WorldWideScience

Sample records for trapped radium ion

  1. Radium removal from Canadian uranium mining effluents by a radium-selective ion exchange complexer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-07-01

    A laboratory test program was initiated by the Department of Energy, Mines and Resources as part of the National Uranium Tailings Program to investigate the applicability of a radium-selective ion exchange complexer for removing radium from Canadian uranium mining effluents. The ion exchange complexer was shown to be efficient in removing radium from contaminated water of uranium mining operations, with the ultimate loading capacity of the resin on one type of water treated being determined as approximately 1,600 Bq/cm 3 of new resin. The results showed that the resin was effective in removing radium but not any other contaminants

  2. Cryogenic surface ion traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niedermayr, M.

    2015-01-01

    Microfabricated surface traps are a promising architecture to realize a scalable quantum computer based on trapped ions. In principle, hundreds or thousands of surface traps can be located on a single substrate in order to provide large arrays of interacting ions. To this end, trap designs and fabrication methods are required that provide scalable, stable and reproducible ion traps. This work presents a novel surface-trap design developed for cryogenic applications. Intrinsic silicon is used as the substrate material of the traps. The well-developed microfabrication and structuring methods of silicon are utilized to create simple and reproducible traps. The traps were tested and characterized in a cryogenic setup. Ions could be trapped and their life time and motional heating were investigated. Long ion lifetimes of several hours were observed and the measured heating rates were reproducibly low at around 1 phonon per second at a trap frequency of 1 MHz. (author) [de

  3. Trapping radioactive ions

    CERN Document Server

    Kluge, Heinz-Jürgen

    2004-01-01

    Trapping devices for atomic and nuclear physics experiments with radioactive ions are becoming more and more important at accelerator facilities. While about ten years ago only one online Penning trap experiment existed, namely ISOLTRAP at ISOLDE/CERN, meanwhile almost every radioactive beam facility has installed or plans an ion trap setup. This article gives an overview on ion traps in the operation, construction or planing phase which will be used for fundamental studies with short-lived radioactive nuclides such as mass spectrometry, laser spectroscopy and nuclear decay spectroscopy. In addition, this article summarizes the use of gas cells and radiofrequency quadrupole (Paul) traps at different facilities as a versatile tool for ion beam manipulation like retardation, cooling, bunching, and cleaning.

  4. Trapping radioactive ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluge, H.-J.; Blaum, K.

    2004-01-01

    Trapping devices for atomic and nuclear physics experiments with radioactive ions are becoming more and more important at accelerator facilities. While about ten years ago only one online Penning trap experiment existed, namely ISOLTRAP at ISOLDE/CERN, meanwhile almost every radioactive beam facility has installed or plans an ion trap setup. This article gives an overview on ion traps in the operation, construction or planing phase which will be used for fundamental studies with short-lived radioactive nuclides such as mass spectrometry, laser spectroscopy and nuclear decay spectroscopy. In addition, this article summarizes the use of gas cells and radiofrequency quadrupole (Paul) traps at different facilities as a versatile tool for ion beam manipulation like retardation, cooling, bunching, and cleaning

  5. Ion Trap Quantum Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    variations of ion traps, including (1) the cylindrically symmetric 3D ring trap; (2) the linear trap with a combination of cavity QED; (#) the symmetric...concepts of quantum information. The major demonstration has been the test of a Bell inequality as demonstrated by Rowe et al. [50] and a decoherence...famous physics experiment [62]. Wolfgang Paul demonstrated a similar apparatus during his Nobel Prize speech [63]. This device is hyperbolic- parabolic

  6. Ion trap device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2016-01-26

    An ion trap device is disclosed. The device includes a series of electrodes that define an ion flow path. A radio frequency (RF) field is applied to the series of electrodes such that each electrode is phase shifted approximately 180 degrees from an adjacent electrode. A DC voltage is superimposed with the RF field to create a DC gradient to drive ions in the direction of the gradient. A second RF field or DC voltage is applied to selectively trap and release the ions from the device. Further, the device may be gridless and utilized at high pressure.

  7. Asymmetric ion trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Stephan E.; Alexander, Michael L.; Follansbee, James C.

    1997-01-01

    An ion trap having two end cap electrodes disposed asymmetrically about a center of a ring electrode. The inner surface of the end cap electrodes are conformed to an asymmetric pair of equipotential lines of the harmonic formed by the application of voltages to the electrodes. The asymmetry of the end cap electrodes allows ejection of charged species through the closer of the two electrodes which in turn allows for simultaneously detecting anions and cations expelled from the ion trap through the use of two detectors charged with opposite polarity.

  8. Collinear resonance ionization spectroscopy of radium ions

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose to study the neutron-deficient radium isotopes with high-resolution collinear resonance ionization spectroscopy. Probing the hyperfine structure of the $7{s}\\,^2\\!{S}\\!_{1/2}\\,\\rightarrow\\,7{p}\\,^{2}\\!{P}\\!_{1/2}$ and $7{s}\\,^{2}\\!{S}\\!_{1/2}\\,\\rightarrow\\,7{p}\\,^{2}\\!{P}\\!_{3/2}$ transitions in Ra II will provide atomic-structure measurements that have not been achieved for $^{{A}<208}$Ra. Measurement of the $7{s}\\,^{2}\\!{S}\\!_{1/2}\\,\\rightarrow\\,7{p}\\,^{2}\\!{P}\\!_{3/2}$ transition in $^{{A}<214}$Ra will allow the spectroscopic quadrupole moments to be directly measured for the first time. In addition, the technique will allow tentative spin assignments to be confirmed and the magnetic dipole moments measured for $^{\\textit{A}<208}$Ra. Measurement of the hyperfine structure (in particular the isotope shifts) of the neutron-deficient radium will provide information to further constrain the nuclear models away from the N=126 shell closure.

  9. Radium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerskov-Klika, Midana; Lokner, Vladimir

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the problem of control and/or storage of radiation sources used in hospitals in Croatia. The administration organization of the country, now being established; work on the new legislation, and the regulatory framework for protection against radiation, combined with a desire to achieve the systematic and safe storage of all existing radioactive waste, until the construction of a disposal site for low- and medium - level radiation waste, have all contributed to the decision whereby all radiation sources in Croatia are to be located and made safe. Accordingly, it was agreed that a commission, involving Croatian Health Ministry, the Hazardous Waste Management Agency, the Institute for Medical Research, and the Ruder Boskovic Institute, should organize the search, collection and conditioning of all radium sources which have been used in medical establishments throughout Croatia. The subsequent investigation revealed that almost half of all radium sources are located in an old storage facility at the Institute for Medical Research. Those sources, as well as others located in hospitals following months of investigation, have now been collected together in one place - the Ruder Boskovic Institute. Following a process of identification, and entry in a relevant data base, all sources were subject to a conditioning procedure. They were placed in stainless-steel capsules, each capsule containing approximately 50 milli curries of radium. The capsules are scaled with a lid, welded in a place using a special procedure, which totally isolates the contents from the environment. Neither radium nor its products are able to escape from the capsule. Then, the capsules, in groups of ten, are placed in a massive lead container, which prevents leakage of radiation resulting from disintegration. The lead container is placed inside a stainless-steel barrel filled with concrete. In this way, the radium sources no longer pose any threat to the environment. Due to its long

  10. Trapped Ion Qubits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maunz, Peter Lukas Wilhelm

    2017-04-01

    Qubits can be encoded in clock states of trapped ions. These states are well isolated from the environment resulting in long coherence times [1] while enabling efficient high-fidelity qubit interactions mediated by the Coulomb coupled motion of the ions in the trap. Quantum states can be prepared with high fidelity and measured efficiently using fluorescence detection. State preparation and detection with 99.93% fidelity have been realized in multiple systems [1,2]. Single qubit gates have been demonstrated below rigorous fault-tolerance thresholds [1,3]. Two qubit gates have been realized with more than 99.9% fidelity [4,5]. Quantum algorithms have been demonstrated on systems of 5 to 15 qubits [6–8].

  11. Quantum computing with trapped ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    The significance of quantum computation for cryptography is discussed. Following a brief survey of the requirements for quantum computational hardware, an overview of the ion trap quantum computation project at Los Alamos is presented. The physical limitations to quantum computation with trapped ions are analyzed and an assessment of the computational potential of the technology is made.

  12. Mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, D.D.; Keville, R.F.

    1995-09-19

    An ion trap is described which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10{sup 9} and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10{sup 4} ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products. 10 figs.

  13. Spin resonance with trapped ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wunderlich, Ch; Balzer, Ch; Hannemann, T; Mintert, F; Neuhauser, W; Reiss, D; Toschek, P E [Institut fuer Laser-Physik, Universitaet Hamburg, Jungiusstrasse 9, 20355 Hamburg (Germany)

    2003-03-14

    A modified ion trap is described where experiments (in particular related to quantum information processing) that usually require optical radiation can be carried out using microwave or radio frequency electromagnetic fields. Instead of applying the usual methods for coherent manipulation of trapped ions, a string of ions in such a modified trap can be treated like a molecule in nuclear magnetic resonance experiments taking advantage of spin-spin coupling. The collection of trapped ions can be viewed as an N-qubit molecule with adjustable spin-spin coupling constants. Given N identically prepared quantum mechanical two-level systems (qubits), the optimal strategy to estimate their quantum state requires collective measurements. Using the ground state hyperfine levels of electrodynamically trapped {sup 171}Yb{sup +}, we have implemented an adaptive algorithm for state estimation involving sequential measurements on arbitrary qubit states.

  14. Spin resonance with trapped ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wunderlich, Ch; Balzer, Ch; Hannemann, T; Mintert, F; Neuhauser, W; Reiss, D; Toschek, P E

    2003-01-01

    A modified ion trap is described where experiments (in particular related to quantum information processing) that usually require optical radiation can be carried out using microwave or radio frequency electromagnetic fields. Instead of applying the usual methods for coherent manipulation of trapped ions, a string of ions in such a modified trap can be treated like a molecule in nuclear magnetic resonance experiments taking advantage of spin-spin coupling. The collection of trapped ions can be viewed as an N-qubit molecule with adjustable spin-spin coupling constants. Given N identically prepared quantum mechanical two-level systems (qubits), the optimal strategy to estimate their quantum state requires collective measurements. Using the ground state hyperfine levels of electrodynamically trapped 171 Yb + , we have implemented an adaptive algorithm for state estimation involving sequential measurements on arbitrary qubit states

  15. Quantized motion of trapped ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinbach, J.

    1999-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with a theoretical and numerical study of the preparation and coherent manipulation of quantum states in the external and internal degrees of freedom of trapped ions. In its first part, this thesis proposes and investigates schemes for generating several nonclassical states for the quantized vibrational motion of a trapped ion. Based on dark state preparation specific laser excitation configurations are presented which, given appropriately chosen initial states, realize the desired motional states in the steady-state, indicated by the cessation of the fluorescence emitted by the ion. The focus is on the SU(1,1) intelligent states in both their single- and two-mode realization, corresponding to one- and two-dimensional motion of the ion. The presented schemes are also studied numerically using a Monte-Carlo state-vector method. The second part of the thesis describes how two vibrational degrees of freedom of a single trapped ion can be coupled through the action of suitably chosen laser excitation. Concentrating on a two-dimensional ion trap with dissimilar vibrational frequencies a variety of quantized two-mode couplings are derived. The focus is on a linear coupling that takes excitations from one mode to another. It is demonstrated how this can result in a state rotation, in which it is possible to coherently transfer the motional state of the ion between orthogonal directions without prior knowledge of that motional state. The third part of this thesis presents a new efficient method for generating maximally entangled internal states of a collection of trapped ions. The method is deterministic and independent of the number of ions in the trap. As the essential element of the scheme a mechanism for the realization of a controlled NOT operation that can operate on multiple ions is proposed. The potential application of the scheme for high-precision frequency standards is explored. (author)

  16. Quadrupole Ion Traps

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    to do precision spectroscopic measurements on these ions. ... Bonn, investigated the non-magnetic quadrupole mass filter, .... the details of which will be discussed in the subse- ... the radial plane the ion undergoes a circular motion with the.

  17. Microfabricated linear Paul-Straubel ion trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, Michael A [Albuquerque, NM; Blain, Matthew G [Albuquerque, NM; Tigges, Chris P [Albuquerque, NM; Linker, Kevin L [Albuquerque, NM

    2011-04-19

    An array of microfabricated linear Paul-Straubel ion traps can be used for mass spectrometric applications. Each ion trap comprises two parallel inner RF electrodes and two parallel outer DC control electrodes symmetric about a central trap axis and suspended over an opening in a substrate. Neighboring ion traps in the array can share a common outer DC control electrode. The ions confined transversely by an RF quadrupole electric field potential well on the ion trap axis. The array can trap a wide array of ions.

  18. Quantum computing with trapped ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeffner, H.; Roos, C.F.; Blatt, R.

    2008-01-01

    Quantum computers hold the promise of solving certain computational tasks much more efficiently than classical computers. We review recent experimental advances towards a quantum computer with trapped ions. In particular, various implementations of qubits, quantum gates and some key experiments are discussed. Furthermore, we review some implementations of quantum algorithms such as a deterministic teleportation of quantum information and an error correction scheme

  19. Ion trap architectures and new directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siverns, James D.; Quraishi, Qudsia

    2017-12-01

    Trapped ion technology has seen advances in performance, robustness and versatility over the last decade. With increasing numbers of trapped ion groups worldwide, a myriad of trap architectures are currently in use. Applications of trapped ions include: quantum simulation, computing and networking, time standards and fundamental studies in quantum dynamics. Design of such traps is driven by these various research aims, but some universally desirable properties have lead to the development of ion trap foundries. Additionally, the excellent control achievable with trapped ions and the ability to do photonic readout has allowed progress on quantum networking using entanglement between remotely situated ion-based nodes. Here, we present a selection of trap architectures currently in use by the community and present their most salient characteristics, identifying features particularly suited for quantum networking. We also discuss our own in-house research efforts aimed at long-distance trapped ion networking.

  20. Scaling ion traps for quantum computing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Uys, H

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The design, fabrication and preliminary testing of a chipscale, multi-zone, surface electrode ion trap is reported. The modular design and fabrication techniques used are anticipated to advance scalability of ion trap quantum computing architectures...

  1. Laser induced fluorescence of trapped molecular ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grieman, F.J.

    1979-10-01

    An experimental apparatus for obtaining the optical spectra of molecular ions is described. The experimental technique includes the use of three dimensional ion trapping, laser induced fluorescence, and gated photon counting methods. The ions, which are produced by electron impact, are confined in a radio-frequency quadrupole ion trap of cylindrical design. Because the quadrupole ion trap allows mass selection of the molecular ion desired for study, the analysis of the spectra obtained is greatly simplified. The ion trap also confines the ions to a region easily probed by a laser beam. 18 references

  2. Laser induced fluorescence of trapped molecular ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grieman, F.J.

    1979-10-01

    An experimental apparatus for obtaining the optical spectra of molecular ions is described. The experimental technique includes the use of three dimensional ion trapping, laser induced fluorescence, and gated photon counting methods. The ions, which are produced by electron impact, are confined in a radio-frequency quadrupole ion trap of cylindrical design. Because the quadrupole ion trap allows mass selection of the molecular ion desired for study, the analysis of the spectra obtained is greatly simplified. The ion trap also confines the ions to a region easily probed by a laser beam. 18 references.

  3. Optical Trapping of Ion Coulomb Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Julian; Lambrecht, Alexander; Weckesser, Pascal; Debatin, Markus; Karpa, Leon; Schaetz, Tobias

    2018-04-01

    The electronic and motional degrees of freedom of trapped ions can be controlled and coherently coupled on the level of individual quanta. Assembling complex quantum systems ion by ion while keeping this unique level of control remains a challenging task. For many applications, linear chains of ions in conventional traps are ideally suited to address this problem. However, driven motion due to the magnetic or radio-frequency electric trapping fields sometimes limits the performance in one dimension and severely affects the extension to higher-dimensional systems. Here, we report on the trapping of multiple barium ions in a single-beam optical dipole trap without radio-frequency or additional magnetic fields. We study the persistence of order in ensembles of up to six ions within the optical trap, measure their temperature, and conclude that the ions form a linear chain, commonly called a one-dimensional Coulomb crystal. As a proof-of-concept demonstration, we access the collective motion and perform spectrometry of the normal modes in the optical trap. Our system provides a platform that is free of driven motion and combines advantages of optical trapping, such as state-dependent confinement and nanoscale potentials, with the desirable properties of crystals of trapped ions, such as long-range interactions featuring collective motion. Starting with small numbers of ions, it has been proposed that these properties would allow the experimental study of many-body physics and the onset of structural quantum phase transitions between one- and two-dimensional crystals.

  4. Ion traps fabricated in a CMOS foundry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehta, K. K.; Ram, R. J. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Eltony, A. M.; Chuang, I. L. [Center for Ultracold Atoms, Research Laboratory of Electronics and Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Bruzewicz, C. D.; Sage, J. M., E-mail: jsage@ll.mit.edu; Chiaverini, J., E-mail: john.chiaverini@ll.mit.edu [Lincoln Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Lexington, Massachusetts 02420 (United States)

    2014-07-28

    We demonstrate trapping in a surface-electrode ion trap fabricated in a 90-nm CMOS (complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor) foundry process utilizing the top metal layer of the process for the trap electrodes. The process includes doped active regions and metal interconnect layers, allowing for co-fabrication of standard CMOS circuitry as well as devices for optical control and measurement. With one of the interconnect layers defining a ground plane between the trap electrode layer and the p-type doped silicon substrate, ion loading is robust and trapping is stable. We measure a motional heating rate comparable to those seen in surface-electrode traps of similar size. This demonstration of scalable quantum computing hardware utilizing a commercial CMOS process opens the door to integration and co-fabrication of electronics and photonics for large-scale quantum processing in trapped-ion arrays.

  5. Active stabilization of ion trap radiofrequency potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, K. G.; Wong-Campos, J. D.; Restelli, A.; Landsman, K. A.; Neyenhuis, B.; Mizrahi, J.; Monroe, C. [Joint Quantum Institute and University of Maryland Department of Physics, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    We actively stabilize the harmonic oscillation frequency of a laser-cooled atomic ion confined in a radiofrequency (rf) Paul trap by sampling and rectifying the high voltage rf applied to the trap electrodes. We are able to stabilize the 1 MHz atomic oscillation frequency to be better than 10 Hz or 10 ppm. This represents a suppression of ambient noise on the rf circuit by 34 dB. This technique could impact the sensitivity of ion trap mass spectrometry and the fidelity of quantum operations in ion trap quantum information applications.

  6. Cryptography, quantum computation and trapped ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Richard J.

    1998-03-01

    The significance of quantum computation for cryptography is discussed. Following a brief survey of the requirements for quantum computational hardware, an overview of the ion trap quantum computation project at Los Alamos is presented. The physical limitations to quantum computation with trapped ions are analyzed and an assessment of the computational potential of the technology is made.

  7. The Aarhus Ion Micro-Trap Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miroshnychenko, Yevhen; Nielsen, Otto; Poulsen, Gregers

    As part of our involvement in the EU MICROTRAP project, we have designed, manufactured and assembled a micro-scale ion trap with integrated optical fibers. These prealigned fibers will allow delivering cooling laser light to single ions. Therefore, such a trap will not require any direct optical...... and installed in an ultra high vacuum chamber, which includes an ablation oven for all-optical loading of the trap [2]. The next steps on the project are to demonstrate the operation of the micro-trap and the cooling of ions using fiber delivered light. [1] D. Grant, Development of Micro-Scale Ion traps, Master...... Thesis (2008). [2] R.J. Hendricks, D.M. Grant, P.F. Herskind, A. Dantan and M. Drewsen, An all-optical ion-loading technique for scalable microtrap architectures, Applied Physics B, 88, 507 (2007)....

  8. Spectroscopy with trapped highly charged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beiersdorfer, Peter

    2009-01-01

    We give an overview of atomic spectroscopy performed on electron beam ion traps at various locations throughout the world. Spectroscopy at these facilities contributes to various areas of science and engineering, including but not limited to basic atomic physics, astrophysics, extreme ultraviolet lithography, and the development of density and temperature diagnostics of fusion plasmas. These contributions are accomplished by generating, for example, spectral surveys, making precise radiative lifetime measurements, accounting for radiative power emitted in a given wavelength band, illucidating isotopic effects, and testing collisional-radiative models. While spectroscopy with electron beam ion traps had originally focused on the x-ray emission from highly charged ions interacting with the electron beam, the operating modes of such devices have expanded to study radiation in almost all wavelength bands from the visible to the hard x-ray region; and at several facilities the ions can be studied even in the absence of an electron beam. Photon emission after charge exchange or laser excitation has been observed; and the work is no longer restricted to highly charged ions. Much of the experimental capabilities are unique to electron beam ion traps, and the work performed with these devices cannot be undertaken elsewhere. However, in other areas the work on electron beam ion traps rivals the spectroscopy performed with conventional ion traps or heavy-ion storage rings. The examples we present highlight many of the capabilities of the existing electron beam ion traps and their contributions to physics.

  9. Practical aspects of trapped ion mass spectrometry, 5 applications of ion trapping devices

    CERN Document Server

    March, Raymond E

    2009-01-01

    Examines ion/neutral and ion/ion reactions, ion spectroscopy, and the structural characterization of proteins and peptides using quadropole ion trap mass spectrometry, Fourier transform - ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry, and traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry.

  10. Nonlinear spectroscopy of trapped ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlawin, Frank; Gessner, Manuel; Mukamel, Shaul; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2014-08-01

    Nonlinear spectroscopy employs a series of laser pulses to interrogate dynamics in large interacting many-body systems, and it has become a highly successful method for experiments in chemical physics. Current quantum optical experiments approach system sizes and levels of complexity that require the development of efficient techniques to assess spectral and dynamical features with scalable experimental overhead. However, established methods from optical spectroscopy of macroscopic ensembles cannot be applied straightforwardly to few-atom systems. Based on the ideas proposed in M. Gessner et al., (arXiv:1312.3365), we develop a diagrammatic approach to construct nonlinear measurement protocols for controlled quantum systems, and we discuss experimental implementations with trapped ion technology in detail. These methods, in combination with distinct features of ultracold-matter systems, allow us to monitor and analyze excitation dynamics in both the electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom. They are independent of system size, and they can therefore reliably probe systems in which, e.g., quantum state tomography becomes prohibitively expensive. We propose signals that can probe steady-state currents, detect the influence of anharmonicities on phonon transport, and identify signatures of chaotic dynamics near a quantum phase transition in an Ising-type spin chain.

  11. Optical Trapping of Ion Coulomb Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Schmidt

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The electronic and motional degrees of freedom of trapped ions can be controlled and coherently coupled on the level of individual quanta. Assembling complex quantum systems ion by ion while keeping this unique level of control remains a challenging task. For many applications, linear chains of ions in conventional traps are ideally suited to address this problem. However, driven motion due to the magnetic or radio-frequency electric trapping fields sometimes limits the performance in one dimension and severely affects the extension to higher-dimensional systems. Here, we report on the trapping of multiple barium ions in a single-beam optical dipole trap without radio-frequency or additional magnetic fields. We study the persistence of order in ensembles of up to six ions within the optical trap, measure their temperature, and conclude that the ions form a linear chain, commonly called a one-dimensional Coulomb crystal. As a proof-of-concept demonstration, we access the collective motion and perform spectrometry of the normal modes in the optical trap. Our system provides a platform that is free of driven motion and combines advantages of optical trapping, such as state-dependent confinement and nanoscale potentials, with the desirable properties of crystals of trapped ions, such as long-range interactions featuring collective motion. Starting with small numbers of ions, it has been proposed that these properties would allow the experimental study of many-body physics and the onset of structural quantum phase transitions between one- and two-dimensional crystals.

  12. Novel Ion Trap Design for Strong Ion-Cavity Coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Márquez Seco

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel ion trap design which facilitates the integration of an optical fiber cavity into the trap structure. The optical fibers are confined inside hollow electrodes in such a way that tight shielding and free movement of the fibers are simultaneously achievable. The latter enables in situ optimization of the overlap between the trapped ions and the cavity field. Through numerical simulations, we systematically analyze the effects of the electrode geometry on the trapping characteristics such as trap depths, secular frequencies and the optical access angle. Additionally, we simulate the effects of the presence of the fibers and confirm the robustness of the trapping potential. Based on these simulations and other technical considerations, we devise a practical trap configuration that isviable to achieve strong coupling of a single ion.

  13. Designing of a Quadrupole Paul Ion Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyani, Abouzar; Abdollahzadeh, M.; Sadat Kiai, S. M.; Zirak, A. R.

    2011-08-01

    The ion motion equation in a Paul ion trap known as Mathieu differential equation has been solved for the first time by using Runge-Kutta methods with 4th, 6th, and 8th orders. The first stability regions in az - qz plane and the corresponding qmax values were determined and compared. Also, the first stability regions of , , , ions in the Vdc - Vac plane were drown, and the threshold voltages for the ion separation was investigated.

  14. Utilization of the ion traps by SPIRAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Brun, C.; Lienard, E.; Mauger, F.; Tamain, B.

    1997-01-01

    An ion trap is a device capable of confine particles, ions or atoms in a well-controlled environment isolated from any exterior perturbations. There are different traps. They are utilized to collect or stock ions, to cool them after in order to subject them to high precision measurement of masses, magnetic moments, hyperfine properties, beta decay properties, etc. Some dozen of traps are currently used all over the world to study stable or radioactive ions.. SPIRAL has been designed and built to produce radioactive ions starting from various heavy ion beams. SPIRAL has the advantage that the projectile parameters, the target and the energy can be chosen to optimize the production in various regions of the nuclear chart. Also, in SPIRAL it is possible to extract more rapidly the radioactive ions formed in the targets. In addition, in SPIRAL the multicharged ion production in a ECR source is possible. The utilization of multicharged ions is indeed very useful for fast mass measurements or for the study of the interaction between the nucleus and the electronic cloud. Finally, utilization of a ion trap on SPIRAL can be designed first at the level of production target by installing a low energy output line. Than, the trap system could be up-graded and brought to its full utilization behind of the recoil spectrometer. It must be capable of selecting and slowing down the ions produced in the reactions (fusion transfer, very inelastic collisions, etc.) induced by the radioactive ions accelerated in CIME. At present, the collaboration is debating on the most favored subject to study and the most suited experimental setups. The following subjects were selected: ion capture, purification and manipulation; isomers (separation and utilization); mass measurements; hyperfine interactions; lifetimes, nuclear electric cloud; β decays; study of the N = Z nuclei close to the proton drip line; physical and chemical properties of transuranium systems

  15. Sympathetic cooling of ions in a hybrid atom ion trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeltkemeier, Bastian

    2016-10-27

    In this thesis the dynamics of a trapped ion immersed in a spatially localized buffer gas is investigated. For a homogeneous buffer gas, the ion's energy distribution reaches a stable equilibrium only if the mass of the buffer gas atoms is below a critical value. This limitation can be overcome by using multipole traps in combination and/or a spatially confined buffer gas. Using a generalized model for elastic collisions of the ion with the buffer gas atoms, the ion's energy distribution is numerically determined for arbitrary buffer gas distributions and trap parameters. Three regimes characterized by the respective analytic form of the ion's equilibrium energy distribution are found. One of these is a novel regime at large atom-to-ion mass ratios where the final ion temperature can tuned by adiabatically decreasing the spatial extension of the buffer gas and the effective ion trap depth (forced sympathetic cooling). The second part of the thesis presents a hybrid atom ion trap designed for sympathetic cooling of hydroxide anions. In this hybrid trap the anions are immersed in a cloud of laser cooled rubidium atoms. The translational and rovibrational temperatures of the anions is probed by photodetachment tomography and spectroscopy which shows the first ever indication of sympathetic cooling of anions by laser cooled atoms.

  16. Prolonging coherence in trapped ions

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Uys, H

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The authors study pulse sequences that dynamically decouple 9Be+ ions from their decohering environment. The noise environment the ions see is artificially synthesized to emulate a variety of physical systems. By incorporating measurement feedback...

  17. Quantum information processing with trapped ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeffner, H.; Haensel, W.; Rapol, U.; Koerber, T.; Benhelm, J.; Riebe, M.; Chek-al-Kar, D.; Schmidt-Kaler, F.; Becher, C.; Roos, C.; Blatt, R.

    2005-01-01

    Single Ca + ions and crystals of Ca + ions are confined in a linear Paul trap and are investigated for quantum information processing. Here we report on recent experimental advancements towards a quantum computer with such a system. Laser-cooled trapped ions are ideally suited systems for the investigation and implementation of quantum information processing as one can gain almost complete control over their internal and external degrees of freedom. The combination of a Paul type ion trap with laser cooling leads to unique properties of trapped cold ions, such as control of the motional state down to the zero-point of the trapping potential, a high degree of isolation from the environment and thus a very long time available for manipulations and interactions at the quantum level. The very same properties make single trapped atoms and ions well suited for storing quantum information in long lived internal states, e.g. by encoding a quantum bit (qubit) of information within the coherent superposition of the S 1/2 ground state and the metastable D 5/2 excited state of Ca + . Recently we have achieved the implementation of simple algorithms with up to 3 qubits on an ion-trap quantum computer. We will report on methods to implement single qubit rotations, the realization of a two-qubit universal quantum gate (Cirac-Zoller CNOT-gate), the deterministic generation of multi-particle entangled states (GHZ- and W-states), their full tomographic reconstruction, the realization of deterministic quantum teleportation, its quantum process tomography and the encoding of quantum information in decoherence-free subspaces with coherence times exceeding 20 seconds. (author)

  18. Ions kinematics in an electrostatic ion beam trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attia, D

    2004-06-01

    In this study, I have tried to provide a better understanding of the dynamics of ions inside an electrostatic ion beam trap. The electrostatic ion trap allows to store ions moving between two electrostatic mirrors. Although the trap has been developed already seven years ago, no direct measurement of the transversal velocity distribution of the ions has been performed. Such quantity is central for understanding the conditions under which a beam should be produced (mainly emittance) in order to be trapped by such a device. The data I have obtained during the course of this work are based on an experimental technique which relies on the direct imaging of the particles exiting the trap, as well as on numerical simulations of the ion trajectories inside the trap. I have personally been involved in the hardware development of the imaging system, the data acquisition and analysis of the data as well as il all numerical calculations presented here. These results allow us to obtain, for the first time, experimental information on the transverse phase space of the trap, and contribute to the overall understanding of the ion motion in this system. (author)

  19. Highly charged ion trapping and cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, B. R.; Church, D. A.; Gruber, L.; Holder, J. P.; Schneider, D.; Steiger, J.

    1998-01-01

    In the past few years a cryogenic Penning trap (RETRAP) has been operational at the Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The combination of RETRAP and EBIT provides a unique possibility of producing and re-trapping highly charged ions and cooling them to very low temperatures. Due to the high Coulomb potentials in such an ensemble of cold highly charged ions the Coulomb coupling parameter (the ratio of Coulomb potential to the thermal energy) can easily reach values of 172 and more. To study such systems is not only of interest in astrophysics to simulate White Dwarf star interiors but opens up new possibilities in a variety of areas (e.g. laser spectroscopy), cold highly charged ion beams

  20. Achieving Translationally Invariant Trapped Ion Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Erik; Li, Hao-Kun; Noel, Crystal; Hemmerling, Boerge; Zhang, Xiang; Haeffner, Hartmut

    2017-04-01

    We present the design and implementation of a novel surface ion trap design in a ring configuration. By eliminating the need for wire bonds through the use of electrical vias and using a rotationally invariant electrode configuration, we have realized a trap that is able to trap up to 20 ions in a ring geometry 45um in diameter, 400um above the trap surface. This large trapping height to ring diameter ratio allows for global addressing of the ring with both lasers and electric fields in the chamber, thereby increasing our ability to control the ring as a whole. Applying compensating electric fields, we measure very low tangential trap frequencies (less than 20kHz) corresponding to rotational barriers down to 4mK. This measurement is currently limited by the temperature of the ions but extrapolation indicates the barrier can be reduced much further with more advanced cooling techniques. Finally, we show that we are able to reduce this energy barrier sufficiently such that the ions are able to overcome it either through thermal motion or rotational motion and delocalize over the full extent of the ring. This work was funded by the Keck Foundation and the NSF.

  1. Microfabricated Microwave-Integrated Surface Ion Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revelle, Melissa C.; Blain, Matthew G.; Haltli, Raymond A.; Hollowell, Andrew E.; Nordquist, Christopher D.; Maunz, Peter

    2017-04-01

    Quantum information processing holds the key to solving computational problems that are intractable with classical computers. Trapped ions are a physical realization of a quantum information system in which qubits are encoded in hyperfine energy states. Coupling the qubit states to ion motion, as needed for two-qubit gates, is typically accomplished using Raman laser beams. Alternatively, this coupling can be achieved with strong microwave gradient fields. While microwave radiation is easier to control than a laser, it is challenging to precisely engineer the radiated microwave field. Taking advantage of Sandia's microfabrication techniques, we created a surface ion trap with integrated microwave electrodes with sub-wavelength dimensions. This multi-layered device permits co-location of the microwave antennae and the ion trap electrodes to create localized microwave gradient fields and necessary trapping fields. Here, we characterize the trap design and present simulated microwave performance with progress towards experimental results. This research was funded, in part, by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA).

  2. Spectroscopy of a Synthetic Trapped Ion Qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hucul, David; Christensen, Justin E.; Hudson, Eric R.; Campbell, Wesley C.

    2017-09-01

    133Ba+ has been identified as an attractive ion for quantum information processing due to the unique combination of its spin-1 /2 nucleus and visible wavelength electronic transitions. Using a microgram source of radioactive material, we trap and laser cool the synthetic A =133 radioisotope of barium II in a radio-frequency ion trap. Using the same, single trapped atom, we measure the isotope shifts and hyperfine structure of the 62P1 /2↔62S1 /2 and 62P1 /2↔52D3 /2 electronic transitions that are needed for laser cooling, state preparation, and state detection of the clock-state hyperfine and optical qubits. We also report the 62P1 /2↔52D3 /2 electronic transition isotope shift for the rare A =130 and 132 barium nuclides, completing the spectroscopic characterization necessary for laser cooling all long-lived barium II isotopes.

  3. A small trapped-ion quantum register

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kielpinski, D

    2003-01-01

    We review experiments performed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology on entanglement, Bell's inequality and decoherence-free subspaces (DFSs) in a quantum register of trapped 9 Be + ions. The group of Dr David Wineland has demonstrated entanglement of up to four ions using the technique of Molmer and Sorensen. This method produces the state (|↓↓> + |↑↑>)/√2 for two ions and the state (|↓↓↓↓> + |↑↑↑↑>)/√2 for four ions. The entanglement was generated deterministically in each shot of the experiment. Measurements on the two-ion entangled state violate Bell's inequality at the 8σ level. Because of the high detector efficiency of the apparatus, this experiment closes the detector loophole for Bell's inequality measurements for the first time. This measurement is also the first violation of Bell's inequality by massive particles that does not implicitly assume results from quantum mechanics. The group also demonstrated measurement of an interferometric phase with precision better than the shot-noise limit using a two-ion entangled state. A large-scale version of this scheme could improve the signal-to-noise ratio of atomic clocks by orders of magnitude. Further experiments demonstrated reversible encoding of an arbitrary qubit, originally contained in one ion, into a DFS of two ions. The DFS-encoded qubit resists applied collective dephasing noise and retains coherence under ambient conditions 3.6 times longer than does an unencoded qubit. The encoding method, which uses single-ion gates and the two-ion entangling gate, demonstrates all the elements required for two-qubit universal quantum logic. Finally, we describe an architecture for a large-scale ion trap quantum computer. By performing logic gates on small numbers of ions trapped in separate regions of the array, we take advantage of existing techniques for manipulating small trapped-ion quantum registers while enabling massively parallel gate operation. Encoding the

  4. Colloquium: Quantum Networks with Trapped Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-28

    observed be- tween two ions held in the same trap Eichmann et al., 1993; DeVoe and Brewer, 1996. Type-II links have the advantage of being less sensitive...Childress, E. Jiang, J. Togan, J. Maze, F. Jelezko, A. S. Zibrov, P. R. Hemmer, and M. D. Lukin, 2007, Science 316, 1312. Eichmann , U., J. C. Bergquist

  5. Proposed LLNL electron beam ion trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marrs, R.E.; Egan, P.O.; Proctor, I.; Levine, M.A.; Hansen, L.; Kajiyama, Y.; Wolgast, R.

    1985-01-01

    The interaction of energetic electrons with highly charged ions is of great importance to several research fields such as astrophysics, laser fusion and magnetic fusion. In spite of this importance there are almost no measurements of electron interaction cross sections for ions more than a few times ionized. To address this problem an electron beam ion trap (EBIT) is being developed at LLNL. The device is essentially an EBIS except that it is not intended as a source of extracted ions. Instead the (variable energy) electron beam interacting with the confined ions will be used to obtain measurements of ionization cross sections, dielectronic recombination cross sections, radiative recombination cross sections, energy levels and oscillator strengths. Charge-exchange recombinaion cross sections with neutral gasses could also be measured. The goal is to produce and study elements in many different charge states up to He-like xenon and Ne-like uranium. 5 refs., 2 figs

  6. Cryogenic setup for trapped ion quantum computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandl, M F; van Mourik, M W; Postler, L; Nolf, A; Lakhmanskiy, K; Paiva, R R; Möller, S; Daniilidis, N; Häffner, H; Kaushal, V; Ruster, T; Warschburger, C; Kaufmann, H; Poschinger, U G; Schmidt-Kaler, F; Schindler, P; Monz, T; Blatt, R

    2016-11-01

    We report on the design of a cryogenic setup for trapped ion quantum computing containing a segmented surface electrode trap. The heat shield of our cryostat is designed to attenuate alternating magnetic field noise, resulting in 120 dB reduction of 50 Hz noise along the magnetic field axis. We combine this efficient magnetic shielding with high optical access required for single ion addressing as well as for efficient state detection by placing two lenses each with numerical aperture 0.23 inside the inner heat shield. The cryostat design incorporates vibration isolation to avoid decoherence of optical qubits due to the motion of the cryostat. We measure vibrations of the cryostat of less than ±20 nm over 2 s. In addition to the cryogenic apparatus, we describe the setup required for an operation with 40 Ca + and 88 Sr + ions. The instability of the laser manipulating the optical qubits in 40 Ca + is characterized by yielding a minimum of its Allan deviation of 2.4 ⋅ 10 -15 at 0.33 s. To evaluate the performance of the apparatus, we trapped 40 Ca + ions, obtaining a heating rate of 2.14(16) phonons/s and a Gaussian decay of the Ramsey contrast with a 1/e-time of 18.2(8) ms.

  7. Quasi-conical centrifugal ion trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golikov, Yu.K.; Solov'ev, K.V.; Grigor'ev, D.V.; Flegontova, E.Yu.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes a new excellent ion trap that principally differs from the classic hyperbolic one by its action. The action is based on the axisymmetric electrostatic quasi-conical field with the following potential type: F=F 0 [ln r - r 2 /2+z 2 ], where r, z are cylindrical dimensionless coordinates. The radial potential run (f=ln r-r 2 /2), in this case, is exactly presented by the approximation function f a =ar 2 +b/r 2 +c. In addition, there are some ranges of r (for example, 0.6< r<0.35), in which the concurrence accuracy value is above 0.5%. The paper presents the theory of particles dynamics in the centrifugal trap. Basic correlation for resolution ratios and sensitivity values are developed. Recommendations on the centrifugal trap design implementation, including the recording system, are given

  8. Spectroscopy of neutral radium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mol, Aran; De, Subhadeep; Jungmann, Klaus; Wilschut, Hans; Willmann, Lorenz [KVI, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2008-07-01

    The heavy alkaline earth atoms radium is uniquely sensitive towards parity and time reversal symmetry violations due to a large enhancement of an intrinsic permanent electric dipole moment of the nucleous or the electron. Furthermore, radium is sensitive to atomic parity violation and the nuclear anapole moment. To prepare such experiments spectroscopy of relevant atomic states need to be done. At a later stage we will build a neutral atom trap for radium. We have built an atomic beam of the short lived isotope {sup 225}Ra with a flux of several 10{sup 4} atoms/sec. We are preparing the laser spectroscopy using this beam setup. In the preparation for efficient laser cooling and trapping we have successfully trapped barium, which is similar in it's requirements for laser cooling. The techniques which we have developed with barium can be used to trap rare radium isotopes. We report on the progress of the experiments.

  9. Ion Motion Stability in Asymmetric Surface Electrode Ion Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Fayaz; Ozakin, Arkadas

    2010-03-01

    Many recently developed designs of the surface electrode ion traps for quantum information processing have asymmetry built into their geometries. The asymmetry helps rotate the trap axes to angles with respect to electrode surface that facilitate laser cooling of ions but introduces a relative angle between the RF and DC fields and invalidates the classical stability analysis of the symmetric case for which the equations of motion are decoupled. For asymmetric case the classical motion of a single ion is given by a coupled, multi-dimensional version of Mathieu's equation. In this poster we discuss the stability diagram of asymmetric surface traps by performing an approximate multiple scale perturbation analysis of the coupled Mathieu equations, and validate the results with numerical simulations. After obtaining the stability diagram for the linear fields, we simulate the motion of an ion in a given asymmetric surface trap, utilizing a method-of-moments calculation of the electrode fields. We obtain the stability diagram and compare it with the ideal case to find the region of validity. Finally, we compare the results of our stability analysis to experiments conducted on a microfabricated asymmetric surface trap.

  10. Radium separation through complexation by aqueous crown ethers and ion exchange or solvent extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiarizia, R.; Dietz, M.L.; Horwitz, E.P. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemistry Div.; Burnett, W.C. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). Dept. of Oceanography

    1997-11-01

    The effect of three water-soluble, unsubstituted crown ethers (15-crown-5 (15C5), 18-crown-6 (18C6) and 21-crown-7 (21C7)) on the uptake of Ca, Sr, Ba and Ra cations by a sulfonic acid cation exchange resin, and on the extraction of the same cations by xylene solutions of dinonylnaphthalenesulfonic acid (HDNNS) from aqueous hydrochloric acid solutions has been investigated. The crown ethers enhance the sorption of the larger cations by the ion exchange resin, thereby improving the resin selectivity over calcium, a result of a synergistic interaction between the crown ether and the ionic functional groups of the resin. Similarly, the extraction of the larger alkaline earth cations into xylene by HDNNS is strongly synergized by the presence of the crown ethers in the aqueous phase. Promising results for intra-Group IIa cation separations have been obtained using each of the three crown ethers as the aqueous ligands and the sulfonic acid cation exchange resin. Even greater separation factors for the radium-calcium couple have been measured with the crown-ethers and HDNNS solutions in the solvent extraction mode. The application of the uptake and extraction results to the development of radium separation schemes is discussed and a possible flowchart for the determination of {sup 226}Ra/{sup 228}Ra in natural waters is presented.

  11. Microwave quantum logic gates for trapped ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ospelkaus, C; Warring, U; Colombe, Y; Brown, K R; Amini, J M; Leibfried, D; Wineland, D J

    2011-08-10

    Control over physical systems at the quantum level is important in fields as diverse as metrology, information processing, simulation and chemistry. For trapped atomic ions, the quantized motional and internal degrees of freedom can be coherently manipulated with laser light. Similar control is difficult to achieve with radio-frequency or microwave radiation: the essential coupling between internal degrees of freedom and motion requires significant field changes over the extent of the atoms' motion, but such changes are negligible at these frequencies for freely propagating fields. An exception is in the near field of microwave currents in structures smaller than the free-space wavelength, where stronger gradients can be generated. Here we first manipulate coherently (on timescales of 20 nanoseconds) the internal quantum states of ions held in a microfabricated trap. The controlling magnetic fields are generated by microwave currents in electrodes that are integrated into the trap structure. We also generate entanglement between the internal degrees of freedom of two atoms with a gate operation suitable for general quantum computation; the entangled state has a fidelity of 0.76(3), where the uncertainty denotes standard error of the mean. Our approach, which involves integrating the quantum control mechanism into the trapping device in a scalable manner, could be applied to quantum information processing, simulation and spectroscopy.

  12. Trapped Ion Quantum Computation by Adiabatic Passage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Xuni; Wu Chunfeng; Lai, C. H.; Oh, C. H.

    2008-01-01

    We propose a new universal quantum computation scheme for trapped ions in thermal motion via the technique of adiabatic passage, which incorporates the advantages of both the adiabatic passage and the model of trapped ions in thermal motion. Our scheme is immune from the decoherence due to spontaneous emission from excited states as the system in our scheme evolves along a dark state. In our scheme the vibrational degrees of freedom are not required to be cooled to their ground states because they are only virtually excited. It is shown that the fidelity of the resultant gate operation is still high even when the magnitude of the effective Rabi frequency moderately deviates from the desired value.

  13. Scalable quantum search using trapped ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, S. S.; Ivanov, P. A.; Linington, I. E.; Vitanov, N. V.

    2010-01-01

    We propose a scalable implementation of Grover's quantum search algorithm in a trapped-ion quantum information processor. The system is initialized in an entangled Dicke state by using adiabatic techniques. The inversion-about-average and oracle operators take the form of single off-resonant laser pulses. This is made possible by utilizing the physical symmetries of the trapped-ion linear crystal. The physical realization of the algorithm represents a dramatic simplification: each logical iteration (oracle and inversion about average) requires only two physical interaction steps, in contrast to the large number of concatenated gates required by previous approaches. This not only facilitates the implementation but also increases the overall fidelity of the algorithm.

  14. Quantum Information Processing with Trapped Ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, M.D.; Schaetz, T.; Chiaverini, J.; Leibfried, D.; Britton, J.; Itano, W.M.; Jost, J.D.; Langer, C.; Ozeri, R.; Wineland, D.J.; Knill, E.

    2005-01-01

    We summarize two experiments on the creation and manipulation of multi-particle entangled states of trapped atomic ions - quantum dense coding and quantum teleportation. The techniques used in these experiments constitute an important step toward performing large-scale quantum information processing. The techniques also have application in other areas of physics, providing improvement in quantum-limited measurement and fundamental tests of quantum mechanical principles, for example

  15. Note: Ion source design for ion trap systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noriega, J. R.; Quevedo, M.; Gnade, B.; Vasselli, J.

    2013-06-01

    A small plasma (glow discharge) based ion source and circuit are described in this work. The ion source works by producing a high voltage pulsed discharge between two electrodes in a pressure range of 50-100 mTorr. A third mesh electrode is used for ion extraction. The electrodes are small stainless steel screws mounted in a MACOR ionization chamber in a linear arrangement. The electrode arrangement is driven by a circuit, design for low power operation. This design is a proof of concept intended for applications on small cylindrical ion traps.

  16. Trapped ion depletion by anomalous diffusion due to the dissipative trapped ion instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wimmel, H.K.

    1975-07-01

    At high temperatures the KADOMTSEV-POGUTSE diffusion in tokamaks can become so large as to cause depletion of trapped ions if these are replaced with free ions by means of collisions rather than being directly recycled or injected. Modified KADOMTSEV-POGUTSE diffusion formulas are employed in order to estimate this effect in the cases of classical and anomalous collisions. The maximum trapped-ion depletion is estimated from the PENROSE stability condition. For anomalous collisions a BOHM-type diffusion is derived. Numerical examples are given for JET-like parameters (JET = Joint European Torus). Depletion is found to reduce diffusion by factors of up to 10 and more. (orig.) [de

  17. Implementation schemes for unsharp measurements with trapped ions

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Choudhary, SK

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available trapped ion. The schemes rely on introducing weak entanglement between the state of a target ion and that of an auxiliary ion, using standard ion-trap quantum logic operations, and then realizing an unsharp measurement through projective measurement...

  18. Optimization and simulation of MEMS rectilinear ion trap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Gang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the design of a MEMS rectilinear ion trap was optimized under simulated conditions. The size range of the MEMS rectilinear ion trap’s electrodes studied in this paper is measured at micron scale. SIMION software was used to simulate the MEMS rectilinear ion trap with different sizes and different radio-frequency signals. The ion-trapping efficiencies of the ion trap under these different simulation conditions were obtained. The ion-trapping efficiencies were compared to determine the performance of the MEMS rectilinear ion trap in different conditions and to find the optimum conditions. The simulation results show that for the ion trap at micron scale or smaller, the optimized length–width ratio was 0.8, and a higher frequency of radio-frequency signal is necessary to obtain a higher ion-trapping efficiency. These results have a guiding role in the process of developing MEMS rectilinear ion traps, and great application prospects in the research fields of the MEMS rectilinear ion trap and the MEMS mass spectrometer.

  19. Ball-grid array architecture for microfabricated ion traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guise, Nicholas D.; Fallek, Spencer D.; Stevens, Kelly E.; Brown, K. R.; Volin, Curtis; Harter, Alexa W.; Amini, Jason M.; Higashi, Robert E.; Lu, Son Thai; Chanhvongsak, Helen M.; Nguyen, Thi A.; Marcus, Matthew S.; Ohnstein, Thomas R.; Youngner, Daniel W.

    2015-05-01

    State-of-the-art microfabricated ion traps for quantum information research are approaching nearly one hundred control electrodes. We report here on the development and testing of a new architecture for microfabricated ion traps, built around ball-grid array (BGA) connections, that is suitable for increasingly complex trap designs. In the BGA trap, through-substrate vias bring electrical signals from the back side of the trap die to the surface trap structure on the top side. Gold-ball bump bonds connect the back side of the trap die to an interposer for signal routing from the carrier. Trench capacitors fabricated into the trap die replace area-intensive surface or edge capacitors. Wirebonds in the BGA architecture are moved to the interposer. These last two features allow the trap die to be reduced to only the area required to produce trapping fields. The smaller trap dimensions allow tight focusing of an addressing laser beam for fast single-qubit rotations. Performance of the BGA trap as characterized with 40Ca+ ions is comparable to previous surface-electrode traps in terms of ion heating rate, mode frequency stability, and storage lifetime. We demonstrate two-qubit entanglement operations with 171Yb+ ions in a second BGA trap.

  20. Ball-grid array architecture for microfabricated ion traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guise, Nicholas D.; Fallek, Spencer D.; Stevens, Kelly E.; Brown, K. R.; Volin, Curtis; Harter, Alexa W.; Amini, Jason M.; Higashi, Robert E.; Lu, Son Thai; Chanhvongsak, Helen M.; Nguyen, Thi A.; Marcus, Matthew S.; Ohnstein, Thomas R.; Youngner, Daniel W.

    2015-01-01

    State-of-the-art microfabricated ion traps for quantum information research are approaching nearly one hundred control electrodes. We report here on the development and testing of a new architecture for microfabricated ion traps, built around ball-grid array (BGA) connections, that is suitable for increasingly complex trap designs. In the BGA trap, through-substrate vias bring electrical signals from the back side of the trap die to the surface trap structure on the top side. Gold-ball bump bonds connect the back side of the trap die to an interposer for signal routing from the carrier. Trench capacitors fabricated into the trap die replace area-intensive surface or edge capacitors. Wirebonds in the BGA architecture are moved to the interposer. These last two features allow the trap die to be reduced to only the area required to produce trapping fields. The smaller trap dimensions allow tight focusing of an addressing laser beam for fast single-qubit rotations. Performance of the BGA trap as characterized with 40 Ca + ions is comparable to previous surface-electrode traps in terms of ion heating rate, mode frequency stability, and storage lifetime. We demonstrate two-qubit entanglement operations with 171 Yb + ions in a second BGA trap

  1. Sawteeth stabilization by energetic trapped ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samain, A.; Edery, D.; Garbet, X.; Roubin, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    The analysis of a possible stabilization of sawteeth by a population of energetic ions is performed by using the Lagrangian of the electromagnetic perturbation. It is shown that the trapped component of such a population has a small influence compared to that of the passing component. The stabilization threshold is calculated assuming a non linear regime in the q=1 resonant layer. The energetic population must create a stable tearing structure if the average curvature effect on thermal particles in the layer is small. However, this effect decreases the actual threshold

  2. Ion production and trapping in electron rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gluckstern, R.C.; Ruggiero, A.G.

    1979-08-01

    The electron beam in the VUV and X-ray rings of NSLS will ionize residual gas by collisions. Positive ions will be produced with low velocity, and will be attracted by the electron beam to the beam axis. If they are trapped in stable (transverse) orbits, they may accumulate, thereby increasing the ν/sub x,z/ of the individual electrons. Since the accumulated ions are unlikely to be of uniform density, a spread in ν/sub x,z/ will also occur. Should these effects be serious, it may be necessary to introduce clearing electrodes, although this may increase Z/n in the rings, thereby adding to longitudinal instability problems. The seriousness of the above effect for the VUV and X-ray rings is estimated

  3. Ion trapping in the high-energy storage ring HESR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinterberger, Frank [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik

    2011-10-15

    The problem of ion trapping in the high-energy storage ring HESR is studied in the present report. Positive ions are trapped in the negative potential well of the antiproton beam. The ions are produced by the interaction between the antiproton beam and the residual gas. The adverse effects of ion trapping like tune shifts, tune spreads and coherent instabilities are reviewed. The ion production rate by ionization of the residual gas molecules is estimated. The negative potential well and the corresponding electric fields of the antiproton beam are evaluated in order to study the transverse and longitudinal motion of the ions and the accumulation in trapping pockets. The removal of ions can be achieved using clearing electrodes and under certain conditions resonant transverse beam shaking. Diagnostic tools and measurements of trapped ion effects are sketched. (orig.)

  4. Detecting yocto (10-24) newton forces with trapped ions

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Uys, H

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on a calibrated measurement of 174 Yoctonewton using a cloud of 60 9 Be+ ion confined in a Penning ion trap. These measurements suggest that ion traps may form the basis of a new class of ultrasensitive deployable force sensors....

  5. Sympathetic Wigner-function tomography of a dark trapped ion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirkhalaf, Safoura; Mølmer, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    A protocol is provided to reconstruct the Wigner function for the motional state of a trapped ion via fluorescence detection on another ion in the same trap. This “sympathetic tomography” of a dark ion without optical transitions suitable for state measurements is based on the mapping of its...

  6. Evaporative cooling of highly charged ions in EBIT [Electron Beam Ion Trap]: An experimental realization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, M.B.; Levine, M.A.; Bennett, C.L.; Henderson, J.R.; Knapp, D.A.; Marrs, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    Both the total number and trapping lifetime of near-neon-like gold ions held in an electron beam ion trap have been greatly increased by a process of 'evaporative cooling'. A continuous flow of low-charge-state ions into the trap cools the high-charge-state ions in the trap. Preliminary experimental results using titanium ions as a coolant are presented. 8 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Trapped ion mode in toroidally rotating plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artun, M.; Tang, W.M.; Rewoldt, G.

    1995-04-01

    The influence of radially sheared toroidal flows on the Trapped Ion Mode (TIM) is investigated using a two-dimensional eigenmode code. These radially extended toroidal microinstabilities could significantly influence the interpretation of confinement scaling trends and associated fluctuation properties observed in recent tokamak experiments. In the present analysis, the electrostatic drift kinetic equation is obtained from the general nonlinear gyrokinetic equation in rotating plasmas. In the long perpendicular wavelength limit k τ ρ bi much-lt 1, where ρ bi is the average trapped-ion banana width, the resulting eigenmode equation becomes a coupled system of second order differential equations nmo for the poloidal harmonics. These equations are solved using finite element methods. Numerical results from the analysis of low and medium toroidal mode number instabilities are presented using representative TFTR L-mode input parameters. To illustrate the effects of mode coupling, a case is presented where the poloidal mode coupling is suppressed. The influence of toroidal rotation on a TFTR L-mode shot is also analyzed by including a beam species with considerable larger temperature. A discussion of the numerical results is presented

  8. High-fidelity operations in microfabricated surface ion traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maunz, Peter

    2017-04-01

    Trapped ion systems can be used to implement quantum computation as well as quantum simulation. To scale these systems to the number of qubits required to solve interesting problems in quantum chemistry or solid state physics, the use of large multi-zone ion traps has been proposed. Microfabrication enables the realization of surface electrode ion traps with complex electrode structures. While these traps may enable the scaling of trapped ion quantum information processing (QIP), microfabricated ion traps also pose several technical challenges. Here, we present Sandia's trap fabrication capabilities and characterize trap properties and shuttling operations in our most recent high optical access trap (HOA-2). To demonstrate the viability of Sandia's microfabricated ion traps for QIP we realize robust single and two-qubit gates and characterize them using gate set tomography (GST). In this way we are able to demonstrate the first single qubit gates with a diamond norm of less than 1 . 7 ×10-4 , below a rigorous fault tolerance threshold for general noise of 6 . 7 ×10-4. Furthermore, we realize Mølmer-Sørensen two qubit gates with a process fidelity of 99 . 58(6) % also characterized by GST. These results demonstrate the viability of microfabricated surface traps for state of the art quantum information processing demonstrations. This research was funded, in part, by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA).

  9. Nonlinear theory of collisionless trapped ion modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahm, T.S.; Tang, W.M.

    1996-01-01

    A simplified two field nonlinear model for collisionless trapped-ion-mode turbulence has been derived from nonlinear bounce-averaged drift kinetic equations. The renormalized thermal diffusivity obtained from this analysis exhibits a Bohm-like scaling. A new nonlinearity associated with the neoclassical polarization density is found to introduce an isotope-dependent modification to this Bohm-like diffusivity. The asymptotic balance between the equilibrium variation and the finite banana width induced reduction of the fluctuation potential leads to the result that the radial correlation length decreases with increasing plasma current. Other important conclusions from the present analysis include the predictions that (i) the relative density fluctuation level δn/n 0 is lower than the conventional mixing length estimate, Δr/L n (ii) the ion temperature fluctuation level δT i /T i significantly exceeds the density fluctuation level δn/n 0 ; and (iii) the parallel ion velocity fluctuation level δv iparallel /v Ti is expected to be negligible

  10. Scaling Trapped Ion Quantum Computers Using Fast Gates and Microtraps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratcliffe, Alexander K.; Taylor, Richard L.; Hope, Joseph J.; Carvalho, André R. R.

    2018-06-01

    Most attempts to produce a scalable quantum information processing platform based on ion traps have focused on the shuttling of ions in segmented traps. We show that an architecture based on an array of microtraps with fast gates will outperform architectures based on ion shuttling. This system requires higher power lasers but does not require the manipulation of potentials or shuttling of ions. This improves optical access, reduces the complexity of the trap, and reduces the number of conductive surfaces close to the ions. The use of fast gates also removes limitations on the gate time. Error rates of 10-5 are shown to be possible with 250 mW laser power and a trap separation of 100 μ m . The performance of the gates is shown to be robust to the limitations in the laser repetition rate and the presence of many ions in the trap array.

  11. Trapped ion simulation of molecular spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yangchao; Lu, Yao; Zhang, Kuan; Zhang, Shuaining; Huh, Joonsuk; Kim, Kihwan

    2016-05-01

    Boson sampling had been suggested as a classically intractable and quantum mechanically manageable problem via computational complexity theory arguments. Recently, Huh and co-workers proposed theoretically a modified version of boson sampling, which is designed to simulate a molecular problem, as a practical application. Here, we report the experimental implementation of the theoretical proposal with a trapped ion system. As a first demonstration, we perform the quantum simulation of molecular vibronic profile of SO2, which incorporates squeezing, rotation and coherent displacements operations, and the collective projection measurement on phonon modes. This work was supported by the National Basic Research Program of China 11CBA00300, 2011CBA00301, National Natural Science Foundation of China 11374178, 11574002. Basic Science Research Program of Korea NRF-2015R1A6A3A04059773.

  12. Systems and Methods for Ejection of Ions from an Ion Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooks, Robert Graham (Inventor); Snyder, Dalton (Inventor)

    2018-01-01

    The invention generally relates to systems and methods for ejection of ions from an ion trap. In certain embodiments, systems and methods of the invention sum two different frequency signals into a single summed signal that is applied to an ion trap. In other embodiments, an amplitude of a single frequency signal is modulated as the single frequency signal is being applied to the ion trap. In other embodiments, a first alternating current (AC) signal is applied to an ion trap that varies as a function of time, while a constant radio frequency (RF) signal is applied to the ion trap.

  13. Atomic physics measurements in an electron Beam Ion Trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marrs, R.E.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Bennett, C.

    1989-01-01

    An electron Beam Ion Trap at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is being used to produce and trap very-highly-charged ions (q ≤ 70/+/) for x-ray spectroscopy measurements. Recent measurements of transition energies and electron excitation cross sections for x-ray line emission are summarized. 13 refs., 10 figs

  14. Controlling trapping potentials and stray electric fields in a microfabricated ion trap through design and compensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charles Doret, S; Amini, Jason M; Wright, Kenneth; Volin, Curtis; Killian, Tyler; Ozakin, Arkadas; Denison, Douglas; Hayden, Harley; Pai, C-S; Slusher, Richart E; Harter, Alexa W

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in quantum information processing with trapped ions have demonstrated the need for new ion trap architectures capable of holding and manipulating chains of many (>10) ions. Here we present the design and detailed characterization of a new linear trap, microfabricated with scalable complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) techniques, that is well-suited to this challenge. Forty-four individually controlled dc electrodes provide the many degrees of freedom required to construct anharmonic potential wells, shuttle ions, merge and split ion chains, precisely tune secular mode frequencies, and adjust the orientation of trap axes. Microfabricated capacitors on dc electrodes suppress radio-frequency pickup and excess micromotion, while a top-level ground layer simplifies modeling of electric fields and protects trap structures underneath. A localized aperture in the substrate provides access to the trapping region from an oven below, permitting deterministic loading of particular isotopic/elemental sequences via species-selective photoionization. The shapes of the aperture and radio-frequency electrodes are optimized to minimize perturbation of the trapping pseudopotential. Laboratory experiments verify simulated potentials and characterize trapping lifetimes, stray electric fields, and ion heating rates, while measurement and cancellation of spatially-varying stray electric fields permits the formation of nearly-equally spaced ion chains. (paper)

  15. METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR TRAPPING IONS IN A MAGNETIC FIELD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luce, J.S.

