WorldWideScience

Sample records for trapped atomic gas

  1. Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless crossover in a trapped atomic gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadzibabic, Zoran; Krüger, Peter; Cheneau, Marc; Battelier, Baptiste; Dalibard, Jean

    2006-06-29

    Any state of matter is classified according to its order, and the type of order that a physical system can possess is profoundly affected by its dimensionality. Conventional long-range order, as in a ferromagnet or a crystal, is common in three-dimensional systems at low temperature. However, in two-dimensional systems with a continuous symmetry, true long-range order is destroyed by thermal fluctuations at any finite temperature. Consequently, for the case of identical bosons, a uniform two-dimensional fluid cannot undergo Bose-Einstein condensation, in contrast to the three-dimensional case. However, the two-dimensional system can form a 'quasi-condensate' and become superfluid below a finite critical temperature. The Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT) theory associates this phase transition with the emergence of a topological order, resulting from the pairing of vortices with opposite circulation. Above the critical temperature, proliferation of unbound vortices is expected. Here we report the observation of a BKT-type crossover in a trapped quantum degenerate gas of rubidium atoms. Using a matter wave heterodyning technique, we observe both the long-wavelength fluctuations of the quasi-condensate phase and the free vortices. At low temperatures, the gas is quasi-coherent on the length scale set by the system size. As the temperature is increased, the loss of long-range coherence coincides with the onset of proliferation of free vortices. Our results provide direct experimental evidence for the microscopic mechanism underlying the BKT theory, and raise new questions regarding coherence and superfluidity in mesoscopic systems.

  2. Luther-Emery Phase and Atomic-Density Waves in a Trapped Fermion Gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Xianlong; Rizzi, M.; Polini, Marco; Tosi, M. P.; Fazio, Rosario; Campo, V. L. Jr.; Capelle, K.

    2007-01-01

    The Luther-Emery liquid is a state of matter that is predicted to occur in one-dimensional systems of interacting fermions and is characterized by a gapless charge spectrum and a gapped spin spectrum. In this Letter we discuss a realization of the Luther-Emery phase in a trapped cold-atom gas. We study by means of the density-matrix renormalization-group technique a two-component atomic Fermi gas with attractive interactions subject to parabolic trapping inside an optical lattice. We demonstrate how this system exhibits compound phases characterized by the coexistence of spin pairing and atomic-density waves. A smooth crossover occurs with increasing magnitude of the atom-atom attraction to a state in which tightly bound spin-singlet dimers occupy the center of the trap. The existence of atomic-density waves could be detected in the elastic contribution to the light-scattering diffraction pattern

  3. Magnetic trapping of buffer-gas-cooled chromium atoms and prospects for the extension to paramagnetic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakker, Joost M [Humboldt Universitaet zu Berlin, Institut fuer Physik, Hausvogteiplatz 5-7, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Stoll, Michael [Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Weise, Dennis R [Universitaet Konstanz, Fachbereich Physik, 78457 Constance (Germany); Vogelsang, Oliver [Universitaet Konstanz, Fachbereich Physik, 78457 Konstanz (Germany); Meijer, Gerard [Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Peters, Achim [Humboldt Universitaet zu Berlin, Institut fuer Physik, Hausvogteiplatz 5-7, 10117 Berlin (Germany)

    2006-10-14

    We report the successful buffer-gas cooling and magnetic trapping of chromium atoms with densities exceeding 10{sup 12} atoms per cm{sup 3} at a temperature of 350 mK for the trapped sample. The possibilities of extending the method to buffer-gas cool and magnetically trap molecules are discussed. To minimize the most important loss mechanism in magnetic trapping, molecules with a small spin-spin interaction and a large rotational constant are preferred. Both the CrH ({sup 6}{sigma}{sup +} ground state) and MnH ({sup 7}{sigma}{sup +}) radicals appear to be suitable systems for future experiments.

  4. Magnetic trapping of buffer-gas-cooled chromium atoms and prospects for the extension to paramagnetic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakker, Joost M; Stoll, Michael; Weise, Dennis R; Vogelsang, Oliver; Meijer, Gerard; Peters, Achim

    2006-01-01

    We report the successful buffer-gas cooling and magnetic trapping of chromium atoms with densities exceeding 10 12 atoms per cm 3 at a temperature of 350 mK for the trapped sample. The possibilities of extending the method to buffer-gas cool and magnetically trap molecules are discussed. To minimize the most important loss mechanism in magnetic trapping, molecules with a small spin-spin interaction and a large rotational constant are preferred. Both the CrH ( 6 Σ + ground state) and MnH ( 7 Σ + ) radicals appear to be suitable systems for future experiments

  5. Repulsive atomic gas in a harmonic trap on the border of itinerant ferromagnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conduit, G J; Simons, B D

    2009-11-13

    Alongside superfluidity, itinerant (Stoner) ferromagnetism remains one of the most well-characterized phases of correlated Fermi systems. A recent experiment has reported the first evidence for novel phase behavior on the repulsive side of the Feshbach resonance in a two-component ultracold Fermi gas. By adapting recent theoretical studies to the atomic trap geometry, we show that an adiabatic ferromagnetic transition would take place at a weaker interaction strength than is observed in experiment. This discrepancy motivates a simple nonequilibrium theory that takes account of the dynamics of magnetic defects and three-body losses. The formalism developed displays good quantitative agreement with experiment.

  6. Electromagnetic trapping of neutral atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metcalf, H.J.

    1986-01-01

    Cooling and trapping of neutral atoms is a new branch of applied physics that has potential for application in many areas. The authors present an introduction to laser cooling and magnetic trapping. Some basic ideas and fundamental limitations are discussed, and the first successful experiments are reviewed. Trapping a neutral object depends on the interaction between an inhomogeneous electromagnetic field and a multiple moment that results in the exchange of kinetic for potential energy. In neutral atom traps, the potential energy must be stored as internal atomic energy, resulting in two immediate and extremely important consequences. First, the atomic energy levels will necessarily shift as the atoms move in the trap, and, second, practical traps for ground state neutral atoms atr necessarily very shallow compared to thermal energy. This small depth also dictates stringent vacuum requirements because a trapped atom cannot survive a single collision with a thermal energy background gas molecule. Neutral trapping, therefore, depends on substantial cooling of a thermal atomic sample and is inextricably connected with the cooling process

  7. Microfabricated Waveguide Atom Traps.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jau, Yuan-Yu [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    A nanoscale , microfabricated waveguide structure can in - principle be used to trap atoms in well - defined locations and enable strong photon-atom interactions . A neutral - atom platform based on this microfabrication technology will be prealigned , which is especially important for quantum - control applications. At present, there is still no reported demonstration of evanescent - field atom trapping using a microfabricated waveguide structure. We described the capabilities established by our team for future development of the waveguide atom - trapping technology at SNL and report our studies to overcome the technical challenges of loading cold atoms into the waveguide atom traps, efficient and broadband optical coupling to a waveguide, and the waveguide material for high - power optical transmission. From the atomic - physics and the waveguide modeling, w e have shown that a square nano-waveguide can be utilized t o achieve better atomic spin squeezing than using a nanofiber for first time.

  8. Low-energy-spread ion bunches from a trapped atomic gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijnders, M.P.; Kruisbergen, van P.A.; Taban, G.; Geer, van der S.B.; Mutsaers, P.H.A.; Vredenbregt, E.J.D.; Luiten, O.J.

    2009-01-01

    We present time-of-flight measurements of the longitudinal energy spread of pulsed ultracold ion beams, produced by near-threshold ionization of rubidium atoms captured in a magneto-optical atom trap. Well-defined pulsed beams have been produced with energies of only 1 eV and a root-mean-square

  9. Trapping hydrogen atoms from a neon-gas matrix: a theoretical simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovino, S; Zhang, P; Kharchenko, V; Dalgarno, A

    2009-08-07

    Hydrogen is of critical importance in atomic and molecular physics and the development of a simple and efficient technique for trapping cold and ultracold hydrogen atoms would be a significant advance. In this study we simulate a recently proposed trap-loading mechanism for trapping hydrogen atoms released from a neon matrix. Accurate ab initio quantum calculations are reported of the neon-hydrogen interaction potential and the energy- and angular-dependent elastic scattering cross sections that control the energy transfer of initially cold atoms are obtained. They are then used to construct the Boltzmann kinetic equation, describing the energy relaxation process. Numerical solutions of the Boltzmann equation predict the time evolution of the hydrogen energy distribution function. Based on the simulations we discuss the prospects of the technique.

  10. Atom trap trace analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Z.-T.; Bailey, K.; Chen, C.-Y.; Du, X.; Li, Y.-M.; O' Connor, T. P.; Young, L.

    2000-05-25

    A new method of ultrasensitive trace-isotope analysis has been developed based upon the technique of laser manipulation of neutral atoms. It has been used to count individual {sup 85}Kr and {sup 81}Kr atoms present in a natural krypton sample with isotopic abundances in the range of 10{sup {minus}11} and 10{sup {minus}13}, respectively. The atom counts are free of contamination from other isotopes, elements,or molecules. The method is applicable to other trace-isotopes that can be efficiently captured with a magneto-optical trap, and has a broad range of potential applications.

  11. Atom trap trace analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Z.-T.; Bailey, K.; Chen, C.-Y.; Du, X.; Li, Y.-M.; O'Connor, T. P.; Young, L.

    2000-01-01

    A new method of ultrasensitive trace-isotope analysis has been developed based upon the technique of laser manipulation of neutral atoms. It has been used to count individual 85 Kr and 81 Kr atoms present in a natural krypton sample with isotopic abundances in the range of 10 -11 and 10 -13 , respectively. The atom counts are free of contamination from other isotopes, elements,or molecules. The method is applicable to other trace-isotopes that can be efficiently captured with a magneto-optical trap, and has a broad range of potential applications

  12. Magnetic trapping of cold bromine atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennick, C J; Lam, J; Doherty, W G; Softley, T P

    2014-01-17

    Magnetic trapping of bromine atoms at temperatures in the millikelvin regime is demonstrated for the first time. The atoms are produced by photodissociation of Br2 molecules in a molecular beam. The lab-frame velocity of Br atoms is controlled by the wavelength and polarization of the photodissociation laser. Careful selection of the wavelength results in one of the pair of atoms having sufficient velocity to exactly cancel that of the parent molecule, and it remains stationary in the lab frame. A trap is formed at the null point between two opposing neodymium permanent magnets. Dissociation of molecules at the field minimum results in the slowest fraction of photofragments remaining trapped. After the ballistic escape of the fastest atoms, the trapped slow atoms are lost only by elastic collisions with the chamber background gas. The measured loss rate is consistent with estimates of the total cross section for only those collisions transferring sufficient kinetic energy to overcome the trapping potential.

  13. Trapped atoms along nanophotonic resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Brian; Kim, May; Chang, Tzu-Han; Hung, Chen-Lung

    2017-04-01

    Many-body systems subject to long-range interactions have remained a very challenging topic experimentally. Ultracold atoms trapped in extreme proximity to the surface of nanophotonic structures provides a dynamic system combining the strong atom-atom interactions mediated by guided mode photons with the exquisite control implemented with trapped atom systems. The hybrid system promises pair-wise tunability of long-range interactions between atomic pseudo spins, allowing studies of quantum magnetism extending far beyond nearest neighbor interactions. In this talk, we will discuss our current status developing high quality nanophotonic ring resonators, engineered on CMOS compatible optical chips with integrated nanostructures that, in combination with a side illuminating beam, can realize stable atom traps approximately 100nm above the surface. We will report on our progress towards loading arrays of cold atoms near the surface of these structures and studying atom-atom interaction mediated by photons with high cooperativity.

  14. Laser trapping of radioactive francium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprouse, G.D.; Orozco, L.A.; Simsarian, J.E.; Shi, W.; Zhao, W.Z.

    1997-01-01

    The difficult problem of quickly slowing and cooling nuclear reaction products so that they can be injected into a laser trap has been solved by several groups and there are now strong efforts to work with the trapped atoms. The atoms are confined in the trap to a small spatial volume of the order of 1 mm 3 , but more importantly, they are also confined in velocity, which makes them an ideal sample for spectroscopic measurements with other lasers. We have recently trapped radioactive francium and have embarked on a program to further study the francium atom as a prelude to a test of the Standard Model analogous to previous work with Cs. Our sample of 3 min 210 Fr now contains over 20 000 atoms, and is readily visible with an ordinary TV camera. We work on-line with the accelerator, and continuously load the trap to replace losses due to decay and collisions with background gas. We have maintained a sample of Fr atoms in the trap for over 10 hours, with occasional adjustment of the trapping laser frequency to account for drifts. The proposed test of the Standard Model will require accurate calculation of its atomic properties. We are currently testing these calculations by measuring other predicted quantities. (orig.)

  15. Magnetic trapping of Rydberg atoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niestadt, D.; Naber, J.; Kokkelmans, S.J.J.M.F.; Spreeuw, R.J.C.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic trapping is a well-established technique for ground state atoms. We seek to extend this concept to Rydberg atoms. Rydberg atoms are important for current visions of quantum simulators that will be used in the near future to simulate and analyse quantum problems. Current efforts in Amsterdam

  16. Neutral atom traps of radioactives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behr, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    Neutral atoms trapped with modern laser cooling techniques offer the promise of improving several broad classes of experiments with radioactive isotopes. In nuclear β decay, neutrino spectroscopy from beta-recoil coincidences, along with highly polarized samples, enable experiments to search for non-Standard Model interactions, test whether parity symmetry is maximally violated, and search for new sources of time reversal violation. Ongoing efforts at TRIUMF, Los Alamos and Berkeley will be highlighted. The traps also offer bright sources for Doppler-free spectroscopy, particularly in high-Z atoms where precision measurements could measure the strength of weak neutral nucleon-nucleon and electron-nucleon interactions. Physics with francium atoms has been vigorously pursued at Stony Brook. Several facilities plan work with radioactive atom traps; concrete plans and efforts at KVI Groningen and Legnaro will be among those summarized. Contributions to the multidisciplinary field of trace analysis will be left up to other presenters

  17. Neutral atom traps of radioactives

    CERN Document Server

    Behr, J A

    2003-01-01

    Neutral atoms trapped with modern laser cooling techniques offer the promise of improving several broad classes of experiments with radioactive isotopes. In nuclear beta decay, neutrino spectroscopy from beta-recoil coincidences, along with highly polarized samples, enable experiments to search for non-Standard Model interactions, test whether parity symmetry is maximally violated, and search for new sources of time reversal violation. Ongoing efforts at TRIUMF, Los Alamos and Berkeley will be highlighted. The traps also offer bright sources for Doppler-free spectroscopy, particularly in high-Z atoms where precision measurements could measure the strength of weak neutral nucleon-nucleon and electron-nucleon interactions. Physics with francium atoms has been vigorously pursued at Stony Brook. Several facilities plan work with radioactive atom traps; concrete plans and efforts at KVI Groningen and Legnaro will be among those summarized. Contributions to the multidisciplinary field of trace analysis will be left...

  18. Calcium Atom Trap for Atom Trap Mass Spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Kwang Hoon; Park, Hyun Min; Han, Jae Min; Kim, Taek Soo; Cha, Yong Ho; Lim, Gwon; Jeong, Do Young [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Trace isotope analysis has been an important role in science, archaeological dating, geology, biology and nuclear industry. Artificially produced fission products such as Sr-90, Cs-135 and Kr-85 can be released to the environment when nuclear accident occurs and the reprocessing factory operates. Thus, the analysis of them has been of interest in nuclear industry. But it is difficult to detect them due to low natural abundance less then 10-10. The ultra-trace radio isotopes have been analyzed by the radio-chemical method, accelerator mass spectrometer, and laser based method. The radiochemical method has been used in the nuclear industry. But this method has disadvantages of long measurement time for long lived radioisotopes and toxic chemical process for the purification. The accelerator mass spectrometer has high isotope selectivity, but the system is huge and it has the isobar effects. The laser based method, such as RIMS (Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry) is a basically isobar-effect free method. Recently, ATTA (Atom Trap Trace Analysis), one of the laser based method, has been successfully demonstrated sufficient isotope selectivity with small system size. It has been applied for the detection of Kr-81 and Kr-85. However, it is not suitable for real sample detection, because it requires steady atomic beam generation during detection and is not allowed simultaneous detection of other isotopes. Therefore, we proposed the coupled method of Atom Trap and Mass Spectrometer. It consists of three parts, neutral atom trap, ionization and mass spectrometer. In this paper, we present the demonstration of the magneto-optical trap of neutral calcium. We discuss the isotope selective characteristics of the MOT (Magneto Optical Trap) of calcium by the fluorescence measurement. In addition, the frequency stabilization of the trap beam will be presented

  19. Tightly confined atoms in optical dipole traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, M.

    2002-12-01

    trap depth. In a crossed beam geometry with red-detuned laser light, efficient transfer of atoms between the beams is observed. Optimum transfer occurs when the two beams cross at a radial offset, which can be qualitatively understood when the particle energy and geometrical properties of the two-beam trapping potential are considered. Numerical simulations reproduce the general features of the measured transfer efficiency vs. radial beam offset. Atoms have been radially confined in a blue-detuned hollow beam. This configuration is currently extended to a three-dimensionally confining blue-detuned dipole trap. For advanced laser cooling, state manipulation and spectroscopy, a double-diode laser system has been set up which is phase-locked with a difference frequency near 6.834 GHz to drive Raman transitions between the hyperfine-split ground states of Rb-87 atoms. Dark resonances with linewidths below 100-Hz have been observed in a buffer gas loaded rubidium vapour cell. (author)

  20. Sympathetic cooling of ions in a hybrid atom ion trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeltkemeier, Bastian

    2016-10-27

    In this thesis the dynamics of a trapped ion immersed in a spatially localized buffer gas is investigated. For a homogeneous buffer gas, the ion's energy distribution reaches a stable equilibrium only if the mass of the buffer gas atoms is below a critical value. This limitation can be overcome by using multipole traps in combination and/or a spatially confined buffer gas. Using a generalized model for elastic collisions of the ion with the buffer gas atoms, the ion's energy distribution is numerically determined for arbitrary buffer gas distributions and trap parameters. Three regimes characterized by the respective analytic form of the ion's equilibrium energy distribution are found. One of these is a novel regime at large atom-to-ion mass ratios where the final ion temperature can tuned by adiabatically decreasing the spatial extension of the buffer gas and the effective ion trap depth (forced sympathetic cooling). The second part of the thesis presents a hybrid atom ion trap designed for sympathetic cooling of hydroxide anions. In this hybrid trap the anions are immersed in a cloud of laser cooled rubidium atoms. The translational and rovibrational temperatures of the anions is probed by photodetachment tomography and spectroscopy which shows the first ever indication of sympathetic cooling of anions by laser cooled atoms.

  1. Laser cooling and trapping of atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, S.

    1995-01-01

    The basic ideas of laser cooling and atom trapping will be discussed. These techniques have applications in spectroscopy, metrology, nuclear physics, biophysics, geophysics, and polymer science. (author)

  2. Curious behavior of optically trapped neutral atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieman, C.; Walker, T.; Sesko, D.; Monroe, C.

    1991-01-01

    We have studied the behavior of clouds of neutral atoms contained in a spontaneous force optical trap. Because of the low temperatures of the atoms ( 5 atoms. These include the expansion of the cloud as the number is increased and dramatic changes in the distribution of the atoms at higher numbers. We can explain much of the collective behavior using a simple model that includes a 1/r 2 force between the atoms arising from the multiple scattering of photons. Finally, we discuss the optical trapping of atoms directly from a low pressure vapor in a small glass cell. We have used these optically trapped atoms to load a magnetostatic trap in the same cell. This provided a high density sample of atoms with a temperature of less than 2 μK

  3. A metastable helium trap for atomic collision physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colla, M.; Gulley, R.; Uhlmann, L.; Hoogerland, M.D.; Baldwin, K.G.H.; Buckman, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: Metastable helium in the 2 3 S state is an important species for atom optics and atomic collision physics. Because of its large internal energy (20eV), long lifetime (∼8000s) and large collision cross section for a range of processes, metastable helium plays an important role in atmospheric physics, plasma discharges and gas laser physics. We have embarked on a program of studies on atom-atom and electron-atom collision processes involving cold metastable helium. We confine metastable helium atoms in a magneto-optic trap (MOT), which is loaded by a transversely collimated, slowed and 2-D focussed atomic beam. We employ diode laser tuned to the 1083 nm (2 3 S 1 - 2 3 P2 1 ) transition to generate laser cooling forces in both the loading beam and the trap. Approximately 10 million helium atoms are trapped at temperatures of ∼ 1mK. We use phase modulation spectroscopy to measure the trapped atomic density. The cold, trapped atoms can collide to produce either atomic He + or molecular He 2 + ions by Penning Ionisation (PI) or Associative Ionisation (AI). The rate of formation of these ions is dependant upon the detuning of the trapping laser from resonance. A further laser can be used to connect the 2 3 S 1 state to another higher lying excited state, and variation of the probe laser detuning used to measure interatomic collision potential. Electron-atom collision processes are studied using a monochromatic electron beam with a well defined spatial current distribution. The total trap loss due to electron collisions is measured as a function of electron energy. Results will be presented for these atomic collision physics measurements involving cold, trapped metastable helium atoms. Copyright (1999) Australian Optical Society

  4. Spin polarized atom traps and fundamental symmetries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeusser, O.

    1994-10-01

    Plans are described to couple a neutral atom trap to an upgraded version of TRIUMF's TISOL on-line mass separator. The unique properties of trapped and cooled atoms promise improvements of some symmetry tests of the Standard Model of the electroweak and strong interactions. (author). 33 refs., 3 figs

  5. Laser trapping of 21Na atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Zheng-Tian.

    1994-09-01

    This thesis describes an experiment in which about four thousand radioactive 21 Na (t l/2 = 22 sec) atoms were trapped in a magneto-optical trap with laser beams. Trapped 21 Na atoms can be used as a beta source in a precision measurement of the beta-asymmetry parameter of the decay of 21 Na → 21 Ne + Β + + v e , which is a promising way to search for an anomalous right-handed current coupling in charged weak interactions. Although the number o trapped atoms that we have achieved is still about two orders of magnitude lower than what is needed to conduct a measurement of the beta-asymmetry parameter at 1% of precision level, the result of this experiment proved the feasibility of trapping short-lived radioactive atoms. In this experiment, 21 Na atoms were produced by bombarding 24 Mg with protons of 25 MeV at the 88 in. Cyclotron of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. A few recently developed techniques of laser manipulation of neutral atoms were applied in this experiment. The 21 Na atoms emerging from a heated oven were first transversely cooled. As a result, the on-axis atomic beam intensity was increased by a factor of 16. The atoms in the beam were then slowed down from thermal speed by applying Zeeman-tuned slowing technique, and subsequently loaded into a magneto-optical trap at the end of the slowing path. The last two chapters of this thesis present two studies on the magneto-optical trap of sodium atoms. In particular, the mechanisms of magneto-optical traps at various laser frequencies and the collisional loss mechanisms of these traps were examined

  6. Laser-cooling and electromagnetic trapping of neutral atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, W.D.; Migdall, A.L.; Metcalf, H.J.

    1986-01-01

    Until recently it has been impossible to confine and trap neutral atoms using electromagnetic fields. While many proposals for such traps exist, the small potential energy depth of the traps and the high kinetic energy of available atoms prevented trapping. We review various schemes for atom trapping, the advances in laser cooling of atomic beams which have now made trapping possible, and the successful magnetic trapping of cold sodium atoms

  7. An atom trap relying on optical pumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouyer, P.; Lemonde, P.; Ben Dahan, M.; Michaud, A.; Salomon, C.; Dalibard, J.

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated a new radiation pressure trap which relies on optical pumping and does not require any magnetic field. It employs six circularly polarized divergent beams and works on the red of a J g →J e = J g + 1 atomic transition with J g ≥1/2. We have demonstrated this trap with cesium atoms from a vapour cell using the 852 nm J g = 4→J e = 5 resonance transition. The trap contained up to 3.10 7 atoms in a cloud of 1/√e radius of 330 μm. (orig.)

  8. Trapping cold ground state argon atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmunds, P D; Barker, P F

    2014-10-31

    We trap cold, ground state argon atoms in a deep optical dipole trap produced by a buildup cavity. The atoms, which are a general source for the sympathetic cooling of molecules, are loaded in the trap by quenching them from a cloud of laser-cooled metastable argon atoms. Although the ground state atoms cannot be directly probed, we detect them by observing the collisional loss of cotrapped metastable argon atoms and determine an elastic cross section. Using a type of parametric loss spectroscopy we also determine the polarizability of the metastable 4s[3/2](2) state to be (7.3±1.1)×10(-39)  C m(2)/V. Finally, Penning and associative losses of metastable atoms in the absence of light assisted collisions, are determined to be (3.3±0.8)×10(-10)  cm(3) s(-1).

  9. Electron scattering by trapped fermionic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Haijun; Jhe, Wonho

    2002-01-01

    Considering the Fermi gases of alkali-metal atoms that are trapped in a harmonic potential, we study theoretically the elastic and inelastic scattering of the electrons by the trapped Fermi atoms and present the corresponding differential cross sections. We also obtain the stopping power for the cases that the electronic state as well as the center-of-mass state are excited both separately and simultaneously. It is shown that the elastic scattering process is no longer coherent in contrast to the electron scattering by the atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). For the inelastic scattering process, on the other hand, the differential cross section is found to be proportional to the 2/3 power of the number of the trapped atoms. In particular, the trapped fermionic atoms display the effect of ''Fermi surface,'' that is, only the energy levels near the Fermi energy have dominant contributions to the scattering process. Moreover, it is found that the stopping power scales as the 7/6 power of the atomic number. These results are fundamentally different from those of the electron scattering by the atomic BEC, mainly due to the different statistics obeyed by the trapped atomic systems

  10. Deep superconducting magnetic traps for neutral atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, J.G.E.; Michniak, R.A.; Nguyen, S.V.; Campbell, W.C.; Egorov, D.; Maxwell, S.E.; Buuren, L.D. van; Doyle, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    We describe the design, construction and performance of three realizations of a high-field superconducting magnetic trap for neutral atoms and molecules. Each of these traps utilizes a pair of coaxial coils in the anti-Helmholtz geometry and achieves depths greater than 4 T, allowing it to capture magnetic atoms and molecules cooled in a cryogenic buffer gas. Achieving this depth requires that the repulsive force between the coils (which can exceed 30 metric tons) be contained. We also describe additional features of the traps, including the elimination of trapped fluxes from the coils and the integration of the coils into a cryogenic vacuum environment suitable for producing cold atoms and molecules

  11. Atom Trap Trace Analysis for radiokrypton and radioargon dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, William; Jiang, Wei; Sun, Yun; Bailey, Kevin; Davis, Andrew; Hu, Shuiming; Lu, Zheng-Tian; Mueller, Peter; O'Connor, Thomas; Purtschert, Roland; Sturchio, Neil

    2011-05-01

    Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA), a MOT-based atom counting method, is used to analyze three noble gas radioisotopes (81Kr, 85Kr, 39Ar) covering a wide range of geological ages and applications in the earth sciences. Their isotopic abundances are extremely low, in the range of 10-16 - 10-11. Yet, ATTA can trap and unmistakably detect these rare isotopes one atom at a time. The system is currently limited by the excitation efficiency of the RF discharge that produces the metastable atoms (Kr* & Ar*) needed for laser trapping. To further improve the MOT loading rate, we plan to replace the RF discharge with a photon excitation scheme that employs a VUV light source at 124 nm. The VUV source can be a lamp or a free electron laser. This work is supported by DOE, Office of Nuclear Physics and by NSF, Division of Earth Sciences.

  12. Resonant quantum transitions in trapped antihydrogen atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amole, C; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Capra, A; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Donnan, P H; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Isaac, C A; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Little, A; Madsen, N; McKenna, J T K; Menary, S; Napoli, S C; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Shields, C R; Silveira, D M; Stracka, S; So, C; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S

    2012-03-07

    The hydrogen atom is one of the most important and influential model systems in modern physics. Attempts to understand its spectrum are inextricably linked to the early history and development of quantum mechanics. The hydrogen atom's stature lies in its simplicity and in the accuracy with which its spectrum can be measured and compared to theory. Today its spectrum remains a valuable tool for determining the values of fundamental constants and for challenging the limits of modern physics, including the validity of quantum electrodynamics and--by comparison with measurements on its antimatter counterpart, antihydrogen--the validity of CPT (charge conjugation, parity and time reversal) symmetry. Here we report spectroscopy of a pure antimatter atom, demonstrating resonant quantum transitions in antihydrogen. We have manipulated the internal spin state of antihydrogen atoms so as to induce magnetic resonance transitions between hyperfine levels of the positronic ground state. We used resonant microwave radiation to flip the spin of the positron in antihydrogen atoms that were magnetically trapped in the ALPHA apparatus. The spin flip causes trapped anti-atoms to be ejected from the trap. We look for evidence of resonant interaction by comparing the survival rate of trapped atoms irradiated with microwaves on-resonance to that of atoms subjected to microwaves that are off-resonance. In one variant of the experiment, we detect 23 atoms that survive in 110 trapping attempts with microwaves off-resonance (0.21 per attempt), and only two atoms that survive in 103 attempts with microwaves on-resonance (0.02 per attempt). We also describe the direct detection of the annihilation of antihydrogen atoms ejected by the microwaves.

  13. Superfluorescence with cold trapped neon atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zachorowski, Jerzy

    2003-01-01

    A method for observation of superfluorescence in a cloud of cold metastable Ne atoms is proposed. Means of achieving a cold sample of trapped metastable atoms are discussed. The feasibility of obtaining conditions for a superfluorescence pulse is studied. The paper also discusses the prospects for obtaining intense pulses of extreme ultraviolet radiation

  14. Theoretical evaluation of matrix effects on trapped atomic levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, G.P.; Gruen, D.M.

    1986-06-01

    We suggest a theoretical model for calculating the matrix perturbation on the spectra of atoms trapped in rare gas systems. The model requires the ''potential curves'' of the diatomic system consisting of the trapped atom interacting with one from the matrix and relies on the approximation that the total matrix perturbation is a scalar sum of the pairwise interactions with each of the lattice sites. Calculations are presented for the prototype systems Na in Ar. Attempts are made to obtain ab initio estimates of the Jahn-Teller effects for excited states. Comparison is made with our recent Matrix-Isolation Spectroscopic (MIS) data. 10 refs., 3 tabs

  15. Thermodynamic Properties of a Trapped Interacting Bose Gas

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Hualin; Zheng, Wei-Mou

    1996-01-01

    A Bose gas in an external potential is studied by means of the local density approximation. Analytical results are derived for the thermodynamic properties of an ideal Bose gas in a generic power-law trapping potential, and their dependence on the mutual interaction of atoms in the case of a non-ideal Bose gas.

  16. Vapor generation and atom traps: Atomic absorption spectrometry at the ng/L level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ataman, O. Yavuz

    2008-01-01

    Atom-trapping atomic absorption spectrometry is a technique that allows detection at the ng/L level for several analytes such as As, Se, Sb, Pb, Bi, Cd, In, Tl, Te, Sn and Hg. The principle involves generation of volatile species, usually hydrides, trapping these species on the surface of an atom trap held at an optimized temperature and, finally, revolatilizing the analyte species by rapid heating of the trap and transporting them in a carrier gas to a heated quartz tube, as commonly used with hydride generation AAS systems. A transient signal having, in most cases, a full width at half maximum of less than 1 s is obtained. The atom trap may be a quartz surface or a W-coil; the former is heated externally and the latter is heated resistively. Both collection and revolatilization temperatures are optimized. In some cases, the W-coil itself is used as an electrothermal atomizer and a heated quartz tube is then not needed. The evolution of these traps starts with the well-known Watling's slotted quartz tube (SQT), continues with atom trapping SQT and finally reaches the present traps mentioned above. The analytical figures of merit for these traps need to be standardized. Naturally, enhancement is on characteristic concentration, C 0 , where the change in characteristic mass, m 0 , can be related to trapping efficiency. Novel terms are suggested for E, enhancement factor; such as E max , maximum enhancement factor; E t , enhancement for 1.0 minute sampling and E v , enhancement for 1.0 mL of sample. These figures will allow easy comparison of results from different laboratories as well as different analytes and/or traps

  17. Vapor generation and atom traps: Atomic absorption spectrometry at the ng/L level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ataman, O. Yavuz [Department of Chemistry, Middle East Technical University, 06531 Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: ataman@metu.edu.tr

    2008-08-15

    Atom-trapping atomic absorption spectrometry is a technique that allows detection at the ng/L level for several analytes such as As, Se, Sb, Pb, Bi, Cd, In, Tl, Te, Sn and Hg. The principle involves generation of volatile species, usually hydrides, trapping these species on the surface of an atom trap held at an optimized temperature and, finally, revolatilizing the analyte species by rapid heating of the trap and transporting them in a carrier gas to a heated quartz tube, as commonly used with hydride generation AAS systems. A transient signal having, in most cases, a full width at half maximum of less than 1 s is obtained. The atom trap may be a quartz surface or a W-coil; the former is heated externally and the latter is heated resistively. Both collection and revolatilization temperatures are optimized. In some cases, the W-coil itself is used as an electrothermal atomizer and a heated quartz tube is then not needed. The evolution of these traps starts with the well-known Watling's slotted quartz tube (SQT), continues with atom trapping SQT and finally reaches the present traps mentioned above. The analytical figures of merit for these traps need to be standardized. Naturally, enhancement is on characteristic concentration, C{sub 0}, where the change in characteristic mass, m{sub 0}, can be related to trapping efficiency. Novel terms are suggested for E, enhancement factor; such as E{sub max}, maximum enhancement factor; E{sub t}, enhancement for 1.0 minute sampling and E{sub v}, enhancement for 1.0 mL of sample. These figures will allow easy comparison of results from different laboratories as well as different analytes and/or traps.

  18. A quasi-electrostatic trap for neutral atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engler, H.

    2000-01-01

    This thesis reports on the realization of a ''quasi-electrostatic trap'' (QUEST) for neutral atoms. Cesium ( 133 Cs) and Lithium ( 7 Li) atoms are stored, which represents for the first time a mixture of different species in an optical dipole trap. The trap is formed by the focused Gaussian beam of a 30 W cw CO 2 -laser. For a beam waist of 108 μm the resulting trap depth is κ B x 118 μK for Cesium and κ B x 48 μK for Lithium. We transfer up to 2 x 10 6 Cesium and 10 5 Lithium atoms from a magneto-optical trap into the QUEST. When simultaneously transferred, the atom number currently is reduced by roughly a factor of 10. Since photon scattering from the trapping light can be neglected, the QUEST represents an almost perfect conservative trapping potential. Atoms in the QUEST populate the electronic ground state sublevels. Arbitrary sublevels can be addressed via optical pumping. Due to the very low background gas pressure of 2 x 10 -11 mbar storage times of several minutes are realized. Evaporative cooling of Cesium is observed. In addition, laser cooling is applied to the trapped Cesium sample, which reduces the temperature from 25 μK to a value below 7 μK. If prepared in the upper hyper-fine ground state sublevel, spin changing collisions are observed not only within one single species, but also between the two different species. The corresponding relaxation rates are quantitatively analyzed. (orig.)

  19. Speciation of organotin compounds in waters and marine sediments using purge-and-trap capillary gas chromatography with atomic emission detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campillo, Natalia; Aguinaga, Nerea; Vin-tilde as, Pilar; Lopez-Garcia, Ignacio; Hernandez-Cordoba, Manuel

    2004-01-01

    A procedure for the simultaneous determination of six organotin compounds, including methyl-, butyl- and phenyltins, in waters and marine sediments is developed. The analytes were leached from the solid samples into an acetic acid:methanol mixture by using an ultrasonic probe. The organotins were derivatized with sodium tetraethylborate (NaBEt 4 ) in the aqueous phase, stripped by a flow of helium, pre-concentrated in a trap and thermally desorbed. This was followed by capillary gas chromatography with microwave-induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry as the detection system (GC-AED). Each chromatographic run took 22 min, including the purge time. Calibration curves were obtained by plotting peak area versus concentration and the correlation coefficients for linear calibration were at least 0.9991. Detection limits ranged from 11 to 50 ng Sn l -1 for tributyltin and tetramethyltin, respectively. The seawater samples analyzed contained variable concentrations of mono-, di- and tributyl- and monophenyltin, ranging from 0.05 to 0.48 μg Sn l -1 , depending on the compound. Some of the sediments analyzed contained concentrations of dibutyl- and tributyltin of between 6.0 and 13.0 ng Sn g -1 . Analysis of the certified reference material PACS-2, as well as of spiked water and sediment samples showed the accuracy of the method. The proposed method is selective and reproducible, and is considered suitable for monitoring organotin compounds in water and sediment samples

  20. Speciation of organotin compounds in waters and marine sediments using purge-and-trap capillary gas chromatography with atomic emission detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campillo, Natalia [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Murcia, E-30071 Murcia (Spain); Aguinaga, Nerea [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Murcia, E-30071 Murcia (Spain); Vin-tilde as, Pilar [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Murcia, E-30071 Murcia (Spain); Lopez-Garcia, Ignacio [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Murcia, E-30071 Murcia (Spain); Hernandez-Cordoba, Manuel [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Murcia, E-30071 Murcia (Spain)]. E-mail: hcordoba@um.es

    2004-11-08

    A procedure for the simultaneous determination of six organotin compounds, including methyl-, butyl- and phenyltins, in waters and marine sediments is developed. The analytes were leached from the solid samples into an acetic acid:methanol mixture by using an ultrasonic probe. The organotins were derivatized with sodium tetraethylborate (NaBEt{sub 4}) in the aqueous phase, stripped by a flow of helium, pre-concentrated in a trap and thermally desorbed. This was followed by capillary gas chromatography with microwave-induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry as the detection system (GC-AED). Each chromatographic run took 22 min, including the purge time. Calibration curves were obtained by plotting peak area versus concentration and the correlation coefficients for linear calibration were at least 0.9991. Detection limits ranged from 11 to 50 ng Sn l{sup -1} for tributyltin and tetramethyltin, respectively. The seawater samples analyzed contained variable concentrations of mono-, di- and tributyl- and monophenyltin, ranging from 0.05 to 0.48 {mu}g Sn l{sup -1}, depending on the compound. Some of the sediments analyzed contained concentrations of dibutyl- and tributyltin of between 6.0 and 13.0 ng Sn g{sup -1}. Analysis of the certified reference material PACS-2, as well as of spiked water and sediment samples showed the accuracy of the method. The proposed method is selective and reproducible, and is considered suitable for monitoring organotin compounds in water and sediment samples.

  1. Laser cooling and trapping of neutral atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, W.D.

    1998-01-01

    The article is a translation of the lecture given on the occasion of the 1997 Nobel Prize awarding ceremony. The history of the discovery of laser cooling and trapping of neutral atoms is described. An explanation of this phenomenon is presented and the author's personal contribution to the discovery is highlighted. The article is completed by Dr. Phillips' autobiography. (Z.J.)

  2. Continuous magnetic trapping of laser cooled atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagnato, V.S.; Lafyatis, G.; Martin, A.G.; Raab, E.L.; Landry, J.; Ahmad-Bitar, R.N.; Pritchard, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    The authors present here initial results of the deceleration of a thermal atomic beam from -- 1000 to -- 100 m/s. The experiment was conducted in the 1.4-m long vertical superconducting solenoid which produced the slowing field. The fluorescence of the slowed atomic beam has been studied as a function of laser frequency. Figure 2 is a 12-GHz scan showing the fluorescence at a position 150 cm from the beginning of the solenoid. The wide peak corresponds to unslowed atoms with generally the initial velocity distribution. The second, narrower, peak corresponds to slowed atoms with a velocity of -- 150 m/s. Similar spectra have been obtained for various positions along the magnetic slower and trap. These data should allow better understanding of the cooling process and will be compared to computer models

  3. Subwavelength atom localization via coherent population trapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, G S; Kapale, K T

    2006-01-01

    We present an atom localization scheme based on coherent population trapping. We consider atomic transitions in a Lambda configuration where the control field is a standing-wave field. The probe field and the control field produce coherence between the two ground states and prepare the atom in a pure state. We show that the population in one of the ground states has the same fringe pattern as produced by a Fabry-Perot interferometer and thus measurement of this population would localize the atom. Interestingly enough the role of the cavity finesse is played by the ratio of the intensities of the pump and probe. This is in fact the reason for obtaining extreme subwavelength localization

  4. Trapping of Rydberg atoms in tight magnetic microtraps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boetes, A.Q.G.; Skannrup, R.V.; Naber, J.; Kokkelmans, S.J.J.M.F.; Spreeuw, R.J.C.

    2018-01-01

    We explore the possibility to trap Rydberg atoms in tightly confining magnetic microtraps. The trapping frequencies for Rydberg atoms are expected to be influenced strongly by magnetic-field gradients. We show that there are regimes where Rydberg atoms can be trapped. Moreover, we show that

  5. One-Dimensional Rydberg Gas in a Magnetoelectric Trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayle, Michael; Hezel, Bernd; Lesanovsky, Igor; Schmelcher, Peter

    2007-01-01

    We study the quantum properties of Rydberg atoms in a magnetic Ioffe-Pritchard trap which is superimposed by a homogeneous electric field. Trapped Rydberg atoms can be created in long-lived electronic states exhibiting a permanent electric dipole moment of several hundred Debye. The resulting dipole-dipole interaction in conjunction with the radial confinement is demonstrated to give rise to an effectively one-dimensional ultracold Rydberg gas with a macroscopic interparticle distance. We derive analytical expressions for the electric dipole moment and the required linear density of Rydberg atoms

  6. Trapping and stabilization of hydrogen atoms in intracrystalline voids. Defected calcium fluorides and Y zeolite surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iton, L.E.; Turkevich, J.

    1978-01-01

    Using EPR spectroscopy, it has been established that H. atoms are absorbed from the gas phase when CaF 2 powder is exposed to H 2 gas in which a microwave discharge is sustained, being trapped in sites that provide unusual thermal stability. The disposition of the trapped atoms is determined by the occluded water content of the CaF 2 . For ultrapure CaF 2 , atoms are trapped in interstitial sites having A 0 = 1463 MHz; for increasing water content, two types of trapped H. atoms are discriminated, with preferential trapping in void sites (external to the regular fluorite lattice) that are associated with the H 2 O impurity. Characterization of these ''extra-lattice'' H. (and D.) atoms is presented, and their EPR parameters and behavior are discussed in detail. Failure to effect H.-D. atom exchange with D 2 gas suggests that atoms are not stabilized on the CaF 2 surface. H. atoms are trapped exclusively in ''extra-lattice'' sites when the water-containing CaF 2 is γ irradiated at 77 or 298 K indicating that the scission product atoms do not escape from the precursor void region into the regular lattice. It is concluded that the thermal stability of the ''extra-lattice'' atoms, like that of the interstitial atoms, is determined ultimately by the high activation energy for diffusion of the H. atom through the CaF 2 lattice. For comparison, results obtained from H. atoms trapped in γ-irradiated rare earth ion-exchanged Y zeolites are presented and discussed also; these ''surface'' trapped atoms do not exhibit great thermalstability. Distinctions in the H. atom formation mechanisms between the fluorides and the zeolites were deduced from the accompanying paramagnetic species formed. The intracavity electric fields in the Y zeolites have been estimated from the H. atoms hfsc contractions, and are found to be very high, about 1 V/A

  7. Review of statistical analysis of trapped gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmittroth, F.A.

    1996-01-01

    A review was conducted of trapped gas estimates in Hanford waste tanks. Tank waste levels were found to correlate with barometric pressure changes giving the possibility to infer amounts of trapped gas. Previous models of the tank waste level were extended to include other phenomena such as evaporation in a more complete description of tank level changes

  8. Determination of antimony by using tungsten trap atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Titretir, Serap [Department of Chemistry, Inoenue University, 44065 Malatya (Turkey); Kenduezler, Erdal [Department of Primary Education, Faculty of Education, Ahi Evran University, 40100 Kirsehir (Turkey); Arslan, Yasin [Department of Chemistry, Middle East Technical University, 06531 Ankara (Turkey); Department of Chemistry, Atatuerk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey); Kula, Ibrahim [Department of Chemistry, Mugla University, 48000 Mugla (Turkey); Bakirdere, Sezgin [Department of Chemistry, Middle East Technical University, 06531 Ankara (Turkey); Department of Chemistry, Zonguldak Karaelmas University, 67100 Zonguldak (Turkey); Ataman, O. Yavuz. [Department of Chemistry, Middle East Technical University, 06531 Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: ataman@metu.edu.tr

    2008-08-15

    An electrically heated tungsten coil was used as a trap in the determination of antimony. The technique consists of three steps. Initially, SbH{sub 3} is formed by hydride generation procedure; then the analyte species in vapor form are transported to W-coil trap heated at 370 deg. C. Following the preconcentration step, the trap is heated to 895 deg. C; analyte species are revolatilized and transported to the flame-heated quartz atom cell where atomization and the formation of signal take place. The experimental parameters were optimized both for trap and no-trap studies. The most important experimental parameters are concentrations of HCl and NaBH{sub 4} solutions, H{sub 2} and Ar gas flow rates, and collection and revolatilization temperatures of W-coil. Accuracy was tested using a certified reference material, waste water EU-L-1. Limit of detection for the system is 16 ng l{sup -1} using a sample of 36 ml collected in 4.0 min. Enhancement factor in sensitivity was 17.

  9. Isotopic abundance in atom trap trace analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zheng-Tian; Hu, Shiu-Ming; Jiang, Wei; Mueller, Peter

    2014-03-18

    A method and system for detecting ratios and amounts of isotopes of noble gases. The method and system is constructed to be able to measure noble gas isotopes in water and ice, which helps reveal the geological age of the samples and understand their movements. The method and system uses a combination of a cooled discharge source, a beam collimator, a beam slower and magneto-optic trap with a laser to apply resonance frequency energy to the noble gas to be quenched and detected.

  10. Theoretical evaluation of matrix effects on trapped atomic levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, G.P.; Gruen, D.M.

    1986-06-01

    We suggest a theoretical model for calculating the matrix perturbation on the spectra of atoms trapped in rare gas systems. The model requires the ''potential curves'' of the diatomic system consisting of the trapped atom interacting with one from the matrix and relies on the approximation that the total matrix perturbation is a scalar sum of the pairwise interactions with each of the lattice sites. Calculations are presented for the prototype systems Na in Ar. Attempts are made to obtain ab initio estimates of the Jahn-Teller effects for excited states. Comparison is made with our recent Matrix-Isolation Spectroscopic (MIS) data. 10 refs., 3 tabs.

  11. Simple atom trap in a conical hollow mirror: Numerical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J. A.; Lee, K. I.; Nha, H.; Noh, H. R.; Yoo, S. H.; Jhe, W

    1996-01-01

    We analyze the trap dynamic in a conical hollow (axicon) mirror system. Atom's trajectory is ring shaped if we move the coil (magnetic field) axis off the mirror axis and if we overlap these two axes trap cloud is ball shaped and it is consistent with experiment. We also make a simple comparison between 6-beam MOT and axicon MOT in the ball shaped case, and it shows that at low velocity limit the axicon MOT and typical 6-beam MOT have nearly same trap properties. The axicon trap may be useful as precooled atom source for many other atomic physics experiments such as cold atomic beam, atom funnel, and atom waveguide.

  12. The shear viscosity of a trapped Bose-condensed gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahzamanian, M.A.; Yavary, H.

    2006-01-01

    By obtaining Kubo formula type and using nonequilibrium Green's functions, we calculate the shear viscosity of a trapped Bose-condensed gas below and above the Bose-Einstein condensation temperature (T BEC ). The contributions of the interactions between condensate and noncondensate atoms and between noncondensate atoms take into account to the viscous relaxation time, by evaluating second order self-energies in Beliaev approximation

  13. Evaporative cooling of cold atoms in a surface trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammes, M.; Rychtarik, D.; Grimm, R.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Trapping cold atom close to a surface is a promising route for attaining a two-dimensional quantum gas. We present our gravito-optical surface trap (LOST), which consists of a horizontal evanescent-wave atom mirror in combination with a blue-detuned hollow beam for transverse confinement. Optical pre-cooling based on inelastic reflections from the evanescent wave provides good starting conditions for subsequent evaporative cooling, which can be realized by ramping down the optical potentials of the trap. Already our preliminary experiments (performed at the MPI fuer Kernphysik in Heidelberg) show a 100-fold increase in phase-space density and temperature reduction to 300 nK. Substantial further improvements can be expected in our greatly improved set-up after the recent transfer of the experiment to Innsbruck. By eliminating heating processes, optimizing the evaporation ramp, polarizing the atoms and by using an additional far red-detuned laser beam we expect to soon reach the conditions of quantum degeneracy and/or two-dimensionality. (author)

  14. Portable atomic frequency standard based on coherent population trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Fan; Yang, Renfu; Nian, Feng; Zhang, Zhenwei; Cui, Yongshun; Zhao, Huan; Wang, Nuanrang; Feng, Keming

    2015-05-01

    In this work, a portable atomic frequency standard based on coherent population trapping is designed and demonstrated. To achieve a portable prototype, in the system, a single transverse mode 795nm VCSEL modulated by a 3.4GHz RF source is used as a pump laser which generates coherent light fields. The pump beams pass through a vapor cell containing atom gas and buffer gas. This vapor cell is surrounded by a magnetic shield and placed inside a solenoid which applies a longitudinal magnetic field to lift the Zeeman energy levels' degeneracy and to separate the resonance signal, which has no first-order magnetic field dependence, from the field-dependent resonances. The electrical control system comprises two control loops. The first one locks the laser wavelength to the minimum of the absorption spectrum; the second one locks the modulation frequency and output standard frequency. Furthermore, we designed the micro physical package and realized the locking of a coherent population trapping atomic frequency standard portable prototype successfully. The short-term frequency stability of the whole system is measured to be 6×10-11 for averaging times of 1s, and reaches 5×10-12 at an averaging time of 1000s.

  15. Cooling and trapping neutral atoms with radiative forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagnato, V.S.; Castro, J.C.; Li, M.S.; Zilio, S.C.

    1988-01-01

    Techniques to slow and trap neutral atoms at high densities with radiative forces are discussed in this review articles. Among several methods of laser cooling, it is emphasized Zeeman Tuning of the electronic levels and frequency-sweeping techniques. Trapping of neutral atoms and recent results obtained in light and magnetic traps are discussed. Techniques to further cool atoms inside traps are presented and the future of laser cooling of neutral atoms by means of radiation pressure is discussed. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  16. Screening the Hanford tanks for trapped gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitney, P.

    1995-10-01

    The Hanford Site is home to 177 large, underground nuclear waste storage tanks. Hydrogen gas is generated within the waste in these tanks. This document presents the results of a screening of Hanford's nuclear waste storage tanks for the presence of gas trapped in the waste. The method used for the screening is to look for an inverse correlation between waste level measurements and ambient atmospheric pressure. If the waste level in a tank decreases with an increase in ambient atmospheric pressure, then the compressibility may be attributed to gas trapped within the waste. In this report, this methodology is not used to estimate the volume of gas trapped in the waste. The waste level measurements used in this study were made primarily to monitor the tanks for leaks and intrusions. Four measurement devices are widely used in these tanks. Three of these measure the level of the waste surface. The remaining device measures from within a well embedded in the waste, thereby monitoring the liquid level even if the liquid level is below a dry waste crust. In the past, a steady rise in waste level has been taken as an indicator of trapped gas. This indicator is not part of the screening calculation described in this report; however, a possible explanation for the rise is given by the mathematical relation between atmospheric pressure and waste level used to support the screening calculation. The screening was applied to data from each measurement device in each tank. If any of these data for a single tank indicated trapped gas, that tank was flagged by this screening process. A total of 58 of the 177 Hanford tanks were flagged as containing trapped gas, including 21 of the 25 tanks currently on the flammable gas watch list

  17. A momentum filter for atomic gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong, Wei; Zhou, Xiaoji; Yue, Xuguang; Zhai, Yueyang; Chen, Xuzong

    2013-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate a momentum filter for atomic gas-based on a designed Talbot–Lau interferometer. It consists of two identical optical standing-wave pulses separated by a delay equal to odd multiples of the half Talbot time. The one-dimensional momentum width along the long direction of a cigar-shaped condensate is rapidly and greatly purified to a minimum, which corresponds to the ground state energy of the confining trap in our experiment. We find good agreement between theoretical analysis and experimental results. The filter is also effective for non-condensed cold atoms and could be applied widely. (paper)

  18. A circularly polarized optical dipole trap and other developments in laser trapping of atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corwin, Kristan Lee

    Several innovations in laser trapping and cooling of alkali atoms are described. These topics share a common motivation to develop techniques for efficiently manipulating cold atoms. Such advances facilitate sensitive precision measurements such as parity non- conservation and 8-decay asymmetry in large trapped samples, even when only small quantities of the desired species are available. First, a cold, bright beam of Rb atoms is extracted from a magneto-optical trap (MOT) using a very simple technique. This beam has a flux of 5 × 109 atoms/s and a velocity of 14 m/s, and up to 70% of the atoms in the MOT were transferred to the atomic beam. Next, a highly efficient MOT for radioactive atoms is described, in which more than 50% of 221Fr atoms contained in a vapor cell are loaded into a MOT. Measurements were also made of the 221Fr 7 2P1/2 and 7 2P3/2 energies and hyperfine constants. To perform these experiments, two schemes for stabilizing the frequency of the light from a diode laser were developed and are described in detail. Finally, a new type of trap is described and a powerful cooling technique is demonstrated. The circularly polarized optical dipole trap provides large samples of highly spin-polarized atoms, suitable for many applications. Physical processes that govern the transfer of large numbers of atoms into the trap are described, and spin-polarization is measured to be 98(1)%. In addition, the trap breaks the degeneracy of the atomic spin states much like a magnetic trap does. This allows for RF and microwave cooling via both forced evaporation and a Sisyphus mechanism. Preliminary application of these techniques to the atoms in the circularly polarized dipole trap has successfully decreased the temperature by a factor of 4 while simultaneously increasing phase space density.

  19. Nanometer-scale optical traps using atomic state localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yavuz, D. D.; Proite, N. A.; Green, J. T.

    2009-01-01

    We suggest a scheme where a laser beam forms an optical trap with a spatial size that is much smaller than the wavelength of light. The key idea is to combine a far-off-resonant dipole trap with a scheme that localizes an atomic excitation.

  20. Synthesis of antihydrogen atoms in a CUSP trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroda, Naofumi; Enomoto, Yoshinori; Michishio, Koji; Kim, Chanhyoun; Higaki, Hiroyuki; Nagata, Yugo; Kanai, Yasuyuki; Torii, Hiroyuki A.; Corradini, Maurizzio; Leali, Marco; Lodi-Rizzini, Evandro; Mascagna, Valerio; Venturelli, Luca; Zurlo, Nicola; Fujii, Koki; Ohtsuka, Miki; Tanaka, Kazuo; Imao, Hiroshi; Nagashima, Yasuyuki; Matsuda, Yasuyuki

    2012-01-01

    ASACUSA collaboration has been making a path to realize high precision microwave spectroscopy of ground-state hyperfine transitions of antihydrogen atom in flight for stringent test of the CPT symmetry. Recently, we have succeeded in synthesizing our first cold antihydrogen atoms employing a CUSP trap. It is expected that synthesized antihydrogen atoms in the low-field-seeking states are preferentially focused along the cusp magnetic field axis whereas those in the high-field-seeking states are not focused, resulting in the formation of a spin-polarized antihydrogen beam. We report the recent results of antihydrogen atom synthesis and beam production developed with the CUSP trap.

  1. Experiments with Highly-Ionized Atoms in Unitary Penning Traps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon Fogwell Hoogerheide

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Highly-ionized atoms with special properties have been proposed for interesting applications, including potential candidates for a new generation of optical atomic clocks at the one part in 1019 level of precision, quantum information processing and tests of fundamental theory. The proposed atomic systems are largely unexplored. Recent developments at NIST are described, including the isolation of highly-ionized atoms at low energy in unitary Penning traps and the use of these traps for the precise measurement of radiative decay lifetimes (demonstrated with a forbidden transition in Kr17+, as well as for studying electron capture processes.

  2. Synthesis of antihydrogen atoms in a CUSP trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroda, Naofumi, E-mail: kuroda@phys.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp [University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (Japan); Enomoto, Yoshinori [RIKEN Advanced Science Institute (Japan); Michishio, Koji [Tokyo University of Science, Department of Physics (Japan); Kim, Chanhyoun [University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (Japan); Higaki, Hiroyuki [Hiroshima University, Graduate School of Advanced Science of Matter (Japan); Nagata, Yugo; Kanai, Yasuyuki [RIKEN Advanced Science Institute (Japan); Torii, Hiroyuki A. [University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (Japan); Corradini, Maurizzio; Leali, Marco; Lodi-Rizzini, Evandro; Mascagna, Valerio; Venturelli, Luca; Zurlo, Nicola [Universita di Brescia and Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Dipartimento di Chimica e Fisica per l' Ingegneria e per i Materiali (Italy); Fujii, Koki; Ohtsuka, Miki; Tanaka, Kazuo [University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (Japan); Imao, Hiroshi [RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science (Japan); Nagashima, Yasuyuki [Tokyo University of Science, Department of Physics (Japan); Matsuda, Yasuyuki [University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (Japan); and others

    2012-05-15

    ASACUSA collaboration has been making a path to realize high precision microwave spectroscopy of ground-state hyperfine transitions of antihydrogen atom in flight for stringent test of the CPT symmetry. Recently, we have succeeded in synthesizing our first cold antihydrogen atoms employing a CUSP trap. It is expected that synthesized antihydrogen atoms in the low-field-seeking states are preferentially focused along the cusp magnetic field axis whereas those in the high-field-seeking states are not focused, resulting in the formation of a spin-polarized antihydrogen beam. We report the recent results of antihydrogen atom synthesis and beam production developed with the CUSP trap.

  3. Weak Interaction Measurements with Optically Trapped Radioactive Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, D.J.; Crane, S.G.; Guckert, R.; Zhao, X.; Brice, S.J.; Goldschmidt, A.; Hime, A.; Tupa, D.

    1999-01-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The goal of this project is to apply the latest in magneto-optical and pure magnetic trapping technology to concentrate, cool, confine, and polarize radioactive atoms for precise electroweak interaction measurements. In particular, the authors have concentrated their efforts on the trapping of 82 Rb for a parity-violating, beta-asymmetry measurement. Progress has been made in successfully trapping of up to 6 million 82 Rb(t 1/2 =75s) atoms in a magneto-optical trap coupled to a mass separator. This represents a two order of magnitude improvement in the number trapped radioactive atoms over all previous work. They have also measured the atomic hyperfine structure of 82 Rb and demonstrated the MOT-to-MOT transfer and accumulation of atoms in a second trap. Finally, they have constructed and tested a time-orbiting-potential magnetic trap that will serve as a rotating beacon of spin-polarized nuclei and a beta-telescope detection system. Prototype experiments are now underway with the initial goal of making a 1% measurements of the beta-asymmetry parameter A which would match the world's best measurements

  4. Manipulating Neutral Atoms in Chip-Based Magnetic Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aveline, David; Thompson, Robert; Lundblad, Nathan; Maleki, Lute; Yu, Nan; Kohel, James

    2009-01-01

    Several techniques for manipulating neutral atoms (more precisely, ultracold clouds of neutral atoms) in chip-based magnetic traps and atomic waveguides have been demonstrated. Such traps and waveguides are promising components of future quantum sensors that would offer sensitivities much greater than those of conventional sensors. Potential applications include gyroscopy and basic research in physical phenomena that involve gravitational and/or electromagnetic fields. The developed techniques make it possible to control atoms with greater versatility and dexterity than were previously possible and, hence, can be expected to contribute to the value of chip-based magnetic traps and atomic waveguides. The basic principle of these techniques is to control gradient magnetic fields with suitable timing so as to alter a trap to exert position-, velocity-, and/or time-dependent forces on atoms in the trap to obtain desired effects. The trap magnetic fields are generated by controlled electric currents flowing in both macroscopic off-chip electromagnet coils and microscopic wires on the surface of the chip. The methods are best explained in terms of examples. Rather than simply allowing atoms to expand freely into an atomic waveguide, one can give them a controllable push by switching on an externally generated or a chip-based gradient magnetic field. This push can increase the speed of the atoms, typically from about 5 to about 20 cm/s. Applying a non-linear magnetic-field gradient exerts different forces on atoms in different positions a phenomenon that one can exploit by introducing a delay between releasing atoms into the waveguide and turning on the magnetic field.

  5. Atom interferometry with trapped Bose-Einstein condensates: impact of atom-atom interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grond, Julian; Hohenester, Ulrich; Mazets, Igor; Schmiedmayer, Joerg

    2010-01-01

    Interferometry with ultracold atoms promises the possibility of ultraprecise and ultrasensitive measurements in many fields of physics, and is the basis of our most precise atomic clocks. Key to a high sensitivity is the possibility to achieve long measurement times and precise readout. Ultracold atoms can be precisely manipulated at the quantum level and can be held for very long times in traps; they would therefore be an ideal setting for interferometry. In this paper, we discuss how the nonlinearities from atom-atom interactions, on the one hand, allow us to efficiently produce squeezed states for enhanced readout and, on the other hand, result in phase diffusion that limits the phase accumulation time. We find that low-dimensional geometries are favorable, with two-dimensional (2D) settings giving the smallest contribution of phase diffusion caused by atom-atom interactions. Even for time sequences generated by optimal control, the achievable minimal detectable interaction energy ΔE min is of the order of 10 -4 μ, where μ is the chemical potential of the Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in the trap. From these we have to conclude that for more precise measurements with atom interferometers, more sophisticated strategies, or turning off the interaction-induced dephasing during the phase accumulation stage, will be necessary.

