriction of iliac arterial bed but unchanged constriction of the isolated iliac artery. These results show differential influence of HLU on constriction of cephalic and caudal arterial beds, and differential effect on constrictions of arterial beds relative to conduit arteries.

  9. Weigh-in-motion scale with foot alignment features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abercrombie, Robert Knox; Richardson, Gregory David; Scudiere, Matthew Bligh

    2013-03-05

    A pad is disclosed for use in a weighing system for weighing a load. The pad includes a weighing platform, load cells, and foot members. Improvements to the pad reduce or substantially eliminate rotation of one or more of the corner foot members. A flexible foot strap disposed between the corner foot members reduces rotation of the respective foot members about vertical axes through the corner foot members and couples the corner foot members such that rotation of one corner foot member results in substantially the same amount of rotation of the other corner foot member. In a strapless variant one or more fasteners prevents substantially all rotation of a foot member. In a diagonal variant, a foot strap extends between a corner foot member and the weighing platform to reduce rotation of the foot member about a vertical axis through the corner foot member.

  10. Transplantation of MSCs in combination with netrin-1 improves neoangiogenesis in a rat model of hind limb ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Yao, Dan; Ma, Jianhua; Zhu, Jian; Xu, Xianghong; Ren, Yunli; Ding, Xinsheng; Mao, Xiaoming

    2011-03-01

    Similar to the neural network, the vascular network is formed from central axial structures that send sprouts along predetermined trajectories to their distal destinations. Indeed, recent evidence indicates that neuronal guidance factors and their receptors function as angiogenic regulators. As neural guidance cues, netrin-1 is the most extensively studied gene in the field of angiogenesis. Despite achieving some advances in mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy in angiogenesis, there are still a certain number of patients who fail to respond to cell therapy. Thus, a novel therapeutic strategy to enhance the angiogenic property of transplanted cells is desirable. This study examined the impact of combined netrin-1 protein and MSC implantation on therapeutic angiogenesis in a rat model of hind limb ischemia. Hind limb ischemic rats (n = 24) were divided randomly into four groups (six rats per group): control group (0.05 mL saline); netrin-1 group (1 μg netrin-1 dissolved in 0.05 mL saline); MSC group (1 × 10(6) MSCs); and netrin-1/MSCs group (1 μg netrin-1 combined with MSCs). Netrin-1 and/or MSCs were injected directly into the muscle of the ischemic limb. Gross appearance of ischemic limb, collateral vessel formation, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) level were assessed 28 d after treatment. The results showed that pretreatment of MSCs with a recombinant netrin-1 protein markedly augmented the angiographic score and capillary density, improved function of the ischemic limb, and increased levels of VEGF in the plasma and damaged tissues. Further studies assaying the cell migration and network formation suggested that netrin-1 promoted MSC migration and enhanced its ability to participate in tube formation. These results demonstrated that transplantation of MSCs pretreated with netrin-1 protein significantly improved the therapeutic effect of MSCs and, therefore, may provide a novel therapeutic approach for ischemic disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier

  11. Radioprotection by WR-151327 against the late normal tissue damage in mouse hind legs from gamma ray radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushita, Satoru; Ando, Koichi; Koike, Sachiko

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the protective effect of WR-151327 on late radiation-induced damaged to normal tissues in mice, the right hind legs of mice with or without WR-151327 administration (400 mg/kg) were irradiated with 137 Cs gamma rays. Leg contracture and skin shrinkage assays were performed at 380 days after irradiation. The mice were killed on day 400 postirradiation and histological sections of the legs were made. The thickness of the dermis, epidermis, and skin (dermis plus epidermis) was measured. The muscular area of the legs and the posterior knee angle between the femur and tibia were also measured. The left hind legs were similarly assessed as nonirradiated controls. Group means and standard deviations were calculated and dose-response curves were drawn for every endpoint. Then, the dose modifying factor (DMF) for each endpoint and the correlations among endpoints were determined. Latae damage assayed by leg contracture and skin shrinkage progressed with increasing radiation dose. However, it was reduced by drug treatment. The significant effect was indicated for skin shrinkage by a DMF of 1.8 at 35%. The DMF for leg contracture was 1.3 at 6 mm. In the irradiated legs, epidermal hyperplasia and dermal fibrosis in the skin, muscular atrophy, and extension disturbance of the knee joint were observed. These changes progressed with increasing radiation dose. Skin damage assayed by the present endpoints was also reduced by drug treatment by DMFs of 1.4 to 1.7. However, DMFs for damage to the muscle and knee were not determined because no isoeffect was observed. There were good correlations between leg contracture or skin shrinkage and the other endpoints in both untreated and drug-treated mice. WR-151327 has the potential to protect against radiation-induced late normal tissue damage. 17 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  12. TLR4 accessory molecule RP105 (CD180 regulates monocyte-driven arteriogenesis in a murine hind limb ischemia model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonius J N M Bastiaansen

    Full Text Available AIMS: We investigated the role of the TLR4-accessory molecule RP105 (CD180 in post-ischemic neovascularization, i.e. arteriogenesis and angiogenesis. TLR4-mediated activation of pro-inflammatory Ly6Chi monocytes is crucial for effective neovascularization. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that RP105+ monocytes are present in the perivascular space of remodeling collateral arterioles. As RP105 inhibits TLR4 signaling, we hypothesized that RP105 deficiency would lead to an unrestrained TLR4-mediated inflammatory response and hence to enhanced blood flow recovery after ischemia. METHODS AND RESULTS: RP105-/- and wild type (WT mice were subjected to hind limb ischemia and blood flow recovery was followed by Laser Doppler Perfusion Imaging. Surprisingly, we found that blood flow recovery was severely impaired in RP105-/- mice. Immunohistochemistry showed that arteriogenesis was reduced in these mice compared to the WT. However, both in vivo and ex vivo analyses showed that circulatory pro-arteriogenic Ly6Chi monocytes were more readily activated in RP105-/- mice. FACS analyses showed that Ly6Chi monocytes became activated and migrated to the affected muscle tissues in WT mice following induction of hind limb ischemia. Although Ly6Chi monocytes were readily activated in RP105-/- mice, migration into the ischemic tissues was hampered and instead, Ly6Chi monocytes accumulated in their storage compartments, bone marrow and spleen, in RP105-/- mice. CONCLUSIONS: RP105 deficiency results in an unrestrained inflammatory response and monocyte over-activation, most likely due to the lack of TLR4 regulation. Inappropriate, premature systemic activation of pro-inflammatory Ly6Chi monocytes results in reduced infiltration of Ly6Chi monocytes in ischemic tissues and in impaired blood flow recovery.

  13. Effects of hyperbaric therapy on liver morphofunctional of rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus after hind limb ischemia-reperfusion injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Sektiari Lukiswanto

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The objective of this research was to study and to prove the effectiveness of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT starting time on liver morphofunctional changes after ischemia-reperfusion in the hind limb of rabbits. Materials and Methods: This research used a complete randomized design with 4 groups and 6 repetitions on each. After 6 h artery femoral is ligation, reperfusion was performed for 100 min (G1, HBOT for 90 min after 10 min reperfusion (G2, 10 min reperfusion (G3, and HBOT 90 min after 60 min reperfusion (G4. Then, all of the rabbits were sacrificed. The liver and blood were taken for histopathological changes examination as well as for measuring the level of aspartate aminotransferase (AST and alanine aminotransferase (ALT. The statistical test using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney showed that the score of degeneration, necrosis, and portal inflammation in groups without HBOT (G1 and G3 were not significantly different, as well as in group with HBOT (G2 and G4 (p>0.05. However, the scores of histopathological changes in G1 and G3 were significantly different from those in G2 and G4 (p0.05. Results: Hind limb ischemia injury reperfusion can trigger damage for liver morphology, but not lead to liver dysfunction. Reperfusion can trigger increased activity of neutrophils, while neutrophil infiltration in the organ will lead to dysfunction. HBOT can inhibit the activity of neutrophils and the dysfunction of organs caused by ischemic reperfusion. Conclusion: HBOT for 90 min, both 10 and 60 min after the reperfusion, can protect hepatocytes from damage.

  14. The foot-surface interaction and its impact on musculoskeletal adaptation and injury risk in the horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkes, R S V; Witte, T H

    2015-09-01

    The equine limb has evolved for efficient locomotion and high-speed performance, with adaptations of bone, tendon and muscle. However, the system lacks the ability seen in some species to dynamically adapt to different circumstances. The mechanical interaction of the limb and the ground is influenced by internal and external factors including fore-hind mass distribution, lead limb, moving on a curve, shoeing and surface properties. It is unclear which of the components of limb loading have the largest effect on injury and performance but peak load, impact and vibration all play a role. Factors related to the foot-ground interface that limit performance are poorly understood. Peak performance varies vastly between disciplines but at high speeds such as racing and polo, force and grip are key limits to performance. © 2015 EVJ Ltd.

  15. Insights into the dynamics of hind leg development in honey bee (Apis mellifera L. queen and worker larvae - A morphology/differential gene expression analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Gonçalves Santos

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Phenotypic plasticity is a hallmark of the caste systems of social insects, expressed in their life history and morphological traits. These are best studied in bees. In their co-evolution with angiosperm plants, the females of corbiculate bees have acquired a specialized structure on their hind legs for collecting pollen. In the highly eusocial bees (Apini and Meliponini, this structure is however only present in workers and absent in queens. By means of histological sections and cell proliferation analysis we followed the developmental dynamics of the hind legs of queens and workers in the fourth and fifth larval instars. In parallel, we generated subtractive cDNA libraries for hind leg discs of queen and worker larvae by means of a Representational Difference Analysis (RDA. From the total of 135 unique sequences we selected 19 for RT-qPCR analysis, where six of these were confirmed as differing significantly in their expression between the two castes in the larval spinning stage. The development of complex structures such as the bees’ hind legs, requires diverse patterning mechanisms and signaling modules, as indicated by the set of differentially expressed genes related with cell adhesion and signaling pathways.

  16. Effects of 5-hydroxytryptamine on capillary and arteriovenous anastomotic blood flow in the human hand and forearm and in the pig hind leg

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blauw, G.; Bom, A. H.; van Brummelen, P.; Camps, J.; Arndt, J. W.; Verdouw, P. D.; Chang, P. C.; van Zwieten, P. A.; Saxena, P. R.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of intraarterially infused serotonin (5-HT) on capillary and arteriovenous anastomotic (AVA) blood flow were investigated in the hand and forearm of 19 healthy volunteers, and in the hind leg of six anesthetized pigs using radioactive microspheres with a diameter of 15 microns. The

  17. Fatty liver accompanies an increase of Lactobacillus acidophilus in the hind gut of C57/BL mice fed a high-fat diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    High-fat diets can produce obesity and have been linked to the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which also induces changes in the gut microbiome. This study tested the hypothesis that high-fat feeding increases certain predominate hind gut bacteria in a C57BL/6 mouse model o...

  18. Kallinev nafta võib hakata majanduskasvu pidurdama. 145dollariline nafta hind on majandusele ohtlik / Katri Soe-Surén

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Soe-Surén, Katri

    2011-01-01

    Ekspertide hinnangul on nafta hinna tõusu taga paranenud majandusnäitajad. Suurema osa majandusuuringu instituutide, pankade ja ekspertide hinnangul on alanud aastal nafta hind 70 ja 90 dollari vahel barrelist, IEA ekspert Fatih Birol ennustab suuremat hinnatõusu ja hoiatab, et tõusvad hinnad võivad muutuda tõsiseks probleemiks maailma majandusele

  19. Implantation of Autologous Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Foot Fat Pad in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molligan, Jeremy; Mitchell, Reed; Bhasin, Priya; Lakhani, Aliya; Schon, Lew; Zhang, Zijun

    2015-11-01

    The foot fat pad (FFP) bears body weight and may become a source of foot pain during aging. This study investigated the regenerative effects of autologous adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AT-MSCs) in the FFP of rats. Fat tissue was harvested from a total of 30 male Sprague-Dawley rats for isolation of AT-MSCs. The cells were cultured, adipogenic differentiation was induced for 1 week, and the AT-MSCs were labeled with fluorescent dye before injection. AT-MSCs (5 × 10(4) in 50 µL of saline) were injected into the second infradigital pad in the right hindfoot of the rat of origin. Saline only (50 µL) was injected into the corresponding fat pad in the left hind paw of each rat. Rats (n = 10) were euthanized at 1, 2, and 3 weeks, and the second infradigital fat pads were dissected for histologic examination. The fluorescence-labeled AT-MSCs were present in the foot pads throughout the 3-week experimental period. On histologic testing, the area of fat pad units (FPUs) in the fat pads that received AT-MSC injections was greater than that in the control fat pads. Although the thickness of septae was not changed by AT-MSC injections, the density of elastic fibers in the septae was increased in the fat pads with implanted AT-MSCs. In this short-term study, the implanted AT-MSCs largely survived and might have stimulated the expansion of individual FPUs and increased the density of elastic fibers in the FFP in this rat model. These data support the development of stem cell therapies for age-associated degeneration in FFP in humans. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Validation of the Dutch language version of the Foot and Ankle Outcome Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierevelt, I N; Beimers, L; van Bergen, C J A; Haverkamp, D; Terwee, C B; Kerkhoffs, G M M J

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a Dutch language version of the Foot and Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS-DLV) and evaluate its measurement properties according to the definitions of the COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments (COSMIN). After a standard forward-backward translation procedure, the Dutch version of the FAOS was evaluated for reliability and validity in 110 patients with various hind foot and ankle complaints. Reliability was evaluated by calculation of intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), Cronbach's alpha for internal consistency, and the smallest detectable change (SDC). Construct validity of the FAOS was assessed by calculation of Spearman's correlation coefficients with similar and dissimilar domains of the SF-36 health survey, American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society Ankle and Hindfoot Scale, and visual analogue scales for pain and disability. Dimensionality was tested with confirmatory factor analysis. Reliability of the FAOS-DLV was good. The ICC of the subscales ranged from 0.83 to 0.88. The minimal value of Cronbach's alpha was 0.76. The SDC at individual level ranged from 18 to 21 and at group level between 2.1 and 2.5. Construct validity was supported by confirmation of 85 % of the hypothesized correlations. Unidimensionality of the FAOS-DLV domains was moderate. The Dutch version of the FAOS seems to have acceptable measurement properties. The questionnaire can be used for functional assessment of patients with varying hindfoot and ankle symptoms. It is, however, more suitable for clinical evaluation at group level than for monitoring a specific patient. Diagnostic study, Level I.

  1. Laboratory evaluation of footings for lunar telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Koon M.; Golis, Kelly M.; Johnson, Stewart W.

    1992-01-01

    Presented here are the results of laboratory experiments with diffferent footing shapes for lunar telescopes. These experiments used a variety of soils including some to simulate regolith response. Based on what is known of regolith and regolith-structure interaction, a shallow-multiple-contact points footing foundation can be adequately designed to support lunar telescopes. Plane-strain load-displacement tests were conducted with different footings and different lunar simulants in a deep transparent plexiglass container. The model footings considered include the rectangular, hemispherical, and spudcan designs. Simulants used to reproduce the mechanical properties of the lunar regolith were fly ash, crushed basalt with and without glass, and a processed lunar simulant. Load-displacement curves were obtained for the different footings in Ottawa sand and in the crushed basalt with glass. The spudcan footing was found to be self-digging and yet stiff, thus providing excellent lateral stability in a large variety of soils.

  2. Diabetes: Good Diabetes Management and Regular Foot Care Help Prevent Severe Foot Sores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amputation and diabetes: How to protect your feet Good diabetes management and regular foot care help prevent severe foot sores that ... and may require amputation. By Mayo Clinic Staff Diabetes complications can include nerve damage and poor blood ...

  3. Osteomyelitis in diabetic foot: A comprehensive overview

    OpenAIRE

    Giurato, Laura; Meloni, Marco; Izzo, Valentina; Uccioli, Luigi

    2017-01-01

    Foot infection is a well recognized risk factor for major amputation in diabetic patients. The osteomyelitis is one of the most common expression of diabetic foot infection, being present approximately in present in 10%-15% of moderate and in 50% of severe infectious process. An early and accurate diagnosis is required to ensure a targeted treatment and reduce the risk of major amputation. The aim of this review is to report a complete overview about the management of diabetic foot osteomyeli...

  4. Acquired flat foot deformity: postoperative imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimmick, Simon; Chhabra, Avneesh; Grujic, Leslie; Linklater, James M

    2012-07-01

    Flat foot (pes planus) is a progressive and disabling pathology that is treated initially with conservative measures and often followed by a variety of surgeries. This article briefly reviews the pathology in acquired flat foot deformity, the classification of posterior tibial tendon dysfunction, discusses surgical techniques for the management of adult flat foot deformity, and reviews potential complications and their relevant imaging appearances. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  5. The Manchester?Oxford Foot Questionnaire (MOXFQ)

    OpenAIRE

    Morley, D.; Jenkinson, C.; Doll, H.; Lavis, G.; Sharp, R.; Cooke, P.; Dawson, J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire (MOXFQ) is a validated 16-item, patient-reported outcome measure for evaluating outcomes of foot or ankle surgery. The original development of the instrument identified three domains. This present study examined whether the three domains could legitimately be summed to provide a single summary index score. METHODS: The MOXFQ and Short-Form (SF)-36 were administered to 671 patients before surgery of the foot or ankle. Data from the three dom...

  6. Foot structure and footwear prescription in diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bus, Sicco A.

    2008-01-01

    Foot structure abnormalities such as foot deformity and limited joint mobility are common and well established components of the diabetic foot which are associated with increased levels of mechanical stress on the foot and the development of ulcers. Our understanding of foot structure abnormality in

  7. A review of the biomechanics of the diabetic foot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schie, C. H. M.

    2005-01-01

    In general, diabetic foot ulcers result from abnormal mechanical loading of the foot, such as repetitive moderate pressure applied to the plantar aspect of the foot while walking. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy causes changes in foot structure, affecting foot function and subsequently leading to

  8. Sex-related differences in foot shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, I; Grau, S; Mauch, M; Maiwald, C; Horstmann, T

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate sex-related differences in foot morphology. In total, 847 subjects were scanned using a 3-D-footscanner. Three different analysis methods were used: (1) comparisons were made for absolute foot measures within 250-270 mm foot length (FL); (2) and for averaged measures (% FL) across all sizes; (3) the feet were then classified using a cluster analysis. Within 250-270 mm FL, male feet were wider and higher (mean differences (MD) 1.3-5.9 mm). No relevant sex-related differences could be found in the comparison of averaged measures (MD 0.3-0.6% FL). Foot types were categorised into voluminous, flat-pointed and slender. Shorter feet were more often voluminous, longer feet were more likely to be narrow and flat. However, the definition of 'short' and 'long' was sex-related; thus, allometry of foot measures was different. For shoe design, measures should be derived for each size and sex separately. Different foot types should be considered to account for the variety in foot shape. Improper footwear can cause foot pain and deformity. Therefore, knowledge of sex-related differences in foot measures is important to assist proper shoe fit in both men and women. The present study supplements the field of knowledge within this context with recommendations for the manufacturing of shoes.

  9. Prevention and treatment of diabetic foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jonathan Zhang Ming; Ng, Natasha Su Lynn; Thomas, Cecil

    2017-03-01

    The rising prevalence of diabetes estimated at 3.6 million people in the UK represents a major public health and socioeconomic burden to our National Health Service. Diabetes and its associated complications are of a growing concern. Diabetes-related foot complications have been identified as the single most common cause of morbidity among diabetic patients. The complicating factor of underlying peripheral vascular disease renders the majority of diabetic foot ulcers asymptomatic until latter evidence of non-healing ulcers become evident. Therefore, preventative strategies including annual diabetic foot screening and diabetic foot care interventions facilitated through a multidisciplinary team have been implemented to enable early identification of diabetic patients at high risk of diabetic foot complications. The National Diabetes Foot Care Audit reported significant variability and deficiencies of care throughout England and Wales, with emphasis on change in the structure of healthcare provision and commissioning, improvement of patient education and availability of healthcare access, and emphasis on preventative strategies to reduce morbidities and mortality of this debilitating disease. This review article aims to summarise major risk factors contributing to the development of diabetic foot ulcers. It also considers the key evidence-based strategies towards preventing diabetic foot ulcer. We discuss tools used in risk stratification and classifications of foot ulcer.

  10. Prosthetic management of the partial foot amputee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonclas, Peter P; O'donnell, Casey J

    2005-07-01

    Partial foot amputations provide advantages and challenges to the patient confronting loss of limb and the rehabilitation team. The partial foot amputation offers the potential for retention of plantar load-bearing tissues that are capable of tolerating the forces involved in weight bearing; this can allow the patient to ambulate with or without a prosthesis. Because of the complexity of the foot-ankle complex and the multiple types of partial foot amputations encountered, choosing the appropriate prosthesis can be challenging. This article explains some of the rationale and common options available for the different levels of amputation.

  11. Foot type biomechanics part 1: structure and function of the asymptomatic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillstrom, Howard J; Song, Jinsup; Kraszewski, Andrew P; Hafer, Jocelyn F; Mootanah, Rajshree; Dufour, Alyssa B; Chow, Betty Shingpui; Deland, Jonathan T

    2013-03-01

    Differences in foot structure are thought to be associated with differences in foot function during movement. Many foot pathologies are of a biomechanical nature and often associated with foot type. Fundamental to the understanding of foot pathomechanics is the question: do different foot types have distinctly different structure and function? To determine if objective measures of foot structure and function differ between planus, rectus and cavus foot types in asymptomatic individuals. Sixty-one asymptomatic healthy adults between 18 and 77 years old, that had the same foot type bilaterally (44 planus feet, 54 rectus feet, and 24 cavus feet), were recruited. Structural and functional measurements were taken using custom equipment, an emed-x plantar pressure measuring device, a GaitMat II gait pattern measurement system, and a goniometer. Generalized Estimation Equation modeling was employed to determine if each dependent variable of foot structure and function was significantly different across foot type while accounting for potential dependencies between sides. Post hoc testing was performed to assess pair wise comparisons. Several measures of foot structure (malleolar valgus index and arch height index) were significantly different between foot types. Gait pattern parameters were invariant across foot types. Peak pressure, maximum force, pressure-time-integral, force-time-integral and contact area were significantly different in several medial forefoot and arch locations between foot types. Planus feet exhibited significantly different center of pressure excursion indices compared to rectus and cavus feet. Planus, rectus and cavus feet exhibited significantly different measures of foot structure and function. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Foot Type Biomechanics Part 1: Structure and Function of the Asymptomatic Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillstrom, Howard J.; Song, Jinsup; Kraszewski, Andrew P.; Hafer, Jocelyn F.; Mootanah, Rajshree; Dufour, Alyssa B.; PT, Betty (Shingpui) Chow; Deland, Jonathan T.

    2012-01-01

    Background Differences in foot structure are thought to be associated with differences in foot function during movement. Many foot pathologies are of a biomechanical nature and often associated with foot type. Fundamental to the understanding of foot pathomechanics is the question: do different foot types have distinctly different structure and function? Aim To determine if objective measures of foot structure and function differ between planus, rectus and cavus foot types in asymptomatic individuals. Methods Sixty-one asymptomatic healthy adults between 18 and 77 years old, that had the same foot type bilaterally (44 planus feet, 54 rectus feet, and 24 cavus feet), were recruited. Structural and functional measurements were taken using custom equipment, an emed-x plantar pressure measuring device, a GaitMatII gait pattern measurement system, and a goniometer. Generalized Estimation Equation modeling was employed to determine if each dependent variable of foot structure and function was significantly different across foot type while accounting for potential dependencies between sides. Post hoc testing was performed to assess pairwise comparisons. Results Several measures of foot structure (malleolar valgus index and arch height index) were significantly different between foot types. Gait pattern parameters were invariant across foot types. Peak pressure, maximum force, pressure-time-integral, force-time-integral and contact area were significantly different in several medial forefoot and arch locations between foot types. Planus feet exhibited significantly different center of pressure excursion indices compared to rectus and cavus feet. Conclusions Planus, rectus and cavus feet exhibited significantly different measures of foot structure and function. PMID:23107625

  13. The impact of foot insole on the energy consumption of flat-footed individuals during walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Mohammad Taghi; Fereshtehnejad, Niloofar; Pool, Fatemeh

    2013-02-01

    The human foot contains one of the most variable structures of the body, which is the medial longitudinal arch. Decrease in the height of this arch results in a flat foot. Although there is some evidence regarding the influence of flat foot on gait performance of flat-footed individuals, there is no strong evidence to support the theory that being flat-footed has an effect on energy consumption. Therefore, the aim of this study was to find the relationship between flat foot and energy consumption. Two groups of normal and flat-footed participants were recruited in this research project. They were selected from the staff and students of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. The foot indexes of both groups were obtained using the footprint method with help of Solid worker software. The physiological cost index (PCI) of the participants was measured by the use of a heart rate monitoring system (Polar Electro, Finland). The differences between the PCIs of both groups of participants was determined using a t test. In addition, the influence of using an insole was evaluated using a paired t test. The energy consumption of flat-footed individuals differed significantly from that of normal individuals (the PCIs of normal and flat-footed individuals were 0.357 and 0.368 beats/m, respectively). Using a foot insole improved the performance of the flat-footed individuals during walking. The PCI of flat-footed individuals is more than that of normal participants as a result of misalignment of foot structure. Moreover, using a foot insole improved foot alignment and decreased energy consumption.

  14. The role of foot morphology on foot function in diabetic subjects with or without neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiotto, Annamaria; Sawacha, Zimi; Guarneri, Gabriella; Cristoferi, Giuseppe; Avogaro, Angelo; Cobelli, Claudio

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of foot morphology, related with respect to diabetes and peripheral neuropathy in altering foot kinematics and plantar pressure during gait. Healthy and diabetic subjects with or without neuropathy with different foot types were analyzed. Three dimensional multisegment foot kinematics and plantar pressures were assessed on 120 feet: 40 feet (24 cavus, 20 with valgus heel and 11 with hallux valgus) in the control group, 80 feet in the diabetic (25 cavus 13 with valgus heel and 13 with hallux valgus) and the neuropathic groups (28 cavus, 24 with valgus heel and 18 with hallux valgus). Subjects were classified according to their foot morphology allowing further comparisons among the subgroups with the same foot morphology. When comparing neuropathic subjects with cavus foot, valgus heel with controls with the same foot morphology, important differences were noticed: increased dorsiflexion and peak plantar pressure on the forefoot (P<0.05), decreased contact surface on the hindfoot (P<0.03). While results indicated the important role of foot morphology in altering both kinematics and plantar pressure in diabetic subjects, diabetes appeared to further contribute in altering foot biomechanics. Surprisingly, all the diabetic subjects with normal foot arch or with valgus hallux were no more likely to display significant differences in biomechanics parameters than controls. This data could be considered a valuable support for future research on diabetic foot function, and in planning preventive interventions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Assessment of signs of foot infection in diabetes patients using photographic foot imaging and infrared thermography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazenberg, Constantijn E. V. B.; van Netten, Jaap J.; van Baal, Sjef G.; Bus, Sicco A.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with diabetic foot disease require frequent screening to prevent complications and may be helped through telemedical home monitoring. Within this context, the goal was to determine the validity and reliability of assessing diabetic foot infection using photographic foot imaging and infrared

  16. A new method to normalize plantar pressure measurements for foot size and foot progression angle.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijsers, N.L.; Stolwijk, N.M.; Nienhuis, B.; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2009-01-01

    Plantar pressure measurement provides important information about the structure and function of the foot and is a helpful tool to evaluate patients with foot complaints. In general, average and maximum plantar pressure of 6-11 areas under the foot are used to compare groups of subjects. However,

  17. Multi-body simulation of a canine hind limb: model development, experimental validation and calculation of ground reaction forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helms, Gabriele; Behrens, Bernd-Arno; Stolorz, Martin; Wefstaedt, Patrick; Nolte, Ingo

    2009-11-23

    Among other causes the long-term result of hip prostheses in dogs is determined by aseptic loosening. A prevention of prosthesis complications can be achieved by an optimization of the tribological system which finally results in improved implant duration. In this context a computerized model for the calculation of hip joint loadings during different motions would be of benefit. In a first step in the development of such an inverse dynamic multi-body simulation (MBS-) model we here present the setup of a canine hind limb model applicable for the calculation of ground reaction forces. The anatomical geometries of the MBS-model have been established using computer tomography- (CT-) and magnetic resonance imaging- (MRI-) data. The CT-data were collected from the pelvis, femora, tibiae and pads of a mixed-breed adult dog. Geometric information about 22 muscles of the pelvic extremity of 4 mixed-breed adult dogs was determined using MRI. Kinematic and kinetic data obtained by motion analysis of a clinically healthy dog during a gait cycle (1 m/s) on an instrumented treadmill were used to drive the model in the multi-body simulation. As a result the vertical ground reaction forces (z-direction) calculated by the MBS-system show a maximum deviation of 1.75%BW for the left and 4.65%BW for the right hind limb from the treadmill measurements. The calculated peak ground reaction forces in z- and y-direction were found to be comparable to the treadmill measurements, whereas the curve characteristics of the forces in y-direction were not in complete alignment. In conclusion, it could be demonstrated that the developed MBS-model is suitable for simulating ground reaction forces of dogs during walking. In forthcoming investigations the model will be developed further for the calculation of forces and moments acting on the hip joint during different movements, which can be of help in context with the in silico development and testing of hip prostheses.

  18. Multi-body simulation of a canine hind limb: model development, experimental validation and calculation of ground reaction forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wefstaedt Patrick

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among other causes the long-term result of hip prostheses in dogs is determined by aseptic loosening. A prevention of prosthesis complications can be achieved by an optimization of the tribological system which finally results in improved implant duration. In this context a computerized model for the calculation of hip joint loadings during different motions would be of benefit. In a first step in the development of such an inverse dynamic multi-body simulation (MBS- model we here present the setup of a canine hind limb model applicable for the calculation of ground reaction forces. Methods The anatomical geometries of the MBS-model have been established using computer tomography- (CT- and magnetic resonance imaging- (MRI- data. The CT-data were collected from the pelvis, femora, tibiae and pads of a mixed-breed adult dog. Geometric information about 22 muscles of the pelvic extremity of 4 mixed-breed adult dogs was determined using MRI. Kinematic and kinetic data obtained by motion analysis of a clinically healthy dog during a gait cycle (1 m/s on an instrumented treadmill were used to drive the model in the multi-body simulation. Results and Discussion As a result the vertical ground reaction forces (z-direction calculated by the MBS-system show a maximum deviation of 1.75%BW for the left and 4.65%BW for the right hind limb from the treadmill measurements. The calculated peak ground reaction forces in z- and y-direction were found to be comparable to the treadmill measurements, whereas the curve characteristics of the forces in y-direction were not in complete alignment. Conclusion In conclusion, it could be demonstrated that the developed MBS-model is suitable for simulating ground reaction forces of dogs during walking. In forthcoming investigations the model will be developed further for the calculation of forces and moments acting on the hip joint during different movements, which can be of help in context with the in

  19. Young's modulus and SEM analysis of leg bones exposed to simulated microgravity by hind limb suspension (HLS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Niravkumar D.; Mehta, Rahul [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Central Arkansas, 201 Donaghey Avenue, Lewis Science Center 171, Conway, AR 72035 (United States); Ali, Nawab [Department of Applied Science, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 2801 S. University Avenue, Little Rock, AR 72204 (United States); Soulsby, Michael; Chowdhury, Parimal [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 W. Markham St., Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States)

    2013-04-19

    The aim of this study was to determine composition of the leg bone tissue of rats that were exposed to simulated microgravity by Hind-Limb Suspension (HLS) by tail for one week. The leg bones were cross sectioned, cleaned of soft tissues, dried and sputter coated, and then placed horizontally on the stage of a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) for analysis. Interaction of a 17.5 keV electron beam, incident from the vertical direction on the sample, generated images using two detectors. X-rays emitted from the sample during electron bombardment were measured with an Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) feature of SEM using a liquid-nitrogen cooled Si(Li) detector with a resolution of 144 eV at 5.9 keV ({sub 25}Mn K{sub {alpha}} x-ray). K{sub {alpha}}- x-rays from carbon, oxygen, phosphorus and calcium formed the major peaks in the spectrum. Relative percentages of these elements were determined using a software that could also correct for ZAF factors namely Z(atomic number), A(X-ray absorption) and F(characteristic fluorescence). The x-rays from the control groups and from the experimental (HLS) groups were analyzed on well-defined parts (femur, tibia and knee) of the leg bone. The SEM analysis shows that there are definite changes in the hydroxyl or phosphate group of the main component of the bone structure, hydroxyapatite [Ca{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2}], due to hind limb suspension. In a separate experiment, entire leg bones (both from HLS and control rats) were subjected to mechanical stress by mean of a variable force. The stress vs. strain graph was fitted with linear and polynomial function, and the parameters reflecting the mechanical strength of the bone, under increasing stress, were calculated. From the slope of the linear part of the graph the Young's modulus for HLS bones were calculated and found to be 2.49 times smaller than those for control bones.

  20. Classification of diabetic foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Game, Frances

    2016-01-01

    It is known that the relative importance of factors involved in the development of diabetic foot problems can vary in both their presence and severity between patients and lesions. This may be one of the reasons why outcomes seem to vary centre to centre and why some treatments may seem more effective in some people than others. There is a need therefore to classify and describe lesions of the foot in patients with diabetes in a manner that is agreed across all communities but is simple to use in clinical practice. No single system is currently in widespread use, although a number have been published. Not all are well validated outside the system from which they were derived, and it has not always been made clear the clinical purposes to which such classifications should be put to use, whether that be for research, clinical description in routine clinical care or audit. Here the currently published classification systems, their validation in clinical practice, whether they were designed for research, audit or clinical care, and the strengths and weaknesses of each are explored. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Robust Foot Clearance Estimation Based on the Integration of Foot-Mounted IMU Acceleration Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoussaad, Mourad; Sijobert, Benoît; Mombaur, Katja; Coste, Christine Azevedo

    2015-12-23

    This paper introduces a method for the robust estimation of foot clearance during walking, using a single inertial measurement unit (IMU) placed on the subject's foot. The proposed solution is based on double integration and drift cancellation of foot acceleration signals. The method is insensitive to misalignment of IMU axes with respect to foot axes. Details are provided regarding calibration and signal processing procedures. Experimental validation was performed on 10 healthy subjects under three walking conditions: normal, fast and with obstacles. Foot clearance estimation results were compared to measurements from an optical motion capture system. The mean error between them is significantly less than 15 % under the various walking conditions.

  2. Preventing Diabetic Foot Complications : Strategic Recommendations

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The diabetic foot is the commonest cause of non-traumatic lower extremity amputation in the developed and developing nations. Several risk factors predispose the diabetic patient to foot ulceration and peripheral neuropathy, with peripheral vascular disease are the commonest risk factors. Clinical examination for these risk ...

  3. VACUUM ASSISTED CLOSURE IN DIABETIC FOOT MANAGEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Moganakannan; `Prema; Arun Sundara Rajan

    2014-01-01

    Comparision of vacuum assisted closure vs conventional dressing in management of diabetic foot patients. 30 patients were taken in that 15 underwent vacuum therapy and remaining 15 underwent conventional dressing.They were analysed by the development of granulation tissue and wound healing.The study showed Vac therapy is the best modality for management of diabetic foot patients.

  4. Efficient foot motor control by Neymar's brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Eiichi; Hirose, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    How very long-term (over many years) motor skill training shapes internal motor representation remains poorly understood. We provide valuable evidence that the football brain of Neymar da Silva Santos Júnior (the Brasilian footballer) recruits very limited neural resources in the motor-cortical foot regions during foot movements. We scanned his brain activity with a 3-tesla functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while he rotated his right ankle at 1 Hz. We also scanned brain activity when three other age-controlled professional footballers, two top-athlete swimmers and one amateur footballer performed the identical task. A comparison was made between Neymar's brain activity with that obtained from the others. We found activations in the left medial-wall foot motor regions during the foot movements consistently across all participants. However, the size and intensity of medial-wall activity was smaller in the four professional footballers than in the three other participants, despite no difference in amount of foot movement. Surprisingly, the reduced recruitment of medial-wall foot motor regions became apparent in Neymar. His medial-wall activity was smallest among all participants with absolutely no difference in amount of foot movement. Neymar may efficiently control given foot movements probably by largely conserving motor-cortical neural resources. We discuss this possibility in terms of over-years motor skill training effect, use-dependent plasticity, and efficient motor control.