    1962-04-17

    A method and apparatus are described for trapping ions within an evacuated container and within a magnetic field utilizing dissociation and/or ionization of molecular ions to form atomic ions and energetic neutral particles. The atomic ions are magnetically trapped as a result of a change of charge-to- mass ratio. The molecular ions are injected into the container and into the path of an energetic carbon arc discharge which dissociates and/or ionizes a portion of the molecular ions into atomic ions and energetic neutrals. The resulting atomic ions are trapped by the magnetic field to form a circulating beam of atomic ions, and the energetic neutrals pass out of the system and may be utilized in a particle accelerator. (AEC)

  16. Atomic and nuclear physics with stored particles in ion traps

    CERN Document Server

    Kluge, H J; Herfurth, F; Quint, W

    2002-01-01

    Trapping and cooling techniques play an increasingly important role in many areas of science. This review concentrates on recent applications of ion traps installed at accelerator facilities to atomic and nuclear physics such as mass spectrometry of radioactive isotopes, weak interaction studies, symmetry tests, determination of fundamental constants, laser spectroscopy, and spectroscopy of highly-charged ions. In addition, ion traps are proven to be extremely efficient devices for (radioactive) ion beam manipulation as, for example, retardation, accumulation, cooling, beam cleaning, charge-breeding, and bunching.

  17. Space-charge effects in Penning ion traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porobić, T.; Beck, M.; Breitenfeldt, M.; Couratin, C.; Finlay, P.; Knecht, A.; Fabian, X.; Friedag, P.; Fléchard, X.; Liénard, E.; Ban, G.; Zákoucký, D.; Soti, G.; Van Gorp, S.; Weinheimer, Ch.; Wursten, E.; Severijns, N.

    2015-06-01

    The influence of space-charge on ion cyclotron resonances and magnetron eigenfrequency in a gas-filled Penning ion trap has been investigated. Off-line measurements with K39+ using the cooling trap of the WITCH retardation spectrometer-based setup at ISOLDE/CERN were performed. Experimental ion cyclotron resonances were compared with ab initio Coulomb simulations and found to be in agreement. As an important systematic effect of the WITCH experiment, the magnetron eigenfrequency of the ion cloud was studied under increasing space-charge conditions. Finally, the helium buffer gas pressure in the Penning trap was determined by comparing experimental cooling rates with simulations.

  18. Removal of radium from drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauch, R.P.

    1992-08-01

    The report summarizes processes for removal of radium from drinking water. Ion exchange, including strong acid and weak acid resin, is discussed. Both processes remove better than 95 percent of the radium from the water. Weak acid ion exchange does not add sodium to the water. Calcium cation exchange removes radium and can be used when hardness removal is not necessary. Iron removal processes are discussed in relation to radium removal. Iron oxides remove much less than 20 percent of the radium from water under typical conditions. Manganese dioxide removes radium from water when competition for sorption sites and clogging of sites is reduced. Filter sand that is rinsed daily with dilute acid will remove radium from water. Manganese dioxide coated filter sorption removes radium but more capacity would be desirable. The radium selective complexer selectively removes radium with significant capacity if iron fouling is eliminated

  19. Modular Universal Scalable Ion-trap Quantum Computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-02

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The main goal of the original MUSIQC proposal was to construct and demonstrate a modular and universally- expandable ion...Distribution Unlimited UU UU UU UU 02-06-2016 1-Aug-2010 31-Jan-2016 Final Report: Modular Universal Scalable Ion-trap Quantum Computer The views...P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Ion trap quantum computation, scalable modular architectures REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11

  20. Towards a wire-mediated coupling of trapped ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Robert; Lee, Tony; Daniilidis, Nikos; Sankaranarayanan, S.; Häffner, Hartmut

    2008-03-01

    Most schemes for ion trap quantum computation rely upon the exchange of information between ion-qubits in the same trap region, mediated by their shared vibrational mode. An alternative way to achieve this coupling is via the image charges induced in a conducting wire that connects different traps. This was shown to be theoretically possible by Heinzen and Wineland in 1990, but some important practical questions have remained unaddressed. Among these are how the presence of such a wire modifies the motional frequencies and heating rates of trapped ions. We thus have realized this system as a 1 mm-scale planar segmented rf ion trap combined with an electrically floating gold wire of 25 microns diameter and length 1 cm. This wire is placed close to trapped ions using a set of piezoelectric nanopositioners. We present here experimental measurements of the motional frequencies and heating rates of a single trapped calcium ion as the wire is moved from 3.0 mm to 0.2 mm away from the ion. We discuss the implications of these results for achieving wire-mediated coupling in the present apparatus, as well as in future improved setups.

  1. Single qubit manipulation in a microfabricated surface electrode ion trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mount, Emily; Baek, So-Young; Blain, Matthew; Stick, Daniel; Gaultney, Daniel; Crain, Stephen; Noek, Rachel; Kim, Taehyun; Maunz, Peter; Kim, Jungsang

    2013-09-01

    We trap individual 171Yb+ ions in a surface trap microfabricated on a silicon substrate, and demonstrate a complete set of high fidelity single qubit operations for the hyperfine qubit. Trapping times exceeding 20 min without laser cooling, and heating rates as low as 0.8 quanta ms-1, indicate stable trapping conditions in these microtraps. A coherence time of more than 1 s, high fidelity qubit state detection and single qubit rotations are demonstrated. The observation of low heating rates and demonstration of high quality single qubit gates at room temperature are critical steps toward scalable quantum information processing in microfabricated surface traps.

  2. Single qubit manipulation in a microfabricated surface electrode ion trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mount, Emily; Baek, So-Young; Gaultney, Daniel; Crain, Stephen; Noek, Rachel; Kim, Taehyun; Maunz, Peter; Kim, Jungsang; Blain, Matthew; Stick, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    We trap individual 171 Yb + ions in a surface trap microfabricated on a silicon substrate, and demonstrate a complete set of high fidelity single qubit operations for the hyperfine qubit. Trapping times exceeding 20 min without laser cooling, and heating rates as low as 0.8 quanta ms −1 , indicate stable trapping conditions in these microtraps. A coherence time of more than 1 s, high fidelity qubit state detection and single qubit rotations are demonstrated. The observation of low heating rates and demonstration of high quality single qubit gates at room temperature are critical steps toward scalable quantum information processing in microfabricated surface traps. (paper)

  3. Scalable error correction in distributed ion trap computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oi, Daniel K. L.; Devitt, Simon J.; Hollenberg, Lloyd C. L.

    2006-01-01

    A major challenge for quantum computation in ion trap systems is scalable integration of error correction and fault tolerance. We analyze a distributed architecture with rapid high-fidelity local control within nodes and entangled links between nodes alleviating long-distance transport. We demonstrate fault-tolerant operator measurements which are used for error correction and nonlocal gates. This scheme is readily applied to linear ion traps which cannot be scaled up beyond a few ions per individual trap but which have access to a probabilistic entanglement mechanism. A proof-of-concept system is presented which is within the reach of current experiment

  4. Dielectronic recombination measurements using the Electron Beam Ion Trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    We have used the Electron Beam Ion Trap at LLNL to study dielectronic recombination in highly charged ions. Our technique is unique because we observe the x-rays from dielectronic recombination at the same time we see x-rays from all other electron-ion interactions. We have recently taken high-resolution, state-selective data that resolves individual resonances

  5. Ion bunch stacking in a Penning trap after purification in an electrostatic mirror trap

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenbusch, M; Blaum, K; Borgmann, Ch; Kreim, S; Lunney, D; Manea, V; Schweikhard, L; Wienholtz, F; Wolf, R N

    2014-01-01

    The success of many measurements in analytical mass spectrometry as well as in precision mass determinations for atomic and nuclear physics is handicapped when the ion sources deliver ``contaminations'', i.e., unwanted ions of masses similar to those of the ions of interest. In particular, in ion-trapping devices, large amounts of contaminant ions result in significant systematic errors-if the measurements are possible at all. We present a solution for such cases: The ions from a quasi-continuous source are bunched in a linear radio-frequency-quadrupole ion trap, separated by a multi-reflection time-of-flight section followed by a Bradbury-Nielsen gate, and then captured in a Penning trap. Buffer-gas cooling is used to damp the ion motion in the latter, which allows a repeated opening of the Penning trap for a stacking of mass-selected ion bunches. Proof-of-principle demonstrations have been performed with the ISOLTRAP setup at ISOLDE/CERN, both with Cs-133(+) ions from an off-line ion source and by applicati...

  6. Ion trapping within the dust grain plasma sheath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovanovic, D.; Shukla, P.K.

    2002-01-01

    One of the most important and still unresolved problems in the physics of dusty plasmas is the determination of the dust charge. The grains are not directly accessible to measurements and it is necessary to have a reliable theoretical model of the electron and ion dynamics inside the Debye sphere for the interpretation of the relevant experimental data, which include also the effects of the surrounding electron and ion clouds. Recent computer simulations [6] and laboratory experiments [9] indicate that the plasma sheath is dominated by trapped ions, orbiting the grain on closed trajectories at distances smaller than the Debye radius, that cannot be accounted for by the classical theories. We present the first analytical, fully self-consistent, calculations of the electrostatic shielding of a charged dust grain in a collisional plasma. In the regime when the mean free path for the ion-dust collisions is larger than that for the ion-neutral collisions, we solve the kinetic equation for the ions, coupled with Boltzmann distributed electrons and Poisson's equation. The ion velocity distribution function, in the form of a spherically symmetric ion hole, is found to be anisotropic in the presence of charge-exchange collisions. The number of trapped ions and their spatial distribution are determined from the interplay between the collective plasma interaction and the collisional trapping/de-trapping. The stationary state results from the self-tuning of the trapped ion density by the feedback based on the nonlocality of the collisional integral, and on the ion mixing in the radial direction along elongated orbits. Our results confirm the existence of a strong Debye shielding of the dust charge, allowing also the over-population of the trapped ion distribution (ion hump)

  7. Numerical simulation of injection and resistive trapping of ion rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mankofsky, A.; Friedman, A.; Sudan, R.N.

    1981-01-01

    Numerical studies of the injection and resistive trapping efficiency of ion rings, using an improved algorithm are presented. Trapping efficiency is found to be strongly dependent upon the number of particles injected and upon mirror ratios in the system. Wall resistivity and beam divergence affect the process to a lesser extent. (author)

  8. From transistor to trapped-ion computers for quantum chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, M-H; Casanova, J; Mezzacapo, A; McClean, J; Lamata, L; Aspuru-Guzik, A; Solano, E

    2014-01-07

    Over the last few decades, quantum chemistry has progressed through the development of computational methods based on modern digital computers. However, these methods can hardly fulfill the exponentially-growing resource requirements when applied to large quantum systems. As pointed out by Feynman, this restriction is intrinsic to all computational models based on classical physics. Recently, the rapid advancement of trapped-ion technologies has opened new possibilities for quantum control and quantum simulations. Here, we present an efficient toolkit that exploits both the internal and motional degrees of freedom of trapped ions for solving problems in quantum chemistry, including molecular electronic structure, molecular dynamics, and vibronic coupling. We focus on applications that go beyond the capacity of classical computers, but may be realizable on state-of-the-art trapped-ion systems. These results allow us to envision a new paradigm of quantum chemistry that shifts from the current transistor to a near-future trapped-ion-based technology.

  9. Quantum Information Experiments with Trapped Ions at NIST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Andrew

    2015-03-01

    We present an overview of recent trapped-ion quantum information experiments at NIST. Advancing beyond few-qubit ``proof-of-principle'' experiments to the many-qubit systems needed for practical quantum simulation and information processing, without compromising on the performance demonstrated with small systems, remains a major challenge. One approach to scalable hardware development is surface-electrode traps. Micro-fabricated planar traps can have a number of useful features, including flexible electrode geometries, integrated microwave delivery, and spatio-temporal tuning of potentials for ion transport and spin-spin interactions. In this talk we report on a number of on-going investigations with surface traps. Experiments feature a multi-zone trap with closely spaced ions in a triangular arrangement (a first step towards 2D arrays of ions with tunable spin-spin interactions), a scheme for smooth transport through a junction in a 2D structure based on switchable RF potentials, and a micro-fabricated photo-detector integrated into a trap. We also give a progress report on our latest efforts to improve the fidelity of both optical and microwave 2-qubit gates. This work was supported by IARPA, ONR and the NIST Quantum Information Program. The 3-ion and switchable-RF-junction traps were developed in collaboration with Sandia National Laboratory.

  10. Space-charge effects in Penning ion traps

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Porobic, T.; Beck, M.; Breitenfeldt, M.; Couratin, C.; Finlay, P.; Knecht, A.; Fabian, X.; Friedag, P.; Flechard, X.; Lienard, E.; Ban, G.; Zákoucký, Dalibor; Soti, G.; Van Gorp, S.; Weinheimer, C.; Wursten, E.; Severijns, N.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 785, JUN (2015), s. 153-162 ISSN 0168-9002 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LA08015; GA MŠk(CZ) LG13031 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Penning trap * space-charge * magnetron motion * ion trapping * buffer gas cooling * ion cyclotron resonance Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.200, year: 2015

  11. Two-dimensional analysis of trapped-ion eigenmodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchand, R.; Tang, W.M.; Rewoldt, G.

    1979-11-01

    A fully two-dimensional eigenmode analysis of the trapped-ion instability in axisymmetric toroidal geometry is presented. The calculations also takes into account the basic dynamics associated with other low frequency modes such as the trapped-electron instability and the ion-temperature-gradient instability. The poloidal structure of the mode is taken into account by Fourier expanding the perturbed electrostatic potential, PHI, in theta

  12. Sawtooth activity of the ion cloud in an electron-beam ion trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radtke, R.; Biedermann, C.

    2003-01-01

    The dynamics of an ensemble of highly charged Ar and Ba ions in an electron-beam ion trap (EBIT) was studied by recording time-resolved x-ray spectra emitted from trapped ions. Sawtoothlike signatures manifest in the spectra for a variety of EBIT operating conditions indicating a sudden collapse of the ion inventory in the trap. The collapse occurs on a time scale of approximately 100 ms and the evolution of the sawteeth is very sensitive to parameters such as electron-beam current and axial trap depth. Analysis of the measurements is based on a time-dependent calculation of the trapping process showing that sawtooth activity is caused by the feedback between the low-Z argon and high-Z barium ions. This unexpected behavior demonstrates the importance of nonlinear effects in electron-beam traps containing more than a single ion species

  13. Memory coherence of a sympathetically cooled trapped-ion qubit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Home, J. P.; McDonnell, M. J.; Szwer, D. J.; Keitch, B. C.; Lucas, D. M.; Stacey, D. N.; Steane, A. M.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate sympathetic cooling of a 43 Ca + trapped-ion 'memory' qubit by a 40 Ca + 'coolant' ion sufficiently near the ground state of motion for fault-tolerant quantum logic, while maintaining coherence of the qubit. This is an essential ingredient in trapped-ion quantum computers. The isotope shifts are sufficient to suppress decoherence and phase shifts of the memory qubit due to the cooling light which illuminates both ions. We measure the qubit coherence during ten cycles of sideband cooling, finding a coherence loss of 3.3% per cooling cycle. The natural limit of the method is O(10 -4 ) infidelity per cooling cycle.

  14. Observation of String Ion Cloud in a Linear RF Trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aramaki, M.; Kameyama, S.; Kono, A.; Sakawa, Y.; Shoji, T.

    2009-01-01

    We aim to study the effect of the long-range correlation among ions on their statistical characteristics using ion clouds confined in a linear rf ion trap. It is important to keep the ion cloud in one dimension, where the influence of the rf heating is negligible, for the detailed research on the effect of the Coulomb interaction on the statistical characteristics of the ion cloud. In this paper, the method of the generation of an ideal ion string is proposed. We also briefly report the performances of our experimental equipment and the preliminary results of generation of ideal 1D ion cloud.

  15. Nested Penning Trap as a Source of Singly Charged Ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordonez, C.A.

    2003-01-01

    In the work reported, the possibility of using a nested Penning trap as a high purity source of low-charge-state ions is studied. For the configuration considered, a relatively dense ion plasma is confined by a three-dimensional electric potential well. The three-dimensional well is produced by the electric field generated by both the trap electrodes and a trapped electron plasma. The ion and electron plasmas are each considered to have Maxwellian velocity distributions. However, it is shown that the electron plasma must have a temperature that is higher than that of the ion plasma when the ions have low charge states. The work reported includes a self-consistent prediction of a possible plasma equilibrium

  16. HITRAP: A Facility for Experiments with Trapped Highly Charged Ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quint, W.; Dilling, J.; Djekic, S.; Haeffner, H.; Hermanspahn, N.; Kluge, H.-J.; Marx, G.; Moore, R.; Rodriguez, D.; Schoenfelder, J.; Sikler, G.; Valenzuela, T.; Verdu, J.; Weber, C.; Werth, G.

    2001-01-01

    HITRAP is a planned ion trap facility for capturing and cooling of highly charged ions produced at GSI in the heavy-ion complex of the UNILAC-SIS accelerators and the ESR storage ring. In this facility heavy highly charged ions up to uranium will be available as bare nuclei, hydrogen-like ions or few-electron systems at low temperatures. The trap for receiving and studying these ions is designed for operation at extremely high vacuum by cooling to cryogenic temperatures. The stored highly charged ions can be investigated in the trap itself or can be extracted from the trap at energies up to about 10 keV/q. The proposed physics experiments are collision studies with highly charged ions at well-defined low energies (eV/u), high-accuracy measurements to determine the g-factor of the electron bound in a hydrogen-like heavy ion and the atomic binding energies of few-electron systems, laser spectroscopy of HFS transitions and X-ray spectroscopy

  17. Study of heliumlike neon using an electron beam ion trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wargelin, B.J.; Kahn, S.M.; Beiersdorfer, P.

    1992-01-01

    The 2-to-1 spectra of several astrophysically abundant He-like ions are being studied using the Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Spectra are recorded for a broad range of plasma parameters, including electron density, energy, and ionization balance. We describe the experimental equipment and procedure and present some typical data

  18. Integrated Visible Photonics for Trapped-Ion Quantum Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-10

    etch to provide a smooth oxide facet, and clearance for fiber positioning for edge input coupling. Integrated Visible Photonics for Trapped-Ion...capability to optically address individual ions at several wavelengths. We demonstrate a dual-layered silicon nitride photonic platform for integration...coherence times, strong coulomb interactions, and optical addressability, hold great promise for implementation of practical quantum information

  19. Ion trap simulations of quantum fields in an expanding universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsing, Paul M; Dowling, Jonathan P; Milburn, G J

    2005-06-10

    We propose an experiment in which the phonon excitation of ion(s) in a trap, with a trap frequency exponentially modulated at rate kappa, exhibits a thermal spectrum with an "Unruh" temperature given by k(B)T=Planck kappa. We discuss the similarities of this experiment to the response of detectors in a de Sitter universe and the usual Unruh effect for uniformly accelerated detectors. We demonstrate a new Unruh effect for detectors that respond to antinormally ordered moments using the ion's first blue sideband transition.

  20. Electrodynamically trapped Yb+ ions for quantum information processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balzer, Chr.; Braun, A.; Hannemann, T.; Wunderlich, Chr.; Paape, Chr.; Ettler, M.; Neuhauser, W.

    2006-01-01

    Highly efficient, nearly deterministic, and isotope selective generation of Yb + ions by one- and two-color photoionization is demonstrated. State preparation and state selective detection of hyperfine states in 171 Yb + is investigated in order to optimize the purity of the prepared state and to time-optimize the detection process. Linear laser-cooled Yb + ion crystals confined in a Paul trap are demonstrated. Advantageous features of different previous ion trap experiments are combined, while at the same time the number of possible error sources is reduced by using a comparatively simple experimental apparatus. This opens a new path toward quantum state manipulation of individual trapped ions, and in particular, to scalable quantum computing

  1. Integrated System Technologies for Modular Trapped Ion Quantum Information Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crain, Stephen G.

    Although trapped ion technology is well-suited for quantum information science, scalability of the system remains one of the main challenges. One of the challenges associated with scaling the ion trap quantum computer is the ability to individually manipulate the increasing number of qubits. Using micro-mirrors fabricated with micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology, laser beams are focused on individual ions in a linear chain and steer the focal point in two dimensions. Multiple single qubit gates are demonstrated on trapped 171Yb+ qubits and the gate performance is characterized using quantum state tomography. The system features negligible crosstalk to neighboring ions (technologies demonstrated in this thesis can be integrated to form a single quantum register with all of the necessary resources to perform local gates as well as high fidelity readout and provide a photon link to other systems.

  2. Demonstration of Cold 40Ca+ Ions Confined in a Microscopic Surface-Electrode Ion Trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Liang; Wan Wei; Xie Yi; Wu Hao-Yu; Zhou Fei; Feng Mang

    2013-01-01

    40 Ca + ions are successfully confined, under the cooling of a red-detuned laser, in a home-built microscopic surface-electrode (MSE) trap. With all electrodes deposited on a low-rf-loss substrate, our 500-μm-scale MSE trap is designed involving three potential wells and manufactured by the standard technique of the printed circuit board. Both linear and two-dimensional crystals of 40 Ca + are observed in the trap after preliminary micromotion compensation is carried out. The development of the MSE trap aims at large-scale trapped-ion quantum information processing

  3. Reducing Motional Decoherence in Ion Traps with Surface Science Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeffner, Hartmut

    2014-03-01

    Many trapped ions experiments ask for low motional heating rates while trapping the ions close to trapping electrodes. However, in practice small ion-electrode distances lead to unexpected high heating rates. While the mechanisms for the heating is still unclear, it is now evident that surface contamination of the metallic electrodes is at least partially responsible for the elevated heating rates. I will discuss heating rate measurements in a microfabricated surface trap complemented with basic surface science studies. We monitor the elemental surface composition of the Cu-Al alloy trap with an Auger spectrometer. After bake-out, we find a strong Carbon and Oxygen contamination and heating rates of 200 quanta/s at 1 MHz trap frequency. After removing most of the Carbon and Oxygen with Ar-Ion sputtering, the heating rates drop to 4 quanta/s. Interestingly, we still measure the decreased heating rate even after the surface oxidized from the background gas throughout a 40-day waiting time in UHV.

  4. Parallel Transport Quantum Logic Gates with Trapped Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Clercq, Ludwig E; Lo, Hsiang-Yu; Marinelli, Matteo; Nadlinger, David; Oswald, Robin; Negnevitsky, Vlad; Kienzler, Daniel; Keitch, Ben; Home, Jonathan P

    2016-02-26

    We demonstrate single-qubit operations by transporting a beryllium ion with a controlled velocity through a stationary laser beam. We use these to perform coherent sequences of quantum operations, and to perform parallel quantum logic gates on two ions in different processing zones of a multiplexed ion trap chip using a single recycled laser beam. For the latter, we demonstrate individually addressed single-qubit gates by local control of the speed of each ion. The fidelities we observe are consistent with operations performed using standard methods involving static ions and pulsed laser fields. This work therefore provides a path to scalable ion trap quantum computing with reduced requirements on the optical control complexity.

  5. Ion Trapping, Storage, and Ejection in Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinyu; Garimella, Sandilya V B; Prost, Spencer A; Webb, Ian K; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Tang, Keqi; Tolmachev, Aleksey V; Norheim, Randolph V; Baker, Erin S; Anderson, Gordon A; Ibrahim, Yehia M; Smith, Richard D

    2015-06-16

    A new Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations (SLIM) module, having electrode arrays patterned on a pair of parallel printed circuit boards (PCB), was constructed and utilized to investigate capabilities for ion trapping at a pressure of 4 Torr. Positive ions were confined by application of RF voltages to a series of inner rung electrodes with alternating phase on adjacent electrodes, in conjunction with positive DC potentials on surrounding guard electrodes on each PCB. An axial DC field was also introduced by stepwise varying the DC potentials applied to the inner rung electrodes to control the ion transport and accumulation inside the ion trapping region. We show that ions can be trapped and accumulated with up to 100% efficiency, stored for at least 5 h with no significant losses, and then could be rapidly ejected from the SLIM trap. The present results provide a foundation for the development of much more complex SLIM devices that facilitate extended ion manipulations.

  6. Technologies for Trapped-Ion Quantum Information Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-21

    we discuss work aiming to leverage a commer- cial CMOS (complementary metal-oxide- semiconductor ) process to develop an integrated ion trap architecture...this integration: alignment of optical elements with tiny modes to point emitters, and trap- ping charged particles close to dielectric surfaces. Inte...far by heating in several ways. The deep optical potentials required to confine a charged particle against stray fields impart significant recoil

  7. Cavity QED with single trapped Ca+-ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mundt, A.B.

    2003-02-01

    This thesis reports on the design and setup of a vacuum apparatus allowing the investigation of cavity QED effects with single trapped 40 Ca + ions. The weak coupling of ion and cavity in the 'bad cavity limit' may serve to inter--convert stationary and flying qubits. The ion is confined in a miniaturized Paul trap and cooled via the Doppler effect to the Lamb--Dicke regime. The extent of the atomic wave function is less than 30 nm. The ion is enclosed by a high finesse optical cavity. The technically--involved apparatus allows movement of the trap relative to the cavity and the trapped ion can be placed at any position in the standing wave. By means of a transfer lock the cavity can be resonantly stabilized with the S 1/2 ↔ D 5/2 quadrupole transition at 729 nm (suitable as a qubit) without light at that wavelength being present in the cavity. The coupling of the cavity field to the S 1/2 ↔ D 5/2 quadrupole transition is investigated with various techniques in order to determine the spatial dependence as well as the temporal dynamics. The orthogonal coupling of carrier and first--order sideband transitions at field nodes and antinodes is explored. The coherent interaction of the ion and the cavity field is confirmed by exciting Rabi oscillations with short resonant pulses injected into the cavity. Finally, first experimental steps towards the observation of cavity enhanced spontaneous emission have been taken. (author)

  8. Spectroscopy and nonclassical fluorescence properties of single trapped Ba+ ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolle, J.

    1998-06-01

    This thesis reports on the setup and application of an experimental apparatus for spectroscopic and quantum optical investigations of a single Barium ion in a Paul trap. The realization of the apparatus, which consists of the ion trap in ultra high vacuum, two laser systems, and a photon counting detection system, is described in detail, with particular consideration of the noise sources like stray light and laser frequency instabilities. The two lasers at 493 nm and 650 nm needed to continuously excite resonance fluorescence from the Barium ion have been realized using diode lasers only. The preparation of a single localized Barium ion is described, in particular its optical cooling with the laser light and the minimization of induced vibration in the trapping potential. The purely quantum mechanical property of antibunching is observed by measuring the intensity correlation function of resonance fluorescence from the trapped and cooled ion. Interference properties of the single ion resonance fluorescence are investigated with a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. From the measured high-contrast interference signal it is proven that each individual fluorescence photon interferes with itself. The fluorescence excitation spectrum, on varying one laser frequency, is also measured and exhibits dark resonances. These measurements are compared to calculations based on optical Bloch equations for the 8 atomic levels involved. Future experiments, in particular the detection of reduced quantum fluctuations (squeezing) in one quadrature component of the resonance fluorescence, are discussed. (author)

  9. Scheme for teleportation of unknown states of trapped ion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Mei-Feng; Ma Song-She

    2008-01-01

    A scheme is presented for teleporting an unknown state in a trapped ion system.The scheme only requires a single laser beam.It allows the trap to be in any state with a few phonons,e.g.a thermal motion.Furthermore,it works in the regime,where the Rabi frequency of the laser is on the order of the trap frequency.Thus,the teleportation speed is greatly increased,which is important for decreasing the decoherence effect.This idea can also be used to teleport an unknown ionic entangled state.

  10. Geometric Phases for Mixed States in Trapped Ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Hongxia

    2006-01-01

    The generalization of geometric phase from the pure states to the mixed states may have potential applications in constructing geometric quantum gates. We here investigate the mixed state geometric phases and visibilities of the trapped ion system in both non-degenerate and degenerate cases. In the proposed quantum system, the geometric phases are determined by the evolution time, the initial states of trapped ions, and the initial states of photons. Moreover, special periods are gained under which the geometric phases do not change with the initial states changing of photon parts in both non-degenerate and degenerate cases. The high detection efficiency in the ion trap system implies that the mixed state geometric phases proposed here can be easily tested.

  11. Single Ion Trapping for the Enriched Xenon Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldman, Samuel J.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC

    2006-03-28

    In the last decade, a variety of neutrino oscillation experiments have established that there is a mass difference between neutrino flavors, without determining the absolute neutrino mass scale. The Enriched Xenon Observatory for neutrinoless double beta decay (EXO) will search for the rare decays of xenon to determine the absolute value of the neutrino mass. The experiment uses a novel technique to minimize backgrounds, identifying the decay daughter product in real time using single ion spectroscopy. Here, we describe single ion trapping and spectroscopy compatible with the EXO detector. We extend the technique of single ion trapping in ultrahigh vacuum to trapping in xenon gas. With this technique, EXO will achieve a neutrino mass sensitivity of {approx_equal} .010 eV.

  12. Quantum computing with trapped ions, atoms and light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steane, Andrew M.

    2001-01-01

    We consider experimental issues relevant to quantum computing, and discuss the best way to achieve the essential requirements of reliable quantum memory and gate operations. Nuclear spins in trapped ions or atoms are a very promising candidate for the qubits. We estimate the parameters required to couple atoms using light via cavity QED in order to achieve quantum gates. We briefly comment on recent improvements to the Cirac-Zoller method for coupling trapped ions via their vibrational degree of freedom. Error processes result in a trade-off between quantum gate speed and failure probability. A useful quantum computer does appear to be feasible using a combination of ion trap and optical methods. The best understood method to stabilize a large computer relies on quantum error correction. The essential ideas of this are discussed, and recent estimates of the noise requirements in a quantum computing device are given

  13. Decoherence of superposition states in trapped ions

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Uys, H

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the decoherence of superpositions of hyperfine states of 9Be+ ions due to spontaneous scattering of off-resonant light. It was found that, contrary to conventional wisdom, elastic Raleigh scattering can have major...

  14. A quadrupole ion trap as low-energy cluster ion beam source

    CERN Document Server

    Uchida, N; Kanayama, T

    2003-01-01

    Kinetic energy distribution of ion beams was measured by a retarding field energy analyzer for a mass-selective cluster ion beam deposition system that uses a quadrupole ion trap as a cluster ion beam source. The results indicated that the system delivers a cluster-ion beam with energy distribution of approx 2 eV, which corresponded well to the calculation results of the trapping potentials in the ion trap. Using this deposition system, mass-selected hydrogenated Si cluster ions Si sub n H sub x sup + were actually deposited on Si(111)-(7x7) surfaces at impact kinetic energy E sub d of 3-30 eV. Observation by using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) demonstrated that Si sub 6 H sub x sup + cluster ions landed on the surface without decomposition at E sub d =3 eV, while the deposition was destructive at E sub d>=18 eV. (author)

  15. Atomic physics of highly charged ions in an electron beam ion trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marrs, R.E.

    1990-07-01

    Two electron beam ion traps are in use at LLNL for the purpose of studying the properties of very highly charged ions and their interactions with electrons. This paper reviews the operation of the traps and discusses recent experiments in three areas: precision transition energy measurements in the limit of very high ion charge, dielectronic recombination measurements for the He-like isoelectronic sequence, and measurements of x-ray polarization. 22 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab

  16. First experiments with the Greifswald electron-beam ion trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schabinger, B.; Biedermann, C.; Gierke, S.; Marx, G.; Radtke, R.; Schweikhard, L.

    2013-09-01

    The former Berlin electron-beam ion trap (EBIT) was moved to Greifswald. In addition to x-ray studies the setup will be used for the investigation of interaction processes between highly charged ions and atomic clusters such as charge exchange and fragmentation. The EBIT setup has now been reassembled and highly charged ions have been produced from Xe-Ar gas mixtures to study the ‘sawtooth effect’. In addition, the layout of the extraction beamline, the interaction region and product analysis for interaction studies with highly charged ions are presented.

  17. Cold highly charged ions in a cryogenic Paul trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Versolato, O. O., E-mail: oscar.versolato@mpi-hd.mpg.de; Schwarz, M.; Windberger, A.; Ullrich, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik (Germany); Schmidt, P. O. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (Germany); Drewsen, M. [University of Aarhus, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Denmark); Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J. R. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik (Germany)

    2013-03-15

    Narrow optical transitions in highly charged ions (HCIs) are of particular interest for metrology and fundamental physics, exploiting the high sensitivity of HCIs to new physics. The highest sensitivity for a changing fine structure constant ever predicted for a stable atomic system is found in Ir{sup 17 + }. However, laser spectroscopy of HCIs is hindered by the large ({approx} 10{sup 6} K) temperatures at which they are produced and trapped. An unprecedented improvement in such laser spectroscopy can be obtained when HCIs are cooled down to the mK range in a linear Paul trap. We have developed a cryogenic linear Paul trap in which HCIs will be sympathetically cooled by {sup 9}Be{sup + } ions. Optimized optical access for laser light is provided while maintaining excellent UHV conditions. The Paul trap will be connected to an electron beam ion trap (EBIT) which is able to produce a wide range of HCIs. This EBIT will also provide the first experimental input needed for the determination of the transition energies in Ir{sup 17 + }, enabling further laser-spectroscopic investigations of this promising HCI.

  18. Overview of the Livermore electron beam ion trap project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Behar, E.; Boyce, K.R.; Brown, G.V.; Chen, H.; Gendreau, K.C.; Graf, A.; Gu, M.-F.; Harris, C.L.; Kahn, S.M.; Kelley, R.L.; Lepson, J.K.; May, M.J.; Neill, P.A.; Pinnington, E.H.; Porter, F.S.; Smith, A.J.; Stahle, C.K.; Szymkowiak, A.E.; Tillotson, A.; Thorn, D.B.; Traebert, E.; Wargelin, B.J.

    2003-01-01

    The Livermore electron beam ion trap facility has recently been moved to a new location within LLNL, and new instrumentation was added, including a 32-pixel microcalorimeter. The move was accompanied by a shift of focus toward in situ measurements of highly charged ions, which continue with increased vigor. Overviews of the facility, which includes EBIT-I and SuperEBIT, and the research projects are given, including results from optical spectroscopy, QED, and X-ray line excitation measurements

  19. Paul Ion Trap as a Diagnostic for Plasma Focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadat Kiai, S. M.; Adlparvar, S.; Zirak, A.; Alhooie, Samira; Elahi, M.; Sheibani, S.; Safarien, A.; Farhangi, S.; Dabirzadeh, A. A.; Khalaj, M. M.; Mahlooji, M. S.; KaKaei, S.; Talaei, A.; Kashani, A.; Tajik Ahmadi, H.; Zahedi, F.

    2010-02-01

    The plasma discharge contamination by high and low Z Impurities affect the rate of nuclear fusion reaction products, specially when light particles have to be confined. These impurities should be analyzed and can be fairly controlled. This paper reports on the development of a Paul ion trap with ion sources by impact electron ionization as a diagnostic for the 10 kJ Iranian sunshine plasma focus device. Preliminary results of the residual gas are analyzed and presented.

  20. Measurement of few-electron uranium ions on a high-energy electron beam ion trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.

    1994-01-01

    The high-energy electron beam ion trap, dubbed Super-EBIT, was used to produce, trap, and excite uranium ions as highly charged as fully stripped U 92+ . The production of such highly charged ions was indicated by the x-ray emission observed with high-purity Ge detectors. Moreover, high-resolution Bragg crystal spectromters were used to analyze the x-ray emission, including a detailed measurement of both the 2s 1/2 -2p 3/2 electric dipole and 2p 1/2 -2p 3/2 magnetic dipole transitions. Unlike in ion accelerators, where the uranium ions move at relativistic speeds, the ions in this trap are stationary. Thus very precise measurements of the transition energies could be made, and the QED contribution to the transition energies could be measured within less than 1 %. Details of the production of these highly charged ions and their measurement is given

  1. Cluster observations of trapped ions interacting with magnetosheath mirror modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Soucek

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Mirror modes are among the most intense low frequency plasma wave phenomena observed in the magnetosheaths of magnetized planets. They appear as large amplitude non-propagating fluctuations in the magnetic field magnitude and plasma density. These structures are widely accepted to represent a non-linear stage of the mirror instability, dominant in plasmas with large ion beta and a significant ion temperature anisotropy T⊥/T∥>1. It has long been recognized that the mirror instability both in the linear and non-linear stage is a kinetic process and that the behavior of resonant particles at small parallel velocities is crucial for its development and saturation. While the dynamics of the instability and the effect of trapped particles have been studied extensively in theoretical models and numerical simulations, only spurious observations of the trapped ions were published to date. In this work we used data from the Cluster spacecraft to perform the first detailed experimental study of ion velocity distribution associated with mirror mode oscillations. We show a conclusive evidence for the predicted cooling of resonant ions at small parallel velocities and heating of trapped ions at intermediate pitch angles.

  2. Cluster observations of trapped ions interacting with magnetosheath mirror modes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Souček, Jan; Escoubet, C. P.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 29, - (2011), s. 1049-1060 ISSN 0992-7689 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : mirror mode waves * trapped particles * magnetosheath ions Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.842, year: 2011 http://www.ann-geophys.net/29/1049/2011/angeo-29-1049-2011.pdf

  3. Laser induced fluorescence of trapped molecular ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winn, J.S.

    1980-10-01

    Laser induced fluoresence (LIF) spectra (laser excitation spectra) are conceptually among the most simple spectra to obtain. One need only confine a gaseous sample in a suitable container, direct a laser along one axis of the container, and monitor the sample's fluorescence at a right angle to the laser beam. As the laser wavelength is changed, the changes in fluorescence intensity map the absorption spectrum of the sample. (More precisely, only absorption to states which have a significant radiative decay component are monitored.) For ion spectroscopy, one could benefit in many ways by such an experiment. Most optical ion spectra have been observed by emission techniques, and, aside from the problems of spectral analysis, discharge emission methods often produce the spectra of many species, some of which may be unknown or uncertain. Implicit in the description of LIF given above is certainty as to the chemical identity of the carrier of the spectrum. This article describes a method by which the simplifying aspects of LIF can be extended to molecular ions

  4. Single trapped cold ions: a testing ground for quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maniscalco, S

    2005-01-01

    In this article I review some results obtained during my PhD work in the group of Professor Messina, at the University of Palermo. I discuss some proposals aimed at exploring fundamental issues of quantum theory, e.g. entanglement and quantum superpositions, in the context of single trapped ions. This physical context turns out to be extremely well suited both for studying fundamental features of quantum mechanics, such as the quantum-classical border, and for technological applications such as quantum logic gates and quantum registers. I focus on some procedures for engineering nonclassical states of the vibrational motion of the centre of mass of the ion. I consider both the case in which the ion interacts with classical laser beams and the case of interaction with a quantized mode of light. In particular, I discuss the generation of Schroedinger cat-like states, Bell states and Greenberger-Horn-Zeilinger states. The schemes for generating nonclassical states stem from two different quantum processes: the parity effect and the quantum state manipulation via quantum non-demolition measurement. Finally, I consider a microscopic theory of the interaction of a quantum harmonic oscillator (the centre of mass of the ion in the trapped ion context) with a bosonic thermal environment. Using an exact approach to the dynamics, I discuss a quantum theory of heating of trapped ions able to describe both the short time non-Markovian regime and the thermalization process. I conclude showing briefly how the trapped ion systems can be used as simulators of key models of open quantum systems such as the Caldeira-Leggett model. (phd tutorial)

  5. Characterization of ion Coulomb crystals in a linear Paul trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, K.; Takayanagi, T.; Wada, M.; Ohtani, S.; Schuessler, H. A.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a simple and fast method for simulating observed images of ion Coulomb crystals. In doing so, cold elastic collisions between Coulomb crystals and virtual very light atoms are implemented in a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation code. Such an approach reproduces the observed images of Coulomb crystals by obtaining density plots of the statistics of existence of each ion. The simple method has the advantage of short computing time in comparison with previous calculation methods. As a demonstration of the simulation, the formation of a planar Coulomb crystal with a small number of ions has been investigated in detail in a linear ion trap both experimentally and by simulation. However, also large Coulomb crystals including up to 1400 ions have been photographed and simulated to extract the secular temperature and the number of ions. For medium-sized crystals, a comparison between experiments and calculations has been performed. Moreover, an MD simulation of the sympathetic cooling of small molecular ions was performed in order to test the possibility of extracting the temperature and the number of refrigerated molecular ions from crystal images of laser-cooled ions. Such information is basic to studying ultracold ion-molecule reactions using ion Coulomb crystals including sympathetically cooled molecular ions.

  6. A Trapped Mercury 199 Ion Frequency Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-01

    ing resul t t h a t could possibly be explained by a for tu i t ious cancel la t ion of t w o e f f ec t s : t h e second order doppler...h a t t h e helium cooling is e f f ec t ive . O the r e f f e c t s of t he helium include nar rower l ines and a la rger s ignal indicat...Desaintfuscien, K. Barjllet, J . Viennet, P. Pet i t , and C. Audoin, Appl. Phys. 24, 107 (1981). 4. R, Ifflaender and G. Werth; Metrologia 13, 167 (1977

  7. Advanced ion trap structures with integrated tools for qubit manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterk, J. D.; Benito, F.; Clark, C. R.; Haltli, R.; Highstrete, C.; Nordquist, C. D.; Scott, S.; Stevens, J. E.; Tabakov, B. P.; Tigges, C. P.; Moehring, D. L.; Stick, D.; Blain, M. G.

    2012-06-01

    We survey the ion trap fabrication technologies available at Sandia National Laboratories. These include four metal layers, precision backside etching, and low profile wirebonds. We demonstrate loading of ions in a variety of ion traps that utilize these technologies. Additionally, we present progress towards integration of on-board filtering with trench capacitors, photon collection via an optical cavity, and integrated microwave electrodes for localized hyperfine qubit control and magnetic field gradient quantum gates. [4pt] This work was supported by Sandia's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program and the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA). Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  8. Frequency-scanning MALDI linear ion trap mass spectrometer for large biomolecular ion detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, I-Chung; Lin, Jung Lee; Lai, Szu-Hsueh; Chen, Chung-Hsuan

    2011-11-01

    This study presents the first report on the development of a matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) linear ion trap mass spectrometer for large biomolecular ion detection by frequency scan. We designed, installed, and tested this radio frequency (RF) scan linear ion trap mass spectrometer and its associated electronics to dramatically extend the mass region to be detected. The RF circuit can be adjusted from 300 to 10 kHz with a set of operation amplifiers. To trap the ions produced by MALDI, a high pressure of helium buffer gas was employed to quench extra kinetic energy of the heavy ions produced by MALDI. The successful detection of the singly charged secretory immunoglobulin A ions indicates that the detectable mass-to-charge ratio (m/z) of this system can reach ~385 000 or beyond.

  9. Fast quantum logic by selective displacement of hot trapped ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasura, Marek; Steane, Andrew M.

    2003-01-01

    The 'pushing gate' proposed by Cirac and Zoller for quantum logic in ion traps is discussed, in which a force is used to give a controlled push to a pair of trapped ions and thus realize a phase gate. The original proposal had a weakness in that it involved a hidden extreme sensitivity to the size of the force. Also, the physical origin of this force was not fully addressed. Here, we discuss the sensitivity and present a way to avoid it by choosing the spatial form of the pushing force in an optimal way. We also analyze the effect of imperfections in a pair of π pulses which are used to implement a 'spin echo' to cancel correlated errors. We present a physical model for the force, namely, the dipole force, and discuss the impact of unwanted photon scattering, and of finite temperature of the ions. The main effect of the temperature is to blur the phase of the gate owing to the ions exploring a range of values of the force. When the distance scale of the force profile is smaller than the ion separation, this effect is more important than the high-order terms in the Coulomb repulsion which were originally discussed. Overall, we find that whereas the pushing gate is not as resistant to imperfection as was supposed, it remains a significant candidate for ion trap quantum computing since it does not require ground-state cooling, and in some cases it does not require the Lamb-Dicke limit, while the gate rate is fast, close to (rather than small compared to) the trap vibrational frequency

  10. New experimental initiatives using very highly charged ions from an 'electron beam ion trap'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, D.

    1996-01-01

    A short review of the experimental program in highly-charged heavy ion physics conducted at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) facility is presented. The heavy-ion research, involving ions up to fully stripped U 92+ , includes precision x-ray spectroscopy and lifetime studies, electron impact ionization and excitation cross section measurements. The investigations of ion-surface interactions following the impact of high-Z highly charged ions on surfaces are aimed to study the neutralization dynamics effecting the ion and the response of the surface as well. (author)

  11. Experiments with trapped ions and ultrafast laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kale Gifford

    Since the dawn of quantum information science, laser-cooled trapped atomic ions have been one of the most compelling systems for the physical realization of a quantum computer. By applying qubit state dependent forces to the ions, their collective motional modes can be used as a bus to realize entangling quantum gates. Ultrafast state-dependent kicks [1] can provide a universal set of quantum logic operations, in conjunction with ultrafast single qubit rotations [2], which uses only ultrafast laser pulses. This may present a clearer route to scaling a trapped ion processor [3]. In addition to the role that spin-dependent kicks (SDKs) play in quantum computation, their utility in fundamental quantum mechanics research is also apparent. In this thesis, we present a set of experiments which demonstrate some of the principle properties of SDKs including ion motion independence (we demonstrate single ion thermometry from the ground state to near room temperature and the largest Schrodinger cat state ever created in an oscillator), high speed operations (compared with conventional atom-laser interactions), and multi-qubit entanglement operations with speed that is not fundamentally limited by the trap oscillation frequency. We also present a method to provide higher stability in the radial mode ion oscillation frequencies of a linear radiofrequency (rf) Paul trap-a crucial factor when performing operations on the rf-sensitive modes. Finally, we present the highest atomic position sensitivity measurement of an isolated atom to date of 0.5 nm Hz. (-1/2) with a minimum uncertaintyof 1.7 nm using a 0.6 numerical aperature (NA) lens system, along with a method to correct aberrations and a direct position measurement of ion micromotion (the inherent oscillations of an ion trapped in an oscillating rf field). This development could be used to directly image atom motion in the quantum regime, along with sensing forces at the yoctonewton [10. (-24) N)] scale forgravity sensing

  12. Spectral measurements of few-electron uranium ions produced and trapped in a high-energy electron beam ion trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.

    1994-01-01

    Measurements of 2s l/2 -2p 3/2 electric dipole and 2p 1/2 -2p 3/2 magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole transitions in U 82+ through U 89+ have been made with a high-resolution crystal spectrometer that recorded the line radiation from stationary ions produced and trapped in a high-energy electron beam ion trap. From the measurements we infer -39.21 ± 0.23 eV for the QED contribution to the 2s 1/2 -2p 3/2 transition energy of lithiumlike U 89+ . A comparison between our measurements and various computations illustrates the need for continued improvements in theoretical approaches for calculating the atomic structure of ions with two or more electrons in the L shell

  13. Non-thermalization in trapped atomic ion spin chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, P. W.; Becker, P.; Kaplan, H. B.; Kyprianidis, A.; Lee, A. C.; Neyenhuis, B.; Pagano, G.; Richerme, P.; Senko, C.; Smith, J.; Tan, W. L.; Zhang, J.; Monroe, C.

    2017-10-01

    Linear arrays of trapped and laser-cooled atomic ions are a versatile platform for studying strongly interacting many-body quantum systems. Effective spins are encoded in long-lived electronic levels of each ion and made to interact through laser-mediated optical dipole forces. The advantages of experiments with cold trapped ions, including high spatio-temporal resolution, decoupling from the external environment and control over the system Hamiltonian, are used to measure quantum effects not always accessible in natural condensed matter samples. In this review, we highlight recent work using trapped ions to explore a variety of non-ergodic phenomena in long-range interacting spin models, effects that are heralded by the memory of out-of-equilibrium initial conditions. We observe long-lived memory in static magnetizations for quenched many-body localization and prethermalization, while memory is preserved in the periodic oscillations of a driven discrete time crystal state. This article is part of the themed issue 'Breakdown of ergodicity in quantum systems: from solids to synthetic matter'.

  14. The kick-out mass selection technique for ions stored in an Electrostatic Ion Beam Trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toker, Y; Altstein, N; Aviv, O; Rappaport, M L; Heber, O; Schwalm, D; Strasser, D; Zajfman, D

    2009-01-01

    A simple mass selection technique which allows one to clean a keV ion beam of undesirable masses while stored in an Electrostatic Ion Beam Trap (EIBT) is described. The technique is based on the time-of-flight principle and takes advantage of the long storage times and self-bunching that are possible in this type of traps (self bunching being the effect that keeps ions of the same mass bunched in spite of their finite distributions of velocities and trajectories). As the oscillation period is proportional to the square root of the ion mass, bunches containing ions of different masses will separate in space with increasing storage time and can be kicked out by a pulsed deflector mounted inside the trap. A mass selector of this type has been implemented successfully in an EIBT connected to an Even-Lavie supersonic expansion source and is routinely used in ongoing cluster experiments.

  15. Preliminary Tests of a Paul ion Trap as an Ion Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadat Kiai, S. M.; Zirak, A. R.; Elahi, M.; Adlparvar, S.; Mortazavi, B. N.; Safarien, A.; Farhangi, S.; Sheibani, S.; Alhooie, S.; Khalaj, M. M. A.; Dabirzadeh, A. A.; Ruzbehani, M.; Zahedi, F.

    2010-10-01

    The paper reports on the design and construction of a Paul ion trap as an ion source by using an impact electron ionization technique. Ions are produced in the trap and confined for the specific time which is then extracted and detected by a Faraday cup. Especial electronic configurations are employed between the end caps, ring electrodes, electron gun and a negative voltage for the detector. This configuration allows a constant low level of pure ion source between the pulsed confined ion sources. The present experimental results are based on the production and confinement of Argon ions with good stability and repeatability, but in principle, the technique can be used for various Argon like ions.

  16. Superconducting qubits can be coupled and addressed as trapped ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y. X.; Wei, L. F.; Johansson, J. R.; Tsai, J. S.; Nori, F.

    2009-03-01

    Exploiting the intrinsic nonlinearity of superconducting Josephson junctions, we propose a scalable circuit with superconducting qubits (SCQs) which is very similar to the successful one now being used for trapped ions. The SCQs are coupled to the ``vibrational'' mode provided by a superconducting LC circuit or its equivalent (e.g., a superconducting quantum interference device). Both single-qubit rotations and qubit-LC-circuit couplings and/or decouplings can be controlled by the frequencies of the time-dependent magnetic fluxes. The circuit is scalable since the qubit-qubit interactions, mediated by the LC circuit, can be selectively performed, and the information transfer can be realized in a controllable way. [4pt] Y.X. Liu, L.F. Wei, J.R. Johansson, J.S. Tsai, F. Nori, Superconducting qubits can be coupled and addressed as trapped ions, Phys. Rev. B 76, 144518 (2007). URL: http://link.aps.org/abstract/PRB/v76/e144518

  17. Quantum-enhanced deliberation of learning agents using trapped ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunjko, V.; Friis, N.; Briegel, H. J.

    2015-02-01

    A scheme that successfully employs quantum mechanics in the design of autonomous learning agents has recently been reported in the context of the projective simulation (PS) model for artificial intelligence. In that approach, the key feature of a PS agent, a specific type of memory which is explored via random walks, was shown to be amenable to quantization, allowing for a speed-up. In this work we propose an implementation of such classical and quantum agents in systems of trapped ions. We employ a generic construction by which the classical agents are ‘upgraded’ to their quantum counterparts by a nested process of adding coherent control, and we outline how this construction can be realized in ion traps. Our results provide a flexible modular architecture for the design of PS agents. Furthermore, we present numerical simulations of simple PS agents which analyze the robustness of our proposal under certain noise models.

  18. Quantum-enhanced deliberation of learning agents using trapped ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunjko, V; Friis, N; Briegel, H J

    2015-01-01

    A scheme that successfully employs quantum mechanics in the design of autonomous learning agents has recently been reported in the context of the projective simulation (PS) model for artificial intelligence. In that approach, the key feature of a PS agent, a specific type of memory which is explored via random walks, was shown to be amenable to quantization, allowing for a speed-up. In this work we propose an implementation of such classical and quantum agents in systems of trapped ions. We employ a generic construction by which the classical agents are ‘upgraded’ to their quantum counterparts by a nested process of adding coherent control, and we outline how this construction can be realized in ion traps. Our results provide a flexible modular architecture for the design of PS agents. Furthermore, we present numerical simulations of simple PS agents which analyze the robustness of our proposal under certain noise models. (paper)

  19. Robust quantum gates between trapped ions using shaped pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Ping, E-mail: zouping@m.scnu.edu.cn; Zhang, Zhi-Ming, E-mail: zmzhang@scnu.edu.cn

    2015-12-18

    We improve two existing entangling gate schemes between trapped ion qubits immersed in a large linear crystal. Based on the existing two-qubit gate schemes by applying segmented forces on the individually addressed qubits, we present a systematic method to optimize the shapes of the forces to suppress the dominant source of infidelity. The spin-dependent forces in the scheme can be from periodic photon kicks or from continuous optical pulses. The entangling gates are fast, robust, and have high fidelity. They can be used to implement scalable quantum computation and quantum simulation. - Highlights: • We present a systematic method to optimize the shape of the pulses to decouple qubits from intermediary motional modes. • Our optimized scheme can be applied to both the ultrafast gate and fast gate. • Our optimized scheme can suppress the dominant source of infidelity to arbitrary order. • When the number of trapped ions increase, the number of needed segments increases slowly.

  20. A New Trapped Ion Clock Based on Hg-201(+)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghavi-Larigani, S.; Burt, E. A.; Lea, S. N.; Prestage, J. D.; Tjoelker, R. L.

    2009-01-01

    There are two stable odd isotopes of mercury with singly ionized hyperfine structure suitable for a microwave clock: Hg-199(+) and Hg-201(+). Virtually all trapped mercury ion clocks to date have used the 199 isotope. We have begun to investigate the viability of a trapped ion clock based on Hg-201(+). We have measured the unperturbed frequency of the (S-2)(sub 1/2) F = 1, m(sub F) = 0 to (S-2)(sub 1/2) F = 2, m(sub F) = 0 clock transition to be 29.9543658211(2) GHz. In this paper we describe initial measurements with Hg-201(+) and new applications to clocks and fundamental physics.

  1. Nonlinear saturation of dissipative trapped ion instability and anomalous transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugihara, Masayoshi; Ogasawara, Masatada.

    1977-04-01

    An expression for the turbulent collision frequency is derived by summing up the most dominant terms from each order in the perturbation expansion in order to obtain the nonlinear saturation level of the dissipative trapped ion instability. Numerical calculation shows that the anomalous diffusion coefficient at the saturated state is in good agreement with the result of Kadomtsev and Pogutse when the effect of the magnetic shear is taken into account. (auth.)

  2. Symplectic tomography of nonclassical states of trapped ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Man'ko, O.

    1996-03-01

    The marginal distribution for two types of nonclassical states of trapped ion - for squeezed and correlated states and for squeezed even and odd coherent states (squeezed Schroedinger cat states) is studied. The obtained marginal distribution for the two types of states is shown to satisfy classical dynamical equation equivalent to standard quantum evolution equation for density matrix (wave function) derived in symplectic tomography scheme. (author). 20 refs

  3. Control of trapped-ion quantum states with optical pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangan, C.; Monroe, C.; Bucksbaum, P.H.; Bloch, A.M.

    2004-01-01

    We present new results on the quantum control of systems with infinitely large Hilbert spaces. A control-theoretic analysis of the control of trapped-ion quantum states via optical pulses is performed. We demonstrate how resonant bichromatic fields can be applied in two contrasting ways--one that makes the system completely uncontrollable and the other that makes the system controllable. In some interesting cases, the Hilbert space of the qubit-harmonic oscillator can be made finite, and the Schroedinger equation controllable via bichromatic resonant pulses. Extending this analysis to the quantum states of two ions, a new scheme for producing entangled qubits is discovered

  4. Trapped-Ion Quantum Logic with Global Radiation Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidt, S; Randall, J; Webster, S C; Lake, K; Webb, A E; Cohen, I; Navickas, T; Lekitsch, B; Retzker, A; Hensinger, W K

    2016-11-25

    Trapped ions are a promising tool for building a large-scale quantum computer. However, the number of required radiation fields for the realization of quantum gates in any proposed ion-based architecture scales with the number of ions within the quantum computer, posing a major obstacle when imagining a device with millions of ions. Here, we present a fundamentally different approach for trapped-ion quantum computing where this detrimental scaling vanishes. The method is based on individually controlled voltages applied to each logic gate location to facilitate the actual gate operation analogous to a traditional transistor architecture within a classical computer processor. To demonstrate the key principle of this approach we implement a versatile quantum gate method based on long-wavelength radiation and use this method to generate a maximally entangled state of two quantum engineered clock qubits with fidelity 0.985(12). This quantum gate also constitutes a simple-to-implement tool for quantum metrology, sensing, and simulation.

  5. Qubit Manipulations Techniques for Trapped-Ion Quantum Information Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaebler, John; Tan, Ting; Lin, Yiheng; Bowler, Ryan; Jost, John; Meier, Adam; Knill, Emanuel; Leibfried, Dietrich; Wineland, David; Ion Storage Team

    2013-05-01

    We report recent results on qubit manipulation techniques for trapped-ions towards scalable quantum information processing (QIP). We demonstrate a platform-independent benchmarking protocol for evaluating the performance of Clifford gates, which form a basis for fault-tolerant QIP. We report a demonstration of an entangling gate scheme proposed by Bermudez et al. [Phys. Rev. A. 85, 040302 (2012)] and achieve a fidelity of 0.974(4). This scheme takes advantage of dynamic decoupling which protects the qubit against dephasing errors. It can be applied directly on magnetic-field-insensitive states, and provides a number of simplifications in experimental implementation compared to some other entangling gates with trapped ions. We also report preliminary results on dissipative creation of entanglement with trapped-ions. Creation of an entangled pair does not require discrete logic gates and thus could reduce the level of quantum-coherent control needed for large-scale QIP. Supported by IARPA, ARO contract No. EAO139840, ONR, and the NIST Quantum Information Program.

  6. Spectroscopy of highly charged tungsten ions with Electron Beam Ion Traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Kato, Daiji; Morita, Shigeru; Murakami, Izumi; Yamamoto, Norimasa; Ohashi, Hayato; Yatsurugi, Junji; Nakamura, Nobuyuki

    2013-01-01

    We present spectra of highly charged tungsten ions in the extreme ultra-violet (EUV) by using electron beam ion traps. The electron energy dependence of spectra is investigated of electron energies from 490 to 1440 eV. Previously unreported lines are presented in the EUV range, and some of them are identified by comparing the wavelengths with theoretical calculations. (author)

  7. EUV spectrum of highly charged tungsten ions in electron beam ion trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaue, H.A.; Kato, D.; Murakami, I.; Nakamura, N.

    2016-01-01

    We present spectra of highly charged tungsten ions in the extreme ultra-violet (EUV) by using electron beam ion traps. The electron energy dependence of spectra was investigated for electron energy from 540 to 1370 eV. Previously unreported lines were presented in the EUV range, and comparing the wavelengths with theoretical calculations identified them. (author)

  8. Electrostatic ion trap and Fourier transform measurements for high-resolution mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhushan, K. G.; Gadkari, S. C.; Yakhmi, J. V.; Sahni, V. C.

    2007-01-01

    We report on the development of an electrostatic ion trap for high-resolution mass spectrometry. The trap works on purely electrostatic fields and hence trapping and storing of ions is not mass restrictive, unlike other techniques based on Penning, Paul, or radio frequency quadrupole ion traps. It allows simultaneous trapping and studying of multiple mass species over a large mass range. Mass spectra were recorded in ''dispersive'' and ''self-bunching'' modes of ions. Storage lifetimes of about 100 ms and mass resolving power of about 20 000 could be achieved from the fifth harmonic Fourier transform spectrum of Xe ions recorded in the self-bunching mode

  9. Experimental characterization of the Hitrap Cooler trap with highly charged ions.

    OpenAIRE

    Fedotova, Svetlana

    2013-01-01

    The HITRAP (Highly charged Ions TRAP)facility is being set up and commissioned at GSI, Darmstadt. It will provide heavy, highly charged ions at low velocities to high-precision atomic physics experiments. Within this work the Cooler trap- the key element of the HITRAP facility was tested. The Cooler trap was assembled, aligned, and commissioned in trapping experiments with ions from off-line sources.The work performed within the scope of this thesis provided the baseline for further operation...

  10. Fast quantum logic gates with trapped-ion qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, V. M.; Ballance, C. J.; Thirumalai, K.; Stephenson, L. J.; Ballance, T. G.; Steane, A. M.; Lucas, D. M.

