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Sample records for traumatic cervical spinal

  1. New Insights from Clinical Assessment of Upper Extremities in Cervical Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury.

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    Carrasco-López, Carmen; Jimenez, Samuel; Mosqueda-Pozon, Maria Carmen; Pérez-Borrego, Yolanda A; Alcobendas-Maestro, Monica; Gallego-Izquierdo, Tomas; Esclarin-Ruz, Ana; Oliviero, Antonio

    2016-09-15

    Upper extremity function has a strong impact on the quality of life in cervical spinal cord-injured patients. Upper extremity function depends on many factors, such as muscle strength, level of lesion, and extension of the cord damage in its axial axis produced by the injury. These variables can be obtained by the International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury, which is the standard for the functional evaluation of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) patients. The aim of this study was to describe the relationship between upper limb muscle strength, level of injury, and axial damage with the functionality of upper limb measured using the Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function Test (JTHFT) and the 9 Hole Peg Test (9HPT) in cervical SCI. Twenty-nine patients were included in this study. Our results suggest that both the JTHFT and 9HPT can be similarly used to quantify functional impairment after cervical SCI. Moreover, our data suggest that the upper extremity motor score, JTHFT, and 9HPT strongly correlate with the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) impairment scale (graded from A to E), but not with the lesion level. Our findings can be of great importance for the clinician or researchers whose therapeutic interventions have as a main objective to improve upper limb functionality in patients with cervical SCI. We suggest that ASIA impairment scale, ASIA motor score, and functional tests (including JTHFT and/or 9HPT) could be used as outcome measures in cervical SCI clinical trials.

  2. Synergistic impact of acute kidney injury and high level of cervical spinal cord injury on the weaning outcome of patients with acute traumatic cervical spinal cord injury.

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    Yu, Wen-Kuang; Ko, Hsin-Kuo; Ho, Li-Ing; Wang, Jia-Horng; Kou, Yu Ru

    2015-07-01

    Respiratory neuromuscular impairment severity is known to predict weaning outcome among patients with cervical spinal cord injury; however, the impact of non-neuromuscular complications remains unexplored. This study was to evaluate possible neuromuscular and non-neuromuscular factors that may negatively impact weaning outcome. From September 2002 to October 2012, acute traumatic cervical spinal cord injury patients who had received mechanical ventilation for >48h were enrolled and divided into successful (n=54) and unsuccessful weaning groups (n=19). Various neuromuscular, non-neuromuscular factors and events during the intensive care unit stay were extracted from medical charts and electronic medical records. Variables presenting with a significant difference (pspinal cord injury (C1-3), lower pulse rates, and lower Glasgow Coma Scale score on admission, higher peak blood urea nitrogen, lower trough albumin, and lower trough blood leukocyte counts. Furthermore, unsuccessful weaning patients had a higher incidence of pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, shock and acute kidney injury during the intensive care unit stay. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed acute kidney injury and high level of cervical spinal cord injury were independent risk factors for failure of weaning. Importantly, patients with both risk factors showed a large increase in odds ratio for unsuccessful weaning from mechanical ventilation (pinjury during the intensive care unit stay and high level of cervical spinal injury are two independent risk factors that synergistically work together producing a negative impact on weaning outcome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Neurological outcome in surgically treated patients with incomplete closed traumatic cervical spinal cord injury.

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    Singhal, B; Mohammed, A; Samuel, J; Mues, J; Kluger, P

    2008-09-01

    Retrospective study based on a reference paper. Neurological outcome in patients who were managed surgically with closed traumatic cervical spine injury was evaluated using the ASIA motor scoring system and Frankel grading. To assess the accuracy of motor charting and Frankel grading as tools to evaluate neurological outcome in closed traumatic cervical spine injury, and also to evaluate how the surgically treated patients fared in their neurological recovery by measurement tools as in the reference paper. National Spinal Injuries Centre, Stoke Mandeville Hospital, Aylesbury, UK. Fifty-seven patients were admitted within 2 days of the injury with closed traumatic cervical spine injuries (1997-2004). Thirty-seven (65%) met the inclusion criteria as per the referenced paper, that is, were treated surgically, were Frankel grade B and above and had at least 12 months follow up. The remaining 20 patients were not included as they did not meet the inclusion criteria. The breakdown of the 20 patients is given in Table 1. The mean recovery percentage (MRP) and mean deficit percentage (MDP) were calculated as per the referenced paper. An evaluation of 37 patients surgically treated, who had follow up of at least 12 months, showed that preservation of pin prick below the level of lesion, and preservation of anal tone and perianal sensation were good prognostic indicators. There was no correlation between degree of encroachment of canal or the degree of kyphosis to MDP or MRP. The mean time from injury to mobilization was 7.6 days in 25 out of 37 patients. Twelve of the 37 patients had prolonged immobilization because of ITU stay or because they were initially treated conservatively. Three out of the 37 patients developed DVT/PE. Mean hospital stay was 6.4 months. The neurological outcome in surgically treated patients is comparable to the conservatively treated patients. The Frankel grading and ASIA motor charting combined is a powerful tool in assessing the neurological

  4. Risk factors for respiratory failure with tetraplegia after acute traumatic cervical spinal cord injury.

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    Song, J; Shao, J; Qi, H-H; Song, D-W; Zhu, W

    2015-01-01

    To analyze risk factors for respiratory failure with tetraplegia after acute traumatic cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI). Total 180 tetraplegia cases after acute traumatic CSCI treated in Shanghai Changzheng Hospital from 2001 to 2011 were reviewed retrospectively and the frequency of respiratory failure in these patients were analyzed against the factors including age, gender, cause of injury, level/severity of injury, high-dose methylprednisolone (MP) therapy, and surgery intervention, using Chi-square test to look into the correlations of the prevalence of respiratory failure to those factors. Of the 180 tetraplegia with acute traumatic CSCI, 29 patients (16.11%) developed respiratory failure. The factors, including age, level and severity of injury, high-dose MP therapy, and surgery intervention, were found to significantly correlate with the appearance of respiratory failure in tetraplegia after acute traumatic CSCI (p < 0.05), while no significant correlation was found between the other factors: gender and cause of injury and the frequency of respiratory failure. Age, level/severity of injury, high-dose MP therapy, and surgery intervention are the four major relevant factors of respiratory failure in patients with acute traumatic CSCI. The appropriate and timing treatments involving high-dose MP therapy and surgical decompression and reconstruction can substantially increase the rates of clinical improvements and reduce the frequency of respiratory failure.

  5. Preexisting severe cervical spinal cord compression is a significant risk factor for severe paralysis development in patients with traumatic cervical spinal cord injury without bone injury: a retrospective cohort study.

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    Oichi, Takeshi; Oshima, Yasushi; Okazaki, Rentaro; Azuma, Seiichi

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate whether preexisting severe cervical spinal cord compression affects the severity of paralysis once patients develop traumatic cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI) without bone injury. We retrospectively investigated 122 consecutive patients with traumatic CSCI without bone injury. The severity of paralysis on admission was assessed by the American Spinal Injury Association impairment scale (AIS). The degree of preexisting cervical spinal cord compression was evaluated by the maximum spinal cord compression (MSCC) and was divided into three categories: minor compression (MSCC ≤ 20 %), moderate compression (20 % paralysis (AIS A-C) on admission. Our study included 103 males and 19 females with mean age of 65 years. Sixty-one patients showed severe paralysis (AIS A-C) on admission. The average MSCC was 22 %. Moderate compression was observed in 41, and severe in 20. Soft-tissue damage was observed in 91. A multivariate analysis showed that severe cervical spinal cord compression significantly affected the severity of paralysis at the time of injury, whereas both mild and moderate compression did not affect it. Soft-tissue damage was also significantly associated with severe paralysis on admission. Preexisting severe cervical cord compression is an independent risk factor for severe paralysis once patients develop traumatic CSCI without bone injury.

  6. Non-contiguous spinal injury in cervical spinal trauma: evaluation with cervical spine MRI

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    Choi, Soo Jung; Shin, Myung Jin; Kim, Sung Moon [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Sang Jin [Sanggyepaik Hospital, Inje University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-12-15

    We wished to evaluate the incidence of non-contiguous spinal injury in the cervicothoracic junction (CTJ) or the upper thoracic spines on cervical spinal MR images in the patients with cervical spinal injuries. Seventy-five cervical spine MR imagings for acute cervical spinal injury were retrospectively reviewed (58 men and 17 women, mean age: 35.3, range: 18-81 years). They were divided into three groups based on the mechanism of injury; axial compression, hyperflexion or hyperextension injury, according to the findings on the MR and CT images. On cervical spine MR images, we evaluated the presence of non-contiguous spinal injury in the CTJ or upper thoracic spine with regard to the presence of marrow contusion or fracture, ligament injury, traumatic disc herniation and spinal cord injury. Twenty-one cases (28%) showed CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injuries (C7-T5) on cervical spinal MR images that were separated from the cervical spinal injuries. Seven of 21 cases revealed overt fractures in the CTJs or upper thoracic spines. Ligament injury in these regions was found in three cases. Traumatic disc herniation and spinal cord injury in these regions were shown in one and two cases, respectively. The incidence of the non-contiguous spinal injuries in CTJ or upper thoracic spines was higher in the axial compression injury group (35.5%) than in the hyperflexion injury group (26.9%) or the hyperextension (25%) injury group. However, there was no statistical significance ({rho} > 0.05). Cervical spinal MR revealed non-contiguous CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injuries in 28% of the patients with cervical spinal injury. The mechanism of cervical spinal injury did not significantly affect the incidence of the non-contiguous CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injury.

  7. Non-contiguous spinal injury in cervical spinal trauma: evaluation with cervical spine MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Soo Jung; Shin, Myung Jin; Kim, Sung Moon; Bae, Sang Jin

    2004-01-01

    We wished to evaluate the incidence of non-contiguous spinal injury in the cervicothoracic junction (CTJ) or the upper thoracic spines on cervical spinal MR images in the patients with cervical spinal injuries. Seventy-five cervical spine MR imagings for acute cervical spinal injury were retrospectively reviewed (58 men and 17 women, mean age: 35.3, range: 18-81 years). They were divided into three groups based on the mechanism of injury; axial compression, hyperflexion or hyperextension injury, according to the findings on the MR and CT images. On cervical spine MR images, we evaluated the presence of non-contiguous spinal injury in the CTJ or upper thoracic spine with regard to the presence of marrow contusion or fracture, ligament injury, traumatic disc herniation and spinal cord injury. Twenty-one cases (28%) showed CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injuries (C7-T5) on cervical spinal MR images that were separated from the cervical spinal injuries. Seven of 21 cases revealed overt fractures in the CTJs or upper thoracic spines. Ligament injury in these regions was found in three cases. Traumatic disc herniation and spinal cord injury in these regions were shown in one and two cases, respectively. The incidence of the non-contiguous spinal injuries in CTJ or upper thoracic spines was higher in the axial compression injury group (35.5%) than in the hyperflexion injury group (26.9%) or the hyperextension (25%) injury group. However, there was no statistical significance (ρ > 0.05). Cervical spinal MR revealed non-contiguous CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injuries in 28% of the patients with cervical spinal injury. The mechanism of cervical spinal injury did not significantly affect the incidence of the non-contiguous CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injury

  8. A comparison of cervical cancer screening rates among women with traumatic spinal cord injury and the general population.

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    Guilcher, Sara J T; Newman, Alice; Jaglal, Susan B

    2010-01-01

    Previous qualitative and survey studies have suggested women with spinal cord injury (SCI) are screened less often for cervical cancer compared with the general population. We investigated whether cervical cancer screening rates differ between population-based women with and without traumatic SCI, matched for age and geography. A double cohort design was used, comparing women with SCI to the general population (1:4) using administrative data for Ontario, Canada. Women with SCI, identified using the Discharge Abstract Database for the fiscal years 1995-1996 to 2001-2002, were female residents of Ontario between the ages of 25 and 66, admitted to an acute care facility with a traumatic SCI (ICD-9 CM code 806 or 952). Women in the general Ontario population were randomly matched by age and geography. Screening rates were calculated from fee codes related to Papanicolaou (Pap) smear tests for a 3-year period preinjury and postinjury. There were 339 women with SCI matched to 1506 women in the general Ontario population. Screening rates pre-SCI were 55% for women with SCI and 57% during this same time period for matched women in the general population; post-SCI rates were 58% for both the two groups. Factors predicting the likelihood of receiving a Pap test for SCI cases included younger age and higher socioeconomic status. Utilization data suggest that there are no significant differences in screening rates for women with SCI compared with the general population. However, screening rates for women with SCI were significantly influenced by age as well as income.

  9. Cervical spinal canal narrowing and cervical neurologi-cal injuries

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    ZHANG Ling

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Cervical spinal canal narrowing can lead to injury of the spinal cord and neurological symptoms in-cluding neck pain, headache, weakness and parasthesisas. According to previous and recent clinical researches, we investigated the geometric parameters of normal cervical spinal canal including the sagittal and transverse diameters as well as Torg ratio. The mean sagittal diameter of cervical spinal canal at C 1 to C 7 ranges from 15.33 mm to 20.46 mm, the mean transverse diameter at the same levels ranges from 24.45 mm to 27.00 mm and the mean value of Torg ratio is 0.96. With respect to narrow cervical spinal canal, the following charaterstics are found: firstly, extension of the cervical spine results in statistically significant stenosis as compared with the flexed or neutral positions; secondly, females sustain cervical spinal canal narrowing more easily than males; finally, the consistent narrowest cervical canal level is at C 4 for all ethnicity, but there is a slight variation in the sagittal diameter of cervical spinal stenosis (≤14 mm in Whites, ≤ 12 mm in Japanese, ≤13.7 mm in Chinese. Narrow sagittal cervical canal diameter brings about an increased risk of neurological injuries in traumatic, degenerative and inflam-matory conditions and is related with extension of cervical spine, gender, as well as ethnicity. It is hoped that this re-view will be helpful in diagnosing spinal cord and neuro-logical injuries with the geometric parameters of cervical spine in the future. Key words: Spinal cord injuries; Spinal stenosis; Trauma, nervous system

  10. Traumatic cervical artery dissection.

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    Nedeltchev, Krassen; Baumgartner, Ralf W

    2005-01-01

    Traumatic cervical artery dissection (TCAD) is a complication of severe blunt head or neck trauma, the main cause being motor vehicle accidents. TCAD are increasingly recognized, and incidences of up to 0.86% for internal carotid and 0.53% for traumatic vertebral artery dissections (TVAD) among blunt trauma victims are reported. Diagnostic evaluation for TCAD is mandatory in the presence of (1) hemorrhage of potential arterial origin originating from the nose, ears, mouth, or a wound; (2) expanding cervical hematoma; (3) cervical bruit in a patient >50 years of age; (4) evidence of acute infarct at brain imaging; (5) unexplained central or lateralizing neurological deficit or transient ischemic attack, or (6) Horner syndrome, neck or head pain. In addition, a number of centers screen asymptomatic patients with blunt trauma for TCAD. Catheter angiography is the standard of reference for diagnosis of TCAD. Color duplex ultrasound, computed tomographic, and magnetic resonance angiography are noninvasive screening alternatives, but each method has its diagnostic limitations compared to catheter angiography. Anticoagulants and antiplatelet drugs may prevent ischemic stroke, but bleeding from traumatized tissues may offset the benefits of antithrombotic treatment. Endovascular therapy of dissected vessels, thrombarterectomy, direct suture of intimal tears, and extracranial-intracranial bypass should be considered in exceptional cases. Neurological outcome is probably worse in TCAD compared to spontaneous CAD, although it is unclear whether this is due to dissection-induced ischemic stroke or associated traumatic lesions.

  11. Clinical Trial of Human Fetal Brain-Derived Neural Stem/Progenitor Cell Transplantation in Patients with Traumatic Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

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    Ji Cheol Shin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In a phase I/IIa open-label and nonrandomized controlled clinical trial, we sought to assess the safety and neurological effects of human neural stem/progenitor cells (hNSPCs transplanted into the injured cord after traumatic cervical spinal cord injury (SCI. Of 19 treated subjects, 17 were sensorimotor complete and 2 were motor complete and sensory incomplete. hNSPCs derived from the fetal telencephalon were grown as neurospheres and transplanted into the cord. In the control group, who did not receive cell implantation but were otherwise closely matched with the transplantation group, 15 patients with traumatic cervical SCI were included. At 1 year after cell transplantation, there was no evidence of cord damage, syrinx or tumor formation, neurological deterioration, and exacerbating neuropathic pain or spasticity. The American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS grade improved in 5 of 19 transplanted patients, 2 (A → C, 1 (A → B, and 2 (B → D, whereas only one patient in the control group showed improvement (A → B. Improvements included increased motor scores, recovery of motor levels, and responses to electrophysiological studies in the transplantation group. Therefore, the transplantation of hNSPCs into cervical SCI is safe and well-tolerated and is of modest neurological benefit up to 1 year after transplants. This trial is registered with Clinical Research Information Service (CRIS, Registration Number: KCT0000879.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of traumatic cervical injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhng, S. K.; Lee, K. S.; Sohn, K. J.; Choi, S. S.; Won, J. J.

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of cevical injuries. MRI studies of 34 patients with cervical spinal injuries were analyzed retrospectively. All MRI scans were obtained with an 1.0T superconductive MRI scanner (Siemens Magnetom 42SPE) and their findings were analyzed regarding the spinal cord, bony spine, ligaments, and intervertebral disks. A variety of abnormal findings were detected: 25 cord abnormalities including cord compression (15 cases), cord edema (4 cases), syringomyelia (4 cases), myelomalacia (1 case), and hemorrhagic contusion (1 case), 18 ligamentous injuries, 22 disk herniations (9 post-traumatic, 13 chronic degenerative), 11 spine fractures, and 4 subluxations. MRI is useful in evaluating the spinal cord itself, in depicting ligamentous injuries, in establishing the presence of disc herniation, and in assessing the alignment of cervical spine

  13. Presentation and outcome of traumatic spinal fractures

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    Ahmed El-Faramawy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Motor vehicle crashes and falls account for most of the spine fractures with subsequent serious disability. Aim: To define the incidence, causes, and outcome of spinal fractures. Materials and Methods: Data were collected retrospectively from trauma registry database of all traumatic spinal injuries admitted to the section of trauma surgery in Qatar from November 2007 to December 2009. Results: Among 3712 patients who were admitted to the section of trauma surgery, 442 (12% injured patients had spinal fractures with a mean age of 33.2 ± 12 years. The male to female ratio was 11.6:1. Motor vehicle crashes (36.5% and falls from height (19.3% were the leading causes of cervical injury (P = 0.001. The injury severity score ranged between 4 and 75. Nineteen percent of cases with cervical injury had thoracic injury as well (P = 0.04. Lumber injury was associated with thoracic injury in 27% of cases (P < 0.001. Combined thoracic and lumber injuries were associated with cervical injury in 33% of cases (P < 0.001. The total percent of injuries associated with neurological deficit was 5.4%. Fifty-three cases were managed surgically for spine fractures; 14 of them had associated neurological deficits. Overall mortalityrate was 5%. Conclusions: Spine fractures are not uncommon in Qatar. Cervical and thoracic spine injuries carry the highest incidence of associated neurological deficit and injuries at other spinal levels. Young males are the most exposed population that deserves more emphasis on injury prevention programs in the working sites and in enforcement of traffic laws.

  14. A Cadaveric Study of the Morphometry of the Cervical Spinal Canal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Morphometry of the cervical spinal canal is of clinical importance in traumatic, degenerative and inflammatory conditions. A small canal diameter has been associated with an increase of injury mainly in athletes who participate in contact or collision sports. Before abnormal spinal morphometry can be determined, it is first ...

  15. Computed tomography of the spinal canal for the cervical spine and spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Isao; Niimiya, Hikosuke; Nasu, Kichiro; Shioya, Akihide; Ohhama, Mitsuru

    1983-01-01

    The cervical spinal canal and cervical spinal cord were measured in normal cases and 34 cases of spinal or spinal cord injury. The anteroposterior diameter and area of the normal cervical spinal canal showed a high correlation. The area ratio of the normal cervical spinal canal to the cervical spinal cord showed that the proportion of the cervical spinal cord in the spinal canal was 1/3 - 1/5, Csub(4,5) showing a particularly large proportion. In acute and subacute spinal or spinal cord injury, CT visualized in more details of the spinal canal in cases that x-ray showed definite bone injuries. Computer assisted myelography visualized more clearly the condition of the spinal cord in cases without definite findings bone injuries on x-ray. Demonstrating the morphology of spinal injury in more details, CT is useful for selection of therapy for injured spines. (Chiba, N.)

  16. Arteriovenous malformations of the cervical spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagasawa, Shiro; Yoshida, Shinzo; Ishikawa, Masatsune; Yonekawa, Yasuhiro; Handa, Hajime

    1984-01-01

    Arteriovenous malformation (AVM) of the cervical spinal cord has been known to constitute 5-13% of all spinal AVMs. In contrast to the AVMs located in thoracic or thoraco-lumbar regions, cervical AVM has several characteristic features such as preponderance in younger generation, high incidence of subarachnoid hemorrhage, intramedullary location of the nidus usually fed by the anterior spinal arterial system. We reported three cases of cervical AVMs, which located intramedullary at the levels of C 4 -C 6 , C 1 -C 4 and C 1 -C 2 , respectively. Although selective angiography (vertebral artery, thyrocervical artery, costocervical artery) was essential for the diagnosis of these lesions, computerized tomographic (CT) study with both intrathecal injection of metrizamide and intravenous infusion of contrast material (dynamic and static study) was found to be extremely advantageous in detecting the topography of AVMs in the concerned horizontal planes of the spinal cord. Removal of AVM was given up in one case because of its possible involvement of the anterior spinal artery and central artery shown by CT scan. Removal of AVMs were performed in other two cases. A lateral approach was tried in one case with the AVM located in C 1 -C 2 level, in which CT scan revealed not only an intramedullary but the associated extramedullary AVM in ventrolateral surface of the spinal cord. This operative approach was found to involve less bone removal and markedly reduce spinal cord manipulation necessary to deal with ventrally situated high cervical lesions, compared with a posterior approach with laminectomy. (author)

  17. Airway management in a patient of ankylosing spondylitis with traumatic cervical spine injury

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    Nilesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic cervical lesions compressing the spinal cord pose a significant risk of exacerbating the existing neurological condition during tracheal intubation and subsequent positioning. Preexisting ankylosing spondylitis with spinal column involvement renders the spinal column more rigid and introduces difficulty in airway management of the patient with traumatic cervical spinal cord. To improve ease and success, and reduce cervical spine movement, awake fibreoptic intubation (FOI is considered the gold standard technique for airway management in such cases. Attaining appropriate position for intubation was challenge in this case due to rigid curvature of the ankylosed spinal column. To prevent neurological injury to the spinal cord and preserve spinal cord function, minimizing movement during intubation and attaining appropriate position was of prime concern. Optimal sedation with self-positioning by the patient in a comfortable posture is quite imperative and assures both airway as well as neurological protection in such expected difficult situations. We report the use of dexmedetomidine for self-positioning and awake FOI in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis having traumatic cervical spine who was otherwise neither able to co-operative nor able to give appropriate position for FOI.

  18. Surgical Strategies for Cervical Spinal Neurinomas.

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    Ito, Kiyoshi; Aoyama, Tatsuro; Miyaoka, Yoshinari; Horiuchi, Tetsuyoshi; Hongo, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Cervical spinal neurinomas are benign tumors that arise from nerve roots. Based on their location, these tumors can also take the form of a dumbbell-shaped mass. Treatment strategies for these tumors have raised several controversial issues such as appropriate surgical indications and selection of surgical approaches for cervical dumbbell-shaped spinal neurinomas. In this report, we review previous literature and retrospectively analyze cervical spinal neurinoma cases that have been treated at our hospital. Surgical indications and approaches based on tumor location and severity are discussed in detail. Thus, with advances in neuroimaging and neurophysiological monitoring, we conclude that appropriate surgical approaches and intraoperative surgical manipulations should be chosen on a case-by-case basis.

  19. Post-traumatic recto-spinal fistula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lantsberg, L.; Greenberg, G.; Laufer, L.; Hertzanu, Y.

    2000-01-01

    Acquired recto-spinal fistula has been described elsewhere as a rare complication of colorectal malignancy and Crohn's enterocolitis. We treated a young man who developed a recto-spinal fistula as a result of a high fall injury. The patient presented with meningeal signs, sepsis and perianal laceration. Computerized axial tomography revealed air in the supersellar cistern. Gastrografin enema showed that contrast material was leaking from the rectum into the spinal canal. Surgical management included a diverting sigmoid colostomy, sacral bone curettage and wide presacral drainage. To the best of our knowledge, rectospinal fistula of traumatic origin has not been previously reported in the English literature. (orig.)

  20. Traumatic spinal cord injury in MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronarski, J.; Wozniak, E.

    1993-01-01

    Spinal cord injuries in tetraplegics were briefly discussed on the basis of MR imaging. It was found that severe cervical spine trauma usually results in concussion - the complete transection of the cord is rare. A case of 19 years old male with total cord transection confirmed by MR imaging is described. (author)

  1. Cervical spinal canal narrowing in idiopathic syringomyelia

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    Struck, Aaron F. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Neurology, Boston, MA (United States); Carr, Carrie M. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Shah, Vinil [University of California San Francisco, Department of Radiology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Hesselink, John R. [University of California San Diego, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Haughton, Victor M. [University of Wisconsin, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-08-15

    The cervical spine in Chiari I patient with syringomyelia has significantly different anteroposterior diameters than it does in Chiari I patients without syringomyelia. We tested the hypothesis that patients with idiopathic syringomyelia (IS) also have abnormal cervical spinal canal diameters. The finding in both groups may relate to the pathogenesis of syringomyelia. Local institutional review boards approved this retrospective study. Patients with IS were compared to age-matched controls with normal sagittal spine MR. All subjects had T1-weighted spin-echo (500/20) and T2-weighted fast spin-echo (2000/90) sagittal cervical spine images at 1.5 T. Readers blinded to demographic data and study hypothesis measured anteroposterior diameters at each cervical level. The spinal canal diameters were compared with a Mann-Whitney U test. The overall difference was assessed with a Friedman test. Seventeen subjects were read by two reviewers to assess inter-rater reliability. Fifty IS patients with 50 age-matched controls were studied. IS subjects had one or more syrinxes varying from 1 to 19 spinal segments. Spinal canal diameters narrowed from C1 to C3 and then enlarged from C5 to C7 in both groups. Diameters from C2 to C4 were narrower in the IS group (p < 0.005) than in controls. The ratio of the C3 to the C7 diameters was also smaller (p = 0.004) in IS than controls. Collectively, the spinal canal diameters in the IS were significantly different from controls (Friedman test p < 0.0001). Patients with IS have abnormally narrow upper and mid cervical spinal canal diameters and greater positive tapering between C3 and C7. (orig.)

  2. Traumatic cervical epidural hematoma in an infant

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    Vithal Rangarajan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An 8-month-old male infant had presented with a history of a fall from the crib a fortnight ago. He had developed progressive weakness of both lower limbs. On examination, the infant had spastic paraplegia. Magnetic resonance (MR imaging of the cervical spine showed an epidural hematoma extending from the fourth cervical (C4 to the first dorsal (D1 vertebral level with cord compression. The patient had no bleeding disorder on investigation. He underwent cervical laminoplasty at C6 and C7 levels. The epidural hematoma was evacuated. The cervical cord started pulsating immediately. Postoperatively, the patient′s paraplegia improved dramatically in 48 hours. According to the author′s literature search, only seven cases of post-traumatic epidural hematoma have been reported in pediatric patients, and our patient is the youngest. The present case report discusses the etiopathology, presentation, and management of this rare case.

  3. Biomarkers of Spontaneous Recovery from Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury

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    2017-10-01

    inflammation. 15. SUBJECT TERMS traumatic spinal cord injury, spinal cord , spontaneous recovery, functional recovery, inflammation, biomarkers, trauma 16...Award Number: W81XWH-15-1-0614 TITLE: Biomarkers of Spontaneous Recovery from Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ona Bloom...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0614 W81XWH-15-1-0614 Biomarkers of Spontaneous Recovery from Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  4. Epidemiology of traumatic spinal cord injury in Canada.

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    Pickett, Gwynedd E; Campos-Benitez, Mauricio; Keller, Jana L; Duggal, Neil

    2006-04-01

    Retrospective review. To describe the incidence, clinical features, and treatment of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) treated at a Canadian tertiary care center. Understanding the current epidemiology of acute traumatic SCI is essential for public resource allocation and primary prevention. Recent reports suggest that the mean age of patients with SCI may be increasing. We retrospectively reviewed hospital records on all patients with traumatic SCI between January 1997 and June 2001 (n = 151). Variables assessed included age, gender, length of hospitalization, type and mechanism of injury, associated spinal fractures, neurologic deficit, and treatment. Annual age-adjusted incidence rates were 42.4 per million for adults aged 15-64 years, and 51.4 per million for those 65 years and older. Motor vehicle accidents accounted for 35% of SCI. Falls were responsible for 63% of SCI among patients older than 65 years and for 31% of injuries overall. Cervical SCI was most common, particularly in the elderly, and was associated with fracture in only 56% of cases. Thoracic and lumbar SCI were associated with spinal fractures in 100% and 85% of cases, respectively. In-hospital mortality was 8%. Mortality was significantly higher among the elderly. Treatment of thoracic and lumbar fractures associated with SCI was predominantly surgical, whereas cervical fractures were equally likely to be treated with external immobilization alone or with surgery. A large proportion of injuries was seen among older adults, predominantly as a result of falls. Prevention programs should expand their focus to include home safety and avoidance of falls in the elderly.

  5. Cervical spinal cord injury in abused children.

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    Feldman, Kenneth W; Avellino, Anthony M; Sugar, Naomi F; Ellenbogen, Richard G

    2008-04-01

    Five infants and toddlers who sustained cervical spinal cord injury as the result of child abuse are described. Three cases are previously unreported. Diagnosis was complicated by coexistent brain injuries and their treatments, subtle and/or evolving paralysis, and central cord syndrome, in which arm function is diminished but leg function is preserved. Definitive spinal imaging by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography, and plain radiographs was delayed because of life support efforts. When completed, the MRI was most sensitive to cord injury. Evidence of associated bony spinal injury was often absent or unapparent until healing occurred; 4 children had spinal cord injury without (or with minimal) radiological abnormality. The 3 children presenting to our hospital with cord injury represent 1% of the estimated cases of inflicted head injury seen during a 23-year period.

  6. Brown-Séquard syndrome and cervical post-traumatic subarachnoid hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rascón-Ramírez, Fernando; Avecillas-Chasín, Josué M; Trondin, Albert; Arredondo, M Javier

    2017-10-20

    Cervical Traumatic SSH are very rare in literature. They are usually caused by cardiopulmonary diseases that increase vascular pressure causing spinal vessels rupture. In thoracolumbar spine, the spinal puncture is the most common cause. The ventrolateral position is even more unusual. In traumatic brain injury (TBI), an abrupt extension-flexion movement could have caused the rupture of subarachnoid vessels. This, accompanied by the slowed blood "wash out" (probably due to the previous osteoarthrosis and spinal canal stenosis), led to the formation of an organized clot, which caused an acute spinal cord compression syndrome. Cervical subarachnoid spinal hematoma can present as Brown-Séquard syndrome. The treatment is prompt surgical removal and decompression. The posterior approach (partial hemilaminectomy with or without laminoplasty) with microsurgical technique is feasible, fast and simple to evacuate the hematoma with good results. Surgical nuances in posterior approach are: small spinal canal, difficulty in mobilizing the cervical cord, these haematomas are wrapped and attached to the spinal cord or nerve roots by multiple arachnoid bands, requiring techniques of Microdissection for its evacuation unlike the epidural and subdural haematomas that are easily aspirated. Here, we report a unique case of a ventrolateral SSH due to TBI. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Acute Traumatic Cervical Cord Injury in Pediatric Patients with os Odontoideum: A Series of 6 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengfeng; Wang, Honggang; Liu, Chao

    2015-06-01

    Os odontoideum can lead to instability of the atlantoaxial joint and places the spinal cord at significant risk for acute traumatic catastrophic events or chronic neurologic change. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively review acute cervical cord injury after minor trauma in 6 pediatric patients with os odontoideum. Between 2012 and 2013, 6 pediatric patients with os odontoideum who suffered acute traumatic cervical cord injury were reviewed retrospectively. Their clinical history, neurologic symptoms, radiological investigations, follow-up period, American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) impairment classification, and motor score were reviewed. There were 2 male and 4 female subjects ranging in age from 4 to 18 years (mean 11.8 years). Before the traumatic injury, 2 cases were asymptomatic and 4 complained of myelopathic feature with unsteadiness on feet. Falls were the most common injury (n = 5), followed by a minor motor vehicle accident (n = 1). Atlantoaxial instability and cord compression were presented in all cases with dynamic cervical lateral radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging. Most patients presented with spinal cord thinning and hyperintensity on T2-weighted sequences in magnetic resonance imaging. Spinal cord compression was anterior in 2 cases and both anterior and posterior in 4. Two patients was classified as ASIA B, 1 as ASIA C, and 3 as ASIA D category on admission. Two patients presented with respiratory failure with mechanical ventilation for over 2 weeks in perioperative period. Postoperatively, all patients improved neurologically and clinically after underwent posterior atlantoaxial fixation and fusion. Pediatric patients with asymptomatic or myelopathic atlantoaxial instability secondary to os odontoideum are at risk for acute spinal cord injury even after minor traumatic injury. Sufficient fixation and fusion should be undertaken as prophylactic treatment of developing myelopathy and to improve neurologic symptoms with

  8. Spinal trauma. Pathophysiology and management of traumatic spinal injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shores, A

    1992-07-01

    Spinal trauma can originate from internal or external sources. Injuries to the spinal cord can be classified as either concussive or compressive and concussive. The pathophysiologic events surrounding spinal cord injury include the primary injury (compression, concussion) and numerous secondary injury mechanisms (vascular, biochemical, electrolyte), which are mediated by excessive oxygen free radicles, neurotransmitter and electrolyte alterations in cell membrane permeability, excitotoxic amino acids, and various other biochemical factors that collectively result in reduced SCBF, ischemia, and eventual necrosis of the gray and white matter. Management of acute spinal cord injuries includes the use of a high-dose corticosteroid regimen within the initial 8 hours after trauma. Sodium prednisolone and methylprednisolone, at recommended doses, act as oxygen radical scavengers and are anti-inflammatory. Additional considerations are the stability of the vertebral column, other conditions associated with trauma (i.e., pneumothorax), and the presence or absence of spinal cord compression, which may warrant surgical therapy. Vertebral fractures or luxations can occur in any area of the spine but most commonly occur at the junction of mobile and immobile segments. Dorsal and dorsolateral surgical approaches are applicable to the lumbosacral and thoracolumbar spine and dorsal and ventral approaches to the cervical spine. Indications for surgical intervention include spinal cord compression and vertebral instability. Instability can be determined from the type of fracture, how many of the three compartments of the vertebrae are disrupted, and on occasion, by carefully positioned stress studies of fluoroscopy. Decompression (dorsal laminectomy, hemilaminectomy, or ventral cervical slot) is employed when compression of the spinal cord exists. The hemilaminectomy (unilateral or bilateral) causes less instability than dorsal laminectomy and therefore should be used when practical

  9. Treat high cervical spinal arteriovenous malformation with Cyberknife radiosurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Fen Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the use of CyberKnife radiosurgery in the treatment of accidentally found cervical spinal arteriovenous malformation (AVM. We present the case of a patient with cervical spinal AVM, who developed progressive neck pain, gait disturbance, urine and stool incontinence 2 weeks after the fell down accident. The patient underwent CyberKnife radiosurgery. After CyberKnife radiosurgery for 2 years, the patient′s neck pain diminished and was able to keep the walk without any assistance. The management of cervical spinal AVM varies. This patient demonstrated a successful treatment of cervical spinal AVM with CyberKnife radiosurgery.

  10. Remote cerebellar hemorrhage after cervical spinal surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Hsien Huang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Remote cerebellar hemorrhage (RCH is an unpredictable and rare complication of spinal surgery. We report five cases of RCH following cervical spinal surgery, and summarize another seven similar cases from the literature. Dural opening with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF hypovolemia seems to be an important factor contributing to RCH following cervical spinal surgery. As other authors have proposed, surgical positioning may be another factor contributing to RCH. RCH is thought to be hemorrhagic venous infarction, resulting from the stretching occlusion of the superior cerebellar vein by the cerebellar sag effect. Either intraoperative CSF loss or a postoperative CSF leak from drainage may cause cerebellar sag, further resulting in RCH. RCH is usually self-limiting, and most patients with RCH have an optimal outcome after conservative treatment. Severe cases that involved surgical intervention because of evidence of brainstem compression or hydrocephalus also had acceptable outcomes, compared to spontaneous CH. It has been suggested that one way to prevent RCH is to avoid extensive perioperative loss of CSF, by paying attention to surgical positioning during spinal surgery. We also underline the importance of early diagnosis and CSF expansion in the early treatment of RCH.

  11. Remote cerebellar hemorrhage after cervical spinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Po-Hsien; Wu, Jau-Ching; Cheng, Henrich; Shih, Yang-Hsin; Huang, Wen-Cheng

    2013-10-01

    Remote cerebellar hemorrhage (RCH) is an unpredictable and rare complication of spinal surgery. We report five cases of RCH following cervical spinal surgery, and summarize another seven similar cases from the literature. Dural opening with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hypovolemia seems to be an important factor contributing to RCH following cervical spinal surgery. As other authors have proposed, surgical positioning may be another factor contributing to RCH. RCH is thought to be hemorrhagic venous infarction, resulting from the stretching occlusion of the superior cerebellar vein by the cerebellar sag effect. Either intraoperative CSF loss or a postoperative CSF leak from drainage may cause cerebellar sag, further resulting in RCH. RCH is usually self-limiting, and most patients with RCH have an optimal outcome after conservative treatment. Severe cases that involved surgical intervention because of evidence of brainstem compression or hydrocephalus also had acceptable outcomes, compared to spontaneous CH. It has been suggested that one way to prevent RCH is to avoid extensive perioperative loss of CSF, by paying attention to surgical positioning during spinal surgery. We also underline the importance of early diagnosis and CSF expansion in the early treatment of RCH. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Taiwan LLC. All rights reserved.

  12. Radiation tolerance of the cervical spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCunniff, A.J.; Liang, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    The incidence of permanent injury to the spinal cord as a complication of radiation therapy generally correlates positively with total radiation dosage. However, several reports in the literature have indicated that fraction size is also an important factor in the development or nondevelopment of late injuries in normal tissue. To determine the effect of fraction size on the incidence of radiation-induced spinal cord injuries, we reviewed 144 cases of head and neck cancer treated at our institution between 1971 and 1980 with radiation greater than 5600 cGy to a portion of the cervical spinal cord. Most of these patients received greater than or equal to 6000 cGy, with fraction sizes ranging from 133 cGy to 200 cGy. Fifty-three of the 144 patients have been followed up for 2 years or more. Nearly half of these (26 patients) received greater than 6000 cGy with fraction sizes of 133 cGy to 180 cGy. Only 1 of the 53 (1.9%) has sustained permanent spinal cord injury; 20 months after completion of radiation treatments he developed Brown-Sequard syndrome. Our experience suggests that radiation injuries to the spinal cord correlate not only with total radiation dosage, but also with fraction size; low fraction sizes appear to decrease the incidence of such injuries

  13. Nonoperative treatment of acute traumatic spinal injuries: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Traumatic spinal injury is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. There is no agreed method of care. Neurological recovery in complete injury has been dismal. Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study is to determine the neurological recovery at discharge in traumatic spinal injury patients ...

  14. Evaluation of acute respiratory failure after cervical spinal cord injury in Mashhad Shahid Kamyab Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MohammadReza Ahsaei

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Acuterespiratory  complications are common in patients with cervical spinal cord injury. These complications can increase mortality and morbidity rates. The aim of this study is to specify the complications after traumatic cervical spinal cord injury, management of these patients and to select the appropriate remedial and preventive measures. Materials and Methods: This study has been performed retrospectively in Shahid Kamyab ICU wards for 2.5 years in patient group with cervical cord injury. The severity of injury had been scored based on Frankel scoring. We completed the charts for clinical and neurological findings, the remedial ways and the results. Finally, statistical analysis has been accomplished. Results: From 592 patients being admitted with spinal trauma, 61 cases had cervical spine injury. 27 patients (44.3% had been hospitalized in ICU for respiratory problems. Methyl prednisolon succinate has been used only for 4 patients. There was not any difference in this group versus control group. 23 patients (85.18% had been scored in Frankel A. Mortality rate was 11 cases (40.7%. Tracheostomy had been used for patients with prolonged intubation and respiratory infection. Conclusion: Respiratory complications after cervical spinal cord injury are common and are accompanied by numerous complications and even mortality. We can reduce the mortality and morbidity rates in these patients by paying attention to these complications and using the immediate and appropriate ways of treating.

  15. Congenital spondylolysis of the cervical spine with spinal cord compression: MR and CT studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, M.J.; Marti-Bonmati, L.; Molla, E.; Poyatos, C.; Cerda, E. de la; Urrizola, J.

    1997-01-01

    Spondylolysis of the cervical spine is a rare disorder that is characterized by a defect in the articular mass between the superior and inferior facets of a cervical vertebra. It is considered to be congenital because it is usually associated with dysplastic changes, especially involving the posterior arch of the vertebra, which differentiates it from its traumatic equivalent. We present two cases of spondylolysis of the cervical spine without spondylolisthesis, which were studied by means of magnetic resonance (MR) and computerized tomography (CT). One patient showed contralateral involvement at two levels and the other had a single lesion presenting canal stenosis with chronic spinal cord compression, an unusual association in previously reported series. the combination of MR and CT makes it possible to limit the spectrum of bone changes and their impact on the spinal cord in these patients. (Author) 12 refs

  16. Analysis of Associated Spinal Fractures in Cases of Traumatic Intracranial Hemorrhage or Skull Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunoki M

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patients with traumatic intracranial hemorrhage (ICH or skull fracture are typically admitted to the Department of Neurosurgery for fear of delayed neurological deterioration. Neurosurgeons, therefore, must be careful not to overlook a spinal fracture in these patients. In this study, we investigated the occurrence and risk factor of spinal fracture in patients with traumatic ICH or skull fracture. Patients and methods: We retrospectively analyzed the hospital records of 134 patients admitted to the Department of Neurosurgery at Kagawa Rosai Hospital for traumatic ICH or skull fracture. The etiology of trauma, level of consciousness, presence or absence of ICH, skull fracture, craniotomy and spinal surgery were investigated. Furthermore, in cases of spinal fracture, its type, neurological symptoms, treatment were investigated. Results: In an analysis of 134 patients, Ground level fall and traffic accident were the most frequent etiologies of trauma (47.0% and 23.9% respectively. Glasgow coma scale on admission was 15-13 for 106 patients (79.1%. Spinal fracture was identified in 10 of 134 patients (7.5%. Two patients had cervical, 8 had thoracolumbar fractures. In the analysis of risk factors, an accidental fall and skull fracture was observed significantly more in the spinal fracture cases. Conclusion: The majority of traumatic ICH or skull fracture cases treated in the Department of Neurosurgery were caused by minor head impacts. When treating these patients, it is necessary to investigate not only the cervical, but also the thoracolumbar spine, especially when the cause of injury is an accidental fall and a skull fracture is identified.

  17. Urinary calculi following traumatic spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rikke Bølling; Biering-Sørensen, Fin; Kristensen, Jørgen Kvist

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the time aspect of the development of renal and bladder calculi in individuals with traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) and a possible relation between the development of calculi and the bladder-emptying method. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study comprised a retrospective data...... calculus was highest within the first 6 months post-injury. The cumulative proportion of calculi-free participants 45 years post-injury was 62% for renal calculi and 85% for bladder calculi. For participants who did not develop renal calculi within the first 2 years post-injury, the risk of having a renal...... calculi was higher in the SCI population compared to the normal population. Bladder calculi primarily occur early post-injury and renal calculi appear both early post-injury and years later. Therefore, it is important to follow individuals with SCI regularly by means of urological investigations from...

  18. Evolution of spinal cord injuries due to cervical canal stenosis without radiographic evidence of trauma (SCIWORET): a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamothe, G; Muller, F; Vital, J-M; Goossens, D; Barat, M

    2011-06-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injuries on cervical canal stenosis represent a steadily increasing pathology, of which clinical and functional outcomes remain largely unknown. We present the results of a prospective study of 20 patients followed for one year who had presented with traumatic spinal cord injury involving initially acute neurological symptoms and cervical canal stenosis defined in the imaging by a Torg ratio0.65, without vertebral fracture. Traumatic spinal cord injuries on cervical canal stenosis are caused mainly by falls in the elderly population and by unsafe behaviour among younger subjects. Most of the patients present with initially incomplete tetraplegia, and two thirds have centromedullary syndrome. Association of complete tetraplegia with advanced age would seem to be a predictive factor of death in the early post-traumatic period. For incomplete tetraplegics, the main phase of neurological and functional recovery is observed over the first six months. Radiological data and timing of surgery do not appear to affect the prognosis. This study underlines the need for individualized specialized care of patients with spinal cord injuries on cervical canal stenosis, particularly according to their demographic and lesional characteristics. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Non-traumatic spinal cord compression at Parirenyatwa Hospital in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Compression of the spinal cord by encroachment on its space is of major importance as a cause of injury to its tissues, with serious neurological consequences. Patients with non-traumatic spinal cord compression represent a significant proportion of paraplegic/paretic individuals attended to in the neurosurgical units in ...

  20. Cervical myelopathy from traditional bonesetters' treatment of spinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Approximately 55% of the entire rotation of the cervical spine takes place at this joint2. This joint is kept stable only by its capsule and ligaments, hence the possibility of dislocation. Any injury in this region is associated with potentially catastrophic neurological complications. We report a case of severe upper cervical spinal ...

  1. X-ray signs of traumas of the cervical region of the spinal cord in the acute period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodskaya, Z.L.

    1983-01-01

    The results are analyzed of an X-ray examination of 208 patients with traumas of the cervical region of the spinal column and spinal cord in the acute period of trauma. The authors proposed a scheme that included telespondylography in standard and oblique projections, flebospondylography, discography and pneumomyelography in the Schantz collar with a patient lying on the back. Four types of the spinal cord traumas were diagnosed: compression with osseous elements (76.92%), with sharp discs and strained epidural hematomas (3.85%), isolated contusion of the spinal cord (10.1%) and disorder of the spinal circulation (9.13%). Special emphasis was laid on clinicospondylographic correlations, a critical distance, congenital narrowing of the vertebral canal. The concept of traumatic decompression of the spinal cord was stressed. Symptoms of its contusion and trauma of the spinal circulation were indicated

  2. Post-traumatic upper cervical subluxation visualized by MRI: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demetrious James

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper describes MRI findings of upper cervical subluxation due to alar ligament disruption following a vehicular collision. Incidental findings included the presence of a myodural bridge and a spinal cord syrinx. Chiropractic management of the patient is discussed. Case presentation A 21-year old female presented with complaints of acute, debilitating upper neck pain with unremitting sub-occipital headache and dizziness following a vehicular collision. Initial emergency department and neurologic investigations included x-ray and CT evaluation of the head and neck. Due to persistent pain, the patient sought chiropractic care. MRI of the upper cervical spine revealed previously unrecognized clinical entities. Conclusion This case highlights the identification of upper cervical ligamentous injury that produced vertebral subluxation following a traumatic incident. MRI evaluation provided visualization of previously undetected injury. The patient experienced improvement through chiropractic care.

  3. Spinal CT scan, 1. Cervical and thoracic spines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, Hiroshi (Aichi Medical Univ. (Japan))

    1982-01-01

    Methods of CT of the cervical and thoracic spines were explained, and normal CT pictures of them were described. Spinal CT was evaluated in comparison with other methods in various spinal diseases. Plain CT revealed stenosis due to spondylosis or ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament and hernia of intervertebral disc. CT took an important role in the diagnosis of spinal cord tumors with calcification and destruction of the bone. CT scan in combination with other methods was also useful for the diagnosis of spinal injuries, congenital anomalies and infections.

  4. Absent cervical spine pedicle and associated congenital spinal abnormalities - a diagnostic trap in a setting of acute trauma: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wildermuth Simon

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital spinal abnormalities can easily be misdiagnosed on plain radiographs. Additional imaging is warranted in doubtful cases, especially in a setting of acute trauma. Case Presentation This patient presented at the emergency unit of our university hospital after a motor vehicle accident and was sent to our radiology department for imaging of the cervical spine. Initial clinical examination and plain radiographs of the cervical spine were performed but not conclusive. Additional CT of the neck helped establish the right diagnosis. Conclusion CT as a three-dimensional imaging modality with the possibility of multiplanar reconstructions allows for the exact diagnosis and exclusion of acute traumatic lesions of the cervical spine, especially in cases of doubtful plain radiographs and when congenital spinal abnormalities like absent cervical spine pedicle with associated spina bifida may insinuate severe trauma.

  5. Absent cervical spine pedicle and associated congenital spinal abnormalities - a diagnostic trap in a setting of acute trauma: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guggenberger, Roman; Andreisek, Gustav; Scheffel, Hans; Wildermuth, Simon; Leschka, Sebastian; Stolzmann, Paul

    2010-11-09

    Congenital spinal abnormalities can easily be misdiagnosed on plain radiographs. Additional imaging is warranted in doubtful cases, especially in a setting of acute trauma. This patient presented at the emergency unit of our university hospital after a motor vehicle accident and was sent to our radiology department for imaging of the cervical spine. Initial clinical examination and plain radiographs of the cervical spine were performed but not conclusive. Additional CT of the neck helped establish the right diagnosis. CT as a three-dimensional imaging modality with the possibility of multiplanar reconstructions allows for the exact diagnosis and exclusion of acute traumatic lesions of the cervical spine, especially in cases of doubtful plain radiographs and when congenital spinal abnormalities like absent cervical spine pedicle with associated spina bifida may insinuate severe trauma.

  6. Intermittent hypoxia induces functional recovery following cervical spinal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinit, Stéphane; Lovett-Barr, Mary Rachael; Mitchell, Gordon S

    2009-11-30

    Respiratory-related complications are the leading cause of death in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients. Few effective SCI treatments are available after therapeutic interventions are performed in the period shortly after injury (e.g. spine stabilization and prevention of further spinal damage). In this review we explore the capacity to harness endogenous spinal plasticity induced by intermittent hypoxia to optimize function of surviving (spared) neural pathways associated with breathing. Two primary questions are addressed: (1) does intermittent hypoxia induce plasticity in spinal synaptic pathways to respiratory motor neurons following experimental SCI? and (2) can this plasticity improve respiratory function? In normal rats, intermittent hypoxia induces serotonin-dependent plasticity in spinal pathways to respiratory motor neurons. Early experiments suggest that intermittent hypoxia also enhances respiratory motor output in experimental models of cervical SCI (cervical hemisection) and that the capacity to induce functional recovery is greater with longer durations post-injury. Available evidence suggests that intermittent hypoxia-induced spinal plasticity has considerable therapeutic potential to treat respiratory insufficiency following chronic cervical spinal injury.

  7. Should suspected cervical spinal cord injury be immobilised?: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oteir, Ala'a O; Smith, Karen; Stoelwinder, Johannes U; Middleton, James; Jennings, Paul A

    2015-04-01

    Spinal cord injuries occur worldwide; often being life-threatening with devastating long term impacts on functioning, independence, health, and quality of life. Systematic review of the literature to determine the efficacy of cervical spinal immobilisation (vs no immobilisation) in patients with suspected cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI); and to provide recommendations for prehospital spinal immobilisation. Searches were conducted of the Cochrane library, CINAHL, EMBASE, Pubmed, Scopus, Web of science, Google scholar, and OvidSP (MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and DARE) databases. Studies were included if they were relevant to the research question, published in English, based in the prehospital setting, and included adult patients with traumatic injury. The search identified 1471 citations, of which eight observational studies of variable quality were included. Four studies were retrospective cohorts, three were case series and one a case report. Cervical collar application was reported in penetrating trauma to be associated with unadjusted increased risk of mortality in two studies [(OR, 8.82; 95% CI, 1.09-194; p=0.038) & (OR, 2.06; 95% CI, 1.35-3.13)], concealment of neck injuries in one study and increased scene time in another study. While, in blunt trauma, one study indicated that immobilisation might be associated with worsened neurological outcome (OR, 2.03; 95% CI, 1.03-3.99; p=0.04, unadjusted). We did not attempt to combine study results due to significant heterogeneity of study design and outcome measures. There is a lack of high-level evidence on the effect of prehospital cervical spine immobilisation on patient outcomes. There is a clear need for large prospective studies to determine the clinical benefit of prehospital spinal immobilisation as well as to identify the subgroup of patients most likely to benefit. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The dynamic evaluation of the cervical spinal canal and spinal cord by magnetic resonance imaging during movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koschorek, F.; Jensen, H.P.; Terwey, B.

    1987-01-01

    The authors present results of in vivo measurements of the cervical canal and spinal cord. They indicate that tension in the spinal cord increases during flexion. They conclude that, as the dorsal approach avoids this increased tension of the spinal cord, the surgical treatment in chronic cervical myelopathy using this route seems to be preferable

  9. Cervical Spinal Cord Compression: A Rare Presentation of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chime, Chukwunonso; Arjun, Shiva; Reddy, Pavithra; Niazi, Masooma

    2017-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary malignancy of liver. Distant metastasis to various organs is well known. Skeletal metastasis is also reported to various locations. Vertebral metastasis has been reported mostly to thoracic spine. However, cervical spinal cord involvement leading to cord compression has been reported very rarely in literature. We present a case of 58-year-old male with liver cirrhosis presenting as neck pain. Further work-up revealed metastatic HCC to cervical spinal cord resulting in acute cord compression. Patient has been treated with neurosurgical intervention. PMID:28299213

  10. Measurement of normal cervical spinal cord in metrizamide CT myelography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Fumio; Koyama, Tsunemaro; Aii, Heihachirou

    1985-01-01

    The shape of the spinal cord is the most important factor in diagnosis of spinal disorders by metrizamide CT myelography (met. CT). Even in cases where the spinal cord looks normal in shape its size might be abnormal, for example in cases with spinal cord atrophy, syringomyelia, intramedullary tumor and several other conditions. In detecting the slightest abnormality in such cases, it is absolutely necessary to have in hand the knowledge of the nomal size of the spinal cord at each level. We measured, therefore, the sagittal and transverse diameters of the cervical spinal cord in 55 patients with no known lesions on met. CT (Fig. 1). Comparing our results with those by others, we found some differences as to the size of the spinal cord. We assume that these differences are due to the differences in resolution of the CT scanners used. The size of the spinal cord tends to measure larger with a CT scanner with high resolution than with others. Previous authors reported that the size of the spinal cord would vary by window center settings. Our experimental results indicate, however, that window center settings do not significantly affect the measurements. It is concluded that the normal values of the spinal cord dimensions at each level somewhat differ by CT equipments used. One should have normal values with one's own equipment in hand in order to take full advantage of this sophisticated diagnostic technique. (author)

  11. Cervical Cord-Canal Mismatch: A New Method for Identifying Predisposition to Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouri, Aria; Montejo, Julio; Sun, Xin; Virojanapa, Justin; Kolb, Luis E; Abbed, Khalid M; Cheng, Joseph S

    2017-12-01

    The risk for spinal cord injuries (SCIs) ranging from devastating traumatic injuries, compression because of degenerative pathology, and neurapraxia is increased in patients with congenital spinal stenosis. Classical diagnostic criteria include an absolute anteroposterior diameter of spinal cord, which varies across patients, independent of canal size. Recent large magnetic resonance imaging studies of population cohorts have allowed newer methods to emerge that account for both cord and canal size by measuring a spinal cord occupation ratio (SCOR). A SCOR defined as ≥70% on midsagittal imaging or ≥80% on axial imaging appears to be an effective method of identifying cord-canal mismatch, but requires further validation. Cord-canal size mismatch predisposes patients to SCI because of 1) less space within the canal lowering the amount of degenerative changes needed for cord compression, and 2) less cerebrospinal fluid surrounding the spinal cord decreasing the ability to absorb kinetic forces directed at the spine. Patients with cord-canal mismatch have been reported to be at a substantially higher risk of traumatic SCI, and present with degenerative cervical myelopathy at a younger age than patients without cord-canal mismatch. However, neurologic outcome after SCI has occurred does not appear to be different in patients with or without a cord-canal mismatch. Recognition that canal and cord size are both factors which predispose to SCI supports that cord-canal size mismatch rather than a narrow cervical canal in isolation should be viewed as the underlying mechanism predisposing to SCI. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Cervical spinal cord compression from delayed epidural scar tissue formation around plate lead for SCS. Case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzzi, G; Volpentesta, G; Chirchiglia, D; Della Torre, A; Lavano, F; Lavano, A

    2015-10-02

    Cervical spinal compression is a serious and rare complication of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) that can occur using leads placed via open surgical approach. The present report describe a case of cervical plate lead implant that developed spinal and radicular compression symptoms after seven years due to the growth of fibrotic epidural mass at the level of lead. A review of literature is provided. A 59-year-old woman with 3-year history of left arm post-traumatic complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) was treated with SCS performed with the implant of paddle lead in the epidural space from C3-C5. Seven years later she reported progressive paresthesia along the spine and the limbs, gait ataxia with sensation of weakness in the legs, increased muscle tone and tendon reflexes in the lower extremities and decrease in effectiveness of stimulation. Cervical CT showed a tissue mass into the cervical canal posteriorly to the lead. This finding was confirmed by MR performed after lead removal that also allowed to document the amount of spinal cord compression. The patient underwent C4-C5-C6 laminectomy and a thick scar was removed from the dura. After surgery there was progressive and incomplete improvement of neurological signs but symptoms related to algodystrophy recurred partly. The formation of hypertrophic epidural scar tissue at the level of lead implant must be taken into consideration in presence of the onset of progressive cervical myelopathy in patient treated with SCS using laminectomy lead.

  13. The Risk of Acute Spinal Cord Injury After Minor Trauma in Patients With Preexisting Cervical Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Victor; Ellingson, Benjamin M; Salamon, Noriko; Holly, Langston T

    2015-10-01

    Cervical stenosis patients are commonly advised to undergo surgery due to the risk of spinal cord injury (SCI) after a traumatic event. However, the actual risk of SCI in this scenario is unknown. To evaluate the risk of SCI after minor trauma in a cohort of prospectively followed cervical stenosis patients. Clinical and radiographical analysis was performed in 55 nonoperatively treated patients evaluated between 2009 and 2014. Each patient was asked standardized questions including: 1) whether a previous physician recommended neck surgery, 2) whether a physician indicated that they would become paralyzed after a traumatic event, and 3) whether they experienced a traumatic event during the follow-up period. The mean age was 65, with a mean modified Japanese Orthopedic Association score of 16.6. The mean canal diameter was 6.1 mm. Nineteen patients (35%) had evidence of intramedullary T2 signal abnormality. Thirty-one patients (56%) were previously recommended for surgery. Twenty-six patients (47%) were told that they would be paralyzed after a motor vehicle accident or fall unless surgery was performed. Ten patients (18%) experienced a traumatic event during the follow-up, with none sustaining an SCI. Asymptomatic and mildly symptomatic cervical stenosis patients are commonly recommended to undergo surgery due to risk of paralysis after a traumatic event. SCI was not observed after minor trauma in our cohort of prospectively followed patients. It seems that occurrence of SCI in this patient population after minor trauma is likely smaller than many physicians surmise, yet will require future prospective study in a large cohort of patients.

  14. Preliminary clinical applications of DTI in human cervical spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Ting; Mai Weiwen; Liang Biling; Shen Jun; Huang Suiqiao; Hu Chunhong

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To condcut preliminary study of the value of DTI(diffusion tensor imaging) in human cervical spinal cord. Methods: Twenty-one patients suffering from cervical spondylotic myelopathy and twenty volunteers without any clinical symptoms underwent routine MRI and DTI examination. DTI was performed in six non-collinear directions with single-shot fast spin echo echo, planar imaging sequence(b value = 400 s·mm -2 ). ADC(apparent diffusion coefficient) and FA(fractional anisotropy)values were measured by ROIs(regions of interest) in 4 different level segment spinal cord (C 2/3 , C 3/4 , C 4/5 , C 5/6 ) in normal volunteers, in lesions and normal segmental spinal cord in clinical cases respectively. DTI original images were automatically processed by using IDL (Version 5.6) soft- ware to produce color tensor images. SPSS11.0 software for windows was used for t-test and one-way ANOVA analysis. The difference was considered statistically significant if P 2/3 , C 3/4 , C 4/5 , C 5/6 , were analyzed and it was found that FA value between them had a significant difference by ANOVA, F=159.24, P 2/3 level. However, ADC value between 4 segments had no significant difference(F=2.191, P>0.05). (2)In patients of cervical spondylotic myelopathy, routine MRI T2WI showed abnormal signal in 9 cases, and showed no abnormal signal in 12 dases. In sixteen cases it was found that abnormal patchy green signal on colorized tensor maps appeared on the normal blue spinal cord. Also, in patients of cervical spondylotic myelopathy, there was significant difference in ADC and FA value between lesions and normal spinal cord (paired t test, for ADC, t=2.88, P 2/3 level segment spinal cord in normal volunteers (0.85 ± 0.03) is the highest among other segments. FA value decreases gradually along cervical spinal cord towards the caudal direction. However, the difference of ADC values amongst 4 segments is not significant. DTI colorized tensor maps can show more lesions than routine MRI

  15. Characterizing the location of spinal and vertebral levels in the human cervical spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadotte, D W; Cadotte, A; Cohen-Adad, J; Fleet, D; Livne, M; Wilson, J R; Mikulis, D; Nugaeva, N; Fehlings, M G

    2015-04-01

    Advanced MR imaging techniques are critical to understanding the pathophysiology of conditions involving the spinal cord. We provide a novel, quantitative solution to map vertebral and spinal cord levels accounting for anatomic variability within the human spinal cord. For the first time, we report a population distribution of the segmental anatomy of the cervical spinal cord that has direct implications for the interpretation of advanced imaging studies most often conducted across groups of subjects. Twenty healthy volunteers underwent a T2-weighted, 3T MRI of the cervical spinal cord. Two experts marked the C3-C8 cervical nerve rootlets, C3-C7 vertebral bodies, and pontomedullary junction. A semiautomated algorithm was used to locate the centerline of the spinal cord and measure rostral-caudal distances from a fixed point in the brain stem, the pontomedullary junction, to each of the spinal rootlets and vertebral bodies. Distances to each location were compared across subjects. Six volunteers had 2 additional scans in neck flexion and extension to measure the effects of patient positioning in the scanner. We demonstrated that substantial variation exists in the rostral-caudal position of spinal cord segments among individuals and that prior methods of predicting spinal segments are imprecise. We also show that neck flexion or extension has little effect on the relative location of vertebral-versus-spinal levels. Accounting for spinal level variation is lacking in existing imaging studies. Future studies should account for this variation for accurate interpretation of the neuroanatomic origin of acquired MR signals. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  16. Regional differences in radiosensitivity across the rat cervical spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bijl, Hendrik P.; Luijk, Peter van; Coppes, Rob P.; Schippers, Jacobus M.; Konings, Antonius W.T.; Kogel, Albert J. van der

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To study regional differences in radiosensitivity within the rat cervical spinal cord. Methods and materials: Three types of inhomogeneous dose distributions were applied to compare the radiosensitivity of the lateral and central parts of the rat cervical spinal cord. The left lateral half of the spinal cord was irradiated with two grazing proton beams, each with a different penumbra (20-80% isodoses): lateral wide (penumbra = 1.1 mm) and lateral tight (penumbra = 0.8 mm). In the third experiment, the midline of the cord was irradiated with a narrow proton beam with a penumbra of 0.8 mm. The irradiated spinal cord length (CT-2) was 20 mm in all experiments. The animals were irradiated with variable single doses of unmodulated protons (150 MeV) with the shoot-through method, whereby the plateau of the depth-dose profile is used rather than the Bragg peak. The endpoint for estimating isoeffective dose (ED 50 ) values was paralysis of fore and/or hind limbs within 210 days after irradiation. Histology of the spinal cords was performed to assess the radiation-induced tissue damage. Results: High-precision proton irradiation of the lateral or the central part of the spinal cord resulted in a shift of dose-response curves to higher dose values compared with the homogeneously irradiated cervical cord to the same 20-mm length. The ED 50 values were 28.9 Gy and 33.4 Gy for the lateral wide and lateral tight irradiations, respectively, and as high as 71.9 Gy for the central beam experiment, compared with 20.4 Gy for the homogeneously irradiated 20-mm length of cervical cord. Histologic analysis of the spinal cords showed that the paralysis was due to white matter necrosis. The radiosensitivity was inhomogeneously distributed across the spinal cord, with a much more radioresistant central white matter (ED 50 = 71.9 Gy) compared with lateral white matter (ED 50 values = 28.9 Gy and 33.4 Gy). The gray matter did not show any noticeable lesions, such as necrosis or

  17. MRI of anterior spinal artery syndrome of the cervical spinal cord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, S. (Dept. of Radiology, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)); Yamada, T. (Dept. of Radiology, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)); Ishii, K. (Dept. of Radiology, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)); Saito, H. (Dept. of Neurology, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)); Tanji, H. (Dept. of Neurology, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)); Kobayashi, T. (Inst. of Rehabilitation Medicine, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Miyagi (Japan)); Soma, Y. (Div. of Neurology, Takeda Hospital, Aizuwakamatsu (Japan)); Sakamoto, K. (Dept. of Radiology, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan))

    1992-12-01

    Cervical spinal cord lesions in the anterior spinal artery syndrome were delineated on magnetic resonance images (MRI) in four patients. The lesion was always seen anteriorly in the cervical cord. On T2-weighted images, the lesions appeared hyperintense relative to the normal spinal cord, while on T1-weighted images, two chronic lesions appeared hypointense, with local atrophy of the cord. In one case, repeated T1-weighted images showed no signal abnormality 4 days after the ictus, but the lesion became hypointense 18 days later, when contrast enhancement was also recognized after injection of Gd-DTPA; this sequence of intensity changes was similar to that of cerebral infarction. The extent of the lesion seen MRI correlated closely with neurological findings in all cases. Although the findings may not be specific, MRI is now the modality of choice for confirming the diagnosis in patients suspected of having an anterior spinal artery syndrome. (orig.)

  18. MRI of anterior spinal artery syndrome of the cervical spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, S.; Yamada, T.; Ishii, K.; Saito, H.; Tanji, H.; Kobayashi, T.; Soma, Y.; Sakamoto, K.

    1992-01-01

    Cervical spinal cord lesions in the anterior spinal artery syndrome were delineated on magnetic resonance images (MRI) in four patients. The lesion was always seen anteriorly in the cervical cord. On T2-weighted images, the lesions appeared hyperintense relative to the normal spinal cord, while on T1-weighted images, two chronic lesions appeared hypointense, with local atrophy of the cord. In one case, repeated T1-weighted images showed no signal abnormality 4 days after the ictus, but the lesion became hypointense 18 days later, when contrast enhancement was also recognized after injection of Gd-DTPA; this sequence of intensity changes was similar to that of cerebral infarction. The extent of the lesion seen MRI correlated closely with neurological findings in all cases. Although the findings may not be specific, MRI is now the modality of choice for confirming the diagnosis in patients suspected of having an anterior spinal artery syndrome. (orig.)

  19. Thermal Stimulation Alters Cervical Spinal Cord Functional Connectivity in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Kenneth A; Sentis, Amy I; Bernadel-Huey, Olivia N; Chen, Yufen; Wang, Xue; Parrish, Todd B; Mackey, Sean

    2018-01-15

    The spinal cord has an active role in the modulation and transmission of the neural signals traveling between the body and the brain. Recent advancements in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have made the in vivo examination of spinal cord function in humans now possible. This technology has been recently extended to the investigation of resting state functional networks in the spinal cord, leading to the identification of distinct patterns of spinal cord functional connectivity. In this study, we expand on the previous work and further investigate resting state cervical spinal cord functional connectivity in healthy participants (n = 15) using high resolution imaging coupled with both seed-based functional connectivity analyses and graph theory-based metrics. Within spinal cord segment functional connectivity was present between the left and right ventral horns (bilateral motor network), left and right dorsal horns (bilateral sensory network), and the ipsilateral ventral and dorsal horns (unilateral sensory-motor network). Functional connectivity between the spinal cord segments was less apparent with the connectivity centered at the region of interest and spanning spinal cord functional network was demonstrated to be state-dependent as thermal stimulation of the right ventrolateral forearm resulted in significant disruption of the bilateral sensory network, increased network global efficiency, and decreased network modularity. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Computed tomography in the treatment of cervical spinal cord tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Hideo

    1984-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the cervical and thoracic spinal column was carried out in 12 patients of spinal cord tumor. There were 6 schwannomas, 2 metastatic tumors and other 4 cases of different tumors, which were studied by either a General Electric CT/T or a Toshiba TCT 60 Type A scanner. In all patients, CT-examination followed conventional spinal X-ray studies. The usefulness of the plain spinal CT (PCT: CT without any contrast enhancement neither intravenously nor intrathecally) was to detect subtle bony changes as well as paraspinal soft tissue abnormalities, although it was hard to distinguish the spinal cord by PCT. Metrizamide CT myelography (CTM: CT with intrathecal instillation of metrizamide) was indispensable to identify the intracanalicular architecture. It provided the clue to determine the site and the size of tumor, and it was also useful after surgical procedure. CTM with intravenous contrast enhancement (CTM-CE) together with CTM distinguished the spinal tumor from the spinal cord very well, particularly in the cases of schwannoma. The author supports significant reliability of PCT, CTM and CTM-CE in identifying the presence, the extension and the bony involvement of spinal cord tumors. (author)

  1. Prediction of functional recovery six months following traumatic spinal cord injury during acute care hospitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard-Denis, Andréane; Feldman, Debbie; Thompson, Cynthia; Mac-Thiong, Jean-Marc

    2017-02-15

    To determine factors associated with functional status six months following a traumatic cervical and thoracic spinal cord injury (SCI), with a particular interest in factors related to the acute care hospitalization stay. This is a prospective cohort study. Sixteen potential predictive variables were studied. Univariate regression analyses were first performed to determine the strength of association of each variable independently with the total Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM) score. Significant ones were then included in a General linear model in order to determine the most relevant predictive factors among them. Analyses were carried out separately for tetraplegia and paraplegia. A single specialized Level I trauma center. One hundred fifty-nine patients hospitalized for an acute traumatic SCI between January 2010 and February 2015. Not applicable. The SCIM (version 3) functional score. Motor-complete SCI (AIS-A,B) was the main predictive factor associated with decreased total SCIM score in tetraplegia and paraplegia. Longer acute care length of stay and the occurrence of acute medical complications (either pneumonia, urinary tract infections or pressure ulcers) were predictors of decreased functional outcome following tetraplegia, while increased body mass index and higher trauma severity were predictive of decreased functional outcome following paraplegia. This study supports previous work while adding information regarding the importance of optimizing acute care hospitalization as it may influence chronic functional status following traumatic SCI.