  5. 33 CFR 142.33 - Foot protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES WORKPLACE SAFETY AND HEALTH Personal Protective Equipment § 142.33 Foot... for foot injury to occur shall wear footwear meeting the specifications of ANSI Z41, except when environmental conditions exist that present a hazard greater than that against which the footwear is designed to...

  6. Foot osteoarthritis: latest evidence and developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roddy, Edward; Menz, Hylton B

    2018-04-01

    Foot osteoarthritis (OA) is a common problem in older adults yet is under-researched compared to knee or hand OA. Most existing studies focus on the first metatarsophalangeal joint, with evidence relating to midfoot OA being particularly sparse. Symptomatic radiographic foot OA affects 17% of adults aged 50 years and over. The first metatarsophalangeal joint is most commonly affected, followed by the second cuneometatarsal and talonavicular joints. Epidemiological studies suggest the existence of distinct first metatarsophalangeal joint and polyarticular phenotypes, which have differing clinical and risk factor profiles. There are few randomized controlled trials in foot OA. Existing trials provide some evidence of the effectiveness for pain relief of physical therapy, rocker-sole shoes, foot orthoses and surgical interventions in first metatarsophalangeal joint OA and prefabricated orthoses in midfoot OA. Prospective epidemiological studies and randomized trials are needed to establish the incidence, progression and prognosis of foot OA and determine the effectiveness of both commonly used and more novel interventions.

  7. Real-time control of hind limb functional electrical stimulation using feedback from dorsal root ganglia recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruns, Tim M; Wagenaar, Joost B; Bauman, Matthew J; Gaunt, Robert A; Weber, Douglas J

    2013-04-01

    Functional electrical stimulation (FES) approaches often utilize an open-loop controller to drive state transitions. The addition of sensory feedback may allow for closed-loop control that can respond effectively to perturbations and muscle fatigue. We evaluated the use of natural sensory nerve signals obtained with penetrating microelectrode arrays in lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG) as real-time feedback for closed-loop control of FES-generated hind limb stepping in anesthetized cats. Leg position feedback was obtained in near real-time at 50 ms intervals by decoding the firing rates of more than 120 DRG neurons recorded simultaneously. Over 5 m of effective linear distance was traversed during closed-loop stepping trials in each of two cats. The controller compensated effectively for perturbations in the stepping path when DRG sensory feedback was provided. The presence of stimulation artifacts and the quality of DRG unit sorting did not significantly affect the accuracy of leg position feedback obtained from the linear decoding model as long as at least 20 DRG units were included in the model. This work demonstrates the feasibility and utility of closed-loop FES control based on natural neural sensors. Further work is needed to improve the controller and electrode technologies and to evaluate long-term viability.

  8. An investigation of mechanical nociceptive thresholds in dogs with hind limb joint pain compared to healthy control dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, L K; Whay, H R; Murrell, J C

    2018-04-01

    This study investigated the effects of osteoarthritis (OA) on somatosensory processing in dogs using mechanical threshold testing. A pressure algometer was used to measure mechanical thresholds in 27 dogs with presumed hind limb osteoarthritis and 28 healthy dogs. Mechanical thresholds were measured at the stifles, radii and sternum, and were correlated with scores from an owner questionnaire and a clinical checklist, a scoring system that quantified clinical signs of osteoarthritis. The effects of age and bodyweight on mechanical thresholds were also investigated. Multiple regression models indicated that, when bodyweight was taken into account, dogs with presumed osteoarthritis had lower mechanical thresholds at the stifles than control dogs, but not at other sites. Non-parametric correlations showed that clinical checklist scores and questionnaire scores were negatively correlated with mechanical thresholds at the stifles. The results suggest that mechanical threshold testing using a pressure algometer can detect primary, and possibly secondary, hyperalgesia in dogs with presumed osteoarthritis. This suggests that the mechanical threshold testing protocol used in this study might facilitate assessment of somatosensory changes associated with disease progression or response to treatment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Real-time control of hind limb functional electrical stimulation using feedback from dorsal root ganglia recordings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruns, Tim M.; Wagenaar, Joost B.; Bauman, Matthew J.; Gaunt, Robert A.; Weber, Douglas J.

    2013-04-01

    Objective. Functional electrical stimulation (FES) approaches often utilize an open-loop controller to drive state transitions. The addition of sensory feedback may allow for closed-loop control that can respond effectively to perturbations and muscle fatigue. Approach. We evaluated the use of natural sensory nerve signals obtained with penetrating microelectrode arrays in lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG) as real-time feedback for closed-loop control of FES-generated hind limb stepping in anesthetized cats. Main results. Leg position feedback was obtained in near real-time at 50 ms intervals by decoding the firing rates of more than 120 DRG neurons recorded simultaneously. Over 5 m of effective linear distance was traversed during closed-loop stepping trials in each of two cats. The controller compensated effectively for perturbations in the stepping path when DRG sensory feedback was provided. The presence of stimulation artifacts and the quality of DRG unit sorting did not significantly affect the accuracy of leg position feedback obtained from the linear decoding model as long as at least 20 DRG units were included in the model. Significance. This work demonstrates the feasibility and utility of closed-loop FES control based on natural neural sensors. Further work is needed to improve the controller and electrode technologies and to evaluate long-term viability.

  10. The role of indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase in beneficial effects of stem cells in hind limb ischemia reperfusion injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Masoumy

    Full Text Available Ischemia-Reperfusion (IR injury of limb remains a significant clinical problem causing secondary complications and restricting clinical recovery, despite rapid restoration of blood flow and successful surgery. In an attempt to further improve post ischemic tissue repair, we investigated the effect of a local administration of bone marrow derived stem cells (BMDSCs in the presence or absence of immune-regulatory enzyme, IDO, in a murine model. A whole limb warm ischemia-reperfusion model was developed using IDO sufficient (WT and deficient (KO mice with C57/BL6 background. Twenty-four hours after injury, 5 × 105 cells (5×105 cells/200 µL of PBS solution BMDSCs (Sca1 + cells were injected intramuscularly while the control group received just the vehicle buffer (PBS. Forty-eight to seventy-two hours after limb BMDSC injection, recovery status including the ratio of intrinsic paw function between affected and normal paws, general mobility, and inflammatory responses were measured using video micrometery, flow cytometry, and immunohistochemistry techniques. Additionally, MRI/MRA studies were performed to further study the inflammatory response between groups and to confirm reconstitution of blood flow after ischemia. For the first time, our data, showed that IDO may potentially represent a partial role in triggering the beneficial effects of BMDSCs in faster recovery and protection against structural changes and cellular damage in a hind limb IR injury setting (P = 0.00058.

  11. Dietary fat content and fiber type modulate hind gut microbial community and metabolic markers in the pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hui; Potu, Ramesh; Lu, Hang; Vezzoni de Almeida, Vivian; Stewart, Terry; Ragland, Darryl; Armstrong, Arthur; Adeola, Olayiwola; Nakatsu, Cindy H; Ajuwon, Kolapo M

    2013-01-01

    Obesity leads to changes in the gut microbial community which contribute to the metabolic dysregulation in obesity. Dietary fat and fiber affect the caloric density of foods. The impact of dietary fat content and fiber type on the microbial community in the hind gut is unknown. Effect of dietary fat level and fiber type on hindgut microbiota and volatile fatty acid (VFA) profiles was investigated. Expression of metabolic marker genes in the gut, adipose tissue and liver was determined. A 2 × 2 experiment was conducted in pigs fed at two dietary fat levels (5% or 17.5% swine grease) and two fiber types (4% inulin, fermentable fructo-oligosaccharide or 4% solka floc, non-fermentable cellulose). High fat diets (HFD) resulted in a higher (Pfiber type but not the level of dietary fat. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) of PCR- DGGE profiles showed that inulin feeding negatively correlated with back fat thickness. This study suggests a strong interplay between dietary fat level and fiber type in determining susceptibility to obesity.

  12. Curcumin and dexmedetomidine prevents oxidative stress and renal injury in hind limb ischemia/reperfusion injury in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karahan, M A; Yalcin, S; Aydogan, H; Büyükfirat, E; Kücük, A; Kocarslan, S; Yüce, H H; Taskın, A; Aksoy, N

    2016-06-01

    Curcumin and dexmedetomidine have been shown to have protective effects in ischemia-reperfusion injury on various organs. However, their protective effects on kidney tissue against ischemia-reperfusion injury remain unclear. We aimed to determine whether curcumin or dexmedetomidine prevents renal tissue from injury that was induced by hind limb ischemia-reperfusion in rats. Fifty rats were divided into five groups: sham, control, curcumin (CUR) group (200 mg/kg curcumin, n = 10), dexmedetomidine (DEX) group (25 μg/kg dexmedetomidine, n = 10), and curcumin-dexmedetomidine (CUR-DEX) group (200 mg/kg curcumin and 25 μg/kg dexmedetomidine). Curcumin and dexmedetomidine were administered intraperitoneally immediately after the end of 4 h ischemia, just 5 min before reperfusion. The extremity re-perfused for 2 h and then blood samples were taken and total antioxidant capacity (TAC), total oxidative status (TOS) levels, and oxidative stress index (OSI) were measured, and renal tissue samples were histopathologically examined. The TAC activity levels in blood samples were significantly lower in the control than the other groups (p OSI were found to be significantly increased in the control group compared to others groups (p model.

  13. Foot problems in a group of patients with rheumatoid arthritis: an unmet need for foot care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borman, Pinar; Ayhan, Figen; Tuncay, Figen; Sahin, Mehtap

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the foot involvement in a group of RA patients in regard to symptoms, type and frequency of deformities, location, radiological changes, and foot care. A randomized selected 100 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients were recruited to the study. Data about foot symptoms, duration and location of foot pain, pain intensity, access to services related to foot, treatment, orthoses and assistive devices, and usefulness of therapies were determined by the questionnaire. Radiological changes were assessed according to modified Larsen scoring system. The scores of disease activity scale of 28 joints and Health Assessment Questionnaire indicating the functional status of RA patients were collected from patient files. A total of 100 RA patients (90 female, 10 male) with a mean age of 52.5 ±10.9 years were enrolled to the study. Eighty-nine of the 100 patients had experienced foot complaints/symptoms in the past or currently. Foot pain and foot symptoms were reported as the first site of involvement in 14 patients. Thirty-six patients had ankle pain and the most common sites of the foot symptoms were ankle (36%) and forefoot (30%) followed by hindfoot (17%) and midfoot (7%) currently. Forty-nine of the patients described that they had difficulty in performing their foot care. Insoles and orthopedic shoes were prescribed in 39 patients, but only 14 of them continued to use them. The main reasons for not wearing them were; 17 not helpful (43%), 5 made foot pain worse (12.8%), and 3 did not fit (7.6%). Foot symptoms were reported to be decreased in 24 % of the subjects after the medical treatment and 6 patients indicated that they had underwent foot surgery. Current foot pain was significantly associated with higher body mass index and longer disease duration, and duration of morning stiffness. The radiological scores did not correlate with duration of foot symptoms and current foot pain (p>0.05) but the total number of foot deformities was

  14. Effect of Custom-Molded Foot Orthoses on Foot Pain and Balance in Children With Symptomatic Flexible Flat Feet

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hong-Jae; Lim, Kil-Byung; Yoo, JeeHyun; Yoon, Sung-Won; Yun, Hyun-Ju; Jeong, Tae-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of custom-molded foot orthoses on foot pain and balance in children with symptomatic flexible flat foot 1 month and 3 months after fitting foot orthosis. Method A total of 24 children over 6 years old with flexible flat feet and foot pain for at least 6 months were recruited for this study. Their resting calcaneal stance position and calcaneal pitch angle were measured. Individual custom-molded rigid foot orthoses were prescribed using inverted orthotic techni...

  15. Hand and foot contamination monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakati, R.K.; Kaptral, R.S.; Ananthkrishnan, T.S.; Pansare, M.G.

    1989-01-01

    In order to make quick measurements of beta and gamma contaminations on hands and feet of personnel working in radioactive environments, hand and foot contamination monitors are widely used. This paper describes such a monitor system designed with Intel 8085 based microcomputer. The monitoring and warning system is designed to perform measurement of activity spread over surface of hands and soles of shoes or feet. Even though the system has many features to aid testing and maintainance operation, it is easy to use for unskilled persons. In order to check the contamination, the person stands on platform and inserts both his hands into detector assemblies thereby actuating the sensing switches. After a preset interval, annunciation of clean or contaminated status is declared by the system. (author)

  16. Holistic management of diabetic foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindarto, D.

    2018-03-01

    Diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) is the most costly and devastating complication of diabetes mellitus, which affect 15% of diabetic patients during their lifetime. DFUs are complex, chronic wounds, which have a major long-term impact on the morbidity, mortality and quality of patients’ lives. Individuals who develop a DFU are at greater risk of premature death, myocardial infarction and fatal stroke than those without a history of DFU. Unlike other chronic wounds, the development and progression of DFU is often complicated by wideranging diabetic changes, such as neuropathy and vascular disease. The management of DFU should be optimized by using a multidisciplinary team, due to a holistic approach to wound management is required. Based on studies, blood sugar control, wound debridement, advanced dressings and offloading modalities should always be a part of DFU management. Furthermore, surgery to heal chronic ulcer and prevent recurrence should be considered as an essential component of management in some cases.

  17. Bacteriology of diabetic foot lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anandi C

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical grading and bacteriological study of 107 patients with diabetic foot lesions revealed polymicrobial aetiology in 69 (64.4% and single aetiology in 21 (19.6%. Among 107 patients 62 had ulcer. Of these 31 had mixed aerobes. Twenty six patients with cellulitis and 12 with gangrene had more than 5 types of aerobes and anaerobes such as E.coli, Klebsiella spp., Pseudomonas spp., Proteus spp., Enterobactor spp., Enterococci spp., Clostridium perfringens, Bacteroides spp., Prevotella spp. and Peptostreptococcus spp. It was noted that 50 out of 62 patients with ulcer, and all the patients with cellulitis and gangrene were given surgical management and treated with appropriate antibiotics based on antimicrobial susceptibility testing.

  18. Assessment of signs of foot infection in diabetes patients using photographic foot imaging and infrared thermography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazenberg, Constantijn E V B; van Netten, Jaap J; van Baal, Sjef G; Bus, Sicco A

    2014-06-01

    Patients with diabetic foot disease require frequent screening to prevent complications and may be helped through telemedical home monitoring. Within this context, the goal was to determine the validity and reliability of assessing diabetic foot infection using photographic foot imaging and infrared thermography. For 38 patients with diabetes who presented with a foot infection or were admitted to the hospital with a foot-related complication, photographs of the plantar foot surface using a photographic imaging device and temperature data from six plantar regions using an infrared thermometer were obtained. A temperature difference between feet of >2.2 °C defined a "hotspot." Two independent observers assessed each foot for presence of foot infection, both live (using the Perfusion-Extent-Depth-Infection-Sensation classification) and from photographs 2 and 4 weeks later (for presence of erythema and ulcers). Agreement in diagnosis between live assessment and (the combination of ) photographic assessment and temperature recordings was calculated. Diagnosis of infection from photographs was specific (>85%) but not very sensitive (90%) but not very specific (60%) and specific (>79%). Intra-observer agreement between photographic assessments was good (Cohen's κ=0.77 and 0.52 for both observers). Diagnosis of foot infection in patients with diabetes seems valid and reliable using photographic imaging in combination with infrared thermography. This supports the intended use of these modalities for the home monitoring of high-risk patients with diabetes to facilitate early diagnosis of signs of foot infection.

  19. Foot lengthening and shortening during gait: a parameter to investigate foot function?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolwijk, N M; Koenraadt, K L M; Louwerens, J W K; Grim, D; Duysens, J; Keijsers, N L W

    2014-02-01

    Based on the windlass mechanism theory of Hicks, the medial longitudinal arch (MLA) flattens during weight bearing. Simultaneously, foot lengthening is expected. However, changes in foot length during gait and the influence of walking speed has not been investigated yet. The foot length and MLA angle of 34 healthy subjects (18 males, 16 females) at 3 velocities (preferred, low (preferred -0.4 m/s) and fast (preferred +0.4 m/s) speed were investigated with a 3D motion analysis system (VICON(®)). The MLA angle was calculated as the angle between the second metatarsal head, the navicular tuberculum and the heel in the local sagittal plane. Foot length was calculated as the distance between the marker at the heel and the 2nd metatarsal head. A General Linear Model for repeated measures was used to indicate significant differences in MLA angle and foot length between different walking speeds. The foot lengthened during the weight acceptance phase of gait and shortened during propulsion. With increased walking speed, the foot elongated less after heel strike and shortened more during push off. The MLA angle and foot length curve were similar, except between 50% and 80% of the stance phase in which the MLA increases whereas the foot length showed a slight decrease. Foot length seems to represent the Hicks mechanism in the foot and the ability of the foot to bear weight. At higher speeds, the foot becomes relatively stiffer, presumably to act as a lever arm to provide extra propulsion. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The angiotensin II AT1 receptor antagonist irbesartan prevents thromboxane A2-induced vasoconstriction in the rat hind-limb vascular bed in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuhara, M; Neves, L A; Li, P; Diz, D I; Ferrario, C M; Brosnihan, K B

    2001-03-01

    We studied the vasoconstrictor effects of the thromboxane A2 (TxA2) analogue U46619 in the perfused hind limb of rats under constant flow before and after intravenous injection of irbesartan, an angiotensin II AT1 receptor antagonist, to test whether irbesartan interacts in vivo with the thromboxane A2/prostaglandin endoperoxidase H2 (TxA2/PGH2) receptor. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 15, body weight 350-420 g) were anesthetized with thiobutabarbital sodium (Inactin, 100 mg/kg intraperitoneally). Regional vascular responses to U46619 (0.5 and 1.0 microg) were investigated in the rat hind quarter under conditions of controlled flow before and after administration of irbesartan (10 mg/kg, intravenously). In addition, to test the specificity of the effect of irbesartan on U46619, phenylephrine (0.5, 1.0 microg) and another AT1 receptor antagonist, candesartan CV11974 (0.3 mg/kg, intravenously) were used. The dose-dependent increases in hind-limb perfusion pressure produced by U46619 were significantly attenuated by prior injection of irbesartan, at a dose that blocked the angiotensin II (Ang II) pressor responses. The specificity for the response was shown with the demonstrations that the increase in vascular resistance produced by phenylephrine was unchanged by irbesartan and, furthermore, that the increase in vascular resistance produced by U46619 was unchanged by another AT1 receptor antagonist, candesartan. This study demonstrates that irbesartan interacts at the TxA2/PGH2 receptor in the rat's hind limb in vivo, to modify changes in local regional vascular resistance. The dual antagonistic actions of irbesartan, acting at both AT1 and TxA2 receptors in blood vessels, may overall enhance its therapeutic profile in the treatment of hypertension.

  1. Protease-activated receptor (PAR2, but not PAR1, is involved in collateral formation and anti-inflammatory monocyte polarization in a mouse hind limb ischemia model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa G van den Hengel

    Full Text Available AIMS: In collateral development (i.e. arteriogenesis, mononuclear cells are important and exist as a heterogeneous population consisting of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory/repair-associated cells. Protease-activated receptor (PAR1 and PAR2 are G-protein-coupled receptors that are both expressed by mononuclear cells and are involved in pro-inflammatory reactions, while PAR2 also plays a role in repair-associated responses. Here, we investigated the physiological role of PAR1 and PAR2 in arteriogenesis in a murine hind limb ischemia model. METHODS AND RESULTS: PAR1-deficient (PAR1-/-, PAR2-deficient (PAR2-/- and wild-type (WT mice underwent femoral artery ligation. Laser Doppler measurements revealed reduced post-ischemic blood flow recovery in PAR2-/- hind limbs when compared to WT, while PAR1-/- mice were not affected. Upon ischemia, reduced numbers of smooth muscle actin (SMA-positive collaterals and CD31-positive capillaries were found in PAR2-/- mice when compared to WT mice, whereas these parameters in PAR1-/- mice did not differ from WT mice. The pool of circulating repair-associated (Ly6C-low monocytes and the number of repair-associated (CD206-positive macrophages surrounding collaterals in the hind limbs were increased in WT and PAR1-/- mice, but unaffected in PAR2-/- mice. The number of repair-associated macrophages in PAR2-/- hind limbs correlated with CD11b- and CD115-expression on the circulating monocytes in these animals, suggesting that monocyte extravasation and M-CSF-dependent differentiation into repair-associated cells are hampered. CONCLUSION: PAR2, but not PAR1, is involved in arteriogenesis and promotes the repair-associated response in ischemic tissues. Therefore, PAR2 potentially forms a new pro-arteriogenic target in coronary artery disease (CAD patients.

  2. Ultrastructure of the fibrous matrix surrounding cells of Trypanosoma melophagium in the hind-gut of the sheep ked, Melophagus ovinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heywood, P; Molyneux, D H

    1985-01-01

    A fibrous material surrounds cells of Trypanosoma (Megatrypanum) melophagium in the hind-gut of the sheep ked, Melophagus ovinus, and terminates just beyond the distal portions of the attached cells. The fibres of this extracellular matrix have a diameter of approximately 4 nm and are closely packed. Individual fibres have approximately the same orientation as adjacent fibres and usually lie parallel to the longitudinal axis of the parasite cells.

  3. [The rheumatoid foot. Origin of deformations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, L; Claustre, J; Allieu, Y

    1980-02-01

    Deformations of the foot are a logical and predictable function of the biomechanics of the foot and the constraints undergone by the articulations of the foot, that are unstabilized by the inflammatory process. They result from the combination of three factors : anevolutive teno-articular synovitis, predictible forces (the weight of the extrinsic muscle, the anti-physiological foot), and the congenital morphotype of the foot. Typical deformations (peroneal " coup de vent " of the toes, triangular metatarsus), differ on the clinical level in keeping with the morphotype but respond to the same mechanism. The " coup de vent peronier " remains the most characteristic deformation and is furthered by the excentric action of the extrinsic muscles, and in particular the foot muscle. The common denomination of deformations of the back part of the foot is represented by the valgus calcanean, linked to the action of the weight on the orsion forces that is more or less modified. A better knowledge of the cause of these deformations would make it possible to avoid, if not their apparition, at least their worsening.

  4. Diabetic foot ulcer teams in Norwegian hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robberstad, Mari; Bentsen, Signe Berit; Berg, Tore Julsrud; Iversen, Marjolein M

    2017-09-19

    The national clincial guidelines for diabetes recommend that diabetic foot ulcers be treated by interdisciplinary diabetic foot ulcer teams. This study aims to survey the extent of diabetic foot ulcer teams in the specialist health service in Norwegian hospitals and to describe their clinical composition, organisation and working routines. The study is cross-sectional with the use of a questionnaire survey. The criteria for participating were somatic hospitals with 24-hour operations and a specialist function for patients with diabetes mellitus. A total of 41 hospitals participated of the 51 that fulfilled the criteria. Altogether 17 of 41 hospitals had diabetic foot ulcer teams. The teams had a broad clinical composition and followed national recommendations for surveying risk factors and treatment of diabetic foot ulcers. Nine foot ulcer teams had written routines for assessment, five used the Noklus diabetes patient records to document ulcer treatment, and ten had planned interdisciplinary meetings. Only one-quarter of the teams included both medical and surgical competence in the planned interdisciplinary collaboration. The diabetic foot ulcer teams had broad clinical competence and followed national clinical guidelines. The teams had a short waiting time for the initial consultation, half had written guidelines, and 60 % had planned interdisciplinary meetings. Far fewer had included both medical and surgical competence in the planned interdisciplinary collaboration.

  5. Diabetic Foot Complications Despite Successful Pancreas Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Dong-Kyo; Lee, Ho Seong; Park, Jungu; Ryu, Chang Hyun; Han, Duck Jong; Seo, Sang Gyo

    2017-06-01

    It is known that successful pancreas transplantation enables patients with diabetes to maintain a normal glucose level without insulin and reduces diabetes-related complications. However, we have little information about the foot-specific morbidity in patients who have undergone successful pancreas transplantation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence and predisposing factors for foot complications after successful pancreas transplantation. This retrospective study included 218 patients (91 males, 127 females) who had undergone pancreas transplantation for diabetes. The mean age was 40.7 (range, 15-76) years. Diabetes type, transplantation type, body mass index, and diabetes duration before transplantation were confirmed. After pancreas transplantation, the occurrence and duration of foot and ankle complications were assessed. Twenty-two patients (10.1%) had diabetic foot complications. Fifteen patients (6.9%) had diabetic foot ulcer and 7 patients (3.2%) had Charcot arthropathy. Three patients had both diabetic foot ulcer and Charcot arthropathy. Three insufficiency fractures (1.4%) were included. Mean time of complications after transplantation was 18.5 (range, 2-77) months. Creatinine level 1 year after surgery was higher in the complication group rather than the noncomplication group ( P = .02). Complications of the foot and ankle still occurred following pancreas transplantation in patients with diabetes. Level III, comparative study.

  6. Malignant tumours of the foot and ankle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascard, E.; Gaspar, N.; Brugières, L.; Glorion, C.; Pannier, S.; Gomez-Brouchet, A.

    2017-01-01

    Most of tumours of the foot are tumour-like (synovial cyst, foreign body reactions and epidermal inclusion cyst) or benign conditions (tenosynovial giant cells tumours, planta fibromatosis). Malignant tumours of the soft-tissue and skeleton are very rare in the foot and their diagnosis is often delayed with referral to specialised teams after initial inappropriate procedures or unplanned excisions. The adverse effect of these misdiagnosed tumours is the increasing rate of amputation or local recurrences in the involved patients. In every lump, imaging should be discussed before any local treatment. Every lesion which is not an obvious synovial cyst or plantar fibromatosis should have a biopsy performed. After the age of 40 years, chondrosarcoma is the most usual malignant tumour of the foot. In young patients bone tumours such as osteosarcoma or Ewing’s sarcoma, are very unusually located in the foot. Synovial sarcoma is the most frequent histological diagnosis in soft tissues. Epithelioid sarcoma or clear cell sarcoma, involve more frequently the foot and ankle than other sites. The classic local treatment of malignant conditions of the foot and ankle was below-knee amputation at different levels. Nowadays, with the development of adjuvant therapies, some patients may benefit from conservative surgery or partial amputation after multidisciplinary team discussions. The prognosis of foot malignancy is not different from that at other locations, except perhaps in chondrosarcoma, which seems to be less aggressive in the foot. The anatomy of the foot is very complex with many bony and soft tissue structures in a relatively small space making large resections and conservative treatments difficult to achieve. Cite this article: EFORT Open Rev 2017;2. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.2.160078. Originally published online at www.efortopenreviews.org PMID:28630763

  7. FOOT POSTURAL DEVIATIONS IN FEMALE KATHAK DANCERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roopika Sabharwal

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Kathak is a very complex dance form in which greater emphasis is laid on foot work thus putting substantial amount of stress over the feet. The purpose of this study was to investigate the foot postural deviations amongst the Kathak dancers. Methods: Screening of 40 Female Kathak Dancers was done for the study from Department of Dance, Punjabi University, Patiala on the basis of inclusion criteria. Subjects were assessed for Postural deviations via. Foot Posture Index, Medial Longitudinal Arch Angle, Navicular Drop, Rearfoot angle and Forefoot angle. Results: Percentile analysis of Foot Posture index scores suggested that a large population of kathak dancers (approx 92.5 % have pronated feet. Most of the Kathak dancers showed increase in Rearfoot angle (approx. 90%, Forefoot angle (approx.75% and Navicular drop (approx. 97% and decrease in Medial Longitudinal Arch angle (approx. 95%. Analysis of Coefficient of Correlation suggested a significant positive relationship of Foot Posture Index scores with Rearfoot angle (r = 0.40, p= 0.0087, Navicular Drop (r = 0.62, p= < 0.0001 and Forefoot angle (r = 0.51, p=0.0007 and a significant negative correlation with Medial Longitudinal Arch angle (r = -0.42, p= 0.0059. Conclusion: From the observations, it can be concluded that with time kathak dancers start developing certain Postural Deviations at Foot which can lead to hyperpronation. These changes if not treated on time may lead to various degenerative changes in the Foot and Ankle thus leading to the instabilities and can also make them susceptible to foot and ankle injuries, shin pain, etc. Thus, the study recommends that the dancers should be educated and trained about the foot problems associated with kathak dance and their prevention.

  8. Las reformas del derecho de familia en India: el matrimonio de niños entre derecho hindú tradicional e intervención estatal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Francavilla

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available El artículo analiza la evolución del derecho de India en relación con el matrimonio de niños, considerando algunos aspectos del derecho tradicional hindú, los caracteres de la intervención colonial y las reformas jurídicas posteriores a la independencia. El trabajo resalta la interacción entre las diferentes fuentes de las que emerge el derecho hindú y los conflictos que se presentan entre derecho oficial y no oficial, para, con base en ello, explicar la manera como la modernización del derecho hindú ha encontrado diferentes resistencias que se han traducido en una peculiar separación entre disciplina privatista y penalista del matrimonio de niños, siendo este sancionado penalmente pero considerado válido hasta el Child Marriage Prohibition Act de 2006, cuya eficacia en el contexto indio aún sigue siendo problemática.

  9. Split tendon transfers for the correction of spastic varus foot deformity: a case series study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitriadis Dimitris

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Overactivity of anterior and/or posterior tibial tendon may be a causative factor of spastic varus foot deformity. The prevalence of their dysfunction has been reported with not well defined results. Although gait analysis and dynamic electromyography provide useful information for the assessment of the patients, they are not available in every hospital. The purpose of the current study is to identify the causative muscle producing the deformity and apply the most suitable technique for its correction. Methods We retrospectively evaluated 48 consecutive ambulant patients (52 feet with spastic paralysis due to cerebral palsy. The average age at the time of the operation was 12,4 yrs (9-18 and the mean follow-up 7,8 yrs (4-14. Eigtheen feet presented equinus hind foot deformity due to gastrocnemius and soleus shortening. According to the deformity, the feet were divided in two groups (Group I with forefoot and midfoot inversion and Group II with hindfoot varus. The deformities were flexible in all cases in both groups. Split anterior tibial tendon transfer (SPLATT was performed in Group I (11 feet, while split posterior tibial tendon transfer (SPOTT was performed in Group II (38 feet. In 3 feet both procedures were performed. Achilles tendon sliding lengthening (Hoke procedure was done in 18 feet either preoperatively or concomitantly with the index procedure. Results The results in Group I, were rated according to Hoffer's clinical criteria as excellent in 8 feet and satisfactory in 3, while in Group II according to Kling's clinical criteria were rated as excellent in 20 feet, good in 14 and poor in 4. The feet with poor results presented residual varus deformity due to intraoperative technical errors. Conclusion Overactivity of the anterior tibial tendon produces inversion most prominent in the forefoot and midfoot and similarly overactivity of the posterior tibial tendon produces hindfoot varus. The deformity can be

  10. Dietary fat content and fiber type modulate hind gut microbial community and metabolic markers in the pig.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Yan

    Full Text Available Obesity leads to changes in the gut microbial community which contribute to the metabolic dysregulation in obesity. Dietary fat and fiber affect the caloric density of foods. The impact of dietary fat content and fiber type on the microbial community in the hind gut is unknown. Effect of dietary fat level and fiber type on hindgut microbiota and volatile fatty acid (VFA profiles was investigated. Expression of metabolic marker genes in the gut, adipose tissue and liver was determined. A 2 × 2 experiment was conducted in pigs fed at two dietary fat levels (5% or 17.5% swine grease and two fiber types (4% inulin, fermentable fructo-oligosaccharide or 4% solka floc, non-fermentable cellulose. High fat diets (HFD resulted in a higher (P<0.05 total body weight gain, feed efficiency and back fat accumulation than the low fat diet. Feeding of inulin, but not solka floc, attenuated (P<0.05 the HFD-induced higher body weight gain and fat mass accumulation. Inulin feeding tended to lead to higher total VFA production in the cecum and resulted in a higher (P<0.05 expression of acyl coA oxidase (ACO, a marker of peroxisomal β-oxidation. Inulin feeding also resulted in lower expression of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c (SREBP-1c, a marker of lipid anabolism. Bacteria community structure characterized by DGGE analysis of PCR amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments showed that inulin feeding resulted in greater bacterial population richness than solka floc feeding. Cluster analysis of pairwise Dice similarity comparisons of the DGGE profiles showed grouping by fiber type but not the level of dietary fat. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA of PCR- DGGE profiles showed that inulin feeding negatively correlated with back fat thickness. This study suggests a strong interplay between dietary fat level and fiber type in determining susceptibility to obesity.

  11. Effect of forward/backward standing posture on foot shape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.; Tan, T.K.; Punte, P.A.J.

    2000-01-01

    Foot length and breadth are generally used to determine the correct shoe size. An important question is whether foot length and foot breadth are dependent upon body posture. Therefore, the effect of leaning forward/backward on foot length and breadth is investigated in this study. Seven subjects

  12. Clinical and functional correlates of foot pain in diabetic patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijken, P.M.; Dekker, J.; Rauwerda, J.A.; Dekker, E.; Lankhorst, G.J.; Bakker, K.; Dooren, J.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: patients with diabetes mellitus frequently suffer from foot pain. This pain seems to be a neglected area in studies on the diabetic foot. The purpose of this study was to identify clinical variables associated with foot pain in diabetic patients. In addition, the relationships between foot

  13. Knowledge evaluation and educating diabetic patients on self foot ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion and recommendation: A considerable number of diabetic patients have poor self foot care knowledge and the level of knowledge on self foot care improved prominently following foot care education session. Therefore there is a need for establishment and strengthening effective foot care education for diabetic ...

  14. Age-related differences in women's foot shape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ansuategui Echeita, Jone; Hijmans, Juha M.; Smits, Sharon; Van der Woude, Lucas H. V.; Postema, Klaas

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Describe age-related differences in women's foot shape using a wide range of measurements and ages. Study design: Cross-sectional, observational study. Main outcome measurements: Six foot-shape measurements of each foot: foot lengths, ball widths, ball circumferences, low instep

  15. Increased plantar foot pressure in persons affected by leprosy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slim, Frederik J.; van Schie, Carine H.; Keukenkamp, Renske; Faber, William R.; Nollet, Frans

    2012-01-01

    Although foot pressure has been reported to be increased in people affected by leprosy, studies on foot pressure and its determinants are limited. Therefore, the aim was to assess barefoot plantar foot pressure and to identify clinical determinants of increased plantar foot pressure in leprosy

  16. The diabetic foot: recognition and principles of management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lynne Tudhope is President of the Diabetic Foot Working Group of South Africa and an editorial board member for diabetes in the Journal of Wound Healing of South .... foot care team is the most effective way to provide patient education, manage foot ulceration, infection and deformity. Palpation of foot pulses is crucial in.

  17. Foot Complications in a Representative Australian Inpatient Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A. Lazzarini

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the prevalence and factors independently associated with foot complications in a representative inpatient population (adults admitted for any reason with and without diabetes. We analysed data from the Foot disease in inpatients study, a sample of 733 representative inpatients. Previous amputation, previous foot ulceration, peripheral arterial disease (PAD, peripheral neuropathy (PN, and foot deformity were the foot complications assessed. Sociodemographic, medical, and foot treatment history were collected. Overall, 46.0% had a foot complication with 23.9% having multiple; those with diabetes had higher prevalence of foot complications than those without diabetes (p<0.01. Previous amputation (4.1% was independently associated with previous foot ulceration, foot deformity, cerebrovascular accident, and past surgeon treatment (p<0.01. Previous foot ulceration (9.8% was associated with PN, PAD, past podiatry, and past nurse treatment (p<0.02. PAD (21.0% was associated with older age, males, indigenous people, cancer, PN, and past surgeon treatment (p<0.02. PN (22.0% was associated with older age, diabetes, mobility impairment, and PAD (p<0.05. Foot deformity (22.4% was associated with older age, mobility impairment, past podiatry treatment, and PN (p<0.01. Nearly half of all inpatients had a foot complication. Those with foot complications were older, male, indigenous, had diabetes, cerebrovascular accident, mobility impairment, and other foot complications or past foot treatment.

