WorldWideScience

Sample records for trapped radium ion

  1. Precision spectroscopy of trapped radioactive radium ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giri, G. S.; Versolato, O. O.; Wansbeek, L. W.; van den Berg, J. E.; van der Hoek, D. J.; Jungmann, K.; Kruithof, W. L.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Sahoo, B. K.; Santra, B.; Shidling, P. D.; Timmermans, R. G. E.; Willmann, L.; Wilschut, H. W.

    Atomic parity violation (APV) can be measured in a single Ra(+) ion, enabling a precise measurement of the electroweak mixing angle in the Standard Model of particle physics at low momentum transfer. This provides sensitivity to new particles such as extra Z(0) bosons or leptoquarks. The Weinberg

  2. Radium removal from Canadian uranium mining effluents by a radium-selective ion exchange complexer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-07-01

    A laboratory test program was initiated by the Department of Energy, Mines and Resources as part of the National Uranium Tailings Program to investigate the applicability of a radium-selective ion exchange complexer for removing radium from Canadian uranium mining effluents. The ion exchange complexer was shown to be efficient in removing radium from contaminated water of uranium mining operations, with the ultimate loading capacity of the resin on one type of water treated being determined as approximately 1,600 Bq/cm 3 of new resin. The results showed that the resin was effective in removing radium but not any other contaminants

  3. Cryogenic surface ion traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niedermayr, M.

    2015-01-01

    Microfabricated surface traps are a promising architecture to realize a scalable quantum computer based on trapped ions. In principle, hundreds or thousands of surface traps can be located on a single substrate in order to provide large arrays of interacting ions. To this end, trap designs and fabrication methods are required that provide scalable, stable and reproducible ion traps. This work presents a novel surface-trap design developed for cryogenic applications. Intrinsic silicon is used as the substrate material of the traps. The well-developed microfabrication and structuring methods of silicon are utilized to create simple and reproducible traps. The traps were tested and characterized in a cryogenic setup. Ions could be trapped and their life time and motional heating were investigated. Long ion lifetimes of several hours were observed and the measured heating rates were reproducibly low at around 1 phonon per second at a trap frequency of 1 MHz. (author) [de

  4. Evaluating ion exchange for removing radium from ground water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subramonian, S.; Clifford, D.; Vijjeswarapu, W.

    1990-05-01

    The article focuses on the results of bench- and pilot-scale studies of ion exchange processes for radium removal from groundwater in Lemont, Ill. Batch and column studies indicated a very high resin selectivity for radium compared with common cations. Exhaustion-regeneration studies with a variety of resins showed that a standard gel-type strong-acid cation exchanger is most suitable for radium removal in cyclic operation. Because the ion exchange softening process, operating to hardness breakthrough (300-360 bed volumes (BV)), removes radium but does not fully utilize the resin capacity, cyclic runs were made with resins exhausted to radium breakthrough (2,500-3,000 BV) and regenerated with sodium and calcium salts. But because of poor radium regenerability of the exhausted resins, simultaneous breakthrough of radium and hardness occurred during the subsequent exhaustion run on the sodium cycle, and high radium leakage was observed on the calcium cycle. The sodium ion exchange softening process (operated to hardness breakthrough without regenerant reuse) continues to be an appropriate technology for the removal of radium

  5. Quadrupole Ion Traps

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    electron bound to the gravitational field, the 'geonium atom'. The first atomic hyperfine structure experiment on trapped ions was performed by Dehmelt's group using the stored-ion exchange-collision technique in a Paul trap which paved the way for some of the subsequent experiment for atomic frequency. A single atom at.

  6. Ion Trap Quantum Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    stored ions,” Adv. Atom Mol. Phys., vol. Volume 3, pp. 53–72 1968. [48] P. H. Dawson, Quadrupole Mass Spectometry and Its Applications, Melville, NY... DATE December 2011 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ion trap Quantum Computing 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6...researcher [30] that introduced the concept of ion traps in the 1950s. His experiments focused on separating atoms with different masses in order to

  7. Collinear resonance ionization spectroscopy of radium ions

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose to study the neutron-deficient radium isotopes with high-resolution collinear resonance ionization spectroscopy. Probing the hyperfine structure of the $7{s}\\,^2\\!{S}\\!_{1/2}\\,\\rightarrow\\,7{p}\\,^{2}\\!{P}\\!_{1/2}$ and $7{s}\\,^{2}\\!{S}\\!_{1/2}\\,\\rightarrow\\,7{p}\\,^{2}\\!{P}\\!_{3/2}$ transitions in Ra II will provide atomic-structure measurements that have not been achieved for $^{{A}<208}$Ra. Measurement of the $7{s}\\,^{2}\\!{S}\\!_{1/2}\\,\\rightarrow\\,7{p}\\,^{2}\\!{P}\\!_{3/2}$ transition in $^{{A}<214}$Ra will allow the spectroscopic quadrupole moments to be directly measured for the first time. In addition, the technique will allow tentative spin assignments to be confirmed and the magnetic dipole moments measured for $^{\\textit{A}<208}$Ra. Measurement of the hyperfine structure (in particular the isotope shifts) of the neutron-deficient radium will provide information to further constrain the nuclear models away from the N=126 shell closure.

  8. Radium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerskov-Klika, Midana; Lokner, Vladimir

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the problem of control and/or storage of radiation sources used in hospitals in Croatia. The administration organization of the country, now being established; work on the new legislation, and the regulatory framework for protection against radiation, combined with a desire to achieve the systematic and safe storage of all existing radioactive waste, until the construction of a disposal site for low- and medium - level radiation waste, have all contributed to the decision whereby all radiation sources in Croatia are to be located and made safe. Accordingly, it was agreed that a commission, involving Croatian Health Ministry, the Hazardous Waste Management Agency, the Institute for Medical Research, and the Ruder Boskovic Institute, should organize the search, collection and conditioning of all radium sources which have been used in medical establishments throughout Croatia. The subsequent investigation revealed that almost half of all radium sources are located in an old storage facility at the Institute for Medical Research. Those sources, as well as others located in hospitals following months of investigation, have now been collected together in one place - the Ruder Boskovic Institute. Following a process of identification, and entry in a relevant data base, all sources were subject to a conditioning procedure. They were placed in stainless-steel capsules, each capsule containing approximately 50 milli curries of radium. The capsules are scaled with a lid, welded in a place using a special procedure, which totally isolates the contents from the environment. Neither radium nor its products are able to escape from the capsule. Then, the capsules, in groups of ten, are placed in a massive lead container, which prevents leakage of radiation resulting from disintegration. The lead container is placed inside a stainless-steel barrel filled with concrete. In this way, the radium sources no longer pose any threat to the environment. Due to its long

  9. Trapped Ion Qubits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maunz, Peter Lukas Wilhelm

    2017-04-01

    Qubits can be encoded in clock states of trapped ions. These states are well isolated from the environment resulting in long coherence times [1] while enabling efficient high-fidelity qubit interactions mediated by the Coulomb coupled motion of the ions in the trap. Quantum states can be prepared with high fidelity and measured efficiently using fluorescence detection. State preparation and detection with 99.93% fidelity have been realized in multiple systems [1,2]. Single qubit gates have been demonstrated below rigorous fault-tolerance thresholds [1,3]. Two qubit gates have been realized with more than 99.9% fidelity [4,5]. Quantum algorithms have been demonstrated on systems of 5 to 15 qubits [6–8].

  10. Quantum computing with trapped ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    The significance of quantum computation for cryptography is discussed. Following a brief survey of the requirements for quantum computational hardware, an overview of the ion trap quantum computation project at Los Alamos is presented. The physical limitations to quantum computation with trapped ions are analyzed and an assessment of the computational potential of the technology is made.

  11. Ion funnel ion trap and process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belov, Mikhail E [Richland, WA; Ibrahim, Yehia M [Richland, WA; Clowers, Biran H [West Richland, WA; Prior, David C [Hermiston, OR; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

    2011-02-15

    An ion funnel trap is described that includes a inlet portion, a trapping portion, and a outlet portion that couples, in normal operation, with an ion funnel. The ion trap operates efficiently at a pressure of .about.1 Torr and provides for: 1) removal of low mass-to-charge (m/z) ion species, 2) ion accumulation efficiency of up to 80%, 3) charge capacity of .about.10,000,000 elementary charges, 4) ion ejection time of 40 to 200 .mu.s, and 5) optimized variable ion accumulation times. Ion accumulation with low concentration peptide mixtures has shown an increase in analyte signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) of a factor of 30, and a greater than 10-fold improvement in SNR for multiply charged analytes.

  12. Quadrupole Ion Traps

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    elimination of transit-time broadening making it possible to do precision spectroscopic measurements on these ions. Several important experiments with single electron or ion have been undertaken to address problems related to basic physics, such as the measurement of the electron radius, precision measurements of ...

  13. Microfabricated linear Paul-Straubel ion trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, Michael A [Albuquerque, NM; Blain, Matthew G [Albuquerque, NM; Tigges, Chris P [Albuquerque, NM; Linker, Kevin L [Albuquerque, NM

    2011-04-19

    An array of microfabricated linear Paul-Straubel ion traps can be used for mass spectrometric applications. Each ion trap comprises two parallel inner RF electrodes and two parallel outer DC control electrodes symmetric about a central trap axis and suspended over an opening in a substrate. Neighboring ion traps in the array can share a common outer DC control electrode. The ions confined transversely by an RF quadrupole electric field potential well on the ion trap axis. The array can trap a wide array of ions.

  14. Quantum computing with trapped ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeffner, H.; Roos, C.F.; Blatt, R.

    2008-01-01

    Quantum computers hold the promise of solving certain computational tasks much more efficiently than classical computers. We review recent experimental advances towards a quantum computer with trapped ions. In particular, various implementations of qubits, quantum gates and some key experiments are discussed. Furthermore, we review some implementations of quantum algorithms such as a deterministic teleportation of quantum information and an error correction scheme

  15. Quantum Games in ion traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buluta, Iulia Maria; Fujiwara, Shingo; Hasegawa, Shuichi

    2006-01-01

    We propose a general, scalable framework for implementing two-choices-multiplayer Quantum Games in ion traps. In particular, we discuss two famous examples: the Quantum Prisoners' Dilemma and the Quantum Minority Game. An analysis of decoherence due to intensity fluctuations in the applied laser fields is also provided

  16. Quantum Games in ion traps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buluta, Iulia Maria [Department of Quantum Engineering and Systems Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)]. E-mail: noa@lyman.q.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Fujiwara, Shingo [Department of Quantum Engineering and Systems Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)]. E-mail: fujiwara@lyman.q.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Hasegawa, Shuichi [Department of Quantum Engineering and Systems Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)]. E-mail: hasegawa@q.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2006-10-09

    We propose a general, scalable framework for implementing two-choices-multiplayer Quantum Games in ion traps. In particular, we discuss two famous examples: the Quantum Prisoners' Dilemma and the Quantum Minority Game. An analysis of decoherence due to intensity fluctuations in the applied laser fields is also provided.

  17. Ion trap architectures and new directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siverns, James D.; Quraishi, Qudsia

    2017-12-01

    Trapped ion technology has seen advances in performance, robustness and versatility over the last decade. With increasing numbers of trapped ion groups worldwide, a myriad of trap architectures are currently in use. Applications of trapped ions include: quantum simulation, computing and networking, time standards and fundamental studies in quantum dynamics. Design of such traps is driven by these various research aims, but some universally desirable properties have lead to the development of ion trap foundries. Additionally, the excellent control achievable with trapped ions and the ability to do photonic readout has allowed progress on quantum networking using entanglement between remotely situated ion-based nodes. Here, we present a selection of trap architectures currently in use by the community and present their most salient characteristics, identifying features particularly suited for quantum networking. We also discuss our own in-house research efforts aimed at long-distance trapped ion networking.

  18. Microscale ion trap mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, J. Michael; Witten, William B.; Kornienko, Oleg

    2002-01-01

    An ion trap for mass spectrometric chemical analysis of ions is delineated. The ion trap includes a central electrode having an aperture; a pair of insulators, each having an aperture; a pair of end cap electrodes, each having an aperture; a first electronic signal source coupled to the central electrode; a second electronic signal source coupled to the end cap electrodes. The central electrode, insulators, and end cap electrodes are united in a sandwich construction where their respective apertures are coaxially aligned and symmetric about an axis to form a partially enclosed cavity having an effective radius r.sub.0 and an effective length 2z.sub.0, wherein r.sub.0 and/or z.sub.0 are less than 1.0 mm, and a ratio z.sub.0 /r.sub.0 is greater than 0.83.

  19. Rotation sensing with trapped ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, W. C.; Hamilton, P.

    2017-03-01

    We present a protocol for rotation measurement via matter-wave Sagnac interferometry using trapped ions. The ion trap based interferometer encloses a large area in a compact apparatus through repeated round-trips in a Sagnac geometry. We show how a uniform magnetic field can be used to close the interferometer over a large dynamic range in rotation speed and measurement bandwidth without contrast loss. Since this technique does not require the ions to be confined in the Lamb-Dicke regime, Doppler laser cooling should be sufficient to reach a sensitivity of { S }=1.4× {10}-6 {{rad}} {{{s}}}-1 {{{H}}{{z}}}-1/2. , which features invited work from the best early-career researchers working within the scope of J. Phys. B. This project is part of the Journal of Physics series’ 50th anniversary celebrations in 2017. Wes Campbell was selected by the Editorial Board of J. Phys. B as an Emerging Leader.

  20. Scaling ion traps for quantum computing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Uys, H

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The design, fabrication and preliminary testing of a chipscale, multi-zone, surface electrode ion trap is reported. The modular design and fabrication techniques used are anticipated to advance scalability of ion trap quantum computing architectures...

  1. Laser induced fluorescence of trapped molecular ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grieman, F.J.

    1979-10-01

    An experimental apparatus for obtaining the optical spectra of molecular ions is described. The experimental technique includes the use of three dimensional ion trapping, laser induced fluorescence, and gated photon counting methods. The ions, which are produced by electron impact, are confined in a radio-frequency quadrupole ion trap of cylindrical design. Because the quadrupole ion trap allows mass selection of the molecular ion desired for study, the analysis of the spectra obtained is greatly simplified. The ion trap also confines the ions to a region easily probed by a laser beam. 18 references.

  2. Laser induced fluorescence of trapped molecular ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grieman, F.J.

    1979-10-01

    An experimental apparatus for obtaining the optical spectra of molecular ions is described. The experimental technique includes the use of three dimensional ion trapping, laser induced fluorescence, and gated photon counting methods. The ions, which are produced by electron impact, are confined in a radio-frequency quadrupole ion trap of cylindrical design. Because the quadrupole ion trap allows mass selection of the molecular ion desired for study, the analysis of the spectra obtained is greatly simplified. The ion trap also confines the ions to a region easily probed by a laser beam. 18 references

  3. The Aarhus Ion Micro-Trap Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miroshnychenko, Yevhen; Nielsen, Otto; Poulsen, Gregers

    and installed in an ultra high vacuum chamber, which includes an ablation oven for all-optical loading of the trap [2]. The next steps on the project are to demonstrate the operation of the micro-trap and the cooling of ions using fiber delivered light. [1] D. Grant, Development of Micro-Scale Ion traps, Master...

  4. Ion temperature gradient driven turbulence with strong trapped ion resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosuga, Y., E-mail: kosuga@riam.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Institute for Advanced Study, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Itoh, S.-I. [Research Center for Plasma Turbulence, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Diamond, P. H. [CASS and CMTFO, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); WCI Center for Fusion Theory, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Itoh, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Gifu (Japan); Research Center for Plasma Turbulence, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Lesur, M. [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2014-10-15

    A theory to describe basic characterization of ion temperature gradient driven turbulence with strong trapped ion resonance is presented. The role of trapped ion granulations, clusters of trapped ions correlated by precession resonance, is the focus. Microscopically, the presence of trapped ion granulations leads to a sharp (logarithmic) divergence of two point phase space density correlation at small scales. Macroscopically, trapped ion granulations excite potential fluctuations that do not satisfy dispersion relation and so broaden frequency spectrum. The line width from emission due only to trapped ion granulations is calculated. The result shows that the line width depends on ion free energy and electron dissipation, which implies that non-adiabatic electrons are essential to recover non-trivial dynamics of trapped ion granulations. Relevant testable predictions are summarized.

  5. Potential of electric quadrupole transitions in radium isotopes for single-ion optical frequency standards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versolato, O. O.; Wansbeek, L. W.; Jungmann, K.; Timmermans, R. G. E.; Willmann, L.; Wilschut, H. W.

    2011-01-01

    We explore the potential of the electric quadrupole transitions 7s (2)S(1/2)-(6)d (2)D(3/2), 6d (2)D(5/2) in radium isotopes as single-ion optical frequency standards. The frequency shifts of the clock transitions due to external fields and the corresponding uncertainties are calculated. Several

  6. Atomic ion clock with two ion traps, and method to transfer ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestage, John D. (Inventor); Chung, Sang K. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An atomic ion clock with a first ion trap and a second ion trap, where the second ion trap is of higher order than the first ion trap. In one embodiment, ions may be shuttled back and forth from one ion trap to the other by application of voltage ramps to the electrodes in the ion traps, where microwave interrogation takes place when the ions are in the second ion trap, and fluorescence is induced and measured when the ions are in the first ion trap. In one embodiment, the RF voltages applied to the second ion trap to contain the ions are at a higher frequency than that applied to the first ion trap. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  7. Cryptography, quantum computation and trapped ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Richard J.

    1998-03-01

    The significance of quantum computation for cryptography is discussed. Following a brief survey of the requirements for quantum computational hardware, an overview of the ion trap quantum computation project at Los Alamos is presented. The physical limitations to quantum computation with trapped ions are analyzed and an assessment of the computational potential of the technology is made.

  8. Practical aspects of trapped ion mass spectrometry, 5 applications of ion trapping devices

    CERN Document Server

    March, Raymond E

    2009-01-01

    Examines ion/neutral and ion/ion reactions, ion spectroscopy, and the structural characterization of proteins and peptides using quadropole ion trap mass spectrometry, Fourier transform - ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry, and traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry.

  9. Spectroscopy with trapped highly charged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beiersdorfer, Peter

    2009-01-01

    We give an overview of atomic spectroscopy performed on electron beam ion traps at various locations throughout the world. Spectroscopy at these facilities contributes to various areas of science and engineering, including but not limited to basic atomic physics, astrophysics, extreme ultraviolet lithography, and the development of density and temperature diagnostics of fusion plasmas. These contributions are accomplished by generating, for example, spectral surveys, making precise radiative lifetime measurements, accounting for radiative power emitted in a given wavelength band, illucidating isotopic effects, and testing collisional-radiative models. While spectroscopy with electron beam ion traps had originally focused on the x-ray emission from highly charged ions interacting with the electron beam, the operating modes of such devices have expanded to study radiation in almost all wavelength bands from the visible to the hard x-ray region; and at several facilities the ions can be studied even in the absence of an electron beam. Photon emission after charge exchange or laser excitation has been observed; and the work is no longer restricted to highly charged ions. Much of the experimental capabilities are unique to electron beam ion traps, and the work performed with these devices cannot be undertaken elsewhere. However, in other areas the work on electron beam ion traps rivals the spectroscopy performed with conventional ion traps or heavy-ion storage rings. The examples we present highlight many of the capabilities of the existing electron beam ion traps and their contributions to physics.

  10. Nonlinear spectroscopy of trapped ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlawin, Frank; Gessner, Manuel; Mukamel, Shaul; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2014-08-01

    Nonlinear spectroscopy employs a series of laser pulses to interrogate dynamics in large interacting many-body systems, and it has become a highly successful method for experiments in chemical physics. Current quantum optical experiments approach system sizes and levels of complexity that require the development of efficient techniques to assess spectral and dynamical features with scalable experimental overhead. However, established methods from optical spectroscopy of macroscopic ensembles cannot be applied straightforwardly to few-atom systems. Based on the ideas proposed in M. Gessner et al., (arXiv:1312.3365), we develop a diagrammatic approach to construct nonlinear measurement protocols for controlled quantum systems, and we discuss experimental implementations with trapped ion technology in detail. These methods, in combination with distinct features of ultracold-matter systems, allow us to monitor and analyze excitation dynamics in both the electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom. They are independent of system size, and they can therefore reliably probe systems in which, e.g., quantum state tomography becomes prohibitively expensive. We propose signals that can probe steady-state currents, detect the influence of anharmonicities on phonon transport, and identify signatures of chaotic dynamics near a quantum phase transition in an Ising-type spin chain.

  11. Highly charged ions trapping for lifetime measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attia, D.

    2007-10-01

    A new experimental setup dedicated to highly charged ion trapping is presented in this work. The final goal is to perform lifetime measurement of metastable states produced by our ECR (Electron Cyclotron Resonance) ion source. Lifetimes to be measured are in the range of a few ms and more. We have measured the lifetimes of the M1 transitions of the metastable states of Ar 9+ , Ar 13+ and Ar 14+ . These measurements are useful to test the N-body problem in the relativistic range. The trap we have built, was designed a few years ago at the Weizman Institute in Israel, it allows ions with an energy of several keV to be trapped for lifetimes of about 1 second. This trap was originally designed to study the dynamics of excited molecules. We have shown for the first time how the trap operates and that it can operate with highly charged ions. We have studied the beam dynamics of highly charged ions and the trap has been tested with various species of ions and different charge states: from O + to O 6+ , from Ar 8+ to Ar 13+ , and from Kr 13+ to Kr 20+

  12. Sympathetic cooling of ions in a hybrid atom ion trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeltkemeier, Bastian

    2016-10-27

    In this thesis the dynamics of a trapped ion immersed in a spatially localized buffer gas is investigated. For a homogeneous buffer gas, the ion's energy distribution reaches a stable equilibrium only if the mass of the buffer gas atoms is below a critical value. This limitation can be overcome by using multipole traps in combination and/or a spatially confined buffer gas. Using a generalized model for elastic collisions of the ion with the buffer gas atoms, the ion's energy distribution is numerically determined for arbitrary buffer gas distributions and trap parameters. Three regimes characterized by the respective analytic form of the ion's equilibrium energy distribution are found. One of these is a novel regime at large atom-to-ion mass ratios where the final ion temperature can tuned by adiabatically decreasing the spatial extension of the buffer gas and the effective ion trap depth (forced sympathetic cooling). The second part of the thesis presents a hybrid atom ion trap designed for sympathetic cooling of hydroxide anions. In this hybrid trap the anions are immersed in a cloud of laser cooled rubidium atoms. The translational and rovibrational temperatures of the anions is probed by photodetachment tomography and spectroscopy which shows the first ever indication of sympathetic cooling of anions by laser cooled atoms.

  13. Ions kinematics in an electrostatic ion beam trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attia, D

    2004-06-01

    In this study, I have tried to provide a better understanding of the dynamics of ions inside an electrostatic ion beam trap. The electrostatic ion trap allows to store ions moving between two electrostatic mirrors. Although the trap has been developed already seven years ago, no direct measurement of the transversal velocity distribution of the ions has been performed. Such quantity is central for understanding the conditions under which a beam should be produced (mainly emittance) in order to be trapped by such a device. The data I have obtained during the course of this work are based on an experimental technique which relies on the direct imaging of the particles exiting the trap, as well as on numerical simulations of the ion trajectories inside the trap. I have personally been involved in the hardware development of the imaging system, the data acquisition and analysis of the data as well as il all numerical calculations presented here. These results allow us to obtain, for the first time, experimental information on the transverse phase space of the trap, and contribute to the overall understanding of the ion motion in this system. (author)

  14. An electrostatic autoresonant ion trap mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermakov, A. V.; Hinch, B. J.

    2010-01-01

    A new method for ion extraction from an anharmonic electrostatic trap is introduced. Anharmonicity is a common feature of electrostatic traps which can be used for small scale spatial confinement of ions, and this feature is also necessary for autoresonant ion extraction. With the aid of ion trajectory simulations, novel autoresonant trap mass spectrometers (ART-MSs) have been designed based on these very simple principles. A mass resolution ∼60 is demonstrated for the prototypes discussed here. We report also on the pressure dependencies, and the (mV) rf field strength dependencies of the ART-MS sensitivity. Importantly the new MS designs do not require heavy magnets, tight manufacturing tolerances, introduction of buffer gases, high power rf sources, nor complicated electronics. The designs described here are very inexpensive to implement relative to other instruments, and can be easily miniaturized. Possible applications are discussed.

  15. Achieving Translationally Invariant Trapped Ion Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Erik; Li, Hao-Kun; Noel, Crystal; Hemmerling, Boerge; Zhang, Xiang; Haeffner, Hartmut

    2017-04-01

    We present the design and implementation of a novel surface ion trap design in a ring configuration. By eliminating the need for wire bonds through the use of electrical vias and using a rotationally invariant electrode configuration, we have realized a trap that is able to trap up to 20 ions in a ring geometry 45um in diameter, 400um above the trap surface. This large trapping height to ring diameter ratio allows for global addressing of the ring with both lasers and electric fields in the chamber, thereby increasing our ability to control the ring as a whole. Applying compensating electric fields, we measure very low tangential trap frequencies (less than 20kHz) corresponding to rotational barriers down to 4mK. This measurement is currently limited by the temperature of the ions but extrapolation indicates the barrier can be reduced much further with more advanced cooling techniques. Finally, we show that we are able to reduce this energy barrier sufficiently such that the ions are able to overcome it either through thermal motion or rotational motion and delocalize over the full extent of the ring. This work was funded by the Keck Foundation and the NSF.

  16. Trapped individual ion at absolute zero temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Nan; Dehmelt, Hans; Nagourney, Warren

    1989-01-01

    Laser cooling and ion trapping have progressed to such an extent that one can now speak of realizing a confined atom at absolute zero temperature. In this short publication, we analyze an experiment toward such realization using a single Ba+ ion in a miniature rf trap. The Ba+ ion is first laser-cooled to the limit where the ion spends most of its time in the zero-point energy state. Then a test sequence allows one to verify whether or not the ion is actually in its zero-point state. The test sequence may also serve as a device for state selection of an atom at absolute zero temperature. PMID:16594054

  17. Microfabricated Microwave-Integrated Surface Ion Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revelle, Melissa C.; Blain, Matthew G.; Haltli, Raymond A.; Hollowell, Andrew E.; Nordquist, Christopher D.; Maunz, Peter

    2017-04-01

    Quantum information processing holds the key to solving computational problems that are intractable with classical computers. Trapped ions are a physical realization of a quantum information system in which qubits are encoded in hyperfine energy states. Coupling the qubit states to ion motion, as needed for two-qubit gates, is typically accomplished using Raman laser beams. Alternatively, this coupling can be achieved with strong microwave gradient fields. While microwave radiation is easier to control than a laser, it is challenging to precisely engineer the radiated microwave field. Taking advantage of Sandia's microfabrication techniques, we created a surface ion trap with integrated microwave electrodes with sub-wavelength dimensions. This multi-layered device permits co-location of the microwave antennae and the ion trap electrodes to create localized microwave gradient fields and necessary trapping fields. Here, we characterize the trap design and present simulated microwave performance with progress towards experimental results. This research was funded, in part, by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA).

  18. Fast Quantum Rabi Model with Trapped Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moya-Cessa, Héctor M

    2016-12-12

    We show how to produce a fast quantum Rabi model with trapped ions. Its importance resides not only in the acceleration of the phenomena that may be achieved with these systems, from quantum gates to the generation of nonclassical states of the vibrational motion of the ion, but also in reducing unwanted effects such as the decay of coherences that may appear in such systems.

  19. Quantum interference from remotely trapped ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, S; Rotter, D; Hennrich, M; Blatt, R; Rohde, F; Schuck, C; Almendros, M; Gehr, R; Dubin, F; Eschner, J

    2009-01-01

    We observe quantum interference of photons emitted by two continuously laser-excited single ions, independently trapped in distinct vacuum vessels. High contrast two-photon interference is observed in two experiments with different ion species, Ca + and Ba + . Our experimental findings are quantitatively reproduced by Bloch equation calculations. In particular, we show that the coherence of the individual resonance fluorescence light field is determined from the observed interference.

  20. Quantum interference from remotely trapped ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, S; Rotter, D; Hennrich, M; Blatt, R [Institute for Experimental Physics, University of Innsbruck, Technikerstr. 25, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Rohde, F; Schuck, C; Almendros, M; Gehr, R; Dubin, F; Eschner, J [ICFO-Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques, Mediterranean Technology Park, Av del Canal OlImpic, E-08860 Castelldefels (Spain)], E-mail: francois.dubin@icfo.es

    2009-01-15

    We observe quantum interference of photons emitted by two continuously laser-excited single ions, independently trapped in distinct vacuum vessels. High contrast two-photon interference is observed in two experiments with different ion species, Ca{sup +} and Ba{sup +}. Our experimental findings are quantitatively reproduced by Bloch equation calculations. In particular, we show that the coherence of the individual resonance fluorescence light field is determined from the observed interference.

  1. Radium separation through complexation by aqueous crown ethers and ion exchange or solvent extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiarizia, R.; Dietz, M.L.; Horwitz, E.P. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemistry Div.; Burnett, W.C. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). Dept. of Oceanography

    1997-11-01

    The effect of three water-soluble, unsubstituted crown ethers (15-crown-5 (15C5), 18-crown-6 (18C6) and 21-crown-7 (21C7)) on the uptake of Ca, Sr, Ba and Ra cations by a sulfonic acid cation exchange resin, and on the extraction of the same cations by xylene solutions of dinonylnaphthalenesulfonic acid (HDNNS) from aqueous hydrochloric acid solutions has been investigated. The crown ethers enhance the sorption of the larger cations by the ion exchange resin, thereby improving the resin selectivity over calcium, a result of a synergistic interaction between the crown ether and the ionic functional groups of the resin. Similarly, the extraction of the larger alkaline earth cations into xylene by HDNNS is strongly synergized by the presence of the crown ethers in the aqueous phase. Promising results for intra-Group IIa cation separations have been obtained using each of the three crown ethers as the aqueous ligands and the sulfonic acid cation exchange resin. Even greater separation factors for the radium-calcium couple have been measured with the crown-ethers and HDNNS solutions in the solvent extraction mode. The application of the uptake and extraction results to the development of radium separation schemes is discussed and a possible flowchart for the determination of {sup 226}Ra/{sup 228}Ra in natural waters is presented.

  2. Spectroscopy of neutral radium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mol, Aran; De, Subhadeep; Jungmann, Klaus; Wilschut, Hans; Willmann, Lorenz [KVI, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2008-07-01

    The heavy alkaline earth atoms radium is uniquely sensitive towards parity and time reversal symmetry violations due to a large enhancement of an intrinsic permanent electric dipole moment of the nucleous or the electron. Furthermore, radium is sensitive to atomic parity violation and the nuclear anapole moment. To prepare such experiments spectroscopy of relevant atomic states need to be done. At a later stage we will build a neutral atom trap for radium. We have built an atomic beam of the short lived isotope {sup 225}Ra with a flux of several 10{sup 4} atoms/sec. We are preparing the laser spectroscopy using this beam setup. In the preparation for efficient laser cooling and trapping we have successfully trapped barium, which is similar in it's requirements for laser cooling. The techniques which we have developed with barium can be used to trap rare radium isotopes. We report on the progress of the experiments.

  3. An ion trap time-of-flight mass spectrometer with high mass resolution for cold trapped ion experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, P. C.; Greenberg, J.; Miller, M. I.; Loeffler, K.; Lewandowski, H. J.

    2017-12-01

    Trapping molecular ions that have been sympathetically cooled with laser-cooled atomic ions is a useful platform for exploring cold ion chemistry. We designed and characterized a new experimental apparatus for probing chemical reaction dynamics between molecular cations and neutral radicals at temperatures below 1 K. The ions are trapped in a linear quadrupole radio-frequency trap and sympathetically cooled by co-trapped, laser-cooled, atomic ions. The ion trap is coupled to a time-of-flight mass spectrometer to readily identify product ion species and to accurately determine trapped ion numbers. We discuss, and present in detail, the design of this ion trap time-of-flight mass spectrometer and the electronics required for driving the trap and mass spectrometer. Furthermore, we measure the performance of this system, which yields mass resolutions of m/Δm ≥ 1100 over a wide mass range, and discuss its relevance for future measurements in chemical reaction kinetics and dynamics.

  4. Cryogenic setup for trapped ion quantum computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandl, M F; van Mourik, M W; Postler, L; Nolf, A; Lakhmanskiy, K; Paiva, R R; Möller, S; Daniilidis, N; Häffner, H; Kaushal, V; Ruster, T; Warschburger, C; Kaufmann, H; Poschinger, U G; Schmidt-Kaler, F; Schindler, P; Monz, T; Blatt, R

    2016-11-01

    We report on the design of a cryogenic setup for trapped ion quantum computing containing a segmented surface electrode trap. The heat shield of our cryostat is designed to attenuate alternating magnetic field noise, resulting in 120 dB reduction of 50 Hz noise along the magnetic field axis. We combine this efficient magnetic shielding with high optical access required for single ion addressing as well as for efficient state detection by placing two lenses each with numerical aperture 0.23 inside the inner heat shield. The cryostat design incorporates vibration isolation to avoid decoherence of optical qubits due to the motion of the cryostat. We measure vibrations of the cryostat of less than ±20 nm over 2 s. In addition to the cryogenic apparatus, we describe the setup required for an operation with 40 Ca + and 88 Sr + ions. The instability of the laser manipulating the optical qubits in 40 Ca + is characterized by yielding a minimum of its Allan deviation of 2.4 ⋅ 10 -15 at 0.33 s. To evaluate the performance of the apparatus, we trapped 40 Ca + ions, obtaining a heating rate of 2.14(16) phonons/s and a Gaussian decay of the Ramsey contrast with a 1/e-time of 18.2(8) ms.

  5. Ion Motion Stability in Asymmetric Surface Electrode Ion Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Fayaz; Ozakin, Arkadas

    2010-03-01

    Many recently developed designs of the surface electrode ion traps for quantum information processing have asymmetry built into their geometries. The asymmetry helps rotate the trap axes to angles with respect to electrode surface that facilitate laser cooling of ions but introduces a relative angle between the RF and DC fields and invalidates the classical stability analysis of the symmetric case for which the equations of motion are decoupled. For asymmetric case the classical motion of a single ion is given by a coupled, multi-dimensional version of Mathieu's equation. In this poster we discuss the stability diagram of asymmetric surface traps by performing an approximate multiple scale perturbation analysis of the coupled Mathieu equations, and validate the results with numerical simulations. After obtaining the stability diagram for the linear fields, we simulate the motion of an ion in a given asymmetric surface trap, utilizing a method-of-moments calculation of the electrode fields. We obtain the stability diagram and compare it with the ideal case to find the region of validity. Finally, we compare the results of our stability analysis to experiments conducted on a microfabricated asymmetric surface trap.

  6. Quasi-conical centrifugal ion trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golikov, Yu.K.; Solov'ev, K.V.; Grigor'ev, D.V.; Flegontova, E.Yu.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes a new excellent ion trap that principally differs from the classic hyperbolic one by its action. The action is based on the axisymmetric electrostatic quasi-conical field with the following potential type: F=F 0 [ln r - r 2 /2+z 2 ], where r, z are cylindrical dimensionless coordinates. The radial potential run (f=ln r-r 2 /2), in this case, is exactly presented by the approximation function f a =ar 2 +b/r 2 +c. In addition, there are some ranges of r (for example, 0.6< r<0.35), in which the concurrence accuracy value is above 0.5%. The paper presents the theory of particles dynamics in the centrifugal trap. Basic correlation for resolution ratios and sensitivity values are developed. Recommendations on the centrifugal trap design implementation, including the recording system, are given

  7. Note: Ion source design for ion trap systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noriega, J. R.; Quevedo, M.; Gnade, B.; Vasselli, J.

    2013-06-01

    A small plasma (glow discharge) based ion source and circuit are described in this work. The ion source works by producing a high voltage pulsed discharge between two electrodes in a pressure range of 50-100 mTorr. A third mesh electrode is used for ion extraction. The electrodes are small stainless steel screws mounted in a MACOR ionization chamber in a linear arrangement. The electrode arrangement is driven by a circuit, design for low power operation. This design is a proof of concept intended for applications on small cylindrical ion traps.

  8. Quantum Rabi Model with Trapped Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedernales, J S; Lizuain, I; Felicetti, S; Romero, G; Lamata, L; Solano, E

    2015-10-20

    We propose the quantum simulation of the quantum Rabi model in all parameter regimes by means of detuned bichromatic sideband excitations of a single trapped ion. We show that current setups can reproduce, in particular, the ultrastrong and deep strong coupling regimes of such a paradigmatic light-matter interaction. Furthermore, associated with these extreme dipolar regimes, we study the controlled generation and detection of their entangled ground states by means of adiabatic methods. Ion traps have arguably performed the first quantum simulation of the Jaynes-Cummings model, a restricted regime of the quantum Rabi model where the rotating-wave approximation holds. We show that one can go beyond and experimentally investigate the quantum simulation of coupling regimes of the quantum Rabi model that are difficult to achieve with natural dipolar interactions.

  9. Trapped Ion Quantum Computation by Adiabatic Passage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Xuni; Wu Chunfeng; Lai, C. H.; Oh, C. H.

    2008-01-01

    We propose a new universal quantum computation scheme for trapped ions in thermal motion via the technique of adiabatic passage, which incorporates the advantages of both the adiabatic passage and the model of trapped ions in thermal motion. Our scheme is immune from the decoherence due to spontaneous emission from excited states as the system in our scheme evolves along a dark state. In our scheme the vibrational degrees of freedom are not required to be cooled to their ground states because they are only virtually excited. It is shown that the fidelity of the resultant gate operation is still high even when the magnitude of the effective Rabi frequency moderately deviates from the desired value.

  10. Scalable quantum search using trapped ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, S. S.; Ivanov, P. A.; Linington, I. E.; Vitanov, N. V.

    2010-01-01

    We propose a scalable implementation of Grover's quantum search algorithm in a trapped-ion quantum information processor. The system is initialized in an entangled Dicke state by using adiabatic techniques. The inversion-about-average and oracle operators take the form of single off-resonant laser pulses. This is made possible by utilizing the physical symmetries of the trapped-ion linear crystal. The physical realization of the algorithm represents a dramatic simplification: each logical iteration (oracle and inversion about average) requires only two physical interaction steps, in contrast to the large number of concatenated gates required by previous approaches. This not only facilitates the implementation but also increases the overall fidelity of the algorithm.

  11. Trapped ion depletion by anomalous diffusion due to the dissipative trapped ion instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wimmel, H.K.

    1975-07-01

    At high temperatures the KADOMTSEV-POGUTSE diffusion in tokamaks can become so large as to cause depletion of trapped ions if these are replaced with free ions by means of collisions rather than being directly recycled or injected. Modified KADOMTSEV-POGUTSE diffusion formulas are employed in order to estimate this effect in the cases of classical and anomalous collisions. The maximum trapped-ion depletion is estimated from the PENROSE stability condition. For anomalous collisions a BOHM-type diffusion is derived. Numerical examples are given for JET-like parameters (JET = Joint European Torus). Depletion is found to reduce diffusion by factors of up to 10 and more. (orig.) [de

  12. Modular Universal Scalable Ion-trap Quantum Computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-02

    trap quantum computer . This architecture has two separate layers of scalability: the first is to increase the number of ion qubits in a single trap...Distribution Unlimited UU UU UU UU 02-06-2016 1-Aug-2010 31-Jan-2016 Final Report: Modular Universal Scalable Ion-trap Quantum Computer The views...P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Ion trap quantum computation , scalable modular architectures REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11

  13. Coherent Control of a Single Trapped Rydberg Ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Gerard; Pokorny, Fabian; Zhang, Chi; Bodart, Quentin; Hennrich, Markus

    2017-12-01

    Trapped Rydberg ions are a promising novel approach to quantum computing and simulations. They are envisaged to combine the exquisite control of trapped ion qubits with the fast two-qubit Rydberg gates already demonstrated in neutral atom experiments. Coherent Rydberg excitation is a key requirement for these gates. Here, we carry out the first coherent Rydberg excitation of an ion and perform a single-qubit Rydberg gate, thus demonstrating basic elements of a trapped Rydberg ion quantum computer.

  14. Cold highly charged ions in a cryogenic Paul trap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Versolato, O.O.; Schwarz, M.; Windberger, A.

    2013-01-01

    linear Paul trap in which HCIs will be sympathetically cooled by 9Be +  ions. Optimized optical access for laser light is provided while maintaining excellent UHV conditions. The Paul trap will be connected to an electron beam ion trap (EBIT) which is able to produce a wide range of HCIs. This EBIT...

  15. Ball-grid array architecture for microfabricated ion traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guise, Nicholas D.; Fallek, Spencer D.; Stevens, Kelly E.; Brown, K. R.; Volin, Curtis; Harter, Alexa W.; Amini, Jason M.; Higashi, Robert E.; Lu, Son Thai; Chanhvongsak, Helen M.; Nguyen, Thi A.; Marcus, Matthew S.; Ohnstein, Thomas R.; Youngner, Daniel W.

    2015-05-01

    State-of-the-art microfabricated ion traps for quantum information research are approaching nearly one hundred control electrodes. We report here on the development and testing of a new architecture for microfabricated ion traps, built around ball-grid array (BGA) connections, that is suitable for increasingly complex trap designs. In the BGA trap, through-substrate vias bring electrical signals from the back side of the trap die to the surface trap structure on the top side. Gold-ball bump bonds connect the back side of the trap die to an interposer for signal routing from the carrier. Trench capacitors fabricated into the trap die replace area-intensive surface or edge capacitors. Wirebonds in the BGA architecture are moved to the interposer. These last two features allow the trap die to be reduced to only the area required to produce trapping fields. The smaller trap dimensions allow tight focusing of an addressing laser beam for fast single-qubit rotations. Performance of the BGA trap as characterized with 40Ca+ ions is comparable to previous surface-electrode traps in terms of ion heating rate, mode frequency stability, and storage lifetime. We demonstrate two-qubit entanglement operations with 171Yb+ ions in a second BGA trap.

  16. Ball-grid array architecture for microfabricated ion traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guise, Nicholas D.; Fallek, Spencer D.; Stevens, Kelly E.; Brown, K. R.; Volin, Curtis; Harter, Alexa W.; Amini, Jason M.; Higashi, Robert E.; Lu, Son Thai; Chanhvongsak, Helen M.; Nguyen, Thi A.; Marcus, Matthew S.; Ohnstein, Thomas R.; Youngner, Daniel W.

    2015-01-01

    State-of-the-art microfabricated ion traps for quantum information research are approaching nearly one hundred control electrodes. We report here on the development and testing of a new architecture for microfabricated ion traps, built around ball-grid array (BGA) connections, that is suitable for increasingly complex trap designs. In the BGA trap, through-substrate vias bring electrical signals from the back side of the trap die to the surface trap structure on the top side. Gold-ball bump bonds connect the back side of the trap die to an interposer for signal routing from the carrier. Trench capacitors fabricated into the trap die replace area-intensive surface or edge capacitors. Wirebonds in the BGA architecture are moved to the interposer. These last two features allow the trap die to be reduced to only the area required to produce trapping fields. The smaller trap dimensions allow tight focusing of an addressing laser beam for fast single-qubit rotations. Performance of the BGA trap as characterized with 40 Ca + ions is comparable to previous surface-electrode traps in terms of ion heating rate, mode frequency stability, and storage lifetime. We demonstrate two-qubit entanglement operations with 171 Yb + ions in a second BGA trap

  17. Ion production and trapping in electron rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gluckstern, R.C.; Ruggiero, A.G.

    1979-08-01

    The electron beam in the VUV and X-ray rings of NSLS will ionize residual gas by collisions. Positive ions will be produced with low velocity, and will be attracted by the electron beam to the beam axis. If they are trapped in stable (transverse) orbits, they may accumulate, thereby increasing the ν/sub x,z/ of the individual electrons. Since the accumulated ions are unlikely to be of uniform density, a spread in ν/sub x,z/ will also occur. Should these effects be serious, it may be necessary to introduce clearing electrodes, although this may increase Z/n in the rings, thereby adding to longitudinal instability problems. The seriousness of the above effect for the VUV and X-ray rings is estimated

  18. A radio-frequency ion trap with string electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanai, Daisuke; Hasegawa, Taro

    2018-02-01

    A radio-frequency (rf) ion trap with string electrodes is introduced. In this trap configuration, the rf electrodes are made of narrow metal strings, by which a negligibly small portion of light-induced fluorescence (LIF) is blocked. Then the LIF collection solid angle can be maximized. In the demonstration, barium ions are trapped and laser-cooled in the rf trap with string electrodes successfully, and the crystallization is confirmed by the LIF spectrum.

  19. Ion trapping in the high-energy storage ring HESR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinterberger, Frank [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik

    2011-10-15

    The problem of ion trapping in the high-energy storage ring HESR is studied in the present report. Positive ions are trapped in the negative potential well of the antiproton beam. The ions are produced by the interaction between the antiproton beam and the residual gas. The adverse effects of ion trapping like tune shifts, tune spreads and coherent instabilities are reviewed. The ion production rate by ionization of the residual gas molecules is estimated. The negative potential well and the corresponding electric fields of the antiproton beam are evaluated in order to study the transverse and longitudinal motion of the ions and the accumulation in trapping pockets. The removal of ions can be achieved using clearing electrodes and under certain conditions resonant transverse beam shaking. Diagnostic tools and measurements of trapped ion effects are sketched. (orig.)

  20. Detecting yocto (10-24) newton forces with trapped ions

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Uys, H

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on a calibrated measurement of 174 Yoctonewton using a cloud of 60 9 Be+ ion confined in a Penning ion trap. These measurements suggest that ion traps may form the basis of a new class of ultrasensitive deployable force sensors....

  1. Evaporative cooling of highly charged ions in EBIT [Electron Beam Ion Trap]: An experimental realization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, M.B.; Levine, M.A.; Bennett, C.L.; Henderson, J.R.; Knapp, D.A.; Marrs, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    Both the total number and trapping lifetime of near-neon-like gold ions held in an electron beam ion trap have been greatly increased by a process of 'evaporative cooling'. A continuous flow of low-charge-state ions into the trap cools the high-charge-state ions in the trap. Preliminary experimental results using titanium ions as a coolant are presented. 8 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Removal of radium from drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauch, R.P.

    1992-08-01

    The report summarizes processes for removal of radium from drinking water. Ion exchange, including strong acid and weak acid resin, is discussed. Both processes remove better than 95 percent of the radium from the water. Weak acid ion exchange does not add sodium to the water. Calcium cation exchange removes radium and can be used when hardness removal is not necessary. Iron removal processes are discussed in relation to radium removal. Iron oxides remove much less than 20 percent of the radium from water under typical conditions. Manganese dioxide removes radium from water when competition for sorption sites and clogging of sites is reduced. Filter sand that is rinsed daily with dilute acid will remove radium from water. Manganese dioxide coated filter sorption removes radium but more capacity would be desirable. The radium selective complexer selectively removes radium with significant capacity if iron fouling is eliminated

  3. Nonlinear theory of collisionless trapped ion modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahm, T.S.; Tang, W.M.

    1996-01-01

    A simplified two field nonlinear model for collisionless trapped-ion-mode turbulence has been derived from nonlinear bounce-averaged drift kinetic equations. The renormalized thermal diffusivity obtained from this analysis exhibits a Bohm-like scaling. A new nonlinearity associated with the neoclassical polarization density is found to introduce an isotope-dependent modification to this Bohm-like diffusivity. The asymptotic balance between the equilibrium variation and the finite banana width induced reduction of the fluctuation potential leads to the result that the radial correlation length decreases with increasing plasma current. Other important conclusions from the present analysis include the predictions that (i) the relative density fluctuation level δn/n 0 is lower than the conventional mixing length estimate, Δr/L n (ii) the ion temperature fluctuation level δT i /T i significantly exceeds the density fluctuation level δn/n 0 ; and (iii) the parallel ion velocity fluctuation level δv iparallel /v Ti is expected to be negligible

  4. An Atomic Abacus: Trapped ion quantum computing experiments at NIST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarco, Brian

    2003-03-01

    Trapped atomic ions are an ideal system for exploring quantum information science because deterministic state preparation and efficient state detection are possible and coherent manipulation of atomic systems is relatively advanced. In our experiment, a few singly charged Be ions are confined by static and radio-frequency electric fields in a micro-machined linear Paul trap. The internal and motional states of the ions are coherently manipulated using applied laser light. Our current work focuses on demonstrating the necessary ingredients to produce a scalable quantum computing scheme and on simplifying and improving quantum logic gates. I will speak about a new set of experiments that was made possible by recent improvements in trap technology. A novel trap with multiple trapping regions was used to demonstrate the first steps towards a fully scalable quantum computing scheme. Single ions were ``shuttled" between trapping regions without disturbing the ion's motional and internal state, and two ions were separated from a single to two different trapping zones. Improvements in the trap manufacturing process has led to a reduction of nearly two orders of magnitude in the ion's motional heating rate, making possible two new improved logic gates. The first gate utilizes the wave-packet nature of the ions to tune the laser-atom interaction and achieve a controlled-NOT gate between a single ion's spin and motional states. The second, a two-ion phase gate, uses phase-space dynamics to produce a state-sensitive geometric phase. I will end with a quick look at experiments using a Mg ion to sympathetically cool a simultaneously trapped Be ion and a glimpse of the next generation of ions traps currently under construction.

  5. Trapped ion simulation of molecular spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yangchao; Lu, Yao; Zhang, Kuan; Zhang, Shuaining; Huh, Joonsuk; Kim, Kihwan

    2016-05-01

    Boson sampling had been suggested as a classically intractable and quantum mechanically manageable problem via computational complexity theory arguments. Recently, Huh and co-workers proposed theoretically a modified version of boson sampling, which is designed to simulate a molecular problem, as a practical application. Here, we report the experimental implementation of the theoretical proposal with a trapped ion system. As a first demonstration, we perform the quantum simulation of molecular vibronic profile of SO2, which incorporates squeezing, rotation and coherent displacements operations, and the collective projection measurement on phonon modes. This work was supported by the National Basic Research Program of China 11CBA00300, 2011CBA00301, National Natural Science Foundation of China 11374178, 11574002. Basic Science Research Program of Korea NRF-2015R1A6A3A04059773.

  6. Progress Report on the Improved Linear Ion Trap Physics Package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestage, John D.

    1995-01-01

    This article describes the first operational results from the extended linear ion trap frequency standard now being developed at JPL. This new design separates the state selection/interrogation region from the more critical microwave resonance region where the multiplied local oscillator (LO) signal is compared to the stable atomic transition. Hg+ ions have been trapped, shuttled back and forth between the resonance and state selection traps. In addition, microwave transitions between the Hg+ clock levels have been driven in the resonance trap and detected in the state selection trap.

  7. Atomic physics measurements in an electron beam ion trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrs, R. E.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Bennett, C.; Chen, M. H.; Cowan, T.; Dietrich, D.; Henderson, J. R.; Knapp, D. A.; Osterheld, S.; Schneider, M. B.; Scofield, J. H.; Levine, M. A.

    1989-06-01

    An electron Beam Ion Trap at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is being used to produce and trap very-highly-charged ions (q≥70+) for x-ray spectroscopy measurements. Recent measurements of transition energies and electron excitation cross sections for x-ray line emission are summarized.

  8. Optical probing of Eu ions confined in an RF trap

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    by combining a turbo-molecular pump and a sputter ion pump. In vacuum the temperature of ions is of the order of few ten thousands of Kelvin, which leads to rapid loss of the hot ions from the trap, limiting the storage time to just about 30 s. Cooling of the hot ions is imperative and was achieved by collisional cooling, ...

  9. Controlling trapping potentials and stray electric fields in a microfabricated ion trap through design and compensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charles Doret, S; Amini, Jason M; Wright, Kenneth; Volin, Curtis; Killian, Tyler; Ozakin, Arkadas; Denison, Douglas; Hayden, Harley; Pai, C-S; Slusher, Richart E; Harter, Alexa W

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in quantum information processing with trapped ions have demonstrated the need for new ion trap architectures capable of holding and manipulating chains of many (>10) ions. Here we present the design and detailed characterization of a new linear trap, microfabricated with scalable complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) techniques, that is well-suited to this challenge. Forty-four individually controlled dc electrodes provide the many degrees of freedom required to construct anharmonic potential wells, shuttle ions, merge and split ion chains, precisely tune secular mode frequencies, and adjust the orientation of trap axes. Microfabricated capacitors on dc electrodes suppress radio-frequency pickup and excess micromotion, while a top-level ground layer simplifies modeling of electric fields and protects trap structures underneath. A localized aperture in the substrate provides access to the trapping region from an oven below, permitting deterministic loading of particular isotopic/elemental sequences via species-selective photoionization. The shapes of the aperture and radio-frequency electrodes are optimized to minimize perturbation of the trapping pseudopotential. Laboratory experiments verify simulated potentials and characterize trapping lifetimes, stray electric fields, and ion heating rates, while measurement and cancellation of spatially-varying stray electric fields permits the formation of nearly-equally spaced ion chains. (paper)

  10. Quantum absorption refrigerator with trapped ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Jaren; Maslennikov, Gleb; Hablützel Marrero, Roland; Ding, Shiqian; Nimmrichter, Stefan; Roulet, Alexandre; Dai, Jibo; Scarani, Valerio; Matsukevich, Dzmitry

    2017-04-01

    We report on an experimental realization of a quantum absorption refrigerator in a system of the three trapped 171Yb+ ions. The normal modes of motion are coupled by a trilinear Hamiltonian a† bc + h . c . and represent ``hot'', ``work'' and ``cold'' bodies of the refrigerator. We investigate the equilibrium properties of the refrigerator, and demonstrate the absorption refrigeration effect with the modes being prepared in thermal states. We also investigate the coherent dynamics and steady state properties of such a system away from equilibrium operation. We compare the cooling capabilities of thermal versus squeezed thermal states prepared in the work mode as a quantum resource for cooling. Finally, we exploit the coherent dynamics of the system and demonstrate single-shot cooling in the refrigerator. By stopping the evolution in the right moment, we show a significant advantage in cooling as compared to both the steady state and equilibrium performance. This research is supported by the National Research Foundation, Prime Minister's Office, Singapore and the Ministry of Education, Singapore under the Research Centres of Excellence programme.

  11. Quantum Control Engineering with Trapped Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biercuk, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Technologies fundamentally enabled by quantum mechanics are poised to transform a broad range of applications from computation to precision metrology over the coming decades. This talk will introduce a new field of research which is seeing concepts from control engineering translated to the domain of quantum mechanics in an effort to realize the full potential of engineered quantum technologies. We focus on understanding the physics underlying controlled quantum dynamics in the presence of rapidly fluctuating time-dependent Hamiltonians, leveraging the unique capabilities provided by trapped ions as a model quantum system. Our results introduce and experimentally validate generalized filter-transfer functions which cast arbitrary quantum control operations on qubits as noise spectral filters. We demonstrate the utility of these constructs for directly predicting the evolution of a quantum state in a realistic noisy environment, for developing novel robust control and sensing protocols, and for improving the stability of atomic clocks. This work demonstrates how quantum control can be leveraged to overcome some of the most challenging problems in quantum engineering, and even provide totally new functionality to quantum systems.

  12. Single qubit manipulation in a microfabricated surface electrode ion trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mount, Emily; Baek, So-Young; Blain, Matthew; Stick, Daniel; Gaultney, Daniel; Crain, Stephen; Noek, Rachel; Kim, Taehyun; Maunz, Peter; Kim, Jungsang

    2013-09-01

    We trap individual 171Yb+ ions in a surface trap microfabricated on a silicon substrate, and demonstrate a complete set of high fidelity single qubit operations for the hyperfine qubit. Trapping times exceeding 20 min without laser cooling, and heating rates as low as 0.8 quanta ms-1, indicate stable trapping conditions in these microtraps. A coherence time of more than 1 s, high fidelity qubit state detection and single qubit rotations are demonstrated. The observation of low heating rates and demonstration of high quality single qubit gates at room temperature are critical steps toward scalable quantum information processing in microfabricated surface traps.

  13. Single qubit manipulation in a microfabricated surface electrode ion trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mount, Emily; Baek, So-Young; Gaultney, Daniel; Crain, Stephen; Noek, Rachel; Kim, Taehyun; Maunz, Peter; Kim, Jungsang; Blain, Matthew; Stick, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    We trap individual 171 Yb + ions in a surface trap microfabricated on a silicon substrate, and demonstrate a complete set of high fidelity single qubit operations for the hyperfine qubit. Trapping times exceeding 20 min without laser cooling, and heating rates as low as 0.8 quanta ms −1 , indicate stable trapping conditions in these microtraps. A coherence time of more than 1 s, high fidelity qubit state detection and single qubit rotations are demonstrated. The observation of low heating rates and demonstration of high quality single qubit gates at room temperature are critical steps toward scalable quantum information processing in microfabricated surface traps. (paper)

  14. Scalable error correction in distributed ion trap computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oi, Daniel K. L.; Devitt, Simon J.; Hollenberg, Lloyd C. L.

    2006-01-01

    A major challenge for quantum computation in ion trap systems is scalable integration of error correction and fault tolerance. We analyze a distributed architecture with rapid high-fidelity local control within nodes and entangled links between nodes alleviating long-distance transport. We demonstrate fault-tolerant operator measurements which are used for error correction and nonlocal gates. This scheme is readily applied to linear ion traps which cannot be scaled up beyond a few ions per individual trap but which have access to a probabilistic entanglement mechanism. A proof-of-concept system is presented which is within the reach of current experiment

  15. Dielectronic recombination measurements using the Electron Beam Ion Trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    We have used the Electron Beam Ion Trap at LLNL to study dielectronic recombination in highly charged ions. Our technique is unique because we observe the x-rays from dielectronic recombination at the same time we see x-rays from all other electron-ion interactions. We have recently taken high-resolution, state-selective data that resolves individual resonances

  16. Ion bunch stacking in a Penning trap after purification in an electrostatic mirror trap

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenbusch, M; Blaum, K; Borgmann, Ch; Kreim, S; Lunney, D; Manea, V; Schweikhard, L; Wienholtz, F; Wolf, R N

    2014-01-01

    The success of many measurements in analytical mass spectrometry as well as in precision mass determinations for atomic and nuclear physics is handicapped when the ion sources deliver ``contaminations'', i.e., unwanted ions of masses similar to those of the ions of interest. In particular, in ion-trapping devices, large amounts of contaminant ions result in significant systematic errors-if the measurements are possible at all. We present a solution for such cases: The ions from a quasi-continuous source are bunched in a linear radio-frequency-quadrupole ion trap, separated by a multi-reflection time-of-flight section followed by a Bradbury-Nielsen gate, and then captured in a Penning trap. Buffer-gas cooling is used to damp the ion motion in the latter, which allows a repeated opening of the Penning trap for a stacking of mass-selected ion bunches. Proof-of-principle demonstrations have been performed with the ISOLTRAP setup at ISOLDE/CERN, both with Cs-133(+) ions from an off-line ion source and by applicati...

  17. Trapping Ions in an optical lattice for quantum simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau, Matt; Fischer, Christoph; Wipfli, Oliver; Home, Jonathan

    2017-04-01

    Quantum many-body spin Hamiltonians are important tools for describing condensed matter systems, but many such Hamiltonians are difficult to simulate on classical computers. Quantum simulation offers an avenue for overcoming these limitations. Arrays of trapped ions are an attractive platform for quantum simulation due to the high level of control combined with the intrinsic long-range Coulomb interaction that can be used to engineer tunable spin-spin couplings. However, varying lattice geometry is challenging with current trapping techniques. We are developing a new apparatus to trap arrays of ions in optical lattices for the purpose of quantum simulation. This should allow trapping two and three-dimensional crystals with a designed geometry. I will present results of simulations of equilibrium positions and normal modes of such a system, which indicate that in a first design arrays of around 40 ions could be trapped with ion-ion distances of under 10 microns, and also with low residual heating rates due to off-resonant scattering and laser fluctuations. By using Magnesium ions, we expect to be able to cool and image the ions while trapped in a deep optical lattice formed by a high finesse optical cavity. Experimental progress towards these goals will be described.

  18. Numerical simulation of injection and resistive trapping of ion rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mankofsky, A.; Friedman, A.; Sudan, R.N.

    1981-01-01

    Numerical studies of the injection and resistive trapping efficiency of ion rings, using an improved algorithm are presented. Trapping efficiency is found to be strongly dependent upon the number of particles injected and upon mirror ratios in the system. Wall resistivity and beam divergence affect the process to a lesser extent. (author)

  19. An ion trap - laser experiment at the INS cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katayama, I.; Wada, M.; Tanaka, J.

    1994-09-01

    A new nuclear instrument which comprises an ion guide behind a recoil mass separator, an RF trap, a Penning trap and a UV laser system is being built to perform a laser-microwave double resonance experiment. Initially the instrument will be used to measure hyperfine anomalies of Ca isotopes produced by a cyclotron beam. (author)

  20. From transistor to trapped-ion computers for quantum chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, M-H; Casanova, J; Mezzacapo, A; McClean, J; Lamata, L; Aspuru-Guzik, A; Solano, E

    2014-01-07

    Over the last few decades, quantum chemistry has progressed through the development of computational methods based on modern digital computers. However, these methods can hardly fulfill the exponentially-growing resource requirements when applied to large quantum systems. As pointed out by Feynman, this restriction is intrinsic to all computational models based on classical physics. Recently, the rapid advancement of trapped-ion technologies has opened new possibilities for quantum control and quantum simulations. Here, we present an efficient toolkit that exploits both the internal and motional degrees of freedom of trapped ions for solving problems in quantum chemistry, including molecular electronic structure, molecular dynamics, and vibronic coupling. We focus on applications that go beyond the capacity of classical computers, but may be realizable on state-of-the-art trapped-ion systems. These results allow us to envision a new paradigm of quantum chemistry that shifts from the current transistor to a near-future trapped-ion-based technology.