  2. Comparative analysis of cervical spine management in a subset of severe traumatic brain injury cases using computer simulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimbroe J Carter

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: No randomized control trial to date has studied the use of cervical spine management strategies in cases of severe traumatic brain injury (TBI at risk for cervical spine instability solely due to damaged ligaments. A computer algorithm is used to decide between four cervical spine management strategies. A model assumption is that the emergency room evaluation shows no spinal deficit and a computerized tomogram of the cervical spine excludes the possibility of fracture of cervical vertebrae. The study's goal is to determine cervical spine management strategies that maximize brain injury functional survival while minimizing quadriplegia. METHODS/FINDINGS: The severity of TBI is categorized as unstable, high risk and stable based on intracranial hypertension, hypoxemia, hypotension, early ventilator associated pneumonia, admission Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS and age. Complications resulting from cervical spine management are simulated using three decision trees. Each case starts with an amount of primary and secondary brain injury and ends as a functional survivor, severely brain injured, quadriplegic or dead. Cervical spine instability is studied with one-way and two-way sensitivity analyses providing rankings of cervical spine management strategies for probabilities of management complications based on QALYs. Early collar removal received more QALYs than the alternative strategies in most arrangements of these comparisons. A limitation of the model is the absence of testing against an independent data set. CONCLUSIONS: When clinical logic and components of cervical spine management are systematically altered, changes that improve health outcomes are identified. In the absence of controlled clinical studies, the results of this comparative computer assessment show that early collar removal is preferred over a wide range of realistic inputs for this subset of traumatic brain injury. Future research is needed on identifying factors in

  3. Anaesthetic and Intensive Care Management of Traumatic Cervical Spine Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G S Umamaheswara Rao

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Trauma to the cervical spine may have devastating consequences. Timely interventions are essential to prevent avoidable neurological deterioration. In the initial stabilization of patients with acute cervical spine injuries, physiological disturbances, especially those involving cardiac and respiratory function require careful attention. Early surgery, which facilitates rapid mobi-lization of the patient, is fraught with important management considerations in the intraopoerative period and the subsequent critical care. Airway management poses a crucial challenge at this stage. Those patients who survive the injury with quadriplegia or quadriparesis may present themselves for incidental surgical procedures. Chronic systemic manifestations in these patients require attention in providing anaesthesia and postoperative care at this stage. The current review provides an insight into the physiological disturbances and the management issues in both acute and chronic phases of traumatic cervical spine injury.

  4. Diagnosis of cervical spinal cord disorders with MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suyama, Naohito; Iizuka, Tadashi

    1991-01-01

    From September 1987 through May 1989, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been performed in 58 patients with myelopathy and 9 patients with spinal cord injuries. This study was designed to determine the rate of spinal cord stricture and changes of signal intensities. Increased signal intensity on T2-weighted images was more frequently observed than decreased intensity on T1-weighted images in the group of myelopathy (19/58 vs 10/58). In the group of spinal cord injuries, however, there was no significant difference in the incidence between increased intensity on T2-weighted images (4/9) and decreased intensity on T1-weighted images (7/9). Twelve patients with chronic compressive spinal myelopathy tended to have an increased intensity on T2-weighted images. In such cases, although JOA scores were low before surgery, signal intensity returned to that without marked signal changes. In chronic compressive cervical myelopathy, the degree of preoperative compression was the same as the postoperative JOA scores. Regarding cervical spinal injury, there was a good correlation between the size of low signal area and the degree of paralysis. (N.K.)

  5. Controversies in the differential diagnosis of Brown-Sequard syndrome due to cervical spinal disease from stroke: A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaner Koksal, M.D.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is generally considered to be the first preliminary diagnosis in patients presenting with acute hemiparesia in the emergency department. But rarely in unexpected spontaneous neurological pathologies that may lead to hemiparesis. The data from 8 non-traumatic patients who underwent surgical treatment for brown-sequard syndrome (BSS were reviewed retrospectively. All patients were initially misdiagnosed with strokes. Two of the patients had spinal canal stenosis, two had spinal epidural hematomas, one had an ossified herniated disc and three had soft herniated discs. None of the patients complained of significant pain at the initial presentation. All of the patients had a mild sensory deficit that was initially unrecognized. The pain of the patients began to become evident after hospitalization and, patients transferred to neurosurgery department. Cervical spinal pathologies compressing the corticospinal tract in one-half of the cervical spinal canal may present with only hemiparesis, without neck and radicular pain. If it's too late, permanent neurological damage may become inevitable while it is a correctable pathology. Keywords: Brown-Sequard syndrome, Cervical cord, Herniated disc, Spinal epidural hematoma, Stroke

  6. Cervical spinal tuberculosis with tuberculous otitis media ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prompt and effective response to anti tuberculosis drugs informed the diagnosis of tuberculosis of the cervical vertebra and tuberculous otitis media with multiple cranial nerve palsies. This case underscores the value of high index of suspicion, thorough and complete clinical evaluation in any patient with chronic symptoms ...

  7. CT imaging of cervical spinal vascular malformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Takashi; Iwamoto, Munehisa; Miyamoto, Etsuo; Kuriyama, Tsuyoshi; Hayama, Tsuneto

    1982-01-01

    The patient had a history of the onset of motor paralysis of the right upper and lower extremities. Eight years later, numbness of the right upper extremity and a severe neck pain developed, and transverse paralysis of the lower extremities appeared in about 10 hours. CT demonstrated the presence of spinal vascular abnormality. Angiography suggested arteriovenous malformation of glomus type. (Chiba, N.)

  8. CT imaging of cervical spinal vascular malformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, Takashi; Iwamoto, Munehisa; Miyamoto, Etsuo; Kuriyama, Tsuyoshi; Hayama, Tsuneto (Wakayama Red Cross Hospital, Wakayama (Japan))

    1982-05-01

    The patient had a history of the onset of motor paralysis of the right upper and lower extremities. Eight years later, numbness of the right upper extremity and a severe neck pain developed, and transverse paralysis of the lower extremities appeared in about 10 hours. CT demonstrated the presence of spinal vascular abnormality. Angiography suggested arteriovenous malformation of glomus type.

  9. Non-traumatic spinal extradural haematoma: magnetic resonance findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, E.M.; Smith, P.J.; Fitt, G.; Hennessy, O.F. [St. Vincent`s Hospital, Fitzroy, VIC (Australia). University of Melbourne, Department of Medical Imaging

    1999-05-01

    Non-traumatic extradural spinal haematoma is an uncommon condition that is usually associated with a poor outcome. It may present acutely with signs and symptoms of major neurological dysfunction secondary to cord compression, or subacutely over a number of days or weeks with fluctuating symptoms. The exact aetiology of this condition is incompletely understood, but it is believed that the blood is venous in origin, as distinct from the arterial origin of intracranial extradural haematomas. Causes of non-traumatic extradural spinal haematoma include anticoagulation, vasculitis such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and spinal arteriovenous malformations. Conditions that may mimic an acute spinal haematoma include extradural abscess and extradural metastatic infiltration. It is important to make a diagnosis of extradural compression because surgery may offer the best hope in restoring neurological function in these patients. Imaging modalities used for the investigation of extradural haematomas include myelography, CT myelography (CTM) and MRI with or without gadolinium enhancement. The MR appearances of acute extradural abscess and extradural tumour can mimic an extradural haematoma. In subacute haematoma, owing to the magnetic properties of blood degradation products, MR is more specific in diagnosing and ageing of the haematoma. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd 11 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Cervical Spinal Motion During Orotacheal Intubation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    the trauma victim with an unstable cervical spine. Ann Emerg Med 17: 25- 29, 1988 4. Cormack RS, Lehane J: Difficult tracheal intubation in...optimal airway view was scored according to Cormack .4 The Malampati Grade, ease or difficulty of intubation, and Cormack scores for each patient are...Malampati and Cormack scores for individual patients and specific events. 13 Median Distraction at each stage of intubation for different methods of

  11. MRI Prognostication Factors in the Setting of Cervical Spinal Cord Injury Secondary to Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Pérez, Rafael; Cepeda, Santiago; Paredes, Igor; Alen, Jose F; Lagares, Alfonso

    2017-05-01

    Several studies have looked for an association between radiologic findings and neurologic outcome after cervical trauma. In the current literature, there is a paucity of evidence proving the prognostic role of soft tissue damage or bony integrity. Our objective is to determine radiologic findings related to neurologic prognosis in patients after incomplete acute traumatic cervical spinal cord injury, regardless of initial neurologic examination results. We retrospectively reviewed patients with acute traumatic cervical spinal cord injury who had a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed within the first 96 hours. Clinical and epidemiologic data were recorded from the medical records along with several radiologic findings from the initial computed tomographic scan and MRI. Data were analyzed using a non-parametric test. Significant prognostic factors were analyzed through a stepwise multivariable logistic regression, adjusted by neurologic status at baseline. The receiver-operating characteristic curve was used to test the discriminative capacity of the model. Eighty-six patients (68 males and 18 females) were included for the analysis. Mean age was 49 years. Ligamentum flavum injury, intramedullary edema larger than 36 mm, and facet dislocation were demonstrated to be associated with a lack of neurologic improvement at follow-up. Multivariable analysis showed that edema larger than 36 mm and facet dislocation were strong predictors of clinical outcome, regardless of the initial neurologic examination result. Early MRI has an intrinsic prognostic value. Ligamentous injury and larger edema are strong predicting factors of a bad neurologic outcome at long-term follow-up. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Traumatic injuries: imaging of spinal injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imhof, H.; Fuchsjaeger, M. [Department of Osteology, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Wien (Austria)

    2002-06-01

    Severe (high-energy) spinal injuries are common sequelae of acute traumas. The task of radiology is to establish the radiological diagnosis, classify it, judge stability and instability and lead further radiological evaluation in cases of non-agreement between the radiological diagnosis and the clinical (neurological) findings. While skeletal abnormalities are best diagnosed with spiral CT and to a lesser degree with plain-film radiographs, soft tissue lesions, such as cord injuries or ligament ruptures, are best outlined with emergency MRI. The classification of fractures depends on fracture (trauma)-biomechanics and location. All these efforts are necessary to get the best clinical outcome for the patient. (orig.)

  13. Morphology of the cervical spinal cord with myelopathy on computed myelography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, Hiroaki; Asano, Masafumi; Yokota, Hidemaro

    1984-01-01

    The relationship between morphological changes in the spinal cord shown on computer-assisted myelography and symptoms was investigated in 73 patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Flatness of the spinal cord was seen in many of the patients. Symptoms were likely to be severer with increasing the degree of flatness of the spinal cord. The length of the flat spinal cord will help to select the operative method for cervical spondylotic myelopathy. (Namekawa, K.)

  14. Activation of Central Pattern Generator for Respiration Following Complete High Cervical Spinal Cord Interruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    cord injury . We also found that late-Insp interneurons are the most sensitive spinal units to GABAa and Glycine-receptor blockers (GABAzine and...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0324 TITLE: Activation of Central Pattern Generator for Respiration Following Complete High Cervical Spinal Cord ...TERMS Spinal cord injury , high cervical transection, respiration, CPG, GABA, Glycine, spinal cord 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF

  15. The increased prevalence of cervical spondylosis in patients with adult thoracolumbar spinal deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schairer, William W; Carrer, Alexandra; Lu, Michael; Hu, Serena S

    2014-12-01

    Retrospective cohort study. To assess the concomitance of cervical spondylosis and thoracolumbar spinal deformity. Patients with degenerative cervical spine disease have higher rates of degeneration in the lumbar spine. In addition, degenerative cervical spine changes have been observed in adult patients with thoracolumbar spinal deformities. However, to the best of our knowledge, there have been no studies quantifying the association between cervical spondylosis and thoracolumbar spinal deformity in adult patients. Patients seen by a spine surgeon or spine specialist at a single institution were assessed for cervical spondylosis and/or thoracolumbar spinal deformity using an administrative claims database. Spinal radiographic utilization and surgical intervention were used to infer severity of spinal disease. The relative prevalence of each spinal diagnosis was assessed in patients with and without the other diagnosis. A total of 47,560 patients were included in this study. Cervical spondylosis occurred in 13.1% overall, but was found in 31.0% of patients with thoracolumbar spinal deformity (OR=3.27, Pspondylosis (OR=3.26, Pspondylosis or thoracolumbar spinal deformity had significantly higher rates of the other spinal diagnosis. This correlation was increased with increased severity of disease. Patients with both diagnoses were significantly more likely to have received a spine fusion. Further research is warranted to establish the cause of this correlation. Clinicians should use this information to both screen and counsel patients who present for cervical spondylosis or thoracolumbar spinal deformity.

  16. MR imaging of spinal factors and compression of the spinal cord in cervical myelopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokubun, Shoichi; Ozawa, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Minoru; Ishii, Sukenobu; Tani, Shotaro; Sato, Tetsuaki.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of surgical 109 patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy were retrospectively reviewed to examine whether MR imaging would replace conventional radiological procedures in determining spinal factors and spinal cord compression in this disease. MR imaging was useful in determining spondylotic herniation, continuous type of ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament, and calcification of yellow ligament, probably replacing CT myelography, discography, and CT discography. When total defect of the subarachnoid space on T2-weighted images and block on myelograms were compared in determining spinal cord compression, the spinal cord was affected more extensively by 1.3 intervertebral distance (IVD) on T2-weighted images. When indentation of one third or more in anterior and posterior diameter of the spinal cord was used as spinal cord compression, the difference in the affected extension between myelography and MR imaging was 0.2 IVD on T1-weighted images and 0.6 IVD on T2-weighted images. However, when block was seen in 3 or more IVD on myelograms, the range of spinal cord compression tended to be larger on T1-weighted images. For a small range of spinal cord compression, T1-weighted imaging seems to be helpful in determining the range of decompression. When using T2-weighted imaging, the range of decompression becomes large, frequently including posterior decompression. (N.K.)

  17. Morphological analysis of the cervical spinal canal, dural tube and spinal cord in normal individuals using CT myelography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, H.; Ohmori, K.; Takatsu, T.; Teramoto, T.; Ishida, Y.; Suzuki, K.

    1996-01-01

    To verify the conventional concept of ''developmental stenosis of the cervical spinal canal'', we performed a morphological analysis of the relations of the cervical spinal canal, dural tube and spinal cord in normal individuals. The sagittal diameter, area and circularity of the three structures, and the dispersion of each parameter, were examined on axial sections of CT myelograms of 36 normal subjects. The spinal canal was narrowest at C4, followed by C5, while the spinal cord was largest at C4/5. The area and circularity of the cervical spinal cord were not significantly correlated with any parameter of the spinal canal nor with the sagittal diameter and area of the dural tube at any level examined, and the spinal cord showed less individual variation than the bony canal. Compression of the spinal cord might be expected whenever the sagittal diameter of the spinal canal is below the lower limit of normal, that is about 12 mm on plain radiographs. Thus, we concluded that the concept of ''developmental stenosis of the cervical spinal canal'' was reasonable and acceptable. (orig.). With 2 figs., 3 tabs

  18. Spinal cord injury after blunt cervical spine trauma: correlation of soft-tissue damage and extension of lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Pérez, R; Paredes, I; Cepeda, S; Ramos, A; Castaño-León, A M; García-Fuentes, C; Lobato, R D; Gómez, P A; Lagares, A

    2014-05-01

    In patients with spinal cord injury after blunt trauma, several studies have observed a correlation between neurologic impairment and radiologic findings. Few studies have been performed to correlate spinal cord injury with ligamentous injury. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate whether ligamentous injury or disk disruption after spinal cord injury correlates with lesion length. We retrospectively reviewed 108 patients diagnosed with traumatic spinal cord injury after cervical trauma between 1990-2011. Plain films, CT, and MR imaging were performed on patients and then reviewed for this study. MR imaging was performed within 96 hours after cervical trauma for all patients. Data regarding ligamentous injury, disk injury, and the extent of the spinal cord injury were collected from an adequate number of MR images. We evaluated anterior longitudinal ligaments, posterior longitudinal ligaments, and the ligamentum flavum. Length of lesion, disk disruption, and ligamentous injury association, as well as the extent of the spinal cord injury were statistically assessed by means of univariate analysis, with the use of nonparametric tests and multivariate analysis along with linear regression. There were significant differences in lesion length on T2-weighted images for anterior longitudinal ligaments, posterior longitudinal ligaments, and ligamentum flavum in the univariate analysis; however, when this was adjusted by age, level of injury, sex, and disruption of the soft tissue evaluated (disk, anterior longitudinal ligaments, posterior longitudinal ligaments, and ligamentum flavum) in a multivariable analysis, only ligamentum flavum showed a statistically significant association with lesion length. Furthermore, the number of ligaments affected had a positive correlation with the extension of the lesion. In cervical spine trauma, a specific pattern of ligamentous injury correlates with the length of the spinal cord lesion in MR imaging studies

  19. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Therapies for Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doulames, Vanessa M.; Plant, Giles W.

    2016-01-01

    Cervical-level injuries account for the majority of presented spinal cord injuries (SCIs) to date. Despite the increase in survival rates due to emergency medicine improvements, overall quality of life remains poor, with patients facing variable deficits in respiratory and motor function. Therapies aiming to ameliorate symptoms and restore function, even partially, are urgently needed. Current therapeutic avenues in SCI seek to increase regenerative capacities through trophic and immunomodulatory factors, provide scaffolding to bridge the lesion site and promote regeneration of native axons, and to replace SCI-lost neurons and glia via intraspinal transplantation. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are a clinically viable means to accomplish this; they have no major ethical barriers, sources can be patient-matched and collected using non-invasive methods. In addition, the patient’s own cells can be used to establish a starter population capable of producing multiple cell types. To date, there is only a limited pool of research examining iPSC-derived transplants in SCI—even less research that is specific to cervical injury. The purpose of the review herein is to explore both preclinical and clinical recent advances in iPSC therapies with a detailed focus on cervical spinal cord injury. PMID:27070598

  20. Traumatic vs non-traumatic spinal cord lesions: comparison of neurological and functional outcome after in-patient rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, A; Taly, A B; Srivastava, A; Vishal, S; Murali, T

    2008-07-01

    Retrospective comparative study of 2 years duration. To compare neurological and functional outcome and length of stay of persons with traumatic vs non-traumatic spinal cord lesion (SCL) after in-patient rehabilitation. Neurological rehabilitation department of a tertiary research center in Bangalore, Karnataka, India. Seventy-six in-patients with spinal cord lesion: traumatic (38 patients, M/F=34:4) and non-traumatic (38 patients, M/F=16:22) were admitted for in-patient multidisciplinary neurorehabilitation. ASIA impairment scale, duration of stay (DOS), and admission and discharge--Barthel Index scores in both the groups were recorded, compared and analyzed. ASIA impairment scale scores were significantly higher in non-traumatic group both at admission and discharge (P=0.020 and 0.017), respectively, showing lesser impairment in non-traumatic group. DOS for rehabilitation was higher for traumatic group as compared to non-traumatic group (65.97+/-47.66 vs 60.68+/-45.69 days), although statistically not significant (P>0.05). Barthel Index scores were 28.68+/-17.15 vs 27.63+/-14.96 at admission and 54.21+/-25.10 vs 51.44+/-19.86 at discharge in traumatic and non-traumatic groups, respectively. All patients (n=76) showed significant improvement in Barthel Index (P=0.000), but no statistically significant difference (P>0.05) was recorded between the two groups, both at admission and at discharge. Orthoses was required significantly more frequently (P=0.043) in traumatic SCL group. The study showed that despite more impairment in persons with traumatic spinal cord lesion, there was statistically no significant difference in the length of stay and the functional outcome between persons with traumatic and non-traumatic spinal cord lesion after in-patient rehabilitation.

  1. Traumatic and non-traumatic spinal cord impairment in New Zealand: incidence and characteristics of people admitted to spinal units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrett, Sarah; Beaver, Carolyn; Sullivan, Martin J; Herbison, G Peter; Acland, Rick; Paul, Charlotte

    2012-10-01

    This paper estimates the incidence (all ages) of spinal cord neurological impairment (SCI; traumatic and non-traumatic) in New Zealand and describes pre-SCI characteristics and early post-SCI outcomes for participants (16-64 years) in this longitudinal study. Demographic and clinical data on all people admitted to New Zealand's two spinal units (mid-2007 to mid-2009) were included for the estimate of incidence. Participants in this longitudinal study were asked at first interview about pre-SCI socio-demographic, health and behavioural characteristics, and about post-SCI symptoms, general health status (EQ-5D) and disability (WHODAS 12-item). Age-adjusted incidence rates (95% CI) for European, Māori, Pacific and 'Other' ethnicities were 29 (24-34), 46 (30-64), 70 (40-100) and 16 (9-22) per million, respectively. Interviews with 118 (73%) participants (16-64 years), occurred 6.5 months post-SCI. Most reported bother with symptoms, and problems with health status and disability. Compared with Europeans, the incidence of SCI is high among Māori and particularly high among Pacific people. Six months after SCI, proximate to discharge from the spinal units, considerable symptomatic, general health and disability burden was borne by people with SCI.

  2. Epidemiology of traumatic spinal cord injury in Galicia, Spain: trends over a 20-year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoto-Marqués, A; Ferreiro-Velasco, M E; Salvador-de la Barrera, S; Balboa-Barreiro, V; Rodriguez-Sotillo, A; Meijide-Failde, R

    2017-06-01

    Observational study with prospective and retrospective monitoring. To describe the epidemiological and demographic characteristics of traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI), and to analyze its epidemiological changes. Unidad de Lesionados Medulares, Complejo Hospitalario Universitario A Coruña, in Galicia (Spain). The study included patients with TSCI who had been hospitalized between January 1995 and December 2014. Relevant data were extracted from the admissions registry and electronic health record. A total of 1195 patients with TSCI were admitted over the specified period of time; 76.4% male and 23.6% female. Mean patient age at injury was 50.20 years. Causes of injury were falls (54.2%), traffic accidents (37%), sports/leisure-related accidents (3.5%) and other traumatic causes (5.3%). Mean patient age increased significantly over time (from 46.40 to 56.54 years), and the number of cases of TSCI related to traffic accidents decreased (from 44.5% to 23.7%), whereas those linked to falls increased (from 46.9% to 65.6%). The most commonly affected neurological level was the cervical level (54.9%), increasing in the case of levels C1-C4 over time, and the most frequent ASIA (American Spinal Injury Association) grade was A (44.3%). The crude annual incidence rate was 2.17/100 000 inhabitants, decreasing significantly over time at an annual percentage rate change of -1.4%. The incidence rate of TSCI tends to decline progressively. Mean patient age has increased over time and cervical levels C1-C4 are currently the most commonly affected ones. These epidemiological changes will eventually result in adjustments in the standard model of care for TSCI.

  3. Rehabilitation outcome of upper extremetiy skilled performance in persons with cervical spinal cord injuries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spooren, Annemie I.F.; Janssen-Potten, Yvonne J.M.; Snoek, Govert J.; IJzerman, Maarten Joost; Kerckhofs, Eric; Seelen, Henk A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate changes in arm hand skilled performance during and after active rehabilitation in (sub)groups of subjects with cervical spinal cord injuries. Design: Longitudinal multi-centre cohort study. Patients: Persons with cervical spinal cord injuries during (n?=?57) and after

  4. Dose-volume effects in the rat cervical spinal cord after proton irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijl, HP; van Luijk, P; Coppes, RP; Schippers, JM; Konings, AWT; van der Kogel, AJ

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate dose-volume effects in the rat cervical spinal cord with protons. Methods and Materials: Wistar rats were irradiated on the cervical spinal cord with a single fraction of unmodulated protons (150-190 MeV) using the shoot through method, which employs the plateau of the

  5. Pathology and Treatment of Traumatic Cervical Spine Syndrome: Whiplash Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuhiro Tanaka

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic cervical syndrome comprises the various symptoms that occur as a result of external force such as that of a traffic accident. In 1995, the Quebec Task Force on whiplash-associated disorders (WAD formulated the Quebec classification, with accompanying clinical practice guidelines. These guidelines were in accordance with the stated clinical isolated or combined symptoms of the syndrome: neck pain, headaches, dizziness, numbness of head or face, eye pain, vision loss, double vision, tinnitus, hearing loss, nausea, and numbness and/or weakness of extremities. In recent years, cerebrospinal fluid hypovolemia or fibromyalgia has been recognized as a major notable cause of a variety of symptoms, although many clinical questions remain regarding the pathology of this syndrome. Therefore, its diagnosis and treatment should be conducted extremely carefully. While the Quebec classification and its guidelines are very useful for the normalization and standardization of symptoms of traumatic cervical syndrome, in the future, we would like to see the emergence of new guidelines that better address the diversity of this disease.

  6. Are midsagittal tissue bridges predictive of outcome after cervical spinal cord injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Eveline; Lachappelle, Patrice; Sutter, Reto; Curt, Armin; Freund, Patrick

    2017-05-01

    T 2 -weighted scans provided data on the extent and dynamics of neuronal tissue damage and midsagittal tissue bridges at the epicenter of traumatic cervical spinal cord lesions in 24 subacute tetraplegic patients. At 1 month postinjury, smaller lesion area and midsagittal tissue bridges identified those patients with lower extremity evoked potentials and better clinical recovery. Wider midsagittal tissue bridges and smaller lesions at 1 month post-injury were associated with neurological and functional recovery at 1-year follow-up. Neuroimaging biomarkers of lesion size and midsagittal tissue bridges are potential outcome predictors and patient stratifiers in both subacute and chronic clinical trials. Ann Neurol 2017;81:740-748. © 2017 American Neurological Association.

  7. Traumatic spinal cord injury in the north-east Tanzania - describing incidence, etiology and clinical outcomes retrospectively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshi, Haleluya; Sundelin, Gunnevi; Sahlen, Klas-Göran; Sörlin, Ann

    2017-01-01

    Causes, magnitude and consequences of traumatic spinal cord injury depend largely on geography, infrastructure, socioeconomic and cultural activities of a given region. There is a scarcity of literature on profile of traumatic spinal cord injury to inform prevention and rehabilitation of this health condition in African rural settings, particularly Tanzania. To describe the incidence, etiology and clinical outcomes of traumatic spinal cord injury and issues related to retrospective study in underdeveloped setting. Records for patients with traumatic spinal cord injury for five consecutive years (2010-2014) were obtained retrospectively from the admission wards and health records archives of the Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Center. Sociodemographic, cause, complications and patients' condition on discharge were recorded and analyzed descriptively. The admission books in the wards registered 288 new traumatic spinal cord injury cases from January 2010 to December 2014. Of the 288 cases registered in the books, 224 were males and 64 females with mean age 39.1(39.1 ± 16.3) years and the majority of individuals 196(68.1%) were aged between 16 and 45 years. A search of the hospital archives provided 213 full patient records in which the leading cause of injury was falls 104(48.8%) followed by road traffic accidents 73(34.3%). Cervical 81(39.9%) and lumbar 71(34.74%) spinal levels were the most affected. The annual incidence for the Kilimanjaro region (population 1,640,087) was estimated at more than 26 persons per million population. The most documented complications were pressure ulcers 42(19.7%), respiratory complications 32(15.0%) and multiple complications 28(13.1%). The mean length of hospital stay was 64.2 ± 54.3 days and the mortality rate was 24.4%. Prevention of traumatic spinal cord injury in North-east Tanzania should consider falls (particularly from height) as the leading cause, targeting male teenagers and young adults. Pressure ulcers, respiratory

  8. Normal morphology of the cervical spinal cord and spinal canal using MRI in Japanese

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Fumihiko; Yukawa, Yasutsugu; Suda, Kota; Yamagata, Masatsune; Ueta, Takayoshi

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish standard MRI values for the cervical spinal canal, dural tube, and spinal cord in healthy Japanese subjects and to define developmental stenosis of the cervical spinal canal based on MRI data. To establish standard values for ''finger grip and release in 10 seconds (G and R test)'' and ''10 second step test'' in healthy Japanese subjects. There were approximately 100 volunteers representing each gender and generation, including persons aged in their 20s to 70s. The sagittal diameter of the spinal canal, and the sagittal diameter and axial area of the dural tube and spinal cord were measured on MRIs of 1,211 subjects. From this data, we calculated the spinal cord occupation rate in the dural tube for defining developmental stenosis of the cervical spinal canal. ''Finger grip and release in 10 seconds (G and R test)'' and ''10 second step test'' were also examined on 1,211 subjects. The spinal canal diameter in sagittal images for all ages at the C5/6 intervertebral disc level was 11.7±1.6 mm in males and 11.6±1.5 mm in females, while that at the C5 vertebral body level was 12.9±1.4 mm in males and 12.5±1.3 mm in females. Dural tube diameter in sagittal images for all ages at the C5/6 intervertebral disc level was 9.5±1.8 mm in males and 9.6±1.6 mm in females, while that at the C5 vertebral body level was 11.2±1.4 mm in males and 11.1±1.4 mm in females. Dural tube area in axial images for all ages at the C5/6 intervertebral disc level was 155.7±32.1 mm 2 in males and 149.6±29.0 mm 2 in females, while that at the C5 vertebral body level was 187.4±32.6 mm 2 in males and 177.0±32.7 mm 2 in females. Spinal cord diameter in sagittal images for all ages at the C5/6 intervertebral disc level was 5.9±1.0 mm in males and 5.8±0.9 mm in females, while that at the C5 vertebral body level was 6.5±0.7 mm in males and 6.4±0.7 mm in females. Spinal cord area in axial images for all ages at the C5/6 intervertebral disc level

  9. Acquired cervical spinal arachnoid diverticulum in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, R J; Garosi, L; Matiasek, K; Lowrie, M

    2015-04-01

    A one-year-old, female entire, domestic, shorthair cat presented with acute onset non-ambulatory tetraparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging was consistent with a C3-C4 acute non-compressive nucleus pulposus extrusion and the cat was treated conservatively. The cat was able to walk after 10 days and was normal 2 months after presentation. The cat was referred five and a half years later for investigation of an insidious onset 3-month history of ataxia and tetraparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine was repeated, demonstrating a spinal arachnoid diverticulum at C3 causing marked focal compression of the spinal cord. This was treated surgically with hemilaminectomy and durectomy. The cat improved uneventfully and was discharged 12 days later. © 2014 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  10. A profile of traumatic spinal cord injury and medical complications in Latvia

    OpenAIRE

    Nulle, Anda; Tjurina, Uljana; Erts, Renars; Vetra, Anita

    2017-01-01

    Study design A single centre retrospective study. Objectives To collect data and analyse the epidemiological profile of traumatic spinal cord injury and its medical complications during the subacute rehabilitation period. Setting Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Programme of the National Rehabilitation Centre, ‘Vaivari’, Jurmala, Latvia. Methods Information was collected in 2015 from the medical records of 134 patients with a traumatic spinal cord injury admitted for primary rehabilitation b...

  11. The epidemiology of traumatic spinal cord injury in British Columbia, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenehan, Brian; Street, John; Kwon, Brian K; Noonan, Vanessa; Zhang, Hongbin; Fisher, Charles G; Dvorak, Marcel F

    2012-02-15

    Retrospective observational study utilizing prospectively collected population-based data. To describe the epidemiology and demographics of all patients with traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI) treated at a single institution, which represents the sole referral center and specialized SCI unit for a population of 4 million people. Although many studies report on the epidemiology of TSCI, studies in which patients are prospectively characterized in the acute setting with precise recording of their baseline neurological impairment are uncommon. Data on all patients admitted to a level 1 trauma center with TSCI between 1995 and 2004 were prospectively collected using a customized, fully relational, locally designed, spine database. The incidence of TSCI averaged 35.7 per million and did not change substantially during 10 years of data collection. However, the median age of TSCI patients increased from 34.5 to 45.5 years during this period. The men-to-women ratio was 4.4:1. In those older than 55 years, cervical-level injuries with incomplete American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS) scores C and D were most common, with men demonstrating predominantly lower cervical injuries and women more likely to exhibit upper cervical injuries. Increasing rates of surgical treatment during 10 years of this study (61.8%-86.4%) were not associated with improvements in mortality rate or length of hospital stay. Patients older than 75 years who presented with an acute TSCI had a mortality rate of 20% while in hospital. The incidence of TSCI in our population has remained remarkably stable, and age-related changes mirror those in the population across 10 years. An increased tendency to surgical treatment during the 10 years of this study has not resulted in concomitant changes in patients' in-hospital mortality or length of stay.

  12. Usefulness of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage with plate augmentation for anterior arthrodesis in traumatic cervical spine injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kyung-Jin; Choi, Byung-Wan; Kim, Gyu-Hyung; Song, Ji-Hun

    2010-01-01

    Even though many clinical reports about cages have been documented in patients with degenerative disorders, reports were scarce for traumatic injury cases, and those cases using metal cages were restricted to only one-level injury. To evaluate the usefulness of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage and plate construction in anterior interbody fusions (AIF) for traumatic cervical spine injuries by analyzing radiographic changes and clinical outcomes. Retrospective study. Fifty-eight patients (91 levels) underwent cage and plate construction for treatment of traumatic cervical spine injury. The fusion rate, fusion time, changes of Cobb angle, subsidence rate, and adjacent level changes were assessed as a radiographic outcome. Clinical analysis includes the recovery rate on the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) impairment scale and the presence of the complications. We evaluated 58 patients (91 levels) who underwent surgery and had at least 24 months in follow-up study. Radiographic evaluation included the assessment of interbody fusion rate, fusion time, changes of Cobb angle, subsidence rate, and adjacent level changes. Clinical assessment was done by analyzing recovery state of ASIA impairment scale from preoperative period to the last follow-up and by evaluating complications. Fifty-four cases showed bony fusion within 3 months after the surgery. The mean Cobb angle between the vertebral bodies was 2.54 degrees before operation, 9.13 degrees after operation, and 8.39 degrees at the latest follow-up. The mean intervertebral disc height was increased by 3.01 mm after the operation, but the mean height was 2.17 mm shorter at the last follow-up than after postoperation. In terms of clinical results, five Grade A cases and one Grade B case as assessed by the ASIA impairment scale were unchanged until the last follow-up. Twenty-three cases of Grade C, 16 cases of Grade D, and 13 cases of Grade E improved to seven cases, 26 cases, and 19 cases, respectively. Three

  13. Complications of the lateral C1-C2 puncture myelography for cervical spinal canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihale, J.; Traubner, P.

    1998-01-01

    This reviewed the complications of 106 patients of the lateral C1-C2 puncture myelography for cervical spinal canal and cervical spinal cord disorders. Spinal cord puncture and contrast injection, puncture between the occiput and C1, and blood vessel puncture were the main complications. These principally depended on the misdirection of the X ray beam. For preventing major arterial puncture determined the pathway of the vertebral arteries and incidence of anomaly. (authors)

  14. Hematome Extra Dural (HED) cervical post traumatique revelateur d ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mots clés: Hématome extra dural, traumatisme, trouble de l'hémostase, rachis cervical. English Title: Post traumatic cervical epidural hematoma revelating hemostasis disorder. Englsh Abstract. Extra dural hematoma or epidural post traumatic hematoma of the cervical rachis is a rare affection witch causes a severe spinal ...

  15. Catastrophic cervical spinal injury in an amateur college wrestler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayana Kurup, Jayakrishnan Kelamangalathu; Jampani, Ravitheja; Mohanty, Simanchal P

    2017-07-18

    A young amateur wrestler presented with a burst fracture of the seventh cervical vertebra with complete paraplegia. He was treated with surgery for spine stabilisation and was actively rehabilitated. Adolescents and teenagers are indulging in high-contact sports like wrestling, without proper training and technical know-how, which can lead to severe injuries and possibly, permanent handicap or death. Trainers, assistants and institutions should be well equipped to diagnose and provide initial care of people with a spinal injury to prevent a partial injury from progressing to complete injury. Athletes, coaches and the public should be aware of methods of first aid and how to transport a patient with a cervical spine injury. Authorities should take steps to improve infrastructures in training institutions and ambulance services. Specialised spinal centres should be established throughout the country for management and rehabilitation of patients with paraplegia. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. Anesthetic considerations for patients with acute cervical spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang-ping Bao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Anesthesiologists work to prevent or minimize secondary injury of the nervous system and improve the outcome of medical procedures. To this end, anesthesiologists must have a thorough understanding of pathophysiology and optimize their skills and equipment to make an anesthesia plan. Anesthesiologists should conduct careful physical examinations of patients and consider neuroprotection at preoperative interviews, consider cervical spinal cord movement and compression during airway management, and suggest awake fiberoptic bronchoscope intubation for stable patients and direct laryngoscopy with manual in-line immobilization in emergency situations. During induction, anesthesiologists should avoid hypotension and depolarizing muscle relaxants. Mean artery pressure should be maintained within 85–90 mmHg (1 mmHg = 0.133 kPa; vasoactive drug selection and fluid management. Normal arterial carbon dioxide pressure and normal blood glucose levels should be maintained. Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring is a useful option. Anesthesiologists should be attentive to postoperative respiratory insufficiency (carefully considering postoperative extubation, thrombus, and infection. In conclusion, anesthesiologists should carefully plan the treatment of patients with acute cervical spinal cord injuries to protect the nervous system and improve patient outcome.

  17. Delayed diagnosis of traumatic cervical subluxation in patients with mandibular fractures: a 5-year retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Po-Hsun; Liu, Zhuo-Hao; Yang, Tao-Chieh; Lee, Shih-Tseng; Chen, Jyi-Feng

    2010-11-01

    Mandibular bone fracture associated with traumatic cervical subluxation is a rare injury. The diagnosis of a traumatic cervical subluxation is more easily delayed than other conditions in patients with mandibular bone fractures. The aim of this study is to investigate the incidence of traumatic cervical subluxation associated with mandibular bone fractures. This is a retrospective cohort study of 653 consecutive emergency department patients with mandibular bone fractures investigated for evidence of concomitant traumatic cervical subluxation. This study reports on 7 patients (1.07%) with a diagnosis of traumatic cervical subluxation from a cohort of 653 with mandibular bone fractures as a result of motor vehicle accidents. Two of seven patients had their diagnosis made while in the emergency room, thus, 71.43% of these injuries were discovered on studies done up to 10 days after the trauma, including after surgical correction of the mandibular bone fracture. The importance of a thorough initial examination (both physical and radiologic) and suspicion of traumatic cervical subluxation in patients with mandibular bone fractures is worth emphasizing as delayed diagnosis and management could result in permanent neurologic injury. We suggest dynamic flexion-extension cervical radiographs and thin-slice computerized tomography scans in patients with mandibular fractures routine as an important and routine practice protocol.

  18. Subarachnoid hematoma of the craniocervical junction and upper cervical spine after traumatic cerebral contusion: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Rienzo, Alessandro; Iacoangeli, Maurizio; Alvaro, Lorenzo; Colasanti, Roberto; Moriconi, Elisa; Gladi, Maurizio; Nocchi, Niccolò; Scerrati, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Spinal subarachnoid hematoma (SSH) is a rare condition, more commonly occurring after lumbar puncture for diagnostic or anesthesiological procedures. It has also been observed after traumatic events, in patients under anticoagulation therapy or in case of arteriovenous malformation rupture. In a very small number of cases no causative agent can be identified and a diagnosis of spontaneous SSH is established. The lumbar and thoracic spine are the most frequently involved segments and only seven cases of cervical spine SSH have been described until now. Differential diagnosis between subdural and subarachnoid hematoma is complex because the common neuroradiological investigations, including a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), are not enough sensitive to exactly define clot location. Actually, confirmation of the subarachnoid location of bleeding is obtained at surgery, which is necessary to resolve the fast and sometimes dramatic evolution of clinical symptoms. Nonetheless, there are occasional reports on successful conservative treatment of these lesions. We present a peculiar case of subarachnoid hematoma of the craniocervical junction, developing after the rupture of a right temporal lobe contusion within the adjacent arachnoidal spaces and the following clot migration along the right lateral aspect of the foramen magnum and the upper cervical spine, causing severe neurological impairment. After surgical removal of the hematoma, significant symptom improvement was observed.

  19. Management of traumatic spinal column injury: A tertiary hospital experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Kamrul Ahsan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Trauma is the leading cause of disability in the first four decades of life and third most common cause of death. Spinal trauma poses considerable threats to survival and quality of life.Objective: Aims of this study is to assess the demographics, mode of trauma, hospital stay, complications, neurological improvement and mortality.Methods: Retrospective Cross sectional analysis of the records of spinal injury patients admitted in the Spine Unit of Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU Hospital from October 2003 to December 2013 was carried out. The demo­graphics, mode of trauma, involved vertebral level, co-morbid factors; neurological status and its improvement by Ameri­can Spinal Injury Association (ASIA Score, duration of hospital stay and complications during hospital stay was assessed. Results were analyzed by SPSS.Results: Out of 1288 patients admitted, 192(14.90% patients(range, 8-72 years sustained spinal injuries and most (63.02%of them were young (range, 21-40 years. Male to female ratio was 5:1. Cervical spine was most commonly ( 44.66% affected followed by lumbar (35 .41 % , thoracic (13 .54% , thoraco-lumbar (06.25% and Cervico-thoracic (03.13% region. Fracture through intervertebral disc was most common in cervical spine. Among the common causes were road traffic accidents (44.47%, fall from height (29.69%, heavy weight bearing (14.58% and assault with gunshot (07.29%. Paraparesis was most frequent (51.05% clinical presentation followed by quadriparesis (45.83%. Significant number of patients (83.33% required operative treatment (p<0.05 and 09.89% were managed conservatively. Mortality rate (03.64% was insignificant (p>0.05% and 03.12% patient refused to take treatment. Of these patients, 77.01 % had shown neurological improvement of at least one grade according to ASIA Score.Conclusion: Wide varieties of patients are encountered and managed varying from conservative to surgery. Carefully selected

  20. HOMICIDE BY CERVICAL SPINAL CORD GUNSHOT INJURY WITH SHOTGUN FIRE PELLETS: CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Turliuc, Serban Turliuc, Iustin Mihailov, Andrei Cucu, Gabriel Dumitrescu,Claudia Costea

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This case present a rare forensic case of cervical spinal gunshot injury of a female by her husband, a professional hunter, during a family fight with a shotgun fire pellets. The gunshot destroyed completely the cervical spinal cord, without injury to the neck vessels and organs and with the patient survival for seven days. We discuss notions of judicial ballistics, assessment of the patient with spinal cord gunshot injury and therapeutic strategies. Even if cervical spine gunshot injuries are most of the times lethal for majority of patients, the surviving patients need the coordination of a multidisciplinary surgical team to ensure the optimal functional prognostic.

  1. Traumatic Spinal Subdural Hematoma with Intracranial Subdural Hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Gon; Kim, Tae Wan; Park, Kwan Ho; Chi, Moon Pyo

    2014-10-01

    Traumatic spinal subdural hematoma associated with intracranial subdural hematoma is a rare condition. Herein, we report the case of a 62-year-old man with lower back pain, radiating pain, and numbness in both lower extremities, without motor weakness, for 2 weeks. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed high signal intensity on T1-weighted image (WI), and low signal intensity on T2-WI from L2 to L5. Two weeks after conservative management, follow-up lumbar MRI did not show the hematoma and his symptoms were relieved and there was no neurological deficit; therefore, he was discharged. However, subsequently, intracranial subdural hematoma increased and upper extremity motor weakness appeared. This was treated surgically. If there is no neurological deficit, conservative treatment may be a good option. Follow-up evaluation for asymptomatic cranial subdural hematoma is necessary.

  2. MR imaging in severe upper cervical spinal cord injury in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, H.J.; Steele, N.; Tilton, A.; Bodin, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that MR imaging of the cervical spine in patients with upper cervical spinal cord injury can accurately define the extent of cord injury for prognostic and rehabilitative purpose. Seven patients, ages newborn to 11 y, had acute upper cervical spinal cord injury and required continuous respiratory assistance. All patients had cervical spine radiography initially, but the extent of injuries precluded transport for early MR imaging. One or more MR imaging studies were done when the acute injury phase subsided. Manual ventilatory support by Ambu bag with oxygen was combined with careful respiratory and cardiac monitoring during imaging

  3. Change in the profile of traumatic spinal cord injury over 15 years in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bárbara-Bataller, Enrique; Méndez-Suárez, José Luis; Alemán-Sánchez, Carolina; Sánchez-Enríquez, Jesús; Sosa-Henríquez, Manuel

    2018-04-05

    Traumatic spinal cord injury remains a serious public health and social problem. Although incidence rates are decreasing in our environment, it is a high cost condition that is associated with great disability. The objective of this study was to describe the epidemiological and demographic characteristics of traumatic spinal cord injury and to analyse its epidemiological changes. This study was an observational study with prospective monitoring of all traumatic spinal cord injury patients in the Canary Islands, Spain (2.1 million inhabitants) between 2001 and 2015. Over the specified period of the study, 282 patients suffered a traumatic spinal cord injury. The crude incidence rate was 9.3 cases per million people/year. The patients' mean age increased from 38 years (2001-2005) to 48 years (2011-2015) (p spinal cord injury were falls in 44%, traffic accidents in 36.5%, diving accidents in 8.9% and others in 10.7%. While traffic accidents decreased, falls increased, particularly in the elderly (p injuries and injuries associated with poor functionality (p spinal cord injury in our environment. This change in the profile of new traumatic spinal cord injuries led us to reformulate the functional objectives planned for these patients upon admission to specialized units, to plan destination-upon-discharge in advance and to promote campaigns to prevent spinal cord injury in older adults.

  4. MR spectroscopy of cervical spinal cord in patients with multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendi, Ayse Tuba Karaguelle; Kendi, Mustafa; Tan, Funda Uysal; Tellioglu, Serdar; Huvaj, Sinef

    2004-01-01

    MR spectroscopy (MRS) of the brain in patients with multiple sclerosis has been well studied. However, in vivo MRS of the spinal cord in patients with MR spectroscopy has not been reported to our knowledge. We performed MRS of normal-appearing cervical spinal cords in multiple sclerosis patients and in healthy controls. N-acetyl aspartate was shown to be reduced within the cervical spinal cord of multiple sclerosis patients when compared with healthy controls. This finding supports axonal loss and damage within even normal-appearing spinal cords of multiple sclerosis patients. (orig.)

  5. Stingers, transient quadriplegia, and cervical spinal stenosis: return to play criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantu, R C

    1997-07-01

    This article focuses on sports related spinal cord and nerve injuries, ranging from mild "stinger" syndrome to complete quadriplegia. Particular emphasis is placed on recommendations for return to competition after such injuries. Cervical spinal cord symptoms after a spine injury from contact sports require a more precise work up to detect cervical spinal stenosis than radiographic bone measurements alone can provide. Imaging technology such as MRI, contrast positive CT, and myelography more accurately identify true spinal stenosis and allow for safer return to play decisions.

  6. Morphological study of the axial view of the cervical spinal cord by MR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Masahiro; Shimamura, Tadashi

    1994-01-01

    To investigate the morphological changes in the cervical spinal cord in patients with cervical myelopathy, we examined the axial anatomy of the cervical spinal cord and the spinal canal using MRI and CT scans. This study involved 35 patients (mean age=56.8) with cervical myelopathy and 118 adult normal volunteers (mean age=48.1) as controls. The transverse area of the spinal cord was measured on MR images (T 1 images), while the transverse area of the spinal canal was measured on CT. In normal subjects, the transverse area, the sagittal diameter, and the coronal diameter of the spinal cord showed a significant positive correlation with body height, and a significant negative correlation with age. No significant difference was identified between males and females. The transverse area, the sagittal diameter, the coronal diameter, and the ratio of the sagittal/coronal diameter of the spinal cord and the spinal canal showed significant positive correlations among each other in normal subjects, but no significant correlation was noted in the patients with cervical myelopathy. These was no significant difference between the normal subjects and the patients in the transverse area or in the ratio of the sagittal/coronal diameter of the spinal cord at the levels without cord compression. However, the transverse area of the spinal canal in the patients with myelopathy was significantly smaller than that of normal subjects. In conclusion, a poor or no correlation between the size of the spinal cord and the spinal canal is a frequent finding in patients with myelopathy. Furthermore, this study suggests that patients with myelopathy present a narrow spinal canal more frequently than do normal subjects. (author)

  7. Chemokine-Ligands/Receptors: Multiplayers in Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friederike Knerlich-Lukoschus

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI results in complex posttraumatic sequelae affecting the whole neuraxis. Due to its involvement in varied neuromodulatory processes, the chemokine-ligand/receptor-network is a key element of secondary lesion cascades induced by SCI. This review will provide a synopsis of chemokine-ligand/receptor-expression along the whole neuraxis after traumatic spinal cord (sc insults on basis of recent in vivo and in vitro findings in a SCI paradigm of thoracic force-defined impact lesions (Infinite Horizon Impactor in adult rats. Analyses of chemokine-ligand/receptor-expression at defined time points after sc lesion of different severity grades or sham operation revealed that these inflammatory mediators are induced in distinct anatomical sc regions and in thalamic nuclei, periaqueductal grey, and hippocampal structures in the brain. Cellular and anatomical expression profiles together with colocalization/expression of neural stem/progenitor cell markers in adult sc stem cells niches or with pain-related receptors and mediators in dorsal horns, dorsal columns, and pain-processing brain areas support the notion that chemokines are involved in distinct cascades underlying clinical posttraumatic impairments and syndromes. These aspects and their implication in concepts of tailored SCI treatment are reviewed in the context of the recent literature on chemokine-ligand/receptor involvement in complex secondary lesion cascades.

  8. Correlation of force control with regional spinal DTI in patients with cervical spondylosis without signs of spinal cord injury on conventional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, Påvel G; Sanchez, Katherine; Ozcan, Fidan; Rannou, François; Poiraudeau, Serge; Feydy, Antoine; Maier, Marc A

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate spinal cord structure in patients with cervical spondylosis where conventional MRI fails to reveal spinal cord damage. We performed a cross-sectional study of patients with cervical spondylosis without conventional MRI findings of spinal cord damage and healthy controls. Subjects were studied using spinal diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), precision grip and foot force-tracking tasks, and a clinical examination including assessment of neurological signs. A regional analysis of lateral and medial spinal white matter across multiple cervical levels (C1-C5) was performed. DTI revealed reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) and increased radial diffusivity (RD) in the lateral spinal cord at the level of greatest compression (lowest Pavlov ratio) in patients (p spondylosis had greater error and longer release duration in both grip and foot force-tracking. Similar spinal cord deficits were present in patients without neurological signs. Increased error in grip and foot tracking (low accuracy) correlated with increased RD in the lateral spinal cord at the level of greatest compression (p ≤ 0.01). Spinal DTI can detect subtle spinal cord damage of functional relevance in cervical spondylosis, even in patients without signs on conventional T2-imaging and without neurological signs. DTI reveals spinal cord changes in cervical spondylosis with few symptoms. DTI changes were present despite normal spinal cord on conventional MRI. DTI parameters correlated with force control accuracy in hand and foot. Spinal DTI is a promising technique for patients with cervical spondylosis.

  9. Effect of technique and timing of tracheostomy in patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injury undergoing mechanical ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganuza, Javier Romero; Forcada, Angel Garcia; Gambarrutta, Claudia; De La Lastra Buigues, Elena Diez; Gonzalez, Victoria Eugenia Merlo; Fuentes, Fátima Paz; Luciani, Alejandro A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of timing and techniques of tracheostomy on morbidity, mortality, and the burden of resources in patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injuries (SCIs) undergoing mechanical ventilation. Design Review of a prospectively collected database. Setting Intensive and intermediate care units of a monographic hospital for the treatment of SCI. Participants Consecutive patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) during their first inpatient rehabilitation for cervical and thoracic traumatic SCI. A total of 323 patients were included: 297 required mechanical ventilation and 215 underwent tracheostomy. Outcome measures Demographic data, data relevant to the patients’ neurological injuries (level and grade of spinal cord damage), tracheostomy technique and timing, duration of mechanical ventilation, length of stay at ICU, incidence of pneumonia, incidence of perioperative and early postoperative complications, and mortality. Results Early tracheostomy (tracheostomy was performed in 101 patients (47%) and late (≥7 days) in 114 (53%). Surgical tracheostomy was employed in 119 cases (55%) and percutaneous tracheostomy in 96 (45%). There were 61 complications in 53 patients related to all tracheostomy procedures. Two were qualified as serious (tracheoesophageal fistula and mediastinal abscess). Other complications were mild. Bleeding was moderate in one case (late, percutaneous tracheostomy). Postoperative infection rate was low. Mortality of all causes was also low. Conclusion Early tracheostomy may have favorable effects in patients with acute traumatic SC. Both techniques, percutaneous and surgical tracheostomy, can be performed safely in the ICU. PMID:21528630

  10. An investigation of cervical spinal posture in cervicogenic headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Peter K; Snodgrass, Suzanne J; Buxton, Anthony J; Rivett, Darren A

    2015-02-01

    Cervicogenic headache (CGH) is defined as headache symptoms originating from the cervical spine. Cervical dysfunction from abnormal posture has been proposed to aggravate or cause CGH, but there are conflicting reports as to whether there is an association between posture and CGH. The purpose of this study was to evaluate differences in cervical spinal posture, measured on radiographs, between patients with probable CGH and asymptomatic control participants. A single-blinded comparative measurement design was used. Differences in postural variables from radiographs between participants with CGH (n=30) and age- and sex-matched asymptomatic control participants (n=30) were determined using paired t tests or the nonparametric equivalent. Postural variables were general cervical lordosis (GCL, Cobb angle C2-C7), upper cervical lordosis (UCL, sagittal alignment C2 compared with C3-C4), and C2 spinous process horizontal deviation. Logistic regression determined postural variables, increasing the likelihood of CGH. There were no significant differences in posture between the CGH and control groups. The mean GCL was 10.97 degrees (SD=7.50) for the CGH group and 7.17 degrees (SD=5.69) for the control group. The mean UCL was 11.86 degrees (SD=6.46) for the CGH group and 9.44 degrees (SD=4.28) for the control group. The mean C2 spinous process horizontal deviation was 3.00 mm (SD=1.66) for the CGH group and 2.86 mm (SD=2.04) for the control group. However, there was a significant association between greater GCL and an increased likelihood of having CGH (odds ratio=1.08; 95% confidence interval=1.001, 1.191). The findings are limited to an association between GCL and posture, as cause and effect cannot be determined. The association between greater GCL and increased likelihood of having CGH suggests that GCL might be considered in the treatment of patients with CGH. However, as the data do not support posture as a cause of CGH, it is unknown whether addressing posture would

  11. Association between spinal immobilization and survival at discharge for on-scene blunt traumatic cardiac arrest: A nationwide retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsumi, Yusuke; Fukuma, Shingo; Tsuchiya, Asuka; Ikenoue, Tatsuyoshi; Yamamoto, Yosuke; Shimizu, Sayaka; Kimachi, Miho; Fukuhara, Shunichi

    2018-01-01

    Spinal immobilization has been indicated for all blunt trauma patients suspected of having cervical spine injury. However, for traumatic cardiac arrest (TCA) patients, rapid transportation without compromising potentially reversible causes is necessary. Our objective was to investigate the temporal trend of spinal immobilization for TCA patients and to examine the association between spinal immobilization and survival. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using the Japan Trauma Data Bank 2004-2015 registry data. Our study population consisted of adult blunt TCA patients encountered at the scene of a trauma. The primary outcome was the survival proportion at hospital discharge, and the secondary outcome was the proportion achieving return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). We examined the association between spinal immobilization and these outcomes using a logistic regression model based on imputed data sets with the multiple imputation method to account for missing data. Among 4313 patients who met the inclusion criteria, 3307 (76.7%) were immobilized. The proportion of patients that underwent spinal immobilization gradually decreased from 82.7% in 2004-2006 to 74.0% in 2013-2015. 1.0% of immobilized and 0.9% of non-immobilized patients had severe cervical spine injury. Spinal immobilization was significantly associated with lower survival at discharge (odds ratio [OR], 0.64; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.42 to 0.98) and ROSC by admission (OR, 0.48; 95%CI, 0.27 to 0.87). There was no significant sub-group difference of the association between spinal immobilization and survival at discharge by patients with or without cervical spine injury (p for interaction 0.73). Spinal immobilization is widely used even for blunt TCA patients, even though it is associated with a lower rate of survival at discharge and ROSC by admission. According to these results, we suggest that spinal immobilization should not be routinely recommended for all blunt TCA patients

  12. Traumatic spinal cord injury in Tianjin, China: a single-center report of 354 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y; Wang, X-B; Kan, S-L; Ning, G-Z; Li, Y-L; Yang, B; Li, Y; Sun, J-C; Feng, S-Q

    2016-09-01

    Hospital-based retrospective study. The objective of this study was to describe the epidemiological profile of traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI) in Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, China, from 2009 to 2014. Tianjin Medical University General Hospital. Hospital medical records of patients with TSCI admitted to hospital from 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2014 were reviewed. Collected variables included gender, age, marital status, ethnic group, occupation, etiology, neurological level of injury, American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA)-ISCoS impairment scale at admission, the severity, death and its cause, concomitant injuries and treatment choice. During the study period, 354 cases were identified. Male-to-female ratio was 2.34:1, with a mean age of 50.1±15.5 years. Falls (55.1%), comprising low falls and high falls (33.6% and 21.5%, respectively), were the leading cause, followed by motor vehicle collisions (MVCs) (35.9%). The most common injury site was the cervical spinal cord, especially C4-C6, accounting for 59.3%. Surgery was the major treatment choice (57.6%). The number of TSCI patients increased annually in our center. The mean age at the time of injury was older, and the proportion of males was higher. The leading two causes were falls and MVCs. The SCIs caused by MVCs were increasing. Peasants, workers and unemployed individuals were those at higher risk. Surgery was the major treatment choice. These data may be useful to implement those preventive strategies focused on the characteristics of different groups and pay more attention to high-risk populations.

  13. Neurological deterioration after laminectomy for spondylotic cervical myeloradiculopathy: the putative role of spinal cord ischaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cybulski, G R; D'Angelo, C M

    1988-01-01

    Most cases of neurological deterioration after laminectomy for cervical radiculomyelopathy occur several weeks to months postoperatively, except when there has been direct trauma to the spinal cord or nerve roots during surgery. Four patients are described who developed episodes of neurological deterioration during the postoperative recovery period that could not be attributed to direct intraoperative trauma nor to epidural haematoma or instability of the cervical spine as a consequence of laminectomy. Following laminectomy for cervical radiculomyelopathy four patients were unchanged neurologically from their pre-operative examinations, but as they were raised into the upright position for the first time following surgery focal neurological deficits referrable to the spinal cord developed. Hypotension was present in all four cases during these episodes and three of the four patients had residual central cervical cord syndromes. These cases represent the first reported instances of spinal cord ischaemia occurring with post-operative hypotensive episodes after decompression for cervical spondylosis. PMID:3404170

  14. Pathogenetic and clinical analysis of spinal masses in the cervical region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruss, P.

    1988-09-01

    The pathogenetic and clinical analysis of spinal masses in the cervical region were discussed from a neurosurgical viewpoint, and the significance of the radiological diagnostics is presented. After careful clinical observation of cervical radiculopathy and/or myelopathy, several diagnostic procedures, including new methods, were used to characterize the very different spinal masses with respect to their localization, distribution, and offen their biological properties. This permitted the selection of the most approbate from the many possible surgical approaches.

  15. 'Crashing' the rugby scrum -- an avoidable cause of cervical spinal injury. Case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scher, A T

    1982-06-12

    Deliberate crashing of the opposing packs prior to a rugby scrum is an illegal but commonly practised manoeuvre which can lead to abnormal flexion forces being applied to players in the front row, with resultant cervical spine and spinal cord injury. Two cases of cervical spinal cord injury sustained in this manner are presented. The mechanism of injury, the forces involved and preventive measures are discussed.

  16. Pathogenetic and clinical analysis of spinal masses in the cervical region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruss, P.

    1988-01-01

    The pathogenetic and clinical analysis of spinal masses in the cervical region were discussed from a neurosurgical viewpoint, and the significance of the radiological diagnostics is presented. After careful clinical observation of cervical radiculopathy and/or myelopathy, several diagnostic procedures, including new methods, were used to characterize the very different spinal masses with respect to their localization, distribution, and offen their biological properties. This permitted the selection of the most approbate from the many possible surgical approaches. (orig.) [de

  17. Outcome of the upper limb in cervical spinal cord injury: Profiles of recovery and insights for clinical studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalsi-Ryan, Sukhvinder; Beaton, Dorcas; Curt, Armin; Popovic, Milos R.; Verrier, Mary C.; Fehlings, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Improved appreciation of recovery profiles of sensory and motor function as well as complex motor functions (prehension) after cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) will be essential to inform clinical studies to consider primary and secondary outcome measures for interventions and the optimization of dosing and timing of therapies in acute and chronic SCI. Objectives (1) To define the sensory, motor, and prehension recovery profiles of the upper limb and hand in acute cervical SCI and (2) to confirm the impact of AIS severity and conversion on upper limb sensorimotor recovery. Methods An observational longitudinal cohort study consisting of serial testing of 53 patients with acute cervical SCI was conducted. International Standards of Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury, Graded Redefined Assessment of Strength Sensibility and Prehension (GRASSP), Capabilities of Upper Extremity (CUE-Q) Questionnaire, and Spinal Cord Independence Measure III (SCIM-III) were administered at 0–10 days, 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. Analysis Change over time was plotted using mean and standard deviation of the total and subgroups of the sample. Results Individuals with traumatic tetraplegia show distinct patterns of recovery. Factors that distinguish homogeneous subgroups of the sample are: severity of injury (level of injury, completeness) at baseline and conversion from a complete to an incomplete injury. Conclusions In cervical SCI, clinical recovery can be assessed using standardized measures that distinguish levels of activity and impairment. Specific recovery profiles of the upper limb over the 1-year timecourse provide new insights and opportunity for combined analysis of recovery profiles for different clinical assessment tools of upper limb function which are meaningful to inform the design of study protocols. PMID:25229734

  18. Application of the Rat Grimace Scale as a Marker of Supraspinal Pain Sensation after Cervical Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Lonnie E; Henley, Kathryn Y; Turner, Omari A; Pat, Betty; Niedzielko, Tracy L; Floyd, Candace L

    2017-11-01

    Experimental models of neuropathic pain (NP) typically rely on withdrawal responses to assess the presence of pain. Reflexive withdrawal responses to a stimulus are used to evaluate evoked pain and, as such, do not include the assessment of spontaneous NP nor evaluation of the affective and emotional consequences of pain in animal models. Additionally, withdrawal responses can be mediated by spinal cord reflexes and may not accurately indicate supraspinal pain sensation. This is especially true in models of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), wherein spastic syndrome, a motor disorder characterized by exaggeration of the stretch reflex that is secondary to hyperexcitability of the spinal reflex, can cause paroxysmal withdrawals not associated with NP sensation. Consequently, the aim of this study was to utilize an assessment of supraspinal pain sensation, the Rat Grimace Scale (RGS), to measure both spontaneous and evoked NP after a contusion SCI at cervical level 5 in adult male rats. Spontaneous and evoked pain were assessed using the RGS to score facial action units before and after the application of a stimulus, respectively. Rodents exhibited significantly higher RGS scores at week 5 post-injury as compared to baseline and laminectomy controls before the application of the stimulus, suggesting the presence of spontaneous NP. Additionally, there was a significant increase in RGS scores after the application of the acetone. These data suggest that the RGS can be used to assess spontaneous NP and determine the presence of evoked supraspinal pain sensation after experimental cervical SCI.

  19. Preliminary study of diffusion tensor MR on the cervical spinal cord in normal subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Kuihong; Ma Lin; Guo Xinggao; Liang Li

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate a simplified and practical strategy for MR diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the cervical spinal cord and acquire the normal values of DTI parameters in normal subjects, and to offer the basis for the research of the cervical spinal cord disorders. Methods: DTI examinations were performed in 36 consecutive healthy subjects by using SE-EPI sequence on the cervical spinal cord. The values of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), fractional anisotropy (FA), λ 1 , λ 2 , and λ 3 were measured in regions of interest positioned in the normal cervical cords. Results: All 36 subjects completed the examinations. The cervical spinal cords were clearly demonstrated on the postprocessing images, and there were no obvious artifacts on the diffusion tensor images. The average value of ADC was (914.44±82.61) x 10 -6 mm 2 /s and FA was (593.84±52.22) x 10 -3 . The diffusivity components parallel (λ 1 ) and orthogonal (λ 2 and λ 3 ) to the longitudinal axes of the spinal cord were (1585.10±130.07) x 10 -6 mm 2 /s, (559.84±66.49) x 10 -6 mm 2 /s, and (613.28±128.71) x 10 -6 mm 2 /s, respectively. The value of λ 1 was significantly higher than that of λ 2 and λ 3 (P 2 and λ 3 (P>0.05). The value of 2λ 1 /(λ 2 +λ 3 ) was 2.74± 0.32. Conclusion: The normal cervical spinal cord can be well demonstrated in vivo by using DTI with SE-EPI sequence, and various parameters acquired on DTI are stable. The water diffusivity in the direction parallel to the longitudinal axes of the spinal cord is found to be higher than that in directions perpendicular to the longitudinal axes of the spinal cord, thus suggesting the cylindrical anisotropic characteristics in the cervical spinal cord. (authors)

  20. Corticobulbar motor evoked potentials from tongue muscles used as a control in cervical spinal surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Gun Kim

    Full Text Available Objective: Motor evoked potentials (MEPs changes might be caused to the non-surgically induced factors during cervical spinal surgery. Therefore, control MEPs recorded cranially to the exit of the C5 root are highly recommendable in cervical spinal surgery. We studied whether corticobulbar MEPs (C-MEPs from tongue muscle could be used as a control MEPs in cervical spinal surgery. Methods: Twenty-five consecutive cervical spinal surgeries were analyzed. Stimulation of motor area for tongue was done by subcutaneous electrodes placed at C3/C4 (10–20 EEG System, and recording was done from both sides of tongue. Results: C-MEPs were recorded successfully 24 out of the 25 (96% tested patients. Forty-six out of fifty MEPs (92% from tongue muscles were monitorable from the baseline. In two patients, we could obtain only unilateral C-MEPs. Mean MEPs latencies obtained from the left and right side of the tongue were 11.5 ± 1 ms and 11.5 ± 0.8 ms, respectively. Conclusions: Monitoring C-MEPs from tongue muscles might be useful control in cervical spinal surgery. They were easily elicited and relatively free from phenomenon of peripheral stimulation of the hypoglossal nerves. Significance: This is first study to identify the usefulness of C-MEPs as a control of cervical spinal surgery. Keywords: Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring, Motor-evoked potential, Corticospinal tract, Corticobulbar MEPs, Hypoglossal nerve

  1. Pripherical muscular blood, flow in patient with traumatic spinal cord disease according to 133Xe data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galakhin, K.A.

    1983-01-01

    Studies with 133 Xe on the voluminous muscular blood flow in the lower limbs of patients with trauma of the spinal cord showed significant disturbance of the peripheral hemodynamics. In a spinal cord trauma the blood flow rate is reduced irrespective of patients' age and the site of trauma. The most noticeable disturbances of the peripheral blood flow are observed in patients with the affected cervical and upper thoracic regions of the spinal cord as compared to the thoracolumbar region

  2. Traumatic spinal cord injuries – epidemiologic and medico-legal issues

    OpenAIRE

    Hanganu Bianca; Velnic Andreea Alexandra; Petre-Ciudin Valentin; Manoilescu Irina; Ioan Beatrice Gabriela

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord injuries represent a special category of injuries in traumatic pathology, with high morbidity and mortality, which justify their analysis with the aim to identify useful aspects in order to prevent and treat them. We therefore performed a retrospective study on 426 cases in order to analyze epidemiology and medico-legal issues related to spinal cord injuries. The studied items regarded socio-demographic aspects (gender, age, home region), type of lesions (vertebral, spinal cord, a...

  3. Effects of hyperthermia applied to previously irradiated cervical spinal cord in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sminia, P.; Haveman, J.; Koedooder, C.