  18. The Occurrence of Ipsilateral or Contralateral Foot Disorders and Hand Dominance: The Framingham Foot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Uyen-Sa D. T.; Dufour, Alyssa B.; Positano, Rock G.; Dines, Joshua S.; Dodson, Christopher C.; Gagnon, David R.; Hillstrom, Howard J.; Hannan, Marian T.

    2011-01-01

    Background To our knowledge, hand dominance and side of foot disorders has not been described in the literature. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate whether hand dominance was associated with ipsilateral foot disorders among community-dwelling older men and women Methods Data were from the Framingham Foot Study (n=2,089, examined 2002–2008). Hand preference for writing was used to classify hand dominance. Foot disorders and side of disorders were based on a validated foot examination. Generalized linear models with GEE was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), accounting for intra-person variability. Results Left-handed people were less likely to have foot pain or any foot disorders ipsilateral, but were more likely to have hallux valgus ipsilateral to the left hand. Among right-handed people, the following statistically significant increased odds of having an ipsilateral foot disorder versus contralateral foot disorder were seen: 30% for Morton’s Neuroma, 18% for hammer toes, 21% for lesser toe deformity, and a 2-fold increased odds of any foot disorder; there was a 17% decreased odds for Tailor’s Bunion, and an 11% decreased odds for pes cavus. Conclusion For the 2089 study participants, certain forefoot disorders were shown to be ipsilateral while other foot disorders were contralateral to the dominant hand. It is possible that the side of the dominant hand was a proxy for biomechanics of the dominant foot that may explain some of the associations with ipsilateral forefoot disorders. PMID:23328848

  19. Associations of Foot Posture and Function to Lower Extremity Pain: The Framingham Foot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riskowski, JL; Dufour, AB; Hagedorn, TJ; Hillstrom, Howard; Casey, VA; Hannan, MT

    2014-01-01

    Objective Studies have implicated foot posture and foot function as risk factors for lower extremity pain. Empirical population-based evidence for this assertion is lacking; therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate cross-sectional associations of foot posture and foot function to lower extremity joint pain in a population-based study of adults. Methods Participants were members of the Framingham Foot Study. lower extremity joint pain was determined by the response to the NHANES-type question, “On most days do you have pain, aching or stiffness in your [hips, knees, ankles, or feet]?” Modified Arch Index (MAI) classified participants as having planus, rectus (referent) or cavus foot posture. Center of Pressure Excursion Index (CPEI) classified participants as having over-pronated, normal (referent) or over-supinated foot function. Crude and adjusted (age, gender, BMI) logistic regression determined associations of foot posture and function to lower extremity pain. Results Participants with planus structure had higher odds of knee (1.57, 95% CI: 1.24– 1.99) or ankle (1.47, 95% CI: 1.05–2.06) pain, whereas those with a cavus foot structure had increased odds of ankle pain only (7.56, 95% CI: 1.99–28.8) and pain at one lower extremity site (1.37, 95% CI: 1.04–1.80). Associations between foot function and lower extremity joint pain were not statistically significant, except for a reduced risk of hip pain in those with an over-supinated foot function (0.69, 95% CI: 0.51–0.93). Conclusions These findings offer a link between foot posture and lower extremity pain, highlighting the need for longitudinal or intervention studies. PMID:24591410

  20. Loobumise hind / Andrus Villem

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Villem, Andrus

    2004-01-01

    Ilmunud ka: Võrumaa Teataja, 7. aug. 2004, lk. 1; Vooremaa, 7. aug. 2004, lk. 1; Põhjarannik, 6. aug. 2004, lk. 2; Elva Postipoiss, 7. aug. 2004, lk. 4; Nädaline, 10. aug. 2004, lk. 4; Harjumaa, 10. aug. 2004, lk. 2; Hiiu Leht, 10. aug. 2004, lk. 2; Koit, 10. aug. 2004, lk. 6; Meie Maa, 10. aug. 2004, lk. 2; Valgamaalane, 12. aug. 2004, lk. 2; Virumaa Teataja, 12. aug. 2004, lk. 7; Sakala, 13. aug. 2004, lk. 2; Järva Teataja, 17. aug. 2004, lk. 2. Poliitikute eetilise käitumise olulisusest, võimest otsuseid põhjendada

  1. Angiography in the region of the foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeitler, E.

    1984-01-01

    It is reported on technique, incidence and findings of angiography of the foot which provided magnifying angiography and non-ionic contrast media are used, is especially qualified for the differentiation of diabetic and non-diabetic angiopathies as well as for the identification of peripherical embolizations and digital arterial occlusions at thrombocytosis or polycythemia. The arteries of the foot represent the peripherical outflow at peripherical reconstructive performances at the lower leg and have to be studied prior to such reconstructive surgical interventions. The different localization of arterial obliterations and changes of the walls in diabetics of stage I-IV according to Fontaine shows the particularly large number of vascular-pathological findings in arteries of the lower leg and foot in diabetics with arterial occlusive diseases of stage III and IV. Therefore, the unfavourable prognoses of arterial occlusive diseases in diabetics have also to be made for peripherical arterial obliterations of the foot and lower leg. (orig.) [de

  2. Foot Swelling during Air Travel: A Concern?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... concern? What causes leg and foot swelling during air travel? Answers from Sheldon G. Sheps, M.D. ... had major surgery or you take birth control pills, for example — consult your doctor before flying. He ...

  3. Diabetic foot infections: current concept review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberlee B. Hobizal

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this manuscript is to provide a current concept review on the diagnosis and management of diabetic foot infections which are among the most serious and frequent complications encountered in patients with diabetes mellitus. A literature review on diabetic foot infections with emphasis on pathophysiology, identifiable risk factors, evaluation including physical examination, laboratory values, treatment strategies and assessing the severity of infection has been performed in detail. Diabetic foot infections are associated with high morbidity and risk factors for failure of treatment and classification systems are also described. Most diabetic foot infections begin with a wound and once an infection occurs, the risk of hospitalization and amputation increases dramatically. Early identification of infection and prompt treatment may optimize the patient's outcome and provide limb salvage.

  4. Formal Design Review Foot Clamp Modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    OTEN, T.C.

    2000-01-01

    This report documents the Design Review performed for the foot clamp modification. The report documents the acceptability of the design, identifies the documents that were reviewed, the scope of the review and the members of the review team

  5. Leg or foot amputation - dressing change

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... patientinstructions/000018.htm Leg or foot amputation - dressing change To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You will need to change the dressing on your limb. This will help ...

  6. On-the-Job Foot Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... improves your efficiency and keeps you on the job. Your podiatric physician and surgeon is a specialist ... 20814 FP-65M-4/96 2014 ON-THE-JOB FOOT HEALTH YOUR PODIATRIC PHYSICIAN TALKS ABOUT ON- ...

  7. The Glasgow-Maastricht foot model, evaluation of a 26 segment kinematic model of the foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterwaal, Michiel; Carbes, Sylvain; Telfer, Scott; Woodburn, James; Tørholm, Søren; Al-Munajjed, Amir A; van Rhijn, Lodewijk; Meijer, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Accurately measuring of intrinsic foot kinematics using skin mounted markers is difficult, limited in part by the physical dimensions of the foot. Existing kinematic foot models solve this problem by combining multiple bones into idealized rigid segments. This study presents a novel foot model that allows the motion of the 26 bones to be individually estimated via a combination of partial joint constraints and coupling the motion of separate joints using kinematic rhythms. Segmented CT data from one healthy subject was used to create a template Glasgow-Maastricht foot model (GM-model). Following this, the template was scaled to produce subject-specific models for five additional healthy participants using a surface scan of the foot and ankle. Forty-three skin mounted markers, mainly positioned around the foot and ankle, were used to capture the stance phase of the right foot of the six healthy participants during walking. The GM-model was then applied to calculate the intrinsic foot kinematics. Distinct motion patterns where found for all joints. The variability in outcome depended on the location of the joint, with reasonable results for sagittal plane motions and poor results for transverse plane motions. The results of the GM-model were comparable with existing literature, including bone pin studies, with respect to the range of motion, motion pattern and timing of the motion in the studied joints. This novel model is the most complete kinematic model to date. Further evaluation of the model is warranted.

  8. Body weight and the medial longitudinal foot arch: high-arched foot, a hidden problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woźniacka, R; Bac, A; Matusik, S; Szczygieł, E; Ciszek, E

    2013-05-01

    This study had two objectives. First, to determine the prevalence of hollow (high-arched) and flat foot among primary school children in Cracow (Poland). Second, to evaluate the relationship between the type of medial longitudinal arch (MLA; determined by the Clarke's angle) and degree of fatness. The prevalence of underweight, overweight, and obesity was determined by means of IOTF cut-offs with respect to age and gender. A sample of 1,115 children (564 boys and 551 girls) aged between 3 and 13 years was analyzed. In all age groups, regardless of gender, high-arched foot was diagnosed in the majority of children. A distinct increase in the number of children with high-arched foot was observed between 7- and 8-year olds. Regardless of the gender, high-arched foot was more common among underweight children. In the group of obese children, the biggest differences were attributed to gender. High-arched foot was the most frequently observed among boys. In all gender and obesity level groups, the flat foot was more common among boys than among girls. High-arched foot is the most common foot defect among children 3-13 years old regardless of gender. Flat foot is least frequently observed in children 3-13 years old. A statistic correlation between MLA and adiposity is observed. Stronger correlation is observed among girls.

  9. The Foot-Reading Cult of Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosmia, Anand N; Bosmia, Arpan N; Tubbs, R S

    2017-10-01

    Ho-no-Hana-Sanpogyo was a Japanese new religious movement referred to as the "foot-reading cult" in the media. Its founder, Fukunaga Hogen, claimed to have divine authority and the ability to diagnose physical illness by studying the soles of an individual's feet. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the history of Ho-no-Hana-Sanpogyo and Fukunaga's practice of foot reading.

  10. CLINICOMICROBIOLOGICAL STUDY OF DIABETIC FOOT ULCERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmal Kumar Palaniappan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease caused by a combination of lifestyle and genetic factors affecting all organs in the body. Foot ulcers are one of the common and serious long-term complications of diabetes leads to recurrent and chronic infections, which results in limb loss when treatment is delayed. The aim of this study is to find out the clinical outcome and microbiological profile in patients admitted with diabetic foot ulcers. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study conducted between November 2008 to November 2009 over 50 patients with history of foot ulceration and diabetes. 50 patients were admitted with diabetic foot ulcer over a period of one year between November 2008-2009. They were studied after getting written consent. A predesigned pro forma was used to get the parameters comprising age, gender, duration, type of diabetes mellitus, presence of neuropathy, nephropathy (serum creatinine, urine albumin, retinopathy (screening funduscopy by ophthalmologist. RESULTS Among 50 patients admitted and treated for diabetic foot ulcers with mean stay of 18 days, 29 (58% had complete healing on conservative management, 18 (36% underwent minor amputation (toes, 3 (6% had major amputation (below knee/above knee. No mortality among the study groups encountered. Gram-negative aerobes E. coli (36%, Pseudomonas (52%, Klebsiella (28%, Proteus vulgaris (20% and Acinetobacter (16% were most frequently isolated followed by gram-positive aerobes MRSA (14%, Enterococcus (6%, Strep pyogenes (4% and no anaerobic growth. CONCLUSION Diabetic foot infections are frequently polymicrobial and predominantly gram-negative aerobic bacteria at presentation. Multidrug resistance pseudomonas aeruginosa and MRSA in diabetic foot ulcer is at its emergence and life threatening. Initial aggressive multimodal approach with surgical intervention, culture specific and sensitive targeted combined broad-spectrum antibiotics decreases the morbidity and mortality

  11. Surgical revascularization techniques for diabetic foot

    OpenAIRE

    Kota, Siva Krishna; Kota, Sunil Kumar; Meher, Lalit Kumar; Sahoo, Satyajit; Mohapatra, Sudeep; Modi, Kirtikumar Dharmsibhai

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is an important risk factor for atherosclerosis. The diabetic foot is characterized by the presence of arteriopathy and neuropathy. The vascular damage includes non-occlusive microangiopathy and macroangiopathy. Diabetic foot wounds are responsible for 5–10% of the cases of major or minor amputations. In fact, the risk of amputation of the lower limbs is 15–20% higher in diabetic populations than in the general population. The University of Texas classification is the reference class...

  12. Postoperative infection in the foot and ankle.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chan, Victoria O

    2012-07-01

    Our discussion highlights the commonly performed surgical procedures in the foot and ankle and reviews the various imaging modalities available for the detection of infection with graphic examples to better enable radiologists to approach the radiological evaluation of postoperative infection in the foot and ankle. Discrimination between infectious and noninfectious inflammation remains a diagnostic challenge usually needing a combination of clinical assessment, laboratory investigations, and imaging studies to increase diagnostic accuracy.

  13. Geckos significantly alter foot orientation to facilitate adhesion during downhill locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birn-Jeffery, Aleksandra V; Higham, Timothy E

    2014-10-01

    Geckos employ their adhesive system when moving up an incline, but the directionality of the system may limit function on downhill surfaces. Here, we use a generalist gecko to test whether limb modulation occurs on downhill slopes to allow geckos to take advantage of their adhesive system. We examined three-dimensional limb kinematics for geckos moving up and down a 45° slope. Remarkably, the hind limbs were rotated posteriorly on declines, resulting in digit III of the pes facing a more posterior direction (opposite to the direction of travel). No significant changes in limb orientation were found in any other condition. This pes rotation leads to a dramatic shift in foot function that facilitates the use of the adhesive system as a brake/stabilizer during downhill locomotion and, although this rotation is not unique to geckos, it is significant for the deployment of adhesion. Adhesion is not just advantageous for uphill locomotion but can be employed to help deal with the effects of gravity during downhill locomotion, highlighting the incredible multi-functionality of this key innovation. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  14. The growth of foot arches and influencing factors

    OpenAIRE

    Ferial Hadipoetro Idris

    2016-01-01

    Background Foot arches are important components for body sup- port. Foot arch deformity caused by growth abnormalities cause serious limitations in daily activities. Objectives To determine the patterns of foot arch growth, factors influencing foot arch growth, and the timing for intervention in er- rant growth patterns. Methods A cross-sectional study evaluated the foot arches of chil- dren aged 0-18 years according to age and sex. Subjects included had no evidence of...

  15. Taiwanese adult foot shape classification using 3D scanning data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yu-Chi; Wang, Mao-Jiun

    2015-01-01

    This study classifies the foot shapes of Taiwanese using 3D foot scanning data from 2000 males and 1000 females. Nine foot dimensions relative to foot length and absolute measures in the common foot length categories were applied to compare the gender differences. Using foot breadth in % foot length (% FL), ball of foot length in % FL and arch height in % FL as feature parameters, three foot shape types for males and females can be classified. Significant gender differences were found in seven of the nine foot dimensions. Females had greater ball of foot length than males (0.2% FL). When comparing feet of the same foot length, males had greater breadth, girth and height dimensions than females, except for toe height. In addition, ethnic differences in foot shape were also observed. The findings can provide very useful information for building gender-specific shoe lasts and designing footwear insoles. 3D foot scanning data of 2000 males and 1000 females were classified into three different footshapes for males and females, respectively. Gender and ethnic differences on foot shape were also compared. The finding scan provide very useful information for gender-specific shoe last design and footwear production.

  16. Contributions of foot muscles and plantar fascia morphology to foot posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angin, Salih; Mickle, Karen J; Nester, Christopher J

    2018-01-27

    The plantar foot muscles and plantar fascia differ between different foot postures. However, how each individual plantar structure contribute to foot posture has not been explored. The purpose of this study was to investigate the associations between static foot posture and morphology of plantar foot muscles and plantar fascia and thus the contributions of these structures to static foot posture. A total of 111 participants were recruited, 43 were classified as having pes planus and 68 as having normal foot posture using Foot Posture Index assessment tool. Images from the flexor digitorum longus (FDL), flexor hallucis longus (FHL), peroneus longus and brevis (PER), flexor hallucis brevis (FHB), flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) and abductor hallucis (AbH) muscles, and the calcaneal (PF1), middle (PF2) and metatarsal (PF3) regions of the plantar fascia were obtained using a Venue 40 ultrasound system with a 5-13 MHz transducer. In order of decreasing contribution, PF3 > FHB > FHL > PER > FDB were all associated with FPI and able to explain 69% of the change in FPI scores. PF3 was the highest contributor explaining 52% of increases in FPI score. Decreased thickness was associated with increased FPI score. Smaller cross sectional area (CSA) in FHB and PER muscles explained 20% and 8% of increase in FPI score. Larger CSA of FDB and FHL muscles explained 4% and 14% increase in FPI score respectively. The medial plantar structures and the plantar fascia appear to be the major contributors to static foot posture. Elucidating the individual contribution of multiple muscles of the foot could provide insight about their role in the foot posture. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. The influence of foot orthoses on foot mobility magnitude and arch height index in adults with flexible flat feet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheykhi-Dolagh, Roghaye; Saeedi, Hassan; Farahmand, Behshid; Kamyab, Mojtaba; Kamali, Mohammad; Gholizadeh, Hossein; Derayatifar, Amir A; Curran, Sarah

    2015-06-01

    Flexible flat foot is described as a reduction in the height of the medial longitudinal arch and may occur from abnormal foot pronation. A foot orthosis is thought to modify and control excessive pronation and improve arch height. To compare the immediate effect of three types of orthoses on foot mobility and the arch height index in subjects with flexible flat feet. A quasi-experimental study. The dorsal arch height, midfoot width, foot mobility and arch height index were assessed in 20 participants with flexible flat feet (mean age = 23.2 ± 3 years) for three different foot orthosis conditions: soft, semi-rigid and rigid University of California Biomechanics Laboratory (UCBL). Maximum midfoot width at 90% with arch mobility in the coronal plane was shown in the semi-rigid orthosis condition. The semi-rigid orthosis resulted in the highest mean foot mobility in 90% of weight bearing, and the rigid orthosis (UCBL) had the lowest mean foot mobility. The soft orthosis resulted in foot mobility between that of the rigid and the semi-rigid orthosis. UCBL orthosis showed the highest arch height index, and the semi-rigid orthosis showed the lowest mean arch height index. Due to its rigid structure and long medial-lateral walls, the UCBL orthosis appears to limit foot mobility. Therefore, it is necessary to make an orthosis that facilitates foot mobility in the normal range of the foot arch. Future studies should address the dynamic mobility of the foot with using various types of foot orthoses. Although there are many studies focussed on flat foot and the use of foot orthoses, the mechanism of action is still unclear. This study explored foot mobility and the influence of foot orthoses and showed that a more rigid foot orthosis should be selected based on foot mobility. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2014.

  18. Evaluation of intravenous regional anaesthesia and four-point nerve block efficacy in the distal hind limb of dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavari, S; Khraim, N; Szura, G; Starke, A; Engelke, E; Pfarrer, C; Hopster, K; Schmicke, M; Kehler, W; Heppelmann, M; Kästner, S B R; Rehage, J

    2017-11-07

    Intravenous regional anaesthesia (IVRA) and hindfoot four-point nerve block anaesthesia (NBA) are recommended for local anaesthesia (LA) in the distal limb of dairy cows. Two studies were conducted to compare the efficacy, time until onset and stress responses to IVRA and NBA in dairy cows. In the first cross-over designed study, eight healthy unsedated German Holstein cows, restrained in lateral recumbency (LR) on a surgical tipping table, were treated with IVRA and NBA using procaine 2% as a local anaesthetic. Distal limb desensitization was tested by electrical (e-), mechanical (m-) and thermal (t-) nociceptive stimulation 10 min before and 15 and 30 min after LA. Hormonal-metabolic (blood concentrations of cortisol, lactate, non-esterified fatty acids, and glucose) and cardio-respiratory (heart and respiratory rate, mean arterial blood pressure) stress responses to treatment were assessed at predetermined intervals. In the second study, six healthy, unsedated German Holstein cows in LR were treated (crossover design) with IVRA and NBA. Short-interval e-stimulation was measured by the time until complete distal limb desensitization. In the first study, four of eight cows responded to e-stimulation 15 min after IVRA, while none of the cows treated with NBA responded until the safety cut-off level was reached. E-stimulation revealed complete desensitization of the distal limb 30 min after LA in all cows. Half of the cows did not respond to m- and t-stimulation before LA, so no further evaluation was performed. Stress reactions to IVRA and NBA treatment were similar, but differences may have been masked by stress response to LR restraint. In the second study, complete desensitization was achieved 12.5 min after NBA, while one of the six cows still responded to e-stimulation 20 min after IVRA. Hindfoot nerve block anaesthesia and intravenous regional anaesthesia induced complete desensitization of the distal hind limb in dairy cows. However, the anaesthesia

  19. Recipient bone marrow-derived stromal cells prolong graft survival in a rat hind limb allotransplantation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeguchi, Ryosuke; Kakinoki, Ryosuke; Ohta, Souichi; Oda, Hiroki; Yurie, Hirofumi; Kaizawa, Yukitoshi; Mitsui, Hiroto; Aoyama, Tomoki; Toguchida, Junya; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2017-09-01

    Recent studies have indicated that bone marrow-derived stromal cells (BMSCs) have immunomodulatory properties that suppress the T cell responses that cause graft rejection. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of recipient BMSCs intravenous infusion for immunomodulation in a rat vascularized composite allotransplantation model. A total of nine Wistar (WIS) rats and thirty Lewis (LEW) rats were used. BMSCs were harvested from three LEW rats. Twenty-four LEW rats were used as recipients and divided randomly into four groups: BMSC group, FK group, UT group, and Iso group. In the BMSC group, orthotopic rat hind limb transplantation was performed between WIS donor and LEW recipient rats. Recipient rats were injected intravenously with 2 × 10 6 recipient BMSCs on day 6, and with 0.2 mg/kg/day tacrolimus administered over 7 days (n = 6). In the FK group, recipient rats were treated with tacrolimus alone (n = 6). Rats in the UT group received no immunosuppressive treatment (n = 6). In the Iso group, transplantation was performed from three LEW donor rats to six LEW recipient rats without any immunosuppressive treatment (n = 6). Graft survival was assessed by daily inspection and histology. The immunological reactions of recipients were also evaluated. The graft survival of recipient rats in the BMSC group (24.5 days) was significantly prolonged in comparison with that of the FK group (18 days) (P Recipient rats in the BMSC group had significantly reduced serum IFN-γ cytokine levels (1.571 ± 0.779 pg/ml) in comparison with that of the FK group (7.059 ± 1.522 pg/ml) (P = .001). In in vitro study, BMSCs induce T cell hyporesponsiveness in a mixed lymphocyte reaction. BMSCs induce T cell hyporesponsiveness and prolong graft survival in the rat vascularized composite allotransplantation model. BMSCs exhibit immunomodulatory properties against acute rejection that can be realized without the need for significant recipient

  20. Pig specific vascular anatomy allows acute infrarenal aortic occlusion without hind limb ischemia and stepwise occlusion without clinical signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haacke, N; Unger, J K; Haidenhein, C; Russ, M; Hiebl, B; Niehues, S M

    2011-01-01

    EGAs for a partial collateral support of an infrarenal aortic occlusion the pig's EGA is a naturally sufficient collateral system capable to cover immediately for an acute infrarenal aortic occlusion. Further collateral enlargement even provides a permanent, sufficient hind limb perfusion in pigs. As the sufficient collateral system probably reduce pressure and shear rates in the infrarenal aortic segment after cross clamping, pigs might have a higher predisposition to produce early thrombosis related graft occlusions tan humans.

  1. Comparing 3D foot scanning with conventional measurement methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yu-Chi; Lin, Gloria; Wang, Mao-Jiun J

    2014-01-01

    Foot dimension information on different user groups is important for footwear design and clinical applications. Foot dimension data collected using different measurement methods presents accuracy problems. This study compared the precision and accuracy of the 3D foot scanning method with conventional foot dimension measurement methods including the digital caliper, ink footprint and digital footprint. Six commonly used foot dimensions, i.e. foot length, ball of foot length, outside ball of foot length, foot breadth diagonal, foot breadth horizontal and heel breadth were measured from 130 males and females using four foot measurement methods. Two-way ANOVA was performed to evaluate the sex and method effect on the measured foot dimensions. In addition, the mean absolute difference values and intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) were used for precision and accuracy evaluation. The results were also compared with the ISO 20685 criteria. The participant's sex and the measurement method were found (p < 0.05) to exert significant effects on the measured six foot dimensions. The precision of the 3D scanning measurement method with mean absolute difference values between 0.73 to 1.50 mm showed the best performance among the four measurement methods. The 3D scanning measurements showed better measurement accuracy performance than the other methods (mean absolute difference was 0.6 to 4.3 mm), except for measuring outside ball of foot length and foot breadth horizontal. The ICCs for all six foot dimension measurements among the four measurement methods were within the 0.61 to 0.98 range. Overall, the 3D foot scanner is recommended for collecting foot anthropometric data because it has relatively higher precision, accuracy and robustness. This finding suggests that when comparing foot anthropometric data among different references, it is important to consider the differences caused by the different measurement methods.

  2. COMPARISON OF GAIT USING A MULTIFLEX FOOT VERSUS A QUANTUM FOOT IN KNEE DISARTICULATION AMPUTEES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BOONSTRA, AM; FIDLER, [No Value; SPITS, GMA; HOF, AL; Tuil, P.

    The subjective responses and gait patterns of unilateral knee disarticulation amputees wearing prostheses fitted first with the Multiflex foot and then with the Quantum foot were studied. Nine amputees were included in the trial. A questionnaire asked the amputees about their preference for one of

  3. Repeatability of the Oxford Foot Model for Kinematic Gait Analysis of the Foot and Ankle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoeve, S.; Vos, J.; Weijers, P.; Verbruggen, J.; Willems, P.; Poeze, M.; Meijer, K.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Kinematic gait analysis via the multi-segmental Oxford foot model (OFM) may be a valuable addition to the biomechanical examination of the foot and ankle. The aim of this study is to assess the repeatability of the OFM in healthy subjects. METHODS: Nine healthy subjects, without a

  4. Foot lengthening and shortening during gait: a parameter to investigate foot function?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolwijk, N.M.; Koenraadt, K.L.M.; Louwerens, J.W.; Grim, D.; Duysens, J.E.J.; Keijsers, N.L.W.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Based on the windlass mechanism theory of Hicks, the medial longitudinal arch (MLA) flattens during weight bearing. Simultaneously, foot lengthening is expected. However, changes in foot length during gait and the influence of walking speed has not been investigated yet. METHODS: The

  5. The forgotten foot - an assessment of foot and ankle radiograph pathology in final year medical students.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Groarke, P J

    2014-04-27

    It has been shown that doctors in Emergency Departments (EDs) have inconsistent knowledge of musculoskeletal anatomy. This is most likely due to a deficiency in focused musculoskeletal modules at undergraduate level in medical school. The aims of this study were to evaluate the knowledge of final year medical students on foot anatomy and common foot and ankle pathology as seen on radiographs.

  6. Robust Foot Clearance Estimation Based on the Integration of Foot-Mounted IMU Acceleration Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoussaad, Mourad; Sijobert, Benoît; Mombaur, Katja; Azevedo Coste, Christine

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a method for the robust estimation of foot clearance during walking, using a single inertial measurement unit (IMU) placed on the subject’s foot. The proposed solution is based on double integration and drift cancellation of foot acceleration signals. The method is insensitive to misalignment of IMU axes with respect to foot axes. Details are provided regarding calibration and signal processing procedures. Experimental validation was performed on 10 healthy subjects under three walking conditions: normal, fast and with obstacles. Foot clearance estimation results were compared to measurements from an optical motion capture system. The mean error between them is significantly less than 15% under the various walking conditions. PMID:26703622

  7. Relationship between foot eversion and thermographic foot skin temperature after running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priego Quesada, Jose Ignacio; Gil-Calvo, Marina; Jimenez-Perez, Irene; Lucas-Cuevas, Ángel G; Pérez-Soriano, Pedro

    2017-07-01

    The main instruments to assess foot eversion have some limitations (especially for field applications), and therefore it is necessary to explore new methods. The objective was to determine the relationship between foot eversion and skin temperature asymmetry of the foot sole (difference between medial and lateral side), using infrared thermography. Twenty-two runners performed a running test lasting 30 min. Skin temperature of the feet soles was measured by infrared thermography before and after running. Foot eversion during running was measured by kinematic analysis. Immediately after running, weak negative correlations were observed between thermal symmetry of the rearfoot and eversion at contact time, and between thermal symmetry of the entire plantar surface of the foot and maximum eversion during stance phase (r=-0.3 and p=0.04 in both cases). Regarding temperature variations, weak correlations were also observed (r=0.4 and pfoot eversion. However, these results open interesting future lines of research.

  8. Natural gaits of the non-pathological flat foot and high-arched foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yifang; Fan, Yubo; Li, Zhiyu; Lv, Changsheng; Luo, Donglin

    2011-03-18

    There has been a controversy as to whether or not the non-pathological flat foot and high-arched foot have an effect on human walking activities. The 3D foot scanning system was employed to obtain static footprints from subjects adopting a half-weight-bearing stance. Based upon their footprints, the subjects were divided into two groups: the flat-footed and the high-arched. The plantar pressure measurement system was used to measure and record the subjects' successive natural gaits. Two indices were proposed: distribution of vertical ground reaction force (VGRF) of plantar and the rate of change of footprint areas. Using these two indices to compare the natural gaits of the two subject groups, we found that (1) in stance phase, there is a significant difference (pflat-footed while a smaller rate of change of footprint area brings greater stability to the high-arched.

  9. Beyond the Bottom of the Foot: Topographic Organization of the Foot Dorsum in Walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klarner, Taryn; Pearcey, Gregory E P; Sun, Yao; Barss, Trevor S; Kaupp, Chelsea; Munro, Bridget; Frank, Nick; Zehr, E Paul

    2017-12-01

    Sensory feedback from the foot dorsum during walking has only been studied globally by whole nerve stimulation. Stimulating the main nerve innervating the dorsal surface produces a functional stumble corrective response that is phase-dependently modulated. We speculated that effects evoked by activation of discrete skin regions on the foot dorsum would be topographically organized, as with the foot sole. Nonnoxious electrical stimulation was delivered to five discrete locations on the dorsal surface of the foot during treadmill walking. Muscle activity from muscles acting at the ankle, knee, hip, and shoulder were recorded along with ankle, knee, and hip kinematics and kinetic information from forces under the foot. All data were sorted on the basis of stimulus occurrence in 12 step cycle phases, before being averaged together within a phase for subsequent analysis. Results reveal dynamic changes in reflex amplitudes and kinematics that are site specific and phase dependent. Most responses from discrete sites on the foot dorsum were seen in the swing phase suggesting function to conform foot trajectory to maintain stability of the moving limb. In general, responses from lateral stimulation differed from medial stimulation, and effects were largest from stimulation at the distal end of the foot at the metatarsals; that is, in anatomical locations where actual impact with an object in the environment is most likely during swing. Responses to stimulation extend to include muscles at the hip and shoulder. We reveal that afferent feedback from specific cutaneous locations on the foot dorsum influences stance and swing phase corrective responses. This emphasizes the critical importance of feedback from the entire foot surface in locomotor control and has application for rehabilitation after neurological injury and in footwear development.

  10. A shift in priority in diabetic foot care and research: 75% of foot ulcers are preventable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bus, Sicco A; van Netten, Jaap J

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration poses a heavy burden on the patient and the healthcare system, but prevention thereof receives little attention. For every euro spent on ulcer prevention, ten are spent on ulcer healing, and for every randomized controlled trial conducted on prevention, ten are conducted on healing. In this article, we argue that a shift in priorities is needed. For the prevention of a first foot ulcer, we need more insight into the effect of interventions and practices already applied globally in many settings. This requires systematic recording of interventions and outcomes, and well-designed randomized controlled trials that include analysis of cost-effectiveness. After healing of a foot ulcer, the risk of recurrence is high. For the prevention of a recurrent foot ulcer, home monitoring of foot temperature, pressure-relieving therapeutic footwear, and certain surgical interventions prove to be effective. The median effect size found in a total of 23 studies on these interventions is large, over 60%, and further increases when patients are adherent to treatment. These interventions should be investigated for efficacy as a state-of-the-art integrated foot care approach, where attempts are made to assure treatment adherence. Effect sizes of 75-80% may be expected. If such state-of-the-art integrated foot care is implemented, the majority of problems with foot ulcer recurrence in diabetes can be resolved. It is therefore time to act and to set a new target in diabetic foot care. This target is to reduce foot ulcer incidence with at least 75%. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. The Ubr2 gene is expressed in skeletal muscle atrophying as a result of hind limb suspension, but not Merg1a expression alone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory H. Hockerman

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle (SKM atrophy is a potentially debilitating condition induced by muscle disuse, denervation, many disease states, and aging. The ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPP contributes greatly to the protein loss suffered in muscle atrophy. The MERG1a K+ channel is known to induce UPP activity and atrophy in SKM. It has been further demonstrated that the mouse ether-a-gogo-related gene (Merg1a channel modulates expression of MURF1, an E3 ligase component of the UPP, while it does not affect expression of the UPP E3 ligase Mafbx/ATROGIN1. Because the UBR2 E3 ligase is known to participate in SKM atrophy, we have investigated the effect of Merg1a expression and hind limb suspension on Ubr2 expression. Here, we report that hind limb suspension results in a significant 25.6% decrease in mouse gastrocnemius muscle fiber cross sectional area (CSA and that electro-transfer of Merg1a alone into gastrocnemius muscles yields a 15.3% decrease in CSA after 7 days. More interestingly, we discovered that hind limb suspension caused a significant 8-fold increase in Merg1a expression and a significant 4.7-fold increase in Ubr2 transcript after 4 days, while electro-transfer of Merg1a into gastrocnemius muscles resulted in a significant 6.2-fold increase in Merg1a transcript after 4 days but had no effect on Ubr2 expression. In summary, the MERG1a K+ channel, known to induce atrophy and MURF1 E3 ligase expression, does not affect UBR2 E3 ligase transcript levels. Therefore, to date, the MERG1a channel’s contribution to UPP activity appears mainly to be through up-regulation of Murf1 gene expression.

  12. The Ubr2 gene is expressed in skeletal muscle atrophying as a result of hind limb suspension, but not Merg1a expression alone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory H. Hockerman

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle (SKM atrophy is a potentially debilitating condition induced by muscle disuse, denervation, many disease states, and aging. The ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPP contributes greatly to the protein loss suffered in muscle atrophy. The MERG1a K+ channel is known to induce UPP activity and atrophy in SKM. It has been further demonstrated that the mouse ether-a-gogo-related gene (Merg1a channel modulates expression of MURF1, an E3 ligase component of the UPP, while it does not affect expression of the UPP E3 ligase Mafbx/ATROGIN1. Because the UBR2 E3 ligase is known to participate in SKM atrophy, we have investigated the effect of Merg1a expression and hind limb suspension on Ubr2 expression. Here, we report that hind limb suspension results in a significant 25.6% decrease in mouse gastrocnemius muscle fiber cross sectional area (CSA and that electro-transfer of Merg1a alone into gastrocnemius muscles yields a 15.3% decrease in CSA after 7 days. More interestingly, we discovered that hind limb suspension caused a significant 8-fold increase in Merg1a expression and a significant 4.7-fold increase in Ubr2 transcript after 4 days, while electro-transfer of Merg1a into gastrocnemius muscles resulted in a significant 6.2-fold increase in Merg1a transcript after 4 days but had no effect on Ubr2 expression. In summary, the MERG1a K+ channel, known to induce atrophy and MURF1 E3 ligase expression, does not affect UBR2 E3 ligase transcript levels. Therefore, to date, the MERG1a channel’s contribution to UPP activity appears mainly to be through up-regulation of Murf1 gene expression.

  13. A flexible electrode array for muscle impedance measurements in the mouse hind limb: A tool to speed research in neuromuscular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Rutkove, S. B.