  1. Space-charge effects in Penning ion traps

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Porobic, T.; Beck, M.; Breitenfeldt, M.; Couratin, C.; Finlay, P.; Knecht, A.; Fabian, X.; Friedag, P.; Flechard, X.; Lienard, E.; Ban, G.; Zákoucký, Dalibor; Soti, G.; Van Gorp, S.; Weinheimer, C.; Wursten, E.; Severijns, N.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 785, JUN (2015), s. 153-162 ISSN 0168-9002 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LA08015; GA MŠk(CZ) LG13031 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Penning trap * space-charge * magnetron motion * ion trapping * buffer gas cooling * ion cyclotron resonance Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.200, year: 2015

  2. Memory coherence of a sympathetically cooled trapped-ion qubit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Home, J. P.; McDonnell, M. J.; Szwer, D. J.; Keitch, B. C.; Lucas, D. M.; Stacey, D. N.; Steane, A. M.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate sympathetic cooling of a 43 Ca + trapped-ion 'memory' qubit by a 40 Ca + 'coolant' ion sufficiently near the ground state of motion for fault-tolerant quantum logic, while maintaining coherence of the qubit. This is an essential ingredient in trapped-ion quantum computers. The isotope shifts are sufficient to suppress decoherence and phase shifts of the memory qubit due to the cooling light which illuminates both ions. We measure the qubit coherence during ten cycles of sideband cooling, finding a coherence loss of 3.3% per cooling cycle. The natural limit of the method is O(10 -4 ) infidelity per cooling cycle.

  3. HITRAP: A Facility for Experiments with Trapped Highly Charged Ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quint, W.; Dilling, J.; Djekic, S.; Haeffner, H.; Hermanspahn, N.; Kluge, H.-J.; Marx, G.; Moore, R.; Rodriguez, D.; Schoenfelder, J.; Sikler, G.; Valenzuela, T.; Verdu, J.; Weber, C.; Werth, G.

    2001-01-01

    HITRAP is a planned ion trap facility for capturing and cooling of highly charged ions produced at GSI in the heavy-ion complex of the UNILAC-SIS accelerators and the ESR storage ring. In this facility heavy highly charged ions up to uranium will be available as bare nuclei, hydrogen-like ions or few-electron systems at low temperatures. The trap for receiving and studying these ions is designed for operation at extremely high vacuum by cooling to cryogenic temperatures. The stored highly charged ions can be investigated in the trap itself or can be extracted from the trap at energies up to about 10 keV/q. The proposed physics experiments are collision studies with highly charged ions at well-defined low energies (eV/u), high-accuracy measurements to determine the g-factor of the electron bound in a hydrogen-like heavy ion and the atomic binding energies of few-electron systems, laser spectroscopy of HFS transitions and X-ray spectroscopy

  4. Cryogenic linear Paul trap for cold highly charged ion experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwarz, Maria; Versolato, Oscar; Windberger, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Storage and cooling of highly charged ions require ultra-high vacuum levels obtainable by means of cryogenic methods. We have developed a linear Paul trap operating at 4 K capable of very long ion storage times of about 30 h. A conservative upper bound of the H2 partial pressure of about 10−15 mbar...

  5. Observation and mitigation of ion trapping in Indus-2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of betatron tune, beam instabilities etc. This paper discusses the effects of ion trapping and its mitigation in Indus-2 electron storage ring. Ion-induced instability generating partial beam loss is one of the main barriers in higher beam current accumulation in any electron storage ring. Though there are several techniques to ...

  6. Towards trapping and laser cooling Ba and La ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankes, Jessie; Nelson, Amanda; Banner, Patrick; Olmschenk, Steven

    2017-04-01

    Trapped atomic ions are one of the leading candidates for applications in quantum information. We are currently working with barium ions (Ba II), directly loaded by laser ablation of a barium titanium oxide target, and laser cooled using visible laser light (650 nm and 494 nm). Motivated by applications of quantum networks, we also present progress towards laser cooling and trapping lanthanum ions (La III), which should enable quantum information protocols at telecom wavelengths for long-distance applications. This research is supported by the Army Research Office, Research Corporation for Science Advancement, and Denison University.

  7. Reducing Motional Decoherence in Ion Traps with Surface Science Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeffner, Hartmut

    2014-03-01

    Many trapped ions experiments ask for low motional heating rates while trapping the ions close to trapping electrodes. However, in practice small ion-electrode distances lead to unexpected high heating rates. While the mechanisms for the heating is still unclear, it is now evident that surface contamination of the metallic electrodes is at least partially responsible for the elevated heating rates. I will discuss heating rate measurements in a microfabricated surface trap complemented with basic surface science studies. We monitor the elemental surface composition of the Cu-Al alloy trap with an Auger spectrometer. After bake-out, we find a strong Carbon and Oxygen contamination and heating rates of 200 quanta/s at 1 MHz trap frequency. After removing most of the Carbon and Oxygen with Ar-Ion sputtering, the heating rates drop to 4 quanta/s. Interestingly, we still measure the decreased heating rate even after the surface oxidized from the background gas throughout a 40-day waiting time in UHV.

  8. Integrated Visible Photonics for Trapped-Ion Quantum Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-10

    capability to optically address individual ions at several wavelengths. We demonstrate a dual-layered silicon nitride photonic platform for integration...1]. Integrated photonics in the visible and near IR provides a scalable platform in which the optical beams can be routed beneath a planar ion...trap array and directed out-of-plane to address the ions of interest. Silicon-nitride photonic integrated circuits (PICs) offer an appealing system

  9. Ion Trapping, Storage, and Ejection in Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinyu; Garimella, Sandilya V B; Prost, Spencer A; Webb, Ian K; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Tang, Keqi; Tolmachev, Aleksey V; Norheim, Randolph V; Baker, Erin S; Anderson, Gordon A; Ibrahim, Yehia M; Smith, Richard D

    2015-06-16

    A new Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations (SLIM) module, having electrode arrays patterned on a pair of parallel printed circuit boards (PCB), was constructed and utilized to investigate capabilities for ion trapping at a pressure of 4 Torr. Positive ions were confined by application of RF voltages to a series of inner rung electrodes with alternating phase on adjacent electrodes, in conjunction with positive DC potentials on surrounding guard electrodes on each PCB. An axial DC field was also introduced by stepwise varying the DC potentials applied to the inner rung electrodes to control the ion transport and accumulation inside the ion trapping region. We show that ions can be trapped and accumulated with up to 100% efficiency, stored for at least 5 h with no significant losses, and then could be rapidly ejected from the SLIM trap. The present results provide a foundation for the development of much more complex SLIM devices that facilitate extended ion manipulations.

  10. Single Ion Trapping for the Enriched Xenon Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldman, Samuel J.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC

    2006-03-28

    In the last decade, a variety of neutrino oscillation experiments have established that there is a mass difference between neutrino flavors, without determining the absolute neutrino mass scale. The Enriched Xenon Observatory for neutrinoless double beta decay (EXO) will search for the rare decays of xenon to determine the absolute value of the neutrino mass. The experiment uses a novel technique to minimize backgrounds, identifying the decay daughter product in real time using single ion spectroscopy. Here, we describe single ion trapping and spectroscopy compatible with the EXO detector. We extend the technique of single ion trapping in ultrahigh vacuum to trapping in xenon gas. With this technique, EXO will achieve a neutrino mass sensitivity of {approx_equal} .010 eV.

  11. Quantum computing with trapped ions, atoms and light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steane, Andrew M.

    2001-01-01

    We consider experimental issues relevant to quantum computing, and discuss the best way to achieve the essential requirements of reliable quantum memory and gate operations. Nuclear spins in trapped ions or atoms are a very promising candidate for the qubits. We estimate the parameters required to couple atoms using light via cavity QED in order to achieve quantum gates. We briefly comment on recent improvements to the Cirac-Zoller method for coupling trapped ions via their vibrational degree of freedom. Error processes result in a trade-off between quantum gate speed and failure probability. A useful quantum computer does appear to be feasible using a combination of ion trap and optical methods. The best understood method to stabilize a large computer relies on quantum error correction. The essential ideas of this are discussed, and recent estimates of the noise requirements in a quantum computing device are given

  12. The non-neutral ion trap at Brigham Young University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Bryan; Williams, Chad; Hall, William; Hart, Grant

    2011-10-01

    We have constructed a non-neutral ion trap with the eventual goal of measuring the rate of decay of singly-ionized 7Be. Since 7Be decays exclusively by electron capture a Malmberg-Penning trap provides an ideal environment for this measurement due to the near absence of free electrons. We will use the FTICR (Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance) mass spectrometry technique to measure the ratio of 7Be to 7Li to determine the decay rate. We are using an enriched boron carbide target (77.7% 10B, 2.3% 11B, 20% 12C) to provide the ions for the test plasma. This allows us to test the FTICR technique through the presence of three different ions at very different concentrations. We will discuss the current status of the experiment.

  13. A System For High Flexibility Entangling Gates With Trapped Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Alistair; Edmunds, Claire; Mavadia, Sandeep; Green, Todd; Biercuk, Michael

    Trapped ion qubits may be entangled via coupling to shared modes of motion using spin-dependent forces generated by optical fields. Residual qubit-motional coupling at the conclusion of the entangling operation is the dominant source of infidelity in this type of gate. For synchronously entangling increasing numbers of ions, longer gate times are required to minimise this residual coupling. We present a scheme that enables the state of each qubit to be simultaneously decoupled from all motional modes in an arbitrarily chosen gate time, increasing the gate fidelity and scalability. This is achieved by implementing discrete phase shifts in the optical field moderating the entangling operation. We describe an experimental system based on trapped ytterbium ions and demonstrate this scheme for two-qubit entangling gates on ytterbium ion pairs.

  14. Cold highly charged ions in a cryogenic Paul trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Versolato, O. O., E-mail: oscar.versolato@mpi-hd.mpg.de; Schwarz, M.; Windberger, A.; Ullrich, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik (Germany); Schmidt, P. O. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (Germany); Drewsen, M. [University of Aarhus, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Denmark); Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J. R. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik (Germany)

    2013-03-15

    Narrow optical transitions in highly charged ions (HCIs) are of particular interest for metrology and fundamental physics, exploiting the high sensitivity of HCIs to new physics. The highest sensitivity for a changing fine structure constant ever predicted for a stable atomic system is found in Ir{sup 17 + }. However, laser spectroscopy of HCIs is hindered by the large ({approx} 10{sup 6} K) temperatures at which they are produced and trapped. An unprecedented improvement in such laser spectroscopy can be obtained when HCIs are cooled down to the mK range in a linear Paul trap. We have developed a cryogenic linear Paul trap in which HCIs will be sympathetically cooled by {sup 9}Be{sup + } ions. Optimized optical access for laser light is provided while maintaining excellent UHV conditions. The Paul trap will be connected to an electron beam ion trap (EBIT) which is able to produce a wide range of HCIs. This EBIT will also provide the first experimental input needed for the determination of the transition energies in Ir{sup 17 + }, enabling further laser-spectroscopic investigations of this promising HCI.

  15. Nonlinear saturation of the trapped-ion mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaQuey, R.E.; Mahajan, S.M.; Rutherford, P.H.; Tang, W.M.

    1974-11-01

    A nonlinear model of the collisional trapped-ion mode in tokamak geometry is presented, in which the energy in long wavelength instabilities is transferred to short wavelength modes which are then damped by ion bounce resonances. Near marginal stability, the saturation of a single unstable Fourier mode is computed. Far from marginal stability, steady state nonlinear solitary waves containing many Fourier modes are found. Particle transport is computed in both cases. (auth)

  16. Overview of the Livermore electron beam ion trap project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Behar, E.; Boyce, K.R.; Brown, G.V.; Chen, H.; Gendreau, K.C.; Graf, A.; Gu, M.-F.; Harris, C.L.; Kahn, S.M.; Kelley, R.L.; Lepson, J.K.; May, M.J.; Neill, P.A.; Pinnington, E.H.; Porter, F.S.; Smith, A.J.; Stahle, C.K.; Szymkowiak, A.E.; Tillotson, A.; Thorn, D.B.; Traebert, E.; Wargelin, B.J.

    2003-01-01

    The Livermore electron beam ion trap facility has recently been moved to a new location within LLNL, and new instrumentation was added, including a 32-pixel microcalorimeter. The move was accompanied by a shift of focus toward in situ measurements of highly charged ions, which continue with increased vigor. Overviews of the facility, which includes EBIT-I and SuperEBIT, and the research projects are given, including results from optical spectroscopy, QED, and X-ray line excitation measurements

  17. Optical probing of Eu ions confined in an RF trap

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Eu ions confined in an RF quadrupole trap, has been optically detected. Using a tunable dye laser which is pumped by a Nd-YAG pulsed laser system, the resonance 9 S 4 – 6 p 3 / 2 , = 5 transition of the Eu ions have been excited and the resulting fluorescence to the metastable 9 D 4 − 6 state has been detected.

  18. Simplified Quantum Logic with Trapped Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-23

    oscillating faster than g j (g j!v ,v0) have been neglected. Here, h [(k• ẑ)z0 is the Lamb -Dicke parameter, which controls the amount of cou- pling between...nonlinearity mediated by the Lamb -Dicke parameter h @15,16#. The reduced CN gate @Eq. ~1!# can be achieved in a single pulse by setting h so that V1,1 /V0,05...mod 2p) on the un&5u1& component, TABLE I. Selected ‘‘magic’’ values of the Lamb -Dicke param- eter h which satisfy 12h25(2k11)/2m . When the trapped

  19. Cluster observations of trapped ions interacting with magnetosheath mirror modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Soucek

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Mirror modes are among the most intense low frequency plasma wave phenomena observed in the magnetosheaths of magnetized planets. They appear as large amplitude non-propagating fluctuations in the magnetic field magnitude and plasma density. These structures are widely accepted to represent a non-linear stage of the mirror instability, dominant in plasmas with large ion beta and a significant ion temperature anisotropy T⊥/T∥>1. It has long been recognized that the mirror instability both in the linear and non-linear stage is a kinetic process and that the behavior of resonant particles at small parallel velocities is crucial for its development and saturation. While the dynamics of the instability and the effect of trapped particles have been studied extensively in theoretical models and numerical simulations, only spurious observations of the trapped ions were published to date. In this work we used data from the Cluster spacecraft to perform the first detailed experimental study of ion velocity distribution associated with mirror mode oscillations. We show a conclusive evidence for the predicted cooling of resonant ions at small parallel velocities and heating of trapped ions at intermediate pitch angles.

  20. From transistor to trapped-ion computers for quantum chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, M.-H.; Casanova, J.; Mezzacapo, A.; McClean, J.; Lamata, L.; Aspuru-Guzik, A.; Solano, E.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few decades, quantum chemistry has progressed through the development of computational methods based on modern digital computers. However, these methods can hardly fulfill the exponentially-growing resource requirements when applied to large quantum systems. As pointed out by Feynman, this restriction is intrinsic to all computational models based on classical physics. Recently, the rapid advancement of trapped-ion technologies has opened new possibilities for quantum control and quantum simulations. Here, we present an efficient toolkit that exploits both the internal and motional degrees of freedom of trapped ions for solving problems in quantum chemistry, including molecular electronic structure, molecular dynamics, and vibronic coupling. We focus on applications that go beyond the capacity of classical computers, but may be realizable on state-of-the-art trapped-ion systems. These results allow us to envision a new paradigm of quantum chemistry that shifts from the current transistor to a near-future trapped-ion-based technology. PMID:24395054

  1. Differentially pumped dual linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Benjamin C.; Kenttamaa, Hilkka I.

    2015-10-20

    The present disclosure provides a new tandem mass spectrometer and methods of using the same for analyzing charged particles. The differentially pumped dual linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer of the present disclose includes a combination of two linear quadrupole (LQIT) mass spectrometers with differentially pumped vacuum chambers.

  2. Cluster observations of trapped ions interacting with magnetosheath mirror modes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Souček, Jan; Escoubet, C. P.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 29, - (2011), s. 1049-1060 ISSN 0992-7689 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : mirror mode waves * trapped particles * magnetosheath ions Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.842, year: 2011 http://www.ann-geophys.net/29/1049/2011/angeo-29-1049-2011.pdf

  3. Laser induced fluorescence of trapped molecular ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winn, J.S.

    1980-10-01

    Laser induced fluoresence (LIF) spectra (laser excitation spectra) are conceptually among the most simple spectra to obtain. One need only confine a gaseous sample in a suitable container, direct a laser along one axis of the container, and monitor the sample's fluorescence at a right angle to the laser beam. As the laser wavelength is changed, the changes in fluorescence intensity map the absorption spectrum of the sample. (More precisely, only absorption to states which have a significant radiative decay component are monitored.) For ion spectroscopy, one could benefit in many ways by such an experiment. Most optical ion spectra have been observed by emission techniques, and, aside from the problems of spectral analysis, discharge emission methods often produce the spectra of many species, some of which may be unknown or uncertain. Implicit in the description of LIF given above is certainty as to the chemical identity of the carrier of the spectrum. This article describes a method by which the simplifying aspects of LIF can be extended to molecular ions

  4. Microsecond pulsed hydrogen/deuterium exchange of electrosprayed ubiquitin ions stored in a linear ion trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabi, Khadijeh

    2015-02-07

    A pulse of D2O vapour on the order of microseconds is allowed to react with the +6 to +9 charge states of ubiquitin confined in a linear ion trap (LIT). Two envelopes of peaks are detected for the ions of ubiquitin, corresponding to the ions that exchange more quickly and more slowly. The deuterium uptake of the protonated sites on ubiquitin ions accounts for the ion population with the fast exchange. The hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) kinetics of ubiquitin ions trapped in the LIT for 200 ms showed comparable structural transitions to those trapped for 300 ms. When ions are trapped for longer, i.e. up to 2000 ms, mainly the slow exchanging ion population is detected. In all experiments the +7 ions exchange the most, suggesting a short distance between the surface protonated sites and nearby charged sites, and concomitantly high accessibility of surface protonated sites towards D2O. The +6 ions are more compact than the +7 ions but have one fewer protonated site, therefore fewer surface availabilities for D2O attack. The data suggest that the +6 ions keep most of their solution-phase contacts intact while the hydrophobic core is slightly interrupted in the +7 ions, possibly due to the exposure of charged His68 that is normally buried in the hydrophobic pocket. The +8 and +9 ions have more protonated sites but are less compact than the +7 ions because of Coulombic repulsion, resulting in a larger distance between the protonated sites and the basic sites. The data indicate that the HDX mechanism of ions with the slower exchange corresponding to the second envelope of peaks is primarily governed via a relay mechanism. The results suggest that the pulsed HDX MS method is sampling a population of ubiquitin ions with a similar backbone fold to the solution.

  5. Molecular Ions and Nanoparticles in RF and AC Traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes recent advances in using innovative storage devices based on inhomogeneous, time-dependent electric fields. Electrode arrangements include quadrupoles, linear octopoles, higher-order multipoles, or a series of ring electrodes. Applying suitable oscillating voltages to such structures, with frequencies ranging from GHz via MHz to a few Hz, a variety of charged particles can be confined ranging from electrons via molecular ions to nanoparticles with masses of more than 10 10 u. This contribution give a short summary of the theory, especially the effective potential approximation. The features of the technique are illustrated by several examples such as trapped ion beams, buffer gas cooling of ions in a 22-pole trap, and nanoparticle mass spectrometry in a quadrupole. Recent experimental results include growth of structures, isotope enrichment, and submonolayer gas ad- and desorption on a stored 500 nm SiO 2 particle. In the summary a few hints concerning ongoing experiments are given such as laser induced reactions, combination of traps with atomic beams, state-selected perturbation of a trapped low temperature ensemble with an infrared laser, and future trends in nanoparticle research.

  6. Non-thermalization in trapped atomic ion spin chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, P. W.; Becker, P.; Kaplan, H. B.; Kyprianidis, A.; Lee, A. C.; Neyenhuis, B.; Pagano, G.; Richerme, P.; Senko, C.; Smith, J.; Tan, W. L.; Zhang, J.; Monroe, C.

    2017-10-01

    Linear arrays of trapped and laser-cooled atomic ions are a versatile platform for studying strongly interacting many-body quantum systems. Effective spins are encoded in long-lived electronic levels of each ion and made to interact through laser-mediated optical dipole forces. The advantages of experiments with cold trapped ions, including high spatio-temporal resolution, decoupling from the external environment and control over the system Hamiltonian, are used to measure quantum effects not always accessible in natural condensed matter samples. In this review, we highlight recent work using trapped ions to explore a variety of non-ergodic phenomena in long-range interacting spin models, effects that are heralded by the memory of out-of-equilibrium initial conditions. We observe long-lived memory in static magnetizations for quenched many-body localization and prethermalization, while memory is preserved in the periodic oscillations of a driven discrete time crystal state. This article is part of the themed issue 'Breakdown of ergodicity in quantum systems: from solids to synthetic matter'.

  7. Trapping ions from a fast beam in a radio-frequency ion trap: Exploring the energy exchange with the longitudinal radio-frequency field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Annette; Lammich, Lutz; Vad Andersen, John Erik

    2013-01-01

    The possibility of injecting ions from an initially fast moving beam into a multipole radio-frequency (RF) ion trap without the use of buffer gas is described. The chosen trap geometry gives rise to an oscillating electric field along the direction of the incoming ions, and through an analytical...

  8. The kick-out mass selection technique for ions stored in an Electrostatic Ion Beam Trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toker, Y; Altstein, N; Aviv, O; Rappaport, M L; Heber, O; Schwalm, D; Strasser, D; Zajfman, D

    2009-01-01

    A simple mass selection technique which allows one to clean a keV ion beam of undesirable masses while stored in an Electrostatic Ion Beam Trap (EIBT) is described. The technique is based on the time-of-flight principle and takes advantage of the long storage times and self-bunching that are possible in this type of traps (self bunching being the effect that keeps ions of the same mass bunched in spite of their finite distributions of velocities and trajectories). As the oscillation period is proportional to the square root of the ion mass, bunches containing ions of different masses will separate in space with increasing storage time and can be kicked out by a pulsed deflector mounted inside the trap. A mass selector of this type has been implemented successfully in an EIBT connected to an Even-Lavie supersonic expansion source and is routinely used in ongoing cluster experiments.

  9. Removal of radium from drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clifford, D.A.

    1990-01-01

    The traditional, proven process for radium removal are sodium ion exchange softening, lime softening, and reverse osmosis. The newer, radium-specific column processes include adsorption onto the Dow RSC and BaSO 4 -impregnated alumina. The most promising new radium-specific treatment process for large-scale use is adsorption onto preformed manganese dioxide followed by multimedia or diatomaceous earth filtration The disposal of radium-contaminated wastewaters and sludges from processes under consideration will be a major factor in process selection. The processes of choice for municipal water supply treatment to remove radium are sodium ion exchange softening, lime softening, manganese dioxide adsorption-filtration, and selective adsorption onto the Dow RSC or BaSO 4 -impregnated alumina. Where the water is brackish, reverse osmosis hyperfiltration should also be considered. The radium removal process of choice for whole-house or point-of-entry treatment is sodium ion exchange softening. For point-of-use radium removal, a standard reverse osmosis system including cartridge filtration, activated carbon adsorption, and reverse osmosis hyperfiltration is recommended. Although no cost estimates have been made, the relative costs from most expensive to least expansive, for radium removal in small community water supplies are reverse osmosis, sodium ion exchange softening, lime soda softening, manganese dioxide adsorption-filtration, and the radium-selective adsorbents. 34 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Quantum-enhanced deliberation of learning agents using trapped ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunjko, V.; Friis, N.; Briegel, H. J.

    2015-02-01

    A scheme that successfully employs quantum mechanics in the design of autonomous learning agents has recently been reported in the context of the projective simulation (PS) model for artificial intelligence. In that approach, the key feature of a PS agent, a specific type of memory which is explored via random walks, was shown to be amenable to quantization, allowing for a speed-up. In this work we propose an implementation of such classical and quantum agents in systems of trapped ions. We employ a generic construction by which the classical agents are ‘upgraded’ to their quantum counterparts by a nested process of adding coherent control, and we outline how this construction can be realized in ion traps. Our results provide a flexible modular architecture for the design of PS agents. Furthermore, we present numerical simulations of simple PS agents which analyze the robustness of our proposal under certain noise models.

  11. Electromagnetic two-dimensional analysis of trapped-ion eigenmodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D.; Rewoldt, G.

    1984-11-01

    A two-dimensional electromagnetic analysis of the trapped-ion instability for the tokamak case with ..beta.. not equal to 0 has been made, based on previous work in the electrostatic limit. The quasineutrality condition and the component of Ampere's law along the equilibrium magnetic field are solved for the perturbed electrostatic potential and the component of the perturbed vector potential along the equilibrium magnetic field. The general integro-differential equations are converted into a matrix eigenvalue-eigenfunction problem by expanding in cubic B-spline finite elements in the minor radius and in Fourier harmonics in the poloidal angle. A model MHD equilibrium with circular, concentric magnetic surfaces and large aspect ratio is used which is consistent with our assemption that B << 1. The effect on the trapped-ion mode of including these electromagnetic extensions to the calculation is considered, and the temperature (and ..beta..) scaling of the mode frequency is shown and discussed.

  12. Robust quantum gates between trapped ions using shaped pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Ping, E-mail: zouping@m.scnu.edu.cn; Zhang, Zhi-Ming, E-mail: zmzhang@scnu.edu.cn

    2015-12-18

    We improve two existing entangling gate schemes between trapped ion qubits immersed in a large linear crystal. Based on the existing two-qubit gate schemes by applying segmented forces on the individually addressed qubits, we present a systematic method to optimize the shapes of the forces to suppress the dominant source of infidelity. The spin-dependent forces in the scheme can be from periodic photon kicks or from continuous optical pulses. The entangling gates are fast, robust, and have high fidelity. They can be used to implement scalable quantum computation and quantum simulation. - Highlights: • We present a systematic method to optimize the shape of the pulses to decouple qubits from intermediary motional modes. • Our optimized scheme can be applied to both the ultrafast gate and fast gate. • Our optimized scheme can suppress the dominant source of infidelity to arbitrary order. • When the number of trapped ions increase, the number of needed segments increases slowly.

  13. Superconducting qubits can be coupled and addressed as trapped ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y. X.; Wei, L. F.; Johansson, J. R.; Tsai, J. S.; Nori, F.

    2009-03-01

    Exploiting the intrinsic nonlinearity of superconducting Josephson junctions, we propose a scalable circuit with superconducting qubits (SCQs) which is very similar to the successful one now being used for trapped ions. The SCQs are coupled to the ``vibrational'' mode provided by a superconducting LC circuit or its equivalent (e.g., a superconducting quantum interference device). Both single-qubit rotations and qubit-LC-circuit couplings and/or decouplings can be controlled by the frequencies of the time-dependent magnetic fluxes. The circuit is scalable since the qubit-qubit interactions, mediated by the LC circuit, can be selectively performed, and the information transfer can be realized in a controllable way. [4pt] Y.X. Liu, L.F. Wei, J.R. Johansson, J.S. Tsai, F. Nori, Superconducting qubits can be coupled and addressed as trapped ions, Phys. Rev. B 76, 144518 (2007). URL: http://link.aps.org/abstract/PRB/v76/e144518

  14. A New Trapped Ion Clock Based on Hg-201(+)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghavi-Larigani, S.; Burt, E. A.; Lea, S. N.; Prestage, J. D.; Tjoelker, R. L.

    2009-01-01

    There are two stable odd isotopes of mercury with singly ionized hyperfine structure suitable for a microwave clock: Hg-199(+) and Hg-201(+). Virtually all trapped mercury ion clocks to date have used the 199 isotope. We have begun to investigate the viability of a trapped ion clock based on Hg-201(+). We have measured the unperturbed frequency of the (S-2)(sub 1/2) F = 1, m(sub F) = 0 to (S-2)(sub 1/2) F = 2, m(sub F) = 0 clock transition to be 29.9543658211(2) GHz. In this paper we describe initial measurements with Hg-201(+) and new applications to clocks and fundamental physics.

  15. Symplectic tomography of nonclassical states of trapped ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Man'ko, O.

    1996-03-01

    The marginal distribution for two types of nonclassical states of trapped ion - for squeezed and correlated states and for squeezed even and odd coherent states (squeezed Schroedinger cat states) is studied. The obtained marginal distribution for the two types of states is shown to satisfy classical dynamical equation equivalent to standard quantum evolution equation for density matrix (wave function) derived in symplectic tomography scheme. (author). 20 refs

  16. Nonlinear saturation of dissipative trapped ion instability and anomalous transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugihara, Masayoshi; Ogasawara, Masatada.

    1977-04-01

    An expression for the turbulent collision frequency is derived by summing up the most dominant terms from each order in the perturbation expansion in order to obtain the nonlinear saturation level of the dissipative trapped ion instability. Numerical calculation shows that the anomalous diffusion coefficient at the saturated state is in good agreement with the result of Kadomtsev and Pogutse when the effect of the magnetic shear is taken into account. (auth.)

  17. Optical probing of Eu ions confined in an RF trap

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the averaged signal captured on the digital storage oscilloscope. 381.93 381.94 381.95 381.96 381.97 381.98 381.99. 0.000. 0.002. 0.004. 0.006. 0.008. 0.010. 0.012. 0.014. 0.016. 0.018. 0.020. Signal Strength (AU). Wavelength (nm). Figure 3. Fluorescence observed from a cloud of trapped Eu ions when laser was swept.

  18. Spectroscopy of highly charged tungsten ions with Electron Beam Ion Traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Kato, Daiji; Morita, Shigeru; Murakami, Izumi; Yamamoto, Norimasa; Ohashi, Hayato; Yatsurugi, Junji; Nakamura, Nobuyuki

    2013-01-01

    We present spectra of highly charged tungsten ions in the extreme ultra-violet (EUV) by using electron beam ion traps. The electron energy dependence of spectra is investigated of electron energies from 490 to 1440 eV. Previously unreported lines are presented in the EUV range, and some of them are identified by comparing the wavelengths with theoretical calculations. (author)

  19. EUV spectrum of highly charged tungsten ions in electron beam ion trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaue, H.A.; Kato, D.; Murakami, I.; Nakamura, N.

    2016-01-01

    We present spectra of highly charged tungsten ions in the extreme ultra-violet (EUV) by using electron beam ion traps. The electron energy dependence of spectra was investigated for electron energy from 540 to 1370 eV. Previously unreported lines were presented in the EUV range, and comparing the wavelengths with theoretical calculations identified them. (author)

  20. Study of In-Trap Ion Clouds by Ion Trajectory Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaoyu; Liu, Xinwei; Cao, Wenbo; Wang, Xiao; Li, Ming; Qiao, Haoxue; Ouyang, Zheng

    2018-02-01

    Gaussian distribution has been utilized to describe the global number density distribution of ion cloud in the Paul trap, which is known as the thermal equilibrium theory and widely used in theoretical modeling of ion clouds in the ion traps. Using ion trajectory simulations, however, the ion clouds can now also be treated as a dynamic ion flow field and the location-dependent features could now be characterized. This study was carried out to better understand the in-trap ion cloud properties, such as the local particle velocity and temperature. The local ion number densities were found to be heterogeneously distributed in terms of mean and distribution width; the velocity and temperature of the ion flow varied with pressure depending on the flow type of the neutral molecules; and the "quasi-static" equilibrium status can only be achieved after a certain number of collisions, for which the time period is pressure-dependent. This work provides new insights of the ion clouds that are globally stable but subjected to local rf heating and collisional cooling. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  1. Cold K-Ca+ interaction studies in an ion-atom hybrid trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraladevi, Jyothi; Egodapitiya, Kisra; Shu, Gang; Zhang, Bichen; Condoluci, John; Chiappina, Piero; Lao, Di; Jia, Zhubing; Clark, Rob; Brown, Ken

    2017-04-01

    Mixtures of cooled and trapped ions and atoms enable study of cold collisions including elastic collisions, charge exchange interactions and molecular ion formation. To facilitate these studies, we have developed an apparatus comprising a spatially overlapped ion trap (linear Paul trap) and an atom trap (magneto optical trap). The apparatus is integrated with a high resolution time of flight mass spectrometer for identifying the reaction products. Initial studies on interactions between cold Calcium (Ca+) ions and Potassium (K) atoms will be presented. The prospects for rotational cooling of molecular ions by interaction with ultracold Potassium atoms will be discussed. Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative of ARO.

  2. Fast quantum logic gates with trapped-ion qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, V. M.; Ballance, C. J.; Thirumalai, K.; Stephenson, L. J.; Ballance, T. G.; Steane, A. M.; Lucas, D. M.

    2018-03-01

    Quantum bits (qubits) based on individual trapped atomic ions are a promising technology for building a quantum computer. The elementary operations necessary to do so have been achieved with the required precision for some error-correction schemes. However, the essential two-qubit logic gate that is used to generate quantum entanglement has hitherto always been performed in an adiabatic regime (in which the gate is slow compared with the characteristic motional frequencies of the ions in the trap), resulting in logic speeds of the order of 10 kilohertz. There have been numerous proposals of methods for performing gates faster than this natural ‘speed limit’ of the trap. Here we implement one such method, which uses amplitude-shaped laser pulses to drive the motion of the ions along trajectories designed so that the gate operation is insensitive to the optical phase of the pulses. This enables fast (megahertz-rate) quantum logic that is robust to fluctuations in the optical phase, which would otherwise be an important source of experimental error. We demonstrate entanglement generation for gate times as short as 480 nanoseconds—less than a single oscillation period of an ion in the trap and eight orders of magnitude shorter than the memory coherence time measured in similar calcium-43 hyperfine qubits. The power of the method is most evident at intermediate timescales, at which it yields a gate error more than ten times lower than can be attained using conventional techniques; for example, we achieve a 1.6-microsecond-duration gate with a fidelity of 99.8 per cent. Faster and higher-fidelity gates are possible at the cost of greater laser intensity. The method requires only a single amplitude-shaped pulse and one pair of beams derived from a continuous-wave laser. It offers the prospect of combining the unrivalled coherence properties, operation fidelities and optical connectivity of trapped-ion qubits with the submicrosecond logic speeds that are usually

  3. Experimental characterization of the Hitrap Cooler trap with highly charged ions.

    OpenAIRE

    Fedotova, Svetlana

    2013-01-01

    The HITRAP (Highly charged Ions TRAP)facility is being set up and commissioned at GSI, Darmstadt. It will provide heavy, highly charged ions at low velocities to high-precision atomic physics experiments. Within this work the Cooler trap- the key element of the HITRAP facility was tested. The Cooler trap was assembled, aligned, and commissioned in trapping experiments with ions from off-line sources.The work performed within the scope of this thesis provided the baseline for further operation...

  4. Upgrade of the electron beam ion trap in Shanghai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, D.; Yang, Y.; Xiao, J.; Shen, Y.; Fu, Y.; Wei, B.; Yao, K.; Hutton, R.; Zou, Y., E-mail: zouym@fudan.edu.cn [The Key Lab of Applied Ion Beam Physics, Ministry of Education, 200433 Shanghai (China); Shanghai EBIT Lab, Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, 200433 Shanghai (China)

    2014-09-15

    Over the last few years the Shanghai electron beam ion trap (EBIT) has been successfully redesigned and rebuilt. The original machine, developed under collaboration with the Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, first produced an electron beam in 2005. It could be tuned with electron energies between 1 and 130 keV and beam current up to 160 mA. After several years of operation, it was found that several modifications for improvements were necessary to reach the goals of better electron optics, higher photon detection, and ion injection efficiencies, and more economical running costs. The upgraded Shanghai-EBIT is made almost entirely from Ti instead of stainless steel and achieves a vacuum of less than 10{sup −10} Torr, which helps to minimize the loss of highly changed ions through charge exchange. Meanwhile, a more compact structure and efficient cryogenic system, and excellent optical alignment have been of satisfactory. The magnetic field in the central trap region can reach up till 4.8 T with a uniformity of 2.77 × 10{sup −4}. So far the upgraded Shanghai-EBIT has been operated up to an electron energy of 151 keV and a beam current of up to 218 mA, although promotion to even higher energy is still in progress. Radiation from ions as highly charged as Xe{sup 53+,} {sup 54+} has been produced and the characterization of current density is estimated from the measured electron beam width.

  5. Investigation of ion capture in an electron beam ion trap charge-breeder for rare isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittimanapun, Kritsada

    Charge breeding of rare isotope ions has become an important ingredient for providing reaccelerated rare isotope beams for science. At the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), a reaccelerator, ReA, has been built that employs an advanced Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) as a charge breeder. ReA will provide rare-isotope beams with energies of a few hundred keV/u up to tens of MeV/u to enable the study of properties of rare isotopes via low energy Coulomb excitation and transfer reactions, and to investigate nuclear reactions important for nuclear astrophysics. ReA consists of an EBIT charge breeder, a charge-over-mass selector, a room temperature radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator, and a superconducting radio-frequency linear accelerator. The EBIT charge breeder features a high-current electron gun, a long trap structure, and a hybrid superconducting magnet to reach both high acceptance for injected low-charge ions as well as high-electron beam current densities for fast charge breeding. In this work, continuous ion injection and capture in the EBIT have been investigated with a dedicated Monte-Carlo simulation code and in experimental studies. The Monte-Carlo code NEBIT considers the electron-impact ionization cross sections, space charge due to the electron beam current, ion dynamics, electric field from electrodes, and magnetic field from the superconducting magnet. Experiments were performed to study the capture efficiency as a function of injected ion beam current, electron beam current, trap size, and trap potential depth. The charge state evolution of trapped ions was studied, providing information about the effective current density of the electron beam inside the EBIT. An attempt was made to measure the effective space-charge potential of the electron beam by studying the dynamics of a beam injected and reflected inside the trap.

  6. New macroscopic theory of anamalous diffusion induced by the dissipative trapped-ion instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wimmel, H.K.

    1975-03-01

    For an axisymmetric toroidal plasma of the TOKAMAK type a new set of dissipative trapped-fluid equations is established. In addition to E vector x B vector drifts and collisions of the trapped particles, these equations take full account of the effect of Esub(//) (of the trapped ion modes) on free and trapped particles, and of the effect of grad delta 0 (delta 0 = equilibrium fraction of trapped particles). From the new equations the linear-mode properties of the dissipative trapped-ion instability and the anomalous diffusion flux of the trapped particles are derived. (orig.) [de

  7. Applications of the trilinear Hamiltonian with three trapped ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hablutzel Marrero, Roland Esteban; Ding, Shiqian; Maslennikov, Gleb; Gan, Jaren; Nimmrichter, Stefan; Roulet, Alexandre; Dai, Jibo; Scarani, Valerio; Matsukevich, Dzmitry

    2017-04-01

    The trilinear Hamiltonian a† bc + ab†c† , which describes a nonlinear interaction between harmonic oscillators, can be implemented to study different phenomena ranging from simple quantum models to quantum thermodynamics. We engineer this coupling between three modes of motion of three trapped 171Yb+ ions, where the interaction arises naturally from their mutual (anharmonic) Coulomb repulsion. By tuning our trapping parameters we are able to turn on / off resonant exchange of energy between the modes on demand. We present applications of this Hamiltonian for simulations of the parametric down conversion process in the regime of depleted pump, a simple model of Hawking radiation, and the Tavis-Cummings model. We also discuss the implementation of the quantum absorption refrigerator in such system and experimentally study effects of quantum coherence on its performance. This research is supported by the National Research Foundation, Prime Minister's Office, Singapore and the Ministry of Education, Singapore under the Research Centres of Excellence programme.

  8. Conversion electron spectroscopy of isobarically purified trapped radioactive ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rissanen, J.; Elomaa, V.V.; Eronen, T.; Hakala, J.; Jokinen, A.; Rahaman, S.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Aeystoe, J.

    2007-01-01

    The feasibility of the JYFLTRAP for in-trap spectroscopy has been studied. Several internally converted transitions have been measured for isomers of fission products with good accuracy. High-resolution spectroscopic data free of source effects have been obtained proving that trapped radioactive ions can provide excellent conversion electron sources. The shortest-lived isomer studied in this work was 117m Pd with a half-life of 19.1 ms, for which a superior peak-to-total ratio and an excellent line shape at the 9.9 keV conversion electron line have been observed. Detection efficiencies and related phenomena of the present setup are analyzed. (orig.)

  9. Recycling radium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blair, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    The Technology Programs Department of Fluor Daniel Fernald investigated alternatives for dealing with the World's largest concentrated supply of radium, the K-65 silos at Fernald, the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) former uranium processing facility near Cincinnati, Ohio. These two silos contain nearly 3,770 curies (by definition 3,770 grams) primarily of Ra-226 (T 1/2 = 1600 a) within 10,000 metric tons of material. Material contents of the silos were to be vitrified according to a Record of Decision (ROD) between the DOE and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Because of cost considerations, that alternative must be reconsidered. Research showed that although Ra-226 had come mostly into disfavor as a therapeutic agent for cancer, isotopes derived from the neutron bombardment of pure Ra-226 and radioactive decay of the resulting purified isotopes could be used to good effect. One of these isotopes, bismuth-213 (Bi-213, T 1/2 = 45.6 m), is being used in clinical trials against acute myelogenous leukemia. The isotope is attached to an antibody that seeks out cancer cells. Because alpha particles dissipate most of their energy within the space of one or a few cells, virtually all the surrounding healthy tissue remains unharmed. Because of the short half life, waste disposal is no problem. Because of past policies, radium for feedstock is difficult to find. A new policy is needed in the United States acknowledging radium's value for feedstock while continuing to control its health and environmental consequences

  10. Blueprint for a microwave trapped ion quantum computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekitsch, Bjoern; Weidt, Sebastian; Fowler, Austin G; Mølmer, Klaus; Devitt, Simon J; Wunderlich, Christof; Hensinger, Winfried K

    2017-02-01

    The availability of a universal quantum computer may have a fundamental impact on a vast number of research fields and on society as a whole. An increasingly large scientific and industrial community is working toward the realization of such a device. An arbitrarily large quantum computer may best be constructed using a modular approach. We present a blueprint for a trapped ion-based scalable quantum computer module, making it possible to create a scalable quantum computer architecture based on long-wavelength radiation quantum gates. The modules control all operations as stand-alone units, are constructed using silicon microfabrication techniques, and are within reach of current technology. To perform the required quantum computations, the modules make use of long-wavelength radiation-based quantum gate technology. To scale this microwave quantum computer architecture to a large size, we present a fully scalable design that makes use of ion transport between different modules, thereby allowing arbitrarily many modules to be connected to construct a large-scale device. A high error-threshold surface error correction code can be implemented in the proposed architecture to execute fault-tolerant operations. With appropriate adjustments, the proposed modules are also suitable for alternative trapped ion quantum computer architectures, such as schemes using photonic interconnects.

  11. Plasmas in compact traps: From ion sources to multidisciplinary research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascali, D.; Musumarra, A.; Leone, F.; Galatà, A.; Romano, F. P.; Gammino, S.

    2017-09-01

    In linear (minimum-B) magneto-static traps dense and hot plasmas are heated by electromagnetic radiation in the GHz domain via the Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR). The values of plasma density, temperature and confinement times ( n_eτ_i>10^{13} cm ^{-3} s; T_e>10 keV) are similar to the ones of thermonuclear plasmas. The research in this field -devoted to heating and confinement optimization- has been supported by numerical modeling and advanced diagnostics, for probing the plasma especially in a non-invasive way. ECR-based systems are nowadays able to produce extremely intense (tens or hundreds of mA) beams of light ions (p, d, He), and relevant currents of heavier elements (C, O, N) up to heavy ions like Xe, Pb, U. Such beams can be extracted from the trap by a proper electrostatic system. The above-mentioned properties make these plasmas very attractive for interdisciplinary researches also, such as i) nuclear decays rates measurements in stellar-like conditions, ii) energy conversion studies, being exceptional sources of short-wavelength electromagnetic radiation (EUV, X-rays, hard X-rays and gammas, useful in material science and archaeometry), iii) environments allowing precise spectroscopical measurements as benchmarks for magnetized astrophysical plasmas. The talk will give an overview about the state-of-the-art in the field of intense ion sources, and some new perspectives for interdisciplinary research, with a special attention to the developments based at INFN-LNS.

  12. High-resolution excitation of ions in a low-pressure linear ion trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collings, B A

    2011-01-15

    An exploration of the parameters necessary to obtain high-resolution excitation, using dipolar excitation, of an ion in a linear ion trap has been undertaken in this study. These parameters included ion trap pressure, excitation amplitude, excitation period, drive frequency of the ion trap, Mathieu q value and the mass of the ion of interest. An understanding of how these parameters play a role in high-resolution excitation is necessary to the development of a method for the targeted tandem mass spectrometric (MS/MS) analysis of ions with the same nominal mass. Resonance excitation profiles with full width half maxima as narrow as 0.015 m/z units could be obtained, under the right conditions, for an ion from a homogenously substituted triazatriphosphorine at m/z 322.049, which translates into a mass resolution of >21 500. In this particular case the requirement for high resolution was a low trap pressure (3.8 × 10(-5) Torr), low excitation amplitude (3 mV), long excitation period (100 ms) and a high Mathieu q value(0.8) when using a drive frequency of 1.228 MHz. Similar conditions were used to demonstrate the isolation of individual [M + H](+) component ions from mixtures of bromazepam (m/z 316.008)/chlorprothixene (m/z 316.0921)/fendiline (m/z 316.206) and chlorprothixene (m/z 316.0921)/oxycodone (m/z 316.1543)/fendiline (m/z 316.206) prior to obtaining product ion spectra with excitation at q = 0.236. In the former mixture the individual components were isolated with near 100% efficiency while in the latter mixture the isolation efficiency dropped to near 50% for the oxycodone component and to 80% for the other components. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Proposal for Verification of the Haldane Phase Using Trapped Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, I.; Retzker, A.

    2014-01-01

    A proposal to use trapped ions to implement spin-one XXZ antiferromagnetic chains as an experimental tool to explore the Haldane phase is presented. We explain how to reach the Haldane phase adiabatically, demonstrate the robustness of the ground states to noise in the magnetic field and Rabi frequencies, and propose a way to detect them using their characteristics: an excitation gap and exponentially decaying correlations, a nonvanishing nonlocal string order, and a double degenerate entanglement spectrum. Scaling up to higher dimensions and more frustrated lattices, we obtain richer phase diagrams, and we can reach spin liquid phase, which can be detected by its entanglement entropy which obeys the boundary law.

  14. A Decoherence-Free Quantum Memory Using Trapped Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-22

    A Decoherence-Free Quantum Memory Using Trapped Ions D. Kielpinski,1* V. Meyer,1 M. A. Rowe,1 C. A. Sackett,1 W. M. Itano,1 C. Monroe,2 D. J...Wineland1 We demonstrate a decoherence-free quantum memory of one qubit. By en- coding the qubit into the decoherence-free subspace (DFS) of a pair of... quantum memory stores information in superposition states of a collection of two- level systems called “qubits.” Quantum com- putation, which may

  15. Trapped-Ion State Detection through Coherent Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-12

    8–10], the ions behave like a classical driven harmonic oscillator with resonant driving force, F (i)(t) = F (i) 0 cos(ωM t+ φM ), where F (i) 0 is...the trap axis. We detect the induced harmonic motion by observing the Mg+ ion’s oscillating velocity and resulting Doppler-shift as modulation of the...the Al+ state. To demonstrate this method, we experimentally dis- tinguish Zeeman substates of the Al+ 1S0 ground state. The applied static magnetic

  16. Collapse and revival dynamics of two entangled trapped ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svandal, A.; Hansen, J.P.

    2002-01-01

    We study the long-time dynamics of two entangled ions coupled by a single vibrational mode and two lasers with different frequencies as proposed by Moelmer and Soerensen [Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 1835 (1999)]. It is shown that the time development involves collapses and revivals well known from the dynamics of a single atom in a cavity or in a trap. The revival time is found to be insensitive to the details of the initial collective vibrational state. Therefore, revival and collapse phenomena are obtained for coherent, thermal as well as other vibrational states

  17. Heating and confinement of ions at multimirror trap GOL-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koidan, V.S.; Arzhannikov, A.V.; Astrelin, V.T.; Burdakov, A.V.; Derevyankin, G.E.; Ivanov, I.A.; Ivantsivsky, M.V.; Kuznetsov, S.A.; Mekler, K.I.; Polosatkin, S.V.; Postupaev, V.V.; Rovenskikh, A.F.; Sinitsky, S.L.; Sulyaev, Yu.S.; Shoshin, A.A.; Zubairov, Eh.R.

    2005-01-01

    Main results of researches on plasma heating and confinement of dense plasma in the multimirror trap GOL-3 are presented. Recently magnetic system of the facility was converted into completely multimirror one. This results in further improvement of energy confinement time of plasma with ion temperature ∼1 keV. Collective plasma heating by ∼120 kJ (∼8 μs) relativistic electron beam results in T e ∼2 keV at ∼10 21 m -3 density. High T e exists for ∼10 μs. To this time T i reaches ∼2 keV. Ion temperature keeps at the high level during ∼1 ms. The energy confinement time sufficiently increases and a value of nτ E =(1.5 / 3)·10 18 m -3 s. (author)

  18. Quantum simulations of quantum magnetism with hundreds of trapped ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Kevin; Bohnet, Justin; Jordan, Elena; Gaerttner, Martin; Safavi-Naini, Arghavan; Rey, Ana Maria; Bollinger, John

    2017-04-01

    Quantum simulators, where one well-controlled physical system mimics another complex system, may enable understanding of quantum many-body physics that cannot be fully studied using conventional techniques on classical computers. We describe quantum simulations of a network of interacting magnetic spins performed with 2-dimensional arrays of hundreds Be+ ions crystallized in a Penning trap. We discuss how we engineer a tunable transverse Ising model, and explain how we generate and observe far-from-equilibrium quantum spin dynamics, including signatures of entanglement. We summarize progress exploring optimized adiabatic protocols for preparing low energy states of the transverse Ising Hamiltonian and implementing a sub-Doppler cooling scheme for the drumhead modes of the ion array.

  19. Low power RF amplifier circuit for ion trap applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noriega, J. R.; García-Delgado, L. A.; Gómez-Fuentes, R.; García-Juárez, A.

    2016-09-01

    A low power RF amplifier circuit for ion trap applications is presented and described. The amplifier is based on a class-D half-bridge amplifier with a voltage mirror driver. The RF amplifier is composed of an RF class-D amplifier, an envelope modulator to ramp up the RF voltage during the ion analysis stage, a detector or amplitude demodulation circuit for sensing the output signal amplitude, and a feedback amplifier that linearizes the steady state output of the amplifier. The RF frequency is set by a crystal oscillator and the series resonant circuit is tuned to the oscillator frequency. The resonant circuit components have been chosen, in this case, to operate at 1 MHz. In testings, the class-D stage operated at a maximum of 78 mW at 1.1356 MHz producing 225 V peak.

  20. Linear Ion Trap for the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinckerhoff, William; Arevalo, Ricardo; Danell, Ryan; van Amerom, Friso; Pinnick, Veronica; Li, Xiang; Hovmand, Lars; Getty, Stephanie; Mahaffy, Paul; Goesmann, Fred; Steininger, Harald

    2014-05-01

    The 2018 ExoMars rover mission includes the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) investigation. MOMA will examine the chemical composition of samples acquired from depths of up to two meters below the martian surface, where organics may be protected from radiative and oxidative degradation. When combined with the complement of instruments in the rover's Pasteur Payload, MOMA has the potential to reveal the presence of a wide range of organics preserved in a variety of mineralogical environments, and to begin to understand the structural character and potential origin of those compounds. MOMA includes a linear, or 2D, ion trap mass spectrometer (ITMS) that is designed to analyze molecular composition of (i) gas evolved from pyrolyzed powder samples and separated on a gas chromatograph and (ii) ions directly desorbed from solid samples at Mars ambient pressure using a pulsed laser and a fast-valve capillary ion inlet system. This "dual source" approach gives MOMA unprecedented breadth of detection over a wide range of molecular weights and volatilities. Analysis of nonvolatile, higher-molecular weight organics such as carboxylic acids and peptides even in the presence of significant perchlorate concentrations is enabled by the extremely short (~1 ns) pulses of the desorption laser. Use of the ion trap's tandem mass spectrometry mode permits selective focus on key species for isolation and controlled fragmentation, providing structural analysis capabilities. The flight-like engineering test unit (ETU) of the ITMS, now under construction, will be used to verify breadboard performance with high fidelity, while simultaneously supporting the development of analytical scripts and spectral libraries using synthetic and natural Mars analog samples guided by current results from MSL. ETU campaign data will strongly advise the specifics of the calibration applied to the MOMA flight model as well as the science operational procedures during the mission.

  1. The Legacy of Radium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Show any person any thing that fluoresces in the dark and ask what it is. Snap comes the reply 'Radium'. In most cases it is not radium. Most people have not seen radium and even fewer have ever handled it. But this testifies the extent to which radium has remained a household word· even a century after its discovery.

  2. Design and operation of a warm electron beam ion trap (WEBIT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, J.W.; Schneider, D.

    1993-01-01

    This contribution describes the operating principles and capabilities of a Non-Cryogenic or Warm Electron Beam Ion Trap (WEBIT). WEBIT is designed as a table top device capable of producing intermediately charged ions up to about Xe40 + at a rate of about 10 5 ions per second. WEBIT consists of an energetic electron beam that is compressed in a strong magnetic field, a potential trap and an ion extraction system. The electron beam ionizes the low-charge state ions via repeated collisions while its space charge confines the ions radially. The potential trap is such that the ions are trapped longitudinally within a potential well formed by the drift tubes. The ion extraction system consists of a focusing Einsel lens and a magnetic analyzer to momentum analyze the ions. Preliminary results for the production of highly charged ions are discussed

  3. A versatile MOF-based trap for heavy metal ion capture and dispersion

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Yaguang; Huang, Hongliang; Zhang, Yuxi; Kang, Chufan; Chen, Shuangming; Song, Li; Liu, Dahuan; Zhong, Chongli

    2018-01-01

    Current technologies for removing heavy metal ions are typically metal ion specific. Herein we report the development of a broad-spectrum heavy metal ion trap by incorporation of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid into a robust metal-organic framework. The capture experiments for a total of 22 heavy metal ions, covering hard, soft, and borderline Lewis metal ions, show that the trap is very effective, with removal efficiencies of >99% for single-component adsorption, multi-component adsorption, ...

  4. IMPROVEMENT OF THE CERN SPS ELECTROSTATIC SEPTA ION TRAPS

    CERN Multimedia

    Balhan, Bruno; Barlow, Roger Andrew; Raffaele, Graziano

    2016-01-01

    At CERN, the SPS synchrotron is equipped with a slow extraction channel towards the fixed target beam lines in the North Area This channel includes five consecutive electrostatic septa, where the field free region and the active high field region are separated by an array of tungsten-rhenium wires. The field-free region provides for the circulating beam, while the high field region is used to deflect the extracted beam. Since the residual gas can be ionized by the orbiting beam, low energy ions could cross the wire array and enter the high field region and cause high voltage breakdown when accelerated onto the cathode. To prevent low energy ions from entering this high electric field region, a vertical field is applied to the orbiting beam using so-called ‘ion traps’ for active protection. The vertical field is created by electrodes placed inside the region containing the circulating beam. Due to electromagnetic coupling onto the ion trap electrodes observed with the high frequency LHC beam (25 ns spaced ...

  5. Integrated fiber-mirror ion trap for strong ion-cavity coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandstätter, B.; Schüppert, K.; Casabone, B.; Friebe, K.; Stute, A.; Northup, T. E.; McClung, A.; Schmidt, P. O.; Deutsch, C.; Reichel, J.; Blatt, R.

    2013-01-01

    We present and characterize fiber mirrors and a miniaturized ion-trap design developed to integrate a fiber-based Fabry-Perot cavity (FFPC) with a linear Paul trap for use in cavity-QED experiments with trapped ions. Our fiber-mirror fabrication process not only enables the construction of FFPCs with small mode volumes, but also allows us to minimize the influence of the dielectric fiber mirrors on the trapped-ion pseudopotential. We discuss the effect of clipping losses for long FFPCs and the effect of angular and lateral displacements on the coupling efficiencies between cavity and fiber. Optical profilometry allows us to determine the radii of curvature and ellipticities of the fiber mirrors. From finesse measurements, we infer a single-atom cooperativity of up to 12 for FFPCs longer than 200 μm in length; comparison to cavities constructed with reference substrate mirrors produced in the same coating run indicates that our FFPCs have similar scattering losses. We characterize the birefringence of our fiber mirrors, finding that careful fiber-mirror selection enables us to construct FFPCs with degenerate polarization modes. As FFPCs are novel devices, we describe procedures developed for handling, aligning, and cleaning them. We discuss experiments to anneal fiber mirrors and explore the influence of the atmosphere under which annealing occurs on coating losses, finding that annealing under vacuum increases the losses for our reference substrate mirrors. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements indicate that these losses may be attributable to oxygen depletion in the mirror coating. Special design considerations enable us to introduce a FFPC into a trapped ion setup. Our unique linear Paul trap design provides clearance for such a cavity and is miniaturized to shield trapped ions from the dielectric fiber mirrors. We numerically calculate the trap potential in the absence of fibers. In the experiment additional electrodes can be used to compensate

  6. Position-sensitive ion detection in precision Penning trap mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eitel, G. [Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, 55099 Mainz (Germany)], E-mail: g.eitel@aia.rwth-aachen.de; Block, M. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Czasch, A. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt am Main, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Dworschak, M. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); George, S. [Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Jagutzki, O. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt am Main, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Ketelaer, J.; Ketter, J. [Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Nagy, Sz. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Rodriguez, D. [Departamento de Fisica Atomica Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Granada, 18071 Granada (Spain); Smorra, C. [Institut fuer Kernchemie, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Blaum, K. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2009-07-21

    A commercial, position-sensitive ion detector was used for the first time for the time-of-flight ion-cyclotron resonance detection technique in Penning trap mass spectrometry. In this work, the characteristics of the detector and its implementation in a Penning trap mass spectrometer will be presented. In addition, simulations and experimental studies concerning the observation of ions ejected from a Penning trap are described. This will allow for a precise monitoring of the state of ion motion in the trap.

  7. Trapped-ion quantum logic gates based on oscillating magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ospelkaus, Christian; Langer, Christopher E.; Amini, Jason M.; Brown, Kenton R.; Leibfried, Dietrich; Wineland, David J.

    2009-05-01

    Oscillating magnetic fields and field gradients can be used to implement single-qubit rotations and entangling multiqubit quantum gates for trapped-ion quantum information processing. With fields generated by currents in microfabricated surface-electrode traps, it should be possible to achieve gate speeds that are comparable to those of optically induced gates for realistic distances between the ions and the electrode surface. Magnetic-field-mediated gates have the potential to significantly reduce the overhead in laser-beam control and motional-state initialization compared to current QIP experiments with trapped ions and will eliminate spontaneous scattering decoherence, a fundamental source of decoherence in laser-mediated gates. A potentially beneficial environment for the implementation of such schemes is a cryogenic ion trap, because small length scale traps with low motional heating rates can be realized. A cryogenic ion trap experiment is currently under construction at NIST.

  8. Discovery of Radium 1898

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lokner, V.

    1998-01-01

    Hundred years ago radium was discovered in circumstances depicted in scientific legends. Since then, radium destiny had its ups and downs: for a period of time radium was welcomed as the savior of the mankind, but nowadays radium is perceived only as a threat to the people and environment. For many years possible unfavorable effects of ionizing radiation were less known and rarely discussed. Nobody was concerned with the fact that radium sources could be harmful for thousands of years. Radium euphoria is finally declining in fifties. Since then, the use of radium is limited and the fear rises. Even in the medicine where radium was successfully used for many years and where millions were having direct benefits, radium was replaced. Other sources of radiation, enabled by the development of nuclear technology and production of new and more suitable radionuclides fully replaced radium in other uses, particularly in consumer products. It is estimated that 30,000 medical radium sources are still distributed among numerous users, most of which are in underdeveloped countries. Collecting and conditioning of those sources is important radiation protection task. Long term disposal of long-lived and alpha-emitting radium sources is still unresolved. Most of the countries adopted delayed decision as the strategy. Their intention is to keep conditioned radium sources in storage for at least next forty years. In Croatia 299 radium sources were collected in 1997. They were conditioned and were safely stored at the 'Rudjer Boskovic' Institute in Zagreb. (author)

  9. Confinement in a cryogenic Penning trap of highest charge state ions from EBIT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, D.