    1991-01-01

    Rat cervical spinal cord was X-ray irradiated at doses of 15, 18, 20 and 26 Gy. Ninety days later, approximately the same part of the spinal cord was heated at 42.3 +/- 0.4 degrees C for 50, 60, 75 or 90 min by means of a 434 MHz microwave applicator. After treatment, animals were observed over a

  4. Traumatic Spinal Injury: Global Epidemiology and Worldwide Volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ramesh; Lim, Jaims; Mekary, Rania A; Rattani, Abbas; Dewan, Michael C; Sharif, Salman Y; Osorio-Fonseca, Enrique; Park, Kee B

    2018-02-14

    Traumatic spinal injury (TSI) results from injury to bony, ligamentous, and/or neurologic structures of the spinal column and can cause significant morbidity and mortality. The global burden of TSI is poorly understood, so we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to estimate the global volume of TSI. We performed a systematic review through PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Databases on TSI studies reported from 2000 to 2016. Collected data were used to perform a meta-analysis to estimate the annual incidence of TSI across World Health Organization regions and World Bank income groups using random-effect models. Incorporating global population figures, the annual worldwide volume of TSI was estimated. A total of 102 studies were included in the systematic review and 19 studies in the meta-analysis. The overall global incidence of TSI was 10.5 cases per 100,000 persons, resulting in an estimated 768,473 [95% confidence interval, 597,213-939,732] new cases of TSI annually worldwide. The incidence of TSI was higher in low- and middle-income countries (8.72 per 100,000 persons) compared with high-income countries (13.69 per 100,000 persons). Road traffic accidents, followed by falls, were the most common mechanism of TSI worldwide. Overall, 48.8% of patients with TSI required surgery. TSI is a major source of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. Largely preventable mechanisms, including road traffic accidents and falls, are the main causes of TSI globally. Further investigation is needed to delineate local and regional TSI incidences and causes, especially in low- and middle-income countries. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparing the radiosensitivity of cervical and thoracic spinal cord using the relative seriality model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamus-Gorka, M.; Lind, B.K.; Brahme, A.

    2003-01-01

    Spinal cord is one of the most important normal tissues that are aimed to be spared during radiation therapy of cancer. This organ has been known for its strongly serial character and its high sensitivity to radiation. In order to compare the sensitivity of different parts of spinal cord, the early data (1970's) for radiation myelopathy available in the literature could be used. In the present study the relative seriality model (Kallman et al. 1992) has been fitted to two different sets of clinical data for spinal cord irradiation: radiation myelitis of cervical spinal cord after treating 248 patients for malignant disease of head and neck (Abbatucci et al. 1978) and radiation myelitis of thoracic spinal cord after radiation treating 43 patients with lung carcinoma (Reinhold et al. 1976). The maximum likelihood method was applied for the fitting and the corresponding parameters together with their 68% confidence intervals calculated for each of the datasets respectively. The alpha-beta ratio for the thoracic survival was also obtained. On the basis of the present study the following conclusions can be drawn: 1. radiation myelopathy is a strongly serial endpoint, 2. it appears to be differences in radiosensitivity between the cervical and thoracic region of spinal cord, 3. thoracic spinal cord revealed very serial characteristic of dose response, while the cervical myelopathy seems to be a bit less serial endpoint, 4. the dose-response curve is much steeper in case of myelopathy of cervical spinal cord, due to the much higher gamma value for this region. This work compares the fitting of NTCP model to the cervical and thoracic regions of the spinal cord and shows quite different responses. In the future more data should be tested for better understanding the mechanism of spinal cord sensitivity to radiation

  6. Follow-up CT myelography of severe cervical spinal cord injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Keiichi; Onoda, Kimio; Kawashima, Yasuhiro; Muto, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Yoichi

    1987-11-01

    There are many reports describing gross anatomical and microscopical findings of severely injured cervical cords in autopsy of the acute and chronic state, but no morphological findings of a severe cervical spinal cord injury in a chronic state by follow-up CT myelography have been found in the literature so far. The sagittal and transverse diameters of the cervical spinal cord and subarachnoid space of 9 out of 14 severe cervical spinal cord injury patients were measured with CT myelography within 7.5 years after the tranuma and their size compared with a control group which was made up of 29 patients with slight radiculopathy due to cervical spondylosis and whiplash injuries. Injured cord levels were C4 4 cases, C5 4 cases and C6 1 case. Remarkable spinal cord atrophy was recogniged in the sagittal diameter from C1 to C7 and in the transverse diameter below C4 and narrowing of the cervical subarachnoid space in the sagittal diameter from C2 to C5. The significance level was set at 1 - 5 %. From these fingings, we have concluded that atrophy appeared not only in the injured segment but also the whole cervical cord after the trauma. There was less cord atrophy in a good functional prognosis than in a poor prognosis.

  7. Follow-up CT myelography of severe cervical spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Keiichi; Onoda, Kimio; Kawashima, Yasuhiro; Muto, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Yoichi

    1987-01-01

    There are many reports describing gross anatomical and microscopical findings of severely injured cervical cords in autopsy of the acute and chronic state, but no morphological findings of a severe cervical spinal cord injury in a chronic state by follow-up CT myelography have been found in the literature so far. The sagittal and transverse diameters of the cervical spinal cord and subarachnoid space of 9 out of 14 severe cervical spinal cord injury patients were measured with CT myelography within 7.5 years after the tranuma and their size compared with a control group which was made up of 29 patients with slight radiculopathy due to cervical spondylosis and whiplash injuries. Injured cord levels were C4 4 cases, C5 4 cases and C6 1 case. Remarkable spinal cord atrophy was recogniged in the sagittal diameter from C1 to C7 and in the transverse diameter below C4 and narrowing of the cervical subarachnoid space in the sagittal diameter from C2 to C5. The significance level was set at 1 - 5 %. From these fingings, we have concluded that atrophy appeared not only in the injured segment but also the whole cervical cord after the trauma. There was less cord atrophy in a good functional prognosis than in a poor prognosis. (author)

  8. Lhermitte's sign: Incidence and treatment variables influencing risk after irradiation of the cervical spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fein, D.A.; Marcus, R.B. Jr.; Parsons, J.T.; Mendenhall, W.M.; Million, R.R.

    1993-01-01

    Lhermitte's sign is a relatively infrequent sequela of irradiation of the cervical spinal cord. In this study, the authors sought to determine whether various treatment parameters influenced the likelihood of developing Lhermitte's sign. Between October 1964 and December 1987, 2901 patients with malignancies of the upper respiratory tract were treated at the University of Florida. The dose of radiation to the cervical spinal cord was calculated for those patients who had a minimum 1-year follow-up. A total of 1112 patients who received a minimum of 3000 cGy to at least 2 cm of cervical spinal cord were included in this analysis. Forty patients (3.6%) developed Lhermitte's sign. The mean time to development of Lhermitte's sign after irradiation was 3 months, and the mean duration of symptoms was 6 months. No patient with Lhermitte's sign developed transverse myelitis. Several variables were examined in a univariate analysis, including total dose to the cervical spinal cord, length of cervical spinal cord irradiated, dose per fraction, continuous-course compared with split-course radiotherapy, and once-daily compared with twice-daily irradiation. Only two variables proved to be significant. Six (8%) of 75 patients who received > 5000 cGy to the cervical spinal cord developed Lhermitte's sign compared with 34 (3.3%) of 1037 patients who received < 5000 cGy (p = .04). For patients treated with once-daily fractionation, 28 (3.4%) of 821 patients who received < 200 cGy per fraction developed Lhermitte's sign compared with 6 (10%) of 58 patients who received ≥ 200 cGy (p = .02). An increased risk of developing Lhermitte's sign was demonstrated for patients who received either ≥ 200 cGy per fraction (one fraction per day) or ≥ 5000 cGy total dose to the cervical spinal cord. 29 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs

  9. Traumatic atlantooccipital dislocation. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruin, A H; Pirotte, T P

    1977-05-01

    A case of traumatic atlantooccipital dislocation is presented and the literature reviewed. This type of traumatic dislocation is probably produced by violent hyperextension of the upper cervical spine. Cranial nerve injuries and spinal cord injuries are common. Early fusion is recommended.

  10. Characteristics of adults with incident traumatic spinal cord injury in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couris, C M; Guilcher, S J T; Munce, S E P; Fung, K; Craven, B C; Verrier, M; Jaglal, S B

    2010-01-01

    Cohort study. To provide recent estimates of the incidence of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) in adults living in Ontario. Ontario, Canada. The study included all men and women aged 18 years and older living in Ontario. The two primary data sources used for this study were the census data provided by Statistics Canada and the hospital Discharge Abstract Database (DAD) provided by the Canadian Institute for Health Information. Incidence was estimated for the fiscal years 2003/04-2006/07, and examined by age, gender, mechanism and seasonality of injury, the level of injury, the presence of comorbidity and in-hospital mortality. The incident cases had a mean age of 51.3 years (s.d. 20.1). The majority of the cases was male (74.1%) and had a cervical SCI caused by falls (49.5%). The age-adjusted incidence rate was stable over the 4-year study period, from 24.2 per million (95% CI: 21.2-27.6) in 2003 to 23.1 per million (95% CI: 20.2-26.3) in 2006. Despite worldwide trends that have indicated motor vehicle collisions (MVCs) as the leading cause of injury, falls emerged as the leading cause of traumatic SCI in this study. This finding, and the fact that the number of fall-induced injuries increased steadily with age, may indicate that there is growing concern for the consequences of falls in the elderly. Further work is needed to understand this trend in age and gender and the causes of falls to develop effective fall prevention strategies.

  11. Imagine There Is No Plegia. Mental Motor Imagery Difficulties in Patients with Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aljoscha Thomschewski

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In rehabilitation of patients with spinal cord injury (SCI, imagination of movement is a candidate tool to promote long-term recovery or to control futuristic neuroprostheses. However, little is known about the ability of patients with spinal cord injury to perform this task. It is likely that without the ability to effectively perform the movement, the imagination of movement is also problematic. We therefore examined, whether patients with SCI experience increased difficulties in motor imagery (MI compared to healthy controls. We examined 7 male patients with traumatic spinal cord injury (aged 23–70 years, median 53 and 20 healthy controls (aged 21–54 years, median 30. All patients had incomplete SCI, with AIS (ASIA Impairment Scale grades of C or D. All had cervical lesions, except one who had a thoracic injury level. Duration after injury ranged from 3 to 314 months. We performed the Movement Imagery Questionnaire Revised as well as the Beck Depression Inventory in all participants. The self-assessed ability of patients to visually imagine movements ranged from 7 to 36 (Md = 30 and tended to be decreased in comparison to healthy controls (ranged 16–49, Md = 42.5; W = 326.5, p = 0.055. Also, the self-assessed ability of patients to kinesthetically imagine movements (range = 7–35, Md = 31 differed significantly from the control group (range = 23–49, Md = 41; W = 337.5, p = 0.0047. Two patients yielded tendencies for depressive mood and they also reported most problems with movement imagination. Statistical analysis however did not confirm a general relationship between depressive mood and increased difficulty in MI across both groups. Patients with spinal cord injury seem to experience difficulties in imagining movements compared to healthy controls. This result might not only have implications for training and rehabilitation programs, but also for applications like brain-computer interfaces used to control neuroprostheses, which are

  12. A Review of Dysphagia Presentation and Intervention Following Traumatic Spinal Injury: An Understudied Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzano, Teresa J; Waito, Ashley A; Steele, Catriona M

    2016-10-01

    Dysphagia is reported to be a common secondary complication for individuals with traumatic spinal injuries. Different etiologies of traumatic spinal injuries may lead to different profiles of swallowing impairment. We conducted a systematic review to determine the characteristics of dysphagia after traumatic spinal injury and to describe interventions currently used to improve swallowing function in this population. A comprehensive multiengine literature search identified 137 articles of which five were judged to be relevant. These underwent review for study quality, rating for level of evidence, and data extraction. The literature describing dysphagia after traumatic spinal injury was comprised predominantly of low-level evidence and single case reports. Aspiration, pharyngeal residue, and decreased/absent hyolaryngeal elevation were found to be common characteristics of dysphagia in this population. The most commonly used swallowing interventions included tube feeding, compensatory swallowing strategies, and steroids/antibiotics. Improvement in swallowing function following swallowing intervention was reported in all studies; however, there was no control for spontaneous recovery. The results demonstrate a need for high-quality research to profile the pathophysiology of dysphagia after traumatic spinal injury and controlled studies to demonstrate the efficacy of swallowing interventions in this population.

  13. Characterizing Dysphagia and Swallowing Intervention in the Traumatic Spinal Injury Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzano, Teresa J.; Waito, Ashley A.; Steele, Catriona M.

    2016-01-01

    Dysphagia is reported to be a common secondary complication for individuals with traumatic spinal injuries. Different etiologies of traumatic spinal injuries may lead to different profiles of swallowing impairment. We conducted a systematic review to determine the characteristics of dysphagia after traumatic spinal injury and to describe interventions currently used to improve swallowing function in this population. A comprehensive multi-engine literature search identified 137 articles of which 5 were judged to be relevant. These underwent review for study quality, rating for level of evidence, and data extraction. The literature describing dysphagia after traumatic spinal injury was comprised predominantly of low level evidence and single case reports. Aspiration, pharyngeal residue, and decreased/absent hyolaryngeal elevation were found to be common characteristics of dysphagia in this population. The most commonly used swallowing interventions included tube feeding, compensatory swallowing strategies, and steroids/antibiotics. Improvement in swallowing function following swallowing intervention was reported in all studies, however there was no control for spontaneous recovery. The results demonstrate a need for high-quality research to profile the pathophysiology of dysphagia after traumatic spinal injury and controlled studies to demonstrate the efficacy of swallowing interventions in this population. PMID:27412004

  14. Asymptomatic cervical isthmic spondylolisthesis and associated occult spinal bifida: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jeong-Wook; Kang, Sang-Kuk; Jeon, Su-Gi; Lim, Byeong-Chul

    2013-03-01

    We report a case of rare cervical isthmic spondylolisthesis of C6-7 combined occult spinal bifida at C6, and review the radiologic finding, different diagnosis and treatment. A 23-year old female presented nuchal, back pain after traffic accident. Radiologic finding showed the 6(th) cervical isthmic defect, spondylolisthesis and dysplasia. The patient was conservatively treated about 8 weeks, and 10 months after injury, she was symptom free with full range of motion of cervical spine and she was followed up. Cervical spondylolysis is a very rare condition. This clinical importance is vulnerable to trauma. For whatever reasons, symptomatic patients need to be treated by conservative or surgical option.

  15. Gender differences in the clinical characteristics of traumatic spinal fractures among the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongwei; Xiang, Liangbi; Liu, Jun; Zhou, Yue; Ou, Lan

    2014-01-01

    In order to illustrate the epidemiology of traumatic spinal fractures among the elderly, with an emphasis on exploring gender differences in clinical characteristics, we retrospectively reviewed hospital records on all elderly patients with traumatic spinal fractures who were 60 years of age or older at two university-affiliated hospitals between January 2001 and December 2010. A total of 642 elderly patients with traumatic spinal fractures were identified, of whom 249 were male and 393 were female. Accidental falls from low heights were the most common cause of traumatic spinal fractures among the elderly (50.8%). Frequencies of falls from high heights and direct collisions with a blunt object were significantly higher in male than in female elderly patients (Pspinal fractures, spinal cord injuries, associated non-spinal injuries (ASOIs) and mean injury severity scores (ISSs) were significantly higher in males than in females (Pspinal fractures in females were significantly higher than in males (Pspinal fractures among the elderly. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The epidemiology of traumatic cervical spine fractures: a prospective population study from Norway

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    Fredø Hege Linnerud

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim The aim of this study was to estimate the incidence of traumatic cervical spine fractures (CS-fx in a general population. Background The incidence of CS-fx in the general population is largely unknown. Methods All CS-fx (C0/C1 to C7/Th1 patients diagnosed with cervical-CT in Southeast Norway (2.7 million inhabitants during the time period from April 27, 2010-April 26, 2011 were prospectively registered in this observational cohort study. Results Over a one-year period, 319 patients with CS-fx at one or more levels were registered, constituting an estimated incidence of 11.8/100,000/year. The median age of the patients was 56 years (range 4–101 years, and 68% were males. The relative incidence of CS-fx increased significantly with age. The trauma mechanisms were falls in 60%, motorized vehicle accidents in 21%, bicycling in 8%, diving in 4% and others in 7% of patients. Neurological status was normal in 79%, 5% had a radiculopathy, 8% had an incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI, 2% had a complete SCI, and neurological function could not be determined in 6%. The mortality rates after 1 and 3 months were 7 and 9%, respectively. Among 319 patients, 26.6% were treated with open surgery, 68.7% were treated with external immobilization with a stiff collar and 4.7% were considered stable and not in need of any specific treatment. The estimated incidence of surgically treated CS-fx in our population was 3.1/100,000/year. Conclusions This study estimates the incidence of traumatic CS-fx in a general Norwegian population to be 11.8/100,000/year. A male predominance was observed and the incidence increased with increasing age. Falls were the most common trauma mechanism, and SCI was observed in 10%. The 1- and 3-month mortality rates were 7 and 9%, respectively. The incidence of open surgery for the fixation of CS-fx in this population was 3.1/100,000/year. Level of evidence This is a prospective observational cohort study and level II-2

  17. Cervical Spinal Cord Injury at the Victorian Spinal Cord Injury Service: Epidemiology of the Last Decade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon C.P. Lau

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI is a significant medical and socioeconomic problem. In Victoria, Australia, there has been limited research into the incidence of CSCI. The Austin Hospital's Victorian Spinal Cord Injury Service (VSCIS is a tertiary referral hospital that accepts referrals for surgical management and ongoing neurological rehabilitation for south eastern Australia. The aim of this study was to characterise the epidemiology of CSCI managed operatively at the VSCIS over the last decade, in order to help fashion public health campaigns. Methods This was a retrospective review of medical records from January 2000 to December 2009 of all patients who underwent surgical management of acute CSCI in the VSCIS catchment region. Patients treated non-operatively were excluded. Outcome measures included: demographics, mechanism of injury and associated factors (like alcohol and patient neurological status. Results Men were much more likely to have CSCI than women, with a 4:1 ratio, and the highest incidence of CSCI for men was in their 20s (39%. The most common cause of CSCI was transport related (52%, followed by falls (23% and water-related incidents (16%. Falls were more prevalent among those >50 years. Alcohol was associated in 22% of all CSCIs, including 42% of water-related injuries. Discussion Our retrospective epidemiological study identified at-risk groups presenting to our spinal injury service. Young males in their 20s were associated with an increased risk of transport-related accidents, water-related incidents in the summer months and accidents associated with alcohol. Another high risk group were men >50 years who suffer falls, both from standing and from greater heights. Public awareness campaigns should target these groups to lower incidence of CSCI.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical and thoracic spine and the spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, E.M.

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MR), using a 0.3 T resistive scanner with an iron core and a vertical magnetic field, was evaluated in patients with different diseases affecting the cervical and thoracic spine and the spinal cord. The results indicate that MR is well suited as the procedure of choice for emergency examination of patients with spinal cord symptoms, for examination of patients with suspected spinal multiple sclerosis and for pre-operative evaluation of patients with rheumatoid arthritis with neurological symptoms emanating from the cranio-cervical junction. In patients with cervical radiculapathy and/or myelopathy, caused by spondylosis or disk herniation, MR was found to be equivalent with myelography and CT myelography but MR has several practical advantages. MR at 0.3 T using a vertical magnetic field provided information comparable to that reported from examinations performed with superconducting MR scanners. In order to optimize the MR examinations of the spine, the signal characteristics of different coils available when using a vertical magnetic field were determined by phantom studies. Recommendations for optimal coil selection for different levels of the cervical and thoracic spine are given. In addition, the paramagnetic contrast medium gadolinium-DTPA was administered intravenously to patients with suspected spinal multiple sclerosis. Enhancement of clinically active lesions in the cervical spinal cord was observed. Serial MR examinations with gadolinium-DTPA showed that a decrease in enhancement could be correlated with decrease in clinical symptoms and signs. (author)

  19. Two case reports of cervical spinal cord injury in football (soccer) players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, P; Vaidyanathan, S; Kumar, B N; Soni, B M; Sett, P

    2006-06-01

    Two case reports of male football players who sustained injury to cervical spinal cord as a direct result of the sport. To raise the awareness that playing football (soccer), a very popular sport, may cause injury to the cervical spinal cord with dire consequences, albeit rarely. North West Regional Spinal Injuries Centre, Southport, UK. We report two male football players, who sustained injury to the cervical spine and developed tetraplegia as a direct result of the sport. Case 1: A 21-year-old football player was tackled from behind while running with the football, he lost his balance and landed on his head resulting in burst fracture dislocation of C5/C6 associated with immediate onset of complete tetraplegia (ASIA-A). Case 2: A 24-year-old football player collided, head first, with his own team goalkeeper, causing a hyperextension of neck. He developed motor complete tetraplegia at C5 level, with some sensation sparing below the level of injury (ASIA-B). Injury to the cervical spinal cord is known to occur in some team contact sports such as rugby and American football. Over time the laws and the preparation of the athletes for these games have been changed in order to minimize the neck injuries. What might not be appreciated is that playing football (soccer), a very popular sport worldwide, may cause injury to cervical spinal cord with dire consequences.

  20. Systemic vascular resistance is increased and associated with accelerated arterial stiffening change in patients with chronic cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, S C; May-Kuen Wong, A; Lien, H Y; Fuk-Tan Tang, S; Fu, T C; Lin, Y; Wang, J S

    2013-02-01

    Despite of stiffening change of conduit arteries, how total peripheral resistance (TPR) is adapted to chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) remains unclear. To investigate how chronic cervical SCI influences hemodynamic characteristics Cross-sectional, case-control study. Rehabilitation department in the tertiary medical center. Twenty-one male patients with traumatic SCI resulting from cervical spine fracture were recruited. The injury occurred three to 289 months (46 months in average) previously. Twenty-one healthy male participants with matched age and body mass index were enrolled as control group. The subjects were asked to maintain supine rest (SR) and then head-up tilt (HUT) at 60 degree for five minutes, respectively. A novel noninvasive bio-reactance device was employed to measure cardiac hemodynamics, whereas heart rate variability was used to determine cardiac autonomic activity. Additionally, the digital volume pulse analysis was applied to calculate arterial stiffness index (SI) and arteriolar reflection index (RI). SCI patients revealed less stroke volume and cardiac output (CO), as well as, greater total peripheral resistance (TPR) and SI during SR than normal subjects did. Moreover, the positive correlation between TPR and SI was observed in SCI patients rather than normal subjects. In SCI patients, HUT (1) markedly decreased TPR while CO and cardio-acceleration responses remained intact and (2) decreased HF power value but failed to change LF/HF ratio. Furthermore, the degree of orthostatic hypotension was correlated with the TPRHUT/TPRSR ratio but not the COHUT/COSR ratio. Chronic cervical SCI leads to a progressively accelerated increase in vascular stiffness, which is associated with increase in systemic vascular resistance. Furthermore, the cervical SCI-related orthostatic hypotension lies in the impairment of vasoconstriction without cardiac dysfunction. Clinical Rehabilitation Impact. SI, rather than blood pressure, reflects not only

  1. Mesenchymal stem cells improve locomotor recovery in traumatic spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveri, Roberto S; Bello, Segun; Biering-Sørensen, Fin

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating event with huge personal and societal costs. A limited number of treatments exist to ameliorate the progressive secondary damage that rapidly follows the primary mechanical impact. Mesenchymal stem or stromal cells (MSCs) have anti-inflammatory ......Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating event with huge personal and societal costs. A limited number of treatments exist to ameliorate the progressive secondary damage that rapidly follows the primary mechanical impact. Mesenchymal stem or stromal cells (MSCs) have anti...

  2. Imaging Factors that Distinguish Between Patients with Asymptomatic and Symptomatic Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy with Mild to Moderate Cervical Spinal Cord Compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jun Ming; Zhang, Jing Tao; Yang, Da Long; Yang, Yi Peng; Xia, He Huan; Yang, Liu

    2017-10-13

    BACKGROUND Not all patients with spinal cord compression due to cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) have clinical symptoms and signs. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the imaging findings in asymptomatic and symptomatic patients with CSM with mild to moderate cervical spinal cord compression. MATERIAL AND METHODS A retrospective clinical study included 68 patients. Group A (n=30) had no symptoms and signs; group B (n=38) had symptoms and signs of cervical myelopathy. The age, sex, body mass index (BMI), history of steroid treatment, duration of symptoms, number of spondylotic cervical segments, Torg ratio, range of motion (ROM), incidence of cervical segmental instability, overall curvature of the cervical spine, direction of spinal cord compression, and spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signal intensity were compared. RESULTS For groups A and B, the Torg ratio was 90.3% and 83.6% (Pvariable, independently associated with cervical segmental instability (OR=5.898, P=0.037), an MRI T2-weighted intramedullary high signal (OR=9.718, P=0.002), and Torg ratio (OR=0.155, P=0.006). CONCLUSIONS Cervical segmental instability, a high intramedullary signal on T2-weighted MRI, and the Torg ratio had the greatest capacity to distinguish between asymptomatic and symptomatic patients with CSM with mild to moderate cervical spinal cord compression.

  3. Functional Outcome Prediction after Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury Based on Acute Clinical Factors.

    OpenAIRE

    Kaminski, Ludovic; Cordemans, Virginie; Cernat, Eduard; M'Bra, Kouamé Innocent; Mac-Thiong, Jean-Marc

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating condition that affects patients on both a personal and societal level. The objective of the study is to improve the prediction of long-term functional outcome following SCI based on the acute clinical findings. A total of 76 patients with acute traumatic SCI were prospectively enrolled in a cohort study in a single Level I trauma center. Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM) at 1 year after the trauma was the primary outcome. Potential predictors of...

  4. Systemic bisperoxovanadium activates Akt/mTOR, reduces autophagy, and enhances recovery following cervical spinal cord injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandler L Walker

    Full Text Available Secondary damage following primary spinal cord injury extends pathology beyond the site of initial trauma, and effective management is imperative for maximizing anatomical and functional recovery. Bisperoxovanadium compounds have proven neuroprotective effects in several central nervous system injury/disease models, however, no mechanism has been linked to such neuroprotection from bisperoxovanadium treatment following spinal trauma. The goal of this study was to assess acute bisperoxovanadium treatment effects on neuroprotection and functional recovery following cervical unilateral contusive spinal cord injury, and investigate a potential mechanism of the compound's action. Two experimental groups of rats were established to 1 assess twice-daily 7 day treatment of the compound, potassium bisperoxo (picolinato vanadium, on long-term recovery of skilled forelimb activity using a novel food manipulation test, and neuroprotection 6 weeks following injury and 2 elucidate an acute mechanistic link for the action of the drug post-injury. Immunofluorescence and Western blotting were performed to assess cellular signaling 1 day following SCI, and histochemistry and forelimb functional analysis were utilized to assess neuroprotection and recovery 6 weeks after injury. Bisperoxovanadium promoted significant neuroprotection through reduced motorneuron death, increased tissue sparing, and minimized cavity formation in rats. Enhanced forelimb functional ability during a treat-eating assessment was also observed. Additionally, bisperoxovanadium significantly enhanced downstream Akt and mammalian target of rapamycin signaling and reduced autophagic activity, suggesting inhibition of the phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome ten as a potential mechanism of bisperoxovanadium action following traumatic spinal cord injury. Overall, this study demonstrates the efficacy of a clinically applicable pharmacological therapy for rapid initiation of

  5. Multiple meningiomas of the cervical spinal cord associated with Klippel-Feil malformation and atlantooccipital assimilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holliday, P O; Davis, C; Angelo, J

    1984-03-01

    A case of multiple meningiomas confined solely to the cervical spinal canal in association with multiple bony abnormalities of the cervical spine is presented. The relationship of this entity to neurofibromatosis, whether the central type or a form fruste, is explored. It is suggested that multiple meningiomas unassociated with other central or peripheral tumors may present a distinct clinical entity and may occur in an as yet uncharacterized familial pattern.

  6. SSFSE sequence functional MRI of the human cervical spinal cord with complex finger tapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Chuhai; Kong Kangmei; Guan Jitian; Chen Yexi; He Jiankang; Qi Weili; Wang Xinjia; Shen Zhiwei; Wu Renhua

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Functional MR imaging of the human cervical spinal cord was carried out on volunteers during alternated rest and a complex finger tapping task, in order to detect image intensity changes arising from neuronal activity. Methods: Functional MR imaging data using single-shot fast spin-echo sequence (SSFSE) with echo time 42.4 ms on a 1.5 T GE Clinical System were acquired in eight subjects performing a complex finger tapping task. Cervical spinal cord activation was measured both in the sagittal and transverse imaging planes. Postprocessing was performed by AFNI (Analysis of Functional Neuroimages) software system. Results: Intensity changes (5.5-7.6%) were correlated with the time course of stimulation and were consistently detected in both sagittal and transverse imaging planes of the cervical spinal cord. The activated regions localized to the ipsilateral side of the spinal cord in agreement with the neural anatomy. Conclusion: Functional MR imaging signals can be reliably detected with finger tapping activity in the human cervical spinal cord using a SSFSE sequence with 42.4 ms echo time. The anatomic location of neural activity correlates with the muscles used in the finger tapping task.

  7. Thoracic spinal subdural hematoma complicating anterior cervical discectomy and fusion: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protzman, Nicole M; Kapun, Jennifer; Wagener, Christopher

    2015-10-13

    A spinal subdural hematoma is a rare clinical entity with considerable consequences without prompt diagnosis and treatment. Throughout the literature, there are limited accounts of spinal subdural hematoma formation following spinal surgery. This report is the first to describe the formation of a spinal subdural hematoma in the thoracic spine following surgery at the cervical level. A 53-year-old woman developed significant paraparesis several hours after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion of C5-6. Expeditious return to operating room for anterior cervical revision decompression was performed, and the epidural hematoma was evacuated without difficulty. Postoperative imaging demonstrated a subdural hematoma confined to the thoracic level, and the patient was returned to the operating room for a third surgical procedure. Decompression of T1-3, with evacuation of the subdural hematoma was performed. Postprocedure, the patient's sensory and motor deficits were restored, and, with rehabilitation, the patient gained functional mobility. Spinal subdural hematomas should be considered as a rare but potential complication of cervical discectomy and fusion. With early diagnosis and treatment, favorable outcomes may be achieved.

  8. Pattern and Outcome of Management for Traumatic Closed Cervical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The cervical spine is an area quite prone to trauma due to its mobile character. It is placed under various significant demands during various physical activities which predispose it to various injuries. The knowledge and good understanding of the common patterns of cervical spine injuries and their mechanisms ...

  9. Promising neuroprotective strategies for traumatic spinal cord injury with a focus on the differential effects among anatomical levels of injury [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antigona Ulndreaj

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI is a devastating condition of motor, sensory, and autonomic dysfunction. The significant cost associated with the management and lifetime care of patients with SCI also presents a major economic burden. For these reasons, there is a need to develop and translate strategies that can improve outcomes following SCI. Given the challenges in achieving regeneration of the injured spinal cord, neuroprotection has been at the forefront of clinical translation. Yet, despite many preclinical advances, there has been limited translation into the clinic apart from methylprednisolone (which remains controversial, hypertensive therapy to maintain spinal cord perfusion, and early decompressive surgery. While there are several factors related to the limited translational success, including the clinical and mechanistic heterogeneity of human SCI, the misalignment between animal models of SCI and clinical reality continues to be an important factor. Whereas most clinical cases are at the cervical level, only a small fraction of preclinical research is conducted in cervical models of SCI. Therefore, this review highlights the most promising neuroprotective and neural reparative therapeutic strategies undergoing clinical assessment, including riluzole, hypothermia, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, glibenclamide, minocycline, Cethrin (VX-210, and anti-Nogo-A antibody, and emphasizes their efficacy in relation to the anatomical level of injury. Our hope is that more basic research will be conducted in clinically relevant cervical SCI models in order to expedite the transition of important laboratory discoveries into meaningful treatment options for patients with SCI.

  10. Global prevalence and incidence of traumatic spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh A

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Anoushka Singh*, Lindsay Tetreault*, Suhkvinder Kalsi-Ryan, Aria Nouri, Michael G FehlingsToronto Western Research Institute, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada  *These authors contributed equally to this paper Background: Spinal cord injury (SCI is a traumatic event that impacts a patient's physical, psychological, and social well-being and places substantial financial burden on health care systems. To determine the true impact of SCI, this systematic review aims to summarize literature reporting on either the incidence or prevalence of SCI. Methods: A systematic search was conducted using PubMed, MEDLINE, MEDLINE in process, EMBASE, Cochrane Controlled Trial Register, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews to identify relevant literature published through June 2013. We sought studies that provided regional, provincial/state, or national data on the incidence of SCI or reported estimates of disease prevalence. The level of evidence of each study was rated using a scale that evaluated study design, methodology, sampling bias, and precision of estimates. Results: The initial search yielded 5,874 articles, 48 of which met the inclusion criteria. Forty-four studies estimated the incidence of SCI and nine reported the prevalence, with five discussing both. Of the incidence studies, 14 provided figures at a regional, ten at a state or provincial level and 21 at a national level. The prevalence of SCI was highest in the United States of America (906 per million and lowest in the Rhone-Alpes region, France (250 per million and Helsinki, Finland (280 per million. With respect to states and provinces in North America, the crude annual incidence of SCI was highest in Alaska (83 per million and Mississippi (77 per million and lowest in Alabama (29.4 per million, despite a large percentage of violence injuries (21.2%. Annual incidences were above 50 per million in the Hualien County in Taiwan (56.1 per million, the central Portugal

  11. Contribution of 5-HT2A receptors on diaphragmatic recovery after chronic cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kun-Ze; Gonzalez-Rothi, Elisa J

    2017-10-01

    Unilateral C2 spinal cord hemisection (C2Hx) interrupts bulbospinal respiratory pathways innervating ipsilateral phrenic motoneurons, resulting in cessation of ipsilateral diaphragm motor output. Plasticity within the spinal neural circuitry controlling the diaphragm can induce partial recovery of phrenic bursting which correlates with the time-dependent return of spinal serotonin (5-HT) immunoreactivity in the vicinity of phrenic motoneurons. The 5-HT 2A receptor subtype is present on phrenic motoneurons and its expression is up-regulated after cervical spinal cord injury; however the functional role of these receptors following injury has not been clearly defined. The present study evaluated the functional role of 5-HT 2A receptors by testing the hypothesis that pharmacologic blockade would attenuate diaphragm activity in rats with chronic cervical spinal cord injury. Bilateral diaphragm electromyography (EMG) was performed in vagal-intact and spontaneously breathing rats before and after intravenous administration of the 5-HT 2A receptor antagonist Ketanserin (1mg/kg). Intravenous ketanserin significantly attenuated ipsilateral diaphragm EMG activity in C2Hx animals but had no impact on diaphragm output in uninjured animals. We conclude that 5-HT 2A receptor activation contributes to the recovery of ipsilateral phrenic motor output after chronic cervical spinal cord injury. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The radiographic distinction of degenerative slippage (spondylolisthesis and retrolisthesis) from traumatic slippage of the cervical spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, C.; Woodring, J.H.; Rogers, L.F.; Kim, K.S.

    1986-01-01

    In a review of 42 cases of degenerative arthritis of the cervical spine and 22 cases of cervical spine trauma with an observed anterior slip-page (spondylolisthesis) or posterior slippage (retrolisthesis) of the vertebral bodies of 2 mm or more, characteristic features were observed which allowed distinction between degenerative and traumatic slippage of the cervical spine. In degenerative slippage the shape of the articular facets and width of the facet joint space may remain normal; however, in most cases the articular facets become 'ground-down' with narrowing of the facet joint space and the articular facets themselves becoming thinned or ribbon-like. In traumatic slippage the articular facets will either be normally shaped or fractured and the facet joint space will be abnormally widened. Plain radiographs will usually allow this distinction to be made; however, in difficult cases polytomography may be required. (orig.)

  13. Radiographic distinction of degenerative slippage (spondylolisthesis and retrolisthesis) from traumatic slippage of the cervical spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, C.; Woodring, J.H.; Rogers, L.F.; Kim, K.S.

    1986-08-01

    In a review of 42 cases of degenerative arthritis of the cervical spine and 22 cases of cervical spine trauma with an observed anterior slip-page (spondylolisthesis) or posterior slippage (retrolisthesis) of the vertebral bodies of 2 mm or more, characteristic features were observed which allowed distinction between degenerative and traumatic slippage of the cervical spine. In degenerative slippage the shape of the articular facets and width of the facet joint space may remain normal; however, in most cases the articular facets become 'ground-down' with narrowing of the facet joint space and the articular facets themselves becoming thinned or ribbon-like. In traumatic slippage the articular facets will either be normally shaped or fractured and the facet joint space will be abnormally widened. Plain radiographs will usually allow this distinction to be made; however, in difficult cases polytomography may be required.

  14. Correlation of force control with regional spinal DTI in patients with cervical spondylosis without signs of spinal cord injury on conventional MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindberg, Paavel G.; Sanchez, Katherine; Rannou, Francois; Poiraudeau, Serge; Ozcan, Fidan; Feydy, Antoine; Maier, Marc A.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate spinal cord structure in patients with cervical spondylosis where conventional MRI fails to reveal spinal cord damage. We performed a cross-sectional study of patients with cervical spondylosis without conventional MRI findings of spinal cord damage and healthy controls. Subjects were studied using spinal diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), precision grip and foot force-tracking tasks, and a clinical examination including assessment of neurological signs. A regional analysis of lateral and medial spinal white matter across multiple cervical levels (C1-C5) was performed. DTI revealed reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) and increased radial diffusivity (RD) in the lateral spinal cord at the level of greatest compression (lowest Pavlov ratio) in patients (p < 0.05). Patients with spondylosis had greater error and longer release duration in both grip and foot force-tracking. Similar spinal cord deficits were present in patients without neurological signs. Increased error in grip and foot tracking (low accuracy) correlated with increased RD in the lateral spinal cord at the level of greatest compression (p ≤ 0.01). Spinal DTI can detect subtle spinal cord damage of functional relevance in cervical spondylosis, even in patients without signs on conventional T2-imaging and without neurological signs. (orig.)

  15. Correlation of force control with regional spinal DTI in patients with cervical spondylosis without signs of spinal cord injury on conventional MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindberg, Paavel G. [Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, FR 3636 Neurosciences, Paris (France); Centre de Psychiatrie et Neurosciences, Inserm U894, Paris (France); Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); Universite Paris Descartes, Service de Radiologie B, APHP, CHU Cochin, Faculte de Medecine, Paris (France); Sanchez, Katherine; Rannou, Francois; Poiraudeau, Serge [Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); Service de Medecine Physique et de Readaptation, APHP, CHU Cochin, Paris (France); INSERM U1153 Epidemiologie Clinique des Maladies Osteo-Articulaires, Paris (France); Ozcan, Fidan [Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, FR 3636 Neurosciences, Paris (France); Feydy, Antoine [Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, FR 3636 Neurosciences, Paris (France); Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); Universite Paris Descartes, Service de Radiologie B, APHP, CHU Cochin, Faculte de Medecine, Paris (France); Maier, Marc A. [Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, FR 3636 Neurosciences, Paris (France); Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); Universite Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France)

    2016-03-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate spinal cord structure in patients with cervical spondylosis where conventional MRI fails to reveal spinal cord damage. We performed a cross-sectional study of patients with cervical spondylosis without conventional MRI findings of spinal cord damage and healthy controls. Subjects were studied using spinal diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), precision grip and foot force-tracking tasks, and a clinical examination including assessment of neurological signs. A regional analysis of lateral and medial spinal white matter across multiple cervical levels (C1-C5) was performed. DTI revealed reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) and increased radial diffusivity (RD) in the lateral spinal cord at the level of greatest compression (lowest Pavlov ratio) in patients (p < 0.05). Patients with spondylosis had greater error and longer release duration in both grip and foot force-tracking. Similar spinal cord deficits were present in patients without neurological signs. Increased error in grip and foot tracking (low accuracy) correlated with increased RD in the lateral spinal cord at the level of greatest compression (p ≤ 0.01). Spinal DTI can detect subtle spinal cord damage of functional relevance in cervical spondylosis, even in patients without signs on conventional T2-imaging and without neurological signs. (orig.)

  16. Traumatic spinal cord injury in the United States, 1993-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Nitin B; Ayers, Gregory D; Peterson, Emily N; Harris, Mitchel B; Morse, Leslie; O'Connor, Kevin C; Garshick, Eric

    2015-06-09

    Acute traumatic spinal cord injury results in disability and use of health care resources, yet data on contemporary national trends of traumatic spinal cord injury incidence and etiology are limited. To assess trends in acute traumatic spinal cord injury incidence, etiology, mortality, and associated surgical procedures in the United States from 1993 to 2012. Analysis of survey data from the US Nationwide Inpatient Sample databases for 1993-2012, including a total of 63,109 patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injury. Age- and sex-stratified incidence of acute traumatic spinal cord injury; trends in etiology and in-hospital mortality of acute traumatic spinal cord injury. In 1993, the estimated incidence of acute spinal cord injury was 53 cases (95% CI, 52-54 cases) per 1 million persons based on 2659 actual cases. In 2012, the estimated incidence was 54 cases (95% CI, 53-55 cases) per 1 million population based on 3393 cases (average annual percentage change, 0.2%; 95% CI, -0.5% to 0.9%). Incidence rates among the younger male population declined from 1993 to 2012: for age 16 to 24 years, from 144 cases/million (2405 cases) to 87 cases/million (1770 cases) (average annual percentage change, -2.5%; 95% CI, -3.3% to -1.8%); for age 25 to 44 years, from 96 cases/million (3959 cases) to 71 cases/million persons (2930 cases), (average annual percentage change, -1.2%; 95% CI, -2.1% to -0.3%). A high rate of increase was observed in men aged 65 to 74 years (from 84 cases/million in 1993 [695 cases] to 131 cases/million [1465 cases]; average annual percentage change, 2.7%; 95% CI, 2.0%-3.5%). The percentage of spinal cord injury associated with falls increased significantly from 28% (95% CI, 26%-30%) in 1997-2000 to 66% (95% CI, 64%-68%) in 2010-2012 in those aged 65 years or older (P spinal cord injury remained relatively stable but, reflecting an increasing population, the total number of cases increased. The largest increase in incidence was observed in older

  17. Therapeutic Hypothermia Following Traumatic Spinal Injury Morphological and Functional Correlates

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yezierski, Robert P

    2000-01-01

    The primary objective of experiments carried out during the third year focused on determining the behavioral and morphological effects of systemic hyperthermia following moderate spinal cord injury...

  18. Oxygenation status of cervical carcinomas before and during spinal anesthesia for application of brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weitmann, H.D.; Knocke, T.H.; Poetter, R.; Gustorff, B.; Vaupel, P.

    2003-01-01

    Background and Purpose: To date, no information is available concerning the impact of spinal anesthesia on the oxygenation status of carcinomas of the uterine cervix. The aim of this study was therefore to determine the influence of spinal anesthesia on the oxygenation status of cervical carcinomas. Patients and Methods: In ten patients with cervical carcinoma who received spinal anesthesia for a first application of brachytherapy, intratumoral pO 2 measurements (pO 2 histography system, Eppendorf-Netheler-Hinz, Hamburg, Germany) were performed. Systemic parameters were documented prior to and during spinal anesthesia. Patients breathed room air spontaneously. For further evaluation, all intratumoral pO 2 values were pooled, and overall median pO 2 values and fractions of hypoxic pO 2 values ≤ 5 mm Hg were calculated. Overall median pO 2 values in the subcutis were also calculated. Results: There were no significant changes of systemic parameters, median subcutaneous pO 2 values, median intratumoral pO 2 values, and the fractions of hypoxic pO 2 values ≤ 5 mm Hg in the tumor upon administration of spinal anesthesia. The variability of measured pO 2 values increased during spinal anesthesia, although substantial changes in the oxygenation status were only seen in individual cases (n = 2). Conclusion: This study shows for the first time that the oxygenation status of cervical carcinomas, in general, is not influenced by spinal anesthesia prior to application of brachytherapy. To conclude, the data presented suggest that reliable pO 2 measurements can be performed under spinal anesthesia. At the same time, since no substantial changes in tumor oxygenation were observed, spinal anesthesia should not affect the O 2 -related efficacy of high-dose-rate brachytherapy. (orig.)

  19. The Outcomes of Anterior Spinal Fusion for Cervical Compressive Myelopathy—A Retrospective Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsz-King Suen

    2011-12-01

    Conclusion: Anterior cervical decompression with bone fusion is a viable surgical option for patients with one level of anterior cervical cord compression, especially for patients with kyphosis or straight canal spine. For patients with two- to three-level involvement, anterior cervical decompression with bone fusion provides good functional result in proper selection of cases. We also identified some prognostic factors (male sex, symptoms less than 1 year, and age less than 70 years in predicting a favourable outcome of anterior spinal fusion for CCM.

  20. Non-traumatic acute epidural spinal hematomas diagnosed by magnetic resonance; Hematomas espinales epidurales agudos no traumaticos: diagnostico por resonancia magnetica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rovira, A.; Grive, E.; Pedraza, S.; Capellades, J.; Nos, C.; Alarcon, M.; Rovira, A. [Hospital Universitari Vall d' Hebron. Barcelona (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    The non-traumatic spinal epidural hematoma (NTSEH) is a rare entity that can be the cause of an acute spinal compression syndrome. the objective of this review is to identify the characteristics by MRI and NTSEH and to analyze the factors that influence in its prognosis. In the years 1994 and 1999, 12 patients with NTSEH have been diagnosed in our hospital, and a MRI was performed during the acute phase. the characteristics of the lesions have been analyzed by MRI, with special emphasis on the topographic data and resonance signal and the factors that can influence in the clinical prognosis of the patients. Initially, all of the patients presented pain in the cervical dorsal or interscapular site, followed by a sensitive-motor deficit picture. The MRI showed a lesion of expansive character and posterior epidural location in every case that would produce varying degrees of compression on the spinal cord. The NTSEH should be considered as one of the causes of acute spinal cord compression. The clinical association of intense cervical, dorsal or interscapular pain followed by a sensomotor deficit picture should lead to the suspicion of this entity, that would require an immediate examination with MRI to verify its diagnosis. Both the clinical manifestations as well as the characteristics observed by MRI of the NTSEH have a prognostic value and determine the therapeutic decision. (Author) 34 refs.

  1. ANTERIOR CERVICAL INTRADURAL ARACHNOID CYST - A RARE CAUSE OF SPINAL CORD COMPRESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kollam Chandra Sekhar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Arachnoid cysts of spinal cord are relatively uncommon lesions. Most of them arise dorsal to the cord, and anteriorly placed intradural arachnoid cyst is a rare cause of cervical cord compression. To the best of our knowledge, only 30 cases were reported in the literature. We present a case of anterior cervical intradural arachnoid cyst with review of literature. METHODS We performed a literature search for anteriorly placed intradural arachnoid cysts in the cervical spinal cord through http://pubmed.com, a well-known worldwide internet medical address. To the best of our knowledge, only 30 cases were reported in the literature. We reviewed the literature with illustration of our case. We present a case of a 40-year-old male patient who presented with insidious onset of radicular pain. MRI cervical spine demonstrated cervical intradural cystic lesion extending from C2 to upper border of C4, lying anteriorly with compression over the cord. Cervical laminectomy followed by wide cyst fenestration and subtotal excision of cyst was done. Histopathological diagnosis was arachnoid cyst. RESULTS Patient totally recovered from his pain and sensory symptoms within a week and motor symptoms improved gradually over a period of six to eight weeks. With two years followup, patient had no further complaints. CONCLUSION Anterior cervical intradural arachnoid cysts are rare. These are amenable to resection through posterior approach safely with good postoperative recovery.

  2. Road collisions as a cause of traumatic spinal cord injury in ireland, 2001-2010.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smith, Eimear

    2014-01-01

    Road collisions remain the leading cause of traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI) in the world. Half of all TSCIs in Ireland in 2000 were caused by road collisions. Since then, there has been a downward trend in road fatalities coincident with implemented road safety strategies.

  3. Acute phase complications following traumatic spinal cord injury in Dutch level 1 trauma centres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weert, K.C. van; Schouten, E.J.; Hofstede, J.; Meent, H. van de; Holtslag, H.R.; Berg-Emons, R.J. van den

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the number and nature of complications during the acute phase following traumatic spinal cord injury and to explore the relationship between number of complications and length of hospital stay. DESIGN: Multi-centre prospective cohort study. PATIENTS: A total of 54 patients with

  4. Surgical Decompression for Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-01-24

    Jan 24, 2018 ... Background: There are controversies regarding the importance and timing of spinal cord decompression following trauma. Documented evidence shows that early decompression in the setting of acute spinal cord injury (SCI) improves neurologic outcomes. Our objective was to evaluate the outcome of ...

  5. [Acute traumatic spinal cord injuries: Epidemiology and prospects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonjon, N; Perrin, F E; Lonjon, M; Fattal, C; Segnarbieux, F; Privat, A; Bauchet, L

    2012-10-01

    Specify the epidemiological data on the acute spinal cord injuries and define a group of patients that could benefit from cellular transplantation therapy designed with the aim of repair and regeneration of damaged spinal cord tissues. Five years monocentric (Gui-de-Chauliac Hospital, Montpellier, France) retrospective analysis of patients suffering from spinal cord injury (SCI). Spinal cord injured-patients, defined as sensory-motor complete, underwent a clinical evaluation following American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) and functional type 2 Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM2) scorings as well as radiological evaluation through spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). One hundred and fifty-seven medical records were reviewed and we selected and re-examined 20 patients with complete thoracic spinal cord lesion. Clinical and radiological evaluations of these patients demonstrated, in 75 % of the cases, an absence of clinical progression after a mean of 49months. Radiological abnormalities were constantly present in the initial (at the admission to hospital) and control (re-evaluation) MRI and no reliable predictive criteria of prognosis had been found. We compare our results to the literature and discuss advantages and limits of cellular transplantation strategies for these patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Atlas-Free Cervical Spinal Cord Segmentation on Midsagittal T2-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Chih Liao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An automatic atlas-free method for segmenting the cervical spinal cord on midsagittal T2-weighted magnetic resonance images (MRI is presented. Pertinent anatomical knowledge is transformed into constraints employed at different stages of the algorithm. After picking up the midsagittal image, the spinal cord is detected using expectation maximization and dynamic programming (DP. Using DP, the anterior and posterior edges of the spinal canal and the vertebral column are detected. The vertebral bodies and the intervertebral disks are then segmented using region growing. Then, the anterior and posterior edges of the spinal cord are detected using median filtering followed by DP. We applied this method to 79 noncontrast MRI studies over a 3-month period. The spinal cords were detected in all cases, and the vertebral bodies were successfully labeled in 67 (85% of them. Our algorithm had very good performance. Compared to manual segmentation results, the Jaccard indices ranged from 0.937 to 1, with a mean of 0.980 ± 0.014. The Hausdorff distances between the automatically detected and manually delineated anterior and posterior spinal cord edges were both 1.0 ± 0.5 mm. Used alone or in combination, our method lays a foundation for computer-aided diagnosis of spinal diseases, particularly cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

  7. Sudden post-traumatic sciatica caused by a thoracic spinal meningioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariniello, Giuseppe; Malacario, Francesca; Dones, Flavia; Severino, Rocco; Russo, Camilla; Elefante, Andrea; Maiuri, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Spinal meningiomas usually present with slowly progressive symptoms of cord and root compression, while a sudden clinical onset is very rare. A 35-year-old previously symptom-free woman presented sudden right sciatica and weakness of her right leg following a fall with impact to her left foot. A neurological examination showed paresis of the right quadriceps, tibial and sural muscles, increased bilateral knee and ankle reflexes and positive Babinski sign. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed the presence of a spinal T11 meningioma in the left postero-lateral compartment of the spinal canal; at this level, the spinal cord was displaced to the contralateral side with the conus in the normal position. At surgery, a meningioma with dural attachment of the left postero-lateral dural surface was removed. The intervention resulted in rapid remission of both pain and neurological deficits. Spinal meningiomas may exceptionally present with sudden pain and neurological deficits as result of tumour bleeding or post-traumatic injury of the already compressed nervous structures, both in normal patients and in those with conus displacement or tethered cord. In this case, the traumatic impact of the left foot was transmitted to the spine, resulting in stretching of the already compressed cord and of the contralateral lombosacral roots. This case suggests that low thoracic cord compression should be suspected in patients with post-traumatic radicular leg pain with normal lumbar spine MRI. PMID:27316567

  8. Sudden post-traumatic sciatica caused by a thoracic spinal meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariniello, Giuseppe; Malacario, Francesca; Dones, Flavia; Severino, Rocco; Ugga, Lorenzo; Russo, Camilla; Elefante, Andrea; Maiuri, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    Spinal meningiomas usually present with slowly progressive symptoms of cord and root compression, while a sudden clinical onset is very rare. A 35-year-old previously symptom-free woman presented sudden right sciatica and weakness of her right leg following a fall with impact to her left foot. A neurological examination showed paresis of the right quadriceps, tibial and sural muscles, increased bilateral knee and ankle reflexes and positive Babinski sign. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed the presence of a spinal T11 meningioma in the left postero-lateral compartment of the spinal canal; at this level, the spinal cord was displaced to the contralateral side with the conus in the normal position. At surgery, a meningioma with dural attachment of the left postero-lateral dural surface was removed. The intervention resulted in rapid remission of both pain and neurological deficits. Spinal meningiomas may exceptionally present with sudden pain and neurological deficits as result of tumour bleeding or post-traumatic injury of the already compressed nervous structures, both in normal patients and in those with conus displacement or tethered cord. In this case, the traumatic impact of the left foot was transmitted to the spine, resulting in stretching of the already compressed cord and of the contralateral lombosacral roots. This case suggests that low thoracic cord compression should be suspected in patients with post-traumatic radicular leg pain with normal lumbar spine MRI. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. Central canal ependymal cells proliferate extensively in response to traumatic spinal cord injury but not demyelinating lesions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Lacroix

    Full Text Available The adult mammalian spinal cord has limited regenerative capacity in settings such as spinal cord injury (SCI and multiple sclerosis (MS. Recent studies have revealed that ependymal cells lining the central canal possess latent neural stem cell potential, undergoing proliferation and multi-lineage differentiation following experimental SCI. To determine whether reactive ependymal cells are a realistic endogenous cell population to target in order to promote spinal cord repair, we assessed the spatiotemporal dynamics of ependymal cell proliferation for up to 35 days in three models of spinal pathologies: contusion SCI using the Infinite Horizon impactor, focal demyelination by intraspinal injection of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC, and autoimmune-mediated multi-focal demyelination using the active experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE model of MS. Contusion SCI at the T9-10 thoracic level stimulated a robust, long-lasting and long-distance wave of ependymal proliferation that peaked at 3 days in the lesion segment, 14 days in the rostral segment, and was still detectable at the cervical level, where it peaked at 21 days. This proliferative wave was suppressed distal to the contusion. Unlike SCI, neither chemical- nor autoimmune-mediated demyelination triggered ependymal cell proliferation at any time point, despite the occurrence of demyelination (LPC and EAE, remyelination (LPC and significant locomotor defects (EAE. Thus, traumatic SCI induces widespread and enduring activation of reactive ependymal cells, identifying them as a robust cell population to target for therapeutic manipulation after contusion; conversely, neither demyelination, remyelination nor autoimmunity appears sufficient to trigger proliferation of quiescent ependymal cells in models of MS-like demyelinating diseases.

  10. Systemic hypothermia for the treatment of acute cervical spinal cord injury in sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, William Dalton; Cappuccino, Andrew; Cappuccino, Helen

    2011-01-01

    Spinal cord injury is a devastating condition that affects approximately 12,000 patients each year in the United States. Major causes for spinal cord injury include motor vehicle accidents, sports-related injuries, and direct trauma. Moderate hypothermia has gained attention as a potential therapy due to recent experimental and clinical studies and the use of modest systemic hypothermia (MSH) in high profile case of spinal cord injury in a National Football League (NFL) player. In experimental models of spinal cord injury, moderate hypothermia has been shown to improve functional recovery and reduce overall structural damage. In a recent Phase I clinical trial, systemic hypothermia has been shown to be safe and provide some encouraging results in terms of functional recovery. This review will summarize recent preclinical data, as well as clinical findings that support the continued investigations for the use of hypothermia in severe cervical spinal cord injury.

  11. GLT1 overexpression reverses established neuropathic pain-related behavior and attenuates chronic dorsal horn neuron activation following cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falnikar, Aditi; Hala, Tamara J; Poulsen, David J; Lepore, Angelo C

    2016-03-01

    Development of neuropathic pain occurs in a major portion of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) patients, resulting in debilitating and often long-term physical and psychological burdens. Following SCI, chronic dysregulation of extracellular glutamate homeostasis has been shown to play a key role in persistent central hyperexcitability of superficial dorsal horn neurons that mediate pain neurotransmission, leading to various forms of neuropathic pain. Astrocytes express the major CNS glutamate transporter, GLT1, which is responsible for the vast majority of functional glutamate uptake, particularly in the spinal cord. In our unilateral cervical contusion model of mouse SCI that is associated with ipsilateral forepaw heat hypersensitivity (a form of chronic at-level neuropathic pain-related behavior), we previously reported significant and long-lasting reductions in GLT1 expression and functional GLT1-mediated glutamate uptake in cervical spinal cord dorsal horn. To therapeutically address GLT1 dysfunction following cervical contusion SCI, we injected an adeno-associated virus type 8 (AAV8)-Gfa2 vector into the superficial dorsal horn to increase GLT1 expression selectively in astrocytes. Compared to both contusion-only animals and injured mice that received AAV8-eGFP control injection, AAV8-GLT1 delivery increased GLT1 protein expression in astrocytes of the injured cervical spinal cord dorsal horn, resulting in a significant and persistent reversal of already-established heat hypersensitivity. Furthermore, AAV8-GLT1 injection significantly reduced expression of the transcription factor and marker of persistently increased neuronal activation, ΔFosB, in superficial dorsal horn neurons. These results demonstrate that focal restoration of GLT1 expression in the superficial dorsal horn is a promising target for treating chronic neuropathic pain following SCI. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Unexpected changes of rat cervical spinal cord tolerance caused by inhomogeneous dose distributions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijl, H.P.; Luijk, P. van; Coppes, R.P.; Schippers, J.M.; Konings, A.W.T.; Kogel, A.J. van der

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: The effects of dose distribution on dose-effect relationships have been evaluated and, from this, iso-effective doses (ED(50)) established. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Wistar rats were irradiated on the cervical spinal cord with single doses of unmodulated protons (150 MeV) to obtain sharp

  13. Unexpected changes of rat cervical spinal cord tolerance caused by inhomogeneous dose distributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijl, HP; van Luijk, P; Coppes, RP; Schippers, JM; Konings, AWT; van der Kogel, AJ

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The effects of dose distribution on dose-effect relationships have been evaluated and, from this, iso-effective doses (ED(50)) established. Methods and Materials: Wistar rats were irradiated on the cervical spinal cord with single doses of unmodulated protons (150MeV) to obtain sharp

  14. Modelling of the CSF flow in the spinal canal in cervical stenosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaczmarská, A.; Štěpáník, Z.; Vaněk, P.; Maršík, František; Převorovská, Světlana; Otáhal, J.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 40, - (2007), s. 477-477 ISSN 0021-9290 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : cerebrospinal fluid flow * spinal canal * cervical stenosis Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 2.897, year: 2007

  15. Adverse events after cervical spinal manipulative therapy: consensus based classification and definitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. C.P. van der Schans; M. Schmitt; dr. S.E. Lakke; H.A. Kranenburg

    2015-01-01

    Cervical spinal manipulations (CSM) are frequently employed techniques to alleviate neck pain and headache. Minor and major complications following CSM have been described, though clear consensus on definition and the classification of the complications had not yet been achieved. As a result,

  16. Demographic characteristics and functional outcomes in patients with traumatic and nontraumatic spinal cord injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milićević Saša

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Spinal cord injuries (SCI could be associated with a significant functional impairment in the areas of mobility, self-care, bowel and bladder emptying and sexuality. The aim of this study was to compare demographic characteristics and functional outcomes of nontraumatic and traumatic spinal cord injury patients. Methods. This study was designed as retrospective case series study. A detailed medical history including sex, age, mode of trauma, and clinical and radiological examination was taken for all patients. Hospital records were used to classify the patients according to the following: mechanism of injury, neurological level of injury, functional outcomes, associated injuries, method of treatment, secondary complications and length of stay. The following clinical scores were measured in the patients: American Spinal Injury Association standards (CASTA, Functional Independence Measure (FIM, and Modified Aschworth score (MAS. Results. Out of totally 441 patients with spinal cord injury, 279 were traumatic patients (TSCI and 162 nontraumatic patients (NTSCI; 322 men and 119 women. The mean age of the patients was 46.1 ± 19.9 years. Traumatic and nontraumatic populations showed several significant differences with regard to age, level and severity of lesion. When adjusted for these factors patients with traumatic injuries showed a significantly lower FIM score at admission and significantly better improvement in the FIM score at discharge. The two populations were discharged with similar functional outcome. Conclusions. The NTSCI patients in our study were younger, more frequently female, with less complications before rehabilitation and less frequently treated operatively than the TSCI patients. Hospital rehabilitation of the TSCI patients was longer than that of the NTSCI patients, but their functional gain from admission was also higher, so at discharge. Traumatic and nontraumatic spinal cord lesion patients achieved similar

  17. Rate of perioperative neurological complications after surgery for cervical spinal cord stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Andrew K; Winkler, Ethan A; Jacques, Line

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE Cervical spinal cord stimulation (cSCS) is used to treat pain of the cervical region and upper extremities. Case reports and small series have shown a relatively low risk of complication after cSCS, with only a single reported case of perioperative spinal cord injury in the literature. Catastrophic cSCS-associated spinal cord injury remains a concern as a result of underreporting. To aid in preoperative counseling, it is necessary to establish a minimum rate of spinal cord injury and surgical complication following cSCS. METHODS The Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) is a stratified sample of 20% of all patient discharges from nonfederal hospitals in the United States. The authors identified discharges with a primary procedure code for spinal cord stimulation (ICD-9 03.93) associated with a primary diagnosis of cervical pathology from 2002 to 2011. They then analyzed short-term safety outcomes including the presence of spinal cord injury and neurological, medical, and general perioperative complications and compared outcomes using univariate analysis. RESULTS Between 2002 and 2011, there were 2053 discharges for cSCS. The spinal cord injury rate was 0.5%. The rates of any neurological, medical, and general perioperative complications were 1.1%, 1.4%, and 11.7%, respectively. There were no deaths. CONCLUSIONS In the largest series of cSCS, the risk of spinal cord injury was higher than previously reported (0.5%). Nonetheless, this procedure remains relatively safe, and physicians may use these data to corroborate the safety of cSCS in an appropriately selected patient population. This may become a key treatment option in an increasingly opioid-dependent, aging population.

  18. Preserved somatosensory conduction in a patient with complete cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Amar; Levi, Richard; Lindgren, Lenita; Hultling, Claes; Westling, Göran; Nyberg, Lars; Eriksson, Johan

    2015-05-01

    Neurophysiological investigation has shown that patients with clinically complete spinal cord injury can have residual motor sparing ("motor discomplete"). In the current study somatosensory conduction was assessed in a patient with clinically complete spinal cord injury and a novel methodology for assessing such preservation is described, in this case indicating "sensory discomplete" spinal cord injury. Blood oxygenation level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD fMRI) was used to examine the somatosensory system in a healthy subject and in a subject with a clinically complete cervical spinal cord injury, by applying tactile stimulation above and below the level of spinal cord injury, with and without visual feedback. In the participant with spinal cord injury, somatosensory stimulation below the neurological level of the lesion gave rise to BOLD signal changes in the corresponding areas of the somatosensory cortex. Visual feedback of the stimulation strongly modulated the somatosensory BOLD signal, implying that cortico-cortical rather than spino-cortical connections can drive activity in the somatosensory cortex. Critically, BOLD signal change was also evident when the visual feedback of the stimulation was removed, thus demonstrating sensory discomplete spinal cord injury. Given the existence of sensory discomplete spinal cord injury, preserved but hitherto undetected somatosensory conduction might contribute to the unexplained variability related to, for example, the propensity to develop decubitus ulcers and neuropathic pain among patients with clinically complete spinal cord injury.

  19. Conservative Management Of Third Trimester Cervical Spinal Cord ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spinal cord injury, though an important cause of morbidity appears to be uncommon in pregnant women or perhaps, has not been accurately documented among them. Superimposed on the many impairments resulting from spinal cord injury is the presence of the foetus in the womb, which in itself normally brings about ...

  20. A neurophysiological approach to nerve transfer to restore upper limb function in cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandeville, Ross M; Brown, Justin M; Sheean, Geoffrey L

    2017-07-01

    A successful nerve transfer surgery can provide a wealth of benefits to a patient with cervical spinal cord injury. The process of surgical decision making ideally uses all pertinent information to produce the best functional outcome. Reliance on clinical examination and imaging studies alone can miss valuable information on the state of spinal cord health. In this regard, neurophysiological evaluation has the potential to effectively gauge the neurological status of even select pools of anterior horn cells and their axons to small nerve branches in question to determine the potential efficacy of their use in a transfer. If available preoperatively, knowledge gained from such an evaluation could significantly alter the reconstructive surgical plan and avoid poor results. The authors describe their institution's approach to the assessment of patients with cervical spinal cord injury who are being considered for nerve transfer surgery in both the acute and chronic setting and broadly review the neurophysiological techniques used.

  1. Therapeutic Hypothermia Following Traumatic Spinal Injury: Morphological and Functional Correlates

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yezierski, Robert P

    1998-01-01

    The general purpose of experiments carried out during the first year focused on the neuroprotective effects of systemic hypothermia and pharmacological treatments following moderate and severe spinal cord injury...

  2. Cervical Spinal Cord Injury without Computed Tomography Evidence of Trauma in Adults: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Prognostic Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Perez, Rafael; Munarriz, Pablo M; Paredes, Igor; Cotrina, Javier; Lagares, Alfonso

    2017-03-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) without computed tomography evidence of trauma is underreported in adults and is considered a subtype of SCI with relatively good outcome. Despite this, few studies have been performed to determine specific imaging-related prognostic factors. Our objective is to describe the imaging characteristics of patients experiencing blunt cervical spine trauma with neurologic deficits, but without radiologic abnormalities and associated prognostic factors. A retrospective review of all adult patients with cervical SCI admitted to the emergency room of 2 university hospitals from January 2004 to December 2013 was performed. Only patients with a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed within 72 hours after trauma were included for further analysis. All patients with bony injury or traumatic malalignment were excluded. Data gathered on the remaining patients included demographics, mechanism of injury, severity of SCI, long-term patient outcome, improvement in neurologic condition, and MRI results. There were 48 patients who met the inclusion and exclusion criteria, and 40 who demonstrated improvement in the neurologic examination at follow-up. Disruption of either the anterior longitudinal ligament or ligamentum flavum and larger lesions in the MRI were predictors of lack of neurologic improvement. Early MRI has prognostic value in patients suffering SCI without computed tomography evidence of trauma. Lesion length is a powerful predictor of outcome in this subgroup of patients. Soft tissue injury plays a role in the severity of injury and the ability to recover in this subgroups of patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cervical spondylosis with spinal cord encroachment: should preventive surgery be recommended?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murphy Donald R

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been stated that individuals who have spondylotic encroachment on the cervical spinal cord without myelopathy are at increased risk of spinal cord injury if they experience minor trauma. Preventive decompression surgery has been recommended for these individuals. The purpose of this paper is to provide the non-surgical spine specialist with information upon which to base advice to patients. The evidence behind claims of increased risk is investigated as well as the evidence regarding the risk of decompression surgery. Methods A literature search was conducted on the risk of spinal cord injury in individuals with asymptomatic cord encroachment and the risk and benefit of preventive decompression surgery. Results Three studies on the risk of spinal cord injury in this population met the inclusion criteria. All reported increased risk. However, none were prospective cohort studies or case-control studies, so the designs did not allow firm conclusions to be drawn. A number of studies and reviews of the risks and benefits of decompression surgery in patients with cervical myelopathy were found, but no studies were found that addressed surgery in asymptomatic individuals thought to be at risk. The complications of decompression surgery range from transient hoarseness to spinal cord injury, with rates ranging from 0.3% to 60%. Conclusion There is insufficient evidence that individuals with spondylotic spinal cord encroachment are at increased risk of spinal cord injury from minor trauma. Prospective cohort or case-control studies are needed to assess this risk. There is no evidence that prophylactic decompression surgery is helpful in this patient population. Decompression surgery appears to be helpful in patients with cervical myelopathy, but the significant risks may outweigh the unknown benefit in asymptomatic individuals. Thus, broad recommendations for decompression surgery in suspected at-risk individuals cannot be made

  4. Traumatic upper cervical esophageal perforation in childhood with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    saliva aspiration may lead to complications ranging from mild aspiration pneumonia to severe respiratory distress. In cases of cervical esophageal perforations resulting in neck abscess, additional surgical drainage may be required. Posterior oropharyngeal tears may drain to the mediastinum and hemithorax. Control chest ...

  5. Pattern and Outcome of Management for Traumatic Closed Cervical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alasia Datonye

    in sports is hyper extension, hyper flexion or axial compression. Axial compression is thought to be the commonest. In automobile/vehicular accidents, a whole spectrum of mechanism of injury can be seen affecting different motion segments of the cervical spine. Torg and associates had suggested that injuries to the.