    2013-04-01

    Electrical impedance myography (EIM) is a bioelectrical impedance technique focused on the assessment of neuromuscular diseases using tetrapolar surface arrays. Recently, we have shown that reproducible and sensitive EIM measurements can be made on the gastrocnemius muscle of the mouse hind limb and that these are sensitive to disease alterations. A dedicated array would help speed data acquisition and provide additional sensitivity to disease-induced alterations. A flexible electrode array was developed with electrode sizes of 1mm × 1mm by Parlex, Inc. Tetrapolar electrode sets were arranged both parallel to (longitudinal) and orthogonally to (transverse) the major muscle fiber direction of the gastrocnemius muscle. Measurements were made with a dedicated EIM system. A total of 11 healthy animals and 7 animals with spinal muscular atrophy (a form of motor neuron disease) were evaluated after the fur was completely removed with a depilatory agent from the hind limb. Standard electrophysiologic testing (compound motor action potential amplitude and motor unit number estimation) was also performed. The flexible electrode array demonstrated high repeatability in both the longitudinal and transverse directions in the healthy and diseased animals (with intraclass correlation coefficients of 0.94 and 0.89, respectively, for phase angle measured transversely). In addition, differences between healthy and diseased animals were identifiable. For example, the 50 kHz transverse phase angle was higher in the healthy as compared to the SMA animals (16.8° ± 0.5 vs. 14.3° ± 0.7, respectively) at 21 weeks of age (p = 0.01). Differences in anisotropy were also identifiable. Correlations to several standard neurophysiologic parameters also appeared promising. This novel flexible tetrapolar electrode array can be used on the mouse hind limb and provides multidirectional data that can be used to assess muscle health. This technique has the potential of finding widespread use in

  14. A flexible electrode array for muscle impedance measurements in the mouse hind limb: A tool to speed research in neuromuscular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J; Rutkove, S B

    2013-01-01

    Electrical impedance myography (EIM) is a bioelectrical impedance technique focused on the assessment of neuromuscular diseases using tetrapolar surface arrays. Recently, we have shown that reproducible and sensitive EIM measurements can be made on the gastrocnemius muscle of the mouse hind limb and that these are sensitive to disease alterations. A dedicated array would help speed data acquisition and provide additional sensitivity to disease-induced alterations. A flexible electrode array was developed with electrode sizes of 1mm × 1mm by Parlex, Inc. Tetrapolar electrode sets were arranged both parallel to (longitudinal) and orthogonally to (transverse) the major muscle fiber direction of the gastrocnemius muscle. Measurements were made with a dedicated EIM system. A total of 11 healthy animals and 7 animals with spinal muscular atrophy (a form of motor neuron disease) were evaluated after the fur was completely removed with a depilatory agent from the hind limb. Standard electrophysiologic testing (compound motor action potential amplitude and motor unit number estimation) was also performed. The flexible electrode array demonstrated high repeatability in both the longitudinal and transverse directions in the healthy and diseased animals (with intraclass correlation coefficients of 0.94 and 0.89, respectively, for phase angle measured transversely). In addition, differences between healthy and diseased animals were identifiable. For example, the 50 kHz transverse phase angle was higher in the healthy as compared to the SMA animals (16.8° ± 0.5 vs. 14.3° ± 0.7, respectively) at 21 weeks of age (p = 0.01). Differences in anisotropy were also identifiable. Correlations to several standard neurophysiologic parameters also appeared promising. This novel flexible tetrapolar electrode array can be used on the mouse hind limb and provides multidirectional data that can be used to assess muscle health. This technique has the potential of finding widespread use in

  15. Association of the HindIII and S447X Polymorphisms in LPL Gene with Hypertension and Type 2 Diabetes in Mexican Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Muñoz-Barrios

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipoprotein lipase (LPL is a key enzyme in lipid metabolismand is associatedwith obesity, dyslipidemias, hypertension (HTN and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. LPL gene polymorphisms can be related with the development of cardiovascular risk factors. The present study was conducted to analyze the relationship of the HindIII and S447X polymorphisms in LPL gene with cardiovascular risk factors in Mexican families. The study population comprised ninety members of 30 Mexican families, in which an index case had obesity, were included in the study. We evaluated the body composition by bioelectrical impedance. Peripheral blood samples were collected to determine biochemical parameters. Screening for both polymorphisms was made by PCR-RFLPs. In the parents, both polymorphisms were in Hardy-Weinberg’s equilibrium. We found that the genotype T/T of HindIII was associated with diastolic blood pressure ≧ 85 mmHg (OR = 1.1; p = 0.011, whereas the genotype C/C of S447X was associated with systolic blood pressure ≧ 130 mmHg (OR = 1.2; p < 0.001, diastolic blood pressure ≧ 85 mmHg (OR = 1.3; p < 0.001, T2DM (OR = 1.3; p < 0.001 and with increase of total cholesterol (β = 23.6 mg/mL; p = 0.03. These data suggest that the HindIII and S447X LPL gene polymorphisms can confer susceptibility for the development of hypertension and T2DM in Mexican families.

  16. [Diabetic foot care. importance of education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torreguitart, Maite Valverde

    2011-05-01

    Diabetes is the most prevalent chronic disease at present. It is estimated that approximately 250 million people worldwide have diabetes, representing 5.9% of the adult population. According to a study published recently in Spain, the prevalence of type 2 diabetes varies between 10 and 15%. Cardiovascular complications associated with the disease produce a high social and health costs significantly reducing the quality of life of patients and their families and are the leading cause of death in developed countries. Complications of diabetes with higher economic costs are the "diabetic foot", which consume about 20% of resources devoted to the care of these patients. Each year more than 1 million people worldwide suffer from a leg amputation due to this condition. Between 50% and 70% of non-traumatic amputations occur in patients with diabetes. Most of these amputations are preceded by a foot ulcer The most important factors related to the development of these ulcers are loss of sensation due to neuropathy minor trauma, foot deformity and peripheral vascular disease. According to the International Diabetes Federation, 15% of people with diabetes will develop foot ulcers during their lifetime. Interventions aimed at preventing foot ulcers in patients such as the comprehensive control, education of people with diabetes and their families as well as health professionals, have been shown to reduce lower extremity amputations by 50% and 85%.

  17. The diabetic foot management - recent advance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinwar, Prabhu Dayal

    2015-03-01

    Diabetic ulceration of the foot represents a major global medical, social and economic problem. It is the commonest major end-point of diabetic complications. Diabetic neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease are the main etiological factors in foot ulceration and may act alone, together, or in combination with other factors such as microvascular disease, biomechanical abnormalities, limited joint mobility and increased susceptibility to infection. In the diabetic foot, distal sensory polyneuropathy is seen most commonly. The advent of insulin overcame the acute problems of ketoacidosis and infection, but could not prevent the vascular and neurological complications. Management of diabetic neuropathic ulcer by appropriate and timely removal of callus, control of infection and reduction of weight bearing forces. Management of diabetic ischaemic foot are medical management, surgical management and percutaneous transluminal angioplasty of stenosed and occluded lower extremity arteries. Foot ulceration in persons with diabetes is the most frequent precursor to amputation. Copyright © 2015 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [Diabetic foot: from diagnosis to therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucchi, P; Ferrari, P; Spina, M L

    2005-01-01

    Four percent of Italians are affected by diabetes mellitus. There are 120 million diabetics worldwide: it is expected that 15% of them will have wounds on their feet during their lifetime. In industrialized countries diabetes mellitus is the main cause of non-accidental amputation and this risk is approximately 15 times higher in diabetics than in any other population. The vasculopathy and/or the diabetic neuropathy represent the basic pathogenic elements in the development of diabetic foot: 15% of diabetics are affected by arteriopathy after 10 yrs of illness and just 40% have neuropathy after 25 yrs. The infection is the third, and often, concomitant pathogenetic factor in the diabetic ulcera. The diagnostics of the vasculopathic diabetic foot makes use of a careful objective check; doppler ultrasonography and arteriography (with the therapeutic application of the PTCA). In addition to the objective check, EMG and the neuropathy autonomy test are fundamental in the neuropathic diabetic foot. Osteomyelitis represents the most fearful complication in the diabetic foot; it can often be solved only through surgical destructive therapy. Therapy of the diabetic foot must come from careful and synergic team work, in which dietician, vascular surgeon, orthopedist and dermatologist make available their own skill with humility and endless patience.

  19. Relationship of metabolic syndrome and its components with -844 G/A and HindIII C/G PAI-1 gene polymorphisms in Mexican children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De la Cruz-Mosso Ulises

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several association studies have shown that -844 G/A and HindIII C/G PAI-1 polymorphisms are related with increase of PAI-1 levels, obesity, insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, hypertension and dyslipidemia, which are components of metabolic syndrome. The aim of this study was to analyze the allele and genotype frequencies of these polymorphisms in PAI-1 gene and its association with metabolic syndrome and its components in a sample of Mexican mestizo children. Methods This study included 100 children with an age range between 6-11 years divided in two groups: a 48 children diagnosed with metabolic syndrome and b 52 children metabolically healthy without any clinical and biochemical alteration. Metabolic syndrome was defined as the presence of three or more of the following criteria: fasting glucose levels ≥ 100 mg/dL, triglycerides ≥ 150 mg/dL, HDL-cholesterol th percentile, systolic blood pressure (SBP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP ≥ 95th percentile and insulin resistance HOMA-IR ≥ 2.4. The -844 G/A and HindIII C/G PAI-1 polymorphisms were analyzed by PCR-RFLP. Results For the -844 G/A polymorphism, the G/A genotype (OR = 2.79; 95% CI, 1.11-7.08; p = 0.015 and the A allele (OR = 2.2; 95% CI, 1.10-4.43; p = 0.015 were associated with metabolic syndrome. The -844 G/A and A/A genotypes were associated with increase in plasma triglycerides levels (OR = 2.6; 95% CI, 1.16 to 6.04; p = 0.02, decrease in plasma HDL-cholesterol levels (OR = 2.4; 95% CI, 1.06 to 5.42; p = 0.03 and obesity (OR = 2.6; 95% CI, 1.17-5.92; p = 0.01. The C/G and G/G genotypes of the HindIII C/G polymorphism contributed to a significant increase in plasma total cholesterol levels (179 vs. 165 mg/dL; p = 0.02 in comparison with C/C genotype. Conclusions The -844 G/A PAI-1 polymorphism is related with the risk of developing metabolic syndrome, obesity and atherogenic dyslipidemia, and the HindIII C/G PAI-1 polymorphism was associated with the

  20. Iambic Feet in Paumari and the Theory of Foot Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L. Everett

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes stress and moraic constituencies in Paumari, an endangered language of the Arawan family of the Brazilian Amazon. It argues that Paumari feet are quantity-insensitive iambs, built from right-to-left within the prosodic word. Both of these latter claims are theoretically important because they violate some proposed universals of foot structure. The paper also discusses more general implications of the Paumari data for theories of foot size and shape, proposing two constraints on foot size, Foot Maximality and Foot Minimality, to replace the less fine-tuned constraint Foot Binarity.

  1. Effects of ankle-foot orthoses on mediolateral foot-placement ability during post-stroke gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zissimopoulos, Angelika; Fatone, Stefania; Gard, Steven

    2015-10-01

    Accurate and precise mediolateral foot placement is important for balance during gait, but is impaired post stroke. Mediolateral foot placement may be improved with ankle-foot orthosis use. The purpose of this study was to determine whether an ankle-foot orthosis improves mediolateral foot-placement ability during post-stroke ambulation. Crossover trial with randomized order of conditions tested. The accuracy and precision of mediolateral foot placement was quantified while subjects targeted four different randomized step widths. Subjects were tested with and without their regular non-rigid ankle-foot orthosis in two separate visits (order randomized). While ankle-foot orthosis use corrected foot and ankle alignment (i.e. significantly decreased mid-swing plantar flexion, p = 0.000), effects of ankle-foot orthosis use on hip hiking (p = 0.545), circumduction (p = 0.179), coronal plane hip range of motion (p = 0.06), and mediolateral foot-placement ability (p = 0.537) were not significant. While ankle-foot orthosis-mediated equinovarus correction of the affected foot and ankle was not associated with improved biomechanics of walking (i.e. proximal ipsilateral hip kinematics or mediolateral foot-placement ability), it may affect other aspects of balance that were not tested in this study (e.g. proprioception, cerebellar, vestibular, and cognitive mechanisms). Studies that investigate the effect of ankle-foot orthosis on gait can help advance stroke rehabilitation by documenting the specific gait benefits of ankle-foot orthosis use. In this study, we investigated the effect of ankle-foot orthosis use on mediolateral foot-placement ability, an aspect of gait important for maintaining balance. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2014.

  2. Metallic Foreign Body in the Foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firat Ozan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: A foreign body injury of the foot is a frequently encountered problem. These foreign bodies can lead to various complications in the affected tissues, and their removal can be difficult and time consuming. Therefore, the removal of a foreign body requires good preoperative preparations. The surgical treatment results of patients with a foreign body, identified as a sewing needle, that had penetrated their foot were evaluated. Material and Method: Thirty-four patients (11 males, 23 females; mean age, 30.2 ± 18.6 years who were surgically treated between 2011 and 2013 were included. Data concerning the affected limb, placement of the needle, imaging techniques, season when the injury occurred, time between medical intervention and injury, anaesthesia type, fluoroscopy of use during surgery and surgical complications were analyzed. Results: A sewing needle had penetrated the right foot of 20 (58.8% patients and the left foot of 14 (41.1% patients. Broken needles were found in the toes of 14 (41.1% patients, in the middle of the foot of 12 (35.2% patients and in the heel area of 8 (23.5% patients. The injuries occurred in summer in 13 (38.2% patients, in winter in seven (20.6% patients, in spring in one (2.9% patient and in autumn in 13 (38.2% patients. Needle penetration had occurred in 28 (82.3% patients at home and 6 (17.6% patients outside of the home environment. The average follow-up time was 8.9 ± 2.8 months. Discussion: Removal of foreign bodies from the foot requires good preoperative preparations. Foreign bodies can lead to various complications in the affected tissues. It is important to perform detailed physical and radiological examinations to obtain good treatment results in these patients.

  3. Biomechanics and pathophysiology of flat foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Boerum, Drew H; Sangeorzan, Bruce J

    2003-09-01

    When the foot works properly it is an amazing, adaptive, powerful aid during walking, running, jumping, and in locomotion up or down hill and over uneven ground. Dysfunction of the foot can often arise from the foot losing its normal structural support, thus altering is shape. An imbalance in the forces that tend to flatten the arch and those that support the arch can lead to loss of the medial longitudinal arch. An increase in the arch-flattening effects of the triceps surae or an increase in the weight of the body will tend to flatten the arch. Weakness of the muscular, ligamentous, or bony arch supporting structures will lead to collapse of the arch. The main factors that contribute to an acquired flat foot deformity are excessive tension in the triceps surae, obesity, PTT dysfunction, or ligamentous laxity in the spring ligament, plantar fascia, or other supporting plantar ligaments. Too little support for the arch or too much arch flattening effect will lead to collapse of the arch. Acquired flat foot most often arises from a combination of too much force flattening the arch in the face of too little support for the arch. Treatment of the adult acquired flat foot is often difficult. The clinician should remember the biomechanics of the normal arch and respond with a treatment that strengthens the supporting structures of the arch or weakens the arch-flattening effects on the arch. After osteotomies or certain hindfoot fusions, the role of the supporting muscles of the arch, in particular the PTT, play less of a role in supporting the arch. Rebalancing the forces that act on the arch can improve function and lessen the chance for further or subsequent development of deformity.

  4. Foot Conditions among Homeless Persons: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Matthew J.; Brothers, Thomas D.; Van Zoost, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Foot problems are common among homeless persons, but are often overlooked. The objectives of this systematic review are to summarize what is known about foot conditions and associated interventions among homeless persons. Methods A literature search was conducted on MEDLINE (1966–2016), EMBASE (1947–2016), and CINAHL (1982–2016) and complemented by manual searches of reference lists. Articles that described foot conditions in homeless persons or associated interventions were included. Data were independently extracted on: general study characteristics; participants; foot assessment methods; foot conditions and associated interventions; study findings; quality score assessed using the Downs and Black checklist. Results Of 333 articles screened, 17 articles met criteria and were included in the study. Prevalence of any foot problem ranged from 9% to 65% across study populations. Common foot-related concerns were corns and calluses, nail pathologies, and infections. Foot pathologies related to chronic diseases such as diabetes were identified. Compared to housed individuals across studies, homeless individuals were more likely to have foot problems including tinea pedis, foot pain, functional limitations with walking, and improperly-fitting shoes. Discussion Foot conditions were highly prevalent among homeless individuals with up to two thirds reporting a foot health concern, approximately one quarter of individuals visiting a health professional, and one fifth of individuals requiring further follow-up due to the severity of their condition. Homeless individuals often had inadequate foot hygiene practices and improperly-fitting shoes. These findings have service provision and public health implications, highlighting the need for evidence-based interventions to improve foot health in this population. An effective interventional approach could include optimization of foot hygiene and footwear, provision of comprehensive medical treatment, and

  5. Foot Conditions among Homeless Persons: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Matthew J; Brothers, Thomas D; Van Zoost, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Foot problems are common among homeless persons, but are often overlooked. The objectives of this systematic review are to summarize what is known about foot conditions and associated interventions among homeless persons. A literature search was conducted on MEDLINE (1966-2016), EMBASE (1947-2016), and CINAHL (1982-2016) and complemented by manual searches of reference lists. Articles that described foot conditions in homeless persons or associated interventions were included. Data were independently extracted on: general study characteristics; participants; foot assessment methods; foot conditions and associated interventions; study findings; quality score assessed using the Downs and Black checklist. Of 333 articles screened, 17 articles met criteria and were included in the study. Prevalence of any foot problem ranged from 9% to 65% across study populations. Common foot-related concerns were corns and calluses, nail pathologies, and infections. Foot pathologies related to chronic diseases such as diabetes were identified. Compared to housed individuals across studies, homeless individuals were more likely to have foot problems including tinea pedis, foot pain, functional limitations with walking, and improperly-fitting shoes. Foot conditions were highly prevalent among homeless individuals with up to two thirds reporting a foot health concern, approximately one quarter of individuals visiting a health professional, and one fifth of individuals requiring further follow-up due to the severity of their condition. Homeless individuals often had inadequate foot hygiene practices and improperly-fitting shoes. These findings have service provision and public health implications, highlighting the need for evidence-based interventions to improve foot health in this population. An effective interventional approach could include optimization of foot hygiene and footwear, provision of comprehensive medical treatment, and addressing social factors that lead to increased risk

  6. How common are foot problems among individuals with diabetes? Diabetic foot ulcers in the Dutch population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoekenbroek, Robert M; Lokin, Joost L C; Nielen, Mark M; Stroes, Erik S G; Koelemay, Mark J W

    2017-07-01

    Contemporary data on diabetic foot ulcer prevalence are scarce. Most studies were conducted in the 1990s, reporting incidence rates of 1.9-2.6%. Since then the prevalence of diabetes has doubled and the organisation of diabetes care has undergone major changes. Up-to-date data that quantify the occurrence of diabetic foot ulcers are required and could serve as baseline measures for future studies. Individuals with diabetes (n = 81,793) were identified from the NIVEL (Netherlands institute for health services research) Primary Care Database, which contains data for standardised routine care and is representative of the Dutch population. The annual incidence rates of ulcers and other foot abnormalities were calculated using data collected between 2010 and 2013. To account for inaccuracies, incidence rates were calculated using: (1) only individuals with a documented foot examination; (2) all individuals; and (3) individuals with explicit documentation of present/absent foot ulceration. There were 412 individuals with documented ulceration during the registration period (0.50%). The annual incidence rate of foot ulcers was 0.34% (range 0.22-1.08%). Of those individuals with a documented foot examination, 14.6% had absent pedal pulsations, 17.3% had neuropathy and 10.1% had callus/pressure marks. The annual incidence rate of foot ulcers in the current study was lower than previously reported. This observation could reflect the efficacy of screening practices and an increased awareness among professionals and patients. Nevertheless, approximately one in every five diabetic individuals had at least one identifiable risk factor on foot examination. This signifies the importance of preventive screening.

  7. Foot and Ankle Injuries in American Football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Andrew R; Anderson, Robert B

    Physicians need to be aware of a variety of foot and ankle injuries that commonly occur in American football, including turf toe, Jones fractures, Lisfranc injuries, syndesmotic and deltoid disruption, and Achilles ruptures. These injuries are often complex and require early individual tailoring of treatment and rehabilitation protocols. Successful management and return to play requires early diagnosis, a thorough work-up, and prompt surgical intervention when warranted with meticulous attention to restoration of normal foot and ankle anatomy. Physicians should have a high suspicion for subtle injuries and variants that can occur via both contact and noncontact mechanisms.

  8. Latin American foot and ankle surgery today.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abello, Sergio

    2012-02-01

    Latin American medical orthopedic sub specialties have evolved a lot during the past decade. Foot and ankle surgery for instance, has gained high level of proficiency and competence throughout the international scientific communities. This may be due to the availability of new technology in osteosyntheses, orthopedic devices and surgical instruments used to optimize results, regardless of the low economic resources Latin American countries possess. Also, foot and ankle surgery training is being promoted by several International Medical associations that pursuit scientific knowledge and strengthen the practice. Day to day, more Latin American universities offer Fellowships for on-going training.

  9. Foot Pedals for Spacecraft Manual Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Stanley G.; Morin, Lee M.; McCabe, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Fifty years ago, NASA decided that the cockpit controls in spacecraft should be like the ones in airplanes. But controls based on the stick and rudder may not be best way to manually control a vehicle in space. A different method is based on submersible vehicles controlled with foot pedals. A new pilot can learn the sub's control scheme in minutes and drive it hands-free. We are building a pair of foot pedals for spacecraft control, and will test them in a spacecraft flight simulator.

  10. Fourier analysis of vertical ground reaction forces in dogs with unilateral hind limb lameness caused by degenerative disease of the hip joint and in dogs without lameness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katic, Nikola; Bockstahler, Barbara A; Mueller, Marion; Peham, Christian

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the applicability of Fourier analysis for assessment of ground reaction forces (GRFs) and differentiation between dogs with unilateral hind limb lameness caused by degenerative joint disease of the hip (DJD-H) and dogs without lameness. 37 dogs with or without unilateral DJD-H. Data were obtained from other studies and analyzed retrospectively. Among the 37 dogs, 20 had unilateral DJD-H and 9 (non-Belgian Malinois breeds) had no lameness; another 8 were nonlame Belgian Malinois (radiographically confirmed Fédération Cinologique International classification A [ie, no hip dysplasia or DJD-H]). Gait data acquisition was performed as dogs walked on a treadmill with integrated force platforms. The peak vertical force, mean vertical force, and vertical impulse were compared among the 3 groups. Fourier analysis was performed on the force-time curves for the vertical GRF, and calculated Fourier coefficients were compared within and between groups. Lameness in the hind limbs with DJD-H was detectable via conventional analysis of the GRF as well as via Fourier analysis. However, subtle gait aberrations in the forelimbs of the dogs with DJD-H were detected solely via Fourier analysis of GRFs and remained undetected via conventional analysis. Results support the applicability of Fourier analysis for evaluation of force-time curves of GRFs. Fourier analysis can reveal subtle alterations of gait that might otherwise remain inapparent; however, further investigation is necessary before this method can be routinely applied for lameness detection in dogs.

  11. Suppression of voluntary wheel running in rats is dependent on the site of inflammation: evidence for voluntary running as a measure of hind paw-evoked pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Peter M; Strand, Keith A; Maier, Steven F; Watkins, Linda R

    2014-02-01

    Decreased voluntary wheel running has recently been proposed as a preclinical pain measure for inflammatory pain, but whether this reflects pain evoked by use of the affected limbs is unknown. To assess the role of inflammation site as a determinant of this measure, complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), formalin, or equivolume vehicle was subcutaneously injected into the plantar surface of the hind paws (bilateral) or L1 dorsum dermatome (leaving paws unaffected) of male Sprague Dawley rats. CFA-induced hind paw mechanical allodynia (P pain evoked by use of the affected limbs rather than supraspinal pain processing that is independent of inflammation site. Furthermore, the results suggest that interpretation of voluntary wheel running data cannot simply be explained by correlation with mechanical allodynia. Whether decreased voluntary running is dependent on inflammation site is unknown. We show that intraplantar, but not L1 dorsum, CFA suppressed voluntary running and formalin-induced licking/writhing/flinching behavior but had no effect on voluntary running. These data suggest that suppressed voluntary running by CFA likely reflects pain evoked by use of the affected limbs. Copyright © 2014 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Parents: Avoid Kids Foot Problems with the Right Shoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Print | Share Avoid Kids Foot Problems with the Right Shoes Before you head to the store to ... College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), All Rights Reserved. Privacy Statement | Disclaimer | Terms and Conditions | Site ...

  13. Isolation of a substance activating foot formation in hydra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimmelikhuijzen, C J; Schaller, H C

    1977-01-01

    -forming potential of the tissue (2) It does not accelerate head regeneration, nor do the head factors of hydra discovered by Schaller (1973) and Berking (1977) accelerate foot regeneration. We propose that the foot-activating substance is a morphogen responsible for foot formation in hydra. The foot activator can...... be extracted from hydra tissue with methanol and separated from other known morphogens of hydra by gel filtration and ion-exchange chromatography. A substance with similar biological and physicochemical properties can be isolated from sea anemones.......We have developed an assay for a substance from hydra that accelerates foot regeneration in the animal. This substance is specific for the foot as evidenced by the following findings: (1) It is present in the animal as a steep gradient descending from foot to head, paralleling the foot...

  14. Back to School Foot Pain (Flip-Flops)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... School Soccer Season Prime time for foot and ankle injuries. Parents and coaches should think twice before coaxing ... foot and ankle surgeons see an increase in ankle injuries among young athletes. Football, soccer and basketball are ...

  15. Principles of management of vascular problems in the diabetic foot ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Principles of management of vascular problems in the diabetic foot: A multidisciplinary approach accounting for the complex pathobiology and biomechanics of the diabetic foot is crucial to decrease the rate of amputations.

  16. Comorbidities associated with Egyptian diabetic foot disease subtypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary N. Rizk

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion Special attention should be paid toward the identification of patients who are at risk of foot ulceration to help prevent foot problems. Comorbid conditions must also be identified early and managed aggressively.

  17. Recognizing the radiographic features of some common bovine foot problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebeid, M.; Steiner, A.

    1996-01-01

    Radiographs of an injured or infected bovine foot can be tricky to interpret - the anatomy is complex, and the signs may be subtle. This guide leads you through the classic radiographic features of several common foot conditions

  18. A Simple New Classification for Diabetic Foot Ulcers

    OpenAIRE

    C Jain, Amit Kumar

    2015-01-01

    AbstractGangrene, infections like abscesses and ulcers are some of the common diabetic foot complications. Of all these, diabetic foot ulcers pose a major public health problem. Around 80% of all the lower limb amputations are preceded by a foot ulcer. There are various classifications for diabetic foot ulcers out of which the two commonly used classifications are Wagner’s ulcer classification and the classification of University of Texas. The author proposes another simple new classification...

  19. The Manchester–Oxford Foot Questionnaire (MOXFQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, D.; Jenkinson, C.; Doll, H.; Lavis, G.; Sharp, R.; Cooke, P.; Dawson, J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The Manchester–Oxford Foot Questionnaire (MOXFQ) is a validated 16-item, patient-reported outcome measure for evaluating outcomes of foot or ankle surgery. The original development of the instrument identified three domains. This present study examined whether the three domains could legitimately be summed to provide a single summary index score. Methods The MOXFQ and Short-Form (SF)-36 were administered to 671 patients before surgery of the foot or ankle. Data from the three domains of the MOXFQ (pain, walking/standing and social interaction) were subjected to higher order factor analysis. Reliability and validity of the summary index score was assessed. Results The mean age of the participants was 52.8 years (sd 15.68; 18 to 89). Higher order principle components factor analysis produced one factor, accounting for 74.7% of the variance. The newly derived single index score was found to be internally reliable (α = 0.93) and valid, achieving at least moderate correlations (r ≥ 0.5, p < 0.001) with related (pain/function) domains of the SF-36. Conclusions Analyses indicated that data from the MOXFQ can be presented in summary form. The MOXFQ summary index score (MOXFQ-Index) provides an overall indication of the outcomes of foot and ankle surgery. Furthermore, the single index reduces the number of statistical comparisons, and hence the role of chance, when exploring MOXFQ data. PMID:23673374

  20. Transkei Foot | Schartz | South African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An epidemiological investigation of bone and joint abnormalities in a Xhosa population revealed 6 females with a condition characterised by marked lateral deviation of the fifth toes. This disorder does not seem to have been previously described, and we therefore propose that it should be named 'Transkei foot'.

  1. Patient education for preventing diabetic foot ulceration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorresteijn, J.A.; Kriegsman, D.M.; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Valk, G.D.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ulceration of the feet, which can result in loss of limbs and even death, is one of the major health problems for people with diabetes mellitus. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of patient education on the prevention of foot ulcers in patients with diabetes mellitus. SEARCH METHODS:

  2. Patient education for preventing diabetic foot ulceration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorresteijn, J.A.; Kriegsman, D.M.; Assendelft, W.J.; Valk, G.D.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ulceration of the feet, which can result in loss of limbs and even death, is one of the major health problems for people with diabetes mellitus. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of patient education on the prevention of foot ulcers in patients with diabetes mellitus. SEARCH METHODS: We

  3. Habitual Physical Activity, Peripheral Neuropathy, Foot Deformities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Habitual physical activity index (3.2 ± 0.83) was highest in work-related activities; 69 (26.1 %) patients presented with peripheral neuropathy and 52 (19. 7%) had the lowest limb function. Pes planus was the most prevalent foot deformity (20.1%). Significant differences existed in physical activity indices across ...

  4. Complex interventions for preventing diabetic foot ulceration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogeveen, Ruben C; Dorresteijn, Johannes A N; Kriegsman, Didi M W; Valk, Gerlof D.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ulceration of the feet, which can lead to the amputation of feet and legs, is a major problem for people with diabetes mellitus, and can cause substantial economic burden. Single preventive strategies have not been shown to reduce the incidence of foot ulceration to a significant extent.

  5. A portable foot-parameter-extracting system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, MingKai; Liang, Jin; Li, Wenpan; Liu, Shifan

    2016-03-01

    In order to solve the problem of automatic foot measurement in garment customization, a new automatic footparameter- extracting system based on stereo vision, photogrammetry and heterodyne multiple frequency phase shift technology is proposed and implemented. The key technologies applied in the system are studied, including calibration of projector, alignment of point clouds, and foot measurement. Firstly, a new projector calibration algorithm based on plane model has been put forward to get the initial calibration parameters and a feature point detection scheme of calibration board image is developed. Then, an almost perfect match of two clouds is achieved by performing a first alignment using the Sampled Consensus - Initial Alignment algorithm (SAC-IA) and refining the alignment using the Iterative Closest Point algorithm (ICP). Finally, the approaches used for foot-parameterextracting and the system scheme are presented in detail. Experimental results show that the RMS error of the calibration result is 0.03 pixel and the foot parameter extracting experiment shows the feasibility of the extracting algorithm. Compared with the traditional measurement method, the system can be more portable, accurate and robust.

  6. Catapult splint: a foot dorsiflexion assist splint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Vineet; Agrawal, Mayank; Dhal, Anil

    2011-12-01

    Loss of dorsiflexion is a common problem in cases where an external fixator or Ilizarov assembly is applied. It results in functional impairment of the foot by affecting the swing phase of gait cycle. We devised a simple dynamic dorsiflexion assist splint for prevention, correction of equinus/cavus deformity and maintenance of normal dorsiflexion of foot. This prospective study used a rubber splint styled in the shape of a catapult, made of discarded car rubber tubes attached to the frame of fixator in 50 patients. In 17 patients there was varying amount of loss of dorsiflexion at the time of application of splint while in 22 patients it was applied soon after the application of the fixator. In the rest of patients it was applied for cavus deformity. Out of 17 patients 10 had complete recovery of dorsiflexion. 22 patients in whom it was applied at the outset had normal range of movement at ankle. Correction was achieved in all 6 cases of cavus deformity and prevented its occurrence in the rest of 5 cases. Catapult splint is a low cost foot dorsiflexion assist splint. Copyright © 2011 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Foot-and-mouth disease vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious disease of domestic and wild cloven-hoofed animals. This disease has affected most areas of the world, often causing extensive epizootics in livestock, mostly farmed cattle and swine, although sheep, goats and many wild species are also susceptible...

  8. Ambulatory assessment of ankle and foot dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, H. Martin; Koopman, Hubertus F.J.M.; Veltink, Petrus H.

    Ground reaction force (GRF) measurement is important in the analysis of human body movements. The main drawback of the existing measurement systems is the restriction to a laboratory environment. This paper proposes an ambulatory system for assessing the dynamics of ankle and foot, which integrates

  9. Malignant melanoma misdiagnosed as diabetic foot ulcer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei; Chen, Dawei; Ran, Xingwu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Acral lentiginous melanoma (AML) does not exhibit the classic signs of malignant melanoma. ALM is frequently misdiagnosed because of its unusual sites and atypical clinical morphologies, which lead to poor prognosis. Patient concerns: A female patient aged 78 years was presented to our center with two ulcers on her right foot. Diabetic foot ulcer was considered as the primary diagnosis. The ulcers failed to improve after 2 weeks’ therapy. Diagnoses: An incisional biopsy of the lesion revealed malignant melanoma. Interventions: The patient received wide excision, skin grafting as well as biotherapy. Outcomes: The lesion was healed and no other metastasis has been founded until now. Lessons: Clinicians must maintain a high level of suspicion in distinguishing malignant melanoma from other more benign skin lesions of the foot. The need for early biopsy of ulcer, even when clinical suspicion is low, can not be overemphasized. Only in this way can we reduce misdiagnosis rate and improve survival rate in patients with foot ulcer. PMID:28723771

  10. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy and the diabetic foot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, D. J.

    2000-01-01

    Common causes for non-healing of diabetic foot ulcers are infection and/or ischaemia. Diabetic patients are compromised hosts as far as wound healing is concerned. Diabetes mellitus is associated with a defective cellular and humoral immunity. In particular, decreased chemotaxis, decreased

  11. Tumors of the ankle and foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankman, S; Cisa, J; Present, D

    1994-02-01

    Although tumor and tumor-like conditions of the foot and ankle are unusual, certain bone and soft tissue lesions are more common than others. Conventional radiographs remain essential in all such cases and are especially specific for intraosseous tumors. MR imaging is more sensitive to the presence and extent of both bone and soft tissue lesions.

  12. Giant epidermal cyst of the foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malkoc Melih

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Epidermoid inclusion cysts are usually composed of epidermal elements implanted into the dermal layers. Patients are seen in the outpatient clinics with a mass. Most of the complaints are mechanical and cosmetic problems. Case Outline. A 34-year-old female patient was admitted to our clinic because of swelling and pain in her right foot. A palpable mass was detected in the first web. On the x-rays of the foot no osseous lesion was detected. There was a soft tissue mass in the first web according to MRI report. Soft tissue mass was excised and sent to pathology. According to pathology report the mass was an epidermoid cyst 5Ч2Ч1.5 cm in size. There were no problems during follow-up of the patient for 6 months after surgery. The patient had no swelling in the foot and had no additional complaints on checkup. Conclusion. In the differential diagnosis, we should take into consideration epidermoid cyst of large soft tissue masses of the foot. Surgical excision should be done within the appropriate limits.

  13. Diabetic foot and PAD: the endovascular approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reekers, J. A.; Lammer, J.

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration (DFU) is recognized as one of the most serious complications of diabetes. Active revascularisation plays a crucial role in achieving ulcer healing. Non-surgical, minimally invasive, revascularisation options for DFU have expanded over the last decade and have become a

  14. Foot Structure in Boys with Down Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Puszczałowska-Lizis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and Aim. Down syndrome (DS is associated with numerous developmental abnormalities, some of which cause dysfunctions of the posture and the locomotor system. The analysis of selected features of the foot structure in boys with DS versus their peers without developmental disorders is done. Materials and Methods. The podoscopic examination was performed on 30 boys with DS aged 14-15 years. A control group consisted of 30 age- and gender-matched peers without DS. Results. The feet of boys with DS are flatter compared to their healthy peers. The hallux valgus angle is not the most important feature differentiating the shape of the foot in the boys with DS and their healthy peers. In terms of the V toe setting, healthy boys had poorer results. Conclusions. Specialized therapeutic treatment in individuals with DS should involve exercises to increase the muscle strength around the foot joints, enhancing the stabilization in the joints and proprioception. Introducing orthotics and proper footwear is also important. It is also necessary to monitor the state of the foot in order to modify undertaken therapies.