    2018-03-01

    Quantum bits (qubits) based on individual trapped atomic ions are a promising technology for building a quantum computer. The elementary operations necessary to do so have been achieved with the required precision for some error-correction schemes. However, the essential two-qubit logic gate that is used to generate quantum entanglement has hitherto always been performed in an adiabatic regime (in which the gate is slow compared with the characteristic motional frequencies of the ions in the trap), resulting in logic speeds of the order of 10 kilohertz. There have been numerous proposals of methods for performing gates faster than this natural ‘speed limit’ of the trap. Here we implement one such method, which uses amplitude-shaped laser pulses to drive the motion of the ions along trajectories designed so that the gate operation is insensitive to the optical phase of the pulses. This enables fast (megahertz-rate) quantum logic that is robust to fluctuations in the optical phase, which would otherwise be an important source of experimental error. We demonstrate entanglement generation for gate times as short as 480 nanoseconds—less than a single oscillation period of an ion in the trap and eight orders of magnitude shorter than the memory coherence time measured in similar calcium-43 hyperfine qubits. The power of the method is most evident at intermediate timescales, at which it yields a gate error more than ten times lower than can be attained using conventional techniques; for example, we achieve a 1.6-microsecond-duration gate with a fidelity of 99.8 per cent. Faster and higher-fidelity gates are possible at the cost of greater laser intensity. The method requires only a single amplitude-shaped pulse and one pair of beams derived from a continuous-wave laser. It offers the prospect of combining the unrivalled coherence properties, operation fidelities and optical connectivity of trapped-ion qubits with the submicrosecond logic speeds that are usually

  11. Eliminating degradation and uncovering ion-trapping dynamics in electrochromic WO3 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Rui-Tao; Granqvist, Claes G.; Niklasson, Gunnar A.

    2015-01-01

    Amorphous WO3 thin films are of keen interest as cathodic electrodes in transmittance-modulating electrochromic devices. However, these films suffer from ion-trapping-induced degradation of optical modulation and reversibility upon extended Li+-ion exchange. Here, we demonstrate that ion-trapping-induced degradation, which is commonly believed to be irreversible, can be successfully eliminated by constant-current-driven de-trapping, i.e., WO3 films can be rejuvenated and regain their initial highly reversible electrochromic performance. Pronounced ion-trapping occurs when x exceeds ~0.65 in LixWO3 during ion insertion. We find two main kinds of Li+-ion trapping sites (intermediate and deep) in WO3, where the intermediate ones are most prevalent. Li+-ions can be completely removed from intermediate traps but are irreversibly bound in deep traps. Our results provide a general framework for developing and designing superior electrochromic materials and devices. PMID:26259104

  12. Analog quantum simulation of generalized Dicke models in trapped ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aedo, Ibai; Lamata, Lucas

    2018-04-01

    We propose the analog quantum simulation of generalized Dicke models in trapped ions. By combining bicromatic laser interactions on multiple ions we can generate all regimes of light-matter coupling in these models, where here the light mode is mimicked by a motional mode. We present numerical simulations of the three-qubit Dicke model both in the weak field (WF) regime, where the Jaynes-Cummings behavior arises, and the ultrastrong coupling (USC) regime, where a rotating-wave approximation cannot be considered. We also simulate the two-qubit biased Dicke model in the WF and USC regimes and the two-qubit anisotropic Dicke model in the USC regime and the deep-strong coupling regime. The agreement between the mathematical models and the ion system convinces us that these quantum simulations can be implemented in the laboratory with current or near-future technology. This formalism establishes an avenue for the quantum simulation of many-spin Dicke models in trapped ions.

  13. New macroscopic theory of anamalous diffusion induced by the dissipative trapped-ion instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wimmel, H.K.

    1975-03-01

    For an axisymmetric toroidal plasma of the TOKAMAK type a new set of dissipative trapped-fluid equations is established. In addition to E vector x B vector drifts and collisions of the trapped particles, these equations take full account of the effect of Esub(//) (of the trapped ion modes) on free and trapped particles, and of the effect of grad delta 0 (delta 0 = equilibrium fraction of trapped particles). From the new equations the linear-mode properties of the dissipative trapped-ion instability and the anomalous diffusion flux of the trapped particles are derived. (orig.) [de

  14. Removal of radium from drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clifford, D.A.

    1990-01-01

    The traditional, proven process for radium removal are sodium ion exchange softening, lime softening, and reverse osmosis. The newer, radium-specific column processes include adsorption onto the Dow RSC and BaSO 4 -impregnated alumina. The most promising new radium-specific treatment process for large-scale use is adsorption onto preformed manganese dioxide followed by multimedia or diatomaceous earth filtration The disposal of radium-contaminated wastewaters and sludges from processes under consideration will be a major factor in process selection. The processes of choice for municipal water supply treatment to remove radium are sodium ion exchange softening, lime softening, manganese dioxide adsorption-filtration, and selective adsorption onto the Dow RSC or BaSO 4 -impregnated alumina. Where the water is brackish, reverse osmosis hyperfiltration should also be considered. The radium removal process of choice for whole-house or point-of-entry treatment is sodium ion exchange softening. For point-of-use radium removal, a standard reverse osmosis system including cartridge filtration, activated carbon adsorption, and reverse osmosis hyperfiltration is recommended. Although no cost estimates have been made, the relative costs from most expensive to least expansive, for radium removal in small community water supplies are reverse osmosis, sodium ion exchange softening, lime soda softening, manganese dioxide adsorption-filtration, and the radium-selective adsorbents. 34 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  15. Experimental violation of multipartite Bell inequalities with trapped ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanyon, B P; Zwerger, M; Jurcevic, P; Hempel, C; Dür, W; Briegel, H J; Blatt, R; Roos, C F

    2014-03-14

    We report on the experimental violation of multipartite Bell inequalities by entangled states of trapped ions. First, we consider resource states for measurement-based quantum computation of between 3 and 7 ions and show that all strongly violate a Bell-type inequality for graph states, where the criterion for violation is a sufficiently high fidelity. Second, we analyze Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states of up to 14 ions generated in a previous experiment using stronger Mermin-Klyshko inequalities, and show that in this case the violation of local realism increases exponentially with system size. These experiments represent a violation of multipartite Bell-type inequalities of deterministically prepared entangled states. In addition, the detection loophole is closed.

  16. Quantum technologies for solid state physics using cold trapped ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferdinand Schmidt-Kaler

    2014-01-01

    The quantum states of ions are perfectly controlled, and may be used for fundamental research in quantum physics, as highlighted by the Nobel Prize given to Dave Wineland in 2012. Two directions of quantum technologies, followed by the Mainz group, have high impact on solid state physics: I) The delivery of single cold ions on demand for the deterministic doping of solid state materials with nm spatial precision to generate design-structures optimized for quantum processors. II) The simulation of solid state relevant Hamiltonians with AMO systems of one or two dimensional arrays of trapped ions. I will talk about the recent progress in both fields. http://www.quantenbit.de/#Number Sign#/publications/(author)

  17. A study of trapped ion dynamics by photon-correlation and pulse-probe techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rink, J.; Dholakia, K.; Zs, G.; Horvath, K.; Hernandez-Pozos, J. L.; Power, W.; Segal, D. M.; Thompson, R. C.; Walker, T.

    1995-01-01

    We demonstrate non-evasive methods for observing ion and ion cloud oscillation frequencies in a quadrupole ion trap. These trap resonances are measured for small clouds using a photon correlation technique. For large clouds the rotation frequency can be detected with the help of an additional pulsed probe laser. We show applications of the photon correlation method such as estimating the dynamic properties of a combined trap and detecting ion crystals

  18. A linear radiofrequency ion trap for accumulation, bunching, and emittance improvement of radioactive ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herfurth, F.; Dilling, J.; Kellerbauer, A.

    2000-05-01

    An ion beam cooler and buncher has been developed for the manipulation of radioactive ion beams. The gas-filled linear radiofrequency ion trap system is installed at the Penning trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP at ISOLDE/CERN. Its purpose is to accumulate the 60-keV continuous ISOLDE ion beam with high efficiency and to convert it into low-energy low-emittance ion pulses. The efficiency was found to exceed 10% in agreement with simulations. A more than 10-fold reduction of the ISOLDE beam emittance can be achieved. The system has been used successfully for first on-line experiments. Its principle, setup and performance will be discussed. (orig.)

  19. Infrared spectra of small molecular ions trapped in solid neon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacox, Marilyn E. [Optical Technology Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States)

    2015-01-22

    The infrared spectrum of a molecular ion provides a unique signature for that species, gives information on its structure, and is amenable to remote sensing. It also serves as a comparison standard for refining ab initio calculations. Experiments in this laboratory trap molecular ions in dilute solid solution in neon at 4.2 K in sufficient concentration for observation of their infrared spectra between 450 and 4000 cm{sup !1}. Discharge-excited neon atoms produce cations by photoionization and/or Penning ionization of the parent molecule. The resulting electrons are captured by other molecules, yielding anions which provide for overall charge neutrality of the deposit. Recent observations of ions produced from C{sub 2}H{sub 4} and BF{sub 3} will be discussed. Because of their relatively large possibility of having low-lying excited electronic states, small, symmetric molecular cations are especially vulnerable to breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Some phenomena which can result from this breakdown will be discussed. Ion-molecule reaction rates are sufficiently high that in some systems absorptions of dimer cations and anions are also observed. When H{sub 2} is introduced into the system, the initially-formed ion may react with it. Among the species resulting from such ion-molecule reactions that have recently been studied are O{sub 4}{sup +}, NH{sub 4}{sup +}, HOCO{sup +}, and HCO{sub 2}{sup !}.

  20. Plasmas in compact traps: From ion sources to multidisciplinary research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascali, D.; Musumarra, A.; Leone, F.; Galatà, A.; Romano, F. P.; Gammino, S.

    2017-09-01

    In linear (minimum-B) magneto-static traps dense and hot plasmas are heated by electromagnetic radiation in the GHz domain via the Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR). The values of plasma density, temperature and confinement times ( n_eτ_i>10^{13} cm ^{-3} s; T_e>10 keV) are similar to the ones of thermonuclear plasmas. The research in this field -devoted to heating and confinement optimization- has been supported by numerical modeling and advanced diagnostics, for probing the plasma especially in a non-invasive way. ECR-based systems are nowadays able to produce extremely intense (tens or hundreds of mA) beams of light ions (p, d, He), and relevant currents of heavier elements (C, O, N) up to heavy ions like Xe, Pb, U. Such beams can be extracted from the trap by a proper electrostatic system. The above-mentioned properties make these plasmas very attractive for interdisciplinary researches also, such as i) nuclear decays rates measurements in stellar-like conditions, ii) energy conversion studies, being exceptional sources of short-wavelength electromagnetic radiation (EUV, X-rays, hard X-rays and gammas, useful in material science and archaeometry), iii) environments allowing precise spectroscopical measurements as benchmarks for magnetized astrophysical plasmas. The talk will give an overview about the state-of-the-art in the field of intense ion sources, and some new perspectives for interdisciplinary research, with a special attention to the developments based at INFN-LNS.

  1. Trapped atomic ions for quantum-limited metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wineland, David

    2017-04-01

    Laser-beam-manipulated trapped ions are a candidate for large-scale quantum information processing and quantum simulation but the basic techniques used can also be applied to quantum-limited metrology and sensing. Some examples being explored at NIST are: 1) As charged harmonic oscillators, trapped ions can be used to sense electric fields; this can be used to characterize the electrode-surface-based noisy electric fields that compromise logic-gate fidelities and may eventually be used as a tool in surface science. 2) Since typical qubit logic gates depend on state-dependent forces, we can adapt the gate dynamics to sensitively detect additional forces. 3) We can use extensions of Bell inequality measurements to further restrict the degree of local realism possessed by Bell states. 4) We also briefly describe experiments for creation of Bell states using Hilbert space engineering. This work is a joint effort including the Ion-Storage group, the Quantum processing group, and the Computing and Communications Theory group at NIST, Boulder. Supported by IARPA, ONR, and the NIST Quantum Information Program.

  2. Blueprint for a microwave trapped ion quantum computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekitsch, Bjoern; Weidt, Sebastian; Fowler, Austin G; Mølmer, Klaus; Devitt, Simon J; Wunderlich, Christof; Hensinger, Winfried K

    2017-02-01

    The availability of a universal quantum computer may have a fundamental impact on a vast number of research fields and on society as a whole. An increasingly large scientific and industrial community is working toward the realization of such a device. An arbitrarily large quantum computer may best be constructed using a modular approach. We present a blueprint for a trapped ion-based scalable quantum computer module, making it possible to create a scalable quantum computer architecture based on long-wavelength radiation quantum gates. The modules control all operations as stand-alone units, are constructed using silicon microfabrication techniques, and are within reach of current technology. To perform the required quantum computations, the modules make use of long-wavelength radiation-based quantum gate technology. To scale this microwave quantum computer architecture to a large size, we present a fully scalable design that makes use of ion transport between different modules, thereby allowing arbitrarily many modules to be connected to construct a large-scale device. A high error-threshold surface error correction code can be implemented in the proposed architecture to execute fault-tolerant operations. With appropriate adjustments, the proposed modules are also suitable for alternative trapped ion quantum computer architectures, such as schemes using photonic interconnects.

  3. Applying Kitaev's algorithm in an ion trap quantum computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travaglione, B.; Milburn, G.J.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Kitaev's algorithm is a method of estimating eigenvalues associated with an operator. Shor's factoring algorithm, which enables a quantum computer to crack RSA encryption codes, is a specific example of Kitaev's algorithm. It has been proposed that the algorithm can also be used to generate eigenstates. We extend this proposal for small quantum systems, identifying the conditions under which the algorithm can successfully generate eigenstates. We then propose an implementation scheme based on an ion trap quantum computer. This scheme allows us to illustrate a simple example, in which the algorithm effectively generates eigenstates

  4. Dissipative trapped ion instability in PLT and INTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakamatsu, A.; Shimizu, K.; Ogasawara, M.

    1983-06-01

    The generation conditions of the dissipative trapped ion instability (DTII) are investigated for the parameters of PLT and INTOR. The finite banana width effect is taken into account in the dispersion relation. The conditions are greatly influenced by the impurities. Though the plasmas are well in the banana regime in bothe PLT and INTOR, DTII is not excited for Zsub(eff) = 3.5, and excited but it has negative growth rate for Zsub(eff) = 1.5, where Zsub(eff) is the effective charge number. Only for the pure case (Zsub(eff) = 1.0), the growth rate has small positive value in INTOR. (author)

  5. X-ray spectroscopy of hydrogen-like ions in an electron beam ion trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarbutt, M.R.; Crosby, D.; Silver, J.D. [Univ. of Oxford, Clarendon Lab. (United Kingdom); Myers, E.G. [Dept. of Physics, Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Nakamura, N.; Ohtani, S. [ICORP, JST, Chofu, Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    The X-ray emission from highly charged hydrogen-like ions in an electron beam ion trap is free from the problems of satellite contamination and Doppler shifts inherent in fast-beam sources. This is a favourable situation for the measurement of ground-state Lamb shifts in these ions. We present recent progress toward this goal, and discuss a method whereby wavelength comparison between transitions in hydrogenlike ions of different nuclear charge Z, enable the measurement of QED effects without requiring an absolute calibration.

  6. A Configurable Surface-Electrode Ion Trap Design for Quantum Information Processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wei; Chen Shu-Ming; Chen Ping-Xing; Wu Wei

    2013-01-01

    We propose a configurable surface-electrode ion trap design to alleviate the poor reusability of the existing traps. It can architecturally and electrically support 5 mainstream modes by design reuse, thus enhancing the trap reusability and reducing the experiment setup overhead. We also develop a corresponding simulation suite which can optimize trap geometries and calculate trap parameters to control the trapped ion's classic motion. According to our analytical and simulated results, the configurable design can serve as a unified platform for basic research of large-scale quantum information processing

  7. Probing Entanglement in Adiabatic Quantum Optimization with Trapped Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp eHauke

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Adiabatic quantum optimization has been proposed as a route to solve NP-complete problems, with a possible quantum speedup compared to classical algorithms. However, the precise role of quantum effects, such as entanglement, in these optimization protocols is still unclear. We propose a setup of cold trapped ions that allows one to quantitatively characterize, in a controlled experiment, the interplay of entanglement, decoherence, and non-adiabaticity in adiabatic quantum optimization. We show that, in this way, a broad class of NP-complete problems becomes accessible for quantum simulations, including the knapsack problem, number partitioning, and instances of the max-cut problem. Moreover, a general theoretical study reveals correlations of the success probability with entanglement at the end of the protocol. From exact numerical simulations for small systems and linear ramps, however, we find no substantial correlations with the entanglement during the optimization. For the final state, we derive analytically a universal upper bound for the success probability as a function of entanglement, which can be measured in experiment. The proposed trapped-ion setups and the presented study of entanglement address pertinent questions of adiabatic quantum optimization, which may be of general interest across experimental platforms.

  8. Trapping behaviour of deuterium ions implanted into tungsten simultaneously with carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Makoto; Suzuki, Sachiko; Wang, Wanjing; Kurata, Rie; Kida, Katsuya; Oya, Yasuhisa; Okuno, Kenji; Ashikawa, Naoko; Sagara, Akio; Yoshida, Naoaki

    2009-01-01

    The trapping behaviour of deuterium ions implanted into tungsten simultaneously with carbon ions was investigated by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The D 2 TDS spectrum consisted of three desorption stages, namely desorption of deuterium trapped by intrinsic defects, ion-induced defects and carbon with the formation of the C-D bond. Although the deuterium retention trapped by intrinsic defects was almost constant, that by ion-induced defects increased as the ion fluence increased. The retention of deuterium with the formation of the C-D bond was saturated at an ion fluence of 0.5x10 22 D + m -2 , where the major process was changed from the sputtering of tungsten with the formation of a W-C mixture to the formation of a C-C layer, and deuterium retention as the C-D bond decreased. It was concluded that the C-C layer would enhance the chemical sputtering of carbon with deuterium with the formation of CD x and the chemical state of carbon would control the deuterium retention in tungsten under C + -D 2 + implantation.

  9. The β-decay Paul trap: A radiofrequency-quadrupole ion trap for precision β-decay studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scielzo, N.D.; Li, G.; Sternberg, M.G.; Savard, G.; Bertone, P.F.; Buchinger, F.; Caldwell, S.; Clark, J.A.; Crawford, J.; Deibel, C.M.; Fallis, J.; Greene, J.P.

    2012-01-01

    The β-decay Paul trap is a linear radiofrequency-quadrupole ion trap that has been developed for precision β-decay studies. The design of the trap electrodes allows a variety of radiation detectors to surround the cloud of trapped ions. The momentum of the low-energy recoiling daughter nuclei following β decay is negligibly perturbed by scattering and is available for study. This advantageous property of traps allows the kinematics of particles that are difficult or even impossible to directly detect to be precisely reconstructed using conservation of energy and momentum. An ion-trap system offers several advantages over atom traps, such as higher trapping efficiencies and element-independent capabilities. The first precision experiment using this system is a measurement of β-decay angular correlations in the decay of 8 Li performed by inferring the momentum of the neutrino from the kinematic shifts imparted to the breakup α particles. Many other β-decay studies that would benefit from a determination of the nuclear recoil can be performed with this system.

  10. The {beta}-decay Paul trap: A radiofrequency-quadrupole ion trap for precision {beta}-decay studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scielzo, N.D., E-mail: scielzo1@llnl.gov [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Physical and Life Sciences Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Li, G. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3A 2T8 (Canada); Sternberg, M.G.; Savard, G. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Bertone, P.F. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Buchinger, F. [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3A 2T8 (Canada); Caldwell, S. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Clark, J.A. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Crawford, J. [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3A 2T8 (Canada); Deibel, C.M. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Fallis, J. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada R3T 2N2 (Canada); Greene, J.P. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); and others

    2012-07-21

    The {beta}-decay Paul trap is a linear radiofrequency-quadrupole ion trap that has been developed for precision {beta}-decay studies. The design of the trap electrodes allows a variety of radiation detectors to surround the cloud of trapped ions. The momentum of the low-energy recoiling daughter nuclei following {beta} decay is negligibly perturbed by scattering and is available for study. This advantageous property of traps allows the kinematics of particles that are difficult or even impossible to directly detect to be precisely reconstructed using conservation of energy and momentum. An ion-trap system offers several advantages over atom traps, such as higher trapping efficiencies and element-independent capabilities. The first precision experiment using this system is a measurement of {beta}-decay angular correlations in the decay of {sup 8}Li performed by inferring the momentum of the neutrino from the kinematic shifts imparted to the breakup {alpha} particles. Many other {beta}-decay studies that would benefit from a determination of the nuclear recoil can be performed with this system.

  11. Recycling radium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blair, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    The Technology Programs Department of Fluor Daniel Fernald investigated alternatives for dealing with the World's largest concentrated supply of radium, the K-65 silos at Fernald, the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) former uranium processing facility near Cincinnati, Ohio. These two silos contain nearly 3,770 curies (by definition 3,770 grams) primarily of Ra-226 (T 1/2 = 1600 a) within 10,000 metric tons of material. Material contents of the silos were to be vitrified according to a Record of Decision (ROD) between the DOE and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Because of cost considerations, that alternative must be reconsidered. Research showed that although Ra-226 had come mostly into disfavor as a therapeutic agent for cancer, isotopes derived from the neutron bombardment of pure Ra-226 and radioactive decay of the resulting purified isotopes could be used to good effect. One of these isotopes, bismuth-213 (Bi-213, T 1/2 = 45.6 m), is being used in clinical trials against acute myelogenous leukemia. The isotope is attached to an antibody that seeks out cancer cells. Because alpha particles dissipate most of their energy within the space of one or a few cells, virtually all the surrounding healthy tissue remains unharmed. Because of the short half life, waste disposal is no problem. Because of past policies, radium for feedstock is difficult to find. A new policy is needed in the United States acknowledging radium's value for feedstock while continuing to control its health and environmental consequences

  12. A rapid method for α-spectrometric analysis of radium isotopes in natural waters using ion-selective membrane technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purkl, Stefan; Eisenhauer, Anton

    2003-01-01

    An α-spectrometric method for the rapid determination of radium isotopes ( 223 Ra, 224 Ra and 226 Ra) in environmental samples is presented. Using Empore TM Radium Rad Disks complete separation of the target radionuclides is achieved. The high selectivity of these Rad Disks allows the straightforward use of 225 Ra as yield tracer. Chemical yield is up to 92±9%. The chemical procedure can be accomplished within 5 h. α-Sources show energy resolution in the range of typically 26-40 keV (FWHM). Despite minimal thickness of the sources no significant radon (Rn) losses can be observed

  13. Mass-selective isolation of ions stored in a quadrupole ion trap. A simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    March, Raymond E.; Londry, Frank A.; Alfred, Roland L.; Franklin, Anthony M.; Todd, John F. J.

    1992-01-01

    Trajectories of single ions stored in the quadrupole ion trap have been calculated using a simulation program described as the specific program for quadrupolar resonance (SPQR). Previously, the program has been used for the investigation of quadrupolar resonance excitation of ions with a static working point (or co-ordinates) in the stability diagram. The program has been modified to accommodate continuous d.c. and/or r.f. voltage ramps so as to permit calculation of ion trajectories while the working point is being changed. The modified program has been applied to the calculation of ion trajectories during ion isolation, or mass-selective storage, in the ion trap. The quadrupolar resonance excitation aspect of SPQR was not used in this study. Trajectories are displayed as temporal variations of ion kinetic energy, and axial and radial excursions from the centre of the ion trap. The working points of three ion species (m/z 144, 146 and 148), located initially on the qz, axis with qz [approximate] 0.12, were moved to the vicinity of the upper apex by a combination of r.f. and d.c. voltages applied in succession. Stable trajectories were maintained only for the ion species of m/z 146 for which the working point lay within this apex; the other ion species were ejected either radially or axially. The d.c. voltage was then reduced to zero so as to restore the working point of the isolated ion species to the qz axis. The amplitude of the r.f voltage was reduced to its initial value so as to retrieve the initial working point for m/z 146. The process extended over a real time of 2.9 ms, and was collision-free. The trajectory of the isolated ion was stable during this process; the ion species with m/z value lower than that of the target ion, that is, m/z 144, was ejected axially at the [beta]z = 1 boundary, while that with higher m/z value, that is, m/z 148, was ejected radially at the [beta]r = 0 boundary, as expected. The moderating effects of buffer gas were not taken

  14. Chemical characterization of microparticles by laser ablation in an ion trap mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dale, J.M.; Whitten, W.B.; Ramsey, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    We are developing a new technique for the chemical characterization of microparticles based upon the use of electrodynamic traps. The electrodynamic trap has achieved widespread use in the mass spectrometry community in the form of the ion trap mass spectrometer or quadrupole ion trap. Small macroscopic particles can be confined or levitated within the electrode structure of a three-dimensional quadrupole electrodynamic trap in the same way as fundamental charges or molecular ions by using a combination of ac and dc potentials. Our concept is to use the same electrode structure to perform both microparticle levitation and ion trapping/mass analysis. The microparticle will first be trapped and spatially stabilized within the trap for characterization by optical probes, i.e., absorption, fluorescence, or Raman spectroscopy. After the particle has been optically characterized, it is further characterized using mass spectrometry. Ions are generated from the particle surface using laser ablation or desorption. The characteristics of the applied voltages are changed to trap the ions formed by the laser with the ions subsequently mass analyzed. The work described in this paper focuses on the ability to perform laser desorption experiments on microparticles contained within the ion trap

  15. Unified theory of ballooning instabilities and temperature gradient driven trapped ion modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, X.Q.

    1990-08-01

    A unified theory of temperature gradient driven trapped ion modes and ballooning instabilities is developed using kinetic theory in banana regimes. All known results, such as electrostatic and purely magnetic trapped particle modes and ideal MHD ballooning modes (or shear Alfven waves) are readily derived from our single general dispersion relation. Several new results from ion-ion collision and trapped particle modification of ballooning modes are derived and discussed and the interrelationship between those modes is established. 24 refs

  16. IMPROVEMENT OF THE CERN SPS ELECTROSTATIC SEPTA ION TRAPS

    CERN Multimedia

    Balhan, Bruno; Barlow, Roger Andrew; Raffaele, Graziano

    2016-01-01

    At CERN, the SPS synchrotron is equipped with a slow extraction channel towards the fixed target beam lines in the North Area This channel includes five consecutive electrostatic septa, where the field free region and the active high field region are separated by an array of tungsten-rhenium wires. The field-free region provides for the circulating beam, while the high field region is used to deflect the extracted beam. Since the residual gas can be ionized by the orbiting beam, low energy ions could cross the wire array and enter the high field region and cause high voltage breakdown when accelerated onto the cathode. To prevent low energy ions from entering this high electric field region, a vertical field is applied to the orbiting beam using so-called ‘ion traps’ for active protection. The vertical field is created by electrodes placed inside the region containing the circulating beam. Due to electromagnetic coupling onto the ion trap electrodes observed with the high frequency LHC beam (25 ns spaced ...

  17. Chemical characterization of microparticles by laser ablation in an ion trap mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dale, J.M.; Whitten, W.B.; Ramsey, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    We are developing a new technique for the chemical characterization of microparticles based upon the use of electrodynamic traps. The electrodynamic trap has achieved widespread use in the mass spectrometry community in the form of the ion trap mass spectrometer or quadrupole ion trap. Small macroscopic particles can be confined or leviated within the electrode structure of a three-dimensional quadrupole electrodynamic trap in the same way as fundamental charges or molecular ions by using a combination of ac and dc potentials. Our concept is to use the same electrode structure to perform both microparticle levitation and ion trapping/mass analysis. The microparticle will first be trapped and spatially stabilized within the trap for characterization by optical probes, i.e., absorption, fluorescence, or Raman spectroscopy. After the particle has been optically characterized, it is further characterized using mass spectrometry. Ions are generated from the particle surface using laser ablation or desorption. The characteristics of the applied voltages are changed to trap the ions formed by the laser with the ions subsequently mass analyzed. The work described in this paper focuses on the ability to perform laser desorption experiments on microparticles contained within the ion trap. Laser desorption has previously been demonstrated in ion trap devices by applying the sample to a probe which is inserted so as to place the sample at the surface of the ring electrode. Our technique requires the placement of a microparticle in the center of the trap. Our initial experiments have been performed on falling microparticles rather than levitated particles to eliminate voltage switching requirements when changing from particle to ion trapping modes

  18. Integrated fiber-mirror ion trap for strong ion-cavity coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandstätter, B.; Schüppert, K.; Casabone, B.; Friebe, K.; Stute, A.; Northup, T. E.; McClung, A.; Schmidt, P. O.; Deutsch, C.; Reichel, J.; Blatt, R.

    2013-01-01

    We present and characterize fiber mirrors and a miniaturized ion-trap design developed to integrate a fiber-based Fabry-Perot cavity (FFPC) with a linear Paul trap for use in cavity-QED experiments with trapped ions. Our fiber-mirror fabrication process not only enables the construction of FFPCs with small mode volumes, but also allows us to minimize the influence of the dielectric fiber mirrors on the trapped-ion pseudopotential. We discuss the effect of clipping losses for long FFPCs and the effect of angular and lateral displacements on the coupling efficiencies between cavity and fiber. Optical profilometry allows us to determine the radii of curvature and ellipticities of the fiber mirrors. From finesse measurements, we infer a single-atom cooperativity of up to 12 for FFPCs longer than 200 μm in length; comparison to cavities constructed with reference substrate mirrors produced in the same coating run indicates that our FFPCs have similar scattering losses. We characterize the birefringence of our fiber mirrors, finding that careful fiber-mirror selection enables us to construct FFPCs with degenerate polarization modes. As FFPCs are novel devices, we describe procedures developed for handling, aligning, and cleaning them. We discuss experiments to anneal fiber mirrors and explore the influence of the atmosphere under which annealing occurs on coating losses, finding that annealing under vacuum increases the losses for our reference substrate mirrors. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements indicate that these losses may be attributable to oxygen depletion in the mirror coating. Special design considerations enable us to introduce a FFPC into a trapped ion setup. Our unique linear Paul trap design provides clearance for such a cavity and is miniaturized to shield trapped ions from the dielectric fiber mirrors. We numerically calculate the trap potential in the absence of fibers. In the experiment additional electrodes can be used to compensate

  19. Trapped-ion quantum logic gates based on oscillating magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ospelkaus, Christian; Langer, Christopher E.; Amini, Jason M.; Brown, Kenton R.; Leibfried, Dietrich; Wineland, David J.

    2009-05-01

    Oscillating magnetic fields and field gradients can be used to implement single-qubit rotations and entangling multiqubit quantum gates for trapped-ion quantum information processing. With fields generated by currents in microfabricated surface-electrode traps, it should be possible to achieve gate speeds that are comparable to those of optically induced gates for realistic distances between the ions and the electrode surface. Magnetic-field-mediated gates have the potential to significantly reduce the overhead in laser-beam control and motional-state initialization compared to current QIP experiments with trapped ions and will eliminate spontaneous scattering decoherence, a fundamental source of decoherence in laser-mediated gates. A potentially beneficial environment for the implementation of such schemes is a cryogenic ion trap, because small length scale traps with low motional heating rates can be realized. A cryogenic ion trap experiment is currently under construction at NIST.

  20. Direct trace analysis of metals and alloys in a quadrupole ion-trap mass spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Song, K S; Yang, M; Cha, H K; Lee, J M; Lee, G H

    1999-01-01

    An ion-trap mass spectrometer adopting a quadrupole ion-trap and laser ablation/ionization method was constructed. The developed system was tested for composition analysis of some metals (Cu, stainless), and alloys (hastalloy C, mumetal) by mass spectrometry. Samples were analyzed by using laser ablation from a sample probe tip followed by a mass analysis with the quadrupole ion-trap. The quadrupole ion-trap was modified to enable laser ablation by a XeCl excimer laser pulse that passed radially through the ring electrode. A mass scan of the produced ions was performed in the mass selective instability mode wherein trapped ions were successively detected by increasing the rf voltage through the ring electrode. Factors affecting the mass resolution, such as pressure of buffer gas and ablation laser power, are discussed.

  1. Confinement in a cryogenic Penning trap of highest charge state ions from EBIT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, D.

    1994-01-01

    The retrapping of highly charged Xe 44+ and Th 68+,72+ ions extracted from an open-quotes Electron Beam Ion Trapclose quotes (EBIT) is demonstrated after injection of the ions into RETRAP, a cryogenic Penning trap (up to 6 Tesla magnetic field) currently with an open cylinder design. Ion extraction in a short pulse (5-20 μsec) from EBIT, essential for efficient retrapping, is employed. The ions are slowed down upon entering a deceleration tube mounted above the trap within the magnetic field. The potential is then rapidly (100 ns) decreased, enabling low energy ions to enter the trap. Capture efficiencies up to 25% are observed via detection of the delayed ion release pulse with a detector below the trap. Signal voltages induced in a tuned circuit due to single and multiple ions have been observed by tuning the ion resonant axial oscillation frequencies for different ions. Results from transporting and retrapping of the ions, as well as their detection, are described and the trapping efficiency is discussed, The motivation for these studies is to cool the trapped very highly charged ions to low temperatures (< 4 K) in order to perform ultrahigh resolution precision spectroscopy, collision studies at ultra low energies and to observe phase transitions in Coulomb clusters of highly charged ions

  2. Carbon nanotori as traps for atoms and ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan Yue; Cox, Barry J.; Hill, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotori surely represent an ideal location to trap both charged and uncharged atoms, since they are open, accessible and possess strong attractive energy. In this paper, we investigate the plausibility of carbon nanotori as atomic traps and we use the continuum approximation together with the Lennard-Jones potential to model the encapsulation of an atom or ion by a nanotorus. The critical geometric factors such as the minor and major radii, i.e. r and R of the nanotorus, for which the maximum interaction between the atom and the nanotorus occurs, are determined. For various atoms, assumed situated along the axis of the torus, the minimum potential energy between the atom and the nanotorus is calculated and compared, and shown to be approximately kηεσ 2 , where η is the uniform atomic density, ε and σ are the Lennard-Jones well depth and the van der Waals radius, respectively, and k is a universal non-dimensional constant with the approximate value -12.42. The results given in this paper might be used for future drug delivery and biosensing design.

  3. Towards scaling up trapped ion quantum information processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leibfried, D.; Wineland, D. J.; Blakestad, R. B.; Bollinger, J. J.; Britton, J.; Chiaverini, J.; Epstein, R. J.; Itano, W. M.; Jost, J. D.; Knill, E.; Langer, C.; Ozeri, R.; Reichle, R.; Seidelin, S.; Shiga, N.; Wesenberg, J. H.

    2007-01-01

    Recent theoretical advances have identified several computational algorithms that can be implemented utilizing quantum information processing (QIP), which gives an exponential speedup over the corresponding (known) algorithms on conventional computers. QIP makes use of the counter-intuitive properties of quantum mechanics, such as entanglement and the superposition principle. Unfortunately it has so far been impossible to build a practical QIP system that outperforms conventional computers. Atomic ions confined in an array of interconnected traps represent a potentially scalable approach to QIP. All basic requirements have been experimentally demonstrated in one and two qubit experiments. The remaining task is to scale the system to many qubits while minimizing and correcting errors in the system. While this requires extremely challenging technological improvements, no fundamental roadblocks are currently foreseen.

  4. Radium-226

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammerich, Marc; Frot, Patricia; Gambini, Denis-Jean; Gauron, Christine; Moureaux, Patrick; Herbelet, Gilbert; Lahaye, Thierry; Pihet, Pascal; Rannou, Alain

    2014-03-01

    This sheet belongs to a collection which relates to the use of radionuclides essentially in unsealed sources. Its goal is to gather on a single document the most relevant information as well as the best prevention practices to be implemented. These sheets are made for the persons in charge of radiation protection: users, radioprotection-skill persons, labor physicians. Each sheet treats of: 1 - the radio-physical and biological properties; 2 - the main uses; 3 - the dosimetric parameters; 4 - the measurement; 5 - the protection means; 6 - the areas delimitation and monitoring; 7 - the personnel classification, training and monitoring; 8 - the effluents and wastes; 9 - the authorization and declaration administrative procedures; 10 - the transport; and 11 - the right conduct to adopt in case of incident or accident. This sheet deals specifically with Radium-226

  5. Ejection of Coulomb Crystals from a Linear Paul Ion Trap for Ion-Molecule Reaction Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, K A E; Pollum, L L; Petralia, L S; Tauschinsky, A; Rennick, C J; Softley, T P; Heazlewood, B R

    2015-12-17

    Coulomb crystals are being increasingly employed as a highly localized source of cold ions for the study of ion-molecule chemical reactions. To extend the scope of reactions that can be studied in Coulomb crystals-from simple reactions involving laser-cooled atomic ions, to more complex systems where molecular reactants give rise to multiple product channels-sensitive product detection methodologies are required. The use of a digital ion trap (DIT) and a new damped cosine trap (DCT) are described, which facilitate the ejection of Coulomb-crystallized ions onto an external detector for the recording of time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectra. This enables the examination of reaction dynamics and kinetics between Coulomb-crystallized ions and neutral molecules: ionic products are typically cotrapped, thus ejecting the crystal onto an external detector reveals the masses, identities, and quantities of all ionic species at a selected point in the reaction. Two reaction systems are examined: the reaction of Ca(+) with deuterated isotopologues of water, and the charge exchange between cotrapped Xe(+) with deuterated isotopologues of ammonia. These reactions are examples of two distinct types of experiment, the first involving direct reaction of the laser-cooled ions, and the second involving reaction of sympathetically-cooled heavy ions to form a mixture of light product ions. Extensive simulations are conducted to interpret experimental results and calculate optimal operating parameters, facilitating a comparison between the DIT and DCT approaches. The simulations also demonstrate a correlation between crystal shape and image shape on the detector, suggesting a possible means for determining crystal geometry for nonfluorescing ions.

  6. Practical aspects of trapped ion mass spectrometry, 4 theory and instrumentation

    CERN Document Server

    March, Raymond E

    2010-01-01

    The expansion of the use of ion trapping in different areas of mass spectrometry and different areas of application indicates the value of a single source of information drawing together diverse inputs. This book provides an account of the theory and instrumentation of mass spectrometric applications and an introduction to ion trapping devices.

  7. X-ray spectroscopy of highly-ionized atoms in an electron beam ion trap (EBIT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marrs, R.E.; Bennett, C.; Chen, M.H.

    1988-01-01

    An Electron Beam Ion Trap at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is being used to produce and trap very-highly-charged-ions (q /le/ 70+) for x-ray spectroscopy measurements. Recent measurements of dielectronic recombination, electron impact excitation and transition energies are presented. 15 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab

  8. Quantum computing with four-particle decoherence-free states in ion trap

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Mang; Wang, Xiaoguang

    2001-01-01

    Quantum computing gates are proposed to apply on trapped ions in decoherence-free states. As phase changes due to time evolution of components with different eigenenergies of quantum superposition are completely frozen, quantum computing based on this model would be perfect. Possible application of our scheme in future ion-trap quantum computer is discussed.

  9. Control of the conformations of ion Coulomb crystals in a Penning trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavadia, Sandeep; Goodwin, Joseph F.; Stutter, Graham; Bharadia, Shailen; Crick, Daniel R.; Segal, Daniel M.; Thompson, Richard C.

    2013-01-01

    Laser-cooled atomic ions form ordered structures in radiofrequency ion traps and in Penning traps. Here we demonstrate in a Penning trap the creation and manipulation of a wide variety of ion Coulomb crystals formed from small numbers of ions. The configuration can be changed from a linear string, through intermediate geometries, to a planar structure. The transition from a linear string to a zigzag geometry is observed for the first time in a Penning trap. The conformations of the crystals are set by the applied trap potential and the laser parameters, and agree with simulations. These simulations indicate that the rotation frequency of a small crystal is mainly determined by the laser parameters, independent of the number of ions and the axial confinement strength. This system has potential applications for quantum simulation, quantum information processing and tests of fundamental physics models from quantum field theory to cosmology. PMID:24096901

  10. Magneto optical trap recoil ion momentum spectroscopy: application to ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blieck, J.

    2008-10-01

    87 Rb atoms have been cooled, trapped and prepared as targets for collision studies with 2 and 5 keV Na + projectiles. The physics studied deals with charge exchange processes. The active electron, which is generally the most peripheral electron of the atomic target, is transferred from the target onto the ionic projectile. The ionized target is called recoil ion. The technique used to study this physics is the MOTRIMS (Magneto Optical Trap Recoil Ion Momentum Spectroscopy) technique, which combines a magneto optical trap and a recoil ion momentum spectrometer. The spectrometer is used for the measurement of the recoil ions momentum, which gives access to all the information of the collision: the Q-value (which is the potential energy difference of the active electron on each particle) and the scattering angle of the projectile. The trap provides extremely cold targets to optimize the measurement of the momentum, and to release the latter from thermal motion. Through cinematically complete experiments, the MOTRIMS technique gives access to better resolutions on momentum measurements. Measurements of differential cross sections in initial and final capture states and in scattering angle have been done. Results obtained for differential cross sections in initial and final states show globally a good agreement with theory and an other experiment. Nevertheless, discrepancies with theory and this other experiment are shown for the measurements of doubly differential cross sections. These discrepancies are not understood yet. The particularity of the experimental setup designed and tested in this work, namely a low background noise, allows a great sensitivity to weak capture channels, and brings a technical and scientific gain compared with previous works. (author)

  11. CrossRef Space-charge effects in Penning ion traps

    CERN Document Server

    Porobić, T; Breitenfeldt, M; Couratin, C; Finlay, P; Knecht, A; Fabian, X; Friedag, P; Fléchard, X; Liénard, E; Ban, G; Zákoucký, D; Soti, G; Van Gorp, S; Weinheimer, Ch; Wursten, E; Severijns, N

    2015-01-01

    The influence of space-charge on ion cyclotron resonances and magnetron eigenfrequency in a gas-filled Penning ion trap has been investigated. Off-line measurements with View the MathML source using the cooling trap of the WITCH retardation spectrometer-based setup at ISOLDE/CERN were performed. Experimental ion cyclotron resonances were compared with ab initio Coulomb simulations and found to be in agreement. As an important systematic effect of the WITCH experiment, the magnetron eigenfrequency of the ion cloud was studied under increasing space-charge conditions. Finally, the helium buffer gas pressure in the Penning trap was determined by comparing experimental cooling rates with simulations.

  12. Simulating quantum effects of cosmological expansion using a static ion trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menicucci, Nicolas C.; Olson, S. Jay; Milburn, Gerard J.

    2010-09-01

    We propose a new experimental test bed that uses ions in the collective ground state of a static trap to study the analogue of quantum-field effects in cosmological spacetimes, including the Gibbons-Hawking effect for a single detector in de Sitter spacetime, as well as the possibility of modeling inflationary structure formation and the entanglement signature of de Sitter spacetime. To date, proposals for using trapped ions in analogue gravity experiments have simulated the effect of gravity on the field modes by directly manipulating the ions' motion. In contrast, by associating laboratory time with conformal time in the simulated universe, we can encode the full effect of curvature in the modulation of the laser used to couple the ions' vibrational motion and electronic states. This model simplifies the experimental requirements for modeling the analogue of an expanding universe using trapped ions, and it enlarges the validity of the ion-trap analogy to a wide range of interesting cases.

  13. A Linear Ion Trap with an Expanded Inscribed Diameter to Improve Optical Access for Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopal, Vaishnavi; Stokes, Chris; Ferzoco, Alessandra

    2018-02-01

    We report a custom-geometry linear ion trap designed for fluorescence spectroscopy of gas-phase ions at ambient to cryogenic temperatures. Laser-induced fluorescence from trapped ions is collected from between the trapping rods, orthogonal to the excitation laser that runs along the axis of the linear ion trap. To increase optical access to the ion cloud, the diameter of the round trapping rods is 80% of the inscribed diameter, rather than the roughly 110% used to approximate purely quadrupolar electric fields. To encompass as much of the ion cloud as possible, the first collection optic has a 25.4 mm diameter and a numerical aperture of 0.6. The choice of geometry and collection optics yields 107 detected photons/s from trapped rhodamine 6G ions. The trap is coupled to a closed-cycle helium refrigerator, which in combination with two 50 Ohm heaters enables temperature control to below 25 K on the rod electrodes. The purpose of the instrument is to broaden the applicability of fluorescence spectroscopy of gas-phase ions to cases where photon emission is a minority relaxation pathway. Such studies are important to understand how the microenvironment of a chromophore influences excited state charge transfer processes.

  14. A novel ion cooling trap for multi-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrograph

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Y., E-mail: yito@riken.jp [SLOWRI Team, Nishina Accelerator-Based Research Center, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Schury, P. [SLOWRI Team, Nishina Accelerator-Based Research Center, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); New Mexico State University, Department Chemistry and Biochemistry, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Wada, M.; Naimi, S. [SLOWRI Team, Nishina Accelerator-Based Research Center, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Smorra, C. [SLOWRI Team, Nishina Accelerator-Based Research Center, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Sonoda, T. [SLOWRI Team, Nishina Accelerator-Based Research Center, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Mita, H. [SLOWRI Team, Nishina Accelerator-Based Research Center, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Takamine, A. [SLOWRI Team, Nishina Accelerator-Based Research Center, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Aoyama Gakuin University, 4-4-25 Shibuya, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-8366 (Japan); Okada, K. [SLOWRI Team, Nishina Accelerator-Based Research Center, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Sophia University, 7-1 Kioi-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Ozawa, A. [University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Wollnik, H. [SLOWRI Team, Nishina Accelerator-Based Research Center, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); New Mexico State University, Department Chemistry and Biochemistry, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Fast cooling time: 2 ms. • High efficiency: ≈27% for {sup 23}Na{sup +} and ≈5.1% for {sup 7}Li{sup +}. • 100% Duty cycle with double trap system. -- Abstract: A radiofrequency quadrupole ion trap system for use with a multi-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrograph (MRTOF) for short-lived nuclei has been developed. The trap system consists of two different parts, an asymmetric taper trap and a flat trap. The ions are cooled to a sufficient small bunch for precise mass measurement with MRTOF in only 2 ms cooling time in the flat trap, then orthogonally ejected to the MRTOF for mass analysis. A trapping efficiency of ≈27% for {sup 23}Na{sup +} and ≈5.1% for {sup 7}Li{sup +} has been achieved.

  15. Manipulation of entanglement and its realisation using trapped ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonathan, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    Entanglement is a fundamental physical resource at the heart of quantum information theory. This Thesis contributes to its study by approaching it from two separate directions: the laws governing its manipulation, and its creation within a concrete physical setting. I begin by studying the manipulation of entangled pure states of two quantum systems when (i) only a single copy of each system is available and (ii) only a restricted class of physical operations are allowed to be performed on them. One physically reasonable class, denoted LQCC, is the set of all possible quantum operations realised on each system by local agents, who are allowed to communicate with each other only by classical means. Given these conditions, I find a minimal set of entropic-like state functions that completely determine which manipulations can be realised. Applications to useful protocols such as entanglement concentration are discussed. Further elaboration allows also the determination of the most faithful approximation to a given target state that can be attained under LQCC, and the most faithful teleportation protocol achievable when only partial entanglement is available. The study of a more general class of transformations demonstrates that entanglement can also be a re-usable resource. Specifically, I show that the mere presence of further entanglement allows the realisation of transformations which are impossible under LQCC alone. The extra entanglement is not consumed in any way, acting as a 'catalyst'. Applications of this counter-intuitive effect are discussed. In the second part of the Thesis, I turn to the concrete creation and manipulation of entanglement within the system of laser-cooled, trapped ions. After a brief survey of known schemes, I propose a new method for realising two-qubit quantum logic gates within this system. The scheme is based on the AC Stark shift (lightshift) induced by laser light resonant with the ionic transition frequency. At specific laser

  16. Penning traps with unitary architecture for storage of highly charged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Joseph N.; Guise, Nicholas D.; Brewer, Samuel M.

    2012-01-01

    Penning traps are made extremely compact by embedding rare-earth permanent magnets in the electrode structure. Axially-oriented NdFeB magnets are used in unitary architectures that couple the electric and magnetic components into an integrated structure. We have constructed a two-magnet Penning trap with radial access to enable the use of laser or atomic beams, as well as the collection of light. An experimental apparatus equipped with ion optics is installed at the NIST electron beam ion trap (EBIT) facility, constrained to fit within 1 meter at the end of a horizontal beamline for transporting highly charged ions. Highly charged ions of neon and argon, extracted with initial energies up to 4000 eV per unit charge, are captured and stored to study the confinement properties of a one-magnet trap and a two-magnet trap. Design considerations and some test results are discussed.

  17. Penning traps with unitary architecture for storage of highly charged ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Joseph N; Brewer, Samuel M; Guise, Nicholas D

    2012-02-01

    Penning traps are made extremely compact by embedding rare-earth permanent magnets in the electrode structure. Axially-oriented NdFeB magnets are used in unitary architectures that couple the electric and magnetic components into an integrated structure. We have constructed a two-magnet Penning trap with radial access to enable the use of laser or atomic beams, as well as the collection of light. An experimental apparatus equipped with ion optics is installed at the NIST electron beam ion trap (EBIT) facility, constrained to fit within 1 meter at the end of a horizontal beamline for transporting highly charged ions. Highly charged ions of neon and argon, extracted with initial energies up to 4000 eV per unit charge, are captured and stored to study the confinement properties of a one-magnet trap and a two-magnet trap. Design considerations and some test results are discussed.

  18. The streaming-trapped ion interface in the equatorial inner magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, J.; Horwitz, J. L.; Gallagher, D.; Pollock, C. J.

    1994-01-01

    Spacecraft measurements of core ions on L=4-7 field-lines typically show trapped ion distributions near the magnetic equator, and frequently indicate field-aligned ion streams at higher latitudes. The nature of the transition between them may indicate both the microphysics of hot-cold plasma interactions and overall consequences for core plasma evolution. We have undertaken a statistical analysis and characterization of this interface and its relation to the equatorial region of the inner magnetosphere. In this analysis, we have characterized such features as the equatorial ion flux anisotropy, the penetration of field-aligned ionospheric streams into the equatorial region, the scale of the transition into trapped ion populations, and the transition latitude. We found that most transition latitudes occur within 13 deg of the equator. The typical values of equatorial ion anisotropies are consistent with bi-Maxwellian temperature ratios of T(sub perpendicular)/T(sub parallel) in the range of 3-5. The latitudinal scales for the edges of the trapped ion populations display a rather strong peak in the 2-3 deg range. We also found that there is a trend for the penetration ratio, the anisotropy half width, and the transition scale length to decrease with a higher equatorial ion anisotropy. We may interpret these features in terms of Liouville mapping of equatorially trapped ions and the reflection of the incoming ionospheric ion streams from the equatorial potential peaks associated with such trapped ions.

  19. Experiments with highly charged ions up to bare U92+ on the electron beam ion trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.

    1994-07-01

    An overview is given of the current experimental effort to investigate the level structure of highly charged ions with the Livermore electron beam ion trap (EBIT) facility. The facility allows the production and study of virtually any ionization state of any element up to bare U 92+ . Precision spectroscopic measurements have been performed for a range of Δn = 0 and Δn = 1 transitions. Examples involving 3-4 and 2-3 as well as 3-3 and 2-2 transitions in uranium ions are discussed that illustrated some of the measurement and analysis techniques employed. The measurements have allowed tests of calculations of the the quantum electrodynamical contributions to the transitions energies at the 0.4% level in a regime where (Zα) ∼ 1

  20. Experimental simulation and limitations of quantum walks with trapped ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matjeschk, R; Schneider, Ch; Enderlein, M; Huber, T; Schmitz, H; Glueckert, J; Schaetz, T

    2012-01-01

    We examine the prospects of discrete quantum walks (QWs) with trapped ions. In particular, we analyze in detail the limitations of the protocol of Travaglione and Milburn (2002 Phys. Rev. A 65 032310) that has been implemented by several experimental groups in recent years. Based on the first realization in our group (Schmitz et al 2009 Phys. Rev. Lett. 103 090504), we investigate the consequences of leaving the scope of the approximations originally made, such as the Lamb-Dicke approximation. We explain the consequential deviations from the idealized QW for different experimental realizations and an increasing number of steps by taking into account higher-order terms of the quantum evolution. It turns out that these already become significant after a few steps, which is confirmed by experimental results and is currently limiting the scalability of this approach. Finally, we propose a new scheme using short laser pulses, derived from a protocol from the field of quantum computation. We show that this scheme is not subject to the above-mentioned restrictions and analytically and numerically evaluate its limitations, based on a realistic implementation with our specific setup. Implementing the protocol with state-of-the-art techniques should allow for substantially increasing the number of steps to 100 and beyond and should be extendable to higher-dimensional QWs. (paper)

  1. Loading of mass spectrometry ion trap with Th ions by laser ablation for nuclear frequency standard application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisyuk, Petr V; Derevyashkin, Sergey P; Khabarova, Ksenia Y; Kolachevsky, Nikolay N; Lebedinsky, Yury Y; Poteshin, Sergey S; Sysoev, Alexey A; Tkalya, Evgeny V; Tregubov, Dmitry O; Troyan, Viktor I; Vasiliev, Oleg S; Yakovlev, Valery P; Yudin, Valery I

    2017-08-01

    We describe an original multisectional quadrupole ion trap aimed to realize nuclear frequency standard based on the unique isomer transition in thorium nucleus. It is shown that the system effectively operates on Th + , Th 2+ and Th 3+ ions produced by laser ablation of metallic thorium-232 target. Laser intensity used for ablation is about 6 GW/cm 2 . Via applying a bias potential to every control voltage including the RF one, we are able not only to manipulate ions within the energy range as wide as 1-500 eV but to specially adjust trap potentials in order to work mainly with ions that belong to energy distribution maximum and therefore to effectively enhance the number of trapped ions. Measurement of energy distributions of 232 Th + , 232 Th 2+ , 232 Th 3+ ions obtained by laser ablation allows us to define optimal potential values for trapping process. Observed number of ions inside trap in dependence on trapping time is found to obey an unusually slow - logarithmic decay law that needs more careful study.

  2. Experimental system design for the integration of trapped-ion and superconducting qubit systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Motte, D.; Grounds, A. R.; Rehák, M.; Rodriguez Blanco, A.; Lekitsch, B.; Giri, G. S.; Neilinger, P.; Oelsner, G.; Il'ichev, E.; Grajcar, M.; Hensinger, W. K.

    2016-12-01

    We present a design for the experimental integration of ion trapping and superconducting qubit systems as a step towards the realization of a quantum hybrid system. The scheme addresses two key difficulties in realizing such a system: a combined microfabricated ion trap and superconducting qubit architecture, and the experimental infrastructure to facilitate both technologies. Developing upon work by Kielpinski et al. (Phys Rev Lett 108(13):130504, 2012. doi: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.130504), we describe the design, simulation and fabrication process for a microfabricated ion trap capable of coupling an ion to a superconducting microwave LC circuit with a coupling strength in the tens of kHz. We also describe existing difficulties in combining the experimental infrastructure of an ion trapping set-up into a dilution refrigerator with superconducting qubits and present solutions that can be immediately implemented using current technology.

  3. Radium in diesel oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulich, J.

    1977-05-01

    In order to determine the addition of radon and radium to the air in mines, originatiny from the combustion of petroleum, measurements of the content of radium in diesel oil have been performed. Knowing the radium content theradon content can easily be calculated. The procedures used for the chemical analysis of radium is desribed. The ash remaining after combustion of the diesel oil is soluted in water and radium is precipiated as sulphate. The radium is detected by a ZnS (Ag) detector. The diesel oils from different petroleum companies contained between o.019-0.5pCi radium - 226. The conclution is that the consumption of diesel oils in motors used in mines does not contribute to the radium - 226 content at the air move than permissible according to norms.(K.K.)

  4. The injection of inert gas ions into solids: their trapping and escape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, G.; Armour, D.G.; Donnelly, S.E.; Ingram, D.C.; Webb, R.P.

    1980-01-01

    The first part of this contribution will review experimental studies of the trapping probabilities of ions injected into solids as a function of ion energy and indicate how the data can be modelled theoretically. It will be demonstrated that trapping is a two stage process, the first involving penetration into the solid and the second requiring atom dissolution and experimental evidence will be cited to show how the latter process may be dominant for light ions which create little radiation damage. For low ion fluences, injected atoms are generally trapped in isolation but as fluence increases gas-defect complexes are formed and it will be shown how post bombardment thermal evaluation studies can provide evidence for the growth of these complexes. Concomitant with trapping however, dissolved gas may be evolved from the solid by some form of sputtering process, sometimes by mechanisms much more efficient than congruent sputtering of the solid together with the trapped species. Measurements of the trapped atom concentration-ion fluence behaviour and of the evolution of one initially trapped species by bombardment with a second species provide information on the physical processes involved in trapped atom sputtering and upon the mechanism of gas incorporation saturation and experimental studies in this area, together with some first approximation theoretical investigations will be discussed. It will be shown that an important mechanism in dictating incorporation saturation, in addition to sputtering, is the atomic saturation of the solid by the implant. (author)

  5. Trapped-ion quantum logic gates based on oscillating magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ospelkaus, C; Langer, C E; Amini, J M; Brown, K R; Leibfried, D; Wineland, D J

    2008-08-29

    Oscillating magnetic fields and field gradients can be used to implement single-qubit rotations and entangling multiqubit quantum gates for trapped-ion quantum information processing (QIP). With fields generated by currents in microfabricated surface-electrode traps, it should be possible to achieve gate speeds that are comparable to those of optically induced gates for realistic distances between the ion crystal and the electrode surface. Magnetic-field-mediated gates have the potential to significantly reduce the overhead in laser-beam control and motional-state initialization compared to current QIP experiments with trapped ions and will eliminate spontaneous scattering, a fundamental source of decoherence in laser-mediated gates.

  6. Experimental investigation of the stability diagram for Paul traps in the case of praseodymium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koczorowski, W.; Szawiola, G.; Walaszyk, A.; Buczek, A.; Stefanska, D.; Stachowska, E.

    2006-01-01

    The present paper describes an investigation of non-linear resonances of praseodymium ion clouds stored in a Paul trap as a function of the storage parameters. These have been observed in traps with different ring electrode diameters. In these different traps the resonances occur for different values of the operating parameters. Discrepancies with the approximation model for one ion have been found. The intensity of the fluorescence signal and the Doppler half width have been recorded as a function of one of the storage parameters: q. We use our results to optimize the fluorescence signal of the stored ions, which is especially useful in the case of the double-resonance method.

  7. Sideband cooling and coherent dynamics in a microchip multi-segmented ion trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, Stephan A; Poschinger, Ulrich; Ziesel, Frank; Schmidt-Kaler, Ferdinand [Universitaet Ulm, Institut fuer Quanteninformationsverarbeitung, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, D-89069 Ulm (Germany)], E-mail: stephan.schulz@uni-ulm.de

    2008-04-15

    Miniaturized ion trap arrays with many trap segments present a promising architecture for scalable quantum information processing. The miniaturization of segmented linear Paul traps allows partitioning the microtrap into different storage and processing zones. The individual position control of many ions-each of them carrying qubit information in its long-lived electronic levels-by the external trap control voltages is important for the implementation of next generation large-scale quantum algorithms. We present a novel scalable microchip multi-segmented ion trap with two different adjacent zones, one for the storage and another dedicated to the processing of quantum information using single ions and linear ion crystals. A pair of radio-frequency-driven electrodes and 62 independently controlled dc electrodes allows shuttling of single ions or linear ion crystals with numerically designed axial potentials at axial and radial trap frequencies of a few megahertz. We characterize and optimize the microtrap using sideband spectroscopy on the narrow S{sub 1/2}{r_reversible}D{sub 5/2} qubit transition of the {sup 40}Ca{sup +} ion, and demonstrate coherent single-qubit Rabi rotations and optical cooling methods. We determine the heating rate using sideband cooling measurements to the vibrational ground state, which is necessary for subsequent two-qubit quantum logic operations. The applicability for scalable quantum information processing is proved.

  8. Lifetime measurements in an electrostatic ion beam trap using image charge monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahinov, Igor; Toker, Yoni; Heber, Oded; Rappaport, Michael; Zajfman, Daniel; Strasser, Daniel; Schwalm, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    A technique for mass-selective lifetime measurements of keV ions in a linear electrostatic ion beam trap is presented. The technique is based on bunching the ions using a weak RF potential and non-destructive ion detection by a pick-up electrode. This method has no mass-limitation, possesses the advantage of inherent mass-selectivity, and offers a possibility of measuring simultaneously the lifetimes of different ion species with no need for prior mass-selection.

  9. UV Photodissociation Action Spectroscopy of Haloanilinium Ions in a Linear Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Christopher S.; Kirk, Benjamin B.; Blanksby, Stephen J.; O'Hair, Richard. A. J.; Trevitt, Adam J.

    2013-06-01

    UV-vis photodissociation action spectroscopy is becoming increasingly prevalent because of advances in, and commercial availability of, ion trapping technologies and tunable laser sources. This study outlines in detail an instrumental arrangement, combining a commercial ion-trap mass spectrometer and tunable nanosecond pulsed laser source, for performing fully automated photodissociation action spectroscopy on gas-phase ions. The components of the instrumentation are outlined, including the optical and electronic interfacing, in addition to the control software for automating the experiment and performing online analysis of the spectra. To demonstrate the utility of this ensemble, the photodissociation action spectra of 4-chloroanilinium, 4-bromoanilinium, and 4-iodoanilinium cations are presented and discussed. Multiple photoproducts are detected in each case and the photoproduct yields are followed as a function of laser wavelength. It is shown that the wavelength-dependent partitioning of the halide loss, H loss, and NH3 loss channels can be broadly rationalized in terms of the relative carbon-halide bond dissociation energies and processes of energy redistribution. The photodissociation action spectrum of (phenyl)Ag2 + is compared with a literature spectrum as a further benchmark.

  10. Ra+ ion trapping : toward an atomic parity violation measurement and an optical clock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Portela, M. Nunez; Dijck, E. A.; Mohanty, A.; Bekker, H.; van den Berg, Joost E.; Giri, G. S.; Hoekstra, S.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Schlesser, S.; Timmermans, R.G.E.; Versolato, O. O.; Willmann, L.; Wilschut, H. W.; Jungmann, K.

