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  1. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in a National Football League Player: Case report and emerging medicolegal practice questions.

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    Omalu, Bennet I; Hamilton, Ronald L; Kamboh, M Ilyas; DeKosky, Steven T; Bailes, Julian

    2010-01-01

    We present a case of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in a retired National Football League (NFL) Player with autopsy findings, apolipoprotein E genotype, and brain tissue evidence of chronic brain damage. This 44-year-old retired NFL player manifested a premortem history of cognitive and neuropsychiatric impairment, which included in part, chronic depression, suicide attempts, insomnia, paranoia, and impaired memory before he finally committed suicide. A full autopsy was performed with Polymerase Chain Reaction-based analyses of his blood to determine the apolipoprotein genotype. Histochemical and immunohistochemical analyses were performed on topographical gross sections of the brain. Autopsy confirmed a fatal gunshot wound of the head. The apolipoprotein E genotype was E3/E3 and the brain tissue revealed diffuse cerebral taupathy (Neurofibrillary Tangles and Neuritic Threads). This will be the third case of CTE in a national football player, which has been reported in the medical literature. Omalu et al., reported the first two cases in 2005 and 2006. This case series manifested similar premortem history of neuropsychiatric impairment with autopsy evidence of cerebral taupathy without any neuritic amyloidopathy. For a definitive diagnosis of CTE to be made, and for medicolegal purposes, a full autopsy must be performed with histochemical and immunohistochemical analyses of the brain to identify the presence of Neurofibrillary Tangles (NFTs) and Neuritic Threads (NTs). Further longitudinal prospective studies are required to confirm the common denominators and epidemiology of CTE in professional American football players, which have been identified by this case series.

  2. Early Recognition of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy Through FDDNP PET Imaging

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    2017-10-01

    characteristic distribution is felt to be the cardinal pathologic feature of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy. This project will examine whether FDDNP PET...chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Pathological series have indicated that a characteristic feature of CTE is accumulation of tau protein in the...3. Accomplishments: Major goals: Upon receiving approval from the Human Research Protection Office, enrollment of participants began in March , 2015

  3. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy in sports: a historical and narrative review.

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    Solomon, Gary

    2018-01-01

    My objectives are to review: 1) a brief history of sport-related concussion (SRC) and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), 2) the evolution of CTE in American professional football, 3) the data regarding SRC/CTE as they relate to depression and suicide, 4) the data on the neurocognitive effects of subconcussion/repetitive head trauma (with emphases on heading the ball in soccer and early exposure to football), 5) the evidence related to SRC and neurodegenerative diseases, 6) the published studies of CTE, 7) the NINDS neuropathological criteria for CTE, 8) public beliefs about SRC/CTE, and 9) the scientific questions regarding CTE.

  4. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy: contributions from the Boston University Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy.

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    Riley, David O; Robbins, Clifford A; Cantu, Robert C; Stern, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative disease associated with repetitive brain trauma (RBT). Initially described in boxers, CTE has now been found in other contact sport athletes with a history of RBT. In recent years, there has been tremendous media attention regarding CTE, primarily because of the deaths of high profile American football players who were found to have CTE upon neuropathological examination. However, the study of CTE remains in its infancy. This review focuses on research from the Centre for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy (CSTE) at Boston University. This study reviews the formation of the CSTE, major CSTE publications and current ongoing research projects at the CSTE. The neuropathology of CTE has been well-described. Current research focuses on: methods of diagnosing the disease during life (including the development of biomarkers), examination of CTE risk factors (including genetic susceptibility and head impact exposure variables); description of the clinical presentation of CTE; development of research diagnostic criteria for Traumatic Encephalopathy Syndrome; and assessment of mechanism and pathogenesis. Current research at the BU CSTE is aimed at increasing understanding of the long-term consequences of repetitive head impacts and attempting to begin to answer several of the unanswered questions regarding CTE.

  5. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: A Review

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    Michael Saulle

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that is a long-term consequence of single or repetitive closed head injuries for which there is no treatment and no definitive pre-mortem diagnosis. It has been closely tied to athletes who participate in contact sports like boxing, American football, soccer, professional wrestling and hockey. Risk factors include head trauma, presence of ApoE3 or ApoE4 allele, military service, and old age. It is histologically identified by the presence of tau-immunoreactive NFTs and NTs with some cases having a TDP-43 proteinopathy or beta-amyloid plaques. It has an insidious clinical presentation that begins with cognitive and emotional disturbances and can progress to Parkinsonian symptoms. The exact mechanism for CTE has not been precisely defined however, research suggest it is due to an ongoing metabolic and immunologic cascade called immunoexcitiotoxicity. Prevention and education are currently the most compelling way to combat CTE and will be an emphasis of both physicians and athletes. Further research is needed to aid in pre-mortem diagnosis, therapies, and support for individuals and their families living with CTE.

  6. The Neuropathology of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

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    McKee, Ann C.; Stein, Thor D.; Kiernan, Patrick T.; Alvarez, Victor E.

    2015-01-01

    Repetitive brain trauma is associated with a progressive neurological deterioration, now termed as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Most instances of CTE occur in association with the play of sports, but CTE has also been reported in association with blast injuries and other neurotrauma. Symptoms of CTE include behavioral and mood changes, memory loss, cognitive impairment and dementia. Like many other neurodegenerative diseases, CTE is diagnosed with certainty only by neuropathological examination of brain tissue. CTE is a tauopathy characterized by the deposition of hyperphosphorylated tau (p-tau) protein as neurofibrillary tangles, astrocytic tangles and neurites in striking clusters around small blood vessels of the cortex, typically at the sulcal depths. Severely affected cases show p-tau pathology throughout the brain. Abnormalities in phosphorylated 43 kDa TAR DNA-binding protein are found in most cases of CTE; beta-amyloid is identified in 43%, associated with age. Given the importance of sports participation and physical exercise to physical and psychological health as well as disease resilience, it is critical to identify the genetic risk factors for CTE as well as to understand how other variables, such as stress, age at exposure, gender, substance abuse and other exposures, contribute to the development of CTE. PMID:25904048

  7. Molecular & Genetic Investigation of Tau in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

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    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0399 TITLE: Molecular & Genetic Investigation of Tau in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: John F...Include area code) October 2015 Annual Report 30 Sep 2014 - 29 Sep 2015 Molecular & Genetic Investigation of Tau in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy John... encephalopathy (CTE), but the underlying molecular changes remain unclear. Here, biochemical and genetic studies that deepen our understanding of the

  8. Neuroimaging assessment of early and late neurobiological sequelae of traumatic brain injury: implications for CTE

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    Mark eSundman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI has been increasingly accepted as a major external risk factor for neurodegenerative morbidity and mortality. Recent evidence indicates that the resultant chronic neurobiological sequelae following head trauma may, at least in part, contribute to a pathologically distinct disease known as Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE. The clinical manifestation of CTE is variable, but the symptoms of this progressive disease include impaired memory and cognition, affective disorders (i.e., impulsivity, aggression, depression, suicidality, etc., and diminished motor control. Notably, mounting evidence suggests that the pathology contributing to CTE may be caused by repetitive exposure to subconcussive hits to the head, even in those with no history of a clinically evident head injury. Given the millions of athletes and military personnel with potential exposure to repetitive subconcussive insults and TBI, CTE represents an important public health issue. However, the incidence rates and pathological mechanisms are still largely unknown, primarily due to the fact that there is no in vivo diagnostic tool. The primary objective of this manuscript is to address this limitation and discuss potential neuroimaging modalities that may be capable of diagnosing CTE in vivo through the detection of tau and other known pathological features. Additionally, we will discuss the challenges of TBI research, outline the known pathology of CTE (with an emphasis on Tau, review current neuroimaging modalities to assess the potential routes for in vivo diagnosis, and discuss the future directions of CTE research.

  9. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy and other neurodegenerative proteinopathies

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    Maria Carmela Tartaglia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE is described as a slowly progressive neurodegenerative disease believed to result from multiple concussions. Traditionally, concussions were considered benign events and although most people recover fully, about 10% develop a post-concussive syndrome with persisting neurological, cognitive and neuropsychiatric symptoms. CTE was once thought to be unique to boxers, but it has now been observed in many different athletes having suffered multiple concussions as well as in military personal after repeated blast injuries. Much remains unknown about the development of CTE but its pathological substrate is usually tau, similar to that seen in Alzheimer’s disease and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. The aim of this perspective is to compare and contrast clinical and pathological CTE with the other neurodegenerative proteinopathies and highlight that there is an urgent need for understanding the relationship between concussion and the development of CTE as it may provide a window into the development of a proteinopathy and thus new avenues for treatment.

  10. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy and Suicide: A Systematic Review

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    Hal S. Wortzel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a global health concern, and the recent literature reports that a single mild TBI can result in chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE. It has been suggested that CTE may lead to death by suicide, raising important prevention, treatment, and policy implications. Thus, we conducted a systematic review of the medical literature to answer the key question: What is the existing evidence in support of a relationship between CTE and suicide? Systematic searches of CTE and suicide yielded 85 unique abstracts. Seven articles were identified for full text review. Only two case series met inclusion criteria and included autopsies from 17 unique cases, 5 of whom died by suicide. Neither studies used blinding, control cases, or systematic data collection regarding TBI exposure and/or medical/neuropsychiatric history. The identified CTE literature revealed divergent opinions regarding neuropathological elements of CTE and heterogeneity regarding clinical manifestations. Overall quality of evidence regarding a relationship between CTE and suicide was rated as very low using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation Working Group (GRADE criteria. Further studies of higher quality and methodological rigor are needed to determine the existence and nature of any relationship between CTE and suicide.

  11. Dr. Omalu Talks Childhood, Concussions, and CTE | Poster

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    Dr. Bennet Omalu, the famed forensic pathologist who discovered Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE), recently spoke at NCI at Frederick about his upbringing as well as the trials he faced while working to educate the NFL about CTE.

  12. Is phosphorylated tau unique to chronic traumatic encephalopathy? Phosphorylated tau in epileptic brain and chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

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    Puvenna, Vikram; Engeler, Madeline; Banjara, Manoj; Brennan, Chanda; Schreiber, Peter; Dadas, Aaron; Bahrami, Ashkon; Solanki, Jesal; Bandyopadhyay, Anasua; Morris, Jacqueline K; Bernick, Charles; Ghosh, Chaitali; Rapp, Edward; Bazarian, Jeffrey J; Janigro, Damir

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive traumatic brain injury (rTBI) is one of the major risk factors for the abnormal deposition of phosphorylated tau (PT) in the brain and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). CTE and temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) affect the limbic system, but no comparative studies on PT distribution in TLE and CTE are available. It is also unclear whether PT pathology results from repeated head hits (rTBI). These gaps prevent a thorough understanding of the pathogenesis and clinical significance of PT, limiting our ability to develop preventative and therapeutic interventions. We quantified PT in TLE and CTE to unveil whether a history of rTBI is a prerequisite for PT accumulation in the brain. Six postmortem CTE (mean 73.3 years) and age matched control samples were compared to 19 surgically resected TLE brain specimens (4 months-58 years; mean 27.6 years). No history of TBI was present in TLE or control; all CTE patients had a history of rTBI. TLE and CTE brain displayed increased levels of PT as revealed by immunohistochemistry. No age-dependent changes were noted, as PT was present as early as 4 months after birth. In TLE and CTE, cortical neurons, perivascular regions around penetrating pial vessels and meninges were immunopositive for PT; white matter tracts also displayed robust expression of extracellular PT organized in bundles parallel to venules. Microscopically, there were extensive tau-immunoreactive neuronal, astrocytic and degenerating neurites throughout the brain. In CTE perivascular tangles were most prominent. Overall, significant differences in staining intensities were found between CTE and control (P<0.01) but not between CTE and TLE (P=0.08). pS199 tau analysis showed that CTE had the most high molecular weight tangle-associated tau, whereas epileptic brain contained low molecular weight tau. Tau deposition may not be specific to rTBI since TLE recapitulated most of the pathological features of CTE. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  13. The evidence for chronic traumatic encephalopathy in boxing.

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    McCrory, Paul; Zazryn, Tsharni; Cameron, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The sport of boxing has been the source of much debate, with concerns about the neurological risks of participating having led to many calls to ban the sport. This review seeks to establish an evidence base for the development of boxing-related chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) and to determine the relevance of this information to the modern day sport.The clinical features of CTE include various symptoms affecting the pyramidal and extrapyramidal systems, which manifest most often as disturbed gait and coordination, slurred speech and tremors, as well as cerebral dysfunction causing cognitive impairments and neurobehavioural disturbances. Both amateur and professional boxers are potentially at risk of developing CTE. No current epidemiological evidence exists to determine the prevalence of this condition in modern day boxing, despite 17% of professional boxers in Britain with careers in the 1930-50s having clinical evidence of CTE. As medical presence within the sport increases and with modern boxers likely to have shorter careers, a reduced exposure to repetitive head trauma, and improved treatment and understanding of the development of CTE will occur. This should lead to the incidence of CTE diminishing in boxing populations.

  14. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy in contact sports: a systematic review of all reported pathological cases.

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    Joseph C Maroon

    Full Text Available Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE is a neurodegenerative disease associated with head trauma. Although initially believed to affect only boxers, the at-risk population has expanded to encompass a much wider demographic, including American football players, hockey players, wrestlers, and military veterans. This expansion has garnered considerable media attention and public concern for the potential neurodegenerative effects of head trauma. The main aim of this systematic review is to give a complete overview of the common findings and risk factors for CTE as well as the status quo regarding the incidence and prevalence of CTE. This systematic review was performed using PubMed and MEDLINE and includes all neuropathologically confirmed cases of CTE in the medical literature to date, from the first published case in 1954 to August 1, 2013 (n = 153. The demographics, including the primary source of mTBI (mild Traumatic Brain Injury, age and cause of death, ApoE genotype, and history of substance abuse, when listed, were obtained from each case report. The demographics of American football players found to have CTE are also presented separately in order to highlight the most prevalent group of CTE cases reported in recent years. These 153 case reports of CTE represent the largest collection to date. We found that a history of mTBI was the only risk factor consistently associated with CTE. In addition, we found no relationships between CTE and age of death or abnormal ApoE allele. Suicide and the presence of premorbid dementia was not strongly associated with CTE. We conclude that the incidence of CTE remains unknown due to the lack of large, longitudinal studies. Furthermore, the neuropathological and clinical findings related to CTE overlap with many common neurodegenerative diseases. Our review reveals significant limitations of the current CTE case reporting and questions the widespread existence of CTE in contact sports.

  15. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy in contact sports: a systematic review of all reported pathological cases.

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    Maroon, Joseph C; Winkelman, Robert; Bost, Jeffrey; Amos, Austin; Mathyssek, Christina; Miele, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative disease associated with head trauma. Although initially believed to affect only boxers, the at-risk population has expanded to encompass a much wider demographic, including American football players, hockey players, wrestlers, and military veterans. This expansion has garnered considerable media attention and public concern for the potential neurodegenerative effects of head trauma. The main aim of this systematic review is to give a complete overview of the common findings and risk factors for CTE as well as the status quo regarding the incidence and prevalence of CTE. This systematic review was performed using PubMed and MEDLINE and includes all neuropathologically confirmed cases of CTE in the medical literature to date, from the first published case in 1954 to August 1, 2013 (n = 153). The demographics, including the primary source of mTBI (mild Traumatic Brain Injury), age and cause of death, ApoE genotype, and history of substance abuse, when listed, were obtained from each case report. The demographics of American football players found to have CTE are also presented separately in order to highlight the most prevalent group of CTE cases reported in recent years. These 153 case reports of CTE represent the largest collection to date. We found that a history of mTBI was the only risk factor consistently associated with CTE. In addition, we found no relationships between CTE and age of death or abnormal ApoE allele. Suicide and the presence of premorbid dementia was not strongly associated with CTE. We conclude that the incidence of CTE remains unknown due to the lack of large, longitudinal studies. Furthermore, the neuropathological and clinical findings related to CTE overlap with many common neurodegenerative diseases. Our review reveals significant limitations of the current CTE case reporting and questions the widespread existence of CTE in contact sports.

  16. Acute and chronic traumatic encephalopathies: pathogenesis and biomarkers

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    DeKosky, Steven T.; Blennow, Kaj; Ikonomovic, Milos D.; Gandy, Sam

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, public awareness of the long-term pathological consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI) has increased. Such awareness has been stimulated mainly by reports of progressive neurological dysfunction in athletes exposed to repetitive concussions in high-impact sports such as boxing and American football, and by the rising number of TBIs in war veterans who are now more likely to survive explosive blasts owing to improved treatment. Moreover, the entity of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE)—which is marked by prominent neuropsychiatric features including dementia, parkinsonism, depression, agitation, psychosis, and aggression—has become increasingly recognized as a potential late outcome of repetitive TBI. Annually, about 1% of the population in developed countries experiences a clinically relevant TBI. The goal of this Review is to provide an overview of the latest understanding of CTE pathophysiology, and to delineate the key issues that are challenging clinical and research communities, such as accurate quantification of the risk of CTE, and development of reliable biomarkers for single-incident TBI and CTE. PMID:23558985

  17. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy: The unknown disease.

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    Martínez-Pérez, R; Paredes, I; Munarriz, P M; Paredes, B; Alén, J F

    2017-04-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy is a neurodegenerative disease produced by accumulated minor traumatic brain injuries; no definitive premortem diagnosis and no treatments are available for chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Risk factors associated with chronic traumatic encephalopathy include playing contact sports, presence of the apolipoprotein E4, and old age. Although it shares certain histopathological findings with Alzheimer disease, chronic traumatic encephalopathy has a more specific presentation (hyperphosphorylated tau protein deposited as neurofibrillary tangles, associated with neuropil threads and sometimes with beta-amyloid plaques). Its clinical presentation is insidious; patients show mild cognitive and emotional symptoms before progressing to parkinsonian motor signs and finally dementia. Results from new experimental diagnostic tools are promising, but these tools are not yet available. The mainstay of managing this disease is prevention and early detection of its first symptoms. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy-integration of canonical traumatic brain injury secondary injury mechanisms with tau pathology.

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    Kulbe, Jacqueline R; Hall, Edward D

    2017-11-01

    In recent years, a new neurodegenerative tauopathy labeled Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE), has been identified that is believed to be primarily a sequela of repeated mild traumatic brain injury (TBI), often referred to as concussion, that occurs in athletes participating in contact sports (e.g. boxing, American football, Australian football, rugby, soccer, ice hockey) or in military combatants, especially after blast-induced injuries. Since the identification of CTE, and its neuropathological finding of deposits of hyperphosphorylated tau protein, mechanistic attention has been on lumping the disorder together with various other non-traumatic neurodegenerative tauopathies. Indeed, brains from suspected CTE cases that have come to autopsy have been confirmed to have deposits of hyperphosphorylated tau in locations that make its anatomical distribution distinct for other tauopathies. The fact that these individuals experienced repetitive TBI episodes during their athletic or military careers suggests that the secondary injury mechanisms that have been extensively characterized in acute TBI preclinical models, and in TBI patients, including glutamate excitotoxicity, intracellular calcium overload, mitochondrial dysfunction, free radical-induced oxidative damage and neuroinflammation, may contribute to the brain damage associated with CTE. Thus, the current review begins with an in depth analysis of what is known about the tau protein and its functions and dysfunctions followed by a discussion of the major TBI secondary injury mechanisms, and how the latter have been shown to contribute to tau pathology. The value of this review is that it might lead to improved neuroprotective strategies for either prophylactically attenuating the development of CTE or slowing its progression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy in Athletes: Progressive Tauopathy following Repetitive Head Injury

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    McKee, Ann C.; Cantu, Robert C.; Nowinski, Christopher J.; Hedley-Whyte, E. Tessa; Gavett, Brandon E.; Budson, Andrew E.; Santini, Veronica E.; Lee, Hyo-Soon; Kubilus, Caroline A.; Stern, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Since the 1920s, it has been known that the repetitive brain trauma associated with boxing may produce a progressive neurological deterioration, originally termed “dementia pugilistica” and more recently, chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). We review the 47 cases of neuropathologically verified CTE recorded in the literature and document the detailed findings of CTE in 3 professional athletes: one football player and 2 boxers. Clinically, CTE is associated with memory disturbances, behavioral and personality changes, Parkinsonism, and speech and gait abnormalities. Neuropathologically, CTE is characterized by atrophy of the cerebral hemispheres, medial temporal lobe, thalamus, mammillary bodies, and brainstem, with ventricular dilatation and a fenestrated cavum septum pellucidum. Microscopically, there are extensive tau-immunoreactive neurofibrillary tangles, astrocytic tangles, and spindle-shaped and threadlike neurites throughout the brain. The neurofibrillary degeneration of CTE is distinguished from other tauopathies by preferential involvement of the superficial cortical layers, irregular, patchy distribution in the frontal and temporal cortices, propensity for sulcal depths, prominent perivascular, periventricular and subpial distribution, and marked accumulation of tau-immunoreactive astrocytes. Deposition of beta amyloid, most commonly as diffuse plaques, occurs in fewer than half the cases. CTE is a neuropathologically distinct, slowly progressive tauopathy with a clear environmental etiology. PMID:19535999

  20. The Spectrum of Disease in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

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    McKee, Ann C.; Stein, Thor D.; Nowinski, Christopher J.; Stern, Robert A.; Daneshvar, Daniel H.; Alvarez, Victor E.; Lee, Hyo-Soon; Hall, Garth; Wojtowicz, Sydney M.; Baugh, Christine M.; Riley, David O.; Kubilus, Caroline A.; Cormier, Kerry A.; Jacobs, Matthew A.; Martin, Brett R.; Abraham, Carmela R.; Ikezu, Tsuneya; Reichard, Robert Ross; Wolozin, Benjamin L.; Budson, Andrew E.; Goldstein, Lee E.; Kowall, Neil W.; Cantu, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy is a progressive tauopathy that occurs as a consequence of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury. We analysed post-mortem brains obtained from a cohort of 85 subjects with histories of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury and found evidence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy in 68 subjects: all males, ranging…

  1. Absence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy in retired football players with multiple concussions and neurological symptomatology

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    Hazrati, Lili-Naz; Tartaglia, Maria C.; Diamandis, Phedias; Davis, Karen D.; Green, Robin E.; Wennberg, Richard; Wong, Janice C.; Ezerins, Leo; Tator, Charles H.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is the term coined for the neurodegenerative disease often suspected in athletes with histories of repeated concussion and progressive dementia. Histologically, CTE is defined as a tauopathy with a distribution of tau-positive neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) that is distinct from other tauopathies, and usually shows an absence of beta-amyloid deposits, in contrast to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although the connection between repeated concussions and CTE-type neurodegeneration has been recently proposed, this causal relationship has not yet been firmly established. Also, the prevalence of CTE among athletes with multiple concussions is unknown. Methods: We performed a consecutive case series brain autopsy study on six retired professional football players from the Canadian Football League (CFL) with histories of multiple concussions and significant neurological decline. Results: All participants had progressive neurocognitive decline prior to death; however, only 3 cases had post-mortem neuropathological findings consistent with CTE. The other 3 participants had pathological diagnoses of AD, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and Parkinson's disease (PD). Moreover, the CTE cases showed co-morbid pathology of cancer, vascular disease, and AD. Discussion: Our case studies highlight that not all athletes with history of repeated concussions and neurological symptomology present neuropathological changes of CTE. These preliminary findings support the need for further research into the link between concussion and CTE as well as the need to expand the research to other possible causes of taupathy in athletes. They point to a critical need for prospective studies with good sampling methods to allow us to understand the relationship between multiple concussions and the development of CTE. PMID:23745112

  2. Absence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy in retired football players with multiple concussions and neurological symptomatology

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    Lili-Naz eHazrati

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE is the term coined for the neurodegenerative disease often suspected in athletes with histories of repeated concussion and progressive dementia. Histologically, CTE is defined as a tauopathy with a distribution of tau-positive neurofibrillary tangles that is distinct from other tauopathies, and usually shows an absence of beta-amyloid deposits, in contrast to Alzheimer’s disease. Although the connection between repeated concussions and CTE-type neurodegeneration has been recently proposed, this causal relationship has not yet been firmly established. Also, the prevalence of CTE among athletes with multiple concussions is unknown. Methods: We performed a consecutive case series brain autopsy study on six retired professional football players from the Canadian Football League with histories of multiple concussions and significant neurological decline. Results: All participants had progressive neurocognitive decline prior to death; however, only 3 cases had post-mortem neuropathological findings consistent with CTE. The other 3 participants had pathological diagnoses of Alzheimer’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinson’s disease. Moreover, the CTE cases showed co-morbid pathology of cancer, vascular disease and Alzheimer’s disease. Discussion: Our case studies highlight that not all athletes with history of repeated concussions and neurological symptomalogy present neuropathological changes of CTE. These preliminary findings support the need for further research into the link between concussion and CTE as well as the need to expand the research to other possible causes of taupathy in athletes. They point to a critical need for prospective studies with good sampling methods to allow us to understand the relationship between multiple concussions and the development of CTE.

  3. In vivo characterization of chronic traumatic encephalopathy using [F-18]FDDNP PET brain imaging.

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    Barrio, Jorge R; Small, Gary W; Wong, Koon-Pong; Huang, Sung-Cheng; Liu, Jie; Merrill, David A; Giza, Christopher C; Fitzsimmons, Robert P; Omalu, Bennet; Bailes, Julian; Kepe, Vladimir

    2015-04-21

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is an acquired primary tauopathy with a variety of cognitive, behavioral, and motor symptoms linked to cumulative brain damage sustained from single, episodic, or repetitive traumatic brain injury (TBI). No definitive clinical diagnosis for this condition exists. In this work, we used [F-18]FDDNP PET to detect brain patterns of neuropathology distribution in retired professional American football players with suspected CTE (n = 14) and compared results with those of cognitively intact controls (n = 28) and patients with Alzheimer's dementia (AD) (n = 24), a disease that has been cognitively associated with CTE. [F-18]FDDNP PET imaging results in the retired players suggested the presence of neuropathological patterns consistent with models of concussion wherein brainstem white matter tracts undergo early axonal damage and cumulative axonal injuries along subcortical, limbic, and cortical brain circuitries supporting mood, emotions, and behavior. This deposition pattern is distinctively different from the progressive pattern of neuropathology [paired helical filament (PHF)-tau and amyloid-β] in AD, which typically begins in the medial temporal lobe progressing along the cortical default mode network, with no or minimal involvement of subcortical structures. This particular [F-18]FDDNP PET imaging pattern in cases of suspected CTE also is primarily consistent with PHF-tau distribution observed at autopsy in subjects with a history of mild TBI and autopsy-confirmed diagnosis of CTE.

  4. Long-term consequences of repetitive brain trauma: chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

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    Stern, Robert A; Riley, David O; Daneshvar, Daniel H; Nowinski, Christopher J; Cantu, Robert C; McKee, Ann C

    2011-10-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) has been linked to participation in contact sports such as boxing and American football. CTE results in a progressive decline of memory and cognition, as well as depression, suicidal behavior, poor impulse control, aggressiveness, parkinsonism, and, eventually, dementia. In some individuals, it is associated with motor neuron disease, referred to as chronic traumatic encephalomyelopathy, which appears clinically similar to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Results of neuropathologic research has shown that CTE may be more common in former contact sports athletes than previously believed. It is believed that repetitive brain trauma, with or possibly without symptomatic concussion, is responsible for neurodegenerative changes highlighted by accumulations of hyperphosphorylated tau and TDP-43 proteins. Given the millions of youth, high school, collegiate, and professional athletes participating in contact sports that involve repetitive brain trauma, as well as military personnel exposed to repeated brain trauma from blast and other injuries in the military, CTE represents an important public health issue. Focused and intensive study of the risk factors and in vivo diagnosis of CTE will potentially allow for methods to prevent and treat these diseases. Research also will provide policy makers with the scientific knowledge to make appropriate guidelines regarding the prevention and treatment of brain trauma in all levels of athletic involvement as well as the military theater. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Preliminary Study of Plasma Exosomal Tau as a Potential Biomarker for Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy.

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    Stern, Robert A; Tripodis, Yorghos; Baugh, Christine M; Fritts, Nathan G; Martin, Brett M; Chaisson, Christine; Cantu, Robert C; Joyce, James A; Shah, Sahil; Ikezu, Tsuneya; Zhang, Jing; Gercel-Taylor, Cicek; Taylor, Douglas D

    2016-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a tauopathy associated with prior exposure to repetitive head impacts, such as those incurred through American football and other collision sports. Diagnosis is made through neuropathological examination. Many of the clinical features of CTE are common in the general population, with and without a history of head impact exposure, making clinical diagnosis difficult. As is now common in the diagnosis of other neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, there is a need for methods to diagnose CTE during life through objective biomarkers. The aim of this study was to examine tau-positive exosomes in plasma as a potential CTE biomarker. Subjects were 78 former National Football League (NFL) players and 16 controls. Extracellular vesicles were isolated from plasma. Fluorescent nanoparticle tracking analysis was used to determine the number of vesicles staining positive for tau. The NFL group had higher exosomal tau than the control group (p <  0.0001). Exosomal tau discriminated between the groups, with 82% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 100% positive predictive value, and 53% negative predictive value. Within the NFL group, higher exosomal tau was associated with worse performance on tests of memory (p = 0.0126) and psychomotor speed (p = 0.0093). These preliminary findings suggest that exosomal tau in plasma may be an accurate, noninvasive CTE biomarker.

  6. Clinicopathological Evaluation of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy in Players of American Football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mez, Jesse; Daneshvar, Daniel H; Kiernan, Patrick T; Abdolmohammadi, Bobak; Alvarez, Victor E; Huber, Bertrand R; Alosco, Michael L; Solomon, Todd M; Nowinski, Christopher J; McHale, Lisa; Cormier, Kerry A; Kubilus, Caroline A; Martin, Brett M; Murphy, Lauren; Baugh, Christine M; Montenigro, Phillip H; Chaisson, Christine E; Tripodis, Yorghos; Kowall, Neil W; Weuve, Jennifer; McClean, Michael D; Cantu, Robert C; Goldstein, Lee E; Katz, Douglas I; Stern, Robert A; Stein, Thor D; McKee, Ann C

    2017-07-25

    Players of American football may be at increased risk of long-term neurological conditions, particularly chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). To determine the neuropathological and clinical features of deceased football players with CTE. Case series of 202 football players whose brains were donated for research. Neuropathological evaluations and retrospective telephone clinical assessments (including head trauma history) with informants were performed blinded. Online questionnaires ascertained athletic and military history. Participation in American football at any level of play. Neuropathological diagnoses of neurodegenerative diseases, including CTE, based on defined diagnostic criteria; CTE neuropathological severity (stages I to IV or dichotomized into mild [stages I and II] and severe [stages III and IV]); informant-reported athletic history and, for players who died in 2014 or later, clinical presentation, including behavior, mood, and cognitive symptoms and dementia. Among 202 deceased former football players (median age at death, 66 years [interquartile range, 47-76 years]), CTE was neuropathologically diagnosed in 177 players (87%; median age at death, 67 years [interquartile range, 52-77 years]; mean years of football participation, 15.1 [SD, 5.2]), including 0 of 2 pre-high school, 3 of 14 high school (21%), 48 of 53 college (91%), 9 of 14 semiprofessional (64%), 7 of 8 Canadian Football League (88%), and 110 of 111 National Football League (99%) players. Neuropathological severity of CTE was distributed across the highest level of play, with all 3 former high school players having mild pathology and the majority of former college (27 [56%]), semiprofessional (5 [56%]), and professional (101 [86%]) players having severe pathology. Among 27 participants with mild CTE pathology, 26 (96%) had behavioral or mood symptoms or both, 23 (85%) had cognitive symptoms, and 9 (33%) had signs of dementia. Among 84 participants with severe CTE pathology, 75 (89

  7. Clinical correlates to assist with chronic traumatic encephalopathy diagnosis: Insights from a novel rodent repeat concussion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Gretchen M; Ko, Ara; Harada, Megan Y; Ma, Annie; Wyss, Livia; Haro, Patricia; Vit, Jean-Philippe; Avalos, Pablo; Dhillon, Navpreet K; Cho, Noell; Shelest, Oksana; Ley, Eric J

    2017-06-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative disease linked to repetitive head injuries. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy symptoms include changes in mood, behavior, cognition, and motor function; however, CTE is currently diagnosed only postmortem. Using a rat model of recurrent traumatic brain injury (TBI), we demonstrate rodent deficits that predict the severity of CTE-like brain pathology. Bilateral, closed-skull, mild TBI was administered once per week to 35 wild-type rats; eight rats received two injuries (2×TBI), 27 rats received five injuries (5×TBI), and 13 rats were sham controls. To determine clinical correlates for CTE diagnosis, TBI rats were separated based on the severity of rotarod deficits and classified as "mild" or "severe" and further separated into "acute," "short," and "long" based on age at euthanasia (90, 144, and 235 days, respectively). Brain atrophy, phosphorylated tau, and inflammation were assessed. All eight 2×TBI cases had mild rotarod deficiency, 11 5×TBI cases had mild deficiency, and 16 cases had severe deficiency. In one cohort of rats, tested at approximately 235 days of age, balance, rearing, and grip strength were significantly worse in the severe group relative to both sham and mild groups. At the acute time period, cortical thinning, phosphorylated tau, and inflammation were not observed in either TBI group, whereas corpus callosum thinning was observed in both TBI groups. At later time points, atrophy, tau pathology, and inflammation were increased in mild and severe TBI groups in the cortex and corpus callosum, relative to sham controls. These injury effects were exacerbated over time in the severe TBI group in the corpus callosum. Our model of repeat mild TBI suggests that permanent deficits in specific motor function tests correlate with CTE-like brain pathology. Assessing balance and motor coordination over time may predict CTE diagnosis.

  8. Environmental Subconcussive Injury, Axonal Injury, and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy A. Morley

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Brain injury occurs in two phases: the initial injury itself and a secondary cascade of precise immune-based neurochemical events. The secondary phase is typically functional in nature and characterized by delayed axonal injury with more axonal disconnections occurring than in the initial phase. Axonal injury occurs across the spectrum of disease severity, with subconcussive injury, especially when repetitive, now considered capable of producing significant neurological damage consistent with axonal injury seen in clinically evident concussion, despite no observable symptoms. This review is the first to introduce the concept of environmental subconcussive injury (ESCI and sets out how secondary brain damage from ESCI once past the juncture of microglial activation appears to follow the same neuron-damaging pathway as secondary brain damage from conventional brain injury. The immune response associated with ESCI is strikingly similar to that mounted after conventional concussion. Specifically, microglial activation is followed closely by glutamate and calcium flux, excitotoxicity, reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species (RNS generation, lipid peroxidation, and mitochondrial dysfunction and energy crisis. ESCI damage also occurs in two phases, with the primary damage coming from microbiome injury (due to microbiome-altering events and secondary damage (axonal injury from progressive secondary neurochemical events. The concept of ESCI and the underlying mechanisms have profound implications for the understanding of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE etiology because it has previously been suggested that repetitive axonal injury may be the primary CTE pathogenesis in susceptible individuals and it is best correlated with lifetime brain trauma load. Taken together, it appears that susceptibility to brain injury and downstream neurodegenerative diseases, such as CTE, can be conceptualized as a continuum of brain resilience. At one end

  9. CCL11 is increased in the CNS in chronic traumatic encephalopathy but not in Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan D Cherry

    Full Text Available CCL11, a protein previously associated with age-associated cognitive decline, is observed to be increased in the brain and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF in chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE compared to Alzheimer's disease (AD. Using a cohort of 23 deceased American football players with neuropathologically verified CTE, 50 subjects with neuropathologically diagnosed AD, and 18 non-athlete controls, CCL11 was measured with ELISA in the dorsolateral frontal cortex (DLFC and CSF. CCL11 levels were significantly increased in the DLFC in subjects with CTE (fold change = 1.234, p < 0.050 compared to non-athlete controls and AD subjects with out a history of head trauma. This increase was also seen to correlate with years of exposure to American football (β = 0.426, p = 0.048 independent of age (β = -0.046, p = 0.824. Preliminary analyses of a subset of subjects with available post-mortem CSF showed a trend for increased CCL11 among individuals with CTE (p = 0.069 mirroring the increase in the DLFC. Furthermore, an association between CSF CCL11 levels and the number of years exposed to football (β = 0.685, p = 0.040 was observed independent of age (β = -0.103, p = 0.716. Finally, a receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve analysis demonstrated CSF CCL11 accurately distinguished CTE subjects from non-athlete controls and AD subjects (AUC = 0.839, 95% CI 0.62-1.058, p = 0.028. Overall, the current findings provide preliminary evidence that CCL11 may be a novel target for future CTE biomarker studies.

  10. CCL11 is increased in the CNS in chronic traumatic encephalopathy but not in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Jonathan D; Stein, Thor D; Tripodis, Yorghos; Alvarez, Victor E; Huber, Bertrand R; Au, Rhoda; Kiernan, Patrick T; Daneshvar, Daniel H; Mez, Jesse; Solomon, Todd M; Alosco, Michael L; McKee, Ann C

    2017-01-01

    CCL11, a protein previously associated with age-associated cognitive decline, is observed to be increased in the brain and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) compared to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Using a cohort of 23 deceased American football players with neuropathologically verified CTE, 50 subjects with neuropathologically diagnosed AD, and 18 non-athlete controls, CCL11 was measured with ELISA in the dorsolateral frontal cortex (DLFC) and CSF. CCL11 levels were significantly increased in the DLFC in subjects with CTE (fold change = 1.234, p history of head trauma. This increase was also seen to correlate with years of exposure to American football (β = 0.426, p = 0.048) independent of age (β = -0.046, p = 0.824). Preliminary analyses of a subset of subjects with available post-mortem CSF showed a trend for increased CCL11 among individuals with CTE (p = 0.069) mirroring the increase in the DLFC. Furthermore, an association between CSF CCL11 levels and the number of years exposed to football (β = 0.685, p = 0.040) was observed independent of age (β = -0.103, p = 0.716). Finally, a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis demonstrated CSF CCL11 accurately distinguished CTE subjects from non-athlete controls and AD subjects (AUC = 0.839, 95% CI 0.62-1.058, p = 0.028). Overall, the current findings provide preliminary evidence that CCL11 may be a novel target for future CTE biomarker studies.

  11. Junior Seau: An Illustrative Case of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy and Update on Chronic Sports-Related Head Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, Tej D; Li, Amy; Pendharkar, Arjun V; Veeravagu, Anand; Grant, Gerald A

    2016-02-01

    Few neurologic diseases have captured the nation's attention more completely than chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), which has been discovered in the autopsies of professional athletes, most notably professional football players. The tragic case of Junior Seau, a Hall of Fame, National Football League linebacker, has been the most high-profile confirmed case of CTE. Here we describe Seau's case, which concludes an autopsy conducted at the National Institutes of Health that confirmed the diagnosis. Since 1990, Junior Seau had a highly distinguished 20-year career playing for the National Football League as a linebacker, from which he sustained multiple concussions. He committed suicide on May 2, 2012, at age 43, after which an autopsy confirmed a diagnosis of CTE. His clinical history was significant for a series of behavioral disturbances. Seau's history and neuropathologic findings were used to better understand the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and possible risk factors for CTE. This high-profile case reflects an increasing awareness of CTE as a long-term consequence of multiple traumatic brain injuries. The previously unforeseen neurologic risks of American football have begun to cast doubt on the safety of the sport. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy: a spectrum of neuropathological changes following repetitive brain trauma in athletes and military personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that occurs in association with repetitive traumatic brain injury experienced in sport and military service. In most instances, the clinical symptoms of the disease begin after a long period of latency ranging from several years to several decades. The initial symptoms are typically insidious, consisting of irritability, impulsivity, aggression, depression, short-term memory loss and heightened suicidality. The symptoms progress slowly over decades to include cognitive deficits and dementia. The pathology of CTE is characterized by the accumulation of phosphorylated tau protein in neurons and astrocytes in a pattern that is unique from other tauopathies, including Alzheimer’s disease. The hyperphosphorylated tau abnormalities begin focally, as perivascular neurofibrillary tangles and neurites at the depths of the cerebral sulci, and then spread to involve superficial layers of adjacent cortex before becoming a widespread degeneration affecting medial temporal lobe structures, diencephalon and brainstem. Most instances of CTE (>85% of cases) show abnormal accumulations of phosphorylated 43 kDa TAR DNA binding protein that are partially colocalized with phosphorylated tau protein. As CTE is characterized pathologically by frontal and temporal lobe atrophy, by abnormal deposits of phosphorylated tau and by 43 kDa TAR DNA binding protein and is associated clinically with behavioral and personality changes, as well as cognitive impairments, CTE is increasingly categorized as an acquired frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Currently, some of the greatest challenges are that CTE cannot be diagnosed during life and the incidence and prevalence of the disorder remain uncertain. Furthermore, the contribution of age, gender, genetics, stress, alcohol and substance abuse to the development of CTE remains to be determined. PMID:24423082

  13. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy: a potential late and under recognized consequence of rugby union?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, W; McNamara, P H; Lawlor, B; Hutchinson, S; Farrell, M

    2016-01-01

    The association between exposure to head injury and increased risk of neurodegenerative disease, specifically chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), is widely recognized. Historically, this was largely considered a phenomenon restricted to boxers, with more recent case series identifying further 'high risk' individuals, such as former American footballers, or military personnel. However, in all cases thus far reported, it is clear that it is the exposure to head injury which is associated with increased dementia risk, and not the circumstances or environment of exposure. As such, there is considerable potential for under-recognition of CTE in patients presenting with neurodegenerative disease, particularly where head injury exposure might have been historical and through sport. This article reviews current understanding of CTE and, via an illustrative case in rugby union, highlights the value of a detailed history on head injury and also draws attention to imaging studies in assessing patients with neurodegenerative disease. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Association of Physicians. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Glymphatic system disruption as a mediator of brain trauma and chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullan, Molly J; Asken, Breton M; Jaffee, Michael S; DeKosky, Steven T; Bauer, Russell M

    2018-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an increasingly important issue among veterans, athletes and the general public. Difficulties with sleep onset and maintenance are among the most commonly reported symptoms following injury, and sleep debt is associated with increased accumulation of beta amyloid (Aβ) and phosphorylated tau (p-tau) in the interstitial space. Recent research into the glymphatic system, a lymphatic-like metabolic clearance mechanism in the central nervous system (CNS) which relies on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), interstitial fluid (ISF), and astrocytic processes, shows that clearance is potentiated during sleep. This system is damaged in the acute phase following mTBI, in part due to re-localization of aquaporin-4 channels away from astrocytic end feet, resulting in reduced potential for waste removal. Long-term consequences of chronic dysfunction within this system in the context of repetitive brain trauma and insomnia have not been established, but potentially provide one link in the explanatory chain connecting repetitive TBI with later neurodegeneration. Current research has shown p-tau deposition in perivascular spaces and along interstitial pathways in chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), pathways related to glymphatic flow; these are the main channels by which metabolic waste is cleared. This review addresses possible links between mTBI-related damage to glymphatic functioning and physiological changes found in CTE, and proposes a model for the mediating role of sleep disruption in increasing the risk for developing CTE-related pathology and subsequent clinical symptoms following repetitive brain trauma. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Polypathology and dementia after brain trauma: Does brain injury trigger distinct neurodegenerative diseases, or should they be classified together as traumatic encephalopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Patricia M; Villapol, Sonia; Burns, Mark P

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathological studies of human traumatic brain injury (TBI) cases have described amyloid plaques acutely after a single severe TBI, and tau pathology after repeat mild TBI (mTBI). This has helped drive the hypothesis that a single moderate to severe TBI increases the risk of developing late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD), while repeat mTBI increases the risk of developing chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). In this review we critically assess this position-examining epidemiological and case control human studies, neuropathological evidence, and preclinical data. Epidemiological studies emphasize that TBI is associated with the increased risk of developing multiple types of dementia, not just AD-type dementia, and that TBI can also trigger other neurodegenerative conditions such as Parkinson's disease. Further, human post-mortem studies on both single TBI and repeat mTBI can show combinations of amyloid, tau, TDP-43, and Lewy body pathology indicating that the neuropathology of TBI is best described as a 'polypathology'. Preclinical studies confirm that multiple proteins associated with the development of neurodegenerative disease accumulate in the brain after TBI. The chronic sequelae of both single TBI and repeat mTBI share common neuropathological features and clinical symptoms of classically defined neurodegenerative disorders. However, while the spectrum of chronic cognitive and neurobehavioral disorders that occur following repeat mTBI is viewed as the symptoms of CTE, the spectrum of chronic cognitive and neurobehavioral symptoms that occur after a single TBI is considered to represent distinct neurodegenerative diseases such as AD. These data support the suggestion that the multiple manifestations of TBI-induced neurodegenerative disorders be classified together as traumatic encephalopathy or trauma-induced neurodegeneration, regardless of the nature or frequency of the precipitating TBI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Neurodegeneration after mild and repetitive traumatic brain injury: Chronic traumatic encepalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanescu Ioana

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Repetitive brain trauma is associated with a progressive neurological deterioration, now termed as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE. Although research on the long-term effects of TBI is advancing quickly, the incidence and prevalence of post-traumatic neurodegeneration and CTE are unknown. The incidence and prevalence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy and the genetic risk factors critical to its development are currently under research. CTE can be diagnosed only by post mortem neuropathological examination of the brain. Great efforts are being made to better understand the clinical signs and symptoms of CTE, obtained in most cases retrospectively from families of affected persons.Patients with CTE are described as having behavioral, mood, cognitive and motor impairments, occurring after a long latency from the traumatic events. Recent pathogenetic studies have provided new insights to CTE mechanisms, offering important clues in understanding neurodegenerative process and relations between physical factors and pathologic protein deposition. Further research is needed to better identify the genetic and environmental risk factors for CTE, as well as rehabilitation and treatment strategies.

  17. Molecular and Genetic Investigation of Tau in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (Log No. 13267017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0399 TITLE: Molecular & Genetic Investigation of Tau in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (Log No. 13267017) PRINCIPAL...this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data ...sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. Send comments regarding this burden

  18. Tauopathy PET and amyloid PET in the diagnosis of chronic traumatic encephalopathies: studies of a retired NFL player and of a man with FTD and a severe head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsis, E M; Riggio, S; Kostakoglu, L; Dickstein, D L; Machac, J; Delman, B; Goldstein, M; Jennings, D; D'Antonio, E; Martin, J; Naidich, T P; Aloysi, A; Fernandez, C; Seibyl, J; DeKosky, S T; Elder, G A; Marek, K; Gordon, W; Hof, P R; Sano, M; Gandy, S

    2014-09-16

    Single, severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) which elevates CNS amyloid, increases the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD); while repetitive concussive and subconcussive events as observed in athletes and military personnel, may increase the risk of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). We describe two clinical cases, one with a history of multiple concussions during a career in the National Football League (NFL) and the second with frontotemporal dementia and a single, severe TBI. Both patients presented with cognitive decline and underwent [(18)F]-Florbetapir positron emission tomography (PET) imaging for amyloid plaques; the retired NFL player also underwent [(18)F]-T807 PET imaging, a new ligand binding to tau, the main constituent of neurofibrillary tangles (NFT). Case 1, the former NFL player, was 71 years old when he presented with memory impairment and a clinical profile highly similar to AD. [(18)F]-Florbetapir PET imaging was negative, essentially excluding AD as a diagnosis. CTE was suspected clinically, and [(18)F]-T807 PET imaging revealed striatal and nigral [(18)F]-T807 retention consistent with the presence of tauopathy. Case 2 was a 56-year-old man with personality changes and cognitive decline who had sustained a fall complicated by a subdural hematoma. At 1 year post injury, [(18)F]-Florbetapir PET imaging was negative for an AD pattern of amyloid accumulation in this subject. Focal [(18)F]-Florbetapir retention was noted at the site of impact. In case 1, amyloid imaging provided improved diagnostic accuracy where standard clinical and laboratory criteria were inadequate. In that same case, tau imaging with [(18)F]-T807 revealed a subcortical tauopathy that we interpret as a novel form of CTE with a distribution of tauopathy that mimics, to some extent, that of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), despite a clinical presentation of amnesia without any movement disorder complaints or signs. A key distinguishing feature is that our patient presented

  19. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... Donate Today Enroll in 123 What is Hepatic Encephalopathy? Hepatic Encephalopathy, sometimes referred to as portosystemic encephalopathy or PSE, is a condition that causes temporary ...

  20. A Proposed Mechanism for Development of CTE Following Concussive Events: Head Impact, Water Hammer Injury, Neurofilament Release, and Autoimmune Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornguth, Steven; Rutledge, Neal; Perlaza, Gabe; Bray, James; Hardin, Allen

    2017-12-19

    During the past decade, there has been an increasing interest in early diagnosis and treatment of traumatic brain injuries (TBI) that lead to chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). The subjects involved range from soldiers exposed to concussive injuries from improvised explosive devices (IEDs) to a significant number of athletes involved in repetitive high force impacts. Although the forces from IEDs are much greater by a magnitude than those from contact sports, the higher frequency associated with contact sports allows for more controlled assessment of the mechanism of action. In our study, we report findings in university-level women soccer athletes followed over a period of four and a half years from accession to graduation. Parameters investigated included T1-, T2-, and susceptibility-weighted magnetic resonance images (SWI), IMPACT (Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing), and C3 Logix behavioral and physiological assessment measures. The MRI Studies show several significant findings: first, a marked increase in the width of sulci in the frontal to occipital cortices; second, an appearance of subtle hemorrhagic changes at the base of the sulci; third was a sustained reduction in total brain volume in several soccer players at a developmental time when brain growth is generally seen. Although all of the athletes successfully completed their college degree and none exhibited long term clinical deficits at the time of graduation, the changes documented by MRI represent a clue to the pathological mechanism following an injury paradigm. The authors propose that our findings and those of prior publications support a mechanism of injury in CTE caused by an autoimmune process associated with the release of neural proteins from nerve cells at the base of the sulcus from a water hammer injury effect. As evidence accumulates to support this hypothesis, there are pharmacological treatment strategies that may be able to mitigate the development of

  1. A Proposed Mechanism for Development of CTE Following Concussive Events: Head Impact, Water Hammer Injury, Neurofilament Release, and Autoimmune Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Kornguth

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available During the past decade, there has been an increasing interest in early diagnosis and treatment of traumatic brain injuries (TBI that lead to chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE. The subjects involved range from soldiers exposed to concussive injuries from improvised explosive devices (IEDs to a significant number of athletes involved in repetitive high force impacts. Although the forces from IEDs are much greater by a magnitude than those from contact sports, the higher frequency associated with contact sports allows for more controlled assessment of the mechanism of action. In our study, we report findings in university-level women soccer athletes followed over a period of four and a half years from accession to graduation. Parameters investigated included T1-, T2-, and susceptibility-weighted magnetic resonance images (SWI, IMPACT (Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing, and C3 Logix behavioral and physiological assessment measures. The MRI Studies show several significant findings: first, a marked increase in the width of sulci in the frontal to occipital cortices; second, an appearance of subtle hemorrhagic changes at the base of the sulci; third was a sustained reduction in total brain volume in several soccer players at a developmental time when brain growth is generally seen. Although all of the athletes successfully completed their college degree and none exhibited long term clinical deficits at the time of graduation, the changes documented by MRI represent a clue to the pathological mechanism following an injury paradigm. The authors propose that our findings and those of prior publications support a mechanism of injury in CTE caused by an autoimmune process associated with the release of neural proteins from nerve cells at the base of the sulcus from a water hammer injury effect. As evidence accumulates to support this hypothesis, there are pharmacological treatment strategies that may be able to mitigate the

  2. ZERODUR: progress in CTE characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedamzik, Ralf; Kunisch, Clemens; Westerhoff, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    In 2010, SCHOTT introduced a method for the modeling of the thermal expansion behavior of ZERODUR® under arbitrary temperature profiles for an optimized production of material for the upcoming Extremely Large Telescope (ELT) projects. In 2012 a new product was introduced based on this method called ZERODUR® TAILORED. ZERODUR® TAILORED provides an evolution in the specification of the absolute Coefficient of Thermal Expansion (CTE) value by including the individual customer requirements in this process. This paper presents examples showing the benefit of an application oriented approach in the design of specifications using ZERODUR®. Additionally it will be shown how the modeling approach has advanced during the last years to improve the prediction accuracy on long time scales. ZERODUR® is known not only for its lowest CTE but also for its excellent CTE homogeneity as shown in the past for disc shaped blanks typical for telescope mirror substrates. Additionally this paper presents recent results of CTE homogeneity measurements in the single digit ppb/K range for a rectangular cast plate proving that the excellent CTE homogeneity is independent of the production format.

  3. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of muscle movement, weakness or rigidity Trouble swallowing (dysphagia) Vision and focusing problems Trouble with sense of ... sclerosis (ALS) — also known as Lou Gehrig's disease — Parkinson's disease or frontotemporal lobar degeneration — also known as ...

  4. CTE: Education for a Strong Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conneely, Nancy; Hyslop, Alisha

    2018-01-01

    For nearly a century, career and technical education (CTE) programs across the United States have focused on equipping students with technical and life skills to help them become productive citizens. This brief report presents the benefits of CTE.

  5. Suboptimal performance on neuropsychological tests in patients with suspected chronic toxic encephalopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hout, Moniek S. E.; Schmand, Ben; Wekking, Ellie M.; Hageman, Gerard; Deelman, Betto G.

    2003-01-01

    Suboptimal performance during neuropsychological testing can seriously complicate assessment in behavioral neurotoxicology. We present data on the prevalence of suboptimal performance in a group of Dutch patients with suspected chronic toxic encephalopathy (CTE) after long-term occupational exposure

  6. Suboptimal performance on neuropsychological tests in patients with suspected chronic toxic encephalopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hout, MSE; Schmand, B; Wekking, EM; Hageman, G; Deelman, BG

    Suboptimal performance during neuropsychological testing can seriously complicate assessment in behavioral neurotoxicology. We present data on the prevalence of suboptimal performance in a group of Dutch patients with suspected chronic toxic encephalopathy (CTE) after long-term occupational exposure

  7. CTE's Focus on Continuous Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, John; Kelley, Patricia; Pritz, Sandy; Hodes, Carol

    2011-01-01

    Just one of the ways career and technical education (CTE) is revamping its image is through increased attention to data-driven instructional techniques as a means of improving and focusing instruction on what matters most. Accountability and data have increasingly become a core focus of research, news, and commentary about education in recent…

  8. Criteria for solvent-induced chronic toxic encephalopathy: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Hoek, J. A.; Verberk, M. M.; Hageman, G.

    2000-01-01

    In 1985, a WHO Working Group presented diagnostic criteria and a classification for solvent-induced chronic toxic encephalopathy (CTE). In the same year, the "Workshop on neurobehavioral effects of solvents" in Raleigh, N.C., USA introduced a somewhat different classification for CTE. The objective

  9. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... Caregiver Support Caregiver Stories Home › What is Hepatic Encephalopathy? Why Your Liver is Important The Connection Between HE and Liver ... Why it’s Important to Treat HE Symptoms of Liver Failure Glossary of terms ... is Hepatic Encephalopathy? Hepatic Encephalopathy, sometimes referred to as portosystemic encephalopathy ...