  15. A case of bilateral trench foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, S L; Leach, I H; Charnley, R M

    1993-12-01

    A case of severe bilateral trench foot is presented in a patient who lived rough for 3 weeks without removing his boots. Non-operative management yielded no clinical improvement and bilateral below-knee amputation was necessary. Histology revealed subcutaneous and muscle necrosis with secondary arterial thrombosis.

  16. Complex Foot Injury: Early and Definite Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, Tim; Rammelt, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Complex foot injuries occur infrequently, but are life-changing events. They often present with other injuries as the result of a high-energy trauma. After initial stabilization, early assessment should be regarding salvagability. All treatment strategies are intensive. The initial treatment

  17. ESTIMATION OF STATURE BASED ON FOOT LENGTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidyullatha Shetty

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Stature is the height of the person in the upright posture. It is an important measure of physical identity. Estimation of body height from its segments or dismember parts has important considerations for identifications of living or dead human body or remains recovered from disasters or other similar conditions. OBJECTIVE : Stature is an important indicator for identification. There are numerous means to establish stature and their significance lies in the simplicity of measurement, applicability and accuracy in prediction. Our aim of the study was to review the relationship between foot length and body height. METHODS : The present study reviews various prospective studies which were done to estimate the stature. All the measurements were taken by using standard measuring devices and standard anthropometric techniques. RESULTS : This review shows there is a correlation between stature and foot dimensions it is found to be positive and statistically highly significant. Prediction of stature was found to be most accurate by multiple regression analysis. CONCLUSIONS : Stature and gender estimation can be done by using foot measurements and stud y will help in medico - legal cases in establishing identity of an individual and this would be useful for Anatomists and Anthropologists to calculate stature based on foot length

  18. 29 CFR 1910.136 - Foot protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Personal Protective Equipment § 1910.136 Foot protection. (a) General requirements. The employer shall ensure that each affected employee uses protective footwear when working in...

  19. 29 CFR 1917.94 - Foot protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED... affected employee wears protective footwear when working in areas where there is a danger of foot injuries... protective footwear complies with any of the following consensus standards: (i) ASTM F-2412-2005, “Standard...

  20. 29 CFR 1918.104 - Foot protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR LONGSHORING Personal Protective Equipment § 1918.104 Foot protection. (a) The employer shall ensure that each affected employee wears protective footwear when working...

  1. 49 CFR 214.115 - Foot protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... shock or burns, or other hazardous condition. (b) Safety-toe footwear for railroad bridge workers shall conform to the national consensus standards for safety-toe footwear (American National Standards Institute..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD WORKPLACE SAFETY Bridge Worker Safety Standards § 214.115 Foot...

  2. 29 CFR 1915.156 - Foot protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS FOR SHIPYARD EMPLOYMENT Personal Protective Equipment... protective footwear when working in areas where there is a danger of foot injuries due to falling or rolling...

  3. The Balloon Foot ; A Rare Presentation Of Congenital Constricting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We present a case of a rare manifestation of congenital constricting annular band (CAB) in the lower extremity resulting in a severe excessive swelling of the foot which we have termed Balloon foot. The ballooned foot is caused by a progressive deepening of the circumferential constriction into the soft tissue of the lower ...

  4. A comparative study of foot measurements using Receiver ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this research was to assess the reliability of the foot measurements by comparing the male and female foot measurements, to know if there is correlation between the male and female foot measurements using the standard set by Landis and Koch (1977), and also to identity the true positive rate and false ...

  5. Preventative foot care in people with diabetes: Quality patient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Foot ulceration and amputation cause extensive burden on individuals and health care systems. One of the reasons for the poor outcome of foot complications in developing countries is the lack of patient education. Due to the multi-factorial pathology of diabetic foot ulceration, the person with diabetes should receive health ...

  6. Diabetic foot disease in Ethiopian patients: A hospital based study ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Ulcers of the foot are one of the most feared and common complications of diabetes. It is a major cause of disability, morbidity and mortality among diabetic patients and about 15% develop foot ulcers in their lifetime. So far, there are few published data in relation to the high-risk diabetic foot in Ethiopian ...

  7. Diabetic foot disease in Ethiopian patients: A hospital based study

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bernt Lindtjørn

    Abstract. Background: Ulcers of the foot are one of the most feared and common complications of diabetes. It is a major cause of disability, morbidity and mortality among diabetic patients and about 15% develop foot ulcers in their lifetime. So far, there are few published data in relation to the high-risk diabetic foot in ...

  8. The Athletic Foot and Its Import to Performance during Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdan, Richard

    In this paper, problems and conditions of the foot, including flat feet, achilles tendon problems, heel spur syndrome, digital problems, shin splints, and leg stress fractures, are examined. Ways to examine the athlete's foot and leg are described, including the one-foot test and the off weight-bearing examination. (CJ)

  9. Board-foot and cubic-foot volume tables for western red cedar in southeast Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald J. DeMars

    1996-01-01

    Four tables give cubic-foot and board-foot volume estimates for western redcedar given breast height diameter outside bark (DBHOB) and either total tree height or number of logs to a 6-inch top. The values for DBHOB and total tree height (or number of logs in the tree) that are in the tables have been limited to the ranges these variables had in the sample data.

  10. Trends in lumber processing in the western United States. Part I: board foot Scribner volume per cubic foot of timber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles E. Keegan; Todd A. Morgan; Keith A. Blatner; Jean M. Daniels

    2010-01-01

    This article describes trends in board foot Scribner volume per cubic foot of timber for logs processed by sawmills in the western United States. Board foot to cubic foot (BF/CF) ratios for the period from 2000 through 2006 ranged from 3.70 in Montana to 5.71 in the Four Corners Region (Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah). Sawmills in the Four Corners Region,...

  11. Tibialis posterior tendon transfer corrects the foot drop component of cavovarus foot deformity in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreher, T; Wolf, S I; Heitzmann, D; Fremd, C; Klotz, M C; Wenz, W

    2014-03-19

    The foot drop component of cavovarus foot deformity in patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is commonly treated by tendon transfer to provide substitute foot dorsiflexion or by tenodesis to prevent the foot from dropping. Our goals were to use three-dimensional foot analysis to evaluate the outcome of tibialis posterior tendon transfer to the dorsum of the foot and to investigate whether the transfer works as an active substitution or as a tenodesis. We prospectively studied fourteen patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease and cavovarus foot deformity in whom twenty-three feet were treated with tibialis posterior tendon transfer to correct the foot drop component as part of a foot deformity correction procedure. Five patients underwent unilateral treatment and nine underwent bilateral treatment; only one foot was analyzed in each of the latter patients. Standardized clinical examinations and three-dimensional gait analysis with a special foot model (Heidelberg Foot Measurement Method) were performed before and at a mean of 28.8 months after surgery. The three-dimensional gait analysis revealed significant increases in tibiotalar and foot-tibia dorsiflexion during the swing phase after surgery. These increases were accompanied by a significant reduction in maximum plantar flexion at the stance-swing transition but without a reduction in active range of motion. Passive ankle dorsiflexion measured in knee flexion and extension increased significantly without any relevant decrease in passive plantar flexion. The AOFAS (American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society) score improved significantly. Tibialis posterior tendon transfer was effective at correcting the foot drop component of cavovarus foot deformity in patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, with the transfer apparently working as an active substitution. Although passive plantar flexion was not limited after surgery, active plantar flexion at push-off was significantly reduced and it is unknown whether

  12. [S2-Guideline: Pediatric Flat Foot].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hell, Anna K; Döderlein, Leo; Eberhardt, Oliver; Hösl, Matthias; von Kalle, Thekla; Mecher, Frauke; Simon, Angela; Stinus, Hartmut; Wilken, Bernd; Wirth, Thomas

    2018-04-09

    In pediatric flat foot a differentiation has to be made between the flexible and the rigid form. The diagnosis is based on the history, clinical examination as well as pedobarography, gait analysis and imaging techniques. It is important to rule out neuropediatric conditions such as muscular dystrophies, Ehlers-Danlos- or Marfan syndrome. In children six years of age and younger a flexible flat foot is nearly always physiological (97% of all 19 months old children). Up to the age of ten years the medial column of the foot is developing. Only a minority of children (4% in ten year olds) has a persistent or progressive deformity. Beyond to age of ten there is a danger of deformity decompensation as well as an increased rigidity. Only a minority of children develops some pain (< 2%). A clear risk factor for persistent pediatric flat foot is obesity (62% of six year old children with flat foot are obese). Pathogenetic factors include muscular, bony or soft tissue conditions. However, there specific rule is still unclear. Prevention consists in a thorough parent information about the normal development as well as encouragement of regular sportive activities. Soft and large enough shoes should be carried as a protection. Barfoot walking has to be encouraged on uneven grounds. If physiotherapy is needed different methods can be applied. Orthosis treatment should include a proprioceptive approach. Surgical interventions in children are rare. If surgical treatment is planned a detailed algorhythm should be used before utilizing one of the many different surgical methods. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Normative values for the Foot Posture Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redmond Anthony C

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Foot Posture Index (FPI is a validated method for quantifying standing foot posture, and is being used in a variety of clinical settings. There have however, been no normative data available to date for comparison and reference. This study aimed to establish normative FPI reference values. Methods Studies reporting FPI data were identified by searching online databases. Nine authors contributed anonymised versions of their original datasets comprising 1648 individual observations. The datasets included information relating to centre, age, gender, pathology (if relevant, FPI scores and body mass index (BMI where available. FPI total scores were transformed to interval logit scores as per the Rasch model and normal ranges were defined. Comparisons between groups employed t-tests or ANOVA models as appropriate and data were explored descriptively and graphically. Results The main analysis based on a normal healthy population (n = 619 confirmed that a slightly pronated foot posture is the normal position at rest (mean back transformed FPI raw score = +4. A 'U' shaped relationship existed for age, with minors and older adults exhibiting significantly higher FPI scores than the general adult population (F = 51.07, p t = -1.44, p = 0.149. No relationship was found between the FPI and BMI. Systematic differences from the adult normals were confirmed in patients with neurogenic and idiopathic cavus (F = 216.981, p Conclusion A set of population norms for children, adults and older people have been derived from a large sample. Foot posture is related to age and the presence of pathology, but not influenced by gender or BMI. The normative values identified may assist in classifying foot type for the purpose of research and clinical decision making.

  14. [Diabetic foot osteomyelitis: is conservative treatment possible?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordano-Montañez, Queralt; Muñiz-Tatay, Montse; Viadé-Julià, Jordi; Jaen-Manzanera, Angeles; Royo-Serrando, Josep; Cuchí-Burgos, Eva; Anglada-Barceló, Jordi; de la Sierra-Iserte, Alejandro

    2014-11-01

    The aim of the present study is to determine the proportion of foot ulcers, complicated by osteomyelitis in diabetic patients, that heal without amputation. Furthermore, an attempt is made to analyze the main clinical and microbiological characteristics of episodes, and to identify potential predictive factors leading to the failure of conservative treatment. A prospective observational study was carried out between 2007 and 2009 on diabetic patients with a foot lesion and attending a diabetic foot clinic. A percutaneous bone biopsy was required to be included in the study. A total of 81 episodes of diabetic foot osteomyelitis in 64 patients were evaluated. Staphylococcus aureus (28/81) and coagulase negative Staphylococcus (22/81) were the most frequent organisms isolated. Among the gramnegative group (34/81), non-fermenting gram negative bacteria were the most prevalent organisms isolated (14/81). Conservative treatment was successful in 73% of episodes. After a logistic regression analysis using the most significant prognostic variables, only lesion size greater than 2cm independently predicted failure of conservative treatment. Culture guided antibiotic treatment was associated with a better prognosis. Conservative treatment, including culture-guided antibiotics, is successful without amputation in a large proportion of diabetic patients with diabetic foot osteomyelitis. Considering empiric therapy directed at non-fermenting gramnegative bacteria could be advisable in some cases, because they are frequently isolated in our setting. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  15. Linear and angular measurements of the foot of modern humans: a test of Morton's foot types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lautzenheiser, Steven G; Kramer, Patricia Ann

    2013-10-01

    In his classic research, Morton established two functionally different configurations of the bipedal and non-bipedal primate foot: one optimized for stability, with a stiff longitudinal arch and adducted first metatarsal, and the other for compliance. Modern human feet were seen as conforming to the bipedal norm and variation from it as pathology, even though clinical evidence has been clear that variation from the norm of a stiff longitudinal arch or adducted first metatarsal exists. This study aims to document the variation in linear and angular measurements of the foot, using weight-bearing radiographs of 50 randomly selected people (25 men) from an urban US Level 1 trauma center. The radiographs were obtained to "rule-out" a foot fracture after trauma or as comparison films for a contralateral foot injury. Measurements were made using Osirix and correlations among the angular and length measurements were determined using Stata with P types. Whether or not this variation in modern humans is linked to functionally important consequences remains to be determined in future research. With the new evidence of a more variable foot structure in fossil hominins, understanding the relationship between foot morphology and function becomes more urgent. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. The Relationship with Balance, Foot Posture, and Foot Size in School of Physical Education and Sports Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irez, Gonul Babayigit

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship of foot posture and foot size with balance. A hundred and thirteen healthy volunteers were recruited from undergraduate students (Male = 74, Female = 37, age range 18-22). The Foot Posture Index (FPI-6), anthropometric measurements, dynamic balance and static balance measurements were done…

  17. Effect of Custom-Molded Foot Orthoses on Foot Pain and Balance in Children With Symptomatic Flexible Flat Feet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hong-Jae; Lim, Kil-Byung; Yoo, JeeHyun; Yoon, Sung-Won; Yun, Hyun-Ju; Jeong, Tae-Ho

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of custom-molded foot orthoses on foot pain and balance in children with symptomatic flexible flat foot 1 month and 3 months after fitting foot orthosis. A total of 24 children over 6 years old with flexible flat feet and foot pain for at least 6 months were recruited for this study. Their resting calcaneal stance position and calcaneal pitch angle were measured. Individual custom-molded rigid foot orthoses were prescribed using inverted orthotic technique to control foot overpronation. Pain questionnaire was used to obtain pain sites, degree, and frequency. Balancing ability was determined using computerized posturography. These evaluations were performed prior to custom-molded foot orthoses, 1 month, and 3 months after fitting foot orthoses. Of 24 children with symptomatic flexible flat feet recruited for this study, 20 completed the study. Significant (pfoot orthoses. In addition, significant (pfoot orthoses. Short-term use of custom-molded foot orthoses significantly improved foot pain and balancing ability in children with symptomatic flexible flat foot.

  18. 2D motion analysis of rabbits after Achilles tendon rupture repair and histological analysis of extracted tendons: can the number of animals be reduced by operating both hind legs simultaneously?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschmann, Johanna; Müller, Angela; Nicholls, Flora; Achermann, Rita; Bürgisser, Gabriella Meier; Baumgartner, Walter; Calcagni, Maurizio; Giovanoli, Pietro

    2013-10-01

    Considering the 3Rs principle in animal experiments, there is a demand to perform research experiments with the fewest number of animals possible while warranting the welfare of the animals. Orthopaedic experimental studies involving operations on the hind legs of rabbits are either performed on one hind leg with the second hind leg serving as control or on both hind legs simultaneously (control: rabbits with no operations at all). The Achilles tendon of rabbits was transected and sutured, and the two-dimensional motion pattern of animals having only one leg operated was compared to rabbits having both hind legs operated (control: non-treated animals). Step length, maximum ankle angle, minimum ankle angle and the resulting range of motion of both hind legs were determined weekly over a time span from 3 weeks to 12 weeks post-operation. The results were fitted by a linear mixed effects model including time dependency. Moreover, all tendon specimen were analysed histologically. Tenocyte and tenoblast density, tenocyte and tenoblast nuclei width, inflammation level and collagen fibre alignment were determined. Statistically significant differences in the motion pattern were found when one-leg treated and two-leg treated animals were compared. However, the absolute differences were on average less than 20%. Histologically, 1-leg treated animals had tendon tissue with higher cell density, but lower inflammation and less ondulated collagen fibres compared to 2-leg treated animals; the nuclei width was the same for both groups. With regard to welfare, all animals were fine during the experiments. While comparative studies should be performed with one-leg treated animals due to interaction effects, for proof-of-principle studies, operating two legs per animal may be justified as the welfare of the animals is warranted. This is a great benefit in the sense of the 3Rs because up to 50% of animals can be spared. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Holographic interferometry for early diagnosisof children flat foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Олег Петрович Большаков

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the first experience ofthe use of holographic interferometr y for earlydiagnosis of the flat foot in 4-5 years old children.13 patients were examined. The results of the clinicalexamination, plantography, and of the graphicalreconstruction of the form of the foot arch basedon the interferogramms of the prints on Pedilen areanalyzed. We revealed typical differences betweenthe form of the foot arches in children with flat foot and children with normal status. The use of the proposed method for early detection of congenital pes valgus and of the signs of “flexible flat” foot is being suggested.

  20. Hubungan Kejadian Flat Foot dengan Obesitas pada Anak

    OpenAIRE

    Levenia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Flat foot is usually occurs and do not cause symptoms in under 5 years old children. But if occur in older children can cause pain even injury in children’s foot. One of flat foot’s risk factor is obesity. Although the prevalence of obesity is increasing every year, research of relationship between obesity and flat foot is still limited. The purpose of this research were to detect prevalence of obesity and flat foot, also to detect the relationship between obesity and flat foot ...

  1. Attenuation of hind-limb ischemia in mice with endothelial-like cells derived from different sources of human stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wing-Hon Lai

    Full Text Available Functional endothelial-like cells (EC have been successfully derived from different cell sources and potentially used for treatment of cardiovascular diseases; however, their relative therapeutic efficacy remains unclear. We differentiated functional EC from human bone marrow mononuclear cells (BM-EC, human embryonic stem cells (hESC-EC and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC-EC, and compared their in-vitro tube formation, migration and cytokine expression profiles, and in-vivo capacity to attenuate hind-limb ischemia in mice. Successful differentiation of BM-EC was only achieved in 1/6 patient with severe coronary artery disease. Nevertheless, BM-EC, hESC-EC and hiPSC-EC exhibited typical cobblestone morphology, had the ability of uptaking DiI-labeled acetylated low-density-lipoprotein, and binding of Ulex europaeus lectin. In-vitro functional assay demonstrated that hiPSC-EC and hESC-EC had similar capacity for tube formation and migration as human umbilical cord endothelial cells (HUVEC and BM-EC (P>0.05. While increased expression of major angiogenic factors including epidermal growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor, placental growth factor and stromal derived factor-1 were observed in all EC cultures during hypoxia compared with normoxia (P<0.05, the magnitudes of cytokine up-regulation upon hypoxic were more dramatic in hiPSC-EC and hESC-EC (P<0.05. Compared with medium, transplanting BM-EC (n = 6, HUVEC (n = 6, hESC-EC (n = 8 or hiPSC-EC (n = 8 significantly attenuated severe hind-limb ischemia in mice via enhancement of neovascularization. In conclusion, functional EC can be generated from hECS and hiPSC with similar therapeutic efficacy for attenuation of severe hind-limb ischemia. Differentiation of functional BM-EC was more difficult to achieve in patients with cardiovascular diseases, and hESC-EC or iPSC-EC are readily available as "off-the-shelf" format for the treatment

  2. Angiogenic properties of sustained release platelet-rich plasma: characterization in-vitro and in the ischemic hind limb of the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bir, Shyamal Chandra; Esaki, Jiro; Marui, Akira; Yamahara, Kenichi; Tsubota, Hideki; Ikeda, Tadashi; Sakata, Ryuzo

    2009-10-01

    While single growth factor has limitation to induce optimal neovascularization, platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is an autologous reserver of various growth factors. However, little is known about the mechanism of PRP-related neovascularization.The objective of this investigation was to characterize the angiogenic and growth factor content of PRP and to determine, in vitro, its effect on endothelial cell proliferation. Additionally, this experiment sought to determine the effectiveness of different compositions of PRP (solution versus sustained release) on perfusion and neovascularization in a murine model of hind limb ischemia. Different growth factors were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In vivo study, we used gelatin hydrogel as a sustained release carrier for growth factors in PRP. We induced hind limb ischemia by excising right femoral artery in wild type C57BL6 mice. After surgery, mice were randomly assigned to four experimental groups; control (C), 100 muL of sustained release form of platelet-poor plasma (PPP), 100 muL of solution form of PRP (PRP-sol), 100 muL of sustained release form of PRP (PRP-sr); each formulation was administered via an intramuscular injection to the ischemic hind limb. Endpoint evaluations were blood perfusion by laser Doppler perfusion image, vascular density by anti Von Willebrand factor (vWF), and mature vessel density by anti smooth muscle actin (SMA) antibody. Green fluorescent protein (GFP+) transgenic mice were generated by transplantation of bone marrow derived mononuclear cells to wild type C57BL6 mice, and finally CD34+ cell in the ischemic site of transgenic mice was detected by staining with anti-CD34 antibody. In vitro study showed that PRP containing different growth factors induces endothelial cell proliferation and capillary tube formation. In vivo study demonstrated that sustained release of PRP increased perfusion of ischemic tissue as measured by laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDPI) (57 +/- 12

  3. Starting off on the right foot: strong right-footers respond faster with the right foot to positive words and with the left foot to negative words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Vega, Irmgard; Graebe, Julia; Härtner, Leonie; Dudschig, Carolin; Kaup, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have provided evidence for an association between valence and left/right modulated by handedness, which is predicted by the body-specificity hypothesis (Casasanto, 2009) and also reflected in response times. We investigated whether such a response facilitation can also be observed with foot responses. Right-footed participants classified positive and negative words according to their valence by pressing a key with their left or right foot. A significant interaction between valence and foot only emerged in the by-items analysis. However, when dividing participants into two groups depending on the strength of their footedness, an interaction between valence and left/right was observed for strong right-footers, who responded faster with the right foot to positive words, and with the left foot to negative words. No interaction emerged for weak right-footers. The results strongly support the assumption that fluency lies at the core of the association between valence and left/right.

  4. Comparison of body fat-free masses calculated from hand-to-foot and foot-to-foot resistances with DXA measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousbiat, Sana; Jaffrin, Michel Y; Dongmo, Edwige

    2011-11-01

    This article compares the determination of body fat-free-mass (FFM) by impedance, using either hand-to-foot resistance (R₁₃) or foot-to-foot one (R₃₄) from comparison with dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) measurements in a normal population. The first goal was to see if the foot-to-foot resistance used in body fat analysers provides less accurate information for body FFM than the hand-to-foot one used by medical impedance-meters. Another goal was to compare the prediction accuracy of six different regression equations of FFM for each sex and for each resistance relatively to DXA. The impedancemeter used in this study was a Tefal prototype with 4 plantar electrodes and 4 additional electrodes for the hands and providing hand-to-foot and foot-to-foot resistances. Coefficients of these correlations were determined by comparison with FFM measured by DXA in a 1st cohort of 170 healthy adults. For an independent validation, these equations were tested in a 2nd cohort of 86 adults who underwent the same impedance and DXA protocols, using Student's paired t-tests. The accuracy of FFM prediction increased generally with the number of physiologic parameters included in the regression, but none of our equations gave FFM predictions significantly different from DXA. FFM calculated from the foot-to-foot resistance were closer to DXA values than those calculated from hand-to-foot resistance, as their average P-value of comparison with DXA was higher at 0.695 against 0.387 for R₁₃.

  5. Effect of ski mountaineering track on foot sole loading pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haselbacher, Matthias; Mader, Katharina; Werner, Maximiliane; Nogler, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Ski mountaineering is becoming a popular sport. The ascending techniques (tracks) can be divided into 3 different groups: flat field, direct ascent, and traversing. This study examines the relationship between different mechanical loads on the foot and the 4 different mountaineering ascending techniques. All subjects used the same pair of ski boots and the same skis while performing the 4 different ascending techniques. An in-shoe dynamic pressure measuring system was used to measure the mechanical load on the foot soles of each ski mountaineer. The foot sole was divided into 6 anatomic sections to measure the different loads in each section. Thirteen men with an average age of 29 years were enrolled in the study. The results showed small, not significant differences in the mechanical foot load in the flat field or in the direct ascent. The average mechanical foot load was highest on the valley side foot while traversing (179 kPa to 117 kPa). The higher load forces were in the medial ball of the foot and the longitudinal aspect of the foot side closer to the hill. The higher impact placed on the valley side foot and the concentration of force placed on the medial ball of the valley side foot suggested the influence of the track on the load pattern of the foot sole. This higher impact may result in upward forces that affect the force distribution in the ankle and knee joints. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Clinical management of acute diabetic Charcot foot in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, Rasmus Bo; Svendsen, Ole Lander; Kirketerp-Møller, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    : This study is based on a questionnaire survey sent out to healthcare professionals, primarily doctors, working with diabetic foot ulcers and Charcot feet in the public sector of the Danish healthcare system. RESULTS: The survey obtained a 52% response rate. A temperature difference of > 2 °C between the two......INTRODUCTION: Charcot foot is a severe complication to diabetes mellitus and treatment involves several different clinical specialities. Our objective was to describe the current awareness, knowledge and treatment practices of Charcot foot among doctors who handle diabetic foot disorders. METHODS...... and treatment practices of acute diabetic Charcot foot at diabetes foot clinics in Denmark. The responders seem to follow the international recommendations and guidelines on management of the acute diabetic Charcot foot, despite a lack of Danish guidelines. FUNDING: none. TRIAL REGISTRATION: not relevant....

  7. Clinical management of acute diabetic Charcot foot in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, Rasmus Bo; Svendsen, Ole Lander; Kirketerp-Møller, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    and treatment practices of acute diabetic Charcot foot at diabetes foot clinics in Denmark. The responders seem to follow the international recommendations and guidelines on management of the acute diabetic Charcot foot, despite a lack of Danish guidelines. FUNDING: none. TRIAL REGISTRATION: not relevant.......INTRODUCTION: Charcot foot is a severe complication to diabetes mellitus and treatment involves several different clinical specialities. Our objective was to describe the current awareness, knowledge and treatment practices of Charcot foot among doctors who handle diabetic foot disorders. METHODS...... feet was the most used method of diagnosing Charcot foot. Along with clinical inspection, temperature difference was also the measurement used for monitoring of healing. None of the suggested formalised classification systems were used to any extent. Most responders use detachable bandages...

  8. Development of an evaluation system for foot arch types in the elderly using foot pressure distribution data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaizumi, Kazuya; Iwakami, Yumi; Yamashita, Kazuhiko; Hiejima, Yoshimitsu

    2012-01-01

    The foot arch serves important functions related to shock absorption and the action of walking. Simple and quantitative classifications of foot arch types, such as flat feet and high arches, help to provide health support services for the elderly. To develop an evaluation system for foot arch types using foot pressure distribution data, discriminant analyses were conducted using data from healthy elderly persons. The midfoot pressure ratio was selected and discriminants were derived. For evaluating the performance of the classification method, the derived discriminants were applied to the data from the other group of healthy elderly persons. Results indicate that both sensitivity and specificity of the classified foot arch types were sufficiently high.

  9. A prospective study of risk factors for foot ulceration: The West of Ireland Diabetes Foot Study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hurley, L

    2013-09-25

    BackgroundThis is the first study to examine risk factors for diabetic foot ulceration in Irish general practice.AimTo determine the prevalence of established risk factors for foot ulceration in a community-based cohort, and to explore the potential for estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) to act as a novel risk factor.DesignA prospective observational study.MethodsPatients with diabetes attending 12 (of 17) invited general practices were invited for foot screening. Validated clinical tests were carried out at baseline to assess for vascular and sensory impairment and foot deformity. Ulcer incidence was ascertained by patient self-report and medical record. Patients were re-assessed 18 months later. ResultsOf 828 invitees, 563 (68%) attended screening. On examination 23-25% had sensory dysfunction and 18-39% had evidence of vascular impairment. Using the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network risk stratification system we found the proportion at moderate and high risk of future ulceration to be 25% and 11% respectively. At follow-up 16\\/383 patients (4.2%) developed a new foot ulcer (annual incidence rate of 2.6%). We observed an increasing probability of abnormal vascular and sensory test results (pedal pulse palpation, doppler waveform assessment, 10g monofilament, vibration perception and neuropathy disability score) with declining eGFR levels. We were unable to show an independent association between new ulceration and reduced eGFR [Odds ratio 1.01; p=0.64].ConclusionsOur data show the extent of foot complications in a representative sample of diabetes patients in Ireland. Use of eGFR did not improve identification of patients at risk of foot ulceration.

  10. Effect of static foot posture on the dynamic stiffness of foot joints during walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchis-Sales, E; Sancho-Bru, J L; Roda-Sales, A; Pascual-Huerta, J

    2018-03-17

    The static foot posture has been related to the development of lower limb injuries. This study aimed to investigate the dynamic stiffness of foot joints during gait in the sagittal plane to understand the role of the static foot posture in the development of injuries. Seventy healthy adult male subjects with different static postures, assessed by the Foot Posture Index (FPI) (30 normal, 20 highly pronated and 20 highly supinated), were recruited. Kinematic and kinetic data were recorded using an optical motion capture system and a pressure platform, and dynamic stiffness at the different stages of the stance was calculated from the slopes of the linear regression on the flexion moment-angle curves. The effect of foot type on dynamic stiffness and on ranges of motion and moments was analysed using ANOVAs and post-hoc tests, and linear correlation between dynamic stiffness and FPI was also tested. Highly pronated feet showed a significantly smaller range of motion at the ankle and metatarsophalangeal joints and also a larger range of moments at the metatarsophalangeal joint than highly supinated feet. Dynamic stiffness during propulsion was significantly greater at all foot joints for highly pronated feet, with positive significant correlations with the squared FPI. Highly supinated feet showed greater dynamic stiffness than normal feet, although to a lesser extent. Highly pronated feet during normal gait experienced the greatest decrease in the dorsiflexor moments during propulsion, normal feet being the most balanced regarding work generated and absorbed. Extreme static foot postures show greater dynamic stiffness during propulsion and greater absorbed work, which increases the risk of developing injuries. The data presented may be used when designing orthotics or prostheses, and also when planning surgery that modifies joint stiffness. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Development process and psychometric testing of foot health assessment instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolt, Minna; Suhonen, Riitta; Puukka, Pauli; Viitanen, Matti; Voutilainen, Päivi; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2013-05-01

    To describe the development process of the foot health assessment instrument for the assessment of foot health in older people and to evaluate the psychometric properties of the foot health assessment instrument. In clinical nursing, assessment of foot health and recognition of foot problems in older people is fundamental for maintain older persons' independent functional ability. However, valid and reliable nurse-administered foot health assessment instruments are lacking. A cross-sectional methodological design. The foot health assessment instrument was developed in 2008-2011 based on a literature review and expertise in podiatry and nursing. Content validity was evaluated in four expert panels. Inter-rater reliability between nurses' and researcher (MS) assessments was evaluated in the pilot test and in the empirical testing of the instrument with a sample of visiting home nurses. Inter-rater reliability was calculated with Cohen's kappa, internal consistency reliability was examined with Cronbach's alpha coefficients and item analysis, and construct validity was evaluated by principal component analysis with Varimax rotation and confirmatory factor analysis. Content validity was guaranteed by the expert analyses. Inter-rater reliability improved after pilot test. The Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the total foot health assessment instrument was satisfactory. Item-to-total correlations varied between but most of them were acceptable. Principal component analysis and confirmatory factor analysis supported the four component structure of the foot health assessment instrument. The 23-item foot health assessment instrument showed preliminary acceptable psychometric properties. However, further modifications and testing are needed to strengthen the psychometric properties of the foot health assessment instrument. The existence of a foot health assessment instrument and its application would considerably improve the assessment of foot health in daily nursing

  12. Improved design and development of a functional moulded prosthetic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Govindarajan; Gnanasundaram, Saraswathy; Ranganathan, Mohan; Ranganathan, Rajaraman; Gopalakrishna, Gautham; Das, Bhabendra Nath; Mandal, Asit Baran

    2016-01-01

    In the Indian scenario, the Jaipur foot is a low-cost breakthrough that enabled the disabled person to adapt to the Indian environment. The aim of this study is to modify the present foot in terms of ankle support design and method of fabrication, foot moulds profile and the inner core material in order to improve the performance and durability. The optimized design of ankle support and flat foot profile moulds suitable for both left and right foot were developed through CAD/CAM and prosthetic feet were fabricated using ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) foam as an appropriate alternative core material for microcellular rubber (MCR). The developed prosthetic feet were tested for rigidity by load-deflection analysis in universal testing machine. EVA foot had shown better rigidity than conventional MCR foot, which will help in weight transfer during walking and increase the durability. The CAD modeled ankle support and single block EVA had made the manufacturing process easy and reduced the weight of foot and improved Gait to the person fitted with it due to improved flat foot profile. The new artificial foot had proven to be efficacious technically as well as functionally, which is clearly borne out from the extremely positive feedback given by the amputees. Implications of Rehabilitation Persons with below knee amputation are usually provided with transtibial prosthesis, which allows for easier ambulation and helps them to get back to their normal life. Transtibial prosthesis is an artificial limb that replaces a lower limb that is amputated below the knee. In our study, a new prosthetic foot with a modified ankle support and flat foot profile using better inner-core material than the conventional Jaipur foot was developed and the process was also optimized for mass production. The developed prosthetic foot can be fitted with both above and below knee exoskeleton type of prosthesis.

  13. CLINICAL MANAGEMENT OF BILATERAL CUTANEOUS SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA OF THE HIND FEET PADS IN A SOUTHERN WHITE RHINOCEROS (CERATOTHERIUM SIMUM SIMUM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greunz, Eva Maria; Simon, Marie; Lemberger, Karin; Galateanu, Gabriela; Hermes, Robert; Leclerc, Antoine

    2016-06-01

    The current report describes the temporary regression, due to intensive symptomatic treatment, of ulcerative skin lesions caused by squamous cell carcinoma in a white rhinoceros. A captive, 40-yr-old southern white rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum simum) developed profound, ulcerative skin lesions on the pads of both hind feet. At the peak of the disease, at least one quarter of the pads was affected. A diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma was made via biopsy. Treatment included anti-inflammatory drugs, antibiotics, and local care. The lesions regressed on both feet until they seemed clinically healed. It was presumed that long-term, anti-inflammatory treatment and local bandaging had induced the temporary regression of the lesions. Two years later, however, a small ulcerative lesion reappeared on one pad and post mortem examination confirmed that the carcinoma was also histologically present in the clinically intact tissue. No metastasis was found and computed tomography showed normal digital bones.

  14. Effect of genetic rabbit lines on lipid content, lipolytic activities and fatty acid composition of hind leg meat and perirenal fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, P; Cesari, V; Blasco, A

    2008-04-01

    The influence of genetic origin on lipid content, lipolytic activities and fatty acid composition of rabbit leg meat and perirenal fat was studied and changes in free fatty acids and oxidative parameters during refrigerated storage evaluated. Three rabbits lines were used, line R selected for growth rate and lines V and A selected for litter size at weaning. Line R had higher fat contents and higher lipolytic activities in the meat of the hind leg than lines A and V. Differences between lines were found in the fatty acids of the meat and perirenal fat. Lower SFA and higher PUFA percentages were found in line A. Free fatty acids and oxidative parameters were little influenced by rabbit line. Animals were measured at the same stage of maturity, thus it can be considered that differences found between lines are genetic differences and not differences due to the degree of maturity.