  6. Traumatic cervical root injury: Diagnostic value of MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seon Kyu; Chang, Kee Hyun; Han, Moon Hee; Kim, Ho Chul; Kim, Jea Seung; Cha, Sang Hoon

    1993-01-01

    Although superior soft tissue contrast and direct multiplanar imaging capability of MRI are well recognized, myelography has been the imaging modality of choice in evaluation cervical root injury. We assessed the role of MRI and compared its diagnostic accuracy with myelography in the evaluation of cervical root injury. MR imagings of cervical root injury in ten patients (55 roots) were retrospectively reviewed. In 26 explored roots (6 patients). MR findings were compared with myelography and surgical results. In 29 roots (8 patients), which were confirmed by myelography or exploration, the MR findings were focal extradural CSF collections (pseudomeningocele) in 21/29 (72.4%, 8 patients), thickening of extradural roots in 4/29 (13.6%, 5 patients), and thickening of dura in 12/29 (41.4%, 6 patients) roots. T2-weighted axial image was superior to T1-weighted and protein-density- weighted images for delineation root avulsion. The sensitivity and specificity of MRI were 72.7% and 93.3% respectively, while those of myelography were 83% and 90%. Overall diagnostic accuracy of MRI and myelography were comparable (84.6% vs 87.5%). In conclusion, myelography is still considered as the modality of choice in the preoperative evaluation of the cervical root avulsion because of its higher sensitivity. MRI, however, may obviate the myelography with some technical refinements

  7. Prediction of Bladder Outcomes after Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: A Longitudinal Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavese, Chiara; Schneider, Marc P; Schubert, Martin; Curt, Armin; Scivoletto, Giorgio; Finazzi-Agrò, Enrico; Mehnert, Ulrich; Maier, Doris; Abel, Rainer; Röhrich, Frank; Weidner, Norbert; Rupp, Rüdiger; Kessels, Alfons G; Bachmann, Lucas M; Kessler, Thomas M

    2016-06-01

    Neurogenic bladder dysfunction represents one of the most common and devastating sequelae of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). As early prediction of bladder outcomes is essential to counsel patients and to plan neurourological management, we aimed to develop and validate a model to predict urinary continence and complete bladder emptying 1 y after traumatic SCI. Using multivariate logistic regression analysis from the data of 1,250 patients with traumatic SCI included in the European Multicenter Spinal Cord Injury study, we developed two prediction models of urinary continence and complete bladder emptying 1 y after traumatic SCI and performed an external validation in 111 patients. As predictors, we evaluated age, gender, and all variables of the International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury (ISNCSCI) and of the Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM). Urinary continence and complete bladder emptying 1 y after SCI were assessed through item 6 of SCIM. The full model relies on lower extremity motor score (LEMS), light-touch sensation in the S3 dermatome of ISNCSI, and SCIM subscale respiration and sphincter management: the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (aROC) was 0.936 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.922-0.951). The simplified model is based on LEMS only: the aROC was 0.912 (95% CI: 0.895-0.930). External validation of the full and simplified models confirmed the excellent predictive power: the aROCs were 0.965 (95% CI: 0.934-0.996) and 0.972 (95% CI 0.943-0.999), respectively. This study is limited by the substantial number of patients with a missing 1-y outcome and by differences between derivation and validation cohort. Our study provides two simple and reliable models to predict urinary continence and complete bladder emptying 1 y after traumatic SCI. Early prediction of bladder function might optimize counselling and patient-tailored rehabilitative interventions and improve patient stratification in

  8. Inflammatory myelopathies and traumatic spinal cord lesions: comparison of functional and neurological outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scivoletto, Giorgio; Cosentino, Elena; Mammone, Alessia; Molinari, Marco

    2008-04-01

    Outcomes knowledge is essential to answer patients' questions regarding function, to plan the use of resources, and to evaluate treatments to enhance recovery. The purpose of this study was to compare the outcomes of patients with traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) with those of patients with inflammatory spinal cord lesions (ISCLs). The authors evaluated 181 subjects with traumatic SCI and 67 subjects with ISCLs. Using a matching cohorts procedure, 38 subjects were selected from each group. The measures used were the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (motor function), the Barthel Index (BI), the Rivermead Mobility Index (RMI), and the Walking Index for Spinal Cord Injury (WISCI). The subjects in the ISCL group were older than those in the SCI group, with a longer interval from onset of lesion to rehabilitation admission and more incomplete lesions. In the matching cohorts, at admission, the traumatic SCI group had RMI and WISCI scores comparable to those of the ISCL group, but the traumatic SCI group had lower scores on the BI (greater dependence on assistance for activities of daily living). At discharge, the 2 groups had comparable functional outcomes. The neurological status of the 2 groups was comparable at admission and discharge. The results indicate that, at admission, patients with SCI have a greater physical dependence for assistance with activities of daily living than patients with ISCLs who have comparable neurological status. Such a difference depends on factors not related to the spinal cord lesion, such as the presence of associated lesions, the need to wear an orthotic device, or the sequelae of surgery. The outcomes of patients with SCI are determined more by factors such as lesion level and severity and age than by etiology. This finding could have implications for health care planning and rehabilitation research.

  9. Neuroprotective effects of Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides against traumatic spinal cord injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokce, Emre Cemal; Kahveci, Ramazan; Atanur, Osman Malik; Gürer, Bora; Aksoy, Nurkan; Gokce, Aysun; Sargon, Mustafa Fevzi; Cemil, Berker; Erdogan, Bulent; Kahveci, Ozan

    2015-11-01

    Ganoderma lucidum (G. lucidum) is a mushroom belonging to the polyporaceae family of Basidiomycota and has widely been used as a traditional medicine for thousands of years. G. lucidum has never been studied in traumatic spinal cord injury. The aim of this study is to investigate whether G. lucidum polysaccharides (GLPS) can protect the spinal cord after experimental spinal cord injury. Rats were randomized into five groups of eight animals each: control, sham, trauma, GLPS, and methylprednisolone. In the control group, no surgical intervention was performed. In the sham group, only a laminectomy was performed. In all the other groups, the spinal cord trauma model was created by the occlusion of the spinal cord with an aneurysm clip. In the spinal cord tissue, caspase-3 activity, tumour necrosis factor-alpha levels, myeloperoxidase activity, malondialdehyde levels, nitric oxide levels, and superoxide dismutase levels were analysed. Histopathological and ultrastructural evaluations were also performed. Neurological evaluation was performed using the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan locomotor scale and the inclined-plane test. After traumatic spinal cord injury, increases in caspase-3 activity, tumour necrosis factor-alpha levels, myeloperoxidase activity, malondialdehyde levels, and nitric oxide levels were detected. After the administration of GLPS, decreases were observed in tissue caspase-3 activity, tumour necrosis factor-alpha levels, myeloperoxidase activity, malondialdehyde levels, and nitric oxide levels. Furthermore, GLPS treatment showed improved results in histopathological scores, ultrastructural scores, and functional tests. Biochemical, histopathological, and ultrastructural analyses and functional tests reveal that GLPS exhibits meaningful neuroprotective effects against spinal cord injury. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The incidence of myelitis after irradiation of the cervical spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcus, R.B. Jr.; Million, R.R.

    1990-01-01

    To further define the tolerance of the cervical spinal cord, the dose of radiation to the cervical spinal cord was calculated for all 2901 patients with malignancies of the upper respiratory tract treated at the University of Florida between October 1964 and December 1987. To further define the population evaluated, certain criteria were used: (a) a minimum of 3000 cGy to at least 2 cm of cervical spinal cord and (b) a minimum of 1 year of follow-up, unless a neurological complication occurred before 1 year. A total of 1112 patients were evaluable, of which 2 (0.18%) developed radiation myelitis. One received 4658 cGy to the cervical cord at 172.5 cGy per day, and the other patient received 4907 cGy to the cord at 169.2 cGy per day. The risk of myelitis at each dose level was 0/124 at 3000-3999 cGy, 0/442 at 4000-4499 cGy, 2/471 at 4500-4999 cGy, and 0/75 at a cord dose of 5000 cGy or greater

  11. Acute Compressive Myelopathy Caused by Spinal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Combined Effect of Asymptomatic Cervical Spondylosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Toshinari; Fukuda, Hitoshi; Kurosaki, Yoshitaka; Handa, Akira; Chin, Masaki; Yamagata, Sen

    2016-11-01

    Patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) by hemorrhagic arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) usually presents with meningeal signs, including headache and nausea, and focal neurologic deficit is found in rare cases. In this article, we report a case of acute compressive cervical myelopathy caused by hemorrhagic AVF at the craniocervical junction. A 73-year-old woman was transferred to our hospital for sudden headache and subsequent left hemiparesis. Head computed tomography scan showed SAH exclusively in the posterior fossa, and catheter angiography revealed a perimedullary arteriovenous fistula at the craniocervical junction as a source of the SAH. Detailed neurologic examination showed the sensory disturbance of bilateral upper extremities and bladder and rectal disturbance, suggesting concurrent cervical myelopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine showed disk herniation at the C4-5 level, spinal SAH deposition above the C4-5 level, and accompanying myelomalacia. No intramedullary hemorrhage was found. Spinal SAH alone rarely causes focal neurologic deficit. However, this case suggests spinal SAH can cause acute compressive myelopathy when complicated with preexisting spinal canal stenosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Care of post-traumatic spinal cord injury patients in India: An analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandey V

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The spinal cord injured patients if congregated early in spinal units where better facilities and dedicated expert care exist the outcome of treatment and rehabilitation, can be improved. The objective of this study is to find out the various factors responsible for a delay in the presentation of spinal injury patients to the specialized spinal trauma units and to suggest steps to improve the quality of care of the spinal trauma patients in the Indian setup. Materials and Methods: Sixty patients of traumatic spinal cord injury admitted for rehabilitation between August 2005 and May 2006 were enrolled into the study and their data was analyzed. Results: Eighty-five per cent of the spinal cord injured patients were males and the mean age was 34 years (range 13-56 years. Twenty-nine (48.33% of the spinal injuries occurred due to fall from height. There was an average of 45 days (range 0-188 days of delay in presentation to a specialized spinal unit and most of the time the cause for the delay was unawareness on the part of patients and/or doctors regarding specialized spinal units. In 38 (62.5% cases the mode of transportation of the spinal cord injured patient to the first visited hospital was by their own conveyance and the attendants of the patients did not have any idea about precautions essential to prevent neurological deterioration. Seventeen (28.33% patients were given injection solumedrol with conservative treatment, 35 (60% patients were given only conservative treatment and seven patients were operated (11.66% upon at initially visited hospital. Of the seven patients operated five were fixed with posterior Harrington instrumentation (71.42% and two (28.57% were operated by short segment posterior pedicle screw fixation. None of the patients were subjected to physiotherapy-assisted transfers or wheel chair skills or even basic postural training, proper bladder/ bowel training program and sitting balance. Conclusion: Awareness

  13. Surgical decompression for traumatic spinal cord injury in a tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The spectrum of injuries included cervical 27 (77.1%), thoracic 7 (20.0%), and lumbar vertebrae 1 (2.9%). The outcome as measured by Frankel's grade at 6 months after surgery showed improvement in 9 (25.7%) patients following intervention. All patients who presented with Frankel's Grade C and D improved to Grade E ...

  14. Changing Demographics and Injury Profile of New Traumatic Spinal Cord Injuries in the United States, 1972-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuying; He, Yin; DeVivo, Michael J

    2016-10-01

    To document trends in the demographic and injury profile of new spinal cord injury (SCI) over time. Cross-sectional analysis of longitudinal data by injury years (1972-1979, 1980-1989, 1990-1999, 2000-2009, 2010-2014). Twenty-eight Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems centers throughout the United States. Persons with traumatic SCI (N=30,881) enrolled in the National Spinal Cord Injury Database. Not applicable. Age, sex, race, education level, employment, marital status, etiology, and severity of injury. Age at injury has increased from 28.7 years in the 1970s to 42.2 years during 2010 to 2014. This aging phenomenon was noted for both sexes, all races, and all etiologies except acts of violence. The percentage of racial minorities expanded continuously over the last 5 decades. Virtually among all age groups, the average education levels and percentage of single/never married status have increased, which is similar to the trends noted in the general population. Although vehicular crashes continue to be the leading cause of SCI overall, the percentage has declined from 47.0% in the 1970s to 38.1% during 2010 to 2014. Injuries caused by falls have increased over time, particularly among those aged ≥46 years. Progressive increases in the percentages of high cervical and motor incomplete injuries were noted for various age, sex, race, and etiology groups. Study findings call for geriatrics expertise and intercultural competency of the clinical team in the acute and rehabilitation care for SCI. This study also highlights the need for a multidimensional risk assessment and multifactorial intervention, especially to reduce falls and SCI in older adults. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The influence of changes in cervical lordosis on bulging disk and spinal stenosis: functional MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Joon; Eun, Choong Ki [Pusan Paik Hospital, Inje Univ. College of Medicine, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-05-01

    To assess the effect of lordotic curve change of the cervical spine on disk bulging and spinal stenosis by means of functional cervical MR imaging at the flexion and extension position. Using a 1.5T imager, kinematic MR examinations of 25 patients with degenerative spondylosis (average age, 41 years) were performed at the neutral, flexed and extended position of the cervical spine. Sagittal T2-weighted turbo spin-echo images were obtained during each of the three phases. Lordotic angle, bulging thickness of the disk, AP diameter of the spinal canal, and distance between the disk and spinal cord were measured on the workstation at each disk level. After qualitative independent observation of disk bulging, one of four grades(0, normal; 1, mild; 2, moderate; 3, marked) was assigned at each phase, and after further comparative observation, one of five scores (-2, prominent decrease; -1, mild decrease; 0, no change; 1, notable increase; 2 prominent increase) was also assigned. In addition, bulging thickness of the disk was measured and compared at the neutral, flexed, and extended positions. Average angles of the cervical spine were 160.5{+-}5.9 deg (neutral position, lordotic angle); 185.4{+-}8.5 deg (flexion, kyphotic angle); and 143.7{+-}6.7 deg (extension, lordotic angle). Average grades of disk bulging were 0.55 at the neutral position. 0.16 at flexion, and 0.7 at extension. Comparative observation showed that average scores of disk bulging were -0.39 at flexion and 0.31 at extension. The bulging thickness of the disk decreased by 24.2% at flexion and increased by 30.3% at extension, while the diameter of the spinal canal increased by 4.5% at flexion and decreased by 3.6% at extension. The distance from the posterior margin of the disk to the anterior margin of the spinal cord decreased at both flexion(6.6%) and extension(19.1%). Functional MRI showed that compared with the neutral position, disk bulging and spinal stenosis are less prominent at flexion and

  16. MR imaging in neuroborreliosis of the cervical spinal cord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hattingen, Elke; Weidauer, Stefan; Zanella, Friedhelm E. [University of Frankfurt, Institute of Neuroradiology, Frankfurt (Germany); Kieslich, Matthias; Boda, Volker [University of Frankfurt, Department of Pediatric Neurology, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2004-11-01

    The central nervous system is involved in 10-20% of cases in Lyme disease. The neurological symptoms, time course of the disease and imaging findings are multifaceted. We report two patients with cervical radiculitis. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed strong enhancement of the cervical nerve roots on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. These imaging patterns of borrelia-associated radiculitis have not been reported before. Knowledge of these imaging features may help to diagnose neuroborreliosis, which presents with non-specific symptoms. (orig.)

  17. Examining the relationship between post-traumatic stress disorder and social participation among Veterans with spinal cord injuries and disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etingen, Bella; Locatelli, Sara M; Miskevics, Scott; LaVela, Sherri L

    2017-07-26

    The objectives of this study were to examine differences in social participation among Veterans with spinal cord injuries/disorders with and without post-traumatic stress disorder, and determine if lower social participation was independently associated with having post-traumatic stress disorder. A cross-sectional mailed national survey was sent to a national sample of Veterans with spinal cord injuries/disorders who received prior-year Veterans Affairs healthcare. Surveys provided data on: demographics, health conditions, injury characteristics, and social participation. Analyses included bivariate comparisons, and multivariate logistic regression to determine if lower social participation was independently associated with post-traumatic stress disorder. Veterans with (vs. without) post-traumatic stress disorder (n = 896) reported lower social participation (40.2 vs. 43.9, p post-traumatic stress disorder, while a greater number of health conditions (OR = 1.43, 95% CI: 1.25-1.64, p post-traumatic stress disorder (OR = 0.94, 95% CI: 0.90-0.98, p = 0.003). Results indicate post-traumatic stress disorder is associated with lower social participation in Veterans with spinal cord injuries/disorders, independent of other factors that may impact participation. Efforts to screen for and treat post-traumatic stress disorder among persons with spinal cord injuries/disorders, regardless of injury-specific factors, are needed to improve participation. Implications for Rehabilitation Individuals with spinal cord injuries/disorders often have post-traumatic stress disorder; in Veterans with spinal cord injuries/disorders this may be compounded by trauma incurred through military experiences. Social participation, an important aspect of rehabilitation and community integration following spinal cord injury or disorder, may be hindered by symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder. Our data show that post-traumatic stress disorder is associated with lower

  18. Review of the History of Non-traumatic Spinal Cord Dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    New, Peter Wayne; Biering-Sørensen, Fin

    2017-01-01

    Background: The incidence of non-traumatic spinal cord dysfunction (SCDys) is reported to be higher than traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) in many countries. No formal review of the history of SCDys has been published. Objective: This article aims to identify key highlights in the history of SCDys....... Method: An electronic literature search was conducted (January 2017) using MEDLINE (1946-2016) and Embase (1974-2016) databases for publications regarding the history of SCDys. Publications on the history of SCI and a selection of neurology textbooks and books on the history of neurology were reviewed...... for potentially relevant references. The focus of the literature search was on identifying publications that detail key highlights regarding the history of the diagnosis and management of the most common SCDys conditions, as well as those of historical significance. Results: The electronic search of MEDLINE...

  19. [Comprehensive management of a child with a post-traumatic brain stem and spinal cord injury. A case study and presentation of current therapeutic modalities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobylarz, Krzysztof; Kwiatkowski, Stanisław; Inglot, Barbara; Mróz, Adam

    2008-01-01

    Less than twenty years ago, a high spinal cord injury accompanied by paralysis of the diaphragm and the resulting apnea and tetraplegia led to certain death within a short time after the trauma, mostly due to respiratory complications associated with ventilatory therapy in hospitals. The objective of this paper is to present the case of a paediatric brain stem trauma with spinal cord injury, consisting of spinal cord rupture in the upper cervical segment. Thanks to appropriate management at all treatment stages (prompt, fully professional assistance in the ambulance, followed by appropriate management at ICU), the child survived. Owing to currently available technical solutions, the boy has achieved considerable self-dependence and an opportunity of having post-traumatic complications treated using a diaphragm pacing stimulator and a baclofen pump. The report presents therapeutic problems encountered in children with post-traumatic spinal cord injury, emphasizing technical opportunities of managing diaphragm paralysis, as exemplified by the five-year treatment and rehabilitation process of a boy with spinal cord injury at C1 level managed at the University Children's Hospital of Cracow, Poland, in whom phrenic nerve stimulation was employed. The implanted stimulator and a specially constructed controller have allowed the boy to achieve mobility using a wheelchair, being able to use a PC and being taught by an individual teacher at home despite his tetraparesis. Recurrent respiratory tract infections and occasional decubitus required periodic hospitalizations. As the patient grew, in consequence of uncontrolled sudden increases of muscle tone of the trunk spine. Increased muscle tone was increasingly resistant to pharmacotherapy and negatively affected the effectiveness of home rehabilitation. In consequence, a decision was made to implant an intraspinal baclofen pump.

  20. The relationship between central motor conduction time and spinal cord compression in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rikita, T; Tanaka, N; Nakanishi, K; Kamei, N; Sumiyoshi, N; Kotaka, S; Adachi, N; Ochi, M

    2017-04-01

    Retrospective study. Few studies have reported a relationship between central motor conduction time (CMCT), which evaluates corticospinal function, and degree of spinal cord compression in patients with myelopathy. Thus, there is no consensus on predicting the degree of prolonged CMCT on the basis of the degree of spinal cord compression. If a correlation exists between CMCT and spinal cord compression, then spinal cord compression may be a useful noninvasive clinical indicator of corticospinal function. Therefore, this study evaluated the relationship between CMCT and cervical spinal cord compression measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). Hiroshima University Hospital in Japan. We studied 33 patients undergoing laminoplasty. Patients exhibited significant cervical spinal cord compression on both MRI and intraoperative electrophysiological examination. We assessed transcranial magnetic stimulation measurement of CMCT; spinal cord compression parameters such as area, lateral diameter, anteroposterior diameter and flattening of the spinal cord at the lesion site and C2/3 levels on MRI; and pre- versus postoperative Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scores. Correlations between CMCT and flattening as well as anteroposterior diameter of the spinal cord at the lesion level were observed. Strong correlations between CMCT and the ratio of the flattening and anteroposterior diameter parameters at the lesion level to that at the C2/3 level were also observed. Measurement of spinal cord compression may be useful for the evaluation of corticospinal function as a proxy for CMCT in patients with CSM.

  1. CASE REPORT Endovascular embolisation of a cervical spinal AVF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    over the right carotid space. Imaging findings ... right vertebral artery and drainage into the right epidural and right internal and external jugular veins (Figs 4a and 4b). Treatment. Treatment was initially via endovascular means. Owing to the complex anatomy of the spinal AVF, the fistula orifice was not identified. Abstract.

  2. CASE REPORT Endovascular embolisation of a cervical spinal AVF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    be a problem.1,2 For large fistulae with multiple collateral feeders, as described in our patient, embolisation alone may be difficult or unsuccessful. Surgery is generally reserved for incomplete endovascular cure and to relieve compression of the dura and spinal cord.2,3. Conclusion. This case highlights the importance of ...

  3. Diagnosis of anterior cervical spinal epidural abscess by US and MRI in a newborn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudinchet, F.; Chapuis, L. (University Hospital, Lausanne (Switzerland). Dept. of Radiology); Berger, D. (University Hospital, Lausanne (Switzerland). Dept. of Pediatric Surgery)

    1991-11-01

    A 10-day-old girl who initially presented with fever developed over five days a complete paresis of both upper arms and swallowing difficulty. After emergency drainage of a retropharyngeal abscess, cervical US demonstrated a cervical anterior epidural mass compressing the cord. MRI confirmed the diagnosis of spinal epidural abscess secondary to C4-C5 spondylodiscitis. Surgical removal of the abscess was followed by complete disappearance of the neurologic symptoms after six months of follow-up. This is the first case of spinal epidural abscess in a newborn to be diagnosed by US and MRI preoperatively. The advantages of these non-invasive imaging modalities are discussed, and compared to myelography. (orig.).

  4. Functional Outcome Prediction after Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury Based on Acute Clinical Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Ludovic; Cordemans, Virginie; Cernat, Eduard; M'Bra, Kouamé Innocent; Mac-Thiong, Jean-Marc

    2017-06-15

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating condition that affects patients on both a personal and societal level. The objective of the study is to improve the prediction of long-term functional outcome following SCI based on the acute clinical findings. A total of 76 patients with acute traumatic SCI were prospectively enrolled in a cohort study in a single Level I trauma center. Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM) at 1 year after the trauma was the primary outcome. Potential predictors of functional outcome were recorded during the acute hospitalization: age, sex, level and type of injury, comorbidities, American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS), ASIA Motor Score (AMS), ASIA Light Touch score (LT), ASIA Pin Prick score (PP), Injury Severity Score (ISS), traumatic brain injury, and delay from trauma to surgery. A linear regression model was created with the primary outcome modeled relative to the acute clinical findings. Only four variables were selected in the model, with performance averaging an R-square value of 0.57. In descending order, the best predictors for SCIM at 1 year were: LT, AIS grade, ISS, and AMS. One-year functional outcome (SCIM) can be estimated by a simple equation that takes into account four parameters of the initial physical examination. Estimating the patient long-term outcome early after traumatic SCI is important in order to define the management strategies that might diminish the costs and to give the patient and family a better view of the long-term expectations.

  5. Biomarkers of Spontaneous Recovery from Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Therapy Efficacy in Rheumatoid Arthritis to Define Unresponsive Patients (BATTER-UP) The goal of this study is to develop a way to...predict which patients with rheumatoid arthritis will benefit from anti- TNF therapy . Role: Principal Investigator, 0.6 Calendar Months, (5%) NIH...Outcomes: • ASIA Impairment Scale Grade (A-D) • Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM, survey of activities of daily living) • NeuroRecovery Scale (NRS, physical therapy -based exam)

  6. Increased intracranial pressure in a case of spinal cervical glioblastoma multiforme: analysis of these two rare conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M. de Castro-Costa

    1994-03-01

    Full Text Available The authors describe a rare case of increased intracranial hypertension consequent to a spinal cervical glioblastoma multiforme in a young patient. They analyse the physiopathology of intracranial hypertension in spinal tumors and the rarity of such kind of tumor in this location, and its clinico-pathological aspects.

  7. Persistent at-level thermal hyperalgesia and tactile allodynia accompany chronic neuronal and astrocyte activation in superficial dorsal horn following mouse cervical contusion spinal cord injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime L Watson

    Full Text Available In humans, sensory abnormalities, including neuropathic pain, often result from traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI. SCI can induce cellular changes in the CNS, termed central sensitization, that alter excitability of spinal cord neurons, including those in the dorsal horn involved in pain transmission. Persistently elevated levels of neuronal activity, glial activation, and glutamatergic transmission are thought to contribute to the hyperexcitability of these dorsal horn neurons, which can lead to maladaptive circuitry, aberrant pain processing and, ultimately, chronic neuropathic pain. Here we present a mouse model of SCI-induced neuropathic pain that exhibits a persistent pain phenotype accompanied by chronic neuronal hyperexcitability and glial activation in the spinal cord dorsal horn. We generated a unilateral cervical contusion injury at the C5 or C6 level of the adult mouse spinal cord. Following injury, an increase in the number of neurons expressing ΔFosB (a marker of chronic neuronal activation, persistent astrocyte activation and proliferation (as measured by GFAP and Ki67 expression, and a decrease in the expression of the astrocyte glutamate transporter GLT1 are observed in the ipsilateral superficial dorsal horn of cervical spinal cord. These changes have previously been associated with neuronal hyperexcitability and may contribute to altered pain transmission and chronic neuropathic pain. In our model, they are accompanied by robust at-level hyperaglesia in the ipsilateral forepaw and allodynia in both forepaws that are evident within two weeks following injury and persist for at least six weeks. Furthermore, the pain phenotype occurs in the absence of alterations in forelimb grip strength, suggesting that it represents sensory and not motor abnormalities. Given the importance of transgenic mouse technology, this clinically-relevant model provides a resource that can be used to study the molecular mechanisms contributing to

  8. Persistent at-level thermal hyperalgesia and tactile allodynia accompany chronic neuronal and astrocyte activation in superficial dorsal horn following mouse cervical contusion spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Jaime L; Hala, Tamara J; Putatunda, Rajarshi; Sannie, Daniel; Lepore, Angelo C

    2014-01-01

    In humans, sensory abnormalities, including neuropathic pain, often result from traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). SCI can induce cellular changes in the CNS, termed central sensitization, that alter excitability of spinal cord neurons, including those in the dorsal horn involved in pain transmission. Persistently elevated levels of neuronal activity, glial activation, and glutamatergic transmission are thought to contribute to the hyperexcitability of these dorsal horn neurons, which can lead to maladaptive circuitry, aberrant pain processing and, ultimately, chronic neuropathic pain. Here we present a mouse model of SCI-induced neuropathic pain that exhibits a persistent pain phenotype accompanied by chronic neuronal hyperexcitability and glial activation in the spinal cord dorsal horn. We generated a unilateral cervical contusion injury at the C5 or C6 level of the adult mouse spinal cord. Following injury, an increase in the number of neurons expressing ΔFosB (a marker of chronic neuronal activation), persistent astrocyte activation and proliferation (as measured by GFAP and Ki67 expression), and a decrease in the expression of the astrocyte glutamate transporter GLT1 are observed in the ipsilateral superficial dorsal horn of cervical spinal cord. These changes have previously been associated with neuronal hyperexcitability and may contribute to altered pain transmission and chronic neuropathic pain. In our model, they are accompanied by robust at-level hyperaglesia in the ipsilateral forepaw and allodynia in both forepaws that are evident within two weeks following injury and persist for at least six weeks. Furthermore, the pain phenotype occurs in the absence of alterations in forelimb grip strength, suggesting that it represents sensory and not motor abnormalities. Given the importance of transgenic mouse technology, this clinically-relevant model provides a resource that can be used to study the molecular mechanisms contributing to neuropathic pain

  9. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL PROFILE OF PATIENTS WITH TRAUMATIC SPINAL FRACTURE

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    MATEUS BERGAMO LOMAZ

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To analyze the epidemiological profile of patients with spinal fractures and the characteristics of the population at risk attended at a university hospital. Methods: The study population is composed of 202 patients diagnosed and treated for vertebral fracture due to trauma. The variables were correlated with each other and the correlations with p<0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: The ratio of incidence of trauma between the sexes was 3:1 for males. The mean age was 37 years and the age group with the highest incidence was between 20 and 39 years. Traffic accidents were the most frequent mechanism (51.2% and secondly, falls (33.2%. There was a statistical correlation between trauma mechanisms to age group and region of the spine. The first lumbar vertebra (L1 fracture alone accounted for 21.5% of all cases studied associated with the fall mechanism. Spinal cord injury was recorded in 33.7% of the individuals in the sample. A total of 57.3% of the patients were submitted to surgical treatment and 41.7% to the conservative treatment. The mean hospitalization time was 15 days. Conclusions: Spinal fractures are important determinants of morbidity and mortality in the population with a major impact on economically active individuals, especially males. They are directly associated to traffic accidents in the young population and to falls in the higher age brackets. Primary prevention of trauma is the main mechanism for change in this scenario.

  10. Cannabis use in persons with traumatic spinal cord injury in Denmark.

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    Andresen, Sven R; Biering-Sørensen, Fin; Hagen, Ellen Merete; Nielsen, Jørgen F; Bach, Flemming W; Finnerup, Nanna B

    2017-01-31

    To evaluate recreational and medical cannabis use in individuals with traumatic spinal cord injury, including reasons and predictors for use, perceived benefits and negative consequences. Cross-sectional survey in Denmark. A 35-item questionnaire was sent to 1,101 patients with spinal cord injury who had been in contact with a rehabilitation centre between 1990 and 2012. A total of 537 participants completed the questionnaire. Of these, 36% had tried cannabis at least once and 9% were current users. Of current users, 79% had started to use cannabis before their spinal cord injury. The main reason for use was pleasure, but 65% used cannabis partly for spinal cord injury-related consequences and 59% reported at least good effect on pain and spasticity. Negative consequences of use were primarily inertia and feeling quiet/subdued. Lower age, living in rural areas/larger cities, tobacco-smoking, high alcohol intake and higher muscle stiffness were significantly associated with cannabis use. Those who had never tried cannabis reported that they would mainly use cannabis to alleviate pain and spasticity if it were legalized. Cannabis use is more frequent among individuals with spinal cord injury in Denmark than among the general population. High muscle stiffness and various demographic characteristics (lower age, living in rural areas/larger cities, tobacco-smoking and high alcohol intake) were associated with cannabis use. Most participants had started using cannabis before their spinal cord injury. There was considerable overlap between recreational and disability-related use.

  11. Cannabis use in persons with traumatic spinal cord injury in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Sven R; Biering-Sørensen, Fin; Hagen, Ellen Merete

    2017-01-01

    individuals with spinal cord injury in Denmark than among the general population. High muscle stiffness and various demographic characteristics (lower age, living in rural areas/larger cities, tobacco-smoking and high alcohol intake) were associated with cannabis use. Most participants had started using......OBJECTIVE: To evaluate recreational and medical cannabis use in individuals with traumatic spinal cord injury, including reasons and predictors for use, perceived benefits and negative consequences. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey in Denmark. METHODS: A 35-item questionnaire was sent to 1......,101 patients with spinal cord injury who had been in contact with a rehabilitation centre between 1990 and 2012. RESULTS: A total of 537 participants completed the questionnaire. Of these, 36% had tried cannabis at least once and 9% were current users. Of current users, 79% had started to use cannabis before...

  12. Activity-based therapies to promote forelimb use after a cervical spinal cord injury.

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    Dai, Haining; MacArthur, Linda; McAtee, Marietta; Hockenbury, Nicole; Tidwell, J Lille; McHugh, Brian; Mansfield, Kevin; Finn, Tom; Hamers, Frank P T; Bregman, Barbara S

    2009-10-01

    Significant interest exists in strategies for improving forelimb function following spinal cord injury. We investigated the effect of enriched housing combined with skilled training on the recovery of skilled and automatic forelimb function after a cervical spinal cord injury in adult rats. All animals were pretrained in skilled reaching, gridwalk crossing, and overground locomotion. Some received a cervical over-hemisection lesion at C4-5, interrupting the right side of the spinal cord and dorsal columns bilaterally, and were housed in standard housing alone or enriched environments with daily training. A subset of animals received rolipram to promote neuronal plasticity. Animals were tested weekly for 4 weeks to measure reaching, errors on the gridwalk, locomotion, and vertical exploration. Biotinylated dextran amine was injected into the cortex to label the corticospinal tract. Enriched environments/daily training significantly increased the number and success of left reaches compared to standard housing. Animals also made fewer errors on the gridwalk, a measure of coordinated forelimb function. However, there were no significant improvements in forelimb use during vertical exploration or locomotion. Likewise, rolipram did not improve any of the behaviors tested. Both enriched housing and rolipram increased plasticity of the corticospinal tract rostral to the lesion. These studies indicate that skilled training after a cervical spinal cord injury improves recovery of skilled forelimb use (reaching) and coordinated limb function (gridwalk) but does not improve automatic forelimb function (locomotion and vertical exploration). These studies suggest that rehabilitating forelimb function after spinal cord injury will require separate strategies for descending and segmental pathways.

  13. Cervical spinal cord bullet fragment removal using a minimally invasive surgical approach: a case report

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    Lawton Cort D

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We present a case of penetrating gunshot injury to the high-cervical spinal cord and describe a minimally invasive approach used for removal of the bullet fragment. We present this report to demonstrate technical feasibility of a minimally invasive approach to projectile removal. Case presentation An 18-year-old African-American man presented to our hospital with a penetrating gunshot injury to the high-cervical spine. The bullet lodged in the spinal cord at the C1 level and rendered our patient quadriplegic and dependent on a ventilator. For personal and forensic reasons, our patient and his family requested removal of the bullet fragment almost one year following the injury. Given the significant comorbidity associated with quadriplegia and ventilator dependency, a minimally invasive approach was used to limit the peri-operative complication risk and expedite recovery. Using a minimally invasive expandable retractor system and the aid of a microscope, the posterior arch of C1 was removed, the dura was opened, and the bullet fragment was successfully removed from the spinal cord. Conclusions Here we describe a minimally invasive procedure demonstrating the technical feasibility of removing an intramedullary foreign object from the high-cervical spine. We do not suggest that the availability of minimally invasive procedures should lower the threshold or expand the indications for the removal of bullet fragments in the spinal canal. Rather, our objective is to expand the indications for minimally invasive procedures in an effort to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with spinal procedures. In addition, this report may help to highlight the feasibility of this approach.

  14. Spinal Cord Injury During Ultrasound-Guided C7 Cervical Medial Branch Block.

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    Park, Donghwi; Seong, Min Yong; Kim, Ha Yong; Ryu, Ju Seok

    2017-06-01

    Ultrasound-guided cervical medial branch block (CMBB) is commonly performed to diagnose and treat head, neck, and shoulder pain. However, its use at the C7 level has been shown to be less accurate than at other levels, which may increase the chance of injury owing to the imprecision of needle site provided by the ultrasound guide. We report the first case of iatrogenic spinal cord injury from an ultrasound-guided C7 CMBB. The patient, upon receiving this procedure, had fainted shortly after experiencing an electrical sensation that ran from the neck to the toe. The patient complained of weakness and tingling sensation in the left upper extremity. Cervical magnetic resonance imaging revealed a hematoma in the cervical spinal cord, and an electrophysiological study, which was performed at 3 weeks after the incident, revealed an injury at the left C3-T2 anterior horn. After 2 months of rehabilitation, the patient showed moderate improvement in the strength of the left proximal upper extremity; however, there was no improvement in the strength of the left distal upper extremity. Therefore, we recommend caution when performing ultrasound-guided CMBB at the C7 level, as the guide particularly at this level is relatively inaccurate, posing a risk of spinal cord injury.

  15. Magnetisation transfer ratio measurement in the cervical spinal cord: a preliminary study in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, N.C.; Barker, G.J.; Losseff, N.A.; Gawne-Cain, M.L.; MacManus, D.G.; Thompson, A.J.; Miller, D.H.

    1997-01-01

    MRI readily detects the lesions of multiple sclerosis (MS) in the brain and spinal cord. Conventional MRI sequences do not, however, permit distinction between the various pathological characteristics (oedema, demyelination, axonal loss and gliosis) of lesions in MS. Magnetisation transfer (MT) imaging may be more specific in distinguishing the pathologies responsible for disability in MS, namely demyelination and axonal loss, and therefore may have a potential role in monitoring treatment. We have applied MT imaging to the cervical spinal cord to see if it is feasible to measure MT ratios (MTR) in this region where pathological changes may result in considerable disability. We studied 12 patients with MS and 12 age- and sex-matched normal controls using a sagittal T2-weighted fast spin-echo sequence with and without an MT pulse. The median value for cervical cord mean MTR measurement in normal controls was 19.30 % units (interquartile range 19.05-19.55), whereas values were significantly lower in MS patients (median = 17.95 % units, interquartile range 17.25-19.00, P 0.0004). There was a low intrarater variability for repeated mean MTR measurements. We conclude that it is possible to measure MTR in the cervical spinal cord, that a significant reduction occurs in patients with MS, and that there may be a role for this measure in future MS treatment trials. (orig.). With 2 figs., 1 tab

  16. Magnetisation transfer ratio measurement in the cervical spinal cord: a preliminary study in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, N C; Barker, G J; Losseff, N A; Gawne-Cain, M L; MacManus, D G; Thompson, A J; Miller, D H

    1997-06-01

    MRI readily detects the lesions of multiple sclerosis (MS) in the brain and spinal cord. Conventional MRI sequences do not, however, permit distinction between the various pathological characteristics (oedema, demyelination, axonal loss and gliosis) of lesions in MS. Magnetisation transfer (MT) imaging may be more specific in distinguishing the pathologies responsible for disability in MS, namely demyelination and axonal loss, and therefore may have a potential role in monitoring treatment. We have applied MT imaging to the cervical spinal cord to see if it is feasible to measure MT ratios (MTR) in this region where pathological changes may result in considerable disability. We studied 12 patients with MS and 12 age- and sex-matched normal controls using a sagittal T2-weighted fast spin-echo sequence with and without an MT pulse. The median value for cervical cord mean MTR measurement in normal controls was 19.30% units (interquartile range 19.05-19.55), whereas values were significantly lower in MS patients (median = 17.95% units, interquartile range 17.25-19.00, P = 0.0004). There was a low intrarater variability for repeated mean MTR measurements. We conclude that it is possible to measure MTR in the cervical spinal cord, that a significant reduction occurs in patients with MS, and that there may be a role for this measure in future MS treatment trials.

  17. Magnetisation transfer ratio measurement in the cervical spinal cord: a preliminary study in multiple sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silver, N.C. [NMR Research Unit and Department of Clinical Neurology, Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG (United Kingdom); Barker, G.J. [NMR Research Unit and Department of Clinical Neurology, Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG (United Kingdom); Losseff, N.A. [NMR Research Unit and Department of Clinical Neurology, Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG (United Kingdom); Gawne-Cain, M.L. [NMR Research Unit and Department of Clinical Neurology, Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG (United Kingdom); MacManus, D.G. [NMR Research Unit and Department of Clinical Neurology, Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG (United Kingdom); Thompson, A.J. [NMR Research Unit and Department of Clinical Neurology, Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG (United Kingdom); Miller, D.H. [NMR Research Unit and Department of Clinical Neurology, Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG (United Kingdom)

    1997-06-01

    MRI readily detects the lesions of multiple sclerosis (MS) in the brain and spinal cord. Conventional MRI sequences do not, however, permit distinction between the various pathological characteristics (oedema, demyelination, axonal loss and gliosis) of lesions in MS. Magnetisation transfer (MT) imaging may be more specific in distinguishing the pathologies responsible for disability in MS, namely demyelination and axonal loss, and therefore may have a potential role in monitoring treatment. We have applied MT imaging to the cervical spinal cord to see if it is feasible to measure MT ratios (MTR) in this region where pathological changes may result in considerable disability. We studied 12 patients with MS and 12 age- and sex-matched normal controls using a sagittal T2-weighted fast spin-echo sequence with and without an MT pulse. The median value for cervical cord mean MTR measurement in normal controls was 19.30 % units (interquartile range 19.05-19.55), whereas values were significantly lower in MS patients (median = 17.95 % units, interquartile range 17.25-19.00, P = 0.0004). There was a low intrarater variability for repeated mean MTR measurements. We conclude that it is possible to measure MTR in the cervical spinal cord, that a significant reduction occurs in patients with MS, and that there may be a role for this measure in future MS treatment trials. (orig.). With 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Cervical Spinal Meningeal Melanocytoma Presenting as Intracranial Superficial Siderosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savitha Srirama Jayamma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Meningeal melanocytoma is a rare pigmented tumor of the leptomeningeal melanocytes. This rare entity results in diagnostic difficulty in imaging unless clinical and histopathology correlation is performed. In this case report, we describe a case of meningeal melanocytoma of the cervical region presenting with superficial siderosis. Extensive neuroradiological examination is necessary to locate the source of the bleeding in such patients. Usually, the patient will be cured by the complete surgical excision of the lesion.

  19. A study of measurement of the spinal cord of cervical myelopathy with CT-myelography and forecast of operative result from the size of the spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oosawa, Yoshimitsu

    1985-01-01

    The antero-posterior (AP) and transverse (T) diameter and the T area of the spinal canal, dural canal, and spinal cord were measured using CT-myelography (CT-M) in 44 patients with cervical myelopathy (CM) and 20 control subjects. The AP diameter of these canals and cord and the T diameter of the spinal canal were smaller in the CM group than in the control group. Postoperative CT-M showed that the dural canal and spinal cord had an increase in the AP diameter and T area and a decrease in the T diameter. Preoperative symptoms were well correlated with the AP diameter and the T area of the spinal canal, dural canal, and spinal cord, and spinal cord compression. The symptoms tended to be milder with larger AT diameter and T area of the spinal canal, dural canal, and spinal cord and with smaller spinal cord compression and deformity. Functional damage was reversible in patients with slight spinal cord compression. Favorable operative outcome tended to be achieved when the preoperative AP diameter and T area of the spinal cord were ≥ 5 mm and ≥ 50 mm 2 , respectively. (Namekawa, K.)

  20. Cervical spinal cord infarction after posterior fossa surgery: a case-based update.

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    Martínez-Lage, Juan F; Almagro, María-José; Izura, Virginia; Serrano, Cristina; Ruiz-Espejo, Antonio M; Sánchez-Del-Rincón, Isabel

    2009-12-01

    Several positions are currently utilized for operating patients with posterior fossa lesions. Each individual position has its own risks and benefits, and none has demonstrated its superiority. A dreaded, and probably underreported, complication of these procedures is cervical cord infarction with quadriplegia. We reviewed eight previous reported instances of this devastating complication aimed at ascertaining its pathogenesis to suggest preventive strategies. Several hypotheses have been put forward to explain the occurrence of this complication. Some factors involved in the production of cervical cord infarction include patient's position (seated or prone), hyperflexion of the neck, excessive spinal cord traction, canal stenosis, and systemic arterial hypotension. We hypothesize that spinal cord infarction in our patient might have resulted from compromised blood supply to the midcervical cord caused by tumor infiltration of the cervical leptomeninges in addition to a brief episode of arterial hypotension during venous air embolism. We treated an 8-year-old girl who developed quadriplegia after surgery for a fourth ventricular ependymoma. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated cervical cord infarction. Evoked potentials confirmed the diagnosis. With this report, we want to draw the attention of neurosurgeons to the possibility of the occurrence of this dreadful complication during posterior fossa procedures. Retrospectively, the only measures that might have helped to avoid this complication in our patient would have been using the prone position and intraoperative monitoring of evoked potentials.

  1. Hemiparesis Caused by Cervical Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma: A Report of 3 Cases

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    Kinya Nakanishi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report three cases of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH with hemiparesis. The first patient was a 73-year-old woman who presented with left hemiparesis, neck pain, and left shoulder pain. A cervical MRI scan revealed a left posterolateral epidural hematoma at the C3–C6 level. The condition of the patient improved after laminectomy and evacuation of the epidural hematoma. The second patient was a 62-year-old man who presented with right hemiparesis and neck pain. A cervical MRI scan revealed a right posterolateral dominant epidural hematoma at the C6-T1 level. The condition of the patient improved after laminectomy and evacuation of the epidural hematoma. The third patient was a 60-year-old woman who presented with left hemiparesis and neck pain. A cervical MRI scan revealed a left posterolateral epidural hematoma at the C2–C4 level. The condition of the patient improved with conservative treatment. The classical clinical presentation of SSEH is acute onset of severe irradiating back pain followed by progression to paralysis, whereas SSEH with hemiparesis is less common. Our cases suggest that acute cervical spinal epidural hematoma should be considered as a differential diagnosis in patients presenting with clinical symptoms of sudden neck pain and radicular pain with progression to hemiparesis.

  2. Human cervical spinal cord funiculi: investigation with magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onu, Mihaela; Gervai, Patricia; Cohen-Adad, Julien; Lawrence, Jane; Kornelsen, Jennifer; Tomanek, Boguslaw; Sboto-Frankenstein, Uta Nicola

    2010-04-01

    To use spinal cord diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) for investigating human cervical funiculi, acquire axial diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data with an in-plane resolution sufficient to delineate subquadrants within the spinal cord, obtain corresponding DTI metrics, and assess potential regional differences. Healthy volunteers were studied with a 3 T Siemens Trio MRI scanner. DTI data were acquired using a single-shot spin echo EPI sequence. The spatial resolution allowed for the delineation of regions of interest (ROIs) in the ventral, dorsal, and lateral spinal cord funiculi. ROI-based and tractography-based analyses were performed. Significant fractional anisotropy (FA) differences were found between ROIs in the dorsal and ventral funiculi (P = 0.0001), dorsal and lateral funiculi (P = 0.015), and lateral and ventral funiculi (P = 0.0002). Transverse diffusivity was significantly different between ROIs in the ventral and dorsal funiculi (P = 0.003) and the ventral and lateral funiculi (P = 0.004). Tractography-based quantifications revealed DTI parameter regional differences that were generally consistent with the ROI-based analysis. Original contributions are: 1) the use of a tractography-based method to quantify DTI metrics in the human cervical spinal cord, and 2) reported DTI values in various funiculi at 3 T. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Delayed rehabilitation with task-specific therapies improves forelimb function after a cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Haining; Macarthur, Linda; McAtee, Marietta; Hockenbury, Nicole; Das, Paramita; Bregman, Barbara S

    2011-01-01

    The effect of activity based therapies on restoring forelimb function in rats was evaluated when initiated one month after a cervical spinal cord injury. Adult rats received a unilateral over-hemisection of the spinal cord at C4/5, which interrupts the right side of the spinal cord and the dorsal columns bilaterally, resulting in severe impairments in forelimb function with greater impairment on the right side. One month after injury rats were housed in enriched housing and received daily training in reaching, gridwalk, and CatWalk. A subset of rats received rolipram for 10 days to promote axonal plasticity. Rats were tested weekly for six weeks for reaching, elevated gridwalk, CatWalk, and forelimb use during vertical exploration. Rats exposed to enriched housing and daily training significantly increased the number of left reaches and pellets grasped and eaten, reduced the number of right forelimb errors on the gridwalk, increased right forelimb use during vertical exploration, recovered more normal step cycles, and reduced their hindlimb base of support on the CatWalk compared to rats in standard cages without daily training. Delayed rehabilitation with enriched housing and daily forelimb training significantly improved skilled, sensorimotor, and automatic forelimb function together after cervical spinal cord injury.

  4. Ultrasonographic cross-sectional area of spinal nerve roots in cervical radiculopathy: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunkuk; Yoon, Joon-Shik; Kang, Hyo Jung

    2015-02-01

    Recently, sonographic assessment has been considered an alternative method for evaluating cervical root lesions. The aim of this pilot study was to measure cross-sectional areas (CSAs) of cervical spinal nerve roots using high-resolution ultrasonography in patients with cervical radiculopathy, to compare the CSA of nerve roots between the affected and unaffected sides. Patients with a clinical diagnosis of unilateral cervical radiculopathy, who were referred to the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation in the University General Hospital by general practitioners, were prospectively recruited. The selected nerve roots were sonographically imaged at the most proximal location possible, where they exited over the transverse processor, just distal to that point. The CSA was measured three times using the trace tool available on the ultrasonography device. The CSA of each contralateral nerve root served as a control. Twenty-four patients (9 women; mean age, 53.7 yrs) were enrolled in this study. The CSAs were measured by ultrasonography in 5 pairs of C5 roots, 12 pairs of C6 roots, and 7 pairs of C7 roots. The mean CSAs of the affected and unaffected sides were 9.74 ± 1.95 and 9.47 ± 1.95 mm, respectively (P = 0.019). Spearman rank-order correlation test showed a positive relationship between the CSA of the affected nerve root and the duration of symptoms (ρ22 = 0.467, P = 0.021).This is, to the authors' knowledge, the first comparative study to obtain the CSA of spinal nerve roots in cervical radiculopathy. Increased CSA of the affected nerve root relative to the unaffected side, as demonstrated by ultrasonography, may be useful as an additive clue for the diagnosis of cervical radiculopathy.

  5. Effect of melatonin on the functional recovery from experimental traumatic compression of the spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiaveto-de-Souza, A.; Silva, C.A. da; Defino, H.L.A.; Bel, E.A.Del

    2013-01-01

    Spinal cord injury is an extremely severe condition with no available effective therapies. We examined the effect of melatonin on traumatic compression of the spinal cord. Sixty male adult Wistar rats were divided into three groups: sham-operated animals and animals with 35 and 50% spinal cord compression with a polycarbonate rod spacer. Each group was divided into two subgroups, each receiving an injection of vehicle or melatonin (2.5 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) 5 min prior to and 1, 2, 3, and 4 h after injury. Functional recovery was monitored weekly by the open-field test, the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan locomotor scale and the inclined plane test. Histological changes of the spinal cord were examined 35 days after injury. Motor scores were progressively lower as spacer size increased according to the motor scale and inclined plane test evaluation at all times of assessment. The results of the two tests were correlated. The open-field test presented similar results with a less pronounced difference between the 35 and 50% compression groups. The injured groups presented functional recovery that was more evident in the first and second weeks. Animals receiving melatonin treatment presented more pronounced functional recovery than vehicle-treated animals as measured by the motor scale or inclined plane. NADPH-d histochemistry revealed integrity of the spinal cord thoracic segment in sham-operated animals and confirmed the severity of the lesion after spinal cord narrowing. The results obtained after experimental compression of the spinal cord support the hypothesis that melatonin may be considered for use in clinical practice because of its protective effect on the secondary wave of neuronal death following the primary wave after spinal cord injury

  6. Effect of melatonin on the functional recovery from experimental traumatic compression of the spinal cord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiaveto-de-Souza, A. [Departamento de Morfofisiologia, Universidade Federal do Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, MS (Brazil); Silva, C.A. da [Departamento de Morfologia,Estomatologia e Fisiologia, Faculdade de Odontologia de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Defino, H.L.A. [Departamento de Orthopedia e Traumatologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Bel, E.A.Del [Departamento de Morfologia,Estomatologia e Fisiologia, Faculdade de Odontologia de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2013-04-12

    Spinal cord injury is an extremely severe condition with no available effective therapies. We examined the effect of melatonin on traumatic compression of the spinal cord. Sixty male adult Wistar rats were divided into three groups: sham-operated animals and animals with 35 and 50% spinal cord compression with a polycarbonate rod spacer. Each group was divided into two subgroups, each receiving an injection of vehicle or melatonin (2.5 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) 5 min prior to and 1, 2, 3, and 4 h after injury. Functional recovery was monitored weekly by the open-field test, the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan locomotor scale and the inclined plane test. Histological changes of the spinal cord were examined 35 days after injury. Motor scores were progressively lower as spacer size increased according to the motor scale and inclined plane test evaluation at all times of assessment. The results of the two tests were correlated. The open-field test presented similar results with a less pronounced difference between the 35 and 50% compression groups. The injured groups presented functional recovery that was more evident in the first and second weeks. Animals receiving melatonin treatment presented more pronounced functional recovery than vehicle-treated animals as measured by the motor scale or inclined plane. NADPH-d histochemistry revealed integrity of the spinal cord thoracic segment in sham-operated animals and confirmed the severity of the lesion after spinal cord narrowing. The results obtained after experimental compression of the spinal cord support the hypothesis that melatonin may be considered for use in clinical practice because of its protective effect on the secondary wave of neuronal death following the primary wave after spinal cord injury.

  7. Klippel-Feil syndrome – the risk of cervical spinal cord injury: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Gurpreet

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Klippel-Feil syndrome is defined as congenital fusion of two or more cervical vertebrae and is believed to result from faulty segmentation along the embryo's developing axis during weeks 3–8 of gestation. Persons with Klippel-Feil syndrome and cervical stenosis may be at increased risk for spinal cord injury after minor trauma as a result of hypermobility of the various cervical segments. Persons with Klippel-Feil Syndrome often have congenital anomalies of the urinary tract as well. Case presentation A 51-year male developed incomplete tetraplegia in 1997 when he slipped and fell backwards hitting his head on the floor. X-rays of cervical spine showed fusion at two levels: C2 and C3 vertebrae, and C4 and C5 vertebrae. Intravenous urography (IVU revealed no kidneys in the renal fossa on both sides, but the presence of crossed, fused renal ectopia in the left ilio-lumbar region. This patient had a similar cervical spinal cord injury about 15 years ago, when he developed transient numbness and paresis of the lower limbs following a fall. Discussion and Conclusion 1 Persons with Klippel-Feil syndrome should be made aware of the increased risk of sustaining transient neurologic deterioration after minor trauma if there is associated radiographic evidence of spinal stenosis. 2 Patients with Klippel-Feil syndrome often have congenital anomalies of the urinary tract. Our patient had crossed, fused, ectopia of kidney. 3 When patients with Klippel-Feil syndrome sustain tetraplegia they have increased chances of developing urinary tract calculi. Treatment of kidney stones may pose a challenge because of associated renal anomalies. 4 Health professionals caring for cervical spinal cord injury patients with Klippel-Feil syndrome and renal anomalies should place emphasis on prevention of kidney stones. A large fluid intake is recommended for these patients, as a high intake of fluids is still the most powerful and certainly the most

  8. Predicting the risk and severity of acute spinal cord injury after a minor trauma to the cervical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aebli, Nikolaus; Rüegg, Tabea B; Wicki, Anina G; Petrou, Nassos; Krebs, Jörg

    2013-06-01

    Acute spinal cord injury (SCI) after a minor trauma to the cervical spine has been reported in patients without preceding neurologic symptoms. Spinal canal stenosis may be the reason for the discrepancy between the severity of the injury and that of the trauma. The spinal canal to vertebral body ratio is often used to assess canal stenosis on conventional radiographs. However, the ratio does not appraise soft-tissue stenosis and canal narrowing at the level of the intervertebral disc. Parameters measured on magnetic resonance (MR) images may thus be more meaningful. The relevance of MR image parameters for predicting the risk and severity of acute SCI in patients after a minor trauma to the cervical spine has not yet been established. To investigate MR image parameters of the cervical spine in patients suffering from acute SCI after a minor trauma to the cervical spine. To investigate the use of these parameters for predicting the risk and severity of acute cervical SCI after a minor trauma to the cervical spine. Retrospective radiological study of consecutive patients. Fifty-two patients suffering from acute cervical SCI and 131 patients showing no neurologic deficits after a minor trauma to the cervical spine. On sagittal MR images: vertebral body diameter, midvertebral canal diameter, disc-level canal diameter, and spinal cord diameter. On lateral conventional radiographs: vertebral body diameter and midvertebral canal diameter. Conventional lateral radiographs and sagittal T2-weighted MR images of the cervical spine (C3-C7) were analyzed. The following calculations were performed using measurements from MR images: the spinal canal to vertebral body ratio, the space available for the cord, and the canal-to-cord ratio. Using measurements from conventional radiographs, the spinal canal to vertebral body ratio was determined. Receiver-operating curves were calculated for evaluating the classification accuracy of the different parameters for predicting the risk

  9. Interneuronal systems of the cervical spinal cord assessed with BOLD imaging at 1.5 T

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    Stracke, C.P.; Schoth, F.; Moeller-Hartmann, W.; Krings, T. [University Hospital of the University of Technology, Departments of Neuroradiology and Diagnostic Radiology, Aachen (Germany); Pettersson, L.G. [University of Goeteborg, Department of Physiology, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate if functional activity with spinal cord somatosensory stimulation can be visualized using BOLD fMRI. We investigated nine healthy volunteers using a somatosensory stimulus generator. The stimuli were applied in three different runs at the first, third, and fifth finger tip of the right hand, respectively, corresponding to dermatomes c6, c7, and c8. The stimuli gave an increase of BOLD signal (activation) in three different locations of the spinal cord and brain stem. First, activations could be seen in the spinal segment corresponding to the stimulated dermatome in seven out of nine volunteers for c6 stimulation, two out of eight for c7, and three out of eight for c8. These activations were located close to the posterior margin of the spinal cord, presumably reflecting synaptic transmission to dorsal horn interneurons. Second, activation in the medulla oblongata was evident in four subjects, most likely corresponding to the location of the nucleus cuneatus. The third location of activation, which was the strongest and most reliable observed was inside the spinal cord in the c3 and c4 segments. Activation at these spinal levels was almost invariably observed independently of the dermatome stimulated (9/9 for c6, 8/8 for c7, and 7/8 for c8 stimulation). These activations may pertain to an interneuronal system at this spinal level. The results are discussed in relation to neurophysiological studies on cervical spinal interneuronal pathways in animals and humans. (orig.)

  10. Interneuronal systems of the cervical spinal cord assessed with BOLD imaging at 1.5 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stracke, C.P.; Schoth, F.; Moeller-Hartmann, W.; Krings, T.; Pettersson, L.G.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate if functional activity with spinal cord somatosensory stimulation can be visualized using BOLD fMRI. We investigated nine healthy volunteers using a somatosensory stimulus generator. The stimuli were applied in three different runs at the first, third, and fifth finger tip of the right hand, respectively, corresponding to dermatomes c6, c7, and c8. The stimuli gave an increase of BOLD signal (activation) in three different locations of the spinal cord and brain stem. First, activations could be seen in the spinal segment corresponding to the stimulated dermatome in seven out of nine volunteers for c6 stimulation, two out of eight for c7, and three out of eight for c8. These activations were located close to the posterior margin of the spinal cord, presumably reflecting synaptic transmission to dorsal horn interneurons. Second, activation in the medulla oblongata was evident in four subjects, most likely corresponding to the location of the nucleus cuneatus. The third location of activation, which was the strongest and most reliable observed was inside the spinal cord in the c3 and c4 segments. Activation at these spinal levels was almost invariably observed independently of the dermatome stimulated (9/9 for c6, 8/8 for c7, and 7/8 for c8 stimulation). These activations may pertain to an interneuronal system at this spinal level. The results are discussed in relation to neurophysiological studies on cervical spinal interneuronal pathways in animals and humans. (orig.)

  11. Apolipoprotein E epsilon 4 allele and outcomes of traumatic spinal cord injury in a Chinese Han population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chongyi; Ji, Guangrong; Liu, Qingpeng; Yao, Meng

    2011-10-01

    The association between apolipoprotein E (APOE) epsilon 4 (ε4) allele and outcomes of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is still controversial and ambiguous. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that APOE polymorphisms are associated with outcomes after SCI in Chinese Han patients. APOE polymorphisms were determined in 100 patients with cervical SCI (C3-C8). The genotype frequency of this polymorphism was determined by using a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism assay. Patients with an APOE ε4 allele had significantly less motor recovery during rehabilitation than did patients without an APOE ε4 allele (mean 3.7 vs. 6.1; P = 0.04) and a longer rehabilitation length of stay (LOS) (mean 117.4 vs. 94.5; P = 0.02), but better sensory-pinprick recovery (mean 6.1 vs. 4.0; P = 0.03). There were no significant differences by APOE ε4 allele status in sensory-light touch recovery or acute LOS. This study suggests that the APOE ε4 allele is associated with outcomes after SCI and longer rehabilitation LOS in Chinese Han patients.

  12. Concurrent electrical cervicomedullary stimulation and cervical transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation result in a stimulus interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongés, Siobhan C; Bai, Siwei; Taylor, Janet L

    2017-10-01

    What is the central question of this study? We previously showed that the motor pathway is not modified after cervical transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation (tsDCS) applied using anterior-posterior electrodes. Here, we examine the motor pathway during stimulation. What is the main finding and its importance? We show that electrically elicited muscle responses to cervicomedullary stimulation are modified during tsDCS, whereas magnetically elicited responses are not. Modelling reveals electrical field modifications during concurrent tsDCS and electrical cervicomedullary stimulation. Changes in muscle response probably result from electrical field modifications rather than physiological changes. Care should be taken when applying electrical stimuli simultaneously. Transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation (tsDCS) can modulate neuronal excitability within the human spinal cord; however, few studies have used tsDCS at a cervical level. This study aimed to characterize cervical tsDCS further by observing its acute effects on motor responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation and cervicomedullary stimulation. In both studies 1 and 2, participants (study 1, n = 8, four female; and study 2, n = 8, three female) received two periods of 10 min, 3 mA cervical tsDCS on the same day through electrodes placed in an anterior-posterior configuration over the neck; one period with the cathode posterior (c-tsDCS) and the other with the anode posterior (a-tsDCS). In study 1, electrically elicited cervicomedullary motor evoked potentials (eCMEPs) and transcranial magnetic stimulation-elicited motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were measured in biceps brachii and flexor carpi radialis before, during and after each tsDCS period. In study 2, eCMEPs and magnetically elicited CMEPs (mCMEPs) were measured before, during and after each tsDCS period. For study 3, computational modelling was used to observe possible interactions of cervical tsDCS and electrical

  13. Spinal subdural hematoma associated with traumatic intracranial interhemispheric subdural hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wajima, Daisuke; Yokota, Hiroshi; Ida, Yuki; Nakase, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    A 78-year-old female fell and hit the back of her head on the floor. Head computed tomography (CT) showed right acute interhemispheric subdural hematoma (ISDH). Her left hemiparesis worsened, so partial removal of ISDH was performed. The hemiparesis was improved, but leg monoparesis persisted. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging showed spinal subdural hematoma (SSDH) at the S1-2 level. Nerve conduction velocity measurements at the knee joint to lower limb showed disappearance of the left peroneal nerve conduction wave, indicating that one of the causes of drop foot was common peroneal nerve palsy. With conservative therapy, her drop foot was gradually improved, then she recovered to walk with a stick and moved to a rehabilitation hospital. Lumbar MR imaging should be performed to rule out SSDH in a patient with posterior fossa subdural hematoma on initial head CT who develops leg palsy.

  14. Relationship between motor recovery and independence after sensorimotor-complete cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, John L K; Lammertse, Daniel P; Schubert, Martin; Curt, Armin; Steeves, John D

    2012-01-01

    For therapeutics directed to the injured spinal cord, a change in neurological impairment has been proposed as a relevant acute clinical study end point. However, changes in neurological function, even if statistically significant, may not be associated with a functional impact, such as a meaningful improvement in items within the self-care subscore of the Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM). The authors examined the functional significance associated with spontaneously recovering upper-extremity motor function after sensorimotor-complete cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Using the European Multi-center Study about Spinal Cord Injury (EMSCI) data set, a retrospective analysis was undertaken of individuals with cervical sensorimotor-complete SCI (initial motor level, C4-C7). Specifically, changes in upper-extremity motor score (UEMS), motor level, and SCIM (total and self-care subscore) were assessed between approximately 1 and 48 weeks after injury (n = 74). The initial motor level did not significantly influence the total UEMS recovered or number of motor levels recovered. SCIM self-care subscore recovery was significantly greater for those individuals regaining 2 motor levels compared with those recovering only 1 or no motor levels. However, the recovery in the SCIM self-care subscore was not significantly different between individuals recovering only 1 motor level and those individuals who showed no motor-level improvement. A 2 motor-level improvement indicates a clinically meaningful change and might be considered a primary outcome in acute and subacute interventional trials enrolling individuals with cervical sensorimotor-complete SCI.

  15. Dose-volume effects in the rat cervical spinal cord after proton irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bijl, Hendrik P.; Vuijk, Peter van; Coppes, Rob P.; Schippers, Jacobus M.; Konings, Antonius W.T.; Kogel, Albert J. van der

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate dose-volume effects in the rat cervical spinal cord with protons. Methods and Materials: Wistar rats were irradiated on the cervical spinal cord with a single fraction of unmodulated protons (150-190 MeV) using the shoot through method, which employs the plateau of the depth-dose profile rather than the Bragg peak. Four different lengths of the spinal cord (2, 4, 8, and 20 mm) were irradiated with variable doses. The endpoint for estimating dose-volume effects was paralysis of fore or hind limbs. Results: The results obtained with a high-precision proton beam showed a marginal increase of ED 50 when decreasing the irradiated cord length from 20 mm (ED 50 = 20.4 Gy) to 8 mm (ED 50 = 24.9 Gy), but a steep increase in ED 50 when further decreasing the length to 4 mm (ED 50 = 53.7 Gy) and 2 mm (ED 50 = 87.8 Gy). These results generally confirm data obtained previously in a limited series with 4-6-MV photons, and for the first time it was possible to construct complete dose-response curves down to lengths of 2 mm. At higher ED 50 values and shorter lengths irradiated, the latent period to paralysis decreased from 125 to 60 days. Conclusions: Irradiation of variable lengths of rat cervical spinal cord with protons showed steeply increasing ED 50 values for lengths of less than 8 mm. These results suggest the presence of a critical migration distance of 2-3 mm for cells involved in regeneration processes

  16. Modified anterior-only reduction and fixation for traumatic cervical facet dislocation (AO type C injuries).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanna, Rishi M; Shetty, Ajoy P; Rajasekaran, S

    2017-12-26

    Surgical reduction of uni and bi-facetal dislocations of the cervical spine (AO type C injuries) can be performed by posterior, anterior or combined approaches. Ease of access, low infection rates and less risks of neurological worsening has popularized anterior approach. However, the reduction of locked cervical facets can be intricate through anterior approach. We analyzed the safety, efficacy and outcomes at a minimum 1 year, of a novel anterior reduction technique for consecutively treated cervical facet dislocations. Patients with single level traumatic sub-axial cervical dislocation (n = 39) treated by this modified anterior technique were studied. The technique involved standard Smith-Robinson approach, discectomy beyond PLL, use of inter-laminar distracter to distract while Caspar pins were used as "joysticks" (either flexion-extension or lateral rotation moments are provided), to reduce the sub-luxed facets. Among 51 patients with cervical type C injury treated during the study period, 4 patients who had spontaneous reduction and 8 treated by planned global fusion were excluded. 39 patients of mean age 49.9 years were studied. The levels of injury included (C3-4 = 2, C4-5 = 5, C5-6 = 20, C6-7 = 12). 18 were bi-facetal and 21 were uni-facetal dislocation. One facet was fractured in 17 and both in 5 patients. 30% (n = 13) had a concomitant disc prolapse. The neurological status was as follows: 9 ASIA A, 9 ASIA C, 13 ASIA D and 8 ASIA E. All the patients were successfully reduced by this technique and fixed with anterior locking cervical locking plates. No supplemental posterior surgery was performed. 22 patients with incomplete deficit showed recovery. The mean follow-up was 14.3 months and there was no implant failure except one patient who had partial loss of the reduction. Patients with traumatic sub-axial cervical dislocation (AO type C injuries) can be safely and effectively reduced by this technique. Other advantages include minimal

  17. Prediction of Bladder Outcomes after Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: A Longitudinal Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Pavese

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Neurogenic bladder dysfunction represents one of the most common and devastating sequelae of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI. As early prediction of bladder outcomes is essential to counsel patients and to plan neurourological management, we aimed to develop and validate a model to predict urinary continence and complete bladder emptying 1 y after traumatic SCI.Using multivariate logistic regression analysis from the data of 1,250 patients with traumatic SCI included in the European Multicenter Spinal Cord Injury study, we developed two prediction models of urinary continence and complete bladder emptying 1 y after traumatic SCI and performed an external validation in 111 patients. As predictors, we evaluated age, gender, and all variables of the International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury (ISNCSCI and of the Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM. Urinary continence and complete bladder emptying 1 y after SCI were assessed through item 6 of SCIM. The full model relies on lower extremity motor score (LEMS, light-touch sensation in the S3 dermatome of ISNCSI, and SCIM subscale respiration and sphincter management: the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (aROC was 0.936 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.922-0.951. The simplified model is based on LEMS only: the aROC was 0.912 (95% CI: 0.895-0.930. External validation of the full and simplified models confirmed the excellent predictive power: the aROCs were 0.965 (95% CI: 0.934-0.996 and 0.972 (95% CI 0.943-0.999, respectively. This study is limited by the substantial number of patients with a missing 1-y outcome and by differences between derivation and validation cohort.Our study provides two simple and reliable models to predict urinary continence and complete bladder emptying 1 y after traumatic SCI. Early prediction of bladder function might optimize counselling and patient-tailored rehabilitative interventions and improve patient

  18. The correlation between evoked spinal cord potentials and magnetic resonance imaging before Surgery in cervical spondylotic myelopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akashi, Kosuke; Kanchiku, Tsukasa; Taguchi, Toshihiko; Kato, Yoshihiko; Imajo, Yasuaki; Suzuki, Hidenori

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to clarify the correlation between electrophysiological examination and MRI diagnosis. Twenty-four patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy were examined with magnetic resonance imaging and evoked spinal cord potentials (ESCPs) before surgery. In all the patients, only the intervertebral level was symptomatic, as shown by ESCPs. ESCPs following median nerve stimulation (MN-ESCPs), transcranial electric stimulation (TCE-ESCPs), and spinal cord stimulation (Spinal-ECSPs) were recorded. The patients were grouped into two groups as follows: group A, all ESCPs were abnormal; group B, normal spinal cord stimulation. Spinal cord transverse area and compression ratio (central and 1/4-lateral anteroposterior diameter divided by transverse diameter) were measured on T1-weighted axial imaging, with abnormal ESCPs as indicators of spinal cord morphology. Central and 1/4-lateral compression ratio was significantly lower in group A. Spinal cord morphology of magnetic resonance imaging is useful for functional diagnosis. (author)

  19. [Our experience with laminectomy in the treatment of spinal cord disease caused by cervical arthrosis: apropos of 42 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueye, E M; Sakho, Y; Badiane, S B; Ba, M C; Ndoye, N; Diene, S M; Gueye, M

    1999-01-01

    Cervical spondylotic arthRosis may lead to a myelopathy and the question which can rise is: posterior surgical decompression is adequate regarding the others surgical technics discussed? In this paper the authors describe the postoperative results of 42 patients who have been operated on by laminectomy from 1971 to 1995 at Fann Hospital in Dakar. The median age was 42 years and the median delay between the onset of neurological disorders and operation was 5.9 months. All patients showed symptoms of spinal cord and root disturbances. Neuro-imaging studies with plan X-rays and myelography reveal arthrosis and the impact of this arthrosis on nervous system. With a follow up of 6 months we found a mortality rate of 4.7% (two cases of death), 66.8% of good results and 28.5% of fail. Eighteen months post surgery results were respectively 52.3% and 45.7% of good and poor results. The complications of the laminectomy were peri operative hemorrhage (19%); sepsis (21.4%); spine cord traumatic injuries (9.5%) spondylolisthesis (4.7%). Laminectomy has been found to improve "spine syndrome"; paresthesia; fasciculations, and sensory deficits. Also three level laminectomy and surgery which can take place before six months are good prognosis factors. The authors stressed on laminectomy because of our low medical care situations particularly that no other surgical procedures through the modern literature leads to better results.