  6. Iodine Gas Trapping using Granular Porous Bismuth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jae Hwan; Shin, Jin Myeong; Park, Jang Jin; Park, Geun Il [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yim, Mansung [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    {sup 129}I is a radionuclide with a very long half-life of 1.57 Χ 10{sup 7} years and has negative health effects to the human body. Therefore, the emission of {sup 129}I into the air is closely regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Many methods for trapping gaseous {sup 129}I have been developed thus far, including wet scrubbing and adsorption using silver loaded zeolites. Although wet scrubbing can effectively remove iodine, it suffers from corrosion of the vessel due to high concentration of the scrubbing solution. Silver loaded zeolites also show effectiveness in capturing {sup 129}I gas, yet weak thermal stability of physisorbed iodine remains a challenge. We studied a novel and facile method to trap iodine gas using bismuth. Granular bismuth having many pores was synthesized using bismuth nitrate and polyvinyl alcohol as a bismuth precursor and pore forming agent, respectively. Reaction of iodine and our samples resulted in an iodine capturing capacity of more than 2 times that of the commercial grade silver exchanged zeolite (AgX). Granular porous bismuths synthesized using bismuth nitrate and PVA show a promising performance in capturing iodine gas. The use of bismuth in trapping {sup 129}I gas can reduce the process cost as bismuth is cheap. Further study is going on to improve the mechanical property of granular porous bismuths for their easy handling.

  7. Iodine Gas Trapping using Granular Porous Bismuth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jae Hwan; Shin, Jin Myeong; Park, Jang Jin; Park, Geun Il; Yim, Mansung

    2014-01-01

    129 I is a radionuclide with a very long half-life of 1.57 Χ 10 7 years and has negative health effects to the human body. Therefore, the emission of 129 I into the air is closely regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Many methods for trapping gaseous 129 I have been developed thus far, including wet scrubbing and adsorption using silver loaded zeolites. Although wet scrubbing can effectively remove iodine, it suffers from corrosion of the vessel due to high concentration of the scrubbing solution. Silver loaded zeolites also show effectiveness in capturing 129 I gas, yet weak thermal stability of physisorbed iodine remains a challenge. We studied a novel and facile method to trap iodine gas using bismuth. Granular bismuth having many pores was synthesized using bismuth nitrate and polyvinyl alcohol as a bismuth precursor and pore forming agent, respectively. Reaction of iodine and our samples resulted in an iodine capturing capacity of more than 2 times that of the commercial grade silver exchanged zeolite (AgX). Granular porous bismuths synthesized using bismuth nitrate and PVA show a promising performance in capturing iodine gas. The use of bismuth in trapping 129 I gas can reduce the process cost as bismuth is cheap. Further study is going on to improve the mechanical property of granular porous bismuths for their easy handling

  8. Evanescent light-wave atom mirrors, resonators, waveguides, and traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowling, J.P.; Gea-Banacloche, J.

    1996-01-01

    For many years, it has been known that light can be used to trap and manipulate small dielectric particles and atoms. In particular, the intense coherent light of lasers has been used to cool neutral atoms down to the micro-Kelvin and now even the nano-Kelvin regimes. At such low temperatures, the de Broglie wavelike character of the atoms becomes pronounced, making it necessary to treat the atoms as wave phenomena. To this end, the study of atom optics has recently developed, in which atom optical elements are fabricated in order to manipulate atoms, while utilizing and preserving the coherence and superposition properties inherent in their wavelike propagation. For example, there has been a concerted effort to study theoretically and produce experimentally the atom optic analogs of photonic optical elements, such as atom beam splitters, atom diffraction gratings, atom lenses, atom interferometers, and-last but not least-atom mirrors. It is light-induced atom mirrors, and their application to making atom resonators, waveguides, and traps, that we shall focus on in this chapter. 133 refs., 26 figs., 1 tab

  9. Mathematical Modeling of Resonant Processes in Confined Geometry of Atomic and Atom-Ion Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melezhik, Vladimir S.

    2018-02-01

    We discuss computational aspects of the developed mathematical models for resonant processes in confined geometry of atomic and atom-ion traps. The main attention is paid to formulation in the nondirect product discrete-variable representation (npDVR) of the multichannel scattering problem with nonseparable angular part in confining traps as the boundary-value problem. Computational efficiency of this approach is demonstrated in application to atomic and atom-ion confinement-induced resonances we predicted recently.

  10. The injection of inert gas ions into solids: their trapping and escape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, G.; Armour, D.G.; Donnelly, S.E.; Ingram, D.C.; Webb, R.P.

    1980-01-01

    The first part of this contribution will review experimental studies of the trapping probabilities of ions injected into solids as a function of ion energy and indicate how the data can be modelled theoretically. It will be demonstrated that trapping is a two stage process, the first involving penetration into the solid and the second requiring atom dissolution and experimental evidence will be cited to show how the latter process may be dominant for light ions which create little radiation damage. For low ion fluences, injected atoms are generally trapped in isolation but as fluence increases gas-defect complexes are formed and it will be shown how post bombardment thermal evaluation studies can provide evidence for the growth of these complexes. Concomitant with trapping however, dissolved gas may be evolved from the solid by some form of sputtering process, sometimes by mechanisms much more efficient than congruent sputtering of the solid together with the trapped species. Measurements of the trapped atom concentration-ion fluence behaviour and of the evolution of one initially trapped species by bombardment with a second species provide information on the physical processes involved in trapped atom sputtering and upon the mechanism of gas incorporation saturation and experimental studies in this area, together with some first approximation theoretical investigations will be discussed. It will be shown that an important mechanism in dictating incorporation saturation, in addition to sputtering, is the atomic saturation of the solid by the implant. (author)

  11. Cooperatively enhanced dipole forces from artificial atoms in trapped nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan, Mathieu L.; Bradac, Carlo; Besga, Benjamin; Johnsson, Mattias; Brennen, Gavin; Molina-Terriza, Gabriel; Volz, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    Optical trapping is a powerful tool to manipulate small particles, from micrometre-size beads in liquid environments to single atoms in vacuum. The trapping mechanism relies on the interaction between a dipole and the electric field of laser light. In atom trapping, the dominant contribution to the associated force typically comes from the allowed optical transition closest to the laser wavelength, whereas for mesoscopic particles it is given by the polarizability of the bulk material. Here, we show that for nanoscale diamond crystals containing a large number of artificial atoms, nitrogen-vacancy colour centres, the contributions from both the nanodiamond and the colour centres to the optical trapping strength can be simultaneously observed in a noisy liquid environment. For wavelengths around the zero-phonon line transition of the colour centres, we observe a 10% increase of overall trapping strength. The magnitude of this effect suggests that due to the large density of centres, cooperative effects between the artificial atoms contribute to the observed modification of the trapping strength. Our approach may enable the study of cooperativity in nanoscale solid-state systems and the use of atomic physics techniques in the field of nano-manipulation.

  12. Analysis of a single-atom dipole trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, Markus; Volz, Juergen; Saucke, Karen; Kurtsiefer, Christian; Weinfurter, Harald

    2006-01-01

    We describe a simple experimental technique which allows us to store a single 87 Rb atom in an optical dipole trap. Due to light-induced two-body collisions during the loading stage of the trap the maximum number of captured atoms is locked to one. This collisional blockade effect is confirmed by the observation of photon antibunching in the detected fluorescence light. The spectral properties of single photons emitted by the atom were studied with a narrow-band scanning cavity. We find that the atomic fluorescence spectrum is dominated by the spectral width of the exciting laser light field. In addition we observe a spectral broadening of the atomic fluorescence light due to the Doppler effect. This allows us to determine the mean kinetic energy of the trapped atom corresponding to a temperature of 105 μK. This simple single-atom trap is the key element for the generation of atom-photon entanglement required for future applications in quantum communication and a first loophole-free test of Bell's inequality

  13. Classical region of a trapped Bose gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blakie, P Blair [Jack Dodd Centre for Photonics and Ultra-Cold Atoms, University of Otago, Dunedin (New Zealand); Davis, Matthew J [ARC Centre of Excellence for Quantum-Atom Optics, School of Physical Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia)

    2007-06-14

    The classical region of a Bose gas consists of all single particle modes that have a high average occupation and are well described by a classical field. Highly occupied modes only occur in massive Bose gases at ultra-cold temperatures, in contrast to the photon case where there are highly occupied modes at all temperatures. For the Bose gas the number of these modes is dependent on the temperature, the total number of particles and their interaction strength. In this paper, we characterize the classical region of a harmonically trapped Bose gas over a wide parameter regime. We use a Hartree-Fock approach to account for the effects of interactions, which we observe to significantly change the classical region as compared to the idealized case. We compare our results to full classical field calculations and show that the Hartree-Fock approach provides a qualitatively accurate description of a classical region for the interacting gas.

  14. Topological Coherent Modes in Trapped Bose Gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yukalov, V.I.; Marzlin, K.-P.; Yukalova, E.P.; Bagnato, V.S.

    2005-01-01

    The report reviews the problem of topological coherent modes, which are nonlinear collective states of Bose-condensed atoms. Such modes can be generated by means of alternating external fields, whose frequencies are in resonance with the transition frequencies between the related modes. The Bose gas with generated topological coherent modes is a collective nonlinear analog of a resonant atom. Such systems exhibit a variety of nontrivial effects, e.g. interference fringes, interference current, mode locking, dynamic transitions, critical phenomena, chaotic motion, harmonic generation, parametric conversion, atomic squeezing, and entanglement production

  15. Phase diagram of a polarized Fermi gas across a Feshbach resonance in a potential trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, W.; Duan, L.-M.

    2006-01-01

    We map out the detailed phase diagram of a trapped ultracold Fermi gas with population imbalance across a wide Feshbach resonance. We show that under the local density approximation, the properties of the atoms in any (anisotropic) harmonic traps are universally characterized by three dimensionless parameters: the normalized temperature, the dimensionless interaction strength, and the population imbalance. We then discuss the possible quantum phases in the trap, and quantitatively characterize their phase boundaries in various typical parameter regions

  16. Magnetic conveyor belt for transporting and merging trapped atom clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hänsel, W; Reichel, J; Hommelhoff, P; Hänsch, T W

    2001-01-22

    We demonstrate an integrated magnetic device which transports cold atoms near a surface with very high positioning accuracy. Time-dependent currents in a lithographic conductor pattern create a moving chain of potential wells; atoms are transported in these wells while remaining confined in all three dimensions. We achieve mean fluxes up to 10(6) s(-1) with a negligible heating rate. An extension of this device allows merging of atom clouds by unification of two Ioffe-Pritchard potentials. The unification, which we demonstrate experimentally, can be performed without loss of phase space density. This novel, all-magnetic atom manipulation offers exciting perspectives, such as trapped-atom interferometry.

  17. Single-atom lasing induced atomic self-trapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salzburger, T.; Ritsch, H.

    2004-01-01

    We study atomic center of mass motion and field dynamics of a single-atom laser consisting of a single incoherently pumped free atom moving in an optical high-Q resonator. For sufficient pumping, the system starts lasing whenever the atom is close to a field antinode. If the field mode eigenfrequency is larger than the atomic transition frequency, the generated laser light attracts the atom to the field antinode and cools its motion. Using quantum Monte Carlo wave function simulations, we investigate this coupled atom-field dynamics including photon recoil and cavity decay. In the regime of strong coupling, the generated field shows strong nonclassical features like photon antibunching, and the atom is spatially confined and cooled to sub-Doppler temperatures. (author)

  18. Construction of a single atom trap for quantum information protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Margaret E.; Baker, Paul M.; Gauthier, Daniel J.; Duke Physics Department Team

    2016-05-01

    The field of quantum information science addresses outstanding problems such as achieving fundamentally secure communication and solving computationally hard problems. Great progress has been made in the field, particularly using photons coupled to ions and super conducting qubits. Neutral atoms are also interesting for these applications and though the technology for control of neutrals lags behind that of trapped ions, they offer some key advantages: primarily coupling to optical frequencies closer to the telecom band than trapped ions or superconducting qubits. Here we report progress on constructing a single atom trap for 87 Rb. This system is a promising platform for studying the technical problems facing neutral atom quantum computing. For example, most protocols destroy the trap when reading out the neutral atom's state; we will investigate an alternative non-destructive state detection scheme. We detail the experimental systems involved and the challenges addressed in trapping a single atom. All of our hardware components are off the shelf and relatively inexpensive. Unlike many other systems, we place a high numerical aperture lens inside our vacuum system to increase photon collection efficiency. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the ARO through Grant # W911NF1520047.

  19. Polarization-dependent atomic dipole traps behind a circular aperture for neutral-atom quantum computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillen-Christandl, Katharina; Copsey, Bert D.

    2011-01-01

    The neutral-atom quantum computing community has successfully implemented almost all necessary steps for constructing a neutral-atom quantum computer. We present computational results of a study aimed at solving the remaining problem of creating a quantum memory with individually addressable sites for quantum computing. The basis of this quantum memory is the diffraction pattern formed by laser light incident on a circular aperture. Very close to the aperture, the diffraction pattern has localized bright and dark spots that can serve as red-detuned or blue-detuned atomic dipole traps. These traps are suitable for quantum computing even for moderate laser powers. In particular, for moderate laser intensities (∼100 W/cm 2 ) and comparatively small detunings (∼1000-10 000 linewidths), trap depths of ∼1 mK and trap frequencies of several to tens of kilohertz are achieved. Our results indicate that these dipole traps can be moved by tilting the incident laser beams without significantly changing the trap properties. We also explored the polarization dependence of these dipole traps. We developed a code that calculates the trapping potential energy for any magnetic substate of any hyperfine ground state of any alkali-metal atom for any laser detuning much smaller than the fine-structure splitting for any given electric field distribution. We describe details of our calculations and include a summary of different notations and conventions for the reduced matrix element and how to convert it to SI units. We applied this code to these traps and found a method for bringing two traps together and apart controllably without expelling the atoms from the trap and without significant tunneling probability between the traps. This approach can be scaled up to a two-dimensional array of many pinholes, forming a quantum memory with single-site addressability, in which pairs of atoms can be brought together and apart for two-qubit gates for quantum computing.

  20. Magnetic atom optics: mirrors, guides, traps, and chips for atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinds, E.A.; Hughes, I.G. [Sussex Centre for Optical and Atomic Physics, University of Sussex, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    1999-09-21

    For the last decade it has been possible to cool atoms to microkelvin temperatures ({approx}1 cm s{sup -1}) using a variety of optical techniques. Light beams provide the very strong frictional forces required to slow atoms from room temperature ({approx}500 m s{sup -1}). However, once the atoms are cold, the relatively weak conservative forces of static electric and magnetic fields play an important role. In our group we have been studying the interaction of cold rubidium atoms with periodically magnetized data storage media. Here we review the underlying principles of the forces acting on atoms above a suitably magnetized substrate or near current-carrying wires. We also summarize the status of experiments. These structures can be used as smooth or corrugated reflectors for controlling the trajectories of cold atoms. Alternatively, they may be used to confine atoms to a plane, a line, or a dot and in some cases to reach the quantum limit of confinement. Atoms levitated above a magnetized surface can be guided electrostatically by wires deposited on the surface. The flow and interaction of atoms in such a structure may form the basis of a new technology, 'integrated atom optics' which might ultimately be capable of realizing a quantum computer. (author)

  1. Resonant quantum transitions in trapped antihydrogen atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Amole, C; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Capra, A; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Donnan, P H; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Isaac, C A; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Little, A; Madsen, N; McKenna, J T K; Menary, S; Napoli, S C; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Shields, C R; Silveira, D M; Stracka, S; So, C; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S

    2012-01-01

    The hydrogen atom is one of the most important and influential model systems in modern physics. Attempts to understand its spectrum are inextricably linked to the early history and development of quantum mechanics. The hydrogen atom’s stature lies in its simplicity and in the accuracy with which its spectrum can be measured1 and compared to theory. Today its spectrum remains a valuable tool for determining the values of fundamental constants and for challenging the limits of modern physics, including the validity of quantum electrodynamics and—by comparison with measurements on its antimatter counterpart, antihydrogen—the validity of CPT (charge conjugation, parity and time reversal) symmetry. Here we report spectroscopy of a pure antimatter atom, demonstrating resonant quantum transitions in antihydrogen. We have manipulated the internal spin state2, 3 of antihydrogen atoms so as to induce magnetic resonance transitions between hyperfine levels of the positronic ground state. We used resonant microwave...

  2. Atomic and nuclear physics with stored particles in ion traps

    CERN Document Server

    Kluge, H J; Herfurth, F; Quint, W

    2002-01-01

    Trapping and cooling techniques play an increasingly important role in many areas of science. This review concentrates on recent applications of ion traps installed at accelerator facilities to atomic and nuclear physics such as mass spectrometry of radioactive isotopes, weak interaction studies, symmetry tests, determination of fundamental constants, laser spectroscopy, and spectroscopy of highly-charged ions. In addition, ion traps are proven to be extremely efficient devices for (radioactive) ion beam manipulation as, for example, retardation, accumulation, cooling, beam cleaning, charge-breeding, and bunching.

  3. The first direct observation of hydrogen trapping sites in TiC precipitation-hardening steel through atom probe tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Jun; Kawakami, Kazuto; Kobayashi, Yukiko; Tarui, Toshimi

    2010-01-01

    For the first time ever, atomic-scale direct observation of deuterium atoms trapping at nano-sized titanium carbide (TiC) precipitates in steel was successfully achieved using atom probe tomography (APT). Deuterium gas charging into the needle specimen and subsequently quenching were conducted in our designed chamber attached to three-dimensional atom probe (3DAP). The deuterium atoms were definitely observed on the broad surface of TiC platelets, which indicated that the broad interface between the matrix and TiC was the main trapping site.

  4. Cold atoms in microscopic traps: from wires to chips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassettari, D.

    2000-05-01

    This thesis reports on the experimental demonstration of magnetic guides, traps and beam splitters for neutral atoms using current carrying wires. A straight wire allows to create two basic guide configurations: the magnetic field generated by the wire alone produces a guide where atoms in a strong field seeking state perform orbits around the wire (Kepler guide); by adding an external magnetic field, atoms in a weak field seeking state are guided at the location where the external field and the field generated by the wire cancel out (side guide). Furthermore, bending the wire in various shapes allows to modify the side guide potential and hence to create a large variety of three dimensional traps. A relevant property of these potentials is that higher trapping gradients are obtained by decreasing the current flowing in the wires. As the trap is compressed, it also moves closer to the wire. This feature has allowed us to create microscopic potentials by using thin wires designed on a surface (atom chip) by means of high resolution microfabrication techniques. Wires mounted on a surface have the advantage of being more robust and able to sustain larger currents due to their thermal coupling with the substrate. In our experiment we have developed methods to load these traps and guides with laser cooled atoms. Our first investigations have been performed with free standing wires which we have used to study the Kepler guide, the side guide and a three dimensional Ioffe-Pritchard trap. In the latter we have achieved the trapping parameters required in the experiments with Bose-Einstein condensates with much reduced power consumption. In a second time we have replaced the free standing wires with an atom chip, which we have used to compress the atomic cloud in potentials with trap frequencies above 100 kHz and ground state sizes below 100 nm. Such potentials are especially interesting for quantum information proposals of performing quantum gate operations with controlled

  5. Characteristics of single-atom trapping in a magneto-optical trap with a high magnetic-field gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Seokchan; Choi, Youngwoon; Park, Sangbum; Ji, Wangxi; Lee, Jai-Hyung; An, Kyungwon

    2007-01-01

    A quantitative study on characteristics of a magneto-optical trap with a single or a few atoms is presented. A very small number of 85 Rb atoms were trapped in a micron-size magneto-optical trap with a high magnetic-field gradient. In order to find the optimum condition for a single-atom trap, we have investigated how the number of atoms and the size of atomic cloud change as various experimental parameters, such as a magnetic-field gradient and the trapping laser intensity and detuning. The averaged number of atoms was measured very accurately with a calibration procedure based on the single-atom saturation curve of resonance fluorescence. In addition, the number of atoms in a trap could be controlled by suppressing stochastic loading events by means of a real-time active feedback on the magnetic-field gradient

  6. C60 as an Atom Trap to Capture Co Adatoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Peng; Li, Dongzhe; Repain, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    C60 molecules were used to trap Co adatoms and clusters on a Au(111) surface using atomic/molecular manipulation with a scanning tunneling microscope. Two manipulation pathways (successive integration of single Co atoms in one molecule or direct integration of a Co cluster) were found...... to efficiently allow the formation of complexes mixing a C60 molecule with Co atoms. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy reveals the robustness of the pi states of C60 that are preserved after Co trapping. Scanning tunneling microscopy images and density functional theory calculations reveal that dissociated Co...... clusters of up to nine atoms can be formed at the molecule-substrate interface. These results open new perspectives in the interactions between metal adatoms and molecules, for applications in metal-organic devices...

  7. Nonequilibrium Spin Dynamics in a Trapped Fermi Gas with Effective Spin-Orbit Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanescu, Tudor D.; Zhang Chuanwei; Galitski, Victor

    2007-01-01

    We consider a trapped atomic system in the presence of spatially varying laser fields. The laser-atom interaction generates a pseudospin degree of freedom (referred to simply as spin) and leads to an effective spin-orbit coupling for the fermions in the trap. Reflections of the fermions from the trap boundaries provide a physical mechanism for effective momentum relaxation and nontrivial spin dynamics due to the emergent spin-orbit coupling. We explicitly consider evolution of an initially spin-polarized Fermi gas in a two-dimensional harmonic trap and derive nonequilibrium behavior of the spin polarization. It shows periodic echoes with a frequency equal to the harmonic trapping frequency. Perturbations, such as an asymmetry of the trap, lead to the suppression of the spin echo amplitudes. We discuss a possible experimental setup to observe spin dynamics and provide numerical estimates of relevant parameters

  8. Transverse confinement in stochastic cooling of trapped atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, D; Wallentowitz, S

    2004-01-01

    Stochastic cooling of trapped atoms is considered for a laser-beam configuration with beam waists equal to or smaller than the extent of the atomic cloud. It is shown that various effects appear due to this transverse confinement, among them heating of transverse kinetic energy. Analytical results of the cooling in dependence on size and location of the laser beam are presented for the case of a non-degenerate vapour

  9. Linear spin waves in a trapped Bose gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikuni, T.; Williams, J.E.; Clark, C.W.

    2002-01-01

    An ultracold Bose gas of two-level atoms can be thought of as a spin-1/2 Bose gas. It supports spin-wave collective modes due to the exchange mean field. Such collective spin oscillations have been observed in recent experiments at JILA with 87 Rb atoms confined in a harmonic trap. We present a theory of the spin-wave collective modes based on the moment method for trapped gases. In the collisionless and hydrodynamic limits, we derive analytic expressions for the frequencies and damping rates of modes with dipole and quadrupole symmetry. We find that the frequency for a given mode is given by a temperature-independent function of the peak density n, and falls off as 1/n. We also find that, to a very good approximation, excitations in the radial and axial directions are decoupled. We compare our model to the numerical integration of a one-dimensional version of the kinetic equation and find very good qualitative agreement. The damping rates, however, show the largest deviation for intermediate densities, where one expects Landau damping--which is unaccounted for in our moment approach--to play a significant role

  10. All-optical atom trap as a target for MOTRIMS-like collision experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, S.; Acharya, B. P.; De Silva, A. H. N. C.; Parris, N. W.; Ramsey, B. J.; Romans, K. L.; Dorn, A.; de Jesus, V. L. B.; Fischer, D.

    2018-04-01

    Momentum-resolved scattering experiments with laser-cooled atomic targets have been performed since almost two decades with magneto-optical trap recoil ion momentum spectroscopy (MOTRIMS) setups. Compared to experiments with gas-jet targets, MOTRIMS features significantly lower target temperatures allowing for an excellent recoil ion momentum resolution. However, the coincident and momentum-resolved detection of electrons was long rendered impossible due to incompatible magnetic field requirements. Here we report on an experimental approach which is based on an all-optical 6Li atom trap that—in contrast to magneto-optical traps—does not require magnetic field gradients in the trapping region. Atom temperatures of about 2 mK and number densities up to 109 cm-3 make this trap ideally suited for momentum-resolved electron-ion coincidence experiments. The overall configuration of the trap is very similar to conventional magneto-optical traps. It mainly requires small modifications of laser beam geometries and polarization which makes it easily implementable in other existing MOTRIMS experiments.

  11. Quantum computing with trapped ions, atoms and light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steane, Andrew M.

    2001-01-01

    We consider experimental issues relevant to quantum computing, and discuss the best way to achieve the essential requirements of reliable quantum memory and gate operations. Nuclear spins in trapped ions or atoms are a very promising candidate for the qubits. We estimate the parameters required to couple atoms using light via cavity QED in order to achieve quantum gates. We briefly comment on recent improvements to the Cirac-Zoller method for coupling trapped ions via their vibrational degree of freedom. Error processes result in a trade-off between quantum gate speed and failure probability. A useful quantum computer does appear to be feasible using a combination of ion trap and optical methods. The best understood method to stabilize a large computer relies on quantum error correction. The essential ideas of this are discussed, and recent estimates of the noise requirements in a quantum computing device are given

  12. Photoionization and cold collision studies using trapped atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gould, P.L.

    1996-01-01

    The authors have used laser cooling and trapping techniques to investigate photoionization and cold collisions. With laser-trapped Rb, they have measured the photoionization cross section from the first excited (5P) level by observing the photoionization-induced loss rate of neutral atoms from the trap. This technique has the advantage that it directly measures the photoionization rate per atom. Knowing the ionizing laser intensity and the excited-state fraction, the measured loss rate gives the absolute cross section. Using this technique, the Rb 5P photoionization cross section at ∼400 nm has been determined with an uncertainty of 9%. The authors are currently attempting to extend this method to the 5D level. Using time-ordered pulses of diode-laser light (similar to the STIRAP technique), they have performed very efficient two-photon excitation of trapped Rb atoms to 5D. Finally, they will present results from a recent collaboration which combines measurements form conventional molecular spectroscopy (single photon and double resonance) with photoassociation collisions of ultracold Na atoms to yield a precise (≤1 ppm) value for the dissociation energy of the X Σ g+ ground state of the Na 2 molecule

  13. Ultratrace determination of tin by hydride generation in-atomizer trapping atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Průša, Libor [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v. v. i., Veveří 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Science, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Hlavova 8, Prague 2, CZ 128 43 Czech Republic (Czech Republic); Dědina, Jiří [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v. v. i., Veveří 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Kratzer, Jan, E-mail: jkratzer@biomed.cas.cz [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v. v. i., Veveří 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2013-12-04

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •In-atomizer trapping HG-AAS was optimized for Sn. •A compact quartz trap-and-atomizer device was employed. •Generation, preconcentration and atomization steps were investigated in detail. •Hundred percent preconcentration efficiency for tin was reached. •Routine analytical method was developed for Sn determination (LOD of 0.03 ng mL{sup −1} Sn). -- Abstract: A quartz multiatomizer with its inlet arm modified to serve as a trap (trap-and-atomizer device) was employed to trap tin hydride and subsequently to volatilize collected analyte species with atomic absorption spectrometric detection. Generation, atomization and preconcentration conditions were optimized and analytical figures of merit of both on-line atomization as well as preconcentration modes were quantified. Preconcentration efficiency of 95 ± 5% was found. The detection limits reached were 0.029 and 0.14 ng mL{sup −1} Sn, respectively, for 120 s preconcentration period and on-line atomization mode without any preconcentration. The interference extent of other hydride forming elements (As, Se, Sb and Bi) on tin determination was found negligible in both modes of operation. The applicability of the developed preconcentration method was verified by Sn determination in a certified reference material as well as by analysis of real samples.

  14. Precision polarization measurements of atoms in a far-off-resonance optical dipole trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, F.; Vieira, D. J.; Zhao, X.

    2011-01-01

    Precision measurement of atomic and nuclear polarization is an essential step for beta-asymmetry measurement of radioactive atoms. In this paper, we report the polarization measurement of Rb atoms in an yttrium-aluminum-garnet (YAG) far-off-resonance optical dipole trap. We have prepared a cold cloud of polarized Rb atoms in the YAG dipole trap by optical pumping and achieved an initial nuclear polarization of up to 97.2(5)%. The initial atom distribution in different Zeeman levels is measured by using a combination of microwave excitation, laser pushing, and atomic retrap techniques. The nuclear-spin polarization is further purified to 99.2(2)% in 10 s and maintained above 99% because the two-body collision loss rate between atoms in mixed spin states is greater than the one-body trap loss rate. Systematic effects on the nuclear polarization, including the off-resonance Raman scattering, magnetic field gradient, and background gas collisions, are discussed.

  15. Carbon nanotori as traps for atoms and ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan Yue; Cox, Barry J.; Hill, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotori surely represent an ideal location to trap both charged and uncharged atoms, since they are open, accessible and possess strong attractive energy. In this paper, we investigate the plausibility of carbon nanotori as atomic traps and we use the continuum approximation together with the Lennard-Jones potential to model the encapsulation of an atom or ion by a nanotorus. The critical geometric factors such as the minor and major radii, i.e. r and R of the nanotorus, for which the maximum interaction between the atom and the nanotorus occurs, are determined. For various atoms, assumed situated along the axis of the torus, the minimum potential energy between the atom and the nanotorus is calculated and compared, and shown to be approximately kηεσ 2 , where η is the uniform atomic density, ε and σ are the Lennard-Jones well depth and the van der Waals radius, respectively, and k is a universal non-dimensional constant with the approximate value -12.42. The results given in this paper might be used for future drug delivery and biosensing design.

  16. Formation of Antihydrogen Rydberg atoms in strong magnetic field traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohl, T.; Sadeghpour, H. R.

    2008-01-01

    It is shown that several features of antihydrogen production in nested Penning traps can be described with accurate and efficient Monte Carlo simulations. It is found that cold deeply-bound Rydberg states of antihydrogen (H-bar) are produced in three-body capture in the ATRAP experiments and an additional formation mechanism -Rydberg charge transfer-, particular to the nested Penning trap geometry, is responsible for the observed fast (hot) H-bar atoms. Detailed description of the numerical propagation technique for following extreme close encounters is given. An analytic derivation of the power law behavior of the field ionization spectrum is provided

  17. Fundamental symmetries studies with cold trapped francium atoms at ISAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gwinner, G.; Gomez, E.; Orozco, L. A.; Perez Galvan, A.; Sheng, D.; Zhao, Y.; Sprouse, G. D.; Behr, J. A.; Jackson, K. P.; Pearson, M. R.; Aubin, S.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2006-01-01

    Francium combines a heavy nucleus (Z = 87) with the simple atomic structure of alkalis and is a very promising candidate for precision tests of fundamental symmetries such as atomic parity non-conservation measurements. Fr has no stable isotopes, and the ISAC radioactive beam facility at TRIUMF, equipped with an actinide target, promises to provide record quantities of Fr atoms, up to 10 10 /s for some isotopes. We discuss our plans for a Fr on-line laser trapping facility at ISAC and experiments with samples of cold Fr atoms. We outline our plans for a measurement of the nuclear anapole moment - a parity non-conserving, time-reversal conserving moment that arises from weak interactions between nucleons - in a chain of Fr isotopes. Its measurement is a unique probe for neutral weak interactions inside the nucleus.

  18. Simplified atom trap using a single microwave modulated diode laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newbury, N.R.; Myatt, C.J.; Wieman, C.E.

    1993-01-01

    We have demonstrated microwave modulation of a diode laser which is operated with optical feedback from a diffraction grating. By directly modulating the diode laser current at frequencies up to 6.8 GHz, we observed 2-30% of the laser power in a single sideband for 20mW of microwave power. Using such a diode laser modulated at 6.6GHz, we have trapped 87 Rb in a vapor cell. With 10mW of microwave power, the number of trapped atoms was only 15% smaller than the number obtained using two lasers in the conventional manner. A microwave modulated diode laser should also be useful for driving stimulated Raman transitions between the hyperfine levels of Rb or Cs

  19. Accurate absolute measurement of trapped Cs atoms in a MOT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talavera O, M.; Lopez R, M.; Carlos L, E. de; Jimenez S, S.

    2007-01-01

    A Cs-133 Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT) has been developed at the Time and Frequency Division of the Centro Nacional de Metrologia, CENAM, in Mexico. This MOT is part of a primary frequency standard based on ultra-cold Cs atoms, called CsF-1 clock, under development at CENAM. In this Cs MOT, we use the standard configuration (σ + - σ - ) 4-horizontal 2-vertical laser beams 1.9 cm in diameter, with 5 mW each. We use a 852 nm, 5 mW, DBR laser as a master laser which is stabilized by saturation spectroscopy. Emission linewidth of the master laser is l MHz. In order to amplify the light of the master laser, a 50 mW, 852 nm AlGaAs laser is used as slave laser. This slave laser is stabilized by light injection technique. A 12 MHz red shift of the light is performed by two double passes through two Acusto-Optic Modulators (AOMs). The optical part of the CENAMs MOT is very robust against mechanical vibration, acoustic noise and temperature changes in our laboratory, because none of our diode lasers use an extended cavity to reduce the linewidth. In this paper, we report results of our MOT characterization as a function of several operation parameters such as the intensity of laser beams, the laser beam diameter, the red shift of light, and the gradient of the magnetic field. We also report accurate absolute measurement of the number of Cs atoms trapped in our Cs MOT. We found up to 6 x 10 7 Cs atoms trapped in our MOT measured with an uncertainty no greater than 6.4%. (Author)

  20. Metal powder production by gas atomization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, E. Y.; Grant, N. J.

    1986-01-01

    The confined liquid, gas-atomization process was investigated. Results from a two-dimensional water model showed the importance of atomization pressure, as well as delivery tube and atomizer design. The atomization process at the tip of the delivery tube was photographed. Results from the atomization of a modified 7075 aluminum alloy yielded up to 60 wt pct. powders that were finer than 45 microns in diameter. Two different atomizer designs were evaluated. The amount of fine powders produced was correlated to a calculated gas-power term. An optimal gas-power value existed for maximized fine powder production. Atomization at gas-power greater than or less than this optimal value produced coarser powders.

  1. Kinetic model of the bichromatic dark trap for atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnov, I. V.

    2017-08-01

    A kinetic model of atom confinement in a bichromatic dark trap (BDT) is developed with the goal of describing its dissipative properties. The operating principle of the deep BDT is based on using the combination of multiple bichromatic cosine-Gaussian optical beams (CGBs) for creating high-potential barriers, which is described in our previous work (Krasnov 2016 Laser Phys. 26 105501). In the indicated work, particle motion in the BDT is described in terms of classical trajectories. In the present study, particle motion is analyzed by means of the Wigner function (phase-space distribution function (DF)), which allows one to properly take into account the quantum fluctuations of optical forces. Besides, we consider an improved scheme of the BDT, where CGBs create, apart from plane potential barriers, a narrow cooling layer. We find an asymptotic solution of the Fokker-Planck equation for the DF and show that the DF of particles deeply trapped in a BDT with a cooling layer is the Tsallis distribution with the effective temperature, which can be considerably lower than in a BDT without a cooling layer. Moreover, it can be adjusted by slightly changing the CGBs’ radii. We also study the effect of particle escape from the trap due to the scattering of resonant photons and show that the particle lifetime in a BDT can exceed several tens of hours when it is limited by photon scattering.

  2. Non-thermalization in trapped atomic ion spin chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, P. W.; Becker, P.; Kaplan, H. B.; Kyprianidis, A.; Lee, A. C.; Neyenhuis, B.; Pagano, G.; Richerme, P.; Senko, C.; Smith, J.; Tan, W. L.; Zhang, J.; Monroe, C.

    2017-10-01

    Linear arrays of trapped and laser-cooled atomic ions are a versatile platform for studying strongly interacting many-body quantum systems. Effective spins are encoded in long-lived electronic levels of each ion and made to interact through laser-mediated optical dipole forces. The advantages of experiments with cold trapped ions, including high spatio-temporal resolution, decoupling from the external environment and control over the system Hamiltonian, are used to measure quantum effects not always accessible in natural condensed matter samples. In this review, we highlight recent work using trapped ions to explore a variety of non-ergodic phenomena in long-range interacting spin models, effects that are heralded by the memory of out-of-equilibrium initial conditions. We observe long-lived memory in static magnetizations for quenched many-body localization and prethermalization, while memory is preserved in the periodic oscillations of a driven discrete time crystal state. This article is part of the themed issue 'Breakdown of ergodicity in quantum systems: from solids to synthetic matter'.

  3. Trapping cold ground state argon atoms for sympathetic cooling of molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Edmunds, P. D.; Barker, P. F.

    2014-01-01

    We trap cold, ground-state, argon atoms in a deep optical dipole trap produced by a build-up cavity. The atoms, which are a general source for the sympathetic cooling of molecules, are loaded in the trap by quenching them from a cloud of laser-cooled metastable argon atoms. Although the ground state atoms cannot be directly probed, we detect them by observing the collisional loss of co-trapped metastable argon atoms using a new type of parametric loss spectroscopy. Using this technique we als...

  4. A highly miniaturized vacuum package for a trapped ion atomic clock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwindt, Peter D. D., E-mail: pschwin@sandia.gov; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Partner, Heather; Casias, Adrian; Wagner, Adrian R.; Moorman, Matthew; Manginell, Ronald P. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Kellogg, James R.; Prestage, John D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    We report on the development of a highly miniaturized vacuum package for use in an atomic clock utilizing trapped ytterbium-171 ions. The vacuum package is approximately 1 cm{sup 3} in size and contains a linear quadrupole RF Paul ion trap, miniature neutral Yb sources, and a non-evaporable getter pump. We describe the fabrication process for making the Yb sources and assembling the vacuum package. To prepare the vacuum package for ion trapping, it was evacuated, baked at a high temperature, and then back filled with a helium buffer gas. Once appropriate vacuum conditions were achieved in the package, it was sealed with a copper pinch-off and was subsequently pumped only by the non-evaporable getter. We demonstrated ion trapping in this vacuum package and the operation of an atomic clock, stabilizing a local oscillator to the 12.6 GHz hyperfine transition of {sup 171}Y b{sup +}. The fractional frequency stability of the clock was measured to be 2 × 10{sup −11}/τ{sup 1/2}.

  5. Optically trapped atomic resonant devices for narrow linewidth spectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Lipeng

    This thesis focuses on the development of atomic resonant devices for spectroscopic applications. The primary emphasis is on the imaging properties of optically thick atomic resonant fluorescent filters and their applications. In addition, this thesis presents a new concept for producing very narrow linewidth light as from an atomic vapor lamp pumped by a nanosecond pulse system. This research was motivated by application for missile warning system, and presents an innovative approach to a wide angle, ultra narrow linewidth imaging filter using a potassium vapor cell. The approach is to image onto and collect the fluorescent photons emitted from the surface of an optically thick potassium vapor cell, generating a 2 GHz pass-band imaging filter. This linewidth is narrow enough to fall within a Fraunhefer dark zone in the solar spectrum, thus make the detection solar blind. Experiments are conducted to measure the absorption line shape of the potassium resonant filter, the quantum efficiency of the fluorescent behavior, and the resolution of the fluorescent image. Fluorescent images with different spatial frequency components are analyzed by using a discrete Fourier transform, and the imaging capability of the fluorescent filter is described by its Modulation Transfer Function. For the detection of radiation that is spectrally broader than the linewidth of the potassium imaging filter, the fluorescent image is seen to be blurred by diffuse fluorescence from the slightly off resonant photons. To correct this, an ultra-thin potassium imaging filter is developed and characterized. The imaging property of the ultra-thin potassium imaging cell is tested with a potassium seeded flame, yielding a resolution image of ˜ 20 lines per mm. The physics behind the atomic resonant fluorescent filter is radiation trapping. The diffusion process of the resonant photons trapped in the atomic vapor is theoretically described in this thesis. A Monte Carlo method is used to simulate the

  6. New Isotope Analysis Method: Atom Trap Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Kwang Hoon; Park, Hyun Min; Han, Jae Min; Kim, Taek Soo; Cha, Yong Ho; Lim, Gwon; Jeong, Do Young

    2011-01-01

    Trace isotope analysis has been an important role in science, archaeological dating, geology, biology and nuclear industry. Some fission products such as Sr-90, Cs-135 and Kr-85 can be released to the environment when nuclear accident occurs and the reprocessing factory operates. Thus, the analysis of artificially produced radioactive isotopes has been of interest in nuclear industry. But it is difficult to detect them due to low natural abundance less then 10 -10 . In general, radio-chemical method has been applied to detect ultra-trace radio isotopes. But this method has disadvantages of long measurement time for long lived radioisotopes and toxic chemical process for the purification. The Accelerator Mass Spectrometer has high isotope selectivity, but the system is huge and its selectivity is affected by isobars. The laser based method, such as RIMS (Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry) has the advantage of isobar-effect free characteristics. But the system size is still huge for high isotope selective system. Recently, ATTA (Atom Trap Trace Analysis) has been successfully applied to detect ultra-trace isotope, Kr-81 and Kr-85. ATTA is the isobar-effect free detection with high isotope selectivity and the system size is small. However, it requires steady atomic beam source during detection, and is not allowed simultaneous detection of several isotopes. In this presentation, we introduce new isotope detection method which is a coupled method of Atom Trap Mass Spectrometry (ATMS). We expect that it can overcome the disadvantage of ATTA while it has both advantages of ATTA and mass spectrometer. The basic concept and the system design will be presented. In addition, the experimental status of ATMS will also be presented

  7. Inflow of atomic gas fuelling star formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michałowski, M. J.; Gentile, G.; Hjorth, Jeppe

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-ray burst host galaxies are deficient in molecular gas, and show anomalous metal-poor regions close to GRB positions. Using recent Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) Hi observations we show that they have substantial atomic gas reservoirs. This suggests that star formation in these ga......Gamma-ray burst host galaxies are deficient in molecular gas, and show anomalous metal-poor regions close to GRB positions. Using recent Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) Hi observations we show that they have substantial atomic gas reservoirs. This suggests that star formation...... in these galaxies may be fuelled by recent inflow of metal-poor atomic gas. While this process is debated, it can happen in low-metallicity gas near the onset of star formation because gas cooling (necessary for star formation) is faster than the Hi-to-H2 conversion....

  8. Laser Cooling without Repumping: A Magneto-Optical Trap for Erbium Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClelland, J.J.; Hanssen, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    We report on a novel mechanism that allows for strong laser cooling of atoms that do not have a closed cycling transition. This mechanism is observed in a magneto-optical trap (MOT) for erbium, an atom with a very complex energy level structure with multiple pathways for optical-pumping losses. We observe surprisingly high trap populations of over 10 6 atoms and densities of over 10 11 atoms cm -3 , despite the many potential loss channels. A model based on recycling of metastable and ground state atoms held in the quadrupole magnetic field of the trap explains the high trap population, and agrees well with time-dependent measurements of MOT fluorescence. The demonstration of trapping of a rare-earth atom such as erbium opens a wide range of new possibilities for practical applications and fundamental studies with cold atoms

  9. Dynamics of trapped atoms around an optical nanofiber probed through polarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano, Pablo; Fatemi, Fredrik K; Orozco, Luis A; Rolston, S L

    2017-06-15

    The evanescent field outside an optical nanofiber (ONF) can create optical traps for neutral atoms. We present a non-destructive method to characterize such trapping potentials. An off-resonance linearly polarized probe beam that propagates through the ONF experiences a slow axis of polarization produced by trapped atoms on opposite sides along the ONF. The transverse atomic motion is imprinted onto the probe polarization through the changing atomic index of refraction. By applying a transient impulse, we measure a time-dependent polarization rotation of the probe beam that provides both a rapid and non-destructive measurement of the optical trapping frequencies.

  10. Determination of antimony by using a quartz atom trap and electrochemical hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menemenlioglu, Ipek; Korkmaz, Deniz [Department of Chemistry, Middle East Technical University, 06531 Ankara (Turkey); Ataman, O. Yavuz [Department of Chemistry, Middle East Technical University, 06531 Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: ataman@metu.edu.tr

    2007-01-15

    The analytical performance of a miniature quartz trap coupled with electrochemical hydride generator for antimony determination is described. A portion of the inlet arm of the conventional quartz tube atomizer was used as an integrated trap medium for on-line preconcentration of electrochemically generated hydrides. This configuration minimizes transfer lines and connections. A thin-layer of electrochemical flow through cell was constructed. Lead and platinum foils were employed as cathode and anode materials, respectively. Experimental operation conditions for hydride generation as well as the collection and revolatilization conditions for the generated hydrides in the inlet arm of the quartz tube atomizer were optimized. Interferences of copper, nickel, iron, cobalt, arsenic, selenium, lead and tin were examined both with and without the trap. 3{sigma} limit of detection was estimated as 0.053 {mu}g l{sup -1} for a sample size of 6.0 ml collected in 120 s. The trap has provided 18 fold sensitivity improvement as compared to electrochemical hydride generation alone. The accuracy of the proposed technique was evaluated with two standard reference materials; Trace Metals in Drinking Water, Cat CRM-TMDW and Metals on Soil/Sediment 4, IRM-008.

  11. Continuous loading of cold atoms into a Ioffe-Pritchard magnetic trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Piet O; Hensler, Sven; Werner, Joerg; Binhammer, Thomas; Goerlitz, Axel; Pfau, Tilman

    2003-01-01

    We present a robust continuous optical loading scheme for a Ioffe-Pritchard (IP) type magnetic trap (MT). Chromium atoms are cooled and trapped in a modified magneto-optical trap (MOT) consisting of a conventional 2D-MOT in the radial direction and an axial molasses. The MOT and IP trap share the same magnetic field configuration. Continuous loading of atoms into the IP trap is provided by radiative leakage from the MOT to a metastable level which is magnetically trapped and decoupled from the MOT light. We are able to accumulate 30 times more atoms in the MT than in the MOT. The absolute number of 2 x 10 8 atoms is limited by inelastic collisions. A model based on rate equations shows good agreement with the data. Our scheme can also be applied to other atoms with similar level structure like alkaline earth metals

  12. Two-Step Condensation of the Ideal Bose Gas in Highly Anisotropic Traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Druten, N.J.; Ketterle, W.

    1997-01-01

    The ideal Bose gas in a highly anisotropic harmonic potential is studied. It is found that Bose-Einstein condensation occurs in two distinct steps as the temperature is lowered. In the first step the specific heat shows a sharp feature, but the system still occupies many one-dimensional quantum states. In the second step, at a significantly lower temperature, the ground state becomes macroscopically occupied. It should be possible to verify these predictions using present-day atom traps. The two-step behavior can occur in a rather general class of anisotropic traps, including the box potential. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  13. Trapping of He clusters by inert-gas impurities in tungsten: First-principles predictions and experimental validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen-Manh, Duc, E-mail: duc.nguyen@ccfe.ac.uk; Dudarev, S.L.

    2015-06-01

    Properties of point defects resulting from the incorporation of inert-gas atoms in bcc tungsten are investigated systematically using first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The most stable configuration for the interstitial neon, argon, krypton and xenon atoms is the tetrahedral site, similarly to what was found earlier for helium in W. The calculated formation energies for single inert-gas atoms at interstitial sites as well as at substitutional sites are much larger for Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe than for He. While the variation of the energy of insertion of inert-gas defects into interstitial configurations can be explained by a strong effect of their large atomic size, the trend exhibited by their substitutional energies is more likely related to the covalent interaction between the noble gas impurity atoms and the tungsten atoms. There is a remarkable variation exhibited by the energy of interaction between inert-gas impurities and vacancies, where a pronounced size effect is observed when going from He to Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe. The origin of this trend is explained by electronic structure calculations showing that p-orbitals play an important part in the formation of chemical bonds between a vacancy and an atom of any of the four inert-gas elements in comparison with helium, where the latter contains only 1s{sup 2} electrons in the outer shell. The binding energies of a helium atom trapped by five different defects (He-v, Ne-v, Ar-v, Kr-v, Xe-v, where v denotes a vacancy in bcc-W) are all in excellent agreement with experimental data derived from thermal desorption spectroscopy. Attachment of He clusters to inert gas impurity atom traps in tungsten is analysed as a function of the number of successive trapping helium atoms. Variation of the Young modulus due to inert-gas impurities is analysed on the basis of data derived from DFT calculations.

  14. Motion of guiding center drift atoms in the electric and magnetic field of a Penning trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzmin, S.G.; O'Neil, T.M.

    2005-01-01

    The ApparaTus for High precision Experiment on Neutral Antimatter and antihydrogen TRAP collaborations have produced antihydrogen atoms by recombination in a cryogenic antiproton-positron plasma. This paper discusses the motion of the weakly bound atoms in the electric and magnetic field of the plasma and trap. The effective electric field in the moving frame of the atom polarizes the atom, and then gradients in the field exert a force on the atom. An approximate equation of motion for the atom center of mass is obtained by averaging over the rapid internal dynamics of the atom. The only remnant of the atom internal dynamics that enters this equation is the polarizability for the atom. This coefficient is evaluated for the weakly bound and strongly magnetized (guiding center drift) atoms understood to be produced in the antihydrogen experiments. Application of the approximate equation of motion shows that the atoms can be trapped radially in the large space charge field near the edge of the positron column. Also, an example is presented for which there is full three-dimensional trapping, not just radial trapping. Even untrapped atoms follow curved trajectories, and such trajectories are discussed for the important class of atoms that reach a field ionization diagnostic. Finally, the critical field for ionization is determined as an upper bound on the range of applicability of the theory

  15. Hexapole-compensated magneto-optical trap on a mesoscopic atom chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jöllenbeck, S.; Mahnke, J.; Randoll, R.

    2011-01-01

    Magneto-optical traps on atom chips are usually restricted to small atomic samples due to a limited capture volume caused primarily by distorted field configurations. Here we present a magneto-optical trap based on a millimeter-sized wire structure which generates a magnetic field with minimized...... distortions. Together with the loading from a high-flux two-dimensional magneto-optical trap, we achieve a loading rate of 8.4×1010 atoms/s and maximum number of 8.7×109 captured atoms. The wire structure is placed outside of the vacuum to enable a further adaptation to new scientific objectives. Since all...

  16. A gas trapping method for high-throughput metabolic experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krycer, James R; Diskin, Ciana; Nelson, Marin E; Zeng, Xiao-Yi; Fazakerley, Daniel J; James, David E

    2018-01-01

    Research into cellular metabolism has become more high-throughput, with typical cell-culture experiments being performed in multiwell plates (microplates). This format presents a challenge when trying to collect gaseous products, such as carbon dioxide (CO2), which requires a sealed environment and a vessel separate from the biological sample. To address this limitation, we developed a gas trapping protocol using perforated plastic lids in sealed cell-culture multiwell plates. We used this trap design to measure CO2 production from glucose and fatty acid metabolism, as well as hydrogen sulfide production from cysteine-treated cells. Our data clearly show that this gas trap can be applied to liquid and solid gas-collection media and can be used to study gaseous product generation by both adherent cells and cells in suspension. Since our gas traps can be adapted to multiwell plates of various sizes, they present a convenient, cost-effective solution that can accommodate the trend toward high-throughput measurements in metabolic research.

  17. Recent developments in trapping and manipulation of atoms with adiabatic potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garraway, Barry M.; Perrin, Hélène

    2016-09-01

    A combination of static and oscillating magnetic fields can be used to ‘dress’ atoms with radio-frequency (RF), or microwave, radiation. The spatial variation of these fields can be used to create an enormous variety of traps for ultra-cold atoms and quantum gases. This article reviews the type and character of these adiabatic traps and the applications which include atom interferometry and the study of low-dimensional quantum systems. We introduce the main concepts of magnetic traps leading to adiabatic dressed traps. The concept of adiabaticity is discussed in the context of the Landau-Zener model. The first bubble trap experiment is reviewed together with the method used for loading it. Experiments based on atom chips show the production of double wells and ring traps. Dressed atom traps can be evaporatively cooled with an additional RF field, and a weak RF field can be used to probe the spectroscopy of the adiabatic potentials. Several approaches to ring traps formed from adiabatic potentials are discussed, including those based on atom chips, time-averaged adiabatic potentials and induction methods. Several proposals for adiabatic lattices with dressed atoms are also reviewed.

  18. Deep cooling of optically trapped atoms implemented by magnetic levitation without transverse confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chen; Zhou, Tianwei; Zhai, Yueyang; Xiang, Jinggang; Luan, Tian; Huang, Qi; Yang, Shifeng; Xiong, Wei; Chen, Xuzong

    2017-05-01

    We report a setup for the deep cooling of atoms in an optical trap. The deep cooling is implemented by eliminating the influence of gravity using specially constructed magnetic coils. Compared to the conventional method of generating a magnetic levitating force, the lower trap frequency achieved in our setup provides a lower limit of temperature and more freedoms to Bose gases with a simpler solution. A final temperature as low as ˜ 6 nK is achieved in the optical trap, and the atomic density is decreased by nearly two orders of magnitude during the second stage of evaporative cooling. This deep cooling of optically trapped atoms holds promise for many applications, such as atomic interferometers, atomic gyroscopes, and magnetometers, as well as many basic scientific research directions, such as quantum simulations and atom optics.

  19. Gas-partitioning tracer test to qualify trapped gas during recharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilweil, Victor M.; Kip, Solomon D.; Perkins, Kim S.; Ellett, Kevin M.

    2004-01-01

    Dissolved helium and bromide tracers were used to evaluate trapped gas during an infiltration pond experiment. Dissolved helium preferentially partitioned into trapped gas bubbles, or other pore air, because of its low solubility in water. This produced observed helium retardation factors of as much as 12 relative to bromide. Numerical simulations of helium breakthrough with both equilibrium and kinetically limited advection/dispersion/retardation did not match observed helium concentrations. However, better fits were obtained by including a decay term representing the diffusive loss of helium through interconnected, gas-filled pores. Calculations indicate that 7% to more than 26% of the porosity beneath the pond was filled with gas. Measurements of laboratory hydraulic properties indicate that a 10% decrease in saturation would reduce the hydraulic conductivity by at least one order of magnitude in the well-sorted sandstone, but less in the overlying soils. This is consistent with in situ measurements during the experiment, which show steeper hydraulic gradients in sandstone than in soil. Intrinsic permeability of the soil doubled during the first six months of the experiment, likely caused by a combination of dissolution and thermal contraction of trapped gas. Managers of artificial recharge basins may consider minimizing the amount of trapped gas by using wet, rather than dry, tilling to optimize infiltration rates, particularly in well-sorted porous media in which reintroduced trapped gas may cause substantial reductions in permeability. Trapped gas may also inhibit the amount of focused infiltration that occurs naturally during ephemeral flood events along washes and playas.

  20. Gas-partitioning tracer test to quantify trapped gas during recharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilweil, V.M.; Solomon, D.K.; Perkins, K.S.; Ellett, K.M.

    2004-01-01

    Dissolved helium and bromide tracers were used to evaluate trapped gas during an infiltration pond experiment. Dissolved helium preferentially partitioned into trapped gas bubbles, or other pore air, because of its low solubility in water. This produced observed helium retardation factors of as much as 12 relative to bromide. Numerical simulations of helium breakthrough with both equilibrium and kinetically limited advection/dispersion/retardation did not match observed helium concentrations. However, better fits were obtained by including a decay term representing the diffusive loss of helium through interconnected, gas-filled pores. Calculations indicate that 7% to more than 26% of the porosity beneath the pond was filled with gas. Measurements of laboratory hydraulic properties indicate that a 10% decrease in saturation would reduce the hydraulic conductivity by at least one order of magnitude in the well-sorted sandstone, but less in the overlying soils. This is consistent with in situ measurements during the experiment, which show steeper hydraulic gradients in sandstone than in soil. Intrinsic permeability of the soil doubled during the first six months of the experiment, likely caused by a combination of dissolution and thermal contraction of trapped gas. Managers of artificial recharge basins may consider minimizing the amount of trapped gas by using wet, rather than dry, tilling to optimize infiltration rates, particularly in well-sorted porous media in which reintroduced trapped gas may cause substantial reductions in permeability. Trapped gas may also inhibit the amount of focused infiltration that occurs naturally during ephemeral flood events along washes and playas.

  1. Quantum Impurity in a One-dimensional Trapped Bose Gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salami Dehkharghani, Amin; Volosniev, A. G.; Zinner, N. T.

    2015-01-01

    We present a new theoretical framework for describing an impurity in a trapped Bose system in one spatial dimension. The theory handles any external confinement, arbitrary mass ratios, and a weak interaction may be included between the Bose particles. To demonstrate our technique, we calculate th...... the ground state energy and properties of a sample system with eight bosons and find an excellent agreement with numerically exact results. Our theory can thus provide definite predictions for experiments in cold atomic gases....

  2. Key technologies and applications of laser cooling and trapping "8"7Rb atomic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ru, Ning; Zhang, Li; Wang, Yu; Fan, Shangchun

    2016-01-01

    Atom Interferometry is proved to be a potential method for measuring the acceleration of atoms due to Gravity, we are now building a feasible system of cold atom gravimeter. In this paper development and the important applications of laser cooling and trapping atoms are introduced, some key techniques which are used to obtain "8"7Rb cold atoms in our experiments are also discussed.

  3. Emission spectrum of a harmonically trapped Λ-type three-level atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Hong; Tang Pei

    2013-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the emission spectrum for a Λ-type three-level atom trapped in the node of a standing wave. We show that the atomic center-of-mass motion not only directly affects the peak number, peak position, and peak height in the atomic emission spectrum, but also influences the effects of the cavity field and the atomic initial state on atomic emission spectrum. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  4. Foam flow in a model porous medium: II. The effect of trapped gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, S A; Getrouw, N; Vincent-Bonnieu, S

    2018-05-09

    Gas trapping is an important mechanism in both Water or Surfactant Alternating Gas (WAG/SAG) and foam injection processes in porous media. Foams for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) can increase sweep efficiency as they decrease the gas relative permeability, and this is mainly due to gas trapping. However, gas trapping mechanisms are poorly understood. Some studies have been performed during corefloods, but little work has been carried out to describe the bubble trapping behaviour at the pore scale. We have carried out foam flow tests in a micromodel etched with an irregular hexagonal pattern. Image analysis of the foam flow allowed the bubble centres to be tracked and local velocities to be obtained. It was found that the flow in the micromodel is dominated by intermittency and localized zones of trapped gas. The quantity of trapped gas was measured both by considering the fraction of bubbles that were trapped (via velocity thresholding) and by measuring the area fraction containing immobile gas (via image analysis). A decrease in the quantity of trapped gas was observed for both increasing total velocity and increasing foam quality. Calculations of the gas relative permeability were made with the Brooks Corey equation, using the measured trapped gas saturations. The results showed a decrease in gas relative permeabilities, and gas mobility, for increasing fractions of trapped gas. It is suggested that the shear thinning behaviour of foam could be coupled to the saturation of trapped gas.

  5. Resonance ionization spectroscopy: Counting noble gas atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurst, G.S.; Payne, M.G.; Chen, C.H.; Willis, R.D.; Lehmann, B.E.; Kramer, S.D.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe new work on the counting of noble gas atoms, using lasers for the selective ionization and detectors for counting individual particles (electrons or positive ions). When positive ions are counted, various kinds of mass analyzers (magnetic, quadrupole, or time-of-flight) can be incorporated to provide A selectivity. We show that a variety of interesting and important applications can be made with atom-counting techniques which are both atomic number (Z) and mass number (A) selective. (orig./FKS)

  6. General Atomic's radioactive gas recovery system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahn, J.A.; Perry, C.A.

    1975-01-01

    General Atomic Company has developed a Radioactive Gas Recovery System for the HTGR which separates, for purposes of retention, the radioactive components from the non-radioactive reactor plant waste gases. This provides the capability for reducing to an insignificant level the amount of radioactivity released from the gas waste system to the atmosphere--a most significant improvement in reducing total activity release to the environment. (U.S.)

  7. Atomic physics measurements in an electron Beam Ion Trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marrs, R.E.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Bennett, C.

    1989-01-01

    An electron Beam Ion Trap at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is being used to produce and trap very-highly-charged ions (q ≤ 70/+/) for x-ray spectroscopy measurements. Recent measurements of transition energies and electron excitation cross sections for x-ray line emission are summarized. 13 refs., 10 figs

  8. Tuning the Electronic and Dynamical Properties of a Molecule by Atom Trapping Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Van Dong; Repain, Vincent; Chacon, Cyril; Bellec, Amandine; Girard, Yann; Rousset, Sylvie; Abad, Enrique; Dappe, Yannick J; Smogunov, Alexander; Lagoute, Jérôme

    2017-11-28

    The ability to trap adatoms with an organic molecule on a surface has been used to obtain a range of molecular functionalities controlled by the choice of the molecular trapping site and local deprotonation. The tetraphenylporphyrin molecule used in this study contains three types of trapping sites: two carbon rings (phenyl and pyrrole) and the center of a macrocycle. Catching a gold adatom on the carbon rings leads to an electronic doping of the molecule, whereas trapping the adatom at the macrocycle center with single deprotonation leads to a molecular rotor and a second deprotonation leads to a molecular jumper. We call "atom trapping chemistry" the control of the structure, electronic, and dynamical properties of a molecule achieved by trapping metallic atoms with a molecule on a surface. In addition to the examples previously described, we show that more complex structures can be envisaged.