  15. A HindIII polymorphism detected by cDMD 4-5a at the DMD locus in a family with Becker muscular dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibb, M.F.; Greenberg, C.R.; Carson, N.L. [Health Sciences Centre, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada)

    1994-09-01

    Deletions within the dystrophin gene can be detected by hybridizing a series of cDNA probes to HindIII-digested DNA, with the absence of one or more fragments indicating the presence of a deletion. However, incorrect interpretations can be made if the absence of a fragment is due to a polymorphism rather than a deletion. Otto and Rothbery reported that the 5.2 kb fragment detected by cM 4-5a could be resolved, with extended electrophoresis, into two fragments estimated to be 5.2 and 5.15 kb in size. They concluded that the extra fragment of this doublet appears to be polymorphic, inherited in a Mendelian dominant fashion. The mother, who is an obligate carrier of BMD, does not have the upper fragment as is the case for her normal and affected sons. The father, who clinically has no evidence of neuromuscular disease, does have the upper fragment as do all their daughters. Given a dominant pattern of inheritance, the daughters should be heterozygous. Analysis of one grandson, who was predicted to have inherited the grandpaternal dystrophin gene, showed that he did have the upper fragment, consistent with our conclusions. To date, we have been unable to analyze a grandson that has inherited the grandmaternal allele; however, presuably he would not have the upper fragment of this doublet. We conclude that there likely is a dominant HindIII polymorphism detected with the cDMD 4-5a probe at the DMD locus. Population studies will be required to determine the frequency of this polymorphism; however, it should be noted that absence of the upper fragment of this doublet in a male with BMD/DMD does not necessarily correspond to the presence of a deletion.

  16. The feral horse foot. Part B: radiographic, gross visual and histopathological parameters of foot health in 100 Australian feral horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, B A; de Laat, M A; Mills, P C; Walsh, D M; Pollitt, C C

    2013-01-01

    It has been proposed that the feral horse foot is a benchmark model for foot health in horses. However, the foot health of feral horses has not been formally investigated. To investigate the foot health of Australian feral horses and determine if foot health is affected by environmental factors, such as substrate properties and distance travelled. Twenty adult feral horses from five populations (n = 100) were investigated. Populations were selected on the basis of substrate hardness and the amount of travel typical for the population. Feet were radiographed and photographed, and digital images were surveyed by two experienced assessors blinded to each other's assessment and to the population origin. Lamellar samples from 15 feet from three populations were investigated histologically for evidence of laminitis. There was a total of 377 gross foot abnormalities identified in 100 left forefeet. There were no abnormalities detected in three of the feet surveyed. Each population had a comparable prevalence of foot abnormalities, although the type and severity of abnormality varied among populations. Of the three populations surveyed by histopathology, the prevalence of chronic laminitis ranged between 40% and 93%. Foot health appeared to be affected by the environment inhabited by the horses. The observed chronic laminitis may be attributable to either nutritional or traumatic causes. Given the overwhelming evidence of suboptimal foot health, it may not be appropriate for the feral horse foot to be the benchmark model for equine foot health. © 2013 The Authors. Australian Veterinary Journal © 2013 Australian Veterinary Association.

  17. Multidisciplinary valuation of the diabetic foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Sánchez Reyes

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Conventional classifications for diabetic foot, among them, Wagner Classification, do not contemplate the criteria or sichemia, neuropathy and infection, pillars that sustain the etiopathogy of this syndrome. With Modified Wagner Classification (MWC, there are cleary defined the phase and characteristics of the wound, incorporatin into the anatomical description by a graphical way (letters in capital letter or small one the mentioned props (infection, neuropathy and ischemia. In this way not only the language is equal (comes to an agreement to avoid interpretation mistakes, but also it is orientated by just one number and a letter towards a prognosis and treatment criteria. Cases received before and after the use of the MWC are compared perfoming a review, by two different professional groups, being catalogued by the same numbers in a high percentage. That is why we recommend its diffusion and generalized the employment for the managing of the diabetic foot.

  18. Recurrent Admissions for Diabetic Foot Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ang CL

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic foot complications are a significant source of morbidity and mortality. Patients who undergo recurrent admissions for the same diabetic foot problems represent a difficult subgroup to treat. From July 2007 to June 2008, there were 38 such patients who were admitted recurrently. Eighteen patients (47% were re-admitted because of previous refusal of surgical treatment. Eighteen patients (47% received treatment as necessary but were still readmitted for recurrent infection at the same wound site. Assessment of patients’ compliance to outpatient treatment was found to be generally lacking. As a significant proportion were re-admitted because of previous refusal of surgery, a trained counselor may be suitable in counselling patients for debridement or amputation surgery.

  19. [Subintimal angioplasty and diabetic foot revascularisation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierret, Charles; Tourtier, Jean-Pierre; Bordier, Lise; Blin, Emmanuel; Duverger, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Diabetic wounds foot are responsible for 5-10% minor or major amputation in France. In fact, amputation risk of lower limbs is 15-30% higher for diabetic patients. University of Texas classification (UT) is the reference for diabetic foot wound. It distinguish non ischemic and ischemic wound with more amputation. If ischaemia is combined, revascularization may be considered for salvage of the limb. Some revascularization techniques are well known: as surgical by-pass, angioplasty with or without stent, or hybrid procedures with the both. Subintimal angioplasty is a more recent endovascular technique, in assessment for old patients who are believed to be unsuitable candidates for conventional by-pass or angioplasty. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. NONLINEAR MHD WAVES IN A PROMINENCE FOOT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ofman, L. [Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Knizhnik, K.; Kucera, T. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Schmieder, B. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, PSL Research University, CNRS, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ. Paris 06, Univ. Paris-Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cit, 5 place Jules Janssen, F-92195 Meudon (France)

    2015-11-10

    We study nonlinear waves in a prominence foot using a 2.5D MHD model motivated by recent high-resolution observations with Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope in Ca ii emission of a prominence on 2012 October 10 showing highly dynamic small-scale motions in the prominence material. Observations of Hα intensities and of Doppler shifts show similar propagating fluctuations. However, the optically thick nature of the emission lines inhibits a unique quantitative interpretation in terms of density. Nevertheless, we find evidence of nonlinear wave activity in the prominence foot by examining the relative magnitude of the fluctuation intensity (δI/I ∼ δn/n). The waves are evident as significant density fluctuations that vary with height and apparently travel upward from the chromosphere into the prominence material with quasi-periodic fluctuations with a typical period in the range of 5–11 minutes and wavelengths <2000 km. Recent Doppler shift observations show the transverse displacement of the propagating waves. The magnetic field was measured with the THEMIS instrument and was found to be 5–14 G. For the typical prominence density the corresponding fast magnetosonic speed is ∼20 km s{sup −1}, in qualitative agreement with the propagation speed of the detected waves. The 2.5D MHD numerical model is constrained with the typical parameters of the prominence waves seen in observations. Our numerical results reproduce the nonlinear fast magnetosonic waves and provide strong support for the presence of these waves in the prominence foot. We also explore gravitational MHD oscillations of the heavy prominence foot material supported by dipped magnetic field structure.

  1. NONLINEAR MHD WAVES IN A PROMINENCE FOOT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ofman, L.; Knizhnik, K.; Kucera, T.; Schmieder, B.

    2015-01-01

    We study nonlinear waves in a prominence foot using a 2.5D MHD model motivated by recent high-resolution observations with Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope in Ca ii emission of a prominence on 2012 October 10 showing highly dynamic small-scale motions in the prominence material. Observations of Hα intensities and of Doppler shifts show similar propagating fluctuations. However, the optically thick nature of the emission lines inhibits a unique quantitative interpretation in terms of density. Nevertheless, we find evidence of nonlinear wave activity in the prominence foot by examining the relative magnitude of the fluctuation intensity (δI/I ∼ δn/n). The waves are evident as significant density fluctuations that vary with height and apparently travel upward from the chromosphere into the prominence material with quasi-periodic fluctuations with a typical period in the range of 5–11 minutes and wavelengths <2000 km. Recent Doppler shift observations show the transverse displacement of the propagating waves. The magnetic field was measured with the THEMIS instrument and was found to be 5–14 G. For the typical prominence density the corresponding fast magnetosonic speed is ∼20 km s −1 , in qualitative agreement with the propagation speed of the detected waves. The 2.5D MHD numerical model is constrained with the typical parameters of the prominence waves seen in observations. Our numerical results reproduce the nonlinear fast magnetosonic waves and provide strong support for the presence of these waves in the prominence foot. We also explore gravitational MHD oscillations of the heavy prominence foot material supported by dipped magnetic field structure

  2. Habitual physical activity, peripheral neuropathy, foot deformities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Function Scale, and a self-designed foot deformity audit form. Results: Habitual ... glycaemic control including the general control of the disorder ...... Intern Med. 2005;20(3):259–66. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1525-. 1497.2005.40198.x. 43. Gutiérrez-Fisac JL, Guallar-Castillón P, Díez-Gañán L, et al. Work-related physical ...

  3. Nuclear medicine applications for the diabetic foot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartshorne, M.F.; Peters, V.

    1987-04-01

    Although not frequently described in the podiatric literature, nuclear medicine imaging may be of great assistance to the clinical podiatrist. This report reviews in detail the use of modern nuclear medicine approaches to the diagnosis and management of the diabetic foot. Nuclear medicine techniques are helpful in evaluating possible osteomyelitis, in determining appropriate amputation levels, and in predicting response to conservative ulcer management. Specific indications for bone, gallium, and perfusion imaging are described.

  4. Diagnostic dilemmas in foot and ankle injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keene, J.S.; Lange, R.H.

    1986-07-11

    Differential diagnosis of foot and ankle injuries should include (1) stress fractures of the great toe sesamoids, the shaft of the fifth metatarsal, and the tarsal navicular bone; (2) transchondral talar-dome fractures; (3) fractures of the os trigonum; and (4) dislocating peroneal tendons. Diagnosis of these injuries is challenging because the initial roentgenograms often are normal, and special clinical tests and ancillary studies are required.

  5. Foot posture is associated with kinematics of the foot during gait: A comparison of normal, planus and cavus feet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buldt, Andrew K; Levinger, Pazit; Murley, George S; Menz, Hylton B; Nester, Christopher J; Landorf, Karl B

    2015-06-01

    Variations in foot posture are associated with the development of some lower limb injuries. However, the mechanisms underlying this relationship are unclear. The objective of this study was to compare foot kinematics between normal, pes cavus and pes planus foot posture groups using a multi-segment foot model. Ninety-seven healthy adults, aged 18-47 were classified as either normal (n=37), pes cavus (n=30) or pes planus (n=30) based on normative data for the Foot Posture Index, Arch Index and normalised navicular height. A five segment foot model was used to measure tri-planar motion of the rearfoot, midfoot, medial forefoot, lateral forefoot and hallux during barefoot walking at a self-selected speed. Angle at heel contact, peak angle, time to peak angle and range of motion was measured for each segment. One way ANOVAs with post-hoc analyses of mean differences were used to compare foot posture groups. The pes cavus group demonstrated a distinctive pattern of motion compared to the normal and pes planus foot posture groups. Effect sizes of significant mean differences were large and comparable to similar studies. Three key differences in overall foot function were observed between the groups: (i) altered frontal and transverse plane angles of the rearfoot in the pes cavus foot; (ii) Less midfoot motion in the pes cavus foot during initial contact and midstance; and (iii) reduced midfoot frontal plane ROM in the pes planus foot during pre-swing. These findings indicate that foot posture does influence motion of the foot. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Diabetic foot infection treatment and care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigna, Emanuele; Fino, Pasquale; Onesti, Maria G; Amorosi, Vittoria; Scuderi, Nicolò

    2016-04-01

    Foot infections in diabetic patients are a common, complex and costly problem. They are potentially adverse with progression to deeper spaces and tissues and are associated with severe complications. The management of diabetic foot infection (DFI) requires a prompt and systematic approach to achieve more successful outcomes and to ultimately avoid amputations. This study reviews a multi-step treatment for DFIs. Between September 2010 and September 2012, a total of about 37 patients were consulted for DFI. The treatment algorithm included four steps, that is, several types of debridement according to the type of wound, the application of negative pressure therapy (NPT), other advanced dressings, a targeted antibiotic therapy local or systemic as the case may, and, if necessary, reconstructive surgery. This treatment protocol showed excellent outcomes, allowing us to avoid amputation in most difficult cases. Only about 8% of patients require amputation. This treatment protocol and a multidisciplinary approach with a specialised team produced excellent results in the treatment of DFI and in the management of diabetic foot in general, allowing us to improve the quality of life of diabetic patients and also to ensure cost savings. © 2014 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2014 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Settlement Prediction of Footings Using VS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung Ik CHO

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The shear wave velocity (VS is a key parameter for estimating the deformation characteristics of soil. In order to predict the settlement of shallow footings in granular soil, the VS and the concept of Schmertmann’s framework were adopted. The VS was utilized to represent soil stiffness instead of cone tip resistance (qc because the VS can be directly related to the small-strain shear modulus. By combining the VS measured in the field and the modulus reduction curve measured in the laboratory, the deformation characteristics of soil can be reliably estimated. Vertical stress increments were determined using two different profiles of the strain influence factor (Iz proposed in Schmertmann’s method and that calculated from the theory of elasticity. The corresponding modulus variation was determined by considering the stress level and strain at each depth. This state-dependent stress-strain relationship was utilized to calculate the settlement of footings based on the theory of elasticity. To verify the developed method, geotechnical centrifuge tests were carried out. The VS profiles were measured before each loading test, and the load-settlement curves were obtained during the tests. Comparisons between the measured and estimated load-settlement curves showed that the developed method adequately predicts the settlement of footings, especially for over-consolidated ground conditions.

  8. A study of dynamic foot pressure measurement in diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milka D Madhale

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetic foot ulcer is a major source of morbidity and a leading cause of hospitalization. It is estimated that approximately 20% of hospital admissions among patients with diabetes mellitus are due to diabetic foot ulcer. It can lead to infection, gangrene, amputation, and even death if appropriate care is not provided. Overall, the lower limb amputation in diabetic patients is 15 times higher than in non-diabetics. In the majority of cases, the cause for the foot ulcer is the altered architecture of the foot due to neuropathy resulting in abnormal pressure points on the soles. Purpose: The aim of this study is to develop low cost, lightweight foot pressure scanner and check its reliability and validity which can help to prevent foot ulceration. Design/Methodology/Approach: In the present study, a low cost, lightweight foot pressure scanner is developed, and dynamic plantar pressures in a group of 110 Indian patients with diabetes with or without neuropathy and foot ulcers are measured. Practical Implications: If these pressure points can be detected, ulcers can be prevented by providing offloading footwear. Originality/Value: Differences are found in dynamic foot pressures in different study groups, namely, diabetic patients, patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy, patients with foot ulcers, and nondiabetics. The differences are significant (P < 0.01, which showed the validity of the tool. Reliability and consistency of the tool was checked by test–retest method. Paper Type: Original Research work. Conclusion: Based on the results of the present study, it is concluded that the scanner is successfully developed and it can measure foot pressures. It is a novel device to proactively monitor foot health in diabetics in an effort to prevent and reduce diabetic foot complications.

  9. Hallux valgus and plantar pressure loading: the Framingham foot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Hallux valgus (HV), a common structural foot deformity, can cause foot pain and lead to limited mobility. The purpose of this study was to evaluate differences in plantar pressure and force during gait by HV status in a large population-based cohort of men and women. Methods A trained examiner performed a validated physical examination on participants’ feet and recorded the presence of hallux valgus and other specific foot disorders. Each foot was classified into one of four mutually exclusive groups based on the foot examination. Foot groups were: (i) HV only, (ii) HV and at least one additional foot disorder (FD), (iii) no HV but at least one other FD, and (iv) neither HV nor FD (referent). Biomechanical data for both feet were collected using Tekscan Matscan. Foot posture during quiet standing, using modified arch index (MAI), and foot function during gait, using center of pressure excursion index (CPEI), were calculated per foot. Further, walking scans were masked into eight sub-regions using Novel Automask, and peak pressure and maximum force exerted in each region were calculated. Results There were 3205 participants, contributing 6393 feet with complete foot exam data and valid biomechanical measurements. Participants with HV had lower hallucal loading and higher forces at lesser toes as well as higher MAI and lower CPEI values compared to the referent. Participants with HV and other FDs were also noted to have aberrant rearfoot forces and pressures. Conclusions These results suggest that HV alters foot loading patterns and pressure profiles. Future work should investigate how these changes affect the risk of other foot and lower extremity ailments. PMID:24138804

  10. Incidence, risk factors and heritability of hind limb lameness in dogs with canine hip dysplasia in a 8 year follow up study of a birth cohort of Dutch boxer dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagen, van M.A.E.; Ducro, B.J.; Broek, van de J.; Knol, B.W.

    2005-01-01

    Objective-To determine incidence, risk factors, and heritability estimates of hind limb lameness caused by hip dysplasia in a birth cohort of Boxers. Animals-1,733 Boxers from 325 litters. Procedure-Status of Boxers with respect to clinical signs of canine hip dysplasia (cCHD) was registered during

  11. Heat removal using microclimate foot cooling: a thermal foot manikin study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellani, John W; Demes, Robert; Endrusick, Thomas L; Cheuvront, Samuel N; Montain, Scott J

    2014-04-01

    It has been proposed that microclimate cooling systems exploit the peripheral extremities because of more efficient heat transfer. The purpose of this study was to quantify, using a patented microclimate cooling technique, the heat transfer from the plantar surface of the foot for comparison to other commonly cooled body regions. A military boot was fitted with an insole embedded with a coiled, 1.27 m length of hollow tubing terminating in inlet and outlet valves. A thermal foot manikin with a surface temperature of 34 degrees C was placed in the boot and the valves were connected to a system that circulated water through the insole at a temperature of 20 degrees C and flow rate of 120 ml x min(-1). The manikin foot served as a constant heat source to determine heat transfer provided by the insole. Testing was done with the foot model dry and sweating at a rate of 500 ml x h(- 1) x m(-2). Climatic chamber conditions were 30 degrees C with 30% RH. Heat loss was approximately 4.1 +/- 0.1 and approximately 7.7 +/- 0.3 W from the dry and sweating foot models, respectively. On a relative scale, the heat loss was 3.0 W and 5.5 W per 1% (unit) body surface area, respectively, for the dry and sweating conditions. The relative heat loss afforded by plantar foot cooling was similar compared to other body regions, but the absolute amount of heat removal is unlikely to make an impact on whole body heat balance.

  12. Diabetic foot disease: From the evaluation of the “foot at risk” to the novel diabetic ulcer treatment modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Noha; Doupis, John

    2016-01-01

    The burden of diabetic foot disease (DFD) is expected to increase in the future. The incidence of DFD is still rising due to the high prevalence of DFD predisposing factors. DFD is multifactorial in nature; however most of the diabetic foot amputations are preceded by foot ulceration. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a major risk factor for foot ulceration. DPN leads to loss of protective sensation resulting in continuous unconscious traumas. Patient education and detection of high risk foot are essential for the prevention of foot ulceration and amputation. Proper assessment of the diabetic foot ulceration and appropriate management ensure better prognosis. Management is based on revascularization procedures, wound debridement, treatment of infection and ulcer offloading. Management and type of dressing applied are tailored according to the type of wound and the foot condition. The scope of this review paper is to describe the diabetic foot syndrome starting from the evaluation of the foot at risk for ulceration, up to the new treatment modalities. PMID:27076876

  13. Analysis of the human and ape foot during bipedal standing with implications for the evolution of the foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W J; Crompton, R H

    2004-12-01

    The ratio of the power arm (the distance from the heel to the talocrural joint) to the load arm (that from the talocrural joint to the distal head of the metatarsals), or RPL, differs markedly between the human and ape foot. The arches are relatively higher in the human foot in comparison with those in apes. This study evaluates the effect of these two differences on biomechanical effectiveness during bipedal standing, estimating the forces acting across the talocrural and tarsometatarsal joints, and attempts to identify which type of foot is optimal for bipedal standing. A simple model of the foot musculoskeletal system was built to represent the geometric and force relationships in the foot during bipedal standing, and measurements for a variety of human and ape feet applied. The results show that: (1) an RPL of around 40% (as is the case in the human foot) minimizes required muscle force at the talocrural joint; (2) the presence of an high arch in the human foot reduces forces in the plantar musculature and aponeurosis; and (3) the human foot has a lower total of force in joints and muscles than do the ape feet. These results indicate that the proportions of the human foot, and the height of the medial arch are indeed better optimized for bipedal standing than those of apes, further suggesting that their current state is to some extent the product of positive selection for enhanced bipedal standing during the evolution of the foot.

  14. Driving a modified car: a simple but unexploited adjunct in the management of patients with chronic right sided foot and ankle pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Carl; Abbassian, Ali; Trompeter, Alex; Solan, Matthew

    2010-12-01

    Driving is important in maintaining independence. Limb pain can significantly limit this ability. Automatic vehicles can restore independence to people with left lower or upper limb disability but those with right-sided pathology are disadvantaged in this respect. This is despite the fact that numerous centers across the UK specialize in modifying automatic cars such that they can be driven solely with the use of the left foot. The knowledge of this amongst patients and health professionals is lacking. In this study we aim to confirm this fact and discuss the legal and practical aspects of driving a modified car. We used patients who had undergone right-sided ankle and hind foot fusions or ankle replacements, as we believed they would have had a long period of right-sided leg pain that may have affected their driving ability. A consecutive series was identified from operative records over a 2 year period and patients contacted by telephone. We identified 33 patients, of these 22 were available for telephonic interview. The average duration of right leg disability was 7.5 years. All responders had seen at least two healthcare professionals but car modification had never been discussed at any stage. Only 3 were aware of such modifications and of these all had been informed by sources outside the health service. The availability of right to left modification of automatic cars is not widely known by patients and healthcare professionals alike with potential benefits of this simple adjunct not being exploited. More needs to be done to generate awareness of its existence as it may have a significant impact on patient independence. Copyright © 2009 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Painful Lytic Lesions of the Foot : A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Vaishya

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The presence of lytic lesions in the bones of foot raises a number of diagnostic possibilities ranging from infection, inflammatory pathology to neoplastic conditions. Although the radiological picture is not pathognomonic of any pathology, clinical history and histopathological examination can help to clinch the diagnosis. We present a case of multiple lytic lesions of the foot and discuss possible differential diagnoses. The patient was diagnosed as a case of madura foot and the lesions responded to surgical debridement and anti-fungal treatment with a good functional outcome. Madura foot is an uncommon, chronic granulomatous fungal or bacterial infection with a predilection in people who walk barefoot. Although known for a specific geographical distribution, madura foot should be kept as a possible diagnosis in patients presenting with lytic lesions of the foot due to population emigration across the world.

  16. Care of Patients with Diabetic Foot Disease in Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim S. Al-Busaidi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a major public health challenge and causes substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. Diabetic foot disease is one of the most debilitating and costly complications of diabetes. While simple preventative foot care measures can reduce the risk of lower limb ulcerations and subsequent amputations by up to 85%, they are not always implemented. In Oman, foot care for patients with diabetes is mainly provided in primary and secondary care settings. Among all lower limb amputations performed in public hospitals in Oman between 2002–2013, 47.3% were performed on patients with diabetes. The quality of foot care among patients with diabetes in Oman has not been evaluated and unidentified gaps in care may exist. This article highlights challenges in the provision of adequate foot care to Omani patients with diabetes. It concludes with suggested strategies for an integrated national diabetic foot care programme in Oman.

  17. Foot morphology of normal, underweight and overweight children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauch, M; Grau, S; Krauss, I; Maiwald, C; Horstmann, T

    2008-07-01

    Due to the fact that there is a global increase in obesity, knowledge about the impact of obesity on the development of a child's foot is of great importance for orthopaedic and paediatric physicians with regard to prevention, clinical treatment and management. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of body mass on the development of a child's foot based on a foot type classification. The feet of 1450 boys and 1437 girls aged 2-14 years were measured using a three-dimensional (3D) foot scanner (Pedus, Human Solutions Inc., Germany) in a bipedal upright position. Twelve relevant 3D foot measures were recorded, as well as the children's age, gender, height and mass. Factor analysis of principal components was used to obtain a smaller number of independent and standardized variables. The variables were used for cluster analysis to classify the children's feet. Five foot types were identified: flat, robust, slender, short and long feet. There were significant differences among foot types with respect to the children's body mass index. Normal weight children displayed an almost equal distribution of all foot types throughout childhood. Flat and robust feet were more common in overweight children, whereas underweight children showed more slender and long feet. The influence of excess, as well as deficient mass could be verified for the comprehensive foot morphology based on a foot type classification. Subsequently, foot discomfort as a result of various musculoskeletal disorders may develop. In turn, this might keep the children from being active and therefore reinforce the risk of developing obesity. However, there is still a lack of information regarding these relationships, which needs to be determined. This knowledge may help prevent orthopaedic foot problems and injuries.

  18. Are we telling the diabetic patients adequately about foot care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, R.; Din, M.J.U.; Jadoon, R.J.; Farooq, U.; Alam, M.A.; Qureshi, A.; Shah, S.U.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus affects more than 285 million people worldwide. The prevalence is expected to rise to 439 million by the year 2030. Diabetic foot ulcers precede 84 percentage of non-traumatic amputations in diabetics. One lower limb is lost every 30 seconds around the world because of diabetic foot ulceration. Apart from being lengthy, the treatment of diabetic foot is also very expensive. There is very limited emphasis on foot care in diabetic patients. Even in developed countries patients feel that they do not have adequate knowledge about foot care. This study was conducted to find out how much information is imparted by doctors to diabetic patients about foot care. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in admitted patients of the Department of Medicine, DHQ Hospital, Abbottabad from May 2014 to June 2015. 139 diabetic patients more than 25 years of age were included by non-probability consecutive sampling. Results: The mean age was 57.17 ( percentage 11.1) years. 35.3 percentage of patients were male and 64.7 percentage were female. The mean duration of diabetes in patients was 8.3 (±6) years. Only 36.7 percentage of patients said that their doctor told them about foot care. Less than 40 percentage of patients knew that they should daily inspect their feet, wash them with gentle warm water, and dry them afterwards. Only 25.2 percentage of the participants knew how to manage corns or calluses on feet. 66.5 percentage of patients knew that they should not walk bare foot. Overall, 63 percentage of our patients had less than 50 percentage knowledge of the 11 points regarding foot care that the investigators asked them. Conclusion: Diabetic foot problems are the one of the costliest, most disabling and disheartening complication of diabetes mellitus. Doctors are not properly telling diabetic patients about foot care. There is a deficiency of knowledge among the diabetic patients regarding foot care. (author)

  19. Prevalence of flat foot in preschool-aged children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Martin; Kotz, Rainer; Ledl, Thomas; Hauser, Gertrude; Sluga, Maria

    2006-08-01

    Our aim with this study was to establish the prevalence of flat foot in a population of 3- to 6-year-old children to evaluate cofactors such as age, weight, and gender and to estimate the number of unnecessary treatments performed. A total of 835 children (411 girls and 424 boys) were included in this study. The clinical diagnosis of flat foot was based on a valgus position of the heel and a poor formation of the arch. Feet of the children were scanned (while they were in a standing position) by using a laser surface scanner, and rearfoot angle was measured. Rearfoot angle was defined as the angle of the upper Achilles tendon and the distal extension of the rearfoot. Prevalence of flexible flat foot in the group of 3- to 6-year-old children was 44%. Prevalence of pathological flat foot was flat foot decreases significantly with age: in the group of 3-year-old children 54% showed a flat foot, whereas in the group of 6-year-old children only 24% had a flat foot. Average rearfoot angle was 5.5 degrees of valgus. Boys had a significant greater tendency for flat foot than girls: the prevalence of flat foot in boys was 52% and 36% in girls. Thirteen percent of the children were overweight or obese. Significant differences in prevalence of flat foot between overweight, obese, and normal-weight children were observed. This study is the first to use a three-dimensional laser surface scanner to measure the rearfoot valgus in preschool-aged children. The data demonstrate that the prevalence of flat foot is influenced by 3 factors: age, gender, and weight. In overweight children and in boys, a highly significant prevalence of flat foot was observed; in addition, a retarded development of the medial arch in the boys was discovered. At the time of the study, > 90% of the treatments were unnecessary.

  20. The natural history of bone bruise and bone remodelling in the traumatised hip: A prospective 2-year follow-up study of bone bruise changes and DEXA measurements in 13 patients with conservatively treated traumatic hip dislocations and/or fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikerøy, Annette K B; Clarke-Jenssen, John; Ovre, Stein A; Nordsletten, Lars; Madsen, Jan Erik; Hellund, Johan C; Røise, Olav

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the natural history of bone bruise and bone mineral density (BMD) after traumatic hip dislocations and conservatively treated acetabular fractures. Our hypothesis was that poor bone quality can influence degree of bone bruise and, in time, cause degenerative changes. Eight consecutive patients with traumatic hip dislocations and five patients with conservatively treated fractures in the femoral head and/or acetabulum were included. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was obtained after 1, 17, 42, 82 and 97 weeks. Dual-emission X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) measurements were made after 10 days and 2 years. Sizes of bone bruise lesions were measured and classified. At the 2-year follow-up, Harris hip score (HHS) was calculated and signs of radiological osteoarthritis (OA) registered. The bone bruise changes were small and all changes resolved within 42 weeks in all, except for three patients; one with a small Pipkin fracture had segmental avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head, one had persisting1-3mm small spots of bone bruises in the femoral head and the third had hip dislocations and more pronounced in the acetabulum in the fractured acetabuli. We found no significant changes in BMD in four regions of interest (ROIs) after 2 years. No patients developed OA, and all had excellent HHS except for the one patient with AVN. The post-traumatic bone bruise changes in the dislocated hips and the fractured acetabuli were small and transient compared to findings of other authors examining traumatised knees. The patients had excellent function and no OA after 2 years if they did not develop AVN. In our small sample of relatively young patients with normal age-adjusted BMD, no post-traumatic osteopenia was observed. This might differ in the elderly with poorer bone quality; further studies are needed to assess that. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Foot structure and footwear prescription in diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bus, Sicco A

    2008-01-01

    Foot structure abnormalities such as foot deformity and limited joint mobility are common and well established components of the diabetic foot which are associated with increased levels of mechanical stress on the foot and the development of ulcers. Our understanding of foot structure abnormality in diabetes has improved recently, mainly through the findings from in vivo imaging studies. Several examples will be discussed in this review. A limited understanding, however, still exists about several aspects related to the assessment, etiology, and consequences of change in foot structure in diabetes. Knowledge on these matters is needed if we are to better deal with the implications of foot structure change in diabetes. Diabetic patients with neuropathy and foot deformity are commonly prescribed with custom footwear, in particular after ulcer healing. The goal of this footwear is to redistribute and reduce plantar foot pressures, and to prevent ulcer recurrence. However, the available evidence for the effectiveness of custom footwear in secondary ulcer prevention is not yet strong. This may be associated with several factors, including a lack of standardized or systematic approach (a set of guidelines) in footwear prescription and evaluation or with the significant variability that exists across patients in the offloading effect of different footwear interventions, which increases the difficulty of predicting what works for a given patient. Objective evaluation tools such as in-shoe plantar pressure analysis can be helpful in this regard in order to ensure efficacy of an intervention. This provides a more optimal footwear solution that may lower the risk for ulceration.

  2. Congenital hypertrophy of multiple intrinsic muscles of the foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Tomohiro; Park, Susam; Niu, Atushi; Hasegawa, Hiromi

    2014-12-01

    Congenital hypertrophy of a single intrinsic muscle of the foot is rare, and as far as we know, only six cases have been reported. We describe a case of congenital anomaly that showed hypertrophy of multiple intrinsic muscles of the foot; the affected muscles were all the intrinsic muscles of the foot except the extensor digitorum brevis or extensor hallucis. Other tissues such as adipose tissue, nervous tissue, or osseous tissue showed no abnormalities. To reduce the volume of the foot we removed parts of the enlarged muscles.

  3. Prospective study of ankle and foot fractures in elderly women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadagiri Surender Rao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The epidemiology of ankle fractures in old people is changing as time passes on. The incidence of ankle fractures increases with advancing age. The study conducted was among a rural popula-tion which comprised of 68 women (32 women with ankle fractures & 36 women with foot fractures. Patients studied were in the age group more than 50 years. The study highlights the etiological & risk factors for fractures of ankle & foot. The commonest ankle fracture was the lateral malleolar fracture & the commonest foot fracture was the 5th Metatarsal fracture. Diabetes is a risk factor which increases the occurrence of ankle and foot injuries.

  4. Relationships between foot type and dynamic rearfoot frontal plane motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuter, Vivienne H

    2010-06-16

    The Foot Posture Index (FPI) provides an easily applicable, validated method for quantifying static foot posture. However there is limited evidence relating to the ability of the FPI to predict dynamic foot function. This study aimed to assess the relationship between dynamic rearfoot motion and FPI scores in pronated and normal foot types. 40 participants were recruited with equal numbers of pronated and normal foot types as classified by their FPI score. Three dimensional rearfoot motion was collected for each of the participants. Dynamic maximum rearfoot eversion was correlated with the total FPI score across all participants and within the normal and pronated foot types. Linear correlations were performed between components of the total FPI scores measuring frontal plane rearfoot position and maximum rearfoot eversion. The capacity of the total FPI score to predict maximum frontal plane motion of the rearfoot was investigated using linear regression analysis. The correlation between the total FPI score and maximum rearfoot eversion was strongly positive (r = 0.92, p foot type (FPI = +6 to +9) and maximum rearfoot eversion angle were more strongly positively correlated (r = 0.81, p foot type (FPI = 0 to +5) and maximum rearfoot eversion (r = 0.76, p plane rearfoot FPI score and frontal plane motion during gait were strongly positive, (r = 0.79 p foot type. Positive correlations between frontal plane rearfoot measurements and maximum rearfoot eversion suggest the FPI may identify dominant planar components of dynamic rearfoot motion and warrants further investigation.

  5. Isolation of a substance activating foot formation in hydra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimmelikhuijzen, C J; Schaller, H C

    1977-01-01

    -forming potential of the tissue (2) It does not accelerate head regeneration, nor do the head factors of hydra discovered by Schaller (1973) and Berking (1977) accelerate foot regeneration. We propose that the foot-activating substance is a morphogen responsible for foot formation in hydra. The foot activator can...... be extracted from hydra tissue with methanol and separated from other known morphogens of hydra by gel filtration and ion-exchange chromatography. A substance with similar biological and physicochemical properties can be isolated from sea anemones....

  6. SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA FOOT WITH ILIOINGUINAL LYMPHADENOPATHY : A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rambabu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Squamous cell carcinoma of the foot is rare. This carcinoma of the foot may arise from a precursor lesion or may be secondary. Squamous cell carcinoma of the foot may resemble verrucous carcinoma or there can be distinct verrucous carcinoma of the foot or epithelioma cuniculatum. We reporting a case of 45 years old male patient developed squamous cell carcinoma over marjolins ulcer and develop ilio - inguinal lymphadenopathy after 1 month of malignancy. We have done below knee amputation and ilioinguinal block dissection

  7. Benign and malignant tumors of the foot and ankle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, Adam D.; Datir, Abhijit; Langley, Travis [Emory University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Section of Musculoskeletal Imaging, Atlanta, GA (United States); Tresley, Jonathan [University of Wisconsin, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Clifford, Paul D.; Jose, Jean; Subhawong, Ty K. [University of Miami, Department of Radiology, Miami, FL (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Pain and focal masses in the foot and ankle are frequently encountered and often initiate a workup including imaging. It is important to differentiate benign lesions from aggressive benign or malignant lesions. In this review, multiple examples of osseous and soft tissue tumors of the foot and ankle will be presented. Additionally, the compartmental anatomy of the foot and ankle will be discussed in terms of its relevance for percutaneous biopsy planning and eventual surgery. Finally, a general overview of the surgical management of benign, benign aggressive and malignant tumors of the foot and ankle will be discussed. (orig.)

  8. Comparison of different outcome instruments following foot and ankle trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Christina L; Schemitsch, Emil; Bhandari, Mohit; Mathew, George; Petrisor, Brad A

    2010-12-01

    Identifying optimal treatment strategies in patients with traumatic foot and ankle injuries has been hampered by the use of multiple available outcome measures with unproven reliability and validity. This prospective observational study aimed to measure the correlation between six functional outcome measures in patients with traumatic foot and ankle injuries. Patients 18 years of age or older with a traumatic foot or ankle injury completed the Short Form-12 (SF-12), Short Musculoskeletal Functional Assessment (SMFA), Foot Function Index (FFI), Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM), American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons (AAOS), Foot and Ankle Questionnaire and American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) Ankle-Hindfoot Scale at a single followup visit. Raw scores for each of the outcome measures were calculated. Fifty-two patients were enrolled in our study. Pearson correlation coefficients provided measures of correlation. Moderate to strong correlations were found for most pairwise comparisons of raw scores and functional categorical rankings (ρ=|0.5243 to 0.92|, p Foot and Ankle Questionnaire. High correlations between scores on six commonly used functional outcome instruments suggest it is likely unnecessary to use more than one instrument when examining functional outcome in patients with traumatic foot and ankle injuries. However, inconsistencies between measures in the same patient population suggest a need for further validation and scrutiny.