  20. Intrinsic cervical spinal cord deformation on MRI: "the distorted 'H' sign".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, I; Rosenbaum, A E; Yu, F S; Collins, G H; Collins, C S; Poe, L B

    1996-12-01

    Extrinsic and intrinsic pathologic processes involving the spinal cord can affect its gross morphologic appearance. Contour-related abnormalities of the spinal cord can be determined by both noninvasive and invasive imaging techniques. Detailing internal dysmorphism of the spinal cord is more difficult to determine because the internal architecture of the cord is not usually visualized. Now magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can readily demonstrate the central "H" configuration of the normal spinal gray matter on axial T2* gradient-recall echo pulse sequences; thus, it should also be capable of demonstrating distortions of it. We initially reviewed 55 abnormal cervical spine 1.5-T MR imaging studies. Of 37 large lesions, 31 deformed the "H" whereas 18 small lesions did not. To compare potential differences in visualization of the "H" by MR scanners of different field strengths (1.5-0.5 T), a total of 125 additional patients were reviewed at different State University of New York (SUNY) sites. Visualization of the "H" varied from 51.4% at 1.5 T to 18.4% at 0.5 T. As resolution of the spinal cord increases on MR imaging, it becomes possible to more accurately map the altered cord "interior," which may have a detectable clinical (neurologic) counterpart.

  1. Side effects of steroid use in patients with traumatic spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Del Toro Aguayo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Indicate and identify potential complications in our unit associated with the use of steroids in patients over 16 years of age with traumatic acute spinal cord injury managed with NASCIS II, III scheme compared with patients with the same characteristics who did not receive this management. METHODS: To conduct a research study with reports of cases and controls in patients over 16 years of age and with an established diagnosis of acute spinal cord injury, treated definitively in our unit, performing the comparison of evolutionary process between those treated with steroids and those who were not, based on the development of a data collection sheet with several variables.. The results were encoded, tabulated and analyzed. RESULTS: A total of 30 patients were analyzed from January to December 2012 and it was found that 16% of the patients managed with the steroid scheme required admission to the intensive care unit, 40% developed hospital-acquired pneumonia, 17% had urinary tract infection, 3% progressed to respiratory failure and 20% of this group had gastrointestinal bleeding. CONCLUSIONS: It was concluded that steroid management is not a risk-free therapy and the recommendation is to make a direct assessment of the potential benefit to its use in relation to the possible complications that can ensue before choosing this option in patients with traumatic spinal cord injury.

  2. Acute traumatic spinal cord injury induces glial activation in the cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, A D; Westmoreland, S V; Evangelous, N R; Graham, A; Sledge, J; Nesathurai, S

    2012-06-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury leads to direct myelin and axonal damage and leads to the recruitment of inflammatory cells to site of injury. Although rodent models have provided the greatest insight into the genesis of traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI), recent studies have attempted to develop an appropriate non-human primate model. We explored TSCI in a cynomolgus macaque model using a balloon catheter to mimic external trauma to further evaluate the underlying mechanisms of acute TSCI. Following 1hour of spinal cord trauma, there were focal areas of hemorrhage and necrosis at the site of trauma. Additionally, there was a marked increased expression of macrophage-related protein 8, MMP9, IBA-1, and inducible nitric oxide synthase in macrophages and microglia at the site of injury. This data indicate that acute TSCI in the cynomolgus macaque is an appropriate model and that the earliest immunohistochemical changes noted are within macrophage and microglia populations. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. Analysis of the Literature on Cervical Spine Fractures in Ankylosing Spinal Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschugg, Anja; Wipplinger, Christoph; Thomé, Claudius

    2017-01-01

    Study Design: Narrative literature review. Objective: The numbers of low-energy cervical fractures seen in patients suffering from ankylosing spondylitis (also known as Bechterew disease) or diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (also known as Forestier disease) have greatly increased over recent decades. These fractures tend to be particularly overlooked, leading to delayed diagnosis and secondary neurological deterioration. The aim of the present evaluation was to summarize current knowledge on cervical fractures in patients with ankylosing spinal disorders (ASDs). Methods: The literature was analyzed through an extensive PubMed search focusing on cervical fractures, especially with delayed diagnosis. Results: In ASDs, it was mainly the cervical spine that was found to be affected by fractures. Fifty percent of ASD patients had neurological deficits at admission, with a high probability of secondary deterioration due to an initially missed diagnosis. Multislice high-resolution imaging techniques should be the radiological standard of care if a vertebral fracture is suspected. Nevertheless, many of these spinal fractures are overlooked, leading to feared secondary deterioration of existing unstable fractures. Long posterior instrumentations were found to be the treatment of choice, followed by anterior and combined anterior-posterior instrumentations. Conclusions: Delayed diagnosis of cervical fractures in ASDs contributes to initially misinterpreted clinical symptoms, inadequate imaging techniques, and a lack of knowledge about this disease entity due to its peculiarities. Thorough assessment of the patients’ neurological morbidity at admission might reduce the occurrence of the associated fractures. The biomechanical behavior of ASD fractures is completely different from that of non-ASD fractures, so that the treatment strategy for these patients should be at least surgical, in combination with long dorsal instrumentations or combined anterior

  4. [Anterior spinal fusion by thoracoscopy. A non-traumatic technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baulot, E; Trouilloud, P; Ragois, P; Giroux, E A; Grammont, P M

    1997-01-01

    Video assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) is a new modality which allows visualization of, and access to the intrathoracic organs without thoracotomy. Recently, this technique has been used for anterior thoracic spine approach to perform surgery which previously required standard postero-lateral thoracotomy. The authors report their initial experience of anterior spinal fusion using thoracoscopy and give a detailed description of their surgical procedure. This technique, started on June 1993, was performed only in one level 1 in 10 patients who had thoracic spine trauma with fracture or luxation. The procedure was performed in the lateral decubitus position. The patient was prepared in the standard manner for a full thoracotomy. Surgical instruments that are needed for conversion to an open procedure must be in the operative room. Ventilation was stopped to the ipsilateral lung. Lung's collapse of the surgical side was obtained with a double lumen tube. Carbon dioxide (CO2) insufflation was used to further collapse. The first thoracoscopic portal was placed through the sixth or seventh intercostal space in the posterior axillary line, which was the safest place. All subsequent portals were placed under thoracoscopic visualization, in a triangular way as recommended by Landreneau (1992). Only open trocars were used to avoid complication of CO2 insufflation. Once the target level has been defined, a needle was placed into the disc space and roentgenographic confirmation obtained. The parietal pleura was then divided using monopolar electrocautery. Segmental vessels of the operation field lied transversely across the midportion of the vertebral body. They were mobilised and systematically ligated with endoscopic clip to simplify the procedure. Then the intervertebral space was opened and bone and disc were removed, restricted to the anterior and middle third. The graft was placed into the thoracic cavity by using a high density calcium hydroxyapatite ceramic block

  5. Nerve Transfers to Restore Upper Extremity Function in Cervical Spinal Cord Injury: Update and Preliminary Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Ida K; Davidge, Kristen M; Novak, Christine B; Hoben, Gwendolyn; Kahn, Lorna C; Juknis, Neringa; Ruvinskaya, Rimma; Mackinnon, Susan E

    2015-10-01

    Cervical spinal cord injury can result in profound loss of upper extremity function. Recent interest in the use of nerve transfers to restore volitional control is an exciting development in the care of these complex patients. In this article, the authors review preliminary results of nerve transfers in spinal cord injury. Review of the literature and the authors' cases series of 13 operations in nine spinal cord injury nerve transfer recipients was performed. Representative cases were reviewed to explore critical concepts and preliminary outcomes. The nerve transfers used expendable donors (e.g., teres minor, deltoid, supinator, and brachialis) innervated above the level of the spinal cord injury to restore volitional control of missing function such as elbow extension, wrist extension, and/or hand function (posterior interosseous nerve or anterior interosseous nerve/finger flexors reinnervated). Results from the literature and the authors' patients (after a mean postsurgical follow-up of 12 months) indicate gains in function as assessed by both manual muscle testing and patients' self-reported outcomes measures. Nerve transfers can provide an alternative and consistent means of reestablishing volitional control of upper extremity function in people with cervical level spinal cord injury. Early outcomes provide evidence of substantial improvements in self-reported function despite relatively subtle objective gains in isolated muscle strength. Further work to investigate the optimal timing and combination of nerve transfer operations, the combination of these with traditional treatments (tendon transfer and functional electrical stimulation), and measurement of outcomes is imperative for determining the precise role of these operations. Therapeutic, IV.

  6. Walking-related outcomes for individuals with traumatic and non-traumatic spinal cord injury inform physical therapy practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinho, Andresa R; Flett, Heather M; Craven, Catharine; Ottensmeyer, C Andrea; Parsons, Daria; Verrier, Molly C

    2012-09-01

    To describe and compare patient demographics, inpatient lengths of stay (LOS), and walking-related functional outcomes of individuals with spinal cord injuries (SCIs) of traumatic (TSCI) and non-traumatic (NTSCI) etiologies. To contrast these features between individuals who walked from those who did not walk at discharge from inpatient rehabilitation. Prospective observational study; comparisons between TSCI and NTSCI, walkers and non-walkers. Information collected as a pilot project within a provincial SCI informatics strategy. Rehabilitation hospital specialized for SCIs. Adults with NTSCI (n = 31) or TSCI (n = 59) admitted to inpatient rehabilitation, 2007-2009. Lower-extremity motor scores (LEMS), spinal cord independence measure version III (SCIM-III) total and mobility subscores, functional independence measure (FIM), Length of Stay (LOS) at inpatient facilities. Groups (NTSCI vs. TSCI) did not differ in the proportion of individuals that achieved "walker" status (SCIM-III mobility indoors (MI) score ≥ 3 at rehab discharge) (P = 0.41, 48.9% overall). Inpatient LOS at both acute care and rehabilitation facilities did not differ between groups; however, TSCI non-walkers had longer inpatient rehabilitation LOS than TSCI walkers. Among walkers, improvement was shown on all three mobility subscores of the SCIM-III between admission and discharge from rehabilitation; highest significance was shown on the SCIM-III MI. Walking status at discharge (SCIM-III MI) was most strongly correlated with LEMS at rehab admission (r = 0.71, P SCIM-III mobility items for assessment of walking outcome is recommended for inpatient rehabilitation.

  7. Serotonin(2) receptors mediate respiratory recovery after cervical spinal cord hemisection in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, S Y; Basura, G J; Goshgarian, H G

    2001-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to specifically investigate the involvement of serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT(2))] receptors in 5-HT-mediated respiratory recovery after cervical hemisection. Experiments were conducted on C(2) spinal cord-hemisected, anesthetized (chloral hydrate, 400 mg/kg ip), vagotomized, pancuronium- paralyzed, and artificially ventilated female Sprague-Dawley rats in which CO(2) levels were monitored and maintained. Twenty-four hours after spinal hemisection, the ipsilateral phrenic nerve displayed no respiratory-related activity indicative of a functionally complete hemisection. Intravenous administration of the 5-HT(2A/2C)-receptor agonist (+/-)-2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine hydrochloride (DOI) induced respiratory-related activity in the phrenic nerve ipsilateral to hemisection under conditions in which CO(2) was maintained at constant levels and augmented the activity induced under conditions of hypercapnia. The effects of DOI were found to be dose dependent, and the recovery of activity could be maintained for up to 2 h after a single injection. DOI-induced recovery was attenuated by the 5-HT(2)-receptor antagonist ketanserin but not with the 5-HT(2C)-receptor antagonist RS-102221, suggesting that 5-HT(2A) and not necessarily 5-HT(2C) receptors may be involved in the induction of respiratory recovery after cervical spinal cord injury.

  8. Combining Constitutively Active Rheb Expression and Chondroitinase Promotes Functional Axonal Regeneration after Cervical Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Di; Klaw, Michelle C; Connors, Theresa; Kholodilov, Nikolai; Burke, Robert E; Côté, Marie-Pascale; Tom, Veronica J

    2017-12-06

    After spinal cord injury (SCI), severed axons in the adult mammalian CNS are unable to mount a robust regenerative response. In addition, the glial scar at the lesion site further restricts the regenerative potential of axons. We hypothesized that a combinatorial approach coincidentally targeting these obstacles would promote axonal regeneration. We combined (1) transplantation of a growth-permissive peripheral nerve graft (PNG) into an incomplete, cervical lesion cavity; (2) transduction of neurons rostral to the SCI site to express constitutively active Rheb (caRheb; a Ras homolog enriched in brain), a GTPase that directly activates the growth-promoting pathway mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) via AAV-caRheb injection; and (3) digestion of growth-inhibitory chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans within the glial scar at the distal PNG interface using the bacterial enzyme chondroitinase ABC (ChABC). We found that expressing caRheb in neurons post-SCI results in modestly yet significantly more axons regenerating across a ChABC-treated distal graft interface into caudal spinal cord than either treatment alone. Excitingly, we found that caRheb+ChABC treatment significantly potentiates the formation of synapses in the host spinal cord and improves the animals' ability to use the affected forelimb. Thus, this combination strategy enhances functional axonal regeneration following a cervical SCI. Copyright © 2017 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Factors associated with upper extremity contractures after cervical spinal cord injury: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardwick, Dustin; Bryden, Anne; Kubec, Gina; Kilgore, Kevin

    2018-05-01

    To examine the prevalence of joint contractures in the upper limb and association with voluntary strength, innervation status, functional status, and demographics in a convenience sample of individuals with cervical spinal cord injury to inform future prospective studies. Cross-sectional convenience sampled pilot study. Department of Veterans Affairs Research Laboratory. Thirty-eight participants with cervical level spinal cord injury. Not applicable. Contractures were measured with goniometric passive range of motion. Every joint in the upper extremity was evaluated bilaterally. Muscle strength was measured with manual muscle testing. Innervation status was determined clinically with surface electrical stimulation. Functional independence was measured with the Spinal Cord Independence Measure III (SCIM-III). Every participant tested had multiple joints with contractures and, on average, participants were unable to achieve the normative values of passive movement in 52% of the joints tested. Contractures were most common in the shoulder and hand. There was a weak negative relationship between percentage of contractures and time post-injury and a moderate positive relationship between percentage of contractures and age. There was a strong negative correlation between SCIM-III score and percentage of contractures. Joint contractures were noted in over half of the joints tested. These joint contractures were associated with decreased functional ability as measured by the SCIM-III. This highlights the need the need for detailed evaluation of the arm and hand early after injury as well as continued monitoring of joint characteristics throughout the life course of the individual with tetraplegia.

  10. Severe cervical spinal cord injuries related to rugby union and league football in New South Wales, 1984-1996.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotem, T R; Lawson, J S; Wilson, S F; Engel, S; Rutkowski, S B; Aisbett, C W

    1998-04-20

    To determine the frequency and circumstances of serious cervical cord injuries associated with rugby union and league football in New South Wales. Retrospective review of patients with rugby football-related cervical spinal cord injuries. The two central spinal units in NSW, from January 1984 to July 1996. Admission to spinal units; injury resulting in permanent tetraplegia. During the review period, 115 rugby football players (56 union and 59 league) were admitted to the spinal units because of cervical spinal cord injuries. 49 patients had resultant permanent neurological deficits (complete tetraplegia [quadriplegia])--26 associated with rugby union and 23 with rugby league. Two patients died of injury sequelae within two weeks of admission. There was no significant change in the rate of football-related admissions to spinal units for either code. There was a small decline in the number (from 15 in 1984 to 1987 to 7 in 1992 to 1996) and incidence (from 1.2 to 0.5 per 10,000 participants) of patients with tetraplegia associated with rugby union. When this decline was tested as a trend over the years, it was found to be statistically significant (P = 0.06). No significant trend was found in the tetraplegia data associated with rugby league. Cervical spinal cord injuries leading to complete tetraplegia were most commonly associated with scrum-like plays in union and with tackles in league. Serious cervical spinal injuries associated with both codes of rugby continue to occur in NSW. Rugby football in its various forms is still an inherently dangerous game.

  11. Coping strategies used by traumatic spinal cord injury patients in Sri Lanka: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Sumedha; Xue, Siqi; Embuldeniya, Amanda; Narammalage, Harsha; da Silva, Tricia; Williams, Shehan; Ravindran, Arun

    2016-10-01

    Psychosocial consequences of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) have been well documented in Western populations, but there is no published literature on such incidence in the Sri Lankan population. The purpose of this study was to explore the psychosocial impact of SCI in a Sri Lankan population and to examine this population's coping mechanisms. Participants were recruited purposively at the Ragama Rheumatology and Rehabilitation Hospital, the sole rehabilitation facility for SCI patients in Sri Lanka. Focus groups were conducted with 23 consenting individuals. Interview transcripts were analysed using descriptive thematic analysis. Four domains of life impact, three types of active coping strategies and four types of external supports were identified. Decreased ambulation and burden on family life were significant concerns for male and female participants alike. Religious practices were reported most frequently as active coping strategies, followed by positive reframing and goal-setting. Reported external supports included guided physiotherapy, informational workshops, social support and peer networks. Rehabilitation efforts for Sri Lankan SCI patients should be sensitive to psychosocial concerns in addition to physical concerns in order to help patients re-integrate into their family lives and community. Furthermore, religious practices should be respected as possible aids to rehabilitation. Implications for Rehabilitation Rehabilitative efforts should be conscientious of patients' psychosocial well-being in addition to their physical well-being. Hospital-based rehabilitative efforts for traumatic spinal cord injury patients should promote functional independence and community re-integration. Spiritual and/or religious practices should be respected as ways by which traumatic spinal cord injury patients may confront personal challenges that arise following injury.

  12. The advantages of computed tomography over conventional x-ray examination in the treatment of cervical spinal diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Hideo; Yamaura, Akira; Makino, Hiroyasu

    1982-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the cervical spinal column was carried out in 42 patients using a General Electric CT/T of a Toshiba TCT60 Type A scanner. There were 22 cervical disk lesions, 4 spinal neoplasms, 6 narrow spinal canals with or without ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament, 2 syringomyelias, 6 traumas and 2 Arnold-Chiari malformations. In all patients, CT-examination followed conventional spinal X-ray studies. Correlation between the CT and conventional X-ray findings revealed the better diagnostic capability of the CT. For example, the measured midline sagittal diameter of the spinal canal in a patient with the narrowest canal in this series was 7.4 mm on the CT and 9.6 mm on the conventioned plain film at the C 5 level. To know the precise sagittal diameter of the cord itself, CT myelography (CTM) is indispensable. CTM is useful in determining the nature of the disease, the risk and approach of surgery, and for evaluation after the surgical procedure. Although the range of motion of cervical joints and intervertebral foramen are visible with conventional films, the size and extension of a tumor, the degree of bony errosion and the spinal subarachnoid space can be precisely identified only by CT. CT study of the spine and spinal cord is a simple procedure and less likely to produce complication, even with CTM, although there are certain limitations in the examination which are also presented. (author)

  13. Advantages of computed tomography over conventional x-ray examination in the treatment of cervical spinal diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hideo; Yamaura, Akira; Makino, Hiroyasu (Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1982-07-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the cervical spinal column was carried out in 42 patients using a General Electric CT/T of a Toshiba TCT60 Type A scanner. There were 22 cervical disk lesions, 4 spinal neoplasms, 6 narrow spinal canals with or without ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament, 2 syringomyelias, 6 traumas and 2 Arnold-Chiari malformations. In all patients, CT-examination followed conventional spinal X-ray studies. Correlation between the CT and conventional X-ray findings revealed the better diagnostic capability of the CT. For example, the measured midline sagittal diameter of the spinal canal in a patient with the narrowest canal in this series was 7.4 mm on the CT and 9.6 mm on the conventioned plain film at the C/sub 5/ level. To know the precise sagittal diameter of the cord itself, CT myelography (CTM) is indispensable. CTM is useful in determining the nature of the disease, the risk and approach of surgery, and for evaluation after the surgical procedure. Although the range of motion of cervical joints and intervertebral foramen are visible with conventional films, the size and extension of a tumor, the degree of bony errosion and the spinal subarachnoid space can be precisely identified only by CT. CT study of the spine and spinal cord is a simple procedure and less likely to produce complication, even with CTM, although there are certain limitations in the examination which are also presented.

  14. Traumatic spinal cord injuries – epidemiologic and medico-legal issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanganu Bianca

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injuries represent a special category of injuries in traumatic pathology, with high morbidity and mortality, which justify their analysis with the aim to identify useful aspects in order to prevent and treat them. We therefore performed a retrospective study on 426 cases in order to analyze epidemiology and medico-legal issues related to spinal cord injuries. The studied items regarded socio-demographic aspects (gender, age, home region, type of lesions (vertebral, spinal cord, association with other trauma, circumstances leading to trauma (cause of the injury, season, data regarding hospitalization (medical condition at the hospital admission, number of days of hospitalization, clinical diagnosis, imaging exploration level and data resulting from autopsy (diagnosis, toxicological examination. Most of our results are consistent with literature data, except for some epidemiological items, which might be explained with cultural differences, life style and inhomogeneous population. Based on our results, the general conclusion is the need for prevention campaigns, focusing on road traffic accidents and falls (especially in elderly as the main causes of spinal cord injuries.

  15. Evaluate the impact of neurogenic bladder in veterans with traumatic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabadi, Meheroz H; Aston, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    This observational study aimed to determine the prevalence of neurogenic bladder (NGB), and its impact (frequency of urinary tract infection [UTI], autonomic dysreflexia (AD) pressure ulcers, spasticity, and hospitalization rates) on veterans with traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). NGB (detrusor muscle and urethral sphincter dysfunction with loss of bladder sensation to void), secondary to SCI, is commonly encountered in daily practice; however, its impact on veterans' overall health has been less well studied. We retrospectively reviewed the electronic charts of veterans with SCI enrolled in our program and regularly followed in our SCI clinic. Demographic data collected included: age, sex, race/ethnicity, and age, level, severity and cause of spinal injury. Also noted was presence of NGB, episodes of UTI, presence of pressure ulcers, AD, spasticity, and hospitalization rate. Differences between those with and without NGB were evaluated using Generalized Linear Models. Of 161 veterans with SCI, symptoms of NGB was present in 133 (83%). Presence of NGB was associated with severe spinal cord injury. Veterans with NGB had more frequent UTI and presence of pressure ulcers (P < 0.05). They also were more likely to need hospitalization and were at an increased risk of dying. Incidence of NGB in veterans with SCI is high, is mainly associated with severe spinal cord injury, and severely impacts veterans' health by frequently causing UTIs, increasing hospitalization rate, and increases risk of death.

  16. Prevalence and Effect of Problematic Spasticity After Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtz, Kaila A; Lipson, Rachel; Noonan, Vanessa K; Kwon, Brian K; Mills, Patricia B

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the prevalence and effect of spasticity after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). Prospective cohort study of the Rick Hansen Spinal Cord Injury Registry (RHSCIR) and retrospective review of inpatient medical charts. Quaternary trauma center, rehabilitation center, and community settings. Individuals (N=860) with a traumatic SCI between March 1, 2005, and March 31, 2014, prospectively enrolled in the Vancouver site RHSCIR were eligible for inclusion. Not applicable. Questionnaires (Penn Spasm Frequency Scale, Spinal Cord Injury Health Questionnaire) and antispasticity medication use. In 465 patients, the prevalence of spasticity at community discharge was 65%, and the prevalence of problematic spasticity (defined as discharged on antispasticity medication) was 35%. Problematic spasticity was associated with cervicothoracic neurologic level and injury severity (Pspasticity treatment (ie, problematic spasticity) was 35% at 1 year, 41% at 2 years, and 31% at 5 years postinjury. Interference with function caused by spasticity was reported by 27% of patients at 1 year, 25% at 2 years, and 20% at 5 years postinjury. Patients with American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale grade C injuries had the highest prevalence of ongoing spasticity treatment and functional limitation. Spasticity is a highly prevalent secondary consequence of SCI, particularly in patients with severe motor incomplete cervicothoracic injuries. It is problematic in one third of all patients with SCI up to 5 years postinjury. One in 5 patients will have ongoing functional limitations related to spasticity, highlighting the importance of close community follow-up and the need for further research into spasticity management strategies. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Prevalence of facet joint pain in chronic spinal pain of cervical, thoracic, and lumbar regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pampati Vidyasagar

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Facet joints are a clinically important source of chronic cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine pain. The purpose of this study was to systematically evaluate the prevalence of facet joint pain by spinal region in patients with chronic spine pain referred to an interventional pain management practice. Methods Five hundred consecutive patients with chronic, non-specific spine pain were evaluated. The prevalence of facet joint pain was determined using controlled comparative local anesthetic blocks (1% lidocaine or 1% lidocaine followed by 0.25% bupivacaine, in accordance with the criteria established by the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP. The study was performed in the United States in a non-university based ambulatory interventional pain management setting. Results The prevalence of facet joint pain in patients with chronic cervical spine pain was 55% 5(95% CI, 49% – 61%, with thoracic spine pain was 42% (95% CI, 30% – 53%, and in with lumbar spine pain was 31% (95% CI, 27% – 36%. The false-positive rate with single blocks with lidocaine was 63% (95% CI, 54% – 72% in the cervical spine, 55% (95% CI, 39% – 78% in the thoracic spine, and 27% (95% CI, 22% – 32% in the lumbar spine. Conclusion This study demonstrated that in an interventional pain management setting, facet joints are clinically important spinal pain generators in a significant proportion of patients with chronic spinal pain. Because these patients typically have failed conservative management, including physical therapy, chiropractic treatment and analgesics, they may benefit from specific interventions designed to manage facet joint pain.

  18. Pathogenesis of spinal cord involvement induced by lower cervical instability in rheumatoid spondylitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taniguchi, Hironobu; Kuwabara, Shigeru; Fukuda, Kenji; Kuroki, Tatsuji; Tajima, Naoya (Miyazaki Medical Coll., Kiyotake (Japan))

    1994-07-01

    To examine prognostic factors in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), plain radiography findings and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings were compared with histopathological findings in 129 RA patients who had local or neurologic symptoms due to the cervical spine. All patients underwent plain radiography, and subdislocation more than 2 mm towards the anterior and posterior directions on plain radiographs was defined as instability. In predicting induction of instability of the inferior cervical spine and risk for spinal compression, erosion of the vertebral rim, as seen on plain X-rays, and irregular findings of the end-plate of the vertebral body and Gd-enhanced nodules around the intervertebral disk, as seen on MRI, seemed to be important. (N.K.).

  19. Mechanisms involved in extraterritorial facial pain following cervical spinal nerve injury in rats

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    Imamura Yoshiki

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study is to clarify the neural mechanisms underlying orofacial pain abnormalities after cervical spinal nerve injury. Nocifensive behavior, phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK expression and astroglial cell activation in the trigeminal spinal subnucleus caudalis (Vc and upper cervical spinal dorsal horn (C1-C2 neurons were analyzed in rats with upper cervical spinal nerve transection (CNX. Results The head withdrawal threshold to mechanical stimulation of the lateral facial skin and head withdrawal latency to heating of the lateral facial skin were significantly lower and shorter respectively in CNX rats compared to Sham rats. These nocifensive effects were apparent within 1 day after CNX and lasted for more than 21 days. The numbers of pERK-like immunoreactive (LI cells in superficial laminae of Vc and C1-C2 were significantly larger in CNX rats compared to Sham rats following noxious and non-noxious mechanical or thermal stimulation of the lateral facial skin at day 7 after CNX. Two peaks of pERK-LI cells were observed in Vc and C1-C2 following mechanical and heat stimulation of the lateral face. The number of pERK-LI cells in C1-C2 was intensity-dependent and increased when the mechanical and heat stimulations of the face were increased. The decrements of head withdrawal latency to heat and head withdrawal threshold to mechanical stimulation were reversed during intrathecal (i.t. administration of MAPK/ERK kinase 1/2 inhibitor PD98059. The area of activated astroglial cells was significantly higher in CNX rats (at day 7 after CNX. The heat and mechanical nocifensive behaviors were significantly depressed and the number of pERK-LI cells in Vc and C1-C2 following noxious and non-noxious mechanical stimulation of the face was also significantly decreased following i.t. administration of the astroglial inhibitor fluoroacetate. Conclusions The present findings have demonstrated that

  20. Cervical spinal epidural abscess following acupuncture and wet-cupping therapy: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yindan; Hong, Wenke; Chen, Huimin; Guan, Qiongfeng; Yu, Hu; Chang, Xianchao; Yu, Yaoping; Xu, Shanhu; Fan, Weinv

    2016-02-01

    Report of an uncommon complication of acupuncture and wet cupping. A 54-year-old man presented with neck pain and fever. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine revealed an epidural abscess at C4 to T2. The symptoms related to epidural abscess resolved partially after treatment with antibiotics. Acupuncture and wet-cupping therapy should be taken into consideration as a cause of spinal epidural abscesses in patients who present with neck pain and fever. Furthermore, acupuncture and wet-cupping practitioners should pay attention to hygienic measures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. MRI signal intensity as a maker of impairment in incomplete cervical spinal cord injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, Hidefumi; Aoki, Haruhito; Hamabe, Masaki; Sasao, Yutaka; Miura, Takehiko

    1998-01-01

    Incomplete cervical spinal cord injuries such as central cord syndrome may result in prolonged spasticity of the limbs, especially disabilities of the upper extremities, even if the patient is able to walk. In this study, relationship between cord impairment and clinical outcome was investigated using MRI. Results showed that small foci of low signal intensity in T 1 -weighted imaging combined with foci of high signal intensity in T 2 -weighted imaging in follow-up MRI are closely related to the severity of sequelae. Small foci of low signal intensity in T 1 -weighted imaging are considered in the literature to indicate myelomalacia or cyst formation with gliosis. (author)

  2. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome following elevated mean arterial pressures for cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimering, Jeffrey H; Mesfin, Addisu

    2018-01-01

    Increasing the mean arterial pressure (MAP) is an accepted treatment modality to minimize the risk for irreversible neurologic damage secondary to spinal cord ischemia. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a rare complication occurring after transplantation surgery, in persons having an autoimmune disorder or after abrupt increases in blood pressure of various etiologies. Case report. Retrospective evaluation of medical records. A 68-year-old female with long-standing diabetes, and rheumatoid arthritis (treated with methotrexate) presented with bilateral upper extremity weakness and numbness developing several days after a motor vehicle accident. Physical examination confirmed decreased upper extremity motor strength and decreased sensation to light touch and pinprick in the C5-C6 dermatomal distribution. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated C5-C6 subluxation with spinal cord compression. The patient had traction applied and mean arterial pressures were elevated greater than 85 mmg. The following day the patient underwent anterior and posterior cervical spine fusion and decompression. Immediately post-operatively, the patient developed status epilepticus. Head MRI revealed areas of high T2 signal intensity in the bilateral occipital lobes, consistent with a diagnosis of PRES. Two weeks later, the patient had resolution of her symptoms and resolution of PRES on imaging. This is the first report of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome secondary to therapeutic blood pressure increase in the setting of cervical spine fracture with neurological deficits. The patients had resolution of symptoms following discontinuation of the MAP goals. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a life-threatening condition characterized by seizures, confusion, visual disturbance, and headaches alongside neuroradiological findings indicative of posterior cerebral hemispheric white matter edema. 1,2 PRES has been described in association

  3. Restoring tactile awareness through the rubber hand illusion in cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenggenhager, Bigna; Scivoletto, Giorgio; Molinari, Marco; Pazzaglia, Mariella

    2013-10-01

    Bodily sensations are an important component of corporeal awareness. Spinal cord injury can leave affected body parts insentient and unmoving, leading to specific disturbances in the mental representation of one's own body and the sense of self. Here, we explored how illusions induced by multisensory stimulation influence immediate sensory signals and tactile awareness in patients with spinal cord injuries. The rubber hand illusion paradigm was applied to 2 patients with chronic and complete spinal cord injury of the sixth cervical spine, with severe somatosensory impairments in 2 of 5 fingers. Both patients experienced a strong illusion of ownership of the rubber hand during synchronous, but not asynchronous, stroking. They also, spontaneously reported basic tactile sensations in their previously numb fingers. Tactile awareness from seeing the rubber hand was enhanced by progressively increasing the stimulation duration. Multisensory illusions directly and specifically modulate the reemergence of sensory memories and enhance tactile sensation, despite (or as a result of) prior deafferentation. When sensory inputs are lost, and are later illusorily regained, the brain updates a coherent body image even several years after the body has become permanently unable to feel. This particular example of neural plasticity represents a significant opportunity to strengthen the sense of the self and the feelings of embodiment in patients with spinal cord injury.

  4. Investigation of the Differential Contributions of Superficial and Deep Muscles on Cervical Spinal Loads with Changing Head Postures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hsiu Cheng

    Full Text Available Cervical spinal loads are predominately influenced by activities of cervical muscles. However, the coordination between deep and superficial muscles and their influence on the spinal loads is not well understood. This study aims to document the changes of cervical spinal loads and the differential contributions of superficial and deep muscles with varying head postures. Electromyography (EMG of cervical muscles from seventeen healthy adults were measured during maximal isometric exertions for lateral flexion (at 10°, 20° and terminal position as well as flexion/extension (at 10°, 20°, 30°, and terminal position neck postures. An EMG-assisted optimization approach was used to estimate the muscle forces and subsequent spinal loads. The results showed that compressive and anterior-posterior shear loads increased significantly with neck flexion. In particular, deep muscle forces increased significantly with increasing flexion. It was also determined that in all different static head postures, the deep muscle forces were greater than those of the superficial muscle forces, however, such pattern was reversed during peak efforts where greater superficial muscle forces were identified with increasing angle of inclination. In summary, the identification of significantly increased spinal loads associated with increased deep muscle activation during flexion postures, implies higher risks in predisposing the neck to occupationally related disorders. The results also explicitly supported that deep muscles play a greater role in maintaining stable head postures where superficial muscles are responsible for peak exertions and reinforcing the spinal stability at terminal head postures. This study provided quantitative data of normal cervical spinal loads and revealed motor control strategies in coordinating the superficial and deep muscles during physical tasks.

  5. Comparison of MRI pulse sequences for investigation of lesions of the cervical spinal cord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campi, A.; Pontesilli, S.; Gerevini, S.; Scotti, G. [San Raffaele Hospital, Milan (Italy). Dept. of Neuroradiology

    2000-09-01

    Small spinal cord lesions, even if clinically significant, can be due to the low sensitivity of some pulse sequences. We compared T2-weighted fast (FSE), and conventional (CSE) spin-echo and short-tau inversion-recovery (STIR)-FSE overlooked on MRI sequences to evaluate their sensitivity to and specificity for lesions of different types. We compared the three sequences in MRI of 57 patients with cervical spinal symptoms. The image sets were assessed by two of us individually for final diagnosis, lesion detectability and image quality. Both readers arrived at the same final diagnoses with all sequences, differentiating four groups of patients. Group 1 (30 patients, 53 %), with a final diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS). Demyelinating lesions were better seen on STIR-FSE images, on which the number of lesions was significantly higher than on FSE, while the FSE and CSE images showed approximately equal numbers of lesions; additional lesions were found in 9 patients. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of 17 demyelinating lesions was significantly higher on STIR-FSE images than with the other sequences. Group 2, 19 patients (33 %) with cervical pain, 15 of whom had disc protrusion or herniation: herniated discs were equally well delineated with all sequences, with better myelographic effect on FSE. In five patients with intrinsic spinal cord abnormalities, the conspicuity and demarcation of the lesions were similar with STIR-FSE and FSE. Group 3, 4 patients (7 %) with acute myelopathy of unknown aetiology. In two patients, STIR-FSE gave better demarcation of lesions and in one a questionable additional lesions. Group 4, 4 patients (7 %) with miscellaneous final diagnoses. STIR-FSE had high sensitivity to demyelinating lesions, can be considered quite specific and should be included in spinal MRI for assessment of suspected demyelinating disease. (orig.)

  6. Only spinal fixation as treatment of prolapsed cervical intervertebral disc in patients presenting with myelopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Atul; Dharurkar, Pralhad; Shah, Abhidha; Gore, Sandeep; More, Sandeep; Ranjan, Shashi

    2017-01-01

    Aim: An alternative form of surgical treatment of prolapsed cervical intervertebral disc in patients presenting with symptoms related to myelopathy is discussed. The treatment involved fixation of the affected spinal segments and aimed at arthrodesis. No direct manipulation or handling of the disc was done. Materials and Methods: During the period August 2010 to June 2017, 16 patients presenting with symptoms attributed to myelopathy and diagnosed to have prolapsed cervical intervertebral disc were surgically treated by spinal stabilization. There were 11 males and 5 females and their ages ranged from 20 to 66 years (average: 40.6 years). Apart from clinical and radiological indicators, the number of spinal segments that were stabilized depended on direct observation of facetal morphology, alignment, and stability. Surgery involved distraction-fixation of facets using Goel facet spacer (8 patients), transarticular facetal fixation (5 patients) using screws or a combination of both facetal spacer, and transarticular screws (3 patients). Results: All patients had “remarkable” clinical improvement in the immediate postoperative period as assessed by visual analog scale, Goel's clinical grading, and Japanese Orthopedic Association scores. Follow-up ranged from 3 to 84 months (average: 50 months). The herniated disc regressed or disappeared at follow-up radiological assessment that ranged from 24 h to 3 months after surgery. Conclusions: Spinal segmental fixation aiming at arthrodesis with or without distraction of facets and without any direct surgical manipulation in the disc space or removal of the prolapsed portion of the disc can be considered in the armamentarium of the surgeon. PMID:29403240

  7. Design of COSMIC: a randomized, multi-centre controlled trial comparing conservative or early surgical management of incomplete cervical cord syndrome without spinal instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartels Ronald HMA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Incomplete cervical cord syndrome without spinal instability is a very devastating event for the patient and the family. It is estimated that up to 25% of all traumatic spinal cord lesions belong to this category. The treatment for this type of spinal cord lesion is still subject of discussion. From a biological point of view early surgery could prevent secondary damage due to ongoing compression of the already damaged spinal cord. Historically, however, conservative treatment was propagated with good clinical results. Proponents for early surgery as well those favoring conservative treatment are still in debate. The proposed trial will contribute to the discussion and hopefully also to a decrease in the variability of clinical practice. Methods/Design A randomized controlled trial is designed to compare the clinical outcome of early surgical strategy versus a conservative approach. The primary outcome is clinical outcome according to mJOA. This also measured by ASIA score, DASH score and SCIM III score. Other endpoints are duration of the stay at a high care department (medium care, intensive care, duration of the stay at the hospital, complication rate, mortality rate, sort of rehabilitation, and quality of life. A sample size of 36 patients per group was calculated to reach a power of 95%. The data will be analyzed as intention-to-treat at regular intervals, but the end evaluation will take place at two years post-injury. Discussion At the end of the study, clinical outcomes between treatments attitudes can be compared. Efficacy, but also efficiency can be determined. A goal of the study is to determine which treatment will result in the best quality of life for the patients. This study will certainly contribute to more uniformity of treatment offered to patients with a special sort of spinal cord injury. Trial Registration Gov: NCT01367405

  8. Sensory Loss Mimicking Cauda Equina Syndrome due to Cervical Spinal Lesion in a Patient with Clinically Isolated Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Giulia Vinceti; Andrea Zini; Paolo Nichelli; Jessica Mandrioli

    2012-01-01

    We describe the case of a 39-year-old woman with signs and symptoms suggesting cauda equina syndrome. Lumbosacral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated no lesion at this level, while cervical MRI showed a T2-hyperintense lesion in the middle-right anterolateral region of the cervical spinal cord, which may explain the symptoms by involving the anterior spinothalamic tract. We suggest that in cases with cauda equina syndrome presentation and normal lumbosacral MRI, a cervicodorsal lesi...

  9. Intramedullary cervical spinal cord abscess by viridans group Streptococcus secondary to infective endocarditis and facilitated by previous local radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Ruiz, Mario; López-Medrano, Francisco; García-Montero, María; Hornedo-Muguiro, Javier; Aguado, Jose-María

    2009-01-01

    The risk factors, microbial patterns, and prognosis of intramedullary abscess have varied with time. The development of an intramedullary abscess of the spinal cord (IASC) constitutes an exceptional complication of infective endocarditis (IE) in the post-antibiotic era. We present a case of cervical IASC by viridans group Streptococcus in a patient with mitral valve IE. We hypothesize that previous cervical radiotherapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma favoured the occurrence of this uncommon entity. This physiopathologic mechanism has not been previously reported.

  10. Is the outcome in acute spinal cord ischaemia different from that in traumatic spinal cord injury? A cross-sectional analysis of the neurological and functional outcome in a cohort of 93 paraplegics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pouw, M.H.; Hosman, A.J.F.; van Kampen, A.; Hirschfeld, S.; Thietje, R.; Meent, H. van de

    2011-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. OBJECTIVES: To compare the neurological outcome between paraplegic patients with acute spinal cord ischaemia syndrome (ASCIS) or traumatic spinal cord injury (tSCI) and to investigate the influence of SCI aetiology on the total Spinal Cord Independence

  11. Functional MRI of the cervical spinal cord on 1.5 T with fingertapping: to what extent is it feasible?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Govers, N.; Beghin, J.; Goethem, J.W.M. van; Hauwe, L. van den; Vandervliet, E.; Parizel, P.M.; Michiels, J.

    2007-01-01

    Until recently, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) contrast, was mainly used to study brain physiology. The activation signal measured with fMRI is based upon the changes in the concentration of deoxyhaemoglobin that arise from an increase in blood flow in the vicinity of neuronal firing. Technical limitations have impeded such research in the human cervical spinal cord. The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether a reliable fMRI signal can be elicited from the cervical spinal cord during fingertapping, a complex motor activity. Furthermore, we wanted to determine whether the fMRI signal could be spatially localized to the particular neuroanatomical location specific for this task. A group of 12 right-handed healthy volunteers performed the complex motor task of fingertapping with their right hand. T2*-weighted gradient-echo echo-planar imaging on a 1.5-T clinical unit was used to image the cervical spinal cord. Motion correction was applied. Cord activation was measured in the transverse imaging plane, between the spinal cord levels C5 and T1. In all subjects spinal cord responses were found, and in most of them on the left and the right side. The distribution of the activation response showed important variations between the subjects. While regions of activation were distributed throughout the spinal cord, concentrated activity was found at the anatomical location of expected motor innervation, namely nerve root C8, in 6 of the 12 subjects. fMRI of the human cervical spinal cord on an 1.5-T unit detects neuronal activity related to a complex motor task. The location of the neuronal activation (spinal cord segment C5 through T1 with a peak on C8) corresponds to the craniocaudal anatomical location of the neurons that activate the muscles in use. (orig.)

  12. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder After High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer With 2 Fractions in 1 Application Under Spinal/Epidural Anesthesia: Incidence and Risk Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchheiner, Kathrin, E-mail: kathrin.kirchheiner@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Czajka-Pepl, Agnieszka [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Ponocny-Seliger, Elisabeth [Department of Psychology, Sigmund Freud Private University Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Scharbert, Gisela; Wetzel, Léonore [Department of Anaesthesia, General Intensive Care and Pain Management, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Nout, Remi A. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Sturdza, Alina [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Dimopoulos, Johannes C. [Metropolitan Hospital, Athens (Greece); Dörr, Wolfgang; Pötter, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the psychological consequences of high-dose-rate brachytherapy with 2 fractions in 1 application under spinal/epidural anesthesia in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: In 50 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, validated questionnaires were used for prospective assessment of acute and posttraumatic stress disorder (ASD/PTSD) (Impact of Event Scale–Revision), anxiety/depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), quality of life (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 30/Cervical Cancer 24), physical functioning (World Health Organization performance status), and pain (visual analogue scale), before and during treatment and 1 week and 3 months after treatment. Qualitative interviews were recorded in open format for content analysis. Results: Symptoms of ASD occurred in 30% of patients 1 week after treatment; and of PTSD in 41% 3 months after treatment in association with this specific brachytherapy procedure. Pretreatment predictive variables explain 82% of the variance of PTSD symptoms. Helpful experiences were the support of the treatment team, psychological support, and a positive attitude. Stressful factors were pain, organizational problems during treatment, and immobility between brachytherapy fractions. Conclusions: The specific brachytherapy procedure, as performed in the investigated mono-institutional setting with 2 fractions in 1 application under spinal/epidural anesthesia, bears a considerable risk of traumatization. The source of stress seems to be not the brachytherapy application itself but the maintenance of the applicator under epidural anesthesia in the time between fractions. Patients at risk may be identified before treatment, to offer targeted psycho-social support. The patients' open reports regarding helpful experiences are an encouraging feedback for the treatment team; the reported stressful

  13. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder After High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer With 2 Fractions in 1 Application Under Spinal/Epidural Anesthesia: Incidence and Risk Factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchheiner, Kathrin; Czajka-Pepl, Agnieszka; Ponocny-Seliger, Elisabeth; Scharbert, Gisela; Wetzel, Léonore; Nout, Remi A.; Sturdza, Alina; Dimopoulos, Johannes C.; Dörr, Wolfgang; Pötter, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the psychological consequences of high-dose-rate brachytherapy with 2 fractions in 1 application under spinal/epidural anesthesia in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: In 50 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, validated questionnaires were used for prospective assessment of acute and posttraumatic stress disorder (ASD/PTSD) (Impact of Event Scale–Revision), anxiety/depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), quality of life (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 30/Cervical Cancer 24), physical functioning (World Health Organization performance status), and pain (visual analogue scale), before and during treatment and 1 week and 3 months after treatment. Qualitative interviews were recorded in open format for content analysis. Results: Symptoms of ASD occurred in 30% of patients 1 week after treatment; and of PTSD in 41% 3 months after treatment in association with this specific brachytherapy procedure. Pretreatment predictive variables explain 82% of the variance of PTSD symptoms. Helpful experiences were the support of the treatment team, psychological support, and a positive attitude. Stressful factors were pain, organizational problems during treatment, and immobility between brachytherapy fractions. Conclusions: The specific brachytherapy procedure, as performed in the investigated mono-institutional setting with 2 fractions in 1 application under spinal/epidural anesthesia, bears a considerable risk of traumatization. The source of stress seems to be not the brachytherapy application itself but the maintenance of the applicator under epidural anesthesia in the time between fractions. Patients at risk may be identified before treatment, to offer targeted psycho-social support. The patients' open reports regarding helpful experiences are an encouraging feedback for the treatment team; the reported stressful

  14. Narrow cervical canal in 1211 asymptomatic healthy subjects: the relationship with spinal cord compression on MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Hiroaki; Yukawa, Yasutsugu; Suda, Kota; Yamagata, Masatsune; Ueta, Takayoshi; Kato, Fumihiko

    2016-07-01

    Narrow cervical canal (NCC) has been a suspected risk factor for later development of cervical myelopathy. However, few studies have evaluated the prevalence in asymptomatic subjects. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of NCC in a large cohort of asymptomatic volunteers. This study was a cross-sectional study of 1211 asymptomatic volunteers. Approximately 100 men and 100 women representing each decade of life from the 20s to the 70s were included in this study. Cervical canal anteroposterior diameters at C5 midvertebral level on X-rays, and the prevalence of spinal cord compression (SCC) and increased signal intensity (ISI) changes on MRI were evaluated. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed to determine the cut-off value of the severity of canal stenosis resulting in SCC. NCC (<14 mm) was observed in 123 (10.2 %) subjects. SCC and ISI were found in 64 (5.3 %) and 28 (2.3 %) subjects, respectively. The prevalence of NCC was significantly higher in females and older subjects, but the occurrence of severe NCC (<12 mm) did not increase with age. The canal size in subjects with SCC or ISI was significantly smaller than in those without SCC (p < 0.0001). The cut-off values of cervical canal stenosis resulting in SCC were 14.8 and 13.9 mm in males and females, respectively. The prevalence of NCC was considerably lower among asymptomatic healthy volunteers; the cervical canal diameter in subjects with SCC or ISI was significantly smaller than in asymptomatic subjects; NCC is a risk factor for SCC.

  15. Fast spin-echo MR assessment of patients with poor outcome following spinal cervical surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, W. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Univ. Hospital, Linkoeping (Sweden)]|[The China-Japan Friendship Hospital, Beijing (China); Thuomas, K.AA. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Univ. Hospital, Linkoeping (Sweden); Hedlund, R. [Spinal Surgery, Univ. Hospital, Linkoeping (Sweden); Leszniewski, W. [Spinal Surgery, Univ. Hospital, Linkoeping (Sweden); Vavruch, L. [Spinal Surgery, Univ. Hospital, Linkoeping (Sweden)

    1996-03-01

    The aim of the investigation was to evaluate poor outcome following spinal cervical surgery. A total of 146 consecutive patients operated with anterior discectomy and fusion (ADF) with the Cloward technique were investigated. Clinical notes, plain radiography, CT, and fast spin-echo (FSE) images were retrospectively evaluated. Some 30% of the patients had unsatisfactory clinical results within 12 months after surgery; 13% had initial improvement followed by deterioration of the preoperative symptoms, while 14.4% were not improved or worsened. Disc herniation and bony stenosis above, below, or at the fused level were the most common findings. In 45% of patients, surgery failed to decompress the spinal canal. In only 4 patients was no cause of remaining myelopathy and/or radiculopathy found. FSE demonstrated a large variety of pathological findings in the patients with poor clinical outcome after ADF. Postoperatively, patients with good clinical outcome had a lower incidence of pathological changes. FSE is considered the primary imaging modality for the cervical spine. However, CT is a useful complement in the axial projection to visualize bone changes. (orig.).

  16. Fast spin-echo MR assessment of patients with poor outcome following spinal cervical surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, W.; Thuomas, K.AA.; Hedlund, R.; Leszniewski, W.; Vavruch, L.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of the investigation was to evaluate poor outcome following spinal cervical surgery. A total of 146 consecutive patients operated with anterior discectomy and fusion (ADF) with the Cloward technique were investigated. Clinical notes, plain radiography, CT, and fast spin-echo (FSE) images were retrospectively evaluated. Some 30% of the patients had unsatisfactory clinical results within 12 months after surgery; 13% had initial improvement followed by deterioration of the preoperative symptoms, while 14.4% were not improved or worsened. Disc herniation and bony stenosis above, below, or at the fused level were the most common findings. In 45% of patients, surgery failed to decompress the spinal canal. In only 4 patients was no cause of remaining myelopathy and/or radiculopathy found. FSE demonstrated a large variety of pathological findings in the patients with poor clinical outcome after ADF. Postoperatively, patients with good clinical outcome had a lower incidence of pathological changes. FSE is considered the primary imaging modality for the cervical spine. However, CT is a useful complement in the axial projection to visualize bone changes. (orig.)

  17. The morphometric analysis of the intervertebral foramen and the spinal nerve root in the cervical spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Yasuo

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the onset of cervical myelopathy and cervical spondylotic radiculopathy as well as what influence the anatomy of the cervical spine and cervical nerves have on their onset and occurrence of various types of disease state. We conducted imaging and morphological measurements on specimens of cervical spine of Japanese people, focusing attention on the running of intervertebral foramen and dorsal nerve rootlets of the cervical spine. The subjects were cervical spine specimens from 12 cadavers (7 males and 5 females, age at the time of death ranged from 48 to 93 years with a mean of 71 years) obtained at Showa University School of Dentistry in 2005 and 2006. Specimens were prepared by removing the atlas through the 1st thoracic vertebra from the cadavers, then resecting the soft tissue such as muscles to expose the cervical spine in whole circumference. The removed cervical spine specimens, from 1st to 7th cervical spines, were imaged by volume scan of radiographic helical CT at 0.6 mm spatial resolution, and their images were stored as Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) data. Image measurement on the vertebral body, vertebral foramen, and intervertebral foramen was conducted based on DICOM data. Furthermore, macroscopic observation and measurement were conducted on the dorsal nerve rootlets of cervical spine specimens. The image measurement of cervical spine specimens showed that the intervertebral foramen at C5/6 was the narrowest, followed by C3/4, C4/5, C6/7, and C2/3, respecting. With regard to angles in the frontal section and horizontal section of the groove for the spinal nerve, there was no significant difference in the angle between the right and the left. In the frontal section, the angle was about 63deg at C3, about 57deg at C4, about 52deg at C5, and about 55deg at C6, showing a significantly acute angle at C5, while in the horizontal section, it was about 54deg at C3, about 59deg at C4, about 63

  18. Comparison of modic changes in the lumbar and cervical spine, in 3167 patients with and without spinal pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Sheng-yun

    Full Text Available There are few comparisons of Modic changes (MCs in the lumbar and cervical spine.Compare the prevalence of MCs in the lumbar and cervical spine, and determine how MC prevalence depends on spinal pain, age, disc degeneration, spinal level, and the presence or absence of kyphosis.Retrospective clinical survey.Magnetic resonance images (MRIs were compared from five patient groups: 1. 1223 patients with low-back pain/radiculopathy only; 2. 1023 patients with neck pain/radiculopathy only; 3. 497 patients with concurrent low-back and neck symptoms; 4. 304 asymptomatic subjects with lumbar MRIs; and 5. 120 asymptomatic subjects with cervical MRIs.The prevalence of MCs was higher in those with spinal pain than in those without, both in the lumbar spine (21.0% vs 10.5% and cervical spine (8.8% vs 3.3%. Type II MCs were most common and Type III were least common in all groups. The prevalence of lumbar MCs in people with back pain was little affected by the presence of concurrent neck pain, and the same was true for the prevalence of cervical MCs in people with neck pain with or without concurrent back pain. When symptomatic patients were reclassified into two groups (back pain, neck pain, the prevalence of lumbar MCs in people with back pain was greater than that of cervical MCs in people with neck pain. The prevalence of lumbar and cervical MCs increased with age, disc degeneration, (descending spinal level, and increased kyphosis.There is a significantly higher prevalence of MCs in patients with back and neck pain. The reported association with increased kyphosis (flat back is novel.

  19. Apolipoprotein E as a novel therapeutic neuroprotection target after traumatic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiaoxin; Zheng, Yiyan; Bu, Ping; Qi, Xiangbei; Fan, Chunling; Li, Fengqiao; Kim, Dong H; Cao, Qilin

    2018-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE), a plasma lipoprotein well known for its important role in lipid and cholesterol metabolism, has also been implicated in many neurological diseases. In this study, we examined the effect of apoE on the pathophysiology of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). ApoE-deficient mutant (apoE -/- ) and wild-type mice received a T9 moderate contusion SCI and were evaluated using histological and behavioral analyses after injury. At 3days after injury, the permeability of spinal cord-blood-barrier, measured by extravasation of Evans blue dye, was significantly increased in apoE -/- mice compared to wild type. The inflammation and spared white matter was also significantly increased and decreased, respectively, in apoE -/- mice compared to the wild type ones. The apoptosis of both neurons and oligodendrocytes was also significantly increased in apoE -/- mice. At 42days after injury, the inflammation was still robust in the injured spinal cord in apoE -/- but not wild type mice. CD45+ leukocytes from peripheral blood persisted in the injured spinal cord of apoE -/- mice. The spared white matter was significantly decreased in apoE -/- mice compared to wild type ones. Locomotor function was significantly decreased in apoE -/- mice compared to wild type ones from week 1 to week 8 after contusion. Treatment of exogenous apoE mimetic peptides partially restored the permeability of spinal cord-blood-barrier in apoE -/- mice after SCI. Importantly, the exogenous apoE peptides decreased inflammation, increased spared white matter and promoted locomotor recovery in apoE -/- mice after SCI. Our results indicate that endogenous apoE plays important roles in maintaining the spinal cord-blood-barrier and decreasing inflammation and spinal cord tissue loss after SCI, suggesting its important neuroprotective function after SCI. Our results further suggest that exogenous apoE mimetic peptides could be a novel and promising neuroprotective reagent for SCI. Copyright

  20. The Torg-Pavlov ratio for the prediction of acute spinal cord injury after a minor trauma to the cervical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aebli, Nikolaus; Wicki, Anina G; Rüegg, Tabea B; Petrou, Nassos; Eisenlohr, Heidrun; Krebs, Jörg

    2013-06-01

    Acute cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) has been observed in some patients after a minor trauma to the cervical spine. The discrepancy between the severity of the trauma and the clinical symptoms has been attributed to spinal canal stenosis. However, to date, there is no universally established radiological parameter for identifying critical spinal stenosis in these patients. The spinal canal-to-vertebral body ratio (Torg-Pavlov ratio) has been proposed for assessing developmental spinal canal stenosis. The relevance of the Torg-Pavlov ratio for predicting the occurrence and severity of acute cervical SCI after a minor trauma to the cervical spine has not yet been established. To investigate the Torg-Pavlov ratio values of the cervical spine in patients suffering from acute cervical SCI after a minor trauma to the cervical spine and the use of the Torg-Pavlov ratio for identifying patients at risk of cervical SCI and predicting the severity and course of symptoms. Retrospective radiological study of consecutive patients. Forty-five patients suffering from acute cervical SCI and 68 patients showing no neurologic symptoms after a minor trauma to the cervical spine. Midvertebral sagittal cervical spinal canal diameter and the sagittal vertebral body diameter. Calculation of the Torg-Pavlov ratio values. Conventional lateral radiographs of the cervical spine (C3-C7) were analyzed to determine the Torg-Pavlov ratio values. Receiver operating characteristic curves were calculated for evaluating the classification accuracy of the Torg-Pavlov ratio for predicting SCI. The Torg-Pavlov ratio values in the SCI group were significantly (pPavlov ratio cutoff value of 0.7 yielded the greatest positive likelihood ratio for predicting the occurrence of SCI. However, there were no significant differences in the Torg-Pavlov ratio values between the different American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Score groups and between patients with complete, partial, and no recovery of

  1. The Beginning of a New Life Following Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury- Patient’s Experiences One Month Post-Discharge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noe, Bodil Bjørnshave; Bjerrum, Merete; Angel, Sanne

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Studies show that individuals having suffered traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI) are challenged by barriers and problems in their transition from hospital rehabilitation to home. This study aims to explore patients’ first-hand experiences of returning home and to compare their post...

  2. Correlation of diffusion tensor imaging and phase-contrast MR with clinical parameters of cervical spinal cord injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S-Y; Shin, M J; Chang, J H; Lee, C-H; Shin, Y-I; Shin, Y B; Ko, H-Y

    2015-08-01

    This is a cross-sectional study. The goal of this study was to characterize the diffusion properties across segments of the spinal cord and peak cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) velocities in the stenotic spinal canal, and to determine the correlation between these properties and clinical and electrophysiological parameters in patients with cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). This study was conducted in the University teaching hospital. The study involved 17 patients with cervical SCI. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and fractional anisotropy (FA) of the spinal cord and peak systolic and diastolic velocities of CSF were measured at the level of maximum compression (region 1) and at the levels above (region 2) and below (region 3) the level of injury with no signal change in conventional magnetic resonance imaging. Neurological and electrophysiological parameters were measured, including American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS), ASIA motor score, ASIA sensory score, Modified Barthel Index, Spinal Cord Independence Measure III (SCIM III), somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP) and motor evoked potentials (MEP). The ADC was significantly higher and the FA was significantly lower in regions 1, 2 and 3 of the SCI patients than in the normal controls (Pscore and SCIM III score, and FA of the level above correlated with SSEP latencies and MEP amplitudes (Pmeasurements and evoked potentials. Diffusion tensor imaging can be used to quantify the proximal and distal extents of spinal cord damage. Reductions in FA were correlated with CSF flow, functional measurements and evoked potentials.

  3. Missed or Delayed Cervical Spine or Spinal Cord Injuries Treated at a Tertiary Referral Hospital in Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkusi, Agabe Emmy; Muneza, Sévérien; Hakizimana, David; Nshuti, Steven; Munyemana, Paulin

    2016-03-01

    This study was aimed at 1) reporting cases of missed cervical spine injuries treated at a tertiary-level hospital, King Faisal Hospital, Rwanda (KFH-R), and 2) identifying the causes of delaying the diagnosis. We prospectively collected data from patients with a missed or delayed cervical spine and/or cord injury treated at King Faisal Hospital, Kigali for a 12-month period (January 2012 to December 2012). The total number of cervical spine injury patients treated at our center was retrieved from the hospital admission registry. Forty-two patients with cervical spine or spinal cord injuries were treated at KFH-R in 2012, and 4 of them had a missed or delayed diagnosis. Clinical and radiologic findings of all 4 patients are presented, and the reasons for delaying diagnosis are identified. This study found that the cervical spine injuries were missed in 9.5% of the cervical spine trauma patients and resulted in a longer hospital stay for all 4 patients and severe disability in 1 patient (25%). The reasons for missed diagnoses in this study were 1) lack of cervical spine radiographic evaluation, 2) inadequate cervical spine radiographs to show the level of injury, 3) poor sensitivity of cervical spine plain radiography, 4) poor physical examination, 5) the presence of a distracting injury, and 6) poor sensitivity of radiographs and computed tomography scans for soft tissue injuries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Novel Sensor Technology To Assess Independence and Limb-Use Laterality in Cervical Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogioli, Michael; Popp, Werner L; Albisser, Urs; Brust, Anne K; Frotzler, Angela; Gassert, Roger; Curt, Armin; Starkey, Michelle L

    2016-11-01

    After spinal cord injury (SCI), levels of independence are commonly assessed with standardized clinical assessments. However, such tests do not provide information about the actual extent of upper limb activities or the impact on independence of bi- versus unilateral usage throughout daily life following cervical SCI. The objective of this study was to correlate activity intensity and laterality of upper extremity activity measured by body-fixed inertial measurement units (IMUs) with clinical assessment scores of independence. Limb-use intensity and laterality of activities performed by the upper extremities was measured in 12 subjects with cervical SCI using four IMUs (positioned on both wrists, on the chest, and on one wheel of the wheelchair). Algorithms capable of reliably detecting self-propulsion and arm activity in a clinical environment were applied to rate functional outcome levels, and were related to clinical independence measures during inpatient rehabilitation. Measures of intensity of upper extremity activity during self-propulsion positively correlated (p laterality were positively correlated (p laterality as measured by IMUs during "daily life," and increased laterality was negatively correlated (p laterality in human cervical SCI. Continuous and objective movement data of distinct daily activities (i.e., mobility and day-to-day activities) can be related to levels of independence. Therefore, IMU sensor technology is suitable not only for monitoring activity levels during rehabilitation (including during clinical trials) but could also be used to assess levels of participation after discharge.

  5. A Unilateral Cervical Spinal Cord Contusion Injury Model in Non-Human Primates (Macaca mulatta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salegio, Ernesto A.; Sparrey, Carolyn J.; Camisa, William; Fischer, Jason; Leasure, Jeremi; Buckley, Jennifer; Nout-Lomas, Yvette S.; Rosenzweig, Ephron S.; Moseanko, Rod; Strand, Sarah; Hawbecker, Stephanie; Lemoy, Marie-Josee; Haefeli, Jenny; Ma, Xiaokui; Nielson, Jessica L.; Edgerton, V.R.; Ferguson, Adam R.; Tuszynski, Mark H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The development of a non-human primate (NHP) model of spinal cord injury (SCI) based on mechanical and computational modeling is described. We scaled up from a rodent model to a larger primate model using a highly controllable, friction-free, electronically-driven actuator to generate unilateral C6-C7 spinal cord injuries. Graded contusion lesions with varying degrees of functional recovery, depending upon pre-set impact parameters, were produced in nine NHPs. Protocols and pre-operative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were used to optimize the predictability of outcomes by matching impact protocols to the size of each animal's spinal canal, cord, and cerebrospinal fluid space. Post-operative MRI confirmed lesion placement and provided information on lesion volume and spread for comparison with histological measures. We evaluated the relationships between impact parameters, lesion measures, and behavioral outcomes, and confirmed that these relationships were consistent with our previous studies in the rat. In addition to providing multiple univariate outcome measures, we also developed an integrated outcome metric describing the multivariate cervical SCI syndrome. Impacts at the higher ranges of peak force produced highly lateralized and enduring deficits in multiple measures of forelimb and hand function, while lower energy impacts produced early weakness followed by substantial recovery but enduring deficits in fine digital control (e.g., pincer grasp). This model provides a clinically relevant system in which to evaluate the safety and, potentially, the efficacy of candidate translational therapies. PMID:26788611

  6. INDUCTION OF CORTICOSPINAL TARGET FINDING BY RELEASE OF A DIFFUSIBLE, CHEMOTROPIC FACTOR IN CERVICAL SPINAL GRAY-MATTER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JOOSTEN, EAJ; VANDERVEN, PFM; Hooiveld, Michiel; TENDONKELAAR, HJ

    1991-01-01

    The outgrowth of corticospinal tract axons in rat spinal cord primarily occurs during the first postnatal week. Axons originating from a group of layer V pyramidal cell bodies situated in the anterior part of the cerebral sensorimotor cortex project mainly to the cervical gray matter (Joosten et

  7. Early versus Late Decompression for Traumatic Spinal Cord Injuries; a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Yousefifard

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Despite the vast number of surveys, no consensus has been reached on the optimum timing of spinal decompression surgery. This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to compare the effects of early and late spinal decompression surgery on neurologic improvement and post-surgical complications in patients with traumatic spinal cord injuries.Methods: Two independent reviewers carried out an extended search in electronic databases. Data of neurological outcome and post-surgery complication were extracted. Finally, pooled relative risk (RR with a 95% confidence interval (CI was reported for comparing of efficacy of early and late surgical decompression.Results: Eventually 22 studies were included. The pooled RR was 0.77 (95% CI: 0.68-0.89 for at least one grade neurological improvement, and 0.84 (95% CI: 0.77-0.92 for at least two grade improvement. Pooled RR for surgical decompression performed within 12 hours after the injury was 0.26 (95% CI: 0.13-0.52; p<0.001, while it was 0.75 (95% CI: 0.63-0.90; p=0.002 when the procedure was performed within 24 hours, and 0.93 (95% CI: 0.76-1.14; p=0.48 when it was carried out in the first 72 hours after the injury. Surgical decompression performed within 24 hours after injury was found to be associated with significantly lower rates of post-surgical complications (RR=0.77; 95% CI: 0.68-0.86; p<0.001.Conclusion: The findings of this study indicate that early spinal decompression surgery can improve neurologic recovery and is associated with less post-surgical complications. The optimum efficacy is observed when the procedure is performed within 12 hours of the injury.

  8. Cervical spine fractures in elderly patients with hip fracture after low-level fall: an opportunity to refine prehospital spinal immobilization guidelines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Lori L; Satterlee, Paul A; Jansen, Paul R

    2014-02-01

    Conventional prehospital spine-assessment approaches based on low index of suspicion and mechanism of injury (MOI) result in the liberal application of spinal immobilization in trauma patients. A painful distracting injury (DI), such as a suspected hip fracture, historically has been a sufficient condition for immobilization, even in an elderly patient who suffers a simple fall from standing and exhibits no other risk factors for spinal injury. Because the elderly are at increased risk of hip fracture from low-level falls, and are also particularly susceptible to the discomfort and morbidity associated with immobilization, the prevalence of cervical spine (c-spine) fracture in this patient population was examined. Hospital billing records were used to identify all cases of traumatic femur fracture in Minnesota (USA) in 2010-2011. Concurrent diagnosis and external cause codes were used to estimate the prevalence of c-spine fracture by age and MOI. Among 1,394 patients with femur fracture, 23 (1.7%) had a c-spine fracture. When the MOI was a fall from standing or sitting height and the patient age was ≥ 65, the prevalence dropped to 0.4% (2/565). The prevalence was similar when the definition of hip fracture additionally included pelvis fractures (0.5%; 11/2,441). Eight of the 11 patients with c-spine fracture had diagnosis codes indicative of criteria other than the DI that likely would have resulted in immobilization (eg, head injury and compromised mental status). C-spine fracture is extremely rare in elderly patients who sustain hip fracture as a result of a low-level fall, and appears to be accompanied frequently by other known predictors of spinal injury besides DI. More research is needed to determine whether conservative use of spinal immobilization may be warranted in elderly patients with hip fracture after low-level falls when the only criteria for immobilization is the distracting hip injury.