  10. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Caregiver Support Caregiver Stories Home › What is Hepatic Encephalopathy? Why Your Liver is Important The Connection Between HE and Liver ... Why it’s Important to Treat HE Symptoms of Liver Failure Glossary of terms ... is Hepatic Encephalopathy? Hepatic Encephalopathy, sometimes referred to as portosystemic encephalopathy ...

  11. Considerations for Experimental Animal Models of Concussion, Traumatic Brain Injury, and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy—These Matters Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark W. Wojnarowicz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Animal models of concussion, traumatic brain injury (TBI, and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE are widely available and routinely deployed in laboratories around the world. Effective animal modeling requires careful consideration of four basic principles. First, animal model use must be guided by clarity of definitions regarding the human disease or condition being modeled. Concussion, TBI, and CTE represent distinct clinical entities that require clear differentiation: concussion is a neurological syndrome, TBI is a neurological event, and CTE is a neurological disease. While these conditions are all associated with head injury, the pathophysiology, clinical course, and medical management of each are distinct. Investigators who use animal models of these conditions must take into account these clinical distinctions to avoid misinterpretation of results and category mistakes. Second, model selection must be grounded by clarity of purpose with respect to experimental questions and frame of reference of the investigation. Distinguishing injury context (“inputs” from injury consequences (“outputs” may be helpful during animal model selection, experimental design and execution, and interpretation of results. Vigilance is required to rout out, or rigorously control for, model artifacts with potential to interfere with primary endpoints. The widespread use of anesthetics in many animal models illustrates the many ways that model artifacts can confound preclinical results. Third, concordance between key features of the animal model and the human disease or condition being modeled is required to confirm model biofidelity. Fourth, experimental results observed in animals must be confirmed in human subjects for model validation. Adherence to these principles serves as a bulwark against flawed interpretation of results, study replication failure, and confusion in the field. Implementing these principles will advance basic science discovery and

  12. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... that can be corrected . It may also occur as part of a chronic problem from liver disease ... worse over time. Hepatic Encephalopathy, sometimes referred to as portosystemic encephalopathy or PSE, is a condition that ...

  13. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... OVERVIEW Donate Now Join an Event Volunteer Your Time The Legacy Society Make Gifts of Stock Donate ... problem from liver disease that gets worse over time. Hepatic Encephalopathy, sometimes referred to as portosystemic encephalopathy ...

  14. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... Disease Type 1 (von Gierke) Hemochromatosis Hepatic Encephalopathy Hepatitis A Hepatitis B Hepatitis C Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy ( ... Disease Type 1 (von Gierke) Hemochromatosis Hepatic Encephalopathy Hepatitis A Hepatitis B Hepatitis C Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy ( ...

  15. Bilirubin encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilirubin encephalopathy is a rare neurological condition that occurs in some newborns with severe jaundice . ... Bilirubin encephalopathy (BE) is caused by very high levels of bilirubin. Bilirubin is a yellow pigment that is created ...

  16. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... Now Hepatic Encephalopathy Back Hepatic Encephalopathy is a brain disorder that develops in some individuals with liver ... is a condition that causes temporary worsening of brain function in people with advanced liver disease. When ...

  17. Molecular mechanisms of cognitive dysfunction following traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Kendall R.; Tesco, Giuseppina

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in significant disability due to cognitive deficits particularly in attention, learning and memory, and higher-order executive functions. The role of TBI in chronic neurodegeneration and the development of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and most recently chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is of particular importance. However, despite significant effort very few therapeutic options exist to prevent or reverse cognitive impairment following TBI. In this review, we present experimental evidence of the known secondary injury mechanisms which contribute to neuronal cell loss, axonal injury, and synaptic dysfunction and hence cognitive impairment both acutely and chronically following TBI. In particular we focus on the mechanisms linking TBI to the development of two forms of dementia: AD and CTE. We provide evidence of potential molecular mechanisms involved in modulating Aβ and Tau following TBI and provide evidence of the role of these mechanisms in AD pathology. Additionally we propose a mechanism by which Aβ generated as a direct result of TBI is capable of exacerbating secondary injury mechanisms thereby establishing a neurotoxic cascade that leads to chronic neurodegeneration. PMID:23847533

  18. Molecular mechanisms of cognitive dysfunction following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Kendall R; Tesco, Giuseppina

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in significant disability due to cognitive deficits particularly in attention, learning and memory, and higher-order executive functions. The role of TBI in chronic neurodegeneration and the development of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and most recently chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is of particular importance. However, despite significant effort very few therapeutic options exist to prevent or reverse cognitive impairment following TBI. In this review, we present experimental evidence of the known secondary injury mechanisms which contribute to neuronal cell loss, axonal injury, and synaptic dysfunction and hence cognitive impairment both acutely and chronically following TBI. In particular we focus on the mechanisms linking TBI to the development of two forms of dementia: AD and CTE. We provide evidence of potential molecular mechanisms involved in modulating Aβ and Tau following TBI and provide evidence of the role of these mechanisms in AD pathology. Additionally we propose a mechanism by which Aβ generated as a direct result of TBI is capable of exacerbating secondary injury mechanisms thereby establishing a neurotoxic cascade that leads to chronic neurodegeneration.

  19. Cerebral Vascular Injury in Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Kimbra; Amyot, Franck; Haber, Margalit; Pronger, Angela; Bogoslovsky, Tanya; Moore, Carol; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic cerebral vascular injury (TCVI) is a very frequent, if not universal, feature after traumatic brain injury (TBI). It is likely responsible, at least in part, for functional deficits and TBI-related chronic disability. Because there are multiple pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic therapies that promote vascular health, TCVI is an attractive target for therapeutic intervention after TBI. The cerebral microvasculature is a component of the neurovascular unit (NVU) coupling neuronal metabolism with local cerebral blood flow. The NVU participates in the pathogenesis of TBI, either directly from physical trauma or as part of the cascade of secondary injury that occurs after TBI. Pathologically, there is extensive cerebral microvascular injury in humans and experimental animal, identified with either conventional light microscopy or ultrastructural examination. It is seen in acute and chronic TBI, and even described in chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Non-invasive, physiologic measures of cerebral microvascular function show dysfunction after TBI in humans and experimental animal models of TBI. These include imaging sequences (MRI-ASL), Transcranial Doppler (TCD), and Near InfraRed Spectroscopy (NIRS). Understanding the pathophysiology of TCVI, a relatively under-studied component of TBI, has promise for the development of novel therapies for TBI. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Multimodal Characterization of the Late Effects of Traumatic Brain Injury: A Methodological Overview of the Late Effects of Traumatic Brain Injury Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlow, Brian L; Keene, C Dirk; Perl, Daniel P; Iacono, Diego; Folkerth, Rebecca D; Stewart, William; Mac Donald, Christine L; Augustinack, Jean; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Estrada, Camilo; Flannery, Elissa; Gordon, Wayne A; Grabowski, Thomas J; Hansen, Kelly; Hoffman, Jeanne; Kroenke, Christopher; Larson, Eric B; Lee, Patricia; Mareyam, Azma; McNab, Jennifer A; McPhee, Jeanne; Moreau, Allison L; Renz, Anne; Richmire, KatieRose; Stevens, Allison; Tang, Cheuk Y; Tirrell, Lee S; Trittschuh, Emily H; van der Kouwe, Andre; Varjabedian, Ani; Wald, Lawrence L; Wu, Ona; Yendiki, Anastasia; Young, Liza; Zöllei, Lilla; Fischl, Bruce; Crane, Paul K; Dams-O'Connor, Kristen

    2018-05-03

    Epidemiological studies suggest that a single moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with an increased risk of neurodegenerative disease, including Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). Histopathological studies describe complex neurodegenerative pathologies in individuals exposed to single moderate-to-severe TBI or repetitive mild TBI, including chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). However, the clinicopathological links between TBI and post-traumatic neurodegenerative diseases such as AD, PD, and CTE remain poorly understood. Here, we describe the methodology of the Late Effects of TBI (LETBI) study, whose goals are to characterize chronic post-traumatic neuropathology and to identify in vivo biomarkers of post-traumatic neurodegeneration. LETBI participants undergo extensive clinical evaluation using National Institutes of Health TBI Common Data Elements, proteomic and genomic analysis, structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and prospective consent for brain donation. Selected brain specimens undergo ultra-high resolution ex vivo MRI and histopathological evaluation including whole-mount analysis. Co-registration of ex vivo and in vivo MRI data enables identification of ex vivo lesions that were present during life. In vivo signatures of postmortem pathology are then correlated with cognitive and behavioral data to characterize the clinical phenotype(s) associated with pathological brain lesions. We illustrate the study methods and demonstrate proof of concept for this approach by reporting results from the first LETBI participant, who despite the presence of multiple in vivo and ex vivo pathoanatomic lesions had normal cognition and was functionally independent until her mid-80s. The LETBI project represents a multidisciplinary effort to characterize post-traumatic neuropathology and identify in vivo signatures of postmortem pathology in a prospective study.

  1. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... Plan Long-Term Considerations Patient Support Finding Support Services Peer Support Groups Financial Assistance Support for My ... is Hepatic Encephalopathy? Why Your Liver is ...

  2. CTE Corrections for WFPC2 and ACS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolphin, Andrew

    2003-07-01

    The error budget for optical broadband photometry is dominated by three factors: CTE corrections, long-short anomaly corrections, and photometric zero points. Questions about the dependencies of the CTE have largely been resolved, and my CTE corrections have been included in the WFPC2 handbook and tutorial. What remains to be done is the determination of the "final" CTE correction at the end of the WFPC2 mission, which will increase the accuracy of photometry obtained in the final few cycles. The long-short anomaly is still the subject of much debate, as it remains unclear whethere or not this effect is real and, if so, what its size and nature is. Photometric zero points have likewise varied by over 0.05 magnitudes in the literature, and will likely remain unresolved until the long-short anomaly is addressed {given that most calibration exposures are short while most science exposures are long}. It is also becoming apparent that similar issues will affect the accuracy of ACS photometry, and consequently that an ACS CTE study analogous to my WFPC2 work would significantly improve the calibration of ACS. I therefore propose to use archival WFPC2 images of omega Cen and ACS images of 47 Tuc to continue my HST calibration work. I also propose to begin work on "next-generation" CTE corrections, in which corrections are applied to the images based on accurate charge-trapping models rather than to the reduced photometry. This technique will allow for more accurate CTE corrections in certain cases {such as a star above a bright star or on a variable background}, improved PSF-fitting photometry of faint stars, and image restoration for accurate analysis of extended objects.

  3. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... to continue to work to my full capacity? Will I be able to drive? Patient Stories Angie M. Caregiver for Brother Charles DiAngelo Hepatic Encephalopathy Jason Dedmon Alcohol-related Cirrhosis ...

  4. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... your body when your liver isn’t working well, it may affect your brain and cause HE. ... it apparent that the liver is not doing well. These could be the symptoms of Hepatic Encephalopathy ( ...

  5. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... bad. It sends the good things – such as vitamins and nutrients – into your bloodstream for your body ... for Wife Joyce O. Caregiver for Mother Lynette K. Hepatic Encephalopathy Samantha W. Caregiver for Husband Stan ...

  6. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... Get Worse? How is HE Diagnosed? Prior to Treatment Who treats HE? Preparing for your Medical Appointment Hepatic Encephalopathy Treatment Options Treatment Basics Treatment Medications Importance of Adhering ...

  7. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... become familiar with the signs of Hepatic Encephalopathy so you can tell your doctor right away if ... with continuous treatment, HE can usually be controlled. So it’s important to tell your doctor about any ...

  8. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... build-up and painful swelling of the legs (edema) and abdomen (ascites) or hepatic encephalopathy. For more ... build up and painful swelling of the legs (edema) and abdomen (ascites) Bruising and bleeding easily Enlarged ...

  9. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... friend, spouse, life partner, parent, sibling or other family member. What is HE? Hepatic Encephalopathy, sometimes referred ... disease is. It’s important for you and your family to become familiar with the signs of Hepatic ...

  10. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... to Treatment Who treats HE? Preparing for your Medical Appointment Hepatic Encephalopathy Treatment Options Treatment Basics Treatment ... treatment. Being a fully-informed participant in your medical care is an important factor in staying as ...

  11. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... Hepatic Encephalopathy so you can tell your doctor right away if you think you may have it. ... American Liver Foundation © 2018 American Liver Foundation. All rights reserved. Funding for the HE123 - Diagnosis, Treatment and ...

  12. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... important for you and your family to become familiar with the signs of Hepatic Encephalopathy so you ... team evaluates the person’s overall physical and mental health, plan to pay for transplant related medical expenses, ...

  13. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... Symptoms to look for Caregiver Support Caregiver Stories Home › What is Hepatic Encephalopathy? Why Your Liver is ... questions about HE, one step at a time. Home About Us Ways to Give Contact Us Privacy ...

  14. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... responsible for the daily needs of another person. Caregivers can be a friend, spouse, life partner, parent, sibling or other family member. What is HE? Hepatic Encephalopathy, sometimes referred to as ...

  15. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... Patient Advisory Council Media Center Careers How You Can Help OVERVIEW Donate Now Join an Event Volunteer ... Hepatic Encephalopathy is a short-term problem that can be corrected . It may also occur as part ...

  16. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... Your Story Spread the Word Give While You Shop Contact Us Donate Now Hepatic Encephalopathy Back Hepatic ... Your Story Spread the Word Give While You Shop Contact Us Donate Now Help ALF Improve This ...

  17. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... Related Liver Disease Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Autoimmune Hepatitis Benign Liver Tumors Biliary Atresia Cirrhosis of the ... Disease Type 1 (von Gierke) Hemochromatosis Hepatic Encephalopathy Hepatitis A Hepatitis B Hepatitis C Intrahepatic Cholestasis of ...

  18. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... People ALF Near You Events ALF Blogs Financial Information Policies Advocacy Patient Advisory Council Media Center Careers ... and abdomen (ascites) or hepatic encephalopathy. For more information about cirrhosis of the liver and symptoms, call ...

  19. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... Hepatic Encephalopathy Treatment Options Treatment Basics Treatment Medications Importance of Adhering to Your Treatment Plan Long-Term Considerations Patient Support Finding Support Services Peer Support Groups Financial Assistance Support for My Loved Ones Resources Find ...

  20. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... Hepatic Encephalopathy so you can tell your doctor right away if you think you may have it. ... Site Map © COPYRIGHT 2017 AMERICAN LIVER FOUNDATION. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Your Liver Overview

    The Faces ...

  1. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... Hemochromatosis Hepatic Encephalopathy Hepatitis A Hepatitis B Hepatitis C Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy (ICP) Jaundice In Newborns ... are the common causes of cirrhosis? Hepatitis B & C Alcohol-related Liver Disease Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver ...

  2. Online CTE in the Community College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza Mitchell, Regina L.; Etshim, Rachal; Dietz, Brian T.

    2016-01-01

    This single-site case study explored how one community college integrated online education into CTE courses and programs. Through semi-structured interviews and document analysis, the study explores how one college integrated online education (fully online, hybrid, and web-enhanced) into areas typically considered "hands-on".…

  3. Trends in CTE Coursetaking. Data Point. NCES 2014-901

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    This NCES Data Point shows changes in high school students' participation in career and technical education (CTE) between 1990 and 2009. The Data Point documents an overall decline in CTE participation during this period, although participation increased in some CTE occupational areas, such as communications and health care. (Contains 2 figures.)

  4. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... 1 (von Gierke) Hemochromatosis Hepatic Encephalopathy Hepatitis A Hepatitis B Hepatitis C Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy (ICP) Jaundice ... diseases. What are the common causes of cirrhosis? Hepatitis B & C Alcohol-related Liver Disease Non-alcoholic Fatty ...

  5. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... of brain function in people with advanced liver disease. When your liver is damaged it can no longer remove toxic substances from your blood. These toxins build up and can travel through your body until they reach your brain, causing mental and physical symptoms of HE. Hepatic Encephalopathy often ...

  6. Short and Long Term Behavioral and Pathological Changes in a Novel Rodent Model of Repetitive Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly M McAteer

    Full Text Available A history of concussion, particularly repeated injury, has been linked to an increased risk for the development of neurodegenerative diseases, particularly chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE. CTE is characterized by abnormal accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau and deficits in learning and memory. As yet the mechanisms associated with the development of CTE are unknown. Accordingly, the aim of the current study was to develop and characterize a novel model of repetitive mTBI that accurately reproduces the key short and long-term functional and histopathological features seen clinically. Forty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to receive 0, 1 or 3x mTBI spaced five days apart using a modified version of the Marmarou impact-acceleration diffuse-TBI model to deliver 110G of linear force. Functional outcomes were assessed six and twelve weeks post-injury, with histopathology assessed twenty-four hours and twelve weeks post-injury. Repetitive mTBI resulted in mild spatial and recognition memory deficits as reflected by increased escape latency on the Barnes maze and decreased time spent in the novel arm of the Y maze. There was a trend towards increased anxiety-like behavior, with decreased time spent in the inner portion of the open field. At 24 hours and 12 weeks post injury, repetitive mTBI animals showed increased tau phosphorylation and microglial activation within the cortex. Increases in APP immunoreactivity were observed in repetitive mTBI animals at 12 weeks indicating long-term changes in axonal integrity. This novel model of repetitive mTBI with its persistent cognitive deficits, neuroinflammation, axonal injury and tau hyperphosphorylation, thus represents a clinically relevant experimental approach to further explore the underlying pathogenesis of CTE.

  7. Psychological treatment of patients with chronic toxic encephalopathy : Lessons from studies of chronic fatigue and whiplash

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hout, MSE; Wekking, EM; Berg, IJ; Deelman, BG

    2003-01-01

    Background. Chronic toxic encephalopathy (CTE), which can result from long-term exposure to organic solvents, is characterized by problems of attention and memory, fatigue and affective symptoms. There is little experience with (neuro)psychological treatment in this patient group. We reviewed

  8. Psychological treatment of patients with chronic toxic encephalopathy: lessons from studies of chronic fatigue and whiplash

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hout, Moniek S. E.; Wekking, Ellie M.; Berg, Ina J.; Deelman, Betto G.

    2003-01-01

    Chronic toxic encephalopathy (CTE), which can result from long-term exposure to organic solvents, is characterized by problems of attention and memory, fatigue and affective symptoms. There is little experience with (neuro)psychological treatment in this patient group. We reviewed treatment outcome

  9. CTE:YAG laser applications in dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shori, Ramesh K.; Fried, Daniel; Featherstone, John D. B.; Kokta, Milan R.; Duhn, Clifford W.

    1998-04-01

    The suitability of CTE:YAG laser radiation was investigated for caries preventive laser treatments and caries ablation. Although, CTE:YAG laser radiation at 2.69 micrometer is less highly absorbed by dental hard tissues than other erbium laser wavelengths, namely 2.79 and 2.94 micrometer, it can readily be transmitted through a conventional low hydroxyl fiber with minimal loss. These studies show that reasonable ablation rates and efficiencies are obtainable with both free running (200 microseconds) and Q-switched (100 ns) laser pulses on both dentin and enamel with the application of a relatively thick layer of water to the tissue surface. The water served to remove tissue char and debris from the ablation site leaving a clean crater. However, mechanical forces produced during the energetic ablative process resulted in peripheral mechanical damage to the tissue. Surface dissolution studies on enamel indicated that CTE:YAG radiation inhibited surface dissolution by organic acid by 60 - 70% compared to unirradiated controls, albeit, at fluences an order of magnitude higher than those required for CO2 laser radiation. This layer system may be suitable for dental hard tissue applications if mechanical damage can be mitigated. This work was supported by NIH/NIDR Grants R29DE12091 and R01DE09958.

  10. Hashimoto's encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montagna, Giacomo; Imperiali, Mauro; Agazzi, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) is a rare not well understood, progressive and relapsing multiform disease, characterized by seizures, movement disorders, subacute cognitive dysfunction, psychiatric symptoms and responsiveness to steroid therapy. The disorder is generally associated with thyroid ...... diseases and the most common feature is the presence of anti-thyroperoxidase antibodies (TPOAb). Patients are usually euthyroid or mildly hypothyroid at presentation. All age groups can be affected. The pathophysiology is still unclear, especially the link between elevated serum TPOAb...... and the encephalopathy. Most reported cases occurred in women and girls. Unspecific symptoms, non-pathognomonic laboratory neurophysiology and neuroimaging features make its diagnosis a real challenge for clinicians.The case of a 16 year old boy, with a clinical picture of HE associated with hypothyroidism...

  11. The Impact of Traumatic Brain Injury on the Aging Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jacob S; Hobbs, Jonathan G; Bailes, Julian E

    2016-09-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has come to the forefront of both the scientific and popular culture. Specifically, sports-related concussions or mild TBI (mTBI) has become the center of scientific scrutiny with a large amount of research focusing on the long-term sequela of this type of injury. As the populace continues to age, the impact of TBI on the aging brain will become clearer. Currently, reports have come to light that link TBI to neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, as well as certain psychiatric diseases. Whether these associations are causations, however, is yet to be determined. Other long-term sequelae, such as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), appear to be associated with repetitive injuries. Going forward, as we gain better understanding of the pathophysiological process involved in TBI and subclinical head traumas, and individual traits that influence susceptibility to neurocognitive diseases, a clearer, more comprehensive understanding of the connection between brain injury and resultant disease processes in the aging brain will become evident.

  12. Are There Academic CTE Cluster Pipelines? Linking High School CTE Coursetaking and Postsecondary Credentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plasman, Jay S.; Gottfried, Michael; Sublett, Cameron

    2017-01-01

    Career and technical education (CTE) has become a key focus of stakeholders across the political spectrum. It has been shown to be an effective means of promoting many desired outcomes, including increased chances of high school graduation, improved opportunities of enrolling in advanced math and science courses, and increased earnings after high…

  13. Ccr2 deletion dissociates cavity size and tau pathology after mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyoneva, Stefka; Kim, Daniel; Katsumoto, Atsuko; Kokiko-Cochran, O Nicole; Lamb, Bruce T; Ransohoff, Richard M

    2015-12-03

    Millions of people experience traumatic brain injury (TBI) as a result of falls, car accidents, sports injury, and blast. TBI has been associated with the development of neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). In the initial hours and days, the pathology of TBI comprises neuronal injury, breakdown of the blood-brain barrier, and inflammation. At the cellular level, the inflammatory reaction consists of responses by brain-resident microglia, astrocytes, and vascular elements as well as infiltration of peripheral cells. After TBI, signaling by chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) to the chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 2 (CCR2) is a key regulator of brain infiltration by monocytes. We utilized mice with one or both copies of Ccr2 disrupted by red fluorescent protein (RFP, Ccr2 (RFP/+) and Ccr2 (RFP/RFP) ). We subjected these mice to the mild lateral fluid percussion model of TBI and examined several pathological outcomes 3 days later in order to determine the effects of altered monocyte entry into the brain. Ccr2 deletion reduced monocyte infiltration, diminished lesion cavity volume, and lessened axonal damage after mild TBI, but the microglial reaction to the lesion was not affected. We further examined phosphorylation of the microtubule-associated protein tau, which aggregates in brains of people with TBI, AD, and CTE. Surprisingly, Ccr2 deletion was associated with increased tau mislocalization to the cell body in the cortex and hippocampus by tissue staining and increased levels of phosphorylated tau in the hippocampus by Western blot. Disruption of CCR2 enhanced tau pathology and reduced cavity volume in the context of TBI. The data reveal a complex role for CCR2(+) monocytes in TBI, as monitored by cavity volume, axonal damage, and tau phosphorylation.

  14. MRI of neonatal encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khong, P.L.; Lam, B.C.C.; Tung, H.K.S.; Wong, V.; Chan, F.L.; Ooi, G.C.

    2003-01-01

    We present the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in neonatal encephalopathy, including hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy, perinatal/neonatal stroke, metabolic encephalopathy from inborn errors of metabolism, congenital central nervous system infections and birth trauma. The applications of advanced MRI techniques, such as diffusion-weighted imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy are emphasized

  15. Pathogenesis of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Ciećko-Michalska

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy can be a serious complication of acute liver failure and chronic liver diseases, predominantly liver cirrhosis. Hyperammonemia plays the most important role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. The brain-blood barrier disturbances, changes in neurotransmission, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, GABA-ergic or benzodiazepine pathway abnormalities, manganese neurotoxicity, brain energetic disturbances, and brain blood flow abnormalities are considered to be involved in the development of hepatic encephalopathy. The influence of small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO on the induction of minimal hepatic encephalopathy is recently emphasized. The aim of this paper is to present the current views on the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy.

  16. Pathogenesis of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciećko-Michalska, Irena; Szczepanek, Małgorzata; Słowik, Agnieszka; Mach, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy can be a serious complication of acute liver failure and chronic liver diseases, predominantly liver cirrhosis. Hyperammonemia plays the most important role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. The brain-blood barrier disturbances, changes in neurotransmission, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, GABA-ergic or benzodiazepine pathway abnormalities, manganese neurotoxicity, brain energetic disturbances, and brain blood flow abnormalities are considered to be involved in the development of hepatic encephalopathy. The influence of small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) on the induction of minimal hepatic encephalopathy is recently emphasized. The aim of this paper is to present the current views on the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:23316223

  17. BLOOD BIOMARKERS FOR EVALUATION OF PERINATAL ENCEPHALOPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest Marshall Graham

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent research in identification of brain injury after trauma shows many possible blood biomarkers that may help identify the fetus and neonate with encephalopathy. Traumatic brain injury shares many common features with perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Trauma has a hypoxic component, and one of the 1st physiologic consequences of moderate-severe traumatic brain injury is apnea. Trauma and hypoxia-ischemia initiate an excitotoxic cascade and free radical injury followed by the inflammatory cascade, producing injury in neurons, glial cells and white matter. Increased excitatory amino acids, lipid peroxidation products and alteration in microRNAs and inflammatory markers are common to both traumatic brain injury and perinatal encephalopathy. The blood-brain barrier is disrupted in both leading to egress of substances normally only found in the central nervous system. Brain exosomes may represent ideal biomarker containers, as RNA and protein transported within the vesicles are protected from enzymatic degradation. Evaluation of fetal or neonatal brain derived exosomes that cross the blood-brain barrier and circulate peripherally has been referred to as the liquid brain biopsy. A multiplex of serum biomarkers could improve upon the current imprecise methods of identifying fetal and neonatal brain injury such as fetal heart rate abnormalities, meconium, cord gases at delivery, and Apgar scores. Quantitative biomarker measurements of perinatal brain injury and recovery could lead to operative delivery only in the presence of significant fetal risk, triage to appropriate therapy after birth and measure the effectiveness of treatment.

  18. Dopaminergic agonists for hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, B; Gluud, L L; Gluud, C

    2004-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy may be associated with an impairment of the dopaminergic neurotransmission. Dopaminergic agonists may therefore have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy.......Hepatic encephalopathy may be associated with an impairment of the dopaminergic neurotransmission. Dopaminergic agonists may therefore have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy....

  19. CTE's Role in Urban Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyslop, Alisha; Imperatore, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Education in the United States is facing a crisis of completion and performance, both at the secondary and postsecondary levels, with high dropout rates and a significant number of students ill-prepared for further education and careers. These problems are even more acute in America's urban schools. Today's CTE is on the cutting edge of…

  20. Team-Teaching a Digital Senior Capstone Project in CTE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Melanie D.; Tews, Nichole M.; Washer, Barton A.

    2012-01-01

    Secondary career and technical education (CTE) students are faced with the unique challenge of learning not only specific content-related knowledge and skills, but also postsecondary preparation, 21st century technology, employability and self-marketing skills. At Cass Career Center in Harrisonville, Missouri, a senior capstone project was…

  1. Lack of Sleep Could Be Trouble for CTE Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpello, Gary

    2010-01-01

    Career and technical education (CTE) students find themselves in school environments using equipment and tools that could cause injury if mishandled. It is imperative that these students be wide awake and alert when operating these tools. But many adolescents are not getting the sleep they need to be refreshed and alert. Sleep restores brain…

  2. Gender, Career and Technical Education (CTE) Nontraditional Coursetaking, and Wage Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluhr, Stephanie A.; Choi, Namok; Herd, Ann; Woo, Hongryun; Alagaraja, Meera

    2017-01-01

    The two main objectives of this study were to examine the relationship between high school student (9th-12th) gender and nontraditional career and technical education (CTE) course taking, and the combined effects of gender and program area on estimated future wage earnings for male and female CTE completers. A Midwestern state CTE database…

  3. Treatment of Epileptic Encephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrini, Simona; Sisodiya, Sanjay M

    2017-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies represent the most severe epilepsies, with onset in infancy and childhood and seizures continuing in adulthood in most cases. New genetic causes are being identified at a rapid rate. Treatment is challenging and the overall outcome remains poor. Available targeted treatments, based on the precision medicine approach, are currently few. To provide an overview of the treatment of epileptic encephalopathies with known genetic determinants, including established treatment, anecdotal reports of specific treatment, and potential tailored precision medicine strategies. Genes known to be associated to epileptic encephalopathy were selected. Genes where the association was uncertain or with no reports of details on treatment, were not included. Although some of the genes included are associated with multiple epilepsy phenotypes or other organ involvement, we have mainly focused on the epileptic encephalopathies and their antiepileptic treatments. Most epileptic encephalopathies show genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity. The treatment of seizures is difficult in most cases. The available evidence may provide some guidance for treatment: for example, ACTH seems to be effective in controlling infantile spams in a number of genetic epileptic encephalopathies. There are potentially effective tailored precision medicine strategies available for some of the encephalopathies, and therapies with currently unexplained effectiveness in others. Understanding the effect of the mutation is crucial for targeted treatment. There is a broad range of disease mechanisms underlying epileptic encephalopathies, and this makes the application of targeted treatments challenging. However, there is evidence that tailored treatment could significantly improve epilepsy treatment and prognosis. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. Current pathogenetic aspects of hepatic encephalopathy and noncirrhotic hyperammonemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichoż-Lach, Halina; Michalak, Agata

    2013-01-07

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a medical phenomenon that is described as a neuropsychiatric manifestation of chronic or acute liver disease that is characterized by psychomotor, intellectual and cognitive abnormalities with emotional/affective and behavioral disturbances. This article focuses on the underlying mechanisms of the condition and the differences between hepatic encephalopathy and noncirrhotic hyperammonemic encephalopathy. Hepatic encephalopathy is a serious condition that can cause neurological death with brain edema and intracranial hypertension. It is assumed that approximately 60%-80% of patients with liver cirrhosis develop hepatic encephalopathy. This review explores the complex mechanisms that lead to hepatic encephalopathy. However, noncirrhotic hyperammonemic encephalopathy is not associated with hepatic diseases and has a completely different etiology. Noncirrhotic hyperammonemic encephalopathy is a severe occurrence that is connected with multiple pathogeneses.

  5. Current pathogenetic aspects of hepatic encephalopathy and noncirrhotic hyperammonemic encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Cichoż-Lach, Halina; Michalak, Agata

    2013-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a medical phenomenon that is described as a neuropsychiatric manifestation of chronic or acute liver disease that is characterized by psychomotor, intellectual and cognitive abnormalities with emotional/affective and behavioral disturbances. This article focuses on the underlying mechanisms of the condition and the differences between hepatic encephalopathy and noncirrhotic hyperammonemic encephalopathy. Hepatic encephalopathy is a serious condition that can cause ne...

  6. The Influence of Career-Focused Education on Student Career Planning and Development: A Comparison of CTE and Non-CTE Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, Catherine; Sharp, Julia L.; Hammond, Cathy; Withington, Cairen; Stipanovic, Natalie

    2017-01-01

    Our study is part of a broader longitudinal study of a state-mandated career-focused school reform policy. We investigate whether career and technical education (CTE) and non-CTE students differed in interactions with guidance counselors, level of participation in career planning and development, and beliefs about the relevance of having a career…

  7. Hepatic encephalopathy. Imaging Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrillo, Maria Claudia; Bermudez Munoz, Sonia; J Morillo, Anibal

    2007-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy occurs in patients with chronic hepatic insufficiency and can produce abnormalities in the central nervous system, which can be observed in MRI studies. Traditionally, these imaging findings include symmetrical hyper intensities in T1-weighted sequences in the basal ganglia (mainly globus pallidus), involving also the substantia nigra, mesencephalic tegmentum, frontal and occipital cortex. These areas appear of normal intensity in T2-weighted imaging sequences. Other entities that can lead to similar findings include manganese intoxication and type-1 neurofibromatosis. Currently, with the advent of MR spectroscopy, abnormalities in patients with clinical and subclinical hepatic encephalopathy have been described. After hepatic transplantation, hyper intensities of the basal ganglia and the MR spectroscopic findings may disappear within 3 months to 1 year, suggesting a functional, more than a structural damage. This article will demonstrate the MR findings of patients with hepatic encephalopathy due to chronic hepatic insufficiency.

  8. [Hashimoto's encephalopathy and autoantibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Makoto

    2013-04-01

    Encephalopathy occasionally occurs in association with thyroid disorders, but most of these are treatable. These encephalopathies include a neuropsychiatric disorder associated with hypothyroidism, called myxedema encephalopathy. Moreover, Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) has been recognized as a new clinical disease based on an autoimmune mechanism associated with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Steroid treatment was successfully administered to these patients. Recently, we discovered that the serum autoantibodies against the NH2-terminal of α-enolase (NAE) are highly specific diagnostic biomarkers for HE. Further, we analyzed serum anti-NAE autoantibodies and the clinical features in many cases of HE from institutions throughout Japan and other countries. Approximately half of assessed HE patients carry anti-NAE antibodies. The age was widely distributed with 2 peaks (20-30 years and 50-70 years). Most HE patients were in euthyroid states, and all patients had anti-thyroid (TG) antibodies and anti-thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibodies. Anti-TSH receptor (TSH-R) antibodies were observed in some cases. The common neuropsychiatry features are consciousness disturbance and psychosis, followed by cognitive dysfunction, involuntary movements, seizures, and ataxia. Abnormalities on electroencephalography (EEG) and decreased cerebral blood flow on brain SPECT were common findings, whereas abnormal findings on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were rare. HE patients have various clinical phenotypes such as the acute encephalopathy form, the chronic psychiatric form, and other particular clinical forms, including limbic encephalitis, progressive cerebellar ataxia, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD)-like form. The cerebellar ataxic form of HE clinically mimics spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD) and is characterized by the absence of nystagmus, absent or mild cerebellar atrophy, and lazy background activities on EEG. Taken together, these data suggest that the possibility of

  9. BACTERICIDAL COATINGS ON TEXTILES FOR REMEDIATION OF INTERMICROBE ACTIVITY (BaCTeRIA) SUMMARY REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-07

    TEXTILES FOR REMEDIATION OF INTERMICROBE ACTIVITY (BaCTeRIA) SUMMARY REPORT by Tobyn A. Branck Courtney M. Cowell Jennifer M. Rego and...October 2011 – September 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE BACTERICIDAL COATINGS ON TEXTILES FOR REMEDIATION OF INTERMICROBE ACTIVITY (BaCTeRIA) SUMMARY REPORT... REMEDIATION OF INTERMICROBE ACTIVITY (BaCTeRIA) SUMMARY REPORT Introduction The Biological Sciences and Technology Team (BSTT), Warfighter

  10. Lightweight, Low-CTE Tubes Made From Biaxially Oriented LCPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Leslie; Federico, Frank; Formato, Richard; Larouco, John; Slager, William

    2004-01-01

    Tubes made from biaxially oriented liquid-crystal polymers (LCPs) have been developed for use as penetrations on cryogenic tanks. ( Penetrations in this context denotes feed lines, vent lines, and sensor tubes, all of which contribute to the undesired conduction of heat into the tanks.) In comparison with corresponding prior cryogenic-tank penetrations made from stainless steels and nickel alloys, the LCP penetrations offer advantages of less weight and less thermal conduction. An additional major advantage of LCP components is that one can tailor their coefficients of thermal expansion (CTEs). The estimated cost of continuous production of LCP tubes of typical sizes is about $1.27/ft ($4.17/m) [based on 1998 prices]. LCP tubes that are compatible with liquid oxygen and that feature tailored biaxial molecular orientation and quasi-isotropic properties (including quasi-isotropic CTE) have been fabricated by a combination of proprietary and patented techniques that involve the use of counterrotating dies (CRDs). Tailoring of the angle of molecular orientation is what makes it possible to tailor the CTE over a wide range to match the CTEs of adjacent penetrations of other tank components; this, in turn, makes it possible to minimize differential-thermal expansion stresses that arise during thermal cycling. The fabrication of biaxially oriented LCP tubes by use of CRDs is not new in itself. The novelty of the present development lies in tailoring the orientations and thus the CTEs and other mechanical properties of the LCPs for the intended cryogenic applications and in modifications of the CRDs for this purpose. The LCP tubes and the 304-stainless-steel tubes that the LCP tubes were intended to supplant were tested with respect to burst strength, permeability, thermal conductivity, and CTE.

  11. Investigation of metabolic encephalopathy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cycle defects is the X-linked recessive disorder, ornithine ... life, or if the child is fed the compounds that they are unable .... as learning difficulties, drowsiness and avoidance of ... Table 2. Laboratory investigation of suspected metabolic encephalopathy. Laboratory .... Clinical approach to treatable inborn metabolic diseases:.

  12. Management of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Wright

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy (HE, the neuropsychiatric presentation of liver disease, is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Reduction of plasma ammonia remains the central therapeutic strategy, but there is a need for newer novel therapies. We discuss current evidence supporting the use of interventions for both the general management of chronic HE and that necessary for more acute and advanced disease.

  13. Encephalopathy and liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavarria, Laia; Cordoba, Juan

    2013-06-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) candidates experience frequently episodic or persistent hepatic encephalopathy. In addition, these patients can exhibit neurological comorbidities that contribute to cognitive impairment in the pre-transplant period. Assessment of the respective contribution of hepatic encephalopathy or comorbidities in the cognitive manifestations is critical to estimate the neurological benefits of restoring liver function. Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy are useful to assess the impact of liver failure or comorbidities. This assessment is critical to decide liver transplant in difficult cases. In the early postoperative period, LT is commonly complicated by a confusional syndrome. The possible role of persisting hepatic encephalopathy in its development has not been clearly established. The origin is usually considered multifactorial and relates to complications following LT, such as infections, rejection, primary liver dysfunction, immunosuppressors, etc.… The diagnosis and treatment is based in the recognition of comorbidities and optimal care of metabolic disturbances. Several studies have demonstrated recovery of cognitive function after LT in patients that have exhibited hepatic encephalopathy. However, some deficits may persist specifically among patients with persistent HE. Other factors present before LT that contribute to a worse neuropsychological outcome after LT are diabetes mellitus and alcohol consumption. Long-term after LT, cognitive function may worsen in relation to vascular risk factors.

  14. GRIN2B encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Platzer, Konrad; Yuan, Hongjie; Schuetz, Hannah

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We aimed for a comprehensive delineation of genetic, functional and phenotypic aspects of GRIN2B encephalopathy and explored potential prospects of personalised medicine. METHODS: Data of 48 individuals with de novo GRIN2B variants were collected from several diagnostic and research c...

  15. Career and Technical Education (CTE) Student Success in Community Colleges: A Conceptual Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschy, Amy S.; Bremer, Christine D.; Castellano, Marisa

    2011-01-01

    Career and technical education (CTE) students pursuing occupational associate's degrees or certificates differ from students seeking academic majors at 2-year institutions in several ways. This article examines several theoretical models of student persistence and offers a conceptual model of student success focused on CTE students in community…

  16. Building Academic Skills in Context: Testing the Value of Enhanced Math Learning in CTE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, James R., III; Alfeld, Corinne; Pearson, Donna; Lewis, Morgan V.; Jensen, Susan

    2006-01-01

    An experimental study tested a model for enhancing mathematics instruction in five high school career and technical education (CTE) programs (agriculture, auto technology, business/marketing, health, and information technology). The model consisted of a pedagogy and intense teacher professional development. Volunteer CTE teachers were randomly…

  17. Oracle Academy: Four Success Stories Model the Competitive Edge of CTE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Techniques: Connecting Education and Careers, 2004

    2004-01-01

    "Vocational Education's" transformation to "Career and Technical Education" (CTE) is clearly underway as evidenced by the increased number of advanced topics and knowledge depth being taught in courses today. Technology advances across all industry sectors impact all CTE departments--from Agricultural Science to Business and Marketing. Building…

  18. Subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy (Binswanger disease)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Settanni, F.; Dumont, P.; Casella, C.L.; Pascuzzi, L.; Cecilio, S.; Caldas, J.G.

    1992-01-01

    Four patients with variable clinical and tomographic features were diagnosed as having subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy (Binswanger disease). This diagnosis was done based on the presence of subacute progression of focal cerebral deficits, presence of hypertension, systemic vascular disease and dementia. The pathogenesis of subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy is unknown; possible mechanism include diffuse ischemia and fluid transudation with subsequent gliosis related to subacute hypertensive encephalopathy. (author)

  19. Genetics Home Reference: glycine encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... seizures. As they get older, many develop intellectual disability, abnormal movements, and behavioral problems. Other atypical types of glycine encephalopathy appear later in childhood or adulthood ...

  20. Pixel-based CTE Correction of ACS/WFC: Modifications To The ACS Calibration Pipeline (CALACS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Linda J.; Anderson, J.; Armstrong, A.; Avila, R.; Bedin, L.; Chiaberge, M.; Davis, M.; Ferguson, B.; Fruchter, A.; Golimowski, D.; Grogin, N.; Hack, W.; Lim, P. L.; Lucas, R.; Maybhate, A.; McMaster, M.; Ogaz, S.; Suchkov, A.; Ubeda, L.

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) was installed on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) nearly ten years ago. Over the last decade, continuous exposure to the harsh radiation environment has degraded the charge transfer efficiency (CTE) of the CCDs. The worsening CTE impacts the science that can be obtained by altering the photometric, astrometric and morphological characteristics of sources, particularly those farthest from the readout amplifiers. To ameliorate these effects, Anderson & Bedin (2010, PASP, 122, 1035) developed a pixel-based empirical approach to correcting ACS data by characterizing the CTE profiles of trails behind warm pixels in dark exposures. The success of this technique means that it is now possible to correct full-frame ACS/WFC images for CTE degradation in the standard data calibration and reduction pipeline CALACS. Over the past year, the ACS team at STScI has developed, refined and tested the new software. The details of this work are described in separate posters. The new code is more effective at low flux levels (repair ACS electronics) and pixel-based CTE correction. In addition to the standard cosmic ray corrected, flat-fielded and drizzled data products (crj, flt and drz files) there are three new equivalent files (crc, flc and drc) which contain the CTE-corrected data products. The user community will be able to choose whether to use the standard or CTE-corrected products.

  1. Screening of subclinical hepatic encephalopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groeneweg, M; Moerland, W; Quero, J C; Hop, W C; Krabbe, P F; Schalm, S W

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: Subclinical hepatic encephalopathy adversely affects daily functioning. The aim of this study was to determine which elements of daily life have predictive value for subclinical hepatic encephalopathy. METHODS: The study was performed in 179 outpatients with liver cirrhosis.

  2. CTE-Matched, Liquid-Cooled, High Thermal Conductivity Heat Sink, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose the development of a CTE-matched, liquid-cooled, high thermal conductivity heat sink for use in spacecraft thermal management applications. The material...

  3. Identification, cloning, and characterization of a major cat flea salivary allergen (Cte f 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, M J; Weber, E; Hunter, S; Stedman, K E; Best, E; Frank, G R; Wang, R; Escudero, J; Kuner, J; McCall, C

    2000-05-01

    An 18 kDa protein isolated from saliva of the cat flea, Ctenocephalides felis, elicits a positive intradermal skin test (IDST) in 100 and 80% of experimental and clinical flea allergic dogs, respectively. Using solid-phase enzyme-linked immuno assay (ELISA), this protein detected IgE in 100 and 80% of experimental and clinical flea allergic dogs, respectively. A cDNA (pFSI) encoding a full-length Cte f 1 protein was isolated from a C. felis salivary gland cDNA library, using a combination of PCR and hybridization screening. This cDNA is 658 bp in length, and contains an open reading frame of 528 bp. The open reading frame encodes a protein of 176 amino acids, consisting of an 18 amino acid signal sequence and a 158 amino acid mature protein. The calculated molecular weight and pI of the mature protein are 18106 Da and 9.3, respectively. The protein, named Cte f 1, is the first novel major allergen described for canine flea allergy. Recombinant Cte f 1 (rCte f 1) was expressed in Escherichia coli, Pichia pastoris and baculovirus infected Trichoplusia ni cells. Approximately, 90% of the rCte f 1 expressed in E. coli accumulated in insoluble inclusion bodies, which could be refolded to a soluble mixture of disulfide isomers with partial IgE binding activity. Small quantities of an apparently correctly refolded form of rCte f 1, which had IgE binding activity equal to the native antigen, was isolated from the soluble fraction of E. coli cells. However, P. pastoris and baculovirus infected insect cells expressed and secreted a fully processed, correctly refolded and fully active form of rCte f 1. Mass spectrometry analysis of the active forms of rCte f 1confirmed that eight intact disulfide bonds were present, matching the number observed in the native allergen. The relative ability of rCte f 1 to bind IgE in the serum of flea allergic animals, produced in these three expression systems, matched that of the native allergen. Competition ELISA demonstrated that

  4. LA CTE "OTTO PARELLADA" (TALLAPIEDRA COMO BASE MATERIAL DE ESTUDIO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto E Calvo González

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta el análisis de las posibilidades que tiene la CTE" Otto Parellada" como elemento fundamental en la formación de ingenieros electricistas, así como para otras especialidades.Se expone el modo en que actualmente se le aprovecha para la carrera de Ingeniería Eléctrica en ladisciplina de Centrales Termoeléctricas, así como para la carrera de Ingeniería Mecánica en la asignatura homónimadel 1er. año. Se exponen otras posibilidades de la planta que podrían ser explotadas aún por otras carreras comoArquitectura, al tener características que la avalan como Patrimonio Industrial.  In this paper is presented the analysis of the possibilities like fundamental element that Otto Parellada SteamPower Plant has for the electrical, as well as other specialties engineers' syllabus. The way that at present time isused for the electrical engineers education, in the thermal engineering subjects is exposed, as well as for themechanical engineering in the 1st year. Other possibilities of the plant that could still be exploited by otherscareers like architecture, due to the characteristic that endorse it as Industrial Patrimony are also exposed.

  5. Determination of Coefficient of Thermal Expansion (CTE) of 20MPa Mass Concrete Using Granite Aggregate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee Siang, GO

    2017-07-01

    Experimental test was carried out to determine the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) value of 20MPa mass concrete using granite aggregate. The CTE value was established using procedure proposed by Kada et al. 2002 in determining the magnitude of early-ages CTE through laboratory test which is a rather accurate way by eliminating any possible superimposed effect of others early-age thermal deformation shrinkages such as autogenous, carbonation, plastic and drying shrinkage. This was done by submitting granite concrete block samples instrumented with ST4 vibrating wire extensometers to thermal shocks. The response of the concrete samples to this shock results in a nearly instantaneous deformation, which are measured by the sensor. These deformations, as well as the temperature signal, are used to calculate the CTE. By repeating heat cycles, the variation in the early-ages of concrete CTE over time was monitored and assessed for a period of upto 7 days. The developed CTE value facilitating the verification and validation of actual maximum permissible critical temperature differential limit (rather than arbitrarily follow published value) of cracking potential. For thick sections, internal restraint is dominant and this is governed by differentials mainly. Of the required physical properties for thermal modelling, CTE is of paramount importance that with given appropriate internal restraint factor the condition of cracking due to internal restraint is governs by equation, ΔTmax= 3.663ɛctu / αc. Thus, it can be appreciated that an increase in CTE will lower the maximum allowable differential for cracking avoidance in mass concrete while an increase of tensile strain capacity will increase the maximum allowable temperature differential.

  6. The Benefits of High School Career and Technical Education (CTE) for Youth With Learning Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Mary M; Newman, Lynn A; Javitz, Harold S

    2016-11-01

    Using data from the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 (NLTS2), this study examines the career and technical education (CTE) course taking of high school students with learning disabilities (LD) in the context of the national movement toward higher standards for determining whether students leave high school "college and career ready." Descriptive analyses document the extent of general education CTE course taking overall by students with LD and their engagement in a concentrated program of occupationally specific general education CTE, a level of course taking early research has linked to improved post-high school employment outcomes. Propensity score modeling was used to determine whether either type of CTE course taking is related to higher odds of full-time employment after high school and whether results differ with the length of time youth were out of high school. Results show no benefits of CTE course taking overall, but demonstrate a significant positive effect for participating in a concentration of occupationally specific CTE in the first 2 post-high school years; effects are nonsignificant for later years. The implications for high school programming and transition planning for students with LD are discussed. © Hammill Institute on Disabilities 2015.

  7. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy (PRES)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moron E, Fanny E; Diaz Marchan, Pedro

    2005-01-01

    The Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES) is a clinical Syndrome composed of cephalea, alteration in vision and convulsions, usually observed in patients with sudden elevation of arterial pressure. The imagenologic evidence shows reversible vasogenic brain edema without stroke. Its location is predominantly posterior; it affects the cortex and the subcortical white matter of the occipital, parietal and temporal lobes. The treatment with antihypertensive drugs and the removing of immunosupressor medication are generally associated with complete neurological recovery; this is reflected also in the images which return to their basal condition. The untreated hypertension, on the other side, can result in a progressive defect of the autoregulation system of the central nervous system with cerebral hemorrhage, irreversible brain stroke, coma and death

  8. Encephalopathy for prions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colegial, Carlos; Silva, Federico; Perez, Carlos

    1999-01-01

    The encephalopathy spongyform for prions are neuro degenerative illness that can be sporadic or transferable, for infectious or hereditary mechanisms. Their investigation has outlined enormous challenges and in the historical journey in search of its cause two doctors have received the Nobel prize of medicine Carleton Gajdusek, for its works in New Guinea where it described the infectious transmission for cannibalistic rites that it took to studies of experimental transmission in chimpanzees and to its theory of the slow virus; later on, Stanley Prusiner developed its experimental works in hamsters, throwing to the neurobiology the prion concept (particles infectious proteinaceous not viral). The paper narrates the history of a patient that died in the San Juan de Dios of Bogota Hospital by cause of this prionic illness and clinical and pathological aspects are discussed

  9. Diabetic encephalopathy: a cerebrovascular disorder?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manschot, S.M.

    2006-01-01

    Animal study: The aim was to investigate the role of vascular disturbances in the development of experimental diabetic encephalopathy. We describe the effects of treatment with the Angiotensin Converting Enzyme(ACE)-inhibitor enalapril (treatment aimed at the

  10. Dopamine agents for hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junker, Anders Ellekær; Als-Nielsen, Bodil; Gluud, Christian

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with hepatic encephalopathy may present with extrapyramidal symptoms and changes in basal ganglia. These changes are similar to those seen in patients with Parkinson's disease. Dopamine agents (such as bromocriptine and levodopa, used for patients with Parkinson's disease) have...... therefore been assessed as a potential treatment for patients with hepatic encephalopathy. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the beneficial and harmful effects of dopamine agents versus placebo or no intervention for patients with hepatic encephalopathy. SEARCH METHODS: Trials were identified through the Cochrane...... hepatic encephalopathy that were published during 1979 to 1982 were included. Three trials assessed levodopa, and two trials assessed bromocriptine. The mean daily dose was 4 grams for levodopa and 15 grams for bromocriptine. The median duration of treatment was 14 days (range seven to 56 days). None...

  11. MRI finding of ethylmalonic encephalopathy: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Yong; Lee, Shi Kyung; Han, Chun Hwan; Rho, Eun Jin

    2002-01-01

    Ethylmalonic encephalopathy is a rare syndrom characterized by developmental delay, acrocyanosis, petechiae, chronic diarrhea, and ethylmalonic, lactic, and methylsuccinic aciduria. We report the MRI finding of ethylmalonic encephalopathy including previously unreported intracranial hematoma

  12. Sepsis Associated Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neera Chaudhry

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis associated encephalopathy (SAE is a common but poorly understood neurological complication of sepsis. It is characterized by diffuse brain dysfunction secondary to infection elsewhere in the body without overt CNS infection. The pathophysiology of SAE is complex and multifactorial including a number of intertwined mechanisms such as vascular damage, endothelial activation, breakdown of the blood brain barrier, altered brain signaling, brain inflammation, and apoptosis. Clinical presentation of SAE may range from mild symptoms such as malaise and concentration deficits to deep coma. The evaluation of cognitive dysfunction is made difficult by the absence of any specific investigations or biomarkers and the common use of sedation in critically ill patients. SAE thus remains diagnosis of exclusion which can only be made after ruling out other causes of altered mentation in a febrile, critically ill patient by appropriate investigations. In spite of high mortality rate, management of SAE is limited to treatment of the underlying infection and symptomatic treatment for delirium and seizures. It is important to be aware of this condition because SAE may present in early stages of sepsis, even before the diagnostic criteria for sepsis can be met. This review discusses the diagnostic approach to patients with SAE along with its epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and differential diagnosis.

  13. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists for hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, B; Gluud, L L; Gluud, C

    2004-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy may be associated with accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists may have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy.......Hepatic encephalopathy may be associated with accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists may have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy....

  14. An unusual cause of anemia and encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Kumar Sharma

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The authors present here an interesting case of recent onset anemia that was associated with an encephalopathy of the unusual cause.Although severe anemia can theoretically result in anemic hypoxia and can then lead to hypoxic encephalopathy, it is not a primary cause of encephalopathy. More frequently anemia can contribute together with other multiple causes of encephalopathy, such as infections, metabolic abnormalities, trauma, hepatic dysfunction, hypertension, toxins.

  15. Recent advances in hepatic encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMorrow, Sharon

    2017-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy describes the array of neurological alterations that occur during acute liver failure or chronic liver injury. While key players in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy, such as increases in brain ammonia, alterations in neurosteroid levels, and neuroinflammation, have been identified, there is still a paucity in our knowledge of the precise pathogenic mechanism. This review gives a brief overview of our understanding of the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy and then summarizes the significant recent advances made in clinical and basic research contributing to our understanding, diagnosis, and possible treatment of hepatic encephalopathy. A literature search using the PubMed database was conducted in May 2017 using “hepatic encephalopathy” as a keyword, and selected manuscripts were limited to those research articles published since May 2014. While the authors acknowledge that many significant advances have been made in the understanding of hepatic encephalopathy prior to May 2014, we have limited the scope of this review to the previous three years only. PMID:29026534

  16. CT and MRI findings of cyclosporine-related encephalopathy and hypertensive encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Akira; Hayakawa, Katsumi; Houjyou, Makoto

    2002-01-01

    We present the MRI and CT findings of one child with cyclosporine-related encephalopathy, and one child with hypertensive encephalopathy following cyclosporine-related encephalopathy. The imaging findings were shown well on T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MR images. Cyclosporine-related encephalopathy was distributed predominantly in the posterior white matter. Hypertensive encephalopathy showed similar changes of CT attenuation, but with wider distribution. These two disorders seem to have the same pathogenesis. (orig.)