  9. Ultratrace determination of lead by hydride generation in-atomizer trapping atomic absorption spectrometry: Optimization of plumbane generation and analyte preconcentration in a quartz trap-and-atomizer device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kratzer, Jan, E-mail: jkratzer@biomed.cas.cz

    2012-05-15

    A compact trap-and-atomizer device and a preconcentration procedure based on hydride trapping in excess of oxygen over hydrogen in the collection step, both constructed and developed previously in our laboratory, were employed to optimize plumbane trapping in this device and to develop a routine method for ultratrace lead determination subsequently. The inherent advantage of this preconcentration approach is that 100% preconcentration efficiency for lead is reached in this device which has never been reported before using quartz or metal traps. Plumbane is completely retained in the trap-and-atomizer device at 290 Degree-Sign C in oxygen-rich atmosphere and trapped species are subsequently volatilized at 830 Degree-Sign C in hydrogen-rich atmosphere. Effect of relevant experimental parameters on plumbane trapping and lead volatilization are discussed, and possible trapping mechanisms are hypothesized. Plumbane trapping in the trap-and-atomizer device can be routinely used for lead determination at ultratrace levels reaching a detection limit of 0.21 ng ml{sup -1} Pb (30 s preconcentration, sample volume 2 ml). Further improvement of the detection limit is feasible by reducing the blank signal and increasing the trapping time. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In-atomizer trapping HG-AAS was optimized for Pb. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A compact quartz trap-and-atomizer device was employed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Generation, preconcentration and atomization steps were investigated in detail. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 100% preconcentration efficiency for lead was reached. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Routine analytical method was developed for Pb determination (LOD of 0.2 ng ml{sup -1} Pb).

  10. Extreme sub-wavelength atom localization via coherent population trapping

    OpenAIRE

    Agarwal, Girish S.; Kapale, Kishore T.

    2005-01-01

    We demonstrate an atom localization scheme based on monitoring of the atomic coherences. We consider atomic transitions in a Lambda configuration where the control field is a standing wave field. The probe field and the control field produce coherence between the two ground states. We show that this coherence has the same fringe pattern as produced by a Fabry-Perot interferometer and thus measurement of the atomic coherence would localize the atom. Interestingly enough the role of the cavity ...

  11. Detection of gas atoms with carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arash, B.; Wang, Q.

    2013-01-01

    Owning to their unparalleled sensitivity resolution, nanomechanical resonators have excellent capabilities in design of nano-sensors for gas detection. The current challenge is to develop new designs of the resonators for differentiating distinct gas atoms with a recognizably high sensitivity. In this work, the characteristics of impulse wave propagation in carbon nanotube-based sensors are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations to provide a new method for detection of noble gases. A sensitivity index based on wave velocity shifts in a single-walled carbon nanotube, induced by surrounding gas atoms, is defined to explore the efficiency of the nano-sensor. The simulation results indicate that the nano-sensor is able to differentiate distinct noble gases at the same environmental temperature and pressure. The inertia and the strengthening effects by the gases on wave characteristics of carbon nanotubes are particularly discussed, and a continuum mechanics shell model is developed to interpret the effects.

  12. Entanglement and quantum state transfer between two atoms trapped in two indirectly coupled cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Bin; Shen, Li-Tuo; Chen, Ming-Feng

    2016-05-01

    We propose a one-step scheme for implementing entanglement generation and the quantum state transfer between two atomic qubits trapped in two different cavities that are not directly coupled to each other. The process is realized through engineering an effective asymmetric X-Y interaction for the two atoms involved in the gate operation and an auxiliary atom trapped in an intermediate cavity, induced by virtually manipulating the atomic excited states and photons. We study the validity of the scheme as well as the influences of the dissipation by numerical simulation and demonstrate that it is robust against decoherence.

  13. Bose-Einstein atoms in atomic traps with predominantly attractive two-body interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, M.S.; Vorov, O.K.

    2002-01-01

    Using the Perron-Frobenius theorem, we prove that the results by Wilkin, Gunn, and Smith [Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 2265 (1998)] for the ground states at angular momentum L of N harmonically trapped Bose atoms, interacting via weak attractive δ 2 (r) forces, are valid for a broad class of predominantly attractive interactions V(r), not necessarily attractive for any r. This class is described by sufficient conditions on the two-body matrix elements of the potential V(r). It includes, in particular, the Gaussian attraction of arbitrary radius, -1/r-Coulomb and log(r)-Coulomb forces, as well as all the short-range interactions satisfying inequality ∫d 2 r-vectorV(r)<0. In the precollapse regime, the angular momentum L is concentrated in the collective 'center-of-mass' mode, and there is no condensation at high L

  14. Continuous imaging of a single neutral atom in a variant magneto-optical trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Tian; Zhou Shuyu; Chen Peng; Li Lin; Hong Tao; Wang Yuzhu

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate continuous imaging of a single 87 Rb atom confined in a steep magneto-optical trap with an electron-multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD) camera and realize a one-dimensional micro-optical trap array with a Dammann grating. We adopt several methods to reduce the noise in the fluorescence signal we obtain with the EMCCD. Step jumping characteristics of the fluorescence demonstrate capturing and losing of individual atoms. (authors)

  15. Development of a buffer gas trap for the confinement of positrons and study of positronium production in the GBAR experiment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2101248; van der Werf, Dirk

    The GBAR experiment relies on the production of antihydrogen positive ions to achieve its goal of measuring the gravitational acceleration of antimatter at rest. The ANTION project, included in the GBAR enterprise, is responsible for the production of these antimatter ions. Moreover, it also aims to measure the cross section of antihydrogen production throughout the collision of antiprotons and positronium atoms, as well as the matter cross sections of hydrogen and the hydrogen negative ion. These experiments imply the formation of a very dense positronium cloud, thus a large amount of positrons will be implanted on a positron/positronium converter material. This thesis reports the construction of a three stage buffer gas trap with the goal of trapping and accumulating positrons for the ANTION project. The combination of the Penning-type trap with a LINAC source constitutes a unique experimental setup. The trap was commissioned and optimized and is now fully operational. Trapping protocols were studied and...

  16. Correlated motion of two atoms trapped in a single-mode cavity field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asboth, Janos K.; Domokos, Peter; Ritsch, Helmut

    2004-01-01

    We study the motion of two atoms trapped at distant positions in the field of a driven standing-wave high-Q optical resonator. Even without any direct atom-atom interaction the atoms are coupled through their position dependent influence on the intracavity field. For sufficiently good trapping and low cavity losses the atomic motion becomes significantly correlated and the two particles oscillate in their wells preferentially with a 90 deg. relative phase shift. The onset of correlations seriously limits cavity cooling efficiency, raising the achievable temperature to the Doppler limit. The physical origin of the correlation can be traced back to a cavity mediated crossfriction, i.e., a friction force on one particle depending on the velocity of the second particle. Choosing appropriate operating conditions allows for engineering these long range correlations. In addition this cross-friction effect can provide a basis for sympathetic cooling of distant trapped clouds

  17. Enhancement of phase space density by increasing trap anisotropy in a magneto-optical trap with a large number of atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vengalattore, M.; Conroy, R.S.; Prentiss, M.G.

    2004-01-01

    The phase space density of dense, cylindrical clouds of atoms in a 2D magneto-optic trap is investigated. For a large number of trapped atoms (>10 8 ), the density of a spherical cloud is limited by photon reabsorption. However, as the atom cloud is deformed to reduce the radial optical density, the temperature of the atoms decreases due to the suppression of multiple scattering leading to an increase in the phase space density. A density of 2x10 -4 has been achieved in a magneto-optic trap containing 2x10 8 atoms

  18. Magnetic trapping of spin-polarized neutral atoms at its limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, V.E.

    1995-01-01

    We investigated the limits of magnetic methods of trapping neutral atoms in a spot of small size and small polarization misalignment. The analysis covers various methods of trapping with static and rotating magnetic field. In particular, new rotating field methods having advantages are proposed. They differ from the recently invented 'top' type by employing a slow rotating field, resonant to the orbiting atoms, rather than much faster rotation. Also a theory of the top trap is developed. It elucidates important features of trapping lying beyond the time-averaged potential concept. General criteria on the trapping temperature as a function of size and misalignment parameters are established for various methods. (author). 8 refs., 2 figs

  19. Radial plasma profile and neutron yield in an adiabatic trap with fast atom injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panov, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    Radial profiles of ion densities depending on two dimensionless parameters, which values are determined by the trap, plasma and injected beam parameters are found in dimensionless units for a plasma generated by fast atom injection in an adiabatic trap. The calculated profiles are used for determining the neutron yield. Simple approximated dimensional relations permitting to estimate quickly neutron yield, required injection power, flux of charge exchange atoms on the wall around the plasma in a wide energy range of injected atoms, trap field modulud, injection angle, trap radius and length are determined. The energetic efficiency of neutron production is estimated and it is shown that it grows with the injection energy. 7 refs.; 7 figs

  20. Three Dimensional Imaging of Cold Atoms in a Magneto Optical Trap with a Light Field Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-14

    with a Light Field Microscope Gordon E. Lott Follow this and additional works at: https://scholar.afit.edu/etd Part of the Atomic, Molecular and......https://scholar.afit.edu/etd/774 THREE-DIMENSIONAL IMAGING OF COLD ATOMS IN A MAGNETO-OPTICAL TRAP WITH A LIGHT FIELD MICROSCOPE DISSERTATION Gordon E

  1. Harmonically trapped cold atom systems: Few-body dynamics and application to many-body thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daily, Kevin Michael

    Underlying the many-body effects of ultracold atomic gases are the few-body dynamics and interparticle interactions. Moreover, the study of few-body systems on their own has accelerated due to confining few atoms in each well of a deep optical lattice or in a single microtrap. This thesis studies the microscopic properties of few-body systems under external spherically symmetric harmonic confinement and how the few-body properties translate to the many-body system. Bosonic and fermionic few-body systems are considered and the dependence of the energetics and other quantities are investigated as functions of the s-wave scattering length, the mass ratio and the temperature. It is found that the condensate fraction of a weakly-interacting trapped Bose gas depletes quadratically with the s-wave scattering length. The next order term in the depletion depends not only, as might be expected naively, on the s-wave scattering length and the effective range but additionally on a two-body parameter that is not needed to reproduce the energy of weakly-interacting trapped Bose gases. This finding has important implications for effective field theory treatments of the system. Weakly-interacting atomic and molecular two-component Fermi gases with equal masses are described using perturbative approaches. The energy shifts are tabulated and interpreted, and a measure of the molecular condensate fraction is developed. We develop a measure of the molecular condensate fraction using the two-body density matrix and we develop a model of the spherical component of the momentum distribution that agrees well with stochastic variational calculations. We establish the existence of intersystem degeneracies for equal mass two-component Fermi gases with zero-range interactions, where the eigen energies of the spin-imbalanced system are degenerate with a subset of the eigen energies of the more spin-balanced system and the same total number of fermions. For unequal mass two-component Fermi

  2. Tunable superconducting resonators with integrated trap structures for coupling with ultracold atomic gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferdinand, Benedikt; Wiedmaier, Dominik; Koelle, Dieter; Kleiner, Reinhold [Physikalisches Institut and Center for Quantum Science in LISA+, Universitaet Tuebingen (Germany); Bothner, Daniel [Physikalisches Institut and Center for Quantum Science in LISA+, Universitaet Tuebingen (Germany); Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands)

    2016-07-01

    We intend to investigate a hybrid quantum system where ultracold atomic gases play the role of a long-living quantum memory, coupled to a superconducting qubit via a coplanar waveguide transmission line resonator. As a first step we developed a resonator chip containing a Z-shaped trapping wire for the atom trap. In order to suppress parasitic resonances due to stray capacitances, and to achieve good ground connection we use hybrid superconductor - normal conductor chips. As an additional degree of freedom we add a ferroelectric capacitor making the resonators voltage-tunable. We furthermore show theoretical results on the expected coupling strength between resonator and atomic cloud.

  3. Single-atom trapping and transport in DMD-controlled optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Dustin; Kuhn, Axel

    2018-02-01

    We demonstrate the trapping and manipulation of single neutral atoms in reconfigurable arrays of optical tweezers. Our approach offers unparalleled speed by using a Texas instruments digital micro-mirror device as a holographic amplitude modulator with a frame rate of 20 000 per second. We show the trapping of static arrays of up to 20 atoms, as well as transport of individually selected atoms over a distance of 25 μm with laser cooling and 4 μm without. We discuss the limitations of the technique and the scope for technical improvements.

  4. Ar39 Detection at the 10-16 Isotopic Abundance Level with Atom Trap Trace Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, W.; Williams, W.; Bailey, K.; Davis, A. M.; Hu, S.-M.; Lu, Z.-T.; O'Connor, T. P.; Purtschert, R.; Sturchio, N. C.; Sun, Y. R.; Mueller, P.

    2011-03-01

    Atom trap trace analysis, a laser-based atom counting method, has been applied to analyze atmospheric Ar39 (half-life=269yr), a cosmogenic isotope with an isotopic abundance of 8×10-16. In addition to the superior selectivity demonstrated in this work, the counting rate and efficiency of atom trap trace analysis have been improved by 2 orders of magnitude over prior results. The significant applications of this new analytical capability lie in radioisotope dating of ice and water samples and in the development of dark matter detectors.

  5. Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state generation of three atoms trapped in two remote cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yanling; Fang Maofa; Xiao Xing; Zeng Ke; Wu Chao

    2010-01-01

    We consider a system composed of a single-atom-trapped cavity (A) and a remote two-atom-trapped cavity (B) which are connected by an optical fibre. It is shown that a shared Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) state of the three atoms can be deterministically generated by controlling the time of interaction or via the adiabatic passage based on this system. The influence of various decoherence processes such as spontaneous emission and photon loss on the fidelity is also investigated. It is found that our schemes can be realized with high fidelity even when these decoherence processes are considered.

  6. Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state generation of three atoms trapped in two remote cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Yanling; Fang Maofa; Xiao Xing; Zeng Ke; Wu Chao, E-mail: mffang@hunnu.edu.c [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Quantum Structures and Quantum Control, Ministry of Education, and College of Physics and Information Science, Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081 (China)

    2010-04-28

    We consider a system composed of a single-atom-trapped cavity (A) and a remote two-atom-trapped cavity (B) which are connected by an optical fibre. It is shown that a shared Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) state of the three atoms can be deterministically generated by controlling the time of interaction or via the adiabatic passage based on this system. The influence of various decoherence processes such as spontaneous emission and photon loss on the fidelity is also investigated. It is found that our schemes can be realized with high fidelity even when these decoherence processes are considered.

  7. Inhomogeneous Spin Diffusion in Traps with Cold Atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Henning

    2012-01-01

    increases. The inhomogeneity and the smaller nite trap size signicantly reduce the spin diusion rate at low temperatures. The resulting spin diusion rates and spin drag at longer time scales are compatible with measurements at low to high temperatures for resonant attractive interactions...

  8. Purification of ammonia-containing trap waters from atomic power plant by ozone treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grachok, M.A.; Prokudina, S.A.; Shulyat'ev, M.I.

    1990-01-01

    The aim of research was to study the process of ozonation of ammonia-containing trap waters from the Kursk Atomic Power Plant both on the model solutions and on real ones. Different factors (pH of the medium, temperature, concentration of the initial substances) have been studied for their effect on ozonation of aqueous ammonia solutions, model solutions of trap waters from the Kursk Atomic Power Plant as well as ammonia-containing trap waters and liquid radioactive wastes delivered to special water treatment at the Kursk Atomic Power Plant. It is shown that in all the cases the highest rate of ammonia oxidation by ozone is observed in the alkaline medium (pH 1.4-11.0) and at 55 deg C. The obtained results have shown that a method of ozonation followed by evaporation of water to be purified can be used to treat ammonia-containing waters from atomic power plant

  9. Laser Cooling and Trapping of Atoms and Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-16

    magnitude. The creation of an atom trampoline , where cold atoms were dropped onto a evanescent wave of light extending out of a totally internally reflected...Staff, Electromagnetic Phenomena Research Bell Laboratories, Murray Hill, 1978-1983 Head , Quantum Electronics Research Department AT&T Bell

  10. De Haas-van Alphen effect of a two-dimensional ultracold atomic gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias, B.; Furtado, C.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we show how the ultracold atom analogue of the two-dimensional de Haas-van Alphen effect in electronic condensed matter systems can be induced by optical fields in a neutral atomic system. The interaction between the suitable spatially varying laser fields and tripod-type trapped atoms generates a synthetic magnetic field which leads the particles to organize themselves in Landau levels. Initially, with the atomic gas in a regime of lowest Landau level, we display the oscillatory behaviour of the atomic energy and its derivative with respect to the effective magnetic field (B) as a function of 1/B. Furthermore, we estimate the area of the Fermi circle of the two-dimensional atomic gas.

  11. Time-Averaged Adiabatic Potentials: Versatile Matter-Wave Guides and Atom Traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesanovsky, Igor; Klitzing, Wolf von

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel class of trapping potentials, time-averaged adiabatic potentials (TAAP), which allows the generation of a large variety of traps for quantum gases and matter-wave guides for atom interferometers. Examples include stacks of pancakes, rows of cigars, and multiple rings or sickles. The traps can be coupled through controllable tunneling barriers or merged altogether. We present analytical expressions for pancake-, cigar-, and ring-shaped traps. The ring geometry is of particular interest for guided matter-wave interferometry as it provides a perfectly smooth waveguide of widely tunable diameter and thus adjustable sensitivity of the interferometer. The flexibility of the TAAP would make possible the use of Bose-Einstein condensates as coherent matter waves in large-area atom interferometers

  12. Multidimensional and interference effects in atom trapping by a cavity field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vukics, A; Domokos, P; Ritsch, H

    2004-01-01

    We study the trapping of a driven two-level atom in a strongly coupled single-mode cavity field. The cavity can significantly enhance the cooling in the direction perpendicular to the cavity axis and thus the standard Doppler-cooling scheme together with a transverse high-finesse resonator yields long trapping times up to the range of seconds. By the addition of a weak cavity pump, trapping can be achieved in the direction of the cavity axis as well. The system is sensitive to the relative phase of the atomic and cavity pumps due to the interference of the fields injected and scattered into the cavity mode. Variation of the phase difference leads to a switching between two possible trap positions along the cavity axis

  13. Trapping and cooling of rf-dressed atoms in a quadrupole magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morizot, O; Alzar, C L Garrido; Pottie, P-E; Lorent, V; Perrin, H

    2007-01-01

    We observe the spontaneous evaporation of atoms confined in a bubble-like radio frequency (rf)-dressed trap (Zobay and Garraway 2001 Phys. Rev. Lett. 86 1195; 2004 Phys. Rev. A 69 023605). The atoms are confined in a quadrupole magnetic trap and are dressed by a linearly polarized rf field. The evaporation is related to the presence of holes in the trap, at the positions where the rf coupling vanishes, due to its vectorial character. The final temperature results from a competition between residual heating and evaporation efficiency, which is controlled via the height of the holes with respect to the bottom of the trap. The experimental data are modelled by a Monte Carlo simulation predicting a small increase in phase-space density limited by the heating rate. This increase was within the phase-space density determination uncertainty of the experiment

  14. Quantum coherent tractor beam effect for atoms trapped near a nanowaveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadgrove, Mark; Wimberger, Sandro; Nic Chormaic, Síle

    2016-01-01

    We propose several schemes to realize a tractor beam effect for ultracold atoms in the vicinity of a few-mode nanowaveguide. Atoms trapped near the waveguide are transported in a direction opposite to the guided mode propagation direction. We analyse three specific examples for ultracold 23Na atoms trapped near a specific nanowaveguide (i.e. an optical nanofibre): (i) a conveyor belt-type tractor beam effect, (ii) an accelerator tractor beam effect, and (iii) a quantum coherent tractor beam effect, all of which can effectively pull atoms along the nanofibre toward the light source. This technique provides a new tool for controlling the motion of particles near nanowaveguides with potential applications in the study of particle transport and binding as well as atom interferometry. PMID:27440516

  15. Determination of tellurium by hydride generation with in situ trapping flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matusiewicz, H.; Krawczyk, M. [Politechn Poznanska, Poznan (Poland)

    2007-03-15

    The analytical performance of coupled hydride generation - integrated atom trap (HG-IAT) atomizer flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) system was evaluated for determination of Te in reference material (GBW 07302 Stream Sediment), coal fly ash and garlic. Tellurium, using formation of H{sub 2}Te vapors, is atomized in air-acetylene flame-heated IAT. A new design HG-IAT-FAAS hyphenated technique that would exceed the operational capabilities of existing arrangernents (a water-cooled single silica tube, double-slotted quartz tube or an 'integrated trap') was investigated. An improvement in detection limit was achieved compared with using either of the above atom trapping techniques separately. The concentration detection limit, defined as 3 times the blank standard deviation (3{sigma}), was 0.9 ng mL{sup -1} for Te. For a 2 min in situ preconcentration time (sample volume of 2 mL), sensitivity enhancement compared to flame AAS, was 222 fold, using the hydride generation atom trapping technique. The sensitivity can be further improved by increasing the collection time. The precision, expressed as RSD, was 7.0% (n = 6) for Te. The accuracy of the method was verified using a certified reference material (GBW 07302 Stream Sediment) by aqueous standard calibration curves. The measured Te contents of the reference material was in agreement with the information value. The method was successfully applied to the determination of tellurium in coal fly ash and garlic.

  16. Preparation of water and ice samples for 39Ar dating by atom trap trace analysis (ATTA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwefel, R.; Reichel, T.; Aeschbach-Hertig, W.; Wagenbach, D.

    2012-04-01

    Atom trap trace analysis (ATTA) is a new and promising method to measure very rare noble gas radioisotopes in the environment. The applicability of this method for the dating of very old groundwater with 81Kr has already been demonstrated [1]. Recent developments now show its feasibility also for the analysis of 39Ar [2,3], which is an ideal dating tracer for the age range between 50 and 1000 years. This range is of interest in the fields of hydro(geo)logy, oceanography, and glaciology. We present preparation (gas extraction and Ar separation) methods for groundwater and ice samples for later analysis by the ATTA technique. For groundwater, the sample size is less of a limitation than for applications in oceanography or glaciology. Large samples are furthermore needed to enable a comparison with the classical method of 39Ar detection by low-level counting. Therefore, a system was built that enables gas extraction from several thousand liters of water using membrane contactors. This system provides degassing efficiencies greater than 80 % and has successfully been tested in the field. Gas samples are further processed to separate a pure Ar fraction by a gas-chromatographic method based on Li-LSX zeolite as selective adsorber material at very low temperatures. The gas separation achieved by this system is controlled by a quadrupole mass spectrometer. It has successfully been tested and used on real samples. The separation efficiency was found to be strongly temperature dependent in the range of -118 to -130 °C. Since ATTA should enable the analysis of 39Ar on samples of less than 1 ccSTP of Ar (corresponding to about 100 ml of air, 2.5 l of water or 1 kg of ice), a method to separate Ar from small amounts of gas was developed. Titanium sponge was found to absorb 60 ccSTP of reactive gases per g of the getter material with reasonably high absorption rates at high operating temperatures (~ 800 ° C). Good separation (higher than 92 % Ar content in residual gas) was

  17. Theory of the time orbiting potential (TOP) quadrupole magnetic trap for cold atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minogin, V.G.; Richmond, J.A.; Opat, G.I.

    1997-12-31

    An analytical theory of the time orbiting potential (TOP) quadrupole magnetic trap for cold atoms is developed. It is shown that the rotating magnetic filed used to create the time-average harmonic potential is responsible for the formation of quasi-energy states of an atom in the trap. It is found that the motion of an atom near the origin of the trap can be represented as consisting of slow motion in the effective potential and fast oscillations with small amplitude. Dipole, quadrupole and higher order atomic transitions between quasi-energy states are shown to be responsible for an additional effective potential for slow atomic motion which is proportional to the fourth power of the atomic co-ordinate. Eigenstates and eigenfunctions are used to calculate the co-ordinate distribution for a single atom. It is concluded that at low temperature the quantum statistical co-ordinate distribution for a single atom exhibits a narrow central peak due to the ground state population, together with relatively broad wings due to the excited state population. (authors). 20 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs.

  18. Cold atomic gas in the inner Galaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garwood, R.W.; Dickey, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    A new set of 21 cm H I absorption spectra were obtained toward 21 compact continuum sources in the Galactic plane is presented. The 21 cm line velocity-averaged absorption coefficient as a function of Galactocentric distance is calculated. The result for distances within 2 kpc of the sun agrees with the local value found from absorption toward pulsars of 5-7 km/s/kpc. Overall, the absorption coefficient decreases to about half of its local value inside a Galactocentric radius of about 4 kpc. This decrease is shown to be primarily due to an increase in the mean line-of-sight distance between absorbing atomic clouds. Thus, the cool phase of the atomic gas is less abundant in the inner Galaxy than at the solar circle. The absorption spectra are similar in appearance to existing (C-12)O spectra. The spectral regions which show H I absorption also show CO emission. 43 references

  19. Boson-fermion demixing in a cloud of lithium atoms in a pancake trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akdeniz, Z.; Vignolo, P.; Tosi, M.P.

    2004-01-01

    We evaluate the equilibrium state of a mixture of 7 Li and 6 Li atoms with repulsive interactions, confined inside a pancake-shaped trap under conditions such that the thickness of the bosonic and fermionic clouds is approaching the values of the s-wave scattering lengths. In this regime the effective couplings depend on the axial confinement and full demixing can become observable by merely squeezing the trap, without enhancing the scattering lengths through recourse to a Feshbach resonance

  20. Impurity coupled to an artificial magnetic field in a Fermi gas in a ring trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünal, F. Nur; Hetényi, B.; Oktel, M. Ã.-.

    2015-05-01

    The dynamics of a single impurity interacting with a many-particle background is one of the central problems of condensed-matter physics. Recent progress in ultracold-atom experiments makes it possible to control this dynamics by coupling an artificial gauge field specifically to the impurity. In this paper, we consider a narrow toroidal trap in which a Fermi gas is interacting with a single atom. We show that an external magnetic field coupled to the impurity is a versatile tool to probe the impurity dynamics. Using a Bethe ansatz, we calculate the eigenstates and corresponding energies exactly as a function of the flux through the trap. Adiabatic change of flux connects the ground state to excited states due to flux quantization. For repulsive interactions, the impurity disturbs the Fermi sea by dragging the fermions whose momentum matches the flux. This drag transfers momentum from the impurity to the background and increases the effective mass. The effective mass saturates to the total mass of the system for infinitely repulsive interactions. For attractive interactions, the drag again increases the effective mass which quickly saturates to twice the mass of a single particle as a dimer of the impurity and one fermion is formed. For excited states with momentum comparable to number of particles, effective mass shows a resonant behavior. We argue that standard tools in cold-atom experiments can be used to test these predictions.

  1. Two-fluid hydrodynamic modes in a trapped superfluid gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, E.; Griffin, A.

    2005-01-01

    In the collisional region at finite temperatures, the collective modes of superfluids are described by the Landau two-fluid hydrodynamic equations. This region can now be probed over the entire BCS-Bose-Einstein-condensate crossover in trapped Fermi superfluids with a Feshbach resonance, including the unitarity region. Building on the approach initiated by Zaremba, Nikuni, and Griffin in 1999 for trapped atomic Bose gases, we present a variational formulation of two-fluid hydrodynamic collective modes based on the work of Zilsel in 1950 developed for superfluid helium. Assuming a simple variational Ansatz for the superfluid and normal fluid velocities, the frequencies of the hydrodynamic modes are given by solutions of coupled algebraic equations, with constants only involving spatial integrals over various equilibrium thermodynamic derivatives. This variational approach is both simpler and more physical than a direct attempt to solve the Landau two-fluid differential equations. Our two-fluid results are shown to reduce to those of Pitaevskii and Stringari for a pure superfluid at T=0

  2. Density of trapped gas in heavily-irradiated lithium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, R.C. Jr.; Attalla, A.; Souers, P.C.; Folkers, C.L.; McCreary, T.; Snider, G.D.; Vanderhoofven, F.; Tsugawa, R.T.

    1988-01-01

    We review old gamma-irradiated lithium hydride data and also display much new bulk and gas-displacement density and nuclear magnetic resonance data on Li(D, T) and LiT at 296 to 373 K. We find that: (1) Li(D, T) swells because of the formation of internal D-T and 3 He gas bubbles, but probably not because of the precipitation of lithium metal; (2) the gas bubbles are at densities of at least 3 to 4x10 4 mol/m 3 , i.e. thousands of atmospheres; (3) outgassing may be largely the result of bubbles rupturing, although diffusion of 3 He as atoms may occur at long times. (orig.)

  3. Trapped atomic ions for quantum-limited metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wineland, David

    2017-04-01

    Laser-beam-manipulated trapped ions are a candidate for large-scale quantum information processing and quantum simulation but the basic techniques used can also be applied to quantum-limited metrology and sensing. Some examples being explored at NIST are: 1) As charged harmonic oscillators, trapped ions can be used to sense electric fields; this can be used to characterize the electrode-surface-based noisy electric fields that compromise logic-gate fidelities and may eventually be used as a tool in surface science. 2) Since typical qubit logic gates depend on state-dependent forces, we can adapt the gate dynamics to sensitively detect additional forces. 3) We can use extensions of Bell inequality measurements to further restrict the degree of local realism possessed by Bell states. 4) We also briefly describe experiments for creation of Bell states using Hilbert space engineering. This work is a joint effort including the Ion-Storage group, the Quantum processing group, and the Computing and Communications Theory group at NIST, Boulder. Supported by IARPA, ONR, and the NIST Quantum Information Program.

  4. BCS-BEC crossover at finite temperature for superfluid trapped Fermi atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perali, A.; Pieri, P.; Pisani, L.; Strinati, G.C.

    2004-01-01

    We consider the BCS-BEC (Bose-Einstein-condensate) crossover for a system of trapped Fermi atoms at finite temperature, both below and above the superfluid critical temperature, by including fluctuations beyond mean field. We determine the superfluid critical temperature and the pair-breaking temperature as functions of the attractive interaction between Fermi atoms, from the weak- to the strong-coupling limit (where bosonic molecules form as bound-fermion pairs). Density profiles in the trap are also obtained for all temperatures and couplings

  5. Observation of Entanglement of a Single Photon with a Trapped Atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volz, Juergen; Weber, Markus; Schlenk, Daniel; Rosenfeld, Wenjamin; Vrana, Johannes; Saucke, Karen; Kurtsiefer, Christian; Weinfurter, Harald

    2006-01-01

    We report the observation of entanglement between a single trapped atom and a single photon at a wavelength suitable for low-loss communication over large distances, thereby achieving a crucial step towards long range quantum networks. To verify the entanglement, we introduce a single atom state analysis. This technique is used for full state tomography of the atom-photon qubit pair. The detection efficiency and the entanglement fidelity are high enough to allow in a next step the generation of entangled atoms at large distances, ready for a final loophole-free Bell experiment

  6. An atomic beam source for fast loading of a magneto-optical trap under high vacuum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McDowall, P.D.; Hilliard, Andrew; Grünzweig, T.

    2012-01-01

    We report on a directional atomic beam created using an alkali metal dispenser and a nozzle. By applying a high current (15 A) pulse to the dispenser at room temperature we can rapidly heat it to a temperature at which it starts dispensing, avoiding the need for preheating. The atomic beam produced...... is capable of loading 90 of a magneto-optical trap (MOT) in less than 7 s while maintaining a low vacuum pressure of 10 -11 Torr. The transverse velocity components of the atomic beam are measured to be within typical capture velocities of a rubidium MOT. Finally, we show that the atomic beam can be turned...

  7. Phase diagrams for an ideal gas mixture of fermionic atoms and bosonic molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, J. E.; Nygaard, Nicolai; Clark, C. W.

    2004-01-01

    We calculate the phase diagrams for a harmonically trapped ideal gas mixture of fermionic atoms and bosonic molecules in chemical and thermal equilibrium, where the internal energy of the molecules can be adjusted relative to that of the atoms by use of a tunable Feshbach resonance. We plot...... diagrams obtained in recent experiments on the Bose-Einstein condensation to Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer crossover, in which the condensate fraction is plotted as a function of the initial temperature of the Fermi gas measured before a sweep of the magnetic field through the resonance region....

  8. Dynamic effect of collision failure of phase in gas of cold dark atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Il'ichev, L.V.

    2005-01-01

    In a gas of slow atoms exhibiting the effect of coherent population trapping (CPT) on the sublevels of the ground state in a spatially nonuniform light field, rare collisions destroying the CPT state initiate the irreversible exchange of momentum between radiation and atoms. This exchange is manifested as an additional force that acts on the particles. The force is of geometric origin, being determined only by the structure of the field of local CPT states. When this force is not masked by the standard collision change in atomic momentum, the observation of the kinetics of the particles may provide information on the physics of the collisions [ru

  9. Antihydrogen formation dynamics in a multipolar neutral anti-atom trap

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Bowe, P D; Bray, C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jørgensen, L V; Kerrigan, S J; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif El Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2010-01-01

    Antihydrogen production in a neutral atom trap formed by an octupole-based magnetic field minimum is demonstrated using field-ionization of weakly bound anti-atoms. Using our unique annihilation imaging detector, we correlate antihydrogen detection by imaging and by field-ionization for the first time. We further establish how field-ionization causes radial redistribution of the antiprotons during antihydrogen formation and use this effect for the first simultaneous measurements of strongly and weakly bound antihydrogen atoms. Distinguishing between these provides critical information needed in the process of optimizing for trappable antihydrogen. These observations are of crucial importance to the ultimate goal of performing CPT tests involving antihydrogen, which likely depends upon trapping the anti-atom.

  10. Antihydrogen atom formation in a CUSP trap towards spin polarized beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroda, N., E-mail: kuroda@radphys4.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp [University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (Japan); Enomoto, Y. [RIKEN Advanced Science Institute (Japan); Michishio, K. [Tokyo University of Science, Department of Physics (Japan); Kim, C. H. [University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (Japan); Higaki, H. [Hiroshima University, Graduate School of Advanced Science of Matter (Japan); Nagata, Y.; Kanai, Y. [RIKEN Advanced Science Institute (Japan); Torii, H. A. [University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (Japan); Corradini, M.; Leali, M.; Lodi-Rizzini, E.; Venturelli, L.; Zurlo, N. [Universita di Brescia and Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Dipartimento di Chimica e Fisica per l' Ingegneria e per i Materiali (Italy); Fujii, K.; Ohtsuka, M.; Tanaka, K. [University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (Japan); Imao, H. [RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science (Japan); Nagashima, Y. [Tokyo University of Science, Department of Physics (Japan); Matsuda, Y. [University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (Japan); Juhasz, B. [Stefan Meyer Institut fuer Subatomare Physik (Austria); and others

    2012-12-15

    The ASACUSA collaboration has been making a path to realize high precision microwave spectroscopy of ground-state hyperfine transitions of antihydrogen atom in flight for stringent test of the CPT symmetry. For this purpose, an efficient extraction of a spin polarized antihydrogen beam is essential. In 2010, we have succeeded in synthesizing our first cold antihydrogen atoms employing a CUSP trap. The CUSP trap confines antiprotons and positrons simultaneously with its axially symmetric magnetic field to form antihydrogen atoms. It is expected that antihydrogen atoms in the low-field-seeking states are preferentially focused along the cusp magnetic field axis whereas those in the high-field-seeking states are defocused, resulting in the formation of a spin-polarized antihydrogen beam.

  11. Computer simulation of void formation in residual gas atom free metals by dual beam irradiation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimomura, Y.; Nishiguchi, R.; La Rubia, T.D. de; Guinan, M.W.

    1992-01-01

    In our recent experiments (1), we found that voids nucleate at vacancy clusters which trap gas atoms such as hydrogen and helium in ion- and neutron-irradiated copper. A molecular dynamics computer simulation, which implements an empirical embedded atom method to calculate forces that act on atoms in metals, suggests that a void nucleation occurs in pure copper at six and seven vacancy clusters. The structure of six and seven vacancy clusters in copper fluctuates between a stacking fault tetrahedron and a void. When a hydrogen is trapped at voids of six and seven vacancy, a void can keep their structure for appreciably long time; that is, the void do not relax to a stacking fault tetrahedron and grows to a large void. In order to explore the detailed atomics of void formation, it is emphasized that dual-beam irradiation experiments that utilize beams of gas atoms and self-ions should be carried out with residual gas atom free metal specimens. (author)

  12. Hydride generation – in-atomizer collection of Pb in a quartz trap-and-atomizer device for atomic absorption spectrometry – an interference study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novotný, Pavel [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v.v.i., Veveří 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic); High School in Hořice, Husova 1414, 508 01 Hořice (Czech Republic); Kratzer, Jan, E-mail: jkratzer@biomed.cas.cz [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v.v.i., Veveří 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2013-01-01

    Interferences of selected hydride forming elements (As, Sb, Bi, Se and Sn) on lead determination by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry were extensively studied in both on-line atomization and preconcentration (collection) modes. The commonly used on-line atomization mode was found free of significant interferences, whereas strong interference from Bi was observed when employing the preconcentration mode with plumbane collection in a quartz trap-and-atomizer device. Interference of Bi seems to take place in the preconcentration step. Interference of Bi in the collection mode cannot be reduced by increased hydrogen radical amount in the trap and/or the atomizer. - Highlights: ► Interference study on Pb determination by in-atomizer trapping was performed for the first time. ► Bi was found as a severe interferent in the preconcentration mode (Pb:Bi ratio 1:100). ► No interference was found in the on-line atomization (no preconcentration). ► Bi interference occurs during preconcentration.

  13. Production of antihydrogen at reduced magnetic field for anti-atom trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G.B.; Boston, A.; Bowe, P.D.; Cesar, C.L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Chartier, M.; Deutsch, A.; Fajans, J.; Fujiwara, M.C.; Funakoshi, R.; Gill, D.R.; Gomberoff, K.; Hangst, J.S.; Hayano, R.S.; Hydomako, R.; Jenkins, M.J.; Jorgensen, L.V.; Kurchaninov, L.; Madsen, N.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Page, R.D.; Povilus, A.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; Silveira, D.M.; Storey, J.W.; Thompson, R.I.; van der Werf, D.P.; Wurtele, J.S.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2008-01-01

    We have demonstrated production of antihydrogen in a 1$,$T solenoidal magnetic field. This field strength is significantly smaller than that used in the first generation experiments ATHENA (3$,$T) and ATRAP (5$,$T). The motivation for using a smaller magnetic field is to facilitate trapping of antihydrogen atoms in a neutral atom trap surrounding the production region. We report the results of measurements with the ALPHA (Antihydrogen Laser PHysics Apparatus) device, which can capture and cool antiprotons at 3$,$T, and then mix the antiprotons with positrons at 1$,$T. We infer antihydrogen production from the time structure of antiproton annihilations during mixing, using mixing with heated positrons as the null experiment, as demonstrated in ATHENA. Implications for antihydrogen trapping are discussed.

  14. Two photon spectroscopy of rubidium atoms in a magneto-optic trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fretel, E.

    1997-01-01

    Two photon transitions without doppler effect can be used as an atomic reference. The aim of this work is to study two photon transitions of rubidium atoms in a magneto-optical trap. The chosen transition is from the level 5 2 S 1/2 toward the level 5 2 D 5/2 . The magneto-optical trap is achieved by using 3 pairs of perpendicular laser beams and by setting a magnetic field gradient. About 10 18 atoms are trapped and cooled in a 1 mm 3 volume. In a first stage we have realized an optical double resonance experiment from the level 5 2 S 1/2 toward the level 5 2 D 5/2 by populating the intermediate level 5 2 P 3/2 . Then we have studied the two photon transition in this cluster of cold atoms. A particular setting of the experiment allows to reduce the effect of ray broadening and shifting due to the magnetic field of the trap

  15. Intrinsic electron traps in atomic-layer deposited HfO{sub 2} insulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerbu, F.; Madia, O.; Afanas' ev, V. V.; Houssa, M.; Stesmans, A. [Laboratory of Semiconductor Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leuven, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Andreev, D. V. [Laboratory of Semiconductor Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leuven, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Bauman Moscow State Technical University—Kaluga Branch, 248000 Kaluga, Moscow obl. (Russian Federation); Fadida, S.; Eizenberg, M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, 32000 Haifa (Israel); Breuil, L. [imec, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Lisoni, J. G. [imec, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Faculty of Science, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia (Chile); Kittl, J. A. [Laboratory of Semiconductor Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leuven, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Advanced Logic Lab, Samsung Semiconductor, Inc., Austin, 78754 Texas (United States); Strand, J.; Shluger, A. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-30

    Analysis of photodepopulation of electron traps in HfO{sub 2} films grown by atomic layer deposition is shown to provide the trap energy distribution across the entire oxide bandgap. The presence is revealed of two kinds of deep electron traps energetically distributed at around E{sub t} ≈ 2.0 eV and E{sub t} ≈ 3.0 eV below the oxide conduction band. Comparison of the trapped electron energy distributions in HfO{sub 2} layers prepared using different precursors or subjected to thermal treatment suggests that these centers are intrinsic in origin. However, the common assumption that these would implicate O vacancies cannot explain the charging behavior of HfO{sub 2}, suggesting that alternative defect models should be considered.

  16. Levitated atoms in a CO2 laser trap: towards BEC with cesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbig, J.; Weber, T.; Naegerl, H.-C.; Grimm, R.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Since the standard approach towards Bose-Einstein condensation has failed for cesium, we are exploring a novel concept employing an optical dipole trap formed by intense CO2 lasers. These provide a conservative and large-volume trapping potential. In order to compensate the gravitational force, a magnetic field gradient along the vertical axis is applied. This counterbalances gravitation for the absolute internal ground state of Cs (F=3, mF=3), effectively levitating those atoms. Other spin states are expelled from the trap, opening up a path for rf exploration. Our approach to trap the lowest spin state at low densities minimizes inelastic processes. The free choice of a magnetic bias field allows exploration of Feshbach resonances to tune scattering properties. (author)

  17. Condensed Fraction of an Atomic Bose Gas Induced by Critical Correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Robert P.; Tammuz, Naaman; Campbell, Robert L. D.; Hadzibabic, Zoran; Holzmann, Markus

    2011-01-01

    We study the condensed fraction of a harmonically trapped atomic Bose gas at the critical point predicted by mean-field theory. The nonzero condensed fraction f 0 is induced by critical correlations which increase the transition temperature T c above T c MF . Unlike the T c shift in a trapped gas, f 0 is sensitive only to the critical behavior in the quasiuniform part of the cloud near the trap center. To leading order in the interaction parameter a/λ 0 , where a is the s-wave scattering length and λ 0 the thermal wavelength, we expect a universal scaling f 0 ∝(a/λ 0 ) 4 . We experimentally verify this scaling using a Feshbach resonance to tune a/λ 0 . Further, using the local density approximation, we compare our measurements with the universal result obtained from Monte Carlo simulations for a uniform system, and find excellent quantitative agreement.

  18. Temperature and phase-space density of a cold atom cloud in a quadrupole magnetic trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ram, S. P.; Mishra, S. R.; Tiwari, S. K.; Rawat, H. S. [Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore (India)

    2014-08-15

    We present studies on modifications in the temperature, number density and phase-space density when a laser-cooled atom cloud from optical molasses is trapped in a quadrupole magnetic trap. Theoretically, for a given temperature and size of the cloud from the molasses, the phase-space density in the magnetic trap is shown first to increase with increasing magnetic field gradient and then to decrease with it after attaining a maximum value at an optimum value of the magnetic-field gradient. The experimentally-measured variation in the phase-space density in the magnetic trap with changing magnetic field gradient is shown to exhibit a similar trend. However, the experimentally-measured values of the number density and the phase-space density are much lower than the theoretically-predicted values. This is attributed to the experimentally-observed temperature in the magnetic trap being higher than the theoretically-predicted temperature. Nevertheless, these studies can be useful for setting a higher phase-space density in the trap by establishing an optimal value of the field gradient for a quadrupole magnetic trap.

  19. Spectroscopy, Manipulation and Trapping of Neutral Atoms, Molecules, and Other Particles Using Optical Nanofibers: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Michael J.; Deasy, Kieran; Frawley, Mary; Kumar, Ravi; Prel, Eugen; Russell, Laura; Truong, Viet Giang; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2013-01-01

    The use of tapered optical fibers, i.e., optical nanofibers, for spectroscopy and the detection of small numbers of particles, such as neutral atoms or molecules, has been gaining interest in recent years. In this review, we briefly introduce the optical nanofiber, its fabrication, and optical mode propagation within. We discuss recent progress on the integration of optical nanofibers into laser-cooled atom and vapor systems, paying particular attention to spectroscopy, cold atom cloud characterization, and optical trapping schemes. Next, a natural extension of this work to molecules is introduced. Finally, we consider several alternatives to optical nanofibers that display some advantages for specific applications. PMID:23945738

  20. A comparison of pulsed and continuous atom transfer between two magneto-optical traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ram, S. P.; Tiwari, S. K.; Mishra, S. R.

    2010-01-01

    We present the experimental results for a comparison between pulsed and continuous transfer of cold 87 Rb atoms between a vapor chamber magneto-optical trap (VC-MOT) and an ultra-high vacuum magneto-optical trap (UHV-MOT) when using a resonant push beam. We find that employing repetitive cycles of a pulsed and unfocused push beam on an unsaturated VC-MOT cloud results in a significantly higher number of atoms transferred to the UHV-MOT than the number obtained with a continuous push beam focused on a continuous VC-MOT. In pulsed transfer, we find that both the VC-MOT loading duration and the push beam duration play important roles in the transfer process and govern the number of atoms transferred to the UHV-MOT. The parameters and processes affecting the transfer have been investigated and are discussed.

  1. Optically trapped atom interferometry using the clock transition of large 87Rb Bose-Einstein condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altin, P A; McDonald, G; Doering, D; Debs, J E; Barter, T H; Close, J D; Robins, N P; Haine, S A; Hanna, T M; Anderson, R P

    2011-01-01

    We present a Ramsey-type atom interferometer operating with an optically trapped sample of 10 6 Bose-condensed 87 Rb atoms. We investigate this interferometer experimentally and theoretically with an eye to the construction of future high precision atomic sensors. Our results indicate that, with further experimental refinements, it will be possible to produce and measure the output of a sub-shot-noise-limited, large atom number BEC-based interferometer. The optical trap allows us to couple the |F=1, m F =0)→|F=2, m F =0) clock states using a single photon 6.8 GHz microwave transition, while state selective readout is achieved with absorption imaging. We analyse the process of absorption imaging and show that it is possible to observe atom number variance directly, with a signal-to-noise ratio ten times better than the atomic projection noise limit on 10 6 condensate atoms. We discuss the technical and fundamental noise sources that limit our current system, and present theoretical and experimental results on interferometer contrast, de-phasing and miscibility.

  2. Itinerant ferromagnetism in an atomic Fermi gas: Influence of population imbalance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conduit, G. J.; Simons, B. D.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate ferromagnetic ordering in an itinerant ultracold atomic Fermi gas with repulsive interactions and population imbalance. In a spatially uniform system, we show that at zero temperature the transition to the itinerant magnetic phase transforms from first to second order with increasing population imbalance. Drawing on these results, we elucidate the phases present in a trapped geometry, finding three characteristic types of behavior with changing population imbalance. Finally, we outline the potential experimental implications of the findings.

  3. Improved atom number with a dual color magneto—optical trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Qiang; Luo Xin-Yu; Gao Kui-Yi; Wang Xiao-Rui; Wang Ru-Quan; Chen Dong-Min

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel dual color magneto—optical trap (MOT), which uses two sets of overlapping laser beams to cool and trap 87 Rb atoms. The volume of cold cloud in the dual color MOT is strongly dependent on the frequency difference of the laser beams and can be significantly larger than that in the normal MOT with single frequency MOT beams. Our experiment shows that the dual color MOT has the same loading rate as the normal MOT, but much longer loading time, leading to threefold increase in the number of trapped atoms. This indicates that the larger number is caused by reduced light induced loss. The dual color MOT is very useful in experiments where both high vacuum level and large atom number are required, such as single chamber quantum memory and Bose—Einstein condensation (BEC) experiments. Compared to the popular dark spontaneous-force optical trap (dark SPOT) technique, our approach is technically simpler and more suitable to low power laser systems. (rapid communication)

  4. Influence of trapping potentials on the phase diagram of bosonic atoms in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giampaolo, S.M.; Illuminati, F.; Mazzarella, G.; De Siena, S.

    2004-01-01

    We study the effect of external trapping potentials on the phase diagram of bosonic atoms in optical lattices. We introduce a generalized Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian that includes the structure of the energy levels of the trapping potential, and show that these levels are in general populated both at finite and zero temperature. We characterize the properties of the superfluid transition for this situation and compare them with those of the standard Bose-Hubbard description. We briefly discuss similar behaviors for fermionic systems

  5. Fast Ground State Manipulation of Neutral Atoms in Microscopic Optical Traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yavuz, D.D.; Kulatunga, P.B.; Urban, E.; Johnson, T.A.; Proite, N.; Henage, T.; Walker, T.G.; Saffman, M.

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate Rabi flopping at MHz rates between ground hyperfine states of neutral 87 Rb atoms that are trapped in two micron sized optical traps. Using tightly focused laser beams we demonstrate high fidelity, site specific Rabi rotations with cross talk on neighboring sites separated by 8 μm at the level of 10 -3 . Ramsey spectroscopy is used to measure a dephasing time of 870 μs, which is ≅5000 times longer than the time for a π/2 pulse

  6. A (201)Hg+ Comagnetometer for (199)Hg+ Trapped Ion Space Atomic Clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Eric A.; Taghavi, Shervin; Tjoelker, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    A method has been developed for unambiguously measuring the exact magnetic field experienced by trapped mercury ions contained within an atomic clock intended for space applications. In general, atomic clocks are insensitive to external perturbations that would change the frequency at which the clocks operate. On a space platform, these perturbative effects can be much larger than they would be on the ground, especially in dealing with the magnetic field environment. The solution is to use a different isotope of mercury held within the same trap as the clock isotope. The magnetic field can be very accurately measured with a magnetic-field-sensitive atomic transition in the added isotope. Further, this measurement can be made simultaneously with normal clock operation, thereby not degrading clock performance. Instead of using a conventional magnetometer to measure ambient fields, which would necessarily be placed some distance away from the clock atoms, first order field-sensitive atomic transition frequency changes in the atoms themselves determine the variations in the magnetic field. As a result, all ambiguity over the exact field value experienced by the atoms is removed. Atoms used in atomic clocks always have an atomic transition (often referred to as the clock transition) that is sensitive to magnetic fields only in second order, and usually have one or more transitions that are first-order field sensitive. For operating parameters used in the (199)Hg(+) clock, the latter can be five orders of magnitude or more sensitive to field fluctuations than the clock transition, thereby providing an unambiguous probe of the magnetic field strength.

  7. Uncondensed atoms in the regime of velocity-selective coherent population trapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Il’ichov, L. V.; Tomilin, V. A.

    2016-01-01

    We consider the model of a Bose condensate in the regime of velocity-selective coherent population trapping. As a result of interaction between particles, some fraction of atoms is outside the condensate, remaining in the coherent trapping state. These atoms are involved in brief events of intense interaction with external resonant electromagnetic fields. Intense induced and spontaneous transitions are accompanied by the exchange of momenta between atoms and radiation, which is manifested as migration of atoms in the velocity space. The rate of such migration is calculated. A nonlinear kinetic equation for the many-particle statistical operator for uncondensed atoms is derived under the assumption that correlations of atoms with different momenta are insignificant. The structure of its steady-state solution leads to certain conclusions about the above-mentioned migration pattern taking the Bose statistics into consideration. With allowance for statistical effects, we derive nonlinear integral equations for frequencies controlling the migration. The results of numerical solution of these equations are represented in the weak interatomic interaction approximation.

  8. On the combination of a low energy hydrogen atom beam with a cold multipole ion trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borodi, Gheorghe

    2008-12-09

    The first part of the activities of this thesis was to develop a sophisticated ion storage apparatus dedicated to study chemical processes with atomic hydrogen. The integration of a differentially pumped radical beam source into an existing temperature variable 22- pole trapping machine has required major modifications. Since astrophysical questions have been in the center of our interest, the introduction first gives a short overview of astrophysics and -chemistry. The basics of ion trapping in temperature variable rf traps is well-documented in the literature; therefore, the description of the basic instrument (Chapter 2) is kept rather short. Much effort has been put into the development of an intense and stable source for hydrogen atoms the kinetic energy of which can be changed. Chapter 3 describes this module in detail with emphasis on the integration of magnetic hexapoles for guiding the atoms and special treatments of the surfaces for reducing H-H recombination. Due to the unique sensitivity of the rf ion trapping technique, this instrument allows one to study a variety of reactions of astrochemical and fundamental interest. The results of this work are summarized in Chapter 4. Reactions of CO{sub 2}{sup +} with hydrogen atoms and molecules have been established as calibration standard for in situ determination of H and H{sub 2} densities over the full temperature range of the apparatus (10 K-300 K). For the first time, reactions of H- and D-atoms with the ionic hydrocarbons CH{sup +}, CH{sub 2}{sup +}, and CH{sub 4}{sup +} have been studied at temperatures of interstellar space. A very interesting, not yet fully understood collision system is the interaction of protonated methane with H. The outlook presents some ideas, how to improve the new instrument and a few reaction systems are mentioned which may be studied next. (orig.)

  9. On the combination of a low energy hydrogen atom beam with a cold multipole ion trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borodi, Gheorghe

    2008-01-01

    The first part of the activities of this thesis was to develop a sophisticated ion storage apparatus dedicated to study chemical processes with atomic hydrogen. The integration of a differentially pumped radical beam source into an existing temperature variable 22- pole trapping machine has required major modifications. Since astrophysical questions have been in the center of our interest, the introduction first gives a short overview of astrophysics and -chemistry. The basics of ion trapping in temperature variable rf traps is well-documented in the literature; therefore, the description of the basic instrument (Chapter 2) is kept rather short. Much effort has been put into the development of an intense and stable source for hydrogen atoms the kinetic energy of which can be changed. Chapter 3 describes this module in detail with emphasis on the integration of magnetic hexapoles for guiding the atoms and special treatments of the surfaces for reducing H-H recombination. Due to the unique sensitivity of the rf ion trapping technique, this instrument allows one to study a variety of reactions of astrochemical and fundamental interest. The results of this work are summarized in Chapter 4. Reactions of CO 2 + with hydrogen atoms and molecules have been established as calibration standard for in situ determination of H and H 2 densities over the full temperature range of the apparatus (10 K-300 K). For the first time, reactions of H- and D-atoms with the ionic hydrocarbons CH + , CH 2 + , and CH 4 + have been studied at temperatures of interstellar space. A very interesting, not yet fully understood collision system is the interaction of protonated methane with H. The outlook presents some ideas, how to improve the new instrument and a few reaction systems are mentioned which may be studied next. (orig.)

  10. In situ atom trapping of Bi on W-coated slotted quartz tube flame atomic absorption spectrometry and interference studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kılınç, Ersin; Bakırdere, Sezgin; Aydın, Fırat; Ataman, O. Yavuz

    2013-01-01

    Analytical performances of metal coated slotted quartz tube flame atomic absorption spectrometry (SQT-FAAS) and slotted quartz tube in situ atom trapping flame atomic absorption spectrometry (SQT-AT-FAAS) systems were evaluated for determination of Bi. Non-volatile elements such as Mo, Zr, W and Ta were tried as coating materials. It was observed that W-coated SQT gave the best sensitivity for the determination of Bi for SQT-FAAS and SQT-AT-FAAS. The parameters for W-coated SQT-FAAS and W-coated SQT-AT-FAAS were optimized. Sensitivity of FAAS for Bi was improved as 4.0 fold by W-coated SQT-FAAS while 613 fold enhancement in sensitivity was achieved by W-coated SQT-AT-FAAS using 5.0 min trapping with respect to conventional FAAS. MIBK was selected as organic solvent for the re-atomization of Bi from the trapping surface. Limit of detection values for W-coated SQT-FAAS and W-coated SQT-AT-FAAS was obtained as 0.14 μg mL −1 and 0.51 ng mL −1 , respectively. Linear calibration plot was obtained in the range of 2.5–25.0 ng mL −1 for W-coated SQT-AT-FAAS. Accuracy of the W-coated SQT-AT-FAAS system was checked by analyzing a standard reference material, NIST 1643e. - Highlights: • Further increasing in sensitivity of SQT-AT-FAAS was obtained by using a W coated SQT. • 613 fold sensitivity enhancement was achieved by W coated SQT-AT-FAAS versus FAAS. • A sensitive, rapid and simple technique for Bi was developed with an LOD of 0.51 ng mL −1 . • The technique is suggested for laboratories equipped with only a flame AA spectrometer

  11. Defect trap model of gas behaviour in UO2 fuel during irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szuta, A.

    2003-01-01

    Fission gas behaviour is one of the central concern in the fuel design, performance and hypothetical accident analysis. The report 'Defect trap model of gas behaviour in UO 2 fuel during irradiation' is the worldwide literature review of problems studied, experimental results and solutions proposed in related topics. Some of them were described in details in the report chapters. They are: anomalies in the experimental results; fission gas retention in the UO 2 fuel; microstructure of the UO 2 fuel after irradiation; fission gas release models; defect trap model of fission gas behaviour; fission gas release from UO 2 single crystal during low temperature irradiation in terms of a defect trap model; analysis of dynamic release of fission gases from single crystal UO 2 during low temperature irradiation in terms of defect trap model; behaviour of fission gas products in single crystal UO 2 during intermediate temperature irradiation in terms of a defect trap model; modification of re-crystallization temperature of UO 2 in function of burnup and its impact on fission gas release; apparent diffusion coefficient; formation of nanostructures in UO 2 fuel at high burnup; applications of the defect trap model to the gas leaking fuel elements number assessment in the nuclear power station (VVER-PWR)

  12. Optical trapping of cold neutral atoms using a two-color evanescent light field around a carbon nanotube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nga, Do Thi; Viet, Nguyen Ai; Nga, Dao Thi Thuy; Lan, Nguyen Thi Phuong

    2014-01-01

    We suggest a new schema of trapping cold atoms using a two-color evanescent light field around a carbon nanotube. The two light fields circularly polarized sending through a carbon nanotube generates an evanescent wave around this nanotube. By evanescent effect, the wave decays away from the nanotube producing a set of trapping minima of the total potential in the transverse plane as a ring around the nanotube. This schema allows capture of atoms to a cylindrical shell around the nanotube. We consider some possible boundary conditions leading to the non-trivial bound state solution. Our result will be compared to some recent trapping models and our previous trapping models.

  13. Atomic origin of high-temperature electron trapping in metal-oxide-semiconductor devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Xiao, E-mail: xiao.shen@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Dhar, Sarit [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama 36849 (United States); Pantelides, Sokrates T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2015-04-06

    MOSFETs based on wide-band-gap semiconductors are suitable for operation at high temperature, at which additional atomic-scale processes that are benign at lower temperatures can get activated, resulting in device degradation. Recently, significant enhancement of electron trapping was observed under positive bias in SiC MOSFETs at temperatures higher than 150 °C. Here, we report first-principles calculations showing that the enhanced electron trapping is associated with thermally activated capturing of a second electron by an oxygen vacancy in SiO{sub 2} by which the vacancy transforms into a structure that comprises one Si dangling bond and a bond between a five-fold and a four-fold Si atoms. The results suggest a key role of oxygen vacancies and their structural reconfigurations in the reliability of high-temperature MOS devices.

  14. Developing Density of Laser-Cooled Neutral Atoms and Molecules in a Linear Magnetic Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasquez, Joe, III; Walstrom, Peter; di Rosa, Michael

    2013-05-01

    In this poster we show that neutral particle injection and accumulation using laser-induced spin flips may be used to form dense ensembles of ultracold magnetic particles, i.e., laser-cooled paramagnetic atoms and molecules. Particles are injected in a field-seeking state, are switched by optical pumping to a field-repelled state, and are stored in the minimum-B trap. The analogous process in high-energy charged-particle accumulator rings is charge-exchange injection using stripper foils. The trap is a linear array of sextupoles capped by solenoids. Particle-tracking calculations and design of our linear accumulator along with related experiments involving 7Li will be presented. We test these concepts first with atoms in preparation for later work with selected molecules. Finally, we present our preliminary results with CaH, our candidate molecule for laser cooling. This project is funded by the LDRD program of Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  15. Generation of a cold pulsed beam of Rb atoms by transfer from a 3D magneto-optic trap

    OpenAIRE

    Chanu, Sapam Ranjita; Rathod, Ketan D.; Natarajan, Vasant

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a technique for producing a cold pulsed beam of atoms by transferring a cloud of atoms trapped in a three dimensional magneto-optic trap (MOT). The MOT is loaded by heating a getter source of Rb atoms. We show that it is advantageous to transfer with two beams (with a small angle between them) compared to a single beam, because the atoms stop interacting with the beams in the two-beam technique, which results in a Gaussian velocity distribution. The atoms are further cooled in ...

  16. A portable magneto-optical trap with prospects for atom interferometry in civil engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, A.; Perea-Ortiz, M.; Winch, J.; Briggs, J.; Freer, S.; Moustoukas, D.; Powell-Gill, S.; Squire, C.; Lamb, A.; Rammeloo, C.; Stray, B.; Voulazeris, G.; Zhu, L.; Kaushik, A.; Lien, Y.-H.; Niggebaum, A.; Rodgers, A.; Stabrawa, A.; Boddice, D.; Plant, S. R.; Tuckwell, G. W.; Bongs, K.; Metje, N.; Holynski, M.