    1994-01-01

    The retrapping of highly charged Xe 44+ and Th 68+,72+ ions extracted from an open-quotes Electron Beam Ion Trapclose quotes (EBIT) is demonstrated after injection of the ions into RETRAP, a cryogenic Penning trap (up to 6 Tesla magnetic field) currently with an open cylinder design. Ion extraction in a short pulse (5-20 μsec) from EBIT, essential for efficient retrapping, is employed. The ions are slowed down upon entering a deceleration tube mounted above the trap within the magnetic field. The potential is then rapidly (100 ns) decreased, enabling low energy ions to enter the trap. Capture efficiencies up to 25% are observed via detection of the delayed ion release pulse with a detector below the trap. Signal voltages induced in a tuned circuit due to single and multiple ions have been observed by tuning the ion resonant axial oscillation frequencies for different ions. Results from transporting and retrapping of the ions, as well as their detection, are described and the trapping efficiency is discussed, The motivation for these studies is to cool the trapped very highly charged ions to low temperatures (< 4 K) in order to perform ultrahigh resolution precision spectroscopy, collision studies at ultra low energies and to observe phase transitions in Coulomb clusters of highly charged ions

  10. Direct trace analysis of metals and alloys in a quadrupole ion-trap mass spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Song, K S; Yang, M; Cha, H K; Lee, J M; Lee, G H

    1999-01-01

    An ion-trap mass spectrometer adopting a quadrupole ion-trap and laser ablation/ionization method was constructed. The developed system was tested for composition analysis of some metals (Cu, stainless), and alloys (hastalloy C, mumetal) by mass spectrometry. Samples were analyzed by using laser ablation from a sample probe tip followed by a mass analysis with the quadrupole ion-trap. The quadrupole ion-trap was modified to enable laser ablation by a XeCl excimer laser pulse that passed radially through the ring electrode. A mass scan of the produced ions was performed in the mass selective instability mode wherein trapped ions were successively detected by increasing the rf voltage through the ring electrode. Factors affecting the mass resolution, such as pressure of buffer gas and ablation laser power, are discussed.

  11. Precise determination of micromotion for trapped-ion optical clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, J.; Partner, H. L.; Burgermeister, T.; Mehlstäubler, T. E.

    2015-09-01

    As relative systematic frequency uncertainties in trapped-ion spectroscopy are approaching the low 10-18 range, motional frequency shifts account for a considerable fraction of the uncertainty budget. Micromotion, a driven motion fundamentally connected to the principle of the Paul trap, is a particular concern in these systems. In this article, we experimentally investigate at this level three common methods for minimizing and determining the micromotion amplitude. We develop a generalized model for a quantitative application of the photon-correlation technique, which is applicable in the commonly encountered regime where the transition linewidth is comparable to the rf drive frequency. We show that a fractional frequency uncertainty due to the 2nd-order Doppler shift below |Δν/ν|=1 ×10-20 can be achieved. The quantitative evaluation is verified in an interleaved measurement with the conceptually simpler resolved sideband method. If not performed deep within the Lamb-Dicke regime, a temperature-dependent offset at the level of 10-19 is observed in resolved sideband measurements due to sampling of intrinsic micromotion. By direct comparison with photon-correlation measurements, we show that the simple to implement parametric heating method is sensitive to micromotion at the level of |Δν/ν|=1 ×10-20 as well.

  12. Topological Edge States in Periodically Driven Trapped-Ion Chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevado, Pedro; Fernández-Lorenzo, Samuel; Porras, Diego

    2017-11-01

    Topological insulating phases are primarily associated with condensed-matter systems, which typically feature short-range interactions. Nevertheless, many realizations of quantum matter can exhibit long-range interactions, and it is still largely unknown the effect that these latter may exert upon the topological phases. In this Letter, we investigate the Su-Schrieffer-Heeger topological insulator in the presence of long-range interactions. We show that this model can be readily realized in quantum simulators with trapped ions by means of a periodic driving. Our results indicate that the localization of the associated edge states is enhanced by the long-range interactions, and that the localized components survive within the ground state of the model. These effects could be easily confirmed in current state-of-the-art experimental implementations.

  13. Blueprint for a microwave trapped-ion quantum computer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lekitsch, B.; Weidt, S.; Fowler, A. G.

    2017-01-01

    The availability of a universal quantum computer will have fundamental impact on a vast number of research fields and society as a whole. An increasingly large scientific and industrial community is working towards the realization of such a device. An arbitrarily large quantum computer is best...... constructed using a modular approach. We present a blueprint for a trapped-ion based scalable quantum computer module which makes it possible to create a scalable quantum computer architecture based on long-wavelength radiation quantum gates. The modules control all operations as stand-alone units......, are constructed using silicon microfabrication techniques and they are within reach of current technology. To perform the required quantum computations, the modules make use of long-wavelength-radiation based quantum gate technology. To scale this microwave quantum computer architecture to an arbitrary size we...

  14. Influence of a geometrical perturbation on the ion dynamics in a 3D Paul trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Manoj Kumar; Satyajit, K. T.; Rao, Pushpa M.

    2015-11-01

    In ion traps, the purity of the Quadrupole potential is essential. Any perturbations in potential caused by geometrical imperfections or the presence of other ions alter the dynamics of trapped ions. In this paper the effect of a particular perturbation on dynamics of trapped ions in a 3-D quadrupole trap is analyzed and we have compared the experimental findings with simulations. To see the effect of geometrical perturbation, the position of a filament reaching into the trap (which acts as the perturbing element) is altered. The equi-frequency line on the a - q Mathieu plot was scanned at different filament insertion heights. We studied the effect of filament current and the duration of loading. The distorted potential within this trap has been theoretically calculated and simulated using SIMION. An analytical expression for potential inside the trap is fitted to the potential values obtained from the simulation and the numerical solutions of the equation of motion of trapped ions is obtained. The motional frequencies are then calculated from the Fourier transformation of the simulated ion trajectories at any given trapping potential and compared with our experimental findings. The shift in the secular frequency with respect to the level of insertion of the filament within the trap is evaluated.

  15. X-ray spectroscopy of highly-ionized atoms in an electron beam ion trap (EBIT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marrs, R.E.; Bennett, C.; Chen, M.H.

    1988-01-01

    An Electron Beam Ion Trap at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is being used to produce and trap very-highly-charged-ions (q /le/ 70+) for x-ray spectroscopy measurements. Recent measurements of dielectronic recombination, electron impact excitation and transition energies are presented. 15 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab

  16. Modelling of the Plasma Dynamics and Ion Heating in a Multimirror Trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astrelin, V.T.; Burdakov, A.V.; Karlykhanov, N.G.

    2005-01-01

    Investigation of mechanism of plasma ions heating in a multimirror magnetic trap became actual due to the essential progress in experiments on GOL-3 facility at Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics.The mechanism of fast (in comparison with the Coulomb one) acceleration and heating of ions in a multimirror trap with injection of a powerful relativistic electron beam is discussed

  17. Practical aspects of trapped ion mass spectrometry, 4 theory and instrumentation

    CERN Document Server

    March, Raymond E

    2010-01-01

    The expansion of the use of ion trapping in different areas of mass spectrometry and different areas of application indicates the value of a single source of information drawing together diverse inputs. This book provides an account of the theory and instrumentation of mass spectrometric applications and an introduction to ion trapping devices.

  18. Magneto optical trap recoil ion momentum spectroscopy: application to ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blieck, J.

    2008-10-01

    87 Rb atoms have been cooled, trapped and prepared as targets for collision studies with 2 and 5 keV Na + projectiles. The physics studied deals with charge exchange processes. The active electron, which is generally the most peripheral electron of the atomic target, is transferred from the target onto the ionic projectile. The ionized target is called recoil ion. The technique used to study this physics is the MOTRIMS (Magneto Optical Trap Recoil Ion Momentum Spectroscopy) technique, which combines a magneto optical trap and a recoil ion momentum spectrometer. The spectrometer is used for the measurement of the recoil ions momentum, which gives access to all the information of the collision: the Q-value (which is the potential energy difference of the active electron on each particle) and the scattering angle of the projectile. The trap provides extremely cold targets to optimize the measurement of the momentum, and to release the latter from thermal motion. Through cinematically complete experiments, the MOTRIMS technique gives access to better resolutions on momentum measurements. Measurements of differential cross sections in initial and final capture states and in scattering angle have been done. Results obtained for differential cross sections in initial and final states show globally a good agreement with theory and an other experiment. Nevertheless, discrepancies with theory and this other experiment are shown for the measurements of doubly differential cross sections. These discrepancies are not understood yet. The particularity of the experimental setup designed and tested in this work, namely a low background noise, allows a great sensitivity to weak capture channels, and brings a technical and scientific gain compared with previous works. (author)

  19. Radium in diesel oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulich, J.

    1977-05-01

    In order to determine the addition of radon and radium to the air in mines, originatiny from the combustion of petroleum, measurements of the content of radium in diesel oil have been performed. Knowing the radium content theradon content can easily be calculated. The procedures used for the chemical analysis of radium is desribed. The ash remaining after combustion of the diesel oil is soluted in water and radium is precipiated as sulphate. The radium is detected by a ZnS (Ag) detector. The diesel oils from different petroleum companies contained between o.019-0.5pCi radium - 226. The conclution is that the consumption of diesel oils in motors used in mines does not contribute to the radium - 226 content at the air move than permissible according to norms.(K.K.)

  20. CrossRef Space-charge effects in Penning ion traps

    CERN Document Server

    Porobić, T; Breitenfeldt, M; Couratin, C; Finlay, P; Knecht, A; Fabian, X; Friedag, P; Fléchard, X; Liénard, E; Ban, G; Zákoucký, D; Soti, G; Van Gorp, S; Weinheimer, Ch; Wursten, E; Severijns, N

    2015-01-01

    The influence of space-charge on ion cyclotron resonances and magnetron eigenfrequency in a gas-filled Penning ion trap has been investigated. Off-line measurements with View the MathML source using the cooling trap of the WITCH retardation spectrometer-based setup at ISOLDE/CERN were performed. Experimental ion cyclotron resonances were compared with ab initio Coulomb simulations and found to be in agreement. As an important systematic effect of the WITCH experiment, the magnetron eigenfrequency of the ion cloud was studied under increasing space-charge conditions. Finally, the helium buffer gas pressure in the Penning trap was determined by comparing experimental cooling rates with simulations.

  1. Implications of surface noise for the motional coherence of trapped ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukdar, I.; Gorman, D. J.; Daniilidis, N.; Schindler, P.; Ebadi, S.; Kaufmann, H.; Zhang, T.; Häffner, H.

    2016-04-01

    Electric noise from metallic surfaces is a major obstacle towards quantum applications with trapped ions due to motional heating of the ions. Here, we discuss how the same noise source can also lead to pure dephasing of motional quantum states. The mechanism is particularly relevant at small ion-surface distances, thus imposing a constraint on trap miniaturization. By means of a free induction decay experiment, we measure the dephasing time of the motion of a single ion trapped 50 μ m above a Cu-Al surface. From the dephasing times we extract the integrated noise below the secular frequency of the ion. We find that none of the most commonly discussed surface noise models for ion traps describes both the observed heating as well as the measured dephasing satisfactorily. Thus, our measurements provide a benchmark for future models for the electric noise emitted by metallic surfaces.

  2. Simulating quantum effects of cosmological expansion using a static ion trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menicucci, Nicolas C.; Olson, S. Jay; Milburn, Gerard J.

    2010-09-01

    We propose a new experimental test bed that uses ions in the collective ground state of a static trap to study the analogue of quantum-field effects in cosmological spacetimes, including the Gibbons-Hawking effect for a single detector in de Sitter spacetime, as well as the possibility of modeling inflationary structure formation and the entanglement signature of de Sitter spacetime. To date, proposals for using trapped ions in analogue gravity experiments have simulated the effect of gravity on the field modes by directly manipulating the ions' motion. In contrast, by associating laboratory time with conformal time in the simulated universe, we can encode the full effect of curvature in the modulation of the laser used to couple the ions' vibrational motion and electronic states. This model simplifies the experimental requirements for modeling the analogue of an expanding universe using trapped ions, and it enlarges the validity of the ion-trap analogy to a wide range of interesting cases.

  3. A Linear Ion Trap with an Expanded Inscribed Diameter to Improve Optical Access for Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopal, Vaishnavi; Stokes, Chris; Ferzoco, Alessandra

    2017-08-01

    We report a custom-geometry linear ion trap designed for fluorescence spectroscopy of gas-phase ions at ambient to cryogenic temperatures. Laser-induced fluorescence from trapped ions is collected from between the trapping rods, orthogonal to the excitation laser that runs along the axis of the linear ion trap. To increase optical access to the ion cloud, the diameter of the round trapping rods is 80% of the inscribed diameter, rather than the roughly 110% used to approximate purely quadrupolar electric fields. To encompass as much of the ion cloud as possible, the first collection optic has a 25.4 mm diameter and a numerical aperture of 0.6. The choice of geometry and collection optics yields 107 detected photons/s from trapped rhodamine 6G ions. The trap is coupled to a closed-cycle helium refrigerator, which in combination with two 50 Ohm heaters enables temperature control to below 25 K on the rod electrodes. The purpose of the instrument is to broaden the applicability of fluorescence spectroscopy of gas-phase ions to cases where photon emission is a minority relaxation pathway. Such studies are important to understand how the microenvironment of a chromophore influences excited state charge transfer processes. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  4. Manipulation of entanglement and its realisation using trapped ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonathan, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    Entanglement is a fundamental physical resource at the heart of quantum information theory. This Thesis contributes to its study by approaching it from two separate directions: the laws governing its manipulation, and its creation within a concrete physical setting. I begin by studying the manipulation of entangled pure states of two quantum systems when (i) only a single copy of each system is available and (ii) only a restricted class of physical operations are allowed to be performed on them. One physically reasonable class, denoted LQCC, is the set of all possible quantum operations realised on each system by local agents, who are allowed to communicate with each other only by classical means. Given these conditions, I find a minimal set of entropic-like state functions that completely determine which manipulations can be realised. Applications to useful protocols such as entanglement concentration are discussed. Further elaboration allows also the determination of the most faithful approximation to a given target state that can be attained under LQCC, and the most faithful teleportation protocol achievable when only partial entanglement is available. The study of a more general class of transformations demonstrates that entanglement can also be a re-usable resource. Specifically, I show that the mere presence of further entanglement allows the realisation of transformations which are impossible under LQCC alone. The extra entanglement is not consumed in any way, acting as a 'catalyst'. Applications of this counter-intuitive effect are discussed. In the second part of the Thesis, I turn to the concrete creation and manipulation of entanglement within the system of laser-cooled, trapped ions. After a brief survey of known schemes, I propose a new method for realising two-qubit quantum logic gates within this system. The scheme is based on the AC Stark shift (lightshift) induced by laser light resonant with the ionic transition frequency. At specific laser

  5. A versatile MOF-based trap for heavy metal ion capture and dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yaguang; Huang, Hongliang; Zhang, Yuxi; Kang, Chufan; Chen, Shuangming; Song, Li; Liu, Dahuan; Zhong, Chongli

    2018-01-15

    Current technologies for removing heavy metal ions are typically metal ion specific. Herein we report the development of a broad-spectrum heavy metal ion trap by incorporation of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid into a robust metal-organic framework. The capture experiments for a total of 22 heavy metal ions, covering hard, soft, and borderline Lewis metal ions, show that the trap is very effective, with removal efficiencies of >99% for single-component adsorption, multi-component adsorption, or in breakthrough processes. The material can also serve as a host for metal ion loading with arbitrary selections of metal ion amounts/types with a controllable uptake ratio to prepare well-dispersed single or multiple metal catalysts. This is supported by the excellent performance of the prepared Pd 2+ -loaded composite toward the Suzuki coupling reaction. This work proposes a versatile heavy metal ion trap that may find applications in the fields of separation and catalysis.

  6. A novel ion cooling trap for multi-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrograph

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Y., E-mail: yito@riken.jp [SLOWRI Team, Nishina Accelerator-Based Research Center, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Schury, P. [SLOWRI Team, Nishina Accelerator-Based Research Center, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); New Mexico State University, Department Chemistry and Biochemistry, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Wada, M.; Naimi, S. [SLOWRI Team, Nishina Accelerator-Based Research Center, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Smorra, C. [SLOWRI Team, Nishina Accelerator-Based Research Center, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Sonoda, T. [SLOWRI Team, Nishina Accelerator-Based Research Center, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Mita, H. [SLOWRI Team, Nishina Accelerator-Based Research Center, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Takamine, A. [SLOWRI Team, Nishina Accelerator-Based Research Center, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Aoyama Gakuin University, 4-4-25 Shibuya, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-8366 (Japan); Okada, K. [SLOWRI Team, Nishina Accelerator-Based Research Center, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Sophia University, 7-1 Kioi-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Ozawa, A. [University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Wollnik, H. [SLOWRI Team, Nishina Accelerator-Based Research Center, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); New Mexico State University, Department Chemistry and Biochemistry, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Fast cooling time: 2 ms. • High efficiency: ≈27% for {sup 23}Na{sup +} and ≈5.1% for {sup 7}Li{sup +}. • 100% Duty cycle with double trap system. -- Abstract: A radiofrequency quadrupole ion trap system for use with a multi-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrograph (MRTOF) for short-lived nuclei has been developed. The trap system consists of two different parts, an asymmetric taper trap and a flat trap. The ions are cooled to a sufficient small bunch for precise mass measurement with MRTOF in only 2 ms cooling time in the flat trap, then orthogonally ejected to the MRTOF for mass analysis. A trapping efficiency of ≈27% for {sup 23}Na{sup +} and ≈5.1% for {sup 7}Li{sup +} has been achieved.

  7. Penning traps with unitary architecture for storage of highly charged ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Joseph N; Brewer, Samuel M; Guise, Nicholas D

    2012-02-01

    Penning traps are made extremely compact by embedding rare-earth permanent magnets in the electrode structure. Axially-oriented NdFeB magnets are used in unitary architectures that couple the electric and magnetic components into an integrated structure. We have constructed a two-magnet Penning trap with radial access to enable the use of laser or atomic beams, as well as the collection of light. An experimental apparatus equipped with ion optics is installed at the NIST electron beam ion trap (EBIT) facility, constrained to fit within 1 meter at the end of a horizontal beamline for transporting highly charged ions. Highly charged ions of neon and argon, extracted with initial energies up to 4000 eV per unit charge, are captured and stored to study the confinement properties of a one-magnet trap and a two-magnet trap. Design considerations and some test results are discussed.

  8. Low jitter metal vapor vacuum arc ion source for electron beam ion trap injections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, Glenn E.; Boyer, Craig N.; Seely, John F.; Tan, J.N.; Pomeroy, J.M.; Gillaspy, J.D.

    2005-01-01

    We describe a metal vapor vacuum arc (MeVVA) ion source containing eight different cathodes that are individually selectable via the control electronics which does not require moving components in vacuum. Inside the vacuum assembly, the arc plasma is produced by means of a 30 μs pulse (26 kV,125 A) delivering 2.4 mC of charge to the cathode sample material. The trigger jitter is minimized ( 9 ions/cm 2 , measured by an unbiased Faraday cup positioned 20 cm from the extractor grid, at discharge rates up to 5 Hz. The electronic triggering of the discharge is via a fiber optic interface. We present the design, fabrication details, and performance of this MeVVA, recently installed on the National Institute of Standards and Technology electron beam ion trap (EBIT)

  9. The streaming-trapped ion interface in the equatorial inner magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, J.; Horwitz, J. L.; Gallagher, D.; Pollock, C. J.

    1994-01-01

    Spacecraft measurements of core ions on L=4-7 field-lines typically show trapped ion distributions near the magnetic equator, and frequently indicate field-aligned ion streams at higher latitudes. The nature of the transition between them may indicate both the microphysics of hot-cold plasma interactions and overall consequences for core plasma evolution. We have undertaken a statistical analysis and characterization of this interface and its relation to the equatorial region of the inner magnetosphere. In this analysis, we have characterized such features as the equatorial ion flux anisotropy, the penetration of field-aligned ionospheric streams into the equatorial region, the scale of the transition into trapped ion populations, and the transition latitude. We found that most transition latitudes occur within 13 deg of the equator. The typical values of equatorial ion anisotropies are consistent with bi-Maxwellian temperature ratios of T(sub perpendicular)/T(sub parallel) in the range of 3-5. The latitudinal scales for the edges of the trapped ion populations display a rather strong peak in the 2-3 deg range. We also found that there is a trend for the penetration ratio, the anisotropy half width, and the transition scale length to decrease with a higher equatorial ion anisotropy. We may interpret these features in terms of Liouville mapping of equatorially trapped ions and the reflection of the incoming ionospheric ion streams from the equatorial potential peaks associated with such trapped ions.

  10. Experimental simulation and limitations of quantum walks with trapped ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matjeschk, R; Schneider, Ch; Enderlein, M; Huber, T; Schmitz, H; Glueckert, J; Schaetz, T

    2012-01-01

    We examine the prospects of discrete quantum walks (QWs) with trapped ions. In particular, we analyze in detail the limitations of the protocol of Travaglione and Milburn (2002 Phys. Rev. A 65 032310) that has been implemented by several experimental groups in recent years. Based on the first realization in our group (Schmitz et al 2009 Phys. Rev. Lett. 103 090504), we investigate the consequences of leaving the scope of the approximations originally made, such as the Lamb-Dicke approximation. We explain the consequential deviations from the idealized QW for different experimental realizations and an increasing number of steps by taking into account higher-order terms of the quantum evolution. It turns out that these already become significant after a few steps, which is confirmed by experimental results and is currently limiting the scalability of this approach. Finally, we propose a new scheme using short laser pulses, derived from a protocol from the field of quantum computation. We show that this scheme is not subject to the above-mentioned restrictions and analytically and numerically evaluate its limitations, based on a realistic implementation with our specific setup. Implementing the protocol with state-of-the-art techniques should allow for substantially increasing the number of steps to 100 and beyond and should be extendable to higher-dimensional QWs. (paper)

  11. Nano-Objects and Ions in Liquid Crystals: Ion Trapping Effect and Related Phenomena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuriy Garbovskiy

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The presence of ions in liquid crystals is one of the grand challenges that hinder the application of liquid crystals in various devices, which include advanced 3-D and flexible displays, tunable lenses, etc. Not only do they compromise the overall performance of liquid crystal devices, ions are also responsible for slow response, image sticking, and image flickering, as well as many other negative effects. Even highly purified liquid crystal materials can get contaminated during the manufacturing process. Moreover, liquid crystals can degrade over time and generate ions. All of these factors raise the bar for their quality control, and increase the manufacturing cost of liquid crystal products. A decade of dedicated research has paved the way to the solution of the issues mentioned above through merging liquid crystals and nanotechnology. Nano-objects (guests that are embedded in the liquid crystals (hosts can trap ions, which decreases the ion concentration and electrical conductivity, and improves the electro-optical response of the host. In this paper, we (i review recently published works reporting the effects of nanoscale dopants on the electrical properties of liquid crystals; and (ii identify the most promising inorganic and organic nanomaterials suitable to capture ions in liquid crystals.

  12. UV photodissociation action spectroscopy of haloanilinium ions in a linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Christopher S; Kirk, Benjamin B; Blanksby, Stephen J; O'Hair, Richard A J; Trevitt, Adam J

    2013-06-01

    UV-vis photodissociation action spectroscopy is becoming increasingly prevalent because of advances in, and commercial availability of, ion trapping technologies and tunable laser sources. This study outlines in detail an instrumental arrangement, combining a commercial ion-trap mass spectrometer and tunable nanosecond pulsed laser source, for performing fully automated photodissociation action spectroscopy on gas-phase ions. The components of the instrumentation are outlined, including the optical and electronic interfacing, in addition to the control software for automating the experiment and performing online analysis of the spectra. To demonstrate the utility of this ensemble, the photodissociation action spectra of 4-chloroanilinium, 4-bromoanilinium, and 4-iodoanilinium cations are presented and discussed. Multiple photoproducts are detected in each case and the photoproduct yields are followed as a function of laser wavelength. It is shown that the wavelength-dependent partitioning of the halide loss, H loss, and NH3 loss channels can be broadly rationalized in terms of the relative carbon-halide bond dissociation energies and processes of energy redistribution. The photodissociation action spectrum of (phenyl)Ag2 (+) is compared with a literature spectrum as a further benchmark.

  13. The injection of inert gas ions into solids: their trapping and escape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, G.; Armour, D.G.; Donnelly, S.E.; Ingram, D.C.; Webb, R.P.

    1980-01-01

    The first part of this contribution will review experimental studies of the trapping probabilities of ions injected into solids as a function of ion energy and indicate how the data can be modelled theoretically. It will be demonstrated that trapping is a two stage process, the first involving penetration into the solid and the second requiring atom dissolution and experimental evidence will be cited to show how the latter process may be dominant for light ions which create little radiation damage. For low ion fluences, injected atoms are generally trapped in isolation but as fluence increases gas-defect complexes are formed and it will be shown how post bombardment thermal evaluation studies can provide evidence for the growth of these complexes. Concomitant with trapping however, dissolved gas may be evolved from the solid by some form of sputtering process, sometimes by mechanisms much more efficient than congruent sputtering of the solid together with the trapped species. Measurements of the trapped atom concentration-ion fluence behaviour and of the evolution of one initially trapped species by bombardment with a second species provide information on the physical processes involved in trapped atom sputtering and upon the mechanism of gas incorporation saturation and experimental studies in this area, together with some first approximation theoretical investigations will be discussed. It will be shown that an important mechanism in dictating incorporation saturation, in addition to sputtering, is the atomic saturation of the solid by the implant. (author)

  14. The JPL Hg(sup +) Extended Linear Ion Trap Frequency Standard: Status, Stability, and Accuracy Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjoelker, R. L.; Prestage, J. D.; Maleki, L.

    1996-01-01

    Microwave frequency standards based on room temperature (sup 199)Hg(sup +) ions in a Linear Ion Trap (LITS) presently achieve a Signal to Noise and line Q inferred short frequency stability. Long term stability has been measured for averaging intervals up to 5 months with apparent sensitivity to variations in ion number/temperature limiting the flicker floor.

  15. Structure and dynamics of highly charged heavy ions studied with the electron beam ion trap in Tokyo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Hu, Zhimin; Watanabe, Hirofumi; Li, Yueming; Kato, Daiji; Currell, Fred J.; Tong Xiaomin; Watanabe, Tsutomu; Ohtani, Shunsuke

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present the structure and the dynamics of highly charged heavy ions studied through dielectronic recombination (DR) observations performed with the Tokyo electron beam ion trap. By measuring the energy dependence of the ion abundance ratio in the trap at equilibrium, we have observed DR processes for open shell systems very clearly. Remarkable relativistic effects due to the generalized Breit interaction have been clearly shown in DR for highly charged heavy ions. We also present the first result for the coincidence measurement of two photons emitted from a single DR event.

  16. Quantum computation and simulation with trapped ions using dissipation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schindler, P.

    2013-01-01

    Quantum information processing combines two of the most successful and fascinating ideas of the 20th century - quantum physics and computer science. A quantum computer promises to solve certain problems more efficient than classical computers. But building such a quantum computer is a cumbersome task as the quantum system needs to be manipulated with tremendous accuracy while being well shielded from the classical environment to preserve its quantum nature. An unwanted coupling to the surrounding environment manifests itself in computational errors. This coupling can be suppressed with the aid of quantum error correction schemes that are still a mainly theoretical construct. These error correcting protocols can only protect the information if they are applied multiple times subsequently. For this, it is necessary to remove the information about previous errors from the quantum system before performing the actual correction. However, this removal of information requires a controlled coupling to the environment which is beyond the standard set of operations available in a quantum computer. In this work, an experimental realization of repetitive quantum error correction in an ion-trap quantum information processor is presented, performing up to three consecutive rounds of correction. Moreover such an error correction algorithm can also be used to demonstrate a physical connection between information processing and quantum mechanics - computational errors are mapped onto quantum mechanical measurements. Therefore, a quantum error correction protocol is able to undo quantum measurements - a task that seemingly contradicts the foundations of quantum physics. In this work, we show that it is indeed possible to undo a partial measurement on a quantum register using an error correction protocol. After closer inspection it becomes obvious this does not violate the laws of quantum mechanics. However, the realization of a large-scale quantum computer lies in the far future as

  17. Trapping of slow recoil ions: past results and speculations on the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prior, M.H.

    1983-01-01

    A simple electrostatic ion trap has been utilized to capture low energy recoil ions made by fast heavy ion impact upon a neon gas target. The heavy ion beams have been provided by the LBL SuperHILAC and the work has so far concentrated upon studies of the decay of the trapped ion population in time following creation by the pulsed HILAC beam (3.3 msec pulse length, 36Hz repetition rate). The various charge states decay predominantly via electron capture collisions with the ambient gas in the ion trap. By varying the gas composition and density, one can determine the electron capture rate constants from which an effective (velocity averaged) capture cross-section can be obtained. The uniqueness of this work lies in the high charge states, up to Ne 10 + (fully stripped), and the low mean collision energies available (in the range 1.0 to 70.0 eV)

  18. Electron cooling of highly charged ions in penning traps; Elektronenkuehlung hochgeladener Ionen in Penningfallen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moellers, B.

    2007-02-08

    For many high precision experiments with highly charged ions in ion traps it is necessary to work with low energy ions. One possibility to slow ions down to a very low energy in a trap is electron cooling, a method, which is already successfully used in storage rings to produce ion beams with high phase space density. Fast ions and a cold electron plasma are inserted into a Penning trap. The ions lose their energy due to Coulomb interaction with the electrons while they cross the plasma, the electrons are heated. The cooling time is the time, which is needed to cool an ion from a given initial energy to a low final energy. To calculate cooling times it is necessary to solve coupled differential equations for the ion energy and electron temperature. In a Penning trap the strong external magnetic field constitutes a theoretical challenge, as it influences the energy loss of the ions in an electron plasma, which can no longer be calculated analytically. In former estimates of cooling times this influence is neglected. But simulations show a dramatic decrease of the energy loss in the presence of a strong magnetic field, so it is necessary to investigate the effect of the magnetic field on the cooling times. This work presents a model to calculate cooling times, which includes both the magnetic field and the trap geometry. In a first step a simplified model without the external trap potential is developed. The energy loss of the ions in the magnetized electron plasma is calculated by an analytic approximation, which requires a numerical solution of integrals. With this model the dependence of the cooling time on different parameters like electron and ion density, magnetic field and the angle between ion velocity and magnetic field is studied for fully ionized uranium. In addition the influence of the electron heating is discussed. Another important topic in this context is the recombination between ions and electrons. The simplified model for cooling times allows to

  19. Applications of the fractional calculus to study the physical theory of ion motion in a quadrupole ion trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaharborj, Sarkhosh S; Moameni, Abbas

    2017-10-01

    In this article, fractional calculus has been applied to study the motion of ions in a three-dimensional radio frequency quadrupole ion trap; we have called this arrangement a fractional quadrupole ion trap. The main purpose of the article is to show that by controlling the fractional parameter of a trapped ion, one can gain a more efficient mass separation. In what follows, we will see that with decreasing the fractional parameter, we can achieve a smaller first stability region. Note that a small stability diagram will result in a good and acceptable mass separation. Various methods can be proposed to obtain a desired ion acceleration with a sufficient accuracy for good mass separation, which is similar to the one obtained by a fractional ion trap. Some of these methods are using the effects of a damping force, a magnetic field or both on the confinement of particles in the quadrupole ion trap. The first stability regions are plotted for all of the aforementioned methods, and simulation results are provided to compare them with those for the fractional case.

  20. Methanol Chemical Ionization Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry of VX Degradation Products

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rohrbaugh, Dennis

    1999-01-01

    ... for on-site analysis by being easier to transport and safer to use than gas cylinders: Ion trap EI and methanol CI mass spectra are provided as a reference for future identification of these compounds.

  1. Mathematical Modeling of Resonant Processes in Confined Geometry of Atomic and Atom-Ion Traps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melezhik Vladimir S.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss computational aspects of the developed mathematical models for resonant processes in confined geometry of atomic and atom-ion traps. The main attention is paid to formulation in the nondirect product discrete-variable representation (npDVR of the multichannel scattering problem with nonseparable angular part in confining traps as the boundary-value problem. Computational efficiency of this approach is demonstrated in application to atomic and atom-ion confinement-induced resonances we predicted recently.

  2. Mathematical Modeling of Resonant Processes in Confined Geometry of Atomic and Atom-Ion Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melezhik, Vladimir S.

    2018-02-01

    We discuss computational aspects of the developed mathematical models for resonant processes in confined geometry of atomic and atom-ion traps. The main attention is paid to formulation in the nondirect product discrete-variable representation (npDVR) of the multichannel scattering problem with nonseparable angular part in confining traps as the boundary-value problem. Computational efficiency of this approach is demonstrated in application to atomic and atom-ion confinement-induced resonances we predicted recently.

  3. Extreme ultra-violet emission spectroscopy of highly charged gadolinium ions with an electron beam ion trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohashi, Hayato; Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A

    2013-01-01

    We present extreme ultra-violet emission spectra of highly charged gadolinium ions obtained with an electron beam ion trap at electron energies of 0.53–1.51 keV. The electron energy dependence of the spectra in the 5.7–11.3 nm range is compared with calculation with the flexible atomic code. (paper)

  4. Single Qubit Manipulation in a Microfabricated Surface Electrode Ion Trap (Open Access, Publisher’s Version)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-13

    electrode ion trap with field compensation using a modulated Raman effect D T C Allcock, J A Sherman, D N Stacey et al. Spatially uniform single-qubit gate...in thermal states of motion G Kirchmair, J Benhelm, F Zähringer et al. Normal modes of trapped ions in the presence of anharmonic trap potentials J P...Qloaded = 280) [35]. New Journal of Physics 15 (2013) 093018 (http://www.njp.org/) 5 2.1 GHz Zeeman = 1.4 MHz/G 36 9. 5 nm HF = 12.6 GHz 171Yb+ 2P 1

  5. A small electron beam ion trap/source facility for electron/neutral–ion collisional spectroscopy in astrophysical plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Gui-Yun; Wei, Hui-Gang; Yuan, Da-Wei; Wang, Fei-Lu; Peng, Ji-Min; Zhong, Jia-Yong; Zhu, Xiao-Long; Schmidt, Mike; Zschornack, Günter; Ma, Xin-Wen; Zhao, Gang

    2018-01-01

    Spectra are fundamental observation data used for astronomical research, but understanding them strongly depends on theoretical models with many fundamental parameters from theoretical calculations. Different models give different insights for understanding a specific object. Hence, laboratory benchmarks for these theoretical models become necessary. An electron beam ion trap is an ideal facility for spectroscopic benchmarks due to its similar conditions of electron density and temperature compared to astrophysical plasmas in stellar coronae, supernova remnants and so on. In this paper, we will describe the performance of a small electron beam ion trap/source facility installed at National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences.We present some preliminary experimental results on X-ray emission, ion production, the ionization process of trapped ions as well as the effects of charge exchange on the ionization.

  6. Excitation of internal kink modes by trapped energetic beam ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, L.; White, R.B.; Rosenbluth, M.N.

    1983-10-01

    Energetic trapped particles are shown to have a destabilizing effect on the internal kink mode in tokamaks. The plasma pressure threshold for the mode is lowered by the particles. The growth rate is near the ideal magnetohydrodynamic value, but the frequency is comparable to the trapped particle precission frequency. A model for the instability cycle gives stability properties, associated particle losses, and neutron emissivity consistent with the fishbone events observed in PDX

  7. Calibration procedure for secular frequency scanning in ion trap mass spectrometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Dalton T; Pulliam, Christopher J; Cooks, R Graham

    2016-05-30

    Mass spectra can be recorded using ion traps by scanning the frequency of an alternating current (ac) signal that corresponds to the secular frequency of a trapped ion. There is a considerable simplification in the instrumentation needed to perform such a scan compared with conventional scans of the radiofrequency (rf) amplitude. However, mass calibration is difficult. An algorithm that can be used to achieve mass calibration is investigated and the factors that affect ion mass assignments are discussed. Time domain data, recorded using a commercial benchtop linear ion trap mass spectrometer, are converted to the m/z domain using ion Mathieu parameter q u values which are derived from the dimensionless frequency parameter β u expressed as a continuing fraction in terms of q u . The relationship between the operating parameters of an ideal ion trap and the ion m/z ratio is derived from the Mathieu equations and expressed as an algorithm which through successive approximations yields the Mathieu q u value and hence m/z values and peak widths. The predictions of the algorithm are tested against experiment by sweeping the frequency of a small supplementary ac signal so as to cause mass-selective ejection of trapped ions. Calibration accuracy is always better than 0.1%, often much better. Peak widths correspond to a mass resolution of 250 to 500 in the m/z 100-1800 range in secular frequency scans. A simple, effective method of calibration of mass spectra recorded using secular frequency scans is achieved. The effects of rf amplitude, scan rate, and ac amplitude on calibration parameters are shown using LTQ linear ion trap data. Corrections for differences in ion mass must be made for accurate calibration, and this is easily incorporated into the calibration procedure. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Advanced Quadrupole Ion Trap Instrumentation for Low Level Vehicle Emissions Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLuckey, S.A.

    1997-01-01

    Quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry has been evaluated for its potential use in vehicle emissions measurements in vehicle test facilities as an analyzer for the top 15 compounds contributing to smog generation. A variety of ionization methods were explored including ion trap in situ chemical ionization, atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization, and nitric oxide chemical ionization in a glow discharge ionization source coupled with anion trap mass spectrometer. Emphasis was placed on the determination of hydrocarbons and oxygenated hydrocarbons at parts per million to parts per billion levels. Ion trap in situ water chemical ionization and atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization were both shown to be amendable to the analysis of arenes, alcohols, aldehydes and, to some degree, alkenes. Atmospheric sampling glow discharge also generated molecular ions of methy-t-butyl ether (MTBE). Neither of these ionization methods, however, were found to generate diagnostic ions for the alkanes. Nitric oxide chemical ionization, on the other hand, was found to yield diagnostic ions for alkanes, alkenes, arenes, alcohols, aldehydes, and MTBE. The ability to measure a variety of hydrocarbons present at roughly 15 parts per billion at measurement rates of 3 Hz was demonstrated. All of the ions with potential to serve as parent ions in a tandem mass spectrometry experiment were found to yield parent-to-product conversion efficiencies greater than 75%. The flexibility afforded to the ion trap by use of tailored wave-forms applied to the end-caps allows parallel monitoring schemes to be devised that provide many of the advantages of tandem mass spectrometry without major loss in measurement rate. A large loss in measurement rate would ordinarily result from the use of conventional tandem mass spectrometry experiments carried out in series for a large number of targeted components. These results have demonstrated that the ion trap has an excellent combination of

  9. Analysis of thermal radiation in ion traps for optical frequency standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doležal, M.; Balling, P.; Nisbet-Jones, P. B. R.; King, S. A.; Jones, J. M.; Klein, H. A.; Gill, P.; Lindvall, T.; Wallin, A. E.; Merimaa, M.; Tamm, C.; Sanner, C.; Huntemann, N.; Scharnhorst, N.; Leroux, I. D.; Schmidt, P. O.; Burgermeister, T.; Mehlstäubler, T. E.; Peik, E.

    2015-12-01

    In many of the high-precision optical frequency standards with trapped atoms or ions that are under development to date, the ac Stark shift induced by thermal radiation leads to a major contribution to the systematic uncertainty. We present an analysis of the inhomogeneous thermal environment experienced by ions in various types of ion traps. Finite element models which allow the determination of the temperature of the trap structure and the temperature of the radiation were developed for five ion trap designs, including operational traps at PTB and NPL and further optimized designs. Models were refined based on comparison with infrared camera measurement until an agreement of better than 10% of the measured temperature rise at critical test points was reached. The effective temperature rises of the radiation seen by the ion range from 0.8 K to 2.1 K at standard working conditions. The corresponding fractional frequency shift uncertainties resulting from the uncertainty in temperature are in the 10-18 range for optical clocks based on the Sr+ and Yb+ E2 transitions, and even lower for Yb+ E3, In+ and Al+. Issues critical for heating of the trap structure and its predictability were identified and design recommendations developed.

  10. Quantum simulation of spin models on an arbitrary lattice with trapped ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korenblit, S; Kafri, D; Campbell, W C; Islam, R; Edwards, E E; Monroe, C; Gong, Z-X; Lin, G-D; Duan, L-M; Kim, J; Kim, K

    2012-01-01

    A collection of trapped atomic ions represents one of the most attractive platforms for the quantum simulation of interacting spin networks and quantum magnetism. Spin-dependent optical dipole forces applied to an ion crystal create long-range effective spin–spin interactions and allow the simulation of spin Hamiltonians that possess nontrivial phases and dynamics. Here we show how the appropriate design of laser fields can provide for arbitrary multidimensional spin–spin interaction graphs even for the case of a linear spatial array of ions. This scheme uses currently available trap technology and is scalable to levels where the classical methods of simulation are intractable. (paper)

  11. Spectroscopy and thermometry of drumhead modes in a mesoscopic trapped-ion crystal using entanglement

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sawyer, BC

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available ) for a 2D crystal of 331 9Be? ions. Mode frequencies, !m, decrease as the effective wavelength gets shorter. The arbitrary color scale indicates relative ion displace- ment amplitude. One example of an ion spin state with similar symmetry is given... thermometry [26]. The Penning trap used for this work is detailed in a previous publication [27]. The application of static volt- ages to a stack of cylindrical electrodes provides harmonic confinement along z^ (the trap symmetry axis) with a 9Be? center...

  12. The Legacy of Radium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    radiological safety and molecular biology. He occasionally writes popular science ... 'radioactivity'. After investigating all the compounds available to'her for their property of radioactivity and finding them .... hazard since radium could remain active for thousands of years. Loss of radium sources into toilets and sewage during ...

  13. Radium regionalization in California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wollenberg, H.A.; Revzan, K.L.

    1990-01-01

    The amount of 222 Rn that enters a house depends to a large extent on the concentration of radon's parent, 226 Ra in the soil. With the assumption that radium is in radioactive equilibrium with its ultimate parent, 238 U, the authors used the National Aerial Radiometric Reconnaissance (NARR) data and a database covering the concentration and distribution of uranium in California rocks to estimate the regional distribution of radium. A north-to-south increase in radium occurs between 42 degree and 36 degree N, then radium decreases southward. This pattern is explained by the distribution of rock types. The overall mean radium concentrations estimated from the aeroradiometric and lithologic data are similar, but there is a significant discrepancy between aeroradiometric and lithologic-estimated radium in central California. Ground measurements suggest that the radium values from aeroradiometric measurements that the radium values from aeroradiometric measurements there are erroneously high, pointing out the necessity of verifying aeroradiometrically-determined data before they are used to help predict radon production

  14. An electrodynamic system for highly charged ion transfer to a Paul trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmoeger, Lisa; Schwarz, Maria; Versolato, Oscar O. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Bundesallee 100, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany); Piest, Baptist; Stark, Julian; Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, Jose R. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Schmidt, Piet O. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Bundesallee 100, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Electron beam ion traps (EBITs) are efficient tools for highly charged ion (HCI) production and spectroscopy. While narrow optical transitions in HCI at rest are of great interest for precision studies of fundamental physics and for realisations of high accuracy frequency standards. However, due to the high ion temperature inside of an EBIT, laser spectroscopy on HCIs is severely constrained by Doppler broadening. For further improvements, our cryogenic linear Paul trap experiment (CryPTEx) in-line with an EBIT will allow for trapping and sympathetic cooling of a wide range of HCIs. A deceleration beamline allows for efficient HCI transfer and their injection at very low kinetic energy into CryPTEx. The deceleration of the ion bunches is performed by means of a novel pulsed buncher tube. We present time-of-flight spectra and measurements with retarding field analysers showing the deceleration and time focussing properties of the setup.

  15. High-Fidelity Preservation of Quantum Information During Trapped-Ion Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Peter; Gloger, Timm F.; Kaufmann, Delia; Johanning, Michael; Wunderlich, Christof

    2018-01-01

    A promising scheme for building scalable quantum simulators and computers is the synthesis of a scalable system using interconnected subsystems. A prerequisite for this approach is the ability to faithfully transfer quantum information between subsystems. With trapped atomic ions, this can be realized by transporting ions with quantum information encoded into their internal states. Here, we measure with high precision the fidelity of quantum information encoded into hyperfine states of a Yb171 + ion during ion transport in a microstructured Paul trap. Ramsey spectroscopy of the ion's internal state is interleaved with up to 4000 transport operations over a distance of 280 μ m each taking 12.8 μ s . We obtain a state fidelity of 99.9994 (-7+6) % per ion transport.

  16. Final Report - Advanced Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry Program - Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Sandia National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitten, W.B.

    2002-12-18

    This report covers the three main projects that collectively comprised the Advanced Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry Program. Chapter 1 describes the direct interrogation of individual particles by laser desorption within the ion trap mass spectrometer analyzer. The goals were (1) to develop an ''intelligent trigger'' capable of distinguishing particles of biological origin from those of nonbiological origin in the background and interferent particles and (2) to explore the capability for individual particle identification. Direct interrogation of particles by laser ablation and ion trap mass spectrometry was shown to have good promise for discriminating between particles of biological origin and those of nonbiological origin, although detailed protocols and operating conditions were not worked out. A library of more than 20,000 spectra of various types of biological particles has been assembled. Methods based on multivariate analysis and on neural networks were used to discriminate between particles of biological origin and those of nonbiological origin. It was possible to discriminate between at least some species of bacteria if mass spectra of several hundred similar particles were obtained. Chapter 2 addresses the development of a new ion trap mass analyzer geometry that offers the potential for a significant increase in ion storage capacity for a given set of analyzer operating conditions. This geometry may lead to the development of smaller, lower-power field-portable ion trap mass spectrometers while retaining laboratory-scale analytical performance. A novel ion trap mass spectrometer based on toroidal ion storage geometry has been developed. The analyzer geometry is based on the edge rotation of a quadrupolar ion trap cross section into the shape of a torus. Initial performance of this device was poor, however, due to the significant contribution of nonlinear fields introduced by the rotation of the symmetric ion-trapping geometry. These

  17. Trapping and re-emission of energetic hydrogen and helium ions in materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Sadae

    1981-01-01

    The experimental results on the trapping and re-emission of energetic hydrogen and helium ions in materials are explained. The trapping of deuterium and helium in graphite saturates at the concentration of 10 18 ions/cm 2 . The trapping rate of hydrogen depends on the kinds of target materials. In the case of the implantation in Mo over 3 x 10 16 H/cm 2 , hydrogen is hardly trapped. On the other hand, the trapping of hydrogen in Ti, Zr and Ta which form solid solution is easily made. The hydrogen in these metals can diffuse toward the inside of metals. The deuterium retained in 316 SS decreased with time. The trapping rate reached saturation more rapidly at higher implantation temperature. The effective diffusion constant for the explanation of the re-emission process is 1/100 as small as the ordinary value. The radiation damage due to helium irradiation affects on the trapping of deuterium in Mo. The temperature dependence of the trapping rate can be explained by the diffusion model based on the Sievert's law. The re-emission of helium was measured at various temperature. At low temperature, the re-emission was low at first, then the rate increased. At high temperature, the re-emission rate was high from the beginning. (Kato, T.)

  18. HITRAP - a facility for experimentation with trapped highly-charged ions at GSI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer, H.F.; Bollen, G.; Bosch, F.; Egelhof, P.; Franzke, B.; Hasse, R.W.; Kluge, H.J.; Kozhuharov, C.; Kuehl, T.; Liesen, D.; Mann, R.; Mokler, P.H.; Mueller, A.; Mueller, R.W.; Muenzenberg, G.; Poth, H.; Schweikhard, L.; Schuch, R.; Werth, G.

    1990-08-01

    A proposal is presented for the development of a facility to capture highly-charged ions, produced in the GSI heavy ion complex, and to store them in electromagnetic traps at thermal or subthermal energy. Such a facility would allow to exploit the physics opened up by the heavy ion rings SIS and ESR and by the fragment separator (FRS) with unprecedented possibilities as will be shown in the outlined physics programme. (orig.)

  19. Power-law distributions for a trapped ion interacting with a classical buffer gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVoe, Ralph G

    2009-02-13

    Classical collisions with an ideal gas generate non-Maxwellian distribution functions for a single ion in a radio frequency ion trap. The distributions have power-law tails whose exponent depends on the ratio of buffer gas to ion mass. This provides a statistical explanation for the previously observed transition from cooling to heating. Monte Carlo results approximate a Tsallis distribution over a wide range of parameters and have ab initio agreement with experiment.

  20. EBIT (Electron Beam Ion Trap), N-Division Experimental Physics. Annual report, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, D. [ed.

    1995-10-01

    The experimental groups in the Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) program continue to perform front-line research with trapped and extracted highly charged ions (HCI) in the areas of ion/surface interactions, atomic spectroscopy, electron-ion interaction and structure measurements, highly charged ion confinement, and EBIT development studies. The ion surface/interaction studies which were initiated five years ago have reached a stage where they an carry out routine investigations, as well as produce breakthrough results towards the development of novel nanotechnology. At EBIT and SuperEBIT studies of the x-ray emission from trapped ions continue to produce significant atomic structure data with high precision for few electron systems of high-Z ions. Furthermore, diagnostics development for magnetic and laser fusion, supporting research for the x-ray laser and weapons programs, and laboratory astrophysics experiments in support of NASA`s astrophysics program are a continuing effort. The two-electron contributions to the binding energy of helium like ions were measured for the first time. The results are significant because their precision is an order of magnitude better than those of competing measurements at accelerators, and the novel technique isolates the energy corrections that are the most interesting. The RETRAP project which was initiated three years ago has reached a stage where trapping, confining and electronic cooling of HCI ions up to Th{sup 80+} can be performed routinely. Measurements of the rates and cross sections for electron transfer from H{sub 2} performed to determine the lifetime of HCI up to Xe{sup q+} and Th{sup q+} (35 {le} q {le} 80) have been studied at mean energies estimated to be {approximately} 5 q eV. This combination of heavy ions with very high charges and very low energies is rare in nature, but may be encountered in planned fusion energy demonstration devices, in highly charged ion sources, or in certain astrophysical events.

  1. EBIT (Electron Beam Ion Trap), N-Division Experimental Physics. Annual report, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, D.

    1995-10-01

    The experimental groups in the Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) program continue to perform front-line research with trapped and extracted highly charged ions (HCI) in the areas of ion/surface interactions, atomic spectroscopy, electron-ion interaction and structure measurements, highly charged ion confinement, and EBIT development studies. The ion surface/interaction studies which were initiated five years ago have reached a stage where they an carry out routine investigations, as well as produce breakthrough results towards the development of novel nanotechnology. At EBIT and SuperEBIT studies of the x-ray emission from trapped ions continue to produce significant atomic structure data with high precision for few electron systems of high-Z ions. Furthermore, diagnostics development for magnetic and laser fusion, supporting research for the x-ray laser and weapons programs, and laboratory astrophysics experiments in support of NASA's astrophysics program are a continuing effort. The two-electron contributions to the binding energy of helium like ions were measured for the first time. The results are significant because their precision is an order of magnitude better than those of competing measurements at accelerators, and the novel technique isolates the energy corrections that are the most interesting. The RETRAP project which was initiated three years ago has reached a stage where trapping, confining and electronic cooling of HCI ions up to Th 80+ can be performed routinely. Measurements of the rates and cross sections for electron transfer from H 2 performed to determine the lifetime of HCI up to Xe q+ and Th q+ (35 ≤ q ≤ 80) have been studied at mean energies estimated to be ∼ 5 q eV. This combination of heavy ions with very high charges and very low energies is rare in nature, but may be encountered in planned fusion energy demonstration devices, in highly charged ion sources, or in certain astrophysical events

  2. Experimental quantum simulations of many-body physics with trapped ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Ch; Porras, Diego; Schaetz, Tobias

    2012-02-01

    Direct experimental access to some of the most intriguing quantum phenomena is not granted due to the lack of precise control of the relevant parameters in their naturally intricate environment. Their simulation on conventional computers is impossible, since quantum behaviour arising with superposition states or entanglement is not efficiently translatable into the classical language. However, one could gain deeper insight into complex quantum dynamics by experimentally simulating the quantum behaviour of interest in another quantum system, where the relevant parameters and interactions can be controlled and robust effects detected sufficiently well. Systems of trapped ions provide unique control of both the internal (electronic) and external (motional) degrees of freedom. The mutual Coulomb interaction between the ions allows for large interaction strengths at comparatively large mutual ion distances enabling individual control and readout. Systems of trapped ions therefore exhibit a prominent system in several physical disciplines, for example, quantum information processing or metrology. Here, we will give an overview of different trapping techniques of ions as well as implementations for coherent manipulation of their quantum states and discuss the related theoretical basics. We then report on the experimental and theoretical progress in simulating quantum many-body physics with trapped ions and present current approaches for scaling up to more ions and more-dimensional systems.

  3. Self-generated zonal flows in the plasma turbulence driven by trapped-ion and trapped-electron instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drouot, T.; Gravier, E.; Reveille, T.; Collard, M. [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198 CNRS - Université de Lorraine, 54 506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy Cedex (France)

    2015-10-15

    This paper presents a study of zonal flows generated by trapped-electron mode and trapped-ion mode micro turbulence as a function of two plasma parameters—banana width and electron temperature. For this purpose, a gyrokinetic code considering only trapped particles is used. First, an analytical equation giving the predicted level of zonal flows is derived from the quasi-neutrality equation of our model, as a function of the density fluctuation levels and the banana widths. Then, the influence of the banana width on the number of zonal flows occurring in the system is studied using the gyrokinetic code. Finally, the impact of the temperature ratio T{sub e}/T{sub i} on the reduction of zonal flows is shown and a close link is highlighted between reduction and different gyro-and-bounce-average ion and electron density fluctuation levels. This reduction is found to be due to the amplitudes of gyro-and-bounce-average density perturbations n{sub e} and n{sub i} gradually becoming closer, which is in agreement with the analytical results given by the quasi-neutrality equation.

  4. Implementation of a symmetric surface-electrode ion trap with field compensation using a modulated Raman effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allcock, D T C; Sherman, J A; Stacey, D N; Burrell, A H; Curtis, M J; Imreh, G; Linke, N M; Szwer, D J; Webster, S C; Steane, A M; Lucas, D M

    2010-01-01

    We describe a new electrode design for a surface-electrode Paul trap, which allows rotation of the normal modes out of the trap plane, and a technique for micromotion compensation in all directions using a two-photon process, which avoids the need for an ultraviolet laser directed to the trap plane. The fabrication and characterization of the trap are described, as well as its implementation for the trapping and cooling of single Ca + ions. We also propose a repumping scheme that increases ion fluorescence and simplifies heating rate measurements obtained by time-resolved ion fluorescence during Doppler cooling.

  5. Implementation of a symmetric surface-electrode ion trap with field compensation using a modulated Raman effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allcock, D. T. C.; Sherman, J. A.; Stacey, D. N.; Burrell, A. H.; Curtis, M. J.; Imreh, G.; Linke, N. M.; Szwer, D. J.; Webster, S. C.; Steane, A. M.; Lucas, D. M.

    2010-05-01

    We describe a new electrode design for a surface-electrode Paul trap, which allows rotation of the normal modes out of the trap plane, and a technique for micromotion compensation in all directions using a two-photon process, which avoids the need for an ultraviolet laser directed to the trap plane. The fabrication and characterization of the trap are described, as well as its implementation for the trapping and cooling of single Ca+ ions. We also propose a repumping scheme that increases ion fluorescence and simplifies heating rate measurements obtained by time-resolved ion fluorescence during Doppler cooling.

  6. Towards understanding thermodynamics and energy transport in strings of trapped ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramm, Michael; Pruttivarasin, Thaned; Talukdar, Ishan; Haeffner, Hartmut

    2012-06-01

    We report experiments on laser induced heating of ions confined in a linear Paul trap. Specifically, we investigate the mechanism of melting of a crystallized ion chain due to heating by light detuned blue from an atomic resonance. In these experiments, we observe the decay of ion fluorescence as we shine laser light on either the entire ion string or a small subset. From these measurements we hope to extract information on the thermodynamic properties of such Coulomb crystals. Understanding these properties, together with the ability to address individual ions will facilitate the study of excitation transfer dynamics along the chain.

  7. 12th International Symposium on Electron Beam Ion Sources and Traps and Their Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Schwarz, Stefan; Baumann, Thomas M

    2014-01-01

    The EBIST symposia date back to 1977 and have taken place every 3 to 4 years to specifically discuss progress and exchange ideas in the design, development, applications of electron beam ion sources and traps, and the physics with highly charged ions. The topics to be covered in 2014 are: - Progress and status of EBIS/T facilities, - Atomic spectroscopy of highly charged ions, - Charge-exchange and surface interaction with highly charged ions, - Charge breeding of stable and radioactive isotopes, - Nuclear physics with highly charged ions.

  8. Biological effects of radium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drosselmeyer, E.

    1982-12-01

    It is evident from a survey of the current literature that a problem exists in finding the correlation between the exposure of the human body to radiation, with the subsequent development of diseases, particularly for certain types of cancer. A brief history of the early experiences of radium incorporation into humans is given followed by data collected on some important polulation groups exposed to radium body burden, such as miners in rare metal and uranium mines, dial painters and some groups of patients. The medical and technical applications of radium are discussed. A summary is also given of the natural occurence of radium and the amounts in which it is present in the environment. Incorporation, retention and excretion pathways are outlined. In order to study the metabolism and the induction of diseases by radium several animal studies have been performed. The ICRP regards radium-226 as the best known and most studied radionuclide. It can thus serve as a guideline for setting limits for other radionuclides, e.g. plutonium. The valid limiting value for radium-226 of 0.1 μCi for whole body exposure is generally accepted and regarded as sufficiently safe. Finally, transfer factors have been collected as fas as they were available in the literature. (orig./MG) [de

  9. Study of uranium(VI) and radium(II) sorption at trace level on kaolinite using a multisite ion exchange model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinoso-Maset, Estela; Ly, Jacques

    2016-06-01

    Uranium and the long-lived decay product radium-226 are abundantly present in mine wastes produced during uranium extraction activities. In the case of release to the surrounding environment, these radionuclides are at trace level compared to groundwater solutes, and the presence, content and properties of clay minerals in the host environment influence the extent of radionuclide sorption and, in turn, migration. Since clays are known to have the distinctive property of retaining ions, the aim of this work was to study the sorption of trace U(VI) and Ra(II) on a common phyllosilicate mineral, kaolinite, in the presence of excess K, a common groundwater cation, in order to obtain a thermodynamic database that describes the ion exchange equilibria occurring at the mineral-solution interface. Following a detailed experimental protocol using chemical and radiochemical analytical techniques, batch experiments over a wide pH range (from 2 to 11) and fixed concentration (ca. 10(-9) M), and additional adsorption isotherms at two different solution pH (6.2 and 10.4) over a concentration range (10(-10) to 10(-4) M) were carried out to measure the distribution coefficient (Kd) of U(VI) and Ra(II) sorption on kaolinite. The experimental sorption data was processed according to a general multisite sorbent/multispecies sorbate ion exchange model, which allowed deducing the charge of adsorbed species and the stoichiometry of the associated adsorption equilibria on kaolinite's surface sites. Aqueous speciation calculations predicted Ra(II) as Ra(2+) over the working pH range, and its adsorption curves and isotherms were explained using three sorption sites. Adsorption of U(VI) occurred on four sorption sites and was governed by its solution speciation, with positively charged hydroxylated (UO2(2+) and UO2(OH)(+)) and silicate (UO2(H3SiO4)(+)) species being adsorbed between pH 2 and 6, whereas its negatively charged forms (UO2(OH)3(-) and UO2(OH)4(2-)) dominated U(VI) sorption at

  10. Rotational dynamics of a diatomic molecular ion in a Paul trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashemloo, A.; Dion, C. M., E-mail: claude.dion@umu.se [Department of Physics, Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå (Sweden)

    2015-11-28

    We present models for a heteronuclear diatomic molecular ion in a linear Paul trap in a rigid-rotor approximation, one purely classical and the other where the center-of-mass motion is treated classically, while rotational motion is quantized. We study the rotational dynamics and their influence on the motion of the center-of-mass, in the presence of the coupling between the permanent dipole moment of the ion and the trapping electric field. We show that the presence of the permanent dipole moment affects the trajectory of the ion and that it departs from the Mathieu equation solution found for atomic ions. For the case of quantum rotations, we also evidence the effect of the above-mentioned coupling on the rotational states of the ion.

  11. Rotational dynamics of a diatomic molecular ion in a Paul trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemloo, A.; Dion, C. M.

    2015-11-01

    We present models for a heteronuclear diatomic molecular ion in a linear Paul trap in a rigid-rotor approximation, one purely classical and the other where the center-of-mass motion is treated classically, while rotational motion is quantized. We study the rotational dynamics and their influence on the motion of the center-of-mass, in the presence of the coupling between the permanent dipole moment of the ion and the trapping electric field. We show that the presence of the permanent dipole moment affects the trajectory of the ion and that it departs from the Mathieu equation solution found for atomic ions. For the case of quantum rotations, we also evidence the effect of the above-mentioned coupling on the rotational states of the ion.

  12. Mercury Trapped Ion Frequency Standard for Ultra-Stable Reference Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Eric A. (Inventor); Hamell, Robert L. (Inventor); Tucker, Blake C. (Inventor); Larsen, Kameron (Inventor); Tjoelker, Robert L. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An atomic clock including an ion trap assembly, a C-field coil positioned for generating a first magnetic field in the interrogation region of the ion trap assembly, a compensation coil positioned for generating a second magnetic field in the interrogation region, wherein the combination of the first and second magnetic fields produces an ion number-dependent second order Zeeman shift (Zeeman shift) in the resonance frequency that is opposite in sign to an ion number-dependent second order Doppler shift (Doppler shift) in the resonance frequency, the C-field coil has a radius selected using data indicating how changes in the radius affect an ion-number-dependent shift in the resonance frequency, such that a difference in magnitude between the Doppler shift and the Zeeman shift is controlled or reduced, and the resonance frequency, including the adjustment by the Zeeman shift, is used to obtain the frequency standard.