  9. Ocular Manifestation of a Cervical Spine Injury: An Adult Case of Traumatic Atlantoaxial Rotatory Subluxation Manifesting with Nystagmus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eghbal, Keyvan; Derakhshan, Nima; Haghighat, Ali

    2017-05-01

    Atlantoaxial rotatory subluxation (AARS) is a rare type of traumatic cervical spine injury in adults, commonly manifesting with painful torticollis and suboccipital headache. Early diagnosis is mandatory to avoid catastrophic consequences. We report a rare case of a patient with AARS who presented with nystagmus due to rotational vertebral artery occlusion. A 35-year-old man was evaluated in the emergency department after falling from 9-m height. In the intensive care unit, left-sided torticollis and nystagmus were noted in the patient. Reassessment of the patient with cervical computed tomography scans revealed AARS type 1. After applying cervical traction and confirmation of partial reduction, the nystagmus resolved, and treatment was continued with posterior C1-2 fusion. Careful neurologic examination is of paramount importance in diagnosis and management of cervical spine injuries. Nystagmus, as a well-known manifestation of rotational vertebral artery syndrome, can be the presenting symptom of AARS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Cervical Spine Injuries: A Whole-Body Musculoskeletal Model for the Analysis of Spinal Loading.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Cazzola

    Full Text Available Cervical spine trauma from sport or traffic collisions can have devastating consequences for individuals and a high societal cost. The precise mechanisms of such injuries are still unknown as investigation is hampered by the difficulty in experimentally replicating the conditions under which these injuries occur. We harness the benefits of computer simulation to report on the creation and validation of i a generic musculoskeletal model (MASI for the analyses of cervical spine loading in healthy subjects, and ii a population-specific version of the model (Rugby Model, for investigating cervical spine injury mechanisms during rugby activities. The musculoskeletal models were created in OpenSim, and validated against in vivo data of a healthy subject and a rugby player performing neck and upper limb movements. The novel aspects of the Rugby Model comprise i population-specific inertial properties and muscle parameters representing rugby forward players, and ii a custom scapula-clavicular joint that allows the application of multiple external loads. We confirm the utility of the developed generic and population-specific models via verification steps and validation of kinematics, joint moments and neuromuscular activations during rugby scrummaging and neck functional movements, which achieve results comparable with in vivo and in vitro data. The Rugby Model was validated and used for the first time to provide insight into anatomical loading and cervical spine injury mechanisms related to rugby, whilst the MASI introduces a new computational tool to allow investigation of spinal injuries arising from other sporting activities, transport, and ergonomic applications. The models used in this study are freely available at simtk.org and allow to integrate in silico analyses with experimental approaches in injury prevention.

  11. Multimodal decoding and congruent sensory information enhance reaching performance in subjects with cervical spinal cord injury

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    Elaine Anna Corbett

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Cervical spinal cord injury (SCI paralyzes muscles of the hand and arm, making it difficult to perform activities of daily living. Restoring the ability to reach can dramatically improve quality of life for people with cervical SCI. Any reaching system requires a user interface to decode parameters of an intended reach, such as trajectory and target. A challenge in developing such decoders is that often few physiological signals related to the intended reach remain under voluntary control, especially in patients with high cervical injuries. Furthermore, the decoding problem changes when the user is controlling the motion of their limb, as opposed to an external device. The purpose of this study was to investigate the benefits of combining disparate signal sources to control reach in people with a range of impairments, and to consider the effect of two feedback approaches. Subjects with cervical SCI performed robot-assisted reaching, controlling trajectories with either shoulder electromyograms (EMGs or EMGs combined with gaze. We then evaluated how reaching performance was influenced by task-related sensory feedback, testing the EMG-only decoder in two conditions. The first involved moving the arm with the robot, providing congruent sensory feedback through their remaining sense of proprioception. In the second, the subjects moved the robot without the arm attached, as in applications that control external devices. We found that the multimodal decoding algorithm worked well for all subjects, enabling them to perform straight, accurate reaches. The inclusion of gaze information, used to estimate target location, was especially important for the most impaired subjects. In the absence of gaze information, congruent sensory feedback improved performance. These results highlight the importance of proprioceptive feedback, and suggest that multi-modal decoders are likely to be most beneficial for highly impaired subjects and in tasks where such

  12. Rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury in patients with traumatic spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeiras, Rita; Mourelo, Mónica; Pértega, Sonia; Lista, Amanda; Ferreiro, Mª Elena; Salvador, Sebastián; Montoto, Antonio; Rodríguez, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injuries (SCIs) exhibit factors that, in other populations, have been associated with rhabdomyolysis. Purpose: The aim of the study is to determine the incidence of rhabdomyolysis in patients with acute traumatic SCI admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), as well as the development of secondary acute kidney injury and associated factors. Study Design and Setting: This was an observational, retrospective study. Patient Sample: All adult patients admitted to the ICU with acute traumatic SCI who presented rhabdomyolysis, diagnosed through creatine phosphokinase (CPK) levels >500 IU/L. Outcome Measures: Incidence of rhabdomyolysis and subsequent renal dysfunction was calculated. Materials and Methods: Data about demographic variables, comorbidity, rhabdomyolysis risk factors, and variables involving SCI, severity scores, and laboratory parameters were obtained from clinical records. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify renal injury risk factors. Results: In 2006–2014, 200 patients with acute SCI were admitted to ICU. Of these, 103 had rhabdomyolysis (incidence = 51.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 44.3%–58.7%). The most typical American Spinal Injury Association classification was A (70.3%). The injury severity score was 30.3 ± 12.1 and sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score was 5.6 ± 3.3 points. During their stay, 57 patients (55.3%; 95% CI: 45.2%–65.4%) presented renal dysfunction (creatinine ≥1.2 mg/dL). In the multivariate analysis, variables associated with renal dysfunction were creatinine at admission (odds ratio [OR] = 9.20; P = 0.006) and hemodynamic SOFA score the day following admission (OR = 1.33; P = 0.024). Creatinine was a better predictor of renal dysfunction than the peak CPK value during the rhabdomyolysis (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve: 0.91 vs. 0.63, respectively). Conclusions: Rhabdomyolysis is a frequent condition in patients

  13. Cardiac arrhythmias the first month after acute traumatic spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartholdy, Kim; Biering-Sørensen, Tor; Malmqvist, Lasse

    2014-01-01

    of this prospective observational study was to investigate the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias and cardiac arrests in patients with acute traumatic SCI. METHODS: As early as possible after SCI 24-hour Holter monitoring was performed. Additional Holter recordings were performed 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks after SCI....... Furthermore, 12-lead electrocardiograms (ECGs) were obtained shortly after SCI and at 4 weeks. RESULTS: Thirty patients were included. Bradycardia (heart rate (HR) ... both on 12-lead ECGs obtained shortly after SCI (P = 0.030) and at 4 weeks (P = 0.041). CONCLUSION: Many patients with cervical SCI experience arrhythmias such as bradycardia, sinus node arrest, supraventricular tachycardia, and more rarely cardiac arrest the first month after SCI. Apart from sinus...

  14. [Treatment of cervical spondylosis by spinal balancing combined with intervention of pathway of qi: a randomized controlled study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun-Xiong; Zhang, Jian-Ping; Yu, Jian-Chun; Han, Jing-Xian

    2013-07-01

    To compare the difference in the efficacy of cervical spondylosis between the combined therapy of spinal balancing and the intervention of pathway of qi and the conventional acupuncture and massage therapy. Two hundred and seventy-four cases of cervical spondylosis were randomized into a spinal balancing group and a conventional acupuncture group, 137 cases in each one. In the spinal balancing group, the points on the pathway of qi on the head and on the abdomen were selected [the pathway of qi on the head: Baihui (GV 20), Tianzhu (BL 10), Wangu (GB 12) and the others; the pathway of qi on the abdomen: Shenshu (BL 23), Guanyuan (CV 4), Zhongji (CV 3) and the others]. The bimanual needling technique was applied in combination with spinal balancing therapy. In the conventional acupuncture group, the points were Jiaji (EX-B 2) (C3-C7), Fengchi (GB 20), Wangu (GB 12), Baihui (GV 20), etc. The conventional acupuncture technique and massage therapy were adopted. The neck pain questionnaire (NPQ) was adopted to assess the clinical efficacy of the two groups before and after treatment. NPQ score was all improved significantly after treatment in the two groups (all P spondylosis, from high to low, the efficacy sequence was cervical type, nerve root type, vertebral artery type, sympathetic nerve type and spinal cord type. The combined therapy of spinal balancing and the intervention of pathway of qi achieves the superior efficacy on various types of cervical spondylosis as compared with the conventional acupuncture and massage therapy. It apparently relieves the symptoms and improves the life quality of the patients.

  15. [Biomechanical behaviors of cervical spinal cord injury related to various bone fragment impact velocities: a finite element study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, S; Zhu, Z Q; Wang, K F; Liu, C J; Xu, S; Xia, W W; Liu, H Y

    2018-03-20

    Objective: To establish a three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) model of the whole cervical spinal cord (WSCS) and explore the biomechanical behaviors of cervical spinal cord injury related to different bone fragment impact velocities by FE analysis. Methods: A 3D FE model of WCSC was established based on the morphologic data of each segment of the human cervical cord. The reconstruction structures, which included the dura mater, the cerebrospinal fluid, the gray and white matter in the C(2) to C(7) cervical vertebrae, were validated.On the validated WCSC model, three kinds of pellets with same mass (7 g) but different impact areas (314, 157 and 78.5 mm(2)) were created to represent the bone fragments.These were positioned in the middle of the spinal cord to impact at various initial velocities.The maximum of von Mises stress and the reduction of the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the spinal cord were measured from each impact. Results: The compression of WCSC (percentage) and the time to reach maximum compression were similar with the results reported in literatures, indicating the validity of the model.Regardless of the impact areas of the pellet, the maximum of von Mises stress and the reduction of CSA of the spinal cord increased with the increased velocity.The maximum of von Mises stress was 5.0-7.0 kPa at a pellet velocity of 1.5 m/s, and the reduction of CSA was 9.3%-12.3%.At a velocity of 3.5 m/s, the maximum of von Mises stress was 42-54 kPa and the reduction of CSA was over 30%.The stress of the spinal cord significantly increased when pellet velocity exceeded 3.5 m/s, and the fastest increase was recorded at 4.5 m/s.The von Mises stress of the spinal cord ranged between 240 and 320 kPa at a velocity of 6.0 m/s, and CSA decreased by more than 50%. Conclusion: The 3D FE model of WSCS could provide more insights on the biomechanical mechanisms of spinal cord injury through various bone fragment impacts in burst fracture.When the impact velocity of the

  16. Nerve tissue growth factors as markers of evaluation of neuro-genesis processes in traumatic spinal cord disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uljanov V.Yu.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: immunological differentiation effects regeneration of nerve tissue in the acute and early periods of traumatic spinal cord disease on the basis of assessment of the dynamics of content neurospecific proteins in serum affected. Material and Methods. Content of neurospecific proteins in the blood serum has been studied by enzyme immunoassay in 40 patients with spinal cord injuries. Results. Dynamics and quantitative changes in the content of chronometric neurospecific proteins in serum of patients in acute and early periods of traumatic spinal cord disease is characterized by two-phase increase in the concentration CNTF; monotonic increase in the content of NT-3 in all periods of observation; biphasic increase in the levels of NT-4 to 1-4th and 14-th day from the date of injury. Conclusion. Complex research of neurospecific levels of proteins in the serum allows one to evaluate selectively the individual components of the process of regeneration of nerve tissue in acute and early periods of traumatic spinal cord disease.

  17. Enhancing neural activity to drive respiratory plasticity following cervical spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormigo, Kristiina M.; Zholudeva, Lyandysha V.; Spruance, Victoria M.; Marchenko, Vitaliy; Cote, Marie-Pascale; Vinit, Stephane; Giszter, Simon; Bezdudnaya, Tatiana; Lane, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) results in permanent life-altering sensorimotor deficits, among which impaired breathing is one of the most devastating and life-threatening. While clinical and experimental research has revealed that some spontaneous respiratory improvement (functional plasticity) can occur post-SCI, the extent of the recovery is limited and significant deficits persist. Thus, increasing effort is being made to develop therapies that harness and enhance this neuroplastic potential to optimize long-term recovery of breathing in injured individuals. One strategy with demonstrated therapeutic potential is the use of treatments that increase neural and muscular activity (e.g. locomotor training, neural and muscular stimulation) and promote plasticity. With a focus on respiratory function post-SCI, this review will discuss advances in the use of neural interfacing strategies and activity-based treatments, and highlights some recent results from our own research. PMID:27582085

  18. Enhancing neural activity to drive respiratory plasticity following cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormigo, Kristiina M; Zholudeva, Lyandysha V; Spruance, Victoria M; Marchenko, Vitaliy; Cote, Marie-Pascale; Vinit, Stephane; Giszter, Simon; Bezdudnaya, Tatiana; Lane, Michael A

    2017-01-01

    Cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) results in permanent life-altering sensorimotor deficits, among which impaired breathing is one of the most devastating and life-threatening. While clinical and experimental research has revealed that some spontaneous respiratory improvement (functional plasticity) can occur post-SCI, the extent of the recovery is limited and significant deficits persist. Thus, increasing effort is being made to develop therapies that harness and enhance this neuroplastic potential to optimize long-term recovery of breathing in injured individuals. One strategy with demonstrated therapeutic potential is the use of treatments that increase neural and muscular activity (e.g. locomotor training, neural and muscular stimulation) and promote plasticity. With a focus on respiratory function post-SCI, this review will discuss advances in the use of neural interfacing strategies and activity-based treatments, and highlights some recent results from our own research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Epidemiology of Pediatric Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury in a Population-Based Cohort, 1998-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Lee L; Selassie, Anbesaw; Cao, Yue; Zebracki, Kathy; Vogel, Lawrence C

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) that occurs in children and adolescents who are still developing represents a different challenge than SCI in adults. However, information on the epidemiology and incidence of SCI in a population-based cohort is lacking. To describe the epidemiology of pediatric SCI in a population-based cohort in the United States and to assess trend in incidence over a 15-year period (1998-2012). Children and adolescents (0-21 years) with SCI were identified through the South Carolina SCI Surveillance Registry using hospital discharge records from 1998 to 2012. Overall age-adjusted incidence rates were calculated for each year, and incidence rates were stratified by age, gender, and race. The overall age-adjusted incidence rate was 26.9 per million population, and there was a trend (P = .0583) toward decreasing incidence of pediatric SCI. When stratified by race, there was a significant decrease in incidence among Whites(P = .0052) but not among non-Whites. Younger participants were more likely to be female, to be injured through sports, and to be more likely to have concomitant traumatic brain injury. Since 1998, the proportion of older pediatric patients (16-22 years) with SCI has increased, as has the proportion of non-White patients. Although there was an overall trend toward decreasing incidence in this population-based cohort, when stratified by race, this trend only occurred in the White population.

  20. Apolipoprotein E epsilon4 allele and outcomes of traumatic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Amitabh; Lammertse, Daniel P; Coll, Joseph R; Charlifue, Susan; Coughlin, Christopher T; Whiteneck, Gale G; Worley, Gordon

    2008-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that apolipoprotein E (APOE) polymorphisms are associated with outcomes after spinal cord injury (SCI). Retrospective cohort study, from rehabilitation admission to discharge. Convenience sample of 89 persons with cervical SCI (C3-C8) treated from 1995 through 2003. Median age was 30 years (range 14-70); 67 were male (75%) and 83 were white (93%). American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) motor and sensory scores, ASIA Impairment Scale (AIS), time from injury to rehabilitation admission, and length of stay (LOS) in rehabilitation. Subjects with an APOE epsilon4 allele (n = 15; 17%) had significantly less motor recovery during rehabilitation than did individuals without an epsilon4 allele (median 3.0 vs 5.5; P rehabilitation LOS (median 106 vs 89 days; P = 0.04), but better sensory-pinprick recovery (median 5.0 vs 2.0; P= 0.03). There were no significant differences by APOE epsilon4 allele status in sensory-light touch recovery, likelihood of improving AIS Grade, or time from injury to rehabilitation admission. APOE epsilon4 allele was associated with differences in neurological recovery and longer rehabilitation LOS. Genetic factors may be among the determinants of outcome after SCI and warrant further study.

  1. Agreement of measures obtained radiographically and by the OSI CA-6000 Spine Motion Analyzer for cervical spinal motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Cheryl M; Schuit, Dale; Johnson, Robert D; Knecht, H; Levine, Phyllis

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the agreement between angular measures of cervical spinal motion obtained from radiographs and from measures recorded by the OSI CA 6000 Spine Motion Analyzer (OSI SMA) in asymptomatic subjects. Fourteen subjects performed each of the following motions two times while wearing the OSI SMA: cervical flexion, extension, side bending to the right and left. Each motion was performed once for the cervical radiograph. The difference between the values obtained by the two methods was plotted against the average of those values for each subject to illustrate the level of agreement of the two methods. The plotted points were widely scattered, with a large range between the limits of agreement. Range of motion values taken from the OSI SMA were not similar to those obtained from radiographs for the motions of the cervical spine.

  2. Characterization of neurological recovery following traumatic sensorimotor complete thoracic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zariffa, J; Kramer, J L K; Fawcett, J W; Lammertse, D P; Blight, A R; Guest, J; Jones, L; Burns, S; Schubert, M; Bolliger, M; Curt, A; Steeves, J D

    2011-03-01

    Retrospective, longitudinal analysis of sensory, motor and functional outcomes from individuals with thoracic (T2-T12) sensorimotor complete spinal cord injury (SCI). To characterize neurological changes over the first year after traumatic thoracic sensorimotor complete SCI. A dataset of 399 thoracic complete SCI subjects from the European Multi-center study about SCI (EMSCI) was examined for neurological level, sensory levels and sensory scores (pin-prick and light touch), lower extremity motor score (LEMS), ASIA Impairment Scale (AIS) grade, and Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM) over the first year after SCI. AIS grade conversions were limited. Sensory scores exhibited minimal mean change, but high variability in both rostral and caudal directions. Pin-prick and light touch sensory levels, as well as neurological level, exhibited minor changes (improvement or deterioration), but most subjects remained within one segment of their initial injury level after 1 year. Recovery of LEMS occurred predominantly in subjects with low thoracic SCI. The sensory zone of partial preservation (ZPP) had no prognostic value for subsequent recovery of sensory levels or LEMS. However, after mid or low thoracic SCI, ≥3 segments of sensory ZPP correlated with an increased likelihood for AIS grade conversion. The data suggest that a sustained deterioration of three or more thoracic sensory levels or loss of upper extremity motor function are rare events and may be useful for tracking the safety of a therapeutic intervention in early phase acute SCI clinical trials, if a significant proportion of study subjects exhibit such an ascent.

  3. Role of Melatonin in Traumatic Brain Injury and Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehar Naseem

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain and spinal cord are implicated in incidences of two of the most severe injuries of central nervous system (CNS. Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a devastating neurological deficit involving primary and secondary injury cascades. The primary and secondary mechanisms include complex consequences of activation of proinflammatory cytokines, cerebral edema, upregulation of NF-κβ, disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB, and oxidative stress. Spinal cord injury (SCI includes primary and secondary injury cascades. Primary injury leads to secondary injury in which generation of free radicals and oxidative or nitrative damage play an important pathophysiological role. The indoleamine melatonin is a hormone secreted or synthesized by pineal gland in the brain which helps to regulate sleep and wake cycle. Melatonin has been shown to be a versatile hormone having antioxidative, antiapoptotic, neuroprotective, and anti-inflammatory properties. It has a special characteristic of crossing BBB. Melatonin has neuroprotective role in the injured part of the CNS after TBI and SCI. A number of studies have successfully shown its therapeutic value as a neuroprotective agent in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Here in this review we have compiled the literature supporting consequences of CNS injuries, TBI and SCI, and the protective role of melatonin in it.

  4. MR imaging of acute cervical spine injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyu Hwa; Lee, Jung Hyung; Joo, Yang Goo [School of Medicine, Keimyung University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-01-15

    To describe magnetic resonance (MR) findings of the patients with acute cervical spinal injury and to assess the usefulness of the MR imagings. We retrospectively reviewed the MR images of 32 patients with acute cervical spinal injury. MR images were obtained with a 2.0 T superconductive MR imaging units (Spectro-20000, Gold-Star, Seoul), using spin-echo and gradient-echo technique. Most of patients were in their 3rd-4th decades and motor vehicle accident was the most frequent cause of acute cervical trauma. We assessed the MR findings with respect to the spinal cord, ligaments, paravertebral soft tissues, intervertebral disk, and bony spine. Spinal cord injury was the most common (65%), where cord swelling, edema, and/or hematoma were demonstrated most frequently at C5-6 level. Traumatic intervertebral disk herniations were the second most common (62.5%) and frequently occurred at the lower cervical levels, mostly at C5-6. Paravertebral soft tissue injury, vertebral body fracture, bone marrow edema and displacement were also well shown on MR images. MR imaging appears to be essential for the evaluation of traumatic disk herniations, spinal cord abnormalities, and injury of paravertebral soft tissue in the acute injury of the cervical spine.

  5. MR imaging of acute cervical spine injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyu Hwa; Lee, Jung Hyung; Joo, Yang Goo

    1995-01-01

    To describe magnetic resonance (MR) findings of the patients with acute cervical spinal injury and to assess the usefulness of the MR imagings. We retrospectively reviewed the MR images of 32 patients with acute cervical spinal injury. MR images were obtained with a 2.0 T superconductive MR imaging units (Spectro-20000, Gold-Star, Seoul), using spin-echo and gradient-echo technique. Most of patients were in their 3rd-4th decades and motor vehicle accident was the most frequent cause of acute cervical trauma. We assessed the MR findings with respect to the spinal cord, ligaments, paravertebral soft tissues, intervertebral disk, and bony spine. Spinal cord injury was the most common (65%), where cord swelling, edema, and/or hematoma were demonstrated most frequently at C5-6 level. Traumatic intervertebral disk herniations were the second most common (62.5%) and frequently occurred at the lower cervical levels, mostly at C5-6. Paravertebral soft tissue injury, vertebral body fracture, bone marrow edema and displacement were also well shown on MR images. MR imaging appears to be essential for the evaluation of traumatic disk herniations, spinal cord abnormalities, and injury of paravertebral soft tissue in the acute injury of the cervical spine

  6. Radiological consideration of neurogenic bladder in patients with traumatic spinal injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Soo Han; Yu, Yun Jeong; Shin, Hyun Ja [Korea Veterans Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-10-15

    We evaluated 104 patients of neurogenic bladder secondary to traumatic spinal cord injury. Those were diagnosed by I. V. P. and V. C. U. at Korea Veterans Hospital during 9 years from January, 1978 to May, 1987. The type of neurogenic bladder, complications and urethral configuration, according to the level of spinal cord injury were discusses. The result were as follows: 1. The incidence of patient according to the level of spinal cord injury was 49 out of 104 in those with vertebral level T7 or above, 15 out of 104 in those with T8-T10 level, and 40 in those with vertebral level T11 or below. The incidence of UMNB was 67.3% in those with vertebral T7 or above, 53.3% in T8-T10. The incidence of LMNB was 62.5% in those with vertebral level T11 or below. 2. Overall incidence of urinary tract calculus was 32.7%. Highest incidence of calculus was 46.7% in those with vertebral level T8-T10. 3. Overall incidence of vesicoureteral reflux was 23.1%. Highest incidence of reflux was 46.7% in those with vertebral level T11 or below. 4. Overall incidence of pyelonephritis was 26.9%. 5. Overall incidence of hydronephrosis was 20.2%. Highest incidence of hydronephrosis was 27.5% in those with vertebral level T11 or below. 6. Almost entire urethra was shown funnel type in 66 out of 73 cases. Saccular dilatation of posterior urethra was 7 cases. Saccular dilatation of posterior urethra with LMNB was 4 cases, which were occurred only in those with vertebral level T11 or below.

  7. Radiological consideration of neurogenic bladder in patients with traumatic spinal injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Soo Han; Yu, Yun Jeong; Shin, Hyun Ja

    1987-01-01

    We evaluated 104 patients of neurogenic bladder secondary to traumatic spinal cord injury. Those were diagnosed by I. V. P. and V. C. U. at Korea Veterans Hospital during 9 years from January, 1978 to May, 1987. The type of neurogenic bladder, complications and urethral configuration, according to the level of spinal cord injury were discusses. The result were as follows: 1. The incidence of patient according to the level of spinal cord injury was 49 out of 104 in those with vertebral level T7 or above, 15 out of 104 in those with T8-T10 level, and 40 in those with vertebral level T11 or below. The incidence of UMNB was 67.3% in those with vertebral T7 or above, 53.3% in T8-T10. The incidence of LMNB was 62.5% in those with vertebral level T11 or below. 2. Overall incidence of urinary tract calculus was 32.7%. Highest incidence of calculus was 46.7% in those with vertebral level T8-T10. 3. Overall incidence of vesicoureteral reflux was 23.1%. Highest incidence of reflux was 46.7% in those with vertebral level T11 or below. 4. Overall incidence of pyelonephritis was 26.9%. 5. Overall incidence of hydronephrosis was 20.2%. Highest incidence of hydronephrosis was 27.5% in those with vertebral level T11 or below. 6. Almost entire urethra was shown funnel type in 66 out of 73 cases. Saccular dilatation of posterior urethra was 7 cases. Saccular dilatation of posterior urethra with LMNB was 4 cases, which were occurred only in those with vertebral level T11 or below

  8. Functional status predicts acute care readmission in the traumatic spinal cord injury population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Donna; Slocum, Chloe; Silver, Julie K; Morgan, James W; Goldstein, Richard; Zafonte, Ross; Schneider, Jeffrey C

    2018-03-29

    Context/objective Acute care readmission has been identified as an important marker of healthcare quality. Most previous models assessing risk prediction of readmission incorporate variables for medical comorbidity. We hypothesized that functional status is a more robust predictor of readmission in the spinal cord injury population than medical comorbidities. Design Retrospective cross-sectional analysis. Setting Inpatient rehabilitation facilities, Uniform Data System for Medical Rehabilitation data from 2002 to 2012 Participants traumatic spinal cord injury patients. Outcome measures A logistic regression model for predicting acute care readmission based on demographic variables and functional status (Functional Model) was compared with models incorporating demographics, functional status, and medical comorbidities (Functional-Plus) or models including demographics and medical comorbidities (Demographic-Comorbidity). The primary outcomes were 3- and 30-day readmission, and the primary measure of model performance was the c-statistic. Results There were a total of 68,395 patients with 1,469 (2.15%) readmitted at 3 days and 7,081 (10.35%) readmitted at 30 days. The c-statistics for the Functional Model were 0.703 and 0.654 for 3 and 30 days. The Functional Model outperformed Demographic-Comorbidity models at 3 days (c-statistic difference: 0.066-0.096) and outperformed two of the three Demographic-Comorbidity models at 30 days (c-statistic difference: 0.029-0.056). The Functional-Plus models exhibited negligible improvements (0.002-0.010) in model performance compared to the Functional models. Conclusion Readmissions are used as a marker of hospital performance. Function-based readmission models in the spinal cord injury population outperform models incorporating medical comorbidities. Readmission risk models for this population would benefit from the inclusion of functional status.

  9. Artificial disc versus spinal fusion in the treatment of cervical spine degenerations in tetraplegics: a comparison of clinical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röhl, K; Röhrich, F

    2009-09-01

    Comparative prospective study. To determine functionality of the cervical spine when using ProDisc C in comparison with the conventional method of treatment (decompression and fusion) in paraplegics. Spinal Cord Injury Centre in Germany. Two homogeneous groups were studied. The patients were treated with ventral decompression and either had a fusion with an iliac bone graft and plate (group 1) or had received a disc replacement (group 2). Pre- and postoperatively, the subjective scores of SF 36 and Neck Disability Score were determined. Also, objective data of the Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM) III and mobility of the cervical spine, using the neutral-0-method, were evaluated. Prosthesis implementation and union or fusion were monitored by X-rays. Complications and alterations of the neurology were recorded according to the American Spinal Injury Association Score. Neurological remissions of the radicular syndrome that caused the operation were observed. In one case, the dislocation of the prosthesis necessitated an alternative treatment. Mobility of the cervical spine after 6 months was higher in group 2. Both groups showed signs of improvement in the Neck Disability Score and in SF 36. None of the two groups had changes in their SCIM score. One case in group 2 showed ventral blocking; all cases of group 1 fused successfully. Usage of prostheses results in improved total mobility of the cervical spine in comparison with the outcomes of a fusion. This study also confirmed these results in tetraplegics.

  10. Imaging in spinal trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goethem, J.W.M. van [Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen, University of Antwerp, Belgium, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium); Algemeen Ziekenhuis Maria Middelares, Department of Radiology, Sint-Niklaas (Belgium); Maes, Menno; Oezsarlak, Oezkan; Hauwe, Luc van den; Parizel, Paul M. [Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen, University of Antwerp, Belgium, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium)

    2005-03-01

    Because it may cause paralysis, injury to the spine is one of the most feared traumas, and spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability. In the USA approximately 10,000 traumatic cervical spine fractures and 4000 traumatic thoracolumbar fractures are diagnosed each year. Although the number of individuals sustaining paralysis is far less than those with moderate or severe brain injury, the socioeconomic costs are significant. Since most of the spinal trauma patients survive their injuries, almost one out of 1000 inhabitants in the USA are currently being cared for partial or complete paralysis. Little controversy exists regarding the need for accurate and emergent imaging assessment of the traumatized spine in order to evaluate spinal stability and integrity of neural elements. Because clinicians fear missing occult spine injuries, they obtain radiographs for nearly all patients who present with blunt trauma. We are influenced on one side by fear of litigation and the possible devastating medical, psychologic and financial consequences of cervical spine injury, and on the other side by pressure to reduce health care costs. A set of clinical and/or anamnestic criteria, however, can be very useful in identifying patients who have an extremely low probability of injury and who consequently have no need for imaging studies. Multidetector (or multislice) computed tomography (MDCT) is the preferred primary imaging modality in blunt spinal trauma patients who do need imaging. Not only is CT more accurate in diagnosing spinal injury, it also reduces imaging time and patient manipulation. Evidence-based research has established that MDCT improves patient outcome and saves money in comparison to plain film. This review discusses the use, advantages and disadvantages of the different imaging techniques used in spinal trauma patients and the criteria used in selecting patients who do not need imaging. Finally an overview of different types of spinal injuries is given

  11. Imaging in spinal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goethem, J.W.M. van; Maes, Menno; Oezsarlak, Oezkan; Hauwe, Luc van den; Parizel, Paul M.

    2005-01-01

    Because it may cause paralysis, injury to the spine is one of the most feared traumas, and spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability. In the USA approximately 10,000 traumatic cervical spine fractures and 4000 traumatic thoracolumbar fractures are diagnosed each year. Although the number of individuals sustaining paralysis is far less than those with moderate or severe brain injury, the socioeconomic costs are significant. Since most of the spinal trauma patients survive their injuries, almost one out of 1000 inhabitants in the USA are currently being cared for partial or complete paralysis. Little controversy exists regarding the need for accurate and emergent imaging assessment of the traumatized spine in order to evaluate spinal stability and integrity of neural elements. Because clinicians fear missing occult spine injuries, they obtain radiographs for nearly all patients who present with blunt trauma. We are influenced on one side by fear of litigation and the possible devastating medical, psychologic and financial consequences of cervical spine injury, and on the other side by pressure to reduce health care costs. A set of clinical and/or anamnestic criteria, however, can be very useful in identifying patients who have an extremely low probability of injury and who consequently have no need for imaging studies. Multidetector (or multislice) computed tomography (MDCT) is the preferred primary imaging modality in blunt spinal trauma patients who do need imaging. Not only is CT more accurate in diagnosing spinal injury, it also reduces imaging time and patient manipulation. Evidence-based research has established that MDCT improves patient outcome and saves money in comparison to plain film. This review discusses the use, advantages and disadvantages of the different imaging techniques used in spinal trauma patients and the criteria used in selecting patients who do not need imaging. Finally an overview of different types of spinal injuries is given

  12. Traumatic expulsion of T4 vertebral body into the spinal canal treated by vertebrectomy and spine shortening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappuccio, Michele; Corghi, Alessandro; De Iure, Federico; Amendola, Luca

    2014-05-20

    A case report. To describe an exceptional case of traumatic 2-level adjacent disk disruption with expulsion of the vertebral body into the spinal canal treated by vertebrectomy and spine shortening. Traumatic spondyloptosis is a very rare injury caused by high-energy trauma. Vertebral body expulsion is mostly the result of tremendous flexion-extension shearing forces causing a double contiguous disk disruption. A 49-year-old male was admitted to the emergency department of another hospital because of a high-speed car crash. He was conscious and collaborating and showed a complete paraplegia. Spinal computed tomographic scan showed a posterior expulsion of the T4 vertebral body and dislocation into the spinal canal. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine confirmed the presence of a 2-level adjacent T3-T4 and T4-T5 disk disruption and severe compression of the spinal cord by the T4 vertebral body. We performed a posterior stabilization from T1 to T8 with T4 vertebrectomy and spine shortening. A postoperative computed tomographic scan showed a tolerable sagittal and frontal alignment and apposition of the endplates of T3 and T5. At present, 12 months after surgery, the patient is neurologically unchanged, but he can keep the sitting position without support. Total vertebrectomy and spinal shortening are safe and replicable procedures applicable in few patients with paraplegia. A surgical procedure after 3 weeks makes a complete reduction and a perfect sagittal alignment of the spine difficult to be obtained.

  13. Spinal Cord Infarction after Cervical Transforaminal Epidural Steroid Injection: Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jangsup Moon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Transforaminal epidural steroid injection (TFESI is a widely used nonsurgical procedure in the treatment of patients with radiculopathy. It is efficacious in relieving pain, but a number of complications are being reported. Recently, increasing frequency of major complications, such as spinal cord infarction and cerebral infarction, has been reported with the use of a particulate steroid within fluoroscopic-guided procedures. Methods: We report a 49-year-old man with a history of chronic cervical radiculopathy, who experienced a devastating complication after TFESI. Results: After 2 min of regular TFESI, the patient abruptly experienced muscle weakness in both upper extremities and within 5 min the patient became quadriplegic. Despite active rehabilitation, the patient remained bed-ridden 4 years after the catastrophic event. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of spinal cord infarction that occurred after TFESI in Korea. Conclusion: Considering the risk of dreadful complications, which appear in an unpredictable manner, TFESI with fluoroscopic guidance should be done only with a nonparticulate steroid.

  14. Predictors of Ventilator Weaning in Individuals With High Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiodo, Anthony E; Scelza, William; Forchheimer, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Background/Objective: To evaluate which tests best predict the ability of patients with ventilator-dependent tetraplegia to wean from the ventilator. Methods: Retrospective review of patients. Participants: Twenty-six ventilator-dependent patients with tetraplegia admitted to a university inpatient spinal cord–injury rehabilitation unit with American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) injury levels C2 to C6, A or B. Results: Failure to wean off the ventilator completely was predicted by absence of motor unit recruitment of one hemidiaphragm or at least moderate decreased recruitment with needle electromyography (EMG) in both hemidiaphragms. Phrenic nerve conduction studies would have predicted that all patients who weaned off the ventilator would have failed. Fluoroscopic examination of the diaphragm and bedside spirometry were not as good predictors of ability to wean, failing to predict accurately in 44% and 19% of cases, respectively. ASIA examination was also not entirely predictive, and any outliers that may have been expected to wean based on ASIA examination (ie, C4 or lower neurological levels) were predicted not to wean by needle electromyography. Conclusions: Negative inspiration force diaphragm needle EMG best predicted the ability to wean from the ventilator. Bedside spirometry (negative inspiratory force and forced vital capacity) is an accurate bedside measure of a patient's readiness to wean. Fluoroscopic examination of the diaphragm and phrenic nerve conduction studies were not helpful in determining weaning potential in ventilator-dependent patients with cervical spine injury. PMID:18533415

  15. Characterization of DTI Indices in the Cervical, Thoracic, and Lumbar Spinal Cord in Healthy Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachael L. Bosma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to characterize in vivo measurements of diffusion along the length of the entire healthy spinal cord and to compare DTI indices, including fractional anisotropy (FA and mean diffusivity (MD, between cord regions. The objective is to determine whether or not there are significant differences in DTI indices along the cord that must be considered for future applications of characterizing the effects of injury or disease. A cardiac gated, single-shot EPI sequence was used to acquire diffusion-weighted images of the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar regions of the spinal cord in nine neurologically intact subjects (19 to 22 years. For each cord section, FA versus MD values were plotted, and a k-means clustering method was applied to partition the data according to tissue properties. FA and MD values from both white matter (average FA=0.69, average MD=0.93 × 10−3 mm2/s and grey matter (average FA=0.44, average MD=1.8 × 10−3 mm2/s were relatively consistent along the length of the cord.

  16. Craniocaudal motion velocity in the cervical spinal cord in degenerative disease as shown by MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, H.; Inaba, F.; Hirabuki, N.; Nakamura, H. [Osaka University Medical School (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Sakurai, K. [Osaka Teishin Hospital (Japan); Iwasaki, M. [Osaka University Medical School, Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery; Harada, K. [Kaizuka Municipal Hospital (Japan)

    1997-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate, by means of MR phase imaging, the effects of compression on the velocity of craniocaudal motion in the spinal cord. Material and Methods: Spin-echo sequences with velocity encoding gradients were used to examine 12 patients with cervical spondylosis and 6 normal volunteers. Oblique-axial phase images at 3 levels (cranial, middle and caudal), were obtained with prospective electrocardiogram gating. The middle level was set at the site where the spinal cord was most severely compressed, and the cranial and caudal sections were set where it was not compressed. Time-velocity curves were generated at these 3 levels and focal velocity change was correlated with motor function in the lower extremities. Results and Conclusion: The cord showed a higher motion velocity at the compression level than at noncompression levels. This paradoxical increase in velocity was observed in 7 out of 8 patients whose lower extremity motor function was impaired. Four patients with normal lower extremity motor function did not demonstrate this increase in velocity. An increase in motion velocity was therefore found to correlate with impaired lower extremity motor function. (orig.).

  17. Upper cervical facet joint and spinal rami blocks for the treatment of cervicogenic headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Linqiu; Hud-Shakoor, Zarinah; Hennessey, Christopher; Ashkenazi, Avi

    2010-04-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of upper cervical facet joint injections and spinal rami blocks in the treatment of cervicogenic headache. Cervicogenic headache has been recognized as a common and often disabling disorder. The treatment of this headache type remains challenging. We conducted a retrospective chart review of 31 patients with refractory cervicogenic headache who underwent fluoroscopically guided C(1/2), C(2/3) facet joint injections and C(2), C(3) spinal rami blocks using a mixture of 0.25% bupivacaine and 3 mg betamehtasone. The outcome measures were the change in headache severity, assessed using an 11-point numerical pain scale, after treatment, and the duration of head pain relief. Twenty-eight (90.3%) patients experienced >50% headache relief after treatment, with an average duration of 21.7 (1-90) days. Mean (+/-SD) head pain intensity decreased from 7.5 +/- 1.3 before treatment to 2.7 +/- 1.9 immediately after it (P rami blocks were effective and well tolerated for the treatment of cervicogenic headache in this study. The procedures provided significant and prolonged pain relief in the majority of patients. Larger controlled studies are needed to further evaluate the efficacy of this treatment modality in cervicogenic headache.

  18. Early versus delayed decompression in acute subaxial cervical spinal cord injury: A prospective outcome study at a Level I trauma center from India

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Deepak Kumar; Vaghani, Gaurang; Siddiqui, Saquib; Sawhney, Chhavi; Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Kumar, Atin; Kale, S. S.; Sharma, B. S.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: This study was done with the aim to compare the clinical outcome and patients’ quality of life between early versus delayed surgically treated patients of acute subaxial cervical spinal cord injury. The current study was based on the hypothesis that early surgical decompression and fixations in acute subaxial cervical spinal cord trauma is safe and is associated with improved outcome as compared to delayed surgical decompression. Materials and Methods: A total of 69 patients were recrui...

  19. Effects of hyperthermia applied to previously irradiated cervical spinal cord in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sminia, P.; Haveman, J.; Koedoder, C.

    1991-01-01

    Rat cervical spinal cord was X-ray irradiated at doses of 15, 18, 20 and 26 Gy. Approximately the same part of the spinal cord was heated by means of a 434 MHz microwave applicator 90 days later. After treatment, animals were observed for 18 months, for expression of neurological complications. These could either be result of the heat or of the radiation treatment. The time course showed 3 distinct peaks in the incidence of neurological symptoms. The 1st peak was due to the acute response to hyperthermia. The ED 50 value for neurological complications one day after treatment at 42.3±0.4 o C was 74 ±2 min. Previous X-ray irradiation of spinal cord with 18, 20 and 26 Gy reduced ED 50 to 57±7,65±4 and 55±5 min (12-26% of control), resp. Recovery from heat-induced neurological complications was diminished in previously irradiated animals. The 2nd peak (150-300 days after X-rays) concerned expression of 'early-delayed' radiation damage. Hyperthermia given in 90 days after irradiation did not influence either the percentage of animals with paralysis or the latent period. Neurological symptoms developing after day 300 were due to the late delayed radiation response. Significant difference was not observed in data on paralysis induced by radiation alone or radiation followed by heat. The late radiation-induced minor neurological symptoms, were however, influenced by retreatment with heat. (author). 30 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  20. A Study of Risk Factors for Tracheostomy in Patients With a Cervical Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Jun; Yugue, Itaru; Shiba, Keiichiro; Maeyama, Akira; Naito, Masatoshi

    2016-05-01

    A retrospective, consecutive case series. To determine the risk factors for a tracheostomy in patients with a cervical spinal cord injury. Respiratory status cannot be stabilized in patients with a cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI) for various reasons, so a number of these patients require long-term respiratory care and a tracheostomy. Various studies have described risk factors for a tracheostomy, but none have indicated a relationship between imaging assessment and the need for a tracheostomy. The current study used imaging assessment and other approaches to assess and examine the risk factors for a tracheostomy in patients with a CSCI. Subjects were 199 patients who were treated at the Spinal Injuries Center within 72 hours of a CSCI over 8-year period. Risk factors for a tracheostomy were retrospectively studied. Patients were assessed in terms of 10 items: age, sex, the presence of a vertebral fracture or dislocation, ASIA Impairment Scale, the neurological level of injury (NLI), PaO2, PaCO2, the level of injury on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the presence of hematoma-like changes (a hypointense core surrounded by a hyperintense rim in T2-weighted images) on MRI, and the Injury Severity Score.Items were analyzed multivariate logistic regression, and P tracheostomy, accounting for 11.6% of patients with a CSCI. Univariate analyses of the risk factors for tracheostomy revealed significant differences for six items: age, Injury Severity Score, presence of fracture or dislocation, ASIA Impairment Scale A, NLI C4 or above, and MRI scans revealing hematoma-like changes. Multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed significant differences in terms of two items: NLI C4 or above and MRI scans revealing hematoma-like changes. Thirty patients had both an NLI C4 or above and MRI scans revealing hematoma-like changes. Of these, 17 (56.7%) required a tracheostomy. Patients with an NLI C4 or above and MRI scans revealing hematoma-like changes were likely to

  1. Recovery of sensorimotor function and activities of daily living after cervical spinal cord injury: the influence of age

    OpenAIRE

    Wirz, Markus; Dietz, Volker

    2015-01-01

    This retrospective study was designed to examine the influence of age on the outcome of motor function and activities of daily living (ADLs) in patients with a cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). The study is based on the data registry of the EMSCI study group. Initial upper extremity motor score (UEMS) and its change over 5 months, as well as the initial Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM) score did not differ between younger adults (20-39 years) and elderly (60-79 years) patients. Howeve...

  2. Traumatic spinal cord injuries in horseback riding: a 35-year review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Cindy Y; Wright, Jerry; Bushnik, Tamara; Shem, Kazuko

    2011-11-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a potentially disabling neurologic injury that can occur in horseback riding. To date, no published study has examined the epidemiology of SCI from horseback riding in the United States, and few international studies exist on this topic. Several studies have described traumatic brain injuries, spine fractures, and extremity injuries; however, SCI patterns and outcomes in horseback riders are poorly understood. This study was undertaken to characterize the demographics, SCI patterns, and neurologic outcomes of persons with SCIs related to horseback riding. Descriptive epidemiologic study. This is a retrospective review of 121 SCI cases from horseback riding in the National SCI Statistical Center database from 1973 to 2008. The treatment setting was 26 U.S. SCI Model Systems of Care. The number of injuries, gender, age, and SCI type for horseback riding were compared with other sports and activities. The level of preserved neurologic function, SCI completeness, American Spinal Injury Association classification, and mechanical ventilation use at discharge were examined in the horseback riding group. The mean age of injury was 37.8 years (standard deviation, 15.2). The majority of patients were white (88%) and female (50.4%). Compared with diving, motorcycle riding, football, and gymnastics, horseback riding involved a significantly higher number of women (P < .005), a higher mean age of injury, and an equal likelihood of resulting in paraplegia and tetraplegia. The most common levels of preserved neurologic function were C4-C6, T12, and L1. Spinal cord injury from horseback riding most commonly resulted in incomplete tetraplegia (41%) followed by complete paraplegia (24%). Only 4 patients required mechanical ventilation on discharge from acute inpatient rehabilitation. Spinal cord injury from horseback riding affects an equal proportion of women and men, has a wide age range, and most commonly results in incomplete tetraplegia followed by

  3. Imaging Atlantooccipital and Atlantoaxial Traumatic Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havrda, Jonathan B; Paterson, Elizabeth

    2017-09-01

    Cervical spine injuries, specifically the atlantooccipital joint and atlantoaxial joint, often involve the spinal canal or large blood vessels that supply blood to the brain. Patient handling, transport, and positioning for imaging plays an important role in diagnosis, treatment, and patient prognosis. This article discusses cervical spine anatomy, specific traumatic spinal injuries, and radiography's role in treating these injuries. Treatment options and imaging before and after treatment also are discussed, and a description of dose reduction techniques is included. ©2017 American Society of Radiologic Technologists.

  4. Fatal injuries of the brain stem and/or upper cervical spinal cord in traffic accidents: nine autopsy cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, T; Saito, K; Nishigami, J; Ohshima, T

    1995-01-01

    Nine forensic autopsy cases were studied. All had injuries of the brain stem and/or upper cervical spinal cord due to traffic accidents. Among the nine subjects, eight were pedestrians and one was a left, front seat occupant of a vehicle. Examination of these 9 cases revealed that three had ponto-medullary avulsion, two had medullary avulsion and the other four had laceration of the upper cervical spinal cord. Atlanto-occipital dislocation was observed in five cases, and a ring fracture around the foramen magnum in the other two cases. Intraventricular haemorrhage, probably due to tears of the choroid plexus caused by hyperextension or hyperflexion of the head, was found in seven cases. In just one of these seven cases, both of the lateral ventricles were filled with dark red haemocoagulum. Hyperextension is considered to occur more commonly in road trauma cases where the victim is alcoholically intoxicated.

  5. Elevated Serum Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Levels in Patients with Neurological Remission after Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Moghaddam

    Full Text Available After traumatic spinal cord injury, an acute phase triggered by trauma is followed by a subacute phase involving inflammatory processes. We previously demonstrated that peripheral serum cytokine expression changes depend on neurological outcome after spinal cord injury. In a subsequent intermediate phase, repair and remodeling takes place under the mediation of growth factors such as Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 (IGF-1. IGF-1 is a promising growth factor which is thought to act as a neuroprotective agent. Since previous findings were taken from animal studies, our aim was to investigate this hypothesis in humans based on peripheral blood serum. Forty-five patients after traumatic spinal cord injury were investigated over a period of three months after trauma. Blood samples were taken according to a fixed schema and IGF-1 levels were determined. Clinical data including AIS scores at admission to the hospital and at discharge were collected and compared with IGF-1 levels. In our study, we could observe distinct patterns in the expression of IGF-1 in peripheral blood serum after traumatic spinal cord injury regardless of the degree of plegia. All patients showed a marked increase of levels seven days after injury. IGF-1 serum levels were significantly different from initial measurements at four and nine hours and seven and 14 days after injury, as well as one, two and three months after injury. We did not detect a significant correlation between fracture and the IGF-1 serum level nor between the quantity of operations performed after trauma and the IGF-1 serum level. Patients with clinically documented neurological remission showed consistently higher IGF-1 levels than patients without neurological remission. This data could be the base for the establishment of animal models for further and much needed research in the field of spinal cord injury.

  6. Epidemiology of traumatic spinal cord injury in childhood and adolescence in Galicia, Spain: report of the last 26-years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canosa-Hermida, E; Mora-Boga, R; Cabrera-Sarmiento, J J; Ferreiro-Velasco, M E; Salvador-de la Barrera, S; Rodríguez-Sotillo, A; Montoto-Marqués, A

    2017-10-23

    To analyze the characteristics of traumatic spinal cord injury in children of Galicia (Spain). Descriptive and retrospective study. Data extracted from the internal registry of the Spinal Cord Injury Unit and the patient's medical records, between March 1988 and December 2014. patients aged ≤ 17 years with a traumatic spinal cord injury. Total patients, percentages, incidence, ASIA scale results and improvement. A total of 68 patients were included. The incidence was 5.6 cases/1,000,000 inhabitants/year. The mean age was 14.4 years (median: 16). Only 25% were younger than 15. Male patients accounted for 73.5% of the total. The main cause were traffic accidents (60.3%; n = 41), being higher (77.8%) in children ≤ 10 years. Other etiologies included falls (19.1%), diving accidents (16.2%) and other causes (4.4%). Eleven patients (16.2%) had injuries classified as SCIWORA, 8 (72.7%) of them aged ≤ 10 years. The mean age of the SCIWORA group was 7.5 years versus 15.7 years in the non-SCIWORA group (P < 0.001). Half (50%) of these patients had a complete spinal cord injury and, of these, 64.6% were paraplegic. Traumatic spinal cord injuries are rare in children, and most cases occur between 15 and 17 years. Unlike in adults, SCIs in children mostly involve the thoracic spine. Most patients aged ≤ 10 years have SCIWORA. The most common etiology continues to be traffic accidents, although sports accidents prevail among adolescent patients.

  7. Acute management of traumatic spinal cord injury in a Greek and a Swedish region: a prospective, population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divanoglou, A; Seiger, A; Levi, R

    2010-06-01

    Prospective, population-based study. This paper is part of the Stockholm Thessaloniki Acute Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury Study (STATSCIS). To characterize patient populations and to compare acute management after traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI). The Greater Thessaloniki region in Greece and the Greater Stockholm region in Sweden. Inception cohorts with acute TSCI that were hospitalized during the study period, that is September 2006 to October 2007, were identified. Overall, 81 out of 87 cases consented to inclusion in Thessaloniki and 47 out of 49 in Stockholm. Data from Thessaloniki were collected through physical examinations, medical record reviews and communication with TSCI cases and medical teams. Data from Stockholm were retrieved from the Nordic Spinal Cord Injury Registry. There were no significant differences between study groups with regard to core clinical characteristics. In contrast, there were significant differences in (1) transfer logistics from the scene of trauma to a tertiary-level hospital (number of intermediate admissions, modes of transportation and duration of transfer) and (2) acute key therapeutic interventions, that is, the use of mechanical ventilation (49% in Thessaloniki versus 20% in Stockholm), and performance of tracheostomy (36% in Thessaloniki versus 15% in Stockholm); spinal surgery was performed significantly more often and earlier in Stockholm than in Thessaloniki. Despite largely similar core clinical characteristics, Stockholm and Thessaloniki cases underwent significantly different acute management, most probably to be attributed to adaptations to the differing regional approaches of care one following a systematic approach of SCI care and the other not.

  8. The potential for functional recovery of upper extremity function following cervical spinal cord injury without major bone injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, T; Kawano, O; Sakai, H; Ideta, R; Ueta, T; Maeda, T; Mori, E; Yugue, I; Takao, T; Masuda, M; Morishita, Y; Shiba, K

    2013-11-01

    This was a retrospective observational study. The objectives were to describe the prognosis of upper extremity function following cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI), and to identify prognostic factors for functional recovery. Spinal Injuries Center, Japan. Sixty patients with C3-4 CSCI without major bone injury participated in the study. Patients were treated nonsurgically and evaluated using the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) scales for the upper and lower extremities, their residual cervical motor functions, the modified Frankel grade and an upper extremity function scale. We compared the findings for the upper extremity function scale at 6 months with those for the residual cervical motor functions and modified Frankel grade obtained 3 days after injury. Most patients with CSCI who could flex their hip and knee from a supine position (95%) or who showed some active elbow extension (86%) 3 days after their injury could use a spoon at 6 months. We compared patients who used their fingers at 6 months to those who could not, and observed significant differences in age and ASIA scores for the upper and lower extremities obtained 3 days after injury. A strong correlation was observed between the initial motor scores and the extent of functional recovery at 6 months. Hip and knee flexion from the supine position and elbow extension 3 days after injury significantly predicted a positive prognosis for upper extremity function. Younger age and higher ASIA motor scores obtained 3 days after injury were factors associated with neurological recovery.

  9. Diffusion tensor MR imaging (DTI) metrics in the cervical spinal cord in asymptomatic HIV-positive patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller-Mang, Christina; Mang, Thomas; Fruehwald-Pallamar, Julia; Weber, Michael; Thurnher, Majda M. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Law, Meng [University of Southern California, Los Angeles County Hospital and USC Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2011-08-15

    This study was conducted to compare diffusion tensor MR imaging (DTI) metrics of the cervical spinal cord in asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients with those measured in healthy volunteers, and to assess whether DTI is a valuable diagnostic tool in the early detection of HIV-associated myelopathy (HIVM). MR imaging of the cervical spinal cord was performed in 20 asymptomatic HIV-positive patients and in 20 healthy volunteers on a 3-T MR scanner. Average fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), and major (E1) and minor (E2, E3) eigenvalues were calculated within regions of interest (ROIs) at the C2/3 level (central and bilateral anterior, lateral and posterior white matter). Statistical analysis showed significant differences with regard to mean E3 values between patients and controls (p = 0.045; mixed-model analysis of variance (ANOVA) test). Mean FA was lower, and mean MD, mean E1, and mean E2 were higher in each measured ROI in patients compared to controls, but these differences were not statistically significant. Asymptomatic HIV-positive patients demonstrate only subtle changes in DTI metrics measured in the cervical spinal cord compared to healthy volunteers that currently do not support using DTI as a diagnostic tool for the early detection of HIVM. (orig.)

  10. Cervical lordotic alignment following posterior spinal fusion for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: reciprocal changes and risk factors for malalignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kazunori; Toyoda, Hiromitsu; Terai, Hidetomi; Suzuki, Akinobu; Hoshino, Masatoshi; Tamai, Koji; Ohyama, Shoichiro; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Numerous reports have been published on the effectiveness and safety of correction of the coronal Cobb angle and thoracolumbar sagittal alignment in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). Suboptimal sagittal alignment, such as decreased thoracic kyphosis (TK), after corrective surgery, is a possible cause of lumbar or cervical spinal degeneration and junctional malalignment; however, few reports are available on reciprocal changes outside of the fused segments, such as the cervical lordotic angle (CLA). This study aimed to investigate the relationship between the perioperative CLA and other radiographic factors or clinical results in AIS, and to identify independent risk factors of postoperative cervical hyperkyphosis. METHODS A total of 51 AIS patients who underwent posterior spinal fusion with the placement of pedicle screw (PS) constructs at thoracic levels were included in the study. Clinical and radiographic follow-up of patients was conducted for a minimum of 2 years, and the postoperative course was evaluated. The authors measured and identified the changes in the CLA and other radiographic parameters using whole-spine radiography, with the patient in the standing position, performed immediately before surgery, 2 weeks after surgery, and 2 years after surgery. The postoperative cervical hyperkyphosis group included patients whose CLA at 2-year follow-up was smaller than -10°. The reciprocal changes of the CLA and other parameters were also investigated. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to determine the associated risk factors for postoperative cervical hyperkyphosis. RESULTS This study comprised 48 females and 3 males (mean age 16.0 years). The mean follow-up period was 47 months (range 24-90 months). The main coronal thoracic curve was corrected from 54.6° to 16.4°, and the mean correction rate was 69.8% at 2 years. The CLA significantly increased from the mean preoperative measurement (-5.4° ± 14°) to the 2

  11. Adjacent segment pathology following anterior decompression and fusion using cage and plate for the treatment of degenerative cervical spinal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kyung-Jin; Choi, Byung-Wan; Kim, Jong-Kil

    2014-12-01

    Retrospective study. To analyze the incidence and prevalence of clinical adjacent segment pathology (CASP) following anterior decompression and fusion with cage and plate augmentation for degenerative cervical diseases. No long-term data on the use of cage and plate augmentation have been reported. The study population consisted of 231 patients who underwent anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) with cage and plate for degenerative cervical spinal disease. The incidence and prevalence of CASP was determined by using the Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. To analyze the factors that influence CASP, data on preoperative and postoperative sagittal alignment, spinal canal diameter, the distance between the plate and adjacent disc, extent of fusion level, and the presence or absence of adjacent segment degenerative changes by imaging studies were evaluated. CASP occurred in 15 of the cases, of which 9 required additional surgery. At 8-year follow-up, the average yearly incidence was 1.1%. The rate of disease-free survival based on Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was 93.6% at 5 years and 90.2% at 8 years. No statistically significant differences in CASP incidence based on radiological analysis were observed. Significantly high incidence of CASP was observed in the presence of increased adjacent segment degenerative changes (pdegenerative cervical disease is associated with a lower incidence in CSAP by 1.1% per year, and the extent of preoperative adjacent segment degenerative changes has been shown as a risk factor for CASP.

  12. The Use of Nerve Transfers to Restore Upper Extremity Function in Cervical Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Ida K; Novak, Christine B; Krauss, Emily M; Hoben, Gwendolyn M; Zaidman, Craig; Ruvinskaya, Rimma; Juknis, Neringa; Winter, Anke C; Mackinnon, Susan E

    2018-03-15

    Nerve transfer surgery to restore upper extremity function in cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) is novel and may transform treatment. Determining candidacy even years post-SCI is ill defined and deserves investigation. To develop a diagnostic algorithm, focusing on electrodiagnostic (EDX) studies, to determine eligibility for nerve transfer surgery. Retrospective descriptive case series. Tertiary university-based institution. Individuals with cervical SCI (n = 45). The electronic medical records of people referred to the Plastic Surgery Multidisciplinary Upper Extremity Surgery unit in the SCI clinic from 2010-2015 were reviewed. People were considered for nerve transfers to restore elbow extension or finger flexion and/or extension. Data including demographic, clinical evaluation, EDX results, surgery, and outcomes were collected and analyzed. EDX data, including nerve conduction studies and electromyography, for bilateral upper extremities of each patient examined was used to assess for the presence of lower motor neuron injury, which would preclude late nerve transfer. Based on our criteria and the results of EDX testing, a substantial number of patients presenting even years post-SCI were candidates for nerve transfers. Clinical outcome results are heterogeneous but promising and suggest that further refinement of eligibility, long-term follow-up, and standardized assessment will improve our understanding of the role of nerve transfer surgery to restore function in people with midcervical SCI. Many patients living with SCI are candidates for nerve transfer surgery to restore upper extremity function. Although the ultimate efficacy of these surgeries is not yet determined, this study attempts to report the criteria we are using and may ultimately determine the timing for intervention and which transfers are most useful for this heterogeneous population. IV. Copyright © 2018 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  13. Interdisciplinary rehabilitation for a patient with incomplete cervical spinal cord injury and multimorbidity: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vining, Robert D; Gosselin, Donna M; Thurmond, Jeb; Case, Kimberlee; Bruch, Frederick R

    2017-08-01

    This report describes interdisciplinary rehabilitation for a 51-year-old male recovering from incomplete cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) and multiple comorbidities following an automobile accident. The patient was admitted to a rehabilitation specialty hospital approximately 2 months post SCI and 2 separate surgical fusion procedures (C3-C6). Clinical presentation at the rehabilitation hospital included moderate to severe motor strength loss in both upper and lower extremities, a percutaneous endoscopic gastronomy tube (PEG), dysphagia, bowel/bladder incontinence, dependence on a mechanical lift and tilting wheelchair due to severe orthostatic hypotension, and pre-existing shoulder pain from bilateral joint degeneration. The interdisciplinary team formally coordinated rehabilitative care from multiple disciplines. Internal medicine managed medications, determined PEG removal, monitored co-morbid conditions, and overall progress. Chiropractic care focused on alleviating shoulder and thoracic pain and improving spinal and extremity mobility. Physical therapy addressed upright tolerance, transfer, gait, and strength training. Occupational therapy focused on hand coordination and feeding/dressing activities. Psychology assisted with coping strategies. Nursing ensured medication adherence, nutrient intake, wound prevention, and incontinence management, whereas physiatry addressed abnormal muscle tone. Eleven months post-admission the patient's progress allowed discharge to a long-term care facility. At this time he was without dysphagia or need for a PEG. Orthostatic hypotension and bilateral shoulder pain symptoms were also resolved while bowel/bladder incontinence and upper and lower extremity motor strength loss remained. He was largely independent in transferring from bed to wheelchair and in upper body dressing. Lower body dressing/bathing required maximal assistance. Gait with a 2-wheeled walker was possible up to 150 feet with verbal cues and occasional

  14. Thoracic spinal cord and cervical vagosympathetic neuromodulation obtund nodose sensory transduction of myocardial ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salavatian, Siamak; Beaumont, Eric; Gibbons, David; Hammer, Matthew; Hoover, Donald B; Armour, J Andrew; Ardell, Jeffrey L

    2017-12-01

    Autonomic regulation therapy involving either vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) or spinal cord stimulation (SCS) represents emerging bioelectronic therapies for heart disease. The objective of this study was to determine if VNS and/or SCS modulate primary cardiac afferent sensory transduction of the ischemic myocardium. Using extracellular recordings in 19 anesthetized canines, of 88 neurons evaluated, 36 ventricular-related nodose ganglia sensory neurons were identified by their functional activity responses to epicardial touch, chemical activation of their sensory neurites (epicardial veratridine) and great vessel (descending aorta or inferior vena cava) occlusion. Neural responses to 1min left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery occlusion (CAO) were then evaluated. These interventions were then studied following either: i) SCS [T1-T3 spinal level; 50Hz, 90% motor threshold] or ii) cervical VNS [15-20Hz; 1.2× threshold]. LAD occlusion activated 66% of identified nodose ventricular sensory neurons (0.33±0.08-0.79±0.20Hz; baseline to CAO; p<0.002). Basal activity of cardiac-related nodose neurons was differentially reduced by VNS (0.31±0.11 to 0.05±0.02Hz; p<0.05) as compared to SCS (0.36±0.12 to 0.28±0.14, p=0.59), with their activity response to transient LAD CAO being suppressed by either SCS (0.85±0.39-0.11±0.04Hz; p<0.03) or VNS (0.75±0.27-0.12±0.05Hz; p<0.04). VNS did not alter evoked neural responses of cardiac-related nodose neurons to great vessel occlusion. Both VNS and SCS obtund ventricular ischemia induced enhancement of nodose afferent neuronal inputs to the medulla. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Cervical spinal cord injuries without radiographic evidence of trauma: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, S P; Bhat, N S; Singh, K A; Bhushan, M

    2013-11-01

    Prospective study. In a prospective study, 45 consecutive cases of cervical spinal cord injury without radiographic evidence of trauma (SCIWORET) who were treated non-operatively were analyzed to correlate the magnetic resonance image findings with the initial neurological deficit and the extent of neurological recovery at 2 years. University tertiary-care teaching hospital in South India. The neurological status of patients who did not have any radiographic or computerized tomographic abnormality at the time of admission was assessed by ASIA Impairment Scale (AIS) modification of Frankel's grading. The spinal cord abnormality seen in the magnetic resonance imaging was noted. The neurological status at the end of 2 years was recorded. Twenty-seven of the 45 patients (60%) had cord oedema, 8 (17.77%) had cord contusion, 8 (17.77%) patients had a normal cord and 2 (4.44%) patients had cord swelling on the magnetic resonance image. Out of 27 patients who presented with cord oedema, 14 (31.11%) patients recovered from AIS D to AIS E and 6 (13.33%) patients did not recover and remained at AIS D. Seven (15.55%) patients who had a normal cord recovered completely to AIS E. Five (11.11%) patients who had contusion of the cord recovered up to AIS D. The initial neurological status correlates with magnetic resonance imaging findings. Subsequent neurological recovery is dependent on the type of cord damage and initial neurological status. The rate of recovery and the final motor outcome are inversely related to the length of cord involvement.

  16. Interdisciplinary rehabilitation for a patient with incomplete cervical spinal cord injury and multimorbidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vining, Robert D.; Gosselin, Donna M.; Thurmond, Jeb; Case, Kimberlee; Bruch, Frederick R.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: This report describes interdisciplinary rehabilitation for a 51-year-old male recovering from incomplete cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) and multiple comorbidities following an automobile accident. Patient concerns: The patient was admitted to a rehabilitation specialty hospital approximately 2 months post SCI and 2 separate surgical fusion procedures (C3–C6). Diagnoses: Clinical presentation at the rehabilitation hospital included moderate to severe motor strength loss in both upper and lower extremities, a percutaneous endoscopic gastronomy tube (PEG), dysphagia, bowel/bladder incontinence, dependence on a mechanical lift and tilting wheelchair due to severe orthostatic hypotension, and pre-existing shoulder pain from bilateral joint degeneration. Interventions: The interdisciplinary team formally coordinated rehabilitative care from multiple disciplines. Internal medicine managed medications, determined PEG removal, monitored co-morbid conditions, and overall progress. Chiropractic care focused on alleviating shoulder and thoracic pain and improving spinal and extremity mobility. Physical therapy addressed upright tolerance, transfer, gait, and strength training. Occupational therapy focused on hand coordination and feeding/dressing activities. Psychology assisted with coping strategies. Nursing ensured medication adherence, nutrient intake, wound prevention, and incontinence management, whereas physiatry addressed abnormal muscle tone. Outcomes: Eleven months post-admission the patient's progress allowed discharge to a long-term care facility. At this time he was without dysphagia or need for a PEG. Orthostatic hypotension and bilateral shoulder pain symptoms were also resolved while bowel/bladder incontinence and upper and lower extremity motor strength loss remained. He was largely independent in transferring from bed to wheelchair and in upper body dressing. Lower body dressing/bathing required maximal assistance. Gait with a 2

  17. Allograft versus autograft in cervical and lumbar spinal fusions: an examination of operative time, length of stay, surgical site infection, and blood transfusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Meghan E; McCutcheon, Brandon A; Grauberger, Jennifer; Shepherd, Daniel; Maloney, Patrick R; Rinaldo, Lorenzo; Kerezoudis, Panagiotis; Fogelson, Jeremy L; Nassr, Ahmad; Bydon, Mohamad

    2016-11-23

    Autograft harvesting for spine arthrodesis has been associated with longer operative times and increased blood loss. Allograft compared to autograft in spinal fusions has not been studied in a multicenter cohort. Patients enrolled in the ACS-NSQIP registry between 2012 and 2013 who underwent cervical or lumbar spinal fusion with either allograft or autograft through a separate incision were included for analysis. The primary outcomes of interest were operative time, length of stay, blood transfusion, and surgical site infection (SSI). A total of 6,790 and 6,718 patients received a cervical or lumbar spinal fusion, respectively. On unadjusted analysis in both cervical and lumbar cohorts, autograft was associated with increased rates of blood transfusion (cervical: 2.9% vs 1.0%, poperative time (cervical: 167 vs 128 minutes, poperative times (cervical: 27.8 minutes, 95% CI 20.7-35.0; and lumbar: 25.4 minutes, 95% CI 17.7-33.1) relative to allograft. Autograft was not associated with either length of stay or SSI. In a multicenter cohort of patients undergoing cervical or lumbar spinal fusion, autograft was associated with increased rates of blood transfusion and increased operative time relative to allograft.

  18. Assessing limb apraxia in traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Cristin; Thakur, Uma; Marcus, Bradley; Barrett, Anna Mariya

    2013-01-01

    People with traumatic brain injury (TBI) may demonstrate action planning disorders and limb apraxia. Many patients, who sustain a spinal cord injury (SCI), sustain a co-occurring TBI (11-29 percent of people with SCI) and therefore are at risk for limb apraxia. People with SCI and TBI (SCI/TBI) rely on powered assistive devices which amplify movement. Their ability to learn complex motor compensatory strategies, that is, limb praxis, is critical to function. We wished to identify methods of screening for apraxia in patients with SCI/TBI. We reviewed instruments available for limb praxis assessment, presenting information on psychometric development, patient groups tested, commercial/clinical availability, and appropriateness for administration to people with motor weakness. Our review revealed that insufficient normative information exists for apraxia assessment in populations comparable to SCI/TBI patients who are typically young adults at the time of injury. There are few apraxia assessment instruments which do not require a motor response. Non-motoric apraxia assessments would be optimal for patients with an underlying motor weakness. PMID:23277082

  19. Evaluation of a pilot Pressure Ulcer Prevention Initiative (PUPI) for patients with traumatic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, J E; Bélanger, L M A; Park, S E; Shen, T; Rivers, C S; Dvorak, M F; Street, J T; Noonan, V K

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether implementation of a Pressure Ulcer Prevention Initiative (PUPI) changed the assessment and treatment of patients with a traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) in an acute care setting, and improved patient outcomes. The success of implementation was evaluated by examining the percentage of patients with completed occupational therapist (OT) skin care assessments and prescriptions for therapeutic support surfaces (TSS; i.e., mattresses) before implementation (historical, cohort 1) and after implementation (experimental, cohort 2). Patient outcomes were evaluated by examining changes in PU incidence, severity, timing and recurrence, as well as PU prevalence and satisfaction with life in the community. Final analysis included 70 patients in cohort 1 and 73 in cohort 2. OT skin care assessment documentation (31% to 60%; pprevention but no statistically significant improvements in PU-related patient outcomes were demonstrated. Results from this study identified facilitators and barriers to implementation and highlighted the complexity and difficulty of instituting effective preventative or therapeutic interventions for this population in an acute care setting. This information will assist with refinements of the PUPI and inform similar future initiatives.