  17. Psychopathology and Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Gama Marques

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Since Hippocrates that neuropsychiatric illness secondary to liver disease fascinates physicians, but only in the XIX century Marcel Nencki and Ivan Pavlov suggested the relation between high concentrations of ammonia and Hepatic Encephalopathy (HE. The reaction of ammonia and glutamate (origins glutamine, “the Trojan Horse of neurotoxicity of ammonia continues to be the main responsible for the neurologic lesions, recently confirmed by neurochemistry and neuroimagiology studies. Glutamine starts the inflammatory reaction at the central nervous sys- tem but other important actors seem to be manganese and the neurotransmitters systems of GABA and endocanabinoids. Nowadays there are three different etiologic big groups for HE: type A associated with acute liver failure; type B associated with portosystemic bypass; and type C associated with cirrhosis of the liver. The staging of HE is still based on classic West Haven system, but a latent Grade 0 was introduced (the so called minimal HE; remaining the aggra- vating HE from Grade 1 (subtle changes at clinical examination to Grade 4 (coma. In this work a bibliographic review was made on 30 of the most pertinent and recent papers, focusing in psychopathology, physiopathology, etiology and staging of this clinical entity transversal to Psychiatry and Gastroenterology. Alterations are described in vigility and conscience like temporal, spatial and personal disorientation. Attention, concentration and memory are impaired very early, on latent phase and can be accessed through neuropsychological tests. Mood oscillates between euphoric and depressive. Personality changes begin obviously and abruptly or in a subtle and insidious way. There can be changes in perception like visual hallucinations or even of acoustic-verbal. The thought disorders can be of delusional type, paranoid, systematized or not, but also monothematic ala Capgras Syndrome. Speech can be accelerated, slowed down or completely in

  18. Law and Justice CTE Program Offers a Hands-On Approach to Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Tom Washburn, founder of the Law and Justice Program in Fulton County Schools in Atlanta, Georgia, sees career and technical education (CTE) as a framework for gains in reading comprehension, public speaking, math and science. "It's a holistic approach to learning, framed by law and justice. Behind the scenes we're reading novels, improving…

  19. CTE: Educating Tomorrow's Workforce Today. Maryland Classroom. Vol. 13, No.2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulqueen, Nan, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    Maryland redesigned its CTE (career and technical education) program a dozen years ago to prepare students for the 21st Century's global economy and its rapidly changing workforce needs. With 350 business and industry representatives, the state created a program whose emphasis is problem-solving and critical thinking, rather than narrow,…

  20. CTE Dual Enrollment: A Strategy for College Completion and Workforce Investment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinth, Jennifer Dounay

    2014-01-01

    Dual enrollment programs are expanding and so are dual enrollment programs with a career and technical education (CTE) focus. Recent data available from the National Center on Education Statistics show that 82 percent of high schools had students enrolling in dual enrollment coursework in 2010-11. Nearly half of the schools had students…

  1. Predicting Community College Outcomes: Does High School CTE Participation Have a Significant Effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Cecile; Lichtenberger, Eric; Kamalludeen, Rosemaliza

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the relative importance of participation in high school career and technical education (CTE) programs in predicting community college outcomes. A hierarchical generalized linear model (HGLM) was used to predict community college outcome attainment among a random sample of direct community college entrants. Results show that…

  2. Gender Equity Issues in CTE and STEM Education: Economic and Social Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toglia, Thomas V.

    2013-01-01

    Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972 has significant implications for gender equity in career and technical education (CTE) and science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) programs--and the relatively low number of women and girls pursuing nontraditional careers has significant economic and social implications. From an…

  3. 21st Century Business Education: Predictions from Oklahoma CTE Business Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAnally, Beverly

    2012-01-01

    This study described the predictions of 146 (n = 146) full-time CTE BMITE teachers about the greatest influences on the future of Business, Marketing and Information Technology Education. A quantitative descriptive survey research design was implemented for the study using a sample of teachers in middle schools, high schools and career and…

  4. A Cooperative Learning Group Procedure for Improving CTE and Science Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spindler, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to create information about the employment of Cooperative Learning Groups (CLG) to enhance the science integrating learning objectives utilized in secondary CTE courses. The objectives of the study were to determine if CLGs were an effective means for increasing the number of: a) science integrating learning…

  5. The STEM and CTE Pipeline for Community College Students with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Micaela Victoria Cesario

    The technological nature of the world we live in has produced a need for a workforce that is technologically savvy and possesses 21st century skills and abilities. Given that students with a learning disability (LD) may be an untapped source of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) or career and technical education (CTE) potential, it is important to understand 1) whether LD students are capable of pursuing STEM and CTE fields and 2) what will aid them in successfully pursuing those fields. The two studies presented aim to answer those questions through a latent profile and latent class analysis. The results from the first study indicated that there are two STEM capable profiles of LD students: High-STEM and CTE Capability or Low-STEM Capability. It was found that female LD students were significantly more likely to be in the High-STEM and CTE Capability profile (.75, p < .05) by 2.11 times and that African-American LD students were significantly more likely to be found in the Low-STEM Capability profile (-1.31, p < .10). It was also more prevalent for LD students to pursue either STEM or CTE at the 2-year college regardless of what profile they resided in. Understanding a students' STEM or CTE capability can play a role in how they prepare and plan for their future. For the second study it was found that LD students could be categorized into three engagement classes: Highly Engaged LD Students, Moderately Engaged LD Students, and Poorly Engaged LD Students. Again, gender played a role in students' classification and it was found that female students were significantly more likely to be in the Moderately Engaged class (.22, p < .05). Results from this study also indicate that the 2-year pathway is the most traversed by LD students. LD students who were engaged in their IEP process, possess self-determination, and are able to utilize accommodations were more successful in pursuing a STEM and CTE field. Implications for postsecondary institutions

  6. Rifaximin in the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iadevaia MD

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Maddalena Diana Iadevaia, Anna Del Prete, Claudia Cesaro, Laura Gaeta, Claudio Zulli, Carmelina LoguercioDepartment of Internistica Clinica e Sperimentale, F Magrassi e A Lanzara, Hepatogastroenterology Unit, Second University of Naples, Naples, ItalyAbstract: Hepatic encephalopathy is a challenging complication in patients with advanced liver disease. It can be defined as a neuropsychiatric syndrome caused by portosystemic venous shunting, ranging from minimal to overt hepatic encephalopathy or coma. Its pathophysiology is still unclear, although increased levels of ammonia play a key role. Diagnosis of hepatic encephalopathy is currently based on specific tests evaluating the neuropsychiatric state of patients and their quality of life; the severity of hepatic encephalopathy is measured by the West Haven criteria. Treatment of hepatic encephalopathy consists of pharmacological and corrective measures, as well as nutritional interventions. Rifaximin received approval for the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy in 2010 because of its few side effects and pharmacological benefits. The aim of this work is to review the use and efficacy of rifaximin both in acute and long-term management of hepatic encephalopathy. Treatment of overt hepatic encephalopathy involves management of the acute episode as well as maintenance of remission in those patients who have previously experienced an episode, in order to improve their quality of life. The positive effect of rifaximin in reducing health care costs is also discussed.Keywords: acute hepatic encephalopathy, recurrent hepatic encephalopathy, rifaximin, lactulose, cost, health-related quality of life

  7. TRAUMATIC PANCREATITIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berne, Clarence J.; Walters, Robert L.

    1953-01-01

    Traumatic pancreatitis should be considered as a diagnostic possibility when trauma to the epigastrium is followed by phenomena suggestive of intra-abdominal injury. The presence or absence of hyperamylasemia should be established immediately. Even when traumatic pancreatitis is believed to exist, any suggestion of injury to other viscera should indicate laparotomy. Retroperitoneal rupture of the duodenum may simulate traumatic pancreatitis in all respects, including hyperamylasemia. X-ray studies may be of value in differentiation. Non-complicated traumatic pancreatitis is best treated conservatively. Gunshot and knife wounds of the pancreas should be drained. PMID:13094537

  8. Wernicke Encephalopathy after Gastrointestinal Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semra Saygi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We herein describe a child operated for acute abdomen who developed Wernickes encephalopathy (WE secondary to prolonged total parenteral nutrition (TPN that lacked vitamin B1 supplementation. The author concluded that surgeons, child neurologists, pediatricians and radiologists need to be aware of the predisposing factors and symptoms of WE. Clinicians need to keep in mind that ophthalmoplegia, ataxia or altered mental status could be findings of WE. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(3.000: 627-631

  9. IMMUNOLOGICAL STUDY OF SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHIES

    OpenAIRE

    J. Meenupriya

    2013-01-01

    Spongiform encephalopathies, categorized as a subclass of neuro-degenerative diseases and commonly known as prion diseases, are a group of progressive conditions that affect the brain and nervous system of many animals, including humans. Prion diseases are common among cannibalistic communities; further research has revealed that the infected or malformed prion protein (named PrPsc) spreads its virulence to the normal, healthy prion protein (named PrPc) when people consume...

  10. Ketogenic Diet in Epileptic Encephalopathies

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Suvasini; Tripathi, Manjari

    2013-01-01

    The ketogenic diet is a medically supervised high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet that has been found useful in patients with refractory epilepsy. It has been shown to be effective in treating multiple seizure types and epilepsy syndromes. In this paper, we review the use of the ketogenic diet in epileptic encephalopathies such as Ohtahara syndrome, West syndrome, Dravet syndrome, epilepsy with myoclonic atonic seizures, and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.

  11. Valproic Acid Induced Hyperammonaemic Encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amanat, S.; Shahbaz, N.; Hassan, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To observe clinical and laboratory features of valproic acid-induced hyperammonaemic encephalopathy in patients taking valproic acid. Methods: Observational study was conducted at the Neurology Department, Dow University of Health Sciences, Civil Hospital, Karachi, from February 26, 2010 to March 20, 2011. Ten patients on valproic acid therapy of any age group with idiopathic or secondary epilepsy, who presented with encephalopathic symptoms, were registered and followed up during the study. Serum ammonia level, serum valproic acid level, liver function test, cerebrospinal fluid examination, electroencephalogram and brain imaging of all the patients were done. Other causes of encephalopathy were excluded after clinical and appropriate laboratory investigations. Microsoft Excel 2007 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Hyperammonaemia was found in all patients with encephalopathic symptoms. Rise in serum ammonia was independent of dose and serum level of valproic acid. Liver function was also found to be normal in 80% (n=8) of the patients. Valproic acid was withdrawn in all patients. Three (30%) patients improved only after the withdrawal of valproic acid. Six (60%) patients improved after L-Carnitine replacement, one (10%) after sodium benzoate. On followup, serum ammonia had reduced to normal in five (50%) patients and to more than half of the baseline level in two (20%) patients. Three (30%) patients were lost to followup after complete clinical improvement. Conclusion: Within therapeutic dose and serum levels, valproic acid can cause symptomatic hyperammonaemia resulting in encephalopathy. All patients taking valproic acid presenting with encephalopathic symptoms must be monitored for the condition. (author)

  12. aCTeX: Autoaprenentatge científico-tècnic en xarxa

    OpenAIRE

    Guillamon Grabolosa, Antoni; Ferrer, Albert

    2007-01-01

    aCTeX és una aplicació web que genera dinàmicament llistats de preguntes tipus test, amb la particularitat que admet expressions matemàtiques introduïdes en llenguatge LaTeX a la base de dades. L’aplicació executa la conversió de LaTeX a HTML i ho presenta de manera integrada en qualsevol navegador. aCTeX permet a l’usuari (alumne) de fixar certes característiques del test (dificultat, temes). Un cop generada la llista de preguntes, l’alumne pot resoldre-la on-line i obtenir resultats i expli...

  13. Diagnostic and prognostic factors for acute encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motojima, Yukiko; Nagura, Michiaki; Asano, Yoshitaka; Arakawa, Hiroshi; Takada, Eiko; Sakurai, Yoshio; Moriwaki, Koichi; Tamura, Masanori

    2016-11-01

    Acute encephalopathy has the possibility of sequelae. While early treatment is required to prevent the development of sequelae, differential diagnosis is of the utmost priority. The aim of this study was therefore to identify parameters that can facilitate early diagnosis and prediction of outcome of acute encephalopathy. We reviewed the medical charts of inpatients from 2005 to 2011 and identified 33 patients with febrile status epilepticus. Subjects were classified into an acute encephalopathy group (n = 20) and a febrile convulsion group (n = 13), and the parameters serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), ammonia (NH 3 ), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tau protein, and CSF interleukin-6 compared between them. Furthermore, the relationship between each parameter and prognosis was investigated in the encephalopathy group. Significant differences in serum AST, ALT, and LDH were observed between the febrile convulsion and acute encephalopathy group. Moreover, a significant difference in serum LDH was noted between the patients with and without developmental regression at the time of hospital discharge in the encephalopathy group. In particular, CSF tau protein was found to be highly likely to indicate progress, with CSF tau protein >1000 pg/dL associated with poor prognosis leading to developmental regression. Serum AST, ALT and LDH may be related to early diagnosis and prognosis, and should be carefully investigated in patients with encephalopathy. CSF tau protein could also be used as an indicator of poor prognosis in acute encephalopathy. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  14. Birth defects in children with newborn encephalopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Felix, JF; Badawi, N; Kurinczuk, JJ; Bower, C; Keogh, JM; Pemberton, PJ

    2000-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate birth defects found in association with newborn encephalopathy. All possible birth defects were ascertained in a population-based study of 276 term infants with moderate or severe encephalopathy and 564 unmatched term control infants. A strong association

  15. Wernicke's encephalopathy after cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Yoshiyuki

    2018-05-01

    A 76-year-old woman who had been on hemodialysis for 3 years developed ischemic mitral valve insufficiency, tricuspid insufficiency, and chronic atrial fibrillation, and underwent cardiac surgery. On the 4th postoperative day, she experienced a sudden disturbance of consciousness, aphasia, and limb ataxia. Brain computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed no abnormalities. Wernicke's encephalopathy was suspected and the patient was given vitamin B1, whereupon her symptoms gradually improved. On the 42nd postoperative day, she was free of neurological symptoms and discharged.

  16. MR findings of wernicke encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Hyun Ki; Chang, Kee Hyun; Lee, Goo; Han, Moon Hee; Park, Sung Ho; Na, Duk Yull; Song, Chi Sung

    1991-01-01

    Seven patients (33 to 58 years old) with clinical diagnoses of Wernicke encephalopathy were examined with MR on either a 2.0T (5 cases) or a 0.5T scanner (2 cases) using spin-echo pulse sequences. In 2 patients, follow-up MR studies were performed 1 and 5 weeks after thiamine (vitamine B1) treatment. Five patients (4 chronic alcoholics and 1 with hyperemesis gravidarum) showed atrophy of both mamillary bodies, along with patchy lesions around the third ventricle, medial thalami, tectum of the midbrain, and periaqueductal gray matter. Another patient with hyperemesis of gravidrum demonstrated only slightly atrophic mamillary bodies, and the last patient with severe vomiting after gastrojejunostomy showed only diencephaic/mesencephalic lesions with apparently normal mamillary bodies. A follow-up MR showed a decrease in previously-noted diencephalic/-/mesencephalic lesions but no change in the size of the mamillary bodies. Diencephalic/mesencephalic lesions were well seen as a high-signal intensity on proton-and T2-weighted axial images, while atrophy of the mamillary bodies was seen best on T1-weighted sagittal images. MR imaging is very useful in demonstrating the characteristic lesions of Wernicke encephalopathy and in evaluating the result of treatment on follow-up study

  17. Computerized tomography in acute toxic encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Nobuhiko; Kaneshi, Kunio; Mizuguchi, Masashi; Kurihara, Eiji.

    1983-01-01

    We experienced three cases of acute toxic encephalopathy, including a case of probable Reye syndrome, which had similar and unique CT findings in their acute stage; symmetrical low density area in the thalamus and the dentate nucleus, followed by changes in cerebellar hemispheres and around lateral ventricles. The CT findings, common to probable Reye syndrome and other acute toxic encephalopathy, may suggest the possibility of similar pathogenesis of brain damage in both disorders. The authors propose that present cases are a new subgroup in acute toxic encephalopathy, because of their similar and unique CT features. (author)

  18. No oxygen delivery limitation in hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjedde, Albert; Keiding, Susanne; Vilstrup, Hendrik

    2010-01-01

    to choose between cause and effect in three groups of volunteers, including healthy control subjects (HC), patients with cirrhosis of the liver without hepatic encephalopathy (CL), and patients with cirrhosis with acute hepatic encephalopathy. Compared to HC subjects, blood flow and energy metabolism had......Hepatic encephalopathy is a condition of reduced brain functioning in which both blood flow and brain energy metabolism declined. It is not known whether blood flow or metabolism is the primary limiting factor of brain function in this condition. We used calculations of mitochondrial oxygen tension...

  19. A new infectious encephalopathy syndrome, clinically mild encephalopathy associated with excitotoxicity (MEEX).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Nozomi; Yoshimaru, Daisuke; Moriyama, Yoko; Yasukawa, Kumi; Takanashi, Jun-Ichi

    2017-09-15

    Acute infectious encephalopathy is often observed in children in East Asia including Japan. More than 40% of the patients remain unclassified into specific syndromes. To investigate the underlying pathomechanisms in those with unclassified encephalopathy, we evaluated brain metabolism by MR spectroscopy. Among seven patients with acute encephalopathy admitted to our hospital from June 2016 to May 2017, three were classified into acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD). The other four showed consciousness disturbance lasting more than three days with no parenchymal lesion visible on MRI, which led to a diagnosis of unclassified encephalopathy. MR spectroscopy in these four patients, however, revealed an increase of glutamine with a normal N-acetyl aspartate level on days 5 to 8, which had normalized by follow-up studies on days 11 to 16. The four patients clinically recovered completely. Among 27 patients with encephalopathy, including the present seven patients, admitted to our hospital from January 2015 to March 2017, seven (26%) were classified into this type, which we propose is a new encephalopathy syndrome, clinically mild encephalopathy associated with excitotoxicity (MEEX). MEEX is the second most common subtype, following AESD (30%). This study suggests that excitotoxicity may be a common underlying pathomechanism of acute infectious encephalopathy, and prompt astrocytic neuroprotection from excitotoxicity may prevent progression of MEEX into AESD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... increased pressure in the skull, prolonged exposure to toxic elements (including solvents, drugs, radiation, paints, industrial chemicals, and certain metals), chronic progressive trauma, poor nutrition, ...

  1. Fundus Findings in Wernicke Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tal Serlin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Wernicke encephalopathy (WE is an acute neuropsychiatric syndrome resulting from thiamine (vitamin B1 deficiency, classically characterized by the triad of ophthalmoplegia, confusion, and ataxia. While commonly associated with chronic alcoholism, WE may also occur in the setting of poor nutrition or absorption. We present a 37-year-old woman who underwent laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and presented with visual disturbance with bilateral horizontal nystagmus, confusion, and postural imbalance. Fundus examination revealed bilateral optic disc edema with a retinal hemorrhage in the left eye. Metabolic workup demonstrated thiamine deficiency. Her symptoms resolved after thiamine treatment. This case raises the awareness of the possibility of posterior segment findings in WE, which are underreported in WE.

  2. Nonabsorbable disaccharides for hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Lise Lotte; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Morgan, Marsha Y

    2016-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Nonabsorbable disaccharides (NADs) have been used to treat hepatic encephalopathy (HE) since 1966. However, a Cochrane Review, published in 2004, found insufficient evidence to recommend their use in this context. This updated systematic review evaluates the effects of the NADs...... primary/secondary prevention. Random-effects meta-analyses showed that, compared to placebo/no intervention, NADs had a beneficial effect on HE (relative risk [RR] = 0.63, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.53-0.74, number needed to treat [NNT] = 4) and serious liver-related adverse events such as liver...... with minimal HE. Meta-analyses of the prevention randomized controlled trials showed that NADs prevented the development of HE (RR = 0.47, 95% CI 0.33-0.68, NNT = 6), the risk of developing serious liver-related adverse events (RR = 0.48, 95% CI 0.33-0.70, NNT = 6), and reduced mortality (RR = 0.63, 95% CI 0...

  3. Rapidly Progressive Quadriplegia and Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, DonRaphael; McCorquodale, Donald; Peters, Angela; Juster-Switlyk, Kelsey; Smith, Gordon; Ansari, Safdar

    2016-11-01

    A woman aged 77 years was transferred to our neurocritical care unit for evaluation and treatment of rapidly progressive motor weakness and encephalopathy. Examination revealed an ability to follow simple commands only and abnormal movements, including myoclonus, tongue and orofacial dyskinesias, and opsoclonus. Imaging study findings were initially unremarkable, but when repeated, they demonstrated enhancement of the cauda equina nerve roots, trigeminal nerve, and pachymeninges. Cerebrospinal fluid examination revealed mildly elevated white blood cell count and protein levels. Serial electrodiagnostic testing demonstrated a rapidly progressive diffuse sensory motor axonopathy, and electroencephalogram findings progressed from generalized slowing to bilateral periodic lateralized epileptiform discharges. Critical details of her recent history prompted a diagnostic biopsy. Over time, the patient became completely unresponsive with no further abnormal movements and ultimately died. The differential diagnosis, pathological findings, and diagnosis are discussed with a brief review of a well-known yet rare diagnosis.

  4. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy: Atypical Pros and Cons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are fatal neurologic diseases that affect several mammalian species including human beings. Four animal TSE agents have been reported: scrapie of sheep and goats; chronic wasting disease (CWD) of deer, elk, and moose; transmissible mink encephalopath...

  5. Hashimoto's encephalopathy: Report of three cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Shun Chang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Both severe thyrotoxicosis and hypothyroidism may affect brain function and cause a change in consciousness, as seen with a thyroid storm or myxedema coma. However, encephalopathy may also develop in patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases independent of actual thyroid function level, and this is known as Hashimoto's encephalopathy. Although most patients are found to have Hashimoto's thyroiditis, less frequently they have Graves' disease. Clinical manifestations include epilepsy, disturbance of consciousness, cognitive impairment, memory loss, myoclonus, hallucinations, stroke-like episodes, tremor, involuntary movements, language impairment, and gait impairment. Hashimoto's encephalopathy is a relatively rare disease. As a good response can be obtained with corticosteroid therapy, early diagnosis and treatment is very beneficial for patients. Here we report three patients with Hashimoto's encephalopathy with typical manifestations of hallucinations that were associated with hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, and euthyroid status, respectively. They all showed a dramatic response to methylprednisolone pulse therapy.

  6. Traumatic Pneumatocele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai-Ching Yang

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic pneumatocele is a rare complication of blunt chest trauma with uncertain pathogenesis. It occurs primarily in pediatric patients and is characterized by single or multiple pulmonary cystic lesions concomitant with other type of injuries of the lung parenchyma. Herein we present a case of traumatic pneumatocele in a 3-year-old boy, together with a brief review of the literature. This rare entity should be considered in the differential diagnosis of cystic lesions complicating blunt chest trauma, especially in young adults. The disease generally has a benign and self-limiting course.

  7. Reversible dementia with psychosis: Hashimoto's encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocellin, Ramon; Lubman, Dan I; Lloyd, John; Tomlinson, E Bruce; Velakoulis, Dennis

    2006-12-01

    A case of presumed Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) is presented. The presentation included memory loss, delusions, functional decline and culminated in a generalized seizure. Anti-thyroid antibodies were detected and symptoms resolved with prednisolone. Patients with HE may present with prominent neuropsychiatric symptoms, attract psychiatric diagnoses and present to psychiatric services. Primarily a diagnosis of exclusion, HE should be considered in cases of encephalopathy in which standard investigations are negative.

  8. STXBP1 encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stamberger, Hannah; Nikanorova, Marina; Willemsen, Marjolein H

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To give a comprehensive overview of the phenotypic and genetic spectrum of STXBP1 encephalopathy (STXBP1-E) by systematically reviewing newly diagnosed and previously reported patients. METHODS: We recruited newly diagnosed patients with STXBP1 mutations through an international networ......, and the degree of ID. Accordingly, we hypothesize that seizure severity and ID present 2 independent dimensions of the STXBP1-E phenotype. STXBP1-E may be conceptualized as a complex neurodevelopmental disorder rather than a primary epileptic encephalopathy....

  9. Acute hepatic encephalopathy with diffuse cortical lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, S.M.; Spreer, J.; Schumacher, M. [Section of Neuroradiology, Univ. of Freiburg (Germany); Els, T. [Dept. of Neurology, University of Freiburg (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    Acute hepatic encephalopathy is a poorly defined syndrome of heterogeneous aetiology. We report a 49-year-old woman with alcoholic cirrhosis and hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia who developed acute hepatic coma induced by severe gastrointestinal bleeding. Laboratory analysis revealed excessively elevated blood ammonia. MRI showed lesions compatible with chronic hepatic encephalopathy and widespread cortical signal change sparing the perirolandic and occipital cortex. The cortical lesions resembled those of hypoxic brain damage and were interpreted as acute toxic cortical laminar necrosis. (orig.)

  10. Post-partum posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    B. V. Triveni; Salman Mohammed Sheikh; Deepak Shedde

    2014-01-01

    Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES) is a clinicopathological syndrome associated with various clinical conditions presenting with headache, encephalopathy, seizure and cortical visual disturbances. Radiological findings in PRES are thought to be due to vasogenic edema predominantly in posterior cerebral hemispheres and are reversible with appropriate management. We present a case of post partum PRES,A 29 year old primigravida of 33 weeks 3 days period of gestation who prese...

  11. Acute hepatic encephalopathy with diffuse cortical lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, S.M.; Spreer, J.; Schumacher, M.; Els, T.

    2001-01-01

    Acute hepatic encephalopathy is a poorly defined syndrome of heterogeneous aetiology. We report a 49-year-old woman with alcoholic cirrhosis and hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia who developed acute hepatic coma induced by severe gastrointestinal bleeding. Laboratory analysis revealed excessively elevated blood ammonia. MRI showed lesions compatible with chronic hepatic encephalopathy and widespread cortical signal change sparing the perirolandic and occipital cortex. The cortical lesions resembled those of hypoxic brain damage and were interpreted as acute toxic cortical laminar necrosis. (orig.)

  12. Wernicke's encephalopathy as a complication of gastroparesis after ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is a common complication of malnutrition, alcohol abuse and gastric outlet obstruction. We describe a patient who developed Wernicke's encephalopathy secondary to gastroparesis, with no significant evidence of malnutrition, alcohol abuse, or gastric outlet obstruction.

  13. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE), or Mad Cow Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the CDC Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE), or Mad Cow Disease Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... spongiform encephalopathy) is a progressive neurological disorder of cattle that results from infection by an unusual transmissible ...

  14. Hypertensive encephalopathy in a patient with neonatal thyrotoxicosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijnenburg, MWH; Zweens, MJ; Bink, MTE; Odink, RJ

    1999-01-01

    Neonatal hyperthyroidism may give rise to serious cardiovascular complications. A girl with severe thyrotoxicosis in whom hypertensive encephalopathy developed is described. Conclusion Neonatal thyrotoxicosis can give rise to hypertension and may lead to hypertensive encephalopathy.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: familial encephalopathy with neuroserpin inclusion bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions FENIB Familial encephalopathy with neuroserpin inclusion bodies Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... expand/collapse boxes. Description Familial encephalopathy with neuroserpin inclusion bodies ( FENIB ) is a disorder that causes progressive ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: STXBP1 encephalopathy with epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources (8 links) Boston Children's Hospital: Epilepsy and Seizure Disorder in Children Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: ... stxbp1 encephalopathy with epilepsy Merck Manual Consumer Version: Seizure Disorders Orphanet: Early infantile epileptic encephalopathy Patient Support and ...

  17. Numerical simulation of CTE mismatch and thermal-structural stresses in the design of interconnects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Geoffrey John M.

    With the ever-increasing chip complexity, interconnects have to be designed to meet the new challenges. Advances in optical lithography have made chip feature sizes available today at 70 nm dimensions. With advances in Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography, X-ray Lithography, and Ion Projection Lithography it is expected that the line width will further decrease to 20 nm or less. With the decrease in feature size, the number of active devices on the chip increases. With higher levels of circuit integration, the challenge is to dissipate the increased heat flux from the chip surface area. Thermal management considerations include coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) matching to prevent failure between the chip and the board. This in turn calls for improved system performance and reliability of the electronic structural systems. Experience has shown that in most electronic systems, failures are mostly due to CTE mismatch between the chip, board, and the solder joint (solder interconnect). The resulting high thermal-structural stress and strain due to CTE mismatch produces cracks in the solder joints with eventual failure of the electronic component. In order to reduce the thermal stress between the chip, board, and the solder joint, this dissertation examines the effect of inserting wire bundle (wire interconnect) between the chip and the board. The flexibility of the wires or fibers would reduce the stress at the rigid joints. Numerical simulations of two, and three-dimensional models of the solder and wire interconnects are examined. The numerical simulation is linear in nature and is based on linear isotropic material properties. The effect of different wire material properties is examined. The effect of varying the wire diameter is studied by changing the wire diameter. A major cause of electronic equipment failure is due to fatigue failure caused by thermal cycling, and vibrations. A two-dimensional modal and harmonic analysis was simulated for the wire interconnect

  18. [Human transmissible subacute spongiform encephalopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dormont, D

    1994-05-01

    Human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) are rare chronic subacute degenerative diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) which include Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), Kuru, Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome (GSS), and Fatal Familial Insomnia (FFI). CJD can be either inherited or sporadic. All these diseases are always fatal. Neuropathological features are mainly constituted of neuronal vacuolisation, neuronal death, gliosis with hyperastrocytosis; plaques might be evidenced in kuru and GSS. Neither inflammatory syndrome nor demyelination is detectable. No virus like structure could be identified reproducibly. Human TSE are transmissible to non human primates and rodents. Iatrogenic CJD have been described after tissue grafting (cornea, dura mater), neurosurgery, electrophysiology investigation, and treatment with pituitary derived gonadotrophins and growth hormone. Molecular biochemistry of the CNS investigation revealed that a host encoded protein, the prion protein (PrP), accumulates proportionally to the infectious titer: this abnormality is the only detectable hallmark in TSE. Infectious fractions contain no detectable specific nucleic acid, and are mainly constituted of PrP under an isoform which resists to proteinase K digestion (PrP-res). The PrP gene (PRNP) is located on chromosome 20 in humans. Several mutations of this gene have been described in all inherited TSE (CJD, GSS, and IFF). No treatment is available today. Agents inducing TSE (TSA) are not known: several authors claim that TSA are only constituted of PrP-res; others support the hypothesis of a conventional agent with a specific genetic information.

  19. Encephalopathy caused by lanthanum carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraile, Pilar; Cacharro, Luis Maria; Garcia-Cosmes, Pedro; Rosado, Consolacion; Tabernero, Jose Matias

    2011-06-01

    Lanthanum carbonate is a nonaluminum, noncalcium phosphate-binding agent, which is widely used in patients with end-stage chronic kidney disease. Until now, no significant side-effects have been described for the clinical use of lanthanum carbonate, and there are no available clinical data regarding its tissue stores. Here we report the case of a 59-year-old patient who was admitted with confusional syndrome. The patient received 3750 mg of lanthanum carbonate daily. Examinations were carried out, and the etiology of the encephalopathy of the patient could not be singled out. The lanthanum carbonate levels in serum and cerebrospinal fluid were high, and the syndrome eased after the drug was removed. The results of our study confirm that, in our case, the lanthanum carbonate did cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Although lanthanum carbonate seems a safe drug with minimal absorption, this work reveals the problem derived from the increase of serum levels of lanthanum carbonate, and the possibility that it may cross the BBB. Further research is required on the possible pathologies that increase serum levels of lanthanum carbonate, as well as the risks and side-effects derived from its absorption.

  20. Hashimoto's encephalopathy : epidemiology, pathogenesis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocellin, Ramon; Walterfang, Mark; Velakoulis, Dennis

    2007-01-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy is a term used to describe an encephalopathy of presumed autoimmune origin characterised by high titres of antithyroid peroxidase antibodies. In a similar fashion to autoimmune thyroid disease, Hashimoto's encephalopathy is more common in women than in men. It has been reported in paediatric, adult and elderly populations throughout the world. The clinical presentation may involve a relapsing and remitting course and include seizures, stroke-like episodes, cognitive decline, neuropsychiatric symptoms and myoclonus. Thyroid function is usually clinically and biochemically normal.Hashimoto's encephalopathy appears to be a rare disorder, but, as it is responsive to treatment with corticosteroids, it must be considered in cases of 'investigation negative encephalopathies'. Diagnosis is made in the first instance by excluding other toxic, metabolic and infectious causes of encephalopathy with neuroimaging and CSF examination. Neuroimaging findings are often not helpful in clarifying the diagnosis. Common differential diagnoses when these conditions are excluded are Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, rapidly progressive dementias, and paraneoplastic and nonparaneoplastic limbic encephalitis. In the context of the typical clinical picture, high titres of antithyroid antibodies, in particular antithyroid peroxidase antibodies, are diagnostic. These antibodies, however, can be detected in elevated titres in the healthy general population. Treatment with corticosteroids is almost always successful, although relapse may occur if this treatment is ceased abruptly. Other forms of immunomodulation, such as intravenous immune-globulin and plasma exchange, may also be effective. Despite the link to autoimmune thyroid disease, the aetiology of Hashimoto's encephalopathy is unknown. It is likely that antithyroid antibodies are not pathogenic, but titres can be a marker of treatment response. Pathological findings can suggest an inflammatory process, but features

  1. Branched-chain amino acids for hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, B; Koretz, R L; Kjaergard, L L

    2003-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy may be caused by a decreased plasma ratio of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) to aromatic amino acids. Treatment with BCAA may therefore have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy.......Hepatic encephalopathy may be caused by a decreased plasma ratio of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) to aromatic amino acids. Treatment with BCAA may therefore have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy....

  2. Electroencephalography and Brain MRI Patterns in Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wabulya, Angela; Lesser, Ronald P; Llinas, Rafael; Kaplan, Peter W

    2016-04-01

    Using electroencephalography (EEG) and histology in patients with diffuse encephalopathy, Gloor et al reported that paroxysmal synchronous discharges (PSDs) on EEG required combined cortical gray (CG) and "subcortical" gray (SCG) matter pathology, while polymorphic delta activity (PDA) occurred in patients with white matter pathology. In patients with encephalopathy, we compared EEG findings and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to determine if MRI reflected similar pathological EEG correlations. Retrospective case control study of 52 cases with EEG evidence of encephalopathy and 50 controls without evidence of encephalopathy. Review of clinical, EEG and MRI data acquired within 4 days of each other. The most common EEG finding in encephalopathy was background slowing, in 96.1%. We found PSDs in 0% of cases with the combination of CG and SCG abnormalities. Although 13.5% (n=7) had PSDs on EEG; 3 of these had CG and 4 had SCG abnormalities. A total of 73.1% (38/52) had white matter abnormalities-of these 28.9% (11/38) had PDA. PSDs were found with either CG or "SCG" MRI abnormalities and did not require a combination of the two. In agreement with Gloor et al, PDA occurred with white matter MRI abnormalities in the absence of gray matter abnormalities. © EEG and Clinical Neuroscience Society (ECNS) 2015.

  3. Posterior encephalopathy with vasospasm: MRI and angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidauer, S.; Gaa, J.; Lanfermann, H.; Zanella, F.E.; Sitzer, M.; Hefner, R.

    2003-01-01

    Posterior encephalopathy is characterised by headache, impairment of consciousness, seizures and progressive visual loss. MRI shows bilateral, predominantly posterior, cortical and subcortical lesions with a distribution. Our aim was to analyse the MRI lesion pattern and angiographic findings because the pathophysiology of posterior encephalopathy is incompletely understood. We report three patients with clinical and imaging findings consistent with posterior encephalopathy who underwent serial MRI including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and construction of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps, and four-vessel digital subtraction angiography (DSA). DWI revealed symmetrical subcortical and cortical parieto-occipital high signal. High and also low ADCs indicated probable vasogenic and cytotoxic oedema. On follow-up there was focal cortical laminar necrosis, while the white-matter lesions resolved almost completely, except in the arterial border zones. DSA revealed diffuse arterial narrowing, slightly more marked in the posterior circulation. These findings suggest that posterior encephalopathy may in some cases be due to diffuse, severe vasospasm affecting especially in the parieto-occipital grey matter, with its higher vulnerability to ischemia. Cerebral vasospasm due to digitoxin intoxication, resulting in posterior encephalopathy, has not yet been described previously. (orig.)

  4. Career Opportunities: Career Technical Education and the College Completion Agenda. Part III: Promising CTE Policies from across the States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulock, Nancy; Chisholm, Eric; Moore, Colleen; Harris, Latonya

    2012-01-01

    California's community colleges are key to resolving the shortage of educated workers that is threatening the competitive position of the state's economy. Tremendous potential for addressing this challenge resides in the system's career technical education (CTE) mission which, with appropriate structures and support, could help many more students…

  5. Tailoring the toughness and CTE of high temperature bisphenol E cyanate ester (BECy resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Thunga

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present work is to enhancing the toughness and minimizing the CTE of a special class of bisphenol E cyanate ester (BECy resin by blending it with a thermoplastic toughening agent. Poly(ether sulfone was chosen as a high temperature resistant thermoplastic resin to enhance the thermo-mechanical properties of BECy. The influence of poly(ether sulfone/BECy blend composition on the morphology and phase behavior was studied using scanning electron microscopy and dynamic mechanical analysis. The mechanical properties of the blends were evaluated by flexural tests, which demonstrated significant enhancement in the material’s toughness with an increase in PES concentration from 0 to 15 wt%. The coefficient of thermal expansion of pure BECy was reduced from 61 to 48 ppm/°C in the blends with PES, emphasizing the multi-functional benefits of PES as a toughening agent in BECy.

  6. Modeling the impact of preflushing on CTE in proton irradiated CCD-based detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philbrick, R. H.

    2002-04-01

    A software model is described that performs a "real world" simulation of the operation of several types of charge-coupled device (CCD)-based detectors in order to accurately predict the impact that high-energy proton radiation has on image distortion and modulation transfer function (MTF). The model was written primarily to predict the effectiveness of vertical preflushing on the custom full frame CCD-based detectors intended for use on the proposed Kepler Discovery mission, but it is capable of simulating many other types of CCD detectors and operating modes as well. The model keeps track of the occupancy of all phosphorous-silicon (P-V), divacancy (V-V) and oxygen-silicon (O-V) defect centers under every CCD electrode over the entire detector area. The integrated image is read out by simulating every electrode-to-electrode charge transfer in both the vertical and horizontal CCD registers. A signal level dependency on the capture and emission of signal is included and the current state of each electrode (e.g., barrier or storage) is considered when distributing integrated and emitted signal. Options for performing preflushing, preflashing, and including mini-channels are available on both the vertical and horizontal CCD registers. In addition, dark signal generation and image transfer smear can be selectively enabled or disabled. A comparison of the charge transfer efficiency (CTE) data measured on the Hubble space telescope imaging spectrometer (STIS) CCD with the CTE extracted from model simulations of the STIS CCD show good agreement.

  7. Stimulus induced bursts in severe postanoxic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjepkema-Cloostermans, Marleen C; Wijers, Elisabeth T; van Putten, Michel J A M

    2016-11-01

    To report on a distinct effect of auditory and sensory stimuli on the EEG in comatose patients with severe postanoxic encephalopathy. In two comatose patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) with severe postanoxic encephalopathy and burst-suppression EEG, we studied the effect of external stimuli (sound and touch) on the occurrence of bursts. In patient A bursts could be induced by either auditory or sensory stimuli. In patient B bursts could only be induced by touching different facial regions (forehead, nose and chin). When stimuli were presented with relatively long intervals, bursts persistently followed the stimuli, while stimuli with short intervals (encephalopathy can be induced by external stimuli, resulting in stimulus-dependent burst-suppression. Stimulus induced bursts should not be interpreted as prognostic favourable EEG reactivity. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Delayed encephalopathy after acute carbon monoxide poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet İbrahim Turan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide poisoning is a major cause of death following attempted suicide and accidental exposures. Although clinical presentation depends on the duration and the intensity of exposure, the assessment of the severity of intoxication is difficult. A small percentage of patients who show complete initial recovery may develop delayed neurological deficits. Delayed encephalopathy after acute carbon monoxide poisoning is a rare and poor prognosis neurologic disorders and there is no specific treatment. We present a case with early onset of delayed encephalopathy after acute carbon monoxide poisoning with typical cranial imaging findings in a child with atypical history and clinical presentation.

  9. Metronidazole-induced encephalopathy in a patient with liver cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Hyeong Cheol; Jeong, Taek Geun; Cho, Young Bum; Yang, Bong Joon; Kim, Tae Hyeon; Kim, Haak Cheoul; Cho, Eun-Young

    2011-06-01

    Encephalopathy is a disorder characterized by altered brain function, which can be attributed to various causes. Encephalopathy associated with metronidazole administration occurs rarely and depends on the cumulative metronidazole dose, and most patients with this condition recover rapidly after discontinuation of therapy. Because metronidazole is metabolized in the liver and can be transported by the cerebrospinal fluid and cross the blood-brain barrier, it may induce encephalopathy even at a low cumulative dose in patients with hepatic dysfunction. We experienced a patient who showed ataxic gait and dysarthric speech after receiving metronidazole for the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy that was not controlled by the administration of lactulose. The patient was diagnosed as metronidazole-induced encephalopathy, and stopping drug administration resulted in a complete recovery from encephalopathy. This case shows that caution should be exercised when administering metronidazole because even a low dose can induce encephalopathy in patients with liver cirrhosis.

  10. Diverse Neurological Manifestations of Lead Encephalopathy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three patients with lead encephalopathy due to industrial poisoning are presented. They all showed a wide spectrum of neurological manifestations, which mimic other neurological presentations. It is emphasised that lead poisoning still occurs in industry, despite efforts at prevention. S. Afr. Med. J., 48, 1721 (1974) ...

  11. Wernicke's Encephalopathy in a Nigerian with Schizophrenia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    While Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is a well-characterized syndrome in alcoholism and malnutrition, little is written of its prevalence or presentation in patients with psychiatric illness. We present a case of a 37-year-old Nigerian male with schizophrenia and malnutrition who presented with delirium and ophthalmoplegia ...

  12. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: Some novel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two cases occurred following cerebral anoxia due to accidental strangulation and near-drowning, respectively. The third patient, a child known to have E-β thalassaemia, presented with transient encephalopathy following blood transfusion but involving the anterior brain rather than the posterior part classically described in ...

  13. Wernicke encephalopathy in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallas, Matt; Desai, Jay

    2014-11-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy is caused by thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency. It is generally considered to be a disease of adult alcoholics. However, it is known to occur in the pediatric population and in non-alcoholic conditions. We searched PubMed with the key words Wernicke, thiamine, pediatric, children and adolescents and selected publications that were deemed appropriate. The global prevalence rates of hunger, poverty and resultant nutrient deprivation have decreased in the 21st century. However, several scenarios which may predispose to Wernicke encephalopathy may be increasingly prevalent in children and adolescents such as malignancies, intensive care unit stays and surgical procedures for the treatment of obesity. Other predisposing conditions include magnesium deficiency and defects in the SLC19A3 gene causing thiamine transporter-2 deficiency. The classic triad consists of encephalopathy, oculomotor dysfunction and gait ataxia but is not seen in a majority of patients. Treatment should be instituted immediately when the diagnosis is suspected clinically without waiting for laboratory confirmation. Common magnetic resonance findings include symmetric T2 hyperintensities in dorsal medial thalamus, mammillary bodies, periaqueductal gray matter, and tectal plate. Wernicke encephalopathy is a medical emergency. Delay in its recognition and treatment may lead to significant morbidity, irreversible neurological damage or even death. This article aims to raise the awareness of this condition among pediatricians.

  14. Hepatic encephalopathy: experimental studies on the pathogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.J. de Knegt (Robert)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractAims of this thesis: 1. To study, in rabbits, the suitability of experimental acute liver failure and acute hyperammonemia simulating acute liver failure for the study of hepatic encephalopathy and ammonia toxicity. 2. To study glutamate neurotransmission in rabbits with acute liver

  15. Clinical and experimental aspects of hepatic encephalopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Groeneweg (Michael)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractHepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a neuropsychiatnc syndrome associated with severe liver disease. Clinical symptoms range from minimal changes in mental state and neuromuscular defects to unresponsive coma. 1-' The syndrome of HE can be divided into three major groups: HE associated with

  16. Hepatic encephalopathy: clinical and experimental studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.C.D. van der Rijt (Carin)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractThe pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy is still unsolved. Therapy, therefore, is often insufficient. For the development of effective, new therapies insight into the disease-inducing substrates and the mechanisms of its toxic actions in the central nervous system ·are required. For

  17. Qualifying and quantifying minimal hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgan, Marsha Y; Amodio, Piero; Cook, Nicola A

    2016-01-01

    Minimal hepatic encephalopathy is the term applied to the neuropsychiatric status of patients with cirrhosis who are unimpaired on clinical examination but show alterations in neuropsychological tests exploring psychomotor speed/executive function and/or in neurophysiological variables. There is ......Minimal hepatic encephalopathy is the term applied to the neuropsychiatric status of patients with cirrhosis who are unimpaired on clinical examination but show alterations in neuropsychological tests exploring psychomotor speed/executive function and/or in neurophysiological variables...... analytical techniques may provide better diagnostic information while the advent of portable wireless headsets may facilitate more widespread use. A large number of other diagnostic tools have been validated for the diagnosis of minimal hepatic encephalopathy including Critical Flicker Frequency......, the Inhibitory Control Test, the Stroop test, the Scan package and the Continuous Reaction Time; each has its pros and cons; strengths and weaknesses; protagonists and detractors. Recent AASLD/EASL Practice Guidelines suggest that the diagnosis of minimal hepatic encephalopathy should be based on the PHES test...

  18. Pathogenesis of bovine spongiform encephalopathy in sheep

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keulen, van L.J.M.; Vromans, M.E.W.; Dolstra, C.H.; Bossers, A.; Zijderveld, van F.G.

    2008-01-01

    The pathogenesis of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in sheep was studied by immunohistochemical detection of scrapie-associated prion protein (PrPSc) in the gastrointestinal, lymphoid and neural tissues following oral inoculation with BSE brain homogenate. First accumulation of PrPSc was

  19. CT diagnosis of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Xiang; Ma Jiwei; Wu Lide

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To explore CT characteristics of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), and to improve the accuracy of CT diagnosis. Methods: 50 cases of neonatal asphyxia in perinatal period diagnosed as hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy by CT was analyzed. Results: The main manifestation of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy is cerebral edema and intracranial hemorrhage. Focal or diffuse hypo-dense lesion and hyper-dense area in various location and morphology were seen on CT images. (1) Localized diffuse hypo-dense area in 1 or 2 cerebral lobe were found in 17 cases, and the lesions were localized in frontal lobe (n=6), in frontotemporal lobe (n=5), and in temporo-occipital lobe (n=6). (2) Hypo-density region involving more than three cerebral lobes were found in 18 cases, and abnormalities were found in frontotemporal and parietal lobe (n=8), accompanying with subarachnoid hemorrhage (n=2); in frontal, temporal and occipital lobe (n=6), in which cerebral hemorrhage was complicated (n=1); and in other cerebral lobe (n=4). (3) Diffuse low-density region in all cerebral lobe were found in 15 cases, in which subarachnoid hemorrhage was complicated in 4 cases, and ventricular hemorrhage was found in 2 case. Conclusion: CT imaging plays an important role in diagnosis of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy and has shown its clinical value

  20. Wernicke’s encephalopathy following hyperemesis gravidarum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Pourali

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: ″Wernicke’s Korsakoff″ syndrome is the most important complication of severe thiamine deficiency. The term refers to two different syndromes, each representing a different stage of the disease. Wernicke’s encephalopathy (WE is an acute syndrome requiring emergent treatment to prevent death and neurologic morbidity. Korsakoff syndrome (KS refers to a chronic neurologic condition that usually occurs as a consequence of WE. It is a rare complication of hyperemesis gravidarum that confusion, ocular signs, and gait ataxia are the most prevalent symptoms, respectively. Typical brain lesions of wernicke’s encephalopathy (WE are observed at autopsy in 0.4 to 2.8 percent of the general population in the western world and the majority of affected patients are alcoholic. The prevalence of wernicke’s encephalopathy lesions seen on autopsy was 12.5% of alcohol abusers in one report. Among those who with alcohol-related death, it has been reported to be even higher, 29 to 59%. The aim of this study was to report a case of wernicke’s encephalopathy following hyperemesis gravidarum. Case Presentation: A 28-year-old-pregnant woman in 19th weeks of gestation referred to the hospital with hyperemesis, gait ataxia, and dysarthria before that she had hyperemesis gravidarum with weight loss and unresponsive to outpatient and inpatient medical therapy. MRI showed hyperdense lesion around thalamus which was characteristic of wernicke’s encephalopathy. Rapid improvement in patient’s condition occurred after high dose thiamine infusion. Conclusion: In hyperemesis gravidarum, presence of either symptoms of ocular or mental disorder or ataxia must be considered to rule out and appropriate treatment of Wernicke’s syndrome which can cause maternal and fetal death.

  1. Autism spectrum disorder and epileptic encephalopathy: common causes, many questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Siddharth; Sahin, Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies represent a particularly severe form of epilepsy, associated with cognitive and behavioral deficits, including impaired social-communication and restricted, repetitive behaviors that are the hallmarks of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). With the advent of next-generation sequencing, the genetic landscape of epileptic encephalopathies is growing and demonstrates overlap with genes separately implicated in ASD. However, many questions remain about this connection, including whether epileptiform activity itself contributes to the development of ASD symptomatology. In this review, we compiled a database of genes associated with both epileptic encephalopathy and ASD, limiting our purview to Mendelian disorders not including inborn errors of metabolism, and we focused on the connection between ASD and epileptic encephalopathy rather than epilepsy broadly. Our review has four goals: to (1) discuss the overlapping presentations of ASD and monogenic epileptic encephalopathies; (2) examine the impact of the epilepsy itself on neurocognitive features, including ASD, in monogenic epileptic encephalopathies; (3) outline many of the genetic causes responsible for both ASD and epileptic encephalopathy; (4) provide an illustrative example of a final common pathway that may be implicated in both ASD and epileptic encephalopathy. We demonstrate that autistic features are a common association with monogenic epileptic encephalopathies. Certain epileptic encephalopathy syndromes, like infantile spasms, are especially linked to the development of ASD. The connection between seizures themselves and neurobehavioral deficits in these monogenic encephalopathies remains open to debate. Finally, advances in genetics have revealed many genes that overlap in ties to both ASD and epileptic encephalopathy and that play a role in diverse central nervous system processes. Increased attention to the autistic features of monogenic epileptic encephalopathies is warranted for

  2. Teaching English Language Skills for School Teachers: CTE Programme of IGNOU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asha Khare

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available India is a multilingual country. English is the second most important language in the country after the national language Hindi since it is taught as a compulsory subject in all the Indian schools. In the educational system of a multilingual country, it becomes imperative to improve the English Language teaching skills of the school teachers who come from various linguistic backgrounds. The school teacher plays a vital role in the development of linguistic skills of the students. What children learn can affect their later success or failure in school, work, and their personal lives. As such, the school teachers need to improve their own English language skills if they are teaching without any previous English language training. This paper throws light on the communicative approach of English language teaching. It introduces the Certificate in Teaching of English (CTE programme of the Indira Gandhi National Open University (IGNOU and outlines the syllabus and the methods used by the university to impart English Language Teaching skills to the elementary/secondary school teachers through this programme with the objective to enhance teacher’s understanding of  the learners and their learning process.

  3. Computedtomographic findings in natal encephalopathies and their significance for the prognosis for the near future and long-term development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotlarek, F.

    1981-01-01

    190 premature babies and newborn with a hypoxic or traumatic natal encephalopathy were examined in the newborn period with cranial computed tomography. 10 other neonatals with cyanotic vitia even without neurologic syndromes were included into this study. 73 of these infants were intubated for a while and supplied with air. The CT findings were compared with those of a ''control group'' of neonatals who provided externally visible malformations but no burdening perinatal anamnesis. 82 premature and neonatal babies showed abnormal morphologic basic findings. Due to kind, localisation and size of the lesion, different morphologic patterns - depending on the birth weight - can be delineated. (orig./MG) [de

  4. The Thompson Encephalopathy Score and Short-Term Outcomes in Asphyxiated Newborns Treated With Therapeutic Hypothermia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thorsen, Patricia; Jansen-van der Weide, Martine C.; Groenendaal, Floris; Onland, Wes; van Straaten, Henrika L. M.; Zonnenberg, Inge; Vermeulen, Jeroen R.; Dijk, Peter H.; Dudink, Jeroen; Rijken, Monique; van Heijst, Arno; Dijkman, Koen P.; Cools, Filip; Zecic, Alexandra; van Kaam, Anton H.; de Haan, Timo R.

    2016-01-01

    The Thompson encephalopathy score is a clinical score to assess newborns suffering from perinatal asphyxia. Previous studies revealed a high sensitivity and specificity of the Thompson encephalopathy score for adverse outcomes (death or severe disability). Because the Thompson encephalopathy score

  5. Association between Helicobacter pylori seropositivity and Hepatic Encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behroozian, R.; Faramarzpur, M.; Rahimi, E.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The knowledge on Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) contribution in the pathology of the liver and biliary tract diseases in human is very limited. The aim of this study was to assess the probable association between H. pylori seropositivity and hepatic encephalopathy. Methodology: This is a case control study conducted through three groups, cirrhotics with hepatic encephalopathy (HE), cirrhotics without HE and healthy controls. All subjects were examined serologically for determination of IgG class antibodies to H. pylori based on ELISA technique. Results: H. pylori seropositivity was present in 88% cirrhotic patients with hepatic encephalopathy, 86% cirrhotics without hepatic encephalopathy and 66% healthy controls. Conclusion: According to our results, H. pylori seropositivity rate in cirrhotic patients with or without hepatic encephalopathy was higher than healthy controls. But H. pylori seropositivity rate was not significantly different among cirrhotics with hepatic encephalopathy and those without it.

  6. Does aetiology of neonatal encephalopathy and hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy influence the outcome of treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcintyre, Sarah; Badawi, Nadia; Blair, Eve; Nelson, Karin B

    2015-04-01

    Neonatal encephalopathy, a clinical syndrome affecting term-born and late preterm newborn infants, increases the risk of perinatal death and long-term neurological morbidity, especially cerebral palsy. With the advent of therapeutic hypothermia, a treatment designed for hypoxic or ischaemic injury, associated mortality and morbidity rates have decreased. Unfortunately, only about one in eight neonates (95% confidence interval) who meet eligibility criteria for therapeutic cooling apparently benefit from the treatment. Studies of infants in representative populations indicate that neonatal encephalopathy is a potential result of a variety of antecedents and that asphyxial complications at birth account for only a small percentage of neonatal encephalopathy. In contrast, clinical case series suggest that a large proportion of neonatal encephalopathy is hypoxic or ischaemic, and trials of therapeutic hypothermia are specifically designed to include only infants exposed to hypoxia or ischaemia. This review addresses the differences, definitional and methodological, between infants studied and investigations undertaken, in population studies compared with cooling trials. It raises the question if there may be subgroups of infants with a clinical diagnosis of hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE) in whom the pathobiology of neonatal neurological depression is not fundamentally hypoxic or ischaemic and, therefore, for whom cooling may not be beneficial. In addition, it suggests approaches to future trials of cooling plus adjuvant therapy that may contribute to further improvement of care for these vulnerable neonates. © The Authors. Journal compilation © 2015 Mac Keith Press.