  13. Radioactive artifacts: historical sources of modern radium contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaufox, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    Radium has been distributed in a wide variety of devices during the early part of this century. Antique objects containing significant amounts of radium turn up at flea markets, antique shows, and antique dealers, in a variety of locations. These objects include radium in devices which were used by legitimate medical practitioners for legitimate medical purposes such as therapy, as well as a wide variety of quack cures. These devices may contain anywhere from a few nanocuries to as much as several hundred microcuries of radium. In addition to medical sources, a large variety of scientific instruments utilize radium in luminous dials. These instruments include compasses, azimuth indicators, and virtually any object which might require some form of calibration. In addition, the consumer market utilized a large amount of radium in the production of wrist watches, pocket watches, and clocks with luminous dials. Some of these watches contained as much as 4.5 microCi of radium, and between 1913 and 1920 about 70 gm was produced for the manufacture of luminous compounds. In addition to the large amount of radium produced for scientific and consumer utilization, there were a number of materials produced which were claimed to contain radium but in fact did not, further adding to the confusion in this area. The wide availability of radium is a result of the public's great fascination with radioactivity during the early part of this century and a belief in its curative properties. A number of objects were produced in order to trap the emanations of radium in water for persons to drink in order to benefit from their healing effects. Since the late 20s and early 30s the public's attitude towards radiation has shifted 180 degrees and it is now considered an extremely dangerous and harmful material

  14. Ion separation in a Paul trap in the presence of damping force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Ziaeian

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Dynamical behavior of particles in a Paul trap has been investigated by solving the set of differential equations considering the effect of damping force. Positions of the trapped ions as a function of time, ion trajectories and the phase space curves in the first stability region have been obtained in the presence of the damping force. The region of stability for r and z components as well as the first stability region with and without the damping force have been computed using the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. Furthermore, for a Paul trap with specified dimensions and a typical RF frequency, the first stability region for 3H+ and 1H+ ions has been determined in the Vdc – Vac plane. It is worthwhile to note that computation of the stability region in the presence of damping force through the use of this method has been reported for the first time.

  15. Integrated Technologies for Large-Scale Trapped-Ion Quantum Information Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorace-Agaskar, C.; Bramhavar, S.; Kharas, D.; Mehta, K. K.; Loh, W.; Panock, R.; Bruzewicz, C. D.; McConnell, R.; Ram, R. J.; Sage, J. M.; Chiaverini, J.

    2016-05-01

    Atomic ions trapped and controlled using electromagnetic fields hold great promise for practical quantum information processing due to their inherent coherence properties and controllability. However, to realize this promise, the ability to maintain and manipulate large-scale systems is required. We present progress toward the development of, and proof-of-principle demonstrations and characterization of, several technologies that can be integrated with ion-trap arrays on-chip to enable such scaling to practically useful sizes. Of particular use are integrated photonic elements for routing and focusing light throughout a chip without the need for free-space optics. The integration of CMOS electronics and photo-detectors for on-chip control and readout, and methods for monolithic fabrication and wafer-scale integration to incorporate these capabilities into tile-able 2D ion-trap array cells, are also explored.

  16. Recombination in Perovskite Solar Cells: Significance of Grain Boundaries, Interface Traps, and Defect Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherkar, Tejas S; Momblona, Cristina; Gil-Escrig, Lidón; Ávila, Jorge; Sessolo, Michele; Bolink, Henk J; Koster, L Jan Anton

    2017-05-12

    Trap-assisted recombination, despite being lower as compared with traditional inorganic solar cells, is still the dominant recombination mechanism in perovskite solar cells (PSCs) and limits their efficiency. We investigate the attributes of the primary trap-assisted recombination channels (grain boundaries and interfaces) and their correlation to defect ions in PSCs. We achieve this by using a validated device model to fit the simulations to the experimental data of efficient vacuum-deposited p-i-n and n-i-p CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 solar cells, including the light intensity dependence of the open-circuit voltage and fill factor. We find that, despite the presence of traps at interfaces and grain boundaries (GBs), their neutral (when filled with photogenerated charges) disposition along with the long-lived nature of holes leads to the high performance of PSCs. The sign of the traps (when filled) is of little importance in efficient solar cells with compact morphologies (fused GBs, low trap density). On the other hand, solar cells with noncompact morphologies (open GBs, high trap density) are sensitive to the sign of the traps and hence to the cell preparation methods. Even in the presence of traps at GBs, trap-assisted recombination at interfaces (between the transport layers and the perovskite) is the dominant loss mechanism. We find a direct correlation between the density of traps, the density of mobile ionic defects, and the degree of hysteresis observed in the current-voltage ( J - V ) characteristics. The presence of defect states or mobile ions not only limits the device performance but also plays a role in the J - V hysteresis.

  17. Mats and LaSpec: High-precision experiments using ion traps and lasers at Fair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, D.; Lallena, A.M.; Blaum, K.; Bohm, C.; Cakirli, R.B.; Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J.R.; Eliseev, S.; Ketelaer, J.; Kreim, M.S.; Kowalska, M.; Litvinov, Y.A.; Nagy, S.; Neidherr, D.; Repp, J.; Roux, C.; Schabinger, B.; Ullrich, J.; Nortershauser, W.; Eberhardt, K.; Geppert, C.; Kramer, J.; Krieger, A.; Sanchez, R.; Ahammed, M.; Das, P.; Ray, A.; Algora, A.; Rubio, B.; Tain, J.L.; Audi, G.; Lunney, D.; Naimi, S.; Aysto, J.; Jokinen, A.; Kolhinen, V.; Moore, I.; Beck, D.; Block, M.; Geissel, H.; Heinz, S.; Herfurth, F.; Litvinov, Y.A.; Minaya-Ramirez, E.; Plab, W.R.; Quint, W.; Scheidenberger, C.; Winkler, M.; Bender, M.; Billowes, J.; Campbell, P.; Flanagan, K.T.; Schwarz, S.; Bollen, G.; Ferrer, R.; George, S.; Kester, O.; Brodeur, M.; Brunner, T.; Delheij, P.; Dilling, J.; Ettenauer, S.; Lapierre, A.; Bushaw, B.A.; Cano-Ott, D.; Martinez, T.; Cortes, G.; Gomez-Hornillos, M.B.; Dax, A.; Herlert, A.; Yordanov, D.; De, A.; Dickel, T.; Geissel, H.; Jesch, C.; Kuhl, T.; Petrick, M.; PlaB, W.R.; Scheidenberger, C.; Garcia-Ramos, J.E.; Gartzke, E.; Habs, D.; Szerypo, J.; Thirolf, P.G.; Weber, C.; Gusev, Y.; Nesterenko, D.; Novikov, Y.N.; Popov, A.; Seliverstov, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vorobjev, G.; Heenen, P.H.; Marx, G.; Schweikhard, L.; Ziegler, F.; Hobein, M.; Schuch, R.; Solders, A.; Suhonen, M.; Huber, G.; Wendt, K.; Huyse, M.; Koudriavtsev, I.; Neyens, G.; Van Duppen, P.; Le Blanc, F.; Matos, M.; Reinhard, P.G.; Schneider, D.

    2010-05-15

    Nuclear ground state properties including mass, charge radii, spins and moments can be determined by applying atomic physics techniques such as Penning-trap based mass spectrometry and laser spectroscopy. The MATS and LaSpec setups at the low-energy beamline at FAIR will allow us to extend the knowledge of these properties further into the region far from stability. With MATS (Precision Measurements of very short-lived nuclei using an Advanced Trapping System for highly-charged ions) at FAIR we aim to apply several techniques to very short-lived radionuclides: High-accuracy mass measurements, in-trap conversion electron and alpha spectroscopy, and trap-assisted spectroscopy. The experimental setup of MATS is a unique combination of an electron beam ion trap for charge breeding, ion traps for beam preparation, and a high-precision Penning trap system for mass measurements and decay studies. For the mass measurements, MATS offers both a high accuracy and a high sensitivity. A relative mass uncertainty of 10{sup -9} can be reached by employing highly-charged ions and a non-destructive Fourier-Transform Ion-Cyclotron-Resonance (FT-ICR) detection technique on single stored ions. Decay studies in ion traps will become possible with MATS. Laser spectroscopy of radioactive isotopes and isomers is an efficient and model-independent approach for the determination of nuclear ground and isomeric state properties. Hyperfine structures and isotope shifts in electronic transitions exhibit readily accessible information on the nuclear spin, magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moments as well as root-mean-square charge radii. The accuracy of laser-spectroscopic-determined nuclear properties is very high while requirements concerning production rates are moderate. This Technical Design Report describes a new Penning trap mass spectrometry setup as well as a number of complementary experimental devices for laser spectroscopy. Since MATS and LaSpec require high-quality low

  18. Mine water purify from radium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebecka, J.

    1996-01-01

    The article describes purification of radium containing water in coal mines. Author concludes that water purification is relatively simple and effective way to decrease environmental pollution caused by coal mining. The amount of radium disposed with type A radium water has been significantly decreased. The results of investigations show that it will be soon possible to purify also type B radium water. Article compares the amounts of radium disposed by coal mines in 1990, 1995 and forecast for 2000

  19. An integrated ion trap and time-of-flight mass spectrometer for chemical and photo- reaction dynamics studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schowalter, Steven J; Chen, Kuang; Rellergert, Wade G; Sullivan, Scott T; Hudson, Eric R

    2012-04-01

    We demonstrate the integration of a linear quadrupole trap with a simple time-of-flight mass spectrometer with medium-mass resolution (m/Δm ∼ 50) geared towards the demands of atomic, molecular, and chemical physics experiments. By utilizing a novel radial ion extraction scheme from the linear quadrupole trap into the mass analyzer, a device with large trap capacity and high optical access is realized without sacrificing mass resolution. This provides the ability to address trapped ions with laser light and facilitates interactions with neutral background gases prior to analyzing the trapped ions. Here, we describe the construction and implementation of the device as well as present representative ToF spectra. We conclude by demonstrating the flexibility of the device with proof-of-principle experiments that include the observation of molecular-ion photodissociation and the measurement of trapped-ion chemical reaction rates. © 2012 American Institute of Physics

  20. An integrated ion trap and time-of-flight mass spectrometer for chemical and photo- reaction dynamics studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schowalter, Steven J.; Chen Kuang; Rellergert, Wade G.; Sullivan, Scott T.; Hudson, Eric R.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the integration of a linear quadrupole trap with a simple time-of-flight mass spectrometer with medium-mass resolution (m/Δm∼ 50) geared towards the demands of atomic, molecular, and chemical physics experiments. By utilizing a novel radial ion extraction scheme from the linear quadrupole trap into the mass analyzer, a device with large trap capacity and high optical access is realized without sacrificing mass resolution. This provides the ability to address trapped ions with laser light and facilitates interactions with neutral background gases prior to analyzing the trapped ions. Here, we describe the construction and implementation of the device as well as present representative ToF spectra. We conclude by demonstrating the flexibility of the device with proof-of-principle experiments that include the observation of molecular-ion photodissociation and the measurement of trapped-ion chemical reaction rates.

  1. An integrated ion trap and time-of-flight mass spectrometer for chemical and photo- reaction dynamics studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schowalter, Steven J.; Chen, Kuang; Rellergert, Wade G.; Sullivan, Scott T.; Hudson, Eric R.

    2012-04-01

    We demonstrate the integration of a linear quadrupole trap with a simple time-of-flight mass spectrometer with medium-mass resolution (m/Δm ˜ 50) geared towards the demands of atomic, molecular, and chemical physics experiments. By utilizing a novel radial ion extraction scheme from the linear quadrupole trap into the mass analyzer, a device with large trap capacity and high optical access is realized without sacrificing mass resolution. This provides the ability to address trapped ions with laser light and facilitates interactions with neutral background gases prior to analyzing the trapped ions. Here, we describe the construction and implementation of the device as well as present representative ToF spectra. We conclude by demonstrating the flexibility of the device with proof-of-principle experiments that include the observation of molecular-ion photodissociation and the measurement of trapped-ion chemical reaction rates.

  2. Ion trap mass spectrometry on a comet nucleus: the Ptolemy instrument and the Rosetta space mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, John F J; Barber, Simeon J; Wright, Ian P; Morgan, Geraint H; Morse, Andrew D; Sheridan, Simon; Leese, Mark R; Maynard, Jon; Evans, Suzanne T; Pillinger, Colin T; Drummond, Duncan L; Heys, Samantha C; Huq, S Ejaz; Kent, Barry J; Sawyer, Eric C; Whalley, Martin S; Waltham, Nicholas R

    2007-01-01

    In May 2014, the Rosetta spacecraft is scheduled to rendezvous with the comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko ('67P'). One of the instruments on board the 'Lander' which will descend on to the surface of the comet is a miniaturised GC/MS system that incorporates an ion trap mass spectrometer, specially developed for isotope ratio analysis. This article describes the development and optimisation of the ion trap for this unique application, and presents a summary of the range of pre-programmed experiments that will contribute to the characterisation of the solid and volatile cometary materials. Copyright 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Technology for On-Chip Qubit Control with Microfabricated Surface Ion Traps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Highstrete, Clark [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Quantum Information Sciences Dept.; Scott, Sean Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). RF/Optoelectronics Dept.; Nordquist, Christopher D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). RF/Optoelectronics Dept.; Sterk, Jonathan David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Photonic Microsystem Technologies Dept.; Maunz, Peter Lukas Wilhelm [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Photonic Microsystem Technologies Dept.; Tigges, Christopher P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Photonic Microsystem Technologies Dept.; Blain, Matthew Glenn [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Photonic Microsystem Technologies Dept.; Heller, Edwin J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Microsystems Integration Dept.; Stevens, James E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). MESAFab Operations 2 Dept.

    2013-11-01

    Trapped atomic ions are a leading physical system for quantum information processing. However, scalability and operational fidelity remain limiting technical issues often associated with optical qubit control. One promising approach is to develop on-chip microwave electronic control of ion qubits based on the atomic hyperfine interaction. This project developed expertise and capabilities at Sandia toward on-chip electronic qubit control in a scalable architecture. The project developed a foundation of laboratory capabilities, including trapping the 171Yb+ hyperfine ion qubit and developing an experimental microwave coherent control capability. Additionally, the project investigated the integration of microwave device elements with surface ion traps utilizing Sandia’s state-of-the-art MEMS microfabrication processing. This effort culminated in a device design for a multi-purpose ion trap experimental platform for investigating on-chip microwave qubit control, laying the groundwork for further funded R&D to develop on-chip microwave qubit control in an architecture that is suitable to engineering development.

  4. A cryogenic electrostatic trap for long-time storage of keV ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, M.; Froese, M.; Menk, S.; Varju, J.; Bastert, R.; Blaum, K.; López-Urrutia, J. R. Crespo; Fellenberger, F.; Grieser, M.; von Hahn, R.; Heber, O.; Kühnel, K.-U.; Laux, F.; Orlov, D. A.; Rappaport, M. L.; Repnow, R.; Schröter, C. D.; Schwalm, D.; Shornikov, A.; Sieber, T.; Toker, Y.; Ullrich, J.; Wolf, A.; Zajfman, D.

    2010-05-01

    We report on the realization and operation of a fast ion beam trap of the linear electrostatic type employing liquid helium cooling to reach extremely low blackbody radiation temperature and residual gas density and, hence, long storage times of more than 5 min which are unprecedented for keV ion beams. Inside a beam pipe that can be cooled to temperatures <15 K, with 1.8 K reached in some locations, an ion beam pulse can be stored at kinetic energies of 2-20 keV between two electrostatic mirrors. Along with an overview of the cryogenic trap design, we present a measurement of the residual gas density inside the trap resulting in only 2×103 cm-3, which for a room temperature environment corresponds to a pressure in the 10-14 mbar range. The device, called the cryogenic trap for fast ion beams, is now being used to investigate molecules and clusters at low temperatures, but has also served as a design prototype for the cryogenic heavy-ion storage ring currently under construction at the Max-Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics.

  5. A cryogenic electrostatic trap for long-time storage of keV ion beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, M; Froese, M; Menk, S; Varju, J; Bastert, R; Blaum, K; López-Urrutia, J R Crespo; Fellenberger, F; Grieser, M; von Hahn, R; Heber, O; Kühnel, K-U; Laux, F; Orlov, D A; Rappaport, M L; Repnow, R; Schröter, C D; Schwalm, D; Shornikov, A; Sieber, T; Toker, Y; Ullrich, J; Wolf, A; Zajfman, D

    2010-05-01

    We report on the realization and operation of a fast ion beam trap of the linear electrostatic type employing liquid helium cooling to reach extremely low blackbody radiation temperature and residual gas density and, hence, long storage times of more than 5 min which are unprecedented for keV ion beams. Inside a beam pipe that can be cooled to temperatures <15 K, with 1.8 K reached in some locations, an ion beam pulse can be stored at kinetic energies of 2-20 keV between two electrostatic mirrors. Along with an overview of the cryogenic trap design, we present a measurement of the residual gas density inside the trap resulting in only 2 x 10(3) cm(-3), which for a room temperature environment corresponds to a pressure in the 10(-14) mbar range. The device, called the cryogenic trap for fast ion beams, is now being used to investigate molecules and clusters at low temperatures, but has also served as a design prototype for the cryogenic heavy-ion storage ring currently under construction at the Max-Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics.

  6. Ring-shaped Wigner crystals of trapped ions at the micronscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haokun; Urban, Erik; Noel, Crystal; Chuang, Alexander; Xia, Yang; Hemmerling, Borge; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiang; Haeffner, Hartmut

    Trapped ion crystals are ideal platforms to study many-body physics and quantum information processing, with both the internal electronic states and external motional degree-of-freedoms controllable at the single quantum level. In contrast to conventional, finite, linear chains of ions, a ring topology exhibiting periodic boundary conditions and rotational symmetry opens up a new directions to diverse topics. However, previous implementations of ion rings result in small aspect ratios (electrode distance to ring diameter, making the rotational symmetry of the ion crystals prone to stray electric fields from imperfections of the trap electrodes, particularly evident at low temperatures. Here, using a new trap design with a 60-fold improvement of this aspect ratio, we demonstrate crystallization of 40Ca+ ions in a ring with rotational energy barriers comparable to the thermal energy of Doppler laser cooled ion crystals. When further reducing the rotational energy barriers, we observe delocalization of the ion rings. With this result, we enter a regime where quantum topological effects can be studied and novel quantum computation and simulation experiments can be implemented.

  7. Cryogenic trapping of keV ion beams at the CSR prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menk, Sebastian; Blaum, Klaus; Froese, Michael; Grieser, Manfred; Lange, Michael; Orlov, Dimitry; Sieber, Thomas; Hahn, Robert von; Varju, Jozef; Wolf, Andreas [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Heber, Oded; Rappaport, Michael; Zajfman, Daniel [Weizmann Institut of Science, Rehovot (Israel)

    2009-07-01

    A Cryogenic Trap for Fast ion beams (CTF) was built to explore cooling techniques and test thermal decoupling of ion optics for the development of the electrostatic Cryogenic Storage Ring (CSR). These challenging projects will lead to a new experimental field of atomic and molecular physics with keV ion beams. The cold conditions of 2-10 K minimize the blackbody radiation field and are expected to lead to extremely low restgas densities (equivalent pressure at room temperature {approx}10{sup -13} mbar) which result in long storage lifetimes and for molecular ions to radiative cooling to their ro-vibrational ground states. The CTF consists of two stacks of electrostatic mirror electrodes allowing the storage of up to 20 keV ion beams. Cryogenic ion beam storage has been realized with this device using a liquid helium refrigeration system to cool down the experimental trapping area to few-Kelvin cryogenic temperatures and experiments with cryogenically trapped molecular nitrogen ions have been performed to verify the low vacuum conditions by measuring their storage lifetimes.

  8. Radium dial workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowland, R.E.; Lucas, H.F. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The population of radium dial workers who were exposed to radium 30 to 50 years ago are currently being followed by the Center for Human Radiobiology at the Argonne National Laboratory. It is not clear that radium has induced additional malignancies in this population, other than the well-known bone sarcomas and head carcinomas, but elevated incidence rates for multiple myeloma and cancers of the colon, rectum, stomach, and breast suggest that radium might be involved. Continued follow-up of this population may resolve these questions. Finally, the question of the effect of fetal irradiation on the offspring of these women remains to be resolved. No evidence exists to suggest that any effects have occurred, but there is no question that a chronic irradiation of the developing fetus did take place. No formal follow-up of these children has yet been initiated

  9. Electrodeposition of Radium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crespo, M.T.; Jimenez, A.S.

    1996-01-01

    A study of different electrodeposition methods of radium for its measurement by alpha-spectrometry is presented. The recommended procedure uses an aqueous solution of ammonium oxalate and nitric acid in the presence of microgram amounts of platinum as electrolyte

  10. Design and Application of a High-Temperature Linear Ion Trap Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Li-Xue; Liu, Qing-Yu; Li, Xiao-Na; He, Sheng-Gui

    2018-01-01

    A high-temperature linear ion trap reactor with hexapole design was homemade to study ion-molecule reactions at variable temperatures. The highest temperature for the trapped ions is up to 773 K, which is much higher than those in available reports. The reaction between V2O6 - cluster anions and CO at different temperatures was investigated to evaluate the performance of this reactor. The apparent activation energy was determined to be 0.10 ± 0.02 eV, which is consistent with the barrier of 0.12 eV calculated by density functional theory. This indicates that the current experimental apparatus is prospective to study ion-molecule reactions at variable temperatures, and more kinetic details can be obtained to have a better understanding of chemical reactions that have overall barriers. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  11. Production of a helium beam in a focused ion beam machine using an electron beam ion trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullmann, F.; Grossmann, F.; Ovsyannikov, V. P.; Gierak, J.; Zschornack, G.

    2007-01-01

    Gallium liquid-metal ion sources that have been introduced in the late 1970s have allowed the development of a new class of micro- and nanofabrication tools collectively denominated as focused ion beam (FIB) machines. To investigate the potential of a helium beam in such a FIB instrument the authors have tested a room-temperature electron beam ion trap coupled with a high resolution FIB machine. In this letter they present their first results in target imaging using a helium beam with a resolution that allows to account for a beam diameter in the submicrometer range

  12. Physico-chemical forms and migration in continental waters of radium from uranium mining and milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benes, P.

    1982-01-01

    Recent advances in knowledge of the physico-chemical forms and migration of radium in continental waters are reviewed and recommendations for future research in this field are given. Computations of solution equilibria based on the reported and newly determined stability constants and solubilities of radium compounds show that a significant percentage of dissolved radium can exist in some waste and natural waters as an RaSO 4 ion pair, besides a significant percentage of Ra 2+ ions. The formation of a solid phase consisting mainly of sparingly soluble radium compounds can be excluded in waste and natural waters. Model experiments revealed that radium can be bound in complexes with some as yet unidentified ligands, probably of organic nature. Direct determinations of the physico-chemical forms of radium in surface and groundwaters were mostly confined to the analysis of the ratio of dissolved to particulate forms of radium. Ratios from 0.01 to 100 were found, depending on the type of water examined. Recently a newly suggested method of selective dissolution was applied to characterize the nature of particulate forms of radium in surface waters. Migration of radium is reviewed, covering the release of radium from its source, its transport in ground and surface waters and its deposition in various sinks. Factors influencing radium release from the sources into the hydrosphere are discussed. The following processes affecting radium migration are discussed: adsorption of dissolved radium on suspended solids and bottom sediments, coprecipitation of radium with solids formed in waste waters or in natural waters, sedimentation of particulate forms of radium in reservoirs and streams, resuspension of bottom sediments and dissolution of radium from suspended solids or bottom sediments

  13. Influence of ion implanted helium on deuterium trapping in Kh18N10T stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolstolutskaya, G.D.; Ruzhitskij, V.V.; Kopanets, I.E.

    2004-01-01

    The results are presented on evolution of distribution profiles and helium and deuterium thermal desorption ion implanted in steel 18Cr10NiTi. Accumulation, trapping, retention and microstructure evolution are studied; effect helium and hydrogen simultaneous implantation on these processes is also studied

  14. Consequences of trapped beam ions of the analysis of neutron emission data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loughlin, M.J.; Hone, M.; Jarvis, O.N.; Laundy, B.; Sadler, G.; Belle, P. van

    1989-01-01

    Neutron energy spectra have been measured during D o neutral beam heating of deuterium plasmas. The thermonuclear to beam-plasma neutron production ratios are deduced. For a non-radial spectrometer line-of-sight, the trapped beam-ion fraction must be considered. (author) 5 refs., 4 figs

  15. Nonlinear ion-mixing-mode particle transport in the dissipative trapped electron regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, A.S.; Terry, P.W.

    1993-09-01

    The nonlinear particle transport arising from the convection of nonadiabatic electron density by ion temperature gradient driven turbulence is examined for trapped electron collisionality regimes. The renormalized dissipative nonadiabatic trapped electron phase space density response is derived and used to calculate the nonlinear particle flux along with an ansatz for the turbulently broadened frequency spectrum. In the lower temperature end of this regime, trapped electrons are collisional and all components of the quasilinear particle flux are outward (i.e., in the direction of the gradients). Nonlinear effects can alter the phase between the nonadiabatic trapped electron phase space density and the electrostatic potential, producing inward components in the particle flux. Specifically, both turbulent shifting of the peak of the frequency spectrum and nonlinear source terms in the trapped electron response can give rise to inward components. However, in the dissipative regime these terms are small and the trapped electron response remains dominantly laminar. When the trapped electrons are collisionless, there is a temperature threshold above which the electron temperature gradient driven component of the quasilinear particle flux changes sign and becomes inward. For finite amplitude turbulence, however, turbulent broadening of both the electron collisional resonance and the frequency spectrum removes tills threshold., and the temperature gradient driven component remains outward

  16. The on-line charge breeding program at TRIUMF's Ion Trap For Atomic and Nuclear Science for precision mass measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, M C; Bale, J C; Chowdhury, U; Eberhardt, B; Ettenauer, S; Gallant, A T; Jang, F; Lennarz, A; Luichtl, M; Ma, T; Robertson, D; Simon, V V; Andreoiu, C; Brodeur, M; Brunner, T; Chaudhuri, A; Crespo López-Urrutia, J R; Delheij, P; Frekers, D; Grossheim, A; Gwinner, G; Kwiatkowski, A A; Lapierre, A; Mané, E; Pearson, M R; Ringle, R; Schultz, B E; Dilling, J

    2012-02-01

    TRIUMF's Ion Trap for Atomic and Nuclear science (TITAN) constitutes the only high precision mass measurement setup coupled to a rare isotope facility capable of increasing the charge state of short-lived nuclides prior to the actual mass determination in a Penning trap. Recent developments around TITAN's charge breeder, the electron beam ion trap, form the basis for several successful experiments on radioactive isotopes with half-lives as low as 65 ms and in charge states as high as 22+.

  17. General Unknown Screening by Ion Trap LC/MS/MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    resulting in an acid/ neutral and a base vial from each specimen. rEsulTs ANd dIsCussION This study established the LOD for 359 forensically...Miconazole 13.30 417.2 159.1 10 Base Midazolam 12.10 326.3 291.2 1 Base Minoxidil 8.80 210.2 137.1 100 Base Mirtazapine 9.94 266.1 195.1 1 Base Modafinil

  18. Ion Storage Tests with the High Performance Antimatter Trap (HiPAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, James J.; Lewis, Raymond A.; Chakrabarti, Suman; Pearson, Boise; Schafer, Charles (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA/Marshall Space Flight Centers (NASA/MSFC) Propulsion Research Center (PRC) is evaluating an antiproton storage system, referred to as the High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT). This interest stems from the sheer energy represented by matter/antimatter annihilation process with has an energy density approximately 10 order of magnitude above that of chemical propellants. In other terms, one gram of antiprotons contains the equivalent energy of approximately 23 space shuttle external tanks or ET's (each ET contains roughly 740,000 kgs of fuel and oxidizer). This incredible source of stored energy, if harnessed, would be an enabling technology for deep space mission where both spacecraft weight and propulsion performance are key to satisfying aggressive mission requirements. The HiPAT hardware consists of a 4 Tesla superconductor system, an ultra high vacuum test section (vacuum approaching 10(exp -12) torr), and a high voltage confinement electrode system (up to 20 kvolts operation). The current laboratory layout is illustrated. The HiPAT designed objectives included storage of up to 1 trillion antiprotons with corresponding lifetimes approaching 18 days. To date, testing has centered on the storage of positive hydrogen ions produced in situ by a stream of high-energy electrons that passes through the trapping region. However, due to space charge issues and electron beam compression as it passes through the HiPAT central field, current ion production is limited to less then 50,000 ions. Ion lifetime was determined by counting particle populations at the end of various storage time intervals. Particle detection was accomplished by destructively expelling the ions against a micro-channel plate located just outside the traps magnetic field. The effect of radio frequency (RF) stabilization on the lifetime of trapped particles was also examined. This technique, referred to as a rotating wall, made use of a segmented electrode located near the center of the trap

  19. Trapping of hydrogen isotopes in molybdenum and niobium predamaged by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottiger, J.; Picraux, S.T.; Rud, N.; Laursen, T.

    1977-01-01

    The trapping of hydrogen isotopes at defects in Mo and Nb have been studied. Ion beams of 11- and 18-keV He + , 55-keV O + and Ne + , and 500-keV Bi + were used to create defects. Subsequently H or D was injected at room temperature by use of molecular beams of 16-keV H + 2 and D + 2 . Appreciable enhancements were observed in the amount of H and D retained within the near-surface region of predamaged samples compared to samples with no prior damage. The total amount of D retained within the near-surface region was measured by means of the nuclear reaction D( 3 He,p) 4 He, and H depth profiles were measured via a resonance in the nuclear reaction 1 H( 19 F,αγ) 16 O. The H profiles correlate with the predicted predamaging ion profiles; however, appreciable tails to deeper depths for the hydrogen profiles are observed for the heavier predamaging ions. For a given predamage ion fluence, the amount of trapped deuterium increases linearly with incident deuterium fluence until a saturation in the enhancement is reached. The amount of deuterium trapped when saturation occurs increases with increasing predamage fluence. The experiments indicate that lighter ions, which create fewer primary displacements, are more effective per displacement in trapping hydrogen. An appreciable release of hydrogen is obtained upon annealing at 200 and 300 degreeC, and a preannealing experiment indicates this is due to detrapping rather than to any loss of traps. These temperatures suggest a much higher binding energy for the trapped hydrogen isotopes (approx.1.5 eV) than the available evidence gives for simple H-defect binding energies (approximately-less-than0.3 eV). The detailed trapping mechanism is not known. However, it is suggested on the basis of the high binding energies and the high concentrations of hydrogen which can be trapped that clusters of hydrogen may be formed

  20. Cooling of ions trapped in potential wells produced by electromagnetic radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobehart, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    The probability distributions for the ground state and the excited state of a two-level ion trapped in an harmonic potential well are studied. The ion is excited by electromagnetic radiation and relaxes back due to either spontaneous or stimulated emission. The photon statistics is considered Poissonian and the momentum transfer between the electromagnetic field and the ion is assumed discrete. The present results are closely related to the quantum treatment in the heavy particle limit as well as to those derived from previous semiclassical models. (Author) [es

  1. Screening of drugs and toxic compounds with liquid chromatography-linear ion trap tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvage, François-Ludovic; Saint-Marcoux, Franck; Duretz, Bénédicte; Deporte, Didier; Lachatre, Gérard; Marquet, Pierre

    2006-09-01

    In clinical and forensic toxicology, general unknown screening is used to detect and identify exogenous compounds. In this study, we aimed to develop a comprehensive general unknown screening method based on liquid chromatography coupled with a hybrid triple-quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometer. After solid-phase extraction, separation was performed using gradient reversed-phase chromatography. The mass spectrometer was operated in the information-dependent acquisition mode, switching between a survey scan acquired in the Enhanced Mass Spectrometry mode with dynamic subtraction of background noise and a dependent scan obtained in the enhanced product ion scan mode. The complete cycle time was 1.36 s. A library of 1000 enhanced product ion-tandem mass spectrometry spectra in positive mode and 250 in negative mode, generated using 3 alternated collision tensions during each scan, was created by injecting pure solutions of drugs and toxic compounds. Comparison with HPLC-diode array detection and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the analysis of 36 clinical samples showed that linear ion trap tandem mass spectrometry could identify most of the compounds (94% of the total). Some compounds were detected only by 1 of the other 2 techniques. Specific clinical cases highlighted the advantages and limitations of the method. A unique combination of new operating modes provided by hybrid triple-quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometers and new software features allowed development of a comprehensive and efficient method for the general unknown screening of drugs and toxic compounds in blood or urine.

  2. Do pyrotechnics contain radium?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinhauser, Georg; Musilek, Andreas, E-mail: georg.steinhauser@ati.ac.a [Vienna University of Technology, Atominstitut der Oesterreichischen Universitaeten, Stadionallee 2, A-1020 Wien (Austria)

    2009-07-15

    Many pyrotechnic devices contain barium nitrate which is used as an oxidizer and colouring agent primarily for green-coloured fireworks. Similarly, strontium nitrate is used for red-coloured pyrotechnic effects. Due to their chemical similarities to radium, barium and strontium ores can accumulate radium, causing a remarkable activity in these minerals. Radium in such contaminated raw materials can be processed together with the barium or strontium, unless extensive purification of the ores was undertaken. For example, the utilization of 'radiobarite' for the production of pyrotechnic ingredients can therefore cause atmospheric pollution with radium aerosols when the firework is displayed, resulting in negative health effects upon inhalation of these aerosols. In this study, we investigated the occurrence of gamma-photon-emitting radionuclides in several pyrotechnic devices. The highest specific activities were due to K-40 (up to 20 Bq g{sup -1}, average value 14 Bq g{sup -1}). Radium-226 activities were in the range of 16-260 mBq g{sup -1} (average value 81 mBq g{sup -1}). Since no uranium was found in any of the samples, indeed, a slight enrichment of Ra-226 in coloured pyrotechnics can be observed. Radioactive impurities stemming from the Th-232 decay chain were found in many samples as well. In the course of novel developments aiming at the 'greening' of pyrotechnics, the potential radioactive hazard should be considered as well.

  3. Improved formulas for trapped-ion anomalous transport in tokamaks without and with shear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sardei, F.; Wimmel, H.K.

    1980-12-01

    More refined numerical calculations of trapped-ion anomalous transport in a 2-D slab, trapped-fluid model suggest an anomalous diffusion coefficient D approx. 3.5 x 10 -2 delta 0 a 2 νsub(i)sup(e)sup(f)sup(f) for a tokamak plasma without shear. This supersedes earlier results. The new formula is independently confirmed by two different analytical calculations. One of them uses a similarity analysis of unabridged Kadomtsev-Pogutse-type trapped-fluid equations and the multiperiodic spatial structure of the saturated trapped-ion wave found in both the earlier and the recent numerical calculations. The other calculation yields a class of exact nonlinear solutions of the trapped-fluid equations. The new shearless result is used to derive the anomalous diffusion with shear effect by a method described in an earlier paper. The new transport formulas have been numerically evaluated for several tokamaks in an IPP report, where the results are shown in graph form. (orig.)

  4. Characteristics of trapping copper ions with scrolled ferritin reactor in the flowing seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, He-Qing; Cao, Ting-ming; Lin, Qing-Mei

    2004-04-15

    Native liver ferritin of Dasyatis akajei (DALF), apoDALF, and reconstituted DALF were employed to construct a ferritin reactor, respectively. An apparatus consisting of a mixer, a ferritin reactor, and a magnetic stirrer was constructed to study capacity and feasibility of trapping Cu2+ in the flowing seawater. The experimental results showed that the numbers of trapping Cu2+ with DALF reactor were higher than these with the reactors of apoDALF and reconstituted DALF, respectively, giving the maximal numbers of 98 +/- 5 Cu2+ per molecular DALF in 120 h. We found that the iron layer with a high ratio of phosphate to ion on the surface of the ferritin core played an important role in increasing numbers of trapping Cu2+. In addition, we found two positive relations of dependence of trapping Cu2+ numbers with the reactor on the incubation time and on the Cu2+ concentration in the flowing seawater. Another apparatus consisting of a buoyage, an isolation basket equipped with griddling, and a scrolled ferritin reactor was constructed to study the feasibility of trapping Cu2+ in the sea area. Moreover, the present studies indicated that this apparatus had been used to not only analyze and evaluate the concentration variety of various heavy metal ions such as Cu2+ and Pb2+ diluting by the seawater but also monitor the formation of pollution degree by various small organic molecules during the climax and the neap.

  5. Laser induced reactions in a 22-pole ion trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlemmer, Stephan [Raymond and Beverly Sackler Laboratory for Astrophysics, Leiden Observatory, PO Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); I. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet zu Koeln, 50937 Cologne (Germany); Asvany, Oskar [Raymond and Beverly Sackler Laboratory for Astrophysics, Leiden Observatory, PO Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2005-01-01

    The method of laser induced reaction (LIR) is used to obtain an IR spectrum of bare CH{sub 5}{sup +} in the range of 250 to 3200 cm{sup -1}. The experimental spectrum compares rather favorable to theoretical predictions based on molecular dynamics simulations except for the very low frequency range below 500 cm{sup -1}. An equation relating the experimental LIR signal to the absorption coefficient and the rate of reaction of the excited species as well as a simple model for the reaction rate coefficient of the laser excited molecules is derived. A variety of LIR schemes are exemplified and their value for IR spectroscopy of molecular ions is discussed.

  6. Diffusion, trapping, and isotope exchange of plasma implanted deuterium in ion beam damaged tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Joseph Lincoln

    Tritium accumulation in nuclear fusion reactor materials is a major concern for practical and safe fusion energy. This work examines hydrogen isotope exchange as a tritium removal technique, analyzes the effects of neutron damage using high energy copper ion beams, and introduces a diffusion coefficient that is a function of the concentration of trapped atoms. Tungsten samples were irradiated with high energy (0.5 - 5 MeV) copper ions for controlled levels of damage - 10-3 to 10-1 displacements per atom (dpa) - at room temperature. Samples were then exposed to deuterium plasma at constant temperature (˜ 380 K) to a high fluence of 1024 ions/m2, where retention is at is maximized (i.e. saturated). By then subsequently exposing these samples to fractions of this fluence with hydrogen plasma, isotope exchange rates were observed. The resulting deuterium still trapped in the tungsten is then measured post mortem. Nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) gives the depth resolved deuterium retention profile with the 3He(D,p) 4He reaction, and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) gives the total amount of deuterium trapped in the tungsten by heating a sample in vacuum up to 1200 K and measuring the evaporated gas molecules with a residual gas analyzer. Isotope exchange data show that hydrogen atoms can displace trapped deuterium atoms efficiently only up to the first few microns, but does not affect the atoms trapped at greater depths. In ion damaged tungsten, measurements showed a significant increase in retention in the damage region proportional to dpa 0.66, which results in a significant spike in total retention, and isotope exchange in damaged samples is still ineffective at depths greater than a few microns. Thus, isotope exchange is not an affective tritium removal technique; however, these experiments have shown that trapping in material defects greatly affects diffusion. These experiments lead to a simplified diffusion model with defect densities as the only free

  7. The mass of $^{22}$Mg and a concept for a novel laser ion source trap

    CERN Document Server

    Mukherjee, Manas

    Clean and high-quality radioactive ion beams can be prepared by combining ion trap and resonance laser ionization techniques. A feasibility study for such a laser ion source trap has been carried out which shows enormous improvement in the beam emittance, purity, and in addition allows for a variation of the ion beam time structure. Direct high-precision mass measurements around mass number A=22 are of utmost importance. First, the masses of the superallowed $\\beta$-emitter $^{22}$Mg and its daughter $^{22}$Na are needed to test the conserved-vector-current(CVC) hypothesis and the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa(CKM) matrix unitarity, both being predictions of the Standard Model. Second, to calculate the reaction rate of $^{21}$Na($p,\\gamma$)$^{22}$Mg the involved masses are required very accurately. This rate is needed in order to extract an upper limit on the amount of a characteristic $\\gamma$-radiation emitted from classical nova bursts which has been searched for but not yet detected. At the triple trap mass s...

  8. Distance scaling of electric-field noise in a surface-electrode ion trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlacek, J. A.; Greene, A.; Stuart, J.; McConnell, R.; Bruzewicz, C. D.; Sage, J. M.; Chiaverini, J.

    2018-02-01

    We investigate anomalous ion-motional heating, a limitation to multiqubit quantum-logic gate fidelity in trapped-ion systems, as a function of ion-electrode separation. Using a multizone surface-electrode trap in which ions can be held at five discrete distances from the metal electrodes, we measure power-law dependencies of the electric-field noise experienced by the ion on the ion-electrode distance d . We find a scaling of approximately d-4 regardless of whether the electrodes are at room temperature or cryogenic temperature, despite the fact that the heating rates are approximately two orders of magnitude smaller in the latter case. Through auxiliary measurements using the application of noise to the electrodes, we rule out technical limitations to the measured heating rates and scalings. We also measure the frequency scaling of the inherent electric-field noise close to 1 /f at both temperatures. These measurements eliminate from consideration anomalous-heating models which do not have a d-4 distance dependence, including several microscopic models of current interest.

  9. Dynamics of a single ion in a perturbed Penning trap: Octupolar perturbation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lara, Martin; Salas, J. Pablo

    2004-01-01

    Imperfections in the design or implementation of Penning traps may give rise to electrostatic perturbations that introduce nonlinearities in the dynamics. In this paper we investigate, from the point of view of classical mechanics, the dynamics of a single ion trapped in a Penning trap perturbed by an octupolar perturbation. Because of the axial symmetry of the problem, the system has two degrees of freedom. Hence, this model is ideal to be managed by numerical techniques like continuation of families of periodic orbits and Poincare surfaces of section. We find that, through the variation of the two parameters controlling the dynamics, several periodic orbits emanate from two fundamental periodic orbits. This process produces important changes (bifurcations) in the phase space structure leading to chaotic behavior

  10. Theory of modulational interaction of trapped ion convective cells and drift wave turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, V.D.; Diamond, P.H.; Lebedev, V.; Soloviev, G.; Shevchenko, V.

    1993-01-01

    Theoretical and computational studies of the modulational interaction between trapped ion convective cells and short wavelength drift wave turbulence are discussed. These studies are motivated by the fact that cells and drift waves are expected to coexist in tokamaks so that: (a) cells strain and modulate drift waves, and (b) drift waves open-quote ride on close-quote a background of cells. The results of the authors' investigation indicate that: (1) (nonlinear) parametric growth rates of trapped ion convective cells can exceed linear predictions (for drift wave levels at the mixing length limit); (2) a set of coupled envelope equations, akin to the Zakharov equations from Langmuir turbulence, can be derived and used to predict the formation of a dipole pair of convective cells trapped by the drift wave envelope. This dipole pair is strongly anisotropic, due to the structure of the drift wave Reynolds stress which drives the cell flow. Numerical solutions of the envelope equations are in good agreement with theoretical predictions, and indicate the persistence of the structure in time; (3) strong modulation and trapping of drift waves with k perpendicular ρ > 1 occurs. Extensions to magnetically sheared systems and the broader implications of this work as a paradigm for the dynamics of persistent structures in shearing flows are discussed

  11. Development of a multiplexed interface for capillary electrophoresis-electrospray ion trap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fu-An; Wu, Ming-Chi; Her, Guor-Rong

    2006-08-01

    A four-channel multiplexed electrospray capillary electrophoresis interface has been developed. This new interface permits up to four capillary electrophoresis columns to be sampled sequentially by means of a stepper motor and a notched rotating plate assembly, which at any instant occludes all but a single sprayer. In this design, four sheath liquid electrospray probes are oriented in a circular array situated 90 degrees relative to one another. The rotating metal disk, which contains a one-quarter notch, is mounted to the stepper motor assembly and is located between the sprayers and the entrance aperture of an ion trap mass spectrometer. By using the data acquisition signal from the ion trap mass spectrometer, the scan event is synchronized with the rotation of the metal disk. With this device, four discrete sample streams can be simultaneously analyzed, resulting in a 4-fold increase in analytical throughput.

  12. Vibrational Cooling in A Cold Ion Trap: Vibrationally Resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Cold C60- Anions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xue B.; Woo, Hin-koon; Wang, Lai S.

    2005-08-01

    We demonstrate vibrational cooling of anions via collisions with a background gas in an ion trap attached to a cryogenically controlled cold head (10 ? 400 K). Photoelectron spectra of vibrationally cold C60- anions, produced by electrospray ionization and cooled in the cold ion trap, have been obtained. Relative to spectra taken at room temperature, vibrational hot bands are completely eliminated, yielding well resolved vibrational structures and a more accurate electron affinity for neutral C60. The electron affinity of C60 is measured to be 2.683 ? 0.008 eV. The cold spectra reveal complicated vibrational structures for the transition to the C60 ground state due to the Jahn-Teller effect in the ground state of C60-. Vibrational excitations in the two Ag modes and eight Hg modes are observed, providing ideal data to assess the vibronic couplings in C60-.

  13. Dissipative quantum error correction and application to quantum sensing with trapped ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, F; Sørensen, A S; Zoller, P; Muschik, C A

    2017-11-28

    Quantum-enhanced measurements hold the promise to improve high-precision sensing ranging from the definition of time standards to the determination of fundamental constants of nature. However, quantum sensors lose their sensitivity in the presence of noise. To protect them, the use of quantum error-correcting codes has been proposed. Trapped ions are an excellent technological platform for both quantum sensing and quantum error correction. Here we present a quantum error correction scheme that harnesses dissipation to stabilize a trapped-ion qubit. In our approach, always-on couplings to an engineered environment protect the qubit against spin-flips or phase-flips. Our dissipative error correction scheme operates in a continuous manner without the need to perform measurements or feedback operations. We show that the resulting enhanced coherence time translates into a significantly enhanced precision for quantum measurements. Our work constitutes a stepping stone towards the paradigm of self-correcting quantum information processing.

  14. Bang-bang shortcut to adiabaticity in trapped-ion quantum simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, S.; Han, Shuyang; Yoshimura, B. T.; Freericks, J. K.

    2018-02-01

    We model the bang-bang optimization protocol as a shortcut to adiabaticity in the ground-state preparation of a trapped-ion quantum simulator. Compared to a locally adiabatic evolution, the bang-bang protocol typically produces a lower ground-state probability, but its implementation is so much simpler than the locally adiabatic approach, that it can become a competitive choice to use for maximizing ground-state preparation in systems that cannot be solved with conventional computers. We describe how one can optimize the shortcut and provide specific details for how it can be implemented with current trapped-ion quantum simulators. However, when frustration is strong enough, no method appears to work well for adiabatic state preparation within the experimental time frames, and one must confront the issue of dealing with diabatic excitations within the simulation.

  15. Quantum optics including noise reduction, trapped ions, quantum trajectories, and decoherence

    CERN Document Server

    Orszag, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    This new edition gives a unique and broad coverage of basic laser-related phenomena that allow graduate students, scientists and engineers to carry out research in quantum optics and laser physics. It covers quantization of the electromagnetic field, quantum theory of coherence, atom-field interaction models, resonance fluorescence, quantum theory of damping, laser theory using both the master equation and the Langevin theory, the correlated emission laser, input-output theory with applications to non-linear optics, quantum trajectories, quantum non-demolition measurements and generation of non-classical vibrational states of ions in a Paul trap. In this third edition, there is an enlarged chapter on trapped ions, as well as new sections on quantum computing and quantum bits with applications. There is also additional material included for quantum processing and entanglement. These topics are presented in a unified and didactic manner, each chapter is accompanied by specific problems and hints to solutions to...

  16. Experimental quantum simulation of fermion-antifermion scattering via boson exchange in a trapped ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiang; Zhang, Kuan; Shen, Yangchao; Zhang, Shuaining; Zhang, Jing-Ning; Yung, Man-Hong; Casanova, Jorge; Pedernales, Julen S; Lamata, Lucas; Solano, Enrique; Kim, Kihwan

    2018-01-15

    Quantum field theories describe a variety of fundamental phenomena in physics. However, their study often involves cumbersome numerical simulations. Quantum simulators, on the other hand, may outperform classical computational capacities due to their potential scalability. Here we report an experimental realization of a quantum simulation of fermion-antifermion scattering mediated by bosonic modes, using a multilevel trapped ion, which is a simplified model of fermion scattering in both perturbative and non-perturbative quantum electrodynamics. The simulated model exhibits prototypical features in quantum field theory including particle pair creation and annihilation, as well as self-energy interactions. These are experimentally observed by manipulating four internal levels of a 171 Yb + trapped ion, where we encode the fermionic modes, and two motional degrees of freedom that simulate the bosonic modes. Our experiment establishes an avenue towards the efficient implementation of field modes, which may prove useful in studies of quantum field theories including non-perturbative regimes.

  17. Hg-201 (+) CO-Magnetometer for HG-199(+) Trapped Ion Space Atomic Clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Eric A. (Inventor); Taghavi, Shervin (Inventor); Tjoelker, Robert L. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Local magnetic field strength in a trapped ion atomic clock is measured in real time, with high accuracy and without degrading clock performance, and the measurement is used to compensate for ambient magnetic field perturbations. First and second isotopes of an element are co-located within the linear ion trap. The first isotope has a resonant microwave transition between two hyperfine energy states, and the second isotope has a resonant Zeeman transition. Optical sources emit ultraviolet light that optically pump both isotopes. A microwave radiation source simultaneously emits microwave fields resonant with the first isotope's clock transition and the second isotope's Zeeman transition, and an optical detector measures the fluorescence from optically pumping both isotopes. The second isotope's Zeeman transition provides the measure of magnetic field strength, and the measurement is used to compensate the first isotope's clock transition or to adjust the applied C-field to reduce the effects of ambient magnetic field perturbations.

  18. Confinement of ripple-trapped slowing-down ions by a radial electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, W.

    1998-03-01

    Weakly collisional ions trapped in the toroidal field ripples at the outer plasma edge can be prevented to escape the plasma due to grad B-drift by a counteracting radial electric field. This leads to an increase in the density of ripple-trapped ions, which can be monitored by the analysis of charge exchange neutrals. The minimum radial electric field E r necessary to confine ions with energy E and charge q (q=-1: charge of the electron) is E r = -E/(q * R), where R is the major radius at the measuring point. Slowing-down ions from neutral injection are usually in the right energy range to be sufficiently collisionless in the plasma edge and show the confinement by radial electric fields in the range of tens of kV/m. The density of banana ions is almost unaffected by the radial electric field. Neither in L/H- nor in H/L-transitions does the density of ripple-trapped ions and, hence, the neutral particle fluxes, show jumps in times shorter than 1 ms. According to [1,2] the response time of the density and the fluxes to a sudden jump in the radial electric field is less than 200 μs, if the halfwidth of the electric field is larger or about 2 cm. This would exclude rapid jumps in the radial electric field at the transition. Whether the halfwidth of the electric field is that large during transition cannot be decided from the measurement of the fluxes alone. (orig.)

  19. Radium uptake in utero

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlenker, R.A.; Keane, A.T.

    1986-01-01

    A summary of information on a stillborn girl and her mother who had been a radium watch dial painter is provided. Although many dial painters bore children, this is the only example we have of simultaneous radioactivity determinations in mother and child prior to normal delivery. This case provides an opportunity to assess the degree of transfer of radium to the fetus in utero and may be unique in the study of the placental transfer of radium in humans. The mother (Case 00-009) worked at the US Radium Corporation, Orange, New Jersey, for 5 to 7 years beginning in 1918. She accumulated a substantial body burden of /sup 226/Ra and /sup 228/Ra by mouth tipping of brushes, as was then the custom in the American dial painting industry. Years later, her husband recalled that tissues inside her mouth glowed brightly in the dark and that the front of her clothing often glowed too; he described her as a rapid worker. The child (Case 01-579) was stillborn after a gestation period listed as six months on the certificate of stillbirth. The cause of death is listed as placenta previa. The mother died on the day of birth, February 24, 1928. She was 26 years old. Mother and daughter were buried in the same casket and exhumed together August 9, 1968. 12 refs., 3 tabs.

  20. A Double-Well System Composed of Phonons in a Pair of Trapped Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    to Rabi oscillation in a two-level system or to Josephson oscillation where there is a barrier between two superconductors. 3. Experimental...fields with fine tuning and high stability. Therefore, we expect a Rabi -like oscillation in the phonon population of each site in the trapped ion...atoms in a double-well optical lattice (12), where atoms initially in a single well are adiabatically transformed to an equal number of atoms in

  1. A generalized Jaynes-Cummings model: The relativistic parametric amplifier and a single trapped ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojeda-Guillén, D., E-mail: dojedag@ipn.mx [Escuela Superior de Cómputo, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Av. Juan de Dios Bátiz esq. Av. Miguel Othón de Mendizábal, Col. Lindavista, Delegación Gustavo A. Madero, C.P. 07738 Ciudad de México (Mexico); Mota, R. D. [Escuela Superior de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica, Unidad Culhuacán, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Av. Santa Ana No. 1000, Col. San Francisco Culhuacán, Delegación Coyoacán, C.P. 04430 Ciudad de México (Mexico); Granados, V. D. [Escuela Superior de Física y Matemáticas, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Ed. 9, Unidad Profesional Adolfo López Mateos, Delegación Gustavo A. Madero, C.P. 07738 Ciudad de México (Mexico)

    2016-06-15

    We introduce a generalization of the Jaynes-Cummings model and study some of its properties. We obtain the energy spectrum and eigenfunctions of this model by using the tilting transformation and the squeezed number states of the one-dimensional harmonic oscillator. As physical applications, we connect this new model to two important and novelty problems: the relativistic parametric amplifier and the quantum simulation of a single trapped ion.

  2. Determination of interfering triazine degradation products by gas chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnuson, M L; Speth, T F; Kelty, C A

    2000-01-28

    Deethylatrazine (DEA), an atrazine degradation product, has been added to the US Environmental Protection Agency's Drinking Water Contaminant Candidate List (CCL). In its gas chromatographic analysis, DEA can coelute with deisopropylatrazine (DIA), another degradation product. The present work demonstrates that the coelution of DEA and DIA can induce a significant (up to approximately 50%) positive bias in the DEA determination, when using an ion-trap mass spectrometer as the detector. The DIA determination is unaffected by the coelution within experimental error. This may be explained in terms of gas-phase ion fragment populations. A correction factor to the observed DEA concentration may be developed based on the measured DIA concentration.

  3. Recent trends in precision measurements of atomic and nuclear properties with lasers and ion traps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, Michael, E-mail: m.block@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    The X. international workshop on “Application of Lasers and Storage Devices in Atomic Nuclei Research” took place in Poznan in May 2016. It addressed the latest experimental and theoretical achievements in laser and ion trap-based investigations of radionuclides, highly charged ions and antiprotons. The precise determination of atomic and nuclear properties provides a stringent benchmark for theoretical models and eventually leads to a better understanding of the underlying fundamental interactions and symmetries. This article addresses some general trends in this field and highlights select recent achievements presented at the workshop. Many of these are covered in more detail within the individual contributions to this special issue of Hyperfine Interactions.

  4. Recent trends in precision measurements of atomic and nuclear properties with lasers and ion traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Michael

    2017-11-01

    The X. international workshop on "Application of Lasers and Storage Devices in Atomic Nuclei Research" took place in Poznan in May 2016. It addressed the latest experimental and theoretical achievements in laser and ion trap-based investigations of radionuclides, highly charged ions and antiprotons. The precise determination of atomic and nuclear properties provides a stringent benchmark for theoretical models and eventually leads to a better understanding of the underlying fundamental interactions and symmetries. This article addresses some general trends in this field and highlights select recent achievements presented at the workshop. Many of these are covered in more detail within the individual contributions to this special issue of Hyperfine Interactions.

  5. A new trapped-ion instability with large frequency and radial wavenumber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagger, M.

    1979-01-01

    The need for theoretical previsions concerning anomalous transport in large Tokamaks, as well as the recent results of PLT, ask the question of the process responsible for non-linear saturation of trapped-ion instabilities. This in turn necessitates the knowledge of the linear behaviour of these waves at large frequencies and large radial wavenumbers. We study the linear dispersion relation of these modes, in the radially local approximation, but including a term due to a new physical effect, combining finite banana-width and bounce resonances. Limiting ourselves presently to the first harmonic expansion of the bounce motion of trapped ions, we show that the effect of finite banana-width on the usual trapped-ion mode is complex and quite different from what is generally expected. In addition we show, analytically and numerically, the appearance of a nex branch of this instability. Essentially due to this new effect, it involves large frequencies (ω approximately ωsub(b) and is destabilized by large radial wavelengths (ksub(x) Λ approximately 1, where Λ is the typical banana-width). We discuss the nature of this new mode and its potential relevance of the experiments

  6. MATS and LaSpec: High-precision experiments using ion traps and lasers at FAIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, D.; Blaum, K.; Nörtershäuser, W.; Ahammed, M.; Algora, A.; Audi, G.; Äystö, J.; Beck, D.; Bender, M.; Billowes, J.; Block, M.; Böhm, C.; Bollen, G.; Brodeur, M.; Brunner, T.; Bushaw, B. A.; Cakirli, R. B.; Campbell, P.; Cano-Ott, D.; Cortés, G.; Crespo López-Urrutia, J. R.; Das, P.; Dax, A.; de, A.; Delheij, P.; Dickel, T.; Dilling, J.; Eberhardt, K.; Eliseev, S.; Ettenauer, S.; Flanagan, K. T.; Ferrer, R.; García-Ramos, J.-E.; Gartzke, E.; Geissel, H.; George, S.; Geppert, C.; Gómez-Hornillos, M. B.; Gusev, Y.; Habs, D.; Heenen, P.-H.; Heinz, S.; Herfurth, F.; Herlert, A.; Hobein, M.; Huber, G.; Huyse, M.; Jesch, C.; Jokinen, A.; Kester, O.; Ketelaer, J.; Kolhinen, V.; Koudriavtsev, I.; Kowalska, M.; Krämer, J.; Kreim, S.; Krieger, A.; Kühl, T.; Lallena, A. M.; Lapierre, A.; Le Blanc, F.; Litvinov, Y. A.; Lunney, D.; Martínez, T.; Marx, G.; Matos, M.; Minaya-Ramirez, E.; Moore, I.; Nagy, S.; Naimi, S.; Neidherr, D.; Nesterenko, D.; Neyens, G.; Novikov, Y. N.; Petrick, M.; Plaß, W. R.; Popov, A.; Quint, W.; Ray, A.; Reinhard, P.-G.; Repp, J.; Roux, C.; Rubio, B.; Sánchez, R.; Schabinger, B.; Scheidenberger, C.; Schneider, D.; Schuch, R.; Schwarz, S.; Schweikhard, L.; Seliverstov, M.; Solders, A.; Suhonen, M.; Szerypo, J.; Taín, J. L.; Thirolf, P. G.; Ullrich, J.; van Duppen, P.; Vasiliev, A.; Vorobjev, G.; Weber, C.; Wendt, K.; Winkler, M.; Yordanov, D.; Ziegler, F.

    2010-05-01

    Nuclear ground state properties including mass, charge radii, spins and moments can be determined by applying atomic physics techniques such as Penning-trap based mass spectrometry and laser spectroscopy. The MATS and LaSpec setups at the low-energy beamline at FAIR will allow us to extend the knowledge of these properties further into the region far from stability. The mass and its inherent connection with the nuclear binding energy is a fundamental property of a nuclide, a unique “fingerprint”. Thus, precise mass values are important for a variety of applications, ranging from nuclear-structure studies like the investigation of shell closures and the onset of deformation, tests of nuclear mass models and mass formulas, to tests of the weak interaction and of the Standard Model. The required relative accuracy ranges from 10-5 to below 10-8 for radionuclides, which most often have half-lives well below 1 s. Substantial progress in Penning trap mass spectrometry has made this method a prime choice for precision measurements on rare isotopes. The technique has the potential to provide high accuracy and sensitivity even for very short-lived nuclides. Furthermore, ion traps can be used for precision decay studies and offer advantages over existing methods. With MATS (Precision Measurements of very short-lived nuclei using an A_dvanced Trapping System for highly-charged ions) at FAIR we aim to apply several techniques to very short-lived radionuclides: High-accuracy mass measurements, in-trap conversion electron and alpha spectroscopy, and trap-assisted spectroscopy. The experimental setup of MATS is a unique combination of an electron beam ion trap for charge breeding, ion traps for beam preparation, and a high-precision Penning trap system for mass measurements and decay studies. For the mass measurements, MATS offers both a high accuracy and a high sensitivity. A relative mass uncertainty of 10-9 can be reached by employing highly-charged ions and a non

  7. Ion Selectivity of Crown Ethers Investigated by UV and IR Spectroscop;y in a Cold Ion Trap

    OpenAIRE

    Inokuchi Y.; Boyarkin O. V.; Kusaka R.; Haino T.; Ebata T.; Rizzo T. R.

    2012-01-01

    Electronic and vibrational spectra of benzo-15-crown-5 (B15C5) and benzo-18-crown-6 (B18C6) complexes with alkali metal ions, M+・B15C5 and M+・B18C6 (M = Li, Na, K, Rb and Cs), are measured using UV photodissociation (UVPD) and IR-UV double resonance spectroscopy in a cold, 22-pole ion trap. We determine the structure of conformers with the aid of density functional theory calculations. In the Na+・B15C5 and K+・B18C6 complexes, the crown ethers open the most and hold the metal ions at the cente...

  8. Evaluation of the frequency instability limited by Dick effect in the microwave 199Hg+ trapped-ion clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-He; She, Lei; Wang, Man; Yang, Zhi-Hui; Liu, Hao; Li, Jiao-Mei

    2016-12-01

    In the microwave 199Hg+ trapped-ion clock, the frequency instability degradation caused by the Dick effect is unavoidable because of the periodical interrogating field. In this paper, the general expression of the sensitivity function g(t) to the frequency fluctuation of the interrogating field with Nπ-pulse (N is odd) is derived. According to the measured phase noise of the 40.5-GHz microwave synthesizer, the Dick-effect limited Allan deviation of our 199Hg+ trapped-ion clock is worked out. The results indicate that the limited Allan deviations are about and respectively in the linear ion trap and in the two-segment extended linear ion trap under our present experimental parameters. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11074248 and 11474320).