    2017-06-01

    The high precision and scalable technology offered by atom interferometry has the opportunity to profoundly affect gravity surveys, enabling the detection of features of either smaller size or greater depth. While such systems are already starting to enter into the commercial market, significant reductions are required in order to reach the size, weight and power of conventional devices. In this article, the potential for atom interferometry based gravimetry is assessed, suggesting that the key opportunity resides within the development of gravity gradiometry sensors to enable drastic improvements in measurement time. To push forward in realizing more compact systems, techniques have been pursued to realize a highly portable magneto-optical trap system, which represents the core package of an atom interferometry system. This can create clouds of 107 atoms within a system package of 20 l and 10 kg, consuming 80 W of power. This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantum technology for the 21st century'.

  17. Forbidden atomic transitions driven by an intensity-modulated laser trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Kaitlin R; Anderson, Sarah E; Raithel, Georg

    2015-01-20

    Spectroscopy is an essential tool in understanding and manipulating quantum systems, such as atoms and molecules. The model describing spectroscopy includes the multipole-field interaction, which leads to established spectroscopic selection rules, and an interaction that is quadratic in the field, which is not often employed. However, spectroscopy using the quadratic (ponderomotive) interaction promises two significant advantages over spectroscopy using the multipole-field interaction: flexible transition rules and vastly improved spatial addressability of the quantum system. Here we demonstrate ponderomotive spectroscopy by using optical-lattice-trapped Rydberg atoms, pulsating the lattice light and driving a microwave atomic transition that would otherwise be forbidden by established spectroscopic selection rules. This ability to measure frequencies of previously inaccessible transitions makes possible improved determinations of atomic characteristics and constants underlying physics. The spatial resolution of ponderomotive spectroscopy is orders of magnitude better than the transition frequency would suggest, promising single-site addressability in dense particle arrays for quantum computing applications.

  18. Ar-39 Detection at the 10^-16 Isotopic Abundance Level with Atom Trap Trace Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, W.; Williams, W. D.; Bailey, K.; Davis, A. M.; Hu, S. -M.; Lu, Z. -T.; O'Connor, T. P.; Purtschert, R.; Sturchio, N. C.; Sun, Y. R.; Mueller, P.

    2011-01-01

    Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA), a laser-based atom counting method, has been applied to analyze atmospheric Ar-39 (half-life = 269 yr), a cosmogenic isotope with an isotopic abundance of 8x10^-16. In addition to the superior selectivity demonstrated in this work, counting rate and efficiency of ATTA have been improved by two orders of magnitude over prior results. Significant applications of this new analytical capability lie in radioisotope dating of ice and water samples and in the develop...

  19. Recent trends in precision measurements of atomic and nuclear properties with lasers and ion traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Michael

    2017-11-01

    The X. international workshop on "Application of Lasers and Storage Devices in Atomic Nuclei Research" took place in Poznan in May 2016. It addressed the latest experimental and theoretical achievements in laser and ion trap-based investigations of radionuclides, highly charged ions and antiprotons. The precise determination of atomic and nuclear properties provides a stringent benchmark for theoretical models and eventually leads to a better understanding of the underlying fundamental interactions and symmetries. This article addresses some general trends in this field and highlights select recent achievements presented at the workshop. Many of these are covered in more detail within the individual contributions to this special issue of Hyperfine Interactions.

  20. Recent trends in precision measurements of atomic and nuclear properties with lasers and ion traps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, Michael, E-mail: m.block@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    The X. international workshop on “Application of Lasers and Storage Devices in Atomic Nuclei Research” took place in Poznan in May 2016. It addressed the latest experimental and theoretical achievements in laser and ion trap-based investigations of radionuclides, highly charged ions and antiprotons. The precise determination of atomic and nuclear properties provides a stringent benchmark for theoretical models and eventually leads to a better understanding of the underlying fundamental interactions and symmetries. This article addresses some general trends in this field and highlights select recent achievements presented at the workshop. Many of these are covered in more detail within the individual contributions to this special issue of Hyperfine Interactions.

  1. Electrochemical selenium hydride generation with in situ trapping in graphite tube atomizers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šíma, Jan; Rychlovský, P.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 5 (2003), s. 919-930 ISSN 0584-8547 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/98/0754; GA ČR GA203/01/0453 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4031919 Keywords : hydride generation * electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry * In situ trapping Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.361, year: 2003

  2. All-optical atom trap trace analysis for rare krypton isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woelk, Pablo; Kohler, Markus; Sieveke, Carsten; Hebel, Simon; Sahling, Peter [Carl Friedrich von Weizsaecker Centre for Science and Peace Research, University of Hamburg (Germany); Becker, Christoph; Sengstock, Klaus [Institut fuer Laser-Physik, University of Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The isotope Krypton-85 is an excellent indicator for the detection of nuclear reprocessing activities. However, for the analysis of atmospheric air samples, sensitive measuring methods down to the single atom level are required because of the small concentrations. Furthermore, for a practical and effective detection of clandestine reprocessing, small sample sizes and a high sample throughput rate are desirable. Established methods using Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA) allow high sensitivity but have a limited throughput of about 200 samples per year, since the vacuum chambers have to be flushed for several hours after each measurement to avoid cross contamination due to the RF-driven excitation of metastable states. Here we present an enhanced ATTA apparatus, which in contrast to the established methods, produces metastable Kr all-optically. This avoids cross contamination, therefore allowing a much higher throughput rate. The apparatus is based on a self-made VUV-lamp and a 2D-3D magneto-optical trap setup. In the 2D trap metastable krypton is produced and a beam of atoms is formed by Doppler-cooling simultaneously.

  3. Radiation trapping in atomic absorption spectroscopy at lead determination in different matricies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Gohary, Z.

    2005-01-01

    The determination of lead by flame atomic absorption analysis in the presence of Sn and Fe atoms and different matrices such as OH and SO 3 was investigated with the objective of understanding the spectral interference processes at the analytical lines 283.31 nm for a wide range of concentration. The radiation trapping factor was interpreted and evaluated assuming Voigt distribution of the atomic and rotational lines in the flame. The radiation trapping factor was increased by increasing the number density (plasma of the absorbing medium is optically thick). In plasma, there is a certain point of equilibrium between the trapping and the escaping of radiation, which is relevant to 50% of absorption. The spectral background interference can cause a variation of the number density at equilibrium point as a result of the degree of overlap with the analytical line. The spectral background interference can be easily avoided by using another resonance absorption line for the analysis. The chemical modification of the matrix is applied to minimize the interference effect. Nitric acid, ammonium nitrate and magnesium nitrate are most commonly recommended as matrix modifiers

  4. A=225 implantation for $^{221}$Fr source for TRIUMF atom trap

    CERN Multimedia

    The FrPNC Collaboration is mounting an atom trap for parity violation experiments and precision spectroscopy on francium atoms at TRIUMF's ISAC facility. We would like to use ISOLDE's capability of simultaneously implanting A=225 (while another experiment runs online) to make a long-lived source feeding $^{221}$Fr for tests of the trap. $^{225}$Ra $\\beta$-decays to $^{225}$Ac, which then $\\alpha$-decays, producing 100 keV $^{221}$Fr t$_{1/2}$= 4.8 minute recoils. The implanted A=225 source would be shipped to TRIUMF, where it would be held for several minutes at a time a few mm from the same yttrium foil that normally receives the ISAC beam. SRIM calculations imply that 20% of the $^{221}$Fr will be implanted in a 1 cm diameter spot on the yttrium. Then the yttrium foil is moved to the trap and heated to release the Fr atoms, just as in normal ISAC online operation. A test implantation will be done at 10$^{7}$/sec production for 1 day, testing whether carbon cracking on the implantation foil in the mass separ...

  5. Optical resonator for a standing wave dipole trap for fermionic lithium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsaesser, T.

    2000-01-01

    This thesis reports on the the construction of an optical resonator for a new resonator dipole trap to store the fermionic 6 Li-isotope and to investigate its scattering properties. It was demonstrated that the resonator enhances the energy density of a (1064 nm and 40 mW) laser beam by a factor of more than 100. A fused silica vacuum cell is positioned inside the resonator under Brewster's angle. The losses of the resonator depend mainly on the optical quality of the cell. The expected trap depth of the dipole trap is 200 μK and the photon scattering rate is expected to be about 0.4 s -1 . The resonator is stabilized by means of a polarization spectroscopy method. Due to high trap frequencies, which are produced by the tight enclosure of the standing wave in the resonator, the axial motion must be quantized. A simple model to describe this quantization has been developed. A magneto-optical trap, which serves as a source of cold lithium atoms, was put in operation. (orig.)

  6. Atomic forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions, and halogen ions for surface interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. W.; Outlaw, R. A.; Heinbockel, J. H.

    1988-01-01

    The components of the physical forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions, and halogen ions are analyzed and a data base developed from analysis of the two-body potential data, the alkali-halide molecular data, and the noble gas crystal and salt crystal data. A satisfactory global fit to this molecular and crystal data is then reproduced by the model to within several percent. Surface potentials are evaluated for noble gas atoms on noble gas surfaces and salt crystal surfaces with surface tension neglected. Within this context, the noble gas surface potentials on noble gas and salt crystals are considered to be accurate to within several percent.

  7. Selective Trapping of Volatile Fission Products with an Off-Gas Treatment System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B.R. Westphal; J.J. Park; J.M. Shin; G.I. Park; K.J. Bateman; D.L. Wahlquist

    2008-07-01

    A head-end processing step, termed DEOX for its emphasis on decladding via oxidation, is being developed for the treatment of spent oxide fuel by pyroprocessing techniques. The head-end step employs high temperatures to oxidize UO2 to U3O8 resulting in the separation of fuel from cladding and the removal of volatile fission products. Development of the head-end step is being performed in collaboration with the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) through an International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative. Following the initial experimentation for the removal of volatile fission products, an off-gas treatment system was designed in conjunction with KAERI to collect specific fission gases. The primary volatile species targeted for trapping were iodine, technetium, and cesium. Each species is intended to be collected in distinct zones of the off-gas system and within those zones, on individual filters. Separation of the volatile off-gases is achieved thermally as well as chemically given the composition of the filter media. A description of the filter media and a basis for its selection will be given along with the collection mechanisms and design considerations. In addition, results from testing with the off-gas treatment system will be presented.

  8. Gas lasers applied atomic collision physics, v.3

    CERN Document Server

    McDaniel, E W

    1982-01-01

    Applied Atomic Collision Physics, Volume 3: Gas Lasers describes the applications of atomic collision physics in the development of many types of gas lasers. Topics covered range from negative ion formation in gas lasers to high-pressure ion kinetics and relaxation of molecules exchanging vibrational energy. Ion-ion recombination in high-pressure plasmas is also discussed, along with electron-ion recombination in gas lasers and collision processes in chemical lasers.Comprised of 14 chapters, this volume begins with a historical summary of gas laser developments and an overview of the basic ope

  9. Noble gas atoms as chemical impurities in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tkachev, V.D.; Mudryi, A.V.; Minaev, N.S.

    1984-01-01

    The behaviour of noble gas atoms implanted in silicon is studied by the luminescence method. The energy position of Moessbauer-type luminescence bands with zero-phonon lines 1.0148, 1.0120, 1.0097, 1.0048 eV and others connected with implanted atoms of neon, helium, argon, krypton, respectively, indicates the formation of deep energy levels in the forbidden gap of silicon. Implantation of the noble gas isotopes confirms their participation in formation processes of the luminescence centers in silicon. The temperature range of existence and the symmetry of defects incorporating the noble gas atoms are found. It is noted that noble gas atoms form impurity complexes with deep energy levels and their behaviour in crystals does not differ from that of main doped or residual technological impurity atoms. (author)

  10. Continuous monitoring of methyl iodide purity and content in the gas feeding the trapping pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charrier, G.

    1988-01-01

    An analysis method is developed for inspection of solid traps for gaseous iodine. Methyl iodide injected in the traps is determined by gas chromatography. Contents of 50 ppm in volume are measured. Labelling with iodine 123 allows a better sensitivity, 4 refs, 5 figs, 6 tables [fr

  11. Interaction of rare gas metastable atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, A.Z.F.

    1977-11-01

    The physical and chemical properties of metastable rare gas atoms are discussed and summarized. This is followed by a detailed examination of the various possible pathways whereby the metastable's excess electronic energy can be dissipated. The phenomenon of chemi-ionization is given special emphasis, and a theoretical treatment based on the use of complex (optical) potential is presented. This is followed by a discussion on the unique advantages offered by elastic differential cross section measurements in the apprehension of the fundamental forces governing the ionization process. The methodology generally adopted to extract information about the interaction potential for scattering data is also systematically outlined. Two widely studied chemi-ionization systems are then closely examined in the light of accurate differential cross section measurements obtained in this work. The first system is He(2 3 S) + Ar for which one can obtain an interaction potential which is in good harmony with the experimental results of other investigators. The validity of using the first-order semiclassical approximation for the phase shifts calculation in the presence of significant opacities is also discussed. The second reaction studied is He*+D 2 for which measurements were made on both spin states of the metastable helium. A self-consistent interaction potential is obtained for the triplet system, and reasons are given for not being able to do likewise for the singlet system. The anomalous hump proposed by a number of laboratories is analyzed. Total elastic and ionization cross sections as well as rate constants are calculated for the triplet case. Good agreement with experimental data is found. Finally, the construction and operation of a high power repetitively pulsed nitrogen laser pumped dye laser system is described in great details. Details for the construction and operation of a flashlamp pumped dye laser are likewise given

  12. Generation of a cold pulsed beam of Rb atoms by transfer from a 3D magneto-optic trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chanu, Sapam Ranjita; Rathod, Ketan D.; Natarajan, Vasant, E-mail: vasant@physics.iisc.ernet.in

    2016-08-26

    We demonstrate a technique for producing a cold pulsed beam of atoms by transferring a cloud of atoms trapped in a three dimensional magneto-optic trap (MOT). The MOT is loaded by heating a getter source of Rb atoms. We show that it is advantageous to transfer with two beams (with a small angle between them) compared to a single beam, because the atoms stop interacting with the beams in the two-beam technique, which results in a Gaussian velocity distribution. The atoms are further cooled in optical molasses by turning off the MOT magnetic field before the transfer beams are turned on. - Highlights: • Getter-source loaded magneto-optic trap (MOT). • Cold atomic beam generated by deflection from the MOT. • Use of two inclined beams for deflection.

  13. Collective excitations in circular atomic configurations and single-photon traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, Hanno

    2004-01-01

    Correlated excitations in a plane circular configuration of identical atoms with parallel dipole moments are investigated. The collective energy eigenstates, which are formally identical to Frenkel excitons, can be computed together with their level shifts and decay rates by decomposing the atomic state space into carrier spaces for the irreducible representations of the symmetry group Z N of the circle. It is shown that the index p of these representations can be used as a quantum number analogously to the orbital angular momentum quantum number l in hydrogenlike systems. Just as the hydrogen s states are the only electronic wave functions which can occupy the central region of the Coulomb potential, the quasiparticle corresponding to a collective excitation of the atoms in the circle can occupy the central atom only for vanishing Z N quantum number p. If a central atom is present, the p=0 state splits into two and shows level crossing at certain radii; in the regions between these radii, damped quantum beats between two 'extreme' p=0 configurations occur. The physical mechanisms behind super- and subradiance at a given radius are discussed. It is shown that, beyond a certain critical number of atoms in the circle, the lifetime of the maximally subradiant state increases exponentially with the number of atoms in the configuration, making the system a natural candidate for a single-photon trap

  14. Ambient-Temperature Trap/Release of Arsenic by Dielectric Barrier Discharge and Its Application to Ultratrace Arsenic Determination in Surface Water Followed by Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xuefei; Qi, Yuehan; Huang, Junwei; Liu, Jixin; Chen, Guoying; Na, Xing; Wang, Min; Qian, Yongzhong

    2016-04-05

    A novel dielectric barrier discharge reactor (DBDR) was utilized to trap/release arsenic coupled to hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS). On the DBD principle, the precise and accurate control of trap/release procedures was fulfilled at ambient temperature, and an analytical method was established for ultratrace arsenic in real samples. Moreover, the effects of voltage, oxygen, hydrogen, and water vapor on trapping and releasing arsenic by DBDR were investigated. For trapping, arsenic could be completely trapped in DBDR at 40 mL/min of O2 input mixed with 600 mL/min Ar carrier gas and 9.2 kV discharge potential; prior to release, the Ar carrier gas input should be changed from the upstream gas liquid separator (GLS) to the downstream GLS and kept for 180 s to eliminate possible water vapor interference; for arsenic release, O2 was replaced by 200 mL/min H2 and discharge potential was adjusted to 9.5 kV. Under optimized conditions, arsenic could be detected as low as 1.0 ng/L with an 8-fold enrichment factor; the linearity of calibration reached R(2) > 0.995 in the 0.05 μg/L-5 μg/L range. The mean spiked recoveries for tap, river, lake, and seawater samples were 98% to 103%; and the measured values of the CRMs including GSB-Z50004-200431, GBW08605, and GBW(E)080390 were in good agreement with the certified values. These findings proved the feasibility of DBDR as an arsenic preconcentration tool for atomic spectrometric instrumentation and arsenic recycling in industrial waste gas discharge.

  15. Multiplicity dependence of matrix-induced frequency shifts for atomic transitions of the group 12 metals in rare gas solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laursen, S.L.; Cartland, H.E.

    1991-01-01

    Atomic resonances of the group 12 metal atoms, Hg, Cd, and Zn, undergo frequency shifts from the gas phase atomic line when trapped in rare gas matrices of Ar, Kr, and Xe at 12 K. As expected, the shifts are approximately linear in polarizability of the rare gas, but the slope of this line depends on whether the transition in question is 1 P 1 left-arrow 1 S 0 or 3 P 1 left-arrow 1 S 0 . Thus the matrix-induced frequency shift is dependent on the singlet or triplet nature of the excited state as well as on the matrix material. This dependence on multiplicity is discussed in terms of interactions between the excited-state atomic orbitals and the matrix. The results are compared to matrix studies of other metals and to related gas-phase work on diatomic van der Waals complexes of group 12 metals with rare gases

  16. Gas Bubble Migration and Trapping in Porous Media: Pore-Scale Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahabadi, Nariman; Zheng, Xianglei; Yun, Tae Sup; van Paassen, Leon; Jang, Jaewon

    2018-02-01

    Gas bubbles can be naturally generated or intentionally introduced in sediments. Gas bubble migration and trapping affect the rate of gas emission into the atmosphere or modify the sediment properties such as hydraulic and mechanical properties. In this study, the migration and trapping of gas bubbles are simulated using the pore-network model extracted from the 3D X-ray image of in situ sediment. Two types of bubble size distribution (mono-sized and distributed-sized cases) are used in the simulation. The spatial and statistical bubble size distribution, residual gas saturation, and hydraulic conductivity reduction due to the bubble trapping are investigated. The results show that the bubble size distribution becomes wider during the gas bubble migration due to bubble coalescence for both mono-sized and distributed-sized cases. And the trapped bubble fraction and the residual gas saturation increase as the bubble size increases. The hydraulic conductivity is reduced as a result of the gas bubble trapping. The reduction in hydraulic conductivity is apparently observed as bubble size and the number of nucleation points increase.

  17. Ti–Al–O nanocrystal charge trapping memory cells fabricated by atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Zheng-Yi; Li, Ai-Dong; Li, Xin; Cao, Yan-Qiang; Wu, Di

    2014-01-01

    Charge trapping memory cells using Ti–Al–O (TAO) film as charge trapping layer and amorphous Al 2 O 3 as the tunneling and blocking layers were fabricated on Si substrates by atomic layer deposition method. As-deposited TAO films were annealed at 700 °C, 800 °C and 900 °C for 3 min in N 2 with a rapid thermal annealing process to form nanocrystals. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to characterize the microstructure and band diagram of the heterostructures. The electrical characteristics and charge storage properties of the Al 2 O 3 /TAO/Al 2 O 3 /Si stack structures were also evaluated. Compared to 700 °C and 900 °C samples, the memory cells annealed at 800 °C exhibit better memory performance with larger memory window of 4.8 V at ± 6 V sweeping, higher program/erase speed and excellent endurance. - Highlights: • The charge trapping memory cells were fabricated by atomic layer deposition method. • The anneal temperature plays a key role in forming nanocrystals. • The memory cells annealed at 800 °C exhibit better memory performance. • The band alignment is beneficial to enhance the retention characteristics

  18. In situ atom trapping of Bi on W-coated slotted quartz tube flame atomic absorption spectrometry and interference studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kılınç, Ersin, E-mail: kilincersin@gmail.com [Medical Laboratory Techniques, Vocational Higher School of Healthcare Studies, Mardin Artuklu University, 47200 Mardin (Turkey); Bakırdere, Sezgin [Yıldız Technical University, Art and Science Faculy, Department of Chemistry, Esenler, TR 34220 İstanbul (Turkey); Aydın, Fırat [Dicle University, Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, Laboratory of Chemical Analysis, TR 21280 Diyarbakır (Turkey); Ataman, O. Yavuz [Middle East Technical University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Chemistry, 06800 Ankara (Turkey)

    2013-11-01

    Analytical performances of metal coated slotted quartz tube flame atomic absorption spectrometry (SQT-FAAS) and slotted quartz tube in situ atom trapping flame atomic absorption spectrometry (SQT-AT-FAAS) systems were evaluated for determination of Bi. Non-volatile elements such as Mo, Zr, W and Ta were tried as coating materials. It was observed that W-coated SQT gave the best sensitivity for the determination of Bi for SQT-FAAS and SQT-AT-FAAS. The parameters for W-coated SQT-FAAS and W-coated SQT-AT-FAAS were optimized. Sensitivity of FAAS for Bi was improved as 4.0 fold by W-coated SQT-FAAS while 613 fold enhancement in sensitivity was achieved by W-coated SQT-AT-FAAS using 5.0 min trapping with respect to conventional FAAS. MIBK was selected as organic solvent for the re-atomization of Bi from the trapping surface. Limit of detection values for W-coated SQT-FAAS and W-coated SQT-AT-FAAS was obtained as 0.14 μg mL{sup −1} and 0.51 ng mL{sup −1}, respectively. Linear calibration plot was obtained in the range of 2.5–25.0 ng mL{sup −1} for W-coated SQT-AT-FAAS. Accuracy of the W-coated SQT-AT-FAAS system was checked by analyzing a standard reference material, NIST 1643e. - Highlights: • Further increasing in sensitivity of SQT-AT-FAAS was obtained by using a W coated SQT. • 613 fold sensitivity enhancement was achieved by W coated SQT-AT-FAAS versus FAAS. • A sensitive, rapid and simple technique for Bi was developed with an LOD of 0.51 ng mL{sup −1}. • The technique is suggested for laboratories equipped with only a flame AA spectrometer.

  19. Investigations of Laser Pumped Gas Cell Atomic Frequency Standard

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Volk, C. H; Camparo, J. C; Frueholz, R. P

    1981-01-01

    Recently it has been suggested that the performance characteristics of a rubidium gas cell atomic frequency standard might be improved by replacing the standard rubidium discharge lamp with a single mode laser diode...

  20. Cooling and trapping of neutral mercury atoms; Kuehlen und Fangen von neutralen Hg-Atomen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villwock, Patrick

    2010-01-15

    Mercury offers numerous opportunities for experiments in cold atomic and molecular physics. Due to the particular energy level structure of the Hg-dimer it should be possible to efficiently populate the rovibrational ground state by employing a particular absorption-emission scheme after the dimers have been formed via photo association. Cold {sup 199}Hg-atoms in the ground state are very well suited for testing the Bell equations with atoms, because they are ideal spin-1/2-particles. Hg-dimers would be optimal for the search of a permanent electrical dipole moment, due to their mass. An optical lattice clock based on neutral mercury atoms using the {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 3}P{sub 0} clock transition at 265.6 nm with a natural linewidth of about 100 mHz is predicted to reach an accuracy better than 10{sup -18}. The frequency ratio of two optical clocks exhibits the opportunity to test the temporal variation of the fine-structure constant. Laser-cooled neutral Hg-atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT) represent a high quality source for a focused ion beam. The isotope selectivity of a MOT offers the potential of producing pure Hg-Isotopes. Mercury has two stable fermionic and five stable bosonic isotopes. The {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 3}P{sub 1} intercombination line at 253.7 nm has a saturation intensity of 10.2 {sup mW}/{sub cm{sup 2}}, with a natural linewidth of 1.27 MHz. This cooling transition is closed since the ground state is free of fine- and hyperfine structure. Consequently no additional repumping is required. Due to the relatively long lifetime of this trapping transition the Doppler limited temperature is 30 μK. This thesis presents the development and experimental setup of a magneto-optical trap for neutral mercury atoms. This undertaking required the development of a commercially unavailable laser source in order to cool and trap Hg-atoms. The cooling transition sets high demands on such a cutting-edge laser, due to its relatively high saturation intensity

  1. Design report: An off gas trapping system for a voloxidizer in INL of US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, I. H.; Shin, J. M.; Park, J. J.; Park, G. I.; Lee, H. H.

    2006-09-01

    This reports on the 'Development of Voloxidation Process for Treatment of LWR Spent Fuel', and it is the second year since it has started from June 2004 as a tripartite cooperation project among KAERI(Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute), INL(Idaho National Laboratory) and ORNL(Oak Ridge National Laboratory). This report is described mainly for the Task B2 accomplished during the second project year. The Task B2 in proposal contains two sub-tasks. The first one is design of an off-gas treatment system for a voloxidizer to be used in HFEF of INL. For this, KAERI team developed the design of INL OTS (Off-gas Treatment System) for hot experiment in the HFEF. INL team modified and completed the design of the INL OTS. The second task is manufacturing and test operation of the INL OTS for a voloxidizer in the INL. Manufacturing of the OTS is accomplished by INL team with co-work of KAERI. KAERI provided four sets of trapping filters needed for conducting hot experiment in the INL HFEF

  2. Hg-201 (+) CO-Magnetometer for HG-199(+) Trapped Ion Space Atomic Clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Eric A. (Inventor); Taghavi, Shervin (Inventor); Tjoelker, Robert L. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Local magnetic field strength in a trapped ion atomic clock is measured in real time, with high accuracy and without degrading clock performance, and the measurement is used to compensate for ambient magnetic field perturbations. First and second isotopes of an element are co-located within the linear ion trap. The first isotope has a resonant microwave transition between two hyperfine energy states, and the second isotope has a resonant Zeeman transition. Optical sources emit ultraviolet light that optically pump both isotopes. A microwave radiation source simultaneously emits microwave fields resonant with the first isotope's clock transition and the second isotope's Zeeman transition, and an optical detector measures the fluorescence from optically pumping both isotopes. The second isotope's Zeeman transition provides the measure of magnetic field strength, and the measurement is used to compensate the first isotope's clock transition or to adjust the applied C-field to reduce the effects of ambient magnetic field perturbations.

  3. Magneto optical trap recoil ion momentum spectroscopy: application to ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blieck, J.

    2008-10-01

    87 Rb atoms have been cooled, trapped and prepared as targets for collision studies with 2 and 5 keV Na + projectiles. The physics studied deals with charge exchange processes. The active electron, which is generally the most peripheral electron of the atomic target, is transferred from the target onto the ionic projectile. The ionized target is called recoil ion. The technique used to study this physics is the MOTRIMS (Magneto Optical Trap Recoil Ion Momentum Spectroscopy) technique, which combines a magneto optical trap and a recoil ion momentum spectrometer. The spectrometer is used for the measurement of the recoil ions momentum, which gives access to all the information of the collision: the Q-value (which is the potential energy difference of the active electron on each particle) and the scattering angle of the projectile. The trap provides extremely cold targets to optimize the measurement of the momentum, and to release the latter from thermal motion. Through cinematically complete experiments, the MOTRIMS technique gives access to better resolutions on momentum measurements. Measurements of differential cross sections in initial and final capture states and in scattering angle have been done. Results obtained for differential cross sections in initial and final states show globally a good agreement with theory and an other experiment. Nevertheless, discrepancies with theory and this other experiment are shown for the measurements of doubly differential cross sections. These discrepancies are not understood yet. The particularity of the experimental setup designed and tested in this work, namely a low background noise, allows a great sensitivity to weak capture channels, and brings a technical and scientific gain compared with previous works. (author)

  4. Mott Transition of Fermionic Atoms in a Three-Dimensional Optical Trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmes, R. W.; Rosch, A.; Costi, T. A.

    2008-01-01

    We study theoretically the Mott metal-insulator transition for a system of fermionic atoms confined in a three-dimensional optical lattice and a harmonic trap. We describe an inhomogeneous system of several thousand sites using an adaptation of dynamical mean-field theory solved efficiently with the numerical renormalization group method. Above a critical value of the on-site interaction, a Mott-insulating phase appears in the system. We investigate signatures of the Mott phase in the density profile and in time-of-flight experiments

  5. Conjugate gradient minimisation approach to generating holographic traps for ultracold atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harte, Tiffany; Bruce, Graham D; Keeling, Jonathan; Cassettari, Donatella

    2014-11-03

    Direct minimisation of a cost function can in principle provide a versatile and highly controllable route to computational hologram generation. Here we show that the careful design of cost functions, combined with numerically efficient conjugate gradient minimisation, establishes a practical method for the generation of holograms for a wide range of target light distributions. This results in a guided optimisation process, with a crucial advantage illustrated by the ability to circumvent optical vortex formation during hologram calculation. We demonstrate the implementation of the conjugate gradient method for both discrete and continuous intensity distributions and discuss its applicability to optical trapping of ultracold atoms.

  6. Symmetry breaking in small rotating clouds of trapped ultracold Bose atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagnino, D.; Barberan, N.; Riera, A.; Osterloh, K.; Lewenstein, M.

    2007-01-01

    We study the signatures of rotational and phase symmetry breaking in small rotating clouds of trapped ultracold Bose atoms by looking at rigorously defined condensate wave function. Rotational symmetry breaking occurs in narrow frequency windows, where energy degeneracy between the lowest energy states of different total angular momentum takes place. This leads to a complex condensate wave function that exhibits vortices clearly seen as holes in the density, as well as characteristic local phase patterns, reflecting the appearance of vorticities. Phase symmetry (or gauge symmetry) breaking, on the other hand, is clearly manifested in the interference of two independent rotating clouds

  7. Precision Tests of the Electroweak Interaction using Trapped Atoms and Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melconian, Daniel George [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2017-06-21

    The objective of the proposed research is to study fundamental aspects of the electroweak interaction via precision measurements in beta decay to test our current understanding of fundamental particles and forces as contained in the so-called "Standard Model" of particle physics. By comparing elegant experiments to rigorous theoretical predictions, we will either confirm the Standard Model to a higher degree and rule out models which seek to extend it, or find evidence of new physics and help guide theorists in developing the New Standard Model. The use of ion and neutral atom traps at radioactive ion beam facilities has opened up a new vista in precision low-energy nuclear physics experiments. Traps provide an ideal source of decaying atoms: they can be extremely cold (~1 mK); they are compact (~1 mm^3); and perhaps most importantly, the daughter particles escape with negligible distortions to their momenta in a scattering-free, open environment. The project is taking advantage of these technologies and applying them to precision beta-decay studies at radioactive beam facilities. The program consists of two complementary efforts: 1) Ion traps are an extremely versatile tool for purifying, cooling and bunching low-energy beams of short-lived nuclei. A large-bore (210~mm) superconducting 7-Tesla solenoid is at the heart of a Penning trap system for which there is a dedicated beamline at T-REX, the upgraded radioactive beam facility at the Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University. In addition to providing a general-purpose decay station, the flagship program for this system is measuring the ft-values and beta-neutrino correlation parameters from isospin T=2 superallowed beta-delayed proton decays, complimenting and expanding the already strong program in fundamental interactions at the Institute. 2) A magneto-optical trap is being used at the TRIUMF Neutral Atom Trap facility to observe the (un)polarized angular distribution parameters of isotopes of potassium. We

  8. Review of chip-scale atomic clocks based on coherent population trapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Research on chip-scale atomic clocks (CSACs) based on coherent population trapping (CPT) is reviewed. The background and the inspiration for the research are described, including the important schemes proposed to improve the CPT signal quality, the selection of atoms and buffer gases, and the development of micro-cell fabrication. With regard to the reliability, stability, and service life of the CSACs, the research regarding the sensitivity of the CPT resonance to temperature and laser power changes is also reviewed, as well as the CPT resonance's collision and light of frequency shifts. The first generation CSACs have already been developed but its characters are still far from our expectations. Our conclusion is that miniaturization and power reduction are the most important aspects calling for further research. (review)

  9. Dynamic regime of coherent population trapping and optimization of frequency modulation parameters in atomic clocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudin, V I; Taichenachev, A V; Basalaev, M Yu; Kovalenko, D V

    2017-02-06

    We theoretically investigate the dynamic regime of coherent population trapping (CPT) in the presence of frequency modulation (FM). We have formulated the criteria for quasi-stationary (adiabatic) and dynamic (non-adiabatic) responses of atomic system driven by this FM. Using the density matrix formalism for Λ system, the error signal is exactly calculated and optimized. It is shown that the optimal FM parameters correspond to the dynamic regime of atomic-field interaction, which significantly differs from conventional description of CPT resonances in the frame of quasi-stationary approach (under small modulation frequency). Obtained theoretical results are in good qualitative agreement with different experiments. Also we have found CPT-analogue of Pound-Driver-Hall regime of frequency stabilization.

  10. Continuous-measurement-enhanced self-trapping of degenerate ultracold atoms in a double well: Nonlinear quantum Zeno effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Weidong; Liu Jie

    2006-01-01

    In the present paper we investigate the influence of measurements on the quantum dynamics of degenerate Bose atoms gases in a symmetric double well. We show that continuous measurements enhance asymmetry on the density distribution of the atoms and broaden the parameter regime for self-trapping. We term this phenomenon as nonlinear quantum Zeno effect in analog to the celebrated Zeno effect in a linear quantum system. Under discontinuous measurements, the self-trapping due to the atomic interaction in the degenerate bosons is shown to be destroyed completely. Underlying physics is revealed and possible experimental realization is discussed

  11. Gas Atomization of Aluminium Melts: Comparison of Analytical Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Antipas

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A number of analytical models predicting the size distribution of particles during atomization of Al-based alloys by N2, He and Ar gases were compared. Simulations of liquid break up in a close coupled atomizer revealed that the finer particles are located near the center of the spray cone. Increasing gas injection pressures led to an overall reduction of particle diameters and caused a migration of the larger powder particles towards the outer boundary of the flow. At sufficiently high gas pressures the spray became monodisperse. The models also indicated that there is a minimum achievable mean diameter for any melt/gas system.

  12. Refined potentials for rare gas atom adsorption on rare gas and alkali-halide surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. W.; Heinbockel, J. H.; Outlaw, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    The utilization of models of interatomic potential for physical interaction to estimate the long range attractive potential for rare gases and ions is discussed. The long range attractive force is calculated in terms of the atomic dispersion properties. A data base of atomic dispersion parameters for rare gas atoms, alkali ion, and halogen ions is applied to the study of the repulsive core; the procedure for evaluating the repulsive core of ion interactions is described. The interaction of rare gas atoms on ideal rare gas solid and alkali-halide surfaces is analyzed; zero coverage absorption potentials are derived.

  13. Highly sensitive and interference-free determination of bismuth in environmental samples by electrothermal vaporization atomic fluorescence spectrometry after hydride trapping on iridium-coated tungsten coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Rui; Wu Peng; Xu Kailai; Lv Yi; Hou Xiandeng

    2008-01-01

    Bismuthine was on-line trapped on tungsten coil and subsequently electrothermally vaporized for the determination by atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS). Several noble metals, including Pd, Rh, Pt, and Ir, were explored as permanent chemical modifier for tungsten coil on-line trapping. Investigation showed that Ir gave the best performance, in which bismuthine was on-line trapped on Ir-coated tungsten coil at 560 o C, and then released at 1550 o C for subsequent transfer to AFS by a mixture of Ar and H 2 . Under optimum instrumental conditions, the trapping efficiency was found to be 73 ± 3%. With 120 s (12 mL sample volume) trapping time, a limit of detection (LOD) of 4 ng L -1 was obtained, compared to conventional hydride generation AFS (0.09 μg L -1 ); the LOD can be lowered down to 1 ng L -1 by increasing the trapping time to 480 s. The LOD was found to be better or at least comparable to literature levels involving on-line trapping and some other sophisticated instrumental methods such as ICP-MS and GF-AAS. A comprehensive interference study involving conventional hydride-forming elements and some transition metals was carried out, and the result showed that the gas phase interference from other hydride-forming elements was largely reduced, thanks to the use of on-line tungsten coil trapping. Finally, the proposed method was applied to the determination of bismuth in several biological and environmental standard reference materials, and a t-test shows that the analytical results by the proposed method have no significant difference from the certified values at the confidence level of 95%

  14. Passivation and alloying element retention in gas atomized powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidloff, Andrew J.; Rieken, Joel R.; Anderson, Iver E.

    2017-12-05

    A method for gas atomization of a titanium alloy, nickel alloy, or other alumina (Al.sub.2O.sub.3)-forming alloy wherein the atomized particles are exposed as they solidify and cool in a very short time to multiple gaseous reactive agents for the in-situ formation of a passivation reaction film on the atomized particles wherein the reaction film retains a precursor halogen alloying element that is subsequently introduced into a microstructure formed by subsequent thermally processing of the atomized particles to improve oxidation resistance.

  15. Cryogenic buffer-gas loading and magnetic trapping of CrH and MnH molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Michael; Bakker, Joost M.; Steimle, Timothy C.; Meijer, Gerard; Peters, Achim

    2008-09-01

    We report on the buffer-gas cooling and trapping of CrH and MnH molecules in a magnetic quadrupole trap with densities on the order of 106cm-3 at a temperature of 650mK . Storage times of up to 180ms have been observed, corresponding to a 20-fold lifetime enhancement with respect to the field-free diffusion through the He3 buffer-gas. Using Monte Carlo trajectory simulations, inelastic molecule- He3 collision cross sections of 1.6×10-18 and 3.1×10-17cm2 are extracted for CrH and MnH, respectively. Furthermore, elastic molecule- He3 collision cross sections of 1.4(±0.5)×10-14cm2 are determined for both species. We conclude that the confinement time of these molecules in a magnetic trapping field is limited by inelastic collisions with the helium atoms leading to Zeeman relaxation.

  16. Development of the Next Generation Gas Trap for the Space Station Internal Thermal Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Spelbring, Chris; Reeves, Daniel R.; Holt, James M.

    2003-01-01

    The current dual-membrane gas trap is designed to remove non-condensed gases (NCG) from the Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) coolant on board the International Space Station (ISS). To date it has successfully served its purpose of preventing depriming, overspeed, and shutdown of the ITCS pump. However, contamination in the ITCS coolant has adversely affected the gas venting rate and lifetime of the gas trap, warranting a development effort for a next-generation gas trap. Design goals are to meet or exceed the current requirements to (1) include greater operating ranges and conditions, (2) eliminate reliance on the current hydrophilic tube fabrication process, and (3) increase operational life and tolerance to particulate and microbial growth fouling. In addition, the next generation gas trap will essentially be a 'dropin" design such that no modifications to the ITCS pump package assembly (PPA) will be required, and the implementation of the new design will not affect changes to the ITCS operational conditions, interfaces, or software. This paper will present the initial membrane module design and development work which has included (1) a trade study among several conceptual designs, (2) performance modeling of a hydrophobic-only design, and (3) small-scale development test data for the hydrophobic-only design. Testing has shown that the hydrophobic-only design is capable of performing even better than the current dual-membrane design for both steady-state gas removal and gas slug removal.

  17. NH2- in a cold ion trap with He buffer gas: Ab initio quantum modeling of the interaction potential and of state-changing multichannel dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Vera, Mario; Yurtsever, Ersin; Wester, Roland; Gianturco, Franco A.

    2018-05-01

    We present an extensive range of accurate ab initio calculations, which map in detail the spatial electronic potential energy surface that describes the interaction between the molecular anion NH2 - (1A1) in its ground electronic state and the He atom. The time-independent close-coupling method is employed to generate the corresponding rotationally inelastic cross sections, and then the state-changing rates over a range of temperatures from 10 to 30 K, which is expected to realistically represent the experimental trapping conditions for this ion in a radio frequency ion trap filled with helium buffer gas. The overall evolutionary kinetics of the rotational level population involving the molecular anion in the cold trap is also modelled during a photodetachment experiment and analyzed using the computed rates. The present results clearly indicate the possibility of selectively detecting differences in behavior between the ortho- and para-anions undergoing photodetachment in the trap.

  18. A portable magneto-optical trap with prospects for atom interferometry in civil engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, A; Perea-Ortiz, M; Winch, J; Briggs, J; Freer, S; Moustoukas, D; Powell-Gill, S; Squire, C; Lamb, A; Rammeloo, C; Stray, B; Voulazeris, G; Zhu, L; Kaushik, A; Lien, Y-H; Niggebaum, A; Rodgers, A; Stabrawa, A; Boddice, D; Plant, S R; Tuckwell, G W; Bongs, K; Metje, N; Holynski, M

    2017-08-06

    The high precision and scalable technology offered by atom interferometry has the opportunity to profoundly affect gravity surveys, enabling the detection of features of either smaller size or greater depth. While such systems are already starting to enter into the commercial market, significant reductions are required in order to reach the size, weight and power of conventional devices. In this article, the potential for atom interferometry based gravimetry is assessed, suggesting that the key opportunity resides within the development of gravity gradiometry sensors to enable drastic improvements in measurement time. To push forward in realizing more compact systems, techniques have been pursued to realize a highly portable magneto-optical trap system, which represents the core package of an atom interferometry system. This can create clouds of 10 7 atoms within a system package of 20 l and 10 kg, consuming 80 W of power.This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantum technology for the 21st century'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  19. Intensity-modulated polarizabilities and magic trapping of alkali-metal and divalent atoms in infrared optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topcu, Turker; Derevianko, Andrei

    2014-05-01

    Long range interactions between neutral Rydberg atoms has emerged as a potential means for implementing quantum logical gates. These experiments utilize hyperfine manifold of ground state atoms to act as a qubit basis, while exploiting the Rydberg blockade mechanism to mediate conditional quantum logic. The necessity for overcoming several sources of decoherence makes magic wavelength trapping in optical lattices an indispensable tool for gate experiments. The common wisdom is that atoms in Rydberg states see trapping potentials that are essentially that of a free electron, and can only be trapped at laser intensity minima. We show that although the polarizability of a Rydberg state is always negative, the optical potential can be both attractive or repulsive at long wavelengths (up to ~104 nm). This opens up the possibility of magic trapping Rydberg states with ground state atoms in optical lattices, thereby eliminating the necessity to turn off trapping fields during gate operations. Because the wavelengths are near the CO2 laser band, the photon scattering and the ensuing motional heating is also reduced compared to conventional traps near low lying resonances, alleviating an important source of decoherence. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) Grant No. PHY-1212482.

  20. Vortices in atomic Bose-Einstein condensates in the large-gas-parameter region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsen, J.K.; Mur-Petit, J.; Guilleumas, M.; Polls, A.; Hjorth-Jensen, M.

    2005-01-01

    In this work we compare the results of the Gross-Pitaevskii and modified Gross-Pitaevskii equations with ab initio variational Monte Carlo calculations for Bose-Einstein condensates of atoms in axially symmetric traps. We examine both the ground state and excited states having a vortex line along the z axis at high values of the gas parameter and demonstrate an excellent agreement between the modified Gross-Pitaevskii and ab initio Monte Carlo methods, both for the ground and vortex states

  1. Lead determination at ng/mL level by flame atomic absorption spectrometry using a tantalum coated slotted quartz tube atom trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirtaş, İlknur; Bakırdere, Sezgin; Ataman, O Yavuz

    2015-06-01

    Flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) still keeps its importance despite the relatively low sensitivity; because it is a simple and economical technique for determination of metals. In recent years, atom traps have been developed to increase the sensitivity of FAAS. Although the detection limit of FAAS is only at the level of µg/mL, with the use of atom traps it can reach to ng/mL. Slotted quartz tube (SQT) is one of the atom traps used to improve sensitivity. In atom trapping mode of SQT, analyte is trapped on-line in SQT for few minutes using ordinary sample aspiration, followed by the introduction of a small volume of organic solvent to effect the revolatilization and atomization of analyte species resulting in a transient signal. This system is economical, commercially available and easy to use. In this study, a sensitive analytical method was developed for the determination of lead with the help of SQT atom trapping flame atomization (SQT-AT-FAAS). 574 Fold sensitivity enhancement was obtained at a sample suction rate of 3.9 mL/min for 5.0 min trapping period with respect to FAAS. Organic solvent was selected as 40 µL of methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). To obtain a further sensitivity enhancement inner surface of SQT was coated with several transition metals. The best sensitivity enhancement, 1650 fold enhancement, was obtained by the Ta-coated SQT-AT-FAAS. In addition, chemical nature of Pb species trapped on quartz and Ta surface, and the chemical nature of Ta on quartz surface were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman Spectroscopy. Raman spectrometric results indicate that tantalum is coated on SQT surface in the form of Ta2O5. XPS studies revealed that the oxidation state of Pb in species trapped on both bare and Ta coated SQT surfaces is +2. For the accuracy check, the analyses of standard reference material were performed by use of SCP SCIENCE EnviroMAT Low (EU-L-2) and results for Pb were to be in good agreement with

  2. High-speed cinematography of gas-metal atomization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ting, Jason [ALCOA Specialty Metals Division, 100 Technical Drive, Alcoa Center, PA 15069 (United States)]. E-mail: jason.ting@alcoa.com; Connor, Jeffery [Material Science Engineering Department, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Ridder, Stephen [Metallurgical Processing Group, NIST, 100 Bureau Dr. Stop 8556, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States)

    2005-01-15

    A high-speed cinematographic footage of a 304L stainless steel gas atomization, recorded at the National Institute of Standard and Technology (NIST), was analyzed using a discrete Fourier transform (DFT) algorithm. The analysis showed the gas atomization process possesses two prominent frequency ranges of melt oscillation (pulsation). A low-frequency oscillation in the melt flow occurring between 5.41 and 123 Hz, with a dominant frequency at 9.93 Hz, was seen in the recirculation zone adjacent to the melt orifice. A high-frequency melt oscillation range was observed above 123 Hz, and was more prominent one melt-tip-diameter downstream in the melt atomization image than upstream near the melt tip. This high-frequency range may reflect the melt atomization frequency used to produce finely atomized powder. This range also included a prominent high frequency at 1273 Hz, which dominated in the image further away downstream from the melt tip. This discrete high-frequency oscillation is most probably caused by the aeroacoustic ''screech'' phenomenon, intrasound (<20 kHz), a result of the atomizing gas jets undergoing flow resonance. It is hypothesized that this discrete intrinsic aeroacoustic tone may enhance melt breakup in the atomization process with evidence of this fact in the melt images.

  3. High-speed cinematography of gas-metal atomization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ting, Jason; Connor, Jeffery; Ridder, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    A high-speed cinematographic footage of a 304L stainless steel gas atomization, recorded at the National Institute of Standard and Technology (NIST), was analyzed using a discrete Fourier transform (DFT) algorithm. The analysis showed the gas atomization process possesses two prominent frequency ranges of melt oscillation (pulsation). A low-frequency oscillation in the melt flow occurring between 5.41 and 123 Hz, with a dominant frequency at 9.93 Hz, was seen in the recirculation zone adjacent to the melt orifice. A high-frequency melt oscillation range was observed above 123 Hz, and was more prominent one melt-tip-diameter downstream in the melt atomization image than upstream near the melt tip. This high-frequency range may reflect the melt atomization frequency used to produce finely atomized powder. This range also included a prominent high frequency at 1273 Hz, which dominated in the image further away downstream from the melt tip. This discrete high-frequency oscillation is most probably caused by the aeroacoustic ''screech'' phenomenon, intrasound (<20 kHz), a result of the atomizing gas jets undergoing flow resonance. It is hypothesized that this discrete intrinsic aeroacoustic tone may enhance melt breakup in the atomization process with evidence of this fact in the melt images

  4. Determination of gas volume trapped in a closed fluid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, W. F.; Jolley, J. E.

    1971-01-01

    Technique involves extracting known volume of fluid and measuring system before and after extraction, volume of entrapped gas is then computed. Formula derived from ideal gas laws is basis of this method. Technique is applicable to thermodynamic cycles and hydraulic systems.

  5. Trapping of self-interstitials at manganese atoms in electron-irradiated dilute AlMn alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartels, A.; Dworschak, F.

    1985-01-01

    Dilute AlMn alloys were irradiated isothermally at different temperatures in stage II with 1.8 MeV electrons and the resistivity damage rates were measured as a function of the residual resistivity increase. The results demonstrate that Mn atoms provide deep traps at least up to 150 K for mobile interstitials. A quantitative evaluation of the data with respect to trapping radii is somewhat handicapped by the fact that the resistivity contribution of a Mn-Al interstitial complex was found to be considerably less than the sum of the resistivity contributions of an isolated solute Mn atom and an Al self-interstitial. The results can be explained by a model which assumes that both the trapping radius and the resistivity contribution of solute-self-interstitial complexes increase with the number of trapped interstitials. (author)

  6. Atomic and molecular gas phase spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winefordner, J. D.

    1985-10-01

    The major goals of this research have been to develop diagnostical spectroscopic methods for measuring spatial/temporal temperatures and species of combustion flames and plasmas and to develop sensitive, selective, precise, reliable, rapid spectrometric methods of trace analysis of elements present in jet engine lubricating oils, metallurgical samples, and engine exhausts. The diagnostical approaches have been based upon the measurement of metal probes introduced into the flame or plasmas and the measurement of OH in flames. The measurement approaches have involved the use of laser-excited fluorescence, saturated absorption, polarization, and linear absorption. The spatial resolution in most studies is less than 1 cu mm and the temporal resolution is less than 10 ns with the use of pulsed lasers. Single pulse temperature and species measurements have also been carried out. Other diagnostical studies have involved the measurement of collisional redistribution of radiatively excited levels of Na and Tl in acetylene/02/Ar flames and the measurement of lifetimes and quantum efficiencies of atoms and ions in the inductively coupled plasmas, ICP. The latter studies indicate that the high electron number densities in ICPs are not efficient quenchers of excited atoms/ions. Temperatures of microwave atmospheric plasmas produced capacitatively and cool metastable N2 discharge produced by a dielectric discharge have also been measured.

  7. The finite-temperature thermodynamics of a trapped unitary Fermi gas within fractional exclusion statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Fang; Chen Jisheng

    2010-01-01

    We utilize the fractional exclusion statistics of the Haldane and Wu hypothesis to study the thermodynamics of a unitary Fermi gas trapped in a harmonic oscillator potential at ultra-low finite temperature. The entropy per particle as a function of the energy per particle and energy per particle versus rescaled temperature are numerically compared with the experimental data. The study shows that, except the chemical potential behaviour, there exists a reasonable consistency between the experimental measurement and theoretical attempt for the entropy and energy per particle. In the fractional exclusion statistics formalism, the behaviour of the isochore heat capacity for a trapped unitary Fermi gas is also analysed.

  8. Experimental study of slight temperature rise combustion in trapped vortex combustors for gas turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, R.C.; Fan, W.J.; Xing, F.; Song, S.W.; Shi, Q.; Tian, G.H.; Tan, W.L.

    2015-01-01

    Interstage turbine combustion used for improving efficiency of gas turbine was a new type of combustion mode. Operating conditions and technical requirements for this type of combustor were different from those of traditional combustor. It was expected to achieve engineering application in both ground-based and aviation gas turbine in the near future. In this study, a number of modifications in a base design were applied and examined experimentally. The trapped-vortex combustion technology was adopted for flame stability under high velocity conditions, and the preheating-fuel injection technology was used to improve the atomization and evaporation performance of liquid fuel. The experimental results indicated that stable and efficient combustion with slight temperature-rise can be achieved under the high velocity conditions of combustor inlet. Under all experimental conditions, the excess air coefficients of ignition and lean blow-out were larger than 7 and 20, respectively; pollutant emission index of NO x and the maximum wall temperature were below 2.5 g/(kg fuel) and 1050 K, respectively. Moreover, the effects of fuel injection and overall configuration on the combustion characteristics were analyzed in detail. The number increase, area increase and depth increase of fuel injectors had different influences on the stability, combustion characteristic and temperature distribution. - Highlights: • The combustion mode of slight temperature-rise (200 K) was achieved. • Effect of fuel and air injection on stability characteristic was investigated. • Impact of overall configuration on combustion performance was analyzed. • The feasibility of scheme was determined.

  9. The trapping of K and Na atoms by a clean W(110) surface. Dynamic trajectory calculations. ch.3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurkmans, A.; Overbosch, E.G.; Los, J.

    1976-01-01

    The fraction of K and Na atoms which are initially trapped by a clean W(110) surface has been measured as a function of incident energy (0.5 < approximately Esub(i) < approximately 15 eV) at several angles of incidence. At the same time the desorption energies Qsub(i) of the trapped potassium and sodium atoms were measured: Qsub(i) = 2.05 +- 0.02 eV and Qsub(i) = 2.60 +- 0.04 eV respectively. The measured trapping probabilities can be described well by Trillings 'partially screened spherical cap' model, except fos the small angles of incidence. Dynamic trajectory calculations were performed for a particle scattered from a diatomic molecule to explain the screening and the descrepancy at normal incidence. The calculations give good quantitative agreement with the measured trapping probability at small angles both for potassium and sodium atoms and show that simultaneous interaction with two adjacent surface atoms affects the trapping particularly at small angles of incidence. (Auth.)

  10. Kinetic Energy of a Trapped Fermi Gas at Finite Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grela, Jacek; Majumdar, Satya N.; Schehr, Grégory

    2017-09-01

    We study the statistics of the kinetic (or, equivalently, potential) energy for N noninteracting fermions in a 1 d harmonic trap of frequency ω at finite temperature T . Remarkably, we find an exact solution for the full distribution of the kinetic energy, at any temperature T and for any N , using a nontrivial mapping to an integrable Calogero-Moser-Sutherland model. As a function of temperature T and for large N , we identify (i) a quantum regime, for T ˜ℏω , where quantum fluctuations dominate and (ii) a thermal regime, for T ˜N ℏω , governed by thermal fluctuations. We show how the mean and the variance as well as the large deviation function associated with the distribution of the kinetic energy cross over from the quantum to the thermal regime as T increases.

  11. Magnetic resonance studies of atomic hydrogen gas at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, W.N.; Morrow, M.; Jochemsen, R.; Statt, B.W.; Kubik, P.R.; Marsolais, R.M.; Berlinsky, A.J.; Landesman, A.

    1980-01-01

    Using a pulsed low temperature discharge in a closed cell containing H 2 and 4 He, we have been able to store a low density (approximately 10 12 atoms/cc) gas of atomic hydrogen for periods of order one hour in zero magnetic field and T=1 K. Pulsed magnetic resonance at the 1420 MHz hyperfine transition has been used to study a number of the properties of the gas, including the recombination rate H + H + 4 He→H 2 + 4 He, the hydrogen spin-exchange relaxation rates, the diffusion coefficient of H in 4 He gas and the pressure shift of the hyperfine frequency due to the 4 He buffer gas. Here we discuss the application of hyperfine frequency shifts as a probe of the H-He potential, and as a means for determining the binding energy of H on liquid helium

  12. First observation of the strongly forbidden transition 1S0 - 3P0 in Strontium, for an atomic clock with trapped atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courtillot, I.

    2003-11-01

    This thesis reports the first results towards the realization of an optical clock using trapped strontium atoms. This set up would combine advantages of the different approaches commonly used to develop an atomic frequency standard. The first part describes the cold atoms source which is implemented. A magneto-optical trap operating on the 1 S 0 - 1 P 1 transition at 461 nm is loaded from an atomic beam decelerated by a Zeeman slower. The 461 nm laser is obtained by sum-frequency mixing in a potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) crystal. The second part is devoted to the different stages developed to achieve the direct excitation of the 1 S 0 - 3 P 0 clock transition in 87 Sr. This line has a theoretical natural width of 10 -3 Hz. Before this detection, we obtained an estimate of the resonance frequency by measuring absolute frequencies of several allowed optical transitions. (author)

  13. Continuous chemical cold traps for reprocessing off-gas purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henrich, E.; Bauder, U.; Steinhardt, H.J.; Bumiller, W.

    1985-01-01

    Absorption of nitrogen oxides and iodine from simulated reprocessing plant off-gas streams has been studied using nitric acid and nitric acid/hydrogen peroxide mixtures at low temperatures. The experiments were carried out at the laboratory and on the engineering scale. The pilot plant scale column has 0.8 m diameter and 16 absorption plates at 0.2 m spacing. Cooling coils on the plates allow operating temperatures down to -60 0 C. The NO concentration in the feed gas usually has been 1% by volume and the flow rate 4-32 m 3 (STP) per hour. The iodine behavior has been studied using I-123 tracer. Results of the study are presented. The chemistry of the processes and the advantages and disadvantages in correlation to the various applications for an off-gas purification in a reprocessing plant are compared and discussed. The processes are compatible with the PUREX process and do not produce additional waste

  14. Scheme for generating the singlet state of three atoms trapped in distant cavities coupled by optical fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Dong-Yang [Department of Physics, College of Science, Yanbian University, Yanji, Jilin 133002 (China); Wen, Jing-Ji [College of Foundation Science, Harbin University of Commerce, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150028 (China); Bai, Cheng-Hua; Hu, Shi; Cui, Wen-Xue [Department of Physics, College of Science, Yanbian University, Yanji, Jilin 133002 (China); Wang, Hong-Fu, E-mail: hfwang@ybu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, College of Science, Yanbian University, Yanji, Jilin 133002 (China); Zhu, Ai-Dong [Department of Physics, College of Science, Yanbian University, Yanji, Jilin 133002 (China); Zhang, Shou, E-mail: szhang@ybu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, College of Science, Yanbian University, Yanji, Jilin 133002 (China)

    2015-09-15

    An effective scheme is proposed to generate the singlet state with three four-level atoms trapped in three distant cavities connected with each other by three optical fibers, respectively. After a series of appropriate atom–cavity interactions, which can be arbitrarily controlled via the selective pairing of Raman transitions and corresponding optical switches, a three-atom singlet state can be successfully generated. The influence of atomic spontaneous decay, photon leakage of cavities and optical fibers on the fidelity of the state is numerically simulated showing that the three-atom singlet state can be generated with high fidelity by choosing the experimental parameters appropriately.

  15. Observation of resonant symmetry lifting by an effective bias field in a parametrically modulated atomic trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yonghee; Heo, Myoung-Sun; Moon, Geol; Kim, Ji-Hyoun; Jhe, Wonho; Noh, Heung-Ryoul

    2010-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate resonant symmetry lifting in a parametrically modulated magneto-optical trap of cold 85 Rb atoms. This is achieved by applying a weak additional modulation at half the frequency of the strong parametric modulation, which acts as an effective static bias field to the system. We measure the system response by varying the amplitude of the additional fictitious bias as well as the relative phase between the bias and the parametric drive, and the results are in good agreement with theory. The additional modulation provides an additional degree of freedom to control the system, which is useful for investigating system properties such as susceptibility, dynamic response, and related critical phenomena. We also have measured the amplitude of the response to higher harmonics of the additional modulation frequency, which allows more precise understanding of the system dynamics.

  16. Analysis of the physical atomic forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions and halogen ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. W.; Heinbockel, J. H.; Outlaw, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    The physical forces between atoms and molecules are important in a number of processes of practical importance, including line broadening in radiative processes, gas and crystal properties, adhesion, and thin films. The components of the physical forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions, and halogen ions are analyzed and a data base for the dispersion forces is developed from the literature based on evaluations with the harmonic oscillator dispersion model for higher order coefficients. The Zener model of the repulsive core is used in the context of the recent asymptotic wave functions of Handler and Smith; and an effective ionization potential within the Handler and Smith wave functions is defined to analyze the two body potential data of Waldman and Gordon, the alkali-halide molecular data, and the noble gas crystal and salt crystal data. A satisfactory global fit to this molecular and crystal data is then reproduced by the model to within several percent. Surface potentials are evaluated for noble gas atoms on noble gas and salt crystal surfaces with surface tension neglected. Within this context, the noble gas surface potentials on noble gas and salt crystals are considered to be accurate to within several percent.

  17. Power-law distributions for a trapped ion interacting with a classical buffer gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVoe, Ralph G

    2009-02-13

    Classical collisions with an ideal gas generate non-Maxwellian distribution functions for a single ion in a radio frequency ion trap. The distributions have power-law tails whose exponent depends on the ratio of buffer gas to ion mass. This provides a statistical explanation for the previously observed transition from cooling to heating. Monte Carlo results approximate a Tsallis distribution over a wide range of parameters and have ab initio agreement with experiment.

  18. Chemical reactivity of the compressed noble gas atoms and their ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Attempts are made to gain insights into the effect of confinement of noble gas atoms on their various reactivity indices. Systems become harder, less polarizable and difficult to excite as the compression increases. Ionization also causes similar effects. A quantum fluid density functional technique is adopted in order to study ...