  7. Diffusion MR findings in cyclosporin-A induced encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aydin, Kubilay; Minareci, Ozenc; Donmez, Fuldem; Tuzun, Umit; Atamer, Tanju

    2004-01-01

    Cyclosporin encephalopathy is a well-known entity, which is clinically characterized by altered mental status, vision problems, focal neurological deficits and seizures. The exact pathophysiology of the cyclosporin encephalopathy has not yet been defined. We report the diffusion-weighted MR imaging and proton MR spectroscopy findings in a case of cyclosporin encephalopathy. The white-matter lesions with reversible restricted diffusion supported the hypothesis of reversible vasospasm induced by the cyclosporin. (orig.)

  8. Case of hepatic encephalopathy induced by thortrast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirato, H.; Kudo, N.; Takita, K. (Nakatori Hospital, Akita (Japan))

    1980-09-01

    A case of hepatic encephalopathy induced by thorotrast injected as a contrast 40 years before was reported. The patient was a 64-year-old man with severe liver dysfunction, and had psychic and neurological symptoms, and hyperammonemia. There was a relationship between ammonium concentration in blood and psychic and neurological symptoms. Electroencephalogram showed three phases waves peculiar to hepatic coma intermittently. Thorotrast in the liver was detected by radiological methods and in vivo measurement of the radioactivity. From the above-mentioned result, this disease was diagnosed as hepatic encephalopathy induced by long-term sedimentation of thorotrast without complication of malignant tumors. Because of the concurrent presence of cerebral infarction, the diagnosis was difficult to make.

  9. Nonconvulsive Status Epilepticus in Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung Kim

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available We discuss a case of a 64-year-old male with a history of liver failure presenting with altered mental status, initially diagnosed with hepatic encephalopathy but ultimately diagnosed with nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE by electroencephalogram (EEG. NCSE is a difficult diagnosis to make, given no clear consensus on diagnostic criteria. Especially in the intensive care unit setting of persistent altered mental status with no clear etiology, NCSE must be considered in the differential diagnosis, as the consequences of delayed diagnosis and treatment can be substantial. EEG can be useful in the evaluation of patients with hepatic encephalopathy who have persistently altered levels of consciousness despite optimal medical management. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(4:372–374.

  10. Hemorrhagic Encephalopathy From Acute Baking Soda Ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Adrienne; Brown, Alisha; Valento, Matthew

    2016-09-01

    Baking soda is a readily available household product composed of sodium bicarbonate. It can be used as a home remedy to treat dyspepsia. If used in excessive amounts, baking soda has the potential to cause a variety of serious metabolic abnormalities. We believe this is the first reported case of hemorrhagic encephalopathy induced by baking soda ingestion. Healthcare providers should be aware of the dangers of baking soda misuse and the associated adverse effects.

  11. Hemorrhagic Encephalopathy From Acute Baking Soda Ingestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrienne Hughes

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Baking soda is a readily available household product composed of sodium bicarbonate. It can be used as a home remedy to treat dyspepsia. If used in excessive amounts, baking soda has the potential to cause a variety of serious metabolic abnormalities. We believe this is the first reported case of hemorrhagic encephalopathy induced by baking soda ingestion. Healthcare providers should be aware of the dangers of baking soda misuse and the associated adverse effects.

  12. Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy and Meat Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Hester J. T.; Knight, Richard S. G.

    Prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) comprise a wide-ranging group of neurodegenerative diseases found in animals and humans. They have diverse causes and geographical distributions, but have similar pathological features, transmissibility and, are ultimately, fatal. Central to all TSEs is the presence of an abnormal form of a normal host protein, namely the prion protein. Because of their potential transmissibility, these diseases have wide public health ramifications.

  13. Inflammatory Macrophages Promotes Development of Diabetic Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Beiyun; Miao, Ya; Zhao, Zhe; Zhong, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes and Alzheimer's disease are often associated with each other, whereas the relationship between two diseases is ill-defined. Although hyperglycemia during diabetes is a major cause of encephalopathy, diabetes may also cause chronic inflammatory complications including peripheral neuropathy. Hence the role and the characteristics of inflammatory macrophages in the development of diabetic encephalopathy need to be clarified. Diabetes were induced in mice by i.p. injection of streptozotocin (STZ). Two weeks after STZ injection and confirmation of development of diabetes, inflammatory macrophages were eliminated by i.p. injection of 20µg saporin-conjugated antibody against a macrophage surface marker CD11b (saporin-CD11b) twice per week, while a STZ-treated group received injection of rat IgG of same frequency as a control. The effects of macrophage depletion on brain degradation markers, brain malondialdehyde (MDA), catalase, superoxidase anion-positive cells and nitric oxide (NO) were measured. Saporin-CD11b significantly reduced inflammatory macrophages in brain, without affecting mouse blood glucose, serum insulin, glucose responses and beta cell mass. However, reduced brain macrophages significantly inhibited the STZ-induced decreases in brain MDA, catalase and superoxidase anion-positive cells, and the STZ-induced decreases in brain NO. Inflammatory macrophages may promote development of diabetic encephalopathy. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Origin and implications of bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, H

    1996-04-01

    All spongiform encephalopathies in animals, including humans, are slow developing infectious diseases. The current working theory links the origin of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) to the feeding of cattle with meat and bone meal prepared from scrapie-infected sheep remains. Recycling of cattle meat and bones (MBM) essentially resulted in the selection of a single strain from the "wild type", a mixture of 20 strains. The BSE agent is easily transmitted through ingestion, with some evidence of vertical transmission. Paradoxically, cattle have selected a major new strain which appears to be more virulent than an unselected strain found in scrapie sheep. The same strain of BSE agent is implicated in the occurrence of spongiform encephalopathy in domestic cats, tiger, and some exotic species of ruminants in zoos. The properties of BSE and its spread into cattle are still disputed. Since our understanding of the disease and its transmissibility in humans must await observations that will be made over some years to come, it is important to keep a reasonable perspective and ensure that any speculative comment is consistent with fact. In risk assessment in such circumstances, it is tempting give too much credence to persuasive parallels when direct relevant information is not available. On the other hand, it would also not be wise to assume that the disease will die by itself and will have no effect on humans.

  15. Minimal hepatic encephalopathy characterized by parallel use of the continuous reaction time and portosystemic encephalopathy tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, M M; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, O B; Vilstrup, H

    2015-01-01

    Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) is a frequent complication to liver cirrhosis that causes poor quality of life, a great burden to caregivers, and can be treated. For diagnosis and grading the international guidelines recommend the use of psychometric tests of different modalities (computer...... based vs. paper and pencil). To compare results of the Continuous Reaction time (CRT) and the Portosystemic Encephalopathy (PSE) tests in a large unselected cohort of cirrhosis patients without clinically detectable brain impairment and to clinically characterize the patients according to their test...

  16. Volume transmission-mediated encephalopathies: a possible new concept?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartung, Hans-Peter; Dihné, Marcel

    2012-03-01

    There is strong evidence that the composition of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) influences brain development, neurogenesis, and behavior. The bidirectional exchange of CSF and interstitial fluid (ISF) across the ependymal and pia-glial membranes is required for these phenomena to occur. Because ISF surrounds the parenchymal compartment, neuroactive substances in the CSF and ISF can influence neuronal activity. Functionally important neuroactive substances are distributed to distant sites of the central nervous system by the convection and diffusion of CSF and ISF, a process known as volume transmission. It has recently been shown that pathologically altered CSF from patients with acute traumatic brain injury suppresses in vitro neuronal network activity (ivNNA) recorded by multielectrode arrays measuring synchronously bursting neural populations. Functionally relevant substances in pathologically altered CSF have been biochemically identified, and ivNNA has been partially recovered by pharmacologic intervention. It remains unclear whether the in vivo parenchymal compartment remains unaffected by pathologically altered CSF that significantly impairs ivNNA. We hypothesize that pathologic CSF alterations are not just passive indicators of brain diseases but that they actively and directly evoke functional disturbances in global brain activity through the distribution of neuroactive substances, for instance, secondary to focal neurologic disease. For this mechanism, we propose the new term volume transmission-mediated encephalopathies (VTE). Recording ivNNA in the presence of pure human CSF could help to identify and monitor functionally relevant CSF alterations that directly result in VTEs, and the collected data might point to therapeutic ways to antagonize these alterations.

  17. Traumatic events and children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... over and over again Know the Signs of Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Half of the children who survive traumatic events ... team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Child Mental Health Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  18. Probiotics for people with hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalal, Rohan; McGee, Richard G; Riordan, Stephen M; Webster, Angela C

    2017-02-23

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a disorder of brain function as a result of liver failure or portosystemic shunt or both. Both hepatic encephalopathy (clinically overt) and minimal hepatic encephalopathy (not clinically overt) significantly impair patient's quality of life and daily functioning, and represent a significant burden on healthcare resources. Probiotics are live micro-organisms, which when administered in adequate amounts, may confer a health benefit on the host. To determine the beneficial and harmful effects of probiotics in any dosage, compared with placebo or no intervention, or with any other treatment for people with any grade of acute or chronic hepatic encephalopathy. This review did not consider the primary prophylaxis of hepatic encephalopathy. We searched The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, Science Citation Index Expanded, conference proceedings, reference lists of included trials, and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform until June 2016. We included randomised clinical trials that compared probiotics in any dosage with placebo or no intervention, or with any other treatment in people with hepatic encephalopathy. We used standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. We conducted random-effects model meta-analysis due to obvious heterogeneity of participants and interventions. We defined a P value of 0.05 or less as significant. We expressed dichotomous outcomes as risk ratio (RR) and continuous outcomes as mean difference (MD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). We included 21 trials with 1420 participants, of these, 14 were new trials. Fourteen trials compared a probiotic with placebo or no treatment, and seven trials compared a probiotic with lactulose. The trials used a variety of probiotics; the most commonly used group of probiotic was VSL#3, a proprietary name for a group of eight probiotics. Duration of administration

  19. Normalization of the psychometric hepatic encephalopathy score for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To construct normal values for the tests of the psychometric hepatic encephalopathy score (PHES) and evaluate the prevalence of minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) among Turkish patients with liver cirrhosis. Materials and Methods: One hundred and eighty-five healthy subjects and sixty patients with liver ...

  20. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists for acute and chronic hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, B; Kjaergard, L L; Gluud, C

    2001-01-01

    The pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy is unknown. It has been suggested that liver failure leads to the accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition which may progress to coma. Several trials have assessed benzodiazepine receptor...... antagonists for hepatic encephalopathy, but the results are conflicting....

  1. Radiographical findings in patients with liver cirrhosis and hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwir, Saleh; Hal, Hassan; Veith, Joshua; Schreibman, Ian; Kadry, Zakiyah; Riley, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a common complication encountered in patients with liver cirrhosis. Hepatic encephalopathy is not reflected in the current liver transplant allocation system. Correlation was sought between hepatic encephalopathy with findings detected on radiographic imaging studies and the patient's clinical profile. A retrospective analysis was conducted of patients with cirrhosis, who presented for liver transplant evaluation in 2009 and 2010. Patients with hepatocellular carcinoma, ejection fraction less than 60% and who had a TIPS (transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunting) procedure or who did not complete the evaluation were excluded. Statistical analysis was performed and variables found to be significant on univariate analysis (P encephalopathy group (n = 58) and a control group (n = 59). Univariate analysis found that a smaller portal vein diameter, smaller liver antero-posterior diameter, liver nodularity and use of diuretics or centrally acting medications showed significant correlation with hepatic encephalopathy. This association was confirmed for smaller portal vein, use of diuretics and centrally acting medications in the multivariate analysis. A decrease in portal vein diameter was associated with increased risk of encephalopathy. Identifying patients with smaller portal vein diameter may warrant screening for encephalopathy by more advanced psychometric testing, and more aggressive control of constipation and other factors that may precipitate encephalopathy. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press and the Digestive Science Publishing Co. Limited.

  2. Evaluation of the zoonotic potential of transmissible mink encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Successful transmission of Transmissible Mink Encephalopathy (TME) to cattle supports the bovine hypothesis to the still controversial origin of TME outbreaks. Human and primate susceptibility to classical Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (c-BSE) and the transmissibility of L-type BSE to macaques as...

  3. Branched-chain amino acids for people with hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Lise Lotte; Dam, Gitte; Les, Iñigo

    2015-01-01

    -chain amino acids (BCAA) versus control interventions has evaluated if BCAA may benefit people with hepatic encephalopathy. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the beneficial and harmful effects of BCAA versus any control intervention for people with hepatic encephalopathy. SEARCH METHODS: We identified trials through...

  4. Branched-chain amino acids for people with hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Lise Lotte; Dam, Gitte; Les, Iñigo

    2017-01-01

    -chain amino acids (BCAA) versus control interventions has evaluated if BCAA may benefit people with hepatic encephalopathy. Objectives: To evaluate the beneficial and harmful effects of BCAA versus any control intervention for people with hepatic encephalopathy. Search methods: We identified trials through...

  5. Safety, efficacy, and patient acceptability of rifaximin for hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kimer, Nina; Krag, Aleksander; Gluud, Lise L

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a complex disease entity ranging from mild cognitive dysfunction to deep coma. Traditionally, treatment has focused on a reduction of ammonia through a reduced production, absorption, or clearance. Rifaximin is a nonabsorbable antibiotic, which reduces the production of ...... and safety of long-term treatment with rifaximin and evaluate effects of combination therapy with lactulose and branched-chain amino acids for patients with liver cirrhosis and hepatic encephalopathy.......Hepatic encephalopathy is a complex disease entity ranging from mild cognitive dysfunction to deep coma. Traditionally, treatment has focused on a reduction of ammonia through a reduced production, absorption, or clearance. Rifaximin is a nonabsorbable antibiotic, which reduces the production...... of ammonia by gut bacteria and, to some extent, other toxic derivatives from the gut. Clinical trials show that these effects improve episodes of hepatic encephalopathy. A large randomized trial found that rifaximin prevents recurrent episodes of hepatic encephalopathy. Most patients were treated...

  6. Reversible cortical blindness in a case of hepatic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amlan Kanti Biswas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy is a frequent and often fatal manifestation of chronic liver disease. The pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy is believed to be multifactorial including impaired blood-brain barrier function, imbalance between the excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters in cortex, accumulation of various toxic and false neurotransmitters, and lack of nutrients like oxygen and glucose. Signs and symptoms of hepatic encephalopathy varies and commonly ranges from personality changes, disturbed consciousness, sleep pattern alternation, intellectual deterioration, speech disturbances, asterixis to frank coma and even death. Reversible or transient cortical blindness is rare manifestation of hepatic encephalopathy. It may even precede the phase of altered consciousness in such patients. Very few similar cases have been reported worldwide. Hence, we would like to report a case of transient cortical blindness in a patient of hepatic encephalopathy.

  7. Some aspects of morphogenesis of diabetic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Tumanskiy

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of the literary data and conducted large-scale research it was ascertained that diabetes mellitus raises the risk of cerebral stroke in 2-6 times, the risk of transitional ischemic attacks in 3 times in comparison with the same risk in the general population [3]. Diabetic encephalopathy in its pure form can be found in 80.7% of patients with diabetes mellitus of the 1st type, its development is caused mainly by ineffective metabolic control of autoregulation of cerebral blood flow [4]. Mixed encephalopathy is prevailed among patients with diabetes mellitus of the 2nd type; lacunar heart attack is more often developed among this category of patients [5], multiple focus of ischemic affection of white substance – leukoaraiosis regarded as the areas of increased level of water, gliosis, and demyelination of white substance is often registered [6]. Pathogeny of diabetic encephalopathy hasn’t been studied properly. It is known that it is a multifactor effect in the development of which the main role is led by the vascular dysfunction with the reduction of blood supply and ischemia of brain tissue, as well as direct toxic influence of hyperglycemia and disorder of trophism of nerve tissue [7]. Microangiopathy and macroangiopathy acquire the special meaning in encephalopathy development among patients with diabetes mellitus. The evidence of microangiopathy and macroangiopathy is identified by the disease course and prognosis. On the ultrastructural level the changes of vessel microcircular movement are registered on the 1st month of the experimental alloxan diabetes. During electronic microscopy the thickening of basal membrane of capillaries as well as their dissection is observed. In micro vessels such phenomena as precipitation of lipoproteids, raising of the synthesis of collagen (the second type, dystrophic changes of endotheliocytes, and lowering of micropinocytosis can be found [11,12,13,14]. As the severity of diabetes mellitus

  8. Hepatic encephalopathy: current challenges and future prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swaminathan M

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Mirashini Swaminathan,1 Mark Alexander Ellul,2 Timothy JS Cross1 1Department of Gastroenterology, Royal Liverpool University Hospital, 2Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Institute of Infection and Global Health, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK Abstract: Hepatic encephalopathy (HE is a common complication of liver dysfunction, including acute liver failure and liver cirrhosis. HE presents as a spectrum of neuropsychiatric symptoms ranging from subtle fluctuating cognitive impairment to coma. It is a significant contributor of morbidity in patients with liver disease. HE is observed in acute liver failure, liver bypass procedures, for example, shunt surgery and transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt, and cirrhosis. These are classified as Type A, B and C HE, respectively. HE can also be classified according to whether its presence is overt or covert. The pathogenesis is linked with ammonia and glutamine production, and treatment is based on mechanisms to reduce the formation and/or removal of these compounds. There is no specific diagnostic test for HE, and diagnosis is based on clinical suspicion, excluding other causes and use of clinical tests that may support its diagnosis. Many tests are used in trials and experimentally, but have not yet gained universal acceptance. This review focuses on the definitions, pathogenesis and treatment of HE. Consideration will be given to existing treatment, including avoidance of precipitating factors and novel therapies such as prebiotics, probiotics, antibiotics, laxatives, branched-chain amino acids, shunt embolization and the importance of considering liver transplant in appropriate cases. Keywords: hepatic encephalopathy, pathogenesis, treatment, lactulose, rifaximin, probiotics, covert hepatic encephalopathy

  9. Memantine, a noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist improves hyperammonemia-induced encephalopathy and acute hepatic encephalopathy in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogels, B. A.; Maas, M. A.; Daalhuisen, J.; Quack, G.; Chamuleau, R. A.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible role of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-receptor overactivity in two different experimental rat models of encephalopathy: subacute encephalopathy caused by severe hyperammonemia in portacaval-shunted rats (AI-PCS rats) and acute hepatic

  10. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE, Mad Cow Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. K. Bruckner

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available Mad Cow Disease or BSE (Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy became a household name internationally and also in South Africa. International hysteria resulted following reports of a possible link between a disease diagnosed in cattle in Britain and a variant of the disease diagnosed in humans after the presumed ingestion or contact with meat from infected cattle. The European Union instituted a ban on the importation of beef from the United Kingdom during March 1996 that had a severe effect on the beef industry in the UK and also resulted in a world wide consumer resistance against beef consumption.

  11. Post-partum posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaen, Anne Albers; Jeppesen, Jørgen; Obaid, Hayder

    2015-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a complex clinical condition with vasogenic subcortical oedema caused by hypertension. Oedema is often seen on magnetic resonance imaging. The wide clinical spectrum ranges from headaches to vision loss and even death. Early diagnosis...... and treatment is important for the reversibility of the condition. In this case report we emphasize the importance of blood pressure control in a post-partum woman, who had a rather complicated pregnancy. The symptoms of PRES were not recognized immediately because of failure to use and acknowledge a blood...

  12. Biomarkers of multiorgan injury in neonatal encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Saima; Molloy, Eleanor J

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal encephalopathy (NE) is a major contributor to neurodevelopmental deficits including cerebral palsy in term and near-term infants. The long-term neurodevelopmental outcome is difficult to predict with certainty in first few days of life. Multiorgan involvement is common but not part of the diagnostic criteria for NE. The most frequently involved organs are the heart, liver, kidneys and hematological system. Cerebral and organ involvement is associated with the release of organ specific biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid, urine and blood. These biomarkers may have a role in the assessment of the severity of asphyxia and long-term outcome in neonates with NE.

  13. Advances in ammonia metabolism and hepatic encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soeters, P.B.; Wilson, J.H.P.; Meijer, A.J.; Holm, E.

    1988-01-01

    There are four main 'parts' within the book: the first is devoted to peripheral and hepatic ammonia metabolism, the urea cycle, acid base status and its regulation; part two addresses animal models in liver failure, GABA-ergic neurotransmission and its relevance in hepatic failure; a third part concerns neurochemistry including brain ammonia metabolism, serotonin metabolism and energy status, in vivo evaluated with modern techniques like infusion of compounds labeled with stable or radioactive isotopes and with NMR, while the last section provides a description of the determination of ammonia and the treatment of encephalopathy with established but also with experimental techniques. refs.; figs.; tabs

  14. Post-partum posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaen, Anne Albers; Jeppesen, Jørgen; Obaid, Hayder

    2015-01-01

    and treatment is important for the reversibility of the condition. In this case report we emphasize the importance of blood pressure control in a post-partum woman, who had a rather complicated pregnancy. The symptoms of PRES were not recognized immediately because of failure to use and acknowledge a blood......Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a complex clinical condition with vasogenic subcortical oedema caused by hypertension. Oedema is often seen on magnetic resonance imaging. The wide clinical spectrum ranges from headaches to vision loss and even death. Early diagnosis...

  15. [Post-partum posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaen, Anne Albers; Jeppesen, Jørgen; Obaid, Hayder; Bülow, Hans Henrik

    2015-11-23

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a complex clinical condition with vasogenic subcortical oedema caused by hypertension. Oedema is often seen on magnetic resonance imaging. The wide clinical spectrum ranges from headaches to vision loss and even death. Early diagnosis and treatment is important for the reversibility of the condition. In this case report we emphasize the importance of blood pressure control in a post-partum woman, who had a rather complicated pregnancy. The symptoms of PRES were not recognized immediately because of failure to use and acknowledge a blood pressure test.

  16. Cardiovascular dysfunction in infants with neonatal encephalopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Armstrong, Katey

    2012-04-01

    Severe perinatal asphyxia with hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy occurs in approximately 1-2\\/1000 live births and is an important cause of cerebral palsy and associated neurological disabilities in children. Multiorgan dysfunction commonly occurs as part of the asphyxial episode, with cardiovascular dysfunction occurring in up to a third of infants. This narrative paper attempts to review the literature on the importance of early recognition of cardiac dysfunction using echocardiography and biomarkers such as troponin and brain type natriuretic peptide. These tools may allow accurate assessment of cardiac dysfunction and guide therapy to improve outcome.

  17. [Star fruit (Averrhoa carambola) toxic encephalopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signaté, A; Olindo, S; Chausson, N; Cassinoto, C; Edimo Nana, M; Saint Vil, M; Cabre, P; Smadja, D

    2009-03-01

    Ingestion of star fruit (Averrhoa carambola) can induce severe intoxication in subjects with chronic renal failure. Oxalate plays a key role in the neurotoxicity of star fruit. We report the cases of two patients with unknown chronic renal insufficiency who developed severe encephalopathy after ingestion of star fruit. The two patients developed intractable hiccups, vomiting, impaired consciousness and status epilepticus. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging showed cortical and thalamic hyperintense lesions related to epileptic status. They improved after being submitted to continuous hemofiltration which constitutes the most effective treatment during the acute phase.

  18. Prions and animal transmissible spongiform encephalopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juntes Polona

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs or prion diseases are a unique group of neurodegenerative diseases of animals and humans, which always have a fatal outcome and are transmissible among animals of the same or different species. Scope and Approach. The aim of this work is to review some recent data about animal TSEs, with the emphasis on their causative agents and zoonotic potential, and to discuss why the surveillance and control measures over animal TSEs should remain in force. Key Findings and Conclusions. We still have incomplete knowledge of prions and prion diseases. Scrapie has been present for a very long time and controlled with varied success. Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE emerged unnoticed, and spread within a few years to epidemic proportions, entailing enormous economic consequences and public concerns. Currently, the classical BSE epidemic is under control, but atypical cases do, and probably will, persist in bovine populations. The Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD of the cervids has been spreading in North America and has recently been detected in Europe. Preventive measures for the control of classical BSE remain in force, including the feed ban and removal of specified risk materials. However, active BSE surveillance has considerably decreased. In the absence of such preventive and control measures, atypical BSE cases in healthy slaughtered bovines might persist in the human food chain, and BSE prions might resurface. Moreover, other prion strains might emerge and spread undetected if the appropriate preventive and surveillance measures were to cease, leaving behind inestimable consequences.

  19. Probiotics in management of hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Barjesh Chander; Singh, Jatinderpal

    2016-12-01

    Gut microflora leads to production of ammonia and endotoxins which play important role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). There is relationship between HE and absorption of nitrogenous substances from the intestines. Probiotics play a role in treatment of HE by causing alterations in gut flora by decreasing the counts of pathogen bacteria, intestinal mucosal acidification, decrease in production and absorption of ammonia, alterations in permeability of gut, decreased endotoxin levels and changes in production of short chain fatty acids. Role of gut microbiota using prebiotics, probiotics and synbiotics have been evaluated in the management of minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE), overt HE and prevention of HE. Many studies have shown efficacy of probiotics in reduction of blood ammonia levels, treatment of MHE and prevention of HE. However these trials have problems like inclusion of small number of patients, short treatment durations, variability in HE/MHE related outcomes utilized and high bias risk, errors of systematic and random types. Systematic reviews also have shown different results with one systematic review showing clinical benefits whereas another concluded that probiotics do not have any role in treatment of MHE or HE. Also practical questions on optimal dose, ideal combination of organisms, and duration of treatment and persistence of benefits on long term follow-up are still to be clarified. At present, there are no recommendations for use of probiotics in patients with HE.

  20. Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy: An Underrecognized Clinicoradiologic Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiujuan; Wu, Wei; Pan, Wei; Wu, Limin; Liu, Kangding; Zhang, Hong-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Acute necrotizing encephalopathy (ANE) is a rare but distinctive type of acute encephalopathy with global distribution. Occurrence of ANE is usually preceded by a virus-associated febrile illness and ensued by rapid deterioration. However, the causal relationship between viral infections and ANE and the exact pathogenesis of ANE remain unclear; both environmental and host factors might be involved. Most cases of ANE are sporadic and nonrecurrent, namely, isolated or sporadic ANE; however, few cases are recurrent and with familial episodes. The recurrent and familial forms of ANE were found to be incompletely autosomal-dominant. Further the missense mutations in the gene encoding the nuclear pore protein Ran Binding Protein 2 (RANBP2) were identified. Although the clinical course and the prognosis of ANE are diverse, the hallmark of neuroradiologic manifestation of ANE is multifocal symmetric brain lesions which are demonstrated by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The treatment of ANE is still under investigation. We summarize the up-to-date knowledge on ANE, with emphasis on prompt diagnosis and better treatment of this rare but fatal disease. PMID:25873770

  1. Septic encephalopathy and septic encephalitis‬‬.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauber, Simone C; Eiffert, Helmut; Brück, Wolfgang; Nau, Roland

    2017-02-01

    During the last two decades, septic encephalopathy (SE) was recognized as a clinically relevant problem with a high prevalence in patients at admission and during their hospital stay. SE is a condition associated with increased mortality and morbidity such as long-term cognitive impairment. Areas covered: This review illustrates the pathophysiology of sepsis-associated encephalopathy and encephalitis involving blood-brain-barrier dysfunction and neuroinflammation caused by endothelial and microglial activation by endogenous or pathogen-derived compounds, hypoxia by impaired microvascular regulation and septic shock as well as imbalance of neurotransmitters. The continuum between septic-embolic and septic-metastatic encephalitis and SE is underlined by histological findings. The options of technical examinations and biomarkers to diagnose SE are discussed together with established therapeutic options as well as current experimental approaches. Expert commentary: An outlook for clinicians is provided including promising diagnostic approaches by means of new imaging techniques. Clinical trials with drugs already established for other indications such as statins, erythropoietin and minocycline are warranted in the future.

  2. The why and wherefore of hepatic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grover VPB

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Vijay PB Grover, Joshua M Tognarelli, Nicolas Massie, Mary ME Crossey, Nicola A Cook, Simon D Taylor-Robinson Liver Unit, Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UK Abstract: Hepatic encephalopathy is a common neuropsychiatric abnormality, which complicates the course of patients with liver disease. It was probably first described by Hippocrates over 2000 years ago, who said that "those whose madness arises from phlegm are quiet and neither shout nor make a disturbance, while those whose madness arises from bile shout, play tricks and will not keep still, but are always up to some mischief". He was presumably describing the differences between patients with pneumonia and acute liver failure. Despite the fact that the syndrome was probably first recognized thousands of years ago, the exact pathogenesis still remains unclear. Furthermore, a precise definition of the syndrome is lacking, as are definitive methods of diagnosing this condition. It is important as both patients with cirrhosis and the general population with whom they interact may be affected as a consequence. At a minimum, the individual may be affected by impaired quality of life, impaired ability to work, and slowed reaction times, which are relevant to the population at large if affected individuals operate heavy machinery or drive a car. Pathogenic mechanisms, diagnostic tools, and treatment options are discussed. Keywords: hepatic encephalopathy, cirrhosis, ammonia, pathology, treatment, rifaximin, lactulose

  3. Anatomy of the late radiation encephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Reuck, J; vander Eecken, H

    1975-01-01

    The clinico-pathological data and the topography of the lesions were determined in 13 cases of late radiation encephalopathy. In one case the arterial vascularisation was studied by the translucidation technique after filling of the blood vessels with a colloidal barium sulphate solution. The radiation lesions consisted of areas of focal necrosis and of diffuse demyelination and necrosis of the deep cerebral structures and the brain stem. Demyelination was predominantly present in cases of late appearance of the neurological symptoms while necrosis was found in cases with a short latency period. The cerebral cortex and the arcuate fibres were always the most preserved structures. The topography of the focal lesions in the cerebral hemispheres and in the brain stem corresponded well to the vascular supply areas of the deep perforating arteries, while the diffuse lesions always had a predominant distribution in the periventricular arterial end- and border-zones. These observations were also confirmed by a post mortem angiographic study. The present report argues once more for a vascular aetiology as cause of the late radiation encephalopathy.

  4. The Frequency and Severity of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Abnormalities in Infants with Mild Neonatal Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Brian H; Neil, Jeffrey; Morey, JoAnn; Yang, Edward; Silvera, Michelle V; Inder, Terrie E; Ortinau, Cynthia

    2017-08-01

    To assess and contrast the incidence and severity of abnormalities on cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) between infants with mild, moderate, and severe neonatal encephalopathy who received therapeutic hypothermia. This retrospective cohort studied infants with mild, moderate, and severe neonatal encephalopathy who received therapeutic hypothermia at a single tertiary neonatal intensive care unit between 2013 and 2015. Two neuroradiologists masked to the clinical condition evaluated brain MRIs for cerebral injury after therapeutic hypothermia using the Barkovich classification system. Additional abnormalities not included in this classification system were also noted. The rate, pattern, and severity of abnormalities/injury were compared across the grades of neonatal encephalopathy. Eighty-nine infants received therapeutic hypothermia and met study criteria, 48 with mild neonatal encephalopathy, 35 with moderate neonatal encephalopathy, and 6 with severe neonatal encephalopathy. Forty-eight infants (54%) had an abnormality on MRI. There was no difference in the rate of overall MRI abnormalities by grade of neonatal encephalopathy (mild neonatal encephalopathy 54%, moderate neonatal encephalopathy 54%, and severe neonatal encephalopathy 50%; P= .89). Basal ganglia/thalamic injury was more common in those with severe neonatal encephalopathy (mild neonatal encephalopathy 4%, moderate neonatal encephalopathy 9%, severe neonatal encephalopathy 34%; P = .03). In contrast, watershed injury did not differ between neonatal encephalopathy grades (mild neonatal encephalopathy 36%, moderate neonatal encephalopathy 32%, severe neonatal encephalopathy 50%; P = .3). Mild neonatal encephalopathy is commonly associated with MRI abnormalities after therapeutic hypothermia. The grade of neonatal encephalopathy during the first hours of life may not discriminate adequately between infants with and without cerebral injury noted on MRI after therapeutic hypothermia

  5. Wernicke encephalopathy in a patient with liver failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Pan; Zhao, Yanling; Wei, Zhenman; Chen, Jing; Yan, Lilong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Early recognition and diagnosis of Wernicke encephalopathy is pivotal for the prognosis of this medical emergency, especially in patients with liver failure which predisposes individuals to develop hepatic encephalopathy. For these patients, distinguishing between hepatic encephalopathy and Wernicke encephalopathy is a challenge in real-world clinical practice. A male patient with 21-year medical history of liver cirrhosis presented diarrhea and ascites. One month before this visit, he was noted to have poor appetite and progressive fatigue. After admission, although several major symptoms, including diarrhea, ascites, hyponatremia, and hypoproteinemia, were greatly improved through appropriate treatments, his laboratory indicators were not changed much. His appetite was not reversed at discharge. On the 5th day after discharge, the patient suddenly became reluctant to speak and did not remember the recent happenings. Simultaneously, unsteady gait and strabismus occurred. On the basis of clinical manifestations and brain magnetic resonance imaging scan results, the patient was diagnosed as Wernicke encephalopathy and these relative symptoms were resolved after intravenous vitamin B1. To our knowledge, this is the second case report of Wernicke encephalopathy developing in a critically ill cirrhotic patient without hepatocellular carcinoma or operative intervention. Wernicke encephalopathy may be underdiagnosed in these patients and this case raises physicians’ awareness of its possible onset. PMID:27399058

  6. Current concepts in the assessment and treatment of hepatic encephalopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cash, W J

    2012-02-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is defined as a metabolically induced, potentially reversible, functional disturbance of the brain that may occur in acute or chronic liver disease. Standardized nomenclature has been proposed but a standardized approach to the treatment, particularly of persistent, episodic and recurrent encephalopathy associated with liver cirrhosis has not been proposed. This review focuses on the pathogenesis and treatment of HE in patients with cirrhosis. The pathogenesis and treatment of hepatic encephalopathy in fulminant hepatic failure is quite different and is reviewed elsewhere.

  7. Portal hemodynamics in chronic portal-systemic encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takashi, Motohide; Igarashi, Masahiko; Hino, Shinichi; Takayasu, Kenichi; Goto, Nobuaki; Musha, Hirotaka; Ohnishi, Kunihiko; Okuda, Kunio

    1985-01-01

    A portal hemodynamic study was made in 7 consecutive patients with chronic portal-systemic encephalopathy by percutaneous transhepatic catheterization of the portal vein and injecting contrast medium into the superior mesenteric vein or by superior mesenteric arterial portography in comparison with patients without encephalopathy studied by percutaneous catheterization of these veins. It is suggested that chronic portal-systemic encephalopathy is a result of a large collateral route shunting a large proportion of the superior mesenteric venous blood into systemic circulation, and that development of such collaterals precludes formation of large esophageal varices. (Auth.)

  8. Dengue viral infections as a cause of encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malavige G

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the clinical characteristics and poor prognostic factors associated with high mortality in dengue encephalopathy. Fifteen patients with confirmed dengue infections, who developed encephalopathy, were recruited from two tertiary care hospitals in Colombo, Sri Lanka. Among the factors that contributed to encephalopathy were: Acute liver failure (73%, electrolyte imbalances (80% and shock (40%. Five (33.3% patients developed seizures. Disseminated intravascular coagulation was seen in five (33.3%. Secondary bacterial infections were observed in 8 (53.3% of our patients. The overall mortality rate was 47%.

  9. Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mild Traumatic Brain Injury Resilience Families with Kids Depression Families & Friendships Tobacco Life Stress Spirituality Anger Physical Injury Stigma Health & Wellness Work Adjustment Community Peer-2-Peer Forum ...

  10. A Case of Valproate Induced Hyperammonemic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surjit Tarafdar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 36-years-old man on phenytoin, levetiracetam, and sodium valproate presented with acute confusion. Routine investigations including serum valproate and phenytoin concentration were normal. His serum ammonia concentration was raised. His valproate was held and 2 days later he recovered with concordant normalisation of serum ammonia concentration. Urea acid cycle disorder was ruled out, and a diagnosis of valproate induced hyperammonemic encephalopathy (VHE was made. Asymptomatic hyperammonemia occurs in 15–50% of valproate-treated patients, and while the true incidence of VHE is not known, it is a recognized complication of sodium valproate treatment. VHE typically presents acutely with impaired consciousness, lethargy, and vomiting. Valproate concentrations may be in the therapeutic range, and liver function tests are typically “normal.” Treatment for VHE consists of ceasing valproate and providing supportive care. Some have advocated carnitine replacement.

  11. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostić Dejan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES is characterized by the following symptoms: seizures, impaired consciousness and/or vision, vomiting, nausea, and focal neurological signs. Diagnostic imaging includes examination by magnetic resonance (MR and computed tomography (CT, where brain edema is visualized bi-laterally and symmetrically, predominantly posteriorly, parietally, and occipitally. Case report. We presented a 73-year-old patient with the years-long medical history of hipertension and renal insufficiency, who developed PRES with the symptomatology of the rear cranium. CT and MR verified changes in the white matter involving all lobes on both sides of the brain. After a two-week treatment (antihypertensive, hypolipemic and rehydration therapy clinical improvement with no complications occurred, with complete resolution of changes in the white matter observed on CT and MR. Conclusion. PRES is a reversible syndrome in which the symptoms withdraw after several days to several weeks if early diagnosis is made and appropriate treatment started without delay.

  12. Transcranial electrostimulation in patients with alcoholic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barylnik Yu.B.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The method of transcranial electrostimulation (TES was used for treating patients with alcoholic encephalopathy against the background of the basic treatment, which includes nootropics, normotimics, soporifics, over-all strengthening therapy and other devices. The course of treatment consisted of 10 daily procedures lasting for 30 minutes. The TES influence was evaluated according to the clinical state, the neurologic status, including EEG (electroencephalogram, the psychometric scales were also used for evaluating the manifestation of depression, anxiety and working memory in comparison with appropriate indices in the control group of patients, who were being treated by the traditional method. TES led to normalization of health state, neurologic status and vegetative innervation, the reduction in pathologic inclination, which corresponded to general improvement of the state of patients, EEG indices and psychometric scales

  13. Myoclonic encephalopathy after exposure to trichloroethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Pere; Nogué, Santiago; Vilchez, Daniel; Salvadó, Elisa; Casal, Amparo; Logroscino, Giancarlo

    2008-12-01

    Trichloroethylene is a widely-used industrial solvent that is absorbed through the digestive or respiratory tracts or cutaneously. It has a selective tropism for the cardiovascular and central nervous systems and may cause death due to cardiac arrest or neurological sequelae. We present the case of a 25-yr-old women who was exposed to trichloroethylene in the workplace for 18 months and who developed a disabling myoclonic encephalopathy. Non-toxicological causes were excluded. Although the exposure ceased, the disease progressed with thalamic and cerebellar involvement. The patient, who had only a partial response to symptomatic treatment, suffered severe limitations in the activities of daily living and was registered as permanently disabled due to a work-related disability.

  14. Cooling for newborns with hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Susan E; Berg, Marie; Hunt, Rod; Tarnow-Mordi, William O; Inder, Terrie E; Davis, Peter G

    2013-01-31

    Newborn animal studies and pilot studies in humans suggest that mild hypothermia following peripartum hypoxia-ischaemia in newborn infants may reduce neurological sequelae without adverse effects. To determine the effect of therapeutic hypothermia in encephalopathic asphyxiated newborn infants on mortality, long-term neurodevelopmental disability and clinically important side effects. We used the standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group as outlined in The Cochrane Library (Issue 2, 2007). Randomised controlled trials evaluating therapeutic hypothermia in term and late preterm newborns with hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy were identified by searching the Oxford Database of Perinatal Trials, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, 2007, Issue 2), MEDLINE (1966 to June 2007), previous reviews including cross-references, abstracts, conferences, symposia proceedings, expert informants and journal handsearching. We updated this search in May 2012. We included randomised controlled trials comparing the use of therapeutic hypothermia with standard care in encephalopathic term or late preterm infants with evidence of peripartum asphyxia and without recognisable major congenital anomalies. The primary outcome measure was death or long-term major neurodevelopmental disability. Other outcomes included adverse effects of cooling and 'early' indicators of neurodevelopmental outcome. Four review authors independently selected, assessed the quality of and extracted data from the included studies. Study authors were contacted for further information. Meta-analyses were performed using risk ratios (RR) and risk differences (RD) for dichotomous data, and weighted mean difference for continuous data with 95% confidence intervals (CI). We included 11 randomised controlled trials in this updated review, comprising 1505 term and late preterm infants with moderate/severe encephalopathy and evidence of intrapartum asphyxia

  15. Leucine metabolism in patients with Hepatic Encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGhee, A.S.; Kassouny, M.E.; Matthews, D.E.; Millikan, W.

    1986-01-01

    A primed continuous infusion of [ 15 N, 1- 13 C]leucine was used to determine whether increased oxidation and/or protein synthesis of leucine occurs in patients with cirrhosis. Five controls and patients were equilibrated on a metabolic balance diet [0.6 g protein per kg ideal body weight (IBW)]. An additional four patients were equilibrated in the same manner with the same type of diet with a protein level of 0.75 g per kg IBW. Plasma leucine and breath CO 2 enrichments were measured by mass spectrometry. Protein synthesis and leucine metabolism were identical in controls and patients when both were fed a diet with 0.6 g protein/kg IBW. Results indicate that systemic derangements of leucine metabolism are not the cause of Hepatic Encephalopathy

  16. Nonconvulsive status epilepticus disguising as hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Yong Min; Lee, Sung Wook; Han, Sang Young; Baek, Yang Hyun; Ahn, Ji Hye; Choi, Won Jong; Lee, Ji Young; Kim, Sang Ho; Yoon, Byeol A

    2015-04-28

    Nonconvulsive status epilepticus has become an important issue in modern neurology and epileptology. This is based on difficulty in definitively elucidating the condition and its various clinical phenomena and on our inadequate insight into the intrinsic pathophysiological processes. Despite nonconvulsive status epilepticus being a situation that requires immediate treatment, this disorder may not be appreciated as the cause of mental status impairment. Although the pathophysiology of nonconvulsive status epilepticus remains unknown, this disorder is thought to lead to neuronal damage, so its identification and treatment are important. Nonconvulsive status epilepticus should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with liver cirrhosis presenting an altered mental status. We report a case of a 52-year-old male with liver cirrhosis presenting an altered mental status. He was initially diagnosed with hepatic encephalopathy but ultimately diagnosed with nonconvulsive status epilepticus by electroencephalogram.

  17. Hypertension as the trigger for posterior reversible encephalopathy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RESEARCH. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a neuro ..... rise of blood pressure instead of the sustained levels of hypertension in these patients. .... high prevalence and more extensive imaging findings. Am J Kidney ...

  18. Hepatic encephalopathy in acute-on-chronic liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Guan-Huei

    2015-10-01

    The presence of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) within 4 weeks is part of the criteria for defining acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF). The pathophysiology of HE is complex, and hyperammonemia and cerebral hemodynamic dysfunction appear to be central in the pathogenesis of encephalopathy. Recent data also suggest that inflammatory mediators may have a significant role in modulating the cerebral effect of ammonia. Multiple prospective and retrospective studies have shown that hepatic encephalopathy in ACLF patients is associated with higher mortality, especially in those with grade III-IV encephalopathy, similar to that of acute liver failure (ALF). Although significant cerebral edema detected by CT in ACLF patients appeared to be less common, specialized MRI imaging was able to detect cerebral edema even in low grade HE. Ammonia-focused therapy constitutes the basis of current therapy, as in the treatment of ALF. Emerging treatment strategies focusing on modulating the gut-liver-circulation-brain axis are discussed.

  19. Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome-associated Encephalopathy Successfully Treated with Corticosteroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosaka, Takashi; Nakamagoe, Kiyotaka; Tamaoka, Akira

    2017-11-01

    The encephalopathy that occurs in association with hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), which is caused by enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (E. coli), has a high mortality rate and patients sometimes present sequelae. We herein describe the case of a 20-year-old woman who developed encephalopathy during the convalescent stage of HUS caused by E.coli O26. Hyperintense lesions were detected in the pons, basal ganglia, and cortex on diffusion-weighted brain MRI. From the onset of HUS encephalopathy, we treated the patient with methylprednisolone (mPSL) pulse therapy alone. Her condition improved, and she did not present sequelae. Our study shows that corticosteroids appear to be effective for the treatment of some patients with HUS encephalopathy.

  20. [Follow-up of newborns with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Biarge, M; Blanco, D; García-Alix, A; Salas, S

    2014-07-01

    Hypothermia treatment for newborn infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy reduces the number of neonates who die or have permanent neurological deficits. Although this therapy is now standard of care, neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy still has a significant impact on the child's neurodevelopment and quality of life. Infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy should be enrolled in multidisciplinary follow-up programs in order to detect impairments, to initiate early intervention, and to provide counselling and support for families. This article describes the main neurodevelopmental outcomes after term neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. We offer recommendations for follow-up based on the infant's clinical condition and other prognostic indicators, mainly neonatal neuroimaging. Other aspects, such as palliative care and medico-legal issues, are also briefly discussed. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. Maternal or neonatal infection: association with neonatal encephalopathy outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenster, Meike; Bonifacio, Sonia L; Ruel, Theodore; Rogers, Elizabeth E; Tam, Emily W; Partridge, John Colin; Barkovich, Anthony James; Ferriero, Donna M; Glass, Hannah C

    2014-07-01

    Perinatal infection may potentiate brain injury among children born preterm. The objective of this study was to examine whether maternal and/or neonatal infection are associated with adverse outcomes among term neonates with encephalopathy. This study is a cohort study of 258 term newborns with encephalopathy whose clinical records were examined for signs of maternal infection (chorioamnionitis) and infant infection (sepsis). Multivariate regression was used to assess associations between infection, pattern, and severity of injury on neonatal magnetic resonance imaging, as well as neurodevelopment at 30 mo (neuromotor examination, or Bayley Scales of Infant Development, second edition mental development index encephalopathy, chorioamnionitis was associated with a lower risk of brain injury and adverse outcomes, whereas signs of neonatal sepsis carried an elevated risk. The etiology of encephalopathy and timing of infection and its associated inflammatory response may influence whether infection potentiates or mitigates injury in term newborns.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: MECP2-related severe neonatal encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Stroke: Encephalopathy Information Page National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: Microcephaly Information Page Educational Resources (8 links) Boston Children's Hospital: Seizures Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: early infantile epileptic encephalopathy 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Early infantile epileptic encephalopathy 1 (EIEE1) is a seizure disorder characterized by a type of seizure known as ... 2 links) Health Topic: Developmental Disabilities Health Topic: Epilepsy Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) ...

  4. Cerebral CT appearances of toxic encephalopathy of tetramine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Wenlong; Wu Aiqin; Xu Chongyong; Ying Binyu; Hong Ruizhen

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the cerebral CT appearances of toxic encephalopathy of tetramine and improve the recognition on this disease. Methods: Four cases of toxic encephalopathy of tetramine were collected and their cerebral CT appearances were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Cerebral CT appearances in acute phase (within 8 days): (1) cerebral edema in different degree. CT abnormalities consisted of cortical hypodensities and complete loss of gray-white matter differentiation. The CT value were in 11-13 HU, and to be watery density in serious case, (2) subarachnoid hemorrhage. It demonstrated the signs of poisoning hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy in chronic phase. Conclusion: The cerebral CT appearances of toxic encephalopathy of tetramine had some character in acute phase and it can predict the serious degree of intoxication, but there was no characteristic findings in chronic phase

  5. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome in Our Setup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, I.; Zubair, U. B.; Mumtaz, H.; Yousaf, M. A.; Muhammad, W. W.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the clinical presentation and neuroimaging abnormalities in a series of patients diagnosed as posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome at Military Hospital Rawalpindi. Study Design: Case series study. Place and Duration: Study was carried out at Military Hospital Rawalpindi form December 01st, 2011 to May 31st, 2012. Patients and Methods: Study included all the cases of the Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) admitted in the wards and intensive care unit (ITC). Neuroimaging was done and all the studies were reviewed by independent neuroradiologist. Different clinical and laboratory variables were also studied and correlated with neuroimaging. Follow up ws done to look for the prognosis. Results: Of the seven patients labelled as PRES two were male and five were female. Two patients were over 50 years of age, out of them one was male and one was female. One patient had end stage renal disease (ESRD) secondary to diabetes mellitus (DM) and hypertension (HTN), one had eclampsia, one had pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) and one had just uncontrolled HTN. Peak spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) in 5 cases was 210 mm of Hg, four of which had seizures. Rest two had spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) of 160 out of which one developed seizures. Total out of 7, 5 experienced seizures and altered conscious state, rest two only had confusion. One patient had papilloedema. Follow up was done after 06 weeks, 02 patients died, 05 remained alive and symptoms of PRES had vanished. Conclusion: PRES is a neurological emergency, presents with a variety of symptoms and has a specific neuroimaging pattern. Early recognition and prompt treatment result in a good neurological outcome. (author)

  6. Neuroimmunomodulators in neuroborreliosis and Lyme encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckman, Elizabeth A; Pacheco-Quinto, Javier; Herdt, Aimee R; Halperin, John J

    2018-01-11

    Lyme encephalopathy, characterized by non-specific neurobehavioral symptoms including mild cognitive difficulties, may occur in patients with systemic Lyme disease and is often mistakenly attributed to CNS infection. Identical symptoms occur in innumerable other inflammatory states and may reflect the effect of systemic immune mediators on the CNS. Multiplex immunoassays were used to characterize the inflammatory profile in serum and CSF from Lyme and non-Lyme patients with a range of symptoms to determine if there are specific markers of active CNS infection (neuroborreliosis), or systemic inflammatory mediators associated with neurobehavioral syndromes. CSF CXCL13 was elevated dramatically in confirmed neuroborreliosis (n=8) and to a lesser extent in possible neuroborreliosis (n=11) and other neuroinflammatory conditions (n=44). Patients with Lyme (n=63) or non-Lyme (n=8) encephalopathy had normal CSF findings, but had elevated serum levels of IL-7, TSLP, IL-17A, IL-17F, and MIP-1α/CCL3. CSF CXCL13 is a sensitive and specific marker of neuroborreliosis in individuals with Borrelia-specific intrathecal antibody (ITAb) production. However, CXCL13 does not distinguish individuals strongly suspected of having neuroborreliosis, but lacking confirmatory ITAb, from those with other neuroinflammatory conditions. Patients with mild cognitive symptoms occurring during acute Lyme disease, and/or following appropriate treatment, have normal CSF but elevated serum levels of T-helper 17 markers and T-cell growth factors. These markers are also elevated in non-Lyme disease patients experiencing similar symptoms. Our results support that in the absence of CSF abnormalities, neurobehavioral symptoms are associated with systemic inflammation, not CNS infection or inflammation, and are not specific to Lyme disease. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Contrast-induced encephalopathy following cardiac catheterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spina, Roberto; Simon, Neil; Markus, Romesh; Muller, David Wm; Kathir, Krishna

    2017-08-01

    To describe the epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and management of contrast-induced encephalopathy (CIE) following cardiac catheterization. CIE is an acute, reversible neurological disturbance directly attributable to the intra-arterial administration of iodinated contrast medium. The PubMed database was searched and all cases in the literature were retrieved and reviewed. 52 reports of CIE following cardiac catheterization were found. Encephalopathy, motor and sensory disturbances, vision disturbance, opthalmoplegia, aphasia, and seizures have been reported. Transient cortical blindness is the most commonly reported neurological syndrome, occurring in approximately 50% of cases. The putative mechanism involves disruption of the blood brain barrier and direct neuronal injury. Contrast-induced transient vasoconstriction has also been implicated. Symptoms typically appear within minutes to hours of contrast administration and resolve entirely within 24-48 hr. Risk factors may include hypertension, diabetes mellitus, renal impairment, the administration of large volumes of iodinated contrast, percutaneous coronary intervention or selective angiography of internal mammary grafts, and previous adverse reaction to iodinated contrast. Characteristic findings on cerebral imaging include cortical and sub-cortical contrast enhancement on computed tomography (CT). Imaging findings in CIE may mimic subarachnoid hemorrhage or cerebral ischemia; the Hounsfield scale on CT and the apparent diffusion coefficient on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are useful imaging tools in distinguishing these entities. In some cases, brain imaging is normal. Prognosis is excellent with supportive management alone. CIE tends to recur, although re-challenge with iodinated contrast without adverse effects has been documented. CIE is an important clinical entity to consider in the differential diagnosis of stroke following cardiac catheterization. Given that prognosis is

  8. Quantitative Risk Assessment of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Toshiyuki; Kasuga, Fumiko

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is a progressive neurological disease of cattle affecting the central nervous system and was first diagnosed in the United Kingdom (UK) in 1986 (Wells et al., 1987). This disease is one of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) which includes Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in humans and scrapie in sheep. The causative agent of TSE is considered to be an abnormal form of prion protein. However, the details of its pathogenic mechanism have not been fully identified. Scrapie, which causes neurological symptoms in sheep and goats, has existed in the UK for 200 years (Hoinville, 1996) and spread across the rest of the world in the 1900s (Detwiler & Baylis, 2003). There has been no report so far that scrapie can be transmitted to humans. Initially, BSE was also considered as a disease affecting only animals. However, a variant type of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) was first reported in the UK, and exposure to a BSE agent was suspected (Collinge, Sidle, Meads, Ironside, & Hill, 1996). vCJD is clinically and pathologically different from the sporadic type of CJD, and age at clinical onset of vCJD is younger than sporadic type (Will et al., 1996). Since the UK government announced the possible association between BSE and vCJD in 1996, BSE has become a huge public health concern all over the world. Of particular concern about vCJD, the fatal disease in younger age, distorted consumer confidence in beef safety, and as a result reduced beef consumption has been seen in many BSE-affected countries.

  9. Traumatic thoracolumbar spine fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Siebenga (Jan)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractTraumatic spinal fractures have the lowest functional outcomes and the lowest rates of return to work after injury of all major organ systems.1 This thesis will cover traumatic thoracolumbar spine fractures and not osteoporotic spine fractures because of the difference in fracture

  10. Late onset arginase deficiency presenting with encephalopathy and midbrain hyperintensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boby Varkey Maramattom

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Urea cycle disorders (UCD are very rare metabolic disorders that present with encephalopathy and hyperammonemia. Of the UCDs, Arginase deficiency (ARD is the rarest and presents in childhood with a progressive spastic diplegia or seizures. Acute presentation in adulthood is extremely unusual. [1] We present the first case of adult onset ARD presenting with encephalopathy and diffusion weighted MRI findings that resembled a moustache in the midbrain.