    2014-01-01

    A single Ra+ ion stored in a Paul radio frequency ion trap has excellent potential for a precision measurement of the electroweak mixing angle at low momentum transfer and as the most stable optical clock. The effective transport and cooling of singly charged ions of the isotopes Ra-209 to Ra-214 in

  11. The JPL Hg(sup +) Extended Linear Ion Trap Frequency Standard: Status, Stability, and Accuracy Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjoelker, R. L.; Prestage, J. D.; Maleki, L.

    1996-01-01

    Microwave frequency standards based on room temperature (sup 199)Hg(sup +) ions in a Linear Ion Trap (LITS) presently achieve a Signal to Noise and line Q inferred short frequency stability. Long term stability has been measured for averaging intervals up to 5 months with apparent sensitivity to variations in ion number/temperature limiting the flicker floor.

  12. A high-energy electron beam ion trap for production of high-charge high-Z ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, D.A.; Marrs, R.E.; Elliott, S.R.; Magee, E.W.; Zasadzinski, R.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a new high-energy electron beam ion trap, the first laboratory source of low-energy, few-electron, high-Z ions. We describe the device and report measurements of its performance, including the electron beam diameter, current density and energy, and measurements of the ionization balance for several high-Z elements in the trap. This device opens up a wide range of possible experiments in atomic physics, plasma physics, and nuclear physics. (orig.)

  13. Structure and dynamics of highly charged heavy ions studied with the electron beam ion trap in Tokyo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Hu, Zhimin; Watanabe, Hirofumi; Li, Yueming; Kato, Daiji; Currell, Fred J.; Tong Xiaomin; Watanabe, Tsutomu; Ohtani, Shunsuke

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present the structure and the dynamics of highly charged heavy ions studied through dielectronic recombination (DR) observations performed with the Tokyo electron beam ion trap. By measuring the energy dependence of the ion abundance ratio in the trap at equilibrium, we have observed DR processes for open shell systems very clearly. Remarkable relativistic effects due to the generalized Breit interaction have been clearly shown in DR for highly charged heavy ions. We also present the first result for the coincidence measurement of two photons emitted from a single DR event.

  14. Quantum computation and simulation with trapped ions using dissipation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schindler, P.

    2013-01-01

    Quantum information processing combines two of the most successful and fascinating ideas of the 20th century - quantum physics and computer science. A quantum computer promises to solve certain problems more efficient than classical computers. But building such a quantum computer is a cumbersome task as the quantum system needs to be manipulated with tremendous accuracy while being well shielded from the classical environment to preserve its quantum nature. An unwanted coupling to the surrounding environment manifests itself in computational errors. This coupling can be suppressed with the aid of quantum error correction schemes that are still a mainly theoretical construct. These error correcting protocols can only protect the information if they are applied multiple times subsequently. For this, it is necessary to remove the information about previous errors from the quantum system before performing the actual correction. However, this removal of information requires a controlled coupling to the environment which is beyond the standard set of operations available in a quantum computer. In this work, an experimental realization of repetitive quantum error correction in an ion-trap quantum information processor is presented, performing up to three consecutive rounds of correction. Moreover such an error correction algorithm can also be used to demonstrate a physical connection between information processing and quantum mechanics - computational errors are mapped onto quantum mechanical measurements. Therefore, a quantum error correction protocol is able to undo quantum measurements - a task that seemingly contradicts the foundations of quantum physics. In this work, we show that it is indeed possible to undo a partial measurement on a quantum register using an error correction protocol. After closer inspection it becomes obvious this does not violate the laws of quantum mechanics. However, the realization of a large-scale quantum computer lies in the far future as

  15. Numerical and graphical description on the ion motions in a Penning trap for mass measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Y.L.; Tian, Y.L.; Huang, W.X.; Wang, J.Y.; Wang, Y.S.; Zhao, J.M.; Wang, Y.

    2013-01-01

    The ion motions in a Penning trap have been studied in detail in the presence of azimuthal dipolar and quadrupolar radio-frequency excitations and buffer gas cooling. The numerical solutions by using the Runge–Kutta method and thus the pictures of the ion trajectories in the trap have been obtained for different cases and summarized in graphical form. For the recentering of the ion of interest and to perform the purification of the ion species, one has to set a reasonable buffer gas pressure in the trap and apply azimuthal quadrupolar excitation at frequency ω rf =ω c . -- Highlights: • Azimuthal dipolar and quadrupolar rf excitations and buffer gas cooling. • Runge–Kutta method. • Pictures of the ion trajectories obtained and summarized in graphical form. • A reasonable buffer gas pressure should be set for recentering ions

  16. Trapping of slow recoil ions: past results and speculations on the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prior, M.H.

    1983-01-01

    A simple electrostatic ion trap has been utilized to capture low energy recoil ions made by fast heavy ion impact upon a neon gas target. The heavy ion beams have been provided by the LBL SuperHILAC and the work has so far concentrated upon studies of the decay of the trapped ion population in time following creation by the pulsed HILAC beam (3.3 msec pulse length, 36Hz repetition rate). The various charge states decay predominantly via electron capture collisions with the ambient gas in the ion trap. By varying the gas composition and density, one can determine the electron capture rate constants from which an effective (velocity averaged) capture cross-section can be obtained. The uniqueness of this work lies in the high charge states, up to Ne 10 + (fully stripped), and the low mean collision energies available (in the range 1.0 to 70.0 eV)

  17. Electron cooling of highly charged ions in penning traps; Elektronenkuehlung hochgeladener Ionen in Penningfallen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moellers, B.

    2007-02-08

    For many high precision experiments with highly charged ions in ion traps it is necessary to work with low energy ions. One possibility to slow ions down to a very low energy in a trap is electron cooling, a method, which is already successfully used in storage rings to produce ion beams with high phase space density. Fast ions and a cold electron plasma are inserted into a Penning trap. The ions lose their energy due to Coulomb interaction with the electrons while they cross the plasma, the electrons are heated. The cooling time is the time, which is needed to cool an ion from a given initial energy to a low final energy. To calculate cooling times it is necessary to solve coupled differential equations for the ion energy and electron temperature. In a Penning trap the strong external magnetic field constitutes a theoretical challenge, as it influences the energy loss of the ions in an electron plasma, which can no longer be calculated analytically. In former estimates of cooling times this influence is neglected. But simulations show a dramatic decrease of the energy loss in the presence of a strong magnetic field, so it is necessary to investigate the effect of the magnetic field on the cooling times. This work presents a model to calculate cooling times, which includes both the magnetic field and the trap geometry. In a first step a simplified model without the external trap potential is developed. The energy loss of the ions in the magnetized electron plasma is calculated by an analytic approximation, which requires a numerical solution of integrals. With this model the dependence of the cooling time on different parameters like electron and ion density, magnetic field and the angle between ion velocity and magnetic field is studied for fully ionized uranium. In addition the influence of the electron heating is discussed. Another important topic in this context is the recombination between ions and electrons. The simplified model for cooling times allows to

  18. Mathematical Modeling of Resonant Processes in Confined Geometry of Atomic and Atom-Ion Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melezhik, Vladimir S.

    2018-02-01

    We discuss computational aspects of the developed mathematical models for resonant processes in confined geometry of atomic and atom-ion traps. The main attention is paid to formulation in the nondirect product discrete-variable representation (npDVR) of the multichannel scattering problem with nonseparable angular part in confining traps as the boundary-value problem. Computational efficiency of this approach is demonstrated in application to atomic and atom-ion confinement-induced resonances we predicted recently.

  19. A cylindrical Penning trap for capture, mass selective cooling, and bunching of radioactive ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raimbault-Hartmann, H.; Bollen, G.; Beck, D.; Koenig, M.; Kluge, H.-J.; Schwarz, S.; Schark, E.; Stein, J.; Szerypo, J.

    1997-01-01

    A Penning trap ion accumulator, cooler, and buncher for low-energy ion beams has been developed for the ISOLTRAP mass spectrometer at ISOLDE/CERN. A cylindrical electrode configuration is used for the creation of a nested trapping potential. This is required for efficient accumulation of externally produced ions and for high-mass selectivity by buffer gas cooling. The design goal of a mass resolving power of about 1 x 10 5 has been achieved. Isobar separation has been demonstrated for radioactive rare-earth ion beams delivered by the ISOLDE on-line mass separator. (orig.)

  20. A cylindrical Penning trap for capture, mass selective cooling, and bunching of radioactive ion beams

    CERN Document Server

    Raimbault-Hartmann, H; Bollen, G; König, M; Kluge, H J; Schark, E; Stein, J; Schwarz, S; Szerypo, J

    1997-01-01

    A Penning trap ion accumulator, cooler, and buncher for low energy ion beams has been developed for the ISOLTRAP mass spectrometer at ISOLDE/CERN. A cylindrical electrode configuration is used for the creation of a nested trapping potential. This is required for efficient accumulation of externally produced ions and for high mass selectivity by buffer gas cooling. The design goal of a mass resolving power of about $1\\cdot 10^{5}$ has been achieved. Isobar separation has been demonstrated for radioactive rare earth ion beams delivered by the ISOLDE on-line mass separator.

  1. Electron spin resonance from NV centers in diamonds levitating in an ion trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delord, T; Nicolas, L; Schwab, L; Hétet, G

    2017-01-01

    We report observations of the electron spin resonance (ESR) of nitrogen vacancy centers in diamonds that are levitating in an ion trap. Using a needle Paul trap operating under ambient conditions, we demonstrate efficient microwave driving of the electronic spin and show that the spin properties of deposited diamond particles measured by the ESR are retained in the Paul trap. We also exploit the ESR signal to show angle stability of single trapped mono-crystals, a necessary step towards spin-controlled levitating macroscopic objects. (paper)

  2. Extreme ultra-violet emission spectroscopy of highly charged gadolinium ions with an electron beam ion trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohashi, Hayato; Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A

    2013-01-01

    We present extreme ultra-violet emission spectra of highly charged gadolinium ions obtained with an electron beam ion trap at electron energies of 0.53–1.51 keV. The electron energy dependence of the spectra in the 5.7–11.3 nm range is compared with calculation with the flexible atomic code. (paper)

  3. Excitation of internal kink modes by trapped energetic beam ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, L.; White, R.B.; Rosenbluth, M.N.

    1983-10-01

    Energetic trapped particles are shown to have a destabilizing effect on the internal kink mode in tokamaks. The plasma pressure threshold for the mode is lowered by the particles. The growth rate is near the ideal magnetohydrodynamic value, but the frequency is comparable to the trapped particle precission frequency. A model for the instability cycle gives stability properties, associated particle losses, and neutron emissivity consistent with the fishbone events observed in PDX

  4. A small electron beam ion trap/source facility for electron/neutral–ion collisional spectroscopy in astrophysical plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Gui-Yun; Wei, Hui-Gang; Yuan, Da-Wei; Wang, Fei-Lu; Peng, Ji-Min; Zhong, Jia-Yong; Zhu, Xiao-Long; Schmidt, Mike; Zschornack, Günter; Ma, Xin-Wen; Zhao, Gang

    2018-01-01

    Spectra are fundamental observation data used for astronomical research, but understanding them strongly depends on theoretical models with many fundamental parameters from theoretical calculations. Different models give different insights for understanding a specific object. Hence, laboratory benchmarks for these theoretical models become necessary. An electron beam ion trap is an ideal facility for spectroscopic benchmarks due to its similar conditions of electron density and temperature compared to astrophysical plasmas in stellar coronae, supernova remnants and so on. In this paper, we will describe the performance of a small electron beam ion trap/source facility installed at National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences.We present some preliminary experimental results on X-ray emission, ion production, the ionization process of trapped ions as well as the effects of charge exchange on the ionization.

  5. Advanced Quadrupole Ion Trap Instrumentation for Low Level Vehicle Emissions Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLuckey, S.A.

    1997-01-01

    Quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry has been evaluated for its potential use in vehicle emissions measurements in vehicle test facilities as an analyzer for the top 15 compounds contributing to smog generation. A variety of ionization methods were explored including ion trap in situ chemical ionization, atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization, and nitric oxide chemical ionization in a glow discharge ionization source coupled with anion trap mass spectrometer. Emphasis was placed on the determination of hydrocarbons and oxygenated hydrocarbons at parts per million to parts per billion levels. Ion trap in situ water chemical ionization and atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization were both shown to be amendable to the analysis of arenes, alcohols, aldehydes and, to some degree, alkenes. Atmospheric sampling glow discharge also generated molecular ions of methy-t-butyl ether (MTBE). Neither of these ionization methods, however, were found to generate diagnostic ions for the alkanes. Nitric oxide chemical ionization, on the other hand, was found to yield diagnostic ions for alkanes, alkenes, arenes, alcohols, aldehydes, and MTBE. The ability to measure a variety of hydrocarbons present at roughly 15 parts per billion at measurement rates of 3 Hz was demonstrated. All of the ions with potential to serve as parent ions in a tandem mass spectrometry experiment were found to yield parent-to-product conversion efficiencies greater than 75%. The flexibility afforded to the ion trap by use of tailored wave-forms applied to the end-caps allows parallel monitoring schemes to be devised that provide many of the advantages of tandem mass spectrometry without major loss in measurement rate. A large loss in measurement rate would ordinarily result from the use of conventional tandem mass spectrometry experiments carried out in series for a large number of targeted components. These results have demonstrated that the ion trap has an excellent combination of

  6. Preparation and cooling of magnesium ion crystals for sympathetic cooling of highly charged ions in a Penning trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murboeck, Tobias

    2017-07-01

    In this work, laser-cooled ion crystals containing 10{sup 3} to 10{sup 5} singly charged magnesium ions (Mg{sup +}) were prepared in a Penning trap. The properties of the ion crystals and their structure displaying long-range ordering were analyzed by various nondestructive techniques. After creation of the Mg{sup +} ions in the form of ion bunches in an external source, the ions were injected into the Penning trap where their temperature was reduced by eight orders of magnitude within seconds using a combination of buffer gas cooling and Doppler laser cooling. The achieved temperatures in the millikelvin-regime were close to the theoretical Doppler-cooling limit and sufficiently low to induce the transition to a crystal phase exhibiting long-range ordering. The structure of these mesoscopic ion crystals is in agreement with a model describing the crystal as a set of planar shells. This allows for a derivation of properties such as the charge density or the temperature of the observed crystals. For the process of combined buffer-gas and Doppler laser cooling an analytical model has been developed, which explains the time development of the temperature and the fluorescence signal in agreement with the experimental results. The external ion source for the production of singly charged magnesium ions was developed and characterized. A SIMION simulation of the ion creation and extraction process allows to describe the ion bunch structure and to increase the Mg{sup +} number by three orders of magnitude to 10{sup 6} Mg{sup +} ions per bunch. Other ion species with charge states between one (H{sup +}{sub 2}, C{sup +}, N{sup +}{sub 2}, CO{sup +}{sub 2}) and three (Ar{sup 3+}) were injected into the Mg{sup +} crystals. Ion crystals containing more than one ion species were observed with structures in agreement with the theory of centrifugal separation, which indicates sympathetic cooling of the non-fluorescing ion species. This preparation of mixed ion crystals is an

  7. Slow electron acoustic double layer (SEADL) structures in bi-ion plasma with trapped electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Shaukat Ali; Imtiaz, Nadia

    2018-05-01

    The properties of ion acoustic double layer (IADL) structures in bi-ion plasma with electron trapping are investigated by using the quasi-potential analysis. The κ-distributed trapped electrons number density expression is truncated to some finite order of the electrostatic potential. By utilizing the reductive perturbation method, a modified Schamel equation which describes the evolution of the slow electron acoustic double layer (SEADL) with the modified speed due to the presence of bi-ion species is investigated. The Sagdeev-like potential has been derived which accounts for the effect of the electron trapping and superthermality in a bi-ion plasma. It is found that the superthermality index, the trapping efficiency of electrons, and ion to electron temperature ratio are the inhibiting parameters for the amplitude of the slow electron acoustic double layers (SEADLs). However, the enhanced population of the cold ions is found to play a supportive role for the low frequency DLs in bi-ion plasmas. The illustrations have been presented with the help of the bi-ion plasma parameters in the Earth's ionosphere F-region.

  8. Temperature measurement of {sup 6}He{sup + } ions confined in a transparent Paul trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flechard, X., E-mail: flechard@lpccaen.in2p3.fr; Ban, G.; Durand, D.; Lienard, E.; Mauger, F. [Universite de Caen, LPC Caen, ENSICAEN (France); Mery, A. [Universite de Caen, CIMAP, CEA/CNRS/ENSICAEN (France); Naviliat-Cuncic, O. [Universite de Caen, LPC Caen, ENSICAEN (France); Rodriguez, D. [Universitad de Granada, Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear (Spain); Velten, P. [Universite de Caen, LPC Caen, ENSICAEN (France)

    2011-07-15

    The LPCTrap setup is a transparent Paul trap dedicated to the measurement of the {beta}-{nu} correlation coefficient a{sub {beta}{nu}} in the {beta} decay of trapped radioactive nuclides. In a first experiment, the system has been used to record {approx}10{sup 5} coincidences between the {beta} particles and recoiling ions emitted from the decay of {sup 6}He{sup + } ions. The analysis of the collected data has already shown that the size of the {sup 6}He{sup + } ion cloud confined in the Paul trap is a critical parameter, potentially limiting the accuracy on the a{sub {beta}{nu}} measurement. We report here the precise determination of the trapped ion cloud temperature and size. This was performed by extracting the trapped ions toward a position sensitive micro channel plate detector at different phases of the RF driving field. We find a temperature T{sub exp} = 0.107(7) eV, consistent with the temperature values inferred using two other observables but 20% higher than the temperature T{sub sim} = 0.09 eV predicted by realistic simulations of the ions interacting with the H{sub 2} buffer gas.

  9. Fluorescence profiles and cooling dynamics of laser-cooled Mg+ ions in a linear rf ion trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Xianzhen; Ryjkov, Vladimir L.; Schuessler, Hans A.

    2006-01-01

    Fluorescence line profiles and their implications on the cooling dynamics of the Mg + ions stored in a linear rf trap are studied. The line profile is dictated by the temperature of the ion cloud at different laser detunings. The upper bound of the lowest temperature was estimated for different values of the rf trapping potential amplitude and the buffer gas pressure. A general trend of this ultimate temperature to increase with the rf trapping voltage and buffer gas pressure is expected, with an abrupt change at some critical value corresponding to the transition to and from a strongly correlated liquid or crystal state. While on the one hand this expectation was confirmed when the buffer gas pressure was varied; on the other hand the influence of the amplitude of the trapping voltage on the ultimate temperature shows an interesting new feature of first dipping down before the sharp increase occurs

  10. Charging and trapping of macroparticles in near-electrode regions of fluorocarbon plasmas with negative ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostrikov, K.N.; Kumar, S.; Sugai, H.

    2001-01-01

    Charging and trapping of macroparticles in the near-electrode region of fluorocarbon etching plasmas with negative ions is considered. The equilibrium charge and forces on particles are computed as a function of the local position in the plasma presheath and sheath. The ionic composition of the plasma corresponds to the etching experiments in 2.45 GHz surface-wave sustained and 13.56 MHz inductively coupled C 4 F 8 +Ar plasmas. It is shown that despite negligible negative ion currents collected by the particles, the negative fluorine ions affect the charging and trapping of particulates through modification of the sheath/presheath structure

  11. Cooling the Collective Motion of Trapped Ions to Initialize a Quantum Register

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-13

    similar to that described in Ref . [6]. The electrodes in this trap are made from 125-mm-thick sheets of Be metal, as shown in Fig. 1. We apply a po...tential fstd ­ V0 cossVT td 1 U0 to the (elliptical) ring electrode relative to the end cap electrodes. If several ions are trapped and cooled, they...previously been observed in single ions [5,10,13]; in Ref . [5], the heating drove the ion out of the motional (COM) ground state in approximately 1 ms. We

  12. Quantum simulation of spin models on an arbitrary lattice with trapped ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korenblit, S; Kafri, D; Campbell, W C; Islam, R; Edwards, E E; Monroe, C; Gong, Z-X; Lin, G-D; Duan, L-M; Kim, J; Kim, K

    2012-01-01

    A collection of trapped atomic ions represents one of the most attractive platforms for the quantum simulation of interacting spin networks and quantum magnetism. Spin-dependent optical dipole forces applied to an ion crystal create long-range effective spin–spin interactions and allow the simulation of spin Hamiltonians that possess nontrivial phases and dynamics. Here we show how the appropriate design of laser fields can provide for arbitrary multidimensional spin–spin interaction graphs even for the case of a linear spatial array of ions. This scheme uses currently available trap technology and is scalable to levels where the classical methods of simulation are intractable. (paper)

  13. Paul Trapping of Radioactive 6He+ Ions and Direct Observation of Their β Decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flechard, X.; Lienard, E.; Mery, A.; Rodriguez, D.; Ban, G.; Durand, D.; Duval, F.; Herbane, M.; Labalme, M.; Mauger, F.; Naviliat-Cuncic, O.; Velten, Ph.; Thomas, J. C.

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate that abundant quantities of short-lived β unstable ions can be trapped in a novel transparent Paul trap and that their decay products can directly be detected in coincidence. Low energy 6 He + (807 ms half-life) ions were extracted from the SPIRAL source at GANIL, then decelerated, cooled, and bunched by means of the buffer gas cooling technique. More than 10 8 ions have been stored over a measuring period of six days, and about 10 5 decay coincidences between the beta particles and the 6 Li ++ recoiling ions have been recorded. The technique can be extended to other short-lived species, opening new possibilities for trap assisted decay experiments

  14. Trapping and re-emission of energetic hydrogen and helium ions in materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Sadae

    1981-01-01

    The experimental results on the trapping and re-emission of energetic hydrogen and helium ions in materials are explained. The trapping of deuterium and helium in graphite saturates at the concentration of 10 18 ions/cm 2 . The trapping rate of hydrogen depends on the kinds of target materials. In the case of the implantation in Mo over 3 x 10 16 H/cm 2 , hydrogen is hardly trapped. On the other hand, the trapping of hydrogen in Ti, Zr and Ta which form solid solution is easily made. The hydrogen in these metals can diffuse toward the inside of metals. The deuterium retained in 316 SS decreased with time. The trapping rate reached saturation more rapidly at higher implantation temperature. The effective diffusion constant for the explanation of the re-emission process is 1/100 as small as the ordinary value. The radiation damage due to helium irradiation affects on the trapping of deuterium in Mo. The temperature dependence of the trapping rate can be explained by the diffusion model based on the Sievert's law. The re-emission of helium was measured at various temperature. At low temperature, the re-emission was low at first, then the rate increased. At high temperature, the re-emission rate was high from the beginning. (Kato, T.)

  15. Sympathetic cooling and crystallization of ions in a linear Paul trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drewsen, M.; Bowe, P.; Hornekaer, L.; Brodersen, C.; Schiffer, J.P.; Hangst, J.S.; Schiffer, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    Coulomb crystals, containing up to a few hundred ions of which more than 50% were cooled sympathetically by the Coulomb interaction with laser cooled Mg + ions, have been produced in a linear Paul trap. By controlling the balance of the radiation pressure from the two cooling lasers, the Coulomb crystals could be segregated according to ion species. Previous studies of ion crystals and molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the temperature may be around 10 mK or lower. The obtained results indicate that a wide range of atomic and molecular ions, which due to their internal structures are not amenable to direct laser cooling, can be effectively cooled and localized (crystallized) in linear Paul traps. For high resolution spectroscopy of such ions this may turn out to be very useful. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  16. Laser-Induced Fluorescence diagnostic of barium ion plasmas in the Paul Trap Simulator Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Moses; Gilson, Erik P.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Efthimion, Philip C.; Majeski, Richard; Startsev, Edward A.

    2005-01-01

    The Paul Trap Simulator Experiment (PTSX) is a cylindrical Paul trap whose purpose is to simulate the nonlinear dynamics of intense charged particle beam propagation in alternating-gradient magnetic transport systems. To investigate the ion plasma microstate in PTSX, including the ion density profile and the ion velocity distribution function, a laser-induced fluorescence diagnostic system is being developed as a nondestructive diagnostic. Instead of cesium, which has been used in the initial phase of the PTSX experiment, barium has been selected as the preferred ion for the laser-induced fluorescence diagnostic. A feasibility study of the laser-induced fluorescence diagnostic using barium ions is presented with the characterization of a tunable dye laser. The installation of the barium ion source and the development of the laser-induced fluorescence diagnostic system are also discussed

  17. Final Report - Advanced Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry Program - Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Sandia National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitten, W.B.

    2002-12-18

    This report covers the three main projects that collectively comprised the Advanced Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry Program. Chapter 1 describes the direct interrogation of individual particles by laser desorption within the ion trap mass spectrometer analyzer. The goals were (1) to develop an ''intelligent trigger'' capable of distinguishing particles of biological origin from those of nonbiological origin in the background and interferent particles and (2) to explore the capability for individual particle identification. Direct interrogation of particles by laser ablation and ion trap mass spectrometry was shown to have good promise for discriminating between particles of biological origin and those of nonbiological origin, although detailed protocols and operating conditions were not worked out. A library of more than 20,000 spectra of various types of biological particles has been assembled. Methods based on multivariate analysis and on neural networks were used to discriminate between particles of biological origin and those of nonbiological origin. It was possible to discriminate between at least some species of bacteria if mass spectra of several hundred similar particles were obtained. Chapter 2 addresses the development of a new ion trap mass analyzer geometry that offers the potential for a significant increase in ion storage capacity for a given set of analyzer operating conditions. This geometry may lead to the development of smaller, lower-power field-portable ion trap mass spectrometers while retaining laboratory-scale analytical performance. A novel ion trap mass spectrometer based on toroidal ion storage geometry has been developed. The analyzer geometry is based on the edge rotation of a quadrupolar ion trap cross section into the shape of a torus. Initial performance of this device was poor, however, due to the significant contribution of nonlinear fields introduced by the rotation of the symmetric ion-trapping geometry. These

  18. Resistive interchange mode destabilized by helically trapped energetic ions and its effects on energetic ions and bulk plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, X.D.; Toi, K.; Osakabe, M.

    2014-10-01

    A resistive interchange mode with bursting behavior and rapid frequency chirping in the range less than 10 kHz is observed for the first time in the magnetic hill region of net current-free, low beta LHD (Large Helical Device) plasmas during high power injection of perpendicular neutral beams. The mode resonates with the precession motion of helically trapped energetic beam ions, following the resonant condition. The radial mode structure is found to be very similar to that of usual pressure-driven interchange mode, of which radial displacement eigenfunction has an even function around the rational surface. This beam driven mode is excited when the beta value of helically trapped energetic ions exceed a certain threshold. The radial transport of helically trapped energetic ions induced by the mode transiently generates significant radial electric field near the plasma peripheral region. Thus generated radial electric field clearly suppresses micro turbulence and improves bulk plasma confinement, suggesting strong flow shear generation. (author)

  19. Self-generated zonal flows in the plasma turbulence driven by trapped-ion and trapped-electron instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drouot, T.; Gravier, E.; Reveille, T.; Collard, M. [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198 CNRS - Université de Lorraine, 54 506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy Cedex (France)

    2015-10-15

    This paper presents a study of zonal flows generated by trapped-electron mode and trapped-ion mode micro turbulence as a function of two plasma parameters—banana width and electron temperature. For this purpose, a gyrokinetic code considering only trapped particles is used. First, an analytical equation giving the predicted level of zonal flows is derived from the quasi-neutrality equation of our model, as a function of the density fluctuation levels and the banana widths. Then, the influence of the banana width on the number of zonal flows occurring in the system is studied using the gyrokinetic code. Finally, the impact of the temperature ratio T{sub e}/T{sub i} on the reduction of zonal flows is shown and a close link is highlighted between reduction and different gyro-and-bounce-average ion and electron density fluctuation levels. This reduction is found to be due to the amplitudes of gyro-and-bounce-average density perturbations n{sub e} and n{sub i} gradually becoming closer, which is in agreement with the analytical results given by the quasi-neutrality equation.

  20. Experimental quantum simulations of many-body physics with trapped ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Ch; Porras, Diego; Schaetz, Tobias

    2012-02-01

    Direct experimental access to some of the most intriguing quantum phenomena is not granted due to the lack of precise control of the relevant parameters in their naturally intricate environment. Their simulation on conventional computers is impossible, since quantum behaviour arising with superposition states or entanglement is not efficiently translatable into the classical language. However, one could gain deeper insight into complex quantum dynamics by experimentally simulating the quantum behaviour of interest in another quantum system, where the relevant parameters and interactions can be controlled and robust effects detected sufficiently well. Systems of trapped ions provide unique control of both the internal (electronic) and external (motional) degrees of freedom. The mutual Coulomb interaction between the ions allows for large interaction strengths at comparatively large mutual ion distances enabling individual control and readout. Systems of trapped ions therefore exhibit a prominent system in several physical disciplines, for example, quantum information processing or metrology. Here, we will give an overview of different trapping techniques of ions as well as implementations for coherent manipulation of their quantum states and discuss the related theoretical basics. We then report on the experimental and theoretical progress in simulating quantum many-body physics with trapped ions and present current approaches for scaling up to more ions and more-dimensional systems.

  1. EBIT (Electron Beam Ion Trap), N-Division Experimental Physics. Annual report, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, D.

    1995-10-01

    The experimental groups in the Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) program continue to perform front-line research with trapped and extracted highly charged ions (HCI) in the areas of ion/surface interactions, atomic spectroscopy, electron-ion interaction and structure measurements, highly charged ion confinement, and EBIT development studies. The ion surface/interaction studies which were initiated five years ago have reached a stage where they an carry out routine investigations, as well as produce breakthrough results towards the development of novel nanotechnology. At EBIT and SuperEBIT studies of the x-ray emission from trapped ions continue to produce significant atomic structure data with high precision for few electron systems of high-Z ions. Furthermore, diagnostics development for magnetic and laser fusion, supporting research for the x-ray laser and weapons programs, and laboratory astrophysics experiments in support of NASA's astrophysics program are a continuing effort. The two-electron contributions to the binding energy of helium like ions were measured for the first time. The results are significant because their precision is an order of magnitude better than those of competing measurements at accelerators, and the novel technique isolates the energy corrections that are the most interesting. The RETRAP project which was initiated three years ago has reached a stage where trapping, confining and electronic cooling of HCI ions up to Th 80+ can be performed routinely. Measurements of the rates and cross sections for electron transfer from H 2 performed to determine the lifetime of HCI up to Xe q+ and Th q+ (35 ≤ q ≤ 80) have been studied at mean energies estimated to be ∼ 5 q eV. This combination of heavy ions with very high charges and very low energies is rare in nature, but may be encountered in planned fusion energy demonstration devices, in highly charged ion sources, or in certain astrophysical events

  2. EBIT (Electron Beam Ion Trap), N-Division Experimental Physics. Annual report, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, D. [ed.

    1995-10-01

    The experimental groups in the Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) program continue to perform front-line research with trapped and extracted highly charged ions (HCI) in the areas of ion/surface interactions, atomic spectroscopy, electron-ion interaction and structure measurements, highly charged ion confinement, and EBIT development studies. The ion surface/interaction studies which were initiated five years ago have reached a stage where they an carry out routine investigations, as well as produce breakthrough results towards the development of novel nanotechnology. At EBIT and SuperEBIT studies of the x-ray emission from trapped ions continue to produce significant atomic structure data with high precision for few electron systems of high-Z ions. Furthermore, diagnostics development for magnetic and laser fusion, supporting research for the x-ray laser and weapons programs, and laboratory astrophysics experiments in support of NASA`s astrophysics program are a continuing effort. The two-electron contributions to the binding energy of helium like ions were measured for the first time. The results are significant because their precision is an order of magnitude better than those of competing measurements at accelerators, and the novel technique isolates the energy corrections that are the most interesting. The RETRAP project which was initiated three years ago has reached a stage where trapping, confining and electronic cooling of HCI ions up to Th{sup 80+} can be performed routinely. Measurements of the rates and cross sections for electron transfer from H{sub 2} performed to determine the lifetime of HCI up to Xe{sup q+} and Th{sup q+} (35 {le} q {le} 80) have been studied at mean energies estimated to be {approximately} 5 q eV. This combination of heavy ions with very high charges and very low energies is rare in nature, but may be encountered in planned fusion energy demonstration devices, in highly charged ion sources, or in certain astrophysical events.

  3. Effect of Trapped Energetic Ions on MHD Activity in Spherical Tori

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, R.B.; Kolesnichenko, Ya.I.; Lutsenko, V.V.; Marchenko, V.S.

    2002-01-01

    It is shown that the increase of beta (the ratio of plasma pressure to the magnetic field pressure) may change the character of the influence of trapped energetic ions on MHD stability in spherical tori. Namely, the energetic ions, which stabilize MHD modes (such as the ideal-kink mode, collisionless tearing mode, and semi-collisional tearing mode) at low beta, have a destabilizing influence at high beta unless the radial distribution of the energetic ions is very peaked

  4. Power-law distributions for a trapped ion interacting with a classical buffer gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVoe, Ralph G

    2009-02-13

    Classical collisions with an ideal gas generate non-Maxwellian distribution functions for a single ion in a radio frequency ion trap. The distributions have power-law tails whose exponent depends on the ratio of buffer gas to ion mass. This provides a statistical explanation for the previously observed transition from cooling to heating. Monte Carlo results approximate a Tsallis distribution over a wide range of parameters and have ab initio agreement with experiment.

  5. The nonlinear dustgrain-charging on large amplitude electrostatic waves in a dusty plasma with trapped ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.-N. Nejoh

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The nonlinear dustgrain-charging and the influence of the ion density and temperature on electrostatic waves in a dusty plasma having trapped ions are investigated by numerical calculation. This work is the first approach to the effect of trapped ions in dusty plasmas. The nonlinear variation of the dust-charge is examined, and it is shown that the characteristics of the dustcharge number sensitively depend on the plasma potential, Mach number, dust mass-to-charge ratio, trapped ion density and temperature. The fast and slow wave modes are shown in this system. An increase of the ion temperature decreases the dust-charging rate and the propagation speed of ion waves. It is found that the existence of electrostatic ion waves sensitively depends on the ion to electron density ratio. New findings of the variable-charge dust grain particles, ion density and temperature in a dusty plasma with trapped ions are predicted.

  6. Implementation of a symmetric surface-electrode ion trap with field compensation using a modulated Raman effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allcock, D T C; Sherman, J A; Stacey, D N; Burrell, A H; Curtis, M J; Imreh, G; Linke, N M; Szwer, D J; Webster, S C; Steane, A M; Lucas, D M

    2010-01-01

    We describe a new electrode design for a surface-electrode Paul trap, which allows rotation of the normal modes out of the trap plane, and a technique for micromotion compensation in all directions using a two-photon process, which avoids the need for an ultraviolet laser directed to the trap plane. The fabrication and characterization of the trap are described, as well as its implementation for the trapping and cooling of single Ca + ions. We also propose a repumping scheme that increases ion fluorescence and simplifies heating rate measurements obtained by time-resolved ion fluorescence during Doppler cooling.

  7. Implementation of a symmetric surface-electrode ion trap with field compensation using a modulated Raman effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allcock, D. T. C.; Sherman, J. A.; Stacey, D. N.; Burrell, A. H.; Curtis, M. J.; Imreh, G.; Linke, N. M.; Szwer, D. J.; Webster, S. C.; Steane, A. M.; Lucas, D. M.

    2010-05-01

    We describe a new electrode design for a surface-electrode Paul trap, which allows rotation of the normal modes out of the trap plane, and a technique for micromotion compensation in all directions using a two-photon process, which avoids the need for an ultraviolet laser directed to the trap plane. The fabrication and characterization of the trap are described, as well as its implementation for the trapping and cooling of single Ca+ ions. We also propose a repumping scheme that increases ion fluorescence and simplifies heating rate measurements obtained by time-resolved ion fluorescence during Doppler cooling.

  8. Mercury Trapped Ion Frequency Standard for Ultra-Stable Reference Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Eric A. (Inventor); Hamell, Robert L. (Inventor); Tucker, Blake C. (Inventor); Larsen, Kameron (Inventor); Tjoelker, Robert L. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An atomic clock including an ion trap assembly, a C-field coil positioned for generating a first magnetic field in the interrogation region of the ion trap assembly, a compensation coil positioned for generating a second magnetic field in the interrogation region, wherein the combination of the first and second magnetic fields produces an ion number-dependent second order Zeeman shift (Zeeman shift) in the resonance frequency that is opposite in sign to an ion number-dependent second order Doppler shift (Doppler shift) in the resonance frequency, the C-field coil has a radius selected using data indicating how changes in the radius affect an ion-number-dependent shift in the resonance frequency, such that a difference in magnitude between the Doppler shift and the Zeeman shift is controlled or reduced, and the resonance frequency, including the adjustment by the Zeeman shift, is used to obtain the frequency standard.

  9. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Collisional Cooling and Ordering of Multiply Charged Ions in a Penning Trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holder, J.P.; Church, D.A.; Gruber, L.; DeWitt, H.E.; Beck, B.R.; Schneider, D.

    2000-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to help design new experiments by modeling the cooling of small numbers of trapped multiply charged ions by Coulomb interactions with laser-cooled Be + ions. A Verlet algorithm is used to integrate the equations of motion of two species of point ions interacting in an ideal Penning trap. We use a time step short enough to follow the cyclotron motion of the ions. Axial and radial temperatures for each species are saved periodically. Direct heating and cooling of each species in the simulation can be performed by periodically rescaling velocities. Of interest are Fe 11+ due to a EUV-optical double resonance for imaging and manipulating the ions, and Ca 14+ since a ground state fine structure transition has a convenient wavelength in the tunable laser range

  10. Mats and LaSpec: High-precision experiments using ion traps and lasers at Fair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, D.; Lallena, A.M.; Blaum, K.; Bohm, C.; Cakirli, R.B.; Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J.R.; Eliseev, S.; Ketelaer, J.; Kreim, M.S.; Kowalska, M.; Litvinov, Y.A.; Nagy, S.; Neidherr, D.; Repp, J.; Roux, C.; Schabinger, B.; Ullrich, J.; Nortershauser, W.; Eberhardt, K.; Geppert, C.; Kramer, J.; Krieger, A.; Sanchez, R.; Ahammed, M.; Das, P.; Ray, A.; Algora, A.; Rubio, B.; Tain, J.L.; Audi, G.; Lunney, D.; Naimi, S.; Aysto, J.; Jokinen, A.; Kolhinen, V.; Moore, I.; Beck, D.; Block, M.; Geissel, H.; Heinz, S.; Herfurth, F.; Litvinov, Y.A.; Minaya-Ramirez, E.; Plab, W.R.; Quint, W.; Scheidenberger, C.; Winkler, M.; Bender, M.; Billowes, J.; Campbell, P.; Flanagan, K.T.; Schwarz, S.; Bollen, G.; Ferrer, R.; George, S.; Kester, O.; Brodeur, M.; Brunner, T.; Delheij, P.; Dilling, J.; Ettenauer, S.; Lapierre, A.; Bushaw, B.A.; Cano-Ott, D.; Martinez, T.; Cortes, G.; Gomez-Hornillos, M.B.; Dax, A.; Herlert, A.; Yordanov, D.; De, A.; Dickel, T.; Geissel, H.; Jesch, C.; Kuhl, T.; Petrick, M.; PlaB, W.R.; Scheidenberger, C.; Garcia-Ramos, J.E.; Gartzke, E.; Habs, D.; Szerypo, J.; Thirolf, P.G.; Weber, C.; Gusev, Y.; Nesterenko, D.; Novikov, Y.N.; Popov, A.; Seliverstov, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vorobjev, G.; Heenen, P.H.; Marx, G.; Schweikhard, L.; Ziegler, F.; Hobein, M.; Schuch, R.; Solders, A.; Suhonen, M.; Huber, G.; Wendt, K.; Huyse, M.; Koudriavtsev, I.; Neyens, G.; Van Duppen, P.; Le Blanc, F.; Matos, M.; Reinhard, P.G.; Schneider, D.

    2010-05-15

    Nuclear ground state properties including mass, charge radii, spins and moments can be determined by applying atomic physics techniques such as Penning-trap based mass spectrometry and laser spectroscopy. The MATS and LaSpec setups at the low-energy beamline at FAIR will allow us to extend the knowledge of these properties further into the region far from stability. With MATS (Precision Measurements of very short-lived nuclei using an Advanced Trapping System for highly-charged ions) at FAIR we aim to apply several techniques to very short-lived radionuclides: High-accuracy mass measurements, in-trap conversion electron and alpha spectroscopy, and trap-assisted spectroscopy. The experimental setup of MATS is a unique combination of an electron beam ion trap for charge breeding, ion traps for beam preparation, and a high-precision Penning trap system for mass measurements and decay studies. For the mass measurements, MATS offers both a high accuracy and a high sensitivity. A relative mass uncertainty of 10{sup -9} can be reached by employing highly-charged ions and a non-destructive Fourier-Transform Ion-Cyclotron-Resonance (FT-ICR) detection technique on single stored ions. Decay studies in ion traps will become possible with MATS. Laser spectroscopy of radioactive isotopes and isomers is an efficient and model-independent approach for the determination of nuclear ground and isomeric state properties. Hyperfine structures and isotope shifts in electronic transitions exhibit readily accessible information on the nuclear spin, magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moments as well as root-mean-square charge radii. The accuracy of laser-spectroscopic-determined nuclear properties is very high while requirements concerning production rates are moderate. This Technical Design Report describes a new Penning trap mass spectrometry setup as well as a number of complementary experimental devices for laser spectroscopy. Since MATS and LaSpec require high-quality low

  11. Mats and LaSpec: High-precision experiments using ion traps and lasers at Fair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, D.; Lallena, A.M.; Blaum, K.; Bohm, C.; Cakirli, R.B.; Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J.R.; Eliseev, S.; Ketelaer, J.; Kreim, M.S.; Kowalska, M.; Litvinov, Y.A.; Nagy, S.; Neidherr, D.; Repp, J.; Roux, C.; Schabinger, B.; Ullrich, J.; Nortershauser, W.; Eberhardt, K.; Geppert, C.; Kramer, J.; Krieger, A.; Sanchez, R.; Ahammed, M.; Das, P.; Ray, A.; Algora, A.; Rubio, B.; Tain, J.L.; Audi, G.; Lunney, D.; Naimi, S.; Aysto, J.; Jokinen, A.; Kolhinen, V.; Moore, I.; Beck, D.; Block, M.; Geissel, H.; Heinz, S.; Herfurth, F.; Litvinov, Y.A.; Minaya-Ramirez, E.; Plab, W.R.; Quint, W.; Scheidenberger, C.; Winkler, M.; Bender, M.; Billowes, J.; Campbell, P.; Flanagan, K.T.; Schwarz, S.; Bollen, G.; Ferrer, R.; George, S.; Kester, O.; Brodeur, M.; Brunner, T.; Delheij, P.; Dilling, J.; Ettenauer, S.; Lapierre, A.; Bushaw, B.A.; Cano-Ott, D.; Martinez, T.; Cortes, G.; Gomez-Hornillos, M.B.; Dax, A.; Herlert, A.; Yordanov, D.; De, A.; Dickel, T.; Geissel, H.; Jesch, C.; Kuhl, T.; Petrick, M.; PlaB, W.R.; Scheidenberger, C.; Garcia-Ramos, J.E.; Gartzke, E.; Habs, D.; Szerypo, J.; Thirolf, P.G.; Weber, C.; Gusev, Y.; Nesterenko, D.; Novikov, Y.N.; Popov, A.; Seliverstov, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vorobjev, G.; Heenen, P.H.; Marx, G.; Schweikhard, L.; Ziegler, F.; Hobein, M.; Schuch, R.; Solders, A.; Suhonen, M.; Huber, G.; Wendt, K.; Huyse, M.; Koudriavtsev, I.; Neyens, G.; Van Duppen, P.; Le Blanc, F.; Matos, M.; Reinhard, P.G.; Schneider, D.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear ground state properties including mass, charge radii, spins and moments can be determined by applying atomic physics techniques such as Penning-trap based mass spectrometry and laser spectroscopy. The MATS and LaSpec setups at the low-energy beamline at FAIR will allow us to extend the knowledge of these properties further into the region far from stability. With MATS (Precision Measurements of very short-lived nuclei using an Advanced Trapping System for highly-charged ions) at FAIR we aim to apply several techniques to very short-lived radionuclides: High-accuracy mass measurements, in-trap conversion electron and alpha spectroscopy, and trap-assisted spectroscopy. The experimental setup of MATS is a unique combination of an electron beam ion trap for charge breeding, ion traps for beam preparation, and a high-precision Penning trap system for mass measurements and decay studies. For the mass measurements, MATS offers both a high accuracy and a high sensitivity. A relative mass uncertainty of 10 -9 can be reached by employing highly-charged ions and a non-destructive Fourier-Transform Ion-Cyclotron-Resonance (FT-ICR) detection technique on single stored ions. Decay studies in ion traps will become possible with MATS. Laser spectroscopy of radioactive isotopes and isomers is an efficient and model-independent approach for the determination of nuclear ground and isomeric state properties. Hyperfine structures and isotope shifts in electronic transitions exhibit readily accessible information on the nuclear spin, magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moments as well as root-mean-square charge radii. The accuracy of laser-spectroscopic-determined nuclear properties is very high while requirements concerning production rates are moderate. This Technical Design Report describes a new Penning trap mass spectrometry setup as well as a number of complementary experimental devices for laser spectroscopy. Since MATS and LaSpec require high-quality low-energy beams

  12. An integrated ion trap and time-of-flight mass spectrometer for chemical and photo- reaction dynamics studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schowalter, Steven J; Chen, Kuang; Rellergert, Wade G; Sullivan, Scott T; Hudson, Eric R

    2012-04-01

    We demonstrate the integration of a linear quadrupole trap with a simple time-of-flight mass spectrometer with medium-mass resolution (m/Δm ∼ 50) geared towards the demands of atomic, molecular, and chemical physics experiments. By utilizing a novel radial ion extraction scheme from the linear quadrupole trap into the mass analyzer, a device with large trap capacity and high optical access is realized without sacrificing mass resolution. This provides the ability to address trapped ions with laser light and facilitates interactions with neutral background gases prior to analyzing the trapped ions. Here, we describe the construction and implementation of the device as well as present representative ToF spectra. We conclude by demonstrating the flexibility of the device with proof-of-principle experiments that include the observation of molecular-ion photodissociation and the measurement of trapped-ion chemical reaction rates. © 2012 American Institute of Physics

  13. An integrated ion trap and time-of-flight mass spectrometer for chemical and photo- reaction dynamics studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schowalter, Steven J.; Chen Kuang; Rellergert, Wade G.; Sullivan, Scott T.; Hudson, Eric R.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the integration of a linear quadrupole trap with a simple time-of-flight mass spectrometer with medium-mass resolution (m/Δm∼ 50) geared towards the demands of atomic, molecular, and chemical physics experiments. By utilizing a novel radial ion extraction scheme from the linear quadrupole trap into the mass analyzer, a device with large trap capacity and high optical access is realized without sacrificing mass resolution. This provides the ability to address trapped ions with laser light and facilitates interactions with neutral background gases prior to analyzing the trapped ions. Here, we describe the construction and implementation of the device as well as present representative ToF spectra. We conclude by demonstrating the flexibility of the device with proof-of-principle experiments that include the observation of molecular-ion photodissociation and the measurement of trapped-ion chemical reaction rates.

  14. Observation and mitigation of ion trapping in Indus-2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    include use of ion clearing electrodes, creation of gap in the bunch filling pattern, and resonant beam ..... This matrix is too complex to determine the stability conditions in a simple analytical form. .... In Synchroton Radiation Research. Figure 3.

  15. Development of a radiofrequency linear ion trap for {beta} decay study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, G. [McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois (United States); Scielzo, N.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California (United States); Segel, R.E. [Northwestern Univ., Illinois (United States); and others

    2010-07-01

    A Beta decay Paul Trap (BPT) has been constructed at Argonne National Laboratory for the precise measurement of beta decay. We have demonstrated the capability of producing and transferring a low-energy, bunched, and isotopically pure ions beam. In BPT the ions are cooled to sub-eV energies, and confined in a volume of less than 1 mm{sup 3}. The trap has an open geometry which allows four sets of radiation detectors covering a substantial potion of solid angle. In combination with versatile detectors, BPT is able to precisely determine the entire decay kinematics of many isotopes. (author)

  16. Beta Neutrino Correlation Measurement with Trapped Radioactive Ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velten, Ph.; Ban, G.; Durand, D.; Flechard, X.; Lienard, E.; Mauger, F.; Naviliat-Cuncic, O.; Mery, A.; Rodriguez, D.; Thomas, J.-C.

    2010-01-01

    The beta-neutrino angular correlation coefficient provides a sensitive observable to search for physics beyond the standard electroweak model in nuclear beta decay. We address here the measurement of this parameter in the pure Gamow-Teller transition of 6 He. A deviation from the standard model prediction would indicate the existence of tensor like couplings, possibly mediated by new bosons like leptoquarks. The aim of the LPCTrap experiment is to measure this coefficient with a statistical uncertainty of 0.5% using a novel transparent Paul trap. The status of the experiment is briefly presented along with the work in progress.

  17. Detection and clearing of trapped ions in the high current Cornell photoinjector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Full

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We have recently performed experiments to test the effectiveness of three ion-clearing strategies in the Cornell high intensity photoinjector: DC clearing electrodes, bunch gaps, and beam shaking. The photoinjector reaches a new regime of linac beam parameters where high continuous wave beam currents lead to ion trapping. Therefore ion mitigation strategies must be evaluated for this machine and other similar future high current linacs. We have developed several techniques to directly measure the residual trapped ions. Our two primary indicators of successful clearing are the amount of ion current removed by a DC clearing electrode, and the absence of bremsstrahlung radiation generated by beam-ion interactions. Measurements were taken for an electron beam with an energy of 5 MeV and continuous wave beam currents in the range of 1–20 mA. Several theoretical models have been developed to explain our data. Using them, we are able to estimate the clearing electrode voltage required for maximum ion clearing, the creation and clearing rates of the ions while employing bunch gaps, and the sinusoidal shaking frequency necessary for clearing via beam shaking. In all cases, we achieve a maximum ion clearing of at least 70% or higher, and in some cases our data is consistent with full ion clearing.

  18. A cryogenic electrostatic trap for long-time storage of keV ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, M.; Froese, M.; Menk, S.; Varju, J.; Bastert, R.; Blaum, K.; López-Urrutia, J. R. Crespo; Fellenberger, F.; Grieser, M.; von Hahn, R.; Heber, O.; Kühnel, K.-U.; Laux, F.; Orlov, D. A.; Rappaport, M. L.; Repnow, R.; Schröter, C. D.; Schwalm, D.; Shornikov, A.; Sieber, T.; Toker, Y.; Ullrich, J.; Wolf, A.; Zajfman, D.

    2010-05-01

    We report on the realization and operation of a fast ion beam trap of the linear electrostatic type employing liquid helium cooling to reach extremely low blackbody radiation temperature and residual gas density and, hence, long storage times of more than 5 min which are unprecedented for keV ion beams. Inside a beam pipe that can be cooled to temperatures <15 K, with 1.8 K reached in some locations, an ion beam pulse can be stored at kinetic energies of 2-20 keV between two electrostatic mirrors. Along with an overview of the cryogenic trap design, we present a measurement of the residual gas density inside the trap resulting in only 2×103 cm-3, which for a room temperature environment corresponds to a pressure in the 10-14 mbar range. The device, called the cryogenic trap for fast ion beams, is now being used to investigate molecules and clusters at low temperatures, but has also served as a design prototype for the cryogenic heavy-ion storage ring currently under construction at the Max-Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics.

  19. A cryogenic electrostatic trap for long-time storage of keV ion beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, M; Froese, M; Menk, S; Varju, J; Bastert, R; Blaum, K; López-Urrutia, J R Crespo; Fellenberger, F; Grieser, M; von Hahn, R; Heber, O; Kühnel, K-U; Laux, F; Orlov, D A; Rappaport, M L; Repnow, R; Schröter, C D; Schwalm, D; Shornikov, A; Sieber, T; Toker, Y; Ullrich, J; Wolf, A; Zajfman, D

    2010-05-01

    We report on the realization and operation of a fast ion beam trap of the linear electrostatic type employing liquid helium cooling to reach extremely low blackbody radiation temperature and residual gas density and, hence, long storage times of more than 5 min which are unprecedented for keV ion beams. Inside a beam pipe that can be cooled to temperatures <15 K, with 1.8 K reached in some locations, an ion beam pulse can be stored at kinetic energies of 2-20 keV between two electrostatic mirrors. Along with an overview of the cryogenic trap design, we present a measurement of the residual gas density inside the trap resulting in only 2 x 10(3) cm(-3), which for a room temperature environment corresponds to a pressure in the 10(-14) mbar range. The device, called the cryogenic trap for fast ion beams, is now being used to investigate molecules and clusters at low temperatures, but has also served as a design prototype for the cryogenic heavy-ion storage ring currently under construction at the Max-Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics.

  20. Technology for On-Chip Qubit Control with Microfabricated Surface Ion Traps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Highstrete, Clark [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Quantum Information Sciences Dept.; Scott, Sean Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). RF/Optoelectronics Dept.; Nordquist, Christopher D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). RF/Optoelectronics Dept.; Sterk, Jonathan David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Photonic Microsystem Technologies Dept.; Maunz, Peter Lukas Wilhelm [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Photonic Microsystem Technologies Dept.; Tigges, Christopher P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Photonic Microsystem Technologies Dept.; Blain, Matthew Glenn [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Photonic Microsystem Technologies Dept.; Heller, Edwin J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Microsystems Integration Dept.; Stevens, James E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). MESAFab Operations 2 Dept.

    2013-11-01

    Trapped atomic ions are a leading physical system for quantum information processing. However, scalability and operational fidelity remain limiting technical issues often associated with optical qubit control. One promising approach is to develop on-chip microwave electronic control of ion qubits based on the atomic hyperfine interaction. This project developed expertise and capabilities at Sandia toward on-chip electronic qubit control in a scalable architecture. The project developed a foundation of laboratory capabilities, including trapping the 171Yb+ hyperfine ion qubit and developing an experimental microwave coherent control capability. Additionally, the project investigated the integration of microwave device elements with surface ion traps utilizing Sandia’s state-of-the-art MEMS microfabrication processing. This effort culminated in a device design for a multi-purpose ion trap experimental platform for investigating on-chip microwave qubit control, laying the groundwork for further funded R&D to develop on-chip microwave qubit control in an architecture that is suitable to engineering development.

  1. Precise positioning of an ion in an integrated Paul trap-cavity system using radiofrequency signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassa, Ezra; Takahashi, Hiroki; Christoforou, Costas; Keller, Matthias

    2018-03-01

    We report a novel miniature Paul ion trap design with an integrated optical fibre cavity which can serve as a building block for a fibre-linked quantum network. In such cavity quantum electrodynamic set-ups, the optimal coupling of the ions to the cavity mode is of vital importance and this is achieved by moving the ion relative to the cavity mode. The trap presented herein features an endcap-style design complemented with extra electrodes on which additional radiofrequency voltages are applied to fully control the pseudopotential minimum in three dimensions. This method lifts the need to use three-dimensional translation stages for moving the fibre cavity with respect to the ion and achieves high integrability, mechanical rigidity and scalability. Not based on modifying the capacitive load of the trap, this method leads to precise control of the pseudopotential minimum allowing the ion to be moved with precisions limited only by the ion's position spread. We demonstrate this by coupling the ion to the fibre cavity and probing the cavity mode profile.

  2. Cryogenic trapping of keV ion beams at the CSR prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menk, Sebastian; Blaum, Klaus; Froese, Michael; Grieser, Manfred; Lange, Michael; Orlov, Dimitry; Sieber, Thomas; Hahn, Robert von; Varju, Jozef; Wolf, Andreas [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Heber, Oded; Rappaport, Michael; Zajfman, Daniel [Weizmann Institut of Science, Rehovot (Israel)

    2009-07-01

    A Cryogenic Trap for Fast ion beams (CTF) was built to explore cooling techniques and test thermal decoupling of ion optics for the development of the electrostatic Cryogenic Storage Ring (CSR). These challenging projects will lead to a new experimental field of atomic and molecular physics with keV ion beams. The cold conditions of 2-10 K minimize the blackbody radiation field and are expected to lead to extremely low restgas densities (equivalent pressure at room temperature {approx}10{sup -13} mbar) which result in long storage lifetimes and for molecular ions to radiative cooling to their ro-vibrational ground states. The CTF consists of two stacks of electrostatic mirror electrodes allowing the storage of up to 20 keV ion beams. Cryogenic ion beam storage has been realized with this device using a liquid helium refrigeration system to cool down the experimental trapping area to few-Kelvin cryogenic temperatures and experiments with cryogenically trapped molecular nitrogen ions have been performed to verify the low vacuum conditions by measuring their storage lifetimes.

  3. Ring-shaped Wigner crystals of trapped ions at the micronscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haokun; Urban, Erik; Noel, Crystal; Chuang, Alexander; Xia, Yang; Hemmerling, Borge; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiang; Haeffner, Hartmut

    Trapped ion crystals are ideal platforms to study many-body physics and quantum information processing, with both the internal electronic states and external motional degree-of-freedoms controllable at the single quantum level. In contrast to conventional, finite, linear chains of ions, a ring topology exhibiting periodic boundary conditions and rotational symmetry opens up a new directions to diverse topics. However, previous implementations of ion rings result in small aspect ratios (electrode distance to ring diameter, making the rotational symmetry of the ion crystals prone to stray electric fields from imperfections of the trap electrodes, particularly evident at low temperatures. Here, using a new trap design with a 60-fold improvement of this aspect ratio, we demonstrate crystallization of 40Ca+ ions in a ring with rotational energy barriers comparable to the thermal energy of Doppler laser cooled ion crystals. When further reducing the rotational energy barriers, we observe delocalization of the ion rings. With this result, we enter a regime where quantum topological effects can be studied and novel quantum computation and simulation experiments can be implemented.

  4. Enhanced quantum sensing with multi-level structures of trapped ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aharon, N.; Drewsen, Michael; Retzker, A.

    2017-01-01

    , robustness to both external and controller noise is achieved. We consider trapped-ion based implementation via the dipole transitions, which is relevant for several types of ions, such as the $^{40}{\\rm{Ca}}^{+}$, $^{88}{\\rm{Sr}}^{+}$, and the $^{138}{\\rm{Ba}}^{+}$ ions. Taking experimental errors...... of magnitude of the sensitivity. In addition, we present a microwave based sensing scheme that is suitable for ions with a hyperfine structure, such as the $^{9}{\\rm{Be}}^{+}$,$^{25}{\\rm{Mg}}^{+}$,$^{43}{\\rm{Ca}}^{+}$,$^{87}{\\rm{Sr}}^{+}$,$^{137}{\\rm{Ba}}^{+}$,$^{111}{\\rm{Cd}}^{+}$,$^{171}{\\rm...

  5. Electron beam ion trap bi-annual report 1996/1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, D.

    1999-01-01

    The research of the EBIT (Electron Beam Ion Trap) program in N Division of the Physics and Space Technology Directorate at LLNL continues to contribute significantly to the understanding of physical processes with low energy highly charged ions in atomic physics, plasma physics, and material science. Low-energy highly charged ions (up to U 92+ ), provided by the EBIT facilities, provide a unique laboratory opportunity to study high field effects in atomic structures and dynamic interaction processes. The formation, existence, and structure of highly charged ions in astrophysical environments and laboratory plasmas make highly charged ions desirable for diagnosing various plasma conditions. The strong interaction of highly charged ions with matter and the response of solid surfaces make them a sensitive analysis tool and possibly a future capability for materials modifications at the atomic scale (nano technology). These physical applications require a good understanding and careful study of the dynamics of the interactions of the ions with complex systems. The EBIT group hosted an international conference and a workshop on trapped charged particles. The various talks and discussions showed that physics research with trapped charged particles is a very active and attractive area of innovative research, and provides a basis for research efforts in new areas. It also became obvious that the EBIT/RETRAP project has unique capabilities to perform important new experiments with trapped very highly charged ions at rest, which are complementary to and competitive with research at heavy ion storage rings and other trapping facilities planned or in operation in Europe, Japan, and the United States. Atomic structure research at EBIT provides ever better and more experimental complete benchmark data, supplying data needed to improve atomic theories. Research highlights through 1996 and 1997 include hyperfine structure measurements in H-like ions, QED studies, lifetime and

  6. Trapped Ion Oscillation Frequencies as Sensors for Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilfried Nörtershäuser

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The oscillation frequencies of charged particles in a Penning trap can serve as sensors for spectroscopy when additional field components are introduced to the magnetic and electric fields used for confinement. The presence of so-called “magnetic bottles” and specific electric anharmonicities creates calculable energy-dependences of the oscillation frequencies in the radiofrequency domain which may be used to detect the absorption or emission of photons both in the microwave and optical frequency domains. The precise electronic measurement of these oscillation frequencies therefore represents an optical sensor for spectroscopy. We discuss possible applications for precision laser and microwave spectroscopy and their role in the determination of magnetic moments and excited state lifetimes. Also, the trap-assisted measurement of radiative nuclear de-excitations in the X-ray domain is discussed. This way, the different applications range over more than 12 orders of magnitude in the detectable photon energies, from below μeV in the microwave domain to beyond MeV in the X-ray domain.

  7. The trapping of hydrogen ions in vanadium and titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arbuzov, V.L.; Vykhodets, V.B.; Raspopova, G.A.