  19. Real-Time Dynamics of an Impurity in an Ideal Bose Gas in a Trap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volosniev, A. G.; Hammer, H. -W.; Zinner, N. T.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the behavior of a harmonically trapped system consisting of an impurity in a dilute ideal Bose gas after the boson-impurity interaction is suddenly switched on. As theoretical framework, we use a field theory approach in the space-time domain within the T-matrix approximation. We...

  20. Cucurbit[6]uril: A Possible Host for Noble Gas Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Sudip; Mandal, Subhajit; Chattaraj, Pratim K

    2015-08-27

    Density functional and ab initio molecular dynamics studies are carried out to investigate the stability of noble gas encapsulated cucurbit[6]uril (CB[6]) systems. Interaction energy, dissociation energy and dissociation enthalpy are calculated to understand the efficacy of CB[6] in encapsulating noble gas atoms. CB[6] could encapsulate up to three Ne atoms having dissociation energy (zero-point energy corrected) in the range of 3.4-4.1 kcal/mol, whereas due to larger size, only one Ar or Kr atom encapsulated analogues would be viable. The dissociation energy value for the second Ar atom is only 1.0 kcal/mol. On the other hand, the same for the second Kr is -0.5 kcal/mol, implying the instability of the system. The noble gas dissociation processes are endothermic in nature, which increases gradually along Ne to Kr. Kr encapsulated analogue is found to be viable at room temperature. However, low temperature is needed for Ne and Ar encapsulated analogues. The temperature-pressure phase diagram highlights the region in which association and dissociation processes of Kr@CB[6] would be favorable. At ambient temperature and pressure, CB[6] may be used as an effective noble gas carrier. Wiberg bond indices, noncovalent interaction indices, electron density, and energy decomposition analyses are used to explore the nature of interaction between noble gas atoms and CB[6]. Dispersion interaction is found to be the most important term in the attraction energy. Ne and Ar atoms in one Ng entrapped analogue are found to stay inside the cavity of CB[6] throughout the simulation at 298 K. However, during simulation Ng2 units in Ng2@CB[6] flip toward the open faces of CB[6]. After 1 ps, one Ne atom of Ne3@CB[6] almost reaches the open face keeping other two Ne atoms inside. At lower temperature (77 K), all the Ng atoms in Ngn@CB[6] remain well inside the cavity of CB[6] throughout the simulation time (1 ps).

  1. Green method for ultrasensitive determination of Hg in natural waters by electrothermal-atomic absorption spectrometry following sono-induced cold vapor generation and 'in-atomizer trapping'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil, Sandra; Lavilla, Isela; Bendicho, Carlos

    2007-01-01

    Sono-induced cold vapor generation (SI-CVG) has been used for the first time in combination with a graphite furnace atomizer for determination of Hg in natural waters by electrothermal-atomic absorption spectrometry after in situ trapping onto a noble metal-pretreated platform (Pd, Pt or Rh) inserted into a graphite tube. The system allows 'in-atomizer trapping' of Hg without the use of conventional reduction reactions based on sodium borohydride or tin chloride in acid medium for cold vapor generation. The sono-induced reaction is accomplished by applying ultrasound irradiation to the sample solution containing Hg(II) in the presence of an organic compound such as formic acid. As this organic acid is partly degraded upon ultrasound irradiation to yield CO, CO 2 , H 2 and H 2 O, the amount of lab wastes is minimized and a green methodology is achieved. For this purpose, experimental variables influencing the generation/trapping process are fully investigated. The limit of detection for a 10 min trapping time and 10 mL sample volume was 0.03 μg L -1 (Integrated absorbance) and the repeatability expressed as relative standard deviation was about 3%. Carbonates and chlorides at 100 mg L -1 level caused a signal depression by 20-30%. The enhanced trapping efficiency observed with the sono-induced cold vapor generation as compared with 'in-atomizer trapping' methods employing chemical vapor generation is discussed. A reaction pathway for SI-CVG is proposed on the basis of the current knowledge for synthesis of noble metal nanoparticles by ultrasound

  2. Dipole-dipole interactions in a hot atomic vapor and in an ultracold gas of Rydberg atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sautenkov, V. A.; Saakyan, S. A.; Bronin, S. Ya; Klyarfeld, A. B.; Zelener, B. B.; Zelener, B. V.

    2018-01-01

    In our paper ideal and non-ideal gas media of neutral atoms are analyzed. The first we discuss a dipole broadening of atomic transitions in excited dilute and dense metal vapors. Then the theoretical studies of the dipole-dipole interactions in dense ultracold gas of Rydberg atoms are considered. Possible future experiments on a base of our experimental arrangement are suggested.

  3. Fermionic Collective Excitations in a Lattice Gas of Rydberg Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olmos, B.; Gonzalez-Ferez, R.; Lesanovsky, I.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the many-body quantum states of a laser-driven gas of Rydberg atoms confined to a large spacing ring lattice. If the laser driving is much stronger than the van der Waals interaction among the Rydberg atoms, these many-body states are collective fermionic excitations. The first excited state is a spin wave that extends over the entire lattice. We demonstrate that our system permits us to study fermions in the presence of disorder although no external atomic motion takes place. We analyze how this disorder influences the excitation properties of the fermionic states. Our work shows a route towards the creation of complex many-particle states with atoms in lattices.

  4. Effects of gas liquid ratio on the atomization characteristics of gas-liquid swirl coaxial injectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Zhongtao; Li, Qinglian; Zhang, Jiaqi; Cheng, Peng

    2018-05-01

    To understand the atomization characteristics and atomization mechanism of the gas-liquid swirl coaxial (GLSC) injector, a back-lighting photography technique has been employed to capture the instantaneous spray images with a high speed camera. The diameter and velocity of the droplets in the spray have been characterized with a Dantec Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA) system. The effects of gas liquid ratio (GLR) on the spray pattern, Sauter mean diameter (SMD), diameter-velocity distribution and mass flow rate distribution were analyzed and discussed. The results show that the atomization of the GLSC injector is dominated by the film breakup when the GLR is small, and violent gas-liquid interaction when the GLR is large enough. The film breakup dominated spray can be divided into gas acceleration region and film breakup region while the violent gas-liquid interaction dominated spray can be divided into the gas acceleration region, violent gas-liquid interaction region and big droplets breakup region. The atomization characteristics of the GLSC injector is significantly influenced by the GLR. From the point of atomization performance, the increase of GLR has positive effects. It decreases the global Sauter mean diameter (GSMD) and varies the SMD distribution from a hollow cone shape (GLR = 0) to an inverted V shape, and finally slanted N shape. However, from the point of spatial distribution, the increase of GLR has negative effects, because the mass flow rate distribution becomes more nonuniform.

  5. Automated Sampling and Extraction of Krypton from Small Air Samples for Kr-85 Measurement Using Atom Trap Trace Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hebel, S.; Hands, J.; Goering, F.; Kirchner, G.; Purtschert, R.

    2015-01-01

    Atom-Trap-Trace-Analysis (ATTA) provides the capability of measuring the Krypton-85 concentration in microlitre amounts of krypton extracted from air samples of about 1 litre. This sample size is sufficiently small to allow for a range of applications, including on-site spot sampling and continuous sampling over periods of several hours. All samples can be easily handled and transported to an off-site laboratory for ATTA measurement, or stored and analyzed on demand. Bayesian sampling methodologies can be applied by blending samples for bulk measurement and performing in-depth analysis as required. Prerequisite for measurement is the extraction of a pure krypton fraction from the sample. This paper introduces an extraction unit able to isolate the krypton in small ambient air samples with high speed, high efficiency and in a fully automated manner using a combination of cryogenic distillation and gas chromatography. Air samples are collected using an automated smart sampler developed in-house to achieve a constant sampling rate over adjustable time periods ranging from 5 minutes to 3 hours per sample. The smart sampler can be deployed in the field and operate on battery for one week to take up to 60 air samples. This high flexibility of sampling and the fast, robust sample preparation are a valuable tool for research and the application of Kr-85 measurements to novel Safeguards procedures. (author)

  6. Long-range interactions of excited He atoms with ground-state noble-gas atoms

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, J.-Y.; Qian, Ying; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo; Yan, Z.-C.

    2013-01-01

    The dispersion coefficients C6, C8, and C10 for long-range interactions of He(n1,3S) and He(n1,3P), 2≤n≤10, with the ground-state noble-gas atoms Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe are calculated by summing over the reduced matrix elements of multipole transition

  7. Trapped Bose gas. Mean-field approximation and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitaevskii, L.P.

    1998-01-01

    The recent realization of Bose-Einstein condensation in atomic gases opens new possibilities for observation of macroscopic quantum phenomena. There are two important features of the system - weak interaction and significant spatial inhomogeneity. Because of this inhomogeneity a non-trivial 'zeroth-order' theory exists, compared to the 'first-order' Bogoliubov theory. This theory is based on the mean-field Gross-Pitaevskii equation for the condensate ψ -function. The equation is classical in its essence but contains the ℎ constant explicitly. Phenomena such as collective modes, interference, tunneling, Josephson-like current and quantized vortex lines can be described using this equation. The study of deviations from the zeroth-order theory arising from zero-point and thermal fluctuations is also of great interest. Thermal fluctuations are described by elementary excitations which define the thermodynamic behaviour of the system and result in Landau-type damping of collective modes. Fluctuations of the phase of the condensate wave function restrict the monochromaticity of the Josephson current. Fluctuations of the numbers of quanta result in the quantum collapse-revival of the collective oscillations. This phenomenon is considered in some details. Collapse time for the JILA experimental conditions turns out to be of the order of seconds. (Copyright (1998) World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd)

  8. Penning ionization cross sections of excited rare gas atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ukai, Masatoshi; Hatano, Yoshihiko.

    1988-01-01

    Electronic energy transfer processes involving excited rare gas atoms play one of the most important roles in ionized gas phenomena. Penning ionization is one of the well known electronic energy transfer processes and has been studied extensively both experimentally and theoretically. The present paper reports the deexcitation (Penning ionization) cross sections of metastable state helium He(2 3 S) and radiative He(2 1 P) atoms in collision with atoms and molecules, which have recently been obtained by the authors' group by using a pulse radiolysis method. Investigation is made of the selected deexcitation cross sections of He(2 3 S) by atoms and molecules in the thermal collisional energy region. Results indicate that the cross sections are strongly dependent on the target molecule. The deexcitation probability of He(2 3 S) per collision increases with the excess electronic energy of He(2 3 S) above the ionization potential of the target atom or molecule. Another investigation, made on the deexcitation of He(2 1 P), suggests that the deexcitation cross section for He(2 1 P) by Ar is determined mainly by the Penning ionization cross section due to a dipole-dipole interaction. Penning ionization due to the dipole-dipole interaction is also important for deexcitation of He(2 1 P) by the target molecules examined. (N.K.)

  9. The trapping of potassium atoms by a polycrystalline tungsten surface as a function of energy and angle of incidence. ch. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurkmans, A.; Overbosch, E.G.; Olander, D.R.; Los, J.

    1976-01-01

    The trapping probability of potassium atoms on a polycrystalline tungsten surface has been measured as a function of the angle of incidence and as a function of the energy of the incoming atoms. Below an energy of 1 eV the trapping was complete; above 20 eV only reflection occurred. The trapping probability increased with increasing angle of incidence. The measurements are compared with a simple model of the fraction of atoms initially trapped. The model, a one-dimensional cube model including a Boltzmann distribution of the velocities of oscillating surface atoms, partially explains the data. The trapping probability as a function of incoming energy is well described for normal incidence, justifying the inclusion of thermal motion of the surface atoms in the model. The angular dependence can be explained in a qualitative way, although there is a substantial discrepancy for large angles of incidence, showing the presence of surface structure. (Auth.)

  10. Extraction of highly charged ions from the Berlin Electron Beam Ion Trap for interactions with a gas target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, F.I.; Biedermann, C.; Radtke, R.; Fussmann, G.

    2006-01-01

    Highly charged ions are extracted from the Berlin Electron Beam Ion Trap for investigations of charge exchange with a gas target. The classical over-the-barrier model for slow highly charged ions describes this process, whereby one or more electrons are captured from the target into Rydberg states of the ion. The excited state relaxes via a radiative cascade of the electron to ground energy. The cascade spectra are characteristic of the capture state. We investigate x-ray photons emitted as a result of interactions between Ar 17+ ions at energies ≤5q keV with Ar atoms. Of particular interest is the velocity dependence of the angular momentum capture state l c

  11. Dynamics of trapped two-component Fermi gas: Temperature dependence of the transition from collisionless to collisional regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toschi, F.; Vignolo, P.; Tosi, M.P.; Succi, S.

    2003-01-01

    We develop a numerical method to study the dynamics of a two-component atomic Fermi gas trapped inside a harmonic potential at temperature T well below the Fermi temperature T F . We examine the transition from the collisionless to the collisional regime down to T=0.2 T F and find a good qualitative agreement with the experiments of B. DeMarco and D.S. Jin [Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 040405 (2002)]. We demonstrate a twofold role of temperature on the collision rate and on the efficiency of collisions. In particular, we observe a hitherto unreported effect, namely, the transition to hydrodynamic behavior is shifted towards lower collision rates as temperature decreases

  12. Optically trapped atom interferometry using the clock transition of large {sup 87}Rb Bose-Einstein condensates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altin, P A; McDonald, G; Doering, D; Debs, J E; Barter, T H; Close, J D; Robins, N P [Department of Quantum Science, ARC Centre of Excellence for Quantum Atom Optics, the Australian National University, ACT 0200 (Australia); Haine, S A [School of Mathematics and Physics, ARC Centre of Excellence for Quantum-Atom Optics, The University of Queensland, Queensland 4072 (Australia); Hanna, T M [Joint Quantum Institute, National Institute of Standards and Technology and University of Maryland, 100 Bureau Drive, Stop 8423, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8423 (United States); Anderson, R P, E-mail: paul.altin@anu.edu.au [School of Physics, Monash University, VIC 3800 (Australia)

    2011-06-15

    We present a Ramsey-type atom interferometer operating with an optically trapped sample of 10{sup 6} Bose-condensed {sup 87}Rb atoms. We investigate this interferometer experimentally and theoretically with an eye to the construction of future high precision atomic sensors. Our results indicate that, with further experimental refinements, it will be possible to produce and measure the output of a sub-shot-noise-limited, large atom number BEC-based interferometer. The optical trap allows us to couple the |F=1, m{sub F}=0){yields}|F=2, m{sub F}=0) clock states using a single photon 6.8 GHz microwave transition, while state selective readout is achieved with absorption imaging. We analyse the process of absorption imaging and show that it is possible to observe atom number variance directly, with a signal-to-noise ratio ten times better than the atomic projection noise limit on 10{sup 6} condensate atoms. We discuss the technical and fundamental noise sources that limit our current system, and present theoretical and experimental results on interferometer contrast, de-phasing and miscibility.

  13. Intensity-gradient induced Sisyphus cooling of a single atom in a localized hollow-beam trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Yaling; Xia, Yong; Ren, Ruimin; Du, Xiangli; Yin, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    In order to realize a convenient and efficient laser cooling of a single atom, we propose a simple and promising scheme to cool a single neutral atom in a blue-detuned localized hollow-beam trap by intensity-gradient induced Sisyphus cooling, and study the dynamic process of the intensity-gradient cooling of a single 87 Rb atom in the localized hollow-beam trap by using Monte-Carlo simulations. Our study shows that a single 87 Rb atom with a temperature of 120 μK from a magneto-optical trap (MOT) can be directly cooled to a final temperature of 4.64 μK in our proposed scheme. We also investigate the dependences of the cooling results on the laser detuning δ of the localized hollow-beam, the power RP 0 of the re-pumping laser beam, the sizes of both the localized hollow-beam and the re-pumping beam, and find that there is a pair of optimal cooling parameters (δ and RP 0 ) for an expected lowest temperature, and the cooling results strongly depend on the size of the re-pumping beam, but weakly depend on the size of the localized hollow-beam. Finally, we further study the cooling potential of our localized hollow-beam trap for the initial temperature of a single atom, and find that a single 87 Rb atom with an initial temperature of higher than 1 mK can also be cooled directly to about 6.6 μK. (paper)

  14. Nanofabrication for On-Chip Optical Levitation, Atom-Trapping, and Superconducting Quantum Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norte, Richard Alexander

    a final value of Qm = 5.8(1.1) x 105, representing more than an order of magnitude improvement over the conventional limits of SiO2 for a pendulum geometry. Our technique may enable new opportunities for mechanical sensing and facilitate observations of quantum behavior in this class of mechanical systems. We then give a detailed overview of the techniques used to produce high-aspect-ratio nanostructures with applications in a wide range of quantum optics experiments. The ability to fabricate such nanodevices with high precision opens the door to a vast array of experiments which integrate macroscopic optical setups with lithographically engineered nanodevices. Coupled with atom-trapping experiments in the Kimble Lab, we use these techniques to realize a new waveguide chip designed to address ultra-cold atoms along lithographically patterned nanobeams which have large atom-photon coupling and near 4pi Steradian optical access for cooling and trapping atoms. We describe a fully integrated and scalable design where cold atoms are spatially overlapped with the nanostring cavities in order to observe a resonant optical depth of d0 ≈ 0.15. The nanodevice illuminates new possibilities for integrating atoms into photonic circuits and engineering quantum states of atoms and light on a microscopic scale. We then describe our work with superconducting microwave resonators coupled to a phononic cavity towards the goal of building an integrated device for quantum-limited microwave-to-optical wavelength conversion. We give an overview of our characterizations of several types of substrates for fabricating a low-loss high-frequency electromechanical system. We describe our electromechanical system fabricated on a SiN membrane which consists of a 12 GHz superconducting LC resonator coupled capacitively to the high frequency localized modes of a phononic nanobeam. Using our suspended membrane geometry we isolate our system from substrates with significant loss tangents

  15. Effects of Surfactant Contamination on the Next Generation Gas Trap for the ISS Internal Thermal Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Lukens, Clark; Reeves, Daniel R.; Holt, James M.

    2004-01-01

    The current dual-membrane gas trap is designed to remove non-condensed gas bubbles from the Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) coolant on board the International Space Station (ISS). To date it has successfully served its purpose of preventing gas bubbles from causing depriming, overspeed, and shutdown of the ITCS pump. However, contamination in the ITCS coolant has adversely affected the gas venting rate and lifetime of the gas trap, warranting a development effort for a next-generation gas trap. Previous testing has shown that a hydrophobic-only design is capable of performing even better than the current dual-membrane design for both steady-state gas removal and gas slug removal in clean deionized water. This paper presents results of testing to evaluate the effects of surfactant contamination on the steady-state performance of the hydrophobic-only design.

  16. Casimir interaction between gas media of excited atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherkunov, Yury

    2007-01-01

    The retarded dispersion interaction (Casimir interaction) between two dilute dielectric media at high temperatures is considered. The excited atoms are taken into account. It is shown that the perturbation technique cannot be applied to this problem due to divergence of integrals. A non-perturbative approach based on kinetic Green functions is implemented. We consider the interaction between two atoms (one of them is excited) embedded in an absorbing dielectric medium. We take into account the possible absorption of photons in the medium, which solves the problem of divergence. The force between two plane dilute dielectric media is calculated at pair interaction approximation. We show that the result of quantum electrodynamics differs from the Lifshitz formula for dilute gas media at high temperatures (if the number of excited atoms is significant). According to quantum electrodynamics, the interaction may be either attractive or repulsive depending on the temperature and the density numbers of the media

  17. All-Optical Atom Trap Trace Analysis: Potential Use of 85Kr in Safeguards Activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohler, M.; Sahling, P.; Sieveke, C.; Kirchner, G.

    2015-01-01

    Sensitive measurement techniques for the detection of anthropogenic tracers demand measurement resolutions down to single atoms, as it has been demonstrated by the first atom trap trace analysis experiments. However, technical limitations had lowered the sample throughput to about 200 per year per machine. We have developed an all-optical apparatus which allows higher sample throughput and small sample sizes at the same time. Krypton-85 as anthropogenic isotope is an ideal tracer for nuclear activities since the only relevant source term is fission. An increased 85Kr concentration in an air sample indicates, that a plume was passing by during sampling. In practice, however, its applicability may be limited by the global and regional background concentrations caused by the emissions of nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. The potential of 85Kr monitoring for safeguards applications has been discussed extensively. Among these is the short range detection of elevated concentrations of 85Kr in the vicinity of reprocessing plants. Our ATTA technique needs sample sizes of about 1 l of air only and thus for the first time will allow simple environmental sampling of 85Kr with high spatial and temporal resolution. The design of such a study including local sampling and tracer transport modelling in proximity to a reprocessing plants is outlined. In addition, such a study could be used also for validating near-field atmospheric dispersion models if the 85Kr source term is known. The potential of environmental analyzes of 85Kr during an IAEA short-notice access is discussed. It is shown that it crucially depends on the emission dynamics after shut-down of fuel dissolution which needs further study. (author)

  18. Dynamics of a trapped two-level and three-level atom interacting with classical electromagnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, Aditi

    2004-01-01

    The dynamics of a two-level atom driven by a single laser beam and three-level atom (Lambda configuration) irradiated by two laser beams are studied taking into account of the quantized center-of-mass motion of the atom. It is shown that the trapped atom system under appropriate resonance condition exhibits the large time-scale revivals when the index of the vibrational sideband responsible for the atomic electronic transition is greater than unity. The revival times are shown to be dependent on the initial number of vibrational excitations and the magnitude of the Lamb-Dicke parameter. The sub-Poissonian statistics in vibrational quantum number is observed at certain time intervals. The minimum time of interaction for which the squeezed states of motional quadrature are generated is found to be decreasing with the increase in the Lamb-Dicke parameter

  19. Observation of ESR spin flip satellite lines of trapped hydrogen atoms in solid H2 at 4.2 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, Tetsuo; Iwata, Nobuchika; Fueki, Kenji; Hase, Hirotomo

    1990-01-01

    ESR spectra of H atoms, produced in γ-irradiated solid H 2 , were studied at 4.2 K. Two main lines of the ESR spectra of H atoms that are separated by about 500 G accompanied two weak satellite lines. Both satellite lines and main lines decrease with the same decay rate. In the D 2 -H 2 mixtures, the satellite-line intensity depends upon the number of matrix protons. The spacing of the satellites from the main lines is equal to that of the NMR proton resonance frequency. It was concluded that the satellite lines were not ascribable to paired atoms but to spin flip lines due to an interaction of H atoms with matrix protons. The analysis of the spin flip lines and the main lines suggests that H atoms in solid H 2 are trapped in the substitutional site

  20. Production of inert gas for substitution of a part of the cushion gas trapped in an aquifer underground storage reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, L.; Arnoult, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    In a natural gas storage reservoir operating over the different seasons, a varying fraction of the injected gas, the cushion gas, remains permanently trapped. This cushion gas may represent more than half the total gas volume, and more than 50% of the initial investment costs for the storage facility. Studies conducted by Gaz de France, backed up by experience acquired over the years, have shown that at least 20% of the cushion gas could be replaced by a less expensive inert gas. Nitrogen, carbon dioxide, or a mixture of the two, satisfy the specifications required for this inert gas. Two main production methods exist: recovery of natural gas combustion products (mixture of 88% N 2 and 12% Co 2 ) and physical separation of air components (more or less pure N 2 , depending on industrial conditions). For the specific needs of Gaz de France, the means of production must be suited to its programme of partial cushion gas substitution. The equipment must satisfy requirements of autonomy, operating flexibility and mobility. Gaz de France has tested two units for recovery of natural gas combustion products. In the first unit, the inert gas is produced in a combustion chamber, treated in a catalytic reactor to reduce nitrogen oxide content and then compressed by gas engine driven compressors. In the second unit, the exhaust gases of the compressor gas engines are collected, treated to eliminate nitrogen oxides and then compressed. The energy balance is improved. A PSA method nitrogen production unit by selective absorption of nitrogen in the air, will be put into service in 1989. The specific features of these two methods and the reasons for choosing them will be reviewed. (author). 1 fig

  1. Nonlinear dynamics in a trapped atomic Bose-Einstein condensate induced by an oscillating Gaussian potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, Kazuya; Tsubota, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    We consider a trapped atomic Bose-Einstein condensate penetrated by a repulsive Gaussian potential and theoretically investigate the dynamics induced by oscillating the Gaussian potential. Our study is based on the numerical calculation of the two-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii equation. Our calculation reveals the dependence of the characteristic behavior of the condensate on the amplitude and frequency of the oscillating potential. These dynamics are deeply related to the nucleation and dynamics of quantized vortices and solitons. When the potential oscillates with a large amplitude, it nucleates many vortex pairs that move away from the potential. When the amplitude of the oscillation is small, it nucleates solitons through an annihilation of vortex pairs. We discuss three issues concerning the nucleation of vortices. The first is the phase diagram for the nucleation of vortices and solitons near the oscillating potential. The second is the mechanism and critical velocity of the nucleation. The critical velocity of the nucleation is an important issue in quantum fluids, and we propose an expression for the velocity containing both the coherence length and the size of the potential. The third is the divergence of the nucleation time, which is the time it takes for the potential to nucleate vortices, near the critical parameters for vortex nucleation.

  2. Soliton Trains Induced by Adaptive Shaping with Periodic Traps in Four-Level Ultracold Atom Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djouom Tchenkoue, M. L.; Welakuh Mbangheku, D.; Dikandé, Alain M.

    2017-01-01

    It is well known that an optical trap can be imprinted by a light field in an ultracold-atom system embedded in an optical cavity, and driven by three different coherent fields. Of the three fields coexisting in the optical cavity there is an intense control field that induces a giant Kerr nonlinearity via electromagnetically-induced transparency, and another field that creates a periodic optical grating of strength proportional to the square of the associated Rabi frequency. In this work elliptic-soliton solutions to the nonlinear equation governing the propagation of the probe field are considered, with emphasis on the possible generation of optical soliton trains forming a discrete spectrum with well defined quantum numbers. The problem is treated assuming two distinct types of periodic optical gratings and taking into account the negative and positive signs of detunings (detuning above or below resonance). Results predict that the competition between the self-phase and cross-phase modulation nonlinearities gives rise to a rich family of temporal soliton train modes characterized by distinct quantum numbers. (paper)

  3. Soliton Trains Induced by Adaptive Shaping with Periodic Traps in Four-Level Ultracold Atom Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djouom Tchenkoue, M. L.; Welakuh Mbangheku, D.; Dikandé, Alain M.

    2017-06-01

    It is well known that an optical trap can be imprinted by a light field in an ultracold-atom system embedded in an optical cavity, and driven by three different coherent fields. Of the three fields coexisting in the optical cavity there is an intense control field that induces a giant Kerr nonlinearity via electromagnetically-induced transparency, and another field that creates a periodic optical grating of strength proportional to the square of the associated Rabi frequency. In this work elliptic-soliton solutions to the nonlinear equation governing the propagation of the probe field are considered, with emphasis on the possible generation of optical soliton trains forming a discrete spectrum with well defined quantum numbers. The problem is treated assuming two distinct types of periodic optical gratings and taking into account the negative and positive signs of detunings (detuning above or below resonance). Results predict that the competition between the self-phase and cross-phase modulation nonlinearities gives rise to a rich family of temporal soliton train modes characterized by distinct quantum numbers.

  4. Flame-in-gas-shield and miniature diffusion flame hydride atomizers for atomic fluorescence spectrometry: optimization and comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marschner, Karel; Musil, Stanislav; Dědina, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    A detailed optimization of relevant experimental parameters of two hydride atomizers for atomic fluorescence spectrometry: flame-in-gas-shield atomizer with a two-channel shielding unit and a standard atomizer for atomic fluorescence spectrometry, miniature diffusion flame, was performed. Arsine, generated by the reaction with NaBH 4 in a flow injection arrangement, was chosen as the model hydride. Analytical characteristics of both the atomizers (sensitivity, noise, limits of detection) were compared. Under optimum conditions sensitivity obtained with flame-in-gas-shield atomizer was approximately twice higher than with miniature diffusion flame. The additional advantage of flame-in-gas-shield atomizer is significantly lower flame emission resulting in a better signal to noise ratio. The resulting arsenic limits of detection for miniature diffusion flame and flame-in-gas-shield atomizer were 3.8 ng l −1 and 1.0 ng l −1 , respectively. - Highlights: • We optimized and compared two hydride atomizers for atomic fluorescence spectrometry. • Miniature diffusion flame and flame-in-gas-shield atomizer were optimized. • The limit of detection for arsenic was 1.0 ng l −1

  5. Flame-in-gas-shield and miniature diffusion flame hydride atomizers for atomic fluorescence spectrometry: optimization and comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marschner, Karel, E-mail: karel.marschner@biomed.cas.cz [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v. v. i., Veveří 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Science, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Albertov 8, 128 43 Prague (Czech Republic); Musil, Stanislav; Dědina, Jiří [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v. v. i., Veveří 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2015-07-01

    A detailed optimization of relevant experimental parameters of two hydride atomizers for atomic fluorescence spectrometry: flame-in-gas-shield atomizer with a two-channel shielding unit and a standard atomizer for atomic fluorescence spectrometry, miniature diffusion flame, was performed. Arsine, generated by the reaction with NaBH{sub 4} in a flow injection arrangement, was chosen as the model hydride. Analytical characteristics of both the atomizers (sensitivity, noise, limits of detection) were compared. Under optimum conditions sensitivity obtained with flame-in-gas-shield atomizer was approximately twice higher than with miniature diffusion flame. The additional advantage of flame-in-gas-shield atomizer is significantly lower flame emission resulting in a better signal to noise ratio. The resulting arsenic limits of detection for miniature diffusion flame and flame-in-gas-shield atomizer were 3.8 ng l{sup −1} and 1.0 ng l{sup −1}, respectively. - Highlights: • We optimized and compared two hydride atomizers for atomic fluorescence spectrometry. • Miniature diffusion flame and flame-in-gas-shield atomizer were optimized. • The limit of detection for arsenic was 1.0 ng l{sup −1}.

  6. Development of adsorbent for C-14 Gas trapping and characteristics evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Geun Il; Kim, I. T.; Kim, K. W.

    2006-08-01

    Desorption characteristics of C-14 adsorbed on spent resin as H 14 CO 3 ion type by applying various stripping solutions were analyzed, and some experiments for gasification of C-14 to CO 2 gas with were also performed. Based on these results, the process concept for spent resin treatment was suggested. Real spent resin was prepared from sampling in storage tank in site 1 of Wolseung Nuclear Power Plant. Desorption characteristics of C-14 and cations of Cs, Co from spent IRN-150 resin was evaluated. Desorption efficiency of C-14 from spent resin by using H 3 PO 4 desorption solution was over 96% regardless of C-14 amount on initial spent resin when comparing a activity of C-14 on initial spent resin. Also, desorption percent of cation of Cs, Co from anion ion-exchange resin (IRN-77) showed that Co-60 was below 1%, Cs-134, 137 was in a range of 2 ∼ 5%. Fundamental studies include an development of adsorbent manufacturing technology and its performance evaluation for C-14 gas trapping, the adsorption process by adopting gas circulation method was suggested for the design of 14 CO 2 gas treatment system generated from spent resin treatment process. In order to predict adsorbent performance of CO 2 trapping, modelling was carried out to verify the breakthrough curves of CO 2 trapping by using soda lime adsorbent. The effect of humidity on CO 2 trapping by using soda lime adsorbent was modelled via chemical reaction in porous media. Assessment of the state-of-the-arts on the solidification of the used adsorbent showed that the cement matrix would be the best-available binder from the view points of the matrix compatibility, properties of the final waste form, simplicity of the process and relatively low cost

  7. Collision induced dissociation of protonated N-nitrosodimethylamine by ion trap mass spectrometry: Ultimate carcinogens in gas phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulikova, Natalia; Baker, Michael; Gabryelski, Wojciech

    2009-12-01

    Collision induced dissociation of protonated N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) and isotopically labeled N-nitrosodimethyl-d6-amine (NDMA-d6) was investigated by sequential ion trap mass spectrometry to establish mechanisms of gas phase reactions leading to intriguing products of this potent carcinogen. The fragmentation of (NDMA + H+) occurs via two dissociation pathways. In the alkylation pathway, homolytic cleavage of the N-O bond of N-dimethyl, N'-hydroxydiazenium ion generates N-dimethyldiazenium distonic ion which reacts further by a CH3 radical loss to form methanediazonium ion. Both methanediazonium ion and its precursor are involved in ion/molecule reactions. Methanediazonium ion showed to be capable of methylating water and methanol molecules in the gas phase of the ion trap and N-dimethyldiazenium distonic ion showed to abstract a hydrogen atom from a solvent molecule. In the denitrosation pathway, a tautomerization of N-dimethyl, N'-hydroxydiazenium ion to N-nitrosodimethylammonium intermediate ion results in radical cleavage of the N-N bond of the intermediate ion to form N-dimethylaminium radical cation which reacts further through [alpha]-cleavage to generate N-methylmethylenimmonium ion. Although the reactions of NDMA in the gas phase are different to those for enzymatic conversion of NDMA in biological systems, each activation method generates the same products. We will show that collision induced dissociation of N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) and N-nitrosodipropylamine (NDPA) is also a feasible approach to gain information on formation, stability, and reactivity of alkylating agents originating from NDEA and NDPA. Investigating such biologically relevant, but highly reactive intermediates in the condensed phase is hampered by the short life-times of these transient species.

  8. Integrated transport code system for a multicomponent plasma in a gas dynamic trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anikeev, A.V.; Karpushov, A.N.; Noak, K.; Strogalova, S.L.

    2000-01-01

    This report is focused on the development of the theoretical and numerical models of multicomponent high-β plasma confinement and transport in the gas-dynamic trap (GDT). In order to simulate the plasma behavior in the GDT as well as that in the GDT-based neutron source the Integrated Transport Code System is developed from existing stand-alone codes calculating the target plasma, the fast ions and the neutral gas in the GDT. The code system considers the full dependence of the transport phenomena on space, time, energy and angle variables as well as the interactions between the particle fields [ru

  9. Trapping and interactions of an ultracold gas of Cs2 molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mark, M.; Kraemer, T.; Herbig, J.; Waldburger, P.; Naegerl, H.C.; Chin, C.; Grimm, R.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: We investigate dynamics and interactions of Cs 2 dimers in a CO2-laser dipole trap. Starting with a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) of 2.2 x 10 5 Cs atoms, we create ultracold molecules in a single, weakly bound quantum state by sweeping the magnetic field across a narrow Feshbach resonance. When the molecules are created in free space, the conversion efficiency exceeds 30 %, yielding up to 50000 molecules. In our trapping experiments, about 6000 ultracold Cs 2 dimers are prepared in the optical trap at a temperature of 200 nK. We transfer the trapped molecules from the initial molecular state to other molecular states by following avoided crossings. We find two magnetically tunable resonances in collisions between the molecules for one of the molecular states. We interpret these Feshbach-liKEX resonances as being induced by Cs 4 bound states near the molecular scattering continuum. Further, we have discovered a new molecular state with very large orbital angular momentum of l = 8. This state is very weakly coupled to one of the initial molecular states. We use the associated avoided crossing as a molecular beam splitter to realize a molecular Ramsey-type interferometer. Refs. 2 (author)

  10. Sensitivity improvement for antimony determination by using in-situ atom trapping in a slotted quartz tube and flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Titretir, Serap, E-mail: serap.titretir@inonu.edu.tr [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Inoenue University, 44280 Malatya (Turkey); S Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I k, Ahmet Inanc [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Inoenue University, 44280 Malatya (Turkey); Arslan, Yasin [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Mehmet Akif Ersoy University, Istiklal Yerleskesi, 15030 Burdur (Turkey); Ataman, O. Yavuz [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Middle East Technical University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey)

    2012-11-15

    Significant improvement has been achieved for antimony determination using a slotted quartz tube (SQT) as an atom trap (AT) for in situ preconcentration and flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The suggested technique consists of trapping analyte species during ordinary nebulization followed by releasing the collected analyte via introducing organic solvent. Procedures and analytical figures of merit have been presented for the techniques called FAAS, SQT-FAAS and finally SQT-AT-FAAS with the relevant comparisons. Analytical parameters, namely composition of the aqueous medium, sample flow rate, flame conditions, distance between burner head and SQT, sampling period and type of organic solvent and its volume have been optimized. Using SQT-AT-FAAS, a sensitivity enhancement of 369 fold has been obtained, 3 s limit of detection was 3.9 {mu}g L{sup -1} when 25.0 mL of sample was collected in 4.0 min. Interference effects of some elements on antimony signal were studied. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Atom trapping in a quartz tube was used for Sb with flame AAS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An inexpensive, simple and sensitive analytical method was suggested for Sb. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Almost no background absorption was observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Range is in microgram per liter level.

  11. Sensitivity improvement for antimony determination by using in-situ atom trapping in a slotted quartz tube and flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titretir, Serap; Şık, Ahmet İnanç; Arslan, Yasin; Ataman, O. Yavuz

    2012-01-01

    Significant improvement has been achieved for antimony determination using a slotted quartz tube (SQT) as an atom trap (AT) for in situ preconcentration and flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The suggested technique consists of trapping analyte species during ordinary nebulization followed by releasing the collected analyte via introducing organic solvent. Procedures and analytical figures of merit have been presented for the techniques called FAAS, SQT-FAAS and finally SQT-AT-FAAS with the relevant comparisons. Analytical parameters, namely composition of the aqueous medium, sample flow rate, flame conditions, distance between burner head and SQT, sampling period and type of organic solvent and its volume have been optimized. Using SQT-AT-FAAS, a sensitivity enhancement of 369 fold has been obtained, 3 s limit of detection was 3.9 μg L −1 when 25.0 mL of sample was collected in 4.0 min. Interference effects of some elements on antimony signal were studied. - Highlights: ► Atom trapping in a quartz tube was used for Sb with flame AAS. ► An inexpensive, simple and sensitive analytical method was suggested for Sb. ► Almost no background absorption was observed. ► Range is in microgram per liter level.

  12. The dynamics of triple-well trapped Bose–Einstein condensates with atoms feeding and loss effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mu Aixia; Zhou Xiaoyan; Xue Jukui

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the macroscopic quantum tunnelling and self-trapping phenomena of Bose–Einstein condensates (BECs) with three-body recombination losses and atoms feeding from thermal cloud in triple-well potential. Using the three-mode approximation, three coupled Gross–Pitaevskii equations (GPEs), which describe the dynamics of the system, are obtained. The corresponding numerical results reveal some interesting characteristics of BECs for different scattering lengths. The self-trapping and quantum tunnelling both are found in zero-phase and π-phase modes. Furthermore, we observe the quantum beating phenomenon and the resonance character during the self-trapping and quantum tunnelling. It is also shown that the initial phase has a significant effect on the dynamics of the system

  13. Cryogenic buffer-gas loading and magnetic trapping of CrH and MnH molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoll, M.; Bakker, J. M.; Steimle, T. C.; Meijer, G.; Peters, A.

    2008-01-01

    We report on the buffer- gas cooling and trapping of CrH and MnH molecules in a magnetic quadrupole trap with densities on the order of 10(6) cm(-3) at a temperature of 650 mK. Storage times of up to 180 ms have been observed, corresponding to a 20- fold lifetime enhancement with respect to the

  14. Trapping radioactive ions

    CERN Document Server

    Kluge, Heinz-Jürgen

    2004-01-01

    Trapping devices for atomic and nuclear physics experiments with radioactive ions are becoming more and more important at accelerator facilities. While about ten years ago only one online Penning trap experiment existed, namely ISOLTRAP at ISOLDE/CERN, meanwhile almost every radioactive beam facility has installed or plans an ion trap setup. This article gives an overview on ion traps in the operation, construction or planing phase which will be used for fundamental studies with short-lived radioactive nuclides such as mass spectrometry, laser spectroscopy and nuclear decay spectroscopy. In addition, this article summarizes the use of gas cells and radiofrequency quadrupole (Paul) traps at different facilities as a versatile tool for ion beam manipulation like retardation, cooling, bunching, and cleaning.

  15. Trapping radioactive ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluge, H.-J.; Blaum, K.

    2004-01-01

    Trapping devices for atomic and nuclear physics experiments with radioactive ions are becoming more and more important at accelerator facilities. While about ten years ago only one online Penning trap experiment existed, namely ISOLTRAP at ISOLDE/CERN, meanwhile almost every radioactive beam facility has installed or plans an ion trap setup. This article gives an overview on ion traps in the operation, construction or planing phase which will be used for fundamental studies with short-lived radioactive nuclides such as mass spectrometry, laser spectroscopy and nuclear decay spectroscopy. In addition, this article summarizes the use of gas cells and radiofrequency quadrupole (Paul) traps at different facilities as a versatile tool for ion beam manipulation like retardation, cooling, bunching, and cleaning

  16. Aspects of hyperspherical adiabaticity in an atomic-gas Bose-Einstein condensate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kushibe, Daisuke; Mutou, Masaki; Morishita, Toru; Watanabe, Shinichi; Matsuzawa, Michio

    2004-01-01

    Excitation of an atomic-gas Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in the zeroth-order ground-state channel is studied with the hyperspherical adiabatic method of Bohn et al. [Bohn et al., Phys. Rev. A 58, 584 (1998)] suitably generalized to accommodate the anisotropic trapping potential. The method exploits the system's size as an adiabatic parameter so that the explicit size dependence is immediately conducive to the virial theorem. The oscillation frequencies associated with the monopole (breathing) and quadrupole modes thus emerge naturally and converge to the well-known Thomas-Fermi limits. Analysis of the single-particle density and the projected excitation wave function shows that the excitation in the single hyperspherical ground-state channel merely represents a progressive increase in occupancy of the first excited single-particle state. The work paves the way for applying the adiabatic picture to other BEC phenomena

  17. Generation of 99-mW continuous-wave 285-nm radiation for magneto-optical trapping of Mg atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Dorte Nørgaard; Yu, Ping; Balslev, Søren

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a tunable intense narrow-band 285 nm light source based on frequency doubling of 570 nm light in BBO. At input powers of 840 mW (including 130 mW used for locking purposes) we generate 99 mW UV radiation with an intensity profile suitable for laser-cooling experiments. The light...... is used for laser cooling of neutral magnesium atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). We capture about 5 x 10(6) atoms directly from a thermal beam and find that the major loss mechanism of the magnesium MOT is a near-resonant two-photon ionization process....

  18. Photoionization of the outer electrons in noble gas endohedral atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amusia, M. Ya.; Baltenkov, A. S.; Chernysheva, L. V.

    2008-01-01

    We suggest a prominent modification of the outer shell photoionization cross section in noble gas (NG) endohedral atoms NG-C n under the action of the electron shell of fullerene C n . This shell leads to two important effects: a strong enhancement of the cross section due to fullerene shell polarization under the action of the incoming electromagnetic wave and to prominent oscillation of this cross section due to the reflection of a photoelectron from the NG by the fullerene shell. Both factors lead to powerful maxima in the outer shell ionization cross sections of NG-C n , which we call giant endohedral resonances. The oscillator strength reaches a very large value in the atomic scale, 25. We consider atoms of all noble gases except He. The polarization of the fullerene shell is expressed in terms of the total photoabsorption cross section of the fullerene. The photoelectron reflection is taken into account in the framework of the so-called bubble potential, which is a spherical δ-type potential. It is assumed in the derivations that the NG is centrally located in the fullerene. It is also assumed, in accordance with the existing experimental data, that the fullerene radius R C is much larger than the atomic radius r A and the thickness Δ C of the fullerene shell. As was demonstrated recently, these assumptions allow us to represent the NG-C n photoionization cross section as a product of the NG cross section and two well-defined calculated factors

  19. Positrons in gas filled traps and their transport in molecular gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrovic, Z Lj; Bankovic, A; Marjanovic, S; Suvakov, M; Dujko, S; Malovic, G [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Pregrevica 118, POB 68, Zemun (Serbia); White, R D [ARC Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, James Cook University, Townsville 4810, QLD (Australia); Buckman, S J, E-mail: zoran@ipb.ac.rs [ARC Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, 0200 (Australia)

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we give a review of two recent developments in positron transport, calculation of transport coefficients for a relatively complete set of collision cross sections for water vapour and for application of they Monte Carlo technique to model gas filled subexcitation positron traps such as Penning Malmberg Surko (Surko) trap. Calculated transport coefficients, very much like those for argon and other molecular gases show several new kinetic phenomena. The most important is the negative differential conductivity (NDC) for the bulk drift velocity when the flux drift velocity shows no sign of NDC. These results in water vapour are similar to the results in argon or hydrogen. The same technique that has been used for positron (and previously electron) transport may be applied to model development of particles in a Surko trap. We have provided calculation of the ensemble of positrons in the trap from an initial beam like distribution to the fully thermalised distribution. This model, however, does not include plasma effects (interaction between charged particles) and may be applied for lower positron densities.

  20. Development of indigenous laboratory scale gas atomizer for producing metal powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, K.K.; Qasim, A.M.; Ahmed, P.

    2011-01-01

    Gas atomization is one of the methods for production of clean metal powders at relatively moderate cost. A laboratory scale gas atomizer was designed and fabricated indigenously to produce metal powders with a batch capacity of 500 g of copper (Cu). The design includes several features regarding fabrication and operation to provide optimum conditions for atomization. The inner diameter of atomizing chamber is 440 mm and its height is 1200 mm. The atomizing nozzle is of annular confined convergent type with an angle of 25 degree. Argon gas at desired pressure has been used for atomizing the metals to produce relatively clean powders. A provision has also been made to view the atomization process. The indigenous laboratory scale gas atomizer was used to produce tin (Sn) and copper (Cu) powders with different atomizing gas pressures ranging from 2 to 10 bar. The particle size of different powders produced ranges from 40 to 400 im. (author)

  1. Interfacial-Bonding-Regulated CO Oxidation over Pt Atoms Immobilized on Gas-Exfoliated Hexagonal Boron Nitride

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Xin

    2017-10-12

    We compared the electronic structure and CO oxidation mechanisms over Pt atoms immobilized by both B-vacancies and N-vacancies on gas-exfoliated hexagonal boron nitride. We showed that chemical bonds are formed between the B atoms associated with dangling bonds around the vacancies and Pt atoms. These bonds not only alter the thermodynamics and kinetics for the aggregation and effectively immobilize Pt atoms, but also significantly change the composition and energetic distribution of the electronic states of the composites to circumvent CO poisoning and to favour coadsorption of CO and O2, which further regulates the reactions to proceed through a Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism. The CO oxidation over Pt atoms immobilized at N-vacancies involves formation of an intermediate with –C(O)-O−O- bonded to Pt, the generation of CO2 by peroxo O−O bond scission and the reduction of the remnant oxygen, and the calculated energy barriers are 0.49, 0.23 and 0.18 eV, respectively. Such small energy barriers are comparable to those over Pt atoms trapped at B-vacancies, showing the effectiveness of Pt/hexagonal boron nitride atomic composites as catalysts for CO oxidation. These findings also suggest the feasibility of regulating the reaction pathways over single atom catalysts via interfacial engineering.

  2. X-ray spectroscopy of highly-ionized atoms in an electron beam ion trap (EBIT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marrs, R.E.; Bennett, C.; Chen, M.H.

    1988-01-01

    An Electron Beam Ion Trap at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is being used to produce and trap very-highly-charged-ions (q /le/ 70+) for x-ray spectroscopy measurements. Recent measurements of dielectronic recombination, electron impact excitation and transition energies are presented. 15 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab

  3. An ultracold, optically trapped mixture of 87Rb and metastable 4He atoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flores, A.S.; Mishra, H.P.; Vassen, Wim; Knoop, S.

    2017-01-01

    We report on the realization of an ultracold (<25 μK) mixture of rubidium (87Rb) and metastable triplet helium (4He) in an optical dipole trap. Our scheme involves laser cooling in a dual-species magneto-optical trap, simultaneous MW- and RF-induced forced evaporative cooling in a quadrupole

  4. Small angle elastic scattering of electrons by noble gas atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagenaar, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    In this thesis, measurements are carried out to obtain small angle elastic differential cross sections in order to check the validity of Kramers-Kronig dispersion relations for electrons scattered by noble gas atoms. First, total cross sections are obtained for argon, krypton and xenon. Next, a parallel plate electrostatic energy analyser for the simultaneous measurement of doubly differential cross section for small angle electron scattering is described. Also absolute differential cross sections are reported. Finally the forward dispersion relation for electron-helium collisions is dealt with. (Auth.)

  5. Critical radius and critical number of gas atoms for cavities containing a Van der Waals gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coghlan, W.A.; Mansur, L.K.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of gas on void nucleation and growth is particularly important for structural materials in fusion reactors because of the high production of helium by neutron-induced transmutation reactions. Gas reduces the critical radius for bias driven growth and there is a critical number of gas atoms, n/sub g/*, at which the critical radius is reduced essentially to zero. The significance of this is that the time interval to the accumulation of n/sub g/* gas atoms may determine the time to the onset of bias driven swelling where n/sub g/* is large. In previous papers these critical quantities were given for an ideal gas. Recently, we presented the results for a Van der Waals gas. Here the derivation of these relations is presented and further results of calculations are given. At low temperatures (high pressures) the results depart from those of the ideal gas, with the critical number affected more strongly than the critical radius. Comparisons are made with earlier calculations

  6. First and second sound of a unitary Fermi gas in highly oblate harmonic traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Hui; Dyke, Paul; Vale, Chris J; Liu, Xia-Ji

    2014-01-01

    We theoretically investigate first and second sound modes of a unitary Fermi gas trapped in a highly oblate harmonic trap at finite temperatures. Following the idea by Stringari and co-workers (2010 Phys. Rev. Lett. 105 150402), we argue that these modes can be described by the simplified two-dimensional two-fluid hydrodynamic equations. Two possible schemes—sound wave propagation and breathing mode excitation—are considered. We calculate the sound wave velocities and discretized sound mode frequencies, as a function of temperature. We find that in both schemes, the coupling between first and second sound modes is large enough to induce significant density fluctuations, suggesting that second sound can be directly observed by measuring in situ density profiles. The frequency of the second sound breathing mode is found to be highly sensitive to the superfluid density. (paper)

  7. Sensitive determination of bismuth by flame atomic absorption spectrometry using atom trapping in a slotted quartz tube and revolatilization with organic solvent pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kılınç, Ersin; Bakırdere, Sezgin; Aydın, Fırat; Ataman, O. Yavuz

    2012-01-01

    Sensitivity of flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) for Bi determination was improved by slotted quartz tube (SQT) that was used also for atom trapping (AT). The trapped analyte was released by aspirating a small volume of organic solvent after a reasonable analyte collection time. Sensitivity was improved by 2.9 times by SQT-FAAS and 256 times by SQT-AT-FAAS with respect to FAAS. Optimum trapping period was found to be 6.0 min (36.0 mL of solution). Limit of detection (LOD) for SQT-AT-FAAS was found to be 1.6 ng mL −1 . %RSD was calculated as 4.0% for five replicate measurements of 7.5 ng mL −1 Bi by SQT-AT-FAAS. Accuracy of the method developed was checked by analyzing a standard reference material of simulated fresh water (NIST 1643e) and result found was in good agreement with the certified one. The method can be applied in any laboratory equipped with a flame AA spectrometer. The consumption of time and sample volume is fairly low and application is simple and easy.

  8. Sensitive determination of bismuth by flame atomic absorption spectrometry using atom trapping in a slotted quartz tube and revolatilization with organic solvent pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I l Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I nc, Ersin, E-mail: ekilinc@dicle.edu.tr [Dicle University, Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, Laboratory of Chemical Analysis, TR 21280 Diyarbak Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I r (Turkey); Bak Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I rdere, Sezgin [Y Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I ld Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I z Technical University, Faculty of Education, Department of Science Education, TR 34210 Esenler-Istanbul (Turkey); Ayd Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I n, F Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I rat [Dicle University, Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, Laboratory of Chemical Analysis, TR 21280 Diyarbak Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I r (Turkey); Ataman, O. Yavuz [Middle East Technical University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Chemistry, 06800 Ankara (Turkey)

    2012-07-15

    Sensitivity of flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) for Bi determination was improved by slotted quartz tube (SQT) that was used also for atom trapping (AT). The trapped analyte was released by aspirating a small volume of organic solvent after a reasonable analyte collection time. Sensitivity was improved by 2.9 times by SQT-FAAS and 256 times by SQT-AT-FAAS with respect to FAAS. Optimum trapping period was found to be 6.0 min (36.0 mL of solution). Limit of detection (LOD) for SQT-AT-FAAS was found to be 1.6 ng mL{sup -1}. %RSD was calculated as 4.0% for five replicate measurements of 7.5 ng mL{sup -1} Bi by SQT-AT-FAAS. Accuracy of the method developed was checked by analyzing a standard reference material of simulated fresh water (NIST 1643e) and result found was in good agreement with the certified one. The method can be applied in any laboratory equipped with a flame AA spectrometer. The consumption of time and sample volume is fairly low and application is simple and easy.

  9. Ambient-temperature trap/release of arsenic by dielectric barrier discharge and its application to ultratrace arsenic determination in surface water followed by atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    A novel dielectric barrier discharge reactor (DBDR) was utilized to trap/release arsenic coupled to hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HGAFS). On the DBD principle, the precise and accurate control of trap/release procedures was fulfilled at ambient temperature, and an analytical m...

  10. Coalbed gas desorption in canisters: Consumption of trapped atmospheric oxygen and implications for measured gas quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Hui; Schimmelmann, Arndt; Mastalerz, Maria; Pope, James; Moore, Tim A.

    2010-01-01

    Desorption canisters are routinely employed to quantify coalbed gas contents in coals. If purging with inert gas or water flooding is not used, entrapment of air with ∝ 78.08 vol.% nitrogen (N 2 ) in canisters during the loading of coal results in contamination by air and subsequent overestimates of N 2 in desorbed coalbed gas. Pure coalbed gas does not contain any elemental oxygen (O 2 ), whereas air contamination originally includes ∝ 20.95 vol.% O 2 and has a N 2 /O 2 volume ratio of ∝ 3.73. A correction for atmospheric N 2 is often attempted by quantifying O 2 in headspace gas and then proportionally subtracting atmospheric N 2 . However, this study shows that O 2 is not a conservative proxy for air contamination in desorption canisters. Time-series of gas chromatographic (GC) compositional data from several desorption experiments using high volatile bituminous coals from the Illinois Basin and a New Zealand subbituminous coal document that atmospheric O 2 was rapidly consumed, especially during the first 24 h. After about 2 weeks of desorption, the concentration of O 2 declined to near or below GC detection limits. Irreversible loss of O 2 in desorption canisters is caused by biological, chemical, and physical mechanisms. The use of O 2 as a proxy for air contamination is justified only immediately after loading of desorption canisters, but such rapid measurements preclude meaningful assessment of coalbed gas concentrations. With increasing time and progressive loss of O 2 , the use of O 2 content as a proxy for atmospheric N 2 results in overestimates of N 2 in desorbed coalbed gas. The indicated errors for nitrogen often range in hundreds of %. Such large analytical errors have a profound influence on market choices for CBM gas. An erroneously calculated N 2 content in CBM would not meet specifications for most pipeline-quality gas. (author)

  11. Atomic and molecular physics in the gas phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toburen, L.H.

    1990-09-01

    The spatial and temporal distributions of energy deposition by high-linear-energy-transfer radiation play an important role in the subsequent chemical and biological processes leading to radiation damage. Because the spatial structures of energy deposition events are of the same dimensions as molecular structures in the mammalian cell, direct measurements of energy deposition distributions appropriate to radiation biology are infeasible. This has led to the development of models of energy transport based on a knowledge of atomic and molecular interactions process that enable one to simulate energy transfer on an atomic scale. Such models require a detailed understanding of the interactions of ions and electrons with biologically relevant material. During the past 20 years there has been a great deal of progress in our understanding of these interactions; much of it coming from studies in the gas phase. These studies provide information on the systematics of interaction cross sections leading to a knowledge of the regions of energy deposition where molecular and phase effects are important and that guide developments in appropriate theory. In this report studies of the doubly differential cross sections, crucial to the development of stochastic energy deposition calculations and track structure simulation, will be reviewed. Areas of understanding are discussed and directions for future work addressed. Particular attention is given to experimental and theoretical findings that have changed the traditional view of secondary electron production for charged particle interactions with atomic and molecular targets

  12. Excited Atoms and Molecules in High Pressure Gas Discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuskovic, L.; Popovic, S.

    2003-01-01

    Various types of high-pressure non-thermal discharges are increasingly drawing attention in view of many interesting applications. These, partially ionized media in non-equilibrium state, tend to generate complex effects that are difficult to interpret without a detailed knowledge of elementary processes involved. Electronically excited molecules and atoms may play an important role as intermediate states in a wide range of atomic and molecular processes, many of which are important in high-pressure discharges. They can serve also as reservoirs of energy or as sources of high energy electrons either through the energy pooling or through superelastic collisions. By presenting the analysis of current situation on the processes involving excited atoms and molecules of interest for high-pressure gas discharges, we will attempt to draw attention on the insufficiency of available data. In the same time we will show how to circumvent this situation and still be able to develop accurate models and interpretations of the observed phenomena

  13. Tonks-Girardeau and super-Tonks-Girardeau states of a trapped one-dimensional spinor Bose gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girardeau, M. D.

    2011-01-01

    A harmonically trapped, ultracold, one-dimensional (1D) spin-1 Bose gas with strongly repulsive or attractive 1D even-wave interactions induced by a three-dimensional (3D) Feshbach resonance is studied. The exact ground state, a hybrid of Tonks-Girardeau (TG) and ideal Fermi gases, is constructed in the TG limit of infinite even-wave repulsion by a spinor Fermi-Bose mapping to a spinless ideal Fermi gas. It is then shown that in the limit of infinite even-wave attraction this same state remains an exact many-body eigenstate, now highly excited relative to the collapsed generalized McGuire-cluster ground state, showing that the hybrid TG state is completely stable against collapse to this cluster ground state under a sudden switch from infinite repulsion to infinite attraction. It is shown to be the TG limit of a hybrid super-Tonks-Girardeau (STG) state, which is metastable under a sudden switch from finite but very strong repulsion to finite but very strong attraction. It should be possible to create it experimentally by a sudden switch from strongly repulsive to strongly attractive interaction, as in the recent Innsbruck experiment on a spin-polarized bosonic STG gas. In the case of strong attraction, there should also exist another STG state of much lower energy, consisting of strongly bound dimers, a bosonic analog of a recently predicted STG state which is an ultracold gas of strongly bound bosonic dimers of fermionic atoms, but it is shown that this STG state cannot be created by such a switch from strong repulsion to strong attraction.

  14. Investigation of ultraviolet photolysis vapor generation with in-atomizer trapping graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for the determination of mercury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madden, Jeremy T. [Department of Chemistry, Biochemistry, and Physics, Marist College, 3399 North Road, Poughkeepsie, NY 12601 (United States); Fitzgerald, Neil [Department of Chemistry, Biochemistry, and Physics, Marist College, 3399 North Road, Poughkeepsie, NY 12601 (United States)], E-mail: neil.fitzgerald@marist.edu

    2009-09-15

    Generation of mercury vapor by ultraviolet irradiation of mercury solutions in low molecular weight organic acid solutions prior to measurement by Atomic Absorption Spectrometry is a cheap, simple and green method for determination of trace concentrations of mercury. In this work mercury vapor generated by ultraviolet photolysis was trapped onto a palladium coated graphite furnace significantly improving the detection limit of the method. The system was optimized and a detection limit of 0.12 {mu}g L{sup - 1} (compared to 2.1 {mu}g L{sup - 1} for a previously reported system in the absence of trapping) with a precision of 11% for a 10 {mu}g L{sup - 1} mercury standard (RSD, N = 5)

  15. Laser spectroscopy of the 4s4p(3) P-2-4s3d(1) D-2 transition on magnetically trapped calcium atoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dammalapati, U.; Norris, I.; Burrows, C.; Riis, E.

    2011-01-01

    Laser excitation of the 4s4p(3) P-2-4s3d(1) D-2 transition in atomic calcium has been observed and the wavelength determined to 1530.5298(6) nm. The metastable 4s4p(3) P-2 atoms were magnetically trapped in the quadrupole magnetic field of a magneto-optical trap. This state represents the only

  16. The injection of inert gas ions into solids: their trapping and escape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, G.; Armour, D.G.; Donnelly, S.E.; Ingram, D.C.; Webb, R.P.

    1980-01-01

    Basic information is required to understand fission gas generation and its consequence for swelling and embrittlement in fission reactors, for understanding and controlling first wall problems in fusion reactors and for attempting to design storage for active gas waste. In all of these areas the rare gas atoms are generated with kinetic energy and may thus interact differently, during their slowing down, with the solid than if they had been introduced more gently (e.g. via diffusion) into the solid. An important method of simulating the behaviour of such energetic rare gas atoms in solids is via external irradiation of the solid with rare gas ions of appropriate species and energies and it is the purpose of this review to evaluate studies of this nature. The review is divided into three parts. The first describes experimental techniques, discusses the results of measurements of how ions penetrate into and may be retained in a solid, and outlines theoretical interpretations of the data. The mechanisms of gas atom dissolution and thermal transport in solids are of profound importance and so, in the second part of this review, attention is devoted to how the technique of post-implantation thermal evolution spectrometry can be employed to attempt to understand some of these processes. Particular attention is paid to the difficulties of unique interpretation of evolution spectra. In the final section, consideration will be given to the processes which lead to the inevitable saturation of solids undergoing continued irradiation with rare gas ions and experimental measurements and their probable interpretation will be discussed. Since many materials are of importance in the context of this symposium, reference will be made to as broad a range of studies as possible. (author)

  17. Exact dynamics of a one dimensional Bose gas in a periodic time-dependent harmonic trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scopa, Stefano; Unterberger, Jéremie; Karevski, Dragi

    2018-05-01

    We study the unitary dynamics of a 1D gas of hard-core bosons trapped into a harmonic potential which varies periodically in time with frequency . Such periodic systems can be classified into orbits of different monodromies corresponding to two different physical situations, namely the case in which the bosonic cloud remains stable during the time-evolution and the case where it turns out to be unstable. In the present work we derive in the large particle number limit exact results for the stroboscopic evolution of the energy and particle densities in both physical situations.