  11. Hemorrhagic shock and encephalopathy syndrome: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Sook Ja; Choi, Yun Sun; Shin, Chung Ho; Cho, Sung Bum; Cho, Jae Min; Kim, Hyun Sook; Han, Tae Il; Yoon, Yong Kyu

    2001-01-01

    Hemorrhagic shock and encephalopathy syndrome (HSES) is a sudden-onset symptom complex that involves multisystem failure and includes encephalopathy, shock, coma, convulsions, prerenal azotemia, hepatic dysfunction, and bleeding coagulopathy and progressive thrombocytopenia in previously healthy infants and children. Its radiologic findings have rarely been reported, and it has not been described in Korea. We present a case of clinically diagnosed HSES, and include the CT and MRI findings

  12. Early progressive encephalopathy in boys and MECP2 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kankirawatana, P; Leonard, H; Ellaway, C; Scurlock, J; Mansour, A; Makris, C M; Dure, L S; Friez, M; Lane, J; Kiraly-Borri, C; Fabian, V; Davis, M; Jackson, J; Christodoulou, J; Kaufmann, W E; Ravine, D; Percy, A K

    2006-07-11

    MECP2 mutations mainly occur in females with Rett syndrome. Mutations have been described in 11 boys with progressive encephalopathy: seven of nine with affected sisters and two de novo. The authors report four de novo occurrences: three pathogenic and one potentially pathogenic. Common features include failure to thrive, respiratory insufficiency, microcephaly, and abnormal motor control. MECP2 mutations should be assessed in boys with progressive encephalopathy and one or more of respiratory insufficiency, abnormal movements or tone, and intractable seizures.

  13. Improving CTE Student Retention and Transfer at Rend Lake College with Degree Audit and Reengagment Strategies. Pathways to Results: Implementation Partnerships Strategy Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockey, Marci

    2016-01-01

    Rend Lake College (RLC) has participated in several Pathways to Results (PTR) projects over the last five years. The PTR model has been an essential tool to drive evidence-based changes throughout the College. In 2015, RLC used the PTR Model to evaluate institutional processes related to the Perkins Career and Technical Education (CTE) Student…

  14. Frequency of helicobacter pylori antibodies in porto-systemic encephalopathy,

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sethar, G.H.; Ahmed, R.; Afsar, S.; Zuberi, B.F.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the frequency of Helicobacter pylori antibodies in patients presenting with porto-systemic encephalopathy due to liver disease. Patients and Methods: During the study period, seventy-six patients of porto-systemic encephalopathy due to liver diseases was selected. These subjects were evaluated for hepatic encephalopathy grade, modified Child-Pugh classification and were managed according to the standard practices. These patients were evaluated for Helicobacter (H. pylori) antibody status by ELlSA (Abbott Laboratories) method. Results: Out of 76 patients studied and tested for H. pylori antibodies, 48(63.2%) were males and 28(36.8%) were females with age ranging between 17 and 85 years. Out of 76 patients who presented with porto-systemic encephalopathy, 59(77.6%) had a positive H. pylori antibody test. Thirty-five of these were males and 24 were females. A significant number of patients who presented with higher grade of encephalopathy were H. pylori antibody positive (p<0.001). Conclusion: In this study, frequency of H. pylori antibodies was significantly high in patients of porto-systematic encephalopathy. (author)

  15. Current state of knowledge of hepatic encephalopathy (part IV): Management of Hepatic Encephalopathy by liver support systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanein, Tarek

    2017-04-01

    Hepatic Encephalopathy is a devastating complication of End-Stage Liver Disease. In its severe grades it requires extra intervention beyond the standard medical approaches. In this article were view the role of liver support systems in managing hepatic encephalopthy.

  16. Performance of the hepatic encephalopathy scoring algorithm in a clinical trial of patients with cirrhosis and severe hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassanein, T.; Blei, A.T.; Perry, W.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The grading of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is based on a combination of indicators that reflect the state of consciousness, intellectual function, changes in behavior, and neuromuscular alterations seen in patients with liver failure. METHODS: We modified the traditional West Haven...... criteria (WHC) to provide an objective assessment of the cognitive parameters to complement the subjective clinical ratings for the performance of extracorporeal albumin dialysis (ECAD) using a molecular adsorption recirculating system in patients with cirrhosis and severe (grade III / IV) encephalopathy...

  17. Topiramate increases the risk of valproic acid-induced encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Young; Kim, Dong Wook; Chu, Kon; Lee, Soon-Tae; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Moon, Hye-Jin; Lee, Sang Kun

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic encephalopathy is a rare but serious complication of valproic acid (VPA) therapy that usually presents with impaired consciousness or increased seizure frequency. Although it has been suggested that topiramate (TPM) increases the risk of VPA-induced encephalopathy, the additional risk in patients receiving TPM therapy has not been evaluated. We reviewed all adult patients who took VPA between January 2005 and February 2009 at the Seoul National University Hospital and identified patients with VPA-induced encephalopathy based on clinical and electroencephalography (EEG) data. Information on sex, age, serum ammonia level, serum VPA level, liver function test, and EEG was collected from patient registry and medical data. We enrolled 8,372 patients who received VPA therapy and 1,236 patients who received VPA/TPM combination therapy. We identified 11 patients with VPA-induced encephalopathy (0.13%), 7 of whom received a combination therapy of VPA and TPM. The odds ratio of VPA-induced encephalopathy with TPM over that without TPM was 10.16. There were no significant differences in sex distribution, number of antiepileptic agents, ammonia level, VPA serum level, underlying diseases, dosage of VPA, duration of VPA treatment, treatment of encephalopathy, and outcomes between the two groups. Our study showed that the prevalence of VPA-induced encephalopathy is approximately 0.1% among patients treated with VPA and that the risk of this condition, although still low, can increase by approximately 10 times in the presence of TPM therapy. Based on these results, we suggest that TPM should be carefully used in patients receiving VPA treatment. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2012 International League Against Epilepsy.

  18. The Thompson Encephalopathy Score and Short-Term Outcomes in Asphyxiated Newborns Treated With Therapeutic Hypothermia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thorsen, Patricia; Jansen-van der Weide, Martine C; Groenendaal, Floris; Onland, Wes; van Straaten, Henrika L M; Zonnenberg, Inge; Vermeulen, Jeroen R.; Dijk, Peter H; Dudink, Jeroen; Rijken, Monique; van Heijst, Arno; Dijkman, Koen P; Cools, Filip; Zecic, Alexandra; van Kaam, Anton H; de Haan, Timo R

    BACKGROUND: The Thompson encephalopathy score is a clinical score to assess newborns suffering from perinatal asphyxia. Previous studies revealed a high sensitivity and specificity of the Thompson encephalopathy score for adverse outcomes (death or severe disability). Because the Thompson

  19. Genetics Home Reference: SCN8A-related epilepsy with encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources (6 links) Boston Children's Hospital: Epilepsy and Seizure Disorder in Children Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: ... related epilepsy with encephalopathy Merck Manual Consumer Version: Seizure Disorders Orphanet: Early infantile epileptic encephalopathy Patient Support and ...

  20. Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... brain injury Some traumatic brain injuries have lasting effects, and some do not. You may be left with disabilities. These can be physical, behavioral, communicative, and/or mental. Customized treatment helps you to have as full ...

  1. Hyperemesis gravidarum complicated by Wernicke encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Güney

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Wernicke encephalopathy (WE is a potentially fatal but reversible medical emergency. WE usually remains unrecognized in obstetric patients. Aim of the present study is to report a rare case of hyperemesis gravidarum that is complicated by WE. CASE: A 29 years-old, gravida 2, para 1 woman was admitted to Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Süleyman Demirel University in 2007 with an one week history of convulsions and confusion. The patient had nausea and vomiting accompanied by weight loss of 8 kg since she was pregnant. Symptoms of nausea and vomiting became severe in the last weeks. The patient had ataxia, nystagmus, confusion and general muscle weakness. Laboratory examinations were normal, except potassium levels (2.4 mmol/l and ketonuria. There was no diagnosed lesion in the radiological examinations. The patient was diagnosed as WE, and she had replacement therapy with potassium and thiamine for 7 seven days. The patient responded well and was discharged. CONCLUSION: Hyperemesis gravidarum may cause WE which can be diagnosed clinically. Thiamine should be supplemented to pregnant women with prolonged vomiting to prevent development of WE.

  2. Neuroinflammation in hepatic encephalopathy: mechanistic aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, Arumugam R; Rama Rao, Kakulavarapu V; Norenberg, Michael D

    2015-03-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a major neurological complication of severe liver disease that presents in acute and chronic forms. While elevated brain ammonia level is known to be a major etiological factor in this disorder, recent studies have shown a significant role of neuroinflammation in the pathogenesis of both acute and chronic HE. This review summarizes the involvement of ammonia in the activation of microglia, as well as the means by which ammonia triggers inflammatory responses in these cells. Additionally, the role of ammonia in stimulating inflammatory events in brain endothelial cells (ECs), likely through the activation of the toll-like receptor-4 and the associated production of cytokines, as well as the stimulation of various inflammatory factors in ECs and in astrocytes, are discussed. This review also summarizes the inflammatory mechanisms by which activation of ECs and microglia impact on astrocytes leading to their dysfunction, ultimately contributing to astrocyte swelling/brain edema in acute HE. The role of microglial activation and its contribution to the progression of neurobehavioral abnormalities in chronic HE are also briefly presented. We posit that a better understanding of the inflammatory events associated with acute and chronic HE will uncover novel therapeutic targets useful in the treatment of patients afflicted with HE.

  3. Prognostic Assessment in Patients with Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Rita García-Martínez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy (HE is a common complication of liver failure that is associated with poor prognosis. However, the prognosis is not uniform and depends on the underlying liver disease. Acute liver failure is an uncommon cause of HE that carries bad prognosis but is potentially reversible. There are several prognostic systems that have been specifically developed for selecting patients for liver transplantation. In patients with cirrhosis the prognosis of the episode of HE is usually dictated by the underlying precipitating factor. Acute-on-chronic liver failure is the most severe form of decompensation of cirrhosis, the prognosis depends on the number of associated organ failures. Patients with cirrhosis that have experienced an episode of HE should be considered candidates for liver transplant. The selection depends on the underlying liver function assessed by the Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD index. There is a subgroup that exhibits low MELD and recurrent HE, usually due to the coexistence of large portosystemic shunts. The recurrence of HE is more common in patients that develop progressive deterioration of liver function and hyponatremia. The bouts of HE may cause sequels that have been shown to persist after liver transplant.

  4. Resveratrol in Patients with Minimal Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Giulia Malaguarnera

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Minimal Hepatic Encephalopathy (MHE is characterized by an impairment of social interaction, emotional behavior, sleep disorders, physical and mental symptoms, and diminished Quality of Life (QoL. The aim of our study is evaluating the potential liver health promoting a perspective of Resveratrol (RV activities and evaluate whether RV treatment may improve health related quality of life (HRQL and reduce depression and anxiety in patients with MHE. Methods: We evaluated depression using the Beck Depression Inventory test, anxiety with State-trait anxiety inventory test, quality of life through SF-36 test, and ammonia serum levels in 70 MHE patients that were randomized into two groups. Results: In the comparison between RV group and placebo group we observed a decrease in Back Depression Inventory (BDI (p < 0.001, in State-trait anxiety inventory (STAI (p < 0.001, and improve in physical function (p < 0.001, in role physical (p < 0.05, in body pain (p < 0.05, in general health (p < 0.001, in vitality (p < 0.05, and in social function (p < 0.001. Conclusions: Resveratrol showed efficacy in the treatment of depression, anxiety, and ammonia serum levels, and improved the quality of life Of MHE patients.

  5. Pathogenesis of bovine spongiform encephalopathy in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Keulen, L J M; Vromans, M E W; Dolstra, C H; Bossers, A; van Zijderveld, F G

    2008-01-01

    The pathogenesis of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in sheep was studied by immunohistochemical detection of scrapie-associated prion protein (PrP(Sc)) in the gastrointestinal, lymphoid and neural tissues following oral inoculation with BSE brain homogenate. First accumulation of PrP(Sc) was detected after 6 months in the tonsil and the ileal Peyer's patches. At 9 months postinfection, PrP(Sc) accumulation involved all gut-associated lymphoid tissues and lymph nodes as well as the spleen. At this time point, PrP(Sc) accumulation in the peripheral neural tissues was first seen in the enteric nervous system of the caudal jejunum and ileum and in the coeliac-mesenteric ganglion. In the central nervous system, PrP(Sc) was first detected in the dorsal motor nucleus of the nervus Vagus in the medulla oblongata and in the intermediolateral column in the spinal cord segments T7-L1. At subsequent time points, PrP(Sc) was seen to spread within the lymphoid system to also involve all non-gut-associated lymphoid tissues. In the enteric nervous system, further spread of PrP(Sc) involved the neural plexi along the entire gastrointestinal tract and in the CNS the complete neuraxis. These findings indicate a spread of the BSE agent in sheep from the enteric nervous system through parasympathetic and sympathetic nerves to the medulla oblongata and the spinal cord.

  6. The mechanisms and treatment of asphyxial encephalopathy

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    Guido eWassink

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Acute post-asphyxial encephalopathy occurring around the time of birth remains a major cause of death and disability. The recent seminal insight that allows active neuroprotective treatment is that even after profound asphyxia (the primary phase, many brain cells show initial recovery from the insult during a short latent phase, typically lasting approximately 6 h, only to die hours to days later after a secondary deterioration characterized by seizures, cytotoxic edema, and progressive failure of cerebral oxidative metabolism. Although many of these secondary processes are potentially injurious, they appear to be primarily epiphenomena of the ‘execution’ phase of cell death. Animal and human studies designed around this conceptual framework have shown that moderate cerebral hypothermia initiated as early as possible but before the onset of secondary deterioration, and continued for a sufficient duration to allow the secondary deterioration to resolve, has been associated with potent, long-lasting neuroprotection. Recent clinical trials show that while therapeutic hypothermia significantly reduces morbidity and mortality, many babies still die or survive with disabilities. The challenge for the future is to find ways of improving the effectiveness of treatment. In this review, we will dissect the known mechanisms of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in relation to the known effects of hypothermic neuroprotection.

  7. Painless thyroiditis complicating with hypercalcemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thewjitcharoen, Yotsapon; Lumlertgul, Nuttha

    2012-01-01

    Severe hypercalcemia has rarely been reported in patients with hyperthyroidism. Although the pathogenesis is not clear; it is believed to be due to activation of osteoclasts resulting in excessive bone resorption. To recognize the unusual cause of hypercalcemia from painless thyroiditis, which could manifest with transient hyperthyroidism in the early stage. A 70-year-old woman presented with watery diarrhea, nausea and vomiting and significant weight loss for two months. Initially, she was misdiagnosed as having Graves'disease from her clinical presentation and thyroid function tests. Oral propylthiouracil was given to treat hyperthyroidism. However two weeks after discharge, she developed altered consciousness due to severe hypercalcemia. After combined treatment of hypercalcemia and severe hyperthyroidism, her symptoms resolved quickly. Later on, her thyroid function tests switched to subclinical hypothyroid at two months after initial presentation. No concurrent pathological conditions could be found to explain the other causes of hypercalcemia. Therefore, painless thyroiditis complicated with severe hypercalcemia was subsequently diagnosed based on her clinical course. Hypercalcemic encephalopathy is an uncommon manifestation of hyperthyroidism that should be kept in mind in patients who demonstrated clinical pictures of hyperthyroidism and alteration of consciousness. Moreover the present case emphasizes the consideration of painless thyroiditis as a differential diagnosis of hyperthyroidism because anti-thyroid medications were not indicated in this condition.

  8. Pathogenetic aspects of alcoholic encephalopathy treatment

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    Shchetinin S.G.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol is considered to be the most common exogenous toxins, causing encephalopathy. The defeat of almost all parts of the nervous system should be assigned to the special features of ethanol. Neurophysiological mechanisms of development of substance dependence are based in the stem and limbic structures of the brain that are involved in ensuring the regulation of emotional state, mood, motivation sphere, psychophysical tone of human behavior in general and its adaptation to the environment. Stress or disruption of the normal functioning of these structures can lead to the formation of abstinence syndrome, affective disorders in remission and craving for alcohol. Dopaminergic and opioid (endorphin system play an important role in the genesis of various mental and motor disorders. In some way alcohol dependence can be regarded as an endorfinodefitsitnoe disease with a pathogenetic point of view. Activating of opioidereal system by trans-cranial electrical stimulation promotes the restoration of disturbed emotional, cognitive and autonomic functions, reduces craving for alcohol and in that way increases the effectiveness of rehabilitation treatment

  9. Evaluation and Management of Hepatic Encephalopathy: Current Status and Future Directions

    OpenAIRE

    Suraweera, Duminda; Sundaram, Vinay; Saab, Sammy

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a spectrum of neurocognitive manifestations often seen in patients with liver injury or rarely in patients with portosystemic shunting without liver injury. It can be divided into minimal (covert) hepatic encephalopathy and overt hepatic encephalopathy, depending on the severity. Patients with hepatic encephalopathy have compromised clinical outcomes, decreased quality of life, and increased healthcare utilization, often resulting in a heavy financial and personal bu...

  10. Primary traumatic patellar dislocation

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    Tsai Chun-Hao

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acute traumatic patellar dislocation is a common injury in the active and young adult populations. MRI of the knee is recommended in all patients who present with acute patellar dislocation. Numerous operative and non-operative methods have been described to treat the injuries; however, the ideal management of the acute traumatic patellar dislocation in young adults is still in debate. This article is intended to review the studies to the subjects of epidemiology, initial examination and management.

  11. Diagnosis of hepatic encephalopathy with magentic resonance imaging; With special reference to portal system encephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Etsuo; Narumi, Yoshifumi; Kadota, Tsuyoshi; Fujita, Makoto; Kuriyama, Keiko; Kuroda, Chikazumi (Osaka Prefectural Center for Adult Diseases (Japan))

    1993-01-01

    Cranial magnetic resonance (MR) images were examined in 16 patients with liver cirrhosis. The findings of MR imaging were correlated with portal-systemic collateral vessel shown on angiograms. In 9 of 16 patients, basal ganglia was hyperintense compared with white matter on T1-weighted images. These 9 patients had portal-systemic collateral vessel 10 mm or more in diameter that was suppied by superior mesenteric vein (SMV), and 4 of the 9 patients had portal-systemic encephalopathy on angiograms. In the remaining 7 patients, no hyperintense lesions were seen in basal ganglia relative to white matter on T1-weighted images; angiography revealed that 2 patients had portal-systemic collateral vessel that was supplied by SMV but was 5 mm or less in diameter, 3 had bood supplies from splenic vein, and 2 had no collateral vessel. There was no change in signal intensity on T2-weighted images. In conclusion, a large portal-systemic collateral vessel supplied by SMV may be shown as a high intensity lesion in basal ganglia, thus making it possible to diagnose hepatic encephalopathy even if there was no psychoneurologic symptoms or signs. (N.K.).

  12. Seeing more clearly through the fog of encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Peter W; Sutter, Raoul

    2013-10-01

    Patients with acute confusional states (often referred to as encephalopathy or delirium) pose diagnostic and management challenges for treating physicians. Encephalopathy is associated with a high morbidity and mortality rate, and the diagnosis rests on clinical grounds but may also be supported by the finding of electroencephalographic (EEG) evidence for diffuse cerebral dysfunction. The myriad cerebral transmitter and metabolic disruptions are generated by systemic organ system failures, principal among which are those of the liver, kidneys, lungs, heart, and endocrine system, along with the effects of exogenous toxins and medications. In most cases, several of these organ failures together contribute to the confusional state, frequently in the context of a diffuse cerebral atrophy that affects the aging brain. This special issue of the Journal of Clinical Neurophysiology is dedicated to exploring the electrophysiology of these conditions. It reviews the pathophysiology, psychiatric manifestations, clinical and imaging correlations of the many causes and types of encephalopathy. A literature review of the EEG abnormalities in the various types of encephalopathy provides an overview that ranges from paraneoplastic causes, through organ system failures, postcardiorespiratory arrest, to postoperative delirium. The issue is supplemented by tables of relevant clinical correlations, graphs, Venn diagrams, and the use of mathematical modeling used to explain how defects in the neuronal interplay might generate the EEG patterns seen in encephalopathy. We hope that this assembly will act as a springboard for further discussion and investigation into the EEG underpinnings, clinical correlations, diagnosis. and prognostication of these common and morbid disturbances of brain function.

  13. Recent advances in hepatic encephalopathy [version 1; referees: 4 approved

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    Victoria Liere

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy describes the array of neurological alterations that occur during acute liver failure or chronic liver injury. While key players in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy, such as increases in brain ammonia, alterations in neurosteroid levels, and neuroinflammation, have been identified, there is still a paucity in our knowledge of the precise pathogenic mechanism. This review gives a brief overview of our understanding of the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy and then summarizes the significant recent advances made in clinical and basic research contributing to our understanding, diagnosis, and possible treatment of hepatic encephalopathy. A literature search using the PubMed database was conducted in May 2017 using “hepatic encephalopathy” as a keyword, and selected manuscripts were limited to those research articles published since May 2014. While the authors acknowledge that many significant advances have been made in the understanding of hepatic encephalopathy prior to May 2014, we have limited the scope of this review to the previous three years only.

  14. Cesarean section on request at 39 weeks: impact on shoulder dystocia, fetal trauma, neonatal encephalopathy, and intrauterine fetal demise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankins, Gary D V; Clark, Shannon M; Munn, Mary B

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of this analysis was to determine the impact on specific forms of neonatal morbidity and mortality by allowing women to opt for delivery by elective cesarean section at 39 weeks of gestation (EGA). According to the National Vital Statistics Reports, over 70% of deliveries in the U.S. annually are at gestational ages>or=39 weeks EGA. Estimating that over 4 million deliveries occur annually in the United States, this would yield approximately 3 million pregnancies wherein the woman may exercise her choice for either primary or repeat cesarean section at 39 weeks EGA or at the point when labor is established. A search was conducted using Ovid Medline spanning the past 10 years using the following key words: fetal trauma, shoulder dystocia, brachial plexus palsy, neonatal skull fracture, obstetrical trauma, traumatic delivery, intrauterine fetal demise, stillbirth, fetal demise, and neonatal encephalopathy. Using this search technique, over 2100 articles were identified. The abstracts were reviewed and pertinent articles were chosen for further consideration. The identified articles and their applicable references were obtained for inclusion in this review. Preference was given to publications on or after the year 2000 with the exception of classical or sentinel articles, which were included without regard to year of publication. Four major categories of neonatal morbidity and mortality are discussed: Shoulder dystocia: Accepting that we do not have a successful method for the prediction or prevention of shoulder dystocia, the question becomes, "What is the chance that a baby will sustain a permanent brachial plexus injury at delivery?" Additionally, is there a significant protective effect of cesarean section in reducing the risk of such injury? Currently, the occurrence rate of brachial plexus palsy at the time of vaginal delivery ranges from 0.047% to 0.6% and for cesarean section from 0.0042% to 0.095%. Using a composite estimate of the risk of 0

  15. The relationship between plasma free fatty acids and experimentally induced hepatic encephalopathy in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, J. J.; Bosman, D. K.; Jörning, G. G.; de Haan, J. G.; Maas, M. A.; Chamuleau, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    Two experimental models of hepatic encephalopathy in the rat have been investigated in order to study the postulated relationship between plasma free fatty acids concentration (C6 - C22:0) and the degree of hepatic encephalopathy. As a model of chronic hepatic encephalopathy, porta caval shunted

  16. 77 FR 29914 - Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-21

    ... Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health... derived from bovines with regard to bovine spongiform encephalopathy. This action will allow interested... importation of live bovines and products derived from bovines with regard to bovine spongiform encephalopathy...

  17. A Critical Case of Wernicke's Encephalopathy Induced by Hyperemesis Gravidarum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung Ju Kang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Wernicke’s encephalopathy is a reversible but potentially critical disease caused by thiamine deficiency. Most patients complain of symptoms such as ophthalmoplegia, ataxia and confusion. Heavy alcohol drinking is commonly associated with the disease, but other clinical conditions also can provoke it. In pregnant women, hyperemesis gravidarum can lead to the depletion of body thiamine due to poor oral intake and a high metabolic demand. We report a case of Wernicke’s encephalopathy following hyperemesis gravidarum in a 36-year-old female at 20 weeks of pregnancy, who visited our hospital because of shock with vaginal bleeding. This case suggests that although the initial presentation may include atypical symptoms (e.g., shock or bleeding, Wernicke’s encephalopathy should be considered, and thiamine replacement should be performed in pregnant women with neurologic symptoms and poor oral intake.

  18. Colectomy for porto-systemic encephalopathy: is it still topical?

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    Rym Ennaifer

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy (HE is a common long term complication of porto-systemic shunt. We report herein the case of a 59-year-old man with Child-Pugh A cirrhosis treated successfully 9 years earlier with distal splenorenal shunt for uncontrolled variceal bleeding. In the last year, he developed a severe and persistent hepatic encephalopathy secondary to the shunt, which was resistant to medical therapy. As liver transplantation was not available and obliteration of the shunt was hazardous, we performed subtotal colectomy in order to reduce ammonia production. This therapeutic option proved successful, as the grade of encephalopathy decreased and the patient improved. Our experience indicates that colonic exclusion should be considered as an option in the management of HE refractory to medical treatment in highly selected patients when liver transplantation is not available or even as a bridge given the long waiting time on lists.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging in a case of Wernicke's encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagnan, L.; Pozzi-Mucelli, R.S.; Berlot, G.

    1998-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is an uncommon disorder caused by a thiamine deficiency which is clinically characterized by the triad of ophthalmoplegia, ataxia and disturbances of consciousness, each finding being variably present. The disease is caused by malnutrition or malabsorption, and is often associated with prolonged alcohol intake, neoplasm and extensive inflammatory processes of the digestive tract and parenteral hyperalimentation-induced gastrointestinal mucosal atrophy. Clinical diagnosis can be elusive and MRI may be the only imaging technique able to detect the cerebral lesions, whose type and distribution are characteristic of the Wernicke's encephalopathy, whereas CT is positive only in exceptional cases. We report a case of a 56-year-old woman who developed a Wernicke's encephalopathy 1 month after a colonic resection with signal intensity changes located in the mammillary bodies and in the medial thalamic nuclei. (orig.)

  20. Research progress of BOLD-functional MRI of hepatic encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni Ling; Zhang Longjiang; Lu Guangming

    2013-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE), characterized by a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations, ranging from behavior abnormality, conscious disorder and even coma, is a consequence of liver dysfunction in both acute and chronic hepatic diseases. Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) refers to a subgroup of cirrhotic patients without clinical overt hepatic encephalopathy symptoms hut with abnormalities in neuro -cognitive functions. HE/MHE can have a far-reaching impact on quality of life and prognosis. The exact neuropathology mechanism was still unclear. Recently, functional MRI (fMRI) has been increasingly applied for investigating the neuro-pathophysiological mechanism of HE. This paper will review the fMRI research applied on uncovering the neuropathology mechanism of HE. (authors)

  1. EPILEPTIC ENCEPHALOPATHY WITH CONTINUOUS SPIKES-WAVES ACTIVITY DURING SLEEP

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    E. D. Belousova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The author represents the review and discussion of current scientific literature devoted to epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spikes-waves activity during sleep — the special form of partly reversible age-dependent epileptic encephalopathy, characterized by triad of symptoms: continuous prolonged epileptiform (spike-wave activity on EEG in sleep, epileptic seizures and cognitive disorders. The author describes the aspects of classification, pathogenesis and etiology, prevalence, clinical picture and diagnostics of this disorder, including the peculiar anomalies on EEG. The especial attention is given to approaches to the treatment of epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spikeswaves activity during sleep. Efficacy of valproates, corticosteroid hormones and antiepileptic drugs of other groups is considered. The author represents own experience of treatment this disorder with corticosteroids, scheme of therapy and assessment of efficacy.

  2. Clinical and radiological features of hypertensive brainstem encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-qiu LI

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To discuss the diagnosis and treatment of hypertensive brainstem encephalopathy. Methods  The clinical and imaging data of 3 cases of hypertensive brainstem encephalopathy were summarized and analyzed for the purpose of improving the acumen in diagnosis and treatment. Results All the 3 patients showed relatively mild clinical symptoms, and they were misdiagnosed in different degrees during the treatment, but their clinical symptoms were improved by rapid and effective antihypertensive therapy. Cerebral CT and MRI scans revealed extensive abnormal signals in brain stem, with or without supratentorial lesions and brain stem hemorrhage. The lesions as revealed by imaging were improved significantly after treatment. Conclusions Clinical-radiographic dissociation is the classic feature of hypertensive brainstem encephalopathy. The clinical symptoms and lesions as shown by imaging could be improved after active treatment. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.06.03

  3. Acute Infantile Encephalopathy Predominantly Affecting The Frontal Lobes (AIEF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raha, Sarbani; Udani, Vrajesh

    2012-12-01

    Acute Infantile Encephalopathy Predominantly Affecting the Frontal Lobes (AIEF) is a relatively recent described entity. This article includes case reports of two patients who had bifrontal involvement during acute febrile encephalopathy. Case 1 describes a 1-y-old boy who presented with hyperpyrexia and dialeptic seizures. Imaging revealed significant bilateral frontal lobe involvement while serology proved presence of Influenza B infection. Over a period of one wk, he recovered with significant cognitive decline and perseveratory behavior. Another 6-y-old boy presented with language and behavioral problems suggestive of frontal dysfunction after recovering from prolonged impairment of consciousness following a convulsive status epilepticus. Bilateral superior frontal lesions with gyral swelling was evident on neuroimaging. These cases are among the very few cases of AIEF described in recent literature and the article also reviews this unique subtype of acute encephalopathy.

  4. Potentially modifiable factors contributing to sepsis-associated encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonneville, Romain; de Montmollin, Etienne; Poujade, Julien; Garrouste-Orgeas, Maïté; Souweine, Bertrand; Darmon, Michael; Mariotte, Eric; Argaud, Laurent; Barbier, François; Goldgran-Toledano, Dany; Marcotte, Guillaume; Dumenil, Anne-Sylvie; Jamali, Samir; Lacave, Guillaume; Ruckly, Stéphane; Mourvillier, Bruno; Timsit, Jean-François

    2017-08-01

    Identifying modifiable factors for sepsis-associated encephalopathy may help improve patient care and outcomes. We conducted a retrospective analysis of a prospective multicenter database. Sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE) was defined by a score on the Glasgow coma scale (GCS) sepsis at ICU admission, of whom 1341 (53%) had sepsis-associated encephalopathy. After adjusting for baseline characteristics, site of infection, and type of admission, the following factors remained independently associated with sepsis-associated encephalopathy: acute renal failure [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 1.41, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.19-1.67], hypoglycemia 10 mmol/l (aOR = 1.37, 95% CI 1.09-1.72), hypercapnia >45 mmHg (aOR = 1.91, 95% CI 1.53-2.38), hypernatremia >145 mmol/l (aOR = 2.30, 95% CI 1.48-3.57), and S. aureus (aOR = 1.54, 95% CI 1.05-2.25). Sepsis-associated encephalopathy was associated with higher mortality, higher use of ICU resources, and longer hospital stay. After adjusting for age, comorbidities, year of admission, and non-neurological SOFA score, even mild alteration of mental status (i.e., a score on the GCS of 13-14) remained independently associated with mortality (adjusted hazard ratio = 1.38, 95% CI 1.09-1.76). Acute renal failure and common metabolic disturbances represent potentially modifiable factors contributing to sepsis-associated encephalopathy. However, a true causal relationship has yet to be demonstrated. Our study confirms the prognostic significance of mild alteration of mental status in patients with sepsis.

  5. Risk factors and outcome of Shigella encephalopathy in Bangladeshi children.

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    Farzana Afroze

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Although, Shigella encephalopathy, a serious extra-intestinal complication of shigellosis, significantly increases the risks of death, data are very limited on predicting factors particularly related to electrolyte profiles in children below five years of age with Shigella encephalopathy. Our objective was to determine the clinical as well as laboratory predicting factors and outcome of children with Shigella encephalopathy.In this unmatched case-control design, children aged 2-59 months having a positive stool culture for Shigella and who had their serum electrolytes been done from July 2012 to June 2015 were studied. Children with Shigella encephalopathy, defined as having abnormal mentation, constituted the cases, and those without encephalopathy constituted the controls. During the study period, we identified a total of 541 children less than five years of age, who had Shigella in their stool culture. Only 139 children fulfilled the study criteria and among them 69 were cases and 70 were controls. The cases more often had fatal outcome compared to the controls (7% vs. 0%, P = 0.02. In logistic regression analysis, the cases were independently associated with shorter duration (1.2 ± 0.4 days of diarrhea prior to admission, dehydrating diarrhea, sepsis and hyponatremia (p<0.05 for all. Among 139 Shigella isolates, S. flexneri (88/139, 63% and S. sonnei(34/139, 24% were the dominant species. S. dysenteriae was not isolated throughout the study period. S.sonnei was more frequently isolated from the cases (24/69, 35% than the controls (10/70, 14%, whereas the isolation of S. flexneri was comparable between the groups (40/69, 58% vs 48/70, 69%. A total of 94 (67.6% isolates were resistant to trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole, 84 (60.4% to ciprofloxacin, 66/138 (48% to ampicillin, 5 (3.5% to ceftriaxone, 17 (12.2% to mecillinum and 35 (25% to azithromycin.The case-fatality-rate was significantly higher among the children with Shigella encephalopathy

  6. Diffusion weighted MR imaging of acute Wernicke's encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Tae-Ick; Kim, Joong-Seok; Park, Soung-Kyeong; Kim, Beum-Saeng; Ahn, Kook-Jin; Yang, Dong-Won

    2003-01-01

    We report a case of Wernicke's encephalopathy in which diffusion-weighted MR images demonstrated symmetrical hyperintense lesions in the paraventricular area of the third ventricles and medial thalami. Apparent diffusion coefficient mapping showed isointensity in the aforementioned areas. Diffusion-weighted MR images may provide evidence of vasogenic edema associated with thiamine deficiency, proven in the histopathology of experimental animals. In addition, diffusion-weighted MRI has many advantages over T2 or FLARE-weighted brain MRI in detecting structural and functional abnormalities in Wernicke's encephalopathy

  7. Hepatic Encephalopathy: Early Diagnosis in Pediatric Patients With Cirrhosis

    OpenAIRE

    DARA, Naghi; SAYYARI, Ali-Akbar; IMANZADEH, Farid

    2014-01-01

    How to Cite This Article: Dara N, Sayyari AA, Imanzadeh F. Hepatic Encephalopathy: Early Diagnosis in Pediatric Patients With Cirrhosis. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Winter; 8(1):1-11.ObjectiveAs acute liver failure (ALF) and chronic liver disease (cirrhosis) continue to increase in prevalence, we will see more cases of hepatic encephalopathy.Primary care physician are often the first to suspect it, since they are familiar with the patient’s usual physical and mental status. This serious complic...

  8. Brain gamma-aminobutyric acid deficiency in dialysis encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, V P; Perry, T L; Price, J D; Reeve, C E; Godolphin, W J; Kish, S J

    1985-02-01

    We measured levels of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the CSF and in the autopsied brain of patients with dialysis encephalopathy. GABA concentrations were low in the CSF of three of five living patients. Mean GABA content was reduced by 30 to 50% in five brain regions (frontal, occipital, and cerebellar cortex, caudate nucleus, and medial dorsal thalamus) in five fatal cases. GABA content was normal in brain regions where GABA is characteristically reduced in Huntington's disease. Choline acetyltransferase activity was diminished (by 25 to 35%) in cerebral cortex of the dialysis encephalopathy patients.

  9. MRI findings in acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy resulting from decompensated chronic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sureka, Jyoti; Jakkani, Ravi Kanth; Panwar, Sanuj

    2012-06-01

    Hyperammonemic encephalopathy is a type of metabolic encephalopathy with diversified etiology. Hyperammonemia is the end result of several metabolic disorders such as congenital deficiencies of urea cycle enzymes, hepatic encephalopathy, Reye's syndrome and other toxic encephalopathies. Non-specific clinical presentation poses a great challenge in early diagnosis of this entity. Irrespective of the underlying etiology, hyperammonemia causes a distinctive pattern of brain parenchymal injury. The cingulate gyrus and insular cortex are more vulnerable to this type of toxic insult. Characteristic magnetic resonance imaging findings in combination with laboratory parameters can help to differentiate this entity from other metabolic encephalopathy and thus aiding in early diagnosis and treatment.

  10. Evaluation and Management of Hepatic Encephalopathy: Current Status and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suraweera, Duminda; Sundaram, Vinay; Saab, Sammy

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a spectrum of neurocognitive manifestations often seen in patients with liver injury or rarely in patients with portosystemic shunting without liver injury. It can be divided into minimal (covert) hepatic encephalopathy and overt hepatic encephalopathy, depending on the severity. Patients with hepatic encephalopathy have compromised clinical outcomes, decreased quality of life, and increased healthcare utilization, often resulting in a heavy financial and personal burden on caregivers. The diagnosis remains largely clinical, with the exclusion of possible other causes for the altered mental status. Current treatment strategies include nonabsorbable disaccharides and antibiotics. This review will focus on the diagnosis, management and clinical impact of hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:27377741

  11. Facilitating post traumatic growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cox Helen

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whilst negative responses to traumatic injury have been well documented in the literature, there is a small but growing body of work that identifies posttraumatic growth as a salient feature of this experience. We contribute to this discourse by reporting on the experiences of 13 individuals who were traumatically injured, had undergone extensive rehabilitation and were discharged from formal care. All participants were injured through involvement in a motor vehicle accident, with the exception of one, who was injured through falling off the roof of a house. Methods In this qualitative study, we used an audio-taped in-depth interview with each participant as the means of data collection. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically to determine the participants' unique perspectives on the experience of recovery from traumatic injury. In reporting the findings, all participants' were given a pseudonym to assure their anonymity. Results Most participants indicated that their involvement in a traumatic occurrence was a springboard for growth that enabled them to develop new perspectives on life and living. Conclusion There are a number of contributions that health providers may make to the recovery of individuals who have been traumatically injured to assist them to develop new views of vulnerability and strength, make changes in relationships, and facilitate philosophical, physical and spiritual growth.

  12. Understanding Traumatic Stress in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... content Experts Careers Contracting Contact Search form Search American Institutes for Research About Us Our Topics Client Services News & Events You are here Home 22 Apr 2013 Report Understanding Traumatic Stress in Children Supporting Children and Families After Traumatic ...

  13. [Leigh's encephalopathy (subacute necrotizing encephalopathy). Documentation of its evolution through neuroimaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, J A; González-Ferrer, S; Martínez, C; Prieto-Carrasquero, M; Delgado, W; Mora La Cruz, E

    1996-09-01

    A 30 months-old boy developed bilateral nistagmus, tremor, gait disturbance, hypotonia and disartria. The diagnose of Leigh encephalopathy was suggested on the basis of clinical, neuroimaging and laboratory findings. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at an early stage revealed bilateral and symmetric lesions in the putamen, appearing as hyperintense signal on T2-weighted images. Twelve months later a relatively large hypertense area in the posterior brainstem was observed. At this stage, the patient exhibited marked deterioration, dystonic manifestations, rigidity and respiratory disturbances. He died 6 months later for respiratory arrest during bronconeumonic infection. We believe MRI is a valuable means to allow assessment of the evolution of the disease.

  14. Transient dysautonomia in an acute phase of encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichimiya, Yuko; Kaku, Noriyuki; Sakai, Yasunari; Yamashita, Fumiya; Matsuoka, Wakato; Muraoka, Mamoru; Akamine, Satoshi; Mizuguchi, Soichi; Torio, Michiko; Motomura, Yoshitomo; Hirata, Yuichiro; Ishizaki, Yoshito; Sanefuji, Masafumi; Torisu, Hiroyuki; Takada, Hidetoshi; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Ohga, Shouichi

    2017-08-01

    Paroxysmal sympathetic hyperactivity (PSH) is a dysautonomic condition that is associated with various types of acquired brain injuries. Traumatic brain lesions have been documented as the leading cause of PSH. However, detailed clinical features of pediatric PSH caused by intrinsic brain lesions remain to be elusive. We present a 3-year-old boy, who had been diagnosed as having cerebral palsy, developmental delay and epilepsy after perinatal hypoxia-induced brain injury. He developed status epilepticus with fever on the third day of respiratory infection. Whereas the seizure was terminated by systemic infusion of midazolam, consciousness remained disturbed for the next 48h. Serial magnetic resonance imaging studies revealed that acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD) evolved on 3days after the seizure. Therapeutic hypothermia was immediately introduced, however, the brain lesion extended to the whole subcortical white matters on day 8. The intermittent bilateral dilation of pupils with increased blood pressure and tachycardia were observed until day 12. Real-time monitoring of electroencephalograms ruled out the recurrent attacks of seizures. The abnormal signs of autonomic nervous system gradually ceased and never relapsed after recovery from the hypothermia. PSH or a transient condition of dysautonomia may emerge and persist during the acute phase of AESD. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Rare and unusual ... or are they? Less commonly diagnosed encephalopathies associated with systemic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weathers, Allison L; Lewis, Steven L

    2009-04-01

    Encephalopathy due to hepatic or renal failure, electrolyte disturbances, or the administration of benzodiazepines and narcotics is commonly encountered, well reviewed in the literature, and, therefore, not usually missed. This article focuses on encephalopathies that were previously well described but may be overlooked by modern clinicians, as well as those that are still taught in the classroom but seldom thought of in practice. Due to the presumed relative rarity of these cases and emphasis on the well-memorized "classic" clinical presentations, these often treatable, and perhaps not so rare, encephalopathies due to systemic medical illness may go undiagnosed and untreated. Pancreatic encephalopathy, Wernicke's encephalopathy, and pellagra encephalopathy are reviewed in detail; cefepime and ifosfamide encephalopathies are discussed as examples of specific medication-induced encephalopathies. Septic encephalopathy, central pontine myelinolysis, and fat embolism syndrome are briefly reviewed. The encephalopathies reviewed have the potential for devastating neurological consequences if recognition and, therefore, treatment are delayed. Clinical improvement for many of these syndromes depends on prompt intervention. This article highlights some representative examples of less-commonly diagnosed metabolic and toxic encephalopathies.

  16. Acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy with features on diffusion-weighted images: Report of two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ja Young; Yu, In Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy is a rare toxic encephalopathy caused by accumulated plasma ammonia. A few literatures are reported about MRI findings of acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy. It is different from the well-known chronic hepatic encephalopathy. The clinical symptom and MRI findings of acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy can be reversible with proper treatment. Acute hepatic encephalopathy involves the cingulate cortex, diffuse cerebral cortices, insula, bilateral thalami on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery. Acute hepatic encephalopathy might mimic hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy because of their similar predominant involving sites. We experienced 2 cases of acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy consecutively. They showed restricted diffusion at the cingulate cortex, cerebral cortices, insula, and bilateral dorsomedial thalami on DWI. One patient underwent acute fulminant hepatitis A, the other patient with underlying chronic liver disease had acute liver failure due to hepatotoxicity of tuberculosis medication. In this report, we presented the characteristic features of DWI in acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy. In addition, we reviewed articles on MRI findings of acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy.

  17. Acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy with features on diffusion-weighted images: Report of two cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ja Young; Yu, In Kyu [Dept. of Radiology, Eulji University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy is a rare toxic encephalopathy caused by accumulated plasma ammonia. A few literatures are reported about MRI findings of acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy. It is different from the well-known chronic hepatic encephalopathy. The clinical symptom and MRI findings of acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy can be reversible with proper treatment. Acute hepatic encephalopathy involves the cingulate cortex, diffuse cerebral cortices, insula, bilateral thalami on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery. Acute hepatic encephalopathy might mimic hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy because of their similar predominant involving sites. We experienced 2 cases of acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy consecutively. They showed restricted diffusion at the cingulate cortex, cerebral cortices, insula, and bilateral dorsomedial thalami on DWI. One patient underwent acute fulminant hepatitis A, the other patient with underlying chronic liver disease had acute liver failure due to hepatotoxicity of tuberculosis medication. In this report, we presented the characteristic features of DWI in acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy. In addition, we reviewed articles on MRI findings of acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy.

  18. Traumatic renal infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yashiro, Naobumi; Ohtomo, Kuni; Kokubo, Takashi; Itai, Yuji; Iio, Masahiro

    1986-01-01

    Four cases of traumatic renal artery occlusion were described and illustrated. In two cases, direct blows to the abdomen compressed the renal artery against the vertebral column. Clinically, they were severely injured with macroscopic hematuria. Aortograms showed abrupt truncation of renal arteries. In the other two, rapid deceleration caused sudden displacement of the kidney producing an intimal tear with resultant thrombosis. Although they showed little injury without macrohematuria, aortograms revealed tapered occlusion of renal arteries. One of them developed hypertension. ''Rim sign'' of post-contrast CT and hypertension resulted from traumatic renal artery occlusion were reviewed. (author)

  19. Neuropsychological functioning in Wernicke′s encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushree Sangita Behura

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Wernicke′s encephalopathy (WE is caused by thiamine (Vitamin B1 deficiency and most commonly found in chronic alcoholism and malnutrition. Clinically, the key features are mental status disturbances (global confusion, oculomotor abnormalities, and gait disturbances (ataxia. Apart from these clinical features, we can find deficits in neuropsychological functioning in patients with WE, which is more prominent after the improvement in the physical conditions. Neuropsychological functioning includes both basic cognitive processes (i.e., attention-concentration as well as higher order cognitive processes (i.e., memory, executive functioning, reasoning, which is much vital for the maintenance of quality of life of an individual. However, unfortunately, in most of the cases, neuropsychological functioning is ignored by the clinicians. Materials and Methods: In this study four case reports of WE have been presented. The patients were taken from the outdoor department of Mental Health Institute, S.C.B. Medical College, Cuttack, Odisha. Neuropsychological functioning was measured by administration of PGIBBD and Quality of Life was measured by WHO-QOL BREF Odia Version. Discussion: As described in the literature, among the three cardinal signs ( global confusion, ataxia, and ocular sings, the first two were present in all cases, but nystagmus was present in only two cases.Memory dysfunction was so disabling that the persons were unable to maintain a good Quality of Life and occupational impairment was prominent. There are disturbances in recent, remote memory, immediate recall, delayed recall, and attention and concentration, ultimately creating both physical and mental disability. PGI-BBD findings also suggest the overall impairment in neuropsychological functioning other than memory, that is, executive functioning, visual acuity, and depth perception. Findings of WHO-QOL BREF suggest the impairment of four domains of QOL in all the cases, but

  20. Celiac crisis presenting with status epilepticus and encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijaz, Nadia M; Bracken, Julia M; Chandratre, Sonal R

    2014-12-01

    Celiac crisis is a life-threatening presentation of celiac disease which is described in the context of classic gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms of diarrhea, leading to dehydration and electrolyte imbalance. Neurologic manifestations are atypical symptoms of celiac crisis. To the best of our knowledge, there is no published report on seizure or encephalopathy as the presenting manifestation of celiac crisis. We describe a 2-year-old boy presenting with acute status epilepticus and lethargy. Prior to presentation, he had mild abdominal distention and intermittent diarrhea. Laboratory analysis revealed hyponatremia, anemia, hypocalcemia, transaminitis, and hyperglycemia. Electroencephalography revealed severe diffuse encephalopathy, and complete infectious work-up was negative. Initial brain magnetic resonance imaging was normal; however, repeat imaging showed osmotic demyelination syndrome. Given the history of GI symptoms and hyperglycemia, celiac serology was obtained revealing elevated tissue transglutaminase, and a diagnosis was confirmed by Marsh 3c lesions in the duodenum. He significantly improved with steroid therapy in addition to adequate nutrition, fluids, and initiation of a gluten-free diet. We report herein on the first case of celiac crisis presenting with status epilepticus and encephalopathy in the absence of profound GI symptoms. Our case suggests that celiac crisis should be considered in the differential of seizures and encephalopathy in children.

  1. [Subacute encephalopathy with epileptic seizures in an alcoholic patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozian, R; Otto, F G

    2000-09-01

    We introduce a case of a 66 year-old male with chronic alcoholism who suffered from confusion, Wernicke-aphasia and epileptic seizures. Several EEG revealed periodic lateralized epileptiform discharges. The patient's case resembles the symptoms of a subacute encephalopathy with epileptic seizures which can occur in alcoholics.

  2. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists for acute and chronic hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, B; Kjaergard, L L; Gluud, C

    2001-01-01

    The pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy is unknown. It has been suggested that liver failure leads to the accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition which may progress to coma. Several trials have assessed benzodiazepine receptor...

  3. Antithyroperoxidase Antibodies in Encephalopathy : Diagnostic Marker or Incidental Finding?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dontje, B.; Van Santen, H. M.; Niermeijer, J. M.; Schonenberg-Meinema, D.; Van Trotsenburg, A. S P

    2016-01-01

    Patients with acute encephalopathy who are thoroughly examined for an underlying diagnosis and in whom infectious, metabolic, and malignant causes are excluded can form a true diagnostic dilemma. If antithyroperoxidase antibodies (anti-TPO abs) are present, the diagnosis steroid responsive

  4. About pathognomonic images: an infrequent case of acute encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Grasso

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The occurrence of acute encephalopathy is a dramatic clinical dilemma when usual diagnostic techniques (blood tests, cerebral CT and cerebrospinal fluid analysis show no abnormalities. CLINICAL CASE We describe a case of a 73 years old man admitted in our Internal Medicine Unit for acute diarrhoea with vomiting and fever who developed a prolonged gastrointestinal dysmotility syndrome with poor nutritional intake. Although a parenteral support was provided, he developed acute encephalopathy followed by hypotension and lactic acidosis without evidence of renal and hepatic disease or glycemic alterations. Likewise, no cerebral CT and cerebrospinal fluid alterations were found. Conversely, cerebral MRI showed marked and diffuse DP-2 and FLAIR hyperintensity of the mesencephalic tectal plate, of the periaqueductal area, and of the periventricular region of the third ventricle including the median thalamic area. These MRI descriptions were considered pathognomonic of Wernicke encephalopathy. Thus, the immediate use of ev thiamine was followed by a prompt and complete recovery of neurological, hemodinamic and metabolic conditions. CONCLUSIONS Non-alcoholic Wernicke encephalopathy is a rare and dramatic clinical event with high mortality. In this context, brain MRI is the best diagnostic tool providing a typical picture.

  5. A case of chronic Wernicke's encephalopathy: A neuropsychological study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudman, Erik; Van der Stigchel, Stefan; Postma, Albert; Wijnia, Jan W.; Nijboer, Tanja C W

    2014-01-01

    A 54-year-old woman was referred to our Korsakoff Center because of extensive cognitive problems following acute Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE). She had a relatively short history of alcohol abuse and was found lying on the floor in her home by her son. After 5 days without treatment, she was

  6. GRIN1 Mutations in Early-Onset Epileptic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjuan Chen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Investigators from Yokohama City University and other medical centers in Israel and Japan reported mutations on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptors subunit GRIN1 (GluN1 identified in patients with nonsyndromic intellectual disability and early-onset epileptic encephalopathy.

  7. Coenzyme Q-responsive Leigh's encephalopathy in two sisters.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maldergem, L. van; Trijbels, J.M.F.; Mauro, S. Di; Sindelar, P.J.; Musumeci, O.; Janssen, A.J.M.; Delberghe, X.; Martin, J.J.; Gillerot, Y.

    2002-01-01

    A 31-year-old woman had encephalopathy, growth retardation, infantilism, ataxia, deafness, lactic acidosis, and increased signals of caudate and putamen on brain magnetic resonance imaging. Muscle biochemistry showed succinate:cytochrome c oxidoreductase (complex II-III) deficiency. Both clinical

  8. STXBP1 encephalopathy: A neurodevelopmental disorder including epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stamberger, H.; Nikanorova, M.; Willemsen, M.H.; Accorsi, P.; Angriman, M.; Baier, H.; Benkel-Herrenbrueck, I.; Benoit, V.; Budetta, M.; Caliebe, A.; Cantalupo, G.; Capovilla, G.; Casara, G.; Courage, C.; Deprez, M.; Destree, A.; Dilena, R.; Erasmus, C.E.; Fannemel, M.; Fjaer, R.; Giordano, L.; Helbig, K.L.; Heyne, H.O.; Klepper, J.; Kluger, G.J.; Lederer, D.; Lodi, M.; Maier, O.; Merkenschlager, A.; Michelberger, N.; Minetti, C.; Muhle, H.; Phalin, J.; Ramsey, K.; Romeo, A.; Schallner, J.; Schanze, I.; Shinawi, M.; Sleegers, K.; Sterbova, K.; Syrbe, S.; Traverso, M.; Tzschach, A.; Uldall, P.; Coster, R. van; Verhelst, H.; Viri, M.; Winter, S.; Wolff, M.; Zenker, M.; Zoccante, L.; Jonghe, P. De; Helbig, I.; Striano, P.; Lemke, J.R.; Moller, R.S.; Weckhuysen, S.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To give a comprehensive overview of the phenotypic and genetic spectrum of STXBP1 encephalopathy (STXBP1-E) by systematically reviewing newly diagnosed and previously reported patients. METHODS: We recruited newly diagnosed patients with STXBP1 mutations through an international network

  9. Update on the Therapeutic Management of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornerup, Linda Skibsted; Gluud, Lise Lotte; Vilstrup, Hendrik

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a common and devastating complication to chronic liver disease. In this paper, we summarize the latest research and evidence of both conventional and up-coming treatments. RECENT FINDINGS: Meta-analyses report beneficial effects of lactulose...

  10. In vitro adsorption of possible aetiological factors of hepatic encephalopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chamuleau, R. A.; Schoemaker, L. P.; Smit, E. M.

    1979-01-01

    Four different adsorbents (activated charcoal, XAD-4, a strong base anion and a strong acid cation-exchange resin) were tested in vitro for their capacity to remove substances that may be important in the development of hepatic encephalopathy. Separate columns packed with one of these adsorbents

  11. Case Report: Hypertensive encephalopathy with CT confirmation in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hypertensive encephalopathy (HE) is a clinical syndrome that occurs infrequently in children and is often underdiagnosed. We review four patients with HE and describe their clinical presentation and radiological findings on computed tomography (CT). Our cases demonstrate typical features on CT and correlate clinically ...