  9. Determination of Collision Cross Sections Using a Fourier Transform Electrostatic Linear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziekonski, Eric T; Johnson, Joshua T; Lee, Kenneth W; McLuckey, Scott A

    2018-02-01

    Collision cross sections (CCSs) were determined from the frequency-domain linewidths in a Fourier transform electrostatic linear ion trap. With use of an ultrahigh-vacuum precision leak valve and nitrogen gas, transients were recorded as the background pressure in the mass analyzer chamber was varied between 4× 10 -8 and 7 × 10 -7 Torr. The energetic hard-sphere ion-neutral collision model, described by Xu and coworkers, was used to relate the recorded image charge to the CCS of the molecule. In lieu of our monoisotopically isolating the mass of interest, the known relative isotopic abundances were programmed into the Lorentzian fitting algorithm such that the linewidth was extracted from a sum of Lorentzians. Although this works only if the isotopic distribution is known a priori, it prevents ion loss, preserves the high signal-to-noise ratio, and minimizes the experimental error on our homebuilt instrument. Six tetraalkylammonium cations were used to correlate the CCS measured in the electrostatic linear ion trap with that measured by drift-tube ion mobility spectrometry, for which there was an excellent correlation (R 2 ≈ 0.9999). Although the absolute CCSs derived with our method differ from those reported, the extracted linear correlation can be used to correct the raw CCS. With use of [angiotensin II] 2+ and reserpine, the corrected CCSs (334.9 ± 2.1 and 250.1 ± 0.5, respectively) were in good agreement with the reported ion mobility spectrometry CCSs (335 and 254.3, respectively). With sufficient signal-to-noise ratio, the CCSs determined are reproducible to within a fraction of a percent, comparable to the uncertainties reported on dedicated ion mobility instruments. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  10. Determination of Collision Cross Sections Using a Fourier Transform Electrostatic Linear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziekonski, Eric T.; Johnson, Joshua T.; Lee, Kenneth W.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2018-02-01

    Collision cross sections (CCSs) were determined from the frequency-domain linewidths in a Fourier transform electrostatic linear ion trap. With use of an ultrahigh-vacuum precision leak valve and nitrogen gas, transients were recorded as the background pressure in the mass analyzer chamber was varied between 4× 10-8 and 7 × 10-7 Torr. The energetic hard-sphere ion-neutral collision model, described by Xu and coworkers, was used to relate the recorded image charge to the CCS of the molecule. In lieu of our monoisotopically isolating the mass of interest, the known relative isotopic abundances were programmed into the Lorentzian fitting algorithm such that the linewidth was extracted from a sum of Lorentzians. Although this works only if the isotopic distribution is known a priori, it prevents ion loss, preserves the high signal-to-noise ratio, and minimizes the experimental error on our homebuilt instrument. Six tetraalkylammonium cations were used to correlate the CCS measured in the electrostatic linear ion trap with that measured by drift-tube ion mobility spectrometry, for which there was an excellent correlation ( R 2 ≈ 0.9999). Although the absolute CCSs derived with our method differ from those reported, the extracted linear correlation can be used to correct the raw CCS. With use of [angiotensin II]2+ and reserpine, the corrected CCSs (334.9 ± 2.1 and 250.1 ± 0.5, respectively) were in good agreement with the reported ion mobility spectrometry CCSs (335 and 254.3, respectively). With sufficient signal-to-noise ratio, the CCSs determined are reproducible to within a fraction of a percent, comparable to the uncertainties reported on dedicated ion mobility instruments.

  11. The ReA electron-beam ion trap charge breeder for reacceleration of rare isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapierre, A.; Schwarz, S.; Kittimanapun, K.; Fogleman, J.; Krause, S.; Nash, S.; Rencsok, R.; Tobos, L.; Perdikakis, G.; Portillo, M.; Rodriguez, J. A.; Wittmer, W.; Wu, X.; Bollen, G.; Leitner, D.; Syphers, M. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), Michigan State University (MSU), 640 South Shaw Lane, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Collaboration: ReA Team

    2013-04-19

    ReA is a post-accelerator at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University. ReA is designed to reaccelerate rare isotopes to energies of a few MeV/u following production by projectile fragmentation and thermalization in a gas cell. The facility consists of four main components: an electron-beam ion trap (EBIT) charge breeder, an achromatic charge-over-mass (Q/A) separator, a radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator, and a superconducting radio-frequency linear accelerator. The EBIT charge breeder was specifically designed to efficiently capture continuous beams of singly charged ions injected at low energy (<60 keV), charge breed in less than 50 ms, and extract highly charged ions to the Q/A separator for charge-state selection and reacceleration through the accelerator structures. The use of highly charged ions to reach high beam energies is a key aspect that makes ReA a compact and cost-efficient post-accelerator. The EBIT is characterized by a high-current electron gun, a long multi-electrode trap structure and a dual magnet to provide both the high electron-beam current density necessary for fast charge breeding of short-lived isotopes as well as the high capture probability of injected beams. This paper presents an overview and the status of the ReA EBIT, which has extracted for reacceleration tests stable {sup 20}Ne{sup 8+} ion beams produced from injected gas and more recently {sup 39}K{sup 16+} beams by injecting stable {sup 39,41}K{sup +} ions from an external ion source.

  12. Buffer gas cooling of polyatomic ions in rf multi-electrode traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlich, D; Borodi, G

    2009-01-01

    Cooling all degrees of freedom of a molecule, a cluster, or even a nanoparticle which is suspended in a vacuum, is an experimental challenge. Without suitable schemes, cold or ultracold chemical reactions are not feasible. Methods such as laser based preparation of very slow atoms, decelerating molecules to low velocities with electric fields or freezing molecular ions into Coulomb crystals, are generally not suitable to cool the vibrational or rotational motion of molecules. This contribution describes a new method in which a beam of slow atoms or molecules (H, He, H2, or D2) is used for cooling charged particles confined in a multi-electrode rf trap. For reaching sub-K temperatures, the fast part of a cold effusive beam is removed with a shutter before the slow remaining neutrals interact with the ion cloud. The development of a pulsed cold beam source is discussed as well as suitable methods for determining the ion temperature. A challenging application is to prepare internally cold CH5+ for spectroscopy or chemistry. New experimental results for hydrogen abstraction in collisions with slow H atoms are reported at energies of a few meV. For evaluating these measurements and for predicting effective rate coefficients at lower energies, the kinematic conditions of the slow neutral beam-ion trap arrangement have been analyzed in detail. The potential of cooling ions such as protonated methane or H3+ with slow energy selected H atoms is briefly mentioned. An interesting process is the formation of weakly bound ions such as H4+ or CH6+ via radiative or ternary association. Such ions are ideal candidates for preparing the corresponding collision complexes very close (microeV) to the dissociation continuum using infrared transitions.

  13. Utility of Higher Harmonics in Electrospray Ionization Fourier Transform Electrostatic Linear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziekonski, Eric T; Johnson, Joshua T; McLuckey, Scott A

    2017-04-18

    Mass resolution (M/ΔM fwhm) is observed to linearly increase with harmonic order in a Fourier transform electrostatic linear ion trap (ELIT) mass spectrometer. This behavior was predicted by Grosshans and Marshall for frequency-multiple detection in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer only for situations when the prominent mechanism for signal decay is ion ejection from the trap. As the analyzer pressure in our ELIT chamber is relatively high, such that collisional scattering and collision-induced dissociation are expected to underlie much of the ion loss, we sought to explore the relationship between harmonic order and mass resolution. Mass resolutions of 36 900 (fundamental), 75 850 (2nd harmonic), and 108 200 (3rd harmonic) were obtained for GdO + (avg. m/z 173.919) with a transient length of 300 ms. To demonstrate that the mass resolution was truly increasing with harmonic order, the unresolved isotopes at the fundamental distribution of cytochrome c +8 (m/z ∼ 1549) were nearly baseline, resolved at the third harmonic (mass resolution ≈ 23 000) with a transient length of only 200 ms. This experiment demonstrates that, when the ion density is sufficiently low, ions with frequency differences of less than 4 Hz remain uncoalesced. Higher harmonics can be used to increase the effective mass resolution for a fixed transient length and thereby may enable the resolution of closely spaced masses, determination of a protein ion's charge state, and study of the onset of peak coalescence when the resolution at the fundamental frequency is insufficient.

  14. On the combination of a low energy hydrogen atom beam with a cold multipole ion trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borodi, Gheorghe

    2008-12-09

    The first part of the activities of this thesis was to develop a sophisticated ion storage apparatus dedicated to study chemical processes with atomic hydrogen. The integration of a differentially pumped radical beam source into an existing temperature variable 22- pole trapping machine has required major modifications. Since astrophysical questions have been in the center of our interest, the introduction first gives a short overview of astrophysics and -chemistry. The basics of ion trapping in temperature variable rf traps is well-documented in the literature; therefore, the description of the basic instrument (Chapter 2) is kept rather short. Much effort has been put into the development of an intense and stable source for hydrogen atoms the kinetic energy of which can be changed. Chapter 3 describes this module in detail with emphasis on the integration of magnetic hexapoles for guiding the atoms and special treatments of the surfaces for reducing H-H recombination. Due to the unique sensitivity of the rf ion trapping technique, this instrument allows one to study a variety of reactions of astrochemical and fundamental interest. The results of this work are summarized in Chapter 4. Reactions of CO{sub 2}{sup +} with hydrogen atoms and molecules have been established as calibration standard for in situ determination of H and H{sub 2} densities over the full temperature range of the apparatus (10 K-300 K). For the first time, reactions of H- and D-atoms with the ionic hydrocarbons CH{sup +}, CH{sub 2}{sup +}, and CH{sub 4}{sup +} have been studied at temperatures of interstellar space. A very interesting, not yet fully understood collision system is the interaction of protonated methane with H. The outlook presents some ideas, how to improve the new instrument and a few reaction systems are mentioned which may be studied next. (orig.)

  15. On the combination of a low energy hydrogen atom beam with a cold multipole ion trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borodi, Gheorghe

    2008-01-01

    The first part of the activities of this thesis was to develop a sophisticated ion storage apparatus dedicated to study chemical processes with atomic hydrogen. The integration of a differentially pumped radical beam source into an existing temperature variable 22- pole trapping machine has required major modifications. Since astrophysical questions have been in the center of our interest, the introduction first gives a short overview of astrophysics and -chemistry. The basics of ion trapping in temperature variable rf traps is well-documented in the literature; therefore, the description of the basic instrument (Chapter 2) is kept rather short. Much effort has been put into the development of an intense and stable source for hydrogen atoms the kinetic energy of which can be changed. Chapter 3 describes this module in detail with emphasis on the integration of magnetic hexapoles for guiding the atoms and special treatments of the surfaces for reducing H-H recombination. Due to the unique sensitivity of the rf ion trapping technique, this instrument allows one to study a variety of reactions of astrochemical and fundamental interest. The results of this work are summarized in Chapter 4. Reactions of CO 2 + with hydrogen atoms and molecules have been established as calibration standard for in situ determination of H and H 2 densities over the full temperature range of the apparatus (10 K-300 K). For the first time, reactions of H- and D-atoms with the ionic hydrocarbons CH + , CH 2 + , and CH 4 + have been studied at temperatures of interstellar space. A very interesting, not yet fully understood collision system is the interaction of protonated methane with H. The outlook presents some ideas, how to improve the new instrument and a few reaction systems are mentioned which may be studied next. (orig.)

  16. Control of the conformations of ion Coulomb crystals in a Penning trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, R. C.; Mavadia, S.; Goodwin, J. F.; Stutter, G.; Bharadia, S.; Crick, D. R.; Segal, D. M. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-29

    Ion Coulomb crystals containing small numbers of ions have been created and manipulated in a wide range of configurations in a Penning trap, from a linear string, through various three-dimensional conformations, to a planar crystal. We show that the dynamics of the system simplifies enormously in a frame which rotates at half the cyclotron frequency and we discuss the effect of the radial cooling laser beam in this frame. Simulations show that the crystal conformations can be reproduced by finding the minimum energy configuration in a frame whose radial potential is modified by the rotation of the ion crystal. The rotation frequency of the crystal deduced from the simulations is consistent with the known laser parameters. We also show that even though the number of ions in our system is small (typically less than 20), the system still behaves like a plasma and its static properties can be calculated using the standard model for a single-component plasma in a trap.

  17. Trapped-ion anomalous diffusion coefficient on the basis of single mode saturation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshi, Yuji; Hatayama, Akiyoshi; Ogasawara, Masatada.

    1982-03-01

    Expressions of the anomalous diffusion coefficient due to the dissipative trapped ion instability (DTII) are derived for the case with and without the effect of magnetic shear. Derivation is made by taking into account of the single mode saturation of the DTII previously obtained numerically. In the absence of the shear effect, the diffusion coefficient is proportional to #betta#sub(i)a 2 (#betta#sub(i) is the effective collision frequency of the trapped ions and a is the minor radius of a torus) and is much larger than the neoclassical ion heat conductivity. In the presence of the shear effect, the diffusion coefficient is much smaller than the Kadomtsev and Pogutse's value and is the same order of magnitude as the neoclassical ion heat conductivity. Dependences of the diffusion coefficient on the temperature and on the total particle number density are rather complicated due to the additional spectral cut-off, which is introduced to regularize the short wavelength modes in the numerical analysis. (author)

  18. Control of the conformations of ion Coulomb crystals in a Penning trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, R. C.; Mavadia, S.; Goodwin, J. F.; Stutter, G.; Bharadia, S.; Crick, D. R.; Segal, D. M.

    2015-01-01

    Ion Coulomb crystals containing small numbers of ions have been created and manipulated in a wide range of configurations in a Penning trap, from a linear string, through various three-dimensional conformations, to a planar crystal. We show that the dynamics of the system simplifies enormously in a frame which rotates at half the cyclotron frequency and we discuss the effect of the radial cooling laser beam in this frame. Simulations show that the crystal conformations can be reproduced by finding the minimum energy configuration in a frame whose radial potential is modified by the rotation of the ion crystal. The rotation frequency of the crystal deduced from the simulations is consistent with the known laser parameters. We also show that even though the number of ions in our system is small (typically less than 20), the system still behaves like a plasma and its static properties can be calculated using the standard model for a single-component plasma in a trap

  19. Observation of enhanced radial transport of energetic ion due to energetic particle mode destabilized by helically-trapped energetic ion in the Large Helical Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, K.; Isobe, M.; Kawase, H.; Nishitani, T.; Seki, R.; Osakabe, M.; LHD Experiment Group

    2018-04-01

    A deuterium experiment was initiated to achieve higher-temperature and higher-density plasmas in March 2017 in the Large Helical Device (LHD). The central ion temperature notably increases compared with that in hydrogen experiments. However, an energetic particle mode called the helically-trapped energetic-ion-driven resistive interchange (EIC) mode is often excited by intensive perpendicular neutral beam injections on high ion-temperature discharges. The mode leads to significant decrease of the ion temperature or to limiting the sustainment of the high ion-temperature state. To understand the effect of EIC on the energetic ion confinement, the radial transport of energetic ions is studied by means of the neutron flux monitor and vertical neutron camera newly installed on the LHD. Decreases of the line-integrated neutron profile in core channels show that helically-trapped energetic ions are lost from the plasma.

  20. Engineering Vibrationally Assisted Energy Transfer in a Trapped-Ion Quantum Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Dylan J.; Hemmerling, Boerge; Megidish, Eli; Moeller, Soenke A.; Schindler, Philipp; Sarovar, Mohan; Haeffner, Hartmut

    2018-01-01

    Many important chemical and biochemical processes in the condensed phase are notoriously difficult to simulate numerically. Often, this difficulty arises from the complexity of simulating dynamics resulting from coupling to structured, mesoscopic baths, for which no separation of time scales exists and statistical treatments fail. A prime example of such a process is vibrationally assisted charge or energy transfer. A quantum simulator, capable of implementing a realistic model of the system of interest, could provide insight into these processes in regimes where numerical treatments fail. We take a first step towards modeling such transfer processes using an ion-trap quantum simulator. By implementing a minimal model, we observe vibrationally assisted energy transport between the electronic states of a donor and an acceptor ion augmented by coupling the donor ion to its vibration. We tune our simulator into several parameter regimes and, in particular, investigate the transfer dynamics in the nonperturbative regime often found in biochemical situations.

  1. The Laser Ion Source Trap (LIST) coupled to a gas cell catcher

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonoda, T. [Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, K.U. Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)], E-mail: tetsu@riken.jp; Cocolios, T.E.; Gentens, J.; Huyse, M.; Ivanov, O.; Kudryavtsev, Yu.; Pauwels, D.; Van den Bergh, P.; Van Duppen, P. [Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, K.U. Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2009-09-01

    The proof of principle of the Laser Ion Source Trap (LIST) coupled to a gas cell catcher system has been demonstrated at the Leuven Isotope Separator On Line (LISOL). The experiments were carried out by using the modified gas cell-based laser ion source and the SextuPole Ion Guide (SPIG). Element-selective resonance laser ionization of neutral atoms was taking place inside the cold jet expanding out of the gas cell catcher. The laser path was oriented in longitudinal as well as transverse geometries with respect to the atoms flow. The enhancement of beam purity and the feasibility for in-source laser spectroscopy were investigated in off-line and on-line conditions.

  2. Transport through dissipative trapped electron mode and toroidal ion temperature gradient mode in TEXTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogister, A.; Hasselberg, G.; Waelbroeck, F.; Weiland, J.

    1987-12-01

    A self-consistent transport code is used to evaluate how plasma confinement in tokamaks is influenced by the microturbulent fields which are excited by the dissipative trapped electron (DTE) instability. As shown previously, the saturation theory on which the code is based has been developed from first principles. The toroidal coupling resulting from the ion magnetic drifts is neglected; arguments are presented to justify this approximation. The numerical results reproduce well the neo-Alcator scaling law observed experimentally - e.g. in TEXTOR - in non detached ohmic discharges, the confinement degradation which results when auxiliary heating is applied, as well as a large number of other experimental observations. We also assess the possible impact of the toroidal ion temperature gradient mode on energy confinement by estimating the ion thermal flux with the help of the mixing length approximation. (orig./GG)

  3. Observation of Hopping and Blockade of Bosons in a Trapped Ion Spin Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, S.; Linke, N. M.; Wang, S.-T.; Figgatt, C.; Landsman, K. A.; Duan, L.-M.; Monroe, C.

    2018-02-01

    The local phonon modes in a Coulomb crystal of trapped ions can represent a Hubbard system of coupled bosons. We selectively prepare single excitations at each site and observe free hopping of a boson between sites, mediated by the long-range Coulomb interaction between ions. We then implement phonon blockades on targeted sites by driving a Jaynes-Cummings interaction on individually addressed ions to couple their internal spin to the local phonon mode. The resulting dressed states have energy splittings that can be tuned to suppress phonon hopping into the site. This new experimental approach opens up the possibility of realizing large-scale Hubbard systems from the bottom up with tunable interactions at the single-site level.

  4. Electrospray ionization ion-trap multiple-stage mass spectrometry of Quillaja saponins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankefors, Johan; Broberg, Susanna; Nord, Lars I; Kenne, Lennart

    2011-07-01

    Fifteen identified C-18 fatty acyl-containing saponin structures from Quillaja saponaria Molina have been investigated by electrospray ionization ion-trap multiple-stage mass spectrometry (ESI-IT-MS(n)) in positive ion mode. Their MS(1)-MS(3) spectra were analyzed and ions corresponding to useful fragments, important for the structural identification of Quillaja saponins, were recognized. A few key fragments could describe the structural variations in the C-3 and the C-28 oligosaccharides of the Quillaja saponins. A flowchart involving a stepwise procedure based on key fragments from the MS(1)-MS(3) spectra of these saponins, together with key fragments from these saponins and 13 previously investigated saponins, was constructed for the identification of structural elements in Quillaja saponins. Peak intensity ratios in MS(3) spectra were found to be correlated to structural features of the investigated saponins and is therefore of value for the identification of regioisomers. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Universal gate-set for trapped-ion qubits using a narrow linewidth diode laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akerman, Nitzan; Navon, Nir; Kotler, Shlomi; Glickman, Yinnon; Ozeri, Roee

    2015-01-01

    We report on the implementation of a high fidelity universal gate-set on optical qubits based on trapped 88 Sr + ions for the purpose of quantum information processing. All coherent operations were performed using a narrow linewidth diode laser. We employed a master-slave configuration for the laser, where an ultra low expansion glass Fabry–Perot cavity is used as a stable reference as well as a spectral filter. We characterized the laser spectrum using the ions with a modified Ramsey sequence which eliminated the affect of the magnetic field noise. We demonstrated high fidelity single qubit gates with individual addressing, based on inhomogeneous micromotion, on a two-ion chain as well as the Mølmer–Sørensen two-qubit entangling gate. (paper)

  6. Charting molecular composition of phosphatidylcholines by fatty acid scanning and ion trap MS3 fragmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekroos, Kim; Ejsing, Christer S.; Bahr, Ute

    2003-01-01

    preliminary separation of lipid classes or of individual molecular species, enzymatic digestion, or chemical derivatization. The approach was validated by the comparative analysis of the molecular composition of PCs from human red blood cells. In the total lipid extract of Madin-Darby canine kidney II cells......The molecular composition of phosphatidylcholines (PCs) in total lipid extracts was characterized by a combination of multiple precursor ion scanning on a hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer and MS3 fragmentation on an ion trap mass spectrometer. Precursor ion spectra for 50 acyl...... spectrometer quantified the relative amount of their positional isomers, thus providing the most detailed and comprehensive characterization of the molecular composition of the pool of PCs at the low-picomole level. The method is vastly simplified, compared with conventional approaches, and does not require...

  7. Synthesis of radium silicate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garibov, A.A; Agayev, T.N; Mansimov, Z.A

    2010-01-01

    Full text :One of the possible ways of implementation of the processes of molecular hydrogen radiologic of the elements in the differential heat of water as a catalyst for the collapse of the creation of a special nuclear reactors. A chemical process in radiation-4-oxide-silicon compounds, which is one of the radium, is of great importance. Research in the silicon-oxide-radiumun different activity-4 has been synthesized. As initial substances for the synthesis of tetra etiolate silicate and radium chloride solutions were used. At the same time to remove reaction products from the reaction intermediate in acetate acid was used. The intermediate product was reacted with ethyl alcohol ethyl acetate ether acetate acid that forms from the reaction of the temperature effect is broken. As a result, 4-oxide was initially pure silicon.

  8. Oversampling Selective Accumulation Trapped Ion Mobility Spectrometry Coupled to FT-ICR MS: Fundamentals and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benigni, Paolo; Fernandez-Lima, Francisco

    2016-07-19

    In the present paper, we describe the fundamentals and analytical advantages of Oversampling Selective Accumulation Trapped Ion Mobility Spectrometry (OSA-TIMS) when coupled to ultrahigh resolution mass analyzers (e.g., FT-ICR MS). During TIMS analysis, ion packages are spatially resolved based on their mobilities along the TIMS analyzer axis and multiple strategies can be utilized during the trapping and elution of the ion population of interest. In the case of OSA-TIMS-FT-ICR MS, the TIMS operation sequence, trapping conditions, and operations are optimized to increase the signal-to-noise and the number of points across the mobility domain, which leads to more accurate mobility and mass measurements. Experimental results show that accurate ion-neutral collision cross sections (analytical advantages of OSA-TIMS over SA-TIMS were illustrated for the analysis of structural peptide isomers (SDGRG and GRGDS [M + H](+)), conformational isomers (AT-hook peptide 3 KRGRGRPRK [M + 2H](+2)), and a complex mixture of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from coal tar. Baseline separation of the structural peptide isomers SDGRG and GRGDS, [M + H](+), was observed, and three conformations were identified for the AT-hook peptide 3 KRGRGRPRK [M + 2H](+2) during OSA-TIMS-FT-ICR MS. A 2-fold increase in the number of molecular features and a 2-6-fold signal-to-noise increase was observed for OSA-TIMS when compared with SA-TIMS during the PAH analysis. This work provides the proof-of-principle for further application of OSA-TIMS-FT-ICR MS for the unsupervised analysis of complex mixtures based on the characterization of the conformational space and the assignment of chemical formulas in a single analysis.

  9. Measurement of Atmospheric Isoprene Concentrations using an Automated Cylindrical Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, G. D.; Shepson, P. B.; Grossenbacher, J. W.; Wells, J. M.; Patterson, G.; Barkett, D. J.

    2005-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released from the biosphere have been shown to substantially influence both ozone and aerosol chemistry. However, field instruments for the detection of these trace gases are often limited by instrument portability and the ability to distinguish compounds of interest from background or other interfering compounds. We have developed an automated sampling system that is coupled to a lightweight, low power cylindrical ion trap mass spectrometer. This instrument was used for high frequency isoprene measurements at a recent field campaign at the University of Michigan Biological Station PROPHET lab. The inlet uses a sample loop and 6-port valves to trap ambient air samples without the aid of cryogens. VOCs are preconcentrated by sampling directly into a pre-cooled capillary column that is then heated by moving the column to a pre-heated region to obtain rapid separation of isoprene from other species. Isoprene eluting from the end of the column is then introduced to the mass spectrometer. The commercially available cylindrical ion trap (Minotaur 400) interfaced with our preconcentrator yields limits of detection of <80 ppt. The data obtained during the PROPHET 2005 campaign suggest the new inlet system, when coupled with the Minotaur 400 detector provides a feasible field instrument for the fast and accurate evaluation of trace gases over a variety of atmospheric conditions.

  10. Behavior of many ions in a Penning trap and results of the WITCH experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Porobic, Tomica

    Precision measurements of the beta−neutrino angular correlation in nuclear beta-decay provide a unique window into the physics beyond the Standard model. The WITCH (Weak Interaction Trap for CHarged particles) experiment aims to measure this correlation, a(beta-nu), in order to impose a more stringent constraint on the exotic scalar current admixture in the beta-decay Hamiltonian. The apparatus is situated at CERN/ISOLDE laboratory and consists of a unique combination of a retardation spectrometer and two Penning traps, with one of them serving as a scattering-free source. This configuration is suited for a precise measurement of the energy spectrum of 35Ar recoiled daughter ions. The shape of the spectrum then allows a determination of a(beta-nu) and consequently of the presence or absence of a scalar current. Radioactive 35Ar ions are created at ISOLDE by impinging 1.2 GeV protons on the target material. After being separated by a magnetic separator and bunched by REXTRAP, a high-capacity Penning trap, th...

  11. Highly charged ions trapping for lifetime measurements; Piegeage d'ions tres charges pour la mesure de duree de vie d'etats metastables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attia, D

    2007-10-15

    A new experimental setup dedicated to highly charged ion trapping is presented in this work. The final goal is to perform lifetime measurement of metastable states produced by our ECR (Electron Cyclotron Resonance) ion source. Lifetimes to be measured are in the range of a few ms and more. We have measured the lifetimes of the M1 transitions of the metastable states of Ar{sup 9+}, Ar{sup 13+} and Ar{sup 14+}. These measurements are useful to test the N-body problem in the relativistic range. The trap we have built, was designed a few years ago at the Weizman Institute in Israel, it allows ions with an energy of several keV to be trapped for lifetimes of about 1 second. This trap was originally designed to study the dynamics of excited molecules. We have shown for the first time how the trap operates and that it can operate with highly charged ions. We have studied the beam dynamics of highly charged ions and the trap has been tested with various species of ions and different charge states: from O{sup +} to O{sup 6+}, from Ar{sup 8+} to Ar{sup 13+}, and from Kr{sup 13+} to Kr{sup 20+}.

  12. Radium bearing waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tope, W.G.; Nixon, D.A.; Smith, M.L.; Stone, T.J.; Vogel, R.A.; Schofield, W.D.

    1995-01-01

    Fernald radium bearing ore residue waste, stored within Silos 1 and 2 (K-65) and Silo 3, will be vitrified for disposal at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). A comprehensive, parametric evaluation of waste form, packaging, and transportation alternatives was completed to identify the most cost-effective approach. The impacts of waste loading, waste form, regulatory requirements, NTS waste acceptance criteria, as-low-as-reasonably-achievable principles, and material handling costs were factored into the recommended approach

  13. Denver radium site's - Case history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topolski, T.T.

    1985-01-01

    In developing this case history of the Denver radium sites, an attempt is made to establish the Colorado carnotite connection from the point of discovery to early development and its eventual role in the inception of the National Radium Institute and Denver's radium legacy. Early exploitive mining activities and the exportation of the highest grades of uranium ore to Europe greatly disturbed key officials at the U.S. Bureau of Mines. With its proximity to known carnotite deposits and industrial capacity, Denver's destiny as one of America's early radium production centers became a reality by 1914. With African pitchblend discoveries, Belgium competition spelled the beginning of the end of Denver's romance with radium by 1920. The sites where Denver made or used its radium were lost in obscurity for 60 years and rediscovered in 1979. Thirty one sites and a characterization of their radioactive impact are now a part of the Superfund National Priorities listing for eventual cleanup

  14. Oligosaccharide sequences in Quillaja saponins by electrospray ionization ion trap multiple-stage mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broberg, Susanna; Nord, Lars I; Kenne, Lennart

    2004-06-01

    Ten different samples with 13 previously identified saponin structures from Quillaja saponaria Molina were investigated by electrospray ionization ion trap multiple-stage mass spectrometry (ESI-ITMS(n)) in positive and negative ion modes. Both positive and negative ion mode MS(1)-MS(4) spectra were analyzed, showing that structural information on the two oligosaccharide parts in the saponin can be obtained from positive ion mode spectra whereas negative ion mode spectra mainly gave information on one of the oligosaccharide parts. Analysis of MS(1)-MS(4) spectra identified useful key fragment ions important for the structural elucidation of Quillaja saponins. A flowchart involving a stepwise procedure based on key fragments from MS(1)-MS(3) spectra was constructed for the identification of structural elements in the saponin. Peak intensity ratios in MS(3) spectra were found to be correlated with structural features of the investigated saponins and are therefore of value for the identification of terminal monosaccharide residues. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Full-scale radium-removal system for a small community. Research report, 1 October 1985-30 September 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauch, R.P.; Mangelson, K.A.

    1988-08-01

    A radium-removal treatment plant was constructed for the small community of Redhill Forest in the central mountains of Colorado. The plant consists of iron removal using oxidation, filtration, and settling; radium and hardness removal using ion exchange; and radium removal from the waste brine using Dow Chemical Company's Radium Selective Complexer (RSC). The raw water comes from deep wells and has naturally occuring radium and iron concentrations of about 30-40 pC/L and 7-10 mg/L, respectively, and is aerated before entering the main treatment plant to remove radon gas and carbon dioxide. A unique feature of the plant is the process that removes radium from the waste brine. The process removes only radium from the spent ion-exchange regeneration water by permanently complexing the radium on the RSC. The RSC is replaced when exhausted and sent to a final disposal site that is acceptable to state regulatory agencies. The overall plant reduces radium from about 35 pCi/L to less than 4 pCi/L. The RSC system has consistently removed over 99% of the radium from the spent ion exchange regenerant. The average inflow radium concentration to the RSC was about 1180 pCi/L, and the average effluent was about 9 pCi/L

  16. Nano-Objects and Ions in Liquid Crystals: Ion Trapping Effect and Related Phenomena

    OpenAIRE

    Yuriy Garbovskiy; Iryna Glushchenko

    2015-01-01

    The presence of ions in liquid crystals is one of the grand challenges that hinder the application of liquid crystals in various devices, which include advanced 3-D and flexible displays, tunable lenses, etc. Not only do they compromise the overall performance of liquid crystal devices, ions are also responsible for slow response, image sticking, and image flickering, as well as many other negative effects. Even highly purified liquid crystal materials can get contaminated during the manufact...

  17. Simulation of ion behavior in an open three-dimensional Paul trap using a power series method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbane, Mustapha Said, E-mail: mherbane@hotmail.com [King Khalid University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 9004, Abha (Saudi Arabia); Berriche, Hamid [King Khalid University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 9004, Abha (Saudi Arabia); Laboratoire des Interfaces et Matériaux Avancés, Physics Department, College of Science, University of Monastir, 5019 Monastir (Tunisia); Abd El-hady, Alaa [King Khalid University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 9004, Abha (Saudi Arabia); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Zagazig University, Zagazig 44519 (Egypt); Al Shahrani, Ghadah [King Khalid University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 9004, Abha (Saudi Arabia); Ban, Gilles; Fléchard, Xavier; Liénard, Etienne [LPC CAEN-ENSICAEN, 6 Boulevard du Marechal Juin, 14050 Caen Cedex (France)

    2014-07-01

    Simulations of the dynamics of ions trapped in a Paul trap with terms in the potential up to the order 10 have been carried out. The power series method is used to solve numerically the equations of motion of the ions. The stability diagram has been studied and the buffer gas cooling has been implemented by a Monte Carlo method. The dipole excitation was also included. The method has been applied to an existing trap and it has shown good agreement with the experimental results and previous simulations using other methods. - Highlights: • Paul trap with potentials up to the order 10. • Series solution of the ions equations of motion. • Hard sphere model for the simulation of the buffer gas cooling and simulation of the dipolar excitation.

  18. Investigation of nonextensivity trapped electrons effect on the solitary ion-acoustic wave using fractional Schamel equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazari-Golshan, A., E-mail: nazarigolshan@yahoo.com [Physics Department, Shahed University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    Ion-acoustic (IA) solitary wave propagation is investigated by solving the fractional Schamel equation (FSE) in a homogenous system of unmagnetized plasma. This plasma consists of the nonextensive trapped electrons and cold fluid ions. The effects of the nonextensive q-parameter, electron trapping, and fractional parameter have been studied. The FSE is derived by using the semi-inverse and Agrawal's methods. The analytical results show that an increase in the amount of electron trapping and nonextensive q-parameter increases the soliton ion-acoustic amplitude in agreement with the previously obtained results. However, it is vice-versa for the fractional parameter. This feature leads to the fact that the fractional parameter may be used to increase the IA soliton amplitude instead of increasing electron trapping and nonextensive parameters.

  19. The environmental behaviour of radium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheppard, M.I.

    1980-09-01

    Radium-226 and its daughter, radon-222, an inert gas, are important members of the uranium decay series as far as human exposure is concerned. Radon diffuses from rocks, soil and water into the atmosphere, and its daughter products polonium-218 and polonium-214 can be retained in the lungs. Radium and radon are contained in emissions from fossil fuel plants, fertilizers, natural gas, building materials and uranium ore. To assess the impact of man's use, intentional or not, of radium and its daughters, we must know their physical, chemical and biological behaviour. This report examines the literature pertinent to the natural levels of radium found in rock, soil, water and plants. Information concerning radium is integrated from several disciplines. The radiological properties and chemistry of radium, and radium-soil interactions are discussed as well as the soil distribution coefficient and the mode of soil transport of radium. Plant transfer coefficients for radium and methods of analysis and measurement are given. A list of topics requiring further research concludes the report. (auth)

  20. Theoretical study of the mode of the mass-selective nonstable axial output ions from the nonlinear trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudakov, M.Yu.

    2000-01-01

    One studied theoretically the mode of mass-selective unstable output of ions from three-dimensional quadrupole ion trap. One developed a method represent coordinates of ions per one period of supplying HF voltage with regard to nonlinear distortions of quadrupole potential. One derived equation for an envelope of ion oscillations in the form of motion equation of mass point in the efficient force field. One explained the effect of output delay of ions at presence of the field negative even harmonics. One proved that the positive even distortions of quadrupole potential favored realization of that mode and studied the dynamics of ions in the course of output [ru

  1. Foetal Fentanyl Exposure and Ion Trapping after Intravenous and Transdermal Administration to the Ewe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkinen, Emma M; Kokki, Hannu; Heikkinen, Aki; Ranta, Veli-Pekka; Räsänen, Juha; Voipio, Hanna-Marja; Kokki, Merja

    2017-02-01

    Opioids given to pregnant and parturient women are relatively freely transferred across the placenta. Spinal, epidural and intravenous fentanyl has been studied in pregnant women and neonates, but foetal safety of fentanyl dosing with transdermal patch during pregnancy and labour is not sufficiently studied. Foetal pH is physiologically lower than maternal pH, and thus, opioids, which are weak bases, are ionized and may cumulate to foetus. Foetal asphyxia may further worsen acidosis, and ion trapping induced by low pH is assumed to increase the foetal exposure to opioids. Here, we show that no correlation between foetal acidosis and ion trapping of fentanyl could be found. In three experiments, 29 pregnant sheep were administered fentanyl with 2 μg/kg/h patch supplemented with IV boluses/infusion. Foetal exposure to fentanyl was extensive, median 0.34 ng/ml (quartiles 0.21, 0.42), yet drug accumulation to foetus was not observed, and median of foetal/maternal concentration (F/M) ratio was 0.63 (0.43, 0.75) during the first hours after the fentanyl administration. Low foetal pH and pH difference between ewe and the foetus did not correlate with fentanyl concentration in the foetus or F/M ratio. At steady-state during the second patch worn, foetal plasma fentanyl was low, 0.13 ng/ml, and the median of F/M ratio was 0.69. Our results demonstrate that drug accumulation to foetus caused by ion trapping seen with some weak base opioids may not be that significant with fentanyl. These results have a clinical relevance when fentanyl is dosed to pregnant woman and the foetus is acidemic. © 2016 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  2. An efficient single-step scheme for manipulating quantum information of two trapped ions beyond the Lamb-Dicke limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, L.F.; Nori, Franco

    2003-01-01

    Based on the exact conditional quantum dynamics for a two-ion system, we propose an efficient single-step scheme for coherently manipulating quantum information of two trapped cold ions by using a pair of synchronous laser pulses. Neither the auxiliary atomic level nor the Lamb-Dicke approximation are needed

  3. Single-Qubit-Gate Error below 0.0001 in a Trapped Ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    nuclear spins in liquid-state nuclear-magnetic resonance experiments [6] and with neutral atoms confined in optical lattices [7]; here we demonstrate...Single trapped ion 2.0(2)×10−5 Reference [6] (2009) Nuclear magnetic resonance 1.3(1)×10−4 Reference [7] (2010) Atoms in an optical lattice 1.4(1)×10...determined by comparing the qubit frequency measured in a Ramsey experiment with that of a Rabi experiment. Such back-to-back comparisons yielded values

  4. Experiments Towards Mitigation of Motional Heating in Trapped Ion Quantum Information Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-27

    books and music recommendations. Maybe I’ll try watching The Wire now that I’ll have a bit of spare time. I cannot thank Robert McConnell enough for...are briefly highlighted. Section 3.1 explains why RF fields are nececary for trapping ions, and Section 3.2 provides a mathematical description of how...of motion: a high-amplitude, low-frequency ’secular’ motion and high-frequency, low-amplitude micromotion. Though thorough mathematical descriptions

  5. Using Metal Complex Ion-Molecule Reactions in a Miniature Rectilinear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer to Detect Chemical Warfare Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graichen, Adam M.; Vachet, Richard W.

    2013-06-01

    The gas-phase reactions of a series of coordinatively unsaturated [Ni(L)n]y+ complexes, where L is a nitrogen-containing ligand, with chemical warfare agent (CWA) simulants in a miniature rectilinear ion trap mass spectrometer were investigated as part of a new approach to detect CWAs. Results show that upon entering the vacuum system via a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) membrane introduction, low concentrations of several CWA simulants, including dipropyl sulfide (simulant for mustard gas), acetonitrile (simulant for the nerve agent tabun), and diethyl phosphite (simulant for nerve agents sarin, soman, tabun, and VX), can react with metal complex ions generated by electrospray ionization (ESI), thereby providing a sensitive means of detecting these compounds. The [Ni(L)n]2+ complexes are found to be particularly reactive with the simulants of mustard gas and tabun, allowing their detection at low parts-per-billion (ppb) levels. These detection limits are well below reported exposure limits for these CWAs, which indicates the applicability of this new approach, and are about two orders of magnitude lower than electron ionization detection limits on the same mass spectrometer. The use of coordinatively unsaturated metal complexes as reagent ions offers the possibility of further tuning the ion-molecule chemistry so that desired compounds can be detected selectively or at even lower concentrations.

  6. Ion trap measurement of U64+ x-ray transition spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Grande, N.K.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Henderson, J.R.; Osterheld, A.L.; Scofield, J.H.; Swenson, J.K.

    1990-09-01

    Highly-charged uranium ions with a dominant nickel-like component (U 64+ ) were produced using the Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) with an electron bombardment energy of 7.4 keV. A comparison of the measured n=4 to n=3 x-ray transition spectra with calculations for U 64+ gave excellent qualitative agreement. The low-energy region of the 4-3 spectrum for the Ni-like ions was characterized by a strong electric quadrupole 4s-3d transition, about as large as the leading dipole 4f-3d transition, which tagged the abundance of U 64+ ions. High resolution spectroscopy was used to measure 4f-3d transition energies for ten charge states: U 60+ -U 69+ excited by 6.4-8.9 keV electrons. The ionization balance for 8.9 keV electron excitation was mostly from five charge states: U 64+ -U 68+ in qualitative agreement with a separate analysis of extracted ions. 16 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  7. The non-linear ion trap. Part 5. Nature of non-linear resonances and resonant ion ejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzen, J.

    1994-01-01

    The superposition of higher order multipole fields on the basic quadrupole field in ion traps generates a non-harmonic oscillator system for the ions. Fourier analyses of simulated secular oscillations in non-linear ion traps, therefore, not only reveal the sideband frequencies, well-known from the Mathieu theory, but additionally a commonwealth of multipole-specific overtones (or higher harmonics), and corresponding sidebands of overtones. Non-linear resonances occur when the overtone frequencies match sideband frequencies. It can be shown that in each of the resonance conditions, not just one overtone matches one sideband, instead, groups of overtones match groups of sidebands. The generation of overtones is studied by Fourier analysis of computed ion oscillations in the direction of thez axis. Even multipoles (octopole, dodecapole, etc.) generate only odd orders of higher harmonics (3, 5, etc.) of the secular frequency, explainable by the symmetry with regard to the planez = 0. In contrast, odd multipoles (hexapole, decapole, etc.) generate all orders of higher harmonics. For all multipoles, the lowest higher harmonics are found to be strongest. With multipoles of higher orders, the strength of the overtones decreases weaker with the order of the harmonics. Forz direction resonances in stationary trapping fields, the function governing the amplitude growth is investigated by computer simulations. The ejection in thez direction, as a function of timet, follows, at least in good approximation, the equation wheren is the order of multipole, andC is a constant. This equation is strictly valid for the electrically applied dipole field (n = 1), matching the secular frequency or one of its sidebands, resulting in a linear increase of the amplitude. It is valid also for the basic quadrupole field (n = 2) outside the stability area, giving an exponential increase. It is at least approximately valid for the non-linear resonances by weak superpositions of all higher odd

  8. Ion suppression in the determination of clenbuterol in urine by solid-phase extraction atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation ion-trap mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hout, M.W.J.; Niederlander, H.A G; de Zeeuw, R.A.; de Jong, G.J.

    2003-01-01

    Ion suppression effects were observed during the determination of clenbuterol in urine with solid-phase extraction/multiple-stage ion-trap mass spectrometry (SPE/MS3), despite the use of atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation. During SPE, a polymeric stationary phase (polydivinylbenzene) was

  9. Evaluating various adsorbents and membranes for removing radium from ground water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clifford, D.; Vijjeswarapu, W.; Subramonian, S.

    1988-01-01

    Field studies were conducted in Lemont, IL to evaluate specific adsorbents and reverse osmosis (RO) membranes for removing radium from ground water. A radium-selective complexer and barium-sulfate-loaded alumina appeared to have the best potential for low-cost adsorption of radium from raw water or ion-exchange brines, provided that the problem of the ultimate disposal of spent media can be solved. A new, low-pressure (70-psig) RO module achieved radium and total dissolved solids (TDS) rejections of 91 and 87%, respectively. Central treatment with standard or low-pressure RO modules would be effective for radium removal but would be expensive and unnecessary if TDS reduction is not also required. Point-of-use treatment using RO is effective for removing radium and may be cost-effective for very small communities

  10. Electron shakeoff following the β+ decay of +19Ne and +35Ar trapped ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian, X.; Fléchard, X.; Pons, B.; Liénard, E.; Ban, G.; Breitenfeldt, M.; Couratin, C.; Delahaye, P.; Durand, D.; Finlay, P.; Guillon, B.; Lemière, Y.; Mauger, F.; Méry, A.; Naviliat-Cuncic, O.; Porobic, T.; Quéméner, G.; Severijns, N.; Thomas, J.-C.

    2018-02-01

    The electron shakeoff of 19F and 35Cl atoms resulting from the β+ decay of +19Ne and +35Ar ions has been investigated using a Paul trap coupled to a time of flight recoil-ion spectrometer. The charge-state distributions of the recoiling daughter nuclei were compared to theoretical calculations based on the sudden approximation and accounting for subsequent Auger processes. The excellent agreement obtained for 35Cl is not reproduced in 19F. The shortcoming is attributed to the inaccuracy of the independent particle model employed to calculate the primary shakeoff probabilities in systems with rather low atomic numbers. This calls for more elaborate calculations, including explicitly the electron-electron correlations.

  11. Fast and noise-resistant ion-trap quantum computation with inherent dynamical decoupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shi-Biao

    2014-02-01

    We propose a scheme for realizing quantum logic gates between any pair of ions confined in a linear trap with a pair of laser beams tuned to the carrier. The striking feature of the scheme is that the carrier excitation accompanying the spin-motion coupling does not affect the gate dynamics. As a consequence, the gate not only is much more insensitive to motional heating but also can operate at a higher speed compared to the previous schemes. The other important advantages are that the gate speed does not need to be inversely proportional to the number of ions in the chain, and the accompanying carrier drive results in dynamical decoupling, making the gate performance robust against dephasing noises. We show that for the same error sources the gate infidelity can be decreased by about ten times compared with previous schemes.

  12. MOMA and other next-generation ion trap mass spectrometers for planetary exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arevalo, R. D., Jr.; Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Getty, S.; Mahaffy, P. R.; van Amerom, F. H. W.; Danell, R.; Pinnick, V. T.; Li, X.; Grubisic, A.; Southard, A. E.; Hovmand, L.; Cottin, H.; Makarov, A.

    2016-12-01

    Since the 1970's, quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) systems have served as low-risk, cost-efficient means to explore the inner and outer reaches of the solar system. These legacy instruments have interrogated the compositions of the lunar exosphere (LADEE), surface materials on Mars (MSL), and the atmospheres of Venus (Pioneer Venus), Mars (MAVEN) and outer planets (Galileo and Cassini-Huygens). However, the in situ detection of organic compounds on Mars and Titan, coupled with ground-based measurements of amino acids in meteorites and a variety of organics in comets, has underlined the importance of molecular disambiguation in the characterization of high-priority planetary environments. The Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) flight instrument, centered on a linear ion trap, enables the in situ detection of volatile and non-volatile organics, but also the characterization of molecular structures through SWIFT ion isolation/excitation and tandem mass spectrometry (MSn). Like the SAM instrument on MSL, the MOMA investigation also includes a gas chromatograph (GC), thereby enabling the chemical separation of potential isobaric interferences based on retention times. The Linear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer (LITMS; PI: William Brinckerhoff), developed to TRL 6 via the ROSES MatISSE Program, augments the core MOMA design and adds: expanded mass range (from 20 - 2000 Da); high-temperature evolved gas analysis (up to 1300°C); and, dual polarity detector assemblies (supporting the measurement of negative ions). The LITMS instrument will be tested in the field in 2017 through the Atacama Rover Astrobiology Drilling Studies (ARADS; PI: Brian Glass) ROSES PSTAR award. Following on these advancements, the Advanced Resolution Organic Molecule Analyzer (AROMA; PI: Ricardo Arevalo Jr.), supported through the ROSES PICASSO Program, combines a highly capable MOMA/LITMS-like linear ion trap and the ultrahigh resolution CosmOrbitrap mass analyzer developed by a consortium of five

  13. Chiral spin currents in a trapped-ion quantum simulator using Floquet engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graß, Tobias; Celi, Alessio; Pagano, Guido; Lewenstein, Maciej

    2018-01-01

    The most typical ingredient of topologically protected quantum states is magnetic fluxes. In a system of spins, complex-valued interaction parameters give rise to a flux, if their phases do not add up to zero along a closed loop. Here we apply periodic driving, a powerful tool for quantum engineering, to a trapped-ion quantum simulator in order to generate such spin-spin interactions. We consider a simple driving scheme, consisting of a repeated series of locally quenched fields, and demonstrate the feasibility of this approach by studying the dynamics of a small system. An emblematic hallmark of the flux, accessible in experiments, is the appearance of chiral spin currents. Strikingly, we find that in parameter regimes where, in the absence of fluxes, phonon excitations dramatically reduce the fidelity of the spin model simulation, the spin dynamics remains widely unaffected by the phonons when fluxes are present. Our work provides a realistic experimental recipe to engineer the minimal building block of a topological quantum system with a currently existing ion trap apparatus.

  14. The effect of high energy ion beam analysis on D trapping in W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay, T. J.; Davis, J. W.; Schwarz-Selinger, T.; Haasz, A. A.

    2017-12-01

    High energy ion beam analyses (IBA) are invaluable for measuring concentration depth profiles of light elements in solid materials, and important in the study of fusion fuel retention in tokamaks. Polycrystalline W specimens were implanted at 300 and 500 K, 5–10 × 1023 D m‑2 fluence, with deuterium-only and simultaneous D-3%He ion beams. Selected specimens were analysed by elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) and/or nuclear reaction analysis (NRA). All specimens were measured by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). The D TDS spectra show an extra peak at 900–1000 K following ERDA and/or NRA measurements. The peak height appears to correlate with the amount of D initially trapped beyond the calculated IBA probe beam peak damage depth. Similar to pre-implantation damage scenarios, the IBA probe beam creates empty high energy traps which later retrap D atoms during TDS heating, which is supported by modelling experimental results using the Tritium Migration Analysis Program.

  15. A very large Paul trap system for in-line capture of high-energy DC radioactive ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dezfuli, A.M. Ghalambor; Moore, R.B.; Varfalvy, P.; Schwarz, S.

    2002-01-01

    A very large Paul trap (VLPTRAP) has built to test in-flight collection of DC ion beams. An iterative design process led to a Paul trap that was basically a cylindrical electrode of internal diameter 120 mm with two symmetrically placed coaxial end electrodes that approximated hyperboloids of revolution separated by 106 mm. The trap was operated at up to 20 kV pp at 1 MHz on the ring cylindrical electrode relative to the end electrodes with buffer gas pressures up to 40 mPa. Ions were delivered to the trap from a 60 keV + Cs ion gun and electrostatically decelerated to about 100 eV for entrance. After a cooling time of the order of 1 ms, the ions were extracted by biasing the end electrodes. Beam pulses of less than 1 s could be extracted, at repetition rates down to 1 Hz. An overall bunching efficiency of about 0.4% was obtained, resulting from a collection efficiency of 2% and an extraction efficiency of 20%. The trap could hold up to 10 7 ions at a temperature of 1000 K

  16. Trapping of positron in gallium arsenide: evidencing of vacancies and of ions with a negative charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierre, F.

    1989-12-01

    Vacancy type defects in Ga As as grown and irradiated by electrons are characterized by lifetime of positrons. Positron lifetime increases from 230 ps to 258 and 295 ps in presence of native vacancies in n type Ga As. Configuration of native vacancies changes when Fermi level crosses energy levels localized in the forbidden zone at 0.035eV and at 0.10eV from the bottom of the conduction band. Native vacancies are identified to arsenic vacancies with or without other point defects. Positron lifetime increases from 230 to 260 ps in presence of vacancies produced by low temperature irradiation negative ions are also produced. In irradiated Ga As, these ions trap positrons in competition with vacancies produced by irradiation, showing they have a negative charge. Two annealing zones between 180-300K and 300-600K are presented by vacancies. Ions do not anneal below ambient temperature. Vacancies and negative ions are identified respectively to gallium vacancies and gallium antisite [fr

  17. Shedding light on the mercury mass discrepancy by weighing Hg52+ ions in a Penning trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritioff, T.; Bluhme, H.; Schuch, R.; Bergstroem, I.; Bjoerkhage, M.

    2003-01-01

    In their nuclear tables Audi and Wapstra have pointed out a serious mass discrepancy between their extrapolated values for the mercury isotopes and those from a direct measurement by the Manitoba group. The values deviate by as much as 85 ppb from each other with claimed uncertainties of about 16 and 7 ppb, respectively. In order to decide which values are correct the masses of the 198 Hg and 204 Hg isotopes have been measured in the Stockholm Penning trap mass spectrometer SMILETRAP using 52+ ions. This charge state corresponds to a filled Ni electron configuration for which the electron binding energy can be accurately calculated. The mass values obtained are 197.966 768 44(43) u for 198 Hg and 203.973 494 10(39) u for 204 Hg. These values agree with those measured by the Manitoba group, with a 3 times lower uncertainty. This measurement was made possible through the implementation of a cooling technique of the highly charged mercury ions during charge breeding in the electron beam ion source used for producing the Hg 52+ ions

  18. Does the parent positive ion intervene in the fate of the incompletely relaxed trapped electron in irradiated polar liquids?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jay-Gerin, J.P.; Ferradini, C.

    1992-01-01

    A model is proposed concerning the influence of the parent positive ion on the fate of the incompletely relaxed trapped electron (e ir - ) in irradiated polar liquids. This model is based on the release, by a tunneling and (or) a trap-hopping mechanism in the Coulomb field of the cation, of the electrons captured in preexisting shallow localized states below the bottom of the conduction band of the solvent. The released electrons would either recombine with the parent positive ion or get retrapped. The net effect would be an accumulation of electrons in deeper traps. The removal of weakly trapped electrons would contribute to the decrease of the infrared part of the optical absorption spectrum during the very early time dynamics of electron solvation. Such a process would imply, as a consequence, the existence of a maximum of the e ir - absorption spectrum

  19. Rapid mass spectrometry analysis of a rectilinear ion trap by continuous secular frequency scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Xinming; Chen, Jin; Tang, Fei; Yao, Tongtong; Piao, Shiyun; Ni, Kai; Wang, Xiaohao

    2017-06-30

    Secular frequency scanning is a mass spectrometry (MS) analysis method in which the frequency of the auxiliary alternating current (AC) signal is scanned. It has low requirements for radio-frequency (RF) power, which is beneficial for the miniaturization of the mass spectrometer. In this study, the MS performance in the reverse secular frequency scanning (RSFS) mode is optimized for a rectilinear ion trap (RIT), and a method for rapid MS analysis using continuous secular frequency scanning (CSFS) is proposed. A RIT mass spectrometer with an auxiliary AC frequency scanning function was built. The resolution, tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) and quantitation capability in the RSFS mode were characterized and optimized. Operation in the CSFS mode was then performed by scanning the frequency of the auxiliary AC signal continuously and periodically while maintaining the RF signal and the front Z electrode in the ion injection state, so that the ion injection and cooling were performed at the same time as the mass analysis. With this system, the RSFS mode achieved unit mass resolution at 332 Th, and the MS/MS analysis was completed without changing the RF amplitude at q = 0.4583 for reserpine. The limit of quantitation for imatinib was about 250 ng/mL with the determination coefficient R 2  = 0.9981. In the CSFS mode, a single analysis cycle of less than 20 ms could be achieved, which is 14 times faster than the traditional sweep modes. In addition, 100% ion utilization can theoretically be achieved in the CSFS mode. The CSFS mode is different from the traditional phased sequential operation mode of an ion trap mass spectrometer. By periodic scanning of the auxiliary AC frequency while maintaining ion injection, it is possible to improve the analysis efficiency of the mass spectrometer, which has the prospect of useful application in the field of rapid MS monitoring. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Precision Tests of the Electroweak Interaction using Trapped Atoms and Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melconian, Daniel George [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2017-06-21

    The objective of the proposed research is to study fundamental aspects of the electroweak interaction via precision measurements in beta decay to test our current understanding of fundamental particles and forces as contained in the so-called "Standard Model" of particle physics. By comparing elegant experiments to rigorous theoretical predictions, we will either confirm the Standard Model to a higher degree and rule out models which seek to extend it, or find evidence of new physics and help guide theorists in developing the New Standard Model. The use of ion and neutral atom traps at radioactive ion beam facilities has opened up a new vista in precision low-energy nuclear physics experiments. Traps provide an ideal source of decaying atoms: they can be extremely cold (~1 mK); they are compact (~1 mm^3); and perhaps most importantly, the daughter particles escape with negligible distortions to their momenta in a scattering-free, open environment. The project is taking advantage of these technologies and applying them to precision beta-decay studies at radioactive beam facilities. The program consists of two complementary efforts: 1) Ion traps are an extremely versatile tool for purifying, cooling and bunching low-energy beams of short-lived nuclei. A large-bore (210~mm) superconducting 7-Tesla solenoid is at the heart of a Penning trap system for which there is a dedicated beamline at T-REX, the upgraded radioactive beam facility at the Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University. In addition to providing a general-purpose decay station, the flagship program for this system is measuring the ft-values and beta-neutrino correlation parameters from isospin T=2 superallowed beta-delayed proton decays, complimenting and expanding the already strong program in fundamental interactions at the Institute. 2) A magneto-optical trap is being used at the TRIUMF Neutral Atom Trap facility to observe the (un)polarized angular distribution parameters of isotopes of potassium. We

  1. EUV spectral lines of highly-charged Hf, Ta and Au ions observed with an electron beam ion trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draganic, Ilija N; Ralchenko, Yuri; Reader, Joseph; Gillaspy, J D; Tan, Joseph N; Pomeroy, Joshua M; Brewer, Samuel M; Osin, Dmitry

    2011-01-01

    Extreme ultraviolet spectra of highly-charged hafnium, tantalum and gold were produced with an electron beam ion trap (EBIT) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and recorded with a flat-field grazing-incidence spectrometer in the wavelength range 4-20 nm. The beam energy was varied between 1.84 and 5.15 keV to selectively enhance spectra from specific ionization stages. Identifications of strong n = 4-n = 4 transitions from Rb-like hafnium (35+) to Co-like gold (52+) were determined with the aid of collisional-radiative modelling of the EBIT plasma. Good quantitative agreement between simulated and measured spectra was achieved. Over 150 spectral lines were identified, 115 of which are new.

  2. EUV spectral lines of highly-charged Hf, Ta and Au ions observed with an electron beam ion trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draganic, Ilija N; Ralchenko, Yuri; Reader, Joseph; Gillaspy, J D; Tan, Joseph N; Pomeroy, Joshua M; Brewer, Samuel M; Osin, Dmitry, E-mail: yuri.ralchenko@nist.gov [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8422 (United States)

    2011-01-28

    Extreme ultraviolet spectra of highly-charged hafnium, tantalum and gold were produced with an electron beam ion trap (EBIT) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and recorded with a flat-field grazing-incidence spectrometer in the wavelength range 4-20 nm. The beam energy was varied between 1.84 and 5.15 keV to selectively enhance spectra from specific ionization stages. Identifications of strong n = 4-n = 4 transitions from Rb-like hafnium (35+) to Co-like gold (52+) were determined with the aid of collisional-radiative modelling of the EBIT plasma. Good quantitative agreement between simulated and measured spectra was achieved. Over 150 spectral lines were identified, 115 of which are new.

  3. Near ground state Raman sideband cooling of an ion in a hybrid radiofrequency-optical lattice trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bylinskii, Alexei; Karpa, Leon; Gangloff, Dorian; Cetina, Marko; Vuletic, Vladan

    2013-05-01

    We achieve near ground state cooling of an ion in a hybrid trap formed by a two-dimensional radio-frequency Paul trap and an optical lattice produced by a cavity in the axial dimension. We drive far-detuned lattice-assisted Raman transitions on the red vibrational sideband between the Zeeman sublevels of the 2S1/2 ground level of 174Yb+. The cooling cycle is completed by a close-detuned spontaneous Raman transition. Efficient Cooling in all three dimensions is achieved this way. Furthermore, spatially dependent AC Stark shifts induced by the lattice allow us to measure axial temperature via ion fluorescence, and we estimate the population of the lattice vibrational ground state to be above 50%. This work is an important step towards quantum information and quantum simulations with ions in hybrid traps and optical lattices. Army Research Office, National Science Foundation, National Science and Engineering Research Council of Canada, Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.

  4. Evaluation of the characteristics of a field emission cathode for use in a Mercury ion trap frequency standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christman, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    The performance is reported of a field emission array characterized for the purpose of replacing the filament in a trapped ion frequency standard. This dark electron emitter eliminates the need for the interference filter currently used in the trapped ion standard. While reducing the filament's unwanted light, this filter causes a significant reduction in the signal. The magnetic field associated with the filament is also eliminated, thus potentially improving the present stability of the trapped ion standard. The operation of the filament in the present system is described, as well as the associated concerns. The cathode considered for the filament's replacement is then described along with the experimental system. Experimental results, observations, and conclusions are presented.

  5. Generation of high charge state metal ion beams by electron cyclotron resonance heating of vacuum arc plasma in cusp trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaev, A G; Savkin, K P; Oks, E M; Vizir, A V; Yushkov, G Yu; Vodopyanov, A V; Izotov, I V; Mansfeld, D A

    2012-02-01

    A method for generating high charge state heavy metal ion beams based on high power microwave heating of vacuum arc plasma confined in a magnetic trap under electron cyclotron resonance conditions has been developed. A feature of the work described here is the use of a cusp magnetic field with inherent "minimum-B" structure as the confinement geometry, as opposed to a simple mirror device as we have reported on previously. The cusp configuration has been successfully used for microwave heating of gas discharge plasma and extraction from the plasma of highly charged, high current, gaseous ion beams. Now we use the trap for heavy metal ion beam generation. Two different approaches were used for injecting the vacuum arc metal plasma into the trap--axial injection from a miniature arc source located on-axis near the microwave window, and radial injection from sources mounted radially at the midplane of the trap. Here, we describe preliminary results of heating vacuum arc plasma in a cusp magnetic trap by pulsed (400 μs) high power (up to 100 kW) microwave radiation at 37.5 GHz for the generation of highly charged heavy metal ion beams.