    1996-01-01

    The accumulation of implanted deuterium has been investigated at room temperature in vanadium, titanium and their alloys up to (2-15) x 10 17 ions cm -2 fluences by means of D(d,p)T reaction. The amount of accumulated D was measured using a 700 KeV D + ion beam during implantation. It is found that concentration of implanted deuterium in irradiated samples nonmonotonously increases with increasing fluence and in a complicated manner depends upon V-Ti alloy composition. These data are explained by concentration dependence of D diffusion coefficient in V-Ti alloys, structural ion irradiation induced inhomogeneity of alloys with >5-8 at.% Ti, and irradiation-enhanced diffusion of deuterium. (orig.)

  8. The ion circus: A novel circular Paul trap to resolve isobaric contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, E. Minaya [CSNSM-IN2P3/CNRS, Bat. 108, Universite de Paris Sud, 91405 Orsay (France)], E-mail: minaya@csnsm.in2p3.fr; Cabaret, S.; Lunney, D. [CSNSM-IN2P3/CNRS, Bat. 108, Universite de Paris Sud, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2008-10-15

    The ion circus is a miniature storage ring formed by a segmented radiofrequency mass filter bent into a circle. The primary goal of this unique device is to perform high-resolution mass separation with small transmission loss since the resolving power is increased while the orbiting ions cool in the ring. Contrary to its linear brother, this circular Paul trap is designed to cool and mass separate the ions over a much longer flight path, thus requiring lower buffer gas pressure. Ions can be accumulated in the ring and extracted either in tangential or perpendicular directions. This way, the trap also serves as a versatile beam distribution device. Design principles are presented and the prototype instrument, under test in Orsay, is described.

  9. Design and Application of a High-Temperature Linear Ion Trap Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Li-Xue; Liu, Qing-Yu; Li, Xiao-Na; He, Sheng-Gui

    2018-01-01

    A high-temperature linear ion trap reactor with hexapole design was homemade to study ion-molecule reactions at variable temperatures. The highest temperature for the trapped ions is up to 773 K, which is much higher than those in available reports. The reaction between V2O6 - cluster anions and CO at different temperatures was investigated to evaluate the performance of this reactor. The apparent activation energy was determined to be 0.10 ± 0.02 eV, which is consistent with the barrier of 0.12 eV calculated by density functional theory. This indicates that the current experimental apparatus is prospective to study ion-molecule reactions at variable temperatures, and more kinetic details can be obtained to have a better understanding of chemical reactions that have overall barriers. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  10. Biological effects of radium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drosselmeyer, E.

    1982-12-01

    It is evident from a survey of the current literature that a problem exists in finding the correlation between the exposure of the human body to radiation, with the subsequent development of diseases, particularly for certain types of cancer. A brief history of the early experiences of radium incorporation into humans is given followed by data collected on some important polulation groups exposed to radium body burden, such as miners in rare metal and uranium mines, dial painters and some groups of patients. The medical and technical applications of radium are discussed. A summary is also given of the natural occurence of radium and the amounts in which it is present in the environment. Incorporation, retention and excretion pathways are outlined. In order to study the metabolism and the induction of diseases by radium several animal studies have been performed. The ICRP regards radium-226 as the best known and most studied radionuclide. It can thus serve as a guideline for setting limits for other radionuclides, e.g. plutonium. The valid limiting value for radium-226 of 0.1 μCi for whole body exposure is generally accepted and regarded as sufficiently safe. Finally, transfer factors have been collected as fas as they were available in the literature. (orig./MG) [de

  11. Generalized qubits of the vibrational motion of a trapped ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arevalo Aguilar, L.M.; Moya-Cessa, H.

    2002-01-01

    We present a method to generate qubits of the vibrational motion of an ion. The method is developed in the non-rotating-wave-approximation regime, therefore we consider regimes where the dynamics has not been studied. Because the solutions are valid for a more extended range of parameters we call them generalized qubits

  12. Radioactive artifacts: historical sources of modern radium contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaufox, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    Radium has been distributed in a wide variety of devices during the early part of this century. Antique objects containing significant amounts of radium turn up at flea markets, antique shows, and antique dealers, in a variety of locations. These objects include radium in devices which were used by legitimate medical practitioners for legitimate medical purposes such as therapy, as well as a wide variety of quack cures. These devices may contain anywhere from a few nanocuries to as much as several hundred microcuries of radium. In addition to medical sources, a large variety of scientific instruments utilize radium in luminous dials. These instruments include compasses, azimuth indicators, and virtually any object which might require some form of calibration. In addition, the consumer market utilized a large amount of radium in the production of wrist watches, pocket watches, and clocks with luminous dials. Some of these watches contained as much as 4.5 microCi of radium, and between 1913 and 1920 about 70 gm was produced for the manufacture of luminous compounds. In addition to the large amount of radium produced for scientific and consumer utilization, there were a number of materials produced which were claimed to contain radium but in fact did not, further adding to the confusion in this area. The wide availability of radium is a result of the public's great fascination with radioactivity during the early part of this century and a belief in its curative properties. A number of objects were produced in order to trap the emanations of radium in water for persons to drink in order to benefit from their healing effects. Since the late 20s and early 30s the public's attitude towards radiation has shifted 180 degrees and it is now considered an extremely dangerous and harmful material

  13. Structure and dynamics of ion clusters in linear octupole traps: Phase diagrams, chirality, and melting mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yurtsever, E.; Onal, E. D.; Calvo, F.

    2011-01-01

    The stable structures and melting dynamics of clusters of identical ions bound by linear octupole radiofrequency traps are theoretically investigated by global optimization methods and molecular dynamics simulations. By varying the cluster sizes in the range of 10-1000 ions and the extent of trap anisotropy by more than one order of magnitude, we find a broad variety of stable structures based on multiple rings at small sizes evolving into tubular geometries at large sizes. The binding energy of these clusters is well represented by two contributions arising from isotropic linear and octupolar traps. The structures generally exhibit strong size effects, and chiral arrangements spontaneously emerge in many crystals. Sufficiently large clusters form nested, coaxial tubes with different thermal stabilities. As in isotropic octupolar clusters, the inner tubes melt at temperatures that are lower than the overall melting point.

  14. Two Schemes for Generation of Entanglement for Vibronic Collective States of Multiple Trapped Ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Wenxing; Li Jiahua; Zheng Anshou

    2007-01-01

    We propose two schemes to prepare entanglement for the vibronic collective states of multiple trapped ions. The first scheme aims to generating multipartite entanglement for vibrational modes of trapped ions, which only requires a single laser beam tuned to the ionic carrier frequency. Our scheme works in the mediated excitation regime, in which the corresponding Rabi frequency is equal to the trap frequency. Beyond their fundamental importance, these states may be of interest for experimental studies on decoherence since the present scheme operates in a fast way. The second scheme aims to preparing the continuous variable multimode maximally Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state. The distinct advantage is that the operation time is only limited by the available laser intensity, not by the inherent mechanisms such as off-resonant excitations. This makes it promising to obtain entanglement of multiple coherent and squeezing states with desired amplitudes in a reasonable time.

  15. Towards a Measurement of the n=2 Lamb Shift in Hydrogen-like Nitrogen Using an Electron Beam Ion Trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosaka, K.; Crosby, D. N.; Gaarde-Widdowson, K.; Smith, C. J.; Silver, J. D.; Myers, E. G.; Kinugawa, T.; Ohtani, S.

    2003-01-01

    Using a 14 C 16 O 2 laser the 2s 1/2 -2p 3/2 (fine structure - Lamb shift) transition has been induced in 14 N 6+ ions trapped in an electron beam ion trap. Prospects for a measurement of the Lamb shift in hydrogen-like nitrogen are discussed.

  16. Nonlinear ion-mixing-mode particle transport in the dissipative trapped electron regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, A.S.; Terry, P.W.

    1993-09-01

    The nonlinear particle transport arising from the convection of nonadiabatic electron density by ion temperature gradient driven turbulence is examined for trapped electron collisionality regimes. The renormalized dissipative nonadiabatic trapped electron phase space density response is derived and used to calculate the nonlinear particle flux along with an ansatz for the turbulently broadened frequency spectrum. In the lower temperature end of this regime, trapped electrons are collisional and all components of the quasilinear particle flux are outward (i.e., in the direction of the gradients). Nonlinear effects can alter the phase between the nonadiabatic trapped electron phase space density and the electrostatic potential, producing inward components in the particle flux. Specifically, both turbulent shifting of the peak of the frequency spectrum and nonlinear source terms in the trapped electron response can give rise to inward components. However, in the dissipative regime these terms are small and the trapped electron response remains dominantly laminar. When the trapped electrons are collisionless, there is a temperature threshold above which the electron temperature gradient driven component of the quasilinear particle flux changes sign and becomes inward. For finite amplitude turbulence, however, turbulent broadening of both the electron collisional resonance and the frequency spectrum removes tills threshold., and the temperature gradient driven component remains outward

  17. Generation of Arbitrary Pure States for Three-dimensional Motion of a Trapped Ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Dachuang; Dong Ping; Cao Zhuoliang; Wang Xianping; Yang Ming

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a scheme for generating an arbitrary three-dimensional pure state of vibrational motion of a trapped ion. Our scheme is based on a sequence of laser pulses, which are tuned to the appropriate vibrational sidebands with respect to the appropriate electronic transition. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  18. Low-energy-spread ion bunches from a trapped atomic gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijnders, M.P.; Kruisbergen, van P.A.; Taban, G.; Geer, van der S.B.; Mutsaers, P.H.A.; Vredenbregt, E.J.D.; Luiten, O.J.

    2009-01-01

    We present time-of-flight measurements of the longitudinal energy spread of pulsed ultracold ion beams, produced by near-threshold ionization of rubidium atoms captured in a magneto-optical atom trap. Well-defined pulsed beams have been produced with energies of only 1 eV and a root-mean-square

  19. Consequences of trapped beam ions of the analysis of neutron emission data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loughlin, M.J.; Hone, M.; Jarvis, O.N.; Laundy, B.; Sadler, G.; Belle, P. van

    1989-01-01

    Neutron energy spectra have been measured during D o neutral beam heating of deuterium plasmas. The thermonuclear to beam-plasma neutron production ratios are deduced. For a non-radial spectrometer line-of-sight, the trapped beam-ion fraction must be considered. (author) 5 refs., 4 figs

  20. Fused Silica Ion Trap Chip with Efficient Optical Collection System for Timekeeping, Sensing, and Emulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-22

    17 This can be accomplished by including Raman side-band cooling after Doppler cooling the system for all modes except the soft rotational mode, at...trapped ions. Nature 2010, 465(7268): 590 –593. 4. Islam R, Edwards EE, Kim K, Korenblit S, Noh C, Carmichael H, Lin G-D, Duan L-M, Wang C-CJ, Freericks

  1. Robust Hadamard gate for optical and ion trap holonomic quantum computers

    OpenAIRE

    Kuvshinov, V. I.; Kuzmin, A. V.

    2005-01-01

    We consider one possible implementation of Hadamard gate for optical and ion trap holonomic quantum computers. The expression for its fidelity determining the gate stability with respect to the errors in the single-mode squeezing parameter control is analytically derived. We demonstrate by means of this expression the cancellation of the squeezing control errors up to the fourth order on their magnitude.

  2. A highly miniaturized vacuum package for a trapped ion atomic clock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwindt, Peter D. D., E-mail: pschwin@sandia.gov; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Partner, Heather; Casias, Adrian; Wagner, Adrian R.; Moorman, Matthew; Manginell, Ronald P. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Kellogg, James R.; Prestage, John D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    We report on the development of a highly miniaturized vacuum package for use in an atomic clock utilizing trapped ytterbium-171 ions. The vacuum package is approximately 1 cm{sup 3} in size and contains a linear quadrupole RF Paul ion trap, miniature neutral Yb sources, and a non-evaporable getter pump. We describe the fabrication process for making the Yb sources and assembling the vacuum package. To prepare the vacuum package for ion trapping, it was evacuated, baked at a high temperature, and then back filled with a helium buffer gas. Once appropriate vacuum conditions were achieved in the package, it was sealed with a copper pinch-off and was subsequently pumped only by the non-evaporable getter. We demonstrated ion trapping in this vacuum package and the operation of an atomic clock, stabilizing a local oscillator to the 12.6 GHz hyperfine transition of {sup 171}Y b{sup +}. The fractional frequency stability of the clock was measured to be 2 × 10{sup −11}/τ{sup 1/2}.

  3. Influence of ion implanted helium on deuterium trapping in Kh18N10T stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolstolutskaya, G.D.; Ruzhitskij, V.V.; Kopanets, I.E.

    2004-01-01

    The results are presented on evolution of distribution profiles and helium and deuterium thermal desorption ion implanted in steel 18Cr10NiTi. Accumulation, trapping, retention and microstructure evolution are studied; effect helium and hydrogen simultaneous implantation on these processes is also studied

  4. RF-Trapped Chip Scale Helium Ion Pump (RFT-CHIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-06

    utilizes two operation states: an ion extraction state and an RF electron trapping state. A high power RF switch S1 (RF- LAMBDA RFSP2TRDC06G, DC-6 GHz...integrated in time. The electric potential is obtained by solution of Poisson’s equation using an incomplete LU BiConjugate Gradient sparse matrix

  5. Mine water purify from radium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebecka, J.

    1996-01-01

    The article describes purification of radium containing water in coal mines. Author concludes that water purification is relatively simple and effective way to decrease environmental pollution caused by coal mining. The amount of radium disposed with type A radium water has been significantly decreased. The results of investigations show that it will be soon possible to purify also type B radium water. Article compares the amounts of radium disposed by coal mines in 1990, 1995 and forecast for 2000

  6. A cylindrical quadrupole ion trap in combination with an electrospray ion source for gas-phase luminescence and absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stockett, Mark H.; Houmøller, Jørgen; Støchkel, Kristian; Svendsen, Annette; Brøndsted Nielsen, Steen

    2016-01-01

    A relatively simple setup for collection and detection of light emitted from isolated photo-excited molecular ions has been constructed. It benefits from a high collection efficiency of photons, which is accomplished by using a cylindrical ion trap where one end-cap electrode is a mesh grid combined with an aspheric condenser lens. The geometry permits nearly 10% of the emitted light to be collected and, after transmission losses, approximately 5% to be delivered to the entrance of a grating spectrometer equipped with a detector array. The high collection efficiency enables the use of pulsed tunable lasers with low repetition rates (e.g., 20 Hz) instead of continuous wave (cw) lasers or very high repetition rate (e.g., MHz) lasers that are typically used as light sources for gas-phase fluorescence experiments on molecular ions. A hole has been drilled in the cylinder electrode so that a light pulse can interact with the ion cloud in the center of the trap. Simulations indicate that these modifications to the trap do not significantly affect the storage capability and the overall shape of the ion cloud. The overlap between the ion cloud and the laser light is basically 100%, and experimentally >50% of negatively charged chromophore ions are routinely photodepleted. The performance of the setup is illustrated based on fluorescence spectra of several laser dyes, and the quality of these spectra is comparable to those reported by other groups. Finally, by replacing the optical system with a channeltron detector, we demonstrate that the setup can also be used for gas-phase action spectroscopy where either depletion or fragmentation is monitored to provide an indirect measurement on the absorption spectrum of the ion.

  7. A cylindrical quadrupole ion trap in combination with an electrospray ion source for gas-phase luminescence and absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stockett, Mark H., E-mail: stockett@phys.au.dk; Houmøller, Jørgen; Støchkel, Kristian; Svendsen, Annette; Brøndsted Nielsen, Steen [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark)

    2016-05-15

    A relatively simple setup for collection and detection of light emitted from isolated photo-excited molecular ions has been constructed. It benefits from a high collection efficiency of photons, which is accomplished by using a cylindrical ion trap where one end-cap electrode is a mesh grid combined with an aspheric condenser lens. The geometry permits nearly 10% of the emitted light to be collected and, after transmission losses, approximately 5% to be delivered to the entrance of a grating spectrometer equipped with a detector array. The high collection efficiency enables the use of pulsed tunable lasers with low repetition rates (e.g., 20 Hz) instead of continuous wave (cw) lasers or very high repetition rate (e.g., MHz) lasers that are typically used as light sources for gas-phase fluorescence experiments on molecular ions. A hole has been drilled in the cylinder electrode so that a light pulse can interact with the ion cloud in the center of the trap. Simulations indicate that these modifications to the trap do not significantly affect the storage capability and the overall shape of the ion cloud. The overlap between the ion cloud and the laser light is basically 100%, and experimentally >50% of negatively charged chromophore ions are routinely photodepleted. The performance of the setup is illustrated based on fluorescence spectra of several laser dyes, and the quality of these spectra is comparable to those reported by other groups. Finally, by replacing the optical system with a channeltron detector, we demonstrate that the setup can also be used for gas-phase action spectroscopy where either depletion or fragmentation is monitored to provide an indirect measurement on the absorption spectrum of the ion.

  8. Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Eight Common Chemical Explosives Using Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sehwan; Lee, Jihyeon; KIm, Jeongkwon [Chungnam National Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Soo Gyeong; Goh, Eun Mee [Agency for Defense Development, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sungman; Koh, Sungsuk [Sensor Tech Inc., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    Eight representative explosives (ammonium perchlorate (AP), ammonium nitrate (AN), trinitrotoluene (TNT), 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT), cyclonite (RDX), cyclotetramethylenetetranitramine (HMX), pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), and hexanitrostilbene (HNS)) were comprehensively analyzed with an ion trap mass spectrometer in negative ion mode using direct infusion electrospray ionization. MS/MS experiments were performed to generate fragment ions from the major parent ion of each explosive. Explosives in salt forms such as AP or AN provided cluster parent ions with their own anions. Explosives with an aromatic ring were observed as either [M.H]{sup -} for TNT and DNT or [M]{sup ·-}. for HNS, while explosives without an aromatic ring such as RDX, HMX, and PETN were detected as an adduct ion with a formate anion, i. e., [M+HCOO]{sup -}. These findings provide a guideline for the rapid and accurate detection of explosives once portable MS instruments become more readily available.

  9. Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Eight Common Chemical Explosives Using Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sehwan; Lee, Jihyeon; KIm, Jeongkwon; Cho, Soo Gyeong; Goh, Eun Mee; Lee, Sungman; Koh, Sungsuk

    2013-01-01

    Eight representative explosives (ammonium perchlorate (AP), ammonium nitrate (AN), trinitrotoluene (TNT), 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT), cyclonite (RDX), cyclotetramethylenetetranitramine (HMX), pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), and hexanitrostilbene (HNS)) were comprehensively analyzed with an ion trap mass spectrometer in negative ion mode using direct infusion electrospray ionization. MS/MS experiments were performed to generate fragment ions from the major parent ion of each explosive. Explosives in salt forms such as AP or AN provided cluster parent ions with their own anions. Explosives with an aromatic ring were observed as either [M.H] - for TNT and DNT or [M] ·- . for HNS, while explosives without an aromatic ring such as RDX, HMX, and PETN were detected as an adduct ion with a formate anion, i. e., [M+HCOO] - . These findings provide a guideline for the rapid and accurate detection of explosives once portable MS instruments become more readily available

  10. Electrodeposition of Radium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crespo, M.T.; Jimenez, A.S.

    1996-01-01

    A study of different electrodeposition methods of radium for its measurement by alpha-spectrometry is presented. The recommended procedure uses an aqueous solution of ammonium oxalate and nitric acid in the presence of microgram amounts of platinum as electrolyte

  11. Radium dial workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowland, R.E.; Lucas, H.F. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The population of radium dial workers who were exposed to radium 30 to 50 years ago are currently being followed by the Center for Human Radiobiology at the Argonne National Laboratory. It is not clear that radium has induced additional malignancies in this population, other than the well-known bone sarcomas and head carcinomas, but elevated incidence rates for multiple myeloma and cancers of the colon, rectum, stomach, and breast suggest that radium might be involved. Continued follow-up of this population may resolve these questions. Finally, the question of the effect of fetal irradiation on the offspring of these women remains to be resolved. No evidence exists to suggest that any effects have occurred, but there is no question that a chronic irradiation of the developing fetus did take place. No formal follow-up of these children has yet been initiated

  12. Trapping of hydrogen isotopes in molybdenum and niobium predamaged by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottiger, J.; Picraux, S.T.; Rud, N.; Laursen, T.

    1977-01-01

    The trapping of hydrogen isotopes at defects in Mo and Nb have been studied. Ion beams of 11- and 18-keV He + , 55-keV O + and Ne + , and 500-keV Bi + were used to create defects. Subsequently H or D was injected at room temperature by use of molecular beams of 16-keV H + 2 and D + 2 . Appreciable enhancements were observed in the amount of H and D retained within the near-surface region of predamaged samples compared to samples with no prior damage. The total amount of D retained within the near-surface region was measured by means of the nuclear reaction D( 3 He,p) 4 He, and H depth profiles were measured via a resonance in the nuclear reaction 1 H( 19 F,αγ) 16 O. The H profiles correlate with the predicted predamaging ion profiles; however, appreciable tails to deeper depths for the hydrogen profiles are observed for the heavier predamaging ions. For a given predamage ion fluence, the amount of trapped deuterium increases linearly with incident deuterium fluence until a saturation in the enhancement is reached. The amount of deuterium trapped when saturation occurs increases with increasing predamage fluence. The experiments indicate that lighter ions, which create fewer primary displacements, are more effective per displacement in trapping hydrogen. An appreciable release of hydrogen is obtained upon annealing at 200 and 300 degreeC, and a preannealing experiment indicates this is due to detrapping rather than to any loss of traps. These temperatures suggest a much higher binding energy for the trapped hydrogen isotopes (approx.1.5 eV) than the available evidence gives for simple H-defect binding energies (approximately-less-than0.3 eV). The detailed trapping mechanism is not known. However, it is suggested on the basis of the high binding energies and the high concentrations of hydrogen which can be trapped that clusters of hydrogen may be formed

  13. The Effect of Ion Energy and Substrate Temperature on Deuterium Trapping in Tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roszell, John Patrick Town

    Tungsten is a candidate plasma facing material for next generation magnetic fusion devices such as ITER and there are major operational and safety issues associated with hydrogen (tritium) retention in plasma facing components. An ion gun was used to simulate plasma-material interactions under various conditions in order to study hydrogen retention characteristics of tungsten thus enabling better predictions of hydrogen retention in ITER. Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy (TDS) was used to measure deuterium retention from ion irradiation while modelling of TDS spectra with the Tritium Migration Analysis Program (TMAP) was used to provide information about the trapping mechanisms involved in deuterium retention in tungsten. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) were used to determine the depth resolved composition of specimens used for irradiation experiments. Carbon and oxygen atoms will be among the most common contaminants within ITER. C and O contamination in polycrystalline tungsten (PCW) specimens even at low levels (˜0.1%) was shown to reduce deuterium retention by preventing diffusion of deuterium into the bulk of the specimen. This diffusion barrier was also responsible for the inhibition of blister formation during irradiations at 500 K. These observations may provide possible mitigation techniques for problems associated with tritium retention and mechanical damage to plasma facing components caused by hydrogen implantation. Deuterium trapping in PCW and single crystal tungsten (SCW) was studied as a function of ion energy and substrate temperature. Deuterium retention was shown to decrease with decreasing ion energy below 100 eV/D+. Irradiation of tungsten specimens with 10 eV/D+ ions was shown to retain up to an order of magnitude less deuterium than irradiation with 500 eV/D+ ions. Furthermore, the retention mechanism for deuterium was shown to be consistent across the entire energy range studied (10-500 e

  14. Ion Storage Tests with the High Performance Antimatter Trap (HiPAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, James J.; Lewis, Raymond A.; Chakrabarti, Suman; Pearson, Boise; Schafer, Charles (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA/Marshall Space Flight Centers (NASA/MSFC) Propulsion Research Center (PRC) is evaluating an antiproton storage system, referred to as the High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT). This interest stems from the sheer energy represented by matter/antimatter annihilation process with has an energy density approximately 10 order of magnitude above that of chemical propellants. In other terms, one gram of antiprotons contains the equivalent energy of approximately 23 space shuttle external tanks or ET's (each ET contains roughly 740,000 kgs of fuel and oxidizer). This incredible source of stored energy, if harnessed, would be an enabling technology for deep space mission where both spacecraft weight and propulsion performance are key to satisfying aggressive mission requirements. The HiPAT hardware consists of a 4 Tesla superconductor system, an ultra high vacuum test section (vacuum approaching 10(exp -12) torr), and a high voltage confinement electrode system (up to 20 kvolts operation). The current laboratory layout is illustrated. The HiPAT designed objectives included storage of up to 1 trillion antiprotons with corresponding lifetimes approaching 18 days. To date, testing has centered on the storage of positive hydrogen ions produced in situ by a stream of high-energy electrons that passes through the trapping region. However, due to space charge issues and electron beam compression as it passes through the HiPAT central field, current ion production is limited to less then 50,000 ions. Ion lifetime was determined by counting particle populations at the end of various storage time intervals. Particle detection was accomplished by destructively expelling the ions against a micro-channel plate located just outside the traps magnetic field. The effect of radio frequency (RF) stabilization on the lifetime of trapped particles was also examined. This technique, referred to as a rotating wall, made use of a segmented electrode located near the center of the trap

  15. Extraction of highly charged ions from the Berlin Electron Beam Ion Trap for interactions with a gas target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, F.I.; Biedermann, C.; Radtke, R.; Fussmann, G.

    2006-01-01

    Highly charged ions are extracted from the Berlin Electron Beam Ion Trap for investigations of charge exchange with a gas target. The classical over-the-barrier model for slow highly charged ions describes this process, whereby one or more electrons are captured from the target into Rydberg states of the ion. The excited state relaxes via a radiative cascade of the electron to ground energy. The cascade spectra are characteristic of the capture state. We investigate x-ray photons emitted as a result of interactions between Ar 17+ ions at energies ≤5q keV with Ar atoms. Of particular interest is the velocity dependence of the angular momentum capture state l c

  16. Cooling of ions trapped in potential wells produced by electromagnetic radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobehart, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    The probability distributions for the ground state and the excited state of a two-level ion trapped in an harmonic potential well are studied. The ion is excited by electromagnetic radiation and relaxes back due to either spontaneous or stimulated emission. The photon statistics is considered Poissonian and the momentum transfer between the electromagnetic field and the ion is assumed discrete. The present results are closely related to the quantum treatment in the heavy particle limit as well as to those derived from previous semiclassical models. (Author) [es

  17. Shot-noise-limited monitoring and phase locking of the motion of a single trapped ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushev, P; Hétet, G; Slodička, L; Rotter, D; Wilson, M A; Schmidt-Kaler, F; Eschner, J; Blatt, R

    2013-03-29

    We perform a high-resolution real-time readout of the motion of a single trapped and laser-cooled Ba+ ion. By using an interferometric setup, we demonstrate a shot-noise-limited measurement of thermal oscillations with a resolution of 4 times the standard quantum limit. We apply the real-time monitoring for phase control of the ion motion through a feedback loop, suppressing the photon recoil-induced phase diffusion. Because of the spectral narrowing in the phase-locked mode, the coherent ion oscillation is measured with a resolution of about 0.3 times the standard quantum limit.

  18. A rare-earth-magnet ion trap for confining low-Z, bare nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Samuel M.; Tan, Joseph N.

    2009-05-01

    Simplifications in the theory for Rydberg states of hydrogenlike ions allow a substantial improvement in the accuracy of predicted levels, which can yield information on the values of fundamental constants and test theory if they can be compared with precision frequency measurements.[1] We consider the trapping of bare nuclei (fully-stripped) to be used in making Rydberg states of one-electron ions with atomic number 1Wundt, ``Fundamental constants and tests of theory in Rydberg states of hydrogenlike ions,'' Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 160404 (2008).

  19. Ion trapping in one-minimum potentials via charge-exchange collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maier, H.; Kuhn, S.

    1994-01-01

    A (1 d, 2 v), electrostatic, kinetics model for time-independent single-ended Q-machine states with a positively biased cold plate and a single internal minimum near the hot plate is presented. While the electrons are treated as collisionless, charge-exchange collisions between the ions and the neutral background gas atoms are taken into account by means of a linearized Boltzmann collision operator. The self-consistent plasma states are found by using an iterative analytic-numerical trajectory-simulation method in which the charge-density and potential distributions are alternately determined numerical results clearly demonstrate the sensitive role that trapped ions play in shaping the microscopic and macroscopic properties of the dc states under study. The trapped-ion distributions themselves are shown to be controlled critically by the detailed scattering conditions, which in turn are determined by the choice of the background properties. (author). 10 refs, 3 figs

  20. Radiation damage and deuterium trapping in deuterium-ion-irradiated Fe–9Cr alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwakir, Hirotomo, E-mail: iwakiri@edu.u-ryukyu.ac.jp [Faculty and Graduate School of Education, University of the Ryukyus, Nishihara, Okinawa 903-0213 (Japan); Tani, Munechika [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyusyu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Watanabe, Yoshiyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Yoshida, Naoaki [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan)

    2014-01-15

    Thermal desorption of deuterium (D{sub 2}) from deuterium-ion (D{sub 2}{sup +})-irradiated Fe–9Cr was correlated with the microstructural evolution of the alloy during irradiation with 8-keV D{sub 2}{sup +} ions following annealing to determine the retention and desorption behavior of the implanted deuterium and to identify effective traps for them, particularly at high temperature. After irradiation at 573 K, a new desorption stage formed between 650 and 1100 K at higher fluences, and cavities were observed using transmission electron microscopy. The total amount of trapped deuterium following irradiation with a fluence of 3.0 × 10{sup 22} ions/m{sup 2} was 6.8 × 10{sup 17} D{sub 2}/m{sup 2}, or approximately 0.007%. These results indicate that the deuterium atoms recombined to form D{sub 2} molecules at the surfaces of the cavities.

  1. LEBIT - a low-energy beam and ion trap facility at NSCL/MSU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, S.; Bollen, G.; Davies, D.; Lawton, D.; Lofy, P.; Morrissey, D. J.; Ottarson, J.; Ringle, R.; Schury, P.; Sun, T.; VanWasshenova, D.; Sun, T.; Weissman, L.; Wiggins, D.

    2003-01-01

    The Low Energy Beam and Ion Trap (LEBIT) Project aims to convert the high-energy exotic beams produced at NSCL/MSU into low-energy low-emittance beams. A combination of a high-pressure gas stopping cell and a radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ) ion accumulator and buncher will be used to manipulate the beam accordingly. High-accuracy mass measurements on very short-lived isotopes with a 9.4 T Penning trap system will be the first experimental program to profit from the low-energy beams. The status of the project is presented with a focus on recent stopping tests of 100-140 MeV/A Ar18+ ions in a gas cell

  2. The low-energy-beam and ion-trap facility at NSCL/MSU

    CERN Document Server

    Schwarz, S; Lawton, D; Lofy, P; Morrissey, D J; Ottarson, J; Ringle, R; Schury, P; Sun, T; Varentsov, V; Weissman, L

    2003-01-01

    The goal of the low-energy-beam and ion-trap (LEBIT) project is to convert the high-energy exotic beams produced at NSCL/MSU into low-energy low-emittance beams. This beam manipulation will be done by a combination of a high-pressure gas stopping cell and a radio-frequency quadrupole ion accumulator and buncher. The first experimental program to profit from the low-energy beams produced will be high-accuracy mass measurements on very short-lived isotopes with a 9.4 T Penning trap system. The status of the project is presented with an emphasis on recent stopping tests range of 100 MeV/A sup 4 sup 0 Ar sup 1 sup 8 sup + ions in a gas cell.

  3. The low-energy-beam and ion-trap facility at NSCL/MSU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, S. E-mail: schwarz@nscl.msu.edu; Bollen, G.; Lawton, D.; Lofy, P.; Morrissey, D.J.; Ottarson, J.; Ringle, R.; Schury, P.; Sun, T.; Varentsov, V.; Weissman, L

    2003-05-01

    The goal of the low-energy-beam and ion-trap (LEBIT) project is to convert the high-energy exotic beams produced at NSCL/MSU into low-energy low-emittance beams. This beam manipulation will be done by a combination of a high-pressure gas stopping cell and a radio-frequency quadrupole ion accumulator and buncher. The first experimental program to profit from the low-energy beams produced will be high-accuracy mass measurements on very short-lived isotopes with a 9.4 T Penning trap system. The status of the project is presented with an emphasis on recent stopping tests range of 100 MeV/A {sup 40}Ar{sup 18+} ions in a gas cell.

  4. The low-energy-beam and ion-trap facility at NSCL/MSU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, S.; Bollen, G.; Lawton, D.; Lofy, P.; Morrissey, D.J.; Ottarson, J.; Ringle, R.; Schury, P.; Sun, T.; Varentsov, V.; Weissman, L.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of the low-energy-beam and ion-trap (LEBIT) project is to convert the high-energy exotic beams produced at NSCL/MSU into low-energy low-emittance beams. This beam manipulation will be done by a combination of a high-pressure gas stopping cell and a radio-frequency quadrupole ion accumulator and buncher. The first experimental program to profit from the low-energy beams produced will be high-accuracy mass measurements on very short-lived isotopes with a 9.4 T Penning trap system. The status of the project is presented with an emphasis on recent stopping tests range of 100 MeV/A 40 Ar 18+ ions in a gas cell

  5. Improved formulas for trapped-ion anomalous transport in tokamaks without and with shear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sardei, F.; Wimmel, H.K.

    1980-12-01

    More refined numerical calculations of trapped-ion anomalous transport in a 2-D slab, trapped-fluid model suggest an anomalous diffusion coefficient D approx. 3.5 x 10 -2 delta 0 a 2 νsub(i)sup(e)sup(f)sup(f) for a tokamak plasma without shear. This supersedes earlier results. The new formula is independently confirmed by two different analytical calculations. One of them uses a similarity analysis of unabridged Kadomtsev-Pogutse-type trapped-fluid equations and the multiperiodic spatial structure of the saturated trapped-ion wave found in both the earlier and the recent numerical calculations. The other calculation yields a class of exact nonlinear solutions of the trapped-fluid equations. The new shearless result is used to derive the anomalous diffusion with shear effect by a method described in an earlier paper. The new transport formulas have been numerically evaluated for several tokamaks in an IPP report, where the results are shown in graph form. (orig.)

  6. Simultaneous and Sequential MS/MS Scan Combinations and Permutations in a Linear Quadrupole Ion Trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Dalton T; Szalwinski, Lucas J; Cooks, R Graham

    2017-10-17

    Methods of performing precursor ion scans as well as neutral loss scans in a single linear quadrupole ion trap have recently been described. In this paper we report methodology for performing permutations of MS/MS scan modes, that is, ordered combinations of precursor, product, and neutral loss scans following a single ion injection event. Only particular permutations are allowed; the sequences demonstrated here are (1) multiple precursor ion scans, (2) precursor ion scans followed by a single neutral loss scan, (3) precursor ion scans followed by product ion scans, and (4) segmented neutral loss scans. (5) The common product ion scan can be performed earlier in these sequences, under certain conditions. Simultaneous scans can also be performed. These include multiple precursor ion scans, precursor ion scans with an accompanying neutral loss scan, and multiple neutral loss scans. We argue that the new capability to perform complex simultaneous and sequential MS n operations on single ion populations represents a significant step in increasing the selectivity of mass spectrometry.

  7. Assessing the Progress of Trapped-Ion Processors Towards Fault-Tolerant Quantum Computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez, A.; Xu, X.; Nigmatullin, R.; O'Gorman, J.; Negnevitsky, V.; Schindler, P.; Monz, T.; Poschinger, U. G.; Hempel, C.; Home, J.; Schmidt-Kaler, F.; Biercuk, M.; Blatt, R.; Benjamin, S.; Müller, M.

    2017-10-01

    A quantitative assessment of the progress of small prototype quantum processors towards fault-tolerant quantum computation is a problem of current interest in experimental and theoretical quantum information science. We introduce a necessary and fair criterion for quantum error correction (QEC), which must be achieved in the development of these quantum processors before their sizes are sufficiently big to consider the well-known QEC threshold. We apply this criterion to benchmark the ongoing effort in implementing QEC with topological color codes using trapped-ion quantum processors and, more importantly, to guide the future hardware developments that will be required in order to demonstrate beneficial QEC with small topological quantum codes. In doing so, we present a thorough description of a realistic trapped-ion toolbox for QEC and a physically motivated error model that goes beyond standard simplifications in the QEC literature. We focus on laser-based quantum gates realized in two-species trapped-ion crystals in high-optical aperture segmented traps. Our large-scale numerical analysis shows that, with the foreseen technological improvements described here, this platform is a very promising candidate for fault-tolerant quantum computation.

  8. Physico-chemical forms and migration in continental waters of radium from uranium mining and milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benes, P.

    1982-01-01

    Recent advances in knowledge of the physico-chemical forms and migration of radium in continental waters are reviewed and recommendations for future research in this field are given. Computations of solution equilibria based on the reported and newly determined stability constants and solubilities of radium compounds show that a significant percentage of dissolved radium can exist in some waste and natural waters as an RaSO 4 ion pair, besides a significant percentage of Ra 2+ ions. The formation of a solid phase consisting mainly of sparingly soluble radium compounds can be excluded in waste and natural waters. Model experiments revealed that radium can be bound in complexes with some as yet unidentified ligands, probably of organic nature. Direct determinations of the physico-chemical forms of radium in surface and groundwaters were mostly confined to the analysis of the ratio of dissolved to particulate forms of radium. Ratios from 0.01 to 100 were found, depending on the type of water examined. Recently a newly suggested method of selective dissolution was applied to characterize the nature of particulate forms of radium in surface waters. Migration of radium is reviewed, covering the release of radium from its source, its transport in ground and surface waters and its deposition in various sinks. Factors influencing radium release from the sources into the hydrosphere are discussed. The following processes affecting radium migration are discussed: adsorption of dissolved radium on suspended solids and bottom sediments, coprecipitation of radium with solids formed in waste waters or in natural waters, sedimentation of particulate forms of radium in reservoirs and streams, resuspension of bottom sediments and dissolution of radium from suspended solids or bottom sediments

  9. Infrared laser dissociation of single megadalton polymer ions in a gated electrostatic ion trap: the added value of statistical analysis of individual events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halim, Mohammad A; Clavier, Christian; Dagany, Xavier; Kerleroux, Michel; Dugourd, Philippe; Dunbar, Robert C; Antoine, Rodolphe

    2018-05-07

    In this study, we report the unimolecular dissociation mechanism of megadalton SO 3 -containing poly(2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid) (PAMPS) polymer cations and anions with the aid of infrared multiphoton dissociation coupled to charge detection ion trap mass spectrometry. A gated electrostatic ion trap ("Benner trap") is used to store and detect single gaseous polymer ions generated by positive and negative polarity in an electrospray ionization source. The trapped ions are then fragmented due to the sequential absorption of multiple infrared photons produced from a continuous-wave CO 2 laser. Several fragmentation pathways having distinct signatures are observed. Highly charged parent ions characteristically adopt a distinctive "stair-case" pattern (assigned to the "fission" process) whereas low charge species take on a "funnel like" shape (assigned to the "evaporation" process). Also, the log-log plot of the dissociation rate constants as a function of laser intensity between PAMPS positive and negative ions is significantly different.

  10. Linear Ion Traps in Space: The Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) Instrument and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arevalo, Ricardo; Brinckerhoff, William; Mahaffy, Paul; van Amerom, Friso; Danell, Ryan; Pinnick, Veronica; Li, Xiang; Hovmand, Lars; Getty, Stephanie; Grubisic, Andrej; Goesmann, Fred; Cottin, Hervé

    2015-11-01

    Historically, quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) instruments have been used to explore a wide survey of planetary targets in our solar system, from Venus (Pioneer Venus) to Saturn (Cassini-Huygens). However, linear ion trap (LIT) mass spectrometers have found a niche as smaller, versatile alternatives to traditional quadrupole analyzers.The core astrobiological experiment of ESA’s ExoMars Program is the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) onboard the ExoMars 2018 rover. The MOMA instrument is centered on a linear (or 2-D) ion trap mass spectrometer. As opposed to 3-D traps, LIT-based instruments accommodate two symmetrical ion injection pathways, enabling two complementary ion sources to be used. In the case of MOMA, these two analytical approaches are laser desorption mass spectrometry (LDMS) at Mars ambient pressures, and traditional gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS). The LIT analyzer employed by MOMA also offers: higher ion capacity compared to a 3-D trap of the same volume; redundant detection subassemblies for extended lifetime; and, a link to heritage QMS designs and assembly logistics. The MOMA engineering test unit (ETU) has demonstrated the detection of organics in the presence of wt.%-levels of perchlorate, effective ion enhancement via stored waveform inverse Fourier transform (SWIFT), and derivation of structural information through tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS).A more progressive linear ion trap mass spectrometer (LITMS), funded by the NASA ROSES MatISSE Program, is being developed at NASA GSFC and promises to augment the capabilities of the MOMA instrument by way of: an expanded mass range (i.e., 20 - 2000 Da); detection of both positive and negative ions; spatially resolved (<1 mm) characterization of individual rock core layers; and, evolved gas analysis and GCMS with pyrolysis up to 1300° C (enabling breakdown of refractory phases). The Advanced Resolution Organic Molecule Analyzer (AROMA) instrument, being developed through NASA

  11. Accurate measurements of visible M1 transitions of titanium-like ions using an electron beam ion trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crosby, D.N.; Gaarde-Widdowson, K.; Silver, J.D.; Tarbutt, M.R.

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic dipole transitions between the fine structure levels (3d 4 ) 5 D 3 - 5 D 2 of titanium-like silver and tin have been observed as emission lines from the Oxford electron beam ion trap (EBIT). The precision of the measurement system is validated by observation and comparison of well known lines in Kr II and He I with the database values, justifying uncertainties of 4-12 ppm. (orig.)

  12. Accurate measurements of visible M1 transitions of titanium-like ions using an electron beam ion trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crosby, D.N.; Gaarde-Widdowson, K.; Silver, J.D.; Tarbutt, M.R. [Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics

    2001-07-01

    Magnetic dipole transitions between the fine structure levels (3d{sup 4}) {sup 5}D{sub 3}-{sup 5}D{sub 2} of titanium-like silver and tin have been observed as emission lines from the Oxford electron beam ion trap (EBIT). The precision of the measurement system is validated by observation and comparison of well known lines in Kr II and He I with the database values, justifying uncertainties of 4-12 ppm. (orig.)

  13. Extending the applicability of an open-ring trap to perform experiments with a single laser-cooled ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornejo, J. M.; Colombano, M.; Doménech, J.; Rodríguez, D., E-mail: danielrodriguez@ugr.es [Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Granada, 18071 Granada (Spain); Block, M. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Helmholtz-Institut Mainz, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Institut für Kernchemie, University of Mainz, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Delahaye, P. [Grand Accélérateur National d’Ions Lourds, 14000 Caen (France)

    2015-10-15

    A special ion trap was initially built up to perform β-ν correlation experiments with radioactive ions. The trap geometry is also well suited to perform experiments with laser-cooled ions, serving for the development of a new type of Penning trap, in the framework of the project TRAPSENSOR at the University of Granada. The goal of this project is to use a single {sup 40}Ca{sup +} ion as detector for single-ion mass spectrometry. Within this project and without any modification to the initial electrode configuration, it was possible to perform Doppler cooling on {sup 40}Ca{sup +} ions, starting from large clouds and reaching single ion sensitivity. This new feature of the trap might be important also for other experiments with ions produced at radioactive ion beam facilities. In this publication, the trap and the laser system will be described, together with their performance with respect to laser cooling applied to large ion clouds down to a single ion.

  14. The mass of $^{22}$Mg and a concept for a novel laser ion source trap

    CERN Document Server

    Mukherjee, Manas

    Clean and high-quality radioactive ion beams can be prepared by combining ion trap and resonance laser ionization techniques. A feasibility study for such a laser ion source trap has been carried out which shows enormous improvement in the beam emittance, purity, and in addition allows for a variation of the ion beam time structure. Direct high-precision mass measurements around mass number A=22 are of utmost importance. First, the masses of the superallowed $\\beta$-emitter $^{22}$Mg and its daughter $^{22}$Na are needed to test the conserved-vector-current(CVC) hypothesis and the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa(CKM) matrix unitarity, both being predictions of the Standard Model. Second, to calculate the reaction rate of $^{21}$Na($p,\\gamma$)$^{22}$Mg the involved masses are required very accurately. This rate is needed in order to extract an upper limit on the amount of a characteristic $\\gamma$-radiation emitted from classical nova bursts which has been searched for but not yet detected. At the triple trap mass s...

  15. Distance scaling of electric-field noise in a surface-electrode ion trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlacek, J. A.; Greene, A.; Stuart, J.; McConnell, R.; Bruzewicz, C. D.; Sage, J. M.; Chiaverini, J.

    2018-02-01

    We investigate anomalous ion-motional heating, a limitation to multiqubit quantum-logic gate fidelity in trapped-ion systems, as a function of ion-electrode separation. Using a multizone surface-electrode trap in which ions can be held at five discrete distances from the metal electrodes, we measure power-law dependencies of the electric-field noise experienced by the ion on the ion-electrode distance d . We find a scaling of approximately d-4 regardless of whether the electrodes are at room temperature or cryogenic temperature, despite the fact that the heating rates are approximately two orders of magnitude smaller in the latter case. Through auxiliary measurements using the application of noise to the electrodes, we rule out technical limitations to the measured heating rates and scalings. We also measure the frequency scaling of the inherent electric-field noise close to 1 /f at both temperatures. These measurements eliminate from consideration anomalous-heating models which do not have a d-4 distance dependence, including several microscopic models of current interest.

  16. Applicability of hybrid linear ion trap-high resolution mass spectrometry and quadrupole-linear ion trap-mass spectrometry for mycotoxin analysis in baby food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubert, Josep; James, Kevin J; Mañes, Jordi; Soler, Carla

    2012-02-03

    Recent developments in mass spectrometers have created a paradoxical situation; different mass spectrometers are available, each of them with their specific strengths and drawbacks. Hybrid instruments try to unify several advantages in one instrument. In this study two of wide-used hybrid instruments were compared: hybrid quadrupole-linear ion trap-mass spectrometry (QTRAP®) and the hybrid linear ion trap-high resolution mass spectrometry (LTQ-Orbitrap®). Both instruments were applied to detect the presence of 18 selected mycotoxins in baby food. Analytical parameters were validated according to 2002/657/CE. Limits of quantification (LOQs) obtained by QTRAP® instrument ranged from 0.45 to 45 μg kg⁻¹ while lower limits of quantification (LLOQs) values were obtained by LTQ-Orbitrap®: 7-70 μg kg⁻¹. The correlation coefficients (r) in both cases were upper than 0.989. These values highlighted that both instruments were complementary for the analysis of mycotoxin in baby food; while QTRAP® reached best sensitivity and selectivity, LTQ-Orbitrap® allowed the identification of non-target and unknowns compounds. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Dynamics of a single ion in a perturbed Penning trap: Octupolar perturbation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lara, Martin; Salas, J. Pablo

    2004-01-01

    Imperfections in the design or implementation of Penning traps may give rise to electrostatic perturbations that introduce nonlinearities in the dynamics. In this paper we investigate, from the point of view of classical mechanics, the dynamics of a single ion trapped in a Penning trap perturbed by an octupolar perturbation. Because of the axial symmetry of the problem, the system has two degrees of freedom. Hence, this model is ideal to be managed by numerical techniques like continuation of families of periodic orbits and Poincare surfaces of section. We find that, through the variation of the two parameters controlling the dynamics, several periodic orbits emanate from two fundamental periodic orbits. This process produces important changes (bifurcations) in the phase space structure leading to chaotic behavior

  18. Do pyrotechnics contain radium?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinhauser, Georg; Musilek, Andreas, E-mail: georg.steinhauser@ati.ac.a [Vienna University of Technology, Atominstitut der Oesterreichischen Universitaeten, Stadionallee 2, A-1020 Wien (Austria)

    2009-07-15

    Many pyrotechnic devices contain barium nitrate which is used as an oxidizer and colouring agent primarily for green-coloured fireworks. Similarly, strontium nitrate is used for red-coloured pyrotechnic effects. Due to their chemical similarities to radium, barium and strontium ores can accumulate radium, causing a remarkable activity in these minerals. Radium in such contaminated raw materials can be processed together with the barium or strontium, unless extensive purification of the ores was undertaken. For example, the utilization of 'radiobarite' for the production of pyrotechnic ingredients can therefore cause atmospheric pollution with radium aerosols when the firework is displayed, resulting in negative health effects upon inhalation of these aerosols. In this study, we investigated the occurrence of gamma-photon-emitting radionuclides in several pyrotechnic devices. The highest specific activities were due to K-40 (up to 20 Bq g{sup -1}, average value 14 Bq g{sup -1}). Radium-226 activities were in the range of 16-260 mBq g{sup -1} (average value 81 mBq g{sup -1}). Since no uranium was found in any of the samples, indeed, a slight enrichment of Ra-226 in coloured pyrotechnics can be observed. Radioactive impurities stemming from the Th-232 decay chain were found in many samples as well. In the course of novel developments aiming at the 'greening' of pyrotechnics, the potential radioactive hazard should be considered as well.

  19. Do pyrotechnics contain radium?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhauser, Georg; Musilek, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Many pyrotechnic devices contain barium nitrate which is used as an oxidizer and colouring agent primarily for green-coloured fireworks. Similarly, strontium nitrate is used for red-coloured pyrotechnic effects. Due to their chemical similarities to radium, barium and strontium ores can accumulate radium, causing a remarkable activity in these minerals. Radium in such contaminated raw materials can be processed together with the barium or strontium, unless extensive purification of the ores was undertaken. For example, the utilization of 'radiobarite' for the production of pyrotechnic ingredients can therefore cause atmospheric pollution with radium aerosols when the firework is displayed, resulting in negative health effects upon inhalation of these aerosols. In this study, we investigated the occurrence of gamma-photon-emitting radionuclides in several pyrotechnic devices. The highest specific activities were due to K-40 (up to 20 Bq g -1 , average value 14 Bq g -1 ). Radium-226 activities were in the range of 16-260 mBq g -1 (average value 81 mBq g -1 ). Since no uranium was found in any of the samples, indeed, a slight enrichment of Ra-226 in coloured pyrotechnics can be observed. Radioactive impurities stemming from the Th-232 decay chain were found in many samples as well. In the course of novel developments aiming at the 'greening' of pyrotechnics, the potential radioactive hazard should be considered as well.

  20. Stability and delayed fragmentation of highly charged C60 trapped in a conic-electrode electrostatic ion resonator (ConeTrap)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, J.; Wei, B.; Bourgey, A.; Bredy, R.; Chen, L.; Kerleroux, M.; Martin, S.; Montagne, G.; Salmoun, A.; Terpend-Ordaciere, B.

    2007-01-01

    We employed a conic-electrode electrostatic ion resonator (ConeTrap) to store the recoil ions (C 60 r+ ) resulting from collision between 56keV Ar 8+ ions and C 60 in order to study their stability over a long time range (several milliseconds). The originality of our method, based on the trapping of a single ion to preserve the detection in coincidence of all the products of the collision, is presented in detail. Our results show that C 60 ions produced in such collisions are stable in the considered observation time. By employing the ConeTrap as a secondary mass spectrometer in order to let the ions oscillate only for a single period, we have been able to observe delayed evaporation of cold C 60 3+ ions 20μs after the collision. We interpret quantitatively the relative yields of daughter ions with a cascade model in which the transition rates are estimated via the commonly used Arrhenius law, taking into account the contribution of the radiative decay

  1. Theory of modulational interaction of trapped ion convective cells and drift wave turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, V.D.; Diamond, P.H.; Lebedev, V.; Soloviev, G.; Shevchenko, V.

    1993-01-01

    Theoretical and computational studies of the modulational interaction between trapped ion convective cells and short wavelength drift wave turbulence are discussed. These studies are motivated by the fact that cells and drift waves are expected to coexist in tokamaks so that: (a) cells strain and modulate drift waves, and (b) drift waves open-quote ride on close-quote a background of cells. The results of the authors' investigation indicate that: (1) (nonlinear) parametric growth rates of trapped ion convective cells can exceed linear predictions (for drift wave levels at the mixing length limit); (2) a set of coupled envelope equations, akin to the Zakharov equations from Langmuir turbulence, can be derived and used to predict the formation of a dipole pair of convective cells trapped by the drift wave envelope. This dipole pair is strongly anisotropic, due to the structure of the drift wave Reynolds stress which drives the cell flow. Numerical solutions of the envelope equations are in good agreement with theoretical predictions, and indicate the persistence of the structure in time; (3) strong modulation and trapping of drift waves with k perpendicular ρ > 1 occurs. Extensions to magnetically sheared systems and the broader implications of this work as a paradigm for the dynamics of persistent structures in shearing flows are discussed

  2. Population trapping: The mechanism for the lost resonance lines in Pm-like ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Daiji; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Murakami, Izumi; Nakamura, Nobuyuki

    2017-10-01

    We report a population kinetics study on line emissions of the Pm-like Bi22+ performed by using a collisional-radiative (CR) model. Population rates of excited levels are analyzed to explain the population trapping in the 4f135s2 state which causes the loss of the 5s - 5p resonance lines in emission spectra. Based on the present analysis, we elucidate why the population trapping is not facilitated for a meta-stable excited level of the Sm-like Bi21+. The emission line spectra are calculated for the Pm-like isoelectronic sequence from Au18+ through W13+ and compared with experimental measurements by electron-beam-ion-traps (EBITs). Structures of the spectra are similar for all of the cases except for calculated W13+ spectra. The calculated spectra are hardly reconciled with the measured W13+ spectrum using the compact electron-beam-ion-trap (CoBIT) [Phys. Rev. A 92 (2015) 022510].

  3. Theoretical examination of the trapping of ion-implanted hydrogen in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, S.M.; Nordlander, P.; Besenbacher, F.; Norskov, J.K.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical analysis of the defect trapping of ion-implanted hydrogen in metals has been extended in two respects. A new transport formalism has been developed which takes account not only of the diffusion, trapping, and surface release of the hydrogen, which were included in earlier treatments, but also the diffusion, recombination, agglomeration, and surface annihilation of the vacancy and interstitial traps. In addition, effective-medium theory has been used to examine multiple hydrogen occupancy of the vacancy, and, for the fcc structure, appreciable binding enthalpies relative to the solution site have been found for occupancies of up to six. These extensions have been employed to model the depth distribution of ion-implanted hydrogen in Ni and Al during linear ramping of temperature, and the results have been used to interpret previously published data from these metals. The agreement between theory and experiment is good for both systems. In the case of Ni, the two experimentally observed hydrogen-release stages are both accounted for in terms of trapping at vacancies with a binding enthalpy that depends upon occupancy in accord with effective-medium theory

  4. Quantum optics including noise reduction, trapped ions, quantum trajectories, and decoherence

    CERN Document Server

    Orszag, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    This new edition gives a unique and broad coverage of basic laser-related phenomena that allow graduate students, scientists and engineers to carry out research in quantum optics and laser physics. It covers quantization of the electromagnetic field, quantum theory of coherence, atom-field interaction models, resonance fluorescence, quantum theory of damping, laser theory using both the master equation and the Langevin theory, the correlated emission laser, input-output theory with applications to non-linear optics, quantum trajectories, quantum non-demolition measurements and generation of non-classical vibrational states of ions in a Paul trap. In this third edition, there is an enlarged chapter on trapped ions, as well as new sections on quantum computing and quantum bits with applications. There is also additional material included for quantum processing and entanglement. These topics are presented in a unified and didactic manner, each chapter is accompanied by specific problems and hints to solutions to...

  5. Analysing destruction channels of interstellar hydrocarbon anions with a 22pol ion-trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endres, Eric; Lakhmanskaya, Olga; Best, Thorsten; Hauser, Daniel; Kumar, Sunil; Wester, Roland [Universitaet Innsbruck, Institut fuer Ionenphysik und Angewandte Physik (Austria)

    2014-07-01

    In the interstellar medium (ISM), ion-molecule reactions are considered to play a key role in the formation of complex molecules. The detection of the first interstellar anions, which happen to be carbon chain anions, has raised new interest in the quantitative composition of the ISM and the underlying reaction network. To understand the observed abundance of these carbon chain anions, a detailed analysis of the possible destruction channels is indispensable. A cryogenic 22-pol radio frequency ion trap is an ideal tool to observe reactions that take place slowly, such as carbon chain anions with molecular hydrogen. Furthermore, measurements over a large temperature scale are feasible. Longitudinal optical access to the trap also provides the possibility to make precise photodetachment measurements. Temperature dependent measurements of the reaction rates for the reaction between hydrocarbon chain anions and H{sub 2} are presented.

  6. Semiclassical approach to finite-temperature quantum annealing with trapped ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raventós, David; Graß, Tobias; Juliá-Díaz, Bruno; Lewenstein, Maciej

    2018-05-01

    Recently it has been demonstrated that an ensemble of trapped ions may serve as a quantum annealer for the number-partitioning problem [Nat. Commun. 7, 11524 (2016), 10.1038/ncomms11524]. This hard computational problem may be addressed by employing a tunable spin-glass architecture. Following the proposal of the trapped-ion annealer, we study here its robustness against thermal effects; that is, we investigate the role played by thermal phonons. For the efficient description of the system, we use a semiclassical approach, and benchmark it against the exact quantum evolution. The aim is to understand better and characterize how the quantum device approaches a solution of an otherwise difficult to solve NP-hard problem.

  7. Dissipative quantum error correction and application to quantum sensing with trapped ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, F; Sørensen, A S; Zoller, P; Muschik, C A

    2017-11-28

    Quantum-enhanced measurements hold the promise to improve high-precision sensing ranging from the definition of time standards to the determination of fundamental constants of nature. However, quantum sensors lose their sensitivity in the presence of noise. To protect them, the use of quantum error-correcting codes has been proposed. Trapped ions are an excellent technological platform for both quantum sensing and quantum error correction. Here we present a quantum error correction scheme that harnesses dissipation to stabilize a trapped-ion qubit. In our approach, always-on couplings to an engineered environment protect the qubit against spin-flips or phase-flips. Our dissipative error correction scheme operates in a continuous manner without the need to perform measurements or feedback operations. We show that the resulting enhanced coherence time translates into a significantly enhanced precision for quantum measurements. Our work constitutes a stepping stone towards the paradigm of self-correcting quantum information processing.

  8. Development of a multiplexed interface for capillary electrophoresis-electrospray ion trap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fu-An; Wu, Ming-Chi; Her, Guor-Rong

    2006-08-01

    A four-channel multiplexed electrospray capillary electrophoresis interface has been developed. This new interface permits up to four capillary electrophoresis columns to be sampled sequentially by means of a stepper motor and a notched rotating plate assembly, which at any instant occludes all but a single sprayer. In this design, four sheath liquid electrospray probes are oriented in a circular array situated 90 degrees relative to one another. The rotating metal disk, which contains a one-quarter notch, is mounted to the stepper motor assembly and is located between the sprayers and the entrance aperture of an ion trap mass spectrometer. By using the data acquisition signal from the ion trap mass spectrometer, the scan event is synchronized with the rotation of the metal disk. With this device, four discrete sample streams can be simultaneously analyzed, resulting in a 4-fold increase in analytical throughput.

  9. Hg-201 (+) CO-Magnetometer for HG-199(+) Trapped Ion Space Atomic Clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Eric A. (Inventor); Taghavi, Shervin (Inventor); Tjoelker, Robert L. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Local magnetic field strength in a trapped ion atomic clock is measured in real time, with high accuracy and without degrading clock performance, and the measurement is used to compensate for ambient magnetic field perturbations. First and second isotopes of an element are co-located within the linear ion trap. The first isotope has a resonant microwave transition between two hyperfine energy states, and the second isotope has a resonant Zeeman transition. Optical sources emit ultraviolet light that optically pump both isotopes. A microwave radiation source simultaneously emits microwave fields resonant with the first isotope's clock transition and the second isotope's Zeeman transition, and an optical detector measures the fluorescence from optically pumping both isotopes. The second isotope's Zeeman transition provides the measure of magnetic field strength, and the measurement is used to compensate the first isotope's clock transition or to adjust the applied C-field to reduce the effects of ambient magnetic field perturbations.

  10. High-resolution compact Johann crystal spectrometer with the Livermore electron beam ion trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robbins, D.L.; Chen, H.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Faenov, A.Ya.; Pikuz, T.A.; May, M.J.; Dunn, J.; Smith, A.J.

    2004-01-01

    A compact high-resolution (λ/Δλ≅10 000) spherically bent crystal spectrometer in the Johann geometry was recently installed and tested on the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory SuperEBIT electron beam ion trap. The curvature of the mica (002) crystal grating allows for higher collection efficiency compared to the flat and cylindrically bent crystal spectrometers commonly used on the Livermore electron beam ion traps. The spectrometer's Johann configuration enables orientation of its dispersion plane to be parallel to the electron beam propagation. Used in concert with a crystal spectrometer, whose dispersion plane is perpendicular to the electron beam propagation, the polarization of x-ray emission lines can be measured

  11. Confinement of ripple-trapped slowing-down ions by a radial electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, W.

    1998-03-01

    Weakly collisional ions trapped in the toroidal field ripples at the outer plasma edge can be prevented to escape the plasma due to grad B-drift by a counteracting radial electric field. This leads to an increase in the density of ripple-trapped ions, which can be monitored by the analysis of charge exchange neutrals. The minimum radial electric field E r necessary to confine ions with energy E and charge q (q=-1: charge of the electron) is E r = -E/(q * R), where R is the major radius at the measuring point. Slowing-down ions from neutral injection are usually in the right energy range to be sufficiently collisionless in the plasma edge and show the confinement by radial electric fields in the range of tens of kV/m. The density of banana ions is almost unaffected by the radial electric field. Neither in L/H- nor in H/L-transitions does the density of ripple-trapped ions and, hence, the neutral particle fluxes, show jumps in times shorter than 1 ms. According to [1,2] the response time of the density and the fluxes to a sudden jump in the radial electric field is less than 200 μs, if the halfwidth of the electric field is larger or about 2 cm. This would exclude rapid jumps in the radial electric field at the transition. Whether the halfwidth of the electric field is that large during transition cannot be decided from the measurement of the fluxes alone. (orig.)