  12. Hypothermia therapy for newborns with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Rita C; Procianoy, Renato S

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia reduces cerebral injury and improves the neurological outcome secondary to hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy in newborns. It has been indicated for asphyxiated full-term or near-term newborn infants with clinical signs of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). A search was performed for articles on therapeutic hypothermia in newborns with perinatal asphyxia in PubMed; the authors chose those considered most significant. There are two therapeutic hypothermia methods: selective head cooling and total body cooling. The target body temperature is 34.5 °C for selective head cooling and 33.5 °C for total body cooling. Temperatures lower than 32 °C are less neuroprotective, and temperatures below 30 °C are very dangerous, with severe complications. Therapeutic hypothermia must start within the first 6h after birth, as studies have shown that this represents the therapeutic window for the hypoxic-ischemic event. Therapy must be maintained for 72 h, with very strict control of the newborn's body temperature. It has been shown that therapeutic hypothermia is effective in reducing neurologic impairment, especially in full-term or near-term newborns with moderate hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Therapeutic hypothermia is a neuroprotective technique indicated for newborn infants with perinatal asphyxia and hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  13. Advanced neuroimaging techniques for the term newborn with encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Vann; Poskitt, Kenneth John; Miller, Steven Paul

    2009-03-01

    Neonatal encephalopathy is associated with a high risk of morbidity and mortality in the neonatal period and of long-term neurodevelopmental disability in survivors. Advanced magnetic resonance techniques now play a major role in the clinical care of newborns with encephalopathy and in research addressing this important condition. From conventional magnetic resonance imaging, typical patterns of injury have been defined in neonatal encephalopathy. When applied in contemporary cohorts of newborns with encephalopathy, the patterns of brain injury on magnetic resonance imaging distinguish risk factors, clinical presentation, and risk of abnormal outcome. Advanced magnetic resonance techniques such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy, diffusion-weighted imaging, and diffusion tensor imaging provide novel perspectives on neonatal brain metabolism, microstructure, and connectivity. With the application of these imaging tools, it is increasingly apparent that brain injury commonly occurs at or near the time of birth and evolves over the first weeks of life. These observations have complemented findings from trials of emerging strategies of brain protection, such as hypothermia. Application of these advanced magnetic resonance techniques may enable the earliest possible identification of newborns at risk of neurodevelopmental impairment, thereby ensuring appropriate follow-up with rehabilitation and psychoeducational resources.

  14. HHV-6 symptoms in central nervous system. Encephalitis and encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshinari, Satoshi; Hamano, Shinichiro

    2007-01-01

    Described is the present knowledge of central nervous symptoms, mainly encephalitis and encephalopathy, caused by the primary infection of human herpes virus-6 (HHV-6) in the pediatric field. Discovery of HHV-6 is in 1986, the virus, normally latent, has a high nervous affinity, and most infants are infected until the age of 3 years. Encephalitis and encephalopathy caused by the primary infection can be derived from direct viral invasion in nervous system or secondary like that through angitis. Most of early clinical symptoms are febrile convulsion. Imaging of the head by MRI particularly with diffusion weighted imaging and by cerebral blood flow SPECT with 123 I-infetamine (IMP) is important for classification of encephalitis and encephalopathy by HHV-6: Four types of them are defined according to the area of lesion observed in abnormal images, the basal nuclei-diencephalon-brainstem, frontal lobe-dominant one, cerebral hemisphere and diffusive one. Further reviewed are the diagnosis, treatment and prognosis together with other HHV-6 related problems like infection in neonate, temporal lobe epilepsy and drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome. Current topics are related with activation of latent HHV-6. Despite numerous findings, many remain to be elucidated in acute encephalitis and encephalopathy which are most important in pediatrics. (R.T.)

  15. Laboratory examinations of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies in Denmark during 2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tim Kåre

    The aim of this report is to give detailed information on the diagnostic examination on trans-missible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) performed in Denmark during 2016. The present annual report is the 21st on this topic published by the National Veterinary Institute, Technical University...

  16. Hepatic Encephalopathy: Early Diagnosis in Pediatric Patients With Cirrhosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    DARA, Naghi; SAYYARI, Ali-Akbar; IMANZADEH, Farid

    2014-01-01

    Objective As acute liver failure (ALF) and chronic liver disease (cirrhosis) continue to increase in prevalence, we will see more cases of hepatic encephalopathy. Primary care physician are often the first to suspect it, since they are familiar with the patient’s usual physical and mental status. This serious complication typically occurs in patients with severe comorbidities and needs multidisciplinary evaluation and care. Hepatic encephalopathy should be considered in any patient with acute liver failure and cirrhosis who presents with neuropsychiatric manifestations, decrease level of consciousness (coma), change of personality, intellectual and behavioral deterioration, speech and motor dysfunction. Every cirrhotic patient may be at risk; potential precipitating factors should be addressed in regular clinic visits. The encephalopathy of liver disease may be prominent, or can be present in subtle forms, such as decline of school performance, emotional outbursts, or depression. “Subtle form” of hepatic encephalopathy may not be obvious on clinical examination, but can be detected by neurophysiologic and neuropsychiatric testing. PMID:24665321

  17. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in a adult female

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    occipital regions. Atypical imaging finding of contrast enhancement of lesion can occur, but is less common. A 20‑year‑old primiparous lady presented with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first ...

  18. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in a adult female ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Typical imaging findings characteristically involve the white matter bilaterally in the parieto-occipital regions. Atypical imaging finding of contrast enhancement of lesion can occur, but is less common. A 20-year-old primiparous lady presented with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. To the best of our knowledge, ...

  19. Hyperammonemic encephalopathy due to suture line breakdown after bladder operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boogerd, W; Zoetmulder, F A; Moffie, D

    1990-01-01

    A patient is described with a severe encephalopathy and hyperammonemia in absence of liver dysfunction, attributed to urine absorption into the systemic circulation due to suture line breakdown after bladder dome resection. At autopsy characteristic Alzheimer type II astrocytes were found in the basal ganglia.

  20. Genetics Home Reference: acute necrotizing encephalopathy type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... encephalopathy type 1 typically appears in infancy or early childhood, although some people do not develop the condition ... status and number of prior infections, may also influence risk. Related ... it mean if a disorder seems to run in my family? What are the different ways in which a ...

  1. Pathophysiological aspects of acute hepatic encephalopathy in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deutz, N.E.P.

    1988-01-01

    The aim of the present thesis is to elucidate the pathogenesis of acute hepatic encephalopathy (HE). In order to study acute HE, plasma and brain concentrations were measured of ammonia, aminoacids, lactate and polyamines as well as brain energy rich phosphates. In addition new techniques of brain research were developed and applied. 277 refs.; 29 figs.; 18 tabs

  2. Metformin inhibits glutaminase activity and protects against hepatic encephalopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Ampuero

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the influence of metformin use on liver dysfunction and hepatic encephalopathy in a retrospective cohort of diabetic cirrhotic patients. To analyze the impact of metformin on glutaminase activity and ammonia production in vitro. METHODS: Eighty-two cirrhotic patients with type 2 diabetes were included. Forty-one patients were classified as insulin sensitizers experienced (metformin and 41 as controls (cirrhotic patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus without metformin treatment. Baseline analysis included: insulin, glucose, glucagon, leptin, adiponectin, TNFr2, AST, ALT. HOMA-IR was calculated. Baseline HE risk was calculated according to minimal hepatic encephalopathy, oral glutamine challenge and mutations in glutaminase gene. We performed an experimental study in vitro including an enzymatic activity assay where glutaminase inhibition was measured according to different metformin concentrations. In Caco2 cells, glutaminase activity inhibition was evaluated by ammonia production at 24, 48 and 72 hours after metformina treatment. RESULTS: Hepatic encephalopathy was diagnosed during follow-up in 23.2% (19/82: 4.9% (2/41 in patients receiving metformin and 41.5% (17/41 in patients without metformin treatment (logRank 9.81; p=0.002. In multivariate analysis, metformin use [H.R.11.4 (95% CI: 1.2-108.8; p=0.034], age at diagnosis [H.R.1.12 (95% CI: 1.04-1.2; p=0.002], female sex [H.R.10.4 (95% CI: 1.5-71.6; p=0.017] and HE risk [H.R.21.3 (95% CI: 2.8-163.4; p=0.003] were found independently associated with hepatic encephalopathy. In the enzymatic assay, glutaminase activity inhibition reached 68% with metformin 100 mM. In Caco2 cells, metformin (20 mM decreased glutaminase activity up to 24% at 72 hours post-treatment (p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Metformin was found independently related to overt hepatic encephalopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and high risk of hepatic encephalopathy. Metformin inhibits glutaminase

  3. NON-TRAUMATIC COMA- INCIDENCE, AETIOLOGY AND OUTCOME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallikarjun R. Patil

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Acute non-traumatic coma is one of the most common paediatric emergencies, which arouses much anxiety and apprehension in both parents and physicians. Due to heterogeneity of causes in these patients, prediction of outcome is difficult and unfortunately no single clinical, laboratory or electrophysiological parameters singly predict their outcome. Aetiology of nontraumatic coma varies depending on different geographical area. We have attempted to find the incidence, aetiology and outcome and delineate neurological signs to predict the prognosis in this study. The aim of this study is to study the incidence, aetiology and outcome of non-traumatic coma in children. MATERIALS AND METHODS 100 consecutive cases of non-traumatic coma between 5months and 15 years of age were selected for the study. Clinical signs and findings were recorded at admission (‘0’ Hr and after ‘48’ Hrs. of hospital stay. Aetiology of coma is determined on the basis of clinical history, examination and relevant laboratory investigations by the treating physician. These children were followed up till the death in the hospital or discharged from the hospital. Discharged patients were asked for followup after 4 weeks. During this period, all of them were evaluated by formal neurological examination and for special sensory involvement. The neurological outcomes were categorised into 6 groups (I-VI based on the severity of neurological involvement. Chisquare test was applied to determine the predictors of outcome. RESULTS 1. The incidence of non-traumatic coma in our hospital based study was 8.02% of all paediatric admissions and 21.64% of all PICU admissions. 2. CNS infections contributed the majority (58% of cases. (Dengue encephalitis-28%, viral encephalitis-12%, TB meningitis-8%, pyogenic meningitis- 6%, Shigella encephalopathy-3% and cerebral malaria-1%. 3. Other non-infectious aetiologies were toxic and metabolic group- 21%, post status epilepticus- 9

  4. SCN8A encephalopathy: Research progress and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisler, Miriam H; Helman, Guy; Hammer, Michael F; Fureman, Brandy E; Gaillard, William D; Goldin, Alan L; Hirose, Shinichi; Ishii, Atsushi; Kroner, Barbara L; Lossin, Christoph; Mefford, Heather C; Parent, Jack M; Patel, Manoj; Schreiber, John; Stewart, Randall; Whittemore, Vicky; Wilcox, Karen; Wagnon, Jacy L; Pearl, Phillip L; Vanderver, Adeline; Scheffer, Ingrid E

    2016-07-01

    On April 21, 2015, the first SCN8A Encephalopathy Research Group convened in Washington, DC, to assess current research into clinical and pathogenic features of the disorder and prepare an agenda for future research collaborations. The group comprised clinical and basic scientists and representatives of patient advocacy groups. SCN8A encephalopathy is a rare disorder caused by de novo missense mutations of the sodium channel gene SCN8A, which encodes the neuronal sodium channel Nav 1.6. Since the initial description in 2012, approximately 140 affected individuals have been reported in publications or by SCN8A family groups. As a result, an understanding of the severe impact of SCN8A mutations is beginning to emerge. Defining a genetic epilepsy syndrome goes beyond identification of molecular etiology. Topics discussed at this meeting included (1) comparison between mutations of SCN8A and the SCN1A mutations in Dravet syndrome, (2) biophysical properties of the Nav 1.6 channel, (3) electrophysiologic effects of patient mutations on channel properties, (4) cell and animal models of SCN8A encephalopathy, (5) drug screening strategies, (6) the phenotypic spectrum of SCN8A encephalopathy, and (7) efforts to develop a bioregistry. A panel discussion of gaps in bioregistry, biobanking, and clinical outcomes data was followed by a planning session for improved integration of clinical and basic science research. Although SCN8A encephalopathy was identified only recently, there has been rapid progress in functional analysis and phenotypic classification. The focus is now shifting from identification of the underlying molecular cause to the development of strategies for drug screening and prioritized patient care. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International League Against Epilepsy.

  5. MRI and CT appearances in metabolic encephalopathies due to systemic diseases in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bathla, G.; Hegde, A.N.

    2013-01-01

    The term encephalopathy refers to a clinical scenario of diffuse brain dysfunction, commonly due to a systemic, metabolic, or toxic derangement. Often the clinical evaluation is unsatisfactory in this scenario and imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis, assessment of treatment response, and prognostication of the disorder. Hence, it is important for radiologists to be familiar with the imaging features of some relatively frequently acquired metabolic encephalopathies encountered in the hospital setting. This study reviews the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of a number of metabolic encephalopathies that occur as part of systemic diseases in adults. The following conditions are covered in this review: hypoglycaemic encephalopathy, hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy, non-ketotic hyperglycaemia, hepatic encephalopathy, uraemic encephalopathy, hyperammonaemic encephalopathy, and posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. MRI is the imaging method of choice in evaluating these conditions. Due to their high metabolic activity, bilateral basal ganglia changes are evident in the majority of cases. Concurrent imaging abnormalities in other parts of the central nervous system often provide useful diagnostic information about the likely underlying cause of the encephalopathy. Besides this, abnormal signal intensity and diffusion restriction patterns on MRI and MR spectroscopy features may provide important clues as to the diagnosis and guide further management. Frequently, the diagnosis is not straightforward and typical imaging features require correlation with clinical and laboratory data for accurate assessment

  6. Current status of fluid biomarkers in mild traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulbe, Jacqueline R.; Geddes, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) affects millions of people annually and is difficult to diagnose. Mild injury is insensitive to conventional imaging techniques and diagnoses are often made using subjective criteria such as self-reported symptoms. Many people who sustain a mTBI develop persistent post-concussive symptoms. Athletes and military personnel are at great risk for repeat injury which can result in second impact syndrome or chronic traumatic encephalopathy. An objective and quantifiable measure, such as a serum biomarker, is needed to aid in mTBI diagnosis, prognosis, return to play/duty assessments, and would further elucidate mTBI pathophysiology. The majority of TBI biomarker research focuses on severe TBI with few studies specific to mild injury. Most studies use a hypothesis-driven approach, screening biofluids for markers known to be associated with TBI pathophysiology. This approach has yielded limited success in identifying markers that can be used clinically, additional candidate biomarkers are needed. Innovative and unbiased methods such as proteomics, microRNA arrays, urinary screens, autoantibody identification and phage display would complement more traditional approaches to aid in the discovery of novel mTBI biomarkers. PMID:25981889

  7. Treatment of Hyponatremic Encephalopathy in the Critically Ill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achinger, Steven G; Ayus, Juan Carlos

    2017-10-01

    Hyponatremic encephalopathy, symptomatic cerebral edema due to a low osmolar state, is a medical emergency and often encountered in the ICU setting. This article provides a critical appraisal and review of the literature on identification of high-risk patients and the treatment of this life-threatening disorder. Online search of the PubMed database and manual review of articles involving risk factors for hyponatremic encephalopathy and treatment of hyponatremic encephalopathy in critical illness. Hyponatremic encephalopathy is a frequently encountered problem in the ICU. Prompt recognition of hyponatremic encephalopathy and early treatment with hypertonic saline are critical for successful outcomes. Manifestations are varied, depending on the extent of CNS's adaptation to the hypoosmolar state. The absolute change in serum sodium alone is a poor predictor of clinical symptoms. However, certain patient specific risks factors are predictive of a poor outcome and are important to identify. Gender (premenopausal and postmenopausal females), age (prepubertal children), and the presence of hypoxia are the three main clinical risk factors and are more predictive of poor outcomes than the rate of development of hyponatremia or the absolute decrease in the serum sodium. In patients with hyponatremic encephalopathy exhibiting neurologic manifestations, a bolus of 100 mL of 3% saline, given over 10 minutes, should be promptly administered. The goal of this initial bolus is to quickly treat cerebral edema. If signs persist, the bolus should be repeated in order to achieve clinical remission. However, the total change in serum sodium should not exceed 5 mEq/L in the initial 1-2 hours and 15-20 mEq/L in the first 48 hours of treatment. It has recently been demonstrated in a prospective fashion that 500 mL of 3% saline at an infusion rate of 100 mL per hour can be given safely. It is critical to recognize the early signs of cerebral edema (nausea, vomiting, and headache

  8. O PROCESSO DE IMPLANTAÇÃO DE NORMAS DE DESEMPENHO NA CONSTRUÇÃO: UM COMPARATIVO ENTRE A ESPANHA (CTE E BRASIL (NBR 15575/2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Parisi Kern

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A preocupação com o desempenho das edificações é uma tendência mundial. No Brasil, em 2010, foi proposta a NBR 15.575, sob o título geral de Edifícios habitacionais até cinco pavimentos – Desempenho. Embora esteja em vigor as iniciativas de utilização do documento por profissionais da construção ainda são incipientes, tendo em vista a complexidade das questões que envolvem o conceito de desempenho e desafiam especialmente arquitetos e engenheiros projetistas. Por outro lado, na Europa é comum o uso de leis, normas ou códigos baseados no conceito de desempenho. Por exemplo, o Código Técnico das Edificações (CTE da Espanha que estabelece desempenho e durabilidade às edificações, em vigor desde 2007, relativamente bem sucedido. Esse artigo tem o objetivo de discutir o processo de implantação do CTE e comparar ao da NBR 15.575/2010. Como contribuições são apontadas algumas estratégias utilizadas na implantação do CTE que poderiam ser consideradas no Brasil tais como a implantação gradual, a criação de meio de comunicação entre responsáveis pela Norma e usuários, a definição de documentos e conteúdos para o cumprimento da norma para projetistas, programas de divulgação e discussão com principais fornecedores de cada área envolvida, e, por fim, a consideração de parâmetros da NBR 15.575/2010 na aprovação dos projetos pelo Município, no Brasil, Códigos de obras.

  9. Clinical manifestations and treatment response of steroid in pediatric Hashimoto encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hee Joon; Lee, Jeehun; Seo, Dae Won; Lee, Munhyang

    2014-07-01

    Hashimoto encephalopathy is a steroid-responsive encephalopathy associated with elevated titers of antithyroid antibodies. Clinical symptoms are characterized by behavioral and cognitive changes, speech disturbance, seizures, myoclonus, psychosis, hallucination, involuntary movements, cerebellar signs, and coma. The standard treatment is the use of corticosteroids along with the treatment of any concurrent dysthyroidism. Other options are immunoglobulins and plasmapheresis. We described symptoms and outcomes on 3 teenage girls with Hashimoto encephalopathy. Presenting symptoms were seizure or altered mental status. One patient took levothyroxine due to hypothyroidism before presentation of Hashimoto encephalopathy. After confirmation of elevated antithyroid antibodies, all patients were treated with steroids. One patient needed plasmapheresis because of the lack of response to steroids and immunoglobulins. Hashimoto encephalopathy should be considered in any patient presenting with acute or subacute unexplained encephalopathy and seizures. Even though the use of steroids is the first line of treatment, plasmapheresis can rescue steroid-resistant patients. © The Author(s) 2013.

  10. Flumazenil versus placebo or no intervention for people with cirrhosis and hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goh, Ee Teng; Andersen, Mette L.; Morgan, Marsha Y.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Hepatic encephalopathy is a common complication of cirrhosis which results in poor brain functioning. The spectrum of changes associated with hepatic encephalopathy ranges from the clinically 'indiscernible' or minimal hepatic encephalopathy to the clinically 'obvious' or overt hepatic...... encephalopathy. Flumazenil is a synthetic benzodiazepine antagonist with high affinity for the central benzodiazepine recognition site. Flumazenil may benefit people with hepatic encephalopathy through an indirect negative allosteric modulatory effect on gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor function. The previous...... version of this review, which included 13 randomised clinical trials, found no effect of flumazenil on all-cause mortality, based on an analysis of 10 randomised clinical trials, but found a beneficial effect on hepatic encephalopathy, based on an analysis of eight randomised clinical trials. Objectives...

  11. Acute traumatic cataracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titelbaum, D.S.; Grossman, R.I.; Lloyd, W.C.; Cohen, E.J.; Atlas, S.W.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports orbital CT scans of 15 patients with clinically diagnoses traumatic cataracts retrospectively reviewed to determine the presence of radiographically detectable lens abnormalities. Definite lens swelling was clinically observed in a lease five cases. Eleven patients, scanned 4 hours of 3 days after injury, revealed visible and measured decreased CT density of the cataractous lens compared with the normal contralateral lens (average mean difference, 28 HU), suggesting acute lens swelling. In one patient, lens morphologic changes but not HU differences were found, probably due to superimposed hemorrhage. Three patients, scanned 3-8 hours after injury, revealed no detectable lens abnormality. The findings suggest that CT is potentially capable of identifying traumatic cataracts

  12. Delayed traumatic intracranial hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, Hiroki

    1984-01-01

    CT was performed serially within 24 hours after head injury in 64 patients having Glasgow Coma Scale of 14 or less or cranial fracture shown on roentgenogram. Delayed traumatic extradural hematoma was observed within 7-12 hours after head injury in 6 cases (9.4%). This was prominent in the frontal and occipital regions (67%). Good recovery was seen in 83.3%. Delayed traumatic intracerebral hematoma was observed within 6-24 hours after head injury in 17 cases (26.6%). This higher incidence was related to contre coup injury. Conservative treatment was possible in 14 of the 17 patients (82.4%), showing good recovery in 70%. (Namekawa, K.)

  13. Brain hypothermia therapy for childhood acute encephalopathy based on clinical evidence

    OpenAIRE

    IMATAKA, GEORGE; ARISAKA, OSAMU

    2015-01-01

    Although previous studies have reported on the effectiveness of brain hypothermia therapy in childhood acute encephalopathy, additional studies in this field are necessary. In this review, we discussed brain hypothermia therapy methods for two clinical conditions for which sufficient evidences are currently available in the literature. The first condition is known as hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and occurs in newborns and the second condition is acute encephalopathy which occurs in adults ...

  14. Traumatic insemination in terrestrial arthropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatarnic, Nikolai J; Cassis, Gerasimos; Siva-Jothy, Michael T

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic insemination is a bizarre form of mating practiced by some invertebrates in which males use hypodermic genitalia to penetrate their partner's body wall during copulation, frequently bypassing the female genital tract and ejaculating into their blood system. The requirements for traumatic insemination to evolve are stringent, yet surprisingly it has arisen multiple times within invertebrates. In terrestrial arthropods traumatic insemination is most prevalent in the true bug infraorder Cimicomorpha, where it has evolved independently at least three times. Traumatic insemination is thought to occur in the Strepsiptera and has recently been recorded in fruit fly and spider lineages. We review the putative selective pressures that may have led to the evolution of traumatic insemination across these lineages, as well as the pressures that continue to drive divergence in male and female reproductive morphology and behavior. Traumatic insemination mechanisms and attributes are compared across independent lineages.

  15. Traumatic-event headaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haas David C

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic headaches from head trauma and whiplash injury are well-known and common, but chronic headaches from other sorts of physical traumas are not recognized. Methods Specific information was obtained from the medical records of 15 consecutive patients with chronic headaches related to physically injurious traumatic events that did not include either head trauma or whiplash injury. The events and the physical injuries produced by them were noted. The headaches' development, characteristics, duration, frequency, and accompaniments were recorded, as were the patients' use of pain-alleviative drugs. From this latter information, the headaches were classified by the diagnostic criteria of the International Headache Society as though they were naturally-occurring headaches. The presence of other post-traumatic symptoms and litigation were also recorded. Results The intervals between the events and the onset of the headaches resembled those between head traumas or whiplash injuries and their subsequent headaches. The headaches themselves were, as a group, similar to those after head trauma and whiplash injury. Thirteen of the patients had chronic tension-type headache, two had migraine. The sustained bodily injuries were trivial or unidentifiable in nine patients. Fabrication of symptoms for financial remuneration was not evident in these patients of whom seven were not even seeking payments of any kind. Conclusions This study suggests that these hitherto unrecognized post-traumatic headaches constitute a class of headaches characterized by a relation to traumatic events affecting the body but not including head or whiplash traumas. The bodily injuries per se can be discounted as the cause of the headaches. So can fabrication of symptoms for financial remuneration. Altered mental states, not systematically evaluated here, were a possible cause of the headaches. The overall resemblance of these headaches to the headaches after

  16. Traumatic Aortic Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brianna Miner

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 48-year-old male with unknown past medical history presents as a trauma after being hit by a car traveling approximately 25 miles per hour. On initial presentation, the patient is confused, combative, and not answering questions appropriately. The patient is hypotensive with a blood pressure of 68/40 and a heart rate of 50 beats per minute, with oxygen saturation at 96% on room air. FAST scan is positive for fluid in Morrison’s pouch, splenorenal space, and pericardial space. Significant findings: The initial chest x-ray showed an abnormal superior mediastinal contour (blue line, suggestive of a possible aortic injury. The CT angiogram showed extensive circumferential irregularity and outpouching of the distal aortic arch (red arrows compatible with aortic transection. In addition, there was a circumferential intramural hematoma, which extended through the descending aorta to the proximal infrarenal abdominal aorta (green arrow. There was also an extensive surrounding mediastinal hematoma extending around the descending aorta and supraaortic branches (purple arrows. Discussion: Traumatic aortic injury is a life-threatening event. The incidence of blunt thoracic aortic injury is low, between 1 to 2 percent of those patients with blunt thoracic trauma.1 However, approximately 80% of patients with traumatic aortic injury die at the scene.2 Therefore it is imperative to diagnose traumatic aortic injury in a timely fashion. The diagnosis can be difficult due to the non-specific signs and symptoms and other distracting injuries. Clinical suspicion should be based on the mechanism of the injury and the hemodynamic status of the patient. In any patient with blunt or penetrating trauma to the chest that is hemodynamically unstable, traumatic aortic injury should be on the differential. Chest x-ray can be used as a screening tool. A normal chest x-ray has a negative predictive value of approximately 97%. CTA chest is the

  17. Mutations of PTPN23 in developmental and epileptic encephalopathy

    KAUST Repository

    Sowada, Nadine

    2017-10-31

    Developmental and epileptic encephalopathies (DEE) are a heterogeneous group of neurodevelopmental disorders with poor prognosis. Recent discoveries have greatly expanded the repertoire of genes that are mutated in epileptic encephalopathies and DEE, often in a de novo fashion, but in many patients, the disease remains molecularly uncharacterized. Here, we describe a new form of DEE in patients with likely deleterious biallelic variants in PTPN23. The phenotype is characterized by early onset drug-resistant epilepsy, severe and global developmental delay, microcephaly, and sometimes premature death. PTPN23 encodes a tyrosine phosphatase with strong brain expression, and its knockout in mouse is embryonically lethal. Structural modeling supports a deleterious effect of the identified alleles. Our data suggest that PTPN23 mutations cause a rare severe form of autosomal-recessive DEE in humans, a finding that requires confirmation.

  18. [Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome after neurosurgery: A literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán Paz, S; Moreno Casanova, I; Benatar-Haserfaty, J

    2015-12-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is a clinical-radiological characterized by decreased level of consciousness, seizures, and visual disturbances, as well as radiologically ras brain edema, predominantly in parieto-occipital white matter regions. There are many situations that can trigger the disorder, including the administration of immunosuppressants, chemotherapy agents, hypertensive disorders, and sepsis. The case is described of a patient diagnosed with stage IV prostate adenocarcinoma, receiving chemotherapy, andundergoing a posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome after surgery for resection of brain metastasis. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. A case of hepatic encephalopathy induced by trotrast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirato, Hideo; Kudo, Norishige; Takita, Kyoji

    1980-01-01

    A case of hepatic encephalopathy induced by thorotrast injected as a contrast 40 years before was reported. The patient was a 64-year-old man with severe liver dysfunction, and had psychic and neurological symptoms, and hyperammonemia. There was a relationship between ammonium concentration in blood and psychic and neurological symptoms. Electroencephalogram showed three phases waves peculiar to hepatic coma intermittently. Throtrast in the liver was detected by radiological methods and in vivo measurement of the radioactivity. From the above-mentioned result, this disease was diagnosed as hepatic encephalopathy induced by long-term sedimentation of thorotrast without complication of malignant tumors. Because of the concurrent presence of cerebral infarction, the diagnosis was difficult to make. (Tsunoda, M.)

  20. [Bio-ecological control of chronic liver disease and encephalopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengmark, S; Di Cocco, P; Clemente, K; Corona, L; Angelico, R; Manzia, T; Famulari, A; Pisani, F; Orlando, G

    2011-08-01

    Minimal encephalopathy was originally associated with chronic liver disease but is increasingly associated with most other chronic diseases and particularly with diabetes and also chronic disorders in other organs: kidneys, lungs, thyroid and with obesity. It is increasingly with dramatically increased and more or less permanent increase in systemic inflammation, most likely a result of Western lifestyle. Frequent physical exercise and intake of foods rich in vitamins, antioxidants, fibres, lactic acid bacteria etc in combination with reduction in intake of refined and processed foods is known to reduce systemic inflammation and prevent chronic diseases. Some lactic acid bacteria, especially Lb paracasei, lb plantarum and pediococcus pentosaceus have proven effective to reduce inflammation and eliminate encephalopathy. Significant reduction in blood ammonia levels and endotoxin levels were reported in parallel to improvement of liver disease. Subsequent studies with other lactic acid bacteria seem to demonstrate suppression of inflammation and one study also provides evidence of clinical improvement.

  1. Concentric structure of thalamic lesions in acute necrotizing encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuguchi, M.; Nakano, I.; Hayashi, M.; Kuwashima, M.; Yoshida, K.; Nakai, Y.; Itoh, M.; Takashima, S.

    2002-01-01

    Acute necrotizing encephalopathy of childhood (ANE) is characterized by multiple, symmetrical brain lesions affecting the bilateral thalami, putamina and cerebral white matter, which often show a concentric structure on CT and MRI. To reveal the pathological substrate of this finding, comparison was made between CT and necropsy findings of three fatal cases of ANE. Cranial CT demonstrated a concentric structure of the thalamocerebral lesions in one patient who died 3.5 days after the onset of encephalopathy, but not in the other two patients who died within 30 h. Neuropathological examination of postmortem brains revealed laminar changes of vascular and parenchymal pathology in all the cases. Excessive permeability of blood vessels and resultant vasogenic edema became more prominent with increasing depth from the cerebral surface. The deep portion of the lesions showed severe perivascular hemorrhage, accounting for the central high density on the CT images of one patient. (orig.)

  2. Encephalopathy Associated with Influenza B in a Healthy Young Man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimamoto, Masaki; Okada, Satoshi; Terashima, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    A 19-year-old man presented with a fever, convulsions, and loss of consciousness at our hospital. The patient had a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 12. Influenza B virus infection was diagnosed using the rapid test kit, and an eight-fold increase in the serum levels of anti-influenza B virus antibody was confirmed using the complement fixation test. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed multifocal high-signal lesions, and an electroencephalogram showed diffuse slowing of the background activity, indicating acute encephalopathy. After treatment with peramivir and methylprednisolone for 3 days, the patient was discharged without any neurological impairment. This was a case of influenza B infection associated with acute encephalopathy in a healthy young man.

  3. Severe valproate induced hyperammonemic encephalopathy successfully managed with peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amandeep; Suri, Ashish; Sharma, Bhawani S

    2014-07-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a commonly used drug for epilepsy, psychiatric disorders and migraine and is frequently used in neurosurgical intensive care units. Though most of its side-effects are mild and transient, certain idiosyncratic side-effects have been attributed to VPA. Valproate induced hyperammonemia (VIH) is one such side-effect. VIH can produce symptoms of encephalopathy known as valproate induced hyperammonemic encephalopathy (VHE). VIH and VHE usually respond to withdrawal of VPA. However, in some cases VHE can be unresponsive to supportive measures and severe enough to be life-threatening. In such cases, dialysis can be used to rapidly reverse hyperammonemia and VHE and can prove to be a lifesaving measure. We report such a case of VIH and life-threatening VHE in a postoperative neurosurgical patient that was managed successfully with peritoneal dialysis.

  4. Wernicke’s encephalopathy following hyperemesis gravidarum: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    leila pourali

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Wernicke’s Korsakoff syndrome is the most important complication of severe thiamine deficiency. Confusion and gait ataxia are the most prevalent symptoms, respectively. The aim of this study was report of a case of Wernicke’s encephalopathy following hyperemesis gravidarum. Case report: A 28-years-old pregnant woman in 19th weeks of gestation referred to the hospital with hyperemesis, gait ataxia, and dysarthria. MRI showed hyperdense lesion which was characteristic of wernicke’s encephalopathy. Rapid improvement in patient’s condition occurred after thiamine infusion. Conclusion: In hyperemesis gravidarum, presence of either symptoms of ocular or mental disorder or ataxia must be considered to rull out Wernicke’s syndrome which can cause maternal death.

  5. Hepatic encephalopathy associated with hepatic lipidosis in llamas (Lama glama).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillitteri, C A; Craig, L E

    2013-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy has been listed as a differential for llamas displaying neurologic signs, but it has not been histopathologically described. This report details the neurologic histopathologic findings associated with 3 cases of hepatic lipidosis with concurrent neurologic signs and compares them to 3 cases of hepatic lipidosis in the absence of neurologic signs and 3 cases without hepatic lipidosis. Brain from all 3 llamas displaying neurologic signs contained Alzheimer type II cells, which were not detected in either subset of llamas without neurologic signs. Astrocytic immunohistochemical staining intensity for glial fibrillary acid protein was decreased in llamas with neurologic signs as compared to 2 of 3 llamas with hepatic lipidosis and without neurologic signs and to 2 of 3 llamas without hepatic lipidosis. Immunohistochemical staining for S100 did not vary between groups. These findings suggest that hepatic encephalopathy may be associated with hepatic lipidosis in llamas.

  6. Acute febrile encephalopathy in adults from Northwest India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhalla Ashish

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Acute onset fever with altered mentation is a common problem encountered by the physician practicing in tropical countries. Central nervous system (CNS infections are the most common cause resulting in fever with altered mentation in children. Aim : In this study, we have tried to analyze the cause of encephalopathy following short febrile illness in adults presenting to a tertiary care center in Northwestern part of India. Setting and Design : A prospective observational study carried out in a tertiary care center in the Northwestern India over a period of 1 year. Material and Methods : A total of 127 patients with fever of less than 2 weeks duration along with alteration in mentation were studied prospectively over a period of 12 months. The demographic variables were recorded in detail. In addition to routine investigations, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, noncontrast- and contrast-enhanced computed tomography, along with magnetic resonance imaging were performed in all the subjects. Statistical Analysis : The results were analyzed using SPSS statistical software. The values were expressed as mean with standard deviation for contiguous variable as percentage for the others. Results and Conclusion : Out of these, 70% had primary CNS infection as the etiology. A total of 33% patients had meningitis, 29.9% had evidence of meningoencephalitis, and 12.7% were diagnosed as sepsis-associated encephalopathy. These were followed by cerebral malaria, leptospirosis, and brain abscess as the cause of febrile encephalopathy in adults. Among the noninfectious causes, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, cortical venous thrombosis, and neuroleptic malignant syndrome were documented in 2.36% each. In 11% of the patients, the final diagnosis could not be made in spite of the extensive investigations. Our study demonstrates that acute febrile encephalopathy in adults is a heterogeneous syndrome with primary CNS infections being the commonest

  7. Approach to Clinical Syndrome of Jaundice and Encephalopathy in Tropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Anil C.; Garg, Hitendra K.

    2015-01-01

    A large number of patients present with jaundice and encephalopathy in tropical country like India and acute liver failure is the usual cause. Clinical presentation like ALF is also a complication of many tropical infections, and these conditions may mimic ALF but may have subtle differences from ALF. Moreover, what hepatologists see as acute liver failure in tropics is different from what is commonly described in Western Textbooks. Paracetamol overdose, which is possibly the commonest cause of ALF in UK and USA, is hardly ever seen in India. Most common etiology here is viral hepatitis (hepatitis E > hepatitis B> hepatitis A). Apart from ALF, one may also come across subacute hepatic failure (SAHF) as well as acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) due to viral hepatitis. Interestingly, a host of other conditions can mimic ALF because clinical presentation in these conditions can be dominated by jaundice and encephalopathy. Malarial hepatopathy is possibly the best-known condition out of these and is not an uncommon manifestation of severe malaria. A similar presentation can also be seen in other common infections in tropics such as dengue fever, typhoid fever, leptospirosis, scrub typhus, amoebic liver abscesses, tuberculosis and other bacterial and fungal infections with or without human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) related disease. In many of these conditions, liver failure may not be underlying pathophysiology. Some pregnancy related liver diseases could also present with jaundice and encephalopathy. This review summarizes the commonly seen presentations in tropical country like India, where jaundice and encephalopathy dominate the clinical picture. PMID:26041951

  8. Pheochromocytoma: a rare cause of childhood hypertensive encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aftab, S.; Yasmeen, T.; Hamid, M.H.; Sarwar, M.; Sipra, H.; Sheikh, A.; Haider, N.; Hanif, G.

    2012-01-01

    Pheochromocytomas are rare neuroendocrine tumours of chromaffin tissues. They are catecholamine secreting tumours which cause severe hypertension and other systemic disturbances. Of all the causes of childhood hypertension, pheochromocytoma constitutes less than 1%. We report the case of a 12 years old child who presented with hypertensive encephalopathy, confirmed histologically to be secondary to pheochromocytoma, and cured with meticulous critical care and surgical resection. (author)

  9. An Unusual Case of Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert P. Zemple

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A 21-year-old pregnant female with no significant past medical history presented with acute onset headache and nausea as well as tonic-clonic seizures, then rapidly decompensated into a coma with complete absence of brainstem reflexes. The patient was ultimately diagnosed with hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets (HELLP syndrome and subsequent posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES with brainstem involvement. Emergent delivery and blood pressure control resulted in rapid and complete neurologic recovery.

  10. Studying neonatal bilirubin encephalopathy with conventional MRI, MRS, and DWI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xiaoyi; Wu, Wulin; Chineah, Ashley; Liu, Fan; Liao, Weihua; Hou, Bob L.; Zhang, Ping

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H-MRS), and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) for neonatal bilirubin encephalopathy. We collected conventional MRI in 24 neonates with neonatal bilirubin encephalopathy. We performed 1 H-MRS and DWI sequences to nine of the 24 patients and seven age-matched healthy control subjects. Multiple-voxel 1 H-MRS data were acquired using PRESS pulse sequence with TE=135 ms and TR=1500 ms. The spectroscopic regions of interest were the bilateral basal ganglia and thalamus with a 1.0 mL spatial resolution. The data from DWI were collected by using a single shot-spin echo-echo planar imaging sequence with TR/TE: 2900/98, and imaging regions were also focused on the bilateral basal ganglia and thalamus. Nineteen of the 24 patients had abnormal T 1 -weighted image hyperintensity in the globus pallidus, but these lesions appeared as normal T 2 -weighted image intensity in the same region. Ten of the 24 patients had T 1 -weighted image high signal intensity in the subthalamic nucleus and appeared as normal intensity in the region for the T 2 -weighted images. The peak area ratios of NAA/Cho and NAA/Cr were significantly decreased (t-test, P 1 H-MRS are important complementary tools in the diagnosis of neonatal bilirubin encephalopathy. The study provides important information for applying these MR modalities to evaluate neonates with bilirubin encephalopathy. (orig.)

  11. Determination of lactic acid level in systemic liquids in children with progressive encephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marszał, Elzbieta; Wojaczyńska-Stanek, Katarzyna; Pietruszewski, Jerzy; Emich-Widera, Ewa; Bielińska-Bujniewicz, Eugenia

    2002-03-01

    This article reports the results of research into the activities of lactic acid concentrations in the body fluids of children with progressive encephalopathies (PE) in comparison to patients with non-progressive encephalopathies (NPE) and those with non-progressive encephalopathies with concomitant epilepsy (NPEE). The study was designed to determine whether there is difference between the serum and CSF lactic acid concentrations in children with progressive encephalopathies (PE), static (non-progressive) encephalopathies (NPE) and non progressive encephalopathies with concomitant epilepsy (NPEE), and whether the clinical status correlates with the concentration of these biochemical markers in children with PE. The assessment involved 138 children of both sexes, whose age ranged between 8 months and 15 years, diagnosed and treated in the Neurology Department at the Pediatric Clinic of the Silesian Medical Academy in Katowice between 1995 and 1997. Lactate concentrations were determined in serum and cerebro-spinal fluid and analyzed statistically. The findings showed higher serum and CSF concentrations in children with PE than in patients who manifested non-progressive forms of encephalopathy. The degree of clinical symptom aggravation in PE children was likewise analyzed and compared to the values of lactate concentrations in body fluids; however, no correlation was found between these parameters. Children with progressive encephalopathies present higher lactate concentrations in serum and cerebrospinal fluid than patients with static (non-progressive) encephalopathy.

  12. Research progress of BOLD-fMRI in minimal hepatic encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Zhiming; Zhao Jiannong

    2013-01-01

    The minimal hepatic encephalopathy is the early stage of hepatic encephalopathy. It has few apparent clinical symptoms and specific manifestations, and is difficult to diagnose. In the recent years, BOLD-fMRI has been used to study hepatic encephalopathy gradually. Through detection of the brain neuron activities in different states, it can not only locate the abnormal activity of brain functional areas, but also can find the changes of brain functional connectivity. BOLD- fMRI combining with other MR technologies can explore the pathology and pathogenesis of minimal hepatic encephalopathy from micro to macro and from structure to function. (authors)

  13. The ketogenic diet can be used successfully in combination with corticosteroids for epileptic encephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ville, Dorothée; Chiron, Catherine; Laschet, Jacques; Dulac, Olivier

    2015-07-01

    Hormonal therapy or ketogenic diet often permits overcoming the challenging periods of many epileptic encephalopathies (West and Lennox-Gastaut syndromes and encephalopathy with continuous spike-waves in slow sleep), but relapse affects over 20% of patients. We report here a monocenter pilot series of 42 consecutive patients in whom we combined oral steroids with the ketogenic diet for corticosteroid-resistant or -dependent epileptic encephalopathy. We retrospectively evaluated the effect on seizure frequency, interictal spike activity, neuropsychological course, and steroid treatment course. Twenty-three patients had West syndrome (WS), 13 had encephalopathy with continuous spike-waves in slow sleep (CSWS), and six others had miscellaneous epileptic encephalopathies. All patients succeeded to reach 0.8 to 1.6g/l ketone bodies in the urine following the usual KD regimen. For at least 6 months, 14/42 responded to the addition of the ketogenic diet: 4/23 with WS, 8/13 with CSWS, and 2/6 with miscellaneous epileptic encephalopathies. The addition of the KD allowed withdrawing steroids in all responders. Among them, 10/15 had been patients with steroid-dependent epileptic encephalopathy and 4/27 patients with steroid-resistant epileptic encephalopathy. Therefore, the ketogenic diet can be used successfully in combination with corticosteroids for epileptic encephalopathies. Patients presenting with steroid-dependent CSWS seem to be the best candidates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Targeted resequencing in epileptic encephalopathies identifies de novo mutations in CHD2 and SYNGAP1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carvill, Gemma L; Heavin, Sinéad B; Yendle, Simone C

    2013-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies are a devastating group of epilepsies with poor prognosis, of which the majority are of unknown etiology. We perform targeted massively parallel resequencing of 19 known and 46 candidate genes for epileptic encephalopathy in 500 affected individuals (cases) to identify...... CHD2 and SYNGAP1 mutations are new causes of epileptic encephalopathies, accounting for 1.2% and 1% of cases, respectively. We also expand the phenotypic spectra explained by SCN1A, SCN2A and SCN8A mutations. To our knowledge, this is the largest cohort of cases with epileptic encephalopathies...

  15. Current trends in the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Rasm Al Sibae

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Mohamad Rasm Al Sibae, Brendan M McGuireDepartment of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USAAbstract: Hepatic encephalopathy (HE is a common reversible neuropsychiatric syndrome associated with chronic and acute liver dysfunction and significant morbidity and mortality. Although a clear pathogenesis is yet to be determined, elevated ammonia in the serum and central nervous system are the mainstay for pathogenesis and treatment. Management includes early diagnosis and prompt treatment of precipitating factors (infection, gastrointestinal bleeding, electrolyte disturbances, hepatocellular carcinoma, dehydration, hypotension, and use of benzodiazepines, psychoactive drugs, and/or alcohol. Clinical trials have established the efficacy of lactulose and lactitol enemas in the treatment of acute hepatic encephalopathy. Extensive clinical experience has demonstrated the efficacy of oral lactulose and lactitol with the goal of two to three soft bowel movements a day for the treatment of chronic HE. However, lactulose and lactitol have significant gastrointestinal side effects. For patients unable to tolerate lactulose or lactitol or who still have persistent chronic HE with lactulose or lactitol, neomycin, metronidazole and rifaximin are second-line agents. More recent data supports the benefits of rifaximin used solely and as an additional agent with fewer side effects than neomycin or metronidazole. Newer therapies being investigated in humans with clinical promise include nitazoxanide, the molecular adsorbent recirculating system (MARS, L-ornithine phenylacetate, sodium benzoate, and/or sodium phenylacetate and Kremezin® (AST-120.Keywords: hepatic encephalopathy, liver dysfunction, lactulose, lactitol

  16. Pure methotrexate encephalopathy presenting with seizures: CT and MRI features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loevblad, K.O.; Kelkar, P.; Ozdoba, C.; Remonda, L.; Schroth, G. [Department of Neuroradiology, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Inselspital, University of Bern, CH-3010 Bern (Switzerland); Ramelli, G. [Department of Pediatrics, Inselspital, University of Bern, Bern (Switzerland)

    1998-02-01

    With the advent of chemotherapy, mortality rates in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) have decreased, but complications in the central nervous system have appeared. These include direct involvement of the brain itself and the development of chemotherapy-related encephalopathy as a delayed reaction. In most reported cases, this encephalopathy is believed to be due to necrotising angiitis arising from the combination of chemotherapy with adjuvant radiotherapy. We report the cases of four children with ALL who had been treated with high-dose intravenous and intrathecal chemotherapy but no radiation therapy, and who were admitted to hospital because of seizures. CT of the brain revealed the presence of diffuse periventricular white matter hypodensities in all cases and subcortical hyperdense foci in three cases. MRI showed diffuse hyperintense white matter lesions on T2-weighted images in all four patients; hypointense changes were observed on susceptibility-sensitive FLASH sequences in the hyperdense foci seen on CT as well as changes that were hyperintense on T1-weighted images. It was, therefore, concluded that the lesions corresponded to a leukoencephalopathy with calcific deposits. These findings are of a pure form of methotrexate encephalopathy causing seizures. (orig.) With 2 figs., 17 refs.

  17. Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy in children : CT findings related to prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Jae Min; Il, Yim Byung; Kim, Ok Hwa; Kang, Doo Kyoung; Suh, Jung Ho

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate prognosis-related CT findings in hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. For the purpose of prognosis, 28 children with a clinical history and CT findings suggestive of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) were restrospectively reviewed. The diagnostic criteria for HIE, as seen on CT scanning, were as follows : 1, ventricular collapse;2, effacement of cortical sulci;3, prominent enhancement of cortical vessels;4, poor differentiation of gray and white matter;5, reversal sign;6, obliteration of perimesencephalic cistern;7, high density on tentorial edge, as seen on precontrast scans;and 8, low density in thalamus, brain stem and basal ganglia. On the basis of clinical outcome, we divided the patients into three groups, as follows:group I(good prognosis);group II(neurologic sequelae), and group III(vegetative state or expire), and among these, compared CT findings. There were thirteen patients in group I, six in group II, and nine in group III. Ventricular collapse, effacement of cortical sulci, and prominent enhancement of cortical vessels were noted in all groups, whereas poor differentiation of gray and white matter, reversal sign, obliteration of perimesencephalic cistern, high density on tentorial edge, on precontrast scan, and low density in brain stem and basal ganglia were observed only in groups II and III. CT findings showed distinct differences between groups in whom prognosis was good, and in whom it was poor. An awareness of poor prognostic CT findings may be clinically helpful in the evaluation of patients with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy

  18. Guillain-Barre syndrome with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basavaraj F Banakar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES is a clinicoradiologic entity commonly associated with eclampsia, septicemia, chemotherapeutic drugs etc. Concurrent occurrence of Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS with PRES is a rare entity. Dysautonomia is a proposed mechanism for such occurrence. Here we present a non-diabetic, non-hypertensive 63-year-old male patient, who came with acute onset flaccid quadriparesis, developing generalized seizures, altered sensorium and raised blood pressure on fifth day of illness. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of brain showed altered signal intensities involving the parieto-occipital areas suggestive of posterior reversible encephalopathy. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed albuminocytological dissociation, nerve conduction studies revealed demyelinating type of polyneuropathy. The patient was treated with antihypertensives and antiepileptics. After resolution of the encephalopathy, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg was given. The patient recovered gradually over few months. Our case concludes GBS as independent risk factor, for PRES may be secondary to dysautonomia and physicians should be aware of such rare coexistence so that early treatment can be done to reduce the mortality and morbidity.

  19. Ammonia levels and the severity of hepatic encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, M.O.; Khokhar, N.; Shafqat, F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the correlation between ammonia levels with the severity of HE in patients coming to the tertiary care hospital with liver cirrhosis and hepatic encephalopathy (HE). Study Design: Descriptive, analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: Shifa International Hospital, Islamabad, from January 2011 to February 2012. Methodology: A total of 135 patients with liver cirrhosis and HE had serum ammonia levels measured on admission. The diagnosis of HE was based on clinical criteria, and its severity was graded according to the West Haven Criteria for grading of mental status. Ammonia levels were correlated with the severity of HE using Spearman rank correlation. Results: Out of 20 patients with normal ammonia levels, 13 (65%) were in HE I-II, 6 (30%) were in grade-III, while 1 (5%) patient was in grade-IV HE. Out of 45 patients with mild hyperammonemia, 27 (60%) were in grade I-II, 12 (26%) were in grade-III and 6 (13%) were in grade-IV HE. Out of 34 patients with moderate hyperammonemia, 9 (26%) were in grade I-II, 18 (53%) were in grade-III, and 7 (20%) were in grade-IV HE. Out of 36 patients with severe hyperammonemia, 31 (86%) patients were in grade-IV HE (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Ammonia levels correlated with the severity of hepatic encephalopathy. Greater the ammonia level, severe is the grade of hepatic encephalopathy. (author)

  20. Pure methotrexate encephalopathy presenting with seizures: CT and MRI features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loevblad, K.O.; Kelkar, P.; Ozdoba, C.; Remonda, L.; Schroth, G.; Ramelli, G.

    1998-01-01

    With the advent of chemotherapy, mortality rates in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) have decreased, but complications in the central nervous system have appeared. These include direct involvement of the brain itself and the development of chemotherapy-related encephalopathy as a delayed reaction. In most reported cases, this encephalopathy is believed to be due to necrotising angiitis arising from the combination of chemotherapy with adjuvant radiotherapy. We report the cases of four children with ALL who had been treated with high-dose intravenous and intrathecal chemotherapy but no radiation therapy, and who were admitted to hospital because of seizures. CT of the brain revealed the presence of diffuse periventricular white matter hypodensities in all cases and subcortical hyperdense foci in three cases. MRI showed diffuse hyperintense white matter lesions on T2-weighted images in all four patients; hypointense changes were observed on susceptibility-sensitive FLASH sequences in the hyperdense foci seen on CT as well as changes that were hyperintense on T1-weighted images. It was, therefore, concluded that the lesions corresponded to a leukoencephalopathy with calcific deposits. These findings are of a pure form of methotrexate encephalopathy causing seizures. (orig.)

  1. Cerebral circulation and prognosis of the patients with hypoxic encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogami, Kenichiro; Fujii, Masami; Kashiwagi, Shiro; Sadamitsu Daikai; Maekawa, Tsuyoshi

    2000-01-01

    Recent progress in cardiopulmonary resuscitation techniques improved the survival rate of patients with acute cardiopulmonary disturbances. However, severe cerebral complications remained frequently in patients who survived the acute stage. Early prediction of cerebral prognosis is important to optimize the management of these patients. We examined the relations between radiological findings (Xe-CT and MRI) and cerebral prognosis. Patients included in this study were selected from all patients with hypoxic encephalopathy admitted to our hospital. There were 11 men and 10 women. Causes of hypoxic encephalopathy were heart disease (11 cases), suffocation (4 cases), CO intoxication (2 cases), asthma (1 case), pneumothorax (1 case), anaphyraxy shock (1 case) and electric shock (1 case). Xe-CT and MRI were carried out 3 weeks after the onset. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) of the patients was measured at rest and 15 minutes after intravenous administration of acetazolamide (1 g). The prognosis was evaluated 3 months after the onset in accordance with Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS). Low hemispheric CBF (30 ml/100 g/min), poor reactivity of acetazolamide challenge test (10 ml/100 g/min), presence of hyperintensity areas in the basal ganglia in T1 weighted images (T1WI) and T2 weighted images (T2WI) are the factors associated with poor outcome in hypoxic encephalopathy. (author)

  2. Management and investigation of neonatal encephalopathy: 2017 update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinello, Kathryn; Hart, Anthony R; Yap, Sufin; Mitra, Subhabrata

    2017-01-01

    This review discusses an approach to determining the cause of neonatal encephalopathy, as well as current evidence on resuscitation and subsequent management of hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE). Encephalopathy in neonates can be due to varied aetiologies in addition to hypoxic-ischaemia. A combination of careful history, examination and the judicious use of investigations can help determine the cause. Over the last 7 years, infants with moderate to severe HIE have benefited from the introduction of routine therapeutic hypothermia; the number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome is 7 (95% CI 5 to 10). More recent research has focused on optimal resuscitation practices for babies with cardiorespiratory depression, such as delayed cord clamping after establishment of ventilation and resuscitation in air. Around a quarter of infants with asystole at 10 min after birth who are subsequently cooled have normal outcomes, suggesting that individualised decision making on stopping resuscitation is needed, based on access to intensive treatment unit and early cooling. The full benefit of cooling appears to have been exploited in our current treatment protocols of 72 hours at 33.5°C; deeper and longer cooling showed adverse outcome. The challenge over the next 5–10 years will be to assess which adjunct therapies are safe and optimise hypothermic brain protection in phase I and phase II trials. Optimal care may require tailoring treatments according to gender, genetic risk, injury severity and inflammatory status. PMID:28389438

  3. L-ornithine-L-aspartate infusion efficacy in hepatic encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, I.

    2008-01-01

    To determine the efficacy of L-ornithine-L-aspartate in treatment of hepatic encephalopathy. Cirrhotic patients with hyperammonemia and overt hepatic encephalopathy were enrolled. Eighty patients were randomized to two treatment groups, L-ornithine-L-aspartate (20g/d) or placebo, both dissolved in 250mL of 5% dextrose water and infused intravenously for four hours a day for five consecutive days with 0.5 g/kg dietary protein intake at the end of daily treatment period. Outcome variables were postprandial blood ammonia and mental state grade. Adverse reactions and mortality were also determined. Both treatment groups were comparable regarding age, gender, etiology of cirrhosis, Child-Pugh class, mental state grade and blood ammonia at baseline. Although, improvement occurred in both groups, there was a greater improvement in L-ornithine-L-aspartate group with regard to both variables. Four patients in the placebo group and 2 in L-ornithine-L-aspartate group died. L-ornithine-L-aspartate infusions were found to be effective in cirrhotic patients with hepatic encephalopathy. (author)

  4. A Rare Case of Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome Accompanying Late Postpartum Eclampsia or Hypertensive Encephalopathy-A Clinical Dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakuntala PN

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES refers to a clinic-radiologic diagnosis. Clinically it is characterized by non specific symptoms such as headache, confusion, visual disturbances and seizures. The radiological findings in PRES are thought to be due to vasogenic oedema, predominantly in the posterior cerebral hemispheres, and are reversible with appropriate management. We report a case of reversible encephalopathy diagnosed by MRI scan occurring in atypical areas like the caudate and lentiform nuclei of the brain following an uneventful lower segment caesarean section in a normotensive patient, who was successfully treated with antihypertensives, anticonvulsants and supportive treatment. The differential diagnosis of convulsions in the post-partum period is discussed.