  18. Optimisation of the neutron source based on gas dynamic trap for transmutation of radioactive wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anikeev, Andrey V.

    2012-06-01

    The Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics in collaboration with the Russian and foreign organizations develop the project of 14 MeV neutron source, which can be used for fusion material studies and for other application. The projected neutron source of plasma type is based on the plasma Gas Dynamic Trap (GDT), which is a special magnetic mirror system for plasma confinement. Presented work continues the subject of development the GDT-based neutron source (GDT-NS) for hybrid fusion-fission reactors. The paper presents the results of recent numerical optimization of such neutron source for transmutation of the long-lives radioactive wastes in spent nuclear fuel.

  19. Bose-Einstein condensation of a relativistic Bose gas trapped in a general external potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Guozhen; Chen Jincan; Chen Lixuan

    2006-01-01

    Bose-Einstein condensation of an ideal relativistic Bose gas trapped in a generic power-law potential is investigated. The analytical expressions for some important parameters such as the critical temperature, ground-state fraction and heat capacity are derived. The general criteria on the occurrence of Bose-Einstein condensation and the discontinuity of heat capacity at the critical temperature are obtained. The results obtained here present a unified description for the Bose-Einstein condensation of a class of ideal Bose systems so that many important conclusions in the literature are included in this paper

  20. Extraction of ultra-low-energy antiprotons from the PS200 catching trap for atomic physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzscheiter, M.H.

    1996-01-01

    Approximately one million antiprotons have been captured in a large-scale Penning trap at the low energy antiproton ring at CERN. Up to 65% of the captured antiprotons have subsequently been cooled by electron cooling to energies below 1 eV and have been stored up to one hour. This has opened new discussions of the possible use of ultra-low-energy antiprotons for nuclear, atomic, and gravitational physics. For most of these experiments it will be necessary to extract the antiprotons from the trap in the form of either a continuous beam or as a bunched beam, allowing the timing structure to be used for post-acceleration schemes or as a time tag for subsequent measurements. We have designed an extraction scheme to accomplish this and have tested portions of it using a smaller-scale Penning trap loaded with protons. First results in generating a time-correlated beam of particles from a Penning trap are presented. (orig.)

  1. Stability of gas atomized reactive powders through multiple step in-situ passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Iver E.; Steinmetz, Andrew D.; Byrd, David J.

    2017-05-16

    A method for gas atomization of oxygen-reactive reactive metals and alloys wherein the atomized particles are exposed as they solidify and cool in a very short time to multiple gaseous reactive agents for the in-situ formation of a protective reaction film on the atomized particles. The present invention is especially useful for making highly pyrophoric reactive metal or alloy atomized powders, such as atomized magnesium and magnesium alloy powders. The gaseous reactive species (agents) are introduced into the atomization spray chamber at locations downstream of a gas atomizing nozzle as determined by the desired powder or particle temperature for the reactions and the desired thickness of the reaction film.

  2. Atomic physics of highly charged ions in an electron beam ion trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marrs, R.E.

    1990-07-01

    Two electron beam ion traps are in use at LLNL for the purpose of studying the properties of very highly charged ions and their interactions with electrons. This paper reviews the operation of the traps and discusses recent experiments in three areas: precision transition energy measurements in the limit of very high ion charge, dielectronic recombination measurements for the He-like isoelectronic sequence, and measurements of x-ray polarization. 22 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab

  3. Coalbed gas desorption in canisters: Consumption of trapped atmospheric oxygen and implications for measured gas quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Hui; Schimmelmann, Arndt [Indiana University, Dept. of Geological Sciences, Bloomington, IN 47405-1405 (United States); Mastalerz, Maria [Indiana University, Indiana Geological Survey, Bloomington, IN 47405-2208 (United States); Pope, James [CRL Energy Ltd., 123 Blenheim Road, Christchurch (New Zealand); University of Canterbury, Dept. of Geological Sciences, Christchurch (New Zealand); Moore, Tim A. [University of Canterbury, Dept. of Geological Sciences, Christchurch (New Zealand); P.T. Arrow Energy Indonesia, Wisma Anugraha, Jl. Taman Kemang No. 32B, Jakarta Selatan (Indonesia)

    2010-01-07

    Desorption canisters are routinely employed to quantify coalbed gas contents in coals. If purging with inert gas or water flooding is not used, entrapment of air with {proportional_to} 78.08 vol.% nitrogen (N{sub 2}) in canisters during the loading of coal results in contamination by air and subsequent overestimates of N{sub 2} in desorbed coalbed gas. Pure coalbed gas does not contain any elemental oxygen (O{sub 2}), whereas air contamination originally includes {proportional_to} 20.95 vol.% O{sub 2} and has a N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} volume ratio of {proportional_to} 3.73. A correction for atmospheric N{sub 2} is often attempted by quantifying O{sub 2} in headspace gas and then proportionally subtracting atmospheric N{sub 2}. However, this study shows that O{sub 2} is not a conservative proxy for air contamination in desorption canisters. Time-series of gas chromatographic (GC) compositional data from several desorption experiments using high volatile bituminous coals from the Illinois Basin and a New Zealand subbituminous coal document that atmospheric O{sub 2} was rapidly consumed, especially during the first 24 h. After about 2 weeks of desorption, the concentration of O{sub 2} declined to near or below GC detection limits. Irreversible loss of O{sub 2} in desorption canisters is caused by biological, chemical, and physical mechanisms. The use of O{sub 2} as a proxy for air contamination is justified only immediately after loading of desorption canisters, but such rapid measurements preclude meaningful assessment of coalbed gas concentrations. With increasing time and progressive loss of O{sub 2}, the use of O{sub 2} content as a proxy for atmospheric N{sub 2} results in overestimates of N{sub 2} in desorbed coalbed gas. The indicated errors for nitrogen often range in hundreds of %. Such large analytical errors have a profound influence on market choices for CBM gas. An erroneously calculated N{sub 2} content in CBM would not meet specifications for most pipeline

  4. The architecture of neutrophil extracellular traps investigated by atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Ricardo H.; Felix, Stephan B.; Delcea, Mihaela

    2016-07-01

    Neutrophils are immune cells that engage in a suicidal pathway leading to the release of partially decondensed chromatin, or neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). NETs behave as a double edged sword; they can bind to pathogens thereby ensnaring them and limiting their spread during infection; however, they may bind to host circulating materials and trigger thrombotic events, and are associated with autoimmune disorders. Despite the fundamental role of NETs as part of an immune system response, there is currently a very poor understanding of how their nanoscale properties are reflected in their macroscopic impact. In this work, using a combination of fluorescence and atomic force microscopy, we show that NETs appear as a branching filament network that results in a substantially organized porous structure with openings with 0.03 +/- 0.04 μm2 on average and thus in the size range of small pathogens. Topological profiles typically up to 3 +/- 1 nm in height are compatible with a ``beads on a string'' model of nucleosome chromatin. Typical branch lengths of 153 +/- 103 nm appearing as rigid rods and height profiles of naked DNA in NETs of 1.2 +/- 0.5 nm are indicative of extensive DNA supercoiling throughout NETs. The presence of DNA duplexes could also be inferred from force spectroscopy and the occurrence of force plateaus that ranged from ~65 pN to 300 pN. Proteolytic digestion of NETs resulted in widespread disassembly of the network structure and considerable loss of mechanical properties. Our results suggest that the underlying structure of NETs is considerably organized and that part of its protein content plays an important role in maintaining its mesh architecture. We anticipate that NETs may work as microscopic mechanical sieves with elastic properties that stem from their DNA-protein composition, which is able to segregate particles also as a result of their size. Such a behavior may explain their participation in capturing pathogens and their association

  5. Atomic-layer deposited IrO2 nanodots for charge-trap flash-memory devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sangmoo; Cha, Young-Kwan; Seo, Bum-Seok; Park, Sangjin; Park, Ju-Hee; Shin, Sangmin; Seol, Kwang Soo; Park, Jong-Bong; Jung, Young-Soo; Park, Youngsoo; Park, Yoondong; Yoo, In-Kyeong; Choi, Suk-Ho

    2007-01-01

    Charge-trap flash- (CTF) memory structures have been fabricated by employing IrO 2 nanodots (NDs) grown by atomic-layer deposition. A band of isolated IrO 2 NDs of about 3 nm lying almost parallel to Si/SiO 2 interface is confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The memory device with IrO 2 NDs shows much larger capacitance-voltage (C-V) hysteresis and memory window compared with the control sample without IrO 2 NDs. After annealing at 800 deg. C for 20 min, the ND device shows almost no change in the width of C-V hysteresis and the ND distribution. These results indicate that the IrO 2 NDs embedded in SiO 2 can be utilized as thermally stable, discrete charge traps, promising for metal oxide-ND-based CTF memory devices

  6. Aging studies on micro-fabricated alkali buffer-gas cells for miniature atomic clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdullah, S.; Affolderbach, C.; Gruet, F.; Mileti, G.

    2015-01-01

    We report an aging study on micro-fabricated alkali vapor cells using neon as a buffer gas. An experimental atomic clock setup is used to measure the cell's intrinsic frequency, by recording the clock frequency shift at different light intensities and extrapolating to zero intensity. We find a drift of the cell's intrinsic frequency of (−5.2 ± 0.6) × 10 −11 /day and quantify deterministic variations in sources of clock frequency shifts due to the major physical effects to identify the most probable cause of the drift. The measured drift is one order of magnitude stronger than the total frequency variations expected from clock parameter variations and corresponds to a slow reduction of buffer gas pressure inside the cell, which is compatible with the hypothesis of loss of Ne gas from the cell due to its permeation through the cell windows. A negative drift on the intrinsic cell frequency is reproducible for another cell of the same type. Based on the Ne permeation model and the measured cell frequency drift, we determine the permeation constant of Ne through borosilicate glass as (5.7 ± 0.7) × 10 −22 m 2 s −1  Pa −1 at 81 °C. We propose this method based on frequency metrology in an alkali vapor cell atomic clock setup based on coherent population trapping for measuring permeation constants of inert gases

  7. Kinetics of heterogeneous nucleation of gas-atomized Sn-5 mass%Pb droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shu; Wu Ping; Zhou Wei; Ando, Teiichi

    2008-01-01

    A method for predicting the nucleation kinetics of gas-atomized droplets has been developed by combining models predicting the nucleation temperature of cooling droplets with a model simulating the droplet motion and cooling in gas atomization. Application to a Sn-5 mass%Pb alloy has yielded continuous-cooling transformation (CCT) diagrams for the heterogeneous droplet nucleation in helium gas atomization. Both internal nucleation caused by a catalyst present in the melt and surface nucleation caused by oxidation are considered. Droplets atomized at a high atomizing gas velocity get around surface oxidation and nucleate internally at high supercoolings. Low atomization gas velocities promote oxidation-catalyzed nucleation which leads to lower supercoolings. The developed method enables improved screening of atomized powders for critical applications where stringent control of powder microstructure is required

  8. Collision-induced polarizabilities of inert gas atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, K.L.; Madden, P.A.; Buckingham, A.D.

    1978-01-01

    The use of polarizability densities to calculate collision-induced polarizabilities is investigated. One method for computing polarizabilities of inert gas diatoms employs atomic polarizability densities from finite-field Hartree-Fock calculations, together with classical equations for the polarization of dielectrics. It is shown that this model gives inaccurate values for both the local fields and the local response to non-uniform fields. An alternative method incorporating the same physical effects is used to compute the pair polarizabilities to first order in the interatomic interaction. To first order the pair contribution to the trace of the polarizability is negative at short range. The calculated anisotropy does not differ significantly from the DID value, whereas the polarizability density calculation gives a substantial reduction in the anisotropy. (author)

  9. Experimental investigation of the trapping and energy loss mechanisms of intense relativistic electron rings in hydrogen gas and plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.C. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The results of an experimental study on the trapping and energy loss mechanisms of intense, relativistic electron rings confined in Astron-like magnetic field geometries are presented. The work is subdivided into four sections: gas trapping; average ring electron energetics; plasma trapping, and hollow-beam cusp-injection into gas and plasma. The mechanisms by which the injected beam coalesces into a current ring in the existing Cornell RECE-Berta facility are considered. To investigate the nature of ring electron energy loss mechanisms following completion of the trapping process, a diagnostic was developed utilizing multi-foil X-ray absorption spectroscopy to analyze the Bremsstrahlung generated by the electrons as they impinge upon a thin tungsten wire target suspended in the circulating current. Finally, a set of preliminary experimental results is presented in which an annular electron beam was passed through a coaxial, non-adiabatic magnetic cusp located at one end of a magnetic mirror well

  10. Compact field programmable gate array-based pulse-sequencer and radio-frequency generator for experiments with trapped atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruttivarasin, Thaned, E-mail: thaned.pruttivarasin@riken.jp [Quantum Metrology Laboratory, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Katori, Hidetoshi [Quantum Metrology Laboratory, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Innovative Space-Time Project, ERATO, JST, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Department of Applied Physics, Graduate School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    We present a compact field-programmable gate array (FPGA) based pulse sequencer and radio-frequency (RF) generator suitable for experiments with cold trapped ions and atoms. The unit is capable of outputting a pulse sequence with at least 32 transistor-transistor logic (TTL) channels with a timing resolution of 40 ns and contains a built-in 100 MHz frequency counter for counting electrical pulses from a photo-multiplier tube. There are 16 independent direct-digital-synthesizers RF sources with fast (rise-time of ∼60 ns) amplitude switching and sub-mHz frequency tuning from 0 to 800 MHz.

  11. Recent results from the chemistry of recoiling carbon and silicon atoms: The interplay between hot atom chemistry and gas kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaspar, P.P.; Garmestani, K.; Ferrieri, R.A.; Wolf, A.P.

    1990-01-01

    Recent results from the chemistry of recoiling carbon and silicon atoms illustrate the power of an experimental approach to the solution of complex mechanistic problems that combines the study of the reactions of recoiling atoms with conventional gas kinetic techniques. Included will be the reactions of 11 C atoms with anisole, addressing the question whether an aromatic pi-electron system can compete as a reactive site with carbon-hydrogen bonds

  12. Low energy atomic field bremsstrahlung from thin rare gas targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semaan, M.E.

    1982-01-01

    A relative measurement of the doubly-differential cross-section for electron atomic field bremsstrahling, differential in photon energy and angle is reported. Data for (d 2 sigma)/(dk dO/sub k/) have been taken for incident electron energies T ranging from 4 to 10 keV on target atoms of helium, neon, argon, krypton and xenon at a photon emission angle of 90 0 . The X-rays, produced at 90 0 to the intersection of the crossed electron and gas beams, are detected by a Si(Li) detector, having a resolution of about 200 eV at 6 keV and 0.3 mil Be window. The theoretical angular distribution (d 2 sigma)/(dk dO/sub k/) has been deduced from the photon energy spectrum by the use of the shape function S(Z,T,k,T) defined by Tseng and Pratt as S(Z,T,k,T) = [(d 2 sigma)/(dk dO/sub k/)] / [(dsigma)/(dk)]. The values of S used were obtained by an interpolation of the benchmark data provided by Pratt et al. Agreement between our experiment and the theory is measured by how well the theoretical curve fits the data. The agreement appeared to be good

  13. Relevance of sub-surface chip layers for the lifetime of magnetically trapped atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, H. B.; Henkel, C; Haller, E.

    2005-01-01

    on the thickness of that layer, as long as the layers below have a much smaller conductivity; essentially the same magnetic noise would be obtained with a metallic membrane suspended in vacuum. Based on our theory we give general scaling laws of how to reduce the effect of surface magnetic noise on the trapped...... measurements where the center of a side guide trap is laterally shifted with respect to the current carrying wire using additional bias fields. Comparing the experiment to theory, we find a fair agreement and demonstrate that for a chip whose topmost layer is metallic, the magnetic noise depends essentially...

  14. Trapping of negative kaons by metastable states during the atomic cascade in liquid helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, T.; Aoki, M.; Iwasaki, M.; Hayano, R.S.; Ishikawa, T.; Outa, H.; Takada, E.; Tamura, H.; Sakaguchi, A.

    1989-06-01

    We observed two distinct peaks, 205 MeV/cπ - and 235 MeV/cμ - , associated with K π2 - and K μ2 - decays at rest, respectively, from negative kaons stopped in liquid helium. These peaks were found to be delayed with respect to the stopping K - , showing that stopped K - mesons of about 2% fraction are trapped in metastable states with an overall lifetime of about 40 nsec. This observation provides a direct evidence for Condo's trapping hypothesis for the at-rest decay components of K - and π - in liquid helium. (author)

  15. Highly versatile atomic micro traps generated by multifrequency magnetic field modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courteille, Ph W; Deh, B; Fortagh, J; Guenther, A; Kraft, S; Marzok, C; Slama, S; Zimmermann, C

    2006-01-01

    We propose the realization of custom-designed adiabatic potentials for cold atoms based on multimode radio frequency radiation in combination with static inhomogeneous magnetic fields. For example, the use of radio frequency combs gives rise to periodic potentials acting as gratings for cold atoms. In strong magnetic field gradients, the lattice constant can be well below 1 μm. By changing the frequencies of the comb in time the gratings can easily be propagated in space, which may prove useful for Bragg scattering atomic matter waves. Furthermore, almost arbitrarily shaped potentials are possible such as disordered potentials on a scale of several 100 nm or lattices with a spatially varying lattice constant. The potentials can be made state selective and, in the case of atomic mixtures, also species selective. This opens new perspectives for generating tailored quantum systems based on ultracold single atoms or degenerate atomic and molecular quantum gases

  16. Differential saturation study of radial and angular modulation mechanisms of electron spin--lattice relaxation for trapped hydrogen atoms in sulfuric acid glasses. [X radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plonka, A; Kevan, L

    1976-11-01

    A differential ESR saturation study of allowed transitions and forbidden proton spin-flip satellite transitions for trapped hydrogen atoms in sulfuric acid glasses indicates that angular modulation dominates the spin-lattice relaxation mechanisms and suggests that the modulation arises from motion of the H atom.

  17. Investigations of the ground-state hyperfine atomic structure and beta decay measurement prospects of 21Na with improved laser trapping techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowe, Mary A.

    1999-01-01

    This thesis describes an experiment in which a neutral atom laser trap loaded with radioactive 21 Na was improved and then used for measurements. The sodium isotope (half-life=22 sec) is produced on line at the 88in cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The author developed an effective magnesium oxide target system which is crucial to deliver a substantive beam of 21 Na to the experiment. Efficient manipulation of the 21 Na beam with lasers allowed 30,000 atoms to be contained in a magneto-optical trap. Using the cold trapped atoms, the author measured to high precision the hyperfine splitting of the atomic ground state of 21 Na. She measured the 3S 1/2 (F=1,m=0)-3S 1/2 (F=2,m=0) atomic level splitting of 21 Na to be 1,906,471,870±200 Hz. Additionally, she achieved initial detection of beta decay from the trap and evaluated the prospects of precision beta decay correlation studies with trapped atoms

  18. Investigations of the ground-state hyperfine atomic structure and beta decay measurement prospects of 21Na with improved laser trapping techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, Mary Anderson [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-05-01

    This thesis describes an experiment in which a neutral atom laser trap loaded with radioactive 21Na was improved and then used for measurements. The sodium isotope (half-life=22 sec) is produced on line at the 88 in. cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The author developed an effective magnesium oxide target system which is crucial to deliver a substantive beam of 21Na to the experiment. Efficient manipulation of the 21Na beam with lasers allowed 30,000 atoms to be contained in a magneto-optical trap. Using the cold trapped atoms, the author measured to high precision the hyperfine splitting of the atomic ground state of 21Na. She measured the 3S1/2(F=1,m=0)-3S1/2(F=2,m=0) atomic level splitting of 21Na to be 1,906,471,870±200 Hz. Additionally, she achieved initial detection of beta decay from the trap and evaluated the prospects of precision beta decay correlation studies with trapped atoms.

  19. Universal Two-Body Spectra of Ultracold Harmonically Trapped Atoms in Two and Three Dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zinner, Nikolaj Thomas

    2012-01-01

    of the short-range interaction. The results in three dimensions are examplified for narrow s-wave Feshbach resonances and we show how effective range corrections can modify the rearrangement of the level structure. However, this requires extremely narrow resonances or very tight traps that are not currently...

  20. Arsine and selenium hydride trapping in a novel quartz device for atomic-absorption spectrometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kratzer, Jan; Dědina, Jiří

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 388, č. 4 (2007), s. 793-800 ISSN 1618-2642 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400310507 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : HG-AAS * quartz surface * hydride trapping Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.867, year: 2007

  1. Ra+ ion trapping : toward an atomic parity violation measurement and an optical clock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Portela, M. Nunez; Dijck, E. A.; Mohanty, A.; Bekker, H.; van den Berg, Joost E.; Giri, G. S.; Hoekstra, S.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Schlesser, S.; Timmermans, R.G.E.; Versolato, O. O.; Willmann, L.; Wilschut, H. W.; Jungmann, K.

    2014-01-01

    A single Ra+ ion stored in a Paul radio frequency ion trap has excellent potential for a precision measurement of the electroweak mixing angle at low momentum transfer and as the most stable optical clock. The effective transport and cooling of singly charged ions of the isotopes Ra-209 to Ra-214 in

  2. Detection methods for atoms and radicals in the gas phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, W.

    This report lists atoms and free radicals in the gas phase which are of interest for environmental and flame chemistry and have been detected directly. The detection methods which have been used are discussed with respect to their range of application, specificity and sensitivity. In table 1, detection methods for the five atoms of group IV (C, Si, Ge, Sn, Pb) and about 60 radicals containing at least one atom of group IV are summarized (CH, Cd, Cf, CC1, CBr, Cn, Cs, CSe, CH2, CD2, Chf, Cdf, CHC1, CHBr, CF2, CC12, CBr2, CFC1, CFBr, CH3, CD3, CF3, CH2F, CH2C1, CH2Br, CHF2, CHC12, CHBr2, Hco, Fco, CH30, CD30, CH2OH, CH3S, Nco, CH4N, CH302, CF302; C2, C2N, C2H, C20, C2HO, C2H3, C2F3, C2H5, C2HsO, C2H4OH, CH3CO, CD3CO, C2H3O, C2H502, CH3COO2, C2H4N, C2H6N, C3; Si, SiF, SiF2, SiO, SiC, Si2; Ge, GeC, GeO, GeF, GeF2, GeCl2, Sn, SnF, SnO, SnF2, Pb, PbF, PbF2, PbO, PbS). In table 2 detection methods for about 25 other atoms and 60 radicals are listed: (H, D, O, O2, Oh, Od, HO2, DO2, F, Ci, Br, I, Fo, Cio, BrO, Io, FO2, C1O2, Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, N, N3, Nh, Nd, Nf, Nci, NBr, NH2, ND2, Nhd, Nhf, NF2, NC12, N2H3, No, NO2, NO3, Hno, Dno, P, Ph, Pd, Pf, Pci, PH2, PD2, PF2, Po, As, AsO, AsS, Sb, Bi, S, S2, Sh, Sd, Sf, SF2, So, Hso, Dso, Sn, Se, Te, Se2, SeH, SeD, SeF, SeO, SeS, SeN, TeH, TeO, Bh, BH2, Bo, Bn, B02, Cd, Hg, UF5). The tables also cite some recent kinetic applications of the various methods.

  3. Optical analysis of trapped Gas—Gas in Scattering Media Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svanberg, S.

    2010-01-01

    An overview of the new field of Gas in Scattering Media Absorption Spectroscopy (GASMAS) is presented. The technique investigates sharp gas spectral signatures, typically 10000 times sharper than those of the host material, in which the gas is trapped in pores or cavities. The presence of pores causes strong multiple scattering. GASMAS combines narrow-band diode-laser spectroscopy, developed for atmospheric gas monitoring, with diffuse media optical propagation, well-known from biomedical optics. Several applications in materials science, food packaging, pharmaceutics and medicine have been demonstrated. So far molecular oxygen and water vapour have been studied around 760 and 935 nm, respectively. Liquid water, an important constituent in many natural materials, such as tissue, has a low absorption at such wavelengths, and this is also true for haemoglobin, making propagation possible in many natural materials. Polystyrene foam, wood, fruits, food-stuffs, pharmaceutical tablets, and human sinus cavities (frontal, maxillary and mastoideal) have been studied, demonstrating new possibilities for characterization and diagnostics. Transport of gas in porous media (diffusion) can be studied by first subjecting the material to, e.g., pure nitrogen, and then observing the rate at which normal, oxygen-containing air, reinvades the material. The conductance of the passages connecting a sinus with the nasal cavity can be objectively assessed by observing the oxygen gas dynamics when flushing the nose with nitrogen. Drying of materials, when liquid water is replaced by air and water vapour, is another example of dynamic processes which can be studied. The technique has also been extended to remote-sensing applications (LIDAR-GASMAS or Multiple-Scattering LIDAR).

  4. Trapping a single atom with a fraction of a photon using a photonic crystal nanocavity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oosten, D.; Kuipers, L.

    2011-01-01

    We consider the interaction between a single rubidium atom and a photonic crystal nanocavity. Because of the ultrasmall mode volume of the nanocavity, an extremely strong coupling regime can be achieved in which the atom can shift the cavity resonance by many cavity linewidths. We show that this

  5. High-precision measurement of the electron spin g factor of trapped atomic nitrogen in the endohedral fullerene N@C60

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, J. J.; Can, T. V.; Eckardt, M.; Harneit, W.; Griffin, R. G.; Corzilius, B.

    2018-05-01

    The electronic g factor carries highly useful information about the electronic structure of a paramagnetic species, such as spin-orbit coupling and dia- or paramagnetic (de-)shielding due to local fields of surrounding electron pairs. However, in many cases, a near "spin-only" case is observed, in particular for light elements, necessitating accurate and precise measurement of the g factors. Such measurement is typically impeded by a "chicken and egg situation": internal or external reference standards are used for relative comparison of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) Larmor frequencies. However, the g factor of the standard itself usually is subject to a significant uncertainty which directly limits the precision and/or accuracy of the sought after sample g factor. Here, we apply an EPR reference-free approach for determining the g factor of atomic nitrogen trapped within the endohedral fullerene C60:N@C60 in its polycrystalline state by measuring the 1H NMR resonance frequency of dispersing toluene at room temperature. We found a value of g = 2.00204 (4) with a finally reached relative precision of ∼20 ppm. This accurate measurement allows us to directly compare the electronic properties of N@C60 to those found in atomic nitrogen in the gas phase or trapped in other solid matrices at liquid helium temperature. We conclude that spin-orbit coupling in N@C60 at room temperature is very similar in magnitude and of same sign as found in other inert solid matrices and that interactions between the quartet spin system and the C60 molecular orbitals are thus negligible.

  6. Communication: Fourier-transform infrared probing of remarkable quantities of gas trapped in cold homogeneously nucleated nanodroplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uras-Aytemiz, Nevin; Devlin, J. Paul

    2013-07-01

    Studies of catalyzed all-vapor gas-hydrate formation on a sub-second timescale have been extended with a special focus on liquid-droplet compositions at the instant of hydrate crystallization. This focus has been enabled by inclusion of methanol in the all-vapor mixture. This slows droplet to gas-hydrate conversion near 200 K to a time scale suited for standard FTIR sampling. Such droplet data are sought as a guide to ongoing efforts to reduce the amount of guest catalyst required for instant formation of the gas hydrates. For the same reason, all-vapor sampling has also been extended to the generation of long-lived liquid droplets with reduced or no water content. Observations of single-solvent droplets show that surprising quantities of gas molecules are trapped during rapid droplet growth. For example, CO2 is trapped at levels near 50 mol. % in droplets of acetone, tetrahydrofuran, or trimethylene oxide formed under CO2 pressures of several Torr in a cold-chamber at 170 K. Less but significant amounts of gas are trapped at higher temperatures, or in methanol or water-methanol droplets. The droplet metastability appears to commonly lead to formation of bubbles larger than the original nanodroplets. Besides serving as a guide for the all-vapor gas-hydrate studies, the semiquantitative evidence of extensive trapping of gases is expected to have a role in future studies of atmospheric aerosols.

  7. Atomization efficiency and photon yield in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis of single nanoparticles in an optical trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purohit, Pablo; Fortes, Francisco J.; Laserna, J. Javier

    2017-04-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was employed for investigating the influence of particle size on the dissociation efficiency and the absolute production of photons per mass unit of airborne solid graphite spheres under single-particle regime. Particles of average diameter of 400 nm were probed and compared with 2 μm particles. Samples were first catapulted into aerosol form and then secluded in an optical trap set by a 532 nm laser. Trap stability was quantified before subjecting particles to LIBS analysis. Fine alignment of the different lines comprising the optical catapulting-optical trapping-laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy instrument and tuning of excitation parameters conditioning the LIBS signal such as fluence and acquisition delay are described in detail with the ultimate goal of acquiring clear spectroscopic data on masses as low as 75 fg. The atomization efficiency and the photon yield increase as the particle size becomes smaller. Time-resolved plasma imaging studies were conducted to elucidate the mechanisms leading to particle disintegration and excitation.

  8. Trapped antihydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, E., E-mail: eoin.butler@cern.ch [CERN, Physics Department (Switzerland); Andresen, G. B. [Aarhus University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Denmark); Ashkezari, M. D. [Simon Fraser University, Department of Physics (Canada); Baquero-Ruiz, M. [University of California, Department of Physics (United States); Bertsche, W. [Swansea University, Department of Physics (United Kingdom); Bowe, P. D. [Aarhus University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Denmark); Cesar, C. L. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Fisica (Brazil); Chapman, S. [University of California, Department of Physics (United States); Charlton, M.; Deller, A.; Eriksson, S. [Swansea University, Department of Physics (United Kingdom); Fajans, J. [University of California, Department of Physics (United States); Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M. C. [University of Calgary, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Gill, D. R. [TRIUMF (Canada); Gutierrez, A. [University of British Columbia, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Hangst, J. S. [Aarhus University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Denmark); Hardy, W. N. [University of British Columbia, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Hayden, M. E. [Simon Fraser University, Department of Physics (Canada); Humphries, A. J. [Swansea University, Department of Physics (United Kingdom); Collaboration: ALPHA Collaboration; and others

    2012-12-15

    Precision spectroscopic comparison of hydrogen and antihydrogen holds the promise of a sensitive test of the Charge-Parity-Time theorem and matter-antimatter equivalence. The clearest path towards realising this goal is to hold a sample of antihydrogen in an atomic trap for interrogation by electromagnetic radiation. Achieving this poses a huge experimental challenge, as state-of-the-art magnetic-minimum atom traps have well depths of only {approx}1 T ({approx}0.5 K for ground state antihydrogen atoms). The atoms annihilate on contact with matter and must be 'born' inside the magnetic trap with low kinetic energies. At the ALPHA experiment, antihydrogen atoms are produced from antiprotons and positrons stored in the form of non-neutral plasmas, where the typical electrostatic potential energy per particle is on the order of electronvolts, more than 10{sup 4} times the maximum trappable kinetic energy. In November 2010, ALPHA published the observation of 38 antiproton annihilations due to antihydrogen atoms that had been trapped for at least 172 ms and then released-the first instance of a purely antimatter atomic system confined for any length of time (Andresen et al., Nature 468:673, 2010). We present a description of the main components of the ALPHA traps and detectors that were key to realising this result. We discuss how the antihydrogen atoms were identified and how they were discriminated from the background processes. Since the results published in Andresen et al. (Nature 468:673, 2010), refinements in the antihydrogen production technique have allowed many more antihydrogen atoms to be trapped, and held for much longer times. We have identified antihydrogen atoms that have been trapped for at least 1,000 s in the apparatus (Andresen et al., Nature Physics 7:558, 2011). This is more than sufficient time to interrogate the atoms spectroscopically, as well as to ensure that they have relaxed to their ground state.

  9. Transporting, splitting and merging of atomic ensembles in a chip trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hommelhoff, P; Haensel, W; Steinmetz, T; Haensch, T W; Reichel, J

    2005-01-01

    We present a toolbox for cold atom manipulation with time-dependent magnetic fields generated by an atom chip. Wire layouts, detailed experimental procedures and results are presented for the following experiments: use of a magnetic conveyor belt for positioning of cold atoms and Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) with a potential resolution of 2 nm; splitting of thermal clouds and BECs in adjustable magnetic double-well potentials; and controlled splitting of a cold reservoir. The devices that enable these manipulations can be combined with each other. We demonstrate this by combining reservoir splitter and conveyor belt to obtain a cold atom dispenser. We discuss the importance of these devices for quantum information processing, atom interferometry and Josephson junction physics on the chip. For all devices, absorption-image video sequences are provided to demonstrate their time-dependent behaviour

  10. Visualization of Atomization Gas Flow and Melt Break-up Effects in Response to Nozzle Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Iver; Rieken, Joel; Meyer, John; Byrd, David; Heidloff, Andy

    2011-04-01

    Both powder particle size control and efficient use of gas flow energy are highly prized goals for gas atomization of metal and alloy powder to minimize off-size powder inventory (or 'reverb') and excessive gas consumption. Recent progress in the design of close-coupled gas atomization nozzles and the water model simulation of melt feed tubes were coupled with previous results from several types of gas flow characterization methods, e.g., aspiration measurements and gas flow visualization, to make progress toward these goals. Size distribution analysis and high speed video recordings of gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS) experiments on special ferritic stainless steel alloy powders with an Ar+O{sub 2} gas mixture were performed to investigate the operating mechanisms and possible advantages of several melt flow tube modifications with one specific gas atomization nozzle. In this study, close-coupled gas atomization under closed wake gas flow conditions was demonstrated to produce large yields of ultrafine (dia.<20 {mu}m) powders (up to 32%) with moderate standard deviations (1.62 to 1.99). The increased yield of fine powders is consistent with the dual atomization mechanisms of closed wake gas flow patterns in the near-field of the melt orifice. Enhanced size control by stabilized pre-filming of the melt with a slotted trumpet bell pour tube was not clearly demonstrated in the current experiments, perhaps confounded by the influence of the melt oxidation reaction that occurred simultaneously with the atomization process. For this GARS variation of close-coupled gas atomization, it may be best to utilize the straight cylindrical pour tube and closed wake operation of an atomization nozzle with higher gas mass flow to promote the maximum yields of ultrafine powders that are preferred for the oxide dispersion strengthened alloys made from these powders.

  11. Long-range interactions of excited He atoms with ground-state noble-gas atoms

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, J.-Y.

    2013-10-09

    The dispersion coefficients C6, C8, and C10 for long-range interactions of He(n1,3S) and He(n1,3P), 2≤n≤10, with the ground-state noble-gas atoms Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe are calculated by summing over the reduced matrix elements of multipole transition operators. The large-n expansions for the sums over the He oscillator strength divided by the corresponding transition energy are presented for these series. Using the expansions, the C6 coefficients for the systems involving He(131,3S) and He(131,3P) are calculated and found to be in good agreement with directly calculated values.

  12. Atomic parity violation in heavy alkalis: detection by stimulated emission for cesium and traps for cold francium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanguinetti, St

    2004-07-01

    The present work deals with the recent advances of atomic spectroscopy experiments on cesium and francium, which aim at precise parity violation (PV) measurements in these atoms. Within the framework of a 'double-badged thesis', the candidate devoted himself on the one hand to the preliminary PV measurement (8% accuracy) of the present Cs experiment at the Kastler-Brossel laboratory in Paris and on the other hand to the preparation of a Fr radioactive atomic sample (production and trapping) at the LNL (INFN) in Italy. The two experiments are at very different stages. The measurements reported for cesium were actually made possible thanks to the work initiated in 1991, for the PV detection by stimulated emission. The Italian experiment is instead in a beginning stage: in order to probe the properties of francium, which is unstable, a number of atoms large enough has to be first produced and collected. The PV schemes which proved to be well suited for cesium are a solid starting point for the case of francium. (author)

  13. [Measurement of atomic number of alkali vapor and pressure of buffer gas based on atomic absorption].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hui-jie; Quan, Wei; Liu, Xiang; Chen, Yao; Lu, Ji-xi

    2015-02-01

    High sensitivitymagnetic measurementscanbe achieved by utilizing atomic spinmanipulation in the spin-exchange-relaxation-free (SERF) regime, which uses an alkali cell as a sensing element. The atomic number density of the alkali vapor and the pressure of the buffer gasare among the most important parameters of the cell andrequire accurate measurement. A method has been proposed and developedto measure the atomic number density and the pressure based on absorption spectroscopy, by sweeping the absorption line and fittingthe experiment data with a Lorentzian profile to obtainboth parameters. Due to Doppler broadening and pressure broadening, which is mainly dominated by the temperature of the cell and the pressure of buffer gas respectively, this work demonstrates a simulation of the errorbetween the peaks of the Lorentzian profile and the Voigt profile caused by bothfactors. The results indicates that the Doppler broadening contribution is insignificant with an error less than 0.015% at 313-513 K for a 4He density of 2 amg, and an error of 0.1% in the presence of 0.6-5 amg at 393 K. We conclude that the Doppler broadening could be ignored under above conditions, and that the Lorentzianprofile is suitably applied to fit the absorption spectrumobtainingboth parameters simultaneously. In addition we discuss the resolution and the instability due to thelight source, wavelength and the temperature of the cell. We find that the cell temperature, whose uncertainty is two orders of magnitude larger than the instability of the light source and the wavelength, is one of the main factors which contributes to the error.

  14. em>d-wave superfluid with gapless edges in a cold-atom trap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anne-Louise Gadsbølle; Francis Song, H.; Le Hur, Karyn

    2012-01-01

    and competing phases. In particular, at low temperatures, this allows the realization of a d-wave superfluid region surrounded by purely (gapless) normal edges. Solving the Bogoliubov–de Gennes equations and comparing them with the local density approximation, we show that the proximity to the Mott insulator...... is revealed by a downturn of the Fermi liquid order parameter at the center of the trap where the d-wave gap has a maximum. The density profile evolves linearly with distance....

  15. Pulmonary hyperinflation due to gas trapping and pulmonary artery size: The MESA COPD Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hooman D Poor

    Full Text Available Pulmonary hypertension is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Since pulmonary artery (PA size increases in pulmonary hypertension, we measured PA cross-sectional area using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI to test the hypothesis that pulmonary hyperinflation due to gas trapping is associated with PA cross-sectional area in COPD.The MESA COPD Study recruited participants with COPD and controls from two population-based cohort studies ages 50-79 years with 10 or more pack-years and free of clinical cardiovascular disease. Body plethysmography was performed according to standard criteria. Cardiac MRI was performed at functional residual capacity to measure the cross-sectional area of the main PA. Percent emphysema was defined as the percentage of lung voxels less than -950 Hounsfield units as assessed via x-ray computed tomography. Analyses were adjusted for age, gender, height, weight, race-ethnicity, the forced expiratory volume in one second, smoking status, pack-years, lung function, oxygen saturation, blood pressure, left ventricular ejection fraction and percent emphysema.Among 106 participants, mean residual volume was 1.98±0.71 L and the mean PA cross-sectional area was 7.23±1.72 cm2. A one standard deviation increase in residual volume was independently associated with an increase in main PA cross-sectional area of 0.55 cm2 (95% CI 0.18 to 0.92; p = 0.003. In contrast, there was no evidence for an association with percent emphysema or total lung capacity.Increased residual volume was associated with a larger PA in COPD, suggesting that gas trapping may contribute to pulmonary hypertension in COPD.

  16. Planet traps and first planets: The critical metallicity for gas giant formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Hirashita, Hiroyuki, E-mail: yasu@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw, E-mail: hirashita@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica (ASIAA), P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2014-06-10

    The ubiquity of planets poses an interesting question: when are first planets formed in galaxies? We investigate this by adopting a theoretical model where planet traps are combined with the standard core accretion scenario in which the efficiency of forming planetary cores directly relates to the metallicity ([Fe/H]) in disks. Three characteristic exoplanetary populations are examined: hot Jupiters, exo-Jupiters around 1 AU, and low-mass planets in tight orbits, such as super-Earths. We statistically compute planet formation frequencies (PFFs), as well as the orbital radius (〈R{sub rapid}〉) within which gas accretion becomes efficient enough to form Jovian planets, as a function of metallicity (–2 ≤ [Fe/H] ≤–0.6). We show that the total PFFs for these three populations increase steadily with metallicity. This is the direct outcome of the core accretion picture. For the metallicity range considered here, the population of low-mass planets dominates Jovian planets. The Jovian planets contribute to the PFFs above [Fe/H] ≅ –1. We find that the hot Jupiters form more efficiently than the exo-Jupiters at [Fe/H] ≲ –0.7. This arises from the slower growth of planetary cores and their more efficient radial inward transport by the host traps in lower metallicity disks. We show that the critical metallicity for forming Jovian planets is [Fe/H] ≅ –1.2 by comparing 〈R{sub rapid}〉 of hot Jupiters and low-mass planets. The comparison intrinsically links to the different gas accretion efficiency between these two types of planets. Therefore, this study implies that important physical processes in planet formation may be tested by exoplanet observations around metal-poor stars.

  17. Planet traps and first planets: The critical metallicity for gas giant formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Hirashita, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquity of planets poses an interesting question: when are first planets formed in galaxies? We investigate this by adopting a theoretical model where planet traps are combined with the standard core accretion scenario in which the efficiency of forming planetary cores directly relates to the metallicity ([Fe/H]) in disks. Three characteristic exoplanetary populations are examined: hot Jupiters, exo-Jupiters around 1 AU, and low-mass planets in tight orbits, such as super-Earths. We statistically compute planet formation frequencies (PFFs), as well as the orbital radius (〈R rapid 〉) within which gas accretion becomes efficient enough to form Jovian planets, as a function of metallicity (–2 ≤ [Fe/H] ≤–0.6). We show that the total PFFs for these three populations increase steadily with metallicity. This is the direct outcome of the core accretion picture. For the metallicity range considered here, the population of low-mass planets dominates Jovian planets. The Jovian planets contribute to the PFFs above [Fe/H] ≅ –1. We find that the hot Jupiters form more efficiently than the exo-Jupiters at [Fe/H] ≲ –0.7. This arises from the slower growth of planetary cores and their more efficient radial inward transport by the host traps in lower metallicity disks. We show that the critical metallicity for forming Jovian planets is [Fe/H] ≅ –1.2 by comparing 〈R rapid 〉 of hot Jupiters and low-mass planets. The comparison intrinsically links to the different gas accretion efficiency between these two types of planets. Therefore, this study implies that important physical processes in planet formation may be tested by exoplanet observations around metal-poor stars.

  18. Critical temperature of Bose-Einstein condensation in trapped atomic Bose-Fermi mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albus, A P [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Potsdam, D-14469 Potsdam (Germany); Giorgini, S [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Trento, and Istituto Nazionale per la Fisica della Materia, I-38050 Povo (Italy); Illuminati, F [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Salerno, and Istituto Nazionale per la Fisica della Materia, I-84081 Baronissi (Italy); Viverit, L [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Trento, and Istituto Nazionale per la Fisica della Materia, I-38050 Povo (Italy)

    2002-12-14

    We calculate the shift in the critical temperature of Bose-Einstein condensation for a dilute Bose-Fermi mixture confined by a harmonic potential, to lowest order in both the Bose-Bose and Bose-Fermi coupling constants. The relative importance of the effect on the critical temperature of the boson-boson and boson-fermion interactions is investigated as a function of the parameters of the mixture. The possible relevance of the shift of the transition temperature in current experiments on trapped Bose-Fermi mixtures is discussed. (letter to the editor)

  19. Critical temperature of Bose-Einstein condensation in trapped atomic Bose-Fermi mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albus, A P; Giorgini, S; Illuminati, F; Viverit, L

    2002-01-01

    We calculate the shift in the critical temperature of Bose-Einstein condensation for a dilute Bose-Fermi mixture confined by a harmonic potential, to lowest order in both the Bose-Bose and Bose-Fermi coupling constants. The relative importance of the effect on the critical temperature of the boson-boson and boson-fermion interactions is investigated as a function of the parameters of the mixture. The possible relevance of the shift of the transition temperature in current experiments on trapped Bose-Fermi mixtures is discussed. (letter to the editor)

  20. Born-Oppenheimer description of two atoms in a combined oscillator and lattice trap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ole Søe; Mølmer, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the quantum states of two identical bosons in a combined harmonic oscillator and periodic lattice trap in one spatial dimension. In the case of tight-binding and only nearest-neighbor tunneling, the equations of motion are conveniently represented in the momentum representation. We sho...... that in the case of strong attraction between the particles, the different time scales of relative and center-of-mass motions validate a separation of the problem similar to the Born-Oppenheimer approximation applied in the description of electronic and nuclear motions in molecules....

  1. Coherent Population Trapping Resonances in Cs Atomic Vapor Layers of Micrometric Thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Krasteva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on a novel behavior of the electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA resonance observed on the D2 line of Cs for atoms confined in cells with micrometric thickness. With the enhancement of light intensity, the EIA resonance amplitude suffers from fast reduction, and even at very low intensity (W < 1 mW/cm2, resonance sign reversal takes place and electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT resonance is observed. Similar EIA resonance transformation to EIT one is not observed in conventional cm-size cells. A theoretical model is proposed to analyze the physical processes behind the EIA resonance sign reversal with light intensity. The model involves elastic interactions between Cs atoms as well as elastic interaction of atom micrometric-cell windows, both resulting in depolarization of excited state which can lead to the new observations. The effect of excited state depolarization is confirmed also by the fluorescence (absorption spectra measurement in micrometric cells with different thicknesses.

  2. Buffer gas cooling of ions stored in an R.F. trap: Computed properties of the ionic cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alili, A.; Andre, J.; Vedel, F.

    1988-01-01

    The spatial and energetic properties of an ion cloud confined in an RF quadrupole trap, together with the lifetimes of the confined ions, have been computed by statistical methods and recently by a simulation method. The influences of different parameters such as ion mass, buffer gas mass, working point in the stability diagram, 'weak' space-charge and shape of the velocity distribution of the cooling buffer gas have been investigated and are described. (orig.)

  3. Ab initio theory of noble gas atoms in bcc transition metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chao; Zhang, Yongfeng; Gao, Yipeng; Gan, Jian

    2018-06-18

    Systematic ab initio calculations based on density functional theory have been performed to gain fundamental understanding of the interactions between noble gas atoms (He, Ne, Ar and Kr) and bcc transition metals in groups 5B (V, Nb and Ta), 6B (Cr, Mo and W) and 8B (Fe). Our charge density analysis indicates that the strong polarization of nearest-neighbor metal atoms by noble gas interstitials is the electronic origin of their high formation energies. Such polarization becomes more significant with an increasing gas atom size and interstitial charge density in the host bcc metal, which explains the similar trend followed by the unrelaxed formation energies of noble gas interstitials. Upon allowing for local relaxation, nearby metal atoms move farther away from gas interstitials in order to decrease polarization, albeit at the expense of increasing the elastic strain energy. Such atomic relaxation is found to play an important role in governing both the energetics and site preference of noble gas atoms in bcc metals. Our most notable finding is that the fully relaxed formation energies of noble gas interstitials are strongly correlated with the elastic shear modulus of the bcc metal, and the physical origin of this unexpected correlation has been elucidated by our theoretical analysis based on the effective-medium theory. The kinetic behavior of noble gas atoms and their interaction with pre-existing vacancies in bcc transition metals have also been discussed in this work.

  4. A purge-and-trap capillary column gas chromatographic method for the measurement of halocarbons in water and air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Happell, J.D.; Wallace, D.W.R.; Wills, K.D.; Wilke, R.J.; Neill, C.C.

    1996-06-01

    This report describes an automated, accurate, precise and sensitive capillary column purge- and -trap method capable of quantifying CFC-12, CFC-11, CFC-113, CH{sub 3}CCL{sub 3}, and CCL{sub 4} during a single chromatographic analysis in either water or gas phase samples.

  5. Maximally entangled mixed states of two atoms trapped inside an optical cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shangbin; Xu Jingbo

    2009-01-01

    In some off-resonant cases, the reduced density matrix of two atoms symmetrically coupled with an optical cavity can very approximately approach maximally entangled mixed states or maximal Bell violation mixed states in their evolution. The influence of a phase decoherence on the generation of a maximally entangled mixed state is also discussed

  6. Speciation of methylmercury and ethylmercury by gas chromatography cold vapor atomic fluresence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boggess, A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-09-28

    Existing models and simulants of tank disposition media at SRS have presumed the presence of high concentrations of inorganic mercury. However, recent quarterly tank analyses show that mercury is present as organomercurial species at concentrations that may present challenges to remediation and disposition and may exceed the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). To-date, methylmercury analysis for Savannah River Remediation (SRR) has been performed off-site by Eurofins Scientific (Lancaster, PA). A series of optimization and validation experiments has been performed at SRNL, which has resulted in the development of on-site organomercury speciation capabilities using purge and trap gas chromatography coupled with thermal desorption cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectroscopy (P&T GC/CVAFS). Speciation has been achieved for methylmercury, with a method reporting limit (MRL) values of 1.42 pg for methylmercury. Results obtained by SRNL from the analysis of past quarterly samples from tanks 21, 40, and 50 have demonstrated statistically indistinguishable concentration values compared with the concentration data obtained from Eurofins, while the data from SRNL has demonstrated significantly improved precision and processing time.

  7. Gas atomized precursor alloy powder for oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieken, Joel [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2011-12-13

    Gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS) was employed as a simplified method for producing precursor powders for oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic stainless steels (e.g., Fe-Cr-Y-(Ti,Hf)-O), departing from the conventional mechanical alloying (MA) process. During GARS processing a reactive atomization gas (i.e., Ar-O2) was used to oxidize the powder surfaces during primary break-up and rapid solidification of the molten alloy. This resulted in envelopment of the powders by an ultra-thin (t < 150 nm) metastable Cr-enriched oxide layer that was used as a vehicle for solid-state transport of O into the consolidated microstructure. In an attempt to better understand the kinetics of this GARS reaction, theoretical cooling curves for the atomized droplets were calculated and used to establish an oxidation model for this process. Subsequent elevated temperature heat treatments, which were derived from Rhines pack measurements using an internal oxidation model, were used to promote thermodynamically driven O exchange reactions between trapped films of the initial Cr-enriched surface oxide and internal Y-enriched intermetallic precipitates. This novel microstructural evolution process resulted in the successful formation of nano-metric Y-enriched dispersoids, as confirmed using high energy X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), equivalent to conventional ODS alloys from MA powders. The thermal stability of these Y-enriched dispersoids was evaluated using high temperature (1200°C) annealing treatments ranging from 2.5 to 1,000 hrs of exposure. In a further departure from current ODS practice, replacing Ti with additions of Hf appeared to improve the Y-enriched dispersoid thermal stability by means of crystal structure modification. Additionally, the spatial distribution of the dispersoids was found to depend strongly on the original rapidly solidified microstructure. To exploit this, ODS microstructures were engineered from

  8. Interface charge trapping induced flatband voltage shift during plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition in through silicon via

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yunlong; Suhard, Samuel; Van Huylenbroeck, Stefaan; Meersschaut, Johan; Van Besien, Els; Stucchi, Michele; Croes, Kristof; Beyer, Gerald; Beyne, Eric

    2017-12-01

    A Through Silicon Via (TSV) is a key component for 3D integrated circuit stacking technology, and the diameter of a TSV keeps scaling down to reduce the footprint in silicon. The TSV aspect ratio, defined as the TSV depth/diameter, tends to increase consequently. Starting from the aspect ratio of 10, to improve the TSV sidewall coverage and reduce the process thermal budget, the TSV dielectric liner deposition process has evolved from sub-atmospheric chemical vapour deposition to plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD). However, with this change, a strong negative shift in the flatband voltage is observed in the capacitance-voltage characteristic of the vertical metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) parasitic capacitor formed between the TSV copper metal and the p-Si substrate. And, no shift is present in planar MOS capacitors manufactured with the same PE-ALD oxide. By comparing the integration process of these two MOS capacitor structures, and by using Elastic Recoil Detection to study the elemental composition of our films, it is found that the origin of the negative flatband voltage shift is the positive charge trapping at the Si/SiO2 interface, due to the positive PE-ALD reactants confined to the narrow cavity of high aspect ratio TSVs. This interface charge trapping effect can be effectively mitigated by high temperature annealing. However, this is limited in the real process due to the high thermal budget. Further investigation on liner oxide process optimization is needed.

  9. Atomic iodine production in a gas flow by decomposing methyl iodide in a dc glow discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikheyev, P A; Shepelenko, A A; Voronov, A I; Kupryaev, Nikolai V

    2002-01-01

    The production of atomic iodine for an oxygen - iodine laser is studied by decomposing methyl iodide in a dc glow discharge in a vortex gas flow. The concentration of iodine atoms in discharge products was measured from the atomic iodine absorption of the radiation of a single-frequency tunable diode laser at a wavelength of 1.315 μm. Atomic iodine concentrations sufficient for the operation of an oxygen - iodine laser were obtained. The concentration of atomic iodine amounted to 3.6 x 10 15 cm -3 for a pressure of the carrying argon gas of 15 Torr. The discharge stabilisation by a vortex gas flow allowed the glow discharge to be sustained in a strongly electronegative halogen-containing gas mixture for pressures up to 20 Torr. (active media)

  10. Multiply-ionized atoms isolated at low energy in a unitary Penning trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Joseph N.; Hoogerheide, Shannon Fogwell; Guise, Nicholas D.; Brewer, Samuel M.

    2015-01-01

    Ions extracted from the EBIT at NIST are slowed and captured in a Penning trap that is made very compact (< 150 cm 3 ) by a unitary architecture [1]. Measurements after 1 ms of ion storage indicate that the isolated ions are distributed with 5.5(5) eV of energy spread, which is roughly 2 orders of magnitude lower than expected in the ion source, without implementing any active cooling [2]. Some experiments are discussed. One goal is to produce one-electron ions in high angular momentum states for studying optical transitions between Rydberg states that could potentially enable new tests of quantum electrodynamics (QED) and determinations of fundamental constants [3

  11. Microstructural and magnetic behavior of nanostructured soft alloys prepared by mechanical grinding and gas atomization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marin, P.; Lopez, M.; Garcia-Escorial, A.; Lieblich, M.

    2007-01-01

    Nanocrystalline powder of Fe-Si-B-Cu-Nb has been obtained by means of mechanical milling of the corresponding nanocrystalline ribbons. Gas atomization technique has been used to minimize the magnetic hardening due to stress effects observed in ball-milled samples. Fe-Si-B-Cu-Nb and Fe-Si nanocrystalline samples have been prepared by gas atomization. The aim of our work is to analyse the particle size dependence of coercivity in this nanostructured alloys and to show the analogies and differences between ball-milled and gas atomized samples

  12. Electrochemical generation of mercury cold vapor and its in-situ trapping in gold-covered graphite tube atomizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerveny, Vaclav; Rychlovsky, Petr; Netolicka, Jarmila; Sima, Jan

    2007-01-01

    The combination of more efficient flow-through electrochemical mercury cold vapor generation with its in-situ trapping in a graphite tube atomizer is described. This coupled technique has been optimized to attain the maximum sensitivity for Hg determination and to minimize the limits of detection and determination. A laboratory constructed thin-layer flow-through cell with a platinum cathode served as the cold vapor generator. Various cathode arrangements with different active surface areas were tested. Automated sampling equipment for the graphite atomizer with an untreated fused silica capillary was used for the introduction of the mercury vapor. The inner surface of the graphite tube was covered with a gold foil placed against the sampling hole. The results attained for the electrochemical mercury cold vapor generation (an absolute limit of detection of 80 pg; peak absorbance, 3σ criterion) were compared with the traditional vapor generation using NaBH 4 as the reducing agent (an absolute limit of detection of 124 pg; peak absorbance, 3σ criterion). The repeatability at the 5 ng ml -1 level was better than 4.1% (RSD) for electrochemical mercury vapor generation and better than 5.6% for the chemical cold vapor generation. The proposed method was applied to the determination the of Hg contents in a certified reference material and in spiked river water samples

  13. Light absorption during alkali atom-noble gas atom interactions at thermal energies: a quantum dynamics treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Alexander B; Reyes, Andrés; Micha, David A

    2006-10-21

    The absorption of light during atomic collisions is treated by coupling electronic excitations, treated quantum mechanically, to the motion of the nuclei described within a short de Broglie wavelength approximation, using a density matrix approach. The time-dependent electric dipole of the system provides the intensity of light absorption in a treatment valid for transient phenomena, and the Fourier transform of time-dependent intensities gives absorption spectra that are very sensitive to details of the interaction potentials of excited diatomic states. We consider several sets of atomic expansion functions and atomic pseudopotentials, and introduce new parametrizations to provide light absorption spectra in good agreement with experimentally measured and ab initio calculated spectra. To this end, we describe the electronic excitation of the valence electron of excited alkali atoms in collisions with noble gas atoms with a procedure that combines l-dependent atomic pseudopotentials, including two- and three-body polarization terms, and a treatment of the dynamics based on the eikonal approximation of atomic motions and time-dependent molecular orbitals. We present results for the collision induced absorption spectra in the Li-He system at 720 K, which display both atomic and molecular transition intensities.

  14. Pairing-gap, pseudogap, and no-gap phases in the radio-frequency spectra of a trapped unitary 6Li gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pieri, P.; Perali, A.; Strinati, G. C.; Riedl, S.; Altmeyer, A.; Grimm, R.; Wright, M. J.; Kohstall, C.; Sanchez Guajardo, E. R.; Hecker Denschlag, J.

    2011-01-01

    Radio frequency spectra of a trapped unitary 6 Li gas are reported and analyzed in terms of a theoretical approach that includes both final-state and trap effects. The different strength of the final-state interaction across the trap is crucial for evidencing two main peaks associated with two distinct phases residing in different trap regions. These are the pairing-gap and pseudo-gap phases below the critical temperature T c , which evolve into the pseudo-gap and no-gap phases above T c . In this way, a long standing puzzle about the interpretation of rf spectra for 6 Li in a trap is solved.

  15. [Determination of 21 fragrance allergens in toys by gas chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Qing; Zang, Qing; Bai, Hua; Li, Haiyu; Kang, Suyuan; Wang, Chao

    2012-05-01

    A method of gas chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry (GC-IT-MS) was developed for the determination of 21 fragrance allergens in sticker toys, plush toys and plastic toys. The experimental conditions, such as sample pretreatment conditions, and the analytical conditions of GC-IT-MS, were optimized. The sticker toy samples and plush toy samples were extracted with acetone by ultrasonic wave, and the extracts were separated on an Agilent HP-1 MS column (50 m x 0.2 mm x 0.5 microm), then determined by IT-MS and quantified by external standard method. The plastic toy samples were extracted by the dissolution-precipitation approach, cleaned up with an Envi-carb solid phase extraction column and concentrated by rotary evaporation and nitrogen blowing, then determined by GC-IT-MS and quantified by external standard method. The calibration curves showed good linearity in the range of 0.002-50 mg/L with the correlation coefficients greater than 0.996 8. The limits of quantification (LOQ, S/N > 10) were 0.02-40 mg/kg. The average recoveries of the target compounds spiked in the sample at three concentration levels were in the range of 82.2%-110.8% with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 0.6%-10.5%. These results show that this method is accurate and sensitive for the qualitative and quantitative determination of the 21 fragrance allergens in the 3 types of toys.

  16. Energy distributions of an ion in a radio-frequency trap immersed in a buffer gas under the influence of additional external forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, I.; Willitsch, S.

    2018-04-01

    An ion held in a radio-frequency trap interacting with a uniform buffer gas of neutral atoms develops a steady-state energy distribution characterized by a power-law tail at high energies instead of the exponential decay characteristic of thermal equilibrium. We have previously shown that the Tsallis statistics frequently used as an empirical model for this distribution is a good approximation when the ion is heated due to a combination of micromotion interruption and exchange of kinetic energy with the buffer gas [Rouse and Willitsch, Phys. Rev. Lett. 118, 143401 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.118.143401]. Here, we extend our treatment to include the heating due to additional motion of the ion caused by external forces, including the "excess micromotion" induced by uniform electric fields and rf phase offsets. We show that this also leads to a Tsallis distribution with a potentially different power-law exponent from that observed in the absence of this additional forced motion, with the difference increasing as the ratio of the mass of the neutral atoms to that of the ion decreases. Our results indicate that unless the excess micromotion is minimized to a very high degree, then even a system with very light neutrals and a heavy ion does not exhibit a thermal distribution.