  20. Environmental factors item development for persons with stroke, traumatic brain injury, and spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, Allen W; Magasi, Susan; Hammel, Joy; Carlozzi, Noelle E; Garcia, Sofia F; Hahn, Elizabeth A; Lai, Jin-Shei; Tulsky, David; Gray, David B; Hollingsworth, Holly; Jerousek, Sara

    2015-04-01

    To describe methods used in operationalizing environmental factors; to describe the results of a research project to develop measures of environmental factors that affect participation; and to define an initial item set of facilitators and barriers to participation after stroke, traumatic brain injury, and spinal cord injury. Instrument development included an extensive literature review, item classification and selection, item writing, and cognitive testing following the approach of the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System. Community. Content area and outcome measurement experts (n=10) contributed to instrument development; individuals (n=200) with the target conditions participated in focus groups and in cognitive testing (n=15). None. Environmental factor items were categorized in 6 domains: assistive technology; built and natural environment; social environment; services, systems, and policies; access to information and technology; and economic quality of life. We binned 2273 items across the 6 domains, winnowed this pool to 291 items for cognitive testing, and recommended 274 items for pilot data collection. Five of the 6 domains correspond closely to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health taxonomy of environmental factors; the sixth domain, economic quality of life, reflects an important construct that reflects financial resources that affect participation. Testing with a new and larger sample is underway to evaluate reliability, validity, and sensitivity. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Topological data analysis for discovery in preclinical spinal cord injury and traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielson, Jessica L; Paquette, Jesse; Liu, Aiwen W; Guandique, Cristian F; Tovar, C Amy; Inoue, Tomoo; Irvine, Karen-Amanda; Gensel, John C; Kloke, Jennifer; Petrossian, Tanya C; Lum, Pek Y; Carlsson, Gunnar E; Manley, Geoffrey T; Young, Wise; Beattie, Michael S; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C; Ferguson, Adam R

    2015-10-14

    Data-driven discovery in complex neurological disorders has potential to extract meaningful syndromic knowledge from large, heterogeneous data sets to enhance potential for precision medicine. Here we describe the application of topological data analysis (TDA) for data-driven discovery in preclinical traumatic brain injury (TBI) and spinal cord injury (SCI) data sets mined from the Visualized Syndromic Information and Outcomes for Neurotrauma-SCI (VISION-SCI) repository. Through direct visualization of inter-related histopathological, functional and health outcomes, TDA detected novel patterns across the syndromic network, uncovering interactions between SCI and co-occurring TBI, as well as detrimental drug effects in unpublished multicentre preclinical drug trial data in SCI. TDA also revealed that perioperative hypertension predicted long-term recovery better than any tested drug after thoracic SCI in rats. TDA-based data-driven discovery has great potential application for decision-support for basic research and clinical problems such as outcome assessment, neurocritical care, treatment planning and rapid, precision-diagnosis.

  2. Longitudinal Investigation of Rehospitalization Patterns in Spinal Cord Injury and Traumatic Brain Injury Among Medicare Beneficiaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretz, Christopher R; Graham, James E; Middleton, Addie; Karmarkar, Amol M; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J

    2017-05-01

    To model 12-month rehospitalization risk among Medicare beneficiaries receiving inpatient rehabilitation for spinal cord injury (SCI) or traumatic brain injury (TBI) and to create 2 (SCI- and TBI-specific) interactive tools enabling users to generate monthly projected probabilities of rehospitalization on the basis of an individual patient's clinical profile at discharge from inpatient rehabilitation. Secondary data analysis. Inpatient rehabilitation facilities. Medicare beneficiaries receiving inpatient rehabilitation for SCI (n=2587) or TBI (n=10,864). Not applicable. Monthly rehospitalization (yes/no) based on Medicare claims. Results are summarized through computer-generated interactive tools, which plot individual level trajectories of rehospitalization probabilities over time. Factors associated with the probability of rehospitalization over time are also provided, with different combinations of these factors generating different individual level trajectories. Four case studies are presented to demonstrate the variability in individual risk trajectories. Monthly rehospitalization probabilities for the individual high-risk TBI and SCI cases declined from 33% to 15% and from 41% to 18%, respectively, over time, whereas the probabilities for the individual low-risk cases were much lower and stable over time: 5% to 2% and 6% to 2%, respectively. Rehospitalization is an undesirable and multifaceted health outcome. Classifying patients into meaningful risk strata at different stages of their recovery is a positive step forward in anticipating and managing their unique health care needs over time. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Personal bankruptcy after traumatic brain or spinal cord injury: the role of medical debt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relyea-Chew, Annemarie; Hollingworth, William; Chan, Leighton; Comstock, Bryan A; Overstreet, Karen A; Jarvik, Jeffrey G

    2009-03-01

    To estimate the prevalence of medical debt among traumatic brain injury (TBI) and spinal cord injury (SCI) patients who discharged their debts through bankruptcy. A cross-sectional comparison of bankruptcy filings of injured versus randomly selected bankruptcy petitioners. Patients hospitalized with SCI or TBI (1996-2002) and personal bankruptcy petitioners (2001-2004) in western Washington State. Subjects (N=186) who filed for bankruptcy, comprised of 93 patients with previous SCI or TBI and 93 randomly selected bankruptcy petitioners. Not applicable. Medical and nonmedical debt, assets, income, expenses, and employment recorded in the bankruptcy petition. Five percent of randomly selected petitioners and 26% of petitioners with TBI or SCI had substantial medical debt (debt that accounted for more than 20% of all unsecured debts). SCI and TBI petitioners had fewer assets and were more likely to be receiving government income assistance at the time of bankruptcy than controls. SCI and TBI patients with a higher blood alcohol content at injury were more likely to have substantial medical debts (odds ratio=2.70; 95% confidence interval, 1.04-7.00). Medical debt plays an important role in some bankruptcies after TBI or SCI. We discuss policy options for reducing financial distress after serious injury.

  4. Design and testing of a controlled electromagnetic spinal cord impactor for use in large animal models of acute traumatic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petteys, Rory J; Spitz, Steven M; Syed, Hasan; Rice, R Andrew; Sarabia-Estrada, Rachel; Goodwin, C Rory; Sciubba, Daniel M; Freedman, Brett A

    2017-09-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) causes debilitating neurological dysfunction and has been observed in warfighters injured in IED blasts. Clinical benefit of SCI treatment remains elusive and better large animal models are needed to assess treatment options. Here, we describe a controlled electromagnetic spinal cord impactor for use in large animal models of SCI. A custom spinal cord impactor and platform were fabricated for large animals (e.g., pig, sheep, dog, etc.). Impacts were generated by a voice coil actuator; force and displacement were measured with a load cell and potentiometer respectively. Labview (National Instruments, Austin, TX) software was used to control the impact cycle and import force and displacement data. Software finite impulse response (FIR) filtering was employed for all input data. Silicon tubing was used a surrogate for spinal cord in order to test the device; repeated impacts were performed at 15, 25, and 40 Newtons. Repeated impacts demonstrated predictable results at each target force. The average duration of impact was 71.2 ±6.1ms. At a target force of 40N, the output force was 41.5 ±0.7N. With a target of 25N, the output force was 23.5 ±0.6N; a target of 15Newtons revealed an output force of 15.2 ±1.4N. The calculated acceleration range was 12.5-21.2m/s 2 . This custom spinal cord impactor reliably delivers precise impacts to the spinal cord and will be utilized in future research to study acute traumatic SCI in a large animal. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Multilevel noncontiguous cervical spine injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adetunji Mapaderun Toluse

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report highlights the successful combination of operative and nonoperative management of a patient with noncontiguous cervical spine fractures and incomplete spinal cord injury. A case report of a 40-year-old male victim of a motor vehicular accident who presented with noncontiguous cervical spine fractures (Anderson and D'Alonzo Type III odontoid fracture and traumatic spondylolisthesis of C4/C5 and incomplete spinal cord injury. The odontoid fracture was managed nonoperatively, whereas anterior cervical discectomy and fusion were done at the C4/C5 vertebral level. The patient made full neurologic recovery with radiologic evidence of successful fusion and fracture healing at 12 weeks postoperation in both levels of injuries. Operative and nonoperative modalities can be utilized to manage selected patients.

  6. Effects of baclofen on motor units paralysed by chronic cervical spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häger-Ross, Charlotte K.; Klein, Cliff S.

    2010-01-01

    Baclofen, a gamma-aminobutyric acid receptorB agonist, is used to reduce symptoms of spasticity (hyperreflexia, increases in muscle tone, involuntary muscle activity), but the long-term effects of sustained baclofen use on skeletal muscle properties are unclear. The aim of our study was to evaluate whether baclofen use and paralysis due to cervical spinal cord injury change the contractile properties of human thenar motor units more than paralysis alone. Evoked electromyographic activity and force were recorded in response to intraneural stimulation of single motor axons to thenar motor units. Data from three groups of motor units were compared: 23 paralysed units from spinal cord injured subjects who take baclofen and have done so for a median of 7 years, 25 paralysed units from spinal cord injured subjects who do not take baclofen (median: 10 years) and 45 units from uninjured control subjects. Paralysed motor unit properties were independent of injury duration and level. With paralysis and baclofen, the median motor unit tetanic forces were significantly weaker, twitch half-relaxation times longer and half maximal forces reached at lower frequencies than for units from uninjured subjects. The median values for these same parameters after paralysis alone were comparable to control data. Axon conduction velocities differed across groups and were slowest for paralysed units from subjects who were not taking baclofen and fastest for units from the uninjured. Greater motor unit weakness with long-term baclofen use and paralysis will make the whole muscle weaker and more fatigable. Significantly more paralysed motor units need to be excited during patterned electrical stimulation to produce any given force over time. The short-term benefits of baclofen on spasticity (e.g. management of muscle spasms that may otherwise hinder movement or social interactions) therefore have to be considered in relation to its possible long-term effects on muscle rehabilitation

  7. An optimized framework for quantitative magnetization transfer imaging of the cervical spinal cord in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battiston, Marco; Grussu, Francesco; Ianus, Andrada; Schneider, Torben; Prados, Ferran; Fairney, James; Ourselin, Sebastien; Alexander, Daniel C; Cercignani, Mara; Gandini Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M; Samson, Rebecca S

    2018-05-01

    To develop a framework to fully characterize quantitative magnetization transfer indices in the human cervical cord in vivo within a clinically feasible time. A dedicated spinal cord imaging protocol for quantitative magnetization transfer was developed using a reduced field-of-view approach with echo planar imaging (EPI) readout. Sequence parameters were optimized based in the Cramer-Rao-lower bound. Quantitative model parameters (i.e., bound pool fraction, free and bound pool transverse relaxation times [ T2F, T2B], and forward exchange rate [k FB ]) were estimated implementing a numerical model capable of dealing with the novelties of the sequence adopted. The framework was tested on five healthy subjects. Cramer-Rao-lower bound minimization produces optimal sampling schemes without requiring the establishment of a steady-state MT effect. The proposed framework allows quantitative voxel-wise estimation of model parameters at the resolution typically used for spinal cord imaging (i.e. 0.75 × 0.75 × 5 mm 3 ), with a protocol duration of ∼35 min. Quantitative magnetization transfer parametric maps agree with literature values. Whole-cord mean values are: bound pool fraction = 0.11(±0.01), T2F = 46.5(±1.6) ms, T2B = 11.0(±0.2) µs, and k FB  = 1.95(±0.06) Hz. Protocol optimization has a beneficial effect on reproducibility, especially for T2B and k FB . The framework developed enables robust characterization of spinal cord microstructure in vivo using qMT. Magn Reson Med 79:2576-2588, 2018. © 2017 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. © 2017 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc

  8. Persistent Outpatient Hypertension Is Independently Associated with Spinal Cord Dysfunction and Imaging Characteristics of Spinal Cord Damage among Patients with Cervical Spondylosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalb, Samuel; Zaidi, Hasan A; Ribas-Nijkerk, Juan C; Sindhwani, Maughan K; Clark, Justin C; Martirosyan, Nikolay L; Theodore, Nicholas

    2015-08-01

    Hypertension and cervical spondylosis are diseases of the adult population that are approaching near pandemic proportions. However, the interactions between these two disease processes are poorly understood. We set out to determine the associations among systemic hypertension, clinical status, and imaging findings of spinal cord damage for patients with cervical stenosis. A retrospective chart review was performed on patients with symptomatic cervical stenosis related to degenerative disease and divided on the basis of outpatient blood pressure control (normal <140/<90 mm Hg). Sagittal T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the cervical spine was analyzed to determine the degree of maximal canal stenosis (MCS; %), surface area of increased signal intensity (ISI; cm(2)), and signal intensity ratio (SIR). Functional status was evaluated using the modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association (mJOA) scale and the Nurick scale. One hundred twenty-two patients were identified (64 hypertensive, 58 nonhypertensive). Likelihood of ISI was higher in hypertensive patients (P < 0.05). Average ISI was significantly higher in patients with uncontrolled blood pressure (P = 0.02) despite MCS being identical between the two groups. The mJOA and Nurick scores were worse for patients with systemic hypertension (P < 0.02). Diabetes mellitus and smoking history did not affect these findings. Persistent hypertension in outpatients is associated with worsened clinical status and increased markers of spinal cord damage on MRI. Perioperative management of blood pressure may serve to improve clinical outcomes. Larger prospective trials are necessary to further validate these findings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. First Human Implantation of a Bioresorbable Polymer Scaffold for Acute Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: A Clinical Pilot Study for Safety and Feasibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodore, Nicholas; Hlubek, Randall; Danielson, Jill; Neff, Kristin; Vaickus, Lou; Ulich, Thomas R; Ropper, Alexander E

    2016-08-01

    A porous bioresorbable polymer scaffold has previously been tested in preclinical animal models of spinal cord contusion injury to promote appositional healing, spare white matter, decrease posttraumatic cysts, and normalize intraparenchymal tissue pressure. This is the first report of its human implantation in a spinal cord injury patient during a pilot study testing the safety and feasibility of this technique (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02138110). A 25-year-old man had a T11-12 fracture dislocation sustained in a motocross accident that resulted in a T11 American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) grade A traumatic spinal cord injury. He was treated with acute surgical decompression and spinal fixation with fusion, and enrolled in the spinal scaffold study. A 2 × 10 mm bioresorbable scaffold was placed in the spinal cord parenchyma at T12. The scaffold was implanted directly into the traumatic cavity within the spinal cord through a dorsal root entry zone myelotomy at the caudal extent of the contused area. By 3 months, his neurological examination improved to an L1 AIS grade C incomplete injury. At 6-month postoperative follow-up, there were no procedural complications or apparent safety issues related to the scaffold implantation. Although longer-term follow-up and investigation are required, this case demonstrates that a polymer scaffold can be safely implanted into an acutely contused spinal cord. This is the first human surgical implantation, and future outcomes of other patients in this clinical trial will better elucidate the safety and possible efficacy profile of the scaffold. AIS, American Spinal Injury Association Impairment ScaleSCI, spinal cord injurytSCI, traumatic spinal cord injury.

  10. Strategies for autonomy used by people with cervical spinal cord injury: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Ven, Leontine; Post, Marcel; de Witte, Luc; van den Heuvel, Wim

    2008-01-01

    To identify strategies used by people with high cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) to function autonomously. A multidimensional concept of autonomy was used, with four dimensions: independence, self-determination, participation and identification. Qualitative methods were used, involving literature study and semi-structured interviews with eight individuals with high SCI who had been discharged from the rehabilitation centre for several years and were members of a sports club. Strategies for independence included making independent functioning a personal challenge and learning from others with SCI. Strategies for self-determination included keeping oneself informed, setting personal goals and being assertive. Strategies for participation were making challenges out of barriers, planning and organizing, asking and accepting help, and dealing with reactions from others. Strategies for identification involved taking life as it comes and focussing on positive aspects of life. Different strategies are necessary for different dimensions of autonomy. Some strategies seem contradictory in terms of their effects on different dimensions of autonomy. Patients can be made aware of strategies for autonomy during the rehabilitation phase.

  11. Motor imagery reinforces brain compensation of reach-to-grasp movement after cervical spinal cord injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien eMateo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with cervical spinal cord injury (SCI that causes tetraplegia are challenged with dramatic sensorimotor deficits. However, certain rehabilitation techniques may significantly enhance their autonomy by restoring reach-to-grasp movements. Among others, evidence of motor imagery (MI benefits for neurological rehabilitation of upper limb movements is growing. This literature review addresses motor imagery (MI effectiveness during reach-to-grasp rehabilitation after tetraplegia. Among articles from MEDLINE published between 1966 and 2015, we selected ten studies including 34 participants with C4 to C7 tetraplegia and 22 healthy controls published during the last fifteen years. We found that MI of possible non-paralyzed movements improved reach-to-grasp performance by i increasing both tenodesis grasp capabilities and muscle strength, ii decreasing movement time, and trajectory variability, and, iii reducing the abnormally increased brain activity. MI can also strengthen motor commands by potentiating recruitment and synchronization of motoneurons, which leads to improved recovery. These improvements reflect brain adaptations induced by MI. Furthermore, MI can be used to control brain computer interfaces (BCI that successfully restore grasp capabilities. These results highlight the growing interest for MI and its potential to recover functional grasping in individuals with tetraplegia, and motivate the need for further studies to substantiate it.

  12. Review of Upper Extremity Nerve Transfer in Cervical Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Sarah A; Gohritz, Andreas; Fridén, Jan; van Zyl, Natasha

    2015-12-01

     Several nerve transfers have now been successfully performed for upper limb reanimation in tetraplegia. This study was performed to review the use of nerve transfers for upper limb reanimation in tetraplegia.  Medline and Embase (1950 to February 11, 2015) were searched using a search strategy designed to include any studies that reported cases of nerve transfer in persons with cervical spinal cord injury (SCI).  A total of 103 manuscripts were selected initially and full-text analysis produced 13 studies with extractable data. Of these manuscripts, 10 reported single cases and 3 reported case series. Eighty-nine nerve transfers have been performed in 57 males and 2 females with a mean age of 34 years. The mean SCI level was C6 (range: C5-7), time to surgery post-SCI was 19.9 months (range: 4.1-156 months), and follow-up time was 18.2 months (range: 3-60 months). All case reports recorded a Medical Research Council (MRC) score of 3 or 4 for recipient muscle power, but two early case series reported more variable results.  This review documents the current status of nerve transfer surgery for upper limb reanimation in tetraplegia and summarizes the functional results in 59 cases with 89 nerve transfers performed, including 15 cases of double-nerve transfer and 1 case of triple-nerve transfer.

  13. Circadian variations in melatonin and cortisol in patients with cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, G; Sharma, V P; Verma, N S

    2016-05-01

    In cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI), afferent and efferent circuits that influence the basal production of melatonin and cortisol may be disrupted and hence disrupt the basal functions of human physiology. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess circadian changes, if any, in serum cortisol and melatonin in patients with CSCI. Serum levels of cortisol and melatonin were measured at 6-h intervals of the day (0600, 1200, 1800 and 0000 hours) in 22 CSCI patients, as well as 22 healthy controls. Significantly higher melatonin levels were observed in the patient group in morning hours, whereas a significantly lower level of melatonin was found during the night time in the patient group than in the control group. Moreover, significantly higher values were obtained in the evening and night time serum cortisol levels among the patients compared with controls. Further, when the mean values of cortisol throughout the day were tested among patient and control groups similar circadian rhythm was found. The only difference being that serum cortisol declined much more in controls in evening and night samples as compared with CSCI patients. We conclude that circadian variations exist in the circulating levels of serum cortisol and melatonin in patients with CSCI. Low levels of melatonin secretion during night may contribute to the pervasive sleep disruption and increased pain perception.

  14. Chronic at-level thermal hyperalgesia following rat cervical contusion spinal cord injury is accompanied by neuronal and astrocyte activation and loss of the astrocyte glutamate transporter, GLT1, in superficial dorsal horn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putatunda, Rajarshi; Hala, Tamara J; Chin, Jeannie; Lepore, Angelo C

    2014-09-18

    Neuropathic pain is a form of pathological nociception that occurs in a significant portion of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) patients, resulting in debilitating and often long-term physical and psychological burdens. While many peripheral and central mechanisms have been implicated in neuropathic pain, central sensitization of dorsal horn spinothalamic tract (STT) neurons is a major underlying substrate. Furthermore, dysregulation of extracellular glutamate homeostasis and chronic astrocyte activation play important underlying roles in persistent hyperexcitability of these superficial dorsal horn neurons. To date, central sensitization and astrocyte changes have not been characterized in cervical SCI-induced neuropathic pain models, despite the fact that a major portion of SCI patients suffer contusion trauma to cervical spinal cord. In this study, we have characterized 2 rat models of unilateral cervical contusion SCI that behaviorally result in chronic persistence of thermal hyperalgesia in the ipsilateral forepaw. In addition, we find that STT neurons are chronically activated in both models when compared to laminectomy-only uninjured rats. Finally, persistent astrocyte activation and significantly reduced expression of the major CNS glutamate transporter, GLT1, in superficial dorsal horn astrocytes are associated with both excitability changes in STT neurons and the neuropathic pain behavioral phenotype. In conclusion, we have characterized clinically-relevant rodent models of cervical contusion-induced neuropathic pain that result in chronic activation of both STT neurons and astrocytes, as well as compromise in astrocyte glutamate transporter expression. These models can be used as important tools to further study mechanisms underlying neuropathic pain post-SCI and to test potential therapeutic interventions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Relationship between clinical assessments of function and measurements from an upper-limb robotic rehabilitation device in cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zariffa, José; Kapadia, Naaz; Kramer, John L K; Taylor, Philippa; Alizadeh-Meghrazi, Milad; Zivanovic, Vera; Albisser, Urs; Willms, Rhonda; Townson, Andrea; Curt, Armin; Popovic, Milos R; Steeves, John D

    2012-05-01

    Upper limb robotic rehabilitation devices can collect quantitative data about the user's movements. Identifying relationships between robotic sensor data and manual clinical assessment scores would enable more precise tracking of the time course of recovery after injury and reduce the need for time-consuming manual assessments by skilled personnel. This study used measurements from robotic rehabilitation sessions to predict clinical scores in a traumatic cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) population. A retrospective analysis was conducted on data collected from subjects using the Armeo Spring (Hocoma, AG) in three rehabilitation centers. Fourteen predictive variables were explored, relating to range-of-motion, movement smoothness, and grip ability. Regression models using up to four predictors were developed to describe the following clinical scores: the GRASSP (consisting of four sub-scores), the ARAT, and the SCIM. The resulting adjusted R(2) value was highest for the GRASSP "Quantitative Prehension" component (0.78), and lowest for the GRASSP "Sensibility" component (0.54). In contrast to comparable studies in stroke survivors, movement smoothness was least beneficial for predicting clinical scores in SCI. Prediction of upper-limb clinical scores in SCI is feasible using measurements from a robotic rehabilitation device, without the need for dedicated assessment procedures.

  16. Influence of the Number of Predicted Words on Text Input Speed in Participants With Cervical Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouplin, Samuel; Roche, Nicolas; Vaugier, Isabelle; Jacob, Antoine; Figere, Marjorie; Pottier, Sandra; Antoine, Jean-Yves; Bensmail, Djamel

    2016-02-01

    To determine whether the number of words displayed in the word prediction software (WPS) list affects text input speed (TIS) in people with cervical spinal cord injury (SCI), and whether any influence is dependent on the level of the lesion. A cross-sectional trial. A rehabilitation center. Persons with cervical SCI (N=45). Lesion level was high (C4 and C5, American Spinal Injury Association [ASIA] grade A or B) for 15 participants (high-lesion group) and low (between C6 and C8, ASIA grade A or B) for 30 participants (low-lesion group). TIS was evaluated during four 10-minute copying tasks: (1) without WPS (Without); (2) with a display of 3 predicted words (3Words); (3) with a display of 6 predicted words (6Words); and (4) with a display of 8 predicted words (8Words). During the 4 copying tasks, TIS was measured objectively (characters per minute, number of errors) and subjectively through subject report (fatigue, perception of speed, cognitive load, satisfaction). For participants with low-cervical SCI, TIS without WPS was faster than with WPS, regardless of the number of words displayed (Pnumber of words displayed in a word prediction list on TIS; however, perception of TIS differed according to lesion level. For persons with low-cervical SCI, a small number of words should be displayed, or WPS should not be used at all. For persons with high-cervical SCI, a larger number of words displayed increases the comfort of use of WPS. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cervicitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... intercourse or during a cervical exam, and abnormal vaginal discharge. However, it's also possible to have cervicitis and ... symptoms, they may include: Large amounts of unusual vaginal discharge Frequent, painful urination Pain during intercourse Bleeding between ...

  18. Neurogenic bladder in patients with traumatic spinal cord injury: treatment and follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yıldız, N; Akkoç, Y; Erhan, B; Gündüz, B; Yılmaz, B; Alaca, R; Gök, H; Köklü, K; Ersöz, M; Cınar, E; Karapolat, H; Catalbaş, N; Bardak, A N; Turna, I; Demir, Y; Güneş, S; Alemdaroğlu, E; Tunç, H

    2014-06-01

    Multi-center, cross-sectional study. Our aim was to evaluate the treatment methods and follow-up of neurogenic bladder in patients with traumatic spinal cord injury retrospectively using a questionnaire. Turkey. Three hundred and thirty-seven patients who had spinal cord injury for at least 2 years were enrolled from six centers in the neurogenic bladder study group. They were asked to fill-out a questionnaire about treatments they received and techniques they used for bladder management. The study included 246 male and 91 female patients with a mean age of 42±14 years. Intermittent catheterization (IC) was performed in 77.9% of the patients, 3.8% had indwelling catheters, 13.8% had normal spontaneous micturition, 2.6% performed voiding maneuvers, 1.3% used diapers and 0.6% used condom catheters. No gender difference was found regarding the techniques used in bladder rehabilitation (P>0.05). Overall, 63.2% of patients used anticholinergic drugs; anticholinergic drug use was similar between genders (P>0.05). The most common anticholinergic drug used was oxybutynin (40.3%), followed by trospium (32.6%), tolterodine (19.3%) darifenacin (3.3%), propiverine (3.3%) and solifenacin (1.1%). The specialties of the physicians who first prescribed the anticholinergic drug were physiatrists (76.2%), urologists (22.1%) and neurologists (1.7%). Only four patients had previously received injections of botulinum-toxin-A into the detrusor muscle and three of them stated that their symptoms showed improvement. Most of the patients (77%) had regular follow-up examinations, including urine cultures, urinary system ultrasound and urodynamic tests, when necessary; the reasons for not having regular control visits were living distant from hospital (15.3%) and monetary problems (7.7%). Of the patients, 42.7% did not experience urinary tract infections (UTI), 36.4% had bacteriuria but no UTI episodes with fever, 15.9% had 1-2 clinical UTI episodes per year and 5% had ⩾3 clinical UTIs

  19. Neuroimaging for spine and spinal cord surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyanagi, Izumi [Hokkaido Neurosurgical Memorial Hospital (Japan); Iwasaki, Yoshinobu; Hida, Kazutoshi

    2001-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroimaging of the spine and spinal cord are described based upon our clinical experiences with spinal disorders. Preoperative neuroradiological examinations, including magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and computerized tomography (CT) with three-dimensional reconstruction (3D-CT), were retrospectively analyzed in patients with cervical spondylosis or ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (130 cases), spinal trauma (43 cases) and intramedullary spinal cord tumors (92 cases). CT scan and 3D-CT were useful in elucidating the spine pathology associated with degenerative and traumatic spine diseases. Visualization of the deformity of the spine or fracture-dislocation of the spinal column with 3D-CT helped to determine the correct surgical treatment. MR imaging was most important in the diagnosis of both spine and spinal cord abnormalities. The axial MR images of the spinal cord were essential in understanding the laterality of the spinal cord compression in spinal column disorders and in determining surgical approaches to the intramedullary lesions. Although non-invasive diagnostic modalities such as MR imaging and CT scans are adequate for deciding which surgical treatment to use in the majority of spine and spinal cord disorders, conventional myelography is still needed in the diagnosis of nerve root compression in some cases of cervical spondylosis. (author)

  20. Preliminary results after upper cervical chiropractic care in patients with chronic cerebro-spinal venous insufficiency and multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandolesi, Sandro; Marceca, Giuseppe; Moser, Jon; Niglio, Tarcisio; d'Alessandro, Aldo; Ciccone, Matteo Marco; Zito, Annapaola; Mandolesi, Dimitri; d'Alessandro, Alessandro; Fedele, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the clinical and X-ray results of the Upper Cervical Chiropractic care through the specific adjustments (corrections) of C1-C2 on patients with chronic venous cerebral-spinal insufficiency (CCSVI) and multiple sclerosis (MS). We studied a sample of 77 patients before and after the Upper Cervical Chiropractic care, and we analyzed: A) The change of the X-ray parameters; B) The clinical results using a new set of questions. The protocol of the C1- C2 upper Cervical Chiropractic treatment, specific for these patients, lasts four months. From a haemodynamic point of view we divided the patients in 3 types: Type 1 - purely vascular with intravenous alterations; Type 2 - "mechanical" with of external venous compressions; Type 3 - mixed. We found an improvement in all kinds of subluxations after the treatment with respect to the pre-treatment X-ray evaluation, with a significant statistical difference. The differences between the clinical symptoms before and after the specific treatment of C1-C2 are statistically significant with pcerebro-spinal fluid.

  1. Calorie and Protein Intake in Acute Rehabilitation Inpatients with Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury Versus Other Diagnoses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background: Obesity and its consequences affect patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). There is a paucity of data with regard to the dietary intake patterns of patients with SCI in the acute inpatient rehabilitation setting. Our hypothesis is that acute rehabilitation inpatients with SCI consume significantly more calories and protein than other inpatient rehabilitation diagnoses. Objective: To compare calorie and protein intake in patients with new SCI versus other diagnoses (new traumatic brain injury [TBI], new stroke, and Parkinson’s disease [PD]) in the acute inpatient rehabilitation setting. Methods: The intake of 78 acute rehabilitation inpatients was recorded by registered dieticians utilizing once-weekly calorie and protein intake calculations. Results: Mean ± SD calorie intake (kcal) for the SCI, TBI, stroke, and PD groups was 1,967.9 ± 611.6, 1,546.8 ± 352.3, 1,459.7 ± 443.2, and 1,459.4 ± 434.6, respectively. ANOVA revealed a significant overall group difference, F(3, 74) = 4.74, P = .004. Mean ± SD protein intake (g) for the SCI, TBI, stroke, and PD groups was 71.5 ± 25.0, 61.1 ± 12.8, 57.6 ± 16.6, and 55.1 ± 19.1, respectively. ANOVA did not reveal an overall group difference, F(3, 74) = 2.50, P = .066. Conclusions: Given the diet-related comorbidities and energy balance abnormalities associated with SCI, combined with the intake levels demonstrated in this study, education with regard to appropriate calorie intake in patients with SCI should be given in the acute inpatient rehabilitation setting. PMID:23960707

  2. Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury Emergency Service Triage Patterns and the Associated Emergency Department Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvarajah, Shalini; Haider, Adil H; Schneider, Eric B; Sadowsky, Cristina L; Becker, Daniel; Hammond, Edward R

    2015-12-15

    Paralysis is an indication for trauma patients to be preferentially triaged by emergency services to designated level I or II trauma centers (TC). We sought to describe triage practices for patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI) and its associated emergency department (ED) outcomes. Adults ages ≥ 18 years with a diagnosis of acute TSCI (International Classification of Diseases-9: 806 and 952) in the 2006-2011 United States Nationwide Emergency Department Sample were included in these analyses. Outcomes assessed include triage to non-trauma centers (NTC), which is referred to as "under-triage," and ED mortality. Of 117,444 adults with TSCI, 33.4% were under-triaged to NTC. Under-triage was more prevalent with increasing age. Among patients under-triaged to NTC, 37.4% had new injury severity score (NISS) >15, representing severe injuries or polytrauma. Among patients with NISS >15, the odds of ED mortality in NTC were four-fold greater compared to level I trauma centers (TC-I) (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 4.06; 95% confidence interval = 1.87-8.79; p triage of adults with acute TSCI occurred in at least one-third of the cases. Patients triaged to NTC rather than TC-I experienced higher likelihood of death in the ED even after controlling for personal and injury characteristics. Further research is necessary to elucidate detailed clinical and logistical factors that may be associated with under-triage of acute TSCI, to facilitate interventions aimed at improving patient experience and outcomes.

  3. Clinical analysis of spinal cord injury with or without cervical ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament, spondylosis, and canal stenosis in elderly head injury patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakae, Ryuta; Onda, Hidetaka; Yokobori, Shoji; Araki, Takashi; Fuse, Akira; Toda, Shigeki; Kushimoto, Shigeki; Yokota, Hiroyuki; Teramoto, Akira

    2010-01-01

    Patients with degenerative diseases of the cervical spine, such as ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament, spondylosis, and canal stenosis, sometimes present with acute spinal cord injury caused by minor trauma. However, the relative risk of cervical cord injury with these diseases is unknown. The clinical and radiological features of 94 elderly patients with head injury, 57 men and 37 women aged from 65 to 98 years (mean 76.6 years), were retrospectively analyzed to assess the association of spinal cord injury with degenerative cervical diseases. Degenerative cervical diseases were present in 25 patients, and spinal cord injury was more common in the patients with degenerative diseases (11/25 patients) than in the patients without such diseases (3/69 patients; relative risk=10.2). The incidence of degenerative cervical diseases seems to be increasing in Japan because life expectancy has increased and the elderly are a rapidly growing part of the population. A fall while walking or cycling is a common mechanism of head injury and/or cervical cord injury in the elderly. To decrease the occurrence of cervical myelopathy, prevention by increasing social awareness and avoiding traffic accidents and falls is important. (author)

  4. Cervical spinal canal stenosis first presenting after spinal cord injury due to minor trauma: An insight into the value of preventive decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigematsu, Hideki; Cheung, Jason Pui Yin; Mak, Kin-Cheung; Bruzzone, Mauro; Luk, Keith D K

    2017-01-01

    Patients with pre-existing cervical spinal canal stenosis (CSCS) may have minimal or no symptoms. However, performing preventive decompression is controversial as the incidence of CSCS leading to severe cord injury is unknown. Hence, this study aims to revisit the threshold for surgery in "silent" CSCS by reviewing the neurologic outcomes of patients with undiagnosed CSCS who sustained a cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI). Two groups of subjects were recruited for analysis. Firstly, patients with trauma-induced CSCI without fracture or dislocation were included. Pre-existing CSCS was diagnosed by MRI measurements. The second group consisted of asymptomatic subjects recruited from the general population who also had MRIs performed. Canal sizes were compared between this control group and the patient group. Within the patient group, neurological assessments and outcomes by Frankel classification were performed in patients treated surgically or conservatively. 32 patients with CSCS were recruited. The mean spinal canal sagittal diameter (disc-level) of all CSCS cases was 5.3 ± 1.4 mm (1.3-8.2). In comparison, the diameter was 10.5 ± 1.7 mm (6.6-14.6) in the 47 asymptomatic individuals recruited from the general population. Decompression was performed in 17 patients and conservative treatment in 15. Mean follow-up was 19.3 ± 17.0 months (6-84). At the final follow-up, 3 patients (9.3%) returned to their pre-injury Frankel grade, whereas 26 patients (83.3%) lost one or more neurological grade. Three patients (9.3%) died. Majority of patients with "silent" CSCS who sustained cervical cord injuries did not return to their pre-injury neurological status. All of these subjects have pre-existing canal stenosis hence the risk of cord injury. Given the poor neurological outcome of CSCS, a lower threshold for surgery could be indicated to avoid these disastrous injuries. However, before making any conclusive recommendation we must first identify the prevalence of

  5. Caregiver outcomes and interventions: a systematic scoping review of the traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Anne; Barker, Samantha; Sampson, Amanda; Martin, Clarissa

    2017-01-01

    To identify factors reported with negative and positive outcomes for caregivers of the traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury cohorts, to investigate what interventions have been studied to support carers and to report what effectiveness has been found. Scoping systematic review. Electronic databases and websites were searched from 1990 to December 2015. Studies were agreed for inclusion using pre-defined criteria. Relevant information from included studies was extracted and quality assessment was completed. Data were synthesised using qualitative methods. A total of 62 studies reported caregiver outcomes for the traumatic brain injury cohort; 51 reported negative outcomes and 11 reported positive outcomes. For the spinal cord injury cohort, 18 studies reported caregiver outcomes; 15 reported negative outcomes and three reported positive outcomes. Burden of care was over-represented in the literature for both cohorts, with few studies looking at factors associated with positive outcomes. Good family functioning, coping skills and social support were reported to mediate caregiver burden and promote positive outcomes. A total of 21 studies further described interventions to support traumatic brain injury caregivers and four described interventions to support spinal cord injury caregivers, with emerging evidence for the effectiveness of problem-solving training. Further research is required to explore the effects of injury severity of the care recipient, as well as caregiver age, on the outcome of the interventions. Most studies reported negative outcomes, suggesting that barriers to caregiving have been established, but not facilitators. The interventions described to support carers are limited and require further testing to confirm their effectiveness.

  6. The prevalence of cervical myelopathy among subjects with narrow cervical spinal canal in a population-based magnetic resonance imaging study: the Wakayama Spine Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Keiji; Yoshimura, Noriko; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Muraki, Shigeyuki; Ishimoto, Yuyu; Yamada, Hiroshi; Takiguchi, Noboru; Nakagawa, Yukihiro; Minamide, Akihito; Oka, Hiroyuki; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Kozo; Akune, Toru; Yoshida, Munehito

    2014-12-01

    A narrow cervical spinal canal (CSC) is a well-known risk factor for cervical myelopathy (CM). However, no epidemiologic data of the CSC based on a population-based cohort are available. The purpose of the study was to investigate the age-related differences in CSC diameters on plain radiographs and to examine the associated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities including cervical cord compression and increased signal intensity (ISI) as well as the clinical CM with the narrow CSC. This was a cross-sectional study. Data were obtained from the baseline survey of the Wakayama Spine Study that was performed from 2008 to 2010 in a western part of Japan. Finally, a total of 959 subjects (319 men and 640 women; mean age, 66.4 years) were included. The outcome measures included in the study were the CSC diameter at C5 level on plain radiographs, cervical cord compression and ISI on sagittal T2-weighted MRI, and physical signs related to CM (eg, the Hoffmann reflex, hyperreflexia of the patellar tendon, the Babinski reflex, sensory and motor function, and bowel/bladder symptoms). The age-related differences of CSC diameters in men and women were investigated by descriptive statistics. The prevalence of MRI abnormalities and clinical CM was compared among the groups divided by the CSC diameter (less than 13, 13-15, and 15 mm or more). In addition, a logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the association of the CSC diameter with cervical cord compression/clinical CM after overall adjustment for age, sex, and body mass index. The CSC diameter was narrower with increasing age in both men and women. The prevalence of cervical cord compression, ISI, and the clinical CM was significantly higher in the narrower CSC group. The prevalence of cervical cord compression, ISI, and CM among subjects with CSC diameter less than 13 mm was 38.0%, 5.4%, and 10.1%, respectively. In the logistic model, the CSC diameter was a significant predictive factor for the

  7. Survival and cause of death after traumatic spinal cord injury. A long-term epidemiological survey from Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartkopp, A; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Seidenschnur, A M

    1997-01-01

    Life expectancy among individuals with spinal cord injuries (SCI) has remained lower than in the normal population, even with optimal medical management. But significant improvement has been achieved, as will be illustrated in this retrospective study of an unselected group of traumatic survivors...... treatment and were rehabilitated at the centre for Spinal Cord Injured in Hornbaek, Denmark. At the end of the follow-up, 31st December 1992, 236 (197 men and 39 women) had died. The commonest causes of death were lung diseases, particularly pneumonia; suicide; and ischaemic heart disease. Among...... of SCI, dead or still living. There has been a complete follow-up over 4 decades, information being obtained from available medical records, death certificates, and post mortem records. The survey included a total of 888 individuals (713 men and 175 women) who had survived the injury and primary...

  8. Survival and cause of death after traumatic spinal cord injury. A long-term epidemiological survey from Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartkopp, A; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Seidenschnur, A M

    1997-01-01

    Life expectancy among individuals with spinal cord injuries (SCI) has remained lower than in the normal population, even with optimal medical management. But significant improvement has been achieved, as will be illustrated in this retrospective study of an unselected group of traumatic survivors...... treatment and were rehabilitated at the centre for Spinal Cord Injured in Hornbaek, Denmark. At the end of the follow-up, 31st December 1992, 236 (197 men and 39 women) had died. The commonest causes of death were lung diseases, particularly pneumonia; suicide; and ischaemic heart disease. Among...... and pneumonia. A significant decrease in the overall mortality was observed from the first (1953-1973) to the second half of the observation period (1972-1992). Similarly the survival curves for both men and women demonstrate that the gap in survival probability between the normal population and the SCI has...

  9. Cervical spinal locking plate in combination with cortical ring allograft for a one level fusion in dogs with cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Robert L; Levine, Jonathan M; Coates, Joan R; Bahr, Anne; Hettlich, Bianca F; Kerwin, Sharon C

    2008-08-01

    To evaluate use of a surgical technique commonly used in humans for treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) in dogs. Prospective case series. Dogs with CSM (n=10). Dogs weighing >30 kg that had CSM at 1 vertebral articulation were eligible for inclusion. Dogs had vertebral column distraction/fusion performed using a cortical ring allograft, cancellous autograft, and a spinal locking plate. Dogs were evaluated temporally by repeat neurological examinations and by client perception of postsurgical outcome, determined by telephone interview. Nine dogs survived the immediate postoperative period. Seven of 8 dogs had moderate to complete improvement without recurrence (mean follow-up, 2.48 years). The most common postsurgical complications were screw loosening (n=4) and plate shifting (2), neither of which required surgical revision. One dog had pseudoarthrosis that may have negatively impacted outcome. Treatment of single level CSM in dogs with ring allograft and a spinal locking plate system may lead to successful outcomes. The major problems encountered with included cost of the implants and adjusting the system designed for humans to fit the vertebral column of a dog. For dogs with CSM at a single level, the use of a spinal locking plate in combination with a cortical ring allograft can be an effective surgical treatment. Costs of the implants as well as anatomic differences in dogs make this type of surgery less appealing.

  10. Incidence, aetiology and injury characteristics of traumatic spinal cord injury in Stockholm, Sweden: A prospective, population-based update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Conran; Andersson, Nina; Bjelak, Sapko; Giesecke, Kajsa; Hultling, Claes; Nilsson Wikmar, Lena; Phillips, Julie; Seiger, Åke; Stenimahitis, Vasilios; Trok, Katarzyna; Åkesson, Elisabet; Wahman, Kerstin

    2017-05-16

    To update the incidence rate, aetiology and injury characteristics of acutely-injured adults with traumatic spinal cord injury in Stockholm, Sweden, using international standards of reporting. Prospective, (regional) population-based observation. Forty-nine consecutively enrolled individuals. A surveillance system of newly-injured adults with traumatic spinal cord injury was implemented for an 18-month period. The International Spinal Cord Injury Core Data Set was used to collect data on those who survived the first 7 days post-injury. After an 18-month period, 49 incident cases were registered, of whom 45 were included in this study. The crude incidence rate was 19.0 per million, consisting mainly of men (60%), and the mean age of the cohort was 55 years (median 58). Causes of injury were almost exclusively limited to falls and transport-related events, accounting for 58% and 40% of cases, respectively. The incidence has remained stable when compared with the previous study; however, significant differences exist for injury aetiology (p = 0.004) and impairment level (p = 0.01) in that more fall- and transport-related spinal cord injury occurred, and a larger proportion of persons was left with resultant tetraplegia, in the current study, compared with more sport-related injuries and those left with paraplegia in the previous study. The incidence rate appeared to remain stable in Stockholm, Sweden. However, significant changes in injury aetiology and impairment-level post injury were found, compared with the previous study. There remains a need for developing fall-related prevention strategies in rehabilitation settings as well as in population-based programmes.

  11. Cervical spinal cord injury associated with near-drowning does not increase pneumonia risk or mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Thomas; Shin, Susanna; Collins, Jay; Britt, Rebecca C; Reed, Scott F; Weireter, Leonard J; Britt, L D

    2011-04-01

    Body surfing accidents (BSA) can cause cervical spinal cord injuries (CSCIs) that are associated with near-drowning (ND). The submersion injury from a ND can result in aspiration and predispose to pulmonary complications. We predicted a worse outcome (particularly the development of pneumonia) in patients with CSCIs associated with ND. A retrospective review was performed of patients who were treated at Eastern Virginia Medical School for a CSCI resulting from a blunt mechanism. Data collected included basic demographic data, data regarding injury and in-hospital outcomes, and discharge data, including discharge disposition. Statistics were performed using χ(2) and Student t test. In 2003 to 2008, 141 patients were treated for CSCIs with inclusion criteria. Thirty patients (21%) had an associated ND (BSA) and 111 patients (79%) did not (BLT). The cohorts were similar in mean age (BSA, 45 years; BLT, 50 years; P = 0.16) and male gender distribution (BSA, 93%; BLT, 79%; P = 0.13). The cohorts were similar in injury severity using Injury Severity Score (BSA, 22; BLT, 24; P = 0.65). The cohorts were similar in rates of developing pneumonia (BSA, 3%; BLT, 12%; P = 0.31). The rate of infection was significantly higher in the cohort without an associated near-drowning (BSA, 10%; BLT, 32%; P = 0.033). The mean intensive care unit stay (BSA, 3.5 days; BLT, 11.3 days; P = 0.057) and the rate of mortality were similar (BSA, 10%; BLT, 10% P = 0.99). Those patients with an associated ND had a shorter hospital stay (BSA, 5.7 days; BLT, 22.2 days; P = 0.007) and a better chance of being discharged home (BSA, 57%; BLT, 27%; P = 0.004). CSCIs after a BSA do better than their counterparts without an associated ND. CSCIs associated with ND appear to be isolated injuries with minimal pulmonary involvement despite submersion injuries.

  12. Feasibility and efficacy of upper limb robotic rehabilitation in a subacute cervical spinal cord injury population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zariffa, J; Kapadia, N; Kramer, J L K; Taylor, P; Alizadeh-Meghrazi, M; Zivanovic, V; Willms, R; Townson, A; Curt, A; Popovic, M R; Steeves, J D

    2012-03-01

    Multi-center pilot study. To investigate the use of an upper limb robotic rehabilitation device (Armeo Spring, Hocoma AG, Switzerland) in a subacute cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) population. Two Canadian inpatient rehabilitation centers. Twelve subjects (motor level C4-C6, ASIA Impairment Scale A-D) completed the training, which consisted of 16.1±4.6 sessions over 5.2±1.4 weeks. Two types of outcomes were recorded: (1) feasibility of incorporating the device into an inpatient rehabilitation program (compliance with training schedule, reduction in therapist time required and subject questionnaires) and (2) efficacy of the robotic rehabilitation for improving functional outcomes (Graded and Redefined Assessment of Strength, Sensibility and Prehension (GRASSP), action research arm test, grip dynamometry and range of motion). By the end of the training period, the robot-assisted training was shown to require active therapist involvement for 25±11% (mean±s.d.) of the total session time. In the group of all subjects and in a subgroup composed of motor-incomplete subjects, no statistically significant differences were found between intervention and control limbs for any of the outcome measures. In a subgroup of subjects with partial hand function at baseline, the GRASSP-Sensibility component showed a statistically significant increase (6.0±1.6 (mean±s.e.m.) point increase between baseline and discharge for the intervention limbs versus 1.9±0.9 points for the control limbs). The pilot results suggest that individuals with some preserved hand function after SCI may be better candidates for rehabilitation training using the Armeo Spring device.

  13. Radiation response of the rat cervical spinal cord after irradiation at different ages: Tolerance, latency and pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruifrok, A.C.C.; Van Der Kogel, A.J.; Stephens, L.C.

    1994-01-01

    Investigation of the age dependent single-dose radiation tolerance, latency to radiation myelopathy, and the histopathological changes after irradiation of the rat cervical spinal cord is presented. Rats were irradiated with graded single doses of 4 MV photons to the cervical spinal cord. When the rats showed definite signs of paresis of the forelegs, they were killed and processed for histological examination. The radiation dose resulting in paresis due to white matter damage in 50% of the animals (ED 50 ) after single dose irradiation was about 21.5 Gy at all ages ≥ 2 weeks. Only the Ed 50 at 1 week was significantly lower. The latency to the development of paresis clearly changed with the age at irradiation, from about 2 weeks after irradiation at 1 week to 6-8 months after irradiation at age ≥ 8 weeks. The white matter damage was similar in all symptomatic animals studied. The most prominent were areas with diffuse demyelination and swollen axons, often with focal necrosis, accompanied by glial reaction. This was observed in all symptomatic animals, irrespective of the age at irradiation. Expression of vascular damage appeared to depend on the age at irradiation. Although the latency to myelopathy is clearly age dependent, single dose tolerance is not age dependent at age ≥ 2 weeks in the rat cervical spinal cord. The white matter damage is similar in all symptomatic animals studied, but the vasculopathies appear to be influenced by the age at irradiation. It is concluded that white matter damage and vascular damage are separate phenomena contributing to the development of radiation myelopathy, expression of which may depend on the radiation dose applied and the age at irradiation. 28 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  14. Comparison of CT and MR in 400 patients with suspected disease of the brain and cervical spinal cord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, W.G. Jr.; Waluch, V.; Yadley, R.A.; Wycoff, R.R.

    1984-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MR) (0.35T) and computed tomography (CT) were compared in 400 consecutive patients with suspected disease of the brain and cervical spinal cord. Of 325 positive diagnoses, MR detected abnormality while CT was normal in 93; MR was more specific in 68; MR and CT gave equivalent information in 129; CT was more specific in 32; and CT was positive while MR was normal in 3. MR was superior to CT in detection of multiple sclerosis, subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy, posterior fossa infarcts and tumors, small extra-axial fluid collections, and cervical syringomyelia. CT was preferable in evaluation of meningiomas and separation of tumor from edema. CT takes less time and may be preferable in patients with acute trauma as well as very young or elderly individuals. Thus the two studies should be considered complementary.

  15. Comparison of CT and MR in 400 patients with suspected disease of the brain and cervical spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, W.G. Jr.; Waluch, V.; Yadley, R.A.; Wycoff, R.R.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MR) (0.35T) and computed tomography (CT) were compared in 400 consecutive patients with suspected disease of the brain and cervical spinal cord. Of 325 positive diagnoses, MR detected abnormality while CT was normal in 93; MR was more specific in 68; MR and CT gave equivalent information in 129; CT was more specific in 32; and CT was positive while MR was normal in 3. MR was superior to CT in detection of multiple sclerosis, subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy, posterior fossa infarcts and tumors, small extra-axial fluid collections, and cervical syringomyelia. CT was preferable in evaluation of meningiomas and separation of tumor from edema. CT takes less time and may be preferable in patients with acute trauma as well as very young or elderly individuals. Thus the two studies should be considered complementary

  16. Atypical symptoms in patients with cervical spondylosis might be the result of stimulation on the dura mater and spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muheremu, Aikeremujiang; Sun, Yuqing

    2016-06-01

    Patients with cervical spondylosis often present with some atypical symptoms such as vertigo, headache, palpitation, nausea, abdominal discomfort, tinnitus and blurred vision and hypomnesia. Although there are a few hypotheses about the etiology of those symptoms, none of them have provided evidence convincing enough to explain the clinical, pathological and anatomic manifestation of those symptoms. One of the more acceptable explanations is that those symptoms are the results of stimulation of the sympathetic nerves in the posterior longitudinal ligament. The clinical fact that dissection of the posterior longitudinal ligament significantly alleviates the severity of those symptoms seems like an evidence for the validity of this hypothesis. However, recent clinical studies showed that laminoplasty, which has no effect on the posterior longitudinal ligament, can achieve the similar effect. In this paper, we hypothesize that stimulation of the dura mater and spinal cord might be the cause of atypical symptoms in patients with cervical spondylosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Riluzole promotes motor and respiratory recovery associated with enhanced neuronal survival and function following high cervical spinal hemisection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satkunendrarajah, K; Nassiri, F; Karadimas, S K; Lip, A; Yao, G; Fehlings, M G

    2016-02-01

    Cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) can result in devastating functional deficits that involve the respiratory and hand function. The mammalian spinal cord has limited ability to regenerate and restore meaningful functional recovery following SCI. Riluzole, 2-amino-6-trifluoromethoxybenzothiazole, an anti-glutamatergic drug has been shown to reduce excitotoxicity and confer neuroprotection at the site of injury following experimental SCI. Based on promising preclinical studies, riluzole is currently under Phase III clinical trial for the treatment of SCI (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01597518). Riluzole's anti-glutamatergic role has the potential to regulate neuronal function and provide neuroprotection and influence glutamatergic connections distal to the initial injury leading to enhanced functional recovery following SCI. In order to investigate this novel role of riluzole we used a high cervical hemisection model of SCI, which interrupts all descending input to motoneurons innervating the ipsilateral forelimb and diaphragm muscles. Following C2 spinal cord hemisection, animals were placed into one of two groups: one group received riluzole (8 mg/kg) 1 h after injury and every 12 h thereafter for 7 days at 6 mg/kg, while the second group of injured rats received vehicle solution for the same duration of time. A third group of sham injured rats underwent a C2 laminectomy without hemisection and served as uninjured control rats. Interestingly, this study reports a significant loss of motoneurons within the cervical spinal cord caudal to C2 hemisection injury. Disruption of descending input led to a decrease in glutamatergic synapses and motoneurons caudal to the injury while riluzole treatment significantly limited this decline. Functionally, Hoffmann reflex recordings revealed an increase in the excitability of the remaining ipsilateral cervical motoneurons and significant improvements in skilled and unskilled forelimb function and respiratory motor function in the

  18. The cervical spinal cord in neuromyelitis optica patients: A comparative study with multiple sclerosis using diffusion tensor imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pessôa, Fernanda Miraldi Clemente, E-mail: fernandamiraldi@hotmail.com [Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Medical Student, Rua Rodolpho Paulo Rocco, 255, Cidade Universitária, Ilha do Fundão, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Lopes, Fernanda Cristina Rueda, E-mail: frueda81@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Avenida das Américas, 4666 sl 325, Barra da Tijuca, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Costa, João Victor Altamiro, E-mail: victoraltamiro@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rua Rodolpho Paulo Rocco, 255, Cidade Universitária, Ilha do Fundão, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Leon, Soniza Vieira Alves, E-mail: sonizavleon@globo.com [Department of Neurology, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rua Rodolpho Paulo Rocco, 255, Cidade Universitária, Ilha do Fundão, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Domingues, Romeu Côrtes, E-mail: romeu@CDPi.com.br [CDPI – Clínica de Diagnóstico Por Imagem, Avenida das Américas, 4666 sl 325, Barra da Tijuca, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro, E-mail: egasparetto@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Avenida das Américas, 4666 sl 325, Barra da Tijuca, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); CDPI – Clínica de Diagnóstico Por Imagem, Avenida das Américas, 4666 sl 325, Barra da Tijuca, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-10-15

    Introduction: This study aims to evaluate “in vivo” the integrity of the normal-appearing spinal cord in patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO), using diffusion tensor MR imaging, comparing to controls and patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Materials and methods: We studied 8 patients with NMO and 17 without any neurologic disorder. Also, 32 MS patients were selected. Fractional anisotropy (FA), axial diffusivity (AD), radial diffusivity (RD) and mean diffusivity (MD) were calculated within regions of interest at C2 and C7 levels in the four columns of the spinal cord. Results: At C2, the FA value was decreased in NMO patients compared to MS and controls in the anterior column. Also in this column, RD value showed increase in NMO compared to MS and to controls. The FA value of the posterior column was decreased in NMO in comparison to controls. At C7, AD value was higher in NMO than in MS in the right column. At the same column, MD values were increased in NMO compared to MS and to controls. Conclusions: There is extensive NASC damage in NMO patients, including peripheral areas of the cervical spinal cord, affecting the white matter, mainly caused by demyelination. This suggests a new spinal cord lesion pattern in NMO in comparison to MS.

  19. [Case report: Iatrogenic shoulder pain syndrome following spinal accessory nerve injury during lateral cervical neck dissection for tongue cancer: the role of rehabilitation and ethical-deontological issues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronconi, Gianpaolo; Spagnolo, Antonio Gioacchino; Ferriero, Giorgio; Giovannini, Silvia; Amabile, Eugenia; Maccauro, Giulio; Ferrara, Paola Emilia

    2017-01-01

    The shoulder pain syndrome is the most frequent complication of lateral cervical neck dissection and may be caused by iatrogenic injury to the spinal accessory nerve, causing pain and functional limitation of the upper limb and of the cervical spine. Interdisciplinary collaboration and early rehabilitation can reduce the consequences of disability and the possible issues that can arise due to inadequate management of the problem.

  20. Paired motor cortex and cervical epidural electrical stimulation timed to converge in the spinal cord promotes lasting increases in motor responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Asht M; Pal, Ajay; Gupta, Disha; Carmel, Jason B

    2017-11-15

    Pairing motor cortex stimulation and spinal cord epidural stimulation produced large augmentation in motor cortex evoked potentials if they were timed to converge in the spinal cord. The modulation of cortical evoked potentials by spinal cord stimulation was largest when the spinal electrodes were placed over the dorsal root entry zone. Repeated pairing of motor cortex and spinal cord stimulation caused lasting increases in evoked potentials from both sites, but only if the time between the stimuli was optimal. Both immediate and lasting effects of paired stimulation are likely mediated by convergence of descending motor circuits and large diameter afferents onto common interneurons in the cervical spinal cord. Convergent activity in neural circuits can generate changes at their intersection. The rules of paired electrical stimulation are best understood for protocols that stimulate input circuits and their targets. We took a different approach by targeting the interaction of descending motor pathways and large diameter afferents in the spinal cord. We hypothesized that pairing stimulation of motor cortex and cervical spinal cord would strengthen motor responses through their convergence. We placed epidural electrodes over motor cortex and the dorsal cervical spinal cord in rats; motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were measured from biceps. MEPs evoked from motor cortex were robustly augmented with spinal epidural stimulation delivered at an intensity below the threshold for provoking an MEP. Augmentation was critically dependent on the timing and position of spinal stimulation. When the spinal stimulation was timed to coincide with the descending volley from motor cortex stimulation, MEPs were more than doubled. We then tested the effect of repeated pairing of motor cortex and spinal stimulation. Repetitive pairing caused strong augmentation of cortical MEPs and spinal excitability that lasted up to an hour after just 5 min of pairing. Additional physiology

  1. Validation of the Dutch clinical prediction rule for ambulation outcomes in an inpatient setting following traumatic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Silfhout, L; Peters, A E J; Graco, M; Schembri, R; Nunn, A K; Berlowitz, D J

    2016-08-01

    Retrospective study. To determine the accuracy of a previously described Dutch clinical prediction rule for ambulation outcome in routine clinical practice. Adult (⩾18 years) patients who were admitted to the Austin Hospital with a traumatic spinal cord injury between January 2006 and August 2014. Data from medical records were extracted to determine the score of the Dutch clinical ambulation prediction rule proposed by van Middendorp et al. in 2011. A receiver-operating characteristics (ROC) curve was generated to investigate the performance of the prediction rule. Univariate analyses were performed to investigate which factors significantly influence ambulation after a traumatic spinal cord injury. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) obtained during the current study (0.939, 95% confidence interval (CI) (0.892, 0.986)) was not significantly different from the AUC from the original Dutch clinical prediction model (0.956, 95% CI (0.936, 0.976)). Factors that were found to have a significant influence on ambulation outcome were time spent in the ICU, number of days hospitalised and injury severity. Age at injury initially showed a significant influence on ambulation however, this effect was not apparent after inclusion of the 24 patients who died due to the trauma (and therefore did not walk after their injuries). The Dutch ambulation prediction rule performed similarly in routine clinical practice as in the original, controlled study environment in which it was developed. The potential effect of survival bias in the original model requires further investigation.

  2. Symptoms of post-traumatic stress following elective lumbar spinal arthrodesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deisseroth, Kate; Hart, Robert A

    2012-08-15

    A prospective cohort study with 100% follow-up. To assess incidence and risk factors for development of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms after elective lumbar arthrodesis. Invasive medical care results in substantial physical and psychological stress to patients. The reported incidence of PTSD after medical care delivery in patients treated for trauma, cancer, and organ transplantation ranges from 5% to 51%. Similar data after elective lumbar spinal arthrodesis have not been reported. A consecutive series of 73 elective lumbar spine arthrodesis patients were evaluated prospectively, using the PTSD checklist-civilian version at 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, 9 months, and 12 months after surgery. Patient's sex, age, education level, job status, marital status, psychiatric history, prior surgery with general anesthetic, surgical approach, blood loss, postoperative intubation, length of intensive care unit and hospital stay, and occurrence of perioperative complications were analyzed as predictors of PTSD symptoms, using χ analyses. The overall incidence of symptoms of PTSD identified at at least 1 time point was 19.2% (14 of 73). At each time point, the percentage of the population that was positive was 7.5% (6 wk), 11.6% (3 mo), 7.8%, (6 mo), 13.6% (9 mo), and 11.0% (12 mo). The presence of a prior psychiatric diagnosis proved to be the strongest predictor of postarthrodesis symptoms of PTSD (odds ratio [OR] = 7.05, P = 0.002). Occurrence of a complication also proved to be significantly correlated with the development of PTSD symptoms (OR = 4.33, P = 0.04). Age less than 50 years, blood loss of more than 1 L, hospital stay of more than 10 days, and diagnosis trended toward but failed to reach statistical significance. None of the remaining variables approached statistical significance. Positive PTSD symptoms occurred at least once in 19.2% of patients after elective lumbar arthrodesis, with 7.5% to 13.6% of patients experiencing these symptoms at any 1

  3. Epidemiology of traumatic spinal cord injuries in Austria 2002-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majdan, Marek; Brazinova, Alexandra; Mauritz, Walter

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the epidemiological patterns (mortality, incidence of non-fatal cases and overall incidence), of traumatic spinal cord injuries (TSCI) in 2002-2012 in Austria. TSCI-related deaths and hospital admissions in Austria 2002-2012 were obtained from Statistics Austria and analysed. Mortality rates, as well as non-fatal and overall incidence rates were calculated and compared across the age spectrum and by sex. Additionally, the main causes and demographic characteristics of victims were analysed. The crude overall incidence rate of TSCI was 16.96, CI 95 % 16.95-16.97 and the standardized incidence rate was 13.98, CI 95 % 13.97-13.99 per million (annual average rate). An annual increase in fatality rates was observed occurring mostly in the age group >65 years (Kendall's Tau = 0.1). Falls (mortality rate 19.58, CI 95 % 19.57-19.59) and injuries at home (incidence rate 56.57, CI 95 % 56.56-56.58) were the principal causes of fatal and non-fatal TSCI, respectively. Injuries to the neck region were the most common. All indicators were the highest for the age group >65 years: non-fatal incidence rate 23.55, CI 95 % 23.54-23.56; mortality rate 21.4, CI 95 % 21.39-21.41; and overall incidence rate 47.9, CI 95 % 47.89-47.91. A clear male dominance was observed (incidence rate ratio 1.9, CI 95 % 1.4-2.7). The population >65 years has been at the highest risk of TSCI in Austria for the analysed period and therefore preventive activities should be focused on this group. The increasing overall incidence of TSCI was driven by the increasing mortality rates that were highest in the age group >65 years. We advocate harmonization of epidemiological reporting especially regarding aetiology of TSCI in order to better inform policy makers and prevention.

  4. Treatment of degenerative cervical spondylosis with radiculopathy. Clinical practice guidelines endorsed by The Polish Society of Spinal Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latka, Dariusz; Miekisiak, Grzegorz; Jarmuzek, Pawel; Lachowski, Marcin; Kaczmarczyk, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Degenerative cervical spondylosis (DCS) with radiculopathy is the most common indication for cervical spine surgery despite favorable natural history. Advances in spinal surgery in conjunction with difficulties in measuring the outcomes caused the paucity of uniform guidelines for the surgical management of DCS. The aim of this paper is to develop guidelines for surgical treatment of DCS. For this purpose the available up-to-date literature relevant on the topic was critically reviewed. Six questions regarding most important clinical questions encountered in the daily practice were formulated. They were answered based upon the systematic literature review, thus creating a set of guidelines. The guidelines were categorized into four tiers based on the level of evidence (I-III and X). They were designed to assist in the selection of optimal and effective treatment leading to the most successful outcome. The evidence based medicine (EBM) is increasingly popular among spinal surgeons. It allows making unbiased, optimal clinical decisions, eliminating the detrimental effect of numerous conflicts of interest. The key role of opinion leaders as well as professional societies is to provide guidelines for practice based on available clinical evidence. The present work contains a set of guidelines for surgical treatment of DCS officially endorsed by the Polish Spine Surgery Society. Copyright © 2015 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  5. Robot-Assisted Training of Arm and Hand Movement Shows Functional Improvements for Incomplete Cervical Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, Gerard E; Yozbatiran, Nuray; Berliner, Jeffrey; OʼMalley, Marcia K; Pehlivan, Ali Utku; Kadivar, Zahra; Fitle, Kyle; Boake, Corwin

    2017-10-01

    The aim of the study was to demonstrate the feasibility, tolerability, and effectiveness of robotic-assisted arm training in incomplete chronic tetraplegia. Pretest/posttest/follow-up was conducted. Ten individuals with chronic cervical spinal cord injury were enrolled. Participants performed single degree-of-freedom exercise of upper limbs at an intensity of 3-hr per session for 3 times a week for 4 wks with MAHI Exo-II. Arm and hand function tests (Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function Test, Action Research Arm Test), strength of upper limb (upper limb motor score, grip, and pinch strength), and independence in daily living activities (Spinal Cord Independence Measure II) were performed at baseline, end of training, and 6 mos later. After 12 sessions of training, improvements in arm and hand functions were observed. Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function Test (0.14[0.04]-0.21[0.07] items/sec, P = 0.04), Action Research Arm Test (30.7[3.8]-34.3[4], P = 0.02), American Spinal Injury Association upper limb motor score (31.5[2.3]-34[2.3], P = 0.04) grip (9.7[3.8]-12[4.3] lb, P = 0.02), and pinch strength (4.5[1.1]-5.7[1.2] lb, P = 0.01) resulted in significant increases. Some gains were maintained at 6 mos. No change in Spinal Cord Independence Measure II scores and no adverse events were observed. Results from this pilot study suggest that repetitive training of arm movements with MAHI Exo-II exoskeleton is safe and has potential to be an adjunct treatment modality in rehabilitation of persons with spinal cord injury with mild to moderate impaired arm functions.

  6. Enfrentamento à lesão medular traumática Coping with traumatic spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Giardini Murta

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo apresenta uma discussão sobre lesão medular traumática conforme a literatura atual, que aponta quatro grupos de variáveis influentes no enfrentamento à lesão medular: (a variáveis referentes à deficiência, como gravidade da lesão; (b variáveis inerentes ao próprio organismo, como nível de instrução e locus de controle interno; (c ambiente imediato, como serviços de saúde e oportunidades de trabalho existentes; e (d contexto cultural, como legislação vigente e preconceito social. A literatura sugere que a adaptação bem sucedida à lesão medular traumática está mais associada a recursos ambientais e variáveis psicossociais do que às características da lesão. As variáveis influentes no enfrentamento e os fatores de sucesso no processo adaptativo à lesão permitem sugerir focos prioritários para a reabilitação.This paper presents a discussion on coping with traumatic spinal cord injury according to the contemporary literature, which points to four groups of influent variables on coping with spinal cord injury: (a variables inherent to the disability, such as injury severity; (b variables inherent to the organism itself, such as education and internal locus of control; (c proximal environment, such as available health services and job access; and (d cultural context, such as present law and social prejudice. The literature suggests that well succeeded adaptation to traumatic spinal cord injury is more related to the environmental resources and psychosocial variables than to the injury characteristics. The variables affecting the coping process and the success adapting to the lesion allow one to suggest priority focus for rehabilitation.

  7. Traumatic spinal cord injury caused by suspected hyperflexion of the atlantoaxial joint in a 10-year-old cat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette Wessmann

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Case summary A 10-year-old cat presented 5 days after a traumatic event with acute recumbency followed by some clinical improvement. The neuroanatomical localisation was the C1–C5 spinal cord segments. Initial survey radiographs, including lateral flexed views, showed no convincing abnormalities. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed a marked focal intramedullary lesion at the level of the dens and suspected oedema extending over C2–C3 vertebrae, suggesting early syrinx formation. The cat made an initial excellent recovery on restricted exercise without medical treatment. The MRI changes largely resolved on follow-up MRI 4 weeks later yet recurred following a relapse 4 months later. At this stage, a post-traumatic syrinx had developed. Moreover, the suspected atlantoaxial instability was finally diagnosed on radiography with fully flexed lateral views. A hyperflexion injury causing tearing of the atlantoaxial ligaments was considered most likely given the lack of malformations or fractures. The cat made a full recovery on conservative management. Relevance and novel information This is the first report of sequential MRI findings in a cat with atlantoaxial instability. Moreover, post-traumatic syringomyelia formation following atlantoaxial injury has not been reported. Sequential MRI aids in the diagnosis of hyperflexion injury if survey radiographs fail to identify atlantoaxial instability.