  9. RISK FACTOR DIAGNOSTIC SCORE IN DIABETIC FOOT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Shameem P. M

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Diabetic foot ulcers vary in their clinical presentation and nature of severity and therefore create a challenging problem to the treating surgeon regarding the prediction of the clinical course and the end result of the treatment. Clinical studies have shown that there are certain risk factors for the progression of foot ulcers in diabetics and it may therefore be possible to predict the course of an ulcer foot at presentation itself, thus instituting proper therapy without delay. Spoken otherwise clinical scoring may tell that this particular ulcer is having highest chance of amputation, then one may be able to take an early decision for the same and avoid the septic complications, inconvenience to the patient, long hospital stay and cost of treatments. AIM OF THE STUDY Aim of the study is to evaluate the above-mentioned scoring system in predicting the course the diabetic foot ulcers. MATERIALS AND METHODS 50 patients with Diabetic Foot attending the OPD of Department of Surgery of Government Hospital attached to Calicut Medical College are included in the present study. After thorough history taking and clinical examination, six risk factors like Age, pedal vessels, renal function, neuropathy, radiological findings and ulcers were observed in the patients by giving certain scoring points to each of them. The total number of points scored by the patients at the time of admission or OPD treatment was correlated with the final outcome in these patients, whether leading to amputation or conservative management. All the data was analysed using standard statistical methods. OBSERVATIONS AND RESULTS There were 12 females and 38 males with a female to male ratio 1:3.1. All were aged above 30 years. Twenty-four (48% of them were between 30-60 years and twenty six (52% were above 60 years. 10 patients were treated conservatively with risk score range: 10 to 35. Six had single toe loss with risk score: 25 to 35. Six had multiple toe loss

  10. Management of diabetic foot by natural honey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhdoom, Asadullah; Khan, Muhammad Shoaib; Lagahari, Muhammad Ayub; Rahopoto, Muhammad Qasim; Tahir, Syed Muhammad; Siddiqui, Khaleeque Ahmad

    2009-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that honey has antibacterial activity in vitro, and a small number of clinical case studies have shown that application of honey to severely infected cutaneous wounds is capable of clearing infection from the wound and improving tissue healing. Research has also indicated that honey may possess anti-inflammatory activity and stimulate immune responses within a wound. The overall effect is to reduce infection and to enhance wound healing in burns, ulcers, and other cutaneous wounds. The objective of the study was to find out the results of topical wound dressings in diabetic wounds with natural honey. The study was conducted at department of Orthopaedics, Unit-1, Liaquat University of Medical and Health Sciences, Jamshoro from July 2006 to June 2007. Study design was experimental. The inclusion criteria were patients of either gender with any age group having diabetic foot Wagner type I, II, III and II. The exclusion criteria were patients not willing for studies and who needed urgent amputation due to deteriorating illness. Initially all wounds were washed thoroughly and necrotic tissues removed and dressings with honey were applied and continued up to healing of wounds. Total number of patients was 12 (14 feet). There were 8 males (66.67%) and 4 females (33.33%), 2 cases (16.67%) were presented with bilateral diabetic feet. The age range was 35 to 65 years (46 +/- 9.07 years). Amputations of big toe in 3 patients (25%), second and third toe ray in 2 patients (16.67%) and of fourth and fifth toes at the level of metatarsophalengeal joints were done in 3 patients (25%). One patient (8.33%) had below knee amputation. In our study we observed excellent results in treating diabetic wounds with dressings soaked with natural honey. The disability of diabetic foot patients was minimized by decreasing the rate of leg or foot amputations and thus enhancing the quality and productivity of individual life.

  11. Metabolic Foot- and Fingerprinting of Lactobacillus paracasei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jäpelt, Kristina Bak

    in the metabolome, and an increased understanding of bile response mechanisms could be obtained by analysis of the response by tools within metabolomics. Therefore, the aim of this PhD thesis was to develop a platform for metabolic foot- and fingerprinting of L. paracasei subsp. paracasei strain (L. casei CRL-431......, it was demonstrated that the subsequent method used to extract intracellular metabolites from the L. paracasei cells altered the metabolic fingerprint. A comparative study was performed to characterise the effect of the genetic alterations in a set of mutants with enhanced bile tolerance from the parental strain of L...

  12. Ron Rash: One Foot in Eden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Thomas Ærvold

    2010-01-01

    An analysis of Ron Rash's novel One Foot in Eden, focusing on his attachment to place and his depiction of the internal conflicts between farmers and townspeople in a small Appalachian community. Rash depicts the contemporary Southerner’s struggle to maintain his or her roots in a time of rapid h...... homogenization. The inherent conflicts in his fiction are simultaneously a reminder of the necessity of living with one’s past and a fierce attack on today’s merciless industrialization. The novel ultimately resonates with the continuous changes of the South in the new millennium....

  13. Utilization of arterial grafts in foot replantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selami S. Sirvan, MD

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Our subject is a 36-year-old man who presented to the emergency department with bilateral lower extremity amputation at the level of the distal third of the tibia after a car accident. Surgery was planned for below-knee amputation of the right lower extremity and replantation of the left foot. The arteries dissected from the iatrogenically amputated segment were used as grafts to repair vascular gaps during the replantation. The patient's follow-up had been problem free. We concluded that whenever possible, amputated parts unsuitable for replantation should be examined thoroughly and neurovascular structures that might be used as grafts should be preserved.

  14. Utilization of arterial grafts in foot replantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirvan, Selami S; Dagdelen, Daghan; Akgun Demir, Isil; Cezairlioglu, Mecd Atif; Sezer, Hasan Basri; Karsidag, Semra

    2017-03-01

    Our subject is a 36-year-old man who presented to the emergency department with bilateral lower extremity amputation at the level of the distal third of the tibia after a car accident. Surgery was planned for below-knee amputation of the right lower extremity and replantation of the left foot. The arteries dissected from the iatrogenically amputated segment were used as grafts to repair vascular gaps during the replantation. The patient's follow-up had been problem free. We concluded that whenever possible, amputated parts unsuitable for replantation should be examined thoroughly and neurovascular structures that might be used as grafts should be preserved.

  15. Complex Foot Injury: Early and Definite Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepers, Tim; Rammelt, Stefan

    2017-03-01

    Complex foot injuries occur infrequently, but are life-changing events. They often present with other injuries as the result of a high-energy trauma. After initial stabilization, early assessment should be regarding salvagability. All treatment strategies are intensive. The initial treatment includes prevention of progression ischemia/necrosis, prevention of infection, and considering salvage or amputation. Definitive treatment for salvage includes anatomic reconstruction with stable internal fixation and early soft tissue coverage followed by aggressive rehabilitation. Prognosis after complex injuries is hard to predict. The various stages of the treatment are reviewed and recommendations are made. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The story of a deformed leprous foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohatgi, Shaurya; Naveen, Sushma; Salunke, Pranjal; Someshwar, Shylaja; Jerajani, Hemangi Rajiv; Joshi, Rajiv

    2016-03-01

    Eccrine syringofibroadenoma (ESFA) is a rare adnexal tumour of eccrine ductal proliferation. A 50 year old treated case of leprosy presented with a chronic non healing ulcer of 5 years duration on the deformity laden right foot. Multiple verrucous papules and plaques were seen surrounding the ulcer which showed histopathological findings consistent with ESFA. Although ESFA constitutes a rare association with leprosy, considering the load of treated cases in our country and elsewhere, it may represent an under-reported entity which requires more attention in the post elimination era.

  17. The effect of additional activation of the plantar intrinsic foot muscles on foot dynamics during gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Kazunori; Kanai, Shusaku; Hasegawa, Masaki; Otsuka, Akira; Oki, Sadaaki

    2017-08-18

    The plantar intrinsic foot muscles (PIFMs) contribute to support the medial longitudinal arch. But the functional role of the PIFMs during dynamic activities is not clear. The purpose of this study was to examine the change in the foot dynamics during gait accompanied with the change in the PIFMs activity to determine the functional role of the PIFMs during gait. Twenty healthy male subjects were randomly assigned to the electrical stimulation group (ESG) or control group (CG). In the ESG, the electrical stimulation to the PIFMs was provided from mid-stance to pre-swing using surface electrodes to simulate reinforcement of the PIFMs. The foot dynamics during the stance phase of gait was measured using a 3D motion analysis, and the amount of change from baseline (electrical stimulation was not provided) was compared between groups using an independent sample t-test. In the ESG, the timing for the navicular height to reach the minimum value was significantly later, and the vertical ground reaction force (2nd peak) significantly decreased more. There were no group differences in the amount of change from baseline on gait velocity, stance phase duration, minimum navicular height and ground reaction force in other directions. Results from this study showed that the functions of the PIFMs most likely include shock absorption and facilitation of efficient foot ground force transmission during the stance phase of gait. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A shift in priority in diabetic foot care and research: 75% of foot ulcers are preventable

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bus, Sicco A.; van Netten, Jaap J.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration poses a heavy burden on the patient and the healthcare system, but prevention thereof receives little attention. For every euro spent on ulcer prevention, ten are spent on ulcer healing, and for every randomized controlled trial conducted on prevention, ten are conducted on

  19. How common are foot problems among individuals with diabetes? Diabetic foot ulcers in the Dutch population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoekenbroek, Robert M.; Lokin, Joost L. C.; Nielen, Mark M.; Stroes, Erik S. G.; Koelemay, Mark J. W.

    2017-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Contemporary data on diabetic foot ulcer prevalence are scarce. Most studies were conducted in the 1990s, reporting incidence rates of 1.9-2.6%. Since then the prevalence of diabetes has doubled and the organisation of diabetes care has undergone major changes. Up-to-date data that

  20. How common are foot problems among individuals with diabetes? Diabetic foot ulcers in the Dutch population.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoekenbroek, R.M.; Lokin, J.L.C.; Nielen, M.M.; Stoers, E.S.G.; Koelemay, M.J.W.

    2017-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Contemporary data on diabetic foot ulcer prevalence are scarce. Most studies w ere conducted in the 1990s, reporting incidence rates of 1.9–2.6%. Since then the revalence of diabetes has doubled and the organisation of diabetes care has undergone major changes. Up-to-date data that

  1. Associations of foot posture and function to lower extremity pain: results from a population-based foot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riskowski, Jody L; Dufour, Alyssa B; Hagedorn, Thomas J; Hillstrom, Howard J; Casey, Virginia A; Hannan, Marian T

    2013-11-01

    Studies have implicated foot posture and foot function as risk factors for lower extremity pain. Empirical population-based evidence for this assertion is lacking; therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate cross-sectional associations of foot posture and foot function to lower extremity joint pain in a population-based study of adults. Participants were members of the Framingham Foot Study. Lower extremity joint pain was determined by the response to the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey-type question, "On most days do you have pain, aching or stiffness in your (hips, knees, ankles, or feet)?" The Modified Arch Index classified participants as having planus, rectus (referent), or cavus foot posture. The Center of Pressure Excursion Index classified participants as having overpronated, normal (referent), or oversupinated foot function. Crude and adjusted (age, sex, and body mass index) logistic regression determined associations of foot posture and function to lower extremity pain. Participants with planus structure had higher odds of knee (odds ratio [OR] 1.57, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.24-1.99) or ankle (OR 1.47, 95% CI 1.05-2.06) pain, whereas those with a cavus foot structure had increased odds of ankle pain only (OR 7.56, 95% CI 1.99-28.8) and pain at 1 lower extremity site (OR 1.37, 95% CI 1.04-1.80). Associations between foot function and lower extremity joint pain were not statistically significant except for a reduced risk of hip pain in those with an oversupinated foot function (OR 0.69, 95% CI 0.51-0.93). These findings offer a link between foot posture and lower extremity pain, highlighting the need for longitudinal or intervention studies. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  2. A review of the foot function index and the foot function index – revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The Foot Function Index (FFI) is a self-report, foot-specific instrument measuring pain and disability and has been widely used to measure foot health for over twenty years. A revised FFI (FFI-R) was developed in response to criticism of the FFI. The purpose of this review was to assess the uses of FFI and FFI-R as were reported in medical and surgical literature and address the suggestions found in the literature to improve the metrics of FFI-R. Methods A systematic literature search of PubMed/Medline and Embase databases from October 1991 through December 2010 comprised the main sources of literature. To enrich the bibliography, the search was extended to BioMedLib and Scopus search engines and manual search methods. Search terms included FFI, FFI scores, FFI-R. Requirements included abstracts/full length articles, English-language publications, and articles containing the term "foot complaints/problems." Articles selected were scrutinized; EBM abstracted data from literature and collected into tables designed for this review. EBM analyzed tables, KJC, JM, RMS reviewed and confirmed table contents. KJC and JM reanalyzed the original database of FFI-R to improve metrics. Results Seventy-eight articles qualified for this review, abstracts were compiled into 12 tables. FFI and FFI-R were used in studies of foot and ankle disorders in 4700 people worldwide. FFI Full scale or the Subscales and FFI-R were used as outcome measures in various studies; new instruments were developed based on FFI subscales. FFI Full scale was adapted/translated into other cultures. FFI and FFI-R psychometric properties are reported in this review. Reanalysis of FFI-R subscales' confirmed unidimensionality, and the FFI-R questionnaires' response categories were edited into four responses for ease of use. Conclusion This review was limited to articles published in English in the past twenty years. FFI is used extensively worldwide; this instrument pioneered a quantifiable measure

  3. Data set incongruence and correlated character evolution: An example of functional convergence in the hind-limbs of stifftail diving ducks

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCracken, K.G.; Harshman, J.; Mcclellan, D.A.; Afton, A.D.

    1999-01-01

    The unwitting inclusion of convergent characters in phylogenetic estimates poses a serious problem for efforts to recover phylogeny. Convergence is not inscrutable, however, particularly when one group of characters tracks phylogeny and another set tracks adaptive history. In such cases, convergent characters may be correlated with one or a few functional anatomical units and readily identifiable by using comparative methods. Stifftail ducks (Oxyurinae) offer one such opportunity to study correlated character evolution and function in the context of phylogenetic reconstruction. Morphological analyses place stifftail ducks as part of a large clade of diving ducks that includes the sea ducks (Mergini), Hymenolaimus, Merganetta, and Tachyeres, and possibly the pochards (Aythyini). Molecular analyses, on the other hand, place stifftails far from other diving ducks and suggest, moreover, that stifftails are polyphyletic. Mitochondrial cytochrome b gene sequences of eight stifftail species traditionally supposed to form a clade were compared with each other and with sequences from 50 other anseriform and galliform species. Stifftail ducks are not the sister group of sea ducks but lie outside the typical ducks (Anatinae). Of the four traditional stifftail genera, monophyly of Oxyura and its sister group relationship with Nomonyx are strongly supported. Heteronetta probably is the sister group of that clade, but support is weak. Biziura is not a true stifftail. Within Oxyura, Old World species (O. australis, O. leucocephala, O. mnccoa) appear to form a clade, with New World species (O. jamaicensis, O. vittata) branching basally. Incongruence between molecules and morphology is interpreted to be the result of adaptive specialization and functional convergence in the hind limbs of Biziura and true stifftails. When morphological characters are divided into classes, only hind-limb characters are significantly in conflict with the molecular tree. Likewise, null models of

  4. A basic study on quantitative evaluation of 3-dimensional foot contact with an inertial sensor for FES foot drop correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiotani, Maho; Watanabe, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    In these days, FES is used to control ankle dorsiflexion of hemiplegic gait. Since not only dorsiflexion but also 3-dimensional foot contact isimportant for gait stability in hemiplegic gait, evaluation and control system of 3-dimensional foot contact with FES is needed to correct foot movement. In this study, the timing of initial contact and the timing when foot movement became stationary in the sagittal plane were detected, and the inclination angles in the sagittal and the frontal planes at these timings were used for evaluation. Using the inclination angles, 10 m walking of a hemiplegic subject under the 4 different gait conditions were quantitatively evaluated. The gait conditions were without FES, stimulation to the tibialis anterior, stimulation to the common peroneal nerve, and stimulation to both the tibialis anterior and the common peroneal nerve. Result of evaluation with the inclination angles showed that stimulation to the tibialis anterior could control foot contact appropriately in the sagittal plane, and stimulation to the common peroneal nerve was better to control foot inclination angle in the frontal plane. Inclination angle at the beginning of the stance phase indicated that FES system which used in clinical site commonly is not appropriate to control 3-dimensional foot contact. It was shown that inclination angle at the beginning of the stance phase was useful to evaluate 3-dimensional foot movements for FES foot drop correction.

  5. The Influence of Foot-Strike Technique on the Neuromechanical Function of the Foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Luke A; Farris, Dominic J; Lichtwark, Glen A; Cresswell, Andrew G

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of foot-strike technique on longitudinal arch mechanics and intrinsic foot muscle function during running. Thirteen healthy participants ran barefoot on a force-instrumented treadmill at 2.8 ms with a forefoot (FFS) and rearfoot (RFS; habitual) running technique, whereas kinetic, kinematic, and electromyographic data from the intrinsic foot muscles were collected simultaneously. The longitudinal arch was modeled as a single "midfoot" joint representing motion of the rearfoot (calcaneus) relative to the forefoot (metatarsals). An inverse dynamic analysis was performed to estimate joint moments generated about the midfoot, as well as mechanical work and power. The midfoot was more plantar flexed (higher arch) at foot contact when running with a forefoot running technique (RFS 0.2 ± 1.8 vs FFS 6.9 ± 3.0°, effect size (ES) = 2.7); however, there was no difference in peak midfoot dorsiflexion in stance (RFS -11.6 ± 3.0 vs FFS -11.4 ± 3.4°, ES = 0.63). When running with a forefoot technique, participants generated greater moments about the midfoot (27% increase, ES = 1.1) and performed more negative work (240% increase, ES = 2.2) and positive work (42% increase, ES = 1.1) about the midfoot. Average stance-phase muscle activation was greater for flexor digitorum brevis (20% increase, ES = 0.56) and abductor hallucis (17% increase, ES = 0.63) when running with a forefoot technique. Forefoot running increases loading about the longitudinal arch and also increases the mechanical work performed by the intrinsic foot muscles. These findings have substantial implications in terms of injury prevention and management for runners who transition from a rearfoot to a forefoot running technique.

  6. Sagittal plane kinematics of the foot during passive ankle dorsiflexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatt, Alfred; Chockalingam, Nachiappan; Chevalier, Thierry Larose

    2011-12-01

    Measurement of ankle joint dorsiflexion is an essential examination technique that needs to be performed prior to prescription of foot orthoses since the presence or absence of ankle equinus will affect the design of such devices. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of foot posture on sagittal plane kinematics of various foot segments during passive dorsiflexion. Comparative repeated measures design. To determine the effect of foot posture on inter segmental kinematics during passive dorsiflexion. An optoelectronic movement analysis system was employed to collect kinematic data. A validated marker set (Oxford Foot Model) was applied to 16 subjects (12 males, 4 females) with a mean age of 35.5 years (range 20-56 years), who provided informed consent. An upward force was applied to the forefoot until maximum resistance. Sagittal movement of the hindfoot and forefoot segments along with the whole foot movement were analyzed in the pronated, neutral and supinated foot postures. While maximum foot dorsiflexion angle showed a significant difference between the three postures (p = 0.000) the actual recorded difference between the neutral and supinated postures was only 2.49°. For the hindfoot and forefoot segments, mean angle range of movement for the pronated foot posture was significantly higher than the other foot postures. The forefoot to hindfoot angle demonstrated a significant (p = 0.005) increase during dorsiflexion between the pronated and supinated postures. These results indicate that during passive dorsiflexion, the forefoot travels through a greater degree of movement than the hindfoot. While the maximum foot dorsiflexion angle differs significantly between the pronated and supinated foot postures, hindfoot movement also varies significantly between foot postures. Furthermore, the forefoot to tibia angle travels through a greater range than the hindfoot to tibia angle, in all three foot postures. The hindfoot to forefoot angle does not

  7. Functional clinical typology of the foot and kinematic gait parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitka Marenčáková

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The foot plays a key role in a standing posture, walking and running performance. Changes in its structure or function may alter upper segments of kinematic chain which can lead to formation of musculoskeletal disorders. Although functional clinical typology provides a complex view of foot kinesiology there is a lack of knowledge and evidence about influences of different foot types on human gait. Objective: The aim of the study was to analyse differences of kinematic gait parameters of lower extremity joints and pelvis between functional clinical foot types in healthy young men. Methods: Three-dimensional kinematic analysis by the Vicon Motion Capture MX System device in synchronization with 2 Kistler force platforms was used to obtain kinematic data from 18 healthy men (mean age 23.2 ± 1.9 years. The functional clinical foot type was clinically examined and sorted into 3 basic foot type groups - forefoot varus (FFvar, rearfoot varus (RFvar and forefoot valgus (FFvalg. Peak angular values and range of an angular displacement in all of three movement planes were analysed for pelvis, hip, knee and ankle joint. For statistical analysis of kinematic gait parameters differences between foot types Mann Whitney U test at a statistical significance level p < .05 and Cohen's coefficient d for effect size were used. Results: This study showed that functional clinical foot type can affect kinematic parameters of gait in the joints of the lower limb and pelvis. Significant differences were presented in the FFvar in comparison with other two foot type groups with middle and high size of effect. The most alterations were observed in pelvis area and in a sagittal plane of movement. Nevertheless, significant differences between FFvalg and RFvar foot types were not noticed. Conclusions: Functional clinical foot typology provides one of the possible methods to describe foot structure and function. Our results showed that foot type could

  8. Foot and ankle problems in Muay Thai kickboxers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaseenon, Tanawat; Intharasompan, Piyapong; Wattanarojanapom, Thongaek; Theeraamphon, Nipon; Auephanviriyakul, Sansanee; Phisitkul, Phinit

    2015-01-01

    Muay Thai kickboxing is a common sport that uses the foot and ankle in fighting. Muay Thai kickboxing trainees usually receive training in Thailand Foot and ankle problems in this group ofpeople who usually train barefoot remain unexplored To evaluate the prevalence of common foot and ankle problems in Muay Thai kick boxers. The present study is a cross-sectional survey of Muay Thai kick boxers practicing in northern Thailand. Interviews were conducted and foot and ankle examinations were evaluated Foot morphology was examined using a Harris mat footprint. One hundred and twenty-three Muay Thai kickbox ersinnine training gyms were included in this study. Common foot and ankle problems found in the Muay Thai kick boxers were callosity (59%), gastrocnemius contracture (57%), toe deformities (49.3%), wounds (10%) and heel pain (9%). Callosity was most commonly found on the forefoot (77.5%), on the plantar first metatarsal (55.3%) and on the big toe (33.3%). An association was found between a tight heel cord and a history of foot injury with prolonged periods of weekly training. Toe deformities such as hallux rigidus (37.6%) were also associated with prolonged periods of training (p = 0.001). No correlation was found between type of foot arch and foot and ankle problems. Plantar forefoot callosities and wounds as well as toe deformities including tight heel cords are some of the foot and ankle problems commonly found in Muay Thai kick boxers. They are associated with prolonged periods of barefoot training. The unique pattern of training and of the kicks in Muay Thai might be a path mechanism, leading to the development of foot and ankle problems.

  9. The German and Belgian accreditation models for diabetic foot services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morbach, Stephan; Kersken, Joachim; Lobmann, Ralf; Nobels, Frank; Doggen, Kris; Van Acker, Kristien

    2016-01-01

    The International Working Group on the Diabetic Foot recommends that auditing should be part of the organization of diabetic foot care, the efforts required for data collection and analysis being balanced by the expected benefits. In Germany legislature demands measures of quality management for in- and out-patient facilities, and, in 2003, the Germany Working Group on the Diabetic Foot defined and developed a certification procedure for diabetic foot centres to be recognized as 'specialized'. This includes a description of management facilities, treatment procedures and outcomes, as well as the organization of mutual auditing visits between the centres. Outcome data is collected at baseline and 6 months on 30 consecutive patients. By 2014 almost 24,000 cases had been collected and analysed. Since 2005 Belgian multidisciplinary diabetic foot clinics could apply for recognition by health authorities. For continued recognition diabetic foot clinics need to treat at least 52 patients with a new foot problem (Wagner 2 or more or active Charcot foot) per annum. Baseline and 6-month outcome data of these patients are included in an audit-feedback initiative. Although originally fully independent of each other, the common goal of these two initiatives is quality improvement of national diabetic foot care, and hence exchanges between systems has commenced. In future, the German and Belgian accreditation models might serve as templates for comparable initiatives in other countries. Just recently the International Working Group on the Diabetic Foot initiated a working group for further discussion of accreditation and auditing models (International Working Group on the Diabetic Foot AB(B)A Working Group). Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Healing ulcers and preventing their recurrences in the diabetic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabapathy, S Raja; Periasamy, Madhu

    2016-01-01

    Fifteen percent of people with diabetes develop an ulcer in the course of their lifetime. Eighty-five percent of the major amputations in diabetes mellitus are preceded by an ulcer. Management of ulcers and preventing their recurrence is important for the quality of life of the individual and reducing the cost of care of treatment. The main causative factors of ulceration are neuropathy, vasculopathy and limited joint mobility. Altered bio-mechanics due to the deformities secondary to neuropathy and limited joint mobility leads to focal points of increased pressure, which compromises circulation leading to ulcers. Ulcer management must not only address the healing of ulcers but also should correct the altered bio-mechanics to reduce the focal pressure points and prevent recurrence. An analysis of 700 patients presenting with foot problems to the Diabetic Clinic of Ganga Hospital led to the stratification of these patients into four classes of incremental severity. Class 1 - the foot at risk, Class 2 - superficial ulcers without infection, Class 3 - the crippled foot and Class 4 - the critical foot. Almost 77.5% presented in either Class 3 or 4 with complicated foot ulcers requiring major reconstruction or amputation. Class 1 foot can be managed conservatively with foot care and appropriate foot wear. Class 2 in addition to measures for ulcer healing would need surgery to correct the altered bio-mechanics to prevent the recurrence. The procedures called surgical offloading would depend on the site of the ulcer and would need an in-depth clinical study of the foot. Class 3 would need major reconstructive procedures and Class 4 would need amputation since it may be life-threatening. As clinicians, our main efforts must be focused towards identifying patients in Class 1 and offer advice on foot care and Class 2 where appropriate surgical offloading procedure would help preserve the foot.

  11. Healing ulcers and preventing their recurrences in the diabetic foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabapathy, S. Raja; Periasamy, Madhu

    2016-01-01

    Fifteen percent of people with diabetes develop an ulcer in the course of their lifetime. Eighty-five percent of the major amputations in diabetes mellitus are preceded by an ulcer. Management of ulcers and preventing their recurrence is important for the quality of life of the individual and reducing the cost of care of treatment. The main causative factors of ulceration are neuropathy, vasculopathy and limited joint mobility. Altered bio-mechanics due to the deformities secondary to neuropathy and limited joint mobility leads to focal points of increased pressure, which compromises circulation leading to ulcers. Ulcer management must not only address the healing of ulcers but also should correct the altered bio-mechanics to reduce the focal pressure points and prevent recurrence. An analysis of 700 patients presenting with foot problems to the Diabetic Clinic of Ganga Hospital led to the stratification of these patients into four classes of incremental severity. Class 1 – the foot at risk, Class 2 – superficial ulcers without infection, Class 3 – the crippled foot and Class 4 – the critical foot. Almost 77.5% presented in either Class 3 or 4 with complicated foot ulcers requiring major reconstruction or amputation. Class 1 foot can be managed conservatively with foot care and appropriate foot wear. Class 2 in addition to measures for ulcer healing would need surgery to correct the altered bio-mechanics to prevent the recurrence. The procedures called surgical offloading would depend on the site of the ulcer and would need an in-depth clinical study of the foot. Class 3 would need major reconstructive procedures and Class 4 would need amputation since it may be life-threatening. As clinicians, our main efforts must be focused towards identifying patients in Class 1 and offer advice on foot care and Class 2 where appropriate surgical offloading procedure would help preserve the foot. PMID:28216809

  12. Diagnostic value of newborn foot length to predict gestational age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutia Farah Fawziah

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background  Identification of gestational age, especially within 48 hours of birth, is crucial for newborns, as the earlier preterm status is detected, the earlier the child can receive optimal management. Newborn foot length is an anthropometric measurement which is easy to perform, inexpensive, and potentially efficient for predicting gestational age. Objective  To analyze the diagnostic value of newborn foot length in predicting gestational age. Methods  This diagnostic study was performed between October 2016 and February 2017 in the High Care Unit of Neonates at Dr. Moewardi General Hospital, Surakarta. A total of 152 newborns were consecutively selected and underwent right foot length measurements before 96 hours of age. The correlation between newborn foot length to classify as full term and gestational age was analyzed with Spearman’s correlation test because of non-normal data distribution. The cut-off point of newborn foot length was calculated by receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve and diagnostic values of newborn foot length were analyzed by 2 x 2 table with SPSS 21.0 software. Results There were no significant differences between male and female newborns in terms of gestational age, birth weight, choronological age, and newborn foot length (P>0.05. Newborn foot length and gestational age had a significant correlation (r=0.53; P=0.000. The optimal cut-off newborn foot length to predict full term status was 7.1 cm. Newborn foot length below 7.1 cm had sensitivity 75%, specificity 98%, positive predictive value 94.3%, negative predictive value 90.6%, positive likelihood ratio 40.5, negative likelihood ratio 0.25, and post-test probability 94.29%, to predict preterm status in newborns. Conclusion  Newborn foot length can be used to predict gestational age, especially for the purpose of differentiating between preterm and full term newborns.

  13. The diabetic foot: Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltran, J.; Campanini, D.S.; Knight, C.; McCalla, M.

    1990-01-01

    Fourteen diabetic patients with suspected foot infection and/or neuropathic joint (Charcot Joint) were evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in an attempt to assess the extent of the infection and also to distinguish infection from the changes seen with neuroarthropathy. The majority of patients with infection had more than one site of involvement and the following diagnoses were made by MRI evaluation: Osteomyelitis (n=8), abscess (n=7), neuropathic joint (n=5), septic arthritis (n=4), and tenosynovitis (n=4). Clinical or surgical/pathological confirmation of the MRI diagnoses was obtained in all but nine sites of infection or cases of neuropathic joint. If the two diagnostic categories of septic arthritis and tenosynovitis are excluded, all but four of the MRI diagnoses were confirmed. A distinctive pattern for neuroarthropathy was identified in five cases, consisting of low signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted images within the bone marrow space adjacent to the involved joint. We conclude that MRI is a valuable adjunct in the evaluation of the diabetic foot, and that it provides accurate information regarding the presence and extent of infection in this subset of patients. MRI has proven particularly helpful in differentiating neuroarthropathy from osteomyelitis. (orig.)

  14. Growth factors for treating diabetic foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí-Carvajal, Arturo J; Gluud, Christian; Nicola, Susana; Simancas-Racines, Daniel; Reveiz, Ludovic; Oliva, Patricio; Cedeño-Taborda, Jorge

    2015-10-28

    Foot ulcers are a major complication of diabetes mellitus, often leading to amputation. Growth factors derived from blood platelets, endothelium, or macrophages could potentially be an important treatment for these wounds but they may also confer risks. To assess the benefits and harms of growth factors for foot ulcers in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus. In March 2015 we searched the Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid EMBASE and EBSCO CINAHL. There were no restrictions with respect to language, date of publication or study setting. Randomised clinical trials in any setting, recruiting people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus diagnosed with a foot ulcer. Trials were eligible for inclusion if they compared a growth factor plus standard care (e.g., antibiotic therapy, debridement, wound dressings) versus placebo or no growth factor plus standard care, or compared different growth factors against each other. We considered lower limb amputation (minimum of one toe), complete healing of the foot ulcer, and time to complete healing of the diabetic foot ulcer as the primary outcomes. Independently, we selected randomised clinical trials, assessed risk of bias, and extracted data in duplicate. We estimated risk ratios (RR) for dichotomous outcomes. We measured statistical heterogeneity using the I(2) statistic. We subjected our analyses to both fixed-effect and random-effects model analyses. We identified 28 randomised clinical trials involving 2365 participants. The cause of foot ulcer (neurologic, vascular, or combined) was poorly defined in all trials. The trials were conducted in ten countries. The trials assessed 11 growth factors in 30 comparisons: platelet-derived wound healing formula, autologous growth factor, allogeneic platelet-derived growth factor, transforming growth

  15. [Management of a diabetic foot ulcer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha Van, G

    2008-09-01

    A chronic diabetic foot ulcer requires a search for the etiology. The three main causes to search for are poor off-loading compliance, osteomyelitis, and peripheral vascular disease. The level of severity is measured with the U.T. classification and the level of infection with the classification of the International Consensus on the Diabetic Foot. Peripheral vascular disease must be precisely evaluated by Doppler ultrasound, which describes all the arteries of the lower limb. Angiography is required only in case of revascularization. Treatment of the ulcer includes strict off-loading, topical treatment, optimal treatment of hyperglycemia, and antibiotic therapy on a case-by-case basis for osteomyelitis and/or, angioplasty or by-pass procedures. Osteomyelitis can be treated by associating conservative surgery, antibiotic therapy, and off-loading. No amputation, even of one toe, must be done without a previous vascular check-up. Off-loading of the ulcer must be regularly checked. Poor off-loading compliance must be systematically investigated if the ulcer worsens or healing is delayed.

  16. Surgical revascularization techniques for diabetic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kota, Siva Krishna; Kota, Sunil Kumar; Meher, Lalit Kumar; Sahoo, Satyajit; Mohapatra, Sudeep; Modi, Kirtikumar Dharmsibhai

    2013-06-01

    Diabetes is an important risk factor for atherosclerosis. The diabetic foot is characterized by the presence of arteriopathy and neuropathy. The vascular damage includes non-occlusive microangiopathy and macroangiopathy. Diabetic foot wounds are responsible for 5-10% of the cases of major or minor amputations. In fact, the risk of amputation of the lower limbs is 15-20% higher in diabetic populations than in the general population. The University of Texas classification is the reference classification for diabetic wounds. It distinguishes non-ischemic wounds from ischemic wounds which are associated with a higher rate of amputation. The first principles of treatment are the control of pain of an eventual infection. When ischemia is diagnosed, restoration of pulsatile blood flow by revascularization may be considered for salvaging the limb. The treatment options are angioplasty with or without stenting and surgical bypass or hybrid procedures combining the two. Distal reconstructions with anastomosis to the leg or pedal arteries have satisfactory limb-salvage rates. Subintimal angioplasty is a more recent endovascular technique. It could be suggested for elderly patients who are believed to be unsuitable candidates for a conventional bypass or angioplasty. The current article would focus on the various revascularization procedures.

  17. Growth factors for treating diabetic foot ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martí-Carvajal, Arturo J; Gluud, Christian; Nicola, Susana

    2015-01-01

    (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid EMBASE and EBSCO CINAHL. There were no restrictions with respect to language, date of publication or study setting. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised clinical trials in any setting, recruiting people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus diagnosed...... following treatment for diabetic foot ulcers (RR 0.64, 95% CI 0.14 to 2.94; P value 0.56, low quality of evidence)Although 11 trials reported time to complete healing of the foot ulcers in people with diabetes , meta-analysis was not possible for this outcome due to the unique comparisons within each trial......, failure to report data, and high number of withdrawals. Data on quality of life were not reported. Growth factors showed an increasing risk of overall adverse event rate compared with compared with placebo or no growth factor (255/498 (51.20%) versus 169/332 (50.90%); RR 0.83; 95% CI 0.72 to 0.96; I(2...