  17. Attosecond time delays in the photoionization of noble gas atoms studied in TDLDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magrakvelidze, Maia; Chakraborty, Himadri; Madjet, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    We perform time-dependent local density functional calculations of the quantum phase and time delays of valence photoionization of noble gas atoms. Results may be accessed by XUV-IR interferometric metrology. (paper)

  18. Accurate characterization and understanding of interface trap density trends between atomic layer deposited dielectrics and AlGaN/GaN with bonding constraint theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramanan, Narayanan; Lee, Bongmook; Misra, Veena, E-mail: vmisra@ncsu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, North Carolina State University, 2410 Campus Shore Drive, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Many dielectrics have been proposed for the gate stack or passivation of AlGaN/GaN based metal oxide semiconductor heterojunction field effect transistors, to reduce gate leakage and current collapse, both for power and RF applications. Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is preferred for dielectric deposition as it provides uniform, conformal, and high quality films with precise monolayer control of film thickness. Identification of the optimum ALD dielectric for the gate stack or passivation requires a critical investigation of traps created at the dielectric/AlGaN interface. In this work, a pulsed-IV traps characterization method has been used for accurate characterization of interface traps with a variety of ALD dielectrics. High-k dielectrics (HfO{sub 2}, HfAlO, and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) are found to host a high density of interface traps with AlGaN. In contrast, ALD SiO{sub 2} shows the lowest interface trap density (<2 × 10{sup 12 }cm{sup −2}) after annealing above 600 °C in N{sub 2} for 60 s. The trend in observed trap densities is subsequently explained with bonding constraint theory, which predicts a high density of interface traps due to a higher coordination state and bond strain in high-k dielectrics.

  19. Resonance Fluorescence of a Trapped Four-Level Atom with Bichromatic Driving

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergou, J.; Jakob, M.; Abranyos, Y.

    1999-01-01

    The resonance fluorescence spectrum of a bichromatically driven four-level atom is polarization dependent. Very narrow lines occur in the incoherent parts of the spectrum for polarization directions which are different from that of the driving fields. The degree of squeezing has a maximum of 56% which should make it easily observable. The second-order correlation function exhibits anti bunching for zero time delay and strong super bunching for certain values of the interaction parameter and time delay. For these parameters resonant two-photon emission takes place in the form of polarization entangled photon pairs. The system can be a novel source of photons in the EPR and/or Bell states. Some experiments will be proposed which make use of this unique source. (Authors)

  20. Experiments on continuum electron capture in atomic hydrogen and collisional interaction of trapped ions. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellin, I.A.; Elston, S.B.

    1981-01-01

    This section describes the background and scope of as well as progress made on experiments designed to test the present theory of charge exchange to continuum for the case of bare nuclei on atomic hydrogen. The charge transfer process is well known to be an essential ingredient of any attempt to understand the ionization of gaseous media traversed by highly-charged energetic ions. Surprisingly, a sometimes dominant contribution to such ionization remained undiscovered until the past decade. This process, known as charge transfer to the continuum, involves the ionization of electrons from the target species into unbound states closely matched in exit direction and speed to the charged particles which generate them. Subsequent measurements of the resultant forward electron production, performed by University of Tennessee searchers at Oak Ridge and Brookhaven National Laboratories, were unique in employing more highly charged projectiles than previously

  1. Dating of ice and ocean samples with Atom Trap Trace Analysis of 39Ar

    OpenAIRE

    Ebser, Sven Conrad

    2018-01-01

    The noble gas radioisotope 39Ar with a half-life of 269 years is an almost ideal tracer for dating ice and water samples in the time range of 50 to 1000 years ago, for which no other reliable methods exist. Due to its very low relative abundance of 39Ar/Ar = 8.1(3)*10^-16, 39Ar has only been routinely measured by Low-Level Counting so far. However, since Low-Level Counting requires samples in the order of 1000 L, the application of 39Ar, besides some proof-of-principle experiments, has been l...

  2. Negative-Mass Instability of the Spin and Motion of an Atomic Gas Driven by Optical Cavity Backaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Jonathan; Gerber, Justin A.; Dowd, Emma; Stamper-Kurn, Dan M.

    2018-01-01

    We realize a spin-orbit interaction between the collective spin precession and center-of-mass motion of a trapped ultracold atomic gas, mediated by spin- and position-dependent dispersive coupling to a driven optical cavity. The collective spin, precessing near its highest-energy state in an applied magnetic field, can be approximated as a negative-mass harmonic oscillator. When the Larmor precession and mechanical motion are nearly resonant, cavity mediated coupling leads to a negative-mass instability, driving exponential growth of a correlated mode of the hybrid system. We observe this growth imprinted on modulations of the cavity field and estimate the full covariance of the resulting two-mode state by observing its transient decay during subsequent free evolution.

  3. Coherent and non coherent atom optics experiment with an ultra-narrow beam of metastable rare gas atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grucker, J.

    2007-12-01

    In this thesis, we present a new type of atomic source: an ultra-narrow beam of metastable atoms produced by resonant metastability exchange inside a supersonic beam of rare gas atoms. We used the coherence properties of this beam to observe the diffraction of metastable helium, argon and neon atoms by a nano-transmission grating and by micro-reflection-gratings. Then, we evidenced transitions between Zeeman sublevels of neon metastable 3 P 2 state due to the quadrupolar part of Van der Waals potential. After we showed experimental proofs of the observation of this phenomenon, we calculated the transition probabilities in the Landau - Zener model. We discussed the interest of Van der Waals - Zeeman transitions for atom interferometry. Last, we described the Zeeman cooling of the supersonic metastable argon beam ( 3 P 2 ). We have succeeded in slowing down atoms to speeds below 100 m/s. We gave experimental details and showed the first time-of-flight measurements of slowed atoms

  4. Specific Adaptation of Gas Atomization Processing for Al-Based Alloy Powder for Additive Manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Iver [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States); Siemon, John [Alcoa Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2017-06-30

    The charge for each gas atomization experiment was provided by Alcoa and consisted of cast blocks cut into 1 inch by 1 inch square rods of the chosen aluminum alloys. The atmosphere in the melting chamber and connected atomization system was evacuated with a mechanical pump prior to backfilling with ultrahigh purity (UHP grade) Ar. The melt was contained in a bottom tapped alumina crucible with an alumina stopper rod to seal the exit while heating to a pouring temperature of 1000 – 1400°C. When the desired superheat was reached, the stopper rod was lifted and melt flowed through pour tube and was atomized with Ar from a 45-22-052-409 gas atomization nozzle (or atomization die), having a jet apex angle of 45 degrees with 22 cylindrical gas jets (each with diameter of 1.32 mm or 0.052 inches) arrayed around the axis of a 10.4 mm central bore. The Ar atomization gas supply regulator pressure was set to produce nozzle manifold pressures for the series of runs at pressures of 250-650 psi. Secondary gas halos of Ar+O2 and He also were added to the interior of the spray chamber at various downstream locations for additional cooling of the atomized droplets, surface passivation, and to prevent coalescence of the resulting powder.

  5. Cryogenic buffer-gas loading and magnetic trapping of CrH and MnH molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Stoll, M.; Bakker, J.; Steimle, T.; Meijer, G.; Peters, A.

    2008-01-01

    We report on the buffer-gas cooling and trapping of CrH and MnH molecules in a magnetic quadrupole trap with densities on the order of 106 cm−3 at a temperature of 650 mK. Storage times of up to 180 ms have been observed, corresponding to a 20-fold lifetime enhancement with respect to the field-free diffusion through the 3He buffer-gas. Using Monte Carlo trajectory simulations, inelastic molecule-3He collision cross sections of 1.6×10−18 and 3.1×10−17 cm2 are extracted for CrH and MnH, respec...

  6. Atomic layer-deposited Al–HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} bi-layers towards 3D charge trapping non-volatile memory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Congedo, Gabriele, E-mail: gabriele.congedo@mdm.imm.cnr.it; Wiemer, Claudia; Lamperti, Alessio; Cianci, Elena; Molle, Alessandro; Volpe, Flavio G.; Spiga, Sabina, E-mail: sabina.spiga@mdm.imm.cnr

    2013-04-30

    A metal/oxide/high-κ dielectric/oxide/silicon (MOHOS) planar charge trapping memory capacitor including SiO{sub 2} as tunnel oxide, Al–HfO{sub 2} as charge trapping layer, SiO{sub 2} as blocking oxide and TaN metal gate was fabricated and characterized as test vehicle in the view of integration into 3D cells. The thin charge trapping layer and blocking oxide were grown by atomic layer deposition, the technique of choice for the implementation of these stacks into 3D structures. The oxide stack shows a good thermal stability for annealing temperature of 900 °C in N{sub 2}, as required for standard complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor processes. MOHOS capacitors can be efficiently programmed and erased under the applied voltages of ± 20 V to ± 12 V. When compared to a benchmark structure including thin Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} as charge trapping layer, the MOHOS cell shows comparable program characteristics, with the further advantage of the equivalent oxide thickness scalability due to the high dielectric constant (κ) value of 32, and an excellent retention even for strong testing conditions. Our results proved that high-κ based oxide structures grown by atomic layer deposition can be of interest for the integration into three dimensionally stacked charge trapping devices. - Highlights: ► Charge trapping device with Al–HfO{sub 2} storage layer is fabricated and characterized. ► Al–HfO{sub 2} and SiO{sub 2} blocking oxides are deposited by atomic layer deposition. ► The oxide stack shows a good thermal stability after annealing at 900 °C. ► The device can be efficiently programmed/erased and retention is excellent. ► The oxide stack could be used for 3D-stacked Flash non-volatile memories.

  7. Individual Tracer Atoms in an Ultracold Dilute Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohmann, Michael; Kindermann, Farina; Lausch, Tobias; Mayer, Daniel; Schmidt, Felix; Lutz, Eric; Widera, Artur

    2017-06-01

    We report on the experimental investigation of individual Cs atoms impinging on a dilute cloud of ultracold Rb atoms with variable density. We study the relaxation of the initial nonthermal state and detect the effect of single collisions which has so far eluded observation. We show that, after few collisions, the measured spatial distribution of the tracer atoms is correctly described by a Langevin equation with a velocity-dependent friction coefficient, over a large range of Knudsen numbers. Our results extend the simple and effective Langevin treatment to the realm of light particles in dilute gases. The experimental technique developed opens up the microscopic exploration of a novel regime of diffusion at the level of individual collisions.

  8. Surface damage and gas trapping profile measurements in copper during 20 kev He+ irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terreault, B.; Veilleux, G.

    1980-01-01

    Surface damage due to 20 keV he + irradiation of OFHC Cu was studied by optical and scanning electron microscopy, and by gas trapping profile measurements with proton backscattering and elastic recoil detection. Both annealed (1 h at 773 K) and unannealed Cu were implanted, at 300 K (0.22Tsub(m)) and 500 K(0.37 Tsub(m)), up to fluences of 3 x 10 18 cm -2 . Additional results with thin (1 μm) evaporated films and stressed cold-rolled foils (3 μm) were obtained. At 500 K in bulk OFHC Cu pores and/or large (approx. 1μm) but scattered blisters appear; at 300 K in bulk or thin film Cu blisters are large and abundant. In all these cases a very large (>=1.5 x 10 1 7 cm -2 ) and sudden release of deeply implanted helium takes place, leading to a depleted profile at a depth of about 90 nm (approx. Rsub(p)). In contrast in cold-rolled foils the blisters are small (approx. 0.4 μm) and the profiles are undepleted. These results are explained by fissuration of helium-pressurized cavities. At high fluence blisters disappear, leaving a porous structure at 500 K and a rough micro-relief at 300 K; the helim profiles are flat and very wide (2-3 Rsub(p)). Blister disappearance, absence of flaking, and porous structure are discussed in terms of the width of the profiles and the formation of a helium-saturated, highly damaged (recrystallized), and permeable layer. (orig.)

  9. Signs of Gas Trapping in Normal Lung Density Regions in Smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodduluri, Sandeep; Reinhardt, Joseph M; Hoffman, Eric A; Newell, John D; Nath, Hrudaya; Dransfield, Mark T; Bhatt, Surya P

    2017-12-01

    A substantial proportion of subjects without overt airflow obstruction have significant respiratory morbidity and structural abnormalities as visualized by computed tomography. Whether regions of the lung that appear normal using traditional computed tomography criteria have mild disease is not known. To identify subthreshold structural disease in normal-appearing lung regions in smokers. We analyzed 8,034 subjects with complete inspiratory and expiratory computed tomographic data participating in the COPDGene Study, including 103 lifetime nonsmokers. The ratio of the mean lung density at end expiration (E) to end inspiration (I) was calculated in lung regions with normal density (ND) by traditional thresholds for mild emphysema (-910 Hounsfield units) and gas trapping (-856 Hounsfield units) to derive the ND-E/I ratio. Multivariable regression analysis was used to measure the associations between ND-E/I, lung function, and respiratory morbidity. The ND-E/I ratio was greater in smokers than in nonsmokers, and it progressively increased from mild to severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease severity. A proportion of 26.3% of smokers without airflow obstruction had ND-E/I greater than the 90th percentile of normal. ND-E/I was independently associated with FEV 1 (adjusted β = -0.020; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.032 to -0.007; P = 0.001), St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire scores (adjusted β = 0.952; 95% CI, 0.529 to 1.374; P smokers without airflow obstruction, and it is associated with respiratory morbidity. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00608764).

  10. Numerical and experimental modelling of back stream flow during close-coupled gas atomization

    OpenAIRE

    Motaman, S; Mullis, AM; Borman, DJ; Cochrane, RF; McCarthy, IN

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the numerical and experimental investigation into the effects of different gas jet mis-match angles (for an external melt nozzle wall) on the back-stream flow in close coupled gas atomization. The Pulse Laser Imaging (PLI) technique was applied for visualising the back-stream melt flow phenomena with an analogue water atomizer and the associated PLI images compared with numerical results. In the investigation a Convergent–Divergent (C–D) discrete gas jet die at five differe...

  11. Magnetic-field-driven localization of light in a cold-atom gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skipetrov, S E; Sokolov, I M

    2015-02-06

    We discover a transition from extended to localized quasimodes for light in a gas of immobile two-level atoms in a magnetic field. The transition takes place either upon increasing the number density of atoms in a strong field or upon increasing the field at a high enough density. It has many characteristic features of a disorder-driven (Anderson) transition but is strongly influenced by near-field interactions between atoms and the anisotropy of the atomic medium induced by the magnetic field.

  12. Starting up a programme of atomic piles using compressed gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horowitz, J.; Yvon, J.

    1959-01-01

    1) An examination of the intellectual and material resources which have directed the French programme towards: a) the natural uranium and plutonium system, b) the use of compressed gas as heat transfer fluid (primary fluid). 2) The parts played in exploring the field by the pile EL2 and G1, EL2 a natural uranium, heavy water and compressed gas pile, G1 a natural uranium, graphite and atmospheric air pile. 3) Development of the neutronics of graphite piles: physical study of G1. 4) The examination of certain problem posed by centres equipped with natural uranium, graphite and compressed carbon dioxide piles: structure, special materials, fluid circuits, maximum efficiency. Economic aspects. 5) Aids to progress: a) piles for testing materials and for tests on canned fuel elements, b) laboratory and calculation facilities. 6) Possible new orientations of compressed gas piles: a) raising of the pressure, b) enriched fuel, c) higher temperatures, d) use of heavy water. (author) [fr

  13. Trapping interference effects of arsenic, antimony and bismuth hydrides in collection of selenium hydride within iridium-modified transversally-heated graphite tube atomizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furdikova, Zuzana [Department of Environmental Chemistry and Technology, Faculty of Chemistry, Brno University of Technology, Purkynova 118, CZ-61200 Brno (Czech Republic); Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic v.v.i., Veveri 97, CZ-60200, Brno (Czech Republic); Docekal, Bohumil [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic v.v.i., Veveri 97, CZ-60200, Brno (Czech Republic)], E-mail: docekal@iach.cz

    2009-04-15

    Interference effects of co-generated hydrides of arsenic, antimony and bismuth on trapping behavior of selenium hydride (analyte) within an iridium-modified, transversely heated graphite tube atomizer (THGA) were investigated. A twin-channel hydride generation system was used for independent separate generation and introduction of analyte and interferent hydrides, i.e. in a simultaneous and/or sequential analyte-interferent and interferent-analyte mode of operation. The influence of the analyte and modifier mass, interferent amount, trapping temperature and composition of the gaseous phase was studied. A simple approach for the elimination of mutual interference effects by modification of the gaseous phase with oxygen in a substoichiometric ratio to chemically generated hydrogen is proposed and the suppression of these interference effects is demonstrated. A hypothesis on the mechanism of trapping and mutual interference effects is drawn.

  14. Positive dielectrophoresis used for selective trapping of nanoparticles from flue gas in a gradient field electrodes device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lungu, Mihail, E-mail: lmihai@physics.uvt.ro; Neculae, Adrian; Lungu, Antoanetta [West University of Timisoara, Faculty of Physics (Romania)

    2015-12-15

    This paper investigates the possibility to use positive dielectrophoresis (pDEP) for selective trapping of nanoparticle dispersed in flue gas in a vertical pDEP-based microfluidic system. The experimental gradient field electrodes device contains as main part a vertical deposition plate with parallel planar electrodes in single connection on an insulating substrate, parallel to the reference electrode—a dielectric plate with a metalized side. The performances of the device were described and analyzed by numerical simulations and experimental tests in terms of two new specific parameters, called Retention rate and Filtration, related to the trapping of nanoparticles in suspension inside the device and the consequent purification of flue gas. It is outlined, both numerically and experimentally, that the concentration of particles trapped inside the device decreases as they are moving away from the inlet zone. The experimental results also highlight the nanoparticle size distribution of the particles collected from the deposition plate, using a nanoparticle tracking analysis method, and their selective capture on the deposition plate, depending on the amplitude and shape of the applied voltage, in a good agreement with the numerical simulations results.

  15. Trapped antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Butler, E; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jonsell, S; Jørgensen, L V; Kemp, S L; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif el Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki,Y

    2012-01-01

    Precision spectroscopic comparison of hydrogen and antihydrogen holds the promise of a sensitive test of the Charge-Parity-Time theorem and matter-antimatter equivalence. The clearest path towards realising this goal is to hold a sample of antihydrogen in an atomic trap for interrogation by electromagnetic radiation. Achieving this poses a huge experimental challenge, as state-of-the-art magnetic-minimum atom traps have well depths of only ∼1 T (∼0.5 K for ground state antihydrogen atoms). The atoms annihilate on contact with matter and must be ‘born’ inside the magnetic trap with low kinetic energies. At the ALPHA experiment, antihydrogen atoms are produced from antiprotons and positrons stored in the form of non-neutral plasmas, where the typical electrostatic potential energy per particle is on the order of electronvolts, more than 104 times the maximum trappable kinetic energy. In November 2010, ALPHA published the observation of 38 antiproton annihilations due to antihydrogen atoms that had been ...

  16. Determination of biodegradation process of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes in seabed sediment by purge and trap gas chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Dongqiang [Key Lab. for Atomic and Molecular Nanosciences of Education Ministry, Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Dept. of Physics; China Pharmaceutical Univ., Nanjing (China). Physics Teaching and Research Section, Dept. of Basic Sciences; Ma, Wanyun; Chen, Dieyan [Key Lab. for Atomic and Molecular Nanosciences of Education Ministry, Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Dept. of Physics

    2007-12-15

    Benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) are commonly found in crude oil and are used in geochemical investigations as direct indicators of the presence of oil and gas. BTEX are easily volatile and can be degraded by microorganisms, which affect their precise measurement seriously. A method for determining the biodegradation process of BTEX in seabed sediment using dynamic headspace (purge and trap) gas chromatography with a photoionization detector (PID) was developed, which had a detection limit of 7.3-13.2 ng L{sup -1} and a recovery rate of 91.6-95.0%. The decrease in the concentration of BTEX components was monitored in seabed sediment samples, which was caused by microorganism biodegradation. The results of BTEX biodegradation process were of great significance in the collection, transportation, preservation, and measurement of seabed sediment samples in the geochemical investigations of oil and gas. (orig.)

  17. Coherent captivity of population in gas of excited atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anisimov, P.M.; Akhmedzhanov, R.A.; Zelenskij, I.V.; Kolesov, R.L.; Kuznetsova, E.A.

    2003-01-01

    The coherent captivity of the population in the gaseous discharge on the transitions between the neon atoms excited levels is studied. The resonances, corresponding to the origination of the population coherent captivity in the Λ- and V-schemes on the Zeeman sublevels of the low and upper working states, were observed in the presence of the longitudinal magnetic field. The effect of the nonlinear rotation of the polarization plane under the conditions of the population coherent captivity was studied. The possibility of applying the results of the work for the diagnostics of the local magnetic fields and other plasma parameters in the gaseous discharges is considered [ru

  18. Crystal structure of a trapped catalytic intermediate suggests that forced atomic proximity drives the catalysis of mIPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelon, Kelly; Roberts, Mary F; Stec, Boguslaw

    2011-12-07

    1-L-myo-inositol-phosphate synthase (mIPS) catalyzes the first step of the unique, de novo pathway of inositol biosynthesis. However, details about the complex mIPS catalytic mechanism, which requires oxidation, enolization, intramolecular aldol cyclization, and reduction, are not fully known. To gain further insight into this mechanism, we determined the crystal structure of the wild-type mIPS from Archaeoglobus fulgidus at 1.7 Å, as well as the crystal structures of three active-site mutants. Additionally, we obtained the structure of mIPS with a trapped 5-keto-glucose-6-phosphate intermediate at 2 Å resolution by a novel (to our knowledge) process of activating the crystal at high temperature. A comparison of all of the crystal structures of mIPS described in this work suggests a novel type of catalytic mechanism that relies on the forced atomic proximity of functional groups. The lysine cluster is contained in a small volume in the active site, where random motions of these side chains are responsible for the progress of the complex multistep reaction as well as for the low rate of catalysis. The mechanism requires that functional groups of Lys-274, Lys-278, Lys-306, and Lys-367 assume differential roles in the protonation/deprotonation steps that must occur during the mIPS reaction. This mechanism is supported by the complete loss of activity of the enzyme caused by the Leu-257 mutation to Ala that releases the lysine containment. Copyright © 2011 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Toward a High-Stability Coherent Population Trapping Cs Vapor-Cell Atomic Clock Using Autobalanced Ramsey Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Hafiz, Moustafa; Coget, Grégoire; Petersen, Michael; Rocher, Cyrus; Guérandel, Stéphane; Zanon-Willette, Thomas; de Clercq, Emeric; Boudot, Rodolphe

    2018-06-01

    Vapor-cell atomic clocks are widely appreciated for their excellent short-term fractional frequency stability and their compactness. However, they are known to suffer on medium and long time scales from significant frequency instabilities, generally attributed to light-induced frequency-shift effects. In order to tackle this limitation, we investigate the application of the recently proposed autobalanced Ramsey (ABR) interrogation protocol onto a pulsed hot-vapor Cs vapor-cell clock based on coherent population trapping (CPT). We demonstrate that the ABR protocol, developed initially to probe the one-photon resonance of quantum optical clocks, can be successfully applied to a two-photon CPT resonance. The applied method, based on the alternation of two successive Ramsey-CPT sequences with unequal free-evolution times and the subsequent management of two interconnected phase and frequency servo loops, is found to allow a relevant reduction of the clock-frequency sensitivity to laser-power variations. This original ABR-CPT approach, combined with the implementation of advanced electronics laser-power stabilization systems, yields the demonstration of a CPT-based Cs vapor-cell clock with a short-term fractional frequency stability at the level of 3.1×10 -13τ-1 /2 , averaging down to the level of 6 ×10-15 at 2000-s integration time. These encouraging performances demonstrate that the use of the ABR interrogation protocol is a promising option towards the development of high-stability CPT-based frequency standards. Such clocks could be attractive candidates in numerous applications including next-generation satellite-based navigation systems, secure communications, instrumentation, or defense systems.

  20. Fe atoms trapped on graphene as a potential efficient catalyst for room-temperature complete oxidation of formaldehyde: a first-principles investigation

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Huimin; Li, Min; Liu, Xin; Meng, Changgong; Linguerri, Roberto; Han, Yu; Chambaud, Gilberte

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the oxidation of formaldehyde, one of the major indoor air pollutants, into CO2 and H2O over Fe atoms trapped in defects on graphene by first-principles based calculations. These trapped Fe atoms are not only stable to withstand interference from the reaction environments but are also efficient in catalyzing the reactions between coadsorbed O-2 and formaldehyde. The oxidation of formaldehyde starts with the formation of a peroxide-like intermediate and continues by its dissociation into. eta(1)-OCHO coadsorbed with an OH radical. Then, the adsorbed OCHO undergoes conformational changes and hydride transfer, leading to the formation of H2O and CO2. Subsequent adsorption of O2 or formaldehyde facilitates desorption of H2O and a new reaction cycle initiates. The calculated barriers for formation and dissociation of the peroxide-like intermediate are 0.43 and 0.40 eV, respectively, and those for conformation changes and hydride transfer are 0.47 and 0.13 eV, respectively. These relatively low barriers along the reaction path suggest the potential high catalytic performance of trapped Fe atoms for formaldehyde oxidation.

  1. Fe atoms trapped on graphene as a potential efficient catalyst for room-temperature complete oxidation of formaldehyde: a first-principles investigation

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Huimin

    2017-03-24

    We investigated the oxidation of formaldehyde, one of the major indoor air pollutants, into CO2 and H2O over Fe atoms trapped in defects on graphene by first-principles based calculations. These trapped Fe atoms are not only stable to withstand interference from the reaction environments but are also efficient in catalyzing the reactions between coadsorbed O-2 and formaldehyde. The oxidation of formaldehyde starts with the formation of a peroxide-like intermediate and continues by its dissociation into. eta(1)-OCHO coadsorbed with an OH radical. Then, the adsorbed OCHO undergoes conformational changes and hydride transfer, leading to the formation of H2O and CO2. Subsequent adsorption of O2 or formaldehyde facilitates desorption of H2O and a new reaction cycle initiates. The calculated barriers for formation and dissociation of the peroxide-like intermediate are 0.43 and 0.40 eV, respectively, and those for conformation changes and hydride transfer are 0.47 and 0.13 eV, respectively. These relatively low barriers along the reaction path suggest the potential high catalytic performance of trapped Fe atoms for formaldehyde oxidation.

  2. Determination of total antimony and inorganic antimony species by hydride generation in situ trapping flame atomic absorption spectrometry: a new way to (ultra)trace speciation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henryk Matusiewicz; Magdalena Krawczyk

    2008-07-01

    The analytical performance of non-chromatographic coupled hydride generation, integrated atom trap (HG-IAT) atomizer flame absorption spectrometry (FAAS) systems were evaluated for the speciation analysis of antimony in environmental samples. Antimony, using formation of stibine (SbH{sub 3}) vapors were atomized in an air-acetylene flame-heated IAT. A new design of HG-IAT-FAAS hyphenated technique that would exceed the operational capabilities of existing arrangements was investigated. For the estimation of Sb(III) and Sb(V) concentrations in samples, the difference between the analytical sensitivities of the absorbance signals obtained for antimony hydride without and with previous treatment of samples with L-cysteine can be used. The concentration of Sb(V) was calculated by the difference between total Sb and Sb(III). A dramatic improvement in detection limit was achieved compared with that obtained using either of the atom trapping techniques, presented above, separately. This novel approach decreases the detection limit down to low pg mL{sup -1} levels. The concentration detection limit, defined as 3 times the blank standard deviation was 0.2 ng mL{sup -1}. For a 120 s in situ pre-concentration time , sensitivity enhancement compared to flame AAS, was 550 fold for Sb, using hydride generation-atom trapping technique. The accuracy of the method was verified by the use of certified reference materials (NIST SRM 2704 Buffalo River Sediment, SRM 2710 Montana Soil, SRM 1633a Coal Fly Ash, SRM 1575 Pine Needles, SRM 1643e Trace Elements in Water) and by aqueous standard calibration technique. The measured Sb content, in reference materials, were in satisfactory agreement with the certified values. The hyphenated technique was applied for antimony determinations in soil, sediment, coal fly ash, sewage and river water.

  3. Plasma effective field theory advertised, then illustrated by e, p, H-atom gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, L.S.

    2001-01-01

    The first part is a lightning fast overview of the application of ideas of modern effective quantum field theory (which originated in elementary particle theory) to plasma physics. An exhaustive account is presented in a long report with L. G. Yaffe which contains all the details set out in a self-contained and pedagogical fashion. The second part shows how the low temperature but dilute limit of the partition function at two-loop order describes a gas of electrons, protons, and hydrogen atoms in their ground state. Hydrogen atoms emerge automatically from the general framework which does not begin with any explicit consideration of atoms. (orig.)

  4. Investigation of Bose Condensation in Ideal Bose Gas Trapped under Generic Power Law Potential in d Dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehedi Faruk, Mir; Sazzad Hossain, Md.; Muktadir Rahman, Md.

    2016-02-01

    The changes in characteristics of Bose condensation of ideal Bose gas due to an external generic power law potential U=\\sumi=1dci\\vert xi/ai\\vertni are studied carefully. Detailed calculation of Kim et al. (J. Phys. Condens. Matter 11 (1999) 10269) yielded the hierarchy of condensation transitions with changing fractional dimensionality. In this manuscript, some theorems regarding specific heat at constant volume CV are presented. Careful examination of these theorems reveal the existence of hidden hierarchy of the condensation transition in trapped systems as well.

  5. Determination of C6-C10 aromatic hydrocarbons in water by purge-and-trap capillary gas chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eganhouse, R.P.; Dorsey, T.F.; Phinney, C.S.; Westcott, A.M.

    1993-01-01

    A method is described for the determination of the C6-C10 aromatic hydrocarbons in water based on purge-and-trap capillary gas chromatography with flame ionization and mass spectrometric detection. Retention time data and 70 eV mass spectra were obtained for benzene and all 35 C7-C10 aromatic hydrocarbons. With optimized chromatographic conditions and mass spectrometric detection, benzene and 33 of the 35 alkylbenzenes can be identified and measured in a 45-min run. Use of a flame ionization detector permits the simultaneous determination of benzene and 26 alkylbenzenes.

  6. Polarization of stable and radioactive noble gas nuclei by spin exchange with laser pumped alkali atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calaprice, F.; Happer, W.; Schreiber, D.

    1984-01-01

    The nuclei of noble gases can be strongly polarized by spin exchange with sufficiently dense optically pumped alkali vapors. Only a small fraction of the spin angular momentum of the alkali atoms is transferred to the nuclear spin of the noble gas. Most of the spin angular momentum is lost to translational angular momentum of the alkali and noble gas atoms about each other. For heavy noble gases most of the angular momentum transfer occurs in alkali-noble-gas van der Waals molecules. The transfer efficiency depends on the formation and breakup rates of the van der Waals molecules in the ambient gas. Experimental methods to measure the spin transfer efficiencies have been developed. Nuclei of radioactive noble gases have been polarized by these methods, and the polarization has been detected by observing the anisotropy of the radioactive decay products. Very precise measurements of the magnetic moments of the radioactive nuclei have been made. 12 references, 9 figures

  7. Influence of the atomic mass of the background gas on laser ablation plume propagation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amoruso, Salvatore; Schou, Jørgen; Lunney, James G.

    2008-01-01

    A combination of time-of-flight ion probe measurements and gas dynamical modeling has been used to investigate the propagation of a laser ablation plume in gases of different atomic/molecular weight. The pressure variation of the ion time-of-flight was found to be well described by the gas...... dynamical model of Predtechensky and Mayorov (Appl. Supercond. 1:2011, 1993). In particular, the model describes how the pressure required to stop the plume in a given distance depends on the atomic/molecular weight of the gas, which is a feature that cannot be explained by standard point......-blast-wave descriptions of laser ablation plume expansion in gas....

  8. Intense source of cold cesium atoms based on a two-dimensional magneto–optical trap with independent axial cooling and pushing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Jia-Qiang; Wu Chen-Fei; Wang Li-Jun; Yan Xue-Shu; Zhang Jian-Wei

    2016-01-01

    We report our studies on an intense source of cold cesium atoms based on a two-dimensional (2D) magneto–optical trap (MOT) with independent axial cooling and pushing. The new-designed source, proposed as 2D-HP MOT, uses hollow laser beams for axial cooling and a thin pushing laser beam to extract a cold atomic beam. With the independent pushing beam, the atomic flux can be substantially optimized. The total atomic flux maximum obtained in the 2D-HP MOT is 4.02 × 10 10 atoms/s, increased by 60 percent compared to the traditional 2D + MOT in our experiment. Moreover, with the pushing power 10 μW and detuning 0 Γ , the 2D-HP MOT can generate a rather intense atomic beam with the concomitant light shift suppressed by a factor of 20. The axial velocity distribution of the cold cesium beams centers at 6.8 m/s with an FMHW of about 2.8 m/s. The dependences of the atomic flux on the pushing power and detuning are studied in detail. The experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical model. (paper)

  9. An improved model of fission gas atom transport in irradiated uranium dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, J. H.

    2018-04-01

    The hitherto standard approach to predicting fission gas release has been a pure diffusion gas atom transport model based upon Fick's law. An additional mechanism has subsequently been identified from experimental data at high burnup and has been summarised in an empirical model that is considered to embody a so-called fuel matrix 'saturation' phenomenon whereby the fuel matrix has become saturated with fission gas so that the continued addition of extra fission gas atoms results in their expulsion from the fuel matrix into the fuel rod plenum. The present paper proposes a different approach by constructing an enhanced fission gas transport law consisting of two components: 1) Fick's law and 2) a so-called drift term. The new transport law can be shown to be effectively identical in its predictions to the 'saturation' approach and is more readily physically justifiable. The method introduces a generalisation of the standard diffusion equation which is dubbed the Drift Diffusion Equation. According to the magnitude of a dimensionless Péclet number, P, the new equation can vary from pure diffusion to pure drift, which latter represents a collective motion of the fission gas atoms through the fuel matrix at a translational velocity. Comparison is made between the saturation and enhanced transport approaches. Because of its dependence on P, the Drift Diffusion Equation is shown to be more effective at managing the transition from one type of limiting transport phenomenon to the other. Thus it can adapt appropriately according to the reactor operation.

  10. Implementation of a fully automated process purge-and-trap gas chromatograph at an environmental remediation site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blair, D.S.; Morrison, D.J.

    1997-01-01

    The AQUASCAN, a commercially available, fully automated purge-and-trap gas chromatograph from Sentex Systems Inc., was implemented and evaluated as an in-field, automated monitoring system of contaminated groundwater at an active DOE remediation site in Pinellas, FL. Though the AQUASCAN is designed as a stand alone process analytical unit, implementation at this site required additional hardware. The hardware included a sample dilution system and a method for delivering standard solution to the gas chromatograph for automated calibration. As a result of the evaluation the system was determined to be a reliable and accurate instrument. The AQUASCAN reported concentration values for methylene chloride, trichloroethylene, and toluene in the Pinellas ground water were within 20% of reference laboratory values

  11. Gas atomization of Cu-modified AB5 metal hydride alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, K.; Ouchi, T.; Banik, A.; Koch, J.; Fetcenko, M.A.; Bendersky, L.A.; Wang, K.; Vaudin, M.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → The gas atomization process together with a hydrogen annealing process was demonstrated on AB5 alloys. → The method was found to be effective in restoring the original cycle life sacrificed by the incorporation of copper in the alloy formula as a means of improving the low temperature performance of AB 5 alloys. → The new process also improves high rate, low temperature, and charge retention performances for both Cu-free and Cu-containing AB 5 alloys. - Abstract: Gas atomization together with a hydrogen annealing process has been proposed as a method to achieve improved low-temperature performance of AB 5 alloy electrodes in Ni/MH batteries and restore the original cycle life which was sacrificed by the incorporation of copper in the alloy formula. While the gas atomization process reduces the lattice constant aspect ratio c/a of the Cu-containing alloys, the addition of a hydrogen annealing step recovers this property, although it is still inferior to the conventionally prepared annealed Cu-free alloy. This observation correlates very well with the cycle life performance. In addition to extending the cycle life of the Cu-containing metal hydride electrode, processing by gas atomization with additional hydrogen annealing improves high-rate, low-temperature, and charge retention performances for both Cu-free and Cu-containing AB 5 alloys. The degradation mechanisms of alloys made by different processes through cycling are also discussed.

  12. Distribution and kinematics of atomic and molecular gas inside the solar circle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marasco, A.; Fraternali, F.; van der Hulst, J. M.; Oosterloo, T.

    2017-01-01

    The detailed distribution and kinematics of the atomic and the CO-bright molecular hydrogen in the disc of the Milky Way inside the solar circle are derived under the assumptions of axisymmetry and pure circular motions. We divide the Galactic disc into a series of rings, and assume that the gas in

  13. Gas Atomization Equipment Statement of Work and Specification for Engineering design, Fabrication, Testing, and Installation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boutaleb, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pluschkell, T. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-11-30

    The Gas Atomization Equipment will be used to fabricate metallic powder suitable for Powder Bed Fusion additive Manufacturing material to support Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) research and development. The project will modernize our capabilities to develop spherical reactive, refractory, and radioactive powders in the 10-75 μm diameter size range at LLNL.

  14. The Use of an Air-Natural Gas Flame in Atomic Absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melucci, Robert C.

    1983-01-01

    Points out that excellent results are obtained using an air-natural gas flame in atomic absorption experiments rather than using an air-acetylene flame. Good results are obtained for alkali metals, copper, cadmium, and zinc but not for the alkaline earths since they form refractory oxides. (Author/JN)

  15. A cylindrical quadrupole ion trap in combination with an electrospray ion source for gas-phase luminescence and absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stockett, Mark H.; Houmøller, Jørgen; Støchkel, Kristian; Svendsen, Annette; Brøndsted Nielsen, Steen

    2016-01-01

    A relatively simple setup for collection and detection of light emitted from isolated photo-excited molecular ions has been constructed. It benefits from a high collection efficiency of photons, which is accomplished by using a cylindrical ion trap where one end-cap electrode is a mesh grid combined with an aspheric condenser lens. The geometry permits nearly 10% of the emitted light to be collected and, after transmission losses, approximately 5% to be delivered to the entrance of a grating spectrometer equipped with a detector array. The high collection efficiency enables the use of pulsed tunable lasers with low repetition rates (e.g., 20 Hz) instead of continuous wave (cw) lasers or very high repetition rate (e.g., MHz) lasers that are typically used as light sources for gas-phase fluorescence experiments on molecular ions. A hole has been drilled in the cylinder electrode so that a light pulse can interact with the ion cloud in the center of the trap. Simulations indicate that these modifications to the trap do not significantly affect the storage capability and the overall shape of the ion cloud. The overlap between the ion cloud and the laser light is basically 100%, and experimentally >50% of negatively charged chromophore ions are routinely photodepleted. The performance of the setup is illustrated based on fluorescence spectra of several laser dyes, and the quality of these spectra is comparable to those reported by other groups. Finally, by replacing the optical system with a channeltron detector, we demonstrate that the setup can also be used for gas-phase action spectroscopy where either depletion or fragmentation is monitored to provide an indirect measurement on the absorption spectrum of the ion.

  16. A cylindrical quadrupole ion trap in combination with an electrospray ion source for gas-phase luminescence and absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stockett, Mark H., E-mail: stockett@phys.au.dk; Houmøller, Jørgen; Støchkel, Kristian; Svendsen, Annette; Brøndsted Nielsen, Steen [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark)

    2016-05-15

    A relatively simple setup for collection and detection of light emitted from isolated photo-excited molecular ions has been constructed. It benefits from a high collection efficiency of photons, which is accomplished by using a cylindrical ion trap where one end-cap electrode is a mesh grid combined with an aspheric condenser lens. The geometry permits nearly 10% of the emitted light to be collected and, after transmission losses, approximately 5% to be delivered to the entrance of a grating spectrometer equipped with a detector array. The high collection efficiency enables the use of pulsed tunable lasers with low repetition rates (e.g., 20 Hz) instead of continuous wave (cw) lasers or very high repetition rate (e.g., MHz) lasers that are typically used as light sources for gas-phase fluorescence experiments on molecular ions. A hole has been drilled in the cylinder electrode so that a light pulse can interact with the ion cloud in the center of the trap. Simulations indicate that these modifications to the trap do not significantly affect the storage capability and the overall shape of the ion cloud. The overlap between the ion cloud and the laser light is basically 100%, and experimentally >50% of negatively charged chromophore ions are routinely photodepleted. The performance of the setup is illustrated based on fluorescence spectra of several laser dyes, and the quality of these spectra is comparable to those reported by other groups. Finally, by replacing the optical system with a channeltron detector, we demonstrate that the setup can also be used for gas-phase action spectroscopy where either depletion or fragmentation is monitored to provide an indirect measurement on the absorption spectrum of the ion.

  17. Analytical constraints on layered gas trapping and smoothing of atmospheric variability in ice under low-accumulation conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Fourteau

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigate for the first time the loss and alteration of past atmospheric information from air trapping mechanisms under low-accumulation conditions through continuous CH4 (and CO measurements. Methane concentration changes were measured over the Dansgaard–Oeschger event 17 (DO-17,  ∼  60 000 yr BP in the Antarctic Vostok 4G-2 ice core. Measurements were performed using continuous-flow analysis combined with laser spectroscopy. The results highlight many anomalous layers at the centimeter scale that are unevenly distributed along the ice core. The anomalous methane mixing ratios differ from those in the immediate surrounding layers by up to 50 ppbv. This phenomenon can be theoretically reproduced by a simple layered trapping model, creating very localized gas age scale inversions. We propose a method for cleaning the record of anomalous values that aims at minimizing the bias in the overall signal. Once the layered-trapping-induced anomalies are removed from the record, DO-17 appears to be smoother than its equivalent record from the high-accumulation WAIS Divide ice core. This is expected due to the slower sinking and densification speeds of firn layers at lower accumulation. However, the degree of smoothing appears surprisingly similar between modern and DO-17 conditions at Vostok. This suggests that glacial records of trace gases from low-accumulation sites in the East Antarctic plateau can provide a better time resolution of past atmospheric composition changes than previously expected. We also developed a numerical method to extract the gas age distributions in ice layers after the removal of the anomalous layers based on comparison with a weakly smoothed record. It is particularly adapted for the conditions of the East Antarctic plateau, as it helps to characterize smoothing for a large range of very low-temperature and low-accumulation conditions.

  18. Attosecond Time Delay in Photoionization of Noble-Gas and Halogen Atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang-Wen Pi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafast processes are now accessible on the attosecond time scale due to the availability of ultrashort XUV laser pulses. Noble-gas and halogen atoms remain important targets due to their giant dipole resonance and Cooper minimum. Here, we calculate photoionization cross section, asymmetry parameter and Wigner time delay using the time-dependent local-density approximation (TDLDA, which includes the electron correlation effects. Our results are consistent with experimental data and other theoretical calculations. The asymmetry parameter provides an extra layer of access to the phase information of the photoionization processes. We find that halogen atoms bear a strong resemblance on cross section, asymmetry parameter and time delay to their noble-gas neighbors. Our predicted time delay should provide a guidance for future experiments on those atoms and related molecules.

  19. Densification behavior of gas and water atomized 316L stainless steel powder during selective laser melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruidi; Shi, Yusheng; Wang, Zhigang; Wang, Li; Liu, Jinhui; Jiang, Wei

    2010-04-01

    The densification during selective laser melting (SLM) process is an important factor determining the final application of SLM-part. In the present work, the densifications under different processing conditions were investigated and the densification mechanisms were elucidated. It was found that the higher laser power, lower scan speed, narrower hatch spacing and thinner layer thickness could enable a much smoother melting surface and consequently a higher densification. The gas atomized powder possessed better densification than water atomized powder, due to the lower oxygen content and higher packing density of gas atomized powder. A large number of regular-shaped pores can be generated at a wider hatch spacing, even if the scanning track is continuous and wetted very well. The densification mechanisms were addressed and the methods for building dense metal parts were also proposed as follows: inhibiting the balling phenomenon, increasing the overlap ratio of scanning tracks and reducing the micro-cracks.

  20. Universal Properties of a Trapped Two-Component Fermi Gas at Unitarity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blume, D.; Stecher, J. von; Greene, Chris H.

    2007-01-01

    We treat the trapped two-component Fermi system, in which unlike fermions interact through a two-body short-range potential having no bound state but an infinite scattering length. By accurately solving the Schroedinger equation for up to N=6 fermions, we show that no many-body bound states exist other than those bound by the trapping potential, and we demonstrate unique universal properties of the system: Certain excitation frequencies are separated by 2(ℎ/2π)ω, the wave functions agree with analytical predictions and a virial theorem is fulfilled. Further calculations up to N=30 determine the excitation gap, an experimentally accessible universal quantity, and it agrees with recent predictions based on a density functional approach

  1. Trapping and detrapping of hydrogen in graphite materials exposed to hydrogen gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atsumi, Hisao; Iseki, Michio; Shikama, Tatsuo.

    1994-01-01

    Measurements of hydrogen solubility have been performed for several unirradiated and neutron-irradiated graphite (and CFC) samples at temperatures between 973 and 1323 K under a ∼10 kPa hydrogen atmosphere. The hydrogen dissolution process has been studied and it is discussed here. The values of hydrogen solubility vary substantially among the samples up to about a factor of 16. A strong correlation has been observed between the values of hydrogen solubility and the degrees of graphitization determined by X-ray diffraction technique. The relation can be extended even for the neutron irradiated samples. Hydrogen dissolution into graphite can be explained with the trapping of hydrogen at defect sites (e.g. dangling carbon bonds) considering an equilibrium reaction between hydrogen molecules and the trapping sites. The migration of hydrogen in graphite is speculated to result from a sequence of detrapping and retrapping events with high energy activation processes. (author)

  2. Atomic and molecular hydrogen gas temperatures in a low-pressure helicon plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuell, Cameron M.; Corr, Cormac S.

    2015-08-01

    Neutral gas temperatures in hydrogen plasmas are important for experimental and modelling efforts in fusion technology, plasma processing, and surface modification applications. To provide values relevant to these application areas, neutral gas temperatures were measured in a low pressure (radiofrequency helicon discharge using spectroscopic techniques. The atomic and molecular species were not found to be in thermal equilibrium with the atomic temperature being mostly larger then the molecular temperature. In low power operation (measurements near a graphite target demonstrated localised cooling near the sample surface. The temporal evolution of the molecular gas temperature during a high power 1.1 ms plasma pulse was also investigated and found to vary considerably as a function of pressure.

  3. Universal fine structure of the specific heat at the critical λ-point for an ideal Bose gas in an arbitrary trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarasov, S V; Kocharovsky, Vl V; Kocharovsky, V V

    2014-01-01

    We analytically find the universal fine structure of the noted discontinuity in the value and/or derivative of the specific heat of an ideal Bose gas in an arbitrary trap in the whole critical region around the λ-point of the Bose–Einstein condensation. The result reveals a remarkable dependence of the λ-point structure on the trap's form and boundary conditions, even for a macroscopically large system. We suggest measuring this strong effect in the experiments with a controllable trap potential. (paper)

  4. Quantum chaos in ultracold collisions of gas-phase erbium atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, Albert; Mark, Michael; Aikawa, Kiyotaka; Ferlaino, Francesca; Bohn, John L; Makrides, Constantinos; Petrov, Alexander; Kotochigova, Svetlana

    2014-03-27

    Atomic and molecular samples reduced to temperatures below one microkelvin, yet still in the gas phase, afford unprecedented energy resolution in probing and manipulating the interactions between their constituent particles. As a result of this resolution, atoms can be made to scatter resonantly on demand, through the precise control of a magnetic field. For simple atoms, such as alkalis, scattering resonances are extremely well characterized. However, ultracold physics is now poised to enter a new regime, where much more complex species can be cooled and studied, including magnetic lanthanide atoms and even molecules. For molecules, it has been speculated that a dense set of resonances in ultracold collision cross-sections will probably exhibit essentially random fluctuations, much as the observed energy spectra of nuclear scattering do. According to the Bohigas-Giannoni-Schmit conjecture, such fluctuations would imply chaotic dynamics of the underlying classical motion driving the collision. This would necessitate new ways of looking at the fundamental interactions in ultracold atomic and molecular systems, as well as perhaps new chaos-driven states of ultracold matter. Here we describe the experimental demonstration that random spectra are indeed found at ultralow temperatures. In the experiment, an ultracold gas of erbium atoms is shown to exhibit many Fano-Feshbach resonances, of the order of three per gauss for bosons. Analysis of their statistics verifies that their distribution of nearest-neighbour spacings is what one would expect from random matrix theory. The density and statistics of these resonances are explained by fully quantum mechanical scattering calculations that locate their origin in the anisotropy of the atoms' potential energy surface. Our results therefore reveal chaotic behaviour in the native interaction between ultracold atoms.

  5. Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, Alain; Villani, Cedric; Guthleben, Denis; Leduc, Michele; Brenner, Anastasios; Pouthas, Joel; Perrin, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Completed by recent contributions on various topics (atoms and the Brownian motion, the career of Jean Perrin, the evolution of atomic physics since Jean Perrin, relationship between scientific atomism and philosophical atomism), this book is a reprint of a book published at the beginning of the twentieth century in which the author addressed the relationship between atomic theory and chemistry (molecules, atoms, the Avogadro hypothesis, molecule structures, solutes, upper limits of molecular quantities), molecular agitation (molecule velocity, molecule rotation or vibration, molecular free range), the Brownian motion and emulsions (history and general features, statistical equilibrium of emulsions), the laws of the Brownian motion (Einstein's theory, experimental control), fluctuations (the theory of Smoluchowski), light and quanta (black body, extension of quantum theory), the electricity atom, the atom genesis and destruction (transmutations, atom counting)

  6. Prospects of Optical Single Atom Detection in Noble Gas Solids for Measurements of Rare Nuclear Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jaideep; Bailey, Kevin G.; Lu, Zheng-Tian; Mueller, Peter; O'Connor, Thomas P.; Xu, Chen-Yu; Tang, Xiaodong

    2013-04-01

    Optical detection of single atoms captured in solid noble gas matrices provides an alternative technique to study rare nuclear reactions relevant to nuclear astrophysics. I will describe the prospects of applying this approach for cross section measurements of the ^22Ne,,),25Mg reaction, which is the crucial neutron source for the weak s process inside of massive stars. Noble gas solids are a promising medium for the capture, detection, and manipulation of atoms and nuclear spins. They provide stable and chemically inert confinement for a wide variety of guest species. Because noble gas solids are transparent at optical wavelengths, the guest atoms can be probed using lasers. We have observed that ytterbium in solid neon exhibits intersystem crossing (ISC) which results in a strong green fluorescence (546 nm) under excitation with blue light (389 nm). Several groups have observed ISC in many other guest-host pairs, notably magnesium in krypton. Because of the large wavelength separation of the excitation light and fluorescence light, optical detection of individual embedded guest atoms is feasible. This work is supported by DOE, Office of Nuclear Physics, under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  7. Orbital alignment effects in near-resonant Rydberg atoms-rare gas collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaacs, W.A.; Morrison, M.A.

    1993-01-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical studies of near-resonant energy transfer collisions involving rare-gas atoms and alkali or alkaline earth atoms which have been initially excited to an aligned state via one or more linearly polarized rasters have yielded a wealth of insight into orbital alignment and related effects. We have extended this inquiry to initially aligned Rydberg states, examining state-to-state and alignment-selected cross sections using quantum collision theory augmented by approximations appropriate to the special characteristics of the Rydberg state (e.g., the quasi-free-electron model and the impulse approximation)

  8. Observation of trapped gas during electrical resistance heating of trichloroethylene under passive venting conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, E. J.; Kueper, B. H.

    2011-11-01

    A two-dimensional experiment employing a heterogeneous sand pack incorporating two pools of trichloroethylene (TCE) was performed to assess the efficacy of electrical resistance heating (ERH) under passive venting conditions. Temperature monitoring displayed the existence of a TCE-water co-boiling plateau at 73.4 °C, followed by continued heating to 100 °C. A 5 cm thick gas accumulation formed beneath a fine-grained capillary barrier during and after co-boiling. The capillary barrier did not desaturate during the course of the experiment; the only pathway for gas escape being through perforated wells traversing the barrier. The thickness of the accumulation was dictated by the entry pressure of the perforated well. The theoretical maximum TCE soil concentration within the region of gas accumulation, following gas collapse, was estimated to be 888 mg/kg. Post-heating soil sampling revealed TCE concentrations in this region ranging from 27 mg/kg to 96.7 mg/kg, indicating removal of aqueous and gas phase TCE following co-boiling as a result of subsequent boiling of water. The equilibrium concentrations of TCE in water corresponding to the range of post-treatment concentrations in soil (6.11 mg/kg to 136 mg/kg) are calculated to range from 19.8 mg/l to 440 mg/l. The results of this experiment illustrate the importance of providing gas phase venting during the application of ERH in heterogeneous porous media.

  9. Experiments on state selection and Penning ionisation with fast metastable rare gas atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroon, J.P.C.

    1985-01-01

    This thesis describes experiments with metastable He/Ne atoms. The experiments are performed in a crossed beam machine. Two different sources are used for the production of metastable atoms: a source for the production of metastable atoms in the thermal energy range and a hollow cathode arc for the production of metastable atoms in the superthermal energy range (1-7 eV). The progress made in the use of the hollow cathode arc is described as well as the experimental set-up. The rare gas energy-level diagram is characterized by two metastable levels. By optical pumping it is possible to select a single metastable level, both for He and Ne. For the case of He this is done by a recently built He quenchlamp which selectively quenches the metastable 2 1 S level population. In the thermal energy range the quenching is complete; in the superthermal energy range the 2 1 S level population is only partly quenched. For the optical pumping of Ne* atoms a cw dye laser is used. New experiments have been started on the measurement, in a crossed beam machine, of the fluorescence caused by inelastic collisions where metastable atoms are involved. The He* + Ne system is used as a pilot study for these experiments. The He-Ne laser is based on this collision system. (Auth.)

  10. Detection of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) in urine by gas chromatography-ion trap tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklerov, J H; Kalasinsky, K S; Ehorn, C A

    1999-10-01

    A confirmatory method for the detection and quantitation of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) is presented. The method employs gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS-MS) using an internal ionization ion trap detector for sensitive MS-MS-in-time measurements of LSD extracted from urine. Following a single-step solid-phase extraction of 5 mL of urine, underivatized LSD can be measured with limits of quantitation and detection of 80 and 20 pg/mL, respectively. Temperature-programmed on-column injections of urine extracts were linear over the concentration range 20-2000 pg/mL (r2 = 0.999). Intraday and interday coefficients of variation were LSD-positive samples in this laboratory. Comparisons with alternate GC-MS methods and extraction procedures are discussed.

  11. Use of CFD to predict trapped gas excitation as source of vibration and noise in screw compressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willie, James

    2017-08-01

    This paper investigates the source of noise in oil free screw compressors mounted on highway trucks and driven by a power take-off (PTO) transmission system. Trapped gas at the discharge side is suggested as possible source of the excitation of low frequency torsional resonance in these compressors that can lead to noise and vibration. Measurements and lumped mass torsional models have shown low frequency torsional resonance in the drive train of these compressors when they are mounted on trucks. This results in high torque peak at the compressor input shaft and in part to pulsating noise inside the machine. The severity of the torque peak depends on the amplitude of the input torque fluctuation from the drive (electric motor or truck engine). This in turn depends on the prop-shaft angle. However, the source of the excitation of this low torsional resonance inside the machine is unknown. Using CFD with mesh motion at every 1° rotation of the rotors, it is shown that the absence of a pressure equalizing chamber at the discharge can lead to trapped gas creation, which can lead to over-compression, over-heating of the rotors, and to high pressure pulsations at the discharge. Over-compression can lead to shock wave generation at the discharge plenum and the pulsation in pressure can lead to noise generation. In addition, if the frequency of the pressure pulsation in the low frequency range coincides with the first torsional frequency of the drive train the first torsional resonance mode can be excited.

  12. Space-charge effects in Penning ion traps

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Porobic, T.; Beck, M.; Breitenfeldt, M.; Couratin, C.; Finlay, P.; Knecht, A.; Fabian, X.; Friedag, P.; Flechard, X.; Lienard, E.; Ban, G.; Zákoucký, Dalibor; Soti, G.; Van Gorp, S.; Weinheimer, C.; Wursten, E.; Severijns, N.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 785, JUN (2015), s. 153-162 ISSN 0168-9002 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LA08015; GA MŠk(CZ) LG13031 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Penning trap * space-charge * magnetron motion * ion trapping * buffer gas cooling * ion cyclotron resonance Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.200, year: 2015

  13. Narrow Line Cooling of 88Sr Atoms in the Magneto-optical Trap for Precision Frequency Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strelkin, S. A.; Galyshev, A. A.; Berdasov, O. I.; Gribov, A. Yu.; Sutyrin, D. V.; Khabarova, K. Yu.; Kolachevsky, N. N.; Slyusarev, S. N.

    We report on our progress toward the realization of a Strontium optical lattice clock, which is under development at VNIIFTRI as a part of GLONASS program. We've prepared the narrow line width laser system for secondary cooling of 88Sr atoms which allows us to reach atom cloud temperature below 3 μK after second cooling stage.

  14. Momentum distributions of selected rare-gas atoms probed by intense femtosecond laser pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abu-Samha, Mahmoud; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2011-01-01

    We provide a direct comparison between numerical and experimental (Rudenko et al 2004 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 37 L407) photoelectron momentum distributions in strong-field ionization of selected rare-gas atoms (He, Ne and Ar), probed by femtosecond linearly polarized laser pulses. The cal......We provide a direct comparison between numerical and experimental (Rudenko et al 2004 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 37 L407) photoelectron momentum distributions in strong-field ionization of selected rare-gas atoms (He, Ne and Ar), probed by femtosecond linearly polarized laser pulses....... The calculations are performed by solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation within the single-active-electron approximation, and focal-volume effects are taken into account by appropriately averaging the results. The resulting momentum distributions are in quantitative agreement with the experimental...

  15. Fermi-Dirac gas of atoms in a box with low adiabatic invariant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlad, V.I.; Inonescu-Pallas, N.

    2004-06-01

    Quantum degenerate Fermi-Dirac gas of atoms, confined in a cubic box, shows an energy spectrum, which is discrete and strongly dependent on the atomic mass number, A at , box geometry and temperature, for low product of A at and the adiabatic invariant, TV 1/3 , i.e. on γ = A at TV 1/3 . The present study compares the total number of particles and the total energy obtained by summing up the contributions of a finite number of states, defined by the values of γ, to the widespread approximations of the corresponding integrals. The sums show simple calculation algorithms and more precise results for a large interval of values of γ. A new accurate analytic formula for the chemical potential of the Fermi-Dirac quantum gas is also given. (author)

  16. Transport, atom blockade, and output coupling in a Tonks-Girardeau gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutherford, L.; McCann, J. F.; Goold, J.; Busch, Th.

    2011-01-01

    Recent experiments have demonstrated how quantum-mechanical impurities can be created within strongly correlated quantum gases and used to probe the coherence properties of these systems [S. Palzer, C. Zipkes, C. Sias, and M. Koehl, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 150601 (2009).]. Here we present a phenomenological model to simulate such an output coupler for a Tonks-Girardeau gas that shows qualitative agreement with the experimental results for atom transport and output coupling. Our model allows us to explore nonequilibrium transport phenomena in ultracold quantum gases and leads us to predict a regime of atom blockade, where the impurity component becomes localized in the parent cloud despite the presence of gravity. We show that this provides a stable mixed-species quantum gas in the strongly correlated limit.

  17. Orientational ordering and site structure of SiF4 trapped in rare gas solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Llewellyn H.; Swanson, Basil I.; Ekberg, Scott A.

    1984-12-01

    The infrared spectrum of the ν3 mode of SiF4 shows only one site with marked site-symmetry splitting accompanied by pronounced (>95%) orientational ordering. The results indicate a site symmetry of C3v with the SiF4 molecule occupying a four-atom substitutional site with a cubic-close-packed environment. In krypton and xenon matrices, however, SiF4 occupies a three-atom substitutional site. The fact that SiF4 shows only one dominant site when present in argon matrices of UF6 indicates that one of the two UF6 sites has a local hexagonal close packed environment induced by short range stacking faults.

  18. Some aspects of the interaction of photons and electrons with rare gas atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westerveld, W.B.

    1979-01-01

    Processes for excitation in rare gas atoms are described, due to absorption of photons and bombardment with electrons. The differences and similarities between excitation by absorption of light (spectroscopy) and by electron impact (collision physics) are qualified. Oscillator strengths from the self-absorption of resonance radiation in rare gases are determined. The excitation of 2'P and 3'P states of helium by electrons has been studied by observing excitation cross sections and polarization fractions obtained from XUV radiation. A description is given of a recently completed apparatus to study inelastic electron-atom scattering processes by coincidence techniques. An introduction is given to the theory which relates the parameters describing an excited state of an atom to the angular distribution of the radiation emitted in the decay of the excited state. (Auth.)

  19. Experimental study of single-electron loss by Ar+ ions in rare-gas atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, P. G.; Castillo, F.; Martínez, H.

    2001-04-01

    Absolute differential and total cross sections for single-electron loss were measured for Ar+ ions on rare-gas atoms in the laboratory energy range of 1.5 to 5.0 keV. The electron loss cross sections for all the targets studied are found to be in the order of magnitude between 10-19 and 10-22 cm2, and show a monotonically increasing behaviour as a function of the incident energy. The behaviour of the total single-electron loss cross sections with the atomic target number, Zt, shows different dependences as the collision energy increases. In all cases the present results display experimental evidence of saturation in the single-electron loss cross section as the atomic number of the target increases.