  6. Differential fragmentation patterns of pectin oligogalacturonides observed by nanoelectrospray quadrupole ion-trap mass spectrometry using automated spectra interpretation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mutenda, Kudzai E; Matthiesen, Rune; Roepstorff, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Oligogalacturonides of different degrees of polymerization (DP) and methyl esterification (DE) were structurally analyzed by nanoESI quadrupole ion-trap mass spectrometry. The fragmentation patterns of the oligogalacturonides were compared using the program 'Virtual Expert Mass Spectrometrist...... oligogalacturonides, cross-ring fragmentation gives more structural information than glycosidic bond cleavage. One implication of this is that more structural information is obtained when analyzing methyl-esterified oligogalacturonides than non-methyl-esterified ones in an ion-trap instrument. This is of particular...

  7. Strong coupling between a single nitrogen-vacancy spin and the rotational mode of diamonds levitating in an ion trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delord, T.; Nicolas, L.; Chassagneux, Y.; Hétet, G.

    2017-12-01

    A scheme for strong coupling between a single atomic spin and the rotational mode of levitating nanoparticles is proposed. The idea is based on spin readout of nitrogen-vacancy centers embedded in aspherical nanodiamonds levitating in an ion trap. We show that the asymmetry of the diamond induces a rotational confinement in the ion trap. Using a weak homogeneous magnetic field and a strong microwave driving we then demonstrate that the spin of the nitrogen-vacancy center can be strongly coupled to the rotational mode of the diamond.

  8. Vibronic Rabi resonances in harmonic and hard-wall ion traps for arbitrary laser intensity and detuning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lizuain, I.; Muga, J. G.

    2007-01-01

    We investigate laser-driven vibronic transitions of a single two-level atomic ion in harmonic and hard-wall traps. In the Lamb-Dicke regime, for tuned or detuned lasers with respect to the internal frequency of the ion, and weak or strong laser intensities, the vibronic transitions occur at well-isolated Rabi resonances, where the detuning-adapted Rabi frequency coincides with the transition frequency between vibrational modes. These vibronic resonances are characterized as avoided crossings of the dressed levels (eigenvalues of the full Hamiltonian). Their peculiarities due to symmetry constraints and trapping potential are also examined

  9. Nanomechanical investigation of ion implanted single crystals - Challenges, possibilities and pitfall traps related to nanoindentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurpaska, Lukasz

    2017-10-01

    Nanoindentation technique have developed considerably over last thirty years. Nowadays, commercially available systems offer very precise measurement in nano- and microscale, environmental noise cancelling (or at least noise suppressing), in situ high temperature indentation in controlled atmosphere and vacuum conditions and different additional options, among them dedicated indentation is one of the most popular. Due to its high precision, and ability to measure mechanical properties from very small depths (tens of nm), this technique become quite popular in the nuclear society. It is known that ion implantation (to some extent) can simulate the influence of neutron flux. However, depth of the material damage is very limited resulting in creation of thin layer of modified material over unmodified bulk. Therefore, only very precise technique, offering possibility to control depth of the measurement can be used to study functional properties of the material. For this reason, nanoindentation technique seems to be a perfect tool to investigate mechanical properties of ion implanted specimens. However, conducting correct nanomechanical experiment and extracting valuable mechanical parameters is not an easy task. In this paper a discussion about the nanoindentation tests performed on ion irradiated YSZ single crystal is presented. The goal of this paper is to discuss possible traps when studying mechanical properties of such materials and thin coatings.

  10. X-Ray Measurements Using a Microcalorimeter on an Electron Beam Ion Trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, E.; Brickhouse, N. S.; Chen, G. X.; Kirby, K.; Gillaspy, J. D.; Tan, J. N.; Pomeroy, J. M.; Laming, J. M.

    2007-01-01

    The X-ray telescopes and spectrometers flown on Chandra and XMM-Newton are returning exciting new data from a wide variety of cosmic sources such as stellar coronae, supernova remnants, galaxies, clusters of galaxies, active galactic nuclei and X-ray binaries. To achieve the best scientific interpretation of the data from these and future spectroscopic missions and related ground-based observations, theoretical calculations and plasma models must be verified or modified by the results obtained from measurements in the laboratory. Such measurements are the focus of several laboratory astrophysics programs that use an electron beam ion trap (EBIT) to simulate astrophysical plasma conditions. Here we describe our recent spectroscopic measurements of neon-like iron and nickel using a microcalorimeter on the EBIT at the National Institute of Standards (NIST). We obtain values for the intensity ratios of the well-known lines emitted by these ions and compare the results with new large scale electron-ion scattering calculations. Additional details about our laboratory astrophysics work can be found in some earlier papers

  11. Electron and recoil ion momentum imaging with a magneto-optically trapped target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubele, R.; Schuricke, M.; Goullon, J.; Lindenblatt, H.; Ferreira, N.; Laforge, A.; Brühl, E.; Globig, D.; Misra, D.; Sell, M.; Song, Z.; Wang, X.; Zhang, S. [Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Jesus, V. L. B. de [Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia do Rio de Janeiro (IFRJ), Rua Lucio Tavares 1045, 26530-060 Nilópolis, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Kelkar, A.; Schneider, K. [Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Extreme Matter Institute EMMI, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Schulz, M. [Physics Department and LAMOR, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, Missouri 65409 (United States); Fischer, D., E-mail: fischerda@mst.edu [Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Physics Department and LAMOR, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, Missouri 65409 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    A reaction microscope (ReMi) has been combined with a magneto-optical trap (MOT) for the kinematically complete investigation of atomic break-up processes. With the novel MOTReMi apparatus, the momentum vectors of the fragments of laser-cooled and state-prepared lithium atoms are measured in coincidence and over the full solid angle. The first successful implementation of a MOTReMi could be realized due to an optimized design of the present setup, a nonstandard operation of the MOT, and by employing a switching cycle with alternating measuring and trapping periods. The very low target temperature in the MOT (∼2 mK) allows for an excellent momentum resolution. Optical preparation of the target atoms in the excited Li 2{sup 2}P{sub 3/2} state was demonstrated providing an atomic polarization of close to 100%. While first experimental results were reported earlier, in this work, we focus on the technical description of the setup and its performance in commissioning experiments involving target ionization in 266 nm laser pulses and in collisions with projectile ions.

  12. Hybrid (Vlasov-Fluid) simulation of ion-acoustic solitons chain formation including trapped electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behjat, E.; Aminmansoor, F.; Abbasi, H. [Faculty of Energy Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, P. O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    Disintegration of a Gaussian profile into ion-acoustic solitons in the presence of trapped electrons [H. Hakimi Pajouh and H. Abbasi, Phys. Plasmas 15, 082105 (2008)] is revisited. Through a hybrid (Vlasov-Fluid) model, the restrictions associated with the simple modified Korteweg de-Vries (mKdV) model are studied. For instance, the lack of vital information in the phase space associated with the evolution of electron velocity distribution, the perturbative nature of mKdV model which limits it to the weak nonlinear cases, and the special spatio-temporal scaling based on which the mKdV is derived. Remarkable differences between the results of the two models lead us to conclude that the mKdV model can only monitor the general aspects of the dynamics, and the precise picture including the correct spatio-temporal scales and the properties of solitons should be studied within the framework of hybrid model.

  13. Quantum Optics Including Noise Reduction, Trapped Ions, Quantum Trajectories, and Decoherence

    CERN Document Server

    Orszag, Miguel

    2008-01-01

    Quantum Optics gives a very broad coverage of basic laser-related phenomena that allow scientist and engineers to carry out research in quantum optics and laser physics. It covers quantization of the electromagnetic field, quantum theory of coherence, atom-field interaction models, resonance fluorescence, quantum theory of damping, laser theory using both the master equation and the Langevin theory, the correlated emission laser, input-output theory with applications to non-linear optics, quantum trajectories, quantum non-demolition measurements and generation of non-classical vibrational states of ions in a Paul trap. In this second edition, there is an enlarged chapter on decoherence, as well as additional material dealing with elements of quantum computation, entanglement of pure and mixed states as well as a chapter on quantum copying and processors. These topics are presented in a unified and didactic manner. The presentation of the book is clear and pedagogical; it balances the theoretical aspect of qua...

  14. An effective method for trapping ion beams in superfluid helium for laser spectroscopy experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang X.F

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A novel laser spectroscopy technique -“OROCHI” (Optical Radioisotopes Observation in Condensed Helium as Ion-catcher has been proposed. This method aimed to investigate the structure of exotic nuclei systematically by measuring nuclear spins and moments. For in-situ laser spectroscopy of atoms in He II, a method to trap atoms precisely at the observation region of laser is highly needed. In this work, a setup composed of a degrader, two plastic scintillators and a photon detection system is further tested and verified for adjusting and checking the stopping position of 84–87Rb beam. Details of the current setup, experimental results using this method are presented.

  15. Studies of space charge effects on operating electron beam ion trap at low electron beam energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Xuelong; Fei, Zejie; Xiao, Jun; Lu, Di; Hutton, Roger [The Key Lab of Applied Ion Beam Physics, Ministry of Education (China); Shanghai EBIT Laboratory, Modern Physics Institute, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Zou, Yaming, E-mail: zouym@fudan.edu.cn [The Key Lab of Applied Ion Beam Physics, Ministry of Education (China); Shanghai EBIT Laboratory, Modern Physics Institute, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)

    2013-08-21

    An electron beam ion trap (EBIT) is a powerful machine for disentangling studies of atomic processes in plasmas. To assist studies on edge plasma spectroscopic diagnostics, a very low energy EBIT, SH-PermEBIT, has been set up at the Shanghai EBIT lab. Large amounts of simulation works were done to study the factors which hinder the EBIT from operation at very low electron beam energies. Under the guide line of the simulation results, we finally managed to successfully reach 60 eV for the lower end of the electron beam energy with a beam transmission above 57%. In this presentation, simulation studies of the space charge effect, which is one of the most important causes of beam loss, was made based on Tricomp (Field precision)

  16. Experimental Verification of a Jarzynski-Related Information-Theoretic Equality by a Single Trapped Ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, T. P.; Yan, L. L.; Zhou, F.; Rehan, K.; Liang, D. F.; Chen, L.; Yang, W. L.; Ma, Z. H.; Feng, M.; Vedral, V.

    2018-01-01

    Most nonequilibrium processes in thermodynamics are quantified only by inequalities; however, the Jarzynski relation presents a remarkably simple and general equality relating nonequilibrium quantities with the equilibrium free energy, and this equality holds in both the classical and quantum regimes. We report a single-spin test and confirmation of the Jarzynski relation in the quantum regime using a single ultracold Ca40 + ion trapped in a harmonic potential, based on a general information-theoretic equality for a temporal evolution of the system sandwiched between two projective measurements. By considering both initially pure and mixed states, respectively, we verify, in an exact and fundamental fashion, the nonequilibrium quantum thermodynamics relevant to the mutual information and Jarzynski equality.

  17. Charge state dependent fragmentation of gaseous [alpha]-synuclein cations via ion trap and beam-type collisional activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanthamontri, Chamnongsak; Liu, Jian; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2009-06-01

    Ions derived from nano-electrospray ionization (nano-ESI) of [alpha]-synuclein, a 14.5 kDa, 140 amino acid residue protein that is a major component of the Lewy bodies associated with Parkinson's disease, have been subjected to ion trap and beam-type collisional activation. The former samples products from fragmentation at rates generally lower than 100 s-1 whereas the latter samples products from fragmentation at rates generally greater than 103 s-1. A wide range of protein charge states spanning from as high as [M+17H]17+ to as low as [M+4H]4+ have been formed either directly from nano-ESI or via ion/ion proton transfer reactions involving the initially formed protein cations and have been subjected to both forms of collision-induced dissociation (CID). The extent of sequence information (i.e., number of distinct amide bond cleavages) available from either CID method was found to be highly sensitive to protein precursor ion charge state. Furthermore, the relative contributions of the various competing dissociation channels were also dependent upon precursor ion charge state. The qualitative trends in the changes in extent of amide bond cleavages and identities of bonds cleaved with precursor ion charge state were similar for two forms of CID. However, for every charge state examined, roughly twice the primary sequence information resulted from beam-type CID relative to ion trap CID. For example, evidence for cleavage of 86% of the protein amide bonds was observed for the [M+9H]9+ precursor ion using beam-type CID whereas 41% of the bonds were cleaved for the same precursor ion using ion trap CID. The higher energies required to drive fragmentation reactions at rates necessary to observe products in the beam experiment access more of the structurally informative fragmentation channels, which has important implications for whole protein tandem mass spectrometry.

  18. On resonant destabilization of toroidal Alfven eigenmodes by circulating and trapped energetic ions/alpha particles in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biglari, H.; Zonca, F.; Chen, L.

    1991-10-01

    Toroidal Alfven eigenmodes are shown to be resonantly destabilized by both circulating and trapped energetic ions/alpha particles. In particular, the energetic circulating ions are shown to resonate with the mode not only at the Alfven speed ({upsilon}{sub A}), but also one-third of this speed, while resonances exist between trapped energetic ions and the wave when {upsilon} = {upsilon}{sub A}/21{epsilon}{sup {1/2}} (l=integer, {epsilon}=r/R is the local inverse aspect ratio), although the instability becomes weaker for resonances other than the fundamental. The oft-quoted criterion that instability requires super-Alfvenic ion velocities is thus sufficient but not necessary. 14 refs.

  19. Studies of the Trapped Particle and Ion Temperature Gradient Instabilities in the Columbia Linear Machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathey, Olivier Henry

    In the first part of the work, the effects of weak Coulomb and neutral collisions on the collisionless curvature driven trapped particle mode are studied in the Columbia Linear Machine (CLM) (Phys. Rev. Lett. 57, 1729, (1986)). Low Coulomb collisionality yields a small stabilizing correction to the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) collisionless mode, which scales as nu_ {rm e} using the Krook model, and nu_{rm ec}^ {1/2} using a Lorentz pitch angle operator. In higher collisionality regimes, both models tend to yield similar scalings. In view of relative high neutral collisionality in CLM, both types of collisionality are then combined, modeling neutral collisions with the conserving Krook and Coulomb collisions with a Lorentz model. The dispersion relation is then integrated over velocity space. This combination yields results in very good accord with the available experimental data. The Ion Temperature Gradient Instability is then investigated. It is shown that anisotropy in gradient has a substantial effect on the ion temperature gradient driven mode. A gradient in the parallel temperature is needed for an instability to occur, and a gradient in the perpendicular temperature gradient further enhances the instability indirectly as long as the frequency of the mode is near ion resonance. The physical reason for this important role difference is presented. The Columbia Linear Machine is being redesigned to produce and identify the ion temperature gradient driven eta_ {rm i} mode. Using the expected parameters, we have developed detailed predictions of the mode characteristics in the CLM. Strong multi mode instabilities are expected. As the ion parallel and perpendicular ion temperature gradients are expected to differ significantly, we differentiate between eta_{ rm iparallel} and eta _{rm i|} and explore the physical differences between them, which leads to a scheme for stabilization of the mode. Lastly, since all gradients are significantly variable over the expected

  20. Negative electrospray, ion trap multistage mass spectrometry of synthetic fragments of the O-PS of Vibrio cholerae O : 1

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bekešová, S.; Kováčik, V.; Chmelík, Josef; Kováč, P.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 1 (2006), s. 43-49 ISSN 1469-0667 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : electrospray ionization * negative multistage ion trap mass spectra * synthetic fragments of the lipopolysaccharide of Vibrio cholerae Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 1.438, year: 2006

  1. A laser desorption-electron impact ionization ion trap mass spectrometer for real-time analysis of single atmospheric particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, E. A.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Hanna, S. J.; Robb, D. B.; Hepburn, J. H.; Blades, M. W.; Bertram, A. K.

    2009-04-01

    A novel aerosol ion trap mass spectrometer combining pulsed IR laser desorption with electron impact (EI) ionization for single particle studies is described. The strengths of this instrument include a two-step desorption and ionization process to minimize matrix effects; electron impact ionization, a universal and well-characterized ionization technique; vaporization and ionization inside the ion trap to improve sensitivity; and an ion trap mass spectrometer for MSn experiments. The instrument has been used for mass spectral identification of laboratory generated pure aerosols in the 600 nm-1.1 [mu]m geometric diameter range of a variety of aromatic and aliphatic compounds, as well as for tandem mass spectrometry studies (up to MS3) of single caffeine particles. We investigate the effect of various operational parameters on the mass spectrum and fragmentation patterns. The single particle detection limit of the instrument was found to be a 325 nm geometric diameter particle (8.7 × 107 molecules or 22 fg) for 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid. Lower single particle detection limits are predicted to be attainable by modifying the EI pulse. The use of laser desorption-electron impact (LD-EI) in an ion trap is a promising technique for determining the size and chemical composition of single aerosol particles in real time.

  2. Quantitation of isobaric phosphatidylcholine species in human plasma using a hybrid quadrupole linear ion-trap mass spectrometer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žáček, Petr; Bukowski, M.; Rosenberger, T. A.; Picklo, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 12 (2016), s. 2225-2234 ISSN 0022-2275 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : shotgun lipidomics * triple quadrupole/ion-trap * human blood plasma * phosphatidylcholines Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 4.810, year: 2016 http://www.jlr.org/content/57/12/2225.full

  3. Characterization of impurities in tylosin using dual liquid chromatography combined with ion trap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Shruti; Van Schepdael, Ann; Hoogmartens, Jos; Adams, Erwin

    2013-03-15

    Investigation of unknown impurities in a tylosin sample was performed using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Separation was performed according to the recently described LC-UV method of Ashenafi et al. (2011) [14]. This method was reported to have a good selectivity as it was able to separate the four main components of tylosin from the already known and 23 unknown impurities. However, as this method uses a mobile phase with non-volatile constituents, direct characterization of these impurities using LC/MS was not possible. The impurity fractions were therefore first collected and then desalted before sending them to the MS. Identification of the impurities in the tylosin sample was performed with a quadruple ion trap (IT) MS, with an electrospray ionization (ESI) source in the positive ion mode. The structure of the impurities was deduced by comparing their fragmentation pattern with those of the main components of tylosin. As several peaks in the LC-UV method contained multiple compounds, using this method in total 41 new impurities were (partly) characterized. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Methylene-transfer reactions of benzylium/tropylium ions with neutral toluene studied by means of ion-trap mass spectrometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zins, E. L.; Pepe, C.; Schröder, Detlef

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 145, - (2010), s. 157-169 E-ISSN 1364-5498 Grant - others: ERC (XE) HORIZOMS AdG226373 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : benzylium * electrospray ionization * infrared spectroscopy * ion trap * tropylium Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.538, year: 2010

  5. Protonated ions as systemic trapping agents for noble gases: From electronic structure to radiative association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgurel, O.; Pauzat, F.; Pilmé, J.; Ellinger, Y.; Bacchus-Montabonel, M.-C.; Mousis, O.

    2017-10-01

    The deficiencies of argon, krypton, and xenon observed in the atmosphere of Titan as well as anticipated in some comets might be related to a scenario of sequestration by H3+ in the gas phase at the early evolution of the solar nebula. The chemical process implied is a radiative association, evaluated as rather efficient in the case of H3+, especially for krypton and xenon. This mechanism of chemical trapping might not be limited to H3+ only, considering that the protonated ions produced in the destruction of H3+ by its main competitors present in the primitive nebula, i.e., H2O, CO, and N2, might also give stable complexes with the noble gases. However the effective efficiency of such processes is still to be proven. Here, the reactivity of the noble gases Ar, Kr, and Xe, with all protonated ions issued from H2O, CO, and N2, expected to be present in the nebula with reasonably high abundances, has been studied with quantum simulation method dynamics included. All of them give stable complexes and the rate coefficients of their radiative associations range from 10-16 to 10-19 cm3 s-1, which is reasonable for such reactions and has to be compared to the rates of 10-16 to 10-18 cm3 s-1, obtained with H3+. We can consider this process as universal for all protonated ions which, if present in the primitive nebula as astrophysical models predict, should act as sequestration agents for all three noble gases with increasing efficiency from Ar to Xe.

  6. Profiling of lipid species by normal-phase liquid chromatography, nanoelectrospray ionization, and ion trap-orbitrap mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sokol, Elena; Almeida, Reinaldo; Hannibal-Bach, Hans Kristian

    2013-01-01

    chromatography-Fourier transform mass spectrometry (LC-FTMS) and LC-ITMS(2) (ion trap tandem mass spectrometry) for profiling and structural analysis of lipid species. The workflow uses a normal-phase LC system for efficient separation of apolar and polar lipid species combined with sensitive and specific...... analysis powered by a chip-based nanoelectrospray ion source and a hybrid ion trap-orbitrap mass spectrometer. The workflow was executed using a primary LC-FTMS survey routine for identification and profiling of lipid species based on high-mass accuracy and retention time followed by a targeted LC-ITMS(2...... of low-abundant triacylglycerol and ceramide species in mouse brain cerebellum and 3T3-L1 adipocytes, respectively. The workflow described here is generic and can be extended for detailed lipid analysis of sample matrices having a wide range of lipid compositions....

  7. A (201)Hg+ Comagnetometer for (199)Hg+ Trapped Ion Space Atomic Clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Eric A.; Taghavi, Shervin; Tjoelker, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    A method has been developed for unambiguously measuring the exact magnetic field experienced by trapped mercury ions contained within an atomic clock intended for space applications. In general, atomic clocks are insensitive to external perturbations that would change the frequency at which the clocks operate. On a space platform, these perturbative effects can be much larger than they would be on the ground, especially in dealing with the magnetic field environment. The solution is to use a different isotope of mercury held within the same trap as the clock isotope. The magnetic field can be very accurately measured with a magnetic-field-sensitive atomic transition in the added isotope. Further, this measurement can be made simultaneously with normal clock operation, thereby not degrading clock performance. Instead of using a conventional magnetometer to measure ambient fields, which would necessarily be placed some distance away from the clock atoms, first order field-sensitive atomic transition frequency changes in the atoms themselves determine the variations in the magnetic field. As a result, all ambiguity over the exact field value experienced by the atoms is removed. Atoms used in atomic clocks always have an atomic transition (often referred to as the clock transition) that is sensitive to magnetic fields only in second order, and usually have one or more transitions that are first-order field sensitive. For operating parameters used in the (199)Hg(+) clock, the latter can be five orders of magnitude or more sensitive to field fluctuations than the clock transition, thereby providing an unambiguous probe of the magnetic field strength.

  8. Determination of radium in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohorst, F.A.; Huntley, M.W.; Hartenstein, S.D.

    1995-10-01

    These detailed work instructions (DWIs) are tailored for the analysis of radium-226 and radium-228 in drinking water supplies from ground water and surface water sources and composites derived from them. The instructions have been adapted from several sources, including a draft EPA method. One objective was to minimize the generation of mixed wastes. Quantitative determinations of actinium-228 are made at 911 keV. The minimum detection level (MDL) for the gamma spectrometric measurements at this energy vary with matrix, volume, geometry, detector, background, and counting statistics. The range of MDL's for current detectors is 0.07 to 0.5 Bq/sample. Quantitative determinations of radium-226 are made by counting the high energy alpha particles which radium-226 progeny emit using liquid scintillation counting (LSC). The minimum detectable activity (MDA) is 3.8 E-3 Bq/sample. The maximum concentration which may be counted on available instruments without dilution is about 2 E + 5 Bq/sample. Typically, this determination of radium in a 2 L sample has a yield of 80%. If radium-228 is determined using a 16 h count after 50 h grow-in, the typical MDL is 1 E-9 to 8 E-9 μCi/mL (1 to 8 pCi/L). If radium-226 is determined using a 2.5 h count after 150 h grow-in, the typical MDA is about 1 E-10 μCi/mL (0. 1 pCi/L)

  9. Determination of radium in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hohorst, F.A.; Huntley, M.W.; Hartenstein, S.D.

    1995-10-01

    These detailed work instructions (DWIs) are tailored for the analysis of radium-226 and radium-228 in drinking water supplies from ground water and surface water sources and composites derived from them. The instructions have been adapted from several sources, including a draft EPA method. One objective was to minimize the generation of mixed wastes. Quantitative determinations of actinium-228 are made at 911 keV. The minimum detection level (MDL) for the gamma spectrometric measurements at this energy vary with matrix, volume, geometry, detector, background, and counting statistics. The range of MDL`s for current detectors is 0.07 to 0.5 Bq/sample. Quantitative determinations of radium-226 are made by counting the high energy alpha particles which radium-226 progeny emit using liquid scintillation counting (LSC). The minimum detectable activity (MDA) is 3.8 E-3 Bq/sample. The maximum concentration which may be counted on available instruments without dilution is about 2 E + 5 Bq/sample. Typically, this determination of radium in a 2 L sample has a yield of 80%. If radium-228 is determined using a 16 h count after 50 h grow-in, the typical MDL is 1 E-9 to 8 E-9 {mu}Ci/mL (1 to 8 pCi/L). If radium-226 is determined using a 2.5 h count after 150 h grow-in, the typical MDA is about 1 E-10 {mu}Ci/mL (0. 1 pCi/L).

  10. Construction of a ferritin reactor: an efficient means for trapping various heavy metal ions in flowing seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H Q; Lin, Q M; Lou, Z B

    2000-08-01

    An apparatus consisting of two pumps, a mixer, a ferritin reactor, and a spectrophotometer was constructed to study the ability to trap various heavy metal ions (M2+) and the dynamics of a reconstituted ferritin reactor in flowing seawater. Reconstituted pig spleen ferritin (PSFr) is assembled from apo-protein shell to form a reconstituted iron core. The main components of the PSFr are its core, which contains an Fe2+:Pi stoichiometry of 6.0 +/- 0.5, reconstituted from pig spleen apoferritin (apo PSF), Fe2+, inorganic phosphate (Pi), and O2 (0.6 atm). The Fe3+-Pi clusters within the PSFr core exhibit resistance to salt ranging from 1% to 6% NaCl. The ferritin reactor consists of PSFr and an oscillating bag. Using the reactor, M2+ ions such as Cd2+, Zn2+, Co2+, and Mn2+ are directly trapped by the ferritin. We found a 1:2 +/- 0.2 stoichiometry of the trapped M2+ to the released iron as measured by chemical analysis or atomic absorption spectrometry; nontransient elements such as Na+, K+, Ca2+, etc., were scarcely trapped by the reactor. This study provides basic conditions for establishing a ferritin reactor and a convenient means for monitoring the pollution of heavy metal ions in seawater.

  11. Quercetin inhibits advanced glycation end product formation via chelating metal ions, trapping methylglyoxal, and trapping reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuiyan, Mohammad Nazrul Islam; Mitsuhashi, Shinya; Sigetomi, Kengo; Ubukata, Makoto

    2017-05-01

    Physiological concentration of Mg 2+ , Cu 2+ , and Zn 2+ accelerated AGE formation only in glucose-mediated conditions, which was effectively inhibited by chelating ligands. Only quercetin (10) inhibited MGO-mediated AGE formation as well as glucose- and ribose-mediated AGE formation among 10 polyphenols (1-10) tested. We performed an additional structure-activity relationship (SAR) study on flavanols (10, 11, 12, 13, and 14). Morin (12) and kaempherol (14) showed inhibitory activity against MGO-mediated AGE formation, whereas rutin (11) and fisetin (13) did not. These observations indicate that 3,5,7,4'-tetrahydroxy and 4-keto groups of 10 are important to yield newly revised mono-MGO adducts (16 and 17) and di-MGO adduct (18) having cyclic hemiacetals, while 3'-hydroxy group is not essential. We propose here a comprehensive inhibitory mechanism of 10 against AGE formation including chelation effect, trapping of MGO, and trapping of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which leads to oxidative degradation of 18 to 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (15) and other fragments.

  12. Observations on small anionic clusters in an electrostatic ion beam trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eritt, Markus

    2008-10-02

    The term atomic cluster relates to compounds of at least two or three atoms. Thereby the physical properties are size dependent and the property transitions between single atoms and bulk material are not always smooth. Ion traps allow it to observe internal cluster properties independent from the influence of external forces. In this work the electron induced decay of singly negatively charged atomic clusters was observed. The dissociation cross section of the clusters is dominated by detachment of the only weakly bound outer electrons. For simple atoms at low electron energies a simple scaling law can be obtained that includes only the binding energies of the valence electrons. Nevertheless for larger sizes theoretical calculations predict so called ''giant resonances'' as dominant decay process in metal clusters. Due to mass limitations in storage rings exist so far only cross section measurements for simple anions and small negative molecules. In this work the electron detachment cross sections of small negatively charged carbon (C{sub n}{sup -} n=2-12), aluminium (Al{sub n}{sup -} n=2-7) and silver clusters (Ag{sub n}{sup -} n=1-11) were measured in an electrostatic ion beam trap. The classical scaling law, including only the binding energies of the valence electrons, turned out to be not sufficient, especially for larger clusters. In order to improve the correlation between measured and predicted values it was proposed to involve the influence of the cluster volume and the specific polarisability induced by long range coulomb interaction. For silver clusters the best agreement was obtained using a combination of the projected area reduced by the polarisability. The existence of ''giant resonances'' could not be confirmed. According to theory for clusters with a broad internal energy distribution, a power-law decay close to 1/time is expected. For some clusters the lifetime behaviour would be strongly quenched by photon

  13. Chemical characterization of individual microparticles using an ion trap: real-time chemical analysis of aerosol particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Mo; Whitten, W.B.; Reilly, P.T.A.; Gieray, R.; Ramsey, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes initial experiments to perform laser ablation mass spectrometry in real time on airborne microparticles. The microparticles are sampled directly from the air by a particle inlet system into the vacuum chamber of a mass spectrometer. An incoming particle is detected as it passes through two CW laser beams and a pulsed laser is triggered to intercept the particle for laser ablation/ionization in the mass spectrometer. The initial studies were made with an existing ion trap mass spectrometer with the particle sampling occurring at the center of the trap electrodes. Performance of the inlet system, particle detection, and preliminary results are described

  14. Chemical characterization of individual microparticles using an ion trap: real-time chemical analysis of aerosol particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Mo; Whitten, W.B.; Reilly, P.T.A.; Gieray, R.; Ramsey, J.M.

    1996-10-01

    This paper describes initial experiments to perform laser ablation mass spectrometry in real time on airborne microparticles. The microparticles are sampled directly from the air by a particle inlet system into the vacuum chamber of a mass spectrometer. An incoming particle is detected as it passes through two CW laser beams and a pulsed laser is triggered to intercept the particle for laser ablation/ionization in the mass spectrometer. The initial studies were made with an existing ion trap mass spectrometer with the particle sampling occurring at the center of the trap electrodes. Performance of the inlet system, particle detection, and preliminary results are described.

  15. Determination of vanillin, ethyl vanillin, and coumarin in infant formula by liquid chromatography-quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yan; Han, Chao; Liu, Bin; Lin, Zhengfeng; Zhou, Xiujin; Wang, Chengjun; Zhu, Zhenou

    2014-02-01

    A simple, precise, accurate, and validated liquid chromatography-quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometry method was developed for the determination of vanillin, ethyl vanillin, and coumarin in infant formula samples. Following ultrasonic extraction with methanol/water (1:1, vol/vol), and clean-up on an HLB solid-phase extraction cartridge (Waters Corp., Milford, MA), samples were separated on a Waters XSelect HSS T3 column (150 × 2.1-mm i.d., 5-μm film thickness; Waters Corp.), with 0.1% formic acid solution-acetonitrile as mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.25 mL/min. Quantification of the target was performed by the internal standard approach, using isotopically labeled compounds for each chemical group, to correct matrix effects. Data acquisition was carried out in multiple reaction monitoring transitions mode, monitoring 2 multiple reaction monitoring transitions to ensure an accurate identification of target compounds in the samples. Additional identification and confirmation of target compounds were performed using the enhanced product ion modus of the linear ion trap. The novel liquid chromatography-quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometry platform offers the best sensitivity and specificity for characterization and quantitative determination of vanillin, ethyl vanillin, and coumarin in infant formula and fulfills the quality criteria for routine laboratory application. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. MSM, an Efficient Workflow for Metabolite Identification Using Hybrid Linear Ion Trap Orbitrap Mass Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Robert; Huang, Yingying; Schwartz, Jae C.; Chen, Yan; Carlson, Timothy J.; Ma, Ji

    2012-05-01

    Identification of drug metabolites can often yield important information regarding clearance mechanism, pharmacologic activity, or toxicity for drug candidate molecules. Additionally, the identification of metabolites can provide beneficial structure-activity insight to help guide lead optimization efforts towards molecules with optimal metabolic profiles. There are challenges associated with detecting and identifying metabolites in the presence of complex biological matrices, and new LC-MS technologies have been developed to meet these challenges. In this report, we describe the development of an experimental approach that applies unique features of the hybrid linear ion trap Orbitrap mass spectrometer to streamline in vitro and in vivo metabolite identification experiments. The approach, referred to as MSM, utilizes multiple collision cells, dissociation methods, mass analyzers, and detectors. With multiple scan types and different dissociation modes built into one experimental method, along with flexible post-acquisition analysis options, the MSM workflow offers an attractive option to fast and reliable identification of metabolites in different kinds of in vitro and in vivo samples. The MSM workflow was successfully applied to metabolite identification analysis of verapamil in both in vitro rat hepatocyte incubations and in vivo rat bile samples.

  17. Verifying Heisenberg's error-disturbance relation using a single trapped ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fei; Yan, Leilei; Gong, Shijie; Ma, Zhihao; He, Jiuzhou; Xiong, Taiping; Chen, Liang; Yang, Wanli; Feng, Mang; Vedral, Vlatko

    2016-10-01

    Heisenberg's uncertainty relations have played an essential role in quantum physics since its very beginning. The uncertainty relations in the modern quantum formalism have become a fundamental limitation on the joint measurements of general quantum mechanical observables, going much beyond the original discussion of the trade-off between knowing a particle's position and momentum. Recently, the uncertainty relations have generated a considerable amount of lively debate as a result of the new inequalities proposed as extensions of the original uncertainty relations. We report an experimental test of one of the new Heisenberg's uncertainty relations using a single 40 Ca + ion trapped in a harmonic potential. By performing unitary operations under carrier transitions, we verify the uncertainty relation proposed by Busch, Lahti, and Werner (BLW) based on a general error-trade-off relation for joint measurements on two compatible observables. The positive operator-valued measure, required by the compatible observables, is constructed by single-qubit operations, and the lower bound of the uncertainty, as observed, is satisfied in a state-independent manner. Our results provide the first evidence confirming the BLW-formulated uncertainty at a single-spin level and will stimulate broad interests in various fields associated with quantum mechanics.

  18. Verifying Heisenberg’s error-disturbance relation using a single trapped ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fei; Yan, Leilei; Gong, Shijie; Ma, Zhihao; He, Jiuzhou; Xiong, Taiping; Chen, Liang; Yang, Wanli; Feng, Mang; Vedral, Vlatko

    2016-01-01

    Heisenberg’s uncertainty relations have played an essential role in quantum physics since its very beginning. The uncertainty relations in the modern quantum formalism have become a fundamental limitation on the joint measurements of general quantum mechanical observables, going much beyond the original discussion of the trade-off between knowing a particle’s position and momentum. Recently, the uncertainty relations have generated a considerable amount of lively debate as a result of the new inequalities proposed as extensions of the original uncertainty relations. We report an experimental test of one of the new Heisenberg’s uncertainty relations using a single 40Ca+ ion trapped in a harmonic potential. By performing unitary operations under carrier transitions, we verify the uncertainty relation proposed by Busch, Lahti, and Werner (BLW) based on a general error–trade-off relation for joint measurements on two compatible observables. The positive operator-valued measure, required by the compatible observables, is constructed by single-qubit operations, and the lower bound of the uncertainty, as observed, is satisfied in a state-independent manner. Our results provide the first evidence confirming the BLW-formulated uncertainty at a single-spin level and will stimulate broad interests in various fields associated with quantum mechanics. PMID:28861461

  19. Determination of 48 fragrance allergens in toys using GC with ion trap MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Qing; Zhang, Qing; Li, Wentao; Li, Haiyu; Li, Pi; Ma, Qiang; Meng, Xianshuang; Qi, Meiling; Bai, Hua

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a method for the simultaneous determination of 48 fragrance allergens in four types of toys (plastic toys, play clays, plush toys, and paper toys) based on GC with ion trap MS/MS. Compared with single-stage MS, MS/MS is superior in terms of the qualification and quantification of a large range of compounds in complicated matrices. Procedures for extraction and purification were optimized for each toy type. The method proved to be linear over a wide range of concentrations for all analytes with correlation coefficients between 0.9768 and 0.9999. Validation parameters, namely, LODs and LOQs, ranged from 0.005-5.0 and from 0.02-20 mg/kg, respectively. Average recoveries of target compounds (spiked at three concentration levels) were in the range of 79.5-109.1%. Intraday and interday repeatabilities of the proposed method varied from 0.7-10.5% and from 3.1-13.4%, respectively. The proposed method was used to monitor fragrance allergens in commercial toy products. Our findings indicate that this method is an accurate and effective technique for analyzing fragrance allergens in materials composed of complex components. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Quantum optical emulation of molecular vibronic spectroscopy using a trapped-ion device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yangchao; Lu, Yao; Zhang, Kuan; Zhang, Junhua; Zhang, Shuaining; Huh, Joonsuk; Kim, Kihwan

    2018-01-28

    Molecules are one of the most demanding quantum systems to be simulated by quantum computers due to their complexity and the emergent role of quantum nature. The recent theoretical proposal of Huh et al. (Nature Photon., 9, 615 (2015)) showed that a multi-photon network with a Gaussian input state can simulate a molecular spectroscopic process. Here, we present the first quantum device that generates a molecular spectroscopic signal with the phonons in a trapped ion system, using SO 2 as an example. In order to perform reliable Gaussian sampling, we develop the essential experimental technology with phonons, which includes the phase-coherent manipulation of displacement, squeezing, and rotation operations with multiple modes in a single realization. The required quantum optical operations are implemented through Raman laser beams. The molecular spectroscopic signal is reconstructed from the collective projection measurements for the two-phonon-mode. Our experimental demonstration will pave the way to large-scale molecular quantum simulations, which are classically intractable, but would be easily verifiable by real molecular spectroscopy.

  1. Error-resistant distributed quantum computation in a trapped ion chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braungardt, Sibylle; Sen, Aditi; Sen, Ujjwal; Lewenstein, Maciej

    2007-01-01

    We consider experimentally feasible chains of trapped ions with pseudospin 1/2 and find models that can potentially be used to implement error-resistant quantum computation. Similar in spirit to classical neural networks, the error resistance of the system is achieved by encoding the qubits distributed over the whole system. We therefore call our system a quantum neural network and present a quantum neural network model of quantum computation. Qubits are encoded in a few quasi degenerated low-energy levels of the whole system, separated by a large gap from the excited states and large energy barriers between themselves. We investigate protocols for implementing a universal set of quantum logic gates in the system by adiabatic passage of a few low-lying energy levels of the whole system. Naturally appearing and potentially dangerous distributed noise in the system leaves the fidelity of the computation virtually unchanged, if it is not too strong. The computation is also naturally resilient to local perturbations of the spins

  2. Schrödinger cat and Werner state disentanglement simulated by trapped ion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittencourt, Victor A. S. V.; Bernardini, Alex E.

    2017-04-01

    Disentanglement and loss of quantum correlations due to one global collective noise effect are described for two-qubit Schrödinger cat and Werner states of a four level trapped ion quantum system. Once the Jaynes-Cummings ionic interactions are mapped onto a Dirac spinor structure, the elementary tools for computing quantum correlations of two-qubit ionic states are provided. With two-qubit quantum numbers related to the total angular momentum and to its projection onto the direction of an external magnetic field (which lifts the degeneracy of the ion’s internal levels), a complete analytical profile of entanglement for the Schrödinger cat and Werner states is obtained. Under vacuum noise (during spontaneous emission), the two-qubit entanglement in the Schrödinger cat states is shown to vanish asymptotically. Otherwise, the robustness of Werner states is concomitantly identified, with the entanglement content recovered by their noiseless-like evolution. Most importantly, our results point to a firstly reported sudden transition between classical and quantum decay regimes driven by a classical collective noise on the Schrödinger cat states, which has been quantified by the geometric discord.

  3. Sequential Modular Position and Momentum Measurements of a Trapped Ion Mechanical Oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flühmann, C.; Negnevitsky, V.; Marinelli, M.; Home, J. P.

    2018-04-01

    The noncommutativity of position and momentum observables is a hallmark feature of quantum physics. However, this incompatibility does not extend to observables that are periodic in these base variables. Such modular-variable observables have been suggested as tools for fault-tolerant quantum computing and enhanced quantum sensing. Here, we implement sequential measurements of modular variables in the oscillatory motion of a single trapped ion, using state-dependent displacements and a heralded nondestructive readout. We investigate the commutative nature of modular variable observables by demonstrating no-signaling in time between successive measurements, using a variety of input states. Employing a different periodicity, we observe signaling in time. This also requires wave-packet overlap, resulting in quantum interference that we enhance using squeezed input states. The sequential measurements allow us to extract two-time correlators for modular variables, which we use to violate a Leggett-Garg inequality. Signaling in time and Leggett-Garg inequalities serve as efficient quantum witnesses, which we probe here with a mechanical oscillator, a system that has a natural crossover from the quantum to the classical regime.

  4. The XRS microcalorimeter spectrometer at the Livermore Electron Beam Ion Trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, F S; Beiersdorfer, P; Boyce, K; Brown, G V; Chen, H; Gygax, J; Kahn, S M; Kelley, R; Kilbourne, C A; Magee, E; Thorn, D B

    2007-08-22

    NASA's X-ray Spectrometer (XRS) microcalorimeter instrument has been operating at the Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory since July of 2000. The spectrometer is currently undergoing its third major upgrade to become an easy to use, extremely high performance instrument for a broad range of EBIT experiments. The spectrometer itself is broadband, capable of simultaneously operating from 0.1 to 12 keV and has been operated at up to 100 keV by manipulating its operating conditions. The spectral resolution closely follows the spaceflight version of the XRS, beginning at 10 eV FWHM at 6 keV in 2000, upgraded to 5.5 eV in 2003, and will hopefully be {approx}3.8 eV in the Fall of 2007. Here we review the operating principles of this unique instrument, the extraordinary science that has been performed at EBIT over the last 6 years, and prospects for future upgrades. Specifically we discuss upgrades to cover the high-energy band (to at least 100 keV) with a high quantum efficiency detector, and prospects for using a new superconducting detector to reach 0.8 eV resolution at 1 keV, and 2 eV at 6 keV with high counting rates.

  5. Basic circuit compilation techniques for an ion-trap quantum machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maslov, Dmitri

    2017-01-01

    We study the problem of compilation of quantum algorithms into optimized physical-level circuits executable in a quantum information processing (QIP) experiment based on trapped atomic ions. We report a complete strategy: starting with an algorithm in the form of a quantum computer program, we compile it into a high-level logical circuit that goes through multiple stages of decomposition into progressively lower-level circuits until we reach the physical execution-level specification. We skip the fault-tolerance layer, as it is not within the scope of this work. The different stages are structured so as to best assist with the overall optimization while taking into account numerous optimization criteria, including minimizing the number of expensive two-qubit gates, minimizing the number of less expensive single-qubit gates, optimizing the runtime, minimizing the overall circuit error, and optimizing classical control sequences. Our approach allows a trade-off between circuit runtime and quantum error, as well as to accommodate future changes in the optimization criteria that may likely arise as a result of the anticipated improvements in the physical-level control of the experiment. (paper)

  6. Can the biogenicity of Europa's surfical sulfur be tested simultaneously with penetrators and ion traps?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chela-Flores, J.; Bhattacherjee, A. B.; Dudeja, S.; Kumar, N.; Seckbach, J.

    2009-04-01

    We suggest a biogenic interpretation of the sulfur patches on the Europan icy surface. This hypothesis is testable by LAPLACE, or a later mission, in which the instrumentation on board are penetrators, or ion traps, with component selection including miniaturized mass spectrometry. The argument in favor of such instrumentation and component selection is as follows: Extreme environments with microbes can act as models for extraterrestrial life (Seckbach et al., 2008). Suggestions have ranged from Venusian environments (Sagan, 1967, Seckbach and Libby, 1970) to Mars (Grilli Caiola and Billi, 2007). Active photosynthetic microbial communities are found on Antarctica, both in and on ice, in fresh water, in saline lakes and streams and within rocks. In the dry valley lakes of Antarctica close to the McMurdo Base, microbial mats are known to selectively remove a huge quantity of sulfur (Parker et al., 1982). Lake Vostok in Antarctica possesses a perennially thick (3 to 4 km) ice-cover that precludes photosynthesis, thus making this subglacial environment a good model system for determining how a potential Europan biota might emerge, evolve and distribute itself. Jupiter's moon Europa may harbor a subsurface water ocean, which lies beneath an ice layer that might be too thick to allow photosynthesis, just as in Lake Vostok. However, disequilibrium chemistry driven by charged particles from Jupiter's magnetosphere could produce sufficient organic and oxidant molecules for an Europan biosphere (Chyba, 2000). We restrict our attention to microbial mats that could still be thriving in spite of the extreme conditions of radiation on Europa. We are especially concerned with sulfur patches discovered by the Galileo mission. In the near future there are technologies available to settle the question of habitability on Europa, such as penetrators that are currently being developed for preliminary trials nearer to the Earth—the Moon-Lite mission (Smith et al., 2008). If analogies

  7. New Method for Double-Resonance Spectroscopy in a Cold Quadrupole Ion Trap and Its Application to UV-UV Hole-Burning Spectroscopy of Protonated Adenine Dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyuk; Féraud, Géraldine; Dedonder-Lardeux, Claude; Jouvet, Christophe

    2014-08-07

    A novel method for double-resonance spectroscopy in a cold quadrupole ion trap is presented, which utilizes dipolar resonant excitation of fragment ions in the quadrupole ion trap. Photofragments by a burn laser are removed by applying an auxiliary RF to the trap, and a probe laser detects the depletion of photofragments by the burn laser. By scanning the wavelength of the burn laser, conformation-specific UV spectrum of a cold ion is obtained. This simple and powerful method is applicable to any type of double-resonance spectroscopy in a cold quadrupole ion trap and was applied to UV-UV hole-burning spectroscopy of protonated adenine dimer. It was found that protonated adenine dimer has multiple conformers/tautomers, each with multiple excited states with drastically different excited state dynamics.

  8. Comparison of direct sampling ion trap mass spectrometry to GC/MS for monitoring VOCs in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wise, M.B.; Merriweather, R.; Guerin, M.; Thompson, C.V.

    1995-01-01

    Rapid analytical methods which utilize Direct Sampling Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry for field screening and compliance monitoring of volatile organic compounds in groundwater have been under development in this laboratory for several years. These methods can be used on fieldable instrumentation, have low ppb detection limits, and require little or no sample preparation. The DSITMS analysis of VOCs in water uses a three minute direct purge of the water sample with a stream of helium at a flow rate of 100 mL/min. VOCs partition into the helium stream and are carried directly into the ion trap via a 100 um section of fused silica capillary. Most of the sample is vented through an open/split interface, with only about 1 mL/min. entering the mass spectrometer. Analysis of the VOCs is accomplished by alternating conditions in the ion trap at roughly one second intervals between electron ionization and chemical ionization (water reagent gas). Two such methods for the analysis of VOCs in water have been submitted to EPA for regulatory approval, and in order to facilitate this process, validation studies have been conducted comparing the DSITMS method to a standard method such as purge-and-trap GC/MS. One such study, recently completed, involved the analysis of over 100 groundwater samples collected from the Oak Ridge reservation for compliance monitoring. Split samples of the groundwater were analyzed by DSITMS and by purge-and-trap GC/MS at a local CLP laboratory. The results of the comparative study generally show excellent qualitative and quantitative agreement between the DSITMS and standard methods, with the DSITMS method being superior with respect to speed, cost, ease of use, and minimized artifacts

  9. Determination of anabolic steroids with gas chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry using hydrogen as carrier gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Impens, S; De Wasch, K; De Brabander, H

    2001-01-01

    Helium is considered to be the ideal carrier gas for gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) in general, and for use with an ion trap in particular. Helium is an inert gas, can be used without special precautions for security and, moreover, it is needed as a damping gas in the trap. A disadvantage of helium is the high viscosity resulting in long GC run times. In this work hydrogen was tested as an alternative carrier gas for GC in performing GC/MS analyses. A hydrogen generator was used as a safe source of hydrogen gas. It is demonstrated that hydrogen can be used as a carrier gas for the gas chromatograph in combination with helium as make-up gas for the trap. The analysis time was thus shortened and the chromatographic performance was optimized. Although hydrogen has proven useful as a carrier gas in gas chromatography coupled to standard detectors such as ECD or FID, its use is not mentioned extensively in the literature concerning gas chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry. However, it is worth considering as a possibility because of its chromatographic advantages and its advantageous price when using a hydrogen generator. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Deuterium ion irradiation damage and deuterium trapping mechanism in candidate stainless steel material (JPCA2) for fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashizuka, Norihiro; Kurita, Takaaki; Yoshida, Naoaki; Fujiwara, Tadashi; Muroga, Takeo

    1987-01-01

    An improved austenitic stainless steel (JPCA), a candidate material for fusion reactor, is irradiated at room temperature with deuterium ion beams. Desorption spectra of deuterium gas is measured at various increased temperatures and defects formed under irradiation are observed by transmission electron microscopy to determine the mechanism of the thermal release of deuteriums and the characteristics of irradiation-induced defects involved in the process. In the deuterium deportion spectra observed, five release stages are found to exist at 90 deg C, 160 deg C, 220 deg C, 300 deg C and 400 deg C, referred to as Stage I, II, III, IV and V, respectively. Stage I is interpreted as representing the release of deuteriums trapped in point defects (presumably vacancies) formed under irradiation. The energy of desorption from the trapping sites is estimated at 0.8 eV. Stage II is concluded to be associated with the release of deuteriums trapped in a certain kind of existing defects. Stage III involves the release of deuteriums that are trapped in dislocations, dislocation loops or dislocated portions of stacking fault tetrahedra. This release occurs significantly in processed materials and other materials irradiated with high energy ion beams that may cause cascade damage. Stage IV is interpreted in terms of thermal decomposition of small deuterium clusters. Stage V is associated with the decomposition of rather large deuterium clusters grown on the {111} plane. (Nogami, K.)

  11. Enhanced light trapping by focused ion beam (FIB) induced self-organized nanoripples on germanium (100) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaliya, Bhaveshkumar; Mote, Rakesh G.; Aslam, Mohammed; Fu, Jing

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate enhanced light trapping by self-organized nanoripples on the germanium surface. The enhanced light trapping leading to high absorption of light is confirmed by the experimental studies as well as the numerical simulations using the finite-difference time-domain method. We used gallium ion (Ga+) focused ion beam to enable the formation of the self-organized nanoripples on the germanium (100) surface. During the fabrication, the overlap of the scanning beam is varied from zero to negative value and found to influence the orientation of the nanoripples. Evolution of nanostructures with the variation of beam overlap is investigated. Parallel, perpendicular, and randomly aligned nanoripples with respect to the scanning direction are obtained via manipulation of the scanning beam overlap. 95% broadband absorptance is measured in the visible electromagnetic region for the nanorippled germanium surface. The reported light absorption enhancement can significantly improve the efficiency of germanium-silicon based photovoltaic systems.

  12. Engineered Two-Dimensional Ising Interactions on a Trapped-Ion Quantum Simulator with Hundreds of Spins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    this approach [6–14]. However, simulations of quantum magnetism allow- ing controlled, tunable interactions between spins localized on 2D and 3D ...antiferromagnetic Heisenberg interaction. The spin-liquid’s Figure 1. The Penning trap confines hundreds of spin-1/2 particles (qubits) on a two...simulations of quantum Ising and Heisenberg inter- actions with localized spins were done with neutral atoms in optical lattices [6, 11], atomic ions in Paul

  13. Quantification of Tetramethylenedisulfotetramine (TETS) in Various Food Matrices by Solid Phase Extraction Liquid ChromatographyIon Trap Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY–ION TRAP MASS SPECTROMETRY ECBC-TR-1450 Sue Y. Bae Li Kong RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY DIRECTORATE April 2017 Approved for...ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) XX-04-2017 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) Mar 2012 – Jun 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE...LC–IT-MS) Consecutive reaction monitoring ( CRM ) 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 38 19a

  14. Characterization of the chemical composition of white chrysanthemum flowers of Hangzhou by using high-performance ion trap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiahui; Chen, Xiaocheng; Wu, Xin; Cao, Gang; Zhang, Junjie

    2016-04-01

    In this study, high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with amaZon SL high-performance ion trap mass spectrometry was used to analyze the target components in white chrysanthemum flowers of Hangzhou. Twenty-one components were detected and identified in both white chrysanthemum flowers of Hangzhou samples by using target compound analysis. Furthermore, seven new compounds in white chrysanthemum flowers of Hangzhou were found and identified by analyzing the fragment ion behavior in the mass spectra. The established method can be expedient for the global quality investigation of complex components in herbal medicines and food. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Sideband-cooling of trapped ytterbium-ions in the microwave regime; Seitenbandkuehlung von gespeicherten Ytterbium-Ionen im Mikrowellenregime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scharfenberger, Benedikt J.

    2012-12-14

    Trapped ions in a Paul trap are at present one of the most promising candidates for Quantum Information Processing (QIP). The technique that is used for this purpose in this experiment was introduced in 2001 by F. Mintert and Ch. Wunderlich. The core of this method is the use of atomic transitions in the radio- or microwave region, while a magnetic field gradient along the trap axis (where the ion chain is situated) lifts the degeneracy of the transition frequencies, such that the ions can be distinguished in frequency space; it also serves for the coupling of internal and external degrees of freedom of the ion chain. This method is called MAGIC (MAgnetic Gradient Induced Coupling). The performance of the measurements required that the apparatus of the experiment, which consists of laser sources, lambdameter, vacuum- and microwave system as well as imaging- and detection-units, had to be assembled and tested, which was an important prerequisite for the successful performance of the here described experiments. For the experiments it is advantageous to prepare the ions in an energetic state close to the motional ground state, which contributes to a reduction of the dephasing of the system while manipulating it with microwaves. By using the sideband-cooling technique to the sub-Doppler regime it is taken advantage of the fact, that ions in a linear trap are in good approximation situated in a harmonic oscillator potential and can therefore only populate discrete vibrational energy levels, whose frequency difference is given by the axial trap frequency {omega}{sub z}. If the system is excited by a microwave, which frequency is detuned from resonance to lower energies by a vibrational quantum, the ion looses one such phonon within each cooling-cycle. When this cycle is driven several times, the average phonon number and thus the temperature of the ion can be reduced efficiently and the ion can be initialized in a state close to the motional ground state. As sideband

  16. Calorimetric Low-Temperature Detectors for X-Ray Spectroscopy on Trapped Highly-Charged Heavy Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourne, Caroline; Kraft-Bermuth, S.; Andrianov, V.; Bleile, A.; Echler, A.; Egelhof, P.; Ilieva, S.; Kilbourne, C.; McCammon, D.

    2012-01-01

    The application of Calorimetric Low-Temperature Detectors (CLTDs) has been proposed at the Heavy-Ion TRAP facility HITRAP which is currently being installed at the Helmholtz Research Center for Heavy Ion Research GSI. This cold ion trap setup will allow the investigation of X-rays from ions practically at rest, for which the excellent energy resolution of CLTDs can be used to its full advantage. However, the relatively low intensities at HITRAP demand larger solid angles and an optimized cryogenic setup. The influence of external magnetic fields has to be taken into account. CLTDs will also be a substantial part of the instrumental equipment at the future Facility for Antiproton and Heavy Ion Research (FAIR), for which a wide variety of high-precision X-ray spectroscopy experiments has been proposed. This contribution will give an overview on the chances and challenges for the application of CLTDs at HITRAP as well as perspectives for future experiments at the FAIR facility.

  17. An improved thin-layer chromatography/mass spectrometry coupling using a surface sampling probe electrospray ion trap system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, Michael J [ORNL; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL

    2004-01-01

    A combined surface sampling probe/electrospray emitter coupled with an ion trap mass spectrometer was used for the direct read out of unmodified reversed-phase C18 thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plates. The operation of the surface sampling electrospray ionization interface in positive and negative ionization modes was demonstrated through the direct analysis of TLC plates on which a commercial test mix comprised of four dye compounds viz., rhodamine B, fluorescein, naphthol blue black, and fast green FCF, and an extract of the caffeine-containing plant Ilex vomitoria, were spotted and developed. Acquisition of full-scan mass spectra and automated collection of MS/MS product ion spectra while scanning a development lane along the surface of a TLC plate demonstrated the advantages of using an ion trap in this combination. Details of the sampling system, benefits of analyzing a developed lane in both positive ion and negative ion modes, levels of detection while surface scanning, surface scan speed effects, and the utility of three-dimensional data display, are also discussed.

  18. The centenary of discovery of radium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazeron, J.-J.; Gerbaulet, A.

    1998-01-01

    Henri Becquerel presented the discovery of radium by Pierre and Marie Curie at the Paris Academy of Science on 26th December 1898. One century later, radium has been abandoned, mainly for radiation protection difficulties. It is, however, likely that modern techniques of brachytherapy have inherited to those designed for radium sources, and that radium has cured thousands and thousands patients all over the world for about eighty years. The history of discovery and medical use of radium is summarised. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  19. Radium in consumer products: an historical perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holm, W.M.

    1978-01-01

    This paper demonstrates in historical and technical perspective how radium began to be used in consumer products and how changing conditions in technology and regulations have greatly modified the use of radium. In addition, the various uses of radium that have been tried or have been used in consumer products have been described, and whenever possible, the historical perspective has been used to show when devices were needed and when changing conditions caused the products to be no longer required. The historical perspective attitude is again used in the evaluation of the risks and benefits of radium in comparison to radium substitutes

  20. Transverse acceptance calculation for continuous ion beam injection into the electron beam ion trap charge breeder of the ReA post-accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kittimanapun, K., E-mail: kritsadak@slri.or.th [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), Michigan State University (MSU), 640 S. Shaw Lane, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Synchrotron Light Research Institute (SLRI), 111 University Avenue, Muang District, Nakhon Ratchasima, 30000 (Thailand); Baumann, T.M.; Lapierre, A.; Schwarz, S. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), Michigan State University (MSU), 640 S. Shaw Lane, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Bollen, G. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), Michigan State University (MSU), 640 S. Shaw Lane, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), Michigan State University, 640 S. Shaw Lane, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    2015-11-11

    The ReA post-accelerator at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) employs an electron beam ion trap (EBIT) as a charge breeder. A Monte-Carlo simulation code was developed to calculate the transverse acceptance phase space of the EBIT for continuously injected ion beams and to determine the capture efficiency in dependence of the transverse beam emittance. For this purpose, the code records the position and time of changes in charge state of injected ions, leading either to capture or loss of ions. To benchmark and validate the code, calculated capture efficiencies were compared with results from a geometrical model and measurements. The results of the code agree with the experimental findings within a few 10%. The code predicts a maximum total capture efficiency of 50% for EBIT parameters readily achievable and an efficiency of up to 80% for an electron beam current density of 1900 A/cm{sup 2}.

  1. Effect of the helically-trapped energetic-ion-driven resistive interchange modes on energetic ion confinement in the Large Helical Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, K.; Isobe, M.; Kawase, H.; Nishitani, T.; Seki, R.; Osakabe, M.; LHD Experiment Group

    2018-04-01

    The effect of the helically-trapped energetic-ion-driven resistive interchange modes (EICs) on energetic ion confinement is studied in the Large Helical Device deuterium plasmas. Neutron diagnostics such as the neutron flux monitor and the vertical neutron camera (VNC) are used in order to measure neutrons mainly created by beam-plasma reactions. The line-integrated neutron profiles are obtained by VNC in magnetohydrodynamic-quiet plasma with various neutral beam (NB) injection patterns. The profiles are consistent with that expected by the beam ion density calculated using orbit-following simulations. Significant decreases of the total neutron emission rate (S n) and the neutron counting rate of the VNC (C n) in central cords are observed to be synchronized with EIC bursts with perpendicular-NB injection. The drop rates of both S n and C n increase with EIC amplitude and reach around 50%. The line-integrated neutron profiles before and after EIC burst show that in the central cords, C n decrease due to EIC burst whereas there is almost no change in the other cords. The experimental results suggests that the effect of EIC on helically-trapped beam ion is substantial, however the effect of passing beam ion is not significant.

  2. Inspection of radium-needles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stekelenburg, L.H.M. van.

    1976-01-01

    A method for leak testing of a radium point source is given. The point source was placed for three days in a closed bottle containing 15 ml of scintillation liquid (Instagel). After removing the point source, the decrease in activity was measured over a 25 day period

  3. Prehistory of Z=88 radium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwankner, R.J.; Schoeffl, P.; Lieckfeld, G.