  5. COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC EVALUATION OF POSTERIOR REVERSIBLE ENCEPHALOPATHY SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishwaprem Raj

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES is a neurotoxic state that occurs secondary to the inability of posterior circulation to autoregulate. The clinical spectrum and the underlying pathophysiology are still poorly defined. No conclusive evidence has been put forward regarding the relationship between clinical conditions and specific imaging findings of severity or location of oedema. PURPOSE To assess the role of computed tomography in evaluation of Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome. MATERIALS AND METHODS 55 patients referred to the Department of Radio-Diagnosis, with a history of neurological abnormalities, including altered mental function, visual loss, stupor with a predisposing history favouring PRES and followed up for a period of 10 – 30 days. RESULTS 21 patients (38.2% were females. 32 patients (58.1% were in the age group between 21 to 30 years. Predisposing condition; 16 (29.1% presented with pre-eclampsia, 12 (21.8% with post-partum status in altered sensorium, 9 (16.4% with seizures, 7 (12.7% with hypertension, 6 (10.9% with visual disturbances, 4 (7.3% with eclampsia and 1 (1.8% with uraemia. 20 cases (36.4% showed findings suggestive of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome on initial computed tomography examination. 35 cases showed no initial radiological evidence suggestive of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. Of the 20 cases which showed computed tomographic evidence of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, recovery was noted in 5 cases (9.1%. Persistence of findings detected on first CT was noted in 13 patients (23.6%. Regional predominance of the lesions was as follows. Frontal lobe (39%, Parietal lobe (32%, Temporal lobe (15% and occipital lobe (15%. CONCLUSION Varied clinical manifestations are associated with anatomical findings recognisable by neuro-imaging as PRES. Prompt imaging is necessary for the recognition of the condition and appropriate

  6. How to diagnose and manage hepatic encephalopathy: A consensus statement on roles and responsibilities beyond the liver specialist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shawcross, D.L. (Debbie L.); Dunk, A.A. (Arthur A.); Jalan, R. (Rajiv); Kircheis, G. (Gerald); R.J. de Knegt (Robert); W. Laleman (Wim); Ramage, J.K. (John K.); H. Wedemeyer (Heiner); Morgan, I.E.J. (Ian E.J.)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction Hepatic encephalopathy is defined as brain dysfunction caused by liver insufficiency and/or portosystemic shunting. Symptoms include nonspecific cognitive impairment, personality changes and changes in consciousness. Overt (symptomatic) hepatic encephalopathy is a common

  7. A Case of Traumatic Proptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobby Desai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of traumatic proptosis in a competitive football player. This entity can occur with a significant decrease in vision, but in this case it did not. Some other causes of this condition are also discussed. A review of some traumatic conditions that may cause proptosis is provided as well.

  8. The role of magnetic resonance imaging in the prediction of the neurodevelopmental outcome of acute bilirubin encephalopathy in newborns

    OpenAIRE

    TATLI, Mustafa Mansur

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is widely used in the diagnosis of acute bilirubin encephalopathy, but the relationship between MRI findings and neurodevelopmental outcome in newborns with acute bilirubin encephalopathy remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between acute bilirubin encephalopathy, MRI findings, and neurodevelopmental outcome. Materials and Methods: The study included 13 infants with acute bilirubin encephalopathy. MRI was performed ...

  9. Hypothyroidism-induced Reversible Encephalopathy as a Cause of Aggravation of Parkinsonism and Myoclonus in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehm, Gwanhee; Kim, Han-Joon; Jeon, Beomseok

    2017-01-01

    Myoclonus and encephalopathy are unusual in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). We describe the case of a 59-year-old male with PD who developed myoclonus and encephalopathy. Underlying hypothyroidism was revealed after admission and treated with levothyroxine. Myoclonus and encephalopathy were completely resolved following thyroid hormone replacement. Hypothyroidism can cause reversible myoclonus and encephalopathy along with unusual aggravation of parkinsonism symptoms in patients with PD.

  10. Post-traumatic syringomyelia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freund, M.; Sartor, K.; Aschoff, A.; Spahn, B.

    1999-01-01

    The improvement of preclinical emergency medicine, better surgical and conservative therapies, and the development of intensive care units and specialized centers have improved the survival rate for patients with serious spinal cord injuries. Therefore, more sequelae of chronic spinal cord injuries such as post-traumatic spinal cord cavitations also occur. The first such case was described by Bastian in 1867. Generally, these cavitations were diagnosed from 2 months up to 32 years after the trauma. The overall prevalence of post-traumatic syringomyelia (PTS) is not known; however, with the increasing use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), its diagnosis has increased, ranging from 2.3% of paraplegic and tetraplegic patients in 1976 and 3.2% in 1985, to nearly 50% in a selected group of patients in 1991 and 1993. In 1995, a 4.45% incidence was reported. In our clinic we are currently treating 440 cases of syringomyelia, 140 of which are PTS. Several observations suggest more than one potential mechanism for the evolution of a post-traumatic cyst or PTS. Various factors, such as hemorrhage or, in particular, ischemia within the spinal cord, blockage of the cerebrosinal fluid (CSF) pathways around the cord or localized meningeal fibrosis either alone or in combination with other factors, may be involved. Clinically, sensory disturbances, loss of motor function, pain, and modification of the deep tendon reflexes are observed in most patients. On MRI, PTS is seen as a longitudinal, cystic cavity within the spinal cord, giving a hypointense signal on T 1 -weighted images and a hyperintense signal on T 2 -weighted images. For treatment planning it is mandatory to identify the lower and upper end of the PTS on the MRI. (orig.) [de

  11. Post-traumatic pseudomyopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, Richard; Wick, Bruce; Kirschen, David

    2003-02-01

    Many clinicians have noted that patients demonstrate a myopic refractive change following Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). This apparent myopic shift disappears with cycloplegia, yet stubbornly reappears as soon as the pharmaceutical effect wears off. We propose that this shift is secondary to an irritative lesion that affects the parasympathetic innervation, resulting in ciliary body contracture. The dilemma for the clinician is whether to provide the immediate relief of clear distance vision by prescribing additional minus lenses, or to work toward attempting to re-establish the baseline refractive error. The natural history of post-traumatic pseudomyopia in our experience involves one of the following three courses: (1) a transient condition that will occasionally resolve; (2) the typical case, a recalcitrant condition that will resolve under cycloplegic intervention, but immediately return as the cycloplegic wears off; or (3) a less-common subgroup of patients who continue to show an increase in myopia over time. Our description of these cases demonstrates management strategies (including atropinization) to relax accommodative spasm, traditional vision therapy techniques aimed at loosening the accommodative system, and refractive corrections. Pseudomyopia is one of many ocular and behavioral sequelae following TBI. By understanding the natural course and potential management options for post-traumatic pseudomyopia, the clinician will be better prepared to deal with these challenging cases. Flexibility is required, since options that work with one patient may prove ineffective with another. Counseling the patient as to potential outcomes given the natural history of this condition helps establish more-realistic expectations by the patients being treated.

  12. Traumatic skeletal changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troeger, J.; Schofer, O.

    1985-01-01

    Skeleton scintiscanning is indicated in the following cases: (1) Suspected bone injury after clinical examination, the radiograph of the skeletal region in question contributing findings that either do not confirm suspision, or make not clear whether the changes observed are traumatic. (2) Polytrauma. (3) When the accident scenario reported by the persons taking care of the child does not sufficiently explain the skeletal changes observed, or when these persons expressly deny the possibility of a trauma being the cause of findings observed. (4) Suspected or proven battered-child syndrome. (orig./MG) [de

  13. Traumatic olecranon bursitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saini, M.; Canoso, J.J.

    1982-01-01

    The affected elbow of 28 patients with traumatic olecranon bursitis was radiographically compared with the homologous elbow of 28 matched controls. Olecranon spurs, amorphous calcium deposits, or both, were present in 16 patients and 4 controls (p<0.01). Air was injected in the bursa in 12 additional patients. Nodules in the bursal floor were noted in 10, and the bursa was partially septated in 8. Olecranon spurs, present in 6 patients, corresponded to the insertion of the triceps tendon. With elbow flexion the bursa flattened and lengthened while the olecranon process glided distally beneath the bursal floor. (Auth.)

  14. [Traumatic tricuspid insufficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vayre, F; Richard, P; Ollivier, J P

    1996-04-01

    Traumatic tricuspid insufficiency is a rare condition. The diagnosis is difficult because of the slow progression of this pathology and the presence of more clinically acute lesions. Non-penetrating chest trauma is responsible for 90% of cases. Echocardiography is the investigation of choice for assessing the mechanism of the tricuspid regurgitation and for diagnosing associated lesions. It should be performed systematically in patients with multiple trauma. The surgical indications are difficult to determine and depend on the patients' symptoms and the type of anatomical lesions. It should be undertaken before right ventricular myocardial dysfunction. Several techniques may be used from valvuloplasty to valve replacement mainly with bioprostheses in symptomatic patients.

  15. Adult onset urea cycle disorder in a patient with presumed hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atiq, Muslim; Holt, Andrew F; Safdar, Kamran; Weber, Frederick; Ravinuthala, Ravi; Jonas, Mark E; Neff, Guy W

    2008-02-01

    Deficiency of any of the 5 enzymes in the urea cycle results in the accumulation of ammonia, leading to encephalopathy; which if untreated, can be lethal and produce devastating neurologic sequelae in long-term survivors. We hereby present an interesting case that presented with hyperammonemia and encephalopathy; later found to have an urea cycle defect.

  16. Changes in Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Human Herpesvirus-6-Associated Acute Encephalopathy/Febrile Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoyuki Tanuma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine the involvement of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of acute encephalopathy associated with human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6 infection, we measured the levels of oxidative stress markers 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG and hexanoyl-lysine adduct (HEL, tau protein, and cytokines in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF obtained from patients with HHV-6-associated acute encephalopathy (HHV-6 encephalopathy (n=16 and complex febrile seizures associated with HHV-6 (HHV-6 complex FS (n=10. We also examined changes in CSF-8OHdG and CSF-HEL levels in patients with HHV-6 encephalopathy before and after treatment with edaravone, a free radical scavenger. CSF-8-OHdG levels in HHV-6 encephalopathy and HHV-6 complex FS were significantly higher than in control subjects. In contrast, CSF-HEL levels showed no significant difference between groups. The levels of total tau protein in HHV-6 encephalopathy were significantly higher than in control subjects. In six patients with HHV-6 infection (5 encephalopathy and 1 febrile seizure, the CSF-8-OHdG levels of five patients decreased after edaravone treatment. Our results suggest that oxidative DNA damage is involved in acute encephalopathy associated with HHV-6 infection.

  17. Systemic hypothermia after neonatal encephalopathy: outcomes of neo.nEURO.network RCT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simbruner, Georg; Mittal, Rashmi A; Rohlmann, Friederike

    2010-01-01

    Mild hypothermia after perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) reduces neurologic sequelae without significant adverse effects, but studies are needed to determine the most-efficacious methods.......Mild hypothermia after perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) reduces neurologic sequelae without significant adverse effects, but studies are needed to determine the most-efficacious methods....

  18. Localized Cerebral Energy Failure in DNA Polymerase Gamma-Associated Encephalopathy Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzoulis, Charalampos; Neckelmann, Gesche; Mork, Sverre J.; Engelsen, Bernt E.; Viscomi, Carlo; Moen, Gunnar; Ersland, Lars; Zeviani, Massimo; Bindoff, Laurence A.

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the catalytic subunit of the mitochondrial DNA-polymerase gamma cause a wide spectrum of clinical disease ranging from infantile hepato-encephalopathy to juvenile/adult-onset spinocerebellar ataxia and late onset progressive external ophthalmoplegia. Several of these syndromes are associated with an encephalopathy that…

  19. Intrapartum fever and chorioamnionitis as risks for encephalopathy in term newborns: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blume, Heidi K; Li, Christopher I; Loch, Christian M; Koepsell, Thomas D

    2008-01-01

    In this study we examined the relationship between diagnoses of isolated intrapartum fever or chorioamnionitis and the risk of encephalopathy in term newborns. We conducted a population-based, case-control study in Washington State using 1994 to 2002 linked data from the Washington State Birth Registry and the Comprehensive Hospital Abstract Reporting System (CHARS). We identified 1060 singleton, term newborns (602 males, 458 females) with International Classification of Diseases (ICD-9) diagnoses consistent with encephalopathy, and 5330 unaffected control newborns (2756 males, 2574 females). Intrapartum fever was defined by a diagnosis of intrapartum temperature of >38 degrees C in the birth registry or CHARS databases. Chorioamnionitis was defined using ICD-9 diagnoses recorded in CHARS. We identified 2.2 cases of encephalopathy per 1000 births. Isolated intrapartum fever was associated with a 3.1-fold (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.3-4.2) increased risk of newborn encephalopathy. Chorioamnionitis was associated with a 5.4-fold (95% CI 3.6-7.8) increased risk of encephalopathy. We found that isolated intrapartum fever and chorioamnionitis were independently associated with an increased risk of encephalopathy in term infants. Our data also indicate that there is a spectrum of risk for encephalopathy in term infants exposed to intrapartum fever. Infants born to women with signs of chorioamnionitis other than isolated intrapartum fever may be at higher risk of encephalopathy than those exposed only to isolated intrapartum fever.

  20. Effect of antibiotics, prebiotics and probiotics in treatment for hepatic encephalopathy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongaerts, G.P.A.; Severijnen, R.S.V.M.; Timmerman, H.

    2005-01-01

    In order to reduce ammonia production by urease-positive bacteria Solga recently hypothesised (S.F. Solga, Probiotics can treat hepatic encephalopathy, Medical Hypotheses 2003; 61: 307-13), that probiotics are new therapeutics for hepatic encephalopathy (HE), and that they may replace antibiotics

  1. [Post-traumatic tics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegre, S; Chacón, J; Redondo, L; Navarro-Busto, C; Solana, B

    1996-10-01

    Secondary tics are those in which an aetiology justifying them can be found, as compared to idiopathic tics, which make up the majority, and the Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (SGT), which is, at the moment, of unknown origin. Of the possible aetiologies described as causing tics, craneo-encephalic trauma has been mentioned on very few occasions. We present a case of post-traumatic tics (verbal and neck) in a young man of 24, and review the published cases which can be considered to be of post-traumatic tics. We have found six cases of tics secondary to traumas, all craneo-encephalic, like ours (the one under study). The time interval between the blow and the appearance of the tic or tics varied between 2 weeks and 3 months. The absence of significant lesions seen in the complementary investigations make it impossible for us to discover the site of the lesion caused by the trauma. However, the presence in some cases of other tics before the trauma, and of family histories of tics, supports the idea of a genetic basis or predisposition to suffer this disorder.

  2. [Social support after traumatism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maercker, A; Heim, E; Hecker, T; Thoma, M V

    2017-01-01

    The classical concept of social support has recently become of relevance again, particularly in the context of traumatized patient groups, which include refugees and migrants. This article summarizes the evidence from social support research, e. g. different types of positive effects as well as context, gender and cultural aspects. These aspects are highlighted by means of studies stemming from applied healthcare research and thus describe a wide range of health effects, e.g. increased well-being and reduced depressive symptoms, improved functional abilities, better immune status and longevity. Two new trauma-specific differentiations of the social support concept are introduced: societal acknowledgement as a trauma survivor and disclosure of traumatic experiences. Against this background several implications for working with refugees arise: promotion of self-efficacy and posttraumatic maturation as well as the treatment of mental disorders show considerable benefits from focusing on social support. Finally, possibilities emerging from digital communication media are discussed, which are particularly relevant in this context.

  3. Imaging Neuroinflammation in Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Post traumatic stress disorder ( PTSD ) is a complex...several central nervous system conditions including post - traumatic stress disorder ( PTSD ) and traumatic brain injury (TBI). Microglia represent over...trials. We have subsequently identified a better agent for interrogating TSPO in post - traumatic stress disorder ( PTSD ) subjects, 18-F PBR111, a

  4. [Changes in serotonin and noradrenaline in hepatic encephalopathy as a result of liver failure in rat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Min-ning; Song, Yu-na; Chen, Fu; Luo, Mei-lan

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the changes in serotonin (5-HT) and noradrenaline (NA) in hepatic encephalopathy as a result of acute and chronic liver failure in rat. One hundred and ten Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into groups of normal control (n=20), experimental group of acute liver failure (ALF) encephalopathy (n=45), and experimental group of chronic liver failure (CLF) encephalopathy (n=45). Two dosages of thioacetamide (TAA) of 500 mg/kg were gavaged with an interval of 24 hours to reproduce ALF model. To reproduce CLF model rats were fed with 0.03% TAA in drinking water for 10 weeks, and 50% of TAA dosage was added or withheld according to the change in weekly body weight measurement. Animals were sacrificed and venous blood specimens were obtained after successful replication of model, and 5-HT, NA, ammonia, parameters of liver function were determined, and liver and brain were studied pathologically. The experiment showed that the liver functions of rats in groups ALF encephalopathy and CLF encephalopathy deteriorated seriously, changes in alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), total bilirubin (TBIL), albumen (ALB), ALB/globulin (A/G), and blood ammonia were observed(Pliver and brain pathologies were identical to those of ALF and CLF encephalopathy. The values of 5-HT were increased in groups ALF encephalopathy and CLF encephalopathy [(16.06+/-1.08) micromol/L and (15.32+/-1.48) micromol/L] compared with the normal group [(2.75+/-0.26) micromol/L, both Pencephalopathy [(94.0+/-2.13) pmol/L vs.(121.2+/-14.8) pmol/L,Pencephalopathy and CLF encephalopathy. The content of NA decreases remarkably in CLF encephalopathy.

  5. Risk factor for hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butt, T.K.; Farooqui, R.; Khan, U.; Farooqui, R.

    2008-01-01

    To determine underlying risk factors in neonates with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. All neonates (153) with the diagnosis of Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy (HIE) were included in the study. Controls (187) were selected from admissions on the same day. Possible risk factors such as maternal age, parity, antenatal monitoring, place of delivery, prolonged second stage of labour, type of delivery, type of attendant at delivery and the gestational age were noted and compared. Sixty one (39.9%) mothers of asphyxiated babies reported no antenatal visits compared to 24.1% in the control group (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.3-3.2; p=0.002). Only 6.5% of cases were born in government hospitals (teaching and district) in comparison to 20.9% of controls (OR 3.8, 95% CI 1.9-7.6; p=0.001). In 28.1% of cases, mothers had history of prolonged 2nd stage of labour in comparison to 5.9% of controls (OR 6.3, 95% CI 3.3-11.9; p<0.001). Fifty five cases (35.9%) were delivered by unskilled birth attendants compared to 28 (14.9%) controls (OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.9-5.3; p<0.001). No significant difference was found in maternal age, maternal parity, gestational age and the mode of delivery between the two groups. Delivery by unskilled birth attendant, prolonged second stage of labour, birth in a non-government hospital setup and absence of antenatal care were significant risk factors for hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy in neonates. Improvement in antenatal and intrapartum care may be helpful in decreasing the frequency of this problem. (author)

  6. Study of MRI characteristics of newborn bilirubin encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Wulin; Wang Xiaoyi; Liao Weihua; Liu Fan; Zhang Ping

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore routine magnetic resonance imaging characteristics of newborn bilirubin encephalopathy (NBE). Methods: MRI features and clinical data of 17 patients with Newborn bilirubin encephalopathy were retrospectively analyzed, globus pallidus (GP)and subthalamic signal intensity was evaluated. The increase of GP signal intensity and serum total bilirubin peak value were analyzed using pearson correlation analysis. Serum total bilirubin peak value between patients with high signal in the subthalamic nuclei on T 1 WI and patients without high signal in the subthalamic nuclei were compared statistically. Results: The main MRI presentation in the NBE group was abnormally increased signal intensity in the GP on T 1 WI, which was not apparent on T 2 WI. One patient showed abnormal high signal intensity in the posteromedial part of GP. Nine patients had high signal in the subthalamic nuclei on T 1 WI and normal signal on T 2 WI. Four patients showed high signal in the brainstem with sparing of dorsal pontine. The increase in value of GP signal intensity was 249.0-423.8 in 12 patients and their serum total bilirubin peak values were 366.0-983.3 μmol/L. A positive correlation was found between increase of GP signal intensity and serum total bilirubin peak value. The serum total bilirubin level of abnormal subthalamic group and normal subthalamic group were 660.7±192.4 μmol/L and 513.3±107.51 μmol/L respectively. The difference between the two groups was not statistically significant (t=1.914, P>0.05). Conclusion: The routine MRI has some characteristics and is useful in the diagnosis of newborn bilirubin encephalopathy. (authors)

  7. Prognostic factors for acute encephalopathy with bright tree appearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Junji; Nabatame, Shin; Nakano, Sayaka; Iwatani, Yoshiko; Kitai, Yukihiro; Tominaga, Koji; Kagitani-Shimono, Kuriko; Okinaga, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Takehisa; Nagai, Toshisaburo; Ozono, Keiichi

    2015-02-01

    To determine the prognostic factors for encephalopathy with bright tree appearance (BTA) in the acute phase through retrospective case evaluation. We recruited 10 children with encephalopathy who presented with BTA and classified them into 2 groups. Six patients with evident regression and severe psychomotor developmental delay after encephalopathy were included in the severe group, while the remaining 4 patients with mild mental retardation were included in the mild group. We retrospectively analyzed their clinical symptoms, laboratory data, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) findings. Patients in the severe group developed subsequent complications such as epilepsy and severe motor impairment. Univariate analysis revealed that higher maximum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels (p=0.055) were a weak predictor of poor outcome. Maximum creatinine levels were significantly higher (p<0.05) and minimal platelet counts were significantly lower (p<0.05) in the severe group than in the mild group. Acute renal failure was not observed in any patient throughout the study. MRS of the BTA lesion during the BTA period showed elevated lactate levels in 5 children in the severe group and 1 child in the mild group. MRI performed during the chronic phase revealed severe brain atrophy in all patients in the severe group. Higher creatinine and LDH levels and lower platelet counts in the acute phase correlated with poor prognosis. Increased lactate levels in the BTA lesion during the BTA period on MRS may predict severe physical and mental disability. Copyright © 2014 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Biomarkers of brain injury in neonatal encephalopathy treated with hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massaro, An N; Chang, Taeun; Kadom, Nadja; Tsuchida, Tammy; Scafidi, Joseph; Glass, Penny; McCarter, Robert; Baumgart, Stephen; Vezina, Gilbert; Nelson, Karin B

    2012-09-01

    To determine if early serum S100B and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) levels are associated with neuroradiographic and clinical evidence of brain injury in newborns with encephalopathy. Patients who received therapeutic whole-body hypothermia were prospectively enrolled in this observational study. Serum specimens were collected at 0, 12, 24, and 72 hours of cooling. S100B and NSE levels were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed in surviving infants at 7-10 days of life. Standardized neurologic examination was performed by a child neurologist at 14 days of life. Multiple linear regression analyses were performed to evaluate the association between S100B and NSE levels and unfavorable outcome (death or severe magnetic resonance imaging injury/significant neurologic deficit). Cutoff values were determined by receiver operating curve analysis. Newborns with moderate to severe encephalopathy were enrolled (n = 75). Median pH at presentation was 6.9 (range, 6.5-7.35), and median Apgar scores of 1 at 1 minute, 3 at 5 minutes, and 5 at 10 minutes. NSE and S100B levels were higher in patients with unfavorable outcomes across all time points. These results remained statistically significant after controlling for covariables, including encephalopathy grade at presentation, Apgar score at 5 minutes of life, initial pH, and clinical seizures. Elevated serum S100B and NSE levels measured during hypothermia were associated with neuroradiographic and clinical evidence of brain injury in encephalopathic newborns. These brain-specific proteins may be useful immediate biomarkers of cerebral injury severity. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Laboratory Examinations of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies in Denmark during 2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tim Kåre

    of Denmark (DTU-VET). The report is made to fulfil the demands given by the EU Commission (Regulation No 999/2001 of the European Parliament and the Council of 22. May 2001) and the Office Inter-national des Epizooties (OIE) (Manual of Diagnostic Tests and Vaccines for Terrestrial Ani-mals, 5th edition 2008......, Chapter 2.4.6 and Chapter 2.7.13) regarding diagnostic examinations. The DTU-VET is the national reference laboratory of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and TSE/Scrapie, and therefore the results of all neuropathological examinations on BSE and Scrapie in Denmark are given in the present report...

  10. Laboratory Examinations of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies in Denmark during 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tim Kåre

    of Denmark (DTU-VET). The report is made to fulfil the demands given by the EU Commission (Regulation No 999/2001 of the European Parliament and the Council of 22. May 2001) and the Office Inter-national des Epizooties (OIE) (Manual of Diagnostic Tests and Vaccines for Terrestrial Animals, 5th edition 2008......, Chapter 2.4.6 and Chapter 2.7.13) regarding diagnostic examinations. The DTU-VET is the national reference laboratory of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and TSE/Scrapie, and therefore the results of all neuropathological examinations on BSE and Scrapie in Denmark are given in the present report...

  11. Laboratory Examinations of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies in Denmark during 2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tim Kåre

    of Denmark (DTU-VET). The report is made to fulfil the demands given by the EU Commission (Regulation No 999/2001 of the European Parliament and the Council of 22. May 2001) and the Office Inter-national des Epizooties (OIE) (Manual of Diagnostic Tests and Vaccines for Terrestrial Ani-mals, 5th edition 2008......, Chapter 2.4.6 and Chapter 2.7.13) regarding diagnostic examinations. The DTU-VET is the national reference laboratory of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and TSE/Scrapie, and therefore the results of all neuropathological examinations on BSE and Scrapie in Denmark are given in the present report...

  12. Branched-chain amino acids for people with hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluud, Lise Lotte; Dam, Gitte; Les, Iñigo; Marchesini, Giulio; Borre, Mette; Aagaard, Niels Kristian; Vilstrup, Hendrik

    2017-05-18

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a brain dysfunction with neurological and psychiatric changes associated with liver insufficiency or portal-systemic shunting. The severity ranges from minor symptoms to coma. A Cochrane systematic review including 11 randomised clinical trials on branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) versus control interventions has evaluated if BCAA may benefit people with hepatic encephalopathy. To evaluate the beneficial and harmful effects of BCAA versus any control intervention for people with hepatic encephalopathy. We identified trials through manual and electronic searches in The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, Embase, Science Citation Index Expanded and Conference Proceedings Citation Index - Science, and LILACS (May 2017). We included randomised clinical trials, irrespective of the bias control, language, or publication status. The authors independently extracted data based on published reports and collected data from the primary investigators. We changed our primary outcomes in this update of the review to include mortality (all cause), hepatic encephalopathy (number of people without improved manifestations of hepatic encephalopathy), and adverse events. The analyses included random-effects and fixed-effect meta-analyses. We performed subgroup, sensitivity, regression, and trial sequential analyses to evaluate sources of heterogeneity (including intervention, and participant and trial characteristics), bias (using The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group method), small-study effects, and the robustness of the results after adjusting for sparse data and multiplicity. We graded the quality of the evidence using the GRADE approach. We found 16 randomised clinical trials including 827 participants with hepatic encephalopathy classed as overt (12 trials) or minimal (four trials). Eight trials assessed oral BCAA supplements and seven trials assessed intravenous

  13. Subacute encephalopathy with epileptic seizures in alcoholism (SESA): case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, F G; Kozian, R

    2001-10-01

    The case of a 66-year-old patient is reported in view of the rarity of his condition: a case of subacute encephalopathy with seizures in alcoholics (SESA syndrome), described first in 1981 by Niedermeyer, et al. Wernicke-type aphasia, epileptic seizures (generalized tonic-clonic) and PLEDs EEG pattern dominated the neurological picture, in addition to hepatomegaly and rhabdomyolysis. This condition differs from all other known CNS complications in chronic alcoholism and is withdrawal-independent. It is prognostically favorable as far as the syndrome as such is concerned.

  14. Atypical presentation of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: Two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishant Kumar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES is a clinico-neuroradiological entity, first described in 1996. It is commonly associated with systemic hypertension, intake of immunosuppressant drugs, sepsis and eclampsia and preeclampsia. Headache, alteration in consciousness, visual disturbances and seizures are common manifestations of PRES. Signs of pyramidal tract involvement and motor dysfunction are uncommon clinical findings. However, clinical presentation is not diagnostic. On neuroimaging, lesions are characteristically found in parieto occipital region of the brain due to vasogenic edema. We report two cases of PRES with atypical clinical presentation-one which was suggestive of neurocysticercosis and the other in which agitation and opisthotonic posture were predominant features.

  15. A Less Known Stroke Mimic: Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keneilwe Malomo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES is a clinico-neuro-radiological diagnosis, which can complicate a wide range of conditions. Clinical features include generalised and/or focal neurological deficits. These features are also present in neurovascular disorders, such as stroke. Currently, emphasis in the management of hyperacute stroke is thrombolysis, and it is important to bear in mind stroke mimics as a possible cause of clinical features. The Authors present the case of a 66-year-old man, who presented with acute focal neurological deficit. His brain imaging and history were consistent with PRES.

  16. Moyamoya disease in a child with previous acute necrotizing encephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Taik-Kun; Cha, Sang Hoon; Chung, Kyoo Byung; Kim, Jung Hyuck; Kim, Baek Hyun; Chung, Hwan Hoon [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Korea University College of Medicine, Ansan Hospital, 516 Kojan-Dong, Ansan City, Kyungki-Do 425-020 (Korea); Eun, Baik-Lin [Department of Pediatrics, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea)

    2003-09-01

    A previously healthy 24-day-old boy presented with a 2-day history of fever and had a convulsion on the day of admission. MRI showed abnormal signal in the thalami, caudate nuclei and central white matter. Acute necrotising encephalopathy was diagnosed, other causes having been excluded after biochemical and haematological analysis of blood, urine and CSF. He recovered, but with spastic quadriparesis. At the age of 28 months, he suffered sudden deterioration of consciousness and motor weakness of his right limbs. MRI was consistent with an acute cerebrovascular accident. Angiography showed bilateral middle cerebral artery stenosis or frank occlusion with numerous lenticulostriate collateral vessels consistent with moyamoya disease. (orig.)

  17. Oxidative metabolism of astrocytes is not reduced in hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Peter; Mouridsen, Kim; Hansen, Mikkel B

    2014-01-01

    In patients with impaired liver function and hepatic encephalopathy (HE), consistent elevations of blood ammonia concentration suggest a crucial role in the pathogenesis of HE. Ammonia and acetate are metabolized in brain both primarily in astrocytes. Here, we used dynamic [(11)C]acetate PET...... of the brain to measure the contribution of astrocytes to the previously observed reduction of brain oxidative metabolism in patients with liver cirrhosis and HE, compared to patients with cirrhosis without HE, and to healthy subjects. We used a new kinetic model to estimate uptake from blood to astrocytes...

  18. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome Presenting as Stroke Mimic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Frick

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a 33-year-old male with end stage renal disease presenting to the emergency department (ED with headache, dizziness, and unilateral weakness. Initial concern was for ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke. Magnetic resonance imaging confirmed posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES. The patient was treated appropriately and made a full neurologic recovery. PRES is an under-recognized diagnosis in the ED. As a stroke mimic, PRES can lead the clinician on an incorrect diagnostic pathway with potential for iatrogenic harm.

  19. Cattle traceability system in Japan for bovine spongiform encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuaki Sugiura

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available To promote consumer confidence in the safety of beef and to ensure the proper implementation of eradication measures against bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE, the Cattle Traceability Law was approved by the Diet in June 2003 and a cattle traceability system has been in operation in Japan since December 2003. The system enables tracing the cohort and offspring animals of a BSE case within 24 h of its detection. The traceability database system also provides distributors, restaurants and consumers with information on the cattle from which the beef that they sell, serve and consume originate.

  20. Blunt traumatic diaphragmatic rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Carlos Nogueira

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic injury of the diaphragm ranges from 0.6 to 1.2% and rise up to 5%among patients who were victims of blunt trauma and underwent laparotomy.Clinical suspicion associated with radiological assessment contributes to earlydiagnosis. Isolated diaphragmatic injury has a good prognosis. Generallyworse outcomes are associated with other trauma injuries. Bilateral andright diaphragmatic lesions have worse prognosis. Multi detector computed tomography (MDCT scan of the chest and abdomen provides better diagnosticaccuracy using the possibility of image multiplanar reconstruction. Surgicalrepair via laparotomy and/ or thoracotomy in the acute phase of the injury hasa better outcome and avoids chronic complications of diaphragmatic hernia.The authors present the case of a young male patient, victim of blunt abdominaltrauma due to motor vehicle accident with rupture of the diaphragm, spleenand kidney injuries. The diagnosis was made by computed tomography of thethorax and abdomen and was confirmed during laparotomy.

  1. Post-traumatic hemobilia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlahos, L.; Kalovidouris, A.; Gouliamos, A.; Kailidou, E.

    1991-01-01

    Four patients with post-traumatic hemobilia were evaluated with arteriography over a 2-year period. In two patients hemobilia was of iatrogenic origin; in particular, one case appeared after a cholecystectomy, and the other was due to placement of a biliary stent with an endoscope. In the other two patients hemobilia was the result of a gun injury. Arteriography of the hepatic arterial system demonstrated two false aneurysms, extravasation of contrast medium through the biliary system in one patient and arterioportal fistula in another patient. It is concluded that arteriography of the hepatic arterial system is the method of choice for the evaluation and the possible treatment of patients with hemobilia. (author). 20 refs.; 4 figs

  2. Post-traumatic hemobilia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlahos, L.; Kalovidouris, A.; Gouliamos, A.; Kailidou, E. (Athens Univ. (Greece))

    Four patients with post-traumatic hemobilia were evaluated with arteriography over a 2-year period. In two patients hemobilia was of iatrogenic origin; in particular, one case appeared after a cholecystectomy, and the other was due to placement of a biliary stent with an endoscope. In the other two patients hemobilia was the result of a gun injury. Arteriography of the hepatic arterial system demonstrated two false aneurysms, extravasation of contrast medium through the biliary system in one patient and arterioportal fistula in another patient. It is concluded that arteriography of the hepatic arterial system is the method of choice for the evaluation and the possible treatment of patients with hemobilia. (author). 20 refs.; 4 figs.

  3. Traumatic lung hernia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabaza, M. J.; Alcazar, P. P.; Touma, C.

    2001-01-01

    Lung hernia is an uncommon entity that is defined as the protrusion of the lung parenchyma through a defect in the thoracic cavity. It is classified on the basis of its location (cervical, intercostal and diaphragmatic) and etiology (congenital and acquired). Acquired lung hernias can be further grouped as spontaneous, traumatic or pathological, depending on the responsible mechanism. Nearly half of them are secondary to chest trauma, whether penetrating or blunt. We present a case of lung hernia in a patient with penetrating chest trauma. The diagnosis was suspected from the radiographic images and was confirmed by computed tomography. We also review the literature concerning its classification and incidence, diagnostic methods used and treatment. (Author) 9 refs

  4. Evaluation of 80 Term Neonates with Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selahattin Katar

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to review the etiology, clinical - laboratory features and mortality rate of term 80 neonates with perinatal asphyxia admitted to our neonatal unit between January 2005-April 2006. The sex distribution was 24 (%30 female and 56 (% 70 male. The mean gestational age was 38.6±1.3 weeks and weight 3156±561 gram. Of the patients % 46.25 were delivered with a cesarean section and % 53.75 with spontaneous vaginal delivery. The etiologic factors for hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy were % 31.25 force delivery, meconium aspiration, and % 66.25 preeclampsia, eclampsia and diabetic mother’s infant. The distribution of patients according to HIE statging system (Sarnat&Sarnat were as follows: 33 patients (% 41.25 in stage 1, 20 (% 25 in stage 2 and 27 (% 33.75 in stage 3. Seizures were observed in % 33.75 of patients. The mean duration of hospital stay was 10.6±7.7 days for the surviving patients and 4.2±3.4 days for patients who died. Except from central nervous system, liver and kidney were the most involved organs.Perinatal asphyxia remains to be leading cause of neonatal mortality. Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy is a common newborn problem and cause important mortality and morbidity where low-social –cultural –education conditions with in regions.

  5. Clinical and Imaging Findings in Childhood Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    GUNGOR, Serdal; KILIC, Betul; TABEL, Yilmaz; SELIMOGLU, Ayse; OZGEN, Unsal; YILMAZ, Sezai

    2018-01-01

    Objective Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is characterized by typical radiologic findings in the posterior regions of the cerebral hemispheres and cerebellum. The symptoms include headache, nausea, vomiting, visual disturbances, focal neurologic deficits, and seizures. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical and radiological features of PRES in children and to emphasize the recognition of atypical features. Materials & Methods We retrospectively examined 23 children with PRES from Mar 2010-Apr 2015 in Inonu University Turgut Ozal Medical Center in Turkey. We compared the clinical features and cranial MRI findings between underlying diseases of PRES. Results The most common precipitating factors were hypertension (78.2%) and medications, namely immunosuppressive and antineoplastic agents (60.8%). Manifestations included mental changes (100%), seizures (95.6%), headache (60.8%), and visual disturbances (21.7%) of mean 3.6 (range 1-10) days' duration. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed bilateral occipital lesions in all patients, associated in 82.6% with less typical distribution of lesions in frontal, temporal or parietal lobes, cerebellum, corpus callosum, basal ganglia, thalamus, and brain stem. Frontal involvement was predominant, observed in 56.5% of patients. Clinical recovery was followed by radiologic resolution in all patients. Conclusion PRES is often unsuspected by the clinician, thus radiologists may be the first to suggest this diagnosis on an MRI obtained for seizures or encephalopathy. Atypical MRI finding is seen quite often. Rapid diagnosis and treatment are required to avoid a devastating outcome. PMID:29379559

  6. A case of tacrolimus-induced encephalopathy after kidney transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myoung Uk Kim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of tacrolimus-induced encephalopathy after successful kidney transplantation. An 11-year-old girl presented with sudden onset of neurologic symptoms, hypertension, and psychiatric symptoms, with normal kidney function, after kidney transplantation. The symptoms improved after cessation of tacrolimus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed acute infarction of the middle cerebral artery (MCA territory in the right frontal lobe. Three days later, she had normal mental function and maintained normal blood pressure with left hemiparesis. Follow-up MRI was performed on D19, showing new infarct lesions at both cerebral hemispheres. Ten days later, MRI showed further improvement, but brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT showed mild reduction of uptake in both the anterior cingulate gyrus and the left thalamus. One month after onset of symptoms, angiography showed complete resolution of stenosis. However, presenting as a mild fine motor disability of both hands and mild dysarthria, what had been atrophy at both centrum semiovale at 4 months now showed progression to encephalomalacia. There are two points of interest in this case. First, encephalopathy occurred after administration of tacrolimus and improved after discontinuation of the drug. Second, the development of right-side hemiplegia could not be explained by conventional MRI; but through diffusion tensor imaging (DTI and diffusion tensor tractography (DTT of white matter tract, visualization was possible.

  7. Subacute Noninfective Inflammatory Encephalopathy: Our Experience and Diagnostic Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Sadanandavalli Retnaswami; Viswanathan, Lakshminarayanapuram Gopal; Sindhu, Dodmalur Malikarjuna; Pai, Anupama Ramakanth

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Immune dysregulation associated encephalopathies present with significant psychiatric manifestations and only a few soft neurological and general systemic features. They are generally resistant to treatment with psychiatric medications. Generalized orthostatic myoclonus and faciobrachial dystonic seizures are mistaken as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. Patients and Methods: Forty-two patients seen during 2010–2015 and diagnosed as noninfective encephalopathy were analyzed. Those patients with infective causes and those who had significant features of systemic manifestations of vasculitis and other disorders of central nervous system were excluded from the study. They were investigated with cerebrospinal fluid imaging, electroencephalogram (EEG), and antibody profile. Results: More than 70% patients had psychiatric manifestation as presenting features and reported to psychiatrist. Three patients had paraneoplastic and others N-methyl-D-aspartate, voltage-gated potassium channel, thyroid peroxidase, antinuclear antibody related, and few were due to unknown antibody. Conclusion: Serious diagnostic errors are common and early diagnosis is based on high degree suspicion in patients presenting with new-onset refractory psychosis. Soft neurological features should be looked for and EEG serves as a very sensitive tool in establishing organicity. PMID:28515556

  8. Hepatic encephalopathy: cause and possible management with botanicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Suyash; Tripathi, Yamini B

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a brain functional disorder, characterized by neuropsychiatric abnormalities with liver failure. High blood ammonia, causing glutamate neurotoxicity is the basic cause, finally leading to low-grade cerebral edema. Its manifestation is more likely in patients of sepsis, oxidative stress, generalized inflammation, gut mal-functioning, amoebiaesis, viral hepatitis, nervous imbalance, etc. Thus, the therapeutic goals primarily include the maintenance of proper blood supply and prevention of hypoxic condition in liver, along with management of factors responsible for high blood ammonia, oxidative stress, inflammation, and high GI- serotonin. The drugs in clinical practice include lactulose, sodium benzoate, flumazenil and rifaximin, supplementation of zinc, branched chain amino acids (BCAA), l-ornithine-l aspartate, antioxidants and iNOS inhibitors. However, herbal formulations would be of great importance as it shows multi-targeted action because it possesses a natural cocktail of secondary metabolites. It can collectively act as an antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, prebiotic, hepatoprotective and neuron-protective agents. We have briefly outlined some of these plants and also recent patents useful in the management of hepatic encephalopathy.

  9. Diagnosis of hepatic encephalopathy with magentic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Etsuo; Narumi, Yoshifumi; Kadota, Tsuyoshi; Fujita, Makoto; Kuriyama, Keiko; Kuroda, Chikazumi

    1993-01-01

    Cranial magnetic resonance (MR) images were examined in 16 patients with liver cirrhosis. The findings of MR imaging were correlated with portal-systemic collateral vessel shown on angiograms. In 9 of 16 patients, basal ganglia was hyperintense compared with white matter on T1-weighted images. These 9 patients had portal-systemic collateral vessel 10 mm or more in diameter that was suppied by superior mesenteric vein (SMV), and 4 of the 9 patients had portal-systemic encephalopathy on angiograms. In the remaining 7 patients, no hyperintense lesions were seen in basal ganglia relative to white matter on T1-weighted images; angiography revealed that 2 patients had portal-systemic collateral vessel that was supplied by SMV but was 5 mm or less in diameter, 3 had bood supplies from splenic vein, and 2 had no collateral vessel. There was no change in signal intensity on T2-weighted images. In conclusion, a large portal-systemic collateral vessel supplied by SMV may be shown as a high intensity lesion in basal ganglia, thus making it possible to diagnose hepatic encephalopathy even if there was no psychoneurologic symptoms or signs. (N.K.)

  10. Hepatic encephalopathy: Ever closer to its big bang.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souto, Pablo A; Marcotegui, Ariel R; Orbea, Lisandro; Skerl, Juan; Perazzo, Juan Carlos

    2016-11-14

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a neuropsychiatric disorder that commonly complicates the course of patients with liver disease. Despite the fact that the syndrome was probably first recognized hundreds of years ago, the exact pathogenesis still remains unclear. Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) is the earliest form of HE and is estimated to affect more that 75% of patients with liver cirrhosis. It is characterized by cognitive impairment predominantly attention, reactiveness and integrative function with very subtle clinical manifestations. The development of MHE is associated with worsen in driving skills, daily activities and the increase of overall mortality. Skeletal muscle has the ability to shift from ammonia producer to ammonia detoxifying organ. Due to its large size, becomes the main ammonia detoxifying organ in case of chronic liver failure and muscular glutamine-synthase becomes important due to the failing liver and brain metabolic activity. Gut is the major glutamine consumer and ammonia producer organ in the body. Hepatocellular dysfunction due to liver disease, results in an impaired clearance of ammonium and in its inter-organ trafficking. Intestinal bacteria, can also represent an extra source of ammonia production and in cirrhosis, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and symbiosis can be observed. In the study of HE, to get close to MHE is to get closer to its big bang; and from here, to travel less transited roads such as skeletal muscle and intestine, is to go even closer. The aim of this editorial is to expose this road for further and deeper work.

  11. Therapeutic hypothermia for neonates with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Chou Chiang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic hypothermia (TH is a recommended regimen for newborn infants who are at or near term with evolving moderate-to-severe hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE. The Task Force of the Taiwan Child Neurology Society and the Taiwan Society of Neonatology held a joint meeting in 2015 to establish recommendations for using TH on newborn patients with HIE. Based on current evidence and experts' experiences, this review article summarizes the key points and recommendations regarding TH for newborns with HIE, including: (1 selection criteria for TH; (2 choices of method and equipment for TH; (3 TH prior to and during transport; (4 methods for temperature maintenance, monitoring, and rewarming; (5 systemic care of patients during TH, including the care of respiratory and cardiovascular systems, management of fluids, electrolytes, and nutrition, as well as sedation and drug metabolism; (6 monitoring and management of seizures; (7 neuroimaging, prognostic factors, and outcomes; and (8 adjuvant therapy for TH. Key Words: hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy, neonate, patient care, perinatal asphyxia, therapeutic hypothermia

  12. Development of a murine model of acute radiation encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Yigang; Tang Yamei; Liu Jun; Sun Ying

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To develop a murine model of acute radiation encephalopathy. Methods: A total of 40 rats were subjected to local γ-irradiation to the brain with the dosage of 7 Gy/d for 6 consecutive days. The amount of food intake, hairs and skin of irradiated field, body weight, general activities, CNS symptoms and signs were examined and recorded after irradiation. On day 3, 7, 14 and 30, the brain tissue was removed to observe histopathologic changes. Results: During the first two days after irradiation, the irradiated rats were agitated, and the amount of food intake decreased from day 2 onwards. No serious skin reaction to irradiation was observed. Survived rats had normal activities without any abnormal nervous signs. Histopathologic changes showed slight neuronal degeneration, smaller cell body, red-colored cytoplasm, disappearance of Nissl body, vacuolation, typical cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation and nuclear divergence. On the 14th and 30th days, hypochromatism, loose and reticular necrotic foci were found in some samples. Conclusion: The murine model of acute radiation encephalopathy is useful and practical in radiobiological studies

  13. MR imaging for diagnostic evaluation of encephalopathy in the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shroff, Manohar M; Soares-Fernandes, João P; Whyte, Hilary; Raybaud, Charles

    2010-05-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is used with increasing frequency to evaluate the neonatal brain because it can provide important diagnostic and prognostic information that is needed for optimal treatment and appropriate counseling. Special care must be taken in preparing encephalopathic neonates for an MR study, transporting them from the intensive care unit, monitoring their vital signs, and optimizing MR sequences and protocols. Moreover, to accurately interpret the findings, specific knowledge is needed about the normal MR imaging appearances of the physiologic processes of myelination, cell migration, and sulcation, as well as patterns of injury, in the neonatal brain at various stages of gestational development. Hypoxic-ischemic injury, the most common cause of neonatal encephalopathy, has characteristic appearances that depend on the severity and duration of the insult as well as the stage of brain development. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging and MR spectroscopy depict abnormalities earlier than do conventional MR imaging sequences. However, diffusion-weighted imaging, if performed in the first 24 hours after the insult, might lead to underestimation of the extent of injury. When the MR findings are atypical, the differential diagnosis of neonatal encephalopathy also should include congenital and metabolic disorders and infectious diseases. Despite recent advances in the MR imaging-based characterization of these conditions, the clinical history must be borne in mind to achieve an accurate diagnosis.

  14. White matter injury in term newborns with neonatal encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Amanda M; Chau, Vann; Poskitt, Kenneth J; Sargent, Michael A; Lupton, Brian A; Hill, Alan; Roland, Elke; Miller, Steven P

    2009-01-01

    White matter injury (WMI) is the characteristic pattern of brain injury detected on magnetic resonance imaging in the premature newborn. Focal noncystic WMI is increasingly recognized in populations of term newborns. The aim of this study was to describe the occurrence of focal noncystic WMI in a cohort of 48 term newborns with encephalopathy studied with magnetic resonance imaging at 72 +/- 12 h of life, and to identify clinical risk factors for this pattern of injury. Eleven newborns (23%; 95% CI 11-35) were found to have WMI (four minimal, three moderate, and four severe). In 10 of the 11 newborns, the WMI was associated with restricted diffusion on apparent diffusion coefficient maps. An increasing severity of WMI was associated with lower gestational age at birth (p = 0.05), but not lower birth weight. Newborns with WMI had milder encephalopathy and fewer clinical seizures relative to other newborns in the cohort. Other brain injuries were seen in three of the 11 newborns: basal nuclei predominant pattern of injury in one and cortical strokes in two. These findings suggest that WMI in the term newborn is acquired near birth and that the state of brain maturation is an important determinant of this pattern of brain injury.

  15. Is Encephalopathy a Mechanism to Renew Sulfate in Autism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurie Lentz-Marino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper makes two claims: (1 autism can be characterized as a chronic low-grade encephalopathy, associated with excess exposure to nitric oxide, ammonia and glutamate in the central nervous system, which leads to hippocampal pathologies and resulting cognitive impairment, and (2, encephalitis is provoked by a systemic deficiency in sulfate, but associated seizures and fever support sulfate restoration. We argue that impaired synthesis of cholesterol sulfate in the skin and red blood cells, catalyzed by sunlight and nitric oxide synthase enzymes, creates a state of colloidal instability in the blood manifested as a low zeta potential and increased interfacial stress. Encephalitis, while life-threatening, can result in partial renewal of sulfate supply, promoting neuronal survival. Research is cited showing how taurine may not only help protect neurons from hypochlorite exposure, but also provide a source for sulfate renewal. Several environmental factors can synergistically promote the encephalopathy of autism, including the herbicide, glyphosate, aluminum, mercury, lead, nutritional deficiencies in thiamine and zinc, and yeast overgrowth due to excess dietary sugar. Given these facts, dietary and lifestyle changes, including increased sulfur ingestion, organic whole foods, increased sun exposure, and avoidance of toxins such as aluminum, mercury, and lead, may help to alleviate symptoms or, in some instances, to prevent autism altogether.

  16. CT and MR manifestations of acute methyl alcohol toxic encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Xiaofen; Yang Bo; Ye Gengxin; Zhang Cheng

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the CT and MR manifestations of methyl alcohol toxic encephalopathy and to improve the diagnosing value of CT and MRI. Methods: 40 patients with methyl alcohol intoxication were collected in this study, in which CT scan was performed on 40 cases and MRI on 4 cases. All CT and MRI radiological data of brain were retrospectively studied. Results: 13 of 40 cases showed abnormal findings on brain CT and MRI. The most common manifestation (6/13, 46%)was hypodensity in frontal parietal white matter and external capsule-putamen on CT, which showed long or short T1 and long T2 on MR. Hemorrhage in right putamen was found only in 1 patient (1/13,7%). CT showed low density inbilateral external capsule in 4 cases (4/13,31%), in which MR showed long or short T1 and long T2. Low density lesions in subcortical white matter of bilateral frontal and parietal lobes, cingulate gyms and insular lobes were found in 2 patients (2/13,15%). The more severe clinic manifestation, the more obvious brain lesion CT and MRI showed. Conclusion: Brain CT and MR manifestations have great diagnostic value of acute methyl alcohol toxic encephalopathy. MRI was more sensitive and better than CT in finding early brain damage caused by methanol intoxication. (authors)

  17. Genetic epileptic encephalopathies: is all written into the DNA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striano, Pasquale; de Jonghe, Peter; Zara, Federico

    2013-11-01

    Epileptic encephalopathy is a condition in which epileptic activity, clinical or subclinical, is thought to be responsible for any disturbance of cognition, behavior, or motor control. However, experimental evidence supporting this clinical observation are still poor and the causal relationship between pharmacoresistant seizures and cognitive outcome is controversial. In the past two decades, genetic studies shed new light onto complex mechanisms underlying different severe epileptic conditions associated with intellectual disability and behavioral abnormalities, thereby providing important clues on the relationship between seizures and cognitive outcome. Dravet syndrome is a childhood disorder associated with loss-of-function mutations in SCN1A and is characterized by frequent seizures and severe cognitive impairment, thus well illustrating the concept of epileptic encephalopathy. However, it is difficult to determine the causative role of the underlying sodium channel dysfunction and that of the consequent seizures in influencing cognitive outcome in these children. It is also difficult to demonstrate whether a recognizable profile of cognitive impairment or a definite behavioral phenotype exists. Data from the laboratory and the clinics may provide greater insight into the degree to which epileptic activity may contribute to cognitive impairment in individual syndromes. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 International League Against Epilepsy.

  18. Post-traumatic Stress Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Seedat

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD is among the most prevalentanxiety disorders, both in terms of lifetime and 12-month prevalencerates documented in epidemiological studies worldwide.

  19. Coping with a Traumatic Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Traumatic events are marked by a sense of horror, helplessness, serious injury, or the threat of serious ... The symptoms of PTSD fall into three broad types: re-living, avoidance and increased arousal. • Symptoms of ...

  20. Traumatic Brain Injury Registry (TBI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — As the number of Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) patients has grown, so has the need to track and monitor...

  1. Need for early diagnosis of mental and mobility changes in Wernicke encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijnia, Jan W; Oudman, Erik; Bresser, Esmay L; Gerridzen, Ineke J; van de Wiel, Albert; Beuman, Carla; Mulder, Cornelis L

    2014-12-01

    Korsakoff syndrome is a chronic form of amnesia resulting from thiamine deficiency. The syndrome can develop from unrecognized or undertreated Wernicke encephalopathy. The intra-individual course of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome has not been studied extensively, nor has the temporal progression of gait disturbances and other symptoms of Wernicke encephalopathy. Here we present the detailed history of a patient whose acute symptoms of Wernicke encephalopathy were far from stable. We follow his mobility changes and the shifts in his mental status from global confusion and impaired consciousness to more selective cognitive deficits. His Wernicke encephalopathy was missed and left untreated, being labeled as "probable" Korsakoff syndrome. Patients with a history of self-neglect and alcohol abuse, at risk of or suffering with Wernicke encephalopathy, should receive immediate and adequate vitamin replacement. Self-neglecting alcoholics who are bedridden may have severe illness and probably active Wernicke encephalopathy. In these patients, mobility changes, delirium, or impaired consciousness can be an expression of Wernicke encephalopathy, and should be treated to prevent further damage from the neurologic complications of thiamine deficiency.