  20. Generator of a dense atomic gas curtain (for use in Intersecting Storage Rings)

    CERN Document Server

    Zankel, K

    1975-01-01

    A supersonic beam source is described which continuously generates a gas curtain for the proton beam profile observation in the Intersecting Storage Rings at CERN. Its maximum intensity is 10/sup 20 / atoms/sr s. A commonly used theoretical model for the determination of the intensity downstream of the source is discussed. Some results about the condensation behaviour of sodium vapour on metallic substrate surfaces are reported. (8 refs).

  1. Maximum compression of Z-pinch in a gas with high atomic number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerusov, A.V.

    1989-01-01

    An ideal system of equations with shock heating is used for describing of a Z pinch in a gas with high atomic number. In this case equations do not depend from the installation parameters. The approximate simple solution of such a system is presented. Numerical calculations of equations with radiative cooling and various dissipative effects have determined the employment conditions of ideal magnetohydrodynamic equation system. 10 refs

  2. Spectroscopic and Kinetic Measurements of Alkali Atom-Rare Gas Excimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-04

    vapors – Exciplex molecules absorb over much greater bandwidth • Control of inherent high optical gain to minimize ASE and optimize laser oscillation... Exciplex assisted diode Pumped Alkali Laser (XPAL) • Education of a future generation of laser scientists VG09-227-2 Physical Sciences Inc. Novel Approach...This new laser exploits the optical properties of weakly-bound alkali/rare-gas exciplexes for pumping the 2P1/2, 3/2 alkali atomic excited states 4

  3. Spark Plasma Sintering of a Gas Atomized Al7075 Alloy: Microstructure and Properties

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Molnárová, O.; Málek, P.; Lukáč, František; Chráska, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 12 (2016), č. článku 1004. ISSN 1996-1944 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-15609S Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : gas atomized Al7075 alloy * spark plasma sintering * microstructure * microhardness * high temperature stability Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials Impact factor: 2.654, year: 2016 http://www.mdpi.com/1996-1944/9/12/1004

  4. Modern atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Natarajan, Vasant

    2015-01-01

    Much of our understanding of physics in the last 30-plus years has come from research on atoms, photons, and their interactions. Collecting information previously scattered throughout the literature, Modern Atomic Physics provides students with one unified guide to contemporary developments in the field. After reviewing metrology and preliminary material, the text explains core areas of atomic physics. Important topics discussed include the spontaneous emission of radiation, stimulated transitions and the properties of gas, the physics and applications of resonance fluorescence, coherence, cooling and trapping of charged and neutral particles, and atomic beam magnetic resonance experiments. Covering standards, a different way of looking at a photon, stimulated radiation, and frequency combs, the appendices avoid jargon and use historical notes and personal anecdotes to make the topics accessible to non-atomic physics students. Written by a leader in atomic and optical physics, this text gives a state-of-the...

  5. Selenium analysis by an integrated microwave digestion-needle trap device with hydride sorption on carbon nanotubes and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maratta Martínez, Ariel; Vázquez, Sandra; Lara, Rodolfo; Martínez, Luis Dante; Pacheco, Pablo

    2018-02-01

    An integrated microwave assisted digestion (MW-AD) - needle trap device (NTD) for selenium determination in grape pomace samples is presented. The NTD was filled with oxidized multiwall carbon nanotubes (oxMWCNTS) where Se hydrides were preconcentrated. Determination was carried out by flow injection-electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (FI-ETAAS). The variables affecting the system were established by a multivariate design (Plackett Burman), indicating that the following variables significantly affect the system: sample amount, HNO3 digestion solution concentration, NaBH4 volume and elution volume. A Box-Behnken design was implemented to determine the optimized values of these variables. The system improved Se atomization in the graphite furnace, since only trapped hydrides reached the graphite furnace, and the pyrolysis stage was eliminated according to the aqueous matrix of the eluate. Under optimized conditions the system reached a limit of quantification of 0.11 μg kg- 1, a detection limit of 0.032 μg kg- 1, a relative standard deviation of 4% and a preconcentration factor (PF) of 100, reaching a throughput sample of 5 samples per hour. Sample analysis show Se concentrations between 0.34 ± 0.03 μg kg- 1 to 0.48 ± 0.03 μg kg- 1 in grape pomace. This system provides minimal reagents and sample consumption, eliminates discontinuous stages between samples processing reaching a simpler and faster Se analysis.

  6. Characterization of atomic spin polarization lifetime of cesium vapor cells with neon buffer gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Janet W.; Cranch, Geoffrey A.

    2018-02-01

    The dephasing time of spin-polarized atoms in an atomic vapor cell plays an important role in determining the stability of vapor-cell clocks as well as the sensitivity of optically-pumped magnetometers. The presence of a buffer gas can extend the lifetime of these atoms. Many vapor cell systems operate at a fixed (often elevated) temperature. For ambient temperature operation with no temperature control, it is necessary to characterize the temperature dependence as well. We present a spin-polarization lifetime study of Cesium vapor cells with different buffer gas pressures, and find good agreement with expectations based on the combined effects of wall collisions, spin exchange, and spin destruction. For our (7.5 mm diameter) vapor cells, the lifetime can be increased by two orders of magnitude by introducing Ne buffer gas up to 100 Torr. Additionally, the dependence of the lifetime on temperature is measured (25 - 47 oC) and simulated for the first time to our knowledge with reasonable agreement.

  7. Conversion of a Degenerate Fermi Gas of 6Li Atoms to a Molecular BEC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strecker, K.E.; Partridge, G.B.; Kamar, R.I.; Jack, M.W.; Hulet, R.G.

    2005-01-01

    Atomic Feshbach resonances have recently been used to produce a strongly interacting Fermi gas, where the BCS/BEC crossover can be explored. We have used both narrow and broad Feshbach resonances to convert a quantum degenerate Fermi gas of 6Li atoms into an ultracold gas of Li2 molecules. For the narrow resonances, the molecules are formed by coherent adiabatic passage through the resonance. We find that 50% of the atoms are converted to molecules. Furthermore, the lifetime of these molecules was measured to be surprisingly long, 1 s. We will discuss these measurements in the context of the present theoretical understanding. Molecules can also be formed using static fields near the broad Feshbach resonance. The lifetime of these molecules is again long, and sufficient to enable their evaporation to a Bose-Einstein condensate. Phase contrast images of the molecular condensate are presented. The BCS/BEC crossover may be explored by starting with a pure molecular condensate on the low-field side of the Feshbach resonance, and adiabatically changing the field to any final value around resonance. We combine this ability with optical spectroscopy on a bound-bound molecular transition to probe the nature of the many-body wavefunction in the crossover regime

  8. Gas-phase absorbents for trapping radioactive iodine and iodine compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    This standard covers granular absorbents (activated carbon, mineral base, polymer, etc.) for use in air and gas treatment systems. The absorbents are used in both thin-bed absorber cells and deep-bed systems. The standard includes docuent list, technical requirements, quality assurance requirements, and preparation for delivery. Test and sampling procedures are given

  9. Two-step condensation of the ideal Bose gas in highly anisotropic traps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Druten, N.J.; Ketterle, W.

    1997-01-01

    The ideal Bose gas in a highly anisotropic harmonic potential is studied. It is found that Bose-Einstein condensation occurs in two distinct steps as the temperature is lowered. In the first step the specific heat shows a sharp feature, but the system still occupies many one-dimensional quantum

  10. Towards trapped antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Jorgensen, L V; Bertsche, W; Boston, A; Bowe, P D; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hayano, R S; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Page, R D; Povilus, A; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2008-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made in the last few years in the nascent field of antihydrogen physics. The next big step forward is expected to be the trapping of the formed antihydrogen atoms using a magnetic multipole trap. ALPHA is a new international project that started to take data in 2006 at CERN’s Antiproton Decelerator facility. The primary goal of ALPHA is stable trapping of cold antihydrogen atoms to facilitate measurements of its properties. We discuss the status of the ALPHA project and the prospects for antihydrogen trapping.

  11. Dynamic response of interacting one-dimensional fermions in the harmonic atom trap: Phase response and the inhomogeneous mobility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wonneberger, W.

    2006-01-01

    The problem of the Kohn mode in bosonized theories of one-dimensional interacting fermions in the harmonic trap is investigated and a suitable modification of the interaction is proposed which preserves the Kohn mode. The modified theory is used to calculate exactly the inhomogeneous linear mobility μ(z,z 0 ;ω) at position z in response to a spatial force pulse at position z 0 . It is found that the inhomogeneous particle mobility exhibits resonances not only at the trap frequency ω - bar but also at multiples mε-bar , m=2,3,... of a new renormalized collective mode frequency which depends on the strength of the interaction. In contrast, the homogeneous response obtained by an average over z 0 remains that of the non-interacting system

  12. Comparative investigation of pure and mixed rare gas atoms on coronene molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Cantano, Rocío; Bartolomei, Massimiliano; Hernández, Marta I; Campos-Martínez, José; González-Lezana, Tomás; Villarreal, Pablo; Pérez de Tudela, Ricardo; Pirani, Fernando; Hernández-Rojas, Javier; Bretón, José

    2017-01-21

    Clusters formed by the combination of rare gas (RG) atoms of He, Ne, Ar, and Kr on coronene have been investigated by means of a basin-hopping algorithm and path integral Monte Carlo calculations at T = 2 K. Energies and geometries have been obtained and the role played by the specific RG-RG and RG-coronene interactions on the final results is analysed in detail. Signatures of diffuse behavior of the He atoms on the surface of the coronene are in contrast with the localization of the heavier species, Ar and Kr. The observed coexistence of various geometries for Ne suggests the motion of the RG atoms on the multi-well potential energy surface landscape offered by the coronene. Therefore, the investigation of different clusters enables a comparative analysis of localized versus non-localized features. Mixed Ar-He-coronene clusters have also been considered and the competition of the RG atoms to occupy the docking sites on the molecule is discussed. All the obtained information is crucial to assess the behavior of coronene, a prototypical polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon clustering with RG atoms at a temperature close to that of interstellar medium, which arises from the critical balance of the interactions involved.

  13. Selective removal of water in purge and cold-trap capillary gas chromatographic analysis of volatile organic traces in aqueous samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noij, T.H.M.; van Es, A.J.J.; Cramers, C.A.M.G.; Rijks, J.A.; Dooper, R.P.M.

    1987-01-01

    The design and features of an on-line purge and cold-trap pre-concentration device for rapid analysis of volatile organic compounds in aqueous samples are discussed. Excessive water is removed from the purge gas by a condenser or a water permeable membrane in order to avoid blocking of the capillary

  14. High-harmonic generation in a quantum electron gas trapped in a nonparabolic and anisotropic well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Jérôme; Lévêque-Simon, Kévin; Hervieux, Paul-Antoine; Manfredi, Giovanni; Haas, Fernando

    2016-05-01

    An effective self-consistent model is derived and used to study the dynamics of an electron gas confined in a nonparabolic and anisotropic quantum well. This approach is based on the equations of quantum hydrodynamics, which incorporate quantum and nonlinear effects in an approximate fashion. The effective model consists of a set of six coupled differential equations (dynamical system) for the electric dipole and the size of the electron gas. Using this model we show that: (i) high harmonic generation is related to the appearance of chaos in the phase space, as attested to by related Poincaré sections; (ii) higher order harmonics can be excited efficiently and with relatively weak driving fields by making use of chirped electromagnetic waves.

  15. The ALPHA antihydrogen trapping apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amole, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, Toronto ON Canada, M3J 1P3 (Canada); Andresen, G.B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Ashkezari, M.D. [Department of Physics, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC Canada, V5A 1S6 (Canada); Baquero-Ruiz, M. [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-7300 (United States); Bertsche, W. [Department of Physics, College of Science, Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); The Cockcroft Institute, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Bowe, P.D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Butler, E. [Physics Department, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Capra, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, Toronto ON Canada, M3J 1P3 (Canada); Carpenter, P.T. [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849-5311 (United States); Cesar, C.L. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro 21941-972 (Brazil); Chapman, S. [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-7300 (United States); Charlton, M.; Deller, A.; Eriksson, S. [Department of Physics, College of Science, Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Escallier, J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Fajans, J. [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-7300 (United States); Friesen, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary AB, Canada, T2N 1N4 (Canada); Fujiwara, M.C.; Gill, D.R. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver BC, Canada V6T 2A3 (Canada); Gutierrez, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver BC, Canada V6T 1Z4 (Canada); and others

    2014-01-21

    The ALPHA collaboration, based at CERN, has recently succeeded in confining cold antihydrogen atoms in a magnetic minimum neutral atom trap and has performed the first study of a resonant transition of the anti-atoms. The ALPHA apparatus will be described herein, with emphasis on the structural aspects, diagnostic methods and techniques that have enabled antihydrogen trapping and experimentation to be achieved.

  16. Dissolution off-gases at the marcoule pilot facility: Iodine trapping and off-gas characterization unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pouyat, D.; Vignau, B.; Roux, J.P.

    1993-01-01

    The Marcoule Pilot Reprocessing Facility (APM) reprocesses spent fuel from light water reactors and fast breeder reactors. A batch dissolution process is used with an annual throughput capacity of 5 metric tons. The off-gas treatment unit is described together with its characterization laboratory in order to highlight the functions and potential of the facilities. The objectives are consistent with the Marcoule site policy regarding diminished iodine release and investigation of the off-gas treatment process. The equipment used to meet these objectives is described from a functional standpoint. The facility implements measurement techniques to allow continuous quantitative measurements of nitrogen oxides, oxygen, iodine and krypton, as well as continuous monitoring of the demister inlet flow by γ spectrometry. Sorbents used for iodine trapping may be tested over a wide range of operating conditions (temperature, flow rate, iodine concentration) with representative dissolution off-gases. An X-ray and γ counting system is used to assess the activity of the adsorbed radionuclides, notably 129 I

  17. Atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auffray, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    The atom through centuries, has been imagined, described, explored, then accelerated, combined...But what happens truly inside the atom? And what are mechanisms who allow its stability? Physicist and historian of sciences, Jean-Paul Auffray explains that these questions are to the heart of the modern physics and it brings them a new lighting. (N.C.)

  18. Pairing fluctuations in trapped Fermi gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viverit, Luciano; Bruun, Georg M.; Minguzzi, Anna; Fazio, Rosario

    2004-01-01

    We examine the contribution of pairing fluctuations to the superfluid order parameter for harmonically trapped atomic Fermi gases in the BCS regime. In the limit of small systems we consider, both analytically and numerically, their space and temperature dependence. We predict a parity effect, i.e., that pairing fluctuations show a maximum or a minimum at the center of the trap, depending on the value of the last occupied shell being even or odd. We propose to detect pairing fluctuations by measuring the density-density correlation function after a ballistic expansion of the gas

  19. Speciation analysis of arsenic by selective hydride generation- cryotrapping-atomic fluorescence spectrometry with flame-in-gas- shield atomizer: Achieving extremely low detection limits with inexpensive instrumentation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Musil, Stanislav; Matoušek, Tomáš; Currier, J. M.; Stýblo, M.; Dědina, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 86, č. 20 (2014), s. 10422-10428 ISSN 0003-2700 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-23532S; GA MŠk LH12040 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : speciation analysis of arsenic * selective hydride generation * flame-in-gas-shield atomizer * cryotrapping-atomic fluorescence spectrometry Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 5.636, year: 2014

  20. Dust trap formation in a non-self-sustained discharge with external gas ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filippov, A. V.; Babichev, V. N.; Pal’, A. F.; Starostin, A. N.; Cherkovets, V. E.; Rerikh, V. K.; Taran, M. D.

    2015-01-01

    Results from numerical studies of a non-self-sustained gas discharge containing micrometer dust grains are presented. The non-self-sustained discharge (NSSD) was controlled by a stationary fast electron beam. The numerical model of an NSSD is based on the diffusion drift approximation for electrons and ions and self-consistently takes into account the influence of the dust component on the electron and ion densities. The dust component is described by the balance equation for the number of dust grains and the equation of motion for dust grains with allowance for the Stokes force, gravity force, and electric force in the cathode sheath. The interaction between dust grains is described in the self-consistent field approximation. The height of dust grain levitation over the cathode is determined and compared with experimental results. It is established that, at a given gas ionization rate and given applied voltage, there is a critical dust grain size above which the levitation condition in the cathode sheath cannot be satisfied. Simulations performed for the dust component consisting of dust grains of two different sizes shows that such grains levitate at different heights, i.e., size separation of dust drains levitating in the cathode sheath of an NSSD takes place

  1. Dust trap formation in a non-self-sustained discharge with external gas ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filippov, A. V., E-mail: fav@triniti.ru; Babichev, V. N.; Pal’, A. F.; Starostin, A. N.; Cherkovets, V. E.; Rerikh, V. K.; Taran, M. D. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-15

    Results from numerical studies of a non-self-sustained gas discharge containing micrometer dust grains are presented. The non-self-sustained discharge (NSSD) was controlled by a stationary fast electron beam. The numerical model of an NSSD is based on the diffusion drift approximation for electrons and ions and self-consistently takes into account the influence of the dust component on the electron and ion densities. The dust component is described by the balance equation for the number of dust grains and the equation of motion for dust grains with allowance for the Stokes force, gravity force, and electric force in the cathode sheath. The interaction between dust grains is described in the self-consistent field approximation. The height of dust grain levitation over the cathode is determined and compared with experimental results. It is established that, at a given gas ionization rate and given applied voltage, there is a critical dust grain size above which the levitation condition in the cathode sheath cannot be satisfied. Simulations performed for the dust component consisting of dust grains of two different sizes shows that such grains levitate at different heights, i.e., size separation of dust drains levitating in the cathode sheath of an NSSD takes place.

  2. Grouping and trapping of evaporating droplets in an oscillating gas flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katoshevski, David; Shakked, Tal; Sazhin, Sergei S.; Crua, Cyril; Heikal, Morgan R.

    2008-01-01

    A new approach to the analysis of droplet grouping in an oscillating gas flow is suggested. This is based on the investigation of droplet trajectories in the frame of reference moving with the phase velocity of the wave. Although the equations involved are relatively simple, the analysis shows distinctive characteristics of grouping and non-grouping cases. In the case of grouping, droplet trajectories converge to the points for which the ratio of flow velocity in this frame of reference and the amplitude of flow oscillations is less than 1, and the cosine of the arc sine of this ratio is positive. In the case of non-grouping, droplet trajectories in this frame of reference oscillate around the translational velocity close to the velocity of flow in the same frame of reference. The effect of droplet size on the grouping pattern is investigated. It has been pointed out that for the smaller droplets much more stable grouping is observed. The effect of droplet evaporation is studied in the limiting case when the contribution of the heat-up period can be ignored. It is shown that evaporation can lead to droplet grouping even in the case when the non-evaporating droplets are not grouped. This is related to the reduction in droplet diameter during the evaporation process. Coupling between gas and droplets is shown to decrease the grouping tendency. A qualitative agreement between predictions of the model and in-house experimental observations referring to Diesel engine sprays has been demonstrated

  3. Transport of Gas-Phase Anthropogenic VOCs to the Remote Troposphere During the NASA ATom Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornbrook, R. S.; Apel, E. C.; Hills, A. J.; Asher, E. C. C.; Emmons, L. K.; Blake, D. R.; Blake, N. J.; Simpson, I. J.; Barletta, B.; Meinardi, S.; Montzka, S. A.; Moore, F. L.; Miller, B. R.; Sweeney, C.; McKain, K.; Wofsy, S. C.; Daube, B. C.; Commane, R.; Bui, T. V.; Hanisco, T. F.; Wolfe, G. M.; St Clair, J. M.; Ryerson, T. B.; Thompson, C. R.; Peischl, J.; Ray, E. A.

    2017-12-01

    The NASA Atmospheric Tomography (ATom) project aims to study the impact of human-produced air pollution on greenhouse gases and on chemically reactive gases in the atmosphere. During the first two deployments, ATom-1 and ATom-2, which took place August 2016 and February 2017, respectively, a suite of trace gas measurement instruments were deployed on the NASA DC-8 which profiled the atmosphere between 0.2 and 13 km from near-pole to near-pole around the globe, sampling in the most remote regions of the atmosphere over the Arctic, Pacific, Southern, and Atlantic Oceans. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with a range of lifetimes from days to decades quantified using the Trace Organic Gas Analyzer (TOGA), Whole Air Sampler (WAS) and Programmable Flask Packages (PFPs) demonstrate a significant impact on the remote atmosphere from urban and industrial sources. Comparisons between the transport and fate of pollutants during Northern Hemisphere summer and winter will be presented. Observations of the distributions of anthropogenic VOCs will be compared with simulations using the Community Atmosphere Model with chemistry (CAM-chem).

  4. Light-pressure-induced nonlinear dispersion of a laser field interacting with an atomic gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimm, R.; Mlynek, J.

    1990-01-01

    We report on detailed studies of the effect of resonant light pressure on the optical response of an atomic gas to a single monochromatic laser field. In this very elementary situation of laser spectroscopy, the redistribution of atomic velocities that is induced by spontaneous light pressure leads to a novel contribution to the optical dispersion curve of the medium. This light-pressure-induced dispersion phenomenon displays a pronounced nonlinear dependence on the laser intensity. Moreover, for a given intensity, its strength is closely related to the laser beam diameter. As most important feature, this light-pressure-induced dispersion displays an even symmetry with respect to the optical detuning from line center. As a result, the total Doppler-broadened dispersion curve of the gas can become asymmetric, and a significant shift of the dispersion line center can occur. In addition to a detailed theoretical description of the phenomenon, we report on its experimental investigation on the λ=555.6 nm 1 S 0 - 3 P 1 transition in atomic ytterbium vapor with the use of frequency-modulation spectroscopy. The experimental findings are in good quantitative agreement with theoretical predictions

  5. Pyrolysis gas chromatographic atomic emission detection for sediments, coals and other petrochemical precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeley, J.A.; Zeng, Y.D.; Uden, P.C.; Eglinton, T.I.; Ericson, I. (Massachusetts University, Amherst, MA (USA). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1992-09-01

    On-line flash pyrolysis coupled to a capillary gas chromatograph for the characterization of marine sediments, coals and other heterogeneous solid samples is described. A helium microwave-induced plasma is used for chromatographic detection by atomic emission spectrometry. Simultaneous multi-element detection is achieved with a photodiode array detector. The optical path of the gas chromatographic atomic emission detector is purged with helium, allowing simultaneous, sensitive detection of atomic emission from sulfur 181 nm, phosphorous 186 nm, arsenic 189 nm, selenium 196 nm and carbon 193 nm. Several sediment and coal samples have been analysed for their carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, oxygen, phosphorous, arsenic and selenium content. Qualitative information indicating the occurrence and distribution of these elements in the samples can be used to gauge the relative stage of diagenetic evolution of the samples and provide information on their depositional environment. In some instances the chromatographic behaviour of the compounds produced upon pyrolysis is improved through on-line alkylation. This on-line derivatization is achieved by adding liquid reagents to the pyrolysis probe or by adding liquid reagents to the pyrolysis probe or by adding solid reagents either to the solid sample or by packing the reagent in the injection port of the chromatograph.

  6. Multi-quantum excitation in optically pumped alkali atom: rare gas mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbally-Kinney, K. L.; Rawlins, W. T.; Davis, S. J.

    2014-03-01

    Diode-pumped alkali laser (DPAL) technology offers a means of achieving high-energy gas laser output through optical pumping of the D-lines of Cs, Rb, and K. The exciplex effect, based on weak attractive forces between alkali atoms and polarizable rare gas atoms (Ar, Kr, Xe), provides an alternative approach via broadband excitation of exciplex precursors (XPAL). In XPAL configurations, we have observed multi-quantum excitation within the alkali manifolds which result in infrared emission lines between 1 and 4 μm. The observed excited states include the 42FJ states of both Cs and Rb, which are well above the two-photon energy of the excitation laser in each case. We have observed fluorescence from multi-quantum states for excitation wavelengths throughout the exciplex absorption bands of Cs-Ar, Cs-Kr, and Cs-Xe. The intensity scaling is roughly first-order or less in both pump power and alkali concentration, suggesting a collisional energy pooling excitation mechanism. Collisional up-pumping appears to present a parasitic loss term for optically pumped atomic systems at high intensities, however there may also be excitation of other lasing transitions at infrared wavelengths.

  7. Gas chromatography of organic microcontaminants using atomic emission and mass spectrometric detection combined in one instrument (GC-AED/MS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, H.G.J.; Hankemeier, T.; Brinkman, U.A.T.

    1999-01-01

    This study describes the coupling of an atomic-emission detector and mass-spectrometric detector to a single gas chromatograph. Splitting of the column effluent enables simultaneous detection by atomic-emission detection (AED) and mass spectrometry (MS) and yields a powerful system for the target

  8. Interfacial-Bonding-Regulated CO Oxidation over Pt Atoms Immobilized on Gas-Exfoliated Hexagonal Boron Nitride

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Xin; Zhu, Hongdan; Linguerri, Roberto; Han, Yu; Chambaud, Gilberte; Meng, Changgong

    2017-01-01

    We compared the electronic structure and CO oxidation mechanisms over Pt atoms immobilized by both B-vacancies and N-vacancies on gas-exfoliated hexagonal boron nitride. We showed that chemical bonds are formed between the B atoms associated

  9. Hollow cathode discharges with gas flow: numerical modelling for the effect on the sputtered atoms and the deposition flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogaerts, Annemie; Okhrimovskyy, Andriy; Baguer, Neyda; Gijbels, Renaat

    2005-01-01

    A model is developed for a cylindrical hollow cathode discharge (HCD), with an axial gas flow (entering through a hole in the cathode bottom). The model combines a commercial computational fluid dynamics program 'FLUENT' to compute the gas flow, with home-developed Monte Carlo and fluid models for the plasma behaviour. In this paper, we focus on the behaviour of the sputtered atoms, and we investigate how the gas flow affects the sputtered atom density profiles and the fluxes, which is important for sputter deposition. The sputtered atom density profiles are not much affected by the gas flow. The flux, on the other hand, is found to be significantly enhanced by the gas flow, but in the present set-up it is far from uniform in the radial direction at the open end of the HCD, where a substrate for deposition could be located

  10. Evolution from Rydberg gas to ultracold plasma in a supersonic atomic beam of Xe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung, J; Sadeghi, H; Schulz-Weiling, M; Grant, E R

    2014-01-01

    A Rydberg gas of xenon, entrained in a supersonic atomic beam, evolves slowly to form an ultracold plasma. In the early stages of this evolution, when the free-electron density is low, Rydberg atoms undergo long-range ℓ-mixing collisions, yielding states of high orbital angular momentum. The development of high-ℓ states promotes dipole–dipole interactions that help to drive Penning ionization. The electron density increases until it reaches the threshold for avalanche. Ninety μs after the production of a Rydberg gas with the initial state, n 0 ℓ 0 =42d, a 432 V cm −1 electrostatic pulse fails to separate charge in the excited volume, an effect which is ascribed to screening by free electrons. Photoexcitation cross sections, observed rates of ℓ-mixing, and a coupled-rate-equation model simulating the onset of the electron-impact avalanche point consistently to an initial Rydberg gas density of 5×10 8 cm −3 . (paper)

  11. Evolution from Rydberg gas to ultracold plasma in a supersonic atomic beam of Xe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, J.; Sadeghi, H.; Schulz-Weiling, M.; Grant, E. R.

    2014-08-01

    A Rydberg gas of xenon, entrained in a supersonic atomic beam, evolves slowly to form an ultracold plasma. In the early stages of this evolution, when the free-electron density is low, Rydberg atoms undergo long-range \\ell -mixing collisions, yielding states of high orbital angular momentum. The development of high-\\ell states promotes dipole-dipole interactions that help to drive Penning ionization. The electron density increases until it reaches the threshold for avalanche. Ninety μs after the production of a Rydberg gas with the initial state, {{n}_{0}}{{\\ell }_{0}}=42d, a 432 V cm-1 electrostatic pulse fails to separate charge in the excited volume, an effect which is ascribed to screening by free electrons. Photoexcitation cross sections, observed rates of \\ell -mixing, and a coupled-rate-equation model simulating the onset of the electron-impact avalanche point consistently to an initial Rydberg gas density of 5\\times {{10}^{8}}\\;c{{m}^{-3}}.

  12. EBIT trapping program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, S.R.; Beck, B.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Church, D.; DeWitt, D.; Knapp, D.K.; Marrs, R.E.; Schneider, D.; Schweikhard, L.

    1993-01-01

    The LLNL electron beam ion trap provides the world's only source of stationary highly charged ions up to bare U. This unique capability makes many new atomic and nuclear physics experiments possible. (orig.)

  13. Progress Toward Buffer Gas Cooling of a 1 μB Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Cort; Newman, Bonna; Brahms, Nathan; Decarvalho, Robert; Li, Chih-Hao; Greytak, Tom; Kleppner, Dan; Doyle, John

    2006-05-01

    Thermalization with a non-magnetic ^3He buffer gas has been demonstrated to be an effective means of removing heat from a sample of hot magnetic atoms held in a magnetic trap[1]. To thermally isolate the atoms, it is necessary to remove the buffer gas without sweeping away the magnetically trapped atoms. The magnetic trap strength is proportional to the magnitude of the atom's moment. This is the primary reason that trapping a 1 μB species has never been realized in a buffer gas cooling experiment. Eventually, we plan to use this technique to trap and cool atomic hydrogen and deuterium. We have built a cryogenic valved cell suspended from a dilution refrigerator along the axis of a 4T quadrupole magnetic field. The cell is maintained at a base temperature of 100mK. The buffer gas is removed by opening the valve. Any remaining buffer gas may be energetic enough to scatter the atoms out of the trapping potential, thus limiting the lifetime. Therefore, we lower the temperature of the cell to decrease the vapor pressure of any ^3He remaining on the walls. We can mimic the conditions of a 1 μB species using atomic Mn (5 μB) simply by lowering the trapping field strength by a factor of five. Further, we will report on efforts to trap and thermally isolate ^7Li, a true 1 μB species. [1]J. D. Weinstein et al., Phys. Rev. A 57, R3173 (1998).

  14. Guest Editor’s Notes on the “Atoms” Special Issue on “Perspectives of Atomic Physics with Trapped Highly Charged Ions”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmar Träbert

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The study of highly charged ions (HCI was pursued first at Uppsala (Sweden, by Edlén and Tyrén in the 1930s. Their work led to the recognition that the solar corona is populated by such ions, an insight which forced massive paradigm changes in solar physics. Plasmas aiming at controlled fusion in the laboratory, laser-produced plasmas, foil-excited swift ion beams, and electron beam ion traps have all pushed the envelope in the production of HCI. However, while there are competitive aspects in the race for higher ion charge states, the real interest lies in the very many physics topics that can be studied in these ions. Out of this rich field, the Special Issue concentrates on atomic physics studies that investigate highly charged ions produced, maintained, and/or manipulated in ion traps. There have been excellent achievements in the field in the past, and including fairly recent work, they have been described by their authors at conferences and in the appropriate journals. The present article attempts an overview over current lines of development, some of which are expanded upon in this Special Issue.

  15. Relativistic effects in photoionization time delay near the Cooper minimum of noble-gas atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Soumyajit; Mandal, Ankur; Jose, Jobin; Varma, Hari R.; Deshmukh, P. C.; Kheifets, A. S.; Dolmatov, V. K.; Manson, S. T.

    2014-11-01

    Time delay of photoemission from valence n s , n p3 /2 , and n p1 /2 subshells of noble-gas atoms is theoretically scrutinized within the framework of the dipole relativistic random phase approximation. The focus is on the variation of time delay in the vicinity of the Cooper minima in photoionization of the outer subshells of neon, argon, krypton, and xenon, where the corresponding dipole matrix element changes its sign while passing through a node. It is revealed that the presence of the Cooper minimum in one photoionization channel has a strong effect on time delay in other channels. This is shown to be due to interchannel coupling.

  16. Fabrication of remote steam atomized scrubbers for DWPF off-gas system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, M.G.; Lafferty, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    The defense waste processing facility (DWPF) is being constructed for the purpose of processing high-level waste from sludge to a vitrified borosilicate glass. In the operation of continuous slurry-fed melters, off-gas aerosols are created by entrainment of feed slurries and the vaporization of volatile species from the molten glass mixture. It is necessary to decontaminate these aerosols in order to minimize discharge of airborne radionuclide particulates. A steam atomized scrubber (SAS) has been developed for DWPF which utilizes a patented hydro- sonic system gas scrubbing method. The Hydro-Sonic System utilizes a steam aspirating-type venturi scrubber that requires very precise fabrication tolerances in order to obtain acceptable decontamination factors. In addition to the process-related tolerances, precision mounting and nozzle tolerances are required for remote service at DWPF

  17. Carbon Co-Deposition During Gas Reduction of Water-Atomized Fe-Cr-Mo Powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali B.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The water atomization of iron powder with a composition of Fe-3Cr-0.5Mo (wt.% at 1600°C and 150 bar creates an oxide layer, which in this study was reduced using a mixture of methane (CH4 and argon (Ar gas. The lowest oxygen content was achieved with a 100 cc/min flow rate of CH4, but this also resulted in a co-deposition of carbon due to the cracking of CH4. This carbon can be used directly to create high-quality, sinter hardenable steel, thereby eliminating the need for an additional mixing step prior to sintering. An exponential relationship was found to exist between the CH4 gas flow rate and carbon content of the powder, meaning that its composition can be easily controlled to suit a variety of different applications.

  18. Assessment of the gas dynamic trap mirror facility as intense neutron source for fusion material test irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, U.; Moeslang, A.; Ivanov, A.A.

    2000-01-01

    The gas dynamic trap (GDT) mirror machine has been proposed by the Budker Institute of nuclear physics, Novosibirsk, as a volumetric neutron source for fusion material test irradiations. On the basis of the GDT plasma confinement concept, 14 MeV neutrons are generated at high production rates in the two end sections of the axially symmetrical central mirror cell, serving as suitable irradiation test regions. In this paper, we present an assessment of the GDT as intense neutron source for fusion material test irradiations. This includes comparisons to irradiation conditions in fusion reactor systems (ITER, Demo) and the International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility (IFMIF), as well as a conceptual design for a helium-cooled tubular test assembly elaborated for the largest of the two test zones taking proper account of neutronics, thermal-hydraulic and mechanical aspects. This tubular test assembly incorporates ten rigs of about 200 cm length used for inserting instrumented test capsules with miniaturized specimens taking advantage of the 'small specimen test technology'. The proposed design allows individual temperatures in each of the rigs, and active heating systems inside the capsules ensures specimen temperature stability even during beam-off periods. The major concern is about the maximum achievable dpa accumulation of less than 15 dpa per full power year on the basis of the present design parameters of the GDT neutron source. A design upgrading is proposed to allow for higher neutron wall loadings in the material test regions

  19. Microscopic modeling of gas-surface scattering: II. Application to argon atom adsorption on a platinum (111) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filinov, A.; Bonitz, M.; Loffhagen, D.

    2018-06-01

    A new combination of first principle molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with a rate equation model presented in the preceding paper (paper I) is applied to analyze in detail the scattering of argon atoms from a platinum (111) surface. The combined model is based on a classification of all atom trajectories according to their energies into trapped, quasi-trapped and scattering states. The number of particles in each of the three classes obeys coupled rate equations. The coefficients in the rate equations are the transition probabilities between these states which are obtained from MD simulations. While these rates are generally time-dependent, after a characteristic time scale t E of several tens of picoseconds they become stationary allowing for a rather simple analysis. Here, we investigate this time scale by analyzing in detail the temporal evolution of the energy distribution functions of the adsorbate atoms. We separately study the energy loss distribution function of the atoms and the distribution function of in-plane and perpendicular energy components. Further, we compute the sticking probability of argon atoms as a function of incident energy, angle and lattice temperature. Our model is important for plasma-surface modeling as it allows to extend accurate simulations to longer time scales.

  20. Collisions of halogen (2P) and rare gas (1S) atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, C.H.

    1978-12-01

    Differential cross sections I (THETA) at several collision energies measured in crossed molecular beam experiments are reported for several combinations of halogen atoms ( 2 P) scattered off rare gas-rare gas atoms ( 1 S 0 ), namely, F + Ne, F + Ar, F + Kr, F + Xe, C1 + Xe. The scattering is described by an elastic model appropriate to Hund's case c coupling. With the use of this model, the X 1/2, I 3/2, and II 1/2 interaction potential energy curves are derived by fitting calculated differential cross sections, based on analytic representations of the potentials, to the data. The F - Xe X 1/2 potential shows a significant bonding qualitatively different than for the other F-rare gases. The I 3/2 and II 1/2 potentials closely resemble the van der Waals interactions of the one electron richer ground state rare gas-rare gas systems. Coupled-channel scattering calculations are carried out for F + Ar, F + Xe, and C1 + Xe using the realistic potential curves derived earlier. The results justify the use of the elastic model, and give additional information on intramultiplet and intermultiplet transitions. The transitions are found to be governed by the crossing of the two Ω = 1/2 potentials in the complex plane. The measured I (theta) and I (THETA) derived from the coupled-channel computations show small oscillations or perturbations (Stueckelberg oscillations) though quantitative agreement is not obtained.The nature of the anomalous F - Xe X 1/2 potential is discussed as is the approximation of a constant spin orbit coupling over the experimentally accessible range of internuclear distances for these open shell molecules. 55 references

  1. xGASS: total cold gas scaling relations and molecular-to-atomic gas ratios of galaxies in the local Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catinella, Barbara; Saintonge, Amélie; Janowiecki, Steven; Cortese, Luca; Davé, Romeel; Lemonias, Jenna J.; Cooper, Andrew P.; Schiminovich, David; Hummels, Cameron B.; Fabello, Silvia; Geréb, Katinka; Kilborn, Virginia; Wang, Jing

    2018-05-01

    We present the extended GALEX Arecibo SDSS Survey (xGASS), a gas fraction-limited census of the atomic hydrogen (H I) gas content of 1179 galaxies selected only by stellar mass (M⋆ = 109-1011.5 M⊙) and redshift (0.01 new Arecibo observations of 208 galaxies, for which we release catalogues and H I spectra. In addition to extending the GASS H I scaling relations by one decade in stellar mass, we quantify total (atomic+molecular) cold gas fractions and molecular-to-atomic gas mass ratios, Rmol, for the subset of 477 galaxies observed with the IRAM 30 m telescope. We find that atomic gas fractions keep increasing with decreasing stellar mass, with no sign of a plateau down to log M⋆/M⊙ = 9. Total gas reservoirs remain H I-dominated across our full stellar mass range, hence total gas fraction scaling relations closely resemble atomic ones, but with a scatter that strongly correlates with Rmol, especially at fixed specific star formation rate. On average, Rmol weakly increases with stellar mass and stellar surface density μ⋆, but individual values vary by almost two orders of magnitude at fixed M⋆ or μ⋆. We show that, for galaxies on the star-forming sequence, variations of Rmol are mostly driven by changes of the H I reservoirs, with a clear dependence on μ⋆. Establishing if galaxy mass or structure plays the most important role in regulating the cold gas content of galaxies requires an accurate separation of bulge and disc components for the study of gas scaling relations.

  2. Measurements of an ablator-gas atomic mix in indirectly driven implosions at the National Ignition Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalyuk, V A; Tipton, R E; Pino, J E; Casey, D T; Grim, G P; Remington, B A; Rowley, D P; Weber, S V; Barrios, M; Benedetti, L R; Bleuel, D L; Bradley, D K; Caggiano, J A; Callahan, D A; Cerjan, C J; Clark, D S; Edgell, D H; Edwards, M J; Frenje, J A; Gatu-Johnson, M; Glebov, V Y; Glenn, S; Haan, S W; Hamza, A; Hatarik, R; Hsing, W W; Izumi, N; Khan, S; Kilkenny, J D; Kline, J; Knauer, J; Landen, O L; Ma, T; McNaney, J M; Mintz, M; Moore, A; Nikroo, A; Pak, A; Parham, T; Petrasso, R; Sayre, D B; Schneider, M B; Tommasini, R; Town, R P; Widmann, K; Wilson, D C; Yeamans, C B

    2014-01-17

    We present the first results from an experimental campaign to measure the atomic ablator-gas mix in the deceleration phase of gas-filled capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility. Plastic capsules containing CD layers were filled with tritium gas; as the reactants are initially separated, DT fusion yield provides a direct measure of the atomic mix of ablator into the hot spot gas. Capsules were imploded with x rays generated in hohlraums with peak radiation temperatures of ∼294  eV. While the TT fusion reaction probes conditions in the central part (core) of the implosion hot spot, the DT reaction probes a mixed region on the outer part of the hot spot near the ablator-hot-spot interface. Experimental data were used to develop and validate the atomic-mix model used in two-dimensional simulations.

  3. Effect of lattice-gas atoms on the adsorption behaviour of thioether molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yi; Yang, Bing; Hulot, Catherine; Blechert, Siegfried; Nilius, Niklas; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2012-08-21

    Using STM topographic imaging and spectroscopy, we have investigated the adsorption of two thioether molecules, 1,2-bis(phenylthio)benzene and (bis(3-phenylthio)-phenyl)sulfane, on noble and transition metal surfaces. The two substrates show nearly antipodal behaviour. Whereas complexes with one or two protruding centres are observed on Au(111), only flat and uniform ad-structures are found on NiAl(110). The difference is ascribed to the possibility of the thioethers to form metal-organic complexes by coordinating lattice-gas atoms on the Au(111), while only the pristine molecules adsorb on the alloy surface. The metal coordination in the first case is driven by the formation of strong Au-S bonds and enables the formation of characteristic monomer, dimer and chain-like structures of the thioethers, using the Au atoms as linkers. A similar mechanism is not available on the NiAl, because no lattice gas develops at this surface at room temperature. Our work demonstrates how surface properties, i.e. the availability of mobile ad-species, determine the interaction of organic molecules with metallic substrates.

  4. Dynamics of gas-surface interactions atomic-level understanding of scattering processes at surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Díez Muniño, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    This book gives a representative survey of the state of the art of research on gas-surface interactions. It provides an overview of the current understanding of gas surface dynamics and, in particular, of the reactive and non-reactive processes of atoms and small molecules at surfaces. Leading scientists in the field, both from the theoretical and the experimental sides, write in this book about their most recent advances. Surface science grew as an interdisciplinary research area over the last decades, mostly because of new experimental technologies (ultra-high vacuum, for instance), as well as because of a novel paradigm, the ‘surface science’ approach. The book describes the second transformation which is now taking place pushed by the availability of powerful quantum-mechanical theoretical methods implemented numerically. In the book, experiment and theory progress hand in hand with an unprecedented degree of accuracy and control. The book presents how modern surface science targets the atomic-level u...

  5. Nucleation and microstructure development in Cr-Mo-V tool steel during gas atomization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behúlová, M.; Grgač, P.; Čička, R.

    2017-11-01

    Nucleation studies of undercooled metallic melts are of essential interest for the understanding of phase selection, growth kinetics and microstructure development during their rapid non-equilibrium solidification. The paper deals with the modelling of nucleation processes and microstructure development in the hypoeutectic tool steel Ch12MF4 with the chemical composition of 2.37% C, 12.06 % Cr, 1.2% Mo, 4.0% V and balance Fe [wt. %] in the process of nitrogen gas atomization. Based on the classical theory of homogeneous nucleation, the nucleation temperature of molten rapidly cooled spherical particles from this alloy with diameter from 40 μm to 600 μm in the gas atomization process is calculated using various estimations of parameters influencing the nucleation process - the Gibbs free energy difference between solid and liquid phases and the solid/liquid interfacial energy. Results of numerical calculations are compared with experimentally measured nucleation temperatures during levitation experiments and microstructures developed in rapidly solidified powder particles from the investigated alloy.

  6. Collisional energy dependence of molecular ionization by metastable rare gas atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, R.M.; Parr, T.P.

    1979-01-01

    The collisional energy dependence of several molecular total ionization cross sections by metastable rare gas atoms was studied over the thermal energy region using the crossed molecular beam time-of-flight method. Results are reported for the collision systems He, Ne, and Ar ionizing the geometric isomers cis- and trans-dichloroethylene and ortho- and para-dichlorobenzene. The He ionization cross sections oscillate about an energy dependence of E/sup -1/2/ over the energy range 0.004--1.0 eV, and the Ar*+para-dichlorobenzene cross section oscillates about an energy dependence of E/sup -2/5/ over the energy range 0.011--0.64 eV. The remaining systems are characterized by ''bent'' E/sup -m/ dependences with m values of 0.56--0.70 at low energies changing to 0.07--0.29 at higher energies. Comparison with the slopes of the He* systems and the Ar*+para-dichlorobenzene system shows that the ''bent'' and ''oscillating'' energy dependences are similar except for the form of the cross section functions at the lowest energies. No systematic differences are found between the cross section energy dependences for ionization of different geometric isomers or for ionization by the different metastable rare gas atoms

  7. Regimes of spray formation in gas-centered swirl coaxial atomizers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivakumar, D.; Kulkarni, V. [Indian Institute of Science, Department of Aerospace Engineering, Bangalore (India)

    2011-09-15

    Spray formation in ambient atmosphere from gas-centered swirl coaxial atomizers is described by carrying out experiments in a spray test facility. The atomizer discharges a circular air jet and an axisymmetric swirling water sheet from its coaxially arranged inner and outer orifices. A high-speed digital imaging system along with a backlight illumination arrangement is employed to record the details of liquid sheet breakup and spray development. Spray regimes exhibiting different sheet breakup mechanisms are identified and their characteristic features presented. The identified spray regimes are wave-assisted sheet breakup, perforated sheet breakup, segmented sheet breakup, and pulsation spray regime. In the regime of wave-assisted sheet breakup, the sheet breakup shows features similar to the breakup of two-dimensional planar air-blasted liquid sheets. At high air-to-liquid momentum ratios, the interaction process between the axisymmetric swirling liquid sheet and the circular air jet develops spray processes which are more specific to the atomizer studied here. The spray exhibits a periodic ejection of liquid masses whose features are dominantly controlled by the central air jet. (orig.)

  8. Effects of N2 mixed gas atomization on electrochemical properties of Mm(Ni,Co,Mn,Al)5.0 alloy powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagimoto, K.; Sunada, S.; Majima, K.; Sawada, T.

    2004-01-01

    N 2 gas, N 2 -Ar mixed gas and Ar gas atomization followed by acid surface treatment was applied to improve electrochemical properties of AB 5 type hydrogen storage alloy powder. The shape of Ar atomized powder was spherical and it changed to be irregular with increasing N 2 content of mixed gas. Irrespective of gas kinds, electrodes of atomized powder showed the same discharge capacity as cast-pulverized powder under auxiliary electrical conductivity by nickel powder addition. Without nickel powder, however, N 2 atomized powder showed the best electrochemical properties as well as gas activation behavior. By the combination process of N 2 gas atomization and acid surface treatment, it was considered that irregular shape of N 2 atomized powder promoted electrical conductivity of electrodes and catalytic nickel concentrated surface layer was formed to increase the hydrogen storage rapidity

  9. The effect of the partial pressure of H2 gas and atomic hydrogen on diamond films deposited using CH3OH/H2O gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kwon-Jai; Koh, Jae-Gui; Shin, Jae-Soo; Kwon, Ki-Hong; Lee, Chang-Hee

    2006-01-01

    Diamond films were deposited on Si(100) substrates by hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) with a CH 3 OH/H 2 O gas mixture while changing the gas ratio. The films were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman spectroscopy, and optical emission spectroscopy (OES). The diamond films were grown with CH 3 OH being 52 % by volume of the gas mixture. The effect of atomic hydrogen on the film was different from that of the CH 4 /H 2 gas mixture. Analysis with OES during film growth indicated that among the thermally dissociated hydrogen radicals, only H α contributed to the etching of graphite.

  10. The influence of gas phase velocity fluctuations on primary atomization and droplet deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourmatzis, A.; Masri, A. R.

    2014-02-01

    The effects of grid-generated velocity fluctuations on the primary atomization and subsequent droplet deformation of a range of laminar liquid jets are examined using microscopic high-speed backlit imaging of the break-up zone and laser Doppler anemometry of the gas phase separately. This is done for fixed gas mean flow conditions in a miniature wind tunnel experiment utilizing a selection of fuels, turbulence-generating grids and two syringe sizes. The constant mean flow allows for an isolated study of velocity fluctuation effects on primary atomization in a close approximation to homogeneous decaying turbulence. The qualitative morphology of the primary break-up region is examined over a range of turbulence intensities, and spectral analysis is performed in order to ascertain the break-up frequency which, for a case of no grid, compares well with the existing literature. The addition of velocity fluctuations tends to randomize the break-up process. Slightly downstream of the break-up region, image processing is conducted in order to extract a number of metrics, which do not depend on droplet sphericity, and these include droplet aspect ratio and orientation, the latter quantity being somewhat unconventional in spray characterization. A turbulent Weber number which takes into account gas phase fluctuations is utilized to characterize the resulting droplet shapes, in addition to a mean Weber number . Above a a clear positive relationship exists between the mean aspect ratio of droplets and the turbulent Weber number where is varied by altering all relevant variables including the velocity root mean square, the initial droplet diameter, the surface tension and the density.

  11. Xenon gas field ion source from a single-atom tip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Wei-Chiao; Lin, Chun-Yueh; Chang, Wei-Tse; Li, Po-Chang; Fu, Tsu-Yi; Chang, Chia-Seng; Tsong, T. T.; Hwang, Ing-Shouh

    2017-06-01

    Focused ion beam (FIB) systems have become powerful diagnostic and modification tools for nanoscience and nanotechnology. Gas field ion sources (GFISs) built from atomic-size emitters offer the highest brightness among all ion sources and thus can improve the spatial resolution of FIB systems. Here we show that the Ir/W(111) single-atom tip (SAT) can emit high-brightness Xe+ ion beams with a high current stability. The ion emission current versus extraction voltage was analyzed from 150 K up to 309 K. The optimal emitter temperature for maximum Xe+ ion emission was ˜150 K and the reduced brightness at the Xe gas pressure of 1 × 10-4 torr is two to three orders of magnitude higher than that of a Ga liquid metal ion source, and four to five orders of magnitude higher than that of a Xe inductively coupled plasma ion source. Most surprisingly, the SAT emitter remained stable even when operated at 309 K. Even though the ion current decreased with increasing temperature, the current at room temperature (RT) could still reach over 1 pA when the gas pressure was higher than 1 × 10-3 torr, indicating the feasibility of RT-Xe-GFIS for application to FIB systems. The operation temperature of Xe-SAT-GFIS is considerably higher than the cryogenic temperature required for the helium ion microscope (HIM), which offers great technical advantages because only simple or no cooling schemes can be adopted. Thus, Xe-GFIS-FIB would be easy to implement and may become a powerful tool for nanoscale milling and secondary ion mass spectroscopy.

  12. Stored ions in the Paul trap. Preliminary investigations on life-time measurement of the metastable 6D3/2 state of 226Ra+, storage properties of 138Ba+ and 28N2+ at variation of the buffer-gas pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leuthner, Heiko

    2011-01-01

    Paul-traps are a widely used tool in scientific research and play an important role in atomic physics and mass spectrometry. (1) From the earth-alkaline ions only spectroscopic data of Ra + are lacking. Those are important for the test of theoretical models and for a future atomic parity violation experiment. The first part of this work describes the setting up of a Paul-trap based Laser-experiment for measuring the lifetime of the 6D 3/2 state of 226 Ra + . Basic tests with 138 Ba + ions are presented. (2) Damping and space charge effects on resonances in the stability region strongly affect the use of Paul-traps in mass spectrometry and analysis of reaction products. The second part of this work presents detailed investigations on the storage of big, buffer-gas-cooled ion clouds in two different Paul-trap experiments; the first of them uses 138 Ba + ions detected continuously by electronic and optical detection systems, the second one uses N 2 + molecular ions and an automated destructive time-of-flight-detection method. A high precision measurement with N 2 + of the first stability region of the trap not only gives the possibility of direct comparison of experimental and theoretical resonances but also provides absolute ion numbers over the whole region for the first time. Unlike previous measurements, the investigations on nonlinear resonances where done on the superimposed stability regions of 4 simultaneously stored ion species. The nonlinear resonances were studied by varying buffer gas pressure and ion number and showed collective resonances without external excitation. By varying the buffer gas pressure the spatial distribution of a Ba + -ion cloud was investigated as well as the change of the optimal storing parameters using N 2 + -ions. Optimum Pressures for catching and trapping of ions turned out to be unequal. Shape and position of externally excited collective and individual resonances were studied under variation of ion number, buffer-gas pressure

  13. A MOLECULAR STAR FORMATION LAW IN THE ATOMIC-GAS-DOMINATED REGIME IN NEARBY GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schruba, Andreas; Walter, Fabian; Dumas, Gaelle; Sandstrom, Karin; Leroy, Adam K.; Bigiel, Frank; Brinks, Elias; De Blok, W. J. G.; Kramer, Carsten; Rosolowsky, Erik; Schuster, Karl; Usero, Antonio; Weiss, Axel; Wiesemeyer, Helmut

    2011-01-01

    We use the IRAM HERACLES survey to study CO emission from 33 nearby spiral galaxies down to very low intensities. Using 21 cm line atomic hydrogen (H I) data, mostly from THINGS, we predict the local mean CO velocity based on the mean H I velocity. By re-normalizing the CO velocity axis so that zero corresponds to the local mean H I velocity we are able to stack spectra coherently over large regions. This enables us to measure CO intensities with high significance as low as I CO ∼ 0.3 K km s -1 (Σ H 2 ∼1 M sun pc -2 ), an improvement of about one order of magnitude over previous studies. We detect CO out to galactocentric radii r gal ∼ r 25 and find the CO radial profile to follow a remarkably uniform exponential decline with a scale length of ∼0.2 r 25 . Here we focus on stacking as a function of radius, comparing our sensitive CO profiles to matched profiles of H I, Hα, far-UV (FUV), and Infrared (IR) emission at 24 μm and 70 μm. We observe a tight, roughly linear relationship between CO and IR intensity that does not show any notable break between regions that are dominated by molecular gas (Σ H 2 >Σ H i ) and those dominated by atomic gas (Σ H 2 H i ). We use combinations of FUV+24 μm and Hα+24 μm to estimate the recent star formation rate (SFR) surface density, Σ SFR , and find approximately linear relations between Σ SFR and Σ H 2 . We interpret this as evidence of stars forming in molecular gas with little dependence on the local total gas surface density. While galaxies display small internal variations in the SFR-to-H 2 ratio, we do observe systematic galaxy-to-galaxy variations. These galaxy-to-galaxy variations dominate the scatter in relationships between CO and SFR tracers measured at large scales. The variations have the sense that less massive galaxies exhibit larger ratios of SFR-to-CO than massive galaxies. Unlike the SFR-to-CO ratio, the balance between atomic and molecular gas depends strongly on the total gas surface density

  14. In situ measurements of krypton in xenon gas with a quadrupole mass spectrometer following a cold-trap at a temporarily reduced pumping speed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, E; Rosendahl, S; Huhmann, C; Weinheimer, C; Kettling, H

    2013-01-01

    A new method for measuring trace amounts of krypton in xenon using a cold trap with a residual gas analyzer has been developed, which achieves an increased sensitivity by temporarily reducing the pumping speed while expending a minimal amount of xenon. By partially closing a custom built butterfly valve between the measurement chamber and the turbomolecular pump, a sensitivity of 40 ppt has been reached. This method has been tested on an ultra-pure gas sample from Air Liquide with an unknown intrinsic krypton concentration, yielding a krypton concentration of 330±200 ppt.

  15. All-gas-phase synthesis of UiO-66 through modulated atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lausund, Kristian Blindheim; Nilsen, Ola

    2016-11-01

    Thin films of stable metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) such as UiO-66 have enormous application potential, for instance in microelectronics. However, all-gas-phase deposition techniques are currently not available for such MOFs. We here report on thin-film deposition of the thermally and chemically stable UiO-66 in an all-gas-phase process by the aid of atomic layer deposition (ALD). Sequential reactions of ZrCl4 and 1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid produce amorphous organic-inorganic hybrid films that are subsequently crystallized to the UiO-66 structure by treatment in acetic acid vapour. We also introduce a new approach to control the stoichiometry between metal clusters and organic linkers by modulation of the ALD growth with additional acetic acid pulses. An all-gas-phase synthesis technique for UiO-66 could enable implementations in microelectronics that are not compatible with solvothermal synthesis. Since this technique is ALD-based, it could also give enhanced thickness control and the possibility to coat irregular substrates with high aspect ratios.

  16. Atomization of volatile compounds for atomic absorption and atomic fluorescence spectrometry: On the way towards the ideal atomizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dedina, Jiri

    2007-01-01

    This review summarizes and discusses the individual atomizers of volatile compounds. A set of criteria important for analytical praxis is used to rank all the currently existing approaches to the atomization based on on-line atomization for atomic absorption (AAS) and atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) as well as on in-atomizer trapping for AAS. Regarding on-line atomization for AAS, conventional quartz tubes are currently the most commonly used devices. They provide high sensitivity and low baseline noise. Running and investment costs are low. The most serious disadvantage is the poor resistance against atomization interferences and often unsatisfactory linearity of calibration graphs. Miniature diffusion flame (MDF) is extremely resistant to interferences, simple, cheap and user-friendly. Its essential disadvantage is low sensitivity. A novel device, known as a multiatomizer, was designed to overcome disadvantages of previous atomizers. It matches performance of conventional quartz tubes in terms of sensitivity and baseline noise as well as in running and investment costs. The multiatomizer, however, provides much better (i) resistance against atomization interferences and (ii) linearity of calibration graphs. In-atomizer trapping enhances the sensitivity of the determination and eliminates the effect of the generation kinetics and of surges in gas flow on the signal shape. This is beneficial for the accuracy of the determination. It could also be an effective tool for reducing some interferences in the liquid phase. In-situ trapping in graphite furnaces (GF) is presently by far the most popular approach to the in-atomizer trapping. Its resistance against interferences is reasonably good and it can be easily automated. In-situ trapping in GF is a mature method well established in various application fields. These are the reasons to rank in-situ trapping in GF as currently the most convenient approach to hydride atomization for AAS. The recently suggested

  17. Moeller polarimetry with atomic hydrogen targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chudakov, E.; Luppov, V.

    2005-01-01

    A novel proposal of using polarized atomic hydrogen gas, stored in an ultra-cold magnetic trap, as the target for electron beam polarimetry based on Moeller scattering is discussed. Such a target of practically 100% polarized electrons could provide a superb systematic accuracy of about 0.5% for beam polarization measurements. Feasibility studies for the CEBAF electron beam have been performed. (orig.)

  18. Physics with Trapped Antihydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, Michael

    2017-04-01

    For more than a decade antihydrogen atoms have been formed by mixing antiprotons and positrons held in arrangements of charged particle (Penning) traps. More recently, magnetic minimum neutral atom traps have been superimposed upon the anti-atom production region, promoting the trapping of a small quantity of the antihydrogen yield. We will review these advances, and describe some of the first physics experiments performed on anrtihydrogen including the observation of the two-photon 1S-2S transition, invesigation of the charge neutrailty of the anti-atom and studies of the ground state hyperfine splitting. We will discuss the physics motivations for undertaking these experiments and describe some near-future initiatives.

  19. Single and multiple ionization of noble gas atoms by H0 impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkadi, L.; Gulyas, L.; Herczku, P.; Kovacs, S.T.S.; Koever, A.

    2012-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The understanding of the mechanisms of collisions between energetic charged particles and neutral atoms is of fundamental significance, and it has large importance in many research fields (plasma physics, astrophysics, materials science, etc.), as well as in number of practical applications. In the present work we measured total direct ionization and electron loss cross sections for the collisions of H 0 atoms with noble gas atoms (He, Ne, Ar, Kr) in the energy range 75-300 keV. The experiment was carried out at the 1.5 MV Van de Graaff accelerator of Atomki by coincident detection of the recoil target ions and the charge-state analyzed scattered projectiles. With this study we wished to obtain information about the role played by the electron of the H 0 projectile in the process of the single and multiple vacancy production induced by the collision. For this purpose we repeated the measurements also with proton projectile under the same experimental conditions. For calibration of the measuring system and normalization of our data we used the cross section values of Ref. [1]. The experimental results were analysed with using the classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) method. CTMC describes well the experimental data for both projectiles for the single vacancy creation, however we observed increasing deviation between the theory and experiment with increasing number of the created vacancies, as well as with decreasing atomic number of the target atoms. Fig. 1 shows our results obtained for the single, double and triple ionization (q = 1, 2, 3) of Kr at H 0 impact for the two cases when the outgoing projectile is H 0 (a) and H + (b), i.e., for pure ionization of the target, and ionization of the target with simultaneous electron loss of the projectile. The curves in the figure were obtained by two versions of the three-body CTMC theory: a conventional model (dashed curves); and a model taking partially account of the many

  20. Selective vibrational pumping of molecular hydrogen via gas phase atomic recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Fabrizio; Capitelli, Mario

    2009-12-31

    Formation of rovibrational excited molecular hydrogen from atomic recombination has been computationally studied using three body dynamics and orbiting resonance theory. Each of the two methods in the frame of classical mechanics, that has been used for all of the calculations, appear complementary rather than complete, with similar values in the low temperature region, and predominance of three body dynamics for temperatures higher than about 1000 K. The sum of the two contributions appears in fairly good agreement with available data from the literature. Dependence of total recombination on the temperature over pressure ratio is stressed. Detailed recombination toward rovibrational states is presented, with large evidence of importance of rotation in final products. Comparison with gas-surface recombination implying only physiadsorbed molecules shows approximate similarities at T = 5000 K, being on the contrary different at lower temperature.