  12. A generalized Jaynes-Cummings model: The relativistic parametric amplifier and a single trapped ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojeda-Guillén, D., E-mail: dojedag@ipn.mx [Escuela Superior de Cómputo, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Av. Juan de Dios Bátiz esq. Av. Miguel Othón de Mendizábal, Col. Lindavista, Delegación Gustavo A. Madero, C.P. 07738 Ciudad de México (Mexico); Mota, R. D. [Escuela Superior de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica, Unidad Culhuacán, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Av. Santa Ana No. 1000, Col. San Francisco Culhuacán, Delegación Coyoacán, C.P. 04430 Ciudad de México (Mexico); Granados, V. D. [Escuela Superior de Física y Matemáticas, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Ed. 9, Unidad Profesional Adolfo López Mateos, Delegación Gustavo A. Madero, C.P. 07738 Ciudad de México (Mexico)

    2016-06-15

    We introduce a generalization of the Jaynes-Cummings model and study some of its properties. We obtain the energy spectrum and eigenfunctions of this model by using the tilting transformation and the squeezed number states of the one-dimensional harmonic oscillator. As physical applications, we connect this new model to two important and novelty problems: the relativistic parametric amplifier and the quantum simulation of a single trapped ion.

  13. Sideband-cooling of trapped ytterbium-ions in the microwave regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharfenberger, Benedikt J.

    2012-01-01

    Trapped ions in a Paul trap are at present one of the most promising candidates for Quantum Information Processing (QIP). The technique that is used for this purpose in this experiment was introduced in 2001 by F. Mintert and Ch. Wunderlich. The core of this method is the use of atomic transitions in the radio- or microwave region, while a magnetic field gradient along the trap axis (where the ion chain is situated) lifts the degeneracy of the transition frequencies, such that the ions can be distinguished in frequency space; it also serves for the coupling of internal and external degrees of freedom of the ion chain. This method is called MAGIC (MAgnetic Gradient Induced Coupling). The performance of the measurements required that the apparatus of the experiment, which consists of laser sources, lambdameter, vacuum- and microwave system as well as imaging- and detection-units, had to be assembled and tested, which was an important prerequisite for the successful performance of the here described experiments. For the experiments it is advantageous to prepare the ions in an energetic state close to the motional ground state, which contributes to a reduction of the dephasing of the system while manipulating it with microwaves. By using the sideband-cooling technique to the sub-Doppler regime it is taken advantage of the fact, that ions in a linear trap are in good approximation situated in a harmonic oscillator potential and can therefore only populate discrete vibrational energy levels, whose frequency difference is given by the axial trap frequency ω z . If the system is excited by a microwave, which frequency is detuned from resonance to lower energies by a vibrational quantum, the ion looses one such phonon within each cooling-cycle. When this cycle is driven several times, the average phonon number and thus the temperature of the ion can be reduced efficiently and the ion can be initialized in a state close to the motional ground state. As sideband

  14. Recent trends in precision measurements of atomic and nuclear properties with lasers and ion traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Michael

    2017-11-01

    The X. international workshop on "Application of Lasers and Storage Devices in Atomic Nuclei Research" took place in Poznan in May 2016. It addressed the latest experimental and theoretical achievements in laser and ion trap-based investigations of radionuclides, highly charged ions and antiprotons. The precise determination of atomic and nuclear properties provides a stringent benchmark for theoretical models and eventually leads to a better understanding of the underlying fundamental interactions and symmetries. This article addresses some general trends in this field and highlights select recent achievements presented at the workshop. Many of these are covered in more detail within the individual contributions to this special issue of Hyperfine Interactions.

  15. Recent trends in precision measurements of atomic and nuclear properties with lasers and ion traps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, Michael, E-mail: m.block@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    The X. international workshop on “Application of Lasers and Storage Devices in Atomic Nuclei Research” took place in Poznan in May 2016. It addressed the latest experimental and theoretical achievements in laser and ion trap-based investigations of radionuclides, highly charged ions and antiprotons. The precise determination of atomic and nuclear properties provides a stringent benchmark for theoretical models and eventually leads to a better understanding of the underlying fundamental interactions and symmetries. This article addresses some general trends in this field and highlights select recent achievements presented at the workshop. Many of these are covered in more detail within the individual contributions to this special issue of Hyperfine Interactions.

  16. MATS and LaSpec: High-precision experiments using ion traps and lasers at FAIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, D.; Blaum, K.; Nörtershäuser, W.; Ahammed, M.; Algora, A.; Audi, G.; Äystö, J.; Beck, D.; Bender, M.; Billowes, J.; Block, M.; Böhm, C.; Bollen, G.; Brodeur, M.; Brunner, T.; Bushaw, B. A.; Cakirli, R. B.; Campbell, P.; Cano-Ott, D.; Cortés, G.; Crespo López-Urrutia, J. R.; Das, P.; Dax, A.; de, A.; Delheij, P.; Dickel, T.; Dilling, J.; Eberhardt, K.; Eliseev, S.; Ettenauer, S.; Flanagan, K. T.; Ferrer, R.; García-Ramos, J.-E.; Gartzke, E.; Geissel, H.; George, S.; Geppert, C.; Gómez-Hornillos, M. B.; Gusev, Y.; Habs, D.; Heenen, P.-H.; Heinz, S.; Herfurth, F.; Herlert, A.; Hobein, M.; Huber, G.; Huyse, M.; Jesch, C.; Jokinen, A.; Kester, O.; Ketelaer, J.; Kolhinen, V.; Koudriavtsev, I.; Kowalska, M.; Krämer, J.; Kreim, S.; Krieger, A.; Kühl, T.; Lallena, A. M.; Lapierre, A.; Le Blanc, F.; Litvinov, Y. A.; Lunney, D.; Martínez, T.; Marx, G.; Matos, M.; Minaya-Ramirez, E.; Moore, I.; Nagy, S.; Naimi, S.; Neidherr, D.; Nesterenko, D.; Neyens, G.; Novikov, Y. N.; Petrick, M.; Plaß, W. R.; Popov, A.; Quint, W.; Ray, A.; Reinhard, P.-G.; Repp, J.; Roux, C.; Rubio, B.; Sánchez, R.; Schabinger, B.; Scheidenberger, C.; Schneider, D.; Schuch, R.; Schwarz, S.; Schweikhard, L.; Seliverstov, M.; Solders, A.; Suhonen, M.; Szerypo, J.; Taín, J. L.; Thirolf, P. G.; Ullrich, J.; van Duppen, P.; Vasiliev, A.; Vorobjev, G.; Weber, C.; Wendt, K.; Winkler, M.; Yordanov, D.; Ziegler, F.

    2010-05-01

    Nuclear ground state properties including mass, charge radii, spins and moments can be determined by applying atomic physics techniques such as Penning-trap based mass spectrometry and laser spectroscopy. The MATS and LaSpec setups at the low-energy beamline at FAIR will allow us to extend the knowledge of these properties further into the region far from stability. The mass and its inherent connection with the nuclear binding energy is a fundamental property of a nuclide, a unique “fingerprint”. Thus, precise mass values are important for a variety of applications, ranging from nuclear-structure studies like the investigation of shell closures and the onset of deformation, tests of nuclear mass models and mass formulas, to tests of the weak interaction and of the Standard Model. The required relative accuracy ranges from 10-5 to below 10-8 for radionuclides, which most often have half-lives well below 1 s. Substantial progress in Penning trap mass spectrometry has made this method a prime choice for precision measurements on rare isotopes. The technique has the potential to provide high accuracy and sensitivity even for very short-lived nuclides. Furthermore, ion traps can be used for precision decay studies and offer advantages over existing methods. With MATS (Precision Measurements of very short-lived nuclei using an A_dvanced Trapping System for highly-charged ions) at FAIR we aim to apply several techniques to very short-lived radionuclides: High-accuracy mass measurements, in-trap conversion electron and alpha spectroscopy, and trap-assisted spectroscopy. The experimental setup of MATS is a unique combination of an electron beam ion trap for charge breeding, ion traps for beam preparation, and a high-precision Penning trap system for mass measurements and decay studies. For the mass measurements, MATS offers both a high accuracy and a high sensitivity. A relative mass uncertainty of 10-9 can be reached by employing highly-charged ions and a non

  17. Bifurcation analysis for ion acoustic waves in a strongly coupled plasma including trapped electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Labany, S. K.; El-Taibany, W. F.; Atteya, A.

    2018-02-01

    The nonlinear ion acoustic wave propagation in a strongly coupled plasma composed of ions and trapped electrons has been investigated. The reductive perturbation method is employed to derive a modified Korteweg-de Vries-Burgers (mKdV-Burgers) equation. To solve this equation in case of dissipative system, the tangent hyperbolic method is used, and a shock wave solution is obtained. Numerical investigations show that, the ion acoustic waves are significantly modified by the effect of polarization force, the trapped electrons and the viscosity coefficients. Applying the bifurcation theory to the dynamical system of the derived mKdV-Burgers equation, the phase portraits of the traveling wave solutions of both of dissipative and non-dissipative systems are analyzed. The present results could be helpful for a better understanding of the waves nonlinear propagation in a strongly coupled plasma, which can be produced by photoionizing laser-cooled and trapped electrons [1], and also in neutron stars or white dwarfs interior.

  18. A new trapped-ion instability with large frequency and radial wavenumber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagger, M.

    1979-01-01

    The need for theoretical previsions concerning anomalous transport in large Tokamaks, as well as the recent results of PLT, ask the question of the process responsible for non-linear saturation of trapped-ion instabilities. This in turn necessitates the knowledge of the linear behaviour of these waves at large frequencies and large radial wavenumbers. We study the linear dispersion relation of these modes, in the radially local approximation, but including a term due to a new physical effect, combining finite banana-width and bounce resonances. Limiting ourselves presently to the first harmonic expansion of the bounce motion of trapped ions, we show that the effect of finite banana-width on the usual trapped-ion mode is complex and quite different from what is generally expected. In addition we show, analytically and numerically, the appearance of a nex branch of this instability. Essentially due to this new effect, it involves large frequencies (ω approximately ωsub(b) and is destabilized by large radial wavelengths (ksub(x) Λ approximately 1, where Λ is the typical banana-width). We discuss the nature of this new mode and its potential relevance of the experiments

  19. Coupled ion temperature gradient and trapped electron mode to electron temperature gradient mode gyrokinetic simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waltz, R. E.; Candy, J.; Fahey, M.

    2007-01-01

    Electron temperature gradient (ETG) transport is conventionally defined as the electron energy transport at high wave number (high-k) where ions are adiabatic and there can be no ion energy or plasma transport. Previous gyrokinetic simulations have assumed adiabatic ions (ETG-ai) and work on the small electron gyroradius scale. However such ETG-ai simulations with trapped electrons often do not have well behaved nonlinear saturation unless fully kinetic ions (ki) and proper ion scale zonal flow modes are included. Electron energy transport is separated into ETG-ki at high-k and ion temperature gradient-trapped electron mode (ITG/TEM) at low-k. Expensive (more computer-intensive), high-resolution, large-ion-scale flux-tube simulations coupling ITG/TEM and ETG-ki turbulence are presented. These require a high effective Reynolds number R≡[k(max)/k(min)] 2 =μ 2 , where μ=[ρ si /ρ si ] is the ratio of ion to electron gyroradii. Compute times scale faster than μ 3 . By comparing the coupled expensive simulations with (1) much cheaper (less compute-intensive), uncoupled, high-resolution, small, flux-tube ETG-ki and with (2) uncoupled low-resolution, large, flux-tube ITG/TEM simulations, and also by artificially turning ''off'' the low-k or high-k drives, it appears that ITG/TEM and ETG-ki transport are not strongly coupled so long as ETG-ki can access some nonadiabatic ion scale zonal flows and both high-k and low-k are linearly unstable. However expensive coupled simulations are required for physically accurate k-spectra of the transport and turbulence. Simulations with μ≥30 appear to represent the physical range μ>40. ETG-ki transport measured in ion gyro-Bohm units is weakly dependent on μ. For the mid-radius core tokamak plasma parameters studied, ETG-ki is about 10% of the electron energy transport, which in turn is about 30% of the total energy transport (with negligible ExB shear). However at large ExB shear sufficient to quench the low-k ITG

  20. Radium diagnosis campaign - 59327

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabillaud Poillion, Florence

    2012-01-01

    In line with the approaches already adopted in France during the 90's on various sites where research and/or radium-extraction activities were mostly conducted in the past, the French public authorities wish from now on to pursue their prevention and site-rehabilitation approach inherited from the French craftsman and medical sectors that used that radioelement. As a matter of fact, radium has been in use in several medical activities, notably in the initial methods of cancer therapy. Similarly, it was also used in some craftsman activities, such as the clock industry, for its radioluminescent properties, the fabrication of lightning conductors or cosmetics until the 60's. Those activities have generated various traces of pollution that have remained today. On the basis of the different inventories of industrial sites where radium may have been held or used, and notably the inventory updated by the French Institute for Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety (Institut de radioprotection et de surete nucleaire - IRSN) in 2007 at the request of the French Nuclear Safety Authority (Autorite de surete nucleaire - ASN), French State services have potentially identified 134 sites that hosted radium-related activities in France. The radiological status of those sites is either unknown or very partially known by State services. Sites include both dwellings or commercial premises and derelict lands. The 'Radium Diagnosis Campaign' (Operation Diagnostic Radium), consists of a radiological survey carried out by the IRSN. In cases where traces of radium are detected, plans call for the implementation of precautionary measures and of a medical follow-up of the relevant populations. Lastly, radium-contaminated sites are rehabilitated by the French National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (Agence nationale pour la gestion des dechets radioactifs - Andra). That voluntary and positive approach on the part of public authorities is fully financed by public funds, and consequently

  1. Immobilization of radium in uranium mine and mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutwick, G.D.; Mosher, J.; Tizzard, R.

    1982-01-01

    Radium has been coprecipitated from solution as the arsenate in which ferric iron, barium, copper and lead are the macro ions. The order of efficiency of the macro ions in removing radium was found to be Ba > Fe > Pb > Cu at a pH of 6. It is expected that at higher pH's i.e., greater than 8, ferric iron will change positions. This change in position will be caused by the formation of ferrate ion hence increasing the solubility of ferric arsenate. The removal of radium from solution by ion exchangers consisting of the arsenates of ferric iron, barium, copper and lead was successful. As the pH is increased from 4 to 10 the efficiency of these exchangers in removing radium increases. The columns removed over 99 percent of the radium at pH's of 5.6 and higher. The order of efficiency of the exchangers in removing radium is not well defined. Thorium has been precipitated as the arsenate over the pH range of 2 to 9.6. This reaction suggests the possibility of using arsenate to remove thorium from uranium mill plant streams and as a reagent to keep thorium in the tailings ponds

  2. On the combination of a low energy hydrogen atom beam with a cold multipole ion trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borodi, Gheorghe

    2008-12-09

    The first part of the activities of this thesis was to develop a sophisticated ion storage apparatus dedicated to study chemical processes with atomic hydrogen. The integration of a differentially pumped radical beam source into an existing temperature variable 22- pole trapping machine has required major modifications. Since astrophysical questions have been in the center of our interest, the introduction first gives a short overview of astrophysics and -chemistry. The basics of ion trapping in temperature variable rf traps is well-documented in the literature; therefore, the description of the basic instrument (Chapter 2) is kept rather short. Much effort has been put into the development of an intense and stable source for hydrogen atoms the kinetic energy of which can be changed. Chapter 3 describes this module in detail with emphasis on the integration of magnetic hexapoles for guiding the atoms and special treatments of the surfaces for reducing H-H recombination. Due to the unique sensitivity of the rf ion trapping technique, this instrument allows one to study a variety of reactions of astrochemical and fundamental interest. The results of this work are summarized in Chapter 4. Reactions of CO{sub 2}{sup +} with hydrogen atoms and molecules have been established as calibration standard for in situ determination of H and H{sub 2} densities over the full temperature range of the apparatus (10 K-300 K). For the first time, reactions of H- and D-atoms with the ionic hydrocarbons CH{sup +}, CH{sub 2}{sup +}, and CH{sub 4}{sup +} have been studied at temperatures of interstellar space. A very interesting, not yet fully understood collision system is the interaction of protonated methane with H. The outlook presents some ideas, how to improve the new instrument and a few reaction systems are mentioned which may be studied next. (orig.)

  3. On the combination of a low energy hydrogen atom beam with a cold multipole ion trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borodi, Gheorghe

    2008-01-01

    The first part of the activities of this thesis was to develop a sophisticated ion storage apparatus dedicated to study chemical processes with atomic hydrogen. The integration of a differentially pumped radical beam source into an existing temperature variable 22- pole trapping machine has required major modifications. Since astrophysical questions have been in the center of our interest, the introduction first gives a short overview of astrophysics and -chemistry. The basics of ion trapping in temperature variable rf traps is well-documented in the literature; therefore, the description of the basic instrument (Chapter 2) is kept rather short. Much effort has been put into the development of an intense and stable source for hydrogen atoms the kinetic energy of which can be changed. Chapter 3 describes this module in detail with emphasis on the integration of magnetic hexapoles for guiding the atoms and special treatments of the surfaces for reducing H-H recombination. Due to the unique sensitivity of the rf ion trapping technique, this instrument allows one to study a variety of reactions of astrochemical and fundamental interest. The results of this work are summarized in Chapter 4. Reactions of CO 2 + with hydrogen atoms and molecules have been established as calibration standard for in situ determination of H and H 2 densities over the full temperature range of the apparatus (10 K-300 K). For the first time, reactions of H- and D-atoms with the ionic hydrocarbons CH + , CH 2 + , and CH 4 + have been studied at temperatures of interstellar space. A very interesting, not yet fully understood collision system is the interaction of protonated methane with H. The outlook presents some ideas, how to improve the new instrument and a few reaction systems are mentioned which may be studied next. (orig.)

  4. Towards a Measurement of the n=2 Lamb Shift in Hydrogen-like Nitrogen Using an Electron Beam Ion Trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosaka, K.; Crosby, D. N.; Gaarde-Widdowson, K.; Smith, C. J.; Silver, J. D. [University of Oxford, Department of Physics (United Kingdom); Myers, E. G. [Florida State University (United States); Kinugawa, T.; Ohtani, S. [University of Electro-Communications, Cold Trapped Ions Project, JST (Japan)

    2003-03-15

    Using a {sup 14}C{sup 16}O{sub 2} laser the 2s{sub 1/2}-2p{sub 3/2} (fine structure - Lamb shift) transition has been induced in {sup 14}N{sup 6+} ions trapped in an electron beam ion trap. Prospects for a measurement of the Lamb shift in hydrogen-like nitrogen are discussed.

  5. Utility of Higher Harmonics in Electrospray Ionization Fourier Transform Electrostatic Linear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziekonski, Eric T; Johnson, Joshua T; McLuckey, Scott A

    2017-04-18

    Mass resolution (M/ΔM fwhm) is observed to linearly increase with harmonic order in a Fourier transform electrostatic linear ion trap (ELIT) mass spectrometer. This behavior was predicted by Grosshans and Marshall for frequency-multiple detection in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer only for situations when the prominent mechanism for signal decay is ion ejection from the trap. As the analyzer pressure in our ELIT chamber is relatively high, such that collisional scattering and collision-induced dissociation are expected to underlie much of the ion loss, we sought to explore the relationship between harmonic order and mass resolution. Mass resolutions of 36 900 (fundamental), 75 850 (2nd harmonic), and 108 200 (3rd harmonic) were obtained for GdO + (avg. m/z 173.919) with a transient length of 300 ms. To demonstrate that the mass resolution was truly increasing with harmonic order, the unresolved isotopes at the fundamental distribution of cytochrome c +8 (m/z ∼ 1549) were nearly baseline, resolved at the third harmonic (mass resolution ≈ 23 000) with a transient length of only 200 ms. This experiment demonstrates that, when the ion density is sufficiently low, ions with frequency differences of less than 4 Hz remain uncoalesced. Higher harmonics can be used to increase the effective mass resolution for a fixed transient length and thereby may enable the resolution of closely spaced masses, determination of a protein ion's charge state, and study of the onset of peak coalescence when the resolution at the fundamental frequency is insufficient.

  6. Control of the conformations of ion Coulomb crystals in a Penning trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, R. C.; Mavadia, S.; Goodwin, J. F.; Stutter, G.; Bharadia, S.; Crick, D. R.; Segal, D. M.

    2015-01-01

    Ion Coulomb crystals containing small numbers of ions have been created and manipulated in a wide range of configurations in a Penning trap, from a linear string, through various three-dimensional conformations, to a planar crystal. We show that the dynamics of the system simplifies enormously in a frame which rotates at half the cyclotron frequency and we discuss the effect of the radial cooling laser beam in this frame. Simulations show that the crystal conformations can be reproduced by finding the minimum energy configuration in a frame whose radial potential is modified by the rotation of the ion crystal. The rotation frequency of the crystal deduced from the simulations is consistent with the known laser parameters. We also show that even though the number of ions in our system is small (typically less than 20), the system still behaves like a plasma and its static properties can be calculated using the standard model for a single-component plasma in a trap

  7. Quantum Simulation of a Lattice Schwinger Model in a Chain of Trapped Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Hauke

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We discuss how a lattice Schwinger model can be realized in a linear ion trap, allowing a detailed study of the physics of Abelian lattice gauge theories related to one-dimensional quantum electrodynamics. Relying on the rich quantum-simulation toolbox available in state-of-the-art trapped-ion experiments, we show how one can engineer an effectively gauge-invariant dynamics by imposing energetic constraints, provided by strong Ising-like interactions. Applying exact diagonalization to ground-state and time-dependent properties, we study the underlying microscopic model and discuss undesired interaction terms and other imperfections. As our analysis shows, the proposed scheme allows for the observation in realistic setups of spontaneous parity- and charge-symmetry breaking, as well as false-vacuum decay. Besides an implementation aimed at larger ion chains, we also discuss a minimal setting, consisting of only four ions in a simpler experimental setup, which enables us to probe basic physical phenomena related to the full many-body problem. The proposal opens a new route for analog quantum simulation of high-energy and condensed-matter models where gauge symmetries play a prominent role.

  8. A comb-sampling method for enhanced mass analysis in linear electrostatic ion traps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenwood, J. B.; Kelly, O.; Calvert, C. R.; Duffy, M. J.; King, R. B.; Belshaw, L.; Graham, L.; Alexander, J. D.; Williams, I. D. [Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Bryan, W. A. [Department of Physics, Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Turcu, I. C. E.; Cacho, C. M.; Springate, E. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-15

    In this paper an algorithm for extracting spectral information from signals containing a series of narrow periodic impulses is presented. Such signals can typically be acquired by pickup detectors from the image-charge of ion bunches oscillating in a linear electrostatic ion trap, where frequency analysis provides a scheme for high-resolution mass spectrometry. To provide an improved technique for such frequency analysis, we introduce the CHIMERA algorithm (Comb-sampling for High-resolution IMpulse-train frequency ExtRAaction). This algorithm utilizes a comb function to generate frequency coefficients, rather than using sinusoids via a Fourier transform, since the comb provides a superior match to the data. This new technique is developed theoretically, applied to synthetic data, and then used to perform high resolution mass spectrometry on real data from an ion trap. If the ions are generated at a localized point in time and space, and the data is simultaneously acquired with multiple pickup rings, the method is shown to be a significant improvement on Fourier analysis. The mass spectra generated typically have an order of magnitude higher resolution compared with that obtained from fundamental Fourier frequencies, and are absent of large contributions from harmonic frequency components.

  9. Trapped-ion anomalous diffusion coefficient on the basis of single mode saturation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshi, Yuji; Hatayama, Akiyoshi; Ogasawara, Masatada.

    1982-03-01

    Expressions of the anomalous diffusion coefficient due to the dissipative trapped ion instability (DTII) are derived for the case with and without the effect of magnetic shear. Derivation is made by taking into account of the single mode saturation of the DTII previously obtained numerically. In the absence of the shear effect, the diffusion coefficient is proportional to #betta#sub(i)a 2 (#betta#sub(i) is the effective collision frequency of the trapped ions and a is the minor radius of a torus) and is much larger than the neoclassical ion heat conductivity. In the presence of the shear effect, the diffusion coefficient is much smaller than the Kadomtsev and Pogutse's value and is the same order of magnitude as the neoclassical ion heat conductivity. Dependences of the diffusion coefficient on the temperature and on the total particle number density are rather complicated due to the additional spectral cut-off, which is introduced to regularize the short wavelength modes in the numerical analysis. (author)

  10. Control of the conformations of ion Coulomb crystals in a Penning trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, R. C.; Mavadia, S.; Goodwin, J. F.; Stutter, G.; Bharadia, S.; Crick, D. R.; Segal, D. M. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-29

    Ion Coulomb crystals containing small numbers of ions have been created and manipulated in a wide range of configurations in a Penning trap, from a linear string, through various three-dimensional conformations, to a planar crystal. We show that the dynamics of the system simplifies enormously in a frame which rotates at half the cyclotron frequency and we discuss the effect of the radial cooling laser beam in this frame. Simulations show that the crystal conformations can be reproduced by finding the minimum energy configuration in a frame whose radial potential is modified by the rotation of the ion crystal. The rotation frequency of the crystal deduced from the simulations is consistent with the known laser parameters. We also show that even though the number of ions in our system is small (typically less than 20), the system still behaves like a plasma and its static properties can be calculated using the standard model for a single-component plasma in a trap.

  11. Nonlinear saturation of the trapped-ion mode by mode coupling in two dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, B.I.; Tang, W.M.

    1977-01-01

    A study of the nonlinear saturation by mode coupling of the dissipative trapped-ion mode is presented in which both radial and poloidal variations are considered. The saturation mechanism consists of the nonlinear coupling via E x B convection of energy from linearly unstable modes to stable modes. Stabilization is provided at short poloidal wavelengths by Landau damping from trapped and circulating ions, at short radial wavelengths by effects associated with the finite ion banana excursions and at long wavelengths by ion collisions. A one-dimensional, nonlinear partial differential equation for the electrostatic potential derived in earlier work is extended to two dimensions and to third order in amplitude. Included systematically are kinetic effects, e.g., Landau damping and its spatial dependence due to magnetic shear. The stability and accessibility of equilibria are considered in detail for cases far from as well as close to marginal stability. In the first case three-wave interactions are found to be important when the spectrum of unstable modes is sufficiently narrow. In the latter case, it is found that for a single unstable mode, a four-wave interaction can provide the dominant saturation mechanism. Cross-field transport is calculated, and the scaling of results is considered for tokamak parameters

  12. Gas Chromatographic-Ion Trap Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Volatile Organic Compounds by Ion-Molecule Reactions Using the Electron-Deficient Reagent Ion CCl{3/+}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng-Zhong; Su, Yue; Wang, Hao-Yang; Guo, Yin-Long

    2011-10-01

    When using tetrachloromethane as the reagent gas in gas chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry equipped with hybrid ionization source, the cation CCl{3/+} was generated in high abundance and further gas-phase experiments showed that such an electron-deficient reagent ion CCl{3/+} could undergo interesting ion-molecule reactions with various volatile organic compounds, which not only present some informative gas-phase reactions, but also facilitate qualitative analysis of diverse volatile compounds by providing unique mass spectral data that are characteristic of particular chemical structures. The ion-molecule reactions of the reagent ion CCl{3/+} with different types of compounds were studied, and results showed that such reactions could give rise to structurally diagnostic ions, such as [M + CCl3 - HCl]+ for aromatic hydrocarbons, [M - OH]+ for saturated cyclic ether, ketone, and alcoholic compounds, [M - H]+ ion for monoterpenes, M·+ for sesquiterpenes, [M - CH3CO]+ for esters, as well as the further fragment ions. The mechanisms of ion-molecule reactions of aromatic hydrocarbons, aliphatic ketones and alcoholic compounds with the reagent ion CCl{3/+} were investigated and proposed according to the information provided by MS/MS experiments and theoretical calculations. Then, this method was applied to study volatile organic compounds in Dendranthema indicum var. aromaticum and 20 compounds, including monoterpenes and their oxygen-containing derivatives, aromatic hydrocarbon and sesquiterpenes were identified using such ion-molecule reactions. This study offers a perspective and an alternative tool for the analysis and identification of various volatile compounds.

  13. Simulating the performance of a distance-3 surface code in a linear ion trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trout, Colin J.; Li, Muyuan; Gutiérrez, Mauricio; Wu, Yukai; Wang, Sheng-Tao; Duan, Luming; Brown, Kenneth R.

    2018-04-01

    We explore the feasibility of implementing a small surface code with 9 data qubits and 8 ancilla qubits, commonly referred to as surface-17, using a linear chain of 171Yb+ ions. Two-qubit gates can be performed between any two ions in the chain with gate time increasing linearly with ion distance. Measurement of the ion state by fluorescence requires that the ancilla qubits be physically separated from the data qubits to avoid errors on the data due to scattered photons. We minimize the time required to measure one round of stabilizers by optimizing the mapping of the two-dimensional surface code to the linear chain of ions. We develop a physically motivated Pauli error model that allows for fast simulation and captures the key sources of noise in an ion trap quantum computer including gate imperfections and ion heating. Our simulations showed a consistent requirement of a two-qubit gate fidelity of ≥99.9% for the logical memory to have a better fidelity than physical two-qubit operations. Finally, we perform an analysis of the error subsets from the importance sampling method used to bound the logical error rates to gain insight into which error sources are particularly detrimental to error correction.

  14. Behavior of many ions in a Penning trap and results of the WITCH experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Porobic, Tomica

    Precision measurements of the beta−neutrino angular correlation in nuclear beta-decay provide a unique window into the physics beyond the Standard model. The WITCH (Weak Interaction Trap for CHarged particles) experiment aims to measure this correlation, a(beta-nu), in order to impose a more stringent constraint on the exotic scalar current admixture in the beta-decay Hamiltonian. The apparatus is situated at CERN/ISOLDE laboratory and consists of a unique combination of a retardation spectrometer and two Penning traps, with one of them serving as a scattering-free source. This configuration is suited for a precise measurement of the energy spectrum of 35Ar recoiled daughter ions. The shape of the spectrum then allows a determination of a(beta-nu) and consequently of the presence or absence of a scalar current. Radioactive 35Ar ions are created at ISOLDE by impinging 1.2 GeV protons on the target material. After being separated by a magnetic separator and bunched by REXTRAP, a high-capacity Penning trap, th...

  15. Ultrafast state detection and 2D ion crystals in a Paul trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Michael; Ransford, Anthony; Campbell, Wesley

    2016-05-01

    Projective readout of quantum information stored in atomic qubits typically uses state-dependent CW laser-induced fluorescence. This method requires an often sophisticated imaging system to spatially filter out the background CW laser light. We present an alternative approach that instead uses simple pulse sequences from a mode-locked laser to affect the same state-dependent excitations in less than 1 ns. The resulting atomic fluorescence occurs in the dark, allowing the placement of non-imaging detectors right next to the atom to improve the qubit state detection efficiency and speed. We also study 2D Coulomb crystals of atomic ions in an oblate Paul trap. We find that crystals with hundreds of ions can be held in the trap, potentially offering an alternative to the use of Penning traps for the quantum simulation of 2D lattice spin models. We discuss the classical physics of these crystals and the metastable states that are supported in 2D. This work is supported by the US Army Research Office.

  16. Transport through dissipative trapped electron mode and toroidal ion temperature gradient mode in TEXTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogister, A.; Hasselberg, G.; Waelbroeck, F.; Weiland, J.

    1987-12-01

    A self-consistent transport code is used to evaluate how plasma confinement in tokamaks is influenced by the microturbulent fields which are excited by the dissipative trapped electron (DTE) instability. As shown previously, the saturation theory on which the code is based has been developed from first principles. The toroidal coupling resulting from the ion magnetic drifts is neglected; arguments are presented to justify this approximation. The numerical results reproduce well the neo-Alcator scaling law observed experimentally - e.g. in TEXTOR - in non detached ohmic discharges, the confinement degradation which results when auxiliary heating is applied, as well as a large number of other experimental observations. We also assess the possible impact of the toroidal ion temperature gradient mode on energy confinement by estimating the ion thermal flux with the help of the mixing length approximation. (orig./GG)

  17. Engineering Vibrationally Assisted Energy Transfer in a Trapped-Ion Quantum Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Dylan J.; Hemmerling, Boerge; Megidish, Eli; Moeller, Soenke A.; Schindler, Philipp; Sarovar, Mohan; Haeffner, Hartmut

    2018-01-01

    Many important chemical and biochemical processes in the condensed phase are notoriously difficult to simulate numerically. Often, this difficulty arises from the complexity of simulating dynamics resulting from coupling to structured, mesoscopic baths, for which no separation of time scales exists and statistical treatments fail. A prime example of such a process is vibrationally assisted charge or energy transfer. A quantum simulator, capable of implementing a realistic model of the system of interest, could provide insight into these processes in regimes where numerical treatments fail. We take a first step towards modeling such transfer processes using an ion-trap quantum simulator. By implementing a minimal model, we observe vibrationally assisted energy transport between the electronic states of a donor and an acceptor ion augmented by coupling the donor ion to its vibration. We tune our simulator into several parameter regimes and, in particular, investigate the transfer dynamics in the nonperturbative regime often found in biochemical situations.

  18. First experiments with the 200 keV electron beam ion trap at LLNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marrs, R.E.; Knapp, D.A.; Elliott, S.

    1993-01-01

    A high-energy electron beam ion trap (Super EBIT) is operating at electron energies up to 200 keV and currents up to 200 mA. Highly charged ions up to Li-like U 89+ and H-like Pb 81+ have been produced and studied. Ionization cross sections for H-like Dy 66+ at E e = 170 keV have been measured with respect to radiative recombination from the observed Dy 66+ /Dy 67+ equilibrium ionization balance. A Bragg crystal spectrometer has been used to measure 2s 1/2 -2p 3/2 transition energies in Li-like U 82+ with respect to the Lymann-series transitions in lower-Z hydrogenic ions

  19. Control of entanglement following the photoionization of trapped, hydrogen-like ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radtke, Thomas; Fritzsche, Stephan; Surzhykov, Andrey

    2005-01-01

    Density matrix theory is applied to re-investigate the entanglement in the spin state of pairs of electrons following the photoionization of trapped, hydrogen-like ions. For the ionization of one out of two non-interacting atoms, in particular, we analyzed how the entanglement between the electrons is changed owing to their interaction with the radiation field. Detailed calculations on the concurrence of the final spin-state of the electrons have been performed for the photoionization of hydrogen as well as for hydrogen-like Xe 53+ and U 91+ ions. From these computations it is shown that the degree of entanglement, which is quite well preserved for neutral hydrogen, will be strongly affected by relativistic and non-dipole effects of the radiation field as the nuclear charge of the ions is increased

  20. Universal gate-set for trapped-ion qubits using a narrow linewidth diode laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akerman, Nitzan; Navon, Nir; Kotler, Shlomi; Glickman, Yinnon; Ozeri, Roee

    2015-01-01

    We report on the implementation of a high fidelity universal gate-set on optical qubits based on trapped 88 Sr + ions for the purpose of quantum information processing. All coherent operations were performed using a narrow linewidth diode laser. We employed a master-slave configuration for the laser, where an ultra low expansion glass Fabry–Perot cavity is used as a stable reference as well as a spectral filter. We characterized the laser spectrum using the ions with a modified Ramsey sequence which eliminated the affect of the magnetic field noise. We demonstrated high fidelity single qubit gates with individual addressing, based on inhomogeneous micromotion, on a two-ion chain as well as the Mølmer–Sørensen two-qubit entangling gate. (paper)

  1. Observation of enhanced radial transport of energetic ion due to energetic particle mode destabilized by helically-trapped energetic ion in the Large Helical Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, K.; Isobe, M.; Kawase, H.; Nishitani, T.; Seki, R.; Osakabe, M.; LHD Experiment Group

    2018-04-01

    A deuterium experiment was initiated to achieve higher-temperature and higher-density plasmas in March 2017 in the Large Helical Device (LHD). The central ion temperature notably increases compared with that in hydrogen experiments. However, an energetic particle mode called the helically-trapped energetic-ion-driven resistive interchange (EIC) mode is often excited by intensive perpendicular neutral beam injections on high ion-temperature discharges. The mode leads to significant decrease of the ion temperature or to limiting the sustainment of the high ion-temperature state. To understand the effect of EIC on the energetic ion confinement, the radial transport of energetic ions is studied by means of the neutron flux monitor and vertical neutron camera newly installed on the LHD. Decreases of the line-integrated neutron profile in core channels show that helically-trapped energetic ions are lost from the plasma.

  2. Highly charged ions trapping for lifetime measurements; Piegeage d'ions tres charges pour la mesure de duree de vie d'etats metastables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attia, D

    2007-10-15

    A new experimental setup dedicated to highly charged ion trapping is presented in this work. The final goal is to perform lifetime measurement of metastable states produced by our ECR (Electron Cyclotron Resonance) ion source. Lifetimes to be measured are in the range of a few ms and more. We have measured the lifetimes of the M1 transitions of the metastable states of Ar{sup 9+}, Ar{sup 13+} and Ar{sup 14+}. These measurements are useful to test the N-body problem in the relativistic range. The trap we have built, was designed a few years ago at the Weizman Institute in Israel, it allows ions with an energy of several keV to be trapped for lifetimes of about 1 second. This trap was originally designed to study the dynamics of excited molecules. We have shown for the first time how the trap operates and that it can operate with highly charged ions. We have studied the beam dynamics of highly charged ions and the trap has been tested with various species of ions and different charge states: from O{sup +} to O{sup 6+}, from Ar{sup 8+} to Ar{sup 13+}, and from Kr{sup 13+} to Kr{sup 20+}.

  3. Motional frequency shifts of trapped ions in the Lamb-Dicke regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lizuain, I.; Muga, J. G.; Eschner, J.

    2007-01-01

    First order Doppler effects are usually ignored in laser driven trapped ions when the recoil frequency is much smaller than the trapping frequency (Lamb-Dicke regime). This means that the central, carrier excitation band is supposed to be unaffected by vibronic transitions in which the vibrational number changes. While this is strictly true in the Lamb-Dicke limit (infinitely tight confinement), the vibronic transitions do play a role in the Lamb-Dicke regime. In this paper we quantify the asymptotic behavior of their effect with respect to the Lamb-Dicke parameter. In particular, we give analytical expressions for the frequency shift, 'pulling' or 'pushing', produced in the carrier absorption band by the vibronic transitions both for Rabi and Ramsey schemes. This shift is shown to be independent of the initial vibrational state

  4. Estimation of tritium trapped in the used ion exchange column resins using water as scavenger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumaravel, S.; Ramakrishna, V.; Nair, B.S.K.; Ganesh, G.; Tripathi, R.M.

    2018-01-01

    Estimation of Tritium trapped in the used resins of Ion exchange (IX) columns apart from the gross beta activity in heavy water systems of Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (PHWR) is mandatory before their disposal as radioactive waste. The gross beta activity is estimated by Gieger- Muller (GM) counter and by using gamma spectrometer. Accurate estimation of tritium activity of the resin without compromising the counting efficiency is a challenging task because, if a fixed quantity of the resin is directly added to the scintillation solution and counted on a liquid scintillation analyser (LSA), it is prone to interfere with counting efficiency drastically and results in unquantifiable errors and other practical difficulties. In this study a standard technique using light water as scavenger medium to precisely quantify the total activity of tritium trapped in the resin by a systematic approach was carried out

  5. Optical and magnetic measurements of gyroscopically stabilized graphene nanoplatelets levitated in an ion trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagornykh, Pavel; Coppock, Joyce E.; Murphy, Jacob P. J.; Kane, B. E.

    2017-07-01

    Using optical measurements, we demonstrate that the rotation of micron-scale graphene nanoplatelets levitated in a quadrupole ion trap in high vacuum can be frequency-locked to an applied radiofrequency electric field Erf. Over time, frequency-locking stabilizes the nanoplatelet so that its axis of rotation is normal to the nanoplatelet and perpendicular to Erf. We observe that residual slow dynamics of the direction of the axis of rotation in the plane normal to Erf is determined by an applied magnetic field. We present a simple model that accurately describes our observations. From our data and model, we can infer both a diamagnetic polarizability and a magnetic moment proportional to the frequency of rotation, which we compare to theoretical values. Our results establish that trapping technologies have applications for materials measurements at the nanoscale.

  6. Trapping of hydrogen isotopes in radiation defects formed in tungsten by neutron and ion irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatano, Y., E-mail: hatano@ctg.u-toyama.ac.jp [Hydrogen Isotope Research Center, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Shimada, M. [Fusion Safety Program, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Alimov, V.Kh.; Shi, J.; Hara, M.; Nozaki, T. [Hydrogen Isotope Research Center, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Oya, Y.; Kobayashi, M.; Okuno, K. [Faculty of Science, Shizuoka University, Shizuoka 422-8529 (Japan); Oda, T. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Cao, G. [Department of Engineering Physics, The University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Yoshida, N.; Futagami, N. [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan); Sugiyama, K.; Roth, J.; Tyburska-Püschel, B.; Dorner, J. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Takagi, I. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Hatakeyama, M.; Kurishita, H. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai 311-1313 (Japan); and others

    2013-07-15

    Retention of D in neutron-irradiated W and desorption were examined after plasma exposure at 773 K. Deuterium was accumulated at a relatively high concentration up to a large depth of 50–100 μm due to the trapping effects of defects uniformly induced in the bulk. A significant D release in a vacuum continued to temperatures ⩾1173 K because of the small effective diffusion coefficient and the long diffusion distance. Exposure of ion-irradiated W to D{sub 2} gas showed a clear correlation between concentrations of trapped and solute D as determined by the trapping–detrapping equilibrium. These observations indicated that the accumulation of tritium in high concentrations is possible even at high temperatures if the concentration of solute tritium is high, and baking at moderate temperatures is ineffective for removal of tritium deeply penetrating into the bulk. Nevertheless, clear enhancement of D release was observed under the presence of solute H.

  7. Simulation of ion behavior in an open three-dimensional Paul trap using a power series method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbane, Mustapha Said, E-mail: mherbane@hotmail.com [King Khalid University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 9004, Abha (Saudi Arabia); Berriche, Hamid [King Khalid University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 9004, Abha (Saudi Arabia); Laboratoire des Interfaces et Matériaux Avancés, Physics Department, College of Science, University of Monastir, 5019 Monastir (Tunisia); Abd El-hady, Alaa [King Khalid University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 9004, Abha (Saudi Arabia); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Zagazig University, Zagazig 44519 (Egypt); Al Shahrani, Ghadah [King Khalid University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 9004, Abha (Saudi Arabia); Ban, Gilles; Fléchard, Xavier; Liénard, Etienne [LPC CAEN-ENSICAEN, 6 Boulevard du Marechal Juin, 14050 Caen Cedex (France)

    2014-07-01

    Simulations of the dynamics of ions trapped in a Paul trap with terms in the potential up to the order 10 have been carried out. The power series method is used to solve numerically the equations of motion of the ions. The stability diagram has been studied and the buffer gas cooling has been implemented by a Monte Carlo method. The dipole excitation was also included. The method has been applied to an existing trap and it has shown good agreement with the experimental results and previous simulations using other methods. - Highlights: • Paul trap with potentials up to the order 10. • Series solution of the ions equations of motion. • Hard sphere model for the simulation of the buffer gas cooling and simulation of the dipolar excitation.

  8. Purification of mine water of radium - The implementation of the technology in a coal mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalupnik, S.

    2002-01-01

    In underground coal mines in the Upper Silesian Coal Basin there are inflows of highly mineralised waters containing radium isotopes. These waters cause radioactive pollution of the natural environment in mining areas. Therefore cleaning of saline waters of radium is very important. Two types of radium-bearing waters were distinguished - one type containing radium and barium ions, but no sulphates (type A) and another one in which radium and sulphate ions are present but no barium (type B). A very efficient and inexpensive method of purification of saline waters, of Ba 2+ and Ra 2+ ions was developed and implemented in two coal mines. As the result of used technology, based on application of phosphogypsum as the cleaning agent, a significant decrease of radium discharge was achieved - daily of about 120 MBq of 226 Ra and 80 MBq of 228 Ra. Another type of radium waters does not contain barium ions, but contains sulphate ions SO 4 2- . There is no carrier for co-precipitation of radium so radium is transported with discharged waters to main rivers. Different method of purification from radium must be applied for such waters. Laboratory and field experiments were performed, and a cleaning method was chosen. For purification of saline waters - waste products from other industrial processes are applied. The method of purification have been applied in full technical scale in coal mine with very good results - of about 6 m 3 /min of radium-bearing waters is cleaned. Whole this process takes place in underground old workings without any contact of mining crew with radioactive deposits, which are produced during the process. As a result radium amount released to the natural environment was significantly diminished - approximately of about 90 MBq of 226 Ra per day and 150 MBq of 228 Ra. (author)

  9. Theoretical study of the mode of the mass-selective nonstable axial output ions from the nonlinear trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudakov, M.Yu.

    2000-01-01

    One studied theoretically the mode of mass-selective unstable output of ions from three-dimensional quadrupole ion trap. One developed a method represent coordinates of ions per one period of supplying HF voltage with regard to nonlinear distortions of quadrupole potential. One derived equation for an envelope of ion oscillations in the form of motion equation of mass point in the efficient force field. One explained the effect of output delay of ions at presence of the field negative even harmonics. One proved that the positive even distortions of quadrupole potential favored realization of that mode and studied the dynamics of ions in the course of output [ru

  10. Foetal Fentanyl Exposure and Ion Trapping after Intravenous and Transdermal Administration to the Ewe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkinen, Emma M; Kokki, Hannu; Heikkinen, Aki; Ranta, Veli-Pekka; Räsänen, Juha; Voipio, Hanna-Marja; Kokki, Merja

    2017-02-01

    Opioids given to pregnant and parturient women are relatively freely transferred across the placenta. Spinal, epidural and intravenous fentanyl has been studied in pregnant women and neonates, but foetal safety of fentanyl dosing with transdermal patch during pregnancy and labour is not sufficiently studied. Foetal pH is physiologically lower than maternal pH, and thus, opioids, which are weak bases, are ionized and may cumulate to foetus. Foetal asphyxia may further worsen acidosis, and ion trapping induced by low pH is assumed to increase the foetal exposure to opioids. Here, we show that no correlation between foetal acidosis and ion trapping of fentanyl could be found. In three experiments, 29 pregnant sheep were administered fentanyl with 2 μg/kg/h patch supplemented with IV boluses/infusion. Foetal exposure to fentanyl was extensive, median 0.34 ng/ml (quartiles 0.21, 0.42), yet drug accumulation to foetus was not observed, and median of foetal/maternal concentration (F/M) ratio was 0.63 (0.43, 0.75) during the first hours after the fentanyl administration. Low foetal pH and pH difference between ewe and the foetus did not correlate with fentanyl concentration in the foetus or F/M ratio. At steady-state during the second patch worn, foetal plasma fentanyl was low, 0.13 ng/ml, and the median of F/M ratio was 0.69. Our results demonstrate that drug accumulation to foetus caused by ion trapping seen with some weak base opioids may not be that significant with fentanyl. These results have a clinical relevance when fentanyl is dosed to pregnant woman and the foetus is acidemic. © 2016 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  11. Novel control modes to improve the performance of rectilinear ion trap mass spectrometer with dual pressure chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Xinming; Tang, Fei; Zhang, Xiaohua; Chen, Jin; Zhang, Yan; Guo, Cheng'an; Wang, Xiaohao

    2016-10-01

    The rectilinear ion trap (RIT) has gradually become one of the preferred mass analyzers for portable mass spectrometers because of its simple configuration. In order to enhance the performance, including sensitivity, quantitation capability, throughput, and resolution, a novel RIT mass spectrometer with dual pressure chambers was designed and characterized. The studied system constituted a quadrupole linear ion trap (QLIT) in the first chamber and a RIT in the second chamber. Two control modes are hereby proposed: Storage Quadrupole Linear Ion Trap-Rectilinear Ion Trap (SQLIT-RIT) mode, in which the QLIT was used at high pressure for ion storage and isolation, and the RIT was used for analysis; and Analysis Quadrupole Linear Ion Trap-Rectilinear Ion Trap (AQLIT-RIT) mode, in which the QLIT was used for ion storage and cooling. Subsequently, synchronous scanning and analysis were carried out by QLIT and RIT. In SQLIT-RIT mode, signal intensity was improved by a factor of 30; the limit of quantitation was reduced more than tenfold to 50 ng mL-1, and an optimal duty cycle of 96.4% was achieved. In AQLIT-RIT mode, the number of ions coexisting in the RIT was reduced, which weakened the space-charge effect and reduced the mass shift. Furthermore, the mass resolution was enhanced by a factor of 3. The results indicate that the novel control modes achieve satisfactory performance without adding any system complexity, which provides a viable pathway to guarantee good analytical performance in miniaturization of the mass spectrometer.

  12. An efficient single-step scheme for manipulating quantum information of two trapped ions beyond the Lamb-Dicke limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, L.F.; Nori, Franco

    2003-01-01

    Based on the exact conditional quantum dynamics for a two-ion system, we propose an efficient single-step scheme for coherently manipulating quantum information of two trapped cold ions by using a pair of synchronous laser pulses. Neither the auxiliary atomic level nor the Lamb-Dicke approximation are needed

  13. High-Fidelity Trapped-Ion Quantum Logic Using Near-Field Microwaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harty, T P; Sepiol, M A; Allcock, D T C; Ballance, C J; Tarlton, J E; Lucas, D M

    2016-09-30

    We demonstrate a two-qubit logic gate driven by near-field microwaves in a room-temperature microfabricated surface ion trap. We introduce a dynamically decoupled gate method, which stabilizes the qubits against fluctuating energy shifts and avoids the need to null the microwave field. We use the gate to produce a Bell state with fidelity 99.7(1)%, after accounting for state preparation and measurement errors. The gate is applied directly to ^{43}Ca^{+} hyperfine "atomic clock" qubits (coherence time T_{2}^{*}≈50  s) using the oscillating magnetic field gradient produced by an integrated microwave electrode.

  14. Quantum synchronization of quantum van der Pol oscillators with trapped ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tony E; Sadeghpour, H R

    2013-12-06

    The van der Pol oscillator is the prototypical self-sustained oscillator and has been used to model nonlinear behavior in biological and other classical processes. We investigate how quantum fluctuations affect phase locking of one or many van der Pol oscillators. We find that phase locking is much more robust in the quantum model than in the equivalent classical model. Trapped-ion experiments are ideally suited to simulate van der Pol oscillators in the quantum regime via sideband heating and cooling of motional modes. We provide realistic experimental parameters for 171Yb+ achievable with current technology.

  15. Precursor and Neutral Loss Scans in an RF Scanning Linear Quadrupole Ion Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Dalton T.; Szalwinski, Lucas J.; Schrader, Robert L.; Pirro, Valentina; Hilger, Ryan; Cooks, R. Graham

    2018-03-01

    Methodology for performing precursor and neutral loss scans in an RF scanning linear quadrupole ion trap is described and compared to the unconventional ac frequency scan technique. In the RF scanning variant, precursor ions are mass selectively excited by a fixed frequency resonance excitation signal at low Mathieu q while the RF amplitude is ramped linearly to pass ions through the point of excitation such that the excited ion's m/z varies linearly with time. Ironically, a nonlinear ac frequency scan is still required for ejection of the product ions since their frequencies vary nonlinearly with the linearly varying RF amplitude. In the case of the precursor scan, the ejection frequency must be scanned so that it is fixed on a product ion m/z throughout the RF scan, whereas in the neutral loss scan, it must be scanned to maintain a constant mass offset from the excited precursor ions. Both simultaneous and sequential permutation scans are possible; only the former are demonstrated here. The scans described are performed on a variety of samples using different ionization sources: protonated amphetamine ions generated by nanoelectrospray ionization (nESI), explosives ionized by low-temperature plasma (LTP), and chemical warfare agent simulants sampled from a surface and analyzed with swab touch spray (TS). We lastly conclude that the ac frequency scan variant of these MS/MS scans is preferred due to electronic simplicity. In an accompanying manuscript, we thus describe the implementation of orthogonal double resonance precursor and neutral loss scans on the Mini 12 using constant RF voltage. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  16. Overview of the current spectroscopy effort on the Livermore electron beam ion traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Lopez-Urrutia, J.C.; Brown, G.

    1995-01-01

    An overview is given of the current spectroscopic effort on the Livermore electron beam ion trap facilities. The effort focuses on four aspects: spectral line position, line intensity, temporal evolution, and line shape. Examples of line position measurements include studies of the K-shell transitions in heliumlike Kr 34+ and the 2s-2p intrashell transitions in lithiumlike Th 87+ and U 89+ , which provide benchmark values for testing the theory of relativistic and quantum electrodynamical contributions in high-Z ions. Examples of line intensity measurements are provided by measurements of the electron-impact excitation and dielectronic recombination cross sections of heliumlike transition-metal ions Ti 20+ through CO 25+ . A discussion of radiative lifetime measurements of metastable levels in heliumlike ions is given to illustrate the time-resolved spectroscopy techniques in the microsecond range. The authors also present a measurement of the spectral lineshape that illustrates the very low ion temperatures that can be achieved in an EBIT

  17. A dual cryogenic ion trap spectrometer for the formation and characterization of solvated ionic clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, Brett M.; Voss, Jonathan M.; Garand, Etienne, E-mail: egarand@chem.wisc.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1101 University Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2015-11-28

    A new experimental approach is presented in which two separate cryogenic ion traps are used to reproducibly form weakly bound solvent clusters around electrosprayed ions and messenger-tag them for single-photon infrared photodissociation spectroscopy. This approach thus enables the vibrational characterization of ionic clusters comprised of a solvent network around large and non-volatile ions. We demonstrate the capabilities of the instrument by clustering water, methanol, and acetone around a protonated glycylglycine peptide. For water, cluster sizes with greater than twenty solvent molecules around a single ion are readily formed. We further demonstrate that similar water clusters can be formed around ions having a shielded charge center or those that do not readily form hydrogen bonds. Finally, infrared photodissociation spectra of D{sub 2}-tagged GlyGlyH{sup +} ⋅ (H{sub 2}O){sub 1−4} are presented. They display well-resolved spectral features and comparisons with calculations reveal detailed information on the solvation structures of this prototypical peptide.

  18. Polarisation-preserving photon frequency conversion from a trapped-ion-compatible wavelength to the telecom C-band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krutyanskiy, V.; Meraner, M.; Schupp, J.; Lanyon, B. P.

    2017-09-01

    We demonstrate polarisation-preserving frequency conversion of single-photon-level light at 854 nm, resonant with a trapped-ion transition and qubit, to the 1550-nm telecom C band. A total photon in / fiber-coupled photon out efficiency of ˜30% is achieved, for a free-running photon noise rate of ˜60 Hz. This performance would enable telecom conversion of 854 nm polarisation qubits, produced in existing trapped-ion systems, with a signal-to-noise ratio greater than 1. In combination with near-future trapped-ion systems, our converter would enable the observation of entanglement between an ion and a photon that has travelled more than 100 km in optical fiber: three orders of magnitude further than the state-of-the-art.

  19. Radium bearing waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tope, W.G.; Nixon, D.A.; Smith, M.L.; Stone, T.J.; Vogel, R.A.; Schofield, W.D.

    1995-01-01

    Fernald radium bearing ore residue waste, stored within Silos 1 and 2 (K-65) and Silo 3, will be vitrified for disposal at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). A comprehensive, parametric evaluation of waste form, packaging, and transportation alternatives was completed to identify the most cost-effective approach. The impacts of waste loading, waste form, regulatory requirements, NTS waste acceptance criteria, as-low-as-reasonably-achievable principles, and material handling costs were factored into the recommended approach

  20. The non-linear ion trap. Part 5. Nature of non-linear resonances and resonant ion ejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzen, J.

    1994-01-01

    The superposition of higher order multipole fields on the basic quadrupole field in ion traps generates a non-harmonic oscillator system for the ions. Fourier analyses of simulated secular oscillations in non-linear ion traps, therefore, not only reveal the sideband frequencies, well-known from the Mathieu theory, but additionally a commonwealth of multipole-specific overtones (or higher harmonics), and corresponding sidebands of overtones. Non-linear resonances occur when the overtone frequencies match sideband frequencies. It can be shown that in each of the resonance conditions, not just one overtone matches one sideband, instead, groups of overtones match groups of sidebands. The generation of overtones is studied by Fourier analysis of computed ion oscillations in the direction of thez axis. Even multipoles (octopole, dodecapole, etc.) generate only odd orders of higher harmonics (3, 5, etc.) of the secular frequency, explainable by the symmetry with regard to the planez = 0. In contrast, odd multipoles (hexapole, decapole, etc.) generate all orders of higher harmonics. For all multipoles, the lowest higher harmonics are found to be strongest. With multipoles of higher orders, the strength of the overtones decreases weaker with the order of the harmonics. Forz direction resonances in stationary trapping fields, the function governing the amplitude growth is investigated by computer simulations. The ejection in thez direction, as a function of timet, follows, at least in good approximation, the equation wheren is the order of multipole, andC is a constant. This equation is strictly valid for the electrically applied dipole field (n = 1), matching the secular frequency or one of its sidebands, resulting in a linear increase of the amplitude. It is valid also for the basic quadrupole field (n = 2) outside the stability area, giving an exponential increase. It is at least approximately valid for the non-linear resonances by weak superpositions of all higher odd

  1. A linear radiofrequency quadrupole ion trap for the cooling and bunching of radioactive ion beams

    CERN Document Server

    Kellerbauer, A G; Dilling, J; Henry, S; Herfurth, F; Kluge, H J; Lamour, E; Moore, R B; Scheidenberger, C; Schwarz, S; Sikler, G; Szerypo, J

    2002-01-01

    A linear radiofrequency quadrupole ion guide and beam buncher has been installed at the ISOLTRAP mass spectrometry experiment at the ISOLDE facility at CERN. The apparatus is being used as a beam cooling, accumulation, and bunching system. It operates with a buffer gas that cools the injected ions and converts the quasicontinuous 60- keV beam from the ISOLDE facility to 2.5-keV beam pulses with improved normalized transverse emittance. Recent measurements suggest a capture efficiency of the ion guide of up to 40% and a cooling and bunching efficiency of at least 12% which is expected to still be increased. The improved ISOLTRAP setup has so far been used very successfully in three on-line experiments. (12 refs).

  2. Studying fundamental physics using quantum enabled technologies with trapped molecular ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, D. M.; Lorent, V.; Dubessy, R.; Darquié, B.

    2018-03-01

    The text below was written during two visits that Daniel Segal made at Université Paris 13. Danny stayed at Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers the summers of 2008 and 2009 to participate in the exploration of a novel lead in the field of ultra-high resolution spectroscopy. Our idea was to probe trapped molecular ions using Quantum Logic Spectroscopy (QLS) in order to advance our understanding of a variety of fundamental processes in nature. At that time, QLS, a ground-breaking spectroscopic technique, had only been demonstrated with atomic ions. Our ultimate goals were new approaches to the observation of parity violation in chiral molecules and tests of time variations of the fundamental constants. This text is the original research proposal written eight years ago. We have added a series of notes to revisit it in the light of what has been since realized in the field.

  3. Quantum sensing of the phase-space-displacement parameters using a single trapped ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Peter A.; Vitanov, Nikolay V.

    2018-03-01

    We introduce a quantum sensing protocol for detecting the parameters characterizing the phase-space displacement by using a single trapped ion as a quantum probe. We show that, thanks to the laser-induced coupling between the ion's internal states and the motion mode, the estimation of the two conjugated parameters describing the displacement can be efficiently performed by a set of measurements of the atomic state populations. Furthermore, we introduce a three-parameter protocol capable of detecting the magnitude, the transverse direction, and the phase of the displacement. We characterize the uncertainty of the two- and three-parameter problems in terms of the Fisher information and show that state projective measurement saturates the fundamental quantum Cramér-Rao bound.

  4. Analysis of iodinated quorum sensing peptides by LC–UV/ESI ion trap mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yorick Janssens

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Five different quorum sensing peptides (QSP were iodinated using different iodination techniques. These iodinated peptides were analyzed using a C18 reversed phase HPLC system, applying a linear gradient of water and acetonitrile containing 0.1% (m/v formic acid as mobile phase. Electrospray ionization (ESI ion trap mass spectrometry was used for the identification of the modified peptides, while semi-quantification was performed using total ion current (TIC spectra. Non-iodinated peptides and mono- and di-iodinated peptides (NIP, MIP and DIP respectively were well separated and eluted in that order. Depending on the used iodination method, iodination yields varied from low (2% to high (57%.

  5. Time-dependent nonlinear Jaynes-Cummings dynamics of a trapped ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumm, F.; Vogel, W.

    2018-04-01

    In quantum interaction problems with explicitly time-dependent interaction Hamiltonians, the time ordering plays a crucial role for describing the quantum evolution of the system under consideration. In such complex scenarios, exact solutions of the dynamics are rarely available. Here we study the nonlinear vibronic dynamics of a trapped ion, driven in the resolved sideband regime with some small frequency mismatch. By describing the pump field in a quantized manner, we are able to derive exact solutions for the dynamics of the system. This eventually allows us to provide analytical solutions for various types of time-dependent quantities. In particular, we study in some detail the electronic and the motional quantum dynamics of the ion, as well as the time evolution of the nonclassicality of the motional quantum state.