  2. Wernicke encephalopathy in a patient with liver failure: Clinical case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Pan; Zhao, Yanling; Wei, Zhenman; Chen, Jing; Yan, Lilong

    2016-07-01

    Early recognition and diagnosis of Wernicke encephalopathy is pivotal for the prognosis of this medical emergency, especially in patients with liver failure which predisposes individuals to develop hepatic encephalopathy. For these patients, distinguishing between hepatic encephalopathy and Wernicke encephalopathy is a challenge in real-world clinical practice.A male patient with 21-year medical history of liver cirrhosis presented diarrhea and ascites. One month before this visit, he was noted to have poor appetite and progressive fatigue. After admission, although several major symptoms, including diarrhea, ascites, hyponatremia, and hypoproteinemia, were greatly improved through appropriate treatments, his laboratory indicators were not changed much. His appetite was not reversed at discharge. On the 5th day after discharge, the patient suddenly became reluctant to speak and did not remember the recent happenings. Simultaneously, unsteady gait and strabismus occurred. On the basis of clinical manifestations and brain magnetic resonance imaging scan results, the patient was diagnosed as Wernicke encephalopathy and these relative symptoms were resolved after intravenous vitamin B1.To our knowledge, this is the second case report of Wernicke encephalopathy developing in a critically ill cirrhotic patient without hepatocellular carcinoma or operative intervention. Wernicke encephalopathy may be underdiagnosed in these patients and this case raises physicians' awareness of its possible onset.

  3. Initial Management of Traumatic Wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devriendt, Nausikaa; de Rooster, Hilde

    2017-11-01

    When traumatic wounds are quickly and accurately treated, morbidity and costs can be significantly decreased. Several factors, such as time delay between injury and treatment, the degree of contamination, extension and depth of the wound, and the mechanism of injury, influence the treatment and prognosis and stress the importance of a patient-specific approach. Although all traumatic wounds are contaminated, antibiotic therapy is seldom required if correct wound management is installed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Malnutrition-induced Wernicke's encephalopathy following a water-only fasting diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutcheon, Deborah A

    2015-02-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is a critical condition of neurological dysfunction resulting from a deficiency in thiamine. Chronic alcoholism is recognized as the most common cause of Wernicke's encephalopathy, but other causes, including fasting/starvation and malnutrition, have been documented within the scientific literature. These causes may not be readily recognized by healthcare professionals and may lead to Wernicke's encephalopathy being overlooked as a diagnosis when a nonalcoholic patient presents with classic signs and symptoms of the disorder. A narrative review of thiamine and its relationship to the development, diagnosis, and treatment of Wernicke's encephalopathy is presented based on a review of evidence-based guidelines and published research. To heighten awareness of the development of Wernicke's encephalopathy in fasted/starved and malnourished patients and to contribute to the scientific body of knowledge for the identification and management of Wernicke's encephalopathy in these patients, the clinical course and treatment of an adult woman who developed Wernicke's encephalopathy following a 40-day water-only fasting diet is outlined. Clinical suspicion was required to identify the patient's condition and initiate immediate intervention through parenteral thiamine administration. Oral thiamine supplementation of 100 to 800 mg per day for 6 months was required to aid recovery. The patient's clinical course and response to treatment illustrate the necessity for clinical awareness and suspicion of Wernicke's encephalopathy among healthcare professionals, timely and adequate parenteral thiamine administration, and oral thiamine supplementation at therapeutic doses to correct the nutrient deficiency, halt the progression of Wernicke's encephalopathy, and promote recovery. © 2014 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  5. Acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy after fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy: A case series and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitani, Seiichiro; Kadowaki, Shigenori; Komori, Azusa; Sugiyama, Keiji; Narita, Yukiya; Taniguchi, Hiroya; Ura, Takashi; Ando, Masashi; Sato, Yozo; Yamaura, Hidekazu; Inaba, Yoshitaka; Ishihara, Makoto; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Tajika, Masahiro; Muro, Kei

    2017-06-01

    Acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy induced by fluoropyrimidines (FPs) is a rare complication. Its pathophysiology remains unclear, especially given the currently used regimens, including intermediate-doses of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) or oral FP agents. We aimed to characterize the clinical manifestations in cancer patients who developed hyperammonemic encephalopathy after receiving FP-based chemotherapy.We retrospectively reviewed 1786 patients with gastrointestinal or primary-unknown cancer who received FP-based regimens between 2007 and 2012. Eleven patients (0.6%) developed acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy. The incidence according to the administered anticancer drugs were as follows: 5-FU (8 of 1176, 0.7%), S-1 (1 of 679, 0.1%), capecitabine (2 of 225, 0.9%), and tegafur-uracil (UFT) (0 of 39, 0%). Ten patients (90.9%) had at least 1 aggravating factor, including infection, dehydration, constipation, renal dysfunction, and muscle loss. All the 10 patients met the definition of sarcopenia. Median time to the onset of hyperammonemic encephalopathy in the cycle was 3 days (range: 2-21). Three patients (27.3%) developed encephalopathy during the first cycle of the regimen and the remaining 8 patients during the second or more cycles. Seven patients (63.6%) had received at least 1 other FP-containing regimen before without episodes of encephalopathy.All patients recovered soon after immediate discontinuation of chemotherapy and supportive therapies, such as hydration, infusion of branched-chain amino acids, and oral lactulose intake, with a median time to recovery of 2 days (range: encephalopathy due to S-1 monotherapy, received modified FOLFOX-6 therapy without encephalopathy later.FP-associated acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy is extremely rare, but a possible event at any time and even during the administration of oral FP agents. Particular attention is warranted when giving FP-based therapy for patients with aggravating factors, such as sarcopenia. This

  6. Uremic Encephalopathy with Atypical Magnetic Resonance Features on Diffusion-Weighted Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Eu Gene; Jeon, Se Jeong; Choi, See Sung

    2012-01-01

    Uremic encephalopathy is a well-known disease with typical MR findings including bilateral vasogenic or cytotoxic edema at the cerebral cortex or basal ganglia. Involvement of the basal ganglia has been very rarely reported, typically occurring in uremic-diabetic patients. We recently treated a patient who had non-diabetic uremic encephalopathy with an atypical lesion distribution involving the supratentorial white matter, without cortical or basal ganglia involvement. To the best of our knowledge, this is only the second reported case of non-diabetic uremic encephalopathy with atypical MR findings.

  7. Uremic Encephalopathy with Atypical Magnetic Resonance Features on Diffusion-Weighted Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Eu Gene; Jeon, Se Jeong; Choi, See Sung [Dept. of Radiology, Wonkwang University School of Medicine and Hospital, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    Uremic encephalopathy is a well-known disease with typical MR findings including bilateral vasogenic or cytotoxic edema at the cerebral cortex or basal ganglia. Involvement of the basal ganglia has been very rarely reported, typically occurring in uremic-diabetic patients. We recently treated a patient who had non-diabetic uremic encephalopathy with an atypical lesion distribution involving the supratentorial white matter, without cortical or basal ganglia involvement. To the best of our knowledge, this is only the second reported case of non-diabetic uremic encephalopathy with atypical MR findings.

  8. Severe posterior reversible encephalopathy in pheochromocytoma: Importance of susceptibility-weighted MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serter, Asil; Alkan, Alpay; Aralasmak, Ayse; Kocakoc, Ercan [Dept. of Radiology, Bezmialem Vakif University School of Medicine, Istanbul (Turkmenistan)

    2013-10-15

    Pheochromocytoma is a rare cause of hypertension in children. Hypertension is one of the common reasons of posterior reversible encephalopathy. Intracerebral hemorrhage is a serious and unexpected complication of hypertensive encephalopathy due to pheochromocytoma, and very rarely seen in the childhood. Intracerebral hemorrhages should be searched if there are hypertensive reversible signal changes on the brain. Susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) is a more sensitive method than conventional MRI when demonstrating cerebral microhemorrhagic foci. This is the first report of SWI findings on intracerebral hemorrhages in basal ganglia, brain stem and periventricular white matter due to hypertensive encephalopathy in a child with pheochromocytoma.

  9. The neuropathology of sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Ann C; Daneshvar, Daniel H; Alvarez, Victor E; Stein, Thor D

    2014-01-01

    The benefits of regular exercise, physical fitness and sports participation on cardiovascular and brain health are undeniable. Physical activity reduces the risk for cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and stroke, and produces beneficial effects on cholesterol levels, antioxidant systems, inflammation, and vascular function. Exercise also enhances psychological health, reduces age-related loss of brain volume, improves cognition, reduces the risk of developing dementia, and impedes neurodegeneration. Nonetheless, the play of sports is associated with risks, including a risk for mild TBI (mTBI) and, rarely, catastrophic traumatic injury and death. There is also growing awareness that repetitive mTBIs, such as concussion and subconcussion, can occasionally produce persistent cognitive, behavioral, and psychiatric problems as well as lead to the development of a neurodegeneration, chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). In this review, we summarize the beneficial aspects of sports participation on psychological, emotional, physical and cognitive health, and specifically analyze some of the less common adverse neuropathological outcomes, including concussion, second-impact syndrome, juvenile head trauma syndrome, catastrophic sudden death, and CTE. CTE is a latent neurodegeneration clinically associated with behavioral changes, executive dysfunction and cognitive impairments, and pathologically characterized by frontal and temporal lobe atrophy, neuronal and axonal loss, and abnormal deposits of paired helical filament (PHF)-tau and 43 kDa TAR deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-binding protein (TDP-43). CTE often occurs as a sole diagnosis, but may be associated with other neurodegenerative disorders, including motor neuron disease (CTE-MND). Although the incidence and prevalence of CTE are not known, CTE has been reported most frequently in American football players and boxers. Other sports associated with CTE include ice hockey, professional

  10. Newborns Referred for Therapeutic Hypothermia: Association between Initial Degree of Encephalopathy and Severity of Brain Injury (What About the Newborns with Mild Encephalopathy on Admission?).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagne-Loranger, Maude; Sheppard, Megan; Ali, Nabeel; Saint-Martin, Christine; Wintermark, Pia

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article was to describe the severity of brain injury and/or mortality in a cohort of newborns referred for therapeutic hypothermia, in relation to the degree of encephalopathy on admission, and to especially look at the ones with initial mild encephalopathy. Term newborns with perinatal depression referred to our neonatal intensive care unit for possible hypothermia treatment from 2008 to 2012 were enrolled prospectively. The modified Sarnat score on admission was correlated with severity of brain injury on brain imaging and/or autopsy. A total of 215 newborns were referred for possible cooling. Sixty percent (128/215) were cooled. Most of the not-cooled newborns with an available brain magnetic resonance imaging (85% = 50/59) had an initial mild encephalopathy, and 40% (20/50) developed brain injury. Some cooled newborns had an initial mild encephalopathy (12% = 13/108); only 31% (4/13) developed brain injury. Our results demonstrated that several newborns with an initial mild encephalopathy developed subsequent brain injury, especially when they were not cooled. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  11. Relation between traumatic experience and post-traumatic symptomatics in Lithuanian Afghanistan war veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Domanskaitė Gota, Vėjūnė; Gailienė, Danutė; Kazlauskas, Evaldas

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to assess what potential traumatic life-events and experiences are related to PTSD in the Lithuanian Afghanistan war veterans (N = 174). [...]. The following variables were investigated: demographics, traumatic life-events or conditions, PTSD and sub-clinical level of PTSD.The Lithuanian Afghanistan war veterans with PTSD and sub-clinical level of PTSD reported significantly more lifetime traumatic events and conditions. The average number of traumatic events per man ...

  12. Bovine spongiform encephalopathy and spatial analysis of the feed industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Mathilde; Abrial, David; Jarrige, Nathalie; Rican, Stéphane; Garrido, Myriam; Calavas, Didier; Ducrot, Christian

    2007-06-01

    In France, despite the ban of meat-and-bone meal (MBM) in cattle feed, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) was detected in hundreds of cattle born after the ban. To study the role of MBM, animal fat, and dicalcium phosphate on the risk for BSE after the feed ban, we conducted a spatial analysis of the feed industry. We used data from 629 BSE cases as well as data on use of each byproduct and market area of the feed factories. We mapped risk for BSE in 951 areas supplied by the same factories and connection with use of byproducts. A disease map of BSE with covariates was built with the hierarchical Bayesian modeling methods, based on Poisson distribution with spatial smoothing. Only use of MBM was spatially linked to risk for BSE, which highlights cross-contamination as the most probable source of infection after the feed ban.

  13. Bruxism Associated with Anoxic Encephalopathy: Successful Treatment with Baclofen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bruce Janati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Bruxism is a movement disorder characterized by grinding and clenching of the teeth. Etiology of bruxism can be divided into three groups: psychosocial factors, peripheral factors, and pathophysiological factors. Methods. The clinical investigation was conducted at King Khaled Hospital in Hail, Saudi Arabia, in 2012. Results. A 16-year-old Saudi female was brought to the hospital in a comatose state and with generalized convulsive seizures secondary to acute anoxic encephalopathy. In the third week of hospitalization, while still in a state of akinetic mutism, she developed incessant bruxism which responded favorably to a GABA receptor agonist (baclofen. Conclusion. Our data support the hypothesis that bruxism emanates from imbalance or dysregulation of the neurotransmitter system. Larger scale studies will be needed to confirm this hypothesis.

  14. CT perfusion imaging in the management of posterior reversible encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casey, S.O.; McKinney, A.; Teksam, M.; Liu, H.; Truwit, C.L.

    2004-01-01

    A 13-year-old girl with a renal transplant presented with hypertension and seizures. CT and MRI demonstrated typical bilateral parietal, occipital and posterior frontal cortical and subcortical edema, thought to represent posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. The cause was presumed to be hypertension. Antihypertensive therapy was started, lowering of the blood pressure in the range of 110-120 mmHg systolic. However, stable xenon (Xe) CT perfusion imaging revealed ischemia within the left parietal occipital region. The antihypertensive was adjusted which increased both the systolic and diastolic blood pressure by 31 mm Hg. The patient was re-imaged with Xe CT and was found to have resolution of the ischemic changes within the left parietal occipital region. In this report, we present a case in which stable Xe CT was used to monitor the degree of cerebral perfusion and guide titration of antihypertensive therapy. Such brain perfusion monitoring may have helped to prevent infarction of our patient. (orig.)

  15. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: An atypical postpartum complication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debashish Paul

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES is presented by headache, altered mental status, blurring of vision, vomiting and seizure in conjunction with radiological finding of posterior cerebral white matter edema. Data suggest that most cases occur in young middle-aged with marked female preponderance, hypertension being the most common cause. In this case, it was diagnosed in a normotensive patient in the postnatal period that underwent cesarean section. The initial symptoms had misled toward a diagnosis of postdural puncture headache. Symptomatic treatment was started immediately in the ICU. This is an interesting case as the patient was a normotensive one without any other contributory factors and there was unanticipated delay in diagnosing the case until the time we could get a magnetic resonance imaging report.

  16. Evaluating and treating neurobehavioral symptoms in professional American football players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possin, Katherine L.; Hess, Christopher P.; Huang, Eric J.; Grinberg, Lea T.; Nolan, Amber L.; Cohn-Sheehy, Brendan I.; Ghosh, Pia M.; Lanata, Serggio; Merrilees, Jennifer; Kramer, Joel H.; Berger, Mitchel S.; Miller, Bruce L.; Yaffe, Kristine; Rabinovici, Gil D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary In the aftermath of multiple high-profile cases of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in professional American football players, physicians in clinical practice are likely to face an increasing number of retired football players seeking evaluation for chronic neurobehavioral symptoms. Guidelines for the evaluation and treatment of these patients are sparse. Clinical criteria for a diagnosis of CTE are under development. The contribution of CTE vs other neuropathologies to neurobehavioral symptoms in these players remains unclear. Here we describe the experience of our academic memory clinic in evaluating and treating a series of 14 self-referred symptomatic players. Our aim is to raise awareness in the neurology community regarding the different clinical phenotypes, idiosyncratic but potentially treatable symptoms, and the spectrum of underlying neuropathologies in these players. PMID:26336629

  17. Compare Of the West Syndrome with Other Syndromes in the Epileptic Encephalopathy - Kosovo Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naim Zeka

    2017-11-01

    CONCLUSION: WS is a frequent disease of the encephalopathies with the epileptogenic framework. The resistance in anticonvulsive therapy is huge, and psychomotoric retardation follows a big percentage of children with this syndrome.

  18. De novo mutations in synaptic transmission genes including DNM1 cause epileptic encephalopathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    in five individuals and de novo mutations in GABBR2, FASN, and RYR3 in two individuals each. Unlike previous studies, this cohort is sufficiently large to show a significant excess of de novo mutations in epileptic encephalopathy probands compared to the general population using a likelihood analysis (p...... = 8.2 × 10(-4)), supporting a prominent role for de novo mutations in epileptic encephalopathies. We bring statistical evidence that mutations in DNM1 cause epileptic encephalopathy, find suggestive evidence for a role of three additional genes, and show that at least 12% of analyzed individuals have...... analyzed exome-sequencing data of 356 trios with the "classical" epileptic encephalopathies, infantile spasms and Lennox Gastaut syndrome, including 264 trios previously analyzed by the Epi4K/EPGP consortium. In this expanded cohort, we find 429 de novo mutations, including de novo mutations in DNM1...

  19. Prognostic Value of Cytochrome C and Cytokines in Acute Viral Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Serum cytochrome c and cytokines were evaluated as prognostic predictors in 29 children (ages 9 mos to 9 yrs 11 mos with viral acute encephalopathies and multiple organ failure at Fukushima Medical University School of Medicine, Japan.

  20. Wernicke’s encephalopathy associated with liver abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Rajesh; Garg, Vipul

    2017-07-31

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is a rare neurological disorder caused by thiamine deficiency, characterised by ocular motor dysfunction, ataxia and impairment in consciousness. It predominantly affects brain regions with a high metabolic rate such as mammillary bodies, medial thalamic nuclei, the tectal region and the cerebellum. Although chronic alcoholism is the most common cause of Wernicke's encephalopathy, various other conditions not related to alcohol consumption such as bariatric surgery, acute pancreatitis, hyperemesis gravidarum, prolonged fasting and gastrointestinal surgery have been implicated in its aetiology. We report the case of a patient who underwent surgery for liver abscess and subsequently developed Wernicke's encephalopathy; he showed a positive response to thiamine supplementation. This is the first report describing liver abscess as the cause of Wernicke's encephalopathy. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  1. Human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies in eleven countries: Diagnostic pattern across time, 1993-2002

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. de Pedro-Cuesta (Jesús); M. Glatzel (Markus); J. Almazán (Javier); K. Stoeck (Katharina); V. Mellina (Vittorio); M. Puopolo (Maria); M. Pocchiari (Maurizio); I. Zerr (Inga); H.A. Kretszchmar (Hans); J-P. Brandel (Jean-Philippe); N. Delasnerie-Laupretre (Nicole); A. Alperovitch (Annick); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); P. Sanchez-Juan (Pascual); S.J. Collins (Steven); V. Lewis (Victoria); G.H. Jansen (Gerard); M.B. Coulthart (Michael); E. Gelpi (Ellen); H. Budka (Herbert); E. Mitrová (Eva)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The objective of this study was to describe the diagnostic panorama of human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies across 11 countries. Methods: From data collected for surveillance purposes, we describe annual proportions of deaths due to different human transmissible

  2. Bronchiolitis-associated encephalopathy in critically-ill infants: an underestimated complication?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonucci, Roberto; Chiappe, Stefano; Porcella, Annalisa; Rosatelli, Daniela; Fanos, Vassilios

    2010-05-01

    To investigate the bronchiolitis-associated encephalopathy in critically ill infants. The records of infants with severe bronchiolitis admitted to our intensive care unit between 1991 and 2003 were reviewed. Subjects with underlying neurological disorders were excluded. Encephalopathy was defined as occurrence of seizures or at least two nonconvulsive neurologic manifestations. A semistructured telephone interview investigated long-term neurodevelopmental outcome. Twenty-one infants (11 newborns) were enrolled. All patients required oxygen supplementation and 14 required mechanical ventilation. Encephalopathy occurred in 10 infants, six of whom developed seizures. Encephalopathic infants frequently (six of nine) showed transient EEG abnormalities, and occasionally (one of nine) cranial ultrasound abnormalities. A positive respiratory syncytial virus test was found in five of nine encephalopathic infants. One encephalopathic patient died, while 20 infants clinically normalised before discharge and showed a good neurodevelopmental outcome. Acute encephalopathy was frequently observed in our patients with severe bronchiolitis. Long-term prognosis of encephalopathic infants was good.

  3. Effect of Neonatal Seizures on Cognitive Outcome of Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The independent effect of clinical neonatal seizures and their treatment on longterm neurodevelopmental outcome in 77 term newborns at risk for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE was determined in a study at University of California San Francisco.

  4. Dextromethorphan in the treatment of early myoclonic encephalopathy evolving into migrating partial seizures in infancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-Hsuan Chien

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Epileptic encephalopathy with suppression-burst in electroencephalography (EEG can evolve into a few types of epileptic syndromes. We present here an unusual case of early myoclonic encephalopathy that evolved into migrating partial seizures in infancy. A female neonate initially had erratic myoclonus movements, hiccups, and a suppression-burst pattern in EEG that was compatible with early myoclonic encephalopathy. The seizures were controlled with dextromethorphan (20 mg/kg, and a suppression-burst pattern in EEG was reverted to relatively normal background activity. However, at 72 days of age, alternating focal tonic seizures, compatible with migrating partial seizures in infancy, were demonstrated by the 24-hour EEG recording. The seizures responded poorly to dextromethorphan. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of early myoclonic encephalopathy evolving into migrating partial seizure in infancy. Whether it represents another age-dependent epilepsy evolution needs more clinical observation.

  5. Long-term cognitive and behavioral consequences of neonatal encephalopathy following perinatal asphyxia: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Handel, M.; Swaab, H.; de Vries, L.S.; Jongmans, M.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/258268743

    2007-01-01

    Neonatal encephalopathy (NE) following perinatal asphyxia (PA) is considered an important cause of later neurodevelopmental impairment in infants born at term. This review discusses long-term consequences for general cognitive functioning, educational achievement, neuropsychological functioning and

  6. Encephalopathy with status epilepticus during sleep (ESES) induced by oxcarbazepine in idiopathic focal epilepsy in childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pavlidis, Elena; Rubboli, Guido; Nikanorova, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Encephalopathy with status epilepticus during sleep (ESES) is an age-related disorder characterized by neuropsychological regression, epilepsy and a typical EEG pattern of continuous epileptiform activity (> 85%) during NREM sleep. Cases of worsening or induction of ESES with phenytoin...

  7. Hypertensive Encephalopathy: Isolated Pons Involvement Mimicking Central Pontine Myelinolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamanagatti, S.; Subramanian, S. [India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India)

    2006-09-15

    MRI of the brain was performed, and it demonstrated an isolated high signal on the T2 weighted and fluid attenuated inversion recovery sequences that involved only the central pons with sparing the periphery. There was no restricted diffusion on diffusion weighted imaging. The differential diagnosis included posterior reversible syndrome and central pontine myelinolysis; however, the blood sodium on admission was normal. The pathogenesis of HE is that the auto-regulatory mechanisms that control the cerebral blood flow are exceeded, resulting in hyper-perfusion. The consequent over-distension of the cerebral vessels, the breakdown of the blood brain barrier and ultimately, the extravasation of fluid into the interstitium all cause vasogenic edema. In most cases, the changes of hypertensive encephalopathy represent reversible vasogenic edema, which can be seen on T2-weighted images, and restricted diffusion is not seen on the diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps. Hypertensive encephalopathy that manifests as a reversible increased signal isolated to the pons on T2-weighted images is extremely uncommon. The differential diagnosis for such pontine T2 hyperintensity includes pontine glioma, ischemic and radiation changes (generally irreversible conditions), as well as central pontine myelinolysis (CPM) and demyelinating disorders such as multiple sclerosis, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis and rhomb-encephalitis. In CPM electrolyte imbalances provide a clue for the diagnosis, where as for glioma, there will be an expansion and mass effect. In conclusion, clinical recognition of brainstem HE may be difficult. The features of a lack of correlation between the severity of the radiological abnormality and the clinical status, combined with the rapid resolution following antihypertensive treatment, should suggest the diagnosis. It is important for the radiologist to be familiar with the imaging abnormalities of this life

  8. Hypertensive Encephalopathy: Isolated Pons Involvement Mimicking Central Pontine Myelinolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamanagatti, S.; Subramanian, S.

    2006-01-01

    MRI of the brain was performed, and it demonstrated an isolated high signal on the T2 weighted and fluid attenuated inversion recovery sequences that involved only the central pons with sparing the periphery. There was no restricted diffusion on diffusion weighted imaging. The differential diagnosis included posterior reversible syndrome and central pontine myelinolysis; however, the blood sodium on admission was normal. The pathogenesis of HE is that the auto-regulatory mechanisms that control the cerebral blood flow are exceeded, resulting in hyper-perfusion. The consequent over-distension of the cerebral vessels, the breakdown of the blood brain barrier and ultimately, the extravasation of fluid into the interstitium all cause vasogenic edema. In most cases, the changes of hypertensive encephalopathy represent reversible vasogenic edema, which can be seen on T2-weighted images, and restricted diffusion is not seen on the diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps. Hypertensive encephalopathy that manifests as a reversible increased signal isolated to the pons on T2-weighted images is extremely uncommon. The differential diagnosis for such pontine T2 hyperintensity includes pontine glioma, ischemic and radiation changes (generally irreversible conditions), as well as central pontine myelinolysis (CPM) and demyelinating disorders such as multiple sclerosis, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis and rhomb-encephalitis. In CPM electrolyte imbalances provide a clue for the diagnosis, where as for glioma, there will be an expansion and mass effect. In conclusion, clinical recognition of brainstem HE may be difficult. The features of a lack of correlation between the severity of the radiological abnormality and the clinical status, combined with the rapid resolution following antihypertensive treatment, should suggest the diagnosis. It is important for the radiologist to be familiar with the imaging abnormalities of this life

  9. Encefalopatías espongiformes transmisibles Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge E Delgado-Hachmeister

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Las encefalopatías espongiformes transmisibles (EET han cobrado gran importancia en los últimos años. Principalmente por el surgimiento de la encefalopatía espongiforme del bovino (EEB y la nueva variante de la ermedad de Creutzfeldt-Jakob (nvECJ, esta última probablemente adquirida por la ingesta de carne de bovino contaminada. Hasta la fecha se ha informado de 109 casos de la nvECJ en el humano y la gran mayoría de los casos ha ocurrido en el Reino Unido. No se sabe la magnitud real que podrán tener las EET en el humano, sin embargo algunos piensan que nos encontramos en el principio de una pandemia de la nvECJ. En el presente artículo se discuten varios aspectos de las EET y métodos para la prevención de la transmisión de estas enfermedades, tanto en rumiantes como en el humano.Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE are a group of diseases which have received a lot of attention in recent years. The interest on these diseases has been stimulated by the appearance of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE and the new variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (nvCJD; the latter is likely to be acquired by ingesting contaminated beef. Until now 109 cases of nvCJD have been reported, most of them occurring in the United Kingdom. Some experts think that this is the beginning of a nvCJD pandemic. Deep knowledge of the mechanisms of transmission of TSE is needed to prevent the emergence of a TSE pandemic in humans.We address various aspects of TSE and discuss prevention methods of TSE in ruminants and humans.

  10. Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy after Bee Sting and Treatment with Zolpidem: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turgay Demir

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE, a metabolic encephalopathy, develops as a result of cessation or reduction of oxygen and blood flow to the brain. The clinical picture may vary in severity from minimal neurologic deficits to coma. In living patients, permanent neuropsychological sequelae can develop. Herein, we present a case of HIE that occured after anaphylactic reaction due to bee sting, which was treatedm with zolpidem.

  11. More than meets the eye: infant presenting with hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Kuntal; Agarwal, Rajkumar

    2018-04-05

    We report a newborn infant who presented with poor Apgar scores and umbilical artery acidosis leading to the diagnosis of hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy. During the course of the infant's hospitalisation, subsequent workup revealed an underlying genetic cause that masqueraded as hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  12. Acute necrotising encephalopathy of childhood after exanthema subitum outside Japan or Taiwan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porto, L.; Lanferman, H.; Moeller-Hartmann, W.; Jacobi, G.; Zanella, F. [Inst. fuer Neuroradiologie, Klinikum der Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Univ., Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    1999-10-01

    Acute necrotising encephalopathy of childhood (ANE) is an uncommon disease which predominantly affects infants and young children living in Japan and Taiwan. A multifocal encephalopathy with symmetrical lesions in the thalamus, tegmentum of the brain stem, cerebral periventricular white matter and cerebellar medulla is characteristic. We present the imaging features in a 4-year-old Japanese boy who had been living in Germany for 2{sup 1}/{sub 2} years before presentation. (orig.)

  13. Recurrent occurrences of CDKL5 mutations in patients with epileptic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Shimojima, Keiko; Kimura, Nobusuke; Mogami, Yukiko; Usui, Daisuke; Takayama, Rumiko; Ikeda, Hiroko; Imai, Katsumi

    2015-01-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 gene (CDKL5) is recognized as one of the genes responsible for epileptic encephalopathy. We identified CDKL5 mutations in five Japanese patients (one male and four female) with epileptic encephalopathy. Although all mutations were of de novo origin, they were located in the same positions as previously reported pathogenic mutations. These recurrent occurrences of de novo mutations in the same loci may indicate hot spots of nucleotide alteration.

  14. OUTCOMES in CHILDHOOD FOLLOWING THERAPEUTIC HYPOTHERMIA for NEONATAL HYPOXIC-ISCHEMIC ENCEPHALOPATHY (HIE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Girija; Pappas, Athina; Shankaran, Seetha

    2017-01-01

    In this chapter we review the childhood outcomes of neonates with birth depression and/or hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. The outcomes of these children prior to the era of hypothermia for neuroprotection will first be summarized, followed by discussion of results from randomized controlled trials of therapeutic hypothermia for neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. The predictors of outcome in childhood following neonatal HIE using clinical and imaging biomarkers following hypothermia therapy will be described. PMID:27863707

  15. Outcomes in childhood following therapeutic hypothermia for neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Girija; Pappas, Athina; Shankaran, Seetha

    2016-12-01

    In this article, we review the childhood outcomes of neonates with birth depression and/or hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. The outcomes of these children prior to the era of hypothermia for neuroprotection will first be summarized, followed by discussion of results from randomized controlled trials of therapeutic hypothermia for neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. The predictors of outcome in childhood following neonatal HIE using clinical and imaging biomarkers following hypothermia therapy will be described. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Early Prediction and Outcome of Septic Encephalopathy in Acute Stroke Patients With Nosocomial Coma

    OpenAIRE

    Tong, Dao-Ming; Zhou, Ye-Ting; Wang, Guang-Sheng; Chen, Xiao-Dong; Yang, Tong-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Background Septic encephalopathy (SE) is the most common acute encephalopathy in ICU; however, little attention has been focused on risk of SE in the course of acute stroke. Our aim is to investigate the early prediction and outcome of SE in stroke patients with nosocomial coma (NC). Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted in an ICU of the tertiary teaching hospital in China from January 2006 to December 2009. Ninety-four acute stroke patients with NC were grouped according to with...

  17. The thalamus in cirrhotic patients with and without hepatic encephalopathy: A volumetric MRI study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao, Ran; Zhang, Jiuquan; You, Zhonglan; Wei, Luqing; Fan, Yi; Cui, Jinguo; Wang, Jian

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims: The thalamus is a major relay and filter station in the central neural system. Some previous studies have suggested that the thalamus maybe implicated in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. The aim of our study was to investigate changing thalamic volumes in cirrhotic patients with and without hepatic encephalopathy. Methods: Neuropsychological tests and structural MR scanning were performed on 24 cirrhotic patients, 23 cirrhotic patients with minimal hepatic encephalopathy, 24 cirrhotic patients during their first episode of overt hepatic encephalopathy, and 33 healthy controls. Voxel-based morphometry analysis was performed to detect gray matter morphological changes. The thalamus and whole brain volume were extrapolated. A receiver operating characteristic curve analysis of thalamic volumes was used to discriminate patients with minimal hepatic encephalopathy from those with hepatic cirrhosis. Results: Thalamic volume increased in a stepwise manner in patients with progressively worse stages of hepatic encephalopathy compared to healthy subjects. Additionally, a comparison of gray matter morphometry between patients with Child–Pugh grades A, B, or C and controls revealed a progression in thalamic volumes in parallel with the degree of liver failure. Moreover, thalamic volume was significantly correlated with the number connection test A time and digit-symbol test score in cirrhotic patients with minimal hepatic encephalopathy (r = 0.659, P = 0.001; r = −0.577, P = 0.004; respectively). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.827 (P = 0.001). Conclusions: A significantly increased thalamic volume may be provide an objective imaging measure for predicting seizures due to minimal hepatic encephalopathy in cirrhotic patients

  18. The thalamus in cirrhotic patients with and without hepatic encephalopathy: A volumetric MRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Ran, E-mail: taoran1648@yahoo.cn [Department of Radiology, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Department of Radiology, Bethune International Peace Hospital of People' s Liberty Army, Shijiazhuang 050082, Hebei Province (China); Zhang, Jiuquan, E-mail: jiuquanzhang@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); You, Zhonglan, E-mail: you_zhonglan@163.com [Department of Infectious Diseases, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Wei, Luqing, E-mail: weiluqing@foxmail.com [Department of Radiology, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Fan, Yi, E-mail: fanyi1978@yahoo.cn [Department of Infectious Diseases, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Cui, Jinguo, E-mail: cuijinguo2005@163.com [Department of Radiology, Bethune International Peace Hospital of People' s Liberty Army, Shijiazhuang 050082, Hebei Province (China); Wang, Jian, E-mail: wangjian_811@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China)

    2013-11-01

    Background and aims: The thalamus is a major relay and filter station in the central neural system. Some previous studies have suggested that the thalamus maybe implicated in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. The aim of our study was to investigate changing thalamic volumes in cirrhotic patients with and without hepatic encephalopathy. Methods: Neuropsychological tests and structural MR scanning were performed on 24 cirrhotic patients, 23 cirrhotic patients with minimal hepatic encephalopathy, 24 cirrhotic patients during their first episode of overt hepatic encephalopathy, and 33 healthy controls. Voxel-based morphometry analysis was performed to detect gray matter morphological changes. The thalamus and whole brain volume were extrapolated. A receiver operating characteristic curve analysis of thalamic volumes was used to discriminate patients with minimal hepatic encephalopathy from those with hepatic cirrhosis. Results: Thalamic volume increased in a stepwise manner in patients with progressively worse stages of hepatic encephalopathy compared to healthy subjects. Additionally, a comparison of gray matter morphometry between patients with Child–Pugh grades A, B, or C and controls revealed a progression in thalamic volumes in parallel with the degree of liver failure. Moreover, thalamic volume was significantly correlated with the number connection test A time and digit-symbol test score in cirrhotic patients with minimal hepatic encephalopathy (r = 0.659, P = 0.001; r = −0.577, P = 0.004; respectively). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.827 (P = 0.001). Conclusions: A significantly increased thalamic volume may be provide an objective imaging measure for predicting seizures due to minimal hepatic encephalopathy in cirrhotic patients.

  19. Reversible encephalopathy syndrome: report of 12 cases with follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greco Crasto, S.; Sardo, P.; Davini, O.; Rizzo, L.; De Lucchi, R.

    2004-01-01

    We report the clinical and neuroradiological features of reversible encephalopathy syndrome and follow-up results in 12 patients. This syndrome seems to be the result of an acute encephalopathy showing with brain edema mainly in the white matter (vasogenic edema). Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images are useful to distinguish this entity from acute ischemia. Early recognition and treatment often lead to complete neurological recovery. If unrecognized, the patient's condition can progress to central nervous system failure. (orig.)

  20. Acute necrotising encephalopathy of childhood after exanthema subitum outside Japan or Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porto, L.; Lanferman, H.; Moeller-Hartmann, W.; Jacobi, G.; Zanella, F.

    1999-01-01

    Acute necrotising encephalopathy of childhood (ANE) is an uncommon disease which predominantly affects infants and young children living in Japan and Taiwan. A multifocal encephalopathy with symmetrical lesions in the thalamus, tegmentum of the brain stem, cerebral periventricular white matter and cerebellar medulla is characteristic. We present the imaging features in a 4-year-old Japanese boy who had been living in Germany for 2 1 / 2 years before presentation. (orig.)

  1. Prodominant hypertensive brainstem encephalopathy with supratentorial involvement: Case report and literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Hee; Park, Sung Tae; Lim, Hyun Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University Hospital, Soonchunhyang University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Tae; Cha, Ji Hoon [Dept. of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    Hypertensive encephalopathy typically presents with bilateral parietooccipital vasogenic edema. Brainstem and cerebellar edema are uncommon in association with typical supratentorial changes. We experienced three cases of atypical hypertensive encephalopathy involving brainstem and cerebellum as well as cerebral white matter, which showed characteristic alternating linear bright and low signals in the pons, the so-called 'stripe sign'. We report these cases here with a brief literature review.

  2. Neonatal encephalopathy and socioeconomic status: population-based case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blume, Heidi K; Loch, Christian M; Li, Christopher I

    2007-07-01

    To investigate the association between maternal socioeconomic status and the risk of encephalopathy in full-term newborns. Population-based case-control study. Washington State births from 1994 through 2002 recorded in the linked Washington State Birth Registry and Comprehensive Hospital Abstract Reporting System. Cases (n = 1060) were singleton full-term newborns with Comprehensive Hospital Abstract Reporting System International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision diagnoses of seizures, birth asphyxia, central nervous system dysfunction, or cerebral irritability. Control cases (n = 5330) were singleton full-term newborns selected from the same database. Main Exposures Socioeconomic status was defined by median income of the census tract of the mother's residence, number of years of maternal educational achievement, or maternal insurance status. Odds ratios estimating the risk of encephalopathy associated with disadvantaged socioeconomic status were calculated in 3 separate analyses using multivariate adjusted logistic regression. Newborns of mothers living in neighborhoods in which residents have a low median income were at increased risk of encephalopathy compared with newborns in neighborhoods in which residents have a median income more than 3 times the poverty level (adjusted odds ratio, 1.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.5-2.3). There was also a trend for increasing risk of encephalopathy associated with decreasing neighborhood income (PNewborns of mothers with less than 12 years of educational achievement had a higher risk of encephalopathy compared with newborns of mothers with more than 16 years of educational achievement (adjusted odds ratio, 1.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-2.3). Newborns of mothers receiving public insurance also had a higher risk of encephalopathy compared with newborns of mothers who have commercial insurance (adjusted odds ratio, 1.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-1.7). Disadvantaged socioeconomic status was independently

  3. Heat stress presenting with encephalopathy and MRI findings of diffuse cerebral injury and hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Waldo R; Varghese, Shaun; Savitz, Sean; Wu, Tzu Ching

    2013-06-17

    Heat stress results in multiorgan failure and CNS injury. There a few case reports in the literature on the neurological consequences of heat stress. We describe a patient with heat stress presenting with encephalopathy and bilateral cerebral, cerebellar, and thalamic lesions and intraventricular hemorrhage on MRI. Heat stress should be in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with encephalopathy and elevated serum inflammatory markers especially if the history suggests a preceding episode of hyperthermia.

  4. Catecholamines in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    CONTRACT NUMBER Catecholamines in post - traumatic stress disorder 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-08-1-0327 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d...emotionally arousing experiences are typically vivid and persistent. The recurrent, intrusive memories of traumatic events in post - traumatic stress disorder ...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-08-1-0327 TITLE: Catecholamines in post - traumatic stress

  5. Influenza-associated Encephalitis/Encephalopathy Identified by the Australian Childhood Encephalitis Study 2013-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Philip N; Dale, Russell C; Blyth, Christopher C; Macartney, Kristine; Crawford, Nigel W; Marshall, Helen; Clark, Julia E; Elliott, Elizabeth J; Webster, Richard I; Cheng, Allen C; Booy, Robert; Jones, Cheryl A

    2017-11-01

    Influenza-associated encephalitis/encephalopathy (IAE) is an important cause of acute encephalitis syndrome in children. IAE includes a series of clinicoradiologic syndromes or acute encephalopathy syndromes that have been infrequently reported outside East Asia. We aimed to describe cases of IAE identified by the Australian Childhood Encephalitis study. Children ≤ 14 years of age with suspected encephalitis were prospectively identified in 5 hospitals in Australia. Demographic, clinical, laboratory, imaging, and outcome at discharge data were reviewed by an expert panel and cases were categorized by using predetermined case definitions. We extracted cases associated with laboratory identification of influenza virus for this analysis; among these cases, specific IAE syndromes were identified where clinical and radiologic features were consistent with descriptions in the published literature. We identified 13 cases of IAE during 3 southern hemisphere influenza seasons at 5 tertiary children's hospitals in Australia; 8 children with specific acute encephalopathy syndromes including: acute necrotizing encephalopathy, acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late diffusion restriction, mild encephalopathy with reversible splenial lesion, and hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia syndrome. Use of influenza-specific antiviral therapy and prior influenza vaccination were infrequent. In contrast, death or significant neurologic morbidity occurred in 7 of the 13 children (54%). The conditions comprising IAE are heterogeneous with varied clinical features, magnetic resonance imaging changes, and outcomes. Overall, outcome of IAE is poor emphasizing the need for optimized prevention, early recognition, and empiric management.

  6. Population pharmacokinetics of phenobarbital in infants with neonatal encephalopathy treated with therapeutic hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shellhaas, Renée A; Ng, Chee M; Dillon, Christina H; Barks, John D E; Bhatt-Mehta, Varsha

    2013-02-01

    Phenobarbital is the first-line treatment for neonatal seizures. Many neonates with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy are treated with therapeutic hypothermia, and about 40% have clinical seizures. Little is known about the pharmacokinetics of phenobarbital in infants with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy who undergo therapeutic hypothermia. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of therapeutic hypothermia on phenobarbital pharmacokinetics, taking into account maturational changes. Level 3 neonatal ICU. Infants with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy and suspected seizures, all treated with phenobarbital. Some of these infants also received treatment with therapeutic hypothermia. None. A retrospective cohort study of 39 infants with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy treated with phenobarbital (20 were treated with therapeutic hypothermia and 19 were not). Data on phenobarbital plasma concentrations were collected in 39 subjects with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy with or without therapeutic hypothermia. Using nonlinear mixed-effects modeling, population pharmacokinetics of phenobarbital were developed with a total of 164 plasma concentrations. A one-compartment model best described the pharmacokinetics. The clearance of phenobarbital was linearly related to body weight and matured with increasing age with a maturation half-life of 22.1 days. Therapeutic hypothermia did not influence the pharmacokinetic parameters of phenobarbital. Therapeutic hypothermia does not influence the clearance of phenobarbital after accounting for weight and age. Standard phenobarbital dosing is appropriate for the initial treatment of seizures in neonates with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy treated with therapeutic hypothermia.

  7. Efficacy of Rifaximin in Prevention of Recurrence of Hepatic Encephalopathy in Patients with Cirrhosis of Liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, B.; Zaidi, Y. A.; Alam, A.; Anjum, H. S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the efficacy of Rifaximin in prevention of repeated episodes of hepatic encephalopathy in patients with liver cirrhosis as compared to placebo. Study Design: Triple-blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Gastroenterology-Hepatology, Shaikh Zayed Hospital, Lahore, from October 2012 to April 2013. Methodology: Patients in remission from recurrent hepatic encephalopathy resulting from cirrhosis were randomly assigned to receive either Rifaximin, at a dose of 550 mg twice daily (63 patients), or placebo (63 patients.) Patients were requested to take the drug orally twice daily for 6 months or until they developed a breakthrough episode of hepatic encephalopathy. Results: Mean age of patients in treatment and control group was 40.21 A +- 2.33 years and 42.87 A +- 4.54 years respectively. The most common etiology of cirrhosis was hepatitis C followed by hepatitis B. Patients who remained free of hepatic encephalopathy during study period were 40 out of 63 patients in control group and 35 patients out of 63 patients (p = 0.56). Most of the patients who developed breakthrough hepatic encephalopathy had a MELD score range of 21-25 in both groups. The number of deaths and adverse events was similar in both groups. Conclusion: Over a 6-month period, treatment with Rifaximin failed to maintain remission from hepatic encephalopathy more effectively than placebo in the studied group. (author)

  8. Traumatic brain injury : from impact to rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halliday, J.; Absalom, A. R.

    Traumatic brain injury is a significant cause of mortality and morbidity in our society, particularly among the young. This review discusses the pathophysiology of traumatic brain injury, and current management from the acute phase through to rehabilitation of the traumatic brain injury patient.

  9. Traumatic Childhood Events and Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerns, Connor Morrow; Newschaffer, Craig J.; Berkowitz, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic childhood events are associated with a wide range of negative physical, psychological and adaptive outcomes over the life course and are one of the few identifiable causes of psychiatric illness. Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may be at increased risk for both encountering traumatic events and developing traumatic sequelae;…

  10. Bilateral Occipital Lobe Hemorrhages Presenting as Denial of Blindness in Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome- A Rare Combination of Anton Syndrome and Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godasi, Raja; Rupareliya, Chintan; Bollu, Pradeep C

    2017-10-04

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) or reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy (RPL) is an acute neurological syndrome characterized by the development of radiological abnormalities on brain imaging along with clinical manifestations, such as a headache, seizures, encephalopathy, etc. We report the case of a middle-aged male who presented to the emergency department after he woke up with complete blindness and was found to have hemorrhagic PRES. Intracranial hemorrhages were seen in around 15% of patients who presented with this condition. In this article, we review the different types of hemorrhages seen in the setting of PRES and their associations.

  11. Thyroid abscess following traumatic intubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc A. Polacco, MD

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid abscess is a rare condition, and consequently diagnosis is often delayed. Causes include 3rd and 4th branchial cleft anomalies, hematogenous spread of infection, trauma from esophageal foreign body, and fine needle aspiration. Thyroid abscesses carry potential morbidity with thyroid and parathyroid gland destruction, tracheal compression, tracheal or esophageal fistula, internal jugular vein thrombophlebitis, and sepsis. The authors report a case of a 33-year old woman with a thyroid abscess following traumatic intubation. Thyroid abscess should be considered in patients presenting with anterior neck pain and swelling with a recent history of traumatic intubation, ultrasound or CT with contrast being the ideal diagnostic modalities.

  12. Traumatic primary brain stem haemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrioli, G.C.; Zuccarello, M.; Trincia, G.; Fiore, D.L.; De Caro, R.

    1983-01-01

    We report 36 cases of post-traumatic 'primary brain stem haemorrhage' visualized by the CT scan and confirmed at autopsy. Clinical experience shows that many technical factors influence the inability to visualize brain stem haemorrhages. Experimental injection of fresh blood into the pons and midbrain of cadavers shows that lesions as small as 0.25 ml in volume may be visualized. The volume and the anatomical configuration of traumatic lesions of the brain stem extended over a rostro-caudal direction, and their proximity to bony structures at the base of the skull are obstacles to the visualization of brain stem haemorrhages. (Author)

  13. How to diagnose and manage hepatic encephalopathy: a consensus statement on roles and responsibilities beyond the liver specialist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawcross, Debbie L; Dunk, Arthur A; Jalan, Rajiv; Kircheis, Gerald; de Knegt, Robert J; Laleman, Wim; Ramage, John K; Wedemeyer, Heiner; Morgan, Ian E J

    2016-02-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is defined as brain dysfunction caused by liver insufficiency and/or portosystemic shunting. Symptoms include nonspecific cognitive impairment, personality changes and changes in consciousness. Overt (symptomatic) hepatic encephalopathy is a common complication of cirrhosis that is associated with a poor prognosis. Patients with hepatic encephalopathy may present to healthcare providers who do not have primary responsibility for management of patients with cirrhosis. Therefore, we developed a series of 'consensus points' to provide some guidance on management. Using a modified 'Delphi' process, consensus statements were developed that summarize our recommendations for the diagnosis and management of patients with hepatic encephalopathy. Points on which full consensus could not be reached are also discussed. Our recommendations emphasize the role of all healthcare providers in the identification of cognitive impairment in patients with cirrhosis and provide guidance on steps that might be considered to make a diagnosis of overt hepatic encephalopathy. In addition, treatment recommendations are summarized. Minimal hepatic encephalopathy can have a significant impact on patients; however, in most circumstances identification and management of minimal hepatic encephalopathy remains the responsibility of specialists in liver diseases. Our opinion statements aim to define the roles and responsibilities of all healthcare providers who at times care for patients with cirrhosis and hepatic encephalopathy. We suggest that these recommendations be considered further by colleagues in other disciplines and hope that future guidelines consider the management of patients with cirrhosis and with a 'suspicion' of cognitive impairment through to a formal diagnosis of hepatic encephalopathy.

  14. Subthreshold Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eylem Ozten

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Post-traumatic stress disorder is a very broad category among mental disorders. Since its inclusion in DSM-III, the diagnostic criteria of post-traumatic stress disorder has undergone a number of changes. The diagnosis and treatment of people who have some symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder without meeting full criteria still remains controversial. Although subthreshold post-traumatic stress disorder has been debated since it was first defined, the presence of subthreshold post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms has found to raise the risk for suicidal ideation significantly. This article overviews the definitions of trauma related disorders in history of psychiatry and highlights the need to define subthreshold post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms that were reported to be associated with impairment, comorbidity, and suicidal ideation. Clinical differences between subthreshold and full post-traumatic stress disorder will also be discussed.

  15. Evaluation after Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudel, Tina M.; Halper, James; Pines, Hayley; Cancro, Lorraine

    2010-01-01

    It is important to determine if a traumatic brain injury (TBI) has occurred when an individual is assessed in a hospital emergency room after a car accident, fall, or other injury that affects the head. This determination influences decisions about treatment. It is essential to screen for the injury, because the sooner they begin appropriate…

  16. Traumatic Brain Injury Inpatient Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Brian; Schrer, Marcia J.; Gaeta, Raphael; Elias, Eileen

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBI) can cause multiple medical and functional problems. As the brain is involved in regulating nearly every bodily function, a TBI can affect any part of the body and aspect of cognitive, behavioral, and physical functioning. However, TBI affects each individual differently. Optimal management requires understanding the…

  17. Hypopituitarism in Traumatic Brain Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klose, Marianne; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla

    2015-01-01

    While hypopituitarism after traumatic brain injury (TBI) was previously considered rare, it is now thought to be a major cause of treatable morbidity among TBI survivors. Consequently, recommendations for assessment of pituitary function and replacement in TBI were recently introduced. Given...

  18. Gastric traumatic injuries: CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lassandro, Francesco; Romano, Stefania; Rossi, Giovanni; Muto, Roberto; Cappabianca, Salvatore; Grassi, Roberto

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Gastric blunt traumatic injuries are uncommon and their radiological appearance has been infrequently reported in medical literature. These injuries are difficult to diagnose preoperatively, though they require immediate recognition to minimize their otherwise high mortality and morbidity. The aim of our study is to describe the radiological appearance of blunt gastric traumatic injuries. Materials and methods: Retrospective evaluation of a 25 patients series observed between January 1997 and May 2005. Results: We observed rupture of the stomach in 20% of cases, in 44% of cases a partial lesion of the stomach, in one case a necrotic post-traumatic volvulus, five patients (20%) had benign portal pneumatosis, in three patients the stomach was secondarily involved because of a diaphragmatic hernia. The fundus resulted to be the most frequently damaged part of the stomach (80%). Conclusions: Blunt traumatic injuries need a careful and systematic approach given their economical and social relevance. For these reasons uncommon lesions require attention and may be important to search for specific findings of gastric lesions

  19. Gastric traumatic injuries: CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lassandro, Francesco [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, ' A. Cardarelli' Hospital, I-80131 Naples (Italy)]. E-mail: francesco.lassandro@fastwebnet.it; Romano, Stefania [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, ' A. Cardarelli' Hospital, I-80131 Naples (Italy); Rossi, Giovanni [Department of Radiology, V. Monaldi Hospital, Naples (Italy); Muto, Roberto [Department of Radiology, V. Monaldi Hospital, Naples (Italy); Cappabianca, Salvatore [Magrassi-Lanzara Department, Institute of Radiology, Second University of Naples (Italy); Grassi, Roberto [Magrassi-Lanzara Department, Institute of Radiology, Second University of Naples (Italy)

    2006-09-15

    Objective: Gastric blunt traumatic injuries are uncommon and their radiological appearance has been infrequently reported in medical literature. These injuries are difficult to diagnose preoperatively, though they require immediate recognition to minimize their otherwise high mortality and morbidity. The aim of our study is to describe the radiological appearance of blunt gastric traumatic injuries. Materials and methods: Retrospective evaluation of a 25 patients series observed between January 1997 and May 2005. Results: We observed rupture of the stomach in 20% of cases, in 44% of cases a partial lesion of the stomach, in one case a necrotic post-traumatic volvulus, five patients (20%) had benign portal pneumatosis, in three patients the stomach was secondarily involved because of a diaphragmatic hernia. The fundus resulted to be the most frequently damaged part of the stomach (80%). Conclusions: Blunt traumatic injuries need a careful and systematic approach given their economical and social relevance. For these reasons uncommon lesions require attention and may be important to search for specific findings of gastric lesions.

  20. Nationwide survey of rotavirus-associated encephalopathy and sudden unexpected death in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Yoshiki; Ohashi, Masahiro; Ihira, Masaru; Hashimoto, Shuji; Taniguchi, Koki; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi

    2014-08-01

    Rotavirus can cause severe complications such as encephalopathy/encephalitis and sudden unexpected death. The incidence of rotavirus-associated encephalopathy/encephalitis or sudden unexpected death remains unknown. To clarify the clinical features of rotavirus-associated encephalitis/encephalopathy and sudden unexpected death, we conducted a nationwide survey in Japan. A two-part questionnaire was designed to determine the number of the cases and the clinical features of severe cases of rotavirus infection, including encephalitis/encephalopathy and sudden unexpected death, between 2009 and 2011. Of the 1365 questionnaires sent to hospitals, 963 (70.5%) were returned and eligible for analysis. We determined 58 cases of rotavirus-associated encephalitis/encephalopathy and 7 cases of sudden unexpected death. These patients were diagnosed with rotavirus infection by immunochromatography. Although 36/58 (62.1%) encephalitis/encephalopathy patients had no sequelae, 15/58 (25.9%) patients had neurological sequelae, and 7/58 (12.1%) patients had fatal outcomes. Pleocytosis was observed in 9/40 (22.5%) patients and cerebrospinal fluid protein levels were elevated in only 4/40 (10%) patients. Elevated lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) (>500 IU/L) or acidemia (pHdeath were 44.0 and 4.9 cases in Japan, respectively. Elevated LDH (>500 IU/L) or acidemia (pH<7.15) were related to a poor prognosis of the encephalitis/encephalopathy. Copyright © 2013 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.