    1994-01-01

    Radium discovery in tailings of early uranium industry was the beginning of its widespread use e.g. in research, medicine and luminous paint production. It is this development taking place in various fields as well as recent results of custodian radiometry, that will be subject of the presentation. (orig.) [de

  4. Eye changes induced by radium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, G.N.; Lloyd, R.D.; Shabestari, Lorraine; Angus, Walter; Muggenburg, B.A.

    1989-01-01

    This report presents some features of the radium induced eye syndrome observed in beagles, including the prominence of intraocular pigmentary lesions and compares these with the results of rodent studies (Onychomys leucogaster) featuring a heavily pigmented uvea, and with the radiation syndrome reported in humans. (author)

  5. Magneto optical trap recoil ion momentum spectroscopy: application to ion-atom collisions; Couplage entre un piege magneto-optique et un spectrometre d'impulsion d'ions de recul: application aux collisions ions-atomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blieck, J

    2008-10-15

    {sup 87}Rb atoms have been cooled, trapped and prepared as targets for collision studies with 2 and 5 keV Na{sup +} projectiles. The physics studied deals with charge exchange processes. The active electron, which is generally the most peripheral electron of the atomic target, is transferred from the target onto the ionic projectile. The ionized target is called recoil ion. The technique used to study this physics is the MOTRIMS (Magneto Optical Trap Recoil Ion Momentum Spectroscopy) technique, which combines a magneto optical trap and a recoil ion momentum spectrometer. The spectrometer is used for the measurement of the recoil ions momentum, which gives access to all the information of the collision: the Q-value (which is the potential energy difference of the active electron on each particle) and the scattering angle of the projectile. The trap provides extremely cold targets to optimize the measurement of the momentum, and to release the latter from thermal motion. Through cinematically complete experiments, the MOTRIMS technique gives access to better resolutions on momentum measurements. Measurements of differential cross sections in initial and final capture states and in scattering angle have been done. Results obtained for differential cross sections in initial and final states show globally a good agreement with theory and an other experiment. Nevertheless, discrepancies with theory and this other experiment are shown for the measurements of doubly differential cross sections. These discrepancies are not understood yet. The particularity of the experimental setup designed and tested in this work, namely a low background noise, allows a great sensitivity to weak capture channels, and brings a technical and scientific gain compared with previous works. (author)

  6. Architecture Framework for Trapped-Ion Quantum Computer based on Performance Simulation Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahsan, Muhammad

    The challenge of building scalable quantum computer lies in striking appropriate balance between designing a reliable system architecture from large number of faulty computational resources and improving the physical quality of system components. The detailed investigation of performance variation with physics of the components and the system architecture requires adequate performance simulation tool. In this thesis we demonstrate a software tool capable of (1) mapping and scheduling the quantum circuit on a realistic quantum hardware architecture with physical resource constraints, (2) evaluating the performance metrics such as the execution time and the success probability of the algorithm execution, and (3) analyzing the constituents of these metrics and visualizing resource utilization to identify system components which crucially define the overall performance. Using this versatile tool, we explore vast design space for modular quantum computer architecture based on trapped ions. We find that while success probability is uniformly determined by the fidelity of physical quantum operation, the execution time is a function of system resources invested at various layers of design hierarchy. At physical level, the number of lasers performing quantum gates, impact the latency of the fault-tolerant circuit blocks execution. When these blocks are used to construct meaningful arithmetic circuit such as quantum adders, the number of ancilla qubits for complicated non-clifford gates and entanglement resources to establish long-distance communication channels, become major performance limiting factors. Next, in order to factorize large integers, these adders are assembled into modular exponentiation circuit comprising bulk of Shor's algorithm. At this stage, the overall scaling of resource-constraint performance with the size of problem, describes the effectiveness of chosen design. By matching the resource investment with the pace of advancement in hardware technology

  7. Development of a Linear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer (LITMS) Investigation for Future Planetary Surface Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinckerhoff, W.; Danell, R.; Van Ameron, F.; Pinnick, V.; Li, X.; Arevalo, R.; Glavin, D.; Getty, S.; Mahaffy, P.; Chu, P.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Future surface missions to Mars and other planetary bodies will benefit from continued advances in miniature sensor and sample handling technologies that enable high-performance chemical analyses of natural samples. Fine-scale (approx.1 mm and below) analyses of rock surfaces and interiors, such as exposed on a drill core, will permit (1) the detection of habitability markers including complex organics in association with their original depositional environment, and (2) the characterization of successive layers and gradients that can reveal the time-evolution of those environments. In particular, if broad-based and highly-sensitive mass spectrometry techniques could be brought to such scales, the resulting planetary science capability would be truly powerful. The Linear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer (LITMS) investigation is designed to conduct fine-scale organic and inorganic analyses of short (approx.5-10 cm) rock cores such as could be acquired by a planetary lander or rover arm-based drill. LITMS combines both pyrolysis/gas chromatograph mass spectrometry (GCMS) of sub-sampled core fines, and laser desorption mass spectrometry (LDMS) of the intact core surface, using a common mass analyzer, enhanced from the design used in the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) instrument on the 2018 ExoMars rover. LITMS additionally features developments based on the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) investigation on MSL and recent NASA-funded prototype efforts in laser mass spectrometry, pyrolysis, and precision subsampling. LITMS brings these combined capabilities to achieve its four measurement objectives: (1) Organics: Broad Survey Detect organic molecules over a wide range of molecular weight, volatility, electronegativity, concentration, and host mineralogy. (2) Organic: Molecular Structure Characterize internal molecular structure to identify individual compounds, and reveal functionalization and processing. (3) Inorganic Host Environment Assess the local chemical

  8. Detection of Chemical/Biological Agents and Stimulants using Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, S.H.; Hart, K.J.; Vass, A.A.; Wise, M.B.; Wolf, D.A.

    1999-01-01

    expanded with additional bacteria and fungi. These spectra were acquired on a Finnigan Magnum ion trap using helium buffer gas. A new database of Cl spectra of microorganisms is planned using the CBMS Block II instrument and air as the buffer gas. Using the current database, the fatty acid composition of the organisms was compared using the percentage of the ion current attributable to fatty acids. The data presented suggest promising rules for discrimination of these organisms. Strain, growth media and vegetative state do contribute to some of the distributions observed in the data. However, the data distributions observed in the current study only reflect our experience to date and do not fully represent the variability that might be expected in practice: Acquisition of MS/ MS spectra has begun (using He and air buffer gas) of the protonated molecular ion of a variety of fatty acids and for a number of ions nominally assigned as fatty acids from microorganisms. These spectra will be used to help verify fatty acid

  9. Recombination in Perovskite Solar Cells : Significance of Grain Boundaries, Interface Traps, and Defect Ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sherkar, Tejas; Momblona, Cristina; Gil-Escrig, Lidon; Avila, Jorge; Sessolo, Michele; Bolink, Henk J.; Koster, Lambert

    2017-01-01

    Trap-assisted recombination, despite being lower as compared with traditional inorganic solar cells, is still the dominant recombination mechanism in perovskite solar cells (PSCs) and limits their efficiency. We investigate the attributes of the primary trap-assisted recombination channels (grain

  10. Combined use of peptide ion and normalized delta scores to evaluate milk authenticity by ion-trap based proteomics coupled with error tolerant searching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardiello, Donatella; Natale, Anna; Palermo, Carmen; Quinto, Maurizio; Centonze, Diego

    2017-03-01

    A fundamental issue in proteomics is the peptide identification by database searching and the assessment of the goodness of fit between experimental and theoretical data. Despite the different number of ways to measure the quality of search results, the definition of a scoring criterion is still highly desirable in ion-trap based proteomics. Indeed, in order to fully take advantage of a low resolution MS/MS dataset, it is essential to strike a balance between greater information capture and reduced number of incorrect peptide assignments. In addition, the development of user-specified rules is a crucial aspect when very similar proteins of the same family are analyzed in order to infer the origin species. In this study, a post-processing validation scheme is provided for the evaluation of proteomic data in shot-gun ion-trap proteomics, when a flexible database searching based on the error tolerant mode is adopted in combination with a low-specificity enzyme to maximize sequence coverage. To validate peptide assignments, we used standard β-casein digested with trypsin/chymotrypsin or trypsin alone and the popular search engine MASCOT to identify the relevant (known) peptide sequences. A linear combination between peptide ion score and normalized delta score (i.e. the difference between the best and the second best ion score, divided by the best score) is proposed to increase the accuracy in sequence assignments from low-resolution tandem mass spectra. Finally, the optimized post-processing database validation was successfully applied to the direct analysis of milk tryptic/chymotryptic digests of different origin, without resorting to two-dimensional electrophoresis that is usually performed for protein separation in ion-trap proteomics. The identification of species-specific amino acidic sequences among the validated peptide spectrum matches has allowed to fully discriminate between the animal species, so evaluating accurately the milk authenticity. Copyright

  11. In-depth study of in-trap high-resolution mass separation by transversal ion ejection from a multi-reflection time-of-flight device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Paul; Knauer, Stefan; Marx, Gerrit; Schweikhard, Lutz

    2018-01-01

    The recently introduced method of ion separation by transversal ejection of unwanted species in electrostatic ion-beam traps and multi-reflection time-of-flight devices has been further studied in detail. As this separation is performed during the ion storage itself, there is no need for additional external devices such as ion gates or traps for either pre- or postselection of the ions of interest. The ejection of unwanted contaminant ions is performed by appropriate pulses of the potentials of deflector electrodes. These segmented ring electrodes are located off-center in the trap, i.e., between one of the two ion mirrors and the central drift tube, which also serves as a potential lift for capturing incoming ions and axially ejecting ions of interest after their selection. The various parameters affecting the selection effectivity and resolving power are illustrated with tin-cluster measurements, where isotopologue ion species provide mass differences down to a single atomic mass unit at ion masses of several hundred. Symmetric deflection voltages of only 10 V were found sufficient for the transversal ejection of ion species with as few as three deflection pulses. The duty cycle, i.e., the pulse duration with respect to the period of ion revolution, has been varied, resulting in resolving powers of up to several tens of thousands for this selection technique.

  12. Case report 361: Radium intoxication with radium-induced osteonecrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milgram, J.W.; Jasty, M.

    1986-03-01

    In summary, a male patient was treated with radium chloride for arthritis involving both knees at a time when he had gonococcal urethritis. He was then 20 years of age and was followed until his death 40 years later at the age of 60 years. During that interval this individual, who possessed one of the largest burdens of radium ever recorded in man, developed spontaneous fractures of both femori and one humerus, symptomatic osteonecrosis of both femoral heads, dramatic progressive radiological findings of bone, and finally, a carcinoma of the maxillary sinus which proved to be the cause of his death. Tissue was obtained from both cortical and cancellous bone at four different times during the patient's life and again at post-mortem. Progressive ischemia with abnormal calcification and then necrosis of both bone and bone marrow were demonstrated in the skeletal tissues. The pathological chances are correlated superbly with the roentgenograms in this report.

  13. Encoded recoupling and decoupling: An alternative to quantum error-correcting codes applied to trapped-ion quantum computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lidar, D.A.; Wu, L.-A.

    2003-01-01

    A recently developed theory for eliminating decoherence and design constraints in quantum computers, 'encoded recoupling and decoupling', is shown to be fully compatible with a promising proposal for an architecture enabling scalable ion-trap quantum computation [D. Kielpinski et al., Nature (London) 417, 709 (2002)]. Logical qubits are encoded into pairs of ions. Logic gates are implemented using the Soerensen-Moelmer (SM) scheme applied to pairs of ions at a time. The encoding offers continuous protection against collective dephasing. Decoupling pulses, that are also implemented using the SM scheme directly to the encoded qubits, are capable of further reducing various other sources of qubit decoherence, such as due to differential dephasing and due to decohered vibrational modes. The feasibility of using the relatively slow SM pulses in a decoupling scheme quenching the latter source of decoherence follows from the observed 1/f spectrum of the vibrational bath

  14. Storage ion trap of an 'In-Flight Capture' type for precise mass measurement of radioactive nuclear reaction products and fission fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarantin, N.I.

    2001-01-01

    Data on nuclear masses provide a basis for creating and testing various nuclear models. A tandem system of FLNR comprised of the U-400M cyclotron, the COMBAS magnetic separator and the mass-spectrometric ion trap of an 'in-flight capture' type is considered as a possible complex for producing of the short-lived nuclei in fragmentation reactions by heavy ions and for precise mass measurement of these nuclei. The plan of scientific and technical FLNR research includes a project DRIBs for producing beams of accelerated radioactive nuclear reaction products and photofission fragments. This project proposes also precise mass measurements of the fission fragment with the help of the ion trap. The in-flight entrance of the ions and their capture in the mass-spectrometric ion trap using the monochromatizing degrader, the static electric and magnetic fields and a new invention, a magnetic unidirectional transporting ventil, is considered

  15. Influence of the shear flow on electron cyclotron resonance plasma confinement in an axisymmetric magnetic mirror trap of the electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izotov, I. V.; Razin, S. V.; Sidorov, A. V.; Skalyga, V. A.; Zorin, V. G.; Bagryansky, P. A.; Beklemishev, A. D.; Prikhodko, V. V.

    2012-01-01

    Influence of shear flows of the dense plasma created under conditions of the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) gas breakdown on the plasma confinement in the axisymmetric mirror trap (''vortex'' confinement) was studied experimentally and theoretically. A limiter with bias potential was set inside the mirror trap for plasma rotation. The limiter construction and the optimal value of the potential were chosen according to the results of the preliminary theoretical analysis. This method of ''vortex'' confinement realization in an axisymmetric mirror trap for non-equilibrium heavy-ion plasmas seems to be promising for creation of ECR multicharged ion sources with high magnetic fields, more than 1 T.

  16. Fused Silica Ion Trap Chip with Efficient Optical Collection System for Timekeeping, Sensing, and Emulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-22

    are shielded from unwanted perturbations. Such traps permit the observation, manipulation, or storage of isolated particles or small groups of...resins to optimize surface wetting with the glass and surface tension forming a smooth outer surface. The third approach involves fabricating a socket ...B) optical port assemblies consisting of a fiber alignment hole, ball lens socket , and conical shaped aperture(s) opening into the trap slot. The

  17. Digital quantum simulation, Schrödinger cat state spectroscopy and setting up a linear ion trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hempel, C.

    2014-01-01

    This PhD thesis reports on two experiments in the field of quantum information processing using trapped calcium ions. In addition, the text covers the setup and characterization of a new linear Paul trap accompanied by a novel implementation of single-ion addressing using an acousto-optic deflector. The first of the two experiments is concerned with the proof-of-principle implementation of digital quantum simulations using up to 6 ions and 100 gate operations. It investigates the scaling behavior of simulations of elementary models of magnetism in terms of the number of involved spins and the complexity of their mutual interactions. The second experiment introduces the application of a Schroedinger cat state in the indirect detection of photon scattering events on a broad electronic transition. The method is shown to have a sensitivity down to the single photon level in a proof-of-principle demonstration using a mixed-isotope crystal of 40Ca+ and 44Ca+. A brief outlook towards future experiments and extensions of the experimental setup concludes the manuscript.(author) [de

  18. Finnigan ion trap mass spectrometer detection limits and thermal energy analyzer interface status report and present capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcaraz, A.; Andresen, B.; Martin, W.

    1990-10-18

    A new Finnigan ion trap mass spectrometer was purchased and installed at LLNL. Over a period of several months the instrument was tested under a variety of conditions utilizing a capillary gas chromatography interface which allowed separated organic compounds to be carried directly into the ion source of the mass spectrometer. This direct interface allowed maximum analytical sensitivity. A variety of critical tests were performed in order to optimize the sensitivity of the system under a variety of analysis conditions. These tests altered the critical time cycles of the ionization, ion trapping, and detection. Various carrier gas pressures were also employed in order to ascertain the overall sensitivity of the instrument. In addition we have also interfaced a thermal energy analyzer (TEA) to the gas chromatograph in order to simultaneously detect volatile nitrogen containing compounds while mass spectral data is being acquired. This is the first application at this laboratory of simultaneous ultra-trace detections while utilizing two orthogonal analytical techniques. In particular, explosive-related compound and/or residues are of interest to the general community in water, soil and gas sampler. In this paper are highlighted a few examples of the analytical power of this new GC-TEA-ITMS technology.

  19. Collective focusing ion accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldin, F.J.

    1986-01-01

    The principal subject of this dissertation is the trapping confinement of pure electron plasmas in bumpy toroidal magnetic fields, with particular attention given to the trapping procedure and the behavior of the plasma during the final equilibrium. The most important aspects of the equilibrium studied were the qualitative nature of the plasma configuration and motion and its density, distribution and stability. The motivation for this study was that an unneutralized cloud of electrons contained in a toroidal system, sufficiently dense and stable, may serve to electrostatically focus ions (against centrifugal and self space charge forces) in a cyclic ion accelerator. Such an accelerator, known as a Collective Focusing Ion Accelerator (CFIA) could be far smaller than conventional designs (which use external magnetic fields directly to focus the ions) due to the smaller gyro-radium of an electron in a magnetic field of given strength. The electron cloud generally drifted poloidally at a finite radius from the toroidal minor axis. As this would preclude focusing ions with such clouds, damping this motion was investigated. Finite resistance in the normally perfectly conductive vessel wall did this. In further preparation for a working CFIA, additional experiments studied the effect of ions on the stability of the electron cloud

  20. Radium issues at Hunters Point Annex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dean, S.M.

    1994-01-01

    Radium was a common source of illumination used in numerous instruments and gauges for military equipment prior to 1970. As a result of its many military applications radium 226 is now a principle radionuclide of concern at military base closures sites throughout the United States. This is an overview of the site characterization strategy employed and a potential site remediation technology being considered at a radium contaminated landfill at Hunters Point Annex, a former U.S. Navy shipyard in San Francisco, California

  1. The Radiochemical and Radiopharmaceutical Applications of Radium

    OpenAIRE

    Gott Matthew; Steinbach Jörg; Mamat Constantin

    2016-01-01

    This review focuses on the chemistry and application of radium isotopes to environmental monitoring, analytical, and medicinal uses. In recent years, radium has been used primarily as a tracer to study the migration of radioactive substances in environmental systems. Tracing the naturally occurring radium isotopes in mineral and water sources allows for the determination of source location, residence time, and concentrations. An understanding of the concentration of radionuclides in our food ...

  2. Efficient ground-state cooling of an ion in a large room-temperature linear Paul trap with a sub-Hertz heating rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Gregers; Miroshnychenko, Yevhen; Drewsen, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate efficient resolved sideband laser cooling (99±1% ground-state population) of a single 40Ca+ ion in a large linear Paul trap (electrode spacing of 7 mm) operated at an rf drive frequency of just 3.7 MHz. For ion oscillation frequencies in the range 280–585 kHz, heating rates below...

  3. Rabi lattice models with discrete gauge symmetry: Phase diagram and implementation in trapped-ion quantum simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevado, Pedro; Porras, Diego

    2015-07-01

    We study a spin-boson chain that exhibits a local Z2 symmetry. We investigate the quantum phase diagram of the model by means of perturbation theory, mean-field theory, and the density matrix renormalization group method. Our calculations show the existence of a first-order phase transition in the region where the boson quantum dynamics is slow compared to the spin-spin interactions. Our model can be implemented with trapped-ion quantum simulators, leading to a realization of minimal models showing local gauge invariance and first-order phase transitions.

  4. A Dual Source Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer for the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer of ExoMars 2018

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brickerhoff, William B.; vanAmerom, F. H. W.; Danell, R. M.; Arevalo, R.; Atanassova, M.; Hovmand, L.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Cotter, R. J.

    2011-01-01

    We present details on the objectives, requirements, design and operational approach of the core mass spectrometer of the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) investigation on the 2018 ExoMars mission. The MOMA mass spectrometer enables the investigation to fulfill its objective of analyzing the chemical composition of organic compounds in solid samples obtained from the near surface of Mars. Two methods of ionization are realized, associated with different modes of MOMA operation, in a single compact ion trap mass spectrometer. The stringent mass and power constraints of the mission have led to features such as low voltage and low frequency RF operation [1] and pulse counting detection.

  5. Comprehensive lipidome analysis by shotgun lipidomics on a hybrid quadrupole-orbitrap-linear ion trap mass spectrometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almeida, Reinaldo; Pauling, Josch Konstantin; Sokol, Elena

    2015-01-01

    , including its high resolution power unsurpassed by any other contemporary Orbitrap instrumentation, its dynamic quantification range and its efficacy for in-depth structural characterization of molecular lipid species by quadrupole-based higher-energy collisional dissociation (HCD), and ion trap...... and CID and ITMS(3) analysis utilizing dual CID for in-depth structural characterization of molecular glycerophospholipid species. The performance of the MS(ALL) method was benchmarked in a comparative analysis of mouse cerebellum and hippocampus. This analysis demonstrated extensive lipidome...

  6. Gas-Phase Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange of Dinucleotides and 5′-Monophosphate Dinucleotides in a Quadrupole Ion Trap

    OpenAIRE

    Chipuk, Joseph E.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2009-01-01

    Gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange reactions of four deprotonated dinucleotides (dAA, dAG, dGA, dGG) and their 5′-monophosphate analogs (5′-dAA, 5′-dAG, 5′-dGA, 5′-dGG) with D2O were performed in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. Significant differences in the rates and extents of exchange were found when the 5′-hydroxyl group of the dinucleotides was replaced by a phosphate functionality. Extensive and nucleobase-dependent exchange occurred for the deprotonated 5′-monophospha...

  7. Interaction of beta-amyloid(1-40) peptide with pairs of metal ions: An electrospray ion trap mass spectrometric model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drochioiu, Gabi; Manea, Marilena; Dragusanu, Mihaela; Murariu, Manuela; Dragan, Ecaterina Stela; Petre, Brandusa Alina; Mezo, Gabor; Przybylski, Michael

    2009-09-01

    The stoichiometries and the affinity toward simple and paired metal ions of synthetic amyloid-beta(1-40) peptide (Abeta1-40) were investigated by electrospray ion trap mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), circular dichroism (CD), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results lead to the working hypothesis that pH-dependent metal binding to Abeta1-40 may induce conformational changes, which affect the affinity toward other metals. A significant copper and zinc binding to Abeta1-40 peptide at pH 5.5 was found, whereas nickel ions commonly bind to each molecule of beta-amyloid peptide. Some complexes of Abeta1-40 with more than one nickel ion were identified by ESI-MS. In addition, nickel ions proved to enhance Abeta oligomerization. On increasing pH, up to 12 ions of zinc may bind to a single Abeta molecule. Under the same pH and concentration conditions, the binding pattern of the independent copper and silver ions to Abeta1-40 was different from that of the equimolecular mixture of the two metal ions. One might assume that some conformational changes due to water loss altered the capacity of Abeta peptide to bind certain heavy metal ions. As a consequence, copper-silver interaction with the binding process to Abeta1-40 became highly complex. A competition between silver and nickel ions for Abeta1-40 binding sites at high pH was also observed. New strategies were proposed to identify the characteristic signals for some important metal ion-peptide complexes in the spectra recorded at high pH or high concentrations of metal ions. To explain the formation of such a large number of high metal ion-Abeta complexes, we took into consideration the participation of both histidine residues and free amino groups as well as carboxylate ones in the binding process. Finally, CD and AFM studies supported the mass spectrometric data.

  8. Trapped ion system for sympathetic cooling and non-equilibrium dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doret, Charlie; Jubin, Sierra; Stevenson, Sarah

    2017-04-01

    Atomic systems are superbly suited to the study of non-equilibrium dynamics. These systems' exquisite isolation from environmental perturbations leads to long relaxation times that enable exploration of far-from-equilibrium phenomena. We present progress towards trapping chains of multiple co-trapped calcium isotopes geared towards measuring thermal equilibration and sympathetic cooling rates. We also discuss plans for future experiments in non-equilibrium statistical mechanics, including exploration of the quantum-to-classical crossover between ballistic transport and diffusive, Fourier's Law conduction. This work is supported by Cottrell College Science Award from the Research Corporation for Science Advancement and by Williams College.

  9. First application of the Laser Ion Source and Trap (LIST) for on-line experiments at ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Fink, D A; Imai, N; Blaum, K; Rothe, S; Sjoedin, M; Rossel, R E; Kron, T; Marsh, B A; Richter, S D; Cocolios, T E; Lecesne, N; Ghys, L; Pauwels, D; Rapisarda, E; Seliverstov, M D; Stora, T; Ramos, J P; Mendonca, T M; Fedosseev, V N; Lynch, K M; Wendt, K D A; Gottberg, A; Flanagan, K T; Van Beveren, C; Bastin, B; Fedorov, D V

    2013-01-01

    The Laser Ion Source and Trap (LIST) provides a new mode of operation for the resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) at ISOLDE/CERN, reducing the amount of surface-ionized isobaric contaminants by up to four orders of magnitude. After the first successful on-line test at ISOLDE in 2011 the LIST was further improved in terms of efficiency, selectivity, and reliability through several off-line tests at Mainz University and at ISOLDE. In September 2012, the first on-line physics experiments to use the LIST took place at ISOLDE. The measurements of the improved LIST indicate more than a twofold increase in efficiency compared to the LIST of the 2011 run. The suppression of surface-ionized francium contaminants has enabled the first in-source laser spectroscopy of Po-217 and Po-219. (C) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Trapped-ion quantum simulation of excitation transport: Disordered, noisy, and long-range connected quantum networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautmann, N.; Hauke, P.

    2018-02-01

    The transport of excitations governs fundamental properties of matter. Particularly rich physics emerges in the interplay between disorder and environmental noise, even in small systems such as photosynthetic biomolecules. Counterintuitively, noise can enhance coherent quantum transport, which has been proposed as a mechanism behind the high transport efficiencies observed in photosynthetic complexes. This effect has been called "environment-assisted quantum transport". Here, we propose a quantum simulation of the excitation transport in an open quantum network, taking advantage of the high controllability of current trapped-ion experiments. Our scheme allows for the controlled study of various different aspects of the excitation transfer, ranging from the influence of static disorder and interaction range, over the effect of Markovian and non-Markovian dephasing, to the impact of a continuous insertion of excitations. Our paper discusses experimental error sources and realistic parameters, showing that it can be implemented in state-of-the-art ion-chain experiments.

  11. Radium removal for a small community water-supply system. Research report, 1 October 1985-30 September 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangelson, K.A.

    1988-07-01

    In 1984, a radium-removal treatment plant was constructed for the small community of Redhill Forest located in the central mountains of Colorado. The treatment plant consists of a process for removing iron and manganese ahead of an ion-exchange process for the removal of radium. The raw water comes from deep wells and has naturally occurring radium and iron concentrations of about 30-40 pCi/L and 7-10 mg/L, respectively. Before the raw water enters the main treatment plant, the raw water is aerated to remove radon gas and carbon dioxide. The unique features of the Redhill Forest Treatment Plant are related to the ways in which the radium removed from the raw water is further treated and eventually disposed of as treatment plant waste. A separate system removes only radium from the backwash/regeneration water of the ion exchange process and the radium is permanently complexed on a Radium Selective Complexer (RSC) resin made by Dow Chemical. The RSC resin containing radium is replaced with virgin resin as needed and the resin waste transported to a permanent final disposal site in Beatty, NV. This report presents a detailed description of the Redhill Forest treatment system and the results of in-depth monitoring of the processes and other factors relating to the overall operation of the radium-removal system. Included are descriptions of modifications made in the plant operation to improve the overall system operation and of the procedures for final disposal of the RSC resin-containing radium

  12. Simulation of the elementary evolution operator with the motional states of an ion in an anharmonic trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Ludovic; Vaeck, Nathalie [Laboratoire de Chimie Quantique et Photophysique, CP 160/09 Université Libre de Bruxelles, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Justum, Yves [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique, UMR 8000 and CNRS, Université Paris-Sud, F-91405 Orsay (France); Desouter-Lecomte, M. [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique, UMR 8000 and CNRS, Université Paris-Sud, F-91405 Orsay (France); Département de Chimie, Université de Liège, Bât B6c, Sart Tilman B-4000, Liège (Belgium)

    2015-04-07

    Following a recent proposal of L. Wang and D. Babikov [J. Chem. Phys. 137, 064301 (2012)], we theoretically illustrate the possibility of using the motional states of a Cd{sup +} ion trapped in a slightly anharmonic potential to simulate the single-particle time-dependent Schrödinger equation. The simulated wave packet is discretized on a spatial grid and the grid points are mapped on the ion motional states which define the qubit network. The localization probability at each grid point is obtained from the population in the corresponding motional state. The quantum gate is the elementary evolution operator corresponding to the time-dependent Schrödinger equation of the simulated system. The corresponding matrix can be estimated by any numerical algorithm. The radio-frequency field which is able to drive this unitary transformation among the qubit states of the ion is obtained by multi-target optimal control theory. The ion is assumed to be cooled in the ground motional state, and the preliminary step consists in initializing the qubits with the amplitudes of the initial simulated wave packet. The time evolution of the localization probability at the grids points is then obtained by successive applications of the gate and reading out the motional state population. The gate field is always identical for a given simulated potential, only the field preparing the initial wave packet has to be optimized for different simulations. We check the stability of the simulation against decoherence due to fluctuating electric fields in the trap electrodes by applying dissipative Lindblad dynamics.

  13. High-accuracy Penning trap mass measurements with stored and cooled exotic ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaum, K; Nagy, Sz [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Werth, G, E-mail: klaus.blaum@mpi-hd.mpg.d [Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, D-55099 Mainz (Germany)

    2009-08-14

    The technique of Penning trap mass spectrometry is briefly reviewed particularly in view of precision experiments on unstable nuclei, performed at different facilities worldwide. Selected examples of recent results emphasize the importance of high-precision mass measurements in various fields of physics. (review)

  14. Liquid chromatography coupled with time-of-flight and ion trap mass spectrometry for qualitative analysis of herbal medicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Fei Chen

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available With the expansion of herbal medicine (HM market, the issue on how to apply up-to-date analytical tools on qualitative analysis of HMs to assure their quality, safety and efficacy has been arousing great attention. Due to its inherent characteristics of accurate mass measurements and multiple stages analysis, the integrated strategy of liquid chromatography (LC coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS and ion trap mass spectrometry (IT-MS is well-suited to be performed as qualitative analysis tool in this field. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview on the potential of this integrated strategy, including the review of general features of LC-IT-MS and LC-TOF-MS, the advantages of their combination, the common procedures for structure elucidation, the potential of LC-hybrid-IT-TOF/MS and also the summary and discussion of the applications of the integrated strategy for HM qualitative analysis (2006–2011. The advantages and future developments of LC coupled with IT and TOF-MS are highlighted. Keywords: High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC, Time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS, Ion trap mass spectrometry (IT-MS, Herbal medicine (HM

  15. An aircraft-borne chemical ionization – ion trap mass spectrometer (CI-ITMS for fast PAN and PPN measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Schlager

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available An airborne chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometer instrument (CI-ITMS has been developed for tropospheric and stratospheric fast in-situ measurements of PAN (peroxyacetyl nitrate and PPN (peroxypropionyl nitrate. The first scientific deployment of the FASTPEX instrument (FASTPEX = Fast Measurement of Peroxyacyl nitrates took place in the Arctic during 18 missions aboard the DLR research aircraft Falcon, within the framework of the POLARCAT-GRACE campaign in the summer of 2008. The FASTPEX instrument is described and characteristic properties of the employed ion trap mass spectrometer are discussed. Atmospheric data obtained at altitudes of up to ~12 km are presented, from the boundary layer to the lowermost stratosphere. Data were sampled with a time resolution of 2 s and a 2σ detection limit of 25 pmol mol−1. An isotopically labelled standard was used for a permanent on-line calibration. For this reason the accuracy of the PAN measurements is better than ±10% for mixing ratios greater than 200 pmol mol−1. PAN mixing ratios in the summer Arctic troposphere were in the order of a few hundred pmol mol−1 and generally correlated well with CO. In the Arctic boundary layer and lowermost stratosphere smaller PAN mixing ratios were observed due to a combination of missing local sources of PAN precursor gases and efficient removal processes (thermolysis/photolysis. PPN, the second most abundant PAN homologue, was measured simultaneously. Observed PPN/PAN ratios range between ~0.03 and 0.3.

  16. Nonlinear Ion Harmonics in the Paul Trap with Added Octopole Field: Theoretical Characterization and New Insight into Nonlinear Resonance Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Caiqiao; Zhou, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Ning; Zhan, Lingpeng; Chen, Yongtai; Nie, Zongxiu

    2016-02-01

    The nonlinear harmonics within the ion motion are the fingerprint of the nonlinear fields. They are exclusively introduced by these nonlinear fields and are responsible to some specific nonlinear effects such as nonlinear resonance effect. In this article, the ion motion in the quadrupole field with a weak superimposed octopole component, described by the nonlinear Mathieu equation (NME), was studied by using the analytical harmonic balance (HB) method. Good accuracy of the HB method, which was comparable with that of the numerical fourth-order Runge-Kutta (4th RK), was achieved in the entire first stability region, except for the points at the stability boundary (i.e., β = 1) and at the nonlinear resonance condition (i.e., β = 0.5). Using the HB method, the nonlinear 3β harmonic series introduced by the octopole component and the resultant nonlinear resonance effect were characterized. At nonlinear resonance, obvious resonant peaks were observed in the nonlinear 3β series of ion motion, but were not found in the natural harmonics. In addition, both resonant excitation and absorption peaks could be observed, simultaneously. These are two unique features of the nonlinear resonance, distinguishing it from the normal resonance. Finally, an approximation equation was given to describe the corresponding working parameter, q nr , at nonlinear resonance. This equation can help avoid the sensitivity degradation due to the operation of ion traps at the nonlinear resonance condition.

  17. Determination of triacylglycerol regioisomers using electrospray ionization-quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry with a kinetic method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leveque, Nathalie L; Acheampong, Akwasi; Heron, Sylvie; Tchapla, Alain

    2012-04-13

    The kinetic method was applied to differentiate and quantify mixtures of regioisomeric triacylglycerols (TAGs) by generating and mass selecting alkali ion bound metal dimeric clusters with a TAG chosen as reference (ref) and examining their competitive dissociations in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. This methodology readily distinguished pairs of regioisomers (AAB/ABA) such as LLO/LOL, OOP/OPO and SSP/SPS and consequently distinguished sn-1/sn-3, sn-2 substituents on the glycerol backbone. The dimeric complex ions [ref, Li, TAG((AAB and/or ABA))](+) generated by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry were subjected to collision induced dissociation causing competitive loss of either the neutral TAG reference (ref) leading to [Li(AAB and/or ABA)](+) or the neutral TAG molecule (TAG((AAB and/or ABA))) leading to [ref, Li](+). The ratio of the two competitive dissociation rates, defined by the product ion branching ratio (R(iso)), was related via the kinetic method to the regioisomeric composition of the investigated TAG mixture. In this work, a linear correlation was established between composition of the mixture of each TAG regioisomer and the logarithm of the branching ratio for competitive fragmentation. Depending on the availability of at least one TAG regioisomer as standard, the kinetic method and the standard additions method led to the quantitative analysis of natural TAG mixtures. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Some Rare Earth Elements Analysis by Microwave Plasma Torch Coupled with the Linear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xiaohong; Jiang, Tao; Qi, Wenhao; Zuo, Jun; Yang, Meiling; Fei, Qiang; Xiao, Saijin; Yu, Aimin; Zhu, Zhiqiang; Chen, Huanwen

    2015-01-01

    A sensitive mass spectrometric analysis method based on the microwave plasma technique is developed for the fast detection of trace rare earth elements (REEs) in aqueous solution. The plasma was produced from a microwave plasma torch (MPT) under atmospheric pressure and was used as ambient ion source of a linear ion trap mass spectrometer (LTQ). Water samples were directly pneumatically nebulized to flow into the plasma through the central tube of MPT. For some REEs, the generated composite ions were detected in both positive and negative ion modes and further characterized in tandem mass spectrometry. Under the optimized conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) was at the level 0.1 ng/mL using MS(2) procedure in negative mode. A single REE analysis can be completed within 2~3 minutes with the relative standard deviation ranging between 2.4% and 21.2% (six repeated measurements) for the 5 experimental runs. Moreover, the recovery rates of these REEs are between the range of 97.6%-122.1%. Two real samples have also been analyzed, including well and orange juice. These experimental data demonstrated that this method is a useful tool for the field analysis of REEs in water and can be used as an alternative supplement of ICP-MS.

  19. Nonlinear Ion Harmonics in the Paul Trap with Added Octopole Field: Theoretical Characterization and New Insight into Nonlinear Resonance Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Caiqiao; Zhou, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Ning; Zhan, Lingpeng; Chen, Yongtai; Nie, Zongxiu

    2016-02-01

    The nonlinear harmonics within the ion motion are the fingerprint of the nonlinear fields. They are exclusively introduced by these nonlinear fields and are responsible to some specific nonlinear effects such as nonlinear resonance effect. In this article, the ion motion in the quadrupole field with a weak superimposed octopole component, described by the nonlinear Mathieu equation (NME), was studied by using the analytical harmonic balance (HB) method. Good accuracy of the HB method, which was comparable with that of the numerical fourth-order Runge-Kutta (4th RK), was achieved in the entire first stability region, except for the points at the stability boundary (i.e., β = 1) and at the nonlinear resonance condition (i.e., β = 0.5). Using the HB method, the nonlinear 3β harmonic series introduced by the octopole component and the resultant nonlinear resonance effect were characterized. At nonlinear resonance, obvious resonant peaks were observed in the nonlinear 3β series of ion motion, but were not found in the natural harmonics. In addition, both resonant excitation and absorption peaks could be observed, simultaneously. These are two unique features of the nonlinear resonance, distinguishing it from the normal resonance. Finally, an approximation equation was given to describe the corresponding working parameter, q nr , at nonlinear resonance. This equation can help avoid the sensitivity degradation due to the operation of ion traps at the nonlinear resonance condition.

  20. Removal of Radium isotopes from oil co-produced water using Bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Masri, M.S.; Al Attar, L.; Budeir, Y.; Al Chayah, O.

    2010-01-01

    In view of environmental concern, sorption of radium on natural bentonite mineral (Aleppo, Syria) was investigated using batch-type method. Data were expressed in terms of distribution coefficients. An attempt to increase the selectivity of bentonite for radium was made by preparing M-derivatives. Loss of mineral crystallinity in acidic media and the formation of new phase, such as BaCO 3 , in Ba-derivative were imposed by XRD characterisations. Of the cationic forms, Na-bentonite had shown the highest affinity. Mechanisms of radium uptake were pictured using M-derivatives and simulated radium solutions. The obtained results indicated that surface sorption/surface ion exchange were the predominated processes. The distinct sorption behaviour observed with Ba-form was, possibly, a reflection of radium co-precipitation with barium carbonate. The competing order of macro component, likely present in waste streams, was drawn by studying different concentrations of the corresponding salt media. As an outcome, sodium was the weakest inhibitor. The performance of natural bentonite and the most selective forms, i.e. Ba- and Na-derivatives, to sorb radium from actual oil co-produced waters, collected form Der Ezzor Petroleum Company (DEZPC), was studied. This mirrored the influential effect of waters pH over other comparable parameters. (author)

  1. Radium in baggerspecie afkomstig uit het Rijnmondgebied

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijwaard H; Overwater RMW; Glastra P; Nissan LA; LSO

    2003-01-01

    The radium concentration was measured in 25 samples of harbour sludge taken from the Rijnmond area (Rotterdam harbours and the Nieuwe Waterweg) in 2002. High radium levels were found near the former discharge points of the phosphate ore processing plants, confirming the results of previous

  2. Calculation of axial secular frequencies in a nonlinear ion trap with hexapole, octupole, decapole and dodecapole superpositions by the combined methods of multiple scales and Lindstedt-Poincare

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doroudi, A.; Emampour, M.; Emampour, M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper a combination of the method of multiple scales and the method of Lindstedt-Poincare which is a perturbative technique is used for calculation of axial secular frequencies of a nonlinear ion trap in the presence of second ,third, fourth and fifth order nonlinear terms of the potential distribution within the trap. The frequencies are calculated. The calculated frequencies are compared with the results of multiple scales method and the exact results.

  3. Untrapping Kinetically Trapped Ions: The Role of Water Vapor and Ion-Source Activation Conditions on the Gas-Phase Protomer Ratio of Benzocaine Revealed by Ion-Mobility Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hanxue; Attygalle, Athula B.

    2017-12-01

    The role of water vapor in transforming the thermodynamically preferred species of protonated benzocaine to the less favored protomer was investigated using helium-plasma ionization (HePI) in conjunction with ion-mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS). The IM arrival-time distribution (ATD) recorded from a neat benzocaine sample desorbed to the gas phase by a stream of dry nitrogen and ionized by HePI showed essentially one peak for the O-protonated species. However, when water vapor was introduced to the enclosed ion source, within a span of about 150 ms the ATD profile changed completely to one dominated by the N-protonated species. Under spray-based ionization conditions, the nature and composition of the solvents have been postulated to play a decisive role in defining the manifested protomer ratios. In reality, the solvent vapors present in the ion source (particularly the ambient humidity) indirectly dictate the gas-phase ratio of the protomers. Evidently, the gas-phase protomer ratio established at the confinement of the ions is readjusted by the ion-activation that takes place during the transmission of ions to the vacuum. Although it has been repeatedly stated that ions can retain a "memory" of their solution structures because they can be kinetically trapped, and thereby represent their solution-based stabilities, we show that the initial airborne ions can undergo significant transformations in the transit through the intermediate vacuum zones between the ion source and the mass detector. In this context, we demonstrate that the kinetically trapped N-protomer of benzocaine can be untrapped by reducing the humidity of the enclosed ion source. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  4. Extraction of Coulomb crystals from a paul-trap ion source for nano-beam generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izawa, Kenji; Ito, Kiyokazu; Higaki, Hiroyuki; Okamoto, Hiromi

    2009-01-01

    As is well-known, a single-species plasma confined in a compact trap system naturally forms a spatially ordered configuration near the absolute zero. Such a unique state of matter is called 'Coulomb crystal'. The emittance of this strongly coupled plasma is close to the ultimate limit, far below those of regular particle beams. This implies that, if we can somehow accelerate a crystal without serious heating, an ultralow-emittance beam becomes available. To test this idea, we produce a string Coulomb crystal in a linear Paul trap by laser cooling and then try to extract it by switching off the axial confinement potential. Preliminary experimental results indicate that it is possible to transport the crystal while roughly maintaining its linear ordered structure. (author)

  5. Association of leukemia with radium groundwater contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyman, G.H.; Lyman, C.G.; Johnson, W.

    1985-01-01

    Radiation exposure, including the ingestion of radium, has been causally associated with leukemia in man. Groundwater samples from 27 counties on or near Florida phosphate lands were found to exceed 5 pCi/L total radium in 12.4% of measurements. The incidence of leukemia was greater in those counties with high levels of radium contamination (greater than 10% of the samples contaminated) than in those with low levels of contamination. Rank correlation coefficients of .56 and .45 were observed between the radium contamination level and the incidence of total leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia, respectively. The standardized incidence density ratio for those in high-contamination counties was 1.5 for total leukemia and 2.0 for acute myeloid leukemia. Further investigation is necessary, however, before a causal relationship between groundwater radium content and human leukemia can be established

  6. RF-Trapped Chip Scale Helium Ion Pump (RFT-CHIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-06

    are fabricated from 100 µm thick titanium sheet with photochemical machining (PCM) - a commercially available batch compatible lithographic approach... machining (µEDM) from a 200 µm thick, 15 mm diameter tantalum disk (Goodfellow, 012-928-68) [Mas90]. Fig. 16: The E3TM consists of two titanium grid...and RF electron trapping cycle .................... 17 16: The E3TM consists of two titanium grid electrodes and a tantalum sorption layer, and is

  7. Calibration of the OHREX high-resolution imaging crystal spectrometer at the Livermore electron beam ion traps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hell, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Dr. Remeis-Sternwarte and ECAP, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Bamberg 96049 (Germany); Beiersdorfer, P.; Magee, E. W.; Brown, G. V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    We report the calibration of the Orion High-Resolution X-ray (OHREX) imaging crystal spectrometer at the EBIT-I electron beam ion trap at Livermore. Two such instruments, dubbed OHREX-1 and OHREX-2, are fielded for plasma diagnostics at the Orion laser facility in the United Kingdom. The OHREX spectrometer can simultaneously house two spherically bent crystals with a radius of curvature of r = 67.2 cm. The focusing properties of the spectrometer allow both for larger distance to the source due to the increase in collected light and for observation of extended sources. OHREX is designed to cover a 2.5°–3° spectral range at Bragg angles around 51.3°. The typically high resolving powers at these large Bragg angles are ideally suited for line shape diagnostics. For instance, the nominal resolving power of the instrument (>10 000) is much higher than the effective resolving power associated with the Doppler broadening due to the temperature of the trapped ions in EBIT-I. The effective resolving power is only around 3000 at typical EBIT-I conditions, which nevertheless is sufficient to set up and test the instrument’s spectral characteristics. We have calibrated the spectral range for a number of crystals using well known reference lines in the first and second order and derived the ion temperatures from these lines. We have also made use of the 50 μm size of the EBIT-I source width to characterize the spatial focusing of the spectrometer.

  8. Energy measurement of fast ions trapped in the toroidal field ripple of Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basiuk, V.; Becoulet, A.; Hutter, T.; Martin, G.; Pecquet, A.L.; Saoutic, B.

    1993-09-01

    During additional heating in Tore Supra (ICRF or NBI) fast ion losses due to the toroidal field ripple were clearly measured by a set of graphite probes. This diagnostic collects the flow of fast ions entering a vertical port and usually shows a maximum flux for ions originating from the vicinity of surface δ * = 0. During the monster sawteeth regime, achieved with ICRF, a remarkable phenomenon was observed: the ejection of fast ions, not correlated with any measured MHD activity. The radial distribution of these ions is quite different from that usually observed exhibiting a peak located in the central section of the plasma. In order to measure the energy distribution of these ions, from 80 keV (energy of the neutral beam injected in Tore Supra) up to 1 MeV (expected during ICRF), a new diagnostic is under construction. The principle of the diagnostic is to discriminate the ions in energy using their Larmor radius (p = 1.3 cm for 100 keV → p = 3.6 cm for 700 keV, B = 4T). The detector is made of a hollow graphite cylinder with a small entrance slot, located in a vertical port on the ion drift side. An array of six metallic collectors placed inside the graphite cylinder intercepts the ions. The current on each collector was estimated at 10 → 100 nA, during ICRF heating. The energy resolution of this diagnostic is expected to be about 20 keV for the lowest energy range and 100 keV for the highest. This type of ruggedized detector might be extrapolated for the measurements of alpha particle losses in future DT experiments. It should also be suitable for the studies of stochastic ripple diffusion. (authors). 3 refs., 9 figs

  9. Trapped-Ion Quantum Simulation of an Ising Model with Transverse and Longitudinal Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-29

    where Ωi is the Rabi frequency of the ith ion, M is the single ion mass, and bi,m is the normal-mode transformation matrix for ion i in mode m [17...transverse and longitudinal magnetic fields By(t) and Bx drive Rabi oscillations between the spin states |↓〉z and |↑〉z. Each effective field is gener...finding the lowest energy arrangement of q charged particles on N lattice sites. The creation of such periodic spin structures realizes a generalized Wigner

  10. Neutral gas sympathetic cooling of an ion in a Paul trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuang; Sullivan, Scott T; Hudson, Eric R

    2014-04-11

    A single ion immersed in a neutral buffer gas is studied. An analytical model is developed that gives a complete description of the dynamics and steady-state properties of the ions. An extension of this model, using techniques employed in the mathematics of economics and finance, is used to explain the recent observation of non-Maxwellian statistics for these systems. Taken together, these results offer an explanation of the long-standing issues associated with sympathetic cooling of an ion by a neutral buffer gas.

  11. A high-current electron gun for the electron beam ion trap at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, S., E-mail: schwarz@nscl.msu.edu; Baumann, T. M.; Kittimanapun, K.; Lapierre, A.; Snyder, A. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    The Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) in NSCL’s reaccelerator ReA uses continuous ion injection and accumulation. In order to maximize capture efficiency and minimize breeding time into high charge states, the EBIT requires a high-current/high current-density electron beam. A new electron gun insert based on a concave Ba-dispenser cathode has been designed and built to increase the current transmitted through the EBIT’s superconducting magnet. With the new insert, stable EBIT operating conditions with 0.8 A of electron beam have been established. The design of the electron gun is presented together with calculated and measured perveance data. In order to assess the experimental compression of the electron beam, a pinhole CCD camera has been set up to measure the electron beam radius. The camera observes X-rays emitted from highly charged ions, excited by the electron beam. Initial tests with this camera setup will be presented. They indicate that a current density of 640 A/cm{sup 2} has been reached when the EBIT magnet was operated at 4 T.

  12. Trapping of muscle relaxant methocarbamol degradation product by complexation with copper(II) ion: spectroscopic and quantum chemical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Ahmed M; Shehab, Ola R

    2014-07-15

    Structural properties of methocarbamol (Mcm) were extensively studied both experimentally and theoretically using FT IR, (1)H NMR, UV-Vis., geometry optimization, Mulliken charge, and molecular electrostatic potential. Stability arises from hyper-conjugative interactions, charge delocalization and H-bonding was analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. Mcm was decomposed in ethanol/water mixture at 80°C to guaifenesin [(RS)-3-(2-methoxyphenoxy)propane-1,2-diol] and carbamate ion [NH2COO(-)], where the degradation mechanism was explained by trapping the carbamate ion via the complexation with copper(II) ion. The structure of the isolated complex ([Cu(NH2COO)2(H2O)]⋅4H2O) was elucidated by spectral, thermal, and magnetic tools. Electronic spectra were discussed by TD-DFT and the descriptions of frontier molecular orbitals and the relocations of the electron density were determined. Calculated g-tensor values showed best agreement with experimental values from EPR when carried out using both the B3LYP and B3PW91 functional. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Amplitude Sensing below the Zero-Point Fluctuations with a Two-Dimensional Trapped-Ion Mechanical Oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, K A; Bohnet, J G; Sawyer, B C; Britton, J W; Bollinger, J J

    2017-06-30

    We present a technique to measure the amplitude of a center-of-mass (c.m.) motion of a two-dimensional ion crystal of ∼100 ions. By sensing motion at frequencies far from the c.m. resonance frequency, we experimentally determine the technique's measurement imprecision. We resolve amplitudes as small as 50 pm, 40 times smaller than the c.m. mode zero-point fluctuations. The technique employs a spin-dependent, optical-dipole force to couple the mechanical oscillation to the electron spins of the trapped ions, enabling a measurement of one quadrature of the c.m. motion through a readout of the spin state. We demonstrate sensitivity limits set by spin projection noise and spin decoherence due to off-resonant light scattering. When performed on resonance with the c.m. mode frequency, the technique demonstrated here can enable the detection of extremely weak forces (limits and search for physics beyond the standard model.

  14. Quantum tunneling recombination in a system of randomly distributed trapped electrons and positive ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagonis, Vasilis; Kulp, Christopher; Chaney, Charity-Grace; Tachiya, M

    2017-09-13

    During the past 10 years, quantum tunneling has been established as one of the dominant mechanisms for recombination in random distributions of electrons and positive ions, and in many dosimetric materials. Specifically quantum tunneling has been shown to be closely associated with two important effects in luminescence materials, namely long term afterglow luminescence and anomalous fading. Two of the common assumptions of quantum tunneling models based on random distributions of electrons and positive ions are: (a) An electron tunnels from a donor to the nearest acceptor, and (b) the concentration of electrons is much lower than that of positive ions at all times during the tunneling process. This paper presents theoretical studies for arbitrary relative concentrations of electrons and positive ions in the solid. Two new differential equations are derived which describe the loss of charge in the solid by tunneling, and they are solved analytically. The analytical solution compares well with the results of Monte Carlo simulations carried out in a random distribution of electrons and positive ions. Possible experimental implications of the model are discussed for tunneling phenomena in long term afterglow signals, and also for anomalous fading studies in feldspars and apatite samples.

  15. MATS and LaSpec: High-precision experiments using ion traps and lasers at FAIR

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez, D; Scheidenberger, C; Kreim, S; Gomez-Hornillos, M B; Aysto, J; Dickel, T; Geppert, C; Novikov, Y N; Tain, J L; Garcia-Ramos, J E; Bollen, G; Hobein, M; Audi, G; Beck, D; Winkler, M; Jesch, C; Vasiliev, A; Sanchez, R; Neidherr, D; Huber, G; Weber, C; Suhonen, M; Reinhard, P G; Jokinen, A; Lapierre, A; Bender, M; Martinez, T; Solders, A; Huyse, M; Matos, M; Szerypo, J; Seliverstov, M; Cortes, G; Cakirli, R B; Van Duppen, P; George, S; Block, M; Ahammed, M; Herfurth, F; Neyens, G; Habs, D; Thirolf, P G; Flanagan, K T; Roux, C; Schneider, D; Brodeur, M; Yordanov, D; Marx, G; Koudriavtsev, I; De, A; Boehm, C; Noertershaeuser, W; Blaum, K; Schabinger, B; Ettenauer, S; Plass, W R; Wendt, K; Nagy, S; Vorobjev, G; Minaya-Ramirez, E; Heenen, P-H; Quint, W; Kester, O; Le Blanc, F; Ray, A; Billowes, J; Kuehl, T; Kraemer, J; Lunney, D; Kolhinen, V; Rubio, B; Brunner, T; Nesterenko, D; Ferrer, R; Algora, A; Repp, J; Naimi, S; Eberhardt, K; Ziegler, F; Popov, A; Krieger, A; Campbell, P; Gartzke, E; Ketelaer, J; Heinz, S; Delheij, P; Ullrich, J; Dax, A; Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J R; Eliseev, S; Das, P; Cano-Ott, D; Petrick, M; Moore, I; Litvinov, Y A; Schwarz, S; Dilling, J; Geissel, H; Bushaw, B A; Gusev, Y; Lallena, A M; Schweikhard, L; Schuch, R; Herlert, A

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear ground state properties including mass, charge radii, spins and moments can be determined by applying atomic physics techniques such as Penning-trap based mass spectrometry and laser spectroscopy. The MATS and LaSpec setups at the low-energy beamline at FAIR will allow us to extend the knowledge of these properties further into the region far from stability. The mass and its inherent connection with the nuclear binding energy is a fundamental property of a nuclide, a unique ``fingerprint{''}. Thus, precise mass values are important for a variety of applications, ranging from nuclear-structure studies like the investigation of shell closures and the onset of deformation, tests of nuclear mass models and mass formulas, to tests of the weak interaction and of the Standard Model. The required relative accuracy ranges from 10(-5) to below 10(-8) for radionuclides, which most often have half-lives well below 1 s. Substantial progress in Penning trap mass spectrometry has made this method a prime choice for ...

  16. A computational study of doped olivine structured Cd2GeO4: local defect trapping of interstitial oxide ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSloy, Adam J; Kelly, Paul F; Slater, Peter R; Panchmatia, Pooja M

    2016-09-21

    Computational modelling techniques have been employed to investigate defects and ionic conductivity in Cd 2 GeO 4 . We show due to highly unfavourable intrinsic defect formation energies the ionic conducting ability of pristine Cd 2 GeO 4 is extremely limited. The modelling results suggest trivalent doping on the Cd site as a viable means of promoting the formation of the oxygen interstitial defects. However, the defect cluster calculations for the first time explicitly suggest a strong association of the oxide defects to the dopant cations and tetrahedral units. Defect clustering is a complicated phenomenon and therefore not trivial to assess. In this study the trapping energies are explicitly quantified. The trends are further confirmed by molecular dynamic simulations. Despite this, the calculated diffusion coefficients do suggest an enhanced oxide ion mobility in the doped system compared to the pristine Cd 2 GeO 4 .

  17. Analysis of Disperse Dyes Using Liquid Chromatography/Linear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry (LC/LIT-MSn) and Database Construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Takao; Ikeue, Takahisa; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Handa, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Liquid chromatography/linear ion trap mass spectrometry (LC/LIT-MS(n)) was used to construct a database of disperse dyes. Fifty-three standard dyes were subjected to LC/LIT-MS(n) and characterized based on their mass spectra (MS, MS(2), and MS(3)), values of λmax (maximum absorption wavelength in the UV-visible spectrum), and retention times. The results demonstrate that it is possible to reliably identify coexisting dyes that cannot be separated by LC or detected by diode array detection due to their low molecular absorption coefficients. In addition, the by-products included in the standard dyes were found to provide important information for the identification and discrimination of dyestuffs synthesized using different processes. The confirmation of the effectiveness of LC/LIT-MS(n) analysis in detecting small amounts of disperse dyes in this study shows its potential for use in the discrimination of dyed fibers obtained at crime scenes.

  18. Sub-mm Scale Fiber Guided Deep/Vacuum Ultra-Violet Optical Source for Trapped Mercury Ion Clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Lin; Burt, Eric A.; Huang, Shouhua; Tjoelker, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the functionality of a mercury capillary lamp with a diameter in the sub-mm range and deep ultraviolet (DUV)/ vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation delivery via an optical fiber integrated with the capillary. DUV spectrum control is observed by varying the fabrication parameters such as buffer gas type and pressure, capillary diameter, electrical resonator design, and temperature. We also show spectroscopic data of the 199Hg+ hyper-fine transition at 40.5GHz when applying the above fiber optical design. We present efforts toward micro-plasma generation in hollow-core photonic crystal fiber with related optical design and theoretical estimations. This new approach towards a more practical DUV optical interface could benefit trapped ion clock developments for future ultra-stable frequency reference and time-keeping applications.

  19. Identification and quantitation of auxins in plants by liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization ion trap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qiaomei; Zhang, Lan; Chen, Tianwen; Lu, Minghua; Ping, Tong; Chen, Guonan

    2008-08-01

    Auxin is an important phylohormone, which regulates specific physiological responses such as division, elongation and differentiation of cells. A new method using liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization ion trap mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-ITMS) has been developed for identification and quantitation of four auxins. Under the optimum conditions, four auxins (indole-3-acetic acid, indole-3-propionic acid, indole-3-butyric acid and 1-naphthylacetic acid) were completely separated and quantitated within 7 min with a minimum detection limit of 8.0 ng mL(-1) with relative standard deviations lower than 5.0%. This method also has been applied to analysis of auxins in Chinese cabbage where, even with a complicated serious background perturbation due to the natural biological matrix, the mean recoveries ranged from 77.5% to 99.8%. Finally, we discuss the MS-relevant properties of the identified auxins in detail. Copyright (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. The detection of piroxicam, tenoxicam and their metabolites in equine urine by electrospray ionisation ion trap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, Andrew R; Suann, Craig J; Stenhouse, Allen M

    2004-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted into the metabolism and urinary excretion of orally administered piroxicam and tenoxicam in the horse. The major component detected in urine after the administration of piroxicam was 5'-hydroxypiroxicam, which was detectable up to 24 h post-administration. Unchanged piroxicam was present only as a minor component. In contrast, unchanged tenoxicam was the major component observed after the administration of tenoxicam, being detectable for 72 h post-administration, while 5'-hydroxytenoxicam was a minor component. Phase II beta-glucuronide conjugation in each case was found to be negligible. The ion trap mass spectral characteristics of piroxicam, tenoxicam, 5'-hydroxypiroxicam and 5'-hydroxytenoxicam under electrospray ionisation conditions were examined in some detail. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Detection of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) in urine by gas chromatography-ion trap tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklerov, J H; Kalasinsky, K S; Ehorn, C A

    1999-10-01

    A confirmatory method for the detection and quantitation of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) is presented. The method employs gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS-MS) using an internal ionization ion trap detector for sensitive MS-MS-in-time measurements of LSD extracted from urine. Following a single-step solid-phase extraction of 5 mL of urine, underivatized LSD can be measured with limits of quantitation and detection of 80 and 20 pg/mL, respectively. Temperature-programmed on-column injections of urine extracts were linear over the concentration range 20-2000 pg/mL (r2 = 0.999). Intraday and interday coefficients of variation were LSD-positive samples in this laboratory. Comparisons with alternate GC-MS methods and extraction procedures are discussed.

  2. Negative ion surface plasma source development for plasma trap injectors in Novosibirsk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bel'chenko, Yu.I.; Dimov, G.I.; Dudnikov, V.G.; Kupriyanov, A.S.

    1989-01-01

    Work on high-current ion sources carried out at the Novosibirsk Institute of Nuclear Physics (INP) is presented. The INP investigations on ''pure plasma'' planotron and ''pure surface'' secondary emission systems of H - generation, which preceded the surface-plasma concept developed in Novosibirsk, are described. The physical basis of the surface-plasma method of negative-ion production is considered. The versions and operating characteristics of different surface-plasma sources including the multi-ampere (approx-gt 10A) source are discussed. Research on efficient large-area (∼10 2 cm 2 ) negative ion surface-plasma emitters is described. The INP long-pulse multiaperture surface- plasma generators, with a current of about 1A, are described. 38 refs., 17 figs

  3. Scalable Loading of a Two-Dimensional Trapped-Ion Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-25

    2×2 square geometry with an array pitch of 500 µm. Although ion-ion interactions are too small at this dis- tance for practical multi-qubit logic...two-qubit gates [13]. The additional space afforded by this array pitch may permit the use of in- tegrated photonic devices to route the large number of...Itano, J. Jost, E. Knill, C. Langer, et al., Nature 432 , 602 (2004). [19] H. L. Schwartz, T. M. Miller, and B. Bederson, Phys. Rev. A 10, 1924 (1974

  4. Radium removal from Australian spa waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickson, B.L.; Meakins, R.L.; Bland, C.J.