  6. Electron shakeoff following the β+ decay of +19Ne and +35Ar trapped ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian, X.; Fléchard, X.; Pons, B.; Liénard, E.; Ban, G.; Breitenfeldt, M.; Couratin, C.; Delahaye, P.; Durand, D.; Finlay, P.; Guillon, B.; Lemière, Y.; Mauger, F.; Méry, A.; Naviliat-Cuncic, O.; Porobic, T.; Quéméner, G.; Severijns, N.; Thomas, J.-C.

    2018-02-01

    The electron shakeoff of 19F and 35Cl atoms resulting from the β+ decay of +19Ne and +35Ar ions has been investigated using a Paul trap coupled to a time of flight recoil-ion spectrometer. The charge-state distributions of the recoiling daughter nuclei were compared to theoretical calculations based on the sudden approximation and accounting for subsequent Auger processes. The excellent agreement obtained for 35Cl is not reproduced in 19F. The shortcoming is attributed to the inaccuracy of the independent particle model employed to calculate the primary shakeoff probabilities in systems with rather low atomic numbers. This calls for more elaborate calculations, including explicitly the electron-electron correlations.

  7. Denver radium site's - Case history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topolski, T.T.

    1985-01-01

    In developing this case history of the Denver radium sites, an attempt is made to establish the Colorado carnotite connection from the point of discovery to early development and its eventual role in the inception of the National Radium Institute and Denver's radium legacy. Early exploitive mining activities and the exportation of the highest grades of uranium ore to Europe greatly disturbed key officials at the U.S. Bureau of Mines. With its proximity to known carnotite deposits and industrial capacity, Denver's destiny as one of America's early radium production centers became a reality by 1914. With African pitchblend discoveries, Belgium competition spelled the beginning of the end of Denver's romance with radium by 1920. The sites where Denver made or used its radium were lost in obscurity for 60 years and rediscovered in 1979. Thirty one sites and a characterization of their radioactive impact are now a part of the Superfund National Priorities listing for eventual cleanup

  8. MOMA and other next-generation ion trap mass spectrometers for planetary exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arevalo, R. D., Jr.; Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Getty, S.; Mahaffy, P. R.; van Amerom, F. H. W.; Danell, R.; Pinnick, V. T.; Li, X.; Grubisic, A.; Southard, A. E.; Hovmand, L.; Cottin, H.; Makarov, A.

    2016-12-01

    Since the 1970's, quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) systems have served as low-risk, cost-efficient means to explore the inner and outer reaches of the solar system. These legacy instruments have interrogated the compositions of the lunar exosphere (LADEE), surface materials on Mars (MSL), and the atmospheres of Venus (Pioneer Venus), Mars (MAVEN) and outer planets (Galileo and Cassini-Huygens). However, the in situ detection of organic compounds on Mars and Titan, coupled with ground-based measurements of amino acids in meteorites and a variety of organics in comets, has underlined the importance of molecular disambiguation in the characterization of high-priority planetary environments. The Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) flight instrument, centered on a linear ion trap, enables the in situ detection of volatile and non-volatile organics, but also the characterization of molecular structures through SWIFT ion isolation/excitation and tandem mass spectrometry (MSn). Like the SAM instrument on MSL, the MOMA investigation also includes a gas chromatograph (GC), thereby enabling the chemical separation of potential isobaric interferences based on retention times. The Linear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer (LITMS; PI: William Brinckerhoff), developed to TRL 6 via the ROSES MatISSE Program, augments the core MOMA design and adds: expanded mass range (from 20 - 2000 Da); high-temperature evolved gas analysis (up to 1300°C); and, dual polarity detector assemblies (supporting the measurement of negative ions). The LITMS instrument will be tested in the field in 2017 through the Atacama Rover Astrobiology Drilling Studies (ARADS; PI: Brian Glass) ROSES PSTAR award. Following on these advancements, the Advanced Resolution Organic Molecule Analyzer (AROMA; PI: Ricardo Arevalo Jr.), supported through the ROSES PICASSO Program, combines a highly capable MOMA/LITMS-like linear ion trap and the ultrahigh resolution CosmOrbitrap mass analyzer developed by a consortium of five

  9. Buffer gas cooling of ions stored in an R.F. trap: Computed properties of the ionic cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alili, A.; Andre, J.; Vedel, F.

    1988-01-01

    The spatial and energetic properties of an ion cloud confined in an RF quadrupole trap, together with the lifetimes of the confined ions, have been computed by statistical methods and recently by a simulation method. The influences of different parameters such as ion mass, buffer gas mass, working point in the stability diagram, 'weak' space-charge and shape of the velocity distribution of the cooling buffer gas have been investigated and are described. (orig.)

  10. Radioactive Barium Ion Trap Based on Metal-Organic Framework for Efficient and Irreversible Removal of Barium from Nuclear Wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yaguang; Huang, Hongliang; Liu, Dahuan; Zhong, Chongli

    2016-04-06

    Highly efficient and irreversible capture of radioactive barium from aqueous media remains a serious task for nuclear waste disposal and environmental protection. To address this task, here we propose a concept of barium ion trap based on metal-organic framework (MOF) with a strong barium-chelating group (sulfate and sulfonic acid group) in the pore structures of MOFs. The functionalized MOF-based ion traps can remove >90% of the barium within the first 5 min, and the removal efficiency reaches 99% after equilibrium. Remarkably, the sulfate-group-functionalized ion trap demonstrates a high barium uptake capacity of 131.1 mg g(-1), which surpasses most of the reported sorbents and can selectively capture barium from nuclear wastewater, whereas the sulfonic-acid-group-functionalized ion trap exhibits ultrafast kinetics with a kinetic rate constant k2 of 27.77 g mg(-1) min(-1), which is 1-3 orders of magnitude higher than existing sorbents. Both of the two MOF-based ion traps can capture barium irreversibly. Our work proposes a new strategy to design barium adsorbent materials and provides a new perspective for removing radioactive barium and other radionuclides from nuclear wastewater for environment remediation. Besides, the concrete mechanisms of barium-sorbent interactions are also demonstrated in this contribution.

  11. A very large Paul trap system for in-line capture of high-energy DC radioactive ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dezfuli, A.M. Ghalambor; Moore, R.B.; Varfalvy, P.; Schwarz, S.

    2002-01-01

    A very large Paul trap (VLPTRAP) has built to test in-flight collection of DC ion beams. An iterative design process led to a Paul trap that was basically a cylindrical electrode of internal diameter 120 mm with two symmetrically placed coaxial end electrodes that approximated hyperboloids of revolution separated by 106 mm. The trap was operated at up to 20 kV pp at 1 MHz on the ring cylindrical electrode relative to the end electrodes with buffer gas pressures up to 40 mPa. Ions were delivered to the trap from a 60 keV + Cs ion gun and electrostatically decelerated to about 100 eV for entrance. After a cooling time of the order of 1 ms, the ions were extracted by biasing the end electrodes. Beam pulses of less than 1 s could be extracted, at repetition rates down to 1 Hz. An overall bunching efficiency of about 0.4% was obtained, resulting from a collection efficiency of 2% and an extraction efficiency of 20%. The trap could hold up to 10 7 ions at a temperature of 1000 K

  12. Exposure data for radium patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    This appendix summarizes exposure data collected as of 31 December 1981 for 2282 radium cases under study at the Center for Human Radiobiology. It includes all persons meaasured for radium since the start of te Center in 1969 and all persons for whom we have analytic data from earlier work at the Radioactivity Center of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the New Jersey Radium Research Project of the New Jersey department of Health, and the Argonne Radium Studies at the Argonne National Laboratory and the Argonne Cancer Research Hospital

  13. The environmental behaviour of radium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheppard, M.I.

    1980-09-01

    Radium-226 and its daughter, radon-222, an inert gas, are important members of the uranium decay series as far as human exposure is concerned. Radon diffuses from rocks, soil and water into the atmosphere, and its daughter products polonium-218 and polonium-214 can be retained in the lungs. Radium and radon are contained in emissions from fossil fuel plants, fertilizers, natural gas, building materials and uranium ore. To assess the impact of man's use, intentional or not, of radium and its daughters, we must know their physical, chemical and biological behaviour. This report examines the literature pertinent to the natural levels of radium found in rock, soil, water and plants. Information concerning radium is integrated from several disciplines. The radiological properties and chemistry of radium, and radium-soil interactions are discussed as well as the soil distribution coefficient and the mode of soil transport of radium. Plant transfer coefficients for radium and methods of analysis and measurement are given. A list of topics requiring further research concludes the report. (auth)

  14. Full-scale radium-removal system for a small community. Research report, 1 October 1985-30 September 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauch, R.P.; Mangelson, K.A.

    1988-08-01

    A radium-removal treatment plant was constructed for the small community of Redhill Forest in the central mountains of Colorado. The plant consists of iron removal using oxidation, filtration, and settling; radium and hardness removal using ion exchange; and radium removal from the waste brine using Dow Chemical Company's Radium Selective Complexer (RSC). The raw water comes from deep wells and has naturally occuring radium and iron concentrations of about 30-40 pC/L and 7-10 mg/L, respectively, and is aerated before entering the main treatment plant to remove radon gas and carbon dioxide. A unique feature of the plant is the process that removes radium from the waste brine. The process removes only radium from the spent ion-exchange regeneration water by permanently complexing the radium on the RSC. The RSC is replaced when exhausted and sent to a final disposal site that is acceptable to state regulatory agencies. The overall plant reduces radium from about 35 pCi/L to less than 4 pCi/L. The RSC system has consistently removed over 99% of the radium from the spent ion exchange regenerant. The average inflow radium concentration to the RSC was about 1180 pCi/L, and the average effluent was about 9 pCi/L

  15. Trapping of positron in gallium arsenide: evidencing of vacancies and of ions with a negative charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierre, F.

    1989-12-01

    Vacancy type defects in Ga As as grown and irradiated by electrons are characterized by lifetime of positrons. Positron lifetime increases from 230 ps to 258 and 295 ps in presence of native vacancies in n type Ga As. Configuration of native vacancies changes when Fermi level crosses energy levels localized in the forbidden zone at 0.035eV and at 0.10eV from the bottom of the conduction band. Native vacancies are identified to arsenic vacancies with or without other point defects. Positron lifetime increases from 230 to 260 ps in presence of vacancies produced by low temperature irradiation negative ions are also produced. In irradiated Ga As, these ions trap positrons in competition with vacancies produced by irradiation, showing they have a negative charge. Two annealing zones between 180-300K and 300-600K are presented by vacancies. Ions do not anneal below ambient temperature. Vacancies and negative ions are identified respectively to gallium vacancies and gallium antisite [fr

  16. Shedding light on the mercury mass discrepancy by weighing Hg52+ ions in a Penning trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritioff, T.; Bluhme, H.; Schuch, R.; Bergstroem, I.; Bjoerkhage, M.

    2003-01-01

    In their nuclear tables Audi and Wapstra have pointed out a serious mass discrepancy between their extrapolated values for the mercury isotopes and those from a direct measurement by the Manitoba group. The values deviate by as much as 85 ppb from each other with claimed uncertainties of about 16 and 7 ppb, respectively. In order to decide which values are correct the masses of the 198 Hg and 204 Hg isotopes have been measured in the Stockholm Penning trap mass spectrometer SMILETRAP using 52+ ions. This charge state corresponds to a filled Ni electron configuration for which the electron binding energy can be accurately calculated. The mass values obtained are 197.966 768 44(43) u for 198 Hg and 203.973 494 10(39) u for 204 Hg. These values agree with those measured by the Manitoba group, with a 3 times lower uncertainty. This measurement was made possible through the implementation of a cooling technique of the highly charged mercury ions during charge breeding in the electron beam ion source used for producing the Hg 52+ ions

  17. Studies of the trapped particle and ion temperature gradient instabilities in the Columbia Linear Machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathey, O.H.

    1989-01-01

    In the first part of the work, the effects of weak Coulomb and neutral collisions on the collisionless curvature driven trapped particle mode are studied in the Columbia Linear Machine (CLM) [Phys. Rev. Lett. 57, 1729, (1986)]. Low Coulomb collisionality yields a small stabilizing correction to the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) collisionless mode, which scales as v, using the Krook model, and ν ec 1/2 using a Lorentz pitch angle operator. In higher collisionality regimes, both models tend to yield similar scalings. In view of relative high neutral collisionality in CLM, both types of collisionality are then combined, modeling neutral collisions with the conserving Krook and Coulomb collisions with a Lorentz model. The dispersion relation is then integrated over velocity space. This combination yields results in very good accord with the available experimental data. The Ion Temperature Gradient Instability is then investigated. It is shown that anisotropy in gradient has a substantial effect on the ion temperature gradient driven mode. A gradient in the parallel temperature is needed for an instability to occur, and a gradient in the perpendicular temperature gradient further enhances the instability indirectly as long as the frequency of the mode is near ion resonance. The physical reason for this important role difference is presented. The Columbia Linear Machine is being redesigned to produce and identify the ion temperature gradient driven η i mode. Using the expected parameters, the author has developed detailed predictions of the mode characteristics in the CLM. Strong multi mode instabilities are expected. As the ion parallel and perpendicular ion temperature gradients are expected to differ significantly, we differentiate between η i parallel and ν i perpendicular and explore the physical differences between them, which leads to a scheme for stabilization of the mode

  18. Precision Tests of the Electroweak Interaction using Trapped Atoms and Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melconian, Daniel George [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2017-06-21

    The objective of the proposed research is to study fundamental aspects of the electroweak interaction via precision measurements in beta decay to test our current understanding of fundamental particles and forces as contained in the so-called "Standard Model" of particle physics. By comparing elegant experiments to rigorous theoretical predictions, we will either confirm the Standard Model to a higher degree and rule out models which seek to extend it, or find evidence of new physics and help guide theorists in developing the New Standard Model. The use of ion and neutral atom traps at radioactive ion beam facilities has opened up a new vista in precision low-energy nuclear physics experiments. Traps provide an ideal source of decaying atoms: they can be extremely cold (~1 mK); they are compact (~1 mm^3); and perhaps most importantly, the daughter particles escape with negligible distortions to their momenta in a scattering-free, open environment. The project is taking advantage of these technologies and applying them to precision beta-decay studies at radioactive beam facilities. The program consists of two complementary efforts: 1) Ion traps are an extremely versatile tool for purifying, cooling and bunching low-energy beams of short-lived nuclei. A large-bore (210~mm) superconducting 7-Tesla solenoid is at the heart of a Penning trap system for which there is a dedicated beamline at T-REX, the upgraded radioactive beam facility at the Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University. In addition to providing a general-purpose decay station, the flagship program for this system is measuring the ft-values and beta-neutrino correlation parameters from isospin T=2 superallowed beta-delayed proton decays, complimenting and expanding the already strong program in fundamental interactions at the Institute. 2) A magneto-optical trap is being used at the TRIUMF Neutral Atom Trap facility to observe the (un)polarized angular distribution parameters of isotopes of potassium. We

  19. First β-ν correlation measurement from the recoil-energy spectrum of Penning trapped Ar35 ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gorp, S.; Breitenfeldt, M.; Tandecki, M.; Beck, M.; Finlay, P.; Friedag, P.; Glück, F.; Herlert, A.; Kozlov, V.; Porobic, T.; Soti, G.; Traykov, E.; Wauters, F.; Weinheimer, Ch.; Zákoucký, D.; Severijns, N.

    2014-08-01

    We demonstrate a novel method to search for physics beyond the standard model by determining the β-ν angular correlation from the recoil-ion energy distribution after β decay of ions stored in a Penning trap. This recoil-ion energy distribution is measured with a retardation spectrometer. The unique combination of the spectrometer with a Penning trap provides a number of advantages, e.g., a high recoil-ion count rate and low sensitivity to the initial position and velocity distribution of the ions and completely different sources of systematic errors compared to other state-of-the-art experiments. Results of a first measurement with the isotope Ar35 are presented. Although currently at limited precision, we show that a statistical precision of about 0.5% is achievable with this unique method, thereby opening up the possibility of contributing to state-of-the-art searches for exotic currents in weak interactions.

  20. Evaluation of the characteristics of a field emission cathode for use in a Mercury ion trap frequency standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christman, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    The performance is reported of a field emission array characterized for the purpose of replacing the filament in a trapped ion frequency standard. This dark electron emitter eliminates the need for the interference filter currently used in the trapped ion standard. While reducing the filament's unwanted light, this filter causes a significant reduction in the signal. The magnetic field associated with the filament is also eliminated, thus potentially improving the present stability of the trapped ion standard. The operation of the filament in the present system is described, as well as the associated concerns. The cathode considered for the filament's replacement is then described along with the experimental system. Experimental results, observations, and conclusions are presented.

  1. Vibronic Rabi resonances in harmonic and hard-wall ion traps for arbitrary laser intensity and detuning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lizuain, I.; Muga, J. G.

    2007-01-01

    We investigate laser-driven vibronic transitions of a single two-level atomic ion in harmonic and hard-wall traps. In the Lamb-Dicke regime, for tuned or detuned lasers with respect to the internal frequency of the ion, and weak or strong laser intensities, the vibronic transitions occur at well-isolated Rabi resonances, where the detuning-adapted Rabi frequency coincides with the transition frequency between vibrational modes. These vibronic resonances are characterized as avoided crossings of the dressed levels (eigenvalues of the full Hamiltonian). Their peculiarities due to symmetry constraints and trapping potential are also examined

  2. Strong coupling between a single nitrogen-vacancy spin and the rotational mode of diamonds levitating in an ion trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delord, T.; Nicolas, L.; Chassagneux, Y.; Hétet, G.

    2017-12-01

    A scheme for strong coupling between a single atomic spin and the rotational mode of levitating nanoparticles is proposed. The idea is based on spin readout of nitrogen-vacancy centers embedded in aspherical nanodiamonds levitating in an ion trap. We show that the asymmetry of the diamond induces a rotational confinement in the ion trap. Using a weak homogeneous magnetic field and a strong microwave driving we then demonstrate that the spin of the nitrogen-vacancy center can be strongly coupled to the rotational mode of the diamond.

  3. Nanomechanical investigation of ion implanted single crystals - Challenges, possibilities and pitfall traps related to nanoindentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurpaska, Lukasz

    2017-10-01

    Nanoindentation technique have developed considerably over last thirty years. Nowadays, commercially available systems offer very precise measurement in nano- and microscale, environmental noise cancelling (or at least noise suppressing), in situ high temperature indentation in controlled atmosphere and vacuum conditions and different additional options, among them dedicated indentation is one of the most popular. Due to its high precision, and ability to measure mechanical properties from very small depths (tens of nm), this technique become quite popular in the nuclear society. It is known that ion implantation (to some extent) can simulate the influence of neutron flux. However, depth of the material damage is very limited resulting in creation of thin layer of modified material over unmodified bulk. Therefore, only very precise technique, offering possibility to control depth of the measurement can be used to study functional properties of the material. For this reason, nanoindentation technique seems to be a perfect tool to investigate mechanical properties of ion implanted specimens. However, conducting correct nanomechanical experiment and extracting valuable mechanical parameters is not an easy task. In this paper a discussion about the nanoindentation tests performed on ion irradiated YSZ single crystal is presented. The goal of this paper is to discuss possible traps when studying mechanical properties of such materials and thin coatings.

  4. Long-Distance Single Photon Transmission from a Trapped Ion via Quantum Frequency Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Thomas; Miyanishi, Koichiro; Ikuta, Rikizo; Takahashi, Hiroki; Vartabi Kashanian, Samir; Tsujimoto, Yoshiaki; Hayasaka, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Takashi; Imoto, Nobuyuki; Keller, Matthias

    2018-05-01

    Trapped atomic ions are ideal single photon emitters with long-lived internal states which can be entangled with emitted photons. Coupling the ion to an optical cavity enables the efficient emission of single photons into a single spatial mode and grants control over their temporal shape. These features are key for quantum information processing and quantum communication. However, the photons emitted by these systems are unsuitable for long-distance transmission due to their wavelengths. Here we report the transmission of single photons from a single 40Ca+ ion coupled to an optical cavity over a 10 km optical fiber via frequency conversion from 866 nm to the telecom C band at 1530 nm. We observe nonclassical photon statistics of the direct cavity emission, the converted photons, and the 10 km transmitted photons, as well as the preservation of the photons' temporal shape throughout. This telecommunication-ready system can be a key component for long-distance quantum communication as well as future cloud quantum computation.

  5. Eye changes induced by radium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, G.N.; Lloyd, R.D.; Shabestari, L.; Angus, W.; Muggenburg, B.A.

    1989-01-01

    Radium-induced intraocular neoplasia has not been reported in people, nor were the intraocular pigmentary changes observed in the beagles described in the dial painters or the radium 226 iatrogenic cases. However, Spiess (1969) has observed a 25% incidence of multiple pigmented naevi in the iris of the radium 224 German cases and Stefani, Spiess and Mays (1986) have noted an abnormal incidence of cataracts in this same group of patients. The reasons for the absence of the much less severe radium-induced eye changes in man as compared to the dog has not been determined. Reference is also made to the authors radium 226 rodent studies with mouse strain onychomys leucogaster. (author)

  6. A Quantum Non-Demolition Parity measurement in a mixed-species trapped-ion quantum processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinelli, Matteo; Negnevitsky, Vlad; Lo, Hsiang-Yu; Flühmann, Christa; Mehta, Karan; Home, Jonathan

    2017-04-01

    Quantum non-demolition measurements of multi-qubit systems are an important tool in quantum information processing, in particular for syndrome extraction in quantum error correction. We have recently demonstrated a protocol for quantum non-demolition measurement of the parity of two beryllium ions by detection of a co-trapped calcium ion. The measurement requires a sequence of quantum gates between the three ions, using mixed-species gates between beryllium hyperfine qubits and a calcium optical qubit. Our work takes place in a multi-zone segmented trap setup in which we have demonstrated high fidelity control of both species and multi-well ion shuttling. The advantage of using two species of ion is that we can individually manipulate and read out the state of each ion species without disturbing the internal state of the other. The methods demonstrated here can be used for quantum error correcting codes as well as quantum metrology and are key ingredients for realizing a hybrid universal quantum computer based on trapped ions. Mixed-species control may also enable the investigation of new avenues in quantum simulation and quantum state control. left the group and working in a company now.

  7. Intrinsic anharmonic effects on the phonon frequencies and effective spin-spin interactions in a quantum simulator made from trapped ions in a linear Paul trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAneny, M.; Freericks, J. K.

    2014-11-01

    The Coulomb repulsion between ions in a linear Paul trap gives rise to anharmonic terms in the potential energy when expanded about the equilibrium positions. We examine the effect of these anharmonic terms on the accuracy of a quantum simulator made from trapped ions. To be concrete, we consider a linear chain of Yb171+ ions stabilized close to the zigzag transition. We find that for typical experimental temperatures, frequencies change by no more than a factor of 0.01 % due to the anharmonic couplings. Furthermore, shifts in the effective spin-spin interactions (driven by a spin-dependent optical dipole force) are also, in general, less than 0.01 % for detunings to the blue of the transverse center-of-mass frequency. However, detuning the spin interactions near other frequencies can lead to non-negligible anharmonic contributions to the effective spin-spin interactions. We also examine an odd behavior exhibited by the harmonic spin-spin interactions for a range of intermediate detunings, where nearest-neighbor spins with a larger spatial separation on the ion chain interact more strongly than nearest neighbors with a smaller spatial separation.

  8. Hybrid (Vlasov-Fluid) simulation of ion-acoustic solitons chain formation including trapped electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behjat, E.; Aminmansoor, F.; Abbasi, H. [Faculty of Energy Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, P. O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    Disintegration of a Gaussian profile into ion-acoustic solitons in the presence of trapped electrons [H. Hakimi Pajouh and H. Abbasi, Phys. Plasmas 15, 082105 (2008)] is revisited. Through a hybrid (Vlasov-Fluid) model, the restrictions associated with the simple modified Korteweg de-Vries (mKdV) model are studied. For instance, the lack of vital information in the phase space associated with the evolution of electron velocity distribution, the perturbative nature of mKdV model which limits it to the weak nonlinear cases, and the special spatio-temporal scaling based on which the mKdV is derived. Remarkable differences between the results of the two models lead us to conclude that the mKdV model can only monitor the general aspects of the dynamics, and the precise picture including the correct spatio-temporal scales and the properties of solitons should be studied within the framework of hybrid model.

  9. High-Fidelity Quantum Logic Gates Using Trapped-Ion Hyperfine Qubits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballance, C J; Harty, T P; Linke, N M; Sepiol, M A; Lucas, D M

    2016-08-05

    We demonstrate laser-driven two-qubit and single-qubit logic gates with respective fidelities 99.9(1)% and 99.9934(3)%, significantly above the ≈99% minimum threshold level required for fault-tolerant quantum computation, using qubits stored in hyperfine ground states of calcium-43 ions held in a room-temperature trap. We study the speed-fidelity trade-off for the two-qubit gate, for gate times between 3.8  μs and 520  μs, and develop a theoretical error model which is consistent with the data and which allows us to identify the principal technical sources of infidelity.

  10. Flower-Like Squeezing in the Motion of a Laser-Driven Trapped Ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Ba An; Truong, Minh Duc

    We investigate the Nth order amplitude squeezing in the fan-state |ξ2k,f>F which is a linear superposition of the 2k-quantum nonlinear coherent states. Unlike in usual states where an ellipse is the symbol of squeezing, a 4k-winged flower results in the fan state. We first derive the analytical expression of squeezing for arbitrary k, N, f and then study in detail the case of a laser-driven trapped ion characterized by a specific form of the nonlinear function f. We show that the lowest order in which squeezing may appear and the number of directions along which the amplitude may be squeezed depend only on k whereas the precise directions of squeezing are determined also by the other physical parameters involved. Finally, we present a scheme to produce such fan-states.

  11. Deuterium trapping in ion implanted and co-deposited beryllium oxide layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markin, A.V.; Gorodetsky, A.E.; Zakharov, A.P.; Wu, C.H.

    2000-01-01

    Deuterium trapping in beryllium oxide films irradiated with 400 eV D ions has been studied by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). It has been found that for thermally grown BeO films implanted in the range 300 - 900 K the total deuterium retention doesn't depend whereas TDS spectra do markedly on irradiation temperature. For R.T. implantation the deuterium is released in a wide range from 500 to 1100 K. At implantation above 600 K the main portion of retained deuterium is released in a single peak centered at about 1000 K. The similar TDS peak is measured for D/BeO co-deposited layer. In addition we correlate our implantation data on BeO with the relevant data on beryllium metal and carbon. The interrelations between deuterium retention and microstructure are discussed. (orig.)

  12. Kβ spectra of heliumlike chromium from an electron-beam ion trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decaux, V.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Elliott, S.; Osterheld, A.

    1993-01-01

    Kβ spectra of heliumlike chromium have been recorded using the Livermore electron-beam ion trap (EBIT) with a high-resolution Bragg crystal spectrometer in the von Hamos configuration, in the wavelong range from 1.870 Angstrom. Measurements have been made both for direct excitation at an electron beam energy of 8 k and dielectronic recombination around the KLM resonance energy of 5 keV. In order to evaluate the resonance strength the lithiumlike dielectronic satellites, we used a data routine technique to accumulate spectra at 15 different beam energies between 4.96 and 5.28 keV. Results are compared to theoretical calculations using the multiconfiguration parametric potential method

  13. Circular Cationic Compounds B3Rgn+ of Triangular Ion B3 Trapping Rare Gases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ruiwen; LI Anyong; LI Zhuozhe

    2017-01-01

    The circular cationic compounds B3Rgn+(n=1-3,Rg=He-Rn) formed by the electron-deficient aromatic ion B3+ trapping rare gases were studied theoretically.The formed B-Rg bond has large bonding energy in the range of 60--209 kJ/mol,its length is close to the stun of covalent radii of B and Rg,for Ar-Rn.The analyses based on the natural bond orbitals and electron density topology show that the B-Rg bonds for Ar-Rn have strong covalent character.The geometric structures,binding energy,bond nature and thermodynamic stability of the boron-rare gas compounds show that these species for Ar-Rn may be experimentally available.Several different theoretical studies have demonstrated that these triangular cations are aromatic.

  14. Experimental Verification of a Jarzynski-Related Information-Theoretic Equality by a Single Trapped Ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, T P; Yan, L L; Zhou, F; Rehan, K; Liang, D F; Chen, L; Yang, W L; Ma, Z H; Feng, M; Vedral, V

    2018-01-05

    Most nonequilibrium processes in thermodynamics are quantified only by inequalities; however, the Jarzynski relation presents a remarkably simple and general equality relating nonequilibrium quantities with the equilibrium free energy, and this equality holds in both the classical and quantum regimes. We report a single-spin test and confirmation of the Jarzynski relation in the quantum regime using a single ultracold ^{40}Ca^{+} ion trapped in a harmonic potential, based on a general information-theoretic equality for a temporal evolution of the system sandwiched between two projective measurements. By considering both initially pure and mixed states, respectively, we verify, in an exact and fundamental fashion, the nonequilibrium quantum thermodynamics relevant to the mutual information and Jarzynski equality.

  15. Precision Measurement of the Electron's Electric Dipole Moment Using Trapped Molecular Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairncross, William B.; Gresh, Daniel N.; Grau, Matt; Cossel, Kevin C.; Roussy, Tanya S.; Ni, Yiqi; Zhou, Yan; Ye, Jun; Cornell, Eric A.

    2017-10-01

    We describe the first precision measurement of the electron's electric dipole moment (de) using trapped molecular ions, demonstrating the application of spin interrogation times over 700 ms to achieve high sensitivity and stringent rejection of systematic errors. Through electron spin resonance spectroscopy on 180Hf 19F+ in its metastable 3Δ1 electronic state, we obtain de=(0.9 ±7. 7stat±1. 7syst)×10-29 e cm , resulting in an upper bound of |de|<1.3 ×10-28 e cm (90% confidence). Our result provides independent confirmation of the current upper bound of |de|<9.4 ×10-29 e cm [J. Baron et al., New J. Phys. 19, 073029 (2017), 10.1088/1367-2630/aa708e], and offers the potential to improve on this limit in the near future.

  16. Calibration and fluctuation of the secular frequency peak amplitude versus initial condition distribution of the ion cloud confined into a three-dimensional quadrupole ion trap using a fourier transform operating mode and a steady ion flow injection mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janulyte, A.; Andre, J.; Carette, M.; Mercury, M.; Reynard, C; Zerega, Y.

    2009-01-01

    A specific Fourier transform operating mode is applied to a 3-dimensional quadrupolar ion trap for mass analysis (Fourier Transform Quadrupolar Ion Trap (FTQIT) Operating Mode or Mass Spectrometer). With this operating mode, an image signal, which is representative of the collective motion of simultaneously confined ions, is made up from a set of recorded time-of-flight histograms. In an ion trap, the secular frequency of ion motion depends on m/Z ratio of the ion. By Fourier transformation of the image signal, one observes the frequency peak of each confined ionic species. When only one ionic species is confined, the peak amplitude is proportional to the maximal amplitude of the image signal. The maximal amplitude of the image signal is expressed according to the operating parameters, the initial conditions of the ions and the number of ions. Simulation tools lead to fluctuation calculation of the maximal amplitude of the image signal. Two origins are explored: (1) the fluctuation of the numbers of ions according to the steady ion flow injection mode (SIFIM) used with this operating mode and (2) the distribution fluctuation of the initial positions and velocities. Initial confinement conditions, obtained with SIFIM injection mode, lead to optimal detection with small fluctuations of the peak amplitude for Fourier transform operating mode applied to an ion trap. (authors)

  17. Quantitation of isobaric phosphatidylcholine species in human plasma using a hybrid quadrupole linear ion-trap mass spectrometer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žáček, Petr; Bukowski, M.; Rosenberger, T. A.; Picklo, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 12 (2016), s. 2225-2234 ISSN 0022-2275 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : shotgun lipidomics * triple quadrupole/ion-trap * human blood plasma * phosphatidylcholines Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 4.810, year: 2016 http://www.jlr.org/content/57/12/2225.full

  18. Radium-bearing waters in the Upper Silesian Coal Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomza, I.; Lebecka, J.; Pluta, I.

    1986-01-01

    Natural waters with a high radium content occuring in underground workings of coal mines in Upper Silesia are described. Above 1500 water samples from carbonifereous aquifers were taken and the concentration of 226 Ra was measured. In about 100 samples also uranium was determined. The 226 Ra concentration varied in a wide range from 0.01 kBq/m 3 to 270 kBq/m 3 , while the uranium content was usually much lower than one could expect from the equilibrium between radium and uranium. It was observed that the 226 Ra concentration increases with mineralization of water, however the correlation was rather poor. Two types of radium-bearing waters were distinguished. Waters type A - containing Ba 2+ ions and waters type B - containing SO 4 2- ions. Waters type A are always reach in radium and usually have higher concentration of 226 Ra than waters type B. The described waters have one of the highest radium concentration which have been found so far in the natural environment. (author)

  19. Collision induced dissociation of protonated N-nitrosodimethylamine by ion trap mass spectrometry: Ultimate carcinogens in gas phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulikova, Natalia; Baker, Michael; Gabryelski, Wojciech

    2009-12-01

    Collision induced dissociation of protonated N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) and isotopically labeled N-nitrosodimethyl-d6-amine (NDMA-d6) was investigated by sequential ion trap mass spectrometry to establish mechanisms of gas phase reactions leading to intriguing products of this potent carcinogen. The fragmentation of (NDMA + H+) occurs via two dissociation pathways. In the alkylation pathway, homolytic cleavage of the N-O bond of N-dimethyl, N'-hydroxydiazenium ion generates N-dimethyldiazenium distonic ion which reacts further by a CH3 radical loss to form methanediazonium ion. Both methanediazonium ion and its precursor are involved in ion/molecule reactions. Methanediazonium ion showed to be capable of methylating water and methanol molecules in the gas phase of the ion trap and N-dimethyldiazenium distonic ion showed to abstract a hydrogen atom from a solvent molecule. In the denitrosation pathway, a tautomerization of N-dimethyl, N'-hydroxydiazenium ion to N-nitrosodimethylammonium intermediate ion results in radical cleavage of the N-N bond of the intermediate ion to form N-dimethylaminium radical cation which reacts further through [alpha]-cleavage to generate N-methylmethylenimmonium ion. Although the reactions of NDMA in the gas phase are different to those for enzymatic conversion of NDMA in biological systems, each activation method generates the same products. We will show that collision induced dissociation of N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) and N-nitrosodipropylamine (NDPA) is also a feasible approach to gain information on formation, stability, and reactivity of alkylating agents originating from NDEA and NDPA. Investigating such biologically relevant, but highly reactive intermediates in the condensed phase is hampered by the short life-times of these transient species.

  20. Multipole electrodynamic ion trap geometries for microparticle confinement under standard ambient temperature and pressure conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihalcea, Bogdan M., E-mail: bogdan.mihalcea@inflpr.ro; Vişan, Gina T.; Ganciu, Mihai [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics (INFLPR), Atomiştilor Str. Nr. 409, 077125 Măgurele, Ilfov (Romania); Giurgiu, Liviu C. [University of Bucharest, Faculty of Physics, Atomistilor Str. Nr. 405, 077125 Măgurele (Romania); Stan, Cristina [Department of Physics, Politehnica University, 313 Splaiul Independenţei, RO-060042 Bucharest (Romania); Filinov, Vladimir; Lapitsky, Dmitry, E-mail: dmitrucho@yandex.ru; Deputatova, Lidiya; Syrovatka, Roman [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskaya Str. 13, Bd. 2, 125412 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-03-21

    Trapping of microparticles and aerosols is of great interest for physics and chemistry. We report microparticle trapping in case of multipole linear Paul trap geometries, operating under standard ambient temperature and pressure conditions. An 8- and 12-electrode linear trap geometries have been designed and tested with an aim to achieve trapping for larger number of particles and to study microparticle dynamical stability in electrodynamic fields. We report emergence of planar and volume ordered structures of microparticles, depending on the a.c. trapping frequency and particle specific charge ratio. The electric potential within the trap is mapped using the electrolytic tank method. Particle dynamics is simulated using a stochastic Langevin equation. We emphasize extended regions of stable trapping with respect to quadrupole traps, as well as good agreement between experiment and numerical simulations.

  1. Multipole electrodynamic ion trap geometries for microparticle confinement under standard ambient temperature and pressure conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihalcea, Bogdan M.; Vişan, Gina T.; Ganciu, Mihai; Giurgiu, Liviu C.; Stan, Cristina; Filinov, Vladimir; Lapitsky, Dmitry; Deputatova, Lidiya; Syrovatka, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Trapping of microparticles and aerosols is of great interest for physics and chemistry. We report microparticle trapping in case of multipole linear Paul trap geometries, operating under standard ambient temperature and pressure conditions. An 8- and 12-electrode linear trap geometries have been designed and tested with an aim to achieve trapping for larger number of particles and to study microparticle dynamical stability in electrodynamic fields. We report emergence of planar and volume ordered structures of microparticles, depending on the a.c. trapping frequency and particle specific charge ratio. The electric potential within the trap is mapped using the electrolytic tank method. Particle dynamics is simulated using a stochastic Langevin equation. We emphasize extended regions of stable trapping with respect to quadrupole traps, as well as good agreement between experiment and numerical simulations.

  2. Methylene-transfer reactions of benzylium/tropylium ions with neutral toluene studied by means of ion-trap mass spectrometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zins, E. L.; Pepe, C.; Schröder, Detlef

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 145, - (2010), s. 157-169 E-ISSN 1364-5498 Grant - others: ERC (XE) HORIZOMS AdG226373 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : benzylium * electrospray ionization * infrared spectroscopy * ion trap * tropylium Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.538, year: 2010

  3. Barium and radium radiopolarography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourest, B.

    1979-01-01

    Radiopolarography has been applied to the study of two elements (barium and radium) which is difficult by classical polarography because of their strong electropositivity. Various parameters have been considered: nature, concentration and pH of supporting electrolyte. In any case of investigated mediums, the reduction to the metallic state reaction appeared to be reversible. An important variation of the barium half-wave potential E 1/2 with the ionic strength μ of the solution, imposed by LiCl used as supporting electrolyte, has been observed. It gives the possibility to estimate, for μ = 0, E 1/2 (Ba) = - 1.916 V/S.C.E. and E 1/2(Ra) = - 1.852 V/S.C.E. The values of barium and radium half wave potentials, obtained with a good accuracy in LiCl (or LiClO 4 ) 0.1 M medium, have been used to establish the amalgamation energy Δ 2 (M) of these elements. A linear variation of Δ 2 (M) with the metallic radius of the 2a elements has been obtained. On the other hand, by making the concentration of the complex forming agent (Cit 3- ) vary in the solution, we have a shift in the half wave potential from which we can deduce the stability constant of the complexe and its composition (BaCit - ; pK 1 =2). At last, nature and concentration of the supporting electrolyte (between 5.10 -2 M and 5M) have a determining influence on the extent of the polarogram plateau. This plateau is limited by an 'hollow effect' preceding the supporting electrolyte discharge. An interpretation of this effect is suggested which is based on the Stern model [fr

  4. Protonated ions as systemic trapping agents for noble gases: From electronic structure to radiative association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgurel, O; Pauzat, F; Pilmé, J; Ellinger, Y; Bacchus-Montabonel, M-C; Mousis, O

    2017-10-07

    The deficiencies of argon, krypton, and xenon observed in the atmosphere of Titan as well as anticipated in some comets might be related to a scenario of sequestration by H 3 + in the gas phase at the early evolution of the solar nebula. The chemical process implied is a radiative association, evaluated as rather efficient in the case of H 3 + , especially for krypton and xenon. This mechanism of chemical trapping might not be limited to H 3 + only, considering that the protonated ions produced in the destruction of H 3 + by its main competitors present in the primitive nebula, i.e., H 2 O, CO, and N 2 , might also give stable complexes with the noble gases. However the effective efficiency of such processes is still to be proven. Here, the reactivity of the noble gases Ar, Kr, and Xe, with all protonated ions issued from H 2 O, CO, and N 2 , expected to be present in the nebula with reasonably high abundances, has been studied with quantum simulation method dynamics included. All of them give stable complexes and the rate coefficients of their radiative associations range from 10 -16 to 10 -19 cm 3 s -1 , which is reasonable for such reactions and has to be compared to the rates of 10 -16 to 10 -18 cm 3 s -1 , obtained with H 3 + . We can consider this process as universal for all protonated ions which, if present in the primitive nebula as astrophysical models predict, should act as sequestration agents for all three noble gases with increasing efficiency from Ar to Xe.

  5. Information entropy of a time-dependent three-level trapped ion interacting with a laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Aty, Mahmoud

    2005-01-01

    Trapped and laser-cooled ions are increasingly used for a variety of modern high-precision experiments, frequency standard applications and quantum information processing. Therefore, in this communication we present a comprehensive analysis of the pattern of information entropy arising in the time evolution of an ion interacting with a laser field. A general analytic approach is proposed for a three-level trapped-ion system in the presence of the time-dependent couplings. By working out an exact analytic solution, we conclusively analyse the general properties of the von Neumann entropy and quantum information entropy. It is shown that the information entropy is affected strongly by the time-dependent coupling and exhibits long time periodic oscillations. This feature attributed to the fact that in the time-dependent region Rabi oscillation is time dependent. Using parameters corresponding to a specific three-level ionic system, a single beryllium ion in a RF-(Paul) trap, we obtain illustrative examples of some novel aspects of this system in the dynamical evolution. Our results establish an explicit relation between the exact information entropy and the entanglement between the multi-level ion and the laser field. We show that different nonclassical effects arise in the dynamics of the ionic population inversion, depending on the initial states of the vibrational motion/field and on the values of Lamb-Dicke parameter η

  6. Individual addressing of trapped {sup 171}Yb{sup +} ion qubits using a microelectromechanical systems-based beam steering system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crain, S.; Mount, E.; Baek, S.; Kim, J., E-mail: jungsang@duke.edu [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Fitzpatrick Institute for Photonics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

    2014-11-03

    The ability to individually manipulate the increasing number of qubits is one of the many challenges towards scalable quantum information processing with trapped ions. Using micro-mirrors fabricated with micro-electromechanical systems technology, we focus laser beams on individual ions in a linear chain and steer the focal point in two dimensions. We demonstrate sequential single qubit gates on multiple {sup 171}Yb{sup +} qubits and characterize the gate performance using quantum state tomography. Our system features negligible crosstalk to neighboring ions (<3×10{sup −4}), and switching speed comparable to typical single qubit gate times (<2 μs)

  7. Trapped ultracold molecular ions: candidates for an optical molecular clock for a fundamental physics mission in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, B.; Koelemeij, J.; Daerr, H.; Ernsting, I.; Jorgensen, S.; Okhapkin, M.; Wicht, A.; Nevsky, A.; Schiller, S.

    2017-11-01

    Narrow ro-vibrational transitions in ultracold molecules are excellent candidates for frequency references in the near-IR to visible spectral domain and interesting systems for fundamental tests of physics, in particular for a satellite test of the gravitational redshift of clocks. We have performed laser spectroscopy of several ro-vibrational overtone transitions υ = 0 → υ = 4 in HD+ ions at around 1.4 μm. 1+1 REMPD was used as a detection method, followed by measurement of the number of remaining molecules. The molecular ions were stored in a linear radiofrequency trap and cooled to millikelvin temperatures, by sympathetic cooling using laser-cooled Be+ ions simultaneously stored in the same trap.

  8. A (201)Hg+ Comagnetometer for (199)Hg+ Trapped Ion Space Atomic Clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Eric A.; Taghavi, Shervin; Tjoelker, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    A method has been developed for unambiguously measuring the exact magnetic field experienced by trapped mercury ions contained within an atomic clock intended for space applications. In general, atomic clocks are insensitive to external perturbations that would change the frequency at which the clocks operate. On a space platform, these perturbative effects can be much larger than they would be on the ground, especially in dealing with the magnetic field environment. The solution is to use a different isotope of mercury held within the same trap as the clock isotope. The magnetic field can be very accurately measured with a magnetic-field-sensitive atomic transition in the added isotope. Further, this measurement can be made simultaneously with normal clock operation, thereby not degrading clock performance. Instead of using a conventional magnetometer to measure ambient fields, which would necessarily be placed some distance away from the clock atoms, first order field-sensitive atomic transition frequency changes in the atoms themselves determine the variations in the magnetic field. As a result, all ambiguity over the exact field value experienced by the atoms is removed. Atoms used in atomic clocks always have an atomic transition (often referred to as the clock transition) that is sensitive to magnetic fields only in second order, and usually have one or more transitions that are first-order field sensitive. For operating parameters used in the (199)Hg(+) clock, the latter can be five orders of magnitude or more sensitive to field fluctuations than the clock transition, thereby providing an unambiguous probe of the magnetic field strength.

  9. Chemical characterization of individual microparticles using an ion trap: real-time chemical analysis of aerosol particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Mo; Whitten, W.B.; Reilly, P.T.A.; Gieray, R.; Ramsey, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes initial experiments to perform laser ablation mass spectrometry in real time on airborne microparticles. The microparticles are sampled directly from the air by a particle inlet system into the vacuum chamber of a mass spectrometer. An incoming particle is detected as it passes through two CW laser beams and a pulsed laser is triggered to intercept the particle for laser ablation/ionization in the mass spectrometer. The initial studies were made with an existing ion trap mass spectrometer with the particle sampling occurring at the center of the trap electrodes. Performance of the inlet system, particle detection, and preliminary results are described

  10. Observations on small anionic clusters in an electrostatic ion beam trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eritt, Markus

    2008-01-01

    The term atomic cluster relates to compounds of at least two or three atoms. Thereby the physical properties are size dependent and the property transitions between single atoms and bulk material are not always smooth. Ion traps allow it to observe internal cluster properties independent from the influence of external forces. In this work the electron induced decay of singly negatively charged atomic clusters was observed. The dissociation cross section of the clusters is dominated by detachment of the only weakly bound outer electrons. For simple atoms at low electron energies a simple scaling law can be obtained that includes only the binding energies of the valence electrons. Nevertheless for larger sizes theoretical calculations predict so called ''giant resonances'' as dominant decay process in metal clusters. Due to mass limitations in storage rings exist so far only cross section measurements for simple anions and small negative molecules. In this work the electron detachment cross sections of small negatively charged carbon (C n - n=2-12), aluminium (Al n - n=2-7) and silver clusters (Ag n - n=1-11) were measured in an electrostatic ion beam trap. The classical scaling law, including only the binding energies of the valence electrons, turned out to be not sufficient, especially for larger clusters. In order to improve the correlation between measured and predicted values it was proposed to involve the influence of the cluster volume and the specific polarisability induced by long range coulomb interaction. For silver clusters the best agreement was obtained using a combination of the projected area reduced by the polarisability. The existence of ''giant resonances'' could not be confirmed. According to theory for clusters with a broad internal energy distribution, a power-law decay close to 1/time is expected. For some clusters the lifetime behaviour would be strongly quenched by photon emission. The thermionic evaporative decay of anionic aluminium and

  11. Observations on small anionic clusters in an electrostatic ion beam trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eritt, Markus

    2008-10-02

    The term atomic cluster relates to compounds of at least two or three atoms. Thereby the physical properties are size dependent and the property transitions between single atoms and bulk material are not always smooth. Ion traps allow it to observe internal cluster properties independent from the influence of external forces. In this work the electron induced decay of singly negatively charged atomic clusters was observed. The dissociation cross section of the clusters is dominated by detachment of the only weakly bound outer electrons. For simple atoms at low electron energies a simple scaling law can be obtained that includes only the binding energies of the valence electrons. Nevertheless for larger sizes theoretical calculations predict so called ''giant resonances'' as dominant decay process in metal clusters. Due to mass limitations in storage rings exist so far only cross section measurements for simple anions and small negative molecules. In this work the electron detachment cross sections of small negatively charged carbon (C{sub n}{sup -} n=2-12), aluminium (Al{sub n}{sup -} n=2-7) and silver clusters (Ag{sub n}{sup -} n=1-11) were measured in an electrostatic ion beam trap. The classical scaling law, including only the binding energies of the valence electrons, turned out to be not sufficient, especially for larger clusters. In order to improve the correlation between measured and predicted values it was proposed to involve the influence of the cluster volume and the specific polarisability induced by long range coulomb interaction. For silver clusters the best agreement was obtained using a combination of the projected area reduced by the polarisability. The existence of ''giant resonances'' could not be confirmed. According to theory for clusters with a broad internal energy distribution, a power-law decay close to 1/time is expected. For some clusters the lifetime behaviour would be strongly quenched by photon

  12. Removal of radium from aqueous sulphate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weir, D.R.; Masters, J.T.; Neven, M.

    1983-01-01

    Radium is often present in ores and an aqueous solution associated with the ore may consequently contain dissolved radium. It is frequently necessary to remove radium from such solutions to reduce the total radium content to a prescribed low level before the solution can be returned to the environment. The present invention is based on the discovery that the total radium content can be reduced to a satisfactory level within a reasonable time by adding a soluble barium salt to a radium-containing sulphate solution which also contains dissolved magnesium at a pH not greater than about 0 to precipitate radium as barium radium sulphate, raising the pH to at least 11 to precipitate an insoluble magnesium compound which collects the barium radium sulphate precipitate, and separating substantially all of the precipitates from the solution

  13. Determination of vanillin, ethyl vanillin, and coumarin in infant formula by liquid chromatography-quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yan; Han, Chao; Liu, Bin; Lin, Zhengfeng; Zhou, Xiujin; Wang, Chengjun; Zhu, Zhenou

    2014-02-01

    A simple, precise, accurate, and validated liquid chromatography-quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometry method was developed for the determination of vanillin, ethyl vanillin, and coumarin in infant formula samples. Following ultrasonic extraction with methanol/water (1:1, vol/vol), and clean-up on an HLB solid-phase extraction cartridge (Waters Corp., Milford, MA), samples were separated on a Waters XSelect HSS T3 column (150 × 2.1-mm i.d., 5-μm film thickness; Waters Corp.), with 0.1% formic acid solution-acetonitrile as mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.25 mL/min. Quantification of the target was performed by the internal standard approach, using isotopically labeled compounds for each chemical group, to correct matrix effects. Data acquisition was carried out in multiple reaction monitoring transitions mode, monitoring 2 multiple reaction monitoring transitions to ensure an accurate identification of target compounds in the samples. Additional identification and confirmation of target compounds were performed using the enhanced product ion modus of the linear ion trap. The novel liquid chromatography-quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometry platform offers the best sensitivity and specificity for characterization and quantitative determination of vanillin, ethyl vanillin, and coumarin in infant formula and fulfills the quality criteria for routine laboratory application. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Sequential Modular Position and Momentum Measurements of a Trapped Ion Mechanical Oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flühmann, C.; Negnevitsky, V.; Marinelli, M.; Home, J. P.

    2018-04-01

    The noncommutativity of position and momentum observables is a hallmark feature of quantum physics. However, this incompatibility does not extend to observables that are periodic in these base variables. Such modular-variable observables have been suggested as tools for fault-tolerant quantum computing and enhanced quantum sensing. Here, we implement sequential measurements of modular variables in the oscillatory motion of a single trapped ion, using state-dependent displacements and a heralded nondestructive readout. We investigate the commutative nature of modular variable observables by demonstrating no-signaling in time between successive measurements, using a variety of input states. Employing a different periodicity, we observe signaling in time. This also requires wave-packet overlap, resulting in quantum interference that we enhance using squeezed input states. The sequential measurements allow us to extract two-time correlators for modular variables, which we use to violate a Leggett-Garg inequality. Signaling in time and Leggett-Garg inequalities serve as efficient quantum witnesses, which we probe here with a mechanical oscillator, a system that has a natural crossover from the quantum to the classical regime.

  15. Developing a Vacuum Electrospray Source To Implement Efficient Atmospheric Sampling for Miniature Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Quan; Zhang, Qian; Lu, Xinqiong; Qian, Xiang; Ni, Kai; Wang, Xiaohao

    2017-12-05

    The performance of a miniature mass spectrometer in atmospheric analysis is closely related to the design of its sampling system. In this study, a simplified vacuum electrospray ionization (VESI) source was developed based on a combination of several techniques, including the discontinuous atmospheric pressure interface, direct capillary sampling, and pneumatic-assisted electrospray. Pulsed air was used as a vital factor to facilitate the operation of electrospray ionization in the vacuum chamber. This VESI device can be used as an efficient atmospheric sampling interface when coupled with a miniature rectilinear ion trap (RIT) mass spectrometer. The developed VESI-RIT instrument enables regular ESI analysis of liquid, and its qualitative and quantitative capabilities have been characterized by using various solution samples. A limit of detection of 8 ppb could be attained for arginine in a methanol solution. In addition, extractive electrospray ionization of organic compounds can be implemented by using the same VESI device, as long as the gas analytes are injected with the pulsed auxiliary air. This methodology can extend the use of the proposed VESI technique to rapid and online analysis of gaseous and volatile samples.

  16. The XRS microcalorimeter spectrometer at the Livermore Electron Beam Ion Trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, F S; Beiersdorfer, P; Boyce, K; Brown, G V; Chen, H; Gygax, J; Kahn, S M; Kelley, R; Kilbourne, C A; Magee, E; Thorn, D B

    2007-08-22

    NASA's X-ray Spectrometer (XRS) microcalorimeter instrument has been operating at the Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory since July of 2000. The spectrometer is currently undergoing its third major upgrade to become an easy to use, extremely high performance instrument for a broad range of EBIT experiments. The spectrometer itself is broadband, capable of simultaneously operating from 0.1 to 12 keV and has been operated at up to 100 keV by manipulating its operating conditions. The spectral resolution closely follows the spaceflight version of the XRS, beginning at 10 eV FWHM at 6 keV in 2000, upgraded to 5.5 eV in 2003, and will hopefully be {approx}3.8 eV in the Fall of 2007. Here we review the operating principles of this unique instrument, the extraordinary science that has been performed at EBIT over the last 6 years, and prospects for future upgrades. Specifically we discuss upgrades to cover the high-energy band (to at least 100 keV) with a high quantum efficiency detector, and prospects for using a new superconducting detector to reach 0.8 eV resolution at 1 keV, and 2 eV at 6 keV with high counting rates.

  17. Quantum Simulation of the Quantum Rabi Model in a Trapped Ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Dingshun; An, Shuoming; Liu, Zhenyu; Zhang, Jing-Ning; Pedernales, Julen S.; Lamata, Lucas; Solano, Enrique; Kim, Kihwan

    2018-04-01

    The quantum Rabi model, involving a two-level system and a bosonic field mode, is arguably the simplest and most fundamental model describing quantum light-matter interactions. Historically, due to the restricted parameter regimes of natural light-matter processes, the richness of this model has been elusive in the lab. Here, we experimentally realize a quantum simulation of the quantum Rabi model in a single trapped ion, where the coupling strength between the simulated light mode and atom can be tuned at will. The versatility of the demonstrated quantum simulator enables us to experimentally explore the quantum Rabi model in detail, including a wide range of otherwise unaccessible phenomena, as those happening in the ultrastrong and deep strong-coupling regimes. In this sense, we are able to adiabatically generate the ground state of the quantum Rabi model in the deep strong-coupling regime, where we are able to detect the nontrivial entanglement between the bosonic field mode and the two-level system. Moreover, we observe the breakdown of the rotating-wave approximation when the coupling strength is increased, and the generation of phonon wave packets that bounce back and forth when the coupling reaches the deep strong-coupling regime. Finally, we also measure the energy spectrum of the quantum Rabi model in the ultrastrong-coupling regime.

  18. Quantum Simulation of the Quantum Rabi Model in a Trapped Ion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dingshun Lv

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The quantum Rabi model, involving a two-level system and a bosonic field mode, is arguably the simplest and most fundamental model describing quantum light-matter interactions. Historically, due to the restricted parameter regimes of natural light-matter processes, the richness of this model has been elusive in the lab. Here, we experimentally realize a quantum simulation of the quantum Rabi model in a single trapped ion, where the coupling strength between the simulated light mode and atom can be tuned at will. The versatility of the demonstrated quantum simulator enables us to experimentally explore the quantum Rabi model in detail, including a wide range of otherwise unaccessible phenomena, as those happening in the ultrastrong and deep strong-coupling regimes. In this sense, we are able to adiabatically generate the ground state of the quantum Rabi model in the deep strong-coupling regime, where we are able to detect the nontrivial entanglement between the bosonic field mode and the two-level system. Moreover, we observe the breakdown of the rotating-wave approximation when the coupling strength is increased, and the generation of phonon wave packets that bounce back and forth when the coupling reaches the deep strong-coupling regime. Finally, we also measure the energy spectrum of the quantum Rabi model in the ultrastrong-coupling regime.

  19. [Determination of 21 fragrance allergens in toys by gas chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Qing; Zang, Qing; Bai, Hua; Li, Haiyu; Kang, Suyuan; Wang, Chao

    2012-05-01

    A method of gas chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry (GC-IT-MS) was developed for the determination of 21 fragrance allergens in sticker toys, plush toys and plastic toys. The experimental conditions, such as sample pretreatment conditions, and the analytical conditions of GC-IT-MS, were optimized. The sticker toy samples and plush toy samples were extracted with acetone by ultrasonic wave, and the extracts were separated on an Agilent HP-1 MS column (50 m x 0.2 mm x 0.5 microm), then determined by IT-MS and quantified by external standard method. The plastic toy samples were extracted by the dissolution-precipitation approach, cleaned up with an Envi-carb solid phase extraction column and concentrated by rotary evaporation and nitrogen blowing, then determined by GC-IT-MS and quantified by external standard method. The calibration curves showed good linearity in the range of 0.002-50 mg/L with the correlation coefficients greater than 0.996 8. The limits of quantification (LOQ, S/N > 10) were 0.02-40 mg/kg. The average recoveries of the target compounds spiked in the sample at three concentration levels were in the range of 82.2%-110.8% with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 0.6%-10.5%. These results show that this method is accurate and sensitive for the qualitative and quantitative determination of the 21 fragrance allergens in the 3 types of toys.

  20. Determination of 48 fragrance allergens in toys using GC with ion trap MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Qing; Zhang, Qing; Li, Wentao; Li, Haiyu; Li, Pi; Ma, Qiang; Meng, Xianshuang; Qi, Meiling; Bai, Hua

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a method for the simultaneous determination of 48 fragrance allergens in four types of toys (plastic toys, play clays, plush toys, and paper toys) based on GC with ion trap MS/MS. Compared with single-stage MS, MS/MS is superior in terms of the qualification and quantification of a large range of compounds in complicated matrices. Procedures for extraction and purification were optimized for each toy type. The method proved to be linear over a wide range of concentrations for all analytes with correlation coefficients between 0.9768 and 0.9999. Validation parameters, namely, LODs and LOQs, ranged from 0.005-5.0 and from 0.02-20 mg/kg, respectively. Average recoveries of target compounds (spiked at three concentration levels) were in the range of 79.5-109.1%. Intraday and interday repeatabilities of the proposed method varied from 0.7-10.5% and from 3.1-13.4%, respectively. The proposed method was used to monitor fragrance allergens in commercial toy products. Our findings indicate that this method is an accurate and effective technique for analyzing fragrance allergens in materials composed of complex components. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. MSM, an Efficient Workflow for Metabolite Identification Using Hybrid Linear Ion Trap Orbitrap Mass Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Robert; Huang, Yingying; Schwartz, Jae C.; Chen, Yan; Carlson, Timothy J.; Ma, Ji

    2012-05-01

    Identification of drug metabolites can often yield important information regarding clearance mechanism, pharmacologic activity, or toxicity for drug candidate molecules. Additionally, the identification of metabolites can provide beneficial structure-activity insight to help guide lead optimization efforts towards molecules with optimal metabolic profiles. There are challenges associated with detecting and identifying metabolites in the presence of complex biological matrices, and new LC-MS technologies have been developed to meet these challenges. In this report, we describe the development of an experimental approach that applies unique features of the hybrid linear ion trap Orbitrap mass spectrometer to streamline in vitro and in vivo metabolite identification experiments. The approach, referred to as MSM, utilizes multiple collision cells, dissociation methods, mass analyzers, and detectors. With multiple scan types and different dissociation modes built into one experimental method, along with flexible post-acquisition analysis options, the MSM workflow offers an attractive option to fast and reliable identification of metabolites in different kinds of in vitro and in vivo samples. The MSM workflow was successfully applied to metabolite identification analysis of verapamil in both in vitro rat hepatocyte incubations and in vivo rat bile samples.

  2. Quantum optical emulation of molecular vibronic spectroscopy using a trapped-ion device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yangchao; Lu, Yao; Zhang, Kuan; Zhang, Junhua; Zhang, Shuaining; Huh, Joonsuk; Kim, Kihwan

    2018-01-28

    Molecules are one of the most demanding quantum systems to be simulated by quantum computers due to their complexity and the emergent role of quantum nature. The recent theoretical proposal of Huh et al. (Nature Photon., 9, 615 (2015)) showed that a multi-photon network with a Gaussian input state can simulate a molecular spectroscopic process. Here, we present the first quantum device that generates a molecular spectroscopic signal with the phonons in a trapped ion system, using SO 2 as an example. In order to perform reliable Gaussian sampling, we develop the essential experimental technology with phonons, which includes the phase-coherent manipulation of displacement, squeezing, and rotation operations with multiple modes in a single realization. The required quantum optical operations are implemented through Raman laser beams. The molecular spectroscopic signal is reconstructed from the collective projection measurements for the two-phonon-mode. Our experimental demonstration will pave the way to large-scale molecular quantum simulations, which are classically intractable, but would be easily verifiable by real molecular spectroscopy.