  18. Comparative Anatomy of the Hind Limb Vessels of the Bearded Capuchins (Sapajus libidinosus with Apes, Baboons, and Cebus capucinus: With Comments on the Vessels' Role in Bipedalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roqueline A. G. M. F. Aversi-Ferreira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Capuchin monkeys are known to exhibit sporadic bipedalism while performing specific tasks, such as cracking nuts. The bipedal posture and locomotion cause an increase in the metabolic cost and therefore increased blood supply to lower limbs is necessary. Here, we present a detailed anatomical description of the capuchin arteries and veins of the pelvic limb of Sapajus libidinosus in comparison with other primates. The arterial pattern of the bearded capuchin hind limb is more similar to other quadrupedal Cebus species. Similarities were also found to the pattern observed in the quadruped Papio, which is probably due to a comparable pelvis and the presence of the tail. Sapajus' traits show fewer similarities when compared to great apes and modern humans. Moreover, the bearded capuchin showed unique patterns for the femoral and the short saphenous veins. Although this species switches easily from quadrupedal to bipedal postures, our results indicate that the bearded capuchin has no specific or differential features that support extended bipedal posture and locomotion. Thus, the explanation for the behavioral differences found among capuchin genera probably includes other aspects of their physiology.

  19. Effect of Hind-Limb Suspension and X-Ray Irradiation on the Mechanical and Chemical Properties of Rat Femur and Tibia Bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heacox, Hayley; Hill, Brent; Mehta, Rahul; Barajas, Jordan; Freyaldenhoven, Sidney; Dobretsov, Max; Chowdhury, Parimal

    It is known that space conditions such as microgravity and cosmic radiation have detrimental effects on the skeletal system of humans, such as decreased bone mineral density. This research studies the changes in mechanical properties, elasticity, and chemical properties, calcium and phosphorus content, of rat femur and tibia bones when exposed to hind-limb suspension and x-ray irradiation, simulated microgravity and cosmic radiation. It is hypothesized that if microgravity and cosmic radiation lead to decreased bone mineral density, then these conditions will produce weakened bones, lower elastic moduli and abnormal concentrations of calcium and phosphorus, as compared to bones not subject to these conditions. A technique known as three-point bending was employed to estimate the Young's (elastic) modulus for the leg bones. To investigate the chemical nature of the bones, a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) was utilized to take cross-sectional images and to perform energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. Ultimately, the results produced by this research will aid in quantifying the effects of spaceflight and may be used in developing a treatment to counteract such effects. This work supported by a RID and CRP Grant from Arkansas Space Grant Consortium.

  20. Targeted disruption of the Mast syndrome gene SPG21 in mice impairs hind limb function and alters axon branching in cultured cortical neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderblom, Cynthia; Stadler, Julia; Jupille, Henri; Blackstone, Craig; Shupliakov, Oleg

    2017-01-01

    Mast syndrome (SPG21) is a childhood-onset, autosomal recessive, complicated form of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) characterized by dementia, thin corpus callosum, white matter abnormalities, and cerebellar and extrapyramidal signs in addition to spastic paraparesis. A nucleotide insertion resulting in premature truncation of the SPG21 gene product maspardin underlies this disorder, likely leading to loss of protein function. In this study, we generated SPG21−/− knockout mice by homologous recombination as a possible animal model for SPG21. Though SPG21−/− mice appeared normal at birth, within several months they developed gradually progressive hind limb dysfunction. Cerebral cortical neurons cultured from SPG21−/− mice exhibited significantly more axonal branching than neurons from wild-type animals, while comprehensive neuropathological analysis of SPG21−/− mice did not reveal definitive abnormalities. Since alterations in axon branching have been seen in neurons derived from animal models of other forms of HSP as well as motor neuron diseases, this may represent a common cellular pathogenic theme. PMID:20661613

  1. Modest Amounts of Voluntary Exercise Reduce Pain- and Stress-Related Outcomes in a Rat Model of Persistent Hind Limb Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitcher, Mark H; Tarum, Farid; Rauf, Imran Z; Low, Lucie A; Bushnell, Catherine

    2017-06-01

    Aerobic exercise improves outcomes in a variety of chronic health conditions, yet the support for exercise-induced effects on chronic pain in humans is mixed. Although many rodent studies have examined the effects of exercise on persistent hypersensitivity, the most used forced exercise paradigms that are known to be highly stressful. Because stress can also produce analgesic effects, we studied how voluntary exercise, known to reduce stress in healthy subjects, alters hypersensitivity, stress, and swelling in a rat model of persistent hind paw inflammation. Our data indicate that voluntary exercise rapidly and effectively reduces hypersensitivity as well as stress-related outcomes without altering swelling. Moreover, the level of exercise is unrelated to the analgesic and stress-reducing effects, suggesting that even modest amounts of exercise may impart significant benefit in persistent inflammatory pain states. Modest levels of voluntary exercise reduce pain- and stress-related outcomes in a rat model of persistent inflammatory pain, independently of the amount of exercise. As such, consistent, self-regulated activity levels may be more relevant to health improvement in persistent pain states than standardized exercise goals. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Occurrence of foot and mouth disease serotypes in Tanzania: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Occurrence of foot and mouth disease serotypes in Tanzania: A retrospective study of tongue epithelial tissue samples. E. S. Swai, A. Mrosso, J. I.G. Masambu. Abstract. Samples of suspected foot and mouth disease (FMD) cases were collected via veterinary investigation centers (VIC) from different geographical locations ...

  3. Role of footcare education in diabetic foot status and glycaemic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Prevalence of type 2 diabetes among the adult population is rising globally. As the case detection rates of diabetes increase in adult Nigerians, managing the attendant (foot) complications has become an important health challenge. Poor practice of foot care and poor glycaemic control is potential risk for ...

  4. Diabetic foot care: Self reported knowledge and practice among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Diabetes Mellitus (DM) foot complications are a leading cause of mortality in developing countries and the prevalence of diabetes is expected to increase in the next decades in these countries. The aim of this study was to determine the knowledge and practice of foot care among diabetes patients attending ...

  5. Diabetic foot ulcers – evidence-based wound management: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diabetic foot ulcers have a significant impact on the individual patient's quality of life, potential morbidity and even mortality. Diabetic foot ulcers also consume a gradually increasing portion of our health care budget. Whenever possible the focus should be on prevention rather than cure. All diabetic patients must have both ...

  6. Foot Posture and Patellar Tendon Pain Among Adult Volleyball Players

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Reinier; Malliaras, Peter; Munteanu, Shannon; Payne, Craig; Morrissey, Dylan; Maffulli, Nicola

    Objective: We hypothesized that individuals with a normal foot posture would be less likely to experience patellar tendon pain and pathology than those with a pronated or supinated foot. Design: Observational study. Setting: Field-based study among competing athletes. Participants: Volleyball

  7. Foot posture and patellar tendon pain among adult volleyball players.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, R. de; Malliaras, P.; Munteanu, S.; Payne, C.; Morrissey, D.; Maffulli, N.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We hypothesized that individuals with a normal foot posture would be less likely to experience patellar tendon pain and pathology than those with a pronated or supinated foot. DESIGN: Observational study. SETTING: Field-based study among competing athletes. PARTICIPANTS: Volleyball

  8. Foot complications among diabetics attending a district hospital in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-09-01

    Sep 1, 2007 ... OBJECTIVES: To relate skin health, footwear practices and foot care education with occurrence of foot complications among diabetics attending a district hospital in. Kenya. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Two hundred and nineteen patients attending the diabetic clinic at the Kikuyu Mission Hospital (99 males ...

  9. Efficient foot motor control by Neymar’s brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiichi eNaito

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available How very long-term (over many years motor skill training shapes internal motor representation remains poorly understood. We provide valuable evidence that the football brain of Neymar da Silva Santos Júnior (the Brasilian footballer recruits very limited neural resources in the motor-cortical foot regions during foot movements. We scanned his brain activity with a 3-tesla functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI while he rotated his right ankle at 1Hz. We also scanned brain activity when three other age-controlled professional footballers, two top-athlete swimmers and one amateur footballer performed the identical task. A comparison was made between Neymar’s brain activity with that obtained from the others. We found activations in the left medial-wall foot motor regions during the foot movements consistently across all participants. However, the size and intensity of medial-wall activity was smaller in the four professional footballers than in the three other participants, despite no difference in amount of foot movement. Surprisingly, the reduced recruitment of medial-wall foot motor regions became apparent in Neymar. His medial-wall activity was smallest among all participants with absolutely no difference in amount of foot movement. Neymar may efficiently control given foot movements probably by largely conserving motor-cortical neural resources. We discuss this possibility in terms of over-years motor skill training effect, use-dependent plasticity, and efficient motor control.

  10. Efficient foot motor control by Neymar’s brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Eiichi; Hirose, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    How very long-term (over many years) motor skill training shapes internal motor representation remains poorly understood. We provide valuable evidence that the football brain of Neymar da Silva Santos Júnior (the Brasilian footballer) recruits very limited neural resources in the motor-cortical foot regions during foot movements. We scanned his brain activity with a 3-tesla functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while he rotated his right ankle at 1 Hz. We also scanned brain activity when three other age-controlled professional footballers, two top-athlete swimmers and one amateur footballer performed the identical task. A comparison was made between Neymar’s brain activity with that obtained from the others. We found activations in the left medial-wall foot motor regions during the foot movements consistently across all participants. However, the size and intensity of medial-wall activity was smaller in the four professional footballers than in the three other participants, despite no difference in amount of foot movement. Surprisingly, the reduced recruitment of medial-wall foot motor regions became apparent in Neymar. His medial-wall activity was smallest among all participants with absolutely no difference in amount of foot movement. Neymar may efficiently control given foot movements probably by largely conserving motor-cortical neural resources. We discuss this possibility in terms of over-years motor skill training effect, use-dependent plasticity, and efficient motor control. PMID:25136312

  11. The prevalence of foot ulceration in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firth, Jill; Hale, Claire; Helliwell, Philip; Hill, Jackie; Nelson, E Andrea

    2008-02-15

    To establish the prevalence of foot ulceration in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in secondary care. A postal survey of all patients with RA (n = 1,130) under the care of rheumatologists in Bradford, West Yorkshire, UK was performed. The prevalence data were validated through clinical examination, case-note review, and contact with health professionals. The false-negative rate was investigated in a subsample of patients (n = 70) who denied any history of ulceration. The postal survey achieved a 78% response rate. Following validation, the point prevalence of foot ulceration was 3.39% and the overall prevalence was 9.73%. The false-positive rate was initially high at 21.21%, but use of diagrammatic questionnaire data to exclude leg ulceration reduced the rate to 10.76%. The false-negative rate was 11.76%. The most common sites for ulceration were the dorsal aspect of hammer toes, the metatarsal heads, and the metatarsophalangeal joint in patients with hallux abducto valgus, with 33% of patients reporting multiple sites of ulceration. Patients with open-foot and healed-foot ulceration had significantly longer RA disease duration, reported significantly greater use of special footwear, and had a higher prevalence of foot surgery than ulcer-free patients. Foot ulceration affects a significant proportion of patients with RA. Further work is needed to establish risk factors for foot ulceration in RA and to target foot health provision more effectively.

  12. Diabetic Foot Ulcers: Current Trends In Management | Igbinovia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Diabetic foot is the commonest complication of Diabetes and is a leading cause of hospitalization and prolonged in – patient treatment. Diabetic foot ulcer is far and away the most frequent indication for non traumatic lower limb amputations. ppropriate preventive measures as well as patient education will markedly

  13. STUDIES ON DIABETIC FOOT ULCERS IN PATIENTS AT JOS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An epidemiologcal and microbiological studies of diabetic foot ulcers were carried out in our hospital, with a view to reducing the amputation and mortality rate associated with the disease. Wound swabs from 38 Diabetes Mellitus (DM) foot ulcer patients were investigated using culture methods for both strict aerobes and ...

  14. Chronic foot ulcer complicating a traumatic arteriovenous fistula ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Chronic foot ulcers could be a complication of traumatic arteriovenous (A-V) fistulation. We report a rare case of chronic foot ulcer and deformity resulting from arteriovenous fistula of the anterior tibial artery. Method: The clinical presentation and the outcome of treatment in a patient treated at the University of ...

  15. Risk factors and prevalence of diabetic foot ulcers at Kenyatta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of diabetic foot ulcers and the risk factors in a clinic-based setting. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Kenyatta National Hospital, Kenya. Subjects: Patients with both type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus who had active foot ulcers in both outpatient and inpatient units. Main outcome ...

  16. fungal infections among diabetic foot ulcer- patients attending ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-01-01

    Jan 1, 2011 ... a period of four months, from August to November. 2009 at Kenyatta National Hospital diabetic clinic. Patients presenting with foot ulcer(s) and those admitted to the surgical wards with diabetes were recruited. Those without visible foot ulcer and/or superficial lesions or declined consent to participate ...

  17. Diabetic foot workshop: Improving technical and educational skills for nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalaa, Maryam; Sanjari, Mahnaz; Shahbazi, Samimeh; Shayeganmehr, Zahra; Abooeirad, Maryam; Amini, Mohammad Reza; Adibi, Hossien; Mehrdad, Neda

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus as one of the most common metabolic disorders has some complications, one of the main ones is diabetic foot (DF). Appropriate care and education prevents 85% of diabetic foot amputations. An ideal management to prevent and treat diabetic foot necessitates a close collaboration between the health team members and the diabetic patient. Therefore, improving nurses' knowledge about DF care and advancement in the quality of care provided by the nurses could significantly improve diabetic foot prevention and management. Therefore, the aim of DF workshop was to improve technical and educational skills of the nurses to prevent and manage diabetic foot. Considering the vital role of the nurses in providing DF care, EMRI decided to conduct Diabetic foot workshop for them. The following five steps were designed for the 14 coordinating sessions in the workshop: Goals definition, deciding about attendees, location selection, creating agenda, and developing a follow-up plan. "Diabetic Foot Workshop for Nurses" provides appropriate training to DF nurses at the national level; and combining theory and practice in this workshop not only increases nurses' knowledge, but also improves their skills in the field of the diabetic foot. Providing education and care to patients by DF nurse specialists instead of general nurses could be an important output of this workshop, which may lead to DF prevention and amputation decrease in the long term.

  18. Quality and Toxicity Assessments of Foot and Mouth Disease Virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The quality and toxicity assessment of foot and mouth disease virus vaccine was carried out in inoculated guinea pigs. The vaccine was developed from local isolates for the control and prevention of foot and mouth disease in Nigerian cattle. All the vaccine inputs tested were sterile and the high mean titre levels of ...

  19. Ambulatory estimation of foot placement during walking using inertial sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, H. Martin; van Asseldonk, Edwin H.F.; Baten, Christian T.M.; Veltink, Petrus H.

    This study proposes a method to assess foot placement during walking using an ambulatory measurement system consisting of orthopaedic sandals equipped with force/moment sensors and inertial sensors (accelerometers and gyroscopes). Two parameters, lateral foot placement (LFP) and stride length (SL),

  20. The Pattern and Surgical Management of Diabetic Foot at Muhimbili ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed at determining the pattern and the surgical management of patients with Diabetic Foot at Muhimbili National Hospital, from March to December 2008. Methods: All in-patients with diabetic foot who were admitted in the hospital during the study period were included into the study. Results: A total of 67 ...

  1. Principles of management of vascular problems in the diabetic foot

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The treatment of vascular insufficiency either by bypass grafting or endovascular ... evidence, however, that diabetes mellitus increases perioperative cardiac morbidity or ... endovascular treatment of the neuroischaemic diabetic foot and heads the multidisciplinary foot clinics at Montana and Wilgers hospitals in Pretoria.

  2. Foot complications among diabetics attending a district hospital in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OBJECTIVES: To relate skin health, footwear practices and foot care education with occurrence of foot complications among diabetics attending a district hospital in Kenya. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Two hundred and nineteen patients attending the diabetic clinic at the Kikuyu Mission Hospital (99 males, 120 females) ...

  3. Gender differences in adult foot shape: implications for shoe design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderlich, R E; Cavanagh, P R

    2001-04-01

    To analyze gender differences in foot shape in a large sample of young individuals. Univariate t-tests and multivariate discriminant analyses were used to assess 1) significant differences between men and women for each foot and leg dimension, standardized to foot length, 2) the reliability of classification into gender classes using the absolute and standardized variable sets, and 3) the relative importance of each variable to the discrimination between men and women. Men have longer and broader feet than women for a given stature. After normalization of the measurements by foot length, men and women were found to differ significantly in two calf, five ankle, and four foot shape variables. Classification by gender using absolute values was correct at least 93% of the time. Using the variables standardized to foot length, gender was correctly classified 85% of the time. This study demonstrates that female feet and legs are not simply scaled-down versions of male feet but rather differ in a number of shape characteristics, particularly at the arch, the lateral side of the foot, the first toe, and the ball of the foot. These differences should be taken into account in the design and manufacture of women's sport shoes.

  4. Bearing capacity of Skirt circular footing on sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr Z. EL Wakil

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Skirts are used to improve the bearing capacity of shallow footings on sandy soil by constraining the soil beneath and containing the plastic flow of soil. They are used as an alternative to deep foundations in soils with low strength at the surface. As there has been available little work studying the performance of skirted foundation, we are performing eighteen laboratory experiments on circular steel footings of different diameters and different skirt lengths. The aim of these experiments is to shed some lights on the effects of skirts on the bearing capacity of shallow footings. The effects of skirt length and the relative density of sand on the ultimate load attained were investigated. From the accomplished laboratory tests, it was found that skirts improve appreciably the sustainability of shallow footings to applied load as they increase the ultimate load of shallow footings by some up to 6.25 times for the current study conditions and variables. The performance of skirted footing depends upon the relative density of sand and on the skirt length to footing diameter ratio. Skirts are more beneficial in case of footings on loose sand than in case of medium and dense sand.

  5. Assessment of foot perfusion in patients with a diabetic foot ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, Rachael O; Hinchliffe, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of foot perfusion is a vital step in the management of patients with diabetic foot ulceration, in order to understand the risk of amputation and likelihood of wound healing. Underlying peripheral artery disease is a common finding in patients with foot ulceration and is associated with poor outcomes. Assessment of foot perfusion should therefore focus on identifying the presence of peripheral artery disease and to subsequently estimate the effect this may have on wound healing. Assessment of perfusion can be difficult because of the often complex, diffuse and distal nature of peripheral artery disease in patients with diabetes, as well as poor collateralisation and heavy vascular calcification. Conventional methods of assessing tissue perfusion in the peripheral circulation may be unreliable in patients with diabetes, and it may therefore be difficult to determine the extent to which poor perfusion contributes to foot ulceration. Anatomical data obtained on cross-sectional imaging is important but must be combined with measurements of tissue perfusion (such as transcutaneous oxygen tension) in order to understand the global and regional perfusion deficit present in a patient with diabetic foot ulceration. Ankle-brachial pressure index is routinely used to screen for peripheral artery disease, but its use in patients with diabetes is limited in the presence of neuropathy and medial arterial calcification. Toe pressure index may be more useful because of the relative sparing of pedal arteries from medial calcification but may not always be possible in patients with ulceration. Fluorescence angiography is a non-invasive technique that can provide rapid quantitative information about regional tissue perfusion; capillaroscopy, iontophoresis and hyperspectral imaging may also be useful in assessing physiological perfusion but are not widely available. There may be a future role for specialized perfusion imaging of these patients, including magnetic resonance

  6. Clinical management of acute diabetic Charcot foot in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, Rasmus Bo; Svendsen, Ole Lander; Kirketerp-Møller, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Charcot foot is a severe complication to diabetes mellitus and treatment involves several different clinical specialities. Our objective was to describe the current awareness, knowledge and treatment practices of Charcot foot among doctors who handle diabetic foot disorders. METHODS......: This study is based on a questionnaire survey sent out to healthcare professionals, primarily doctors, working with diabetic foot ulcers and Charcot feet in the public sector of the Danish healthcare system. RESULTS: The survey obtained a 52% response rate. A temperature difference of > 2 °C between the two...... feet was the most used method of diagnosing Charcot foot. Along with clinical inspection, temperature difference was also the measurement used for monitoring of healing. None of the suggested formalised classification systems were used to any extent. Most responders use detachable bandages...

  7. Factors associated with combined hand and foot eczema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agner, T; Aalto-Korte, K; Andersen, K E

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As for hand eczema, the aetiology of foot eczema is multifactorial and not very well understood. The aim of the present study was to identify factors associated with foot eczema in a cohort of hand eczema patients being classified into different subgroups. METHODS: Associations between...... foot and hand eczema were studied in a cross-sectional design in a cohort of hand eczema patients. Consecutive patients were recruited from nine different European Centres during the period October 2011-September 2012. Data on demographic factors, presence of foot eczema, hand eczema duration...... and severity, and whether the hand eczema was work-related or not were available, as well as patch-test results. RESULTS: Of a total of 427 hand eczema patients identified, information on foot eczema was available in 419 patients who were included in the present study. A total of 125 patients (29.8%) had...

  8. Functional limitations related to foot pain in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Maria Rodrigues Lopes de Oliveira

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to investigate the association between foot pain and functional disability in the elderly. Methods: descriptive study conducted among the elderly attended in a geriatric outpatient clinic of a university hospital. The sample consisted of 114 elderly who reported foot pain. Data was collected through subsidized interview, using structured instrument, covering demographic variables and the Manchester Foot Pain and Disability Index in Elderly and the Mini Mental State Examination. Results: there was a high incidence of foot pain among women and young elderly as well as significant inability to perform certain daily activities. Conclusion: it is identified the need for special attention to the health of elderly reporting foot pain, since this tends to restrict daily activities, causing decreased quality of life, immobilization and possible episodes of falls.

  9. Movement coordination patterns between the foot joints during walking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John B. Arnold

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 3D gait analysis, kinematics of the foot joints are usually reported via isolated time histories of joint rotations and no information is provided on the relationship between rotations at different joints. The aim of this study was to identify movement coordination patterns in the foot during walking by expanding an existing vector coding technique according to an established multi-segment foot and ankle model. A graphical representation is also described to summarise the coordination patterns of joint rotations across multiple patients. Methods Three-dimensional multi-segment foot kinematics were recorded in 13 adults during walking. A modified vector coding technique was used to identify coordination patterns between foot joints involving calcaneus, midfoot, metatarsus and hallux segments. According to the type and direction of joints rotations, these were classified as in-phase (same direction, anti-phase (opposite directions, proximal or distal joint dominant. Results In early stance, 51 to 75% of walking trials showed proximal-phase coordination between foot joints comprising the calcaneus, midfoot and metatarsus. In-phase coordination was more prominent in late stance, reflecting synergy in the simultaneous inversion occurring at multiple foot joints. Conversely, a distal-phase coordination pattern was identified for sagittal plane motion of the ankle relative to the midtarsal joint, highlighting the critical role of arch shortening to locomotor function in push-off. Conclusions This study has identified coordination patterns between movement of the calcaneus, midfoot, metatarsus and hallux by expanding an existing vector cording technique for assessing and classifying coordination patterns of foot joints rotations during walking. This approach provides a different perspective in the analysis of multi-segment foot kinematics, and may be used for the objective quantification of the alterations in foot joint

  10. Movement coordination patterns between the foot joints during walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, John B; Caravaggi, Paolo; Fraysse, François; Thewlis, Dominic; Leardini, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    In 3D gait analysis, kinematics of the foot joints are usually reported via isolated time histories of joint rotations and no information is provided on the relationship between rotations at different joints. The aim of this study was to identify movement coordination patterns in the foot during walking by expanding an existing vector coding technique according to an established multi-segment foot and ankle model. A graphical representation is also described to summarise the coordination patterns of joint rotations across multiple patients. Three-dimensional multi-segment foot kinematics were recorded in 13 adults during walking. A modified vector coding technique was used to identify coordination patterns between foot joints involving calcaneus, midfoot, metatarsus and hallux segments. According to the type and direction of joints rotations, these were classified as in-phase (same direction), anti-phase (opposite directions), proximal or distal joint dominant. In early stance, 51 to 75% of walking trials showed proximal-phase coordination between foot joints comprising the calcaneus, midfoot and metatarsus. In-phase coordination was more prominent in late stance, reflecting synergy in the simultaneous inversion occurring at multiple foot joints. Conversely, a distal-phase coordination pattern was identified for sagittal plane motion of the ankle relative to the midtarsal joint, highlighting the critical role of arch shortening to locomotor function in push-off. This study has identified coordination patterns between movement of the calcaneus, midfoot, metatarsus and hallux by expanding an existing vector cording technique for assessing and classifying coordination patterns of foot joints rotations during walking. This approach provides a different perspective in the analysis of multi-segment foot kinematics, and may be used for the objective quantification of the alterations in foot joint coordination patterns due to lower limb pathologies or following injuries.

  11. Characteristics of diabetic foot ulcers in Western Sydney, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haji Zaine, Norafizah; Burns, Joshua; Vicaretti, Mauro; Fletcher, John P; Begg, Lindy; Hitos, Kerry

    2014-01-01

    Australia is ranked ninth of 39 countries in the Western Pacific region most affected by diabetes. Patients with diabetes are at high risk of developing foot ulcerations that can develop into non-healing wounds. Recent studies suggest that the lifetime risk of developing a diabetic foot ulcer is as high as 25%. Few studies have reported the prevalence of, risk factors and socioeconomic status associated with, diabetic foot ulcers in Australia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the characteristics of diabetic foot ulcers in a tertiary referral outpatient hospital setting in Western Sydney, Australia. From January-December 2011, a total of 195 outpatients with diabetes were retrospectively extracted for analysis from the Westmead Hospital's Foot Wound Clinic Registry. Data on demographics, socioeconomic status, co-morbidities, foot ulcer characteristics and treatment were recorded on a standardised form. Demographics and physical characteristics were: 66.2% male, median age 67 years (IQR: 56-76), median body mass index (BMI) of 28 kg/m(2) (IQR: 25.2-34.1), 75.4% had peripheral neuropathy and the median postcode score for socioeconomic status was 996 (IQR: 897-1022). Diabetic foot ulcer characteristics were: median cross sectional area of 1.5 cm(2) (IQR: 0.5-7.0), median volume of 0.4 cm(3) (IQR: 0.11-3.0), 45.1% on the plantar aspect of the foot, 16.6% UT Wound Grade of 0C to 3C (with ischaemia) and 11.8% with a Grade 0D to 3D (with infection and ischaemia) and 25.6% with osteomyelitis. Five patients required an amputation: 1 major and 4 minor amputations. In accordance with other international studies, foot ulcers are more likely to present on the plantar surface of the foot and largely affect overweight older males with a long standing history diabetes in our outpatient hospital in Western Sydney.

  12. Gastrocnemius operating length with ankle foot orthoses in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hwan; Wren, Tishya Anne Leong; Steele, Katherine Muterspaugh

    2017-06-01

    Many individuals with cerebral palsy wear ankle foot orthoses during daily life. Orthoses influence joint motion, but how they impact muscle remains unclear. In particular, the gastrocnemius is commonly stiff in cerebral palsy. Understanding whether orthoses stretch or shorten this muscle during daily life may inform orthosis design and rehabilitation. This study investigated the impact of different ankle foot orthoses on gastrocnemius operating length during walking in children with cerebral palsy. Case series, within subject comparison of gastrocnemius operating length while walking barefoot and with two types of ankle foot orthoses. We performed gait analyses for 11 children with cerebral palsy. Each child was fit with two types of orthoses: a dynamic ankle foot orthosis (Cascade dynamic ankle foot orthosis) and an adjustable dynamic response ankle foot orthosis (Ultraflex ankle foot orthosis). Musculoskeletal modeling was used to quantify gastrocnemius musculotendon operating length and velocity with each orthosis. Walking with ankle foot orthoses could stretch the gastrocnemius more than barefoot walking for some individuals; however, there was significant variability between participants and orthoses. At least one type of orthosis stretched the gastrocnemius during walking for 4/6 and 3/5 of the Gross Motor Functional Classification System Level I and III participants, respectively. AFOs also reduced peak gastrocnemius lengthening velocity compared to barefoot walking for some participants, with greater reductions among the Gross Motor Functional Classification System Level III participants. Changes in gastrocnemius operating length and lengthening velocity were related to changes in ankle and knee kinematics during gait. Ankle foot orthoses impact gastrocnemius operating length during walking and, with proper design, may assist with stretching tight muscles in daily life. Clinical relevance Determining whether ankle foot orthoses stretch tight muscles can

  13. The effects of foot position and orientation on inter- and intra-foot coordination in standing postures: a frequency domain PCA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng; Molenaar, Peter C M; Molenaar, Peter M C; Newell, Karl M

    2013-09-01

    We investigated the effect of foot position and foot orientation on asymmetrical body weight loading and the inter- and intra-foot coordination dynamics of standing postures. The participants were instructed to stand with the feet side-by-side and in staggered and tandem positions with the right foot oriented at different angles (30, 60 and 90°). The results showed that the participants naturally loaded more on their left foot when positioned with their right foot forward. As the orientation of the right foot was changed from 90 to 30°, they loaded a significantly large proportion of their body weight on their left foot and the degree of coordination of the 4 COP time series increased. Foot position, constrains both the area of the base of support and the loading of the feet, played an important role differentiating the contribution of each COP to the postural control system. In particular, when postural stance was challenged by the limitation of the base of support, the COPs in the unstable plane (inter-foot coordination) showed larger factor weightings. In contrast, when standing posture was not challenged by the base of support boundary, the COPs of the more loaded foot (intra-foot coordination) dominated foot coordination in postural control. These findings show that the mechanical constraints of foot position and orientation interact to channel different patterns of inter- and intra-foot coordination dynamics of standing postures.

  14. Influence of antibacterial therapy on bone scan indices at foot inflammation in diabetes mellitus accompanied by diabetic foot syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slavnov, V.M.; Bolgars'ka, S.V.; Taran, E.V.; Markov, V.V.

    2004-01-01

    The influence of antibacterial therapy on bone scan indices at foot inflammation in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) accompanied by diabetic foot syndrome was studied. Bone scan was performed using scintillation tomographic gamma-camera hours after intravenous injection of 99m Tc-methylene diphosphonate

  15. Implementation of foot thermometry plus mHealth to prevent diabetic foot ulcers: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazo-Porras, Maria; Bernabe-Ortiz, Antonio; Sacksteder, Katherine A; Gilman, Robert H; Malaga, German; Armstrong, David G; Miranda, J Jaime

    2016-04-19

    Diabetic foot neuropathy (DFN) is one of the most important complications of diabetes mellitus; its early diagnosis and intervention can prevent foot ulcers and the need for amputation. Thermometry, measuring the temperature of the feet, is a promising emerging modality for diabetic foot ulcer prevention. However, patient compliance with at-home monitoring is concerning. Delivering messages to remind patients to perform thermometry and foot care might be helpful to guarantee regular foot monitoring. This trial was designed to compare the incidence of diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) between participants who receive thermometry alone and those who receive thermometry as well as mHealth (SMS and voice messaging) over a year-long study period. This is an evaluator-blinded, randomized, 12-month trial. Individuals with a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus, aged between 18-80 years, having a present dorsalis pedis pulse in both feet, are in risk group 2 or 3 using the diabetic foot risk classification system (as specified by the International Working Group on the Diabetic Foot), have an operating cell phone or a caregiver with an operating cell phone, and have the ability to provide informed consent will be eligible to participate in the study. Recruitment will be performed in diabetes outpatient clinics at two Ministry of Health tertiary hospitals in Lima, Peru. participants in both groups will receive education about foot care at the beginning of the study and they will be provided with a thermometry device (TempStat™). TempStat™ is a tool that captures a thermal image of the feet, which, depending on the temperature of the feet, shows different colors. In this study, if a participant notes a single yellow image or variance between one foot and the contralateral foot, they will be prompted to notify a nurse to evaluate their activity within the previous 2 weeks and make appropriate recommendations. In addition to thermometry, participants in the intervention arm

  16. From flat foot to fat foot: structure, ontogeny, function, and evolution of elephant "sixth toes".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, John R; Delmer, Cyrille; Miller, Charlotte E; Hildebrandt, Thomas; Pitsillides, Andrew A; Boyde, Alan

    2011-12-23

    Several groups of tetrapods have expanded sesamoid (small, tendon-anchoring) bones into digit-like structures ("predigits"), such as pandas' "thumbs." Elephants similarly have expanded structures in the fat pads of their fore- and hindfeet, but for three centuries these have been overlooked as mere cartilaginous curiosities. We show that these are indeed massive sesamoids that employ a patchy mode of ossification of a massive cartilaginous precursor and that the predigits act functionally like digits. Further, we reveal clear osteological correlates of predigit joint articulation with the carpals/tarsals that are visible in fossils. Our survey shows that basal proboscideans were relatively "flat-footed" (plantigrade), whereas early elephantiforms evolved the more derived "tip-toed" (subunguligrade) morphology, including the predigits and fat pad, of extant elephants. Thus, elephants co-opted sesamoid bones into a role as false digits and used them for support as they changed their foot posture.

  17. Australian Diabetes Foot Network: management of diabetes-related foot ulceration - a clinical update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergin, Shan M; Gurr, Joel M; Allard, Bernard P; Holland, Emma L; Horsley, Mark W; Kamp, Maarten C; Lazzarini, Peter A; Nube, Vanessa L; Sinha, Ashim K; Warnock, Jason T; Alford, Jan B; Wraight, Paul R

    2012-08-20

    Appropriate assessment and management of diabetes-related foot ulcers (DRFUs) is essential to reduce amputation risk. Management requires debridement, wound dressing, pressure off-loading, good glycaemic control and potentially antibiotic therapy and vascular intervention. As a minimum, all DRFUs should be managed by a doctor and a podiatrist and/or wound care nurse. Health professionals unable to provide appropriate care for people with DRFUs should promptly refer individuals to professionals with the requisite knowledge and skills. Indicators for immediate referral to an emergency department or multidisciplinary foot care team (MFCT) include gangrene, limb-threatening ischaemia, deep ulcers (bone, joint or tendon in the wound base), ascending cellulitis, systemic symptoms of infection and abscesses. Referral to an MFCT should occur if there is lack of wound progress after 4 weeks of appropriate treatment.

  18. MR imaging evaluation of diabetic foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltran, J.; Campanini, D.S.; McCalla, M.; Knight, C.T.

    1988-01-01

    Fourteen diabetic patients with suspected foot infection and/or neuropathic joint were evaluated with MR imaging to identify the presence and extent of infection and also to exclude coexistent infection in the neuropathic joint. Osteomyelitis (n = 8), abscess (n = 7), septic arthritis (n = 4), tenosynovitis (n = 4), and neuropathic joint (n = 5) were diagnosed with MR imaging. Osteomyelitis and/or abscess were excluded by MR findings in 13 instances. Most patients with infection had one more than one site of involvement. Clinical or surgical confirmation of the MR diagnoses was obtained in all but nine of the infection sites or cases of neuropathic joint. Only one false-negative diagnosis of osteomyelitis was made in this series. It is concluded that MR imaging provided accurate information regarding the presence and extent of infection and that this information was decisive in patient management

  19. Having the Foot at Risk: Experience Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria da Luz Barros

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Sensory changes due to neuropathy, namely those affecting the feet, make diabetic patients more prone to repeated trauma that tends to create clinically significant lesions, often with serious consequences and a considerable negative impact in well-being and quality of life. Objective: To understand the implications of diabetic foot ulcers on the daily life of patients. Methods: Experience Report resorting to informal interviews, application of the Cardiff Wound Impact Schedule. Results: Patients expressed particular concern in 4 areas: the future; tranquility in the face of disease; resources; and knowledge of risks. About the questionnaire data, the only life activity shown to be altered was mobility. Conclusions: There has been a concern to empower and inform the patient, which helps to better adapt to the transformations that will pass the course of their disease. It would be advantageous refer the patient to primary health care and nurse surveillance.

  20. Effect of feeding growing-fattening rabbits a diet supplemented with whole white lupin (Lupinus albus cv. Amiga) seeds on fatty acid composition and indexes related to human health in hind leg meat and perirenal fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volek, Zdeněk; Marounek, Milan

    2011-01-01

    A total of 20 weaned rabbits (33 days old) (10 per treatment) were fed one of two diets that included 150 g of sunflower meal (SF)/kg of diet or 120 g of whole white lupin (WL)/kg of diet for 42 days. The WL diet contained less saturated fatty acids (SFA) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) but more monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) than the SF diet. The WL diet significantly decreased SFA and PUFA content, as well as the PUFA n-6/PUFA n-3 ratio and saturation, atherogenic and thrombogenic indexes in hind leg meat. The fatty acid composition in perirenal fat was similar to that of hind leg meat; however, significantly higher MUFA levels were observed in rabbits fed the WL diet. Thus, feeding rabbits the WL diet affected the fatty acid profile of hind leg meat and perirenal fat in a favourable manner. Copyright © 2010 The American Meat Science Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.