    1982-01-01

    The dissolved radium content of some mineral spring waters in Victoria and Queensland has been found to exceed the maximum permissible concentration in drinking water. Activities in excess of 40 pCi/1 were measured in some bottles. Studies revealed that the dissolved radium content decreased markedly if the spring water was aerated and filtered prior to bottling. The sediment removed contained ferric hydroxide which is a natural scavenging agent for radium. The formation of such sediments in storage tanks and their removal prior to bottling may create a possible radiation hazard

  5. Observation of extreme ultraviolet transitions in highly charged Ba{sup 16+} to Ba{sup 23+} ions with electron beam ion trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, S.; Shimizu, E.; Nakamura, N. [Institute for Laser Science, The University of Electro-Communications, Tokyo 182-8585 (Japan)

    2016-03-15

    We have investigated extreme ultraviolet emission from highly charged barium using a compact electron beam ion trap at the Tokyo EBIT laboratory. The spectra were recorded for several beam energies ranging from 440 to 740 eV, while keeping the electron beam current constant at 10 mA. Radiation from charge states Zr-like Ba{sup 16+} to As-like Ba{sup 23+} were recorded and identified by varying the electron beam energy across the ionization thresholds and comparing with calculated results. The calculations were performed with a detailed relativistic configuration interaction approach using the Flexible Atomic Code. Several new lines belonging to electric dipole transitions were observed and identified.

  6. Gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange of dinucleotides and 5'-monophosphate dinucleotides in a quadrupole ion trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipuk, Joseph E.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2009-10-01

    Gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange reactions of four deprotonated dinucleotides (dAA, dAG, dGA, dGG) and their 5'-monophosphate analogs (5'-dAA, 5'-dAG, 5'-dGA, 5'-dGG) with D2O were performed in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. Significant differences in the rates and extents of exchange were found when the 5'-hydroxyl group of the dinucleotides was replaced by a phosphate functionality. Extensive and nucleobase-dependent exchange occurred for the deprotonated 5'-monophosphate dinucleotides, whereas the dinucleotides all exhibited essentially the same limited exchange. Results for the isomeric 5'-monophosphates, 5'-dAG and 5'-dGA, were remarkably different, indicating that the H/D exchange reaction was sequence dependent. An elaborate array of computations was performed to investigate the gas-phase structures of the ions individually and also as participants in ion-molecule complexes with D2O. Integration of the experimental and theoretical results supports a relay exchange mechanism and suggests that the exchange behavior depends highly on the identity and sequence of the nucleobases as well as their ability to interact with the deprotonation site. Finally, a shuttling mechanism is proposed to possibly account for the bimodal H/D exchange behavior observed for deprotonated 5'P-dGA. In this case, hydrogen bonding between the nucleobases in concert with interaction from the deuterating agent creates an ion-molecule complex in which hydrogen and deuterium atoms may be shuttled amongst the hydrogen-bonded participants.

  7. Screening of Carotenoids in Tomato Fruits by Using Liquid Chromatography with Diode Array-Linear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentili, Alessandra; Caretti, Fulvia; Ventura, Salvatore; Pérez-Fernández, Virginia; Venditti, Alessandro; Curini, Roberta

    2015-08-26

    This paper presents an analytical strategy for a large-scale screening of carotenoids in tomato fruits by exploiting the potentialities of the triple quadrupole-linear ion trap hybrid mass spectrometer (QqQLIT). The method involves separation on C30 reversed-phase column and identification by means of diode array detection (DAD) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (APCI-MS). The authentic standards of six model compounds were used to optimize the separative conditions and to predict the chromatographic behavior of untargeted carotenoids. An information dependent acquisition (IDA) was performed with (i) enhanced-mass scan (EMS) as the survey scan, (ii) enhanced-resolution (ER) scan to obtain the exact mass of the precursor ions (16-35 ppm), and (iii) enhanced product ion (EPI) scan as dependent scan to obtain structural information. LC-DAD-multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) chromatograms were also acquired for the identification of targeted carotenoids occurring at low concentrations; for the first time, the relative abundance between the MRM transitions (ion ratio) was used as an extra tool for the MS distinction of structural isomers and the related families of geometrical isomers. The whole analytical strategy was high-throughput, because a great number of experimental data could be acquired with few analytical steps, and cost-effective, because only few standards were used; when applied to characterize some tomato varieties ('Tangerine', 'Pachino', 'Datterino', and 'Camone') and passata of 'San Marzano' tomatoes, our method succeeded in identifying up to 44 carotenoids in the 'Tangerine'" variety.

  8. Radium and barium in the Amazon River system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, W.S.; Edmond, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    Data for 226 Ra and 228 Ra in the Amazon River system show that the activity of each radium isotope is strongly correlated with barium concentrations. Two trends are apparent, one for rivers which drain shield areas and another for all other rivers. These data suggest that there has been extensive fractionation of U, Th, and Ba during weathering in the Amazon basin. The 226 Ra data fit a flux model for the major ions indicating that 226 Ra behaves conservatively along the main channel of the Amazon River

  9. Structural elucidation of biologically active neomycin N-octyl derivatives in a regioisomeric mixture by means of liquid chromatography/ion trap time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giera, M.; de Vlieger, J.S.B.; Lingeman, H.; Irth, H.; Niessen, W.M.A.

    2010-01-01

    Structural elucidation of six regioisomers of mono-N-octyl derivatized neomycin is achieved using MSn (up to n1/4 4) on an ion trap time-of-flight (IT-TOF) instrument equipped with electrospray ionization. The mixture of six derivatized neomycin analogues was generated by reductive amination in a

  10. Performance of the linear ion trap Orbitrap mass analyzer for qualitative and quantitative analysis of drugs of abuse and relevant metabolites in sewage water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijlsma, L.; Emke, E.; Hernández, F.; de Voogt, P.

    2013-01-01

    This work illustrates the potential of liquid chromatography coupled to a hybrid linear ion trap Fourier Transform Orbitrap mass spectrometer for the simultaneous identification and quantification of 24 drugs of abuse and relevant metabolites in sewage water. The developed methodology consisted of

  11. Characterization of structure and function of ZS-9, a K+ selective ion trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavros, Fiona; Yang, Alex; Leon, Alejandro; Nuttall, Mark; Rasmussen, Henrik S

    2014-01-01

    Hyperkalemia, a condition in which serum potassium ions (K+) exceed 5.0 mmol/L, is a common electrolyte disorder associated with substantial morbidity. Current methods of managing hyperkalemia, including organic polymer resins such as sodium polystyrene sulfonate (SPS), are poorly tolerated and/or not effective. Sodium zirconium cyclosilicate (ZS-9) is under clinical development as an orally administered, non-absorbed, novel, inorganic microporous zirconium silicate compound that selectively removes excess K+ in vivo. The development, structure and ion exchange properties of ZS-9 and its hypothesized mechanism of action are described. Based on calculation of the interatomic distances between the atoms forming the ZS-9 micropores, the size of the pore opening was determined to be ∼ 3 Å (∼ diameter of unhydrated K+). Unlike nonspecific organic polymer resins like SPS, the ZS-9 K+ exchange capacity (KEC) was unaffected by the presence of calcium (Ca2+) or magnesium ions (Mg2+) and showed>25-fold selectivity for K+ over either Ca2+ or Mg2+. Conversely, the selectivity of SPS for K+ was only 0.2-0.3 times its selectivity for Ca2+ or Mg2+in mixed ionic media. It is hypothesized that the high K+ specificity of ZS-9 is attributable to the chemical composition and diameter of the micropores, which possibly act in an analogous manner to the selectivity filter utilized by physiologic K+ channels. This hypothesized mechanism of action is supported by the multi-ion exchange studies. The effect of pH on the KEC of ZS-9 was tested in different media buffered to mimic different portions of the human gastrointestinal tract. Rapid K+ uptake was observed within 5 minutes - mainly in the simulated small intestinal and large intestinal fluids, an effect that was sustained for up to 1 hour. If approved, ZS-9 will represent a novel, first-in-class therapy for hyperkalemia with improved capacity, selectivity, and speed for entrapping K+ when compared to currently available options.

  12. Double penning trap technique for precise g factor determinations in highly charged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haffner, H.; Beier, T.; Kluge, H.J.; Quint, W.; Stahl, S.; Haffner, H.; Djekic, S.; Hermanspah, N.; Stahl, S.; Verdu, J.; Valenzuela, T.; Werth, G.

    2003-01-01

    We present a detailed description of an experiment to determine the magnetic moment of an electron bound in hydrogen-like carbon. This forms a high-accuracy test of bound-state quantum electro-dynamics. Special emphasis is given to the discussion of systematic uncertainties which limit our present accuracy. The described experimental setup may also be used for the determination of g factors in other highly charged ions. (authors)

  13. Simultaneous analysis of strychnine and brucine and their major metabolites by liquid chromatography-electrospray ion trap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xueguo; Lai, Yongquan; Cai, Zongwei

    2012-04-01

    A liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-ion trap mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-ITMS) method was developed for the simultaneous analysis of strychnine, brucine and their major metabolites. Strychnine and brucine were individually incubated with rat liver S9 fraction. The incubation samples were pooled together and analyzed with LC-ESI-ITMS in positive ion and full-scan detection mode. The calibration curves of strychnine and brucine in rat liver showed good linearity in ranges of 0.020 to 8.0 µg/mL for strychnine and 0.020 to 8.5 µg/mL for brucine. The limits of detections were both 0.008 µg/mL and the recoveries were 88.3 and 83.2% for strychnine and brucine, respectively. Two metabolites were identified as strychnine N-oxide and brucine N-oxide by comparing the molecular mass, retention time, full-scan mass spectra, tandem MS and MS(3) spectra with those of strychnine and brucine. The developed method provided high sensitivity and selectivity for the determination of poisonous alkaloids and their major metabolites and can be applied in the determination of samples in forensic and clinically toxicological cases.

  14. The ninth International Symposium on Electron Beam Ion Sources and Traps and Their Applications, 15-17 April 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Ohtani, Shunsuke

    2004-01-01

    The ninth International Symposium on Electron Beam Ion Sources and Traps and Their Applications - EBIS/T 2004 was held at the Tokyo Metropolitan University (TMU), 15-17 April 2004. There were about 40 participants and about 30 papers presented. The meeting has shown the remarkable progress in science and technology with the EBIS/T machines. In this meeting, besides the normal presentations related to the EBIS/T works, a special session was organized on the last day which was dedicated to Professors N Kobayashi and K Okuno, who have contributed to the EBIS/T development and to the physics of highly charged ions (HCI), to mark their retirement from the TMU in March 2004. In the evening of the first day, there was a laboratory tour where the participants enjoyed seeing the Tokyo EBIT facility and also a beer party in a small hall next to the laboratory. The banquet was held in a traditional Japanese restaurant in a village under Mt Takao with the Japanese meals and performances, after seeing the HCI-research activities in the TMU. The next EBIS/T symposium will be held in Heidelberg in the summer of 2007 as a satellite meeting of XXV ICPEAC. We are looking forward to the next exciting meeting there. Finally, we thank all of TMU staffs and students for their help during the meeting. (preface)

  15. Radium, Marie Curie and modern science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langevin-Joliot, H

    1998-11-01

    In 1898, the discovery of two new elements, polonium and radium, reawakened interest in the topic of uranic rays discovered 2 years before by H. Becquerel. Radioactivity, a name coined by Marie Curie, became a major research field for decades. The contrasting personalities of Pierre Curie, already a first-rank physicist, and of the young Marie Curie-Sklodowska as they undertook their common work are described. It is shown how a well-chosen quantitative method and a systematic approach combining physics and chemistry led to the discovery within less than 1 year. The special role of radium and the determination of its atomic weight by Marie Curie followed by her long-term program for accumulating pure radium salts are emphasized. The first woman with a full professorship at a French University, Marie Curie created and managed the Radium Institute.

  16. Recent cases of radium-induced malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brues, A.M.

    1978-01-01

    Five cases of malignant disease attributed to radium in patients with measured body burdens have been discovered since 1974, including three bone sarcomas and two mastoid carcinomas. Pertinent findings in these cases are summarized here

  17. Recent cases of radium-induced malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, E.E.

    1984-01-01

    Three cases of malignant disease attributed to radium in patients with measured body burdens have been observed since 1978 - one paranasal sinus carcinoma, one mastoid carcinoma, and one fibrosarcoma of bone. These cases are summarized here. 4 references

  18. The Radiochemical and Radiopharmaceutical Applications of Radium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gott Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on the chemistry and application of radium isotopes to environmental monitoring, analytical, and medicinal uses. In recent years, radium has been used primarily as a tracer to study the migration of radioactive substances in environmental systems. Tracing the naturally occurring radium isotopes in mineral and water sources allows for the determination of source location, residence time, and concentrations. An understanding of the concentration of radionuclides in our food and water sources is essential to everyone’s health as alpha particle decay is highly damaging in vivo. Due to this high radiobiological effectiveness, there is increased interest in using alpha-emitting radionuclides to prepare new, therapeutic radiopharmaceutical drugs. Selected studies from the recent literature are provided as examples of these modern applications of radium isotopes.

  19. Preliminary study of radium-contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Healy, J.W.; Rodgers, J.C.

    1978-10-01

    A preliminary study was made of the potential radiation exposures to people from radium-226 contamination in the soil in order to provide guidance on limits to be applied in decontaminating land. Pathways included were inhalation of radium from resuspension; ingestion of radium with foods; external gamma radiation from radium daughters; inhalation of radon and daughter, both in the open air and in houses; and the intake of 210 Pb and 210 Po from both inhalation and ingestion. The depth of the contaminated layer is of importance for external exposure and especially for radon emanation. The most limiting pathway was found to be emanation of the radon into buildings with limiting values comparable to those found naturally in many areas

  20. Experimental study of radium partitioning between anorthite and melt at 1 atm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, S; Burnett, D; Asimow, P; Phinney, D; Hutcheon, I

    2007-03-08

    We present the first experimental radium mineral/melt partitioning data, specifically between anorthite and a CMAS melt at atmospheric pressure. Ion microprobe measurement of coexisting anorthite and glass phases produces a molar D{sub Ra} = 0.040 {+-} 0.006 and D{sub Ra}/D{sub Ba} = 0.23 {+-} 0.05 at 1400 C. Our results indicate that lattice strain partitioning models fit the divalent (Ca, Sr, Ba, Ra) partition coefficient data of this study well, supporting previous work on crustal melting and magma chamber dynamics that has relied on such models to approximate radium partitioning behavior in the absence of experimentally determined values.

  1. Global Images of Trapped Ring Current Ions During Main Phase of 17 March 2015 Geomagnetic Storm as Observed by TWINS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, J. D.; Goldstein, J.; McComas, D. J.; Valek, P.; Fok, Mei-Ching; Hwang, Kyoung-Joo

    2016-01-01

    A unique view of the trapped particles in the inner magnetosphere provided by energetic neutral atom (ENA) imaging is used to observe the dynamics of the spatial structure and the pitch angle anisotropy on a global scale during the last 6 h of the main phase of a large geomagnetic storm (minimum SYM-H 230 nT) that began on 17 March 2015. Ion flux and pressure anisotropy obtained from Two Wide-angle Imaging Neutral-atom Spectrometers (TWINS) ENA images are shown. The ion flux shows two peaks, an inner one at approximately radii 34 RE in the dusk-to-midnight sector and an outer peak at radii 89 RE prior to midnight. The inner peak is relatively stationary during the entire period with some intensification during the final steep decline in SYM-H to its minimum. The outer peak shows the significant temporal variation brightening and dimming and finally disappearing at the end of the main phase. The pressure anisotropy shows the expected perpendicular pitch angles inside of L 6 but shows parallel pitch angles at greater L values. This is interpreted as consistent with pitch angle-dependent drift as modeled in the Tsy05 magnetic field and Comprehensive Inner Magnetosphere-Ionosphere simulations. The TWINS results are compared directly with Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE)-A measurements. Using 15 min snapshots of flux and pressure anisotropy from TWINS along the path of RBSPICE-A during the 6 h focused upon in this study, the essential features displayed in the TWINS global images are supported.

  2. Development of solid radium-226 reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chessmore, R.B.; Engelder, P.R.; Sill, C.W.

    1983-11-01

    Radium-226 reference materials having a matrix similar to soil or tailings samples are not available in sufficient quantity for use by remedial-action contractors to calibrate their laboratory gamma-ray spectrometers. Such reference materials are needed to provide uniform standardization among measurements made by remedial-action contractors. A task, therefore, was undertaken to prepare about 200 pounds each of three different concentrations of radium-226 reference materials by diluting tailings with high-purity silica. Target values for radium-226 content were 50, 15, and 5 pCi/g. The radium-226 content of the reference materials was measured by C.W. Sill of EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, using a high- resolution alpha spectrometry technique standardized with National Bureau of Standards (NBS) standard 4961. A summary of this technique is provided in Appendix A of this report. An independent measurement of the radium-226 content was conducted by Bendix Field Engineering Corporation (Bendix), Grand Junction, Colorado, using a high-resolution Ge(Li) detector, which was calibrated using the New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) 100-A Series standards. The Ge(Li) detector has also been used to determine the radium-226 content in the calibration models at the Grand Junction facility; these models are used by remedial-action contractors for calibration of borehole logging gamma-ray probes. 8 references, 12 tables

  3. Measurements of the intercombination and forbidden lines from helium-like ions in Tokamaks and Electron Beam Ion Traps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitter, M; Hill, K W; von Goeler, S; Stodiek, W; Beiersdorfer, P; Rice, J E; Ince-Cushman, A

    2007-08-22

    The paper reviews the results from tokamak experiments for the line ratios x/w, y/w, and z/w from helium-like ions with Z in the range from 14 to 28. With exception of the DITE experiments, where these line ratios were found to be in agreement with theoretical predictions, all other tokamak experiments yielded values that were significantly larger than predicted. The reasons for these discrepancies are not yet understood. It is possible that radial profile effects were not properly taken into account in the majority of the tokamak experiments. The paper also gives a short historical review of the X-ray diagnostic developments and also presents very recent data from a new type of X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer, which records spatially resolved spectra with a spatial resolution of about 1 cm in the plasma. These new data can be Abel inverted, so that it will be possible to determine line ratios at each radial position in the plasma. Effects of radial profiles, which may have affected the chord-integrated measurements of the past, will thus be eliminated in the future.

  4. Personal characteristics relating to radium loss over a decade or more in radium dial workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stebbings, J.H.; Jansen, A.; Kotek, T.J.

    1986-01-01

    Personal habits and biological characteristics of 42 female Illinois radium workers first employed during the 1920s were analyzed in relationship to radium loss in late adult life. The 42 women met the criteria that they first were examined between 1957 and 1969 and are no longer employed, have had two or more radium body-burden measurements by gamma spectroscopy, 10-year minimum interval exists between initial and final measurements, and exhibit a RaC body burden in 1970 or later of ≥.137 kBQ. High radium body burdens are associated with decreased rates of radium elimination, as previously described. However, the most powerful predictor was coffee/tea consumption, increased consumption being associated with increased rates of radium elimination and explaining ∼35% of the variance. The effect persisted after deletion of smokers and subjects with x-ray evidence of bone damage. Weight/height ratios were positively associated with radium excretion. Individuals smoking cigarettes throughout the study period had significantly low rates of elimination of radium, similar to subjects with x-ray evidence of significant radiation-induced bone damage. Both smokers and subjects with x-ray evidence of radiation damage to bone had low weight/height ratios, suggesting that biological promoters of radiation damage to bone may exist. Rates of radium elimination were significantly associated with (linear) bone density, demonstrating that rates of loss of radium cannot be assumed to be independent of adult or postmenopausal bone density losses. Number of children and age of menopause did not have demonstrable effects on radium elimination. 9 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs

  5. The injection of inert gas ions into solids: their trapping and escape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, G.; Armour, D.G.; Donnelly, S.E.; Ingram, D.C.; Webb, R.P.

    1980-01-01

    Basic information is required to understand fission gas generation and its consequence for swelling and embrittlement in fission reactors, for understanding and controlling first wall problems in fusion reactors and for attempting to design storage for active gas waste. In all of these areas the rare gas atoms are generated with kinetic energy and may thus interact differently, during their slowing down, with the solid than if they had been introduced more gently (e.g. via diffusion) into the solid. An important method of simulating the behaviour of such energetic rare gas atoms in solids is via external irradiation of the solid with rare gas ions of appropriate species and energies and it is the purpose of this review to evaluate studies of this nature. The review is divided into three parts. The first describes experimental techniques, discusses the results of measurements of how ions penetrate into and may be retained in a solid, and outlines theoretical interpretations of the data. The mechanisms of gas atom dissolution and thermal transport in solids are of profound importance and so, in the second part of this review, attention is devoted to how the technique of post-implantation thermal evolution spectrometry can be employed to attempt to understand some of these processes. Particular attention is paid to the difficulties of unique interpretation of evolution spectra. In the final section, consideration will be given to the processes which lead to the inevitable saturation of solids undergoing continued irradiation with rare gas ions and experimental measurements and their probable interpretation will be discussed. Since many materials are of importance in the context of this symposium, reference will be made to as broad a range of studies as possible. (author)

  6. A Brief History in Time of Ion Traps and their Achievements in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzscheiter, M. H.

    1994-01-01

    A short history of the development of the ion storage technique for precision experiments is given. This is by no means meant to be a complete review of the field, but the intend is to use a few specific examples to describe how the persistence, ingenuity, and experimental skill of a few people has generated the core of a field which is now growing at an ever faster pace, spreading into new areas, developing sub fields, and allowing a view at nature, using very modest experimental equipment, which by far rivals even the most ambitious dreams of high energy physics.

  7. Characterization of structure and function of ZS-9, a K+ selective ion trap.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona Stavros

    Full Text Available Hyperkalemia, a condition in which serum potassium ions (K+ exceed 5.0 mmol/L, is a common electrolyte disorder associated with substantial morbidity. Current methods of managing hyperkalemia, including organic polymer resins such as sodium polystyrene sulfonate (SPS, are poorly tolerated and/or not effective. Sodium zirconium cyclosilicate (ZS-9 is under clinical development as an orally administered, non-absorbed, novel, inorganic microporous zirconium silicate compound that selectively removes excess K+ in vivo. The development, structure and ion exchange properties of ZS-9 and its hypothesized mechanism of action are described. Based on calculation of the interatomic distances between the atoms forming the ZS-9 micropores, the size of the pore opening was determined to be ∼ 3 Å (∼ diameter of unhydrated K+. Unlike nonspecific organic polymer resins like SPS, the ZS-9 K+ exchange capacity (KEC was unaffected by the presence of calcium (Ca2+ or magnesium ions (Mg2+ and showed>25-fold selectivity for K+ over either Ca2+ or Mg2+. Conversely, the selectivity of SPS for K+ was only 0.2-0.3 times its selectivity for Ca2+ or Mg2+in mixed ionic media. It is hypothesized that the high K+ specificity of ZS-9 is attributable to the chemical composition and diameter of the micropores, which possibly act in an analogous manner to the selectivity filter utilized by physiologic K+ channels. This hypothesized mechanism of action is supported by the multi-ion exchange studies. The effect of pH on the KEC of ZS-9 was tested in different media buffered to mimic different portions of the human gastrointestinal tract. Rapid K+ uptake was observed within 5 minutes - mainly in the simulated small intestinal and large intestinal fluids, an effect that was sustained for up to 1 hour. If approved, ZS-9 will represent a novel, first-in-class therapy for hyperkalemia with improved capacity, selectivity, and speed for entrapping K+ when compared to currently

  8. MRM screening/biomarker discovery with linear ion trap MS: a library of human cancer-specific peptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Xu; Lazar, Iulia M

    2009-01-01

    The discovery of novel protein biomarkers is essential in the clinical setting to enable early disease diagnosis and increase survivability rates. To facilitate differential expression analysis and biomarker discovery, a variety of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS)-based protein profiling techniques have been developed. For achieving sensitive detection and accurate quantitation, targeted MS screening approaches, such as multiple reaction monitoring (MRM), have been implemented. MCF-7 breast cancer protein cellular extracts were analyzed by 2D-strong cation exchange (SCX)/reversed phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) separations interfaced to linear ion trap MS detection. MS data were interpreted with the Sequest-based Bioworks software (Thermo Electron). In-house developed Perl-scripts were used to calculate the spectral counts and the representative fragment ions for each peptide. In this work, we report on the generation of a library of 9,677 peptides (p < 0.001), representing ~1,572 proteins from human breast cancer cells, that can be used for MRM/MS-based biomarker screening studies. For each protein, the library provides the number and sequence of detectable peptides, the charge state, the spectral count, the molecular weight, the parameters that characterize the quality of the tandem mass spectrum (p-value, DeltaM, Xcorr, DeltaCn, Sp, no. of matching a, b, y ions in the spectrum), the retention time, and the top 10 most intense product ions that correspond to a given peptide. Only proteins identified by at least two spectral counts are listed. The experimental distribution of protein frequencies, as a function of molecular weight, closely matched the theoretical distribution of proteins in the human proteome, as provided in the SwissProt database. The amino acid sequence coverage of the identified proteins ranged from 0.04% to 98.3%. The highest-abundance proteins in the cellular extract had a molecular weight (MW)<50,000. Preliminary experiments have

  9. A study of tungsten spectra using large helical device and compact electron beam ion trap in NIFS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, S.; Goto, M.; Murakami, I. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); Department of Fusion Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); Dong, C. F.; Kato, D.; Sakaue, H. A.; Oishi, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); Hasuo, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Koike, F. [Physics Laboratory, School of Medicine, Kitasato University, Sagamihara 252-0374 (Japan); Nakamura, N. [Institute of Laser Science, University of Electro-Communications, Tokyo 182-8585 (Japan); Sasaki, A. [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Research Agency, Kizugawa 619-0215, Kyoto (Japan); Wang, E. H. [Department of Fusion Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan)

    2013-07-11

    Tungsten spectra have been observed from Large Helical Device (LHD) and Compact electron Beam Ion Trap (CoBIT) in wavelength ranges of visible to EUV. The EUV spectra with unresolved transition array (UTA), e.g., 6g-4f, 5g-4f, 5f-4d and 5p-4d transitions for W{sup +24-+33}, measured from LHD plasmas are compared with those measured from CoBIT with monoenergetic electron beam ({<=}2keV). The tungsten spectra from LHD are well analyzed based on the knowledge from CoBIT tungsten spectra. The C-R model code has been developed to explain the UTA spectra in details. Radial profiles of EUV spectra from highly ionized tungsten ions have been measured and analyzed by impurity transport simulation code with ADPAK atomic database code to examine the ionization balance determined by ionization and recombination rate coefficients. As the first trial, analysis of the tungsten density in LHD plasmas is attempted from radial profile of Zn-like WXLV (W{sup 44+}) 4p-4s transition at 60.9A based on the emission rate coefficient calculated with HULLAC code. As a result, a total tungsten ion density of 3.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10}cm{sup -3} at the plasma center is reasonably obtained. In order to observe the spectra from tungsten ions in lower-ionized charge stages, which can give useful information on the tungsten influx in fusion plasmas, the ablation cloud of the impurity pellet is directly measured with visible spectroscopy. A lot of spectra from neutral and singly ionized tungsten are observed and some of them are identified. A magnetic forbidden line from highly ionized tungsten ions has been examined and Cd-like WXXVII (W{sup 26+}) at 3893.7A is identified as the ground-term fine-structure transition of 4f{sup 23}H{sub 5}-{sup 3}H{sub 4}. The possibility of {alpha} particle diagnostic in D-T burning plasmas using the magnetic forbidden line is discussed.

  10. A study of tungsten spectra using large helical device and compact electron beam ion trap in NIFS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, S.; Goto, M.; Murakami, I.; Dong, C. F.; Kato, D.; Sakaue, H. A.; Oishi, T.; Hasuo, M.; Koike, F.; Nakamura, N.; Sasaki, A.; Wang, E. H.

    2013-01-01

    Tungsten spectra have been observed from Large Helical Device (LHD) and Compact electron Beam Ion Trap (CoBIT) in wavelength ranges of visible to EUV. The EUV spectra with unresolved transition array (UTA), e.g., 6g-4f, 5g-4f, 5f-4d and 5p-4d transitions for W +24-+33 , measured from LHD plasmas are compared with those measured from CoBIT with monoenergetic electron beam (≤2keV). The tungsten spectra from LHD are well analyzed based on the knowledge from CoBIT tungsten spectra. The C-R model code has been developed to explain the UTA spectra in details. Radial profiles of EUV spectra from highly ionized tungsten ions have been measured and analyzed by impurity transport simulation code with ADPAK atomic database code to examine the ionization balance determined by ionization and recombination rate coefficients. As the first trial, analysis of the tungsten density in LHD plasmas is attempted from radial profile of Zn-like WXLV (W 44+ ) 4p-4s transition at 60.9Å based on the emission rate coefficient calculated with HULLAC code. As a result, a total tungsten ion density of 3.5×10 10 cm −3 at the plasma center is reasonably obtained. In order to observe the spectra from tungsten ions in lower-ionized charge stages, which can give useful information on the tungsten influx in fusion plasmas, the ablation cloud of the impurity pellet is directly measured with visible spectroscopy. A lot of spectra from neutral and singly ionized tungsten are observed and some of them are identified. A magnetic forbidden line from highly ionized tungsten ions has been examined and Cd-like WXXVII (W 26+ ) at 3893.7Å is identified as the ground-term fine-structure transition of 4f 23 H 5 - 3 H 4 . The possibility of α particle diagnostic in D-T burning plasmas using the magnetic forbidden line is discussed

  11. Determination of the ReA Electron Beam Ion Trap electron beam radius and current density with an X-ray pinhole camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, Thomas M., E-mail: baumannt@nscl.msu.edu; Lapierre, Alain, E-mail: lapierre@nscl.msu.edu; Kittimanapun, Kritsada; Schwarz, Stefan; Leitner, Daniela; Bollen, Georg [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), Michigan State University (MSU), 640 S. Shaw Lane, East Lansing, Michigan, 48824 (United States)

    2014-07-15

    The Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) of the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University is used as a charge booster and injector for the currently commissioned rare isotope re-accelerator facility ReA. This EBIT charge breeder is equipped with a unique superconducting magnet configuration, a combination of a solenoid and a pair of Helmholtz coils, allowing for a direct observation of the ion cloud while maintaining the advantages of a long ion trapping region. The current density of its electron beam is a key factor for efficient capture and fast charge breeding of continuously injected, short-lived isotope beams. It depends on the radius of the magnetically compressed electron beam. This radius is measured by imaging the highly charged ion cloud trapped within the electron beam with a pinhole camera, which is sensitive to X-rays emitted by the ions with photon energies between 2 keV and 10 keV. The 80%-radius of a cylindrical 800 mA electron beam with an energy of 15 keV is determined to be r{sub 80%}=(212±19)μm in a 4 T magnetic field. From this, a current density of j = (454 ± 83)A/cm{sup 2} is derived. These results are in good agreement with electron beam trajectory simulations performed with TriComp and serve as a test for future electron gun design developments.

  12. The Search for Fundamental Symmetry Violation in Radium Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Matthew; Bishof, Michael; Bailey, Kevin; Greene, John; Mueller, Peter; O'Connor, Thomas; Lu, Zheng-Tian; Rabga, Tenzin; Ready, Roy; Singh, Jaideep

    2017-09-01

    Electric dipole moments (EDMs) are signatures of time-reversal, parity, and charge-parity (CP) violation, which makes them a sensitive probe of expected new physics beyond the Standard Model. Due to its large nuclear octupole deformation and high atomic mass, the radioactive Ra-225 isotope is a favorable EDM case; it is particularly sensitive to CP-violating interactions in the nuclear medium. We have developed a cold-atom approach of measuring the atomic EDM of atoms held stationary in an optical dipole trap, which we have used to place the only upper limit on the EDM of radium, |d(225Ra)|EDM, but also the first time the EDM of any octupole deformed species has been measured. We will present results on a new approach to spin detection that we expect to improve our EDM sensitivity by a factor of 20. Combined with upcoming improvements to our electric field generation, the next measurement should be competitive with the best neutron EDM result, in terms of sensitivity to CP-violating interactions. The Search for Fudamental Symmetry Violation in Radium Nuclei. This work is supported by the U.S. DOE, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, under Contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  13. Direct Analysis of Organic Compounds in Liquid Using a Miniature Photoionization Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer with Pulsed Carrier-Gas Capillary Inlet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xinqiong; Yu, Quan; Zhang, Qian; Ni, Kai; Qian, Xiang; Tang, Fei; Wang, Xiaohao

    2017-08-01

    A miniature ion trap mass spectrometer with capillary direct sampling and vacuum ultraviolet photoionization source was developed to conduct trace analysis of organic compounds in liquids. Self-aspiration sampling is available where the samples are drawn into the vacuum chamber through a capillary with an extremely low flow rate (less than 1 μL/min), which minimizes sample consumption in each analysis to tens of micrograms. A pulsed gas-assisted inlet was designed and optimized to promote sample transmission in the tube and facilitate the cooling of ions, thereby improving instrument sensitivity. A limit of detection of 2 ppb could be achieved for 2,4-dimethylaniline in a methanol solution. The sampling system described in the present study is specifically suitable for a miniature photoionization ion trap mass spectrometer that can perform rapid and online analysis for liquid samples. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  14. Flavor release measurement by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry, construction of interface and mathematical modeling of release profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haahr, Anne-Mette; Madsen, Henrik; Smedsgaard, Jørn

    2003-01-01

    An instrumental on-line retronasal flavor analysis was developed to obtain information about the release of flavor compounds in expired air from humans during eating. The volatile flavor compounds were measured by ion trap mass spectrometry with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source...... (APCI). An interface was designed to sample the breath directly from the nose. The repeat-ability in vitro for seven different flavor compounds came out with relative standard derivation less than 10% in most cases, which is acceptable. In vitro quantification was carried out by a determination...... of the concentration in the gas phase over a flavor solution by GC/MS, followed by measurements of intensities by the APCI ion trap. Ion suppression by acetone in the breath was negligible at concentration levels relevant in these experiments. The instrumental limits of detection for menthone and menthol coincide...

  15. Permanent magnet electron beam ion source/trap systems with bakeable magnets for improved operation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, M; Zschornack, G; Kentsch, U; Ritter, E

    2014-02-01

    The magnetic system of a Dresden electron beam ion source (EBIS) generating the necessary magnetic field with a new type of permanent magnet made of high energy density NdFeB-type material operable at temperatures above 100 °C has been investigated and tested. The employment of such kind of magnets provides simplified operation without the time-consuming installation and de-installation procedures of the magnets for the necessary baking of the ion source after commissioning and maintenance work. Furthermore, with the use of a new magnetization technique the geometrical filling factor of the magnetic Dresden EBIS design could be increased to a filling factor of 100% leading to an axial magnetic field strength of approximately 0.5 T exceeding the old design by 20%. Simulations using the finite element method software Field Precision and their results compared with measurements are presented as well. It could be shown that several baking cycles at temperatures higher than 100 °C did not change the magnetic properties of the setup.

  16. Michelson-Morley analogue for electrons using trapped ions to test Lorentz symmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruttivarasin, T; Ramm, M; Porsev, S G; Tupitsyn, I I; Safronova, M S; Hohensee, M A; Häffner, H

    2015-01-29

    All evidence so far suggests that the absolute spatial orientation of an experiment never affects its outcome. This is reflected in the standard model of particle physics by requiring all particles and fields to be invariant under Lorentz transformations. The best-known tests of this important cornerstone of physics are Michelson-Morley-type experiments verifying the isotropy of the speed of light. For matter, Hughes-Drever-type experiments test whether the kinetic energy of particles is independent of the direction of their velocity, that is, whether their dispersion relations are isotropic. To provide more guidance for physics beyond the standard model, refined experimental verifications of Lorentz symmetry are desirable. Here we search for violation of Lorentz symmetry for electrons by performing an electronic analogue of a Michelson-Morley experiment. We split an electron wave packet bound inside a calcium ion into two parts with different orientations and recombine them after a time evolution of 95 milliseconds. As the Earth rotates, the absolute spatial orientation of the two parts of the wave packet changes, and anisotropies in the electron dispersion will modify the phase of the interference signal. To remove noise, we prepare a pair of calcium ions in a superposition of two decoherence-free states, thereby rejecting magnetic field fluctuations common to both ions. After a 23-hour measurement, we find a limit of h × 11 millihertz (h is Planck's constant) on the energy variations, verifying the isotropy of the electron's dispersion relation at the level of one part in 10(18), a 100-fold improvement on previous work. Alternatively, we can interpret our result as testing the rotational invariance of the Coulomb potential. Assuming that Lorentz symmetry holds for electrons and that the photon dispersion relation governs the Coulomb force, we obtain a fivefold-improved limit on anisotropies in the speed of light. Our result probes Lorentz symmetry violation

  17. Effect of pH and phosphate on trapping capacity of various heavy metal ions with ferritin reactor in flowing seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Bo; Huang, He-Qing; Lin, Qing-Mei; Cai, Zong-Wei; Chen, Ping

    2005-08-01

    We describe a protein reactor consisting of native liver ferritin of Dasyatis akajei (DALF) and a dialysis bag. Our goal was to study a ferritin reactor for its capacity to trap various heavy metal ions (M2+) in flowing seawater. The reactor is sensitive and inexpensive and can be operated by nonprofessional technicians. A positive relationship between the number of trapped M2+ with the DALF reactor and its concentration in the flowing seawater was observed. Both the pH in the medium and the phosphate content within the ferritin cavity strongly affected trapping capacity. It was found that the ferritin released its phosphate compound directly with a shift in pH without the need for releasing reagent, which differs from the phosphate release characteristics of horse spleen ferritin, as previously described. This behavior evidently makes the trapping capacity with the ferritin reactor weaken, indicating that this trapping capacity is tightly connected to its phosphate compound. Our study shows that a self-regulation ability of the ferritin shell rather than its phosphate compound plays an important role in controlling the rate and capacity of trapping M2+. The ferritin reactor was constructed to monitor the contamination level of M2+ in flowing seawater. Our preliminary data along with fieldwork indicate that the DALF reactor is an analytical means for effectively monitoring the contamination level of M2+ in flowing seawater.

  18. In-Source Laser Spectroscopy with the Laser Ion Source and Trap: First Direct Study of the Ground-State Properties of ^{217,219}Po

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Fink

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A Laser Ion Source and Trap (LIST for a thick-target, isotope-separation on-line facility has been implemented at CERN ISOLDE for the production of pure, laser-ionized, radioactive ion beams. It offers two modes of operation, either as an ion guide, which performs similarly to the standard ISOLDE resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS, or as a more selective ion source, where surface-ionized ions from the hot ion-source cavity are repelled by an electrode, while laser ionization is done within a radio-frequency quadrupole ion guide. The first physics application of the LIST enables the suppression of francium contamination in ion beams of neutron-rich polonium isotopes at ISOLDE by more than 1000 with a reduction in laser-ionization efficiency of only 20. Resonance ionization spectroscopy is performed directly inside the LIST device, allowing the study of the hyperfine structure and isotope shift of ^{217}Po for the first time. Nuclear decay spectroscopy of ^{219}Po is performed for the first time, revealing its half-life, α-to-β-decay branching ratio, and α-particle energy. This experiment demonstrates the applicability of the LIST at radioactive ion-beam facilities for the production and study of pure beams of exotic isotopes.

  19. Mechanism of Radial Redistribution of Energetic Trapped Ions Due to m=2/n=1 Internal Reconnection in Joint European Torus Shear Optimized Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N.N. Gorelenkov; A. Gondhalekar; A.A. Korotkov; S.E. Sharapov; D. Testa; and Contributors to the EFDA-JET Workprogramme

    2002-01-18

    Internal radial redistribution of MeV energy ICRF-driven hydrogen minority ions was inferred from neutral particle analyzer measurements during large amplitude MHD activity leading to internal reconnection in Shear Optimized plasmas in the Joint European Torus (JET). A theory is developed for energetic ion redistribution during a reconnection driven by an m=2/n=1 internal kink mode. Plasma motion during reconnection generates an electric field which can change the energy and radial position of the energetic ions. The magnitude of ion energy change depends on the value of the safety factor at the plasma core from which the energetic ions are redistributed. A relation is found for corresponding change in canonical momentum. P(subscript phi), which leads to radial displacement of the ions. The model yields distinctive new features of energetic ion redistribution under such conditions. Predicted characteristics of ion redistribution are compared with the NPA measurements, and good correlation is found. Sometimes fast ions were transported to the plasma edge due to interaction with a long-lived magnetic island which developed after the reconnection and had chirping frequency in the laboratory frame. Convection of resonant ions trapped in a radially moving phase-space island is modeled to understand the physics of such events.

  20. PSI-ECRIT(S) a hybrid magnetic system with a mirror ratio of 10 for H-like heavy ion production and trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Biri, S; Hitz, D

    1999-01-01

    At the Paul Scherrer Institut ( PSI, Switzerland) an experimental program is started to measure the ground state shift and width of pionic hydrogen. To calibrate the crystal spectrometer X-ray transitions in hydrogen-like heavy ions (e.g. Ar17+) produced by ECR ion sources, are necessary. In PSI a superconducting cyclotron trap magnet originally developed for high energy experiments will be transformed into an ECR Ion Trap (ECRIT). The SC-magnet can deliver more than 4 Tesla magnetic fields with a mirror ratio of 2. A careful calculation showed this mirror ratio can be increased upto 10 and the trap can operate with frequencies between 5 and 20 GHz. To form a closed resonance zone a relatively large open structure (LBL-AECRU-type) NdFeB hexapole will be applied. The first tests will be performed with 6.4 GHz. Later higher frequencies (10 or 14.5 GHz) and the 2-frequency heating (6.4+10, 6.4+14.5 or 10+14.5) are planned to be applied to get enough quantity of H-like heavy ions. Since the main goal of this mach...

  1. Co-precipitation of radium with barium and strontium sulfate and its impact on the fate of radium during treatment of produced water from unconventional gas extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tieyuan; Gregory, Kelvin; Hammack, Richard W; Vidic, Radisav D

    2014-04-15

    Radium occurs in flowback and produced waters from hydraulic fracturing for unconventional gas extraction along with high concentrations of barium and strontium and elevated salinity. Radium is often removed from this wastewater by co-precipitation with barium or other alkaline earth metals. The distribution equation for Ra in the precipitate is derived from the equilibrium of the lattice replacement reaction (inclusion) between the Ra(2+) ion and the carrier ions (e.g., Ba(2+) and Sr(2+)) in aqueous and solid phases and is often applied to describe the fate of radium in these systems. Although the theoretical distribution coefficient for Ra-SrSO4 (Kd = 237) is much larger than that for Ra-BaSO4 (Kd = 1.54), previous studies have focused on Ra-BaSO4 equilibrium. This study evaluates the equilibria and kinetics of co-precipitation reactions in Ra-Ba-SO4 and Ra-Sr-SO4 binary systems and the Ra-Ba-Sr-SO4 ternary system under varying ionic strength (IS) conditions that are representative of brines generated during unconventional gas extraction. Results show that radium removal generally follows the theoretical distribution law in binary systems and is enhanced in the Ra-Ba-SO4 system and restrained in the Ra-Sr-SO4 system by high IS. However, the experimental distribution coefficient (Kd') varies widely and cannot be accurately described by the distribution equation, which depends on IS, kinetics of carrier precipitation and does not account for radium removal by adsorption. Radium removal in the ternary system is controlled by the co-precipitation of Ra-Ba-SO4, which is attributed to the rapid BaSO4 nucleation rate and closer ionic radii of Ra(2+) with Ba(2+) than with Sr(2+). Carrier (i.e., barite) recycling during water treatment was shown to be effective in enhancing radium removal even after co-precipitation was completed. Calculations based on experimental results show that Ra levels in the precipitate generated in centralized waste treatment facilities far

  2. Investigation of the gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange behavior of aromatic dicarboxylic acids in a quadrupole ion trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipuk, Joseph E.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2007-11-01

    Gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange reactions of four deprotonated aromatic dicarboxylic acids (phthalic acid, isophthalic acid, terephthalic acid and 2,6-naphthalic acid) with D2O were performed in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. Experimental results showed significant differences in the rate and extent of exchange when the relative position of the carboxylic acid groups varied. Spontaneous and near complete exchange of one aromatic hydrogen atom occurred when the carboxylic acid groups were in the meta-position, whereas no additional exchange was observed for either the ortho- or para-isomers or for the structurally similar naphthalic acid. Computational investigations support the participation of several possible exchange mechanisms with the contribution of each relying heavily on the relative orientation of the acid moieties. A relay mechanism that bridges the deprotonation site and the labile hydrogen site appears to be responsible for the H/D exchange of not only the labile hydrogen atom of isophthalic acid, but also for the formation of a stable carbanion and corresponding subsequent exchange of one aromatic hydrogen atom. The impact of hydrogen bonding on the relay mechanism is demonstrated by the reaction of phthalic acid as the extent and rate of reaction are greatly retarded by the favorable interaction of the two carboxylic acid groups. Finally, a flip-flop mechanism is likely responsible for the exchange of both terephthalic acid and 2,6-naphthalic acid where the reactive sites are too remote for exchange via relay.

  3. Application of Liquid Chromatography/Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry Technique to Determine Ergot Alkaloids in Grain Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystyna Szymczyk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A liquid chromatography/ion trap mass spectrometry-based method to determine six ergot alkaloids and their isomers is presented. The samples were cleaned on neutral alumina-based solid-phase extraction cartridges. The following method parameters were obtained (depending on the analyte and spiking level: method recovery from 63.0 to 104.6 %, relative standard deviation below 18 %, linear range from 1 to 325 μg/kg, linear correlation coefficient not less than 0.98. The developed analytical procedure was applied to determine the levels of ergot alkaloids in 65 samples of selected rye-based food products (flour– 34 samples, bran – 12 samples, rye – 18 samples, flakes – 1 sample. Measurable levels of alkaloids were found in majority of the analysed samples, particularly in rye flour. Additionally, alkaloids were determined in ergot sclerotia isolated from rye grains. Total content was nearly 0.01 % (97.9 mg/kg. However, the alkaloid profi le was dominated by ergocristine at 45.6 % (44.7 mg/kg, an alkaloid not commonly found in the tested food products. Ergocorninine at 0.2 % (0.2 mg/kg was the least abundant alkaloid.

  4. Application of Liquid Chromatography/Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry Technique to Determine Ergot Alkaloids in Grain Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryła, Marcin; Szymczyk, Krystyna; Jędrzejczak, Renata; Roszko, Marek

    2015-03-01

    A liquid chromatography/ion trap mass spectrometry-based method to determine six ergot alkaloids and their isomers is presented. The samples were cleaned on neutral alumina-based solid-phase extraction cartridges. The following method parameters were obtained (depending on the analyte and spiking level): method recovery from 63.0 to 104.6%, relative standard deviation below 18%, linear range from 1 to 325 µg/kg, linear correlation coefficient not less than 0.98. The developed analytical procedure was applied to determine the levels of ergot alkaloids in 65 samples of selected rye-based food products (flour - 34 samples, bran - 12 samples, rye - 18 samples, flakes - 1 sample). Measurable levels of alkaloids were found in majority of the analysed samples, particularly in rye flour. Additionally, alkaloids were determined in ergot sclerotia isolated from rye grains. Total content was nearly 0.01% (97.9 mg/kg). However, the alkaloid profile was dominated by ergocristine at 45.6% (44.7 mg/kg), an alkaloid not commonly found in the tested food products. Ergocorninine at 0.2% (0.2 mg/kg) was the least abundant alkaloid.

  5. New Jersey Radium Research Project: final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharpe, W.D.

    1979-01-01

    Cancers among dead New Jersey subjects were almost three times the expected number. Their radiation experience apparently acted as a generalized carcinogen. Conventional clinical, laboratory and roentgenographic tests neither correlated with calculated radiation exposure nor predicted which subjects subsequently developed cancer. More subjects than expected were deaf and enough of the subjects had increased erythrocyte sedimentation rates and decreased alpha-1 serum globulin levels that both hearing tests and tests of immune competence should be undertaken among asymptomatic exposed populations at regular intervals to see whether these may indicate radiation effects prior to a fatal cancer or blood dyscrasia. If pre-terminal radium-226 burdens validly express total irradiation experience, and past exposure to shorter-lived radium-228 (mesothorium) makes it unlikely that this is so, the distribution of radium osteitis among our subjects suggests that anatomically demonstrable radiation injury occurs in the vast majority of subjects with any radium-226 burden that can be measured above background levels after twenty-five years, and in almost half of those exposed whose measured radium-226 burdens are indistinguishable from background levels. Modification of the occupational exposure standard is recommended

  6. New Jersey Radium Research Project: final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharpe, W.D.

    1979-01-01

    Cancers among dead New Jersey subjects were almost three times the expected number. Their radiation experience apparently acted as a generalized carcinogen. Conventional clinical, laboratory and roentgenographic tests neither correlated with calculated radiation exposure nor predicted which subjects subsequently developed cancer. More subjects than expected were deaf and enough of the subjects had increased erythrocyte sedimentation rates and decreased alpha-1 serum globulin levels that both hearing tests and tests of immune competence should be undertaken among asymptomatic exposed populations at regular intervals to see whether these may indicate radiation effects prior to a fatal cancer or blood dyscrasia. If pre-terminal radium-226 burdens validly express total irradiation experience, and past exposure to shorter-lived radium-228 (mesothorium) makes it unlikely that this is so, the distribution of radium osteitis among our subjects suggests that anatomically demonstrable radiation injury occurs in the vast majority of subjects with any radium-226 burden that can be measured above background levels after twenty-five years, and in almost half of those exposed whose measured radium-226 burdens are indistinguishable from background levels. Modification of the occupational exposure standard is recommended. (PCS)

  7. Radium removal by a home water softener

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, H.F.

    1987-01-01

    The efficiency of radium removal by a home water softener was evaluated in a manually-operated unit that had been in service for about 10 years. The concentrations of calcium, magnesium, and radium in the water provided during a 100-day period averaged 70.2 +- 0.6 mg liter -1 , 24.8 +- 0.6 mg liter -1 , and 0.355 +- 0.007 Bq liter -1 , respectively. The concentration of radium in the effluent remained at 1.3 +-1.0% of the input level throughout the entire 100-day period. In contrast, the concentration of magnesium began to increase by 30 days. By 40 days, the hardness had increased so much that the homeowner would have initiated another recharge cycle. However, the experiment was allowed to continue until the magnesium content had reached 80% of the influent level. There is no indication that the efficiency of radium removal by this water softener was affected by age or past use. Radium was removed even after the effluent had become hard and a recharge cycle was needed. (author)

  8. Conditioning experience for spent radium sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, I. S.; Shon, J. S.; Kim, K. J.; Min, D. K.

    2001-01-01

    In order to avoid accidents that could be resulted from improper storage of spent radium sources, it is necessary to condition and store them safely. The program for safe conditioning of spent radium sources by IAEA has been established to assist the developing countries. The main object of this paper is to apply the technology that was adapted by IAEA for the conditioning the national inventory of Ra-226 sources in member states, as a part of IAEA's project with the Korean expert team. This paper is the result that the Korean expert team carried out spent radium conditioning, under the project title 'Radium Conditioning in Myanmar(INT4131-06646C)'. The whole inventory of spent radium sources 1,429.5mCi, was safely conditioned by the Korean expert team according to the manual under the supervision of IAEA's technical officer and the control of Myanmar authority on behalf of Myanmar. These sources were encapsuled and welded into 27 small capsules and 3 large capsules, and conditioned in 3 lead shields, producing 3 concrete-shielded drums. The inventories were distributed into 3 shielding devices, holding 500mCi, 459.5mCi, and 470mCi

  9. The setup of the high-precision Penning-trap mass spectrometer PENTATRAP and first production studies of highly charged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Repp, Julia Maria Anne

    2012-01-01

    The five-Penning-trap mass spectrometer PENTATRAP is a novel high-precision experiment located at the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg. PENTATRAP aims for an accuracy of up to a few parts in 10 12 for mass ratios of long-lived highly charged nuclides up to uranium. A physics program for PENTATRAP includes, e.g., measurements of Q-values of relevant β-transitions for neutrino physics, stringent tests of quantum electrodynamics in extreme electromagnetic fields, and a test of special relativity. Thanks to a multi-trap configuration various fast measurement schemes comprising simultaneous frequency measurements can be applied. Further main features of PENTATRAP are highly sensitive cryogenic non-destructive detection systems and the access to highly charged ions via the small PENTATRAP-EBIT and the Heidelberg-EBIT. In the context of the present thesis, the assembly of this world-wide unique facility was started and was considerably put forward. The ion transport and capture in the Penning-traps was simulated and a multitude of operational test, e.g., the investigation of the magnetic field of the superconducting magnet were performed. A magnetic field compensation system and the instrumentally challenging cryogenic translation and tilt system were built up and characterized. Furthermore, the highly tolerated Penning traps were designed, built and assembled. The first installation of the cryogenic assembly including the first cabling of the Penning traps finally allowed the first cool down of the experiment. Moreover, the successful installation of the PENTATRAP-EBIT was performed and the first production of highly charged rhenium and osmium ions which are required for Q-value measurements was demonstrated and optimized.

  10. Effect of trapped electron on the dust ion acoustic waves in dusty plasma using time fractional modified Korteweg-de Vries equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazari-Golshan, A.; Nourazar, S. S.

    2013-01-01

    The time fractional modified Korteweg-de Vries (TFMKdV) equation is solved to study the nonlinear propagation of small but finite amplitude dust ion-acoustic (DIA) solitary waves in un-magnetized dusty plasma with trapped electrons. The plasma is composed of a cold ion fluid, stationary dust grains, and hot electrons obeying a trapped electron distribution. The TFMKdV equation is derived by using the semi-inverse and Agrawal's methods and then solved by the Laplace Adomian decomposition method. Our results show that the amplitude of the DIA solitary waves increases with the increase of time fractional order β, the wave velocity v 0 , and the population of the background free electrons λ. However, it is vice-versa for the deviation from isothermality parameter b, which is in agreement with the result obtained previously

  11. Wavelet-based method for time-domain noise analysis and reduction in a frequency-scan ion trap mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Szu-Wei; Shiu, Guo-Rung; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Peng, Wen-Ping

    2012-11-01

    We adopt an orthogonal wavelet packet decomposition (OWPD) filtering approach to cancel harmonic interference noises arising from an AC power source in time domain and remove the resulting rf voltage interference noise from the mass spectra acquired by using a charge detection frequency-scan quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. With the use of a phase lock resampling technique, the transform coefficients of the rf interference in signals become a constant, exhibiting a shift of the baseline in different rf phases. The rf interference is therefore removable by shifting the baselines back to zero in OWPD coefficients. The approach successfully reduces the time-domain background noise from 1367 electrons (rms) to 408 electrons (rms) (an improvement of 70 %) and removes the high frequency noise components in the charge detection ion trap mass spectrometry. Unlike other smoothing or averaging methods commonly used in the mass-to-charge (m/Ze) domain, our approach does not cause any distortion of original signals.

  12. Health consequences of nasopharyngeal radium exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandler, D.P.; Matanoski, G.; Comstock, G.W.; Mitchell, T.

    1980-01-01

    The study was undertaken to determine whether a population of children with hearing loss who were irradiated with radium applicators in the forties and fifties would have an increased risk of tumors in the area of the nasopharynx, thyroid, and other surrounding tissues or would have other long-term results of radium treatments such as signs of hormonal changes related to radiation exposure of the pituitary glands. The results of the study of the chronic effects from irradiation of adenoids suggests a significant excess risk of head and neck cancers, especially brain tumors. The increased incidence of thyrotoxicosis in the exposed population may have resulted from hormonal imbalance secondary to pituitary gland irradiation and should receive further study. Chronic hearing loss occurred more frequently in the irradiated group but it is difficult to be sure whether this indicated an ineffectiveness of the treatment or differences in the characteristics of the deafness in individuals selected for radium treatments

  13. Survey of medical radium installations in Wisconsin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tapert, A.C.; Lea, W.L.

    1975-05-01

    A radiation protection survey was performed at 70 medical radium installations in the State of Wisconsin. The requirements of the State's Radiation Protection Code were used as survey criteria. Radiation measurements of radium storage containers, radium capsule leakage tests, and monitoring of work surfaces for contamination were performed. Film badge monitoring data of whole body and extremity doses are presented for 221 individuals at 17 hospitals. Whole body doses during single treatments ranged from 10 to 1360 mrems per individual. The estimate of 500 mrems per treatment was determined as the dose aggregate to hospital personnel. Whole body doses from film badges are compared with analogous TLD doses. Four physicians and six technicians at nine hospitals participated in a study for monitoring the extremities with TLD. Cumulative extremity doses ranged from 28 to 6628 mrems per participant during the study. (U.S.)

  14. The environmental behaviour of radium. V.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this publication is to provide an up to date review of the environmental behaviour of radium, including methods for analysis, assessment and control. The need for a reference text on the subject was identified at an early stage of the International Atomic Energy Agency's Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on radium behaviour in relation to uranium mining and milling wastes. This publication deals with the sources, properties, environmental behaviour and the methods of analysis, control and assessment of 226 Ra. It is an outgrowth of Agency programmes directed towards the environmental problems involved in uranium mining and milling. The emphasis in several of the sections reflects these origins. For example, many of the contributions in Volume 2 of this report on technologically enhanced sources of radium (Part 1), methods of control and abatement (Part 2) and the impact on man (Part 3) are concerned with uranium mining and milling. Refs, figs and tabs

  15. Radium in drinking water in southwest Florida

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, W.; Eakins, J.

    1984-01-01

    Screening of public, non-community water supplies in a 12-county study area of Florida was undertaken. Fifty private water supplies in each county were also sampled. In six of the counties, more than 20% of all water supplies tested exceeded the Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for radium. Four of these counties were selected for study as affected counties and four others as control counties. The basis of this selection was the presence or absence of shallow deposits of phosphate ore, which was reported to be present in parts of the affected counties. It was concluded that the distribution of radium in drinking water is related to the presence of shallow deposits of phosphate ore. The geometric mean radium results for counties in the study area were compared with age adjusted cancer rates of the State of Florida and significant co-variance was indicated

  16. Systematic fragmentation patterns of archaeal intact polar lipids by high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization ion-trap mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshinaga, Marcos Y.; Kellermann, Matthias Y.; Rossel, Pamela E.; Schubotz, Florence; Lipp, Julius S.; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2011-01-01

    Archaea are ubiquitous and abundant microorganisms on Earth that mediate key global biogeochemical cycles. The headgroup attached to the sn-1 position in the glycerol backbone and the ether-linked isoprenoid lipids are among the diagnostic traits that distinguish Archaea from Bacteria and Eukarya. Over the last 30 years, numerous archaeal lipids were purified and described in pure cultures. Coupled high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) ion trap mass spectrometry (ITMS) now enables the...

  17. Sympathetic Cooling of Trapped Cd+ Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Blinov, B. B.; Deslauriers, L.; Lee, P.; Madsen, M. J.; Miller, R.; Monroe, C.

    2001-01-01

    We sympathetically cool a trapped 112Cd+ ion by directly Doppler-cooling a 114Cd+ ion in the same trap. This is the first demonstration of optically addressing a single trapped ion being sympathetically cooled by a different species ion. Notably, the experiment uses a single laser source, and does not require strong focusing. This paves the way toward reducing decoherence in an ion trap quantum computer based on Cd+ isotopes.

  18. The environmental behaviour of radium. V.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this publication is to provide an up to date review of the environmental behaviour of radium, including methods for analysis, assessment and control. The need for a reference text on the subject was identified at an early stage of the International Atomic Energy Agency's Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on radium behaviour in relation to uranium mining and milling wastes, which began in 1976. There were two CRPs: (1) The Source, Distribution, Movement and Deposition of Radium in Inland Waterways and Aquifers (1976-1980; final report: IAEA-TECDOC-301, published in 1984). (2) The Environmental Migration of Radium and Other Contaminants Present in Liquid and Solid Wastes from the Mining and Milling of Uranium (1981-1985; final report: IAEA-TECDOC-370, published in 1986). This publication deals with the sources, properties, environmental behaviour and the methods of analysis, control and assessment of 226 Ra. It is an outgrowth of Agency programmes directed towards the environmental problems involved in uranium mining and milling. The emphasis in several of the sections reflects these origins. For example, many of the contributions in Volume 2 of this report on technologically enhanced sources of radium (Part 1), methods of control and abatement (Part 2) and the impact on man (Part 3) are concerned with uranium mining and milling. In Volume 1, coverage of the natural distribution (Part 2), analytical methods (Part 3), environmental migration (Part 4) and biological uptake (Part 5), is more general. It is likely that the reader will find the information needed on the environmental behaviour of radium in this report, or will at least find references to other, more appropriate, texts contained in it. Refs, figs and tabs

  19. Radiation exposure from radium-226 ingestion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keefer, D.H.; Fenyves, E.J.

    1980-01-01

    The contribution of radium to total radiation exposure resulting from the consumption of natural levels of 226 Ra in several public water supplies in an Oklahoma county was determined. A pilot-level study of total dietary intake indicated that the culinary use of water anomalously high in radium and the consumption of water-based beverages contributed significantly to radiation exposure. The mean dietary intake of 226 Ra was 20.6 pCi/day in one community and resulted in an estimated bone dose of 310 mrem/year

  20. Track detection methods of radium measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somogyi, G.

    1986-06-01

    The principles of tack formation and processing including the description of etching and etch-track evaluation for the preferably used plastic track detectors are discussed. Measuring methods to determine 226 Ra activity based either on the mapping of alpha-decaying elements in the complete U-Ra series by alpha-radiography, or on the measurement of uranium alone by neutron induced fissionography, or on the alpha-decay measurement of 222 Rn, the first daughter element of radium, and finally on the measurement of alpha-tracks originating from radium itself, which is separated from its parent nuclides are described in detail. (V.N.)