  8. The value of magnetic resonance imaging in evaluation of the cervical spinal cord changes; Wartosc badania rezonansu magnetycznego w diagnostyce zmian ogniskowych rdzenia kregowego w odcinku szyjnym

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rejniak, I. [Zaklad Diagnostyki Obrazowej, Centrum Medyczne Ksztalcenia Podyplomowego, Centralny Szpital Kliniczny, Warsaw-Miedzylesie (Poland)

    1996-12-31

    60 patients with clinic symptoms of cervical myelopathy were examined in order to evaluate the spinal cord. Majority of the patients had previously CT or/and myelo-CT and plain X-ray examinations. Correlation between age, severity of spondylosis, time of duration and the presence of the focal changes in the spinal cord was observed. Analysis of the relationship between ethiology of myelopathy and morphology of the focal changes and of the spinal cord at the level of lesion was performed. (author) 20 refs, 5 figs, 7 tabs

  9. Age-related changes of the diffusion tensor imaging parameters of the normal cervical spinal cord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Kun, E-mail: medsciwangkun@126.com [Orthopedics Department, Changhai Hospital Affiliated to Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Song, Qingxin; Zhang, Fan; Chen, Zhi; Hou, Canglong; Tang, Yixing [Orthopedics Department, Changhai Hospital Affiliated to Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Chen, Shiyue [Radiology Department, Changhai Hospital Affiliated to Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Hao, Qiang, E-mail: haoqiang@189.cn [Radiology Department, Changhai Hospital Affiliated to Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Shen, Hongxing, E-mail: shenhxgk@126.com [Orthopedics Department, Changhai Hospital Affiliated to Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • It is essential to determine the DTI parameters in the whole CSC. • To analyze DTI parameters in all intervertebral space levels of the CSC. • To study the impact of age on these parameters in healthy Chinese subjects. • Provide better insights in factors that could bias the diagnosis of CSC pathologies. - Abstract: Background: The diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) parameters of the cervical spinal cord (CSC) changes with age. However, previous studies only examined specific CSC areas. Objectives: To analyze the DTI parameters in all intervertebral space levels of the whole normal CSC and to study the impact of age on these parameters in a Chinese population. Methods: Thirty-six healthy subjects aged 20–77 years were recruited. DTI parameters were calculated for gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) funiculi in all the CSC intervertebral spaces (C1/2-C6/7). Age-related changes of DTI parameters were analyzed for the GM and WM funiculi. Results: Fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) were lower in GM than in WM. MD and FA values were lower in the WM in the lower CSC compared with the upper CSC (all P < 0.05), but no difference was observed in GM. In ventral funiculi, MD increased with age, while FA decreased (all P < 0.001). In lateral and dorsal funiculi, MD and FA decreased with age (all P < 0.001). In GM, MD and FA decreased with age (all P < 0.001). Significant age-related changes were observed in FA and MD from GM and WM funiculi. FA was correlated with age in all funiculi (ventral: r = −0.733; lateral: r = −0.468; dorsal: r = −0.607; GM: r = −0.724; all P < 0.01). Conclusion: Important changes in MD and FA were observed with advancing age at all levels of CSC in Chinese patients. DTI parameters may be useful to assess CSC pathology, but the influence of age and segments need to be taken into account in diagnosis.

  10. Age-related changes of the diffusion tensor imaging parameters of the normal cervical spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Kun; Song, Qingxin; Zhang, Fan; Chen, Zhi; Hou, Canglong; Tang, Yixing; Chen, Shiyue; Hao, Qiang; Shen, Hongxing

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • It is essential to determine the DTI parameters in the whole CSC. • To analyze DTI parameters in all intervertebral space levels of the CSC. • To study the impact of age on these parameters in healthy Chinese subjects. • Provide better insights in factors that could bias the diagnosis of CSC pathologies. - Abstract: Background: The diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) parameters of the cervical spinal cord (CSC) changes with age. However, previous studies only examined specific CSC areas. Objectives: To analyze the DTI parameters in all intervertebral space levels of the whole normal CSC and to study the impact of age on these parameters in a Chinese population. Methods: Thirty-six healthy subjects aged 20–77 years were recruited. DTI parameters were calculated for gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) funiculi in all the CSC intervertebral spaces (C1/2-C6/7). Age-related changes of DTI parameters were analyzed for the GM and WM funiculi. Results: Fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) were lower in GM than in WM. MD and FA values were lower in the WM in the lower CSC compared with the upper CSC (all P < 0.05), but no difference was observed in GM. In ventral funiculi, MD increased with age, while FA decreased (all P < 0.001). In lateral and dorsal funiculi, MD and FA decreased with age (all P < 0.001). In GM, MD and FA decreased with age (all P < 0.001). Significant age-related changes were observed in FA and MD from GM and WM funiculi. FA was correlated with age in all funiculi (ventral: r = −0.733; lateral: r = −0.468; dorsal: r = −0.607; GM: r = −0.724; all P < 0.01). Conclusion: Important changes in MD and FA were observed with advancing age at all levels of CSC in Chinese patients. DTI parameters may be useful to assess CSC pathology, but the influence of age and segments need to be taken into account in diagnosis

  11. Spinal cord injuries related to cervical spine fractures in elderly patients: factors affecting mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshvar, Parham; Roffey, Darren M; Brikeet, Yasser A; Tsai, Eve C; Bailey, Chris S; Wai, Eugene K

    2013-08-01

    Spinal cord injuries (SCIs) related to cervical spine (C-spine) fractures can cause significant morbidity and mortality. Aggressive treatment often required to manage instability associated with C-spine fractures is complicated and hazardous in the elderly population. To determine the mortality rate of elderly patients with SCIs related to C-spine fractures and identify factors that contribute toward a higher risk for negative outcomes. Retrospective cohort study at two Level 1 trauma centers. Thirty-seven consecutive patients aged 60 years and older who had SCIs related to C-spine fractures. Level of injury, injury severity, preinjury medical comorbidities, treatment (operative vs. nonoperative), and cause of death. Hospital medical records were reviewed independently. Baseline radiographs and computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging scans were examined to permit categorization according to the mechanistic classification by Allen and Ferguson of subaxial C-spine injuries. Univariate logistic regression analyses were performed to identify factors related to in-hospital mortality and ambulation at discharge. There were no funding sources or potential conflicts of interest to disclose. The in-hospital mortality rate was 38%. Respiratory failure was the leading cause of death. Preinjury medical comorbidities, age, and operative versus nonoperative treatment did not affect mortality. Injury level at or above C4 was associated with a 7.1 times higher risk of mortality compared with injuries below C4 (p=.01). Complete SCI was associated with a 5.1 times higher risk of mortality compared with incomplete SCI (p=.03). Neurological recovery was uncommon. Apart from severity of initial SCI, no other factor was related to ambulatory disposition at discharge. In this elderly population, neurological recovery was poor and the in-hospital mortality rate was high. The strongest risk factors for mortality were injury level and severity of SCI. Although each case of SCI

  12. Acute non-traumatic idiopathic spinal subdural hematoma: radiographic findings and surgical results with a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kazuyoshi; Imagama, Shiro; Ando, Kei; Nishida, Yoshihiro; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2017-11-01

    Intraspinal hematoma is a serious condition, and early diagnosis is necessary to permit emergency treatment. Among such hematomas, non-traumatic spinal subdural hematoma is a rare occurrence. We have experienced three patients with surgically proven subdural spinal hematoma, and here we report these cases with a review of their clinical and imaging characteristics. All three cases were idiopathic with no history of disease, no coagulopathy, and no trauma. All had acute onset that brought about paralysis of the lower limbs with severe pain. Early surgery was performed, based on a relatively early diagnosis using thoracolumbar MRI and CT. Since the epidural fat is not affected by bleeding, the normal structure remains and the boundary between hematoma and fat is a significant feature in MRI and CT. Partial Gd enhancement in MRI and ring enhancement in contrast CT were also apparent. Two of the cases had subarachnoid hematomas. Preoperative diagnosis of spinal subarachnoid hematoma is difficult because there are no specific radiological findings and confirmation can only occur intraoperatively. In particular, one case had a massive hematoma causing canal stenosis, and it was difficult to distinguish between intradural and extradural hematoma. In all cases of subarachnoid or subdural hematoma, decompression was performed within 24 h after onset, and consequently, the patients had relatively good outcomes.

  13. The Effects of rhBMP-2 Used for Spinal Fusion on Spinal Cord Pathology After Traumatic Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-29

    Oudega, 2006). Secondary injury contributes to further cellular loss through hemorrhage, ischemia , excitotoxicity, inflammatory response and...following the accident (Fehlings and Perrin, 2005). Surgical management of spinal column instability requires internal fixation, together with biologic...despite comparable BBB scores observed on the 1st post- operative day between the groups. Thus, treatment with rhBMP-2 led to a transient 73 worsening

  14. Is determination between complete and incomplete traumatic spinal cord injury clinically relevant? Validation of the ASIA sacral sparing criteria in a prospective cohort of 432 patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middendorp, J.J. van; Hosman, A.J.F.; Pouw, M.H.; Meent, H. van de

    2009-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Prospective multicenter longitudinal cohort study. OBJECTIVE: To validate the prognostic value of the acute phase sacral sparing measurements with regard to chronic phase-independent ambulation in patients with traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). SETTING: European Multicenter Study of

  15. Structural biomarkers in the cerebrospinal fluid within 24 h after a traumatic spinal cord injury: a descriptive analysis of 16 subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pouw, M.H.; Kwon, B.K.; Verbeek, M.M.; Vos, P.E.; Kampen, A. van; Fisher, C.G.; Street, J.; Paquette, S.J.; Dvorak, M.F.; Boyd, M.C.; Hosman, A.J.F.; Meent, H. van de

    2014-01-01

    Study design:Prospective cohort study.Objectives:To characterize the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of glial fibrillary acidic protein, neuron specific enolase (NSE), S-100beta, tau and neurofilament heavy chain (NFH) within 24 h of an acute traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), and to

  16. Pre-hospital and acute management of traumatic spinal cord injury in the Netherlands: survey results urge the need for standardisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fransen, B.L.; Hosman, A.J.; Middendorp, J.J. van; Edwards, M.J.; Grunsven, P.M. van; Meent, H. van de

    2016-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Questionnaire survey. OBJECTIVES: Although a range of novel therapeutic approaches for traumatic spinal cord injury (tSCI) are being trialled in highly standardised, pre-clinical research models, little has been published about the extent of standardisation in health service delivery

  17. Design and rationale of a Prospective, Observational European Multicenter study on the efficacy of acute surgical decompression after traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: the SCI-POEM study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middendorp, J.J. van; Barbagallo, G.; Schuetz, M.; Hosman, A.J.F.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives:Despite many years of research, there is currently no treatment available that results in major neurological or functional recovery after traumatic spinal cord injury (tSCI). In particular, no conclusive data related to the role of the timing of decompressive surgery, and the impact of

  18. Theophylline-induced respiratory recovery following cervical spinal cord hemisection is augmented by serotonin 2 receptor stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basura, Gregory J; Nantwi, Kwaku D; Goshgarian, Harry G

    2002-11-22

    Cervical spinal cord hemisection leads to a disruption of bulbospinal innervation of phrenic motoneurons resulting in paralysis of the ipsilateral hemidiaphragm. We have previously demonstrated separate therapeutic roles for theophylline, and more recently serotonin (5-HT) as modulators to phrenic nerve motor recovery; mechanisms that likely occur via adenosine A1 and 5-HT2 receptors, respectively. The present study was designed to specifically determine if concurrent stimulation of 5-HT2 receptors may enhance motor recovery induced by theophylline alone. Adult female rats (250-350 g; n=7 per group) received a left cervical (C2) hemisection that resulted in paralysis of the ipsilateral hemidiaphragm. Twenty-four hours later rats were given systemic theophylline (15 mg/kg, i.v.), resulting in burst recovery in the ipsilateral phrenic nerve. Theophylline-induced recovery was enhanced with the 5-HT2A/2C receptor agonist, (+/-)-2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine hydrochloride (DOI; 1.0 mg/kg). DOI-evoked augmentation of theophylline-induced recovery was attenuated following subsequent injection of the 5-HT2 receptor antagonist, ketanserin (2.0 mg/kg). In a separate group, rats were pretreated with ketanserin, which did not prevent subsequent theophylline-induced respiratory recovery. However, pretreatment with ketanserin did prevent DOI-induced augmentation of the theophylline-evoked phrenic nerve burst recovery. Lastly, using immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridization, we showed for the first time a positive co-localization of adenosine A1 receptor mRNA and immunoreactivity with phrenic motoneurons of the cervical ventral horns. Taken together, the results of the present study suggest that theophylline may induce motor recovery likely at adenosine A1 receptors located at the level of the spinal cord, and the concurrent stimulation of converging 5-HT2 receptors may augment the response.

  19. Transplantation of autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in the treatment of complete and chronic cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Guanghui; Liu, Xuebin; Zhang, Zan; Yang, Zhijun; Dai, Yiwu; Xu, Ruxiang

    2013-10-02

    Neuronal injuries have been a challenging problem for treatment, especially in the case of complete and chronic cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Recently, particular attention is paid to the potential of stem cell in treating SCI, but there are only few clinical studies and insufficient data. This study explored the efficacy of autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) transplantation in the treatment of SCI. Forty patients with complete and chronic cervical SCI were selected and randomly assigned to one of the two experimental groups, treatment group and control group. The treatment group received BMMSCs transplantation to the area surrounding injury, while the control group was not treated with any cell transplantation. Both the transplant recipients and the control group were followed up to 6 months, postoperatively. Preoperative and postoperative neurological functions were evaluated with AIS grading, ASIA score, residual urine volume and neurophysiological examination. Results showed that in the treatment group 10 patients had a significant clinical improvement in terms of motor, light touch, pin prick sensory and residual urine volume, while nine patients showed changes in AIS grade. Neurophysiological examination was consistent with clinical observations. No sign of tumor was evident until 6 months postoperatively. In the control group, no improvement was observed in any of the neurological functions specified above. BMMSCs transplantation improves neurological function in patients with complete and chronic cervical SCI, providing valuable information on applications of BMMSCs for the treatment of SCI. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Traumatic Lumbar Hernia Diagnosed by Ultrasonography: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kwang Lae; Yim, Yoon Myung; Lim, Oh Kyung; Park, Ki Deok; Choi, Chung Hwan; Lee, Ju Kang [Gachon University of Medicine and Science, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    Traumatic lumbar hernia describes the extrusion of intraperitoneal or extraperitoneal contents through a defect in the posterolateral abdominal wall caused by a trauma. This is a rare entity and usually diagnosed by computed tomography. A 64-year-old male received an injury on his cervical spinal cord after an accident in which he fell down. He complained of a mass on his left posterolateral back area. We diagnosed the mass as a traumatic lumbar hernia by ultrasonography and confirmed it by computed tomography. We conclude that the ultrasonography can be a useful diagnostic tool for traumatic lumbar hernia

  1. Traumatic Lumbar Hernia Diagnosed by Ultrasonography: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kwang Lae; Yim, Yoon Myung; Lim, Oh Kyung; Park, Ki Deok; Choi, Chung Hwan; Lee, Ju Kang

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic lumbar hernia describes the extrusion of intraperitoneal or extraperitoneal contents through a defect in the posterolateral abdominal wall caused by a trauma. This is a rare entity and usually diagnosed by computed tomography. A 64-year-old male received an injury on his cervical spinal cord after an accident in which he fell down. He complained of a mass on his left posterolateral back area. We diagnosed the mass as a traumatic lumbar hernia by ultrasonography and confirmed it by computed tomography. We conclude that the ultrasonography can be a useful diagnostic tool for traumatic lumbar hernia

  2. Occipital Condyle Fracture with Accompanying Meningeal Spinal Cysts as a result of Cervical Spine Injury in 15-Year-Old Girl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasz Wiktor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The occipital condyle fracture is rare injury of the craniocervical junction. Meningeal spinal cysts are rare tumors of the spinal cord. Depending on location, these lesions may be classified as extradural and subdural, but extradural spinal cysts are more common. We present the case of a 15-year-old girl who suffered from avulsion occipital condyle fracture treated with use of “halo-vest” system. We established that clinical effect after completed treatment is very good. Control MRI evaluation was performed 12 months after removal of “halo-vest” traction, and clinically silent extradural meningeal spinal cysts were detected at the ventral side of the spinal cord in the cervical segment of the spine. Due to clinically silent course of the disease, we decided to use the conservative treatment. The patient remains under control of our department.

  3. Imaging the Traumatized Spine'Clearing The Cervical Spine'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monu, U.V.J.

    2015-01-01

    Failure to recognize and diagnose injury to the cervical spine on plain radiographs can lead to severe and devastating consequences to the patient in particular and to the radiologist financially and otherwise. CT examination of the cervical spine aids and significantly improves diagnoses in many instances. it is neither economically feasible nor desirable to obtain CT on all patients. Meticulous attention to detail and zero tolerance for deviations from the usual radiographic landmarks will help select cases that should obtain additional imaging in form of CT or MRI scans. Faced with a task of clearing a cervical spine, a number of options are available. The first discriminator is whether or not the patient can be cleared clinically. If that is not possible, radiographic evaluation is needed. Strict adherence to a minimum three view plain radiograph for C-spine series must be maintained. Deviation from established norms for cervical spine radiographs should trigger a CT for additional evaluation

  4. Skull traction for cervical spinal injury in Enugu: A 5‑year ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-11-05

    Nov 5, 2015 ... Background: Treatment of cervical spine injury is the most challenging of all the injuries of the spine, and there is yet no agreement on the best method of care. Objective: We studied the complications and outcome of two skull traction devices used to treat cases of cervical spine injury in three centers in ...

  5. Recovery of sensorimotor function and activities of daily living after cervical spinal cord injury: the influence of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirz, Markus; Dietz, Volker

    2015-02-01

    This retrospective study was designed to examine the influence of age on the outcome of motor function and activities of daily living (ADLs) in patients with a cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). The study is based on the data registry of the European Multicenter Study of Spinal Cord Injury (EMSCI) study group. Initial upper-extremity motor score (UEMS) and its change over 5 months, as well as the initial Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM) score, did not differ between younger adults (20-39 years) and elderly (60-79 years) patients. However, the change in SCIM score over 5 months was significantly greater in the younger patient group. Initial UEMS, SCIM, and ulnar compound motor action potentials (CMAP), reflecting peripheral nerve damage (motoneurons and roots), were significantly greater in incomplete, compared to complete, SCI, regardless of age group. The initial assessment of UEMS in combination with CMAP recordings allows an early prediction of ADLs outcomes in both younger adults and elderly subjects. The impaired translation of gain in motor score into increased ADL independence in elderly patients requires specifically tailored rehabilitation programs.

  6. Influence of gravity compensation on kinematics and muscle activation patterns during reach and retrieval in subjects with cervical spinal cord injury An explorative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloosterman, Marieke G. M.; Snoek, Govert J.; Kouwenhoven, Mirjam; Nene, Anand V.; Jannink, Michiel J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Many interventions in upper-limb rehabilitation after cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI) use arm support (gravity compensation), however, its specific effects on kinematics and muscle activation characteristics in subjects with a CSCI are largely unknown We conducted a cross-sectional explorative

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging susceptibility artifacts in the cervical vertebrae and spinal cord related to monocortical screw-polymethylmethacrylate implants in canine cadavers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Brian G; Fosgate, Geoffrey T; Green, Eric M; Habing, Amy M; Hettlich, Bianca F

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE To characterize and compare MRI susceptibility artifacts related to titanium and stainless steel monocortical screws in the cervical vertebrae and spinal cord of canine cadavers. SAMPLE 12 canine cadavers. PROCEDURES Cervical vertebrae (C4 and C5) were surgically stabilized with titanium or stainless steel monocortical screws and polymethylmethacrylate. Routine T1-weighted, T2-weighted, and short tau inversion recovery sequences were performed at 3.0 T. Magnetic susceptibility artifacts in 20 regions of interest (ROIs) across 4 contiguous vertebrae (C3 through C6) were scored by use of an established scoring system. RESULTS Artifact scores for stainless steel screws were significantly greater than scores for titanium screws at 18 of 20 ROIs. Artifact scores for titanium screws were significantly higher for spinal cord ROIs within the implanted vertebrae. Artifact scores for stainless steel screws at C3 were significantly less than at the other 3 cervical vertebrae. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Evaluation of routine MRI sequences obtained at 3.0 T revealed that susceptibility artifacts related to titanium monocortical screws were considered mild and should not hinder the overall clinical assessment of the cervical vertebrae and spinal cord. However, mild focal artifacts may obscure small portions of the spinal cord or intervertebral discs immediately adjacent to titanium screws. Severe artifacts related to stainless steel screws were more likely to result in routine MRI sequences being nondiagnostic; however, artifacts may be mitigated by implant positioning.

  8. Syrinx of the Spinal Cord and Brain Stem

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blockage of the Spinal Cord’s Blood Supply Cervical Spondylosis Compression of the Spinal Cord Hereditary Spastic Paraparesis ... Blockage of the Spinal Cord’s Blood Supply Cervical Spondylosis Compression of the Spinal Cord Hereditary Spastic Paraparesis ...

  9. Altered spinal kinematics and muscle recruitment pattern of the cervical and thoracic spine in people with chronic neck pain during functional task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Sharon M H; Szeto, Grace P Y; Lee, Raymond Y W

    2014-02-01

    Knowledge on the spinal kinematics and muscle activation of the cervical and thoracic spine during functional task would add to our understanding of the performance and interplay of these spinal regions during dynamic condition. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of chronic neck pain on the three-dimensional kinematics and muscle recruitment pattern of the cervical and thoracic spine during an overhead reaching task involving a light weight transfer by the upper limb. Synchronized measurements of the three-dimensional spinal kinematics and electromyographic activities of cervical and thoracic spine were acquired in thirty individuals with chronic neck pain and thirty age- and gender-matched asymptomatic controls. Neck pain group showed a significantly decreased cervical velocity and acceleration while performing the task. They also displayed with a predominantly prolonged coactivation of cervical and thoracic muscles throughout the task cycle. The current findings highlighted the importance to examine differential kinematic variables of the spine which are associated with changes in the muscle recruitment in people with chronic neck pain. The results also provide an insight to the appropriate clinical intervention to promote the recovery of the functional disability commonly reported in patients with neck pain disorders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Spinal cord edema with contrast enhancement mimicking intramedullary tumor in patient with cervical myelopathy: A case report and a brief literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkasdaris, Grigorios; Chourmouzi, Danai; Karagiannidis, Apostolos; Kapetanakis, Stylianos

    2017-01-01

    Cervical myelopathy (CM) is a clinical diagnosis that may be associated with hyperintense areas on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan. The use of contrast enhancement in such areas to differentiate between neoplastic and degenerative disease has rarely been described. We present a 41-year-old female with a 5-month course of progressive CM. The cervical MRI revealed spinal cord swelling, stenosis, and a hyperintense signal at the C5-C6 and C5-C7 levels. Both the neurologic and radiologic examinations were consistent with an intramedullary cervical cord tumor. To decompress the spinal canal, an anterior cervical discectomy and fusion was performed from C5 to C7 level. This resulted in immediate and significant improvement of the myelopathy. Postoperatively, over 1.5 years, the hyperintense, enhancing intramedullary lesion gradually regressed on multiple postoperative MRI scans. Spinal cord edema is occasionally seen on MR studies of the cervical spine in patients with degenerative CM. Contrast-enhanced MR studies may help differentiate hyperintense cord signals due to edema vs. atypical intramedullary tumors. Routine successive postoperative MRI evaluations are crucial to confirm the diagnosis of degenerative vs. neoplastic disease.

  11. A case report of spondylectomy with circumference reconstruction for aggressive vertebral hemangioma covering the whole cervical spine (C4) with progressive spinal disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Masayuki; Nishida, Kenki; Kumamoto, Shinji; Hijikata, Yasukazu; Harada, Kei

    2017-05-01

    To describe the surgical experience of spondylectomy and spinal reconstruction for aggressive vertebral hemangioma (VH) induced at the C4 vertebra. No reports have described surgical strategy in cases covering an entire cervical vertebra presenting with progressive myelopathy. A 28-year-old man presented with rapidly progressing skilled motor dysfunction and gait disorder. The Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score was 6. Radiography showed a honeycomb appearance for the entire circumference of the C4 vertebra. Spinal computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed vertebral tumor with extraosseous extension causing spinal cord compression. Results of diagnostic imaging were strongly suggestive of VH. Transarterial embolization of the spinal body branch was performed first to decrease intraoperative bleeding, followed by cervical posterior fixation to stabilize the unstable segment and excision biopsy to obtain a definitive diagnosis. After definitive diagnosis of cavernous hemangioma, two-stage surgery (anterior and posterior) was performed to complete total spondylectomy and 360° spinal reconstruction. Despite multiple operations, JOA scores were 8.5 after posterior fixation, 10.5 after anterior surgery, 11 after final surgery and 16 on postoperative day 90. The patient acquired excellent clinical results without complications and returned to society. The present three-stage surgery comprising fixation, biopsy, and final spondylectomy with circumferential fusion from anterior and posterior approaches may offer a useful choice for aggressive VH covering the entire cervical spine with rapidly progressive myelopathy.

  12. Endovascular embolisation of a cervical spinal AVF in a patient with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vascular abnormalities associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) are well described. Spinal arterio-venous fistula (AVF) is a rare finding in NF1 and may present with neurological symptoms that require treatment. Management of spinal AVFs can be endovascular or surgical. We present a patient with known NF1 and ...

  13. The Impact of Surgical Timing in Acute Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Spinal   cord  injury;  surgery;  delay;  recovery;   trauma ;  complications;  length  of  stay;  costs   16...rate  of   complications  such  as  pressure  ulcers  and  pneumonia.   2. KEYWORDS Spinal   cord ;   trauma ;  complications...care  of  patients  with  motor-­complete   spinal   cord   injury  (SCI)

  14. Cervicitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a sexually transmitted infection, such as chlamydia or gonorrhea. Cervicitis can develop from noninfectious causes, too. Successful ... result from common sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including gonorrhea, chlamydia, trichomoniasis and genital herpes. Allergic reactions. An ...

  15. Cervical spine injury in children: a case report and literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Nebhani, Tahir; Bakkali, Hicham; Belyamani, Lahcen

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic injuries of the cervical spine are less common in children than in adults. But may be associated with significant disability and mortality. Pediatric victims of blunt trauma have mechanisms of injury, developmental and anatomic characteristics different than the adults. The purpose of this observation is to highlight the differences between the adult and pediatric cervical spine. We report below the case of spinal cord cut occurs to a very young girl after a motor vehicle accident.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of spinal cord injury in chronic stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobimatsu, Haruki; Nihei, Ryuichi; Kimura, Tetsuhiko; Yano, Hideo; Touyama, Tetsuo; Tobimatsu, Yoshiko; Suyama, Naoto; Yoshino, Yasumasa

    1991-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of a total of 195 patients with cervical (125) or thoracic (70) spinal cord injury were reviewed. The imaging studies of the spinal cord lesions were correlated with clinical manifestations. Sequential MR imaging revealed hypointensity on T1-weighted images (T1WI) and hyperintensity on T2-weighted images (T2WI) in all patients, except for five patients showing no signal changes and two showing isointensity, suggesting gliosis, myelomalacia, and syringomyelia. Spinal cord lesions were classified into four types: small lesions, large lesions, complete transverse, and longitudinal rupture. These lesions were well correlated with the severity of injury and paralysis. Complete paralysis was frequently associated with enlarged, complete transverse for cervical spinal cord injury, and longitudinal ruptured or thinned complete transverse for thoracic spinal cord injury. The height of paralysis was well in agreement with that of lesions. For incomplete paralysis, localized lesions were seen within the spinal cord, coinciding with the paralysis or severity. Traumatic syringomyelia was seen in 17 patients (8.7%)-- for the cervical site (10 patients, 8%) and the thoracic site (7 patients, 10%). When homogeneous and marginally clear hypointensity is shown on T1-weighted images and vacuolated hyperintensity is shown on T2-weighted images, in addition to lesions spreading two or more cords or 1.5 or more cords above the nervous root level of paralysis, traumatic syringomyelia is strongly suspected, requiring the follow up observation. (N.K.)

  17. Improving Survival and Promoting Respiratory Motor Function After Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    care for cervical SCI patients so as to lead to an improved quality of life, better- quality health care management , and improved functional outcomes...to the standard of care for cervical SCI patients so as to lead to an improved quality of life, better- quality health care management , and improved...ventilator in order to survive. Use of the ventilator severely limits the quality of life of those injured and dramatically increases the demand for health

  18. Comparison of tracheal intubation using the Airtraq® and Mc Coy laryngoscope in the presence of rigid cervical collar simulating cervical immobilisation for traumatic cervical spine injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmaja Durga

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is difficult to visualise the larynx using conventional laryngoscopy in the presence of cervical spine immobilisation. Airtraq® provides for easy and successful intubation in the neutral neck position. Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of Airtraq in comparison with the Mc Coy laryngoscope, when performing tracheal intubation in patients with neck immobilisation using hard cervical collar and manual in-line axial cervical spine stabilisation. Methods: A randomised, cross-over, open-labelled study was undertaken in 60 ASA I and II patients aged between 20 and 50 years, belonging to either gender, scheduled to undergo elective surgical procedures. Following induction and adequate muscle relaxation, they were intubated using either of the techniques first, followed by the other. Intubation time and Intubation Difficulty Score (IDS were noted using Mc Coy laryngoscope and Airtraq. The anaesthesiologist was asked to grade the ease of intubation on a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS of 1-10. Chi-square test was used for comparison of categorical data between the groups and paired sample t-test for comparison of continuous data. IDS score and VAS were compared using Wilcoxon Signed ranked test. Results: The mean intubation time was 33.27 sec (13.25 for laryngoscopy and 28.95 sec (18.53 for Airtraq (P=0.32. The median IDS values were 4 (interquartile range (IQR 1-6 and 0 (IQR 0-1 for laryngoscopy and Airtraq, respectively (P=0.007. The median Cormack Lehane glottic view grade was 3 (IQR 2-4 and 1 (IQR 1-1 for laryngoscopy and Airtraq, respectively (P=0.003. The ease of intubation on VAS was graded as 4 (IQR 3-5 for laryngoscopy and 2 (IQR 2-2 for Airtraq (P=0.033. There were two failures to intubate with the Airtraq. Conclusion: Airtraq improves the ease of intubation significantly when compared to Mc Coy blade in patients immobilised with cervical collar and manual in-line stabilisation simulating cervical spine injury.

  19. Overview of Spinal Cord Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blockage of the Spinal Cord’s Blood Supply Cervical Spondylosis Compression of the Spinal Cord Hereditary Spastic Paraparesis ... compressed by bone (which may result from cervical spondylosis or a fracture), an accumulation of blood (hematoma), ...

  20. Pulse low-intensity electromagnetic field as prophylaxis of heterotopic ossification in patients with traumatic spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đurović Aleksandar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Heterotopic ossification (HO is an important complication of head and spinal cord injuries (SCI. Pulse low-intensity electromagnetic field (PLIMF therapy increases blood flow to an area of pain or inflammation, bringing more oxygen to that area and helps to remove toxic substances. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of PLIMF as prophylaxis of HO in patients with SCI. Methods. This prospective random control clinical study included 29 patients with traumatic SCI. The patients were randomly divided into experimental (n = 14 and control group (n = 15. The patients in the experimental group, besides exercise and range of motion therapy, were treated by PLIMF of the following characteristics: induction of 10 mT, frequency of 25 Hz and duration of 30 min. Pulse low-intensity electromagnetic field therapy started in the 7th week after the injury and lasted 4 weeks. The presence or absence of HO around the patients hips we checked by a plane radiography and Brookers classification. Functional capabilities and motor impairment were checked by Functional Independent Measure (FIM, Barthel index and American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA impairment class. Statistic analysis included Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, Shapiro-Wilk test, Mann Whitney Exact test, Exact Wilcoxon signed rank test and Fischer Exact test. Statistical significance was set up to p < 0.05. Results. At the end of the treatment no patient from the experimental group had HO. In the control group, five patients (33.3% had HO. At the end of the treatment the majority of the patients from the experimental group (57.14% moved from ASIA-A to ASIA-B class. Conclusion. Pulse low-intensity electromagnetic field therapy could help as prophylaxis of HO in patients with traumatic SCI.

  1. Factors predictive of survival and estimated years of life lost in the decade following nontraumatic and traumatic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, B B; Wood-Wentz, C M; Therneau, T M; Walker, M G; Payne, J M; Reeves, R K

    2017-06-01

    Retrospective chart review. To identify factors predictive of survival after spinal cord injury (SCI). Tertiary care institution. Multiple-variable Cox proportional hazards regression analysis for 759 patients with SCI (535 nontraumatic and 221 traumatic) included age, sex, completeness of injury, level of injury, functional independence measure (FIM) scores, rehabilitation length of stay and SCI cause. Estimated years of life lost in the decade after injury was calculated for patients vs uninjured controls. Median follow-up was 11.4 years. Population characteristics included paraplegia, 58%; complete injury, 11%; male sex, 64%; and median rehabilitation length of stay, 16 days. Factors independently predictive of decreased survival were increased age (+10 years; hazard ratio (HR (95% CI)), 1.6 (1.4-1.7)), male sex (1.3 (1.0-1.6)), lower dismissal FIM score (-10 points; 1.3 (1.2-1.3)) and all nontraumatic causes. Metastatic cancer had the largest decrease in survival (HR (95% CI), 13.3 (8.7-20.2)). Primary tumors (HR (95% CI), 2.5 (1.7-3.8)), vascular (2.5 (1.6-3.8)), musculoskeletal/stenosis (1.7 (1.2-2.5)) and other nontraumatic SCI (2.3 (1.5-3.6)) were associated with decreased survival. Ten-year survival was decreased in nontraumatic SCI (mean (s.d.), 1.8 (0.3) years lost), with largest decreases in survival for metastatic cancer and spinal cord ischemia. Age, male sex and lower dismissal FIM score were associated with decreased survival, but neither injury severity nor level was associated with it. Survival after SCI varies depending on SCI cause, with survival better after traumatic SCI than after nontraumatic SCI. Metastatic cancer and vascular ischemia were associated with the greatest survival reduction.

  2. Relationship between motor recovery and independence after sensorimotor-complete cervical spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Kramer, John L K; Lammertse, Daniel P; Schubert, Martin; Curt, Armin; Steeves, John D

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For therapeutics directed to the injured spinal cord, a change in neurological impairment has been proposed as a relevant acute clinical study end point. However, changes in neurological function, even if statistically significant, may not be associated with a functional impact, such as a meaningful improvement in items within the self-care subscore of the Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM). OBJECTIVE: The authors examined the functional significance associated with spontane...

  3. Cardiovascular dysfunction due to sympathetic hypoactivity after complete cervical spinal cord injury: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Young-Min; Eun, Jong-Pil

    2015-03-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is one of the most devastating of all traumatic events; it may cause permanent dysfunction in several organ systems and lead to motor and sensory impairment. Cardiovascular dysfunction has been recognized to be the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the acute and chronic stages following SCI. Although cardiovascular dysfunction causes the deaths of many SCI patients, most clinicians are unfamiliar with the phenomenon. The purpose of reporting our case is to remind clinicians to consider the possibility of cardiovascular dysfunction in patients with complete SCI. The patient signed informed consent for publication of this case report and any accompanying image. The ethical approval of this study was waived by the ethics committee of the Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju, Korea, because this study was a case report and the number of patients was report, we emphasize that a thorough understanding of cardiovascular dysfunction following SCI is important for establishing a diagnosis and optimizing clinical outcomes.

  4. Inflammatory Mediators Associated With Pressure Ulcer Development in Individuals With Pneumonia After Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Shilpa; Vodovotz, Yoram; Karg, Patricia E; Constantine, Gregory; Sowa, Gwendolyn A; Constantine, Florica J; Brienza, David M

    2017-09-01

    To identify the inflammatory mediators around the time of pneumonia onset associated with concurrent or later onset of pressure ulcers (PUs). Retrospective. Acute hospitalization and inpatient rehabilitation unit of a university medical center. Individuals (N=86) with traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) were included in the initial analyses. Fifteen of the 86 developed pneumonia and had inflammatory mediator data available. Of these 15, 7 developed PUs and 8 did not. Not applicable. Twenty-three inflammatory mediators in plasma and urine were assayed. The differences in concentrations of plasma and urine inflammatory mediators between the closest time point before and after the diagnosis of pneumonia were calculated. Initial chi-square analysis revealed a significant (P=.02) association between pneumonia and PUs. Individuals with SCI and diagnosed pneumonia had nearly double the risk for developing PUs compared with those with no pneumonia. In individuals with pneumonia, Mann-Whitney U exact tests suggested an association (Ppneumonia. These findings suggest that a relatively small increase in plasma TNF-α, and decreases in urine TNF-α, GM-CSF, and IL-15 from just before to just after the diagnosis of pneumonia could be markers for an increased risk of PUs in individuals with pneumonia after traumatic SCI. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Elevated levels of plasminogen activators in the pathogenesis of delayed radiation damage in rat cervical spinal cord in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawaya, R.; Rayford, A.; Kono, S.; Rao, J.S.; Ang, K.K.; Feng, Y.; Stephens, L.C.

    1994-01-01

    The pathophysiology of the cellular basis of radiation-induced demyelination and white-matter necrosis of the central nervous system (CNS) is poorly understood. Preliminary data suggest that tissue damage is partly mediated through changes in the proteolytic enzymes. In this study, we irradiated rat cervical spinal cords with single doses of 24 Gy of 18 MV photons or 20 MeV electrons and measured the levels of plasminogen activators at days 2, 7, 30, 60, 90, 120, 130 and 145 after irradiation, using appropriate controls at each time. Fibrin zymography revealed fibrinolytic bands representing molecular weights of 68,000 and 48,000 in controls and irradiated samples; these bands increased significantly at days 120, 130 and 145 after irradiation. Inhibition of these enzymatic bands with specific antibodies against tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) and amiloride, an inhibitor for urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), confirmed that these bands were tPA and uPA. Enzymatic levels quantified by densitometry showed a twofold elevation in the levels of tPA and more than a tenfold increase in uPA after 120 days' irradiation. Activity of uPA was increased threefold by day 2 and increased steadily with time compared to nonirradiated control samples. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) also showed a threefold increase in the tPA content in the extracts of irradiated rat cervical spinal cords at days 120, 130 and 145. This study adds additional information to the proposed role of plasminogen activators in the pathogenic pathways of radiation damage in the CNS. 38 refs., 6 figs

  6. Elevated levels of plasminogen activators in the pathogenesis of delayed radiation damage in rat cervical spinal cord in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawaya, R.; Rayford, A.; Kono, S.; Rao, J.S.; Ang, K.K.; Feng, Y.; Stephens, L.C. [Univ. of Texas, Houston, TX (United States)

    1994-06-01

    The pathophysiology of the cellular basis of radiation-induced demyelination and white-matter necrosis of the central nervous system (CNS) is poorly understood. Preliminary data suggest that tissue damage is partly mediated through changes in the proteolytic enzymes. In this study, we irradiated rat cervical spinal cords with single doses of 24 Gy of 18 MV photons or 20 MeV electrons and measured the levels of plasminogen activators at days 2, 7, 30, 60, 90, 120, 130 and 145 after irradiation, using appropriate controls at each time. Fibrin zymography revealed fibrinolytic bands representing molecular weights of 68,000 and 48,000 in controls and irradiated samples; these bands increased significantly at days 120, 130 and 145 after irradiation. Inhibition of these enzymatic bands with specific antibodies against tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) and amiloride, an inhibitor for urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), confirmed that these bands were tPA and uPA. Enzymatic levels quantified by densitometry showed a twofold elevation in the levels of tPA and more than a tenfold increase in uPA after 120 days` irradiation. Activity of uPA was increased threefold by day 2 and increased steadily with time compared to nonirradiated control samples. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) also showed a threefold increase in the tPA content in the extracts of irradiated rat cervical spinal cords at days 120, 130 and 145. This study adds additional information to the proposed role of plasminogen activators in the pathogenic pathways of radiation damage in the CNS. 38 refs., 6 figs.

  7. Delayed Intervention with Intermittent Hypoxia and Task Training Improves Forelimb Function in a Rat Model of Cervical Spinal Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosser-Loose, Erin J; Hassan, Atiq; Mitchell, Gordon S; Muir, Gillian D

    2015-09-15

    The reduction of motor, sensory and autonomic function below the level of an incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI) has devastating consequences. One approach to restore function is to induce neural plasticity as a means of augmenting spontaneous functional recovery. Acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH-brief exposures to reduced O2 levels alternating with normal O2 levels) elicits plasticity in respiratory and nonrespiratory somatic spinal systems, including improvements in ladder walking performance in rats with incomplete SCI. Here, we determined whether delayed treatment with AIH, with or without concomitant motor training, could improve motor recovery in a rat model of incomplete cervical SCI. In a randomized, blinded, sham-controlled study, rats were exposed to AIH for 7 days beginning at 4 weeks post-SCI, after much spontaneous recovery on a horizontal ladder-crossing task had already occurred. For up to 2 months post-treatment, AIH-treated rats made fewer footslips on the ladder task compared with sham-treated rats. Importantly, concomitant ladder-specific motor training was needed to elicit AIH-induced improvements, such that AIH-treated SCI rats receiving no motor training or nontask-specific treadmill training during the treatment week did not show improvements over sham-treated rats with SCI. AIH treatment combined with task-specific training did not improve recovery on two different reach-to-grasp tasks, however, nor on tasks involving unskilled forepaw use. In brief, our results indicate that task-specific training is needed for AIH to improve ladder performance in a rat model of incomplete cervical SCI.

  8. Outcome Measures for Acute/Subacute Cervical Sensorimotor Complete (AIS-A) Spinal Cord Injury During a Phase 2 Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steeves, John D.; Lammertse, Daniel P.; Kramer, John L.K.; Kleitman, Naomi; Kleitman, Naomi; Kalsi-Ryan, Sukhvinder; Jones, Linda; Curt, Armin; Blight, Andrew R.; Anderson, Kim D.

    2012-01-01

    Effective treatment after cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) is imperative as so many activities of daily living (ADLs) are dependent on functional recovery of arm and hand actions. We focus on defining and comparing neurological and functional endpoints that might be used during acute or subacute Phase 2 clinical trials involving subjects with cervical sensorimotor complete SCI (ASIA Impairment Scale [AIS-A]). For the purposes of this review, the trial would examine the effects of a pharmaceutical small molecule, drug, biologic, or cell transplant on spinal tissue. Thus, neurological improvement is the intended consequence and is most directly measured by assessing neurological impairment (eg, motor aspects of the International Standards Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury [ISNCSCI]). However, changes in neurological function, even if statistically significant, may not be associated with a clear functional impact (ie, a meaningful improvement in individual activity, such as independent self-care ADLs). The challenge is to measure improvement as precisely as possible (change in impairment), but to define a clinically meaningful response in the context of functional improvement (impact on activity limitations). The principal comparisons focused on elements of the ISNCSCI assessment, including upper extremity motor score and motor level. Personal activity capabilities were also examined at various time points. The data suggest that an improvement of 2 or more motor levels after cervical sensorimotor complete SCI may be a clinically meaningful endpoint threshold that could be used for acute and subacute Phase 2 trials with subjects having sensorimotor complete cervical SCI. PMID:23239927

  9. Diffusion-weighted MRI of the cervical spinal cord using a single-shot fast spin-echo technique: findings in normal subjects and in myelomalacia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchiya, K.; Katase, S.; Fujikawa, A.; Hachiya, J. [Department of Radiology, Kyorin University School of Medicine, 6-20-2 Shinkawa, Mitaka, 181-8611, Tokyo (Japan); Kanazawa, H. [Toshiba Corporation, 1-1-1 Shibaura, Minato-ku, 105-8001, Tokyo (Japan); Yodo, K. [Toshiba Medical Systems, 3-26-5 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, 113-8456, Tokyo (Japan)

    2003-02-01

    We have implemented a new diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) sequence based on the single-shot fast spin-echo technique. We hypothesised that this would add information to conventional MRI for diagnosis of lesions of the cervical spinal cord. DWI was performed using a technique in which echo collection after the application of motion-probing gradients was done in the same manner as in the single-shot fast spin-echo technique. We first imaged six healthy volunteers to demonstrate the cervical spinal cord using the sequence. Then we applied the sequence to 12 patients with cervical myelomalacia due to chronic cord compression. The spinal cord was well seen in all subjects without the distortion associated with echo-planar DWI. In the patients, lesions appeared as areas of low- or isointense signal on DWI. Calculated apparent diffusion coefficients of the lesions (3.30{+-}0.38 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) were significantly higher than those of normal volunteers (2.26{+-}0.08 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s). Increased diffusion in areas of cervical myelomalacia, suggesting irreversible damage, can be detected using this technique. (orig.)

  10. Tanshinone IIA attenuates the inflammatory response and apoptosis after traumatic injury of the spinal cord in adult rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Yin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Spinal cord injury (SCI, including immediate mechanical injury and secondary injury, is associated with the inflammatory response, apoptosis and oxidative stress in response to traumatic injury. Tanshinone IIA (TIIA is one of the major extracts obtained from Salvia miltiorrhiza BUNGE, which has anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects on many diseases. However, little is known about the effects of TIIA treatment on SCI. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to evaluate the pharmacological action of TIIA on secondary damage and the underlying mechanisms of experimental SCI in rats. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: SCI was generated using a weight drop device on the dorsal spinal cord via a two-level T9-T11 laminectomy. SCI in rats resulted in severe trauma, characterized by locomotor disturbance, edema, neutrophil infiltration, the production of astrocytes and inflammatory mediators, apoptosis and oxidative stress. TIIA treatment (20 mg/kg, i.p. after SCI induced significant effects: (1 improved motor function (Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan scores, (2 reduced the degree of tissue injury (histological score, neutrophil infiltration (myeloperoxidase activity and the expression of astrocytes, (3 inhibited the activation of SCI-related pathways, such as NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways, (4 decreased the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 and iNOS, (5 reduced apoptosis (TUNEL staining, and Bcl-2 and caspase-3 expression and (6 reversed the redox state imbalance. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results clearly show that TIIA has a prominent protective effect against SCI through inhibiting the inflammatory response and apoptosis in the spinal cord tissue after SCI.

  11. Tanshinone IIA attenuates the inflammatory response and apoptosis after traumatic injury of the spinal cord in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xin; Yin, Yue; Cao, Fa-Le; Chen, Yu-Fei; Peng, Ye; Hou, Wu-Gang; Sun, Shu-Kai; Luo, Zhuo-Jing

    2012-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI), including immediate mechanical injury and secondary injury, is associated with the inflammatory response, apoptosis and oxidative stress in response to traumatic injury. Tanshinone IIA (TIIA) is one of the major extracts obtained from Salvia miltiorrhiza BUNGE, which has anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects on many diseases. However, little is known about the effects of TIIA treatment on SCI. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to evaluate the pharmacological action of TIIA on secondary damage and the underlying mechanisms of experimental SCI in rats. SCI was generated using a weight drop device on the dorsal spinal cord via a two-level T9-T11 laminectomy. SCI in rats resulted in severe trauma, characterized by locomotor disturbance, edema, neutrophil infiltration, the production of astrocytes and inflammatory mediators, apoptosis and oxidative stress. TIIA treatment (20 mg/kg, i.p.) after SCI induced significant effects: (1) improved motor function (Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan scores), (2) reduced the degree of tissue injury (histological score), neutrophil infiltration (myeloperoxidase activity) and the expression of astrocytes, (3) inhibited the activation of SCI-related pathways, such as NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways, (4) decreased the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6) and iNOS, (5) reduced apoptosis (TUNEL staining, and Bcl-2 and caspase-3 expression) and (6) reversed the redox state imbalance. The results clearly show that TIIA has a prominent protective effect against SCI through inhibiting the inflammatory response and apoptosis in the spinal cord tissue after SCI.

  12. Human ciliary neurotrophic factor-overexpressing stable bone marrow stromal cells in the treatment of a rat model of traumatic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbaszadeh, Hojjat-Allah; Tiraihi, Taki; Noori-Zadeh, Ali; Delshad, Ali Reza; Sadeghizade, Majid; Taheri, Taher

    2015-07-01

    Traumatic injury to the central nervous system (CNS) often causes motor dysfunctions. However, because of the CNS complexity and variability in the clinical presentations, efforts to repair damaged CNS tissue and restoring its functions are particularly demanding. On the other hand, recent progress in the regenerative therapy field have led to novel approaches for the treatment of traumatic CNS injury and renewed hopes to overcome the obstacles. It appears that the balance between neurite re-growth-inhibiting and neurite re-growth-inducing molecules determines the axonal re-growth fate. Neurotrophic factors can tilt this balance and indeed promote cell survival and axonal re-growth over neurodegeneration. One of the promising neurotrophic factors in this field is ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF). We transfected rat bone marrow stromal cells with a mammalian expression vector-inserted human CNTF gene through the use of a non-viral method to prepare human CNTF-overexpressing stem cells under ex vivo conditions. We transplanted these modified cells to the rat model of spinal cord traumatic injury to explore functional recovery after contusion induction. Our data from immunocytochemistry and behavioral tests showed that such cells can act as a powerful potential approach to treat traumatic CNS injuries because these modified cells improved the behavioral test scores in the rat model of spinal cord injury. CNTF-overexpressing bone marrow stromal cells can ameliorate spinal cord traumatic injury and can be used in the treatment of traumatic CNS injuries in the near future. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Morphology of Donor and Recipient Nerves Utilised in Nerve Transfers to Restore Upper Limb Function in Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurora Messina

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Loss of hand function after cervical spinal cord injury (SCI impacts heavily on independence. Multiple nerve transfer surgery has been applied successfully after cervical SCI to restore critical arm and hand functions, and the outcome depends on nerve integrity. Nerve integrity is assessed indirectly using muscle strength testing and intramuscular electromyography, but these measures cannot show the manifestation that SCI has on the peripheral nerves. We directly assessed the morphology of nerves biopsied at the time of surgery, from three patients within 18 months post injury. Our objective was to document their morphologic features. Donor nerves included teres minor, posterior axillary, brachialis, extensor carpi radialis brevis and supinator. Recipient nerves included triceps, posterior interosseus (PIN and anterior interosseus nerves (AIN. They were fixed in glutaraldehyde, processed and embedded in Araldite Epon for light microscopy. Eighty percent of nerves showed abnormalities. Most common were myelin thickening and folding, demyelination, inflammation and a reduction of large myelinated axon density. Others were a thickened perineurium, oedematous endoneurium and Renaut bodies. Significantly, very thinly myelinated axons and groups of unmyelinated axons were observed indicating regenerative efforts. Abnormalities exist in both donor and recipient nerves and they differ in appearance and aetiology. The abnormalities observed may be preventable or reversible.

  14. Analysis of the diffusion tensor imaging parameters of a normal cervical spinal cord in a healthy population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Liang-Feng; Wang, Shou-Sen; Zheng, Zhao-Cong; Tian, Jun; Xue, Liang

    2017-05-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) shows great advantage in the diagnosis of brain diseases, including cervical spinal cord (CSC) disease. This study aims to obtain the normal values of the DTI parameters for a healthy population and to establish a baseline for CSC disease diagnosis using DTI. A total of 36 healthy adults were subjected to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the entire CSC using the Siemens 3.0 T MR System. Sagittal DTI acquisition was carried out with a single-shot spin-echo echo-planar imaging (EPI) sequence along 12 non-collinear directions. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were determined at different cervical levels using a region of interest (ROI) method, following which they were correlated with parameters, like age and sex. Further, diffusion tensor tracking (DTT) was carried out to reconstruct the white matter fiber bundles of the CSC. The full and complete fiber bundle structure of a normal CSC was confirmed in both the T2-weighted and DTI images. The FA and ADC values were significantly negatively correlated with each other and showed strongly negative and positive correlations with age, respectively, but not with sex. Additionally, there was no significant difference between the FA and the ADC values at different cervical levels. The DTI technique can act as an important supplement to the conventional MRI technique for CSC observation. Moreover, the FA and ADC values can be used as sensitive parameters in the DTI study on the CSC by taking the effects of age into consideration.

  15. Whole-body vibration improves ankle spasticity, balance, and walking ability in individuals with incomplete cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    In, Taesung; Jung, Kyoungsim; Lee, Mingoo; Cho, Hwi-Young

    2018-04-07

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) training on ankle spasticity, balance, and walking ability in patients with incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI) at cervical level. Twenty-eight patients with cervical iSCI were randomly assigned to WBV (n = 14) or control group (n = 14). WBV group received WBV training, while control group was treated with placebo-treatment. All interventions were given for 20-min, twice a day, 5-days a week for 8-weeks. The spasticity of ankle plantar-flexors was assessed by estimating passive resistive force using a hand-held dynamometer. Balance was analyzed based on postural sway length (PSL) using a force plate. Timed-Up and Go test (TUG) and 10 m-Walk Test (10MWT) were used to assess walking ability. Both groups showed significant improvements in spasticity, balance and walking ability. Also, the significant differences between two groups were demonstrated in the outcomes of spasticity (3.0±1.7 vs 0.9±1.2), PSL (6.4±1.2 vs 3.2±0.9 with eyes-open, and 15.1±10.9 vs 7.4±4.3 with eyes-closed), TUG (2.3±1.3 vs 1.0±1.0), and 10MWT (3.5±2.3 vs 1.3±1.4). WBV may be a safe and effective intervention to improve spasticity, balance and walking ability in individuals with cervical iSCI. Thus, WBV may be used to improve these symptoms in clinics.

  16. Mechanical Design and Analysis of a Unilateral Cervical Spinal Cord Contusion Injury Model in Non-Human Primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrey, Carolyn J; Salegio, Ernesto A; Camisa, William; Tam, Horace; Beattie, Michael S; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C

    2016-06-15

    Non-human primate (NHP) models of spinal cord injury better reflect human injury and provide a better foundation to evaluate potential treatments and functional outcomes. We combined finite element (FE) and surrogate models with impact data derived from in vivo experiments to define the impact mechanics needed to generate a moderate severity unilateral cervical contusion injury in NHPs (Macaca mulatta). Three independent variables (impactor displacement, alignment, and pre-load) were examined to determine their effects on tissue level stresses and strains. Mechanical measures of peak force, peak displacement, peak energy, and tissue stiffness were analyzed as potential determinants of injury severity. Data generated from FE simulations predicted a lateral shift of the spinal cord at high levels of compression (>64%) during impact. Submillimeter changes in mediolateral impactor position over the midline increased peak impact forces (>50%). Surrogate cords established a 0.5 N pre-load protocol for positioning the impactor tip onto the dural surface to define a consistent dorsoventral baseline position before impact, which corresponded with cerebrospinal fluid displacement and entrapment of the spinal cord against the vertebral canal. Based on our simulations, impactor alignment and pre-load were strong contributors to the variable mechanical and functional outcomes observed in in vivo experiments. Peak displacement of 4 mm after a 0.5N pre-load aligned 0.5-1.0 mm over the midline should result in a moderate severity injury; however, the observed peak force and calculated peak energy and tissue stiffness are required to properly characterize the severity and variability of in vivo NHP contusion injuries.

  17. Relationship between brainstem neurodegeneration and clinical impairment in traumatic spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Grabher

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Neurodegeneration, indicated by volume loss and myelin reductions, is evident in major brainstem pathways and nuclei following traumatic SCI; the magnitude of these changes relating to clinical impairment. Thus, quantitative MRI protocols offer new targets, which may be used as neuroimaging biomarkers in treatment trials.

  18. Localized delivery of brain-derived neurotrophic factor-expressing mesenchymal stem cells enhances functional recovery following cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gransee, Heather M; Zhan, Wen-Zhi; Sieck, Gary C; Mantilla, Carlos B

    2015-02-01

    Neurotrophins, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), are important in modulating neuroplasticity and promoting recovery after spinal cord injury. Intrathecal delivery of BDNF enhances functional recovery following unilateral spinal cord hemisection (SH) at C2, a well-established model of incomplete cervical spinal cord injury. We hypothesized that localized delivery of BDNF-expressing mesenchymal stem cells (BDNF-MSCs) would promote functional recovery of rhythmic diaphragm activity after SH. In adult rats, bilateral diaphragm electromyographic (EMG) activity was chronically monitored to determine evidence of complete SH at 3 days post-injury, and recovery of rhythmic ipsilateral diaphragm EMG activity over time post-SH. Wild-type, bone marrow-derived MSCs (WT-MSCs) or BDNF-MSCs (2×10(5) cells) were injected intraspinally at C2 at the time of injury. At 14 days post-SH, green fluorescent protein (GFP) immunoreactivity confirmed MSCs presence in the cervical spinal cord. Functional recovery in SH animals injected with WT-MSCs was not different from untreated SH controls (n=10; overall, 20% at 7 days and 30% at 14 days). In contrast, functional recovery was observed in 29% and 100% of SH animals injected with BDNF-MSCs at 7 days and 14 days post-SH, respectively (n=7). In BDNF-MSCs treated SH animals at 14 days, root-mean-squared EMG amplitude was 63±16% of the pre-SH value compared with 12±9% in the control/WT-MSCs group. We conclude that localized delivery of BDNF-expressing MSCs enhances functional recovery of diaphragm muscle activity following cervical spinal cord injury. MSCs can be used to facilitate localized delivery of trophic factors such as BDNF in order to promote neuroplasticity following spinal cord injury.

  19. Post-traumatic epidural and subdural hematomas of the spinal cord in MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronarski, J.; Wozniak, E.; Kiwerski, J.

    1993-01-01

    Diagnostics of epi- and subdural hematomas of the spinal cord is discussed on the basis of 1992 records of Konstancin Rehabilitation Center. 54 patients with symptoms of partial or complete cord injury were submitted to MR imaging. In 4 cases (7.5%) epi- and subdural hematoma was found to contribute to neurological condition of the patient. MRI determines indications for surgical intervention. (author)

  20. Improving outcome of sensorimotor functions after traumatic spinal cord injury [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volker Dietz

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the rehabilitation of a patient suffering a spinal cord injury (SCI, the exploitation of neuroplasticity is well established. It can be facilitated through the training of functional movements with technical assistance as needed and can improve outcome after an SCI. The success of such training in individuals with incomplete SCI critically depends on the presence of physiological proprioceptive input to the spinal cord leading to meaningful muscle activations during movement performances. Some actual preclinical approaches to restore function by compensating for the loss of descending input to spinal networks following complete/incomplete SCI are critically discussed in this report. Electrical and pharmacological stimulation of spinal neural networks is still in the experimental stage, and despite promising repair studies in animal models, translations to humans up to now have not been convincing. It is possible that a combination of techniques targeting the promotion of axonal regeneration is necessary to advance the restoration of function. In the future, refinement of animal models according to clinical conditions and requirements may contribute to greater translational success.

  1. The paradox of chronic neuroinflammation, systemic immune suppression, autoimmunity after traumatic chronic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Jan M; Zhang, Yi; Kopp, Marcel A; Brommer, Benedikt; Popovich, Phillip G

    2014-08-01

    During the transition from acute to chronic stages of recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI), there is an evolving state of immunologic dysfunction that exacerbates the problems associated with the more clinically obvious neurologic deficits. Since injury directly affects cells embedded within the "immune privileged/specialized" milieu of the spinal cord, maladaptive or inefficient responses are likely to occur. Collectively, these responses qualify as part of the continuum of "SCI disease" and are important therapeutic targets to improve neural repair and neurological outcome. Generic immune suppressive therapies have been largely unsuccessful, mostly because inflammation and immunity exert both beneficial (plasticity enhancing) and detrimental (e.g. glia- and neurodegenerative; secondary damage) effects and these functions change over time. Moreover, "compartimentalized" investigations, limited to only intraspinal inflammation and associated cellular or molecular changes in the spinal cord, neglect the reality that the structure and function of the CNS are influenced by systemic immune challenges and that the immune system is 'hardwired' into the nervous system. Here, we consider this interplay during the progression from acute to chronic SCI. Specifically, we survey impaired/non-resolving intraspinal inflammation and the paradox of systemic inflammatory responses in the context of ongoing chronic immune suppression and autoimmunity. The concepts of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome (CARS) and "neurogenic" spinal cord injury-induced immune depression syndrome (SCI-IDS) are discussed as determinants of impaired "host-defense" and trauma-induced autoimmunity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Development of a Novel Alarm System to Improve Adaptation to Non-invasive Ventilation in Patients With High Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sang Hun; Shin, Yong Beom; Jang, Myung Hun; Kim, Soo-Yeon; Ro, Jung Hoon

    2016-01-01

    In this case report, we want to introduce a successful way of applying non-invasive ventilation (NIV) with a full face mask in patients with high cervical spinal cord injury through a novel alarm system for communication. A 57-year-old man was diagnosed with C3 American Spinal Injury Association impairment scale (AIS) B. We applied NIV for treatment of hypercapnia. Because of mouth opening during sleep, a full face mask was the only way to use NIV. However, he could not take off the mask by h...

  3. Cat scratch disease with cervical vertebral osteomyelitis and spinal epidural abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasher, Diana; Armarnik, Erez; Mizrahi, Avram; Liat, Ben Sira; Constantini, Shlomi; Grisaru-Soen, Galia

    2009-09-01

    Cat scratch disease has variable clinical presentations and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of vertebral osteomyelitis and epidural abscess if there is a history of contact with cats. We report a 5-year-old boy with cat scratch disease who presented with painful torticollis and osteomyelitis of the cervical spine associated with an epidural abscess.

  4. Radiographic Analysis of Cervical and Spinal Alignment in Multilevel ACDF with Lordotic Interbody Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuura, Yoshihiro; Lemons, Alex; Lorenz, Eileen; Swafford, Rachel; Osborn, James; Cason, Garrick

    2017-01-01

    Restoration and maintenance of cervical lordosis is an important clinical parameter in spine surgery. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which a multilevel anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF: greater than 3 levels) procedure restores cervical lordosis and the affect of increasing lordosis on sagittal vertical axis. We performed a retrospective radiographic analysis of 69 patients who underwent multilevel ACDF by 2 surgeons between 2013 and 2014. We measured the global and segmental sagittal alignment of the cervical spine using the cobb method at 4 time intervals (preop, post op 4wks, 10wks and 6 months) as well as the sagittal vertical axis (SVA) using both a C1-S1 and C7-S1 plumb line methods at 2 time intervals (preop and post op 4wks). Radiographs were measured by three reviewers. Interrater reliability was good to excellent for all measurements. Cervical lordosis significantly increased from preop 10.26° to 4 weeks postop 19.44° and was maintained up to 6 months 19.34 (p<0.0005). Segmental cervical lordosis was also significantly increased from preop 8.22° to post op at 4 weeks (20.26°) and was maintained at post op 10weeks 20.30° and post op 6 months 19.56° (p<0.0005). C7-S1 SVA and C1-S1 SVA also significantly increased from 12.04mm preop to 27.49mm post op 4 wks (p<0.0005) and -1.93mm preop to 8.67mm post op (p<0.0005) respectively. A change in C2-C7 lordosis positively correlated with a change in C7-SVA and C1-SVA (r=0.37, P<0.005, and r=0.312, p<0.05 respectively). Multilevel ACDF significantly increases and maintains both segmental and global cervical lordosis up to 6 months after surgery. Increasing C2-C7 global lordosis is correlated with increasing positive sagittal vertical axis. Level of evidence: IV.

  5. [Clinical study on spinal cord decompression combined with traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Feng; Tan, Ming-Sheng; Yi, Ping; Tang, Xiang-Sheng; Hao, Qing-Ying; Qi, Ying-Na

    2018-01-25

    To compare the clinical effect between spinal card decompression combined with traditional Chinese medicine and simple spinal card decompression for cervical spondylotic myelopathy. From June 2012 to June 2015, 73 patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy were treated, including 42 males and 31 females, aged from 29 to 73 years old with a mean of 50.9 years old. The patients were divided into the simple operation group (34 cases) and the operation combined with traditional Chinese medicine group(39 cases) according to the idea of themselves. The anterior discectomy or subtotal corpectomy with internal fixation or posterior simple open-door decompression with lateral mass screw fixation were performed in the patients. Among them, 39 cases were treated with traditional Chinese medicine after surgery. The Japanese orthopedic association (JOA) score of spinal cord function, the improvement rate of neural function, the neck dysfunction index (NDI) score and the governor vessel stasis syndrome score were compared between two groups preoperative and postoperative 1 week, 1 month and the final follow-up respectively. The internal fixation and the condition of spinal cord decompression were observed by CT, MRI and X-rays before and after operation. All the operations were successful, no injuries such as dura mater, spinal cord and nerve root were found. All the wounds were healed without infection except one patient had a superficial infection. It was solved after intermittent debridement and anti-infective therapy. Hematoma occurred in 1 case, complicated with spinal cord compression, caused incomplete paralysis, and promptly performed the re-operation to remove the hematoma without any obvious sequelae. All the patients were followed up from 12 to 24 months, (14.6±0.8) months for simple operation group and (13.5±0.7) months for operation combined with traditional Chinese medicine group, and there was no significant difference( P >0.05). The scores of JOA, NDI and

  6. Skull traction for cervical spinal injury in Enugu: A 5‑year ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Forty‑one had the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Grade A whereas 64 had incomplete cord injury of ASIA Grades B–E. Forty‑eight had Crutchfield traction whereas 57 had Gardner‑Wells traction. At the end of treatment, no patient improved among those with ASIA Grades A and B. All the 12 cases of mortality ...

  7. Cervical Retrograde Spinal Cord Stimulation Lead Placement to Treat Failed Back Surgery Syndrome: A Case Report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmond, N. van; Kardaszewski, C.N.; Chapman, K.B.

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation is an effective treatment modality for refractory neuropathic pain conditions, but the placement of leads can be challenging due to unforeseen anatomical variations. We used a retrograde C7-T1 approach to place a lead at the bottom of T8 in a patient suffering from failed

  8. Only spinal fixation as treatment of prolapsed cervical intervertebral disc in patients presenting with myelopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul Goel

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Spinal segmental fixation aiming at arthrodesis with or without distraction of facets and without any direct surgical manipulation in the disc space or removal of the prolapsed portion of the disc can be considered in the armamentarium of the surgeon.

  9. Epicritic Sensation in Cervical Spinal Cord Injury: Diagnostic Gains Beyond Testing Light Touch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velstra, Inge-Marie; Bolliger, Marc; Baumberger, Michael; Rietman, Johan Swanik; Curt, Armin

    2013-01-01

    Applied as a bedside test of gross dorsal column function, the testing of light touch (LT) sensation is of high clinical value in the diagnosis of human spinal cord injury (SCI). However, the assessment of overall dorsal column deficit by testing only LT may be limited, because the dorsal column

  10. Overview of Spinal Cord Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Is the Spinal Cord Damaged? The spine (spinal column) contains the spinal cord, which is divided into four sections: Cervical (neck) Thoracic (chest) Lumbar (lower back) Sacral (pelvis). Each section is referred ...

  11. Long descending cervical propriospinal neurons differ from thoracic propriospinal neurons in response to low thoracic spinal injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stelzner Dennis J

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Propriospinal neurons, with axonal projections intrinsic to the spinal cord, have shown a greater regenerative response than supraspinal neurons after axotomy due to spinal cord injury (SCI. Our previous work focused on the response of axotomized short thoracic propriospinal (TPS neurons following a low thoracic SCI (T9 spinal transection or moderate spinal contusion injury in the rat. The present investigation analyzes the intrinsic response of cervical propriospinal neurons having long descending axons which project into the lumbosacral enlargement, long descending propriospinal tract (LDPT axons. These neurons also were axotomized by T9 spinal injury in the same animals used in our previous study. Results Utilizing laser microdissection (LMD, qRT-PCR, and immunohistochemistry, we studied LDPT neurons (located in the C5-C6 spinal segments between 3-days, and 1-month following a low thoracic (T9 spinal cord injury. We examined the response of 89 genes related to growth factors, cell surface receptors, apoptosis, axonal regeneration, and neuroprotection/cell survival. We found a strong and significant down-regulation of ~25% of the genes analyzed early after injury (3-days post-injury with a sustained down-regulation in most instances. In the few genes that were up-regulated (Actb, Atf3, Frs2, Hspb1, Nrap, Stat1 post-axotomy, the expression for all but one was down-regulated by 2-weeks post-injury. We also compared the uninjured TPS control neurons to the uninjured LDPT neurons used in this experiment for phenotypic differences between these two subpopulations of propriospinal neurons. We found significant differences in expression in 37 of the 84 genes examined between these two subpopulations of propriospinal neurons with LDPT neurons exhibiting a significantly higher base line expression for all but 3 of these genes compared to TPS neurons. Conclusions Taken collectively these data indicate a broad overall down

  12. The paradox of chronic neuroinflammation, systemic immune suppression and autoimmunity after traumatic chronic spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Marcel A.; Brommer, Benedikt; Popovich, Phillip G.

    2014-01-01

    During the transition from acute to chronic stages of recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI), there is an evolving state of immunologic dysfunction that exacerbates the problems associated with the more clinically obvious neurologic deficits. Since injury directly affects cells embedded within the “immune privileged/specialized” milieu of the spinal cord, maladaptive or inefficient responses are likely to occur. Collectively, these responses qualify as part of the continuum of “SCI disease” and are important therapeutic targets to improve neural repair and neurological outcome. Generic immune suppressive therapies have been largely unsuccessful, mostly because nflammation and immunity exert both beneficial (plasticity enhancing) and detrimental (e.g. glia- and neurodegenerative; secondary damage) effects and these functions change over time. Moreover, “compartmentalized” investigations, limited to only intraspinal inflammation and associated cellular or molecular changes in the spinal cord, neglect the reality that the structure and function of the CNS is influenced by systemic immune challenges and that the immune system is hardwired into the nervous system. Here, we consider this interplay during the progression from acute to chronic SCI. Specifically, we survey impaired/non-resolving intraspinal inflammation and the paradox of systemic inflammatory responses in the face of ongoing chronic immune suppression and autoimmunity. The concepts of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome (CARS) and ‘neurogenic’ spinal cord injury-induced immune depression syndrome (SCI-IDS) are discussed as determinants of impaired ‘host-defense’ and trauma-induced autoimmunity. PMID:25017893

  13. Sudden post-traumatic sciatica caused by a thoracic spinal meningioma

    OpenAIRE

    Mariniello, Giuseppe; Malacario, Francesca; Dones, Flavia; Severino, Rocco; Ugga, Lorenzo; Russo, Camilla; Elefante, Andrea; Maiuri, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Spinal meningiomas usually present with slowly progressive symptoms of cord and root compression, while a sudden clinical onset is