  3. Error-resistant distributed quantum computation in a trapped ion chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braungardt, Sibylle; Sen, Aditi; Sen, Ujjwal; Lewenstein, Maciej

    2007-01-01

    We consider experimentally feasible chains of trapped ions with pseudospin 1/2 and find models that can potentially be used to implement error-resistant quantum computation. Similar in spirit to classical neural networks, the error resistance of the system is achieved by encoding the qubits distributed over the whole system. We therefore call our system a quantum neural network and present a quantum neural network model of quantum computation. Qubits are encoded in a few quasi degenerated low-energy levels of the whole system, separated by a large gap from the excited states and large energy barriers between themselves. We investigate protocols for implementing a universal set of quantum logic gates in the system by adiabatic passage of a few low-lying energy levels of the whole system. Naturally appearing and potentially dangerous distributed noise in the system leaves the fidelity of the computation virtually unchanged, if it is not too strong. The computation is also naturally resilient to local perturbations of the spins

  4. Basic circuit compilation techniques for an ion-trap quantum machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maslov, Dmitri

    2017-01-01

    We study the problem of compilation of quantum algorithms into optimized physical-level circuits executable in a quantum information processing (QIP) experiment based on trapped atomic ions. We report a complete strategy: starting with an algorithm in the form of a quantum computer program, we compile it into a high-level logical circuit that goes through multiple stages of decomposition into progressively lower-level circuits until we reach the physical execution-level specification. We skip the fault-tolerance layer, as it is not within the scope of this work. The different stages are structured so as to best assist with the overall optimization while taking into account numerous optimization criteria, including minimizing the number of expensive two-qubit gates, minimizing the number of less expensive single-qubit gates, optimizing the runtime, minimizing the overall circuit error, and optimizing classical control sequences. Our approach allows a trade-off between circuit runtime and quantum error, as well as to accommodate future changes in the optimization criteria that may likely arise as a result of the anticipated improvements in the physical-level control of the experiment. (paper)

  5. Properties of ion temperature gradient and trapped electron modes in tokamak plasmas with inverted density profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Huarong; Jhang, Hogun; Hahm, T. S.; Dong, J. Q.; Wang, Z. X.

    2017-12-01

    We perform a numerical study of linear stability of the ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode and the trapped electron mode (TEM) in tokamak plasmas with inverted density profiles. A local gyrokinetic integral equation is applied for this study. From comprehensive parametric scans, we obtain stability diagrams for ITG modes and TEMs in terms of density and temperature gradient scale lengths. The results show that, for the inverted density profile, there exists a normalized threshold temperature gradient above which the ITG mode and the TEM are either separately or simultaneously unstable. The instability threshold of the TEM for the inverted density profile is substantially different from that for normal and flat density profiles. In addition, deviations are found on the ITG threshold from an early analytic theory in sheared slab geometry with the adiabatic electron response [T. S. Hahm and W. M. Tang, Phys. Fluids B 1, 1185 (1989)]. A possible implication of this work on particle transport in pellet fueled tokamak plasmas is discussed.

  6. Dust acoustic solitary waves and double layers in a dusty plasma with two-temperature trapped ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Labany, S.K.; El-Taibany, W.F.; Mamun, A.A.; Moslem, Waleed M.

    2004-01-01

    The combined effects of trapped ion distribution, two-ion-temperature, dust charge fluctuation, and dust fluid temperature are incorporated in the study of nonlinear dust acoustic waves in an unmagnetized dusty plasma. It is found that, owing to the departure from the Boltzmann ion distribution to the trapped ion distribution, the dynamics of small but finite amplitude dust acoustic waves is governed by a modified Korteweg-de Vries equation. The latter admits a stationary dust acoustic solitary wave solution, which has stronger nonlinearity, smaller amplitude, wider width, and higher propagation velocity than that involving adiabatic ions. The effect of two-ion-temperature is found to provide the possibility for the coexistence of rarefactive and compressive dust acoustic solitary structures and double layers. Although the dust fluid temperature increases the amplitude of the small but finite amplitude solitary waves, the dust charge fluctuation does the opposite effect. The present investigation should help us to understand the salient features of the nonlinear dust acoustic waves that have been observed in a recent numerical simulation study

  7. Can the biogenicity of Europa's surfical sulfur be tested simultaneously with penetrators and ion traps?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chela-Flores, J.; Bhattacherjee, A. B.; Dudeja, S.; Kumar, N.; Seckbach, J.

    2009-04-01

    We suggest a biogenic interpretation of the sulfur patches on the Europan icy surface. This hypothesis is testable by LAPLACE, or a later mission, in which the instrumentation on board are penetrators, or ion traps, with component selection including miniaturized mass spectrometry. The argument in favor of such instrumentation and component selection is as follows: Extreme environments with microbes can act as models for extraterrestrial life (Seckbach et al., 2008). Suggestions have ranged from Venusian environments (Sagan, 1967, Seckbach and Libby, 1970) to Mars (Grilli Caiola and Billi, 2007). Active photosynthetic microbial communities are found on Antarctica, both in and on ice, in fresh water, in saline lakes and streams and within rocks. In the dry valley lakes of Antarctica close to the McMurdo Base, microbial mats are known to selectively remove a huge quantity of sulfur (Parker et al., 1982). Lake Vostok in Antarctica possesses a perennially thick (3 to 4 km) ice-cover that precludes photosynthesis, thus making this subglacial environment a good model system for determining how a potential Europan biota might emerge, evolve and distribute itself. Jupiter's moon Europa may harbor a subsurface water ocean, which lies beneath an ice layer that might be too thick to allow photosynthesis, just as in Lake Vostok. However, disequilibrium chemistry driven by charged particles from Jupiter's magnetosphere could produce sufficient organic and oxidant molecules for an Europan biosphere (Chyba, 2000). We restrict our attention to microbial mats that could still be thriving in spite of the extreme conditions of radiation on Europa. We are especially concerned with sulfur patches discovered by the Galileo mission. In the near future there are technologies available to settle the question of habitability on Europa, such as penetrators that are currently being developed for preliminary trials nearer to the Earth—the Moon-Lite mission (Smith et al., 2008). If analogies

  8. Determination of radium in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hohorst, F.A.; Huntley, M.W.; Hartenstein, S.D.

    1995-10-01

    These detailed work instructions (DWIs) are tailored for the analysis of radium-226 and radium-228 in drinking water supplies from ground water and surface water sources and composites derived from them. The instructions have been adapted from several sources, including a draft EPA method. One objective was to minimize the generation of mixed wastes. Quantitative determinations of actinium-228 are made at 911 keV. The minimum detection level (MDL) for the gamma spectrometric measurements at this energy vary with matrix, volume, geometry, detector, background, and counting statistics. The range of MDL`s for current detectors is 0.07 to 0.5 Bq/sample. Quantitative determinations of radium-226 are made by counting the high energy alpha particles which radium-226 progeny emit using liquid scintillation counting (LSC). The minimum detectable activity (MDA) is 3.8 E-3 Bq/sample. The maximum concentration which may be counted on available instruments without dilution is about 2 E + 5 Bq/sample. Typically, this determination of radium in a 2 L sample has a yield of 80%. If radium-228 is determined using a 16 h count after 50 h grow-in, the typical MDL is 1 E-9 to 8 E-9 {mu}Ci/mL (1 to 8 pCi/L). If radium-226 is determined using a 2.5 h count after 150 h grow-in, the typical MDA is about 1 E-10 {mu}Ci/mL (0. 1 pCi/L).

  9. Determination of radium in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohorst, F.A.; Huntley, M.W.; Hartenstein, S.D.

    1995-10-01

    These detailed work instructions (DWIs) are tailored for the analysis of radium-226 and radium-228 in drinking water supplies from ground water and surface water sources and composites derived from them. The instructions have been adapted from several sources, including a draft EPA method. One objective was to minimize the generation of mixed wastes. Quantitative determinations of actinium-228 are made at 911 keV. The minimum detection level (MDL) for the gamma spectrometric measurements at this energy vary with matrix, volume, geometry, detector, background, and counting statistics. The range of MDL's for current detectors is 0.07 to 0.5 Bq/sample. Quantitative determinations of radium-226 are made by counting the high energy alpha particles which radium-226 progeny emit using liquid scintillation counting (LSC). The minimum detectable activity (MDA) is 3.8 E-3 Bq/sample. The maximum concentration which may be counted on available instruments without dilution is about 2 E + 5 Bq/sample. Typically, this determination of radium in a 2 L sample has a yield of 80%. If radium-228 is determined using a 16 h count after 50 h grow-in, the typical MDL is 1 E-9 to 8 E-9 μCi/mL (1 to 8 pCi/L). If radium-226 is determined using a 2.5 h count after 150 h grow-in, the typical MDA is about 1 E-10 μCi/mL (0. 1 pCi/L)

  10. Coupling of ion temperature gradient and trapped electron modes in the presence of impurities in tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Huarong; Wang, Zheng-Xiong; Dong, J. Q.; Liu, S. F.

    2014-05-01

    The coupling of ion temperature gradient (ITG or ηi) mode and trapped electron mode (TEM) in the presence of impurity ions is numerically investigated in toroidal collisionless plasmas, using the gyrokinetic integral eigenmode equation. A framework for excitations of the ITG modes and TEMs with respect to their driving sources is formulated first, and then the roles of impurity ions played in are analyzed comprehensively. In particular, the characteristics of the ITG and TEM instabilities in the presence of impurity ions are emphasized for both strong and weak coupling (hybrid and coexistent) cases. It is found that the impurity ions with inwardly (outwardly) peaked density profiles have stabilizing (destabilizing) effects on the hybrid (namely the TE-ITG) modes in consistence with previous works. A new finding of this work is that the impurity ions have stabilizing effects on TEMs in small ηi (ηi≤1) regime regardless of peaking directions of their density profiles whereas the impurity ions with density gradient Lez=Lne/Lnz>1 (LezTEMs in large ηi (ηi≥1) regime. In addition, the dependences of the growth rate, real frequency, eigenmode structure, and wave spectrum on charge concentration, charge number, and mass of impurity ions are analyzed in detail. The necessity for taking impurity ion effects on the features of turbulence into account in future transport experimental data analyses is also discussed.

  11. Deuterium ion irradiation damage and deuterium trapping mechanism in candidate stainless steel material (JPCA2) for fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashizuka, Norihiro; Kurita, Takaaki; Yoshida, Naoaki; Fujiwara, Tadashi; Muroga, Takeo

    1987-01-01

    An improved austenitic stainless steel (JPCA), a candidate material for fusion reactor, is irradiated at room temperature with deuterium ion beams. Desorption spectra of deuterium gas is measured at various increased temperatures and defects formed under irradiation are observed by transmission electron microscopy to determine the mechanism of the thermal release of deuteriums and the characteristics of irradiation-induced defects involved in the process. In the deuterium deportion spectra observed, five release stages are found to exist at 90 deg C, 160 deg C, 220 deg C, 300 deg C and 400 deg C, referred to as Stage I, II, III, IV and V, respectively. Stage I is interpreted as representing the release of deuteriums trapped in point defects (presumably vacancies) formed under irradiation. The energy of desorption from the trapping sites is estimated at 0.8 eV. Stage II is concluded to be associated with the release of deuteriums trapped in a certain kind of existing defects. Stage III involves the release of deuteriums that are trapped in dislocations, dislocation loops or dislocated portions of stacking fault tetrahedra. This release occurs significantly in processed materials and other materials irradiated with high energy ion beams that may cause cascade damage. Stage IV is interpreted in terms of thermal decomposition of small deuterium clusters. Stage V is associated with the decomposition of rather large deuterium clusters grown on the {111} plane. (Nogami, K.)

  12. Magnetic field fluctuations analysis for the ion trap implementation of the quantum Rabi model in the deep strong coupling regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puebla, Ricardo; Casanova, Jorge; Plenio, Martin B.

    2018-03-01

    The dynamics of the quantum Rabi model (QRM) in the deep strong coupling regime is theoretically analyzed in a trapped-ion set-up. Recognizably, the main hallmark of this regime is the emergence of collapses and revivals, whose faithful observation is hindered under realistic magnetic dephasing noise. Here, we discuss how to attain a faithful implementation of the QRM in the deep strong coupling regime which is robust against magnetic field fluctuations and at the same time provides a large tunability of the simulated parameters. This is achieved by combining standing wave laser configuration with continuous dynamical decoupling. In addition, we study the role that amplitude fluctuations play to correctly attain the QRM using the proposed method. In this manner, the present work further supports the suitability of continuous dynamical decoupling techniques in trapped-ion settings to faithfully realize different interacting dynamics.

  13. Enhanced light trapping by focused ion beam (FIB) induced self-organized nanoripples on germanium (100) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaliya, Bhaveshkumar; Mote, Rakesh G.; Aslam, Mohammed; Fu, Jing

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate enhanced light trapping by self-organized nanoripples on the germanium surface. The enhanced light trapping leading to high absorption of light is confirmed by the experimental studies as well as the numerical simulations using the finite-difference time-domain method. We used gallium ion (Ga+) focused ion beam to enable the formation of the self-organized nanoripples on the germanium (100) surface. During the fabrication, the overlap of the scanning beam is varied from zero to negative value and found to influence the orientation of the nanoripples. Evolution of nanostructures with the variation of beam overlap is investigated. Parallel, perpendicular, and randomly aligned nanoripples with respect to the scanning direction are obtained via manipulation of the scanning beam overlap. 95% broadband absorptance is measured in the visible electromagnetic region for the nanorippled germanium surface. The reported light absorption enhancement can significantly improve the efficiency of germanium-silicon based photovoltaic systems.

  14. Deep level transient spectroscopy studies of charge traps introduced into silicon by channeling ion implantation of phosphorus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCallum, J.C.; Lay, M.; Deenapanray, P.N.K.; Jagadish, C.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The operating conditions of a silicon-based quantum computer are expected to place stringent requirements on the quality of the material and the processes used to make it. In the Special Research Centre for Quantum Computer Technology, ion implantation is one of the principle processing techniques under investigation for forming an ordered array of phosphorus atoms. This technique introduces defect centres in silicon which act as charge traps. Charge traps are expected to be detrimental to operation of the device. These defect centres, their dependence on ion implantation and thermal annealing conditions are being quantified using Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS). Since the aspect ratio of the masks required for the top-down fabrication process restrict the incident ions to a range of angles in which they may undergo channeling implantation in the silicon substrate, we have examined the effect of channeling implantation on the nature and quantity of the charge traps produced. This is the first time that DLTS studies have been performed for channeling implantation of a dopant species in silicon. DLTS is well-suited to the dose regime of ∼10 11 P/cm 3 required for the quantum computer, however, a standard DLTS measurement is unable to probe the shallow depth range of ∼ 20 nm required for the P atoms (∼ 10-15 keV implantation energy). Our aim has therefore been to perform P implants in the appropriate dose regime but using higher implantation energies, ∼ 75-450 keV, where DLTS can directly identify and profile the charge traps induced by the implantation step and monitor their annealing characteristics during subsequent processing. To map the behaviour observed in this energy regime onto the low energy range required for the quantum computer we are comparing the DLTS results to damage profiles predicted by the Monte Carlo code Crystal Trim which is used in the semiconductor industry to simulate ion implantation processes in crystalline

  15. Sideband-cooling of trapped ytterbium-ions in the microwave regime; Seitenbandkuehlung von gespeicherten Ytterbium-Ionen im Mikrowellenregime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scharfenberger, Benedikt J.

    2012-12-14

    Trapped ions in a Paul trap are at present one of the most promising candidates for Quantum Information Processing (QIP). The technique that is used for this purpose in this experiment was introduced in 2001 by F. Mintert and Ch. Wunderlich. The core of this method is the use of atomic transitions in the radio- or microwave region, while a magnetic field gradient along the trap axis (where the ion chain is situated) lifts the degeneracy of the transition frequencies, such that the ions can be distinguished in frequency space; it also serves for the coupling of internal and external degrees of freedom of the ion chain. This method is called MAGIC (MAgnetic Gradient Induced Coupling). The performance of the measurements required that the apparatus of the experiment, which consists of laser sources, lambdameter, vacuum- and microwave system as well as imaging- and detection-units, had to be assembled and tested, which was an important prerequisite for the successful performance of the here described experiments. For the experiments it is advantageous to prepare the ions in an energetic state close to the motional ground state, which contributes to a reduction of the dephasing of the system while manipulating it with microwaves. By using the sideband-cooling technique to the sub-Doppler regime it is taken advantage of the fact, that ions in a linear trap are in good approximation situated in a harmonic oscillator potential and can therefore only populate discrete vibrational energy levels, whose frequency difference is given by the axial trap frequency {omega}{sub z}. If the system is excited by a microwave, which frequency is detuned from resonance to lower energies by a vibrational quantum, the ion looses one such phonon within each cooling-cycle. When this cycle is driven several times, the average phonon number and thus the temperature of the ion can be reduced efficiently and the ion can be initialized in a state close to the motional ground state. As sideband

  16. Differential fragmentation patterns of pectin oligogalacturonides observed by nanoelectrospray quadrupole ion-trap mass spectrometry using automated spectra interpretation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mutenda, Kudzai E; Matthiesen, Rune; Roepstorff, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Oligogalacturonides of different degrees of polymerization (DP) and methyl esterification (DE) were structurally analyzed by nanoESI quadrupole ion-trap mass spectrometry. The fragmentation patterns of the oligogalacturonides were compared using the program 'Virtual Expert Mass Spectrometrist...... with free carboxylic acid groups underwent higher water loss compared to fully methyl-esterified oligogalacturonides under the same fragmentation conditions. Cross-ring cleavage, in which fragmentation occurs across the ring system of the galacturonate residue and signified by unique mass losses...... water loss than methyl-esterified ones will be postulated. In addition, the VEMS program was extended to automatically interpret and assign the fragment ions peaks generated in this study....

  17. Calorimetric Low-Temperature Detectors for X-Ray Spectroscopy on Trapped Highly-Charged Heavy Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourne, Caroline; Kraft-Bermuth, S.; Andrianov, V.; Bleile, A.; Echler, A.; Egelhof, P.; Ilieva, S.; Kilbourne, C.; McCammon, D.

    2012-01-01

    The application of Calorimetric Low-Temperature Detectors (CLTDs) has been proposed at the Heavy-Ion TRAP facility HITRAP which is currently being installed at the Helmholtz Research Center for Heavy Ion Research GSI. This cold ion trap setup will allow the investigation of X-rays from ions practically at rest, for which the excellent energy resolution of CLTDs can be used to its full advantage. However, the relatively low intensities at HITRAP demand larger solid angles and an optimized cryogenic setup. The influence of external magnetic fields has to be taken into account. CLTDs will also be a substantial part of the instrumental equipment at the future Facility for Antiproton and Heavy Ion Research (FAIR), for which a wide variety of high-precision X-ray spectroscopy experiments has been proposed. This contribution will give an overview on the chances and challenges for the application of CLTDs at HITRAP as well as perspectives for future experiments at the FAIR facility.

  18. Transverse acceptance calculation for continuous ion beam injection into the electron beam ion trap charge breeder of the ReA post-accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kittimanapun, K., E-mail: kritsadak@slri.or.th [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), Michigan State University (MSU), 640 S. Shaw Lane, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Synchrotron Light Research Institute (SLRI), 111 University Avenue, Muang District, Nakhon Ratchasima, 30000 (Thailand); Baumann, T.M.; Lapierre, A.; Schwarz, S. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), Michigan State University (MSU), 640 S. Shaw Lane, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Bollen, G. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), Michigan State University (MSU), 640 S. Shaw Lane, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), Michigan State University, 640 S. Shaw Lane, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    2015-11-11

    The ReA post-accelerator at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) employs an electron beam ion trap (EBIT) as a charge breeder. A Monte-Carlo simulation code was developed to calculate the transverse acceptance phase space of the EBIT for continuously injected ion beams and to determine the capture efficiency in dependence of the transverse beam emittance. For this purpose, the code records the position and time of changes in charge state of injected ions, leading either to capture or loss of ions. To benchmark and validate the code, calculated capture efficiencies were compared with results from a geometrical model and measurements. The results of the code agree with the experimental findings within a few 10%. The code predicts a maximum total capture efficiency of 50% for EBIT parameters readily achievable and an efficiency of up to 80% for an electron beam current density of 1900 A/cm{sup 2}.

  19. Effect of the helically-trapped energetic-ion-driven resistive interchange modes on energetic ion confinement in the Large Helical Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, K.; Isobe, M.; Kawase, H.; Nishitani, T.; Seki, R.; Osakabe, M.; LHD Experiment Group

    2018-04-01

    The effect of the helically-trapped energetic-ion-driven resistive interchange modes (EICs) on energetic ion confinement is studied in the Large Helical Device deuterium plasmas. Neutron diagnostics such as the neutron flux monitor and the vertical neutron camera (VNC) are used in order to measure neutrons mainly created by beam-plasma reactions. The line-integrated neutron profiles are obtained by VNC in magnetohydrodynamic-quiet plasma with various neutral beam (NB) injection patterns. The profiles are consistent with that expected by the beam ion density calculated using orbit-following simulations. Significant decreases of the total neutron emission rate (S n) and the neutron counting rate of the VNC (C n) in central cords are observed to be synchronized with EIC bursts with perpendicular-NB injection. The drop rates of both S n and C n increase with EIC amplitude and reach around 50%. The line-integrated neutron profiles before and after EIC burst show that in the central cords, C n decrease due to EIC burst whereas there is almost no change in the other cords. The experimental results suggests that the effect of EIC on helically-trapped beam ion is substantial, however the effect of passing beam ion is not significant.

  20. Linear ion-trap mass spectrometric characterization of human pituitary nitrotyrosine-containing proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Xianquan; Desiderio, Dominic M.

    2007-01-01

    The nitric oxide-mediated Tyr-nitration of endogenous proteins is associated with several pathological and physiological processes. In order to investigate the presence - and potential roles - of Tyr-nitration in the human pituitary, a large-format two-dimensional gel separation plus a Western blot against a specific anti-3-nitrotyrosine antibody were used to separate and detect nitroproteins from a human pituitary proteome. The nitroproteins were subjected to in-gel trypsin digestion, and high-sensitivity vacuum matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (vMALDI) linear ion-trap tandem mass spectrometry was used to analyze the tryptic peptides. Those MS/MS data were used to determine the amino acid sequence and the specific nitration site of each tryptic nitropeptide, and were matched to corresponding proteins with Bioworks TuboSEQUEST software. Compared to our previous study, 16 new nitrotyrosine-immunoreactive positive Western blot spots were found within the area pI 3.0-10 and Mr 10-100 kDa. Four new nitroproteins were discovered: the stanniocalcin 1 precursor--involved in calcium and phosphate metabolism; mitochondrial co-chaperone protein HscB, which might act as a co-chaperone in iron-sulfur cluster assembly in mitochrondria; progestin and adipoQ receptor family member III--a seven-transmembrane receptor; proteasome subunit alpha type 2--involved in an ATP/ubiquitin-dependent non-lysosomal proteolytic pathway. Those data demonstrate that nitric oxide-mediated Tyr-nitration might participate in various biochemical, metabolic, and pathological processes in the human pituitary.

  1. Development of a Linear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer (LITMS) Investigation for Future Planetary Surface Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinckerhoff, W.; Danell, R.; Van Ameron, F.; Pinnick, V.; Li, X.; Arevalo, R.; Glavin, D.; Getty, S.; Mahaffy, P.; Chu, P.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Future surface missions to Mars and other planetary bodies will benefit from continued advances in miniature sensor and sample handling technologies that enable high-performance chemical analyses of natural samples. Fine-scale (approx.1 mm and below) analyses of rock surfaces and interiors, such as exposed on a drill core, will permit (1) the detection of habitability markers including complex organics in association with their original depositional environment, and (2) the characterization of successive layers and gradients that can reveal the time-evolution of those environments. In particular, if broad-based and highly-sensitive mass spectrometry techniques could be brought to such scales, the resulting planetary science capability would be truly powerful. The Linear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer (LITMS) investigation is designed to conduct fine-scale organic and inorganic analyses of short (approx.5-10 cm) rock cores such as could be acquired by a planetary lander or rover arm-based drill. LITMS combines both pyrolysis/gas chromatograph mass spectrometry (GCMS) of sub-sampled core fines, and laser desorption mass spectrometry (LDMS) of the intact core surface, using a common mass analyzer, enhanced from the design used in the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) instrument on the 2018 ExoMars rover. LITMS additionally features developments based on the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) investigation on MSL and recent NASA-funded prototype efforts in laser mass spectrometry, pyrolysis, and precision subsampling. LITMS brings these combined capabilities to achieve its four measurement objectives: (1) Organics: Broad Survey Detect organic molecules over a wide range of molecular weight, volatility, electronegativity, concentration, and host mineralogy. (2) Organic: Molecular Structure Characterize internal molecular structure to identify individual compounds, and reveal functionalization and processing. (3) Inorganic Host Environment Assess the local chemical

  2. A compensated multi-pole linear ion trap mercury frequency standard for ultra-stable timekeeping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Eric A; Diener, William A; Tjoelker, Robert L

    2008-12-01

    The multi-pole linear ion trap frequency standard (LITS) being developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has demonstrated excellent short- and long-term stability. The technology has now demonstrated long-term field operation providing a new capability for timekeeping standards. Recently implemented enhancements have resulted in a record line Q of 5 x 10(12) for a room temperature microwave atomic transition and a short-term fractional frequency stability of 5 x 10(-14)/tau(1/2). A scheme for compensating the second order Doppler shift has led to a reduction of the combined sensitivity to the primary LITS systematic effects below 5 x 10(-17) fractional frequency. Initial comparisons to JPL's cesium fountain clock show a systematic floor of less than 2 x 10(-16). The compensated multi-pole LITS at JPL was operated continuously and unattended for a 9-mo period from October 2006 to July 2007. During that time it was used as the frequency reference for the JPL geodetic receiver known as JPLT, enabling comparisons to any clock used as a reference for an International GNSS Service (IGS) site. Comparisons with the laser-cooled primary frequency standards that reported to the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) over this period show a frequency deviation less than 2.7 x 10(-17)/day. In the capacity of a stand-alone ultra-stable flywheel, such a standard could be invaluable for long-term timekeeping applications in metrology labs while its methodology and robustness make it ideal for space applications as well.

  3. Detection of Chemical/Biological Agents and Stimulants using Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, S.H.; Hart, K.J.; Vass, A.A.; Wise, M.B.; Wolf, D.A.

    1999-01-01

    expanded with additional bacteria and fungi. These spectra were acquired on a Finnigan Magnum ion trap using helium buffer gas. A new database of Cl spectra of microorganisms is planned using the CBMS Block II instrument and air as the buffer gas. Using the current database, the fatty acid composition of the organisms was compared using the percentage of the ion current attributable to fatty acids. The data presented suggest promising rules for discrimination of these organisms. Strain, growth media and vegetative state do contribute to some of the distributions observed in the data. However, the data distributions observed in the current study only reflect our experience to date and do not fully represent the variability that might be expected in practice: Acquisition of MS/ MS spectra has begun (using He and air buffer gas) of the protonated molecular ion of a variety of fatty acids and for a number of ions nominally assigned as fatty acids from microorganisms. These spectra will be used to help verify fatty acid

  4. Recombination in Perovskite Solar Cells : Significance of Grain Boundaries, Interface Traps, and Defect Ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sherkar, Tejas; Momblona, Cristina; Gil-Escrig, Lidon; Avila, Jorge; Sessolo, Michele; Bolink, Henk J.; Koster, Lambert

    2017-01-01

    Trap-assisted recombination, despite being lower as compared with traditional inorganic solar cells, is still the dominant recombination mechanism in perovskite solar cells (PSCs) and limits their efficiency. We investigate the attributes of the primary trap-assisted recombination channels (grain

  5. Occurrence of Radium-224, Radium-226 and Radium-228 in Water from the Vincentown and Wenonah-Mount Laurel Aquifers, the Englishtown Aquifer System, and the Hornerstown and Red Bank Sands, Southwestern and South-Central New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    dePaul, Vincent T.; Szabo, Zoltan

    2007-01-01

    This investigation is the first regionally focused study of the presence of natural radioactivity in water from the Vincentown and Wenonah-Mount Laurel aquifers, Englishtown aquifer system, and the Hornerstown and Red Bank Sands. Geologic materials composing the Vincentown and Wenonah-Mount Laurel aquifers and the Hornerstown and Red Bank Sands previously have been reported to contain radioactive (uranium-enriched) phosphatic strata, which is common in deposits from some moderate-depth coastal marine environments. The decay of uranium and thorium gives rise to natural radioactivity and numerous radioactive progeny, including isotopes of radium. Naturally occurring radioactive isotopes, especially those of radium, are of concern because radium is a known human carcinogen and ingestion (especially in water used for drinking) can present appreciable health risks. A regional network in southwestern and south-central New Jersey of 39 wells completed in the Vincentown and Wenonah-Mount Laurel aquifers, the Englishtown aquifer system, and the Hornerstown and Red Bank Sands was sampled for determination of gross alpha-particle activity; concentrations of radium radionuclides, major ions, and selected trace elements; and physical properties. Concentrations of radium-224, radium-226, and radium-228 were determined for water from 28 of the 39 wells, whereas gross alpha-particle activity was determined for all 39. The alpha spectroscopic technique was used to determine concentrations of radium-224, which ranged from less than 0.5 to 2.7 pCi/L with a median concentration of less than 0.5pCi/L, and of radium-226, which ranged from less than 0.5 to 3.2 pCi/L with a median concentration of less than 0.5 pCi/L. The beta-counting technique was used to determine concentrations of radium-228. The concentration of radium-228 ranged from less than 0.5 to 4.3 pCi/L with a median of less than 0.5. Radium-228, when quantifiable, had the greatest concentration of the three radium

  6. Chemical Mass Shifts in a Digital Linear Ion Trap as Analytical Identity of o-, m-, and p-Xylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lulu; Xue, Bing; Huang, Zhengxu; Cheng, Ping; Ma, Li; Ding, Li; Zhou, Zhen

    2018-07-01

    Chemical mass shifts between isomeric ions of o-, m-, and p-xylene were measured using a digital linear ion trap, and the directions and values of the shifts were found to be correlated to the collision cross sections of the isomers. Both forward and reverse scans were used and the chemical shifts for each pair of isomers in scans of opposite directions were in opposite signs. Using different voltage settings (namely the voltage dividing ratio-VDR) of the ion trap allows adding high order field components in the quadrupole field and results in larger chemical mass shifts. The differential chemical mass shift which combined the shifts from forward and reverse scans doubled the amount of chemical shift, e.g., 0.077 Th between o- and p-xylene, enough for identification of the type of isomer without using an additional ion mobility spectrometer. The feature of equal and opposite chemical mass shifts also allowed to null out the chemical mass shift by calculating the mean m/z value between the two opposite scans and remove or reduce the mass error caused by chemical mass shift. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  7. Chemical Mass Shifts in a Digital Linear Ion Trap as Analytical Identity of o-, m-, and p-Xylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lulu; Xue, Bing; Huang, Zhengxu; Cheng, Ping; Ma, Li; Ding, Li; Zhou, Zhen

    2018-04-01

    Chemical mass shifts between isomeric ions of o-, m-, and p-xylene were measured using a digital linear ion trap, and the directions and values of the shifts were found to be correlated to the collision cross sections of the isomers. Both forward and reverse scans were used and the chemical shifts for each pair of isomers in scans of opposite directions were in opposite signs. Using different voltage settings (namely the voltage dividing ratio-VDR) of the ion trap allows adding high order field components in the quadrupole field and results in larger chemical mass shifts. The differential chemical mass shift which combined the shifts from forward and reverse scans doubled the amount of chemical shift, e.g., 0.077 Th between o- and p-xylene, enough for identification of the type of isomer without using an additional ion mobility spectrometer. The feature of equal and opposite chemical mass shifts also allowed to null out the chemical mass shift by calculating the mean m/z value between the two opposite scans and remove or reduce the mass error caused by chemical mass shift. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  8. In-depth study of in-trap high-resolution mass separation by transversal ion ejection from a multi-reflection time-of-flight device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Paul; Knauer, Stefan; Marx, Gerrit; Schweikhard, Lutz

    2018-01-01

    The recently introduced method of ion separation by transversal ejection of unwanted species in electrostatic ion-beam traps and multi-reflection time-of-flight devices has been further studied in detail. As this separation is performed during the ion storage itself, there is no need for additional external devices such as ion gates or traps for either pre- or postselection of the ions of interest. The ejection of unwanted contaminant ions is performed by appropriate pulses of the potentials of deflector electrodes. These segmented ring electrodes are located off-center in the trap, i.e., between one of the two ion mirrors and the central drift tube, which also serves as a potential lift for capturing incoming ions and axially ejecting ions of interest after their selection. The various parameters affecting the selection effectivity and resolving power are illustrated with tin-cluster measurements, where isotopologue ion species provide mass differences down to a single atomic mass unit at ion masses of several hundred. Symmetric deflection voltages of only 10 V were found sufficient for the transversal ejection of ion species with as few as three deflection pulses. The duty cycle, i.e., the pulse duration with respect to the period of ion revolution, has been varied, resulting in resolving powers of up to several tens of thousands for this selection technique.

  9. Energy measurement of fast ions trapped in the toroidal magnetic field ripple of Tore Supra during ICRF heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basiuk, V.; Becoulet, A.; Grisolia, C.; Hutter, T.; Mayaux, G.; Martin, G.; Saoutic, B.; Vartanian, S.

    1995-01-01

    Direct losses of ions trapped in the toroidal field ripple of Tore Supra using two techniques were made. The first (DRIPPLE I) correlates the ion loss current measured by an electric probe with the ion loss power measured by a calorimeter. As the calorimeter integrates over all particle energies and time, it yields only the averaged lost ion energy. The second technique (DRIPPLE II), still under development, is a Faraday cup positioned and filtered so as to select ions by their Larmor radius. The currents measured are small (1-100 nA), and improvements in instrumentation are needed to take full advantage of the data, but the preliminary results are still useful. During ICRH (hydrogen minority regime, resonance on axis) a direct correlation between the lost ion mean energy and the density of hydrogen was seen. The energy increased when the hydrogen minority density decreased. Moreover, the line averaged density and the lower hybrid heating (LH) had also an effect on fast ion losses. (authors). 3 refs., 7 figs

  10. Influence of the shear flow on electron cyclotron resonance plasma confinement in an axisymmetric magnetic mirror trap of the electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izotov, I. V.; Razin, S. V.; Sidorov, A. V.; Skalyga, V. A.; Zorin, V. G.; Bagryansky, P. A.; Beklemishev, A. D.; Prikhodko, V. V.

    2012-01-01

    Influence of shear flows of the dense plasma created under conditions of the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) gas breakdown on the plasma confinement in the axisymmetric mirror trap (''vortex'' confinement) was studied experimentally and theoretically. A limiter with bias potential was set inside the mirror trap for plasma rotation. The limiter construction and the optimal value of the potential were chosen according to the results of the preliminary theoretical analysis. This method of ''vortex'' confinement realization in an axisymmetric mirror trap for non-equilibrium heavy-ion plasmas seems to be promising for creation of ECR multicharged ion sources with high magnetic fields, more than 1 T.

  11. Influence of the shear flow on electron cyclotron resonance plasma confinement in an axisymmetric magnetic mirror trap of the electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izotov, I V; Razin, S V; Sidorov, A V; Skalyga, V A; Zorin, V G; Bagryansky, P A; Beklemishev, A D; Prikhodko, V V

    2012-02-01

    Influence of shear flows of the dense plasma created under conditions of the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) gas breakdown on the plasma confinement in the axisymmetric mirror trap ("vortex" confinement) was studied experimentally and theoretically. A limiter with bias potential was set inside the mirror trap for plasma rotation. The limiter construction and the optimal value of the potential were chosen according to the results of the preliminary theoretical analysis. This method of "vortex" confinement realization in an axisymmetric mirror trap for non-equilibrium heavy-ion plasmas seems to be promising for creation of ECR multicharged ion sources with high magnetic fields, more than 1 T.

  12. Radium in consumer products: an historical perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holm, W.M.

    1978-01-01

    This paper demonstrates in historical and technical perspective how radium began to be used in consumer products and how changing conditions in technology and regulations have greatly modified the use of radium. In addition, the various uses of radium that have been tried or have been used in consumer products have been described, and whenever possible, the historical perspective has been used to show when devices were needed and when changing conditions caused the products to be no longer required. The historical perspective attitude is again used in the evaluation of the risks and benefits of radium in comparison to radium substitutes

  13. The centenary of discovery of radium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazeron, J.-J.; Gerbaulet, A.

    1998-01-01

    Henri Becquerel presented the discovery of radium by Pierre and Marie Curie at the Paris Academy of Science on 26th December 1898. One century later, radium has been abandoned, mainly for radiation protection difficulties. It is, however, likely that modern techniques of brachytherapy have inherited to those designed for radium sources, and that radium has cured thousands and thousands patients all over the world for about eighty years. The history of discovery and medical use of radium is summarised. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  14. Storage ion trap of an 'In-Flight Capture' type for precise mass measurement of radioactive nuclear reaction products and fission fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarantin, N.I.

    2001-01-01

    Data on nuclear masses provide a basis for creating and testing various nuclear models. A tandem system of FLNR comprised of the U-400M cyclotron, the COMBAS magnetic separator and the mass-spectrometric ion trap of an 'in-flight capture' type is considered as a possible complex for producing of the short-lived nuclei in fragmentation reactions by heavy ions and for precise mass measurement of these nuclei. The plan of scientific and technical FLNR research includes a project DRIBs for producing beams of accelerated radioactive nuclear reaction products and photofission fragments. This project proposes also precise mass measurements of the fission fragment with the help of the ion trap. The in-flight entrance of the ions and their capture in the mass-spectrometric ion trap using the monochromatizing degrader, the static electric and magnetic fields and a new invention, a magnetic unidirectional transporting ventil, is considered

  15. Eye changes induced by radium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, G.N.; Lloyd, R.D.; Shabestari, Lorraine; Angus, Walter; Muggenburg, B.A.

    1989-01-01

    This report presents some features of the radium induced eye syndrome observed in beagles, including the prominence of intraocular pigmentary lesions and compares these with the results of rodent studies (Onychomys leucogaster) featuring a heavily pigmented uvea, and with the radiation syndrome reported in humans. (author)

  16. Inspection of radium-needles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stekelenburg, L.H.M. van.

    1976-01-01

    A method for leak testing of a radium point source is given. The point source was placed for three days in a closed bottle containing 15 ml of scintillation liquid (Instagel). After removing the point source, the decrease in activity was measured over a 25 day period

  17. Prehistory of Z=88 radium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwankner, R.J.; Schoeffl, P.; Lieckfeld, G.

    1994-01-01

    Radium discovery in tailings of early uranium industry was the beginning of its widespread use e.g. in research, medicine and luminous paint production. It is this development taking place in various fields as well as recent results of custodian radiometry, that will be subject of the presentation. (orig.) [de

  18. Removal of radium-226 from radium-contaminated soil using humic acid by column leaching method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esther Phillip; Muhamad Samudi Yasir

    2012-01-01

    In this study, evaluation of radium-226 removal from radium-contaminated soil using humic acid extracted from peat soil by column leaching method was carried out. Humic acid of concentration 100 ppm and pH 7 was leached through a column packed with radium-contaminated soil and leachates collected were analysed with gamma spectrometer to determine the leached radium-226. Results obtained indicated low removal of radium-226 between 1 - 4 %. Meanwhile, leaching profile revealed that radium-226 was bound to soil components with three different strength, thus resulting in three phases of radium-226 removal. It was estimated that the total removal of radium-226 from 10 g radium-contaminated soil sample studied could be achieved using approximately 31500 - 31850 ml HA solutions with leaching rate of 1 ml/ min. (author)

  19. Digital quantum simulation, Schrödinger cat state spectroscopy and setting up a linear ion trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hempel, C.

    2014-01-01

    This PhD thesis reports on two experiments in the field of quantum information processing using trapped calcium ions. In addition, the text covers the setup and characterization of a new linear Paul trap accompanied by a novel implementation of single-ion addressing using an acousto-optic deflector. The first of the two experiments is concerned with the proof-of-principle implementation of digital quantum simulations using up to 6 ions and 100 gate operations. It investigates the scaling behavior of simulations of elementary models of magnetism in terms of the number of involved spins and the complexity of their mutual interactions. The second experiment introduces the application of a Schroedinger cat state in the indirect detection of photon scattering events on a broad electronic transition. The method is shown to have a sensitivity down to the single photon level in a proof-of-principle demonstration using a mixed-isotope crystal of 40Ca+ and 44Ca+. A brief outlook towards future experiments and extensions of the experimental setup concludes the manuscript.(author) [de

  20. Penning-trap mass spectrometry of radioactive, highly charged ions. Measurements of neutron-rich Rb and Sr nuclides for nuclear astrophysics and development of a novel Penning trap for cooling highly charged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, Vanessa Veronique

    2012-01-01

    High-precision atomic mass measurements are vital for the description of nuclear structure, investigations of nuclear astrophysical processes, and tests of fundamental symmetries. The neutron-rich A ∼ 100 region presents challenges for modeling the astrophysical r-process because of sudden nuclear shape transitions. This thesis reports on high-precision masses of short-lived neutron-rich 94,97,98 Rb and 94,97-99 Sr isotopes using the TITAN Penning-trap mass spectrometer at TRIUMF. The isotopes were charge-bred to q = 15+; uncertainties of less than 4 keV were achieved. Results deviate by up to 11σ compared to earlier measurements and extend the region of nuclear deformation observed in the A∼100 region. A parameterized r-process model network calculation shows that mass uncertainties for the elemental abundances in this region are now negligible. Although beneficial for the measurement precision, the charge breeding process leads to an increased energy spread of the ions on the order of tens of eV/q. To eliminate this drawback, a Cooler Penning Trap (CPET) has been developed as part of this thesis. The novel multi-electrode trap structure of CPET forms nested potentials to cool HCI sympathetically using either electrons or protons to increase the overall efficiency and precision of the mass measurement. The status of the off-line setup and initial commissioning experiments are presented.

  1. Acetonitrile Chemical Ionization Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry of Chemical Warfare Agents and Their Degradation Products

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rohrbaugh, Dennis

    1998-01-01

    .... The protonated molecular ion was observed as the dominant ion and base peak for HD, VX, GA, 1,4-dithiane, 2-diisopropylaminoethanol, and the trimethylsilyl derivatives of methylphosphonic acid...

  2. Determination of radium in urine; Dosage du radium dans l'urine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fourniguet, H; Jeanmaire, L; Jammet, H [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-07-01

    A procedure for the quantitative analysis of radium in urine is described. The radium is carried by a barium sulfate precipitate. The precipitate is mixed with zinc sulfide and the activity measured by scintillation counting. It is thus possible to detect an amount of radium less than 1 pico-curie in the sample. (author) [French] Cet article decrit une technique de dosage du radium dans l'urine. Le radium entraine par un precipite de sulfate de baryum est compte par scintillation apres melange du precipite avec du sulfure de zinc. Cette methode permet de deceler moins de 1 picocurie de radium dans l'echantillon. (auteur)

  3. A Dual Source Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer for the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer of ExoMars 2018

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brickerhoff, William B.; vanAmerom, F. H. W.; Danell, R. M.; Arevalo, R.; Atanassova, M.; Hovmand, L.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Cotter, R. J.

    2011-01-01

    We present details on the objectives, requirements, design and operational approach of the core mass spectrometer of the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) investigation on the 2018 ExoMars mission. The MOMA mass spectrometer enables the investigation to fulfill its objective of analyzing the chemical composition of organic compounds in solid samples obtained from the near surface of Mars. Two methods of ionization are realized, associated with different modes of MOMA operation, in a single compact ion trap mass spectrometer. The stringent mass and power constraints of the mission have led to features such as low voltage and low frequency RF operation [1] and pulse counting detection.

  4. Case report 361: Radium intoxication with radium-induced osteonecrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milgram, J.W.; Jasty, M.

    1986-03-01

    In summary, a male patient was treated with radium chloride for arthritis involving both knees at a time when he had gonococcal urethritis. He was then 20 years of age and was followed until his death 40 years later at the age of 60 years. During that interval this individual, who possessed one of the largest burdens of radium ever recorded in man, developed spontaneous fractures of both femori and one humerus, symptomatic osteonecrosis of both femoral heads, dramatic progressive radiological findings of bone, and finally, a carcinoma of the maxillary sinus which proved to be the cause of his death. Tissue was obtained from both cortical and cancellous bone at four different times during the patient's life and again at post-mortem. Progressive ischemia with abnormal calcification and then necrosis of both bone and bone marrow were demonstrated in the skeletal tissues. The pathological chances are correlated superbly with the roentgenograms in this report.

  5. Mobilities of ions trapped on vortex lines in dilute 3He--4He solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, W.; Dahm, A.J.

    1976-01-01

    A model calculation of the mobility of a positive ion in the presence of 3 He atoms condensed on a vortex core is presented. Reasonable qualitative and quantitative agreement between theory and experiment is obtained, and reasons for differences are discussed. A reason for the larger mobility of the negative ion in comparison to the smaller positive ion is suggested. The contribution of vortex waves to the scattering of ions is addressed

  6. Trapped-ion quantum simulation of excitation transport: Disordered, noisy, and long-range connected quantum networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautmann, N.; Hauke, P.

    2018-02-01

    The transport of excitations governs fundamental properties of matter. Particularly rich physics emerges in the interplay between disorder and environmental noise, even in small systems such as photosynthetic biomolecules. Counterintuitively, noise can enhance coherent quantum transport, which has been proposed as a mechanism behind the high transport efficiencies observed in photosynthetic complexes. This effect has been called "environment-assisted quantum transport". Here, we propose a quantum simulation of the excitation transport in an open quantum network, taking advantage of the high controllability of current trapped-ion experiments. Our scheme allows for the controlled study of various different aspects of the excitation transfer, ranging from the influence of static disorder and interaction range, over the effect of Markovian and non-Markovian dephasing, to the impact of a continuous insertion of excitations. Our paper discusses experimental error sources and realistic parameters, showing that it can be implemented in state-of-the-art ion-chain experiments.

  7. Unusual case of radium exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toohey, R.E.; Sha, J.Y.; Urnezis, P.W.; Hwang, E.Y.

    1984-01-01

    We have determined the body content, distribution, retention, and excretion rate of 226 Ra for a uranium mill worker who inhaled 226 Ra in an unknown form. Radium was retained in the lung with a biological half-life of 120 days, an the amount initially inhaled was estimated to be 180 +- 30 Bq. These values, combined with an observed radon retention factor of 71%, implied a 50-year dose commitment of 0.16 +- 0.04 Sv to the lung. Although it is believed that this case represents an isolated incident, it is possible that some uranium mill workers may form a contemporary population that is occupationally exposed to radium. 5 references, 2 figures, 2 tables

  8. Simulation of the elementary evolution operator with the motional states of an ion in an anharmonic trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Ludovic; Vaeck, Nathalie [Laboratoire de Chimie Quantique et Photophysique, CP 160/09 Université Libre de Bruxelles, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Justum, Yves [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique, UMR 8000 and CNRS, Université Paris-Sud, F-91405 Orsay (France); Desouter-Lecomte, M. [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique, UMR 8000 and CNRS, Université Paris-Sud, F-91405 Orsay (France); Département de Chimie, Université de Liège, Bât B6c, Sart Tilman B-4000, Liège (Belgium)

    2015-04-07

    Following a recent proposal of L. Wang and D. Babikov [J. Chem. Phys. 137, 064301 (2012)], we theoretically illustrate the possibility of using the motional states of a Cd{sup +} ion trapped in a slightly anharmonic potential to simulate the single-particle time-dependent Schrödinger equation. The simulated wave packet is discretized on a spatial grid and the grid points are mapped on the ion motional states which define the qubit network. The localization probability at each grid point is obtained from the population in the corresponding motional state. The quantum gate is the elementary evolution operator corresponding to the time-dependent Schrödinger equation of the simulated system. The corresponding matrix can be estimated by any numerical algorithm. The radio-frequency field which is able to drive this unitary transformation among the qubit states of the ion is obtained by multi-target optimal control theory. The ion is assumed to be cooled in the ground motional state, and the preliminary step consists in initializing the qubits with the amplitudes of the initial simulated wave packet. The time evolution of the localization probability at the grids points is then obtained by successive applications of the gate and reading out the motional state population. The gate field is always identical for a given simulated potential, only the field preparing the initial wave packet has to be optimized for different simulations. We check the stability of the simulation against decoherence due to fluctuating electric fields in the trap electrodes by applying dissipative Lindblad dynamics.

  9. Collective focusing ion accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldin, F.J.

    1986-01-01

    The principal subject of this dissertation is the trapping confinement of pure electron plasmas in bumpy toroidal magnetic fields, with particular attention given to the trapping procedure and the behavior of the plasma during the final equilibrium. The most important aspects of the equilibrium studied were the qualitative nature of the plasma configuration and motion and its density, distribution and stability. The motivation for this study was that an unneutralized cloud of electrons contained in a toroidal system, sufficiently dense and stable, may serve to electrostatically focus ions (against centrifugal and self space charge forces) in a cyclic ion accelerator. Such an accelerator, known as a Collective Focusing Ion Accelerator (CFIA) could be far smaller than conventional designs (which use external magnetic fields directly to focus the ions) due to the smaller gyro-radium of an electron in a magnetic field of given strength. The electron cloud generally drifted poloidally at a finite radius from the toroidal minor axis. As this would preclude focusing ions with such clouds, damping this motion was investigated. Finite resistance in the normally perfectly conductive vessel wall did this. In further preparation for a working CFIA, additional experiments studied the effect of ions on the stability of the electron cloud

  10. Leukemia and radium groundwater contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tracy, B.L.; Letourneau, E.G.

    1986-01-01

    In the August 2, 1985, issue of JAMMA, Lyman et al claim to have shown an association between leukemia incidence in Florida and radium in groundwater supplies. Although cautious in their conclusions, the authors imply that this excess in leukemia was in fact caused by radiation. The authors believe they have not presented a convincing argument for causation. The radiation doses at these levels of exposure could account for only a tiny fraction of the leukemia excess

  11. An aircraft-borne chemical ionization – ion trap mass spectrometer (CI-ITMS for fast PAN and PPN measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Schlager

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available An airborne chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometer instrument (CI-ITMS has been developed for tropospheric and stratospheric fast in-situ measurements of PAN (peroxyacetyl nitrate and PPN (peroxypropionyl nitrate. The first scientific deployment of the FASTPEX instrument (FASTPEX = Fast Measurement of Peroxyacyl nitrates took place in the Arctic during 18 missions aboard the DLR research aircraft Falcon, within the framework of the POLARCAT-GRACE campaign in the summer of 2008. The FASTPEX instrument is described and characteristic properties of the employed ion trap mass spectrometer are discussed. Atmospheric data obtained at altitudes of up to ~12 km are presented, from the boundary layer to the lowermost stratosphere. Data were sampled with a time resolution of 2 s and a 2σ detection limit of 25 pmol mol−1. An isotopically labelled standard was used for a permanent on-line calibration. For this reason the accuracy of the PAN measurements is better than ±10% for mixing ratios greater than 200 pmol mol−1. PAN mixing ratios in the summer Arctic troposphere were in the order of a few hundred pmol mol−1 and generally correlated well with CO. In the Arctic boundary layer and lowermost stratosphere smaller PAN mixing ratios were observed due to a combination of missing local sources of PAN precursor gases and efficient removal processes (thermolysis/photolysis. PPN, the second most abundant PAN homologue, was measured simultaneously. Observed PPN/PAN ratios range between ~0.03 and 0.3.

  12. DTI scouting mission to Japan on trapped ions for measurement and enterprise (TIME) 26th-30th November 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, H.; Knight, D.; Plimmer, M.; Silver, J.

    2002-01-01

    This report describes the findings of the DTI sponsored scouting mission to Japan 'Trapped Ions for Measurement and Enterprise' (TIME). It focuses particularly on new optical frequency standards (for which trapped ions are strong candidates) and measurement of optical frequency standards using femtosecond comb laser systems. There has been a 'sea change' in optical frequency metrology using these measurement systems, and ensuing technical developments are moving quickly, with potential implications for telecommunications and photonics, navigation and ultimately for time measurement. The mission examined what the UK and Japan have in common in this field and the scope for future collaborations. It included visits to two national laboratories, the National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ) and the Communications Research Laboratory (CRL), two companies, Anritsu and NTT, and discussions with staff at the University of Electrocommunications and Kyoto University. At the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) in the UK and elsewhere there have recently been developments of femtosecond comb laser systems, which have been used to measure the absolute frequencies of several optical frequency standards including several very stable ion- trap based standards. In Japan these measurement systems at the National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ) have been used to measure the optical frequencies of iodine stabilised lasers, but trapped-ion based optical standards still need development. More detailed observations and conclusions include: a) The measurement opportunities offered by femtosecond laser comb technology were widely appreciated by scientists in Japan. b) Many of the laboratories we visited were very well equipped, in some cases better than those in the UK. For example NMIJ already had 5 femtosecond comb systems. c) A feasibility study on optical frequency standards and clocks was being started at CRL Koganei; future work would be likely to involve collaboration with the

  13. NH2- in a cold ion trap with He buffer gas: Ab initio quantum modeling of the interaction potential and of state-changing multichannel dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Vera, Mario; Yurtsever, Ersin; Wester, Roland; Gianturco, Franco A.

    2018-05-01

    We present an extensive range of accurate ab initio calculations, which map in detail the spatial electronic potential energy surface that describes the interaction between the molecular anion NH2 - (1A1) in its ground electronic state and the He atom. The time-independent close-coupling method is employed to generate the corresponding rotationally inelastic cross sections, and then the state-changing rates over a range of temperatures from 10 to 30 K, which is expected to realistically represent the experimental trapping conditions for this ion in a radio frequency ion trap filled with helium buffer gas. The overall evolutionary kinetics of the rotational level population involving the molecular anion in the cold trap is also modelled during a photodetachment experiment and analyzed using the computed rates. The present results clearly indicate the possibility of selectively detecting differences in behavior between the ortho- and para-anions undergoing photodetachment in the trap.

  14. Determination of triacylglycerol regioisomers using electrospray ionization-quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry with a kinetic method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leveque, Nathalie L; Acheampong, Akwasi; Heron, Sylvie; Tchapla, Alain

    2012-04-13

    The kinetic method was applied to differentiate and quantify mixtures of regioisomeric triacylglycerols (TAGs) by generating and mass selecting alkali ion bound metal dimeric clusters with a TAG chosen as reference (ref) and examining their competitive dissociations in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. This methodology readily distinguished pairs of regioisomers (AAB/ABA) such as LLO/LOL, OOP/OPO and SSP/SPS and consequently distinguished sn-1/sn-3, sn-2 substituents on the glycerol backbone. The dimeric complex ions [ref, Li, TAG((AAB and/or ABA))](+) generated by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry were subjected to collision induced dissociation causing competitive loss of either the neutral TAG reference (ref) leading to [Li(AAB and/or ABA)](+) or the neutral TAG molecule (TAG((AAB and/or ABA))) leading to [ref, Li](+). The ratio of the two competitive dissociation rates, defined by the product ion branching ratio (R(iso)), was related via the kinetic method to the regioisomeric composition of the investigated TAG mixture. In this work, a linear correlation was established between composition of the mixture of each TAG regioisomer and the logarithm of the branching ratio for competitive fragmentation. Depending on the availability of at least one TAG regioisomer as standard, the kinetic method and the standard additions method led to the quantitative analysis of natural TAG mixtures. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Nonlinear Ion Harmonics in the Paul Trap with Added Octopole Field: Theoretical Characterization and New Insight into Nonlinear Resonance Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Caiqiao; Zhou, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Ning; Zhan, Lingpeng; Chen, Yongtai; Nie, Zongxiu

    2016-02-01

    The nonlinear harmonics within the ion motion are the fingerprint of the nonlinear fields. They are exclusively introduced by these nonlinear fields and are responsible to some specific nonlinear effects such as nonlinear resonance effect. In this article, the ion motion in the quadrupole field with a weak superimposed octopole component, described by the nonlinear Mathieu equation (NME), was studied by using the analytical harmonic balance (HB) method. Good accuracy of the HB method, which was comparable with that of the numerical fourth-order Runge-Kutta (4th RK), was achieved in the entire first stability region, except for the points at the stability boundary (i.e., β = 1) and at the nonlinear resonance condition (i.e., β = 0.5). Using the HB method, the nonlinear 3β harmonic series introduced by the octopole component and the resultant nonlinear resonance effect were characterized. At nonlinear resonance, obvious resonant peaks were observed in the nonlinear 3β series of ion motion, but were not found in the natural harmonics. In addition, both resonant excitation and absorption peaks could be observed, simultaneously. These are two unique features of the nonlinear resonance, distinguishing it from the normal resonance. Finally, an approximation equation was given to describe the corresponding working parameter, q nr , at nonlinear resonance. This equation can help avoid the sensitivity degradation due to the operation of ion traps at the nonlinear resonance condition.

  16. Screening and identification of steroidal saponins from Anemarrhena asphodeloides employing UPLC tandem triple quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yong-Gang; Guo, Xin-Dong; Liang, Jun; Yang, Bing-You; Kuang, Hai-Xue

    2017-09-01

    This study presents a practical and valid strategy for the screening and structural characterization of Anemarrhena asphodeloides Bge steroidal saponins (SSs) using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with triple quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometry. The whole analytical protocols integrate four-step procedures in the positive mode: (1) rational deduction of mass fragmentation pathways of A. asphodeloides SSs; (2) untargeted screening of potential A. asphodeloides SSs by multiple-ion monitoring-information-dependent-acquiring-enhanced product ion (MIM-IDA-EPI) scan through reverse phase liquid chromatography; (3) comprehensive construction of an ammoniated precursor ion database by combining untargeted MIM-IDA-EPI scans and data literature; and (4) structural interpretation of targeted A. asphodeloides SSs using MIM-IDA-EPI and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM)-IDA-EPI with an energy-resolved technique. The protocols were used to analyze SSs in A. asphodeloides; of the 87 detected SSs that were unambiguously characterized or tentatively identified, 19 compounds were the first to be reported from A. asphodeloides and 13 ones were characterized as potential new compounds. Accuracy of the analytical procedure was demonstrated by structural identification of three SSs by NMR spectroscopy. The proposed schemes hold an excellent promise in the structural prediction and interpretation of complex SSs from plant medicines by mass spectrometry. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Radium issues at Hunters Point Annex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dean, S.M.

    1994-01-01

    Radium was a common source of illumination used in numerous instruments and gauges for military equipment prior to 1970. As a result of its many military applications radium 226 is now a principle radionuclide of concern at military base closures sites throughout the United States. This is an overview of the site characterization strategy employed and a potential site remediation technology being considered at a radium contaminated landfill at Hunters Point Annex, a former U.S. Navy shipyard in San Francisco, California

  18. Calculation of axial secular frequencies in a nonlinear ion trap with hexapole, octupole, decapole and dodecapole superpositions by the combined methods of multiple scales and Lindstedt-Poincare

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doroudi, A.; Emampour, M.; Emampour, M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper a combination of the method of multiple scales and the method of Lindstedt-Poincare which is a perturbative technique is used for calculation of axial secular frequencies of a nonlinear ion trap in the presence of second ,third, fourth and fifth order nonlinear terms of the potential distribution within the trap. The frequencies are calculated. The calculated frequencies are compared with the results of multiple scales method and the exact results.

  19. Evaluation of Turner relaxed state as a model of long-lived ion-trapping structures in plasma focus and Z-pinches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auluck, S. K. H.

    2011-03-01

    Relatively long-lived spheroidal structures coincident with the neutron emission phase have been observed in frozen deuterium fiber Z-pinch and some plasma focus devices. Existence of energetic ion-trapping mechanism in plasma focus has also been inferred from experimental data. It has been conjectured that these are related phenomena. This paper applies Turner's theory [L. Turner, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 14, 849 (1986)] of relaxation of a Hall magnetofluid to construct a model of these structures and ion-trapping mechanism. Turner's solution modified for a finite-length plasma is used to obtain expressions for the magnetic field, velocity, and equilibrium pressure fields and is shown to represent an entity which is simultaneously a fluid vortex, a force-free magnetic field, a confined finite-pressure plasma, a charged object, and a trapped energetic ion beam. Characteristic features expected from diagnostic experiments are evaluated and shown to resemble experimental observations.

  20. Calibration of the OHREX high-resolution imaging crystal spectrometer at the Livermore electron beam ion traps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hell, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Dr. Remeis-Sternwarte and ECAP, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Bamberg 96049 (Germany); Beiersdorfer, P.; Magee, E. W.; Brown, G. V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    We report the calibration of the Orion High-Resolution X-ray (OHREX) imaging crystal spectrometer at the EBIT-I electron beam ion trap at Livermore. Two such instruments, dubbed OHREX-1 and OHREX-2, are fielded for plasma diagnostics at the Orion laser facility in the United Kingdom. The OHREX spectrometer can simultaneously house two spherically bent crystals with a radius of curvature of r = 67.2 cm. The focusing properties of the spectrometer allow both for larger distance to the source due to the increase in collected light and for observation of extended sources. OHREX is designed to cover a 2.5°–3° spectral range at Bragg angles around 51.3°. The typically high resolving powers at these large Bragg angles are ideally suited for line shape diagnostics. For instance, the nominal resolving power of the instrument (>10 000) is much higher than the effective resolving power associated with the Doppler broadening due to the temperature of the trapped ions in EBIT-I. The effective resolving power is only around 3000 at typical EBIT-I conditions, which nevertheless is sufficient to set up and test the instrument’s spectral characteristics. We have calibrated the spectral range for a number of crystals using well known reference lines in the first and second order and derived the ion temperatures from these lines. We have also made use of the 50 μm size of the EBIT-I source width to characterize the spatial focusing of the spectrometer.